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Sample records for cells protect neurons

  1. Recombinant AAV-mediated Expression of Human BDNF Protects Neurons against Cell Apoptosis in Aβ-induced Neuronal Damage Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Zhaohui; MA Dongliang; FENG Gaifeng; MA Yanbing; HU Haitao

    2007-01-01

    The human brain-derived neurotrophic factor (hBDNF) gene was cloned by polymerase chain reaction and the recombinant adeno-associated viral vector inserted with hBDNF gene (AAV-hBDNF) was constructed. Cultured rat hippocampal neurons were treated with Aβ25-35 and serued as the experimental Aβ-induced neuronal damage model (AD model), and the AD model was infected with AAV-hBDNF to explore neuroprotective effects of expression of BDNF. Cell viability was assayed by MTT. The expression of bcl-2 anti-apoptosis protein was detected by immunocytochemical staining. The change of intracellular free Ca ion ([Ca2+]i) was measured by laser scanning confocal microscopy. The results showed that BDNF had protective effects against Aβ-induced neuronal damage. The expression of the bcl-2 anti-apoptosis protein was raised significantly and the balance of [Ca2+]i was maintained in the AAV-hBDNF treatment group as compared with AD model group. These data suggested that recombinant AAV mediated a stable expression of hBDNF in cultured hippocampal neurons and resulted in significant neuron protective effects in AD model. The BDNF may reduce neuron apoptosis through increasing the expression of the bcl-2 anti-apoptosis protein and inhibiting intracellular calcium overload. The viral vector-mediated gene expression of BDNF may pave the way of a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease.

  2. Arctigenin protects against neuronal hearing loss by promoting neural stem cell survival and differentiation.

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    Huang, Xinghua; Chen, Mo; Ding, Yan; Wang, Qin

    2016-12-27

    Neuronal hearing loss has become a prevalent health problem. This study focused on the function of arctigenin (ARC) in promoting survival and neuronal differentiation of mouse cochlear neural stem cells (NSCs), and its protection against gentamicin (GMC) induced neuronal hearing loss. Mouse cochlea was used to isolate NSCs, which were subsequently cultured in vitro. The effects of ARC on NSC survival, neurosphere formation, differentiation of NSCs, neurite outgrowth, and neural excitability in neuronal network in vitro were examined. Mechanotransduction ability demonstrated by intact cochlea, auditory brainstem response (ABR), and distortion product optoacoustic emissions (DPOAE) amplitude in mice were measured to evaluate effects of ARC on GMC-induced neuronal hearing loss. ARC increased survival, neurosphere formation, neuron differentiation of NSCs in mouse cochlear in vitro. ARC also promoted the outgrowth of neurites, as well as neural excitability of the NSC-differentiated neuron culture. Additionally, ARC rescued mechanotransduction capacity, restored the threshold shifts of ABR and DPOAE in our GMC ototoxicity murine model. This study supports the potential therapeutic role of ARC in promoting both NSCs proliferation and differentiation in vitro to functional neurons, thus supporting its protective function in the therapeutic treatment of neuropathic hearing loss in vivo.

  3. pSVPoMcat modifying Schwann cell to protect injured spinal neurons in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈礼刚; 高立达; 朴永旭; 毛伯镛; 曾凡俊

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the protective effect of pSVPoMcat (myelin basic protein microgene)modifying Schwann cell on injured spinal neurons.Methods: A model of rat spinal cord injured by hemisection was used. One hundred and twenty healthy SD rats of both sexes weighing 250-300 g were divided into three groups: Group A (n=40, treated with implantation of pSVPoMcat modifying Schwann cell), Group B (n= 40, treated with implantation of Schwann cell only) and Group C (n=400, treated with sham operation as the control). One week after operation the rat functional recovery was observed dynamically by using combined behavioral score (CBS) and cortical somatasensory evoked potentials, the spinal cord sections were stained by Nissl, acid phosphatase enzyme histochemistry and cell apoptosis was examined by methye green, terminal deoxynucleotidyl and the dUTP Nick end labeling technique. Quantitative analysis was done by computer image analysis system.Results: In Group A the injured neurons recovered well morphologically. The imaging analysis showed a result of Group A>Group B>Group C in the size of the neurons (P<0.01). The percentage of ACP (acid phosphatase) stained area and the rate of apoptosis sequence were groups Acell implantation has protective effect on injured spinal neurons and promotes recovery of injured spinal cord function in rats.

  4. Bifunctional apoptosis inhibitor (BAR) protects neurons from diverse cell death pathways.

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    Roth, W; Kermer, P; Krajewska, M; Welsh, K; Davis, S; Krajewski, S; Reed, J C

    2003-10-01

    The bifunctional apoptosis regulator (BAR) is a multidomain protein that was originally identified as an inhibitor of Bax-induced apoptosis. Immunoblot analysis of normal human tissues demonstrated high BAR expression in the brain, compared to low or absent expression in other organs. Immunohistochemical staining of human adult tissues revealed that the BAR protein is predominantly expressed by neurons in the central nervous system. Immunofluorescence microscopy indicated that BAR localizes mainly to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of cells. Overexpression of BAR in CSM 14.1 neuronal cells resulted in significant protection from a broad range of cell death stimuli, including agents that activate apoptotic pathways involving mitochondria, TNF-family death receptors, and ER stress. Downregulation of BAR by antisense oligonucleotides sensitized neuronal cells to induction of apoptosis. Moreover, the search for novel interaction partners of BAR identified several candidate proteins that might contribute to the regulation of neuronal apoptosis (HIP1, Hippi, and Bap31). Taken together, the expression pattern and functional data suggest that the BAR protein is involved in the regulation of neuronal survival.

  5. Protective Effect of Edaravone in Primary Cerebellar Granule Neurons against Iodoacetic Acid-Induced Cell Injury

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    Xinhua Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Edaravone (EDA is clinically used for treatment of acute ischemic stroke in Japan and China due to its potent free radical-scavenging effect. However, it has yet to be determined whether EDA can attenuate iodoacetic acid- (IAA- induced neuronal death in vitro. In the present study, we investigated the effect of EDA on damage of IAA-induced primary cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs and its possible underlying mechanisms. We found that EDA attenuated IAA-induced cell injury in CGNs. Moreover, EDA significantly reduced intracellular reactive oxidative stress production, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, and caspase 3 activity induced by IAA. Taken together, EDA protected CGNs against IAA-induced neuronal damage, which may be attributed to its antiapoptotic and antioxidative activities.

  6. Protective Effect of Edaravone in Primary Cerebellar Granule Neurons against Iodoacetic Acid-Induced Cell Injury

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    Zhou, Xinhua; Zhu, Longjun; Wang, Liang; Guo, Baojian; Zhang, Gaoxiao; Sun, Yewei; Zhang, Zaijun; Lee, Simon Ming-Yuen; Yu, Pei; Wang, Yuqiang

    2015-01-01

    Edaravone (EDA) is clinically used for treatment of acute ischemic stroke in Japan and China due to its potent free radical-scavenging effect. However, it has yet to be determined whether EDA can attenuate iodoacetic acid- (IAA-) induced neuronal death in vitro. In the present study, we investigated the effect of EDA on damage of IAA-induced primary cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) and its possible underlying mechanisms. We found that EDA attenuated IAA-induced cell injury in CGNs. Moreover, EDA significantly reduced intracellular reactive oxidative stress production, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, and caspase 3 activity induced by IAA. Taken together, EDA protected CGNs against IAA-induced neuronal damage, which may be attributed to its antiapoptotic and antioxidative activities. PMID:26557222

  7. Cortical excitatory neurons become protected from cell division during neurogenesis in an Rb family-dependent manner.

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    Oshikawa, Mio; Okada, Kei; Nakajima, Kazunori; Ajioka, Itsuki

    2013-06-01

    Cell cycle dysregulation leads to abnormal proliferation and cell death in a context-specific manner. Cell cycle progression driven via the Rb pathway forces neurons to undergo S-phase, resulting in cell death associated with the progression of neuronal degeneration. Nevertheless, some Rb- and Rb family (Rb, p107 and p130)-deficient differentiating neurons can proliferate and form tumors. Here, we found in mouse that differentiating cerebral cortical excitatory neurons underwent S-phase progression but not cell division after acute Rb family inactivation in differentiating neurons. However, the differentiating neurons underwent cell division and proliferated when Rb family members were inactivated in cortical progenitors. Differentiating neurons generated from Rb(-/-); p107(-/-); p130(-/-) (Rb-TKO) progenitors, but not acutely inactivated Rb-TKO differentiating neurons, activated the DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair pathway without increasing trimethylation at lysine 20 of histone H4 (H4K20), which has a role in protection against DNA damage. The activation of the DSB repair pathway was essential for the cell division of Rb-TKO differentiating neurons. These results suggest that newly born cortical neurons from progenitors become epigenetically protected from DNA damage and cell division in an Rb family-dependent manner.

  8. pSVPoMcat modifying Schwann cell to protect injured spinal neurons in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈礼刚; 高立达; 等

    2002-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the protective effect of pSVPoMcat(myelin basic protein microgene)modifying Schwann cell on injured spinal neurons.Methods;A model of rat spinal cord injured by hemisection was used.One hundred and twenty healthy SD rats of both sexes weighing 250-300g were divided into three groups:GroupA(n=40,treated with implantation of pSPVoMcat modifying Schwann cell),GroupB(n=40,treated with implantation of Schwann cell only)and GroupC(n=400,treated with sham operation as the control).One week after operation the rat functional recovery was observed dynamically by using combined behavioral score(CBS)and cortical somatasensory evoked potentials,the spinal cord sections were stained by Nissl,acid phosphatase enzyme histochemistry and cell apoptosis was examined by metye green,terminal deoxynucleotidyl and the dUTP Nick end labeling technique.Quantitative analysis was done by computer image analysis system.Results:In Group A the injured neurons recovered well morphologically.The imaging analysis showed a result of GroupA>GroupB>Group Cin the size of the neurons (P<0.01),The percentage of ACP(acid phosphatase) stained area and the rate of apoptosis sequence were groupsAcell implantation has protective effect on injured spinal neurons and promotes recovery of injured spinal cord function in rats.

  9. Decay accelerating factor (CD55 protects neuronal cells from chemical hypoxia-induced injury

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    Tsokos George C

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Activated complement system is known to mediate neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration following exposure to hypoxic-ischemic insults. Therefore, inhibition of the complement activation cascade may represent a potential therapeutic strategy for the management of ischemic brain injury. Decay-accelerating factor (DAF, also known as CD55 inhibits complement activation by suppressing the function of C3/C5 convertases, thereby limiting local generation or deposition of C3a/C5a and membrane attack complex (MAC or C5b-9 production. The present study investigates the ability of DAF to protect primary cultured neuronal cells subjected to sodium cyanide (NaCN-induced hypoxia from degeneration and apoptosis. Methods Cultured primary cortical neurons from embryonic Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned one of four groups: control, DAF treatment alone, hypoxic, or hypoxic treated with DAF. Hypoxic cultures were exposed to NaCN for 1 hour, rinsed, followed by 24 hour exposure to 200 ng/ml of recombinant human DAF in normal medium. Human DAF was used in the present study and it has been shown to effectively regulate complement activation in rats. Neuronal cell function, morphology and viability were investigated by measuring plateau depolarization potential, counting the number dendritic spines, and observing TUNEL and MTT assays. Complement C3, C3a, C3a receptor (R production, C3a-C3aR interaction and MAC formation were assessed along with the generation of activated caspase-9, activated caspase-3, and activated Src. Results When compared to controls, hypoxic cells had fewer dendritic spines, reduced plateau depolarization accompanied by increased apoptotic activity and accumulation of MAC, as well as up-regulation of C3, C3a and C3aR, enhancement of C3a-C3aR engagement, and elevated caspase and Src activity. Treatment of hypoxic cells with 200 ng/ml of recombinant human DAF resulted in attenuation of neuronal apoptosis and exerted

  10. Basic fibroblast growth factor protects auditory neurons and hair cells from noise exposure and glutamate neurotoxicity

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    翟所强; 王大君; 王嘉陵

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine protectivie effects of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) on cochlear neurons and hair cells in vitro and in vivo. In experiment I, cultured spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) prepared from P3 mice were exposed to 20mM glutamate for 2 hours before the culture medium was replaced with fresh medium containing 0, 25, 50, and 100 ng/ml bFGF, respectively. Fourteen days later, all cultures were fixed with 4% paraformaldehyde, and stained with 1% toluidine blue. The number of surviving SGNs were counted and the length of SGNs neurites were measured. Exposure to 20 mM glutamate for 24 hours resulted in an inhibition on neurite outgrowth of SGNs and elevated cell death. Treatment of the cultures with bFGF led to promotion of neurite outgrowth and elevated number of surviving SGNs. Effects of bFGF were dose dependent with the highest potency at 100 ng/ml. In experiment Ⅱ, in vivo studies were carried out with guinea pigs in which bFGF or artificial perilymph was perfused into the cochlea to assess possible protective effects of bFGF on cochlear hair cells and compound action potentials(CAP). The CAPs were measured before, immediatly and 48 hours after exposure to noise. Significant differences in CAP were observed (p<0. 05 ) among the bFGF perfused group, control group(t =3. 896 ) and artificial perilymph perfused group (t =2. 520) at 48 hours after noise exposure, Cochleae were removed and hair cell Loss was analyzed in surface preparations prepared from all experimental animals. Acoustic trauma caused loss of 651 and 687 inner hair cells in the control and artificial perilymph perfused group, respectively. In sharp contrast, only 31 inner hair cells were lost in the bFGF perfused ears. Similarly, more outer hair cells died in the control and perilymph perfuesed group (41830 and 41968, respectively) than in the group treated with bFGF (34258). Our results demonstrate that bFGF protected SGNs against glutmate

  11. Orexins protect neuronal cell cultures against hypoxic stress: an involvement of Akt signaling.

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    Sokołowska, Paulina; Urbańska, Anna; Biegańska, Kaja; Wagner, Waldemar; Ciszewski, Wojciech; Namiecińska, Magdalena; Zawilska, Jolanta B

    2014-01-01

    Orexins A and B are peptides produced mainly by hypothalamic neurons that project to numerous brain structures. We have previously demonstrated that rat cortical neurons express both types of orexin receptors, and their activation by orexins initiates different intracellular signals. The present study aimed to determine the effect of orexins on the Akt kinase activation in the rat neuronal cultures and the significance of that response in neurons subjected to hypoxic stress. We report the first evidence that orexins A and B stimulated Akt in cortical neurons in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Orexin B more potently than orexin A increased Akt phosphorylation, but the maximal effect of both peptides on the kinase activation was very similar. Next, cultured cortical neurons were challenged with cobalt chloride, an inducer of reactive oxygen species and hypoxia-mediated signaling pathways. Under conditions of chemical hypoxia, orexins potently increased neuronal viability and protected cortical neurons against oxidative stress. Our results also indicate that Akt kinase plays an important role in the pro-survival effects of orexins in neurons, which implies a possible mechanism of the orexin-induced neuroprotection.

  12. Krebs Cycle Intermediates Protective against Oxidative Stress by Modulating the Level of Reactive Oxygen Species in Neuronal HT22 Cells.

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    Sawa, Kenta; Uematsu, Takumi; Korenaga, Yusuke; Hirasawa, Ryuya; Kikuchi, Masatoshi; Murata, Kyohei; Zhang, Jian; Gai, Xiaoqing; Sakamoto, Kazuichi; Koyama, Tomoyuki; Satoh, Takumi

    2017-03-16

    Krebs cycle intermediates (KCIs) are reported to function as energy substrates in mitochondria and to exert antioxidants effects on the brain. The present study was designed to identify which KCIs are effective neuroprotective compounds against oxidative stress in neuronal cells. Here we found that pyruvate, oxaloacetate, and α-ketoglutarate, but not lactate, citrate, iso-citrate, succinate, fumarate, or malate, protected HT22 cells against hydrogen peroxide-mediated toxicity. These three intermediates reduced the production of hydrogen peroxide-activated reactive oxygen species, measured in terms of 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate fluorescence. In contrast, none of the KCIs-used at 1 mM-protected against cell death induced by high concentrations of glutamate-another type of oxidative stress-induced neuronal cell death. Because these protective KCIs did not have any toxic effects (at least up to 10 mM), they have potential use for therapeutic intervention against chronic neurodegenerative diseases.

  13. Krebs Cycle Intermediates Protective against Oxidative Stress by Modulating the Level of Reactive Oxygen Species in Neuronal HT22 Cells

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    Kenta Sawa

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Krebs cycle intermediates (KCIs are reported to function as energy substrates in mitochondria and to exert antioxidants effects on the brain. The present study was designed to identify which KCIs are effective neuroprotective compounds against oxidative stress in neuronal cells. Here we found that pyruvate, oxaloacetate, and α-ketoglutarate, but not lactate, citrate, iso-citrate, succinate, fumarate, or malate, protected HT22 cells against hydrogen peroxide-mediated toxicity. These three intermediates reduced the production of hydrogen peroxide-activated reactive oxygen species, measured in terms of 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescein diacetate fluorescence. In contrast, none of the KCIs—used at 1 mM—protected against cell death induced by high concentrations of glutamate—another type of oxidative stress-induced neuronal cell death. Because these protective KCIs did not have any toxic effects (at least up to 10 mM, they have potential use for therapeutic intervention against chronic neurodegenerative diseases.

  14. Rhinacanthus nasutus protects cultured neuronal cells against hypoxia induced cell death.

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    Brimson, James M; Tencomnao, Tewin

    2011-07-26

    Rhinacanthus nasutus (L.) Kurz (Acanthaceae) is an herb native to Thailand and Southeast Asia, known for its antioxidant properties. Hypoxia leads to an increase in reactive oxygen species in cells and is a leading cause of neuronal damage. Cell death caused by hypoxia has been linked with a number of neurodegenerative diseases including some forms of dementia and stroke, as well as the build up of reactive oxygen species which can lead to diseases such as Huntington's disease, Parkinson's disease and Alzeheimer's disease. In this study we used an airtight culture container and the Mitsubishi Gas Company anaeropack along with the MTT assay, LDH assay and the trypan blue exlusion assay to show that 1 and 10 µg mL⁻¹ root extract of R. nasutus is able to significantly prevent the death of HT-22 cells subjected to hypoxic conditions, and 0.1 to 10 µg mL⁻¹ had no toxic effect on HT-22 under normal conditions, whereas 100 µg mL⁻¹ reduced HT-22 cell proliferation. We also used H₂DCFDA staining to show R. nasutus can reduce reactive oxygen species production in HT-22 cells.

  15. Rhinacanthus nasutus Protects Cultured Neuronal Cells against Hypoxia Induced Cell Death

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    James M. Brimson

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Rhinacanthus nasutus (L. Kurz (Acanthaceae is an herb native to Thailand and Southeast Asia, known for its antioxidant properties. Hypoxia leads to an increase in reactive oxygen species in cells and is a leading cause of neuronal damage. Cell death caused by hypoxia has been linked with a number of neurodegenerative diseases including some forms of dementia and stroke, as well as the build up of reactive oxygen species which can lead to diseases such as Huntington’s disease, Parkinson’s disease and Alzeheimer’s disease. In this study we used an airtight culture container and the Mitsubishi Gas Company anaeropack along with the MTT assay, LDH assay and the trypan blue exlusion assay to show that 1 and 10 µg mL−1 root extract of R. nasutus is able to significantly prevent the death of HT-22 cells subjected to hypoxic conditions, and 0.1 to 10 µg mL−1 had no toxic effect on HT-22 under normal conditions, whereas 100 µg mL−1 reduced HT-22 cell proliferation. We also used H2DCFDA staining to show R. nasutus can reduce reactive oxygen species production in HT-22 cells.

  16. Intravenous immunoglobulin protects neurons against amyloid beta-peptide toxicity and ischemic stroke by attenuating multiple cell death pathways.

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    Widiapradja, Alexander; Vegh, Viktor; Lok, Ker Zhing; Manzanero, Silvia; Thundyil, John; Gelderblom, Mathias; Cheng, Yi-Lin; Pavlovski, Dale; Tang, Sung-Chun; Jo, Dong-Gyu; Magnus, Tim; Chan, Sic L; Sobey, Christopher G; Reutens, David; Basta, Milan; Mattson, Mark P; Arumugam, Thiruma V

    2012-07-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) preparations obtained by fractionating blood plasma, are increasingly being used increasingly as an effective therapeutic agent in treatment of several inflammatory diseases. Its use as a potential therapeutic agent for treatment of stroke and Alzheimer's disease has been proposed, but little is known about the neuroprotective mechanisms of IVIg. In this study, we investigated the effect of IVIg on downstream signaling pathways that are involved in neuronal cell death in experimental models of stroke and Alzheimer's disease. Treatment of cultured neurons with IVIg reduced simulated ischemia- and amyloid βpeptide (Aβ)-induced caspase 3 cleavage, and phosphorylation of the cell death-associated kinases p38MAPK, c-Jun NH2 -terminal kinase and p65, in vitro. Additionally, Aβ-induced accumulation of the lipid peroxidation product 4-hydroxynonenal was attenuated in neurons treated with IVIg. IVIg treatment also up-regulated the anti-apoptotic protein, Bcl2 in cortical neurons under ischemia-like conditions and exposure to Aβ. Treatment of mice with IVIg reduced neuronal cell loss, apoptosis and infarct size, and improved functional outcome in a model of focal ischemic stroke. Together, these results indicate that IVIg acts directly on neurons to protect them against ischemic stroke and Aβ-induced neuronal apoptosis by inhibiting cell death pathways and by elevating levels of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl2.

  17. Tyrosol exerts a protective effect against dopaminergic neuronal cell death in in vitro model of Parkinson's disease.

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    Dewapriya, Pradeep; Himaya, S W A; Li, Yong-Xin; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2013-11-15

    Experimental evidence suggests that tyrosol [2-(4-hydroxyphenyl)ethanol] exhibits potent protective activities against several pathogeneses. In this study, we evaluated the protective effect of tyrosol against 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+))-induced CATH.a neuron cell death. Tyrosol dose-dependently protected CATH.a cells from MPP(+)-induced cell death and the protection was more apparent after prolong incubation (48h). The data showed that tyrosol treatment suppressed the reduction of phospho-tyrosine hydroxylase level in CATH.a cells. Further, the compound repressed MPP(+)-induced depletion of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) and thereby maintained intracellular ATP production in the cell. The cellular signalling pathway studies revealed that tyrosol protected CATH.a cells from MPP(+)-induced apoptotic signalling, most likely via activation of PI3K/Akt signalling pathway along with up-regulation of anti-oxidative enzymes (SOD-1 and SOD-2) and DJ-1 protein in the cell. Collectively, present study demonstrates that tyrosol significantly protects dopaminergic neurons from MPP(+)-induced degradation, and reveals potential neuroprotective mechanism of tyrosol.

  18. Cell division in the CNS: Protective response or lethal event in post-mitotic neurons?

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    Yang, Yan; Herrup, Karl

    2007-01-01

    Cell cycle events have been documented to be associated with several human neurodegenerative diseases. This review focuses on two diseases - Alzheimer’s disease and ataxia telangiectasia - as well as their mouse models. Cell cycle studies have shown that ectopic expression of cell cycle markers is spatially and regional correlated well with neuronal cell death in both disease conditions. Further evidence of ectopic cell cycling is found in both human diseases and in its mouse models. These fi...

  19. Simultaneous activation of mitophagy and autophagy by staurosporine protects against dopaminergic neuronal cell death.

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    Ha, Ji-Young; Kim, Ji-Soo; Kim, Seo-Eun; Son, Jin H

    2014-02-21

    Abnormal autophagy is frequently observed during dopaminergic neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease (PD). However, it is not yet firmly established whether active autophagy is beneficial or pathogenic with respect to dopaminergic cell loss. Staurosporine, a common inducer of apoptosis, is often used in mechanistic studies of dopaminergic cell death. Here we report that staurosporine activates both autophagy and mitophagy simultaneously during dopaminergic neuronal cell death, and evaluate the physiological significance of these processes during cell death. First, staurosporine treatment resulted in induction of autophagy in more than 75% of apoptotic cells. Pharmacological inhibition of autophagy by bafilomycin A1 decreased significantly cell viability. In addition, staurosporine treatment resulted in activation of the PINK1-Parkin mitophagy pathway, of which deficit underlies some familial cases of PD, in the dopaminergic neuronal cell line, SN4741. The genetic blockade of this pathway by PINK1 null mutation also dramatically increased staurosporine-induced cell death. Taken together, our data suggest that staurosporine induces both mitophagy and autophagy, and that these pathways exert a significant neuroprotective effect, rather than a contribution to autophagic cell death. This model system may therefore be useful for elucidating the mechanisms underlying crosstalk between autophagy, mitophagy, and cell death in dopaminergic neurons.

  20. Coconut oil protects cortical neurons from amyloid beta toxicity by enhancing signaling of cell survival pathways.

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    Nafar, F; Clarke, J P; Mearow, K M

    2017-01-23

    Alzheimer's disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that has links with other conditions that can often be modified by dietary and life-style interventions. In particular, coconut oil has received attention as having potentially having benefits in lessening the cognitive deficits associated with Alzheimer's disease. In a recent report, we showed that neuron survival in cultures co-treated with coconut oil and Aβ was rescued compared to cultures exposed only to Aβ. Here we investigated treatment with Aβ for 1, 6 or 24 h followed by addition of coconut oil for a further 24 h, or treatment with coconut oil for 24 h followed by Aβ exposure for various periods. Neuronal survival and several cellular parameters (cleaved caspase 3, synaptophysin labeling and ROS) were assessed. In addition, the influence of these treatments on relevant signaling pathways was investigated with Western blotting. In terms of the treatment timing, our data indicated that coconut oil rescues cells pre-exposed to Aβ for 1 or 6 h, but is less effective when the pre-exposure has been 24 h. However, pretreatment with coconut oil prior to Aβ exposure showed the best outcomes. Treatment with octanoic or lauric acid also provided protection against Aβ, but was not as effective as the complete oil. The coconut oil treatment reduced the number of cells with cleaved caspase and ROS labeling, as well as rescuing the loss of synaptophysin labeling observed with Aβ treatment. Treatment with coconut oil, as well as octanoic, decanoic and lauric acids, resulted in a modest increase in ketone bodies compared to controls. The biochemical data suggest that Akt and ERK activation may contribute to the survival promoting influence of coconut oil. This was supported by observations that a PI3-Kinase inhibitor blocked the rescue effect of CoOil on Aβ amyloid toxicity. Further studies into the mechanisms of action of coconut oil and its constituent medium chain fatty acids are warranted.

  1. Protection of neuronal cells from excitotoxicity by disrupting nNOS-PSD95 interaction with a small molecule SCR-4026.

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    Mo, Shi-Fu; Liao, Gao-Yong; Yang, Jie; Wang, Meng-Yu; Hu, Yang; Lian, Guo-Ning; Kong, Ling-Dong; Zhao, Yong

    2016-10-01

    Stroke is a major public health problem leading to high rates of death and disability in adults. Coupling of postsynaptic density protein-95 (PSD-95) and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) plays an important part in neuronal damage caused by stroke. Recent studies suggest the possibility of alleviating post ischemia neuron damage by blocking ischemia-induced nNOS-PSD-95 association. Here, we report a small-molecular inhibitor of nNOS-PSD-95 interaction, SCR-4026, which exhibits neuroprotective activities in NMDA-induced or Oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD)-induced neuronal damage in primary cortical neurons cultures, and ameliorated focal cerebral ischemic damage in rats subjected to middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) and reperfusion. Furthermore, we found that SCR-4026 was also able to promote neural stem cells to differentiate into neurons-like cells, which is potentially of great significance for neural protection. Taken together, SCR-4026 is identified as a novel small molecule that shows great potential in treating stroke.

  2. TIMP1 in conditioned media of human adipose stromal cells protects neurons against oxygen-glucose deprivation injury.

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    Du, Shiwei; Mao, Gengsheng; Zhu, Timothy; Luan, Zuo; Du, Yansheng; Gu, Huiying

    2015-01-01

    Adipose stromal cells (ASC) can protect neurons when administered to brains due to secreted trophic factors. Our previous studies demonstrated that several neurotrophic factors such as brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF) and insulin like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) in ASC conditioned media (ASC-CM) can protect brains against hypoxic-ischemic (HI) injury in neonatal rats. In this study, we demonstrated that human ASC-CM potently blockeds caspase-3 mediated cortical neuronal apoptosis under in vitro oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD). Interestingly, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP1), a non neurotrophic factor, played a significant role in the ASC-CM-induced neural protection against OGD. Thus, this study establishes the therapeutic potential of TIMP1 together with other neurotrophic factors in ASC-CM for treating cerebral HI disorders.

  3. Trans-anethole protects cortical neuronal cells against oxygen-glucose deprivation/reoxygenation.

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    Ryu, Sangwoo; Seol, Geun Hee; Park, Hyeon; Choi, In-Young

    2014-10-01

    Trans-anethole has been studied on pharmacological properties such as anti-inflammation, anti-oxidative stress, antifungal and anticancer. However, to date, the anti-ischemic effects of trans-anethole have not been assessed. Therefore, we investigated the neuroprotection of trans-anethole against oxygen-glucose deprivation/reoxygenation (OGD/R)-induced cortical neuronal cell injury, an in vitro model of ischemia. The abilities of trans-anethole to block excitotoxicity, oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction were evaluated in OGD/R-induced neurons. Trans-anethole significantly ameliorated OGD/R-induced neuronal cell injury by attenuating the intracellular calcium overload via the activation of NMDA receptors. Trans-anethole also inhibited OGD/R-induced reactive oxygen species overproduction, which may be derived from the scavenging activity in peroxyl radicals, assessed in an oxygen radical absorbance capacity assay. Furthermore, trans-anethole was shown to attenuate the depolarization of mitochondrial transmembrane. These results indicated that the neuroprotective effect of trans-anethole on OGD/R-induced neuronal injury might be due to its ability to inhibit excitotoxicity, oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. Considering these multiple pathways causing ischemic neuronal damage, the multi-functional effect of trans-anethole suggested that it may be effective in treating ischemic stroke.

  4. Estrogen protects neuronal cells from amyloid beta-induced apoptosis via regulation of mitochondrial proteins and function

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    Iwamoto Sean

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neurodegeneration in Alzheimer's disease is associated with increased apoptosis and parallels increased levels of amyloid beta, which can induce neuronal apoptosis. Estrogen exposure prior to neurotoxic insult of hippocampal neurons promotes neuronal defence and survival against neurodegenerative insults including amyloid beta. Although all underlying molecular mechanisms of amyloid beta neurotoxicity remain undetermined, mitochondrial dysfunction, including altered calcium homeostasis and Bcl-2 expression, are involved in neurodegenerative vulnerability. Results In this study, we investigated the mechanism of 17β-estradiol-induced prevention of amyloid beta-induced apoptosis of rat hippocampal neuronal cultures. Estradiol treatment prior to amyloid beta exposure significantly reduced the number of apoptotic neurons and the associated rise in resting intracellular calcium levels. Amyloid beta exposure provoked down regulation of a key antiapoptotic protein, Bcl-2, and resulted in mitochondrial translocation of Bax, a protein known to promote cell death, and subsequent release of cytochrome c. E2 pretreatment inhibited the amyloid beta-induced decrease in Bcl-2 expression, translocation of Bax to the mitochondria and subsequent release of cytochrome c. Further implicating the mitochondria as a target of estradiol action, in vivo estradiol treatment enhanced the respiratory function of whole brain mitochondria. In addition, estradiol pretreatment protected isolated mitochondria against calcium-induced loss of respiratory function. Conclusion Therefore, we propose that estradiol pretreatment protects against amyloid beta neurotoxicity by limiting mitochondrial dysfunction via activation of antiapoptotic mechanisms.

  5. Thiopental inhibits global protein synthesis by repression of eukaryotic elongation factor 2 and protects from hypoxic neuronal cell death.

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    Christian I Schwer

    Full Text Available Ischemic and traumatic brain injury is associated with increased risk for death and disability. The inhibition of penumbral tissue damage has been recognized as a target for therapeutic intervention, because cellular injury evolves progressively upon ATP-depletion and loss of ion homeostasis. In patients, thiopental is used to treat refractory intracranial hypertension by reducing intracranial pressure and cerebral metabolic demands; however, therapeutic benefits of thiopental-treatment are controversially discussed. In the present study we identified fundamental neuroprotective molecular mechanisms mediated by thiopental. Here we show that thiopental inhibits global protein synthesis, which preserves the intracellular energy metabolite content in oxygen-deprived human neuronal SK-N-SH cells or primary mouse cortical neurons and thus ameliorates hypoxic cell damage. Sensitivity to hypoxic damage was restored by pharmacologic repression of eukaryotic elongation factor 2 kinase. Translational inhibition was mediated by calcium influx, activation of the AMP-activated protein kinase, and inhibitory phosphorylation of eukaryotic elongation factor 2. Our results explain the reduction of cerebral metabolic demands during thiopental treatment. Cycloheximide also protected neurons from hypoxic cell death, indicating that translational inhibitors may generally reduce secondary brain injury. In conclusion our study demonstrates that therapeutic inhibition of global protein synthesis protects neurons from hypoxic damage by preserving energy balance in oxygen-deprived cells. Molecular evidence for thiopental-mediated neuroprotection favours a positive clinical evaluation of barbiturate treatment. The chemical structure of thiopental could represent a pharmacologically relevant scaffold for the development of new organ-protective compounds to ameliorate tissue damage when oxygen availability is limited.

  6. Toxic effects of apomorphine on rat cultured neurons and glial C6 cells, and protection with antioxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos El-Bachá, R; Daval, J; Koziel, V; Netter, P; Minn, A

    2001-01-01

    Many catechol derivatives are currently used as drugs, even if they produce reactive oxygen species that may cause tissue damage. Among them, apomorphine, a potent dopamine agonist, displays efficient anti-parkinsonian properties, but the consequences of its oxidant and toxic properties have been poorly investigated on in vitro models. In the present work, we investigated apomorphine cytotoxicity by incubating cultures of rat glioma C6 cells and primary cultures of neurons with different concentrations of the drug. Apomorphine-promoted cell death was proportional to its concentration and was time-dependent. The ED(50) of apomorphine on C6 cell death after 48 hr was about 200 microM. The cytotoxic effects induced by apomorphine were correlated to its autoxidation, which leads to the formation of reactive oxygen species, semiquinones, quinones, and a melanin-like pigment. C6 cells that underwent treatment with 400 microM apomorphine for 6 hr displayed features of necrosis, including loss of membrane integrity, degeneration of mitochondria, and DNA fragmentation. Thiols, such as cysteine, N-acetyl-L-cysteine, and glutathione, significantly protected cultured neurons and C6 cells against apomorphine-induced cytotoxicity. Thiols also inhibited apomorphine autoxidation. These data strongly suggest that apomorphine cytotoxicity towards neurons and C6 cells results from an intracellular oxidative stress.

  7. Hinokitiol protects primary neuron cells against prion peptide-induced toxicity via autophagy flux regulated by hypoxia inducing factor-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Ji-Hong; Lee, Ju-Hee; Lee, You-Jin; Park, Sang-Youel

    2016-05-24

    Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative disorders that are derived from structural changes of the native PrPc. Recent studies indicated that hinokitiol induced autophagy known to major function that keeps cells alive under stressful conditions. We investigated whether hinokitiol induces autophagy and attenuates PrP (106-126)-induced neurotoxicity. We observed increase of LC3-II protein level, GFP-LC3 puncta by hinokitiol in neuronal cells. Addition to, electron microscopy showed that hinokitiol enhanced autophagic vacuoles in neuronal cells. We demonstrated that hinokitiol protects against PrP (106-126)-induced neurotoxicity via autophagy by using autophagy inhibitor, wortmannin and 3MA, and ATG5 small interfering RNA (siRNA). We checked hinokitiol activated the hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and identified that hinokitiol-induced HIF-1α regulated autophagy. Taken together, this study is the first report demonstrating that hinokitiol protected against prion protein-induced neurotoxicity via autophagy regulated by HIF-1α. We suggest that hinokitiol is a possible therapeutic strategy in neuronal disorders including prion disease.

  8. Protective effect of tubuloside B on TNFα-induced apoptosis in neuronal cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min DENG; Jin-yuan ZHAO; Xiao-dong JU; Peng-fei TU; Yong JIANG; Zheng-bin LI

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the neuroprotective effect of tubuloside B, one of the phenylethanoids isolated from the stems of Cistanche salsa, on tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα)-induced apoptosis in SH-SY5Y neuronal cells.METHODS: Cell viability was analyzed using MTT assay. Apoptotic cells were detected using Hoechst33342 staining, and confirmed by DNA fragmentation and flow cytometric analysis. The activity of caspase-3 was measured with special assay kit. The concentration of free intracellular calcium was determined with the probe Indo-1 by spectrometer. The level of intracellular reactive oxygen species and the potential of mitochondrial membrane were determined by laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) combined with fluorescence probe H2DCFDA or JC-1 respectively. RESULTS: SH-SY5Y cells treated with TNFα 100 μg/L for 36 h showed typical morphological changes of apoptosis. DNA ladder could be observed by agarose gel electrophoresis. The highest percentage of apoptotic cells accumulated to 37.5 %. Following 36 h treatment with TNFα, accumulation of intracellular ROS and [Ca2+]i and decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential were observed, and caspase-3 activity increased by about five-fold compared with controls. However, pretreatment with tubuloside B (1, 10, or 100 mg/L) for 2 h attenuated the TNFα-mediated apoptosis. The antiapoptotic action of tubuloside B was partially dependent on an anti-oxidative stress effects, maintain of mitochondria function, decrease of concentration of free intracellular calcium and inhibition of caspase-3 activity. CONCLUSION: Tubuloside B has the neuroprotective capacity to antagonize TNFα-induced apoptosis in SH-SY5Y cells and may be useful in treating some neurodegenerative diseases.

  9. Eriocaulon buergerianum extract protects PC12 cells and neurons in zebrafish against 6-hydroxydopamine-induced damage

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    Lin Zhixiu

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ericaulon buergerianum (Gujingcao is an ophthalmic, anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial Chinese medicinal herb. This study aims to investigate the neuroprotective effects of Ericaulon buergerianum ethanol extract (EBE and to elucidate its underlying action mechanism. Methods The viability of dopaminergic (DA neuron in zebrafish was examined by anti-tyrosine hydroxylase (TH immunostaining. The locomotor activity of zebrafish was assessed with a digital video tracking system. The viability and cellular damage of the PC12 cells were determined by MTT and LDH assays respectively. The nuclear morphological changes in apoptotic cells were evaluated with DNA staining by Hoechst 33342 dye. Intracellular nitric oxide (NO was quantified by DAF-FM diacetate staining. The expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS was determined by Western blot. Results EBE inhibited the 6-OHDA-induced decrease in total distance of movement in zebrafish. Pretreatments of EBE (25, 50, 100 and 200 μg/ml increased the viability of 6-OHDA-damaged PC12 cells in a dose dependent manner. Protection against 6-OHDA-induced nuclear fragmentation and accumulation of apoptotic bodies was also observed in EBE pretreated cells. Anti-oxidative (inhibition of NO production and iNOS expression in PC12 cells in vitro activities of EBE are related to its neuroprotective effects in 6-OHDA-induced DA neuron damage. Conclusion EBE exhibited significant neuroprotective activities in zebrafish, including recovery of dopaminergic neuron loss caused by 6-OHDA in a dose-dependent manner in vivo, inhibition of 6-OHDA-induced decrease of total distance in movement in zebrafish. The iNOS-NO pathway may be involved.

