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Sample records for cells target polymorphic

  1. Anthrax lethal factor as an immune target in humans and transgenic mice and the impact of HLA polymorphism on CD4+ T cell immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Ascough

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus anthracis produces a binary toxin composed of protective antigen (PA and one of two subunits, lethal factor (LF or edema factor (EF. Most studies have concentrated on induction of toxin-specific antibodies as the correlate of protective immunity, in contrast to which understanding of cellular immunity to these toxins and its impact on infection is limited. We characterized CD4+ T cell immunity to LF in a panel of humanized HLA-DR and DQ transgenic mice and in naturally exposed patients. As the variation in antigen presentation governed by HLA polymorphism has a major impact on protective immunity to specific epitopes, we examined relative binding affinities of LF peptides to purified HLA class II molecules, identifying those regions likely to be of broad applicability to human immune studies through their ability to bind multiple alleles. Transgenics differing only in their expression of human HLA class II alleles showed a marked hierarchy of immunity to LF. Immunogenicity in HLA transgenics was primarily restricted to epitopes from domains II and IV of LF and promiscuous, dominant epitopes, common to all HLA types, were identified in domain II. The relevance of this model was further demonstrated by the fact that a number of the immunodominant epitopes identified in mice were recognized by T cells from humans previously infected with cutaneous anthrax and from vaccinated individuals. The ability of the identified epitopes to confer protective immunity was demonstrated by lethal anthrax challenge of HLA transgenic mice immunized with a peptide subunit vaccine comprising the immunodominant epitopes that we identified.

  2. Anthrax lethal factor as an immune target in humans and transgenic mice and the impact of HLA polymorphism on CD4+ T cell immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascough, Stephanie; Ingram, Rebecca J; Chu, Karen K; Reynolds, Catherine J; Musson, Julie A; Doganay, Mehmet; Metan, Gökhan; Ozkul, Yusuf; Baillie, Les; Sriskandan, Shiranee; Moore, Stephen J; Gallagher, Theresa B; Dyson, Hugh; Williamson, E Diane; Robinson, John H; Maillere, Bernard; Boyton, Rosemary J; Altmann, Daniel M

    2014-05-01

    Bacillus anthracis produces a binary toxin composed of protective antigen (PA) and one of two subunits, lethal factor (LF) or edema factor (EF). Most studies have concentrated on induction of toxin-specific antibodies as the correlate of protective immunity, in contrast to which understanding of cellular immunity to these toxins and its impact on infection is limited. We characterized CD4+ T cell immunity to LF in a panel of humanized HLA-DR and DQ transgenic mice and in naturally exposed patients. As the variation in antigen presentation governed by HLA polymorphism has a major impact on protective immunity to specific epitopes, we examined relative binding affinities of LF peptides to purified HLA class II molecules, identifying those regions likely to be of broad applicability to human immune studies through their ability to bind multiple alleles. Transgenics differing only in their expression of human HLA class II alleles showed a marked hierarchy of immunity to LF. Immunogenicity in HLA transgenics was primarily restricted to epitopes from domains II and IV of LF and promiscuous, dominant epitopes, common to all HLA types, were identified in domain II. The relevance of this model was further demonstrated by the fact that a number of the immunodominant epitopes identified in mice were recognized by T cells from humans previously infected with cutaneous anthrax and from vaccinated individuals. The ability of the identified epitopes to confer protective immunity was demonstrated by lethal anthrax challenge of HLA transgenic mice immunized with a peptide subunit vaccine comprising the immunodominant epitopes that we identified.

  3. Allele-specific cancer cell killing in vitro and in vivo targeting a single-nucleotide polymorphism in POLR2A

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O.R.F. Mook; F. Baas; M.B. de Wissel; K. Fluiter

    2009-01-01

    Cancer is one of the diseases for which RNA interference is a potential therapeutic approach. Genes involved in the promotion or maintenance of tumor growth are obvious targets for RNAi. RNAi is also considered an attractive additional approach to conventional chemotherapy for cancer treatment. More

  4. ErbB polymorphisms: insights and implications for response to targeted cancer therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaoui-Jamali, Moulay A; Morand, Grégoire B; da Silva, Sabrina Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Advances in high-throughput genomic-scanning have expanded the repertory of genetic variations in DNA sequences encoding ErbB tyrosine kinase receptors in humans, including single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), polymorphic repetitive elements, microsatellite variations, small-scale insertions and deletions. The ErbB family members: EGFR, ErbB2, ErbB3, and ErbB4 receptors are established as drivers of many aspects of tumor initiation and progression to metastasis. This knowledge has provided rationales for the development of an arsenal of anti-ErbB therapeutics, ranging from small molecule kinase inhibitors to monoclonal antibodies. Anti-ErbB agents are becoming the cornerstone therapeutics for the management of cancers that overexpress hyperactive variants of ErbB receptors, in particular ErbB2-positive breast cancer and non-small cell lung carcinomas. However, their clinical benefit has been limited to a subset of patients due to a wide heterogeneity in drug response despite the expression of the ErbB targets, attributed to intrinsic (primary) and to acquired (secondary) resistance. Somatic mutations in ErbB tyrosine kinase domains have been extensively investigated in preclinical and clinical setting as determinants for either high sensitivity or resistance to anti-ErbB therapeutics. In contrast, only scant information is available on the impact of SNPs, which are widespread in genes encoding ErbB receptors, on receptor structure and activity, and their predictive values for drug susceptibility. This review aims to briefly update polymorphic variations in genes encoding ErbB receptors based on recent advances in deep sequencing technologies, and to address challenging issues for a better understanding of the functional impact of single versus combined SNPs in ErbB genes to receptor topology, receptor-drug interaction, and drug susceptibility. The potential of exploiting SNPs in the era of stratified targeted therapeutics is discussed. PMID:25699077

  5. ErbB polymorphisms: Insights and implications for response to targeted cancer therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moulay A Alaoui-Jamali

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Advances in high-throughput genomic-scanning have expanded the repertory of genetic variations in DNA sequences encoding ErbB tyrosine kinase receptors in humans, including single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, polymorphic repetitive elements, microsatellite variations, small-scale insertions and deletions. The ErbB family members: EGFR, ErbB2, ErbB3 and ErbB4 receptors are established as drivers of many aspects of tumor initiation and progression to metastasis. This knowledge has provided rationales for the development of an arsenal of anti-ErbB therapeutics, ranging from small molecule kinase inhibitors to monoclonal antibodies. Anti-ErbB agents are becoming the cornerstone therapeutics for the management of cancers that overexpress hyperactive variants of ErbB receptors, in particular ErbB2-positive breast cancer and non-small cell lung carcinomas. However, their clinical benefit has been limited to a subset of patients due to a wide heterogeneity in drug response despite the expression of the ErbB targets, attributed to intrinsic (primary and to acquired (secondary resistance. Somatic mutations in ErbB tyrosine kinase domains have been extensively investigated in preclinical and clinical setting as determinants for either high sensitivity or resistance to anti-ErbB therapeutics. In contrast, only scant information is available on the impact of SNPs, which are widespread in genes encoding ErbB receptors, on receptor structure and activity, and their predictive values for drug susceptibility. This review aims to briefly update polymorphic variations in genes encoding ErbB receptors based on recent advances in deep sequencing technologies, and to address challenging issues for a better understanding of the functional impact of single versus combined SNPs in ErbB genes to receptor topology, receptor-drug interaction, and drug susceptibility. The potential of exploiting SNPs in the era of stratified targeted therapeutics is discussed.

  6. Targeting tumour Cell Plasticity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Elizabeth D. WILLIAMS

    2009-01-01

    @@ Her research is focused on understanding the mechanisms of tumour progression and metastasis, particularly in uro-logical carcinomas (bladder and prostate). Tumour cell plasticity, including epithelial-mesenchymal transition, is a cen-tral theme in Dr Williams' work.

  7. Genetic Analysis of Diversity within a Chinese Local Sugarcane Germplasm Based on Start Codon Targeted Polymorphism

    OpenAIRE

    Youxiong Que; Yongbao Pan; Yunhai Lu; Cui Yang; Yuting Yang; Ning Huang; Liping Xu

    2014-01-01

    In-depth information on sugarcane germplasm is the basis for its conservation and utilization. Data on sugarcane molecular markers are limited for the Chinese sugarcane germplasm collections. In the present study, 20 start codon targeted (SCoT) marker primers were designed to assess the genetic diversity among 107 sugarcane accessions within a local sugarcane germplasm collection. These primers amplified 176 DNA fragments, of which 163 were polymorphic (92.85%). Polymorphic information conten...

  8. Effects of polymorphisms in ovine and caprine prion protein alleles on cell-free conversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eiden Martin

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In sheep polymorphisms of the prion gene (PRNP at the codons 136, 154 and 171 strongly influence the susceptibility to scrapie and bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE infections. In goats a number of other gene polymorphisms were found which are suspected to trigger similar effects. However, no strong correlation between polymorphisms and TSE susceptibility in goats has yet been obtained from epidemiological studies and only a low number of experimental challenge data are available at present. We have therefore studied the potential impact of these polymorphisms in vitro by cell-free conversion assays using mouse scrapie strain Me7. Mouse scrapie brain derived PrPSc served as seeds and eleven recombinant single mutation variants of sheep and goat PrPC as conversion targets. With this approach it was possible to assign reduced conversion efficiencies to specific polymorphisms, which are associated to low frequency in scrapie-affected goats or found only in healthy animals. Moreover, we could demonstrate a dominant-negative inhibition of prion polymorphisms associated with high susceptibility by alleles linked to low susceptibility in vitro.

  9. Targeting vaccines to dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foged, Camilla; Sundblad, Anne; Hovgaard, Lars

    2002-03-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are specialized antigen presenting cells (APC) with a remarkable ability to take up antigens and stimulate major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-restricted specific immune responses. Recent discoveries have shown that their role in initiating primary immune responses seems to be far superior to that of B-cells and macrophages. DC are localized at strategic places in the body at sites used by pathogens to enter the organism, and are thereby in an optimal position to capture antigens. In general, vaccination strategies try to mimic the invasiveness of the pathogens. DC are considered to play a central role for the provocation of primary immune responses by vaccination. A rational way of improving the potency and safety of new and already existing vaccines could therefore be to direct vaccines specifically to DC. There is a need for developing multifunctional vaccine drug delivery systems (DDS) with adjuvant effect that target DC directly and induce optimal immune responses. This paper will review the current knowledge of DC physiology as well as the progress in the field of novel vaccination strategies that directly or indirectly aim at targeting DC.

  10. EVALUATION OF CYTOKINE GENE POLYMORPHISM IN B CELL LYMPHOID MALIGNANCIES

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    E. L. Nazarova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies with some solid tumors has shown that polymorphisms of certain cytokine genes may be used as predictors of clinical outcome in the patients. It seemed important to evaluate potential correlations between production of certain pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and co-receptor molecules, and promoter polymorphism of the cytokine genes involved into regulation of cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, lipid metabolism and blood clotting in the patients with hematological malignancies. The article contains our results concerning associations between of IL-1β, -2, -4, -10, -17, TNFα, and allelic polymorphisms of their genes in 62 patients with B cell lymphoid malignancies in an ethnically homogenous group (self-identified as Russians. We have shown that the GА and AA genotypes of the G-308A polymorphism in TNFα gene are significantly associated with increased production of this cytokine, being more common in aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphomas, more rare in multiple myeloma and in indolent non-Hodgkin lymphomas.

  11. Functional significance of vitamin D receptor FokI polymorphism in human breast cancer cells.

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    Fatouma Alimirah

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The FokI vitamin D receptor (VDR polymorphism results in different translation initiation sites on VDR. In the VDRff variant, initiation of translation occurs at the first ATG site, giving rise to a full length VDR protein of 427 amino acids. Conversely, in the VDRFF variant, translation begins at the second ATG site, resulting in a truncated protein with three less amino acids. Epidemiological studies have paradoxically implicated this polymorphism with increased breast cancer risk. 1α,25 (OH(2D(3, the active metabolite of vitamin D, is known to inhibit cell proliferation, induce apoptosis and potentiate differentiation in human breast cancer cells. It is well documented that 1α,25 (OH(2D(3 downregulates estrogen receptor α expression and inhibits estrogen mediated signaling in these cells. The functional significance of the VDR FokI polymorphism in vitamin D action is undefined. METHODS/FINDINGS: To elucidate the functional role of FokI polymorphism in breast cancer, MCF-7-Vector, MCF-7-VDRff and MCF-7-VDRFF stable cell lines were established from parental MCF-7 cells as single-cell clones. In response to 1α,25 (OH(2D(3 treatments, cell growth was inhibited by 60% in VDRFF cells compared to 28% in VDRff cells. The induction of the vitamin D target gene CYP24A1 mRNA was 1.8 fold higher in VDRFF cells than in VDRff cells. Estrogen receptor-α protein expression was downregulated by 62% in VDRFF cells compared to 25% in VDRff cells. VDR protein stability was greater in MCF-7-VDRFF cells in the presence of cycloheximide. PCR array analyses of VDRff and VDRFF cells revealed increased basal expression levels of pro-inflammatory genes Cyclooxygenase-2, Interleukin-8 and Chemokine (C-C Motif Ligand 2 in MCF-7-VDRff cells by 14, 52.7 and 5 fold, respectively. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest that a VDRff genotype may play a role in amplifying aggressive breast cancer, paving the way for understanding why some breast

  12. SNPing cancer in the bud: microRNA and microRNA-target site polymorphisms as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers in cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Salzman, David W.; Weidhaas, Joanne B

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs are master regulators of gene expression and control many biological pathways such as cell growth, differentiation and apoptosis. Deregulation of microRNA expression and activity results in a myriad of diseases including cancer. Recently, several reports have indicated that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in microRNAs and microRNA-target sites impact microRNA biology and associate with cancer risk, treatment response and outcome. In this review we will describe these findings...

  13. A novel system of polymorphic and diverse NK cell receptors in primates.

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    Anne Averdam

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available There are two main classes of natural killer (NK cell receptors in mammals, the killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR and the structurally unrelated killer cell lectin-like receptors (KLR. While KIR represent the most diverse group of NK receptors in all primates studied to date, including humans, apes, and Old and New World monkeys, KLR represent the functional equivalent in rodents. Here, we report a first digression from this rule in lemurs, where the KLR (CD94/NKG2 rather than KIR constitute the most diverse group of NK cell receptors. We demonstrate that natural selection contributed to such diversification in lemurs and particularly targeted KLR residues interacting with the peptide presented by MHC class I ligands. We further show that lemurs lack a strict ortholog or functional equivalent of MHC-E, the ligands of non-polymorphic KLR in "higher" primates. Our data support the existence of a hitherto unknown system of polymorphic and diverse NK cell receptors in primates and of combinatorial diversity as a novel mechanism to increase NK cell receptor repertoire.

  14. A novel system of polymorphic and diverse NK cell receptors in primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Averdam, Anne; Petersen, Beatrix; Rosner, Cornelia; Neff, Jennifer; Roos, Christian; Eberle, Manfred; Aujard, Fabienne; Münch, Claudia; Schempp, Werner; Carrington, Mary; Shiina, Takashi; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Knaust, Florian; Coggill, Penny; Sehra, Harminder; Beck, Stephan; Abi-Rached, Laurent; Reinhardt, Richard; Walter, Lutz

    2009-10-01

    There are two main classes of natural killer (NK) cell receptors in mammals, the killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) and the structurally unrelated killer cell lectin-like receptors (KLR). While KIR represent the most diverse group of NK receptors in all primates studied to date, including humans, apes, and Old and New World monkeys, KLR represent the functional equivalent in rodents. Here, we report a first digression from this rule in lemurs, where the KLR (CD94/NKG2) rather than KIR constitute the most diverse group of NK cell receptors. We demonstrate that natural selection contributed to such diversification in lemurs and particularly targeted KLR residues interacting with the peptide presented by MHC class I ligands. We further show that lemurs lack a strict ortholog or functional equivalent of MHC-E, the ligands of non-polymorphic KLR in "higher" primates. Our data support the existence of a hitherto unknown system of polymorphic and diverse NK cell receptors in primates and of combinatorial diversity as a novel mechanism to increase NK cell receptor repertoire. PMID:19834558

  15. Polymorphisms associated with sickle cell disease in Southern Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghpanah, S; Nasirabadi, S; Kianmehr, M; Afrasiabi, A; Karimi, M

    2012-07-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is an inherited autosomal recessive disorder. We aimed to describe the spectrum of haplotyes of BS-gene and to investigate a relationship with disease phenotype in patients with SCD in Southern Iran. We didn't find any significant association between BS-globin gene haplotypes and clinical severity of the disease in an Iranian population. The exact mechanism by which the BS-globin gene polymorphism affects clinical presentation is not obvious; however, further detailed studies at the molecular level, with a larger sample size are required to show the mechanisms that influence the clinical presentation of SCD in Iranian population. PMID:22988776

  16. Potential targets for lung squamous cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Researchers have identified potential therapeutic targets in lung squamous cell carcinoma, the second most common form of lung cancer. The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Research Network study comprehensively characterized the lung squamous cell carcinoma gen

  17. HLA Class-II Associated HIV Polymorphisms Predict Escape from CD4+ T Cell Responses.

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    Nathan Erdmann

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Antiretroviral therapy, antibody and CD8+ T cell-mediated responses targeting human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1 exert selection pressure on the virus necessitating escape; however, the ability of CD4+ T cells to exert selective pressure remains unclear. Using a computational approach on HIV gag/pol/nef sequences and HLA-II allelic data, we identified 29 HLA-II associated HIV sequence polymorphisms or adaptations (HLA-AP in an African cohort of chronically HIV-infected individuals. Epitopes encompassing the predicted adaptation (AE or its non-adapted (NAE version were evaluated for immunogenicity. Using a CD8-depleted IFN-γ ELISpot assay, we determined that the magnitude of CD4+ T cell responses to the predicted epitopes in controllers was higher compared to non-controllers (p<0.0001. However, regardless of the group, the magnitude of responses to AE was lower as compared to NAE (p<0.0001. CD4+ T cell responses in patients with acute HIV infection (AHI demonstrated poor immunogenicity towards AE as compared to NAE encoded by their transmitted founder virus. Longitudinal data in AHI off antiretroviral therapy demonstrated sequence changes that were biologically confirmed to represent CD4+ escape mutations. These data demonstrate an innovative application of HLA-associated polymorphisms to identify biologically relevant CD4+ epitopes and suggests CD4+ T cells are active participants in driving HIV evolution.

  18. Design of liposomal formulations for cell targeting

    OpenAIRE

    Nogueira, E.; Gomes, Andreia C.; Preto, Ana; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2015-01-01

    Liposomes have gained extensive attention as carriers for a wide range of drugs due to being both nontoxic and biodegradable as they are composed of substances naturally occurring in biological membranes. Active targeting for cells has explored specific modification of the liposome surface by functionalizing it with specific targeting ligands in order to increase accumulation and intracellular uptake into target cells. None of the Food and Drug Administration-licensed liposomes or lipid nanop...

  19. IMPACT OF MANNOSE-BINDING PROTEIN GENE POLYMORPHISMS IN OMANI SICKLE CELL DISEASE PATIENTS

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    Mathew Zachariah

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Our objective was to study mannose binding protein (MBP polymorphisms in exonic and promoter region and correlate associated infections and vasoocculsive (VOC episodes, since MBP plays an important role in innate immunity by activating the complement system. Methods: We studied the genetic polymorphisms in the Exon 1 (alleles A/O and promoter region (alleles Y/X; H/L, P/Q of the MBL2 gene, in sickle cell disease (SCD patients as increased incidence of infections is seen in these patients. A PCR-based, targeted genomic DNA sequencing of MBL2 was used to study 68 SCD Omani patients and 44 controls (voluntary blood donors. Results: The observed frequencies of MBL2 promoter polymorphism (-221, Y/X were 44.4% and 20.5% for the heterozygous genotype Y/X and 3.2% and 2.2% for the homozygous (X/X respectively between SCD patients and controls. MBL2 Exon1 gene mutations were 29.4% and 50% for the heterozygous genotype A/O and 5.9% and 6.8% respectively for the homozygous (O/O genotype between SCD patients and controls. The distribution of variant MBL2 polymorphisms did not show any correlation in SCD patients with or without vasoocculsive crisis (VOC attacks (p=0.162; OR-0.486; CI=0.177 -1.33, however, it was correlated with infections (p=0.0162; OR-3.55; CI 1.25-10.04. Conclusions: Although the frequency of the genotypes and haplotypes of MBL2 in SCD patients did not differ from controls, overall in the SCD patient cohort the increased representation of variant alleles was significantly correlated with infections (p<0.05. However, these variant MBL2 polymorphisms did not seem to play a significant role in the VOC episodes in this SCD cohort. Keywords: Mannose-binding lectin, polymorphism, promoter, Sickle cell disease, MBL2, MBP

  20. Plague Bacteria Target Immune Cells During Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Marketon, Melanie M.; DePaolo, R. William; DeBord, Kristin L.; Jabri, Bana; Schneewind, Olaf

    2005-01-01

    The plague is caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis. Plague bacteria are thought to inject effector Yop proteins into host cells via the type III pathway. The identity of the host cells targeted for injection during plague infection is unknown. We found, using Yop β-lactamase hybrids and fluorescent staining of live cells from plague-infected animals, that Y. pestis selected immune cells for injection. In vivo, dendritic cells, macrophages, and neutrophils were injected most frequently, whe...

  1. Targeting vaccines to dendritic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foged, Camilla; Sundblad, Anne; Hovgaard, Lars

    2002-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are specialized antigen presenting cells (APC) with a remarkable ability to take up antigens and stimulate major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-restricted specific immune responses. Recent discoveries have shown that their role in initiating primary immune responses seems t...

  2. Cell survival studies for moving targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    More than 330 patients with static tumors have been treated at GSI with a scanned C-12 beam. For targets that are subject to respiratory motion, treatment is not yet possible because target motion and scanning motion interfere. GSI is developing a motion compensation system to compensate target motion by adaptation of each individual Bragg peak position. Within this project, the GSI treatment planning software TRiP was extended to calculate physical dose distributions in the presence of motion. These motion extensions were experimentally validated. Recently we included the calculation of cell survival for moving targets. To validate the software, a program of experimental studies with biological samples has been started. In a first set of experiments, living cell cultures were placed on a periodically moving table and irradiated with and without motion compensation. Results are compared to reference cell cultures that were static during standard irradiations. Furthermore, measured cell survival distributions are compared to calculated distributions for all irradiation schemes

  3. Targeting bactoprenol-coupled cell envelope precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulm, Hannah; Schneider, Tanja

    2016-09-01

    Targeting the bactoprenol-coupled cell wall precursor lipid II is a validated antibacterial strategy. In this review, selected prototype lipid II-binding antibiotics of different chemical classes are discussed. Although these compounds attack the same molecular target, they trigger nuanced and diverse cellular effects. Consequently, the mechanisms of antibacterial resistance and the likelihood of resistance development may vary substantially. PMID:27495122

  4. Targeting the Checkpoint to Kill Cancer Cells

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    Jan Benada

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Cancer treatments such as radiotherapy and most of the chemotherapies act by damaging DNA of cancer cells. Upon DNA damage, cells stop proliferation at cell cycle checkpoints, which provides them time for DNA repair. Inhibiting the checkpoint allows entry to mitosis despite the presence of DNA damage and can lead to cell death. Importantly, as cancer cells exhibit increased levels of endogenous DNA damage due to an excessive replication stress, inhibiting the checkpoint kinases alone could act as a directed anti-cancer therapy. Here, we review the current status of inhibitors targeted towards the checkpoint effectors and discuss mechanisms of their actions in killing of cancer cells.

  5. Candidate gene analysis using imputed genotypes: cell cycle single-nucleotide polymorphisms and ovarian cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goode, Ellen L; Fridley, Brooke L; Vierkant, Robert A;

    2009-01-01

    Polymorphisms in genes critical to cell cycle control are outstanding candidates for association with ovarian cancer risk; numerous genes have been interrogated by multiple research groups using differing tagging single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) sets. To maximize information gleaned from exis...

  6. Improved Gene Targeting through Cell Cycle Synchronization.

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    Vasiliki Tsakraklides

    Full Text Available Gene targeting is a challenge in organisms where non-homologous end-joining is the predominant form of recombination. We show that cell division cycle synchronization can be applied to significantly increase the rate of homologous recombination during transformation. Using hydroxyurea-mediated cell cycle arrest, we obtained improved gene targeting rates in Yarrowia lipolytica, Arxula adeninivorans, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Kluyveromyces lactis and Pichia pastoris demonstrating the broad applicability of the method. Hydroxyurea treatment enriches for S-phase cells that are active in homologous recombination and enables previously unattainable genomic modifications.

  7. Design of targeted B cell killing agents.

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    Alexey V Stepanov

    Full Text Available B cells play an important role in the pathogenesis of both systemic and organ-specific autoimmune diseases. Autoreactive B cells not only produce autoantibodies, but also are capable to efficiently present specific autoantigens to T cells. Furthermore, B cells can secrete proinflammatory cytokines and amplify the vicious process of self-destruction. B cell-directed therapy is a potentially important approach for treatment of various autoimmune diseases. The depletion of B cells by anti-CD20/19 monoclonal antibody Retuximab® used in autoimmune diseases therapy leads to systemic side effects and should be significantly improved. In this study we designed a repertoire of genetically engineered B cell killers that specifically affected one kind of cells carrying a respective B cell receptor. We constructed immunotoxins (ITs, fused with c-myc epitope as a model targeting sequence, based on barnase, Pseudomonas toxin, Shiga-like toxin E.coli and Fc domain of human antibody IgGγ1. C-MYC hybridoma cell line producing anti-c-myc IgG was chosen as a model for targeted cell depletion. C-myc sequence fused with toxins provided addressed delivery of the toxic agent to the target cells. We demonstrated functional activity of designed ITs in vitro and showed recognition of the fusion molecules by antibodies produced by targeted hybridoma. To study specificity of the proposed B cells killing molecules, we tested a set of created ITs ex vivo, using C-MYC and irrelevant hybridoma cell lines. Pseudomonas-containing IT showed one of the highest cytotoxic effects on the model cells, however, possessed promiscuous specificity. Shiga-like toxin construct demonstrated mild both cytotoxicity and specificity. Barnase and Fc-containing ITs revealed excellent balance between their legibility and toxic properties. Moreover, barnase and Fc molecules fused with c-myc epitope were able to selectively deplete c-myc-specific B cells and decrease production of anti

  8. Cost targets for domestic fuel cell CHP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staffell, I.; Green, R.; Kendall, K.

    Fuel cells have the potential to reduce domestic energy bills by providing both heat and power at the point of use, generating high value electricity from a low cost fuel. However, the cost of installing the fuel cell must be sufficiently low to be recovered by the savings made over its lifetime. A computer simulation is used to estimate the savings and cost targets for fuel cell CHP systems. Two pitfalls of this kind of simulation are addressed: the selection of representative performance figures for fuel cells, and the range of houses from which energy demand data was taken. A meta-study of the current state of the art is presented, and used with 102 house-years of demand to simulate the range of economic performance expected from four fuel cell technologies within the UK domestic CHP market. Annual savings relative to a condensing boiler are estimated at €170-300 for a 1 kWe fuel cell, giving a target cost of €350-625 kW -1 for any fuel cell technology that can demonstrate a 2.5-year lifetime. Increasing lifetime and reducing fuel cell capacity are identified as routes to accelerated market entry. The importance of energy demand is seen to outweigh both economic and technical performance assumptions, while manufacture cost and system lifetime are highlighted as the only significant differences between the technologies considered. SOFC are considered to have the greatest potential, but uncertainty in the assumptions used precludes any clear-cut judgement.

  9. Targeting regulatory T cells in cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Byrne, William L

    2012-01-31

    Infiltration of tumors by regulatory T cells confers growth and metastatic advantages by inhibiting antitumor immunity and by production of receptor activator of NF-kappaB (RANK) ligand, which may directly stimulate metastatic propagation of RANK-expressing cancer cells. Modulation of regulatory T cells can enhance the efficacy of cancer immunotherapy. Strategies include depletion, interference with function, inhibition of tumoral migration, and exploitation of T-cell plasticity. Problems with these strategies include a lack of specificity, resulting in depletion of antitumor effector T cells or global interruption of regulatory T cells, which may predispose to autoimmune diseases. Emerging technologies, such as RNA interference and tetramer-based targeting, may have the potential to improve selectivity and efficacy.

  10. Therapeutic Approaches to Target Cancer Stem Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz, Arlhee, E-mail: arlhee@cim.sld.cu; Leon, Kalet [Department of Systems Biology, Center of Molecular Immunology, 216 Street, PO Box 16040, Atabey, Havana 11600 (Cuba)

    2011-08-15

    The clinical relevance of cancer stem cells (CSC) remains a major challenge for current cancer therapies, but preliminary findings indicate that specific targeting may be possible. Recent studies have shown that these tumor subpopulations promote tumor angiogenesis through the increased production of VEGF, whereas the VEGF neutralizing antibody bevacizumab specifically inhibits CSC growth. Moreover, nimotuzumab, a monoclonal antibody against the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) with a potent antiangiogenic activity, has been shown by our group to reduce the frequency of CSC-like subpopulations in mouse models of brain tumors when combined with ionizing radiation. These studies and subsequent reports from other groups support the relevance of approaches based on molecular-targeted therapies to selectively attack CSC. This review discusses the relevance of targeting both the EGFR and angiogenic pathways as valid approaches to this aim. We discuss the relevance of identifying better molecular markers to develop drug screening strategies that selectively target CSC.

  11. Targeting cancer stem cells in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He AR

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aiwu Ruth He,1 Daniel C Smith,1 Lopa Mishra2 1Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University, Washington, DC, 2Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA Abstract: The poor outcome of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is attributed to recurrence of the disease after curative treatment and the resistance of HCC cells to conventional chemotherapy, which may be explained partly by the function of liver cancer stem cells (CSCs. Liver CSCs have emerged as an important therapeutic target against HCC. Numerous surface markers for liver CSCs have been identified, and include CD133, CD90, CD44, CD13, and epithelial cell adhesion molecules. These surface markers serve not only as tools for identifying and isolating liver CSCs but also as therapeutic targets for eradicating these cells. In studies of animal models and large-scale genomic analyses of human HCC samples, many signaling pathways observed in normal stem cells have been found to be altered in liver CSCs, which accounts for the stemness and aggressive behavior of these cells. Antibodies and small molecule inhibitors targeting the signaling pathways have been evaluated at different levels of preclinical and clinical development. Another strategy is to promote the differentiation of liver CSCs to less aggressive HCC that is sensitive to conventional chemotherapy. Disruption of the tumor niche essential for liver CSC homeostasis has become a novel strategy in cancer treatment. To overcome the challenges in developing treatment for liver CSCs, more research into the genetic makeup of patient tumors that respond to treatment may lead to more effective therapy. Standardization of HCC CSC tumor markers would be helpful for measuring the CSC response to these agents. Herein, we review the current strategies for developing treatment to eradicate liver CSCs and to improve the outcome for patients with

  12. Optical cell monitoring system for underwater targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, SangJun; Manzur, Fahim; Manzur, Tariq; Demirci, Utkan

    2008-10-01

    We demonstrate a cell based detection system that could be used for monitoring an underwater target volume and environment using a microfluidic chip and charge-coupled-device (CCD). This technique allows us to capture specific cells and enumerate these cells on a large area on a microchip. The microfluidic chip and a lens-less imaging platform were then merged to monitor cell populations and morphologies as a system that may find use in distributed sensor networks. The chip, featuring surface chemistry and automatic cell imaging, was fabricated from a cover glass slide, double sided adhesive film and a transparent Polymethlymetacrylate (PMMA) slab. The optically clear chip allows detecting cells with a CCD sensor. These chips were fabricated with a laser cutter without the use of photolithography. We utilized CD4+ cells that are captured on the floor of a microfluidic chip due to the ability to address specific target cells using antibody-antigen binding. Captured CD4+ cells were imaged with a fluorescence microscope to verify the chip specificity and efficiency. We achieved 70.2 +/- 6.5% capturing efficiency and 88.8 +/- 5.4% specificity for CD4+ T lymphocytes (n = 9 devices). Bright field images of the captured cells in the 24 mm × 4 mm × 50 μm microfluidic chip were obtained with the CCD sensor in one second. We achieved an inexpensive system that rapidly captures cells and images them using a lens-less CCD system. This microfluidic device can be modified for use in single cell detection utilizing a cheap light-emitting diode (LED) chip instead of a wide range CCD system.

  13. Feasibility of proposed single-nucleotide polymorphisms as predictive markers for targeted regimens in metastatic colorectal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, J. C.; Ha, Y J; Roh, S A; Choi, E. Y.; Yoon, Y.S.; Kim, K P; Hong, Y S; Kim, T. W.; Cho, D H; Kim, S. Y.; Kim, Y.S.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Surrogate biomarkers for metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) are urgently needed to achieve the best outcomes for targeted therapy. Methods: A clinical association analysis was performed to examine the three single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that were previously proposed as markers of chemosensitivity to the cetuximab (124 patients) and bevacizumab regimens (100 patients) in mCRC patients. In addition, biological correlations were examined for the candidate SNPs in terms of t...

  14. Targeted silver nanoparticles for ratiometric cell phenotyping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willmore, Anne-Mari A.; Simón-Gracia, Lorena; Toome, Kadri; Paiste, Päärn; Kotamraju, Venkata Ramana; Mölder, Tarmo; Sugahara, Kazuki N.; Ruoslahti, Erkki; Braun, Gary B.; Teesalu, Tambet

    2016-04-01

    Affinity targeting is used to deliver nanoparticles to cells and tissues. For efficient targeting, it is critical to consider the expression and accessibility of the relevant receptors in the target cells. Here, we describe isotopically barcoded silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) as a tool for auditing affinity ligand receptors in cells. Tumor penetrating peptide RPARPAR (receptor: NRP-1) and tumor homing peptide GKRK (receptor: p32) were used as affinity ligands on the AgNPs. The binding and uptake of the peptide-functionalized AgNPs by cultured PPC-1 prostate cancer and M21 melanoma cells was dependent on the cell surface expression of the cognate peptide receptors. Barcoded peptide-functionalized AgNPs were synthesized from silver and palladium isotopes. The cells were incubated with a cocktail of the barcoded nanoparticles [RPARPAR (R), GKRK (K), and control], and cellular binding and internalization of each type of nanoparticle was assessed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The results of isotopic analysis were in agreement with data obtained using optical methods. Using ratiometric measurements, we were able to classify the PPC-1 cell line as mainly NRP-1-positive, with 75 +/- 5% R-AgNP uptake, and the M21 cell line as only p32-positive, with 89 +/- 9% K-AgNP uptake. The isotopically barcoded multiplexed AgNPs are useful as an in vitro ratiometric phenotyping tool and have potential uses in functional evaluation of the expression of accessible homing peptide receptors in vivo.Affinity targeting is used to deliver nanoparticles to cells and tissues. For efficient targeting, it is critical to consider the expression and accessibility of the relevant receptors in the target cells. Here, we describe isotopically barcoded silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) as a tool for auditing affinity ligand receptors in cells. Tumor penetrating peptide RPARPAR (receptor: NRP-1) and tumor homing peptide GKRK (receptor: p32) were used as affinity ligands on the AgNPs. The

  15. Ion mediated targeting of cells with nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheshwari, Vivek; Fu, Jinlong

    2010-03-01

    In eukaryotic cells, Ca^2+ ions are necessary for intracellular signaling, in activity of mitochondria and a variety of other cellular process that have been linked to cell apoptosis, proteins synthesis and cell-cycle regulation. Here we show that Ca^2+ ions, serving as the bio-compatible interface can be used to target Saccharomyces cerevisiae (SaC, baker's yeast), a model eukaryotic cell, with Au nanoparticles (10 nm). The Ca^2+ ions bind to the carboxylic acid groups in the citrate functionalized Au nanoparticles. This transforms the nanoparticles into micron long 1-D branched chain assemblies due to inter-particle dipole-dipole interaction and inter-particle bonding due to the divalent nature of the Ca^2+ ion. A similar transformation is observed with the use of divalent ions Mg^2+, Cd^2+ and Fe^2+. The 1-D assembly aids the interfacing of ion-nanoparticles on the cell by providing multiple contact points. Further monovalent ions such as Na^+ are also effective for the targeting of the cell with nanoparticles. However Na-Au nanoparticles are limited in their deposition as they exist in solution as single particles. The cells remain alive after the deposition process and their vitality is unaffected by the interfacing with ion-nanoparticles.

  16. Generating Cell Targeting Aptamers for Nanotheranostics Using Cell-SELEX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Yifan; Chen, Guang; Shangguan, Dihua; Zhang, Liqin; Wan, Shuo; Wu, Yuan; Zhang, Hui; Duan, Lian; Liu, Chao; You, Mingxu; Wang, Jie; Tan, Weihong

    2016-01-01

    Detecting and understanding changes in cell conditions on the molecular level is of great importance for the accurate diagnosis and timely therapy of diseases. Cell-based SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment), a foundational technology used to generate highly-specific, cell-targeting aptamers, has been increasingly employed in studies of molecular medicine, including biomarker discovery and early diagnosis/targeting therapy of cancer. In this review, we begin with a mechanical description of the cell-SELEX process, covering aptamer selection, identification and identification, and aptamer characterization; following this introduction is a comprehensive discussion of the potential for aptamers as targeting moieties in the construction of various nanotheranostics. Challenges and prospects for cell-SELEX and aptamer-based nanotheranostic are also discussed. PMID:27375791

  17. ErbB polymorphisms: insights and implications for response to targeted cancer therapeutics

    OpenAIRE

    Alaoui-Jamali, Moulay A.; Morand, Grégoire B.; da Silva, Sabrina Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Advances in high-throughput genomic-scanning have expanded the repertory of genetic variations in DNA sequences encoding ErbB tyrosine kinase receptors in humans, including single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), polymorphic repetitive elements, microsatellite variations, small-scale insertions and deletions. The ErbB family members: EGFR, ErbB2, ErbB3, and ErbB4 receptors are established as drivers of many aspects of tumor initiation and progression to metastasis. This knowledge has provided...

  18. ErbB polymorphisms: Insights and implications for response to targeted cancer therapeutics

    OpenAIRE

    Alaoui-Jamali, Moulay A.; Gregoire Bernard Rene Morand; Sabrina Daniela Silva

    2015-01-01

    Advances in high-throughput genomic-scanning have expanded the repertory of genetic variations in DNA sequences encoding ErbB tyrosine kinase receptors in humans, including single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), polymorphic repetitive elements, microsatellite variations, small-scale insertions and deletions. The ErbB family members: EGFR, ErbB2, ErbB3 and ErbB4 receptors are established as drivers of many aspects of tumor initiation and progression to metastasis. This knowledge has provided ...

  19. Genotyping Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms and Copy Number Variability of the FCGRs Expressed on NK Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erbe, Amy K; Wang, Wei; Gallenberger, Mikayla; Hank, Jacquelyn A; Sondel, Paul M

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are one of the main effector immune cells involved in antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC). Upon recognition of cell-bound IgG antibodies, which occurs through Fc gamma receptors (FCGRs) expressed on the cell surface of NK cells, NK cells become activated and lyse target tumor or infected cells. The FCGRs, FCGR3A and FCGR2C, expressed on the surface of NK cells have single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that result in differential activity of NK cells. In addition to SNP genetic variation within each of these genes, the FCGRs are subject to copy number variation (CNV), which leads to variable protein expression levels on the cell surface. Studies have found that FCGR genotype for FCGR3A and FCGR2C is associated with variation in the response to immunotherapy.Due to high sequence homology within FCGR3 and FCGR2 families, there are difficulties associated with genotyping these specific receptors related to cross-amplification of non-targeted FCGRs. To improve specificity for both FCGR3A and FCGR2C, Rnase-H (RH) primers were designed to amplify specifically FCGR3A (while not co-amplifying FCGR3B) and FCGR2C (while not co-amplifying FCGR2B). In addition, fluorescently labeled locked nucleic acid (LNA) probes provide additional precision for determination of the SNPs within both FCGR3A and FCGR2C. For CNV determination, separate fluorescently labeled probes for FCGR3A, and for FCGR2C, can be used with the same RH primers for each gene. These probes can be combined in the same well with control primers/probe for a known diploid gene and used to calculate the copy number of both FCGR3A and FCGR2C. Here we provide new detailed methodology that allows for the specific amplification of these FCGRs in a single PCR reaction, allowing for genotyping of both the SNPs and CNVs using real-time PCR.

  20. Gene Polymorphisms and Chemotherapy in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kayo OSAWA

    2009-01-01

    The phamacogenetics is being used to predict whether the selected chemotherapy will be really effective and tolerable to the patient. Irinotecan, oxidized by CYP3A4 to produce inactive compounds, is used for treatment of various cancers including advanced non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. CYP3A4*16B polymorphism was associated with decreased metabolism ofirrinotecan. Irinotecan is also metabolized by carboxylesterase to its principal active metabolite, SN-38, which is subsequently glucuronidated by UGT1As to form the inactive compound SN-38G. UGT1A1*28 and UGT1A1*6 polymorphisms were useful for predicting severe toxicity with NSCLC patients treated with irinotecan-based chemotherapy. Platinum-based compounds (cisplatin, carboplatin) are being used in combination with new cytotoxic drugs such as gemcitabine, paclitaxel, docetaxel, or vinorelbine in the treatment of advanced NSCLC. Cisplatin activity is mediated through the formation of cisplatin-DNA adducts. Gene polymorphisms of DNA repair factors are therefore obvious candidates for determinants of repair capacity and chemotherapy efficacy. ERCC1, XRCC1 and XRCC3 gene polymorphisms were a useful marker for predicting better survival in advanced NSCLC patients treated with platinum-based chemotherapy. XPA and XPD polymorphisms significantly increased response to platinum-based chemotherapy. These DNA repair gene polymorphisms were useful as a predictor of clinical outcome to the platinum-based chemotherapy. EGFR kinase inhibitors induce dramatic clinical responses in NSCLC patients with advanced disease. EGFR gene polymorphism in intron 1 contains a polymorphic single sequence dinudeotide repeat (CA-SSR) showed a statistically significant correlation with the gefitinib response and was appeared to be a useful predictive marker of the development of clinical outcome containing skin rashes with gefitinib treatment. The other polymorphisms of EGFR were also associated with increased EGFR promoter activity

  1. Genetic diversity analysis among male and female Jojoba genotypes employing gene targeted molecular markers, start codon targeted (SCoT) polymorphism and CAAT box-derived polymorphism (CBDP) markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikrujam, Monika; Kumar, Jatin; Agrawal, Veena

    2015-09-01

    To detect genetic variations among different Simmondsia chinensis genotypes, two gene targeted markers, start codon targeted (SCoT) polymorphism and CAAT box-derived polymorphism (CBDP) were employed in terms of their informativeness and efficiency in analyzing genetic relationships among different genotypes. A total of 15 SCoT and 17 CBDP primers detected genetic polymorphism among 39 Jojoba genotypes (22 females and 17 males). Comparatively, CBDP markers proved to be more effective than SCoT markers in terms of percentage polymorphism as the former detecting an average of 53.4% and the latter as 49.4%. The Polymorphic information content (PIC) value and marker index (MI) of CBPD were 0.43 and 1.10, respectively which were higher than those of SCoT where the respective values of PIC and MI were 0.38 and 1.09. While comparing male and female genotype populations, the former showed higher variation in respect of polymorphic percentage and PIC, MI and Rp values over female populations. Nei's diversity (h) and Shannon index (I) were calculated for each genotype and found that the genotype "MS F" (in both markers) was highly diverse and genotypes "Q104 F" (SCoT) and "82-18 F" (CBDP) were least diverse among the female genotype populations. Among male genotypes, "32 M" (CBDP) and "MS M" (SCoT) revealed highest h and I values while "58-5 M" (both markers) was the least diverse. Jaccard's similarity co-efficient of SCoT markers ranged from 0.733 to 0.922 in female genotypes and 0.941 to 0.746 in male genotype population. Likewise, CBDP data analysis also revealed similarity ranging from 0.751 to 0.958 within female genotypes and 0.754 to 0.976 within male genotype populations thereby, indicating genetically diverse Jojoba population. Employing the NTSYS (Numerical taxonomy and multivariate analysis system) Version 2.1 software, both the markers generated dendrograms which revealed that all the Jojoba genotypes were clustered into two major groups, one group consisting of

  2. Genetic diversity analysis among male and female Jojoba genotypes employing gene targeted molecular markers, start codon targeted (SCoT polymorphism and CAAT box-derived polymorphism (CBDP markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Heikrujam

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available To detect genetic variations among different Simmondsia chinensis genotypes, two gene targeted markers, start codon targeted (SCoT polymorphism and CAAT box-derived polymorphism (CBDP were employed in terms of their informativeness and efficiency in analyzing genetic relationships among different genotypes. A total of 15 SCoT and 17 CBDP primers detected genetic polymorphism among 39 Jojoba genotypes (22 females and 17 males. Comparatively, CBDP markers proved to be more effective than SCoT markers in terms of percentage polymorphism as the former detecting an average of 53.4% and the latter as 49.4%. The Polymorphic information content (PIC value and marker index (MI of CBPD were 0.43 and 1.10, respectively which were higher than those of SCoT where the respective values of PIC and MI were 0.38 and 1.09. While comparing male and female genotype populations, the former showed higher variation in respect of polymorphic percentage and PIC, MI and Rp values over female populations. Nei's diversity (h and Shannon index (I were calculated for each genotype and found that the genotype “MS F” (in both markers was highly diverse and genotypes “Q104 F” (SCoT and “82–18 F” (CBDP were least diverse among the female genotype populations. Among male genotypes, “32 M” (CBDP and “MS M” (SCoT revealed highest h and I values while “58-5 M” (both markers was the least diverse. Jaccard's similarity co-efficient of SCoT markers ranged from 0.733 to 0.922 in female genotypes and 0.941 to 0.746 in male genotype population. Likewise, CBDP data analysis also revealed similarity ranging from 0.751 to 0.958 within female genotypes and 0.754 to 0.976 within male genotype populations thereby, indicating genetically diverse Jojoba population. Employing the NTSYS (Numerical taxonomy and multivariate analysis system Version 2.1 software, both the markers generated dendrograms which revealed that all the Jojoba genotypes were clustered into two major

  3. Targeting cell cycle regulators in hematologic malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eiman eAleem

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Hematologic malignancies represent the fourth most frequently diagnosed cancer in economically developed countries. In hematologic malignancies normal hematopoiesis is interrupted by uncontrolled growth of a genetically altered stem or progenitor cell (HSPC that maintains its ability of self-renewal. Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs not only regulate the mammalian cell cycle, but also influence other vital cellular processes, such as stem cell renewal, differentiation, transcription, epigenetic regulation, apoptosis, and DNA repair. Chromosomal translocations, amplification, overexpression and altered CDK activities have been described in different types of human cancer, which have made them attractive targets for pharmacological inhibition. Mouse models deficient for one or more CDKs have significantly contributed to our current understanding of the physiological functions of CDKs, as well as their roles in human cancer. The present review focuses on selected cell cycle kinases with recent emerging key functions in hematopoiesis and in hematopoietic malignancies, such as CDK6 and its role in MLL-rearranged leukemia and acute lymphocytic leukemia, CDK1 and its regulator WEE-1 in acute myeloid leukemia, and cyclin C/CDK8/CDK19 complexes in T-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia. The knowledge gained from gene knockout experiments in mice of these kinases is also summarized. An overview of compounds targeting these kinases, which are currently in clinical development in various solid tumors and hematopoietic malignances, is presented. These include the CDK4/CDK6 inhibitors (palbociclib, LEE011, LY2835219, pan-CDK inhibitors that target CDK1 (dinaciclib, flavopiridol, AT7519, TG02, P276-00, terampeprocol and RGB 286638 as well as the WEE-1 kinase inhibitor, MK-1775. The advantage of combination therapy of cell cycle inhibitors with conventional chemotherapeutic agents used in the treatment of AML, such as cytarabine, is discussed.

  4. Functional polymorphisms in antioxidant genes in Hurthle cell thyroid neoplasm - an association of GPX1 polymorphism and recurrent Hurthle cell thyroid carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krhin Blaz

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Hurthle cells of the thyroid gland are very rich in mitochondria and oxidative enzymes. As a high level oxidative metabolism may lead to higher level of oxidative stress and can be associated with an increased risk for cancer, we investigated whether common functional polymorphisms in antioxidant genes (SOD2, CAT, GPX, GSTP1, GSTM1 and GSTT1 are associated with the development or clinical course of Hurthle cell thyroid carcinoma (HCTC.

  5. Functional polymorphisms in antioxidant genes in Hurthle cell thyroid neoplasm - an association of GPX1 polymorphism and recurrent Hurthle cell thyroid carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Krhin Blaz; Goricar Katja; Gazic Barbara; Dolzan Vita; Besic Nikola

    2016-01-01

    Hurthle cells of the thyroid gland are very rich in mitochondria and oxidative enzymes. As a high level oxidative metabolism may lead to higher level of oxidative stress and can be associated with an increased risk for cancer, we investigated whether common functional polymorphisms in antioxidant genes (SOD2, CAT, GPX, GSTP1, GSTM1 and GSTT1) are associated with the development or clinical course of Hurthle cell thyroid carcinoma (HCTC).

  6. Therapeutic strategies targeting cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Xiaoyan; Shu, Jianchang; Du, Yiqi; Ben, Qiwen; Li, Zhaoshen

    2013-04-01

    Increasing studies have demonstrated a small proportion of cancer stem cells (CSCs) exist in the cancer cell population. CSCs have powerful self-renewal capacity and tumor-initiating ability and are resistant to chemotherapy and radiation. Conventional anticancer therapies kill the rapidly proliferating bulk cancer cells but spare the relatively quiescent CSCs, which cause cancer recurrence. So it is necessary to develop therapeutic strategies acting specifically on CSCs. In recent years, studies have shown that therapeutic agents such as metformin, salinomycin, DECA-14, rapamycin, oncostatin M (OSM), some natural compounds, oncolytic viruses, microRNAs, cell signaling pathway inhibitors, TNF-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL), interferon (IFN), telomerase inhibitors, all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and monoclonal antibodies can suppress the self-renewal of CSCs in vitro and in vivo. A combination of these agents and conventional chemotherapy drugs can significantly inhibit tumor growth, metastasis and recurrence. These strategies targeting CSCs may bring new hopes to cancer therapy. PMID:23358473

  7. Targeted therapy for metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, P H; Chaganti, R.S.K.; Motzer, R J

    2006-01-01

    Metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has historically been refractory to cytotoxic and hormonal agents; only interleukin 2 and interferon alpha provide response in a minority of patients. We reviewed RCC biology and explored the ways in which this understanding led to development of novel, effective targeted therapies. Small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors, monoclonal antibodies and novel agents are all being studied, and phase II studies show promising activity of sunitinib, sorafenib a...

  8. Targeted TFO Delivery to Hepatic Stellate Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Ningning; Singh, Saurabh; Mahato, Ram I.

    2011-01-01

    Triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) represent an antigene approach for gene regulation through direct interaction with genomic DNA. While this strategy holds great promise owing to the fact that only two alleles need silencing to impact gene regulation, delivering TFOs to target cells in vivo is still a challenge. Our recent efforts have focused on conjugating TFOs to carrier molecules like cholesterol to enhance their cellular uptake and mannose-6-phosphate-bovine serum albumin (M6P-BSA)...

  9. Isomorphous template induced crystallisation: a robust method for the targeted crystallisation of computationally predicted metastable polymorphs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srirambhatla, Vijay K; Guo, Rui; Price, Sarah L; Florence, Alastair J

    2016-05-31

    A new method of inducing the crystallisation of metastable polymorphs by isomorphous templating has been developed and used to reproduce the crystallisation of CBZ-V on the surface of DHC-II. Studies of the growth of CBZ-V on DHC-II single crystals show crystals growing laterally and vertically on DHC-II surfaces without any significant face selectivity. The generality of this computationally inspired crystallisation approach is demonstrated by producing the first crystals of an entirely new polymorph of cyheptamide, which is isomorphous to both DHC-II and CBZ-V. PMID:27193234

  10. Therapeutic strategies for targeting cancer stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Jeong Kim; Elizabeth L Siegler; Natnaree Siriwon; Pin Wang

    2016-01-01

    The therapeutic limitations of conventional chemotherapeutic drugs present a challenge for cancer therapy; these shortcomings are largely attributed to the ability of cancer cells to repopulate and metastasize after initial therapies. Compelling evidence suggests that cancer stem cells (CSCs) have a crucial impact in current shortcomings of cancer therapy because they are largely responsible for tumor initiation, relapse, metastasis, and chemo-resistance. Thus, a better understanding of the properties and mechanisms underlying CSC resistance to treatments is necessary to improve patient outcomes and survival rates. In this review, the authors characterize and compare different CSC-speciifc biomarkers that are present in various types of tumors. We further discuss multiple targeting approaches currently in preclinical or clinical testing that show great potential for targeting CSCs. This review discusses numerous strategies to eliminate CSCs by targeting surface biomarkers, regulating CSC-associated oncogenes and signaling pathways, inhibiting drug-eflfux pumps involved in drug resistance, modulating the tumor microenvironment and immune system, and applying drug combination therapy using nanomedicine.

  11. Targeted TFO delivery to hepatic stellate cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ningning; Singh, Saurabh; Mahato, Ram I

    2011-10-30

    Triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) represent an antigene approach for gene regulation through direct interaction with genomic DNA. While this strategy holds great promise owing to the fact that only two alleles need silencing to impact gene regulation, delivering TFOs to target cells in vivo is still a challenge. Our recent efforts have focused on conjugating TFOs to carrier molecules like cholesterol to enhance their cellular uptake and mannose-6-phosphate-bovine serum albumin (M6P-BSA) to target TFO delivery to hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) for treating liver fibrosis. These approaches however are rendered less effective owing to a lack of targeted delivery, as seen with lipid-conjugates, and the potential immune reactions due to repeated dosing with high molecular weight BSA conjugated TFO. In this review, we discuss our latest efforts to enhance the effectiveness of TFO for treating liver fibrosis. We have shown that conjugation of TFOs to M6P-HPMA can enhance TFO delivery to HSCs and has the potential to treat liver fibrosis by inhibiting collagen synthesis. This TFO conjugate shows negligible immunogenicity owing to the use of HPMA, one of the least immunogenic copolymers, thereby making it a suitable and more effective candidate for antifibrotic therapy. PMID:21763370

  12. Three-cohort targeted gene screening reveals a non-synonymous TRKA polymorphism associated with schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Schijndel, Jessica E; van Loo, Karen M J; van Zweeden, Martine;

    2009-01-01

    selected non-synonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in three independent Caucasian schizophrenia case-control cohorts (USA, Denmark and Norway). A meta-analysis revealed ten non-synonymous SNPs that were nominally associated with schizophrenia, nine of which have not been previously linked...

  13. Lipoprotein lipase gene polymorphisms and the risk of target vessel revascularization after percutaneous coronary intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monraats, Pascalle S; Rana, Jamal S; Nierman, Melchior C; Pires, Nuno M M; Zwinderman, Aeilko H; Kastelein, John J P; Kuivenhoven, Jan Albert; de Maat, Moniek P M; Rittersma, Saskia Z H; Schepers, Abbey; Doevendans, Pieter A F; de Winter, Robbert J; Tio, René A; Frants, Rune R; Quax, Paul H A; van der Laarse, Arnoud; van der Wall, Ernst E; Jukema, J Wouter

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We sought to identify polymorphisms in genes that predispose to restenosis. BACKGROUND: Variations in the lipoprotein lipase (LPL) gene have been implicated in a number of pathophysiologic conditions associated with coronary heart disease. The present study examines the impact of polymor

  14. Novel (Phenylethynyl)pyrene-LNA Constructs for Fluorescence SNP Sensing in Polymorphic Nucleic Acid Targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astakhova, Irina Kira; Samokhina, Evgeniya; Babu, B Ravindra;

    2012-01-01

    We describe fluorescent oligonucleotide probes labeled with novel (phenylethynyl)pyrene dyes attached to locked nucleic acids. Furthermore, we prove the utility of these probes for the effective detection of single-nucleotide polymorphisms in natural nucleic acids. High-affinity hybridization...

  15. Association of impulsivity and polymorphic microRNA-641 target sites in the SNAP-25 gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nóra Németh

    Full Text Available Impulsivity is a personality trait of high impact and is connected with several types of maladaptive behavior and psychiatric diseases, such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, alcohol and drug abuse, as well as pathological gambling and mood disorders. Polymorphic variants of the SNAP-25 gene emerged as putative genetic components of impulsivity, as SNAP-25 protein plays an important role in the central nervous system, and its SNPs are associated with several psychiatric disorders. In this study we aimed to investigate if polymorphisms in the regulatory regions of the SNAP-25 gene are in association with normal variability of impulsivity. Genotypes and haplotypes of two polymorphisms in the promoter (rs6077690 and rs6039769 and two SNPs in the 3' UTR (rs3746544 and rs1051312 of the SNAP-25 gene were determined in a healthy Hungarian population (N = 901 using PCR-RFLP or real-time PCR in combination with sequence specific probes. Significant association was found between the T-T 3' UTR haplotype and impulsivity, whereas no association could be detected with genotypes or haplotypes of the promoter loci. According to sequence alignment, the polymorphisms in the 3' UTR of the gene alter the binding site of microRNA-641, which was analyzed by luciferase reporter system. It was observed that haplotypes altering one or two nucleotides in the binding site of the seed region of microRNA-641 significantly increased the amount of generated protein in vitro. These findings support the role of polymorphic SNAP-25 variants both at psychogenetic and molecular biological levels.

  16. Engineering novel cell surface chemistry for selective tumor cell targeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertozzi, C.R. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)]|[Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    A common feature of many different cancers is the high expression level of the two monosaccharides sialic acid and fucose within the context of cell-surface associated glycoconjugates. A correlation has been made between hypersialylation and/or hyperfucosylation and the highly metastatic phenotype. Thus, a targeting strategy based on sialic acid or fucose expression would be a powerful tool for the development of new cancer cell-selective therapies and diagnostic agents. We have discovered that ketone groups can be incorporated metabolically into cell-surface associated sialic acids. The ketone is can be covalently ligated with hydrazide functionalized proteins or small molecules under physiological conditions. Thus, we have discovered a mechanism to selectively target hydrazide conjugates to highly sialylated cells such as cancer cells. Applications of this technology to the generation of novel cancer cell-selective toxins and MRI contrast reagents will be discussed, in addition to progress towards the use of cell surface fucose residues as vehicles for ketone expression.

  17. Polymorphisms of NRF2 and NRF2 target genes in urinary bladder cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Reszka, Edyta; Jablonowski, Zbigniew; Wieczorek, Edyta; Jablonska, Ewa; Krol, Magdalena Beata; Gromadzinska, Jolanta; Grzegorczyk, Adam; Sosnowski, Marek; Wasowicz, Wojciech

    2014-01-01

    Purpose NRF2 transcription factor is involved in modulation of various antioxidant and metabolic genes and, therefore, may modulate anti-carcinogenic potential. Association between polymorphisms of NRF2 and five NRF2-regulated genes and urinary bladder cancer (BC) risk was analyzed. Methods The study group included 244 BC patients, while the control group comprised 365 individuals with no evidence of malignancy. Genotyping of GSTM1 (deletion), GSTT1 (deletion), GSTA1 −69C/T (rs3957357), GSTP1...

  18. From Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms to Constant Immunosuppression: Mesenchymal Stem Cell Therapy for Autoimmune Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghavan Chinnadurai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The regenerative abilities and the immunosuppressive properties of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs make them potentially the ideal cellular product of choice for treatment of autoimmune and other immune mediated disorders. Although the usefulness of MSCs for therapeutic applications is in early phases, their potential clinical use remains of great interest. Current clinical evidence of use of MSCs from both autologous and allogeneic sources to treat autoimmune disorders confers conflicting clinical benefit outcomes. These varied results may possibly be due to MSC use across wide range of autoimmune disorders with clinical heterogeneity or due to variability of the cellular product. In the light of recent genome wide association studies (GWAS, linking predisposition of autoimmune diseases to single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the susceptible genetic loci, the clinical relevance of MSCs possessing SNPs in the critical effector molecules of immunosuppression is largely undiscussed. It is of further interest in the allogeneic setting, where SNPs in the target pathway of MSC's intervention may also modulate clinical outcome. In the present review, we have discussed the known critical SNPs predisposing to disease susceptibility in various autoimmune diseases and their significance in the immunomodulatory properties of MSCs.

  19. IL-10 polymorphism and cell-mediated immune response to Chlamydia trachomatis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Öhman, H.; Tiitinen, A; Halttunen, M.;

    2006-01-01

    background. To study a relationship between interleukin-10 (IL-10) promoter -1082 polymorphism and cell-mediated immune response during C trachomatis infection in vitro, lymphocyte proliferation and cytokine (IL-10, IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, IL-2, IL-4 and IL-5) secretion were analysed in subjects with different...

  20. IFN‐λ3 polymorphism indirectly influences NK cell phenotype and function during acute HCV infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depla, Marion; Pelletier, Sandy; Bédard, Nathalie; Brunaud, Camille; Bruneau, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Polymorphisms in the type III interferon IFN‐λ3 and the killer cell immunoglobulin‐like receptor (KIR) genes controlling the activity of natural killer (NK) cells can predict spontaneous resolution of acute hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. We hypothesized that IFN‐λ3 polymorphism may modulate NK cell function during acute HCV. Methods We monitored the plasma levels of type III IFNs in relation to the phenotype and the function of NK cells in a cohort of people who inject drugs (PWID) during acute HCV infection with different outcomes. Results Early acute HCV was associated with high variability in type III IFNs plasma levels and the favorable IFN‐λ3 CC genotype was associated with higher viral loads. Reduced expression of Natural Killer Group Protein 2A (NKG2A) was associated with lower IFN‐λ3 plasma levels and the CC genotype. IFN‐γ production by NK cells was higher in individuals with the CC genotype during acute infection but this did not prevent viral persistence. IFN‐λ3 plasma levels did not correlate with function of NK cells and IFN‐λ3 prestimulation did not affect NK cell activation and function. Conclusions These results suggest that IFN‐λ3 polymorphism indirectly influences NK cell phenotype and function during acute HCV but other factors may act in concert to determine the outcome of the infection. PMID:27621819

  1. Association between IL-18 gene polymorphisms and biopsy-proven giant cell arteritis

    OpenAIRE

    Palomino-Morales, Rogelio; Vázquez-Rodríguez, Tomás R.; Torres, Orlando; Morado, Inmaculada C.; S. Castañeda; Miranda-Filloy, J. A.; Callejas-Rubio, J. L.; Fernández-Gutiérrez, B.; González-Gay, M. A.; Martín, J.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The objective was to investigate the potential implication of the IL18 gene promoter polymorphisms in the susceptibility to giant-cell arteritis (GCA). Methods In total, 212 patients diagnosed with biopsy-proven GCA were included in this study. DNA from patients and matched controls was obtained from peripheral blood. Samples were genotyped for the IL18-137 G>C (rs187238), the IL18-607 C>A (rs1946518), and the IL18-1297 T>C (rs360719) gene polymorphisms with polymerase chain reac...

  2. Targeted Sequencing Reveals Large-Scale Sequence Polymorphism in Maize Candidate Genes for Biomass Production and Composition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moses M Muraya

    Full Text Available A major goal of maize genomic research is to identify sequence polymorphisms responsible for phenotypic variation in traits of economic importance. Large-scale detection of sequence variation is critical for linking genes, or genomic regions, to phenotypes. However, due to its size and complexity, it remains expensive to generate whole genome sequences of sufficient coverage for divergent maize lines, even with access to next generation sequencing (NGS technology. Because methods involving reduction of genome complexity, such as genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS, assess only a limited fraction of sequence variation, targeted sequencing of selected genomic loci offers an attractive alternative. We therefore designed a sequence capture assay to target 29 Mb genomic regions and surveyed a total of 4,648 genes possibly affecting biomass production in 21 diverse inbred maize lines (7 flints, 14 dents. Captured and enriched genomic DNA was sequenced using the 454 NGS platform to 19.6-fold average depth coverage, and a broad evaluation of read alignment and variant calling methods was performed to select optimal procedures for variant discovery. Sequence alignment with the B73 reference and de novo assembly identified 383,145 putative single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, of which 42,685 were non-synonymous alterations and 7,139 caused frameshifts. Presence/absence variation (PAV of genes was also detected. We found that substantial sequence variation exists among genomic regions targeted in this study, which was particularly evident within coding regions. This diversification has the potential to broaden functional diversity and generate phenotypic variation that may lead to new adaptations and the modification of important agronomic traits. Further, annotated SNPs identified here will serve as useful genetic tools and as candidates in searches for phenotype-altering DNA variation. In summary, we demonstrated that sequencing of captured DNA is a powerful

  3. Stem cells and radiation: effects in targeted and non-targeted cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The renewing tissues of the body are hierarchically organized and maintained by a small population of self-maintaining stem cells that are important targets for malignant transformation and also for gene therapy and tissue engineering approaches in regenerative medicine. Deleterious effects of toxic insults such as ionizing radiation may be due to stem cell death, with consequent loss of mature functional cells, or to stem cell damage that leads to aberrant responses to regulatory mechanisms. However, because the homeostatic regulation of these tissues is complex (involving intercellular signalling and cellular interactions that control cell proliferation, differentiation and death) radiation effects on stromal cells that perturb the microenvironmental control may also result in deleterious effects on the stem cell compartment. The rapidly developing fields of research investigating radiation-induced genomic instability and bystander effects also indicate that radiation effects on stem cells can be indirect. Although the non-targeted mechanisms responsible for bystander effects and the induction and maintenance of the inducible instability phenotype are not understood, inter-cellular signalling and free radical-mediated processes may be common features. Inter-cellular signalling and production of free radicals are also features of inflammatory responses; a recently identified indirect consequence of radiation with the potential for both persisting and bystander-mediated damage as well as for conferring a predisposition to malignancy. The production of clastogenic factors and their capacity for indirect cell damage after irradiation, the involvement of stromal cells in malignancy and bystander-mediated genetic instability may all reflect aspects of non-specific inflammatory-type responses to radiation-induced stress and injury. Recent investigations demonstrating that radiation-induced signalling processes are influenced by tissue-specific and genetic factors add

  4. Haptoglobin gene polymorphisms and interleukin-6 and -8 levels in patients with sickle cell anemia

    OpenAIRE

    Bruna Spinella Pierrot-Gallo; Perla Vicari; Sandra Satiko Matsuda; Samuel Ademola Adegoke; Grazielle Mecabo; Maria Stella Figueiredo

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Haptoglobin genotypes, and interleukin-6 and -8 participate in the pathophysiology of sickle cell anemia. The expression of cytokines is regulated by genetic mechanisms however the effect of haptoglobin polymorphisms on these cytokines is not fully understood. This study aimed to compare the frequency of haptoglobin genotypes and the interleukin-6 and -8 concentrations in sickle cell anemia patients and controls to investigate the association between haptoglobin genotypes and cyto...

  5. Polymorphisms in cell cycle regulatory genes, urinary arsenic profile and urothelial carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: Polymorphisms in p53, p21 and CCND1 could regulate the progression of the cell cycle and might increase the susceptibility to inorganic arsenic-related cancer risk. The goal of our study was to evaluate the roles of cell cycle regulatory gene polymorphisms in the carcinogenesis of arsenic-related urothelial carcinoma (UC). Methods: A hospital-based case-controlled study was conducted to explore the relationships among the urinary arsenic profile, 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) levels, p53 codon 72, p21 codon 31 and CCND1 G870A polymorphisms and UC risk. The urinary arsenic profile was determined using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and hydride generator-atomic absorption spectrometry (HG-AAS). 8-OHdG levels were measured by high-sensitivity enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits. Genotyping was conducted using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymerase (PCR-RFLP). Results: Subjects carrying the p21 Arg/Arg genotype had an increased UC risk (age and gender adjusted OR = 1.53; 95% CI, 1.02-2.29). However, there was no association of p53 or CCND1 polymorphisms with UC risk. Significant effects were observed in terms of a combination of the three gene polymorphisms and a cumulative exposure of cigarette smoking, along with the urinary arsenic profile on the UC risk. The higher total arsenic concentration, monomethylarsonic acid percentage (MMA%) and lower dimethylarsinic acid percentage (DMA%), possessed greater gene variant numbers, had a higher UC risk and revealed significant dose-response relationships. However, effects of urinary 8-OHdG levels combined with three gene polymorphisms did not seem to be important for UC risk. Conclusions: The results showed that the variant genotype of p21 might be a predictor of inorganic arsenic-related UC risk

  6. The -271 G>A polymorphism of kinase insert domain-containing receptor gene regulates its transcription level in patients with non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinase insert domain-containing receptor (KDR) plays a critical role in the metastasis of cancer and is used as a molecular target in cancer therapy. We investigated the characteristics of the -271 G>A polymorphism of the KDR gene to gain information that may benefit the development of individualized therapies for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The -271 G>A polymorphism of the KDR gene in 106 lung cancer patients and 203 healthy control individuals was analyzed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and DNA sequencing methods. Real-time quantitative PCR and immunohistochemical methods were used to evaluate KDR mRNA and protein expression levels, respectively, in frozen tumor specimens. The -271 G>A polymorphism was associated with the mRNA expression level of the KDR gene in tumor tissues (t = 2.178, P = 0.032, independent samples t-test). Compared with the AG/GG genotype, the AA genotype was associated with higher KDR mRNA expression in tumor tissues. We found no relationship between the genotype and the KDR protein expression level and no significant difference in the distribution of the KDR gene polymorphism genotypes between lung cancer patients and the control group (χ2 = 1.269, P = 0.264, Fisher's exact test). This study is the first to show that the -271 G>A polymorphism of the KDR gene may be a functional polymorphism related to the regulation of gene transcription. These findings may have important implications for therapies targeting KDR in patients with NSCLC

  7. Identification of polymorphic and off-target probe binding sites on the Illumina Infinium MethylationEPIC BeadChip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCartney, Daniel L; Walker, Rosie M; Morris, Stewart W; McIntosh, Andrew M; Porteous, David J; Evans, Kathryn L

    2016-09-01

    Genome-wide analysis of DNA methylation has now become a relatively inexpensive technique thanks to array-based methylation profiling technologies. The recently developed Illumina Infinium MethylationEPIC BeadChip interrogates methylation at over 850,000 sites across the human genome, covering 99% of RefSeq genes. This array supersedes the widely used Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip, which has permitted insights into the relationship between DNA methylation and a wide range of conditions and traits. Previous research has identified issues with certain probes on both the HumanMethylation450 BeadChip and its predecessor, the Infinium HumanMethylation27 BeadChip, which were predicted to affect array performance. These issues concerned probe-binding specificity and the presence of polymorphisms at target sites. Using in silico methods, we have identified probes on the Infinium MethylationEPIC BeadChip that are predicted to (i) measure methylation at polymorphic sites and (ii) hybridise to multiple genomic regions. We intend these resources to be used for quality control procedures when analysing data derived from this platform. PMID:27330998

  8. IL-18 single nucleotide polymorphisms in hematologic malignancies with HLA matched sibling donor allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡小矜

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the impact of interleukin-18(IL-18)single nucleotide polymorphisms on outcomes of hematologic malignancies with HLA-matched sibling donor hematopoietic stem cell transplantation(allo-HSCT).Methods Single-nucleotide polymorphisms in IL-18 promoter was detected by PCR-sequence-specific primer analysis(PCR-SSP)in 93 recipients and their HLA matched sibling donors.Hematopoietic reconstitution,

  9. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene polymorphism is associated with sickle cell disease patients in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishank, Sudhansu Sekhar; Singh, Mendi Prema Shyam Sunder; Yadav, Rajiv; Gupta, Rasik Bihari; Gadge, Vijay Sadashiv; Gwal, Anil

    2013-12-01

    Patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) produce significantly low levels of plasma nitric oxide (NO) during acute vaso-occlusive crisis. In transgenic sickle cell mice, NO synthesized by endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) enzyme of vascular endothelial cells has been found to protect the mice from vaso-occlusive events. Therefore, the present study aims to explore possible association of eNOS gene polymorphism as a potential genetic modifier in SCD patients. A case control study involving 150 SCD patients and age- and ethnicity-matched 150 healthy controls were genotyped by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism techniques for three important eNOS gene polymorphisms-eNOS 4a/b, eNOS 894G>T and eNOS -786T>C. It was observed that SCD patients had significantly higher frequencies of mutant alleles besides heterozygous and homozygous mutant genotypes of these three eNOS gene polymorphisms and low levels of plasma nitrite (NO2) as compared with control groups. The SCD severe group had significantly lower levels of plasma NO2 and higher frequencies of mutant alleles of these three SNPs of eNOS gene in contrast to the SCD mild group of patients. Haplotype analysis revealed that frequencies of one mutant haplotype '4a-T-C' (alleles in order of eNOS 4a/b, eNOS 894G>T and eNOS -786T>C) were significantly high in the severe SCD patients (Phaplotype '4b-G-T' was found to be significantly high (P<0.0001) in the SCD mild patients, which indicates that eNOS gene polymorphisms are associated with SCD patients in India and may act as a genetic modifier of the phenotypic variation of SCD patients. PMID:24088668

  10. Small organic compounds enhance antigen loading of class II major histocompatibility complex proteins by targeting the polymorphic P1 pocket

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Höpner, Sabine; Dickhaut, Katharina; Hofstätter, Maria;

    2006-01-01

    immune responses by catalyzing the peptide loading of human class II MHC molecules HLA-DR. Here we show now that they achieve this by interacting with a defined binding site of the HLA-DR peptide receptor. Screening of a compound library revealed a set of adamantane derivatives that strongly accelerated......, transient occupation of this pocket by the organic compound stabilizes the peptide-receptive conformation permitting rapid antigen loading. This interaction appeared restricted to the larger Gly(beta86) pocket and allowed striking enhancements of T cell responses for antigens presented by these "adamantyl......Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules are a key element of the cellular immune response. Encoded by the MHC they are a family of highly polymorphic peptide receptors presenting peptide antigens for the surveillance by T cells. We have shown that certain organic compounds can amplify...

