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Sample records for cells reactivate snail1

  1. Mesenchymal cells reactivate Snail1 expression to drive three-dimensional invasion programs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rowe, R.G.; Li, X.Y.; Hu, Y.

    2009-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is required for mesodermal differentiation during development. The zinc-finger transcription factor, Snail1, can trigger EMT and is sufficient to transcriptionally reprogram epithelial cells toward a mesenchymal phenotype during neoplasia and fibrosis. Whet...

  2. Snail1 induces epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and tumor initiating stem cell characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dang, Hien; Ding, Wei; Emerson, Dow; Rountree, C Bart

    2011-01-01

    Tumor initiating stem-like cells (TISCs) are a subset of neoplastic cells that possess distinct survival mechanisms and self-renewal characteristics crucial for tumor maintenance and propagation. The induction of epithelial-mesenchymal-transition (EMT) by TGFβ has been recently linked to the acquisition of TISC characteristics in breast cancer. In HCC, a TISC and EMT phenotype correlates with a worse prognosis. In this work, our aim is to elucidate the underlying mechanism by which cells acquire tumor initiating characteristics after EMT. Gene and protein expression assays and Nanog-promoter luciferase reporter were utilized in epithelial and mesenchymal phenotype liver cancer cell lines. EMT was analyzed with migration/invasion assays. TISC characteristics were analyzed with tumor-sphere self-renewal and chemotherapy resistance assays. In vivo tumor assay was performed to investigate the role of Snail1 in tumor initiation. TGFβ induced EMT in epithelial cells through the up-regulation of Snail1 in Smad-dependent signaling. Mesenchymal liver cancer post-EMT demonstrates TISC characteristics such as tumor-sphere formation but are not resistant to cytotoxic therapy. The inhibition of Snail1 in mesenchymal cells results in decreased Nanog promoter luciferase activity and loss of self-renewal characteristics in vitro. These changes confirm the direct role of Snail1 in some TISC traits. In vivo, the down-regulation of Snail1 reduced tumor growth but was not sufficient to eliminate tumor initiation. In summary, TGFβ induces EMT and TISC characteristics through Snail1 and Nanog up-regulation. In mesenchymal cells post-EMT, Snail1 directly regulates Nanog expression, and loss of Snail1 regulates tumor growth without affecting tumor initiation

  3. An analysis of suppressing migratory effect on human urinary bladder cancer cell line by silencing of snail-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, Shima; Mansoori, Behzad; Mohammadi, Ali; Davoudian, Sadaf; Musavi Shenas, Seyed Mohammad Hossein; Shajari, Neda; Majidi, Jafar; Baradaran, Behzad

    2017-12-01

    Snail-1 actively participates in tumor progression, invasion, and migration. Targeting snail-1 expression can suppress the EMT process in cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of snail1 silencing on urinary bladder cancer. Quantitative RT-PCR was used to detect snail-1 and other related metastatic genes expression following siRNA knockdown in urinary bladder cancer EJ-138 cells. The protein level of snail1 was assessed by Western blot. MTT and TUNEL assays were assessed to understand if snail-1 had survival effects on EJ-138 cells. Scratch wound healing assay measured cell motility effects after snail1 suppression. The significant silencing of snail-1 reached 60pmol siRNA in a 48-h post-transfection. The result of scratch assay showed that snail-1 silencing significantly decreased Vimentin, MMPs, and CXCR4 expression; however, expression of E-cadherin was induced. The cell death assay indicated that snail-1 played the crucial role in bladder cancer survival rate. These results propose that snail-1 plays a major role in the progression and migration of urinary bladder cancer, and can be a potential therapeutic target for target therapy of invasive urinary bladder cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Snail1 Expression Is Required for Sarcomagenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Alba-Castellón

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Snail1 transcriptional repressor is a major inducer of epithelial-to mesenchymal transition but is very limitedly expressed in adult animals. We have previously demonstrated that Snail1 is required for the maintenance of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, preventing their premature differentiation. Now, we show that Snail1 controls the tumorigenic properties of mesenchymal cells. Increased Snail1 expression provides tumorigenic capabilities to fibroblastic cells; on the contrary, Snail1 depletion decreases tumor growth. Genetic depletion of Snail1 in MSCs that are deficient in p53 tumor suppressor downregulates MSC markers and prevents the capability of these cells to originate sarcomas in immunodeficient SCID mice. Notably, an analysis of human sarcomas shows that, contrarily to epithelial tumors, these neoplasms display high Snail1 expression. This is particularly clear for undifferentiated tumors, which are associated with poor outcome. Together, our results indicate a role for Snail1 in the generation of sarcomas.

  5. Combined detection of Twist1, Snail1 and squamous cell carcinoma antigen for the prognostic evaluation of invasion and metastasis in cervical squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huilun; Hu, Haiyang; Gou, Yanling; Hu, Yuhong; Li, Hui; Zhao, Hongwei; Wang, Beidi; Li, Peiling; Zhang, Zongfeng

    2018-04-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the most common malignant tumours of the female reproductive system, ranking second only to breast cancer in morbidity worldwide. Essential features of the progression of cervical cancer are invasion and metastasis, which are closely related to disease prognosis and mortality rate. At the present time there is no effective method to evaluate cancer invasion and metastasis before surgery. Here we report our study on molecular changes in biopsy tissue for the prognostic evaluation of cancer invasion and metastasis. Expression of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition-inducing transcription factors Twist1 and Snail1 was detected by immunohistochemistry in 32 normal, 36 low-grade squamous intraepithelial neoplasia (LSIL), 54 high-grade squamous intraepithelial neoplasia (HSIL) and 320 cervical squamous cell carcinoma (CSCC) samples. The correlation between the expression of Twist1, Snail1 and squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCCA) in CSCC tissues and clinical pathology results was evaluated. A transwell migration and invasion assay was used to explore the roles of Twist1 and Snail1 in the invasion of cancer cells. Lymph node metastasis and lymphovascular space invasion (LVSI) rates for the following groups were analysed: SCCA(+) group, Twist1(+) group, Snail1(+) group, Twist1(+)Snail1(+)group, Twist1(+)SCCA(+)group, Snail1(+)SCCA(+)group and Twist1(+)Snail1(+)SCCA(+) group. The expression of Twist1 and Snail1 was significantly upregulated in HSIL and CSCC (p  0.05). The expression of SCCA was associated with LVSI, lymph node metastasis, FIGO stage and histological grade (p  0.05). Twist1 was an independent factor contributing to the invasion ability of cervical cancer cells. In addition, the positive rate of lymph node metastasis and LVSI was higher in the Twist1(+)Snail1(+)SCCA(+) group than in the SCCA(+) group, Twist1(+) group and Snail1(+) group, respectively (p < 0.05). Combined detection of Twist1 and Snail1 in SCCA-positive biopsy

  6. Snail1 induced in breast cancer cells in 3D collagen I gel environment suppresses cortactin and impairs effective invadopodia formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mi-Sook; Kim, Sudong; Kim, Baek Gil; Won, Cheolhee; Nam, Seo Hee; Kang, Suki; Kim, Hye-Jin; Kang, Minkyung; Ryu, Jihye; Song, Haeng Eun; Lee, Doohyung; Ye, Sang-Kyu; Jeon, Noo Li; Kim, Tai Young; Cho, Nam Hoon; Lee, Jung Weon

    2014-09-01

    Although an in vitro 3D environment cannot completely mimic the in vivo tumor site, embedding tumor cells in a 3D extracellular matrix (ECM) allows for the study of cancer cell behaviors and the screening of anti-metastatic reagents with a more in vivo-like context. Here we explored the behaviors of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells embedded in 3D collagen I. Diverse tumor environmental conditions (including cell density, extracellular acidity, or hypoxia as mimics for a continuous tumor growth) reduced JNKs, enhanced TGFβ1/Smad signaling activity, induced Snail1, and reduced cortactin expression. The reduced JNKs activity blocked efficient formation of invadopodia labeled with actin, cortactin, or MT1-MMP. JNKs inactivation activated Smad2 and Smad4, which were required for Snail1 expression. Snail1 then repressed cortactin expression, causing reduced invadopodia formation and prominent localization of MT1-MMP at perinuclear regions. MDA-MB-231 cells thus exhibited less efficient collagen I degradation and invasion in 3D collagen I upon JNKs inhibition. These observations support a signaling network among JNKs, Smads, Snail1, and cortactin to regulate the invasion of MDA-MB-231 cells embedded in 3D collagen I, which may be targeted during screening of anti-invasion reagents. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Staurosporine augments EGF-mediated EMT in PMC42-LA cells through actin depolymerisation, focal contact size reduction and Snail1 induction – A model for cross-modulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hugo, Honor J; Wafai, Razan; Blick, Tony; Thompson, Erik W; Newgreen, Donald F

    2009-01-01

    A feature of epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) relevant to tumour dissemination is the reorganization of actin cytoskeleton/focal contacts, influencing cellular ECM adherence and motility. This is coupled with the transcriptional repression of E-cadherin, often mediated by Snail1, Snail2 and Zeb1/δEF1. These genes, overexpressed in breast carcinomas, are known targets of growth factor-initiated pathways, however it is less clear how alterations in ECM attachment cross-modulate to regulate these pathways. EGF induces EMT in the breast cancer cell line PMC42-LA and the kinase inhibitor staurosporine (ST) induces EMT in embryonic neural epithelial cells, with F-actin de-bundling and disruption of cell-cell adhesion, via inhibition of aPKC. PMC42-LA cells were treated for 72 h with 10 ng/ml EGF, 40 nM ST, or both, and assessed for expression of E-cadherin repressor genes (Snail1, Snail2, Zeb1/δEF1) and EMT-related genes by QRT-PCR, multiplex tandem PCR (MT-PCR) and immunofluorescence +/- cycloheximide. Actin and focal contacts (paxillin) were visualized by confocal microscopy. A public database of human breast cancers was assessed for expression of Snail1 and Snail2 in relation to outcome. When PMC42-LA were treated with EGF, Snail2 was the principal E-cadherin repressor induced. With ST or ST+EGF this shifted to Snail1, with more extreme EMT and Zeb1/δEF1 induction seen with ST+EGF. ST reduced stress fibres and focal contact size rapidly and independently of gene transcription. Gene expression analysis by MT-PCR indicated that ST repressed many genes which were induced by EGF (EGFR, CAV1, CTGF, CYR61, CD44, S100A4) and induced genes which alter the actin cytoskeleton (NLF1, NLF2, EPHB4). Examination of the public database of breast cancers revealed tumours exhibiting higher Snail1 expression have an increased risk of disease-recurrence. This was not seen for Snail2, and Zeb1/δEF1 showed a reverse correlation with lower expression values being predictive

  8. Staurosporine augments EGF-mediated EMT in PMC42-LA cells through actin depolymerisation, focal contact size reduction and Snail1 induction – A model for cross-modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thompson Erik W

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A feature of epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT relevant to tumour dissemination is the reorganization of actin cytoskeleton/focal contacts, influencing cellular ECM adherence and motility. This is coupled with the transcriptional repression of E-cadherin, often mediated by Snail1, Snail2 and Zeb1/δEF1. These genes, overexpressed in breast carcinomas, are known targets of growth factor-initiated pathways, however it is less clear how alterations in ECM attachment cross-modulate to regulate these pathways. EGF induces EMT in the breast cancer cell line PMC42-LA and the kinase inhibitor staurosporine (ST induces EMT in embryonic neural epithelial cells, with F-actin de-bundling and disruption of cell-cell adhesion, via inhibition of aPKC. Methods PMC42-LA cells were treated for 72 h with 10 ng/ml EGF, 40 nM ST, or both, and assessed for expression of E-cadherin repressor genes (Snail1, Snail2, Zeb1/δEF1 and EMT-related genes by QRT-PCR, multiplex tandem PCR (MT-PCR and immunofluorescence +/- cycloheximide. Actin and focal contacts (paxillin were visualized by confocal microscopy. A public database of human breast cancers was assessed for expression of Snail1 and Snail2 in relation to outcome. Results When PMC42-LA were treated with EGF, Snail2 was the principal E-cadherin repressor induced. With ST or ST+EGF this shifted to Snail1, with more extreme EMT and Zeb1/δEF1 induction seen with ST+EGF. ST reduced stress fibres and focal contact size rapidly and independently of gene transcription. Gene expression analysis by MT-PCR indicated that ST repressed many genes which were induced by EGF (EGFR, CAV1, CTGF, CYR61, CD44, S100A4 and induced genes which alter the actin cytoskeleton (NLF1, NLF2, EPHB4. Examination of the public database of breast cancers revealed tumours exhibiting higher Snail1 expression have an increased risk of disease-recurrence. This was not seen for Snail2, and Zeb1/δEF1 showed a reverse

  9. Nuclear expression of Snail1 in borderline and malignant epithelial ovarian tumours is associated with tumour progression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuhkanen, Hanna; Soini, Ylermi; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Anttila, Maarit; Sironen, Reijo; Hämäläinen, Kirsi; Kukkonen, Laura; Virtanen, Ismo; Mannermaa, Arto

    2009-01-01

    Transcription factor Snail1 has a central role in induction of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). The aim of the present study was to elucidate the expression of Snail1 protein during epithelial ovarian tumourigenesis and to study the association of Snail1 expression with clinicopathological factors and prognosis. Epithelial and stromal fibroblast-like fusiform cells of 14 normal ovarian samples, 21 benign, 24 borderline and 74 malignant epithelial ovarian tumours were studied for Snail1 protein using immunohistochemistry. Nuclei of surface peritoneal cells of normal ovaries (n = 14) were regarded as negative for Snail1. Nuclear expression of Snail1 protein in epithelial ovarian tumours was increased during tumour progression from precursor lesions into carcinomas both in epithelial (p = 0.006) and stromal cells (p = 0.007). Nuclei of benign tumours (n = 21) were negative for Snail1. In borderline tumours (n = 24) occasional positive epithelial cells were found in 2 (8%) samples and in 3 (13%) samples stromal cells were focally positive for Snail1. In carcinomas (n = 74) focal Snail1 staining in epithelial cells was present in 17 (23%) tumours, and in stromal cells in 18 (24%) tumours. Nuclear expression of Snail1 in epithelial or stromal cells was not associated with clinicopathological factors or prognosis. Nuclear Snail1 expression seems to be related to tumour progression, and expression in borderline tumours indicates a role for Snail1 in early epithelial ovarian tumour development. Snail1 also appears to function more generally in tissue remodelling as positive staining was demonstrated in stromal cells

  10. Self-reactive T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Becker, Jürgen C; thor Straten, Per; Andersen, Mads Hald

    2014-01-01

    -proteins expressed in regulatory immune cells have been reported, especially in patients with cancer. The seemingly lack of tolerance toward such proteins is interesting, as it suggests a regulatory function of self-reactive T (srT) cells, which may be important for the fine tuning of the immune system......The immune system is a tightly regulated and complex system. An important part of this immune regulation is the assurance of tolerance toward self-antigens to maintain immune homeostasis. However, in recent years, antigen-specific cellular immune responses toward several normal self....... In particular, surprising has been the description of cytotoxic srT cells that are able to eliminate normal regulatory immune cells. Such srT cells may be important as effector cells that suppress regulatory suppressor cells. The current knowledge of the nature and function of srT cells is still limited. Still...

  11. Host cell reactivation in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lytle, C.D.; Benane, S.G.; Stafford, J.E.

    1976-01-01

    The survival of UV-irradiated herpes simplex virus was determined in cultured Potoroo (a marsupial) and human cells under lighting conditions which promoted photereactivation. Photoreactivation was readily demonstrated for herpes virus in two lines of Potoroo cells with dose reduction factors of 0.7 to 0.8 for ovary cells and 0.5 to 0.7 for kidney cells. Light from Blacklite (near UV) lamps was more effective than from Daylight (mostly visible) lamps, suggesting that near UV radiation was more effecient for photoreactivation in Potoroo cells. The quantitative and qualitative aspects of this photoreactivation were similar to those reported for a similar virus infecting chick embryo cells. UV-survival curves of herpes virus in Potoroo cells indicated a high level of 'dark' host cell reactivation. No photoreactivation was found for UV-irradiated vaccinia virus in Potoroo cells. A similar photoreactivation study was done using special control lighting (lambda>600 nm) and human cells with normal repair and with cells deficient in excision repair (XP). No photoreactivation was found for UV-irradiated herpes virus in either human cell with either Blacklite or Daylight lamps as the sources of photoreactivating light. This result contrasts with a report of photoreactivation for a herpes virus in the same XP cells using incandescent lamps. (author)

  12. Monoclonal antibodies reactive with hairy cell leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, L; Shaw, A; Slupsky, J; Vos, H; Poppema, S

    Monoclonal antibodies reactive with hairy cell leukemia were developed to aid in the diagnosis of this subtype of B cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia and to gain better insight into the origin of hairy cells. Three antibodies were found to be of value in the diagnosis of hairy cell leukemia.

  13. Water reactive hydrogen fuel cell power system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Andrew P; Melack, John M; Lefenfeld, Michael

    2014-01-21

    A water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes devices and methods to combine reactant fuel materials and aqueous solutions to generate hydrogen. The generated hydrogen is converted in a fuel cell to provide electricity. The water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes a fuel cell, a water feed tray, and a fuel cartridge to generate power for portable power electronics. The removable fuel cartridge is encompassed by the water feed tray and fuel cell. The water feed tray is refillable with water by a user. The water is then transferred from the water feed tray into a fuel cartridge to generate hydrogen for the fuel cell which then produces power for the user.

  14. Reciprocal Regulation between DNA-PKcs and Snail1 Conferring Genomic Instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Haeng Ran; Lee, Hae June; Jin, Yeung Bae; Bae, Sang Woo; Lee, Yun Sil; Kim, Nam Hee; Kim, Hyun Sil; Nam, Hyung Wook; Yook, Jong In

    2010-01-01

    Although the roles of DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) involving non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) of DNA repair are well recognized, the biological mechanisms and regulators by which DNA-PKcs regulate genomic instability are not clearly defined. We show herein that DNA-PKcs activity resulting from DNA damage caused by ionizing radiation (IR) phosphorylates Snail1 at serine 100, which results in increased Snail1 expression and its function by inhibition of GSK-3-mediated phosphorylation. Furthermore, Snail1 phosphorylated at serine 100 can reciprocally inhibit kinase activity of DNA-PKcs, resulting in an inhibition to recruit DNA-PKcs or Ku70/80 to a DNA double-strand break site, and ultimately inhibition of DNA repair activity. The impairment of repair activity by a direct interaction between Snail1 and DNA-PKcs increases the resistance to DNA damaging agents, such as IR, and genomic instability. Our findings provide a novel cellular mechanism for induction of genomic instability by reciprocal regulation of DNA-PKcs and Snail1

  15. Species comparison of inflammatory cell reactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boncavage-Hennessey, E.M.; Twerdok, L.E. [Geo-Centers, Inc., Frederick, MD (United States); Finch, R.A.; Gardner, H.S. [Army Biomedical Research and Development Lab., Frederick, MD (United States)

    1994-12-31

    In comparison to the use of rodent models, the use of fish as a potential model to predict immune dysfunction in response to environmental contaminants is a relatively new concept. The development of a fish model for immunotoxicity is possible due to the phylogenetic conservation of many immune functions. The authors have compared mononuclear cell reactivity following in vitro stimulation among five species; Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes), rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), DBA/2 mice, Sprague-Dawley rats and human ML-1 cells. Mononuclear cells were isolated from the rodent bone marrow and from the teleost anterior kidney (the cell population which most closely resembles mammalian hematopoietic tissue). ML-1 cells are a myeloblastic cell line that were differentiated in vitro to monocytes/macrophages. Cell populations were characterized by myeloperoxidase and nonspecific esterase staining characteristic. Reactive oxidant production following in vitro stimulation by phorbol ester was measured using the following methods: reduction of cytochrome c (detection of extracellular superoxide), reduction of nitroblue tetrazolium (detection of intracellular superoxide) and oxidation of phenol red in the presence of horseradish peroxidase (hydrogen peroxide production). In general, teleost cells demonstrated higher superoxide anion production and mammalian cells produced higher quantities of hydrogen peroxide.

  16. Host cell reactivation and UV-enhanced reactivation in synchronized mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lytle, C.D.; Schmidt, B.J.

    1981-01-01

    Does host cell reactivation (HCR) or UV-enhanced reactivation (UVER) of UV-irradiated Herpes simplex virus (UV-HSV) vary during the host mammalian cell cycle. The answer could be useful for interpreting UVER and or the two-component nature of the UV-HSV survival curve. Procedures were developed for infection of mitotically-synchronized CV-l monkey kidney cells. All virus survival curves determined at different cell cycle stages had two components with similar D 0 's and intercepts of the second components. Thus, no single stage of the host cell cycle was responsible for the second component of the virus survival curve. When the cells were UV-irradiated immediately prior to infection, enhanced survival of UV-HSV occurred for cell irradiation and virus infection initiated during late G 1 early S phase or late S early G 2 phase but not during early G 1 phase. For infection delayed by 24 h after cell irradiation, UVER was found at all investigated times. These results indicate that: (1) HCR is similar at all stages of the host cell cycle: and (2) the ''induction'' of UVER is not as rapid for cell-irradiation in early G 1 phase. This latter observation may be one reason why normal, contact-inhibited cells do not express UVER as rapidly as faster growing, less contact-inhibited cells. (author)

  17. Novel understanding of self-reactive T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads Hald

    2016-01-01

    In a recent issue of Immunity, Mark Davis and colleagues describe that thymic selection does not eliminate but prunes self-reactive T cell clones. Self-reactive T cells are a natural part of the T-cell repertoire and may be important in the fight against pathogens in addition to being important...

  18. Auto-reactive T cells revised. Overestimation based on methodology?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorlacius-Ussing, Gorm; Sørensen, Jesper F; Wandall, Hans H

    2015-01-01

    . Thus, T cell antigen reactivities identified with unmodified antigens in vitro may in part represent in vitro T cell activation against neo-epitopes and not true in vivo autoreactivity as postulated. This methodological problem may have implications for the interpretation of the frequent reporting...... methodology applied to document T cell reactivity against unmodified protein or peptide may lead to overinterpretation of the reported frequencies of autoreactive CD4+ and CD8+ T cells....

  19. Molecular mechanisms of 3,3′4,4′,5-pentachlorobiphenyl-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Li; Guo, Linlin; Li, Zhuoyu

    2017-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are classic persistent organic pollutants (POPs). Many studies have found a positive association between the progression of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and PCBs exposure. However, the influence of PCBs on epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of HCC remains to be unclear. In this study, we explored the effect of PCB126 on EMT in HCC cells and its underlying mechanisms. The data showed that PCB126, exposing both Bel-7402 and SMMC-7721 cells for 48 h, promoted EMT that was demonstrated by E-cadherin repression, up-regulation of N-cadherin and vimentin, and morphological alteration. We found that signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3)/Snail1 signaling was activated after PCB126 exposure, and the addition of STAT3 inhibitor WP1066 blocked PCB126-induced down-regulation of E-cadherin as well as up-regulation of N-cadherin and vimentin. Moreover, PCB126 exposure increased pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) expression and its nuclear translocation, whereas treatment with PKM2 shRNA suppressed the activation of STAT3/Snail1 signaling and the alternation of EMT-related molecules (E-cadherin, N-cadherin and vimentin). Furthermore, this study indicated estrogen receptor (ER) and aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) were involved in PCB126-induced effects on PKM2, STAT3/Snail1 signaling and EMT by according treatment using ER inhibitor ICI and AhR shRNA. Notably, PCB126-increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production via AhR is associated with activation of PKM2/STAT3/Snail1 cascades and contributes to EMT. Taken together, these results indicated that PCB126 promotes EMT process of HCC cells via PKM2/STAT3/Snail1 signaling which is mediated by ER and AhR. - Highlights: • PCB126 promotes epithelial-mesenchymal transition of HCC cells. • PCB126 regulates EMT through the activation of STAT3/Snail1 signaling. • PKM2 is responsible for PCB126-induced activation of STAT3/Snail1 signaling. • AhR-induced ROS generation regulates

  20. Molecular mechanisms of 3,3′4,4′,5-pentachlorobiphenyl-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Li; Guo, Linlin [Institute of Biotechnology, Key Laboratory of Chemical Biology and Molecular Engineering of National Ministry of Education, Shanxi University, Taiyuan 030006 (China); Li, Zhuoyu, E-mail: lzy@sxu.edu.cn [Institute of Biotechnology, Key Laboratory of Chemical Biology and Molecular Engineering of National Ministry of Education, Shanxi University, Taiyuan 030006 (China); College of Life Science, Zhejiang Chinese Medical University, Hangzhou 310053 (China)

    2017-05-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are classic persistent organic pollutants (POPs). Many studies have found a positive association between the progression of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and PCBs exposure. However, the influence of PCBs on epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of HCC remains to be unclear. In this study, we explored the effect of PCB126 on EMT in HCC cells and its underlying mechanisms. The data showed that PCB126, exposing both Bel-7402 and SMMC-7721 cells for 48 h, promoted EMT that was demonstrated by E-cadherin repression, up-regulation of N-cadherin and vimentin, and morphological alteration. We found that signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3)/Snail1 signaling was activated after PCB126 exposure, and the addition of STAT3 inhibitor WP1066 blocked PCB126-induced down-regulation of E-cadherin as well as up-regulation of N-cadherin and vimentin. Moreover, PCB126 exposure increased pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) expression and its nuclear translocation, whereas treatment with PKM2 shRNA suppressed the activation of STAT3/Snail1 signaling and the alternation of EMT-related molecules (E-cadherin, N-cadherin and vimentin). Furthermore, this study indicated estrogen receptor (ER) and aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) were involved in PCB126-induced effects on PKM2, STAT3/Snail1 signaling and EMT by according treatment using ER inhibitor ICI and AhR shRNA. Notably, PCB126-increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production via AhR is associated with activation of PKM2/STAT3/Snail1 cascades and contributes to EMT. Taken together, these results indicated that PCB126 promotes EMT process of HCC cells via PKM2/STAT3/Snail1 signaling which is mediated by ER and AhR. - Highlights: • PCB126 promotes epithelial-mesenchymal transition of HCC cells. • PCB126 regulates EMT through the activation of STAT3/Snail1 signaling. • PKM2 is responsible for PCB126-induced activation of STAT3/Snail1 signaling. • AhR-induced ROS generation regulates

  1. UV-enhanced reactivation in mammalian cells: increase by caffeine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lytle, C.D.; Iacangelo, A.L.; Lin, C.H.; Goddard, J.G.

    1981-01-01

    It has been reported that caffeine decreases UV-enhanced reactivation of UV-irradiated Herpes simplex virus in CV-l monkey kidney cells. That occurred when there was no delay between cell irradiation and virus infection. In the present study, virus infection was delayed following cell irradiation to allow an 'induction' period separate from the 'expression' period which occurs during the virus infection. Thus, the effects of caffeine on 'induction' and 'expression' could be determined separately. Caffeine increased the expression of UV-enhanced reactivation, while causing a small decrease in the 'induction' of enhanced reactivation. (author)

  2. Hot gas flow cell for optical measurements on reactive gases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grosch, Helge; Fateev, Alexander; Nielsen, Karsten Lindorff

    2013-01-01

    A new design is presented for a gas flow cell for reactive gases at high temperatures. The design features three heated sections that are separated by flow windows. This design avoids the contact of reactive gases with the material of the exchangeable optical windows. A gas cell with this design ......-resolution measurements are presented for the absorption cross-section of sulfur dioxide (SO2) in the UV range up to 773 K (500 degrees C)...

  3. Reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide signaling in bystander cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jella, Kishore Kumar; Moriarty, Roisin; McClean, Brendan; Byrne, Hugh J; Lyng, Fiona M

    2018-01-01

    It is now well accepted that radiation induced bystander effects can occur in cells exposed to media from irradiated cells. The aim of this study was to follow the bystander cells in real time following addition of media from irradiated cells and to determine the effect of inhibiting these signals. A human keratinocyte cell line, HaCaT cells, was irradiated (0.005, 0.05 and 0.5 Gy) with γ irradiation, conditioned medium was harvested after one hour and added to recipient bystander cells. Reactive oxygen species, nitric oxide, Glutathione levels, caspase activation, cytotoxicity and cell viability was measured after the addition of irradiated cell conditioned media to bystander cells. Reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide levels in bystander cells treated with 0.5Gy ICCM were analysed in real time using time lapse fluorescence microscopy. The levels of reactive oxygen species were also measured in real time after the addition of extracellular signal-regulated kinase and c-Jun amino-terminal kinase pathway inhibitors. ROS and glutathione levels were observed to increase after the addition of irradiated cell conditioned media (0.005, 0.05 and 0.5 Gy ICCM). Caspase activation was found to increase 4 hours after irradiated cell conditioned media treatment (0.005, 0.05 and 0.5 Gy ICCM) and this increase was observed up to 8 hours and there after a reduction in caspase activation was observed. A decrease in cell viability was observed but no major change in cytotoxicity was found in HaCaT cells after treatment with irradiated cell conditioned media (0.005, 0.05 and 0.5 Gy ICCM). This study involved the identification of key signaling molecules such as reactive oxygen species, nitric oxide, glutathione and caspases generated in bystander cells. These results suggest a clear connection between reactive oxygen species and cell survival pathways with persistent production of reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide in bystander cells following exposure to irradiated cell

  4. Formation of reactive oxygen species in rat epithelial cells upon ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In our study, we investigated the influence of fly ash on the promotion of early inflammatory reactions like the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in rat lung epithelial cells (RLE-6TN). Furthermore, we determined the formation of nitric oxide (NO). The cells show a clear dose-response relationship concerning the ...

  5. Human monoclonal antibodies reactive with human myelomonocytic leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posner, M R; Santos, D J; Elboim, H S; Tumber, M B; Frackelton, A R

    1989-04-01

    Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from a patient with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), in remission, were depleted of CD8-positive T-cells and cultured with Epstein-Barr virus. Four of 20 cultures (20%) secreted human IgG antibodies selectively reactive with the cell surfaces of certain human leukemia cell lines. Three polyclonal, Epstein-Barr virus-transformed, B-cell lines were expanded and fused with the human-mouse myeloma analogue HMMA2.11TG/O. Antibody from secreting clones HL 1.2 (IgG1), HL 2.1 (IgG3), and HL 3.1 (IgG1) have been characterized. All three react with HL-60 (promyelocytic), RWLeu4 (CML promyelocytic), and U937 (monocytic), but not with KG-1 (myeloblastic) or K562 (CML erythroid). There is no reactivity with T-cell lines, Burkitt's cell lines, pre-B-leukemia cell lines, or an undifferentiated CML cell line, BV173. Leukemic cells from two of seven patients with acute myelogenous leukemia and one of five with acute lymphocytic leukemia react with all three antibodies. Normal lymphocytes, monocytes, polymorphonuclear cells, red blood cells, bone marrow cells, and platelets do not react. Samples from patients with other diverse hematopoietic malignancies showed no reactivity. Immunoprecipitations suggest that the reactive antigen(s) is a lactoperoxidase iodinatable series of cell surface proteins with molecular weights of 42,000-54,000 and a noniodinatable protein with a molecular weight of 82,000. Based on these data these human monoclonal antibodies appear to react with myelomonocytic leukemic cells and may detect a leukemia-specific antigen or a highly restricted differentiation antigen.

  6. Generation of memory B cells and their reactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Takeshi; Moran, Imogen; Shinnakasu, Ryo; Phan, Tri Giang; Kurosaki, Tomohiro

    2018-05-01

    The successful establishment of humoral memory response depends on at least two layers of defense. Pre-existing protective antibodies secreted by long-lived plasma cells act as a first line of defense against reinfection ("constitutive humoral memory"). Previously, a second line of defense in which pathogen-experienced memory B cells are rapidly reactivated to produce antibodies ("reactive humoral memory"), was considered as simply a back-up system for the first line (particularly for re-infection with homologous viruses). However, in the case of re-infection with similar but different strains of viruses, or in response to viral escape mutants, the reactive humoral memory plays a crucial role. Here, we review recent progress in our understanding of how memory B cells are generated in the pre-GC stage and during the GC reaction, and how these memory B cells are robustly reactivated with the help of memory Tfh cells to generate the secondary antibody response. In addition, we discuss how these advances may be relevant to the quest for a vaccine that can induce broadly reactive antibodies against influenza and HIV. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Pathogen-Reactive T Helper Cell Analysis in the Pig

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friederike Ebner

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available There is growing interest in studying host–pathogen interactions in human-relevant large animal models such as the pig. Despite the progress in developing immunological reagents for porcine T cell research, there is an urgent need to directly assess pathogen-specific T cells—an extremely rare population of cells, but of upmost importance in orchestrating the host immune response to a given pathogen. Here, we established that the activation marker CD154 (CD40L, known from human and mouse studies, identifies also porcine antigen-reactive CD4+ T lymphocytes. CD154 expression was upregulated early after antigen encounter and CD4+CD154+ antigen-reactive T cells coexpressed cytokines. Antigen-induced expansion and autologous restimulation enabled a time- and dose-resolved analysis of CD154 regulation and a significantly increased resolution in phenotypic profiling of antigen-responsive cells. CD154 expression identified T cells responding to staphylococcal Enterotoxin B superantigen stimulation as well as T cells responding to the fungus Candida albicans and T cells specific for a highly prevalent intestinal parasite, the nematode Ascaris suum during acute and trickle infection. Antigen-reactive T cells were further detected after immunization of pigs with a single recombinant bacterial antigen of Streptococcus suis only. Thus, our study offers new ways to study antigen-specific T lymphocytes in the pig and their contribution to host–pathogen interactions.

  8. Burnup dependence of coolant void reactivity for ACR-1000 cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Tellier, R.; Marleau, G.; Hebert, A.; Roubstov, D.; Altiparmakov, D.; Irish, D.

    2008-01-01

    The Advanced Candu Reactor (ACR-1000) is light water cooled, fueled with enriched uranium and has a smaller lattice pitch than the Candu-6. As a result, the neutronic behavior of the ACR-1000 cell is expected to be somewhat different from that of the Candu-6 leading to a negative coolant void reactivity (CVR). Here we evaluate the CVR for the ACR-1000 cell using the lattice code DRAGON and compare our results with those obtained using the code WIMS-AECL. The differences observed between these two codes for the burnup dependence of the CVR is mainly explained in terms of the specific cell leakage model used by both codes. (authors)

  9. Functional cloning of a gp100-reactive T-cell receptor from vitiligo patient skin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klarquist, Jared; Eby, Jonathan M.; Henning, Steven W.; Li, Mingli; Wainwright, Derek A.; Westerhof, Wiete; Luiten, Rosalie M.; Nishimura, Michael I.; Le Poole, I. Caroline

    2016-01-01

    We isolated gp100-reactive T cells from perilesional skin of a patient with progressive vitiligo with superior reactivity toward melanoma cells compared with tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes 1520, a melanoma-derived T-cell line reactive with the same cognate peptide. After dimer enrichment and limited

  10. Evaluation of two different dendritic cell preparations with BCG reactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fol Marek

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs play a key-role in the immune response against intracellular bacterial pathogens, including mycobacteria. Monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDCs are considered to behave as inflammatory cell populations. Different immunomagnetic methods (positive and negative can be used to purify monocytes before their in vitro differentiation and their culture behavior can be expected to be different. In this study we evaluated the reactivity of two dendritic cell populations towards the Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG antigen. Monocytes were obtained from the blood of healthy donors, using positive and negative immunomagnetic separation methods. The expression of DC-SIGN, CD86, CD80, HLA-DR and CD40 on MoDCs was estimated by flow cytometry. The level of IL-12p70, IL-10 and TNF-α was measured by ELISA. Neither of the tested methods affected the surface marker expression of DCs. No significant alteration in immunological response, measured by cytokine production, was noted either. After BCG stimulation, the absence of IL-12, but the IL-23 production was observed in both cell preparations. Positive and negative magnetic separation methods are effective techniques to optimize the preparation of monocytes as the source of MoDCs for potential clinical application.

  11. Reactivation of fetal hemoglobin in thalassemia and sickle cell disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandro Eridani

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Considerable attention has been recently devoted to mechanisms involved in the perinatal hemoglobin switch, as it was long ago established that the survival of fetal hemoglobin (HbF production in significant amount can reduce the severity of the clinical course in severe disorders like β-thalassemia and sickle cell disease (SCD. For instance, when β-thalassemia is associated with hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin (HPFH the disease takes a mild course, labeled as thalassemia intermedia. The same clinical amelioration occurs for the association between HPFH and SCD. As for the mechanism of this effect, some information has been obtained from the study of natural mutations at the human β-globin locus in patients with increased HbF, like the Corfu thalassemia mutations. Important evidence came from the discovery that drugs capable of improving the clinical picture of SCD, like decitabine ad hydroxycarbamide, are acting through the reactivation, to some extent, of HbF synthesis. The study of the mechanism of action of these compounds was followed by the identification of some genetic determinants, which promote this event. In particular, among a few genetic factors involved in this process, the most relevant appears the BCL11A gene, which is now credited to be able to silence γ-globin genes in the perinatal period by interaction with several erythroid-specific transcription factors and is actually considered as a barrier to HbF reactivation by known HbF inducing agents. Epigenetics is also a player in the process, mainly through DNA demethylation. This is certified by the recent demonstration that hypomethylating agents such as 5-azacytidine and decitabine, the first compounds used for HbF induction by pharmacology, act as irreversible inhibitors of demethyltransferase enzymes. Great interest has also been raised by the finding that several micro-RNAs, which act as negative regulators of gene expression, have been implicated in the

  12. Cell extracts of propionic acid bacteria reactivate cells of Escherichia coli inactivated by ultraviolet radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorob'eva, L.I.; Nikitenko, G.V.; Khodzhaev, E.Yu.; Ponomareva, G.M.

    1994-01-01

    Cell extracts of three Propionibacterium shermanii strains were shown to exert a reactivating effect on cells of E. coli AB 1157 inactivated by ultraviolet radiation. The reactivating effect was revealed after both preincubation and postincubation of the irradiated cells with the extracts. The effect increased with a decrease of the survival rate within the range of 1.8-0.006%. The protective factor (or factors) is dialyzable and thermolabile; it was detected both in the fraction of soluble proteins and in the fraction of nucleoproteins and nucleic acids. The protective properties of dialyzate disappear after incubation with proteinase K and trypsin, decrease after incubation with α-amylase, deoxyribonuclease-1, or ribonuclease, and do not change under the influence of lipase. The reactivating factor is believed to be of a polypeptide nature

  13. Self-reactive CD4+ T cells and B cells in the blood in health and autoimmune disease: increased frequency of thyroglobulin-reactive cells in Graves' disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Claus H; Moeller, Ane Christine; Hegedüs, Laszlo

    2006-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying activation of potentially self-reactive circulating B cells and T cells remain unclear. We measured the uptake of a self-antigen, thyroglobulin, by antigen presenting cells, and the subsequent proliferation of CD4(+) T cells and B cells from healthy controls and patients...... with autoimmune thyroiditis. In Hashimoto's thyroiditis, B cells bound increased amounts of thyroglobulin in a complement- and autoantibody-dependent manner, and the thyroglobulin-elicited proliferation of CD4(+) T cells and B cells was complement dependent. Increased proportions of Tg-responsive CD4(+) T cells...... and B cells were found in patients with Graves' disease. Notably, both patient groups and healthy controls exhibited higher proliferative responses to thyroglobulin than to a foreign recall antigen, tetanus toxoid. Our results suggest that self-tolerance can be broken by exposure of circulating...

  14. Sensitivity and uncertainty analysis of reactivities for UO2 and MOX fueled PWR cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foad, Basma [Research Institute of Nuclear Engineering, University of Fukui, Kanawa-cho 1-2-4, Tsuruga-shi, Fukui-ken, 914-0055 (Japan); Egypt Nuclear and Radiological Regulatory Authority, 3 Ahmad El Zomar St., Nasr City, Cairo, 11787 (Egypt); Takeda, Toshikazu [Research Institute of Nuclear Engineering, University of Fukui, Kanawa-cho 1-2-4, Tsuruga-shi, Fukui-ken, 914-0055 (Japan)

    2015-12-31

    The purpose of this paper is to apply our improved method for calculating sensitivities and uncertainties of reactivity responses for UO{sub 2} and MOX fueled pressurized water reactor cells. The improved method has been used to calculate sensitivity coefficients relative to infinite dilution cross-sections, where the self-shielding effect is taken into account. Two types of reactivities are considered: Doppler reactivity and coolant void reactivity, for each type of reactivity, the sensitivities are calculated for small and large perturbations. The results have demonstrated that the reactivity responses have larger relative uncertainty than eigenvalue responses. In addition, the uncertainty of coolant void reactivity is much greater than Doppler reactivity especially for large perturbations. The sensitivity coefficients and uncertainties of both reactivities were verified by comparing with SCALE code results using ENDF/B-VII library and good agreements have been found.

  15. Peptide pool immunization and CD8+ T cell reactivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Susanne B; Harndahl, Mikkel N; Buus, Anette Stryhn

    2013-01-01

    Mice were immunized twice with a pool of five peptides selected among twenty 8-9-mer peptides for their ability to form stable complexes at 37°C with recombinant H-2K(b) (half-lives 10-15h). Vaccine-induced immunity of splenic CD8(+) T cells was studied in a 24h IFNγ Elispot assay. Surprisingly...... peptides induced normal peptide immunity i.e. the specific T cell reactivity in the Elispot culture was strictly dependent on exposure to the immunizing peptide ex vivo. However, immunization with two of the peptides, a VSV- and a Mycobacterium-derived peptide, resulted in IFNγ spot formation without...... peptide in the Elispot culture. Immunization with a mixture of the VSV-peptide and a "normal" peptide also resulted in IFNγ spot formation without addition of peptide to the assay culture. Peptide-tetramer staining of CD8(+) T cells from mice immunized with a mixture of VSV-peptide and "normal" peptide...

  16. Gammaherpesvirus-driven plasma cell differentiation regulates virus reactivation from latently infected B lymphocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaozhen Liang

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Gammaherpesviruses chronically infect their host and are tightly associated with the development of lymphoproliferative diseases and lymphomas, as well as several other types of cancer. Mechanisms involved in maintaining chronic gammaherpesvirus infections are poorly understood and, in particular, little is known about the mechanisms involved in controlling gammaherpesvirus reactivation from latently infected B cells in vivo. Recent evidence has linked plasma cell differentiation with reactivation of the human gammaherpesviruses EBV and KSHV through induction of the immediate-early viral transcriptional activators by the plasma cell-specific transcription factor XBP-1s. We now extend those findings to document a role for a gammaherpesvirus gene product in regulating plasma cell differentiation and thus virus reactivation. We have previously shown that the murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68 gene product M2 is dispensable for virus replication in permissive cells, but plays a critical role in virus reactivation from latently infected B cells. Here we show that in mice infected with wild type MHV68, virus infected plasma cells (ca. 8% of virus infected splenocytes at the peak of viral latency account for the majority of reactivation observed upon explant of splenocytes. In contrast, there is an absence of virus infected plasma cells at the peak of latency in mice infected with a M2 null MHV68. Furthermore, we show that the M2 protein can drive plasma cell differentiation in a B lymphoma cell line in the absence of any other MHV68 gene products. Thus, the role of M2 in MHV68 reactivation can be attributed to its ability to manipulate plasma cell differentiation, providing a novel viral strategy to regulate gammaherpesvirus reactivation from latently infected B cells. We postulate that M2 represents a new class of herpesvirus gene products (reactivation conditioners that do not directly participate in virus replication, but rather facilitate virus

  17. Gammaherpesvirus-driven plasma cell differentiation regulates virus reactivation from latently infected B lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiaozhen; Collins, Christopher M; Mendel, Justin B; Iwakoshi, Neal N; Speck, Samuel H

    2009-11-01

    Gammaherpesviruses chronically infect their host and are tightly associated with the development of lymphoproliferative diseases and lymphomas, as well as several other types of cancer. Mechanisms involved in maintaining chronic gammaherpesvirus infections are poorly understood and, in particular, little is known about the mechanisms involved in controlling gammaherpesvirus reactivation from latently infected B cells in vivo. Recent evidence has linked plasma cell differentiation with reactivation of the human gammaherpesviruses EBV and KSHV through induction of the immediate-early viral transcriptional activators by the plasma cell-specific transcription factor XBP-1s. We now extend those findings to document a role for a gammaherpesvirus gene product in regulating plasma cell differentiation and thus virus reactivation. We have previously shown that the murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68) gene product M2 is dispensable for virus replication in permissive cells, but plays a critical role in virus reactivation from latently infected B cells. Here we show that in mice infected with wild type MHV68, virus infected plasma cells (ca. 8% of virus infected splenocytes at the peak of viral latency) account for the majority of reactivation observed upon explant of splenocytes. In contrast, there is an absence of virus infected plasma cells at the peak of latency in mice infected with a M2 null MHV68. Furthermore, we show that the M2 protein can drive plasma cell differentiation in a B lymphoma cell line in the absence of any other MHV68 gene products. Thus, the role of M2 in MHV68 reactivation can be attributed to its ability to manipulate plasma cell differentiation, providing a novel viral strategy to regulate gammaherpesvirus reactivation from latently infected B cells. We postulate that M2 represents a new class of herpesvirus gene products (reactivation conditioners) that do not directly participate in virus replication, but rather facilitate virus reactivation by

  18. Nonspecific suppressor T cells cause decreased mixed lymphocyte culture reactivity in bone marrow transplant patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harada, M.; Ueda, M.; Nakao, S.; Kondo, K.; Odaka, K.; Shiobara, S.; Matsue, K.; Mori, T.; Matsuda, T.

    1986-01-01

    Decreased reactivity in mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC) was observed in patients within 1 yr after allogeneic and autologous bone marrow transplantation. Suppressor activity of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from transplant patients was studied by adding these cells as modulator cells to a bidirectional MLC with cells from normal individuals. PBMC from transplant patients markedly suppressed MLC reactivity in a dose-dependent manner. Suppressor activity was present in cells forming rosettes with sheep erythrocytes. Treatment of modulator cells with monoclonal antibodies against T cell differentiation antigens (OKT8, OKIa1) and complement completely abolished suppression of MLC. Suppressor activity was unaffected by 30 Gy irradiation. Suppressor activity declined gradually after transplantation and was inversely correlated with MLC reactivity of each patient at a significant level (p less than 0.01). These observations suggest that OKT8+ Ia+ radioresistant suppressor T cells play a role in the development of decreased MLC reactivity observed during the early post-transplant period

  19. Active suppression of in vitro reactivity of spleen cells after BCG treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orbach-Arbouys, S.; Poupon, M.F.

    1978-01-01

    It was found that spleen cells from mice injected i.v. with large doses of BCG responded to PHA stimulation less intensely than did normal spleen cells. It was shown that nylon wool column purified BCG treated T cells also had a low PHA reactivity. Unfractionated spleen cells, adherent cells or T-enriched populations from BCG treated mice, when added to normal T cells lowered their PHA reactivity. When the same BCG treated cell populations were added to tumor cells in vitro, they inhibited their growth. (author)

  20. Reactivation of herpes simplex virus in a cell line inducible for simian virus 40 synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamansky, G.B.; Kleinman, L.F.; Black, P.H.; Kaplan, J.C.

    1980-01-01

    The reactivation of UV-irradiated herpes simplex virus (HSV) was investigated in irradiated and unirradiated transformed hamster cells in which infectious simian virus 40(SV40) can be induced. Reactivation was enhanced when the cells were treated with UV light or mitomycin C prior to infection with HSV. The UV dose-response curve of this enhanced reactivation was strikingly similar to that found for induction of SV40 virus synthesis in cells treated under identical conditions. This is the first time that two SOS functions described in bacteria have been demonstrated in a single mammalian cell line. (orig.)

  1. ent-Jungermannenone C Triggers Reactive Oxygen Species-Dependent Cell Differentiation in Leukemia Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Zongwei; Xiao, Xinhua; Wu, Jinbao; Zhou, Xiaozhou; Liu, Weilong; Liu, Yaxi; Li, Houhua; Chen, Guoqiang; Wu, Yingli; Lei, Xiaoguang

    2018-02-23

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a hematologic malignancy that is characterized by clonal proliferation of myeloid blasts. Despite the progress that has been made in the treatment of various malignant hematopoietic diseases, the effective treatment of AML remains very challenging. Differentiation therapy has emerged as a promising approach for leukemia treatment, and new and effective chemical agents to trigger the differentiation of AML cells, especially drug-resistant cells, are urgently required. Herein, the natural product jungermannenone C, a tetracyclic diterpenoid isolated from liverworts, is reported to induce cell differentiation in AML cells. Interestingly, the unnatural enantiomer of jungermannenone C (1) was found to be more potent than jungermannenone C in inducing cell differentiation. Furthermore, compound 1 targets peroxiredoxins I and II by selectively binding to the conserved cysteine residues and leads to cellular reactive oxygen species accumulation. Accordingly, ent-jungermannenone C (1) shows potential for further investigation as an effective differentiation therapy against AML.

  2. Endothelial cell marker PAL-E reactivity in brain tumor, developing brain, and brain disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leenstra, S.; Troost, D.; Das, P. K.; Claessen, N.; Becker, A. E.; Bosch, D. A.

    1993-01-01

    The endothelial cell marker PAL-E is not reactive to vessels in the normal brain. The present study concerns the PAL-E reactivity in brain tumors in contrast to normal brain and nonneoplastic brain disease. A total of 122 specimens were examined: brain tumors (n = 94), nonneoplastic brain disease (n

  3. Single-Cell RNA-Seq Reveals Transcriptional Heterogeneity in Latent and Reactivated HIV-Infected Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golumbeanu, Monica; Cristinelli, Sara; Rato, Sylvie; Munoz, Miguel; Cavassini, Matthias; Beerenwinkel, Niko; Ciuffi, Angela

    2018-04-24

    Despite effective treatment, HIV can persist in latent reservoirs, which represent a major obstacle toward HIV eradication. Targeting and reactivating latent cells is challenging due to the heterogeneous nature of HIV-infected cells. Here, we used a primary model of HIV latency and single-cell RNA sequencing to characterize transcriptional heterogeneity during HIV latency and reactivation. Our analysis identified transcriptional programs leading to successful reactivation of HIV expression. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Mechanism of reactivation of the UV-inactivated cells of Escherichia coli by cell extracts of propionic acid bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorob'eva, L.I.; Khodzhaev, E.Y.; Ponomareva, G.M.

    1995-01-01

    Two mechanisms of reactivation of UV-inactivated Escherichia coli cells - photoreactivation (PhR) and reactivation by the dialyzate of cell extract of propionic acid bacteria - are shown to be different but not completely additive. PhR displays an insignificant negative effect on the reactivaton by active substances (peptides) of the dialyzate, whereas reactivation by dialyzate inhibits PhR. The maximal reactivation can be attained under complete PhR followed by the protective action of dialyzate. The dialyzate protects UV-irradiated E. coli cells with PolA, UvrA, and RecA mutations and Salmonella typhimurium TA 100 (UvrB) cells, and also exerts an antimutagenic effect on S. typhimurium TA 100. Protection by dialyzate is suggested to be due to restoration of the cell division mechanism damaged by UV irradiation. 14 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs

  5. CD4+ T-Cell Reactivity to Orexin/Hypocretin in Patients With Narcolepsy Type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramberger, Melanie; Högl, Birgit; Stefani, Ambra; Mitterling, Thomas; Reindl, Markus; Lutterotti, Andreas

    2017-03-01

    Narcolepsy type 1 is accompanied by a selective loss of orexin/hypocretin (hcrt) neurons in the lateral hypothalamus caused by yet unknown mechanisms. Epidemiologic and genetic associations strongly suggest an immune-mediated pathogenesis of the disease. We compared specific T-cell reactivity to orexin/hcrt peptides in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of narcolepsy type 1 patients to healthy controls by a carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester proliferation assay. Orexin/hcrt-specific T-cell reactivity was also determined by cytokine (interferon gamma and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor) analysis. Individuals were considered as responders if the cell division index of CD3+CD4+ T cells and both stimulation indices of cytokine secretion exceeded the cutoff 3. Additionally, T-cell reactivity to orexin/hcrt had to be confirmed by showing reactivity to single peptides present in different peptide pools. Using these criteria, 3/15 patients (20%) and 0/13 controls (0%) showed orexin/hcrt-specific CD4+ T-cell proliferation (p = .2262). The heterogeneous reactivity pattern did not allow the identification of a preferential target epitope. A significant role of orexin/hcrt-specific T cells in narcolepsy type 1 patients could not be confirmed in this study. Further studies are needed to assess the exact role of CD4+ T cells and possible target antigens in narcolepsy type 1 patients. © Sleep Research Society 2016. Published by Oxford University Press [on behalf of the Sleep Research Society].

  6. Chemical Reactive Anchoring Lipids with Different Performance for Cell Surface Re-engineering Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vabbilisetty, Pratima; Boron, Mallorie; Nie, Huan; Ozhegov, Evgeny; Sun, Xue-Long

    2018-02-28

    Introduction of selectively chemical reactive groups at the cell surface enables site-specific cell surface labeling and modification opportunity, thus facilitating the capability to study the cell surface molecular structure and function and the molecular mechanism it underlies. Further, it offers the opportunity to change or improve a cell's functionality for interest of choice. In this study, two chemical reactive anchor lipids, phosphatidylethanolamine-poly(ethylene glycol)-dibenzocyclooctyne (DSPE-PEG 2000 -DBCO) and cholesterol-PEG-dibenzocyclooctyne (CHOL-PEG 2000 -DBCO) were synthesized and their potential application for cell surface re-engineering via lipid fusion were assessed with RAW 264.7 cells as a model cell. Briefly, RAW 264.7 cells were incubated with anchor lipids under various concentrations and at different incubation times. The successful incorporation of the chemical reactive anchor lipids was confirmed by biotinylation via copper-free click chemistry, followed by streptavidin-fluorescein isothiocyanate binding. In comparison, the cholesterol-based anchor lipid afforded a higher cell membrane incorporation efficiency with less internalization than the phospholipid-based anchor lipid. Low cytotoxicity of both anchor lipids upon incorporation into the RAW 264.7 cells was observed. Further, the cell membrane residence time of the cholesterol-based anchor lipid was evaluated with confocal microscopy. This study suggests the potential cell surface re-engineering applications of the chemical reactive anchor lipids.

  7. Reactivity of naive CD4+CD25- T cells against gut microflora in healthy mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gad, Monika; Lundsgaard, Dorthe; Kjellev, Stine

    2006-01-01

    We have previously shown that conventional as well as germ-free CD4+ T cells depleted of CD25+ cells from the gut-associated lymphoid tissue and the periphery proliferate specifically in response to enterobacterial antigen exposure whereas unfractionated CD4+ T cells are not reactive under...

  8. Reactive oxygen species induced by Streptococcus pyogenes invasion trigger apoptotic cell death in infected epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aikawa, Chihiro; Nozawa, Takashi; Maruyama, Fumito; Tsumoto, Kohei; Hamada, Shigeyuki; Nakagawa, Ichiro

    2010-06-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococcus, GAS), one of the most common pathogens of humans, attaches and invades into human pharyngeal or skin epithelial cells. We have previously reported that induction of apoptosis is associated with GAS invasion, which induces mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptotic cell death. We demonstrate here that GAS-induced apoptosis is mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Both the induction of apoptosis and ROS production markedly increased upon invasion of wild-type GAS strain JRS4 into HeLa cells; however, the apoptotic response was not observed in fibronectin-binding protein F1-disrupted mutant SAM1-infected cells. In Bcl-2-overexpressing HeLa cells (HBD98-2-4), the induction of apoptosis, ROS production and mitochondrial dysfunction were significantly suppressed, whereas the numbers of invaded GAS was not different between HeLa (mock cells) and the HeLa HBD98-2-4 cells. Whereas Rac1 activation occurred during GAS invasion, ROS production in GAS-infected cells was clearly inhibited by transfection with the Rac1 mutants (L37 or V12L37), but not by the dominant active mutant (V12L61) or by the dominant negative mutant (N17). These observations indicate that GAS invasion triggers ROS production through Rac1 activation and generated ROS induced mitochondrial dysfunction leading to cellular apoptosis.

  9. Human X chromosome inactivation and reactivation: implications for cell reprogramming and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantone, Irene; Fisher, Amanda G

    2017-11-05

    X-chromosome inactivation (XCI) is an exemplar of epigenetic regulation that is set up as pluripotent cells differentiate. Once established, XCI is stably propagated, but can be reversed in vivo or by pluripotent reprogramming in vitro Although reprogramming provides a useful model for inactive X (Xi) reactivation in mouse, the relative instability and heterogeneity of human embryonic stem (ES) cells and induced pluripotent stem cells hampers comparable progress in human. Here we review studies aimed at reactivating the human Xi using different reprogramming strategies. We outline our recent results using mouse ES cells to reprogramme female human fibroblasts by cell-cell fusion. We show that pluripotent reprogramming induces widespread and rapid chromatin remodelling in which the human Xi loses XIST and H3K27m3 enrichment and selected Xi genes become reactivated, ahead of mitotic division. Using RNA sequencing to map the extent of human Xi reactivation, and chromatin-modifying drugs to potentiate reactivation, we outline how this approach could be used to better design strategies to re-express human X-linked loci. As cell fusion induces the expression of human pluripotency genes that represent both the 'primed' and 'naive' states, this approach may also offer a fresh opportunity to segregate human pluripotent states with distinct Xi expression profiles, using single-cell-based approaches.This article is part of the themed issue 'X-chromosome inactivation: a tribute to Mary Lyon'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  10. Chemical Reactive Anchoring Lipids with Different Performance for Cell Surface Re-engineering Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Introduction of selectively chemical reactive groups at the cell surface enables site-specific cell surface labeling and modification opportunity, thus facilitating the capability to study the cell surface molecular structure and function and the molecular mechanism it underlies. Further, it offers the opportunity to change or improve a cell’s functionality for interest of choice. In this study, two chemical reactive anchor lipids, phosphatidylethanolamine–poly(ethylene glycol)–dibenzocyclooctyne (DSPE–PEG2000–DBCO) and cholesterol–PEG–dibenzocyclooctyne (CHOL–PEG2000–DBCO) were synthesized and their potential application for cell surface re-engineering via lipid fusion were assessed with RAW 264.7 cells as a model cell. Briefly, RAW 264.7 cells were incubated with anchor lipids under various concentrations and at different incubation times. The successful incorporation of the chemical reactive anchor lipids was confirmed by biotinylation via copper-free click chemistry, followed by streptavidin-fluorescein isothiocyanate binding. In comparison, the cholesterol-based anchor lipid afforded a higher cell membrane incorporation efficiency with less internalization than the phospholipid-based anchor lipid. Low cytotoxicity of both anchor lipids upon incorporation into the RAW 264.7 cells was observed. Further, the cell membrane residence time of the cholesterol-based anchor lipid was evaluated with confocal microscopy. This study suggests the potential cell surface re-engineering applications of the chemical reactive anchor lipids. PMID:29503972

  11. Adaptive Immunity to Leukemia Is Inhibited by Cross-Reactive Induced Regulatory T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manlove, Luke S; Berquam-Vrieze, Katherine E; Pauken, Kristen E; Williams, Richard T; Jenkins, Marc K; Farrar, Michael A

    2015-10-15

    BCR-ABL(+) acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients have transient responses to current therapies. However, the fusion of BCR to ABL generates a potential leukemia-specific Ag that could be a target for immunotherapy. We demonstrate that the immune system can limit BCR-ABL(+) leukemia progression although ultimately this immune response fails. To address how BCR-ABL(+) leukemia escapes immune surveillance, we developed a peptide: MHC class II tetramer that labels endogenous BCR-ABL-specific CD4(+) T cells. Naive mice harbored a small population of BCR-ABL-specific T cells that proliferated modestly upon immunization. The small number of naive BCR-ABL-specific T cells was due to negative selection in the thymus, which depleted BCR-ABL-specific T cells. Consistent with this observation, we saw that BCR-ABL-specific T cells were cross-reactive with an endogenous peptide derived from ABL. Despite this cross-reactivity, the remaining population of BCR-ABL reactive T cells proliferated upon immunization with the BCR-ABL fusion peptide and adjuvant. In response to BCR-ABL(+) leukemia, BCR-ABL-specific T cells proliferated and converted into regulatory T (Treg) cells, a process that was dependent on cross-reactivity with self-antigen, TGF-β1, and MHC class II Ag presentation by leukemic cells. Treg cells were critical for leukemia progression in C57BL/6 mice, as transient Treg cell ablation led to extended survival of leukemic mice. Thus, BCR-ABL(+) leukemia actively suppresses antileukemia immune responses by converting cross-reactive leukemia-specific T cells into Treg cells. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  12. Evaluation of mast cell counts and microvessel density in reactive lesions of the oral cavity

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    Maryam Kouhsoltani

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Reliable immunohistochemical assays to assess the definitive role of mast cells (MCs and angiogenesis in the pathogenesis of oral reactive lesions are generally not available. The aim of the present study was to evaluate mast cell counts (MCC and microvessel density (MVD in oral reactive lesions and determine the correlation between MCC and MVD. Methods. Seventy-five cases of reactive lesions of the oral cavity, including pyogenic granuloma, fibroma, peripheral giant cell granuloma, inflammatory fibrous hyperplasia, peripheral ossifying fibroma (15 for each category were immunohisto-chemically stained with MC tryptase and CD31. Fifteen cases of normal gingival tissue were considered as the control group. The mean MCC and MVD in superficial and deep connective tissues were assessed and total MCC and MVD was computed for each lesion. Results. Statistically significant differences were observed in MCC and MVD between the study groups (P < 0.001. MC tryptase and CD31 expression increased in the superficial connective tissue of each lesion in comparison to the deep con-nective tissue. A significant negative correlation was not found between MCC and MVD in oral reactive lesions (P < 0.001, r = -0.458. Conclusion. Although MCs were present in the reactive lesions of the oral cavity, a direct correlation between MCC and MVD was not found in these lesions. Therefore, a significant interaction between MCs and endothelial cells and an active role for MCs in the growth of oral reactive lesions was not found in this study.

  13. Characterizing T Cells in SCID Patients Presenting with Reactive or Residual T Lymphocytes

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    Atar Lev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Patients with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID may present with residual circulating T cells. While all cells are functionally deficient, resulting in high susceptibility to infections, only some of these cells are causing autoimmune symptoms. Methods. Here we compared T-cell functions including the number of circulating CD3+ T cells, in vitro responses to mitogens, T-cell receptor (TCR repertoire, TCR excision circles (TREC levels, and regulatory T cells (Tregs enumeration in several immunodeficinecy subtypes, clinically presenting with nonreactive residual cells (MHC-II deficiency or reactive cells. The latter includes patients with autoreactive clonal expanded T cell and patients with alloreactive transplacentally maternal T cells. Results. MHC-II deficient patients had slightly reduced T-cell function, normal TRECs, TCR repertoires, and normal Tregs enumeration. In contrast, patients with reactive T cells exhibited poor T-cell differentiation and activity. While the autoreactive cells displayed significantly reduced Tregs numbers, the alloreactive transplacentally acquired maternal lymphocytes had high functional Tregs. Conclusion. SCID patients presenting with circulating T cells show different patterns of T-cell activity and regulatory T cells enumeration that dictates the immunodeficient and autoimmune manifestations. We suggest that a high-tolerance capacity of the alloreactive transplacentally acquired maternal lymphocytes represents a toleration advantage, yet still associated with severe immunodeficiency.

  14. Radiation enhanced reactivation of irradiated human adenovirus type 2 in human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeeves, W.P.

    1981-04-01

    Radiation-enhanced reactivation (ER) of a radiation-damaged mammalian virus is the term given to the observation that the survival of irradiated virus can be enhanced by irradiation of an appropriate host cell prior to infection. In this work, both UV-enhanced reactivation (UVER) and gamma-ray-enhanced reactivation (γRER) of irradiated human adenovirus type 2 (AD 2) were studied in a variety of normal and DNA repair-deficient human fibroblast host cell strains. In order to examine the lesion specificity of ER in human cells, experiments were performed using UV-irradiated and γ-irradiated virus. The investigation was carried out using a sensitive technique of indirect immunofluorescence, according to which irradiated and unirradiated cell cultures were infected with irradiated or unirradiated AD 2 and were subsequently examined for the presence of viral structural antigens ('V' Ag) at a fixed time after infection

  15. C-reactive protein bearing cells are a subpopulation of natural killer cell precursors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baum, L.L.; Krueger, N.X.

    1986-01-01

    Cell surface C-reactive protein (S-CRP) is expressed on the surface membrane of a small percentage of lymphocytes. Anti-CRP inhibits natural killer (NK) function. Since NK effectors are heterogeneous, they suspected that the cells expressing S-CRP (CRP + ) might respond differently to stimulation than the NK effectors lacking S-CRP (CRP - ). Methods were developed to separate CRP + and CRP - lymphocytes and their functional responses were examined and compared. These techniques are dependent upon the binding of CRP to its ligands, C-polysaccharide (CPS) or Phosphocholine (PC). The first method involves rosette formation with CPS coupled autologous red blood cells; the second method utilizes the binding of CRP + lymphocytes to PC-sepharose. Lymphocytes separated using either of these techniques yield similar results. CRP - lymphocytes respond to 3 day incubation with PHA or Il-2 by producing effectors which kill 51 Cr labeled K562 tumor cells, CRP + precursors do not. CRP + lymphocytes respond to a 5 day incubation with inactivated K562 by producing effectors which kill K562; CRP - precursors do not. NK functional activity of both is increased by incubation with interferon. This ability to respond differently to stimulation suggests that CRP + and CRP - cells are functionally distinct

  16. Reactivation of neutron killed mammalian cells by gamma irradiation: The observations, possible mechanism and implication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calkins, J.; Harrison, W.; Einspenner, M.

    1990-01-01

    We have observed that combinations of neutron plus gamma ray exposure can significantly increase the colony forming ability of monkey and human cell cultures over the neutron dose alone. The 'reactivation' of neutron killed mammalian cells by gamma rays is analogous to observations made in lower eukaryotic organisms and fits the pattern termed 'T repair' previously postulated for yeast and protozoans. (orig.)

  17. Spontaneous cytotoxic T-Cell reactivity against indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Rikke Bæk; Køllgaard, Tania; Andersen, Rikke Sick

    2011-01-01

    in mouse models of cancer in a nontoxic fashion. Here, we describe the immunogenicity of IDO2 by showing the presence of spontaneous cytotoxic T-cell reactivity against IDO2 in peripheral blood of both healthy donors and cancer patients. Furthermore, we show that these IDO2-specific T cells are cytotoxic...

  18. Protective Role of Cross-Reactive CD8 T Cells Against Dengue Virus Infection

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    Annie Elong Ngono

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Infection with one of the four dengue virus serotypes (DENV1-4 presumably leads to lifelong immunity against the infecting serotype but not against heterotypic reinfection, resulting in a greater risk of developing Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever/Dengue Shock Syndrome (DHF/DSS during secondary infection. Both antibodies and T cell responses have been implicated in DHF/DSS pathogenesis. According to the T cell-based hypothesis termed “original antigenic sin,” secondary DENV infection is dominated by non-protective, cross-reactive T cells that elicit an aberrant immune response. The goal of our study was to compare the roles of serotype-specific and cross-reactive T cells in protection vs. pathogenesis during DENV infection in vivo. Specifically, we utilized IFN-α/βR−/− HLA*B0702 transgenic mice in the context of peptide vaccination with relevant human CD8 T cell epitopes. IFN-α/βR−/− HLA*B0702 transgenic mice were immunized with DENV serotype 2 (DENV2-specific epitopes or variants found in any of the other three serotypes (DENV1, DENV3 or DENV4, followed by challenge with DENV. Although cross-reactive T cell responses were lower than responses elicited by serotype-specific T cells, immunization with either serotype-specific or variant peptide epitopes enhanced viral clearance, demonstrating that both serotype-specific and cross-reactive T cells can contribute to protection in vivo against DENV infection.

  19. Responses of human birch pollen allergen-reactive T cells to chemically modified allergens (allergoids).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dormann, D; Ebner, C; Jarman, E R; Montermann, E; Kraft, D; Reske-Kunz, A B

    1998-11-01

    Allergoids are widely used in specific immunotherapy for the treatment of IgE-mediated allergic diseases. The aim of this study was to analyse whether a modification of birch pollen allergens with formaldehyde affects the availability of T-cell epitopes. Efficient modification of the allergens was verified by determining IgE and IgG binding activity using ELISA inhibition tests. T-cell responses to birch pollen allergoids were analysed in polyclonal systems, using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of five birch pollen-allergic individuals, as well as birch pollen extract-reactive T-cell lines (TCL), established from the peripheral blood of 14 birch pollen-allergic donors. To determine whether the modification of natural (n)Bet v 1 with formaldehyde or maleic anhydride results in epitope-specific changes in T-cell reactivities, 22 Bet v 1-specific T-cell clones (TCC), established from nine additional birch pollen-allergic individuals, were tested for their reactivity with these products. The majority of PBMC and TCL showed a reduced response to the birch pollen extract allergoid. Bet v 1-specific TCC could be divided into allergoid-reactive and -non-reactive TCC. No simple correlation between possible modification sites of formaldehyde in the respective T-cell epitopes and the stimulatory potential of the allergoid was observed. Mechanisms of suppression or of anergy induction were excluded as an explanation for the non-reactivity of representative TCC. All TCC could be stimulated by maleylated and unmodified nBet v 1 to a similar extent. These results demonstrate differences in the availability of T-cell epitopes between allergoids and unmodified allergens, which are most likely due to structural changes within the allergen molecule.

  20. Homeostatic proliferation fails to efficiently reactivate HIV-1 latently infected central memory CD4+ T cells.

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    Alberto Bosque

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Homeostatic proliferation ensures the longevity of central memory T-cells by inducing cell proliferation in the absence of cellular differentiation or activation. This process is governed mainly by IL-7. Central memory T-cells can also be stimulated via engagement of the T-cell receptor, leading to cell proliferation but also activation and differentiation. Using an in vitro model of HIV-1 latency, we have examined in detail the effects of homeostatic proliferation on latently infected central memory T cells. We have also used antigenic stimulation via anti-CD3/anti-CD28 antibodies and established a comparison with a homeostatic proliferation stimulus, to evaluate potential differences in how either treatment affects the dynamics of latent virus populations. First, we show that homeostatic proliferation, as induced by a combination of IL-2 plus IL-7, leads to partial reactivation of latent HIV-1 but is unable to reduce the size of the reservoir in vitro. Second, latently infected cells are able to homeostatically proliferate in the absence of viral reactivation or cell differentiation. These results indicate that IL-2 plus IL-7 may induce a detrimental effect by favoring the maintenance of the latent HIV-1 reservoir. On the other hand, antigenic stimulation efficiently reactivated latent HIV-1 in cultured central memory cells and led to depletion of the latently infected cells via virus-induced cell death.

  1. Cross-reactive microbial peptides can modulate HIV-specific CD8+ T cell responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher W Pohlmeyer

    Full Text Available Heterologous immunity is an important aspect of the adaptive immune response. We hypothesized that this process could modulate the HIV-1-specific CD8+ T cell response, which has been shown to play an important role in HIV-1 immunity and control. We found that stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs from HIV-1-positive subjects with microbial peptides that were cross-reactive with immunodominant HIV-1 epitopes resulted in dramatic expansion of HIV-1-specific CD8+ T cells. Interestingly, the TCR repertoire of HIV-1-specific CD8+ T cells generated by ex vivo stimulation of PBMCs using HIV-1 peptide was different from that of cells stimulated with cross-reactive microbial peptides in some HIV-1-positive subjects. Despite these differences, CD8+ T cells stimulated with either HIV-1 or cross-reactive peptides effectively suppressed HIV-1 replication in autologous CD4+ T cells. These data suggest that exposure to cross-reactive microbial antigens can modulate HIV-1-specific immunity.

  2. Prolonged exposure of resveratrol induces reactive superoxide species-independent apoptosis in murine prostate cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sanjay; Stokes, James; Singh, Udai P; Scissum-Gunn, Karyn; Singh, Rajesh; Manne, Upender; Mishra, Manoj K

    2017-10-01

    Nitric oxide, a signaling molecule, inhibits mitochondrial respiration by binding with cytochrome c oxidase, resulting in elevated production of reactive superoxide species (reactive oxygen and nitrogen) in the mitochondria and increased susceptibility to cell death. Generation of mitochondrial superoxide species can be suppressed by natural compounds such as resveratrol, a dietary polyphenol found in the skin of red fruits. In various cancer cells, resveratrol shows anti-oxidant and cancer preventive properties. Since, the effect of resveratrol on reactive superoxide species-independent apoptosis in prostate cancer cells is not well illustrated; therefore, we investigated this phenomenon in TRAMP murine prostate cancer cells. To accomplish this, TRAMP cells were incubated with resveratrol, resveratrol + DETA-NONOate, DETA-NONOate (nitric oxide donor), resveratrol + L-NMMA, or L-NMMA (nitric oxide inhibitor) for 48 h, and reactive superoxide species in the mitochondria and culture supernatant were measured. In addition, the mitochondrial membrane potential, cell viability, expression of apoptotic markers (Bax and Bcl2), γ-H2A.x, p53, and caspase-3 was determined. We found that resveratrol suppressed reactive superoxide species such as reactive oxygen species in the mitochondria and nitric oxide in culture supernatant when compared to the DETA-NONOate treatment and disrupted the mitochondrial membrane potential. Resveratrol also reduced cell viability, altered the expression of apoptotic markers (Bax and Bcl2), and increased expression of γ-H2A.x (indicative marker of DNA fragmentation) and p53 (a critical DNA damage response protein). However, there was no appreciable modulation of the caspase-3. Therefore, our data suggest that resveratrol induces superoxide species-independent apoptosis and may act as a therapeutic agent against prostate cancer.