  10. Tetanus Toxin Hc Fragment Induces the Formation of Ceramide Platforms and Protects Neuronal Cells against Oxidative Stress.

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    Roger Cubí

    Full Text Available Tetanus toxin (TeTx is the protein, synthesized by the anaerobic bacteria Clostridium tetani, which causes tetanus disease. TeTx gains entry into target cells by means of its interaction with lipid rafts, which are membrane domains enriched in sphingomyelin and cholesterol. However, the exact mechanism of host membrane binding remains to be fully established. In the present study we used the recombinant carboxyl terminal fragment from TeTx (Hc-TeTx, the domain responsible for target neuron binding, showing that Hc-TeTx induces a moderate but rapid and sustained increase in the ceramide/sphingomyelin ratio in primary cultures of cerebellar granule neurons and in NGF-differentiated PC12 cells, as well as induces the formation of ceramide platforms in the plasma membrane. The mentioned increase is due to the promotion of neutral sphingomyelinase activity and not to the de novo synthesis, since GW4869, a specific neutral sphingomyelinase inhibitor, prevents neutral sphingomyelinase activity increase and formation of ceramide platforms. Moreover, neutral sphingomyelinase inhibition with GW4869 prevents Hc-TeTx-triggered signaling (Akt phosphorylation, as well as the protective effect of Hc-TeTx on PC12 cells subjected to oxidative stress, while siRNA directed against nSM2 prevents protection by Hc-TeTx of NSC-34 cells against oxidative insult. Finally, neutral sphingomyelinase activity seems not to be related with the internalization of Hc-TeTx into PC12 cells. Thus, the presented data shed light on the mechanisms triggered by TeTx after membrane binding, which could be related with the events leading to the neuroprotective action exerted by the Hc-TeTx fragment.

  11. Microglia-induced IL-6 protects against neuronal loss following HSV-1 infection of neural progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chucair-Elliott, Ana J; Conrady, Christopher; Zheng, Min; Kroll, Chandra M; Lane, Thomas E; Carr, Daniel J J

    2014-09-01

    Herpes virus type 1 (HSV-1) is one of the most widespread human pathogens and accounts for more than 90% of cases of herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) causing severe and permanent neurologic sequelae among surviving patients. We hypothesize such CNS deficits are due to HSV-1 infection of neural progenitor cells (NPCs). In vivo, HSV-1 infection was found to diminish NPC numbers in the subventricular zone. Upon culture of NPCs in conditions that stimulate their differentiation, we found HSV-1 infection of NPCs resulted in the loss of neuronal precursors with no significant change in the percentage of astrocytes or oligodendrocytes. We propose this is due a direct effect of HSV-1 on neuronal survival without alteration of the differentiation process. The neuronal loss was prevented by the addition of microglia or conditioned media from NPC/microglia co-cultures. Using neutralizing antibodies and recombinant cytokines, we identified interleukin-6 (IL-6) as responsible for the protective effect by microglia, likely through its downstream Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 (STAT3) cascade.

  12. Inhibition of neuronal ferroptosis protects hemorrhagic brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qian; Han, Xiaoning; Lan, Xi; Gao, Yufeng; Wan, Jieru; Durham, Frederick; Cheng, Tian; Yang, Jie; Wang, Zhongyu; Jiang, Chao; Ying, Mingyao; Stockwell, Brent R.

    2017-01-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) causes high mortality and morbidity, but our knowledge of post-ICH neuronal death and related mechanisms is limited. In this study, we first demonstrated that ferroptosis, a newly identified form of cell death, occurs in the collagenase-induced ICH model in mice. We found that administration of ferrostatin-1, a specific inhibitor of ferroptosis, prevented neuronal death and reduced iron deposition induced by hemoglobin in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHSCs). Mice treated with ferrostatin-1 after ICH exhibited marked brain protection and improved neurologic function. Additionally, we found that ferrostatin-1 reduced lipid reactive oxygen species production and attenuated the increased expression level of PTGS2 and its gene product cyclooxygenase-2 ex vivo and in vivo. Moreover, ferrostatin-1 in combination with other inhibitors that target different forms of cell death prevented hemoglobin-induced cell death in OHSCs and human induced pluripotent stem cell–derived neurons better than any inhibitor alone. These results indicate that ferroptosis contributes to neuronal death after ICH, that administration of ferrostatin-1 protects hemorrhagic brain, and that cyclooxygenase-2 could be a biomarker of ferroptosis. The insights gained from this study will advance our knowledge of the post-ICH cell death cascade and be essential for future preclinical studies.

  13. Prototypical antipsychotic drugs protect hippocampal neuronal cultures against cell death induced by growth medium deprivation

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    Williams Sylvain

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several clinical studies suggested that antipsychotic-based medications could ameliorate cognitive functions impaired in certain schizophrenic patients. Accordingly, we investigated the effects of various dopaminergic receptor antagonists – including atypical antipsychotics that are prescribed for the treatment of schizophrenia – in a model of toxicity using cultured hippocampal neurons, the hippocampus being a region of particular relevance to cognition. Results Hippocampal cell death induced by deprivation of growth medium constituents was strongly blocked by drugs including antipsychotics (10-10-10-6 M that display nM affinities for D2 and/or D4 receptors (clozapine, haloperidol, (±-sulpiride, domperidone, clozapine, risperidone, chlorpromazine, (+-butaclamol and L-741,742. These effects were shared by some caspases inhibitors and were not accompanied by inhibition of reactive oxygen species. In contrast, (--raclopride and remoxipride, two drugs that preferentially bind D2 over D4 receptors were ineffective, as well as the selective D3 receptor antagonist U 99194. Interestingly, (--raclopride (10-6 M was able to block the neuroprotective effect of the atypical antipsychotic clozapine (10-6 M. Conclusion Taken together, these data suggest that D2-like receptors, particularly the D4 subtype, mediate the neuroprotective effects of antipsychotic drugs possibly through a ROS-independent, caspase-dependent mechanism.

  14. Necrostatin-1 protection of dopaminergic neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing-ru Wu; Jie Wang; Sheng-kui Zhou; Long Yang; Jia-le Yin; Jun-ping Cao; Yan-bo Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Necroptosis is characterized by programmed necrotic cell death and autophagic activation and might be involved in the death process of dopaminergic neurons in Parkinson’s disease. We hypothesized that necrostatin-1 could block necroptosis and give protection to dopaminergic neurons. There is likely to be crosstalk between necroptosis and other cell death pathways, such as apoptosis and autophagy. PC12 cells were pretreated with necroststin-1 1 hour before expo-sure to 6-hydroxydopamine. We examined cell viability, mitochondrial membrane potential and expression patterns of apoptotic and necroptotic death signaling proteins. The results showed that the autophagy/lysosomal pathway is involved in the 6-hydroxydopamine-induced death pro-cess of PC12 cells. Mitochondrial disability induced overactive autophagy, increased cathepsin B expression, and diminished Bcl-2 expression. Necrostatin-1 within a certain concentration range (5–30 μM) elevated the viability of PC12 cells, stabilized mitochondrial membrane potential, inhibited excessive autophagy, reduced the expression of LC3-II and cathepsin B, and increased Bcl-2 expression. These findings suggest that necrostatin-1 exerted a protective effect against injury on dopaminergic neurons. Necrostatin-1 interacts with the apoptosis signaling pathway during this process. This pathway could be a new neuroprotective and therapeutic target in Par-kinson’s disease.

  15. Necrostatin-1 protection of dopaminergic neurons

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    Jing-ru Wu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Necroptosis is characterized by programmed necrotic cell death and autophagic activation and might be involved in the death process of dopaminergic neurons in Parkinson′s disease. We hypothesized that necrostatin-1 could block necroptosis and give protection to dopaminergic neurons. There is likely to be crosstalk between necroptosis and other cell death pathways, such as apoptosis and autophagy. PC12 cells were pretreated with necroststin-1 1 hour before exposure to 6-hydroxydopamine. We examined cell viability, mitochondrial membrane potential and expression patterns of apoptotic and necroptotic death signaling proteins. The results showed that the autophagy/lysosomal pathway is involved in the 6-hydroxydopamine-induced death process of PC12 cells. Mitochondrial disability induced overactive autophagy, increased cathepsin B expression, and diminished Bcl-2 expression. Necrostatin-1 within a certain concentration range (5-30 μM elevated the viability of PC12 cells, stabilized mitochondrial membrane potential, inhibited excessive autophagy, reduced the expression of LC3-II and cathepsin B, and increased Bcl-2 expression. These findings suggest that necrostatin-1 exerted a protective effect against injury on dopaminergic neurons. Necrostatin-1 interacts with the apoptosis signaling pathway during this process. This pathway could be a new neuroprotective and therapeutic target in Parkinson′s disease.

  16. Necrostatin-1 protection of dopaminergic neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jing-ru; Wang, Jie; Zhou, Sheng-kui; Yang, Long; Yin, Jia-le; Cao, Jun-ping; Cheng, Yan-bo

    2015-01-01

    Necroptosis is characterized by programmed necrotic cell death and autophagic activation and might be involved in the death process of dopaminergic neurons in Parkinson's disease. We hypothesized that necrostatin-1 could block necroptosis and give protection to dopaminergic neurons. There is likely to be crosstalk between necroptosis and other cell death pathways, such as apoptosis and autophagy. PC12 cells were pretreated with necroststin-1 1 hour before exposure to 6-hydroxydopamine. We examined cell viability, mitochondrial membrane potential and expression patterns of apoptotic and necroptotic death signaling proteins. The results showed that the autophagy/lysosomal pathway is involved in the 6-hydroxydopamine-induced death process of PC12 cells. Mitochondrial disability induced overactive autophagy, increased cathepsin B expression, and diminished Bcl-2 expression. Necrostatin-1 within a certain concentration range (5–30 μM) elevated the viability of PC12 cells, stabilized mitochondrial membrane potential, inhibited excessive autophagy, reduced the expression of LC3-II and cathepsin B, and increased Bcl-2 expression. These findings suggest that necrostatin-1 exerted a protective effect against injury on dopaminergic neurons. Necrostatin-1 interacts with the apoptosis signaling pathway during this process. This pathway could be a new neuroprotective and therapeutic target in Parkinson's disease. PMID:26330837

  17. Protective effects of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonism on VX-induced neuronal cell death in cultured rat cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yushan; Weiss, M Tracy; Yin, Junfei; Tenn, Catherine C; Nelson, Peggy D; Mikler, John R

    2008-01-01

    Exposure of the central nervous system to organophosphorus (OP) nerve agents induces seizures and neuronal cell death. Here we report that the OP nerve agent, VX, induces apoptotic-like cell death in cultured rat cortical neurons. The VX effects on neurons were concentration-dependent, with an IC(50) of approximately 30 microM. Blockade of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDAR) with 50 microM. D-2-amino-5-phosphonovalerate (APV) diminished 30 microM VX-induced total cell death, as assessed by alamarBlue assay and Hoechst staining. In contrast, neither antagonists of alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid receptors (AMPARs) nor metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) had any effect on VX-induced neurotoxicity. VX-induced neuronal cell death could not be solely attributed to acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition, since neither the reversible pharmacological cholinesterase inhibitor, physostigmine, nor the muscarinic receptor antagonist, atropine, affected VX-induced cell death. Importantly, APV was found to be therapeutically effective against VX-induced cell death up to 2 h post VX exposure. These results suggest that NMDARs, but not AMPARs or mGluRs, play important roles in VX-induced cell death in cultured rat cortical neurons. Based on their therapeutic effects, NMDAR antagonists may be beneficial in the treatment of VX-induced neurotoxicities.

  18. Protection of neurons in the retinal ganglion cell layer against excitotoxicity by the N-acylethanolamine, N-linoleoylethanolamine

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    Duncan RS

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available R. Scott Duncan1,*, Hua Xin1,*, Daryl L Goad1, Kent D Chapman2,3, Peter Koulen1,31Vision Research Center and Departments of Ophthalmology and Basic Medical Science, School of Medicine, University of Missouri, Kansas City, MO, USA; 2Department of Biological Sciences, University of North Texas, Denton, TX, USA; 3Center for Plant Lipid Research, University of North Texas, Denton, TX, USA *Authors contributed equallyAbstract: Retinal ganglion cell (RGC death is a hallmark of neurodegenerative diseases and disease processes of the eye, including glaucoma. The protection of RGCs has been an important strategy for combating glaucoma, but little clinical success has been reported to date. One pathophysiological consequence of glaucoma is excessive extracellular glutamate subsequently leading to excitotoxicity in the retina. Endocannabinoids, such as the N-acylethanolamine (NAE, arachidonylethanolamine (NAE 20:4, exhibit neuroprotective properties in some models of neurodegenerative disease. The majority of NAEs, however, are not cannabinoids, and their physiological function is not clear. Here, we determined whether the noncannabinoid NAE, linoleoylethanolamine (NAE18:2, protects neurons in the RGC layer against glutamate excitotoxicity in ex-vivo retina cultures. Using a terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP (2´-deoxyuridine 5´-triphosphate nick-end labeling (TUNEL assay, we determined that NAE18:2 reduces the number of apoptotic RGC layer neurons in response to glutamate and conclude that NAE18:2 is a neuroprotective compound with potential for treating glaucomatous retinopathy.Keywords: neuroprotection, glutamate, calcium signaling, immunocytochemistry, eye, vision, glaucoma.

  19. Protective effects of quercetin on dieldrin-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress and apoptosis in dopaminergic neuronal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Euteum; Chun, Hong Sung

    2016-10-19

    Dieldrin, an organochlorine pesticide still used in several developing countries, has been proposed as a risk factor for Parkinson's disease. Quercetin is one of the potent bioactive flavonoids present in numerous plants. In this study, we investigated the protective effects of quercetin on neurotoxicity induced by dieldrin in cultured dopaminergic SN4741 cells. Our initial experiments showed that quercetin (10-40 μM) dose dependently prevented dieldrin (20 μM)-induced cytotoxicity in SN4741 cells. Pretreatment for 1 h with quercetin before dieldrin application could significantly suppress dieldrin-induced apoptotic characteristics, including nuclear condensation, DNA fragmentation, and caspase-3/7 activation. Results showed that dieldrin-induced markers of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response such as chaperone GRP78, heme oxygenase-1, and phosphorylation of the α subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor 2. In addition, dieldrin reduced antiapoptotic Bcl-2 expression, but significantly elevated a proapoptotic transcription factor CHOP. Furthermore, RNA interference to CHOP almost completely repressed dieldrin-induced apoptotic cell death. Interestingly, quercetin prevented the changes in dieldrin-induced ER stress markers. These results suggest that quercetin may suppress the ER stress-CHOP pathway and dieldrin-induced apoptosis in dopaminergic neurons.

  20. Silibinin activates AMP-activated protein kinase to protect neuronal cells from oxygen and glucose deprivation-re-oxygenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zhi; Ding, Sheng-quan; Shen, Ya-fang

    2014-11-14

    In this study, we explored the cytoprotective potential of silibinin against oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD)-induced neuronal cell damages, and studied underling mechanisms. In vitro model of ischemic stroke was created by keeping neuronal cells (SH-SY5Y cells and primary mouse cortical neurons) in an OGD condition followed by re-oxygenation. Pre-treatment of silibinin significantly inhibited OGD/re-oxygenation-induced necrosis and apoptosis of neuronal cells. OGD/re-oxygenation-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) reduction were also inhibited by silibinin. At the molecular level, silibinin treatment in SH-SY5Y cells and primary cortical neurons led to significant AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling activation, detected by phosphorylations of AMPKα1, its upstream kinase liver kinase B1 (LKB1) and the downstream target acetyl-CoA Carboxylase (ACC). Pharmacological inhibition or genetic depletion of AMPK alleviated the neuroprotective ability of silibinin against OGD/re-oxygenation. Further, ROS scavenging ability by silibinin was abolished with AMPK inhibition or silencing. While A-769662, the AMPK activator, mimicked silibinin actions and suppressed ROS production and neuronal cell death following OGD/re-oxygenation. Together, these results show that silibinin-mediated neuroprotection requires activation of AMPK signaling.

  1. High-throughput functional genomics identifies genes that ameliorate toxicity due to oxidative stress in neuronal HT-22 cells: GFPT2 protects cells against peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zitzler, Jürgen; Link, Dieter; Schäfer, Rolf; Liebetrau, Wolfgang; Kazinski, Michael; Bonin-Debs, Angelika; Behl, Christian; Buckel, Peter; Brinkmann, Ulrich

    2004-08-01

    We describe a novel genetic screen that is performed by transfecting every individual clone of an expression clone collection into a separate population of cells in a high-throughput mode. We combined high-throughput functional genomics with experimental validation to discover human genes that ameliorate cytotoxic responses of neuronal HT-22 cells upon exposure to oxidative stress. A collection of 5,000 human cDNAs in mammalian expression vectors were individually transfected into HT-22 cells, which were then exposed to H(2)O(2). Five genes were found that are known to be involved in pathways of detoxification of peroxide (catalase, glutathione peroxidase-1, peroxiredoxin-1, peroxiredoxin-5, and nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-like 2). The presence of those genes in our "hit list" validates our screening platform. In addition, a set of candidate genes was found that has not been previously described as involved in detoxification of peroxide. One of these genes, which was consistently found to reduce H(2)O(2) -induced toxicity in HT-22, was GFPT2. This gene is expressed at significant levels in the central nervous system (CNS) and encodes glutamine-fructose-6-phosphate transaminase (GFPT) 2, a rate-limiting enzyme in hexosamine biosynthesis. GFPT has recently also been shown to ameliorate the toxicity of methylmercury in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Methylmercury causes neuronal cell death in part by protein modification as well as enhancing the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The protective effect of GFPT2 against H(2)O(2) toxicity in neuronal HT-22 cells may be similar to its protection against methylmercury in yeast. Thus, GFPT appears to be conserved among yeast and men as a critical target of methylmercury and ROS-induced cytotoxicity.

  2. Topiramate attenuates early brain injury following subarachnoid haemorrhage in rats via duplex protection against inflammation and neuronal cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yong; Guo, Song-Xue; Li, Jian-Ru; Du, Hang-Gen; Wang, Chao-Hui; Zhang, Jian-Min; Wu, Qun

    2015-10-05

    Early brain injury (EBI) following aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) insults contributes to the poor prognosis and high mortality observed in SAH patients. Topiramate (TPM) is a novel, broad-spectrum, antiepileptic drug with a reported protective effect against several brain injuries. The current study aimed to investigate the potential of TPM for neuroprotection against EBI after SAH and the possible dose-dependency of this effect. An endovascular perforation SAH model was established in rats, and TPM was administered by intraperitoneal injection after surgery at three different doses (20mg/kg, 40mg/kg, and 80mg/kg). The animals' neurological scores and brain water content were evaluated, and ELISA, Western blotting and immunostaining assays were conducted to assess the effect of TPM. The results revealed that TPM lowers the elevated levels of myeloperoxidase and proinflammatory mediators observed after SAH in a dose-related fashion, and the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) signalling pathway is the target of neuroinflammation regulation. In addition, TPM ameliorated SAH-induced cortical neuronal apoptosis by influencing Bax, Bcl-2 and cleaved caspase-3 protein expression, and the effect of TPM was enhanced in a dose-dependent manner. Various dosages of TPM also upregulated the protein expression of the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic signalling molecules, GABAA receptor (GABAAR) α1, GABAAR γ2, and K(+)-Cl(-) co-transporter 2 (KCC2) together and downregulated Na(+)-K(+)-Cl(-) co-transporter 1 (NKCC1) expression. Thus, TPM may be an effective neuroprotectant in EBI after SAH by regulating neuroinflammation and neuronal cell death.

  3. Neuron Protective Constituents from Rheum Nanum and Rheum Sublanceolatum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIANG Lan; LEI Fan; XING Dongming; WANG Wei; ZHENG Junhua

    2005-01-01

    The neuron protective activity of the chemical constituents from Rheum nanum and Rheum sublanceolatum in vitro was investigated using cultured embryonic mouse cortical cells exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation. The protective effect was quantitatively evaluated by measuring the lactate dehydrogenase release rate. Most of the compounds reduce the lactate dehydrogenase release rate, including emodin, chrysophanol-8-O-β-D-glucopyranoside, 6-hydroxymusizin-8-O-β-D-glucopyranoside, gnetin C, torachrysone-8-O-β-D-glucopyranoside, and maesopsin, and all possess potent neuron protective activity. Chrysophanol and aloe-emodin exhibit neuron protection only at low concentrations. Emodin-8-O-β-D-glucopyranoside protects the neuron cells at high concentration. Aloe-emodin-8-O-β-D- glucopyranoside is inactive.

  4. Allium cepa Extract and Quercetin Protect Neuronal Cells from Oxidative Stress via PKC-ε Inactivation/ERK1/2 Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathophysiology of various neurologic disorders. Allium cepa extract (ACE) and their main flavonoid component quercetin (QCT) possess antioxidant activities and protect neurons from oxidative stress. We investigated the underlying molecular mechanisms, particularly those linked to the antioxidant effects of the ACE. Primary cortical neuronal cells derived from mouse embryos were preincubated with ACE or QCT for 30 min and exposed to L-buthionine sulfoximine for 4~24 h. We found that ACE and QCT significantly decreased neuronal death and the ROS increase induced by L-buthionine-S, R-sulfoximine (BSO) in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, ACE and QCT activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), leading to downregulation of protein kinase C-ε (PKC-ε) in BSO-stimulated neuronal cells. In addition, ACE and QCT decreased the phosphorylated levels of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase. Our results provide new insight into the protective mechanism of ACE and QCT against oxidative stress in neuronal cells. The results suggest that the inactivation of PKC-ε induced by phosphorylating ERK1/2 is responsible for the neuroprotective effect of ACE and QCT against BSO-induced oxidative stress. PMID:27668036

  5. Prefoldin Protects Neuronal Cells from Polyglutamine Toxicity by Preventing Aggregation Formation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashiro, Erika; Zako, Tamotsu; Muto, Hideki; Itoo, Yoshinori; Sörgjerd, Karin; Terada, Naofumi; Abe, Akira; Miyazawa, Makoto; Kitamura, Akira; Kitaura, Hirotake; Kubota, Hiroshi; Maeda, Mizuo; Momoi, Takashi; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M. M.; Kinjo, Masataka; Ariga, Hiroyoshi

    2013-01-01

    Huntington disease is caused by cell death after the expansion of polyglutamine (polyQ) tracts longer than ∼40 repeats encoded by exon 1 of the huntingtin (HTT) gene. Prefoldin is a molecular chaperone composed of six subunits, PFD1–6, and prevents misfolding of newly synthesized nascent polypeptides. In this study, we found that knockdown of PFD2 and PFD5 disrupted prefoldin formation in HTT-expressing cells, resulting in accumulation of aggregates of a pathogenic form of HTT and in induction of cell death. Dead cells, however, did not contain inclusions of HTT, and analysis by a fluorescence correlation spectroscopy indicated that knockdown of PFD2 and PFD5 also increased the size of soluble oligomers of pathogenic HTT in cells. In vitro single molecule observation demonstrated that prefoldin suppressed HTT aggregation at the small oligomer (dimer to tetramer) stage. These results indicate that prefoldin inhibits elongation of large oligomers of pathogenic Htt, thereby inhibiting subsequent inclusion formation, and suggest that soluble oligomers of polyQ-expanded HTT are more toxic than are inclusion to cells. PMID:23720755

  6. Protective effects of bupivacaine against kainic acid-induced seizure and neuronal cell death in the rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Kuan Ming; Wu, Chia Chan; Wang, Ming Jiuh; Lee, Ming Yi; Wang, Su Jane

    2015-01-01

    The excessive release of glutamate is a critical element in the neuropathology of epilepsy, and bupivacaine, a local anesthetic agent, has been shown to inhibit the release of glutamate in rat cerebrocortical nerve terminals. This study investigated whether bupivacaine produces antiseizure and antiexcitotoxic effects using a kainic acid (KA) rat model, an animal model used for temporal lobe epilepsy, and excitotoxic neurodegeneration experiments. The results showed that administering bupivacaine (0.4 mg/kg or 2 mg/kg) intraperitoneally to rats 30 min before intraperitoneal injection of KA (15 mg/kg) increased seizure latency and reduced the seizure score. In addition, bupivacaine attenuated KA-induced hippocampal neuronal cell death, and this protective effect was accompanied by the inhibition of microglial activation and production of proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α in the hippocampus. Moreover, bupivacaine shortened the latency of escaping onto the platform in the Morris water maze learning performance test. Collectively, these data suggest that bupivacaine has therapeutic potential for treating epilepsy.

  7. Vanillin Protects Dopaminergic Neurons against Inflammation-Mediated Cell Death by Inhibiting ERK1/2, P38 and the NF-κB Signaling Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xuan; Liu, Dian-Feng; Zhang, Xiang-Yang; Liu, Dong; Xu, Shi-Yao; Chen, Guang-Xin; Huang, Bing-Xu; Ren, Wen-Zhi; Wang, Wei; Fu, Shou-Peng; Liu, Ju-Xiong

    2017-01-01

    Neuroinflammation plays a very important role in the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease (PD). After activation, microglia produce pro-inflammatory mediators that damage surrounding neurons. Consequently, the inhibition of microglial activation might represent a new therapeutic approach of PD. Vanillin has been shown to protect dopaminergic neurons, but the mechanism is still unclear. Herein, we further study the underlying mechanisms in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced PD models. In vivo, we firstly established rat models of PD by unilateral injection of LPS into substantia nigra (SN), and then examined the role of vanillin in motor dysfunction, microglial activation and degeneration of dopaminergic neurons. In vitro, murine microglial BV-2 cells were treated with vanillin prior to the incubation of LPS, and then the inflammatory responses and the related signaling pathways were analyzed. The in vivo results showed that vanillin markedly improved the motor dysfunction, suppressed degeneration of dopaminergic neurons and inhibited microglial over-activation induced by LPS intranigral injection. The in vitro studies demonstrated that vanillin reduces LPS-induced expression of inducible nitric oxide (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), IL-1β, and IL-6 through regulating ERK1/2, p38 and NF-κB signaling. Collectively, these data indicated that vanillin has a role in protecting dopaminergic neurons via inhibiting inflammatory activation. PMID:28208679

  8. Vanillin Protects Dopaminergic Neurons against Inflammation-Mediated Cell Death by Inhibiting ERK1/2, P38 and the NF-κB Signaling Pathway

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    Xuan Yan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Neuroinflammation plays a very important role in the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease (PD. After activation, microglia produce pro-inflammatory mediators that damage surrounding neurons. Consequently, the inhibition of microglial activation might represent a new therapeutic approach of PD. Vanillin has been shown to protect dopaminergic neurons, but the mechanism is still unclear. Herein, we further study the underlying mechanisms in lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced PD models. In vivo, we firstly established rat models of PD by unilateral injection of LPS into substantia nigra (SN, and then examined the role of vanillin in motor dysfunction, microglial activation and degeneration of dopaminergic neurons. In vitro, murine microglial BV-2 cells were treated with vanillin prior to the incubation of LPS, and then the inflammatory responses and the related signaling pathways were analyzed. The in vivo results showed that vanillin markedly improved the motor dysfunction, suppressed degeneration of dopaminergic neurons and inhibited microglial over-activation induced by LPS intranigral injection. The in vitro studies demonstrated that vanillin reduces LPS-induced expression of inducible nitric oxide (iNOS, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2, IL-1β, and IL-6 through regulating ERK1/2, p38 and NF-κB signaling. Collectively, these data indicated that vanillin has a role in protecting dopaminergic neurons via inhibiting inflammatory activation.

  9. Vanillin Protects Dopaminergic Neurons against Inflammation-Mediated Cell Death by Inhibiting ERK1/2, P38 and the NF-κB Signaling Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xuan; Liu, Dian-Feng; Zhang, Xiang-Yang; Liu, Dong; Xu, Shi-Yao; Chen, Guang-Xin; Huang, Bing-Xu; Ren, Wen-Zhi; Wang, Wei; Fu, Shou-Peng; Liu, Ju-Xiong

    2017-02-12

    Neuroinflammation plays a very important role in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). After activation, microglia produce pro-inflammatory mediators that damage surrounding neurons. Consequently, the inhibition of microglial activation might represent a new therapeutic approach of PD. Vanillin has been shown to protect dopaminergic neurons, but the mechanism is still unclear. Herein, we further study the underlying mechanisms in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced PD models. In vivo, we firstly established rat models of PD by unilateral injection of LPS into substantia nigra (SN), and then examined the role of vanillin in motor dysfunction, microglial activation and degeneration of dopaminergic neurons. In vitro, murine microglial BV-2 cells were treated with vanillin prior to the incubation of LPS, and then the inflammatory responses and the related signaling pathways were analyzed. The in vivo results showed that vanillin markedly improved the motor dysfunction, suppressed degeneration of dopaminergic neurons and inhibited microglial over-activation induced by LPS intranigral injection. The in vitro studies demonstrated that vanillin reduces LPS-induced expression of inducible nitric oxide (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), IL-1β, and IL-6 through regulating ERK1/2, p38 and NF-κB signaling. Collectively, these data indicated that vanillin has a role in protecting dopaminergic neurons via inhibiting inflammatory activation.

  10. Quercetin and sesamin protect neuronal PC12 cells from high-glucose-induced oxidation, nitrosative stress, and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bournival, Julie; Francoeur, Marc-André; Renaud, Justine; Martinoli, Maria-Grazia

    2012-06-01

    Complications of diabetes are now well-known to affect sensory, motor, and autonomic nerves. Diabetes is also thought to be involved in neurodegenerative processes characteristic of several neurodegenerative diseases. Indeed, it has been acknowledged recently that hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress contributes to numerous cellular reactions typical of central nervous system deterioration. The goal of the present study was to evaluate the effects of the polyphenol quercetin and the lignan sesamin on high-glucose (HG)-induced oxidative damage in an in vitro model of dopaminergic neurons, neuronal PC12 cells. When incubated with HG (13.5 mg/mL), neuronal PC12 cells showed a significant increase of cellular death. Our results revealed that quercetin and sesamin defend neuronal PC12 cells from HG-induced cellular demise. An elevated level of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species is a consequence of improved oxidative stress after HG administration, and we demonstrated that this production diminishes with quercetin and sesamin treatment. We also found that quercetin and sesamin elicited an increment of superoxide dismutase activity. DNA fragmentation, Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, nuclear translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor, as well as poly(adenosine diphosphate [ADP]-ribose) polymerase cleavage were significantly reduced by quercetin and sesamin administration, affirming their antiapoptotic features. Also, HG treatment impacted caspase-3 cleavage, supporting caspase-3-dependent pathways as mechanisms of apoptotic death. Our results indicate a powerful role for these natural dietary compounds and emphasize preventive or complementary nutritional strategies for diabetes control.

  11. GDNF secreting human neural progenitor cells protect dying motor neurons, but not their projection to muscle, in a rat model of familial ALS.

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    Masatoshi Suzuki

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a fatal, progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by rapid loss of muscle control and eventual paralysis due to the death of large motor neurons in the brain and spinal cord. Growth factors such as glial cell line derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF are known to protect motor neurons from damage in a range of models. However, penetrance through the blood brain barrier and delivery to the spinal cord remains a serious challenge. Although there may be a primary dysfunction in the motor neuron itself, there is also increasing evidence that excitotoxicity due to glial dysfunction plays a crucial role in disease progression. Clearly it would be of great interest if wild type glial cells could ameliorate motor neuron loss in these models, perhaps in combination with the release of growth factors such as GDNF. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Human neural progenitor cells can be expanded in culture for long periods and survive transplantation into the adult rodent central nervous system, in some cases making large numbers of GFAP positive astrocytes. They can also be genetically modified to release GDNF (hNPC(GDNF and thus act as long-term 'mini pumps' in specific regions of the rodent and primate brain. In the current study we genetically modified human neural stem cells to release GDNF and transplanted them into the spinal cord of rats over-expressing mutant SOD1 (SOD1(G93A. Following unilateral transplantation into the spinal cord of SOD1(G93A rats there was robust cellular migration into degenerating areas, efficient delivery of GDNF and remarkable preservation of motor neurons at early and end stages of the disease within chimeric regions. The progenitors retained immature markers, and those not secreting GDNF had no effect on motor neuron survival. Interestingly, this robust motor neuron survival was not accompanied by continued innervation of muscle end plates and thus resulted in no

  12. Minocycline inhibited the pro-apoptotic effect of microglia on neural progenitor cells and protected their neuronal differentiation in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuqing; Su, Huanxing; Chu, Tak-Ho; Guo, Anchen; Wu, Wutian

    2013-05-10

    Neural progenitor cell (NPC) transplantation offers great potential to treat spinal cord injury (SCI), but their efficiency is limited by poor survival and neuronal differentiation after transplantation. In the injury site, microglia may become activated and participate in the inflammation reaction. In vitro studies indicated that activated microglia might impair NPC survival and neuronal differentiation, but resting microglia did not. This study investigated the potential of minocycline to modify the negative effects of activated microglia on NPCs in vitro. First, the direct effects of minocycline on NPCs were tested. The results showed that at the concentration of 10μg/ml or lower, minocycline did not affect NPC survival and proliferation, but impaired neuronal differentiation. Then microglia were activated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or treated with LPS plus minocycline (LPSMC), and the effects of conditioned media on NPC apoptosis and differentiation were studied. The results showed that, compared with LPS treatment group, the microglia conditioned media of LPSMC treatment group resulted in a significantly lower apoptotic rate of NPCs, and increased the neuronal differentiation of NPCs. This suggested that minocycline might inhibit the negative effects of microglia on NPCs, and have the potential to support the survival and neuronal differentiation of transplanted NPCs for SCI.

  13. Ecdysterone protects gerbil brain from temporal global cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury via preventing neuron apoptosis and deactivating astrocytes and microglia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Wang, Tao; Feng, Wan-Yu; Wang, Zhan-You; Cheng, Mao-Sheng; Wang, Yun-Jie

    2014-01-01

    Ecdysterone (EDS), a common derivative of ecdysteroid, has shown its effects on alleviating cognitive impairment and improving the cognition and memory. However, the mechanisms remain unknown. Using temporal global forebrain ischemia and reperfusion-induced brain injury as a model system, we investigated the roles of EDS in improving cognitive impairment in gerbil. Our results demonstrated that intraperitoneal injection of EDS obviously increased the number of surviving neuron cells by Nissl and neuronal nuclei (NeuN) staining. Indeed, the protecting effects of EDS are because of its ability to prevent the apoptosis of neuron cells as evidenced by TUNEL staining and caspase-3 deactivation in the brain of temporal global forebrain ischemia/reperfusion-treated gerbil. Moreover, EDS administration suppressed the ischemia stimulated activity of astrocytes and microglia cells by inhibiting the production of tumor necrosis alpha (TNF-α) in the brain of gerbil. More importantly, these actions of neurons and astrocytes/microglia cells in response to EDS treatment played pivotal roles in ameliorating the cognitive impairment in the ischemia/reperfusion-injured gerbil. In view of these observations, we not only decipher the mechanisms of EDS in reducing the syndrome of ischemia, but also provide novel perspectives to combat ischemic stroke.

  14. Protective effect of keishi-bukuryo-gan and its constituent medicinal plants against nitric oxide donor-induced neuronal death in cultured cerebellar granule cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Y; Yokoyama, K; Goto, H; Sekiya, N; Mantani, N; Tahara, E; Hikiami, H; Terasawa, K

    2004-07-01

    Keishi-bukuryo-gan (Gui-Zhi-Fu-Ling-Wan) (KBG) is a traditional Chinese/Japanese medical (Kampo) formulation that has been administered to patients with "Oketsu" (blood stagnation) syndrome. In the process of neuronal cell death induced by brain ischemia, excessive generation of nitric oxide (NO) free radicals is implicated in the neurotoxicity. In the present study, we examined the protective effects of KBG and its constituent medicinal plants against NO donors, sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and 2,2'-(hydroxynitrosohydrazino)bis-ethanamine (NOC18)-induced neuronal death in cultured rat cerebellar granule cells (CGCs). MTT assay showed cell viability to be significantly increased by the addition of KBG extract (KBGE) (100 microg/ml), Cinnamomi Cortex extract (CCE) (3, 10 and 30 microg/ml), Paeoniae Radix extract (PRE) (100 microg/ml) and Moutan Cortex extract (MCE) (10 and 30 microg/ml) compared with exposure to SNP (30 microM, 24 h) only. Also, cell viability was significantly increased by the addition of KBGE (100 and 300 microg/ml), CCE (30 and 100 microg/ml), PRE (100 and 300 microg/ml) and MCE (30 and 100 microg/ml) compared with exposure to NOC 18 (100 microM, 48 h) only. Persicae Semen extract and Hoelen extract did not protect against NO donor-induced neuronal death. These results suggest that KBG has protective effect against NO-mediated neuronal death in cultured CGCs and that it is derived from Cinnamomi Cortex, Paeoniae Radix and Moutan Cortex.

  15. Salvianolic acid B attenuates toxin-induced neuronal damage via Nrf2-dependent glial cells-mediated protective activity in Parkinson's disease models.

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    Jie Zhou

    Full Text Available Salvianolic acid B (SalB, a bioactive compound isolated from the plant-derived medicinal herb Danshen, has been shown to exert various anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory activities in several neurological disorders. In this study, we sought to investigate the potential protective effects and associated molecular mechanisms of SalB in Parkinson's disease (PD models. To determine the neuroprotective effects of SalB in vitro, MPP+- or lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced neuronal injury was achieved using primary cultures with different compositions of neurons, microglia and astrocytes. Our results showed that SalB reduced both LPS- and MPP+-induced toxicity of dopamine neurons in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, SalB treatment inhibited the release of microglial pro-inflammatory cytokines and resulted in an increase in the expression and release of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF from astrocytes. Western blot analysis illustrated that SalB increased the expression and nuclear translocation of nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2-like 2 (Nrf2. The knockdown of Nrf2 using specific small interfering RNA (siRNA partially reversed the SalB-induced GDNF expression and anti-inflammatory activity. Moreover, SalB treatment significantly attenuated dopaminergic (DA neuronal loss, inhibited neuroinflammation, increased GDNF expression and improved the neurological function in MPTP-treated mice. Collectively, these findings demonstrated that SalB protects DA neurons by an Nrf-2 -mediated dual action: reducing microglia activation-mediated neuroinflammation and inducing astrocyte activation-dependent GDNF expression. Importantly the present study also highlights critical roles of glial cells as targets for developing new strategies to alter the progression of neurodegenerative disorders.