  11. Stable gene targeting in human cells using single-strand oligonucleotides with modified bases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Rios

    Full Text Available Recent advances allow multiplexed genome engineering in E. coli, employing easily designed oligonucleotides to edit multiple loci simultaneously. A similar technology in human cells would greatly expedite functional genomics, both by enhancing our ability to test how individual variants such as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs are related to specific phenotypes, and potentially allowing simultaneous mutation of multiple loci. However, oligo-mediated targeting of human cells is currently limited by low targeting efficiencies and low survival of modified cells. Using a HeLa-based EGFP-rescue reporter system we show that use of modified base analogs can increase targeting efficiency, in part by avoiding the mismatch repair machinery. We investigate the effects of oligonucleotide toxicity and find a strong correlation between the number of phosphorothioate bonds and toxicity. Stably EGFP-corrected cells were generated at a frequency of ~0.05% with an optimized oligonucleotide design combining modified bases and reduced number of phosphorothioate bonds. We provide evidence from comparative RNA-seq analysis suggesting cellular immunity induced by the oligonucleotides might contribute to the low viability of oligo-corrected cells. Further optimization of this method should allow rapid and scalable genome engineering in human cells.

  12. Influence of MDM2 polymorphisms on squamous cell carcinoma susceptibility: a meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Huanxin; Li, Haiyan; Zhang, Jinling; Liu, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Controversial associations between single-nucleotide polymorphisms (rs2279744, rs937283, rs3730485) of the MDM2 gene and the etiology of squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) have been reported. This merits further comprehensive assessment. Materials and methods We systematically reviewed the available data and conducted an updated meta-analysis to evaluate the genetic effect of MDM2 polymorphisms in SCC susceptibility, using Stata/SE 12.0 software. Results After screening, 7,987 SCC cases and 12,954 controls from 26 eligible case–control studies were enrolled. Overall, compared with the control group, a significantly increased SCC risk was observed for the MDM2 rs2279744 polymorphism in the Asian population (test of association: odds ratio [OR] 1.12, P=0.027 for G vs T; OR 1.26, P=0.016 for GG vs TT; OR 1.25, P0.05). Conclusion Our results highlight a positive association between the GG genotype of MDM2 rs2279744 polymorphism and an increased risk of esophageal SCC in the Asian population, which needs to be clarified by more large-scale studies.

  13. Polymorphisms in human DNA repair genes and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rim Khlifi; Ahmed Rebai; Amel Hamza-Chaffai

    2012-12-01

    Genetic polymorphisms in some DNA repair proteins are associated with a number of malignant transformations like head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Xeroderma pigmentosum group D (XPD) and X-ray repair cross-complementing proteins 1 (XRCC1) and 3 (XRCC3) genes are involved in DNA repair and were found to be associated with HNSCC in numerous studies. To establish our overall understanding of possible relationships between DNA repair gene polymorphisms and development of HNSCC, we surveyed the literature on epidemiological studies that assessed potential associations with HNSCC risk in terms of gene–environment interactions, genotype-induced functional defects in enzyme activity and/or protein expression, and the influence of ethnic origin on these associations.We conclude that large, well-designed studies of common polymorphisms in DNA repair genes are needed. Such studies may benefit from analysis of multiple genes or polymorphisms and from the consideration of relevant exposures that may influence the likelihood of HNSCC when DNA repair capacity is reduced.

  14. Impacts of CA9 gene polymorphisms on urothelial cell carcinoma susceptibility and clinicopathologic characteristics in Taiwan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shian-Shiang Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Carbonic anhydrase 9 (CA9 is reportedly overexpressed in several types of carcinomas and is generally considered a marker of malignancy. The current study explored the effect of CA9 gene polymorphisms on the susceptibility of developing urothelial cell carcinoma (UCC and the clinicopathological status. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A total of 442 participants, including 221 healthy people and 221 patients with UCC, were recruited for this study. Four single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs of the CA9 gene were assessed by a real-time PCR with the TaqMan assay. After adjusting for other co-variants, the individuals carrying at least one A allele at CA9 rs1048638 had a 2.303-fold risk of developing UCC than did wild-type (CC carriers. Furthermore, UCC patients who carried at least one A allele at rs1048638 had a higher invasive stage risk (p< 0.05 than did patients carrying the wild-type allele. Moreover, among the UCC patients with smoker, people with at least one A allele of CA9 polymorphisms (rs1048638 had a 4.75-fold (95% CI = 1.204-18.746 increased risk of invasive cancer. CONCLUSION: The rs1048638 polymorphic genotypes of CA9 might contribute to the prediction of susceptibility to and pathological development of UCC. This is the first study to provide insight into risk factors associated with CA9 variants in carcinogenesis of UCC in Taiwan.

  15. 506 Basal T Cell Subpopulations of Normal Humans Vary by Stress Hormone Receptor Polymorphisms

    OpenAIRE

    Rehm, Kristina; Xiang, Lianbin; Marshall, Gailen

    2012-01-01

    Background Psychological stress has been correlated with allergy and asthma activity although there are clearly individual differences in the responses to the same stressor. These individual differences could be influenced by stress hormone receptor binding affinity, which could be altered by single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Methods We categorized differences in immunoregulatory profiles from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of 207 normal volunteers according to various glucoc...

  16. Genetic polymorphisms in miRNAs targeting the estrogen receptor and their effect on breast cancer risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giang T. Nguyen-Dien

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the cancer that most commonly affects women worldwide. This type of cancer is genetically complex, but is strongly linked to steroid hormone signaling systems. Because microRNAs act as translational regulators of multiple genes, including the steroid nuclear receptors, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in microRNA genes can have potentially wide-ranging influences on breast cancer development. Thus, this study was conducted to investigate the relationships between six SNPs (rs6977848, rs199981120, rs185641358, rs113054794, rs66461782, and rs12940701 located in four miRNA genes predicted to target the estrogen receptor (miR-148a, miR-221, miR-186, and miR-152 and breast cancer risk in Caucasian Australian women. By using high resolution melt analysis (HRM and polymerase chain reaction- restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR–RFLP, 487 samples including 225 controls and 262 cases were genotyped. Analysis of their genotype and allele frequencies indicated that the differences between case and control populations were not significant for rs6977848, rs66461782, and rs12940701 because their p-values are 0.81, 0.93, and 0.1, respectively, which are all above the threshold value (p = 0.05. Our data thus suggests that these SNPs do not affect breast cancer risk in the tested population. In addition, rs199981120, rs185641358, and rs113054794 could not be found in this population, suggesting that these SNPs do not occur in Caucasian Australians.

  17. Cell-targeting aptamers act as intracellular delivery vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopinath, Subash C B; Lakshmipriya, Thangavel; Chen, Yeng; Arshad, M K Md; Kerishnan, Jesinda P; Ruslinda, A R; Al-Douri, Yarub; Voon, C H; Hashim, Uda

    2016-08-01

    Aptamers are single-stranded nucleic acids or peptides identified from a randomized combinatorial library through specific interaction with the target of interest. Targets can be of any size, from small molecules to whole cells, attesting to the versatility of aptamers for binding a wide range of targets. Aptamers show drug properties that are analogous to antibodies, with high specificity and affinity to their target molecules. Aptamers can penetrate disease-causing microbial and mammalian cells. Generated aptamers that target surface biomarkers act as cell-targeting agents and intracellular delivery vehicles. Within this context, the "cell-internalizing aptamers" are widely investigated via the process of cell uptake with selective binding during in vivo systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) or by cell-internalization SELEX, which targets cell surface antigens to be receptors. These internalizing aptamers are highly preferable for the localization and functional analyses of multiple targets. In this overview, we discuss the ways by which internalizing aptamers are generated and their successful applications. Furthermore, theranostic approaches featuring cell-internalized aptamers are discussed with the purpose of analyzing and diagnosing disease-causing pathogens. PMID:27350620

  18. Cell-targeting aptamers act as intracellular delivery vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopinath, Subash C B; Lakshmipriya, Thangavel; Chen, Yeng; Arshad, M K Md; Kerishnan, Jesinda P; Ruslinda, A R; Al-Douri, Yarub; Voon, C H; Hashim, Uda

    2016-08-01

    Aptamers are single-stranded nucleic acids or peptides identified from a randomized combinatorial library through specific interaction with the target of interest. Targets can be of any size, from small molecules to whole cells, attesting to the versatility of aptamers for binding a wide range of targets. Aptamers show drug properties that are analogous to antibodies, with high specificity and affinity to their target molecules. Aptamers can penetrate disease-causing microbial and mammalian cells. Generated aptamers that target surface biomarkers act as cell-targeting agents and intracellular delivery vehicles. Within this context, the "cell-internalizing aptamers" are widely investigated via the process of cell uptake with selective binding during in vivo systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) or by cell-internalization SELEX, which targets cell surface antigens to be receptors. These internalizing aptamers are highly preferable for the localization and functional analyses of multiple targets. In this overview, we discuss the ways by which internalizing aptamers are generated and their successful applications. Furthermore, theranostic approaches featuring cell-internalized aptamers are discussed with the purpose of analyzing and diagnosing disease-causing pathogens.

  19. MHC class II polymorphisms, autoreactive T-cells and autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sue eTsai

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Major histocompatibility complex (MHC genes, also known as human leukocyte antigen genes (HLA in humans, are the prevailing contributors of genetic susceptibility to autoimmune diseases such as Type 1 Diabetes (T1D, Multiple Sclerosis (MS, and Rheumatoid arthritis (RA, among others (Todd and Wicker, 2001;MacKay et al., 2002;Hafler et al., 2007. Although the pathways through which MHC molecules afford autoimmune risk or resistance remain to be fully mapped out, it is generally accepted that they do so by shaping the central and peripheral T cell repertoires of the host towards autoimmune proclivity or resistance, respectively. Disease-predisposing MHC alleles would both spare autoreactive thymocytes from central tolerance and bias their development towards a pathogenic phenotype. Protective MHC alleles, on the other hand, would promote central deletion of autoreactive thymocytes and skew their development towards non-pathogenic phenotypes. This interpretation of the data is at odds with two other observations: that in MHC-heterozygous individuals, resistance is dominant over susceptibility; and that it is difficult to understand how deletion of one or a few clonal autoreactive T cell types would suffice to curb autoimmune responses driven by hundreds if not thousands of autoreactive T cell specificities. This review provides an update on current advances in our understanding of the mechanisms underlying MHC class II-associated autoimmune disease susceptibility and/or resistance and attempts to reconcile these seemingly opposing concepts.

  20. Polymorphisms in microRNA targets: a source of new molecular markers for male reproduction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jernej Ogorevc; Peter Dove; Tanja Kunej

    2011-01-01

    @@ Dear Editor, Herein we discuss the impact of microRNA (miRNA) target genetic variability in male infertility genes, which can represent a source of novel molecular-genetic markers that can be used for the diagnosis of male infertility.Male-factor infertility accounts for 30%-40% of infertility cases.The causes of spermatogenetic failure found in most cases of non-obstructive azoospermia or severe oligozoospermia still remain idiopathic.1

  1. Association of TERT Polymorphisms with Clinical Outcome of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueying Zhao

    Full Text Available TERT is of great importance in cancer initiation and progression. Many studies have demonstrated the TERT polymorphisms as risk factors for many cancer types, including lung cancer. However, the impacts of TERT variants on cancer progression and treatment efficacy have remained controversial. This study aimed to investigate the association of TERT polymorphisms with clinical outcome of advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients receiving first-line platinum-based chemotherapy, including response rate, clinical benefit, progression-free survival (PFS, overall survival (OS, and grade 3 or 4 toxicity. Seven polymorphisms of TERT were assessed, and a total of 1004 inoperable advanced NSCLC patients treated with platinum-based chemotherapy were enrolled. It is exhibited that the variant heterozygote of rs4975605 showed significant association with a low rate of clinical benefit, and displayed a much stronger effect in never-smoking female subset, leading to the clinical benefit rate decreased from 82.9% (C/C genotype to 56.4% (C/A genotype; adjusted OR, 3.58; P=1.40×10(-4. It is also observed that the polymorphism rs2736109 showed significant correlation with PFS (log-rank P=0.023. In age > 58 subgroup, patients carrying the heterozygous genotype had a longer median PFS than those carrying the wild-type genotypes (P=0.002. The results from the current study, for the first time to our knowledge, provide suggestive evidence of an effect of TERT polymorphisms on disease progression variability among Chinese patients with platinum-treated advanced NSCLC.

  2. DNA Repair Gene Polymorphisms in Relation to Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuliang Su

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the DNA repair genes are suspected to be related to the survival of lung cancer patients due to their possible influence on DNA repair capacity (DRC. However, the study results are inconsistent. Methods: A follow-up study of 610 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients was conducted to investigate genetic polymorphisms associated with the DNA repair genes in relation to NSCLC survival; 6 SNPs were genotyped, including XRCC1 (rs25487 G>A, hOGG1 (rs1052133 C>G, MUTYH (rs3219489 G>C, XPA (rs1800975 G>A, ERCC2 (rs1799793 G>A and XRCC3 (rs861539 C>T. Kaplan-Meier survival curve and Cox proportional hazards regression analyses were performed. SNP-SNP interaction was also examined using the survival tree analysis. Results: Advanced disease stage and older age at diagnosis were associated with poor prognosis of NSCLC. Patients with the variant ‘G' allele of hOGG1 rs1052133 had poor overall survival compared with those with the homozygous wild ‘CC' genotype, especially in female patients, adenocarcinoma histology, early stage, light smokers and without family history of cancer. For never smoking female lung cancer patients, individuals carrying homozygous variant ‘AA' genotype of XPA had shorter survival time compared to those with wild ‘G' alleles. Furthermore, females carrying homozygous variant XPA and hOGG1 genotypes simultaneously had 2.78-fold increased risk for death. Among all 6 polymorphisms, the homozygous variant ‘AA' of XPA carriers had poor prognosis compared to the carriers of wild ‘G' alleles of XPA together with other base excision repair (BER polymorphisms. Conclusions: Besides disease stage and age, the study found DNA repair gene polymorphisms were associated with lung cancer survival.

  3. Human immune cell targeting of protein nanoparticles - caveospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Joshua J; Yuen, Daniel; Rae, James; Johnston, Angus P R; Parton, Robert G; Kent, Stephen J; De Rose, Robert

    2016-04-14

    Nanotechnology has the power to transform vaccine and drug delivery through protection of payloads from both metabolism and off-target effects, while facilitating specific delivery of cargo to immune cells. However, evaluation of immune cell nanoparticle targeting is conventionally restricted to monocultured cell line models. We generated human caveolin-1 nanoparticles, termed caveospheres, which were efficiently functionalized with monoclonal antibodies. Using this platform, we investigated CD4+ T cell and CD20+ B cell targeting within physiological mixtures of primary human blood immune cells using flow cytometry, imaging flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Antibody-functionalization enhanced caveosphere binding to targeted immune cells (6.6 to 43.9-fold) within mixed populations and in the presence of protein-containing fluids. Moreover, targeting caveospheres to CCR5 enabled caveosphere internalization by non-phagocytic CD4+ T cells-an important therapeutic target for HIV treatment. This efficient and flexible system of immune cell-targeted caveosphere nanoparticles holds promise for the development of advanced immunotherapeutics and vaccines. PMID:27031090

  4. Human immune cell targeting of protein nanoparticles - caveospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Joshua J.; Yuen, Daniel; Rae, James; Johnston, Angus P. R.; Parton, Robert G.; Kent, Stephen J.; de Rose, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Nanotechnology has the power to transform vaccine and drug delivery through protection of payloads from both metabolism and off-target effects, while facilitating specific delivery of cargo to immune cells. However, evaluation of immune cell nanoparticle targeting is conventionally restricted to monocultured cell line models. We generated human caveolin-1 nanoparticles, termed caveospheres, which were efficiently functionalized with monoclonal antibodies. Using this platform, we investigated CD4+ T cell and CD20+ B cell targeting within physiological mixtures of primary human blood immune cells using flow cytometry, imaging flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Antibody-functionalization enhanced caveosphere binding to targeted immune cells (6.6 to 43.9-fold) within mixed populations and in the presence of protein-containing fluids. Moreover, targeting caveospheres to CCR5 enabled caveosphere internalization by non-phagocytic CD4+ T cells--an important therapeutic target for HIV treatment. This efficient and flexible system of immune cell-targeted caveosphere nanoparticles holds promise for the development of advanced immunotherapeutics and vaccines.

  5. Patient-Derived Antibody Targets Tumor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    An NCI Cancer Currents blog on an antibody derived from patients that killed tumor cells in cell lines of several cancer types and slowed tumor growth in mouse models of brain and lung cancer without evidence of side effects.

  6. MODULATING EFFECT OF THE −158 GΓ (C→T XMN-1 POLYMORPHISM IN INDIAN SICKLE CELL PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Pandey

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Xmn-1 polymorphism is a known factor, which increases fetal haemoglobin production. Among the inherited disorders of blood, thalassaemia and SCD constitutes a major bulk of genetic diseases in India.  Our aim was to verify the role of the Xmn I polymorphism as a modulating factor in sickle cell patients and frequency of the polymorphism in Indian sickle cell patients. Subjects were 60 sickles homozygous and 75 sickle beta thalassemia patients. 5 ml blood   samples collected from patients. Screening of sickle patients done by HPLC. An automated cell analyzer SYSMEX (K-4500 Model used to analyze the CBC of patients.Xmn1 polymorphism analysis done by PCR-RFLP and Statistical analysis was performed on GraphPad static’s software. t test applied to compare the means amongst group. Among the sickle homozygous 27 were   heterozygous (+/- and 19 were   homozygous (+/+ while 30 were heterozygous and 24 were homozygous in sickle β-thalassemia patients. Extremely significant differences (p-value <0.001 of hematological parameters seen among patient with xmn-1 carrier and without the xmn-1 carrier. In our cases the clinical symptom less frequent and higher HbF level with Xmn-1 carriers. Presence of Xmn-1 polymorphism in sickle patients with higher HbF that improve phenotypic presentation in the sickle cell patients. We conclude that the phenotype of Indian sickle cell patients influenced by Xmn-1 polymorphism.

  7. Genetic polymorphisms and HPV infection in oral squamous cell carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yan; Zhang, Yang; Liu, Limei; Song, Xicheng; Li, Guojun

    2015-10-01

    Despite declining smoking rates in the United States, the incidence of oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC, including oral cavity and oropharynx) is rising in young adults. The reasons have been attributed to changes in sexual behaviors and the increasingly prevalent infection of oncogenic subtypes of human papillomavirus (HPV), principally type16 and occasionally type18. However, only small proportion of individuals who have contracted HPV infection will develop OSCC, suggesting that there is an inter-individual variation in susceptibility to HPV infection and related OSCC. Identification of susceptible biomarkers for HPV status would be useful to identify those individuals who are susceptible to HPV infection, to refine the prognostication of HPV associated OSCC, and ultimately to improve prevention efforts for OSCC and potentially other HPV-associated diseases. Our public health OSCC prevention paradigm will need to expand beyond tobacco and alcohol control.

  8. Polymorphism discovery and allele frequency estimation using high-throughput DNA sequencing of target-enriched pooled DNA samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mullen Michael P

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The central role of the somatotrophic axis in animal post-natal growth, development and fertility is well established. Therefore, the identification of genetic variants affecting quantitative traits within this axis is an attractive goal. However, large sample numbers are a pre-requisite for the identification of genetic variants underlying complex traits and although technologies are improving rapidly, high-throughput sequencing of large numbers of complete individual genomes remains prohibitively expensive. Therefore using a pooled DNA approach coupled with target enrichment and high-throughput sequencing, the aim of this study was to identify polymorphisms and estimate allele frequency differences across 83 candidate genes of the somatotrophic axis, in 150 Holstein-Friesian dairy bulls divided into two groups divergent for genetic merit for fertility. Results In total, 4,135 SNPs and 893 indels were identified during the resequencing of the 83 candidate genes. Nineteen percent (n = 952 of variants were located within 5' and 3' UTRs. Seventy-two percent (n = 3,612 were intronic and 9% (n = 464 were exonic, including 65 indels and 236 SNPs resulting in non-synonymous substitutions (NSS. Significant (P ® MassARRAY. No significant differences (P > 0.1 were observed between the two methods for any of the 43 SNPs across both pools (i.e., 86 tests in total. Conclusions The results of the current study support previous findings of the use of DNA sample pooling and high-throughput sequencing as a viable strategy for polymorphism discovery and allele frequency estimation. Using this approach we have characterised the genetic variation within genes of the somatotrophic axis and related pathways, central to mammalian post-natal growth and development and subsequent lactogenesis and fertility. We have identified a large number of variants segregating at significantly different frequencies between cattle groups divergent for calving

  9. Association of polymorphism in cell death pathway gene FASLG withhuman male infertility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deepika Jaiswal; Sameer Trivedi; Neeraj K Agrawal; Kiran Singh

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate –844C>T single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) present in the promoter of cell death pathway gene FASLG with male infertile phenotype. Methods:Genotyping for SNP FASLG (rs763110) was done by polymerase chain reaction followed by analysis with specific endonuclease (PCR-RFLP). DNA sequencing was used to ascertain PCR-RFLP results. Results: FASLG –844C>T polymorphism, allele and genotype distribution did not differ significantly between patients and controls (OR: 1.03, 95% CI= 0.7638 to 1.3952, P=0.83). Thus SNP-844C>T of the FASLG gene is not associated with male infertility risk in the analyzed patients. Conclusion: Human male infertility is a complex disorder and thus other genetic or environmental factors may be contributing to the complex etiology, and further study in other region of Indian populations will verify whether it is associated with male infertility risk.

  10. Buoyancy-activated cell sorting using targeted biotinylated albumin microbubbles.

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    Yu-Ren Liou

    Full Text Available Cell analysis often requires the isolation of certain cell types. Various isolation methods have been applied to cell sorting, including fluorescence-activated cell sorting and magnetic-activated cell sorting. However, these conventional approaches involve exerting mechanical forces on the cells, thus risking cell damage. In this study we applied a novel isolation method called buoyancy-activated cell sorting, which involves using biotinylated albumin microbubbles (biotin-MBs conjugated with antibodies (i.e., targeted biotin-MBs. Albumin MBs are widely used as contrast agents in ultrasound imaging due to their good biocompatibility and stability. For conjugating antibodies, biotin is conjugated onto the albumin MB shell via covalent bonds and the biotinylated antibodies are conjugated using an avidin-biotin system. The albumin microbubbles had a mean diameter of 2 μm with a polydispersity index of 0.16. For cell separation, the MDA-MB-231 cells are incubated with the targeted biotin-MBs conjugated with anti-CD44 for 10 min, centrifuged at 10 g for 1 min, and then allowed 1 hour at 4 °C for separation. The results indicate that targeted biotin-MBs conjugated with anti-CD44 antibodies can be used to separate MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells; more than 90% of the cells were collected in the MB layer when the ratio of the MBs to cells was higher than 70:1. Furthermore, we found that the separating efficiency was higher for targeted biotin-MBs than for targeted avidin-incorporated albumin MBs (avidin-MBs, which is the most common way to make targeted albumin MBs. We also demonstrated that the recovery rate of targeted biotin-MBs was up to 88% and the sorting purity was higher than 84% for a a heterogenous cell population containing MDA-MB-231 cells (CD44(+ and MDA-MB-453 cells (CD44-, which are classified as basal-like breast cancer cells and luminal breast cancer cells, respectively. Knowing that the CD44(+ is a commonly used cancer-stem-cell

  11. Bacterial cell division proteins as antibiotic targets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. den Blaauwen; J.M. Andreu; O. Monasterio

    2014-01-01

    Proteins involved in bacterial cell division often do not have a counterpart in eukaryotic cells and they are essential for the survival of the bacteria. The genetic accessibility of many bacterial species in combination with the Green Fluorescence Protein revolution to study localization of protein

  12. Mesenchymal stem cells targeting the GVHD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Liang; ZHAO Robert ChunHua

    2009-01-01

    Acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) occurs after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant and is a reaction of donor immune cells against host tissues. About 35% -5% of hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients will develop acute GVHD. It is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality, particularly in patients who do not respond to primary therapy, which usually consists of glucocorticoids(steroids). Most of the available second-line and third-line treatments for sterold-refractory acute GVHD induce severe immunodeficiency, which is commonly accompanied by lethal infectious complications. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been shown to mediate immunomodulatory effects. The recently elucidated immunosuppreseive potential of mesenchymal stem cells has set the stage for their clinical testing as cellular immunosuppressants, MSCs have been used in patients with steroid-refractory acute GVHD, and encouraging responses have been obtained in many studies. The utility of MSCs for the treatment of GVHD is becoming clear.

  13. Controversies in Targeted Therapy of Adult T Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma: ON Target or OFF Target Effects?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugues de Thé

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL represents an ideal model for targeted therapy because of intrinsic chemo-resistance of ATL cells and the presence of two well identified targets: the HTLV-I retrovirus and the viral oncoprotein Tax. The combination of zidovudine (AZT and interferon-alpha (IFN has a dramatic impact on survival of ATL patients. Although the mechanism of action remains unclear, arguments in favor or against a direct antiviral effect will be discussed. Yet, most patients relapse and alternative therapies are mandatory. IFN and arsenic trioxide induce Tax proteolysis, synergize to induce apoptosis in ATL cells and cure Tax-driven ATL in mice through specific targeting of leukemia initiating cell activity. These results provide a biological basis for the clinical success of arsenic/IFN/AZT therapy in ATL patients and suggest that both extinction of viral replication (AZT and Tax degradation (arsenic/IFN are needed to cure ATL.

  14. Sequence based polymorphic (SBP marker technology for targeted genomic regions: its application in generating a molecular map of the Arabidopsis thaliana genome

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    Sahu Binod B

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Molecular markers facilitate both genotype identification, essential for modern animal and plant breeding, and the isolation of genes based on their map positions. Advancements in sequencing technology have made possible the identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs for any genomic regions. Here a sequence based polymorphic (SBP marker technology for generating molecular markers for targeted genomic regions in Arabidopsis is described. Results A ~3X genome coverage sequence of the Arabidopsis thaliana ecotype, Niederzenz (Nd-0 was obtained by applying Illumina's sequencing by synthesis (Solexa technology. Comparison of the Nd-0 genome sequence with the assembled Columbia-0 (Col-0 genome sequence identified putative single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs throughout the entire genome. Multiple 75 base pair Nd-0 sequence reads containing SNPs and originating from individual genomic DNA molecules were the basis for developing co-dominant SBP markers. SNPs containing Col-0 sequences, supported by transcript sequences or sequences from multiple BAC clones, were compared to the respective Nd-0 sequences to identify possible restriction endonuclease enzyme site variations. Small amplicons, PCR amplified from both ecotypes, were digested with suitable restriction enzymes and resolved on a gel to reveal the sequence based polymorphisms. By applying this technology, 21 SBP markers for the marker poor regions of the Arabidopsis map representing polymorphisms between Col-0 and Nd-0 ecotypes were generated. Conclusions The SBP marker technology described here allowed the development of molecular markers for targeted genomic regions of Arabidopsis. It should facilitate isolation of co-dominant molecular markers for targeted genomic regions of any animal or plant species, whose genomic sequences have been assembled. This technology will particularly facilitate the development of high density molecular marker maps, essential for

  15. Genetic polymorphisms and cerebrovascular disease in children with sickle cell anemia from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filho, Isaac Lima da Silva; Leite, Ana Claudia Celestino Bezerra; Moura, Patrícia Gomes; Ribeiro, Georgina Severo; Cavalcante, Andréa Cony; Azevedo, Flávia Carolina Marques de; Andrada-Serpa, Maria José de

    2011-06-01

    The aim of the present work was to examine possible genetic risk factors related to the occurrence of cerebrovascular disease (CVD) in Brazilian population, the frequency of β(S)-globin gene haplotypes and co-inheritance with α-thalassemia (-α(3.7kb)) and single nucleotide polymorphism of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR-C677T), Factor V Leiden (FV-G1691A) and prothrombin (PT-G20210A) genes in children from Rio de Janeiro. Ninety four children with sickle cell anemia (SCA) were included, 24 patients with cerebrovascular involvement and 70 patients without CVD as control group. The mean age of children at the time of the cerebrovascular event was similar to the control group. The frequency of -α(3.7kb) thalassemia was similar in both groups (p=0.751). Children with Bantu/Atypical β(S)-globin gene haplotype presented 15 times more chance (OR=15.4 CI 95% 2.9-81.6) of CVD than the other β(S)-globin gene haplotypes. The C677T polymorphism of MTHFR gene was similar in both groups (p=0.085). No mutation in the FV Leiden or PT genes was found. A large study seems necessary to establish the role of these genetic polymorphisms in Brazilian miscegenated population. PMID:21755116

  16. Genetic polymorphisms and cerebrovascular disease in children with sickle cell anemia from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac Lima da Silva Filho

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present work was to examine possible genetic risk factors related to the occurrence of cerebrovascular disease (CVD in Brazilian population, the frequency of βS-globin gene haplotypes and co-inheritance with α-thalassemia (-α3.7kb and single nucleotide polymorphism of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR-C677T, Factor V Leiden (FV-G1691A and prothrombin (PT-G20210A genes in children from Rio de Janeiro. Ninety four children with sickle cell anemia (SCA were included, 24 patients with cerebrovascular involvement and 70 patients without CVD as control group. The mean age of children at the time of the cerebrovascular event was similar to the control group. The frequency of -α3.7kb thalassemia was similar in both groups (p=0.751. Children with Bantu/Atypical βS-globin gene haplotype presented 15 times more chance (OR=15.4 CI 95% 2.9-81.6 of CVD than the other βS-globin gene haplotypes. The C677T polymorphism of MTHFR gene was similar in both groups (p=0.085. No mutation in the FV Leiden or PT genes was found. A large study seems necessary to establish the role of these genetic polymorphisms in Brazilian miscegenated population.

  17. Reassessing target antigens for adoptive T cell therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinrichs, Christian S.; Restifo, Nicholas P.

    2014-01-01

    Adoptive T cell therapy can target and kill widespread malignant cells thereby inducing durable clinical responses in melanoma and selected other malignances. However, many commonly targeted tumor antigens are also expressed by healthy tissues, and T cells do not distinguish between benign and malignant tissues if both express the target antigen. As such, autoimmune toxicity from T-cell-mediated destruction of normal tissue has limited the development and adoption of this otherwise promising type of cancer therapy. A review of the unique biology of T-cell therapy and of recent clinical experience compels a reassessment of target antigens that traditionally have been viewed from the perspective of weaker immunotherapeutic modalities. In selecting target antigens for adoptive T-cell therapy, expression by tumors and not by essential healthy tissues is of paramount importance. The risk of autoimmune adverse events can be further mitigated by generating antigen receptors using strategies that reduce the chance of cross-reactivity against epitopes in unintended targets. In general, a circumspect approach to target selection and thoughtful preclinical and clinical studies are pivotal to the ongoing advancement of these promising treatments. PMID:24142051

  18. Malaria: targeting parasite and host cell kinomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doerig, Christian; Abdi, Abdirahman; Bland, Nicholas; Eschenlauer, Sylvain; Dorin-Semblat, Dominique; Fennell, Clare; Halbert, Jean; Holland, Zoe; Nivez, Marie-Paule; Semblat, Jean-Philippe; Sicard, Audrey; Reininger, Luc

    2010-03-01

    Malaria still remains one of the deadliest infectious diseases, and has a tremendous morbidity and mortality impact in the developing world. The propensity of the parasites to develop drug resistance, and the relative reluctance of the pharmaceutical industry to invest massively in the developments of drugs that would offer only limited marketing prospects, are major issues in antimalarial drug discovery. Protein kinases (PKs) have become a major family of targets for drug discovery research in a number of disease contexts, which has generated considerable resources such as kinase-directed libraries and high throughput kinase inhibition assays. The phylogenetic distance between malaria parasites and their human host translates into important divergences in their respective kinomes, and most Plasmodium kinases display atypical properties (as compared to mammalian PKs) that can be exploited towards selective inhibition. Here, we discuss the taxon-specific kinases possessed by malaria parasites, and give an overview of target PKs that have been validated by reverse genetics, either in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum or in the rodent model Plasmodium berghei. We also briefly allude to the possibility of attacking Plasmodium through the inhibition of human PKs that are required for survival of this obligatory intracellular parasite, and which are targets for other human diseases. PMID:19840874

  19. Identification of novel Notch target genes in T cell leukaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warrander Fiona

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dysregulated Notch signalling is believed to play an important role in the development and maintenance of T cell leukaemia. At a cellular level, Notch signalling promotes proliferation and inhibits apoptosis of T cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (T-ALL cells. In this study we aimed to identify novel transcriptional targets of Notch signalling in the T-ALL cell line, Jurkat. Results RNA was prepared from Jurkat cells retrovirally transduced with an empty vector (GFP-alone or vectors containing constitutively active forms of Notch (N1ΔE or N3ΔE, and used for Affymetrix microarray analysis. A subset of genes found to be regulated by Notch was chosen for real-time PCR validation and in some cases, validation at the protein level, using several Notch-transduced T-ALL and non-T-ALL leukaemic cell lines. As expected, several known transcriptional target of Notch, such as HES1 and Deltex, were found to be overexpressed in Notch-transduced cells, however, many novel transcriptional targets of Notch signalling were identified using this approach. These included the T cell costimulatory molecule CD28, the anti-apoptotic protein GIMAP5, and inhibitor of DNA binding 1 (1D1. Conclusion The identification of such downstream Notch target genes provides insights into the mechanisms of Notch function in T cell leukaemia, and may help identify novel therapeutic targets in this disease.

  20. Targeting DNA vaccines to myeloid cells using a small peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Chunting; Choi, Jang Gi; Abraham, Sojan; Shankar, Premlata; Manjunath, N

    2015-01-01

    Targeting DNA vaccines to dendritic cells (DCs) greatly enhances immunity. Although several approaches have been used to target protein Ags to DCs, currently there is no method that targets DNA vaccines directly to DCs. Here, we show that a small peptide derived from the rabies virus glycoprotein fused to protamine residues (RVG-P) can target DNA to myeloid cells, including DCs, which results in enhanced humoral and T-cell responses. DCs targeted with a DNA vaccine encoding the immunodominant vaccinia B8R gene via RVG-P were able to restimulate vaccinia-specific memory T cells in vitro. Importantly, a single i.v. injection of B8R gene bound to RVG-P was able to prime a vaccinia-specific T-cell response that was able to rapidly clear a subsequent vaccinia challenge in mice. Moreover, delivery of DNA in DCs was enough to induce DC maturation and efficient Ag presentation without the need for adjuvants. Finally, immunization of mice with a DNA-vaccine encoding West Nile virus (WNV) prM and E proteins via RVG-P elicited high titers of WNV-neutralizing Abs that protected mice from lethal WNV challenge. Thus, RVG-P provides a reagent to target DNA vaccines to myeloid cells and elicit robust T-cell and humoral immune responses.

  1. Mesenchymal stem cells targeting the GVHD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO; Robert; ChunHua

    2009-01-01

    Acute graft-versus-host disease(GVHD) occurs after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant and is a reaction of donor immune cells against host tissues.About 35%-50% of hematopoietic stem cell transplant(HSCT) recipients will develop acute GVHD.It is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality,particularly in patients who do not respond to primary therapy,which usually consists of glucocorticoids(steroids).Most of the available second-line and third-line treatments for steroid-refractory acute GVHD induce severe immunodeficiency,which is commonly accompanied by lethal infectious complications.Mesenchymal stem cells(MSCs) have been shown to mediate immunomodulatory effects.The recently elucidated immunosuppressive potential of mesenchymal stem cells has set the stage for their clinical testing as cellular immunosuppressants,MSCs have been used in patients with steroid-refractory acute GVHD,and encouraging responses have been obtained in many studies.The utility of MSCs for the treatment of GVHD is becoming clear.

  2. The most promising strategy targeted against cancer stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Zhi-xiong; YANG Li-juan; ZHEN Shi-ming

    2011-01-01

    To the Editor:We read with great enthusiasm an interesting and exciting review article Targeting glioma stem cells:enough to terminate gliomagenesis? by Dong and Huang,1 who believed that single targeting therapy against glioma stem cells is unsuccessful and ameliorating the local tumor inducing/promoting microenvironment should be a reasonable strategy.Our group is enduringly engaged in the study of glioma,and we also put much concern upon the research of tumor microecosystem (TMES).In fact,the targeting therapy against cancer stem cells (CSCs) involves two aspects.One is the marked molecular target against CSCs.The other is how to deal with CSCs,by cytotoxic against CSCs,or inducing tumor stem cells to differentiate,or others?

  3. Targeted cellular ablation based on the morphology of malignant cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivey, Jill W.; Latouche, Eduardo L.; Sano, Michael B.; Rossmeisl, John H.; Davalos, Rafael V.; Verbridge, Scott S.

    2015-11-01

    Treatment of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is especially challenging due to a shortage of methods to preferentially target diffuse infiltrative cells, and therapy-resistant glioma stem cell populations. Here we report a physical treatment method based on electrical disruption of cells, whose action depends strongly on cellular morphology. Interestingly, numerical modeling suggests that while outer lipid bilayer disruption induced by long pulses (~100 μs) is enhanced for larger cells, short pulses (~1 μs) preferentially result in high fields within the cell interior, which scale in magnitude with nucleus size. Because enlarged nuclei represent a reliable indicator of malignancy, this suggested a means of preferentially targeting malignant cells. While we demonstrate killing of both normal and malignant cells using pulsed electric fields (PEFs) to treat spontaneous canine GBM, we proposed that properly tuned PEFs might provide targeted ablation based on nuclear size. Using 3D hydrogel models of normal and malignant brain tissues, which permit high-resolution interrogation during treatment testing, we confirmed that PEFs could be tuned to preferentially kill cancerous cells. Finally, we estimated the nuclear envelope electric potential disruption needed for cell death from PEFs. Our results may be useful in safely targeting the therapy-resistant cell niches that cause recurrence of GBM tumors.

  4. Surface-modified gold nanorods for specific cell targeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chan-Ung; Arai, Yoshie; Kim, Insun; Jang, Wonhee; Lee, Seonghyun; Hafner, Jason H.; Jeoung, Eunhee; Jung, Deokho; Kwon, Youngeun

    2012-05-01

    Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) have unique properties that make them highly attractive materials for developing functional reagents for various biomedical applications including photothermal therapy, targeted drug delivery, and molecular imaging. For in vivo applications, GNPs need to be prepared with very little or negligible cytotoxicitiy. Most GNPs are, however, prepared using growth-directing surfactants such as cetyl trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), which are known to have considerable cytotoxicity. In this paper, we describe an approach to remove CTAB to a non-toxic concentration. We optimized the conditions for surface modification with methoxypolyethylene glycol thiol (mPEG), which replaced CTAB and formed a protective layer on the surface of gold nanorods (GNRs). The cytotoxicities of pristine and surface-modified GNRs were measured in primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells and human cell lines derived from hepatic carcinoma cells, embryonic kidney cells, and thyroid papillary carcinoma cells. Cytotoxicity assays revealed that treating cells with GNRs did not significantly affect cell viability except for thyroid papillary carcinoma cells. Thyroid cancer cells were more susceptible to residual CTAB, so CTAB had to be further removed by dialysis in order to use GNRs for thyroid cell targeting. PEGylated GNRs are further modified to present monoclonal antibodies that recognize a specific surface marker, Na-I symporter, for thyroid cells. Antibody-conjugated GNRs specifically targeted human thyroid cells in vitro.

  5. Cdx2 polymorphism affects the activities of vitamin D receptor in human breast cancer cell lines and human breast carcinomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Pulito

    Full Text Available Vitamin D plays a role in cancer development and acts through the vitamin D receptor (VDR. It regulates the action of hormone responsive genes and is involved in cell cycle regulation, differentiation and apoptosis. VDR is a critical component of the vitamin D pathway and different common single nucleotide polymorphisms have been identified. Cdx2 VDR polymorphism can play an important role in breast cancer, modulating the activity of VDR. The objective of this study is to assess the relationship between the Cdx2 VDR polymorphism and the activities of VDR in human breast cancer cell lines and carcinomas breast patients. Cdx2 VDR polymorphism and antiproliferative effects of vitamin D treatment were investigated in a panel of estrogen receptor-positive (MCF7 and T-47D and estrogen receptor-negative (MDA-MB-231, SUM 159PT, SK-BR-3, BT549, MDA-MB-468, HCC1143, BT20 and HCC1954 human breast cancer cell lines. Furthermore, the potential relationship among Cdx2 VDR polymorphism and a number of biomarkers used in clinical management of breast cancer was assessed in an ad hoc set of breast cancer cases. Vitamin D treatment efficacy was found to be strongly dependent on the Cdx2 VDR status in ER-negative breast cancer cell lines tested. In our series of breast cancer cases, the results indicated that patients with variant homozygote AA were associated with bio-pathological characteristics typical of more aggressive tumours, such as ER negative, HER2 positive and G3. Our results may suggest a potential effect of Cdx2 VDR polymorphism on the efficacy of vitamin D treatment in aggressive breast cancer cells (estrogen receptor negative. These results suggest that Cdx2 polymorphism may be a potential biomarker for vitamin D treatment in breast cancer, independently of the VDR receptor expression.

  6. Cdx2 polymorphism affects the activities of vitamin D receptor in human breast cancer cell lines and human breast carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulito, Claudio; Terrenato, Irene; Di Benedetto, Anna; Korita, Etleva; Goeman, Frauke; Sacconi, Andrea; Biagioni, Francesca; Blandino, Giovanni; Strano, Sabrina; Muti, Paola; Mottolese, Marcella; Falvo, Elisabetta

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D plays a role in cancer development and acts through the vitamin D receptor (VDR). It regulates the action of hormone responsive genes and is involved in cell cycle regulation, differentiation and apoptosis. VDR is a critical component of the vitamin D pathway and different common single nucleotide polymorphisms have been identified. Cdx2 VDR polymorphism can play an important role in breast cancer, modulating the activity of VDR. The objective of this study is to assess the relationship between the Cdx2 VDR polymorphism and the activities of VDR in human breast cancer cell lines and carcinomas breast patients. Cdx2 VDR polymorphism and antiproliferative effects of vitamin D treatment were investigated in a panel of estrogen receptor-positive (MCF7 and T-47D) and estrogen receptor-negative (MDA-MB-231, SUM 159PT, SK-BR-3, BT549, MDA-MB-468, HCC1143, BT20 and HCC1954) human breast cancer cell lines. Furthermore, the potential relationship among Cdx2 VDR polymorphism and a number of biomarkers used in clinical management of breast cancer was assessed in an ad hoc set of breast cancer cases. Vitamin D treatment efficacy was found to be strongly dependent on the Cdx2 VDR status in ER-negative breast cancer cell lines tested. In our series of breast cancer cases, the results indicated that patients with variant homozygote AA were associated with bio-pathological characteristics typical of more aggressive tumours, such as ER negative, HER2 positive and G3. Our results may suggest a potential effect of Cdx2 VDR polymorphism on the efficacy of vitamin D treatment in aggressive breast cancer cells (estrogen receptor negative). These results suggest that Cdx2 polymorphism may be a potential biomarker for vitamin D treatment in breast cancer, independently of the VDR receptor expression. PMID:25849303

  7. Polymorphous silicon thin films produced in dusty plasmas: application to solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roca i Cabarrocas, Pere; Chaabane, N; Kharchenko, A V; Tchakarov, S [Laboratoire de Physique des Interfaces et des Couches Minces (UMR 7647), Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France)

    2004-12-01

    We summarize our current understanding of the optimization of PIN solar cells produced by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition from silane-hydrogen mixtures. To increase the deposition rate, the discharge is operated under plasma conditions close to powder formation, where silicon nanocrystals contribute to the deposition of so-called polymorphous silicon thin films. We show that the increase in deposition rate can be achieved via an accurate control of the plasma parameters. However, this also results in a highly defective interface in the solar cells due to the bombardment of the P-layer by positively charged nanocrystals during the deposition of the I-layer. We show that decreasing the ion energy by increasing the total pressure or by using silane-helium mixtures allows us to increase both the deposition rate and the solar cells efficiency, as required for cost effective thin film photovoltaics.

  8. Polymorphous silicon thin films produced in dusty plasmas: application to solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabarrocas, Pere Roca i.; Chaâbane, N.; Kharchenko, A. V.; Tchakarov, S.

    2004-12-01

    We summarize our current understanding of the optimization of PIN solar cells produced by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition from silane hydrogen mixtures. To increase the deposition rate, the discharge is operated under plasma conditions close to powder formation, where silicon nanocrystals contribute to the deposition of so-called polymorphous silicon thin films. We show that the increase in deposition rate can be achieved via an accurate control of the plasma parameters. However, this also results in a highly defective interface in the solar cells due to the bombardment of the P-layer by positively charged nanocrystals during the deposition of the I-layer. We show that decreasing the ion energy by increasing the total pressure or by using silane helium mixtures allows us to increase both the deposition rate and the solar cells efficiency, as required for cost effective thin film photovoltaics.

  9. Therapeutic strategies targeting B-cells in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milo, Ron

    2016-07-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory and demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS) that traditionally has been considered to be mediated primarily by T-cells. Increasing evidence, however, suggests the fundamental role of B-cells in the pathogenesis of the disease. Recent strategies targeting B-cells in MS have demonstrated impressive and sometimes surprising results: B-cell depletion by monoclonal antibodies targeting the B-cell surface antigen CD20 (e.g. rituximab, ocrelizumab, ofatumumab) was shown to exert profound anti-inflammatory effect in MS with favorable risk-benefit ratio, with ocrelizumab demonstrating efficacy in both relapsing-remitting (RR) and primary-progressive (PP) MS in phase III clinical trials. Depletion of CD52 expressing T- and B-cells and monocytes by alemtuzumab resulted in impressive and durable suppression of disease activity in RRMS patients. On the other hand, strategies targeting B-cell cytokines such as atacicept resulted in increased disease activity. As our understanding of the biology of B-cells in MS is increasing, new compounds that target B-cells continue to be developed which promise to further expand the armamentarium of MS therapies and allow for more individualized therapy for patients with this complex disease.

  10. Targeting population heterogeneity for optimal cell factories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heins, Anna-Lena; Carlqvist, Magnus; Helmark, S.;

    , substrates, and pH are typically observed in many industrial scale fermentation processes. Consequently, the microbial cells experience rapid changes in environmental conditions as they circulate throughout the reactor, which might pose stress on the cells and affect their metabolism and consequently affect......To achieve an efficient production process, it is essential to optimize both the strain and the cultivation conditions. Traditionally, a microbial population has been considered homogeneous in optimization studies of fermentation processes. However, research has shown that a typical microbial...... population in a fermentor is heterogeneous. There are indications that such heterogeneity may be both beneficial (facilitates quick adaptation to new conditions) and harmful (reduces yields and productivities) for the robustness of the fermentation process. Significant gradients of e.g. dissolved oxygen...

  11. Targeting cancer stem cells in hepatocellular carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    MISHRA, LOPA

    2014-01-01

    Aiwu Ruth He,1 Daniel C Smith,1 Lopa Mishra2 1Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University, Washington, DC, 2Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA Abstract: The poor outcome of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is attributed to recurrence of the disease after curative treatment and the resistance of HCC cells to conventional chemotherapy, which may be explained partly by the fun...

  12. Natural Products That Target Cancer Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moselhy, Jim; Srinivasan, Sowmyalakshmi; Ankem, Murali K; Damodaran, Chendil

    2015-11-01

    The cancer stem cell model suggests that tumor initiation is governed by a small subset of distinct cells with stem-like character termed cancer stem cells (CSCs). CSCs possess properties of self-renewal and intrinsic survival mechanisms that contribute to resistance of tumors to most chemotherapeutic drugs. The failure to eradicate CSCs during the course of therapy is postulated to be the driving force for tumor recurrence and metastasis. Recent studies have focused on understanding the unique phenotypic properties of CSCs from various tumor types, as well as the signaling pathways that underlie self-renewal and drug resistance. Natural products (NPs) such as those derived from botanicals and food sources may modulate vital signaling pathways involved in the maintenance of CSC phenotype. The Wingless/Integrated (WNT), Hedgehog, Notch and PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathways have all been associated with quiescence and self-renewal of CSCs, as well as execution of CSC function including differentiation, multidrug resistance and metastasis. Recent studies evaluating NPs against CSC support the epidemiological evidence linking plant-based diets with reduced malignancy rates. This review covers the key aspects of NPs as modulators of CSC fate. PMID:26503998

  13. Cancer Stem Cells: Biological Functions and Therapeutically Targeting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Eugen Ciurea

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Almost all tumors are composed of a heterogeneous cell population, making them difficult to treat. A small cancer stem cell population with a low proliferation rate and a high tumorigenic potential is thought to be responsible for cancer development, metastasis and resistance to therapy. Stem cells were reported to be involved in both normal development and carcinogenesis, some molecular mechanisms being common in both processes. No less controversial, stem cells are considered to be important in treatment of malignant diseases both as targets and drug carriers. The efforts to understand the role of different signalling in cancer stem cells requires in depth knowledge about the mechanisms that control their self-renewal, differentiation and malignant potential. The aim of this paper is to discuss insights into cancer stem cells historical background and to provide a brief review of the new therapeutic strategies for targeting cancer stem cells.

  14. Association between polymorphisms in the aryl hydrocarbon receptor repressor gene and disseminated testicular germ cell cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leon J. S. Brokken

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In the Western world, testicular germ cell cancer (TGCC is the most common malignancy of young men. The malignant transformation of germ cells is thought to be caused by developmental and hormonal disturbances, probably related to environmental and lifestyle factors because of rapidly increasing incidence of TGCC in some countries. Additionally, there is a strong genetic component that affects susceptibility. However, genetic polymorphisms that have been identified so far only partially explain the risk of TGCC. Many of the persistent environmental pollutants act through the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR. AHR signalling pathway is known to interfere with reproductive hormone signalling, which is supposed to play a role in the pathogenesis and invasive progression of TGCC. The aim of the present study was to identify whether AHR-related polymorphisms were associated with risk as well as histological and clinical features of TGCC in 367 patients and 537 controls. Haplotype-tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs were genotyped in genes encoding AHR and AHR repressor (AHRR. Binary logistic regression was used to calculate the risk of TGCC, nonseminoma versus seminoma, and metastasis versus localised disease.Four SNPs in AHRR demonstrated a significant allele association with risk to develop metastases (rs2466287: OR = 0.43, 95% CI 0.21-0.90; rs2672725: OR = 0.49, 95% CI: 0.25-0.94; rs6879758: OR = 0.27, 95% CI: 0.08-0.92; rs6896163: OR = 0.34, 95% CI: 0.12-0.98.This finding supports the hypothesis that compounds acting through AHR may play a role in the invasive progression of TGCC, either directly or through modification of reproductive hormone action.

  15. B cells as a target of immune modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hawker Kathleen

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available B cells have recently been identified as an integral component of the immune system; they play a part in autoimmunity through antigen presentation, antibody secretion, and complement activation. Animal models of multiple sclerosis (MS suggest that myelin destruction is partly mediated through B cell activation (and plasmablasts. MS patients with evidence of B cell involvement, as compared to those without, tend to have a worse prognosis. Finally, the significant decrease in new gadolinium-enhancing lesions, new T2 lesions, and relapses in MS patients treated with rituximab (a monoclonal antibody against CD20 on B cells leads us to the conclusion that B cells play an important role in MS and that immune modulation of these cells may ameliorate the disease. This article will explore the role of B cells in MS and the rationale for the development of B cell-targeted therapeutics. MS is an immune-mediated disease that affects over 2 million people worldwide and is the number one cause of disability in young patients. Most therapeutic targets have focused on T cells; however, recently, the focus has shifted to the role of B cells in the pathogenesis of MS and the potential of B cells as a therapeutic target.

  16. The mechanism of gene targeting in human somatic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinan Kan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Gene targeting in human somatic cells is of importance because it can be used to either delineate the loss-of-function phenotype of a gene or correct a mutated gene back to wild-type. Both of these outcomes require a form of DNA double-strand break (DSB repair known as homologous recombination (HR. The mechanism of HR leading to gene targeting, however, is not well understood in human cells. Here, we demonstrate that a two-end, ends-out HR intermediate is valid for human gene targeting. Furthermore, the resolution step of this intermediate occurs via the classic DSB repair model of HR while synthesis-dependent strand annealing and Holliday Junction dissolution are, at best, minor pathways. Moreover, and in contrast to other systems, the positions of Holliday Junction resolution are evenly distributed along the homology arms of the targeting vector. Most unexpectedly, we demonstrate that when a meganuclease is used to introduce a chromosomal DSB to augment gene targeting, the mechanism of gene targeting is inverted to an ends-in process. Finally, we demonstrate that the anti-recombination activity of mismatch repair is a significant impediment to gene targeting. These observations significantly advance our understanding of HR and gene targeting in human cells.

  17. Radiation responses of stem cells: targeted and non-targeted effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stem cells are fundamental to the development of any tissue or organism via their ability to self-renew, which is aided by their unlimited proliferative capacity and their ability to produce fully differentiated offspring, often from multiple lineages. Stems cells are long lived and have the potential to accumulate mutations, including in response to radiation exposure. It is thought that stem cells have the potential to be induced into a cancer stem cell phenotype and that these may play an important role in resistance to radiotherapy. For radiation-induced carcinogenesis, the role of targeted and non-targeted effects is unclear with tissue or origin being important. Studies of genomic instability and bystander responses have shown consistent effects in haematopoietic models. Several models of radiation have predicted that stem cells play an important role in tumour initiation and that bystander responses could play a role in proliferation and self-renewal. (authors)

  18. Magnetic antibody-linked nanomatchmakers for therapeutic cell targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ke; Shen, Deliang; Hensley, M Taylor; Middleton, Ryan; Sun, Baiming; Liu, Weixin; De Couto, Geoffrey; Marbán, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Stem cell transplantation is a promising strategy for therapeutic cardiac regeneration, but current therapies are limited by inefficient interaction between potentially beneficial cells (either exogenously transplanted or endogenously recruited) and the injured tissue. Here we apply targeted nanomedicine to achieve in vivo cell-mediated tissue repair, imaging and localized enrichment without cellular transplantation. Iron nanoparticles are conjugated with two types of antibodies (one against antigens on therapeutic cells and the other directed at injured cells) to produce magnetic bifunctional cell engager (MagBICE). The antibodies link the therapeutic cells to the injured cells, whereas the iron core of MagBICE enables physical enrichment and imaging. We treat acute myocardial infarction by targeting exogenous bone marrow-derived stem cells (expressing CD45) or endogenous CD34-positive cells to injured cardiomyocytes (expressing myosin light chain. Targeting can be further enhanced by magnetic attraction, leading to augmented functional benefits. MagBICE represents a generalizable platform technology for regenerative medicine. PMID:25205020

  19. The Quest for Targets Executing MYC-Dependent Cell Transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartl, Markus

    2016-01-01

    MYC represents a transcription factor with oncogenic potential converting multiple cellular signals into a broad transcriptional response, thereby controlling the expression of numerous protein-coding and non-coding RNAs important for cell proliferation, metabolism, differentiation, and apoptosis. Constitutive activation of MYC leads to neoplastic cell transformation, and deregulated MYC alleles are frequently observed in many human cancer cell types. Multiple approaches have been performed to isolate genes differentially expressed in cells containing aberrantly activated MYC proteins leading to the identification of thousands of putative targets. Functional analyses of genes differentially expressed in MYC-transformed cells had revealed that so far more than 40 upregulated or downregulated MYC targets are actively involved in cell transformation or tumorigenesis. However, further systematic and selective approaches are required for determination of the known or yet unidentified targets responsible for processing the oncogenic MYC program. The search for critical targets in MYC-dependent tumor cells is exacerbated by the fact that during tumor development, cancer cells progressively evolve in a multistep process, thereby acquiring their characteristic features in an additive manner. Functional expression cloning, combinatorial gene expression, and appropriate in vivo tests could represent adequate tools for dissecting the complex scenario of MYC-specified cell transformation. In this context, the central goal is to identify a minimal set of targets that suffices to phenocopy oncogenic MYC. Recently developed genomic editing tools could be employed to confirm the requirement of crucial transformation-associated targets. Knowledge about essential MYC-regulated genes is beneficial to expedite the development of specific inhibitors to interfere with growth and viability of human tumor cells in which MYC is aberrantly activated. Approaches based on the principle of

  20. The quest for targets executing MYC-dependent cell transformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus eHartl

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available MYC represents a transcription factor with oncogenic potential converting multiple cellular signals into a broad transcriptional response, thereby controlling the expression of numerous protein-coding and non-coding RNAs important for cell proliferation, metabolism, differentiation, and apoptosis. Constitutive activation of MYC leads to neoplastic cell transformation, and deregulated MYC alleles are frequently observed in many human cancer cell types. Multiple approaches have been performed to isolate genes differentially expressed in cells containing aberrantly activated MYC proteins leading to the identification of thousands of putative targets. Functional analyses of genes differentially expressed in MYC-transformed cells had revealed that so far more than forty upregulated or downregulated MYC targets are actively involved in cell transformation or tumorigenesis. However, for determination which of the known, or yet unidentified targets are responsible for processing the oncogenic MYC program, further systematic and selective approaches are required. The search for critical targets in MYC-dependent tumor cells is exacerbated by the fact that during tumor development, cancer cells progressively evolve in a multistep process thereby acquiring their characteristic features in an additive manner. Functional expression cloning, combinatorial gene expression and appropriate in vivo tests could represent adequate tools for dissecting the complex scenario of MYC-specified cell transformation. In this context, the central goal is to identify a minimal set of targets that suffices to phenocopy oncogenic MYC. Recently developed genomic editing tools could be employed to confirm the requirement of crucial transformation-associated targets.Knowledge about essential MYC regulated genes is beneficial to expedite the development of specific inhibitors to interfere with growth and viability of human tumor cells in which MYC is aberrantly activated

  1. Targeting dendritic cells in vivo for cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina eCaminschi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Monoclonal antibodies that recognise cell surface molecules have been used deliver antigenic cargo to dendritic cells (DC for induction of immune responses. The encouraging anti-tumour immunity elicited using this immunisation strategy suggests its suitability for clinical trials. This review discusses the complex network of DC, the functional specialisation of DC-subsets, the immunological outcomes of targeting different DC-subsets and their cell surface receptors, and the requirements for the induction of effective anti-tumour immunity. Finally, we review preclinical experiments and the progress towards targeting human DC in vivo.

  2. Mitochondria as therapeutic targets for cancer stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    In Sung Song; Jeong Yu Jeong; Seung Hun Jeong; Hyoung Kyu Kim; Kyung Soo Ko; Byoung Doo Rhee; Nari Kim; Jin Han

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are maintained by theirsomatic stem cells and are responsible for tumorinitiation, chemoresistance, and metastasis. Evidencefor the CSCs existence has been reported for a numberof human cancers. The CSC mitochondria have beenshown recently to be an important target for cancertreatment, but clinical significance of CSCs and theirmitochondria properties remain unclear. Mitochondriatargetedagents are considerably more effectivecompared to other agents in triggering apoptosis ofCSCs, as well as general cancer cells, via mitochondrialdysfunction. Mitochondrial metabolism is altered incancer cells because of their reliance on glycolyticintermediates, which are normally destined for oxidativephosphorylation. Therefore, inhibiting cancer-specificmodifications in mitochondrial metabolism, increasingreactive oxygen species production, or stimulatingmitochondrial permeabilization transition could bepromising new therapeutic strategies to activate celldeath in CSCs as well, as in general cancer cells. Thisreview analyzed mitochondrial function and its potentialas a therapeutic target to induce cell death in CSCs.Furthermore, combined treatment with mitochondriatargeteddrugs will be a promising strategy for thetreatment of relapsed and refractory cancer.

  3. Association between polymorphisms in the aryl hydrocarbon receptor repressor gene and disseminated testicular germ cell cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brokken, Leon J S; Lundberg-Giwercman, Yvonne; Rajpert-De Meyts, Ewa;

    2013-01-01

    In the Western world, testicular germ cell cancer (TGCC) is the most common malignancy of young men. The malignant transformation of germ cells is thought to be caused by developmental and hormonal disturbances, probably related to environmental and lifestyle factors because of rapidly increasing...... receptor (AHR). AHR signaling pathway is known to interfere with reproductive hormone signaling, which is supposed to play a role in the pathogenesis and invasive progression of TGCC. The aim of the present study was to identify whether AHR-related polymorphisms were associated with risk as well...... supports the hypothesis that compounds acting through AHR may play a role in the invasive progression of TGCC, either directly or through modification of reproductive hormone action....

  4. Substrate and p-layer effects on polymorphous silicon solar cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolmasov S.N.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The influence of textured transparent conducting oxide (TCO substrate and p-layer on the performance of single-junction hydrogenated polymorphous silicon (pm-Si:H solar cells has been addressed. Comparative studies were performed using p-i-n devices with identical i/n-layers and back reflectors fabricated on textured Asahi U-type fluorine-doped SnO2, low-pressure chemical vapor deposited (LPCVD boron-doped ZnO and sputtered/etched aluminum-doped ZnO substrates. The p-layers were hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbon and microcrystalline silicon oxide. As expected, the type of TCO and p-layer both have a great influence on the initial conversion efficiency of the solar cells. However they have no effect on the defect density of the pm-Si:H absorber layer.

  5. Cell Targeting and Magnetically Induced Hyperthermia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duguet, Etienne; Hardel, Lucile; Vasseur, Sébastien

    With the recent development of efficient and reproducible methods for synthesis, stable aqueous dispersions of individual particles can be prepared, in which the particle sizes can be accurately adjusted from a few nanometers to a few tens of nanometers [1]. Provided that their physical and chemical surface properties can be suitably adapted, these objects are small enough to circulate within the human body without risk of causing an embolus, since the finest capillaries (those of the lungs) have a minimal internal diameter of 5 μm. They can also escape from the blood compartment by windows of diameter around 100 nm in certain epithelia with permeability defects, such as those located in tumours and centers of infection, whereby they may then accumulate in such tissues. Furthermore, the smallest particles can migrate from the cardiovascular system into the lymph system. Finally, under the right conditions, they can enter cells and their various compartments. They should quickly become indispensable in the field of biological labelling, image contrast enhancement, the delivery of active principles, and the treatment of many different pathologies, by virtue of their novel physical properties [2, 3].

  6. Nipah virus infection and glycoprotein targeting in endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maisner Andrea

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The highly pathogenic Nipah virus (NiV causes fatal respiratory and brain infections in animals and humans. The major hallmark of the infection is a systemic endothelial infection, predominantly in the CNS. Infection of brain endothelial cells allows the virus to overcome the blood-brain-barrier (BBB and to subsequently infect the brain parenchyma. However, the mechanisms of NiV replication in endothelial cells are poorly elucidated. We have shown recently that the bipolar or basolateral expression of the NiV surface glycoproteins F and G in polarized epithelial cell layers is involved in lateral virus spread via cell-to-cell fusion and that correct sorting depends on tyrosine-dependent targeting signals in the cytoplasmic tails of the glycoproteins. Since endothelial cells share many characteristics with epithelial cells in terms of polarization and protein sorting, we wanted to elucidate the role of the NiV glycoprotein targeting signals in endothelial cells. Results As observed in vivo, NiV infection of endothelial cells induced syncytia formation. The further finding that infection increased the transendothelial permeability supports the idea of spread of infection via cell-to-cell fusion and endothelial cell damage as a mechanism to overcome the BBB. We then revealed that both glycoproteins are expressed at lateral cell junctions (bipolar, not only in NiV-infected primary endothelial cells but also upon stable expression in immortalized endothelial cells. Interestingly, mutation of tyrosines 525 and 542/543 in the cytoplasmic tail of the F protein led to an apical redistribution of the protein in endothelial cells whereas tyrosine mutations in the G protein had no effect at all. This fully contrasts the previous results in epithelial cells where tyrosine 525 in the F, and tyrosines 28/29 in the G protein were required for correct targeting. Conclusion We conclude that the NiV glycoprotein distribution is responsible for

  7. Haptoglobin gene polymorphisms and interleukin-6 and -8 levels in patients with sickle cell anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna Spinella Pierrot-Gallo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Haptoglobin genotypes, and interleukin-6 and -8 participate in the pathophysiology of sickle cell anemia. The expression of cytokines is regulated by genetic mechanisms however the effect of haptoglobin polymorphisms on these cytokines is not fully understood. This study aimed to compare the frequency of haptoglobin genotypes and the interleukin-6 and -8 concentrations in sickle cell anemia patients and controls to investigate the association between haptoglobin genotypes and cytokine levels.METHODS: Sixty sickle cell anemia patients and 74 healthy individuals were analyzed. Haptoglobin genotypes were determined by multiplex polymerase chain reaction, and the interleukin-6 and -8 levels by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. The association between haptoglobin genotypes and cytokines was investigated by statistical tests.RESULTS:Hp2-1 was the most common genotype in both the cases and controls while Hp1-1 was less frequent among sickle cell anemia patients. Interleukin-6 and -8 levels were higher in patients than controls (p-value 0.05. A similar trend was observed among the controls.CONCLUSION: Although, levels of interleukin-6 and -8 were higher in the sickle cell anemia patients, they appeared not to be related to the haptoglobin genotypes. Further investigations are necessary to identify factors responsible for increased secretion of the interleukin-6 and -8 pro-inflammatory cytokines in patients with sickle cell anemia.

  8. Mitochondria-Mediated Protein Regulation Mechanism of Polymorphs-Dependent Inhibition of Nanoselenium on Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ge; Guo, Yuming; Yang, Gai; Yang, Lin; Ma, Xiaoming; Wang, Kui; Zhu, Lin; Sun, Jiaojiao; Wang, Xiaobing; Zhang, Hua

    2016-01-01

    The present study was (i) to prepare two types of selenium nanoparticles, namely an amorphous form of selenium quantum dots (A-SeQDs) and a crystalline form of selenium quantum dots (C-SeQDs); and (ii) to investigate the nano-bio interactions of A-SeQDs and C-SeQDs in MCF-7, HepG2, HeLa, NIH/3T3, L929 cells and BRL-3A cells. It was found that A-SeQDs could induce the mitochondria-mediated apoptosis, necrosis and death of cells, while C-SeQDs had much weaker effects. This polymorphs-dependent anti-proliferative activity of nano-selenium was scarcely reported. Further investigation demonstrated that A-SeQDs could differentially regulate 61 proteins and several pathways related to stress response, protein synthesis, cell migration and cell cycle, including "p38 MAPK Signaling", "p53 Signaling", "14-3-3-mediated Signaling", "p70S6K Signaling" and "Protein Ubiquitination Pathway". This was the first report to demonstrate the involvement of protein synthesis and post-translational modification pathways in the anti-proliferative activity associated with NMs. Compared with previously fragmentary studies, this study use a nanomics approach combining bioinformatics and proteomics to systematically investigate the nano-bio interactions of selenium nanoparticles in cancer cells. PMID:27514819

  9. Mitochondria-Mediated Protein Regulation Mechanism of Polymorphs-Dependent Inhibition of Nanoselenium on Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ge; Guo, Yuming; Yang, Gai; Yang, Lin; Ma, Xiaoming; Wang, Kui; Zhu, Lin; Sun, Jiaojiao; Wang, Xiaobing; Zhang, Hua

    2016-08-01

    The present study was (i) to prepare two types of selenium nanoparticles, namely an amorphous form of selenium quantum dots (A-SeQDs) and a crystalline form of selenium quantum dots (C-SeQDs); and (ii) to investigate the nano-bio interactions of A-SeQDs and C-SeQDs in MCF-7, HepG2, HeLa, NIH/3T3, L929 cells and BRL-3A cells. It was found that A-SeQDs could induce the mitochondria-mediated apoptosis, necrosis and death of cells, while C-SeQDs had much weaker effects. This polymorphs-dependent anti-proliferative activity of nano-selenium was scarcely reported. Further investigation demonstrated that A-SeQDs could differentially regulate 61 proteins and several pathways related to stress response, protein synthesis, cell migration and cell cycle, including “p38 MAPK Signaling”, “p53 Signaling”, “14-3-3-mediated Signaling”, “p70S6K Signaling” and “Protein Ubiquitination Pathway”. This was the first report to demonstrate the involvement of protein synthesis and post-translational modification pathways in the anti-proliferative activity associated with NMs. Compared with previously fragmentary studies, this study use a nanomics approach combining bioinformatics and proteomics to systematically investigate the nano-bio interactions of selenium nanoparticles in cancer cells.

  10. MODULATING EFFECT OF THE −158 GΓ (C→T XMN-1 POLYMORPHISM IN INDIAN SICKLE CELL PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Pandey

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available

    Xmn-1 polymorphism is a known factor, which increases fetal haemoglobin production. Among the inherited disorders of blood, thalassaemia and SCD constitutes a major bulk of genetic diseases in India.  Our aim was to verify the role of the Xmn I polymorphism as a modulating factor in sickle cell patients and frequency of the polymorphism in Indian sickle cell patients. Subjects were 60 sickles homozygous and 75 sickle beta thalassemia patients. 5 ml blood   samples collected from patients. Screening of sickle patients done by HPLC. An automated cell analyzer SYSMEX (K-4500 Model used to analyze the CBC of patients.Xmn1 polymorphism analysis done by PCR-RFLP and Statistical analysis was performed on GraphPad static’s software. t test applied to compare the means amongst group. Among the sickle homozygous 27 were   heterozygous (+/- and 19 were   homozygous (+/+ while 30 were heterozygous and 24 were homozygous in sickle β-thalassemia patients. Extremely significant differences (p-value <0.001 of hematological parameters seen among patient with xmn-1 carrier and without the xmn-1 carrier. In our cases the clinical symptom less frequent and higher HbF level with Xmn-1 carriers. Presence of Xmn-1 polymorphism in sickle patients with higher HbF that improve phenotypic presentation in the sickle cell patients. We conclude that the phenotype of Indian sickle cell patients influenced by Xmn-1 polymorphism.