  3. Human T cell leukemia virus reactivation with progression of adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Ratner

    Full Text Available Human T-cell leukemia virus-associated adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma (ATLL has a very poor prognosis, despite trials of a variety of different treatment regimens. Virus expression has been reported to be limited or absent when ATLL is diagnosed, and this has suggested that secondary genetic or epigenetic changes are important in disease pathogenesis.We prospectively investigated combination chemotherapy followed by antiretroviral therapy for this disorder. Nineteen patients were prospectively enrolled between 2002 and 2006 at five medical centers in a phase II clinical trial of infusional chemotherapy with etoposide, doxorubicin, and vincristine, daily prednisone, and bolus cyclophosphamide (EPOCH given for two to six cycles until maximal clinical response, and followed by antiviral therapy with daily zidovudine, lamivudine, and alpha interferon-2a for up to one year. Seven patients were on study for less than one month due to progressive disease or chemotherapy toxicity. Eleven patients achieved an objective response with median duration of response of thirteen months, and two complete remissions. During chemotherapy induction, viral RNA expression increased (median 190-fold, and virus replication occurred, coincident with development of disease progression.EPOCH chemotherapy followed by antiretroviral therapy is an active therapeutic regimen for adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma, but viral reactivation during induction chemotherapy may contribute to treatment failure. Alternative therapies are sorely needed in this disease that simultaneously prevent virus expression, and are cytocidal for malignant cells.

  4. NKT cell self-reactivity: evolutionary master key of immune homeostasis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issazadeh-Navikas, Shohreh

    2012-04-01

    Complex immune responses have evolved to protect multicellular organisms against the invasion of pathogens. This has exerted strong developmental pressure for specialized functions that can also limit damage to self-tissue. Two arms of immunity, the innate and adaptive immune systems, have evolved for quick, non-specific immune responses to pathogens and more efficient, long-lasting ones upon specific recognition of recurrent pathogens. Specialized cells have arisen as the sentinels of these functions, including macrophages, natural killer (NK), and T and B-lymphocytes. Interestingly, a population of immune cells that can exert both of these complex functions, NKT cells, not only share common functions but also exhibit shared cell surface markers of cells of both arms of the immune system. These features, in combination with sophisticated maintenance of immune homeostasis, will be discussed. The recent finding of self-peptide reactivity of NKT cells in the context of CD1d, with capacity to regulate multiple autoimmune and inflammatory conditions, motivates the current proposal that self-reactive NKT cells might be the ancestral link between present NK and T cells. Their parallel selection through evolution by higher vertebrates could be related to their central function as master regulators of immune homeostasis that in part is shared with regulatory T cells. Hypothetical views on how self-reactive NKT cells secure such a central role will also be proposed.

  5. Reactivation of X-irradiated cell material during limb regeneration in Urodeles Amphibians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desselle, J.C.

    1979-10-01

    In amputated members irradiated with X-rays the regeneration power is inhibited. This power is restored by grafts of healthy tissue in the irradiated members. The origin of the cell material of the restored regeneration blastema has been studied by an original labelling technique. The different amounts of DNA in the graft cells and those of the stump mark the graft cells during the regeneration process. It was shown that the graft causes a reactivation of the inhibited stump cells and the reactivation stages are the same as the activation stages of the member regenerating normally. It was also established that during restored regeneration the cell material implanted in the irradiated members contributes, by the 160th day of regeneration, 4.5% of the cartilaginous regenerate cells and 12% of the muscle cells. All the other regenerate cells are supplied by the cells of the stump; these are reactivated and together with the activated graft cells lead to the restitution of the amputated member [fr

  6. ROLE OF STEM CELL FACTOR IN THE REACTIVATION OF HUMAN FETAL HEMOGLOBIN

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    Marco Gabbianelli

    2009-11-01

    In vitro and in vivo models have led to the identification of several chemical compounds able to reactivate HbF synthesis in adult erythroid cells. Although the impact of these HbF inducers, including hypomethylating agents, histone deacetylase inhibitors and hydroxyurea, was clear on the natural history of sickle cell anemia, the benefit on the clinical course of -thalassemia was only limited: particularly, the toxicity and the modest increase in γ-globin reactivation indicated the need for improved agents able to induce higher levels of HbF. In the present review we describe the biologic properties of Stem Cell Factor (SCF, a cytokine sustaining the survival and proliferation of erythroid cells, that at pharmacological doses acts as a potent stimulator of HbF synthesis in adult erythroid cells.

  7. Potential roles of self-reactive T cells in autoimmunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads Hald

    2014-01-01

    The immune system is a complex arrangement of cells and molecules that preserve the integrity of the organism by eliminating all elements judged to be dangerous. Several regulatory mechanisms function to terminate immune responses to antigens, return the immune system to a basal state after the a...

  8. In Situ Detection of Regulatory T Cells in Human Genital Herpes Simplex Virus Type 2 (HSV-2) Reactivation and Their Influence on Spontaneous HSV-2 Reactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milman, Neta; Zhu, Jia; Johnston, Christine; Cheng, Anqi; Magaret, Amalia; Koelle, David M; Huang, Meei-Li; Jin, Lei; Klock, Alexis; Layton, Erik D; Corey, Lawrence

    2016-07-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) reactivation is accompanied by a sustained influx of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells that persist in genital tissue for extended periods. While CD4(+) T cells have long been recognized as being present in herpetic ulcerations, their role in subclinical reactivation and persistence is less well known, especially the role of CD4(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs). We characterized the Treg (CD4(+)Foxp3(+)) population during human HSV-2 reactivation in situ in sequential genital skin biopsy specimens obtained from HSV-2-seropositive subjects at the time of lesion onset up to 8 weeks after healing. High numbers of Tregs infiltrated to the site of viral reactivation and persisted in proximity to conventional CD4(+) T cells (Tconvs) and CD8(+) T cells. Treg density peaked during the lesion stage of the reactivation. The number of Tregs from all time points (lesion, healed, 2 weeks after healing, 4 weeks after healing, and 8 weeks after healing) was significantly higher than in control biopsy specimens from unaffected skin. There was a direct correlation between HSV-2 titer and Treg density. The association of a high Treg to Tconv ratio with high viral shedding suggests that the balance between regulatory and effector T cells influences human HSV-2 disease. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. T cell reactivity with allergoids: influence of the type of APC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahlert, H; Grage-Griebenow, E; Stüwe, H T; Cromwell, O; Fiebig, H

    2000-08-15

    The use of allergoids for allergen-specific immunotherapy has been established for many years. The characteristic features of these chemically modified allergens are their strongly reduced IgE binding activity compared with the native form and the retained immunogenicity. T cell reactivity of chemically modified allergens is documented in animals, but in humans indirect evidence of reactivity has been concluded from the induction of allergen-specific IgG during immunotherapy. Direct evidence of T cell reactivity was obtained recently using isolated human T cells. To obtain further insight into the mechanism of action of allergoids, we compared the Ag-presenting capacity of different APC types, including DC and macrophages, generated from CD14+ precursor cells from the blood of grass pollen allergic subjects, autologous PBMC, and B cells. These APC were used in experiments together with Phl p 5-specific T cell clones under stimulation with grass pollen allergen extract, rPhl p 5b, and the respective allergoids. Using DC and macrophages, allergoids exhibited a pronounced and reproducible T cell-stimulating capacity. Responses were superior to those with PBMC, and isolated B cells failed to present allergoids. Considerable IL-12 production was observed only when using the DC for Ag presentation of both allergens and allergoids. The amount of IL-10 in supernatants was dependent on the phenotype of the respective T cell clone. High IL-10 production was associated with suppressed IL-12 production from the DC in most cases. In conclusion, the reactivity of Th cells with allergoids is dependent on the type of the APC.

  10. Snail/beta-catenin signaling protects breast cancer cells from hypoxia attack

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scherbakov, Alexander M., E-mail: alex.scherbakov@gmail.com [Laboratory of Clinical Biochemistry, Institute of Clinical Oncology, N.N. Blokhin Cancer Research Centre, Kashirskoye sh. 24, Moscow 115478 (Russian Federation); Stefanova, Lidia B.; Sorokin, Danila V.; Semina, Svetlana E. [Laboratory of Molecular Endocrinology, Institute of Carcinogenesis, N.N. Blokhin Cancer Research Centre, Kashirskoye sh. 24, Moscow 115478 (Russian Federation); Berstein, Lev M. [Laboratory of Oncoendocrinology, N.N. Petrov Research Institute of Oncology, St. Petersburg 197758 (Russian Federation); Krasil’nikov, Mikhail A. [Laboratory of Molecular Endocrinology, Institute of Carcinogenesis, N.N. Blokhin Cancer Research Centre, Kashirskoye sh. 24, Moscow 115478 (Russian Federation)

    2013-12-10

    The tolerance of cancer cells to hypoxia depends on the combination of different factors – from increase of glycolysis (Warburg Effect) to activation of intracellular growth/apoptotic pathways. Less is known about the influence of epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) and EMT-associated pathways on the cell sensitivity to hypoxia. The aim of this study was to explore the role of Snail signaling, one of the key EMT pathways, in the mediating of hypoxia response and regulation of cell sensitivity to hypoxia, using as a model in vitro cultured breast cancer cells. Earlier we have shown that estrogen-independent HBL-100 breast cancer cells differ from estrogen-dependent MCF-7 cells with increased expression of Snail1, and demonstrated Snail1 involvement into formation of hormone-resistant phenotype. Because Snail1 belongs to hypoxia-activated proteins, here we studied the influence of Snail1 signaling on the cell tolerance to hypoxia. We found that Snail1-enriched HBL-100 cells were less sensitive to hypoxia-induced growth suppression if compared with MCF-7 line (31% MCF-7 vs. 71% HBL-100 cell viability after 1% O{sub 2} atmosphere for 3 days). Snail1 knock-down enhanced the hypoxia-induced inhibition of cell proliferation giving the direct evidence of Snail1 involvement into cell protection from hypoxia attack. The protective effect of Snail1 was shown to be mediated, at least in a part, via beta-catenin which positively regulated expression of HIF-1-dependent genes. Finally, we found that cell tolerance to hypoxia was accompanied with the failure in the phosphorylation of AMPK – the key energy sensor, and demonstrated an inverse relationship between AMPK and Snail/beta-catenin signaling. Totally, our data show that Snail1 and beta-catenin, besides association with loss of hormone dependence, protect cancer cells from hypoxia and may serve as an important target in the treatment of breast cancer. Moreover, we suggest that the level of these proteins as well

  11. Serological cross-reactivity between Merkel cell polyomavirus and two closely related chimpanzee polyomaviruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérôme T J Nicol

    Full Text Available Phylogenetic analyses based on the major capsid protein sequence indicate that Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV and chimpanzee polyomaviruses (PtvPyV1, PtvPyV2, and similarly Trichodysplasia spinulosa-associated polyomavirus (TSPyV and the orangutan polyomavirus (OraPyV1 are closely related. The existence of cross-reactivity between these polyomaviruses was therefore investigated. The findings indicated serological identity between the two chimpanzee polyomaviruses investigated and a high level of cross-reactivity with Merkel cell polyomavirus. In contrast, cross-reactivity was not observed between TSPyV and OraPyV1. Furthermore, specific antibodies to chimpanzee polyomaviruses were detected in chimpanzee sera by pre-incubation of sera with the different antigens, but not in human sera.

  12. Production of Reactive Oxygen Species by Multipotent Stromal Cells/Mesenchymal Stem Cells Upon Exposure to Fas Ligand

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigues, Melanie; Turner, Omari; Stolz, Donna; Griffith, Linda G.; Wells, Alan

    2011-01-01

    Multipotent stromal cells (MSCs) can be differentiated into osteoblasts and chondrocytes, making these cells candidates to regenerate cranio-facial injuries and lesions in long bones. A major problem with cell replacement therapy, however, is the loss of transplanted MSCs at the site of graft. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nonspecific inflammation generated at the ischemic site have been hypothesized to lead to MSCs loss; studies in vitro show MSCs dying both in the presence of ROS or cyt...

  13. C-reactive Protein and Disease Outcome in Nigerian Sickle Cell ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Evidence suggests that sickle cell disease (SCD) is associated with a chronic inflammatory state. C.reactive protein (CRP) is known to modulate inflammation. Its role in the chronic inflammation of SCD may make it valuable as a therapeutic target. Aim: The aim was to determine CRP levels in SCD subjects in ...

  14. C‑reactive Protein and Disease Outcome in Nigerian Sickle Cell ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sillesen H, Nordestgaard BG. Genetically elevated C‑reactive protein and ischemic vascular disease. N Engl J Med. 2008;359:1897‑908. 18. Walter PB, Fung EB, Killilea DW, Jiang Q, Hudes M, Madden J, et al. Oxidative stress and inflammation in iron‑overloaded patients with beta‑thalassaemia or sickle cell disease. Br J.

  15. Reactive Oxygen Species Regulate the Inflammatory Function of NKT Cells through Promyelocytic Leukemia Zinc Finger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeung-Hyen; Kumar, Ajay; Chang, Cheong-Hee; Pyaram, Kalyani

    2017-11-15

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are byproducts of aerobic metabolism and contribute to both physiological and pathological conditions as second messengers. ROS are essential for activation of T cells, but how ROS influence NKT cells is unknown. In the present study, we investigated the role of ROS in NKT cell function. We found that NKT cells, but not CD4 or CD8 T cells, have dramatically high ROS in the spleen and liver of mice but not in the thymus or adipose tissues. Accordingly, ROS-high NKT cells exhibited increased susceptibility and apoptotic cell death with oxidative stress. High ROS in the peripheral NKT cells were primarily produced by NADPH oxidases and not mitochondria. We observed that sorted ROS-high NKT cells were enriched in NKT1 and NKT17 cells, whereas NKT2 cells were dominant in ROS-low cells. Furthermore, treatment of NKT cells with antioxidants led to reduced frequencies of IFN-γ- and IL-17-expressing cells, indicating that ROS play a role in regulating the inflammatory function of NKT cells. The transcription factor promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger (PLZF) seemed to control the ROS levels. NKT cells from adipose tissues that do not express PLZF and those from PLZF haplodeficient mice have low ROS. Conversely, ROS were highly elevated in CD4 T cells from mice ectopically expressing PLZF. Thus, our findings demonstrate that PLZF controls ROS levels, which in turn governs the inflammatory function of NKT cells. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  16. Tolerance without clonal expansion: self-antigen-expressing B cells program self-reactive T cells for future deletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frommer, Friederike; Heinen, Tobias J A J; Wunderlich, F Thomas; Yogev, Nir; Buch, Thorsten; Roers, Axel; Bettelli, Estelle; Müller, Werner; Anderton, Stephen M; Waisman, Ari

    2008-10-15

    B cells have been shown in various animal models to induce immunological tolerance leading to reduced immune responses and protection from autoimmunity. We show that interaction of B cells with naive T cells results in T cell triggering accompanied by the expression of negative costimulatory molecules such as PD-1, CTLA-4, B and T lymphocyte attenuator, and CD5. Following interaction with B cells, T cells were not induced to proliferate, in a process that was dependent on their expression of PD-1 and CTLA-4, but not CD5. In contrast, the T cells became sensitive to Ag-induced cell death. Our results demonstrate that B cells participate in the homeostasis of the immune system by ablation of conventional self-reactive T cells.

  17. Elevated and cross‐responsive CD1a‐reactive T cells in bee and wasp venom allergic individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Sumithra; Aslam, Aamir; Misbah, Siraj A.; Salio, Mariolina; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Moody, D Branch

    2015-01-01

    The role of CD1a‐reactive T cells in human allergic disease is unknown. We have previously shown that circulating CD1a‐reactive T cells recognize neolipid antigens generated by bee and wasp venom phospholipase, and here tested the hypothesis that venom‐responsive CD1a‐reactive T cells associate with venom allergy. Circulating T cells from bee and wasp venom allergic individuals, before and during immunotherapy, were exposed to CD1a‐transfected K562 cells in the presence of wasp or bee venom. T‐cell response was evaluated based on IFNγ, GM‐CSF, and IL‐13 cytokine production. Venom allergic individuals showed significantly higher frequencies of IFN‐γ, GM‐CSF, and IL‐13 producing CD1a‐reactive T cells responsive to venom and venom‐derived phospholipase than healthy individuals. Venom‐responsive CD1a‐reactive T cells were cross‐responsive between wasp and bee suggesting shared pathways of allergenicity. Frequencies of CD1a‐reactive T cells were initially induced during subcutaneous immunotherapy, peaking by weeks 5, but then reduced despite escalation of antigen dose. Our current understanding of venom allergy and immunotherapy is largely based on peptide and protein‐specific T cell and antibody responses. Here, we show that lipid antigens and CD1a‐reactive T cells associate with the allergic response. These data have implications for mechanisms of allergy and approaches to immunotherapy. PMID:26518614

  18. Fat cells reactivate quiescent neuroblasts via TOR and glial insulin relays in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa-Nunes, Rita; Yee, Lih Ling; Gould, Alex P

    2011-03-24

    Many stem, progenitor and cancer cells undergo periods of mitotic quiescence from which they can be reactivated. The signals triggering entry into and exit from this reversible dormant state are not well understood. In the developing Drosophila central nervous system, multipotent self-renewing progenitors called neuroblasts undergo quiescence in a stereotypical spatiotemporal pattern. Entry into quiescence is regulated by Hox proteins and an internal neuroblast timer. Exit from quiescence (reactivation) is subject to a nutritional checkpoint requiring dietary amino acids. Organ co-cultures also implicate an unidentified signal from an adipose/hepatic-like tissue called the fat body. Here we provide in vivo evidence that Slimfast amino-acid sensing and Target of rapamycin (TOR) signalling activate a fat-body-derived signal (FDS) required for neuroblast reactivation. Downstream of this signal, Insulin-like receptor signalling and the Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/TOR network are required in neuroblasts for exit from quiescence. We demonstrate that nutritionally regulated glial cells provide the source of Insulin-like peptides (ILPs) relevant for timely neuroblast reactivation but not for overall larval growth. Conversely, ILPs secreted into the haemolymph by median neurosecretory cells systemically control organismal size but do not reactivate neuroblasts. Drosophila thus contains two segregated ILP pools, one regulating proliferation within the central nervous system and the other controlling tissue growth systemically. Our findings support a model in which amino acids trigger the cell cycle re-entry of neural progenitors via a fat-body-glia-neuroblasts relay. This mechanism indicates that dietary nutrients and remote organs, as well as local niches, are key regulators of transitions in stem-cell behaviour.

  19. Reactivity descriptors for direct methanol fuel cell anode catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferrin, Peter; Nilekar, Anand Udaykumar; Greeley, Jeff

    2008-01-01

    oxidation to CO2 are investigated: an indirect mechanism that goes through a CO intermediate and a direct mechanism where methanol is oxidized to CO2 without the formation of a CO intermediate. For the direct mechanism, we find that, because of CO poisoning, only a small current will result on all non......We have investigated the anode reaction in direct methanol fuel cells using a database of adsorption free energies for 16 intermediates on 12 close-packed transition metal surfaces calculated with periodic, self-consistent, density functional theory (DFT-GGA). This database, combined with a simple...... electrokinetic model of the methanol electrooxidation reaction, yields mechanistic insights that are consistent with previous experimental and theoretical studies on Pt, and extends these insights to a broad spectrum of other transition metals. In addition, by using linear scaling relations between...

  20. Proteomics Characterization of the Molecular Mechanisms of Mutant P53 Reactivation with PRIMA-1 in Breast Cancer Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Daoud, Sayed S

    2006-01-01

    The main purpose of the study is to identify novel protein-protein interactions in various locations of cells to establish the molecular mechanisms of mutant p53 reactivation with PRIMA-1 in breast cancer cells...

  1. Myelin-specific T cells induce interleukin-1beta expression in lesion-reactive microglial-like cells in zones of axonal degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grebing, Manuela; Nielsen, Helle H; Fenger, Christina D

    2016-01-01

    lesion-reactive CD11b(+) ramified microglia. These results suggest that myelin-specific T cells stimulate lesion-reactive microglial-like cells to produce IL-1β. These findings are relevant to understand the consequences of T-cell infiltration in white and gray matter lesions in patients with MS. GLIA...

  2. ROLE OF STEM CELL FACTOR IN THE REACTIVATION OF HUMAN FETAL HEMOGLOBIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugo Testa

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available

    In humans the switch from fetal to adult  hemoglobin (HbF→ HbA takes place in the perinatal and postnatal period, determining the progressive replacement of HbF with HbA synthesis ( i.e., the relative HbF content in red blood cells decreases from 80-90% to <1%. In spite of more than twenty years of intensive investigations on this classic model, the molecular mechanisms regulating the Hb switching, as well as HbF synthesis in adults, has been only in part elucidated. In adult life, the residual HbF, restricted to F cell compartment, may be reactivated up to 10-20% of total Hb synthesis in various conditions associated with “stress erythropoiesis”: this reactivation represented until now an interesting model of partial Hb switch reverse with important therapeutic implications in patients with hemoglobinopathies, and particularly in -thalassemia.
    In vitro and in vivo models have led to the identification of several chemical compounds able to reactivate HbF synthesis in adult erythroid cells. Although the impact of these HbF inducers, including hypomethylating agents, histone deacetylase inhibitors and hydroxyurea, was clear on the natural history of sickle cell anemia, the benefit on the clinical course of -thalassemia was only limited: particularly, the toxicity and the modest increase in γ-globin reactivation indicated the need for improved agents able to induce higher levels of HbF.
    In the present review we describe the biologic properties of Stem Cell Factor (SCF, a cytokine sustaining the survival and proliferation of erythroid cells, that at pharmacological doses acts as a potent stimulator of HbF synthesis in adult erythroid cells.

  3. Podoplanin (D2-40): A New Immunohistochemical Marker for Reactive Follicular Dendritic Cells and Follicular Dendritic Cell Sarcomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Qingmei; Chen, Lugen; Fu, Kai; Harter, Josephine; Young, Ken H; Sunkara, Jaya; Novak, Deborah; Villanueva-Siles, Esperanza; Ratech, Howard

    2008-01-01

    The diagnosis of follicular dendritic cell (FDC) sarcoma can be challenging because of its morphologic overlaps with many other spindle cell neoplasms and, therefore, new phenotypic markers will be helpful in its differential diagnosis. Podoplanin is a mucin-type transmembrane glycoprotein that has recently been detected in reactive FDCs. In this study, we investigated the expression patterns of podoplanin using a new mouse monoclonal antibody D2-40, and compared them with CD21, a well-established FDC marker, in a comprehensive panel of cases. The panel included 4 FDC sarcomas, 38 spindle cell neoplasms of other types, 25 reactive lymphoid hyperplasia, and 117 lymphoid and 5 myeloid malignant hematopoietic neoplasms. Our study revealed that D2-40 strongly stained 3 of 4 FDC sarcomas. In contrast, D2-40 stained only 2/38 other spindle cell neoplasms tested. Furthermore, we observed that D2-40 highlighted more FDC meshworks than CD21 in Castleman's disease, follicular lymphoma, nodular lymphocyte predominance Hodgkin lymphoma, and residual reactive germinal centers in a variety of lymphoma types. D2-40 and CD21 stained an equal number of cases of reactive lymphoid hyperplasia, progressively transformed germinal centers and angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma. No expression of podoplanin was detected in normal or neoplastic lymphoid and myeloid cells. We conclude that podoplanin (D2-40) is a sensitive and specific FDC marker, which is superior or equal to CD21 in evaluating both reactive and neoplastic FDCs. In addition, our results suggest that podoplanin (D2-40) can be used to support the diagnosis of FDC sarcoma. PMID:18784810

  4. Transcriptional Inhibition of the Human Papilloma Virus Reactivates Tumor Suppressor p53 in Cervical Carcinoma Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochetkov, D. V.; Ilyinskaya, G. V.; Komarov, P. G.; Strom, E.; Agapova, L. S.; Ivanov, A. V.; Budanov, A. V.; Frolova, E. I.; Chumakov, P. M.

    2009-01-01

    Inactivation of tumor suppressor p53 accompanies the majority of human malignancies. Restoration of p53 function causes death of tumor cells and is potentially suitable for gene therapy of cancer. In cervical carcinoma, human papilloma virus (HPV) E6 facilitates proteasomal degradation of p53. Hence, a possible approach to p53 reactivation is the use of small molecules suppressing the function of viral proteins. HeLa cervical carcinoma cells (HPV-18) with a reporter construct containing the b-galactosidase gene under the control of a p53-responsive promoter were used as a test system to screen a library of small molecules for restoration of the transcriptional activity of p53. The effect of the two most active compounds was studied with cell lines differing in the state of p53-dependent signaling pathways. The compounds each specifically activated p53 in cells expressing HPV-18 and, to a lesser extent, HPV-16 and exerted no effect on control p53-negative cells or cells with the intact p53-dependent pathways. Activation of p53 in cervical carcinoma cells was accompanied by induction of p53-dependent CDKN1 (p21), inhibition of cell proliferation, and induction of apoptosis. In addition, the two compounds dramatically decreased transcription of the HPV genome, which was assumed to cause p53 reactivation. The compounds were low-toxic for normal cells and can be considered as prototypes of new anticancer drugs. PMID:17685229

  5. Surgery-induced reactive oxygen species enhance colon carcinoma cell binding by disrupting the liver endothelial cell lining

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gül, Nuray; Bögels, Marijn; Grewal, Simran; van der Meer, Anne Jan; Rojas, Lucy Baldeon; Fluitsma, Donna M.; van den Tol, M. Petrousjka; Hoeben, Kees A.; van Marle, Jan; de Vries, Helga E.; Beelen, Robert H. J.; van Egmond, Marjolein

    2011-01-01

    Resection of primary colorectal cancer is associated with enhanced risk of development of liver metastases. It was previously demonstrated that surgery initiated an early inflammatory response resulting in elevated tumour cell adhesion in the liver. Because reactive oxygen species (ROS) are shown to

  6. Surgery-induced reactive oxygen species enhance colon carcinoma cell binding by disrupting the liver endothelial cell lining

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gül, N.; Bögels, M.; Grewal, S.; van der Meer, A.J.; Rojas, L.B.; Fluitsma, D.M.; van den Tol, M.P.; Hoeben, K.A.; van Marle, J.; de Vries, H.E.; Beelen, R.H.J.; van Egmond, M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Resection of primary colorectal cancer is associated with enhanced risk of development of liver metastases. It was previously demonstrated that surgery initiated an early inflammatory response resulting in elevated tumour cell adhesion in the liver. Because reactive oxygen species (ROS)

  7. Surgery-induced reactive oxygen species enhance colon carcinoma cell binding by disrupting the liver endothelial cell lining

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gul, N.; Bogels, M.; Grewal, S.; van der Meer, A.J.; Rojas, L.B.; Fluitsma, D.M.; van den Tol, M.P.; Hoeben, K.A.; van Marle, J.; de Vries, H.E.; Beelen, R.H.J.; van Egmond, M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Resection of primary colorectal cancer is associated with enhanced risk of development of liver metastases. It was previously demonstrated that surgery initiated an early inflammatory response resulting in elevated tumour cell adhesion in the liver. Because reactive oxygen species (ROS)

  8. Reactivating the Ni-YSZ electrode in solid oxide cells and stacks by infiltration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skafte, Theis Løye; Hjelm, Johan; Blennow, Peter; Graves, Christopher

    2018-02-01

    The solid oxide cell (SOC) could play a vital role in energy storage when the share of intermittent electricity production is high. However, large-scale commercialization of the technology is still hindered by the limited lifetime. Here, we address this issue by examining the potential for repairing various failure and degradation mechanisms occurring in the fuel electrode, thereby extending the potential lifetime of a SOC system. We successfully infiltrated the nickel and yttria-stabilized zirconia cermet electrode in commercial cells with Gd-doped ceria after operation. By this method we fully reactivated the fuel electrode after simulated reactant starvation and after carbon formation. Furthermore, by infiltrating after 900 h of operation, the degradation of the fuel electrode was reduced by a factor of two over the course of 2300 h. Lastly, the scalability of the concept is demonstrated by reactivating an 8-cell stack based on a commercial design.

  9. NKT cell self-reactivity: evolutionary master key of immune homeostasis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Navikas, Shohreh

    2011-01-01

    Complex immune responses have evolved to protect multicellular organisms against the invasion of pathogens. This has exerted strong developmental pressure for specialized functions that can also limit damage to self-tissue. Two arms of immunity, the innate and adaptive immune system, have evolved...... through evolution by higher vertebrates could be related to their central function as master regulators of immune homeostasis that in part is shared with regulatory T cells. Hypothetical views on how self-reactive NKT cells secure such a central role will also be proposed.......Complex immune responses have evolved to protect multicellular organisms against the invasion of pathogens. This has exerted strong developmental pressure for specialized functions that can also limit damage to self-tissue. Two arms of immunity, the innate and adaptive immune system, have evolved....... The recent finding of self-peptide reactivity of NKT cells in the context of CD1d, with capacity to regulate multiple autoimmune and inflammatory conditions, motivates the current proposal that self-reactive NKT cells might be the ancestral link between present NK and T cells. Their parallel selection...

  10. Reactivation in UV inactivated Escherichia coli by cell-free extracts of propionic acid bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorob'eva, L.I.; Nikitenko, G.V.; Khodzhaev, E.Yu.; Ponomareva, G.M.

    1993-01-01

    For the first time reactivation of cell extraction of three strains of Propionibacterium shermanii in UV inactivated not filament-forming strain Escherichia colli AB 1157 is shown. Reactivation was demonstrated in prencubated and postincubated test-culture and increased as survival of E.coli decreased in a range 1,8-0,006%. The factor (factores) of defense in dialysable, thermolable and is present as in a fraction of nucleoproteins and nucleic acids so in a fraction of soluble proteins. The extracts were inactivated by incubation with proteinase K and trypsin, partly decreased activity by incubation with alpha-amylase and selected nuclease but not with lipase. Polypeltide nature of reactivative factor is supposed

  11. Restraining reactive oxygen species in Listeria monocytogenes promotes the apoptosis of glial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sen; Li, Yixuan; Chen, Guowei; Zhang, Jingchen; Xu, Fei; Wu, Man

    2017-07-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a facultative anaerobic foodborne pathogen that can traverse the blood-brain barrier and cause brain infection. L. monocytogenes infection induces host cell apoptosis in several cell types. In this study, we investigated the apoptosis of human glioma cell line U251 invaded by L. monocytogenes and evaluated the function of bacterial reactive oxygen species (ROS) during infection. Bacterial ROS level was reduced by carrying out treatment with N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) and diphenyleneiodonium chloride (DPI). After infection, the apoptosis of U251 cells was examined by flow cytometry assay and propidium iodide staining. DPI and NAC efficiently decreased ROS level in L. monocytogenes without affecting bacterial growth. Moreover, the apoptosis of glial cells was enhanced upon invasion of DPI- and NAC-pretreated L. monocytogenes. Results indicate that the apoptosis of glial cells can be induced by L. monocytogenes, and that the inhibition of bacterial ROS increases the apoptosis of host cells.

  12. Dermal fibroblast-to-myofibroblast transition sustained by αvß3 integrin-ILK-Snail1/Slug signaling is a common feature for hypermobile Ehlers-Danlos syndrome and hypermobility spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoppi, Nicoletta; Chiarelli, Nicola; Binetti, Silvia; Ritelli, Marco; Colombi, Marina

    2018-04-01

    Hypermobile Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (hEDS) is a heritable connective tissue disorder with unknown molecular basis mainly characterized by generalized joint hypermobility, joint instability complications, and minor skin changes. The phenotypic spectrum is broad and includes multiple associated symptoms shared with chronic inflammatory systemic diseases. The stricter criteria defined in the 2017 EDS nosology leave without an identity many individuals with symptomatic joint hypermobility and/or features of hEDS; for these patients, the term Hypermobility Spectrum Disorders (HSD) was introduced. We previously reported that in vitro cultured hEDS and HSD patients' skin fibroblasts show a disarray of several extracellular matrix (ECM) components and dysregulated expression of genes involved in connective tissue homeostasis and inflammatory/pain/immune responses. Herein, we report that hEDS and HSD skin fibroblasts exhibit in vitro a similar myofibroblast-like phenotype characterized by the organization of α-smooth muscle actin cytoskeleton, expression of OB-cadherin/cadherin-11, enhanced migratory capability associated with augmented levels of the ECM-degrading metalloproteinase-9, and altered expression of the inflammation mediators CCN1/CYR61 and CCN2/CTGF. We demonstrate that in hEDS and HSD cells this fibroblast-to-myofibroblast transition is triggered by a signal transduction pathway that involves αvβ3 integrin-ILK complexes, organized in focal adhesions, and the Snail1/Slug transcription factor, thus providing insights into the molecular mechanisms related to the pathophysiology of these protean disorders. The indistinguishable phenotype identified in hEDS and HSD cells resembles an inflammatory-like condition, which correlates well with the systemic phenotype of patients, and suggests that these multisystemic disorders might be part of a phenotypic continuum rather than representing distinct clinical entities. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Phenotypic modulation of auto-reactive cells by insertion of tolerogenic molecules via MSC-derived exosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokarizadeh, Aram; Delirezh, Nowruz; Morshedi, Ahhmad; Mosayebi, Ghasem; Farshid, Amir-Abbas; Dalir-Naghadeh, Bahram

    2012-01-01

    Auto-reactive cells-mediated immune responses are responsible for the current tissue damages during autoimmunity. Accordingly, functional modulation of auto-reactive cells has been a pivotal aim in many of recent studies. In the current study, we investigated the possibility for insertion of regulatory molecules onto auto-reactive cells through exosomal nano-shuttles as a novel approach for phenotype modification of auto-reactive cells. The exosomes were isolated from supernatant of mesenchymal stem cells culture. Resultant exosomes co-cultured with lymphocytes were harvested from established EAE mice in the presence of antigenic MOG35-55 peptide. After 24 hr, insertion of exosomal tolerogenic molecules (PD-L1, TGF-β, galectin-1) onto auto-reactive cells were explored through flow cytometry. The potency of exosomal inserted membrane molecules to modulate phenotype of auto-reactive lymphocytes was assessed upon ELISA test for their-derived cytokines IFN-γ and IL-17. Incorporation of exosomal molecules into lymohocytes' membrane was confirmed by flow cytometric analyses for surface levels of mentioned molecules. Additionally, the decreased secretion of IFN-γ and IL-17 were detected in exosome pre-treated lymphocytes upon stimulation with MOG peptide. Mesenchymal stem cells -derived exosomes showed to be efficient organelles for insertion of bioactive tolerogenic molecules onto auto-reactive cells and modulation of their phenotypes.

  14. Hotspot autoimmune T cell receptor binding underlies pathogen and insulin peptide cross-reactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, David K.; Bulek, Anna M.; Dolton, Garry; Schauenberg, Andrea J.; Szomolay, Barbara; Trimby, Andrew; Jothikumar, Prithiviraj; Fuller, Anna; Skowera, Ania; Rossjohn, Jamie; Zhu, Cheng; Miles, John J.; Wooldridge, Linda; Rizkallah, Pierre J.; Sewell, Andrew K.

    2016-01-01

    The cross-reactivity of T cells with pathogen- and self-derived peptides has been implicated as a pathway involved in the development of autoimmunity. However, the mechanisms that allow the clonal T cell antigen receptor (TCR) to functionally engage multiple peptide–major histocompatibility complexes (pMHC) are unclear. Here, we studied multiligand discrimination by a human, preproinsulin reactive, MHC class-I–restricted CD8+ T cell clone (1E6) that can recognize over 1 million different peptides. We generated high-resolution structures of the 1E6 TCR bound to 7 altered peptide ligands, including a pathogen-derived peptide that was an order of magnitude more potent than the natural self-peptide. Evaluation of these structures demonstrated that binding was stabilized through a conserved lock-and-key–like minimal binding footprint that enables 1E6 TCR to tolerate vast numbers of substitutions outside of this so-called hotspot. Highly potent antigens of the 1E6 TCR engaged with a strong antipathogen-like binding affinity; this engagement was governed though an energetic switch from an enthalpically to entropically driven interaction compared with the natural autoimmune ligand. Together, these data highlight how T cell cross-reactivity with pathogen-derived antigens might break self-tolerance to induce autoimmune disease. PMID:27183389

  15. Photoluminescent Gold Nanoclusters in Cancer Cells: Cellular Uptake, Toxicity, and Generation of Reactive Oxygen Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matulionyte, Marija; Dapkute, Dominyka; Budenaite, Laima; Jarockyte, Greta; Rotomskis, Ricardas

    2017-02-10

    In recent years, photoluminescent gold nanoclusters have attracted considerable interest in both fundamental biomedical research and practical applications. Due to their ultrasmall size, unique molecule-like optical properties, and facile synthesis gold nanoclusters have been considered very promising photoluminescent agents for biosensing, bioimaging, and targeted therapy. Yet, interaction of such ultra-small nanoclusters with cells and other biological objects remains poorly understood. Therefore, the assessment of the biocompatibility and potential toxicity of gold nanoclusters is of major importance before their clinical application. In this study, the cellular uptake, cytotoxicity, and intracellular generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) of bovine serum albumin-encapsulated (BSA-Au NCs) and 2-(N-morpholino) ethanesulfonic acid (MES)capped photoluminescent gold nanoclusters (Au-MES NCs) were investigated. The results showed that BSA-Au NCs accumulate in cells in a similar manner as BSA alone, indicating an endocytotic uptake mechanism while ultrasmall Au-MES NCs were distributed homogeneously throughout the whole cell volume including cell nucleus. The cytotoxicity of BSA-Au NCs was negligible, demonstrating good biocompatibility of such BSA-protected Au NCs. In contrast, possibly due to ultrasmall size and thin coating layer, Au-MES NCs exhibited exposure time-dependent high cytotoxicity and higher reactivity which led to highly increased generation of reactive oxygen species. The results demonstrate the importance of the coating layer to biocompatibility and toxicity of ultrasmall photoluminescent gold nanoclusters.

  16. Photoluminescent Gold Nanoclusters in Cancer Cells: Cellular Uptake, Toxicity, and Generation of Reactive Oxygen Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Matulionyte

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, photoluminescent gold nanoclusters have attracted considerable interest in both fundamental biomedical research and practical applications. Due to their ultrasmall size, unique molecule-like optical properties, and facile synthesis gold nanoclusters have been considered very promising photoluminescent agents for biosensing, bioimaging, and targeted therapy. Yet, interaction of such ultra-small nanoclusters with cells and other biological objects remains poorly understood. Therefore, the assessment of the biocompatibility and potential toxicity of gold nanoclusters is of major importance before their clinical application. In this study, the cellular uptake, cytotoxicity, and intracellular generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS of bovine serum albumin-encapsulated (BSA-Au NCs and 2-(N-morpholino ethanesulfonic acid (MEScapped photoluminescent gold nanoclusters (Au-MES NCs were investigated. The results showed that BSA-Au NCs accumulate in cells in a similar manner as BSA alone, indicating an endocytotic uptake mechanism while ultrasmall Au-MES NCs were distributed homogeneously throughout the whole cell volume including cell nucleus. The cytotoxicity of BSA-Au NCs was negligible, demonstrating good biocompatibility of such BSA-protected Au NCs. In contrast, possibly due to ultrasmall size and thin coating layer, Au-MES NCs exhibited exposure time-dependent high cytotoxicity and higher reactivity which led to highly increased generation of reactive oxygen species. The results demonstrate the importance of the coating layer to biocompatibility and toxicity of ultrasmall photoluminescent gold nanoclusters.

  17. Tissue-specific control of latent CMV reactivation by regulatory T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maha Almanan

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Cytomegalovirus (CMV causes a persistent, lifelong infection. CMV persists in a latent state and undergoes intermittent subclinical viral reactivation that is quelled by ongoing T cell responses. While T cells are critical to maintain control of infection, the immunological factors that promote CMV persistence remain unclear. Here, we investigated the role of regulatory T cells (Treg in a mouse model of latent CMV infection using Foxp3-diphtheria toxin receptor (Foxp3-DTR mice. Eight months after infection, MCMV had established latency in the spleen, salivary gland, lung, and pancreas, which was accompanied by an increased frequency of Treg. Administration of diphtheria toxin (DT after establishment of latency efficiently depleted Treg and drove a significant increase in the numbers of functional MCMV-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Strikingly, Treg depletion decreased the number of animals with reactivatable latent MCMV in the spleen. Unexpectedly, in the same animals, ablation of Treg drove a significant increase in viral reactivation in the salivary gland that was accompanied with augmented local IL-10 production by Foxp3-CD4+T cells. Further, neutralization of IL-10 after Treg depletion significantly decreased viral load in the salivary gland. Combined, these data show that Treg have divergent control of MCMV infection depending upon the tissue. In the spleen, Treg antagonize CD8+ effector function and promote viral persistence while in the salivary gland Treg prevent IL-10 production and limit viral reactivation and replication. These data provide new insights into the organ-specific roles of Treg in controlling the reactivation of latent MCMV infection.

  18. Ionized gas (plasma) delivery of reactive oxygen species (ROS) into artificial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Sung-Ha; Jenkins, A Toby A; Szili, Endre J; Short, Robert D

    2014-01-01

    This study was designed to enhance our understanding of how reactive oxygen species (ROS), generated ex situ by ionized gas (plasma), can affect the regulation of signalling processes within cells. A model system, comprising of a suspension of phospholipid vesicles (cell mimics) encapsulating a ROS reporter, was developed to study the plasma delivery of ROS into cells. For the first time it was shown that plasma unequivocally delivers ROS into cells over a sustained period and without compromising cell membrane integrity. An important consideration in cell and biological assays is the presence of serum, which significantly reduced the transfer efficiency of ROS into the vesicles. These results are key to understanding how plasma treatments can be tailored for specific medical or biotechnology applications. Further, the phospholipid vesicle ROS reporter system may find use in other studies involving the application of free radicals in biology and medicine. (fast track communication)

  19. Ionized gas (plasma) delivery of reactive oxygen species (ROS) into artificial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sung-Ha; Szili, Endre J.; Jenkins, A. Toby A.; Short, Robert D.

    2014-09-01

    This study was designed to enhance our understanding of how reactive oxygen species (ROS), generated ex situ by ionized gas (plasma), can affect the regulation of signalling processes within cells. A model system, comprising of a suspension of phospholipid vesicles (cell mimics) encapsulating a ROS reporter, was developed to study the plasma delivery of ROS into cells. For the first time it was shown that plasma unequivocally delivers ROS into cells over a sustained period and without compromising cell membrane integrity. An important consideration in cell and biological assays is the presence of serum, which significantly reduced the transfer efficiency of ROS into the vesicles. These results are key to understanding how plasma treatments can be tailored for specific medical or biotechnology applications. Further, the phospholipid vesicle ROS reporter system may find use in other studies involving the application of free radicals in biology and medicine.

  20. Selection of Shared and Neoantigen-Reactive T Cells for Adoptive Cell Therapy Based on CD137 Separation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivan Seliktar-Ofir

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Adoptive cell therapy (ACT of autologous tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL is an effective immunotherapy for patients with solid tumors, yielding objective response rates of around 40% in refractory patients with metastatic melanoma. Most clinical centers utilize bulk, randomly isolated TIL from the tumor tissue for ex vivo expansion and infusion. Only a minor fraction of the administered T cells recognizes tumor antigens, such as shared and mutation-derived neoantigens, and consequently eliminates the tumor. Thus, there are many ongoing effects to identify and select tumor-specific TIL for therapy; however, those approaches are very costly and require months, which is unreasonable for most metastatic patients. CD137 (4-1BB has been identified as a co-stimulatory marker, which is induced upon the specific interaction of T cells with their target cell. Therefore, CD137 can be a useful biomarker and an important tool for the selection of tumor-reactive T cells. Here, we developed and validated a simple and time efficient method for the selection of CD137-expressing T cells for therapy based on magnetic bead separation. CD137 selection was performed with clinical grade compliant reagents, and TIL were expanded in a large-scale manner to meet cell numbers required for the patient setting in a GMP facility. For the first time, the methodology was designed to comply with both clinical needs and limitations, and its feasibility was assessed. CD137-selected TIL demonstrated significantly increased antitumor reactivity and were enriched for T cells recognizing neoantigens as well as shared tumor antigens. CD137-based selection enabled the enrichment of tumor-reactive T cells without the necessity of knowing the epitope specificity or the antigen type. The direct implementation of the CD137 separation method to the cell production of TIL may provide a simple way to improve the clinical efficiency of TIL ACT.

  1. Obtaining incremental multigroup cross sections for CANDU super cells with reactivity devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balaceanu, V.; Constantin, M.

    2001-01-01

    In the last 20 years a multigroup methodology WIMS - PIJXYZ (WP) was developed and validated at INR Pitesti for obtaining incremental cross sections for reactivity devices in CANDU reactors. This is an alternate methodology to the CANDU classic methodology (experimentally adjusted) based on the POWDERPUFS and MULTICELL computer codes. The 2D supercell calculation performed with the WIMS code, that is a NEA Data Bank transport code, and which produces multigroup cross sections (on 18 energy groups) for CANDU supercell material (standard and perturbed, with and without reactivity devices). To obtain an as correct as possible 3D modelling for the CANDU supercells containing reactivity devices, the WIMS cross sections are used as input data for the PIJXYZ code, thus obtaining homogenized cross sections for CANDU supercells. PIJXYZ is an integral transport code based on the formalism of the first collision probabilities. It is analogue to the SHETAN code and it was created for neutron analyzes at cell level for CANDU type reactors were the reactivity devices are perpendicular to the fuel channels. The coordinate system used in PIJXYZ is a mixed one, namely a rectangular-cylindrical system. The geometric model used in PIJXYZ is presented. The fuel beam is represented by a horizontal cylinder and the reactivity device by a vertical one both cylinders being immersed in the moderator. Two supercell types were considered: a perturbed supercell (containing a reactivity device) and the standard supercell were the place of reactivity device is occupied by the moderator. The incremental cross sections for reactivity device are obtained as differences between the homogenized over supercell cross sections (with reactivity device) and homogenized over standards supercell (without device) cross sections. The PIJXYZ computation may be done on an energy cutting with 2 up to 18 groups. The validation of VIMS - PIJXYZ was done on the basis of several benchmark and by comparison with

  2. Amino acid similarity accounts for T cell cross-reactivity and for "holes" in the T cell repertoire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pletscher-Frankild, Sune; de Boer, Rob J.; Lund, Ole

    2008-01-01

    Background: Cytotoxic T cell (CTL) cross-reactivity is believed to play a pivotal role in generating immune responses but the extent and mechanisms of CTL cross-reactivity remain largely unknown. Several studies suggest that CTL clones can recognize highly diverse peptides, some sharing no obvious...... sequence identity. The emerging realization in the field is that T cell receptors (TcR) recognize multiple distinct ligands. Principal Findings: First, we analyzed peptide scans of the HIV epitope SLFNTVATL (SFL9) and found that TCR specificity is position dependent and that biochemically similar amino...... to demonstrate that seemingly distinct T cell epitopes, i.e., ones with low sequence identity, are in fact more biochemically similar than expected. Additionally, an analysis of HIV immunogenicity data with our model showed that CTLs have the tendency to respond mostly to peptides that do not resemble self...

  3. CDK2 differentially controls normal cell senescence and cancer cell proliferation upon exposure to reactive oxygen species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Chae Young; Lee, Seung-Min; Park, Sung Sup; Kwon, Ki-Sun

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► H 2 O 2 differently adjusted senescence and proliferation in normal and cancer cells. ► H 2 O 2 exposure transiently decreased PCNA levels in normal cells. ► H 2 O 2 exposure transiently increased CDK2 activity in cancer cells. ► p21 Cip1 is likely dispensable when H 2 O 2 induces senescence in normal cells. ► Suggestively, CDK2 and PCNA play critical roles in H 2 O 2 -induced cell fate decision. -- Abstract: Reactive oxygen species modulate cell fate in a context-dependent manner. Sublethal doses of H 2 O 2 decreased the level of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in normal cells (including primary human dermal fibroblasts and IMR-90 cells) without affecting cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) activity, leading to cell cycle arrest and subsequent senescence. In contrast, exposure of cancer cells (such as HeLa and MCF7 cells) to H 2 O 2 increased CDK2 activity with no accompanying change in the PCNA level, leading to cell proliferation. A CDK2 inhibitor, CVT-313, prevented H 2 O 2 -induced cancer cell proliferation. These results support the notion that the cyclin/CDK2/p21 Cip1 /PCNA complex plays an important role as a regulator of cell fate decisions.

  4. Release of intracellular Calcium increase production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species in renal distal epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Henning F.

    peroxide (H2O2) has traditionally been regarded as toxic by-products of aerobic metabolism. However, recent findings indicate that H2O2 act as a signalling molecule. The aim of the present study was to monitor, in real time, the rates of ROS generation in order to directly determine their production......Release of intracellular Calcium increase production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species in renal distal epithelial cells. Henning F. Bjerregaard, Roskilde University, Department of Science, Systems and Models , 4000 Roskilde, Denmark. HFB@ RUC.DK Reactive oxygen species (ROS) like, hydrogen...... to G-protein stimulation of phospholipase C and release of inositol -3 phosphate. Cd (0.4 mM) treatment of A6 cells enhanced the ROS production after one minutes incubation. The production rate was constant for at least 10 to 20 min. Experiments showed that the Cd induced increase in ROS production...

  5. Virus reactivations after autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation detected by multiplex PCR assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inazawa, Natsuko; Hori, Tsukasa; Nojima, Masanori; Saito, Makoto; Igarashi, Keita; Yamamoto, Masaki; Shimizu, Norio; Yoto, Yuko; Tsutsumi, Hiroyuki

    2017-02-01

    Several studies have indicated that viral reactivations following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) are frequent, but viral reactivations after autologous HSCT (auto-HSCT) have not been investigated in detail. We performed multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay to examine multiple viral reactivations simultaneously in 24 patients undergoing auto-HSCT between September 2010 and December 2012. Weekly whole blood samples were collected from pre- to 42 days post-HSCT, and tested for the following 13 viruses; herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), HSV-2, varicella-zoster virus (VZV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), cytomegalovirus (CMV), human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6), HHV-7, HHV-8, adeno virus (ADV), BK virus (BKV), JC virus (JCV), parvovirus B19 (B19V), and hepatitis B virus (HBV).  Fifteen (63%) patients had at least one type of viral reactivation. HHV6 (n = 10; 41.7%) was most frequently detected followed by EBV (n = 7; 29.2%). HHV-6 peaked on day 21 after HSCT and promptly declined. In addition, HBV, CMV, HHV7, and B19V were each detected in one patient. HHV6 reactivation was detected in almost half the auto-HSCT patients, which was similar to the incidence in allo-HSCT patients. The incidence of EBV was unexpectedly high. Viral infections in patients undergoing auto-HSCT were higher than previously reported in other studies. Although there were no particular complications of viral infection, we should pay attention to possible viral reactivations in auto-HSCT patients. J. Med. Virol. 89:358-362, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. E-Cigarette Aerosol Exposure Induces Reactive Oxygen Species, DNA Damage, and Cell Death in Vascular Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Chastain; Majeste, Andrew; Hanus, Jakub; Wang, Shusheng

    2016-12-01

    Cigarette smoking remains one of the leading causes of preventable death worldwide. Vascular cell death and dysfunction is a central or exacerbating component in the majority of cigarette smoking related pathologies. The recent development of the electronic nicotine delivery systems known as e-cigarettes provides an alternative to conventional cigarette smoking; however, the potential vascular health risks of e-cigarette use remain unclear. This study evaluates the effects of e-cigarette aerosol extract (EAE) and conventional cigarette smoke extract (CSE) on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). A laboratory apparatus was designed to produce extracts from e-cigarettes and conventional cigarettes according to established protocols for cigarette smoking. EAE or conventional CSE was applied to human vascular endothelial cells for 4-72 h, dependent on the assay. Treated cells were assayed for reactive oxygen species, DNA damage, cell viability, and markers of programmed cell death pathways. Additionally, the anti-oxidants α-tocopherol and n-acetyl-l-cysteine were used to attempt to rescue e-cigarette induced cell death. Our results indicate that e-cigarette aerosol is capable of inducing reactive oxygen species, causing DNA damage, and significantly reducing cell viability in a concentration dependent fashion. Immunofluorescent and flow cytometry analysis indicate that both the apoptosis and programmed necrosis pathways are triggered by e-cigarette aerosol treatment. Additionally, anti-oxidant treatment provides a partial rescue of the induced cell death, indicating that reactive oxygen species play a causal role in e-cigarette induced cytotoxicity. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. (3) Melatonin Protects Oocytes and Granulosa Cells from Reactive Oxygen Species during the Ovulatory Process

    OpenAIRE

    田村, 博史; Hiroshi, TAMURA; 山口大学大学院医学系研究科産科婦人科学; Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Yamaguchi University Graduate School of Medicine

    2009-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced within the follicle especially during the ovulatory process. ROS play a physiological role in the process of ovulation, e.g. follicle rapture. However, excessive amount of ROS causes oxidative stress and damages oocytes and luteinized granulosa cells. On the other hand, antioxidant defense systems including superoxide dismutase (SOD) or glutathione (GSH) are present in follicles. The balance between ROS and antioxidants within the follicle seems to b...

  8. CD1d-Restricted Type II NKT Cells Reactive With Endogenous Hydrophobic Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishioka, Yusuke; Masuda, Sakiko; Tomaru, Utano; Ishizu, Akihiro

    2018-01-01

    NKT cells belong to a distinct subset of T cells that recognize hydrophobic antigens presented by major histocompatibility complex class I-like molecules, such as CD1d. Because NKT cells stimulated by antigens can activate or suppress other immunocompetent cells through an immediate production of a large amount of cytokines, they are regarded as immunological modulators. CD1d-restricted NKT cells are classified into two subsets, namely, type I and type II. CD1d-restricted type I NKT cells express invariant T cell receptors (TCRs) and react with lipid antigens, including the marine sponge-derived glycolipid α-galactosylceramide. On the contrary, CD1d-restricted type II NKT cells recognize a wide variety of antigens, including glycolipids, phospholipids, and hydrophobic peptides, by their diverse TCRs. In this review, we focus particularly on CD1d-restricted type II NKT cells that recognize endogenous hydrophobic peptides presented by CD1d. Previous studies have demonstrated that CD1d-restricted type I NKT cells usually act as pro-inflammatory cells but sometimes behave as anti-inflammatory cells. It has been also demonstrated that CD1d-restricted type II NKT cells play opposite roles to CD1d-restricted type I NKT cells; thus, they function as anti-inflammatory or pro-inflammatory cells depending on the situation. In line with this, CD1d-restricted type II NKT cells that recognize type II collagen peptide have been demonstrated to act as anti-inflammatory cells in diverse inflammation-induction models in mice, whereas pro-inflammatory CD1d-restricted type II NKT cells reactive with sterol carrier protein 2 peptide have been demonstrated to be involved in the development of small vessel vasculitis in rats.

  9. Salinomycin induces autophagy in colon and breast cancer cells with concomitant generation of reactive oxygen species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berlinda Verdoodt

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Salinomycin is a polyether ionophore antibiotic that has recently been shown to induce cell death in human cancer cells displaying multiple mechanisms of drug resistance. The underlying mechanisms leading to cell death after salinomycin treatment have not been well characterized. We therefore investigated the role of salinomycin in caspase dependent and independent cell death in colon cancer (SW480, SW620, RKO and breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7, T47D, MDA-MB-453. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We detected features of apoptosis in all cell lines tested, but the executor caspases 3 and 7 were only strongly activated in RKO and MDA-MB-453 cells. MCF-7 and SW620 cells instead presented features of autophagy such as cytoplasmic vacuolization and LC3 processing. Caspase proficient cell lines activated autophagy at lower salinomycin concentrations and before the onset of caspase activation. Salinomycin also led to the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS eliciting JNK activation and induction of the transcription factor JUN. Salinomycin mediated cell death could be partially inhibited by the free radical scavenger N-acetyl-cysteine, implicating ROS formation in the mechanism of salinomycin toxicity. CONCLUSIONS: Our data indicate that, in addition to its previously reported induction of caspase dependent apoptosis, the initiation of autophagy is an important and early effect of salinomycin in tumor cells.

  10. Reactive Hypertrophy of an Accessory Spleen Mimicking Tumour Recurrence of Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christin Tjaden

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available De novo occurrence of an accessory spleen after splenectomy is worth noting for two reasons. First, it is known that splenectomy can cause reactive hypertrophy of initially inactive and macroscopically invisible splenic tissue. Second, it can mimic tumour recurrence in situations in which splenectomy has been performed for oncological reasons. This might cause difficulties in differential diagnosis and the clinical decision for reoperation. We report the case of a patient with suspected recurrence of renal cell carcinoma after total pancreatectomy and splenectomy for metastatic renal cell carcinoma, which finally revealed an accessory spleen as the morphological correlate of the newly diagnosed mass in the left retroperitoneum.

  11. Unique and cross-reactive T cell epitope peptides of the major Bahia grass pollen allergen, Pas n 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etto, Tamara; de Boer, Carmela; Prickett, Sara; Gardner, Leanne M; Voskamp, Astrid; Davies, Janet M; O'Hehir, Robyn E; Rolland, Jennifer M

    2012-01-01

    Bahia grass pollen (BaGP) is a major cause of allergic rhinitis. Subcutaneous allergen-specific immunotherapy is effective for grass pollen allergy, but is unsuitable for patients with moderate to severe asthma due to the risk of anaphylaxis. T cell-reactive but IgE nonreactive peptides provide a safer treatment option. This study aimed to identify and characterize dominant CD4(+) T cell epitope peptides of the major BaGP allergen, Pas n 1. Pas n 1-specific T cell lines generated from the peripheral blood of BaGP-allergic subjects were tested for proliferative and cytokine response to overlapping 20-mer Pas n 1 peptides. Cross-reactivity to homologous peptides from Lol p 1 and Cyn d 1 of Ryegrass and Bermuda grass pollen, respectively, was assessed using Pas n 1 peptide-specific T cell clones. MHC class II restriction of Pas n 1 peptide T cell recognition was determined by HLA blocking assays and peptide IgE reactivity tested by dot blotting. Three Pas n 1 peptides showed dominant T cell reactivity; 15 of 18 (83%) patients responded to one or more of these peptides. T cell clones specific for dominant Pas n 1 peptides showed evidence of species-specific T cell reactivity as well as cross-reactivity with other group 1 grass pollen allergens. The dominant Pas n 1 T cell epitope peptides showed HLA binding diversity and were non-IgE reactive. The immunodominant T cell-reactive Pas n 1 peptides are candidates for safe immunotherapy for individuals, including those with asthma, who are allergic to Bahia and possibly other grass pollens. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Anti-CD20 B-cell depletion enhances monocyte reactivity in neuroimmunological disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hohlfeld Reinhard

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical trials evaluating anti-CD20-mediated B-cell depletion in multiple sclerosis (MS and neuromyelitis optica (NMO generated encouraging results. Our recent studies in the MS model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE attributed clinical benefit to extinction of activated B-cells, but cautioned that depletion of naïve B-cells may be undesirable. We elucidated the regulatory role of un-activated B-cells in EAE and investigated whether anti-CD20 may collaterally diminish regulatory B-cell properties in treatment of neuroimmunological disorders. Methods Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG peptide-immunized C57Bl/6 mice were depleted of B-cells. Functional consequences for regulatory T-cells (Treg and cytokine production of CD11b+ antigen presenting cells (APC were assessed. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 22 patients receiving anti-CD20 and 23 untreated neuroimmunological patients were evaluated for frequencies of B-cells, T-cells and monocytes; monocytic reactivity was determined by TNF-production and expression of signalling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM. Results We observed that EAE-exacerbation upon depletion of un-activated B-cells closely correlated with an enhanced production of pro-inflammatory TNF by CD11b+ APC. Paralleling this pre-clinical finding, anti-CD20 treatment of human neuroimmunological disorders increased the relative frequency of monocytes and accentuated pro-inflammatory monocyte function; when reactivated ex vivo, a higher frequency of monocytes from B-cell depleted patients produced TNF and expressed the activation marker SLAM. Conclusions These data suggest that in neuroimmunological disorders, pro-inflammatory APC activity is controlled by a subset of B-cells which is eliminated concomitantly upon anti-CD20 treatment. While this observation does not conflict with the general concept of B-cell depletion in human autoimmunity, it implies that its safety and

  13. Comparative studies of host-cell reactivation, cellular capacity and enhanced reactivation of herpes simplex virus in normal, xeroderma pigmentosum and Cockayne syndrome fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryan, D.K.G.; Rainbow, A.J.; McMaster Univ., Hamilton, Ontario

    1986-01-01

    Host-cell reactivation (HCR) of UV-irradiated herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2), capacity of UV-irradiated cells to support HSV-2 plaque formation and UV-enhanced reactivation (UVER) of UV-irradiated HSV-2 were examined in fibroblasts from 4 patients with Cockayne syndrome (CS), 5 with xeroderma pigmentosum and 5 normals. The results indicate that delayed capacity for HSV-2 plaque formation is a more sensitive assay than HCR in the detection of cellular DNA-repair deficiency for XP and CS. For the examination of UVER, fibroblasts were irradiated with various UV doses and subsequently infected with either unirradiated or UV-irradiated HSV and scored for plaque formation 2 days later. UVER expression was maximum when the delay between UV-irradiation of the cells and HSV infection was 48 h. (Auth.)

  14. Reactive Oxygen Species and Their Implications on CD4+ T Cells in Type 1 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previte, Dana M; Piganelli, Jon D

    2017-11-28

    Previous work has indicated that type 1 diabetes (T1D) pathology is highly driven by reactive oxygen species (ROS). One way in which ROS shape the autoimmune response demonstrated in T1D is by promoting CD4 + T cell activation and differentiation. As CD4 + T cells are a significant contributor to pancreatic β cell destruction in T1D, understanding how ROS impact their development, activation, and differentiation is critical. Recent Advances: CD4 + T cells themselves generate ROS via nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase expression and electron transport chain activity. Moreover, T cells can also be exposed to exogenous ROS generated by other immune cells (e.g., macrophages and dendritic cells) and β cells. Genetically modified animals and ROS inhibitors have demonstrated that ROS blockade during activation results in CD4 + T cell hyporesponsiveness and reduced diabetes incidence. Critical Issues and Future Directions: Although the majority of studies with regard to T1D and CD4 + T cells have been done to examine the influence of redox on CD4 + T cell activation, this is not the only circumstance in which a T cell can be impacted by redox. ROS and redox have also been shown to play roles in CD4 + T cell-related tolerogenic mechanisms, including thymic selection and regulatory T cell-mediated suppression. However, the effect of these mechanisms with respect to T1D pathogenesis remains elusive. Therefore, pursuing these avenues may provide valuable insight into the global role of ROS and redox in autoreactive CD4 + T cell formation and function. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 00, 000-000.

  15. Tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO)-reactive T cells differ in their functional characteristics in health and cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjortsø, Mads Duus; Larsen, Stine Kiaer; Kongsted, Per

    2015-01-01

    of different origin. Interestingly, the processed and presented TDO-derived epitopes varied between different cancer cells. With respect to CD4(+) TDO-reactive T cells, in vitro expanded T-cell cultures comprised a Th1 and/or a Treg phenotype. In summary, our data demonstrate that the immune modulating enzyme....... In the present study, we detected the presence of both CD8(+) and CD4(+) T-cell reactivity toward TDO in peripheral blood of patients with malignant melanoma (MM) or breast cancer (BC) as well as healthy subjects. However, TDO-reactive CD4(+) T cells constituted distinct functional phenotypes in health...... TDO is a target for CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cell responses both in healthy subjects as well as patients with cancer; notably, however, the functional phenotype of these T-cell responses differ depending on the respective conditions of the host....

  16. Reactivation of DNA replication of the parvovirus MVM in UV preirradiated mouse cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vos, J.M.; Rommelaere, J. (Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Rhode-St-Genese (Belgium))

    1982-07-01

    The parvovirus Minute-Virus-of-Mice (MVM) was used to probe the DNA replication activities expressed by mouse fibroblasts. This system allowed us to study quantitatively the effect of UV-induced DNA lesions on the progression of DNA replication in vivo. MVM was UV-irradiated prior to infection. Pyrimidine dimers induced in the viral genome account for the reduced level of intracellular viral DNA synthesis, assuming that most of these lesions block viral DNA replication in unirradiated cells. The inhibition of damaged MVM DNA synthesis is less severe if the host cells themselves are irradiated prior to virus infection. This stimulation of viral DNA replication in pretreated cells might account for the UV-enhanced viral reactivation phenomenon, i.e. the increased survival of nuclear-replicating viruses propagated in cells preexposed to various genotoxic agents.

  17. Reactivation of DNA replication of the parvovirus MVM in UV preirradiated mouse cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vos, J.M.; Rommelaere, Jean

    1982-01-01

    The parvovirus Minute-Virus-of-Mice (MVM) was used to probe the DNA replication activities expressed by mouse fibroblasts. This system allowed us to study quantitatively the effect of UV-induced DNA lesions on the progression of DNA replication in vivo. MVM was UV-irradiated prior to infection. Pyrimidine dimers induced in the viral genome account for the reduced level of intracellular viral DNA synthesis, assuming that most of these lesions block viral DNA replication in unirradiated cells. The inhibition of damaged MVM DNA synthesis is less severe if the host cells themselves are irradiated prior to virus infection. This stimulation of viral DNA replication in pretreated cells might account for the UV-enhanced viral reactivation phenomenon, i.e. the increased survival of nuclear-replicating viruses propagated in cells preexposed to various genotoxic agents [fr

  18. Elevated and cross-responsive CD1a-reactive T cells in bee and wasp venom allergic individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Sumithra; Aslam, Aamir; Misbah, Siraj A; Salio, Mariolina; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Moody, D Branch; Ogg, Graham

    2016-01-01

    The role of CD1a-reactive T cells in human allergic disease is unknown. We have previously shown that circulating CD1a-reactive T cells recognize neolipid antigens generated by bee and wasp venom phospholipase, and here tested the hypothesis that venom-responsive CD1a-reactive T cells associate with venom allergy. Circulating T cells from bee and wasp venom allergic individuals, before and during immunotherapy, were exposed to CD1a-transfected K562 cells in the presence of wasp or bee venom. T-cell response was evaluated based on IFNγ, GM-CSF, and IL-13 cytokine production. Venom allergic individuals showed significantly higher frequencies of IFN-γ, GM-CSF, and IL-13 producing CD1a-reactive T cells responsive to venom and venom-derived phospholipase than healthy individuals. Venom-responsive CD1a-reactive T cells were cross-responsive between wasp and bee suggesting shared pathways of allergenicity. Frequencies of CD1a-reactive T cells were initially induced during subcutaneous immunotherapy, peaking by weeks 5, but then reduced despite escalation of antigen dose. Our current understanding of venom allergy and immunotherapy is largely based on peptide and protein-specific T cell and antibody responses. Here, we show that lipid antigens and CD1a-reactive T cells associate with the allergic response. These data have implications for mechanisms of allergy and approaches to immunotherapy. © 2015 The Authors. European Journal of Immunology published by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Tumor-reactive immune cells protect against metastatic tumor and induce immunoediting of indolent but not quiescent tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Kyle K; Keim, Rebecca C; Graham, Laura; Idowu, Michael O; Wan, Wen; Wang, Xiang-Yang; Toor, Amir A; Bear, Harry D; Manjili, Masoud H

    2016-09-01

    Two major barriers to cancer immunotherapy include tumor-induced immune suppression mediated by myeloid-derived suppressor cells and poor immunogenicity of the tumor-expressing self-antigens. To overcome these barriers, we reprogrammed tumor-immune cell cross-talk by combined use of decitabine and adoptive immunotherapy, containing tumor-sensitized T cells and CD25(+) NKT cells. Decitabine functioned to induce the expression of highly immunogenic cancer testis antigens in the tumor, while also reducing the frequency of myeloid-derived suppressor cells and the presence of CD25(+) NKT cells rendered T cells, resistant to remaining myeloid-derived suppressor cells. This combinatorial therapy significantly prolonged survival of animals bearing metastatic tumor cells. Adoptive immunotherapy also induced tumor immunoediting, resulting in tumor escape and associated disease-related mortality. To identify a tumor target that is incapable of escape from the immune response, we used dormant tumor cells. We used Adriamycin chemotherapy or radiation therapy, which simultaneously induce tumor cell death and tumor dormancy. Resultant dormant cells became refractory to additional doses of Adriamycin or radiation therapy, but they remained sensitive to tumor-reactive immune cells. Importantly, we discovered that dormant tumor cells contained indolent cells that expressed low levels of Ki67 and quiescent cells that were Ki67 negative. Whereas the former were prone to tumor immunoediting and escape, the latter did not demonstrate immunoediting. Our results suggest that immunotherapy could be highly effective against quiescent dormant tumor cells. The challenge is to develop combinatorial therapies that could establish a quiescent type of tumor dormancy, which would be the best target for immunotherapy. © The Author(s).

  20. FOXO3a reactivation mediates the synergistic cytotoxic effects of rapamycin and cisplatin in oral squamous cell carcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang Liang; Wang Huiming; Zhou Lin; Yu Da

    2011-01-01

    FOXO3a, a well-known transcriptional regulator, controls a wide spectrum of biological processes. The Phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling pathway inactivates FOXO3a via phosphorylation-induced nuclear exclusion and degradation. A loss or gain of FOXO3a activity has been correlated with efficiency of chemotherapies in various cancers including oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Therefore, in the current study, we have investigated the FOXO3a activity modulating and antitumor effects of rapamycin and cisplatin in OSCC cells. Cisplatin inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis in a dose-dependent way in OSCC Tca8113 cells. Rapamycin alone had no effect on cell proliferation and apoptosis. Rapamycin downregulated the expression of S-phase kinase associated protein-2 (Skp2) and increased the FOXO3a protein stability but induced the upregulation of feedback Akt activation-mediated FOXO3a phosphorylation. Cisplatin decreased the phosphorylation of FOXO3a via Akt inhibition. Rapamycin combined with cisplatin as its feedback Akt activation inhibitor revealed the most dramatic FOXO3a nuclear localization and reactivation with the prevention of its feedback loop and exposed significant synergistic effects of decreased cell proliferation and increased apoptosis in vitro and decreased tumor size in vivo. Furthermore, the downstream effects of FOXO3a reactivation were found to be accumulation of p27 and Bim. In conclusion, rapamycin/cisplatin combination therapy boosts synergistic antitumor effects through the significant FOXO3a reactivation in OSCC cells. These results may represent a novel mechanism by which rapamycin/cisplatin combination therapy proves to be a potent molecular-targeted strategy for OSCC.

  1. Enhanced reactivation of UV-irradiated adenovirus 2 in HeLa cells treated with non-mutagenic chemical agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piperakis, S.M.; McLennan, A.G. (Liverpool Univ. (UK). Dept. of Biochemistry)

    1985-03-01

    Treatment of HeLa cells with ethanol and sodium arsenite, compounds which are known to elicit the heat-shock response, before infection with UV-irradiated adenovirus 2 has been found to result in the enhanced reactivation of the damaged virus in a manner similar to that obtained by pre-irradiation or heating of the cells. Enhanced reactivation may be the result of the inhibition of DNA synthesis caused by these agents since hydroxyurea also produced a significant enhancement.