  16. Salvianolic Acid B Attenuates Toxin-Induced Neuronal Damage via Nrf2-Dependent Glial Cells-Mediated Protective Activity in Parkinson’s Disease Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi-Yun; Wei-Ji; Liu, Qi; Ma, Yi-Hui; He, Jiao-Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Salvianolic acid B (SalB), a bioactive compound isolated from the plant-derived medicinal herb Danshen, has been shown to exert various anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory activities in several neurological disorders. In this study, we sought to investigate the potential protective effects and associated molecular mechanisms of SalB in Parkinson’s disease (PD) models. To determine the neuroprotective effects of SalB in vitro, MPP+- or lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced neuronal injury was achieved using primary cultures with different compositions of neurons, microglia and astrocytes. Our results showed that SalB reduced both LPS- and MPP+-induced toxicity of dopamine neurons in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, SalB treatment inhibited the release of microglial pro-inflammatory cytokines and resulted in an increase in the expression and release of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) from astrocytes. Western blot analysis illustrated that SalB increased the expression and nuclear translocation of nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2). The knockdown of Nrf2 using specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) partially reversed the SalB-induced GDNF expression and anti-inflammatory activity. Moreover, SalB treatment significantly attenuated dopaminergic (DA) neuronal loss, inhibited neuroinflammation, increased GDNF expression and improved the neurological function in MPTP-treated mice. Collectively, these findings demonstrated that SalB protects DA neurons by an Nrf-2 -mediated dual action: reducing microglia activation-mediated neuroinflammation and inducing astrocyte activation-dependent GDNF expression. Importantly the present study also highlights critical roles of glial cells as targets for developing new strategies to alter the progression of neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:24991814

  17. Early Cellular Responses of Purine Nucleoside-mediated Protection of Hypoxia-induced Injuries of Neuronal PC12 Cells

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    Bettina Tomaselli

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxia in brain may lead to cell death by apoptosis and necrosis. In parallel adenosine, a powerful endogenous neuroprotectant is formed. We wanted to investigate the effect of adenosine and its purine nucleoside relatives, inosine and guanosine on early cellular responses to hypoxia. O2-sensitive neuronal PC12-cells were subjected to chemical hypoxia induced with rotenone, an inhibitor of mitochondrial complex I. Loss of viability after hypoxic insult was impressively rescued by adenosine, guanosine and inosine. PC12-cells mainly express the A2A adenosine receptor. Its inhibition with a specific antagonist (CSC induced cell death of PC12-cells, which could be salvaged by adenosine but not with guanosine or inosine. We have previously demonstrated the important role of mitogen activated protein kinases 1/2 (p42/44 MAPK in purine-mediated rescue. In this study we were interested in the involvement of protein kinases whose activities mediate these processes, including protein kinase A (PKA, phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3-K and protein kinase C-related kinases (PRK 1/2. Pharmacological inhibition of PKA and PI3-K increased hypoxia-induced toxicity and likewise also affected the rescue by purine nucleosides. Nerve growth factor (NGF and purine nucleosides induced an activation of PRK 1/2, which to our knowledge indicates for the first time that these kinases are potentially involved in purine nucleoside-mediated rescue of hypoxic neuronal cells. Results suggest that A2A receptor expressing cells are mainly dependent on the purine nucleoside adenosine for their rescue after hypoxic insult. In addition to PKA, PI3-K is an important effector molecule in A2A-mediated signaling and for the rescue of PC12-cells after hypoxic insult.

  18. Protection of HT22 neuronal cells against glutamate toxicity mediated by the antioxidant activity of Pueraria candollei var. mirifica extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sucontphunt, Apirada; De-Eknamkul, Wanchai; Nimmannit, Ubonthip; Dan Dimitrijevich, S; Gracy, Robert W

    2011-01-01

    Neuronal degeneration is known to be due to oxidative stress acting through a pathway involving the excessive activation of glutamate receptors. We studied the neuroprotection potential of an ethyl acetate-ethanol extract of Pueraria mirifica (P. candollei var. mirifica) root (PM extract). PM extract was evaluated for its antioxidant and neuroprotective activities against glutamate toxicity in mouse hippocampal HT22 neuronal cells. The extract at concentrations of 10 and 50 μg/ml exhibited considerable antioxidant activity with significant neuroprotection, based on the microscopic observations of cell morphology and the determination of cell viability and cell number. Studies of the possible mechanisms of action indicated that the neuroprotection exerted by PM extract was related to its scavenging activity against H(2)O(2) and related reactive oxygen species. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and thin-layer chromatography (TLC) analyses showed that the extract contained daidzein and genistein as identified constituents, as well as additional components with antioxidant activity. While daidzein and genistein individually and in combination were observed not to be neuroprotective, we propose that the antioxidant and neuroprotective activities of PM extract are derived from the combined properties of its constituents.

  19. Hypoxia pretreatment and EPO-modification enhance the protective effects of MSC on neuron-like PC12 cells in a similar way.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jinli; Wang, Wei

    2017-01-08

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) based cell transplantation therapy is proved to be an attractive strategy with great potential for improvement of hypoxia induced neural damage. In the present study, MSCs were co-culture with PC12 to investigate its protective effects against hypoxia pretreatment, and the Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release assay, MTT and Anexin V staining were performed to analysis the cellular damage or apoptotic. RT-PCR and Western blotting were further used to investigate the underlying mechanism. The results indicate that hypoxia treatment results in the decrease of PC12 cell viability, yet co-culture with MSC could protect the PC12 from hypoxia induced damage. Hypoxia pre-activated or EPO transduced MSC with up-regulated erythropoietin (EPO) expression could further enhance MSC's protective effect against hypoxia induced cell damage, which was associated with high level of anti-apoptotic p-Akt and ration Bcl-2/Bax, and decreased Caspase 3 in PC12. Taken together, these data suggests high levels of MSC-mediated cyto-protection is closely tied to high gene expression levels of EPO. The up-regulation of EPO for enhanced MSC-mediated cyto-protection may has great potential for the MSC cellular therapy of neural or neuronal injuries induced by hypoxia.

  20. Lipid raft disruption protects mature neurons against amyloid oligomer toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malchiodi-Albedi, Fiorella; Contrusciere, Valentina; Raggi, Carla; Fecchi, Katia; Rainaldi, Gabriella; Paradisi, Silvia; Matteucci, Andrea; Santini, Maria Teresa; Sargiacomo, Massimo; Frank, Claudio; Gaudiano, Maria Cristina; Diociaiuti, Marco

    2010-04-01

    A specific neuronal vulnerability to amyloid protein toxicity may account for brain susceptibility to protein misfolding diseases. To investigate this issue, we compared the effects induced by oligomers from salmon calcitonin (sCTOs), a neurotoxic amyloid protein, on cells of different histogenesis: mature and immature primary hippocampal neurons, primary astrocytes, MG63 osteoblasts and NIH-3T3 fibroblasts. In mature neurons, sCTOs increased apoptosis and induced neuritic and synaptic damages similar to those caused by amyloid beta oligomers. Immature neurons and the other cell types showed no cytotoxicity. sCTOs caused cytosolic Ca(2+) rise in mature, but not in immature neurons and the other cell types. Comparison of plasma membrane lipid composition showed that mature neurons had the highest content in lipid rafts, suggesting a key role for them in neuronal vulnerability to sCTOs. Consistently, depletion in gangliosides protected against sCTO toxicity. We hypothesize that the high content in lipid rafts makes mature neurons especially vulnerable to amyloid proteins, as compared to other cell types; this may help explain why the brain is a target organ for amyloid-related diseases.

  1. Ferulic acid antioxidant protection against hydroxyl and peroxyl radical oxidation in synaptosomal and neuronal cell culture systems in vitro: structure-activity studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanski, Jaroslaw; Aksenova, Marina; Stoyanova, Antonia; Butterfield, D Allan

    2002-05-01

    In this study, free radical scavenging abilities of ferulic acid in relation to its structural characteristics were evaluated in solution, cultured neurons, and synaptosomal systems exposed to hydroxyl and peroxyl radicals. Cultured neuronal cells exposed to the peroxyl radical initiator AAPH die in a dose-response manner and show elevated levels of protein carbonyls. The presence of ferulic acid or similar phenolic compounds, however, greatly reduces free radical damage in neuronal cell systems without causing cell death by themselves. In addition, synaptosomal membrane systems exposed to oxidative stress by hydroxyl and peroxyl radical generators show elevated levels of oxidation as indexed by protein oxidation, lipid peroxidation, and ROS measurement. Ferulic acid greatly attenuates these changes, and its effects are far more potent than those obtained for vanillic, coumaric, and cinnamic acid treatments. Moreover, ferulic acid protects against free radical mediated changes in conformation of synaptosomal membrane proteins as monitored by EPR spin labeling techniques. The results presented in this study suggest the importance of naturally occurring antioxidants such as ferulic acid in therapeutic intervention methodology against neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease in which oxidative stress is implicated.

  2. Stem cells decreased neuronal cell death after hypoxic stress in primary fetal rat neurons in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Tetsuro; Xu, Yan

    2012-01-01

    To explore stem cell-mediated neuronal protection through extracellular signaling pathways by transplanted stem cells, we sought to identify potential candidate molecules responsible for neuronal protection using an in vitro coculture system. Primary fetal rat hippocampal neurons underwent hypoxia (≤1% oxygen) for 96 h nad then were returned to a normoxic condition. The study group then received rat umbilical cord matrix-derived stem cells, while the control group received fresh media only. The experimental group showed decreased neuronal apoptosis compared to the control group [44.5 ± 1.6% vs. 71.0 ± 4.2% (mean ± SD, p = 0.0005) on day 5] and higher neuronal survival (4.9 ± 1.2 cells/100× field vs. 2.2 ± 0.3, p = 0.02 on day 5). Among 90 proteins evaluated using a protein array, stem cell coculture media showed increased protein secretion of TIMP-1 (5.61-fold), TIMP-2 (4.88), CNTF-Rα (3.42), activin A (2.20), fractalkine (2.04), CCR4 (2.02), and decreased secretion in MIP-2 (0.30-fold), AMPK α1 (0.43), TROY (0.48), and TIMP-3 (0.50). This study demonstrated that coculturing stem cells with primary neurons in vitro decreased neuronal cell death after hypoxia with significantly altered protein secretion. The results suggest that stem cells may offer neuronal protection through extracellular signaling.

  3. Stearic acid protects primary cultured cortical neurons against oxidative stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ze-jian WANG; Cui-ling LIANG; Guang-mei LI; Cai-yi YU; Ming YIN

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To observe the effects of stearic acid against oxidative stress in primary cultured cortical neurons. Methods: Cortical neurons were exposed to glutamate,hydrogen peroxide (H202), or NaN3 insult in the presence or absence of stearic acid. Cell viability of cortical neurons was determined by MTT assay and LDH release. Endogenous antioxidant enzymes activity[superoxide dismutases (SOD),glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), and catalase (CAT)] and lipid peroxidation in cultured cortical neurons were evaluated using commercial kits. {3-[1(p-chloro-benzyl)-5-(isopropyl)-3-t-butylthiondol-2-yl]-2,2-dimethylpropanoic acid, Na}[MK886; 5 pmol/L; a noncompetitive inhibitor of proliferator-activated receptor(PPAR)α], bisphenol A diglycidyl ether (BADGE; 100 μmol/L; an antagonist of PPARγ), and cycloheximide (CHX; 30 μmol/L, an inhibitor of protein synthesis)were tested for their effects on the neuroprotection afforded by stearic acid.Western blotting was used to determine the PPARγ protein level in cortical neurons.Results: Stearic acid dose-dependently protected cortical neurons against glutamate or H202 injury and increased glutamate uptake in cultured neurons.This protection was concomitant to the inhibition of lipid peroxidation and to the promotion activity of Cu/Zn SOD and CAT in cultured cortical neurons. Its neuroprotective effects were completely blocked by BADGE and CHX. After incubation with H2O2 for 24 h, the expression of the PPARγ protein decreased significantly (P<0.05), and the inhibitory effect of H2O2 on the expression of PPARγ can be attenuated by stearic acid. Conclusion: Stearic acid can protect cortical neurons against oxidative stress by boosting the internal antioxidant enzymes.Its neuroprotective effect may be mainly mediated by the activation of PPARγ and new protein synthesis in cortical neurons.

  4. Activated microglia induce bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells to produce glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor and protect neurons against oxygen-glucose deprivation injury

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    Bingke Lv

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigated interactions among microglia (MG, bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs and neurons in cerebral ischemia and the potential mechanisms using an in vitro oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD model. Rat BMSCs were incubated with conditioned medium (CM from in vitro cultures of OGD-activated rat MG and murine BV2 MG cells. Effects of glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF on rat neuron viability, apoptosis, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH leakage and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP were analyzed in this model. OGD-activated MG promoted GDNF production by BMSCs (P < 0.01. TNFα, but not IL6 or IL1β, promoted GDNF production by BMSCs (P < 0.001. GDNF or CM pre-treated BMSCs elevated neuronal viability and suppressed apoptosis (P < 0.05 or P < 0.01; these effects were inhibited by the RET antibody. GDNF activated MEK/ERK and PI3K/AKT signaling but not JNK/c-JUN. Furthermore, GDNF upregulated B cell lymphoma 2 (BCL2 and heat shock 60 kDa protein 1 (HSP60 levels, suppressed LDH leakage, and promoted MMP. Thus, activated MG produce TNFα to stimulate GDNF production by BMSCs, which prevents and repairs OGD-induced neuronal injury, possibly via regulating MEK/ERK and PI3K/AKT signaling. These findings will facilitate the prevention and treatment of neuronal injury by cerebral ischemia.

  5. Intrastriatal glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factors for protecting dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra of mice with Parkinson disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chenghua Xiao; Yanqiang Wang; Hongmei Liu; Hongjun Wang; Junping Cao; Dianshuai Gao

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Substantia nigra is deep in position and limited in range, the glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) injection directly into substantia nigra has relatively greater damages with higher difficulty. GDNF injection into striatum, the target area of dopaminergic neuron, may protect the dopaminergic neurons in the compact part of substantia nigra through retrograde transport.OBJECTIVE: To investigate the protective effect of intrastriatal GDNF on dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra of mice with Parkinson disease (PD), and analyze the action pathway.DESIGN: A controlled observation.SETTING: Neurobiological Laboratory of Xuzhou Medical College.MATERIALS: Twenty-four male Kunming mice of 7 - 8 weeks old were used. GDNF,1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) were purchased from Sigma Company (USA);LEICAQWin image processing and analytical system.METHODS: The experiments were carried out in the Neurobiological Laboratory of Xuzhou Medical College from September 2005 to October 2006. The PD models were established in adult KunMing mice by intraperitoneal injection of MPTP. The model mice were were randomly divided into four groups with 6 mice in each group: GDNF 4-day group, phosphate buffer solution (PSB) 4-day group, GDNF 6-day group and PSB 6-day group. Mice in the GDNF 4 and 6-day groups were administrated with 1 μL GDNF solution (20 μg/L, dispensed with 0.01 mol/L PBS) injected into right striatum at 4 and 6 days after model establishment. Mice in the PSB 4 and 6-day groups were administrated with 0.01 mol/L PBS of the same volume to the same injection at corresponding time points. ② On the 12th day after model establishment, the midbrain tissue section of each mice was divided into 3 areas from rostral to caudal sides. The positive neurons of tyroxine hydroxylase (TH) and calcium binding protein (CB) with obvious nucleolus and clear outline were randomly selected for the measurement, and the number of positive neurons

  6. Cell biology of neuronal endocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parton, R G; Dotti, C G

    1993-09-01

    Endocytosis is the process by which cells take in fluid and components of the plasma membrane. In this way cells obtain nutrients and trophic factors, retrieve membrane proteins for degradation, and sample their environment. In neuronal cells endocytosis is essential for the recycling of membrane after neurotransmitter release and plays a critical role during early developmental stages. Moreover, alterations of the endocytic pathway have been attributed a crucial role in the pathophysiology of certain neurological diseases. Although well characterized at the ultrastructural level, little is known of the dynamics and molecular organization of the neuronal endocytic pathways. In this respect most of our knowledge comes from studies of non-neuronal cells. In this review we will examine the endocytic pathways in neurons from a cell biological viewpoint by making comparisons with non-neuronal cells and in particular with another polarized cell, the epithelial cell.

  7. PEG-PEI/siROCK2 Protects Against Aβ42-Induced Neurotoxicity in Primary Neuron Cells for Alzheimer Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yunyun; Yang, Xingyi; Lei, Qingfeng; Li, Zhong; Hu, Jingyang; Wen, Xiaojun; Wang, Huijun; Liu, Zhonglin

    2015-08-01

    Gene therapy that targets the ROCK2 gene has yielded promising results in the treatment of AD. Our previous study indicated that PEG-PEI/siROCK2 could effectively suppress ROCK2 mRNA expression and showed a promising prospect for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. However, the ability of PEG-PEI/siROCK2 to reduce Aβ-induced cytotoxicity is unknown. To investigate the effect of PEG-PEI/siROCK2 against Aβ42-induced neurotoxicity, primary cultured cortical neurons were pretreated with PEG-PEI/siROCK2 for 24 h and then treated with 5 μM Aβ42 for 24 h. We found that PEG-PEI/siROCK2 increased the cell viability and reduced the number of apoptotic cells induced by Aβ42, as measured using an MTT assay and Annexin V/PI staining. A further study revealed that PEG-PEI/siROCK2 can activate p-Akt, and treatment with the PI3K inhibitor LY294002 attenuated the neuroprotective effects. These results suggest that PEG-PEI/siROCK2 prevents Aβ42-induced neurotoxicity and that the activation of PI3K/Akt pathway is involved in neuroprotection. Taken together, these findings shed light on the role of PEG-PEI/siROCK2 as a potential therapeutic agent for AD.

  8. miR-7 and miR-153 protect neurons against MPP+- induced cell death via upregulation of mTOR pathway

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    Apostolia eFragkouli

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Differential expression of microRNAs (miRs in the brain of patients with neurodegenerative diseases suggests that they may have key regulatory roles in the development of these disorders. Two such miRs, miR-7 and miR-153 have recently been shown to target α-synuclein, a protein critically involved in the pathological process of Parkinson’s disease. By using a well-established in culture Parkinson’s disease model that of neurotoxin 1-Methyl-4-Phenyl-Pyridinium (MPP+, we examined whether miR-7 and miR-153 display neuroprotective properties. Herein, we demonstrate that treatment of cortical neurons with MPP+ induced a dose-dependent cell death with apoptotic characteristics. This was reflected in altered intracellular signaling characterized by increased levels of activated kinases p38MAPK and ERK1/2 and reduced levels of activated AKT, p70S6K and SAPK/JNK. Overexpression of miR-7 or miR-153 by adenoviral transduction protected cortical neurons from MPP+-induced toxicity, restored neuronal viability and anti-apoptotic BCL-2 protein levels while attenuated activation of caspase-3. Moreover, both miR-7 and miR-153 interfered with MPP+-induced alterations in intracellular signaling pathways in a partially overlapping manner; specifically, they preserved activation of mTOR and SAPK/JNK signaling pathways in the MPP+-treated neurons, while miR-153 also attenuated MPP+-induced activation of p38MAPK. No major effects were observed in the rest of signaling cascades or proteins investigated. Furthermore, the neuroprotective effect of miR-7 and miR-153 was alleviated when MPP+ was co-administered with rapamycin. Taken together, our results suggest that miR-7 and miR-153 protect neurons from cell death by interfering with the MPP+-induced downregulation of mTOR signaling.

  9. Human Adipose Tissue Conditioned Media from Lean Subjects Is Protective against H2O2 Induced Neurotoxicity in Human SH-SY5Y Neuronal Cells

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    Zhongxiao Wan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Adipose tissue secretes numerous hormone-like factors, which are known as adipokines. Adipokine receptors have been identified in the central nervous system but the potential role of adipokine signaling in neuroprotection is unclear. The aim of this study is to determine (1 Whether adipokines secreted from cultured adipose tissue of lean humans is protective against oxidative stress-induced neurotoxicity in human SH-SY5Y neuronal cells; and (2 To explore potential signaling pathways involved in these processes. Adipose tissue conditioned media (ATCM from healthy lean subjects completely prevented H2O2 induced neurotoxicity, while this effect is lost after heating ATCM. ATCM activated the phosphorylation of ERK1/2, JNK and Akt at serine 308 in SH-SY5Y cells. PD98059 (25 µM, SP600125 (5 µM and LY29400 (20 µM partially blocked the protective effects of ATCM against H2O2 induced neurotoxicity. Findings demonstrate that heat-sensitive factors secreted from human adipose tissue of lean subjects are protective against H2O2 induced neurotoxicity and ERK1/2, JNK, and PI3K signaling pathways are involved in these processes. In conclusion, this study demonstrates preliminary but encouraging data to further support that adipose tissue secreted factors from lean human subjects might possess neuroprotective properties and unravel the specific roles of ERK1/2, JNK and PI3K in these processes.

  10. Neuronal Sirt3 protects against excitotoxic injury in mouse cortical neuron culture.

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    Sun Hee Kim

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sirtuins (Sirt, a family of nicotinamide adenine nucleotide (NAD dependent deacetylases, are implicated in energy metabolism and life span. Among the known Sirt isoforms (Sirt1-7, Sirt3 was identified as a stress responsive deacetylase recently shown to play a role in protecting cells under stress conditions. Here, we demonstrated the presence of Sirt3 in neurons, and characterized the role of Sirt3 in neuron survival under NMDA-induced excitotoxicity. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To induce excitotoxic injury, we exposed primary cultured mouse cortical neurons to NMDA (30 µM. NMDA induced a rapid decrease of cytoplasmic NAD (but not mitochondrial NAD in neurons through poly (ADP-ribose polymerase-1 (PARP-1 activation. Mitochondrial Sirt3 was increased following PARP-1 mediated NAD depletion, which was reversed by either inhibition of PARP-1 or exogenous NAD. We found that massive reactive oxygen species (ROS produced under this NAD depleted condition mediated the increase in mitochondrial Sirt3. By transfecting primary neurons with a Sirt3 overexpressing plasmid or Sirt3 siRNA, we showed that Sirt3 is required for neuroprotection against excitotoxicity. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrated for the first time that mitochondrial Sirt3 acts as a prosurvival factor playing an essential role to protect neurons under excitotoxic injury.

  11. Human embryonic stem cells for neuronal repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Hur, Tamir

    2006-02-01

    Human embryonic stem cells may serve as a potentially endeless source of transplantable cells to treat various neurologic disorders. Accumulating data have shown the therapeutic value of various neural precursor cell types in experimental models of neurologic diseases. Tailoring cell therapy for specific disorders requires the generation of cells that are committed to specific neural lineages. To this end, protocols were recently developed for the derivation of dopaminergic neurons, spinal motor neurons and oligodendrocytes from hESC. These protocols recapitulate normal development in culture conditions. However, a novel concept emerging from these studies is that the beneficial effect of transplanted stem cells is not only via cell replacement in damaged host tissue, but also by trophic and protective effects, as well as by an immunomodulatory effect that down-regulates detrimental brain inflammation.

  12. Quinolinic acid induces disrupts cytoskeletal homeostasis in striatal neurons. Protective role of astrocyte-neuron interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierozan, Paula; Ferreira, Fernanda; de Lima, Bárbara Ortiz; Pessoa-Pureur, Regina

    2015-02-01

    Quinolinic acid (QUIN) is an endogenous metabolite of the kynurenine pathway involved in several neurological disorders. Among the several mechanisms involved in QUIN-mediated toxicity, disruption of the cytoskeleton has been demonstrated in striatally injected rats and in striatal slices. The present work searched for the actions of QUIN in primary striatal neurons. Neurons exposed to 10 µM QUIN presented hyperphosphorylated neurofilament (NF) subunits (NFL, NFM, and NFH). Hyperphosphorylation was abrogated in the presence of protein kinase A and protein kinase C inhibitors H89 (20 μM) and staurosporine (10 nM), respectively, as well as by specific antagonists to N-methyl-D-aspartate (50 µM DL-AP5) and metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (100 µM MPEP). Also, intra- and extracellular Ca(2+) chelators (10 µM BAPTA-AM and 1 mM EGTA, respectively) and Ca(2+) influx through L-type voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channel (10 µM verapamil) are implicated in QUIN-mediated effects. Cells immunostained for the neuronal markers βIII-tubulin and microtubule-associated protein 2 showed altered neurite/neuron ratios and neurite outgrowth. NF hyperphosphorylation and morphological alterations were totally prevented by conditioned medium from QUIN-treated astrocytes. Cocultured astrocytes and neurons interacted with one another reciprocally, protecting them against QUIN injury. Cocultured cells preserved their cytoskeletal organization and cell morphology together with unaltered activity of the phosphorylating system associated with the cytoskeleton. This article describes cytoskeletal disruption as one of the most relevant actions of QUIN toxicity in striatal neurons in culture with soluble factors secreted by astrocytes, with neuron-astrocyte interaction playing a role in neuroprotection.

  13. Protective effects of berberine against amyloid beta-induced toxicity in cultured rat cortical neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Wang; Yanjun Zhang; Shuai Du; Mixia Zhang

    2011-01-01

    Berberine, a major constituent of Coptidis rhizoma, exhibits neural protective effects. The present study analyzed the potential protective effect of berberine against amyloid G-induced cytotoxicity in rat cerebral cortical neurons. Alzheimer's disease cell models were treated with 0.5 and 2 μmol/Lberberine for 36 hours to inhibit amyloid G-induced toxicity. Methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium assay and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling staining results showed that berberine significantly increased cell viability and reduced cell apoptosis in primary cultured rat cortical neurons. In addition, western blot analysis revealed a protective effect of berberine against amyloid β-induced toxicity in cultured cortical neurons, which coincided with significantly decreased abnormal up-regulation of activated caspase-3. These results showed that berberine exhibited a protective effect against amyloid 13-induced cytotoxicity in cultured rat cortical neurons.

  14. Quercetin and sesamin protect dopaminergic cells from MPP+-induced neuroinflammation in a microglial (N9)-neuronal (PC12) coculture system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bournival, Julie; Plouffe, Marilyn; Renaud, Justine; Provencher, Cindy; Martinoli, Maria-Grazia

    2012-01-01

    A growing body of evidence indicates that the majority of Parkinson's disease (PD) cases are associated with microglia activation with resultant elevation of various inflammatory mediators and neuroinflammation. In this study, we investigated the effects of 2 natural molecules, quercetin and sesamin, on neuroinflammation induced by the Parkinsonian toxin 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+)) in a glial-neuronal system. We first established that quercetin and sesamin defend microglial cells against MPP(+)-induced increases in the mRNA or protein levels of 3 pro-inflammatory cytokines (interleukin-6, IL-1β and tumor necrosis factor-alpha), as revealed by real time-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay, respectively. Quercetin and sesamin also decrease MPP(+)-induced oxidative stress in microglial cells by reducing inducible nitric oxide synthase protein expression as well as mitochondrial superoxide radicals. We then measured neuronal cell death and apoptosis after MPP(+) activation of microglia, in a microglial (N9)-neuronal (PC12) coculture system. Our results revealed that quercetin and sesamin rescued neuronal PC12 cells from apoptotic death induced by MPP(+) activation of microglial cells. Altogether, our data demonstrate that the phytoestrogen quercetin and the lignan sesamin diminish MPP(+)-evoked microglial activation and suggest that both these molecules may be regarded as potent, natural, anti-inflammatory compounds.

  15. Quercetin and Sesamin Protect Dopaminergic Cells from MPP+-Induced Neuroinflammation in a Microglial (N9-Neuronal (PC12 Coculture System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Bournival

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A growing body of evidence indicates that the majority of Parkinson’s disease (PD cases are associated with microglia activation with resultant elevation of various inflammatory mediators and neuroinflammation. In this study, we investigated the effects of 2 natural molecules, quercetin and sesamin, on neuroinflammation induced by the Parkinsonian toxin 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+ in a glial-neuronal system. We first established that quercetin and sesamin defend microglial cells against MPP+-induced increases in the mRNA or protein levels of 3 pro-inflammatory cytokines (interleukin-6, IL-1β and tumor necrosis factor-alpha, as revealed by real time-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay, respectively. Quercetin and sesamin also decrease MPP+-induced oxidative stress in microglial cells by reducing inducible nitric oxide synthase protein expression as well as mitochondrial superoxide radicals. We then measured neuronal cell death and apoptosis after MPP+ activation of microglia, in a microglial (N9-neuronal (PC12 coculture system. Our results revealed that quercetin and sesamin rescued neuronal PC12 cells from apoptotic death induced by MPP+ activation of microglial cells. Altogether, our data demonstrate that the phytoestrogen quercetin and the lignan sesamin diminish MPP+-evoked microglial activation and suggest that both these molecules may be regarded as potent, natural, anti-inflammatory compounds.

  16. Curcumin protects against interleukin-6-induced rapid Ca2+ influx in rat hippocampal neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qinying Deng; Tao Huang; Hongmei Tang; Xingming Zhong; Sujian Xia; Xiangcai Wei; Jun Dong

    2011-01-01

    The current study sought to investigate the potential protective action of curcumin against interleukin-6-induced injury in rat hippocampal neurons. The results revealed that interleukin-6 induced typical cellular injury, such as the swelling of cell bodies and increased Ca2+ concentration. After administration of curcumin, interleukin-6-induced neurons recovered to a normal state, and the fluorescence intensity of Ca2+ gradually returned to normal. These findings suggest that curcumin exerts a protective effect on hippocampal neurons of rats. In addition, our results suggest that the protective effect of curcumin involves prevention of the rapid Ca2+ influx induced by interleukin-6, which maintains Ca2+ homeostasis.

  17. Curcumin protects against staurosporine toxicity in rat neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Yan Qin; Ji-Hui Lv; Jia Cui; Xue Fang; Yan Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Objective Curcumin is extracted from the turmeric plant (Curcuma longa Linn.) and is widely used as a food additive and traditional medicine.The present study investigated the activity of curcumin against staurosporine (STS) toxicity in cell culture.Methods Rat hippocampal neurons in primary culture were exposed to STS (20 μmol/L) and treated with curcumin (20 μmol/L).Cell viability was tested by MTT assay and reactive oxygen species (ROS) were measured using the MitoSOXTM red mitochondrial superoxide indicator.Western blot was used to assess changes in the levels of caspasc-3 (Csp3),heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) and Akt.Results The results showed that curcumin protects against STS-induced cytotoxicity in rat hippocampal neurons.Csp3,Hsp70,Akt and ROS activation may be involved in this protection.Conclusion Curcumin could be a potential drug for combination with STS in cancer treatment to reduce the unwanted cytotoxicity of STS.

  18. Ginkgolides protects cultured cortical neurons against excitotoxic and oxidative insults

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGYu-Yang; YUQing-Hai; YOUSong; SHENGLi

    2004-01-01

    AIM: The neurotoxicity of glutamate is associated with neurological disorders including hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury. Studies using cultured cortical neurons have demonstrated that exposure to glutamate produced delayed degeneration of mature neurons. Oxygen free radicals generated during injury have been postulated to be a major cause of neuronal cell

  19. Insect peptide CopA3-induced protein degradation of p27Kip1 stimulates proliferation and protects neuronal cells from apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Seung Taek; Kim, Dae Hong; Lee, Min Bum; Nam, Hyo Jung; Kang, Jin Ku; Park, Mi Jung; Lee, Ik Hwan [Department of Life Science, College of Natural Science, Daejin University, Pocheon, Gyeonggido 487-711 (Korea, Republic of); Seok, Heon [Department of Biomedical Science, Jungwon University, Goesan, Chungcheongbukdo 367-700 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Dong Gun [School of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, College of Natural Sciences, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Jae Sam [Department of Agricultural Biology, National Academy of Agricultural Science, RDA, Suwon 441-707 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ho, E-mail: hokim@daejin.ac.kr [Department of Life Science, College of Natural Science, Daejin University, Pocheon, Gyeonggido 487-711 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-19

    Highlights: •CopA3 peptide isolated from the Korean dung beetle has antimicrobial activity. •Our study reported that CopA3 has anticancer and immunosuppressive effects. •We here demonstrated that CopA3 has neurotropic and neuroprotective effects. •CopA3 degrades p27Kip1 protein and this mediates effects of CopA3 on neuronal cells. -- Abstract: We recently demonstrated that the antibacterial peptide, CopA3 (a D-type disulfide dimer peptide, LLCIALRKK), inhibits LPS-induced macrophage activation and also has anticancer activity in leukemia cells. Here, we examined whether CopA3 could affect neuronal cell proliferation. We found that CopA3 time-dependently increased cell proliferation by up to 31 ± 2% in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells, and up to 29 ± 2% in neural stem cells isolated from neonatal mouse brains. In both cell types, CopA3 also significantly inhibited the apoptosis and viability losses caused by 6-hydroxy dopamine (a Parkinson disease-mimicking agent) and okadaic acid (an Alzheimer’s disease-mimicking agent). Immunoblotting revealed that the p27Kip1 protein (a negative regulator of cell cycle progression) was markedly degraded in CopA3-treated SH-SY5Y cells. Conversely, an adenovirus expressing p27Kip1 significantly inhibited the antiapoptotic effects of CopA3 against 6-hydroxy dopamine- and okadaic acid-induced apoptosis, and decreased the neurotropic effects of CopA3. These results collectively suggest that CopA3-mediated protein degradation of p27Kip1 may be the main mechanism through which CopA3 exerts neuroprotective and neurotropic effects.

  20. The high-affinity D2/D3 agonist D512 protects PC12 cells from 6-OHDA-induced apoptotic cell death and rescues dopaminergic neurons in the MPTP mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Mrudang; Rajagopalan, Subramanian; Xu, Liping; Voshavar, Chandrashekhar; Shurubor, Yevgeniya; Beal, Flint; Andersen, Julie K; Dutta, Aloke K

    2014-10-01

    In this study, in vitro and in vivo experiments were carried out with the high-affinity multifunctional D2/D3 agonist D-512 to explore its potential neuroprotective effects in models of Parkinson's disease and the potential mechanism(s) underlying such properties. Pre-treatment with D-512 in vitro was found to rescue rat adrenal Pheochromocytoma PC12 cells from toxicity induced by 6-hydroxydopamine administration in a dose-dependent manner. Neuroprotection was found to coincide with reductions in intracellular reactive oxygen species, lipid peroxidation, and DNA damage. In vivo, pre-treatment with 0.5 mg/kg D-512 was protective against neurodegenerative phenotypes associated with systemic administration of MPTP, including losses in striatal dopamine, reductions in numbers of DAergic neurons in the substantia nigra (SN), and locomotor dysfunction. These observations strongly suggest that the multifunctional drug D-512 may constitute a novel viable therapy for Parkinson's disease.

  1. Neuron-derived IgG protects neurons from complement-dependent cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Niu, Na; Li, Bingjie; McNutt, Michael A

    2013-12-01

    Passive immunity of the nervous system has traditionally been thought to be predominantly due to the blood-brain barrier. This concept must now be revisited based on the existence of neuron-derived IgG. The conventional concept is that IgG is produced solely by mature B lymphocytes, but it has now been found to be synthesized by murine and human neurons. However, the function of this endogenous IgG is poorly understood. In this study, we confirm IgG production by rat cortical neurons at the protein and mRNA levels, with 69.0 ± 5.8% of cortical neurons IgG-positive. Injury to primary-culture neurons was induced by complement leading to increases in IgG production. Blockage of neuron-derived IgG resulted in more neuronal death and early apoptosis in the presence of complement. In addition, FcγRI was found in microglia and astrocytes. Expression of FcγR I in microglia was increased by exposure to neuron-derived IgG. Release of NO from microglia triggered by complement was attenuated by neuron-derived IgG, and this attenuation could be reversed by IgG neutralization. These data demonstrate that neuron-derived IgG is protective of neurons against injury induced by complement and microglial activation. IgG appears to play an important role in maintaining the stability of the nervous system.

  2. Heat shock protein 70 protects against seizure-induced neuronal cell death in the hippocampus following experimental status epilepticus via inhibition of nuclear factor-κB activation-induced nitric oxide synthase II expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chiung-Chih; Chen, Shang-Der; Lin, Tsu-Kung; Chang, Wen-Neng; Liou, Chia-Wei; Chang, Alice Y W; Chan, Samuel H H; Chuang, Yao-Chung

    2014-02-01

    Status epilepticus induces subcellular changes that may eventually lead to neuronal cell death in the hippocampus. Based on an animal model of status epilepticus, our laboratory showed previously that sustained hippocampal seizure activity activates nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and upregulates nitric oxide synthase (NOS) II gene expression, leading to apoptotic neuronal cell death in the hippocampus. The present study examined the potential modulatory role of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) on NF-κB signaling in the hippocampus following experimental status epilepticus. In Sprague-Dawley rats, kainic acid (KA) was microinjected unilaterally into the hippocampal CA3 subfield to induce prolonged bilateral seizure activity. Expression of HSP70 was elevated as early as 1h after the elicitation of sustained seizure activity, followed by a progressive elevation that peaked at 24h. Pretreatment with an antisense oligonucleotide against hsp70 decreased the HSP70 expression, and significantly augmented IκB kinase (IKK) activity and phosphorylation of IκBα, alongside enhanced nuclear translocation and DNA binding activity of NF-κB in the hippocampal CA3 neurons and glial cells. These cellular events were followed by enhanced upregulation of NOS II and peroxynitrite expression 3h after sustained seizure activity that led to an increase of caspase-3 and DNA fragmentation in the hippocampal CA3 neurons 7days after experimental status epilepticus. We concluded that HSP70 protects against apoptotic cell death induced by NF-κB activation and NOS II-peroxynitrite signaling cascade in the hippocampal CA3 and glial cells following experimental status epilepticus via suppression of IKK activity and deactivation of IκBα.