  11. Inhibitors targeting on cell wall biosynthesis pathway of MRSA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Haihong; Cheng, Guyue; Dai, Menghong; Wu, Qinghua; Yuan, Zonghui

    2012-11-01

    Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), widely known as a type of new superbug, has aroused world-wide concern. Cell wall biosynthesis pathway is an old but good target for the development of antibacterial agents. Peptidoglycan and wall teichoic acids (WTAs) biosynthesis are two main processes of the cell wall biosynthesis pathway (CWBP). Other than penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs), some key factors (Mur enzymes, lipid I or II precursor, etc.) in CWBP are becoming attractive molecule targets for the discovery of anti-MRSA compounds. A number of new compounds, with higher affinity for PBPs or with inhibitory activity on such molecule targets in CWBP of MRSA, have been in the pipeline recently. This review concludes recent research achievements and provides a complete picture of CWBP of MRSA, including the peptidoglycan and wall teichoic acids synthesis pathway. The potential inhibitors targeting on CWBP are subsequently presented to improve development of novel therapeutic strategies for MRSA. PMID:22898792

  12. Immunologic targeting of FOXP3 in inflammatory breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smita Nair

    Full Text Available The forkhead transcription factor FOXP3 is necessary for induction of regulatory T lymphocytes (Tregs and their immunosuppressive function. We have previously demonstrated that targeting Tregs by vaccination of mice with murine FOXP3 mRNA-transfected dendritic cells (DCs elicits FOXP3-specific T cell responses and enhances tumor immunity. It is clear that FOXP3 expression is not restricted to T-cell lineage and herein, using RT-PCR, flow cytometry, and western immunoblot we demonstrate for the first time that FOXP3 is expressed in inflammatory breast cancer (IBC cells, SUM149 (triple negative, ErbB1-activated and SUM190 (ErbB2-overexpressing. Importantly, FOXP3-specific T cells generated in vitro using human FOXP3 RNA-transfected DCs as stimulators efficiently lyse SUM149 cells. Interestingly, an isogenic model (rSUM149 derived from SUM149 with an enhanced anti-apoptotic phenotype was resistant to FOXP3-specific T cell mediated lysis. The MHC class I cellular processing mechanism was intact in both cell lines at the protein and transcription levels suggesting that the resistance to cytolysis by rSUM149 cells was not related to MHC class I expression or to the MHC class I antigen processing machinery in these cells. Our data suggest that FOXP3 may be an effective tumor target in IBC cells however increased anti-apoptotic signaling can lead to immune evasion.

  13. PEG-templated mesoporous silica nanoparticles exclusively target cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morelli, Catia; Maris, Pamela; Sisci, Diego; Perrotta, Enrico; Brunelli, Elvira; Perrotta, Ida; Panno, Maria Luisa; Tagarelli, Antonio; Versace, Carlo; Casula, Maria Francesca; Testa, Flaviano; Andò, Sebastiano; Nagy, Janos B.; Pasqua, Luigi

    2011-08-01

    Mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) have been proposed as DNA and drug delivery carriers, as well as efficient tools for fluorescent cell tracking. The major limitation is that MSNs enter cells regardless of a target-specific functionalization. Here we show that non functionalized MSNs, synthesized using a PEG surfactant-based interfacial synthesis procedure, do not enter cells, while a highly specific, receptor mediated, cellular internalization of folic acid (FOL) grafted MSNs (MSN-FOL), occurs exclusively in folate receptor (FR) expressing cells. Neither the classical clathrin pathway nor macropinocytosis is involved in the MSN endocytic process, while fluorescent MSNs (MSN-FITC) enter cells through aspecific, caveolae-mediated, endocytosis. Moreover, internalized particles seem to be mostly exocytosed from cells within 96 h. Finally, cisplatin (Cp) loaded MSN-FOL were tested on cancerous FR-positive (HeLa) or normal FR-negative (HEK293) cells. A strong growth arrest was observed only in HeLa cells treated with MSN-FOL-Cp. The results presented here show that our mesoporous nanoparticles do not enter cells unless opportunely functionalized, suggesting that they could represent a promising vehicle for drug targeting applications.Mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) have been proposed as DNA and drug delivery carriers, as well as efficient tools for fluorescent cell tracking. The major limitation is that MSNs enter cells regardless of a target-specific functionalization. Here we show that non functionalized MSNs, synthesized using a PEG surfactant-based interfacial synthesis procedure, do not enter cells, while a highly specific, receptor mediated, cellular internalization of folic acid (FOL) grafted MSNs (MSN-FOL), occurs exclusively in folate receptor (FR) expressing cells. Neither the classical clathrin pathway nor macropinocytosis is involved in the MSN endocytic process, while fluorescent MSNs (MSN-FITC) enter cells through aspecific, caveolae

  14. Targeted cancer cell death induced by biofunctionalized magnetic nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Contreras, Maria F.

    2014-02-01

    Magnetic micro and nanomaterials are increasingly interesting for biomedical applications since they possess many advantageous properties: they can become biocompatible, they can be functionalized to target specific cells and they can be remotely manipulated by magnetic fields. The goal of this study is to use antibody-functionalized nickel nanowires (Ab-NWs) as an alternative method in cancer therapy overcoming the limitations of current treatments that lack specificity and are highly cytotoxic. Ab-NWs have been incubated with cancer cells and a 12% drop on cell viability was observed for a treatment of only 10 minutes and an alternating magnetic field of low intensity and low frequency. It is believed that the Ab-NWs vibrate transmitting a mechanical force to the targeted cells inducing cell death. © 2014 IEEE.

  15. High efficiency cell-specific targeting of cytokine activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcin, Geneviève; Paul, Franciane; Staufenbiel, Markus; Bordat, Yann; van der Heyden, José; Wilmes, Stephan; Cartron, Guillaume; Apparailly, Florence; de Koker, Stefaan; Piehler, Jacob; Tavernier, Jan; Uzé, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    Systemic toxicity currently prevents exploiting the huge potential of many cytokines for medical applications. Here we present a novel strategy to engineer immunocytokines with very high targeting efficacies. The method lies in the use of mutants of toxic cytokines that markedly reduce their receptor-binding affinities, and that are thus rendered essentially inactive. Upon fusion to nanobodies specifically binding to marker proteins, activity of these cytokines is selectively restored for cell populations expressing this marker. This ‘activity-by-targeting’ concept was validated for type I interferons and leptin. In the case of interferon, activity can be directed to target cells in vitro and to selected cell populations in mice, with up to 1,000-fold increased specific activity. This targeting strategy holds promise to revitalize the clinical potential of many cytokines.

  16. Cyclooxygenase-2 polymorphisms and the risk of esophageal adeno- or squamous cell carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jón O Kristinsson; Paul van Westerveld; Rene HM te Morsche; Hennie MJ Roelofs; T Wobbes; Ben JM Witteman; Adriaan CITL Tan; Martijn GH van Oijen; Jan BMJ Jansen; Wilbert HM Peters

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether - 1195 A→ G and/or - 765 G→ C polymorphisms in Cyclooxygenase-2 ( COX-2) may have a risk modifying effect on the development of esophageal carcinoma in a Dutch Caucasian population. METHODS: Two study groups were recruited, 252 patients with esophageal carcinoma and 240 healthy controls, matched for race, age, gender and recruiting area. DNA was isolated from whole blood and used for genotyping. PCR products were digested with restriction enzymes and products were analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated. RESULTS: The dist r ibut ion of the - 1195 A→ G polymorphism was significantly different in esophageal cancer patients compared to controls. The - 1195 GG genotype resulted in a higher risk of developing esophageal adenocarcinoma (OR = 3.85, 95% CI: 1.45-10.3) compared with the - 1195 AA genotype as a reference. The - 765 G→ C genotype distribution was not different between the two groups. The GG/ GG haplotype was present more often in esophageal adenocarcinoma patients than in controls (OR = 3.45, 95% CI: 1.24-9.58; with AG/AG as a reference). The same trends were observed in patients with squamous cell carcinomas, however, the results did not reach statistical significance. CONCLUSION: Presence of the COX-2 -1195 GG genotype and of the GG/GG haplotype may result in a higher risk of developing esophageal carcinoma.

  17. Three-dimensional atomic mapping of hydrogenated polymorphous silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wanghua; Pareige, Philippe; Roca i Cabarrocas, Pere

    2016-06-01

    Hydrogenated polymorphous silicon (pm-Si:H) is a nanostructured material consisting of silicon nanocrystals embedded in an amorphous silicon matrix. Its use as the intrinsic layer in thin film p-i-n solar cells has led to good cell properties in terms of stability and efficiency. Here, we have been able to assess directly the concentration and distribution of nanocrystals and impurities (dopants) in p-i-n solar cells, by using femtosecond laser-assisted atom probe tomography (APT). An effective sample preparation method for APT characterization is developed. Based on the difference in atomic density between hydrogenated amorphous and crystalline silicon, we are able to distinguish the nanocrystals from the amorphous matrix by using APT. Moreover, thanks to the three-dimensional reconstruction, we demonstrate that Si nanocrystals are homogeneously distributed in the entire intrinsic layer of the solar cell. The influence of the process pressure on the incorporation of nanocrystals and their distribution is also investigated. Thanks to APT we could determine crystalline fractions as low as 4.2% in the pm-Si:H films, which is very difficult to determine by standard techniques, such as X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and spectroscopic ellipsometry. Moreover, we also demonstrate a sharp p/i interface in our solar cells.

  18. Stem cell guidance through the mechanistic target of rapamycin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kenneth; Maiese

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells offer great promise for the treatment of multiple disorders throughout the body. Critical to this premise is the ability to govern stem cell pluripotency, proliferation, and differentiation. The mechanistic target of rapamycin(mT OR), 289-kD a serine/threonine protein kinase, that is a vital component of mT OR Complex 1 and mT OR Complex 2 represents a critical pathway for the oversight of stem cell maintenance. mT OR can control the programmed cell death pathways of autophagy andapoptosis that can yield variable outcomes in stem cell survival and be reliant upon proliferative pathways that include Wnt signaling, Wnt1 inducible signaling pathway protein 1(WISP1), silent mating type information regulation 2 homolog 1(Saccharomyces cerevisiae)(SIRT1), and trophic factors. mT OR also is a necessary component for the early development and establishment of stem cells as well as having a significant impact in the regulation of the maturation of specific cell phenotypes. Yet, as a proliferative agent, mT OR can not only foster cancer stem cell development and tumorigenesis, but also mediate cell senescence under certain conditions to limit invasive cancer growth. mT OR offers an exciting target for the oversight of stem cell therapies but requires careful consideration of the diverse clinical outcomes that can be fueled by mT OR signaling pathways.

  19. Direct targeting of cancer cells: a multiparameter approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, Eileen L; Welty, Lily Anne Y; Banner, Lisa R; Oppenheimer, Steven B

    2005-01-01

    Lectins have been widely used in cell surface studies and in the development of potential anticancer drugs. Many past studies that have examined lectin toxicity have only evaluated the effects on cancer cells, not their non-cancer counterparts. In addition, few past studies have evaluated the relationship between lectin-cell binding and lectin toxicity on both cell types. Here we examine these parameters in one study: lectin-cell binding and lectin toxicity with both cancer cells and their normal counterparts. We found that the human colon cancer cell line CCL-220/Colo320DM bound to agarose beads derivatized with Phaseolus vulgaris agglutinin (PHA-L) and wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), while the non-cancer human colon cell line CRL-1459/CCD-18Co did not. When these lectins were tested for their effects on cell viability in culture, both cell lines were affected by the lectins but at 6, 48 and 72 h incubation times, PHA-L was most toxic to the cancer cell line in a concentration dependent manner. At 48 h incubation, WGA was more toxic to the cancer cell line. The results suggest that it may be possible to develop lectin protocols that selectively target cancer cells for death. In any case, examination of both malignant cells and their non-malignant counterparts, analysis of their binding characteristics to immobilized lectins, and examination of the toxicity of free lectins in culture, provides a multiparameter model for obtaining more comprehensive information than from more limited approaches. PMID:16181664

  20. Polymorphisms of the T cell receptor CD3delta and CD3varepsilon chains affect anti-CD3 antibody binding and T cell activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boding, Lasse; Nielsen, Martin Weiss; Bonefeld, Charlotte Menné;

    2010-01-01

    suitable embryonic stem (ES) cell lines. Traditionally, ES cell lines from the 129 mouse strains have been used followed by backcrossing to the C57BL/6 strain. In the present study, we demonstrate the existence of polymorphisms in the CD3 genes from mice of the 129 and C57BL/6 strains. These polymorphisms...... CD3delta and varepsilon ectodomains exist in mice, and that some of these polymorphisms lead to amino acid substitutions which cause structural changes and affect anti-CD3 antibody binding. Thus, functional T cell studies should be interpreted with caution when anti-CD3 antibodies are used for......T cell receptor (TCR) structure and function have been thoroughly studied for decades. Production and analyses of knock-out and knock-in mice with mutations in the CD3 chains have contributed significantly to these studies. The generation of such gene-modified mice relies on the availability of...

  1. Killing cancer cells by targeted drug-carrying phage nanomedicines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yacoby Iftach

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Systemic administration of chemotherapeutic agents, in addition to its anti-tumor benefits, results in indiscriminate drug distribution and severe toxicity. This shortcoming may be overcome by targeted drug-carrying platforms that ferry the drug to the tumor site while limiting exposure to non-target tissues and organs. Results We present a new form of targeted anti-cancer therapy in the form of targeted drug-carrying phage nanoparticles. Our approach is based on genetically-modified and chemically manipulated filamentous bacteriophages. The genetic manipulation endows the phages with the ability to display a host-specificity-conferring ligand. The phages are loaded with a large payload of a cytotoxic drug by chemical conjugation. In the presented examples we used anti ErbB2 and anti ERGR antibodies as targeting moieties, the drug hygromycin conjugated to the phages by a covalent amide bond, or the drug doxorubicin conjugated to genetically-engineered cathepsin-B sites on the phage coat. We show that targeting of phage nanomedicines via specific antibodies to receptors on cancer cell membranes results in endocytosis, intracellular degradation, and drug release, resulting in growth inhibition of the target cells in vitro with a potentiation factor of >1000 over the corresponding free drugs. Conclusion The results of the proof-of concept study presented here reveal important features regarding the potential of filamentous phages to serve as drug-delivery platform, on the affect of drug solubility or hydrophobicity on the target specificity of the platform and on the effect of drug release mechanism on the potency of the platform. These results define targeted drug-carrying filamentous phage nanoparticles as a unique type of antibody-drug conjugates.

  2. Reduced FOXP3(+) regulatory T cells in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis are associated with IL2RA gene polymorphisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sebode, M.; Peiseler, M.; Franke, B.; Schwinge, D.; Schoknecht, T.; Wortmann, F.; Quaas, A.; Petersen, B.S.; Ellinghaus, E.; Baron, U.; Olek, S.; Wiegard, C.; Weiler-Normann, C.; Lohse, A.W.; Herkel, J.; Schramm, C.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Recently, genome wide association studies in primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) revealed associations with gene polymorphisms that potentially could affect the function of regulatory T cells (Treg). The aim of this study was to investigate Treg in patients with PSC and to associ

  3. Functional Characterization of Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms in the Human Undifferentiated Embryonic-Cell Transcription Factor 1 Gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thummer, Rajkumar P.; Drenth-Diephuis, Loes J.; Carney, Karen E.; Eggen, Bart J. L.

    2010-01-01

    Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are single-nucleotide sequence variations between individuals. Two missense SNPs are present in the human undifferentiated embryonic-cell transcription factor 1 (UTF1) gene and their consequences for UTF1 function are investigated in this study. Expression of t

  4. Genetic polymorphism in FOXP3 gene: imbalance in regulatory T-cell role and development of human diseases

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Julie Massayo Maeda Oda; Bruna Karina Banin Hirata; Roberta Losi Guembarovski; Maria Angelica Ehara Watanabe

    2013-04-01

    The FOXP3 gene encodes a transcription factor thought to be important for the development and function of regulatory T cells (Treg cells). These cells are involved in the regulation of T cell activation and therefore are essential for normal immune homeostasis. Signals from microenvironment have a profound influence on the maintenance or progression of diseases. Thus, Tregs have an important marker protein, FOXP3, though it does not necessarily confer a Treg phenotype when expressed. FOXP3 polymorphisms that occur with high frequency in the general populations have been studied in common multifactorial human diseases. Dysfunction of FOXP3 gene product could result in lack of Treg cells and subsequently chronically activated CD4+ T cells which express increased levels of several activation markers and cytokines, resulting in some autoimmune diseases. In contrast, high Treg levels have been reported in peripheral blood, lymph nodes, and tumour specimens from patients with different types of cancer. The present study discusses the polymorphisms located in intron, exon and promoter regions of FOXP3 which have already been investigated by many researchers. FOXP3 has received considerable attention in attempts to understand the molecular aspect of Treg cells. Therefore, in the present study, the relationship between genetic polymorphism of FOXP3 in Treg-cell role and in disease development are reviewed considering the interactive effect of genetic factors.

  5. Selective Cell Targeting with Light-Absorbing Microparticles and Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Pitsillides, Costas M; Joe, Edwin K.; Wei, Xunbin; Anderson, R. Rox; Lin, Charles P.

    2003-01-01

    We describe a new method for selective cell targeting based on the use of light-absorbing microparticles and nanoparticles that are heated by short laser pulses to create highly localized cell damage. The method is closely related to chromophore-assisted laser inactivation and photodynamic therapy, but is driven solely by light absorption, without the need for photochemical intermediates (particularly singlet oxygen). The mechanism of light-particle interaction was investigated by nanosecond ...

  6. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Targeting with Surface-Engineered Lentiviral Vectors

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2014-01-01

    Authors: Els Verhoeyen and Francois-Loic Cosset Adapted from [*Gene Transfer: Delivery and Expression of DNA and RNA*](http://www.cshlpress.com/link/genetrnp.htm) (eds. Friedmann and Rossi). CSHL Press, Cold Spring Harbor, NY, USA, 2007. ### INTRODUCTION In the protocol presented here, hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are specifically transduced with a vector displaying the HSC-activating polypeptides, stem cell factor (SCF) and thrombopoietin (TPO). Targeted HSC transduction is e...

  7. Cell Targeting in Anti-Cancer Gene Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Lila, Mohd Azmi Mohd; Siew, John Shia Kwong; Zakaria, Hayati; Saad, Suria Mohd; Ni, Lim Shen; Abdullah, Jafri Malin

    2004-01-01

    Gene therapy is a promising approach towards cancer treatment. The main aim of the therapy is to destroy cancer cells, usually by apoptotic mechanisms, and preserving others. However, its application has been hindered by many factors including poor cellular uptake, non-specific cell targeting and undesirable interferences with other genes or gene products. A variety of strategies exist to improve cellular uptake efficiency of gene-based therapies. This paper highlights advancements in gene th...

  8. Light induced electrical and macroscopic changes in hydrogenated polymorphous silicon solar cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roca i Cabarrocas P.

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available We report on light-induced electrical and macroscopic changes in hydrogenated polymorphous silicon (pm-Si:H PIN solar cells. To explain the particular light-soaking behavior of such cells – namely an increase of the open circuit voltage (Voc and a rapid drop of the short circuit current density (Jsc – we correlate these effects to changes in hydrogen incorporation and structural properties in the layers of the cells. Numerous techniques such as current-voltage characteristics, infrared spectroscopy, hydrogen exodiffusion, Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry are used to study the light-induced changes from microscopic to macroscopic scales (up to tens of microns. Such comprehensive use of complementary techniques lead us to suggest that light-soaking produces the diffusion of molecular hydrogen, hydrogen accumulation at p-layer/substrate interface and localized delamination of the interface. Based on these results we propose that light-induced degradation of PIN solar cells has to be addressed from not only as a material issue, but also a device point of view. In particular we bring experimental evidence that localized delamination at the interface between the p-layer and SnO2 substrate by light-induced hydrogen motion causes the rapid drop of Jsc.

  9. Light induced electrical and macroscopic changes in hydrogenated polymorphous silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, K. H.; Johnson, E. V.; Abramov, A.; Cabarrocas, P. Roca i.

    2012-07-01

    We report on light-induced electrical and macroscopic changes in hydrogenated polymorphous silicon (pm-Si:H) PIN solar cells. To explain the particular light-soaking behavior of such cells - namely an increase of the open circuit voltage (Voc) and a rapid drop of the short circuit current density (Jsc) - we correlate these effects to changes in hydrogen incorporation and structural properties in the layers of the cells. Numerous techniques such as current-voltage characteristics, infrared spectroscopy, hydrogen exodiffusion, Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry are used to study the light-induced changes from microscopic to macroscopic scales (up to tens of microns). Such comprehensive use of complementary techniques lead us to suggest that light-soaking produces the diffusion of molecular hydrogen, hydrogen accumulation at p-layer/substrate interface and localized delamination of the interface. Based on these results we propose that light-induced degradation of PIN solar cells has to be addressed from not only as a material issue, but also a device point of view. In particular we bring experimental evidence that localized delamination at the interface between the p-layer and SnO2 substrate by light-induced hydrogen motion causes the rapid drop of Jsc.

  10. Dendritic cell targeted vaccines: Recent progresses and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pengfei; Liu, Xinsheng; Sun, Yuefeng; Zhou, Peng; Wang, Yonglu; Zhang, Yongguang

    2016-03-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are known to be a set of morphology, structure and function of heterogeneous professional antigen presenting cells (APCs), as well as the strongest functional antigen presenting cells, which can absorb, process and present antigens. As the key regulators of innate and adaptive immune responses, DCs are at the center of the immune system and capable of interacting with both B cells and T cells, thereby manipulating the humoral and cellular immune responses. DCs provide an essential link between the innate and adaptive immunity, and the strong immune activation function of DCs and their properties of natural adjuvants, make them a valuable target for antigen delivery. Targeting antigens to DC-specific endocytic receptors in combination with the relevant antibodies or ligands along with immunostimulatory adjuvants has been recently recognized as a promising strategy for designing an effective vaccine that elicits a strong and durable T cell response against intracellular pathogens and cancer. This opinion article provides a brief summary of the rationales, superiorities and challenges of existing DC-targeting approaches.

  11. A study on the effect of IL-6 gene polymorphism on the prognosis of non-small-cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia W

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Wei Jia, Guang-He Fei, Jie-Gui Hu, Xian-Wei Hu Pulmonary Department, First Affiliated Hospital of Anhui Medical University, Hefei, People’s Republic of China Background: Lung cancer is one of the most commonly diagnosed clinical diseases. IL-6 is a multifunctional cytokine that is related to chemotactic factors and tumor biological regulation. -174G/C polymorphism in the promoter region of the IL-6 gene single-nucleotide polymorphism is the -174 position change from G to C. However, the relationship between the IL-6 gene polymorphism and prognosis of lung cancer is elusive. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of -174G/C polymorphism on the prognosis of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC.Methods: DNA was extracted from the peripheral blood of 434 cases diagnosed with NSCLC by cytologic or histologic examination. Polymerase chain reaction–restriction fragment length polymorphism (NlaIII was used to detect the genotype of -174G/C. Based on the functional activity of the IL-6 gene polymorphism, genotypes were divided into G vector (CG/GG (high yield and CC genotype (low yield. Prognosis of patients was analyzed and independent risk factors evaluated. A quantitative analysis of the degree of pain after diagnosis was performed to evaluate the correlations between gene polymorphisms and the degree of pain and use of analgesics.Results: Survival analysis showed that survival of the patients carrying the G allele (CG/GG was significantly lower than that of patients with CC genotype (42.31 versus 62.79 months; P=0.032. The IL-6 gene promoter region revealed the presence of polymorphic variants, which may be associated with changes in the gene transcription process that affect the level of serum cytokines. IL-6 -174G/C gene polymorphism is associated with a significant morphine equivalent daily dose (IL-6 GG, 69.61; GC, 73.17; CC, 181.67; P=0.004. Homozygous IL-6 -174C/C genotype carriers required higher doses of

  12. Targeting Negative Surface Charges of Cancer Cells by Multifunctional Nanoprobes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bingdi; Le, Wenjun; Wang, Yilong; Li, Zhuoquan; Wang, Dong; Ren, Lei; Lin, Ling; Cui, Shaobin; Hu, Jennifer J.; Hu, Yihui; Yang, Pengyuan; Ewing, Rodney C.; Shi, Donglu; Cui, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    A set of electrostatically charged, fluorescent, and superparamagnetic nanoprobes was developed for targeting cancer cells without using any molecular biomarkers. The surface electrostatic properties of the established cancer cell lines and primary normal cells were characterized by using these nanoprobes with various electrostatic signs and amplitudes. All twenty two randomly selected cancer cell lines of different organs, but not normal control cells, bound specifically to the positively charged nanoprobes. The relative surface charges of cancer cells could be quantified by the percentage of cells captured magnetically. The activities of glucose metabolism had a profound impact on the surface charge level of cancer cells. The data indicate that an elevated glycolysis in the cancer cells led to a higher level secretion of lactate. The secreted lactate anions are known to remove the positive ions, leaving behind the negative changes on the cell surfaces. This unique metabolic behavior is responsible for generating negative cancer surface charges in a perpetuating fashion. The metabolically active cancer cells are shown to a unique surface electrostatic pattern that can be used for recovering cancer cells from the circulating blood and other solutions. PMID:27570558

  13. Targeting Negative Surface Charges of Cancer Cells by Multifunctional Nanoprobes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bingdi; Le, Wenjun; Wang, Yilong; Li, Zhuoquan; Wang, Dong; Ren, Lei; Lin, Ling; Cui, Shaobin; Hu, Jennifer J; Hu, Yihui; Yang, Pengyuan; Ewing, Rodney C; Shi, Donglu; Cui, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    A set of electrostatically charged, fluorescent, and superparamagnetic nanoprobes was developed for targeting cancer cells without using any molecular biomarkers. The surface electrostatic properties of the established cancer cell lines and primary normal cells were characterized by using these nanoprobes with various electrostatic signs and amplitudes. All twenty two randomly selected cancer cell lines of different organs, but not normal control cells, bound specifically to the positively charged nanoprobes. The relative surface charges of cancer cells could be quantified by the percentage of cells captured magnetically. The activities of glucose metabolism had a profound impact on the surface charge level of cancer cells. The data indicate that an elevated glycolysis in the cancer cells led to a higher level secretion of lactate. The secreted lactate anions are known to remove the positive ions, leaving behind the negative changes on the cell surfaces. This unique metabolic behavior is responsible for generating negative cancer surface charges in a perpetuating fashion. The metabolically active cancer cells are shown to a unique surface electrostatic pattern that can be used for recovering cancer cells from the circulating blood and other solutions. PMID:27570558

  14. NK Cells Preferentially Target Tumor Cells with a Cancer Stem Cell Phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ames, Erik; Canter, Robert J; Grossenbacher, Steven K; Mac, Stephanie; Chen, Mingyi; Smith, Rachel C; Hagino, Takeshi; Perez-Cunningham, Jessica; Sckisel, Gail D; Urayama, Shiro; Monjazeb, Arta M; Fragoso, Ruben C; Sayers, Thomas J; Murphy, William J

    2015-10-15

    Increasing evidence supports the hypothesis that cancer stem cells (CSCs) are resistant to antiproliferative therapies, able to repopulate tumor bulk, and seed metastasis. NK cells are able to target stem cells as shown by their ability to reject allogeneic hematopoietic stem cells but not solid tissue grafts. Using multiple preclinical models, including NK coculture (autologous and allogeneic) with multiple human cancer cell lines and dissociated primary cancer specimens and NK transfer in NSG mice harboring orthotopic pancreatic cancer xenografts, we assessed CSC viability, CSC frequency, expression of death receptor ligands, and tumor burden. We demonstrate that activated NK cells are capable of preferentially killing CSCs identified by multiple CSC markers (CD24(+)/CD44(+), CD133(+), and aldehyde dehydrogenase(bright)) from a wide variety of human cancer cell lines in vitro and dissociated primary cancer specimens ex vivo. We observed comparable effector function of allogeneic and autologous NK cells. We also observed preferential upregulation of NK activation ligands MICA/B, Fas, and DR5 on CSCs. Blocking studies further implicated an NKG2D-dependent mechanism for NK killing of CSCs. Treatment of orthotopic human pancreatic cancer tumor-bearing NSG mice with activated NK cells led to significant reductions in both intratumoral CSCs and tumor burden. Taken together, these data from multiple preclinical models, including a strong reliance on primary human cancer specimens, provide compelling preclinical evidence that activated NK cells preferentially target cancer cells with a CSC phenotype, highlighting the translational potential of NK immunotherapy as part of a combined modality approach for refractory solid malignancies.

  15. TCF7L2 Polymorphisms Modulate Proinsulin Levels and β-Cell Function in a British Europid Population

    OpenAIRE

    Loos, Ruth J.F.; Franks, Paul W.; Francis, Richard W.; Barroso, Inês; Gribble, Fiona M.; Savage, David B.; Ong, Ken K.; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Wareham, Nicholas J.

    2007-01-01

    Rapidly accumulating evidence shows that common T-cell transcription factor (TCF)7L2 polymorphisms confer risk of type 2 diabetes through unknown mechanisms. We examined the association between four TCF7L2 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), including rs7903146, and measures of insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion in 1,697 Europid men and women of the population-based MRC (Medical Research Council)-Ely study. The T-(minor) allele of rs7903146 was strongly and positively associated wi...

  16. MITOCHONDRIA: INSIGHT TARGET OF DRUG DEVELOPMENT IN CANCER CELLS

    OpenAIRE

    Md. Ataur Rahman

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondria are involved in different physiological and pathological processes that are crucial for tumor cell physiology, growth and survival and its dysfunction leads to many human abnormalities, including cardiovascular diseases, neurodegenerative diseases, autoimmune disorders and cancer. The present review is focused on the different experimental and therapeutic cancer strategies addressed to either target mitochondria directly, or use mitochondria as mediators of apoptosis, although it...

  17. Multimodal imaging of nanovaccine carriers targeted to human dendritic cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cruz, L.J.; Tacken, P.J.; Bonetto, F.J.; Buschow, S.I.; Croes, H.J.E.; Wijers-Rouw, M.J.P.; Vries, I.J.M. de; Figdor, C.G.

    2011-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are key players in the initiation of adaptive immune responses and are currently exploited in immunotherapy against cancer and infectious diseases. The targeted delivery of nanovaccine particles (NPs) to DCs in vivo is a promising strategy to enhance immune responses. Here, tar

  18. Oncotripsy: Targeting cancer cells selectively via resonant harmonic excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyden, S.; Ortiz, M.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate a method of selectively targeting cancer cells by means of ultrasound harmonic excitation at their resonance frequency, which we refer to as oncotripsy. The geometric model of the cells takes into account the cytoplasm, nucleus and nucleolus, as well as the plasma membrane and nuclear envelope. Material properties are varied within a pathophysiologically-relevant range. A first modal analysis reveals the existence of a spectral gap between the natural frequencies and, most importantly, resonant growth rates of healthy and cancerous cells. The results of the modal analysis are verified by simulating the fully-nonlinear transient response of healthy and cancerous cells at resonance. The fully nonlinear analysis confirms that cancerous cells can be selectively taken to lysis by the application of carefully tuned ultrasound harmonic excitation while simultaneously leaving healthy cells intact.

  19. Oncotripsy: Targeting cancer cells selectively via resonant harmonic excitation

    CERN Document Server

    Heyden, Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    We investigate a method of selectively targeting cancer cells by means of ultrasound harmonic excitation at their resonance frequency, which we refer to as oncotripsy. The geometric model of the cells takes into account the cytoplasm, nucleus and nucleolus, as well as the plasma membrane and nuclear envelope. Material properties are varied within a pathophysiologically-relevant range. A first modal analysis reveals the existence of a spectral gap between the natural frequencies and, most importantly, resonant growth rates of healthy and cancerous cells. The results of the modal analysis are verified by simulating the fully-nonlinear transient response of healthy and cancerous cells at resonance. The fully nonlinear analysis confirms that cancerous cells can be selectively taken to lysis by the application of carefully tuned ultrasound harmonic excitation while simultaneously leaving healthy cells intact.

  20. Simultaneous measurement of NK cell cytotoxicity against two target cell lines labelled with fluorescent lanthanide chelates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lövgren, J; Blomberg, K

    1994-07-12

    We describe a cytotoxicity assay which permits the simultaneous measurement of natural killer cell activity against two different cell lines. The target cell lines are labelled either with a fluorescent europium chelate or with a fluorescent terbium chelate and cell death is quantified by measuring the chelate release. K-562, Molt4 and Daudi cell lines have been used as targets. The release of the two chelates from the target cells can be detected with the help of time resolved fluorometry. As the measurements are made after background fluorescence has decayed no additional steps are needed to correct for the background from the medium. The assay procedure used for measurement of cytotoxicity against two target cell lines is very similar to the widely used 51Cr release assay. PMID:8034979

  1. Polylactic Acid Nanoparticles Targeted to Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Huafang; HU Yu; SUN Wangqiang; XIE Changsheng

    2005-01-01

    In this work, blank polylactic acid (PLA) nanoparticles with unstained surface were prepared by the nano-deposition method. On the basis of the preparation, the effect of surface modification on brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs) targeting was examined by in vivo experiments and fluorescence microscopy. The results showed that PLA nanoparticles are less toxic than PACA nanoparticles but their BMECs targeting is similar to PACA nanoparticles. The experiments suggest that drugs can be loaded onto the particles and become more stable through adsorption on the surface of PLA nanoparticles with high surface activity. The surface of PLA nanoparticles was obviously modified and the hydrophilicity was increased as well in the presence of non-ionic surfactants on PLA nanoparticles. As a targeting moiety, polysobate 80 (T-80) can facilitate BMECs targeting of PLA nanoparticles.

  2. Breast cancer stem cells, EMT and therapeutic targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotiyal, Srishti; Bhattacharya, Susinjan, E-mail: s.bhattacharya@jiit.ac.in

    2014-10-10

    Highlights: • Therapeutic targeting or inhibition of the key molecules of signaling pathways can control growth of breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs). • Development of BCSCs also involves miRNA interactions. • Therapeutic achievement can be done by targeting identified targets in the BCSC pathways. - Abstract: A small heterogeneous population of breast cancer cells acts as seeds to induce new tumor growth. These seeds or breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) exhibit great phenotypical plasticity which allows them to undergo “epithelial to mesenchymal transition” (EMT) at the site of primary tumor and a future reverse transition. Apart from metastasis they are also responsible for maintaining the tumor and conferring it with drug and radiation resistance and a tendency for post-treatment relapse. Many of the signaling pathways involved in induction of EMT are involved in CSC generation and regulation. Here we are briefly reviewing the mechanism of TGF-β, Wnt, Notch, TNF-α, NF-κB, RTK signalling pathways which are involved in EMT as well as BCSCs maintenance. Therapeutic targeting or inhibition of the key/accessory players of these pathways could control growth of BCSCs and hence malignant cancer. Additionally several miRNAs are dysregulated in cancer stem cells indicating their roles as oncogenes or tumor suppressors. This review also lists the miRNA interactions identified in BCSCs and discusses on some newly identified targets in the BCSC regulatory pathways like SHIP2, nicastrin, Pin 1, IGF-1R, pro-inflammatory cytokines and syndecan which can be targeted for therapeutic achievements.

  3. Bystander responses in cells models; targets, dosimetry and mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of microbeam approaches has been a major advance in probing the relevance of bystander responses in cell and tissue models. Our own studies at the Gray Cancer Institute have used both a charged particle microbeam, producing protons and helium ions and a soft X-ray microprobe, delivering focused carbon-K, aluminium-K and titanium-K soft X-rays. Using these techniques we have been able to build up a comprehensive picture of the underlying differences between bystander responses and direct effects in cell and tissue-like models. What is now clear is that bystander dose-response relationships, the underlying mechanisms of action and the targets involved are not the same as those observed for direct irradiation of DNA in the nucleus. Our recent studies have shown bystander responses induced in human or hamster cells even when radiation is deposited away from the nucleus in cytoplasmic targets either after charged particle or soft X-ray exposure. Importantly, the level of bystander effect, measured as cell killing was similar to that observed when the same amount of energy was deposited but targeted to the nucleus. In other studies, we have shown that underlying determination of the level of response is the energy deposited in a single cell rather than the number of cells hit. Also the overall response at low doses may be dominated by bystander signaling. These observations have significance for our understanding of radiation risk at low doses including those of environmental exposures and the applicability of the Linear Non Threshold model. The realization that cell to cell signaling is important for radiation response may also open up new therapeutic opportunities to either improve tumor cell kill or protect normal tissues if the pathways underpinning bystander signaling can be elucidated and controlled

  4. Simultaneous measurement of natural killer cell cytotoxicity against each of three different target cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomberg, K

    1994-02-10

    A time-resolved fluorometric assay for the simultaneous measurement of natural killer cell activity against three different lanthanide diethylenetriaminopentaacetate (LaDTPA) labelled target cell lines is described. The target cell line K-562 was labelled with SmDTPA, the cell line Molt with TbDTPA and the cell line Raji with EuDTPA. After co-incubation of the three target cell lines with effector cells the fluorescence of the lanthanides released from the lysed target cells was measured in an enhancer solution in which they formed highly fluorescent complexes. It was possible to differentiate the specific release from the three target cell lines because the emission lines of the europium, samarium and terbium complexes formed in the enhancer solution are well separated from each other. The autofluorescence from culture media supplemented with serum was avoided by the use of time-resolved fluorometry. The results show that applying fluorometry based on the combination of spectral and temporal resolution to natural killer cell assays, makes possible the simultaneous determination of lysis in up to three target cell lines in complex culture medium. PMID:8308301

  5. Novel therapeutic Strategies for Targeting Liver Cancer Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Oishi, Xin Wei Wang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The cancer stem cell (CSC hypothesis was first proposed over 40 years ago. Advances in CSC isolation were first achieved in hematological malignancies, with the first CSC demonstrated in acute myeloid leukemia. However, using similar strategies and technologies, and taking advantage of available surface markers, CSCs have been more recently demonstrated in a growing range of epithelial and other solid organ malignancies, suggesting that the majority of malignancies are dependent on such a compartment.Primary liver cancer consists predominantly of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC. It is believed that hepatic progenitor cells (HPCs could be the origin of some HCCs and ICCs. Furthermore, stem cell activators such as Wnt/β-catenin, TGF-β, Notch and Hedgehog signaling pathways also expedite tumorigenesis, and these pathways could serve as molecular targets to assist in designing cancer prevention strategies. Recent studies indicate that additional factors such as EpCAM, Lin28 or miR-181 may also contribute to HCC progression by targeting HCC CSCs. Various therapeutic drugs that directly modulate CSCs have been examined in vivo and in vitro. However, CSCs clearly have a complex pathogenesis, with a considerable crosstalk and redundancy in signaling pathways, and hence targeting single molecules or pathways may have a limited benefit for treatment. Many of the key signaling molecules are shared by both CSCs and normal stem cells, which add further challenges for designing molecularly targeted strategies specific to CSCs but sparing normal stem cells to avoid side effects. In addition to the direct control of CSCs, many other factors that are needed for the maintenance of CSCs, such as angiogenesis, vasculogenesis, invasion and migration, hypoxia, immune evasion, multiple drug resistance, and radioresistance, should be taken into consideration when designing therapeutic strategies for HCC.Here we provide a brief

  6. Telomere Transcripts Target Telomerase in Human Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreilmeier, Theresa; Mejri, Doris; Hauck, Marlene; Kleiter, Miriam; Holzmann, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Long non-coding transcripts from telomeres, called telomeric repeat-containing RNA (TERRA), were identified as blocking telomerase activity (TA), a telomere maintenance mechanism (TMM), in tumors. We expressed recombinant TERRA transcripts in tumor cell lines with TA and with alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) to study effects on TMM and cell growth. Adeno- and lentivirus constructs (AV and LV) were established for transient and stable expression of approximately 130 units of telomere hexanucleotide repeats under control of cytomegalovirus (CMV) and human RNase P RNA H1 (hH1) promoters with and without polyadenylation, respectively. Six human tumor cell lines either using telomerase or ALT were infected and analyzed for TA levels. Pre-infection cells using telomerase had 1%-3% of the TERRA expression levels of ALT cells. AV and LV expression of recombinant TERRA in telomerase positive cells showed a 1.3-2.6 fold increase in TERRA levels, and a decrease in TA of 25%-58%. Dominant-negative or small hairpin RNA (shRNA) viral expression against human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) results in senescence, not induced by TERRA expression. Population doubling time, cell viability and TL (telomere length) were not impacted by ectopic TERRA expression. Clonal growth was reduced by TERRA expression in TA but not ALT cell lines. ALT cells were not affected by treatments applied. Established cell models and tools may be used to better understand the role of TERRA in the cell, especially for targeting telomerase. PMID:27537914

  7. Lactoferrin targets T cells in the small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sanne Mie; Hansen, Gert Helge; Danielsen, E Michael

    2010-01-01

    pathogens, and Lf receptors have been identified at the surfaces of a number of different cells. In the small intestine Lf binds to the luminal surface, but its further interaction with the epithelial cells is controversial. METHODS: In the present work, we studied the uptake of Lf in cultured mucosal...... explants of pig small intestine by immunofluorescence and immunogold microscopy. RESULTS: Lf rapidly bound to the brush border and subsequently appeared in punctae in the apical cytoplasm, indicating internalization into an endosomal compartment. Essentially, no labeling was detected elsewhere...... defense of the small intestinal mucosa by targeting the population of T cells in the lamina propria....

  8. Targeting cancer stem cells: emerging role of Nanog transcription factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang ML

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Mong-Lien Wang,1 Shih-Hwa Chiou,2,3 Cheng-Wen Wu1,4–61Institute of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 2Institute of Pharmacology, National Yang Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan; 3Department of Medical Research and Education, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; 4Institute of Microbiology and Immunology, 5Institute of Clinical Medicine, National Yang Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan; 6Institute of Biomedical Science, Academia Sinica, Taipei, TaiwanAbstract: The involvement of stemness factors in cancer initiation and progression has drawn much attention recently, especially after the finding that introducing four stemness factors in somatic cells is able to reprogram the cells back to an embryonic stem cell-like state. Following accumulating data revealing abnormal elevated expression levels of key stemness factors, like Nanog, Oct4, and Sox2, in several types of cancer stem cells; the importance and therapeutic potential of targeting these stemness regulators in cancers has turned to research focus. Nanog determines cell fate in both embryonic and cancer stem cells; activating Nanog at an inappropriate time would result in cancer stem cells rather than normal pluripotent stem cells or differentiated somatic cells. Upregulated Nanog is correlated with poor survival outcome of patients with various types of cancer. The discoveries of downstream regulatory pathways directly or indirectly mediated by Nanog indicate that Nanog regulates several aspects of cancer development such as tumor cell proliferation, self-renewal, motility, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, immune evasion, and drug-resistance, which are all defined features for cancer stem cells. The current review paper illustrates the central role of Nanog in the regulatory networks of cancer malignant development and stemness acquirement, as well as in the communication between cancer cells and the surrounding stroma. Though a more defined model is needed to test the

  9. Key cancer cell signal transduction pathways as therapeutic targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, Roberto; Melisi, Davide; Ciardiello, Fortunato; Tortora, Giampaolo

    2006-02-01

    Growth factor signals are propagated from the cell surface, through the action of transmembrane receptors, to intracellular effectors that control critical functions in human cancer cells, such as differentiation, growth, angiogenesis, and inhibition of cell death and apoptosis. Several kinases are involved in transduction pathways via sequential signalling activation. These kinases include transmembrane receptor kinases (e.g., epidermal growth factor receptor EGFR); or cytoplasmic kinases (e.g., PI3 kinase). In cancer cells, these signalling pathways are often altered and results in a phenotype characterized by uncontrolled growth and increased capability to invade surrounding tissue. Therefore, these crucial transduction molecules represent attractive targets for cancer therapy. This review will summarize current knowledge of key signal transduction pathways, that are altered in cancer cells, as therapeutic targets for novel selective inhibitors. The most advanced targeted agents currently under development interfere with function and expression of several signalling molecules, including the EGFR family; the vascular endothelial growth factor and its receptors; and cytoplasmic kinases such as Ras, PI3K and mTOR.

  10. Advances in targeting cell surface signalling molecules for immune modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Sheng; Zhu, Yuwen; Chen, Lieping

    2013-01-01

    The past decade has witnessed a surge in the development of immunomodulatory approaches to combat a broad range of human diseases, including cancer, viral infections, autoimmunity and inflammation as well as in the prevention of transplant rejection. Immunomodulatory approaches mostly involve the use of monoclonal antibodies or recombinant fusion proteins that target cell surface signalling molecules on immune cells to drive immune responses towards the desired direction. Advances in our understanding of the human immune system, along with valuable lessons learned from the first generation of therapeutic biologics, are aiding the design of the next generation of immunomodulatory biologics with better therapeutic efficacy, minimized adverse effects and long-lasting clinical benefit. The recent encouraging results from antibodies targeting programmed cell death protein 1 (PD1) and B7 homolog 1 (B7H1; also known as PDL1) for the treatment of various advanced human cancers show that immunomodulatory therapy has come of age. PMID:23370250

  11. Modeling Catecholaminergic Polymorphic Ventricular Tachycardia using Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-derived Cardiomyocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atara Novak

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT is an inherited arrhythmogenic cardiac disorder characterized by life-threatening arrhythmias induced by physical or emotional stress, in the absence structural heart abnormalities. The arrhythmias may cause syncope or degenerate into cardiac arrest and sudden death which usually occurs during childhood. Recent studies have shown that CPVT is caused by mutations in the cardiac ryanodine receptor type 2 (RyR2 or calsequestrin 2 (CASQ2 genes. Both proteins are key contributors to the intracellular Ca2+ handling process and play a pivotal role in Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum to the cytosol during systole. Although the molecular pathogenesis of CPVT is not entirely clear, it was suggested that the CPVT mutations promote excessive sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ leak, which initiates delayed afterdepolarizations (DADs and triggered arrhythmias in cardiac myocytes. The recent breakthrough discovery of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC generated from somatic cells (e.g. fibroblasts, keratinocytes now enables researches to investigate mutated cardiomyocytes generated from the patient’s iPSC. To this end, in the present article we review recent studies on CPVT iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes, thus demonstrating in the mutated cells catecholamine-induced DADs and triggered arrhythmias.

  12. [Novel calretinin-positive cells with polymorphous spines in the mouse forebrain during early postnatal ontogenesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revishchin, A V; Okhotin, V E; Pavlova, G V

    2009-01-01

    Using an immunocytochemical method for calretinin (CR) detection, we have earlier described (Morfologiya, 2009 v. 135. No. 3, p. 7-19) the population of previously unknown mono- and bipolar cells with polymorphous spines (PS) covering their cell bodies and processes, in adult mice forebrain structures adjacent to anterior horn of lateral ventricle. CR-positive spiny (CR+PS) cells were negative to GAD67 and were detected in the white matter and in layers V and VI of frontal area of dorsomedial cortex close to the cingulum, in in rostro-dorsal part of the caudate nucleus-putamen complex, anterior olfactory nucleus and in subependymal layer of the dorso-lateral angle of the lateral ventricle. In this work, the distribution of these cells in 7-day-old mice was studied. Comparative topographical analysis of definitive and early CR+PS cells demonstrated that in 7-day-old mice CR+PS cells were absent from the areas of their localization in adult animals - anterior olfactory nucleus, cortical plate and inner portion of neostriatum. Meanwhile, some CR+PS-like cells were detected in 7-day-old mice inside the rostral migratory route, close to neostriatum anterior boundary, along the dorsal border between neostriatum and corpus callosum, subependymal layer of lateral wall of the lateral ventricle, and in the cingulum area. These findings are indicative of the possible postnatal appearance of CR+PS cells. To test this hypothesis, the experiments were conducted in which bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) was administered to the mice on their postnatal days 2-4 with the subsequent study of the brain sections of these animals sacrificed on their postnatal day 20. Double immunolabeling of these sections for CR and BrdU has detected the presence of CR+PS cells that contained postnatally administered BrdU. These results strongly suggest that, at least, some portion of CR+PS cells have their mitosis postnatally. It may be assumed, that CR+PS cells migrate to the sites of their distribution in

  13. Measurement of cell mediated cytotoxicity by post-labeling surviving target cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 51Cr release assay (CRA) is the commonly accepted technique for measurement of cell mediated cytotoxicity. This assay shows some disadvantages when mononucleated cells of human peripheral blood (MNC) are used as effector and target cells. The uptake of 51Cr by PHA stimulated lymphocytes is low compared to the spontaneous release. In an attempt to develop a cytotoxicity assay suitable for human lymphocytes we used 14C-TdR to label target cells surviving after contact with effector cells. Cytotoxic lymphocytes were generated by incubation of MNC with irradiated allogeneic MNC for 6 days. On day 6 the effector cells are irradiated and cocultured with PHA stimulated target cells. Twenty-four hours later 14C-TdR is added. After an additional 24 h the cultures are harvested and 14C-TdR taken up by target cells is measured. It is shown that the effector cells are still cytotoxic after irradiation. These cells do not take up 14C-TdR. Cell-free supernatants do not influence the uptake of 14C-TdR by target cells. The results obtained with this assay correlate very well those obtained by the CRA, if the spontaneous release does not exceed 30%. (author)

  14. Glial cells as drug targets: What does it take?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möller, Thomas; Boddeke, Hendrikus W G M

    2016-10-01

    The last two decades have brought a significant increase in our understanding of glial biology and glial contribution to CNS disease. Yet, despite the fact that glial cells make up the majority of CNS cells, no drug specifically targeting glial cells is on the market. Given the long development times of CNS drugs, on average over 12 years, this is not completely surprising. However, there is increasing interest from academia and industry to exploit glial targets to develop drugs for the benefit of patients with currently limited or no therapeutic options. CNS drug development has a high attrition rate and has encountered many challenges. It seems unlikely that developing drugs against glial targets would be any less demanding. However, the knowledge generated in traditional CNS drug discovery teaches valuable lessons, which could enable the glial community to accelerate the cycle time from basic discovery to drug development. In this review we will discuss steps necessary to bring a "glial target idea" to a clinical development program. GLIA 2016;64:1742-1754. PMID:27121701

  15. Lysosomal disruption preferentially targets acute myeloid leukemia cells and progenitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhai, Mahadeo A.; Prabha, Swayam; Hurren, Rose; Rutledge, Angela C.; Lee, Anna Y.; Sriskanthadevan, Shrivani; Sun, Hong; Wang, Xiaoming; Skrtic, Marko; Seneviratne, Ayesh; Cusimano, Maria; Jhas, Bozhena; Gronda, Marcela; MacLean, Neil; Cho, Eunice E.; Spagnuolo, Paul A.; Sharmeen, Sumaiya; Gebbia, Marinella; Urbanus, Malene; Eppert, Kolja; Dissanayake, Dilan; Jonet, Alexia; Dassonville-Klimpt, Alexandra; Li, Xiaoming; Datti, Alessandro; Ohashi, Pamela S.; Wrana, Jeff; Rogers, Ian; Sonnet, Pascal; Ellis, William Y.; Corey, Seth J.; Eaves, Connie; Minden, Mark D.; Wang, Jean C.Y.; Dick, John E.; Nislow, Corey; Giaever, Guri; Schimmer, Aaron D.

    2012-01-01

    Despite efforts to understand and treat acute myeloid leukemia (AML), there remains a need for more comprehensive therapies to prevent AML-associated relapses. To identify new therapeutic strategies for AML, we screened a library of on- and off-patent drugs and identified the antimalarial agent mefloquine as a compound that selectively kills AML cells and AML stem cells in a panel of leukemia cell lines and in mice. Using a yeast genome-wide functional screen for mefloquine sensitizers, we identified genes associated with the yeast vacuole, the homolog of the mammalian lysosome. Consistent with this, we determined that mefloquine disrupts lysosomes, directly permeabilizes the lysosome membrane, and releases cathepsins into the cytosol. Knockdown of the lysosomal membrane proteins LAMP1 and LAMP2 resulted in decreased cell viability, as did treatment of AML cells with known lysosome disrupters. Highlighting a potential therapeutic rationale for this strategy, leukemic cells had significantly larger lysosomes compared with normal cells, and leukemia-initiating cells overexpressed lysosomal biogenesis genes. These results demonstrate that lysosomal disruption preferentially targets AML cells and AML progenitor cells, providing a rationale for testing lysosomal disruption as a novel therapeutic strategy for AML. PMID:23202731

  16. Predictive role of vascular endothelial growth factor polymorphisms in the survival of renal cell carcinoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y-Q; Chen, J

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a study to investigate the possible role of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) polymorphisms -2578C/A, -1154G/A and -634C/G and clinical factors in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) prognosis in a cohort of 336 RCC cases. A total of 336 patients with RCC were recruited from PLA General Hospital between January 2004 and December 2005. All patients were followed up until December 2010, and no patient was lost to follow-up. The follow-up time of this study was 60 months. At the time of analysis, a total of 210 died during the follow-up. The median overall survival for patients was 29.1 months (95%CI = 17.1 to 41.3 months), and the 5-year survival rate for the patients was 37.5%. Our study showed that Karnofsky performance status ≥60 could delay death from RCC, with HR (95%CI) of 0.57 (0.39-0.84). Patients with anemia, platelet count >400 x 10(9)/L, neutrophilia and lymphocytes >160 g/L had increased risk of death from RCC, with HR (95%CI) of 1.84 (1.18-2.96), 2.01 (1.27-3.25), 1.65 (1.03-2.56) and 1.49 (0.99-2.71), respectively. The VEGF -2578AA and -1154AA genotypes were significantly associated with a poor overall survival of RCC patients, with HR (95%CI) of 2.41 (1.32-5.13) and 3.77 (1.42-15.67), respectively. In conclusion, our study presented the factors regarding the prognosis of RCC patients, and high platelet and neutrophil counts, low lymphocytes, and VEGF -2578C/A and -1154G/A polymorphisms were shown to be independent factors for a lower prognosis of RCC patients. PMID:25062489

  17. Associations of ATM Polymorphisms With Survival in Advanced Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Patients Receiving Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Zhongli [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Oncology, Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Department of Etiology and Carcinogenesis (Beijing Key Laboratory for Carcinogenesis and Cancer Prevention), Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Zhang, Wencheng [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Zhou, Yuling; Yu, Dianke; Chen, Xiabin; Chang, Jiang; Qiao, Yan; Zhang, Meng; Huang, Ying; Wu, Chen [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Oncology, Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Department of Etiology and Carcinogenesis (Beijing Key Laboratory for Carcinogenesis and Cancer Prevention), Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Xiao, Zefen, E-mail: xiaozefen@sina.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Tan, Wen, E-mail: tanwen@cicams.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Oncology, Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Department of Etiology and Carcinogenesis (Beijing Key Laboratory for Carcinogenesis and Cancer Prevention), Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); and others

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene are associated with survival in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) receiving radiation therapy or chemoradiation therapy or surgery only. Methods and Materials: Four tagSNPs of ATM were genotyped in 412 individuals with clinical stage III or IV ESCC receiving radiation therapy or chemoradiation therapy, and in 388 individuals with stage I, II, or III ESCC treated with surgery only. Overall survival time of ESCC among different genotypes was estimated by Kaplan-Meier plot, and the significance was examined by log-rank test. The hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for death from ESCC among different genotypes were computed by a Cox proportional regression model. Results: We found 2 SNPs, rs664143 and rs664677, associated with survival time of ESCC patients receiving radiation therapy. Individuals with the rs664143A allele had poorer median survival time compared with the rs664143G allele (14.0 vs 20.0 months), with the HR for death being 1.45 (95% CI 1.12-1.89). Individuals with the rs664677C allele also had worse median survival time than those with the rs664677T allele (14.0 vs 23.5 months), with the HR of 1.57 (95% CI 1.18-2.08). Stratified analysis showed that these associations were present in both stage III and IV cancer and different radiation therapy techniques. Significant associations were also found between the SNPs and locosregional progression or progression-free survival. No association between these SNPs and survival time was detected in ESCC patients treated with surgery only. Conclusion: These results suggest that the ATM polymorphisms might serve as independent biomarkers for predicting prognosis in ESCC patients receiving radiation therapy.

  18. New calretinin-positive cells with polymorphous spines in the mouse forebrain during early postnatal ontogeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revishchin, A V; Okhotin, V E; Pavlova, G V

    2010-10-01

    Immunohistochemical studies of calretinin (CR) in forebrain structures adjacent to the anterior horn of the lateral ventricle in adult mice allowed us to detect a population of previously unknown mono- and bipolar cells whose bodies and processes were coated with polymorphous spines (PS) (Morfologiya, 135, No. 3, 7-19 (2009)). CR-positive spiny (CR(+)PS) cells did not contain GAD67 and were located in the white matter and layers V-VI of the frontal area of the dorsomedial cortex close to the cingulum, the rostrodorsal part of the caudate-putamen, the anterior olfactory nucleus, and the subependyma of the dorsolateral angle of the lateral ventricle. We report here studies of the distribution of these cells in seven-day-old mice. Comparative topographic analysis of definitive and early CR(+)PS cells showed that in seven-day-old mice, CR(+)PS cells were absent from the sites at which they were seen in adults, i.e., the anterior olfactory cortex, the cortical plate, and the inner part of the neostriatum. In addition, small numbers of CR(+)PS-like cells were seen at this age within the dorsal migration pathway, at the anterior margin of the neostriatum, along the dorsal border of the neostriatum with the corpus callosum, in the subependymal layer of the lateral wall of the lateral ventricle, and in the cingulum area. These data demonstrate that CR(+)PS cells may have a postnatal origin. Experiments to verify this hypothesis were performed using postnatal administration of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) to mice aged 2-4 days, followed by assessment of brain sections fixed at age 20 days. Double immunolabeling of sections for CR and BrdU demonstrated the presence of CR(+)PS cells containing postnatally supplied BrdU. These data provide evidence that at least some CR(+)PS cells undergo mitosis at postnatal age. In all probability, during the period from 7 to 20 days of postnatal development, CR(+)PS cells migrate to the sites that they occupy in adult animals. PMID:20721693

  19. A single nucleotide polymorphism in the Bax gene promoter affects transcription and influences retinal ganglion cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila J Semaan

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Pro-apoptotic Bax is essential for RGC (retinal ganglion cell death. Gene dosage experiments in mice, yielding a single wild-type Bax allele, indicated that genetic background was able to influence the cell death phenotype. DBA/2JBax+/− mice exhibited complete resistance to nerve damage after 2 weeks (similar to Bax−/− mice, but 129B6Bax+/− mice exhibited significant cell loss (similar to wild-type mice. The different cell death phenotype was associated with the level of Bax expression, where 129B6 neurons had twice the level of endogenous Bax mRNA and protein as DBA/2J neurons. Sequence analysis of the Bax promoters between these strains revealed a single nucleotide polymorphism (T129B6 to CDBA/2J at position −515. A 1.5- to 2.5-fold increase in transcriptional activity was observed from the 129B6 promoter in transient transfection assays in a variety of cell types, including RGC5 cells derived from rat RGCs. Since this polymorphism occurred in a p53 half-site, we investigated the requirement of p53 for the differential transcriptional activity. Differential transcriptional activity from either 129B6 or DBA/2J Bax promoters were unaffected in p53−/− cells, and addition of exogenous p53 had no further effect on this difference, thus a role for p53 was excluded. Competitive electrophoretic mobility-shift assays identified two DNA–protein complexes that interacted with the polymorphic region. Those forming Complex 1 bound with higher affinity to the 129B6 polymorphic site, suggesting that these proteins probably comprised a transcriptional activator complex. These studies implicated quantitative expression of the Bax gene as playing a possible role in neuronal susceptibility to damaging stimuli.

  20. Towards 12% stabilised efficiency in single junction polymorphous silicon solar cells: experimental developments and model predictions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolmasov Sergey

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We have combined recent experimental developments in our laboratory with modelling to devise ways of maximising the stabilised efficiency of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H PIN solar cells. The cells were fabricated using the conventional plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD technique at various temperatures, pressures and gas flow ratios. A detailed electrical-optical simulator was used to examine the effect of using wide band gap P-and N-doped μc-SiOx:H layers, as well as a MgF2 anti-reflection coating (ARC on cell performance. We find that with the best quality a-Si:H so far produced in our laboratory and optimised deposition parameters for the corresponding solar cell, we could not attain a 10% stabilised efficiency due to the high stabilised defect density of a-Si:H, although this landmark has been achieved in some laboratories. On the other hand, a close cousin of a-Si:H, hydrogenated polymorphous silicon (pm-Si:H, a nano-structured silicon thin film produced by PECVD under conditions close to powder formation, has been developed in our laboratory. This material has been shown to have a lower initial and stabilised defect density as well as higher hole mobility than a-Si:H. Modelling indicates that it is possible to attain stabilised efficiencies of 12% when pm-Si:H is incorporated in a solar cell, deposited in a NIP configuration to reduce the P/I interface defects and combined with P- and N-doped μc-SiOx:H layers and a MgF2 ARC.

  1. Towards 12% stabilised efficiency in single junction polymorphous silicon solar cells: experimental developments and model predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abolmasov, Sergey; Cabarrocas, Pere Roca i.; Chatterjee, Parsathi

    2016-01-01

    We have combined recent experimental developments in our laboratory with modelling to devise ways of maximising the stabilised efficiency of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) PIN solar cells. The cells were fabricated using the conventional plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) technique at various temperatures, pressures and gas flow ratios. A detailed electrical-optical simulator was used to examine the effect of using wide band gap P-and N-doped μc-SiOx:H layers, as well as a MgF2 anti-reflection coating (ARC) on cell performance. We find that with the best quality a-Si:H so far produced in our laboratory and optimised deposition parameters for the corresponding solar cell, we could not attain a 10% stabilised efficiency due to the high stabilised defect density of a-Si:H, although this landmark has been achieved in some laboratories. On the other hand, a close cousin of a-Si:H, hydrogenated polymorphous silicon (pm-Si:H), a nano-structured silicon thin film produced by PECVD under conditions close to powder formation, has been developed in our laboratory. This material has been shown to have a lower initial and stabilised defect density as well as higher hole mobility than a-Si:H. Modelling indicates that it is possible to attain stabilised efficiencies of 12% when pm-Si:H is incorporated in a solar cell, deposited in a NIP configuration to reduce the P/I interface defects and combined with P- and N-doped μc-SiOx:H layers and a MgF2 ARC.

  2. T-Cell Cytokine Gene Polymorphisms and Vitamin D Pathway Gene Polymorphisms in End-Stage Renal Disease due to Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Nephropathy: Comparisons with Health Status and Other Main Causes of End-Stage Renal Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicja E. Grzegorzewska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. T-cell cytokine gene polymorphisms and vitamin D pathway gene polymorphisms were evaluated as possibly associated with end-stage renal disease (ESRD resulting from type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM nephropathy. Methods. Studies were conducted among hemodialysis (HD patients with ESRD due to type 2 DM nephropathy, chronic glomerulonephritis, chronic infective tubulointerstitial nephritis, and hypertensive nephropathy as well as in healthy subjects. A frequency distribution of T-cell-related interleukin (IL genes (IL18 rs360719, IL12A rs568408, IL12B rs3212227, IL4R rs1805015, IL13 rs20541, IL28B rs8099917, IL28B, and rs12979860 and vitamin D pathway genes (GC genes: rs2298849, rs7041, and rs1155563; VDR genes: rs2228570, rs1544410; and RXRA genes: rs10776909, rs10881578, and rs749759 was compared between groups. Results. No significant differences in a frequency distribution of tested polymorphisms were shown between type 2 DM nephropathy patients and controls. A difference was found in IL18 rs360719 polymorphic distribution between the former group and chronic infective tubulointerstitial nephritic patients (Ptrend=0.033, which also differed in this polymorphism from controls (Ptrend=0.005. Conclusion. T-cell cytokine and vitamin D pathway gene polymorphisms are not associated with ESRD due to type 2 DM nephropathy in Polish HD patients. IL18 rs360719 is probably associated with the pathogenesis of chronic infective tubulointerstitial nephritis.

  3. Mast Cell-Targeted Strategies in Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammendola, Michele; Sacco, Rosario; Sammarco, Giuseppe; Luposella, Maria; Patruno, Rosa; Gadaleta, Cosmo Damiano; Sarro, Giovambattista De; Ranieri, Girolamo

    2016-03-01

    Mast cells (MCs) are cells that originate in the bone marrow from pluripotent CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells. Precursors of MCs migrate through the circulation to their target tissues, completing their maturation process into granulated cells under the influence of several microenvironment growth factors. The most important of these factors is the ligand for the c-Kit receptor (c-Kit-R) namely stem cell factor (SCF), secreted mainly by fibroblasts and endothelial cells (ECs). SCF also regulates development, survival and de novo proliferation of MCs. It has already been demonstrated that gain-of-function mutations of gene c-Kit encoding c-Kit-R result in the development of some tumors. Furthermore, MCs are able also to modulate both innate and adaptive immune response and to express the high-affinity IgE receptor following IgE activation. Among the other IgE-independent MC activation mechanisms, a wide variety of other surface receptors for cytokines, chemokines, immunoglobulins, and complement are also described. Interestingly, MCs can stimulate angiogenesis by releasing of several pro-angiogenic cytokines stored in their cytoplasm. Studies published in the last year suggest that angiogenesis stimulated by MCs may play an important role in tumor growth and progression. Here, we aim to focus several biological features of MCs and to summarize new anti-cancer MC-targeted strategies with potential translation in human clinical trials. PMID:27330532

  4. Brain tumor stem cells as research and treatment targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is one of the most malignant forms of human cancer. Despite intensive treatment, the mean survival of GBM patients remains about 1 year. Recent cancer studies revealed that cancer tissues are pathologically heterogeneous and only a small population of cells has the specific ability to reinitiate cancer. This small cell population is called cancer stem cells (CSCs); in brain tumors these are known as brain tumor stem cells (BTSCs). The identification of BTSCs yielded new insights into chemo- and radioresistance, by which BTSCs can survive selectively and initiate recurrence. Research focused on BTSCs as treatment targets may contribute to the discovery of new therapeutic strategies. Clinical and basic research studies gradually led to improved outcomes in patients with brain tumors. Stupp et al. reported a mean survival of 14.6 months in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients treated with radiotherapy plus temozolomide and 12.1 months in those subjected to radiotherapy alone. Earlier cancer therapies primarily targeted rapidly dividing cells but not minor populations of slowly dividing cells that contain BTSCs. Accumulating evidence suggests that BTSCs may represent an excellent tool for discovering new strategies to treat GBM patients. In this review, we present evidence supporting the CSC model of tumor progression, and discuss difficulties encountered in CSC research and experimental and therapeutic implications. (author)

  5. Assessing genetic polymorphisms using DNA extracted from cells present in saliva samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nemoda Zsofia

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Technical advances following the Human Genome Project revealed that high-quality and -quantity DNA may be obtained from whole saliva samples. However, usability of previously collected samples and the effects of environmental conditions on the samples during collection have not been assessed in detail. In five studies we document the effects of sample volume, handling and storage conditions, type of collection device, and oral sampling location, on quantity, quality, and genetic assessment of DNA extracted from cells present in saliva. Methods Saliva samples were collected from ten adults in each study. Saliva volumes from .10-1.0 ml, different saliva collection devices, sampling locations in the mouth, room temperature storage, and multiple freeze-thaw cycles were tested. One representative single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP in the catechol-0-methyltransferase gene (COMT rs4680 and one representative variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR in the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR: serotonin transporter linked polymorphic region were selected for genetic analyses. Results The smallest tested whole saliva volume of .10 ml yielded, on average, 1.43 ± .77 μg DNA and gave accurate genotype calls in both genetic analyses. The usage of collection devices reduced the amount of DNA extracted from the saliva filtrates compared to the whole saliva sample, as 54-92% of the DNA was retained on the device. An "adhered cell" extraction enabled recovery of this DNA and provided good quality and quantity DNA. The DNA from both the saliva filtrates and the adhered cell recovery provided accurate genotype calls. The effects of storage at room temperature (up to 5 days, repeated freeze-thaw cycles (up to 6 cycles, and oral sampling location on DNA extraction and on genetic analysis from saliva were negligible. Conclusions Whole saliva samples with volumes of at least .10 ml were sufficient to extract good quality and quantity DNA. Using

  6. Targeting insulin-producing beta cells for regenerative therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliorini, Adriana; Roscioni, Sara S; Lickert, Heiko

    2016-09-01

    Pancreatic beta cells differ in terms of glucose responsiveness, insulin secretion and proliferative capacity; however, the molecular pathways that regulate this cellular heterogeneity are unknown. We have identified the Wnt-planar cell polarity (PCP) effector Flattop (FLTP) as a biomarker that identifies mature beta cells in the islets of Langerhans. Interestingly, three-dimensional architecture and Wnt-PCP ligands are sufficient to trigger mouse and human beta cell maturation. These results highlight the fact that novel biomarkers shed light on the long-standing mystery of beta cell heterogeneity and identify the Wnt-PCP pathway as triggering beta cell maturation. Understanding heterogeneity in the islets of Langerhans might allow targeting of beta cell subpopulations for regenerative therapy and provide building principles for stem cell-derived islets. This review summarises a presentation given at the 'Can we make a better beta cell?' symposium at the 2015 annual meeting of the EASD. It is accompanied by two other reviews on topics from this symposium (by Amin Ardestani and Kathrin Maedler, DOI: 10.1007/s00125-016-3892-9 , and by Harry Heimberg and colleagues, DOI: 10.1007/s00125-016-3879-6 ) and a commentary by the Session Chair, Shanta Persaud (DOI: 10.1007/s00125-016-3870-2 ). PMID:27412250

  7. Correlating the Polymorphism of Titanyl Phthalocyanine Thin Films with Solar Cell Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasseur, Karolien; Rand, Barry P; Cheyns, David; Temst, Kristiaan; Froyen, Ludo; Heremans, Paul

    2012-09-01

    The structure of titanyl phthalocyanine (TiOPc) thin films is correlated with photovoltaic properties of planar heterojunction solar cells by pairing different TiOPc polymorph donor layers with C60 as an acceptor. Solvent annealing and the insertion of two different templating layers, namely 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorodecyltrichlorosilane (FDTS) and CuI, prove to be effective methods to control the TiOPc thin film structure. The crystal phase of TiOPc thin films was identified by combining X-ray reflectivity (XRR) measurements with spectroscopic techniques, including absorption and micro-Raman measurements. Implementation of a donor layer with an absorption spectrum extending into the near-infrared (NIR) led to solar cells with external quantum efficiencies (EQEs) above 27% from λ = 600 - 890 nm, with the best device yielding a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 2.6%. Our results highlight the need to understand the relationship between processing parameters and thin film structure, as these have important consequences on device performance.