  2. Behaviour of the reactivity for BWR fuel cells; Comportamiento de la reactividad para celdas de combustible BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, J. A.; Alonso, G.; Delfin, A.; Vargas, S. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Del Valle G, E., E-mail: galonso@inin.gob.mx [IPN, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, U. P. Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Col. Lindavista, 07738 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2011-11-15

    In this work the behaviour of the reactivity of a fuel assembly type BWR was studied, the objective is to obtain some expressions that consider the average enrichment of U-235 and the gadolinium concentration like a function of the fuel cells burnt. Also, the applicability of the lineal reactivity model was analyzed for fuel cells type BWR. The analysis was carried out with the CASMO-4 code. (Author)

  3. Enhanced reactive oxygen species overexpression by CuO nanoparticles in poorly differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kung, Mei-Lang; Hsieh, Shu-Ling; Wu, Chih-Chung; Chu, Tian-Huei; Lin, Yu-Chun; Yeh, Bi-Wen; Hsieh, Shuchen

    2015-01-01

    Copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO NPs) are known to exhibit toxic effects on a variety of cell types and organs. To determine the oxidative impact of CuO NPs on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells, well-differentiated (HepG2) and poorly differentiated (SK-Hep-1) cells were exposed to CuO NPs. Cell viability assay showed that the median inhibition concentration (IC50) for SK-Hep-1 and HepG2 cells was 25 μg ml-1 and 85 μg ml-1, respectively. Cellular fluorescence intensity using DCFH-DA staining analysis revealed significant intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation of up to 242% in SK-Hep-1 cells, compared with 86% in HepG2 cells. HPLC analysis demonstrated that a CuO NP treatment caused cellular GSH depletion of 58% and a GSH/GSSG ratio decrease to ~0.1 in SK-Hep-1 cells. The oxidative stress caused by enhanced superoxide anion production was observed in both HepG2 (146%) and SK-Hep-1 (192%) cells. The Griess assay verified that CuO NPs induced NO production (170%) in SK-Hep-1 cells. Comet assay and western blot further demonstrated that CuO NPs induced severe DNA strand breakage (70%) in SK-Hep-1 cells and caused DNA damage via increased γ-H2AX levels. These results suggest that well-differentiated HepG2 cells possess a robust antioxidant defense system against CuO NP-induced ROS stress and exhibit more tolerance to oxidative stress. Conversely, poorly differentiated SK-Hep-1 cells exhibited a deregulated antioxidant defense system that allowed accumulation of CuO NP-induced ROS and resulted in severe cytotoxicity.Copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO NPs) are known to exhibit toxic effects on a variety of cell types and organs. To determine the oxidative impact of CuO NPs on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells, well-differentiated (HepG2) and poorly differentiated (SK-Hep-1) cells were exposed to CuO NPs. Cell viability assay showed that the median inhibition concentration (IC50) for SK-Hep-1 and HepG2 cells was 25 μg ml-1 and 85 μg ml-1, respectively

  4. Regulation of radiation protective agents on cell damage induced by reactive oxygen species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jeong Hee; Lee, Si Eun; Ju, Eun Mi; Gao, Eu Feng [Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea)

    2002-04-01

    In this study, we developed candidates of new radio-protective agents and elucidated the regulation mechanism of these candidates on cell damage induced by reactive oxygen species. The methanol extracts and ethylacetate fractions of NP-1, NP-5, NP-7, NP-11, NP-12 and NP-14 showed higher radical scavenging activity. The extracts of NP-7, NP-12 and NP-14 showed strong protective effect against oxidative damage induced by UV and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. The most of samples enhanced SOD, CAT and GPX activity in V79-4 cells. The protective effect of samples on H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced apoptosis was observed with microscope and flow cytometer. Cells exposed to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} exhibit distinct morphological features of programmed cell death, such as nuclear fragmentation and increase in the percentage of cells with a sub-G1 DNA content. However, cells which was pretreated with samples significantly reduced the characteristics of apoptotic cells. Their morphological observation and DNA profiles were similar to those of the control cells. NP-14 which had excellent antioxidant activity restored G2/M arrest induced by oxidative stress. These data suggested that natural medicinal plants protected H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced apoptosis. 42 refs., 29 figs., 11 tabs. (Author)

  5. Generation of reactive oxygen species from porous silicon microparticles in cell culture medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Suet Peng; Williams, Keryn A; Canham, Leigh T; Voelcker, Nicolas H

    2010-06-01

    Nanostructured (porous) silicon is a promising biodegradable biomaterial, which is being intensively researched as a tissue engineering scaffold and drug-delivery vehicle. Here, we tested the biocompatibility of non-treated and thermally-oxidized porous silicon particles using an indirect cell viability assay. Initial direct cell culture on porous silicon determined that human lens epithelial cells only poorly adhered to non-treated porous silicon. Using an indirect cell culture assay, we found that non-treated microparticles caused complete cell death, indicating that these particles generated a toxic product in cell culture medium. In contrast, thermally-oxidized microparticles did not reduce cell viability significantly. We found evidence for the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by means of the fluorescent probe 2',7'-dichlorofluorescin. Our results suggest that non-treated porous silicon microparticles produced ROS, which interacted with the components of the cell culture medium, leading to the formation of cytotoxic species. Oxidation of porous silicon microparticles not only mitigated, but also abolished the toxic effects.

  6. Establishment of a vascular endothelial cell-reactive type II NKT cell clone from a rat model of autoimmune vasculitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iinuma, Chihiro; Waki, Masashi; Kawakami, Ai; Yamaguchi, Madoka; Tomaru, Utano; Sasaki, Naomi; Masuda, Sakiko; Matsui, Yuki; Iwasaki, Sari; Baba, Tomohisa; Kasahara, Masanori; Yoshiki, Takashi; Paletta, Daniel; Herrmann, Thomas; Ishizu, Akihiro

    2015-02-01

    We previously generated a rat model that spontaneously developed small vessel vasculitis (SVV). In this study, a T cell clone reactive with rat vascular endothelial cells (REC) was established and named VASC-1. Intravenous injection of VASC-1 induced SVV in normal recipients. VASC-1 was a TCRαβ/CD3-positive CD4/CD8 double-negative T cell clone with expression of NKG2D. The cytokine mRNA profile under unstimulated condition was positive for IL-4 and IFN-γ but negative for IL-2 and IL-10. After interaction with REC, the mRNA expression of IL-2, IL-5 and IL-6 was induced in VASC-1, which was inhibited by blocking of CD1d on the REC surface. Although the protein levels of these cytokines seemed to be lower than the detection limit in the culture medium, IFN-γ was detectable. The production of IFN-γ from the VASC-1 stimulated with LPS-pre-treated REC was inhibited by the CD1d blockade on the REC. These findings indicated VASC-1 as an NKT cell clone. The NKT cell pool includes two major subsets, namely types I and II. Type I NKT cells are characterized by expression of semi-invariant TCRs and the potential to bind to marine sponge-derived α-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer) loaded on CD1d; whereas, type II NKT cells do not manifest these characteristics. VASC-1 exhibited a usage of TCR other than the type I invariant TCR α chain and did not bind to α-GalCer-loaded CD1d; therefore, it was determined as a type II NKT cell clone. The collective evidence suggested that REC-reactive type II NKT cells could be involved in the pathogenesis of SVV in rats. © The Japanese Society for Immunology. 2014. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Streptococcus sanguinis induces foam cell formation and cell death of macrophages in association with production of reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okahashi, Nobuo; Okinaga, Toshinori; Sakurai, Atsuo; Terao, Yutaka; Nakata, Masanobu; Nakashima, Keisuke; Shintani, Seikou; Kawabata, Shigetada; Ooshima, Takashi; Nishihara, Tatsuji

    2011-10-01

    Streptococcus sanguinis, a normal inhabitant of the human oral cavity, is a common streptococcal species implicated in infective endocarditis. Herein, we investigated the effects of infection with S. sanguinis on foam cell formation and cell death of macrophages. Infection with S. sanguinis stimulated foam cell formation of THP-1, a human macrophage cell line. At a multiplicity of infection >100, S. sanguinis-induced cell death of the macrophages. Viable bacterial infection was required to trigger cell death because heat-inactivated S. sanguinis did not induce cell death. The production of cytokines interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α from macrophages was also stimulated during bacterial infection. Inhibition of the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) resulted in reduced cell death, suggesting an association of ROS with cell death. Furthermore, S. sanguinis-induced cell death appeared to be independent of activation of inflammasomes, because cleavage of procaspase-1 was not evident in infected macrophages. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Reactivity of inducer cell subsets and T8-cell activation during the human autologous mixed lymphocyte reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romain, P L; Morimoto, C; Daley, J F; Palley, L S; Reinherz, E L; Schlossman, S F

    1984-01-01

    To characterize the responding T cells in the autologous mixed lymphocyte reaction (AMLR), T cells were fractionated into purified subpopulations employing monoclonal antibodies and a variety of separation techniques including fluorescence-activated cell sorting. It was found that isolated T4 cells, but not T8 cells, proliferated in response to autologous non-T cells. More importantly, within the T4 subset, the autoreactive population was greatly enriched in a fraction reactive with an autoantibody from patients with juvenile chronic arthritis (JRA) or the monoclonal antibody anti-TQ1. Although T8 cells themselves were unable to proliferate in the AMLR, they could be induced to respond in the presence of either T4 cells or exogenous IL-2 containing medium. This was demonstrated by direct measurement of tritiated thymidine uptake by T8 cells during the course of the AMLR as well as by analysis of their relative DNA content. Taken together, these data indicate that the AMLR represents a complex pattern of immune responsiveness distinct from that observed in response to soluble antigen or alloantigen. The precise function of this T-cell circuit remains to be determined.

  9. Sensitization to epithelial antigens in chronic mucosal inflammatory disease. Characterization of human intestinal mucosa-derived mononuclear cells reactive with purified epithelial cell-associated components in vitro.

    OpenAIRE

    Roche, J K; Fiocchi, C; Youngman, K

    1985-01-01

    To explore the auto-reactive potential of cells infiltrating the gut mucosa in idiopathic chronic inflammatory bowel disease, intestinal lamina propria mononuclear cells (LPMC) were isolated, characterized morphologically and phenotypically, and evaluated for antigen-specific reactivity. The last was assessed by quantitating LPMC cytotoxic capabilities against purified, aqueous-soluble, organ-specific epithelial cell-associated components (ECAC) characterized previously. Enzyme-isolated infla...

  10. Development of tumor-reactive T cells after nonmyeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant for chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Tetsuya; Hudecek, Michael; Kostic, Ana; Bleakley, Marie; Warren, Edus H; Maloney, David; Storb, Rainer; Riddell, Stanley R

    2009-07-15

    Allogeneic nonmyeloablative hematopoietic stem cell transplant (NM-HSCT) can result in durable remission of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). It is thought that the efficacy of NM-HSCT is mediated by recognition of tumor cells by T cells in the donor stem cell graft. We evaluated the development of CTLs specific for CLL after NM-HSCT to determine if their presence correlated with antitumor efficacy. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells obtained from 12 transplant recipients at intervals after NM-HSCT were stimulated in vitro with CLL cells. Polyclonal T-cell lines and CD8(+) T-cell clones were derived from these cultures and evaluated for lysis of donor and recipient target cells including CLL. The presence and specificity of responses was correlated with clinical outcomes. Eight of the 12 patients achieved remission or a major antitumor response and all 8 developed CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells specific for antigens expressed by CLL. A clonal analysis of the CD8(+) T-cell response identified T cells specific for multiple minor histocompatibility (H) antigens expressed on CLL in six of the responding patients. A significant fraction of the CD8(+) T-cell response in some patients was also directed against nonshared tumor-specific antigens. By contrast, CLL-reactive T cells were not detected in the four patients who had persistent CLL after NM-HSCT, despite the development of graft-versus-host disease. The development of a diverse T-cell response specific for minor H and tumor-associated antigens expressed by CLL predicts an effective graft-versus-leukemia response after NM-HSCT.

  11. Elimination of self-reactive CD8+, but not CD4+, T cells by a peripheral immune mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rammensee, H.G.; Huegin, D.

    1990-01-01

    Unirradiated (BALB/c X B6)F1 recipients of lymphocytes from either parent or (B6 X DBA/2)F2 recipients of DBA/2 parental lymphocytes specifically remove the function of donor-derived F1-reactive CTL from the spleen, since such cells could not be recovered 1 week after injection. However, donor-derived CTL specific for third-party antigens, as well as donor-derived F1-reactive CD4+ T cells could be recovered. In contrast, CTL in spleens from recipients sublethally irradiated prior to injections consisted predominantly of F1-reactive CTL in all strain combinations tested. Athymic BALB/c nude mice grafted with fetal thymus of B6 develop a T cell compartment tolerant of BALB/c and B6, like (BALB/c X B6)F1 animals. However, unlike the F1 mice, the thymus-grafted nude mice were not able to eliminate B6-reactive lymphocytes after injection of normal BALB/c spleen cells. Our data indicate the existence of a peripheral immune mechanism capable of selectively eliminating self-reactive CD8+ CTL, but not CD4+, T cells. This mechanism requires self antigen expressed on radiosensitive cells. The presence of T cells tolerant to self antigen by thymic negative selection is not sufficient and perhaps not required. Most likely, this mechanism is involved in the relative resistance to lethal GVHR mediated by parental CD8+ T cells in parent-into-F1 situations

  12. Real-Time In Vivo Monitoring of Reactive Oxygen Species in Guard Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ky Young; Roubelakis-Angelakis, Kalliopi A

    2018-01-01

    The intra-/intercellular homeostasis of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and especially of superoxides (O 2 .- ) and hydrogen peroxide (O 2 .- ) participate in signalling cascades which dictate developmental processes and reactions to biotic/abiotic stresses. Polyamine oxidases terminally oxidize/back convert polyamines generating H 2 O 2 . Recently, an NADPH-oxidase/Polyamine oxidase feedback loop was identified to control oxidative burst under salinity. Thus, the real-time localization/monitoring of ROS in specific cells, such as the guard cells, can be of great interest. Here we present a detailed description of the real-time in vivo monitoring of ROS in the guard cells using H 2 O 2 - and O 2 .- specific fluorescing probes, which can be used for studying ROS accumulation generated from any source, including the amine oxidases-dependent pathway, during development and stress.

  13. Mechanism of artemisinin phytotoxicity action: induction of reactive oxygen species and cell death in lettuce seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhi-Qiang; Wang, Dan-Dan; Ding, Lan; Cui, Hai-Yan; Jin, Hui; Yang, Xiao-Yan; Yang, Jian-She; Qin, Bo

    2015-03-01

    Artemisinin has been recognized as an allelochemical that inhibits growth of several plant species. However, its mode of action is not well clarified. In this study, the mechanism of artemisinin phytotoxicity on lettuce seedlings was investigated. Root and shoot elongation of lettuce seedlings were inhibited by artemisinin in a concentration-dependent manner. The compound effectively arrested cell division and caused loss of cell viability in root tips of lettuce. Overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was induced by artemisinin. Lipid peroxidation, proline overproduction and reduction of chlorophyll content in lettuce seedlings were found after treatments. These results suggested that artemisinin could induce ROS overproduction, which caused membrane lipids peroxidation and cell death, and impacted mitosis and physiological processes, resulting in growth inhibition of receptor plants. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Enrichment of herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) reactive mucosal T cells in the human female genital tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posavad, C M; Zhao, L; Dong, L; Jin, L; Stevens, C E; Magaret, A S; Johnston, C; Wald, A; Zhu, J; Corey, L; Koelle, D M

    2017-09-01

    Local mucosal cellular immunity is critical in providing protection from HSV-2. To characterize and quantify HSV-2-reactive mucosal T cells, lymphocytes were isolated from endocervical cytobrush and biopsy specimens from 17 HSV-2-infected women and examined ex vivo for the expression of markers associated with maturation and tissue residency and for functional T-cell responses to HSV-2. Compared with their circulating counterparts, cervix-derived CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were predominantly effector memory T cells (CCR7-/CD45RA-) and the majority expressed CD69, a marker of tissue residency. Co-expression of CD103, another marker of tissue residency, was highest on cervix-derived CD8+ T cells. Functional HSV-2 reactive CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses were detected in cervical samples and a median of 17% co-expressed CD103. HSV-2-reactive CD4+ T cells co-expressed IL-2 and were significantly enriched in the cervix compared with blood. This first direct ex vivo documentation of local enrichment of HSV-2-reactive T cells in the human female genital mucosa is consistent with the presence of antigen-specific tissue-resident memory T cells. Ex vivo analysis of these T cells may uncover tissue-specific mechanisms of local control of HSV-2 to assist the development of vaccine strategies that target protective T cells to sites of HSV-2 infection.

  15. Induction of reactive oxygen species-stimulated distinctive autophagy by chelerythrine in non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zheng-Hai; Cao, Wen-Xiang; Wang, Zhao-Yu; Lu, Jia-Hong; Liu, Bo; Chen, Xiuping; Lu, Jin-Jian

    2017-08-01

    Chelerythrine (CHE), a natural benzo[c]phenanthridine alkaloid, shows anti-cancer effect through a number of mechanisms. Herein, the effect and mechanism of the CHE-induced autophagy, a type II programmed cell death, in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells were studied for the first time. CHE induced cell viability decrease, colony formation inhibition, and apoptosis in a concentration-dependent manner in NSCLC A549 and NCI-H1299 cells. In addition, CHE triggered the expression of phosphatidylethanolamine-modified microtubule-associated protein light-chain 3 (LC3-II). The CHE-induced expression of LC3-II was further increased in the combination treatment with chloroquine (CQ), an autophagy inhibitor, and large amounts of red-puncta were observed in the CHE-treated A549 cells with stable expression of mRFP-EGFP-LC3, indicating that CHE induces autophagy flux. Silence of beclin 1 reversed the CHE-induced expression of LC3-II. Inhibition of autophagy remarkably reversed the CHE-induced cell viability decrease and apoptosis in NCI-H1299 cells but not in A549 cells. Furthermore, CHE triggered reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in both cell lines. A decreased level of ROS through pretreatment with N-acetyl-L-cysteine reversed the CHE-induced cell viability decrease, apoptosis, and autophagy. Taken together, CHE induced distinctive autophagy in A549 (accompanied autophagy) and NCI-H1299 (pro-death autophagy) cells and a decreased level of ROS reversed the effect of CHE in NSCLC cells in terms of cell viability, apoptosis, and autophagy. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Reactive Oxygen Species and Mitochondrial Homeostasis as Regulators of Stem Cell Fate and Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Darren Q; Suda, Toshio

    2018-07-10

    The precise role and impact of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in stem cells, which are essential for lifelong tissue homeostasis and regeneration, remain of significant interest to the field. The long-term regenerative potential of a stem cell compartment is determined by the delicate balance between quiescence, self-renewal, and differentiation, all of which can be influenced by ROS levels. Recent Advances: The past decade has seen a growing appreciation for the importance of ROS and redox homeostasis in various stem cell compartments, particularly those of hematopoietic, neural, and muscle tissues. In recent years, the importance of proteostasis and mitochondria in relation to stem cell biology and redox homeostasis has garnered considerable interest. Here, we explore the reciprocal relationship between ROS and stem cells, with significant emphasis on mitochondria as a core component of redox homeostasis. We discuss how redox signaling, involving cell-fate determining protein kinases and transcription factors, can control stem cell function and fate. We also address the impact of oxidative stress on stem cells, especially oxidative damage of lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids. We further discuss ROS management in stem cells, and present recent evidence supporting the importance of mitochondrial activity and its modulation (via mitochondrial clearance, biogenesis, dynamics, and distribution [i.e., segregation and transfer]) in stem cell redox homeostasis. Therefore, elucidating the intricate links between mitochondria, cellular metabolism, and redox homeostasis is envisioned to be critical for our understanding of ROS in stem cell biology and its therapeutic relevance in regenerative medicine. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 00, 000-000.

  17. Loss of receptor on tuberculin-reactive T-cells marks active pulmonary tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathias Streitz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tuberculin-specific T-cell responses have low diagnostic specificity in BCG vaccinated populations. While subunit-antigen (e.g. ESAT-6, CFP-10 based tests are useful for diagnosing latent tuberculosis infection, there is no reliable immunological test for active pulmonary tuberculosis. Notably, all existing immunological tuberculosis-tests are based on T-cell response size, whereas the diagnostic potential of T-cell response quality has never been explored. This includes surface marker expression and functionality of mycobacterial antigen specific T-cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Flow-cytometry was used to examine over-night antigen-stimulated T-cells from tuberculosis patients and controls. Tuberculin and/or the relatively M. tuberculosis specific ESAT-6 protein were used as stimulants. A set of classic surface markers of T-cell naïve/memory differentiation was selected and IFN-gamma production was used to identify T-cells recognizing these antigens. The percentage of tuberculin-specific T-helper-cells lacking the surface receptor CD27, a state associated with advanced differentiation, varied considerably between individuals (from less than 5% to more than 95%. Healthy BCG vaccinated individuals had significantly fewer CD27-negative tuberculin-reactive CD4 T-cells than patients with smear and/or culture positive pulmonary tuberculosis, discriminating these groups with high sensitivity and specificity, whereas individuals with latent tuberculosis infection exhibited levels in between. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Smear and/or culture positive pulmonary tuberculosis can be diagnosed by a rapid and reliable immunological test based on the distribution of CD27 expression on peripheral blood tuberculin specific T-cells. This test works very well even in a BCG vaccinated population. It is simple and will be of great utility in situations where sputum specimens are difficult to obtain or sputum-smear is negative. It will also help

  18. Detection of the Level of Reactive Oxygen Species Induced by Ionizing Radiation in Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Kyu; Chung, Dong Min; Kim, Jin-Hong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    By definition, the direct effect is referred to interaction between photon and DNA molecule, whereas the indirect effect is mediated by the reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by radiolysis and subsequent reaction. It has been reported that ROS produced after exposure to IR can react with cellular materials such as DNA, proteins, carbohydrates and lipids. ROS is free radicals such as the superoxide anion, hydroxyl radicals and the non-radical hydrogen peroxide. Cells generate ROS during aerobic metabolism. Excessive production of ROS can lead to oxidative stress, genetic alteration and even cell death. It has been reported that ROS plays a critical role in radiation-induced cell injury. Thus, it is of great interest to determine the radiation-induced ROS level. Many kinds of methods to detect the level of ROS have been developed so far. There were random changes of fluorescence intensity in the treatment after irradiation. This result meant that this protocol was not appropriate for determination of radiation-induced ROS. On the other hand, the fluorescence intensity was increased in a dose-dependent manner when the cells were treated with the DCFH-DA solution before irradiation. Conclusions can be drawn from the experimental results of this study. In order to properly measure the ROS level in the cells exposed to ionizing radiation, the cells should be treated with the DCFH-DA solution before irradiation.

  19. Inhibition of Rho Kinase Induces Antioxidative Molecules and Suppresses Reactive Oxidative Species in Trabecular Meshwork Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomokazu Fujimoto

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To investigate the effect of rho kinase inhibitors on oxidative stress in trabecular meshwork (TM cells. Methods. TM cells were isolated from the eyes of cynomolgus monkeys. Y-27632 and menadione were used to inhibit rho kinase and induce production of reactive oxygen species (ROS, respectively. The cynomolgus monkey array and 12,613 probes were used in DNA microarray analysis, and the affected genes were categorized using gene ontology analysis. The mRNA levels of the target genes were confirmed by real-time RT-PCR. Intracellular oxidative stress was detected using a fluorescent reagent sensitive to ROS. Cell viability was assessed by the WST-8 assay. Results. Gene ontology analysis revealed upregulation of genes involved in antioxidant activity, and upregulation of catalase was confirmed by real-time RT-PCR after 30 min treatment with Y-27632. Production of ROS was increased by menadione, and the effect was partly suppressed by pretreatment with Y-27632. At a lower dose of menadione, Y-27632 stimulated TM cells and significantly increased their viability following menadione treatment compared to control cells. Conclusion. Using microarray analysis, Y-27632 was shown to upregulate antioxidative genes including catalase and partially reduce ROS production and cell death by oxidative stress caused by menadione.

  20. The utility of flow cytometry in differentiating NK/T cell lymphoma from indolent and reactive NK cell proliferations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mel, Sanjay; Li, Jenny Bei; Abid, Muhammad Bilal; Tang, Tiffany; Tay, Hui Ming; Ting, Wen Chang; Poon, Li Mei; Chung, Tae Hoon; Mow, Benjamin; Tso, Allison; Ong, Kiat Hoe; Chng, Wee Joo; Liu, Te Chih

    2018-01-01

    The WHO defines three categories of NK cell malignancies; extra nodal NK/T cell lymphoma (NKTCL), aggressive NK cell leukemia, and the provisional entity chronic lymphoproliferative disorder of NK cells (CLPD-NK). Although the flow cytometric (FC) phenotype of CLPD-NK has been described, studies on FC phenotype of NKTCL are limited. To the best of our knowledge ours is the first study to compare the phenotype of NKTCL, CLPD-NK, reactive NK lymphocytosis (RNKL), and normal NK cells using eight color (8C) FC. Specimens analyzed using the Euroflow8C NK Lymphoproliferative Disorder (NKLPD) panel between 2011 and 2014 were identified from our database. All samples were analyzed on the FACSCantoII cytometer. NK cells were identified as CD45+, smCD3-, CD19-, CD56+ and normal T-cells served as internal controls. The majority of NKTCL were CD56 bright, CD16 dim, CD57-, and CD94+. CLPD-NK and RNKL were predominantly CD56+ or dim with positive expression of CD16 and CD57 and weak CD94 expression. Antigen based statistical analyses showed robust division of samples along the NKTCL/normal CD56 bright NK cell and CLPD-NK/RNKL/normal CD56 positive NK cell groups. It was concluded that FC can reliably distinguish NKTCL from CLPD-NK, normal NK cells of CD56+ phenotype, and RNKL. It was proposed that the typical phenotype for NKTCL is: CD56 bright, CD16 dim with positive CD2, CD7, CD94, HLADR, CD25, CD26, and absent CD57. This resembles the phenotype of the CD56 bright immunoregulatory subset of NK cells which we therefore hypothesize is the cell of origin of NKTCL. © 2017 International Clinical Cytometry Society. © 2017 International Clinical Cytometry Society.

  1. ATM facilitates mouse gammaherpesvirus reactivation from myeloid cells during chronic infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulinski, Joseph M; Darrah, Eric J; Broniowska, Katarzyna A; Mboko, Wadzanai P; Mounce, Bryan C; Malherbe, Laurent P; Corbett, John A; Gauld, Stephen B; Tarakanova, Vera L

    2015-09-01

    Gammaherpesviruses are cancer-associated pathogens that establish life-long infection in most adults. Insufficiency of Ataxia-Telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase leads to a poor control of chronic gammaherpesvirus infection via an unknown mechanism that likely involves a suboptimal antiviral response. In contrast to the phenotype in the intact host, ATM facilitates gammaherpesvirus reactivation and replication in vitro. We hypothesized that ATM mediates both pro- and antiviral activities to regulate chronic gammaherpesvirus infection in an immunocompetent host. To test the proposed proviral activity of ATM in vivo, we generated mice with ATM deficiency limited to myeloid cells. Myeloid-specific ATM deficiency attenuated gammaherpesvirus infection during the establishment of viral latency. The results of our study uncover a proviral role of ATM in the context of gammaherpesvirus infection in vivo and support a model where ATM combines pro- and antiviral functions to facilitate both gammaherpesvirus-specific T cell immune response and viral reactivation in vivo. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Dual-reactive B cells are autoreactive and highly enriched in the plasmablast and memory B cell subsets of autoimmune mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Emilie M.; Velez, Maria-Gabriela; Leahy, Katelyn; Swanson, Cristina L.; Rubtsov, Anatoly V.; Torres, Raul M.

    2012-01-01

    Rare dual-reactive B cells expressing two types of Ig light or heavy chains have been shown to participate in immune responses and differentiate into IgG+ cells in healthy mice. These cells are generated more often in autoreactive mice, leading us to hypothesize they might be relevant in autoimmunity. Using mice bearing Igk allotypic markers and a wild-type Ig repertoire, we demonstrate that the generation of dual-κ B cells increases with age and disease progression in autoimmune-prone MRL and MRL/lpr mice. These dual-reactive cells express markers of activation and are more frequently autoreactive than single-reactive B cells. Moreover, dual-κ B cells represent up to half of plasmablasts and memory B cells in autoimmune mice, whereas they remain infrequent in healthy mice. Differentiation of dual-κ B cells into plasmablasts is driven by MRL genes, whereas the maintenance of IgG+ cells is partly dependent on Fas inactivation. Furthermore, dual-κ B cells that differentiate into plasmablasts retain the capacity to secrete autoantibodies. Overall, our study indicates that dual-reactive B cells significantly contribute to the plasmablast and memory B cell populations of autoimmune-prone mice suggesting a role in autoimmunity. PMID:22927551

  3. Moscatilin Inhibits Lung Cancer Cell Motility and Invasion via Suppression of Endogenous Reactive Oxygen Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akkarawut Kowitdamrong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the leading cause of death among cancer patients worldwide, and most of them have died from metastasis. Migration and invasion are prerequisite processes associated with high metastasis potential in cancers. Moscatilin, a bibenzyl derivative isolated from the Thai orchid Dendrobium pulchellum, has been shown to have anticancer effect against numerous cancer cell lines. However, little is known regarding the effect of moscatilin on cancer cell migration and invasion. The present study demonstrates that nontoxic concentrations of moscatilin were able to inhibit human nonsmall cell lung cancer H23 cell migration and invasion. The inhibitory effect of moscatilin was associated with an attenuation of endogenous reactive oxygen species (ROS, in which hydroxyl radical (OH∙ was identified as a dominant species in the suppression of filopodia formation. Western blot analysis also revealed that moscatilin downregulated activated focal adhesion kinase (phosphorylated FAK, Tyr 397 and activated ATP-dependent tyrosine kinase (phosphorylated Akt, Ser 473, whereas their parental counterparts were not detectable changed. In conclusion, our results indicate the novel molecular basis of moscalitin-inhibiting lung cancer cell motility and invasion and demonstrate a promising antimetastatic potential of such an agent for lung cancer therapy.

  4. [Value of immunocytochemistry in differential diagnosis of gastric adenocarcinoma, reactive mesothelial cells and malignant epithelial mesothelioma in metastatic effusion fluid].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, M; Cha, N; Zou, Y F; Leng, J H; Xu, L; Sun, Y; Hao, Y Y

    2018-03-08

    Objective: To investigate the diagnostic value of some antibodies in peritoneal fluid of patients with gastric cancer and malignant epithelioid mesothelioma in serous effusion. Methods: One hundred and eighty-two cases of serous effusion were collected at Jilin Cancer Hospital, from July 2012 to July 2016. The expression of GLUT1, CDX2, Villin, calretinin and WT1 was evaluated using SP immunocytochemical technique in peritoneal fluid samples collected from 98 patients with gastric cancer and 74 patients with reactive mesothelial cells. The expression of GLUT1, calretinin and WT1 was also evaluated in serous effusion from 10 patients with mesothelioma. Results: The sensitivity of GLUT1, CDX2 and Villin in adenocarcinoma cells was 91.8%(90/98), 68.4% (67/98) and 88.8%(87/98), respectively. The specificity was 95.9% (71/74), 100.0%(74/74) and 100.0% (74/74), respectively. The sensitivity of calretinin and WT1 for reactive mesothelium was 93.2% (69/74) and 79.7% (59/74), respectively. The specificity was 96.9% (95/98) and 100.0% (98/98), respectively. The sensitivity of GLUT1, calretinin and WT1 for mesothelioma was 9/10, 9/10 and 7/10. The reactivity of GLUT1, CDX2, Villin, calretinin and WT1 showed a significant difference ( P <0.01) between adenocarcinoma cells and reactive mesothelium. The reactivity of GLUT1 showed a significant difference ( P <0.01) between mesothelioma and reactive mesothelium. Conclusions: The optimal combination is a panel of GLUT1, CDX2, Villin, calretinin and WT1 for differential diagnosis between adenocarcinoma cells and reactive mesothelium in peritoneal fluid of patients with gastric cancer. Whereas GLUT1, calretinin and WT1 is the best for differential diagnosis between reactive mesothelium and mesothelioma in serous effusions.

  5. Natural killer cells facilitate PRAME-specific T-cell reactivity against neuroblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spel, Lotte; Boelens, Jaap-Jan; van der Steen, Dirk M.; Blokland, Nina J.G.; van Noesel, Max M.; Molenaar, Jan J.; Heemskerk, Mirjam H.M.

    2015-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is the most common solid tumor in children with an estimated 5-year progression free survival of 20–40% in stage 4 disease. Neuroblastoma actively avoids recognition by natural killer (NK) cells and cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). Although immunotherapy has gained traction for neuroblastoma treatment, these immune escape mechanisms restrain clinical results. Therefore, we aimed to improve neuroblastoma immunogenicity to further the development of antigen-specific immunotherapy against neuroblastoma. We found that neuroblastoma cells significantly increase surface expression of MHC I upon exposure to active NK cells which thereby readily sensitize neuroblastoma cells for recognition by CTLs. We show that oncoprotein PRAME serves as an immunodominant antigen for neuroblastoma as NK-modulated neuroblastoma cells are recognized by PRAMESLLQHLIGL/A2-specific CTL clones. Furthermore, NK cells induce MHC I upregulation in neuroblastoma through contact-dependent secretion of IFNγ. Our results demonstrate remarkable plasticity in the peptide/MHC I surface expression of neuroblastoma cells, which is reversed when neuroblastoma cells experience innate immune attack by sensitized NK cells. These findings support the exploration of NK cells as adjuvant therapy to enforce neuroblastoma-specific CTL responses. PMID:26452036

  6. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV Rta-mediated EBV and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus lytic reactivations in 293 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-Ju Chen

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus (EBV Rta belongs to a lytic switch gene family that is evolutionarily conserved in all gamma-herpesviruses. Emerging evidence indicates that cell cycle arrest is a common means by which herpesviral immediate-early protein hijacks the host cell to advance the virus's lytic cycle progression. To examine the role of Rta in cell cycle regulation, we recently established a doxycycline (Dox-inducible Rta system in 293 cells. In this cell background, inducible Rta modulated the levels of signature G1 arrest proteins, followed by induction of the cellular senescence marker, SA-β-Gal. To delineate the relationship between Rta-induced cell growth arrest and EBV reactivation, recombinant viral genomes were transferred into Rta-inducible 293 cells. Somewhat unexpectedly, we found that Dox-inducible Rta reactivated both EBV and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV, to similar efficacy. As a consequence, the Rta-mediated EBV and KSHV lytic replication systems, designated as EREV8 and ERKV, respectively, were homogenous, robust, and concurrent with cell death likely due to permissive lytic replication. In addition, the expression kinetics of EBV lytic genes in Dox-treated EREV8 cells was similar to that of their KSHV counterparts in Dox-induced ERKV cells, suggesting that a common pathway is used to disrupt viral latency in both cell systems. When the time course was compared, cell cycle arrest was achieved between 6 and 48 h, EBV or KSHV reactivation was initiated abruptly at 48 h, and the cellular senescence marker was not detected until 120 h after Dox treatment. These results lead us to hypothesize that in 293 cells, Rta-induced G1 cell cycle arrest could provide (1 an ideal environment for virus reactivation if EBV or KSHV coexists and (2 a preparatory milieu for cell senescence if no viral genome is available. The latter is hypothetical in a transient-lytic situation.

  7. Host-cell reactivation of ultraviolet-irradiated SV 40 DNA in five complementation groups of xeroderma pigmentosum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrahams, P.J.; Eb, A.J. van der

    1976-01-01

    Host-cell reactivation of UV-irradiated double-stranded SV40 DNA was studied in BSC-1 monkey cells, normal human cells, heterozygous Xeroderma pigmentosum xp cells, representative cell strains of the five complemention groups of XP and in XP 'variant' cells. The following percentages of survival of the plaque-forming ability of double-stranded SV40 DNA were found in XP cells compared with the value found in normal monkey and human cells: groupA, 13%; group B, 30%; group C, 18%; group D, 14%; group E, 59%; and in the heterozygous XP cells almost 100%. The survival in XP 'variant' cells was 66%. The survival of single-stranded SV40 DNA in BSC-1 cells was much lower than that of double-stranded SV40 DNA in XP cells of complementation group A, which possibly indicates that some repair of UV damage occurs even in XP cells of group A

  8. Differential surface phenotype and context-dependent reactivity of functionally diverse NKT cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Garth; Godfrey, Dale I

    2018-03-05

    Natural Killer T (NKT) cells are a functionally diverse population that recognizes lipid-based antigens in association with the antigen-presenting molecule CD1d. Here, we define a technique to separate the functionally distinct thymic NKT1, NKT2 and NKT17 cell subsets by their surface expression of CD278 (ICOS) and the activation-associated glycoform of CD43, enabling the investigation of subset-specific effector-functions. We report that all three subsets express the transcription factor GATA-3 and the potential to produce IL-4 and IL-10 following activation. This questions the notion that NKT2 cells are the predominant source of IL-4 within the NKT cell pool, and suggests that IL-10-production may be more indicative of NKT cell plasticity than the existence of a distinct regulatory lineage or subset. We also show that many NKT17 cells are CD4 + and are biased toward Vβ8.3 TCR gene usage. Lastly, we demonstrate that the toll-like receptor (TLR) ligand lipopolysaccharide (LPS) can induce a NKT17 cell-biased response, even in the absence of exogenous antigen, and that combining LPS with α-GalCer resulted in enhanced IL-17A-production, and reduced levels of the immunosuppressive cytokine IL-10. This study provides a novel means to examine the context-dependent reactivity of the functionally heterogeneous NKT cell population and provides important new insight into the functional biology of these subsets. © 2018 Australasian Society for Immunology Inc.

  9. Identification of a B cell-dependent subpopulation of multiple sclerosis by measurements of brain-reactive B cells in the blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuerten, Stefanie; Pommerschein, Giovanna; Barth, Stefanie K; Hohmann, Christopher; Milles, Bianca; Sammer, Fabian W; Duffy, Cathrina E; Wunsch, Marie; Rovituso, Damiano M; Schroeter, Michael; Addicks, Klaus; Kaiser, Claudia C; Lehmann, Paul V

    2014-01-01

    B cells are increasingly coming into play in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS). Here, we screened peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from patients with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS), MS, other non-inflammatory neurological, inflammatory neurological or autoimmune diseases, and healthy donors for their B cell reactivity to CNS antigen using the enzyme-linked immunospot technique (ELISPOT) after 96 h of polyclonal stimulation. Our data show that nine of 15 patients with CIS (60.0%) and 53 of 67 patients with definite MS (79.1%) displayed CNS-reactive B cells, compared to none of the control donors. The presence of CNS-reactive B cells in the blood of the majority of patients with MS or at risk to develop MS along with their absence in control subjects suggests that they might be indicative of a B cell-dependent subpopulation of the disease. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. CIGS thin film solar cell prepared by reactive co-sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeha; Lee, Ho-Sub; Park, Nae-Man

    2013-09-01

    The reactive co-sputtering was developed as a new way of preparing high quality CuInGaSe2(CIGS) films from two sets of targets; Cu0.6Ga 0.4 and Cu0.4In0.6 alloy and Cu and (In0.7Ga0.3)2Se3 compound targets. During sputtering, Cu, In, Ga metallic elements as well as the compound materials were reacted to form CIGS simultaneously in highly reactive elemental Se atmosphere generated by a thermal cracker. CIGS layer had been grown on Mo/soda-lime glass(SLG) at 500°C. For both sets of targets, we controlled the composition of CIGS thin film by changing the RF power for target components. All the films showed a preferential (112) orientation as observed from X-ray diffraction analysis. The composition ratios of CIGS were easily set to 0.71-0.95, 0.10-0.30 for [Cu]/[III] and [Ga]/[III], respectively. The grain size and the surface roughness of a CIGS film increased as the [Cu]/[III] ratios increased. The solar cells were fabricated using a standard base line process in the device structure of grid/ITO/i-ZnO/CdS/CIGS/Mo/ SLG. The best performance was obtained the performance of Voc = 0.45 V, Jsc =35.6, FF = 0.535, η = 8.6% with a 0.9 μm-CIGS solar cell from alloy targets while Voc = 0.54 V, Jsc =30.8, FF = 0.509, η = 8.5% with a 0.8 μm-CIGS solar cell from Cu and (In0.7Ga0.3)2Se3.

  11. Ion reactivity of calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite in standard cell culture media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustavsson, J; Ginebra, M P; Engel, E; Planell, J

    2011-12-01

    Solution-mediated surface reactions occur for most calcium phosphate-based biomaterials and may influence cellular response. A reasonable extrapolation of such processes observed in vitro to in vivo performance requires a deep understanding of the underlying mechanisms. We therefore systematically investigated the nature of ion reactivity of calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA) by exposing it for different periods of time to standard cell culture media of different chemical composition (DMEM and McCoy medium, with and without osteogenic supplements and serum proteins). Kinetic ion interaction studies of principal extracellular ions revealed non-linear sorption of Ca²⁺ (∼50% sorption) and K⁺ (∼8%) as well as acidification of all media during initial contact with CDHA (48h). Interestingly, inorganic phosphorus (P(i)) was sorbed from McCoy medium (∼50%) or when using osteogenic media containing β-glycerophosphate, but not from DMEM medium. Non-linear sorption data could be perfectly described by pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order sorption models. At longer contact time (21 days), and with frequent renewal of culture medium, sorption of Ca²⁺ remained constant throughout the experiment, while sorption of P(i) gradually decreased in McCoy medium. In great contrast, CDHA began to release P(i) slowly with time when using DMEM medium. Infrared spectra showed that CDHA exposed to culture media had a carbonated surface chemistry, suggesting that carbonate plays a key role in the ion reactivity of CDHA. Our data show that different compositions of the aqueous environment may provoke opposite ion reactivity of CDHA, and this must be carefully considered when evaluating the osteoinductive potential of the material. Copyright © 2011 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Reactive oxygen species are crucial for hydroxychavicol toxicity toward KB epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeng, J H; Wang, Y J; Chang, W H; Wu, H L; Li, C H; Uang, B J; Kang, J J; Lee, J J; Hahn, L J; Lin, B R; Chang, M C

    2004-01-01

    Betel quid (BQ) chewing shows a strong correlation to the incidence of oral submucous fibrosis (OSF), leukoplakia and oral cancer. BQ contains mainly areca nut, lime, Piper betle leaf (PBL) and the inflorescence of P. betle (IPB). Hydroxychavicol (4-allyl-catechol, HC), as a major phenolic compound in PBL and IPB, is shown to induce oxidative stress, glutathione (GSH) depletion and cell cycle deregulation. Using bivariate BrdU/PI flow cytometry, KB cells in DNA synthesis (S phase) are shown to be sensitive to the toxic effect of HC and show cell cycle arrest and apoptosis following exposure to 0.1 and 0.3 mM HC. HC-induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest are associated with mitochondrial membrane potential (delta Psim) depolarization as revealed by a decrease in rhodamine fluorescence. N-acetyl-L-cysteine (1 mM), superoxide dismutase (100 U/ml) and catalase (1000 U/ml) were effective in prevention of HC-induced GSH depletion (as indicated by chloromethylfluorescein fluorescence), reactive oxygen species (ROS) production (by dichlorofluorescein fluorescence), cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. However, dimethylthiourea (2 mM), neocuproine (1 mM), 1,10-phenanthroline (200 microM) and desferrioxamine (0.5 mM) showed little effect on HC-induced cell changes. HC elevated the cellular and mitochondrial GSH levels at moderate concentrations (0.05-0.1 mM), whereas at a concentration of 0.3 mM, inhibitory effects were noted. These results indicate that HC consumption may be associated with BQ-chewing-related oral mucosal diseases via GSH depletion, ROS production, mitochondrial dysfunction, cell cycle disturbance and the induction of apoptosis. These events are related to the production of superoxide radicals and hydrogen peroxide.

  13. Role of reactive oxygen species in the radiation response of human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaru Yamaguchi

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs, which are present in small numbers in hematopoietic tissues, can differentiate into all hematopoietic lineages and self-renew to maintain their undifferentiated phenotype. HSPCs are extremely sensitive to oxidative stressors such as anti-cancer agents, radiation, and the extensive accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS. The quiescence and stemness of HSPCs are maintained by the regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis, ROS, and energy homeostasis in a special microenvironment called the stem cell niche. The present study evaluated the relationship between the production of intracellular ROS and mitochondrial function during the proliferation and differentiation of X-irradiated CD34(+ cells prepared from human placental/umbilical cord blood HSPCs. Highly purified CD34(+ HSPCs exposed to X-rays were cultured in liquid and semi-solid medium supplemented with hematopoietic cytokines. X-irradiated CD34(+ HSPCs treated with hematopoietic cytokines, which promote their proliferation and differentiation, exhibited dramatically suppressed cell growth and clonogenic potential. The amount of intracellular ROS in X-irradiated CD34(+ HSPCs was significantly higher than that in non-irradiated cells during the culture period. However, neither the intracellular mitochondrial content nor the mitochondrial superoxide production was elevated in X-irradiated CD34(+ HSPCs compared with non-irradiated cells. Radiation-induced gamma-H2AX expression was observed immediately following exposure to 4 Gy of X-rays and gradually decreased during the culture period. This study reveals that X-irradiation can increase persistent intracellular ROS in human CD34(+ HSPCs, which may not result from mitochondrial ROS due to mitochondrial dysfunction, and indicates that substantial DNA double-strand breakage can critically reduce the stem cell function.

  14. Anticancer Effect of Ginger Extract against Pancreatic Cancer Cells Mainly through Reactive Oxygen Species-Mediated Autotic Cell Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akimoto, Miho; Iizuka, Mari; Kanematsu, Rie; Yoshida, Masato; Takenaga, Keizo

    2015-01-01

    The extract of ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) and its major pungent components, [6]-shogaol and [6]-gingerol, have been shown to have an anti-proliferative effect on several tumor cell lines. However, the anticancer activity of the ginger extract in pancreatic cancer is poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that the ethanol-extracted materials of ginger suppressed cell cycle progression and consequently induced the death of human pancreatic cancer cell lines, including Panc-1 cells. The underlying mechanism entailed autosis, a recently characterized form of cell death, but not apoptosis or necroptosis. The extract markedly increased the LC3-II/LC3-I ratio, decreased SQSTM1/p62 protein, and enhanced vacuolization of the cytoplasm in Panc-1 cells. It activated AMPK, a positive regulator of autophagy, and inhibited mTOR, a negative autophagic regulator. The autophagy inhibitors 3-methyladenine and chloroquine partially prevented cell death. Morphologically, however, focal membrane rupture, nuclear shrinkage, focal swelling of the perinuclear space and electron dense mitochondria, which are unique morphological features of autosis, were observed. The extract enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and the antioxidant N-acetylcystein attenuated cell death. Our study revealed that daily intraperitoneal administration of the extract significantly prolonged survival (P = 0.0069) in a peritoneal dissemination model and suppressed tumor growth in an orthotopic model of pancreatic cancer (P < 0.01) without serious adverse effects. Although [6]-shogaol but not [6]-gingerol showed similar effects, chromatographic analyses suggested the presence of other constituent(s) as active substances. Together, these results show that ginger extract has potent anticancer activity against pancreatic cancer cells by inducing ROS-mediated autosis and warrants further investigation in order to develop an efficacious candidate drug. PMID:25961833

  15. Anticancer Effect of Ginger Extract against Pancreatic Cancer Cells Mainly through Reactive Oxygen Species-Mediated Autotic Cell Death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miho Akimoto

    Full Text Available The extract of ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe and its major pungent components, [6]-shogaol and [6]-gingerol, have been shown to have an anti-proliferative effect on several tumor cell lines. However, the anticancer activity of the ginger extract in pancreatic cancer is poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that the ethanol-extracted materials of ginger suppressed cell cycle progression and consequently induced the death of human pancreatic cancer cell lines, including Panc-1 cells. The underlying mechanism entailed autosis, a recently characterized form of cell death, but not apoptosis or necroptosis. The extract markedly increased the LC3-II/LC3-I ratio, decreased SQSTM1/p62 protein, and enhanced vacuolization of the cytoplasm in Panc-1 cells. It activated AMPK, a positive regulator of autophagy, and inhibited mTOR, a negative autophagic regulator. The autophagy inhibitors 3-methyladenine and chloroquine partially prevented cell death. Morphologically, however, focal membrane rupture, nuclear shrinkage, focal swelling of the perinuclear space and electron dense mitochondria, which are unique morphological features of autosis, were observed. The extract enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS generation, and the antioxidant N-acetylcystein attenuated cell death. Our study revealed that daily intraperitoneal administration of the extract significantly prolonged survival (P = 0.0069 in a peritoneal dissemination model and suppressed tumor growth in an orthotopic model of pancreatic cancer (P < 0.01 without serious adverse effects. Although [6]-shogaol but not [6]-gingerol showed similar effects, chromatographic analyses suggested the presence of other constituent(s as active substances. Together, these results show that ginger extract has potent anticancer activity against pancreatic cancer cells by inducing ROS-mediated autosis and warrants further investigation in order to develop an efficacious candidate drug.

  16. Effects of menadione, a reactive oxygen generator, on leukotriene secretion from RBL-2H3 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Fumio; Nakanishi, Mamoru; Hirashima, Naohide

    2010-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced in various cells and affect many biological processes. We previously reported that 2-methyl-1,4-naphtoquinone (menadione) inhibited Ca(2+) influx from the extracellular medium and exocytosis evoked by antigen stimulation in the mast cell line, RBL-2H3. Mast cells release various inflammatory mediators such as leukotrienes (LTs) and cytokines in addition to the exocytotic secretion of histamine. In this study, we investigated the effects of menadione on LT release in RBL-2H3. Treatment of RBL cells with menadione inhibited LTC(4) secretion induced by antigen stimulation. To elucidate the mechanism of this inhibition, we examined the effects of menadione on the activation process of 5-lipoxygenase that is responsible for the synthesis of LTs from arachidonic acid. Menadione did not affect the phosophorylation of mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinases, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and p38, which regulates phosphorylation of 5-lipoxygenase. However, menadione inhibited the translocation of 5-lipoxygenase from the cytoplasm to the nuclear membrane. Together with the result that LT secretion was severely impaired in the absence of extracellular Ca2(2+), it is suggested that ROS produced by menadione inhibited LT secretion through impaired Ca2(2+) influx and 5-lipoxygenase translocation to the nuclear membrane.

  17. Effects of combined radiofrequency radiation exposure on levels of reactive oxygen species in neuronal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Kyoung Ah; Lee, Hyung Chul; Lee, Je-Jung

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of the combined RF radiation (837 MHz CDMA plus 1950 MHz WCDMA) signal on levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in neuronal cells. Exposure of the combined RF signal was conducted at specific absorption rate values of 2 W/kg of CDMA plus 2 W/kg of WCDMA for 2 h. Co-exposure to combined RF radiation with either H 2 O 2 or menadione was also performed. The experimental exposure groups were incubator control, sham-exposed, combined RF radiation-exposed with or without either H 2 O 2 or menadione groups. The intracellular ROS level was measured by flow cytometry using the fluorescent probe dichlorofluorescein diacetate. Intracellular ROS levels were not consistently affected by combined RF radiation exposure alone in a time-dependent manner in U87, PC12 or SH-SY5Y cells. In neuronal cells exposed to combined RF radiation with either H 2 O 2 or menadione, intracellular ROS levels showed no statically significant alteration compared with exposure to menadione or H 2 O 2 alone. These findings indicate that neither combined RF radiation alone nor combined RF radiation with menadione or H 2 O 2 influences the intracellular ROS level in neuronal cells such as U87, PC12 or SH-SY5Y. (author)

  18. Cold stress increases reactive oxygen species formation via TRPA1 activation in A549 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wenwu; Wang, Zhonghua; Cao, Jianping; Cui, Haiyang; Ma, Zhuang

    2016-03-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are responsible for lung damage during inhalation of cold air. However, the mechanism of the ROS production induced by cold stress in the lung is still unclear. In this work, we measured the changes of ROS and the cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]c) in A549 cell. We observed that cold stress (from 20 to 5 °C) exposure of A549 cell resulted in an increase of ROS and [Ca(2+)]c, which was completely attenuated by removing Ca(2+) from medium. Further experiments showed that cold-sensing transient receptor potential subfamily member 1 (TRPA1) agonist (allyl isothiocyanate, AITC) increased the production of ROS and the level of [Ca(2+)]c in A549 cell. Moreover, HC-030031, a TRPA1 selective antagonist, significantly inhibited the enhanced ROS and [Ca(2+)]c induced by AITC or cold stimulation, respectively. Taken together, these data demonstrated that TRPA1 activation played an important role in the enhanced production of ROS induced by cold stress in A549 cell.

  19. Sibutramine provokes apoptosis of aortic endothelial cells through altered production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morikawa, Yoshifumi; Shibata, Akinobu; Okumura, Naoko; Ikari, Akira; Sasajima, Yasuhide; Suenami, Koichi; Sato, Kiyohito; Takekoshi, Yuji; El-Kabbani, Ossama; Matsunaga, Toshiyuki

    2017-01-01

    Overdose administration of sibutramine, a serotonin-noradrenalin reuptake inhibitor, is considered to elicit severe side effects including hypertension, whose pathogenic mechanism remains unclear. Here, we found that 48-h incubation with >10μM sibutramine provokes apoptosis of human aortic endothelial (HAE) cells. Treatment with the lethal concentration of sibutramine facilitated production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), altered expression of endoplasmic reticulum stress response genes (heat shock protein 70 and C/EBP homologous protein), and inactivated 26S proteasome-based proteolysis. The treatment also decreased cellular level of nitric oxide (NO) through lowering of expression and activity of endothelial NO synthase. These results suggest that ROS production and depletion of NO are crucial events in the apoptotic mechanism and may be linked to the pathogenesis of vasoconstriction elicited by the drug. Compared to sibutramine, its metabolites (N-desmethylsibutramine and N-didesmethylsibutramine) were much less cytotoxic to HAE cells, which hardly metabolized sibutramine. In contrast, both the drug and metabolites showed low cytotoxicity to hepatic HepG2 cells with high metabolic potency and expression of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4. The cytotoxicity of sibutramine to HepG2 and Chang Liver cells was remarkably augmented by inhibition and knockdown of CYP3A4. This study also suggests an inverse relationship between sibutramine cytotoxicity and CYP3A4-mediated metabolism into the N-desmethyl metabolites. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Antimony trichloride induces a loss of cell viability via reactive oxygen species-dependent autophagy in A549 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xinyuan; Xing, Fengjun; Cong, Yewen; Zhuang, Yin; Han, Muxi; Wu, Zhiqiang; Yu, Shali; Wei, Haiyan; Wang, Xiaoke; Chen, Gang

    2017-12-01

    Antimony (Sb) is one of the most prevalent heavy metals and frequently leads to biological toxicity. Although autophagy is believed to be involved in metal-associated cytotoxicity, there is no evidence of its involvement following exposure. Moreover, the underlying mechanism of autophagy remains unclear. In this study, treatment with antimony trichloride caused autophagy in a dose- and time-dependent manner in A549 cells but did not affect the level of Atg5 or Atg7 mRNA expression. Furthermore, Sb enhanced autophagic flux while upregulating p62 gene and protein levels. The classic mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway is not involved in Sb-induced autophagy. However, Sb-induced autophagy and the upregulation of p62 were inhibited by treatment with the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC). Subsequent analyses demonstrated that the inhibition of autophagy protected A549 cells from a loss of cell viability, while the activation of autophagy by rapamycin had the opposite effect. These data suggest that reactive oxygen species-dependent autophagy mediates Sb-stimulated cell viability loss in A549 cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Selenoprotein P Inhibits Radiation-Induced Late Reactive Oxygen Species Accumulation and Normal Cell Injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eckers, Jaimee C.; Kalen, Amanda L.; Xiao, Wusheng; Sarsour, Ehab H.; Goswami, Prabhat C., E-mail: prabhat-goswami@uiowa.edu

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: Radiation is a common mode of cancer therapy whose outcome is often limited because of normal tissue toxicity. We have shown previously that the accumulation of radiation-induced late reactive oxygen species (ROS) precedes cell death, suggesting that metabolic oxidative stress could regulate cellular radiation response. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether selenoprotein P (SEPP1), a major supplier of selenium to tissues and an antioxidant, regulates late ROS accumulation and toxicity in irradiated normal human fibroblasts (NHFs). Methods and Materials: Flow cytometry analysis of cell viability, cell cycle phase distribution, and dihydroethidium oxidation, along with clonogenic assays, were used to measure oxidative stress and toxicity. Human antioxidant mechanisms array and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction assays were used to measure gene expression during late ROS accumulation in irradiated NHFs. Sodium selenite addition and SEPP1 overexpression were used to determine the causality of SEPP1 regulating late ROS accumulation and toxicity in irradiated NHFs. Results: Irradiated NHFs showed late ROS accumulation (4.5-fold increase from control; P<.05) that occurs after activation of the cell cycle checkpoint pathways and precedes cell death. The mRNA levels of CuZn- and Mn-superoxide dismutase, catalase, peroxiredoxin 3, and thioredoxin reductase 1 increased approximately 2- to 3-fold, whereas mRNA levels of cold shock domain containing E1 and SEPP1 increased more than 6-fold (P<.05). The addition of sodium selenite before the radiation treatment suppressed toxicity (45%; P<.05). SEPP1 overexpression suppressed radiation-induced late ROS accumulation (35%; P<.05) and protected NHFs from radiation-induced toxicity (58%; P<.05). Conclusion: SEPP1 mitigates radiation-induced late ROS accumulation and normal cell injury.

  2. Cell-mediated reduction of protein and peptide hydroperoxides to reactive free radicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Headlam, Henrietta A; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2003-01-01

    Radical attack on proteins in the presence of O(2) gives protein hydroperoxides in high yields. These peroxides are decomposed by transition metal ions, reducing agents, UV light and heat, with the formation of a range of reactive radicals that are capable of initiating further damage. Evidence has...... been presented for the formation of alcohols as stable products of peroxide decomposition, and these have been employed as markers of oxidative damage in vivo. The mechanism of formation of these alcohols is unclear, with both radical and nonradical pathways capable of generating these products....... In this study we have investigated the reduction of peptide and protein hydroperoxides by THP-1 (human monocyte-like) cells and it is shown that this process is accompanied by radical formation as detected by EPR spin trapping. The radicals detected, which are similar to those detected from metal-ion catalyzed...

  3. Radiation-induced Epstein-Barr virus reactivation in gastric cancer cells with latent EBV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandakumar, Athira; Uwatoko, Futoshi; Yamamoto, Megumi; Tomita, Kazuo; Majima, Hideyuki J; Akiba, Suminori; Koriyama, Chihaya

    2017-07-01

    Epstein-Barr virus, a ubiquitous human herpes virus with oncogenic activity, can be found in 6%-16% of gastric carcinomas worldwide. In Epstein-Barr virus-associated gastric carcinoma, only a few latent genes of the virus are expressed. Ionizing irradiation was shown to induce lytic Epstein-Barr virus infection in lymphoblastoid cell lines with latent Epstein-Barr virus infection. In this study, we examined the effect of ionizing radiation on the Epstein-Barr virus reactivation in a gastric epithelial cancer cell line (SNU-719, an Epstein-Barr virus-associated gastric carcinoma cell line). Irradiation with X-ray (dose = 5 and 10 Gy; dose rate = 0.5398 Gy/min) killed approximately 25% and 50% of cultured SNU-719 cells, respectively, in 48 h. Ionizing radiation increased the messenger RNA expression of immediate early Epstein-Barr virus lytic genes (BZLF1 and BRLF1), determined by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, in a dose-dependent manner at 48 h and, to a slightly lesser extent, at 72 h after irradiation. Similar findings were observed for other Epstein-Barr virus lytic genes (BMRF1, BLLF1, and BcLF1). After radiation, the expression of transforming growth factor beta 1 messenger RNA increased and reached a peak in 12-24 h, and the high-level expression of the Epstein-Barr virus immediate early genes can convert latent Epstein-Barr virus infection into the lytic form and result in the release of infectious Epstein-Barr virus. To conclude, Ionizing radiation activates lytic Epstein-Barr virus gene expression in the SNU-719 cell line mainly through nuclear factor kappaB activation. We made a brief review of literature to explore underlying mechanism involved in transforming growth factor beta-induced Epstein-Barr virus reactivation. A possible involvement of nuclear factor kappaB was hypothesized.

  4. Self-reactive CD4+ T cells and B cells in the blood in health and autoimmune disease: increased frequency of thyroglobulin-reactive cells in Graves' disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Claus H; Moeller, Ane Christine; Hegedüs, Laszlo

    2006-01-01

    and B cells were found in patients with Graves' disease. Notably, both patient groups and healthy controls exhibited higher proliferative responses to thyroglobulin than to a foreign recall antigen, tetanus toxoid. Our results suggest that self-tolerance can be broken by exposure of circulating...

  5. The synergistic effect of chemical carcinogens enhances Epstein-Barr virus reactivation and tumor progression of nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Chih-Yeu; Huang, Sheng-Yen; Wu, Chung-Chun; Hsu, Hui-Yu; Chou, Sheng-Ping; Tsai, Ching-Hwa; Chang, Yao; Takada, Kenzo; Chen, Jen-Yang

    2012-01-01

    Seroepidemiological studies imply a correlation between Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) reactivation and the development of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). N-nitroso compounds, phorbols, and butyrates are chemicals found in food and herb samples collected from NPC high-risk areas. These chemicals have been reported to be risk factors contributing to the development of NPC, however, the underlying mechanism is not fully understood. We have demonstrated previously that low dose N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG, 0.1 µg/ml) had a synergistic effect with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) and sodium butyrate (SB) in enhancing EBV reactivation and genome instability in NPC cells harboring EBV. Considering that residents in NPC high-risk areas may contact regularly with these chemical carcinogens, it is vital to elucidate the relation between chemicals and EBV and their contributions to the carcinogenesis of NPC. In this study, we constructed a cell culture model to show that genome instability, alterations of cancer hallmark gene expression, and tumorigenicity were increased after recurrent EBV reactivation in NPC cells following combined treatment of TPA/SB and MNNG. NPC cells latently infected with EBV, NA, and the corresponding EBV-negative cell, NPC-TW01, were periodically treated with MNNG, TPA/SB, or TPA/SB combined with MNNG. With chemically-induced recurrent reactivation of EBV, the degree of genome instability was significantly enhanced in NA cells treated with a combination of TPA/SB and MNNG than those treated individually. The Matrigel invasiveness, as well as the tumorigenicity in mouse, was also enhanced in NA cells after recurrent EBV reactivation. Expression profile analysis by microarray indicates that many carcinogenesis-related genes were altered after recurrent EBV reactivation, and several aberrations observed in cell lines correspond to alterations in NPC lesions. These results indicate that cooperation between chemical carcinogens can

  6. An in-depth comparison of latent HIV-1 reactivation in multiple cell model systems and resting CD4+ T cells from aviremic patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celsa A Spina

    Full Text Available The possibility of HIV-1 eradication has been limited by the existence of latently infected cellular reservoirs. Studies to examine control of HIV latency and potential reactivation have been hindered by the small numbers of latently infected cells found in vivo. Major conceptual leaps have been facilitated by the use of latently infected T cell lines and primary cells. However, notable differences exist among cell model systems. Furthermore, screening efforts in specific cell models have identified drug candidates for "anti-latency" therapy, which often fail to reactivate HIV uniformly across different models. Therefore, the activity of a given drug candidate, demonstrated in a particular cellular model, cannot reliably predict its activity in other cell model systems or in infected patient cells, tested ex vivo. This situation represents a critical knowledge gap that adversely affects our ability to identify promising treatment compounds and hinders the advancement of drug testing into relevant animal models and clinical trials. To begin to understand the biological characteristics that are inherent to each HIV-1 latency model, we compared the response properties of five primary T cell models, four J-Lat cell models and those obtained with a viral outgrowth assay using patient-derived infected cells. A panel of thirteen stimuli that are known to reactivate HIV by defined mechanisms of action was selected and tested in parallel in all models. Our results indicate that no single in vitro cell model alone is able to capture accurately the ex vivo response characteristics of latently infected T cells from patients. Most cell models demonstrated that sensitivity to HIV reactivation was skewed toward or against specific drug classes. Protein kinase C agonists and PHA reactivated latent HIV uniformly across models, although drugs in most other classes did not.

  7. An In-Depth Comparison of Latent HIV-1 Reactivation in Multiple Cell Model Systems and Resting CD4+ T Cells from Aviremic Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spina, Celsa A.; Anderson, Jenny; Archin, Nancie M.; Bosque, Alberto; Chan, Jonathan; Famiglietti, Marylinda; Greene, Warner C.; Kashuba, Angela; Lewin, Sharon R.; Margolis, David M.; Mau, Matthew; Ruelas, Debbie; Saleh, Suha; Shirakawa, Kotaro; Siliciano, Robert F.; Singhania, Akul; Soto, Paula C.; Terry, Valeri H.; Verdin, Eric; Woelk, Christopher; Wooden, Stacey; Xing, Sifei; Planelles, Vicente

    2013-01-01

    The possibility of HIV-1 eradication has been limited by the existence of latently infected cellular reservoirs. Studies to examine control of HIV latency and potential reactivation have been hindered by the small numbers of latently infected cells found in vivo. Major conceptual leaps have been facilitated by the use of latently infected T cell lines and primary cells. However, notable differences exist among cell model systems. Furthermore, screening efforts in specific cell models have identified drug candidates for “anti-latency” therapy, which often fail to reactivate HIV uniformly across different models. Therefore, the activity of a given drug candidate, demonstrated in a particular cellular model, cannot reliably predict its activity in other cell model systems or in infected patient cells, tested ex vivo. This situation represents a critical knowledge gap that adversely affects our ability to identify promising treatment compounds and hinders the advancement of drug testing into relevant animal models and clinical trials. To begin to understand the biological characteristics that are inherent to each HIV-1 latency model, we compared the response properties of five primary T cell models, four J-Lat cell models and those obtained with a viral outgrowth assay using patient-derived infected cells. A panel of thirteen stimuli that are known to reactivate HIV by defined mechanisms of action was selected and tested in parallel in all models. Our results indicate that no single in vitro cell model alone is able to capture accurately the ex vivo response characteristics of latently infected T cells from patients. Most cell models demonstrated that sensitivity to HIV reactivation was skewed toward or against specific drug classes. Protein kinase C agonists and PHA reactivated latent HIV uniformly across models, although drugs in most other classes did not. PMID:24385908

  8. The p53-reactivating small molecule RITA induces senescence in head and neck cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Ching Chuang

    Full Text Available TP53 is the most commonly mutated gene in head and neck cancer (HNSCC, with mutations being associated with resistance to conventional therapy. Restoring normal p53 function has previously been investigated via the use of RITA (reactivation of p53 and induction of tumor cell apoptosis, a small molecule that induces a conformational change in p53, leading to activation of its downstream targets. In the current study we found that RITA indeed exerts significant effects in HNSCC cells. However, in this model, we found that a significant outcome of RITA treatment was accelerated senescence. RITA-induced senescence in a variety of p53 backgrounds, including p53 null cells. Also, inhibition of p53 expression did not appear to significantly inhibit RITA-induced senescence. Thus, this phenomenon appears to be partially p53-independent. Additionally, RITA-induced senescence appears to be partially mediated by activation of the DNA damage response and SIRT1 (Silent information regulator T1 inhibition, with a synergistic effect seen by combining either ionizing radiation or SIRT1 inhibition with RITA treatment. These data point toward a novel mechanism of RITA function as well as hint to its possible therapeutic benefit in HNSCC.

  9. Controlled intracellular generation of reactive oxygen species in human mesenchymal stem cells using porphyrin conjugated nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavado, Andrea S; Chauhan, Veeren M; Zen, Amer Alhaj; Giuntini, Francesca; Jones, D Rhodri E; Boyle, Ross W; Beeby, Andrew; Chan, Weng C; Aylott, Jonathan W

    2015-09-14

    Nanoparticles capable of generating controlled amounts of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), that advance the study of oxidative stress and cellular communication, were synthesized by functionalizing polyacrylamide nanoparticles with zinc(II) porphyrin photosensitisers. Controlled ROS production was demonstrated in human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) through (1) production of nanoparticles functionalized with varying percentages of Zn(II) porphyrin and (2) modulating the number of doses of excitation light to internalized nanoparticles. hMSCs challenged with nanoparticles functionalized with increasing percentages of Zn(II) porphyrin and high numbers of irradiations of excitation light were found to generate greater amounts of ROS. A novel dye, which is transformed into fluorescent 7-hydroxy-4-trifluoromethyl-coumarin in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, provided an indirect indicator for cumulative ROS production. The mitochondrial membrane potential was monitored to investigate the destructive effect of increased intracellular ROS production. Flow cytometric analysis of nanoparticle treated hMSCs suggested irradiation with excitation light signalled controlled apoptotic cell death, rather than uncontrolled necrotic cell death. Increased intracellular ROS production did not induce phenotypic changes in hMSC subcultures.

  10. The p53-reactivating small molecule RITA induces senescence in head and neck cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Hui-Ching; Yang, Liang Peng; Fitzgerald, Alison L; Osman, Abdullah; Woo, Sang Hyeok; Myers, Jeffrey N; Skinner, Heath D

    2014-01-01

    TP53 is the most commonly mutated gene in head and neck cancer (HNSCC), with mutations being associated with resistance to conventional therapy. Restoring normal p53 function has previously been investigated via the use of RITA (reactivation of p53 and induction of tumor cell apoptosis), a small molecule that induces a conformational change in p53, leading to activation of its downstream targets. In the current study we found that RITA indeed exerts significant effects in HNSCC cells. However, in this model, we found that a significant outcome of RITA treatment was accelerated senescence. RITA-induced senescence in a variety of p53 backgrounds, including p53 null cells. Also, inhibition of p53 expression did not appear to significantly inhibit RITA-induced senescence. Thus, this phenomenon appears to be partially p53-independent. Additionally, RITA-induced senescence appears to be partially mediated by activation of the DNA damage response and SIRT1 (Silent information regulator T1) inhibition, with a synergistic effect seen by combining either ionizing radiation or SIRT1 inhibition with RITA treatment. These data point toward a novel mechanism of RITA function as well as hint to its possible therapeutic benefit in HNSCC.

  11. Reactive oxygen species are key mediators of the nitric oxide apoptotic pathway in anterior pituitary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machiavelli, Leticia I; Poliandri, Ariel H; Quinteros, Fernanda A; Cabilla, Jimena P; Duvilanski, Beatriz H

    2007-03-01

    We previously showed that long-term exposure of anterior pituitary cells to nitric oxide (NO) induces apoptosis. The intracellular signals underlying this effect remained unclear. In this study, we searched for possible mechanisms involved in the early stages of the NO apoptotic cascade. Caspase 3 was activated by NO with no apparent disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential. NO caused a rapid increase of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and this increase seems to be dependent of mitochondrial electron transport chain. The antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine avoided ROS increase, prevented the NO-induced caspase 3 activation, and reduced the NO apoptotic effect. Catalase was inactivated by NO, while glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity and reduced glutathione (GSH) were not modified at first, but increased at later times of NO exposure. The increase of GSH level is important for the scavenging of the NO-induced ROS overproduction. Our results indicate that ROS have an essential role as a trigger of the NO apoptotic cascade in anterior pituitary cells. The permanent inhibition of catalase may strengthen the oxidative damage induced by NO. GPx activity and GSH level augment in response to the oxidative damage, though this increase seems not to be enough to rescue the cells from the NO effect.