  3. Engrailed Homeoprotein Protects Mesencephalic Dopaminergic Neurons from Oxidative Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rekaik, Hocine; Blaudin de Thé, François-Xavier; Fuchs, Julia; Massiani-Beaudoin, Olivia; Prochiantz, Alain; Joshi, Rajiv L.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Engrailed homeoproteins are expressed in adult dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra. In Engrailed1 heterozygous mice, these neurons start dying at 6 weeks, are more sensitive to oxidative stress, and progressively develop traits similar to those observed following an acute and strong oxidative stress inflected to wild-type neurons. These changes include DNA strand breaks and the modification (intensity and distribution) of several nuclear and nucleolar heterochromatin marks. Engrailed1 and Engrailed2 are biochemically equivalent transducing proteins previously used to antagonize dopaminergic neuron death in Engrailed1 heterozygous mice and in mouse models of Parkinson disease. Accordingly, we show that, following an acute oxidative stress, a single Engrailed2 injection restores all nuclear and nucleolar heterochromatin marks, decreases the number of DNA strand breaks, and protects dopaminergic neurons against apoptosis. PMID:26411690

  4. Dimethyl Fumarate Protects Neural Stem/Progenitor Cells and Neurons from Oxidative Damage through Nrf2-ERK1/2 MAPK Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Wang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is the most common multifocal inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS. Due to the progressive neurodegenerative nature of MS, developing treatments that exhibit direct neuroprotective effects are needed. Tecfidera™ (BG-12 is an oral formulation of the fumaric acid esters (FAE, containing the active metabolite dimethyl fumarate (DMF. Although BG-12 showed remarkable efficacy in lowering relapse rates in clinical trials, its mechanism of action in MS is not yet well understood. In this study, we reported the potential neuroprotective effects of dimethyl fumarate (DMF on mouse and rat neural stem/progenitor cells (NPCs and neurons. We found that DMF increased the frequency of the multipotent neurospheres and the survival of NPCs following oxidative stress with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 treatment. In addition, utilizing the reactive oxygen species (ROS assay, we showed that DMF reduced ROS production induced by H2O2. DMF also decreased oxidative stress-induced apoptosis. Using motor neuron survival assay, DMF significantly promoted survival of motor neurons under oxidative stress. We further analyzed the expression of oxidative stress-induced genes in the NPC cultures and showed that DMF increased the expression of transcription factor nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2 at both levels of RNA and protein. Furthermore, we demonstrated the involvement of Nrf2-ERK1/2 MAPK pathway in DMF-mediated neuroprotection. Finally, we utilized SuperArray gene screen technology to identify additional anti-oxidative stress genes (Gstp1, Sod2, Nqo1, Srxn1, Fth1. Our data suggests that analysis of anti-oxidative stress mechanisms may yield further insights into new targets for treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS.

  5. Protective effect of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells on dopaminergic neurons against 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium ion-induced neurotoxicity in rat brain slices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lirong Jin; Zhen Hong; Chunjiu Zhong; Yang Wang

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To date, the use of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for the treatment of Parkinson's disease have solely focused on in vivo animal models. Because of the number of influencing factors, it has been difficult to determine a consistent outcome. OBJECTIVE: To establish an injury model in brain slices of substantia nigra and striatum using 1-methyl-4-phenylpytidinium ion (MPP+), and to investigate the effect of MSCs on dopaminergic neurons following MPP+ induced damage.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: An in vitro, randomized, controlled, animal experiment using immunohistochemistry was performed at the Laboratory of the Department of Anatomy, Fudan University between January 2004 and December 2006.MATERIALS: Primary MSC cultures were obtained from femurs and tibias of adult Sprague Dawley rats. Organotypic brain slices were isolated from substantia nigra and striatum of 1-day-old Sprague Dawley rat pups. Monoclonal antibodies for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH, 1:5 000) were from Santa Cruz (USA); goat anti-rabbit IgG antibodies labeled with FITC were from Boster Company (China).METHODS: Organotypic brain slices were cultured for 5 days in whole culture medium supplemented with 50% DMEM, 25% equine serum, and 25% Tyrode's balanced salt solution. The medium was supplemented with 5 μg/mL Ara-C, and the culture was continued for an additional 5 days. The undergrowth of brain slices was discarded at day 10. Eugonic brain slices were cultured with basal media for an additional 7 days. The brain slices were divided into three groups: control, MPP+ exposure, and co-culture. For the MPP+ group, MPP+ (30 μmol/L) was added to the media at day 17 and brain slices were cultured for 4 days, followed by control media. For the co-culture group, the MPP+ injured brain slices were placed over MSCs in the well and were further cultured for 7 days.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: After 28 days in culture, neurite outgrowth was examined in the brain slices under phase

  6. Inhibition of aminoacylase 3 protects rat brain cortex neuronal cells from the toxicity of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal mercapturate and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsirulnikov, Kirill; Abuladze, Natalia [Department of Medicine, University of California at Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Bragin, Anatol [Department of Neurology, University of California at Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Brain Research Institute, University of California at Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Faull, Kym [Brain Research Institute, University of California at Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, University of California at Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Pasarow Mass Spectrometry Laboratory, University of California at Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Cascio, Duilio [Institute of Genomics and Proteomics, University of California at Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Damoiseaux, Robert; Schibler, Matthew J. [California NanoSystems Institute, University of California at Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Pushkin, Alexander, E-mail: apushkin@mednet.ucla.edu [Department of Medicine, University of California at Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2012-09-15

    4-Hydroxy-2-nonenal (4HNE) and acrolein (ACR) are highly reactive neurotoxic products of lipid peroxidation that are implicated in the pathogenesis and progression of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. Conjugation with glutathione (GSH) initiates the 4HNE and ACR detoxification pathway, which generates the mercapturates of 4HNE and ACR that can be excreted. Prior work has shown that the efficiency of the GSH-dependent renal detoxification of haloalkene derived mercapturates is significantly decreased upon their deacetylation because of rapid transformation of the deacetylated products into toxic compounds mediated by β-lyase. The enzymes of the GSH-conjugation pathway and β-lyases are expressed in the brain, and we hypothesized that a similar toxicity mechanism may be initiated in the brain by the deacetylation of 4HNE- and ACR-mercapturate. The present study was performed to identify an enzyme(s) involved in 4HNE- and ACR-mercapturate deacetylation, characterize the brain expression of this enzyme and determine whether its inhibition decreases 4HNE and 4HNE-mercapturate neurotoxicity. We demonstrated that of two candidate deacetylases, aminoacylases 1 (AA1) and 3 (AA3), only AA3 efficiently deacetylates both 4HNE- and ACR-mercapturate. AA3 was further localized to neurons and blood vessels. Using a small molecule screen we generated high-affinity AA3 inhibitors. Two of them completely protected rat brain cortex neurons expressing AA3 from the toxicity of 4HNE-mercapturate. 4HNE-cysteine (4HNE-Cys) was also neurotoxic and its toxicity was mostly prevented by a β-lyase inhibitor, aminooxyacetate. The results suggest that the AA3 mediated deacetylation of 4HNE-mercapturate may be involved in the neurotoxicity of 4HNE.

  7. Neuronize: a tool for building realistic neuronal cell morphologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, Juan P.; Mata, Susana; Bayona, Sofia; Pastor, Luis; DeFelipe, Javier; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth

    2013-01-01

    This study presents a tool, Neuronize, for building realistic three-dimensional models of neuronal cells from the morphological information extracted through computer-aided tracing applications. Neuronize consists of a set of methods designed to build 3D neural meshes that approximate the cell membrane at different resolution levels, allowing a balance to be reached between the complexity and the quality of the final model. The main contribution of the present study is the proposal of a novel approach to build a realistic and accurate 3D shape of the soma from the incomplete information stored in the digitally traced neuron, which usually consists of a 2D cell body contour. This technique is based on the deformation of an initial shape driven by the position and thickness of the first order dendrites. The addition of a set of spines along the dendrites completes the model, building a final 3D neuronal cell suitable for its visualization in a wide range of 3D environments. PMID:23761740

  8. Parkin protects dopaminergic neurons from excessive Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rawal, Nina [Laboratory of Molecular Neurobiology, MBB, DBRM, Karolinska Institute, S-17177 Stockholm (Sweden); Corti, Olga [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6, CRICM UMR-S975, Inserm, U975 (France); CNRS, UMR 7225, Paris (France); Sacchetti, Paola [Laboratory of Molecular Neurobiology, MBB, DBRM, Karolinska Institute, S-17177 Stockholm (Sweden); Ardilla-Osorio, Hector [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6, CRICM UMR-S975, Inserm, U975 (France); CNRS, UMR 7225, Paris (France); Sehat, Bita [Cancer Center Karolinska, Karolinska Institute, S-17177 Stockholm (Sweden); Brice, Alexis [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6, CRICM UMR-S975, Inserm, U975 (France); CNRS, UMR 7225, Paris (France); Department of Genetics and Cytogenetics, AP-HP, Groupe Hospitalier Pitie-Salpetriere, Paris (France); Arenas, Ernest, E-mail: Ernest.Arenas@ki.se [Laboratory of Molecular Neurobiology, MBB, DBRM, Karolinska Institute, S-17177 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2009-10-23

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is caused by degeneration of the dopaminergic (DA) neurons of the substantia nigra but the molecular mechanisms underlying the degenerative process remain elusive. Several reports suggest that cell cycle deregulation in post-mitotic neurons could lead to neuronal cell death. We now show that Parkin, an E3 ubiquitin ligase linked to familial PD, regulates {beta}-catenin protein levels in vivo. Stabilization of {beta}-catenin in differentiated primary ventral midbrain neurons results in increased levels of cyclin E and proliferation, followed by increased levels of cleaved PARP and loss of DA neurons. Wnt3a signaling also causes death of post-mitotic DA neurons in parkin null animals, suggesting that both increased stabilization and decreased degradation of {beta}-catenin results in DA cell death. These findings demonstrate a novel regulation of Wnt signaling by Parkin and suggest that Parkin protects DA neurons against excessive Wnt signaling and {beta}-catenin-induced cell death.

  9. The protective effect of myo-inositol on hippocamal cell loss and structural alterations in neurons and synapses triggered by kainic acid-induced status epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotaria, Nato; Kiladze, Maia; Zhvania, Mzia G; Japaridze, Nadezhda J; Bikashvili, Tamar; Solomonia, Revaz O; Bolkvadze, Tamar

    2013-07-01

    It is known that myo-inositol pretreatment attenuates the seizure severity and several biochemical changes provoked by experimentally induced status epilepticus. However, it remains unidentified whether such properties of myo-inositol influence the structure of epileptic brain. In the present light and electron microscopic research we elucidate if pretreatment with myo-inositol has positive effect on hippocampal cell loss, and cell and synapses damage provoked by kainic acid-induced status epilepticus. Adult male Wistar rats were treated with (i) saline, (ii) saline + kainic acid, (iii) myo-inositol + kainic acid. Assessment of cell loss at 2, 14, and 30 days after treatment demonstrate cytoprotective effect of myo-inositol in CA1 and CA3 areas. It was strongly expressed in pyramidal layer of CA1, radial and oriental layers of CA3 and in less degree-in other layers of both fields. Ultrastructural alterations were described in CA1, 14 days after treatment. The structure of neurons, synapses, and porosomes are well preserved in the rats pretreated with myo-inositol in comparing with rats treated with only kainic acid.

  10. Phytic Acid Protects against 6-Hydroxydopamine-Induced Dopaminergic Neuron Apoptosis in Normal and Iron Excess Conditions in a Cell Culture Model

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    Qi Xu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Iron may play an important role in Parkinson's disease (PD since it can induce oxidative stress-dependent neurodegeneration. The objective of this study was to determine whether the iron chelator, phytic acid (IP6 can protect against 6-hydroxydopamine- (6-OHDA- induced apoptosis in immortalized rat mesencephalic dopaminergic cells under normal and iron-excess conditions. Caspase-3 activity was increased about 6-fold after 6-OHDA treatment (compared to control; <.001 and 30 μmol/L IP6 pretreatment decreased it by 38% (<.05. Similarly, a 63% protection (<.001 against 6-OHDA induced DNA fragmentation was observed with IP6 pretreatment. Under iron-excess condition, a 6-fold increase in caspase-3 activity (<.001 and a 42% increase in DNA fragmentation (<.05 with 6-OHDA treatment were decreased by 41% (<.01 and 27% (<.05, respectively, with 30 μmol/L IP6. Together, our data suggest that IP6 protects against 6-OHDA-induced cell apoptosis in both normal and iron-excess conditions, and IP6 may offer neuroprotection in PD.

  11. Beclin-1-mediated autophagy protects spinal cord neurons against mechanical injury-induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen-Yu; Lin, Jian-Hua; Muharram, Akram; Liu, Wen-Ge

    2014-06-01

    Apoptosis has been widely reported to be involved in the pathogenesis associated with spinal cord injury (SCI). Recently, autophagy has also been implicated in various neuronal damage models. However, the role of autophagy in SCI is still controversial and its interrelationship with apoptosis remains unclear. Here, we used an in vitro SCI model to observe a time-dependent induction of autophagy and apoptosis. Mechanical injury induced autophagy markers such as LC3 lipidation, LC3II/LC3I conversion, and Beclin-1 expression. Injured neurons showed decreased cell viability and increased apoptosis. To elucidate the effect of autophagy on apoptosis, the mechanically-injured neurons were treated with the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin and 3-methyl adenine (3-MA), which are known to regulate autophagy positively and negatively, respectively. Rapamycin-treated neurons showed the highest level of cell viability and lowest level of apoptosis among the injured neurons and those treated with 3-MA showed the reciprocal effect. Notably, rapamycin-treated neurons exhibited slightly reduced Bax expression and significantly increased Bcl-2 expression. Furthermore, by plasmid transfection, we showed that Beclin-1-overexpressing neuronal cells responded to mechanical injury with greater LC3II/LC3I conversion and cell viability, lower levels of apoptosis, higher Bcl-2 expression, and unaltered Bax expression as compared to vector control cells. Beclin-1-knockdown neurons showed almost the opposite effects. Taken together, our results suggest that autophagy may serve as a protection against apoptosis in mechanically-injured spinal cord neurons. Targeting mTOR and/or enhancing Beclin-1 expression might be alternative therapeutic strategies for SCI.

  12. Interactions between neuronal and non-neuronal cells in adult rat isolated dorsal root ganglion cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NG K Y; WONG Y H; WISE H

    2008-01-01

    Objective The glial cells of the central nervous system are involved in tripartite signaling, therefore we have been investigating the relationship between sensory neurons and non-neuronal cells in isolated preparations of dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Methods The mixed cell cultures of dissociated DRG cells were separated to yield enriched fractions of IB4-positive cells (small diameter, non-peptidergic cells), IB4-negative cells (small diameter, peptidergic cells, and large diameter cells), and non-neuronal cells (principally satellite glial cells, Schwarm cells and fibroblasts). Adenylyl cyclase activity was assayed by measuring production of [3H]cAMP from cells preloaded with [3H]adenine. Results PGE2 and the PGI2 mimetic eicaprost stimulated adenylyl cyclase activity which was inhibited by ONO-AE3-208 (EP4 antagonist) or CAY10441 (IP antagonist) with estimated pA2 values of 8.9 and 8.2, respectively. Surprisingly, both PGE2 and cicaprost-stimulated [3H] cAMP production was greatest in the non-neuronal cell preparation. Furthermore, when the number of non-neuronal cells was kept constant and the number of neuronal cells was increased, we observed a progressive decrease in prostanoid-stimulated activity. Conclusions Sensory neurons appear to regulate prostanoid receptor-mediated cell signaling in non-neuronal cells within the DRG.

  13. Clinacanthus nutans Protects Cortical Neurons Against Hypoxia-Induced Toxicity by Downregulating HDAC1/6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Hsin-Da; Wu, Jui-Sheng; Kao, Mei-Han; Chen, Jin-Jer; Sun, Grace Y; Ong, Wei-Yi; Lin, Teng-Nan

    2016-09-01

    Many population-based epidemiological studies have unveiled an inverse correlation between intake of herbal plants and incidence of stroke. C. nutans is a traditional herbal medicine widely used for snake bite, viral infection and cancer in Asian countries. However, its role in protecting stroke damage remains to be studied. Despite of growing evidence to support epigenetic regulation in the pathogenesis and recovery of stroke, a clear understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms is still lacking. In the present study, primary cortical neurons were subjected to in vitro oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD)-reoxygenation and hypoxic neuronal death was used to investigate the interaction between C. nutans and histone deacetylases (HDACs). Using pharmacological agents (HDAC inhibitor/activator), loss-of-function (HDAC siRNA) and gain-of-function (HDAC plasmid) approaches, we demonstrated an early induction of HDAC1/2/3/8 and HDAC6 in neurons after OGD insult. C. nutans extract selectively inhibited HDAC1 and HDAC6 expression and attenuated neuronal death. Results of reporter analysis further revealed that C. nutans suppressed HDAC1 and HDAC6 transcription. Besides ameliorating neuronal death, C. nutans also protected astrocytes and endothelial cells from hypoxic-induced cell death. In summary, results support ability for C. nutans to suppress post-hypoxic HDACs activation and mitigate against OGD-induced neuronal death. This study further opens a new avenue for the use of herbal medicines to regulate epigenetic control of brain injury.

  14. Neuropeptide Y protects cerebral cortical neurons by regulating microglial immune function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qijun Li; Changzheng Dong; Wenling Li; Wei Bu; Jiang Wu; Wenqing Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y has been shown to inhibit the immunological activity of reactive microglia in the rat cerebral cortex, to reduce N-methyl-D-aspartate current (INMDA) in cortical neurons, and protect neurons. In this study, after primary cultured microglia from the cerebral cortex of rats were treated with lipopolysaccharide, interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α levels in the cell culture medium increased, and mRNA expression of these cytokines also increased. After primary cultured cortical neurons were incubated with the lipopolysaccharide-treated microg-lial conditioned medium, peak INMDA in neurons increased. These effects of lipopolysaccharide were suppressed by neuropeptide Y. After addition of the neuropeptide Y Y1 receptor antago-nist BIBP3226, the effects of neuropeptide Y completely disappeared. These results suggest that neuropeptide Y prevents excessive production of interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α by inhibiting microglial reactivity. This reduces INMDA in rat cortical neurons, preventing excitotoxic-ity, thereby protecting neurons.

  15. Oenanthe Javanica Extract Protects Against Experimentally Induced Ischemic Neuronal Damage via its Antioxidant Effects

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    Joon Ha Park

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Water dropwort (Oenanthe javanica as a popular traditional medicine in Asia shows various biological properties including antioxidant activity. In this study, we firstly examined the neuroprotective effect of Oenanthe javanica extract (OJE in the hippocampal cornus ammonis 1 region (CA1 region of the gerbil subjected to transient cerebral ischemia. Methods: Gerbils were established by the occlusion of common carotid arteries for 5 min. The neuroprotective effect of OJE was estimated by cresyl violet staining. In addition, 4 antioxidants (copper, zinc superoxide dismutase [SOD], manganese SOD, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase immunoreactivities were investigated by immunohistochemistry. Results: Pyramidal neurons in the CA1 region showed neuronal death at 5 days postischemia; at this point in time, all antioxidants immunoreactivities disappeared in CA1 pyramidal neurons and showed in many nonpyramidal cells. Treatment with 200 mg/kg, not 100 mg/kg, OJE protected CA1 pyramidal neurons from ischemic damage. In addition, 200 mg/kg OJE treatment increased or maintained antioxidants immunoreactivities. Especially, among the antioxidants, glutathione peroxidase immunoreactivity was effectively increased in the CA1 pyramidal neurons of the OJE-treated sham-operated and ischemia-operated groups. Conclusion: Our present results indicate that treatment with OJE can protect neurons from transient ischemic damage and that the neuroprotective effect may be closely associated with increased or maintained intracellular antioxidant enzymes by OJE.

  16. Oenanthe Javanica Extract Protects Against Experimentally Induced Ischemic Neuronal Damage via its Antioxidant Effects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Joon Ha Park; Jeong Hwi Cho; In Hye Kim; Ji Hyeon Ahn; Jae-Chul Lee; Bai Hui Chen; Bich-Na Shin

    2015-01-01

    Background:Water dropwort (Oenanthejavanica) as a popular traditional medicine in Asia shows various biological properties including antioxidant activity.In this study,we firstly examined the neuroprotective effect of Oenanthejavanica extract (OJE) in the hippocampal cornus ammonis 1 region (CA1 region) of the gerbil subjected to transient cerebral ischemia.Methods:Gerbils were established by the occlusion of common carotid arteries for 5 min.The neuroprotective effect of OJE was estimated by cresyl violet staining.In addition,4 antioxidants (copper,zinc superoxide dismutase [SOD],manganese SOD,catalase,and glutathione peroxidase) immunoreactivities were investigated by immunohistochemistry.Results:Pyramidal neurons in the CA1 region showed neuronal death at 5 days postischemia;at this point in time,all antioxidants immunoreactivities disappeared in CA1 pyramidal neurons and showed in many nonpyramidal cells.Treatment with 200 mg/kg,not 100 mg/kg,OJE protected CA1 pyramidal neurons from ischemic damage.In addition,200 mg/kg OJE treatment increased or maintained antioxidants immunoreactivities.Especially,among the antioxidants,glutathione peroxidase immunoreactivity was effectively increased in the CA1 pyramidal neurons of the OJE-treated sham-operated and ischemia-operated groups.Conclusion:Our present results indicate that treatment with OJE can protect neurons from transient ischemic damage and that the neuroprotective effect may be closely associated with increased or maintained intracellular antioxidant enzymes by OJE.

  17. Synthesis of docosahexaenoic acid from eicosapentaenoic acid in retina neurons protects photoreceptors from oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simón, María Victoria; Agnolazza, Daniela L; German, Olga Lorena; Garelli, Andrés; Politi, Luis E; Agbaga, Martin-Paul; Anderson, Robert E; Rotstein, Nora P

    2016-03-01

    Oxidative stress is involved in activating photoreceptor death in several retinal degenerations. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), the major polyunsaturated fatty acid in the retina, protects cultured retina photoreceptors from apoptosis induced by oxidative stress and promotes photoreceptor differentiation. Here, we investigated whether eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), a metabolic precursor to DHA, had similar effects and whether retinal neurons could metabolize EPA to DHA. Adding EPA to rat retina neuronal cultures increased opsin expression and protected photoreceptors from apoptosis induced by the oxidants paraquat and hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ). Palmitic, oleic, and arachidonic acids had no protective effect, showing the specificity for DHA. We found that EPA supplementation significantly increased DHA percentage in retinal neurons, but not EPA percentage. Photoreceptors and glial cells expressed Δ6 desaturase (FADS2), which introduces the last double bond in DHA biosynthetic pathway. Pre-treatment of neuronal cultures with CP-24879 hydrochloride, a Δ5/Δ6 desaturase inhibitor, prevented EPA-induced increase in DHA percentage and completely blocked EPA protection and its effect on photoreceptor differentiation. These results suggest that EPA promoted photoreceptor differentiation and rescued photoreceptors from oxidative stress-induced apoptosis through its elongation and desaturation to DHA. Our data show, for the first time, that isolated retinal neurons can synthesize DHA in culture. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), the major polyunsaturated fatty acid in retina photoreceptors, and its precursor, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) have multiple beneficial effects. Here, we show that retina neurons in vitro express the desaturase FADS2 and can synthesize DHA from EPA. Moreover, addition of EPA to these cultures protects photoreceptors from oxidative stress and promotes their differentiation through its metabolization to DHA.

  18. Role of carotid body for neuronal protection in experimental subarachnoid haemorrhage

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    Mehmet Dumlu Aydın

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Carotid bodies are known as main arterialchemoregulatory units. Despite well known that carotidbodies have an important role in cerebral circulation andblood pH regulation, their roles has not been investigatedin subarachnoid haemorrhage. We investigated whetherthere is neuroprotective effect of neuron density of carotidbodies on the brain in subarachnoid haemorrhage.Methods: Twenty hybrid rabbits were studied. Four ofthem were used as reference group (n=4 and the remainingwas obliged to subarachnoid haemorrhage by injectingautologous blood into their cisterna magna (n=16and sacrificed after one month. All carotid bodies andbrains examined histopathologically using by stereologicmethods. The relationship between the neuronal densityof carotid body and degenerated neuron density of thehippocampus were compared statistically.Results: Five rabbits with subarachnoid haemorrhagedead during the follow-up time (n=5. The average neuronaldensity of carotid body was 4500±500 cells/mm3and of hippocampus 170.000±17.000 cell/mm3 in normalrabbit family. The degenerated neuron density ofthe hippocampus was 20.000±3.000 cells/mm3 in rabbitswith have high neuron density of carotid body and was65.000±8.000 cells/mm3 in rabbits with low neuron densityof carotid body. The differences between the neuronaldensity of carotid body and the degenerated neuron numbersof the hippocampus were significant.Conclusion: The neuron density of carotid body mayplay an important role on the protection of brain in subarachnoidhaemorrhage.Key words: Subarachnoid haemorrhage, carotid body,hippocampus, neurodegeneration, cerebral ischemia

  19. Protective effect of astrocyte-conditioned medium on neurons following hypoxia and mechanical injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YAN Ji-wen

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Objective: To investigate the protec-tive effect of mouse astrocyte-conditioned medium (ACM on hypoxic and mechanically injured neurons by a cell model in vitro, and to explore the possible mechanism. Methods: The model of hypoxic neuronal injury was caused by 3% O 2 in three-gas incubator. Neurons were cul-tured with ordinary medium or 20% ACM respectively and randomly divided into hypoxic group (hypoxia for 4, 8, 24 h and marked as H4R0, H8R0, H24R0 and hypoxia reoxygenation group (H4R24, H8R24, H24R24. Mechanical injury model was developed by scratching neurons cultured in 20% ACM or ordinary medium to different degrees. Neu-rons in both medium were divided into normal control group, mild, moderate and severe injury groups. The 20% ACM was added 24 h before hypoxia/reoxygenation or mechanical injury. The morphology and survival of neurons were observed and counted by trypan blue staining. The concentration of NO, lactic dehydrogenase (LDH and membrane ATPase activity were detected by corresponding kits. Results: It was showed that 20% ACM can obviously promote the survival rate of hypoxia/reoxygenated neurons and scratched neurons as well. The morphology and num-ber of neurons exposed to hypoxia or scratch injury showed great difference between groups with or without ACM treatment. Compared with control group, the concentration of NO and LDH was much lower in hypoxic/reoxygenated neurons treated with 20% ACM, and the ATPase activity was higher. For the mechanical injury model, neurons with moderate injury also revealed a lower NO and LDH concen-tration than the control group. All the differences were sta-tistically significant (P<0.05. Conclusion: ACM can promote the survival and func-tional recovery of neurons following hypoxia or scratching to a certain degree. The mechanism may be associated with reducing the synthesis and release of NO and LDH as well as increasing the activity of membrane ATPase. Key words: Glial cell line

  20. New Insight in Neuron Regeneration: Induction of Glia Cell to Neuron Cell

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    Morteza Aliashrafi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Induction neuron from a veriety of cell resource were remaining challeng in regenerative medicine, so finding the convenient method to reprogram different cells to neuron could be helpful. In this study, we analysis the transcriptome of glia and neuron cells to determine the gene expression in neuron that different when compare to glia cells. Then based on this transcriptom data seek the transcription factor and miRNA. Data extract from transcriptome database of mouse cells comprise cerebral cortex that generated by RNAseq technique. By comparison neuron against glia cells (astrocyte, oligodenderocyte and microglia determined different gene expression in neuron. By using genetrail2 database determined transcription factor and miRNA associated with neuron gene expression.Result determined the 500 genes with different expression in neuron in comparison with glia cells. 2 significant TF families, DLX and MSX, 3 TF, Sp1, Ctcf and Pax1, 85 miRNA release from analysis this 500 gene. Analysis the gene target of all identified miRNA represent the important biological process related to neurogenesis neurodevelopment, in addition to most important proteins like Dnm1, Gad1 and Grin1 were obtained by functional and structural of network analysis. Dnm1 and Grin1 regulated by Sp1. In sum up, since one of the methods to reprogramming resident glia cells to induce neuron is applying TF and miRNAs, TF like Sp1 lonely or in combination with other factors can be experimentally approved.

  1. Planar multipolar cells in the cochlear nucleus project to medial olivocochlear neurons in mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrow, Keith N; Benson, Thane E; Brown, M Christian

    2012-05-01

    Medial olivocochlear (MOC) neurons originate in the superior olivary complex and project to the cochlea, where they act to reduce the effects of noise masking and protect the cochlea from damage. MOC neurons respond to sound via a reflex pathway; however, in this pathway the cochlear nucleus cell type that provides input to MOC neurons is not known. We investigated whether multipolar cells of the ventral cochlear nucleus have projections to MOC neurons by labeling them with injections into the dorsal cochlear nucleus. The projections of one type of labeled multipolar cell, planar neurons, were traced into the ventral nucleus of the trapezoid body, where they were observed terminating on MOC neurons (labeled in some cases by a second cochlear injection of FluoroGold). These terminations formed what appear to be excitatory synapses, i.e., containing small, round vesicles and prominent postsynaptic densities. These data suggest that cochlear nucleus planar multipolar neurons drive the MOC neuron's response to sound.

  2. Iron accumulates in Huntington's disease neurons: protection by deferoxamine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianfang Chen

    Full Text Available Huntington's disease (HD is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder caused by a polyglutamine-encoding CAG expansion in the huntingtin gene. Iron accumulates in the brains of HD patients and mouse disease models. However, the cellular and subcellular sites of iron accumulation, as well as significance to disease progression are not well understood. We used independent approaches to investigate the location of brain iron accumulation. In R6/2 HD mouse brain, synchotron x-ray fluorescence analysis revealed iron accumulation as discrete puncta in the perinuclear cytoplasm of striatal neurons. Further, perfusion Turnbull's staining for ferrous iron (II combined with transmission electron microscope ultra-structural analysis revealed increased staining in membrane bound peri-nuclear vesicles in R6/2 HD striatal neurons. Analysis of iron homeostatic proteins in R6/2 HD mice revealed decreased levels of the iron response proteins (IRPs 1 and 2 and accordingly decreased expression of iron uptake transferrin receptor (TfR and increased levels of neuronal iron export protein ferroportin (FPN. Finally, we show that intra-ventricular delivery of the iron chelator deferoxamine results in an improvement of the motor phenotype in R6/2 HD mice. Our data supports accumulation of redox-active ferrous iron in the endocytic / lysosomal compartment in mouse HD neurons. Expression changes of IRPs, TfR and FPN are consistent with a compensatory response to an increased intra-neuronal labile iron pool leading to increased susceptibility to iron-associated oxidative stress. These findings, together with protection by deferoxamine, support a potentiating role of neuronal iron accumulation in HD.

  3. Green tea polyphenols protect spinal cord neurons against hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianbo Zhao; Shiqiang Fang; Yajiang Yuan; Zhanpeng Guo; Jinhao Zeng; Yue Guo; Peifu Tang; Xifan Mei

    2014-01-01

    Green tea polyphenols are strong antioxidants and can reduce free radical damage. To investigate their neuroprotective potential, we induced oxidative damage in spinal cord neurons using hy-drogen peroxide, and applied different concentrations (50-200 µg/mL) of green tea polyphenol to the cell medium for 24 hours. Measurements of superoxide dismutase activity, malondial-dehyde content, and expression of apoptosis-related genes and proteins revealed that green tea polyphenol effectively alleviated oxidative stress. Our results indicate that green tea polyphenols play a protective role in spinal cord neurons under oxidative stress.

  4. Protective effect of melatonin on neurons after oxidative-stress injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ximing Wang; Zhiqiang Lu; Qiuhong Duan; Tao Lu; Shanshu He

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It has been suggested that melatonin(MT) can protect secondary neuronal injury.However,the protective effect of MT on neuronal injury in ischemia/reperfusion models in vitro still has not been proved.OBJECTIVE:To investigate the protective effect of MT on central ischemic injury of nerve cells and analyze its possible mechanism.DESIGN: Contrast observational study.SETTING: Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology,Tongji Medical College,Huazhong University of Science and Technology.MATERIALS: Rats aged 7-8 days and weighing 10-12g were provided by Medical Experimental Animal Center,Tongji Medical College,Huazhong University of Science and Technology,MT was provided by Sigma Company,USA.METHODS:The experiment was carried out in the Laboratory of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology,Tongji Hospital,Huazhong University of Science and Technology from October 2002 to March 2004.The effects of MT on the neurodegeneration induced by oxygen-glucose-deprivation (OGD) were tested in cultured rat cerebellar granule cells.Neuron damage was quantitatively assessed by Typan Blue exclusion and MTT assay at different time points after oxygen-glucose-deprivation(90 minutes).DNA gel electrophoresis and acridine orange stain were performed to determine the nature of cell damage.And fluorescence spectrophotometer was used for quantification of intracellular malondialdehyde(MDA)at various time intervals.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Correlation between degrees of neuronal injury and reperfusion times,apoptosis,and production of MDA in cells.RESULTS:①The neuron injury was aggravated with reperfusion time.②The protective effect of MT was time-and dose-dependent when its concentration was not higher than 10 μmol/L.⑧When neurons were exposed to OGD for 90 minutes.part of the cells exhibited typical features of apoptosis:internucleosomal DNA condensation and DNA ladder on agarose gel electrophoresis.MT added to cells recovering from OGD exerted neuroprotective action

  5. Astrocytes require insulin-like growth factor I to protect neurons against oxidative injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genis, Laura; Dávila, David; Fernandez, Silvia; Pozo-Rodrigálvarez, Andrea; Martínez-Murillo, Ricardo; Torres-Aleman, Ignacio

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a proposed mechanism in brain aging, making the study of its regulatory processes an important aspect of current neurobiological research. In this regard, the role of the aging regulator insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) in brain responses to oxidative stress remains elusive as both beneficial and detrimental actions have been ascribed to this growth factor. Because astrocytes protect neurons against oxidative injury, we explored whether IGF-I participates in astrocyte neuroprotection and found that blockade of the IGF-I receptor in astrocytes abrogated their rescuing effect on neurons. We found that IGF-I directly protects astrocytes against oxidative stress (H 2O 2). Indeed, in astrocytes but not in neurons, IGF-I decreases the pro-oxidant protein thioredoxin-interacting protein 1 and normalizes the levels of reactive oxygen species. Furthermore, IGF-I cooperates with trophic signals produced by astrocytes in response to H 2O 2 such as stem cell factor (SCF) to protect neurons against oxidative insult. After stroke, a condition associated with brain aging where oxidative injury affects peri-infarcted regions, a simultaneous increase in SCF and IGF-I expression was found in the cortex, suggesting that a similar cooperative response takes place in vivo. Cell-specific modulation by IGF-I of brain responses to oxidative stress may contribute in clarifying the role of IGF-I in brain aging.

  6. Human embryonic stem cell-derived neuronal cells form spontaneously active neuronal networks in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikkilä, Teemu J; Ylä-Outinen, Laura; Tanskanen, Jarno M A; Lappalainen, Riikka S; Skottman, Heli; Suuronen, Riitta; Mikkonen, Jarno E; Hyttinen, Jari A K; Narkilahti, Susanna

    2009-07-01

    The production of functional human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-derived neuronal cells is critical for the application of hESCs in treating neurodegenerative disorders. To study the potential functionality of hESC-derived neurons, we cultured and monitored the development of hESC-derived neuronal networks on microelectrode arrays. Immunocytochemical studies revealed that these networks were positive for the neuronal marker proteins beta-tubulin(III) and microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP-2). The hESC-derived neuronal networks were spontaneously active and exhibited a multitude of electrical impulse firing patterns. Synchronous bursts of electrical activity similar to those reported for hippocampal neurons and rodent embryonic stem cell-derived neuronal networks were recorded from the differentiated cultures until up to 4 months. The dependence of the observed neuronal network activity on sodium ion channels was examined using tetrodotoxin (TTX). Antagonists for the glutamate receptors NMDA [D(-)-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid] and AMPA/kainate [6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione], and for GABAA receptors [(-)-bicuculline methiodide] modulated the spontaneous electrical activity, indicating that pharmacologically susceptible neuronal networks with functional synapses had been generated. The findings indicate that hESC-derived neuronal cells can generate spontaneously active networks with synchronous communication in vitro, and are therefore suitable for use in developmental and drug screening studies, as well as for regenerative medicine.

  7. β-Amyloid1-42, HIV-1Ba-L (clade B infection and drugs of abuse induced degeneration in human neuronal cells and protective effects of ashwagandha (Withania somnifera and its constituent Withanolide A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kesava Rao Venkata Kurapati

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is characterized by progressive dysfunction of memory and higher cognitive functions with abnormal accumulation of extracellular amyloid plaques and intracellular neurofibrillary tangles throughout cortical and limbic brain regions. Withania somnifera (WS also known as 'ashwagandha' (ASH is used widely in Ayurvedic medicine as a nerve tonic and memory enhancer. However, there is paucity of data on potential neuroprotective effects of ASH against β-Amyloid (1-42 (Aβ induced neuropathogenesis. In the present study, we have tested the neuroprotective effects of Methanol: Chloroform (3:1 extract of ASH and its constituent Withanolide A (WA against Aβ induced toxicity, HIV-1(Ba-L (clade B infection and the effects of drugs of abuse using a human neuronal SK-N-MC cell line. Aβ when tested individually, induced cytotoxic effects in SK-N-MC cells as shown by increased trypan blue stained cells. However, when ASH was added to Aβ treated cells the toxic effects were neutralized. This observation was supported by cellular localization of Aβ, MTT formazan exocytosis, and the levels of acetylcholinesterase activity, confirming the chemopreventive or protective effects of ASH against Aβ induced toxicity. Further, the levels of MAP2 were significantly increased in cells infected with HIV-1(Ba-L (clade B as well as in cells treated with Cocaine (COC and Methamphetamine (METH compared with control cells. In ASH treated cells the MAP2 levels were significantly less compared to controls. Similar results were observed in combination experiments. Also, WA, a purified constituent of ASH, showed same pattern using MTT assay as a parameter. These results suggests that neuroprotective properties of ASH observed in the present study may provide some explanation for the ethnopharmacological uses of ASH in traditional medicine for cognitive and other HIV associated neurodegenerative disorders and further ASH could be a potential novel drug to

  8. Aged garlic extract and its components protect cultured rat hippocampal neurons from amyloid β—protein—in—duced neuronal death

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ItoY; KosuY

    2002-01-01

    Aged garlic extract and its components such as S-allyl-L-cysteine (SAC) and sllixin have been shown to possess various biological effects including neurotrophic activity.We characterized the neuronal death induced by amyloid β-protein (Aβ),4-hydroxynoenal (HNE),tunicamycin(TM),and trophic factor-deprivation (TFD),and ivestigated whether these garlic compounds could prevent this in cultured PC12 cells and rat hippocampal neurons.Treatment with SAC protected these cells against Aβ- and TM-induced neuronal death.SAC also attenuated the processing of procaspase-12 induced by Aβ25-35 or TM.In contrast,allixin and its analogue,DHP,afforded no protection against Aβ-induced cell death.SAC afforded no protection against HNE- and TFD-induced cell death,which has been shown to be mediated by caspase-3 dependent pathway.These results suggest that SAC protect against the neuronal cell death that is triggered by ER dysfunction.

  9. Acute bioenergetic intervention or pharmacological preconditioning protects neuron against ischemic injury

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Although acute ischemic stroke has high mortality and morbidity rate but yet still has very limited treatment. In this study we have tested the concept of neuron protection by acute bioenergetic intervention or by pharmacological preconditioning with natural antioxidants. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP), pentobarbital, and suramin were encapsulated in pH-sensitive liposomes and used as bioenergy stabilizer. We induced ATP depletion model by incubating cells with media added with ATP-depleting ag...