  8. Targeted therapy in non-small cell lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shou-Ching Tang

    2004-01-01

    @@ 1 Introduction Recent progress in molecular biology has enabled us to better understand the molecular mechanism underlying pathogenesis of human malignancy including lung cancer. Sequencing of human genome has identified many oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes,giving us a better understanding of the molecular events leading to the formation, progression, metastasis, and the development of drug resistance in human lung cancer. In addition, many signal transduction pathways have been discovered that play important roles in lung cancer. Novel strategy of anti-cancer drug development now involves the identification and development of targeted therapy that interrupts one or more than one pathways or cross-talk among different signal transduction pathways. In addition, efforts are underway that combine the traditional cytotoxic (non-targeted) agents with the biological (targeted) therapy to increase the response rate and survival in patients with lung cancer, especially advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

  9. Intracellular targets of RGDS peptide in melanoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Capogrossi Maurizio C

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RGD-motif acts as a specific integrins-ligand and regulates a variety of cell-functions via extracellular action affecting cell-adhesion properties. However, increasing evidence identifies additional RGDS-functions at intracellular level. Previous reports show RGDS-internalization in endothelial cells, cardiomyocytes and lymphocytes, indicating intracellular targets such as caspase-8 and caspase-9, and suggest RGDS specific activity at cytoplasmic level. Given the role RGDS-peptides play in controlling proliferation and apoptosis in several cell types, investigating intracellular targets of RGDS in melanoma cells may un-reveal novel molecular targets and key pathways, potentially useful for a more effective approach to melanoma treatment. Results In the present study we show for the first time that RGDS-peptide is internalized in melanoma cells in a time-dependent way and exerts strong anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects independently from its extracellular anti-adhesive action. RGES control-peptide did not show biological effects, as expected; nevertheless it is internalized, although with slower kinetics. Survivin, a known cell-cycle and survival-regulator is highly expressed in melanoma cells. Co-immunoprecipitation assays in cell lysates and overlay assays with the purified proteins showed that RGDS interacts with survivin, as well as with procaspase-3, -8 and -9. RGDS-peptide binding to survivin was found to be specific, at high affinity (Kd 27.5 μM and located at the survivin C-terminus. RGDS-survivin interaction appeared to play a key role, since RGDS lost its anti-mitogenic effect in survivin-deprived cells with a specific siRNA. Conclusions RGDS inhibits melanoma growth with an adhesion-independent mechanism; it is internalized in melanoma cells and specifically interacts with survivin. The present data may indicate a novel role of RGDS-containing peptides physiologically released from the extracellular

  10. Genetic polymorphism directs IL-6 expression in fibroblasts but not selected other cell types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noss, Erika H; Nguyen, Hung N; Chang, Sook Kyung; Watts, Gerald F M; Brenner, Michael B

    2015-12-01

    Interleukin (IL)-6 blockade is an effective treatment for rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and synovial fibroblasts are a major IL-6 producer in the inflamed joint. We found that human RA and osteoarthritis (OA) synovial fibroblasts derived from independent donors reproducibly segregated into low, medium, and high IL-6 producers, independent of stimulus, cell passage, or disease state. IL-6 expression pattern correlated strongly with total mRNA expression, not mRNA stability, suggesting transcriptional rather than posttranscriptional regulation. High-fibroblast IL-6 expression was significantly associated with the IL-6 proximal promoter single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs1800795 minor allele (CC) genotype. In contrast, no association between this SNP and IL-6 production was detected in CD14(+) monocytes, another major producer of synovial IL-6. Luciferase expression assays confirmed that this SNP was associated with differential IL-6 expression in fibroblasts. To date, several association studies examining rs1800795 allele frequency and disease risk have reported seemingly conflicting results ranging from no association to association with either the major or minor allele across a spectrum of conditions, including cancer and autoimmune, cardiovascular, infectious, and metabolic diseases. This study points to a prominent contribution from promoter genetic variation in fibroblast IL-6 regulation, but not in other IL-6-producing cell types. We propose that some of the heterogeneity in these clinical studies likely reflects the cellular source of IL-6 in specific diseases, much of which may be produced by nonhematopoietic cells. These results highlight that functional analysis of disease-associated SNPs on gene expression and pathologic processes must consider variation in diverse cell types.

  11. Delivery of Therapeutic RNAs Into Target Cells IN VIVO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Mei Ying; Hagen, Thilo

    2014-02-01

    RNA-based therapy is one of the most promising approaches to treat human diseases. Specifically, the use of short interfering RNA (siRNA) siRNA and microRNA (miRNA) mimics for in vivo RNA interference has immense potential as it directly lowers the expression of the therapeutic target protein. However, there are a number of major roadblocks to the successful implementation of siRNA and other RNA based therapies in the clinic. These include the instability of RNAs in vivo and the difficulty to efficiently deliver the RNA into the target cells. Hence, various innovative approaches have been taken over the years to develop effective RNA delivery methods. These methods include liposome-, polymeric nanoparticle- and peptide-mediated cellular delivery. In a recent innovative study, bioengineered bacterial outer membrane vesicles were used as vehicles for effective delivery of siRNA into cells in vivo.

  12. Double Gene Targeting Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism Assay Discriminates Beef, Buffalo, and Pork Substitution in Frankfurter Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, M A Motalib; Ali, Md Eaqub; Abd Hamid, Sharifah Bee; Asing; Mustafa, Shuhaimi; Mohd Desa, Mohd Nasir; Zaidul, I S M

    2016-08-17

    Beef, buffalo, and pork adulteration in the food chain is an emerging and sensitive issue. Current molecular techniques to authenticate these species depend on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays involving long and single targets which break down under natural decomposition and/or processing treatments. This novel multiplex polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism assay targeted two different gene sites for each of the bovine, buffalo, and porcine materials. This authentication ensured better security, first through a complementation approach because it is highly unlikely that both sites will be missing under compromised states, and second through molecular fingerprints. Mitochondrial cytochrome b and ND5 genes were targeted, and all targets (73, 90, 106, 120, 138, and 146 bp) were stable under extreme boiling and autoclaving treatments. Target specificity and authenticity were ensured through cross-amplification reaction and restriction digestion of PCR products with AluI, EciI, FatI, and CviKI-1 enzymes. A survey of Malaysian frankfurter products revealed rampant substitution of beef with buffalo but purity in porcine materials. PMID:27501408

  13. Topical vaccination with functionalized particles targeting dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baleeiro, Renato B; Wiesmüller, Karl-Heinz; Reiter, Yoran; Baude, Barbara; Dähne, Lars; Patzelt, Alexa; Lademann, Jürgen; Barbuto, José A; Walden, Peter

    2013-08-01

    Needle-free vaccination, for reasons of safety, economy, and convenience, is a central goal in vaccine development, but it also needs to meet the immunological requirements for efficient induction of prophylactic and therapeutic immune responses. Combining the principles of noninvasive delivery to dendritic cells (DCs) through skin and the immunological principles of cell-mediated immunity, we developed microparticle-based topical vaccines. We show here that the microparticles are efficient carriers for coordinated delivery of the essential vaccine constituents to DCs for cross-presentation of the antigens and stimulation of T-cell responses. When applied to the skin, the microparticles penetrate into hair follicles and target the resident DCs, the immunologically most potent cells and site for induction of efficient immune responses. The microparticle vaccine principle can be applied to different antigen formats such as peptides and proteins, or nucleic acids coding for the antigens.

  14. Topical vaccination with functionalized particles targeting dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baleeiro, Renato B; Wiesmüller, Karl-Heinz; Reiter, Yoran; Baude, Barbara; Dähne, Lars; Patzelt, Alexa; Lademann, Jürgen; Barbuto, José A; Walden, Peter

    2013-08-01

    Needle-free vaccination, for reasons of safety, economy, and convenience, is a central goal in vaccine development, but it also needs to meet the immunological requirements for efficient induction of prophylactic and therapeutic immune responses. Combining the principles of noninvasive delivery to dendritic cells (DCs) through skin and the immunological principles of cell-mediated immunity, we developed microparticle-based topical vaccines. We show here that the microparticles are efficient carriers for coordinated delivery of the essential vaccine constituents to DCs for cross-presentation of the antigens and stimulation of T-cell responses. When applied to the skin, the microparticles penetrate into hair follicles and target the resident DCs, the immunologically most potent cells and site for induction of efficient immune responses. The microparticle vaccine principle can be applied to different antigen formats such as peptides and proteins, or nucleic acids coding for the antigens. PMID:23426134

  15. Targeted therapy for renal cell carcinoma: The next lap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravindran Kanesvaran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Advances in rationally targeted therapeutics over the last decade have transformed the clinical care of advanced kidney cancer. While oncologists consolidate the gains of the wave of new agents, comprising a panoply of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors and inhibitors of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR, there is an increasing sense that a plateau has been reached in the short term. It is sobering that all currently approved targeted therapies have not yielded durable remissions and remain palliative in intent. In the context of recent insights in kidney cancer biology, we review promising ongoing and future approaches for kidney cancer therapeutics aimed toward forging new paths in the systemic management of renal cell carcinoma. Broadly, candidate agents for such innovative strategies include immune check-point inhibitors, anti-cancer stem cell agents, next-generation anti-vascular endothelial growth factor receptor and anti-mTOR agents as well as more investigational agents in the preclinical and early clinical development settings.

  16. Targeting prostate cancer stem cells for cancer therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Guocan; Wang, Zhiwei; Sarkar, Fazlul H; Wei, Wenyi

    2012-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most common malignant neoplasm in men and the second most frequent cause of cancer death for males in the United States. Recently, emerging evidence suggests that prostate cancer stem cells (CSCs) may play a critical role in the development and progression of PCa. Therefore, targeting prostate CSCs for the prevention of tumor progression and treatment of PCa could become a novel strategy for better treatment of patients diagnosed with PCa. In this review article, ...

  17. Fluoxetine targets early progenitor cells in the adult brain

    OpenAIRE

    Encinas, Juan M.; Vaahtokari, Anne; Enikolopov, Grigori

    2006-01-01

    Chronic treatment with antidepressants increases neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus. This increase in the production of new neurons may be required for the behavioral effects of antidepressants. However, it is not known which class of cells within the neuronal differentiation cascade is targeted by the drugs. We have generated a reporter mouse line, which allows identification and classification of early neuronal progenitors. It also allows accurate quantitation of changes induced by neuro...

  18. Interleukin 10 gene promoter polymorphism and risk of diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roba M. Talaat

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: Taken together, our findings demonstrated that IL-10 promoter gene polymorphism (−1082 and −819 may not have an influence on the clinical outcome of DLBCL, especially in terms of overall secretion level. Further investigations of other cytokine gene polymorphisms will lead to a better understanding of the disease’s biological background.

  19. The cell's nucleolus: an emerging target for chemotherapeutic intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickard, Amanda J; Bierbach, Ulrich

    2013-09-01

    The transient nucleolus plays a central role in the up-regulated synthesis of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) to sustain ribosome biogenesis, a hallmark of aberrant cell growth. This function, in conjunction with its unique pathohistological features in malignant cells and its ability to mediate apoptosis, renders this sub-nuclear structure a potential target for chemotherapeutic agents. In this Minireview, structurally and functionally diverse small molecules are discussed that have been reported to either interact with the nucleolus directly or perturb its function indirectly by acting on its dynamic components. These molecules include all major classes of nucleic-acid-targeted agents, antimetabolites, kinase inhibitors, anti-inflammatory drugs, natural product antibiotics, oligopeptides, as well as nanoparticles. Together, these molecules are invaluable probes of structure and function of the nucleolus. They also provide a unique opportunity to develop novel strategies for more selective and therefore better-tolerated chemotherapeutic intervention. In this regard, inhibition of RNA polymerase-I-mediated rRNA synthesis appears to be a promising mechanism for killing cancer cells. The recent development of molecules targeted at G-quadruplex-forming rRNA gene sequences, which are currently undergoing clinical trials, seems to attest to the success of this approach.

  20. Therapies targeting cancer stem cells: Current trends and future challenges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Denisa; L; Dragu; Laura; G; Necula; Coralia; Bleotu; Carmen; C; Diaconu; Mihaela; Chivu-Economescu

    2015-01-01

    Traditional therapies against cancer, chemo- and radiotherapy, have multiple limitations that lead to treatment failure and cancer recurrence. These limitations are related to systemic and local toxicity, while treatment failure and cancer relapse are due to drug resistance and self-renewal, properties of a small population of tumor cells called cancer stem cells(CSCs). These cells are involved in cancer initiation, maintenance, metastasis and recurrence. Therefore, in order to develop efficient treatments that can induce a longlasting clinical response preventing tumor relapse it is important to develop drugs that can specifically target and eliminate CSCs. Recent identification of surface markers and understanding of molecular feature associated with CSC phenotype helped with the design of effective treatments. In this review we discuss targeting surface biomarkers, signaling pathways that regulate CSCs self-renewal and differentiation, drug-efflux pumps involved in apoptosis resistance, microenvironmental signals that sustain CSCs growth, manipulation of mi RNA expression, and induction of CSCs apoptosis and differentiation, with specific aim to hamper CSCs regeneration and cancer relapse. Some of these agents are under evaluation in preclinical and clinical studies, most of them for using in combination with traditional therapies. The combined therapy using conventional anticancer drugs with CSCs-targeting agents, may offer a promising strategy for management and eradication of different types of cancers.

  1. Targeting dendritic cells for improved HIV-1 vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smed-Sörensen, Anna; Loré, Karin

    2013-01-01

    As dendritic cells (DCs) have the unique capacity to activate antigen-naive T cells they likely play a critical role in eliciting immune responses to vaccines. DCs are therefore being explored as attractive targets for vaccines, but understanding the interaction of DCs and clinically relevant vaccine antigens and adjuvants is a prerequisite. The HIV-1/AIDS epidemic continues to be a significant health problem, and despite intense research efforts over the past 30 years a protective vaccine has not yet been developed. A common challenge in vaccine design is to find a vaccine formulation that best shapes the immune response to protect against and/or control the given pathogen. Here, we discuss the importance of understanding the diversity, anatomical location and function of different human DC subsets in order to identify the optimal target cells for an HIV-1 vaccine. We review human DC interactions with some of the HIV-1 vaccine antigen delivery vehicles and adjuvants currently utilized in preclinical and clinical studies. Specifically, the effects of distinctly different vaccine adjuvants in terms of activation of DCs and improving DC function and vaccine efficacy are discussed. The susceptibility and responses of DCs to recombinant adenovirus vectors are reviewed, as well as the strategy of directly targeting DCs by using DC marker-specific monoclonal antibodies coupled to an antigen. PMID:22975879

  2. Target cell lysis by natural killer cells is influenced by beta 2-microglobulin expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müllbacher, A; King, N J

    1989-07-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells form part of the vertebrate defence against viruses and tumours, but show only limited specificity. The molecule(s) recognized by NK cells on target cells are at present unknown. Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I antigen concentration on target cells is inversely correlated with NK cell lysis. Here we show that MHC class I-unassociated beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2-m) expression is involved in NK cell-target cell interaction. Two human MHC class I negative cell lines, Daudi and K562, are differentially susceptible to NK cell lysis. Daudi cells are beta 2-m-negative and resistant to NK lysis, K562 are beta 2-m-positive and highly susceptible to lysis by NK cells. Interferon (IFN) treatment augments beta 2-m expression and NK lysis of K562, but not in Daudi cells. NK cell lysis of K562, but not YAC-1 cells, can be inhibited by monoclonal anti-human beta 2-m antibody. Furthermore, susceptibility of mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEF) to NK lysis can be increased by infection with recombinant vaccinia virus expressing the human beta 2-m gene.

  3. Coupling Neurogenetics (GARS™) and a Nutrigenomic Based Dopaminergic Agonist to Treat Reward Deficiency Syndrome (RDS): Targeting Polymorphic Reward Genes for Carbohydrate Addiction Algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Kenneth; Simpatico, Thomas; Badgaiyan, Rajendra D.; Demetrovics, Zsolt; Fratantonio, James; Agan, Gozde; Febo, Marcelo; Gold, Mark S.

    2016-01-01

    Earlier work from our laboratory, showing anti-addiction activity of a nutraceutical consisting of amino-acid precursors and enkephalinase inhibition properties and our discovery of the first polymorphic gene (Dopamine D2 Receptor Gene [DRD2]) to associate with severe alcoholism serves as a blue-print for the development of “Personalized Medicine” in addiction. Prior to the later genetic finding, we developed the concept of Brain Reward Cascade, which continues to act as an important component for stratification of addiction risk through neurogenetics. In 1996 our laboratory also coined the term “Reward Deficiency Syndrome (RDS)” to define a common genetic rubric for both substance and non-substance related addictive behaviors. Following many reiterations we utilized polymorphic targets of a number of reward genes (serotonergic, Opioidergic, GABAergic and Dopaminergic) to customize KB220 [Neuroadaptogen- amino-acid therapy (NAAT)] by specific algorithms. Identifying 1,000 obese subjects in the Netherlands a subsequent small subset was administered various KB220Z formulae customized according to respective DNA polymorphisms individualized that translated to significant decreases in both Body Mass Index (BMI) and weight in pounds. Following these experiments, we have been successfully developing a panel of genes known as “Genetic Addiction Risk Score” (GARSpDX)™. Selection of 10 genes with appropriate variants, a statistically significant association between the ASI-Media Version-alcohol and drug severity scores and GARSpDx was found A variant of KB220Z in abstinent heroin addicts increased resting state functional connectivity in a putative network including: dorsal anterior cingulate, medial frontal gyrus, nucleus accumbens, posterior cingulate, occipital cortical areas, and cerebellum. In addition, we show that KB220Z significantly activates, above placebo, seed regions of interest including the left nucleus accumbens, cingulate gyrus, anterior

  4. Coupling Neurogenetics (GARS™ and a Nutrigenomic Based Dopaminergic Agonist to Treat Reward Deficiency Syndrome (RDS: Targeting Polymorphic Reward Genes for Carbohydrate Addiction Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Blum

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Earlier work from our laboratory, showing anti-addiction activity of a nutraceutical consisting of amino-acid precursors and enkephalinase inhibition properties and our discovery of the first polymorphic gene (Dopamine D2 Receptor Gene [DRD2] to associate with severe alcoholism serves as a blue-print for the development of "Personalized Medicine" in addiction. Prior to the later genetic finding, we developed the concept of Brain Reward Cascade, which continues to act as an important component for stratification of addiction risk through neurogenetics. In 1996 our laboratory also coined the term "Reward Deficiency Syndrome (RDS" to define a common genetic rubric for both substance and non-substance related addictive behaviors. Following many reiterations we utilized polymorphic targets of a number of reward genes (serotonergic, Opioidergic, GABAergic and Dopaminergic to customize KB220 [Neuroadaptogen- amino-acid therapy (NAAT] by specific algorithms. Identifying 1,000 obese subjects in the Netherlands a subsequent small subset was administered various KB220Z formulae customized according to respective DNA polymorphisms individualized that translated to significant decreases in both Body Mass Index (BMI and weight in pounds. Following these experiments, we have been successfully developing a panel of genes known as "Genetic Addiction Risk Score" (GARSpDX™. Selection of 10 genes with appropriate variants, a statistically significant association between the ASIMedia Version-alcohol and drug severity scores and GARSpDx was found A variant of KB220Z in abstinent heroin addicts increased resting state functional connectivity in a putative network including: dorsal anterior cingulate, medial frontal gyrus, nucleus accumbens, posterior cingulate, occipital cortical areas, and cerebellum. In addition, we show that KB220Z significantly activates, above placebo, seed regions of interest including the left nucleus accumbens, cingulate gyrus, anterior

  5. Telomere Transcripts Target Telomerase in Human Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theresa Kreilmeier

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Long non-coding transcripts from telomeres, called telomeric repeat-containing RNA (TERRA, were identified as blocking telomerase activity (TA, a telomere maintenance mechanism (TMM, in tumors. We expressed recombinant TERRA transcripts in tumor cell lines with TA and with alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT to study effects on TMM and cell growth. Adeno- and lentivirus constructs (AV and LV were established for transient and stable expression of approximately 130 units of telomere hexanucleotide repeats under control of cytomegalovirus (CMV and human RNase P RNA H1 (hH1 promoters with and without polyadenylation, respectively. Six human tumor cell lines either using telomerase or ALT were infected and analyzed for TA levels. Pre-infection cells using telomerase had 1%–3% of the TERRA expression levels of ALT cells. AV and LV expression of recombinant TERRA in telomerase positive cells showed a 1.3–2.6 fold increase in TERRA levels, and a decrease in TA of 25%–58%. Dominant-negative or small hairpin RNA (shRNA viral expression against human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT results in senescence, not induced by TERRA expression. Population doubling time, cell viability and TL (telomere length were not impacted by ectopic TERRA expression. Clonal growth was reduced by TERRA expression in TA but not ALT cell lines. ALT cells were not affected by treatments applied. Established cell models and tools may be used to better understand the role of TERRA in the cell, especially for targeting telomerase.

  6. Cell model of catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia reveals early and delayed afterdepolarizations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsi Kujala

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC provide means to study the pathophysiology of genetic disorders. Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT is a malignant inherited ion channel disorder predominantly caused by mutations in the cardiac ryanodine receptor (RyR2. In this study the cellular characteristics of CPVT are investigated and whether the electrophysiological features of this mutation can be mimicked using iPSC -derived cardiomyocytes (CM. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Spontaneously beating CMs were differentiated from iPSCs derived from a CPVT patient carrying a P2328S mutation in RyR2 and from two healthy controls. Calcium (Ca(2+ cycling and electrophysiological properties were studied by Ca(2+ imaging and patch-clamp techniques. Monophasic action potential (MAP recordings and 24h-ECGs of CPVT-P2328S patients were analyzed for the presence of afterdepolarizations. We found defects in Ca(2+ cycling and electrophysiology in CPVT CMs, reflecting the cardiac phenotype observed in the patients. Catecholaminergic stress led to abnormal Ca(2+ signaling and induced arrhythmias in CPVT CMs. CPVT CMs also displayed reduced sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR Ca(2+ content, indicating leakage of Ca(2+ from the SR. Patch-clamp recordings of CPVT CMs revealed both delayed afterdepolarizations (DADs during spontaneous beating and in response to adrenaline and also early afterdepolarizations (EADs during spontaneous beating, recapitulating the changes seen in MAP and 24h-ECG recordings of patients carrying the same mutation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This cell model shows aberrant Ca(2+ cycling characteristic of CPVT and in addition to DADs it displays EADs. This cell model for CPVT provides a platform to study basic pathology, to screen drugs, and to optimize drug therapy.

  7. New small molecules targeting apoptosis and cell viability in osteosarcoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doris Maugg

    Full Text Available Despite the option of multimodal therapy in the treatment strategies of osteosarcoma (OS, the most common primary malignant bone tumor, the standard therapy has not changed over the last decades and still involves multidrug chemotherapy and radical surgery. Although successfully applied in many patients a large number of patients eventually develop recurrent or metastatic disease in which current therapeutic regimens often lack efficacy. Thus, new therapeutic strategies are urgently needed. In this study, we performed a phenotypic high-throughput screening campaign using a 25,000 small-molecule diversity library to identify new small molecules selectively targeting osteosarcoma cells. We could identify two new small molecules that specifically reduced cell viability in OS cell lines U2OS and HOS, but affected neither hepatocellular carcinoma cell line (HepG2 nor primary human osteoblasts (hOB. In addition, the two compounds induced caspase 3 and 7 activity in the U2OS cell line. Compared to conventional drugs generally used in OS treatment such as doxorubicin, we indeed observed a greater sensitivity of OS cell viability to the newly identified compounds compared to doxorubicin and staurosporine. The p53-negative OS cell line Saos-2 almost completely lacked sensitivity to compound treatment that could indicate a role of p53 in the drug response. Taken together, our data show potential implications for designing more efficient therapies in OS.

  8. Radioprotection of targeted and bystander cells by methylproamine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burdak-Rothkamm, Susanne [Queen' s University Belfast, Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Belfast (United Kingdom); Oxford University Hospitals, Cellular Pathology, Oxford (United Kingdom); Smith, Andrea; Lobachevsky, Pavel; Martin, Roger [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Molecular Radiation Biology Laboratory, Melbourne (Australia); University of Melbourne, The Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, Melbourne (Australia); Prise, Kevin M. [Queen' s University Belfast, Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Belfast (United Kingdom)

    2014-09-23

    Radioprotective agents are of interest for application in radiotherapy for cancer and in public health medicine in the context of accidental radiation exposure. Methylproamine is the lead compound of a class of radioprotectors which act as DNA binding anti-oxidants, enabling the repair of transient radiation-induced oxidative DNA lesions. This study tested methylproamine for the radioprotection of both directly targeted and bystander cells. T98G glioma cells were treated with 15 μM methylproamine and exposed to {sup 137}Cs γ-ray/X-ray irradiation and He{sup 2+} microbeam irradiation. Radioprotection of directly targeted cells and bystander cells was measured by clonogenic survival or γH2AX assay. Radioprotection of directly targeted T98G cells by methylproamine was observed for {sup 137}Cs γ-rays and X-rays but not for He{sup 2+} charged particle irradiation. The effect of methylproamine on the bystander cell population was tested for both X-ray irradiation and He{sup 2+} ion microbeam irradiation. The X-ray bystander experiments were carried out by medium transfer from irradiated to non-irradiated cultures and three experimental designs were tested. Radioprotection was only observed when recipient cells were pretreated with the drug prior to exposure to the conditioned medium. In microbeam bystander experiments targeted and nontargeted cells were co-cultured with continuous methylproamine treatment during irradiation and postradiation incubation; radioprotection of bystander cells was observed. Methylproamine protected targeted cells from DNA damage caused by γ-ray or X-ray radiation but not He{sup 2+} ion radiation. Protection of bystander cells was independent of the type of radiation which the donor population received. (orig.) [German] Radioprotektive Agenzien sind sowohl in der Strahlentherapie von Krebserkrankungen als auch im Strahlenschutz im Zusammenhang mit akzidenteller Exposition von Bedeutung. Methylproamine ist die Leitsubstanz einer Klasse von

  9. De novo LINE-1 retrotransposition in HepG2 cells preferentially targets gene poor regions of chromosome 13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojang, Pasano; Anderton, Mark J; Roberts, Ruth A; Ramos, Kenneth S

    2014-08-01

    Long interspersed nuclear elements (Line-1 or L1s) account for ~17% of the human genome. While the majority of human L1s are inactive, ~80-100 elements remain retrotransposition competent and mobilize through RNA intermediates to different locations within the genome. De novo insertions of L1s account for polymorphic variation of the human genome and disruption of target loci at their new location. In the present study, fluorescence in situ hybridization and DNA sequencing were used to characterize retrotransposition profiles of L1(RP) in cultured human HepG2 cells. While expression of synthetic L1(RP) was associated with full-length and truncated insertions throughout the entire genome, a strong preference for gene-poor regions, such as those found in chromosome 13 was observed for full-length insertions. These findings shed light into L1 targeting mechanisms within the human genome and question the putative randomness of L1 retrotransposition.

  10. Lipoproteins tethered dendrimeric nanoconstructs for effective targeting to cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Anupriya; Jain, Keerti, E-mail: keertijain02@gmail.com; Mehra, Neelesh Kumar, E-mail: neelesh81mph@gmail.com; Jain, N. K., E-mail: dr.jnarendr@gmail.com [Dr. H. S. Gour University, Pharmaceutics Research Laboratory, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences (India)

    2013-10-15

    In the present investigation, poly (propylene imine) dendrimers up to fifth generation (PPI G5.0) were synthesized using ethylene diamine and acrylonitrile. Lipoproteins (high-density lipoprotein; HDL and low-density lipoprotein; LDL) were isolated from human plasma by discontinuous density gradient ultracentrifugation, characterized and tethered to G5.0 PPI dendrimers to construct LDL- and HDL-conjugated dendrimeric nanoconstructs for tumor-specific delivery of docetaxel. Developed formulations showed sustained release characteristics in in vitro drug release and in vivo pharmacokinetic studies. The cancer targeting potential of lipoprotein coupled dendrimers was investigated by ex vivo cytotoxicity and cell uptake studies using human hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines (HepG2 cells) and biodistribution studies in albino rats of Sprague-Dawley strain. Lipoprotein anchored dendrimeric nanoconstructs showed significant uptake by cancer cells as well as higher biodistribution of docetaxel to liver and spleen. It is concluded that these precisely synthesized engineered dendrimeric nanoconstructs could serve as promising drug carrier for fighting with the fatal disease, i.e., cancer, attributed to their defined targeting and therapeutic potential.

  11. Targeting Gallium to Cancer Cells through the Folate Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nerissa Viola-Villegas

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of gallium(III compounds as anti-cancer agents for both treatment and diagnosis is a rapidly developing field of research. Problems remain in exploring the full potential of gallium(III as a safe and successful therapeutic agent or as an imaging agent. One of the major issues is that gallium(III compounds have little tropism for cancer cells. We have combined the targeting properties of folic acid (FA with long chain liquid polymer poly(ethylene glycol (PEG ‘spacers’. This FA-PEG unit has been coupled to the gallium coordination complex of 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclo-dodecane-N,N′,N′′,N′′′-tetraacetic acid (DOTA through amide linkages for delivery into target cells overexpressing the folate receptor (FR. In vitro cytotoxicity assays were conducted against a multi-drug resistant ovarian cell line (A2780/AD that overexpresses the FR and contrasted against a FR free Chinese hamster ovary (CHO cell line. Results are rationalized taking into account stability studies conducted in RPMI 1640 media and HEPES buffer at pH 7.4.

  12. Nano-enhanced optical delivery into targeted cells (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Weldon; Pradhan, Sanjay

    2016-03-01

    Nano-enhanced optical field of gold nanoparticles allowed the use of a continuous wave (cw) laser beam for efficient delivery of exogenous impermeable materials into targeted cells. Using this Nano-enhanced Optical Delivery (NOD) method, we show that large molecules could be delivered with low power cw laser with exposure time ~ 1sec. At such low power (and exposure), the non-targeted cells (not bound to gold nanoparticles) were not adversely affected by the laser beam. Further, by varying the size of the gold nanoparticles, cells could be exclusively sensitized to selective wavelengths of laser beam. In contrast other nanoparticles, gold nanoparticles were found to have lower cytotoxicity, making it better suited for clinical NOD. Further, as compared with pulsed lasers, cw (diode) lasers are compact, easy-to-use and therefore, NOD using cw laser beam has significant translational potential for delivery of impermeable bio-molecules to tissues in different organs. We will present optimization of NOD parameters for delivering different molecules to different cells. Success of this NOD method may lead to a new clinical approach for treating AMD and RP patients with geographic atrophy in retina.

  13. Target cell cyclophilins facilitate human papillomavirus type 16 infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malgorzata Bienkowska-Haba

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Following attachment to primary receptor heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG, human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16 particles undergo conformational changes affecting the major and minor capsid proteins, L1 and L2, respectively. This results in exposure of the L2 N-terminus, transfer to uptake receptors, and infectious internalization. Here, we report that target cell cyclophilins, peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerases, are required for efficient HPV16 infection. Cell surface cyclophilin B (CyPB facilitates conformational changes in capsid proteins, resulting in exposure of the L2 N-terminus. Inhibition of CyPB blocked HPV16 infection by inducing noninfectious internalization. Mutation of a putative CyP binding site present in HPV16 L2 yielded exposed L2 N-terminus in the absence of active CyP and bypassed the need for cell surface CyPB. However, this mutant was still sensitive to CyP inhibition and required CyP for completion of infection, probably after internalization. Taken together, these data suggest that CyP is required during two distinct steps of HPV16 infection. Identification of cell surface CyPB will facilitate the study of the complex events preceding internalization and adds a putative drug target for prevention of HPV-induced diseases.

  14. MITOCHONDRIA: INSIGHT TARGET OF DRUG DEVELOPMENT IN CANCER CELLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Ataur Rahman

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are involved in different physiological and pathological processes that are crucial for tumor cell physiology, growth and survival and its dysfunction leads to many human abnormalities, including cardiovascular diseases, neurodegenerative diseases, autoimmune disorders and cancer. The present review is focused on the different experimental and therapeutic cancer strategies addressed to either target mitochondria directly, or use mitochondria as mediators of apoptosis, although its total molecular mechanism has not been elucidated. Therefore, the role of mitochondria in the etiology and progression of several function and explore potential therapeutic benefits of targeting mitochondria in the disease processes. Newly evolving advances in disease diagnostics and therapy will further facilitate future growth in the field of mitochondrian biology, where there is a dire need for sensitive and more affordable diagnostic tools and an urgency to develop effective therapies and identify reliable drug to predict accurately the response to a cancer therapy. These approaches to treat mitochondrial dysfunction rationally could lead to selective protection of cells in different tissues and various disease states. To avoid mitochondrial liabilities, routine screens need to be positioned within the drug-development process as targets of drug-induced cytotoxicity or cancer promotion, as regulators of apoptosis, as sources of cell signalling through reactive oxygen species, and mitochondrial control of specific nuclear responses. However, several novel mitochondrial targets are now emerging, including the potential to manipulate the mitochondrial pool to maintain function via biogenesis and mitophagy. Forthcoming insights into the fine regulation of mitochondrial apoptosis will likely open future perspectives for cancer drug development.

  15. A new prospect in cancer therapy: targeting cancer stem cells to eradicate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Sha Chen; An-Xin Wang; Bing Dong; Ke-Feng Pu; Li-Hua Yuan; Yi-Min Zhu

    2012-01-01

    According to the cancer stem cell theory,cancers can be initiated by cancer stem cells.This makes cancer stem cells prime targets for therapeutic intervention.Eradicating cancer stem cells by efficient targeting agents may have the potential to cure cancer.In this review,we summarize recent breakthroughs that have improved our understanding of cancer stem cells,and we discuss the therapeutic strategy of targeting cancer stem cells,a promising future direction for cancer stem cell research.

  16. A new prospect in cancer therapy: targeting cancer stem cells to eradicate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Yi-Min Zhu; Li-Hua Yuan; Ke-Feng Pu; Bing Dong; An-Xin Wang; Li-Sha Chen

    2012-01-01

    According to the cancer stem cell theory, cancers can be initiated by cancer stem cells. This makes cancer stem cells prime targets for therapeutic intervention. Eradicating cancer stem cells by efficient targeting agents may have the potential to cure cancer. In this review, we summarize recent breakthroughs that have improved our understanding of cancer stem cells, and we discuss the therapeutic strategy of targeting cancer stem cells, a promising future direction for cancer stem cell resea...

  17. Fetal Hemoglobin in Tunisian Sickle Cell Disease Patient: Relationship with Polymorphic Sequences Cis to the β-Globin Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moumni, Imen; Ben Mustapha, Maha; Ben Mansour, Ikbel; Zoraï, Amine; Douzi, Kaïs; Sassi, Sarah; Chaouachi, Dorra; Mellouli, Fethi; Bejaoui, Mohamed; Abbes, Salem

    2016-03-01

    Fetal hemoglobin (HbF) plays a dominant role in ameliorating morbidity and mortality of hemoglobinopathies. We evaluated the effects of polymorphic markers within the β-globin gene cluster to identify the genetic mechanics that influence HbF on Tunisian sickling patients (n = 242). Haplotype analysis was carried out by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and the framework polymorphism was established by PCR-sequencing, four independent regions of interest were identified: the 5' region of β-LCR-HS2 site, the intervening sequence II (IVSII) region of two fetal (Gγ and Aγ) genes and the 5' region of β-globin gene. The correlation of these various Haplotypes and SNPs with HbF expression and clinical data was studied. Our data showed that among the various polymorphic markers analyzed, only the sequence (AT)xN12(AT)y in LCR HS2 region was significantly associated (p sickle cell patients. This study can improve understanding of the physiopathology of the disease and aid to increase our ability to predict clinical severity. PMID:26855518

  18. The relationship between C20orf54 gene rs3746804 position single nucleotide polymorphism and susceptibility to esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    纪爱芳

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the association of C20orf54 gene rs3746804 position single nucleotide polymorphism and susceptibility to esophageal squamous cell carcinoma(ESCC). Methods Purification of genomic DNA from whole blood was used the

  19. Early modification of sickle cell disease clinical course by UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 gene promoter polymorphism

    OpenAIRE

    Martins, R.; Morais, A.; Dias, A; Soares, I; Rolão, C; Ducla-Soares, J; Braga, L.; Seixas, T.; Nunes, B.; Olim, G; Romão, L; Lavinha, J; Faustino, P

    2008-01-01

    Elevated erythrocyte destruction in sickle cell disease (SCD) results in chronic hyperbilirubinaemia and, in a subset of patients, cholelithiasis occurs. We investigated whether the (TA)n promoter polymorphism in the UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 gene (UGT1A1) may modify bilirubin metabolism, influencing bilirubinaemia, predisposition to cholelithiasis and subsequent cholecystectomy, in a group of 153 young SCD patients (mean age 12.0 +/- 9.0 years) predominantly of Bantu beta S haplotype. ...

  20. Targeting cancer stem cells by using the nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong IS

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In-Sun Hong,1,2,* Gyu-Beom Jang,1,2,* Hwa-Yong Lee,3 Jeong-Seok Nam1,2 1Laboratory of Tumor Suppressor, Lee Gil Ya Cancer and Diabetes Institute, 2Department of Molecular Medicine, School of Medicine, Gachon University, Incheon, 3The Faculty of Liberal Arts, Jungwon University, Chungbuk, Republic of Korea *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Cancer stem cells (CSCs have been shown to be markedly resistant to conventional cancer treatments such as chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Therefore, therapeutic strategies that selectively target CSCs will ultimately lead to better cancer treatments. Currently, accessible conventional therapeutic agents mainly eliminate the bulk tumor but do not eliminate CSCs. Therefore, the discovery and improvement of CSC-targeting therapeutic agents are necessary. Nanoparticles effectively inhibit multiple types of CSCs by targeting specific signaling pathways (Wnt/ß-catenin, Notch, transforming growth factor-ß, and hedgehog signaling and/or specific markers (aldehyde dehydrogenases, CD44, CD90, and CD133 critically involved in CSC function and maintenance. In this review article, we summarized a number of findings to provide current information about their therapeutic potential of nanoparticles in various cancer cell types and CSCs. Keywords: ALDH, Wnt/ß-catenin, Hedgehog, Notch, TGF-ß signaling, CD44, CD133

  1. Targeting the erythropoietin receptor on glioma cells reduces tumour growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hypoxia has been shown to be one of the major events involved in EPO expression. Accordingly, EPO might be expressed by cerebral neoplastic cells, especially in glioblastoma, known to be highly hypoxic tumours. The expression of EPOR has been described in glioma cells. However, data from the literature remain descriptive and controversial. On the basis of an endogenous source of EPO in the brain, we have focused on a potential role of EPOR in brain tumour growth. In the present study, with complementary approaches to target EPO/EPOR signalling, we demonstrate the presence of a functional EPO/EPOR system on glioma cells leading to the activation of the ERK pathway. This EPO/EPOR system is involved in glioma cell proliferation in vitro. In vivo, we show that the down-regulation of EPOR expression on glioma cells reduces tumour growth and enhances animal survival. Our results support the hypothesis that EPOR signalling in tumour cells is involved in the control of glioma growth.

  2. Targeting the erythropoietin receptor on glioma cells reduces tumour growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peres, Elodie A.; Valable, Samuel [CERVOxy team ' Hypoxia and cerebrovascular pathophysiology' , UMR 6232 CI-NAPS, Universite de Caen Basse-Normandie, Universite Paris-Descartes, CNRS, CEA. G.I.P. CYCERON, Caen (France); Guillamo, Jean-Sebastien [CERVOxy team ' Hypoxia and cerebrovascular pathophysiology' , UMR 6232 CI-NAPS, Universite de Caen Basse-Normandie, Universite Paris-Descartes, CNRS, CEA. G.I.P. CYCERON, Caen (France); Departement de Neurologie, CHU de Caen (France); Marteau, Lena [CERVOxy team ' Hypoxia and cerebrovascular pathophysiology' , UMR 6232 CI-NAPS, Universite de Caen Basse-Normandie, Universite Paris-Descartes, CNRS, CEA. G.I.P. CYCERON, Caen (France); Bernaudin, Jean-Francois [Service d' Histologie-Biologie Tumorale, ER2UPMC, Universite Paris 6, Hopital Tenon, Paris (France); Roussel, Simon [CERVOxy team ' Hypoxia and cerebrovascular pathophysiology' , UMR 6232 CI-NAPS, Universite de Caen Basse-Normandie, Universite Paris-Descartes, CNRS, CEA. G.I.P. CYCERON, Caen (France); Lechapt-Zalcman, Emmanuele [CERVOxy team ' Hypoxia and cerebrovascular pathophysiology' , UMR 6232 CI-NAPS, Universite de Caen Basse-Normandie, Universite Paris-Descartes, CNRS, CEA. G.I.P. CYCERON, Caen (France); Service d' Anatomie Pathologique, CHU de Caen (France); Bernaudin, Myriam [CERVOxy team ' Hypoxia and cerebrovascular pathophysiology' , UMR 6232 CI-NAPS, Universite de Caen Basse-Normandie, Universite Paris-Descartes, CNRS, CEA. G.I.P. CYCERON, Caen (France); Petit, Edwige, E-mail: epetit@cyceron.fr [CERVOxy team ' Hypoxia and cerebrovascular pathophysiology' , UMR 6232 CI-NAPS, Universite de Caen Basse-Normandie, Universite Paris-Descartes, CNRS, CEA. G.I.P. CYCERON, Caen (France)

    2011-10-01

    Hypoxia has been shown to be one of the major events involved in EPO expression. Accordingly, EPO might be expressed by cerebral neoplastic cells, especially in glioblastoma, known to be highly hypoxic tumours. The expression of EPOR has been described in glioma cells. However, data from the literature remain descriptive and controversial. On the basis of an endogenous source of EPO in the brain, we have focused on a potential role of EPOR in brain tumour growth. In the present study, with complementary approaches to target EPO/EPOR signalling, we demonstrate the presence of a functional EPO/EPOR system on glioma cells leading to the activation of the ERK pathway. This EPO/EPOR system is involved in glioma cell proliferation in vitro. In vivo, we show that the down-regulation of EPOR expression on glioma cells reduces tumour growth and enhances animal survival. Our results support the hypothesis that EPOR signalling in tumour cells is involved in the control of glioma growth.

  3. Polymorphisms of the cell surface receptor control mouse susceptibilities to xenotropic and polytropic leukemia viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, M; Tailor, C S; Nouri, A; Kozak, S L; Kabat, D

    1999-11-01

    The differential susceptibilities of mouse strains to xenotropic and polytropic murine leukemia viruses (X-MLVs and P-MLVs, respectively) are poorly understood but may involve multiple mechanisms. Recent evidence has demonstrated that these viruses use a common cell surface receptor (the X-receptor) for infection of human cells. We describe the properties of X-receptor cDNAs with distinct sequences cloned from five laboratory and wild strains of mice and from hamsters and minks. Expression of these cDNAs in resistant cells conferred susceptibilities to the same viruses that naturally infect the animals from which the cDNAs were derived. Thus, a laboratory mouse (NIH Swiss) X-receptor conferred susceptibility to P-MLVs but not to X-MLVs, whereas those from humans, minks, and several wild mice (Mus dunni, SC-1 cells, and Mus spretus) mediated infections by both X-MLVs and P-MLVs. In contrast, X-receptors from the resistant mouse strain Mus castaneus and from hamsters were inactive as viral receptors. These results suggest that X-receptor polymorphisms are a primary cause of resistances of mice to members of the X-MLV/P-MLV family of retroviruses and are responsible for the xenotropism of X-MLVs in laboratory mice. By site-directed mutagenesis, we substituted sequences between the X-receptors of M. dunni and NIH Swiss mice. The NIH Swiss protein contains two key differences (K500E in presumptive extracellular loop 3 [ECL 3] and a T582 deletion in ECL 4) that are both required to block X-MLV infections. Accordingly, a single inverse mutation in the NIH Swiss protein conferred X-MLV susceptibility. Furthermore, expression of an X-MLV envelope glycoprotein in Chinese hamster ovary cells interfered efficiently with X-MLV and P-MLV infections mediated by X-receptors that contained K500 and/or T582 but had no effect on P-MLV infections mediated by X-receptors that lacked these amino acids. In contrast, moderate expression of a P-MLV (MCF247) envelope glycoprotein did not

  4. Folate-conjugated immunoglobulin targets melanoma tumor cells for NK cell effector functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Cassandra C.; McMichael, Elizabeth L.; Jaime-Ramirez, Alena C.; Abrams, Zachary B.; Lee, Robert J.; Carson, William E.

    2016-01-01

    The folate receptor (FR) is over-expressed on the vascular side of cancerous cells including those of the breast, ovaries, testes, and cervix. We hypothesized that a folate-conjugated immunoglobulin (F-IgG) would bind to the FR that is over-expressed on melanoma tumor cells to target these cells for lysis by natural killer (NK) cells. Folate receptor expression was confirmed in the Mel-39 (human melanoma) cell line by flow cytometry and immunoblot analysis, using KB (human oral epithelial) and F01 (human melanoma) as a positive and negative control, respectively. FR-positive and negative cell lines were treated with F-IgG or control immunoglobulin G (C-IgG) in the presence or absence of cytokines in order to determine NK cell ability to lyse FR-positive cell lines. NK cell activation was significantly upregulated and lysis of Mel 39 tumor cells enhanced following treatment with F-IgG, as compared to C-IgG at all effector:target (E:T) ratios (p<0.01). This trend was further enhanced by NK cell stimulation with the activating cytokine interleukin-12 (IL-12). NK cell production of cytokines such as interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), macrophage inflammatory protein 1 alpha (MIP-1α), and regulated on activation normal T-cell expressed and secreted (RANTES) were also significantly increased in response to co-stimulation with IL-12 stimulation and F-IgG-coated Mel 39 target cells, as compared to controls (p<0.01). In contrast, F-IgG did not bind to the FR-negative cell line F01 and had no significant effect on NK cell lysis or cytokine production. This research indicates the potential use of F-IgG for its ability to induce an immune response from NK cells against FR-positive melanoma tumor cells which can be further enhanced by the addition of cytokines. PMID:27035691

  5. Targeting proliferating cell nuclear antigen and its protein interactions induces apoptosis in multiple myeloma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebekka Müller

    Full Text Available Multiple myeloma is a hematological cancer that is considered incurable despite advances in treatment strategy during the last decade. Therapies targeting single pathways are unlikely to succeed due to the heterogeneous nature of the malignancy. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA is a multifunctional protein essential for DNA replication and repair that is often overexpressed in cancer cells. Many proteins involved in the cellular stress response interact with PCNA through the five amino acid sequence AlkB homologue 2 PCNA-interacting motif (APIM. Thus inhibiting PCNA's protein interactions may be a good strategy to target multiple pathways simultaneously. We initially found that overexpression of peptides containing the APIM sequence increases the sensitivity of cancer cells to contemporary therapeutics. Here we have designed a cell-penetrating APIM-containing peptide, ATX-101, that targets PCNA and show that it has anti-myeloma activity. We found that ATX-101 induced apoptosis in multiple myeloma cell lines and primary cancer cells, while bone marrow stromal cells and primary healthy lymphocytes were much less sensitive. ATX-101-induced apoptosis was caspase-dependent and cell cycle phase-independent. ATX-101 also increased multiple myeloma cells' sensitivity against melphalan, a DNA damaging agent commonly used for treatment of multiple myeloma. In a xenograft mouse model, ATX-101 was well tolerated and increased the anti-tumor activity of melphalan. Therefore, targeting PCNA by ATX-101 may be a novel strategy in multiple myeloma treatment.

  6. Advanced cell therapies: targeting, tracking and actuation of cells with magnetic particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connell, John J; Patrick, P Stephen; Yu, Yichao; Lythgoe, Mark F; Kalber, Tammy L

    2015-01-01

    Regenerative medicine would greatly benefit from a new platform technology that enabled measurable, controllable and targeting of stem cells to a site of disease or injury in the body. Superparamagnetic iron-oxide nanoparticles offer attractive possibilities in biomedicine and can be incorporated into cells, affording a safe and reliable means of tagging. This review describes three current and emerging methods to enhance regenerative medicine using magnetic particles to guide therapeutic cells to a target organ; track the cells using MRI and assess their spatial localization with high precision and influence the behavior of the cell using magnetic actuation. This approach is complementary to the systemic injection of cell therapies, thus expanding the horizon of stem cell therapeutics.

  7. Metformin and prostate cancer stem cells: a novel therapeutic target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, M J; Klotz, L H; Venkateswaran, V

    2015-12-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most frequently diagnosed cancer in the world. Localized disease can be effectively treated with radiation therapy or radical prostatectomy. However, advanced prostate cancer is more difficult to treat and if metastatic, is incurable. There is a need for more effective therapy for advanced prostate cancer. One potential target is the cancer stem cell (CSC). CSCs have been described in several solid tumors, including prostate cancer, and contribute to therapeutic resistance and tumor recurrence. Metformin, a common oral biguanide used to treat type 2 diabetes, has been demonstrated to have anti-neoplastic effects. Specifically, metformin targets CSCs in breast cancer, pancreatic cancer, glioblastoma and colon cancer. Metformin acts directly on the mitochondria to inhibit oxidative phosphorylation and reduce mitochondrial ATP production. This forces tumor cells to compensate by increasing the rate of glycolysis. CSCs rely heavily on mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation for energy production. The glycolytic switch results in an energy crisis in these cells. Metformin could be used to exploit this metabolic weakness in CSCs. This would increase CSC sensitivity to conventional cancer therapies, circumventing treatment resistance and enhancing treatment efficacy. This review will explore the characteristics of prostate CSCs, their role in tumor propagation and therapeutic resistance and the role of metformin as a potential prostate CSC sensitizer to current anticancer therapies. PMID:26215782

  8. The polymorphism and haplotypes of XRCC1 and survival of non-small-cell lung cancer after radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The X-ray repair cross-complementing Group 1 (XRCC1) protein is involved mainly in the base excision repair of the DNA repair process. This study examined the association of 3 polymorphisms (codon 194, 280, and 399) of XRCC1 and lung cancer in terms of whether or not these polymorphisms have an effect on the survival of lung cancer patients who have received radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Between January 2000 and April 2004, 229 lung cancer patients with non-small-cell lung cancer in Stages I-III were enrolled. Genotyping was performed by single base primer extension assay using the SNP-IT Kit with genomic DNA samples from all patients. The haplotype of the XRCC1 polymorphisms was estimated by PHASE version 2.1. Results: The patients consisted of 191 (83.4%) males and 38 (16.6%) females with a median age of 62 (range, 26-88 years). Sixty percent of the patients were included in Stage I-IIIa. The median progression-free and overall survival was 13 months and 16 months, respectively. The XRCC1 codon 194, histology, and stage were shown to be significant predictors of the progression-free survival. The 6 haplotypes among the XRCC1 polymorphisms (194, 280, and 399) were estimated by PHASE v.2.1. The patients with haplotype pairs other than the homozygous TGG haplotype pairs survived significantly longer (p = 0.04). Conclusions: Polymorphisms of XRCC1 have an effect on the survival of lung cancer patients treated with radiotherapy, and this effect seems to be more significant after the haplotype pairs are considered

  9. The Fc Receptor Polymorphisms and Expression of Neutrophil Activation Markers in Patients with Sickle Cell Disease from Western India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harshada K. Kangne

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Sickle cell disease has variable clinical manifestations. Activation of neutrophils plays an important role in the initiation and propagation of vaso occlusive crises which can be analysed by determining the expression of neutrophil antigens such as CD16, CD32, and CD62L. The common FcγR polymorphisms (FcγRIIA and FcγRIIIB are considered to influence clinical presentation. This study focuses on distribution of FcγR polymorphisms and their association with neutrophil activity among the patients from western India. Methods. In this paper 127 sickle cell anemia patients and 58 patients with sickle-β-thalassemia (median age 12±8.58 years with variable clinical phenotypes along with 175 normals were investigated. FcγRs polymorphisms were analysed by RFLP and AS-PCR. Activation of neutrophils was measured by flow cytometry. Results. The genotypic frequency of the H/R genotype of FcγRIIA and the NA1/NA1 genotype of FcγRIIIB was significantly decreased in patients compared to normals (P-0.0074, P-0.0471, resp.. We found a significant difference in the expression of CD32 and CD62L among the patients as against normals. A significantly higher expression of CD32 was seen in the milder patients with the H/H genotype (P-0.0231, whereas the expression of CD16 was higher in severe patients with the NA2/NA2 genotype (P-0.0312. Conclusion. The two FcγR polymorphisms had significant association with variable phenotypes of sickle cell disease. The expression of CD62L decreased in our patients indicating activation of neutrophils.

  10. Medulloblastoma stem cells: Promising targets in medulloblastoma therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Guo-Hao; Xu, Qing-Fu; Cui, You-Hong; Li, Ningning; Bian, Xiu-Wu; Lv, Sheng-Qing

    2016-05-01

    Medulloblastoma (MB) is the most common malignant pediatric brain tumor. Despite great improvements in the therapeutic regimen, relapse and leptomeningeal dissemination still pose great challenges to the long-term survival of MB patients. Developing more effective strategies has become extremely urgent. In recent years, a number of malignancies, including MB, have been found to contain a subpopulation of cancer cells known as cancer stem cells (CSCs), or tumor initiating/propagating cells. The CSCs are thought to be largely responsible for tumor initiation, maintenance, dissemination, and relapse; therefore, their pivotal roles have revealed them to be promising targets in MB therapy. Our growing understanding of the major medulloblastoma molecular subgroups and the derivation of some of these groups from specific stem or progenitor cells adds additional layers to the CSC knowledge base. Herein we review the current knowledge of MB stem cells, highlight the molecular mechanisms relating to MB relapse and leptomeningeal dissemination, and incorporate these with the need to develop more effective and accurate therapies for MB patients. PMID:27171351

  11. Genetic polymorphism at codon 546 of the human RAD17 contributes to the risk for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Yukiko; Sakai, Akiko; Ito, Sachio; Mita, Yuichiro; Sonoyama, Takayuki; Tanabe, Shunsuke; Shirakawa, Yasuhiro; Naomoto, Yoshio; Katayama, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Human RAD17, a human homolog of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe cell cycle checkpoint gene RAD17, plays a significant role in activating checkpoint signals in response to DNA damage. We evaluated the association of hRAD17 Leu546Arg (rs1045051), a missense single nucleotide polymorphism, with the risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma in relation to smoking and alcohol consumption history in 154 esophageal squamous cell carcinoma male patients and 695 cancer-free male controls by a case-control study conducted in Japan. The results showed that the hRAD17 Arg/Arg genotype compared to the Leu/Leu and Leu/Arg genotypes was significantly associated with the risk of the esophageal squamous cell carcinoma with an adjusted odds ratios of 2.22 (95% CI: 1.19-4.16 P=0.013). In stratified studies, the risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma was markedly higher in light drinkers (less than 23 g ethanol/day) with the Arg/Arg genotype than in heavy drinkers (excess of 23 g ethanol/day) with the Arg/Arg genotype (OR=2.83, 95% CI: 1.05-7.61, P=0.04). We concluded that the genetic variant of hRAD17 Leu546Arg polymorphism exerts a significant effect on esophageal squamous cell carcinoma risk among Japanese men. PMID:27186329

  12. Graphene-Based Interfaces Do Not Alter Target Nerve Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabbro, Alessandra; Scaini, Denis; León, Verónica; Vázquez, Ester; Cellot, Giada; Privitera, Giulia; Lombardi, Lucia; Torrisi, Felice; Tomarchio, Flavia; Bonaccorso, Francesco; Bosi, Susanna; Ferrari, Andrea C; Ballerini, Laura; Prato, Maurizio

    2016-01-26

    Neural-interfaces rely on the ability of electrodes to transduce stimuli into electrical patterns delivered to the brain. In addition to sensitivity to the stimuli, stability in the operating conditions and efficient charge transfer to neurons, the electrodes should not alter the physiological properties of the target tissue. Graphene is emerging as a promising material for neuro-interfacing applications, given its outstanding physico-chemical properties. Here, we use graphene-based substrates (GBSs) to interface neuronal growth. We test our GBSs on brain cell cultures by measuring functional and synaptic integrity of the emerging neuronal networks. We show that GBSs are permissive interfaces, even when uncoated by cell adhesion layers, retaining unaltered neuronal signaling properties, thus being suitable for carbon-based neural prosthetic devices. PMID:26700626

  13. Associations between gene polymorphisms of thymidylate synthase with its protein expression and chemosensitivity to 5-fluorouracil in pancreatic carcinoma cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Qiang; ZHAO Yu-pei; LIAO Quan; HU Ya; XU Qiang; ZHOU Li; SHU Hong

    2011-01-01

    Background Thymidylate synthase (TS) is a key regulatory enzyme for de novo DNA synthesis.TS activity is also an important determinant of the response to chemotherapy with fluoropyrimidine prodrugs,and its expression may be affected by gene polymorphisms.In this study,we investigated the associations between polymorphisms of the TS gene and its protein expression,and the implications on the efficacy of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in pancreatic cancer cells.Methods Genotypes based on the 28-bp TS tandem repeat for pancreatic cell lines were determined by electrophoretic analysis of PCR products.A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) at nucleotide 12 of the second 28-bp repeat of the 3R allele was determined by nucleotide sequencing.The chemosensitivity of pancreatic carcinoma cells to 5-FU in vitro was evaluated using Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8).TS protein expression was analyzed by Western blotting.Results Seven pancreatic carcinoma cell lines had different genotypes in terms of the 28-bp TS tandem repeat,as follows:homozygous 2R/2R (T3M4 and BxPC-3 cells),heterozygous 2R/3R (AsPC-1,Capan-1,and SU86.86),and homozygous 3R/3R (PANC-1 and COLO357).The optical density ratio of genotypes 3R/3R,2R/2R and 2R/3R was 1.393±0.374,0.568±0.032 and 0.561±0.056,respectively.Cells with the 2R/3R or 3R/3R genotypes were further analyzed for the G to C SNP at nucleotide 12 of the second 28-bp repeat of the 3R allele,yielding heterozygous 2R/3Rc (AsPC-1,Capan-1,and SU86.86),homozygous 3Rg/3Rg (COLO357) and homozygous 3Rc/3Rc (PANC-1).The optical density ratio of homozygous 3Rg/3Rg cells and homozygous 3Rc/3Rc cells was 1.723±0.062 and 1.063±0.134,respectively,and this difference was statistically significant (P <0.05).Cells with the 2R/2R and 2R/3R genotypes of TS were hypersensitive to 5-FU in vitro as compared with those with the 3R/3R cells.Conclusions Polymorphisms in the TS gene influenced its protein expression and affected sensitivity of 5-FU in seven pancreatic cancer cell

  14. Mannosylated biodegradable polyethyleneimine for targeted DNA delivery to dendritic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun X

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Xun Sun, Simu Chen, Jianfeng Han, Zhirong ZhangKey Laboratory of Drug Targeting and Drug Delivery System, Ministry of Education, West China School of Pharmacy, Sichuan University, Chengdu, People’s Republic of ChinaBackground: To establish a potential gene-delivery system with the ability to deliver plasmid DNA to dendritic cells (DCs more efficiently and specifically, we designed and synthesized a low-molecular-weight polyethyleneimine and triethyleneglycol polymer (PEI–TEG and a series of its mannosylated derivatives.Methods: PEI–TEG was synthesized from PEI2000 and PEI600 with TEG as the cross-linker. PEI–TEG was then linked to mannose via a phenylisothiocyanate bridge to obtain man-PEI–TEG conjugates. The DNA conveyance abilities of PEI–TEG, man-PEI–TEG, as well as control PEI25k were evaluated by measuring their zeta potential, particle size, and DNA-binding abilities. The in vitro cytotoxicity, cell uptake, and transfection efficiency of these PEI/DNA complexes were examined on the DC2.4 cell line. Finally, a maturation experiment evaluated the effect of costimulatory molecules CD40, CD80, and CD86 on murine bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs using flow cytometry.Results: PEI–TEG and man-PEI–TEG were successfully synthesized and were shown to retain the excellent properties of PEI25k for condensing DNA. Compared with PEI–TEG as well as PEI25k, the man-PEI–TEG had less cytotoxicity and performed better in both cellular uptake and transfection assays in vitro. The results of the maturation experiment showed that all the PEI/DNA complexes induced an adequate upregulation of surface markers for DC maturation.Conclusion: These results demonstrated that man-PEI–TEG can be employed as a DC-targeting gene-delivery system.Keywords: dendritic cells, DCs, mannose, polyethyleneimine, PEI, gene delivery

  15. Effects of small interfering RNAs targeting fascin on human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cell lines

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    Garcia Jose

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fascin induces membrane protrusions and cell motility. Fascin overexpression was associated with poor prognosis, and its downregulation reduces cell motility and invasiveness in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC. Using a stable knockdown cell line, we revealed the effect of fascin on cell growth, cell adhesion and tumor formation. Methods We examined whether fascin is a potential target in ESCC using in vitro and in vivo studies utilizing a specific siRNA. We established a stable transfectant with downregulated fascin from KYSE170 cell line. Results The fascin downregulated cell lines showed a slower growth pattern by 40.3% (p In vivo, the tumor size was significantly smaller in the tumor with fascin knockdown cells than in mock cells by 95% at 30 days after inoculation. Conclusions These findings suggest that fascin overexpression plays a role in tumor growth and progression in ESCC and that cell death caused by its downregulation might be induced by cell adhesion loss. This indicates that targeting fascin pathway could be a novel therapeutic strategy for the human ESCC.

  16. Haptoglobin and sickle cell polymorphisms and risk of active trachoma in Gambian children.

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    Mathilde Savy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Susceptibility and resistance to trachoma, the leading infectious cause of blindness, have been associated with a range of host genetic factors. In vitro studies of the causative organism, Chlamydia trachomatis, demonstrate that iron availability regulates its growth, suggesting that host genes involved in regulating iron status and/or availability may modulate the risk of trachoma. The objective was to investigate whether haptoglobin (Hp haplotypes constructed from the functional polymorphism (Hp1/Hp2 plus the functional promoter SNPs -61A-C (rs5471 and -101C-G (rs5470, or sickle cell trait (HbAS, rs334 were associated with risk of active trachoma when stratified by age and sex, in rural Gambian children. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In two cross sectional surveys of children aged 6-78 months (n = 836, the prevalence of the clinical signs of active trachoma was 21.4%. Within boys, haplotype E (-101G, -61A, Hp1, containing the variant allele of the -101C-G promoter SNP, was associated with a two-fold increased risk of active trachoma (OR = 2.0 [1.17-3.44]. Within girls, an opposite association was non-significant (OR = 0.58 [0.32-1.04]; P = 0.07 and the interaction by sex was statistically significant (P = 0.001. There was no association between trachoma and HbAS. CONCLUSIONS: These data indicate that genetic variation in Hp may affect susceptibility to active trachoma differentially by sex in The Gambia.

  17. Dendritic Cells as a Pharmacological Target of Traditional Chinese Medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin Chen; Lu Yang; O. M. Zack Howard; Joost J. Oppenheim

    2006-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) represent a heterogeneous population of professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs) that play a central role in the initiation and regulation of immune responses. There is considerable evidence that DCs can be used as therapeutic targets for pharmacological modulation of immune responses. Traditional Chines emedicine (TCM) has a long-standing history of using herbal medicine in the treatment of variety of human diseases.Many of the clinical effects of TCM have reportedly been attributed to the up- or down-regulation of immune responses. Accumulating evidence indicates that TCM and its components can interfere with immune responses at the earliest stage by targeting key functions of DCs. Here, we review those published studies of TCM with respect to their effects on immunobiological functions of DCs. Investigations based on both chemical entities derived from TCM as well as TCM herbal mixtures are presented. These studies suggest that various TCM herbal medicines have the capacity to inhibit or promote major functions of DCs, such as differentiation, maturation, cytokine production, survival, antigen uptake and presentation as well as trafficking. These studies have revealed novel biological effects of TCM and documented the utility of this approach to discover novel biological modifier of DC functions derived from natural sources.

  18. Modified procedure for labelling target cells in a europium release assay of natural killer cell activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacifici, R; Di Carlo, S; Bacosi, A; Altieri, I; Pichini, S; Zuccaro, P

    1993-05-01

    Lanthanide europium chelated to diethylenetriaminopentaacetate (EuDTPA) can be used to label target cells such as tumor cells and lymphocytes (Blomberg et al., 1986a,b; Granberg et al., 1988). This procedure has permitted the development of new non-radioactive methods for the detection of target cell cytolysis by natural killer (NK) cells (Blomberg et al., 1986a,b), cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) (Granberg et al., 1988) or complement-mediated cytolysis (Cui et al., 1992). However, we had no success with this method because of a lack of comparability between human NK cell activity simultaneously measured by a classical 51Cr release assay (Seaman et al., 1981) and EuDTPA release assay (Blomberg et al., 1986a). Furthermore, cell division and cell viability were significantly impaired by the suggested concentrations of EuCl3. In this paper, we present a modified non-cytotoxic method for target cell labelling with EuDTPA while cells are growing in culture medium. PMID:8486925

  19. Salinomycin as a Drug for Targeting Human Cancer Stem Cells

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    Cord Naujokat

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells (CSCs represent a subpopulation of tumor cells that possess self-renewal and tumor initiation capacity and the ability to give rise to the heterogenous lineages of malignant cells that comprise a tumor. CSCs possess multiple intrinsic mechanisms of resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs, novel tumor-targeted drugs, and radiation therapy, allowing them to survive standard cancer therapies and to initiate tumor recurrence and metastasis. Various molecular complexes and pathways that confer resistance and survival of CSCs, including expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC drug transporters, activation of the Wnt/β-catenin, Hedgehog, Notch and PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathways, and acquisition of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT, have been identified recently. Salinomycin, a polyether ionophore antibiotic isolated from Streptomyces albus, has been shown to kill CSCs in different types of human cancers, most likely by interfering with ABC drug transporters, the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, and other CSC pathways. Promising results from preclinical trials in human xenograft mice and a few clinical pilote studies reveal that salinomycin is able to effectively eliminate CSCs and to induce partial clinical regression of heavily pretreated and therapy-resistant cancers. The ability of salinomycin to kill both CSCs and therapy-resistant cancer cells may define the compound as a novel and an effective anticancer drug.

  20. Curcumin targets fibroblast–tumor cell interactions in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Co-culture of periodontal ligament fibroblasts (PDLs) and SCC-25 oral squamous carcinoma cells (OSCC) results in conversion of PDLs into carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and induces epithelial-to mesenchymal transition (EMT) of OSCC tumor cells. We hypothesized that Curcumin targets this dynamic mutual interaction between CAFs and tumor cells. Normal and 2 μM Curcumin-treated co-culture were performed for 4 days, followed by analysis of tumor cell invasivity, mRNA/protein expression of EMT-markers and mediators, activity measure of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9), and western blot analysis of signal transduction in tumor cells and fibroblasts. In Curcumin-treated co-culture, in tumor cells, the levels of nuclear factor κB (NFκBα) and early response kinase (ERK)—decreased, in fibroblasts, integrin αv protein synthesis decreased compared to corresponding cells in normal co-culture. The signal modulatory changes induced by Curcumin caused decreased release of EMT-mediators in CAFs and reversal of EMT in tumor cells, which was associated with decreased invasion. These data confirm the palliative potential of Curcumin in clinical application. - Graphical abstract: Co-culture of periodontal ligament fibroblasts (PDLs) and SCC-25 oral squamous carcinoma cells (OSCC) results in conversion of PDLs into carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and induces epithelial-to mesenchymal transition (EMT) of tumor cells. Curcumin targets this dynamic mutual interaction between CAFs and tumor cells by inhibiting the production of EMT mediators in CAFs and by modification of intracellular signaling in tumor cells. This causes less invasivity and reversal of EMT in tumor cells. Highlights: ► Curcumin targets tumor–fibroblast interaction in head and neck cancer. ► Curcumin suppresses mediators of epithelial–mesenchymal transition. ► Curcumin decreases the invasivity of tumor cells

  1. Curcumin targets fibroblast–tumor cell interactions in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dudás, József, E-mail: jozsef.dudas@i-med.ac.at [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Fullár, Alexandra, E-mail: fullarsz@gmail.com [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); 1st Department of Pathology and Experimental Cancer Research, Semmelweis University, Üllői út 26, 1085 Budapest (Hungary); Romani, Angela, E-mail: angela.romani@i-med.ac.at [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Pritz, Christian, E-mail: christian.pritz@i-med.ac.at [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Kovalszky, Ilona, E-mail: koval@korb1.sote.hu [1st Department of Pathology and Experimental Cancer Research, Semmelweis University, Üllői út 26, 1085 Budapest (Hungary); Hans Schartinger, Volker, E-mail: volker.schartinger@i-med.ac.at [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Mathias Sprinzl, Georg, E-mail: georg.sprinzl@i-med.ac.at [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Riechelmann, Herbert, E-mail: herbert.riechelmann@i-med.ac.at [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

    2013-04-01

    Co-culture of periodontal ligament fibroblasts (PDLs) and SCC-25 oral squamous carcinoma cells (OSCC) results in conversion of PDLs into carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and induces epithelial-to mesenchymal transition (EMT) of OSCC tumor cells. We hypothesized that Curcumin targets this dynamic mutual interaction between CAFs and tumor cells. Normal and 2 μM Curcumin-treated co-culture were performed for 4 days, followed by analysis of tumor cell invasivity, mRNA/protein expression of EMT-markers and mediators, activity measure of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9), and western blot analysis of signal transduction in tumor cells and fibroblasts. In Curcumin-treated co-culture, in tumor cells, the levels of nuclear factor κB (NFκBα) and early response kinase (ERK)—decreased, in fibroblasts, integrin αv protein synthesis decreased compared to corresponding cells in normal co-culture. The signal modulatory changes induced by Curcumin caused decreased release of EMT-mediators in CAFs and reversal of EMT in tumor cells, which was associated with decreased invasion. These data confirm the palliative potential of Curcumin in clinical application. - Graphical abstract: Co-culture of periodontal ligament fibroblasts (PDLs) and SCC-25 oral squamous carcinoma cells (OSCC) results in conversion of PDLs into carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and induces epithelial-to mesenchymal transition (EMT) of tumor cells. Curcumin targets this dynamic mutual interaction between CAFs and tumor cells by inhibiting the production of EMT mediators in CAFs and by modification of intracellular signaling in tumor cells. This causes less invasivity and reversal of EMT in tumor cells. Highlights: ► Curcumin targets tumor–fibroblast interaction in head and neck cancer. ► Curcumin suppresses mediators of epithelial–mesenchymal transition. ► Curcumin decreases the invasivity of tumor cells.

  2. Rheumatoid arthritis-associated RBPJ polymorphism alters memory CD4+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orent, William; Mchenry, Allison R; Rao, Deepak A; White, Charles; Klein, Hans-Ulrich; Bassil, Ribal; Srivastava, Gyan; Replogle, Joseph M; Raj, Towfique; Frangieh, Michael; Cimpean, Maria; Cuerdon, Nicole; Chibnik, Lori; Khoury, Samia J; Karlson, Elizabeth W; Brenner, Michael B; De Jager, Philip; Bradshaw, Elizabeth M; Elyaman, Wassim

    2016-01-15

    Notch signaling has recently emerged as an important regulator of immune responses in autoimmune diseases. The recombination signal-binding protein for immunoglobulin kappa J region (RBPJ) is a transcriptional repressor, but converts into a transcriptional activator upon activation of the canonical Notch pathway. Genome-wide association studies of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) identified a susceptibility locus, rs874040(CC), which implicated the RBPJ gene. Here, chromatin state mapping generated using the chromHMM algorithm reveals strong enhancer regions containing DNase I hypersensitive sites overlapping the rs874040 linkage disequilibrium block in human memory, but not in naïve CD4(+) T cells. The rs874040 overlapping this chromatin state was associated with increased RBPJ expression in stimulated memory CD4(+) T cells from healthy subjects homozygous for the risk allele (CC) compared with memory CD4(+) T cells bearing the protective allele (GG). Transcriptomic analysis of rs874040(CC) memory T cells showed a repression of canonical Notch target genes IL (interleukin)-9, IL-17 and interferon (IFN)γ in the basal state. Interestingly, activation of the Notch pathway using soluble Notch ligand, Jagged2-Fc, induced IL-9 and IL-17A while delta-like 4Fc, another Notch ligand, induced higher IFNγ expression in the rs874040(CC) memory CD4(+) T cells compared with their rs874040(GG) counterparts. In RA, RBPJ expression is elevated in memory T cells from RA patients compared with control subjects, and this was associated with induced inflammatory cytokines IL-9, IL-17A and IFNγ in response to Notch ligation in vitro. These findings demonstrate that the rs874040(CC) allele skews memory T cells toward a pro-inflammatory phenotype involving Notch signaling, thus increasing the susceptibility to develop RA. PMID:26604133

  3. Central nervous system myeloid cells as drug targets: current status and translational challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biber, Knut; Möller, Thomas; Boddeke, Erik; Prinz, Marco

    2016-02-01

    Myeloid cells of the central nervous system (CNS), which include parenchymal microglia, macrophages at CNS interfaces and monocytes recruited from the circulation during disease, are increasingly being recognized as targets for therapeutic intervention in neurological and psychiatric diseases. The origin of these cells in the immune system distinguishes them from ectodermal neurons and other glia and endows them with potential drug targets distinct from classical CNS target groups. However, despite the identification of several promising therapeutic approaches and molecular targets, no agents directly targeting these cells are currently available. Here, we assess strategies for targeting CNS myeloid cells and address key issues associated with their translation into the clinic.