  12. Osimertinib induces autophagy and apoptosis via reactive oxygen species generation in non-small cell lung cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Zheng-Hai; Cao, Wen-Xiang; Su, Min-Xia; Chen, Xiuping; Lu, Jin-Jian, E-mail: jinjianlu@umac.mo

    2017-04-15

    Osimertinib (OSI), also known as AZD9291, is a third-generation epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor that has been approved for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients harboring EGFR T790M mutation. Herein, we indicated for the first time that OSI increased the accumulations of cytoplasmic vacuoles, the expression of phosphatidylethanolamine-modified microtubule-associated protein light-chain 3 (LC3-II), and the formation of GFP-LC3 puncta in various cancer cells. The OSI-induced expression of LC3-II was further increased when combined treatment with chloroquine (CQ), an autophagy inhibitor, and the mRFP-EGFP-LC3 plasmid-transfected cells exposed to OSI led to the production of more red-fluorescent puncta than green-fluorescent puncta, indicating OSI induced autophagic flux in the NSCLC cells. Knockdown of EGFR showed no effect on the OSI-induced expression of LC3-II in NCI-H1975 cells. In addition, OSI increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and scavenge of ROS via pretreatment with N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), catalase (CAT), or vitamin E (Vita E) significantly inhibited OSI-induced the accumulations of cytoplasmic vacuoles, the expression of LC3-II, as well as the formation of GFP-LC3 puncta. Combinative treatment with CQ could not remarkably change the OSI-induced cell viability decrease, whereas the OSI-induced cell viability decrease and apoptosis could be reversed through pretreatment with NAC, CAT, and Vita E, respectively. Taken together, this is the first report that OSI induces an accompanied autophagy and the generation of ROS is critical for the OSI-induced autophagy, cell viability decrease, and apoptosis in NSCLC cells. - Highlights: • Osimertinib induced the expressions of cytoplasmic vacuoles and autophagic markers in different cancer cells. • Osimertinib induced autophagic flux in NSCLC NCI-H1975 and HCC827 cell lines. • ROS generation contributed to osimertinib-induced cytoplasmic

  13. Osimertinib induces autophagy and apoptosis via reactive oxygen species generation in non-small cell lung cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Zheng-Hai; Cao, Wen-Xiang; Su, Min-Xia; Chen, Xiuping; Lu, Jin-Jian

    2017-01-01

    Osimertinib (OSI), also known as AZD9291, is a third-generation epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor that has been approved for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients harboring EGFR T790M mutation. Herein, we indicated for the first time that OSI increased the accumulations of cytoplasmic vacuoles, the expression of phosphatidylethanolamine-modified microtubule-associated protein light-chain 3 (LC3-II), and the formation of GFP-LC3 puncta in various cancer cells. The OSI-induced expression of LC3-II was further increased when combined treatment with chloroquine (CQ), an autophagy inhibitor, and the mRFP-EGFP-LC3 plasmid-transfected cells exposed to OSI led to the production of more red-fluorescent puncta than green-fluorescent puncta, indicating OSI induced autophagic flux in the NSCLC cells. Knockdown of EGFR showed no effect on the OSI-induced expression of LC3-II in NCI-H1975 cells. In addition, OSI increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and scavenge of ROS via pretreatment with N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), catalase (CAT), or vitamin E (Vita E) significantly inhibited OSI-induced the accumulations of cytoplasmic vacuoles, the expression of LC3-II, as well as the formation of GFP-LC3 puncta. Combinative treatment with CQ could not remarkably change the OSI-induced cell viability decrease, whereas the OSI-induced cell viability decrease and apoptosis could be reversed through pretreatment with NAC, CAT, and Vita E, respectively. Taken together, this is the first report that OSI induces an accompanied autophagy and the generation of ROS is critical for the OSI-induced autophagy, cell viability decrease, and apoptosis in NSCLC cells. - Highlights: • Osimertinib induced the expressions of cytoplasmic vacuoles and autophagic markers in different cancer cells. • Osimertinib induced autophagic flux in NSCLC NCI-H1975 and HCC827 cell lines. • ROS generation contributed to osimertinib-induced cytoplasmic

  14. Sibutramine provokes apoptosis of aortic endothelial cells through altered production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morikawa, Yoshifumi [Forensic Science Laboratory, Gifu Prefectural Police Headquarters, Gifu 500-8501 (Japan); Shibata, Akinobu; Okumura, Naoko; Ikari, Akira [Laboratory of Biochemistry, Gifu Pharmaceutical University, Gifu 501-1196 (Japan); Sasajima, Yasuhide; Suenami, Koichi; Sato, Kiyohito; Takekoshi, Yuji [Forensic Science Laboratory, Gifu Prefectural Police Headquarters, Gifu 500-8501 (Japan); El-Kabbani, Ossama [Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Matsunaga, Toshiyuki, E-mail: matsunagat@gifu-pu.ac.jp [Laboratory of Biochemistry, Gifu Pharmaceutical University, Gifu 501-1196 (Japan)

    2017-01-01

    Overdose administration of sibutramine, a serotonin-noradrenalin reuptake inhibitor, is considered to elicit severe side effects including hypertension, whose pathogenic mechanism remains unclear. Here, we found that 48-h incubation with > 10 μM sibutramine provokes apoptosis of human aortic endothelial (HAE) cells. Treatment with the lethal concentration of sibutramine facilitated production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), altered expression of endoplasmic reticulum stress response genes (heat shock protein 70 and C/EBP homologous protein), and inactivated 26S proteasome-based proteolysis. The treatment also decreased cellular level of nitric oxide (NO) through lowering of expression and activity of endothelial NO synthase. These results suggest that ROS production and depletion of NO are crucial events in the apoptotic mechanism and may be linked to the pathogenesis of vasoconstriction elicited by the drug. Compared to sibutramine, its metabolites (N-desmethylsibutramine and N-didesmethylsibutramine) were much less cytotoxic to HAE cells, which hardly metabolized sibutramine. In contrast, both the drug and metabolites showed low cytotoxicity to hepatic HepG2 cells with high metabolic potency and expression of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4. The cytotoxicity of sibutramine to HepG2 and Chang Liver cells was remarkably augmented by inhibition and knockdown of CYP3A4. This study also suggests an inverse relationship between sibutramine cytotoxicity and CYP3A4-mediated metabolism into the N-desmethyl metabolites. - Highlights: • Treatment with sibutramine, an anorexiant, induces endothelial cell apoptosis. • The apoptotic mechanism includes induction of ROS and NO depletion. • There is an inverse relationship between sibutramine cytotoxicity and its metabolism.

  15. Induction of Tca8113 tumor cell apoptosis by icotinib is associated with reactive oxygen species mediated p38-MAPK activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Cailing; Yan, Jianguo; Yuan, Guoyan; Zhang, Yinghua; Lu, Derong; Ren, Mingxin; Cui, Weigang

    2014-08-01

    Icotinib, a selective EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR-TKI), has been shown to exhibit anti-tumor activity against several tumor cell lines. However, the exact molecular mechanism of icotinib's anti-tumor effect remains unknown. This study aims to examine the zytotoxic effect of icotinib on Tca8113 cells and its potential molecular mechanism. Icotinib significantly resulted in dose-dependent cell death as determined by MTT assay, accompanied by increased levels of Bax and DNA fragmentation. Icotinib could also induce Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) generation. Further studies confirmed that scavenging of reactive oxygen species by N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), and pharmacological inhibition of MAPK reversed icotinib-induced apoptosis in Tca8113 cells. Our data provide evidence that icotinib induces apoptosis, possibly via ROS-mediated MAPK pathway in Tca8113 cells.

  16. Reactivation of UV- and γ-irradiated herpes virus in UV- and X-irradiated CV-1 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takimoto, K.; Niwa, O.; Sugahara, T.

    1982-01-01

    Enhanced reactivation of UV- and γ-irradiated herpes virus was investigated by the plaque assay on CV-1 monkey kidney monolayer cells irradiated with UV light or X-rays. Both UV- and X-irradiated CV-1 cells showed enhancement of survival of UV-irradiated virus, while little or no enhancement was detected for γ-irradiated virus assayed on UV- or X-irradiated cells. The enhanced reactivation of UV-irradiated virus was greater when virus infection was delayed 24 or 48 h, than for infection immediately following the irradiation of cells. Thus the UV- or X-irradiated CV-1 cells are able to enhance the repair of UV damaged herpes virus DNA, but not of γ-ray damaged ones. (author)

  17. Reactive oxygen species, cell growth, cell cycle progression and vascular remodeling in hypertension

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vokurková, Martina; Xu, S.; Touyz, R.M.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 3, č. 1 (2007), s. 53-63 ISSN 1479-6678 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0510 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : cyclins * oxidative stress * cell proliferation Subject RIV: ED - Physiology

  18. Natural killer cells facilitate PRAME-specific T-cell reactivity against neuroblastoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spel, Lotte; Boelens, Jaap Jan; Van Der Steen, Dirk M.; Blokland, Nina J G; van Noesel, Max M.; Molenaar, Jan J.; Heemskerk, Mirjam H M; Boes, Marianne; Nierkens, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is the most common solid tumor in children with an estimated 5-year progression free survival of 20-40% in stage 4 disease. Neuroblastoma actively avoids recognition by natural killer (NK) cells and cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). Although immunotherapy has gained traction for

  19. The Effects of Allicin, a Reactive Sulfur Species from Garlic, on a Selection of Mammalian Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin C. H. Gruhlke

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Garlic (Allium sativum L. has been used as a spice and medicinal plant since ancient times. Garlic produces the thiol-reactive defence substance, allicin, upon wounding. The effects of allicin on human lung epithelium carcinoma (A549, mouse fibroblast (3T3, human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC, human colon carcinoma (HT29 and human breast cancer (MCF7 cell lines were tested. To estimate toxic effects of allicin, we used a standard MTT-test (methylthiazoltetrazolium for cell viability and 3H-thymidine incorporation for cell proliferation. The glutathione pool was measured using monobromobimane and the formation of reactive species was identified using 2′,7′-dichlorofluoresceine-diacetate. The YO-PRO-1 iodide staining procedure was used to estimate apoptosis. Allicin reduced cell viability and cell proliferation in a concentration dependent manner. In the bimane test, it was observed that cells treated with allicin showed reduced fluorescence, suggesting glutathione oxidation. The cell lines tested differed in sensitivity to allicin in regard to viability, cell proliferation and glutathione oxidation. The 3T3 and MCF-7 cells showed a higher proportion of apoptosis compared to the other cell types. These data show that mammalian cell lines differ in their sensitivity and responses to allicin.

  20. On the lack of host-cell reactivation of UV-irradiated phage T5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiang, T.; Harm, W.

    1976-01-01

    Previously reported experiments have shown that host-cell reactivation (HCR) of UV-irradiated phage T1 in excision-repair proficient Escherichia coli cells is inhibited by superinfection with phage T5. Theoretical considerations have led to predictions concerning the dependence of repair inhibition on the multiplicity of superinfecting T5 phage and on the UV fluence to which they were exposed. These predictions have been supported by experimental results described in this paper. The fluence dependence permitted calculation of the relative UV sensitivity of the gene function responsible for repair inhibition; it was found to be about 2.3% that of the plaque-forming ability of phage T5. The T5-inhibitable step in excision repair occurs early in the infective cycle of T1. Furthermore, experiments involving the presence of 400 μg/ml chloramphenicol showed that HCR inhibition of T1 is caused by a protein produced after the FST segment of T5 (i.e. the first 8% of the T5 genome) has entered the host cell. A previously described minor T1 recovery process, occuring in both excision-repair-proficient and -deficient host-cells, is inhibited by T5 infection due to a different substance, which is most likely associated with the 'second-step-transfer' region of T5 DNA (involving the remainder of the genome). Superinfection with T4v 1 phage resulted in HCR inhibition of T1, resembling that observed after T5 superinfection. The discussion of these results suggests that inhibition of the bacterial excision repair system by T5 or T4 infection occurs at the level of UV-endonucleolytic incision, and that lack of HCR both in T-even phages and in T5 can be explained in the same manner

  1. Iron and Reactive Oxygen Species: Friends or Foes of Cancer Cells?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bystrom, Laura M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: In this review, the dual nature of both iron and reactive oxygen species (ROS) will be explored in normal and cancer cell metabolism. Although iron and ROS play important roles in cellular homeostasis, they may also contribute to carcinogenesis. On the other hand, many studies have indicated that abrogation of iron metabolism, elevation of ROS, or modification of redox regulatory mechanisms in cancer cells, should be considered as therapeutic approaches for cancer. Recent Advances: Drugs that target different aspects of iron metabolism may be promising therapeutics for cancer. The ability of iron chelators to cause iron depletion and/or elevate ROS levels indicates that these types of compounds have more potential as antitumor medicines than originally expected. Other natural and synthetic compounds that target pathways involved in ROS homeostasis also have potential value alone or in combination with current chemotherapeutics. Critical Issues: Although ROS induction and iron depletion may be targets for cancer therapies, the optimal therapeutic strategies have yet to be identified. This review highlights some of the research that strives to identify such therapeutics. Future Directions: More studies are needed to better understand the role of iron and ROS in carcinogenesis not only as cancer promoters, but also as cytotoxic agents to cancer cells and cancer stem cells (CSCs). Moreover, the structure–activity effects of iron chelators and other compounds that increase ROS and/or disrupt iron metabolism need to be further evaluated to assess the effectiveness and selectivity of these compounds against both cancer and CSCs. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 1917–1924. PMID:23198911

  2. Exposure to ultrafine particles, intracellular production of reactive oxygen species in leukocytes and altered levels of endothelial progenitor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jantzen, Kim; Møller, Peter; Karottki, Dorina Gabriela; Olsen, Yulia; Bekö, Gabriel; Clausen, Geo; Hersoug, Lars-Georg; Loft, Steffen

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to particles in the fine and ultrafine size range has been linked to induction of low-grade systemic inflammation, oxidative stress and development of cardiovascular diseases. Declining levels of endothelial progenitor cells within systemic circulation have likewise been linked to progression of cardiovascular diseases. The objective was to determine if exposure to fine and ultrafine particles from indoor and outdoor sources, assessed by personal and residential indoor monitoring, is associated with altered levels of endothelial progenitor cells, and whether such effects are related to leukocyte-mediated oxidative stress. The study utilized a cross sectional design performed in 58 study participants from a larger cohort. Levels of circulating endothelial progenitor cells, defined as either late (CD34 + KDR + cells) or early (CD34 + CD133 + KDR + cells) subsets were measured using polychromatic flow cytometry. We additionally measured production of reactive oxygen species in leukocyte subsets (lymphocytes, monocytes and granulocytes) by flow cytometry using intracellular 2′,7′-dichlorofluoroscein. The measurements encompassed both basal levels of reactive oxygen species production and capacity for reactive oxygen species production for each leukocyte subset. We found that the late endothelial progenitor subset was negatively associated with levels of ultrafine particles measured within the participant residences and with reactive oxygen species production capacity in lymphocytes. Additionally, the early endothelial progenitor cell levels were positively associated with a personalised measure of ultrafine particle exposure and negatively associated with both basal and capacity for reactive oxygen species production in lymphocytes and granulocytes, respectively. Our results indicate that exposure to fine and ultrafine particles derived from indoor sources may have adverse effects on human vascular health.

  3. Mechanisms for Selective Single-Cell Reactivation during Offline Sharp-Wave Ripples and Their Distortion by Fast Ripples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valero, Manuel; Averkin, Robert G; Fernandez-Lamo, Ivan; Aguilar, Juan; Lopez-Pigozzi, Diego; Brotons-Mas, Jorge R; Cid, Elena; Tamas, Gabor; Menendez de la Prida, Liset

    2017-06-21

    Memory traces are reactivated selectively during sharp-wave ripples. The mechanisms of selective reactivation, and how degraded reactivation affects memory, are poorly understood. We evaluated hippocampal single-cell activity during physiological and pathological sharp-wave ripples using juxtacellular and intracellular recordings in normal and epileptic rats with different memory abilities. CA1 pyramidal cells participate selectively during physiological events but fired together during epileptic fast ripples. We found that firing selectivity was dominated by an event- and cell-specific synaptic drive, modulated in single cells by changes in the excitatory/inhibitory ratio measured intracellularly. This mechanism collapses during pathological fast ripples to exacerbate and randomize neuronal firing. Acute administration of a use- and cell-type-dependent sodium channel blocker reduced neuronal collapse and randomness and improved recall in epileptic rats. We propose that cell-specific synaptic inputs govern firing selectivity of CA1 pyramidal cells during sharp-wave ripples. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Elimination of self-reactive T cells in the thymus: a timeline for negative selection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Lilyanov Dzhagalov

    Full Text Available The elimination of autoreactive T cells occurs via thymocyte apoptosis and removal by thymic phagocytes, but the sequence of events in vivo, and the relationship between thymocyte death and phagocytic clearance, are unknown. Here we address these questions by following a synchronized cohort of thymocytes undergoing negative selection within a three-dimensional thymic tissue environment, from the initial encounter with a negative selecting ligand to thymocyte death and clearance. Encounter with cognate peptide-MHC complexes results in rapid calcium flux and migratory arrest in auto-reactive thymocytes over a broad range of peptide concentrations, followed by a lag period in which gene expression changes occurred, but there was little sign of thymocyte death. Caspase 3 activation and thymocyte loss were first detectable at 2 and 3 hours, respectively, and entry of individual thymocytes into the death program occurred asynchronously over the next 10 hours. Two-photon time-lapse imaging revealed that thymocyte death and phagocytosis occurred simultaneously, often with thymocytes engulfed prior to changes in chromatin and membrane permeability. Our data provide a timeline for negative selection and reveal close coupling between cell death and clearance in the thymus.

  5. Reactive oxygen species mediates homocysteine-induced mitochondrial biogenesis in human endothelial cells: Modulation by antioxidants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-de-Arce, Karen; Foncea, Rocio; Leighton, Federico

    2005-01-01

    It has been proposed that homocysteine (Hcy)-induces endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis by generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). A previous report has shown that Hcy promotes mitochondrial damage. Considering that oxidative stress can affect mitochondrial biogenesis, we hypothesized that Hcy-induced ROS in endothelial cells may lead to increased mitochondrial biogenesis. We found that Hcy-induced ROS (1.85-fold), leading to a NF-κB activation and increase the formation of 3-nitrotyrosine. Furthermore, expression of the mitochondrial biogenesis factors, nuclear respiratory factor-1 and mitochondrial transcription factor A, was significantly elevated in Hcy-treated cells. These changes were accompanied by increase in mitochondrial mass and higher mRNA and protein expression of the subunit III of cytochrome c oxidase. These effects were significantly prevented by pretreatment with the antioxidants, catechin and trolox. Taken together, our results suggest that ROS is an important mediator of mitochondrial biogenesis induced by Hcy, and that modulation of oxidative stress by antioxidants may protect against the adverse vascular effects of Hcy

  6. Cell Surface Glycoprotein of Reactive Stromal Fibroblasts as a Potential Antibody Target in Human Epithelial Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garin-Chesa, Pilar; Old, Lloyd J.; Rettig, Wolfgang J.

    1990-09-01

    The F19 antigen is a cell surface glycoprotein (M_r, 95,000) of human sarcomas and proliferating, cultured fibroblasts that is absent from resting fibroblasts in normal adult tissues. Normal and malignant epithelial cells are also F19^-. The present immunohistochemical study describes induction of F19 in the reactive mesenchyme of epithelial tumors. F19^+ fibroblasts were found in primary and metastatic carcinomas, including colorectal (18 of 18 cases studied), breast (14/14), ovarian (21/21), bladder (9/10), and lung carcinomas (13/13). In contrast, the stroma of benign colorectal adenomas, fibrocystic disease and fibroadenomas of breast, benign prostate hyperplasia, in situ bladder carcinomas, and benign ovarian tumors showed no or only moderate numbers of F19^+ fibroblasts. Analysis of dermal incision wounds revealed that F19 is strongly induced during scar formation. Comparison of F19 with the extracellular matrix protein tenascin, a putative marker of tumor mesenchyme, showed a cellular staining pattern for F19 vs. the extracellular matrix pattern for tenascin and widespread expression of tenascin in F19^- normal tissues and benign tumors. Our results suggest that the F19^+ phenotype correlates with specialized fibroblast functions in wound healing and malignant tumor growth. Because of its abundance in tumor mesenchyme, F19 may serve as a target for antibodies labeled with radioisotopes or toxic agents, or inflammatogenic antibodies, in carcinoma patients.

  7. Rapid detection of defects in fuel-cell electrodes using infrared reactive-flow-through technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Prodip K.; Weber, Adam Z.; Bender, Guido; Manak, Austin; Bittinat, Daniel; Herring, Andrew M.; Ulsh, Michael

    2014-09-01

    As fuel cells become more prominent, new manufacturing and production methods will need to be developed to deal efficiently and effectively with increased demand. One necessary component of this industrial growth is the accurate measurement of the variability in the manufacturing process. In this study, we present a diagnostic system that combines infrared thermography with a reactive-flow-through technique to detect catalyst-loading defects in fuel-cell gas-diffusion electrodes accurately with high spatial and temporal resolutions. Experimental results are compared with model predictions of thermal response with good agreement. Data analysis, operating-condition impacts, and detection limits are explored using both experiments and simulation. Overall, the results demonstrate the potential of this technique to measure defects on the millimeter length scale with temporal resolutions appropriate for use on a web-line. Thus we present the first development stage of a next-generation non-destructive diagnostic tool, which may be amenable to eventual use on roll-to-roll manufacturing lines.

  8. Host cell reactivation by fibroblasts from patients with pigmentary degeneration of the retina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lytle, C.D.; Tarone, R.E.; Barrett, S.F.; Robbins, J.H.; Wirtschafter, J.D.; Dupuy, J.-M.

    1983-01-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by numerous clinical abnormalities including acute sun sensitivity and primary pigmentary degeneration of the retina. Cultured fibroblasts from CS patients are hypersensitive to ultraviolet radiation. Host cell reactivation of irradiated virus was studied in CS and in other diseases with retinal degeneration to evaluate repair. The survival of UV-irradiated Herpes simplex virus type 1 was determined in fibroblast lines from four normal donors, two patients with CS, one with both xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) and CS, and from several other patients with (Usher syndrome, olivopontocerebellar atrophy, retinitis pigmentosa) and without (XP, ataxia telangiectasia) primary pigmentary degeneration of the retina. The viral survival curves in all cell lines showed two components: a very sensitive initial component followed by an exponential, less sensitive component. The exponential component had greater sensitivity than normal in the case of the CS patients, the patient with both XP and CS, and the XP patient. It was proposed that patients with CS have defective repair of DNA which may be the cause of their retinal degeneration. (author)

  9. Host cell reactivation by fibroblasts from patients with pigmentary degeneration of the retina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lytle, C.D. (Food and Drug Administration, Rockville, MD (USA)); Tarone, R.E.; Barrett, S.F.; Robbins, J.H. (National Cancer Inst., Bethesda, MD (USA)); Wirtschafter, J.D. (Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis (USA). Hospitals); Dupuy, J.M. (Quebec Univ., Laval-des-Rapides (Canada). Inst. Armand-Frappier)

    1983-05-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by numerous clinical abnormalities including acute sun sensitivity and primary pigmentary degeneration of the retina. Cultured fibroblasts from CS patients are hypersensitive to ultraviolet radiation. Host cell reactivation of irradiated virus was studied in CS and in other diseases with retinal degeneration to evaluate repair. The survival of UV-irradiated Herpes simplex virus type 1 was determined in fibroblast lines from four normal donors, two patients with CS, one with both xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) and CS, and from several other patients with (Usher syndrome, olivopontocerebellar atrophy, retinitis pigmentosa) and without (XP, ataxia telangiectasia) primary pigmentary degeneration of the retina. The viral survival curves in all cell lines showed two components: a very sensitive initial component followed by an exponential, less sensitive component. The exponential component had greater sensitivity than normal in the case of the CS patients, the patient with both XP and CS, and the XP patient. It was proposed that patients with CS have defective repair of DNA which may be the cause of their retinal degeneration.

  10. Dynamics of von Willebrand factor reactivity in sickle cell disease during vaso-occlusive crisis and steady state

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sins, J. W.R.; Schimmel, Marein; Luken, Brenda M.; Nur, Erfan; Zeerleder, S.; van Tuijn, Charlotte F. J.; Brandjes, Dees P. M.; Kopatz, W. F.; Urbanus, R. T.; Meijers, Joost C. M.; Biemond, B. J.; Fijnvandraat, K.

    2017-01-01

    Essentials The role of von Willebrand Factor (VWF) in the pathophysiology of sickle cell disease is unclear. We assessed markers of VWF during admission for vaso-occlusive crisis (VOC) and steady state. VWF reactivity was higher during VOC and was associated with inflammation and neutrophil

  11. Induction of molecular endpoints by reactive oxygen species in human lung cells predicted by physical chemical properties of engineered nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    A series of six titanium dioxide and two cerium oxide engineered nanomaterials were assessed for their ability to induce cytotoxicity, reactive oxygen species (ROS), and various types of DNA and protein damage in human respiratory BEAS-2B cells exposed in vitro for 72 hours at se...

  12. Sharp-Wave Ripples Orchestrate the Induction of Synaptic Plasticity during Reactivation of Place Cell Firing Patterns in the Hippocampus

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    Josef H.L.P. Sadowski

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Place cell firing patterns reactivated during hippocampal sharp-wave ripples (SWRs in rest or sleep are thought to induce synaptic plasticity and thereby promote the consolidation of recently encoded information. However, the capacity of reactivated spike trains to induce plasticity has not been directly tested. Here, we show that reactivated place cell firing patterns simultaneously recorded from CA3 and CA1 of rat dorsal hippocampus are able to induce long-term potentiation (LTP at synapses between CA3 and CA1 cells but only if accompanied by SWR-associated synaptic activity and resulting dendritic depolarization. In addition, we show that the precise timing of coincident CA3 and CA1 place cell spikes in relation to SWR onset is critical for the induction of LTP and predictive of plasticity generated by reactivation. Our findings confirm an important role for SWRs in triggering and tuning plasticity processes that underlie memory consolidation in the hippocampus during rest or sleep.

  13. Rabies virus cross-reactive murine T cell clones: analysis of helper and delayed-type hypersensitivity function.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Bunschoten; B. Dietzschold; I.J.Th.M. Claassen (Ivo); R. Klapmuts; F. UytdeHaag; A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    1990-01-01

    textabstractThree T cell clones derived from rabies virus-immunized BALB/c mice were analysed for specificity and function. The clones proved to be broadly cross-reactive by responding to different rabies virus isolates (PM, ERA, CVS, HEP) and other representatives of the genus Lyssavirus, like the

  14. 6-Thioguanine Reactivates Epigenetically Silenced Genes in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Cells by Facilitating Proteasome-mediated Degradation of DNMT1

    OpenAIRE

    Yuan, Bifeng; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Hongxia; Xiong, Lei; Cai, Qian; Wang, Tina; Jacobsen, Steven; Pradhan, Sriharsa; Wang, Yinsheng

    2011-01-01

    Thiopurines including 6-thioguanine (SG), 6-mercaptopurine and azathioprine are effective anticancer agents with remarkable success in clinical practice, especially in effective treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). SG is understood to act as a DNA hypomethylating agent in ALL cells, however, the underlying mechanism leading to global cytosine demethylation remains unclear. Here we report that SG treatment results in reactivation of epigenetically silenced genes in T leukemia cells...

  15. C-Reactive Protein Impairs Dendritic Cell Development, Maturation, and Function: Implications for Peripheral Tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel V. Jimenez

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available C-reactive protein (CRP is the prototypical acute phase reactant, increasing in blood concentration rapidly and several-fold in response to inflammation. Recent evidence indicates that CRP has an important physiological role even at low, baseline levels, or in the absence of overt inflammation. For example, we have shown that human CRP inhibits the progression of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE in CRP transgenic mice by shifting CD4+ T cells away from the TH1 and toward the TH2 subset. Notably, this action required the inhibitory Fcγ receptor IIB (FcγRIIB, but did not require high levels of human CRP. Herein, we sought to determine if CRP’s influence in EAE might be explained by CRP acting on dendritic cells (DC; antigen presenting cells known to express FcγRIIB. We found that CRP (50 µg/ml reduced the yield of CD11c+ bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs and CRP (≥5 μg/ml prevented their full expression of major histocompatibility complex class II and the co-stimulatory molecules CD86 and CD40. CRP also decreased the ability of BMDCs to stimulate antigen-driven proliferation of T cells in vitro. Importantly, if the BMDCs were genetically deficient in mouse FcγRIIB then (i the ability of CRP to alter BMDC surface phenotype and impair T cell proliferation was ablated and (ii CD11c-driven expression of a human FCGR2B transgene rescued the CRP effect. Lastly, the protective influence of CRP in EAE was fully restored in mice with CD11c-driven human FcγRIIB expression. These findings add to the growing evidence that CRP has important biological effects even in the absence of an acute phase response, i.e., CRP acts as a tonic suppressor of the adaptive immune system. The ability of CRP to suppress development, maturation, and function of DCs implicates CRP in the maintenance of peripheral T cell tolerance.

  16. Controlled intracellular generation of reactive oxygen species in human mesenchymal stem cells using porphyrin conjugated nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavado, Andrea S.; Chauhan, Veeren M.; Alhaj Zen, Amer; Giuntini, Francesca; Jones, D. Rhodri E.; Boyle, Ross W.; Beeby, Andrew; Chan, Weng C.; Aylott, Jonathan W.

    2015-08-01

    Nanoparticles capable of generating controlled amounts of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), that advance the study of oxidative stress and cellular communication, were synthesized by functionalizing polyacrylamide nanoparticles with zinc(ii) porphyrin photosensitisers. Controlled ROS production was demonstrated in human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) through (1) production of nanoparticles functionalized with varying percentages of Zn(ii) porphyrin and (2) modulating the number of doses of excitation light to internalized nanoparticles. hMSCs challenged with nanoparticles functionalized with increasing percentages of Zn(ii) porphyrin and high numbers of irradiations of excitation light were found to generate greater amounts of ROS. A novel dye, which is transformed into fluorescent 7-hydroxy-4-trifluoromethyl-coumarin in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, provided an indirect indicator for cumulative ROS production. The mitochondrial membrane potential was monitored to investigate the destructive effect of increased intracellular ROS production. Flow cytometric analysis of nanoparticle treated hMSCs suggested irradiation with excitation light signalled controlled apoptotic cell death, rather than uncontrolled necrotic cell death. Increased intracellular ROS production did not induce phenotypic changes in hMSC subcultures.Nanoparticles capable of generating controlled amounts of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), that advance the study of oxidative stress and cellular communication, were synthesized by functionalizing polyacrylamide nanoparticles with zinc(ii) porphyrin photosensitisers. Controlled ROS production was demonstrated in human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) through (1) production of nanoparticles functionalized with varying percentages of Zn(ii) porphyrin and (2) modulating the number of doses of excitation light to internalized nanoparticles. hMSCs challenged with nanoparticles functionalized with increasing percentages of Zn

  17. Cell viability, reactive oxygen species, apoptosis, and necrosis in myoblast cultures exposed to low-level infrared laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexsandra da Silva Neto Trajano, Larissa; da Silva, Camila Luna; de Carvalho, Simone Nunes; Cortez, Erika; Mencalha, André Luiz; de Souza da Fonseca, Adenilson; Stumbo, Ana Carolina

    2016-07-01

    Low-level infrared laser is considered safe and effective for treatment of muscle injuries. However, the mechanism involved on beneficial effects of laser therapy are not understood. The aim was to evaluate cell viability, reactive oxygen species, apoptosis, and necrosis in myoblast cultures exposed to low-level infrared laser at therapeutic fluences. C2C12 myoblast cultures at different (2 and 10 %) fetal bovine serum (FBS) concentrations were exposed to low-level infrared laser (808 nm, 100 mW) at different fluences (10, 35, and 70 J/cm(2)) and evaluated after 24, 48, and 72 h. Cell viability was evaluated by WST-1 assay; reactive oxygen species (ROS), apoptosis, and necrosis were evaluated by flow cytometry. Cell viability was decreased atthe lowest FBS concentration. Laser exposure increased the cell viability in myoblast cultures at 2 % FBS after 48 and 72 h, but no significant increase in ROS was observed. Apoptosis was decreased at the higher fluence and necrosis was increased at lower fluence in myoblast cultures after 24 h of laser exposure at 2 % FBS. No laser-induced alterations were obtained at 10 % FBS. Results show that level of reactive oxygen species is not altered, at least to those evaluated in this study, but low-level infrared laser exposure affects cell viability, apoptosis, and necrosis in myoblast cultures depending on laser fluence and physiologic conditions of cells.

  18. Reactive oxygen species regulated mitochondria-mediated apoptosis in PC12 cells exposed to chlorpyrifos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong Eun [Department of Pharmacology, College of Medicine, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hanyang Biomedical Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jae Hyeon [Hanyang Biomedical Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Graduate School of Biomedical Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, In Chul [Department of Pharmacology, College of Medicine, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Koh, Hyun Chul, E-mail: hckoh@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Pharmacology, College of Medicine, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hanyang Biomedical Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Graduate School of Biomedical Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-01

    Reactive oxidative species (ROS) generated by environmental toxicants including pesticides could be one of the factors underlying the neuronal cell damage in neurodegenerative diseases. In this study we found that chlorpyrifos (CPF) induced apoptosis in dopaminergic neuronal components of PC12 cells as demonstrated by the activation of caspases and nuclear condensation. Furthermore, CPF also reduced the tyrosine hydroxylase-positive immunoreactivity in substantia nigra of the rat. In addition, CPF induced inhibition of mitochondrial complex I activity. Importantly, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) treatment effectively blocked apoptosis via the caspase-9 and caspase-3 pathways while NAC attenuated the inhibition of mitochondrial complex I activity as well as the oxidative metabolism of dopamine (DA). These results demonstrated that CPF-induced apoptosis was involved in mitochondrial dysfunction through the production of ROS. In the response of cellular antioxidant systems to CPF, we found that CPF treatment increased HO-1 expression while the expression of CuZnSOD and MnSOD was reduced. In addition, we found that CPF treatment activated MAPK pathways, including ERK 1/2, the JNK, and the p38 MAP kinase in a time-dependent manner. NAC treatment abolished MAPK phosphorylation caused by CPF, indicating that ROS are upstream signals of MAPK. Interestingly, MAPK inhibitors abolished cytotoxicity and reduced ROS generation by CPF treatment. Our results demonstrate that CPF induced neuronal cell death in part through MAPK activation via ROS generation, suggesting its potential to generate oxidative stress via mitochondrial damage and its involvement in oxidative stress-related neurodegenerative disease. -- Highlights: ► Chlorpyrifos induces apoptosis. ► Chlorpyrifos inhibits mitochondrial complex I activity. ► ROS is involved in chlorpyrifos-induced apoptosis. ► Chlorpyrifos affects cellular antioxidant systems. ► Chlorpyrifos-induced apoptosis mediates activation of MAPK.

  19. Reactive oxygen species regulated mitochondria-mediated apoptosis in PC12 cells exposed to chlorpyrifos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeong Eun; Park, Jae Hyeon; Shin, In Chul; Koh, Hyun Chul

    2012-01-01

    Reactive oxidative species (ROS) generated by environmental toxicants including pesticides could be one of the factors underlying the neuronal cell damage in neurodegenerative diseases. In this study we found that chlorpyrifos (CPF) induced apoptosis in dopaminergic neuronal components of PC12 cells as demonstrated by the activation of caspases and nuclear condensation. Furthermore, CPF also reduced the tyrosine hydroxylase-positive immunoreactivity in substantia nigra of the rat. In addition, CPF induced inhibition of mitochondrial complex I activity. Importantly, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) treatment effectively blocked apoptosis via the caspase-9 and caspase-3 pathways while NAC attenuated the inhibition of mitochondrial complex I activity as well as the oxidative metabolism of dopamine (DA). These results demonstrated that CPF-induced apoptosis was involved in mitochondrial dysfunction through the production of ROS. In the response of cellular antioxidant systems to CPF, we found that CPF treatment increased HO-1 expression while the expression of CuZnSOD and MnSOD was reduced. In addition, we found that CPF treatment activated MAPK pathways, including ERK 1/2, the JNK, and the p38 MAP kinase in a time-dependent manner. NAC treatment abolished MAPK phosphorylation caused by CPF, indicating that ROS are upstream signals of MAPK. Interestingly, MAPK inhibitors abolished cytotoxicity and reduced ROS generation by CPF treatment. Our results demonstrate that CPF induced neuronal cell death in part through MAPK activation via ROS generation, suggesting its potential to generate oxidative stress via mitochondrial damage and its involvement in oxidative stress-related neurodegenerative disease. -- Highlights: ► Chlorpyrifos induces apoptosis. ► Chlorpyrifos inhibits mitochondrial complex I activity. ► ROS is involved in chlorpyrifos-induced apoptosis. ► Chlorpyrifos affects cellular antioxidant systems. ► Chlorpyrifos-induced apoptosis mediates activation of MAPK.

  20. Hydroxylated polychlorinated biphenyls increase reactive oxygen species formation and induce cell death in cultured cerebellar granule cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dreiem, Anne; Rykken, Sidsel; Lehmler, Hans-Joachim; Robertson, Larry W.; Fonnum, Frode

    2009-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are persistent organic pollutants that bioaccumulate in the body, however, they can be metabolized to more water-soluble products. Although they are more readily excreted than the parent compounds, some of the metabolites are still hydrophobic and may be more available to target tissues, such as the brain. They can also cross the placenta and reach a developing foetus. Much less is known about the toxicity of PCB metabolites than about the parent compounds. In the present study, we have investigated the effects of eight hydroxylated (OH) PCB congeners (2'-OH PCB 3, 4-OH PCB 14, 4-OH PCB 34, 4'-OH PCB 35, 4-OH PCB 36, 4'-OH PCB 36, 4-OH PCB 39, and 4'-OH PCB 68) on reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and cell viability in rat cerebellar granule cells. We found that, similar to their parent compounds, OH-PCBs are potent ROS inducers with potency 4-OH PCB 14 < 4-OH PCB 36 < 4-OH PCB 34 < 4'-OH PCB 36 < 4'-OH PCB 68 < 4-OH PCB 39 < 4'-OH PCB 35. 4-OH PCB 36 was the most potent cell death inducer, and caused apoptotic or necrotic morphology depending on concentration. Inhibition of ERK1/2 kinase with U0126 reduced both cell death and ROS formation, suggesting that ERK1/2 activation is involved in OH-PCB toxicity. The results indicate that the hydroxylation of PCBs may not constitute a detoxification reaction. Since OH-PCBs like their parent compounds are retained in the body and may be more widely distributed to sensitive tissues, it is important that not only the levels of the parent compounds but also the levels of their metabolites are taken into account during risk assessment of PCBs and related compounds.

  1. Inhibition of CD200R1 expression by C/EBP beta in reactive microglial cells

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    Dentesano Guido

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In physiological conditions, it is postulated that neurons control microglial reactivity through a series of inhibitory mechanisms, involving either cell contact-dependent, soluble-factor-dependent or neurotransmitter-associated pathways. In the current study, we focus on CD200R1, a microglial receptor involved in one of these cell contact-dependent mechanisms. CD200R1 activation by its ligand, CD200 (mainly expressed by neurons in the central nervous system,is postulated to inhibit the pro-inflammatory phenotype of microglial cells, while alterations in CD200-CD200R1 signalling potentiate this phenotype. Little is known about the regulation of CD200R1 expression in microglia or possible alterations in the presence of pro-inflammatory stimuli. Methods Murine primary microglial cultures, mixed glial cultures from wild-type and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein β (C/EBPβ-deficient mice, and the BV2 murine cell line overexpressing C/EBPβ were used to study the involvement of C/EBPβ transcription factor in the regulation of CD200R1 expression in response to a proinflammatory stimulus (lipopolysaccharide (LPS. Binding of C/EBPβ to the CD200R1 promoter was determined by quantitative chromatin immunoprecipitation (qChIP. The involvement of histone deacetylase 1 in the control of CD200R1 expression by C/EBPβ was also determined by co-immunoprecipitation and qChIP. Results LPS treatment induced a decrease in CD200R1 mRNA and protein expression in microglial cells, an effect that was not observed in the absence of C/EBPβ. C/EBPβ overexpression in BV2 cells resulted in a decrease in basal CD200R1 mRNA and protein expression. In addition, C/EBPβ binding to the CD200R1 promoter was observed in LPS-treated but not in control glial cells, and also in control BV2 cells overexpressing C/EBPβ. Finally, we observed that histone deacetylase 1 co-immunoprecipitated with C/EBPβ and showed binding to a C/EBPβ consensus sequence of the CD

  2. MG132 as a proteasome inhibitor induces cell growth inhibition and cell death in A549 lung cancer cells via influencing reactive oxygen species and GSH level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yong Hwan; Park, Woo Hyun

    2010-07-01

    Carbobenzoxy-Leu-Leu-leucinal (MG132) as a proteasome inhibitor has been shown to induce apoptotic cell death through formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In the present study, we evaluated the effects of MG132 on the growth of A549 lung cancer cells in relation to cell growth, ROS and glutathione (GSH) levels. Treatment with MG132 inhibited the growth of A549 cells with an IC(50) of approximately 20 microM at 24 hours. DNA flow cytometric analysis indicated that 0.5 approximately 30 microM MG132 induced a G1 phase arrest of the cell cycle in A549 cells. Treatment with 10 or 30 microM MG132 also induced apoptosis, as evidenced by sub-G1 cells and annexin V staining cells. This was accompanied by the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP; Delta psi m). The intracellular ROS levels including O(2) (*-) were strongly increased in 10 or 30 microM MG132-treated A549 cells but were down-regulated in 0.1, 0.5 or 1 microM MG132-treated cells. Furthermore, 10 or 30 microM MG132 increased mitochondrial O(2) (*- ) level but 0.1, 0.5 or 1 microM MG132 decreased that. In addition, 10 or 30 microM MG132 induced GSH depletion in A549 cells. In conclusion, MG132 inhibited the growth of human A549 cells via inducing the cell cycle arrest as well as triggering apoptosis, which was in part correlated with the changes of ROS and GSH levels. Our present data provide important information on the anti-growth mechanisms of MG132 in A549 lung cancer cells in relation to ROS and GSH.

  3. Bioactive dietary supplements reactivate ER expression in ER-negative breast cancer cells by active chromatin modifications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed M Meeran

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most common cancer and the leading cause of cancer death in women. Although tamoxifen therapy is successful for some patients, it does not provide adequate benefit for those who have estrogen receptor (ER-negative cancers. Therefore, we approached novel treatment strategies by combining two potential bioactive dietary supplements for the reactivation of ERα expression for effective treatment of ERα-negative breast cancer with tamoxifen. Bioactive dietary supplements such as green tea polyphenols (GTPs and sulforaphane (SFN inhibit DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs and histone deacetylases (HDACs, respectively, which are of central importance to cancer prevention. In the present study, we have observed that treatment of ERα-negative breast cancer cells with GTPs and SFN alone or in combination leads to the reactivation of ERα expression. The combination of 20 µg/mL GTPs and 5 µM SFN was found to be the optimal dose of ERα-reactivation at 3 days in MDA-MB-231 cells. The reactivation of ERα expression was consistently correlated with ERα promoter hypomethylation and hyperacetylation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP analysis of the ERα promoter revealed that GTPs and SFN altered the binding of ERα-transcriptional co-repressor complex thereby contributing to ERα-reactivation. In addition, treatment with tamoxifen in combination with GTPs and SFN significantly increased both cell death and inhibition of cellular proliferation in MDA-MB-231 cells in comparison to treatment with tamoxifen alone. Collectively, our findings suggest that a novel combination of bioactive-HDAC inhibitors with bioactive-demethylating agents is a promising strategy for the effective treatment of hormonal refractory breast cancer with available anti-estrogens.

  4. Severity of Acute Infectious Mononucleosis Correlates with Cross-Reactive Influenza CD8 T-Cell Receptor Repertoires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslan, Nuray; Watkin, Levi B; Gil, Anna; Mishra, Rabinarayan; Clark, Fransenio G; Welsh, Raymond M; Ghersi, Dario; Luzuriaga, Katherine; Selin, Liisa K

    2017-12-05

    Fifty years after the discovery of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), it remains unclear how primary infection with this virus leads to massive CD8 T-cell expansion and acute infectious mononucleosis (AIM) in young adults. AIM can vary greatly in severity, from a mild transient influenza-like illness to a prolonged severe syndrome. We questioned whether expansion of a unique HLA-A2.01-restricted, cross-reactive CD8 T-cell response between influenza virus A-M1 58 (IAV-M1) and EBV BMLF1 280 (EBV-BM) could modulate the immune response to EBV and play a role in determining the severity of AIM in 32 college students. Only ex vivo total IAV-M1 and IAV-M1+EBV-BM cross-reactive tetramer + frequencies directly correlated with AIM severity and were predictive of severe disease. Expansion of specific cross-reactive memory IAV-M1 T-cell receptor (TCR) Vβ repertoires correlated with levels of disease severity. There were unique profiles of qualitatively different functional responses in the cross-reactive and EBV-specific CD8 T-cell responses in each of the three groups studied, severe-AIM patients, mild-AIM patients, and seropositive persistently EBV-infected healthy donors, that may result from differences in TCR repertoire use. IAV-M1 tetramer + cells were functionally cross-reactive in short-term cultures, were associated with the highest disease severity in AIM, and displayed enhanced production of gamma interferon, a cytokine that greatly amplifies immune responses, thus frequently contributing to induction of immunopathology. Altogether, these data link heterologous immunity via CD8 T-cell cross-reactivity to CD8 T-cell repertoire selection, function, and resultant disease severity in a common and important human infection. In particular, it highlights for the first time a direct link between the TCR repertoire with pathogenesis and the diversity of outcomes upon pathogen encounter. IMPORTANCE The pathogenic impact of immune responses that by chance cross-react to unrelated

  5. Epstein-Barr virus reactivation associated with diminished cell-mediated immunity in antarctic expeditioners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, S. K.; Pierson, D. L.; Cooley, H.; Dubow, R.; Lugg, D.

    2000-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) reactivation and cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses were followed in 16 Antarctic expeditioners during winter-over isolation at 2 Australian National Antarctic Research Expedition stations. Delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) skin testing was used as an indicator of the CMI response, that was evaluated 2 times before winter isolation and 3 times during isolation. At all 5 evaluation times, 8 or more of the 16 subjects had a diminished CMI response. Diminished DTH was observed on every test occasion in 4/16 subjects; only 2/16 subjects exhibited normal DTH responses for all 5 tests. A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was used to detect EBV DNA in saliva specimens collected before, during, and after the winter isolation. EBV DNA was present in 17% (111/642) of the saliva specimens; all 16 subjects shed EBV in their saliva on at least 1 occasion. The probability of EBV shedding increased (P = 0.013) from 6% before or after winter isolation to 13% during the winter period. EBV appeared in saliva during the winter isolation more frequently (P viruses.

  6. Sensitivity and Uncertainty Analysis for coolant void reactivity in a CANDU Fuel Lattice Cell Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Seung Yeol; Shim, Hyung Jin [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    In this study, the EPBM is implemented in Seoul National university Monte Carlo (MC) code, McCARD which has the k uncertainty evaluation capability by the adjoint-weighted perturbation (AWP) method. The implementation is verified by comparing the sensitivities of the k-eigenvalue difference to the microscopic cross sections computed by the DPBM and the direct subtractions for the TMI-1 pin-cell problem. The uncertainty of the coolant void reactivity (CVR) in a CANDU fuel lattice model due to the ENDF/B-VII.1 covariance data is calculated by its sensitivities estimated by the EPBM. The method based on the eigenvalue perturbation theory (EPBM) utilizes the 1st order adjoint-weighted perturbation (AWP) technique to estimate the sensitivity of the eigenvalue difference. Furthermore this method can be easily applied in a S/U analysis code system equipped with the eigenvalue sensitivity calculation capability. The EPBM is implemented in McCARD code and verified by showing good agreement with reference solution. Then the McCARD S/U analysis have been performed with the EPBM module for the CVR in CANDU fuel lattice problem. It shows that the uncertainty contributions of nu of {sup 235}U and gamma reaction of {sup 238}U are dominant.

  7. Grass-specific CD4+ T-cells exhibit varying degrees of cross-reactivity, implications for allergen-specific immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archila, LD; DeLong, JH; Wambre, E; James, EA; Robinson, DM; Kwok, WW

    2014-01-01

    Background Conceptually, allergic responses may involve cross-reactivity by antibodies or T-cells. While IgE cross-reactivity amongst grass pollen allergens has been observed, cross-reactivity at the allergen-specific T-cell level has been less documented. Identification of the patterns of cross-reactivity may improve our understanding, allowing optimization of better immunotherapy strategies. Objectives We use Phleum pratense as model for the studying of cross-reactivity at the allergen-specific CD4+ T cell level amongst DR04:01 restricted Pooideae grass pollen T-cell epitopes. Methods After In vitro culture of blood mononucleated cells from Grass-pollen allergic subjects with specific Pooideae antigenic epitopes, dual tetramer staining with APC-labeled DR04:01/Phleum pratense tetramers and PE-labeled DR04:01/Pooideae grass homolog tetramers was assessed to identify cross-reactivity amongst allergen-specific DR04:01-restricted T-cells in 6 subjects. Direct ex vivo staining enabled the comparison of frequency and phenotype of different Pooideae grass pollen reactive T-cells. Intracellular cytokine staining (ICS) assays were also used to examine phenotypes of these T-cells. Results T-cells with various degree of cross reactive profiles could be detected. Poa p 1 97-116, Lol p 1 221-240, Lol p 5a 199-218, and Poa p 5a 199-218 were identified as minimally-cross-reactive T-cell epitopes that do not show cross reactivity to Phl p 1 and Phl p 5a epitopes. Ex vivo tetramer staining assays demonstrated T-cells that recognized these minimally-cross reactive T-cell epitopes are present in Grass-pollen allergic subjects. Conclusions Our results suggest that not all Pooideae grass epitopes with sequence homology are cross-reactive. Non-cross reactive T-cells with comparable frequency, phenotype and functionality to Phl p-specific T-cells, suggest that a multiple allergen system should be considered for immunotherapy instead of a mono allergen system. PMID:24708411

  8. Grass-specific CD4(+) T-cells exhibit varying degrees of cross-reactivity, implications for allergen-specific immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archila, L D; DeLong, J H; Wambre, E; James, E A; Robinson, D M; Kwok, W W

    2014-07-01

    Conceptually, allergic responses may involve cross-reactivity by antibodies or T-cells. While IgE cross-reactivity among grass-pollen allergens has been observed, cross-reactivity at the allergen-specific T-cell level has been less documented. Identification of the patterns of cross-reactivity may improve our understanding, allowing optimization of better immunotherapy strategies. We use Phleum pratense as model for the studying of cross-reactivity at the allergen-specific CD4(+) T cell level among DR04:01 restricted Pooideae grass-pollen T-cell epitopes. After in vitro culture of blood mono-nucleated cells from grass-pollen-allergic subjects with specific Pooideae antigenic epitopes, dual tetramer staining with APC-labelled DR04:01/Phleum pratense tetramers and PE-labelled DR04:01/Pooideae grass homolog tetramers was assessed to identify cross-reactivity among allergen-specific DR04:01-restricted T-cells in six subjects. Direct ex vivo staining enabled the comparison of frequency and phenotype of different Pooideae grass-pollen reactive T-cells. Intracellular cytokine staining (ICS) assays were also used to examine phenotypes of these T-cells. T-cells with various degrees of cross-reactive profiles could be detected. Poa p 1 97-116 , Lol p 1 221-240 , Lol p 5a 199-218 , and Poa p 5a 199-218 were identified as minimally cross-reactive T-cell epitopes that do not show cross-reactivity to Phl p 1 and Phl p 5a epitopes. Ex vivo tetramer staining assays demonstrated T-cells that recognized these minimally cross-reactive T-cell epitopes are present in Grass-pollen-allergic subjects. Our results suggest that not all Pooideae grass epitopes with sequence homology are cross-reactive. Non-cross-reactive T-cells with comparable frequency, phenotype and functionality to Phl p-specific T-cells suggest that a multiple allergen system should be considered for immunotherapy instead of a mono-allergen system. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Reactive oxygen species contribute to arsenic-induced EZH2 phosphorylation in human bronchial epithelial cells and lung cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Lingzhi; Qiu, Ping; Chen, Bailing; Lu, Yongju; Wu, Kai; Thakur, Chitra; Chang, Qingshan; Sun, Jiaying; Chen, Fei, E-mail: fchen@wayne.edu

    2014-05-01

    Our previous studies suggested that arsenic is able to induce serine 21 phosphorylation of the EZH2 protein through activation of JNK, STAT3, and Akt signaling pathways in the bronchial epithelial cell line, BEAS-2B. In the present report, we further demonstrated that reactive oxygen species (ROS) were involved in the arsenic-induced protein kinase activation that leads to EZH2 phosphorylation. Several lines of evidence supported this notion. First, the pretreatment of the cells with N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), a potent antioxidant, abolishes arsenic-induced EZH2 phosphorylation along with the inhibition of JNK, STAT3, and Akt. Second, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, the most important form of ROS in the cells in response to extracellular stress signals, can induce phosphorylation of the EZH2 protein and the activation of JNK, STAT3, and Akt. By ectopic expression of the myc-tagged EZH2, we additionally identified direct interaction and phosphorylation of the EZH2 protein by Akt in response to arsenic and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Furthermore, both arsenic and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} were able to induce the translocation of ectopically expressed or endogenous EZH2 from nucleus to cytoplasm. In summary, the data presented in this report indicate that oxidative stress due to ROS generation plays an important role in the arsenic-induced EZH2 phosphorylation. - Highlights:: • Arsenic (As{sup 3+}) induces EZH phosphorylation. • JNK, STAT3, and Akt contribute to EZH2 phosphorylation. • Oxidative stress is involved in As{sup 3+}-induced EZH2 phosphorylation. • As{sup 3+} induces direct interaction of Akt and EZH2. • Phosphorylated EZH2 localized in cytoplasm.

  10. Critical role of SAP in progression and reactivation but not maintenance of T cell-dependent humoral immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Ming-Chao; Veillette, André

    2013-03-01

    Signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM)-associated protein (SAP) is a small adaptor molecule mutated in X-linked lymphoproliferative disease, a human immunodeficiency. SAP plays a critical role in the initiation of T cell-dependent B cell responses leading to germinal center reaction, the production of high-affinity antibodies, and B cell memory. However, whether SAP has a role in these responses beyond their initiation is not known. It is important to address this matter not only for mechanistic reasons but also because blockade of the SAP pathway is being contemplated as a means to treat autoimmune diseases in humans. Using an inducibly SAP deficient mouse, we found that SAP was required not only for the initiation but also for the progression of primary T cell-driven B cell responses to haptens. It was also necessary for the reactivation of T cell-dependent B cell immunity during secondary immune responses. These activities consistently correlated with the requirement of SAP for full expression of the lineage commitment factor Bcl-6 in follicular T helper (T(FH)) cells. However, once memory B cells and long-lived antibody-secreting cells were established, SAP became dispensable for maintaining T cell-dependent B cell responses. Thus, SAP is pivotal for nearly all phases, but not for maintenance, of T cell-driven B cell humoral immunity. These findings may have implications for the treatment of immune disorders by targeting the SAP pathway.

  11. Cytomegalovirus reactivation is associated with a lower rate of early relapse in myeloid malignancies independent of in-vivo T cell depletion strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilal, Talal; Slone, Stacey; Peterson, Shawn; Bodine, Charles; Gul, Zartash

    2017-06-01

    The association between cytomegalovirus (CMV) reactivation and relapse risk has not been evaluated in relation to T cell depletion strategies. We evaluated 93 patients who underwent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and analyzed the association between T cell depletion strategies with the cumulative incidence of relapse and CMV reactivation. A total of 33% of patients who received ATG vs. 34% who received alemtuzumab developed CMV reactivation. The cumulative incidence of relapse was 3% at 1year and 20% at 3 years in patients with CMV reactivation vs. 30% at 1year and 38% at 3 years in patients without CMV reactivation (p=0.02). When analyzed separately, this effect persisted in the myeloid, but not the lymphoid group. There was a numerical trend towards increased non-relapse mortality (NRM) in patients with CMV reactivation, especially in the myeloid group. The choice of T cell depleting agent and the rate of CMV reactivation were not associated with different overall survival (OS) rates. These results suggest that the choice of T cell depletion strategy may have similar effects on rates of CMV reactivation, disease relapse, and survival. Further studies examining these variables in patients not exposed to in-vivo T cell depleting agents may be of interest. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Copper electrowinning in a moving-bed cell based on reactive electrodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cifuentes, L.

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available A two-compartment lab-scale reactive electrodialysis (RED cell with a moving particulate cathode has been used for copper electrowinning. The cathodic reaction was copper electrodeposition on a bed of copper particles forced to circulate inside a fixed cylindrical enclosure by the action of rotating paddles; the anodic reaction was ferrous to ferric ion oxidation on an anode made of static graphite bars. The anolyte (aqueous FeSO4 + H2SO4 and catholyte (aqueous CuSO4 + H2SO4 are kept separate by an anion membrane which prevents cation transport between the electrolytes. Experiments were carried out in order to characterize cell performance under various conditions. When operating with 40 g/L Cu (II, I = 6 A, T = 50°C, 40 rpm paddle rotation and 990 mL/min electrolyte recirculation flowrate, the specific energy consumption (SEC for copper electrowinning was 2.25 kWh/kg. An optimization of cell dimensions gave an improved SEC of 1.55 kWh/kg whereas a temperature increase from 50 to 56°C (without changing cell dimensions produced a SEC of 1.50 kWh/kg, which is 25% lower than normal values for conventional copper electrowinning cells. A comparison was drawn between the performance of this cell and a squirrel-cage cell previously developed by the authors.

    Una celda a escala laboratorio de electrodiálisis reactiva (EDR, de dos compartimientos con cátodo particulado móvil, se ha utilizado para electroobtener cobre. La reacción catódica fue la electrodeposición de cobre sobre un lecho de partículas de cobre que circulan dentro de un cilindro fijo por la acción de paletas rotatorias; la reacción anódica fue la oxidación de ión ferroso a ión férrico sobre un ánodo hecho de barras de grafito estáticas. El anolito (FeSO4 + H2SO4 acuoso y el catolito (CuSO4 + H2SO4 acuoso se mantienen separados por una

  13. Epstein-Barr Virus Lytic Reactivation Activates B Cells Polyclonally and Induces Activation-Induced Cytidine Deaminase Expression: A Mechanism Underlying Autoimmunity and Its Contribution to Graves' Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Keiko; Kumata, Keisuke; Nakayama, Yuji; Satoh, Yukio; Sugihara, Hirotsugu; Hara, Sayuri; Matsushita, Michiko; Kuwamoto, Satoshi; Kato, Masako; Murakami, Ichiro; Hayashi, Kazuhiko

    2017-04-01

    Graves' disease is an autoimmune disease that results in and is the most common cause of hyperthyroidism, and the reactivation of persisting Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in B lymphocytes induces the differentiation of host B cells into plasma cells. We previously reported that some EBV-infected B cells had thyrotropin receptor antibodies (TRAbs) as surface immunoglobulins (Igs), and EBV reactivation induced these TRAb+EBV+ cells to produce TRAbs. EBV reactivation induces Ig production from host B cells. The purpose of the present study was to examine total Ig productions from B cell culture fluids and to detect activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), and EBV latent membrane protein (LMP) 1 in culture B cells during EBV reactivation induction and then we discussed the mechanisms of EBV reactivation-induced Ig production in relation to autoimmunity. We showed that the EBV reactivation induces the production of every isotype of Ig and suggested that the Ig production was catalyzed by AID through LMP1 and NF-κB. The results that the amount of IgM was significantly larger compared with IgG suggested the polyclonal B cell activation due to LMP1. We proposed the pathway of EBV reactivation induced Ig production; B cells newly infected with EBV are activated by polyclonal B cell activation and produce Igs through plasma cell differentiation induced by EBV reactivation. LMP1-induced AID enabled B cells to undergo class-switch recombination to produce every isotype of Ig. According to this mechanism, EBV rescues autoreactive B cells to produce autoantibodies, which contribute to the development and exacerbation of autoimmune diseases.

  14. Newly synthesized bis-benzimidazole compound 8 induces apoptosis, autophagy and reactive oxygen species generation in HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Naying; Yao, Guodong; Liu, Yuan; Cheng, Maosheng; Ikejima, Takashi

    2016-09-01

    Compound 8 (C8) is a newly synthesized bis-benzimidazole derivative and exerts significant anti-tumor activity in vitro. Previous studies demonstrated that C8 induced apoptosis and autophagy in human promyelocytic leukemia HL60 cells. However, cytotoxicity study on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (hPBMC) showed that C8 exhibited less toxicity in normal cells. In this study, the molecular mechanism of C8 on human cervical carcinoma HeLa cells was investigated. The results showed that C8 inhibited the growth of HeLa cells and triggered both apoptotic and autophagic cell death. Subsequent experiment also indicated that reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation was induced in C8-treated HeLa cells. Since ROS scavenger decreased the ratio of apoptotic and autophagic cells, ROS generation contributed to C8-induced apoptosis and autophagy. Furthermore, inhibitors of apoptosis and autophagy also reduced ROS generation, respectively. Autophagy inhibition increased cell growth compared to C8-treated group and attenuated apoptotic cell death, indicating that C8-induced autophagy promoted apoptosis for cell death. However, the percentage of autophagic cells was enhanced when limiting apoptosis process. Taken together, C8 induced ROS-mediated apoptosis and autophagy in HeLa cells, autophagy promoted apoptosis but the former was antagonized by the latter. The data also gave us a new perspective on the anti-tumor effect of C8. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Chemistry and biology of reactive species with special reference to the antioxidative defence status in pancreatic β-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenzen, Sigurd

    2017-08-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a serious metabolic disease. Dysfunction and subsequent loss of the β-cells in the islets of Langerhans through apoptosis ultimately cause a life-threatening insulin deficiency. The underlying reason for the particular vulnerability of the β-cells is an extraordinary sensitivity to the toxicity of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS) due to its low antioxidative defense status. This review considers the different aspects of the chemistry and biology of the biologically most important reactive species and their chemico-biological interactions in the β-cell toxicity of proinflammatory cytokines in type 1 diabetes and of lipotoxicity in type 2 diabetes development. The weak antioxidative defense equipment in the different subcellular organelles makes the β-cells particularly vulnerable and prone to mitochondrial, peroxisomal and ER stress. Looking upon the enzyme deficiencies which are responsible for the low antioxidative defense status of the pancreatic β-cells it is the lack of enzymatic capacity for H 2 O 2 inactivation at all major subcellular sites. Diabetes is the most prevalent metabolic disorder with a steadily increasing incidence of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes worldwide. The weak protection of the pancreatic β-cells against oxidative stress is a major reason for their particular vulnerability. Thus, careful protection of the β-cells is required for prevention of the disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Anticancer immune reactivity and long-term survival after treatment of metastatic ovarian cancer with dendritic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    BERNAL, SAMUEL D.; ONA, ENRIQUE T.; RIEGO-JAVIER, AILEEN; DE VILLA, ROMULO; CRISTAL-LUNA, GLORIA R.; LAGUATAN, JOSEPHINE B.; BATAC, EUNICE R.; CANLAS, OSCAR Q.

    2012-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells collected by leukapheresis of a patient with metastatic ovarian carcinoma (OVCA) were induced into dendritic cell (DC) differentiation and fused with liposomal constructs of autologous and allogeneic ovarian carcinoma antigens (DC-OVCA). The proliferation of autologous T cells induced by DCs was determined by [3H]-thymidine uptake. Maximal T-cell proliferation was observed in co-cultures of DCs fused with liposomal OVCA constructs compared with intact autologous OVCA cells. The combination of autologous and allogeneic liposomal OVCA constructs induced greater T-cell proliferation than either alone. The cytotoxicity of DC-activated T cells against various target cells were analyzed by a 51Cr-release assay. The combination of autologous and allogeneic liposomal OVCA constructs showed the highest stimulation of T cell-mediated cytotoxicity against OVCA cells, but had minimal cytotoxicity against normal fibroblasts or leukemia cells. The liposomal preparations of DC-OVCA were injected monthly into a patient with metastatic ovarian carcinoma whose tumors progressed following multiple courses of chemotherapy. DCs analyzed from the patient post-immunization showed 2- to 3-fold greater OVCA cytotoxicity compared to pre-immunization DCs. Immunoblots using the patient's serum showed reactivity with a number of proteins from ovarian cancer extracts, but not in normal fibroblasts and breast cancer. Following the DC-OVCA treatment, the metastatic lesions progressively decreased in size to the point of being undetectable by serial CAT scans. Seven years following the initial diagnosis, the patient continues to be free of cancer. This report described the anticancer immune reactivity and anti-tumor response induced by DCs sensitized with liposomal constructs of OVCA antigens. Immune cell therapy may therefore be a useful adjunct to surgery and chemotherapy for the treatment of ovarian cancer. PMID:22740858

  17. Involvement of oxygen reactive species in the cellular response of carcinoma cells to irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tulard, A.

    2004-06-01

    After a presentation of oxygen reactive species and their sources, the author describes the enzymatic and non-enzymatic anti-oxidative defenses, the physiological roles of oxygen reactive species, the oxidative stress, the water radiolysis, the anti-oxidative enzymes and the effects of ionizing radiations. The author then reports an investigation on the contribution of oxygen reactive species in the cellular response to irradiation, and an investigation on the influence of the breathing chain on the persistence of a radio-induced oxidative stress. He also reports a research on molecular mechanisms involved in the cellular radio-sensitivity

  18. Intra- and inter-individual variability of Aspergillus fumigatus reactive T-cell frequencies in healthy volunteers in dependency of mould exposure in residential and working environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurster, Sebastian; Weis, Philipp; Page, Lukas; Helm, Johanna; Lazariotou, Maria; Einsele, Hermann; Ullmann, Andrew J

    2017-10-01

    Invasive aspergillosis remains a deadly disease in immunocompromised patients, whereas the combination of an exaggerated immune response and continuous exposure lead to various hyperinflammatory diseases. This pilot study aimed to gain an overview of the intra- and inter-individual variability in Aspergillus fumigatus reactive T-helper cells in healthy adults and the correlation with environmental mould exposure. In this flow cytometric study, the frequencies of CD154 + A. fumigatus reactive T cells were evaluated in 70 healthy volunteers. All subjects completed a standardised questionnaire addressing their mould exposure. Subjects with intensive mould exposure in their professional or residential surrounding demonstrated considerably higher mean frequencies of A. fumigatus reactive T-helper and T-memory cells. Comparative evaluation of multiple measurements over time demonstrated relatively conserved reactive T-cell frequencies in the absence of major changes to the exposure profile, whereas those frequently exposed in professional environment or with changes to their risk score demonstrated a marked dependency of antigen reactive T-cell frequencies on recent mould exposure. This pilot study was the first to provide data on the intra-individual variability in A. fumigatus reactive T-cell frequencies and its linkage to mould encounter. Fungus reactive T cells are to be considered a valued tool for the assessment of environmental mould exposure. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  19. Growth and structural properties of reactively co-sputtered CIGS films and their solar cell applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jeha [Cheongju University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of); Park, Nae-Man [Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-15

    Using reactive sputtering, we fabricated stoichiometric CuIn{sub 1-x}Ga{sub x}Se{sub 2} (CIGS) thin films. Both Cu{sub 0.6}Ga{sub 0.4} (CuGa) and Cu{sub 0.4}In{sub 0.6} (CuIn) alloy targets were simultaneously sputtered under the delivery of elemental Se produced from a thermal cracker. By changing the sputtering rates of the CuGa and the CuIn, we were able to obtain the composition ratios of Cu/(Ga+In) and Ga/(Ga+In) in the range of 0.71-0.95 and 0.10-0.30, respectively. Both the grain size and the surface roughness of the CIGS film increased as the Cu/(Ga+In) ratio increased. In the X-ray diffraction analysis on CIGS films of 0.9 m, preferential growth with a [112] orientation was found, and reflections from the (211), (220)/(204), (301), (312)/(116), (400)/(008), and (332)/(316) planes were observed. The CIGS films showed the existence of Cu{sub 2-x}Se phases in the Cu-rich samples and ordered defect compound (ODC) phases in the Cu-poor films, as confirmed in the Raman measurements. A best device performance of η = 8.1%, V{sub oc} = 0.442 V, J{sub sc} = 34.3 mA/cm{sup 2}, and FF = 53.4% was obtained from a cell fabricated with a CIGS layer (t = 0.9 μm) with the Cu/(Ga+In) ratio = 0.71 and the Ga/(Ga+In) ratio = 0.10.

  20. Emerging roles of hypoxia-inducible factors and reactive oxygen species in cancer and pluripotent stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeo Saito

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic organisms require oxygen homeostasis to maintain proper cellular function for survival. During conditions of low oxygen tension (hypoxia, cells activate the transcription of genes that induce an adaptive response, which supplies oxygen to tissues. Hypoxia and hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs may contribute to the maintenance of putative cancer stem cells, which can continue self-renewal indefinitely and express stemness genes in hypoxic stress environments (stem cell niches. Reactive oxygen species (ROS have long been recognized as toxic by-products of aerobic metabolism that are harmful to living cells, leading to DNA damage, senescence, or cell death. HIFs may promote a cancer stem cell state, whereas the loss of HIFs induces the production of cellular ROS and activation of proteins p53 and p16Ink4a, which lead to tumor cell death and senescence. ROS seem to inhibit HIF regulation in cancer cells. By contrast, controversial data have suggested that hypoxia increases the generation of ROS, which prevents hydroxylation of HIF proteins by inducing their transcription as negative feedback. Moreover, hypoxic conditions enhance the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs. During reprogramming of somatic cells into a PSC state, cells attain a metabolic state typically observed in embryonic stem cells (ESCs. ESCs and iPSCs share similar bioenergetic metabolisms, including decreased mitochondrial number and activity, and induced anaerobic glycolysis. This review discusses the current knowledge regarding the emerging roles of ROS homeostasis in cellular reprogramming and the implications of hypoxic regulation in cancer development.

  1. Vitamin K3 induces antiproliferative effect in cervical epithelial cells transformed by HPV 16 (SiHa cells) through the increase in reactive oxygen species production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho Scharf Santana, Natália; Lima, Natália Alves; Desoti, Vânia Cristina; Bidóia, Danielle Lazarin; de Souza Bonfim Mendonça, Patrícia; Ratti, Bianca Altrão; Nakamura, Tânia Ueda; Nakamura, Celso Vataru; Consolaro, Marcia Edilaine Lopes; Ximenes, Valdecir Farias; de Oliveira Silva, Sueli

    2016-10-01

    Cervical cancer is characterized as an important public health problem. According to latest estimates, cancer of the cervix is the fourth most common cancer among women. Due to its high prevalence, the search for new and efficient drugs to treat this infection is continuous. The progression of HPV-associated cervical cancer involves the expression of two viral proteins, E6 and E7, which are rapidly degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome system through the increase in reactive oxygen species generation. Vitamins are essential to human substances, participate in the regulation of metabolism, and facilitate the process of energy transfer. Some early studies have indicated that vitamin K3 exerts antitumor activity by inducing cell death by apoptosis through an increase in the generation of reactive oxygen species. Thus, we evaluated the antiproliferative effect and a likely mechanism of action of vitamin K3 against cervical epithelial cells transformed by HPV 16 (SiHa cells) assessing the production of total ROS, the mitochondrial membrane potential, the cell morphology, the cell volume, and the cell membrane integrity. Our results show that vitamin K3 induces an increase in ROS production in SiHa cells, triggering biochemical and morphological events, such as depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential and decreasing cell volume. Our data showed that vitamin K3 generates an oxidative imbalance in SiHa cells, leading to mechanisms that induce cell death by apoptosis.

  2. Titanium dioxide induces apoptotic cell death through reactive oxygen species-mediated Fas upregulation and Bax activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon TH

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Ki-Chun Yoo1, Chang-Hwan Yoon1, Dongwook Kwon2, Kyung-Hwan Hyun1, Soo Jung Woo1, Rae-Kwon Kim1, Eun-Jung Lim1, Yongjoon Suh1, Min-Jung Kim1, Tae Hyun Yoon2, Su-Jae Lee11Laboratory of Molecular Biochemistry, 2Laboratory of Nanoscale Characterization and Environmental Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, Hanyang University, Seoul, Republic of KoreaBackground: Titanium dioxide (TiO2 has been widely used in many areas, including biomedicine, cosmetics, and environmental engineering. Recently, it has become evident that some TiO2 particles have a considerable cytotoxic effect in normal human cells. However, the molecular basis for the cytotoxicity of TiO2 has yet to be defined.Methods and results: In this study, we demonstrated that combined treatment with TiO2 nanoparticles sized less than 100 nm and ultraviolet A irradiation induces apoptotic cell death through reactive oxygen species-dependent upregulation of Fas and conformational activation of Bax in normal human cells. Treatment with P25 TiO2 nanoparticles with a hydrodynamic size distribution centered around 70 nm (TiO2P25–70 together with ultraviolet A irradiation-induced caspase-dependent apoptotic cell death, accompanied by transcriptional upregulation of the death receptor, Fas, and conformational activation of Bax. In line with these results, knockdown of either Fas or Bax with specific siRNA significantly inhibited TiO2-induced apoptotic cell death. Moreover, inhibition of reactive oxygen species with an antioxidant, N-acetyl-L-cysteine, clearly suppressed upregulation of Fas, conformational activation of Bax, and subsequent apoptotic cell death in response to combination treatment using TiO2P25–70 and ultraviolet A irradiation.Conclusion: These results indicate that sub-100 nm sized TiO2 treatment under ultraviolet A irradiation induces apoptotic cell death through reactive oxygen species-mediated upregulation of the death receptor, Fas, and activation of the preapoptotic protein

  3. Modulation of cisplatin-induced reactive oxygen species production by fullerene C(60 in normal and transformed lymphoid cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Franskevych

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The early response of normal (Wistar rat thymocytes and transformed (mice lymphoid leukemia L1210 cells to treatment with anticancer drug cisplatin or to combined treatment with cisplatin and carbon nanostructure fullerene C60 was studied. We demonstrated with fluorescent probes DCFH-DA and TMRE that cisplatin at concentration 1 μg/ml induced reactive oxygen species (ROS production and decreased the value of mitochondrial membrane potential in both cell types. The combined treatment with cisplatin (1 μg/ml and fullerene C60 (7.2 μg/ml was shown to be followed by oppositely directed modulation of ROS production in thymocytes and L1210 cells. Cisplatin-induced ROS production was intensified in L1210 cells, while in thymocytes it was decreased. It is supposed that the different effects of combined treatment are associated with peculiarities of fullerene C60 accumulation and localization in normal and cancer cells.

  4. Reactive Oxygen Species Are Required for Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells to Initiate Proliferation after the Quiescence Exit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. G. Lyublinskaya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study focuses on the involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS in the process of mesenchymal stem cells “waking up” and entering the cell cycle after the quiescence. Using human endometrial mesenchymal stem cells (eMSCs, we showed that intracellular basal ROS level is positively correlated with the proliferative status of the cell cultures. Our experiments with the eMSCs synchronized in the G0 phase of the cell cycle revealed a transient increase in the ROS level upon the quiescence exit after stimulation of the cell proliferation. This increase was registered before the eMSC entry to the S-phase of the cell cycle, and elimination of this increase by antioxidants (N-acetyl-L-cysteine, Tempol, and Resveratrol blocked G1–S-phase transition. Similarly, a cell cycle arrest which resulted from the antioxidant treatment was observed in the experiments with synchronized human mesenchymal stem cells derived from the adipose tissue. Thus, we showed that physiologically relevant level of ROS is required for the initiation of human mesenchymal stem cell proliferation and that low levels of ROS due to the antioxidant treatment can block the stem cell self-renewal.