  10. Protective effects of icariin on neurons injured by cerebral ischemia/reperfusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Li; ZHOU Qi-xin; SHI Jing-shan

    2005-01-01

    Background It is very important to search for novel anti-ischemia/reperfusion neuroprotective drugs for prevention or treatment of cerebrovascular diseases. Icariin, the major active component of traditional Chinese herb Yinyanghuo, may have a beneficial role for neurons in cerebral ischemia/reperfusion caused by accident. However, it was not clear yet. In this study, we observed the protective effects of icariin on neurons injured by ischemia/reperfusion in vitro and in vivo and investigated its protective mechanism.Methods Cerebral cortical neurons of Wistar rats in primary culture were studied during the different periods of oxygen-glucose deprivation and reperfusion with oxygen and glucose. Cell viability was determined by methyl thiazoleterazolium (MTT) assay. The activity of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leaked from neurons, cell apoptosis and the concentration of intracellular free calcium were measured respectively. On the other hand, the mice model of transient cerebral ischemia/reperfusion was made by bilateral occlusion of common carotid arteries and ischemic hypotension/reperfusion. The mice were divided into several groups at random: sham operated group, model group and icariin preventive treatment group. The changes of mice behavioral, activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and the content of malondialdehyde (MDA) were measured, respectively. Results Treatment with icariin (final concentration 0.25, 0.5, and 1 mg/L) during ischemia/reperfusion-mimetic incubation in vitro concentration-dependently attenuated neuronal damage with characteristics of increasing injured neuronal absorbance of MTT, decreasing LDH release, decreasing cell apoptosis, and blunting elevation of intracellular calcium concentration. And in vivo the learning and memory abilities significantly decreased,activities of SOD were diminished and MDA level increased obviously in model group,compared with that in sham operated group. But pre-treatment of model mice with icariin (10, 30

  11. Prokineticin-2 upregulation during neuronal injury mediates a compensatory protective response against dopaminergic neuronal degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Richard; Neal, Matthew L.; Luo, Jie; Langley, Monica R.; Harischandra, Dilshan S.; Panicker, Nikhil; Charli, Adhithiya; Jin, Huajun; Anantharam, Vellareddy; Woodruff, Trent M.; Zhou, Qun-Yong; Kanthasamy, Anumantha G.; Kanthasamy, Arthi

    2016-01-01

    Prokineticin-2 (PK2), a recently discovered secreted protein, regulates important physiological functions including olfactory biogenesis and circadian rhythms in the CNS. Interestingly, although PK2 expression is low in the nigral system, its receptors are constitutively expressed on nigrostriatal neurons. Herein, we demonstrate that PK2 expression is highly induced in nigral dopaminergic neurons during early stages of degeneration in multiple models of Parkinson's disease (PD), including PK2 reporter mice and MitoPark mice. Functional studies demonstrate that PK2 promotes mitochondrial biogenesis and activates ERK and Akt survival signalling pathways, thereby driving neuroprotection. Importantly, PK2 overexpression is protective whereas PK2 receptor antagonism exacerbates dopaminergic degeneration in experimental PD. Furthermore, PK2 expression increased in surviving nigral dopaminergic neurons from PD brains, indicating that PK2 upregulation is clinically relevant to human PD. Collectively, our results identify a paradigm for compensatory neuroprotective PK2 signalling in nigral dopaminergic neurons that could have important therapeutic implications for PD. PMID:27703142

  12. Prostaglandin receptor EP2 protects dopaminergic neurons against 6-OHDA-mediated low oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco, Emilce; Werner, Peter; Casper, Diana

    2008-08-15

    Dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra (SN) selectively die in Parkinson's disease (PD), but it is unclear how and why this occurs. Recent findings implicate prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) and two of its four receptors, namely EP1 and EP2, as mediators of degenerative and protective events in situations of acute and chronic neuronal death. EP1 activation can exacerbate excitotoxic damage in stroke models and our recent study showed that EP1 activation may explain the selective sensitivity of dopaminergic neurons to oxidative stress. Conversely, EP2 activation may be neuroprotective, although toxic effects have also been demonstrated. Here we investigated if and how EP2 activation might alter the survival of dopaminergic neurons following selective low-level oxidative injury evoked by the neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) in primary neuronal cultures prepared from embryonic rat midbrain. We found that cultured dopaminergic neurons displayed EP2 receptors. Butaprost, a selective EP2 agonist, significantly reduced 6-OHDA neurotoxicity. EP2 receptors are coupled to stimulatory G-proteins (Gs), which activate adenylate cyclase, increasing cAMP synthesis, which then activates protein kinase A (PKA). Both dibutyryl cAMP and forskolin reduced dopaminergic cell loss after 6-OHDA exposure. Conversely, KT5720 and H-89, two structurally distinct high-affinity PKA inhibitors, abolished the protective effect of butaprost, implicating cAMP-dependent PKA activity in the neuroprotection by EP2 activation. Finally, we show that melanized dopaminergic neurons in the human SN express EP2. This pathway warrants consideration as a neuroprotective strategy for PD.

  13. General overview of neuronal cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Jennifer; Amini, Shohreh; White, Martyn K

    2013-01-01

    In this introductory chapter, we provide a general overview of neuronal cell culture. This is a rapidly evolving area of research and we provide an outline and contextual framework for the different chapters of this book. These chapters were all contributed by scientists actively working in the field who are currently using state-of-the-art techniques to advance our understanding of the molecular and cellular biology of the central nervous system. Each chapter provides detailed descriptions and experimental protocols for a variety of techniques ranging in scope from basic neuronal cell line culturing to advanced and specialized methods.

  14. Protective effect of astrocyte-conditioned medium on neurons following hypoxia and mechanical injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Ji-wen; TAN Tong-yan; HUANG Qi-lin

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the protective effect of mouse astrocyte-conditioned medium (ACM)on hypoxic and mechanically injured neurons by a cell model in vitro,and to explore the possible mechanism.Methods:The model of hypoxic neuronal injury was caused by 3% O2 in three-gas incubator.Neurons were cultured with ordinary medium or 20% ACM respectively and randomly divided into hypoxic group (hypoxia for 4,8,24 h and marked as H4R0,H8R0,H24R0) and hypoxia reoxygenation group (H4R24,HSR24,H24R24).Mechanical injury model was developed by scratching neurons cultured in 20% ACM or ordinary medium to different degrees.Neurons in both medium were divided into normal control group,mild,moderate and severe injury groups.The 20% ACM was added 24 h before hypoxia/reoxygenation or mechanical injury.The morphology and survival of neurons were observed and counted by trypan blue staining.The concentration of NO,lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) and membrane ATPase activity were detected by corresponding kits.Results:It was showed that 20% ACM can obviously promote the survival rate of hypoxia/reoxygenated neurons and scratched neurons as well The morphology and number of neurons exposed to hypoxia or scratch injury showed great difference between groups with or without ACM treatment.Compared with control group,the concentration of NO and LDH was much lower in hypoxic/reoxygenated neurons treated with 20% ACM,and the ATPase activity was higher.For the mechanical injury model,neurons with moderate injury also revealed a lower NO and LDH concentration than the control group.All the differences were statistically significant (P<0.05).Conclusion:ACM can promote the survival and functional recovery of neurons following hypoxia or scratching to a certain degree.The mechanism may be associated with reducing the synthesis and release of NO and LDH as well as increasing the activity of membrane ATPase.

  15. Valproic acid protects neurons and promotes neuronal regeneration after brachial plexus avulsion****

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiang Li; Dianxiu Wu; Rui Li; Xiaojuan Zhu; Shusen Cui

    2013-01-01

    Valproic acid has been shown to exert neuroprotective effects and promote neurite outgrowth in several peripheral nerve injury models. However, whether valproic acid can exert its beneficial effect on neurons after brachial plexus avulsion injury is currently unknown. In this study, brachial plexus root avulsion models, established in Wistar rats, were administered daily with valproic acid dis-solved in drinking water (300 mg/kg) or normal water. On days 1, 2, 3, 7, 14 and 28 after avulsion injury, tissues of the C 5-T 1 spinal cord segments of the avulsion injured side were harvested to in-vestigate the expression of Bcl-2, c-Jun and growth associated protein 43 by real-time PCR and western blot assay. Results showed that valproic acid significantly increased the expression of Bcl-2 and growth associated protein 43, and reduced the c-Jun expression after brachial plexus avulsion. Our findings indicate that valproic acid can protect neurons in the spinal cord and enhance neuronal regeneration fol owing brachial plexus root avulsion.

  16. Retinoic acids acting through retinoid receptors protect hippocampal neurons from oxygen-glucose deprivation-mediated cell death by inhibition of c-jun-N-terminal kinase and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinozaki, Y; Sato, Y; Koizumi, S; Ohno, Y; Nagao, T; Inoue, K

    2007-06-15

    Retinoic acids (RAs), including all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and 9-cis retinoic acid (9-cis RA), play fundamental roles in a variety of physiological events in vertebrates, through their specific nuclear receptors: retinoic acid receptor (RAR) and retinoid X receptor (RXR). Despite the physiological importance of RA, their functional significance under pathological conditions is not well understood. We examined the effect of ATRA on oxygen/glucose-deprivation/reperfusion (OGD/Rep)-induced neuronal damage in cultured rat hippocampal slices, and found that ATRA significantly reduced neuronal death. The cytoprotective effect of ATRA was observed not only in cornu ammonis (CA) 1 but also in CA2 and dentate gyrus (DG), and was attenuated by selective antagonists for RAR or RXR. By contrast, in the CA3 region, no protective effects of ATRA were observed. The OGD/Rep also increased phosphorylated forms of c-jun-N-terminal kinase (P-JNK) and p38 (P-p38) in hippocampus, and specific inhibitors for these kinases protected neurons. ATRA prevented the increases in P-JNK and P-p38 after OGD/Rep, as well as the decrease in NeuN and its shrinkage, all of which were inhibited by antagonists for RAR or RXR. These findings suggest that the ATRA signaling via retinoid receptors results in the inhibition of JNK and p38 activation, leading to the protection of neurons against OGD/Rep-induced damage in the rat hippocampus.

  17. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor protects neurons from GdCl3-induced impairment in neuron-astrocyte co-cultures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Gadolinium (Gd3+) complexes are important contrast agents in medical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and of great potential value in brain research. In order to better understand the mechanisms of the action of Gd3+ on neurons in the complex central nervous system (CNS), the neurotoxic actions of GdCl3 have been investigated in both neuron monoculture and astrocyte-neuron co-culture systems. Measurements of lactate dehydrogenase release showed that GdCl3 causes significant cell death of monocultured neurons as a result of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and down-regulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). However, GdCl3 does not affect the viability and BDNF expression of astrocytes. Both co-culturing of neurons with astrocytes and addition of BDNF ameliorated GdCl3-induced neurotoxicity by decreasing ROS generation and facilitating recovery of BDNF levels. The results obtained suggest that astrocytes in the CNS may protect neurons from GdCl3-induced impairment through secreting BDNF and thus up-regulating BDNF expression and interfering with Gd3+-induced cell signaling in neurons. A possible molecular mechanism is suggested which should be helpful in understand- ing the neurotoxic actions of gadolinium probes .

  18. Antioxidants: Protecting Healthy Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cancers and may help decrease your risk of macular degeneration. Foods high in carotenoids include red, orange, deep- ... as vitamin C to offer protection from some chronic diseases. Vitamin E is found in vegetable oils, salad ...

  19. γ-Tocotrienol does not substantially protect DS neurons from hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Then Sue-Mian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Down syndrome (DS neurons are more susceptible to oxidative stress and previous studies have shown that vitamin E was able to reduce oxidative stress and improve DS neurons' viability. Therefore, this study was done to investigate the protective role of γ-tocotrienol (γT3 in DS neurons from hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 -induced oxidative stress. The pro-apoptosis tendency of γT3 was compared to α-tocopherol (αT in non-stress condition as well. Methods Primary culture of DS and euploid neurons were divided into six groups of treatment: control, H2O2, γT3 pre-treatment with H2O2, γT3 only, αT pre-treatment with H2O2 and αT only. The treatments were assessed by MTS assay and apoptosis assay by single-stranded DNA (ssDNA apoptosis ELISA assay, Hoechst and Neu-N immunofluorescence staining. The cellular uptake of γT3 and αT was determined by HPLC while protein expressions were determined by Western blot. Comparison between groups was made by the Student's t test, one-way ANOVA and Bonferroni adjustment as well as two-way ANOVA for multiple comparisons. Results One day incubation of γT3 was able to reduced apoptosis of DS neurons by 10%, however γT3 was cytotoxic at longer incubation period (14 days and at concentrations ≥ 100 μM. Pre-treatment of αT and γT3 only attenuate apoptosis and increase cell viability in H2O2-treated DS and euploid neurons by 10% in which the effects were minimal to maintain most of the DS cells' morphology. γT3 act as a free radical scavenger by reducing ROS generated by H2O2. In untreated controls, DS neurons showed lower Bcl-2/Bax ratio and p53 expression compared to normal neurons, while cPKC and PKC-δ expressions were higher in DS neurons. On the other hand, pre-treatment of γT3 in H2O2-treated DS neurons have reduced Bcl-2/Bax ratio, which was not shown in euploid neurons. This suggests that pre-treatment of γT3 did not promote DS cell survival. Meanwhile γT3 and αT treatments

  20. Protective effects of plant seed extracts against amyloid β-induced neurotoxicity in cultured hippocampal neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshinori Okada

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Alzheimer′s disease (AD is characterized by large deposits of amyloid β (Aβ peptide. Aβ is known to increase reactive oxygen species (ROS production in neurons, leading to cell death. In this study, we screened 15 plant seeds′ aqueous extracts (PSAE for inhibitory effects on Aβ (25-35-induced cell death using hippocampus neurons (HIPN. Materials and Methods: Fifteen chosen plants were nine medical herbs (Japanese honeywort, luffa, rapeseed, Chinese colza, potherb mustard, Japanese radish, bitter melon, red shiso, corn, and kaiware radish and six general commercial plants (common bean, komatsuna, Qing geng cai, bell pepper, kale, and lettuce. PSAE were measured for total phenolic content (TPC with the Folin-Ciocalteu method, and the 2-diphenyl-1-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH radical scavenging effect of each seed extract was measured. To find a protectant against Aβ-induced oxidative stress, we screened 15 PSAE using a 2′, 7′-dichlorofluorescein diacetate assay. To further unravel the anti-inflammatory effects of PSAE on Aβ-induced inflammation, PSAE were added to HIPN. The neuroprotective effects of the PSAE were evaluated by Cell Counting Kit-8 assay, measuring the cell viability in Aβ-induced HIPN. Results: TPC of 15 PSAE was in the range of 0.024-1.96 mg of chlorogenic acid equivalents/gram. The aqueous extracts showed antioxidant activities. Furthermore, intracellular ROS accumulation resulting from Aβ treatment was reduced when cells were treated with some PSAE. Kale, bitter melon, kaiware radish, red shiso, and corn inhibited tumor necrosis factor-alpha secretion by the Aβ-stimulated neurons and all samples except Japanese honeywort showed enhancement of cell survival. Conclusion: From these results, we suggest that some plant seed extracts offer protection against Aβ-mediated cell death.

  1. Labeling of neuronal differentiation and neuron cells with biocompatible fluorescent nanodiamonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Tzu-Chia; Liu, Kuang-Kai; Chang, Huan-Cheng; Hwang, Eric; Chao, Jui-I

    2014-05-16

    Nanodiamond is a promising carbon nanomaterial developed for biomedical applications. Here, we show fluorescent nanodiamond (FND) with the biocompatible properties that can be used for the labeling and tracking of neuronal differentiation and neuron cells derived from embryonal carcinoma stem (ECS) cells. The fluorescence intensities of FNDs were increased by treatment with FNDs in both the mouse P19 and human NT2/D1 ECS cells. FNDs were taken into ECS cells; however, FNDs did not alter the cellular morphology and growth ability. Moreover, FNDs did not change the protein expression of stem cell marker SSEA-1 of ECS cells. The neuronal differentiation of ECS cells could be induced by retinoic acid (RA). Interestingly, FNDs did not affect on the morphological alteration, cytotoxicity and apoptosis during the neuronal differentiation. Besides, FNDs did not alter the cell viability and the expression of neuron-specific marker β-III-tubulin in these differentiated neuron cells. The existence of FNDs in the neuron cells can be identified by confocal microscopy and flow cytometry. Together, FND is a biocompatible and readily detectable nanomaterial for the labeling and tracking of neuronal differentiation process and neuron cells from stem cells.

  2. Labeling of neuronal differentiation and neuron cells with biocompatible fluorescent nanodiamonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Tzu-Chia; Liu, Kuang-Kai; Chang, Huan-Cheng; Hwang, Eric; Chao, Jui-I.

    2014-05-01

    Nanodiamond is a promising carbon nanomaterial developed for biomedical applications. Here, we show fluorescent nanodiamond (FND) with the biocompatible properties that can be used for the labeling and tracking of neuronal differentiation and neuron cells derived from embryonal carcinoma stem (ECS) cells. The fluorescence intensities of FNDs were increased by treatment with FNDs in both the mouse P19 and human NT2/D1 ECS cells. FNDs were taken into ECS cells; however, FNDs did not alter the cellular morphology and growth ability. Moreover, FNDs did not change the protein expression of stem cell marker SSEA-1 of ECS cells. The neuronal differentiation of ECS cells could be induced by retinoic acid (RA). Interestingly, FNDs did not affect on the morphological alteration, cytotoxicity and apoptosis during the neuronal differentiation. Besides, FNDs did not alter the cell viability and the expression of neuron-specific marker β-III-tubulin in these differentiated neuron cells. The existence of FNDs in the neuron cells can be identified by confocal microscopy and flow cytometry. Together, FND is a biocompatible and readily detectable nanomaterial for the labeling and tracking of neuronal differentiation process and neuron cells from stem cells.

  3. Existence of glia mitigated ketamine-induced neurotoxicity in neuron-glia mixed cultures of neonatal rat cortex and the glia-mediated protective effect of 2-PMPA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Daiying; Wang, Chengna; Li, Zengqiang; Lin, Li; Duan, Zhenfang; Qi, Huan; Li, Lin; Sun, Feng; Wu, Yingliang

    2014-09-01

    The present study compared ketamine-induced neurotoxicity in the neuron-glia mixed cultures and neuronal cultures and further explored the neuroprotective effect of the NAAG peptidase inhibitor 2-(phosphonomethyl) pentanedioic acid (2-PMPA). Firstly, Rosenfeld's staining and immunofluorescence staining of microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) were used to address the difference of morphology in the mixed cultures and neuronal cultures. Our results showed that neurons and astrocytes grew in good conditions. The ratio of neurons and astrocytes in the mixed cultures was around 1:1, and the purity of neurons in the neuronal cultures is 91.3%. Furthermore, ketamine was used to test the hypothesis that the presence of a higher proportion of glia in the mixed cultures would be protective against ketamine-induced neurotoxicity in the mixed cultures compared with neuronal cultures. The results showed that ketamine-induced morphological changes, cell viability decrease and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels increase were significantly mitigated in neuron-glia mixed cultures compared with neuronal cultures. Furthermore, 2-PMPA was included to further explore efficient protective drug for ketamine-induced neurotoxicity. Our results showed that 2-PMPA reduced ketamine-induced decrease of cell viability and increase of LDH levels in the mixed cultures but not in the neuronal cultures. Further morphological changes of neurons and astrocytes also indicated that 2-PMPA could improve ketamine damaged neurons in the mixed cultures instead of neuronal cultures. These results indicate that glia protect neurons from ketamine-induced neurotoxicity. These data further suggest that glia mediate the neuroprotective effect of 2-PMPA and 2-PMPA has the potential to treat ketamine-induced neurotoxicity in vivo. Delineating the mechanisms underlying the communication between neurons and glia and the neuroprotective effects of 2-PMPA in the mixed

  4. Protective effect of parvalbumin on excitotoxic motor neuron death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van den Bosch, L.; Schwaller, B.; Vleminckx, V.;

    2002-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, ALS, AMPA receptor, calcium-binding proteins, calcium buffering, excitotoxity, kainic acid, motor neuron, parvalbumin......Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, ALS, AMPA receptor, calcium-binding proteins, calcium buffering, excitotoxity, kainic acid, motor neuron, parvalbumin...

  5. Genetic strategies to investigate neuronal circuit properties using stem cell-derived neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabella eGarcia

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The mammalian brain is anatomically and functionally complex, and prone to diverse forms of injury and neuropathology. Scientists have long strived to develop cell replacement therapies to repair damaged and diseased nervous tissue. However, this goal has remained unrealized for various reasons, including nascent knowledge of neuronal development, the inability to track and manipulate transplanted cells within complex neuronal networks, and host graft rejection. Recent advances in embryonic stem cell (ESC and induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC technology, alongside novel genetic strategies to mark and manipulate stem cell-derived neurons now provide unprecedented opportunities to investigate complex neuronal circuits in both healthy and diseased brains. Here, we review current technologies aimed at generating and manipulating neurons derived from ESCs and iPSCs towards investigation and manipulation of complex neuronal circuits, ultimately leading to the design and development of novel cell-based therapeutic approaches.

  6. Neuronal apoptosis: signal and cell diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Vanessa Becerra

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Programmed cell death occurs as a physiological process during development. In the brain and spinal cord this event determines the number and location of the different cell types. In adulthood, programmed cell death or apoptosis is more restricted but it may play a major role in different acute and chronic pathological entities. However, in contrast to other tissues where apoptosis has been widely documented from a morphological point of view, in the central nervous system complete anatomical evidence of apoptosis is scanty. In spite of this there is consensus about the activation of different signal systems associated to programmed cell death. In the present article we attempt to summarize the main apoptotic pathways so far identified in nervous tissue. Considering that apoptotic pathways are multiple, the neuronal cell types are highly diverse and specialized and that neuronal response to injury and survival depends upon tissue context, (i.e., preservation of connectivity, glial integrity and cell matrix, blood supply and trophic factors availability what is relevant for the apoptotic process in a sector of the brain may not be important in another.

  7. Electrical signals polarize neuronal organelles, direct neuron migration, and orient cell division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Li; McCaig, Colin D; Zhao, Min

    2009-09-01

    During early brain development, the axis of division of neuronal precursor cells is regulated tightly and can determine whether neurons remain in the germinal layers or migrate away. Directed neuronal migration depends on the establishment of cell polarity, and cells are polarized dynamically in response to extracellular signals. Endogenous electric fields (EFs) orient cell division and direct migration of a variety of cell types. Here, we show that cell division of cultured hippocampal cells (neuron-like cells and glial-like cells) is oriented strikingly by an applied EF, which also directs neuronal migration. Directed migration involves polarization of the leading neurite, of the microtubule-associated protein MAP-2 and of the Golgi apparatus and the centrosome, all of which reposition asymmetrically to face the cathode. Pharmacological inhibition of Rho-associated coiled-coil forming protein kinases (ROCK) and phosphoinositide 3-kinase decreased, leading neurite orientation and Golgi polarization in the neurons in response to an EF and in parallel decreased the directedness of EF-guided neuronal migration. This work demonstrates that the axis of hippocampal cell division, the establishment of neuronal polarity, the polarization of intracellular structures, and the direction of neuronal migration are all regulated by an extracellular electrical cue.

  8. carboxypeptidase E-ΔN, a neuroprotein transiently expressed during development protects embryonic neurons against glutamate neurotoxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Yan Qin

    Full Text Available Neuroprotective proteins expressed in the fetus play a critical role during early embryonic neurodevelopment, especially during maternal exposure to alcohol and drugs that cause stress, glutamate neuroexcitotoxicity, and damage to the fetal brain, if prolonged. We have identified a novel protein, carboxypeptidase E-ΔN (CPE-ΔN, which is a splice variant of CPE that has neuroprotective effects on embryonic neurons. CPE-ΔN is transiently expressed in mouse embryos from embryonic day 5.5 to postnatal day 1. It is expressed in embryonic neurons, but not in 3 week or older mouse brains, suggesting a function primarily in utero. CPE-ΔN expression was up-regulated in embryonic hippocampal neurons in response to dexamethasone treatment. CPE-ΔN transduced into rat embryonic cortical and hippocampal neurons protected them from glutamate- and H2O2-induced cell death. When transduced into embryonic cortical neurons, CPE-ΔN was found in the nucleus and enhanced the transcription of FGF2 mRNA. Embryonic cortical neurons challenged with glutamate resulted in attenuated FGF2 levels and cell death, but CPE-ΔN transduced neurons treated in the same manner showed increased FGF2 expression and normal viability. This neuroprotective effect of CPE-ΔN was mediated by secreted FGF2. Through receptor signaling, FGF2 activated the AKT and ERK signaling pathways, which in turn increased BCL-2 expression. This led to inhibition of caspase-3 activity and cell survival.

  9. Glucagon-like peptide-1 protects hippocampal neurons against advanced glycation end product-induced tau hyperphosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, S; An, F-M; Yin, L; Liu, A-R; Yin, D-K; Yao, W-B; Gao, X-D

    2014-01-03

    We have previously demonstrated that glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist ameliorated neurodegenerative changes in rat models of diabetes-related Alzheimer's disease (AD), and protected neurons from glucose toxicity in vitro. Herein, we investigated the effects of GLP-1 receptor mediates on cell toxicity and tau hyperphosphorylation induced by advanced glycation end products (AGEs), which are associated with glucose toxicity, and the molecular mechanism in PC12 cells and the primary hippocampal neurons. Our study demonstrated that the similar protection effects of GLP-1 existed in PC12 cells treated with glucose-bovine serum albumin (BSA) in hyperglycemic conditions or with glycoaldehyde-BSA alone. Additionally, glucose-BSA alone did not induce significant cytotoxicity in PC12 cells, but resulted in tau hyperphosphorylation in primary hippocampal neurons in 24h. And we found that GLP-1 could reduce cell tau phosphorylation induced by high glucose or glucose-BSA. Furthermore, our data in the present study suggested that GLP-1 regulated tau phosphorylation induced by AGEs through a signaling pathway involving glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β), similarly to the GSK-3β inhibitor, lithium chloride. Our findings suggest that GLP-1 can protect neurons from diabetes-associated AGE insults in vitro, and provide new evidence for a potential therapeutic value of GLP-1 receptor agonist in the treatment of AD especially diabetes-related AD.

  10. Mitochondria-targeted antioxidant mitotempo protects mitochondrial function against amyloid beta toxicity in primary cultured mouse neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hongtao; Li, Mo

    2016-09-01

    Mitochondrial defects including excess reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and compromised ATP generation are featured pathology in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Amyloid beta (Aβ)-mediated mitochondrial ROS overproduction disrupts intra-neuronal Redox balance, in turn exacerbating mitochondrial dysfunction leading to neuronal injury. Previous studies have found the beneficial effects of mitochondria-targeted antioxidants in preventing mitochondrial dysfunction and neuronal injury in AD animal and cell models, suggesting that mitochondrial ROS scavengers hold promise for the treatment of this neurological disorder. In this study, we have determined that mitotempo, a novel mitochondria-targeted antioxidant protects mitochondrial function from the toxicity of Aβ in primary cultured neurons. Our results showed that Aβ-promoted mitochondrial superoxide production and neuronal lipid oxidation were significantly suppressed by the application of mitotempo. Moreover, mitotempo also demonstrated protective effects on mitochondrial bioenergetics evidenced by preserved mitochondrial membrane potential, cytochrome c oxidase activity as well as ATP production. In addition, the Aβ-induced mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion and decreased expression levels of mtDNA replication-related DNA polymerase gamma (DNA pol γ) and Twinkle were substantially mitigated by mitotempo. Therefore, our study suggests that elimination of excess mitochondrial ROS rescues mitochondrial function in Aβ-insulted neruons; and mitotempo has the potential to be a promising therapeutic agent to protect mitochondrial and neuronal function in AD.

  11. Limitations of Mild, Moderate, and Profound Hypothermia in Protecting Developing Hippocampal Neurons After Simulated Ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregersen, Maren; Lee, Deok Hee; Gabatto, Pablo; Bickler, Philip E

    2013-12-01

    Mild hypothermia (33°C-34°C) after cerebral ischemia in intact animals or ischemia-like conditions in vitro reduces neuron death. However, it is now clear that more profound hypothermia or delayed hypothermia may not provide significant protection. To further define the limitations of hypothermia after cerebral ischemia, we used hippocampal slice cultures to examine the effects of various degrees, durations, and delays of hypothermia on neuron death after an ischemia-like insult. Organotypic cultures of the hippocampus from 7- to 8 day-old rat pups were cooled to 32°C, 23°C, 17°C, or 4°C immediately or after a 2-4 hour delay from an injurious insult of oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD). Cell death in CA1, CA3 and dentate regions of the cultures was assessed 24 hours later with SYTOX(®) or propidium iodide, both of which are fluorescent markers labeling damaged cells. OGD caused extensive cell death in CA1, CA3, and dentate regions of the hippocampal cultures. Hypothermia (32°C, 23°C and 17°C) for 4-6 hours immediately after OGD was protective at 24 hours, but when hypothermia was applied for longer periods or delayed after OGD, no protection or increased death was seen. Ultra-profound hypothermia (4°C) increased cell death in all cell areas of the hippocampus even when after a milder insult of only hypoxia. In an in vitro model of recovery after an ischemia-like insult, mild to profound hypothermia is protective only when applied without delay and for limited periods of time (6-8 hours). Longer durations of hypothermia, or delayed application of the hypothermia can increase neuron death. These findings may have implications for clinical uses of therapeutic hypothermia after hypoxic or ischemic insults, and suggest that further work is needed to elucidate the limitations of hypothermia as a protective treatment after ischemic stress.

  12. Non-Neuronal Cells in the Hypothalamic Adaptation to Metabolic Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire-Regatillo, Alejandra; Argente-Arizón, Pilar; Argente, Jesús; García-Segura, Luis Miguel; Chowen, Julie A.

    2017-01-01

    Although the brain is composed of numerous cell types, neurons have received the vast majority of attention in the attempt to understand how this organ functions. Neurons are indeed fundamental but, in order for them to function correctly, they rely on the surrounding “non-neuronal” cells. These different cell types, which include glia, epithelial cells, pericytes, and endothelia, supply essential substances to neurons, in addition to protecting them from dangerous substances and situations. Moreover, it is now clear that non-neuronal cells can also actively participate in determining neuronal signaling outcomes. Due to the increasing problem of obesity in industrialized countries, investigation of the central control of energy balance has greatly increased in attempts to identify new therapeutic targets. This has led to interesting advances in our understanding of how appetite and systemic metabolism are modulated by non-neuronal cells. For example, not only are nutrients and hormones transported into the brain by non-neuronal cells, but these cells can also metabolize these metabolic factors, thus modifying the signals reaching the neurons. The hypothalamus is the main integrating center of incoming metabolic and hormonal signals and interprets this information in order to control appetite and systemic metabolism. Hence, the factors transported and released from surrounding non-neuronal cells will undoubtedly influence metabolic homeostasis. This review focuses on what is known to date regarding the involvement of different cell types in the transport and metabolism of nutrients and hormones in the hypothalamus. The possible involvement of non-neuronal cells, in particular glial cells, in physiopathological outcomes of poor dietary habits and excess weight gain are also discussed. PMID:28377744

  13. Bimatoprost protects retinal neuronal damage via Akt pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Norihito; Tsuruma, Kazuhiro; Ohno, Yuta; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Hara, Hideaki

    2013-02-28

    Worldwide, prostaglandin analogs, such as bimatoprost, have become the major therapeutic class for medical treatment of glaucoma because of their efficacy and generally well tolerated systemic safety profile. However, the detailed mechanism of the direct action of bimatoprost on retinal ganglion cells (RGC) has rarely been understood. Thus, in this study, we elucidated the mechanism of the protective effects of bimatoprost on RGC against oxidative stress. To examine the protective effects of bimatoprost, cultured RGC with various concentrations of bimatoprost (in both free acid and amide form) were exposed to l-buthionin-(S,R)-sulfoximine (BSO) plus glutamate or serum depletion in vitro and intravitreal injection of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) was used to induce retinal damage in vivo. To elucidate the protective mechanism of bimatoprost, we used western blot analysis to investigate the phosphorylation of Akt and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). Bimatoprost significantly reduced BSO plus glutamate- and serum deprivation-induced death in concentration-dependent manners. Bimatoprost induced activation of Akt and ERK, and a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor, LY294002, attenuated the protective effect of bimatoprost. On the other hand, a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase inhibitor, U0126, exhibited protective effect unexpectedly. Moreover, ERK was more phosphorylated by attenuation of Akt activity in cultured RGC. In an in vivo study, bimatoprost reduced NMDA-induced RGC death. Taken together, these findings indicate that bimatoprost has protective effects on in vitro and in vivo retinal damage, suggesting that the mechanism underlying may be via the Akt pathway, which may modulate the ERK pathway.

  14. Reynosin protects against neuronal toxicity in dopamine-induced SH-SY5Y cells and 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rats as models of Parkinson's disease: Reciprocal up-regulation of E6-AP and down-regulation of α-synuclein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, Ahrom; Kim, Dong-Woo; Kim, Kyeong Ho; Lee, Sung-Jin; Oh, Ki-Bong; Shin, Jongheon; Mar, Woongchon

    2013-08-01

    Aggregation of α-synuclein (ASYN) is considered a major determinant of neuronal loss in Parkinson's disease (PD). E6-associated protein (E6-AP), an E3 ubiquitin protein ligase, has been known to promote the degradation of α-synuclein. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of the sesquiterpene lactone reynosin on dopamine (DA)-induced neuronal toxicity and regulation of E6-associated protein and α-synuclein proteins in both in vitro and in vivo models of Parkinson's disease. Usi"ng flow cytometry and western blot analysis, we determined that reynosin significantly protected both against cell death from dopamine-induced toxicity in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells and against the loss of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive cells in 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned rats (a rodent Parkinson's disease model system). In addition, reynosin made up-regulation of E6-associated protein expression and down-regulation of the over-expression of α-synuclein protein in both dopamine-treated SH-SY5Y cells and 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rats. These results suggest that the protective effect of reynosin against dopamine-induced neuronal cell death may be due to the reciprocal up-regulation of E6-associated protein and down-regulation of α-synuclein protein expression.

  15. Molecular Mechanisms Responsible for Neuron-Derived Conditioned Medium (NCM)-Mediated Protection of Ischemic Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chi-Hsin; Wang, Chen-Hsuan; Hsu, Shih-Lan; Liao, Li-Ya; Lin, Ting-An; Hsueh, Chi-Mei

    2016-01-01

    The protective value of neuron-derived conditioned medium (NCM) in cerebral ischemia and the underlying mechanism(s) responsible for NCM-mediated brain protection against cerebral ischemia were investigated in the study. NCM was first collected from the neuronal culture growing under the in vitro ischemic condition (glucose-, oxygen- and serum-deprivation or GOSD) for 2, 4 or 6 h. Through the focal cerebral ischemia (bilateral CCAO/unilateral MCAO) animal model, we discovered that ischemia/reperfusion (I/R)-induced brain infarction was significantly reduced by NCM, given directly into the cistern magna at the end of 90 min of CCAO/MCAO. Immunoblocking and chemical blocking strategies were applied in the in vitro ischemic studies to show that NCM supplement could protect microglia, astrocytes and neurons from GOSD-induced cell death, in a growth factor (TGFβ1, NT-3 and GDNF) and p-ERK dependent manner. Brain injection with TGFβ1, NT3, GDNF and ERK agonist (DADS) alone or in combination, therefore also significantly decreased the infarct volume of ischemic brain. Moreover, NCM could inhibit ROS but stimulate IL-1β release from GOSD-treated microglia and limit the infiltration of IL-β-positive microglia into the core area of ischemic brain, revealing the anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of NCM. In overall, NCM-mediated brain protection against cerebral ischemia has been demonstrated for the first time in S.D. rats, due to its anti-apoptotic, anti-oxidant and potentially anti-glutamate activities (NCM-induced IL-1β can inhibit the glutamate-mediated neurotoxicity) and restriction upon the infiltration of inflammatory microglia into the core area of ischemic brain. The therapeutic potentials of NCM, TGFβ1, GDNF, NT-3 and DADS in the control of cerebral ischemia in human therefore have been suggested and require further investigation.

  16. APP as a Protective Factor in Acute Neuronal Insults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hefter, Dimitri; Draguhn, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Despite its key role in the molecular pathology of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), the physiological function of amyloid precursor protein (APP) is unknown. Increasing evidence, however, points towards a neuroprotective role of this membrane protein in situations of metabolic stress. A key observation is the up-regulation of APP following acute (stroke, cardiac arrest) or chronic (cerebrovascular disease) hypoxic-ischemic conditions. While this mechanism may increase the risk or severity of AD, APP by itself or its soluble extracellular fragment APPsα can promote neuronal survival. Indeed, different animal models of acute hypoxia-ischemia, traumatic brain injury (TBI) and excitotoxicity have revealed protective effects of APP or APPsα. The underlying mechanisms involve APP-mediated regulation of calcium homeostasis via NMDA receptors (NMDAR), voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCC) or internal calcium stores. In addition, APP affects the expression of survival- or apoptosis-related genes as well as neurotrophic factors. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of the neuroprotective role of APP and APPsα and possible implications for future research and new therapeutic strategies. PMID:28210211

  17. Cell cycle markers have different expression and localization patterns in neuron-like PC12 cells and primary hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negis, Yesim; Unal, Aysegul Yildiz; Korulu, Sirin; Karabay, Arzu

    2011-06-01

    Neuron-like PC12 cells are extensively used in place of neurons in published studies. Aim of this paper has been to compare mRNA and protein expressions of cell cycle markers; cyclinA, B, D, E; Cdk1, 2 and 4; and p27 in post-mitotic primary hippocampal neurons, mitotically active PC12 cells and NGF-differentiated post-mitotic PC12 cells. Contrary to PC12 cells, in neurons, the presence of all these markers was detected only at mRNA level; except for cyclinA, cyclinE and Cdk4, which were detectable also at protein levels. In both NGF-treated PC12 cells and neurons, cyclinE was localized only in the nucleus. In NGF-treated PC12 cells cyclinD and Cdk4 were localized in the nucleus while, in neurons cyclinD expression was not detectable; Cdk4 was localized in the cytoplasm. In neurons, cyclinA was nuclear, whereas in NGF-treated PC12 cells, it was localized in the cell body and along the processes. These results suggest that PC12 cells and primary neurons are different in terms of cell cycle protein expressions and localizations. Thus, it may not be very appropriate to use these cells as neuronal model system in order to understand neuronal physiological activities, upstream of where may lie cell cycle activation triggered events.