  4. Stem Cell-Based Cell Carrier for Targeted Oncolytic Virotherapy: Translational Opportunity and Open Questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Janice; Hall, Robert R; Lesniak, Maciej S; Ahmed, Atique U

    2015-11-27

    Oncolytic virotherapy for cancer is an innovative therapeutic option where the ability of a virus to promote cell lysis is harnessed and reprogrammed to selectively destroy cancer cells. Such treatment modalities exhibited antitumor activity in preclinical and clinical settings and appear to be well tolerated when tested in clinical trials. However, the clinical success of oncolytic virotherapy has been significantly hampered due to the inability to target systematic metastasis. This is partly due to the inability of the therapeutic virus to survive in the patient circulation, in order to target tumors at distant sites. An early study from various laboratories demonstrated that cells infected with oncolytic virus can protect the therapeutic payload form the host immune system as well as function as factories for virus production and enhance the therapeutic efficacy of oncolytic virus. While a variety of cell lineages possessed potential as cell carriers, copious investigation has established stem cells as a very attractive cell carrier system in oncolytic virotherapy. The ideal cell carrier desire to be susceptible to viral infection as well as support viral infection, maintain immunosuppressive properties to shield the loaded viruses from the host immune system, and most importantly possess an intrinsic tumor homing ability to deliver loaded viruses directly to the site of the metastasis-all qualities stem cells exhibit. In this review, we summarize the recent work in the development of stem cell-based carrier for oncolytic virotherapy, discuss the advantages and disadvantages of a variety of cell carriers, especially focusing on why stem cells have emerged as the leading candidate, and finally propose a future direction for stem cell-based targeted oncolytic virotherapy that involves its establishment as a viable treatment option for cancer patients in the clinical setting.

  5. Lsd1 restricts the number of germline stem cells by regulating multiple targets in escort cells.

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    Susan Eliazer

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Specialized microenvironments called niches regulate tissue homeostasis by controlling the balance between stem cell self-renewal and the differentiation of stem cell daughters. However the mechanisms that govern the formation, size and signaling of in vivo niches remain poorly understood. Loss of the highly conserved histone demethylase Lsd1 in Drosophila escort cells results in increased BMP signaling outside the cap cell niche and an expanded germline stem cell (GSC phenotype. Here we present evidence that loss of Lsd1 also results in gradual changes in escort cell morphology and their eventual death. To better characterize the function of Lsd1 in different cell populations within the ovary, we performed Chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with massive parallel sequencing (ChIP-seq. This analysis shows that Lsd1 associates with a surprisingly limited number of sites in escort cells and fewer, and often, different sites in cap cells. These findings indicate that Lsd1 exhibits highly selective binding that depends greatly on specific cellular contexts. Lsd1 does not directly target the dpp locus in escort cells. Instead, Lsd1 regulates engrailed expression and disruption of engrailed and its putative downstream target hedgehog suppress the Lsd1 mutant phenotype. Interestingly, over-expression of engrailed, but not hedgehog, results in an expansion of GSC cells, marked by the expansion of BMP signaling. Knockdown of other potential direct Lsd1 target genes, not obviously linked to BMP signaling, also partially suppresses the Lsd1 mutant phenotype. These results suggest that Lsd1 restricts the number of GSC-like cells by regulating a diverse group of genes and provide further evidence that escort cell function must be carefully controlled during development and adulthood to ensure proper germline differentiation.

  6. Inferring polymorphism-induced regulatory gene networks active in human lymphocyte cell lines by weighted linear mixed model analysis of multiple RNA-Seq datasets.

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    Wensheng Zhang

    Full Text Available Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs contribute to the between-individual expression variation of many genes. A regulatory (trait-associated SNP is usually located near or within a (host gene, possibly influencing the gene's transcription or/and post-transcriptional modification. But its targets may also include genes that are physically farther away from it. A heuristic explanation of such multiple-target interferences is that the host gene transfers the SNP genotypic effects to the distant gene(s by a transcriptional or signaling cascade. These connections between the host genes (regulators and the distant genes (targets make the genetic analysis of gene expression traits a promising approach for identifying unknown regulatory relationships. In this study, through a mixed model analysis of multi-source digital expression profiling for 140 human lymphocyte cell lines (LCLs and the genotypes distributed by the international HapMap project, we identified 45 thousands of potential SNP-induced regulatory relationships among genes (the significance level for the underlying associations between expression traits and SNP genotypes was set at FDR < 0.01. We grouped the identified relationships into four classes (paradigms according to the two different mechanisms by which the regulatory SNPs affect their cis- and trans- regulated genes, modifying mRNA level or altering transcript splicing patterns. We further organized the relationships in each class into a set of network modules with the cis- regulated genes as hubs. We found that the target genes in a network module were often characterized by significant functional similarity, and the distributions of the target genes in three out of the four networks roughly resemble a power-law, a typical pattern of gene networks obtained from mutation experiments. By two case studies, we also demonstrated that significant biological insights can be inferred from the identified network modules.

  7. Polymorphisms of CUL5 are associated with CD4+ T cell loss in HIV-1 infected individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Ping; Duggal, Priya; Wang, Li Hua; O'Brien, Stephen J; Donfield, Sharyne; Goedert, James J; Phair, John; Buchbinder, Susan; Kirk, Gregory D; Winkler, Cheryl A

    2007-01-26

    Human apolipoprotein B mRNA editing enzyme, catalytic polypeptide-like 3 (Apobec3) antiretroviral factors cause hypermutation of proviral DNA leading to degradation or replication-incompetent HIV-1. However, HIV-1 viral infectivity factor (Vif) suppresses Apobec3 activity through the Cullin 5-Elongin B-Elongin C E3 ubiquitin ligase complex. We examined the effect of genetic polymorphisms in the CUL5 gene (encoding Cullin 5 protein) on AIDS disease progression in five HIV-1 longitudinal cohorts. A total of 12 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) spanning 93 kb in the CUL5 locus were genotyped and their haplotypes inferred. A phylogenetic network analysis revealed that CUL5 haplotypes were grouped into two clusters of evolutionarily related haplotypes. Cox survival analysis and mixed effects models were used to assess time to AIDS outcomes and CD4(+) T cell trajectories, respectively. Relative to cluster I haplotypes, the collective cluster II haplotypes were associated with more rapid CD4(+) T cell loss (relative hazards [RH] = 1.47 and p = 0.009), in a dose-dependent fashion. This effect was mainly attributable to a single cluster II haplotype (Hap10) (RH = 2.49 and p = 0.00001), possibly due to differential nuclear protein-binding efficiencies of a Hap10-specifying SNP as indicated by a gel shift assay. Consistent effects were observed for CD4(+) T cell counts and HIV-1 viral load trajectories over time. The findings of both functional and genetic epidemiologic consequences of CUL5 polymorphism on CD4(+) T cell and HIV-1 levels point to a role for Cullin 5 in HIV-1 pathogenesis and suggest interference with the Vif-Cullin 5 pathway as a possible anti-HIV-1 therapeutic strategy. PMID:17257057

  8. Polymorphisms of CUL5 are associated with CD4+ T cell loss in HIV-1 infected individuals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping An

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Human apolipoprotein B mRNA editing enzyme, catalytic polypeptide-like 3 (Apobec3 antiretroviral factors cause hypermutation of proviral DNA leading to degradation or replication-incompetent HIV-1. However, HIV-1 viral infectivity factor (Vif suppresses Apobec3 activity through the Cullin 5-Elongin B-Elongin C E3 ubiquitin ligase complex. We examined the effect of genetic polymorphisms in the CUL5 gene (encoding Cullin 5 protein on AIDS disease progression in five HIV-1 longitudinal cohorts. A total of 12 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs spanning 93 kb in the CUL5 locus were genotyped and their haplotypes inferred. A phylogenetic network analysis revealed that CUL5 haplotypes were grouped into two clusters of evolutionarily related haplotypes. Cox survival analysis and mixed effects models were used to assess time to AIDS outcomes and CD4(+ T cell trajectories, respectively. Relative to cluster I haplotypes, the collective cluster II haplotypes were associated with more rapid CD4(+ T cell loss (relative hazards [RH] = 1.47 and p = 0.009, in a dose-dependent fashion. This effect was mainly attributable to a single cluster II haplotype (Hap10 (RH = 2.49 and p = 0.00001, possibly due to differential nuclear protein-binding efficiencies of a Hap10-specifying SNP as indicated by a gel shift assay. Consistent effects were observed for CD4(+ T cell counts and HIV-1 viral load trajectories over time. The findings of both functional and genetic epidemiologic consequences of CUL5 polymorphism on CD4(+ T cell and HIV-1 levels point to a role for Cullin 5 in HIV-1 pathogenesis and suggest interference with the Vif-Cullin 5 pathway as a possible anti-HIV-1 therapeutic strategy.

  9. Multi-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes as tumor cell targeting biological transporters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multi-functionalized single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were prepared and applied as tumor cell targeting biological transporters. A positive charge was introduced on SWNTs to get high loading efficiency of fluorescein (FAM) labeled short double strands DNA (20 base pairs). The SWNTs were encapsulated with the folic acid modified phospholipids for active targeting into tumor cell. The tumor cell-targeting properties of these multi-functionalized SWNTs were investigated by active targeting into mouse ovarian surface epithelial cells. The experimental results show that these multi-functionalized SWNTs have good tumor cell targeting property

  10. RNA interference targeting raptor inhibits proliferation of gastric cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, William Ka Kei; Lee, Chung Wa [Institute of Digestive Diseases, LKS Institute of Health Sciences and Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, NT, Hong Kong (China); Cho, Chi Hin [Institute of Digestive Diseases, LKS Institute of Health Sciences and Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, NT, Hong Kong (China); School of Biomedical Sciences, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, NT, Hong Kong (China); Chan, Francis Ka Leung [Institute of Digestive Diseases, LKS Institute of Health Sciences and Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, NT, Hong Kong (China); Yu, Jun, E-mail: junyu@cuhk.edu.hk [Institute of Digestive Diseases, LKS Institute of Health Sciences and Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, NT, Hong Kong (China); Sung, Joseph Jao Yiu, E-mail: joesung@cuhk.edu.hk [Institute of Digestive Diseases, LKS Institute of Health Sciences and Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, NT, Hong Kong (China)

    2011-06-10

    Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is dysregulated in gastric cancer. The biologic function of mTORC1 in gastric carcinogenesis is unclear. Here, we demonstrate that disruption of mTORC1 function by RNA interference-mediated downregulation of raptor substantially inhibited gastric cancer cell proliferation through induction of G{sub 0}/G{sub 1}-phase cell cycle arrest. The anti-proliferative effect was accompanied by concomitant downregulation of activator protein-1 and upregulation of Smad2/3 transcriptional activities. In addition, the expression of cyclin D{sub 3} and p21{sup Waf1}, which stabilizes cyclin D/cdk4 complex for G{sub 1}-S transition, was reduced by raptor knockdown. In conclusion, disruption of mTORC1 inhibits gastric cancer cell proliferation through multiple pathways. This discovery may have an implication in the application of mTORC1-directed therapy for the treatment of gastric cancer.

  11. Oxymatrine liposome attenuates hepatic fibrosis via targeting hepatic stellate cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ning-Li Chai; Qiang Fu; Hui Shi; Chang-Hao Cai; Jun Wan; Shi-Ping Xu; Ben-Yan Wu

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the potential mechanism of ArgGly-Asp (RGD) peptide-labeled liposome loading oxymatrine (OM) therapy in CCl4-induced hepatic fibrosis in METHODS:We constructed a rat model of CCl4-induced hepatic fibrosis and treated the rats with different formulations of OM.To evaluate the antifibrotic effect of OM,we detected levels of alkaline phosphatase,hepatic histopathology (hematoxylin and eosin stain and Masson staining) and fibrosis-related gene expression of matrix metallopeptidase (MMP)-2,tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1 as well as type Ⅰ procollagen via quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction.To detect cell viability and apoptosis of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs),we performed 3-(4,5)-dimethylthiahiazo(-z-y1)-3,5-diphenytetrazoliumromide assay and flow cytometry.To reinforce the combination of oxymatrine with HSCs,we constructed fluorescein-isothiocyanate-conjugated Arg-Gly-Asp peptide-labeled liposomes loading OM,and its targeting of HSCs was examined by fluorescent microscopy.RESULTS:OM attenuated CCl4-induced hepatic fibrosis,as defined by reducing serum alkaline phosphatase (344.47 ± 27.52 U/L vs 550.69 ± 43.78 U/L,P < 0.05),attenuating liver injury and improving collagen deposits (2.36% ± 0.09% vs 7.70% ± 0.60%,P < 0.05) and downregulating fibrosis-related gene expression,that is,MMP-2,TIMP-1 and type Ⅰ procollagen (P < 0.05).OM inhibited cell viability and induced apoptosis of HSCs in vitro.RGD promoted OM targeting of HSCs and enhanced the therapeutic effect of OM in terms of serum alkaline phosphatase (272.51 ± 19.55 U/L vs 344.47 ± 27.52 U/L,P < 0.05),liver injury,collagen deposits (0.26% ± 0.09% vs 2.36% ± 0.09%,P < 0.05) and downregulating fibrosis-related gene expression,that is,MMP-2,TIMP-1 and type Ⅰ procollagen (P < 0.05).Moreover,in vitro assay demonstrated that RGD enhanced the effect of OM on HSC viability and apoptosis.CONCLUSION:OM attenuated hepatic fibrosis by

  12. Association of Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 and p53 Gene Polymorphisms with Genetic Susceptibility to No-small-cell Lung Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Ying-hao; MA Tong-hui; ZHENG Yong-chen; ZHANG Kun; YANG Jing-bo; YANG Long-fei; YANG Zhi-guang; SHAO Guo-guang

    2011-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-9(MMP-9) and p53 genes play an essential role in the multi-step process of tumorigenesis in lung cancer. Single nucleotide polymorphisms(SNPs) of MMP-9 and p53 genes are associated with the risk and progression of many cancers. In this study, we evaluated the association of the R279Q polymo rphism of MMP-9 or the A1/A2 polymorphism of p53 gene with the risk of no-small-cell lung cancer(NSCLC) in Hah population of Northeast China. We examined the frequency of SNPs in the two kinds of genes of 50 patients with NSCLC and 50 cancer-free controls frequency-matched by age and sex. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism(PCR-RFLP) technique was used to determine the genotypes. The results indicate that the 279RR genotype in MMP-9 gene and the A1/A2 genotype in p53 gene show a significantly increased risk of NSCLC. Therefore,the MMP-9 279RR and p53 A1/A2 genotypes may be used as markers for susceptibility to NSCLC in Han population of Northeast China.

  13. Leptin receptor polymorphism Gln223Arg (rs1137101) in oral squamous cell carcinoma and potentially malignant oral lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingos, Patrícia Luciana Batista; Farias, Lucyana Conceição; Pereira, Camila Santos; das Graças Pena, Geórgia; Reis, Tatiana Carvalho; Silva, Rosângela Ramos Veloso; Fraga, Carlos Alberto de Carvalho; de Souza, Marcela Gonçalves; Soares, Mariana Batista; Jones, Kimberly Marie; Menezes, Elytania Veiga; Nobre, Sérgio Avelino Mota; Rodrigues Neto, João Felício; de Paula, Alfredo Maurício Batista; Velásquez-Meléndez, Jorge Gustavo; Sena Guimarães, André Luiz

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the LEPR gene Gln223Arg polymorphism (rs1137101) in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and in potentially malignant oral lesions (PMOL) in comparison to normal oral mucosa in a Brazilian population. Smokers (n = 89) were selected from a representative sample of 471 individuals from the general population of Montes Claros, Brazil. Participants were age and gender matched to patients with OSCC (n = 25) and oral epithelial dysplasia (n = 25). We investigated the LEPR Gln223Arg polymorphism (A>G; rs1137101) in these groups. Genotype variants were assessed by RFLP-PCR, using MspI (HPAII) restriction endonuclease. The institutional review board of the Universidade Estadual de Montes Claros approved the study (process number 2667/2011). Written informed consent for this study was obtained from all participants. The GG genotype (Arg223Arg) appears to be the more relevant polymorphic variant in OSCC. It occurred, approximately, twice as frequently in OSCC patients than in the general population. In contrast, the A allele in its homozygosis form (Gln223Gln) is significantly associated with the development of PMOL; 80% of the samples from the PMOL group exhibit AA genotype. Our findings suggest new insights regarding LEPR gene variations in the development of OSCC and PMOL. PMID:26034683

  14. Facile Discovery of Cell-Surface Protein Targets of Cancer Cell Aptamers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bing, Tao; Shangguan, Dihua; Wang, Yinsheng

    2015-10-01

    Cancer biomarker discovery constitutes a frontier in cancer research. In recent years, cell-binding aptamers have become useful molecular probes for biomarker discovery. However, there are few successful examples, and the critical barrier resides in the identification of the cell-surface protein targets for the aptamers, where only a limited number of aptamer targets have been identified so far. Herein, we developed a universal SILAC-based quantitative proteomic method for target discovery of cell-binding aptamers. The method allowed for distinguishing specific aptamer-binding proteins from nonspecific proteins based on abundance ratios of proteins bound to aptamer-carrying bait and control bait. In addition, we employed fluorescently labeled aptamers for monitoring and optimizing the binding conditions. We were able to identify and validate selectin L and integrin α4 as the protein targets for two previously reported aptamers, Sgc-3b and Sgc-4e, respectively. This strategy should be generally applicable for the discovery of protein targets for other cell-binding aptamers, which will promote the applications of these aptamers.

  15. The L84F polymorphic variant of human O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase alters stability in U87MG glioma cells but not temozolomide sensitivity

    OpenAIRE

    Remington, Maya; Chtchetinin, Jana; Ancheta, Karen; Nghiemphu, Phioanh Leia; Cloughesy, Timothy; Lai, Albert

    2009-01-01

    First-line therapy for patients with glioblastoma multiforme includes treatment with radiation and temozolomide (TMZ), an oral DNA alkylating chemotherapy. Sensitivity of glioma cells to TMZ is dependent on the level of cellular O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) repair activity. Several common coding- region polymorphisms in the MGMT gene (L84F and the linked pair I143V/K178R) modify functional characteristics of MGMT and cancer risk. To determine whether these polymorphic changes...

  16. Retinal Targets ALDH Positive Cancer Stem Cell and Alters the Phenotype of Highly Metastatic Osteosarcoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong Mu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH is a cancer stem cell marker. Retinoic acid has antitumor properties, including the induction of apoptosis and inhibition of proliferation. Retinal, the precursor of retinoic acid, can be oxidized to retinoic acid by dehydrogenases, including ALDH. We hypothesized that retinal could potentially be transformed to retinoic acid with higher efficiency by cancer stem cells, due to the higher ALDH activity. We previously observed that ALDH activity is greater in highly metastatic K7M2 osteosarcoma (OS cells than in nonmetastatic K12 OS cells. We also demonstrated that ALDH activity correlates with clinical metastases in bone sarcoma patients, suggesting that ALDH may be a therapeutic target specific to cells with high metastatic potential. Our current results demonstrated that retinal preferentially affected the phenotypes of ALDH-high K7M2 cells in contrast to ALDH-low K12 cells, which could be mediated by the more efficient transformation of retinal to retinoic acid by ALDH in K7M2 cells. Retinal treatment of highly metastatic K7M2 cells decreased their proliferation, invasion capacity, and resistance to oxidative stress. Retinal altered the expression of metastasis-related genes. These observations indicate that retinal may be used to specifically target metastatic cancer stem cells in OS.

  17. Selective cell targeting and lineage tracing of human induced pluripotent stem cells using recombinant avian retroviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrand, Laura; Seemann, Petra; Kurtz, Andreas; Hecht, Jochen; Contzen, Jörg; Gossen, Manfred; Stachelscheid, Harald

    2015-12-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC) differentiate into multiple cell types. Selective cell targeting is often needed for analyzing gene function by overexpressing proteins in a distinct population of hiPSC-derived cell types and for monitoring cell fate in response to stimuli. However, to date, this has not been possible, as commonly used viruses enter the hiPSC via ubiquitously expressed receptors. Here, we report for the first time the application of a heterologous avian receptor, the tumor virus receptor A (TVA), to selectively transduce TVA(+) cells in a mixed cell population. Expression of the TVA surface receptor via genetic engineering renders cells susceptible for infection by avian leucosis virus (ALV). We generated hiPSC lines with this stably integrated, ectopic TVA receptor gene that expressed the receptor while retaining pluripotency. The undifferentiated hiPSC(TVA+) as well as their differentiating progeny could be infected by recombinant ALV (so-called RCAS virus) with high efficiency. Due to incomplete receptor blocking, even sequential infection of differentiating or undifferentiated TVA(+) cells was possible. In conclusion, the TVA/RCAS system provides an efficient and gentle gene transfer system for hiPSC and extends our possibilities for selective cell targeting and lineage tracing studies.

  18. Targeting single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the 16S rRNA gene to detect and differentiate Legionella pneumophila and non-Legionella pneumophila species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Xiao-Yong; Hu, Chao-Hui; Zhu, Qing-Yi

    2016-08-01

    A PCR-based method targeting single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the 16S rRNA gene was developed for differential identification of Legionella pneumophila and non-Legionella pneumophila. Based on the bioinformatics analysis for 176 Legionella 16S rRNA gene fragments of 56 different Legionella species, a set of SNPs, A(628)C(629) was found to be highly specific to L. pneumophila strains. A multiplex assay was designed that was able to distinguish sites with limited sequence heterogeneity between L. pneumophila and non-L. pneumophila in the targeted 16S rRNA gene. The assay amplified a 261-bp amplicon for Legionella spp. and a set of 203- and 97-bp amplicons only specific to L. pneumophila species. Among 49 ATCC strains and 284 Legionella isolates from environmental water and clinical samples, 100 % of L. pneumophila and non-L. pneumophila strains were correctly identified and differentiated by this assay. The assay presents a more rapid, sensitive and alternative method to the currently available PCR-sequencing detection and differentiation method.

  19. Targeting single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the 16S rRNA gene to detect and differentiate Legionella pneumophila and non-Legionella pneumophila species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Xiao-Yong; Hu, Chao-Hui; Zhu, Qing-Yi

    2016-08-01

    A PCR-based method targeting single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the 16S rRNA gene was developed for differential identification of Legionella pneumophila and non-Legionella pneumophila. Based on the bioinformatics analysis for 176 Legionella 16S rRNA gene fragments of 56 different Legionella species, a set of SNPs, A(628)C(629) was found to be highly specific to L. pneumophila strains. A multiplex assay was designed that was able to distinguish sites with limited sequence heterogeneity between L. pneumophila and non-L. pneumophila in the targeted 16S rRNA gene. The assay amplified a 261-bp amplicon for Legionella spp. and a set of 203- and 97-bp amplicons only specific to L. pneumophila species. Among 49 ATCC strains and 284 Legionella isolates from environmental water and clinical samples, 100 % of L. pneumophila and non-L. pneumophila strains were correctly identified and differentiated by this assay. The assay presents a more rapid, sensitive and alternative method to the currently available PCR-sequencing detection and differentiation method. PMID:27112927

  20. Glutathione S-transferase gene polymorphisms (GSTM1, GSTT1, and GSTP1) in Egyptian pediatric patients with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiba, Hala Fathy; El-Ghamrawy, Mona Kamal; Shaheen, Iman Abd El-Mohsen; Ali, Rasha Abd El-Ghani; Mousa, Somaia Mohammed

    2014-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) complications are associated with oxidative stress. Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are a group of enzymes that protect against oxidative stress. The aims of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of GSTM1, GSTT1, and GSTP1 gene polymorphisms among homozygous sickle cell anemia patients and to investigate the possible association between the presence of these polymorphisms and SCD severity and complications. Genotyping the polymorphisms in GSTT1 and GSTM1 genes was performed using the multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. The GSTP1 ILe105Val polymorphism was determined using PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism. GSTM1 null genotype was significantly associated with increased risk of severe vaso-occlusive crises (VOC) (odds ratio  =  1.52, 95% confidence interval  =  0.42-5.56, P  =  0.005). We found no significant association between GST genotypes and frequency of sickle cell-related pain, transfusion frequency, disease severity, or hydroxyurea treatment. GSTM1 gene polymorphism may be associated with risk of severe VOC among Egyptian SCD patients.

  1. Novel Hedgehog pathway targets against basal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Hedgehog signaling pathway plays a key role in directing growth and patterning during embryonic development and is required in vertebrates for the normal development of many structures, including the neural tube, axial skeleton, skin, and hair. Aberrant activation of the Hedgehog (Hh) pathway in adult tissue is associated with the development of basal cell carcinoma (BCC), medulloblastoma, and a subset of pancreatic, gastrointestinal, and other cancers. This review will provide an overview of what is known about the mechanisms by which activation of Hedgehog signaling leads to the development of BCCs and will review two recent papers suggesting that agents that modulate sterol levels might influence the Hh pathway. Thus, sterols may be a new therapeutic target for the treatment of BCCs, and readily available agents such as statins (HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors) or vitamin D might be helpful in reducing BCC incidence

  2. Functional RNA delivery targeted to dendritic cells by synthetic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, Kenneth C; Bassi, Isabelle; Démoulins, Thomas; Thomann-Harwood, Lisa J; Ruggli, Nicolas

    2012-09-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are essential to many aspects of immune defense development and regulation. They provide important targets for prophylactic and therapeutic delivery. While protein delivery has had considerable success, RNA delivery is still expanding. Delivering RNA molecules for RNAi has shown particular success and there are reports on successful delivery of mRNA. Central, therein, is the application of cationic entities. Following endocytosis of the delivery vehicle for the RNA, cationic entities should promote vesicular membrane perturbation, facilitating cytosolic release. The present review explains the diversity of DC function in immune response development and control. Promotion of delivered RNA cytosolic release is discussed, relating to immunoprophylactic and therapeutic potential, and DC endocytic machinery is reviewed, showing how DC endocytic pathways influence the handling of internalized material. The potential advantages for application of replicating RNA are presented and discussed, in consideration of their value and development in the near future.

  3. Engineering targeted chromosomal amplifications in human breast epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Simeon; Yi, Kyung H; Park, Jeenah; Rajpurohit, Anandita; Price, Amanda J; Lauring, Josh

    2015-07-01

    Chromosomal amplifications are among the most common genetic alterations found in human cancers. However, experimental systems to study the processes that lead to specific, recurrent amplification events in human cancers are lacking. Moreover, some common amplifications, such as that at 8p11-12 in breast cancer, harbor multiple driver oncogenes, which are poorly modeled by conventional overexpression approaches. We sought to develop an experimental system to model recurrent chromosomal amplification events in human cell lines. Our strategy is to use homologous-recombination-mediated gene targeting to deliver a dominantly selectable, amplifiable marker to a specified chromosomal location. We used adeno-associated virus vectors to target human MCF-7 breast cancer cells at the ZNF703 locus, in the recurrent 8p11-12 amplicon, using the E. coli inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) enzyme as a marker. We applied selective pressure using IMPDH inhibitors. Surviving clones were found to have increased copy number of ZNF703 (average 2.5-fold increase) by droplet digital PCR and FISH. Genome-wide array comparative genomic hybridization confirmed that amplifications had occurred on the short arm of chromosome 8, without changes on 8q or other chromosomes. Patterns of amplification were variable and similar to those seen in primary human breast cancers, including "sawtooth" patterns, distal copy number loss, and large continuous regions of copy number gain. This system will allow study of the cis- and trans-acting factors that are permissive for chromosomal amplification and provide a model to analyze oncogene cooperativity in amplifications harboring multiple candidate driver genes.

  4. Active targeting of tumor cells using light emitting bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Sung Min; Min, Jung Joon; Hong, Yeong Jin; Kim, Hyun Ju; Le, Uuenchi N.; Rhee, Joon Haeng; Song, Ho Chun; Heo, Young Jun; Bom, Hee Seung; Choy, Hyon E [School of Medicine, Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    The presence of bacteria and viruses in human tumors has been recognized for more than 50 years. Today, with the discovery of bacterial strains that specifically target tumors, and aided by genomic sequencing and genetic engineering, there is new interest in the use of bacteria as tumor vectors. Here, we show that bacteria injected intravenously into live animals entered and replicated in solid tumors and metastases using the novel imaging technology of biophotonics. Bioluminescence operon (LuxCDABE) or fluorescence protein, GFP) has been cloned into pUC19 plasmid to engineer pUC19lux or pUC19gfp. Engineered plasmid was transformed into different kinds of wild type (MG1655) or mutant E. coli (DH5, ppGpp, fnr, purE, crpA, flagella, etc.) strains to construct light emitting bacteria. Xenograft tumor model has been established using CT26 colon cancer cell line. Light emitting bacteria was injected via tail vein into tumor bearing mouse. In vivo bioluminescence imaging has been done after 20 min to 14 days of bacterial injection. We observed localization of tumors by light-emitting E. coli in tumor (CT-26) bearing mice. We confirmed the presence of light-emitting bacteria under the fluorescence microscope with E. coli expressing GFP. Althoug varying mutants strain with deficient invading function has been found in tumor tissues, mutant strains of movement (flagella) couldn't show any light signal from the tumor tissue under the cooled CCD camera, indicating bacteria may actively target the tumor cells. Based on their 'tumor-finding' nature, bacteria may be designed to carry multiple genes or drugs for detection and treatment of cancer, such as prodrug-converting enzymes, toxins, angiogenesis inhibitors and cytokines.

  5. RNA interference targets arbovirus replication in Culicoides cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnettler, Esther; Ratinier, Maxime; Watson, Mick; Shaw, Andrew E; McFarlane, Melanie; Varela, Mariana; Elliott, Richard M; Palmarini, Massimo; Kohl, Alain

    2013-03-01

    Arboviruses are transmitted to vertebrate hosts by biting arthropod vectors such as mosquitoes, ticks, and midges. These viruses replicate in both arthropods and vertebrates and are thus exposed to different antiviral responses in these organisms. RNA interference (RNAi) is a sequence-specific RNA degradation mechanism that has been shown to play a major role in the antiviral response against arboviruses in mosquitoes. Culicoides midges are important vectors of arboviruses, known to transmit pathogens of humans and livestock such as bluetongue virus (BTV) (Reoviridae), Oropouche virus (Bunyaviridae), and likely the recently discovered Schmallenberg virus (Bunyaviridae). In this study, we investigated whether Culicoides cells possess an antiviral RNAi response and whether this is effective against arboviruses, including those with double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) genomes, such as BTV. Using reporter gene-based assays, we established the presence of a functional RNAi response in Culicoides sonorensis-derived KC cells which is effective in inhibiting BTV infection. Sequencing of small RNAs from KC and Aedes aegypti-derived Aag2 cells infected with BTV or the unrelated Schmallenberg virus resulted in the production of virus-derived small interfering RNAs (viRNAs) of 21 nucleotides, similar to the viRNAs produced during arbovirus infections of mosquitoes. In addition, viRNA profiles strongly suggest that the BTV dsRNA genome is accessible to a Dicer-type nuclease. Thus, we show for the first time that midge cells target arbovirus replication by mounting an antiviral RNAi response mainly resembling that of other insect vectors of arboviruses.

  6. Interethnic diversity of the CD209 (rs4804803 gene promoter polymorphism in African but not American sickle cell disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenelle A. Noble

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Elucidating the genomic diversity of CD209 gene promoter polymorphism could assist in clarifying disease pathophysiology as well as contribution to co-morbidities. CD209 gene promoter polymorphism has been shown to be associated with susceptibility to infection. We hypothesize that CD209 mutant variants occur at a higher frequency among Africans and in sickle cell disease. We analyzed the frequency of the CD209 gene (rs4804803 in healthy control and sickle cell disease (SCD populations and determined association with disease. Genomic DNA was extracted from blood samples collected from 145 SCD and 231 control Africans (from Mali, 331 SCD and 379 control African Americans and 159 Caucasians. Comparative analysis among and between groups was carried out by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP. Per ethnic diversification, we found significant disparity in genotypic (23.4% versus 16.9% versus 3.2% and allelic frequencies (48.7% versus 42.1% versus 19.8% of the homozygote mutant variant of the CD209 (snp 309A/G gene promoter between Africans, African Americans and Caucasians respectively. Comparative evaluation between disease and control groups reveal a significant difference in genotypic (10.4% versus 23.4%; p = 0.002 and allelic frequencies (39.7% versus 48.7%; p = 0.02 of the homozygote mutant variant in African SCD and healthy controls respectively, an observation that is completely absent among Americans. Comparing disease groups, we found no difference in the genotypic (p = 0.19 or allelic (p = 0.72 frequencies of CD209 homozygote mutant variant between Africans and Americans with sickle cell disease. The higher frequency of CD209 homozygote mutant variants in the African control group reveals a potential impairment of the capacity to mount an immune response to infectious diseases, and possibly delineate susceptibility to or severity of infectious co-morbidities within and between groups.

  7. Cornering metastases: therapeutic targeting of circulating tumor cells and stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bishoy eFaltas

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The last decade has witnessed an evolution of our understanding of the biology of the metastatic cascade. Recent insights into the metastatic process show that it is complex, dynamic and multi-directional. This process starts at a very early stage in the natural history of solid tumor growth leading to early development of metastases that grow in parallel with the primary tumor. The role of stem cells in perpetuating cancer metastases is increasingly becoming more evident. At the same time, there is a growing recognition of the crucial role circulating tumor cells (CTCs play in the development of metastases. These insights have laid the biological foundations for therapeutic targeting of CTCs, a promising area of research that aims to reduce cancer morbidity and mortality by preventing the development of metastases at a very early stage. The hematogenous transport phase of the metastatic cascade provides critical access to CTCs for therapeutic targeting aiming to interrupt the metastatic process. Recent advances in the fields of nanotechnology and micro-fluidics have led to the development of several devices for in-vivo targeting of CTC during transit in the circulation. Selectin-coated tubes that target cell adhesion molecules, immuno-magnetic separators and in-vivo photoacoustic flow cytometers are currently being developed for this purpose. On the pharmacological front, several pharmacological and immunological agents targeting cancer stem cells are currently being developed. Such agents may ultimately prove to be effective against circulating tumor stem cells (CTSCs. Although still in its infancy, therapeutic targeting of CTCs and CTSCs offers an unprecedented opportunity to prevent the development of metastasis and potentially alter the natural history of cancer. By rendering cancer a local disease, these approaches could lead to major reductions in metastasis-related morbidity and mortality.

  8. DNA polymorphism and risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma in a population of North Xinjiang,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ilyar; Sheyhidin

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the role of metabolic enzyme and DNA repair genes in susceptibility of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma(ESCC). METHODS:A case-control study was designed with 454 samples from 128 ESCC patients and 326 gender, age and ethnicity-matched control subjects.Genotypes of 69 single nucleotide polymorphisms(SNPs)of metabolic enzyme(aldehyde dehydrogenase-2,ALDH2; alcohol dehydrogenase-1 B,ADHB1;Cytochrome P450 2A6,CYP2A6)and DNA repair capacity genes(excision repair cross complementing group 1,E...

  9. Leptin receptor polymorphism Gln223Arg (rs1137101) in oral squamous cell carcinoma and potentially malignant oral lesions

    OpenAIRE

    Domingos, Patrícia Luciana Batista; Farias, Lucyana Conceição; Pereira, Camila Santos; das Graças Pena, Geórgia; Reis, Tatiana Carvalho; Silva, Rosângela Ramos Veloso; Fraga, Carlos Alberto de Carvalho; de Souza, Marcela Gonçalves; Soares, Mariana Batista; Jones, Kimberly Marie; Menezes, Elytania Veiga; Nobre, Sérgio Avelino Mota; Rodrigues Neto, João Felício; de Paula, Alfredo Maurício Batista; Velásquez-Meléndez, Jorge Gustavo

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the LEPR gene Gln223Arg polymorphism (rs1137101) in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and in potentially malignant oral lesions (PMOL) in comparison to normal oral mucosa in a Brazilian population. Smokers (n = 89) were selected from a representative sample of 471 individuals from the general population of Montes Claros, Brazil. Participants were age and gender matched to patients with OSCC (n = 25) and oral epithelial dysplasia (n = 25). We investiga...

  10. Cell Membrane-Cloaked Nanoparticles for Targeted Therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luk, Brian Tsengchi

    interactions between membranes and synthetic nanoparticles, and how the membrane coating technique faithfully translates the complexities of natural cellular membranes to the nanoscale. The following three sections explore potential therapeutic applications of membrane-coated nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery, biodetoxification, and immunomodulation. Ultimately, cell membrane-cloaked nanoparticles have the potential to significantly change the landscape of nanomedicine. The novel applications presented in this thesis are just a few of many examples currently being researched, with countless more avenues waiting to be explored.

  11. Free Extracellular miRNA Functionally Targets Cells by Transfecting Exosomes from Their Companion Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Bryniarski

    Full Text Available Lymph node and spleen cells of mice doubly immunized by epicutaneous and intravenous hapten application produce a suppressive component that inhibits the action of the effector T cells that mediate contact sensitivity reactions. We recently re-investigated this phenomenon in an immunological system. CD8+ T lymphocyte-derived exosomes transferred suppressive miR-150 to the effector T cells antigen-specifically due to exosome surface coat of antibody light chains made by B1a lymphocytes. Extracellular RNA (exRNA is protected from plasma RNases by carriage in exosomes or by chaperones. Exosome transfer of functional RNA to target cells is well described, whereas the mechanism of transfer of exRNA free of exosomes remains unclear. In the current study we describe extracellular miR-150, extracted from exosomes, yet still able to mediate antigen-specific suppression. We have determined that this was due to miR-150 association with antibody-coated exosomes produced by B1a cell companions of the effector T cells, which resulted in antigen-specific suppression of their function. Thus functional cell targeting by free exRNA can proceed by transfecting companion cell exosomes that then transfer RNA cargo to the acceptor cells. This contrasts with the classical view on release of RNA-containing exosomes from the multivesicular bodies for subsequent intercellular targeting. This new alternate pathway for transfer of exRNA between cells has distinct biological and immunological significance, and since most human blood exRNA is not in exosomes may be relevant to evaluation and treatment of diseases.

  12. Osteosarcoma: Cells-of-Origin, Cancer Stem Cells, and Targeted Therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ander Abarrategi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteosarcoma (OS is the most common type of primary solid tumor that develops in bone. Although standard chemotherapy has significantly improved long-term survival over the past few decades, the outcome for those patients with metastatic or recurrent OS remains dismally poor and, therefore, novel agents and treatment regimens are urgently required. A hypothesis to explain the resistance of OS to chemotherapy is the existence of drug resistant CSCs with progenitor properties that are responsible of tumor relapses and metastasis. These subpopulations of CSCs commonly emerge during tumor evolution from the cell-of-origin, which are the normal cells that acquire the first cancer-promoting mutations to initiate tumor formation. In OS, several cell types along the osteogenic lineage have been proposed as cell-of-origin. Both the cell-of-origin and their derived CSC subpopulations are highly influenced by environmental and epigenetic factors and, therefore, targeting the OS-CSC environment and niche is the rationale for many recently postulated therapies. Likewise, some strategies for targeting CSC-associated signaling pathways have already been tested in both preclinical and clinical settings. This review recapitulates current OS cell-of-origin models, the properties of the OS-CSC and its niche, and potential new therapies able to target OS-CSCs.

  13. Glioblastoma: Molecular Pathways, Stem Cells and Therapeutic Targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jhanwar-Uniyal, Meena, E-mail: meena_jhanwar@nymc.edu; Labagnara, Michael; Friedman, Marissa; Kwasnicki, Amanda; Murali, Raj [Department of Neurosurgery, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY 10595 (United States)

    2015-03-25

    Glioblastoma (GBM), a WHO-defined Grade IV astrocytoma, is the most common and aggressive CNS malignancy. Despite current treatment modalities, the survival time remains dismal. The main cause of mortality in patients with this disease is reoccurrence of the malignancy, which is attributed to treatment-resistant cancer stem cells within and surrounding the primary tumor. Inclusion of novel therapies, such as immuno- and DNA-based therapy, may provide better means of treating GBM. Furthermore, manipulation of recently discovered non-coding microRNAs, some of which regulate tumor growth through the development and maintenance of GBM stem cells, could provide new prospective therapies. Studies conducted by The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) also demonstrate the role of molecular pathways, specifically the activated PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway, in GBM tumorigenesis. Inhibition of the aforementioned pathway may provide a more direct and targeted method to GBM treatment. The combination of these treatment modalities may provide an innovative therapeutic approach for the management of GBM.

  14. Targeting of 111In-Labeled Dendritic Cell Human Vaccines Improved by Reducing Number of Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aarntzen, E.H.J.G.; Srinivas, M.; Bonetto, F.J.; Cruz, L.J.; Verdijk, P.; Schreibelt, G.; Rakt, M.W.M.M. van de; Lesterhuis, W.J.; Riel, M. van; Punt, C.J.A.; Adema, G.J.; Heerschap, A.; Figdor, C.G.; Oyen, W.J.G.; Vries, I.J.M. de

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: Anticancer dendritic cell (DC) vaccines require the DCs to relocate to lymph nodes (LN) to trigger immune responses. However, these migration rates are typically very poor. Improving the targeting of ex vivo generated DCs to LNs might increase vaccine efficacy and reduce costs. We investiga

  15. A smart multifunctional drug delivery nanoplatform for targeting cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoop, M.; Mushtaq, F.; Hurter, C.; Chen, X.-Z.; Nelson, B. J.; Pané, S.

    2016-06-01

    most tumors. Approximately a 2.5 times higher drug release from Ni nanotubes at pH = 6 is achieved compared to that at pH = 7.4. The outside of the Ni tube is coated with gold. A fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) labeled thiol-ssDNA, a biological marker, was conjugated on its surface by thiol-gold click chemistry, which enables traceability. The Ni nanotube allows the propulsion of the device by means of external magnetic fields. As the proposed nanoarchitecture integrates different functional building blocks, our drug delivery nanoplatform can be employed for carrying molecular drug conjugates and for performing targeted combinatorial therapies, which can provide an alternative and supplementary solution to current drug delivery technologies. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Fig. S1 drug release control experiment; Fig. S2 cell viability assay; video - magnetic manipulation. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr02228f

  16. Prognostic significance of interleukin-7 receptor-α gene polymorphisms in allogeneic stem-cell transplantation: a confirmatory study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shamim, Zaiba; Ryder, Lars P; Christensen, Ib J;

    2011-01-01

    allogeneic stem-cell transplantation (SCT) identified donor genotype GG at rs1494555 as a risk factor for treatment-related mortality (TRM) after SCT. METHODS: In this validation study, 116 British and French SCT patients and their donors were investigated by sequence-specific primer polymerase chain......BACKGROUND: Interleukin-7 (IL-7) is a hematopoietic cytokine essential for T-cell development in the thymus and for the maintenance of peripheral T cells. A previous study of single nucleotide polymorphisms in the exons of IL-7 receptor a-chain (IL-7Ra) in a Danish cohort of patients undergoing...... reaction. RESULTS: Both donor rs1494555GG genotype and the tightly coupled rs1494558TT genotype were significantly associated with grade 3 to 4 acute graft versus host disease. Although both genotypes tended to be associated with increased TRM, this did not translate into altered overall survival...

  17. TISs-ST: a web server to evaluate polymorphic translation initiation sites and their reflections on the secretory targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menossi Marcelo

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The nucleotide sequence flanking the translation initiation codon (start codon context affects the translational efficiency of eukaryotic mRNAs, and may indicate the presence of an alternative translation initiation site (TIS to produce proteins with different properties. Multi-targeting may reflect the translational variability of these other protein forms. In this paper we present a web server that performs computations to investigate the usage of alternative translation initiation sites for the synthesis of new protein variants that might have different functions. Results An efficient web-based tool entitled TISs-ST (Translation Initiation Sites and Secretory Targets evaluates putative translation initiation sites and indicates the prediction of a signal peptide of the protein encoded from this site. The TISs-ST web server is freely available to both academic and commercial users and can be accessed at http://ipe.cbmeg.unicamp.br/pub/TISs-ST. Conclusion The program can be used to evaluate alternative translation initiation site consensus with user-specified sequences, based on their composition or on many position weight matrix models. TISs-ST provides analytical and visualization tools for evaluating the periodic frequency, the consensus pattern and the total information content of a sequence data set. A search option allows for the identification of signal peptides from predicted proteins using the PrediSi software.

  18. Mitochondria-targeted vitamin E analogs inhibit breast cancer cell energy metabolism and promote cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent research has revealed that targeting mitochondrial bioenergetic metabolism is a promising chemotherapeutic strategy. Key to successful implementation of this chemotherapeutic strategy is the use of new and improved mitochondria-targeted cationic agents that selectively inhibit energy metabolism in breast cancer cells, while exerting little or no long-term cytotoxic effect in normal cells. In this study, we investigated the cytotoxicity and alterations in bioenergetic metabolism induced by mitochondria-targeted vitamin E analog (Mito-chromanol, Mito-ChM) and its acetylated ester analog (Mito-ChMAc). Assays of cell death, colony formation, mitochondrial bioenergetic function, intracellular ATP levels, intracellular and tissue concentrations of tested compounds, and in vivo tumor growth were performed. Both Mito-ChM and Mito-ChMAc selectively depleted intracellular ATP and caused prolonged inhibition of ATP-linked oxygen consumption rate in breast cancer cells, but not in non-cancerous cells. These effects were significantly augmented by inhibition of glycolysis. Mito-ChM and Mito-ChMAc exhibited anti-proliferative effects and cytotoxicity in several breast cancer cells with different genetic background. Furthermore, Mito-ChM selectively accumulated in tumor tissue and inhibited tumor growth in a xenograft model of human breast cancer. We conclude that mitochondria-targeted small molecular weight chromanols exhibit selective anti-proliferative effects and cytotoxicity in multiple breast cancer cells, and that esterification of the hydroxyl group in mito-chromanols is not a critical requirement for its anti-proliferative and cytotoxic effect

  19. Sorafenib and sunitinib: novel targeted therapies for renal cell cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandinetti, Cheryl A; Goldspiel, Barry R

    2007-08-01

    Renal cell cancer (RCC) is a relatively uncommon malignancy, with 51,190 cases expected to be diagnosed in 2007. Localized disease is curable by surgery; however, locally advanced or metastatic disease is not curable in most cases and, until recently, had a limited response to drug treatment. Historically, biologic response modifiers or immunomodulating agents were tested in clinical trials based on observations that some cases of RCC can spontaneously regress. High-dose aldesleukin is approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration as a treatment for advanced RCC; however, the drug is associated with a high frequency of severe adverse effects. Responses have been observed with low-dose aldesleukin and interferon alfa, but with little effect on overall survival. Sorafenib and sunitinib are novel therapies that target growth factor receptors known to be activated by the hypoxia-inducible factor and the Ras-Raf/MEK/ERK pathways. These pathways are important in the pathophysiology of RCC. Sorafenib and sunitinib have shown antitumor activity as first- and second-line therapy in patients with cytokine-refractory metastatic RCC who have clear-cell histology. Although complete responses are not common, both drugs promote disease stabilization and increase progression-free survival. This information suggests that disease stabilization may be an important determinant for response in RCC and possibly other cancers. Sorafenib and sunitinib are generally well tolerated and are considered first- and second-line treatment options for patients with advanced clear cell RCC. In addition, sorafenib and sunitinib have shown promising results in initial clinical trials evaluating antitumor activity in patients who are refractory to other antiangiogenic therapy. The most common toxicities with both sorafenib and sunitinib are hand-foot syndrome, rash, fatigue, hypertension, and diarrhea. Research is directed toward defining the optimal use of these new agents. PMID:17655513

  20. Association of combined CYP2E1 gene polymorphism with the risk for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma in Huai'an population, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Ran; YIN Li-hong; PU Yue-pu

    2007-01-01

    Background Cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1) has an important role in the metabolic activation of precarcinogens such as N-nitrosoamines and other low relative molecular mass, organic compounds. This study examined whether CYP2E1 Rsal and Dral polymorphism are associated with susceptibility to esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and the correlation between the genotypes and expression levels of CYP2E1 mRNA.Methods Seventy-seven patients with newly diagnosed, untreated esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and 79healthy controls matched in age, gender and residence were recruited for the control study. An Rsal polymorphism in the 5'-flanking region and a Dral polymorphism in the sixth intron of the CYP2E1 gene, which could possibly affect its transcription, were determined in this study by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and mRNA level of CYP2E1 was measured by quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR.Results No significant association of Rsal or Dral polymorphism of CYP2E1 with susceptibility of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma were demonstrated (OR=1.67, 95% CI: 0.89-3.15, P=0.11; OR=1.11, 95% CI: 0.59-2.09,P=0.74, respectively). With SHEsis software, no linkage disequilibrium was detected between Rsal and Dral polymorphism (D'=0.528,r2=0.27). When combined Rsal polymorphism with Dral polymorphism, the association between that carrying c2 allele and DD genotype and the risk for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma were found (OR=5.77, 95% CI: 1.65-20.22). Compared with the normal controls, the mRNA levels with Rsal polymorphism, Dral polymorphism, or any combined genotypes in cases showed no statistical difference.Conclusions This study suggests that carryingc2 allele and DD genotype conferreded an elevated risk for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. There was no significant statistical relationship between the genotypes c1/c2, D/C, or the combined allele and mRNA expression.

  1. Bypassing Protein Corona Issue on Active Targeting: Zwitterionic Coatings Dictate Specific Interactions of Targeting Moieties and Cell Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safavi-Sohi, Reihaneh; Maghari, Shokoofeh; Raoufi, Mohammad; Jalali, Seyed Amir; Hajipour, Mohammad J; Ghassempour, Alireza; Mahmoudi, Morteza

    2016-09-01

    Surface functionalization strategies for targeting nanoparticles (NP) to specific organs, cells, or organelles, is the foundation for new applications of nanomedicine to drug delivery and biomedical imaging. Interaction of NPs with biological media leads to the formation of a biomolecular layer at the surface of NPs so-called as "protein corona". This corona layer can shield active molecules at the surface of NPs and cause mistargeting or unintended scavenging by the liver, kidney, or spleen. To overcome this corona issue, we have designed biotin-cysteine conjugated silica NPs (biotin was employed as a targeting molecule and cysteine was used as a zwitterionic ligand) to inhibit corona-induced mistargeting and thus significantly enhance the active targeting capability of NPs in complex biological media. To probe the targeting yield of our engineered NPs, we employed both modified silicon wafer substrates with streptavidin (i.e., biotin receptor) to simulate a target and a cell-based model platform using tumor cell lines that overexpress biotin receptors. In both cases, after incubation with human plasma (thus forming a protein corona), cellular uptake/substrate attachment of the targeted NPs with zwitterionic coatings were significantly higher than the same NPs without zwitterionic coating. Our results demonstrated that NPs with a zwitterionic surface can considerably facilitate targeting yield of NPs and provide a promising new type of nanocarriers in biological applications.

  2. Reiterated Targeting Peptides on the Nanoparticle Surface Significantly Promote Targeted Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Gene Delivery to Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong-Dong; Yang, Mingying; Zhu, Ye; Mao, Chuanbin

    2015-12-14

    Nonviral gene delivery vectors hold great promise for gene therapy due to the safety concerns with viral vectors. However, the application of nonviral vectors is hindered by their low transfection efficiency. Herein, in order to tackle this challenge, we developed a nonviral vector integrating lipids, sleeping beauty transposon system and 8-mer stem cell targeting peptides for safe and efficient gene delivery to hard-to-transfect mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). The 8-mer MSC-targeting peptides, when synthetically reiterated in three folds and chemically presented on the surface, significantly promoted the resultant lipid-based nanoparticles (LBNs) to deliver VEGF gene into MSCs with a high transfection efficiency (∼52%) and long-lasting gene expression (for longer than 170 h) when compared to nonreiterated peptides. However, the reiterated stem cell targeting peptides do not enable the highly efficient gene transfer to other control cells. This work suggests that the surface presentation of the reiterated stem cell-targeting peptides on the nonviral vectors is a promising method for improving the efficiency of cell-specific nonviral gene transfection in stem cells. PMID:26588028

  3. Effect of CD44 gene polymorphisms on risk of transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Wei-Chun; Huang, Yu-Hui; Yang, Shun-Fa; Wang, Shian-Shiang; Kuo, Wu-Hsien; Hsueh, Chao-Wen; Huang, Ching-Hsuan; Chou, Ying-Erh

    2016-05-01

    The carcinogenesis of transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of the urinary bladder involves etiological factors, such as ethnicity, the environment, genetics, and diet. Cluster of differentiation (CD44), a well-known tumor marker, plays a crucial role in regulating tumor cell differentiation and metastasis. This study investigated the effect of CD44 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on TCC risk and clinicopathological characteristics. Five SNPs of CD44 were analyzed through real-time polymerase chain reaction in 275 patients with TCC and 275 participants without cancer. In this study, we observed that CD44 rs187115 polymorphism carriers with the genotype of at least one G were associated with TCC risk. Furthermore, TCC patients who carried at least one G allele at CD44 rs187115 had a higher stage risk than did patients carrying the wild-type allele (p TCC. In conclusion, our results suggest that CD44 SNPs influence the risk of TCC. Patients with CD44 rs187115 variant genotypes (AG + GG) exhibited a higher risk of TCC; these patients may possess chemoresistance to developing late-stage TCC compared with those with the wild-type genotype. The CD44 rs187115 SNP may predict poor prognosis in patients with TCC.

  4. Diverse prognostic value of the GTn promoter polymorphism in squamous cell and adeno carcinoma of the oesophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghadban, T; Miro, J T; Trump, F; Tsui, T Y; Uzunoglu, F G; Reeh, M; Gebauer, F; Bachmann, K; Wellner, U; Kalinin, V; Pantel, K; Izbicki, J R; Vashist, Y K

    2016-10-01

    The basal transcription of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) regulation is dependent upon a GT repeat germ line polymorphism (GTn) in the promoter of the HO-1 gene. We determined the prognostic value of HO-1 promoter polymorphism on the natural postoperative course of complete resected oesophageal cancer. Genomic DNA from 297 patients was amplified by polymerase chain reaction and sequenced. The results were correlated with clinicopathological parameters, disseminated tumour cells in bone marrow (DTC) and clinical outcome. Depending on short allele with GTn repeats three genotypes (SS, SL and LL) were defined. A diverse role of GTn was evident in squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and adenocarcinoma (AC). In SCC, the SS genotype presented less advanced tumours with lower rate DTC in bone marrow and relapse compared with L-allele carriers. In contrast, AC patients with the SS genotype displayed a complete opposing tumour characteristic. The disease-free (DFS) and overall survival (OS) in SCC patients was markedly reduced in LL genotypes (p GTn is a strong prognostic factor with diverse prognostic value for recurrence and survival in AC and SCC.

  5. Inherited polymorphisms in hyaluronan synthase 1 predict risk of systemic B-cell malignancies but not of breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemalatha Kuppusamy

    Full Text Available Genetic variations in the hyaluronan synthase 1 gene (HAS1 influence HAS1 aberrant splicing. HAS1 is aberrantly spliced in malignant cells from multiple myeloma (MM and Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia (WM, but not in their counterparts from healthy donors. The presence of aberrant HAS1 splice variants predicts for poor survival in multiple myeloma (MM. We evaluated the influence of inherited HAS1 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP on the risk of having a systemic B cell malignancy in 1414 individuals compromising 832 patients and 582 healthy controls, including familial analysis of an Icelandic kindred. We sequenced HAS1 gene segments from 181 patients with MM, 98 with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS, 72 with Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia (WM, 169 with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL, as well as 34 members of a monoclonal gammopathy-prone Icelandic family, 212 age-matched healthy donors and a case-control cohort of 295 breast cancer patients with 353 healthy controls. Three linked single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP in HAS1 intron3 are significantly associated with B-cell malignancies (range p = 0.007 to p = 10(-5, but not MGUS or breast cancer, and predict risk in a 34 member Icelandic family (p = 0.005, Odds Ratio = 5.8 (OR, a relatively homogeneous cohort. In contrast, exon3 SNPs were not significantly different among the study groups. Pooled analyses showed a strong association between the linked HAS1 intron3 SNPs and B-cell malignancies (OR = 1.78, but not for sporadic MGUS or for breast cancer (OR<1.0. The minor allele genotypes of HAS1 SNPs are significantly more frequent in MM, WM, CLL and in affected members of a monoclonal gammopathy-prone family than they are in breast cancer, sporadic MGUS or healthy donors. These inherited changes may increase the risk for systemic B-cell malignancies but not for solid tumors.

  6. Apolipoprotein E gene polymorphism influences aggressive behavior in prostate cancer cells by deregulating cholesterol homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    IFERE, GODWIN O.; Desmond, Renee; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Nagy, Tim R.

    2013-01-01

    High circulating cholesterol and its deregulated homeostasis may facilitate prostate cancer progression. Genetic polymorphism in Apolipoprotein (Apo) E, a key cholesterol regulatory protein may effect changes in systemic cholesterol levels. In this investigation, we determined whether variants of the Apo E gene can trigger defective intracellular cholesterol efflux, which could promote aggressive prostate cancer. ApoE genotypes of weakly (non-aggressive), moderate and highly tumorigenic (aggr...

  7. Relationship between single nucleotide polymorphisms in the deoxycytidine kinase gene and chemosensitivity of gemcitabine in six pancreatic cancer cell lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SI Shuang; LIAO Quan; ZHAO Yu-pei; HU Ya; ZHANG Qiang; YOU Li-li

    2011-01-01

    Background Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the deoxycytidine kinase (dCK) gene are associated with chemosensitivity to nucleoside analogs. 2',2'-Difluoro 2'-deoxycytidine (gemcitabine) is a first-line nucleoside analog drug in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. However, the association between SNPs in the dCK gene and chemosensitivity to gemcitabine has not been fully established. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate the relationship between SNPs in the dCKgene and chemosensitivity to gemcitabine in human pancreatic cancer cell lines.Methods Seven SNPs in the dCK gene were sequenced in six human pancreatic cancer cell lines. The chemosensitivity of these six cell lines to gemcitabine were evaluated in vitro with a Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) test.Inhibition rates were used to express the chemosensitivity of pancreatic cancer cell lines to gemcitabine.Results The genotype of the A9846G SNP in the dCKgene was determined in six human pancreatic cancer cell lines.The cell lines BxPC-3 and T3M4 carried the A9846G SNP genotype AG, whereas cell lines AsPC-1, Mia PaCa2, SW1990 and SU86.86 carried the GG genotype. Cell lines with the AG genotype (BxPC-3 and T3M4) were more sensitive to gemcitabine compared with cell lines with the GG genotype (AsPC-1, Mia PaCa2, SW1990 and SU86.86) and significantly different inhibition rates were observed between cell lines carrying the AG and GG genotypes (P <0.01).Conclusions Variants in the A9846G SNP of the dCK gene were associated with sensitivity to gemcitabine in pancreatic cancer cell lines. The dCK A9846G SNP may act as a genetic marker to predict chemotherapy efficacy of gemcitabine in pancreatic cancer.

  8. The cell wall-targeting antibiotic stimulon of Enterococcus faecalis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline Abranches

    Full Text Available Enterococcus faecalis is an opportunistic nosocomial pathogen that is highly resistant to a variety of environmental insults, including an intrinsic tolerance to antimicrobials that target the cell wall (CW. With the goal of determining the CW-stress stimulon of E. faecalis, the global transcriptional profile of E. faecalis OG1RF exposed to ampicillin, bacitracin, cephalotin or vancomycin was obtained via microarrays. Exposure to the β-lactams ampicillin and cephalotin resulted in the fewest transcriptional changes with 50 and 192 genes differentially expressed 60 min after treatment, respectively. On the other hand, treatment with bacitracin or vancomycin for 60 min affected the expression of, respectively, 377 and 297 genes. Despite the differences in the total number of genes affected, all antibiotics induced a very similar gene expression pattern with an overrepresentation of genes encoding hypothetical proteins, followed by genes encoding proteins associated with cell envelope metabolism as well as transport and binding proteins. In particular, all drug treatments, most notably bacitracin and vancomycin, resulted in an apparent metabolic downshift based on the repression of genes involved in translation, energy metabolism, transport and binding. Only 19 genes were up-regulated by all conditions at both the 30 and 60 min time points. Among those 19 genes, 4 genes encoding hypothetical proteins (EF0026, EF0797, EF1533 and EF3245 were inactivated and the respective mutant strains characterized in relation to antibiotic tolerance and virulence in the Galleria mellonella model. The phenotypes obtained for two of these mutants, ΔEF1533 and ΔEF3245, support further characterization of these genes as potential candidates for the development of novel preventive or therapeutic approaches.

  9. Guiding pancreatic beta cells to target electrodes in a whole-cell biosensor for diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedraza, Eileen; Karajić, Aleksandar; Raoux, Matthieu; Perrier, Romain; Pirog, Antoine; Lebreton, Fanny; Arbault, Stéphane; Gaitan, Julien; Renaud, Sylvie; Kuhn, Alexander; Lang, Jochen

    2015-10-01

    We are developing a cell-based bioelectronic glucose sensor that exploits the multi-parametric sensing ability of pancreatic islet cells for the treatment of diabetes. These cells sense changes in the concentration of glucose and physiological hormones and immediately react by generating electrical signals. In our sensor, signals from multiple cells are recorded as field potentials by a micro-electrode array (MEA). Thus, cell response to various factors can be assessed rapidly and with high throughput. However, signal quality and consequently overall sensor performance rely critically on close cell-electrode proximity. Therefore, we present here a non-invasive method of further exploiting the electrical properties of these cells to guide them towards multiple micro-electrodes via electrophoresis. Parameters were optimized by measuring the cell's zeta potential and modeling the electric field distribution. Clonal and primary mouse or human β-cells migrated directly to target electrodes during the application of a 1 V potential between MEA electrodes for 3 minutes. The morphology, insulin secretion, and electrophysiological characteristics were not altered compared to controls. Thus, cell manipulation on standard MEAs was achieved without introducing any external components and while maintaining the performance of the biosensor. Since the analysis of the cells' electrical activity was performed in real time via on-chip recording and processing, this work demonstrates that our biosensor is operational from the first step of electrically guiding cells to the final step of automatic recognition. Our favorable results with pancreatic islets, which are highly sensitive and fragile cells, are encouraging for the extension of this technique to other cell types and microarray devices. PMID:26282013

  10. The gene polymorphisms of drug targets in Pneumocystis jiroveci isolates%耶氏肺孢子菌的药物靶位基因多态性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓西龙; 熊漫; 兰芸; 卓丽; 陈万山; 唐小平

    2016-01-01

    目的 了解耶氏肺孢子菌的药物靶位基因多态性和耐药相关基因突变的情况.方法 从148例艾滋病合并肺炎患者的呼吸道标本中扩增出51个线粒体大亚基rRNA(mtLSUrRNA)基因片段,对51例阳性样本继续进行PCR扩增,以耶氏肺孢子菌药物靶位基因二氢蝶酸合成酶(DHPS)、二氢叶酸还原酶(DHFR)、细胞色素B(CYB)为研究靶标,对扩增产物进行测序和序列分析,与GenBank中的参考序列进行比对,分析基因多态性.结果 51例样本全部扩增出DHPS基因、DHFR基因和CYB基因,序列分析显示DHPS基因中3株(5.9%)为耐药相关突变株,48株(94.1%)为野生株;DHFR基因中1株在188碱基位点有非同义突变,21株在312位点有同义突变,30株为野生株,未发现与药物耐药相关的突变株;CYB基因在5个位点有基因多态性,其中4个为同义突变,1个为非同义突变,未发现与药物耐药相关的突变.根据这5个位点的基因多态性分型可以分为6个基因型,其中2个基因型为首次检测到,51株样本中CYB1型25株、CYB2型13株、CYB5型2株、CYB8型4株,新检测到的CYB10型4株,CYB11型3株.结论 广东地区耶氏肺孢子菌药物靶位基因出现与耐药相关的基因突变较少见,CYB基因的基因多态性明显,可作为多位点序列分型研究的靶位基因.%Objective To investigate gene polymorphisms of drug targets and mutations associated with drug resistance in Pneumocystis jiroveci (P.jiroveci) isolates.Methods Among 148 samples isolated from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)infected patients with pneumonia in Guangdong,mitochondrid larg subunit rRNA (mtLSUrRNA) gene was amplified from 51 samples.Dihydropteroate synthase (DHPS),dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) and Cytochrome b (CYB) genes of P.jiroveci were detected by gene sequencing,and compared with the reference sequences in GenBank to evaluate gene polymorphisms.Results P.jirovecii DHPS,DHFR and CYB genes were all successfully

  11. RNA Interference Targeting Leptin Gene Effect on Hepatic Stellate Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE Xiulan; LIN Jusheng; SONG Yuhu; SUN Xuemei; ZHOU Hejun

    2005-01-01

    To construct the specific siRNA expression vectors and investigate their effect on leptin and collagen I in HSC, which provide a new approach to the prevent and treat hepatic fibrosis. The five siRNAs against leptin gene were transcript synthesized intracellularly by expression templates of plasmid vector psiRNA-hH1neo. The recombinant leptin siRNA plasmid vectors could express in eukaryocyte , and then to evaluate them by using enzyme cutting and sequencing. The recombinant plasmids were transfected into HSCs using Lipofectamine methods respectively. The cells were selected after growing in DMEM containing 300 μg/mL G418 for about 4 weeks. Gene expression of leptin and collagen I were showed by Western blot analysis and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Identification by enzyme cutting and sequencing showed that the leptin siRNA expression vectors were constructed successfully, and leptin siRNA could inhibit the leptin and collagen I gene expression effectively. It was concluded that RNA interference-mediated silencing of leptin gene diminished leptin and collagen I gene expression in HSCs. Furthermore, attenuated the extracellular matrix over-deposition at the same time. Leptin gene is ideal targets of gene therapy for liver fibrosis.

  12. Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase (eNOS) Gene Polymorphism is Associated with Age Onset of Menarche in Sickle Cell Disease Females of India

    OpenAIRE

    Nishank, Sudhansu Sekhar

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objective Females with sickle cell disease (SCD) often show late onset of menarche. In transgenic sickle cell mouse, deficiency of gene encoding endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) has been reported to be associated with late onset of menarche. Thus to explore the possible association of eNOS gene polymorphism with age of onset of menarche in SCD females, 3 important eNOS gene polymorphisms- eNOS 4a/b, eNOS 894G>T (rs1799983) and eNOS-786 T>C (rs2070744) and plasma nitrite...

  13. ENDOTHELIAL NITRIC OXIDE SYNTHASE (ENOS) GENE POLYMORPHISM IS ASSOCIATED WITH AGE ONSET OF MENARCHE IN SICKLE CELL DISEASE FEMALES OF INDIA

    OpenAIRE

    Sudhansu Sekhar Nishank

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT   Background and Objective :  Females with sickle cell disease (SCD) often show late onset of menarche. In transgenic sickle cell mouse, deficiency of gene encoding endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) has been reported to be associated with late onset of menarche. Thus to explore the possible association of eNOS gene polymorphism with age of onset of menarche in SCD females, 3 important eNOS gene polymorphism- eNOS 4a/b, eNOS 894G>T and eNOS-786 T>C  and  plasma ...

  14. DNA damage and Repair Modify DNA methylation and Chromatin Domain of the Targeted Locus: Mechanism of allele methylation polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Giusi; Landi, Rosaria; Pezone, Antonio; Morano, Annalisa; Zuchegna, Candida; Romano, Antonella; Muller, Mark T; Gottesman, Max E; Porcellini, Antonio; Avvedimento, Enrico V

    2016-01-01

    We characterize the changes in chromatin structure, DNA methylation and transcription during and after homologous DNA repair (HR). We find that HR modifies the DNA methylation pattern of the repaired segment. HR also alters local histone H3 methylation as well chromatin structure by inducing DNA-chromatin loops connecting the 5' and 3' ends of the repaired gene. During a two-week period after repair, transcription-associated demethylation promoted by Base Excision Repair enzymes further modifies methylation of the repaired DNA. Subsequently, the repaired genes display stable but diverse methylation profiles. These profiles govern the levels of expression in each clone. Our data argue that DNA methylation and chromatin remodelling induced by HR may be a source of permanent variation of gene expression in somatic cells. PMID:27629060

  15. Involvement of Tspan8 in exosome assembly and target cell selection

    OpenAIRE

    Rana, Sanyukta

    2010-01-01

    Exosomes are the most important intercellular communicators. Tetraspanins/their complexes are suggested to be important in exosomal target cell selection. I showed: changes in Tetraspanin8 associations created from internalization persist upto exosomes and, differences in tetraspanin-complexes on exosomes allow for target cell selectivity.Based on the tetraspanin-complex on exosomes, predictions on potential target cells might be possible, allowing tailored exosome generation for drug delivery.

  16. Polymorphisms of homologous recombination genes and clinical outcomes of non-small cell lung cancer patients treated with definitive radiotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Yin

    Full Text Available The repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs is the major mechanism to maintain genomic stability in response to irradiation. We hypothesized that genetic polymorphisms in DSB repair genes may affect clinical outcomes among non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients treated with definitive radio(chemotherapy. We genotyped six potentially functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs (i.e., RAD51 -135G>C/rs1801320 and -172G>T/rs1801321, XRCC2 4234G>C/rs3218384 and R188H/rs3218536 G>A, XRCC3 T241M/rs861539 and NBN E185Q/rs1805794 and estimated their associations with overall survival (OS and radiation pneumonitis (RP in 228 NSCLC patients. We found a predictive role of RAD51 -135G>C SNP in RP development (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] = 0.52, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.31-0.86, P = 0.010 for CG/CC vs. GG. We also found that RAD51 -135G>C and XRCC2 R188H SNPs were independent prognostic factors for overall survival (adjusted HR = 1.70, 95% CI, 1.14-2.62, P = 0.009 for CG/CC vs. GG; and adjusted HR = 1.70; 95% CI, 1.02-2.85, P = 0.043 for AG vs. GG, respectively and that the SNP-survival association was most pronounced in the presence of RP. Our study suggests that HR genetic polymorphisms, particularly RAD51 -135G>C, may influence overall survival and radiation pneumonitis in NSCLC patients treated with definitive radio(chemotherapy. Large studies are needed to confirm our findings.