  5. Interdisciplinary Evaluation of Broadly-Reactive HLA Class II Restricted Epitopes Eliciting HIV-Specific CD4+T Cell Responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buggert, M.; Norström, M.; Lundegaard, Claus

    2011-01-01

    , the functional and immunodominant discrepancies of CD4+ T cell responses targeting promiscuous MHC II restricted HIV epitopes remains poorly defined. Thus, utilization of interdisciplinary approaches might aid revealing broadly- reactive peptides eliciting CD4 + T cell responses. Methods: We utilized the novel...... bioinformatic prediction program NetMHCIIpan to select 64 optimized MHC II restricted epitopes located in the HIV Gag, Pol, Env, Nef and Tat regions. The epitopes were selected to cover the global diversity of the virus (multiple subtypes) and the human immune system(diverse MHC II types). Optimized...

  6. Role of reactive oxygen species in arsenic-induced transformation of human lung bronchial epithelial (BEAS-2B) cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Zhuo, E-mail: zhuo.zhang@uky.edu [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Pratheeshkumar, Poyil; Budhraja, Amit; Son, Young-Ok [Center for Research on Environmental Diseases, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Kim, Donghern [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Shi, Xianglin [Center for Research on Environmental Diseases, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States)

    2015-01-09

    Highlights: • Short term exposure of cells to arsenic causes ROS generation. • Chronical exposure of cells to arsenic causes malignant cell transformation. • Inhibition of ROS generation reduces cell transformation by arsenic. • Arsenic-transformed cells exhibit reduced capacity of generating ROS. • Arsenic-transformed cells exhibit increased levels of antioxidants. - Abstract: Arsenic is an environmental carcinogen, its mechanisms of carcinogenesis remain to be investigated. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are considered to be important. A previous study (Carpenter et al., 2011) has measured ROS level in human lung bronchial epithelial (BEAS-2B) cells and arsenic-transformed BEAS-2B cells and found that ROS levels were higher in transformed cells than that in parent normal cells. Based on these observations, the authors concluded that cell transformation induced by arsenic is mediated by increased cellular levels of ROS. This conclusion is problematic because this study only measured the basal ROS levels in transformed and parent cells and did not investigate the role of ROS in the process of arsenic-induced cell transformation. The levels of ROS in arsenic-transformed cells represent the result and not the cause of cell transformation. Thus question concerning whether ROS are important in arsenic-induced cell transformation remains to be answered. In the present study, we used expressions of catalase (antioxidant against H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) and superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2, antioxidant against O{sub 2}{sup ·−}) to decrease ROS level and investigated their role in the process of arsenic-induced cell transformation. Our results show that inhibition of ROS by antioxidant enzymes decreased arsenic-induced cell transformation, demonstrating that ROS are important in this process. We have also shown that in arsenic-transformed cells, ROS generation was lower and levels of antioxidants are higher than those in parent cells, in a disagreement with the previous

  7. Role of reactive oxygen species in arsenic-induced transformation of human lung bronchial epithelial (BEAS-2B) cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Zhuo; Pratheeshkumar, Poyil; Budhraja, Amit; Son, Young-Ok; Kim, Donghern; Shi, Xianglin

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Short term exposure of cells to arsenic causes ROS generation. • Chronical exposure of cells to arsenic causes malignant cell transformation. • Inhibition of ROS generation reduces cell transformation by arsenic. • Arsenic-transformed cells exhibit reduced capacity of generating ROS. • Arsenic-transformed cells exhibit increased levels of antioxidants. - Abstract: Arsenic is an environmental carcinogen, its mechanisms of carcinogenesis remain to be investigated. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are considered to be important. A previous study (Carpenter et al., 2011) has measured ROS level in human lung bronchial epithelial (BEAS-2B) cells and arsenic-transformed BEAS-2B cells and found that ROS levels were higher in transformed cells than that in parent normal cells. Based on these observations, the authors concluded that cell transformation induced by arsenic is mediated by increased cellular levels of ROS. This conclusion is problematic because this study only measured the basal ROS levels in transformed and parent cells and did not investigate the role of ROS in the process of arsenic-induced cell transformation. The levels of ROS in arsenic-transformed cells represent the result and not the cause of cell transformation. Thus question concerning whether ROS are important in arsenic-induced cell transformation remains to be answered. In the present study, we used expressions of catalase (antioxidant against H 2 O 2 ) and superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2, antioxidant against O 2 ·− ) to decrease ROS level and investigated their role in the process of arsenic-induced cell transformation. Our results show that inhibition of ROS by antioxidant enzymes decreased arsenic-induced cell transformation, demonstrating that ROS are important in this process. We have also shown that in arsenic-transformed cells, ROS generation was lower and levels of antioxidants are higher than those in parent cells, in a disagreement with the previous report. The

  8. Diagnostic value of tolerance-related gene expression measured in the recipient alloantigen-reactive T cell fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Dong-Gyun; Park, Youn-Hee; Kim, Sung-Eun; Jeong, Seong-Hee; Kim, Song-Cheol

    2013-08-01

    The efficient development of tolerance-inducing therapies and safe reduction of immunosuppression should be supported by early diagnosis and prediction of tolerance in transplantation. Using mouse models of donor-specific tolerance to allogeneic skin and islet grafts we tested whether measurement of tolerance-related gene expression in their alloantigen-reactive peripheral T cell fraction efficiently reflected the tolerance status of recipients. We found that Foxp3, Nrn1, and Klrg1 were preferentially expressed in conditions of tolerance compared with rejection or unmanipulated controls if their expression is measured in CD69(+) T cells prepared from coculture of recipient peripheral T cells and donor antigen-presenting cells. The same pattern of gene expression was observed in recipients grafted with either skin or islets, recipients of different genetic origins, and even those taking immunosuppressive drugs. These findings suggest that the expression of tolerance-related genes in the alloantigen-reactive T cell fraction could be used to detect tolerance in the clinic. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Exposure of Bacterial Biofilms to Electrical Current Leads to Cell Death Mediated in Part by Reactive Oxygen Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkman, Cassandra L; Schmidt-Malan, Suzannah M; Karau, Melissa J; Greenwood-Quaintance, Kerryl; Hassett, Daniel J; Mandrekar, Jayawant N; Patel, Robin

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms may form on indwelling medical devices such as prosthetic joints, heart valves and catheters, causing challenging-to-treat infections. We have previously described the 'electricidal effect', in which bacterial biofilms are decreased following exposure to direct electrical current. Herein, we sought to determine if the decreased bacterial quantities are due to detachment of biofilms or cell death and to investigate the role that reactive oxygen species (ROS) play in the observed effect. Using confocal and electron microscopy and flow cytometry, we found that direct current (DC) leads to cell death and changes in the architecture of biofilms formed by Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) appear to play a role in DC-associated cell death, as there was an increase in ROS-production by Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilms following exposure to DC. An increase in the production of ROS response enzymes catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD) was observed for S. aureus, S. epidermidis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms following exposure to DC. Additionally, biofilms were protected from cell death when supplemented with antioxidants and oxidant scavengers, including catalase, mannitol and Tempol. Knocking out SOD (sodAB) in P. aeruginosa led to an enhanced DC effect. Microarray analysis of P. aeruginosa PAO1 showed transcriptional changes in genes related to the stress response and cell death. In conclusion, the electricidal effect results in death of bacteria in biofilms, mediated, at least in part, by production of ROS.

  10. Advanced glycation end products promote ChREBP expression and cell proliferation in liver cancer cells by increasing reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hanbei; Li, Yakui; Zhu, Yemin; Wu, Lifang; Meng, Jian; Lin, Ning; Yang, Dianqiang; Li, Minle; Ding, WenJin; Tong, Xuemei; Su, Qing

    2017-08-01

    The aim of the study was to elucidate the mechanism by which advanced glycation end products (AGEs) promote cell proliferation in liver cancer cells.We treated liver cancer HepG2 cells with 200 mg/L AGEs or bovine serum albumin (BSA) and assayed for cell viability, cell cycle, and apoptosis. We performed real-time PCR and Western blot analysis for RNA and protein levels of carbohydrate responsive element-binding protein (ChREBP) in AGEs- or BSA-treated HepG2 cells. We analyzed the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in HepG2 cells treated with AGEs or BSA.We found that increased S-phase cell percentage and decreased apoptosis contributed to AGEs-induced liver cancer cell proliferation. Real-time PCR and Western blot analysis showed that AGEs stimulated RNA and protein levels of ChREBP, a transcription factor promoting glycolysis and maintaining cell proliferation in liver cancer cells. Intriguingly, the level of ROS was higher in AGEs-treated liver cancer cells. Treating liver cancer cells with antioxidant N-acetyl cystein (NAC) partly blocked AGEs-induced ChREBP expression and cell proliferation.Our results suggest that the AGEs-ROS-ChREBP pathway plays a critical role in promoting ChREBP expression and liver cancer cell proliferation.

  11. Influenza A Virus Infection in Pigs Attracts Multifunctional and Cross-Reactive T Cells to the Lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talker, Stephanie C; Stadler, Maria; Koinig, Hanna C; Mair, Kerstin H; Rodríguez-Gómez, Irene M; Graage, Robert; Zell, Roland; Dürrwald, Ralf; Starick, Elke; Harder, Timm; Weissenböck, Herbert; Lamp, Benjamin; Hammer, Sabine E; Ladinig, Andrea; Saalmüller, Armin; Gerner, Wilhelm

    2016-10-15

    Pigs are natural hosts for influenza A viruses and play a critical role in influenza epidemiology. However, little is known about their influenza-evoked T-cell response. We performed a thorough analysis of both the local and systemic T-cell response in influenza virus-infected pigs, addressing kinetics and phenotype as well as multifunctionality (gamma interferon [IFN-γ], tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α], and interleukin-2 [IL-2]) and cross-reactivity. A total of 31 pigs were intratracheally infected with an H1N2 swine influenza A virus (FLUAVsw) and consecutively euthanized. Lungs, tracheobronchial lymph nodes, and blood were sampled during the first 15 days postinfection (p.i.) and at 6 weeks p.i. Ex vivo flow cytometry of lung lymphocytes revealed an increase in proliferating (Ki-67(+)) CD8(+) T cells with an early effector phenotype (perforin(+) CD27(+)) at day 6 p.i. Low frequencies of influenza virus-specific IFN-γ-producing CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells could be detected in the lung as early as 4 days p.i. On consecutive days, influenza virus-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells produced mainly IFN-γ and/or TNF-α, reaching peak frequencies around day 9 p.i., which were up to 30-fold higher in the lung than in tracheobronchial lymph nodes or blood. At 6 weeks p.i., CD4(+) and CD8(+) memory T cells had accumulated in lung tissue. These cells showed diverse cytokine profiles and in vitro reactivity against heterologous influenza virus strains, all of which supports their potential to combat heterologous influenza virus infections in pigs. Pigs not only are a suitable large-animal model for human influenza virus infection and vaccine development but also play a central role in the emergence of new pandemic strains. Although promising candidate universal vaccines are tested in pigs and local T cells are the major correlate of heterologous control, detailed and targeted analyses of T-cell responses at the site of infection are scarce. With the present study, we

  12. Acrolein stimulates the synthesis of IL-6 and C-reactive protein (CRP) in thrombosis model mice and cultured cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiki, Ryotaro; Hayashi, Daisuke; Ikuo, Yukiko; Nishimura, Kazuhiro; Ishii, Itsuko; Kobayashi, Kaoru; Chiba, Kan; Toida, Toshihiko; Kashiwagi, Keiko; Igarashi, Kazuei

    2013-12-01

    Measurements of protein-conjugated acrolein (PC-Acro), IL-6, and C-reactive protein (CRP) in plasma were useful for identifying silent brain infarction with high sensitivity and specificity. The aim of this study was to determine whether acrolein causes increased production of IL-6 and CRP in thrombosis model mice and cultured cells. In mice with photochemically induced thrombosis, acrolein produced at the locus of infarction increased the level of IL-6 and then CRP in plasma. This was confirmed in cell culture systems - acrolein stimulated the production of IL-6 in mouse neuroblastoma Neuro-2a cells, mouse macrophage-like J774.1 cells, and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), and IL-6 in turn stimulated the production of CRP in human hepatocarcinoma cells. The level of IL-6 mRNA was increased by acrolein through an increase in phosphorylation of the transcription factors, c-Jun, and NF-κB p65. Furthermore, CRP stimulated IL-6 production in mouse macrophage-like J774.1 cells and HUVEC. IL-6 functioned as a protective factor against acrolein toxicity in Neuro-2a cells and HUVEC. These results show that acrolein stimulates the synthesis of IL-6 and CRP, which function as protecting factors against acrolein toxicity, and that the combined measurement of PC-Acro, IL-6, and CRP is effective for identification of silent brain infarction. The combined measurements of protein-conjugated acrolein (PC-Acro), IL-6, and C-reactive protein (CRP) in plasma were useful for identifying silent brain infarction. The aim of this study was to determine whether acrolein causes increased production of IL-6 and CRP, and indeed acrolein increased IL-6 synthesis and IL-6 in turn increased CRP synthesis. Furthermore, IL-6 decreased acrolein toxicity in several cell lines. © 2013 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  13. Granzyme B of cytotoxic T cells induces extramitochondrial reactive oxygen species production via caspase-dependent NADPH oxidase activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiló, Juan I; Anel, Alberto; Catalán, Elena; Sebastián, Alvaro; Acín-Pérez, Rebeca; Naval, Javier; Wallich, Reinhard; Simon, Markus M; Pardo, Julián

    2010-07-01

    Induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is a hallmark of granzyme B (gzmB)-mediated pro-apoptotic processes and target cell death. However, it is unclear to what extent the generated ROS derive from mitochondrial and/or extra-mitochondrial sources. To clarify this point, we have produced a mutant EL4 cell line, termed EL4-rho(0), which lacks mitochondrial DNA, associated with a decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and a defective ROS production through the electron transport chain of oxidative phosphorylation. When incubated with either recombinant gzmB plus streptolysin or ex vivo gzmB(+) cytotoxic T cells, EL4-rho(0) cells showed phosphatydylserine translocation, caspase 3 activation, Bak conformational change, cytochrome c release and apoptotic morphology comparable to EL4 cells. Moreover, EL4-rho(0) cells produced ROS at levels similar to EL4 under these conditions. GzmB-mediated ROS production was almost totally abolished in both cell lines by the pan-caspase inhibitor, Z-VAD-fmk. However, addition of apocynin, a specific inhibitor of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidases, led to a significant reduction of ROS production and cell death only in EL4-rho(0) but not EL4 cells. These data suggest that gzmB-induced cell death is accompanied by a caspase-dependent pathway of extra-mitochondrial ROS production, most probably through activation of NADPH oxidase.

  14. Large-scale multiplex polymerase chain reaction assay for diagnosis of viral reactivations after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inazawa, Natsuko; Hori, Tsukasa; Hatakeyama, Naoki; Yamamoto, Masaki; Yoto, Yuko; Nojima, Masanori; Suzuki, Nobuhiro; Shimizu, Norio; Tsutsumi, Hiroyuki

    2015-08-01

    Viral reactivations following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation are thought to result from the breakdown of both cell-mediated and humoral immunity. As a result, many viruses could be reactivated individually or simultaneously. Using a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR), we prospectively examined many kinds of viral DNAs at a time in 105 patients who underwent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. In total, 591 whole blood samples were collected weekly from pre- to 42 days post-transplantation and the following 13 viruses were tested; herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), HSV-2, varicella-zoster virus (VZV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), cytomegalovirus (CMV), human herpes virus 6 (HHV-6), HHV-7, HHV-8, adenovirus, BK virus (BKV), JC virus (JCV), parvovirus B19, and hepatitis B virus (HBV). Several viral DNAs were detected in 12 patients before hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The detection rate gradually increased after transplantation and peaked at 21 days. The most frequently detected virus was HHV-6 (n = 63; 60.0%), followed by EBV (n = 11; 10.5%), CMV (n = 11; 10.5%), and HHV-7 (n = 9; 8.6%). Adenovirus and HBV were each detected in one patient (1.0%). Detection of HHV-6 DNA was significantly more common among patients undergoing cord blood transplantation or with steroid treatment. EBV DNA tended to be more common in patients treated with anti-thymocyte globulin. Multiplex PCR was useful for detecting many viral reactivations after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, simultaneously. Cord blood transplantation, steroid treatment, or anti-thymocyte globulin use was confirmed to be risk factors after transplantation. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Krebs Cycle Intermediates Protective against Oxidative Stress by Modulating the Level of Reactive Oxygen Species in Neuronal HT22 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenta Sawa

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Krebs cycle intermediates (KCIs are reported to function as energy substrates in mitochondria and to exert antioxidants effects on the brain. The present study was designed to identify which KCIs are effective neuroprotective compounds against oxidative stress in neuronal cells. Here we found that pyruvate, oxaloacetate, and α-ketoglutarate, but not lactate, citrate, iso-citrate, succinate, fumarate, or malate, protected HT22 cells against hydrogen peroxide-mediated toxicity. These three intermediates reduced the production of hydrogen peroxide-activated reactive oxygen species, measured in terms of 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescein diacetate fluorescence. In contrast, none of the KCIs—used at 1 mM—protected against cell death induced by high concentrations of glutamate—another type of oxidative stress-induced neuronal cell death. Because these protective KCIs did not have any toxic effects (at least up to 10 mM, they have potential use for therapeutic intervention against chronic neurodegenerative diseases.

  16. Effect of heat absorbing powder addition on cell morphology of porous titanium composite manufactured by reactive precursor method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobashi, Makoto; Kamiya, Yoshinori; Kanetake, Naoyuki

    2012-01-01

    Open-cell structured porous titanium/ceramics composite was synthesized by a reactive precursor method using titanium and boron carbide (B 4 C) as reactant powders. Pore morphology was controlled by adding heat absorbing powder (titanium diboride: TiB 2 ) in the Ti+B 4 C blended powder. The effects of molar blending ratio of titanium and B 4 C and the amount of heat absorbing powder addition on the cell morphology (either open or closed) were investigated. Fine and homogeneous open-cell structure was achieved by adding appropriate amount of heat absorbing agent powder (>15 vol%), and the relative density of the specimen after the reaction became closer to that of the precursor by increasing TiB 2 volume fraction. When the volume fraction of TiB 2 addition was 20%, the open-cell fraction was maintained as 1.0 regardless of the relative density of the precursor.

  17. On the Effects of Reactive Oxygen Species and Nitric Oxide on Red Blood Cell Deformability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukas Diederich

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The main function of red blood cells (RBCs is the transport of respiratory gases along the vascular tree. To fulfill their task, RBCs are able to elastically deform in response to mechanical forces and, pass through the narrow vessels of the microcirculation. Decreased RBC deformability was observed in pathological conditions linked to increased oxidative stress or decreased nitric oxide (NO bioavailability, like hypertension. Treatments with oxidants and with NO were shown to affect RBC deformability ex vivo, but the mechanisms underpinning these effects are unknown. In this study we investigate whether changes in intracellular redox status/oxidative stress or nitrosation reactions induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS or NO may affect RBC deformability. In a case-control study comparing RBCs from healthy and hypertensive participants, we found that RBC deformability was decreased, and levels of ROS were increased in RBCs from hypertensive patients as compared to RBCs from aged-matched healthy controls, while NO levels in RBCs were not significantly different. To study the effects of oxidants on RBC redox state and deformability, RBCs from healthy volunteers were treated with increasing concentrations of tert-butylhydroperoxide (t-BuOOH. We found that high concentrations of t-BuOOH (≥ 1 mM significantly decreased the GSH/GSSG ratio in RBCs, decreased RBC deformability and increased blood bulk viscosity. Moreover, RBCs from Nrf2 knockout (KO mice, a strain genetically deficient in a number of antioxidant/reducing enzymes, were more susceptible to t-BuOOH-induced impairment in RBC deformability as compared to wild type (WT mice. To study the role of NO in RBC deformability we treated RBC suspensions from human volunteers with NO donors and nitrosothiols and analyzed deformability of RBCs from mice lacking the endothelial NO synthase (eNOS. We found that NO donors induced S-nitrosation of the cytoskeletal protein spectrin, but did not affect

  18. Cancer vaccine enhanced, non-tumor-reactive CD8(+) T cells exhibit a distinct molecular program associated with "division arrest anergy".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Marc; Karbach, Julia; Mallmann, Michael R; Zander, Thomas; Eggle, Daniela; Classen, Sabine; Debey-Pascher, Svenja; Famulok, Michael; Jäger, Elke; Schultze, Joachim L

    2009-05-15

    Immune-mediated tumor rejection relies on fully functional T-cell responses and neutralization of an adverse tumor microenvironment. In clinical trials, we detected peptide-specific but non-tumor-reactive and therefore not fully functional CD8(+) T cells post-vaccination against tumor antigens. Understanding the molecular mechanisms behind nontumor reactivity will be a prerequisite to overcome this CD8(+) T-cell deviation. We report that these non-tumor-reactive CD8(+) T cells are characterized by a molecular program associated with hallmarks of "division arrest anergy." Non-tumor-reactive CD8(+) T cells are characterized by coexpression of CD7, CD25, and CD69 as well as elevated levels of lck(p505) and p27(kip1). In vivo quantification revealed high prevalence of non-tumor-reactive CD8(+) T cells with increased levels during cancer vaccination. Furthermore, their presence was associated with a trend toward shorter survival. Dynamics and frequencies of non-target-reactive CD8(+) T cells need to be further addressed in context of therapeutic vaccine development in cancer, chronic infections, and autoimmune diseases.

  19. Relationships between human vitality and mitochondrial respiratory parameters, reactive oxygen species production and dNTP levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maynard, Scott; Keijzers, Guido; Gram, Martin

    2013-01-01

    . Therefore, we measured a number of cellular parameters related to mitochondrial activity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) isolated from middle-aged men, and tested for association with vitality. These parameters estimate mitochondrial respiration, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production...

  20. Glycidamide inhibits progesterone production through reactive oxygen species-induced apoptosis in R2C Rat Leydig Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mingwei; Sun, Jianxia; Zou, Feiyan; Bai, Shun; Jiang, Xinwei; Jiao, Rui; Ou, Shiyi; Zhang, Hui; Su, Zhijian; Huang, Yadong; Bai, Weibin

    2017-10-01

    The food contaminant acrylamide (AA) is usually recognized as a probable human carcinogen. In addition, AA has also been found able to induce male infertility in animals. Interestingly, resent research work revealed that the toxic effect of AA on the ability of male reproduction in vivo may due to glycidamide (GA) which is the metabolite of AA. In this study, R2C Leydig cells was used to investigate the toxic effects of GA on progesterone production. GA caused dose-dependent inhibition on the cell growth, with IC 25 , IC 50, and IC 75 values found at 0.635, 0.872, and 1.198 mM, respectively. The results of single cell gel/Comet assay showed that GA significantly induced early-phase cell apoptosis, reduced progesterone production, as well as decreasing the protein expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) in R2C cells. Furthermore, GA induced overproduction of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), upregulated Bax expression, decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, and triggered mitochondria-mediated cell apoptosis. Consequently, the downstream effector caspase-3 was activated, resulting in Leydig cells apoptosis. Overall, our results showed that GA could damage R2C Leydig cells by the lesion of the ability of progesterone genesis and inducing cells apoptosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Phenethyl isothiocyanate inhibits growth of human chronic myeloid leukemia K562 cells via reactive oxygen species generation and caspases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yating; Wei, Sixi; Wang, Jishi; Fang, Qin; Chai, Qixiang

    2014-07-01

    Phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC), a potential cancer chemopreventive constituent of cruciferous vegetables, including watercress, has been reported to inhibit cancer cell growth by arresting the cell cycle and inducing apoptosis in various human cancer cell models. However, the role of PEITC in the inhibition of human chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) K562 cell growth and its underlying mechanisms have yet to be elucidated. In the present study, PEITC was found to induce cell death through the induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) stress and oxidative damage. Heme oxygenase‑1 (HO‑1), which participates in the development of numerous tumors and the sensitivity of these tumors to chemotherapeutic drugs, plays a protective role by modulating oxidative injury. Therefore, the present study assessed the inhibitory effect of PEITC on K562 cells and whether HO‑1 facilitated cell apoptosis and ROS generation. PEITC was found to suppress cell growth and cause apoptosis by promoting Fas and Fas ligand expression, increasing ROS generation and by the successive release of cytochrome c as well as the activation of caspase‑9 and caspase‑3. PEITC was also combined with the HO‑1 inhibitor zinc protoporphyrin IX and the inducer hemin to assess whether HO‑1 determines cell survival and ROS generation. The results of the present study suggest that PEITC may be a potential anti‑tumor compound for CML therapy, and that HO‑1 has a critical function in PEITC‑induced apoptosis and ROS generation.

  2. Impact of cytomegalovirus reactivation on relapse and survival in patients with acute leukemia who received allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in first remission

    OpenAIRE

    Yoon, Jae-Ho; Lee, Seok; Kim, Hee-Je; Jeon, Young-Woo; Lee, Sung-Eun; Cho, Byung-Sik; Lee, Dong-Gun; Eom, Ki-Seong; Kim, Yoo-Jin; Min, Chang-Ki; Cho, Seok-Goo; Min, Woo-Sung; Lee, Jong Wook

    2016-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV)-reactivation is associated with graft-vs-leukemia (GVL) effect by stimulating natural-killer or T-cells, which showed leukemia relapse prevention after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). We enrolled patients with acute myeloid leukemia (n = 197) and acute lymphoid leukemia (n = 192) who underwent allogeneic-HSCT in first remission. We measured RQ-PCR weekly to detect CMV-reactivation and preemptively used ganciclovir (GCV) when the titer increased twice cons...

  3. Lack of radioimmunodetection and complications associated with monoclonal anticarcinoembryonic antigen antibody cross-reactivity with an antigen on circulating cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dillman, R.O.; Beauregard, J.C.; Sobol, R.E.; Royston, I.; Bartholomew, R.M.; Hagan, P.S.; Halpern, S.E.

    1984-01-01

    Characterization of several high-affinity murine monoclonal anticarcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) antibodies suggested good specificity except for cross-reactivity with an antigen on granulocytes and erythrocytes which was different from the previously described normal cross-reacting antigen of granulocytes. In vivo studies in athymic mice using an indium conjugate of an anti-CEA monoclonal antibody (MoAb) revealed excellent specific uptake in colorectal carcinoma xenografts. Studies were conducted in humans to determine the limitations produced by the cross-reactivity with granulocytes and erythrocytes. Patients with metastatic colorectal cancer received 3 to 6 mg of anti-CEA MoAb over 10 min or 2 hr. In five of six trials, the MoAb infusion was associated with a 40 to 90% decrease in circulating granulocytes and systemic toxicity including fever, rigors, and emesis. One patient had no change in cell count and had no toxicity. Radionuclide scans with 111 In-anti-CEA MoAb showed marked uptake in the spleen when cells were eliminated, and in the liver, especially when pretreatment CEA levels were high. Metastatic tumor sites failed to concentrate the isotope. This study emphasizes the potential limitations for radioimmunodetection and/or radioimmunotherapy imposed by reactivity with circulating cells, and suggests that certain toxic reactions associated with MoAb infusions are related to destruction of circulating cells rather than allergic reactions to mouse protein. It also emphasizes how variables such as dose and binding affinity of antibody, radioisotope used, and assessment at different observation points can obscure lack of antibody specificity

  4. Lack of radioimmunodetection and complications associated with monoclonal anticarcinoembryonic antigen antibody cross-reactivity with an antigen on circulating cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dillman, R.O.; Beauregard, J.C.; Sobol, R.E.; Royston, I.; Bartholomew, R.M.; Hagan, P.S.; Halpern, S.E.

    1984-05-01

    Characterization of several high-affinity murine monoclonal anticarcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) antibodies suggested good specificity except for cross-reactivity with an antigen on granulocytes and erythrocytes which was different from the previously described normal cross-reacting antigen of granulocytes. In vivo studies in athymic mice using an indium conjugate of an anti-CEA monoclonal antibody (MoAb) revealed excellent specific uptake in colorectal carcinoma xenografts. Studies were conducted in humans to determine the limitations produced by the cross-reactivity with granulocytes and erythrocytes. Patients with metastatic colorectal cancer received 3 to 6 mg of anti-CEA MoAb over 10 min or 2 hr. In five of six trials, the MoAb infusion was associated with a 40 to 90% decrease in circulating granulocytes and systemic toxicity including fever, rigors, and emesis. One patient had no change in cell count and had no toxicity. Radionuclide scans with /sup 111/In-anti-CEA MoAb showed marked uptake in the spleen when cells were eliminated, and in the liver, especially when pretreatment CEA levels were high. Metastatic tumor sites failed to concentrate the isotope. This study emphasizes the potential limitations for radioimmunodetection and/or radioimmunotherapy imposed by reactivity with circulating cells, and suggests that certain toxic reactions associated with MoAb infusions are related to destruction of circulating cells rather than allergic reactions to mouse protein. It also emphasizes how variables such as dose and binding affinity of antibody, radioisotope used, and assessment at different observation points can obscure lack of antibody specificity.

  5. Corosolic Acid Induces Non-Apoptotic Cell Death through Generation of Lipid Reactive Oxygen Species Production in Human Renal Carcinoma Caki Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seon Min Woo

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Corosolic acid is one of the pentacyclic triterpenoids isolated from Lagerstroemia speciose and has been reported to exhibit anti-cancer and anti-proliferative activities in various cancer cells. In the present study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms of corosolic acid in cancer cell death. Corosolic acid induces a decrease of cell viability and an increase of cell cytotoxicity in human renal carcinoma Caki cells. Corosolic acid-induced cell death is not inhibited by apoptosis inhibitor (z-VAD-fmk, a pan-caspase inhibitor, necroptosis inhibitor (necrostatin-1, or ferroptosis inhibitors (ferrostatin-1 and deferoxamine (DFO. Furthermore, corosolic acid significantly induces reactive oxygen species (ROS levels, but antioxidants (N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC and trolox do not inhibit corosolic acid-induced cell death. Interestingly, corosolic acid induces lipid oxidation, and α-tocopherol markedly prevents corosolic acid-induced lipid peroxidation and cell death. Anti-chemotherapeutic effects of α-tocopherol are dependent on inhibition of lipid oxidation rather than inhibition of ROS production. In addition, corosolic acid induces non-apoptotic cell death in other renal cancer (ACHN and A498, breast cancer (MDA-MB231, and hepatocellular carcinoma (SK-Hep1 and Huh7 cells, and α-tocopherol markedly inhibits corosolic acid-induced cell death. Therefore, our results suggest that corosolic acid induces non-apoptotic cell death in cancer cells through the increase of lipid peroxidation.

  6. Reactive oxygen species activate differentiation gene transcription of acute myeloid leukemia cells via the JNK/c-JUN signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Chung Fan; Yeung, Hoi Ting; Lam, Yuk Man; Ng, Ray Kit

    2018-05-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and altered cellular redox status are associated with many malignancies. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells are maintained at immature state by differentiation blockade, which involves deregulation of transcription factors in myeloid differentiation. AML cells can be induced to differentiate by phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA), which possesses pro-oxidative activity. However, the signaling events mediated by ROS in the activation of transcriptional program during AML differentiation has not been fully elucidated. Here, we investigated AML cell differentiation by treatment with PMA and ROS scavenger N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC). We observed elevation of intracellular ROS level in the PMA-treated AML cells, which correlated with differentiated cell morphology and increased CD11b + mature cell population. The effect of PMA can be abolished by NAC co-treatment, supporting the involvement of ROS in the process. Moreover, we demonstrated that short ROS elevation mediated cell cycle arrest, but failed to activate myeloid gene transcription; whereas prolonged ROS elevation activated JNK/c-JUN signaling pathway. Inhibition of JNK suppressed the expression of key myeloid transcriptional regulators c-JUN, SPI-1 and MAFB, and prevented AML cells from undergoing terminal differentiation. These findings provide new insights into the crucial role of JNK/c-Jun signaling pathway in the activation of transcriptional program during ROS-mediated AML differentiation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Reactive glia promote development of CD103+ CD69+ CD8+ T-cells through programmed cell death-ligand 1 (PD-L1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Sujata; Hu, Shuxian; Sheng, Wen S; Chauhan, Priyanka; Lokensgard, James R

    2018-06-01

    Previous work from our laboratory has demonstrated in vivo persistence of CD103 + CD69 + brain resident memory CD8 + T-cells (bT RM ) following viral infection, and that the PD-1: PD-L1 pathway promotes development of these T RM cells within the brain. Although glial cells express low basal levels of PD-L1, its expression is upregulated upon IFN-γ-treatment, and they have been shown to modulate antiviral T-cell effector responses through the PD-1: PD-L1 pathway. We performed flow cytometric analysis of cells from co-cultures of mixed glia and CD8 + T-cells obtained from wild type mice to investigate the role of glial cells in the development of bT RM . In this study, we show that interactions between reactive glia and anti-CD3 Ab-stimulated CD8 + T-cells promote development of CD103 + CD69 + CD8 + T-cells through engagement of the PD-1: PD-L1 pathway. These studies used co-cultures of primary murine glial cells obtained from WT animals along with CD8 + T-cells obtained from either WT or PD-1 KO mice. We found that αCD3 Ab-stimulated CD8 + T-cells from WT animals increased expression of CD103 and CD69 when co-cultured with primary murine glial cells. In contrast, significantly reduced expression of CD103 and CD69 was observed using CD8 + T-cells from PD-1 KO mice. We also observed that reactive glia promoted high levels of CD127, a marker of memory precursor effector cells (MPEC), on CD69 + CD8 + T-cells, which promotes development of T RM cells. Interestingly, results obtained using T-cells from PD-1 KO animals showed significantly reduced expression of CD127 on CD69 + CD8 + cells. Additionally, blocking of glial PD-L1 resulted in decreased expression of CD103, along with reduced CD127 on CD69 + CD8 + T-cells. Taken together, these results demonstrate a role for activated glia in promoting development of bT RM through the PD-1: PD-L1 pathway. © 2018 The Authors. Immunity, Inflammation and Disease Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Patterns of labeling of intraspinal reactive cells in rats injected with [3H]thymidine prior to or following sciatic axotomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilmore, S.A.; Walls, R.C.

    1981-01-01

    Labeling patterns of reactive cells which occur in the spinal cord following sciatic axotomy were investigated by autoradiography following administration of [ 3 H]thymidine (2 μCi/g body weight/injection). In this investigation the labeling patterns in reactive cells were compared when [ 3 H]thymidine was injected: (1) prior to or (2) following surgery. Immature rats underwent sciatic axotomy and were killed 3 days later (20 days of age). Some of their littermates served as sham-operated controls, and others were killed on the day of surgery to evaluate intraspinal labeling at that time. In one series of animals, a single injection of [ 3 H]thymidine was administered 2 h prior to autopsy. This procedure resulted in heavy labeling of 6.2% of the cells classified as reactive cells. In the second series, 3 injections of [ 3 H]thymidine were given on the day prior to surgery. On the third post-operative day, 19.4% of the reactive cells were labeled, and the majority of these were lightly labeled, suggesting that they had undergone several cell divisions. The data from both injection protocols indicate that the magnitude of the cellular response to axotomy would be markedly underestimated, if one were to consider only labeled cells. The present investigators concluded that these particular applications of [ 3 H]thymidine autoradiography provide valuable information on reactions of the central nervous system to injury but are of little value in determining origins of the reactive cells. (Auth.)

  9. Exposure to ultrafine particles, intracellular production of reactive oxygen species in leukocytes and altered levels of endothelial progenitor cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jantzen, Kim; Møller, Peter Horn; Karottki, Dorina Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    . Additionally, the early endothelial progenitor cell levels were positively associated with a personalised measure of ultrafine particle exposure and negatively associated with both basal and capacity for reactive oxygen species production in lymphocytes and granulocytes, respectively. Our results indicate......Exposure to particles in the fine and ultrafine size range has been linked to induction of low-grade systemic inflammation, oxidative stress and development of cardiovascular diseases. Declining levels of endothelial progenitor cells within systemic circulation have likewise been linked...... to progression of cardiovascular diseases. The objective was to determine if exposure to fine and ultrafine particles from indoor and outdoor sources, assessed by personal and residential indoor monitoring, is associated with altered levels of endothelial progenitor cells, and whether such effects are related...

  10. Generation of B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL)-reactive T-cell lines and clones from HLA class I-matched donors using modified B-CLL cells as stimulators: implications for adoptive immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogendoorn, M; Wolbers, J Olde; Smit, W M; Schaafsma, M R; Barge, R M Y; Willemze, R; Falkenburg, J H F

    2004-07-01

    Allogeneic stem cell transplantation following reduced-intensity conditioning is being evaluated in patients with advanced B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL). The curative potential of this procedure is mediated by donor-derived alloreactive T cells, resulting in a graft-versus-leukemia effect. However, B-CLL may escape T-cell-mediated immune reactivity since these cells lack expression of costimulatory molecules. We examined the most optimal method to transform B-CLL cells into efficient antigen-presenting cells (APC) using activating cytokines, by triggering toll-like receptors (TLRs) using microbial pathogens and by CD40 stimulation with CD40L-transfected fibroblasts. CD40 activation in the presence of IL-4 induced strongest upregulation of costimulatory and adhesion molecules on B-CLL cells and induced the production of high amounts of IL-12 by the leukemic cells. In contrast to primary B-CLL cells as stimulator cells, these malignant APCs were capable of inducing the generation of B-CLL-reactive CD8(+) CTL lines and clones from HLA class I-matched donors. These CTL lines and clones recognized and killed primary B-CLL as well as patient-derived lymphoblasts, but not donor cells. These results show the feasibility of ex vivo generation of B-CLL-reactive CD8(+) CTLs. This opens new perspectives for adoptive immunotherapy, following allogeneic stem cell transplantation in patients with advanced B-CLL.

  11. Host cell reactivation of uv- and X-ray-damaged herpes simplex virus by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henderson, E.E.; Long, W.K.

    1981-01-01

    The efficacy of using an infected centers assay, employing herpes simplex virus-infected, Epstein-Barr virus-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) as components, to study host cell reactivation has been explored. Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) was shown through the infected centers assay to have detectable but varying ability to lytically infect LCLs established from chromosomal breakage syndromes or closely related genetic disorders. The rate of HSV inactivation by ultraviolet (uv) irradiation was faster in LCLs established from Cockaynes's syndrome than in normal LCLs, and faster still in LCLs established from xeroderma pigmentosum. These results indicate that Cockayne's syndrome, while having what appears to be quantitatively normal levels of uv-induced DNA repair replication, shows decreased ability to host cell reactivated uv-damaged HSV. In direct contrast, X-irradiated HSV showed identical survival when assayed on normal LCLs or LCLs established from ataxia telangiectasia showing increased sensitivity to X irradiation as measured by colony formation. Through the infected centers assay, it has also been possible to demonstrate low levels of multiplicity reactivation of mutagen-damaged HSV in permanently proliferating LCLs

  12. Reactive hypoglycemia in lean young women with PCOS and correlations with insulin sensitivity and with beta cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altuntas, Yuksel; Bilir, Muammer; Ucak, Sema; Gundogdu, Sadi

    2005-04-01

    Reactive hypoglycemia (RH), which is a postprandial hypoglycemic state, occurs within 2-5 h after food intake. It is classified as idiopathic, alimentary, or diabetic reactive hypoglycemia. We studied the incidence of reactive hypoglycemia and looked for any correlations between it and the presence of insulin sensitivity and/or beta cell function in young lean polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) patients. This study was designed as a cross-sectional study in 64 lean young women with PCOS (BMI lean young women with PCOS. DHEA-S and PRL levels were found to be lower in subjects with RH (P 0.05, respectively). Beta cell function indices such as the insulinogenic index (at 120 min), CIR (at 120 min) and HOMA beta cell index were found to be insignificantly higher in the RH group than the nonreactive hypoglycemia (NRH) group. The 4 h glucose level, but not the 3 h glucose level, was significantly correlated with insulin resistance indices, such as fasting insulin level, HOMA-IR, Quicky index, and FIRI in the RH group. Significantly decreased DHEA-S levels were an interesting finding. In conclusion, there is an urgent need to investigate RH in lean young women with PCOS. Our results indicate that more definite insulin resistance occurs in subjects with RH in the fourth hour of the OGTT than those with RH in the third hour. In addition, RH in the fourth hour together with a low DHEA-S level may be predictive of future diabetes in young women with PCOS even when they are not obese.

  13. Pre-emptive rituximab for Epstein-Barr virus reactivation after haplo-hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Shogo; Sano, Hideki; Mochizuki, Kazuhiro; Ohara, Yoshihiro; Takahashi, Nobuhisa; Ohto, Hitoshi; Kikuta, Atsushi

    2017-09-01

    Epstein-Barr virus-related post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disease (EBV-PTLD) is a serious complication in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) recipients. We conducted a retrospective study to investigate the incidence and potential risk factors for EBV reactivation and to assess the efficacy of the management of EBV reactivation with pre-emptive rituximab in children who had T-cell-replete haploidentical HSCT (TCR-haplo-SCT) with low-dose anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG). EBV-DNA level in peripheral blood (PB) was measured when suspected EBV reactivation were observed. When the EBV-DNA level in PB increased to >1,000 copies/10 6 peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), patients were pre-emptively treated with rituximab (375 mg/m 2 /dose). A total of 19 (50%) of 38 patients received rituximab infusion at a median time of 56 days after HSCT (range, 17-270 days). The median viral load at initiation of therapy was 2,900 copies/10 6 PBMC (range, 1,000-650 000). Pre-emptive therapy was started after a median of 2 days (range, 0-7 days). The median number of weekly treatment cycles was 2 (range, 1-3). None of the patients developed PTLD or other EBV-associated diseases. Pre-emptive rituximab therapy could be a useful strategy for EBV-PTLD in TCR-haplo-SCT recipients with low-dose ATG. © 2017 Japan Pediatric Society.

  14. Role of dissolved oxygen on the degradation mechanism of Reactive Green 19 and electricity generation in photocatalytic fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sin-Li; Ho, Li-Ngee; Ong, Soon-An; Wong, Yee-Shian; Voon, Chun-Hong; Khalik, Wan Fadhilah; Yusoff, Nik Athirah; Nordin, Noradiba

    2018-03-01

    In this study, a membraneless photocatalytic fuel cell with zinc oxide loaded carbon photoanode and platinum loaded carbon cathode was constructed to investigate the impact of dissolved oxygen on the mechanism of dye degradation and electricity generation of photocatalytic fuel cell. The photocatalytic fuel cell with high and low aeration rate, no aeration and nitrogen purged were investigated, respectively. The degradation rate of diazo dye Reactive Green 19 and the electricity generation was enhanced in photocatalytic fuel cell with higher dissolved oxygen concentration. However, the photocatalytic fuel cell was still able to perform 37% of decolorization in a slow rate (k = 0.033 h -1 ) under extremely low dissolved oxygen concentration (approximately 0.2 mg L -1 ) when nitrogen gas was introduced into the fuel cell throughout the 8 h. However, the change of the UV-Vis spectrum indicates that the intermediates of the dye could not be mineralized under insufficient dissolved oxygen level. In the aspect of electricity generation, the maximum short circuit current (0.0041 mA cm -2 ) and power density (0.00028 mW cm -2 ) of the air purged photocatalytic fuel cell was obviously higher than that with nitrogen purging (0.0015 mA cm -2 and 0.00008 mW cm -2 ). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Protective effects of kaempferol against reactive oxygen species-induced hemolysis and its antiproliferative activity on human cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Wenzhen; Chen, Luying; Ma, Xiang; Jiao, Rui; Li, Xiaofeng; Wang, Yong

    2016-05-23

    The protective effects of kaempferol against reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced hemolysis and its antiproliferative activity on human cancer cells were evaluated in this study. Kaempferol exhibited strong cellular antioxidant ability (CAA) with a CAA value of 59.80 ± 0.379 μM of quercetin (QE)/100 μM (EC50 = 7.74 ± 0.049 μM). Pretreatment with kaempferol significantly attenuated the ROS-induced hemolysis of human erythrocyte (87.4% hemolysis suppressed at 100 μg/mL) and reduced the accumulation of toxic lipid peroxidation product malondialdehyde (MDA). The anti-hemolytic activity of kaempferol was mainly through scavenging excessive ROS and preserving the intrinsic antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase, SOD; catalase, CAT; and glutathione peroxidase, GPx) activities in normal levels. Additionally, kaempferol showed significant antiproliferative activity on a panel of human cancer cell lines including human breast carcinoma (MCF-7) cells, human stomach carcinoma (SGC-7901) cells, human cervical carcinoma (Hela) cells and human lung carcinoma (A549) cells. Kaemperol induced apoptosis of MCF-7 cells accompanied with nuclear condensation and mitochondria dysfunction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Regulation of Cys-based protein tyrosine phosphatases via reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in mast cells and basophils

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Heneberg, Petr; Dráber, Petr

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 16 (2005), s. 1859-1871 ISSN 0929-8673 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA204/03/0594; GA ČR(CZ) GA301/03/0596; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA5052310; GA MZd(CZ) NR8079; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0506; GA MŠk(CZ) 1P04OE158 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : mast cell * tyrosine phosphatase * reactive oxygen species Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.904, year: 2005

  17. Electronegative Low-Density Lipoprotein Increases C-Reactive Protein Expression in Vascular Endothelial Cells through the LOX-1 Receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Chu, Chih-Sheng; Wang, Yu-Chen; Lu, Long-Sheng; Walton, Brian; Yilmaz, H. Ramazan; Huang, Roger Y.; Sawamura, Tatsuya; Dixon, Richard A. F.; Lai, Wen-Ter; Chen, Chu-Huang; Lu, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Increased plasma C-reactive protein (CRP) levels are associated with the occurrence and severity of acute coronary syndrome. We investigated whether CRP can be generated in vascular endothelial cells (ECs) after exposure to the most electronegative subfraction of low-density lipoprotein (LDL), L5, which is atherogenic to ECs. Because L5 and CRP are both ligands for the lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1), we also examined the role of LOX-1. Methods and Results Plasma LDL sa...

  18. Anticancer effect of (S)-crizotinib on osteosarcoma cells by targeting MTH1 and activating reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qing, Xiangcheng; Shao, Zengwu; Lv, Xiao; Pu, Feifei; Gao, Feng; Liu, Lei; Shi, Deyao

    2018-04-01

    MTH1 has become a new rising star in the field of 'cancer phenotypic lethality' and can be targeted in many kinds of tumors. This study aimed to explore the anticancer effect of MTH1-targeted drug (S)-crizotinib on osteosarcoma (OS) cells. We detected MTH1 expression in OS tissues and cells using immunohistochemistry and western blot. The effects of MTH1 on OS cell viability were explored using the siRNA technique and CCK8. The anticancer effects of the MTH1-targeted drug (S)-crizotinib on OS cells were explored by in-vitro assays. The intracellular 8-oxo-dGTP level and oxygen reactive species (ROS) of OS cells were detected by Cy3-conjugated avidin staining and dichlorofluorescein diacetate staining, respectively. The expression of MTH1 was significantly higher in OS tissues and cell lines than that in the corresponding adjacent tissues and osteoblastic cell line. The proliferation of OS cells was significantly inhibited through knockdown of MTH1 by siRNA technology. (S)-Crizotinib could inhibit the proliferation of OS cells with an increase in the apoptosis levels and causing G0/G1 arrest by targeting MTH1 and activating ROS. In addition, (S)-crizotinib could inhibit the migration of OS cells. (S)-Crizotinib could suppress the proliferation and migration, cause G0/G1 arrest, and increase the apoptosis level of OS cells by targeting MTH1 and activating ROS. This study will provide a promising therapeutic target and the theoretical basis for the clinical application of (S)-crizotinib in OS.

  19. Sulfatide-Reactive Natural Killer T Cells Abrogate Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Seung Hee; Lee, Jung Pyo; Jang, Hye Ryoun; Cha, Ran-hui; Han, Seung Seok; Jeon, Un Sil; Kim, Dong Ki; Song, Junghan; Lee, Dong-Sup; Kim, Yon Su

    2011-01-01

    There is a significant immune response to ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI), but the role of immunomodulatory natural killer T (NKT) cell subtypes is not well understood. Here, we compared the severity of IRI in mice deficient in type I/II NKT cells (CD1d−/−) or type I NKT cells (Jα18−/−). The absence of NKT cells, especially type II NKT cells, accentuated the severity of renal injury, whereas repletion of NKT cells attenuated injury. Adoptively transferred NKT cells trafficked into the tubul...

  20. Fabrication of antireflective nanostructures for crystalline silicon solar cells by reactive ion etching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Hsin-Han; Chen, Wen-Hua; Wang, Chi-Jen; Hong, Franklin Chau-Nan

    2013-01-01

    In this study we have fabricated large-area (15 × 15 cm 2 ) subwavelength antireflection structure on poly-Si substrates to reduce their solar reflectivity. A reactive ion etching system was used to fabricate nanostructures on the poly-silicon surface. Reactive gases, composed of chlorine (Cl 2 ), sulfur hexafluoride (SF 6 ) and oxygen (O 2 ), were activated to fabricate nanoscale pyramids by RF plasma. The poly-Si substrates were etched in various gas compositions for 6–10 min to form nano-pyramids. The sizes of pyramids were about 200–300 nm in heights and about 100 nm in width. Besides the nanoscale features, the high pyramid density on the poly-Si surface is another important factor to reduce the reflectivity. Low-reflectivity surface was fabricated with reflectivity significantly reduced down to < 2% for photons in a wavelength range of 500–900 nm. - Highlights: ► Large-area (15 × 15 cm 2 ) antireflection structures fabricated on poly-Si substrates ► Si nano-pyramids produced by utilizing self-masked reactive ion etching process ► High density of nanoscale pyramids was formed on the entire substrate surface. ► Surface reflectivity below 2% was achieved in the wavelength range of 500–900 nm

  1. Donor Vδ1+ γδ T cells expand after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and show reactivity against CMV-infected cells but not against progressing B-CLL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinz, Immo; Thamm, Kristina; Port, Matthias; Weissinger, Eva M; Stadler, Michael; Gabaev, Ildar; Jacobs, Roland; Ganser, Arnold; Koenecke, Christian

    2013-05-11

    γδ T lymphocytes play an important role in immune reactions towards infections and malignancies. In particular, Vγ9-Vδ1+ T lymphocytes are thought to play protective antiviral roles in human CMV infection. Recently, Vδ1+ T lymphocytes were proposed to also have anti- B-CLL reactivity. Here we report a case of 48-year-old man who received allogeneic stem cell transplantation for progressive B-CLL. Within one year after transplantation, lymphoma relapsed despite a dramatic increase of Vδ1+ T cells in the patient's blood. In vitro killing assays revealed activity of patient's γδ cells against CMV target cells, but not against the relapsing lymphoma-cells. This argues for a contribution of Vδ1+ cells in the immune reaction against CMV reactivation, but does not support a strong correlation of expanded Vδ1+ T cells and favorable disease outcome in B-CLL patients.

  2. CD44+CD24+ subset of PANC-1 cells exhibits radiation resistance via decreased levels of reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Li, Pengping; Hu, Wei; Xia, Youyou; Hu, Chenxi; Liu, Liang; Jiang, Xiaodong

    2017-08-01

    Emerging evidence has suggested that pancreatic adenocarcinoma is sustained by pancreatic cancer stem cells. The present study aimed to investigate the expression patterns of the pancreatic cancer stem cell surface markers cluster of differentiation CD44 and CD24 in a pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell line, and to investigate the possible mechanisms for their radiation resistance. Flow cytometry was used to analyze the expression patterns of CD44 and CD24 in the pancreatic adenocarcinoma PANC-1 cell line. In addition, a multi-target click model was used to fit cell survival curves and determine the sensitizer enhancement ratio. The apoptosis and cycle distribution of the four cell subsets was determined using flow cytometry, and the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was determined using the 2',7'-dichlorofluorescin diacetate probe. The present results identified that the ratios of CD44 + and CD24 + in the sorted PANC-1 cell line were 92.0 and 4.7%, respectively. Prior to radiation, no statistically significant differences were observed among the four groups. Following treatment with 6 MV of X-rays, the rate of apoptosis was decreased in the CD44 + CD24 + group compared with other subsets. The percentage of G0/G1 cells was highest in the CD44 + CD24 + group compared with the three other groups, which exhibited increased radiosensitivity. In addition, the level of ROS in the CD44 + CD24 + group was reduced compared with the other groups. In summary, the results of the present study indicated that CD44 + CD24 + exhibited stem cell properties. The lower level of ROS and apoptosis in CD44 + CD24 + cells may contribute to their resistance to radiation in pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

  3. Arsenite induces cell transformation by reactive oxygen species, AKT, ERK1/2, and p70S6K1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, Richard L.; Jiang, Yue; Jing, Yi; He, Jun; Rojanasakul, Yon; Liu, Ling-Zhi; Jiang, Bing-Hua

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► Chronic exposure to arsenite induces cell proliferation and transformation. ► Arsenite-induced transformation increases ROS production and downstream signalings. ► Inhibition of ROS levels via catalase reduces arsenite-induced cell transformation. ► Interruption of AKT, ERK, or p70S6K1 inhibits arsenite-induced cell transformation. -- Abstract: Arsenic is naturally occurring element that exists in both organic and inorganic formulations. The inorganic form arsenite has a positive association with development of multiple cancer types. There are significant populations throughout the world with high exposure to arsenite via drinking water. Thus, human exposure to arsenic has become a significant public health problem. Recent evidence suggests that reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediate multiple changes to cell behavior after acute arsenic exposure, including activation of proliferative signaling and angiogenesis. However, the role of ROS in mediating cell transformation by chronic arsenic exposure is unknown. We found that cells chronically exposed to sodium arsenite increased proliferation and gained anchorage-independent growth. This cell transformation phenotype required constitutive activation of AKT, ERK1/2, mTOR, and p70S6K1. We also observed these cells constitutively produce ROS, which was required for the constitutive activation of AKT, ERK1/2, mTOR, and p70S6K1. Suppression of ROS levels by forced expression of catalase also reduced cell proliferation and anchorage-independent growth. These results indicate cell transformation induced by chronic arsenic exposure is mediated by increased cellular levels of ROS, which mediates activation of AKT, ERK1/2, and p70S6K1.

  4. Antihelminthic drug niclosamide inhibits CIP2A and reactivates tumor suppressor protein phosphatase 2A in non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myeong-Ok; Choe, Min Ho; Yoon, Yi Na; Ahn, Jiyeon; Yoo, Minjin; Jung, Kwan-Young; An, Sungkwan; Hwang, Sang-Gu; Oh, Jeong Su; Kim, Jae-Sung

    2017-11-15

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a critical tumor suppressor complex responsible for the inactivation of various oncogenes. Recently, PP2A reactivation has emerged asan anticancer strategy. Cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A (CIP2A), an endogenous inhibitor of PP2A, is upregulated in many cancer cells, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. We demonstrated that the antihelminthic drug niclosamide inhibited the expression of CIP2A and reactivated the tumor suppressor PP2A in NSCLC cells. We performed a drug-repurposing screen and identified niclosamide asa CIP2A suppressor in NSCLC cells. Niclosamide inhibited cell proliferation, colony formation, and tumor sphere formation, and induced mitochondrial dysfunction through increased mitochondrial ROS production in NSCLC cells; however, these effects were rescued by CIP2A overexpression, which indicated that the antitumor activity of niclosamide was dependent on CIP2A. We found that niclosamide increased PP2A activity through CIP2A inhibition, which reduced the phosphorylation of several oncogenic proteins. Moreover, we found that a niclosamide analog inhibited CIP2A expression and increased PP2A activity in several types of NSCLC cells. Finally, we showed that other well-known PP2A activators, including forskolin and FTY720, did not inhibit CIP2A and that their activities were not dependent on CIP2A. Collectively, our data suggested that niclosamide effectively suppressed CIP2A expression and subsequently activated PP2A in NSCLC cells. This provided strong evidence for the potential use of niclosamide asa PP2A-activating drug in the clinical treatment of NSCLC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Autophagic cell death induced by reactive oxygen species is involved in hyperthermic sensitization to ionizing radiation in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Guang-Jin; Deng, Jun-Jian; Cao, De-Dong; Shi, Lei; Chen, Xin; Lei, Jin-Ju; Xu, Xi-Ming

    2017-08-14

    To investigate whether autophagic cell death is involved in hyperthermic sensitization to ionizing radiation in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells, and to explore the underlying mechanism. Human hepatocellular carcinoma cells were treated with hyperthermia and ionizing radiation. MTT and clonogenic assays were performed to determine cell survival. Cell autophagy was detected using acridine orange staining and flow cytometric analysis, and the expression of autophagy-associated proteins, LC3 and p62, was determined by Western blot analysis. Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) were quantified using the fluorescent probe DCFH-DA. Treatment with hyperthermia and ionizing radiation significantly decreased cell viability and surviving fraction as compared with hyperthermia or ionizing radiation alone. Cell autophagy was significantly increased after ionizing radiation combined with hyperthermia treatment, as evidenced by increased formation of acidic vesicular organelles, increased expression of LC3II and decreased expression of p62. Intracellular ROS were also increased after combined treatment with hyperthermia and ionizing radiation. Pretreatment with N-acetylcysteine, an ROS scavenger, markedly inhibited the cytotoxicity and cell autophagy induced by hyperthermia and ionizing radiation. Autophagic cell death is involved in hyperthermic sensitization of cancer cells to ionizing radiation, and its induction may be due to the increased intracellular ROS.

  6. Expansion of mycobacterium-reactive gamma delta T cells by a subset of memory helper T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vila, L M; Haftel, H M; Park, H S; Lin, M S; Romzek, N C; Hanash, S M; Holoshitz, J

    1995-04-01

    Human gamma delta T cells expressing the V gamma 9/V delta 2 T-cell receptor have been previously found to proliferate in response to certain microorganisms and to expand throughout life, presumably because of extrathymic activation by foreign antigens. In vitro expansion of V gamma 9/V delta 2 cells by mycobacteria has been previously shown to be dependent on accessory cells. In order to gain an insight into the mechanisms involved in the expansion of these cells, we have undertaken to identify the peripheral blood subset of cells on which proliferation of V gamma 9/V delta 2 cells in response to mycobacteria is dependent. Contrary to their role in antigen presentation to alpha beta T cells, professional antigen-presenting cells, such as monocytes, B cells, and dendritic cells, were unable to provide the cellular support for the expansion of V gamma 9/V delta 2 cells. Selective depletion of T-cell subsets, as well as the use of highly purified T-cell populations, indicated that the only subset of peripheral blood cells that could expand V gamma 9/V delta 2 cells were CD4+ CD45RO+ CD7- alpha beta T cells. These cells underwent distinct intracellular signaling events after stimulation with the mycobacterial antigen. Expansion of V gamma 9/V delta 2 cells by alpha beta T cells was dependent on cell-cell contact. This is the first evidence that a small subset of the memory helper T-cell population is exclusively responsible for the peripheral expansion of V gamma 9/V delta 2 cells. These data illustrate a unique aspect of antigen recognition by gamma delta T cells and provide new means to study their immune defense role.

  7. Dual oxidase maturation factor 1 (DUOXA1) overexpression increases reactive oxygen species production and inhibits murine muscle satellite cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandiford, Shelley D E; Kennedy, Karen A M; Xie, Xiaojun; Pickering, J Geoffrey; Li, Shawn S C

    2014-01-11

    Dual oxidase maturation factor 1 (DUOXA1) has been associated with the maturation of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) producing enzyme, dual oxidase 1 (DUOX1) in the adult thyroid. However, ROS have also been implicated in the development of several tissues. We found that activated muscle satellite cells and primary myoblasts isolated from mice express robust levels of DUOXA1 and that its levels are altered as cells differentiate. To determine whether DUOXA1 levels affect muscle differentiation, we used an adenoviral construct (pCMV5-DUOXA1-GFP) to drive constitutive overexpression of this protein in primary myoblasts. High levels of DUOXA1 throughout myogenesis resulted in enhanced H2O2 production, fusion defects, reduced expression of early (myogenin) and late (myosin heavy chain) markers of differentiation, and elevated levels of apoptosis compared to control cells infected with an empty adenoviral vector (pCMV5-GFP). DUOXA1 knockdown (using a DUOXA1 shRNA construct) resulted in enhanced differentiation compared to cells subjected to a control shRNA, and subjecting DUOXA1 overexpressing cells to siRNAs targeting DUOX1 or apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) rescued the phenotype. This study represents the first to demonstrate the importance of DUOXA1 in skeletal muscle myoblasts and that DUOXA1 overexpression in muscle stem cells induces apoptosis and inhibits differentiation through DUOX1 and ASK1.

  8. Flow cytometric analysis of immunoglobulin heavy chain expression in B-cell lymphoma and reactive lymphoid hyperplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grier, David D; Al-Quran, Samer Z; Cardona, Diana M; Li, Ying; Braylan, Raul C

    2012-01-01

    The diagnosis of B-cell lymphoma (BCL) is often dependent on the detection of clonal immunoglobulin (Ig) light chain expression. In some BCLs, the determination of clonality based on Ig light chain restriction may be difficult. The aim of our study was to assess the utility of flow cytometric analysis of surface Ig heavy chain (HC) expression in lymphoid tissues in distinguishing lymphoid hyperplasias from BCLs, and also differentiating various BCL subtypes. HC expression on B-cells varied among different types of hyperplasias. In follicular hyperplasia, IgM and IgD expression was high in mantle cells while germinal center cells showed poor HC expression. In other hyperplasias, B cell compartments were blurred but generally showed high IgD and IgM expression. Compared to hyperplasias, BCLs varied in IgM expression. Small lymphocytic lymphomas had lower IgM expression than mantle cell lymphomas. Of importance, IgD expression was significantly lower in BCLs than in hyperplasias, a finding that can be useful in differentiating lymphoma from reactive processes. PMID:22400070

  9. Induction of Apoptosis in Human Multiple Myeloma Cell Lines by Ebselen via Enhancing the Endogenous Reactive Oxygen Species Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ebselen a selenoorganic compound showing glutathione peroxidase like activity is an anti-inflammatory and antioxidative agent. Its cytoprotective activity has been investigated in recent years. However, experimental evidence also shows that ebselen causes cell death in several cancer cell types whose mechanism has not yet been elucidated. In this study, we examined the effect of ebselen on multiple myeloma (MM cell lines in vitro. The results showed that ebselen significantly enhanced the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS accompanied by cell viability decrease and apoptosis rate increase. Further studies revealed that ebselen can induce Bax redistribution from the cytosol to mitochondria leading to mitochondrial membrane potential ΔΨm changes and cytochrome C release from the mitochondria to cytosol. Furtherly, we found that exogenous addition of N-acetyl cysteine (NAC completely diminished the cell damage induced by ebselen. This result suggests that relatively high concentration of ebselen can induce MM cells apoptosis in culture by enhancing the production of endogenous ROS and triggering mitochondria mediated apoptotic pathway.

  10. Trichomonas vaginalis Induces SiHa Cell Apoptosis by NF-κB Inactivation via Reactive Oxygen Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Juan-Hua; Kang, Byung-Hun; Yang, Jung-Bo; Rhee, Yun-Ee; Noh, Heung-Tae; Choi, In-Wook; Cha, Guang-Ho; Yuk, Jae-Min

    2017-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis induces apoptosis in host cells through various mechanisms; however, little is known about the relationship between apoptosis, reactive oxygen species (ROS), and NF-κB signaling pathways in the cervical mucosal epithelium. Here, we evaluated apoptotic events, ROS production, and NF-κB activity in T. vaginalis-treated cervical mucosal epithelial SiHa cells, with or without specific inhibitors, using fluorescence microscopy, DNA fragmentation assays, subcellular fractionation, western blotting, and luciferase reporter assay. SiHa cells treated with live T. vaginalis at a multiplicity of infection of 5 (MOI 5) for 4 h produced intracellular and mitochondrial ROS in a parasite-load-dependent manner. Incubation with T. vaginalis caused DNA fragmentation, cleavage of caspase 3 and PARP, and release of cytochrome c into the cytoplasm. T. vaginalis-treated SiHa cells showed transient early NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation, which dramatically dropped at 4 h after treatment. Suppression of NF-κB activity was dependent on parasite burden. However, treatment with the ROS scavenger, N-acetyl-C-cysteine (NAC), reversed the effect of T. vaginalis on apoptosis and NF-κB inactivation in SiHa cells. Taken together, T. vaginalis induces apoptosis in human cervical mucosal epithelial cells by parasite-dose-dependent ROS production through an NF-κB-regulated, mitochondria-mediated pathway. PMID:29410962

  11. Trichomonas vaginalis Induces SiHa Cell Apoptosis by NF-κB Inactivation via Reactive Oxygen Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan-Hua Quan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Trichomonas vaginalis induces apoptosis in host cells through various mechanisms; however, little is known about the relationship between apoptosis, reactive oxygen species (ROS, and NF-κB signaling pathways in the cervical mucosal epithelium. Here, we evaluated apoptotic events, ROS production, and NF-κB activity in T. vaginalis-treated cervical mucosal epithelial SiHa cells, with or without specific inhibitors, using fluorescence microscopy, DNA fragmentation assays, subcellular fractionation, western blotting, and luciferase reporter assay. SiHa cells treated with live T. vaginalis at a multiplicity of infection of 5 (MOI 5 for 4 h produced intracellular and mitochondrial ROS in a parasite-load-dependent manner. Incubation with T. vaginalis caused DNA fragmentation, cleavage of caspase 3 and PARP, and release of cytochrome c into the cytoplasm. T. vaginalis-treated SiHa cells showed transient early NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation, which dramatically dropped at 4 h after treatment. Suppression of NF-κB activity was dependent on parasite burden. However, treatment with the ROS scavenger, N-acetyl-C-cysteine (NAC, reversed the effect of T. vaginalis on apoptosis and NF-κB inactivation in SiHa cells. Taken together, T. vaginalis induces apoptosis in human cervical mucosal epithelial cells by parasite-dose-dependent ROS production through an NF-κB-regulated, mitochondria-mediated pathway.

  12. Induction of apoptosis in human multiple myeloma cell lines by ebselen via enhancing the endogenous reactive oxygen species production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liang; Zhou, Liwei; Du, Jia; Li, Mengxia; Qian, Chengyuan; Cheng, Yi; Peng, Yang; Xie, Jiayin; Wang, Dong

    2014-01-01

    Ebselen a selenoorganic compound showing glutathione peroxidase like activity is an anti-inflammatory and antioxidative agent. Its cytoprotective activity has been investigated in recent years. However, experimental evidence also shows that ebselen causes cell death in several cancer cell types whose mechanism has not yet been elucidated. In this study, we examined the effect of ebselen on multiple myeloma (MM) cell lines in vitro. The results showed that ebselen significantly enhanced the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) accompanied by cell viability decrease and apoptosis rate increase. Further studies revealed that ebselen can induce Bax redistribution from the cytosol to mitochondria leading to mitochondrial membrane potential ΔΨm changes and cytochrome C release from the mitochondria to cytosol. Furtherly, we found that exogenous addition of N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) completely diminished the cell damage induced by ebselen. This result suggests that relatively high concentration of ebselen can induce MM cells apoptosis in culture by enhancing the production of endogenous ROS and triggering mitochondria mediated apoptotic pathway.

  13. Electrochemical reduction and oxidation pathways for Reactive Black 5 dye using nickel electrodes in divided and undivided cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Méndez-Martínez, Ana J.; Dávila-Jiménez, Martin M.; Ornelas-Dávila, Omar; Elizalde-González, María P.; Arroyo-Abad, Uriel; Sirés, Ignasi; Brillas, Enric

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Ni electrodes were used for the mild degradation of the azo dye Reactive Black 5. ► Potentiostatic degradation was performed in undivided and divided cells. ► Degradation by-products were detected and monitored by RP-HPLC and LC–MS/MS. ► Small alkylsulfonyl phenol and isoxazole derivatives were identified. ► The cathodic and anodic degradation pathways for Reactive Black 5 were elucidated. - Abstract: The cathodic reduction and anodic ·OH-mediated oxidation of the azo dye Reactive Black 5 (RB5) have been studied potentiostatically by using undivided and divided cells with a Ni-polyvinylchloride (Ni-PVC) composite cathode and a Ni wire mesh anode. Solutions of 50–100 cm 3 of 20–80 mg dm −3 RB5 in 0.1 mol dm −3 KOH were degraded to assess the effect of electrolysis time and electrode potentials on the infrared and absorbance spectra, as well as on the decay of the total organic carbon and chemical oxygen demand. Reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) with ion-pairing and diode array detection (ion pair chromatography), along with coupling to tandem mass spectrometry (LC–MS/MS), were used for the identification of the aromatic degradation by-products and monitoring their time course. These analyses revealed the progressive conversion of the RB5 dye to simpler molecules with m/z 200, 369.5 and 547 under the direct action of the electron at the cathode and the formation of polar compounds such as alkylsulfonyl phenol derivatives with m/z 201, 185 and 171 by the ·OH mediation at the anode. From these results, the electrochemical reduction and oxidation pathways for the RB5 dye were elucidated.

  14. [Relationship among the Oxygen Concentration, Reactive Oxygen Species and the Biological Characteristics of Mouse Bone Marrow Hematopoietic Stem Cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Si-Hua; He, Yu-Xin; Ma, Yi-Ran; Jin, Jing-Chun; Kang, Dan

    2016-02-01

    To investigate the effects of oxygen concentration and reactive oxygen species (ROS) on the biological characteristics of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) and to analyzed the relationship among the oxygen concentration, ROS and the biological characteristics of mouse HSC through simulation of oxygen environment experienced by PB HSC during transplantation. The detection of reactive oxygen species (ROS), in vitro amplification, directional differentiation (BFU-E, CFU-GM, CFU-Mix), homing of adhesion molecules (CXCR4, CD44, VLA4, VLA5, P-selectin), migration rate, CFU-S of NOD/SCID mice irradiated with sublethal dose were performed to study the effect of oxgen concentration and reactive oxygen species on the biological characteristics of mouse BM-HSC and the relationship among them. The oxygen concentrations lower than normal oxygen concentration (especially hypoxic oxygen environment) could reduce ROS level and amplify more Lin(-) c-kit(+) Sca-1(+) BM HSC, which was more helpful to the growth of various colonies (BFU-E, CFU-GM, CFU-Mix) and to maintain the migratory ability of HSC, thus promoting CFU-S growth significantly after the transplantation of HSC in NOD/SCID mice irradiated by a sublethal dose. BM HSC exposed to oxygen environments of normal, inconstant oxygen level and strenuously thanging of oxygen concentration could result in higher level of ROS, at the same time, the above-mentioned features and functional indicators were relatively lower. The ROS levels of BM HSC in PB HSCT are closely related to the concentrations and stability of oxygen surrounding the cells. High oxygen concentration results in an high level of ROS, which is not helpful to maintain the biological characteristics of BM HSC. Before transplantation and in vitro amplification, the application of antioxidancs and constant oxygen level environments may be beneficial for transplantation of BMMSC.

  15. Relationships among cell survival, O6-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase activity, and reactivation of methylated adenovirus 5 and herpes simplex virus type 1 in human melanoma cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maynard, K.; Parsons, P.G.; Cerny, T.; Margison, G.P. (Queensland Institute of Medical Research, Herston (Australia))

    1989-09-01

    O6-Alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase (ATase) activity and host cell reactivation (HCR) of 5-(3-methyl-1-triazeno)imidazole-4-carboxamide (MTIC)-methylated viruses were compared in human melanoma cell lines that were sensitive or resistant to killing by the antitumor DNA-methylating agent MTIC. Enhanced HCR of adenovirus 5 (defined as the Mer+ phenotype) generally showed a semiquantitative correlation with the natural or induced resistance of the host cells to the toxic effects of MTIC and to the level of ATase activity. However, one MTIC-resistant cell line was found (MM170) which had a low level of ATase and intermediate HCR of adenovirus. The HCR of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) was enhanced in the Mer+ cells that had natural resistance to MTIC compared with Mer- cells. On the other hand, HCR of HSV-1 in Mer+ cells with induced resistance to MTIC was similar to that in Mer- cells. Neither adenovirus 5 nor HSV-1 infection induced ATase activity in Mer- cells. This indicates that resistance to the toxic effects of methylating agents is not invariably associated with high levels of ATase activity in human melanoma cells. Furthermore, while induction of the Mer+ phenotype from Mer- cells was usually accompanied by the recovery of ATase activity, induced Mer+ cells had less proficient repair than natural Mer+ cells, as judged quantitatively by slightly lower cellular resistance and qualitatively by deficient HCR response for HSV-1. These results suggest that the Mer- and induced Mer+ cells lack an ATase-independent DNA repair mechanism. No differences in MTIC-induced DNA repair synthesis or strand breaks were found between the Mer-, natural Mer+, and induced Mer+ phenotypes. However, UV-induced DNA repair synthesis was higher in the natural Mer+ than in the Mer- or induced Mer+ cells, both of which had increased cellular sensitivity to the antimetabolites methotrexate and hydroxyurea.

  16. Relationships among cell survival, O6-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase activity, and reactivation of methylated adenovirus 5 and herpes simplex virus type 1 in human melanoma cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maynard, K.; Parsons, P.G.; Cerny, T.; Margison, G.P.