  18. Neurotoxicity of isoniazid and its metabolites in cultures of mouse dorsal root ganglion neurons and hybrid neuronal cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanfeliu, C; Wright, J M; Kim, S U

    1999-12-01

    Isoniazid (INH) is one of the anti-tuberculosis drugs widely prescribed for patients since the early 1950s. It is relatively nontoxic but some patients develop peripheral neuropathy attributed to a disturbance of vitamin B6 metabolism. Some isoniazid metabolites are hepatotoxic but little is known about their neurotoxic property. Isoniazid and its metabolites including acetylisoniazid, acetylhydrazine, diacetylhydrazine, isonicotinic acid and hydrazine were examined for their potential neurotoxic effects in cultured mouse dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and mouse neuroblastoma x DRG neuron hybrid cell line N18D3. Isoniazid did not cause neurotoxicity at exposures up to 7 days. Hydrazine was found to be the most toxic metabolite with LC50 values of 2.7 mM and 0.3 mM after 7 days of exposure in DRG neurons and N18D3 hybrid neurons, respectively. Other metabolites including acetylisoniazid, acetylhydrazine, diacetylhydrazine and isonicotinic acid had moderate to minor neurotoxic effects on N18D3 hybrid neurons. Pyridoxine, which is used in clinical practice to prevent or ameliorate the isoniazid-induced neuropathy, did not consistently reverse the neurotoxicity of any of the metabolites in the cell cultures, but some interaction with hydrazine cannot be ruled out. Pyridoxine itself was found to be neurotoxic both in DRG neurons and N18D3 hybrid neurons, in agreement with human peripheral sensory neuropathy caused by prolonged overdosage. The enzymes catalase and superoxide dismutase and the antioxidant agent selenium showed some protection against hydrazine neurotoxicity, suggesting an involvement of the generation of reactive oxygen species in the pathogenesis of isoniazid neuropathy. Both mouse DRG neurons and N18D3 mouse hybrid neurons were shown to be useful culture systems for elucidating the neurotoxicity mechanisms of agents causing sensory neuropathies and general neurotoxic effects in the nervous system.

  19. Closing the Phenotypic Gap between Transformed Neuronal Cell Lines in Culture and Untransformed Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Tereance A.; Nickerson, Cheryl A.; Kaushal, Deepak; Ott, C. Mark; HonerzuBentrup, Kerstin; Ramamurthy, Rajee; Nelman-Gonzales, Mayra; Pierson, Duane L.; Philipp, Mario T.

    2008-01-01

    Studies of neuronal dysfunction in the central nervous system (CNS) are frequently limited by the failure of primary neurons to propagate in vitro. Neuronal cell lines can be substituted for primary cells but they often misrepresent normal conditions. We hypothesized that a dimensional (3-D) cell culture system would drive the phenotype of transformed neurons closer to that of untransformed cells. In our studies comparing 3-D versus 2-dimensional (2-D) culture, neuronal SH-SY5Y (SY) cells underwent distinct morphological changes combined with a significant drop in their rate of cell division. Expression of the proto-oncogene N-myc and the RNA binding protein HuD was decreased in 3-D culture as compared to standard 2-D conditions. We observed a decline in the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 in 3-D culture, coupled with increased expression of the pro-apoptotic proteins Bax and Bak. Moreover, thapsigargin (TG)-induced apoptosis was enhanced in the 3-D cells. Microarray analysis demonstrated significantly differing mRNA levels for over 700 genes in the cells of each culture type. These results indicate that a 3-D culture approach narrows the phenotypic gap between neuronal cell lines and primary neurons. The resulting cells may readily be used for in vitro research of neuronal pathogenesis.

  20. Protective effects of gastrodine on dendritic spines in kainic acid-injured neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yangfei Ji; Boai Zhang; Yanjie Jia; Guifang Sun; Yu Liu; Tao Peng; Yanru Liu; Xingrong Ma

    2011-01-01

    EphB2 affects neuronal cells by altering the dendritic spines. The present study analyzed the neuroprotective effects of gastrodine by measuring EphB2 expression in rat neural cells cultured in vitro and injured by kainic acid. Gastrodine (12.5, 25, and 50 mg/L) improved morphology in kainic acid-injured neurons, reduced lactate dehydrogenase leakage, decreased neuronal apoptosis, and increased EphB2 expression in neuronal cells. A moderate dose of 25 mg/L gastrodine resulted in the most significant effects. These results suggested that gastrodine suppressed the neurotoxic effects of excitatory amino acids and provided neuroprotection by remodeling neuronal dendritic spines.

  1. Phenolic Compounds Protect Cultured Hippocampal Neurons against Ethanol-Withdrawal Induced Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianna E. Jung

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Ethanol withdrawal is linked to elevated oxidative damage to neurons. Here we report our findings on the contribution of phenolic antioxidants (17β-estradiol, p-octyl-phenol and 2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-methylphenol to counterbalance sudden ethanol withdrawal-initiated oxidative events in hippocampus-derived cultured HT-22 cells. We showed that ethanol withdrawal for 4 h after 24-h ethanol treatment provoked greater levels of oxidative damage than the preceding ethanol exposure. Phenolic antioxidant treatment either during ethanol exposure or ethanol withdrawal only, however, dose-dependently reversed cellular oxidative damage, as demonstrated by the significantly enhanced cell viability, reduced malondialdehyde production and protein carbonylation, compared to untreated cells. Interestingly, the antioxidant treatment schedule had no significant impact on the observed neuroprotection. In addition, the efficacy of the three phenolic compounds was practically equipotent in protecting HT-22 cells in spite of predictions based on an in silico study and a cell free assay of lipid peroxidation. This finding implies that free-radical scavenging may not be the sole factor responsible for the observed neuroprotection and warrants further studies to establish, whether the HT-22 line is indeed a suitable model for in vitro screening of antioxidants against EW-related neuronal damage.

  2. Autophagy Constitutes a Protective Mechanism against Ethanol Toxicity in Mouse Astrocytes and Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pla, Antoni; Pascual, María; Guerri, Consuelo

    2016-01-01

    Ethanol induces brain damage and neurodegeneration by triggering inflammatory processes in glial cells through activation of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling. Recent evidence indicates the role of protein degradation pathways in neurodegeneration and alcoholic liver disease, but how these processes affect the brain remains elusive. We have demonstrated that chronic ethanol consumption impairs proteolytic pathways in mouse brain, and the immune response mediated by TLR4 receptors participates in these dysfunctions. We evaluate the in vitro effects of an acute ethanol dose on the autophagy-lysosome pathway (ALP) on WT and TLR4-/- mouse astrocytes and neurons in primary culture, and how these changes affect cell survival. Our results show that ethanol induces overexpression of several autophagy markers (ATG12, LC3-II, CTSB), and increases the number of lysosomes in WT astrocytes, effects accompanied by a basification of lysosomal pH and by lowered phosphorylation levels of autophagy inhibitor mTOR, along with activation of complexes beclin-1 and ULK1. Notably, we found only minor changes between control and ethanol-treated TLR4-/- mouse astroglial cells. Ethanol also triggers the expression of the inflammatory mediators iNOS and COX-2, but induces astroglial death only slightly. Blocking autophagy by using specific inhibitors increases both inflammation and cell death. Conversely, in neurons, ethanol down-regulates the autophagy pathway and triggers cell death, which is partially recovered by using autophagy enhancers. These results support the protective role of the ALP against ethanol-induced astroglial cell damage in a TLR4-dependent manner, and provide new insight into the mechanisms that underlie ethanol-induced brain damage and are neuronal sensitive to the ethanol effects.

  3. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester protects against the dopaminergic neuronal loss induced by 6-hydroxydopamine in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros Silva, R; Santos, N A G; Martins, N M; Ferreira, D A S; Barbosa, F; Oliveira Souza, V C; Kinoshita, A; Baffa, O; Del-Bel, E; Santos, A C

    2013-03-13

    Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) is a botanical compound abundant in honeybees' propolis. It has anti-inflammatory, antiviral, antioxidant, immunomodulatory and antitumor properties. Its beneficial effects against neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease, have also been suggested and some mechanisms have been proposed. Mitochondrial damage and oxidative stress are critical events in neurodegeneration. Release of cytochrome c from mitochondria to cytosol and the downstream activation of caspase-3 have been suggested as targets of the protective mechanism of CAPE. Most of the studies addressing the protective effect of CAPE have been performed in cell culture. This is the first study to demonstrate the protective effect of CAPE against the dopaminergic neuronal loss induced by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) in rats. It also demonstrates, for the first time, the inhibitory effect of CAPE on mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT), a mediator of neuronal death that triggers cytochrome c release and caspase-3 activation. Scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and metal chelation was demonstrated in the brain-affected areas of the rats treated with 6-OHDA and CAPE. Additionally, we demonstrated that CAPE does not affect brain mitochondrial function. Based on these findings and on its ability to cross the blood-brain barrier, CAPE is a promising compound to treat Parkinson's and other neurodegenerative diseases.

  4. Transgenic expression and activation of PGC-1α protect dopaminergic neurons in the MPTP mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudò, Giuseppa; Mäkelä, Johanna; Di Liberto, Valentina; Tselykh, Timofey V; Olivieri, Melania; Piepponen, Petteri; Eriksson, Ove; Mälkiä, Annika; Bonomo, Alessandra; Kairisalo, Minna; Aguirre, Jose A; Korhonen, Laura; Belluardo, Natale; Lindholm, Dan

    2012-04-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress occur in Parkinson's disease (PD), but little is known about the molecular mechanisms controlling these events. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) is a transcriptional coactivator that is a master regulator of oxidative stress and mitochondrial metabolism. We show here that transgenic mice overexpressing PGC-1α in dopaminergic neurons are resistant against cell degeneration induced by the neurotoxin MPTP. The increase in neuronal viability was accompanied by elevated levels of mitochondrial antioxidants SOD2 and Trx2 in the substantia nigra of transgenic mice. PGC-1α overexpression also protected against MPTP-induced striatal loss of dopamine, and mitochondria from PGC-1α transgenic mice showed an increased respiratory control ratio compared with wild-type animals. To modulate PGC-1α, we employed the small molecular compound, resveratrol (RSV) that protected dopaminergic neurons against the MPTP-induced cell degeneration almost to the same extent as after PGC-1α overexpression. As studied in vitro, RSV activated PGC-1α in dopaminergic SN4741 cells via the deacetylase SIRT1, and enhanced PGC-1α gene transcription with increases in SOD2 and Trx2. Taken together, the results reveal an important function of PGC-1α in dopaminergic neurons to combat oxidative stress and increase neuronal viability. RSV and other compounds acting via SIRT1/PGC-1α may prove useful as neuroprotective agents in PD and possibly in other neurological disorders.

  5. Multiple Modes of Communication between Neurons and Oligodendrocyte Precursor Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maldonado, Paloma P; Angulo, María Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    The surprising discovery of bona fide synapses between neurons and oligodendrocytes precursor cells (OPCs) 15 years ago placed these progenitors as real partners of neurons in the CNS. The role of these synapses has not been established yet, but a main hypothesis is that neuron-OPC synaptic activity

  6. [Induced-division of neurons derived from neural stem cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Qiu-Xia; Que, Hai-Ping; Lu, Shuang-Hong; Liu, Shao-Jun

    2004-04-25

    In order to explore if mature neurons derived from neural stem cells have the potentiality to divide, we utilized the chemical digestion method to disperse the adult rat brain tissue into single cells, and culture them in serum-free medium. After being cultured for about eight days in vitro, the neural stem cells were induced to differentiate into neurons. The neurons were further induced to divide. Utilizing the method of serial photograph and NF-160 immunocytochemistry, the processes of division of some neurons were recorded. At the same time, PCNA+NF-160 (or Chat, GABA, GAD) double label were used to investigate if the dividing-neurons were mature ones. After the neural stem cells were induced to differentiate in vitro for eight days, they possessed the shape and character of mature neurons. The differentiated neuron had a big nucleus and one or two distinct nucleolus in the nuclear. Within the perikaryon,there were a large amount of dense and Nissl body-like structure. Several long processes emerged from various locations of the cell body. Then, EGF and bFGF were added into the medium to induce division. After two days of induced-division, neuron-like cells were observed to divide; moreover, the number of neuron-like cells in the region increased continually. Immunocytochemistry demonstrated these cells were NF-160-positive. Serial photographs of dividing-process of neuron-like cells were obtained and their daughter cells were also NF-160-positive. After PCNA+NF-160 (or Chat, GABA, GAD) double label, some cells showed brown cell plasma and black nucleus. The above-mentioned results indicate that neurons, which were previously thought to be end-differentiated, can be re-called into cell cycle under appropriate conditions. Mature neurons still have the potential to divide, proliferate and self-renew.

  7. Schisandrin B protects rat cortical neurons against Abeta1-42-induced neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bin; Wang, Xue-Mei

    2009-07-01

    In the present study, we investigated the neuroprotective effects of schisandrin B on amyloid-beta1-42-induced toxicity and its potential mechanisms in rat cortical neuron cells. Amyloid beta1-42 significantly reduced cell viability and increased apoptosis. Pretreatment with schisandrin B prior to amyloid-beta1-42 exposure significantly elevated cell viability and reduced apoptosis. The anti-apoptotic effect of schisandrin B in rat cortical neurons was mediated by up-regulation of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 and down-regulation of the pro-apoptotic protein Bax. Schisandrin B also reduced the release of mitochondrial cytochrome c into cytosol and decreased caspase-9 and caspase-3 activities. Furthermore, schisandrin B increased activities of anti-oxidant reduced glutathione and decreased production of oxidative glutathione. Taken together, these results suggest that schisandrin B protected primary cultures of rat cortical cells against amyloid-beta1-42-induced neurotoxicity through anti-apoptosis involved in a mitochondria-mediated pathway and anti-oxidant action. Schisandrin B may represent a potential treatment strategy for Alzheimer's disease.

  8. Naphthazarin protects against glutamate-induced neuronal death via activation of the Nrf2/ARE pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Tae Gen; Kawamoto, Elisa M.; Yu, Qian-Sheng; Greig, Nigel H. [Laboratory of Neurosciences, National Institute on Aging, Intramural Research Program, 251 Bayview Blvd., Baltimore, MD 21224 (United States); Mattson, Mark P. [Laboratory of Neurosciences, National Institute on Aging, Intramural Research Program, 251 Bayview Blvd., Baltimore, MD 21224 (United States); Department of Neuroscience, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Camandola, Simonetta, E-mail: camandolasi@mail.nih.gov [Laboratory of Neurosciences, National Institute on Aging, Intramural Research Program, 251 Bayview Blvd., Baltimore, MD 21224 (United States)

    2013-04-19

    Highlights: •Naphthazarin activates the Nrf2/ARE pathway. •Naphthazarin induces Nrf2-driven genes in neurons and astrocytes. •Naphthazarin protects neurons against excitotoxicity. -- Abstract: Nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)/antioxidant response element (ARE) pathway is an important cellular stress response pathway involved in neuroprotection. We previously screened several natural phytochemicals and identified plumbagin as a novel activator of the Nrf2/ARE pathway that can protect neurons against ischemic injury. Here we extended our studies to natural and synthetic derivatives of plumbagin. We found that 5,8-dimethoxy-1,4-naphthoquinone (naphthazarin) is a potent activator of the Nrf2/ARE pathway, up-regulates the expression of Nrf2-driven genes in primary neuronal and glial cultures, and protects neurons against glutamate-induced excitotoxicity.

  9. Cortical cell and neuron density estimates in one chimpanzee hemisphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Christine E; Turner, Emily C; Sawyer, Eva Kille; Reed, Jamie L; Young, Nicole A; Flaherty, David K; Kaas, Jon H

    2016-01-19

    The density of cells and neurons in the neocortex of many mammals varies across cortical areas and regions. This variability is, perhaps, most pronounced in primates. Nonuniformity in the composition of cortex suggests regions of the cortex have different specializations. Specifically, regions with densely packed neurons contain smaller neurons that are activated by relatively few inputs, thereby preserving information, whereas regions that are less densely packed have larger neurons that have more integrative functions. Here we present the numbers of cells and neurons for 742 discrete locations across the neocortex in a chimpanzee. Using isotropic fractionation and flow fractionation methods for cell and neuron counts, we estimate that neocortex of one hemisphere contains 9.5 billion cells and 3.7 billion neurons. Primary visual cortex occupies 35 cm(2) of surface, 10% of the total, and contains 737 million densely packed neurons, 20% of the total neurons contained within the hemisphere. Other areas of high neuron packing include secondary visual areas, somatosensory cortex, and prefrontal granular cortex. Areas of low levels of neuron packing density include motor and premotor cortex. These values reflect those obtained from more limited samples of cortex in humans and other primates.

  10. Underlying mechanism of protection from hypoxic injury seen with n-butanol extract of Potentilla anserine L. in hippocampal neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaojing Qin; Lingzhi Li; Qi Lv; Baoguo Yu; Shuwang Yang; Tao He; Yongliang Zhang

    2012-01-01

    The alcohol and n-butanol extract of Potentilla anserine L.significantly protects myocardium from acute ischemic injury.However,its effects on rat hippocampal neurons and the mechanism of protection remain unclear.In this study,primary cultured hippocampal neurons from neonatal rats were incubated in 95% N2 and 5% CO2 for 4 hours.Results indicated that hypoxic injury decreased the viability of neurons,increased the expression levels of caspase-9 and caspase-3 mRNA,as well as cytochrome c,Caspase-9,and Caspase-3 protein.Pretreatment with 0.25,0.0625,0.0156 mg/mL n-butanol extract of Potentilla anserine L.led to a significant increase in cell viability.Expression levels of caspase-9 and caspase-3 mRNA,as well as cytochrome c,Caspase-9,andCaspase-3 protein,were attenuated.The neuroprotective effect of n-butanol extract of Potentillaanserine L.was equivalent to tanshinone IIA.Our data suggest that the n-butanol extract of Potentilla anserine L.could protect primary hippocampal neurons from hypoxic injury by deactivating mitochondrial cell death.

  11. Hyperexcitable neurons and altered non-neuronal cells in the compressed spinal ganglion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaMotte, Robert H; Ma, Chao

    2008-10-25

    The cell body or soma in the dosal root ganglion (DRG) is normally excitable and this excitability can increase and persist after an injury of peripheral sensory neurons. In a rat model of radicular pain, an intraforaminal implantation of a rod that chronically compressed the lumbar DRG ("CCD" model) resulted in neuronal somal hyperexcitability and spontaneous activity that was accompanied by hyperalgesia in the ipsilateral hind paw. By the 5th day after onset of CCD, there was a novel upregulation in neuronal expression of the chemokine, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1 or CCL2) and also its receptor, CCR2. The neurons developed, in response to topically applied MCP-1, an excitatory response that they normally do not have. CCD also activated non-neuronal cells including, for example, the endothelial cells as evidenced by angiogenesis in the form of an increased number of capillaries in the DRG after 7 days. A working hypothesis is that the CCD induced changes in neurons and non-neuronal cells that may act together to promote the survival of the injured tissue. The release of ligands such as CCL2, in addition to possibly activating nociceptive neurons (maintaining the pain), may also act to preserve injured cells in the face of ischemia and hypoxia, for example, by promoting angiogenesis. Thus, somal hyperexcitability, as often said of inflammation, may represent a double edged sword.

  12. Hyperexcitable neurons and altered non-neuronal cells in the compressed spinal ganglion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Robert H. LaMotte; Chao MA

    2008-01-01

    The cell body or soma in the dosal root ganglion (DRG) is normally excitable and this excitability can increase and persist after an injury of peripheral sensory neurons. In a rat model of radicular pain, an intraforaminal implantation of a rod that chronically compressed the lumbar DRG ("CCD" model) resulted in neuronal somal hyperexcitability and spontaneous activity that was accom-panied by hyperalgesia in the ipsilateral hind paw. By the 5th day after onset of CCD, there was a novel upregulation in neuronal expression of the chemokine, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP- 1 or CCL2) and also its receptor, CCR2. The neurons developed, in response to topically applied MCP-1, an excitatory response that they normally do not have. CCD also activated non-neuronal cells including, for example, the endothelial cells as evidenced by angiogenesis in the form of an increased number of capillaries in the DRG after 7 days. A working hypothesis is that the CCD induced changes in neurons and non-neuronal cells that may act together to promote the survival of the injured tissue. The release of ligands such as CCL2, in addition to possibly activating nociceptive neurons (maintaining the pain), may also act to preserve injured cells in the face of ischemia and hypoxia, for example, by promoting angiogenesis. Thus, somal hyperexcitability, as often said of inflammation, may represent a double edged sword.

  13. 14,15-EET promotes mitochondrial biogenesis and protects cortical neurons against oxygen/glucose deprivation-induced apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lai; Chen, Man; Yuan, Lin; Xiang, Yuting [Department of Physiology and Pathophysiology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing (China); Zheng, Ruimao, E-mail: rmzheng@pku.edu.cn [Department of Anatomy, Histology and Embryology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing (China); Zhu, Shigong, E-mail: sgzhu@bjmu.edu.cn [Department of Physiology and Pathophysiology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing (China)

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • 14,15-EET inhibits OGD-induced apoptosis in cortical neurons. • Mitochondrial biogenesis of cortical neurons is promoted by 14,15-EET. • 14,15-EET preserves mitochondrial function of cortical neurons under OGD. • CREB mediates effect of 14,15-EET on mitochondrial biogenesis and function. - Abstract: 14,15-Epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (14,15-EET), a metabolite of arachidonic acid, is enriched in the brain cortex and exerts protective effect against neuronal apoptosis induced by ischemia/reperfusion. Although apoptosis has been well recognized to be closely associated with mitochondrial biogenesis and function, it is still unclear whether the neuroprotective effect of 14,15-EET is mediated by promotion of mitochondrial biogenesis and function in cortical neurons under the condition of oxygen–glucose deprivation (OGD). In this study, we found that 14,15-EET improved cell viability and inhibited apoptosis of cortical neurons. 14,15-EET significantly increased the mitochondrial mass and the ratio of mitochondrial DNA to nuclear DNA. Key makers of mitochondrial biogenesis, peroxisome proliferator activator receptor gamma-coactivator 1 alpha (PGC-1α), nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF-1) and mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM), were elevated at both mRNA and protein levels in the cortical neurons treated with 14,15-EET. Moreover, 14,15-EET markedly attenuated the decline of mitochondrial membrane potential, reduced ROS, while increased ATP synthesis. Knockdown of cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB) by siRNA blunted the up-regulation of PGC-1α and NRF-1 stimulated by 14,15-EET, and consequently abolished the neuroprotective effect of 14,15-EET. Our results indicate that 14,15-EET protects neurons from OGD-induced apoptosis by promoting mitochondrial biogenesis and function through CREB mediated activation of PGC-1α and NRF-1.

  14. Delayed translocation of NGFI-B/RXR in glutamate stimulated neurons allows late protection by 9-cis retinoic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathisen, Gro H.; Fallgren, Asa B.; Strom, Bjorn O.; Boldingh Debernard, Karen A.; Mohebi, Beata U. [Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1068, Blindern, N-0316 Oslo (Norway); Paulsen, Ragnhild E., E-mail: r.e.paulsen@farmasi.uio.no [Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1068, Blindern, N-0316 Oslo (Norway)

    2011-10-14

    Highlights: {yields} NGFI-B and RXR translocate out of the nucleus after glutamate treatment. {yields} Arresting NGFI-B/RXR in the nucleus protects neurons from excitotoxicity. {yields} Late protection by 9-cis RA is possible due to a delayed translocation of NGFI-B/RXR. -- Abstract: Nuclear receptor and apoptosis inducer NGFI-B translocates out of the nucleus as a heterodimer with RXR in response to different apoptosis stimuli, and therefore represents a potential pharmacological target. We found that the cytosolic levels of NGFI-B and RXR{alpha} were increased in cultures of cerebellar granule neurons 2 h after treatment with glutamate (excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain, involved in stroke). To find a time-window for potential intervention the neurons were transfected with gfp-tagged expressor plasmids for NGFI-B and RXR. The default localization of NGFI-Bgfp and RXRgfp was nuclear, however, translocation out of the nucleus was observed 2-3 h after glutamate treatment. We therefore hypothesized that the time-window between treatment and translocation would allow late protection against neuronal death. The RXR ligand 9-cis retinoic acid was used to arrest NGFI-B and RXR in the nucleus. Addition of 9-cis retinoic acid 1 h after treatment with glutamate reduced the cytosolic translocation of NGFI-B and RXR{alpha}, the cytosolic translocation of NGFI-Bgfp observed in live neurons, as well as the neuronal death. However, the reduced translocation and the reduced cell death were not observed when 9-cis retinoic acid was added after 3 h. Thus, late protection from glutamate induced death by addition of 9-cis retinoic acid is possible in a time-window after apoptosis induction.

  15. Hydroxysafflor Yellow A Protects Neurons From Excitotoxic Death through Inhibition of NMDARs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingtao Wang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Excessive glutamate release causes overactivation of N-methyl d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs, leading to excitatory neuronal damage in cerebral ischemia. Hydroxysafflor yellow A (HSYA, a compound extracted from Carthamus tinctorius L., has been reported to exert a neuroprotective effect in many pathological conditions, including brain ischemia. However, the underlying mechanism of HSYA's effect on neurons remains elusive. In the present study, we conducted experiments using patch-clamp recording of mouse hippocampal slices. In addition, we performed Ca2+ imaging, Western blots, as well as mitochondrial-targeted circularly permuted yellow fluorescent protein transfection into cultured hippocampal neurons in order to decipher the physiological mechanism underlying HSYA's neuroprotective effect. Through the electrophysiology experiments, we found that HSYA inhibited NMDAR-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents without affecting α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor and γ-aminobutyric acid A-type receptor-mediated currents. This inhibitory effect of HSYA on NMDARs was concentration dependent. HSYA did not show any preferential inhibition of either N-methyl d-aspartate receptor subtype 2A- or N-methyl d-aspartate receptor subtype 2B- subunit-containing NMDARs. Additionally, HSYA exhibits a facilitatory effect on paired NMDAR-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents. Furthermore, HSYA reduced the magnitude of NMDAR-mediated membrane depolarization currents evoked by oxygen-glucose deprivation, and suppressed oxygen-glucose deprivation–induced and NMDAR-dependent ischemic long-term potentiation, which is believed to cause severe reperfusion damage after ischemia. Through the molecular biology experiments, we found that HSYA inhibited the NMDA-induced and NMDAR-mediated intracellular Ca2+ concentration increase in hippocampal cultures, reduced apoptotic and necrotic cell deaths, and prevented mitochondrial damage. Together

  16. Reconstruction of phrenic neuron identity in embryonic stem cell-derived motor neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Carolina Barcellos; Kanning, Kevin C; Kreis, Patricia; Stevenson, Danielle; Crossley, Martin; Nowak, Magdalena; Iacovino, Michelina; Kyba, Michael; Chambers, David; Blanc, Eric; Lieberam, Ivo

    2014-02-01

    Air breathing is an essential motor function for vertebrates living on land. The rhythm that drives breathing is generated within the central nervous system and relayed via specialised subsets of spinal motor neurons to muscles that regulate lung volume. In mammals, a key respiratory muscle is the diaphragm, which is innervated by motor neurons in the phrenic nucleus. Remarkably, relatively little is known about how this crucial subtype of motor neuron is generated during embryogenesis. Here, we used direct differentiation of motor neurons from mouse embryonic stem cells as a tool to identify genes that direct phrenic neuron identity. We find that three determinants, Pou3f1, Hoxa5 and Notch, act in combination to promote a phrenic neuron molecular identity. We show that Notch signalling induces Pou3f1 in developing motor neurons in vitro and in vivo. This suggests that the phrenic neuron lineage is established through a local source of Notch ligand at mid-cervical levels. Furthermore, we find that the cadherins Pcdh10, which is regulated by Pou3f1 and Hoxa5, and Cdh10, which is controlled by Pou3f1, are both mediators of like-like clustering of motor neuron cell bodies. This specific Pcdh10/Cdh10 activity might provide the means by which phrenic neurons are assembled into a distinct nucleus. Our study provides a framework for understanding how phrenic neuron identity is conferred and will help to generate this rare and inaccessible yet vital neuronal subtype directly from pluripotent stem cells, thus facilitating subsequent functional investigations.

  17. Does Piroxicam really protect ischemic neurons and influence neuronal firing in cerebral ischemia? An exploration towards therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Pallab; Pandey, Anand Kumar; Paul, Sudip; Patnaik, Ranjana

    2013-09-01

    Cerebral ischemia is still one of the most confusing and enigmatic neurological disorders with least understood injuries. The EEG measures have been traditionally used to detect residual neural dysfunctions after cerebral ischemia although having several shortcomings, yielding controversial and inconsistent results. It is feasible to hypothesize that advanced EEG research can overcome these shortcomings and provide more clear information regarding the long lasting neural impairment in the subjects suffered from brain stroke. To our understanding, EEG power spectrum density measures can significantly contribute towards intervening drug administered diseased model and give us correct status of neuronal firing after an insult. On the basis of our findings we hypothesize that Piroxicam, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) can protect neurons and improves neuronal firing after ischemia/reperfusion injury in animal model of focal cerebral ischemia. This is the first ever finding which advocates the role of Piroxicam, a NSAID in neuronal firing apart from its other neuroprotective roles. Thus, we consider the possibility of modulation of neuronal firing as a therapeutic strategy to help prevent neuronal dysfunctions in cerebral ischemia.

  18. Protective effects of Ginkgo biloba extract 761 against glutamate-induced neurotoxicity in cultured retinal neuron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yun-song; XU Liang; MA Ke; WANG Shuang; WANG Jin-jin

    2005-01-01

    @@ A large part of neuronal death is the result of episodes of anoxia and ischaemia in the retina and other eye diseases, such as anterior ischemic optic neuropathy, glaucoma. The neuronal death is due to the accumulation of glutamate in the extracellular space. Glutamate is the primary excitatory neurotransmitter in the retina. However, excessive overactivation of glutamate receptors leads to excitotoxic neuronal cell death. Glutamate induces cell death by increasing the levels of intracellular Ca2+ in neurons, thereby leading to generation of free radicals and activation proteases, as well as transcriptional activation of specific cell death programs. Glutamate excitoxicity can also cause neuronal mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) loss, which is associated with changes in mitochondrial function leading to a neuronal dysfunction.

  19. Potential protection of green tea polyphenols against 1800 MHz electromagnetic radiation-induced injury on rat cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mei-Li; Wen, Jian-Qiang; Fan, Yu-Bo

    2011-10-01

    Radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (EMF) are harmful to public health, but the certain anti-irradiation mechanism is not clear yet. The present study was performed to investigate the possible protective effects of green tea polyphenols against electromagnetic radiation-induced injury in the cultured rat cortical neurons. In this study, green tea polyphenols were used in the cultured cortical neurons exposed to 1800 MHz EMFs by the mobile phone. We found that the mobile phone irradiation for 24 h induced marked neuronal cell death in the MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazole-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide) and TUNEL (TdT mediated biotin-dUTP nicked-end labeling) assay, and protective effects of green tea polyphenols on the injured cortical neurons were demonstrated by testing the content of Bcl-2 Assaciated X protein (Bax) in the immunoprecipitation assay and Western blot assay. In our study results, the mobile phone irradiation-induced increases in the content of active Bax were inhibited significantly by green tea polyphenols, while the contents of total Bax had no marked changes after the treatment of green tea polyphenols. Our results suggested a neuroprotective effect of green tea polyphenols against the mobile phone irradiation-induced injury on the cultured rat cortical neurons.

  20. Is the loss of thalamostriatal neurons protective in parkinsonism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusnoor, Sheila V; Muly, E Chris; Morgan, James I; Deutch, Ariel Y

    2009-12-01

    Neuronal loss in Parkinson's disease (PD) is more widespread than originally thought. Among the extrastriatal sites in which significant loss of neurons has been reported is the centremedian-parafascicular (CM-PF) complex of the thalamus, which provides one of the three major afferent sources to the striatum. The functional significance of CM-PF loss in PD is unclear. Interestingly, several recent small trials have suggested that deep brain stimulation of the CM-PF improves motor function in PD. We discuss the possible transsynaptic determination of CM-PF loss secondary to nigrostriatal dopamine degeneration, and suggest that expression of the glycoprotein cerebellin1 (Cbln1) in CM-PF neurons may play an important role in striatal synaptic remodeling in parkinsonism.

  1. Expression of polysialylated neural cell adhesion molecules on adult stem cells after neuronal differentiation of inner ear spiral ganglion neurons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Kyoung Ho [Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, College of Medicine, Catholic University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yeo, Sang Won, E-mail: swyeo@catholic.ac.kr [Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, College of Medicine, Catholic University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Troy, Frederic A., E-mail: fatroy@ucdavis.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine, University of California, School of Medicine, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Xiamen University, School of Medicine, Xiamen City (China)

    2014-10-17

    Highlights: • PolySia expressed on neurons primarily during early stages of neuronal development. • PolySia–NCAM is expressed on neural stem cells from adult guinea pig spiral ganglion. • PolySia is a biomarker that modulates neuronal differentiation in inner ear stem cells. - Abstract: During brain development, polysialylated (polySia) neural cell adhesion molecules (polySia–NCAMs) modulate cell–cell adhesive interactions involved in synaptogenesis, neural plasticity, myelination, and neural stem cell (NSC) proliferation and differentiation. Our findings show that polySia–NCAM is expressed on NSC isolated from adult guinea pig spiral ganglion (GPSG), and in neurons and Schwann cells after differentiation of the NSC with epidermal, glia, fibroblast growth factors (GFs) and neurotrophins. These differentiated cells were immunoreactive with mAb’s to polySia, NCAM, β-III tubulin, nestin, S-100 and stained with BrdU. NSC could regenerate and be differentiated into neurons and Schwann cells. We conclude: (1) polySia is expressed on NSC isolated from adult GPSG and on neurons and Schwann cells differentiated from these NSC; (2) polySia is expressed on neurons primarily during the early stage of neuronal development and is expressed on Schwann cells at points of cell–cell contact; (3) polySia is a functional biomarker that modulates neuronal differentiation in inner ear stem cells. These new findings suggest that replacement of defective cells in the inner ear of hearing impaired patients using adult spiral ganglion neurons may offer potential hope to improve the quality of life for patients with auditory dysfunction and impaired hearing disorders.

  2. Cholesterol synthesis inhibitors protect against platelet-activating factor-induced neuronal damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams Alun

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Platelet-activating factor (PAF is implicated in the neuronal damage that accompanies ischemia, prion disease and Alzheimer's disease (AD. Since some epidemiological studies demonstrate that statins, drugs that reduce cholesterol synthesis, have a beneficial effect on mild AD, we examined the effects of two cholesterol synthesis inhibitors on neuronal responses to PAF. Methods Primary cortical neurons were treated with cholesterol synthesis inhibitors (simvastatin or squalestatin prior to incubation with different neurotoxins. The effects of these drugs on neuronal cholesterol levels and neuronal survival were measured. Immunoblots were used to determine the effects of simvastatin or squalestatin on the distribution of the PAF receptor and an enzyme linked immunoassay was used to quantify the amounts of PAF receptor. Results PAF killed primary neurons in a dose-dependent manner. Pre-treatment with simvastatin or squalestatin reduced neuronal cholesterol and increased the survival of PAF-treated neurons. Neuronal survival was increased 50% by 100 nM simvastatin, or 20 nM squalestatin. The addition of mevalonate restored cholesterol levels, and reversed the protective effect of simvastatin. Simvastatin or squalestatin did not affect the amounts of the PAF receptor but did cause it to disperse from within lipid rafts. Conclusion Treatment of neurons with cholesterol synthesis inhibitors including simvastatin and squalestatin protected neurons against PAF. Treatment caused a percentage of the PAF receptors to disperse from cholesterol-sensitive domains. These results raise the possibility that the effects of statins on neurodegenerative disease are, at least in part, due to desensitisation of neurons to PAF.

  3. Curcumin protects microglia and primary rat cortical neurons against HIV-1 gp120-mediated inflammation and apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luyan Guo

    Full Text Available Curcumin is a molecule found in turmeric root that has anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and anti-tumor properties and has been widely used as both an herbal drug and a food additive to treat or prevent neurodegenerative diseases. To explore whether curcumin is able to ameliorate HIV-1-associated neurotoxicity, we treated a murine microglial cell line (N9 and primary rat cortical neurons with curcumin in the presence or absence of neurotoxic HIV-1 gp120 (V3 loop protein. We found that HIV-1 gp120 profoundly induced N9 cells to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1. HIV-1 gp120 also induced apoptosis of primary rat cortical neurons. Curcumin exerted a powerful inhibitory effect against HIV-1 gp120-induced neuronal damage, reducing the production of ROS, TNF-α and MCP-1 by N9 cells and inhibiting apoptosis of primary rat cortical neurons. Curcumin may exert its biological activities through inhibition of the delayed rectification and transient outward potassium (K(+ current, as curcumin effectively reduced HIV-1 gp120-mediated elevation of the delayed rectification and transient outward K(+ channel current in neurons. We conclude that HIV-1 gp120 increases ROS, TNF-α and MCP-1 production in microglia, and induces cortical neuron apoptosis by affecting the delayed rectification and transient outward K(+ channel current. Curcumin reduces production of ROS and inflammatory mediators in HIV-1-gp120-stimulated microglia, and protects cortical neurons against HIV-1-mediated apoptosis, most likely through inhibition of HIV-1 gp120-induced elevation of the delayed rectification and transient outward K(+ current.

  4. Evaluation of the importance of astrocytes when screening for acute toxicity in neuronal cell systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woehrling, E K; Hill, E J; Coleman, M D

    2010-02-01

    Reliable, high throughput, in vitro preliminary screening batteries have the potential to greatly accelerate the rate at which regulatory neurotoxicity data is generated. This study evaluated the importance of astrocytes when predicting acute toxic potential using a neuronal screening battery of pure neuronal (NT2.N) and astrocytic (NT2.A) and integrated neuronal/astrocytic (NT2.N/A) cell systems derived from the human NT2.D1 cell line, using biochemical endpoints (mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) depolarisation and ATP and GSH depletion). Following exposure for 72 h, the known acute human neurotoxicants trimethyltin-chloride, chloroquine and 6-hydroxydopamine were frequently capable of disrupting biochemical processes in all of the cell systems at non-cytotoxic concentrations. Astrocytes provide key metabolic and protective support to neurons during toxic challenge in vivo and generally the astrocyte containing cell systems showed increased tolerance to toxicant insult compared with the NT2.N mono-culture in vitro. Whilst there was no consistent relationship between MMP, ATP and GSH log IC(50) values for the NT2.N/A and NT2.A cell systems, these data did provide preliminary evidence of modulation of the acute neuronal toxic response by astrocytes. In conclusion, the suitability of NT2 neurons and astrocytes as cell systems for acute toxicity screening deserves further investigation.