  17. ATM Polymorphisms Predict Severe Radiation Pneumonitis in Patients With Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treated With Definitive Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiong, Huihua [Department of Oncology, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1095 Jiefang Avenue, Wuhan (China); Department of Epidemiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Liao, Zhongxing, E-mail: zliao@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Liu, Zhensheng [Department of Epidemiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Xu, Ting [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Wang, Qiming; Liu, Hongliang [Department of Epidemiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Komaki, Ritsuko; Gomez, Daniel [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Wang, Li-E [Department of Epidemiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Wei, Qingyi, E-mail: qwei@mdanderson.org [Department of Epidemiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: The ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene mediates detection and repair of DNA damage. We investigated associations between ATM polymorphisms and severe radiation-induced pneumonitis (RP). Methods and Materials: We genotyped 3 potentially functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of ATM (rs1801516 [D1853N/5557G>A], rs189037 [-111G>A] and rs228590) in 362 patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), who received definitive (chemo)radiation therapy. The cumulative severe RP probabilities by genotypes were evaluated using the Kaplan-Meier analysis. The associations between severe RP risk and genotypes were assessed by both logistic regression analysis and Cox proportional hazard model with time to event considered. Results: Of 362 patients (72.4% of non-Hispanic whites), 56 (15.5%) experienced grade ≥3 RP. Patients carrying ATM rs189037 AG/GG or rs228590 TT/CT genotypes or rs189037G/rs228590T/rs1801516G (G-T-G) haplotype had a lower risk of severe RP (rs189037: GG/AG vs AA, adjusted hazard ratio [HR] = 0.49, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.29-0.83, P=.009; rs228590: TT/CT vs CC, HR=0.57, 95% CI, 0.33-0.97, P=.036; haplotype: G-T-G vs A-C-G, HR=0.52, 95% CI, 0.35-0.79, P=.002). Such positive findings remained in non-Hispanic whites. Conclusions: ATM polymorphisms may serve as biomarkers for susceptibility to severe RP in non-Hispanic whites. Large prospective studies are required to confirm our findings.

  18. Relationship between genetic polymorphisms of alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenases and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma risk in males

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chia-Fang Wu; Deng-Chyang Wu; Hon-Ki Hsu; Ein-Long Kao; Jang-Ming Lee; Cheng-Chieh Lin; Ming-Tsang Wu

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the association between the genetic polymorphisms of ADH2 and ALDH2, lifetime alcohol consumption and esophageal cancer risk in the Taiwanese men.METHODS: Between August 2000 and June 2003, 134 pathologically-proven esophageal squamous cell carcinoma male patients and 237 male controls were recruited from Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital and Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital in southern Taiwan.ADH2 and ALDH2 polymorphisms were genotyped using PCR-RFLP.RESULTS: Compared to those with ADH2*2/*2,individuals with ADH2*1/*2 and ADH2*1/*1 had 2.28-and 7.14-fold, respectively, increased risk of developing esophageal cancer (95%CI = 1.11-4.68 and 2.76-18.46)after adjusting for alcohol consumption and other covariates. The significant increased risk was also noted among subjects with ALDH2*1/*2 (adjusted OR (AOR)= 5.25, 95%CI = 2.47-11.19), when compared to those with ALDH2*1/*1. The increased risk of esophageal cancer was made greater, when subjects carried both ADH2*1/*1 and ALDH2*1/*2, compared to those with ADH2*1/*2 or ADH2*2/*2 and ALDH2*1/*1 (AOR = 36.79,95%CI = 9.36-144.65). Furthermore, we found a multiplicative effect of lifetime alcoholic consumption and genotypes (ADH2 and ALDH2) on esophageal cancer risk.CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that polymorphisms of ADH2 and ALDH2 can modify the influence of alcoholic consumption on esophageal cancer risk.

  19. Targeted and non-targeted effects in cell wall polysaccharides from transgenetically modified potato tubers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, J.H.

    2016-01-01

    The plant cell wall is a chemically complex network composed mainly of polysaccharides. Cell wall polysaccharides surround and protect plant cells and are responsible for the stability and rigidity of plant tissue. Pectin is a major component of primary cell wall and the middle lamella of plants. Ho

  20. Different frequencies and effects of ABCB1 T3435C polymorphism on clinical and laboratory features of B cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia in Kurdish patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroofi, Farzad; Amini, Sabrieh; Roshani, Daem; Ghaderi, Bayazid; Abdi, Mohammad

    2015-04-01

    Finding the effects of gene polymorphism on cancer pathogenesis is very desirable. The ATP-binding cassette is involved in drug metabolism, and the polymorphism of this gene may be an important risk factor in B cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) or progression and/or response to chemotherapy agents. For the first time, the present study was aimed to evaluate the probable effects of ABCB1 T3435C polymorphism on clinical and laboratory features of Kurdish patients with B-CLL. This descriptive analytical case-control study was performed on 50 B-CLL patients and 100 healthy subjects. Serum levels of beta-2-microglobulin (B2M) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and blood WBC, RBC, Plt and ESR were measured. The T3435C polymorphism of the ABCB1 gene was determined by PCR-RFLP. Concentration of serum and blood markers was significantly higher in the malignant group than in the benign subjects. The CC genotype had the highest frequency (66%) in the patient groups. There are no significant differences between the genotypes and type of treatment. Our results demonstrate the high frequency of C allele of ABCB1 T3435C in B-CLL patients with Kurdish ethnicity. We also show that this polymorphism has a significant risk factor in B-CLL. However, the effect of this polymorphism on clinical and laboratory characteristics of B-CLL patients was not significant. PMID:25586345

  1. The interleukin-18 gene promoter -607 A/C polymorphism contributes to non-small-cell lung cancer risk in a Chinese population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia YC

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Youchao Jia,1,2 Aimin Zang,2 Shunchang Jiao,1 Sumei Chen,1 Fu Yan1 1Department of Medical Oncology, General Hospital of Chinese PLA, Beijing, 2Department of Oncology, Affiliated Hospital of Hebei University, Hebei, People’s Republic of China Abstract: The purpose of the present study was to determine the relationship between interleukin-18 (IL-18 -607 A/C polymorphism and the risk of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC and its impact on the serum IL-18 level. The genotyping of IL-18 -607 A/C polymorphism was detected by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP. The results showed that the AA/AC genotype distribution in NSCLC patients was significantly higher than that of healthy controls (P=0.02. However, no significant differences were found between the two subgroups when stratified by clinical characteristics. Furthermore, serum IL-18 levels were found to be significantly higher in the NSCLC patients than in the controls (P=0.01 as detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay analysis. There was no correlation between serum IL-18 levels and different genotypes. In conclusion, these findings suggest that IL-18 -607 A/C polymorphism increases the risk of NSCLC in the Chinese population, and this polymorphism could not functionally affect the IL-18 levels. Keywords: IL-18, polymorphism, NSCLC

  2. Relationship Between Chronic Tinnitus and Glial Cell Line-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Gene rs3812047, rs1110149, and rs884344 Polymorphisms in a Turkish Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orenay-Boyacioglu, Seda; Coskunoglu, Aysun; Caki, Zerrin; Cam, Fethi Sirri

    2016-08-01

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) plays a key role in early development of central auditory pathway and the inner ear. However, the auditory pathway studies of GDNF gene polymorphisms are scarce in the literature, and the studies especially associated with tinnitus are limited. Our study aimed to identify whether GDNF gene polymorphisms play any roles in the pathophysiology of tinnitus by investigating the relationship between tinnitus and GDNF polymorphisms. A total of 52 patients with chronic tinnitus and ages ranging from 18 to 55 were admitted to the Ear-Nose-Throat outpatient clinic of Celal Bayar University Medical Faculty Hospital of Manisa, Turkey and constituted the study group. Another 42 patients of the same age range, without tinnitus symptoms and lacking any systemic disease, were also admitted to the clinic and formed the control group. The tympanometric, audiological, and psychoacoustic assessments of the subjects were performed. Deoxyribonucleic acid samples obtained using venous blood taken for routine inspections were used to investigate GDNF gene polymorphisms (rs884344, rs3812047, and rs1110149) by polymerase chain reaction-based restriction fragment length polymorphism method. No correlation could be detected between GDNF rs884344 and rs3812047 polymorphisms and subjects with tinnitus (p > 0.05). Heterozygosity was significantly lower for GDNF rs1110149 polymorphism in tinnitus subjects compared to the controls (p tinnitus and control groups (p > 0.05). Failure to detect correlations between tinnitus and GDNF gene polymorphisms suggests this may be due to the fact that the GDNF gene has a variable expression pattern in different tissues and pathologies. Therefore, the study should be improved and its scope should be expanded by including a larger group of patients and different tissues to investigate the expression pattern of GDNF. PMID:27180191

  3. Antibody-targeting of steady state dendritic cells induces tolerance mediated by regulatory T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karsten eMahnke

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs are often defined as pivotal inducers of immunity, but these proinflammatory properties only develop after stimulation or ex vivo manipulation of DCs. Under non-inflammatory conditions in vivo, DCs are embedded into a tissue environment and encounter a plethora of self-antigens derived from apoptotic material. This material is transported to secondary lymphoid organs. As DCs maintain their non-activated phenotype in a sterile tissue environment, interaction with T cells will induce rather regulatory T cells (Treg than effector T cells. Thus, DCs are not only inducers of immunity but are also critical for maintenance of peripheral tolerance. Therapeutical intervention for the induction of long lasting tolerance in several autoimmune conditions may therefore be possible by manipulating DC activation and/or targeting of DCs in their natural tissue environment.

  4. XPA A23G polymorphism is associated with the elevated response to platinum-based chemotherapy in advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jifeng Feng; Xinchen Sun; Ning Sun; Shukui Qin; Fan Li; Hongyan Cheng; Baoan Chen; YuanDong Cao; Jun Ma; Lu Cheng; Zuhong Lu; Jiazhong Ji; Yingfeng Zhou

    2009-01-01

    DNA repair capacity(DRC)is correlated with sensi tivity of cancer cells toward platinum-based chemotherapy.We hypothesize that genetic polymorphisms in DNA repair gene XPA(xeroderma pigmentosum group A)and XPG(xeroderma pigmentosum group G)(ERCC5,excision repair cross-complementation group 5),which result in inter-individual differences in DNA repair efficiency,may predict clinical response to platinum agents in advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)patients.In this study,we find that the A→G change of XPA A23G polymorphism significantly increased response to platinum-based chemotherapy.Polymorphism in XPG His46His was associated with a decreased treatment response,but was not statistically significant.

  5. Cellulose Structural Polymorphism in Plant Primary Cell Walls Investigated by High-Field 2D Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy and Density Functional Theory Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tuo; Yang, Hui; Kubicki, James D; Hong, Mei

    2016-06-13

    bacterial, algal, and animal cellulose, interacts with hemicellulose, is poorly hydrated, and is targeted by the protein expansin during wall loosening. To obtain information about the C6 hydroxymethyl conformation of these plant celluloses, we carried out DFT calculations of (13)C chemical shifts, using the Iα and Iβ crystal structures as templates and varying the C5-C6 torsion angle. Comparison with the experimental chemical shifts suggests that all interior cellulose favor the tg conformation, but cellulose d also has a similar propensity to adopt the gt conformation. These results indicate that cellulose in plant primary cell walls, due to their interactions with matrix polysaccharides, and has polymorphic structures that are not a simple superposition of the Iα and Iβ allomorphs, thus distinguishing them from bacterial and animal celluloses. PMID:27192562

  6. Plasmodium falciparum field isolates from South America use an atypical red blood cell invasion pathway associated with invasion ligand polymorphisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Lopez-Perez

    Full Text Available Studies of Plasmodium falciparum invasion pathways in field isolates have been limited. Red blood cell (RBC invasion is a complex process involving two invasion protein families; Erythrocyte Binding-Like (EBL and the Reticulocyte Binding-Like (PfRh proteins, which are polymorphic and not fully characterized in field isolates. To determine the various P. falciparum invasion pathways used by parasite isolates from South America, we studied the invasion phenotypes in three regions: Colombia, Peru and Brazil. Additionally, polymorphisms in three members of the EBL (EBA-181, EBA-175 and EBL-1 and five members of the PfRh (PfRh1, PfRh2a, PfRh2b, PfRh4, PfRh5 families were determined. We found that most P. falciparum field isolates from Colombia and Peru invade RBCs through an atypical invasion pathway phenotypically characterized as resistant to all enzyme treatments (NrTrCr. Moreover, the invasion pathways and the ligand polymorphisms differed substantially among the Colombian and Brazilian isolates while the Peruvian isolates represent an amalgam of those present in the Colombian and Brazilian field isolates. The NrTrCr invasion profile was associated with the presence of the PfRh2a pepC variant, the PfRh5 variant 1 and EBA-181 RVNKN variant. The ebl and Pfrh expression levels in a field isolate displaying the NrTrCr profile also pointed to PfRh2a, PfRh5 and EBA-181 as being possibly the major players in this invasion pathway. Notably, our studies demonstrate the uniqueness of the Peruvian P. falciparum field isolates in terms of their invasion profiles and ligand polymorphisms, and present a unique opportunity for studying the ability of P. falciparum parasites to expand their invasion repertoire after being reintroduced to human populations. The present study is directly relevant to asexual blood stage vaccine design focused on invasion pathway proteins, suggesting that regional invasion variants and global geographical variation are likely to

  7. Computational Approach for Epitaxial Polymorph Stabilization through Substrate Selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Hong; Dwaraknath, Shyam S; Garten, Lauren; Ndione, Paul; Ginley, David; Persson, Kristin A

    2016-05-25

    With the ultimate goal of finding new polymorphs through targeted synthesis conditions and techniques, we outline a computational framework to select optimal substrates for epitaxial growth using first principle calculations of formation energies, elastic strain energy, and topological information. To demonstrate the approach, we study the stabilization of metastable VO2 compounds which provides a rich chemical and structural polymorph space. We find that common polymorph statistics, lattice matching, and energy above hull considerations recommends homostructural growth on TiO2 substrates, where the VO2 brookite phase would be preferentially grown on the a-c TiO2 brookite plane while the columbite and anatase structures favor the a-b plane on the respective TiO2 phases. Overall, we find that a model which incorporates a geometric unit cell area matching between the substrate and the target film as well as the resulting strain energy density of the film provide qualitative agreement with experimental observations for the heterostructural growth of known VO2 polymorphs: rutile, A and B phases. The minimal interfacial geometry matching and estimated strain energy criteria provide several suggestions for substrates and substrate-film orientations for the heterostructural growth of the hitherto hypothetical anatase, brookite, and columbite polymorphs. These criteria serve as a preliminary guidance for the experimental efforts stabilizing new materials and/or polymorphs through epitaxy. The current screening algorithm is being integrated within the Materials Project online framework and data and hence publicly available. PMID:27145398

  8. Computational Approach for Epitaxial Polymorph Stabilization through Substrate Selection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Hong; Dwaraknath, Shyam S.; Garten, Lauren; Ndione, Paul; Ginley, David; Persson, Kristin A.

    2016-05-25

    With the ultimate goal of finding new polymorphs through targeted synthesis conditions and techniques, we outline a computational framework to select optimal substrates for epitaxial growth using first principle calculations of formation energies, elastic strain energy, and topological information. To demonstrate the approach, we study the stabilization of metastable VO2 compounds which provides a rich chemical and structural polymorph space. We find that common polymorph statistics, lattice matching, and energy above hull considerations recommends homostructural growth on TiO2 substrates, where the VO2 brookite phase would be preferentially grown on the a-c TiO2 brookite plane while the columbite and anatase structures favor the a-b plane on the respective TiO2 phases. Overall, we find that a model which incorporates a geometric unit cell area matching between the substrate and the target film as well as the resulting strain energy density of the film provide qualitative agreement with experimental observations for the heterostructural growth of known VO2 polymorphs: rutile, A and B phases. The minimal interfacial geometry matching and estimated strain energy criteria provide several suggestions for substrates and substrate-film orientations for the heterostructural growth of the hitherto hypothetical anatase, brookite, and columbite polymorphs. These criteria serve as a preliminary guidance for the experimental efforts stabilizing new materials and/or polymorphs through epitaxy. The current screening algorithm is being integrated within the Materials Project online framework and data and hence publicly available.

  9. Cell Membrane Capsules for Encapsulation of Chemotherapeutic and Cancer Cell Targeting in Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Li-Hua; Zhang, Yuan-Hong; Han, Li-Jie; Zhang, Chen-Zhen; Wu, Jia-He; Wang, Xia-Rong; Gao, Jian-Qing; Mao, Zheng-Wei

    2015-08-26

    Systemic administration of chemotherapeutic agents can cause indiscriminate drug distribution and severe toxicity. Until now, encapsulation and targeting of drugs have typically relied on synthetic vehicles, which cannot minimize the clearance by the renal system and may also increase the risk of chemical side effects. Cell membrane capsules (CMCs) provide a generic and far more natural approach to the challenges of drug encapsulation and delivery in vivo. Here aptamer AS1411, which can recognize and bind overexpressed nucleolin on a cancer cell membrane, was chemically conjugated onto CMCs. As a result, AS1411 modified CMCs showed enhanced ingestion in certain cancer cells in vitro and accumulation in mouse cancer xenografts in vivo. Chemotherapeutics and contrast agents with therapeutically significant concentrations can be packaged into CMCs by reversible permeating their plasma membranes. The systematic administration of cancer targeting CMCs loaded with doxorubicin hydrochloride can significantly inhibit tumor growth in mouse xenografts, with significantly reduced toxicity compared to free drug. These findings suggest that cancer targeting CMCs may have considerable benefits in drug delivery and cancer treatment. PMID:26262951

  10. Display of GPI-anchored anti-EGFR nanobodies on extracellular vesicles promotes tumour cell targeting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooijmans, Sander A A; Aleza, Clara Gómez; Roffler, Steve R; van Solinge, Wouter W; Vader, Pieter; Schiffelers, Raymond M

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are attractive candidate drug delivery systems due to their ability to functionally transport biological cargo to recipient cells. However, the apparent lack of target cell specificity of exogenously administered EVs limits their therapeutic applicability. In

  11. Relationship between target organ damage and blood pressure, retinal vessel calibre, oxidative stress and polymorphisms in VAV-2 and VAV-3 genes in patients with hypertension: a case–control study protocol (LOD-Hipertensión)

    OpenAIRE

    Gomez-Marcos, Manuel A; Gonzalez-Sarmiento, Rogelio; Recio-Rodríguez, José I.; Agudo-Conde, Cristina; Gamella-Pozuelo, Luis; Perretta-Tejedor, Nuria; Martínez-Salgado, Carlos; García-Ortiz, Luis

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Target organ damage (TOD) is associated with increased cardiovascular risk. The study objectives were to analyse the relationship of TOD to blood pressure, size of retinal arteries and veins, oxidative stress and different polymorphisms in the VAV-2 and VAV-3 genes in participants with hypertension. Methods and analysis A case–control study to analyse the relationship between clinical, biochemical and genetic parameters and presence of cardiac, vascular and renal TOD in 486 patie...

  12. Induction of the Matrix Metalloproteinase 13 Gene in Bronchial Epithelial Cells by Interferon and Identification of its Novel Functional Polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashimo, Yoichi; Sakurai-Yageta, Mika; Watanabe, Misa; Arima, Takayasu; Morita, Yoshinori; Inoue, Yuzaburo; Sato, Kazuki; Nishimuta, Toshiyuki; Suzuki, Shuichi; Watanabe, Hiroko; Hoshioka, Akira; Tomiita, Minako; Yamaide, Akiko; Kohno, Yoichi; Okamoto, Yoshitaka; Shimojo, Naoki; Hata, Akira; Suzuki, Yoichi

    2016-06-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a class of extra-cellular and membrane-bound proteases involved in a wide array of physiological and pathological processes including tissue remodeling, inflammation, and cytokine secretion and activation. MMP-13 has been shown to be involved in lung diseases such as acute lung injury, viral infections, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; however, the molecular pathogenesis of MMP-13 in these conditions is not well understood. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms and roles of MMP-13 secretion in human small airway epithelial cells (SAECs) and functional polymorphisms of the MMP13 gene. Polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (poly(I:C)) and interferon β (IFN-β) stimulated the secretion of MMP-13 from SAECs by more than several hundred-fold. Stimulation of the secretion by poly(I:C) was abolished by SB304680 (p38 inhibitor), LY294002 (PI3K inhibitor), Janus kinase (JAK) inhibitor I, RNA-activated protein kinase (PKR) inhibitor, and Bay 11-7082 (NF-κB inhibitor), while stimulation by IFN-β was inhibited by all except Bay 11-7082. These data suggested that the secretion of MMP-13 was mediated through IFN receptor pathways independently of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and that poly(I:C) stimulated IFN secretion in an NF-κB-dependent manner from SAECs, leading to IFN-stimulated MMP-13 secretion. Chemical MMP-13 inhibitors and MMP-13 small interfering RNA (siRNA) inhibited IFN-stimulated secretion of interferon gamma-inducible protein 10 (IP-10) and regulated on activation, normal T-cell expressed and secreted (RANTES), suggesting that MMP-13 is involved in the secretion of these virus-induced proinflammatory chemokines. We identified a novel functional polymorphism in the promoter region of the MMP13 gene. The MMP13 gene may play important roles in defense mechanisms of airway epithelial cells. PMID:26635116

  13. A Modular Probe Strategy for Drug Localization, Target Identification and Target Occupancy Measurement on Single Cell Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutkowska, Anna; Thomson, Douglas W; Vappiani, Johanna; Werner, Thilo; Mueller, Katrin M; Dittus, Lars; Krause, Jana; Muelbaier, Marcel; Bergamini, Giovanna; Bantscheff, Marcus

    2016-09-16

    Late stage failures of candidate drug molecules are frequently caused by off-target effects or inefficient target engagement in vivo. In order to address these fundamental challenges in drug discovery, we developed a modular probe strategy based on bioorthogonal chemistry that enables the attachment of multiple reporters to the same probe in cell extracts and live cells. In a systematic evaluation, we identified the inverse electron demand Diels-Alder reaction between trans-cyclooctene labeled probe molecules and tetrazine-tagged reporters to be the most efficient bioorthogonal reaction for this strategy. Bioorthogonal biotinylation of the probe allows the identification of drug targets in a chemoproteomics competition binding assay using quantitative mass spectrometry. Attachment of a fluorescent reporter enables monitoring of spatial localization of probes as well as drug-target colocalization studies. Finally, direct target occupancy of unlabeled drugs can be determined at single cell resolution by competitive binding with fluorescently labeled probe molecules. The feasibility of the modular probe strategy is demonstrated with noncovalent PARP inhibitors.

  14. A Modular Probe Strategy for Drug Localization, Target Identification and Target Occupancy Measurement on Single Cell Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutkowska, Anna; Thomson, Douglas W; Vappiani, Johanna; Werner, Thilo; Mueller, Katrin M; Dittus, Lars; Krause, Jana; Muelbaier, Marcel; Bergamini, Giovanna; Bantscheff, Marcus

    2016-09-16

    Late stage failures of candidate drug molecules are frequently caused by off-target effects or inefficient target engagement in vivo. In order to address these fundamental challenges in drug discovery, we developed a modular probe strategy based on bioorthogonal chemistry that enables the attachment of multiple reporters to the same probe in cell extracts and live cells. In a systematic evaluation, we identified the inverse electron demand Diels-Alder reaction between trans-cyclooctene labeled probe molecules and tetrazine-tagged reporters to be the most efficient bioorthogonal reaction for this strategy. Bioorthogonal biotinylation of the probe allows the identification of drug targets in a chemoproteomics competition binding assay using quantitative mass spectrometry. Attachment of a fluorescent reporter enables monitoring of spatial localization of probes as well as drug-target colocalization studies. Finally, direct target occupancy of unlabeled drugs can be determined at single cell resolution by competitive binding with fluorescently labeled probe molecules. The feasibility of the modular probe strategy is demonstrated with noncovalent PARP inhibitors. PMID:27384741

  15. Cold atmospheric plasma treatment selectively targets head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero-Preston, Rafael; Ogawa, Takenori; Uemura, Mamoru; Shumulinsky, Gary; Valle, Blanca L; Pirini, Francesca; Ravi, Rajani; Sidransky, David; Keidar, Michael; Trink, Barry

    2014-10-01

    The treatment of locoregional recurrence (LRR) of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) often requires a combination of surgery, radiation therapy and/or chemotherapy. Survival outcomes are poor and the treatment outcomes are morbid. Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) is an ionized gas produced at room temperature under laboratory conditions. We have previously demonstrated that treatment with a CAP jet device selectively targets cancer cells using in vitro melanoma and in vivo bladder cancer models. In the present study, we wished to examine CAP selectivity in HNSCC in vitro models, and to explore its potential for use as a minimally invasive surgical approach that allows for specific cancer cell or tumor tissue ablation without affecting the surrounding healthy cells and tissues. Four HNSCC cell lines (JHU-022, JHU-028, JHU-029, SCC25) and 2 normal oral cavity epithelial cell lines (OKF6 and NOKsi) were subjected to cold plasma treatment for durations of 10, 30 and 45 sec, and a helium flow of 20 l/min-1 for 10 sec was used as a positive treatment control. We showed that cold plasma selectively diminished HNSCC cell viability in a dose-response manner, as evidenced by MTT assays; the viability of the OKF6 cells was not affected by the cold plasma. The results of colony formation assays also revealed a cell-specific response to cold plasma application. Western blot analysis did not provide evidence that the cleavage of PARP occurred following cold plasma treatment. In conclusion, our results suggest that cold plasma application selectively impairs HNSCC cell lines through non-apoptotic mechanisms, while having a minimal effect on normal oral cavity epithelial cell lines.

  16. Fcγ receptor IIIA polymorphisms and efficacy of rituximab therapy on Chinese diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Wei; WANG Xuan; Li Jian; DUAN Ming-hui; ZHOU Dao-bin

    2010-01-01

    Background Rituximab is used extensively in combination with chemotherapy to cure non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), and not only accelerates short-term improvement, but also prolongs patient survival and decreases relapse. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of Fcγ receptor IIIA (FcγRIIIA) gene polymorphisms on the response to rituximab therapy for newly diagnosed B-cell lymphomas. Methods Patients with newly diagnosed histologically-proven CD20-positive B-cell lymphoma were eligible for the study. All of the patients received rituximab combined with chemotherapy (CHOP). The FcγRIIIA type was analyzed by PCR. The initial efficacy was assessed after 6 cycles and the long-term survival was determined. Results Thirty-four patients were recruited between October 2005 and April 2006. The FcγRIIIA distribution was as follows: 11 patients were W, 5 were FF, and 18 were VF. After a median of 6 cycles (range 4-8) of rituximab combined chemotherapy, the overall response rate was 79% (82% in the VV group, 83% in the VF group, and 60% in the FF group; P=0.04). After a median follow-up time of 37 months (range 34-41), there were 12 relapses among 27 responders (44%); 5 of 9 patients (5/9) in the VV group, 5 of 15 patients (33%) in the VF group, and 2 of 3 patients (2/3) in the FF group (P=0.21). The 1-year overall survival in the VV, FF, and VF groups was 80%, 60%, and 80%, respectively, and the 3-year overall survival was 58%, 40%, and 69%, respectively (P=0.08). After analysis by COX regression, only the international prognosis index and response to initial treatment were significantly related to overall survival. Conclusions The distribution of FcγRIIIA polymorphisms in this B-cell lymphoma population shows that VF is most frequently expressed, followed by VV and FF. Patients with the FcγRIIIA VV and VF types are more sensitive to the initial treatment of rituximab combined with chemotherapy and have superior long-term survival compared with those with FF

  17. Display of GPI-anchored anti-EGFR nanobodies on extracellular vesicles promotes tumour cell targeting

    OpenAIRE

    Sander A. A. Kooijmans; Gómez Aleza, Clara; Roffler, Steve R; van Solinge, Wouter W.; Vader, Pieter; Schiffelers, Raymond M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are attractive candidate drug delivery systems due to their ability to functionally transport biological cargo to recipient cells. However, the apparent lack of target cell specificity of exogenously administered EVs limits their therapeutic applicability. In this study, we propose a novel method to equip EVs with targeting properties, in order to improve their interaction with tumour cells.Methods: EV producing cells were transfected with vectors enco...

  18. Targeting Bruton's tyrosine kinase signaling as an emerging therapeutic agent of B-cell malignancies

    OpenAIRE

    Xia, Bing; QU, FULIAN; Yuan, Tian; Zhang, Yizhuo

    2015-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly evident that B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling is central to the development and function of B cells. BCR signaling has emerged as a pivotal pathway and a key driver of numerous B-cell lymphomas. Disruption of BCR signaling can be lethal to malignant B cells. Recently, kinase inhibitors that target BCR signaling have induced notable clinical responses. These inhibitors include spleen tyrosine kinase, mammalian target of rapamycin, phosphoinositide 3′-kinase and Bruto...

  19. Structural insight of dopamine β-hydroxylase, a drug target for complex traits, and functional significance of exonic single nucleotide polymorphisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhijeet Kapoor

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human dopamine β-hydroxylase (DBH is an important therapeutic target for complex traits. Several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs have also been identified in DBH with potential adverse physiological effect. However, difficulty in obtaining diffractable crystals and lack of a suitable template for modeling the protein has ensured that neither crystallographic three-dimensional structure nor computational model for the enzyme is available to aid rational drug design, prediction of functional significance of SNPs or analytical protein engineering. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Adequate biochemical information regarding human DBH, structural coordinates for peptidylglycine alpha-hydroxylating monooxygenase and computational data from a partial model of rat DBH were used along with logical manual intervention in a novel way to build an in silico model of human DBH. The model provides structural insight into the active site, metal coordination, subunit interface, substrate recognition and inhibitor binding. It reveals that DOMON domain potentially promotes tetramerization, while substrate dopamine and a potential therapeutic inhibitor nepicastat are stabilized in the active site through multiple hydrogen bonding. Functional significance of several exonic SNPs could be described from a structural analysis of the model. The model confirms that SNP resulting in Ala318Ser or Leu317Pro mutation may not influence enzyme activity, while Gly482Arg might actually do so being in the proximity of the active site. Arg549Cys may cause abnormal oligomerization through non-native disulfide bond formation. Other SNPs like Glu181, Glu250, Lys239 and Asp290 could potentially inhibit tetramerization thus affecting function. CONCLUSIONS: The first three-dimensional model of full-length human DBH protein was obtained in a novel manner with a set of experimental data as guideline for consistency of in silico prediction. Preliminary physicochemical tests validated

  20. New Strategies in Engineering T-cell Receptor Gene-Modified T cells to More Effectively Target Malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Thomas M; Stromnes, Ingunn M; Chapuis, Aude G; Greenberg, Philip D

    2015-12-01

    The immune system, T cells in particular, have the ability to target and destroy malignant cells. However, antitumor immune responses induced from the endogenous T-cell repertoire are often insufficient for the eradication of established tumors, as illustrated by the failure of cancer vaccination strategies or checkpoint blockade for most tumors. Genetic modification of T cells to express a defined T-cell receptor (TCR) can provide the means to rapidly generate large numbers of tumor-reactive T cells capable of targeting tumor cells in vivo. However, cell-intrinsic factors as well as immunosuppressive factors in the tumor microenvironment can limit the function of such gene-modified T cells. New strategies currently being developed are refining and enhancing this approach, resulting in cellular therapies that more effectively target tumors and that are less susceptible to tumor immune evasion.

  1. Myeloid cells - targets of medication in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Manoj K; Yong, V Wee

    2016-09-01

    Discussions of multiple sclerosis (MS) pathophysiology tend to focus on T cells and B cells of the adaptive immune response. The innate immune system is less commonly considered in this context, although dendritic cells, monocytes, macrophages and microglia - collectively referred to as myeloid cells - have prominent roles in MS pathogenesis. These populations of myeloid cells function as antigen-presenting cells and effector cells in neuroinflammation. Furthermore, a vicious cycle of interactions between T cells and myeloid cells exacerbates pathology. Several disease-modifying therapies are now available to treat MS, and insights into their mechanisms of action have largely focused on the adaptive immune system, but these therapies also have important effects on myeloid cells. In this Review, we discuss the evidence for the roles of myeloid cells in MS and the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis model of MS, and consider how interactions between myeloid cells and T cells and/or B cells promote MS pathology. Finally, we discuss the direct and indirect effects of existing MS medications on myeloid cells. PMID:27514287

  2. Single-nucleotide polymorphism in microRNA-binding site of SULF1 target gene as a protective factor against the susceptibility to breast cancer: a case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Q

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Qiong Zhou,1–3 Yiwei Jiang,1,2,4 Wenjin Yin,1,2 Yaohui Wang,1,2,4 Jinsong Lu4 1Department of Breast Surgery, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, 2Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai, 3Department of Gynecology, Zhejiang Cancer Hospital, Hangzhou, 4Breast Cancer Center, Renji Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China Purpose: Numerous clinical studies have suggested that chemopreventive drugs for breast cancer such as tamoxifen and exemestane can effectively reduce the incidence of estrogen receptor (ER-positive breast cancer. However, it remains unclear how to identify those who are susceptible to ER-positive breast cancer. Accordingly, there is a great demand for a probe into the predisposing factors so as to provide precise chemoprevention. Recent evidence has indicated that ERα expression can be regulated by microRNAs (miRNAs, such as miR-206, in breast cancer. We assumed that single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the miR-206-binding sites of the target genes may be associated with breast cancer susceptibility with different ER statuses. Methods: We genotyped the SNPs that reside in and around the miR-206-binding sites of two target genes – heparan sulfatase 1 (SULF1 and RPTOR-independent companion of mammalian target of rapamycin Complex 2 (RICTOR – which were related to the progression or metastasis of breast cancer cells in 710 breast cancer patients and 294 controls by the matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry method. Modified odds ratios (ORs with their 95% confidence intervals (CIs were calculated by a multivariate logistic regression analysis to evaluate the potential association between the SNPs and breast cancer susceptibility. Results: For rs3802278, which is located in the 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR of SULF1, the frequency of the AA genotype was less in breast cancer patients

  3. Targeting Head and Neck Cancer Stem Cells: Current Advances and Future Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkeland, A C; Owen, J H; Prince, M E

    2015-11-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs), or tumor-initiating cells, comprise a subset of tumor cells with demonstrated ability for tumor growth, invasion, metastasis, and resistance to chemotherapy and radiation. Targeting of CSCs remains an attractive yet elusive therapeutic option, with the goal of increasing specificity and effectiveness in tumor eradication, as well as decreasing off-target or systemic toxicity. Research into further characterization and targeted therapy toward head and neck CSCs is an active and rapidly evolving field. This review discusses the current state of research into therapy against head and neck CSCs and future directions for targeted therapy.

  4. Association of the polymorphism of the CAG repeat in the mitochondrial DNA polymerase gamma gene (POLG) with testicular germ-cell cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomberg Jensen, M; Leffers, H; Petersen, J H;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A possible association between the polymorphic CAG repeat in the DNA polymerase gamma (POLG) gene and the risk of testicular germ-cell tumours (TGCT) was investigated in this study. The hypothesis was prompted by an earlier preliminary study proposing an association of the absence of ...

  5. Clearance of red cells by monoclonal IgG3 anti-D in vivo is affected by the VF polymorphism of Fc gamma RIIIa (CD16)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kumpel, BM; De Haas, M; Koene, HR; Van de Winkel, JGJ; Goodrick, MJ

    2003-01-01

    Human red cells (RBC) coated with IgG anti-D are cleared from the circulation to the spleen by macrophages which express IgG receptors (Fcgamma R). Polymorphisms of Fcgamma RIIa and Fcgamma RIIIa affect IgG binding in vitro , and may alter the efficiency of clearance of immune complexes in vivo. In

  6. Toll-like receptor 4 polymorphism associated with the response to whole-cell pertussis vaccination in children from the KOALA study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Banus, Sander; Bottema, Renske W. B.; Siezen, Christine L. E.; Vandebriel, Rob J.; Reimerink, Johan; Mommers, Monique; Koppelman, Gerard H.; Hoebee, Barbara; Thijs, Carel; Postma, Dirkje S.; Kimman, Tjeerd G.; Stelma, Foekje F.

    2007-01-01

    We examined the association between haplotype tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms in TLR4 and the pertussis toxin-specific immunoglobulin G response after whole-cell pertussis (wP) vaccination in 515 1-year-old children from the KOALA study. A lower titer was associated with the minor allele of

  7. Basal cell carcinoma is associated with high TNF-alpha release but nor with TNF-alpha polymorphism at position--308

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Lone; Allen, Michael H; Bang, Bo;

    2003-01-01

    secretion of TNF-alpha has been identified in humans. We have therefore investigated the association of the --308 polymorphism with the risk of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) in humans. The frequency of TNF G and TNF A alleles among Caucasian patients with a previous BCC (n=191) and health adults (n-107) were...

  8. MPLA incorporation into DC-targeting glycoliposomes favours anti-tumour T cell responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boks, Martine A.; Ambrosini, Martino; Bruijns, Sven C.; Kalay, Hakan; Van Bloois, Louis; Storm, G; Garcia-Vallejo, Juan J.; Van Kooyk, Yvette

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Dendritic cells (DC) are attractive targets for cancer immunotherapy as they initiate strong and long-lived tumour-specific T cell responses. DC can be effectively targeted in vivo with tumour antigens by using nanocarriers such as liposomes. Cross-presentation of tumour antigens is enhance

  9. MPLA incorporation into DC-targeting glycoliposomes favours anti-tumour T cell responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boks, M.A.; Ambrosini, Martino; Bruijns, Sven C.M.; Kalay, Hakan; Bloois, van Louis; Storm, G.; Garcia-Vallejo, Juan J.; Kooyk, van Y.

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are attractive targets for cancer immunotherapy as they initiate strong and long-lived tumour-specific T cell responses. DC can be effectively targeted in vivo with tumour antigens by using nanocarriers such as liposomes. Cross-presentation of tumour antigens is enhanced with st

  10. Reduced heat shock response in human mononuclear cells during aging and its association with polymorphisms in HSP70 genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Ripudaman; Kølvraa, Steen; Bross, Peter;

    2006-01-01

    Age-dependent changes in heat shock response (HSR) were studied in mononuclear cells (monocytes and lymphocytes) collected from young (mean age = 22.6 +/- 1.7 years) and middle-aged (mean age = 56.3 +/- 4.7 years) subjects after 1 hour of heat shock at 42 degrees C. Genotype-specific HSR was...... measured by genotyping the subjects for 3 single nucleotide polymorphisms, HSPA1A(A-110C), HSPA1B(A1267G), and HSPA1L(T2437C), 1 each in the 3 HSP70 genes. A significant age-related decrease in the induction of Hsp70 occurred after heat shock in both monocytes and lymphocytes. The noninducible and...

  11. Multivalent glycopeptide dendrimers for the targeted delivery of antigens to dendritic cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.J. García-Vallejo; M. Ambrosini; A. Overbeek; W.E. van Riel; K. Bloem; W.W.J. Unger; F. Chiodo; J.G. Bolscher; K. Nazmi; H. Kalay; Y. van Kooyk

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells are the most powerful type of antigen presenting cells. Current immunotherapies targeting dendritic cells have shown a relative degree of success but still require further improvement. One of the most important issues to solve is the efficiency of antigen delivery to dendritic cells

  12. Facts and fictions about polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Cabeza, Aurora J; Reutzel-Edens, Susan M; Bernstein, Joel

    2015-12-01

    We present new facts about polymorphism based on (i) crystallographic data from the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD, a database built over 50 years of community effort), (ii) 229 solid form screens conducted at Hoffmann-La Roche and Eli Lilly and Company over the course of 8+ and 15+ years respectively and (iii) a dataset of 446 polymorphic crystals with energies and properties computed with modern DFT-d methods. We found that molecular flexibility or size has no correlation with the ability of a compound to be polymorphic. Chiral molecules, however, were found to be less prone to polymorphism than their achiral counterparts and compounds able to hydrogen bond exhibit only a slightly higher propensity to polymorphism than those which do not. Whilst the energy difference between polymorphs is usually less than 1 kcal mol(-1), conformational polymorphs are capable of differing by larger values (up to 2.5 kcal mol(-1) in our dataset). As overall statistics, we found that one in three compounds in the CSD are polymorphic whilst at least one in two compounds from the Roche and Lilly set display polymorphism with a higher estimate of up to three in four when compounds are screened intensively. Whilst the statistics provide some guidance of expectations, each compound constitutes a new challenge and prediction and realization of targeted polymorphism still remains a holy grail of materials sciences.

  13. Impact of Fc gamma-receptor polymorphisms on the response to rituximab treatment in children and adolescents with mature B cell lymphoma/leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhardt, Birgit; Yavuz, Deniz; Zimmermann, Martin; Schieferstein, Jutta; Kabickova, Edita; Attarbaschi, Andishe; Lisfeld, Jasmin; Reiter, Alfred; Makarova, Olga; Worch, Jennifer; Bonn, Bettina R; Damm-Welk, Christine

    2016-09-01

    Recent studies in adult lymphoma patients have indicated a correlation between polymorphisms of Fc gamma-receptors (FcγRs, encoded by the respective FCGR genes) and the response to rituximab treatment. In vitro, cells expressing FcγRIIIa-158V mediate antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) more efficiently than cells expressing FcγRIIIa-158F. The impact of the FCGR2A-131HR polymorphism is unclear. In this study, the FCGR polymorphisms FCGR3A-158VF and FCGR2A-131HR were analyzed in pediatric patients with mature aggressive B cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma/leukemia (B-NHL). Pediatric patients received a single dose of rituximab monotherapy. Response was evaluated on day 5 followed by standard chemotherapy for B-NHL. Among 105 evaluable patients, a response to rituximab was observed in 21 % of those homozygous for FcγRIIa-131RR (5/24) compared to 48 % of patients who were HH and HR FcγRIIa-131 allele carriers (18/34 and 21/47, respectively; p = 0.044). Among patients with the FCGR3A-158 polymorphism, those homozygous for the FF genotype had a significantly favorable rituximab response rate of 59 % (22/37) compared to 32 % in patients who were FcγRIIIa-158VV and FcγRIIIa-VF allele carriers (2/9 and 20/59, respectively; p = 0.022). A stringent phase II response evaluation of children and adolescents with B-NHL after one dose of rituximab monotherapy showed a significant association between the rituximab response rate and FCGR polymorphisms. These findings support the hypothesis that FCGR polymorphisms represent patient-specific parameters that influence the response to rituximab. PMID:27376362

  14. Identification of novel GRM1 mutations and single nucleotide polymorphisms in prostate cancer cell lines and tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shafat Ali

    Full Text Available Metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (GRM1 signaling has been implicated in benign and malignant disorders including prostate cancer (PCa. To further explore the role of genetic alterations of GRM1 in PCa, we screened the entire human GRM1 gene including coding sequence, exon-intron junctions, and flanking untranslated regions (UTRs for the presence of mutations and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in several PCa cell lines and matched tumor-normal tissues from Caucasian Americans (CAs and African Americans (AAs. We used bidirectional sequencing, allele-specific PCR, and bioinformatics to identify the genetic changes in GRM1 and to predict their functional role. A novel missense mutation identified at C1744T (582 Pro > Ser position of GRM1 gene in a primary AA-PCa cell line (E006AA was predicted to affect the protein stability and functions. Another novel mutation identified at exon-intron junction of exon-8 in C4-2B cell line resulted in alteration of the GRM1 splicing donor site. In addition, we found missense SNP at T2977C (993 Ser > Pro position and multiple non-coding mutations and SNPs in 3'-UTR of GRM1 gene in PCa cell lines and tissues. These novel mutations may contribute to the disease by alterations in GRM1 gene splicing, receptor activation, and post-receptor downstream signaling.

  15. Monodisperse Magnetite Nanoparticles Coupled with Nuclear Localization Signal Peptide for Cell-Nucleus Targeting

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Chenjie; Xie, Jin; Kohler, Nathan; Walsh, Edward G; Chin, Y. Eugene; Sun, Shouheng

    2008-01-01

    Functionalization of monodisperse superparamagnetic magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles for cell specific targeting is crucial for cancer diagnostics and therapeutics. Targeted magnetic nanoparticles can be used to enhance the tissue contrast in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), to improve the efficiency in anticancer drug delivery, and to eliminate tumor cells by magnetic fluid hyperthermia. Herein we report the nucleus-targeting Fe3O4 nanoparticles functionalized with protein and nuclear locali...

  16. Aspects of Tumour Targeting : Preclinical Studies on Human Malignant Cells in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Dahlström Wester, Maria

    2009-01-01

    Exclusive eradication of tumour cells causing minimal damage to healthy tissue, a concept referred to as targeting, is an interesting approach to improve the outcome for patients afflicted with cancer. The general aim of this thesis was to highlighten aspects that could be of importance in developing novel treatment regimens based on specific targeting of tumour cells. Two variants of targeting strategies, boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR...

  17. Cell-based phenotypic screening of mast cell degranulation unveils kinetic perturbations of agents targeting phosphorylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Shenlu; Wang, Xumeng; Wu, Huanwen; Xiao, Peng; Cheng, Hongqiang; Zhang, Xue; Ke, Yuehai

    2016-01-01

    Mast cells play an essential role in initiating allergic diseases. The activation of mast cells are controlled by a complicated signal network of reversible phosphorylation, and finding the key regulators involved in this network has been the focus of the pharmaceutical industry. In this work, we used a method named Time-dependent cell responding profile (TCRP) to track the process of mast cell degranulation under various perturbations caused by agents targeting phosphorylation. To test the feasibility of this high-throughput cell-based phenotypic screening method, a variety of biological techniques were used. We further screened 145 inhibitors and clustered them based on the similarities of their TCRPs. Stat3 phosphorylation has been widely reported as a key step in mast cell degranulation. Interestingly, our TCRP results showed that a Stat3 inhibitor JSI124 did not inhibit degranulation like other Stat3 inhibitors, such as Stattic, clearly inhibited degranulation. Regular endpoint assays demonstrated that the distinctive TCRP of JSI124 potentially correlated with the ability to induce apoptosis. Consequently, different agents possibly have disparate functions, which can be conveniently detected by TCRP. From this perspective, our TCRP screening method is reliable and sensitive when it comes to discovering and selecting novel compounds for new drug developments. PMID:27502076

  18. Targeting Btk with ibrutinib inhibit gastric carcinoma cells growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin Dao; Chen, Xiao Ying; Ji, Ke Wei; Tao, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (Btk) is a member of the Tec-family non-receptor tyrosine kinases family. It has previously been reported to be expressed in B cells and has an important role in B-cell malignancies. While the roles of Btk in the pathogenesis of certain B-cell malignancies are well established, the functions of Btk in gastric carcinoma have never been investigated. Herein, we found that Btk is over-expressed in gastric carcinoma tissues and gastric cancer cells. Knockdown of Btk expression selectively inhibits the growth of gastric cancer cells, but not that of the normal gastric mucosa epithelial cell, which express very little Btk. Inhibition of Btk by its inhibitor ibrutinib has an additive inhibitory effect on gastric cancer cell growth. Treatment of gastric cancer cells, but not immortalized breast epithelial cells with ibrutinib results in effective cell killing, accompanied by the attenuation of Btk signals. Ibrutinib also induces apoptosis in gastric carcinoma cells as well as is a chemo-sensitizer for docetaxel (DTX), a standard of care for gastric carcinoma patients. Finally, ibrutinib markedly reduces tumor growth and increases tumor cell apoptosis in the tumors formed in mice inoculated with the gastric carcinoma cells. Given these promising preclinical results for ibrutinib in gastric carcinoma, a strategy combining Btk inhibitor warrants attention in gastric cancer. PMID:27508020

  19. Targeted microbubbles for ultrasound mediated gene transfection and apoptosis induction in ovarian cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Shufang; Guo, Juan; Sun, Jiangchuan; Zhu, Shenyin; Yan, Yu; Zhu, Yi; Li, Min; Wang, Zhigang; Xu, Ronald X

    2012-01-01

    Ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD) technique can be potentially used for non-viral delivery of gene therapy. Targeting wild-type p53 (wtp53) tumor suppressor gene may provide a clinically promising treatment for patients with ovarian cancer. However, UTMD mediated gene therapy typically uses non-targeted microbubbles with suboptimal gene transfection efficiency. We synthesized a targeted microbubble agent for UTMD mediated wtp53 gene therapy in ovarian cancer cells. Lipid micr...

  20. Vesicle-associated membrane protein 7 (VAMP-7) is essential for target cell killing in a natural killer cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcet-Palacios, Marcelo; Odemuyiwa, Solomon O; Coughlin, Jason J; Garofoli, Daniella; Ewen, Catherine; Davidson, Courtney E; Ghaffari, Mazyar; Kane, Kevin P; Lacy, Paige; Logan, Michael R; Befus, A Dean; Bleackley, R Chris; Moqbel, Redwan

    2008-02-15

    Natural killer cells recognize and induce apoptosis in foreign, transformed or virus-infected cells through the release of perforin and granzymes from secretory lysosomes. Clinically, NK-cell mediated killing is a major limitation to successful allo- and xenotransplantation. The molecular mechanisms that regulate the fusion of granzyme B-containing secretory lysosomes to the plasma membrane in activated NK cells, prior to target cell killing, are not fully understood. Using the NK cell line YT-Indy as a model, we have investigated the expression of SNAP REceptors (SNAREs), both target (t-) and vesicular (v-) SNAREs, and their function in granzyme B-mediated target cell killing. Our data showed that YT-Indy cells express VAMP-7 and SNAP-23, but not VAMP-2. VAMP-7 was associated with granzyme B-containing lysosomal granules. Using VAMP-7 small interfering RNA (siRNA), we successfully knocked down the expression of VAMP-7 protein in YT-Indy to less than 10% of untreated cells in 24h. VAMP7-deficient YT-Indy cells activated via co-culture with Jurkat cells released <1ng/mL of granzyme B, compared to 1.5-2.5 microg/mL from controls. Using Jurkat cells as targets, we showed a 7-fold reduction in NK cell-mediated killing by VAMP-7 deficient YT-Indy cells. Our results show that VAMP-7 is a crucial component of granzyme B release and target cell killing in the NK cell line YT-Indy. Thus, targeting VAMP-7 expression specifically with siRNA, following transplantation, may be a viable strategy for preventing NK cell-mediated transplant rejection, in vivo.

  1. Cas9-mediated targeting of viral RNA in eukaryotic cells

    OpenAIRE

    Price, Aryn A.; Sampson, Timothy R.; Ratner, Hannah K.; Grakoui, Arash; Weiss, David S

    2015-01-01

    The clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeats associated endonuclease, Cas9, has quickly become a revolutionary tool in genome engineering. Utilizing small guiding RNAs, Cas9 can be targeted to specific DNA sequences of interest, where it catalyzes DNA cleavage. We now demonstrate that Cas9 from the Gram-negative bacterium Francisella novicida (FnCas9) can be reprogrammed to target a specific RNA substrate, the genome of the +ssRNA virus, hepatitis C virus, in eukaryotic cel...

  2. Taking Aim at Moving Targets in Computational Cell Migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuzzo, Paola; Van Troys, Marleen; Ampe, Christophe; Martens, Lennart

    2016-02-01

    Cell migration is central to the development and maintenance of multicellular organisms. Fundamental understanding of cell migration can, for example, direct novel therapeutic strategies to control invasive tumor cells. However, the study of cell migration yields an overabundance of experimental data that require demanding processing and analysis for results extraction. Computational methods and tools have therefore become essential in the quantification and modeling of cell migration data. We review computational approaches for the key tasks in the quantification of in vitro cell migration: image pre-processing, motion estimation and feature extraction. Moreover, we summarize the current state-of-the-art for in silico modeling of cell migration. Finally, we provide a list of available software tools for cell migration to assist researchers in choosing the most appropriate solution for their needs.

  3. A drug target that stimulates development of healthy stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scientists have overcome a major impediment to the development of effective stem cell therapies by studying mice that lack CD47, a protein found on the surface of both healthy and cancer cells. They discovered that cells obtained from the lungs of CD47-de

  4. Apoptosis and cancer stem cells : Implications for apoptosis targeted therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruyt, Frank A. E.; Schuringa, Jan Jacob

    2010-01-01

    Evidence is accumulating showing that cancer stem cells or tumor-initiating cells are key drivers of tumor formation and progression. Successful therapy must therefore eliminate these cells, which is hampered by their high resistance to commonly used treatment modalities. Thus far, only a limited nu

  5. Acute myeloid leukemia of donor origin after allogeneic stem cell transplantation from a sibling who harbors germline XPD and XRCC3 homozygous polymorphisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    da Silva Dayse A

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A 54-year-old woman was diagnosed with infiltrative ductal breast carcinoma. Two years after treatment, the patient developed an acute myeloid leukemia (AML which harbored del(11q23 in 8% of the blast cells. The patient was submitted for allogeneic stem cell transplantation (aSCT from her HLA-compatible sister. Ten months after transplantation, she relapsed with an AML with basophilic maturation characterized by CD45low CD33high, CD117+, CD13-/+, HLA Drhigh, CD123high, and CD203c+ blast cells lacking expression of CD7, CD10, CD34, CD15, CD14, CD56, CD36, CD64, and cytoplasmic tryptase. Karyotype analysis showed the emergence of a new clone with t(2;14 and FISH analysis indicated the presence of MLL gene rearrangement consistent with del(11q23. Interestingly, AML blast cell DNA tested with microsatellite markers showed the same pattern as the donor's, suggesting that this AML emerged from donor cells. Additionally, polymorphisms of the XPA, XPD, XRCC1, XRCC3 and RAD51 DNA repair genes revealed three unfavorable alleles with low DNA repair capacity. In summary, we report the first case of AML involving XPD and XRCC3 polymorphisms from donor origin following allogeneic stem cell transplantation and highlight the potential need for careful analysis of DNA repair gene polymorphisms in selecting candidate donors prior to allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

  6. Targeting eradication of malignant cells derived from human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yingbin [Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, Bioengineering College, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); School of Life Science, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); Cai, Shaoxi, E-mail: sxcai@cqu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, Bioengineering College, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Yang, Li [Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, Bioengineering College, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); College of Pharmacy, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Yu, Shuhui [Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, Bioengineering College, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Library of Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); Jiang, Jiahuan; Yan, Xiaoqing [Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, Bioengineering College, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Zhang, Haoxing [School of Life Science, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); Liu, Lan [Department of Laboratory of Medicine, Children' s Hospital of Chongqin Medical University, Chongqing 400014 (China); Liu, Qun [College of Life Science and Technology, Southwest University for Nationalities, Chengdu 610041 (China); Du, Jun [Center of Microbiology, Biochemistry, and Pharmacology, School of Pharmaceutical Science, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Cai, Shaohui [College of Pharmacy, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Sung, K.L. Paul [Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, Bioengineering College, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Departments of Orthopaedic Surgery and Bioengineering, University of California, SD 0412 (United States)

    2010-12-10

    Human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (hBMSC) have been shown to participate in malignant transformation. However, hampered by the low frequency of malignant transformation of hBMSC, we do not yet know how to prevent malignant transformation of implanted hBMSC. In this study, in order to establish a model for the eradication of hBMSC-derived malignant cells, a gene fusion consisting of a human telomerase (hTERT) promoter modified with both c-Myc and myeloid zinc finger protein2 (MZF-2) binding elements and followed by the E. coli cytosine deaminase (CD) and luciferase genes was stably transferred into hBMSC via lentiviral transduction; n-phosphonacelyl-L-aspartic acid (PALA) selection was used to generate malignant cell colonies derived from transduced hBMSC after treatment with the carcinogenic reagent BPDE. Cells that were amplified after PALA selection were used for transplantation and 5-FC pro-drug cytotoxicity tests. The results showed that PALA-resistant malignant cells could be generated from hBMSC co-induced with lentiviral transduction and treatment with Benzo(a)pyrene Diol Epoxide (BPDE); the modification of c-Myc and MZF-2 binding elements could remarkably enhance the transcriptional activities of the hTERT promoter in malignant cells, whereas transcriptional activity was depressed in normal hBMSC; malignant cells stably expressing CD under the control of the modified hTERT promoter could be eliminated by 5-FC administration. This study has provided a method for targeted eradication of malignant cells derived from hBMSC.

  7. Targeting eradication of malignant cells derived from human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (hBMSC) have been shown to participate in malignant transformation. However, hampered by the low frequency of malignant transformation of hBMSC, we do not yet know how to prevent malignant transformation of implanted hBMSC. In this study, in order to establish a model for the eradication of hBMSC-derived malignant cells, a gene fusion consisting of a human telomerase (hTERT) promoter modified with both c-Myc and myeloid zinc finger protein2 (MZF-2) binding elements and followed by the E. coli cytosine deaminase (CD) and luciferase genes was stably transferred into hBMSC via lentiviral transduction; n-phosphonacelyl-L-aspartic acid (PALA) selection was used to generate malignant cell colonies derived from transduced hBMSC after treatment with the carcinogenic reagent BPDE. Cells that were amplified after PALA selection were used for transplantation and 5-FC pro-drug cytotoxicity tests. The results showed that PALA-resistant malignant cells could be generated from hBMSC co-induced with lentiviral transduction and treatment with Benzo(a)pyrene Diol Epoxide (BPDE); the modification of c-Myc and MZF-2 binding elements could remarkably enhance the transcriptional activities of the hTERT promoter in malignant cells, whereas transcriptional activity was depressed in normal hBMSC; malignant cells stably expressing CD under the control of the modified hTERT promoter could be eliminated by 5-FC administration. This study has provided a method for targeted eradication of malignant cells derived from hBMSC.

  8. Association of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 genetic polymorphism, hepatitis C viral infection and B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma: an Egyptian study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorshied, Mervat Mamdooh; Gouda, Heba Mahmoud; Khorshid, Ola M Reda

    2014-05-01

    Abstract Genetic and environmental factors are involved in the pathogenesis of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). The present study aimed to investigate the association between cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) genetic polymorphism, hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and B-cell NHL risk in Egypt. Genotyping of CTLA-4 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) was performed by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) assay for 181 adult patients with B-NHL and 200 controls. Our study revealed that CTLA-4 + 49 A/G polymorphism conferred increased risk of B-NHL (odds ratio [OR] = 1.7, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.36-2.565). The prevalence of HCV infection in individuals harboring the mutant genotype + 49 A/G and - 318 C/T SNPs was higher in patients with B-NHL and was associated with increased risk of B-NHL (OR = 2.79, 95% CI = 1.24-6.93 for + 49 A/G and OR = 3.9, 95% CI = 1.01-15.98 for - 318 C/T). In conclusion, some SNPs of CTLA-4 are genetic risk factors for B-NHL. Moreover, this study identified an association of CTLA-4 + 49 A/G and - 318 C/T promoter polymorphisms with HCV infection.

  9. Simultaneous Cell-to-Cell Transmission of Human Immunodeficiency Virus to Multiple Targets through Polysynapses▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudnicka, Dominika; Feldmann, Jérôme; Porrot, Françoise; Wietgrefe, Steve; Guadagnini, Stéphanie; Prévost, Marie-Christine; Estaquier, Jérôme; Haase, Ashley T.; Sol-Foulon, Nathalie; Schwartz, Olivier

    2009-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) efficiently propagates through cell-to-cell contacts, which include virological synapses (VS), filopodia, and nanotubes. Here, we quantified and characterized further these diverse modes of contact in lymphocytes. We report that viral transmission mainly occurs across VS and through “polysynapses,” a rosette-like structure formed between one infected cell and multiple adjacent recipients. Polysynapses are characterized by simultaneous HIV clustering and transfer at multiple membrane regions. HIV Gag proteins often adopt a ring-like supramolecular organization at sites of intercellular contacts and colocalize with CD63 tetraspanin and raft components GM1, Thy-1, and CD59. In donor cells engaged in polysynapses, there is no preferential accumulation of Gag proteins at contact sites facing the microtubule organizing center. The LFA-1 adhesion molecule, known to facilitate viral replication, enhances formation of polysynapses. Altogether, our results reveal an underestimated mode of viral transfer through polysynapses. In HIV-infected individuals, these structures, by promoting concomitant infection of multiple targets in the vicinity of infected cells, may facilitate exponential viral growth and escape from immune responses. PMID:19369333

  10. Cells by design: a mini-review of targeting cell engineering using DNA microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaluria, Pratik; Chu, Chia; Betenbaugh, Michael; Shiloach, Joseph

    2008-06-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the utility of DNA microarray technology in engineering cellular properties. For instance, cellular adhesion, the necessity of cells to attach to a surface in order to to proliferate, was examined by comparing two distinct HeLa cell lines. Two genes, one encoding a type II membrane glycosylating sialyltransferase (siat7e) and the other encoding a secreted glycoprotein (lama4), were found to influence adhesion. The expression of siat7e correlated with reduced adhesion, whereas expression of lama4 correlated with increased adhesion, as shown by various assays. In a separate example, a gene encoding a mitochondrial assembly protein (cox15) and a gene encoding a kinase (cdkl3), were found to influence cellular growth. Enhanced expression of either gene resulted in slightly higher specific growth rates and higher maximum cell densities for HeLa, HEK-293, and CHO cell lines. Another investigated property was the adaptation of HEK-293 cells to serum-free media. The genes egr1 and gas6, both with anti-apoptotic properties, were identified as potentially improving adaptability by impacting viability at low serum levels. In trying to control apoptosis, researchers found that by altering the expression levels of four genes faim, fadd, alg-2, and requiem, apoptotic response could be altered. In the present work, these and related studies in microorganisms (prokaryote and eukaryote) are examined in greater detail focusing on the approach of using DNA microarrays to direct cellular behavior by targeting select genes. PMID:18327555

  11. Blastic Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Neoplasm: From Origin of the Cell to Targeted Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laribi, Kamel; Denizon, Nathalie; Besançon, Anne; Farhi, Jonathan; Lemaire, Pierre; Sandrini, Jeremy; Truong, Catherine; Ghnaya, Habib; Baugier de Materre, Alix

    2016-08-01

    Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm (BPDCN) is a rare hematological malignancy with an aggressive clinical course. It is grouped with acute myeloid leukemia-related precursor neoplasms in the 2008 World Health Organization classification. Most patients with BPDCN have skin lesions at diagnosis and subsequent or simultaneous involvement of the bone marrow, peripheral blood, and lymph nodes. Patients usually respond to initial chemotherapy but often relapse. Stem cell transplantation may improve survival. This neoplasm is derived from precursors of plasmacytoid dendritic cells and is characterized by the coexpression of the immunophenotypic markers CD4, CD56, CD123, blood dendritic cell antigen-2, blood dendritic cell antigen-4, CD2AP, and lineage(-). Atypical immunophenotype expression may be present, making diagnosis difficult. BPDCN is often associated with a complex karyotype, frequent deletions of tumor suppressor genes, and mutations affecting either the DNA methylation or chromatin remodeling pathways. A better understanding of the etiology and pathophysiology of this neoplasm could open the way to new therapies targeting specific signaling pathways or involving epigenetics. PMID:27026248

  12. B cells as therapeutic targets in autoimmune neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalakas, Marinos C

    2008-10-01

    B cells have a fundamental role in the pathogenesis of various autoimmune neurological disorders, not only as precursors of antibody-producing cells, but also as important regulators of the T-cell activation process through their participation in antigen presentation, cytokine production, and formation of ectopic germinal centers in the intermeningeal spaces. Two B-cell trophic factors-BAFF (B-cell-activating factor) and APRIL (a proliferation-inducing ligand)-and their receptors are strongly upregulated in many immunological disorders of the CNS and PNS, and these molecules contribute to clonal expansion of B cells in situ. The availability of monoclonal antibodies or fusion proteins against B-cell surface molecules and trophic factors provides a rational approach to the treatment of autoimmune neurological diseases. This article reviews the role of B cells in autoimmune neurological disorders and summarizes the experience to date with rituximab, a B-cell-depleting monoclonal antibody against CD20, for the treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, autoimmune neuropathies, neuromyelitis optica, paraneoplastic neurological disorders, myasthenia gravis, and inflammatory myopathies. It is expected that ongoing controlled trials will establish the efficacy and long-term safety profile of anti-B-cell agents in several autoimmune neurological disorders, as well as exploring the possibility of a safe and synergistic effect with other immunosuppressants or immunomodulators.

  13. Cell cycle and anti-estrogen effects synergize to regulate cell proliferation and ER target gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Dalvai

    Full Text Available Antiestrogens are designed to antagonize hormone induced proliferation and ERalpha target gene expression in mammary tumor cells. Commonly used drugs such as OH-Tamoxifen and ICI 182780 (Fulvestrant block cell cycle progression in G0/G1. Inversely, the effect of cell cycle stage on ER regulated gene expression has not been tested directly. We show that in ERalpha-positive breast cancer cells (MCF-7 the estrogen receptor gene and downstream target genes are cell cycle regulated with expression levels varying as much as three-fold between phases of the cell cycle. Steroid free culture conditions commonly used to assess the effect of hormones or antiestrogens on gene expression also block MCF-7 cells in G1-phase when several ERalpha target genes are overexpressed. Thus, cell cycle effects have to be taken into account when analyzing the impact of hormonal treatments on gene transcription. We found that antiestrogens repress transcription of several ERalpha target genes specifically in S phase. This observation corroborates the more rapid and strong impact of antiestrogen treatments on cell proliferation in thymidine, hydroxyurea or aphidicolin arrested cells and correlates with an increase of apoptosis compared to similar treatments in lovastatin or nocodazol treated cells. Hence, cell cycle effects synergize with the action of antiestrogens. An interesting therapeutic perspective could be to enhance the action of anti-estrogens by associating hormone-therapy with specific cell cycle drugs.

  14. Family Polymorphism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ernst, Erik

    2001-01-01

    This paper takes polymorphism to the multi-object level. Traditional inheritance, polymorphism, and late binding interact nicely to provide both flexibility and safety — when a method is invoked on an object via a polymorphic reference, late binding ensures that we get the appropriate...... implementation of that method for the actual object. We are granted the flexibility of using different kinds of objects and different method implementations, and we are guaranteed the safety of the combination. Nested classes, polymorphism, and late binding of nested classes interact similarly to provide both...... safety and flexibility at the level of multi-object systems. We are granted the flexibility of using different families of kinds of objects, and we are guaranteed the safety of the combination. This paper highlights the inability of traditional polymorphism to handle multiple objects, and presents family...

  15. Stem cells and lung cancer: future therapeutic targets?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alison, Malcolm R; Lebrenne, Arielle C; Islam, Shahriar

    2009-09-01

    In both the UK and USA more people die of lung cancer than any other type of cancer. Lung cancer's high mortality rate is also reflected on a global scale, with lung cancer accounting for more than 1 million deaths per year. In tissues with ordered structure such a lung epithelia, it is likely that the cancers have their origins in normal adult stem cells, and then the tumours themselves are maintained by a population of malignant stem cells - so-called cancer stem cells. This review examines both these postulates in animal models and in the clinical setting, noting that stem cell niches appear to foster tumour development, and that drug resistance can often be attributed to malignant cells with stem cell properties. PMID:19653862

  16. Rapid and Cost-Effective Gene Targeting in Rat Embryonic Stem Cells by TALENs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang Tong; Guanyi Huang; Charles Ashton; Hongping Wu; Hexin Yan; Qi-Long Ying

    2012-01-01

    The rat is the preferred animal model in many areas of biomedical research and drug development.Genetic manipulation in rats has lagged behind that in mice due to the lack of efficient gene targeting tools.Previously,we generated a knockout rat via conventional homologous recombination in rat embryonic stem (ES) cells.Here,we show that efficient gene targeting in rat ES cells can be achieved quickly through transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN)-mediated DNA double-strand breaks.Using the Golden Gate cloning technique,we constructed a pair of TALEN targeting vectors for the gene of interest in 5 days.After gene transfection,the targeted rat ES cell colonies were isolated,screened,and confirmed by PCR without the need of drug selection.Our results suggest that TALEN-mediated gene targeting is a superior means of establishing genetically modified rat ES cell lines with high efficiency and short turnaround time.

  17. Target cell-dependent normalization of transmitter release at neocortical synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koester, Helmut J; Johnston, Daniel

    2005-05-01

    The efficacy and short-term modification of neocortical synaptic connections vary with the type of target neuron. We investigated presynaptic Ca2+ and release probability at single synaptic contacts between pairs of neurons in layer 2/3 of the rat neocortex. The amplitude of Ca2+ signals in boutons of pyramids contacting bitufted or multipolar interneurons or other pyramids was dependent on the target cell type. Optical quantal analysis at single synaptic contacts suggested that release probabilities are also target cell-specific. Both the Ca2+ signal and the release probability of different boutons of a pyramid contacting the same target cell varied little. We propose that the mechanisms that regulate the functional properties of boutons of a pyramid normalize the presynaptic Ca2+ influx and release probability for all those boutons that innervate the same target cell.

  18. [Research progress in developing reporter systems for the enrichment of positive cells with targeted genome modification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yichun; Xu, Kun; Wei, Zehui; Ma, Zheng; Zhang, Zhiying

    2016-01-01

    Targeted genome editing technology plays an important role in studies of gene function, gene therapy and transgenic breeding. Moreover, the efficiency of targeted genome editing is increased dramatically with the application of recently developed artificial nucleases such as ZFNs, TALENs and CRISPR/Cas9. However, obtaining positive cells with targeted genome modification is restricted to some extent by nucleases expression plasmid transfection efficiency, nucleases expression and activity, and repair efficiency after genome editing. Thus, the enrichment and screening of positive cells with targeted genome modification remains a problem that need to be solved. Surrogate reporter systems could be used to reflect the efficiency of nucleases indirectly and enrich genetically modified positive cells effectively, which may increase the efficiency of the enrichment and screening of positive cells with targeted genome modification. In this review, we mainly summarized principles and applications of reporter systems based on NHEJ and SSA repair mechanisms, which may provide references for related studies in future.

  19. Impaired desensitization of a human polymorphic α2B-adrenergic receptor variant enhances its sympatho-inhibitory activity in chromaffin cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lymperopoulos Anastasios

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background α2-adrenergic receptors (ARs mediate many cellular actions of epinephrine and norepinephrine and inhibit their secretion from adrenal chromaffin cells. Like many other G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs, they undergo agonist-dependent phopshorylation and desensitization by GPCR Kinases (GRKs, a phenomenon recently shown to play a major role in the sympathetic overdrive that accompanies and aggravates chronic heart failure. A deletion polymorphism in the human α2B-AR gene (Glu301-303 causes impaired agonist-promoted receptor phosphorylation and desensitization in heterologous cell lines. Given the importance of α2-ARs in regulation of catecholamine secretion from chromaffin cells, we sought to investigate, in the present study, the desensitization properties and the sympatho-inhibitory activity of this variant in a chromaffin cell line. For this purpose, we expressed this variant and its wild type counterpart in the well-established chromaffin cell line PC12, and performed receptor phosphorylation and desensitization studies, as well as in vitro catecholamine secretion assays. Results Both the agonist-induced phosphorylation and agonist-dependent desensitization of the human Glu301-303 deletion polymorphic α2B-AR are significantly impaired in PC12 cells, resulting in enhanced signaling to inhibition of cholinergic-induced catecholamine secretion in vitro. Conclusion This α2B-AR gene polymorphism (Glu301-303 deletion might confer better protection against conditions characterized and aggravated by sympathetic/catecholaminergic overstimulation in vivo.

  20. New approaches to targeted drug delivery to tumour cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basic approaches to the design of targeted drugs for the treatment of human malignant tumours have been considered. The stages of the development of these approaches have been described in detail and theoretically substantiated, and basic experimental results have been reported. Considerable attention is paid to the general characteristic of nanopharmacological drugs and to the description of mechanisms of cellular interactions with nanodrugs. The potentialities and limitations of application of nanodrugs for cancer therapy and treatment of other diseases have been considered. The use of nanodrugs conjugated with vector molecules seems to be the most promising trend of targeted therapy of malignant tumours. The bibliography includes 122 references

  1. New approaches to targeted drug delivery to tumour cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severin, E. S.