    1989-01-01

    O6-Alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase (ATase) activity and host cell reactivation (HCR) of 5-(3-methyl-1-triazeno)imidazole-4-carboxamide (MTIC)-methylated viruses were compared in human melanoma cell lines that were sensitive or resistant to killing by the antitumor DNA-methylating agent MTIC. Enhanced HCR of adenovirus 5 (defined as the Mer+ phenotype) generally showed a semiquantitative correlation with the natural or induced resistance of the host cells to the toxic effects of MTIC and to the level of ATase activity. However, one MTIC-resistant cell line was found (MM170) which had a low level of ATase and intermediate HCR of adenovirus. The HCR of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) was enhanced in the Mer+ cells that had natural resistance to MTIC compared with Mer- cells. On the other hand, HCR of HSV-1 in Mer+ cells with induced resistance to MTIC was similar to that in Mer- cells. Neither adenovirus 5 nor HSV-1 infection induced ATase activity in Mer- cells. This indicates that resistance to the toxic effects of methylating agents is not invariably associated with high levels of ATase activity in human melanoma cells. Furthermore, while induction of the Mer+ phenotype from Mer- cells was usually accompanied by the recovery of ATase activity, induced Mer+ cells had less proficient repair than natural Mer+ cells, as judged quantitatively by slightly lower cellular resistance and qualitatively by deficient HCR response for HSV-1. These results suggest that the Mer- and induced Mer+ cells lack an ATase-independent DNA repair mechanism. No differences in MTIC-induced DNA repair synthesis or strand breaks were found between the Mer-, natural Mer+, and induced Mer+ phenotypes. However, UV-induced DNA repair synthesis was higher in the natural Mer+ than in the Mer- or induced Mer+ cells, both of which had increased cellular sensitivity to the antimetabolites methotrexate and hydroxyurea

  17. Grape seed proanthocyanidins reactivate silenced tumor suppressor genes in human skin cancer cells by targeting epigenetic regulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaid, Mudit; Prasad, Ram; Singh, Tripti; Jones, Virginia; Katiyar, Santosh K.

    2012-01-01

    Grape seed proanthocyanidins (GSPs) have been shown to have anti-skin carcinogenic effects in in vitro and in vivo models. However, the precise epigenetic molecular mechanisms remain unexplored. This study was designed to investigate whether GSPs reactivate silenced tumor suppressor genes following epigenetic modifications in skin cancer cells. For this purpose, A431 and SCC13 human squamous cell carcinoma cell lines were used as in vitro models. The effects of GSPs on DNA methylation, histone modifications and tumor suppressor gene expressions were studied in these cell lines using enzyme activity assays, western blotting, dot-blot analysis and real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). We found that treatment of A431 and SCC13 cells with GSPs decreased the levels of: (i) global DNA methylation, (ii) 5-methylcytosine, (iii) DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) activity and (iv) messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels of DNMT1, DNMT3a and DNMT3b in these cells. Similar effects were noted when these cancer cells were treated identically with 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine, an inhibitor of DNA methylation. GSPs decreased histone deacetylase activity, increased levels of acetylated lysines 9 and 14 on histone H3 (H3-Lys 9 and 14) and acetylated lysines 5, 12 and 16 on histone H4, and reduced the levels of methylated H3-Lys 9. Further, GSP treatment resulted in re-expression of the mRNA and proteins of silenced tumor suppressor genes, RASSF1A, p16 INK4a and Cip1/p21. Together, this study provides a new insight into the epigenetic mechanisms of GSPs and may have significant implications for epigenetic therapy in the treatment/prevention of skin cancers in humans. -- Highlights: ►Epigenetic modulations have been shown to have a role in cancer risk. ►Proanthocyanidins decrease the levels of DNA methylation and histone deacetylation. ►Proanthocyanidins inhibit histone deacetylase activity in skin cancer cells. ►Proanthocyanidins reactivate tumor suppressor genes in skin

  18. Sinoporphyrin sodium, a novel sensitizer, triggers mitochondrial-dependent apoptosis in ECA-109 cells via production of reactive oxygen species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang H

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Haiping Wang,1 Xiaobing Wang,1 Shaoliang Zhang,2 Pan Wang,1 Kun Zhang,1 Quanhong Liu1 1Key Laboratory of Medicinal Resources and Natural Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Ministry of Education, National Engineering Laboratory for Resource Developing of Endangered Chinese Crude Drugs in Northwest of China, College of Life Sciences, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi'an, Shaanxi, 2Qinglong High-Tech Co, Ltd, Yichun, Jiangxi, People's Republic of China Background: Sonodynamic therapy (SDT is a promising method that uses ultrasound to activate certain chemical sensitizers for the treatment of cancer. The purpose of this study was to investigate the sonoactivity of a novel sensitizer, sinoporphyrin sodium (DVDMS, and its sonotoxicity in an esophageal cancer (ECA-109 cell line. Methods: The fluorescence intensity of DVDMS, hematoporphyrin, protoporphyrin IX, and Photofrin II was detected by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. Generation of singlet oxygen was measured using a 1, 3-diphenylisobenzofuran experiment. A 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2, 5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay was used to examine cell viability. Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS and destabilization of the mitochondrial membrane potential were assessed by flow cytometry. Apoptosis was analyzed using Annexin-PE/7-amino-actinomycin D staining. Confocal microscopy was performed to assess mitochondrial damage and identify release of cytochrome C after treatment. Western blots were used to determine expression of oxidative stress-related and apoptosis-associated protein. Ultrastructural changes in the cell were studied by scanning electron microscopy. Results: DVDMS showed higher autofluorescence intensity and singlet oxygen production efficiency compared with other photosensitizers in both cancerous and normal cells. Compared with hematoporphyrin, DVDMS-mediated SDT was more cytotoxic in ECA-109 cells. Abundant intracellular ROS was found in the SDT groups, and the cytotoxicity

  19. Reactive Oxygen is a Major Factor Regulating Cell Division and Angiogenesis in Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Arnold, Rebecca

    2001-01-01

    .... We investigated the generation of the H2O2 and O2%. While O2 levels appeared to remain unchanged, 11202 levels increased significantly over control cell lines in several of the tumor cell lines...

  20. Multigenic DNA vaccine induces protective cross-reactive T cell responses against heterologous influenza virus in nonhuman primates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merika T Koday

    Full Text Available Recent avian and swine-origin influenza virus outbreaks illustrate the ongoing threat of influenza pandemics. We investigated immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a multi-antigen (MA universal influenza DNA vaccine consisting of HA, M2, and NP antigens in cynomolgus macaques. Following challenge with a heterologous pandemic H1N1 strain, vaccinated animals exhibited significantly lower viral loads and more rapid viral clearance when compared to unvaccinated controls. The MA DNA vaccine induced robust serum and mucosal antibody responses but these high antibody titers were not broadly neutralizing. In contrast, the vaccine induced broadly-reactive NP specific T cell responses that cross-reacted with the challenge virus and inversely correlated with lower viral loads and inflammation. These results demonstrate that a MA DNA vaccine that induces strong cross-reactive T cell responses can, independent of neutralizing antibody, mediate significant cross-protection in a nonhuman primate model and further supports development as an effective approach to induce broad protection against circulating and emerging influenza strains.

  1. Abnormal Wnt signaling and stem cell activation in reactive lymphoid tissue and low-grade marginal zone lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Da; O'neil, Maura F; Cunningham, Mark T; Fan, Fang; Olyaee, Mojtaba; Li, Linheng

    2010-05-01

    The variable natural history of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma poses a challenge in predicting clinical outcome. Since Wnt signaling, as indicated by nuclear localization of beta-catenin, is believed to be key in stem cell activation and stem cell self-renewal, we explored the possibility that it might have a predictive value in marginal zone lymphoma. We chose to analyze pbeta-catenin-S552 because its nuclear localization by immunohistochemistry appears to coincide with Wnt signaling-initiated tumorigenesis in intestinal and hematopoietic tissues. Wnt signaling and activation was studied in 22 tissue samples of extranodal marginal zone lymphoma, atypical lymphoid hyperplasia, reactive lymphoid hyperplasia, and normal lymphoid tissue to determine whether Wnt signaling could help distinguish MALT lymphoma from benign lesions. Compared to normal or reactive lymphoid tissue, we found increased nuclear expression of localized pbeta-catenin-S552 in atypical lymphoid hyperplasia and extranodal marginal zone lymphoma. We show that the anti-pbeta-catenin-S552 antibody may be useful in diagnosing and monitoring the progression of or response to therapy of MALT lymphoma.

  2. Germline bias dictates cross-serotype reactivity in a common dengue-virus-specific CD8+ T cell response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culshaw, Abigail; Ladell, Kristin; Gras, Stephanie; McLaren, James E; Miners, Kelly L; Farenc, Carine; van den Heuvel, Heleen; Gostick, Emma; Dejnirattisai, Wanwisa; Wangteeraprasert, Apirath; Duangchinda, Thaneeya; Chotiyarnwong, Pojchong; Limpitikul, Wannee; Vasanawathana, Sirijitt; Malasit, Prida; Dong, Tao; Rossjohn, Jamie; Mongkolsapaya, Juthathip; Price, David A; Screaton, Gavin R

    2017-11-01

    Adaptive immune responses protect against infection with dengue virus (DENV), yet cross-reactivity with distinct serotypes can precipitate life-threatening clinical disease. We found that clonotypes expressing the T cell antigen receptor (TCR) β-chain variable region 11 (TRBV11-2) were 'preferentially' activated and mobilized within immunodominant human-leukocyte-antigen-(HLA)-A*11:01-restricted CD8 + T cell populations specific for variants of the nonstructural protein epitope NS3 133 that characterize the serotypes DENV1, DENV3 and DENV4. In contrast, the NS3 133 -DENV2-specific repertoire was largely devoid of such TCRs. Structural analysis of a representative TRBV11-2 + TCR demonstrated that cross-serotype reactivity was governed by unique interplay between the variable antigenic determinant and germline-encoded residues in the second β-chain complementarity-determining region (CDR2β). Extensive mutagenesis studies of three distinct TRBV11-2 + TCRs further confirmed that antigen recognition was dependent on key contacts between the serotype-defined peptide and discrete residues in the CDR2β loop. Collectively, these data reveal an innate-like mode of epitope recognition with potential implications for the outcome of sequential exposure to heterologous DENVs.

  3. A reactive oxygen species activation mechanism contributes to JS-K-induced apoptosis in human bladder cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Mingning; Chen, Lieqian; Tan, Guobin; Ke, Longzhi; Zhang, Sai; Chen, Hege; Liu, Jianjun

    2015-10-13

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cellular oxidant stress are regulators of cancer cells. The alteration of redox status, which is induced by increased generation of ROS, results in increased vulnerability to oxidative stress. The aim of this study is to investigate the influence of O2-(2,4-dinitrophenyl) 1-[(4-ethoxycarbonyl)piperazin-1-yl]diazen-1-ium-1,2-diolate (JS-K, C13H16N6O8) on proliferation and apoptosis in bladder cancer cells and explored possible ROS-related mechanisms. Our results indicated that JS-K could suppress bladder cancer cell proliferation in a concentration- and time-dependent manner and induce apoptosis and ROS accumulation in a concentration-dependent manner. With increasing concentrations of JS-K, expression of proteins that are involved in cell apoptosis increased in a concentration-dependent manner. Additionally, the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) reversed JS-K-induced cell apoptosis; conversely, the prooxidant oxidized glutathione (GSSG) exacerbated JS-K-induced cell apoptosis. Furthermore, we found that nitrites, which were generated from the oxidation of JS-K-released NO, induced apoptosis in bladder cancer cells to a lower extent through the ROS-related pathway. In addition, JS-K was shown to enhance the chemo-sensitivity of doxorubicin in bladder cancer cells. Taken together, the data suggest that JS-K-released NO induces bladder cancer cell apoptosis by increasing ROS levels, and nitrites resulting from oxidation of NO have a continuous apoptosis-inducing effect.

  4. DNA binding, anti-tumour activity and reactivity toward cell thiols of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    leukemia cell line L1210 than alkene 1. The incubation of ... intracellular target of anti-cancer drugs, so any interac- ... lymphocytic leukemia cells (L1210) and human ovarian cancer cell ..... was also supplemented with 2 mM glutamine. The.

  5. Application of primary cell cultures of laryngeal carcinoma and laser scanning cytometry in the evaluation of tumor reactivity to cisplatinum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Kupisz

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Unsatisfactory effects of treatment of laryngeal carcinoma patients stimulate the clinicians as well as researchers to develop new more effective treatment models and to find new reliable prognostic factors. The aim of the present study was the evaluation of the use of primary cell cultures of the laryngeal carcinoma and laser scanning cytometry (LSC in the assessment of tumor reactivity to cisplatinum. Nineteen primary cultures of laryngeal carcinoma cells established from fragments of laryngeal carcinoma infiltrations were cultured with or without cisplatin, stained with monoclonal antibodies against P53 and BCL-2 proteins and analyzed by LSC. Cisplatin added to the culture medium leads to the significant increase of P53 expression and decrease of BCL-2 expression. Moreover, changes of P53 and BCL-2 expressions were significantly correlated. Our findings of apoptosis regulatory mechanisms could be useful in patient qualification for the chemotherapeutic follow-up treatment.

  6. DELIGHT-B/REDEL, point reactivity burnup code for high-temperature gas-cooled reactor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shindo, Ryuiti; Watanabe, Takashi.

    1977-03-01

    Code DELIGHT-2 was previously developed to analyze cell burnup characteristics and to produce few-group constants for core burnup calculation in high-temperature gas-cooled reactors. In the code, burnup dependency of the burnable poison, boron-10, is considered with the homogeneous model of space. In actuality, however, the burnable poison is used as homogeneous rods or uniform rods of small granular poison and graphite, to control the reactivity and power distribution. Precise analysis of the burnup characteristics is thus difficult because of the heterogeneity due to the configuration of poison rods. In cell burnup calculation, the DELIGHT-B, which is a modification of DELIGHT-2, takes into consideration this heterogeneous effect. The auxiliary code REDEL, a reduction of DELIGHT-B, used in combination with 3 dimensional diffusion code CITATION, is for core burnup calculation with the macro-scopic cross section model. (auth.)

  7. NADPH oxidase complex-derived reactive oxygen species, the actin cytoskeleton, and rho GTPases in cell migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stanley, Alanna; Thompson, Kerry; Hynes, Ailish

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Rho GTPases are historically known to be central regulators of actin cytoskeleton reorganization. This affects many processes including cell migration. In addition, members of the Rac subfamily are known to be involved in reactive oxygen species (ROS) production through...... mediating cytoskeletal reorganization. Critical Issues: The role of the actin cytoskeleton in providing a scaffold for components of the Nox complex needs to be examined in the light of these new advances. During cell migration, Rho GTPases, ROS, and cytoskeletal organization appear to function as a complex...... compartments. This in conjunction with the analysis of tissues lacking specific Rho GTPases, and Nox components will facilitate a detailed examination of the interactions of these structures with the actin cytoskeleton. In combination with the analysis of ROS production, including its subcellular location...

  8. Application of primary cell cultures of laryngeal carcinoma and laser scanning cytometry in the evaluation of tumor reactivity to cisplatinum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klatka, J.; Trojanowski, P.; Paduch, R.; Pozarowski, P.; Rolinski, J.; Pietruszewska, W.; Kupisz, K.

    2008-01-01

    Unsatisfactory effects of treatment of laryngeal carcinoma patients stimulate the clinicians as well as researchers to develop new more effective treatment models and to find new reliable prognostic factors. The aim of the present study was the evaluation of the use of primary cell cultures of the laryngeal carcinoma and laser scanning cytometry (LSC) in the assessment of tumor reactivity to cis platinum. Nineteen primary cultures of laryngeal carcinoma cells established from fragments of laryngeal carcinoma infiltrations were cultured with or without cisplatin, stained with monoclonal antibodies against P53 and BCL-2 proteins and analyzed by LSC. Cisplatin added to the culture medium leads to the significant increase of P53 expression and decrease of BCL-2 expression. Moreover, changes of P53 and BCL-2 expressions were significantly correlated. Our findings of apoptosis regulatory mechanisms could be useful in patient qualification for the chemotherapeutic follow-up treatment. (author)

  9. The role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production on diallyl disulfide (DADS) induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in human A549 lung carcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Xinjiang; Kassie, Fekadu; Mersch-Sundermann, Volker

    2005-01-01

    Diallyl disulfide (DADS), an oil soluble constituent of garlic (Allium sativum), has been reported to cause antimutagentic and anticarcinogenic effects in vitro and in vivo by modulating phases I and II enzyme activities. In recent years, several studies suggested that the chemopreventive effects of DADS can also be attributed to induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in cancer cells. In the present study, we reported that DADS-induced cell cycle arrest at G2/M and apoptosis in human A549 lung cancer cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Additionally, a significant increase of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) was induced in A549 cells less than 0.5 h after DADS treatment, indicating that ROS may be an early event in DADS-modulated apoptosis. Treatment of A549 cells with N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) completely abrogated DADS-induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. The result indicated that oxidative stress modulates cell proliferation and cell death induced by DADS

  10. The role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production on diallyl disulfide (DADS) induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in human A549 lung carcinoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Xinjiang [Institute of Indoor and Environmental Toxicology, Faculty of Medicine, Justus-Liebig-University of Giessen, Aulweg 123, D-35385 Giessen (Germany); Kassie, Fekadu [Institute of Indoor and Environmental Toxicology, Faculty of Medicine, Justus-Liebig-University of Giessen, Aulweg 123, D-35385 Giessen (Germany); Mersch-Sundermann, Volker [Institute of Indoor and Environmental Toxicology, Faculty of Medicine, Justus-Liebig-University of Giessen, Aulweg 123, D-35385 Giessen (Germany)]. E-mail: Volker.mersch-sundermann@uniklinikum-giessen.de

    2005-11-11

    Diallyl disulfide (DADS), an oil soluble constituent of garlic (Allium sativum), has been reported to cause antimutagentic and anticarcinogenic effects in vitro and in vivo by modulating phases I and II enzyme activities. In recent years, several studies suggested that the chemopreventive effects of DADS can also be attributed to induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in cancer cells. In the present study, we reported that DADS-induced cell cycle arrest at G2/M and apoptosis in human A549 lung cancer cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Additionally, a significant increase of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) was induced in A549 cells less than 0.5 h after DADS treatment, indicating that ROS may be an early event in DADS-modulated apoptosis. Treatment of A549 cells with N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) completely abrogated DADS-induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. The result indicated that oxidative stress modulates cell proliferation and cell death induced by DADS.

  11. Low dose X-irradiation of thymus filler cells in limiting dilution cultures of LPS-reactive B cells reduces the background Ig-secreting cells without affecting growth-supporting capacity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooijkaas, H.; Preesman, A.A.; Benner, R.

    1982-01-01

    Frequencies of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-reactive B cells in the mouse can be determined in the limiting dilution culture system developed by Andersson et al. (1976, 1977) which is completely dependent upon the presence of thymus filler cells, usually of rat origin. The assessment of B cell clones of mouse origin, however, can be hampered by the occurrence of varying numbers of thymus-derived immunoglobulin (Ig)-secreting cells. The number of these background Ig-secreting cells can be significantly reduced by low dose (110 mgray = 11 rad) X-irradiation of the rat thymus filler cells, without affecting their growth-supporting capacity. (Auth.)

  12. Kazinol Q from Broussonetia kazinoki Enhances Cell Death Induced by Cu(ll through Increased Reactive Oxygen Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsue-Yin Hsu

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The ability of the flavan kazinol Q (KQ to induce DNA breakage in the presence of Cu(II was examined by agarose gel electrophoresis using supercoiled plasmid DNA. In KQ-mediated DNA breakage reaction, the involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS, H2O2 and O2 - was established by the inhibition of DNA breakage by catalase and revealed DNA breakage by superoxide dismutase (SOD. The cell viability of gastric carcinoma SCM-1 cells treated with various concentrations of KQ was significantly decreased by cotreatment with Cu(II. Treatment of SCM-1 cells with 300 μM Cu(II enhanced the necrosis induced by 100 μM KQ. Treatment of SCM-1 cells with 100 mM KQ in the presence of 300 mM Cu(II increased the generation of H2O2. Taken together, the above finding suggested that KQ cotreatment with Cu(II produced increased amounts of H2O2, thus enhancing subsequent cell death due to necrosis.

  13. Human Leukemic Cells performing Oxidative Phosphorylation (OXPHOS Generate an Antioxidant Response Independently of Reactive Oxygen species (ROS Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abrar Ul Haq Khan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumor cell metabolism is altered during leukemogenesis. Cells performing oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS generate reactive oxygen species (ROS through mitochondrial activity. To limit the deleterious effects of excess ROS, certain gene promoters contain antioxidant response elements (ARE, e.g. the genes NQO-1 and HO-1. ROS induces conformational changes in KEAP1 and releases NRF2, which activates AREs. We show in vitro and in vivo that OXPHOS induces, both in primary leukemic cells and cell lines, de novo expression of NQO-1 and HO-1 and also the MAPK ERK5 and decreases KEAP1 mRNA. ERK5 activates the transcription factor MEF2, which binds to the promoter of the miR-23a–27a–24-2 cluster. Newly generated miR-23a destabilizes KEAP1 mRNA by binding to its 3′UTR. Lower KEAP1 levels increase the basal expression of the NRF2-dependent genes NQO-1 and HO-1. Hence, leukemic cells performing OXPHOS, independently of de novo ROS production, generate an antioxidant response to protect themselves from ROS.

  14. Iron oxide nanoparticles induce human microvascular endothelial cell permeability through reactive oxygen species production and microtubule remodeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi Xianglin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Engineered iron nanoparticles are being explored for the development of biomedical applications and many other industry purposes. However, to date little is known concerning the precise mechanisms of translocation of iron nanoparticles into targeted tissues and organs from blood circulation, as well as the underlying implications of potential harmful health effects in human. Results The confocal microscopy imaging analysis demonstrates that exposure to engineered iron nanoparticles induces an increase in cell permeability in human microvascular endothelial cells. Our studies further reveal iron nanoparticles enhance the permeability through the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS and the stabilization of microtubules. We also showed Akt/GSK-3β signaling pathways are involved in iron nanoparticle-induced cell permeability. The inhibition of ROS demonstrate ROS play a major role in regulating Akt/GSK-3β – mediated cell permeability upon iron nanoparticle exposure. These results provide new insights into the bioreactivity of engineered iron nanoparticles which can inform potential applications in medical imaging or drug delivery. Conclusion Our results indicate that exposure to iron nanoparticles induces an increase in endothelial cell permeability through ROS oxidative stress-modulated microtubule remodeling. The findings from this study provide new understandings on the effects of nanoparticles on vascular transport of macromolecules and drugs.

  15. SJL mice infected with Acanthamoeba castellanii develop central nervous system autoimmunity through the generation of cross-reactive T cells for myelin antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Massilamany, Chandirasegaran; Marciano-Cabral, Francine; Rocha-Azevedo, Bruno da

    2014-01-01

    ) in SJL mice reminiscent of the diseases induced with their corresponding cognate peptides. We now demonstrate that mice infected with ACA also show the generation of cross-reactive T cells, predominantly for PLP 139-151, as evaluated by T cell proliferation and IAs/dextramer staining. We verified...

  16. Broadly reactive human CD8 T cells that recognize an epitope conserved between VZV, HSV and EBV.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Chiu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Human herpesviruses are important causes of potentially severe chronic infections for which T cells are believed to be necessary for control. In order to examine the role of virus-specific CD8 T cells against Varicella Zoster Virus (VZV, we generated a comprehensive panel of potential epitopes predicted in silico and screened for T cell responses in healthy VZV seropositive donors. We identified a dominant HLA-A*0201-restricted epitope in the VZV ribonucleotide reductase subunit 2 and used a tetramer to analyze the phenotype and function of epitope-specific CD8 T cells. Interestingly, CD8 T cells responding to this VZV epitope also recognized homologous epitopes, not only in the other α-herpesviruses, HSV-1 and HSV-2, but also the γ-herpesvirus, EBV. Responses against these epitopes did not depend on previous infection with the originating virus, thus indicating the cross-reactive nature of this T cell population. Between individuals, the cells demonstrated marked phenotypic heterogeneity. This was associated with differences in functional capacity related to increased inhibitory receptor expression (including PD-1 along with decreased expression of co-stimulatory molecules that potentially reflected their stimulation history. Vaccination with the live attenuated Zostavax vaccine did not efficiently stimulate a proliferative response in this epitope-specific population. Thus, we identified a human CD8 T cell epitope that is conserved in four clinically important herpesviruses but that was poorly boosted by the current adult VZV vaccine. We discuss the concept of a "pan-herpesvirus" vaccine that this discovery raises and the hurdles that may need to be overcome in order to achieve this.

  17. ETV6/RUNX1 Induces Reactive Oxygen Species and Drives the Accumulation of DNA Damage in B Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans-Peter Kantner

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The t(12;21(p13;q22 chromosomal translocation is the most frequent translocation in childhood B cell precursor-acute lymphoblastic leukemia and results in the expression of an ETV6/RUNX1 fusion protein. The frequency of ETV6/RUNX1 fusions in newborns clearly exceeds the leukemia rate revealing that additional events occur in ETV6/RUNX1-positive cells for leukemic transformation. Hitherto, the mechanisms triggering these second hits remain largely elusive. Thus, we generated a novel ETV6/RUNX1 transgenic mouse model where the expression of the fusion protein is restricted to CD19+ B cells. These animals harbor regular B cell development and lack gross abnormalities. We established stable pro-B cell lines carrying the ETV6/RUNX1 transgene that allowed us to investigate whether ETV6/RUNX1 itself favors the acquisition of second hits. Remarkably, these pro-B cell lines as well as primary bone marrow cells derived from ETV6/RUNX1 transgenic animals display elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS as tested with ETV6/RUNX1 transgenic dihydroethidium staining. In line, intracellular phospho-histone H2AX flow cytometry and comet assay revealed increased DNA damage indicating that ETV6/RUNX1 expression enhances ROS. On the basis of our data, we propose the following model: the expression of ETV6/RUNX1 creates a preleukemic clone and leads to increased ROS levels. These elevated ROS favor the accumulation of secondary hits by increasing genetic instability and doublestrand breaks, thus allowing preleukemic clones to develop into fully transformed leukemic cells.

  18. Cancer stem-like cells of ovarian clear cell carcinoma are enriched in the ALDH-high population associated with an accelerated scavenging system in reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, T; Suzuki, N; Makino, H; Furui, T; Morii, E; Aoki, H; Kunisada, T; Yano, M; Kuji, S; Hirashima, Y; Arakawa, A; Nishio, S; Ushijima, K; Ito, K; Itani, Y; Morishige, K

    2015-05-01

    In ovarian cancer cases, recurrence after chemotherapy is frequently observed, suggesting the involvement of ovarian cancer stem-like cells (CSCs). The chemoresistance of ovarian clear cell carcinomas is particularly strong in comparison to other epithelial ovarian cancer subtypes. We investigated the relationship between a CSC marker, aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1), and clinical prognosis using ovarian clear cell carcinoma tissue samples. Furthermore, we investigated the antioxidant mechanism by which CSCs maintain a lower reactive oxygen species (ROS) level, which provides protection from chemotherapeutic agents. Immunohistochemical staining was performed to examine the CSC markers (CD133, CD44, ALDH1) using ovarian clear cell carcinoma tissue samples (n=81). Clear cell carcinoma cell lines (KOC-7C, OVTOKO) are separated into the ALDH-high and ALDH-low populations by ALDEFLUOR assay and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). We compared the intracellular ROS level, mRNA level of the antioxidant enzymes and Nrf2 expression of the two populations. High ALDH1 expression levels are related to advanced stage in clear cell carcinoma cases. ALDH1 expression significantly reduced progression free survival. Other markers are not related to clinical stage and prognosis. ALDH-high cells contained a lower ROS level than ALDH-low cells. Antioxidant enzymes were upregulated in ALDH-high cells. ALDH-high cells showed increased expression of Nrf2, a key transcriptional factor of the antioxidant system. ALDH-positive CSCs might have increased Nrf2-induced antioxidant scavengers, which lower ROS level relevant to chemoresistance in ovarian clear cell carcinoma. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The nitric oxide prodrug JS-K is effective against non-small-cell lung cancer cells in vitro and in vivo: involvement of reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciag, Anna E; Chakrapani, Harinath; Saavedra, Joseph E; Morris, Nicole L; Holland, Ryan J; Kosak, Ken M; Shami, Paul J; Anderson, Lucy M; Keefer, Larry K

    2011-02-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer is among the most common and deadly forms of human malignancies. Early detection is unusual, and there are no curative therapies in most cases. Diazeniumdiolate-based nitric oxide (NO)-releasing prodrugs are a growing class of promising NO-based therapeutics. Here, we show that O(2)-(2,4-dinitrophenyl)-1-[(4-ethoxycarbonyl)piperazin-1-yl]diazen-1-ium-1,2-diolate (JS-K) is a potent cytotoxic agent against a subset of human non-small-cell lung cancer cell lines both in vitro and as xenografts in mice. JS-K treatment led to 75% reduction in the growth of H1703 lung adenocarcinoma cells in vivo. Differences in sensitivity to JS-K in different lung cancer cell lines seem to be related to their endogenous levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS)/reactive nitrogen species (RNS). Other related factors, levels of peroxiredoxin 1 (PRX1) and 8-oxo-deoxyguanosine glycosylase (OGG1), also correlated with drug sensitivity. Treatment of the lung adenocarcinoma cells with JS-K resulted in oxidative/nitrosative stress in cells with high basal levels of ROS/RNS, which, combined with the arylating properties of the compound, was reflected in glutathione depletion and alteration in cellular redox potential, mitochondrial membrane permeabilization, and cytochrome c release. Inactivation of manganese superoxide dismutase by nitration was associated with increased superoxide and significant DNA damage. Apoptosis followed these events. Taken together, the data suggest that diazeniumdiolate-based NO-releasing prodrugs may have application as a personalized therapy for lung cancers characterized by high levels of ROS/RNS. PRX1 and OGG1 proteins, which can be easily measured, could function as biomarkers for identifying tumors sensitive to the therapy.

  20. The initiation of lateral roots in the primary roots of maize (Zea mays L.) implies a reactivation of cell proliferation in a group of founder pericycle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alarcón, M Victoria; Lloret, Pedro G; Martín-Partido, Gervasio; Salguero, Julio

    2016-03-15

    The initiation of lateral roots (LRs) has generally been viewed as a reactivation of proliferative activity in pericycle cells that are committed to initiate primordia. However, it is also possible that pericycle founder cells that initiate LRs never cease proliferative activity but rather are displaced to the most distal root zones while undertaking successive stages of LR initiation. In this study, we tested these two alternative hypotheses by examining the incorporation of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) into the DNA of meristematic root cells of Zea mays. According to the values for the length of the cell cycle and values for cell displacement along the maize root, our results strongly suggest that pericycle cells that initiate LR primordia ceased proliferative activity upon exiting the meristematic zone. This finding is supported by the existence of a root zone between 4 and 20mm from the root cap junction, in which neither mitotic cells nor labelled nuclei were observed in phloem pericycle cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. Natriuretic peptide receptor A inhibition suppresses gastric cancer development through reactive oxygen species-mediated G2/M cell cycle arrest and cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zheng; Wang, Ji-Wei; Wang, Wei-Zhi; Zhi, Xiao-Fei; Zhang, Qun; Li, Bo-Wen; Wang, Lin-Jun; Xie, Kun-Ling; Tao, Jin-Qiu; Tang, Jie; Wei, Song; Zhu, Yi; Xu, Hao; Zhang, Dian-Cai; Yang, Li; Xu, Ze-Kuan

    2016-10-01

    Natriuretic peptide receptor A (NPRA), the major receptor for atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), has been implicated in tumorigenesis; however, the role of ANP-NPRA signaling in the development of gastric cancer remains unclear. Immunohistochemical analyses indicated that NPRA expression was positively associated with gastric tumor size and cancer stage. NPRA inhibition by shRNA induced G2/M cell cycle arrest, cell death, and autophagy in gastric cancer cells, due to accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Either genetic or pharmacologic inhibition of autophagy led to caspase-dependent cell death. Therefore, autophagy induced by NPRA silencing may represent a cytoprotective mechanism. ROS accumulation activated c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). ROS-mediated activation of JNK inhibited cell proliferation by disturbing cell cycle and decreased cell viability. In addition, AMPK activation promoted autophagy in NPRA-downregulated cancer cells. Overall, our results indicate that the inhibition of NPRA suppresses gastric cancer development and targeting NPRA may represent a promising strategy for the treatment of gastric cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells in murine AIDS inhibit B-cell responses in part via soluble mediators including reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, and TGF-β

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rastad, Jessica L. [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Lebanon, NH 03756 (United States); Green, William R., E-mail: William.R.Green@dartmouth.edu [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Lebanon, NH 03756 (United States); Norris Cotton Cancer Center, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Lebanon, NH 03756 (United States)

    2016-12-15

    Monocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells (M-MDSCs) were increased during LP-BM5 retroviral infection, and were capable of suppressing not only T-cell, but also B-cell responses. In addition to previously demonstrating iNOS- and VISTA-dependent M-MDSC mechanisms, in this paper, we detail how M-MDSCs utilized soluble mediators, including the reactive oxygen and nitrogen species superoxide, peroxynitrite, and nitric oxide, and TGF-β, to suppress B cells in a predominantly contact-independent manner. Suppression was independent of cysteine-depletion and hydrogen peroxide production. When two major mechanisms of suppression (iNOS and VISTA) were eliminated in double knockout mice, M-MDSCs from LP-BM5-infected mice were able to compensate using other, soluble mechanisms in order to maintain suppression of B cells. The IL-10 producing regulatory B-cell compartment was among the targets of M-MDSC-mediated suppression. -- Highlights: •LP-BM5-expanded M-MDSCs utilized soluble mediators nitric oxide, superoxide, peroxynitrite, and TGF-β to suppress B cells. •When two major mechanisms of suppression were eliminated through knockouts, M-MDSCs maintained suppression. •M-MDSCs from LP-BM5-infected mice decreased proliferation of IL-10 producing regulatory B cells.

  3. Chrysophanol-induced cell death (necrosis) in human lung cancer A549 cells is mediated through increasing reactive oxygen species and decreasing the level of mitochondrial membrane potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Chien-Hang; Yu, Chun-Shu; Lu, Hsu-Feng; Yang, Jai-Sing; Huang, Hui-Ying; Chen, Po-Yuan; Wu, Shin-Hwar; Ip, Siu-Wan; Chiang, Su-Yin; Lin, Jaung-Geng; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2014-05-01

    Chrysophanol (1,8-dihydroxy-3-methylanthraquinone) is one of the anthraquinone compounds, and it has been shown to induce cell death in different types of cancer cells. The effects of chrysophanol on human lung cancer cell death have not been well studied. The purpose of this study is to examine chrysophanol-induced cytotoxic effects and also to investigate such influences that involved apoptosis or necrosis in A549 human lung cancer cells in vitro. Our results indicated that chrysophanol decreased the viable A549 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Chrysophanol also promoted the release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and Ca(2+) and decreased the levels of mitochondria membrane potential (ΔΨm ) and adenosine triphosphate in A549 cells. Furthermore, chrysophanol triggered DNA damage by using Comet assay and DAPI staining. Importantly, chrysophanol only stimulated the cytocheome c release, but it did not activate other apoptosis-associated protein levels including caspase-3, caspase-8, Apaf-1, and AIF. In conclusion, human lung cancer A549 cells treated with chrysophanol exhibited a cellular pattern associated with necrotic cell death and not apoptosis in vitro. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 29: 740-749, 2014. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., a Wiley company.

  4. The production of reactive oxygen species and the mitochondrial membrane potential are modulated during onion oil-induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in A549 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xin-jiang; Stahl, Thorsten; Hu, Ying; Kassie, Fekadu; Mersch-Sundermann, Volker

    2006-03-01

    Protective effects of Allium vegetables against cancers have been shown extensively in experimental animals and epidemiologic studies. We investigated cell proliferation and the induction of apoptosis by onion oil extracted from Allium cepa, a widely consumed Allium vegetable, in human lung cancer A549 cells. GC/MS analysis suggested that propyl sulfides but not allyl sulfides are major sulfur-containing constituents of onion oil. Onion oil at 12.5 mg/L significantly induced apoptosis (13% increase of apoptotic cells) as indicated by sub-G1 DNA content. It also caused cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase; 25 mg/L onion oil increased the percentage of G2/M cells almost 6-fold compared with the dimethyl sulfoxide control. The action of onion oil may occur via a reactive oxygen species-dependent pathway because cell cycle arrest and apoptosis were blocked by the antioxidants N-acetylcysteine and exogenous glutathione. Marked collapse of the mitochondrial membrane potential suggested that dysfunction of the mitochondria may be involved in the oxidative burst and apoptosis induced by onion oil. Expression of phospho-cdc2 and phospho-cyclin B1 were downregulated by onion oil, perhaps accounting for the G2/M arrest. Overall, these results suggest that onion oil may exert chemopreventive action by inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in tumor cells.

  5. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells in murine AIDS inhibit B-cell responses in part via soluble mediators including reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, and TGF-β

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rastad, Jessica L.; Green, William R.

    2016-01-01

    Monocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells (M-MDSCs) were increased during LP-BM5 retroviral infection, and were capable of suppressing not only T-cell, but also B-cell responses. In addition to previously demonstrating iNOS- and VISTA-dependent M-MDSC mechanisms, in this paper, we detail how M-MDSCs utilized soluble mediators, including the reactive oxygen and nitrogen species superoxide, peroxynitrite, and nitric oxide, and TGF-β, to suppress B cells in a predominantly contact-independent manner. Suppression was independent of cysteine-depletion and hydrogen peroxide production. When two major mechanisms of suppression (iNOS and VISTA) were eliminated in double knockout mice, M-MDSCs from LP-BM5-infected mice were able to compensate using other, soluble mechanisms in order to maintain suppression of B cells. The IL-10 producing regulatory B-cell compartment was among the targets of M-MDSC-mediated suppression. -- Highlights: •LP-BM5-expanded M-MDSCs utilized soluble mediators nitric oxide, superoxide, peroxynitrite, and TGF-β to suppress B cells. •When two major mechanisms of suppression were eliminated through knockouts, M-MDSCs maintained suppression. •M-MDSCs from LP-BM5-infected mice decreased proliferation of IL-10 producing regulatory B cells.

  6. Concise Review: Reactive Astrocytes and Stem Cells in Spinal Cord Injury: Good Guys or Bad Guys?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lukovic, D.; Stojkovic, M.; Moreno-Manzano, V.; Jendelová, Pavla; Syková, Eva; Bhattacharya, S.S.; Erceg, Slaven

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 33, APR (2015), s. 1036-1041 ISSN 1066-5099 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1309 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : glia * induced pluripotent stem cells * neural differentiation * neural stem cell * spinal cord injury * stem cell transplantation Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 5.902, year: 2015

  7. Gambogic Acid Lysinate Induces Apoptosis in Breast Cancer MCF-7 Cells by Increasing Reactive Oxygen Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Zhan Zhen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Gambogic acid (GA inhibits the proliferation of various human cancer cells. However, because of its water insolubility, the antitumor efficacy of GA is limited. Objectives. To investigate the antitumor activity of gambogic acid lysinate (GAL and its mechanism. Methods. Inhibition of cell proliferation was determined by MTT assay; intracellular ROS level was detected by staining cells with DCFH-DA; cell apoptosis was determined by flow cytometer and the mechanism of GAL was investigated by Western blot. Results. GAL inhibited the proliferation of MCF-7 cells with IC50 values 1.46 μmol/L comparable with GA (IC50, 1.16 μmol/L. GAL promoted the production of ROS; however NAC could remove ROS and block the effect of GAL. GAL inhibited the expression of SIRT1 but increased the phosphorylation of FOXO3a and the expression of p27Kip1. At knockdown of FOXO3a, cell apoptosis induced by GAL can be partly blocked. In addition it also enhanced the cleavage of caspase-3. Conclusions. GAL inhibited MCF-7 cell proliferation and induced MCF-7 cell apoptosis by increasing ROS level which could induce cell apoptosis by both SIRT1/FOXO3a/p27Kip1 and caspase-3 signal pathway. These results suggested that GAL might be useful as a modulation agent in cancer chemotherapy.

  8. Activation of cross-reactive mucosal T and B cell responses in human nasopharynx-associated lymphoid tissue in vitro by Modified Vaccinia Ankara-vectored influenza vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullin, Jennifer; Ahmed, Muhammed S; Sharma, Ravi; Upile, Navdeep; Beer, Helen; Achar, Priya; Puksuriwong, Suttida; Ferrara, Francesca; Temperton, Nigel; McNamara, Paul; Lambe, Teresa; Gilbert, Sarah C; Zhang, Qibo

    2016-03-29

    Recent efforts have been focused on the development of vaccines that could induce broad immunity against influenza virus, either through T cell responses to conserved internal antigens or B cell response to cross-reactive haemagglutinin (HA). We studied the capacity of Modified Vaccinia Ankara (MVA)-vectored influenza vaccines to induce cross-reactive immunity to influenza virus in human nasopharynx-associated lymphoid tissue (NALT) in vitro. Adenotonsillar cells were isolated and stimulated with MVA vaccines expressing either conserved nucleoprotein (NP) and matrix protein 1 (M1) (MVA-NP-M1) or pandemic H1N1 HA (MVA-pdmH1HA). The MVA vaccine uptake and expression, and T and B cell responses were analyzed. MVA-vectored vaccines were highly efficient infecting NALT and vaccine antigens were highly expressed by B cells. MVA-NP-M1 elicited T cell response with greater numbers of IFNγ-producing CD4+ T cells and tissue-resident memory T cells than controls. MVA-pdmH1HA induced cross-reactive anti-HA antibodies to a number of influenza subtypes, in an age-dependent manner. The cross-reactive antibodies include anti-avian H5N1 and mainly target HA2 domain. MVA vaccines are efficient in infecting NALT and the vaccine antigen is highly expressed by B cells. MVA vaccines expressing conserved influenza antigens induce cross-reactive T and B cell responses in human NALT in vitro, suggesting the potential as mucosal vaccines for broader immunity against influenza. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Alteronol induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis via increased reactive oxygen species production in human breast cancer T47D cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Boxue; Li, Defang; Si, Lingling; Ding, Yangfang; Han, Jichun; Chen, Xiaoyu; Zheng, Qiusheng

    2018-04-01

    Emerging evidence showed that alteronol has a potential antitumour effect in several tumour cells. However, the antitumour effect of alteronol on breast cancer has not been reported. This study investigated the mechanisms of alteronol-induced cell proliferation inhibition in human breast cancer T47D cells. After treatment with alteronol, T47D cell proliferation was examined by MTT assay. The cell cycle distribution, cell apoptosis, reactive oxygen species level and mitochondrial membrane potential were evaluated via flow cytometry. Next, the protein levels of cyclin B1, cdc2, p21, p-cyclin B1, p-cdc2, p53, Bax, Bcl-2 and cytochrome c were analysed using Western blot analysis. Meanwhile, the mRNA levels of cyclin B1, cdc2, p21 and p53 were examined by qRT-PCR. Our data showed that alteronol inhibited the proliferation of T47D cells via inducing G2-phase arrest and cell apoptosis. Compared with control group, alteronol significantly increased ROS level and triggered mitochondrial dysfunction in alteronol-treated T47D cells. Further studies showed that the mRNA and protein levels of cdc2 and cyclin B1 were downregulated, while the mRNA and protein levels of p21, p53, p-cyclin B1, p-cdc2 and cytochrome c were upregulated. In addition, the expression level of Bax was increased, and the expression level of Bcl-2 was decreased. Alteronol induced T47D cell cycle arrest and cell apoptosis through increasing ROS production and triggering mitochondrial dysfunction, and subsequently inhibiting T47D cell proliferation. © 2018 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  10. Simulation of detonation cell kinematics using two-dimensional reactive blast waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, G. O.; Edwards, D. H.

    1983-10-01

    A method of generating a cylindrical blast wave is developed which overcomes the disadvantages inherent in the converging-diverging nozzle technique used by Edwards et al., 1981. It is demonstrated than an exploding wire placed at the apex of a two-dimensional sector provides a satisfactory source of the generation of blast waves in reactive systems. The velocity profiles of the blast waves are found to simulate those in freely propagating detonations very well, and this method does not suffer from the disadvantage of having the mass flow at the throat as in the nozzle method. The density decay parameter is determined to have a constant value of 4 in the systems investigated, and it is suggested that this may be a universal value. It is proposed that suitable wedges could be used to create artificial Mach stems in the same manner as Strehlow and Barthel (1971) without the attendant disadvantages of the nozzle method.

  11. NADPH oxidase 1 supports proliferation of colon cancer cells by modulating reactive oxygen species-dependent signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhasz, Agnes; Markel, Susan; Gaur, Shikha; Liu, Han; Lu, Jiamo; Jiang, Guojian; Wu, Xiwei; Antony, Smitha; Wu, Yongzhong; Melillo, Giovanni; Meitzler, Jennifer L; Haines, Diana C; Butcher, Donna; Roy, Krishnendu; Doroshow, James H

    2017-05-12

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a critical role in cell signaling and proliferation. NADPH oxidase 1 (NOX1), a membrane-bound flavin dehydrogenase that generates O 2 ̇̄ , is highly expressed in colon cancer. To investigate the role that NOX1 plays in colon cancer growth, we used shRNA to decrease NOX1 expression stably in HT-29 human colon cancer cells. The 80-90% decrease in NOX1 expression achieved by RNAi produced a significant decline in ROS production and a G 1 /S block that translated into a 2-3-fold increase in tumor cell doubling time without increased apoptosis. The block at the G 1 /S checkpoint was associated with a significant decrease in cyclin D 1 expression and profound inhibition of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling. Decreased steady-state MAPK phosphorylation occurred concomitant with a significant increase in protein phosphatase activity for two colon cancer cell lines in which NOX1 expression was knocked down by RNAi. Diminished NOX1 expression also contributed to decreased growth, blood vessel density, and VEGF and hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) expression in HT-29 xenografts initiated from NOX1 knockdown cells. Microarray analysis, supplemented by real-time PCR and Western blotting, revealed that the expression of critical regulators of cell proliferation and angiogenesis, including c-MYC, c-MYB, and VEGF, were down-regulated in association with a decline in hypoxic HIF-1α protein expression downstream of silenced NOX1 in both colon cancer cell lines and xenografts. These studies suggest a role for NOX1 in maintaining the proliferative phenotype of some colon cancers and the potential of NOX1 as a therapeutic target in this disease. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Examining an underappreciated control on lignin decomposition in soils? Effects of reactive manganese species on intact plant cell walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiluweit, M.; Bougoure, J.; Pett-Ridge, J.; Kleber, M.; Nico, P. S.

    2011-12-01

    Lignin comprises a dominant proportion of carbon fluxes into the soil (representing up to 50% of plant litter and roots). Two lines of evidence suggest that manganese (Mn) acts as a strong controlling factor on the residence time of lignin in soil ecosystems. First, Mn content is highly correlated with litter decomposition in temperate and boreal forest soil ecosystems and, second, microbial agents of lignin degradation have been reported to rely on reactive Mn(III)-complexes to specifically oxidize lignin. However, few attempts have been made to isolate the mechanisms responsible for the apparent Mn-dependence of lignin decomposition in soils. Here we tested the hypothesis that Mn(III)-oxalate complexes may act as a perforating 'pretreatment' for structurally intact plant cell walls. We propose that these diffusible oxidizers are small enough to penetrate and react with non-porous ligno-cellulose in cell walls. This process was investigated by reacting single Zinnia elegans tracheary elements with Mn(III)-oxalate complexes in a continuous flow-through microreactor. The uniformity of cultured tracheary elements allowed us to examine Mn(III)-induced changes in cell wall chemistry and ultrastructure on the micro-scale using fluorescence and electron microscopy as well as synchrotron-based infrared and X-ray spectromicroscopy. Our results show that Mn(III)-complexes substantially oxidize specific lignin components of the cell wall, solubilize decomposition products, severely undermine the cell wall integrity, and cause cell lysis. We conclude that Mn(III)-complexes induce oxidative damage in plant cell walls that renders ligno-cellulose substrates more accessible for microbial lignin- and cellulose-decomposing enzymes. Implications of our results for the rate limiting impact of soil Mn speciation and availability on litter decomposition in forest soils will be discussed.

  13. In vitro bacterial cytotoxicity of CNTs: reactive oxygen species mediate cell damage edges over direct physical puncturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajavel, Krishnamoorthy; Gomathi, Rajkumar; Manian, Sellamuthu; Rajendra Kumar, Ramasamy Thangavelu

    2014-01-21

    Understanding the bacterial cytotoxicity of CNTs is important for a wide variety of applications in the biomedical, environmental, and health sectors. A majority of the earlier reports attributed the bactericidal cytotoxicity of CNTs to bacterial cell membrane damage by direct physical puncturing. Our results reveal that bacterial cell death via bacterial cell membrane damage is induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced from CNTs and is not due to direct physical puncturing by CNTs. To understand the actual mechanism of bacterial killing, we elucidated the bacterial cytotoxicity of SWCNTs and MWCNTs against Gram-negative human pathogenic bacterial species Escherichia coli, Shigella sonnei, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa and its amelioration upon functionalizing the CNTs with antioxidant tannic acid (TA). Interestingly, the bacterial cells treated with CNTs exhibited severe cell damage under laboratory (ambient) and sunlight irradiation conditions. However, CNTs showed no cytotoxicity to the bacterial cells when incubated in the dark. The quantitative assessments carried out by us made it explicit that CNTs are effective generators of ROS such as (1)O2, O2(•-), and (•)OH in an aqueous medium under both ambient and sunlight-irradiated conditions. Both naked and TA-functionalized CNTs showed negligible ROS production in the dark. Furthermore, strong correlations were obtained between ROS produced by CNTs and the bacterial cell mortality (with the correlation coefficient varying between 0.7618 and 0.9891) for all four tested pathogens. The absence of bactericidal cytotoxicity in both naked and functionalized CNTs in the dark reveals that the presence of ROS is the major factor responsible for the bactericidal action compared to direct physical puncturing. This understanding of the bactericidal activity of the irradiated CNTs, mediated through the generation of ROS, could be interesting for novel applications such as regulated ROS delivery

  14. Gelsolin-Cu/ZnSOD interaction alters intracellular reactive oxygen species levels to promote cancer cell invasion

    KAUST Repository

    Tochhawng, Lalchhandami

    2016-07-07

    The actin-binding protein, gelsolin, is a well known regulator of cancer cell invasion. However, the mechanisms by which gelsolin promotes invasion are not well established. As reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been shown to promote cancer cell invasion, we investigated on the hypothesis that gelsolin-induced changes in ROS levels may mediate the invasive capacity of colon cancer cells. Herein, we show that increased gelsolin enhances the invasive capacity of colon cancer cells, and this is mediated via gelsolin\\'s effects in elevating intracellular superoxide (O2 .-) levels. We also provide evidence for a novel physical interaction between gelsolin and Cu/ZnSOD, that inhibits the enzymatic activity of Cu/ZnSOD, thereby resulting in a sustained elevation of intracellular O2 .-. Using microarray data of human colorectal cancer tissues from Gene Omnibus, we found that gelsolin gene expression positively correlates with urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA), an important matrix-degrading protease invovled in cancer invasion. Consistent with the in vivo evidence, we show that increased levels of O2 .- induced by gelsolin overexpression triggers the secretion of uPA. We further observed reduction in invasion and intracellular O2 .- levels in colon cancer cells, as a consequence of gelsolin knockdown using two different siRNAs. In these cells, concurrent repression of Cu/ ZnSOD restored intracellular O2 .- levels and rescued invasive capacity. Our study therefore identified gelsolin as a novel regulator of intracellular O2 .- in cancer cells via interacting with Cu/ZnSOD and inhibiting its enzymatic activity. Taken together, these findings provide insight into a novel function of gelsolin in promoting tumor invasion by directly impacting the cellular redox milieu.

  15. Chimeric immunoglobulin E reactive with tumor-associated antigen activates human Fc epsilon RI bearing cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luiten, R. M.; Warnaar, S. O.; Schuurman, J.; Pasmans, S. G.; Latour, S.; Daëron, M.; Fleuren, G. J.; Litvinov, S. V.

    1997-01-01

    Crosslinking of immunoglobulin E molecules that are bound to the Fc epsilon receptors expressed on mast cells or basophils triggers activation of these cells, resulting in the development of a type I hypersensitivity. Targeting this potent immune reaction towards tumors by using IgE that reacts with

  16. Higher acid-chlorite reactivity of cell corner middle lamella lignin in black spruce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umesh P. Agarwal

    2007-01-01

    To determine if there was a delignification behavior difference between secondary wall (S2) and middle lamella (cell corner or CC) lignin, black spruce cross-sections were acid-chlorite delignified and the tissue was evaluated in-situ by Raman imaging. Lignin concentration in S2 and CC was determined in numerous latewood cell areas in the two hour delignified cross...

  17. Qing Dai attenuates nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced mitochondrial reactive oxygen species in gastrointestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Rie; Tamura, Masato; Matsui, Hirofumi; Nagano, Yumiko; Suzuki, Hideo; Kaneko, Tsuyoshi; Mizokami, Yuji; Hyodo, Ichinosuke

    2015-01-01

    Treatments with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have increased the number of patients with gastrointestinal complications. Qing Dai has been traditionally used in Chinese herbal medicine for various inflammatory diseases such as ulcerative colitis. We previously reported that Qing Dai suppressed inflammations by scavenging reactive oxygen species (ROS) in ulcerative colitis patients. Thus, Qing Dai can attenuate the production of ROS, which play an important role in NSAID-induced gastrointestinal injuries. In this study, we aimed to elucidate whether Qing Dai decreased mitochondrial ROS production in NSAID-treated gastrointestinal cells by examining cellular injury, mitochondrial membrane potentials, and ROS production with specific fluorescent indicators. We also performed electron paramagnetic resonance measurement in isolated mitochondria with a spin-trapping reagent (CYPMPO or DMPO). Treatments with indomethacin and aspirin induced cellular injury and mitochondrial impairment in the gastrointestinal cells. Under these conditions, mitochondrial alterations were observed on electron microscopy. Qing Dai prevented these complications by suppressing ROS production in gastrointestinal cells. These results indicate that Qing Dai attenuated the ROS production from the NSAID-induced mitochondrial alteration in the gastrointestinal epithelial cells. Qing Dai treatment may be considered effective for the prevention NSAID-induced gastrointestinal injury.

  18. Lysophosphatidic acid induces reactive oxygen species generation by activating protein kinase C in PC-3 human prostate cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Chu-Cheng; Lin, Chuan-En; Lin, Yueh-Chien; Ju, Tsai-Kai; Huang, Yuan-Li; Lee, Ming-Shyue; Chen, Jiun-Hong; Lee, Hsinyu

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •LPA induces ROS generation through LPA 1 and LPA 3 . •LPA induces ROS generation by activating PLC. •PKCζ mediates LPA-induced ROS generation. -- Abstract: Prostate cancer is one of the most frequently diagnosed cancers in males, and PC-3 is a cell model popularly used for investigating the behavior of late stage prostate cancer. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a lysophospholipid that mediates multiple behaviors in cancer cells, such as proliferation, migration and adhesion. We have previously demonstrated that LPA enhances vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-C expression in PC-3 cells by activating the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which is known to be an important mediator in cancer progression. Using flow cytometry, we showed that LPA triggers ROS generation within 10 min and that the generated ROS can be suppressed by pretreatment with the NADPH oxidase (Nox) inhibitor diphenylene iodonium. In addition, transfection with LPA 1 and LPA 3 siRNA efficiently blocked LPA-induced ROS production, suggesting that both receptors are involved in this pathway. Using specific inhibitors and siRNA, phospholipase C (PLC) and protein kinase C (PKC) were also suggested to participate in LPA-induced ROS generation. Overall, we demonstrated that LPA induces ROS generation in PC-3 prostate cancer cells and this is mediated through the PLC/PKC/Nox pathway

  19. Lysophosphatidic acid induces reactive oxygen species generation by activating protein kinase C in PC-3 human prostate cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Chu-Cheng; Lin, Chuan-En; Lin, Yueh-Chien [Institute of Zoology, College of Life Science, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Ju, Tsai-Kai [Instrumentation Center, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Technology Commons, College of Life Science, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Huang, Yuan-Li [Department of Biotechnology, Asia University, Taichung, Taiwan, ROC (China); Lee, Ming-Shyue [Institute of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Chen, Jiun-Hong [Institute of Zoology, College of Life Science, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Department of Life Science, College of Life Science, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Lee, Hsinyu, E-mail: hsinyu@ntu.edu.tw [Institute of Zoology, College of Life Science, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Department of Life Science, College of Life Science, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Center for Biotechnology, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Research Center for Developmental Biology and Regenerative Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: •LPA induces ROS generation through LPA{sub 1} and LPA{sub 3}. •LPA induces ROS generation by activating PLC. •PKCζ mediates LPA-induced ROS generation. -- Abstract: Prostate cancer is one of the most frequently diagnosed cancers in males, and PC-3 is a cell model popularly used for investigating the behavior of late stage prostate cancer. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a lysophospholipid that mediates multiple behaviors in cancer cells, such as proliferation, migration and adhesion. We have previously demonstrated that LPA enhances vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-C expression in PC-3 cells by activating the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which is known to be an important mediator in cancer progression. Using flow cytometry, we showed that LPA triggers ROS generation within 10 min and that the generated ROS can be suppressed by pretreatment with the NADPH oxidase (Nox) inhibitor diphenylene iodonium. In addition, transfection with LPA{sub 1} and LPA{sub 3} siRNA efficiently blocked LPA-induced ROS production, suggesting that both receptors are involved in this pathway. Using specific inhibitors and siRNA, phospholipase C (PLC) and protein kinase C (PKC) were also suggested to participate in LPA-induced ROS generation. Overall, we demonstrated that LPA induces ROS generation in PC-3 prostate cancer cells and this is mediated through the PLC/PKC/Nox pathway.

  20. BL-038, a Benzofuran Derivative, Induces Cell Apoptosis in Human Chondrosarcoma Cells through Reactive Oxygen Species/Mitochondrial Dysfunction and the Caspases Dependent Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ju-Fang; Chen, Chien-Yu; Chen, Hsien-Te; Chang, Chih-Shiang; Tang, Chih-Hsin

    2016-09-07

    Chondrosarcoma is a highly malignant cartilage-forming bone tumor that has the capacity to invade locally and cause distant metastasis. Moreover, chondrosarcoma is intrinsically resistant to conventional chemotherapy or radiotherapy. The novel benzofuran derivative, BL-038 (2-amino-3-(2,6-dichlorophenyl)-6-(4-methoxyphenyl)benzofuran-4-yl acetate), has been evaluated for its anticancer effects in human chondrosarcoma cells. BL-038 caused cell apoptosis in two human chondrosarcoma cell lines, JJ012 and SW1353, but not in primary chondrocytes. Treatment of chondrosarcoma with BL-038 also induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Furthermore, BL-038 decreased mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and changed mitochondrial-related apoptosis, by downregulating the anti-apoptotic activity members (Bcl-2, Bcl-xL) and upregulating pro-apoptotic members (Bax, Bak) of the B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) family of proteins, key regulators of the apoptotic machinery in cells. These results demonstrate that in human chondrosarcoma cells, the apoptotic and cytotoxic effects of BL-038 are mediated by the intrinsic mitochondria-mediated apoptotic pathway, which in turn causes the release of cytochrome c, the activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3, and the cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), to elicit apoptosis response. Our results show that the benzofuran derivative BL-038 induces apoptosis in chondrosarcoma cells.

  1. Concentration-dependent induction of reactive oxygen species, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in human liver cells after nickel nanoparticles exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Javed; Alhadlaq, Hisham A; Siddiqui, Maqsood A; Saquib, Quaiser; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A; Musarrat, Javed; Ahamed, Maqusood

    2015-02-01

    Due to advent of nanotechnology, nickel nanoparticles (Ni NPs) are increasingly recognized for their utility in various applications including catalysts, sensors and electronics. However, the environmental and human health effects of Ni NPs have not been fully investigated. In this study, we examined toxic effects of Ni NPs in human liver (HepG2) cells. Ni NPs were prepared and characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. We observed that Ni NPs (size, ∼28 nm; concentration range, 25-100 μg/mL) induced cytotoxicity in HepG2 cells and degree of induction was concentration-dependent. Ni NPs were also found to induce oxidative stress in dose-dependent manner evident by induction of reactive oxygen species and depletion of glutathione. Cell cycle analysis of cells treated with Ni NPs exhibited significant increase of apoptotic cell population in subG1 phase. Ni NPs also induced caspase-3 enzyme activity and apoptotic DNA fragmentation. Upregulation of cell cycle checkpoint gene p53 and bax/bcl-2 ratio with a concomitant loss in mitochondrial membrane potential suggested that Ni NPs induced apoptosis in HepG2 cells was mediated through mitochondrial pathway. This study warrants that applications of Ni NPs should be carefully assessed as to their toxicity to human health. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Activation of iNKT Cells Prevents Salmonella-Enterocolitis and Salmonella-Induced Reactive Arthritis by Downregulating IL-17-Producing γδT Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariángeles Noto Llana

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Reactive arthritis (ReA is an inflammatory condition of the joints that arises following an infection. Salmonella enterocolitis is one of the most common infections leading to ReA. Although the pathogenesis remains unclear, it is known that IL-17 plays a pivotal role in the development of ReA. IL-17-producers cells are mainly Th17, iNKT, and γδT lymphocytes. It is known that iNKT cells regulate the development of Th17 lineage. Whether iNKT cells also regulate γδT lymphocytes differentiation is unknown. We found that iNKT cells play a protective role in ReA. BALB/c Jα18−/− mice suffered a severe Salmonella enterocolitis, a 3.5-fold increase in IL-17 expression and aggravated inflammation of the synovial membrane. On the other hand, activation of iNKT cells with α-GalCer abrogated IL-17 response to Salmonella enterocolitis and prevented intestinal and joint tissue damage. Moreover, the anti-inflammatory effect of α-GalCer was related to a drop in the proportion of IL-17-producing γδT lymphocytes (IL17-γδTcells rather than to a decrease in Th17 cells. In summary, we here show that iNKT cells play a protective role against Salmonella-enterocolitis and Salmonella-induced ReA by downregulating IL17-γδTcells.

  3. Optimization of degradation of Reactive Black 5 (RB5) and electricity generation in solar photocatalytic fuel cell system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalik, Wan Fadhilah; Ho, Li-Ngee; Ong, Soon-An; Voon, Chun-Hong; Wong, Yee-Shian; Yusoff, NikAthirah; Lee, Sin-Li; Yusuf, Sara Yasina

    2017-10-01

    The photocatalytic fuel cell (PFC) system was developed in order to study the effect of several operating parameters in degradation of Reactive Black 5 (RB5) and its electricity generation. Light irradiation, initial dye concentration, aeration, pH and cathode electrode are the operating parameters that might give contribution in the efficiency of PFC system. The degradation of RB5 depends on the presence of light irradiation and solar light gives better performance to degrade the azo dye. The azo dye with low initial concentration decolorizes faster compared to higher initial concentration and presence of aeration in PFC system would enhance its performance. Reactive Black 5 rapidly decreased at higher pH due to the higher amount of OH generated at higher pH and Pt-loaded carbon (Pt/C) was more suitable to be used as cathode in PFC system compared to Cu foil and Fe foil. The rapid decolorization of RB5 would increase their voltage output and in addition, it would also increase their V oc , J sc and P max . The breakage of azo bond and aromatic rings was confirmed through UV-Vis spectrum and COD analysis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. NADPH oxidase-mediated generation of reactive oxygen species: A new mechanism for X-ray-induced HeLa cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Qing; He Xiaoqing; Liu Yongsheng; Du Bingbing; Wang Xiaoyan; Zhang Weisheng; Jia Pengfei; Dong Jingmei; Ma Jianxiu; Wang Xiaohu; Li Sha; Zhang Hong

    2008-01-01

    Oxidative damage is an important mechanism in X-ray-induced cell death. Radiolysis of water molecules is a source of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that contribute to X-ray-induced cell death. In this study, we showed by ROS detection and a cell survival assay that NADPH oxidase has a very important role in X-ray-induced cell death. Under X-ray irradiation, the upregulation of the expression of NADPH oxidase membrane subunit gp91 phox was dose-dependent. Meanwhile, the cytoplasmic subunit p47 phox was translocated to the cell membrane and localized with p22 phox and gp91 phox to form reactive NADPH oxidase. Our data suggest, for the first time, that NADPH oxidase-mediated generation of ROS is an important contributor to X-ray-induced cell death. This suggests a new target for combined gene transfer and radiotherapy.

  5. Increased reactive oxygen species levels cause ER stress and cytotoxicity in andrographolide treated colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Aditi; Banerjee, Vivekjyoti; Czinn, Steven; Blanchard, Thomas

    2017-04-18

    Chemotherapy continues to play an essential role in the management of many cancers including colon cancer, the third leading cause of death due to cancer in the United States. Many naturally occurring plant compounds have been demonstrated to possess anti-cancer cell activity and have the potential to supplement existing chemotherapy strategies. The plant metabolite andrographolide induces cell death in cancer cells and apoptosis is dependent upon the induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress (ER stress) leading to the unfolded protein response (UPR). The goal of the present study was to determine the mechanism by which andrographolide induces ER stress and to further evaluate its role in promoting cell death pathways. The T84 and COLO 205 cancer cell lines were used to demonstrate that andrographolide induces increased ROS levels, corresponding anti-oxidant response molecules, and reduced mitochondrial membrane potential. No increases in ROS levels were detected in control colon fibroblast cells. Andrographolide-induced cell death, UPR signaling, and CHOP, Bax, and caspase 3 apoptosis elements were all inhibited in the presence of the ROS scavenger NAC. Additionally, andrographolide-induced suppression of cyclins B1 and D1 were also reversed in the presence of NAC. Finally, Akt phosphorylation and phospho-mTOR levels that are normally suppressed by andrographolide were also expressed at normal levels in the absence of ROS. These data demonstrate that andrographolide induces ER stress leading to apoptosis through the induction of ROS and that elevated ROS also play an important role in down-regulating cell cycle progression and cell survival pathways as well.

  6. Natural autoantibodies and complement promote the uptake of a self antigen, human thyroglobulin, by B cells and the proliferation of thyroglobulin-reactive CD4(+) T cells in healthy individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, C H; Leslie, R G; Jepsen, B S

    2001-01-01

    Serum from normal individuals contains substantial amounts of natural antibodies (NA) capable of recognizing self antigens. However, the physiological implications of this autoreactivity remain unclear. We have examined the role of self-reactive NA and complement in mediating the uptake of human...... cells are prerequisites for the proliferation of Tg-reactive CD4(+) T cells, suggesting a novel role for natural autoantibodies and complement in the regulation of autoreactivity under physiological conditions....

  7. Cytotoxicity of pyrrolizidine alkaloid in human hepatic parenchymal and sinusoidal endothelial cells: Firm evidence for the reactive metabolites mediated pyrrolizidine alkaloid-induced hepatotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mengbi; Ruan, Jianqing; Fu, Peter P; Lin, Ge

    2016-01-05

    Pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) widely distribute in plants and can cause hepatic sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (HSOS), which typically presents as a primary sinusoidal endothelial cell damage. It is well-recognized that after ingestion, PAs undergo hepatic cytochromes P450 (CYPs)-mediated metabolic activation to generate dehydropyrrolizidine alkaloids (DHPAs), which are hydrolyzed to dehydroretronecine (DHR). DHPAs and DHR are reactive metabolites having same core pyrrole moiety, and can bind proteins to form pyrrole-protein adducts, which are believed as the primary cause for PA-induced HSOS. However, to date, the direct evidences supporting the toxicity of DHPAs and DHR in the liver, in particular in the sinusoidal endothelial cells, are lacking. Using human hepatic sinusoidal endothelial cells (HSEC) and HepG2 (representing hepatic parenchymal cells), cells that lack CYPs activity, this study determined the direct cytotoxicity of dehydromonocrotaline, a representative DHPA, and DHR, but no cytotoxicity of the intact PA (monocrotaline) in both cell lines, confirming that reactive metabolites mediate PA intoxication. Comparing with HepG2, HSEC had significantly lower basal glutathione (GSH) level, and was significantly more susceptible to the reactive metabolites with severer GSH depletion and pyrrole-protein adducts formation. The toxic potency of two reactive metabolites was also compared. DHPA was more reactive than DHR, leading to severer toxicity. In conclusion, our results unambiguously provided the first direct evidence for the critical role of DHPA and DHR in the reactive metabolites-mediated PA-induced hepatotoxicity, which occurs predominantly in HSEC due to severe GSH depletion and the significant formation of pyrrole-protein adducts in HSEC. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Decitabine induces delayed reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation in leukemia cells and induces the expression of ROS generating enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fandy, Tamer E; Jiemjit, Anchalee; Thakar, Manjusha; Rhoden, Paulette; Suarez, Lauren; Gore, Steven D

    2014-03-01

    Azanucleoside DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) inhibitors are currently approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for treatment of myelodysplastic syndrome. The relative contributions of DNMT inhibition and other off-target effects to their clinical efficacy remain unclear. Data correlating DNA methylation reversal and clinical response have been conflicting. Consequently, it is necessary to investigate so-called off-target effects and their impact on cell survival and differentiation. Flow cytometry was used for cell cycle, apoptosis, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation analysis. Gene expression analysis was performed using real-time PCR. DNA methylation was detected by methylation-specific PCR. Mitochondrial membrane potential was analyzed using JC-1 dye staining. Western blotting was used for quantitative protein expression analysis. 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine (DAC) induced cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis in leukemia cells. p53 expression was dispensable for DAC-induced apoptosis. DAC induced delayed ROS accumulation in leukemia cells but not in solid tumor cells and p53 expression was dispensable for ROS increase. ROS increase was deoxycytidine kinase dependent, indicating that incorporation of DAC into nuclear DNA is required for ROS generation. ROS accumulation by DAC was caspase-independent and mediated the dissipation of the mitochondrial membrane potential. Concordantly, ROS scavengers diminished DAC-induced apoptosis. DAC induced the expression of different NADPH oxidase isoforms and upregulated Nox4 protein expression in an ATM-dependent manner, indicating the involvement of DNA damage signaling in Nox4 upregulation. These data highlight the importance of mechanisms other than DNA cytosine demethylation in modulating gene expression and suggest investigating the relevance of ROS accumulation to the clinical activity of DAC. ©2014 AACR

  9. Generation of reactive oxygen species by a novel berberine–bile acid analog mediates apoptosis in hepatocarcinoma SMMC-7721 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Qingyong, E-mail: li_qingyong@126.com [Key Laboratory of Forest Plant Ecology (Northeast Forestry University), Ministry of Education (China); Zhang, Li; Zu, Yuangang; Liu, Tianyu; Zhang, Baoyou; He, Wuna [Key Laboratory of Forest Plant Ecology (Northeast Forestry University), Ministry of Education (China)

    2013-04-19

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Anticancer effects of B4, a novel berberine–bile acid analog, were tested. • B4 inhibited cell proliferation in hepatocellular carcinoma cells. • It also stimulated mitochondrial ROS production and membrane depolarization. • Effects of B4 were inhibited by a non-specific ROS scavenger. • Regulation of ROS generation may be a strategy for treating hepatic carcinoma. - Abstract: 2,3-Methenedioxy-9-O-(3′α,7′α-dihydroxy-5′β-cholan-24′-propy-lester) berberine (B4) is a novel berberine–bile acid analog synthesized in our laboratory. Previously, we showed that B4 exerted greater cytotoxicity than berberine in several human cancer cell lines. Therefore, we further evaluated the mechanism governing its anticancer actions in hepatocellular carcinoma SMMC-7721 cells. B4 inhibited the proliferation of SMMC-7721 cells, and stimulated reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and mitochondrial membrane depolarization; anti-oxidant capacity was reduced. B4 also induced the release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria to the cytosol and an increase in poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) cleavage products, reflective of caspase-3 activation. Moreover, B4 induced the nuclear translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) and a rise in DNA fragmentation. Pretreatment with the anti-oxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) inhibited B4-mediated effects, including cytotoxicity, ROS production, mitochondrial membrane depolarization increase in intracellular Ca{sup 2+}, cytochrome c release, PARP cleavage, and AIF translocation. Our data suggest that B4 induces ROS-triggered caspase-dependent and caspase-independent apoptosis pathways in SMMC-7721 cells and that ROS production may be a specific potential strategy for treating hepatic carcinoma.

  10. Nucleolar re-activation is delayed in mouse embryos cloned from two different cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svarcova, Olga; Dinnyes, A.; Polgar, Z.