  5. Activity deprivation induces neuronal cell death: mediation by tissue-type plasminogen activator.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eldi Schonfeld-Dado

    Full Text Available Spontaneous activity is an essential attribute of neuronal networks and plays a critical role in their development and maintenance. Upon blockade of activity with tetrodotoxin (TTX, neurons degenerate slowly and die in a manner resembling neurodegenerative diseases-induced neuronal cell death. The molecular cascade leading to this type of slow cell death is not entirely clear. Primary post-natal cortical neurons were exposed to TTX for up to two weeks, followed by molecular, biochemical and immunefluorescence analysis. The expression of the neuronal marker, neuron specific enolase (NSE, was down-regulated, as expected, but surprisingly, there was a concomitant and striking elevation in expression of tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA. Immunofluorescence analysis indicated that tPA was highly elevated inside affected neurons. Transfection of an endogenous tPA inhibitor, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1, protected the TTX-exposed neurons from dying. These results indicate that tPA is a pivotal player in slowly progressing activity deprivation-induced neurodegeneration.

  6. The effect of deafness duration on neurotrophin gene therapy for spiral ganglion neuron protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Andrew K; Tu, Tian; Atkinson, Patrick J; Flynn, Brianna O; Sgro, Beatrice E; Hume, Cliff; O'Leary, Stephen J; Shepherd, Robert K; Richardson, Rachael T

    2011-08-01

    A cochlear implant can restore hearing function by electrically exciting spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) in the deaf cochlea. However, following deafness SGNs undergo progressive degeneration ultimately leading to their death. One significant cause of SGN degeneration is the loss of neurotrophic support that is normally provided by cells within the organ of Corti (OC). The administration of exogenous neurotrophins (NTs) can protect SGNs from degeneration but the effects are short-lived once the source of NTs has been exhausted. NT gene therapy, whereby cells within the cochlea are transfected with genes enabling them to produce NTs, is one strategy for providing a cellular source of NTs that may provide long-term support for SGNs. As the SGNs normally innervate sensory cells within the OC, targeting residual OC cells for gene therapy in the deaf cochlea may provide a source of NTs for SGN protection and targeted regrowth of their peripheral fibers. However, the continual degeneration of the OC over extended periods of deafness may deplete the cellular targets for NT gene therapy and hence limit the effectiveness of this method in preventing SGN loss. This study examined the effects of deafness duration on the efficacy of NT gene therapy in preventing SGN loss in guinea pigs that were systemically deafened with aminoglycosides. Adenoviral vectors containing green fluorescent protein (GFP) with or without genes for Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) and Neurotrophin-3 (NT3) were injected into the scala media (SM) compartment of cochleae that had been deafened for one, four or eight weeks prior to the viral injection. The results showed that viral transfection of cells within the SM was still possible even after severe degeneration of the OC. Supporting cells (pillar and Deiters' cells), cells within the stria vascularis, the spiral ligament, endosteal cells lining the scala compartments and interdental cells in the spiral limbus were transfected. However, the

  7. [Electrophysiological properties of inhibitory neurones in cultured dissociated hippocampal cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskaliuk, A O; Kolodin, Iu O; Kravchenko, M O; Fedulova, S A; Veselovs'kyĭ, M S

    2004-01-01

    Electrophysiological properties of inhibitory (GABAergic) neurones were studied in dissociated hippocampal culture using simultaneous whole cell recordings from pairs of monosynaptically coupled neurons. Reliable identification of GABAergic neuron was performed by presence of monosynaptic inhibitory currents at postsynaptic cell in response to action potentials at stimulated cell. It was shown that GABAergic neurons in hippocampal culture are divided in two groups by their firing characteristics: first type generates action potentials at high frequency in response to injection of current (duration 0.5 s)--fast-spiking neurons (FS), cells from second type has no ability for high-frequency action potential generation--regular spiking neurons (RS). These two groups were distinguished by kinetic characteristics of action potentials, adaptation characteristics during continuous generation of action potentials and inhibitory effect making on postsynaptic cell. Application of potassium channel blocker 4-AP to somas of FS neurons in concentration, which selectively inhibits Kv3 potassium channels evoked reversible changes in kinetic of action potentials, frequency and adaptation characteristics during continuous generation of action potentials. It was concluded that there is hight level of expression of Kv3 potassium channels in the first group of neurons.

  8. Efficient differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells into motor neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chia-Yen; Whye, Dosh; Mason, Robert W; Wang, Wenlan

    2012-06-09

    Direct differentiation of embryonic stem (ES) cells into functional motor neurons represents a promising resource to study disease mechanisms, to screen new drug compounds, and to develop new therapies for motor neuron diseases such as spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Many current protocols use a combination of retinoic acid (RA) and sonic hedgehog (Shh) to differentiate mouse embryonic stem (mES) cells into motor neurons. However, the differentiation efficiency of mES cells into motor neurons has only met with moderate success. We have developed a two-step differentiation protocol that significantly improves the differentiation efficiency compared with currently established protocols. The first step is to enhance the neuralization process by adding Noggin and fibroblast growth factors (FGFs). Noggin is a bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) antagonist and is implicated in neural induction according to the default model of neurogenesis and results in the formation of anterior neural patterning. FGF signaling acts synergistically with Noggin in inducing neural tissue formation by promoting a posterior neural identity. In this step, mES cells were primed with Noggin, bFGF, and FGF-8 for two days to promote differentiation towards neural lineages. The second step is to induce motor neuron specification. Noggin/FGFs exposed mES cells were incubated with RA and a Shh agonist, Smoothened agonist (SAG), for another 5 days to facilitate motor neuron generation. To monitor the differentiation of mESs into motor neurons, we used an ES cell line derived from a transgenic mouse expressing eGFP under the control of the motor neuron specific promoter Hb9. Using this robust protocol, we achieved 51 ± 0.8% of differentiation efficiency (n = 3; p motor neuron specific markers, Islet-1 and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT). Our two-step differentiation protocol provides an efficient way to differentiate mES cells into spinal motor neurons.

  9. Metformin Protects Neurons against Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation/Reoxygenation -Induced Injury by Down-Regulating MAD2B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianfang Meng

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Metformin, the common medication for type II diabetes, has protective effects on cerebral ischemia. However, the molecular mechanisms are far from clear. Mitotic arrest deficient 2-like protein 2 (MAD2B, an inhibitor of the anaphase-promoting complex (APC, is widely expressed in hippocampal and cortical neurons and plays an important role in mediating high glucose-induced neurotoxicity. The present study investigated whether metformin modifies the expression of MAD2B and to exert its neuroprotective effects in primary cultured cortical neurons during oxygen-glucose deprivation/reoxygenation (OGD/R, a widely used in vitro model of ischemia/reperfusion. Methods: Primary cortical neurons were cultured, deprived of oxygen-glucose for 1 h, and then recovered with oxygen-glucose for 12 h and 24 h. Cell viability was measured by detecting the levels of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH in culture medium. The levels of MAD2B, cyclin B and p-histone 3 were measured by Western blot. Results: Cell viability of neurons was reduced under oxygen-glucose deprivation/reoxygenation (OGD/R. The expression of MAD2B was increased under OGD/R. The levels of cyclin B1, which is a substrate of APC, were also increased. Moreover, OGD/R up-regulated the phosphorylation levels of histone 3, which is the induction of aberrant re-entry of post-mitotic neurons. However, pretreatment of neurons with metformin alleviated OGD/R-induced injury. Metformin further decreased the expression of MAD2B, cyclin B1 and phosphorylation levels of histone 3. Conclusion: Metformin exerts its neuroprotective effect through regulating the expression of MAD2B in neurons under OGD/R.

  10. Imipramine protects mouse hippocampus against tunicamycin-induced cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Yoko; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Ishisaka, Mitsue; Oyagi, Atsushi; Tsuruma, Kazuhiro; Hara, Hideaki

    2012-12-05

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is implicated in various diseases. Recently, some reports have suggested that the sigma-1 receptor may play a role in ER stress, and many antidepressants have a high affinity for the sigma-1 receptor. In the present study, we focused on imipramine, a widely used antidepressant, and investigated whether it might protect against the neuronal cell death induced by tunicamycin, an ER stress inducer. In mouse cultured hippocampal HT22 cells, imipramine inhibited cell death and caspase-3 activation induced by tunicamycin, although it did not alter the elevated expressions of 78 kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP78) and C/EBP-homologous protein (CHOP). Interestingly, in such cells application of imipramine normalized the expression of the sigma-1 receptor, which was decreased by treatment with tunicamycin alone. Additionally, NE-100, a selective sigma-1 receptor antagonist, abolished the protective effect of imipramine against such tunicamycin-induced cell death. Imipramine inhibited the reduction of mitochondrial membrane potential induced by tunicamycin, and NE-100 blocked this modulating effect of imipramine. Furthermore, in anesthetized mice intracerebroventricular administration of tunicamycin decreased the number of neuronal cells in the hippocampus, particularly in the CA1 and dentate gyrus (DG) areas, and 7 days' imipramine treatment (10mg/kg/day; i.p.) significantly suppressed these reductions in CA1 and DG. These findings suggest that imipramine protects against ER stress-induced hippocampal neuronal cell death both in vitro and in vivo. Such protection may be partly due to the sigma-1 receptor.

  11. Activation of Transcription Factor MEF2D by Bis(3)-cognitin Protects Dopaminergic Neurons and Ameliorates Parkinsonian Motor Defects*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Lu; Li, Wenming; She, Hua; Dou, Juan; Jia, Leili; He, Yingli; Yang, Qian; Zhu, Jinqiu; Cápiro, Natalie L.; Walker, Douglas I.; Pennell, Kurt D.; Pang, Yuanping; Liu, Yong; Han, Yifan; Mao, Zixu

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is characterized by the selective demise of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the substantial nigra pars compacta. Dysregulation of transcriptional factor myocyte enhancer factor 2D (MEF2D) has been implicated in the pathogenic process in in vivo and in vitro models of PD. Here, we identified a small molecule bis(3)-cognitin (B3C) as a potent activator of MEF2D. We showed that B3C attenuated the toxic effects of neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+) by activating MEF2D via multiple mechanisms. B3C significantly reduced MPP+-induced oxidative stress and potentiated Akt to down-regulate the activity of MEF2 inhibitor glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) in a DA neuronal cell line SN4741. Furthermore, B3C effectively rescued MEF2D from MPP+-induced decline in both nucleic and mitochondrial compartments. B3C offered SN4741 cells potent protection against MPP+-induced apoptosis via MEF2D. Interestingly, B3C also protected SN4741 cells from wild type or mutant A53T α-synuclein-induced cytotoxicity. Using the in vivo PD model of C57BL/6 mice treated with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine hydrochloride (MPTP), we showed that B3C maintained redox homeostasis, promoted Akt function activity, and restored MEF2D level in midbrain neurons. Moreover, B3C greatly prevented the loss of tyrosine hydroxylase signal in substantial nigra pars compacta DA neurons and ameliorated behavioral impairments in mice treated with MPTP. Collectedly, our studies identified B3C as a potent neuroprotective agent whose effectiveness relies on its ability to effectively up-regulate MEF2D in DA neurons against toxic stress in models of PD in vitro and in vivo. PMID:22891246

  12. Activation of transcription factor MEF2D by bis(3)-cognitin protects dopaminergic neurons and ameliorates Parkinsonian motor defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Lu; Li, Wenming; She, Hua; Dou, Juan; Jia, Leili; He, Yingli; Yang, Qian; Zhu, Jinqiu; Cápiro, Natalie L; Walker, Douglas I; Pennell, Kurt D; Pang, Yuanping; Liu, Yong; Han, Yifan; Mao, Zixu

    2012-10-05

    Parkinson disease (PD) is characterized by the selective demise of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the substantial nigra pars compacta. Dysregulation of transcriptional factor myocyte enhancer factor 2D (MEF2D) has been implicated in the pathogenic process in in vivo and in vitro models of PD. Here, we identified a small molecule bis(3)-cognitin (B3C) as a potent activator of MEF2D. We showed that B3C attenuated the toxic effects of neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+)) by activating MEF2D via multiple mechanisms. B3C significantly reduced MPP(+)-induced oxidative stress and potentiated Akt to down-regulate the activity of MEF2 inhibitor glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) in a DA neuronal cell line SN4741. Furthermore, B3C effectively rescued MEF2D from MPP(+)-induced decline in both nucleic and mitochondrial compartments. B3C offered SN4741 cells potent protection against MPP(+)-induced apoptosis via MEF2D. Interestingly, B3C also protected SN4741 cells from wild type or mutant A53T α-synuclein-induced cytotoxicity. Using the in vivo PD model of C57BL/6 mice treated with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine hydrochloride (MPTP), we showed that B3C maintained redox homeostasis, promoted Akt function activity, and restored MEF2D level in midbrain neurons. Moreover, B3C greatly prevented the loss of tyrosine hydroxylase signal in substantial nigra pars compacta DA neurons and ameliorated behavioral impairments in mice treated with MPTP. Collectedly, our studies identified B3C as a potent neuroprotective agent whose effectiveness relies on its ability to effectively up-regulate MEF2D in DA neurons against toxic stress in models of PD in vitro and in vivo.

  13. Cannabidiol Exposure During Neuronal Differentiation Sensitizes Cells Against Redox-Active Neurotoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönhofen, Patrícia; de Medeiros, Liana M; Bristot, Ivi Juliana; Lopes, Fernanda M; De Bastiani, Marco A; Kapczinski, Flávio; Crippa, José Alexandre S; Castro, Mauro Antônio A; Parsons, Richard B; Klamt, Fábio

    2015-08-01

    Cannabidiol (CBD), one of the most abundant Cannabis sativa-derived compounds, has been implicated with neuroprotective effect in several human pathologies. Until now, no undesired side effects have been associated with CBD. In this study, we evaluated CBD's neuroprotective effect in terminal differentiation (mature) and during neuronal differentiation (neuronal developmental toxicity model) of the human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cell line. A dose-response curve was performed to establish a sublethal dose of CBD with antioxidant activity (2.5 μM). In terminally differentiated SH-SY5Y cells, incubation with 2.5 μM CBD was unable to protect cells against the neurotoxic effect of glycolaldehyde, methylglyoxal, 6-hydroxydopamine, and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Moreover, no difference in antioxidant potential and neurite density was observed. When SH-SY5Y cells undergoing neuronal differentiation were exposed to CBD, no differences in antioxidant potential and neurite density were observed. However, CBD potentiated the neurotoxicity induced by all redox-active drugs tested. Our data indicate that 2.5 μM of CBD, the higher dose tolerated by differentiated SH-SY5Y neuronal cells, does not provide neuroprotection for terminally differentiated cells and shows, for the first time, that exposure of CBD during neuronal differentiation could sensitize immature cells to future challenges with neurotoxins.

  14. Attenuation of oxidative neuronal cell death by coffee phenolic phytochemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Eun Sun; Jang, Young Jin [Department of Agricultural Biotechnology and Research Institute for Agriculture and Life Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-921 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Mun Kyung; Kang, Nam Joo [Department of Agricultural Biotechnology and Research Institute for Agriculture and Life Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-921 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Konkuk University, 1 Hwayang-dong, Gwangjin-gu, Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ki Won [Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Konkuk University, 1 Hwayang-dong, Gwangjin-gu, Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: kiwon@konkuk.ac.kr; Lee, Hyong Joo [Department of Agricultural Biotechnology and Research Institute for Agriculture and Life Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-921 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: leehyjo@snu.ac.kr

    2009-02-10

    Neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) are strongly associated with oxidative stress, which is induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS) including hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}). Recent studies suggest that moderate coffee consumption may reduce the risk of neurodegenerative diseases such as AD, but the molecular mechanisms underlying this effect remain to be clarified. In this study, we investigated the protective effects of chlorogenic acid (5-O-caffeoylquinic acid; CGA), a major phenolic phytochemical found in instant decaffeinated coffee (IDC), and IDC against oxidative PC12 neuronal cell death. IDC (1 and 5 {mu}g/ml) or CGA (1 and 5 {mu}M) attenuated H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced PC12 cell death. H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced nuclear condensation and DNA fragmentation were strongly inhibited by pretreatment with IDC or CGA. Pretreatment with IDC or CGA also inhibited the H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), and downregulation of Bcl-X{sub L} and caspase-3. The accumulation of intracellular ROS in H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-treated PC12 cells was dose-dependently diminished by IDC or CGA. The activation of c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in PC12 cells was also inhibited by IDC or CGA. Collectively, these results indicate that IDC and CGA protect PC12 cells from H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced apoptosis by blocking the accumulation of intracellular ROS and the activation of MAPKs.

  15. Cytotoxic effects of catechols to glial and neuronal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramon Santos El-Bachá

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Catechols are compounds that autoxidises under physiological conditions leading to the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS, semiquinones, and quinones. These molecules can be formed in organisms because of the metabolism of exogenous aromatic substances, such as benzene. However, there are several important endogenous catechols, which have physiological functions, such as catecholamines. Furthermore, several pharmacological agents are catechols, such as apomorphine, or can be metabolised to generate these compounds. In this presentation we will show that apomorphine can unspecifically bind to proteins during its autoxidation, a phenomenon that is inhibited by thiols. Brain endothelial cells and glial cells express xenobiotic-metabolising enzymes as components of the metabolic blood-brain barrier in an attempt to protect the central nervous system against drugs. Since UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (EC 2.4.1.17 are among these enzymes, we investigated the ability of brain microsomes to conjugate catechols with glucuronate. Despite the fact that 1-naphtol could be glucuronidated in the presence of brain cortex microsomes, the same was not observed for most of catechols that were tested. Therefore, this is not the main mechanism used to protect the brain against them. Indeed, catechols may inhibit other xenobiotic-metabolising enzymes. We showed that apomorphine inhibited the cytochrome P450-dependent dealkylation activity. The production of ROS and reactive quinones, as well as their effects on protein functions, seems to be involved in the cytotoxicity of catechols. Glial cells are more resistant than neuronal cells. Apomorphine was more toxic to rat neurons than to rat C6 glioma cells. 1,2-Dihydroxybenzene (catechol killed human GL-15 cells with an EC50 of 230 uM after 72 h, a effect that was significantly inhibited by superoxide dismutase (EC 1.15.1.1. Another mechanism that we found to be involved in catechol cytotoxicity is the inhibition

  16. Protective Effect of Interleukin-1β on Motor Neurons after Sciatic Nerve Injury in Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    翁雨雄; 巴拉特; 洪光祥; 王发斌; 陈振斌; 黄启顺

    2004-01-01

    Summary: Protective effect of interleukin-lβ (IL-1β) on motor neurons was studied after peripheral nerve injury. Twenty Wistar rats were divided into 2 groups randomly. The right sciatic nerve of each rat was resected. After silicon tubulization of sciatic nerve in rat, 15 μl 1 ng/ml IL-1β and PBS solution were injected into the silicon capsule respectively. Enzyme histochemistry was performed to show acetyle cholesterase (AchE) and nitric oxide staining (NOS) activity of spinal a motor neurons in spinal segments 2 weeks later. Neurons were counted and the diameter and cross sectional (c/s) area of neurons were analyzed by using computer image analysis system. The results showed that as compared with the normal side, both enzyme activities significantly changed in motor neurons in PBS group. The diameter and c/s area of both neurons changed significantly too (P<0.01). These results suggest that exogenous IL-1β protects a-motor neurons from degeneration and necrosis after peripheral nerve injury.

  17. Adipose tissue-derived stromal cells express neuronal phenotypes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨立业; 刘相名; 孙兵; 惠国桢; 费俭; 郭礼和

    2004-01-01

    Background Adipose tissue-derived stromal cells (ADSCs) can be greatly expanded in vitro, and induced to differentiate into multiple mesenchymal cell types, including osteogenic, chondrogenic, myogenic, and adipogenic cells. This study was designed to investigate the possibility of ADSCs differentiating into neurons.Methods Adipose tissue from rats was digested with collagenase, and adherent stromal cells were cultured. A medium containing a low concentration of fetal bovine serum was adopted to induce the cells to differentiate. ADSCs were identified by immunocytochemistry, and semi-quantitative RT-PCR was applied to detect mRNA expression of neurofilament 1 (NF1), nestin, and neuron-specific enolase (NSE).Results Nestin-positive cells were found occasionally among ADSCs. ADSCs were found to express NSE mRNA and nestin mRNA, but not NF1 mRNA. ADSCs could differentiate into neuron-like cells in a medium composed of a low concentration of fetal bovine serum, and these differentiated cells displayed complicated neuron-like morphologies.Conclusions The data support the hypothesis that adipose tissue contains stem cells capable of differentiating into neurons. These stem cells can overcome their mesenchymal commitment, and may represent an alternative autologous stem cell source for CNS cell transplantation.

  18. Curcumin protects nigral dopaminergic neurons by iron-chelation in the 6-hydroxydopamine rat model of Parkinson's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xi-Xun Du; Hua-Min Xu; Hong Jiang; Ning Song; Jun Wang; Jun-Xia Xie

    2012-01-01

    [Objective] Curcumin is a plant polyphenolic compound and a major component of spice turmeric (Curcuma longa).It has been reported to possess free radical-scavenging,iron-chelating,and anti-inflammatory properties in different tissues.Our previous study showed that curcumin protects MES23.5 dopaminergic cells from 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced neurotoxicity in vitro.The present study aimed to explore this neuroprotective effect in the 6-OHDAlesioned rat model of Parkinson's disease in vivo.[Methods] Rats were given intragastric curcumin for 24 days.6-OHDA lesioning was conducted on day 4 of curcumin treatment.Dopamine content was assessed by high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection,tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-containing neurons by immunohistochemistry,and iron-containing cells by Perls' iron staining.[Results] The dopamine content in the striatum and the number of THimmunoreactive neurons decreased after 6-OHDA treatment.Curcumin pretreatment reversed these changes.Further studies demonstrated that 6-OHDA treatment increased the number of iron-staining cells,which was dramatically decreased by curcumin pretreatment.[Conclusion]The protective effects of curcumin against 6-OHDA may be attributable to the ironchelating activity of curcumin to suppress the iron-induced degeneration of nigral dopaminergic neurons.

  19. Mouse bone marrow stromal cells differentiate to neuron-like cells upon inhibition of BMP signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Monika; Prashar, Paritosh; Yadav, Prem Swaroop; Sen, Jonaki

    2016-01-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) are a source of autologous stem cells that have the potential for undergoing differentiation into multiple cell types including neurons. Although the neuronal differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells has been studied for a long time, the molecular players involved are still not defined. Here we report that the genetic deletion of two members of the bone morphogenetic protein (Bmp) family, Bmp2 and Bmp4 in mouse BMSCs causes their differentiation into cells with neuron-like morphology. Surprisingly these cells expressed certain markers characteristic of both neuronal and glial cells. Based on this observation, we inhibited BMP signaling in mouse BMSCs through a brief exposure to Noggin protein which also led to their differentiation into cells expressing both neuronal and glial markers. Such cells seem to have the potential for further differentiation into subtypes of neuronal and glial cells and thus could be utilized for cell-based therapeutic applications.

  20. Pulsed Electromagnetic Field Exposure Reduces Hypoxia and Inflammation Damage in Neuron-Like and Microglial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincenzi, Fabrizio; Ravani, Annalisa; Pasquini, Silvia; Merighi, Stefania; Gessi, Stefania; Setti, Stefania; Cadossi, Ruggero; Borea, Pier Andrea; Varani, Katia

    2017-05-01

    In the present study, the effect of low-frequency, low-energy pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs) has been investigated by using different cell lines derived from neuron-like cells and microglial cells. In particular, the primary aim was to evaluate the effect of PEMF exposure in inflammation- and hypoxia-induced injury in two different neuronal cell models, the human neuroblastoma-derived SH-SY5Y cells and rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells and in N9 microglial cells. In neuron-like cells, live/dead and apoptosis assays were performed in hypoxia conditions from 2 to 48 h. Interestingly, PEMF exposure counteracted hypoxia damage significantly reducing cell death and apoptosis. In the same cell lines, PEMFs inhibited the activation of the hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α), the master transcriptional regulator of cellular response to hypoxia. The effect of PEMF exposure on reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in both neuron-like and microglial cells was investigated considering their key role in ischemic injury. PEMFs significantly decreased hypoxia-induced ROS generation in PC12, SH-SY5Y, and N9 cells after 24 or 48 h of incubation. Moreover, PEMFs were able to reduce some of the most well-known pro-inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and IL-8 release in N9 microglial cells stimulated with different concentrations of LPS for 24 or 48 h of incubation time. These results show a protective effect of PEMFs on hypoxia damage in neuron-like cells and an anti-inflammatory effect in microglial cells suggesting that PEMFs could represent a potential therapeutic approach in cerebral ischemic conditions. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 1200-1208, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Clinical implications of the involvement of tPA in neuronal cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsirka, S E

    1997-05-01

    Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), the serine protease that converts inactive plasminogen to the protease plasmin, was recently shown to mediate neurodegeneration in the mouse hippocampus. Mice deficient in tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) display a dramatic resistance to a paradigm of excitotoxic neuronal death that involves intrahippocampal injection of the excitotoxin. This model is thought to reproduce the mechanism of neuronal death observed during acute (such as ischemic stroke) and degenerative (such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis) diseases of the nervous system. The requirement for the proteolytic activity of tPA to mediate neuronal death is acute in the adult mouse. Serine protease inhibitors, specific for tPA or the tPA/plasmin proteolytic cascade, are effective in conferring extensive neuroprotection following the excitotoxic injection. These findings suggest possible new ways for interfering with the neuronal death observed in the hippocampus as a result of excitotoxicity. In addition, tPA is produced in the hippocampus primarily by microglial cells, which become activated in response to the neuronal injury. Blocking microglial activation has been shown in other injury paradigms to protect against neuronal death, therefore suggesting another way to retard neurodegeneration in the CNS. Furthermore, after the insult has been inflicted and in the presence of a compromised blood-brain barrier macrophages (cells deriving from the same lineage as microglia) migrate into the brain, where they are thought to contribute to the neuronal cell loss by secreting neurotoxic molecules. If these macrophages/microglia expressed, however, a tPA inhibitor, rather than the possibly neurotoxic tPA, they might be able to protect the neurons from dying.

  2. Protective role of melatonin in domoic acid-induced neuronal damage in the hippocampus of adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananth, C; Gopalakrishnakone, P; Kaur, C

    2003-01-01

    Domoic acid (DA), a kainite-receptor agonist and potent inducer of neurotoxicity, has been administered intravenously in adult rats in the present study (0.75 mg/kg body weight) to demonstrate neuronal degeneration followed by glial activation and their involvement with inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in the hippocampus. An equal volume of normal saline was administered in control rats. The pineal hormone melatonin, which protects the neurons efficiently against excitotoxicity mediated by sensitive glutamate receptor, was administered intraperitoneally (10 mg/kg body weight), 20 min before, immediately after, and 1 h and 2 h after the DA administration, to demonstrate its role in therapeutic strategy. Histopathological analysis (Nissl staining) demonstrated extensive neuronal damage in the pyramidal neurons of CA1, CA3 subfields and hilus of the dentate gyrus (DG) in the hippocampus at 5 days after DA administration. Sparsely distributed glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-immunoreactive astrocytes were observed in the hippocampus at 4-24 h after DA administration and in the control rats. Astrogliosis was evidenced by increased GFAP immunoreactivity in the areas of severe neuronal degeneration at 5 days after DA administration. Along with this, microglial cells exhibited an intense immunoreaction with OX-42, indicating upregulation of complement type 3 receptors (CR3). Ultrastructural study revealed swollen or shrunken degenerating neurons in the CA1, CA3 subfields and hilus of the DG and hypertrophied astrocytes showing accumulation of intermediate filament bundles in the cytoplasm were observed after administration of DA. Although no significant change could be observed in the mRNA level of iNOS expression between the DA-treated rats and controls at 4-24 h and at 5-day time intervals, double immunofluorescense revealed co-expression of induced iNOS with GFAP immunoreactive astrocytes, but not in the microglial cells, and iNOS expression in the neurons

  3. Neuro-protective effects of CNTF on hippocampal neurons via an unknown signal transduction pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    In our previous study, we proposed that there may be an unknown pathway in the upper stream of the known signal transduction pathway of Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) that mediates the neuro-protective function of CNTF. In the present experiment, we observed that the neuro-protective function of the non-classic signal transduction pathway in a L-NMDA (a glutamic acid ion type receptor atagonist) induced hippocampal neuron injury model, using primary culture rat hippocampal neurons, continuous photography and gp130 immunohistochemical assay. The results showed that L-NMDA induced injurious reaction of hippocampal neurons, and CNTF was able to inhibit the toxic action of L-NMDA on hippocampal neurons. Additionally, when JAK/STATs in the known classic signal transduction pathway of CNTF were blocked by PTPi-2, the protective effect of CNTF against L-NMDA injury still existed. L-NMDA caused a rapid increase in the concentration of hippocampal intracellular free [Ca2+]i. CNTF was able to attenuate L-NMDA-induced elevation of [Ca2+]i, and blocking JAK/STATs in the known classic signal trans- duction pathway of CNTF did not affect L-NMDA- induced elevation of [Ca2+]i, indicating that, apart from the known classic signal transduction pathway, there may be some other transduction pathways for CNTF to exert the protective effect on hippocampal neurons, and this pathway is related to [Ca2+].

  4. Are paradoxical cell cycle activities in neurons and glia related to the metabolic theory of Alzheimer's disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erol, Adnan

    2010-01-01

    The progression and outcome of neurological diseases are determined by the balance between neurodegeneration, neuroprotection, and neuroregeneration. In this context, astroglial cells are invariably involved in every kind of neuropathology. Mitotically, active glial cells provide metabolic support to active neurons, contribute to coupling between synaptic activity and local blood flow, and thus protect against oxidative stress. Disturbances of the complex neuron-glia interrelation are increasingly recognized as a potentially important pathophysiological mechanism in a wide variety of neurological disorders including those marked by neurodegeneration. Peripheral insulin resistance-mediated increased oxidative stress in glial cells, and consequent DNA damage, induces senescence in glial cells leads to the development of an inflammatory environment. The immune mediators released by senescent (activated) glial cells are considered to be neurotoxic and ultimately increase the oxidant load of neurons. While the neuron is viewed as the prototypical post-mitotic, fully differentiated cell, certain subsets of neurons reactivate cell-cycle activity in response to triggers of neuronal apoptosis, such as genotoxic stress generated by redox changes due to pathological alterations in supporting astroglial cells. Thus, a paradoxical cell cycle block in glial cells coupled with concomitant cell cycle re-entry in neurons (due to pathological alterations created by peripheral insulin resistance-induced neuroendocrine signaling changes) may cause neurodegeneration, such as seen in Alzheimer's disease.

  5. Phase II enzyme induction by a carotenoid, lutein, in a PC12D neuronal cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyake, Seiji [Laboratory of Retinal Cell Biology, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Department of Ophthalmology, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Wakasa Seikatsu Co., Ltd., 134 Chudoujiminami-cho, Shimogyo-ku, Kyoto 600-8813 (Japan); Kobayashi, Saori [Wakasa Seikatsu Co., Ltd., 134 Chudoujiminami-cho, Shimogyo-ku, Kyoto 600-8813 (Japan); Tsubota, Kazuo [Laboratory of Retinal Cell Biology, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Ozawa, Yoko, E-mail: ozawa@a5.keio.jp [Laboratory of Retinal Cell Biology, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Department of Ophthalmology, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan)

    2014-04-04

    Highlights: • Lutein reduced ROS levels in a PC12D neuronal cell line. • Lutein induced mRNAs of phase II antioxidative enzymes in PC12D neuronal cells. • Lutein increased protein levels of HO-1, SOD2, and NQO-1 in PC12D neuronal cells. • Lutein had no effect on intranuclear Nrf2 levels in PC12D neuronal cells. • Lutein did not activate potential upstream Nrf2 nuclear translocation pathways. - Abstract: The mechanism by which lutein, a carotenoid, acts as an antioxidant in retinal cells is still not fully understood. Here, lutein treatment of a neuronal cell line (PC12D) immediately resulted in reduced intracellular ROS levels, implying that it has a direct role in ROS scavenging. Significantly, lutein treatment also induced phase II antioxidative enzyme expression, probably via a nuclear factor-like 2 (Nrf2) independent pathway. This latter mechanism could explain why lutein acts diversely to protect against oxidative/cytotoxic stress, and why it is physiologically involved in the human neural tissue, such as the retina.

  6. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells stimulate proliferation and neuronal differentiation of retinal progenitor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Xia

    Full Text Available During retina development, retinal progenitor cell (RPC proliferation and differentiation are regulated by complex inter- and intracellular interactions. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs are reported to express a variety of cytokines and neurotrophic factors, which have powerful trophic and protective functions for neural tissue-derived cells. Here, we show that the expanded RPC cultures treated with BMSC-derived conditioned medium (CM which was substantially enriched for bFGF and CNTF, expressed clearly increased levels of nuclear receptor TLX, an essential regulator of neural stem cell (NSC self-renewal, as well as betacellulin (BTC, an EGF-like protein described as supporting NSC expansion. The BMSC CM- or bFGF-treated RPCs also displayed an obviously enhanced proliferation capability, while BMSC CM-derived bFGF knocked down by anti-bFGF, the effect of BMSC CM on enhancing RPC proliferation was partly reversed. Under differentiation conditions, treatment with BMSC CM or CNTF markedly favoured RPC differentiation towards retinal neurons, including Brn3a-positive retinal ganglion cells (RGCs and rhodopsin-positive photoreceptors, and clearly diminished retinal glial cell differentiation. These findings demonstrate that BMSCs supported RPC proliferation and neuronal differentiation which may be partly mediated by BMSC CM-derived bFGF and CNTF, reveal potential limitations of RPC culture systems, and suggest a means for optimizing RPC cell fate determination in vitro.

  7. Ginseng Rb fraction protects glia, neurons and cognitive function in a rat model of neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kangning; Zhang, Yufen; Wang, Yan; Ling, Peng; Xie, Xin; Jiang, Chenyao; Zhang, Zhizhen; Lian, Xiao-Yuan

    2014-01-01

    The loss and injury of neurons play an important role in the onset of various neurodegenerative diseases, while both microgliosis and astrocyte loss or dysfunction are significant causes of neuronal degeneration. Previous studies have suggested that an extract enriched panaxadiol saponins from ginseng has more neuroprotective potential than the total saponins of ginseng. The present study investigated whether a fraction of highly purified panaxadiol saponins (termed as Rb fraction) was protective for both glia and neurons, especially GABAergic interneurons, against kainic acid (KA)-induced excitotoxicity in rats. Rats received Rb fraction at 30 mg/kg (i.p.), 40 mg/kg (i.p. or saline followed 40 min later by an intracerebroventricular injection of KA. Acute hippocampal injury was determined at 48 h after KA, and impairment of hippocampus-dependent learning and memory as well as delayed neuronal injury was determined 16 to 21 days later. KA injection produced significant acute hippocampal injuries, including GAD67-positive GABAergic interneuron loss in CA1, paralbumin (PV)-positive GABAergic interneuron loss, pyramidal neuron degeneration and astrocyte damage accompanied with reactive microglia in both CA1 and CA3 regions of the hippocampus. There was also a delayed loss of GAD67-positive interneurons in CA1, CA3, hilus and dentate gyrus. Microgliosis also became more severe 21 days later. Accordingly, KA injection resulted in hippocampus-dependent spatial memory impairment. Interestingly, the pretreatment with Rb fraction at 30 or 40 mg/kg significantly protected the pyramidal neurons and GABAergic interneurons against KA-induced acute excitotoxicity and delayed injury. Rb fraction also prevented memory impairments and protected astrocytes from KA-induced acute excitotoxicity. Additionally, microglial activation, especially the delayed microgliosis, was inhibited by Rb fraction. Overall, this study demonstrated that Rb fraction protected both astrocytes and neurons

  8. Ginseng Rb fraction protects glia, neurons and cognitive function in a rat model of neurodegeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kangning Xu

    Full Text Available The loss and injury of neurons play an important role in the onset of various neurodegenerative diseases, while both microgliosis and astrocyte loss or dysfunction are significant causes of neuronal degeneration. Previous studies have suggested that an extract enriched panaxadiol saponins from ginseng has more neuroprotective potential than the total saponins of ginseng. The present study investigated whether a fraction of highly purified panaxadiol saponins (termed as Rb fraction was protective for both glia and neurons, especially GABAergic interneurons, against kainic acid (KA-induced excitotoxicity in rats. Rats received Rb fraction at 30 mg/kg (i.p., 40 mg/kg (i.p. or saline followed 40 min later by an intracerebroventricular injection of KA. Acute hippocampal injury was determined at 48 h after KA, and impairment of hippocampus-dependent learning and memory as well as delayed neuronal injury was determined 16 to 21 days later. KA injection produced significant acute hippocampal injuries, including GAD67-positive GABAergic interneuron loss in CA1, paralbumin (PV-positive GABAergic interneuron loss, pyramidal neuron degeneration and astrocyte damage accompanied with reactive microglia in both CA1 and CA3 regions of the hippocampus. There was also a delayed loss of GAD67-positive interneurons in CA1, CA3, hilus and dentate gyrus. Microgliosis also became more severe 21 days later. Accordingly, KA injection resulted in hippocampus-dependent spatial memory impairment. Interestingly, the pretreatment with Rb fraction at 30 or 40 mg/kg significantly protected the pyramidal neurons and GABAergic interneurons against KA-induced acute excitotoxicity and delayed injury. Rb fraction also prevented memory impairments and protected astrocytes from KA-induced acute excitotoxicity. Additionally, microglial activation, especially the delayed microgliosis, was inhibited by Rb fraction. Overall, this study demonstrated that Rb fraction protected both

  9. Specification of Region-Specific Neurons Including Forebrain Glutamatergic Neurons from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

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    Martins-Taylor, Kristen; Wang, Xiaofang; Zhang, Zheng; Park, Jung Woo; Zhan, Shuning; Kronenberg, Mark S.; Lichtler, Alexander; Liu, Hui-Xia; Chen, Fang-Ping; Yue, Lixia; Li, Xue-Jun; Xu, Ren-He

    2010-01-01

    Background Directed differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC) into functional, region-specific neural cells is a key step to realizing their therapeutic promise to treat various neural disorders, which awaits detailed elucidation. Methodology/Principal Findings We analyzed neural differentiation from various hiPSC lines generated by others and ourselves. Although heterogeneity in efficiency of neuroepithelial (NE) cell differentiation was observed among different hiPSC lines, the NE differentiation process resembles that from human embryonic stem cells (hESC) in morphology, timing, transcriptional profile, and requirement for FGF signaling. NE cells differentiated from hiPSC, like those from hESC, can also form rostral phenotypes by default, and form the midbrain or spinal progenitors upon caudalization by morphogens. The rostrocaudal neural progenitors can further mature to develop forebrain glutamatergic projection neurons, midbrain dopaminergic neurons, and spinal motor neurons, respectively. Typical ion channels and action potentials were recorded in the hiPSC-derived neurons. Conclusions/Significance Our results demonstrate that hiPSC, regardless of how they were derived, can differentiate into a spectrum of rostrocaudal neurons with functionality, which supports the considerable value of hiPSC for study and treatment of patient-specific neural disorders. PMID:20686615

  10. Specification of region-specific neurons including forebrain glutamatergic neurons from human induced pluripotent stem cells.