    2015-01-01

    Basic approaches to the design of targeted drugs for the treatment of human malignant tumours have been considered. The stages of the development of these approaches have been described in detail and theoretically substantiated, and basic experimental results have been reported. Considerable attention is paid to the general characteristic of nanopharmacological drugs and to the description of mechanisms of cellular interactions with nanodrugs. The potentialities and limitations of application of nanodrugs for cancer therapy and treatment of other diseases have been considered. The use of nanodrugs conjugated with vector molecules seems to be the most promising trend of targeted therapy of malignant tumours. The bibliography includes 122 references.

  2. Gastric cancer stem cells: A novel therapeutic target

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Shree Ram

    2013-01-01

    Gastric cancer remains one of the leading causes of global cancer mortality. Multipotent gastric stem cells have been identified in both mouse and human stomachs, and they play an essential role in the self-renewal and homeostasis of gastric mucosa. There are several environmental and genetic factors known to promote gastric cancer. In recent years, numerous in vitro and in vivo studies suggest that gastric cancer may originate from normal stem cells or bone marrow–derived mesenchymal cells, ...

  3. Differentiation of cytotoxicity using target cells labelled with europium and samarium by electroporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohlen, H; Manzke, O; Engert, A; Hertel, M; Hippler-Altenburg, R; Diehl, V; Tesch, H

    1994-07-12

    We report the simultaneous use of europium-DTPA (Eu-DTPA) and samarium-DTPA (Sm-DTPA) in cytotoxicity experiments to analyze simultaneously LAK and NK cell lysis and to differentiate between specific target lysis and bystander killing. The target cells were either labelled with Eu-DTPA or Sm-DTPA chelates by electroporation, which permits the use of target cell lines or primary leukemic B cells (B-CLL) that cannot be labelled by the conventional dextran-sulphate method. The release of europium and samarium reaches a maximum at comparable time intervals (2-3 h). Due to the shorter counting interval within the samarium window the labelling efficiency is about ten times less efficient compared to europium. Using europium as label for the LAK target Daudi and samarium as label for the NK sensitive cell line K562 the differentiation of LAK versus NK activity can be performed in a single culture assay. Also, the killing of B cells and bystander cells by cytotoxic T cells was analyzed in a system where T cells were redirected to B cells through CD3 x CD19 bispecific antibodies. In fact, no bystander killing was noted when bispecific antibodies were used to bridge cytotoxic T cells to the B cells. This approach provides a simple non-radioactive method for evaluating cytotoxicity against two different cells in a single culture well. PMID:8034986

  4. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotides targeting the serine/threonine kinase Pim-2 inhibited proliferation of DU-145 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin-ming DAI; Shu-qun ZHANG; Wei ZHANG; Ru-xian LIN; Zong-zheng JI; Sheng-qi WANG

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effect of antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (ASODN) targeting Pim-2 on cell proliferation of DU-145 cells. Methods: Three ASODN targeting Pim-2 were designed and synthesized. After transfection with ASODN, cell proliferation was analyzed using an MTS [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium, inner salt] assay. In addition, Pim-2 mRNA, protein levels, and cell cycles were examined. Results:The ASODN designed and synthesized by our laboratory significantly reduced Pim-2 mRNA level and protein content in DU-145 cells. After transfection with ASODN for 48 h, a marked reduction in cell viability was observed in DU- 145 cells in a dose-dependent manner. No remarkable apoptosis occurred in cells treated with ASODN compared with control cells. However, it should be noted that G1 phase arrest was clearly observed in ASODN-treated cells. Conclusion: ASODN targeting Pim-2 resulted in a marked reduction in DU-145 cell proliferation, and induction of G1 phase cell cycle arrest is one of the important mechanisms for ASODN to reduce cell growth. Moreover, antisense inhibition of Pim-2 expression provides a new promising therapy target for prostate cancer.

  5. A genetic polymorphism evolving in parallel in two cell compartments and in two clades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watt Ward B

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The enzyme phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, PEPCK, occurs in its guanosine-nucleotide-using form in animals and a few prokaryotes. We study its natural genetic variation in Colias (Lepidoptera, Pieridae. PEPCK offers a route, alternative to pyruvate kinase, for carbon skeletons to move between cytosolic glycolysis and mitochondrial Krebs cycle reactions. Results PEPCK is expressed in both cytosol and mitochondrion, but differently in diverse animal clades. In vertebrates and independently in Drosophila, compartment-specific paralogous genes occur. In a contrasting expression strategy, compartment-specific PEPCKs of Colias and of the silkmoth, Bombyx, differ only in their first, 5′, exons; these are alternatively spliced onto a common series of following exons. In two Colias species from distinct clades, PEPCK sequence is highly variable at nonsynonymous and synonymous sites, mainly in its common exons. Three major amino acid polymorphisms, Gly 335 ↔ Ser, Asp 503 ↔ Glu, and Ile 629 ↔ Val occur in both species, and in the first two cases are similar in frequency between species. Homology-based structural modelling shows that the variants can alter hydrogen bonding, salt bridging, or van der Waals interactions of amino acid side chains, locally or at one another′s sites which are distant in PEPCK′s structure, and thus may affect its enzyme function. We ask, using coalescent simulations, if these polymorphisms′ cross-species similarities are compatible with neutral evolution by genetic drift, but find the probability of this null hypothesis is 0.001 ≤ P ≤ 0.006 under differing scenarios. Conclusion Our results make the null hypothesis of neutrality of these PEPCK polymorphisms quite unlikely, but support an alternative hypothesis that they are maintained by natural selection in parallel in the two species. This alternative can now be justifiably tested further via studies of PEPCK genotypes′ effects

  6. A functional TNFAIP2 3'-UTR rs8126 genetic polymorphism contributes to risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Accumulated evidences demonstrated that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in mRNA 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR may impact microRNAs (miRNAs-mediated expression regulation of oncogenes and tumor suppressors. There is a TNFAIP2 3'-UTR rs8126 T>C genetic variant which has been proved to be associated with head and neck cancer susceptibility. This SNP could disturb binding of miR-184 with TNFAIP2 mRNA and influence TNFAIP2 regulation. However, it is still unclear how this polymorphism is involved in development of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC. Therefore, we hypothesized that the functional TNFAIP2 rs8126 SNP may affect TNFAIP2 expression and, thus, ESCC risk. METHODS: We investigated the association between the TNFAIP2 rs8126 variant and ESCC risk as well as the functional relevance on TNFAIP2 expression in vivo. Genotypes were determined in a case-control set consisted of 588 ESCC patients and 600 controls. The allele-specific regulation on TNFAIP2 expression by the rs8126 SNP was examined in normal and cancerous tissue specimens of esophagus. RESULTS: We found that individuals carrying the rs8126 CC or CT genotype had an OR of 1.89 (95%CI  = 1.23-2.85, P = 0.003 or 1.38 (95%CI  = 1.05-1.73, P = 0.017 for developing ESCC in Chinese compared with individual carrying the TT genotype. Carriers of the rs8126 CC and CT genotypes had significantly lower TNFAIP2 mRNA levels than those with the TT genotypes in normal esophagus tissues (P<0.05. CONCLUSIONS: Our data demonstrate that functional TNFAIP2 rs8126 genetic variant is a ESCC susceptibility SNP. These results support the hypothesis that genetic variants interrupting miRNA-mediated gene regulation might be important genetic modifiers of cancer risk.

  7. Polymorphic changes of cell phenotype caused by elevated expression of an exogenous NEU proto-oncogene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarakhovsky, A M; Resnikov, M; Zaichuk, T; Tugusheva, M V; Butenko, Z A; Prassolov, V S

    1990-03-01

    The NEU proto-oncogene encodes a 185,000 dalton transmembrane glycoprotein with extensive homology to epidermal growth factor receptor. In the current study the effect of exogenous NEU expression on phenotype and growth properties of cells established lines was examined. The replication defective retroviruses were used to express constitutively NEU cDNA in the Rat-1, NIH3T3 and Balb/c3T3 cells. In spite of the practically similar NEU mRNA and protein content in infected cells only in Balb/c3T3 cells, high NEU expression ultimately led to oncogenic transformation. The Rat-1 cells were practically insensitive to oncogenic action of NEU. Subpopulation divergency with respect to NEU-dependent transformation was also revealed in infected NIH3T3 cells. These results suggest the existence of unknown host-specific factor(s) determining the response of cells to NEU overexpression.

  8. Identification of human embryonic progenitor cell targeting peptides using phage display.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola A Bignone

    Full Text Available Human pluripotent stem (hPS cells are capable of differentiation into derivatives of all three primary embryonic germ layers and can self-renew indefinitely. They therefore offer a potentially scalable source of replacement cells to treat a variety of degenerative diseases. The ability to reprogram adult cells to induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells has now enabled the possibility of patient-specific hPS cells as a source of cells for disease modeling, drug discovery, and potentially, cell replacement therapies. While reprogramming technology has dramatically increased the availability of normal and diseased hPS cell lines for basic research, a major bottleneck is the critical unmet need for more efficient methods of deriving well-defined cell populations from hPS cells. Phage display is a powerful method for selecting affinity ligands that could be used for identifying and potentially purifying a variety of cell types derived from hPS cells. However, identification of specific progenitor cell-binding peptides using phage display may be hindered by the large cellular heterogeneity present in differentiating hPS cell populations. We therefore tested the hypothesis that peptides selected for their ability to bind a clonal cell line derived from hPS cells would bind early progenitor cell types emerging from differentiating hPS cells. The human embryonic stem (hES cell-derived embryonic progenitor cell line, W10, was used and cell-targeting peptides were identified. Competition studies demonstrated specificity of peptide binding to the target cell surface. Efficient peptide targeted cell labeling was accomplished using multivalent peptide-quantum dot complexes as detected by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. The cell-binding peptides were selective for differentiated hPS cells, had little or no binding on pluripotent cells, but preferential binding to certain embryonic progenitor cell lines and early endodermal hPS cell derivatives. Taken

  9. Cell-type-specific, Aptamer-functionalized Agents for Targeted Disease Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jiehua; Rossi, John J

    2014-06-17

    One hundred years ago, Dr. Paul Ehrlich popularized the "magic bullet" concept for cancer therapy in which an ideal therapeutic agent would only kill the specific tumor cells it targeted. Since then, "targeted therapy" that specifically targets the molecular defects responsible for a patient's condition has become a long-standing goal for treating human disease. However, safe and efficient drug delivery during the treatment of cancer and infectious disease remains a major challenge for clinical translation and the development of new therapies. The advent of SELEX technology has inspired many groundbreaking studies that successfully adapted cell-specific aptamers for targeted delivery of active drug substances in both in vitro and in vivo models. By covalently linking or physically functionalizing the cell-specific aptamers with therapeutic agents, such as siRNA, microRNA, chemotherapeutics or toxins, or delivery vehicles, such as organic or inorganic nanocarriers, the targeted cells and tissues can be specifically recognized and the therapeutic compounds internalized, thereby improving the local concentration of the drug and its therapeutic efficacy. Currently, many cell-type-specific aptamers have been developed that can target distinct diseases or tissues in a cell-type-specific manner. In this review, we discuss recent advances in the use of cell-specific aptamers for targeted disease therapy, as well as conjugation strategies and challenges.

  10. Protocells and their use for targeted delivery of multicomponent cargos to cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brinker, Jeffrey C.; Ashley, Carlee Erin; Jiang, Xingmao; Liu, Juewen; Peabody, David S.; Wharton, Walker Richard; Carnes, Eric; Chackerian, Bryce; Willman, Cheryl L.

    2016-11-01

    Various embodiments provide materials and methods for synthesizing protocells for use in targeted delivery of cargo components to cancer cells. In one embodiment, the lipid bilayer can be fused to the porous particle core to form a protocell. The lipid bilayer can be modified with targeting ligands or other ligands to achieve targeted delivery of cargo components that are loaded within the protocell to a target cell, e.g., a type of cancer. Shielding materials can be conjugated to the surface of the lipid bilayer to reduce undesired non-specific binding.

  11. Protocells and their use for targeted delivery of multicomponent cargos to cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brinker, C Jeffrey; Ashley, Carlee Erin; Jiang, Xingmao; Liu, Juewen; Peabody, David S; Wharton, Walker Richard; Carnes, Eric; Chackerian, Bryce; Willman, Cheryl L

    2015-03-31

    Various embodiments provide materials and methods for synthesizing protocells for use in targeted delivery of cargo components to cancer cells. In one embodiment, the lipid bilayer can be fused to the porous particle core to form a protocell. The lipid bilayer can be modified with targeting ligands or other ligands to achieve targeted delivery of cargo components that are loaded within the protocell to a target cell, e.g., a type of cancer. Shielding materials can be conjugated to the surface of the lipid bilayer to reduce undesired non-specific binding.

  12. Peptide aptamer identified by molecular docking targeting translationally controlled tumor protein in leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadioglu, Onat; Efferth, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    Bioinformatics screening and molecular docking analyses were utilized to select high affinity peptides targeting translationally controlled tumor protein (TCTP). Selected peptide aptamers were tested towards cancer cell lines with different levels of TCTP expression. One peptide (WGQWPYHC) revealed specific cytotoxicity according to the TCTP expression in tumor cells without affecting normal cells. Western blot analysis showed peptide-induced down-regulation of TCTP as primary target as well as of cell-cycle related downstream proteins (CDK2, CDK6, Cyclin D3) in MOLT-4 leukemia cells. "WGQWPYHC" deserves further analysis for targeted therapy of TCTP-expressing tumor cells. Graphical abstract Molecular docking on TCTP, cytotoxicity toward MOLT-4 leukemia cell line and downregulation of CDK2, CDK6, CyclinD3 and TCTP proteins. PMID:26972431

  13. Specific targeting of tumor cells by lyophilisomes functionalized with antibodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bracht, Etienne; Stolle, Sarah; Hafmans, Theo G.; Boerman, Otto C.; Oosterwijk, Egbert; van Kuppevelt, Toin H.; Daamen, Willeke F.

    2014-01-01

    Lyophilisomes are a novel class of proteinaceous biodegradable nano/micro drug delivery capsules prepared by freezing, annealing and Iyophilization. In the present study, lyophilisomes were functionalized for active targeting by antibody conjugation in order to obtain a selective drug-carrier system

  14. Cell-penetrating antimicrobial peptides - prospectives for targeting intracellular infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahnsen, Jesper S; Franzyk, Henrik; Sayers, Edward J;

    2015-01-01

    La WT cells and analyzed by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Furthermore, the effects of the peptides on eukaryotic cell viability as well as their antimicrobial effect were tested. In addition, the disrupting ability of the peptides in the presence of bilayer membranes of different composition...

  15. The role of physical forces on cytotoxic T cell-target cell conjugate stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, B B; Glacken, M W; Rodgers, J R; Rich, R R

    1990-06-01

    Theoretical considerations suggest that external forces play a significant role in cell-cell conjugate formation and may lead to the misinterpretation of adhesion data. To test this, the stability of conjugates formed between CTL and fibroblast target cells (TC) was examined in the controlled shear environment of a parallel plate flow chamber. Murine fibroblast targets expressing class I maternally transmitted Ag Mtaa or Mtab were grown on a glass slide that formed one wall of the flow chamber and were used in conjunction with anti-Mtaa and anti-Mtab specific mouse CTL clones to establish a panel of Ag-reciprocal targets and lymphocytes. Although cytolysis assays indicated that lymphocytes recognized and destroyed appropriate but not inappropriate targets, the stability of some CTL/TC conjugates was Ag independent. In all cases, the conjugate stability was shear dependent over a 100-fold range (0.04 to 4.0 dynes/cm2). For some clones, the ratio of the stabilities of Ag-specific CTL/TC conjugates to nonspecific conjugates was significantly enhanced with increasing shear. This implies that the role of Ag specificity in CTL/TC adhesion may be misinterpreted if the shear environment of CTL/TC conjugates is unknown or uncontrolled. Kinetic analysis revealed that conjugate stability was dependent on the exposure time to external forces and that there existed two populations of conjugates; weak associations that disengaged within the first 30 s of flow, and strong associations that remained attached even after a 5-min exposure to a steady shear stress. The stability of Ag-specific CTL/TC conjugates at 0.04 dynes/cm2 was enhanced by 50% as the temperature was increased from 25 to 37 degrees C, whereas the stability of nonspecific CTL/TC associations was not affected. This result indicates that significant Ag-specific strengthening may occur at physiologic temperatures. This work suggests the importance of attention to role of fluid mechanical shear stress in standard

  16. Targeting of liposomes to HIV-1-infected cells by peptides derived from the CD4 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slepushkin, V A; Salem, I I; Andreev, S M; Dazin, P; Düzgüneş, N

    1996-10-23

    Liposomes can be targeted to HIV-infected cells by either reconstituting transmembrane CD4 in the membrane or covalently coupling soluble CD4 to modified lipids. We investigated whether synthetic peptides could be used as ligands for targeting liposomes. A synthetic peptide from the complementarity determining region 2 (CDR-2)-like domain of CD4 could bind specifically to HIV-infected cells and mediate the binding of peptide-coupled liposomes to these cells. A peptide from the CDR-3-like domain of CD4 inhibited HIV-induced syncytia formation, but failed to target liposomes to infected cells. This apparent discrepancy may be due to the requirement for a conformational change in the CD4 receptor for the CDR-3 region to interact with the HIV envelope protein. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of using synthetic peptides to target liposomes containing antiviral drugs to HIV-infected cells.

  17. The hair follicle and its stem cells as drug delivery targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Robert M

    2006-05-01

    The hair follicle is a skin appendage with a complex structure containing many cell types that produce highly specialised proteins. The hair follicle is in a continuous cycle: anagen is the hair growth phase, catagen the involution phase and telogen is the resting phase. The follicle offers many potential therapeutic targets. Hoffman and colleagues have pioneered hair-follicle-specific targeting using liposomes to deliver small and large molecules, including genes. They have also pioneered ex vivo hair-follicle targeting with continued expression of the introduced gene following transplantation. Recently, it has been discovered that hair follicle stem cells are highly pluripotent and can form neurons, glial cells and other cell types, and this has suggested that hair follicle stem cells may serve as gene therapy targets for regenerative medicine.

  18. Mesenchymal stem cells as therapeutic delivery vehicles targeting tumor stroma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serakinci, Nedime; Christensen, Rikke; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt;

    2011-01-01

    The field of stem cell biology continues to evolve by characterization of further types of stem cells and by exploring their therapeutic potential for experimental and clinical applications. Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) are one of the most promising candidates simply because...... of their easiness of both ex vivo expansion in culture dishes and genetic manipulation. Despite many extensive isolation and expansion studies, relatively little has been done with regard to hMSCs' therapeutic potential. Although clinical trials using hMSCs are underway, their use in cancer therapy still needs...... better understanding and in vivo supporting data. The homing ability of hMSCs was investigated by creating a human xenograft model by transplanting an ovarian cancer cell line into immunocompromised mice. Then, genetically engineered hMSC-telo1 cells were injected through the tail vein...

  19. [Towards new targets for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension : Importance of cell-cell communications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Ly; Ghigna, Maria-Rosa; Phan, Carole; Bordenave, Jennifer; Le Hiress, Morane; Thuillet, Raphaël; Ricard, Nicolas; Huertas, Alice; Humbert, Marc; Guignabert, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a disorder in which mechanical obstruction of the pulmonary vascular bed is largely responsible for the rise in mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP), resulting in a progressive functional decline despite current available therapeutic options. There are multiple mechanisms predisposing to and/or promoting the aberrant pulmonary vascular remodeling in PAH, and these involve not only altered crosstalk between cells within the vascular wall but also sustained inflammation and dysimmunity, cell accumulation in the vascular wall and excessive activation of some growth factor-stimulated signaling pathways, in addition to the interaction of systemic hormones, local growth factors, cytokines, and transcription factors. Heterozygous germline mutations in the bone morphogenetic protein receptor, type-2 (BMPR2) gene, a gene encoding a receptor for the transforming growth factor (TGF)-β superfamily, can predispose to the disease. Although the spectrum of therapeutic options for PAH has expanded in the last 20 years, available therapies remain essentially palliative. Over the past decade, however, a better understanding of key regulators of this irreversible remodeling of the pulmonary vasculature has been obtained. New and more effective approaches are likely to emerge. The present article profiles the innovative research into novel pathways and therapeutic targets that may lead to the development of targeted agents in PAH. PMID:27687598

  20. Oct4 targets regulatory nodes to modulate stem cell function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pearl A Campbell

    Full Text Available Stem cells are characterized by two defining features, the ability to self-renew and to differentiate into highly specialized cell types. The POU homeodomain transcription factor Oct4 (Pou5f1 is an essential mediator of the embryonic stem cell state and has been implicated in lineage specific differentiation, adult stem cell identity, and cancer. Recent description of the regulatory networks which maintain 'ES' have highlighted a dual role for Oct4 in the transcriptional activation of genes required to maintain self-renewal and pluripotency while concomitantly repressing genes which facilitate lineage specific differentiation. However, the molecular mechanism by which Oct4 mediates differential activation or repression at these loci to either maintain stem cell identity or facilitate the emergence of alternate transcriptional programs required for the realization of lineage remains to be elucidated. To further investigate Oct4 function, we employed gene expression profiling together with a robust statistical analysis to identify genes highly correlated to Oct4. Gene Ontology analysis to categorize overrepresented genes has led to the identification of themes which may prove essential to stem cell identity, including chromatin structure, nuclear architecture, cell cycle control, DNA repair, and apoptosis. Our experiments have identified previously unappreciated roles for Oct4 for firstly, regulating chromatin structure in a state consistent with self-renewal and pluripotency, and secondly, facilitating the expression of genes that keeps the cell poised to respond to cues that lead to differentiation. Together, these data define the mechanism by which Oct4 orchestrates cellular regulatory pathways to enforce the stem cell state and provides important insight into stem cell function and cancer.

  1. Nanoscale mapping and organization analysis of target proteins on cancer cells from B-cell lymphoma patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CD20, a membrane protein highly expressed on most B-cell lymphomas, is an effective target demonstrated in clinical practice for treating B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). Rituximab is a monoclonal antibody against CD20. In this work, we applied atomic force microscopy (AFM) to map the nanoscale distribution of CD20 molecules on the surface of cancer cells from clinical B-cell NHL patients under the assistance of ROR1 fluorescence recognition (ROR1 is a specific cell surface marker exclusively expressed on cancer cells). First, the ROR1 fluorescence labeling experiments showed that ROR1 was expressed on cancer cells from B-cell lymphoma patients, but not on normal cells from healthy volunteers. Next, under the guidance of ROR1 fluorescence, the rituximab-conjugated AFM tips were moved to cancer cells to image the cellular morphologies and detect the CD20-rituximab interactions on the cell surfaces. The distribution maps of CD20 on cancer cells were constructed by obtaining arrays of (16×16) force curves in local areas (500×500 nm2) on the cell surfaces. The experimental results provide a new approach to directly investigate the nanoscale distribution of target protein on single clinical cancer cells. - Highlights: • Cancer cells were recognized from healthy cells by ROR1 fluorescence labeling. • The nanoscale distribution of CD20 on cancer cells was characterized. • The distribution of CD20 was non-uniform on the surface of cancer cells

  2. Nanoscale mapping and organization analysis of target proteins on cancer cells from B-cell lymphoma patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Mi [State Key Laboratory of Robotics, Shenyang Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Xiao, Xiubin [Department of Lymphoma, Affiliated Hospital of Military Medical Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100071 (China); Liu, Lianqing, E-mail: lqliu@sia.cn [State Key Laboratory of Robotics, Shenyang Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Xi, Ning, E-mail: xin@egr.msu.edu [State Key Laboratory of Robotics, Shenyang Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Department of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Wang, Yuechao; Dong, Zaili [State Key Laboratory of Robotics, Shenyang Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Zhang, Weijing, E-mail: zhangwj3072@163.com [Department of Lymphoma, Affiliated Hospital of Military Medical Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100071 (China)

    2013-11-01

    CD20, a membrane protein highly expressed on most B-cell lymphomas, is an effective target demonstrated in clinical practice for treating B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). Rituximab is a monoclonal antibody against CD20. In this work, we applied atomic force microscopy (AFM) to map the nanoscale distribution of CD20 molecules on the surface of cancer cells from clinical B-cell NHL patients under the assistance of ROR1 fluorescence recognition (ROR1 is a specific cell surface marker exclusively expressed on cancer cells). First, the ROR1 fluorescence labeling experiments showed that ROR1 was expressed on cancer cells from B-cell lymphoma patients, but not on normal cells from healthy volunteers. Next, under the guidance of ROR1 fluorescence, the rituximab-conjugated AFM tips were moved to cancer cells to image the cellular morphologies and detect the CD20-rituximab interactions on the cell surfaces. The distribution maps of CD20 on cancer cells were constructed by obtaining arrays of (16×16) force curves in local areas (500×500 nm{sup 2}) on the cell surfaces. The experimental results provide a new approach to directly investigate the nanoscale distribution of target protein on single clinical cancer cells. - Highlights: • Cancer cells were recognized from healthy cells by ROR1 fluorescence labeling. • The nanoscale distribution of CD20 on cancer cells was characterized. • The distribution of CD20 was non-uniform on the surface of cancer cells.

  3. Designing and modeling a centrifugal microfluidic device to separate target blood cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamloo, Amir; Selahi, AmirAli; Madadelahi, Masoud

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study is to design a novel and efficient portable lab-on-a-CD (LOCD) microfluidic device for separation of specific cells (target cells) using magnetic beads. In this study the results are shown for neutrophils as target cells. However, other kinds of target cells can be separated in a similar approach. The designed microfluidics can be utilized as a point of care system for neutrophil detection. This microfluidic system employs centrifugal and magnetic forces for separation. After model validation by the experimental data in the literature (that may be used as a design tool for developing centrifugo-magnetophoretic devices), two models are presented for separation of target cells using magnetic beads. The first model consists of one container in the inlet section and two containers in the outlets. Initially, the inlet container is filled with diluted blood sample which is a mixture of red blood cells (RBCs) plus neutrophils which are attached to Magnetic beads. It is shown that by using centrifugal and magnetic forces, this model can separate all neutrophils with recovery factor of ~100%. In the second model, due to excess of magnetic beads in usual experimental analysis (to ensure that all target cells are attached to them) the geometry is improved by adding a third outlet for these free magnetic beads. It is shown that at angular velocity of 45 rad s-1, recovery factor of 100% is achievable for RBCs, free magnetic beads and neutrophils as target cells.

  4. Designing and modeling a centrifugal microfluidic device to separate target blood cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study is to design a novel and efficient portable lab-on-a-CD (LOCD) microfluidic device for separation of specific cells (target cells) using magnetic beads. In this study the results are shown for neutrophils as target cells. However, other kinds of target cells can be separated in a similar approach. The designed microfluidics can be utilized as a point of care system for neutrophil detection. This microfluidic system employs centrifugal and magnetic forces for separation. After model validation by the experimental data in the literature (that may be used as a design tool for developing centrifugo-magnetophoretic devices), two models are presented for separation of target cells using magnetic beads. The first model consists of one container in the inlet section and two containers in the outlets. Initially, the inlet container is filled with diluted blood sample which is a mixture of red blood cells (RBCs) plus neutrophils which are attached to Magnetic beads. It is shown that by using centrifugal and magnetic forces, this model can separate all neutrophils with recovery factor of ∼100%. In the second model, due to excess of magnetic beads in usual experimental analysis (to ensure that all target cells are attached to them) the geometry is improved by adding a third outlet for these free magnetic beads. It is shown that at angular velocity of 45 rad s−1, recovery factor of 100% is achievable for RBCs, free magnetic beads and neutrophils as target cells. (paper)

  5. Plectasin, a Fungal Defensin, Targets the Bacterial Cell Wall Precursor Lipid II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, Tanja; Kruse, Thomas; Wimmer, Reinhard;

    2010-01-01

    that plectasin, a fungal defensin, acts by directly binding the bacterial cell-wall precursor Lipid II. A wide range of genetic and biochemical approaches identify cell-wall biosynthesis as the pathway targeted by plectasin. In vitro assays for cell-wall synthesis identified Lipid II as the specific cellular...

  6. Relationship among tobacco habits, human papilloma virus (HPV infection, p53 polymorphism/mutation and the risk of oral squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bidyut Chakrobarty

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC has significantly increased over decades in several countries and human papilloma virus (HPV has been indicated as one of the underlying causes. This suggests that HPV plays a role in the early stages of carcinogenesis but is not a requisite for the maintenance and progression of malignant state. p53 is a tumor suppressor gene that checks the cell and promotes apoptosis and cell repair that can be deactivated by mutations and a viral interaction leading to cancer and individuals with particular polymorphic variant of p53 is more susceptible to HPV-induced carcinogenesis. The present study has been carried out to detect and correlate p53 polymorphism/mutation, HPV DNA in the biopsy samples of oral cancer patients who had tobacco habits.

  7. Pros and Cons of Antigen-Presenting Cell Targeted Tumor Vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cleo Goyvaerts

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In therapeutic antitumor vaccination, dendritic cells play the leading role since they decide if, how, when, and where a potent antitumor immune response will take place. Since the disentanglement of the complexity and merit of different antigen-presenting cell subtypes, antitumor immunotherapeutic research started to investigate the potential benefit of targeting these subtypes in situ. This review will discuss which antigen-presenting cell subtypes are at play and how they have been targeted and finally question the true meaning of targeting antitumor-based vaccines.

  8. Kinome sequencing reveals RET G691S polymorphism in human neuroendocrine lung cancer cell lines

    OpenAIRE

    Sosonkina, Nadiya; HONG, SEUNG-KEUN; Starenki, Dmytro; Park, Jong-In

    2014-01-01

    Neuroendocrine (NE) lung tumors comprise 20–25% of all invasive lung malignancies. Currently, no effective treatments are available to cure these tumors, and it is necessary to identify a molecular alteration(s) that characterizes NE lung tumor cells. We aimed to identify a kinase mutation(s) associated with NE lung tumor by screening 517 kinase-encoding genes in human lung cancer cell lines. Our next-generation sequencing analysis of six NE lung tumor cell lines (four small cell lung cancer ...

  9. A one-step rectification of sperm cell targeting ensures the success of double fertilization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jilei Huang; Yan Ju; Xiangfeng Wang; Quan Zhang; Sodmergen

    2015-01-01

    Successful fertilization in animals depends on competition among millions of sperm cells, whereas double fertilization in flowering plants usually involves just one pollen tube releasing two immobile sperm cells. It is largely a mystery how the plant sperm cells fuse efficiently with their female targets within an embryo sac. We show that the initial positioning of sperm cells upon discharge from the pollen tube is usually inopportune for gamete fusions and that adjustment of sperm cell targeting occurs through release and re-adhesion of one sperm cell, while the other connected sperm cell remains in stagnation. This enables proper adhesion of each sperm cell to a female gamete and coordinates the gamete fusions. Our findings reveal inner embryo sac dynamics that ensure the reproductive success of flowering plants and suggest a requirement for sperm cell differentiation as the basis of double fertilization.

  10. ENDOTHELIAL NITRIC OXIDE SYNTHASE (ENOS GENE POLYMORPHISM IS ASSOCIATED WITH AGE ONSET OF MENARCHE IN SICKLE CELL DISEASE FEMALES OF INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhansu Sekhar Nishank

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT   Background and Objective :  Females with sickle cell disease (SCD often show late onset of menarche. In transgenic sickle cell mouse, deficiency of gene encoding endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS has been reported to be associated with late onset of menarche. Thus to explore the possible association of eNOS gene polymorphism with age of onset of menarche in SCD females, 3 important eNOS gene polymorphism- eNOS 4a/b, eNOS 894G>T and eNOS-786 T>C  and  plasma nitrite levels were tested among three groups of females- SCD late menarche, SCD early menarche and control females. Methods : PCR-RFLP method for genotyping eNOS gene polymorphisms and quantification of plasma nitrite level by ELISA based commercial kits were used Results: SCD late menarche females showed significantly higher prevalence and higher association of heterozygous genotypes, higher frequency of mutant alleles ‘4a’, ‘T’ and ‘C’ as compared to that of control group and SCD early menarche group. The frequency of haplotype  ‘4a-G-C’ and haplotype’ 4b-G-C’ (alleles in order of  eNOS 4a/b, eNOS 894G>T and eNOS-786 T>C respectively were found to be significantly high in SCD late menarche compared to combined groups of SCD early menarche and controls. SCD late menarche group had significantly low level of plasma nitrite concentration for all 3 eNOS gene polymorphisms as compared to controls and SCD early menarche females. Conclusion: eNOS gene polymorphism may influence age of onset of menarche in SCD females.   Key words : eNOS gene, sickle cell disease, menarche, haplotype, nitric oxide

  11. Predicting enzyme targets for cancer drugs by profiling human Metabolic reactions in NCI-60 cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching Wai-Ki

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Drugs can influence the whole metabolic system by targeting enzymes which catalyze metabolic reactions. The existence of interactions between drugs and metabolic reactions suggests a potential way to discover drug targets. Results In this paper, we present a computational method to predict new targets for approved anti-cancer drugs by exploring drug-reaction interactions. We construct a Drug-Reaction Network to provide a global view of drug-reaction interactions and drug-pathway interactions. The recent reconstruction of the human metabolic network and development of flux analysis approaches make it possible to predict each metabolic reaction's cell line-specific flux state based on the cell line-specific gene expressions. We first profile each reaction by its flux states in NCI-60 cancer cell lines, and then propose a kernel k-nearest neighbor model to predict related metabolic reactions and enzyme targets for approved cancer drugs. We also integrate the target structure data with reaction flux profiles to predict drug targets and the area under curves can reach 0.92. Conclusions The cross validations using the methods with and without metabolic network indicate that the former method is significantly better than the latter. Further experiments show the synergism of reaction flux profiles and target structure for drug target prediction. It also implies the significant contribution of metabolic network to predict drug targets. Finally, we apply our method to predict new reactions and possible enzyme targets for cancer drugs.

  12. Fluorescent non-conjugated polymer dots for targeted cell imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Bin; Zhao, Bin; Wang, Dandan; Wang, Yibo; Tang, Qi; Zhu, Shoujun; Yang, Bai; Sun, Hongchen

    2016-05-01

    Through the chemical crosslinking of the sub-fluorophore, linear non-conjugated polymers can possess strong photoluminescence (PL), which is a very important fluorescence behavior and the non-conjugated polymer dots (PDs) are efficient bio-fluorophores for bio-based applications. Herein, the new type of non-conjugated polyethyleneimine (PEI) PDs was further modified by targeting molecules (folic acid) for a new generation of bio-fluorophores. The free folic acid can quench the PL of PDs by energy transfer, while the conjugated folic acid@PDs (FA@PDs) can still maintain their PL properties to a certain degree. The FA@PDs also possess lower toxicity compared with free PDs, which is possibly due to blocking of the amino groups. Moreover, we investigated the targeted bioimaging applications of the FA@PDs, which gave a very important direction for application of these types of materials.Through the chemical crosslinking of the sub-fluorophore, linear non-conjugated polymers can possess strong photoluminescence (PL), which is a very important fluorescence behavior and the non-conjugated polymer dots (PDs) are efficient bio-fluorophores for bio-based applications. Herein, the new type of non-conjugated polyethyleneimine (PEI) PDs was further modified by targeting molecules (folic acid) for a new generation of bio-fluorophores. The free folic acid can quench the PL of PDs by energy transfer, while the conjugated folic acid@PDs (FA@PDs) can still maintain their PL properties to a certain degree. The FA@PDs also possess lower toxicity compared with free PDs, which is possibly due to blocking of the amino groups. Moreover, we investigated the targeted bioimaging applications of the FA@PDs, which gave a very important direction for application of these types of materials. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr01909a

  13. An electrochemical surface plasmon resonance imaging system targeting cell analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L. L.; Chen, X.; Wei, H. T.; Li, H.; Sun, J. H.; Cai, H. Y.; Chen, J. L.; Cui, D. F.

    2013-08-01

    This paper presents an electrochemical-surface plasmon resonance imaging (EC-SPRI) system, enabling the characterization of optical and electrical properties of cells, simultaneously. The developed surface plasmon resonance (SPR) imaging system was capable of imaging micro cavities with a dimension of 10 μm × 10 μm and differentiated glycerol solutions with a group of refractive indices (RIs). Furthermore, the EC-SPRI system was used to image A549 cells, suggesting corresponding RI and morphology changes during the cell death process. In the end, electrochemical and SPR methods were used in combination, recording oxidation peaks of A549 cells in the cyclic voltage curves and SPR response unit increase, simultaneously.

  14. Relation of red blood cell\\\\\\'s folate and methylenetetrahedrofolate reductase C677T polymorphism to colorectal adenoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Mazloom

    2014-11-01

    Methods: In a case-control study conducted from January to October 2007 in Endoscopy-Colonoscopy ward of Shahid Faghihi Hospital, Shiraz. Participants were 177 case of colorectal adenoma who had pathologic-confirmed adenomatous polyps in full colonoscopy examination and 366 controls without polyps in full colonoscopy. Fasting venous blood were drawn from patients in order to determine RBC’s folate and to identify the MTHFR polymorphism by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP technique. Results: Gender Distribution in the patient group were 57.6% male and 42.3% female and control group consisted of 55.1% male and 43.9% female. 50.2% of cases and 49.2% of controls were in the age group “45 years and above”. The T allele frequency was 56.6% in control group and 34.4% in colorectal adenoma patients. There was a significant association between T allele in -677 position of MTHFR gene and colorectal adenoma susceptibility (OR: 1.85, 95% CI: 0.76-4.24, P0.05 but mean concentration of RBC’s folate was the lowest in TT genotype compare with two other genotype. Odd's Ratio for low (<140ng/ml versus high level of RBC’s folate in participants with TT genotype was (OR: 2.08, 95% CI: 0.10-2.19, P<0.05 as compare with the CC ones. Conclusion: The result of this study suggested an inverse association between RBC's folate concentration and colorectal adenomas risk, which may be more relevant for those with the MTHFR TT genotype.

  15. Targeting epidermal Langerhans cells by epidermal powder immunization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Immune reactions to foreign or self-antigens lead to protective immunity and, sometimes, immune disorders such as allergies and autoimmune diseases. Antigen presenting cells (APC) including epidermal Langerhans cells (LCs) play an important role in the course and outcome of the immune reactions. Epidermal powder immunization (EPI) is a technology that offers a tool to manipulate the LCs and the potential to harness the immune reactions towards prevention and treatment of infectious diseases and immune disorders.

  16. Bisphosphonates target B cells to enhance humoral immune responses

    OpenAIRE

    Tonti, Elena; Jiménez de Oya, Nereida; Galliverti, Gabriele; Moseman, E. Ashley; Di Lucia, Pietro; Amabile, Angelo; Sammicheli, Stefano; De Giovanni, Marco; Sironi, Laura; Chevrier, Nicolas; Sitia, Giovanni; Gennari, Luigi; Guidotti, Luca G.; von Andrian, Ulrich H.; Iannacone, Matteo

    2013-01-01

    Bisphosphonates are a class of drugs that are widely used to inhibit loss of bone mass in patients. We show here that the administration of clinically relevant doses of bisphosphonates in mice increases antibody responses to live and inactive viruses, proteins, haptens and existing commercial vaccine formulations. Bisphosphonates exert this adjuvant-like activity in the absence of CD4+ and γδ T cells, neutrophils or dendritic cells and their effect does not rely on local macrophage depletion ...

  17. Target cell-specific modulation of neuronal activity by astrocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Kozlov, A. S.; Angulo, M. C.; Audinat, E.; Charpak, S

    2006-01-01

    Interaction between astrocytes and neurons enriches the behavior of brain circuits. By releasing glutamate and ATP, astrocytes can directly excite neurons and modulate synaptic transmission. In the rat olfactory bulb, we demonstrate that the release of GABA by astrocytes causes long-lasting and synchronous inhibition of mitral and granule cells. In addition, astrocytes release glutamate, leading to a selective activation of granule-cell NMDA receptors. Thus, by releasing excitatory and inhibi...

  18. The mesenchymal stromal cell magic bullet finds yet another target

    OpenAIRE

    Masterson, Claire; O’Toole, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Rojas and colleagues have presented an exciting paper demonstrating yet another relevant preclinical setting in which the mesenchymal stromal cell has a potential therapeutic application. What is particularly interesting about this study is that it addresses a disease, blood-borne systemic sepsis, which has multiple complex host responses and involves a variety of disparate organs and immune cell types. Here, the authors focus on how this injury relates more specifically to the lung, with qui...

  19. Combined effects of DNA methyltransferase 1 and 3A polymorphisms and urinary total arsenic levels on the risk for clear cell renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shu-Mei; Huang, Chao-Yuan; Shiue, Horng-Sheng; Pu, Yeong-Shiau; Hsieh, Yi-Hsun; Chen, Wei-Jen; Lin, Ying-Chin; Hsueh, Yu-Mei

    2016-08-15

    Our previous study showed that high urinary total arsenic levels were associated with higher odds ratio (OR) for renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) might influence DNMT enzyme activity associated with tumorigenesis. In this study, we investigated the association of five SNPs from DNMT1 (rs8101626 and rs2228611), DNMT3A (rs34048824 and rs1550117), and DNMT3B (rs1569686) with the risk of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). We also examined the combined effects of DNMT genotypes and urinary arsenic levels on ccRCC risk. We conducted a hospital-based case-control study, which included 293 subjects with ccRCC and 293 age- and gender-matched controls. The urinary arsenic species were determined by a high performance liquid chromatography-linked hydride generator and atomic absorption spectrometry. Genotypes were investigated using polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism analyses. We observed that the DNMT1 rs8101626 G/G genotype was significantly associated with reduced odds ratio (OR) of ccRCC [OR=0.38, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.14-0.99]. Subjects with concurrent DNMT1 rs8101626 A/A+A/G and DNMT3A rs34048824 T/T+T/C genotypes had significantly higher OR for ccRCC [OR=2.88, 95% CI 1.44-5.77]. Participants with the high-risk genotype of DNMT1 rs8101626 and DNMT3A rs34048824 with concurrently high urinary total arsenic levels had even higher OR of ccRCC in a dose-response manner. This is the first study to evaluate variant DNMT1 rs8101626 and DNMT3A rs34048824 genotypes that modify the arsenic-related ccRCC risk in a geographic area without significant arsenic exposure in Taiwan. PMID:27292127

  20. Predictive value of XPD polymorphisms on platinum-based chemotherapy in non-small cell lung cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mantang Qiu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The correlation between xeroderma pigmentosum group D (XPD polymorphisms (Lys751Gln and Asp312Asn and clinical outcomes of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients, who received platinum-based chemotherapy (Pt-chemotherapy, is still inconclusive. This meta-analysis was aimed to systematically review published evidence and ascertain the exact role of XPD polymorphisms. METHODS: Databases of MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched up to April 2013 to identify eligible studies. A rigorous quality assessment of eligible studies was conducted according the Newcastle-Ottawa Quality Assessment Scales. The relationship between XPD polymorphisms and response to Pt-chemotherapy and survival was analyzed. RESULTS: A total of 22 eligible studies were included and analyzed in this meta-analysis. The overall analysis suggested that the XPD Lys751Gln polymorphism was not associated with response to Pt-chemotherapy or survival. However, the XPD 312Asn allele was significantly associated with poor response to Pt-chemotherapy compared with the Asp312 allele (Asn vs. Asp: OR = 0.435, 95% CI: 0.261-0.726. Additionally, the variant genotype of XPD Asp312Asn polymorphism was associated with favorable survival in Caucasian (AspAsn vs. AspAsp: HR = 0.781, 95% CI: 0.619-0.986 but unfavorable survival in Asian (AspAsn+AsnAsn vs. AspAsp: HR = 1.550, 95% CI: 1.038-2.315. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that XPD Asp312Asn polymorphism may function as a predictive biomarker on platinum-based chemotherapy in NSCLC and further studies are warranted.

  1. Endothelial cell protein C receptor gene 6936A/G and 4678G/C polymorphisms as risk factors for deep venous thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoheir, Naguib; Eldanasouri, Nabiel; Abdel-Aal, Asmaa A; Hosny, Karim Adel; Abdel-Ghany, Wafaa M

    2016-04-01

    Endothelial cell protein C receptor (EPCR) enhances the generation of activated protein C by the thrombin-thrombomodulin complex. A soluble form of EPCR (sEPCR) is present in plasma. Two polymorphisms in the EPCR gene (6936A/G and 4678G/C) have been reported to influence the risk of venous thromboembolism. We aimed to investigate the relation between EPCR gene polymorphisms (6936A/G and 4678C/G) and deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and their relations to sEPCR level. This study involved 90 patients with DVT and 90 age and sex-matched healthy controls. Plasma levels of sEPCR were measured in 45 cases of the primary DVT by ELISA. PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) was used for detection of EPCR polymorphisms (6936A/G and 4678G/C). Regarding 6936A/G, our results demonstrated that mutant genotypes (AG, GG) were associated with an increased risk for DVT [P mutant allele G (P mutant genotypes were associated with increased levels of sEPCR. Although in 4678G/C, our results demonstrated that the mutant genotype (CC) was considered as a protective factor against DVT (P = 0.014, OR 0.289, 95% CI 0.108-0.776) as well as its mutant allele C (P = 0.02, OR 0.600, 95% CI 0.388-0.927), but it had no effect on sEPCR level. Our data suggest that 6936A/G polymorphism is a risk factor for DVT and is associated with elevated plasma levels of sEPCR, while 4678G/C polymorphism plays a role in protection against DVT. PMID:26340463

  2. A replication study confirms the association of dendritic cell immunoreceptor (DCIR polymorphisms with ACPA - negative RA in a large Asian cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianping Guo

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Dendritic cell immunoreceptor (DCIR has been implicated in development of autoimmune disorders in rodent and DCIR polymorphisms were associated with anti-citrullinated proteins antibodies (ACPA-negative rheumatoid arthritis (RA in Swedish Caucasians. This study was undertaken to further investigate whether DCIR polymorphisms are also risk factors for the development of RA in four Asian populations originated from China and Malaysia. METHODS: We genotyped two DCIR SNPs rs2377422 and rs10840759 in Han Chinese population (1,193 cases, 1,278 controls, to assess their association with RA. Subsequently, rs2377422 was further genotyped in three independent cohorts of Malaysian-Chinese subjects (MY_Chinese, 254 cases, 206 controls, Malay subjects (MY_ Malay, 515 cases, 986 controls, and Malaysian-Indian subjects (MY_Indian, 378 cases, 285 controls, to seek confirmation of association in various ethnic groups. Meta-analysis was preformed to evaluate the contribution of rs2377422 polymorphisms to the development of ACPA-negative RA in distinct ethnic groups. Finally, we carried out association analysis of rs2377422 polymorphisms with DCIR mRNA expression levels. RESULTS: DCIR rs2377422 was found to be significantly associated with ACPA -negative RA in Han Chinese (OR 1.92, 95% CI 1.27-2.90, P=0.0020. Meta-analysis confirms DCIR rs2377422 as a risk factor for ACPA-negative RA across distinct ethnic groups (OR(overall =1.17, 95% CI 1.06-1.30, P=0.003. The SNP rs2377422 polymorphism showed significant association with DCIR mRNA expression level, i.e. RA-risk CC genotype exhibit a significant increase in the expression of DCIR (P=0.0023, Kruskal-Wallis. CONCLUSIONS: Our data provide evidence for association between DCIR rs2377422 and RA in non-Caucasian populations and confirm the influence of DCIR polymorphisms on RA susceptibility, especially on ACPA-negative RA.

  3. Hyaluronic acid-conjugated liposome nanoparticles for targeted delivery to CD44 overexpressing glioblastoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, Stephen L.; Wilson, Christina L.; Kidambi, Srivatsan

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) is a highly prevalent and deadly brain malignancy characterized by poor prognosis and restricted disease management potential. Despite the success of nanocarrier systems to improve drug/gene therapy for cancer, active targeting specificity remains a major hurdle for GBM. Additionally, since the brain is a multi-cell type organ, there is a critical need to develop an approach to distinguish between GBM cells and healthy brain cells for safe and successful treatment. In this report, we have incorporated hyaluronic acid (HA) as an active targeting ligand for GBM. To do so, we employed HA conjugated liposomes (HALNPs) to study the uptake pathway in key cells in the brain including primary astrocytes, microglia, and human GBM cells. We observed that the HALNPs specifically target GBM cells over other brain cells due to higher expression of CD44 in tumor cells. Furthermore, CD44 driven HALNP uptake into GBM cells resulted in lysosomal evasion and increased efficacy of Doxorubicin, a model anti-neoplastic agent, while the astrocytes and microglia cells exhibited extensive HALNP-lysosome co-localization and decreased antineoplastic potency. In summary, novel CD44 targeted lipid based nanocarriers appear to be proficient in mediating site-specific delivery of drugs via CD44 receptors in GBM cells, with an improved therapeutic margin and safety. PMID:27120809

  4. CAM and cell fate targeting: molecular and energetic insights into cell growth and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura, Carlo

    2005-09-01

    Evidence-based medicine is switching from the analysis of single diseases at a time toward an integrated assessment of a diseased person. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) offers multiple holistic approaches, including osteopathy, homeopathy, chiropractic, acupuncture, herbal and energy medicine and meditation, all potentially impacting on major human diseases. It is now becoming evident that acupuncture can modify the expression of different endorphin genes and the expression of genes encoding for crucial transcription factors in cellular homeostasis. Extremely low frequency magnetic fields have been found to prime the commitment to a myocardial lineage in mouse embryonic stem cells, suggesting that magnetic energy may direct stem cell differentiation into specific cellular phenotypes without the aid of gene transfer technologies. This finding may pave the way to novel approaches in tissue engineering and regeneration. Different ginseng extracts have been shown to modulate growth and differentiation in pluripotent cells and to exert wound-healing and antitumor effects through opposing activities on the vascular system, prompting the hypothesis that ancient compounds may be the target for new logics in cell therapy. These observations and the subtle entanglement among different CAM systems suggest that CAM modalities may deeply affect both the signaling and transcriptional level of cellular homeostasis. Such a perception holds promises for a new era in CAM, prompting reproducible documentation of biological responses to CAM-related strategies and compounds. To this end, functional genomics and proteomics and the comprehension of the cell signaling networks may substantially contribute to the development of a molecular evidence-based CAM. PMID:16136206

  5. CAM and Cell Fate Targeting: Molecular and Energetic Insights into Cell Growth and Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Ventura

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Evidence-based medicine is switching from the analysis of single diseases at a time toward an integrated assessment of a diseased person. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM offers multiple holistic approaches, including osteopathy, homeopathy, chiropractic, acupuncture, herbal and energy medicine and meditation, all potentially impacting on major human diseases. It is now becoming evident that acupuncture can modify the expression of different endorphin genes and the expression of genes encoding for crucial transcription factors in cellular homeostasis. Extremely low frequency magnetic fields have been found to prime the commitment to a myocardial lineage in mouse embryonic stem cells, suggesting that magnetic energy may direct stem cell differentiation into specific cellular phenotypes without the aid of gene transfer technologies. This finding may pave the way to novel approaches in tissue engineering and regeneration. Different ginseng extracts have been shown to modulate growth and differentiation in pluripotent cells and to exert wound-healing and antitumor effects through opposing activities on the vascular system, prompting the hypothesis that ancient compounds may be the target for new logics in cell therapy. These observations and the subtle entanglement among different CAM systems suggest that CAM modalities may deeply affect both the signaling and transcriptional level of cellular homeostasis. Such a perception holds promises for a new era in CAM, prompting reproducible documentation of biological responses to CAM-related strategies and compounds. To this end, functional genomics and proteomics and the comprehension of the cell signaling networks may substantially contribute to the development of a molecular evidence–based CAM.

  6. Influence of interferon on the functional expression of natural killer target structures of murine lymphoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marini, S; Guadagni, F; Bonmassar, E; Potenza, P; Giuliani, A

    1986-10-01

    Murine lymphoma cells (YAC-1), induced by Moloney leukemia virus, nontreated (YAC) or pretreated in vitro with interferon (YAC-IF), were tested for their susceptibility to natural killer (NK)-mediated cytolysis. In line with previous reports YAC-IF were less susceptible to NK lysis than YAC cells. In cold competition assay, YAC-IF inhibited cytotoxicity to a lesser extent than YAC lymphoma when labeled target YAC cells were used. However, when radioactive YAC-IF cells were used as targets, cold competition attained with both YAC and YAC-IF was essentially the same. Furthermore, effector splenocytes, depleted of NK effector cells through immunoabsorption on YAC monolayer, were inactive against both YAC and YAC-IF targets. On the other hand, effector lymphocytes, absorbed on YAC-IF monolayer, retained NK activity against YAC cells but not against YAC-IF targets. These results are compatible with the hypothesis that interferon (IF) modulates negatively a subset of "interferon-susceptible" (IFS) NK target structure(s) (TS) of YAC cells, which would then express membrane determinants not functionally present on YAC-IF cells. On the other hand YAC and YAC-IF cells share "interferon-resistant" (IFR) TS not affected by pretreatment with IF. In order to test whether IFS X TS and IFR X TS are present on the same cell or clonally distributed, YAC cells were cloned and tested for NK susceptibility following IF pretreatment. The results did not support the hypothesis of a clonal distribution of both IFS X TS and IFR X TS since IF pretreatment of all clones, obtained by limiting dilution, resulted in a net impairment of target susceptibility to NK effector cells.

  7. Tapping Stem Cells to Target AMD: Challenges and Prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Brandl

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs are increasingly gaining attention in biomedicine as valuable resources to establish patient-derived cell culture models of the cell type known to express the primary pathology. The idea of “a patient in a dish” aims at basic, but also clinical, applications with the promise to mimic individual genetic and metabolic complexities barely reflected in current invertebrate or vertebrate animal model systems. This may particularly be true for the inherited and complex diseases of the retina, as this tissue has anatomical and physiological aspects unique to the human eye. For example, the complex age-related macular degeneration (AMD, the leading cause of blindness in Western societies, can be attributed to a large number of genetic and individual factors with so far unclear modes of mutual interaction. Here, we review the current status and future prospects of utilizing hPSCs, specifically induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs, in basic and clinical AMD research, but also in assessing potential treatment options. We provide an outline of concepts for disease modelling and summarize ongoing and projected clinical trials for stem cell-based therapy in late-stage AMD.

  8. Gene Targeting Using Homologous Recombination in Embryonic Stem Cells: The Future for Behavior Genetics?

    OpenAIRE

    Gerlai, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Gene targeting with homologous recombination in embryonic stem cells created a revolution in the analysis of the function of genes in behavioral brain research. The technology allowed unprecedented precision with which one could manipulate genes and study the effect of this manipulation on the central nervous system. With gene targeting, the uncertainty inherent in psychopharmacology regarding whether a particular compound would act only through a specific target was removed. Thus, gene targe...

  9. Targeted Germline Modifications in Rats using CRISPR/Cas9 and Spermatogonial Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Karen M. Chapman; Gerardo A. Medrano; Priscilla Jaichander; Jaideep Chaudhary; Alexandra E. Waits; Marcelo A. Nobrega; James M. Hotaling; Carole Ober; F. Kent Hamra

    2015-01-01

    Organisms with targeted genomic modifications are efficiently produced by gene editing in embryos using CRISPR/Cas9 RNA-guided DNA endonuclease. Here, to facilitate germline editing in rats, we used CRISPR/Cas9 to catalyze targeted genomic mutations in rat spermatogonial stem cell cultures. CRISPR/Cas9-modified spermatogonia regenerated spermatogenesis and displayed long-term sperm-forming potential following transplantation into rat testes. Targeted germline mutations in Epsti1 and Erbb3 wer...

  10. Targeted gene conversion induced by triplex-directed psoralen interstrand crosslinks in mammalian cells

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Yaobin; Nairn, Rodney S.; Vasquez, Karen M.

    2009-01-01

    Correction of a defective gene is a promising approach for both basic research and clinical gene therapy. However, the absence of site-specific targeting and the low efficiency of homologous recombination in human cells present barriers to successful gene targeting. In an effort to overcome these barriers, we utilized triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) conjugated to a DNA interstrand crosslinking (ICL) agent, psoralen (pTFO-ICLs), to improve the gene targeting efficiency at a specific si...

  11. Sensitivity of human lung adenocarcinoma cell lines to targeted inhibition of BET epigenetic signaling proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Lockwood, William W; Zejnullahu, Kreshnik; James E Bradner; Varmus, Harold

    2012-01-01

    Bromodomain and extra terminal domain (BET) proteins function as epigenetic signaling factors that associate with acetylated histones and facilitate transcription of target genes. Inhibitors targeting the activity of BET proteins have shown potent antiproliferative effects in hematological cancers through the suppression of c-MYC and downstream target genes. However, as the epigenetic landscape of a cell varies drastically depending on lineage, transcriptional coactivators such as BETs would ...

  12. MicroRNAs targeting TGFβ signalling underlie the regulatory T cell defect in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severin, Mary E; Lee, Priscilla W; Liu, Yue; Selhorst, Amanda J; Gormley, Matthew G; Pei, Wei; Yang, Yuhong; Guerau-de-Arellano, Mireia; Racke, Michael K; Lovett-Racke, Amy E

    2016-06-01

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) signalling is critical for regulatory T cell development and function, and regulatory T cell dysregulation is a common observation in autoimmune diseases, including multiple sclerosis. In a comprehensive miRNA profiling study of patients with multiple sclerosis naïve CD4 T cells, 19 differentially expressed miRNAs predicted to target the TGFβ signalling pathway were identified, leading to the hypothesis that miRNAs may be responsible for the regulatory T cell defect observed in patients with multiple sclerosis. Patients with multiple sclerosis had reduced levels of TGFβ signalling components in their naïve CD4 T cells. The differentially expressed miRNAs negatively regulated the TGFβ pathway, resulting in a reduced capacity of naïve CD4 T cells to differentiate into regulatory T cells. Interestingly, the limited number of regulatory T cells, that did develop when these TGFβ-targeting miRNAs were overexpressed, were capable of suppressing effector T cells. As it has previously been demonstrated that compromising TGFβ signalling results in a reduced regulatory T cell repertoire insufficient to control autoimmunity, and patients with multiple sclerosis have a reduced regulatory T cell repertoire, these data indicate that the elevated expression of multiple TGFβ-targeting miRNAs in naïve CD4 T cells of patients with multiple sclerosis impairs TGFβ signalling, and dampens regulatory T cell development, thereby enhancing susceptibility to developing multiple sclerosis.

  13. A novel strategy for cancer treatment:Targeting cancer stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jia; MA LeiNa; WANG YiGang; LIU XinYuan; QIAN QiJun

    2008-01-01

    Cancer stem cell/tumor-initiating cell (CSC/TIC) is a subclass of cancer cells possessing parts of properties of normal stem cell. It has a high capacity of proliferation and plays a pivotal role in tumor recurrence and tumor resistance to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. At present, small molecule in-hibitors and fusion proteins are widely used in the CSC-targeting strategy. Gene-virotherapy, which uses oncolytic adenovirus as a vector to mediate the expression of therapeutic gene, shows a signifi-cant superiority to other regimens of cancer treatment and has a good efficacy in the treatment of solid tumors. Thus, it is a promising choice to apply gene-virotherapy into the CSC-targeting treatment. Based on the molecular mechanism underlying CSC self-renewal, a series of effective strategies for targeting CSC have been established. This review will summarize the recent research progresses on CSC-targeting treatment.

  14. Cell-mediated Delivery and Targeted Erosion of Noncovalently Crosslinked Hydrogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiick, Kristi L. (Inventor); Yamaguchi, Nori (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method for targeted delivery of therapeutic compounds from hydrogels is presented. The method involves administering to a cell a hydrogel in which a therapeutic compound is noncovalently bound to heparin.

  15. Separation of effector cells mediating antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADC) to erythrocyte targets from those mediating ADC to tumor targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollack, S B; Nelson, K; Grausz, J D

    1976-04-01

    Murine spleen cells mediate antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADC) both to erythrocyte targets in a 51Cr release assay and to syngeneic tumor targets in a microcytotoxicity assay. The effector cells active in the two ADC assays can be separated by passage of the spleen cells through columns of Sephadex G-10 at 37 degrees C. Cells mediating ADC to sarcoma cells did not adhere to the G-10 and were recovered in the column effluent. These nonadherent cells were not cytotoxic to antibody-coated chicken red blood cells. Spleen cells which mediated ADC in a 51Cr release assay to the red cell targets adhered to G-10. Adherent effector cells could subsequently be recovered from the columns by elution with 5 X 10(-4) M EDTA. PMID:815438

  16. The Targeted Delivery of Multicomponent Cargos to Cancer Cells via Nanoporous Particle-Supported Lipid Bilayers

    OpenAIRE

    Ashley, Carlee E.; CARNES, ERIC C.; Phillips, Genevieve K.; Padilla, David; Durfee, Paul N.; Brown, Page A.; Hanna, Tracey N.; Liu, Juewen; Phillips, Brandy; Carter, Mark B.; Carroll, Nick J.; Jiang, Xingmao; Dunphy, Darren R.; Willman, Cheryl L.; Petsev, Dimiter N.

    2011-01-01

    Encapsulation of drugs within nanocarriers that selectively target malignant cells promises to mitigate side effects of conventional chemotherapy and to enable delivery of the unique drug combinations needed for personalized medicine. To realize this potential, however, targeted nanocarriers must simultaneously overcome multiple challenges, including specificity, stability, and a high capacity for disparate cargos. Here we report porous nanoparticle-supported lipid bilayers (protocells) that ...

  17. Re-programming tumour cell metabolism to treat cancer: no lone target for lonidamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhutia, Yangzom D.; Babu, Ellappan; Ganapathy, Vadivel

    2016-01-01

    Tumour cell metabolism is very different from normal cell metabolism; cancer cells re-programme the metabolic pathways that occur in normal cells in such a manner that it optimizes their proliferation, growth and survival. Although this metabolic re-programming obviously operates to the advantage of the tumour, it also offers unique opportunities for effective cancer therapy. Molecules that target the tumour cell-specific metabolic pathways have potential as novel anti-cancer drugs. Lonidamine belongs to this group of molecules and is already in use in some countries for cancer treatment. It has been known for a long time that lonidamine interferes with energy production in tumour cells by inhibiting hexokinase II (HKII), a glycolytic enzyme. However, subsequent studies have uncovered additional pharmacological targets for the drug, which include the electron transport chain and the mitochondrial permeability transition pore, thus expanding the pharmacological effects of the drug on tumour cell metabolism. A study by Nancolas et al. in a recent issue of the Biochemical Journal identifies two additional new targets for lonidamine: the pyruvate transporter in the mitochondria and the H+-coupled monocarboxylate transporters in the plasma membrane (PM). It is thus becoming increasingly apparent that the anti-cancer effects of lonidamine do not occur through a single target; the drug works at multiple sites. Irrespective of the molecular targets, what lonidamine does in the end is to undo what the tumour cells have done in terms of re-programming cellular metabolism and mitochondrial function. PMID:27234586

  18. Highly Sensitive Detection of Target Biomolecules on Cell Surface Using Gold Nanoparticle Conjugated with Aptamer Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyonchol; Terazono, Hideyuki; Hayashi, Masahito; Takei, Hiroyuki; Yasuda, Kenji

    2012-06-01

    A method of gold nanoparticle (Au NP) labeling with backscattered electron (BE) imaging of field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) was applied for specific detection of target biomolecules on a cell surface. A single-stranded DNA aptamer, which specifically binds to the target molecule on a human acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell, was conjugated with a 20 nm Au NP and used as a probe to label its target molecule on the cell. The Au NP probe was incubated with the cell, and the interaction was confirmed using BE imaging of FE-SEM through direct counting of the number of Au NPs attached on the target cell surface. Specific Au NP-aptamer probes were observed on a single cell surface and their spatial distributions including submicron-order localizations were also clearly visualized, whereas the nonspecific aptamer probes were not observed on it. The aptamer probe can be potentially dislodged from the cell surface with treatment of nucleases, indicating that Au NP-conjugated aptamer probes can be used as sensitive and reversible probes to label target biomolecules on cells.

  19. Engineering of Targeted Nanoparticles for Cancer Therapy Using Internalizing Aptamers Isolated by Cell-Uptake Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Zeyu; Levy-Nissenbaum, Etgar; Alexis, Frank; Lupták, Andrej; Teply, Benjamin A.; Chan, Juliana M.; Shi, Jinjun; Digga, Elise; Cheng, Judy; Langer, Robert; Farokhzad, Omid C.

    2012-01-01

    One of the major challenges in the development of targeted nanoparticles (NPs) for cancer therapy is to discover targeting ligands that allow for differential binding and uptake by the target cancer cells. Using prostate cancer (PCa) as a model disease, we developed a cell-uptake selection strategy to isolate PCa-specific internalizing 2'-Omethyl RNA aptamers (Apts) for NP incorporation. Twelve cycles of selection and counter-selection were done to obtain a panel of internalizing Apts, which can distinguish PCa cells from non-prostate and normal prostate cells. After Apt characterization, size minimization, and conjugation of the Apts with fluorescently-labeled polymeric NPs, the NP-Apt bioconjugates exhibit PCa specificity and enhancement in cellular uptake when compared to non-targeted NPs lacking the internalizing Apts. Furthermore, when docetaxel, a chemotherapeutic agent used for the treatment of PCa, was encapsulated within the NP-Apt, a significant improvement in cytotoxicity was achieved in targeted PCa cells. Rather than isolating high-affinity Apts as reported in previous selection processes, our selection strategy was designed to enrich cancer-cell specific internalizing Apts. A similar cell-uptake selection strategy may be used to develop specific internalizing ligands for a myriad of other diseases and can potentially facilitate delivering various molecules, including drugs and siRNAs, into cells. PMID:22214176

  20. Polarizing T and B cell responses by APC-targeted subunit vaccines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunnveig eGrødeland

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Current influenza vaccines mostly aim at the induction of specific neutralizing antibodies. While antibodies are important for protection against a particular virus strain, T cells can recognize epitopes that will offer broader protection against influenza. We have previously developed a DNA vaccine format by which protein antigens can be targeted specifically to receptors on antigen presenting cells (APCs. The DNA-encoded vaccine proteins are homodimers, each chain consisting of a targeting unit, a dimerization unit, and an antigen. The strategy of targeting antigen to APCs greatly enhances immune responses as compared to non-targeted controls. Furthermore, targeting of antigen to different receptors on APCs can polarize the immune response to different arms of immunity. Here, we discuss how targeting of hemagglutinin (HA to MHC class II molecules increases Th2 and IgG1 antibody responses, whereas targeting to chemokine receptors XCR1 or CCR1/3/5 increases Th1 and IgG2a responses, in addition to CD8+ T cell responses. We also discuss these results in relation to work published by others on APC-targeting. Differential targeting of APC surface molecules may allow the induction of tailor-made phenotypes of adaptive immune responses that are optimal for protection against various infectious agents, including influenza virus.

  1. Targeting and Regulation of Cell Wall Synthesis During Tip Growth in Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fangwei Gu; Erik Nielsen

    2013-01-01

    Root hairs and pollen tubes are formed through tip growth, a process requiring synthesis of new cell wall material and the precise targeting and integration of these components to a selected apical plasma membrane domain in the growing tips of these cells. Presence of a tip-focused calcium gradient, control of actin cytoskeleton dynamics, and formation and targeting of secretory vesicles are essential to tip growth. Similar to cells undergoing diffuse growth, cellulose, hemi-celluloses, and pectins are also deposited in the growing apices of tip-growing cells. However, differences in the manner in which these cell wall components are targeted and inserted in the expanding portion of tip-growing cells is reflected by the identification of elements of the plant cell wall synthesis machinery which have been shown to play unique roles in tip-growing cells. In this review, we summarize our current understanding of the tip growth process, with a particular focus on the subcellular targeting of newly synthesized cell wall components, and their roles in this form of plant cell expansion.

  2. Targeting and Imaging of Cancer Cells via Monosaccharide-Imprinted Fluorescent Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuangshou; Yin, Danyang; Wang, Wenjing; Shen, Xiaojing; Zhu, Jun-Jie; Chen, Hong-Yuan; Liu, Zhen

    2016-03-01

    The recognition of cancer cells is a key for cancer diagnosis and therapy, but the specificity highly relies on the use of biorecognition molecules particularly antibodies. Because biorecognition molecules suffer from some apparent disadvantages, such as hard to prepare and poor storage stability, novel alternatives that can overcome these disadvantages are highly important. Here we present monosaccharide-imprinted fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs) for targeting and imaging of cancer cells. The molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) probe was fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) doped silica NPs with a shell imprinted with sialic acid, fucose or mannose as the template. The monosaccharide-imprinted NPs exhibited high specificity toward the target monosaccharides. As the template monosaccharides used are over-expressed on cancer cells, these monosaccharide-imprinted NPs allowed for specific targeting cancer cells over normal cells. Fluorescence imaging of human hepatoma carcinoma cells (HepG-2) over normal hepatic cells (L-02) and mammary cancer cells (MCF-7) over normal mammary epithelial cells (MCF-10A) by these NPs was demonstrated. As the imprinting approach employed herein is generally applicable and highly efficient, monosaccharide-imprinted NPs can be promising probes for targeting cancer cells.

  3. DELIVERY OF siRNA INTO BREAST CANCER CELLS VIA PHAGE FUSION PROTEIN-TARGETED LIPOSOMES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedi, Deepa; Musacchio, Tiziana; Fagbohun, Olusegun A.; Gillespie, James W.; Deinnocentes, Patricia; Bird, R. Curtis; Bookbinder, Lonnie; Torchilin, Vladimir P.; Petrenko, Valery A.

    2011-01-01

    Efficacy of siRNAs as potential anticancer therapeutics can be increased by their targeted delivery into cancer cells via tumor-specific ligands. Phage display offers an unique approach to identify highly specific and selective ligands that can deliver nanocarriers to the site of disease. In this study, we proved a novel approach for intracellular delivery of siRNAs into breast cancer cells through their encapsulation into liposomes targeted to the tumor cells with preselected intact phage proteins. The targeted siRNA liposomes were obtained by a fusion of two parental liposomes containing spontaneously inserted siRNA and fusion phage proteins. The presence of pVIII coat protein fused to a MCF-7 cell-targeting peptide DMPGTVLP in the liposomes was confirmed by Western blotting. The novel phage-targeted siRNA-nanopharmaceuticals demonstrate significant down-regulation of PRDM14 gene expression and PRDM14 protein synthesis in the target MCF- 7 cells. This approach offers the potential for development of new anticancer siRNA-based targeted nanomedicines. PMID:21050894

  4. Rapid and Cost-Effective Gene Targeting in Rat Embryonic Stem Cells by TALENs

    OpenAIRE

    Tong, Chang; Huang, Guanyi; Ashton, Charles; WU, HONGPING; Yan, Hexin; Ying, Qi-Long

    2012-01-01

    The rat is the preferred animal model in many areas of biomedical research and drug development. Genetic manipulation in rats has lagged behind that in mice due to the lack of efficient gene targeting tools. Previously, we generated a knockout rat via conventional homologous recombination in rat embryonic stem (ES) cells. Here, we show that efficient gene targeting in rat ES cells can be achieved quickly through transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN)-mediated DNA double-strand...

  5. Curcumin suppresses proliferation of colon cancer cells by targeting CDK2

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, Tae-Gyu; Lee, Sung-Young; Huang, Zunnan; Lim, Do Young; Chen, Hanyong; Jung, Sung Keun; Bode, Ann M.; Lee, Ki Won; Dong, Zigang

    2014-01-01

    Curcumin, the yellow pigment of turmeric found in Southeast Indian food, is one of the most popular phytochemicals for cancer prevention. Numerous reports have demonstrated modulation of multiple cellular signaling pathways by curcumin and its molecular targets in various cancer cell lines. To identify a new molecular target of curcumin, we used shape screening and reverse docking to screen the protein data bank against curcumin. Cyclin dependent kinase 2 (CDK2), a major cell cycle protein, w...