    2009-01-01

    displayed early NPBs transformation. In conclusion, despite normal onset of EGA in cloned embryos, activation of functional nucleoli was one cell cycle delayed in NT embryos. NT-MEF embryos displayed normal targeting but delayed activation of nucleolar proteins. Contrary, in NT-HM1 embryos, both......Aim of this study was to evaluate and compare embryonic genome activation (EGA) in mouse embryos of different origin using nucleolus as a marker. Early and late 2-cell and late 4-cell stage embryos, prepared by in vitro fertilization (IVF), parthenogenetic activation (PG), and nuclear transfer...... ofmouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) and mouse HM1 emryonic stem cells (HM1), were processed for autoradiography following 3H-uridine incubation (transcriptional activity), transmission electron microscopy (ultrastructure) and immunofluorescence (nucleolar proteins; upstream binding factor, UBF...

  11. Reactive Oxygen is a Major Factor Regulating Cell Division and Angiogenesis in Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Arnold, Rebecca

    2001-01-01

    .... These include lines developed from both primary and metastatic tumors. In addition, we surveyed three control cells lines, MCFlOA, MCFl2A, and 184A1 derived from either fibrocystic disease or breast reduction...

  12. Detection of circulating tumor lysate-reactive CD4+ T cells in melanoma patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladekarl, Morten; Agger, Ralf; Fleischer, Charlotte C

    2004-01-01

    PURPOSE: We wanted to study whether an allogeneic melanoma lysate would be a feasible stimulatory antigen source for detection of a peripheral CD4+ T-cell immune response in patients with medically untreated malignant melanoma. The lysate was produced from a melanoma cell line (FM3.29) which...... was found in 1 of 4 patients radically operated for localized disease, whereas no responders were seen among 7 healthy donors. The fraction of circulating lysate-activated T cells ranged from 0.0037% to 0.080% of the CD4+ population. A negative result of the assay was found occasionally, especially...... expresses high amounts of melanoma antigens. METHODS: Fresh peripheral blood was incubated with and without lysate for 6 h in the presence of anti-CD28/anti-CD49d MoAb (for costimulation). After flow cytometric estimation of the frequency of CD69+/IFN-gamma+ cells in the CD4+ population, the response...

  13. Nickel nanowires induced and reactive oxygen species mediated apoptosis in human pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kleve MG

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Md. Zakir Hossain1, Maurice G Kleve21Applied Biosciences (Bionanotechnology Research, Department of Applied Science, 2Molecular Biotechnology and Microscopy Laboratory, Department of Biology, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, Little Rock, Arkansas, USABackground: The ability to evade apoptosis is one of the key properties of cancer. The apoptogenic effect of nickel nanowires (Ni NWs on cancer cell lines has never been adequately addressed. Due to the unique physicochemical characteristics of Ni NWs, we envision the development of a novel anticancer therapeutics specifically for pancreatic cancer. Thus, we investigated whether Ni NWs induce ROS-mediated apoptosis in human pancreatic adenocarcinoma (Panc-1 cells. Methods: In this study Ni NWs were fabricated using the electrodeposition method. Synthesized Ni NWs were physically characterized by energy dispersive X-ray analysis, UV-Vis spectroscopy of NanoDrop 2000 (UV-Vis, magnetization study, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Assessment of morphological apoptotic characteristics by phase contrast microscopy (PCM, Ni-NWs-induced apoptosis staining with ethidium bromide (EB and acridine orange (AO followed by fluorescence microscopy (FM was performed. For molecular biological and biochemical characterization, Panc-1 cell culture and cytotoxic effect of Ni NWs were determined by using 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2, 5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT assay. Quantitative apoptosis was analyzed by flow cytometry staining with propidium iodide through cell cycle arrest and generation of ROS using 2', 7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate fluorescence intensity. In all experiments, Panc-1 cancer cells without any treatment were used as the negative controls.Results: The intracellular uptake of Ni NWs through endocytosis by Panc-1 cells was observed by PCM. EB and AO staining of FM and MTT assay qualitatively and quantitatively confirmed the extent of apoptosis. Flow

  14. Specific Depletion of Myelin-Reactive B Cells via BCR-Targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanov, A V; Belogurov, A A; Kothapalli, P; Shamborant, O G; Knorre, V D; Telegin, G B; Ovsepyan, A A; Ponomarenko, N A; Deyev, S M; Kaveri, S V; Gabibov, A G

    2015-01-01

    B cells play a crucial role in the development and pathogenesis of systemic and organ-specific autoimmune diseases. Autoreactive B cells not only produce antibodies, but also secrete pro-inflammatory cytokines and present specific autoantigens to T cells. The treatment of autoimmune diseases via the elimination of the majority of B cells using the monoclonal anti-CD19/20 antibody (Rituximab) causes systemic side effects and, thus, requires a major revision. Therapeutic intervention directed towards selective elimination of pathogenic autoreactive B cells has the potential to become a universal approach to the treatment of various autoimmune abnormalities. Here, we developed a recombinant immunotoxin based on the immunodominant peptide of the myelin basic protein (MBP), fused to the antibody Fc domain. We showed that the obtained immunotoxin provides selective in vivo elimination of autoreactive B cells in mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. The proposed conception may be further used for the development of new therapeutics for a targeted treatment of multiple sclerosis and other autoimmune disorders.

  15. Numerical algorithms based on Galerkin methods for the modeling of reactive interfaces in photoelectrochemical (PEC) solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, Michael; Gamba, Irene M.; Ren, Kui

    2016-12-01

    This work concerns the numerical solution of a coupled system of self-consistent reaction-drift-diffusion-Poisson equations that describes the macroscopic dynamics of charge transport in photoelectrochemical (PEC) solar cells with reactive semiconductor and electrolyte interfaces. We present three numerical algorithms, mainly based on a mixed finite element and a local discontinuous Galerkin method for spatial discretization, with carefully chosen numerical fluxes, and implicit-explicit time stepping techniques, for solving the time-dependent nonlinear systems of partial differential equations. We perform computational simulations under various model parameters to demonstrate the performance of the proposed numerical algorithms as well as the impact of these parameters on the solution to the model.

  16. Increasing the endogenous NO level causes catalase inactivation and reactivation of intercellular apoptosis signaling specifically in tumor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Georg

    2015-01-01

    Tumor cells generate extracellular superoxide anions and are protected against intercellular apoptosis-inducing HOCl- and NO/peroxynitrite signaling through the expression of membrane-associated catalase. This enzyme decomposes H2O2 and thus prevents HOCl synthesis. It efficiently interferes with NO/peroxynitrite signaling through oxidation of NO and decomposition of peroxynitrite. The regulatory potential of catalase at the crosspoint of ROS and RNS chemical biology, as well as its high local concentration on the outside of the cell membrane of tumor cells, establish tight control of intercellular signaling and thus prevent tumor cell apoptosis. Therefore, inhibition of catalase or its inactivation by singlet oxygen reactivate intercellular apoptosis-inducing signaling. Nitric oxide and peroxynitrite are connected with catalase in multiple and meaningful ways, as (i) NO can be oxidated by compound I of catalase, (ii) NO can reversibly inhibit catalase, (iii) peroxynitrite can be decomposed by catalase and (iv) the interaction between peroxynitrite and H2O2 leads to the generation of singlet oxygen that inactivates catalase. Therefore, modulation of the concentration of free NO through addition of arginine, inhibition of arginase, induction of NOS expression or inhibition of NO dioxygenase triggers an autoamplificatory biochemical cascade that is based on initial formation of singlet oxygen, amplification of superoxide anion/H2O2 and NO generation through singlet oxygen dependent stimulation of the FAS receptor and caspase-8. Finally, singlet oxygen is generated at sufficiently high concentration to inactivate protective catalase and to reactivate intercellular apoptosis-inducing ROS signaling. This regulatory network allows to establish several pathways for synergistic interactions, like the combination of modulators of NO metabolism with enhancers of superoxide anion generation, modulators of NO metabolism that act at different targets and between modulators of

  17. Increasing the endogenous NO level causes catalase inactivation and reactivation of intercellular apoptosis signaling specifically in tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Georg

    2015-12-01

    Tumor cells generate extracellular superoxide anions and are protected against intercellular apoptosis-inducing HOCl- and NO/peroxynitrite signaling through the expression of membrane-associated catalase. This enzyme decomposes H2O2 and thus prevents HOCl synthesis. It efficiently interferes with NO/peroxynitrite signaling through oxidation of NO and decomposition of peroxynitrite. The regulatory potential of catalase at the crosspoint of ROS and RNS chemical biology, as well as its high local concentration on the outside of the cell membrane of tumor cells, establish tight control of intercellular signaling and thus prevent tumor cell apoptosis. Therefore, inhibition of catalase or its inactivation by singlet oxygen reactivate intercellular apoptosis-inducing signaling. Nitric oxide and peroxynitrite are connected with catalase in multiple and meaningful ways, as (i) NO can be oxidated by compound I of catalase, (ii) NO can reversibly inhibit catalase, (iii) peroxynitrite can be decomposed by catalase and (iv) the interaction between peroxynitrite and H2O2 leads to the generation of singlet oxygen that inactivates catalase. Therefore, modulation of the concentration of free NO through addition of arginine, inhibition of arginase, induction of NOS expression or inhibition of NO dioxygenase triggers an autoamplificatory biochemical cascade that is based on initial formation of singlet oxygen, amplification of superoxide anion/H2O2 and NO generation through singlet oxygen dependent stimulation of the FAS receptor and caspase-8. Finally, singlet oxygen is generated at sufficiently high concentration to inactivate protective catalase and to reactivate intercellular apoptosis-inducing ROS signaling. This regulatory network allows to establish several pathways for synergistic interactions, like the combination of modulators of NO metabolism with enhancers of superoxide anion generation, modulators of NO metabolism that act at different targets and between modulators of

  18. Ultrastable BSA-capped gold nanoclusters with a polymer-like shielding layer against reactive oxygen species in living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wenjuan; Cao, Yuqing; Sui, Dandan; Guan, Weijiang; Lu, Chao; Xie, Jianping

    2016-05-01

    The prevalence of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and the enzyme-containing intracellular environment could lead to the fluorescence quenching of bovine serum albumin (BSA)-capped gold nanoclusters (AuNCs). Here we report an efficient strategy to address this issue, where a polymer-like shielding layer is designed to wrap around the Au core to significantly improve the stability of AuNCs against ROS and protease degradation. The key of our design is to covalently incorporate a thiolated AuNC into the BSA-AuNC via carbodiimide-activated coupling, leading to the formation of a AuNC pair inside the cross-linked BSA molecule. The as-designed paired AuNCs in BSA (or BSA-p-AuNCs for short) show improved performances in living cells.The prevalence of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and the enzyme-containing intracellular environment could lead to the fluorescence quenching of bovine serum albumin (BSA)-capped gold nanoclusters (AuNCs). Here we report an efficient strategy to address this issue, where a polymer-like shielding layer is designed to wrap around the Au core to significantly improve the stability of AuNCs against ROS and protease degradation. The key of our design is to covalently incorporate a thiolated AuNC into the BSA-AuNC via carbodiimide-activated coupling, leading to the formation of a AuNC pair inside the cross-linked BSA molecule. The as-designed paired AuNCs in BSA (or BSA-p-AuNCs for short) show improved performances in living cells. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Detailed experimental materials, apparatus, experimental procedures and characterization data. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr02178f

  19. Host-cell reactivation of uv-irradiated and chemically treated Herpes simplex virus type 1 strain MP in normal and xeroderma pigmentosum skin fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selsky, C.A.

    1976-01-01

    The host-cell reactivation of UV-irradiated and N-acetoxy-2-acetylaminofluorene-treated herpes simplex virus type 1 strain mp was studied in normal human skin fibroblasts and xeroderma pigmentosum skin fibroblasts from XP genetic complementation groups A-D and in an XP variant. The increasing relative order for the host-cell reactivation of both types of damaged virus in the different complementation groups is A = D < B < C; XP variant = normal controls. XP complementation group D cells, which manifest the most severe inhibition of her ability for both UV-irradiated and N-acetoxy-2-acetylaminofluorene-treated virus, can reactivate nitrogen mustard treated HSV-1 mp to the same extent as normal cells. Together, these results indicate that (1) Excision repair of UV and N-acetoxy-2-acetylaminofluorene DNA damaged viruses share a common rate limiting enzymatic step and (2) The repair defect in xeroderma pigmentosum cells plays little or no role in the recovery of nitrogen mustard treated virus. The results of studies on the effect of caffeine on the survival of both UV- and N-acetoxy-2-acetylaminofluorene-treated virus in normal and XP cells imply that the reactivation of HSV-1 mp is mediated by an excision repair process with little if any recovery contributed by post-replication repair mechanisms. The host-cell reactivation of N-acetoxy-2-acetylaminofluorene-treated HSV-1 mp was also correlated with the defective UV-induced unscheduled DNA synthesis in two skin fibroblast strains established from a skin biopsy obtained from each of two juvenile females who had been clinically diagnosed as xeroderma pigmentosum. These findings are discussed in relation to the further characterization of the xeroderma pigmentosum phenotype and their possible utilization for the selection and isolation of new mammalian cell DNA repair mutants

  20. Autophagy is activated in compression-induced cell degeneration and is mediated by reactive oxygen species in nucleus pulposus cells exposed to compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, K-G; Shao, Z-W; Yang, S-H; Wang, J; Wang, B-C; Xiong, L-M; Wu, Q; Chen, S-F

    2013-12-01

    To determine whether autophagy contributes to the pathogenesis of degenerative disc disease (DDD) or retards the intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration, and investigate the possible relationship between compression-induced autophagy and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in nucleus pulposus (NP) cells in vitro. The autophagosome and autophagy-related markers were used to explore the role of autophagy in rat NP cells under compressive stress, which were measured directly by electronic microscopy, monodansylcadaverine (MDC) staining, immunofluorescence, western blot, and indirectly by analyzing the impact of pharmacological inhibitors of autophagy such as 3-methyladenine (3-MA) and chloroquine (CQ). And the relationship between autophagy and apoptosis was investigated by Annexin-V/propidium iodide (PI)-fluorescein staining. In addition, ROS were measured to determine whether these factors are responsible for the development of compression-induced autophagy. Our results indicated that rat NP cells activated autophagy in response to the same strong apoptotic stimuli that triggered apoptosis by compression. Autophagy and apoptosis were interconnected and coordinated in rat NP cells exposed to compression stimuli. Compression-induced autophagy was closely related to intracellular ROS production. Enhanced degradation of damaged components of NP cells by autophagy may be a crucial survival response against mechanical overload, and extensive autophagy may trigger autophagic cell death. Regulating autophagy and reducing the generation of intracellular ROS may retard IVD degeneration. Copyright © 2013 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Mobilization of Intracellular Copper by Gossypol and Apogossypolone Leads to Reactive Oxygen Species-Mediated Cell Death: Putative Anticancer Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haseeb Zubair

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available There is compelling evidence that serum, tissue and intracellular levels of copper are elevated in all types of cancer. Copper has been suggested as an important co-factor for angiogenesis. It is also a major metal ion present inside the nucleus, bound to DNA bases, particularly guanine. We have earlier proposed that the interaction of phenolic-antioxidants with intracellular copper leads to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS that ultimately serve as DNA cleaving agents. To further validate our hypothesis we show here that the antioxidant gossypol and its semi-synthetic derivative apogossypolone induce copper-mediated apoptosis in breast MDA-MB-231, prostate PC3 and pancreatic BxPC-3 cancer cells, through the generation of ROS. MCF10A breast epithelial cells refractory to the cytotoxic property of these compounds become sensitized to treatment against gossypol, as well as apogossypolone, when pre-incubated with copper. Our present results confirm our earlier findings and strengthen our hypothesis that plant-derived antioxidants mobilize intracellular copper instigating ROS-mediated cellular DNA breakage. As cancer cells exist under significant oxidative stress, this increase in ROS-stress to cytotoxic levels could be a successful anticancer approach.

  2. Blue light induced reactive oxygen species from flavin mononucleotide and flavin adenine dinucleotide on lethality of HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ming-Yeh; Chang, Chih-Jui; Chen, Liang-Yü

    2017-08-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a safe and non-invasive treatment for cancers and microbial infections. Various photosensitizers and light sources have been developed for clinical cancer therapies. Flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) are the cofactor of enzymes and are used as photosensitizers in this study. Targeting hypoxia and light-triggering reactive oxygen species (ROS) are experimental strategies for poisoning tumor cells in vitro. HeLa cells are committed to apoptosis when treated with FMN or FAD and exposed to visible blue light (the maximum emitted wavelength of blue light is 462nm). Under blue light irradiation at 3.744J/cm 2 (=0.52mW/cm 2 irradiated for 2h), the minimal lethal dose is 3.125μM and the median lethal doses (LD 50 ) for FMN and FAD are 6.5μM and 7.2μM, respectively. Individual exposure to visible blue light irradiation or riboflavin photosensitizers does not produce cytotoxicity and no side effects are observed in this study. The western blotting results also show that an intrinsic apoptosis pathway is activated by the ROS during photolysis of riboflavin analogues. Blue light triggers the cytotoxicity of riboflavins on HeLa cells in vitro. Based on these results, this is a feasible and efficient of PDT with an intrinsic photosensitizer for cancer research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Reactive oxygen species-driven HIF1α triggers accelerated glycolysis in endothelial cells exposed to low oxygen tension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paik, Jin-Young; Jung, Kyung-Ho; Lee, Jin-Hee; Park, Jin-Won; Lee, Kyung-Han

    2017-01-01

    Endothelial cells and their metabolic state regulate glucose transport into underlying tissues. Here, we show that low oxygen tension stimulates human umbilical vein endothelial cell 18 F–fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F–FDG) uptake and lactate production. This was accompanied by augmented hexokinase activity and membrane Glut-1, and increased accumulation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF1α). Restoration of oxygen reversed the metabolic effect, but this was blocked by HIF1α stabilization. Hypoxia-stimulated 18 F–FDG uptake was completely abrogated by silencing of HIF1α expression or by a specific inhibitor. There was a rapid and marked increase of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by hypoxia, and ROS scavenging or NADPH oxidase inhibition completely abolished hypoxia-stimulated HIF1α and 18 F–FDG accumulation, placing ROS production upstream of HIF1α signaling. Hypoxia-stimulated HIF1α and 18 F–FDG accumulation was blocked by the protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor, staurosporine. The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor, wortmannin, blocked hypoxia-stimulated 18 F–FDG uptake and attenuated hypoxia-responsive element binding of HIF1α without influencing its accumulation. Thus, ROS-driven HIF1α accumulation, along with PKC and PI3K signaling, play a key role in triggering accelerated glycolysis in endothelial cells under hypoxia, thereby contributing to 18 F–FDG transport.

  4. Reactive oxygen species-mediated DNA damage and apoptosis in human skin epidermal cells after exposure to nickel nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alarifi, Saud; Ali, Daoud; Alakhtani, Saad; Al Suhaibani, Entissar S; Al-Qahtani, Ahmed A

    2014-01-01

    Nickel nanoparticles (NiNPs) are increasingly used in various applications due to their unique properties. However, there is little information concerning the toxicity of NiNPs in the human skin cell (A431). The present study was designed to investigate the cytotoxicity, apoptosis, and DNA damage due to NiNPs in A431 cells. A cellular proliferative capacity test showed that NiNPs induce significant cytotoxicity in a dose- and time-dependent manner. NiNPs were also found to induce oxidative stress evidenced by the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and depletion of glutathione (GSH). Further, co-treatment with the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) mitigated the ROS generation due to NiNPs, suggesting the potential mechanism of oxidative stress. NiNPs also induced significant elevation of lipid peroxidation, catalase, and superoxide dismutase and caspase-3 activity in A431 cells. In addition, NAC suppressed NiNP-induced caspase-3 activity. DNA fragmentation analysis using the comet assay showed that the NiNPs cause genotoxicity in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Therefore, the study points out the capability of the NiNPs to induce oxidative stress resulting in apoptosis and genotoxicity. This study warrants more careful assessment of NiNPs before their industrial applications.

  5. Anethole induces apoptotic cell death accompanied by reactive oxygen species production and DNA fragmentation in Aspergillus fumigatus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Ken-Ichi; Tatsumi, Miki; Ogita, Akira; Kubo, Isao; Tanaka, Toshio

    2014-02-01

    trans-Anethole (anethole), a major component of anise oil, has a broad antimicrobial spectrum, and antimicrobial activity that is weaker than that of other antibiotics on the market. When combined with polygodial, nagilactone E, and n-dodecanol, anethole has been shown to possess significant synergistic antifungal activity against a budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and a human opportunistic pathogenic yeast, Candida albicans. However, the antifungal mechanism of anethole has not been completely determined. We found that anethole stimulated cell death of a human opportunistic pathogenic fungus, Aspergillus fumigatus, in addition to S. cerevisiae. The anethole-induced cell death was accompanied by reactive oxygen species production, metacaspase activation, and DNA fragmentation. Several mutants of S. cerevisiae, in which genes related to the apoptosis-initiating execution signals from mitochondria were deleted, were resistant to anethole. These results suggest that anethole-induced cell death could be explained by oxidative stress-dependent apoptosis via typical mitochondrial death cascades in fungi, including A. fumigatus and S. cerevisiae. © 2014 FEBS.

  6. Vorinostat induces reactive oxygen species and DNA damage in acute myeloid leukemia cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca A Petruccelli

    Full Text Available Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi are promising anti-cancer agents, however, their mechanisms of action remain unclear. In acute myeloid leukemia (AML cells, HDACi have been reported to arrest growth and induce apoptosis. In this study, we elucidate details of the DNA damage induced by the HDACi vorinostat in AML cells. At clinically relevant concentrations, vorinostat induces double-strand breaks and oxidative DNA damage in AML cell lines. Additionally, AML patient blasts treated with vorinostat display increased DNA damage, followed by an increase in caspase-3/7 activity and a reduction in cell viability. Vorinostat-induced DNA damage is followed by a G2-M arrest and eventually apoptosis. We found that pre-treatment with the antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine (NAC reduces vorinostat-induced DNA double strand breaks, G2-M arrest and apoptosis. These data implicate DNA damage as an important mechanism in vorinostat-induced growth arrest and apoptosis in both AML cell lines and patient-derived blasts. This supports the continued study and development of vorinostat in AMLs that may be sensitive to DNA-damaging agents and as a combination therapy with ionizing radiation and/or other DNA damaging agents.

  7. Vorinostat Induces Reactive Oxygen Species and DNA Damage in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettersson, Filippa; Retrouvey, Hélène; Skoulikas, Sophia; Miller, Wilson H.

    2011-01-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) are promising anti-cancer agents, however, their mechanisms of action remain unclear. In acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells, HDACi have been reported to arrest growth and induce apoptosis. In this study, we elucidate details of the DNA damage induced by the HDACi vorinostat in AML cells. At clinically relevant concentrations, vorinostat induces double-strand breaks and oxidative DNA damage in AML cell lines. Additionally, AML patient blasts treated with vorinostat display increased DNA damage, followed by an increase in caspase-3/7 activity and a reduction in cell viability. Vorinostat-induced DNA damage is followed by a G2-M arrest and eventually apoptosis. We found that pre-treatment with the antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) reduces vorinostat-induced DNA double strand breaks, G2-M arrest and apoptosis. These data implicate DNA damage as an important mechanism in vorinostat-induced growth arrest and apoptosis in both AML cell lines and patient-derived blasts. This supports the continued study and development of vorinostat in AMLs that may be sensitive to DNA-damaging agents and as a combination therapy with ionizing radiation and/or other DNA damaging agents. PMID:21695163

  8. Donor-Derived Regulatory Dendritic Cell Infusion Maintains Donor-Reactive CD4+CTLA4hi T Cells in Non-Human Primate Renal Allograft Recipients Treated with CD28 Co-Stimulation Blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezzelarab, Mohamed B; Lu, Lien; Shufesky, William F; Morelli, Adrian E; Thomson, Angus W

    2018-01-01

    Donor-derived regulatory dendritic cell (DCreg) infusion before transplantation, significantly prolongs renal allograft survival in non-human primates. This is associated with enhanced expression of the immunoregulatory molecules cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen (Ag) 4 (CTLA4) and programmed cell death protein 1 (PD1) by host donor-reactive T cells. In rodents and humans, CD28 co-stimulatory pathway blockade with the fusion protein CTLA4:Ig (CTLA4Ig) is associated with reduced differentiation and development of regulatory T cells (Treg). We hypothesized that upregulation of CTLA4 by donor-reactive CD4 + T cells in DCreg-infused recipients treated with CTLA4Ig, might be associated with higher incidences of donor-reactive CD4 + T cells with a Treg phenotype. In normal rhesus monkeys, allo-stimulated CD4 + CTLA4 hi , but not CD4 + CTLA4 med/lo T cells exhibited a regulatory phenotype, irrespective of PD1 expression. CTLA4Ig significantly reduced the incidence of CD4 + CTLA4 hi , but not CD4 + CTLA4 med/lo T cells following allo-stimulation, associated with a significant reduction in the CD4 + CTLA4 hi /CD4 + CTLA4 med/lo T cell ratio. In CTLA4Ig-treated renal allograft recipient monkeys, there was a marked reduction in circulating donor-reactive CD4 + CTLA4 hi T cells. In contrast, in CTLA4Ig-treated monkeys with DCreg infusion, no such reduction was observed. In parallel, the donor-reactive CD4 + CTLA4 hi /CD4 + CTLA4 med/lo T cell ratio was reduced significantly in graft recipients without DCreg infusion, but increased in those given DCreg. These observations suggest that pre-transplant DCreg infusion promotes and maintains donor-reactive CD4 + CTLA4 hi T cells with a regulatory phenotype after transplantation, even in the presence of CD28 co-stimulation blockade.

  9. Target-specific activation of mast cells by immunoglobulin E reactive with a renal cell carcinoma-associated antigen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luiten, R. M.; Fleuren, G. J.; Warnaar, S. O.; Litvinov, S. V.

    1996-01-01

    Immunoglobulin E (IgE) that specifically binds to antigens present on carcinoma cells may represent a useful tool to combat carcinomas. Induction of an inflammatory response at the tumor site by tumor-specific IgE may result in reduced tumor growth and tumor regression. Local mast cells may be

  10. Circulating and Tissue-Resident CD4+ T Cells With Reactivity to Intestinal Microbiota Are Abundant in Healthy Individuals and Function Is Altered During Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegazy, Ahmed N; West, Nathaniel R; Stubbington, Michael J T; Wendt, Emily; Suijker, Kim I M; Datsi, Angeliki; This, Sebastien; Danne, Camille; Campion, Suzanne; Duncan, Sylvia H; Owens, Benjamin M J; Uhlig, Holm H; McMichael, Andrew; Bergthaler, Andreas; Teichmann, Sarah A; Keshav, Satish; Powrie, Fiona

    2017-11-01

    Interactions between commensal microbes and the immune system are tightly regulated and maintain intestinal homeostasis, but little is known about these interactions in humans. We investigated responses of human CD4 + T cells to the intestinal microbiota. We measured the abundance of T cells in circulation and intestinal tissues that respond to intestinal microbes and determined their clonal diversity. We also assessed their functional phenotypes and effects on intestinal resident cell populations, and studied alterations in microbe-reactive T cells in patients with chronic intestinal inflammation. We collected samples of peripheral blood mononuclear cells and intestinal tissues from healthy individuals (controls, n = 13-30) and patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (n = 119; 59 with ulcerative colitis and 60 with Crohn's disease). We used 2 independent assays (CD154 detection and carboxy-fluorescein succinimidyl ester dilution assays) and 9 intestinal bacterial species (Escherichia coli, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Bifidobacterium animalis subsp lactis, Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, Bacteroides vulgatus, Roseburia intestinalis, Ruminococcus obeum, Salmonella typhimurium, and Clostridium difficile) to quantify, expand, and characterize microbe-reactive CD4 + T cells. We sequenced T-cell receptor Vβ genes in expanded microbe-reactive T-cell lines to determine their clonal diversity. We examined the effects of microbe-reactive CD4 + T cells on intestinal stromal and epithelial cell lines. Cytokines, chemokines, and gene expression patterns were measured by flow cytometry and quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Circulating and gut-resident CD4 + T cells from controls responded to bacteria at frequencies of 40-4000 per million for each bacterial species tested. Microbiota-reactive CD4 + T cells were mainly of a memory phenotype, present in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and intestinal tissue, and had a diverse T-cell receptor Vβ repertoire. These

  11. Reactivating the Ni-YSZ electrode in solid oxide cells and stacks by infiltration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skafte, Theis Løye; Hjelm, Johan; Blennow Tullmar, Peter

    2018-01-01

    for repairing various failure and degradation mechanisms occurring in the fuel electrode, thereby extending the potential lifetime of a SOC system. We successfully infiltrated the nickel and yttria-stabilized zirconia cermet electrode in commercial cells with Gd-doped ceria after operation. By this method we...

  12. PGC-1α and Reactive Oxygen Species Regulate Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocyte Function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Birket, Matthew J.; Casini, Simona; Kosmidis, Georgios; Elliott, David A.; Gerencser, Akos A.; Baartscheer, Antonius; Schumacher, Cees; Mastroberardino, Pier G.; Elefanty, Andrew G.; Stanley, Ed G.; Mummery, Christine L.

    2013-01-01

    Diminished mitochondrial function is causally related to some heart diseases. Here, we developed a human disease model based on cardiomyocytes from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), in which an important pathway of mitochondrial gene expression was inactivated. Repression of PGC-1α, which is

  13. Autoimmune gastritis and parietal cell reactivity in two children with abnormal intestinal permeability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greenwood, Deanne L. V.; Crock, Patricia; Braye, Stephen; Davidson, Patricia; Sentry, John W.

    Autoimmune gastritis is characterised by lymphocytic infiltration of the gastric submucosa, with loss of parietal and chief cells and achlorhydria. Often, gastritis is expressed clinically as cobalamin deficiency with megaloblastic anaemia, which is generally described as a disease of the elderly.

  14. Targeting natural killer cell reactivity by employing antibody to NKp46: implications for type 1 diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rami Yossef

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells belong to the innate lymphoid cells. Their cytotoxic activity is regulated by the delicate balance between activating and inhibitory signals. NKp46 is a member of the primary activating receptors of NK cells. We previously reported that the NKp46 receptor is involved in the development of type 1 diabetes (T1D. Subsequently, we hypothesized that blocking this receptor could prevent or hinder disease development. To address this goal, we developed monoclonal antibodies for murine NKp46. One mAb, named NCR1.15, recognizes the mouse homologue protein of NKp46, named Ncr1, and was able to down-regulate the surface expression of NKp46 on primary murine NK cells following antibody injection in vivo. Additionally, NCR1.15 treatments were able to down-regulate cytotoxic activity mediated by NKp46, but not by other NK receptors. To test our primary assumption, we examined T1D development in two models, non-obese diabetic mice and low-dose streptozotocin. Our results show a significantly lower incidence of diabetic mice in the NCR1.15-treated group compared to control groups. This study directly demonstrates the involvement of NKp46 in T1D development and suggests a novel treatment strategy for early insulitis.

  15. Survivin-specific T-cell reactivity correlates with tumor response and patient survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Becker, Jürgen C; Andersen, Mads H; Hofmeister-Müller, Valeska

    2012-01-01

    Therapeutic vaccination directed to induce an anti-tumoral T-cell response is a field of extensive investigation in the treatment of melanoma. However, many vaccination trials in melanoma failed to demonstrate a correlation between the vaccine-specific immune response and therapy outcome. This has...

  16. Reduced reactivation from dormancy but maintained lineage choice of human mesenchymal stem cells with donor age.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verena Dexheimer

    Full Text Available UNLABELLED: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC are promising for cell-based regeneration therapies but up to date it is still controversial whether their function is maintained throughout ageing. Aim of this study was to address whether frequency, activation in vitro, replicative function, and in vitro lineage choice of MSC is maintained throughout ageing to answer the question whether MSC-based regeneration strategies should be restricted to younger individuals. MSC from bone marrow aspirates of 28 donors (5-80 years were characterized regarding colony-forming unit-fibroblast (CFU-F numbers, single cell cloning efficiency (SSCE, osteogenic, adipogenic and chondrogenic differentiation capacity in vitro. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP activity, mineralization, Oil Red O content, proteoglycan- and collagen type II deposition were quantified. While CFU-F frequency was maintained, SSCE and early proliferation rate decreased significantly with advanced donor age. MSC with higher proliferation rate before start of induction showed stronger osteogenic, adipogenic and chondrogenic differentiation. MSC with high osteogenic capacity underwent better chondrogenesis and showed a trend to better adipogenesis. Lineage choice was, however, unaltered with age. CONCLUSION: Ageing influenced activation from dormancy and replicative function of MSC in a way that it may be more demanding to mobilize MSC to fast cell growth at advanced age. Since fast proliferation came along with high multilineage capacity, the proliferation status of expanded MSC rather than donor age may provide an argument to restrict MSC-based therapies to certain individuals.

  17. Tolerization of an established αb-crystallin-reactive T-cell response by intravenous antigen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeek, R.; Mark, K. van der; Wawrousek, E.F.; Plomp, A.C.; Noort, J.M. van

    2007-01-01

    Tolerance induction to prevent activation of a naïve T-cell repertoire has been well documented in rodents and can be readily achieved by intravenous, oral or intranasal administration of antigen in the absence of adjuvants. In autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS) the presence of an

  18. Phenol-formaldehyde reactivity with lignin in the wood cell wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel J. Yelle; John Ralph

    2016-01-01

    Latewood from Pinus taeda was reacted with alkaline phenol–formaldehyde (PF) adhesive and characterised using two-dimensional 1H–13C solution-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy so that chemical modification of the wood cell wall polymers, after PF resol curing, could be elucidated. The...

  19. Extensive CD4 and CD8 T Cell cross-reactivity between alphaherpesviruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jing, Lichen; Laing, Kerry J.; Dong, Lichun

    2016-01-01

    The Alphaherpesvirinae subfamily includes HSV types 1 and 2 and the sequence-divergent pathogen varicella zoster virus (VZV). T cells, controlled by TCR and HLA molecules that tolerate limited epitope amino acid variation, might cross-react between these microbes. We show that memory PBMC expansi...... be useful for multi-alphaherpesvirus vaccine design and adoptive cellular therapy....

  20. Effects of reactive Mn(III)-oxalate complexes on structurally intact plant cell walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summering, J. A.; Keiluweit, M.; Goni, M. A.; Nico, P. S.; Kleber, M.

    2011-12-01

    Lignin components in the in plant litter are commonly assumed to have longer residence times in soil than many other compounds, which are supposedly, more easily degradable. The supposed resistance of lignin compounds to decomposition is generally attributed to the complex chain of biochemical steps required to create footholds in the non-porous structure of ligno-cellulose in cell walls. Interestingly, Mn(III) complexes have shown the ability to degrade ligno-cellulose. Mn(III) chelated by ligands such as oxalate are soluble oxidizers with a high affinity for lignin structures. Here we determined (i) the formation and decay kinetics of the Mn(III)-oxalate complexes in aqueous solution and (ii) the effects that these complexes have on intact ligno-cellulose. UV/vis spectroscopy and iodometric titrations confirmed the transient nature of Mn(III)-oxalate complexes with decay rates being in the order of hours. Zinnia elegans tracheary elements - a model ligno-cellulose substrate - were treated with Mn(III)-oxalate complexes in a newly developed flow-through reactor. Soluble decomposition products released during the treatment were analyzed by GC/MS and the degree of cell integrity was measured by cell counts, pre- and post-treatment counts indicate a decrease in intact Zinnia elegans as a result of Mn(III)-treatment. GC/MS results showed the release of a multitude of solubilized lignin breakdown products from plant cell walls. We conclude that Mn(III)-oxalate complexes have the ability to lyse intact plant cells and solubilize lignin. Lignin decomposition may thus be seen as resource dependent, with Mn(III) a powerful resource that should be abundant in terrestrial characterized by frequent redox fluctuations.

  1. A modified fluorimetric host cell reactivation assay to determine the repair capacity of primary keratinocytes, melanocytes and fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gebhard Daniel

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Host Cell Reactivation Assay (HCRA is widely used to identify circumstances and substances affecting the repair capacity of cells, however, it is restricted by the transfection procedure used and the sensitivity of the detection method. Primary skin cells are particularly difficult to transfect, and therefore sensitive methods are needed to detect any variations due to the cell-type or inter-individual differences or changes induced by diverse substances. A sensitive and repeatable method to detect the repair capacity of skin cells would be useful in two different aspects: On the one hand, to identify substances influencing the repair capacity in a positive manner (these substances could be promising ingredients for cosmetic products and on the other hand, to exclude the negative effects of substances on the repair capacity (this could serve as one step further towards replacing or at least reducing animal testing. Results In this paper, we present a rapid and sensitive assay to determine the repair capacity of primary keratinocytes, melanocytes and fibroblasts based on two wave-length Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP and DsRed reporter technology in order to test different substances and their potential to influence the DNA repair capacity. For the detection of plasmid restoration, we used FACS technology, which, in comparison to luminometer technology, is highly sensitive and allows single cell based analysis. The usefulness of this assay and studying the repair capacity is demonstrated by the evidence that DNA repair is repressed by Cyclosporin A in fibroblasts. Conclusions The methodology described in this paper determines the DNA repair capacity in different types of human skin cells. The described transfection protocol is suitable for the transfection of melanocytes, keratinocytes and fibroblasts, reaching efficacies suitable for the detection of the restored plasmids by FACS technology. Therefore the repair capacity

  2. 5-lipoxygenase mediates docosahexaenoyl ethanolamide and N-arachidonoyl-L-alanine-induced reactive oxygen species production and inhibition of proliferation of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seok-Woo; Hah, J Hun; Oh, Sang-Mi; Jeong, Woo-Jin; Sung, Myung-Whun

    2016-07-13

    Endocannabinoids have recently drawn attention as promising anti-cancer agents. We previously observed that anandamide (AEA), one of the representative endocannabinoids, effectively inhibited the proliferation of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cell lines in a receptor-independent manner. In this study, using HNSCC cell lines, we examined the anti-cancer effects and the mechanisms of action of docosahexaenoyl ethanolamide (DHEA) and N-arachidonoyl-L-alanine (NALA), which are polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA)-based ethanolamides like AEA. DHEA and NALA were found to effectively inhibit HNSCC cell proliferation. These anti-proliferative effects seemed to be mediated in a cannabinoid receptor-independent manner, since the antagonist of cannabinoid receptor-1 (CB1) and vanilloid receptor-1 (VR1), two endocannabinoid receptors, did not reverse the ability of DHEA and NALA to induce cell death. Instead, we observed an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and a decrease of phosphorylated Akt as a result of DHEA and NALA treatment. Antioxidants efficiently reversed the inhibition of cell proliferation and the decrease of phosphorylated Akt induced by DHEA and NALA; inhibition of 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO), which is expected to be involved in DHEA- and NALA-degradation pathway, also partially blocked the ability of DHEA and NALA to inhibit cell proliferation and phosphorylated Akt. Interestingly, ROS production as a result of DHEA and NALA treatment was decreased by inhibition of 5-LO. From these findings, we suggest that ROS production induced by the 5-LO pathway mediates the anti-cancer effects of DHEA and NALA on HNSCC cells. Finally, our findings suggest the possibility of a new cancer-specific therapeutic strategy, which utilizes 5-LO activity rather than inhibiting it.

  3. Comparative reactivity of human IgE to cynomolgus monkey and human effector cells and effects on IgE effector cell potency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saul, Louise; Saul, Louise; Josephs, Debra H; Josephs, Debra H; Cutler, Keith; Cutler, Keith; Bradwell, Andrew; Bradwell, Andrew; Karagiannis, Panagiotis; Karagiannis, Panagiotis; Selkirk, Chris; Selkirk, Chris; Gould, Hannah J; Gould, Hannah J; Jones, Paul; Jones, Paul; Spicer, James F; Spicer, James F; Karagiannis, Sophia N; Karagiannis, Sophia N

    2014-01-01

    Background: Due to genetic similarities with humans, primates of the macaque genus such as the cynomolgus monkey are often chosen as models for toxicology studies of antibody therapies. IgE therapeutics in development depend upon engagement with the FcεRI and FcεRII receptors on immune effector cells for their function. Only limited knowledge of the primate IgE immune system is available to inform the choice of models for mechanistic and safety evaluations.   Methods: The recognition of human IgE by peripheral blood lymphocytes from cynomolgus monkey and man was compared. We used effector cells from each species in ex vivo affinity, dose-response, antibody-receptor dissociation and potency assays. Results: We report cross-reactivity of human IgE Fc with cynomolgus monkey cells, and comparable binding kinetics to peripheral blood lymphocytes from both species. In competition and dissociation assays, however, human IgE dissociated faster from cynomolgus monkey compared with human effector cells. Differences in association and dissociation kinetics were reflected in effector cell potency assays of IgE-mediated target cell killing, with higher concentrations of human IgE needed to elicit effector response in the cynomolgus monkey system. Additionally, human IgE binding on immune effector cells yielded significantly different cytokine release profiles in each species. Conclusion: These data suggest that human IgE binds with different characteristics to human and cynomolgus monkey IgE effector cells. This is likely to affect the potency of IgE effector functions in these two species, and so has relevance for the selection of biologically-relevant model systems when designing pre-clinical toxicology and functional studies. PMID:24492303

  4. Induction of reactive oxygen intermediates-dependent programmed cell death in human malignant ex vivo glioma cells and inhibition of the vascular endothelial growth factor production by taurolidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodak, Roksana; Kubota, Hisashi; Ishihara, Hideyuki; Eugster, Hans-Pietro; Könü, Dilek; Möhler, Hanns; Yonekawa, Yasuhiro; Frei, Karl

    2005-06-01

    Taurolidine, a derivative of the amino acid taurin, was recently found to display a potent antineoplastic effect both in vitro and in vivo. The authors therefore initiated studies to assess the potential antineoplastic activity of taurolidine in human glioma cell lines and in ex vivo malignant cell cultures. They also studied the mechanisms that induce cell death and the impact of taurolidine on tumor-derived vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) production. Cytotoxicity and clonogenic assays were performed using crystal violet staining. In the cytotoxicity assay 100% of glioma cell lines (eight of eight) and 74% of ex vivo glioma cultures (14 of 19) demonstrated sensitivity to taurolidine, with a mean median effective concentration (EC50) of 51 +/- 28 microg/ml and 56 +/- 23 microg/ml, respectively. Colony formation was inhibited by taurolidine, with a mean EC50 of 7 +/- 3 microg/ml for the cell lines and a mean EC50 of 3.5 +/- 1.7 microg/ml for the ex vivo glioma cultures. On observing this high activity of taurolidine in both assays, the authors decided to evaluate its cell death mechanisms. Fragmentation of DNA, externalization of phosphatidylserine, activation of poly(adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase, loss of the mitochondrial membrane potential followed by a release of apoptosis-inducing factor, and typical apoptotic features were found after taurolidine treatment. Cell death was preceded by the generation of reactive O2 intermediates, which was abrogated by N-acetylcysteine but not by benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp-fluoromethylketone. Moreover, taurolidine also induced suppression of VEGF production on the protein and messenger RNA level, as shown by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Given all these findings, taurolidine may be a promising new agent in the treatment of malignant gliomas; it displays a combination of antineoplastic and antiangiogenic activities, inducing tumor cell

  5. 5-lipoxygenase mediates docosahexaenoyl ethanolamide and N-arachidonoyl-L-alanine-induced reactive oxygen species production and inhibition of proliferation of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Seok-Woo; Hah, J. Hun; Oh, Sang-Mi; Jeong, Woo-Jin; Sung, Myung-Whun

    2016-01-01

    Endocannabinoids have recently drawn attention as promising anti-cancer agents. We previously observed that anandamide (AEA), one of the representative endocannabinoids, effectively inhibited the proliferation of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cell lines in a receptor-independent manner. In this study, using HNSCC cell lines, we examined the anti-cancer effects and the mechanisms of action of docosahexaenoyl ethanolamide (DHEA) and N-arachidonoyl-L-alanine (NALA), which are polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA)-based ethanolamides like AEA. DHEA and NALA were found to effectively inhibit HNSCC cell proliferation. These anti-proliferative effects seemed to be mediated in a cannabinoid receptor-independent manner, since the antagonist of cannabinoid receptor-1 (CB1) and vanilloid receptor-1 (VR1), two endocannabinoid receptors, did not reverse the ability of DHEA and NALA to induce cell death. Instead, we observed an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and a decrease of phosphorylated Akt as a result of DHEA and NALA treatment. Antioxidants efficiently reversed the inhibition of cell proliferation and the decrease of phosphorylated Akt induced by DHEA and NALA; inhibition of 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO), which is expected to be involved in DHEA- and NALA-degradation pathway, also partially blocked the ability of DHEA and NALA to inhibit cell proliferation and phosphorylated Akt. Interestingly, ROS production as a result of DHEA and NALA treatment was decreased by inhibition of 5-LO. From these findings, we suggest that ROS production induced by the 5-LO pathway mediates the anti-cancer effects of DHEA and NALA on HNSCC cells. Finally, our findings suggest the possibility of a new cancer-specific therapeutic strategy, which utilizes 5-LO activity rather than inhibiting it. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12885-016-2499-3) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  6. Adaptive immunity to leukemia is inhibited by cross-reactive induced regulatory T cells

    OpenAIRE

    Manlove, Luke S.; Berquam-Vrieze, Katherine E.; Pauken, Kristen E.; Williams, Richard T.; Jenkins, Marc K.; Farrar, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    BCR-ABL+ acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients have transient responses to current therapies. However, the fusion of BCR to ABL generates a potential leukemia-specific antigen that could be a target for immunotherapy. We demonstrate that the immune system can limit BCR-ABL+ leukemia progression although ultimately this immune response fails. To address how BCR-ABL+ leukemia escapes immune surveillance, we developed a peptide: MHC-II tetramer that labels endogenous BCR-ABL-specific CD4+ T cell...

  7. Tuberculin purified protein derivative-reactive T cells in cord blood lymphocytes.

    OpenAIRE

    Shiratsuchi, H; Tsuyuguchi, I

    1981-01-01

    Lymphocytes obtained from cord blood of newborn babies who were born of healthy mothers were studied in vitro for their responsiveness to purified protein derivative (PPD) of tuberculin. Cord blood lymphocytes proliferated in vitro by stimulation with PPD, despite wide variations in the results. Studies with fractionated lymphocytes revealed that PPD-responding cells belonged to E-rosetting, nylon wool-nonadherent T lymphocytes. Non-E-rosetting B lymphocytes alone did not proliferate at all a...

  8. Sodium Lauryl Sulfate Stimulates the Generation of Reactive Oxygen Species through Interactions with Cell Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizutani, Taeko; Mori, Ryota; Hirayama, Misaki; Sagawa, Yuki; Shimizu, Kenji; Okano, Yuri; Masaki, Hitoshi

    2016-12-01

    Sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS), a representative anionic surfactant, is well-known to induce rough skin following single or multiple topical applications. The mechanism by which SLS induces rough skin is thought to result from the disruption of skin moisture function consisting of NMF and epidermal lipids. However, a recent study demonstrated that topically applied SLS easily penetrates into the living cell layers of the epidermis, which suggests that physiological alterations of keratinocytes might cause the SLS-induced rough skin. This study was conducted to clarify the effects of SLS on keratinocytes to demonstrate the contribution of SLS to the induction of rough skin. In addition, the potentials of other widely used anionic surfactants to induce rough skin were evaluated. HaCaT keratinocytes treated with SLS had increased levels of intracellular ROS and IL-1α secretion. Application of SLS on the surface of a reconstructed epidermal equivalent also showed the increased generation of ROS. Further, SLS-treated cells showed an increase of intracellular calpain activity associated with the increase of intracellular Ca 2+ concentration. The increase of intracellular ROS was abolished by the addition of BAPTA-AM, a specific chelator of Ca 2+ . In addition, IL-1α also stimulated ROS generation by HaCaT keratinocytes. An ESR spin-labeling study demonstrated that SLS increased the fluidity of membranes of liposomes and cells. Together, those results indicate that SLS initially interacts with cell membranes, which results in the elevation of intracellular Ca 2+ influx. Ca 2+ stimulates the secretion of IL-1α due to the activation of calpain, and also increases ROS generation. IL-1α also stimulates ROS generation by HaCaT keratinocytes. We conclude from these results that the elevation of intracellular ROS levels is one of the causes of SLS-induced rough skin. Finally, among the other anionic surfactants tested, sodium lauryl phosphate has less potential to induce rough

  9. Photoluminescent Gold Nanoclusters in Cancer Cells: Cellular Uptake, Toxicity, and Generation of Reactive Oxygen Species

    OpenAIRE

    Marija Matulionyte; Dominyka Dapkute; Laima Budenaite; Greta Jarockyte; Ricardas Rotomskis

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, photoluminescent gold nanoclusters have attracted considerable interest in both fundamental biomedical research and practical applications. Due to their ultrasmall size, unique molecule-like optical properties, and facile synthesis gold nanoclusters have been considered very promising photoluminescent agents for biosensing, bioimaging, and targeted therapy. Yet, interaction of such ultra-small nanoclusters with cells and other biological objects remains poorly understood. The...

  10. The triterpenoid corosolic acid blocks transformation and epigenetically reactivates Nrf2 in TRAMP-C1 prostate cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jie; Wu, Renyi; Li, Wenji; Gao, Linbo; Yang, Yuqing; Li, Ping; Kong, Ah-Ng

    2018-04-01

    Corosolic acid (CRA) is found in various plants and has been used as a health food supplement worldwide. Although it has been reported that CRA exhibits significant anticancer activity, the effect of this compound on prostate cancer remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the effect of CRA on cellular transformation and the reactivation of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) through epigenetic regulation in TRAMP-C1 prostate cells. Specifically, we found that CRA inhibited anchorage-independent growth of prostate cancer TRAMP-C1 cells but not Nrf2 knockout prostate cancer TRAMP-C1 cells. Moreover, CRA induced mRNA and protein expression of Nrf2, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and NAD(P)H Quinone Oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1). Bisulfite genomic sequencing and methylated DNA immunoprecipitation results revealed that CRA treatment decreased the level of methylation of the first five CpG sites of the Nrf2 promoter. Histone modification was analyzed using a chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay, which revealed that CRA treatment increased the acetylation of histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27ac) while decreasing the trimethylation of histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27me3) in the promoter region of Nrf2. Furthermore, CRA treatment attenuated the protein expression of DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs). These findings indicate that CRA has a significant anticancer effect in TRAMP-C1 cells, which could be partly attributed to epigenetics including its ability to epigenetically restore the expression of Nrf2. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Epigenetics Reactivation of Nrf2 in Prostate TRAMP C1 Cells by Curcumin Analogue FN1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenji; Pung, Doug; Su, Zheng-Yuan; Guo, Yue; Zhang, Chengyue; Yang, Anne Yuqing; Zheng, Xi; Du, Zhi-Yun; Zhang, Kun; Kong, Ah-Ng

    2016-04-18

    It has previously been shown that curcumin can effectively inhibit prostate cancer proliferation and progression in TRAMP mice, potentially acting through the hypomethylation of the Nrf2 gene promoter and hence activation of the Nrf2 pathway to enhance cell antioxidative defense. FN1 is a synthetic curcumin analogue that shows stronger anticancer activity than curcumin in other reports. We aimed to explore the epigenetic modification of FN1 that restores Nrf2 expression in TRAMP-C1 cells. Stably transfected HepG2-C8 cells were used to investigate the effect of FN1 on the Nrf2- antioxidant response element (ARE) pathway. Real-time quantitative PCR and Western blotting were applied to study the influence of FN1 on endogenous Nrf2 and its downstream genes. Bisulfite genomic sequencing (BGS) and methylated DNA immunoprecipitation (MeDIP) were then performed to examine the methylation profile of the Nrf2 promoter. An anchorage-independent colony-formation analysis was conducted to examine the tumor inhibition activity of FN1. Epigenetic modification enzymes, including DNMTs and HDACs, were investigated by Western blotting. The luciferase reporter assay indicated that FN1 was more potent than curcumin in activating the Nrf2-ARE pathway. FN1 increased the expression of Nrf2 and its downstream detoxifying enzymes. FN1 significantly inhibited the colony formation of TRAMP-C1 cells. BGS and MeDIP assays revealed that FN1 treatment (250 nM for 3 days) reduced the percentage of CpG methylation of the Nrf2 promoter. FN1 also downregulated epigenetic modification enzymes. In conclusion, our results suggest that FN1 is a novel anticancer agent for prostate cancer. In the TRAMP-C1 cell line, FN1 can increase the level of Nrf2 and downstream genes via activating the Nrf2-ARE pathway and inhibit the colony formation potentially through the decreased expression of keap1 coupled with CpG demethylation of the Nrf2 promoter. This CpG demethylation effect may come from decreased

  12. Oxoferryl-Porphyrin Radical Catalytic Intermediate in Cytochrome bd Oxidases Protects Cells from Formation of Reactive Oxygen Species*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulus, Angela; Rossius, Sebastiaan Gijsbertus Hendrik; Dijk, Madelon; de Vries, Simon

    2012-01-01

    The quinol-linked cytochrome bd oxidases are terminal oxidases in respiration. These oxidases harbor a low spin heme b558 that donates electrons to a binuclear heme b595/heme d center. The reaction with O2 and subsequent catalytic steps of the Escherichia coli cytochrome bd-I oxidase were investigated by means of ultra-fast freeze-quench trapping followed by EPR and UV-visible spectroscopy. After the initial binding of O2, the O–O bond is heterolytically cleaved to yield a kinetically competent heme d oxoferryl porphyrin π-cation radical intermediate (compound I) magnetically interacting with heme b595. Compound I accumulates to 0.75–0.85 per enzyme in agreement with its much higher rate of formation (∼20,000 s−1) compared with its rate of decay (∼1,900 s−1). Compound I is next converted to a short lived heme d oxoferryl intermediate (compound II) in a phase kinetically matched to the oxidation of heme b558 before completion of the reaction. The results indicate that cytochrome bd oxidases like the heme-copper oxidases break the O–O bond in a single four-electron transfer without a peroxide intermediate. However, in cytochrome bd oxidases, the fourth electron is donated by the porphyrin moiety rather than by a nearby amino acid. The production of reactive oxygen species by the cytochrome bd oxidase was below the detection level of 1 per 1000 turnovers. We propose that the two classes of terminal oxidases have mechanistically converged to enzymes in which the O–O bond is broken in a single four-electron transfer reaction to safeguard the cell from the formation of reactive oxygen species. PMID:22287551

  13. Quantitative sensory testing and pain-evoked cytokine reactivity: comparison of patients with sickle cell disease to healthy matched controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Claudia M; Carroll, C Patrick; Kiley, Kasey; Han, Dingfen; Haywood, Carlton; Lanzkron, Sophie; Swedberg, Lauren; Edwards, Robert R; Page, Gayle G; Haythornthwaite, Jennifer A

    2016-04-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is an inherited blood disorder associated with significant morbidity, which includes severe episodic pain, and, often, chronic pain. Compared to healthy individuals, patients with SCD report enhanced sensitivity to thermal detection and pain thresholds and have altered inflammatory profiles, yet no studies to date have examined biomarker reactivity after laboratory-induced pain. We sought to examine this relationship in patients with SCD compared to healthy control participants. We completed quantitative sensory testing in 83 patients with SCD and sequential blood sampling in 27 of them, whom we matched (sex, age, race, body mass index, and education) to 27 healthy controls. Surprisingly, few quantitative sensory testing differences emerged between groups. Heat pain tolerance, pressure pain threshold at the trapezius, thumb, and quadriceps, and thermal temporal summation at 45°C differed between groups in the expected direction, whereas conditioned pain modulation and pain ratings to hot water hand immersion were counterintuitive, possibly because of tailoring the water temperature to a perceptual level; patients with SCD received milder temperatures. In the matched subsample, group differences and group-by-time interactions were observed in biomarkers including tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-1ß, interleukin-4, and neuropeptide Y. These findings highlight the utility of laboratory pain testing methods for understanding individual differences in inflammatory cytokines. Our findings suggest amplified pain-evoked proinflammatory cytokine reactivity among patients with SCD relative to carefully matched controls. Future research is warranted to evaluate the impact of enhanced pain-related cytokine response and whether it is predictive of clinical characteristics and the frequency/severity of pain crises in patients with SCD.

  14. BMI-1 Mediates Estrogen-Deficiency-Induced Bone Loss by Inhibiting Reactive Oxygen Species Accumulation and T Cell Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinbo; Wang, Qian; Yang, Renlei; Zhang, Jiaqi; Li, Xing; Zhou, Xichao; Miao, Dengshun

    2017-05-01

    Previous studies have shown that estrogen regulates bone homeostasis through regulatory effects on oxidative stress. However, it is unclear how estrogen deficiency triggers reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation. Recent studies provide evidence that the B lymphoma Mo-MLV insertion region 1 (BMI-1) plays a critical role in protection against oxidative stress and that this gene is directly regulated by estrogen via estrogen receptor (ER) at the transcriptional level. In this study, ovariectomized mice were given drinking water with/without antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC, 1 mg/mL) supplementation, and compared with each other and with sham mice. Results showed that ovariectomy resulted in bone loss with increased osteoclast surface, increased ROS levels, T cell activation, and increased TNF and RANKL levels in serum and in CD4 T cells; NAC supplementation largely prevented these alterations. BMI-1 expression levels were dramatically downregulated in CD4 T cells from ovariectomized mice. We supplemented drinking water to BMI-1-deficient mice with/without NAC and compared them with each other and with wild-type (WT) mice. We found that BMI-1 deficiency mimicked alterations observed in ovariectomy whereas NAC supplementation reversed all alterations induced by BMI-1 deficiency. Because T cells are critical in mediating ovariectomy-induced bone loss, we further assessed whether BMI-1 overexpression in lymphocytes can protect against estrogen deficiency-induced osteoclastogenesis and bone loss by inhibiting oxidative stress, T cell activation, and RANKL production. When WT and Eμ-BMI-1 transgenic mice with BMI-1 specifically overexpressed in lymphocytes were ovariectomized and compared with each other and with WT sham mice, we found that BMI-1 overexpression in lymphocytes clearly reversed all alterations induced by ovariectomy. Results from this study indicate that estrogen deficiency downregulates BMI-1 and subsequently increases ROS, T cell activation, and

  15. Reactive oxygen species mediate soft corals-derived sinuleptolide-induced antiproliferation and DNA damage in oral cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang YT

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Yung-Ting Chang,1,2,* Chiung-Yao Huang,3,* Jen-Yang Tang,4,5 Chih-Chuang Liaw,1,3 Ruei-Nian Li,6 Jing-Ru Liu,6 Jyh-Horng Sheu,1,3,7,8 Hsueh-Wei Chang6,9–12 1Doctoral Degree Program in Marine Biotechnology, National Sun Yat-sen University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan; 2Doctoral Degree Program in Marine Biotechnology, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan; 3Department of Marine Biotechnology and Resources, National Sun Yat-sen University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan; 4Department of Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan; 5Department of Radiation Oncology, Kaohsiung Municipal Ta-Tung Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan; 6Department of Biomedical Science and Environmental Biology, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan; 7Department of Medical Research, China Medical University Hospital, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan; 8Frontier Center for Ocean Science and Technology, National Sun Yat-sen University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan; 9Institute of Medical Science and Technology, National Sun Yat-sen University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan; 10Cancer Center, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital; Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan; 11Department of Medical Research, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan; 12Research Center for Natural Products and Drug Development, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: We previously reported that the soft coral-derived bioactive substance, sinuleptolide, can inhibit the proliferation of oral cancer cells in association with oxidative stress. The functional role of oxidative stress in the cell-killing effect of sinuleptolide on oral cancer cells was not investigated as yet. To address this question, we introduced the reactive oxygen species (ROS scavenger (N-acetylcysteine [NAC] in a pretreatment to evaluate the sinuleptolide-induced changes to cell viability, morphology, intracellular

  16. In situ fluorescence spectroscopy correlates ionomer degradation to reactive oxygen species generation in an operating fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakaran, Venkateshkumar; Arges, Christopher G; Ramani, Vijay

    2013-11-21

    The rate of generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) within the polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) of an operating proton exchange member fuel cell (PEMFC) was monitored using in situ fluorescence spectroscopy. A modified barrier layer was introduced between the PEM and the electrocatalyst layer to eliminate metal-dye interactions and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) effects during measurements. Standard fuel cell operating parameters (temperature, relative humidity, and electrode potential) were systematically varied to evaluate their influence on the rate of ROS generation during PEMFC operation. Independently, the macroscopic rate of PEM degradation was measured by monitoring the fluoride ion emission rate (FER) in the effluent stream at each operating condition. The ROS generation reaction rate constant (estimated from the in situ fluorescence experiments) correlated perfectly with the measured FER across all conditions, demonstrating unequivocally for the first time that a direct correlation exists between in situ ROS generation and PEM macroscopic degradation. The activation energy for ROS generation within the PEM was estimated to be 12.5 kJ mol(-1).

  17. Downregulation of catalase by reactive oxygen species via PI 3 kinase/Akt signaling in mesangial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesan, Balachandar; Mahimainathan, Lenin; Das, Falguni; Ghosh-Choudhury, Nandini; Ghosh Choudhury, Goutam

    2007-05-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) contribute to many glomerular diseases by targeting mesangial cells. ROS have been shown to regulate expression of many antioxidant enzymes including catalase. The mechanism by which the expression of catalase protein is regulated by ROS is not precisely known. Here we report that increased intracellular ROS level by hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) reduced the expression of catalase. H(2)O(2) increased phosphorylation of Akt kinase in a dose-dependent and sustained manner with a concomitant increase in the phosphorylation of FoxO1 transcription factor. Further analysis revealed that H(2)O(2) promoted rapid activation of phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3 kinase. The PI 3 kinase inhibitor Ly294002 and expression of tumor suppressor protein PTEN inhibited Akt kinase activity, resulting in the attenuation of FoxO1 phosphorylation and preventing the downregulating effect of H(2)O(2) on catalase protein level. Dominant negative Akt attenuated the inhibitory effect of H(2)O(2) on expression of catalase. Constitutively active FoxO1 increased the expression of catalase. However, dominant negative FoxO1 inhibited catalase protein level. Catalase transcription was reduced by H(2)O(2) treatment. Furthermore, expression of dominant negative Akt and constitutively active FoxO1 increased catalase transcription, respectively. These results demonstrate that ROS downregulate the expression of catalase in mesangial cells by PI 3 kinase/Akt signaling via FoxO1 as a target. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Thermally reactive Thiazolo[5,4-d]thiazole based copolymers for high photochemical stability in polymer solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helgesen, Martin; Vesterager Madsen, Morten; Andreasen, Birgitta

    2011-01-01

    New thermally reactive copolymers based on dithienylthiazolo[5,4-d]thiazole (DTZ) and silolodithiophene (SDT) have been synthesized and explored in bulk heterojunction solar cells as mixtures with [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM). In thin films the polymers had optical band gaps...... in the range of 1.64-1.80 eV. For solubility the polymers have incorporated alkyl groups on the SDT unit and thermally removable ester groups on the DTZ unit that can be eliminated around 200 °C for improved photochemical stability in thin films. The bulkiness of the alkyl chains on the SDT unit proved...... to be very significant in terms of photovoltaic performance of the polymer:PCBM solar cells. Polymers based on 4,4-dihexyl-4H-silolo[3,2-b:4,5-b′]dithiophene reached power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) up to 1.45% but changing the alkyl groups to more bulky ethylhexyl chains reduced the PCE to 1.17%. More...

  19. Proteomic Profiling of a Primary CD4+ T Cell Model of HIV-1 Latency Identifies Proteins Whose Differential Expression Correlates with Reactivation of Latent HIV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Jamaluddin Md; Liu, Hongbing; Hu, Pei-Wen; Nikolai, Bryan C; Wu, Hulin; Miao, Hongyu; Rice, Andrew P

    2018-01-01

    The latent HIV-1 reservoir of memory CD4 + T cells that persists during combination antiviral therapy prevents a cure of infection. Insight into mechanisms of latency and viral reactivation are essential for the rational design of strategies to reduce the latent reservoir. In this study, we quantified the levels of >2,600 proteins in the CCL19 primary CD4 + T cell model of HIV-1 latency. We profiled proteins under conditions that promote latent infection and after cells were treated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) + ionomycin, which is known to efficiently induce reactivation of latent HIV-1. In an analysis of cells from two healthy blood donors, we identified 61 proteins that were upregulated ≥2-fold, and 36 proteins that were downregulated ≥2-fold under conditions in which latent viruses were reactivated. These differentially expressed proteins are, therefore, candidates for cellular factors that regulate latency or viral reactivation. Two unexpected findings were obtained from the proteomic data: (1) the interactions among the majority of upregulated proteins are largely undetermined in published protein-protein interaction networks and (2) downregulated proteins are strongly associated with Gene Ontology terms related to mitochondrial protein synthesis. This proteomic data set provides a useful resource for future mechanistic studies of HIV-1 latency.

  20. Induction of Multifunctional Broadly Reactive T Cell Responses by a Plasmodium vivax Circumsporozoite Protein Recombinant Chimera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera-Mora, Monica; Fonseca, Jairo Andres; Singh, Balwan; Oliveira-Ferreira, Joseli; Lima-Junior, Josué da Costa; Calvo-Calle, J Mauricio; Moreno, Alberto

    2015-09-01

    Plasmodium vivax is the most widespread species of Plasmodium, causing up to 50% of the malaria cases occurring outside sub-Saharan Africa. An effective vaccine is essential for successful control and potential eradication. A well-characterized vaccine candidate is the circumsporozoite protein (CSP). Preclinical and clinical trials have shown that both antibodies and cellular immune responses have been correlated with protection induced by immunization with CSP. On the basis of our reported approach of developing chimeric Plasmodium yoelii proteins to enhance protective efficacy, we designed PvRMC-CSP, a recombinant chimeric protein based on the P. vivax CSP (PvCSP). In this engineered protein, regions of the PvCSP predicted to contain human T cell epitopes were genetically fused to an immunodominant B cell epitope derived from the N-terminal region I and to repeat sequences representing the two types of PvCSP repeats. The chimeric protein was expressed in soluble form with high yield. As the immune response to PvCSP has been reported to be genetically restricted in the murine model, we tested the immunogenicity of PvRMC-CSP in groups of six inbred strains of mice. PvRMC-CSP was able to induce robust antibody responses in all the mouse strains tested. Synthetic peptides representing the allelic forms of the P. vivax CSP were also recognized to a similar extent regardless of the mouse strain. Furthermore, the immunization regimen induced high frequencies of multifunctional CD4(+) and CD8(+) PvRMC-CSP-specific T cells. The depth and breadth of the immune responses elicited suggest that immunization with PvRMC-CSP can circumvent the genetic restriction of the immune response to P. vivax CSP. Interestingly, PvRMC-CSP was also recognized by naturally acquired antibodies from individuals living in areas where malaria is endemic. These features make PvRMC-CSP a promising vaccine candidate for further development. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All

  1. Generation of Reactive Astrocytes from NG2 Cells is Regulated by Sonic Hedgehog

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Honsa, Pavel; Valný, Martin; Kriška, Ján; Matušková, Hana; Harantová, Lenka; Kirdajová, Denisa; Valihrach, Lukáš; Kubista, Mikael; Anděrová, Miroslava

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 64, č. 9 (2016), s. 1518-1531 ISSN 0894-1491 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069; GA ČR(CZ) GA16-10214S; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109; GA MŠk(CZ) LQ1604; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0045 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 ; RVO:86652036 Keywords : ischemia * NG2 cells * glial scar Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology; EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics (BTO-N) Impact factor: 6.200, year: 2016

  2. Benzo(a)pyrene induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in human choriocarcinoma cancer cells through reactive oxygen species-induced endoplasmic reticulum-stress pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo-Min; Lee, Hae-Miru; Hwang, Kyung-A; Choi, Kyung-Chul

    2017-09-01

    Cigarette smoke (CS) contains over 60 well established carcinogens. In this study, we examined the effects of benzo(a)pyrene (B(a)P), a main CS component, on the viability and apoptosis of JEG-3 and BeWo human choriocarcinoma cancer cell lines. An MTT assay confirmed that B(a)P decreased the cell viability of JEG-3 and BeWo cells in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, Western blot (WB) assay revealed that protein expression of cyclin D and cyclin E decreased, while protein expression of p21 and p27 was increased in response to B(a)P treatment for 48 h. The changes in reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in JEG-3 and BeWo cells exposed to B(a)P were also measured by a dichlorofluorescein diacetate (DCF-DA) assay, which revealed that ROS levels increased in response to B(a)P treatment for 48 h. WB assay also confirmed that each B(a)P treatment of JEG-3 and BeWo cells for 4 h promoted the expression of phosphorylated eukaryotic initiation factor 2 alpha protein (p-eIF2α) and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP), which are known to be involved in ROS-mediated endoplasmic reticulum stress (ER-stress) related apoptosis. Overall, the protein expression of Bax (a pro-apoptosis marker) increased, while the expression of Bcl-xl (an anti-apoptotic marker) decreased and the number of apoptotic cells increased in response to B(a)P treatment for 48 h. Taken together, these results suggest that B(a)P has the potential to induce apoptosis of JEG-3 and BeWo human choriocarcinoma cancer cells by increasing the ROS level and simultaneously activating ER-stress. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Meclofenamic Acid Reduces Reactive Oxygen Species Accumulation and Apoptosis, Inhibits Excessive Autophagy, and Protects Hair Cell-Like HEI-OC1 Cells From Cisplatin-Induced Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Li

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Hearing loss is the most common sensory disorder in humans, and a significant number of cases is due to the ototoxicity of drugs such as cisplatin that cause hair cell (HC damage. Thus, there is great interest in finding agents and mechanisms that protect HCs from ototoxic drug damage. It has been proposed that epigenetic modifications are related to inner ear development and play a significant role in HC protection and HC regeneration; however, whether the m6A modification and the ethyl ester form of meclofenamic acid (MA2, which is a highly selective inhibitor of FTO (fatmass and obesity-associated enzyme, one of the primary human demethylases, can affect the process of HC apoptosis induced by ototoxic drugs remains largely unexplored. In this study, we took advantage of the HEI-OC1 cell line, which is a cochlear HC-like cell line, to investigate the role of epigenetic modifications in cisplatin-induced cell death. We found that cisplatin injury caused reactive oxygen species accumulation and increased apoptosis in HEI-OC1 cells, and the cisplatin injury was reduced by co-treatment with MA2 compared to the cisplatin-only group. Further investigation showed that MA2 attenuated cisplatin-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis in HEI-OC1 cells. We next found that the cisplatin-induced upregulation of autophagy was significantly inhibited after MA2 treatment, indicating that MA2 inhibited the cisplatin-induced excessive autophagy. Our findings show that MA2 has a protective effect and improves the viability of HEI-OC1 cells after cisplatin treatment, and they provide new insights into potential therapeutic targets for the amelioration of cisplatin-induced ototoxicity.

  4. Clarifying the Role of Reactive Oxygen Species and Reported Effects of Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation on Cells - Clarifying the Role of Reactive Oxygen Species in Producing the Reported Effects of Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation on Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willey, Neil J. [Centre for Research In Biosciences, University of the West of England, Coldharbour Lane, Frenchay, Bristol BS16 1QY (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-01

    Chronic low doses of ionizing radiation (IR) to cells, such as those that occur in contaminated environments, are widely reported to produce a variety of effects, from adverse effects to no effects to positive effects. In addition, bystander effects have been reported in some studies. For only relatively few of these effects have mechanistic explanations been reported but in many of those for which they have, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and/or the anti-oxidants that help to control their effects, have often been suggested to have a role. In general, it is assumed that either radiolysis of water or stress due to IR cause an increase in ROS and/or anti-oxidant activity, and hence the observed effects. The role of ROS in producing the effects reported at chronic low doses of radiation has infrequently been tested at either a theoretical or experimental level. Here we use a dynamic model of anti-oxidant capacity in cells to test the theoretical underpinnings of the ROS hypothesis together with genomic and proteomic experiments using Arabidopsis thaliana to test the molecular effects of IR in cells. The published model we have constructed for testing the interaction of IR and anti-oxidant systems (Smith et al, 2012) first calculates the amount of ROS produced by IR. Overall, at the dose rates that occur in contaminated environments the amount of ROS produced by IR is extremely small, certainly much smaller than is routinely produced in a cell during many metabolic processes. ROS from respiration leak out of mitochondria at significant rates and in plant cells ROS also leak out of photo-synthesizing chloroplasts. Although there is a variety of anti-oxidants in many cells, the nexus of their capacity is glutathione (GSH) which ultimately derives its reducing power from NADPH. We thus modeled the anti-oxidative capacity of a cell from the activity GSH and used predicted concentrations of ROS from IR to calculate the oxidative stress that they would cause via the

  5. Generation and reactivation of T-cell receptor A joining region pseudogenes in primates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiel, C.; Lanchbury, J.S. [Guy`s Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Otting, N. [Biomedical Primate Research Centre, Rijswijk (Netherlands)] [and others

    1996-06-01

    Tandemly duplicated T-cell receptor (Tcr) AJ (J{alpha}) segments contribute significantly to TCRA chain junctional region diversity in mammals. Since only limited data exists on TCRA diversity in nonhuman primates, we examined the TCRAJ regions of 37 chimpanzee and 71 rhesus macaque TCRA cDNA clones derived from inverse polymerase chain reaction on peripheral blood mononuclear cell cDNA of healthy animals. Twenty-five different TCRAJ regions were characterized in the chimpanzee and 36 in the rhesus macaque. Each bears a close structural relationship to an equivalent human TCRAJ region. Conserved amino acid motifs are shared between all three species. There are indications that differences between nonhuman primates and humans exist in the generation of TCRAJ pseudogenes. The nucleotide and amino acid sequences of the various characterized TCRAJ of each species are reported and we compare our results to the available information on human genomic sequences. Although we provide evidence of dynamic processes modifying TCRAJ segments during primate evolution, their repertoire and primary structure appears to be relatively conserved. 21 refs., 2 figs.

  6. Host-cell reactivation of UV-irradiated and chemically-treated herpes simplex virus-1 by xeroderma pigmentosum, xp heterozygotes and normal skin fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selsky, C.A.

    1978-01-01

    The host-cell reactivation of UV-irradiated and N-acetoxy-2-acetylamino-fluorene-treated herpes simplex virus type 1 strain MP was studied in normal and xeroderma pigmentosum human skin fibroblasts. Virus treated with either agent demonstrated lower survival in XP cells from complementation groups A, B, C and D than in normal fibroblasts. The relative reactivation ability of XP cells from the different genetic complementation groups was found to be the same for both irradiated and chemically treated virus. In addition, the inactivation kinetics for virus treated with either agent in the XP variant were comparable to that seen in normal skin fibroblasts. The addition of 2 or 4 mmoles caffeine to the post-infection assay medium had no effect on the inactivation kinetics of virus treated by either agent in the XP variant or in XP cells from the different genetic complementation groups. Treatment of the virus with nitrogen mustard resulted in equivalent survival in normal and XP genetic complementation group D cells. No apparent defect was observed in the ability of XP heterozygous skin fibroblasts to repair virus damaged with up to 100 μg N-acetoxy-2-acetylaminofluorene per ml. These findings indicate that the repair of UV-irradiated and N-acetoxy-2-acetylaminofluorene-treated virus is accomplished by the same pathway or different pathways sharing a common intermediate step and that the excision defect of XP cells plays little if any role in the reactivation of nitrogen mustard treated virus. (Auth.)

  7. Menadione induces the formation of reactive oxygen species and depletion of GSH-mediated apoptosis and inhibits the FAK-mediated cell invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yun Jeong; Shin, Yong Kyoo; Sohn, Dong Suep; Lee, Chung Soo

    2014-09-01

    Menadione induces apoptosis in tumor cells. However, the mechanism of apoptosis in ovarian cancer cells exposed to menadione is not clear. In addition, it is unclear whether menadione-induced apoptosis is mediated by the depletion of glutathione (GSH) contents that is associated with the formation of reactive oxygen species. Furthermore, the effect of menadione on the invasion and migration of human epithelial ovarian cancer cells has not been studied. Therefore, we investigated the effects of menadione exposure on apoptosis, cell adhesion, and cell migration using the human epithelial ovarian carcinoma cell lines OVCAR-3 and SK-OV-3. The results suggest that menadione may induce apoptotic cell death in ovarian carcinoma cell lines by activating the mitochondrial pathway and the caspase-8- and Bid-dependent pathways. The apoptotic effect of menadione appears to be mediated by the formation of reactive oxygen species and the depletion of GSH. Menadione inhibited fetal-bovine-serum-induced cell adhesion and migration of OVCAR-3 cells, possibly through the suppression the focal adhesion kinase (FAK)-dependent activation of cytoskeletal-associated components. Therefore, menadione might be beneficial in the treatment of epithelial ovarian adenocarcinoma and combination therapy.

  8. Graft-versus-host reaction and immune function. III. Functional pre-T cells in the bone marrow of graft-versus-host-reactive mice displaying T cell immunodeficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seddik, M.; Seemayer, T.A.; Lapp, W.S.

    1986-01-01

    Studies were performed to determine whether pre-T cells develop normally in the bone marrow of mice displaying thymic dysplasia and T cell immunodeficiency as a consequence of a graft-versus-host (GVH) reaction. GVH reactions were induced in CBAxAF1 mice by the injection of A strain lymphoid cells. To test for the presence of pre-T cells in GVH-reactive mice, bone marrow from GVH-reactive mice (GVHBM) was injected into irradiated syngeneic F1 mice and 30-40 days later thymic morphology and function were studied. Morphology studies showed nearly normal thymic architectural restoration; moreover, such glands contained normal numbers of Thy-1-positive cells. Functional pre-T cells were evaluated by transferring thymocytes from the irradiated GVHBM-reconstituted mice into T-cell-deprived mice. These thymocytes reconstituted allograft reactivity, T helper cell function and Con A and PHA mitogen responses of T-cell-deprived mice. These results suggest that the pre-T cell population in the bone marrow is not affected by the GVH reaction. Therefore, the T cell immunodeficiency associated with the GVH reaction is not due to a deficiency of pre-T cells in the bone marrow but is more likely associated with GVH-induced thymic dysplasia

  9. Approaches to systems biology. Four methods to study single-cell gene expression, cell motility, antibody reactivity, and respiratory metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagedorn, Peter

    To understand how complex systems, such as cells, function, comprehensive Measurements of their constituent parts must be made. This can be achieved by combining methods that are each optimized to measure specific parts of the system. Four such methods,each covering a different area, are presented...... from such measurements allows models of the system to be developed and tested. For each of the methods, such analysis and modelling approaches have beenapplied and are presented: Differentially regulated genes are identified and classified according to function; cell-specfic motility models...... are developed that can distinguish between different surfaces; a method for selecting repertoires of antigens thatseparate mice based on their response to treatment is developed; and the observed concentrations of free and bound NADH is used to build and test a basic model of respiratory metabolism...

  10. Coomassie Brilliant Blue G is a more potent antagonist of P2 purinergic responses than Reactive Blue 2 (Cibacron Blue 3GA) in rat parotid acinar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soltoff, S.P.; McMillian, M.K.; Talamo, B.R.

    1989-01-01

    The ability of Brilliant Blue G (Coomassie Brilliant Blue G) and Reactive Blue 2 (Cibacron Blue 3GA) to block the effects of extracellular ATP on rat parotid acinar cells was examined by evaluating their effects on ATP-stimulated 45Ca 2+ entry and the elevation of [Ca 2+ ]i (Fura 2 fluorescence). ATP (300 microM) increased the rate of Ca 2+ entry to more than 25-times the basal rate and elevated [Ca 2+ ]i to levels more than three times the basal value. Brilliant Blue G and Reactive Blue 2 greatly reduced the entry of 45 Ca 2+ into parotid cells, but the potency of Brilliant Blue G (IC50 approximately 0.4 microM) was about 100-times that of Reactive Blue 2. Fura 2 studies demonstrated that inhibitory concentrations of these compounds did not block the cholinergic response of these cells, thus demonstrating the selectivity of the dye compounds for purinergic receptors. Unlike Reactive Blue 2, effective concentrations of Brilliant Blue G did not substantially quench Fura 2 fluorescence. The greater potency of Brilliant Blue G suggests that it may be very useful in identifying P2-type purinergic receptors, especially in studies which utilize fluorescent probes

  11. Beta-hydroxybutyrate increases reactive oxygen species in late but not in early postimplantation embryonic cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsberg, H; Eriksson, U J; Melefors, O; Welsh, N

    1998-02-01

    Embryonic dysmorphogenesis has been blocked by antioxidant treatment in vivo and in vitro, suggesting that embryonic excess of reactive oxygen species (ROS) has a role in the teratogenic process of diabetic pregnancy. We report that the basal levels of ROS in dispersed rat embryonic cells in vitro, as determined by fluorescence of dichlorofluorescein (DCF), were not different in cells from control and diabetic pregnancy at day 10 or 12. Beta-hydroxybutyrate (beta-HB) and succinic acid monomethyl ester both augmented DCF fluorescence in cells from day 12 embryos of normal and diabetic rats but not from day 10 embryos. Cells of day 10 and day 12 embryos from normal and diabetic rats responded to increasing glucose concentrations with a dosage-dependent alleviation of DCF fluorescence. Day 10 embryonic cells exhibited high glucose utilization rates and high pentose phosphate shunt rates, but low mitochondrial oxidation rates. Moreover, in vitro culture of embryos between gestational days 9 and 10 in the presence of 20% oxygen induced an increased and glucose-sensitive oxidation of glucose compared with embryos not cultured in vitro. At gestation day 12, however, pentose phosphate shunt rates showed a decrease, whereas the mitochondrial beta-HB oxidation rates were increased compared with those at gestation day 10. This was paralleled by a lower expression of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase- and phosphofructokinase-mRNA levels at day 12 than at day 10. On the other hand, H-ferritin mRNA expression at day 12 was high compared with day 10. None of the mRNA species investigated were affected by the diabetic state of the mother. It was concluded that beta-HB-induced stimulation of mitochondrial oxidative events may lead to the generation of ROS at gestational day 12, but probably not at day 10, when only a minute amount of mitochondrial activity occurs. Thus our results do not support the notion of diabetes-induced mitochondrial oxidative stress before the development of

  12. Celastrol targets mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I to induce reactive oxygen species-dependent cytotoxicity in tumor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Yuanji

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Celastrol is an active ingredient of the traditional Chinese medicinal plant Tripterygium Wilfordii, which exhibits significant antitumor activity in different cancer models in vitro and in vivo; however, the lack of information on the target and mechanism of action of this compound have impeded its clinical application. In this study, we sought to determine the mode of action of celastrol by focusing on the processes that mediate its anticancer activity. Methods The downregulation of heat shock protein 90 (HSP90 client proteins, phosphorylation of c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK, and cleavage of PARP, caspase 9 and caspase 3 were detected by western blotting. The accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS was analyzed by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. Cell cycle progression, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP and apoptosis were determined by flow cytometry. Absorption spectroscopy was used to determine the activity of mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC complexes. Results Celastrol induced ROS accumulation, G2-M phase blockage, apoptosis and necrosis in H1299 and HepG2 cells in a dose-dependent manner. N-acetylcysteine (NAC, an antioxidative agent, inhibited celastrol-induced ROS accumulation and cytotoxicity. JNK phosphorylation induced by celastrol was suppressed by NAC and JNK inhibitor SP600125 (SP. Moreover, SP significantly inhibited celastrol-induced loss of MMP, cleavage of PARP, caspase 9 and caspase 3, mitochondrial translocation of Bad, cytoplasmic release of cytochrome c, and cell death. However, SP did not inhibit celastrol-induced ROS accumulation. Celastrol downregulated HSP90 client proteins but did not disrupt the interaction between HSP90 and cdc37. NAC completely inhibited celastrol-induced decrease of HSP90 client proteins, catalase and thioredoxin. The activity of MRC complex I was completely inhibited in H1299 cells treated with 6 μM celastrol in the absence and presence of NAC

  13. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Proteins Mimic Human T Cell Receptors Inducing Cross-Reactive Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Root-Bernstein

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV hides from the immune system in part by mimicking host antigens, including human leukocyte antigens. It is demonstrated here that HIV also mimics the V-β-D-J-β of approximately seventy percent of about 600 randomly selected human T cell receptors (TCR. This degree of mimicry is greater than any other human pathogen, commensal or symbiotic organism studied. These data suggest that HIV may be evolving into a commensal organism just as simian immunodeficiency virus has done in some types of monkeys. The gp120 envelope protein, Nef protein and Pol protein are particularly similar to host TCR, camouflaging HIV from the immune system and creating serious barriers to the development of safe HIV vaccines. One consequence of HIV mimicry of host TCR is that antibodies against HIV proteins have a significant probability of recognizing the corresponding TCR as antigenic targets, explaining the widespread observation of lymphocytotoxic autoantibodies in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS. Quantitative enzyme-linked immunoadsorption assays (ELISA demonstrated that every HIV antibody tested recognized at least one of twelve TCR, and as many as seven, with a binding constant in the 10−8 to 10−9 m range. HIV immunity also affects microbiome tolerance in ways that correlate with susceptibility to specific opportunistic infections.

  14. Natural autoantibodies and complement promote the uptake of a self antigen, human thyroglobulin, by B cells and the proliferation of thyroglobulin-reactive CD4(+) T cells in healthy individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, C H; Leslie, R G; Jepsen, B S

    2001-01-01

    of complement receptor types 1 (CR1, CD35) and 2 (CR2, CD21). T cell responsiveness to Tg was examined in a preparation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) cultured in the presence of autologous serum. A subset of CD4(+) T cells exhibited a dose-dependent proliferative response to Tg, which...... cells are prerequisites for the proliferation of Tg-reactive CD4(+) T cells, suggesting a novel role for natural autoantibodies and complement in the regulation of autoreactivity under physiological conditions....... was strongly inhibited by complement inactivation and by immunoabsorption of Tg-reactive antibodies. Furthermore, this T cell response was abrogated by depletion of B cells from the PBMC culture. These data imply that uptake of complement-opsonized Tg / anti-Tg complexes and subsequent presentation of Tg by B...

  15. Using DR52c/Ni2+ mimotope tetramers to detect Ni2+ reactive CD4+ T cells in patients with joint replacement failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Wang, Yang; Anderson, Kirsten; Novikov, Andrey; Liu, Zikou; Pacheco, Karin; Dai, Shaodong

    2017-09-15

    T cell mediated hypersensitivity to nickel (Ni 2+ ) is one of the most common causes of allergic contact dermatitis. Ni 2+ sensitization may also contribute to the failure of Ni 2+ containing joint implants, and revision to non-Ni 2+ containing hardware can be costly and debilitating. Previously, we identified Ni 2+ mimotope peptides, which are reactive to a CD4 + T cell clone, ANi2.3 (Vα1, Vβ17), isolated from a Ni 2+ hypersensitive patient with contact dermatitis. This T cell is restricted to the major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII) molecule, Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA)-DR52c (DRA, DRB3*0301). However, it is not known if Ni 2+ induced T cell responses in sensitized joint replacement failure patients are similar to subjects with Ni 2+ induced contact dermatitis. Here, we generated DR52c/Ni 2+ mimotope tetramers, and used them to test if the same Ni 2+ T cell activation mechanism could be generalized to Ni 2+ sensitized patients with associated joint implant failure. We confirmed the specificity of these tetramers by staining of ANi2.3T cell transfectomas. The DR52c/Ni 2+ mimotope tetramer detected Ni 2+ reactive CD4 + T cells in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of patients identified as Ni 2+ sensitized by patch testing and a positive Ni 2+ LPT. When HLA-typed by a DR52 specific antibody, three out of four patients were DR52 positive. In one patient, Ni 2+ stimulation induced the expansion of Vβ17 positive CD4 + T cells from 0.8% to 13.3%. We found that the percentage of DR52 positivity and Vβ17 usage in Ni 2+ sensitized joint failure patients are similar to Ni sensitized skin allergy patients. Ni 2+ independent mimotope tetramers may be a useful tool to identify the Ni 2+ reactive CD4 + T cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. CD4+ T cell autoimmunity to hypocretin/orexin and cross-reactivity to a 2009 H1N1 influenza A epitope in narcolepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De la Herrán-Arita, Alberto K; Kornum, Birgitte Rahbek; Mahlios, Josh

    2013-01-01

    the wake-promoting neuropeptide hypocretin (HCRT) (orexin). We identified two DQ0602-binding HCRT epitopes, HCRT56-68 and HCRT87-99, that activated a subpopulation of CD4(+) T cells in narcolepsy patients but not in DQ0602-positive healthy control subjects. Because of the established association...... to the 2009 H1N1 strain, pHA1275-287, with homology to HCRT56-68 and HCRT87-99. In vitro stimulation of narcolepsy CD4(+) T cells with pH1N1 proteins or pHA1275-287 increased the frequency of HCRT56-68- and HCRT87-99-reactive T cells. Our data indicate the presence of CD4(+) T cells that are reactive to HCRT...... of narcolepsy with the 2009 H1N1 influenza A strain (pH1N1), we administered a seasonal influenza vaccine (containing pH1N1) to patients with narcolepsy and found an increased frequency of circulating HCRT56-68- and HCRT87-99-reactive T cells. We also identified a hemagglutinin (HA) pHA1 epitope specific...

  17. Characterisation of vaccine-induced, broadly cross-reactive IFN-γ secreting T cell responses that correlate with rapid protection against classical swine fever virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Simon P; Haines, Felicity J; Johns, Helen L; Sosan, Olubukola; La Rocca, S Anna; Lamp, Benjamin; Rümenapf, Till; Everett, Helen E; Crooke, Helen R

    2012-04-05

    Live attenuated C-strain classical swine fever viruses (CSFV) provide a rapid onset of protection, but the lack of a serological test that can differentiate vaccinated from infected animals limits their application in CSF outbreaks. Since immunity may precede antibody responses, we examined the kinetics and specificity of peripheral blood T cell responses from pigs vaccinated with a C-strain vaccine and challenged after five days with a genotypically divergent CSFV isolate. Vaccinated animals displayed virus-specific IFN-γ responses from day 3 post-challenge, whereas, unvaccinated challenge control animals failed to mount a detectable response. Both CD4(+) and cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells were identified as the cellular source of IFN-γ. IFN-γ responses showed extensive cross-reactivity when T cells were stimulated with CSFV isolates spanning the major genotypes. To determine the specificity of these responses, T cells were stimulated with recombinant CSFV proteins and a proteome-wide peptide library from a related virus, BVDV. Major cross-reactive peptides were mapped on the E2 and NS3 proteins. Finally, IFN-γ was shown to exert potent antiviral effects on CSFV in vitro. These data support the involvement of broadly cross-reactive T cell IFN-γ responses in the rapid protection conferred by the C-strain vaccine and this information should aid the development of the next generation of CSFV vaccines. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The Food Contaminants Nivalenol and Deoxynivalenol Induce Inflammation in Intestinal Epithelial Cells by Regulating Reactive Oxygen Species Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Adesso

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Fusarium mycotoxins are fungal metabolites whose ability to affect cereal grains as multi-contaminants is progressively increasing. The trichothecene mycotoxins nivalenol (NIV and deoxynivalenol (DON are often found in almost all agricultural commodities worldwide. They are able to affect animal and human health, including at the intestinal level. In this study, NIV, both alone and in combination with DON, induced inflammation and increased the inflammatory response induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS plus Interferon-γ (IFN in the non-tumorigenic intestinal epithelial cell line (IEC-6. The inflammatory response induced by NIV and DON involves tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α production, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 expression, nitrotyrosine formation, reactive oxygen species (ROS release, Nuclear Factor-κB (NF-κB, Nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2-like 2 (Nrf2 and inflammasome activation. The pro-inflammatory effect was strongly induced by NIV and by the mycotoxin mixture, when compared to DON alone. Mechanistic studies indicate a pivotal role for ROS in the observed pro-inflammatory effects induced by mycotoxins. In this study, the interactions between NIV and DON point out the importance of their food co-contamination, further highlighting the risk assessment process that is of growing concern.

  19. The Food Contaminants Nivalenol and Deoxynivalenol Induce Inflammation in Intestinal Epithelial Cells by Regulating Reactive Oxygen Species Release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adesso, Simona; Autore, Giuseppina; Quaroni, Andrea; Popolo, Ada; Severino, Lorella; Marzocco, Stefania

    2017-12-11

    Fusarium mycotoxins are fungal metabolites whose ability to affect cereal grains as multi-contaminants is progressively increasing. The trichothecene mycotoxins nivalenol (NIV) and deoxynivalenol (DON) are often found in almost all agricultural commodities worldwide. They are able to affect animal and human health, including at the intestinal level. In this study, NIV, both alone and in combination with DON, induced inflammation and increased the inflammatory response induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) plus Interferon-γ (IFN) in the non-tumorigenic intestinal epithelial cell line (IEC-6). The inflammatory response induced by NIV and DON involves tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) production, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression, nitrotyrosine formation, reactive oxygen species (ROS) release, Nuclear Factor-κB (NF-κB), Nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2) and inflammasome activation. The pro-inflammatory effect was strongly induced by NIV and by the mycotoxin mixture, when compared to DON alone. Mechanistic studies indicate a pivotal role for ROS in the observed pro-inflammatory effects induced by mycotoxins. In this study, the interactions between NIV and DON point out the importance of their food co-contamination, further highlighting the risk assessment process that is of growing concern.

  20. Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in human microvascular endothelial cells: role in endothelial permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Yong; Ducatman, Alan; Ward, Rebecca; Leonard, Steve; Bukowski, Valerie; Lan Guo, Nancy; Shi, Xianglin; Vallyathan, Val; Castranova, Vincent

    2010-01-01

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) is a member of the perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAA) containing an eight-carbon backbone. PFOS is a man-made chemical with carbon-fluorine bonds that are among the strongest in organic chemistry, and PFOS is widely used in industry. Human occupational and environmental exposure to PFOS occurs globally. PFOS is non-biodegradable and is persistent in the human body and environment. In this study, data demonstrated that exposure of human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC) to PFOS induced the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) at both high and low concentrations. Morphologically, it was found that exposure to PFOS induced actin filament remodeling and endothelial permeability changes in HMVEC. Furthermore, data demonstrated that the production of ROS plays a regulatory role in PFOS-induced actin filament remodeling and the increase in endothelial permeability. Our results indicate that the generation of ROS may play a role in PFOS-induced aberrations of the endothelial permeability barrier. The results generated from this study may provide a new insight into the potential adverse effects of PFOS exposure on humans at the cellular level.

  1. Identification of a novel dendritic cell surface antigen defined by carbohydrate specific CD24 antibody cross-reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, L A; McLellan, A D; Summers, K L; Sorg, R V; Fearnley, D B; Hart, D N

    1996-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are characterized as leucocytes that lack mature lineage specific markers and stimulate naive T-lymphocyte proliferation in vitro and in vivo. The mouse heat stable antigen (HSA) participates in T lymphocyte co-stimulation and is expressed by DC isolated from thymus, skin and spleen. The human HSA homologue, CD24, is predominantly expressed by B lymphocytes and granulocytes, but its expression on DC has not been studied in detail. CD24 clearly participates in B-lymphocyte signalling but co-stimulatory activity for T lymphocytes has not yet been described. We have examined the expression of CD24 on human peripheral blood DC populations isolated directly or following in vitro culture. The CD24 antigen was absent from blood DC however, cross-reactive sialylated carbohydrate epitopes were detected on DC with some CD24 monoclonal antibodies (mAb). These CD24 mAb define a protein surface antigen, which is expressed by an immature or resting subpopulation of peripheral blood DC and is down-regulated following activation differentiation in vitro. PMID:8911149

  2. Reactivation of Hepatitis B Virus in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Recipients in Japan: Efficacy of Nucleos(tide Analogues for Prevention and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shingo Nakamoto

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We retrospectively reviewed 413 recipients with hematologic malignancies who underwent hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT between June 1986 and March 2013. Recipients with antibody to hepatitis B core antigen (anti-HBc and/or to hepatitis B surface antigen (anti-HBs were regarded as experiencing previous hepatitis B virus (HBV infection. Clinical data of these recipients were reviewed from medical records. We defined ≥1 log IU/mL increase in serum HBV DNA from nadir as HBV reactivation in hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg-positive recipients, and also defined ≥1 log IU/mL increase or re-appearance of HBV DNA and/or HBsAg as HBV reactivation in HBsAg-negative recipients. In 5 HBsAg-positive recipients, 2 recipients initially not administered with nucleos(tide analogues (NUCs experienced HBV reactivation, but finally all 5 were successfully controlled with NUCs. HBV reactivation was observed in 11 (2.7% of 408 HBsAg-negative recipients; 8 of these were treated with NUCs, and fortunately none developed acute liver failure. In 5 (6.0% of 83 anti-HBc and/or anti-HBs-positive recipients, HBV reactivation occurred. None of 157 (0% recipients without HBsAg, anti-HBs or anti-HBc experienced HBV reactivation. In HSCT recipients, HBV reactivation is a common event in HBsAg-positive recipients, or in HBsAg-negative recipients with anti-HBc and/or anti-HBs. Further attention should be paid to HSCT recipients with previous exposure to HBV.

  3. Does thyroidectomy, radioactive iodine therapy, or antithyroid drug treatment alter reactivity of patients` T cells to epitopes of thyrotropin receptor in autoimmune thyroid diseases?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soliman, M.; Kaplan, E.; Abdel-Latif, A. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)] [and others

    1995-08-01

    The effect of treatment on thyroid antibody production and T cell reactivity to thyroid antigens was studied in 15 patients with Graves` disease (GD) before and after thyroidectomy, 19 patients with GD before and after radioactive iodine (RAI) therapy, and 9 patients maintained euthyroid on antithyroid drugs (ATD). In GD patients, the responses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and TSH receptor (TSHR)-specific T cell lines to recombinant human TSHR extracellular domain, thyroglobulin, and TSHR peptides were examined on the day of surgery or RAI therapy (day 0) and also 6-8 weeks and 3-6 months thereafter. Reactivity to TSHR peptides before surgery was heterogeneous and spanned the entire extracellular domain. Six to 8 weeks after subtotal thyroidectomy, the number of patients` PBMC responding to any peptide and the average number of recognized peptides decreased. A further decrease in the T cell reactivity to TSHR peptides was observed 3-6 months after surgery. The responses of PBMC from Graves` patients before RAI therapy were less than those in the presurgical group. Six to 8 weeks after RAI therapy, the number of patients responding to any peptide and the average number of recognized peptides increased. Three to 6 months after RAI, T cell responses to TSHR peptides were less than those 6-8 weeks after RAI therapy, but still higher than the values on day 0. Responses of PBMC from patients with GD, maintained euthyroid on ATD, were lower than those before surgery or RAI therapy. The reactivity of T cell lines in different groups reflected a pattern similar to PBMC after treatment. TSHR antibody and microsomal antibody levels decreased after surgery, but increased after RAI therapy. The difference in the number of recognized peptides by patients` PBMC before RAI and surgery may reflect the effect of long term therapy with ATD in the patients before RAI vs. the shorter period in patients before surgery. 38 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  4. Inhibitory effects of polyphenol-enriched extract from Ziyang tea against human breast cancer MCF-7 cells through reactive oxygen species-dependent mitochondria molecular mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenfeng Li

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A polyphenol-enriched extract from selenium-enriched Ziyang green tea (ZTP was selected to evaluate its antitumor effects against human breast cancer MCF-7 cells. In ZTP, (−-epigallocatechin gallate (28.2% was identified as the major catechin, followed by (−-epigallocatechin (5.7% and (−-epicatechin gallate (12.6%. ZTP was shown to inhibit MCF-7 cell proliferation (half maximal inhibitory concentration, IC50 = 172.2 μg/mL by blocking cell-cycle progression at the G0/G1 phase and inducing apoptotic death. Western blotting assay indicated that ZTP induced cell-cycle arrest by upregulation of p53 and reduced the expression of CDK2 in MCF-7 cells. ZTP-caused cell apoptosis was associated with an increase in Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, and activation of caspase-3 and -9. MCF-7 cells treated with ZTP also showed an overproduction of reactive oxygen species, suggesting that reactive oxygen species played an important role in the induction of apoptosis in MCF-7 cells. This is the first report showing that ZTP is a potential novel dietary agent for cancer chemoprevention or chemotherapy.

  5. 12-Chloracetyl-PPD, a novel dammarane derivative, shows anti-cancer activity via delay the progression of cell cycle G2/M phase and reactive oxygen species-mediate cell apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xu De; Sun, Yuan Yuan; Zhao, Chen; Qu, Fan Zhi; Zhao, Yu Qing

    2017-03-05

    (20R)-Dammarane-3β, 12β, 20, 25-tetrol (25-OH-PPD) is a ginsenoside isolated from Panax ginseng (C. A. Meyer). This compound exhibits anti-cancer activities on many human cancer cell lines. In this study, we investigated anti-cancer mechanisms of 12β-O-( L -Chloracetyl)-dammar-20(22)-ene-3β,25-diol(12-Chloracetyl-PPD), a modified 25-OH-PPD. We found that compound 12-Chloracetyl-PPD resulted in a concentration-dependent inhibition of viability in prostate, breast, and gastric cancer cells, without affecting the viability of normal cell (human gastric epithelial cell line-GES-1, hair follicle dermal papilla cell line-HHDPC and rat myocardial cell line-H9C2). In MDA-MB-435 and C4-2B cancer cells, 12-Chloracetyl-PPD induced G2/M cell cycle arrest, down-regulated mouse double minute 2 (MDM2) expression, up-regulated p53 expression, triggered apoptosis, and stimulated reactive oxygen species production. Apoptosis can be attenuated by the reactive oxygen species scavenger N-acetylcysteine. Our results suggested that compound 12-Chloracetyl-PPD showed obvious anti-cancer activity based on delaying cell cycle arrest and inducing cell apoptosis by reactive oxygen species production, which supported development of 12-Chloracetyl-PPD as a potential agent for cancer chemotherapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Monitoring reactive oxygen species formation and localisation in living cells by use of the fluorescent probe CM-H(2)DCFDA and confocal laser microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Kim Anker; Jensen, Poul Erik; Møller, Ian Max

    2009-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) develop as a consequence of wounding, light stress and chemical imbalances but act also as signals in living cells. The integrity of cells is seriously endangered, if ROS cannot be controlled by scavenging molecules and other repair mechanisms of the cell. For studying...... ROS development and signalling under stress, a reliable indicator is needed. We have tested the ROS sensitive dye 5-(and-6) chloromethyl-2',7' dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate acetyl ester (CM-H(2)DCFDA) using onion bulb scale and leaf epidermis as well as Arabidopsis leaves and protoplasts. ROS...

  7. [Effect of low-energy 633 nm red light stimulation on proliferation and reactive oxygen species level of human epidermal cell line HaCaT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Z Y; Li, D L; Duan, X D; Peng, D Z

    2016-09-20

    To investigate the changes of proliferative activity and reactive oxygen species level of human epidermal cell line HaCaT after being irradiated with low-energy 633 nm red light. Irradiation distance was determined through preliminary experiment. HaCaT cells were conventionally sub-cultured with RPMI 1640 culture medium containing 10% fetal calf serum, 100 U/mL penicillin, and 100 μg/mL streptomycin. Cells of the third passage were used in the following experiments. (1) Cells were divided into blank control group and 0.082, 0.164, 0.245, 0.491, 1.472, 2.453, 4.910, and 9.810 J/cm(2) irradiation groups according to the random number table, with 3 wells in each group. Cells in blank control group were not irradiated, while cells in the latter 8 irradiation groups were irradiated with 633 nm red light for 10, 20, 30, 60, 180, 300, 600, and 1 200 s in turn. Cells were reirradiated once every 8 hours. After being irradiated for 48 hours (6 times) in irradiation groups, the proliferative activity of cells in 9 groups was determined with cell counting kit 8 and microplate reader (denoted as absorbance value). (2) Another batch of cells were grouped and irradiated as in experiment (1). After being irradiated for once in irradiation groups, cells in 9 groups were conventionally cultured for 60 min with detection reagent of reactive oxygen species. At post culture minute (PCM) 0 (immediately), 30, 60, and 120, reactive oxygen species level of cells was determined with microplate reader (denoted as absorbance value). (3) Another batch of cells were divided into blank control group, 0.082, 0.491, 2.453, and 9.810 J/cm(2) irradiation groups, and positive control group. Cells in blank control group and positive control group were not irradiated (positive control reagent of reactive oxygen species was added to cells in positive control group), and cells in irradiation groups were irradiated as in experiment (1) for once. The expression of reactive oxygen species in cells of each

  8. B-cell-rich T-cell lymphoma associated with Epstein-Barr virus-reactivation and T-cell suppression following antithymocyte globulin therapy in a patient with severe aplastic anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuyoshi Hanaoka

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder (B-LPD is generally characterized by the proliferation of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV-infected B lymphocytes. We here report the development of EBV-negative B-LPD associated with EBV-reactivation following antithymocyte globulin (ATG therapy in a patient with aplastic anemia. The molecular autopsy study showed the sparse EBV-infected clonal T cells could be critically involved in the pathogenesis of EBV-negative oligoclonal B-LPD through cytokine amplification and escape from T-cell surveillances attributable to ATG-based immunosuppressive therapy, leading to an extremely rare B-cell-rich T-cell lymphoma. This report helps in elucidating the complex pathophysiology of intractable B-LPD refractory to rituximab.

  9. A highly tilted binding mode by a self-reactive T cell receptor results in altered engagement of peptide and MHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sethi, D.K.; Heroux, A.; Schubert, D. A.; Anders, A.-K.; Bonsor, D. A.; Thomas, C. P.; Sundberg, E. J.; Pyrdol, J.; Wucherpfennig, K. W.

    2011-01-17

    Self-reactive T cells that escape elimination in the thymus can cause autoimmune pathology, and it is therefore important to understand the structural mechanisms of self-antigen recognition. We report the crystal structure of a T cell receptor (TCR) from a patient with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis that engages its self-peptide-major histocompatibility complex (pMHC) ligand in an unusual manner. The TCR is bound in a highly tilted orientation that prevents interaction of the TCR-{alpha} chain with the MHC class II {beta} chain helix. In this structure, only a single germline-encoded TCR loop engages the MHC protein, whereas in most other TCR-pMHC structures all four germline-encoded TCR loops bind to the MHC helices. The tilted binding mode also prevents peptide contacts by the short complementarity-determining region (CDR) 3{beta} loop, and interactions that contribute to peptide side chain specificity are focused on the CDR3{alpha} loop. This structure is the first example in which only a single germline-encoded TCR loop contacts the MHC helices. Furthermore, the reduced interaction surface with the peptide may facilitate TCR cross-reactivity. The structural alterations in the trimolecular complex are distinct from previously characterized self-reactive TCRs, indicating that there are multiple unusual ways for self-reactive TCRs to bind their pMHC ligand.

  10. A Highly Tilted Binding Mode by a Self-Reactive T Cell Receptor Results in Altered Engagement of Peptide and MHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D Sethi; D Schubert; A Anders; A Heroux; D Bonsor; C Thomas; E Sundberg; J Pyrdol; K Wucherpfennig

    2011-12-31

    Self-reactive T cells that escape elimination in the thymus can cause autoimmune pathology, and it is therefore important to understand the structural mechanisms of self-antigen recognition. We report the crystal structure of a T cell receptor (TCR) from a patient with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis that engages its self-peptide-major histocompatibility complex (pMHC) ligand in an unusual manner. The TCR is bound in a highly tilted orientation that prevents interaction of the TCR-{alpha} chain with the MHC class II {beta} chain helix. In this structure, only a single germline-encoded TCR loop engages the MHC protein, whereas in most other TCR-pMHC structures all four germline-encoded TCR loops bind to the MHC helices. The tilted binding mode also prevents peptide contacts by the short complementarity-determining region (CDR) 3{beta} loop, and interactions that contribute to peptide side chain specificity are focused on the CDR3{alpha} loop. This structure is the first example in which only a single germline-encoded TCR loop contacts the MHC helices. Furthermore, the reduced interaction surface with the peptide may facilitate TCR cross-reactivity. The structural alterations in the trimolecular complex are distinct from previously characterized self-reactive TCRs, indicating that there are multiple unusual ways for self-reactive TCRs to bind their pMHC ligand.

  11. Donor-Derived Regulatory Dendritic Cell Infusion Maintains Donor-Reactive CD4+CTLA4hi T Cells in Non-Human Primate Renal Allograft Recipients Treated with CD28 Co-Stimulation Blockade

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed B. Ezzelarab; Lien Lu; William F. Shufesky; Adrian E. Morelli; Adrian E. Morelli; Angus W. Thomson; Angus W. Thomson

    2018-01-01

    Donor-derived regulatory dendritic cell (DCreg) infusion before transplantation, significantly prolongs renal allograft survival in non-human primates. This is associated with enhanced expression of the immunoregulatory molecules cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen (Ag) 4 (CTLA4) and programmed cell death protein 1 (PD1) by host donor-reactive T cells. In rodents and humans, CD28 co-stimulatory pathway blockade with the fusion protein CTLA4:Ig (CTLA4Ig) is associated with reduced differ...

  12. Direct and indirect inactivation of tumor cell protective catalase by salicylic acid and anthocyanidins reactivates intercellular ROS signaling and allows for synergistic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheit, Katrin; Bauer, Georg

    2015-03-01

    Salicylic acid and anthocyanidins are known as plant-derived antioxidants, but also can provoke paradoxically seeming prooxidant effects in vitro. These prooxidant effects are connected to the potential of salicylic acid and anthocyanidins to induce apoptosis selectively in tumor cells in vitro and to inhibit tumor growth in animal models. Several epidemiological studies have shown that salicylic acid and its prodrug acetylsalicylic acid are tumor-preventive for humans. The mechanism of salicylic acid- and anthocyanidin-dependent antitumor effects has remained enigmatic so far. Extracellular apoptosis-inducing reactive oxygen species signaling through the NO/peroxynitrite and the HOCl signaling pathway specifically induces apoptosis in transformed cells. Tumor cells have acquired resistance against intercellular reactive oxygen species signaling through expression of membrane-associated catalase. Here, we show that salicylic acid and anthocyanidins inactivate tumor cell protective catalase and thus reactive apoptosis-inducing intercellular reactive oxygen species signaling of tumor cells and the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis Salicylic acid inhibits catalase directly through its potential to transform compound I of catalase into the inactive compound II. In contrast, anthocyanidins provoke a complex mechanism for catalase inactivation that is initiated by anthocyanidin-mediated inhibition of NO dioxygenase. This allows the formation of extracellular singlet oxygen through the reaction between H(2)O(2) and peroxynitrite, amplification through a caspase8-dependent step and subsequent singlet oxygen-mediated inactivation of catalase. The combination of salicylic acid and anthocyanidins allows for a remarkable synergistic effect in apoptosis induction. This effect may be potentially useful to elaborate novel therapeutic approaches and crucial for the interpretation of epidemiological results related to the antitumor effects of secondary plant compounds. © The

  13. Production of gamma induced reactive oxygen species and damage of DNA molecule in HaCaT cells under euoxic and hypoxic condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joseph, P.; Bhat, N.N.; Copplestone, D.; Narayana, Y.

    2014-01-01

    The paper deals with the study of gamma radiation induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in normal human keratinocytes (HaCaT) cells and quantification of subsequent damages induced on DNA molecules. The DNA damages induced in cells after gamma irradiation has been analyzed using Alkaline comet assay. The ROS produced in the cells were quantified by measuring fluorescence after loading the cells with 2', 7' dichlorofluorescin diacetate, a dye that is oxidized into a highly fluorescent form in the presence of peroxides. Studies reveal that in HaCaT cells radical generation occurs when exposed to ionizing radiation and it increases with dose. The induced DNA damages also increases with dose and ROS generation. The study clearly shows the importance of ROS in DNA damage induction and the cells possessing elevated levels of DNA damage after radiation exposure is due to the effect of increased levels of intracellular ROS. (author)

  14. Gelidium elegans, an edible red seaweed, and hesperidin inhibit lipid accumulation and production of reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species in 3T3-L1 and RAW264.7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Hui-Jeon; Seo, Min-Jung; Choi, Hyeon-Son; Lee, Ok-Hwan; Lee, Boo-Yong

    2014-11-01

    Gelidium elegans is an edible red alga native to the intertidal area of northeastern Asia. We investigated the effect of G. elegans extract and its main flavonoids, rutin and hesperidin, on lipid accumulation and the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) in 3T3-L1 and RAW264.7 cells. Our data show that G. elegans extract decreased lipid accumulation and ROS/RNS production in a dose-dependent manner. The extract also inhibited the mRNA expression of adipogenic transcription factors, such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha, while enhancing the protein expression of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutases 1 and 2, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase compared with controls. In addition, lipopolysaccharide-induced nitric oxide production was significantly reduced in G. elegans extract-treated RAW264.7 cells. In analysis of the effects of G. elegans flavonoids on lipid accumulation and ROS/RNS production, only hesperidin showed an inhibitory effect on lipid accumulation and ROS production; rutin did not affect adipogenesis and ROS status. The antiadipogenic effect of hesperidin was evidenced by the downregulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma, CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha, and fatty acid binding protein 4 gene expression. Collectively, our data suggest that G. elegans is a potential food source containing antiobesity and antioxidant constituents. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Combination of c-reactive protein and squamous cell carcinoma antigen in predicting postoperative prognosis for patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Ji-Feng; Chen, Sheng; Yang, Xun

    2017-09-08

    We initially proposed a useful and novel prognostic model, named CCS [Combination of c-reactive protein (CRP) and squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCC)], for predicting the postoperative survival in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Two hundred and fifty-two patients with resectable ESCC were included in this retrospective study. A logistic regression was performed and yielded a logistic equation. The CCS was calculated by the combined CRP and SCC. The optimal cut-off value for CCS was evaluated by X-tile program. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to evaluate the predictive factors. In addition, a novel nomogram model was also performed to predict the prognosis for patients with ESCC. In the current study, CCS was calculated as CRP+6.33 SCC according to the logistic equation. The optimal cut-off value was 15.8 for CCS according to the X-tile program. Kaplan-Meier analyses demonstrated that high CCS group had a significantly poor 5-year cancer-specific survival (CSS) than low CCS group (10.3% vs. 47.3%, P <0.001). According to multivariate analyses, CCS ( P =0.004), but not CRP ( P =0.466) or SCC ( P =0.926), was an independent prognostic factor. A nomogram could be more accuracy for CSS (Harrell's c-index: 0.70). The CCS is a usefull and independent predictive factor in patients with ESCC.

  16. Generation of T-cells reactive to the poorly immunogenic B16-BL6 melanoma with efficacy in the treatment of spontaneous metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiger, J D; Wagner, P D; Cameron, M J; Shu, S; Chang, A E

    1993-04-01

    The B16-BL6 (BL6) melanoma is a poorly immunogenic murine tumor that is highly invasive and spontaneously metastasizes from the primary site. Utilizing an established anti-CD3/interleukin-2 (IL-2) culture procedure, we have previously reported that lymph nodes (LNs) draining immunogenic murine sarcomas contained preeffector cells that could be activated to differentiate into therapeutic effector cells for adoptive immunotherapy. By contrast, LNs draining the poorly immunogenic BL6 melanoma were found not to be a reliable source of preeffector cells. Instead, sensitization of preeffector cells reactive to BL6 required the subcutaneous inoculation of tumor admixed with Corynebacterium parvum. LN cells draining these vaccination sites demonstrated therapeutic efficacy only after subsequent anti-CD3/IL-2 activation. The sensitization of preeffector cells was dependent on the presence of tumor antigen and an optimal dose of C. parvum ( 140 days. All mice except one that received no treatment or was treated with IL-2 alone succumbed to visceral metastases with an MST of approximately 23 days. This study characterizes a model whereby the weak immune response to the BL6 melanoma can be positively or negatively modulated for the generation of antitumor reactive T-cells useful in adoptive immunotherapy.

  17. Immunobiology of T cell responses to Mls-locus-disparate stimulator cells. III. Helper and cytolytic functions of cloned, Mls-reactive T cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katz, M.E.; Tite, J.P.; Janeway, C.A. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Mls-specific T cell clones derived by limiting dilution were tested for cytotoxic activity in a lectin-dependent 51 Cr-release assay. All the T cell clones tested were cytotoxic in such an assay in apparent contrast to previous reports (1, 2). However, only those target cells sensitive to cytolysis by other L3T4a + cytolytic T cells (3) were killed by Mls-specific T cell clones in short term 51 Cr-release assays, possibly explaining this discrepancy. All the T cell clones tested were L3T4a + ,Lyt-2 - and stimulated B cells from Mls strains of mice to proliferate and secrete immunoglobulin. Furthermore, lysis of innocent bystander targets was observed when the T cells were stimulated with Mls-disparate stimulator cells. These results are consistent with those obtained with L3T4a - T cells specific for protein antigen:self Ia and that express cytotoxic potential (3)

  18. Electromagnetic noise inhibits radiofrequency radiation-induced DNA damage and reactive oxygen species increase in human lens epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wei; Wang, KaiJun; Ni, Shuang; Ye, PanPan; Yu, YiBo; Ye, Juan; Sun, LiXia

    2008-01-01

    Purpose The goal of this study was to investigate whether superposing of electromagnetic noise could block or attenuate DNA damage and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) increase of cultured human lens epithelial cells (HLECs) induced by acute exposure to 1.8 GHz radiofrequency field (RF) of the Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM). Methods An sXc-1800 RF exposure system was used to produce a GSM signal at 1.8 GHz (217 Hz amplitude-modulated) with the specific absorption rate (SAR) of 1, 2, 3, and 4 W/kg. After 2 h of intermittent exposure, the ROS level was assessed by the fluorescent probe, 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA). DNA damage to HLECs was examined by alkaline comet assay and the phosphorylated form of histone variant H2AX (γH2AX) foci formation assay. Results After exposure to 1.8 GHz RF for 2 h, HLECs exhibited significant intracellular ROS increase in the 2, 3, and 4 W/kg groups. RF radiation at the SAR of 3 W/kg and 4 W/kg could induce significant DNA damage, examined by alkaline comet assay, which was used to detect mainly single strand breaks (SSBs), while no statistical difference in double strand breaks (DSBs), evaluated by γH2AX foci, was found between RF exposure (SAR: 3 and 4 W/kg) and sham exposure groups. When RF was superposed with 2 μT electromagnetic noise could block RF-induced ROS increase and DNA damage. Conclusions DNA damage induced by 1.8 GHz radiofrequency field for 2 h, which was mainly SSBs, may be associated with the increased ROS production. Electromagnetic noise could block RF-induced ROS formation and DNA damage. PMID:18509546

  19. The role of calcium in modulating the reactivity of the smooth muscle cells during ischemia/reperfusion. Part 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Szadujkis-Szadurska

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Background:Damage of transplanted organs during reperfusion is still a problem that prompts the search for new drugs able to diminish the risk of graft rejection. The aim of this study was to examine the influence of antioxidant system on the contraction of arteries induced by angiotensin II during ischemia/reperfusion and to determine the role of intracellular and extracellular calcium ions under these conditions.Material/Methods:The experiments were performed on male Wistar rats’ tail arteries. The effects of angiotensin II on vascular tone were examined after ischemia/reperfusion in the presence of catalase or aminotriazole. To determine the role of intracellular and extracellular Ca[sup]2 [/sup], the experiments were performed in Ca[sup]2 [/sup]-free PSS and PSS.Results:Angiotensin II increased perfusion pressure in both Ca[sup]2 [/sup]-free PSS and PSS. After ischemia, the reactions induced by angiotensin II were lower, while after reperfusion they were higher. In the presence of catalase the effects induced by angiotensin II were lower and in the presence of aminotriazole higher.Conclusions:Ischemia inhibits and reperfusion augments the perfusion pressure induced by angiotensin II. The results confirm the vasoprotective effect of catalase and the destructive influence of aminotriazole in modulating the reactions of vascular smooth muscle cells to ANG II after ischemia/reperfusion. These results suggest that the antioxidant system plays a role in modulating the reactions induced by angiotensin II after ischemia/reperfusion and that reperfusion disturbs the balance between antioxidants and the production of reactive oxygen species.

  20. Lipoteichoic acid from Staphylococcus aureus induces lung endothelial cell barrier dysfunction: role of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Barton Pai

    Full Text Available Tunneled central venous catheters (TCVCs are used for dialysis access in 82% of new hemodialysis patients and are rapidly colonized with Gram-positive organism (e.g. Staphylococcus aureus biofilm, a source of recurrent infections and chronic inflammation. Lipoteichoic acid (LTA, a cell wall ribitol polymer from Gram-positive organisms, mediates inflammation through the Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2. The effect of LTA on lung endothelial permeability is not known. We tested the hypothesis that LTA from Staphylococcus aureus induces alterations in the permeability of pulmonary microvessel endothelial monolayers (PMEM that result from activation of TLR2 and are mediated by reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (RONS. The permeability of PMEM was assessed by the clearance rate of Evans blue-labeled albumin, the activation of the TLR2 pathway was assessed by Western blot, and the generation of RONS was measured by the fluorescence of oxidized dihydroethidium and a dichlorofluorescein derivative. Treatment with LTA or the TLR2 agonist Pam((3CSK((4 induced significant increases in albumin permeability, IκBα phosphorylation, IRAK1 degradation, RONS generation, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS activation (as measured by the p-eNOS(ser1177:p-eNOS(thr495 ratio. The effects on permeability and RONS were effectively prevented by co-administration of the superoxide scavenger Tiron, the peroxynitrite scavenger Urate, or the eNOS inhibitor L-NAME and these effects as well as eNOS activation were reduced or prevented by pretreatment with an IRAK1/4 inhibitor. The results indicate that the activation of TLR2 and the generation of ROS/RNS mediates LTA-induced barrier dysfunction in PMEM.

  1. Ebselen exerts antifungal activity by regulating glutathione (GSH) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in fungal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thangamani, Shankar; Eldesouky, Hassan E; Mohammad, Haroon; Pascuzzi, Pete E; Avramova, Larisa; Hazbun, Tony R; Seleem, Mohamed N

    2017-01-01

    Ebselen, an organoselenium compound and a clinically safe molecule has been reported to possess potent antifungal activity, but its antifungal mechanism of action and in vivo antifungal activity remain unclear. The antifungal effect of ebselen was tested against Candida albicans, C. glabrata, C. tropicalis, C. parapsilosis, Cryptococcus neoformans, and C. gattii clinical isolates. Chemogenomic profiling and biochemical assays were employed to identify the antifungal target of ebselen. Ebselen's antifungal activity in vivo was investigated in a Caenorhabditis elegans animal model. Ebselen exhibits potent antifungal activity against both Candida spp. and Cryptococcus spp., at concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 2μg/ml. Ebselen rapidly eradicates a high fungal inoculum within 2h of treatment. Investigation of the drug's antifungal mechanism of action indicates that ebselen depletes intracellular glutathione (GSH) levels, leading to increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and thereby disturbs the redox homeostasis in fungal cells. Examination of ebselen's in vivo antifungal activity in two Caenorhabditis elegans models of infection demonstrate that ebselen is superior to conventional antifungal drugs (fluconazole, flucytosine and amphotericin) in reducing Candida and Cryptococcus fungal load. Ebselen possesses potent antifungal activity against clinically relevant isolates of both Candida and Cryptococcus by regulating GSH and ROS production. The potent in vivo antifungal activity of ebselen supports further investigation for repurposing it for use as an antifungal agent. The present study shows that ebselen targets glutathione and also support that glutathione as a potential target for antifungal drug development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. [{sup 131}I]FIAU labeling of genetically transduced, tumor-reactive lymphocytes: cell-level dosimetry and dose-dependent toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanzonico, Pat [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Medical Physics, New York, NY (United States); Koehne, Guenther; Doubrovina, Ekaterina; O' Reilly, Richard J. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Allogeneic Transplantation Service, New York, NY (United States); Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Immunology Program, New York, NY (United States); Gallardo, Humilidad F. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Gene Transfer and Somatic Cell Engineering Facility, New York, NY (United States); Doubrovin, Mikhail; Blasberg, Ronald G. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Neurology, New York, NY (United States); Finn, Ronald [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Radiochemistry and Cyclotron Core Facility, New York, NY (United States); Riviere, Isabelle; Sadelain, Michel [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Immunology Program, New York, NY (United States); Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Gene Transfer and Somatic Cell Engineering Facility, New York, NY (United States); Larson, Steven M. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States)

    2006-09-15

    Donor T cells have been shown to be reactive against and effective in adoptive immunotherapy of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) lymphomas which develop in some leukemia patients post marrow transplantation. These T cells may be genetically modified by incorporation of a replication-incompetent viral vector (NIT) encoding both an inactive mutant nerve growth factor receptor (LNGFR), as an immunoselectable surface marker, and a herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-TK), rendering the cells sensitive to ganciclovir. The current studies are based on the selective HSV-TK-catalyzed trapping (phosphorylation) of the thymidine analog [{sup 131}I]-2'-fluoro-2'-deoxy-1-{beta}-D-arabinofuransyl-5-iodo-uracil (FIAU) as a means of stably labeling such T cells for in vivo trafficking (including tumor targeting) studies. Because of the radiosensitivity of lymphocytes and the potentially high absorbed dose to the nucleus from intracellular {sup 131}I (even at tracer levels), the nucleus absorbed dose (D{sub n}) and dose-dependent immune functionality were evaluated for NIT {sup +} T cells labeled ex vivo in [{sup 131}I ]FIAU-containing medium. Based on in vitro kinetic studies of [{sup 131}I ]FIAU uptake by NIT {sup +} T cells, D{sub n} was calculated using an adaptation of the MIRD formalism and the recently published MIRD cellular S factors. Immune cytotoxicity of [{sup 131}I ]FIAU-labeled cells was assayed against {sup 51}Cr-labeled target cells [B-lymphoblastoid cells (BLCLs) ] in a standard 4-h release assay. At median nuclear absorbed doses up to 830 cGy, a {sup 51}Cr-release assay against BLCLs showed no loss of immune cytotoxicity, thus demonstrating the functional integrity of genetically transduced, tumor-reactive T cells labeled at this dose level for in vivo cell trafficking and tumor targeting studies. (orig.)

  3. Donor-Derived Regulatory Dendritic Cell Infusion Maintains Donor-Reactive CD4+CTLA4hi T Cells in Non-Human Primate Renal Allograft Recipients Treated with CD28 Co-Stimulation Blockade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed B. Ezzelarab

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Donor-derived regulatory dendritic cell (DCreg infusion before transplantation, significantly prolongs renal allograft survival in non-human primates. This is associated with enhanced expression of the immunoregulatory molecules cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen (Ag 4 (CTLA4 and programmed cell death protein 1 (PD1 by host donor-reactive T cells. In rodents and humans, CD28 co-stimulatory pathway blockade with the fusion protein CTLA4:Ig (CTLA4Ig is associated with reduced differentiation and development of regulatory T cells (Treg. We hypothesized that upregulation of CTLA4 by donor-reactive CD4+ T cells in DCreg-infused recipients treated with CTLA4Ig, might be associated with higher incidences of donor-reactive CD4+ T cells with a Treg phenotype. In normal rhesus monkeys, allo-stimulated CD4+CTLA4hi, but not CD4+CTLA4med/lo T cells exhibited a regulatory phenotype, irrespective of PD1 expression. CTLA4Ig significantly reduced the incidence of CD4+CTLA4hi, but not CD4+CTLA4med/lo T cells following allo-stimulation, associated with a significant reduction in the CD4+CTLA4hi/CD4+CTLA4med/lo T cell ratio. In CTLA4Ig-treated renal allograft recipient monkeys, there was a marked reduction in circulating donor-reactive CD4+CTLA4hi T cells. In contrast, in CTLA4Ig-treated monkeys with DCreg infusion, no such reduction was observed. In parallel, the donor-reactive CD4+CTLA4hi/CD4+CTLA4med/lo T cell ratio was reduced significantly in graft recipients without DCreg infusion, but increased in those given DCreg. These observations suggest that pre-transplant DCreg infusion promotes and maintains donor-reactive CD4+CTLA4hi T cells with a regulatory phenotype after transplantation, even in the presence of CD28 co-stimulation blockade.

  4. A ReaxFF-based molecular dynamics study of the mechanisms of interactions between reactive oxygen plasma species and the Candida albicans cell wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, T.; Shi, L.; Zhang, Y. T.; Zou, L.; Zhang, L.

    2017-10-01

    Atmospheric pressure non-equilibrium plasmas have attracted significant attention and have been widely used to inactivate pathogens, yet the mechanisms underlying the interactions between plasma-generated species and bio-organisms have not been elucidated clearly. In this paper, reactive molecular dynamics simulations are employed to investigate the mechanisms of interactions between reactive oxygen plasma species (O, OH, and O2) and β-1,6-glucan (a model for the C. albicans cell wall) from a microscopic point of view. Our simulations show that O and OH species can break structurally important C-C and C-O bonds, while O2 molecules exhibit only weak, non-bonded interactions with β-1,6-glucan. Hydrogen abstraction from hydroxyl or CH groups occurs first in all bond cleavage mechanisms. This is followed by a cascade of bond cleavage and double bond formation events. These lead to the destruction of the fungal cell wall. O and OH have similar effects related to their bond cleavage mechanisms. Our simulation results provide fundamental insights into the mechanisms underlying the interactions between reactive oxygen plasma species and the fungal cell wall of C. albicans at the atomic level.

  5. T Cell Reactivity against Mycolyl Transferase Antigen 85 of M. tuberculosis in HIV-TB Coinfected Subjects and in AIDS Patients Suffering from Tuberculosis and Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal Launois

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The mycolyl transferase antigen 85 complex is a major secreted protein family from mycobacterial culture filtrate, demonstrating powerful T cell stimulatory properties in most HIV-negative, tuberculin-positive volunteers with latent M.tuberculosis infection and only weak responses in HIV-negative tuberculosis patients. Here, we have analyzed T cell reactivity against PPD and Ag85 in HIV-infected individuals, without or with clinical symptoms of tuberculosis, and in AIDS patients with disease caused by nontuberculous mycobacteria. Whereas responses to PPD were not significantly different in HIV-negative and HIV-positive tuberculin-positive volunteers, responses to Ag85 were significantly decreased in the HIV-positive (CDC-A and CDC-B group. Tuberculosis patients demonstrated low T cell reactivity against Ag85, irrespective of HIV infection, and finally AIDS patients suffering from NTM infections were completely nonreactive to Ag85. A one-year follow-up of twelve HIV-positive tuberculin-positive individuals indicated a decreased reactivity against Ag85 in patients developing clinical tuberculosis, highlighting the protective potential of this antigen.

  6. Local CD4 and CD8 T-cell reactivity to HSV-1 antigens documents broad viral protein expression and immune competence in latently infected human trigeminal ganglia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique van Velzen

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 infection results in lifelong chronic infection of trigeminal ganglion (TG neurons, also referred to as neuronal HSV-1 latency, with periodic reactivation leading to recrudescent herpetic disease in some persons. HSV-1 proteins are expressed in a temporally coordinated fashion during lytic infection, but their expression pattern during latent infection is largely unknown. Selective retention of HSV-1 reactive T-cells in human TG suggests their role in controlling reactivation by recognizing locally expressed HSV-1 proteins. We characterized the HSV-1 proteins recognized by virus-specific CD4 and CD8 T-cells recovered from human HSV-1-infected TG. T-cell clusters, consisting of both CD4 and CD8 T-cells, surrounded neurons and expressed mRNAs and proteins consistent with in situ antigen recognition and antiviral function. HSV-1 proteome-wide scans revealed that intra-TG T-cell responses included both CD4 and CD8 T-cells directed to one to three HSV-1 proteins per person. HSV-1 protein ICP6 was targeted by CD8 T-cells in 4 of 8 HLA-discordant donors. In situ tetramer staining demonstrated HSV-1-specific CD8 T-cells juxtaposed to TG neurons. Intra-TG retention of virus-specific CD4 T-cells, validated to the HSV-1 peptide level, implies trafficking of viral proteins from neurons to HLA class II-expressing non-neuronal cells for antigen presentation. The diversity of viral proteins targeted by TG T-cells across all kinetic and functional classes of viral proteins suggests broad HSV-1 protein expression, and viral antigen processing and presentation, in latently infected human TG. Collectively, the human TG represents an immunocompetent environment for both CD4 and CD8 T-cell recognition of HSV-1 proteins expressed during latent infection. HSV-1 proteins recognized by TG-resident T-cells, particularly ICP6 and VP16, are potential HSV-1 vaccine candidates.

  7. Curcumin Derivative Epigenetically Reactivates Nrf2 Antioxidative Stress Signaling in Mouse Prostate Cancer TRAMP C1 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenji; Su, Zheng-Yuan; Guo, Yue; Zhang, Chengyue; Wu, Renyi; Gao, Linbo; Zheng, Xi; Du, Zhi-Yun; Zhang, Kun; Kong, Ah-Ng

    2018-02-19

    The carcinogenesis of prostate cancer (PCa) in TRAMP model is highly correlated with hypermethylation in the promoter region of Nrf2 and the accompanying reduced transcription of Nrf2 and its regulated detoxifying genes. We aimed to investigate the effects of (3E,5E)-3,5-bis-(3,4,5-trimethoxybenzylidene)-tetrahydro-thiopyran-4-one (F10) and (3E,5E)-3,5-bis-(3,4,5-trimethoxy-benzylidene)-tetrahydropyran-4-one (E10), two synthetic curcumin derivatives, on restoring Nrf2 activity in TRAMP C1 cells. HepG2-C8 cells transfected with an antioxidant-response element (ARE)-luciferase vector were treated with F10, E10, curcumin, and sulforaphane (SFN) to compare their effects on Nrf2-ARE pathways. We performed real-time quantitative PCR and Western blotting to investigate the effects of F10 and E10 on Nrf2, correlated phase II detoxification genes. We also measured expression and activity of DNMTand HDAC enzymes. Enrichment of H3K27me3 on the promoter region of Nrf2 was explored with a chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay. Methylation of the CpG region in Nrf2 promoter was doubly examined by bisulfite genomic sequencing (BGS) and methylation DNA immunoprecipitation (MeDIP). Compared with curcumin and SFN, F10 is more potent in activating Nrf2-ARE pathways. Both F10 and E10 enhanced level of Nrf2 and the correlated phase II detoxifying genes. BGS and MeDIP assays indicated that F10 but not E10 hypomethylated the Nrf2 promoter. F10 also downregulated the protein level of DNMT1, DNMT3a, DNMT3b, HDAC1, HDAC4, and HDAC7 and the activity of DNMTs and HDACs. F10 but not E10 effectively reduced the accumulation of H3k27me3 on the promoter of Nrf2. F10 and E10 can activate the Nrf2-ARE pathway and increase the level of Nrf2 and correlated phase II detoxification genes. The reactivation effect on Nrf2 by F10 in TRAMP C1 may come from demethylation, decrease of HDACs, and inhibition of H3k27me3 accumulation.

  8. Reactive Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eren Erken

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Reactive arthritis is an acute, sterile, non-suppurative and inflammatory arthropaty which has occured as a result of an infectious processes, mostly after gastrointestinal and genitourinary tract infections. Reiter syndrome is a frequent type of reactive arthritis. Both reactive arthritis and Reiter syndrome belong to the group of seronegative spondyloarthropathies, associated with HLA-B27 positivity and characterized by ongoing inflammation after an infectious episode. The classical triad of Reiter syndrome is defined as arthritis, conjuctivitis and urethritis and is seen only in one third of patients with Reiter syndrome. Recently, seronegative asymmetric arthritis and typical extraarticular involvement are thought to be adequate for the diagnosis. However, there is no established criteria for the diagnosis of reactive arthritis and the number of randomized and controlled studies about the therapy is not enough. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2013; 22(3.000: 283-299

  9. Characterization of T-regulatory cells, induced by immature dendritic cells, which inhibit enteroantigen-reactive colitis-inducing T-cell responses in vitro and in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gad, Monika; Kristensen, Nanna N; Kury, Evelyn

    2004-01-01

    -injected into severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice with colitis-inducing CD4(+) CD25(-) T cells. Both unfractionated CD4(+) and purified CD25(+) Treg cells fully protected the recipients against the development of colitis. In contrast, co-transfer of fractionated CD25(-) T cells offered no protection against...

  10. Imaging lysosomal highly reactive oxygen species and lighting up cancer cells and tumors enabled by a Si-rhodamine-based near-infrared fluorescent probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongxing; Liu, Jing; Liu, Chenlu; Yu, Pengcheng; Sun, Minjia; Yan, Xiaohan; Guo, Jian-Ping; Guo, Wei

    2017-07-01

    Lysosomes have recently been regarded as the attractive pharmacological targets for selectively killing of cancer cells via lysosomal cell death (LCD) pathway that is closely associated with reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, the details on the ROS-induced LCD of cancer cells are still poorly understood, partially due to the absence of a lysosome-targetable, robust, and biocompatible imaging tool for ROS. In this work, we brought forward a Si-rhodamine-based fluorescent probe, named PSiR, which could selectively and sensitively image the pathologically more relavent highly reactive oxygen species (hROS: HClO, HO, and ONOO - ) in lysosomes of cancer cells. Compared with many of the existing hROS fluorescent probes, its superiorities are mainly embodied in the high stability against autoxidation and photoxidation, near-infrared exitation and emission, fast fluorescence off-on response, and specific lysosomal localization. Its practicality has been demonstrated by the real-time imaging of hROS generation in lysosomes of human non-small-cell lung cancer cells stimulated by anticancer drug β-lapachone. Moreover, the probe was sensitive enough for basal hROS in cancer cells, allowing its further imaging applications to discriminate not only cancer cells from normal cells, but also tumors from healthy tissues. Overall, our results strongly indicated that PSiR is a very promising imaging tool for the studies of ROS-related LCD of cancer cells, screening of new anticancer drugs, and early diagnosis of cancers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Nicotine stimulates urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor expression and cell invasiveness through mitogen-activated protein kinase and reactive oxygen species signaling in ECV304 endothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khoi, Pham Ngoc; Park, Jung Sun; Kim, Nam Ho; Jung, Young Do, E-mail: ydjung@chonnam.ac.kr

    2012-03-01

    Urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) expression is elevated during inflammation, tissue remodeling and in many human cancers. This study investigated the effect of nicotine, a major alkaloid in tobacco, on uPAR expression and cell invasiveness in ECV304 endothelial cells. Nicotine stimulated uPAR expression in a dose-dependent manner and activated extracellular signal-regulated kinases-1/2 (Erk-1/2), c-Jun amino-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK). Specific inhibitors of MEK-1 (PD98059) and JNK (SP600125) inhibited the nicotine-induced uPAR expression, while the p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580 did not. Expression vectors encoding dominant negative MEK-1 (pMCL-K97M) and JNK (TAM67) also prevented nicotine-induced uPAR promoter activity. The intracellular hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) content was increased by nicotine treatment. The antioxidant N-acetylcysteine prevented nicotine-activated production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and uPAR expression. Furthermore, exogenous H{sub 2}O{sub 2} increased uPAR mRNA expression. Deleted and site-directed mutagenesis demonstrated the involvement of the binding sites of transcription factor nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) and activator protein (AP)-1 in the nicotine-induced uPAR expression. Studies with expression vectors encoding mutated NF-κB signaling molecules and AP-1 decoy confirmed that NF-κB and AP-1 were essential for the nicotine-stimulated uPAR expression. MAPK (Erk-1/2 and JNK) and ROS functioned as upstream signaling molecules in the activation of AP-1 and NF-κB, respectively. In addition, ECV304 endothelial cells treated with nicotine displayed markedly enhanced invasiveness, which was partially abrogated by uPAR neutralizing antibodies. The data indicate that nicotine induces uPAR expression via the MAPK/AP-1 and ROS/NF-κB signaling pathways and, in turn, stimulates invasiveness in human ECV304 endothelial cells. -- Highlights: ► Endothelial cells

  12. Nicotine stimulates urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor expression and cell invasiveness through mitogen-activated protein kinase and reactive oxygen species signaling in ECV304 endothelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoi, Pham Ngoc; Park, Jung Sun; Kim, Nam Ho; Jung, Young Do

    2012-01-01

    Urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) expression is elevated during inflammation, tissue remodeling and in many human cancers. This study investigated the effect of nicotine, a major alkaloid in tobacco, on uPAR expression and cell invasiveness in ECV304 endothelial cells. Nicotine stimulated uPAR expression in a dose-dependent manner and activated extracellular signal-regulated kinases-1/2 (Erk-1/2), c-Jun amino-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK). Specific inhibitors of MEK-1 (PD98059) and JNK (SP600125) inhibited the nicotine-induced uPAR expression, while the p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580 did not. Expression vectors encoding dominant negative MEK-1 (pMCL-K97M) and JNK (TAM67) also prevented nicotine-induced uPAR promoter activity. The intracellular hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) content was increased by nicotine treatment. The antioxidant N-acetylcysteine prevented nicotine-activated production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and uPAR expression. Furthermore, exogenous H 2 O 2 increased uPAR mRNA expression. Deleted and site-directed mutagenesis demonstrated the involvement of the binding sites of transcription factor nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) and activator protein (AP)-1 in the nicotine-induced uPAR expression. Studies with expression vectors encoding mutated NF-κB signaling molecules and AP-1 decoy confirmed that NF-κB and AP-1 were essential for the nicotine-stimulated uPAR expression. MAPK (Erk-1/2 and JNK) and ROS functioned as upstream signaling molecules in the activation of AP-1 and NF-κB, respectively. In addition, ECV304 endothelial cells treated with nicotine displayed markedly enhanced invasiveness, which was partially abrogated by uPAR neutralizing antibodies. The data indicate that nicotine induces uPAR expression via the MAPK/AP-1 and ROS/NF-κB signaling pathways and, in turn, stimulates invasiveness in human ECV304 endothelial cells. -- Highlights: ► Endothelial cells treated with nicotine

  13. Acyl and silyl group effects in reactivity-based one-pot glycosylation: synthesis of embryonic stem cell surface carbohydrates Lc4 and IV(2)Fuc-Lc4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Yun; Lu, Xin-An; Zulueta, Medel Manuel L; Tsai, Chih-Ming; Lin, Kuo-I; Hung, Shang-Cheng; Wong, Chi-Huey

    2012-03-14

    Relative reactivity evaluations showed the graded arming of toluenyl thioglucosides by variously positioned silyl groups but not by their acyl counterparts. These findings were applied in reactivity-based one-pot assembly of linker-attached Lc(4) and IV(2)Fuc-Lc(4), which are components of human embryonic stem cell surface. The sugar-galectin-1 binding was also examined.

  14. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) reactivation is a frequent event after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) and quantitatively predicts EBV-lymphoproliferative disease following T-cell--depleted SCT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Esser, J W; van der Holt, B; Meijer, E; Niesters, H G; Trenschel, R; Thijsen, S F; van Loon, A M; Frassoni, F; Bacigalupo, A; Schaefer, U W; Osterhaus, A D; Gratama, J W; Löwenberg, B; Verdonck, L F; Cornelissen, J J

    2001-01-01

    Reactivation of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) may evoke a protective cellular immune response or may be complicated by the development of EBV-lymphoproliferative disease (EBV-LPD). So far, very little is known about the incidence, recurrence, and

  15. Cr(VI) induces mitochondrial-mediated and caspase-dependent apoptosis through reactive oxygen species-mediated p53 activation in JB6 Cl41 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, Young-Ok; Hitron, J. Andrew; Wang Xin; Chang Qingshan; Pan Jingju; Zhang Zhuo; Liu Jiankang; Wang Shuxia; Lee, Jeong-Chae; Shi Xianglin

    2010-01-01

    Cr(VI) compounds are known to cause serious toxic and carcinogenic effects. Cr(VI) exposure can lead to a severe damage to the skin, but the mechanisms involved in the Cr(VI)-mediated toxicity in the skin are unclear. The present study examined whether Cr(VI) induces cell death by apoptosis or necrosis using mouse skin epidermal cell line, JB6 Cl41 cells. We also investigated the cellular mechanisms of Cr(VI)-induced cell death. This study showed that Cr(VI) induced apoptotic cell death in a dose-dependent manner, as demonstrated by the appearance of cell shrinkage, the migration of cells into the sub-G1 phase, the increase of Annexin V positively stained cells, and the formation of nuclear DNA ladders. Cr(VI) treatment resulted in the increases of mitochondrial membrane depolarization and caspases activation. Electron spin resonance (ESR) and fluorescence analysis revealed that Cr(VI) increased intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as hydrogen peroxide and superoxide anion radical in dose-dependent manner. Blockage of p53 by si-RNA transfection suppressed mitochondrial changes of Bcl-2 family composition, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, caspase activation and PARP cleavage, leading to the inhibition of Cr(VI)-induced apoptosis. Further, catalase treatment prevented p53 phosphorylation stimulated by Cr(VI) with the concomitant inhibition of caspase activation. These results suggest that Cr(VI) induced a mitochondrial-mediated and caspase-dependent apoptosis in skin epidermal cells through activation of p53, which are mainly mediated by reactive oxidants generated by the chemical.

  16. Myricetin-induced apoptosis of triple-negative breast cancer cells is mediated by the iron-dependent generation of reactive oxygen species from hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knickle, Allison; Fernando, Wasundara; Greenshields, Anna L; Rupasinghe, H P Vasantha; Hoskin, David W

    2018-05-06

    Myricetin is a dietary phytochemical with anticancer activity; however, the effect of myricetin on breast cancer cells remains unclear. Here, we show that myricetin inhibited the growth of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cells but was less inhibitory for normal cells. The effect of myricetin was comparable to epigallocatechin gallate and doxorubicin, and greater than resveratrol and cisplatin. Myricetin-treated TNBC cells showed evidence of early and late apoptosis/necrosis, which was associated with intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation, extracellular regulated kinase 1/2 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase activation, mitochondrial membrane destabilization and cytochrome c release, and double-strand DNA breaks. The antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine protected myricetin-treated TNBC cells from cytotoxicity due to DNA damage. Myricetin also induced hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) production in cell-free culture medium, as well as in the presence of TNBC cells and normal cells. In addition, deferriprone-mediated inhibition of intracellular ROS generation via the iron-dependent Fenton reaction and inhibition of extracellular ROS accumulation with superoxide dismutase plus catalase prevented myricetin-induced cytotoxicity in TNBC <