  6. Chimeric nucleolin aptamer with survivin DNAzyme for cancer cell targeted delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Nithya; Kanwar, Jagat R; Akilandeswari, Balachandran; Kanwar, Rupinder K; Khetan, Vikas; Krishnakumar, Subramanian

    2015-04-25

    A chimeric aptamer-DNAzyme conjugate was generated for the first time using a nucleolin aptamer (NCL-APT) and survivin Dz (Sur_Dz) and exhibited the targeted killing of cancer cells. This proof of concept of using an aptamer for the delivery of DNAzyme can be applied to other cancer types to target survivin in cancer cells in a specific manner. PMID:25797393

  7. Immune targeting of fibroblast activation protein triggers recognition of multipotent bone marrow stromal cells and cachexia

    OpenAIRE

    Tran, Eric; Chinnasamy, Dhanalakshmi; Yu, Zhiya; Morgan, Richard A.; Lee, Chyi-Chia Richard; Restifo, Nicholas P; Rosenberg, Steven A.

    2013-01-01

    Fibroblast activation protein (FAP) is a candidate universal target antigen because it has been reported to be selectively expressed in nearly all solid tumors by a subset of immunosuppressive tumor stromal fibroblasts. We verified that 18/18 human tumors of various histologies contained pronounced stromal elements staining strongly for FAP, and hypothesized that targeting tumor stroma with FAP-reactive T cells would inhibit tumor growth in cancer-bearing hosts. T cells genetically engineered...

  8. Antimetastatic therapy targeting aberrant sialylation profiles in cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da Yong Lu

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Neoplasm metastases involve a fixed cascade of pathological processes, and are responsible for more than 60% cancer deaths worldwide and can only be controlled or inhibited by drugs now. Antimetastatic drugs targeting aberrantly sialylated in tumors have involved about a quarter of a century and might be a future therapeutic option apart from currently utilized antimetastatic drugs, such as antivascular and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP inhibitors. Since neoplasm tissues often manifest high levels of sialic acids and sialyl antigens or glycoligands, and some types of sialic acid analogue, such as N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Nau5Gc occurred in most tumor tissues, is absent in common humans, more attentions are needed to work with new therapeutic approaches to target these changes. Previously preliminary data have shown some compounds that inhibit some pathways of sialic acids can inhibit the tumor metastasis in vitro and tumor metastasis in experimental animal models. This type of pharmacological work can be helped by glycome investigations in order to deep understanding their mechanisms. As the central dogma of glycobiology is still unknown, some fundamental questions related to carbohydrate itself are even more welcoming and decisive to our understanding to nature of cancer. These types of work also need mathematical analysis of data. In this review, we will document and discuss the latest experimental therapeutic data and their clinical significance between cancer pathological profiles and therapeutics benefits.

  9. Cancer Cell Signaling Pathways Targeted by Spice-Derived Nutraceuticals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Bokyung; Prasad, Sahdeo; Yadav, Vivek R.; Aggarwal, Bharat B.

    2012-01-01

    Extensive research within the last half a century has revealed that cancer is caused by dysregulation of as many as 500 different gene products. Most natural products target multiple gene products and thus are ideally suited for prevention and treatment of various chronic diseases, including cancer. Dietary agents such as spices have been used extensively in the Eastern world for a variety of ailments for millennia, and five centuries ago they took a golden journey to the Western world. Various spice-derived nutraceuticals, including 1′-acetoxychavicol acetate, anethole, capsaicin, car-damonin, curcumin, dibenzoylmethane, diosgenin, eugenol, gambogic acid, gingerol, thymoquinone, ursolic acid, xanthohumol, and zerumbone derived from galangal, anise, red chili, black cardamom, turmeric, licorice, fenugreek, clove, kokum, ginger, black cumin, rosemary, hop, and pinecone ginger, respectively, are the focus of this review. The modulation of various transcription factors, growth factors, protein kinases, and inflammatory mediators by these spice-derived nutraceuticals are described. The anticancer potential through the modulation of various targets is also the subject of this review. Although they have always been used to improve taste and color and as a preservative, they are now also used for prevention and treatment of a wide variety of chronic inflammatory diseases, including cancer. PMID:22149093

  10. Folate-conjugated polymer micelles for active targeting to cancer cells: preparation, in vitro evaluation of targeting ability and cytotoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You Jian [College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Li Xin [College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Cui Fude [College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Shenyang Pharmaceutical University, Shenyang 110016 (China); Du Yongzhong [College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Yuan Hong [College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Hu Fuqiang [College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China)

    2008-01-30

    To obtain an active-targeting carrier to cancer cells, folate-conjugated stearic acid grafted chitosan oligosaccharide (Fa-CSOSA) was synthesized by 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC)-mediated coupling reaction. The substitution degree is 22.1%. The critical micelle concentrations (CMCs) of Fa-CSOSA were 0.017 and 0.0074 mg ml{sup -1} in distilled water and PBS (pH 7.4), respectively. The average volume size range of Fa-CSOSA micelles was 60-120 nm. The targeting ability of Fa-CSOSA micelles was investigated against two kinds of cell lines (A549 and Hela), which have different amounts of folate receptors in their surface. The results indicated that Fa-CSOSA micelles presented a targeting ability to the cells (Hela) with a higher expression of folate receptor during a short-time incubation (<6 h). As incubation proceeded, the special spatial structure of the micelles gradually plays a main role in cellular internalization of the micelles. Good internalization of the micelles into both Hela and A549 cells was shown. Then, paclitaxel (PTX) was encapsulated into the micelles, and the content of PTX in the micelles was about 4.8% (w/w). The average volume size range of PTX-loaded micelles was 150-340 nm. Furthermore, the anti-tumor efficacy in vitro was investigated by a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) method. The IC{sub 50} of Taxol (a clinical formulation containing PTX) on A549 and Hela cells was 7.0 and 11.0 {mu}g ml{sup -1}, respectively. The cytotoxicity of PTX-loaded micelles was improved sharply (IC{sub 50} on A549: 0.32 {mu}g ml{sup -1}; IC{sub 50} on Hela: 0.268 {mu}g ml{sup -1}). This is attributed to the increased intracellular delivery of the drug. The Fa-CSOSA micelles that are presented may be a promising active-targeting carrier candidate via folate mediation.

  11. Monte Carlo Simulations of Necrotic Cell Targeted Alpha Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Hypoxic tumour cells are radioresistant and are significant contributors to the locoregional recurrences and distant metastases that mark treatment failure. Due to restricted circulatory supply, hypoxic tumor cells frequently become necrotic and thus necrotic areas often lie near hypoxic tumour areas. In this study we investigate the feasibility of binding an alpha-emitting conjugate to necrotic cells located in the proximity of hypoxic, viable tumour cells. Monte Carlo radiation transport simulations were performed to investigate the dose distribution resulting from the thorium 227 (Th227) decay chain in a representative tumour geometry. The Geant4 software toolkit was used to simulate the decay and interactions of the Th227 decay chain. The distribution of Th227 was based on a study by Thomlinson and Gray of human lung cancer histological samples (Thomlinson RH, Gray LH. Br J Cancer 1955; 9:539). The normalized dose distribution obtained with Geant4 from a cylindrical Th227 source in water is illustrated in Fig. I. The relative contribution of the different decay channels is displayed, together with a profile through the centre of the accumulated dose map. The results support the hypothesis that significant α-particle doses will be deposited in the hypoxic tumor tissue immediately surrounding the necrotic core (where the majority of Th227 will be located). As an internal a-particle generator, the Th227-radioimmunoconjugate shows potential as an efficient hypoxic tumour sterilizer.

  12. Targeted treatments in advanced renal cell carcinoma: focus on axitinib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verzoni E

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Elena Verzoni, Paolo Grassi, Isabella Testa, Roberto Iacovelli, Pamela Biondani, Enrico Garanzini , Filippo De Braud, Giuseppe ProcopioDepartment of Medical Oncology 1, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milan, ItalyAbstract: Antiangiogenesis options have evolved rapidly in the last few years, with an increasing number of agents currently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration and European Medicines Agency. Angiogenesis inhibitors have been shown to be very effective for the treatment of metastatic renal cancer cell. Axitinib is a third-generation inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor and is currently being developed for the treatment of various malignancies. The pharmacokinetic properties of axitinib may have a selective therapeutic effect, with minimal adverse reactions and enhanced safety. In a large Phase III study of previously treated patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma, axitinib achieved a longer progression-free survival than sorafenib with an acceptable safety profile and good quality of life. This review focuses on the pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, and clinical activity of axitinib in the current treatment of renal cell carcinoma. The role of axitinib in the adjuvant and/or neoadjuvant setting needs to be evaluated in further clinical trials.Keywords: axitinib, renal cell carcinoma, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, angiogenesis

  13. Gene targeting in embryonic stem cells, II: conditional technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genome modification via transgenesis has allowed researchers to link genotype and phenotype as an alternative approach to the characterization of random mutations through evolution. The synergy of technologies from the fields of embryonic stem (ES) cells, gene knockouts, and protein-mediated recombi...

  14. Targeting inflammation with autoantigen-specific T cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guichelaar, T.

    2008-01-01

    Chronic autoimmune diseases are driven by cells that respond to tissue components of the body. Inflammation in diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes or multiple sclerosis, can be suppressed by drug therapy. However, the broad range of immunosuppressive action of these drugs often does not res

  15. Specifically targeted gene therapy for small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, C.L.; Zandi, R.; Gjetting, T.;

    2009-01-01

    Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) is a highly malignant disease with poor prognosis. Hence, there is great demand for new therapies that can replace or supplement the current available treatment regimes. Gene therapy constitutes a promising strategy and relies on the principle of introducing exogenous...

  16. Mitochondrial targeted β-lapachone induces mitochondrial dysfunction and catastrophic vacuolization in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jing; Lim, Chaemin; Sacher, Joshua R; Van Houten, Bennett; Qian, Wei; Wipf, Peter

    2015-11-01

    Mitochondria play important roles in tumor cell physiology and survival by providing energy and metabolites for proliferation and metastasis. As part of their oncogenic status, cancer cells frequently produce increased levels of mitochondrial-generated reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, extensive stimulation of ROS generation in mitochondria has been shown to be able to induce cancer cell death, and is one of the major mechanisms of action of many anticancer agents. We hypothesized that enhancing mitochondrial ROS generation through direct targeting of a ROS generator into mitochondria will exhibit tumor cell selectivity, as well as high efficacy in inducing cancer cell death. We thus synthesized a mitochondrial targeted version of β-lapachone (XJB-Lapachone) based on our XJB mitochondrial targeting platform. We found that the mitochondrial targeted β-lapachone is more efficient in inducing apoptosis compared to unconjugated β-lapachone, and the tumor cell selectivity is maintained. XJB-Lapachone also induced extensive cellular vacuolization and autophagy at a concentration not observed with unconjugated β-lapachone. Through characterization of mitochondrial function we revealed that XJB-Lapachone is indeed more capable of stimulating ROS generation in mitochondria, which led to a dramatic mitochondrial uncoupling and autophagic degradation of mitochondria. Taken together, we have demonstrated that targeting β-lapachone accomplishes higher efficacy through inducing ROS generation directly in mitochondria, resulting in extensive mitochondrial and cellular damage. XJB-Lapachone will thus help to establish a novel platform for the design of next generation mitochondrial targeted ROS generators for cancer therapy.

  17. Increasing intracellular bioavailable copper selectively targets prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cater, Michael A; Pearson, Helen B; Wolyniec, Kamil; Klaver, Paul; Bilandzic, Maree; Paterson, Brett M; Bush, Ashley I; Humbert, Patrick O; La Fontaine, Sharon; Donnelly, Paul S; Haupt, Ygal

    2013-07-19

    The therapeutic efficacy of two bis(thiosemicarbazonato) copper complexes, glyoxalbis[N4-methylthiosemicarbazonato]Cu(II) [Cu(II)(gtsm)] and diacetylbis[N4-methylthiosemicarbazonato]Cu(II) [Cu(II)(atsm)], for the treatment of prostate cancer was assessed in cell culture and animal models. Distinctively, copper dissociates intracellularly from Cu(II)(gtsm) but is retained by Cu(II)(atsm). We further demonstrated that intracellular H2gtsm [reduced Cu(II)(gtsm)] continues to redistribute copper into a bioavailable (exchangeable) pool. Both Cu(II)(gtsm) and Cu(II)(atsm) selectively kill transformed (hyperplastic and carcinoma) prostate cell lines but, importantly, do not affect the viability of primary prostate epithelial cells. Increasing extracellular copper concentrations enhanced the therapeutic capacity of both Cu(II)(gtsm) and Cu(II)(atsm), and their ligands (H2gtsm and H2atsm) were toxic only toward cancerous prostate cells when combined with copper. Treatment of the Transgenic Adenocarcinoma of Mouse Prostate (TRAMP) model with Cu(II)(gtsm) (2.5 mg/kg) significantly reduced prostate cancer burden (∼70%) and severity (grade), while treatment with Cu(II)(atsm) (30 mg/kg) was ineffective at the given dose. However, Cu(II)(gtsm) caused mild kidney toxicity in the mice, associated primarily with interstitial nephritis and luminal distention. Mechanistically, we demonstrated that Cu(II)(gtsm) inhibits proteasomal chymotrypsin-like activity, a feature further established as being common to copper-ionophores that increase intracellular bioavailable copper. We have demonstrated that increasing intracellular bioavailable copper can selectively kill cancerous prostate cells in vitro and in vivo and have revealed the potential for bis(thiosemicarbazone) copper complexes to be developed as therapeutics for prostate cancer.

  18. Complement bound to tumor target cells enhances their sensitivity to macrophage-mediated killing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bara, S.; Lint, T.F.

    1986-03-05

    Tumor cells are known to be susceptible to destruction by a variety of immune effector mechanisms including complement (C) and activated macrophages (M theta). The authors have chosen to study the interaction of these two effector systems by examining the effects of bound mouse C on the antibody-independent M theta-mediated lysis of the P815 mouse mastocytoma cell line. Hemolytically active normal mouse serum (NMS) was used to deposit C on tumor targets by an alternative pathway mechanism in the absence of added antibody. C3 was quantitated on the P815 cells by a cellular enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay. C. parvum-activated macrophages produced tumor cytolysis which was measured in a serum-free 16 hour /sup 51/Cr-release assay. Target cells which had been incubated with NMS for 30 min at 37/sup 0/C demonstrated a 30% increase in specific /sup 51/Cr-release at a 1:1 effector to target (E:T) ratio, as compared to targets incubated with heat-inactivated (56/sup 0/C, 30 min) NMS. The treatment of target cells with NMS alone did not cause lysis. At higher E:T ratios specific /sup 51/Cr-release approached a maximum level which was not increased further by C treatment of the target cells. However, at low E:T ratios, NMS increased the specific /sup 51/Cr-release in a dose-dependent fashion; this increase was abrogated by 10 mM EDTA. The kinetics of lysis of C-treated P815 cells by activated M theta does not differ from that of control P815 cells. These results indicate that target-bound C may enhance M theta-mediated killing of tumor cells.

  19. Mechanism of Action of Two Flavone Isomers Targeting Cancer Cells with Varying Cell Differentiation Status.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy M LeJeune

    Full Text Available Apoptosis can be triggered in two different ways, through the intrinsic or the extrinsic pathway. The intrinsic pathway is mediated by the mitochondria via the release of cytochrome C while the extrinsic pathway is prompted by death receptor signals and bypasses the mitochondria. These two pathways are closely related to cell proliferation and survival signaling cascades, which thereby constitute possible targets for cancer therapy. In previous studies we introduced two plant derived isomeric flavonoids, flavone A and flavone B which induce apoptosis in highly tumorigenic cancer cells of the breast, colon, pancreas, and the prostate. Flavone A displayed potent cytotoxic activity against more differentiated carcinomas of the colon (CaCo-2 and the pancreas (Panc28, whereas flavone B cytotoxic action is observed on poorly differentiated carcinomas of the colon (HCT 116 and pancreas (MIA PaCa. Apoptosis is induced by flavone A in better differentiated colon cancer CaCo-2 and pancreatic cancer Panc 28 cells via the intrinsic pathway by the inhibition of the activated forms of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK and pS6, and subsequent loss of phosphorylation of Bcl-2 associated death promoter (BAD protein, while apoptosis is triggered by flavone B in poorly differentiated colon cancer HCT 116 and MIA PaCa pancreatic cancer cells through the extrinsic pathway with the concomitant upregulation of the phosphorylated forms of ERK and c-JUN at serine 73. These changes in protein levels ultimately lead to activation of apoptosis, without the involvement of AKT.

  20. Human FasL gene is a target of β-catenin/T-cell factor pathway and complex FasL haplotypes alter promoter functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianming Wu

    Full Text Available FasL expression on human immune cells and cancer cells plays important roles in immune homeostasis and in cancer development. Our previous study suggests that polymorphisms in the FasL promoter can significantly affect the gene expression in human cells. In addition to the functional FasL SNP -844C>T (rs763110, three other SNPs (SNP -756A>G or rs2021837, SNP -478A>T or rs41309790, and SNP -205 C>G or rs74124371 exist in the proximal FasL promoter. In the current study, we established three major FasL hyplotypes in humans. Interestingly, a transcription motif search revealed that the FasL promoter possessed two consensus T-cell factor (TCF/LEF1 binding elements (TBEs, which is either polymorphic (SNP -205C>G or close to the functional SNP -844C>T. Subsequently, we demonstrate that both FasL TBEs formed complexes with the TCF-4 and β-catenin transcription factors in vitro and in vivo. Co-transfection of LEF-1 and β-catenin transcription factors significantly increased FasL promoter activities, suggesting that FasL is a target gene of the β-catenin/T-cell factor pathway. More importantly, we found that the rare allele (-205G of the polymorphic FasL TBE (SNP -205C>G failed to bind the TCF-4 transcription factor and that SNP -205 C>G significantly affected the promoter activity. Furthermore, promoter reporter assays revealed that FasL SNP haplotypes influenced promoter activities in human colon cancer cells and in human T cells. Finally, β-catenin knockdown significantly decreased the FasL expression in human SW480 colon cancer cells. Collectively, our data suggest that β-catenin may be involved in FasL gene regulation and that FasL expression is influenced by FasL SNP haplotypes, which may have significant implications in immune response and tumorigenesis.

  1. miR-1271 promotes non-small-cell lung cancer cell proliferation and invasion via targeting HOXA5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yongfang; Xu, Lianhong; Jiang, Lixin, E-mail: jianglx66766@163.com

    2015-03-13

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short, non-coding RNAs (∼22 nt) that play important roles in the pathogenesis of human diseases by negatively regulating numerous target genes at posttranscriptional level. However, the role of microRNAs in lung cancer, particularly non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), has remained elusive. In this study, two microRNAs, miR-1271 and miR-628, and their predicted target genes were identified differentially expressed in NSCLC by analyzing the miRNA and mRNA expression data from NSCLC tissues and their matching normal controls. miR-1271 and its target gene HOXA5 were selected for further investigation. CCK-8 proliferation assay showed that the cell proliferation was promoted by miR-1271 in NSCLC cells, while miR-1271 inhibitor could significantly inhibited the proliferation of NSCLC cells. Interestingly, migration and invasion assay indicated that overexpression of miR-1271 could significantly promoted the migration and invasion of NSCLC cells, whereas miR-1271 inhibitor could inhibited both cell migration and invasion of NSCLC cells. Western blot showed that miR-1271 suppressed the protein level of HOXA5, and luciferase assays confirmed that miR-1271 directly bound to the 3'untranslated region of HOXA5. This study indicated indicate that miR-1271 regulates NSCLC cell proliferation and invasion, via the down-regulation of HOXA5. Thus, miR-1271 may represent a potential therapeutic target for NSCLC intervention. - Highlights: • Overexpression of miR-1271 promoted proliferation and invasion of NSCLC cells. • miR-1271 inhibitor inhibited the proliferation and invasion of NSCLC cells. • miR-1271 targets 3′ UTR of HOXA5 in NSCLC cells. • miR-1271 negatively regulates HOXA5 in NSCLC cells.

  2. miR-1271 promotes non-small-cell lung cancer cell proliferation and invasion via targeting HOXA5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short, non-coding RNAs (∼22 nt) that play important roles in the pathogenesis of human diseases by negatively regulating numerous target genes at posttranscriptional level. However, the role of microRNAs in lung cancer, particularly non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), has remained elusive. In this study, two microRNAs, miR-1271 and miR-628, and their predicted target genes were identified differentially expressed in NSCLC by analyzing the miRNA and mRNA expression data from NSCLC tissues and their matching normal controls. miR-1271 and its target gene HOXA5 were selected for further investigation. CCK-8 proliferation assay showed that the cell proliferation was promoted by miR-1271 in NSCLC cells, while miR-1271 inhibitor could significantly inhibited the proliferation of NSCLC cells. Interestingly, migration and invasion assay indicated that overexpression of miR-1271 could significantly promoted the migration and invasion of NSCLC cells, whereas miR-1271 inhibitor could inhibited both cell migration and invasion of NSCLC cells. Western blot showed that miR-1271 suppressed the protein level of HOXA5, and luciferase assays confirmed that miR-1271 directly bound to the 3'untranslated region of HOXA5. This study indicated indicate that miR-1271 regulates NSCLC cell proliferation and invasion, via the down-regulation of HOXA5. Thus, miR-1271 may represent a potential therapeutic target for NSCLC intervention. - Highlights: • Overexpression of miR-1271 promoted proliferation and invasion of NSCLC cells. • miR-1271 inhibitor inhibited the proliferation and invasion of NSCLC cells. • miR-1271 targets 3′ UTR of HOXA5 in NSCLC cells. • miR-1271 negatively regulates HOXA5 in NSCLC cells

  3. Natural killer cell immunomodulation: targeting activating, inhibitory, and co-stimulatory receptor signaling for cancer immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cariad eChester

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available There is compelling clinical and experimental evidence to suggest natural killer (NK cells play a critical role in the recognition and eradication of tumors. Efforts at using NK cells as antitumor agents began over two decades ago, but recent advances in elucidating NK cell biology have accelerated the development of NK cell-targeting therapeutics. NK cell activation and the triggering of effector functions is governed by a complex set of activating and inhibitory receptors. In the early phases of cancer immune surveillance, NK cells directly identify and lyse cancer cells. Nascent transformed cells elicit NK cell activation and are eliminated. However, as tumors progress, cancerous cells develop immunosuppressive mechanisms that circumvent NK cell-mediated killing, allowing for tumor escape and proliferation. Therapeutic intervention aims to reverse tumor-induced NK cell suppression and sustain NK cells’ tumorlytic capacities. Here, we review tumor-NK cell interactions, discuss the mechanisms by which NK cells generate an antitumor immune response, and discuss NK cell-based therapeutic strategies targeting activating, inhibitory, and costimulatory receptors.

  4. Keratin 15 promoter targets putative epithelial stem cells in the hair follicle bulge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yaping; Lyle, Stephen; Yang, Zaixin; Cotsarelis, George

    2003-11-01

    Putative epithelial stem cells in the hair follicle bulge are thought to play pivotal roles in the homeostasis, aging, and carcinogenesis of the cutaneous epithelium. Elucidating the role of bulge cells in these processes has been hampered by the lack of gene promoters that target this area with specificity. Here we describe the isolation of the mouse keratin 15 (K15) promoter and demonstrate its utility for preferentially targeting hair follicle bulge cells in adult K15/lacZ transgenic mice. We found that patterns of K15 expression and promoter activity changed with age and correlated with levels of differentiation within the cutaneous epithelium; less differentiated keratinocytes in the epidermis of the neonatal mouse and in the bulge area of the adult mouse preferentially expressed K15. These findings demonstrate the utility of the K15 promoter for targeting epithelial stem cells in the hair follicle bulge and set the stage for elucidating the role of bulge cells in skin biology.

  5. CD19-targeted CAR T-cell therapeutics for hematologic malignancies: interpreting clinical outcomes to date.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jae H; Geyer, Mark B; Brentjens, Renier J

    2016-06-30

    Adoptive transfer of T cells genetically modified to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) targeting CD19 has produced impressive results in treating patients with B-cell malignancies. Although these CAR-modified T cells target the same antigen, the designs of CARs vary as well as several key aspects of the clinical trials in which these CARs have been studied. It is unclear whether these differences have any impact on clinical outcome and treatment-related toxicities. Herein, we review clinical results reflecting the investigational use of CD19-targeted CAR T-cell therapeutics in patients with B-cell hematologic malignancies, in light of differences in CAR design and production, and outline the limitations inherent in comparing outcomes between studies. PMID:27207800

  6. Molecular imaging to target transplanted muscle progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutpell, Kelly; McGirr, Rebecca; Hoffman, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a severe genetic neuromuscular disorder that affects 1 in 3,500 boys, and is characterized by progressive muscle degeneration. In patients, the ability of resident muscle satellite cells (SCs) to regenerate damaged myofibers becomes increasingly inefficient. Therefore, transplantation of muscle progenitor cells (MPCs)/myoblasts from healthy subjects is a promising therapeutic approach to DMD. A major limitation to the use of stem cell therapy, however, is a lack of reliable imaging technologies for long-term monitoring of implanted cells, and for evaluating its effectiveness. Here, we describe a non-invasive, real-time approach to evaluate the success of myoblast transplantation. This method takes advantage of a unified fusion reporter gene composed of genes (firefly luciferase [fluc], monomeric red fluorescent protein [mrfp] and sr39 thymidine kinase [sr39tk]) whose expression can be imaged with different imaging modalities. A variety of imaging modalities, including positron emission tomography (PET), single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), optical imaging, and high frequency 3D-ultrasound are now available, each with unique advantages and limitations. Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) studies, for example, have the advantage of being relatively low cost and high-throughput. It is for this reason that, in this study, we make use of the firefly luciferase (fluc) reporter gene sequence contained within the fusion gene and bioluminescence imaging (BLI) for the short-term localization of viable C2C12 myoblasts following implantation into a mouse model of DMD (muscular dystrophy on the X chromosome [mdx] mouse). Importantly, BLI provides us with a means to examine the kinetics of labeled MPCs post-implantation, and will be useful to track cells repeatedly over time and following migration. Our reporter gene approach further allows us to merge multiple imaging modalities in a single living

  7. XPC Lys939Gln polymorphism is associated with the decreased response to platinum based chemotherapy in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Xiao-li; CHENG Lu; LU Zu-hong; SUN Xin-chen; CHEN Bao-an; SUN Ning; CHENG Hong-yan; LI Fan; ZHANG Hong-ming; FENG Ji-feng; QIN Shu-kui

    2010-01-01

    Background Platinum-based chemotherapeutics are the most common regimens for advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients, and genetic factors are thought to represent important determinants of drug efficacy. We prospectively assessed the status of the XPC Ala499Val and Lys939GIn gene polymorphisms and investigated whether these SNPs can predict the response to cisplatin/carboplatin-based regimens in advanced NSCLC patients in a Chinese population.Methods The treatment outcomes of 96 advanced NSCLC patients who were treated with platinum-based chemotherapy were evaluated. The polymorphic status of xeroderma pigmentosum group C (XPC) gene was genotyped by the 3-D polyacrylamide gel-based DNA microarray method.Results The distributions of XPC Lys939GIn genotypes differed significantly between the response group (complete +partial responses) and the non-response group (stable + progressive disease; P=0.022). The heterozygous A/C genotype carriers had a poorer response rate than the wild A/A genotype carriers in stage Ⅲ (OR, 0.074; 95% CI,0.008-0.704; P=0.023). The XPC Ala499Val polymorphisms were not associated with response to platinum-based chemotherapy.Conclusion Polymorphisms of the XPC gene, Lys939GIn, may be a predictive marker of treatment response for advanced NSCLC patients in stage Ⅲ.

  8. Pro187Ser Polymorphism of NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 and Prognosis of Non-small Cell Lung Cancer after Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Si Yeol; Yoon, Sang Min; Shin, Seong Soo; Ahn, Seung Do; Lee, Jung Shin; Choi, Eun Kyung [University of Ulsan, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Heon Joo [Inha University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Yun Chul; Kim, Jin Hee; Park, Charn Il and others [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) has been known to function on reduction of oxidative status as a cytosolic flavoenzyme that catalyzes the electron reduction of substrates. It was reported to play a role in the prognosis of lung cancer patients treated with chemotherapy. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) make up about ninety percent of human DNA polymorphisms, and they are a major focus of study about the individual differences for the risk of cancer and for anti-cancer treatment. A point mutation in exon 6 of the NQO1 gene is a C-to-T base pair substitution at position 609 of the NQO1 cDNA, and this codes for a proline-to-serine change at position 187 in the amino acid sequence of the protein. We hypothesized that NQO1 polymorphism could have an adverse influence on the survival of NSCLC patients treated with radiation therapy and/or surgery, and so we tried to discover whether the NQO1 polymorphism could be a predictive or prognostic marker for determining treatment outcome of radiotherapy in nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients.

  9. Association of Polymorphisms in X-Ray Repair Cross Complementing 1 Gene and Risk of Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma in a Chinese Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Xia Yun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To investigate the association between three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the X-ray repair cross complementing 1 gene (XRCC1 and the risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC in Chinese population. Methods. A case-control study including 381 primary ESCC patients recruited from hospital and 432 normal controls matched with patients by age and gender from Chinese Han population was conducted. The genotypes of three XRCC1 polymorphisms at −77T>C (T-77C, codon 194 (Arg194Trp, and codon 399 (Arg399Gln were studied by means of polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism techniques (PCR-RFLP. Unconditional logistic regression model and haplotype analysis were used to estimate associations of these three SNPs in XRCC1 gene with ESCC risk. Results. Polymorphisms at these three sites in XRCC1 gene were not found to be associated with risk for developing ESCC; however the haplotype Ccodon 194Gcodon 399C-77T>C was significantly associated with reduced risk of ESCC (OR: 0.62, 95% CI: 0.40–0.96 upon haplotype analysis. Conclusion. These results suggested that the gene-gene interactions might play vital roles in the progression on esophageal cancer in Chinese Han population and it would be necessary to confirm these findings in a large and multiethnic population.

  10. Association of HMGB1 polymorphisms with outcome after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kornblit, Brian Thomas; Masmas, Tania; Petersen, Søren;

    2010-01-01

    activation of antigen presenting cells (APCs) and propagation of inflammation. HMGB1 is implicated in the pathophysiology of a variety of inflammatory diseases, and we have recently found the variation in the HMGB1 gene to be associated with mortality in patients with systemic inflammatory response syndrome......Several studies have demonstrated that genetic variation in cytokine genes can modulate the immune reactions after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). High mobility group box 1 protein (HMBG1) is a pleiotropic cytokine that functions as a pro-inflammatory signal, important for the...

  11. Chemosensitization of cancer cells by siRNA using targeted nanogel delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemoresistance is a major obstacle in cancer treatment. Targeted therapies that enhance cancer cell sensitivity to chemotherapeutic agents have the potential to increase drug efficacy while reducing toxic effects on untargeted cells. Targeted cancer therapy by RNA interference (RNAi) is a relatively new approach that can be used to reversibly silence genes in vivo by selectively targeting genes such as the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), which has been shown to increase the sensitivity of cancer cells to taxane chemotherapy. However, delivery represents the main hurdle for the broad development of RNAi therapeutics. We report here the use of core/shell hydrogel nanoparticles (nanogels) functionalized with peptides that specially target the EphA2 receptor to deliver small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) targeting EGFR. Expression of EGFR was determined by immunoblotting, and the effect of decreased EGFR expression on chemosensitization of ovarian cancer cells after siRNA delivery was investigated. Treatment of EphA2 positive Hey cells with siRNA-loaded, peptide-targeted nanogels decreased EGFR expression levels and significantly increased the sensitivity of this cell line to docetaxel (P < 0.05). Nanogel treatment of SK-OV-3 cells, which are negative for EphA2 expression, failed to reduce EGFR levels and did not increase docetaxel sensitivity (P > 0.05). This study suggests that targeted delivery of siRNAs by nanogels may be a promising strategy to increase the efficacy of chemotherapy drugs for the treatment of ovarian cancer. In addition, EphA2 is a viable target for therapeutic delivery, and the siRNAs are effectively protected by the nanogel carrier, overcoming the poor stability and uptake that has hindered clinical advancement of therapeutic siRNAs

  12. ALK signaling and target therapy in anaplastic large cell lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio eTabbo

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The discovery by Morris SW et al. in 1994 of the genes contributing to the t(2;5(p23;q35 translocation has put the foundation for a molecular based recognition of Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma (ALCL and pointed out the need for a further stratification of T-cell neoplasia. Likewise the detection of ALK genetic lesions among many human cancers has defined unique subsets of cancer patients, providing new opportunities for innovative therapeutic interventions. The objective of this review is to appraise the molecular mechanisms driving ALK-mediated transformation, and to maintain the neoplastic phenotype. The understanding of these events will allow the design and implementation of novel tailored strategies for a well-defined subset of cancer patients.

  13. In Vitro Assessment of the Inflammatory Breast Cancer Cell Line SUM 149: Discovery of 2 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in the RNase L Gene

    OpenAIRE

    Nokes, Brandon T.; Cunliffe, Heather E; LaFleur, Bonnie; Mount, David W.; Livingston, Robert B.; Bernard W Futscher; Lang, Julie E.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is a rare, highly aggressive form of breast cancer. The mechanism of IBC carcinogenesis remains unknown. We sought to evaluate potential genetic risk factors for IBC and whether or not the IBC cell lines SUM149 and SUM190 demonstrated evidence of viral infection. Methods: We performed single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping for 2 variants of the ribonuclease (RNase) L gene that have been correlated with the risk of prostate cancer due to a ...

  14. In Vitro Assessment of the Inflammatory Breast Cancer Cell Line SUM 149: Discovery of 2 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in the RNase L Gene

    OpenAIRE

    Brandon T. Nokes, Heather E. Cunliffe, Bonnie LaFleur, David W. Mount, Robert B. Livingston, Bernard W. Futscher, Julie E. Lang

    2013-01-01

    Background: Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is a rare, highly aggressive form of breast cancer. The mechanism of IBC carcinogenesis remains unknown. We sought to evaluate potential genetic risk factors for IBC and whether or not the IBC cell lines SUM149 and SUM190 demonstrated evidence of viral infection.Methods: We performed single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping for 2 variants of the ribonuclease (RNase) L gene that have been correlated with the risk of prostate cancer due to a p...

  15. Novel Hedgehog pathway targets against Basal Cell Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Jean Y.; So, Po-Lin; Epstein, Ervin H.

    2006-01-01

    The Hedgehog signaling pathway plays a key role in directing growth and patterning during embryonic development and is required in vertebrates for the normal development of many structures, including the neural tube, axial skeleton, skin, and hair. Aberrant activation of the Hedgehog (Hh) pathway in adult tissue is associated with the development of basal cell carcinoma (BCC), medulloblastoma, and a subset of pancreatic, gastro-intestinal, and other cancers. This review will provide an overvi...

  16. Histone modifications: Targeting head and neck cancer stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    John; M; Le; Cristiane; H; Squarize; Rogerio; M; Castilho

    2014-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma(HNSCC) is the sixth most common cancer worldwide, and is responsible for a quarter of a million deaths annually. The survival rate for HNSCC patients is poor, showing only minor improvement in the last three decades. Despite new surgical techniques and chemotherapy protocols, tumor resistance to chemotherapy remains a significant challenge for HNSCC patients. Numerous mechanisms underlie chemoresistance, including genetic and epigenetic alterations in cancer cells that may be acquired during treatment and activation of mitogenic signaling pathways, such as nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer-of activated B cell, that cause reduced apoptosis. In addition to dysfunctional molecular signaling, emerging evidence reveals involvement of cancer stem cells(CSCs) in tumor development and in tumor resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. These observations have sparked interest in understanding the mechanisms involved in the control of CSC function and fate. Post-translational modifications of histones dynamically influence gene expression independent of alterations to the DNA sequence. Recent findings from our group have shown that pharmacological induction of posttranslational modifications of tumor histones dynamically modulates CSC plasticity. These findings suggest that a better understanding of the biology of CSCs in response to epigenetic switches and pharmacological inhibitors of histone function may directly translate to the development of a mechanism-based strategy to disrupt CSCs. In this review, we present and discuss current knowledge on epigenetic modifications of HNSCC and CSC response to DNA methylation and histone modifications. In addition, we discuss chromatin modifications and their role in tumor resistance to therapy.

  17. The acetylenic tricyclic bis(cyano enone), TBE-31, targets microtubule dynamics and cell polarity in migrating cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Eddie; Saito, Akira; Honda, Tadashi; Di Guglielmo, Gianni M

    2016-04-01

    Cell migration is dependent on the microtubule network for structural support as well as for the proper delivery and positioning of polarity proteins at the leading edge of migrating cells. Identification of drugs that target cytoskeletal-dependent cell migration and protein transport in polarized migrating cells is important in understanding the cell biology of normal and tumor cells and can lead to new therapeutic targets in disease processes. Here, we show that the tricyclic compound TBE-31 directly binds to tubulin and interferes with microtubule dynamics, as assessed by end binding 1 (EB1) live cell imaging. Interestingly, this interference is independent of in vitro tubulin polymerization. Using immunofluorescence microscopy, we also observed that TBE-31 interferes with the polarity of migratory cells. The polarity proteins Rac1, IQGAP and Tiam1 were localized at the leading edge of DMSO-treated migrating cell, but were observed to be in multiple protrusions around the cell periphery of TBE-31-treated cells. Finally, we observed that TBE-31 inhibits the migration of Rat2 fibroblasts with an IC50 of 0.75 μM. Taken together, our results suggest that the inhibition of cell migration by TBE-31 may result from the improper maintenance of cell polarity of migrating cells.

  18. CD8(+ T cells restrict Yersinia pseudotuberculosis infection: bypass of anti-phagocytosis by targeting antigen-presenting cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molly A Bergman

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available All Yersinia species target and bind to phagocytic cells, but uptake and destruction of bacteria are prevented by injection of anti-phagocytic Yop proteins into the host cell. Here we provide evidence that CD8(+ T cells, which canonically eliminate intracellular pathogens, are important for restricting Yersinia, even though bacteria are primarily found in an extracellular locale during the course of disease. In a model of infection with attenuated Y. pseudotuberculosis, mice deficient for CD8(+ T cells were more susceptible to infection than immunocompetent mice. Although exposure to attenuated Y. pseudotuberculosis generated T(H1-type antibody responses and conferred protection against challenge with fully virulent bacteria, depletion of CD8(+ T cells during challenge severely compromised protective immunity. Strikingly, mice lacking the T cell effector molecule perforin also succumbed to Y. pseudotuberculosis infection. Given that the function of perforin is to kill antigen-presenting cells, we reasoned that cell death marks bacteria-associated host cells for internalization by neighboring phagocytes, thus allowing ingestion and clearance of the attached bacteria. Supportive of this model, cytolytic T cell killing of Y. pseudotuberculosis-associated host cells results in engulfment by neighboring phagocytes of both bacteria and target cells, bypassing anti-phagocytosis. Our findings are consistent with a novel function for cell-mediated immune responses protecting against extracellular pathogens like Yersinia: perforin and CD8(+ T cells are critical for hosts to overcome the anti-phagocytic action of Yops.

  19. Targeting Protective Autophagy Exacerbates UV-Triggered Apoptotic Cell Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Hwa Chiou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is activated by various stresses, including DNA damage, and previous studies of DNA damage-induced autophagy have focused on the response to chemotherapeutic drugs, ionizing radiation, and reactive oxygen species. In this study, we investigated the biological significance of autophagic response to ultraviolet (UV irradiation in A549 and H1299 cells. Our results indicated that UV induces on-rate autophagic flux in these cells. Autophagy inhibition resulting from the knockdown of beclin-1 and Atg5 reduced cell viability and enhanced apoptosis. Moreover, we found that ATR phosphorylation was accompanied by microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3B II (LC3B-II expression during the early phases following UV irradiation, which is a well-established inducer of ATR. Knocking down ATR further attenuated the reduction in LC3B-II at early stages in response to UV treatment. Despite the potential role of ATR in autophagic response, reduced ATR expression does not affect autophagy induction during late phases (24 and 48 h after UV treatment. The result is consistent with the reduced ATR phosphorylation at the same time points and suggests that autophagic response at this stage is activated via a distinct pathway. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that autophagy acts as a cytoprotective mechanism against UV-induced apoptosis and that autophagy induction accompanied with apoptosis at late stages is independent of ATR activation.

  20. Screening and identification of a specific peptide for targeting hypoxic hepatoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yiming; Xia, Xiangwen; Wang, Yong; Li, Xin; Zhou, Guofeng; Liang, Huiming; Feng, Gansheng; Zheng, Chuansheng

    2016-08-01

    The biological behaviors of residual hepatoma cells after transarterial embolization therapy, which exist in a hypoxic or even anaerobic tumor microenvironment, differ from the tumor cells under normoxic conditions. This study aimed to use a phage display peptide library for in vivo and in vitro screening to obtain a peptide which could specifically bind to hypoxic hepatoma cells, allowing further targeted diagnosis and treatment for liver cancer. In this study, hypoxic hepatoma cells HepG2 (targeted cells), and normal liver cells HL-7702 (control cells), were utilized to perform three rounds of in vitro screening using a phage-displayed 7-mer peptide library. In addition, hypoxic HepG2 were subcutaneously injected into nude mice to establish a hepatocarcinoma model, followed by performing three rounds of in vivo screening on the phages identified from the in vitro screening. The products from the screening were further identified using ELISA and immunofluorescence staining on cells and tissues. The results indicated that the P11 positive clone had the highest binding effect with hypoxic hepatoma cells. The sequence of the exogenous insert fragment of P11 positive clone was obtained by sequencing: GSTSFSK. The binding assay indicated that GSTSFSK could specifically bind to hypoxic hepatoma cells and hepatocarcinoma tissues. This 7-mer peptide has the potential to be developed as an useful molecular to the targeting diagnosis and treatment of residual hepatoma cells after transarterial chemoembolization. PMID:27381416

  1. Joint Effect of Urinary Total Arsenic Level and VEGF-A Genetic Polymorphisms on the Recurrence of Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Mei Yang

    Full Text Available The results of our previous study suggested that high urinary total arsenic levels were associated with an increased risk of renal cell carcinoma (RCC. Germline genetic polymorphisms might also affect cancer risk and clinical outcomes. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF plays an important role in vasculogenesis and angiogenesis, but the combined effect of these factors on RCC remains unclear. In this study, we explored the association between the VEGF-A -2578C>A, -1498T>C, -1154G>A, -634G>C, and +936C>T gene polymorphisms and RCC. We also evaluated the combined effects of the VEGF-A haplotypes and urinary total arsenic levels on the prognosis of RCC. This case-control study was conducted with 191 RCC patients who were diagnosed with renal tumors on the basis of image-guided biopsy or surgical resections. An additional 376 age- and gender-matched controls were recruited. Concentrations of urinary arsenic species were determined by a high performance liquid chromatography-linked hydride generator and atomic absorption spectrometry. Genotyping was investigated using fluorescent-based TaqMan allelic discrimination. We observed no significant associations between VEGF-A haplotypes and RCC risk. However, the VEGF-A ACGG haplotype from VEGF-A -2578, -1498, -1154, and -634 was significantly associated with an increased recurrence of RCC (OR = 3.34, 95% CI = 1.03-10.91. Urinary total arsenic level was significantly associated with the risk of RCC in a dose-response manner, but it was not related to the recurrence of RCC. The combination of high urinary total arsenic level and VEGF-A risk haplotypes affected the OR of RCC recurrence in a dose-response manner. This is the first study to show that joint effect of high urinary total arsenic and VEGF-A risk haplotypes may influence the risk of RCC recurrence in humans who live in an area without obvious arsenic exposure.

  2. Predictive potential role of GSTs gene polymorphisms in the treatment outcome of advanced non-small cell lung cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Kaixiong; Lin, Qichang; Ding, Haibo; Jin, Yongxu; Chen, Gongping

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the possible association between GSTP1, GSTM1, and GSTT1 polymorphisms and treatment outcome of advanced NSCLC. Between October 2009 and October 2011, a total of 308 patients of NSCLC on stage IIIA, IIIB or IV, treated with cisplatin-based chemotherapy were included. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism was used to genotype the GSTP1 and GSTM1, and GSTT1 polymorphisms. We found that the IIe/Val and Val/Val genotypes of GSTP1 showed...

  3. In silico analysis of Ta9 gene polymorphism in an Iranian Theileria annulata schizont-infected cell line S15 vaccine strain and native isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habibi, G.

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Bovine theileriosis is a tick-borne disease caused by obligate intracellular parasites related to the genus Theileria. Cellular immune responses protect cattle against pathogens through the activation of immune cells. Nowadays, live, attenuated vaccine of Theileria annulata (T. annulata is being produced in Iran and is recommended for active cattle immunization. Detection of the immunogenic antigens and epitopes recognized by CD8+ T Lymphocytes is vital for the development of recombinant and subunit vaccines. Herein, sequences of the genes encoding Ta9, which is an important antigen recognized by bovine CD8+ T cells specific for T. annulata, in Iranian S15 vaccine strains, several Iranian isolates, as well as reference Ta9 DNA sequences registered in GeneBank were compared through polymerase chain reaction (PCR. The obtained data from DNA sequences were analyzed by using "Nucleotide", "Blast n", "BioEdit" and "IEDB" softwares. The results showed high level of variation in nucleotides and amino acids level. The observed polymorphism in Ta9 gene sequences of Iranian vaccine strains and some isolates from Iran demonstrated that this antigen contains polymorphic sequences and is active along with the specific major histocompatibility complex (MHC of the host. Polymorphic sequences and specific epitopes of Ta9 gene for CD8+ T cell provides an explanation for incomplete protection observed after inoculation of heterologous parasites in vaccinated cattle. These results have important implications for the application of Ta9 antigen for developing novel subunit vaccines.

  4. Cell to cell spreading of misfolded proteins as a therapeutic target in motor neuron disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquali, Livia; Lenzi, Paola; Biagioni, Francesca; Siciliano, Gabriele; Fornai, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Despite a number of genetic mutations and molecular mechanisms are recognized to participate in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), such a devastating neurological disorder still lacks a substantial cure. The present manuscript rather than a general overview of potential therapeutic approaches focuses on novel research findings detailing novel molecular mechanisms which appear to be promising for developing future ALS therapeutics. A special emphasis is given to the abnormal autophagy status and to those autophagy substrates which aggregate in the form of misfolded proteins. In fact, as reviewed in the first part of the manuscript, altered autophagy pathway is present in most genetic mutations responsible for familial ALS. These mutations impair clearance of autophagy substrates, which determines accumulation of giant altered mitochondria and misfolded proteins. Therefore, a considerable piece of the review is dedicated to unconventional processing of misfolded proteins leading to unconventional protein secretions which may underlie a prionoid cellto- cell spreading of ALS neuropathology. The intimate mechanisms regulating these steps are analyzed in order to comprehend which potential therapeutic targets might be considered in future studies. At the same time, negative findings concerning recent trials are explained in light of novel disease mechanisms. In the final part of the review the replacement therapy with focal stem cells implantation is discussed in relationship with toxic mechanisms operating in the intercellular space of the spinal cord and motor-related areas. PMID:24934358

  5. Targeting aberrant glutathione metabolism to eradicate human acute myelogenous leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Shanshan; Minhajuddin, Mohammad; Callahan, Kevin P; Balys, Marlene; Ashton, John M; Neering, Sarah J; Lagadinou, Eleni D; Corbett, Cheryl; Ye, Haobin; Liesveld, Jane L; O'Dwyer, Kristen M; Li, Zheng; Shi, Lei; Greninger, Patricia; Settleman, Jeffrey; Benes, Cyril; Hagen, Fred K; Munger, Joshua; Crooks, Peter A; Becker, Michael W; Jordan, Craig T

    2013-11-22

    The development of strategies to eradicate primary human acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) cells is a major challenge to the leukemia research field. In particular, primitive leukemia cells, often termed leukemia stem cells, are typically refractory to many forms of therapy. To investigate improved strategies for targeting of human AML cells we compared the molecular mechanisms regulating oxidative state in primitive (CD34(+)) leukemic versus normal specimens. Our data indicate that CD34(+) AML cells have elevated expression of multiple glutathione pathway regulatory proteins, presumably as a mechanism to compensate for increased oxidative stress in leukemic cells. Consistent with this observation, CD34(+) AML cells have lower levels of reduced glutathione and increased levels of oxidized glutathione compared with normal CD34(+) cells. These findings led us to hypothesize that AML cells will be hypersensitive to inhibition of glutathione metabolism. To test this premise, we identified compounds such as parthenolide (PTL) or piperlongumine that induce almost complete glutathione depletion and severe cell death in CD34(+) AML cells. Importantly, these compounds only induce limited and transient glutathione depletion as well as significantly less toxicity in normal CD34(+) cells. We further determined that PTL perturbs glutathione homeostasis by a multifactorial mechanism, which includes inhibiting key glutathione metabolic enzymes (GCLC and GPX1), as well as direct depletion of glutathione. These findings demonstrate that primitive leukemia cells are uniquely sensitive to agents that target aberrant glutathione metabolism, an intrinsic property of primary human AML cells. PMID:24089526

  6. Susceptibility of adherent versus suspension target cells derived from adherent tissue culture lines to cell-mediated cytotoxicity in rapid 51Cr-release assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preparation of target cells from tissue culture lines which grow adherent to tissue culture vessels is often desirable for tests of cell-mediated cytotoxicity (CMC). In the present study the authors used cells derived from adherent tissue culture lines to compare the merits of suspension vs. adherent target cells in short-term 51Cr-release assays. Cytotoxic activity of murine spleen cells sensitized in vitro against allogeneic spleen cells or syngeneic sarcoma cells was tested with fibroblast or sarcoma target cells. In parallel tests, aliquots of tissue culture lines were detached and used as either suspension or adherent target cells in CMC assays, matching the concentrations of suspension and adherent target cells. In both allogeneic and syngeneic combinations adherent target cells released less 51Cr spontaneously and were more susceptible to CMC than their suspension counterparts. (Auth.)

  7. Preclinical targeting of human T-cell malignancies using CD4-specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-engineered T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinz, K; Liu, H; Golightly, M; Jares, A; Lan, F; Zieve, G W; Hagag, N; Schuster, M; Firor, A E; Jiang, X; Ma, Y

    2016-03-01

    Peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTCLs) are aggressive lymphomas with no effective upfront standard treatment and ineffective options in relapsed disease, resulting in poorer clinical outcomes as compared with B-cell lymphomas. The adoptive transfer of T cells engineered to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) is a promising new approach for treatment of hematological malignancies. However, preclinical reports of targeting T-cell lymphoma with CARs are almost non-existent. Here we have designed a CAR, CD4CAR, which redirects the antigen specificity of CD8+ cytotoxic T cells to CD4-expressing cells. CD4CAR T cells derived from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and cord blood effectively redirected T-cell specificity against CD4+ cells in vitro. CD4CAR T cells efficiently eliminated a CD4+ leukemic cell line and primary CD4+ PTCL patient samples in co-culture assays. Notably, CD4CAR T cells maintained a central memory stem cell-like phenotype (CD8+CD45RO+CD62L+) under standard culture conditions. Furthermore, in aggressive orthotropic T-cell lymphoma models, CD4CAR T cells efficiently suppressed the growth of lymphoma cells while also significantly prolonging mouse survival. Combined, these studies demonstrate that CD4CAR-expressing CD8+ T cells are efficacious in ablating malignant CD4+ populations, with potential use as a bridge to transplant or stand-alone therapy for the treatment of PTCLs.

  8. Specific silencing of the REST target genes in insulin-secreting cells uncovers their participation in beta cell survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, David; Allagnat, Florent; Gesina, Emilie; Caille, Dorothee; Gjinovci, Asllan; Waeber, Gerard; Meda, Paolo; Haefliger, Jacques-Antoine

    2012-01-01

    The absence of the transcriptional repressor RE-1 Silencing Transcription Factor (REST) in insulin-secreting beta cells is a major cue for the specific expression of a large number of genes. These REST target genes were largely ascribed to a function of neurotransmission in a neuronal context, whereas their role in pancreatic beta cells has been poorly explored. To identify their functional significance, we have generated transgenic mice expressing REST in beta cells (RIP-REST mice), and previously discovered that REST target genes are essential to insulin exocytosis. Herein we characterized a novel line of RIP-REST mice featuring diabetes. In diabetic RIP-REST mice, high levels of REST were associated with postnatal beta cell apoptosis, which resulted in gradual beta cell loss and sustained hyperglycemia in adults. Moreover, adenoviral REST transduction in INS-1E cells led to increased cell death under control conditions, and sensitized cells to death induced by cytokines. Screening for REST target genes identified several anti-apoptotic genes bearing the binding motif RE-1 that were downregulated upon REST expression in INS-1E cells, including Gjd2, Mapk8ip1, Irs2, Ptprn, and Cdk5r2. Decreased levels of Cdk5r2 in beta cells of RIP-REST mice further confirmed that it is controlled by REST, in vivo. Using siRNA-mediated knock-down in INS-1E cells, we showed that Cdk5r2 protects beta cells against cytokines and palmitate-induced apoptosis. Together, these data document that a set of REST target genes, including Cdk5r2, is important for beta cell survival. PMID:23029270

  9. Specific silencing of the REST target genes in insulin-secreting cells uncovers their participation in beta cell survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Martin

    Full Text Available The absence of the transcriptional repressor RE-1 Silencing Transcription Factor (REST in insulin-secreting beta cells is a major cue for the specific expression of a large number of genes. These REST target genes were largely ascribed to a function of neurotransmission in a neuronal context, whereas their role in pancreatic beta cells has been poorly explored. To identify their functional significance, we have generated transgenic mice expressing REST in beta cells (RIP-REST mice, and previously discovered that REST target genes are essential to insulin exocytosis. Herein we characterized a novel line of RIP-REST mice featuring diabetes. In diabetic RIP-REST mice, high levels of REST were associated with postnatal beta cell apoptosis, which resulted in gradual beta cell loss and sustained hyperglycemia in adults. Moreover, adenoviral REST transduction in INS-1E cells led to increased cell death under control conditions, and sensitized cells to death induced by cytokines. Screening for REST target genes identified several anti-apoptotic genes bearing the binding motif RE-1 that were downregulated upon REST expression in INS-1E cells, including Gjd2, Mapk8ip1, Irs2, Ptprn, and Cdk5r2. Decreased levels of Cdk5r2 in beta cells of RIP-REST mice further confirmed that it is controlled by REST, in vivo. Using siRNA-mediated knock-down in INS-1E cells, we showed that Cdk5r2 protects beta cells against cytokines and palmitate-induced apoptosis. Together, these data document that a set of REST target genes, including Cdk5r2, is important for beta cell survival.

  10. MicroRNA-944 Affects Cell Growth by Targeting EPHA7 in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Minxia; Zhou, Kecheng; Cao, Yi

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have critical roles in lung tumorigenesis and development. To determine aberrantly expressed miRNAs involved in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and investigate pathophysiological functions and mechanisms, we firstly carried out small RNA deep sequencing in NSCLC cell lines (EPLC-32M1, A549 and 801D) and a human immortalized cell line 16HBE, we then studied miRNA function by cell proliferation and apoptosis. cDNA microarray, luciferase reporter assay and miRNA transfection were used to investigate interaction between the miRNA and target gene. miR-944 was significantly down-regulated in NSCLC and had many putative targets. Moreover, the forced expression of miR-944 significantly inhibited the proliferation of NSCLC cells in vitro. By integrating mRNA expression data and miR-944-target prediction, we disclosed that EPHA7 was a potential target of miR-944, which was further verified by luciferase reporter assay and microRNA transfection. Our data indicated that miR-944 targets EPHA7 in NSCLC and regulates NSCLC cell proliferation, which may offer a new mechanism underlying the development and progression of NSCLC. PMID:27681722

  11. Chitosan cross-linked docetaxel loaded EGF receptor targeted nanoparticles for lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maya, S; Sarmento, Bruno; Lakshmanan, Vinoth-Kumar; Menon, Deepthy; Seabra, Vitor; Jayakumar, R

    2014-08-01

    Lung cancer, associated with the up-regulated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) led to the development of EGFR targeted anticancer therapeutics. The biopolymeric nanoparticles form an outstanding system for the targeted delivery of therapeutic agents. The present work evaluated the in vitro effects of chitosan cross-linked γ-poly(glutamic acid) (γ-PGA) nanoparticles (Nps) loaded with docetaxel (DTXL) and decorated with Cetuximab (CET), targeted to EGFR over-expressing non-small-cell-lung-cancer (NSCLC) cells (A549). CET-DTXL-γ-PGA Nps was prepared by ionic gelation and CET conjugation via EDC/NHS chemistry. EGFR specificity of targeted Nps was confirmed by the higher uptake rates of EGFR +ve A549 cells compared to that of EGFR -ve cells (NIH3T3). The cytotoxicity of Nps quantified using cell based (MTT/LDH) and flowcytometry (Cell-cycle analysis, Annexin V/PI and JC-1) assays showed superior antiproliferative activity of CET-DTXL-γ-PGA Nps over DTXL-γ-PGA Nps. The A549 cells treated with CET-DTXL-γ-PGA NPs underwent a G2/M phase cell cycle arrest followed by reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential of A549 cells, inducing apoptosis and necrosis resulting in enhanced cancer cell death. CET-DTXL-γ-PGA Nps exhibited enhanced cellular internalization and therapeutic activity, by actively targeting EGFR on NSCLC cells and hence could be an effective alternative to non-specific, conventional chemotherapy by increasing its efficiency by many folds. PMID:24950310

  12. Odin (ANKS1A is a Src family kinase target in colorectal cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feller Stephan M

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Src family kinases (SFK are implicated in the development of some colorectal cancers (CRC. One SFK member, Lck, is not detectable in normal colonic epithelium, but becomes aberrantly expressed in a subset of CRCs. Although SFK have been extensively studied in fibroblasts and different types of immune cells, their physical and functional targets in many epithelial cancers remain poorly characterised. Results 64 CRC cell lines were tested for expression of Lck. SW620 CRC cells, which express high levels of Lck and also contain high basal levels of tyrosine phosphorylated (pY proteins, were then analysed to identify novel SFK targets. Since SH2 domains of SFK are known to often bind substrates after phosphorylation by the kinase domain, the LckSH2 was compared with 14 other SH2s for suitability as affinity chromatography reagent. Mass spectrometric analyses of LckSH2-purified pY proteins subsequently identified several proteins readily known as SFK kinase substrates, including cortactin, Tom1L1 (SRCASM, GIT1, vimentin and AFAP1L2 (XB130. Additional proteins previously reported as substrates of other tyrosine kinase were also detected, including the EGF and PDGF receptor target Odin. Odin was further analysed and found to contain substantially less pY upon inhibition of SFK activity in SW620 cells, indicating that it is a formerly unknown SFK target in CRC cells. Conclusion Rapid identification of known and novel SFK targets in CRC cells is feasible with SH2 domain affinity chromatography. The elucidation of new SFK targets like Odin in epithelial cancer cells is expected to lead to novel insight into cancer cell signalling mechanisms and may also serve to indicate new biomarkers for monitoring tumor cell responses to drug treatments.

  13. MicroRNA-145 targets YES and STAT1 in colon cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Lea H; Jacobsen, Anders B; Frankel, Lisa;

    2010-01-01

    miRNA overexpression. Gene Ontology analysis showed an overrepresentation of genes involved in cell death, cellular growth and proliferation, cell cycle, gene expression and cancer. A number of the identified miRNA targets have previously been implicated in cancer, including YES, FSCN1, ADAM17, BIRC2...

  14. Magnetic trapping with simultaneous photoacoustic detection of molecularly targeted rare circulating tumor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Chen-Wei; Xia, Jinjun; Pelivanov, Ivan M.; Hu, Xiaoge; Gao, Xiaohu; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2013-03-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging has been widely used in molecular imaging to detect diseased cells by targeting them with nanoparticle-based contrast agents. However, the sensitivity and specificity are easily degraded because contrast agent signals can be masked by the background. Magnetomotive photoacoustic imaging uses a new type of multifunctional composite particle combining an optically absorptive gold nanorod core and magnetic nanospheres, which can potentially accumulate and concentrate targeted cells while simultaneously enhancing their specific contrast compared to background signals. In this study, HeLa cells molecularly targeted using nanocomposites with folic acid mimicking targeted rare circulating tumor cells (CTCs) were circulated at a 6 ml/min flow rate for trapping and imaging studies. Preliminary results show that the cells accumulate rapidly in the presence of an externally applied magnetic field produced by a dual magnet system. The sensitivity of the current system can reach up to 1 cell/ml in clear water. By manipulating the trapped cells magnetically, the specificity of detecting cells in highly absorptive ink solution can be enhanced with 16.98 dB background suppression by applying motion filtering on PA signals to remove unwanted background signals insensitive to the magnetic field. The results appear promising for future preclinical studies on a small animal model and ultimate clinical detection of rare CTCs in the vasculature.

  15. Identification of CD90 as Putative Cancer Stem Cell Marker and Therapeutic Target in Insulinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buishand, Floryne O; Arkesteijn, Ger J A; Feenstra, Laurien R; Oorsprong, Claire W D; Mestemaker, Margiet; Starke, Achim; Speel, Ernst-Jan M; Kirpensteijn, Jolle; Mol, Jan A

    2016-06-01

    The long-term prognosis after surgical resection of malignant insulinoma (INS) is poor. Novel adjuvant therapies, specifically targeting cancer stem cells (CSCs), are warranted. Therefore, the goal of this study was to characterize and target putative INS CSCs. Using fluorescence-activated cell sorting, human INS cell line CM and pancreatic carcinoid cell line BON1 were screened for the presence of stem cell-associated markers. CD90, CD166, and GD2 were identified as potential CSC markers. Only CD90(+) INS cells had an increased tumor-initiating potential in athymic nude mice. Anti-CD90 monoclonal antibodies decreased the viability and metastatic potential of injected cells in a zebrafish embryo INS xenograft model. Primary INS stained positive for CD90 by immunohistochemistry, however also intratumoral fibroblasts and vascular endothelium showed positive staining. The results of this study suggest that anti-CD90 monoclonals form a potential novel adjuvant therapeutic modality by targeting either INS cells directly, or by targeting the INS microenvironment. PMID:27049037

  16. Amidine-bearing lipoplex targeting to hepatocyte cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yasuya Kudo; Kazunori Koiwai; Kazuhiro Shimizu; Shota Kusuki; Mina Sakuragi; Naohiko Shimada; Yoichi Takeda; Kazuo Sakurai

    2008-01-01

    A lipoplex (i.e., pDNA#1/lipid complex and transfection reagent for pDNA delivery) containing galactosylceramide (GalCer) and an amidine-bearing lipid (TRX) was examined whether the bound pDNA was specifically ingested by hepatocyte via asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR) and then expressed protein. Gel electrophoresis and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) confirmed that the TRX-GalCer liposome#2 complexed with pDNA and the resultant lipoplex took a hexagonally packed inverted cylinder structure when the GalCer composition was less than 20 wt.% of the total lipid. When the lipoplex carrying pGL3 (luciferase-cording pDNA) was administrated to HepG2, the luciferase activity was increased with increasing the GalCer composition until it reached 3 wt.% and then decreased upon further addition of GalCer. When we added galactose itself as a competitor, the luciferase activity was decreased, while glucose did not show such decrease, suggesting that HepG2 ingested the lipoplex via ASGPR-mediated endocytosis. This paper indicated that the hexagonally packed inverted cylinder structures of lipoplex may not always provide excellent transfection and presented a possibility that the TRX lipoplex#3 can obtain a cellular-targeting ability through the receptors for oligosaccharide.

  17. Polymorphisms in miRNA binding site: new insight into small cell lung cancer susceptibility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-yu LIU; Jun CHEN

    2011-01-01

    Lung cancer is a leading cause in cancer-related deaths with less than 15% five-year survival worldwide.Small cell lung cancer (SCLC),which accounts for about 15%-18% of lung cancer,carries the worst prognosis within the lung cancer patients.SCLC differs from other lung cancers,so called non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs),in the specifically clinical and biologic characteristics.It exhibits aggressive behavior,with rapid growth,early spread to distant sites.Although exquisite sensitive to chemotherapy and radiation,SCLC recurs rapidly with only 5% of patients surviving five years and frequent association with distinct paraneoplastic syndromes[1].

  18. Targeting CXCR4 in HIV Cell-Entry Inhibition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steen, Anne; Schwartz, T W; Rosenkilde, M M

    2010-01-01

    CXCR4 and CCR5 constitute the two major coreceptors for HIV-1 entry into host cells. In the course of an HIV-infection, a coreceptor switch takes place in approximately half of the patients - from R5 HIV-1 (CCR5 utilizing) strains to X4 HIV-1 (CXCR4 utilizing) strains. Treatment of HIV......-infected individuals with CXCR4 antagonists delays the onset of AIDS by preventing the CCR5 to CXCR4 coreceptor switch. In addition to the endogenous CXCR4 and CCR5 ligands, other chemokines, for example the human herpesvirus 8 encoded CC-chemokine, vCCL2, and modifications hereof, have proven efficient HIV-1 cell...... no oral bioavailability. The hunt for orally active small-molecule CXCR4 antagonists led to the development of monocyclam-based compounds, and recently to the non-cyclam antagonist AMD070, which is orally active and currently in Phase II clinical trial as anti-HIV treatment. Current review provides...

  19. Targeting NK cells for anti-cancer immunotherapy: clinical and pre-clinical approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian eCarotta

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The recent success of checkpoint blockade has highlighted the potential of immunotherapy approaches for cancer treatment. While the majority of approved immunotherapy drugs target T cell subsets, it is appreciated that other components of the immune system have important roles in tumor immune-surveillance as well and thus represent promising additional targets for immunotherapy. Natural killer cells are the body’s first line of defense against infected or transformed cells as they kill target cells in an antigen-independent manner. Although several studies have clearly demonstrated the active role of NK cells in cancer-immune surveillance, only few clinically approved therapies currently exist that harness their potential. Our increased understanding of NK cell biology over the past few years has renewed the interest in NK cell based anti-cancer therapies, which has lead to a steady increase of NK cell based clinical and pre-clinical trials. Here, the role of NK cells in cancer immunesurveillance is summarized and several novel approaches to enhance NK cell cytotoxicity against cancer are discussed.

  20. Tigecycline targets nonsmall cell lung cancer through inhibition of mitochondrial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Xuefeng; Gu, Zhenfang; Chen, Wenming; Jiao, Junbo

    2016-08-01

    Nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the most common type of lung cancer with a high mortality rate and still remains therapeutically a challenge. A strategy to target NSCLC is to identify agents that are effective against NSCLC cells while sparing normal cells. We show that tigecycline, an FDA-approved antibiotic drug, preferentially targets NSCLC cells. Tigecycline is effective in inhibiting proliferation and inducing apoptosis of multiple cell lines derived from two common NSCLC subtypes: adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. Tigecycline also dose-dependently inhibits colony formation of NSCLC subpopulation of cells with highly proliferative and invasive properties. Compared to NSCLC cells, tigecycline affects proliferation and survival of normal fibroblast cells significantly to a less extent. More importantly, tigecycline significantly inhibits NSCLC tumor growth through decreasing proliferation and increasing apoptosis of tumor cells in vivo. Tigecycline significantly inhibits mitochondrial respiration, mitochondrial membrane potential, and ATP levels and increases reactive oxygen species (ROS), suggesting that tigecycline impairs mitochondrial functions. Our study suggests that tigecycline may be a useful therapeutic agent, and inhibiting mitochondrial functions may represent a new targeted therapy for NSCLC. PMID:27009695

  1. Recombination induced by triple-helix-targeted DNA damage in mammalian cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Faruqi, A F; Seidman, M M; Segal, D J; Carroll, D; Glazer, P M

    1996-01-01

    Gene therapy has been hindered by the low frequency of homologous recombination in mammalian cells. To stimulate recombination, we investigated the use of triple-helix-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) to target DNA damage to a selected site within cells. By treating cells with TFOs linked to psoralen, recombination was induced within a simian virus 40 vector carrying two mutant copies of the supF tRNA reporter gene. Gene conversion events, as well as mutations at the target site, were also obs...

  2. siRNA targeting RBP2 inhibits expression, proliferation, tumorigenicity and invasion in thyroid carcinoma cells

    OpenAIRE

    KONG, LING-LING; MAN, DONG-MEI; Wang, Tian; ZHANG, GUO-AN; Cui, Wen

    2015-01-01

    In order to estimate the effects of small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting retinoblastoma binding protein 2 (RBP2) on the proliferation, expression, invasion, migration and tumorigenicity abilities of papillary thyroid carcinoma K1 cells, siRNA targeting RBP2 (RBP2-siRNA) and negative control siRNA were transfected into K1 cells. The mRNA levels of RBP2 in the transfected cells were estimated by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), and the protein levels of...

  3. Recent advances of novel targeted therapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jed A. Katzel

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Targeted therapies have proven beneficial for patients suffering from a number of different malignancies, including cancers of the head and neck. Cetuximab, a monoclonal antibody targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor has shown benefit in combination with radiation for untreated patients or as a single agent for patients with platinum resistant disease. Cetuximab is the only targeted agent currently approved by the Federal Drug Administration for the treatment of head and neck cancer. A number of other agents have shown promising initial results including intracellular tyrosine kinase inhibitors, agents targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, as well as other classes of novel therapies. Some of the data supporting the use of targeted therapy, including agents not yet approved in head and neck cancer, will be presented in this review. As our understanding of the cancer cell signaling pathways and novel targeted agents increases, the potential for treatment with reduced toxicity and improved clinical outcomes will become a reality.

  4. A novel method for producing target cells and assessing cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity in outbred hosts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bendinelli Mauro

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cytotoxic T lymphocytes play a crucial role in the immunological control of microbial infections and in the design of vaccines and immunotherapies. Measurement of cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity requires that the test antigen is presented by target cells having the same or compatible class I major hystocompatibility complex antigens as the effector cells. Conventional assays use target cells labeled with 51chromium and infer cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity by measuring the isotope released by the target cells lysed following incubation with antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes. This assay is sensitive but needs manipulation and disposal of hazardous radioactive reagents and provides a bulk estimate of the reporter released, which may be influenced by spontaneous release of the label and other poorly controllable variables. Here we describe a novel method for producing target in outbred hosts and assessing cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity by flow cytometry. Results The method consists of culturing skin fibroblasts, immortalizing them with a replication defective clone of simian virus 40, and finally transducing them with a bicistronic vector encoding the target antigen and the reporter green fluorescent protein. When used in a flow cytometry-based assay, the target cells obtained with this method proved valuable for assessing the viral envelope protein specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity in domestic cats acutely or chronically infected with feline immunodeficiency virus, a lentivirus similar to human immunodeficiency virus and used as animal model for AIDS studies. Conclusion Given the versatility of the bicistronic vector used, its ability to deliver multiple and large transgenes in target cells, and its extremely wide cell specificity when pseudotyped with the vesicular stomatitis virus envelope protein, the method is potentially exploitable in many animal species.

  5. From drug response profiling to target addiction scoring in cancer cell models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhagwan Yadav

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Deconvoluting the molecular target signals behind observed drug response phenotypes is an important part of phenotype-based drug discovery and repurposing efforts. We demonstrate here how our network-based deconvolution approach, named target addiction score (TAS, provides insights into the functional importance of druggable protein targets in cell-based drug sensitivity testing experiments. Using cancer cell line profiling data sets, we constructed a functional classification across 107 cancer cell models, based on their common and unique target addiction signatures. The pan-cancer addiction correlations could not be explained by the tissue of origin, and only correlated