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    Hui Zeng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Directed differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC into functional, region-specific neural cells is a key step to realizing their therapeutic promise to treat various neural disorders, which awaits detailed elucidation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We analyzed neural differentiation from various hiPSC lines generated by others and ourselves. Although heterogeneity in efficiency of neuroepithelial (NE cell differentiation was observed among different hiPSC lines, the NE differentiation process resembles that from human embryonic stem cells (hESC in morphology, timing, transcriptional profile, and requirement for FGF signaling. NE cells differentiated from hiPSC, like those from hESC, can also form rostral phenotypes by default, and form the midbrain or spinal progenitors upon caudalization by morphogens. The rostrocaudal neural progenitors can further mature to develop forebrain glutamatergic projection neurons, midbrain dopaminergic neurons, and spinal motor neurons, respectively. Typical ion channels and action potentials were recorded in the hiPSC-derived neurons. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results demonstrate that hiPSC, regardless of how they were derived, can differentiate into a spectrum of rostrocaudal neurons with functionality, which supports the considerable value of hiPSC for study and treatment of patient-specific neural disorders.

  11. Progranulin is expressed within motor neurons and promotes neuronal cell survival

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    Kay Denis G

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Progranulin is a secreted high molecular weight growth factor bearing seven and one half copies of the cysteine-rich granulin-epithelin motif. While inappropriate over-expression of the progranulin gene has been associated with many cancers, haploinsufficiency leads to atrophy of the frontotemporal lobes and development of a form of dementia (frontotemporal lobar degeneration with ubiquitin positive inclusions, FTLD-U associated with the formation of ubiquitinated inclusions. Recent reports indicate that progranulin has neurotrophic effects, which, if confirmed would make progranulin the only neuroprotective growth factor that has been associated genetically with a neurological disease in humans. Preliminary studies indicated high progranulin gene expression in spinal cord motor neurons. However, it is uncertain what the role of Progranulin is in normal or diseased motor neuron function. We have investigated progranulin gene expression and subcellular localization in cultured mouse embryonic motor neurons and examined the effect of progranulin over-expression and knockdown in the NSC-34 immortalized motor neuron cell line upon proliferation and survival. Results In situ hybridisation and immunohistochemical techniques revealed that the progranulin gene is highly expressed by motor neurons within the mouse spinal cord and in primary cultures of dissociated mouse embryonic spinal cord-dorsal root ganglia. Confocal microscopy coupled to immunocytochemistry together with the use of a progranulin-green fluorescent protein fusion construct revealed progranulin to be located within compartments of the secretory pathway including the Golgi apparatus. Stable transfection of the human progranulin gene into the NSC-34 motor neuron cell line stimulates the appearance of dendritic structures and provides sufficient trophic stimulus to survive serum deprivation for long periods (up to two months. This is mediated at least in part through

  12. Independent controls for neocortical neuron production and histogenetic cell death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verney, C.; Takahashi, T.; Bhide, P. G.; Nowakowski, R. S.; Caviness, V. S. Jr

    2000-01-01

    We estimated the proportion of cells eliminated by histogenetic cell death during the first 2 postnatal weeks in areas 1, 3 and 40 of the mouse parietal neocortex. For each layer and for the subcortical white matter in each neocortical area, the number of dying cells per mm(2) was calculated and the proportionate cell death for each day of the 2-week interval was estimated. The data show that cell death proceeds essentially uniformly across the neocortical areas and layers and that it does not follow either the spatiotemporal gradient of cell cycle progression in the pseudostratified ventricular epithelium of the cerebral wall, the source of neocortical neurons, or the 'inside-out' neocortical neuronogenetic sequence. Therefore, we infer that the control mechanisms of neocortical histogenetic cell death are independent of mechanisms controlling neuronogenesis or neuronal migration but may be associated with the ingrowth, expansion and a system-wide matching of neuronal connectivity. Copyright 2000 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Dihydromyricetin protects neurons in an MPTP-induced model of Parkinson's disease by suppressing glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhao-xiang; Zhao, Ya-fei; Cao, Ting; Zhen, Xue-chu

    2016-01-01

    Aim: It is general believed that mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress play critical roles in the pathology of Parkinson's disease (PD). Dihydromyricetin (DHM), a natural flavonoid extracted from Ampelopsis grossedentata, has recently been found to elicit potent anti-oxidative effects. In the present study, we explored the role of DHM in protecting dopaminergic neurons. Methods: Male C57BL/6 mice were intraperitoneally injected with 1-methyl4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) for 7 d to induce PD. Additionally, mice were treated with either 5 or 10 mg/kg DHM for a total of 13 d (3 d before the start of MPTP, during MPTP administration (7 d) and 3 d after the end of MPTP). For the saline or DHM alone treatment groups, mice were injected with saline or DHM for 13 d. On d 14, behavioral tests (locomotor activity, the rotarod test and the pole test) were administered. After the behavioral tests, the mice were sacrificed, and brain tissue was collected for immunofluorescence staining and Western blotting. In addition, MES23.5 cells were treated with MPP+ and DHM, and evaluated using cell viability assays, reactive oxygen species (ROS) measurements, apoptosis analysis and Western blotting. Results: DHM significantly attenuated MPTP-induced mouse behavioral impairments and dopaminergic neuron loss. In the MES23.5 cells, DHM attenuated MPP+-induced cell injury and ROS production in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, DHM increased glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta phosphorylation in a dose- and time-dependent manner, which may be associated with DHM-induced dopaminergic neuronal protection. Conclusion: The present study demonstrated that DHM is a potent neuroprotective agent for DA neurons by modulating the Akt/GSK-3β pathway, which suggests that DHM may be a promising therapeutic candidate for PD. PMID:27374489

  14. Citalopram increases the differentiation efifcacy of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells into neuronal-like cells

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    Javad Verdi; Seyed Abdolreza Mortazavi-Tabatabaei; Shiva Sharif; Hadi Verdi; Alireza Shoae-Hassani

    2014-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressants can promote neuronal cell proliferation and enhance neuroplasticity both in vitro and in vivo. It is hypothesized that citalopram, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, can promote the neuronal differentiation of adult bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. Citalopram strongly enhanced neuronal characteristics of the cells derived from bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. The rate of cell death was decreased in citalopram-treated bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells than in control cells in neurobasal medium. In addition, the cumulative population doubling level of the citalopram-treated cells was signiifcantly increased compared to that of control cells. Also BrdU incorporation was elevated in citalopram-treated cells. These ifndings suggest that citalopram can improve the neuronal-like cell differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells by increasing cell proliferation and survival while maintaining their neuronal characteristics.

  15. Sensory neurons do not induce motor neuron loss in a human stem cell model of spinal muscular atrophy.

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    Schwab, Andrew J; Ebert, Allison D

    2014-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive disorder leading to paralysis and early death due to reduced SMN protein. It is unclear why there is such a profound motor neuron loss, but recent evidence from fly and mouse studies indicate that cells comprising the whole sensory-motor circuit may contribute to motor neuron dysfunction and loss. Here, we used induced pluripotent stem cells derived from SMA patients to test whether sensory neurons directly contribute to motor neuron loss. We generated sensory neurons from SMA induced pluripotent stem cells and found no difference in neuron generation or survival, although there was a reduced calcium response to depolarizing stimuli. Using co-culture of SMA induced pluripotent stem cell derived sensory neurons with control induced pluripotent stem cell derived motor neurons, we found no significant reduction in motor neuron number or glutamate transporter boutons on motor neuron cell bodies or neurites. We conclude that SMA sensory neurons do not overtly contribute to motor neuron loss in this human stem cell system.

  16. Sambucus williamsii induced embryonic stem cells differentiated into neurons.

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    Liu, Shih-Ping; Hsu, Chien-Yu; Fu, Ru-Huei; Huang, Yu-Chuen; Chen, Shih-Yin; Lin, Shinn-Zong; Shyu, Woei-Cherng

    2015-01-01

    The pluripotent stem cells, including embryonic stem cells (ESCs), are capable of self-renewal and differentiation into any cell type, thus making them the focus of many clinical application studies. However, the efficiency of ESCs differentiated into neurons needs to improve. In this study, we tried to increase efficiently to a neural fate in the presence of various transitional Chinese medicines through a three-step differentiation strategy. From extracts of 10 transitional Chinese medicine candidates, we determined that Sambucus williamsii (SW) extract triggers the up-regulation of Nestin and Tuj1 (neuron cells markers) gene expression levels. After determining the different concentrations of SW extract, the number of neurons in the 200 μg/ml SW extract group was higher than the control, 50, 100, and 400 μg/ml SW extract groups. In addition, the number of neurons in the 200 μg/ml SW extract group was higher and higher after each time passage (three times). We also detected the Oct4, Sox2 (stem cells markers), Tuj1, and Nestin genes expression levels by RT-PCR. In the differentiated process, Oct4 and Sox2 genes decreased while the Tuj1 and Nestin genes expression levels increased. In summary, we demonstrated that SW could induce pluripotent stem cells differentiated into neurons. Thus, SW might become a powerful material for neurons-differentiating strategies.

  17. The protective role of ascorbic acid on hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons in a rat model of maternal lead exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepehri, Hamid; Ganji, Farzaneh

    2016-07-01

    Oxidative stress is a major pathogenic mechanism of lead neurotoxicity. The antioxidant ascorbic acid protects hippocampal pyramidal neurons against cell death during congenital lead exposure; however, critical functions like synaptic transmission, integration, and plasticity depend on preservation of dendritic and somal morphology. This study was designed to examine if ascorbic acid also protects neuronal morphology during developmental lead exposure. Timed pregnant rats were divided into four treatment groups: (1) control, (2) 100mg/kg ascorbic acid once a day via gavage, (3) 0.05% lead acetate in drinking water, and (4) 0.05% lead+100mg/kg oral ascorbic acid. Brains of eight male pups (P25) per treatment group were processed for Golgi staining. Changes in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons' somal size were estimated by cross-sectional area and changes in dendritic arborization by Sholl's analysis. One-way ANOVA was used to compare results among treatment groups. Lead-exposed pups exhibited a significant decrease in somal size compared to controls (Pascorbic acid. Sholl's analysis revealed a significant increase in apical dendritic branch points near cell body (PAscorbic acid significantly but only partially reversed the somal and dendritic damage caused by developmental lead exposure. Oxidative stress thus contributes to lead neurotoxicity but other pathogenic mechanisms are also involved.

  18. Use of RNAi silencing to target preconditioned glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor in neuronal apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongliang Guo; Zhongxin Xu; Xinhua Li; Jing Mang; Ying Xing; Jinting He; Guihua Xu; Shijun Yan; Lifeng Liu; Chunli Mei

    2011-01-01

    Several studies have suggested that exogenous glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor may protect neurons from cerebral ischemic injury. However, the mechanisms underlying the neuroprotective effects of endogenous glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor remain unclear. The present experiments sought to elucidate the influence of various conditioned media on neuronal apoptosis, using a normal culture medium for astrocytes, an astrocyte medium highly expressing glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor, and an astrocyte medium in which glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor expression was silenced using RNAi technology. The results confirmed that the use of RNAi silencing to target pretreated glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor expression promoted neuronal apoptosis. In addition, oxygen and glucose deprivation preconditioning was found to upregulate glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor expression, and significantly reduce neuronal apoptosis.

  19. Protective effect of Angelica sinensis on cerebral neurons from rat embryos under hypoxia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuling Wu; Hongxian Zhao; Hong Yu

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The enhanced expression of c-Fos protein in nerve cells after hypoxia is the marker for converting extracellular hypoxia information to intracellular changes at hypoxia, and it is suspected that the increase of c-Fos protein can lead to the synthesis and excretion of related neurotrophic factor and nerve growth factor. However, it is still unclear what functional changes of nerve cells are induced by the increase of c-Fos protein at hypoxia, and whether it is good for the survival of damaged neurons.OBJECTIVE: To observe the expression of c-Fos in the cerebral neurons from embryos of rats with hypoxia in uterus, and investigate the pathway for the protective effect of Angelica sinensis injection on the cerebral neurons from rat embryos under hypoxia.DESIGN: A completely randomized controlled study.SETTING: Department of Histology and Embryology, Luzhou Medical College.MATERIALS: Twelve female Wistar rats in oestrum and 1 male adult Wistar rat with body mass of 220 to 250 g were selected. Rabbit-anti-rat neuro-specific enolase (NSE) and rabbit-anti-rat c-Fos were purchased from Wuhan Boster Biological Technology Co., Ltd.; Double-staining kit was bought from Beijing Zhongshan Golden Bridge Biotechnology Co., Ltd. Angelica sinensis injection was produced by the Department of Pharmacy, the Second Affiliated Hospital of Hubei Medical University.METHODS: The experiments were completed in the experimental animal center and the Department of Histology and Embryology of Luzhou Medical College from December 2004 to December 2005. ① Twelve adult female Wistar rats in oestrum and 1 male Wistar rat were housed in one rearing cage. The appearance of vaginal embolus at 8:00 in the next morning was recorded as 0 day of pregnancy and the rats were recorded for 15 days, and they were divided randomly into three groups, control group (n =4), hypoxia group (n =4)and Angelica group (n =4). The pregnant rats in the hypoxia group were firstly injected with saline (8 m

  20. The Endogenous Hallucinogen and Trace Amine N,N-Dimethyltryptamine (DMT) Displays Potent Protective Effects against Hypoxia via Sigma-1 Receptor Activation in Human Primary iPSC-Derived Cortical Neurons and Microglia-Like Immune Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabo, Attila; Kovacs, Attila; Riba, Jordi; Djurovic, Srdjan; Rajnavolgyi, Eva; Frecska, Ede

    2016-01-01

    N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) is a potent endogenous hallucinogen present in the brain of humans and other mammals. Despite extensive research, its physiological role remains largely unknown. Recently, DMT has been found to activate the sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1R), an intracellular chaperone fulfilling an interface role between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria. It ensures the correct transmission of ER stress into the nucleus resulting in the enhanced production of antistress and antioxidant proteins. Due to this function, the activation of Sig-1R can mitigate the outcome of hypoxia or oxidative stress. In this paper, we aimed to test the hypothesis that DMT plays a neuroprotective role in the brain by activating the Sig-1R. We tested whether DMT can mitigate hypoxic stress in in vitro cultured human cortical neurons (derived from induced pluripotent stem cells, iPSCs), monocyte-derived macrophages (moMACs), and dendritic cells (moDCs). Results showed that DMT robustly increases the survival of these cell types in severe hypoxia (0.5% O2) through the Sig-1R. Furthermore, this phenomenon is associated with the decreased expression and function of the alpha subunit of the hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) suggesting that DMT-mediated Sig-1R activation may alleviate hypoxia-induced cellular stress and increase survival in a HIF-1-independent manner. Our results reveal a novel and important role of DMT in human cellular physiology. We postulate that this compound may be endogenously generated in situations of stress, ameliorating the adverse effects of hypoxic/ischemic insult to the brain.

  1. The endogenous hallucinogen and trace amine N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT displays potent protective effects against hypoxia via sigma-1 receptor activation in human primary iPSC-derived cortical neurons and microglia-like immune cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attila Szabo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT is a potent endogenous hallucinogen present in the brain of humans and other mammals. Despite extensive research, its physiological role remains largely unknown. Recently, DMT has been found to activate the sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1R, an intracellular chaperone fulfilling an interface role between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER and mitochondria. It ensures the correct transmission of ER stress into the nucleus resulting in the enhanced production of antistress and antioxidant proteins. Due to this function, the activation of Sig-1R can mitigate the outcome of hypoxia or oxidative stress. In this paper we aimed to test the hypothesis that DMT plays a neuroprotective role in the brain by activating the Sig-1R. We tested whether DMT can mitigate hypoxic stress in in vitro cultured human cortical neurons (derived from induced pluripotent stem cells, and in monocyte-derived macrophages and dendritic cells. Here we report that DMT robustly increases the survival of these cell types in severe hypoxia (0.5% O2 through the Sig-1R. Furthermore, this phenomenon is associated with the decreased expression and function of the alpha subunit of the hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1 suggesting that DMT-mediated Sig-1R activation may alleviate hypoxia-induced cellular stress and increase survival in a HIF-1-independent manner. Our results reveal a novel and important role of DMT in human cellular physiology. We postulate that this compound may be endogenously generated in situations of stress, ameliorating the adverse effects of hypoxic/ischemic insult to the brain.

  2. D609 induces vascular endothelial cells and marrow stromal cells differentiation into neuron-like cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nan WANG; Chun-qing DU; Shao-shan WANG; Kun XIE; Shang-li ZHANG; Jun-ying MIAO

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of tricyclodecane-9-yl-xanthogenate (D609) on cell differentiation in vascular endothelial cells (VECs) and marrow stromal cells (MSCs). METHODS: Morphological changes were observed under phase contrast microscope. Electron microscope and immunostaining were used for VECs identification. The expressions of neuron-specific enolase (NSE) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) were examined by immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: After 6 h of induction with D609, some VECs showed morphological changes characteristic of neurones. 9 h later, more VECs became neuron-like cells. About 30.8 % of VECs displayed positive NSE (P<0.01), while the expression of GFAP was negative. When MSCs were exposed to D609, the cells displayed neuronal morphologies, such as pyramidal cell bodies and processes formed extensive networks at 3 h. 6 h later, almost all of the cells exhibited a typical neuronal appearance, and 85.6 % of MSCs displayed intensive positive NSE, but GFAP did not express. CONCLUSION: D609 induces VECs and MSCs differentiation into neuron-like cells.

  3. Rutin attenuates ethanol-induced neurotoxicity in hippocampal neuronal cells by increasing aldehyde dehydrogenase 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kibbeum; Kim, Sokho; Na, Ji-Young; Park, Jong-Heum; Kim, Jae-Kyung; Kim, Jae-Hun; Kwon, Jungkee

    2014-10-01

    Rutin is derived from buckwheat, apples, and black tea. It has been shown to have beneficial anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects. Ethanol is a central nervous system depressant and neurotoxin. Its metabolite, acetaldehyde, is critically toxic. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) metabolizes acetaldehyde into nontoxic acetate. This study examined rutin's effects on ALDH2 activity in hippocampal neuronal cells (HT22 cells). Rutin's protective effects against acetaldehyde-based ethanol neurotoxicity were confirmed. Daidzin, an ALDH2 inhibitor, was used to clarify the mechanisms of rutin's protective effects. Cell viability was significantly increased after rutin treatment. Rutin significantly reversed ethanol-increased Bax, cytochrome c expression and caspase 3 activity, and decreased Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL protein expression in HT22 cells. Interestingly, rutin increased ALDH2 expression, while daidzin reversed this beneficial effect. Thus, this study demonstrates rutin protects HT22 cells against ethanol-induced neurotoxicity by increasing ALDH2 activity.

  4. Protective Effects of Hericium erinaceus Mycelium and Its Isolated Erinacine A against Ischemia-Injury-Induced Neuronal Cell Death via the Inhibition of iNOS/p38 MAPK and Nitrotyrosine

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    Kam-Fai Lee

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Hericium erinaceus, an edible mushroom, has been demonstrated to potentiate the effects of numerous biological activities. The aim of this study was to investigate whether H. erinaceus mycelium could act as an anti-inflammatory agent to bring about neuroprotection using a model of global ischemic stroke and the mechanisms involved. Rats were treated with H. erinaceus mycelium and its isolated diterpenoid derivative, erinacine A, after ischemia reperfusion brain injuries caused by the occlusion of the two common carotid arteries. The production of inflammatory cytokines in serum and the infracted volume of the brain were measured. The proteins from the stroke animal model (SAM were evaluated to determine the effect of H. erinaceus mycelium. H. erinaceus mycelium reduced the total infarcted volumes by 22% and 44% at a concentration of 50 and 300 mg/kg, respectively, compared to the SAM group. The levels of acute inflammatory cytokines, including interleukin-1β, interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor á, were all reduced by erinacine A. Levels of nitrotyrosine-containing proteins, phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and CCAAT enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP and homologous protein (CHOP expression were attenuated by erinacine A. Moreover, the modulation of ischemia injury factors present in the SAM model by erinacine A seemed to result in the suppression of reactive nitrogen species and the downregulation of inducible NO synthase (iNOS, p38 MAPK and CHOP. These findings confirm the nerve-growth properties of Hericium erinaceus mycelium, which include the prevention of ischemic injury to neurons; this protective effect seems to be involved in the in vivo activity of iNOS, p38 MAPK and CHOP.

  5. Direct reprogramming of somatic cells into neural stem cells or neurons for neurological disorders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shaoping Hou; Paul Lu

    2016-01-01

    Direct reprogramming of somatic cells into neurons or neural stem cells is one of the most important fron-tier ifelds in current neuroscience research. Without undergoing the pluripotency stage, induced neurons or induced neural stem cells are a safer and timelier manner resource in comparison to those derived from induced pluripotent stem cells. In this prospective, we review the recent advances in generation of induced neurons and induced neural stem cellsin vitro andin vivo and their potential treatments of neurological disorders.

  6. Tat-HSP22 inhibits oxidative stress-induced hippocampal neuronal cell death by regulation of the mitochondrial pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Hyo Sang; Kim, Dae Won; Shin, Min Jea; Cho, Su Bin; Park, Jung Hwan; Lee, Chi Hern; Yeo, Eun Ji; Choi, Yeon Joo; Yeo, Hyeon Ji; Sohn, Eun Jeong; Son, Ora; Cho, Sung-Woo; Kim, Duk-Soo; Yu, Yeon Hee; Lee, Keun Wook; Park, Jinseu; Eum, Won Sik; Choi, Soo Young

    2017-01-04

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in the progression of various neuronal diseases including ischemia. Heat shock protein 22 (HSP22) is known to protect cells against oxidative stress. However, the protective effects and mechanisms of HSP22 in hippocampal neuronal cells under oxidative stress remain unknown. In this study, we determined whether HSP22 protects against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced oxidative stress in HT-22 using Tat-HSP22 fusion protein. We found that Tat-HSP22 transduced into HT-22 cells and that H2O2-induced cell death, oxidative stress, and DNA damage were significantly reduced by Tat-HSP22. In addition, Tat-HSP22 markedly inhibited H2O2-induced mitochondrial membrane potential, cytochrome c release, cleaved caspase-3, and Bax expression levels, while Bcl-2 expression levels were increased in HT-22 cells. Further, we showed that Tat-HSP22 transduced into animal brain and inhibited cleaved-caspase-3 expression levels as well as significantly inhibited hippocampal neuronal cell death in the CA1 region of animals in the ischemic animal model. In the present study, we demonstrated that transduced Tat-HSP22 attenuates oxidative stress-induced hippocampal neuronal cell death through the mitochondrial signaling pathway and plays a crucial role in inhibiting neuronal cell death, suggesting that Tat-HSP22 protein may be used to prevent oxidative stress-related brain diseases including ischemia.

  7. Optical imaging for stem cell differentiation to neuronal lineage.

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    Hwang, Do Won; Lee, Dong Soo

    2012-03-01

    In regenerative medicine, the prospect of stem cell therapy holds great promise for the recovery of injured tissues and effective treatment of intractable diseases. Tracking stem cell fate provides critical information to understand and evaluate the success of stem cell therapy. The recent emergence of in vivo noninvasive molecular imaging has enabled assessment of the behavior of grafted stem cells in living subjects. In this review, we provide an overview of current optical imaging strategies based on cell- or tissue-specific reporter gene expression and of in vivo methods to monitor stem cell differentiation into neuronal lineages. These methods use optical reporters either regulated by neuron-specific promoters or containing neuron-specific microRNA binding sites. Both systems revealed dramatic changes in optical reporter imaging signals in cells differentiating into a neuronal lineage. The detection limit of weak promoters or reporter genes can be greatly enhanced by adopting a yeast GAL4 amplification system or an engineering-enhanced luciferase reporter gene. Furthermore, we propose an advanced imaging system to monitor neuronal differentiation during neurogenesis that uses in vivo multiplexed imaging techniques capable of detecting several targets simultaneously.

  8. 14,15-EET promotes mitochondrial biogenesis and protects cortical neurons against oxygen/glucose deprivation-induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lai; Chen, Man; Yuan, Lin; Xiang, Yuting; Zheng, Ruimao; Zhu, Shigong

    2014-07-18

    14,15-Epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (14,15-EET), a metabolite of arachidonic acid, is enriched in the brain cortex and exerts protective effect against neuronal apoptosis induced by ischemia/reperfusion. Although apoptosis has been well recognized to be closely associated with mitochondrial biogenesis and function, it is still unclear whether the neuroprotective effect of 14,15-EET is mediated by promotion of mitochondrial biogenesis and function in cortical neurons under the condition of oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD). In this study, we found that 14,15-EET improved cell viability and inhibited apoptosis of cortical neurons. 14,15-EET significantly increased the mitochondrial mass and the ratio of mitochondrial DNA to nuclear DNA. Key makers of mitochondrial biogenesis, peroxisome proliferator activator receptor gamma-coactivator 1 alpha (PGC-1α), nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF-1) and mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM), were elevated at both mRNA and protein levels in the cortical neurons treated with 14,15-EET. Moreover, 14,15-EET markedly attenuated the decline of mitochondrial membrane potential, reduced ROS, while increased ATP synthesis. Knockdown of cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB) by siRNA blunted the up-regulation of PGC-1α and NRF-1 stimulated by 14,15-EET, and consequently abolished the neuroprotective effect of 14,15-EET. Our results indicate that 14,15-EET protects neurons from OGD-induced apoptosis by promoting mitochondrial biogenesis and function through CREB mediated activation of PGC-1α and NRF-1.

  9. Sulforaphane protects primary cultures of cortical neurons against injury induced by oxygen-glucose deprivation/reoxygenation via antiapoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuemei Wu; Jing Zhao; Shanshan Yu; Yanlin Chen; Jingxian Wu; Yong Zhao

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine whether sulforaphane (SFN) protects neurons against injury caused by oxygenglucose deprivation/reoxygenation (OGD/R) and,if so,to investigate the possible mechanisms.Methods Primary cultures of neurons were prepared from the cerebral cortex of 1-day-old Sprague-Dawley rats.On days 5-6 in vitro,the neurons were exposed to OGD for 1 h,followed by reoxygenation for 24 h.Cells were treated with 0,0.1,0.2,0.5,1,2.5,or 5 μmol/L SFN,with or without 10 μmol/L LY294002,a PI3K-specific inhibitor,during OGD/R (a total of 25 h).After 24-h reoxygenation,MTT was used to assess viability and injury was assessed by Hoechst 33258/propidium iodide (PI) staining;immunofluorescence staining and Western blot were performed to detect molecular events associated with apoptosis.Results The MTT assay showed that 1 μmol/L SFN significantly increased viability,and Hoechst 33258/PI staining showed that the numbers of injured neurons were reduced significantly in the SFN group.Furthermore,immunofluorescence staining and Westem blot showed that SFN increased Bcl-2 and decreased cleaved caspase-3 levels.Moreover,LY294002 inhibited the phosphorylated-Akt expression evoked by SFN,decreased Bcl-2 expression and increased cleaved caspase-3 expression.Conclusion SFN protects neurons against injury from OGD/R and this effect may be partly associated with an antiapoptosis pathway.

  10. Mitochondrial Protection by Exogenous Otx2 in Mouse Retinal Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyoung-Tai Kim

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available OTX2 (orthodenticle homeobox 2 haplodeficiency causes diverse defects in mammalian visual systems ranging from retinal dysfunction to anophthalmia. We find that the retinal dystrophy of Otx2+/GFP heterozygous knockin mice is mainly due to the loss of bipolar cells and consequent deficits in retinal activity. Among bipolar cell types, OFF-cone bipolar subsets, which lack autonomous Otx2 gene expression but receive Otx2 proteins from photoreceptors, degenerate most rapidly in Otx2+/GFP mouse retinas, suggesting a neuroprotective effect of the imported Otx2 protein. In support of this hypothesis, retinal dystrophy in Otx2+/GFP mice is prevented by intraocular injection of Otx2 protein, which localizes to the mitochondria of bipolar cells and facilitates ATP synthesis as a part of mitochondrial ATP synthase complex. Taken together, our findings demonstrate a mitochondrial function for Otx2 and suggest a potential therapeutic application of OTX2 protein delivery in human retinal dystrophy.

  11. Concentration-Dependent Dual Role of Thrombin In Protection of Cultured Rat Cortical Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Paul S.; Ciavatta, Vincent T.; Fidler, Jonathan A.; Woodbury, Anna; Levy, Jerrold H.; Tyor, William R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Thrombin’s role in the nervous system is not well understood. Under conditions of blood-brain barrier compromise (e.g., neurosurgery or stroke), thrombin can result in neuroapoptosis and the formation of glial scars. Despite this, preconditioning with thrombin has been found to be neuroprotective in models of cerebral ischemia and intracerebral hemorrhage. Methods We investigated the effects of physiologically relevant concentrations of thrombin on cortical neurons using two culture-based assays. We examined thrombin’s effect on neurites by quantitative analysis of fluorescently labeled neurons. To characterize thrombin’s effects on neuron survival, we spectrophotometrically measured changes in enzymatic activity. Using receptor agonists and thrombin inhibitors, we separately examined the role of thrombin and its receptor in neuroprotection. Results We found that low concentrations of thrombin (1 nM) enhances neurite growth and branching, neuron viability, and protects against excitotoxic damage. In contrast, higher concentrations of thrombin (100 nM) are potentially detrimental to neuronal health as evidenced by inhibition of neurite growth. Lower concentrations of thrombin resulted in equivalent neuroprotection as the antifibrinolytic, aprotinin, and the direct thrombin inhibitor, argatroban. Interestingly, exogenous application of the species-specific thrombin inhibitor, antithrombin III, was detrimental to neuronal health; suggesting that some endogenous thrombin is necessary for optimal neuron health in our culture system. Activation of the thrombin receptor, protease-activated receptor - 1 (PAR-1), via micromolar concentrations of the thrombin receptor agonist peptide, TRAP, did not adversely affect neuronal viability. Conclusions An optimal concentration of thrombin exists to enhance neuronal health. Neurotoxic effects of thrombin do not involve activation of PAR receptors and thus separate pharmacologic manipulation of thrombin’s receptor

  12. An experimental electronic model for a neuronal cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos-Cantón, I.; Rangel-López, A.; Martel-Gallegos, G.; Zarazúa, S.; Vertiz-Hérnandez, A.

    2014-04-01

    Over the last two decades, the study of information transmission in living beings has acquired great relevance, because it regulates and conducts the functioning of all of the organs in the body. In information transmission pathways, the neuron plays an important role in that it receives, transmits, and processes electrical signals from different parts of the human body; these signals are transmitted as electrical impulses called action potentials, and they transmit information from one neuron to another. In this work, and with the aim of developing experiments for teaching biological processes, we implemented an electronic circuit of the neuron cell device and its mathematical model based on piecewise linear functions.

  13. Amine-modified single-walled carbon nanotubes protect neurons from injury in a rat stroke model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun Jung; Park, Jiae; Yoon, Ok Ja; Kim, Hyun Woo; Lee, Do Yeon; Kim, Do Hee; Lee, Won Bok; Lee, Nae-Eung; Bonventre, Joseph V.; Kim, Sung Su

    2011-02-01

    Stroke results in the disruption of tissue architecture and is the third leading cause of death in the United States. Transplanting scaffolds containing stem cells into the injured areas of the brain has been proposed as a treatment strategy, and carbon nanotubes show promise in this regard, with positive outcomes when used as scaffolds in neural cells and brain tissues. Here, we show that pretreating rats with amine-modified single-walled carbon nanotubes can protect neurons and enhance the recovery of behavioural functions in rats with induced stroke. Treated rats showed less tissue damage than controls and took longer to fall from a rotating rod, suggesting better motor functions after injury. Low levels of apoptotic, angiogenic and inflammation markers indicated that amine-modified single-walled carbon nanotubes protected the brains of treated rats from ischaemic injury.

  14. [From the cell theory to the neuron theory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tixier-Vidal, Andrée

    2010-01-01

    The relationship between the cell theory formulated by Schwann (1839) and by Virchow (1855) on the one hand, and, on the other hand, the neuron theory, as formulated by Waldeyer (1891) and by Cajal (1906), are discussed from a historical point of view. Both of them are the result of technical and conceptuel progress. Both of them had to fight against the dominant dogma before being accepted. The cell theory opposed the school of Bichat, the vitalist philosophy and the positivist philosophy of Auguste Comte. The neuron theory, which is clearly based on the cell theory, was mostly concerned with the mode of interneuronal communication; it opposed the concept of contiguity to Golgi's concept of continuity. At present, the cell theory remains central in every field of Biology. By contrast, the neuron theory, which until the middle of the XXth century opened the study of the nervous system to a necessary reductionnist approach, is no longer central to recent developments of neurosciences.

  15. Strategies for metabolic exchange between glial cells and neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deitmer, J W

    2001-12-01

    The brain is a major energy consumer and dependent on carbohydrate and oxygen supply. Electrical and synaptic activity of neurons can only be sustained given sufficient availability of ATP. Glial cells, which have long been assigned trophic functions, seem to play a pivotal role in meeting the energy requirements of active neurons. Under conditions of high neuronal activity, a number of glial functions, such as the maintenance of ion homeostasis, neurotransmitter clearance from synaptic domains, the supply of energetic compounds and calcium signalling, are challenged. In the vertebrate brain, astrocytes may increase glucose utilization and release lactate, which is taken up and consumed by neurons to generate ATP by oxidative metabolism. The CO(2) produced is processed primarily in astrocytes, which display the major activity of carboanhydrase in the brain. Protons and bicarbonate in turn may contribute to drive acid/base-coupled transporters. In the present article a scenario is discussed which couples the transfer of energy and the conversion of CO(2) with the high-affinity glutamate uptake and other transport processes at glial and neuronal cell membranes. The transporters can be linked to glial signalling and may cooperate with each other at the cellular level. This could save energy, and would render energy exchange processes between glial cells and neurons more effective. Functions implications and physiological responses, in particular in chemosensitive brain areas, are discussed.

  16. Huperzine A provides neuroprotection against several cell death inducers using in vitro model systems of motor neuron cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemendinger, Richelle A; Armstrong, Edward J; Persinski, Rafal; Todd, Julianne; Mougeot, Jean-Luc; Volvovitz, Franklin; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey

    2008-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease resulting from the progressive loss of motor neurons in the spinal cord and brain. To date, clinically effective neuroprotective agents have not been available. The current study demonstrates for the first time that huperzine A, a potential neuroprotective agent, has the ability to protect a motor neuron-like cell line and motor neurons in spinal cord organotypic cultures from toxin-induced cell death. The neuroblastoma-spinal motor neuron fusion cell line, NSC34 and rat spinal cord organotypic cultures (OTC) were exposed to cell death inducers for 24 h or 14 d, respectively, with and without pre-treatment with huperzine A. The inducers used here include: staurosporine, thapsigargin, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl hydrazone (CCCP) and L-(-)-threo-3-hydroxyaspartic acid (THA). These agents were selected as they induce apoptosis/necrosis via mechanisms implicated in patients with generalized motor neuron disease. Cell death was determined in NSC34 cells by metabolic activity, caspase activity/expression and by nuclear morphology and in the OTCs, using immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. Nuclear staining of NSC34 cells revealed cell death induced by staurosporine, thapsigargin, H2O2 and CCCP. This induction was significantly reduced with 2 h pre-treatment with 10 microM huperzine A (maximum, 35% rescue; p 0.05) following exposure to staurosporine, thapsigargin and H2O2 but not with CCCP. These data were supported by the metabolic assays and caspase activity. In addition, pre-treatment with huperzine A dramatically improved motor neuron survival, based on choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) expression analysis in OTCs following exposure to THA, and compared to THA-treated control cultures. These studies are currently being extended to include other inducers and with additional compounds as potential drug therapies that could be used in combination for the treatment of

  17. Nicotine, but not cotinine, partially protects dopaminergic neurons against MPTP-induced degeneration in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parain, K; Marchand, V; Dumery, B; Hirsch, E

    2001-02-02

    In order to analyze the putative neuroprotective role of nicotine and cotinine in parkinsonian syndromes, these two compounds were administered in male C57Bl6 mice for 4 weeks. On day 8, four injections of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6,-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) were administered. MPTP intoxication induced a 50% loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra and a 45% reduction in dopaminergic fibers in the striatum. Administration of cotinine did not affect MPTP toxicity in the nigrostriatal system but chronic nicotine treatment showed a slight protection (15%) of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons against MPTP.

  18. Engrailed protects mouse midbrain dopaminergic neurons against mitochondrial complex I insults

    OpenAIRE

    Alvarez-Fischer, Daniel; Fuchs, Julia; Castagner, François; Stettler, Olivier; Massiani-Beaudoin, Olivia; Moya, Kenneth L.; Bouillot, Colette; Oertel, Wolfgang H; Lombès, Anne; Faigle, Wolfgang; Joshi, Rajiv L.; HARTMANN, Andreas; Prochiantz, Alain

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Mice heterozygous for homeobox gene Engrailed-1 display progressive loss of mesencephalic dopaminergic (mDA) neurons. We report that exogenous Engrailed-1 and Engrailed-2 (collectively Engrailed) protect mDA neurons from 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), a mitochondrial complex I toxin used to model PD in animals. Engrailed enhances the translation of nuclear-encoded mRNAs for two key complex I subunits, Ndufs1 and Ndufs3, and increases complex I activit...

  19. Neuron-derived IgG protects dopaminergic neurons from insult by 6-OHDA and activates microglia through the FcγR I and TLR4 pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Niu, Na; Wang, Mingyu; McNutt, Michael A; Zhang, Donghong; Zhang, Baogang; Lu, Shijun; Liu, Yuqing; Liu, Zhihui

    2013-08-01

    Oxidative and immune attacks from the environment or microglia have been implicated in the loss of dopaminergic neurons of Parkinson's disease. The role of IgG which is an important immunologic molecule in the process of Parkinson's disease has been unclear. Evidence suggests that IgG can be produced by neurons in addition to its traditionally recognized source B lymphocytes, but its function in neurons is poorly understood. In this study, extensive expression of neuron-derived IgG was demonstrated in dopaminergic neurons of human and rat mesencephalon. With an in vitro Parkinson's disease model, we found that neuron-derived IgG can improve the survival and reduce apoptosis of dopaminergic neurons induced by 6-hydroxydopamine toxicity, and also depress the release of NO from microglia triggered by 6-hydroxydopamine. Expression of TNF-α and IL-10 in microglia was elevated to protective levels by neuron-derived IgG at a physiologic level via the FcγR I and TLR4 pathways and microglial activation could be attenuated by IgG blocking. All these data suggested that neuron-derived IgG may exert a self-protective function by activating microglia properly, and IgG may be involved in maintaining immunity homeostasis in the central nervous system and serve as an active factor under pathological conditions such as Parkinson's disease.

  20. Chlorogenic acid protection of neuronal nitric oxide synthase-positive neurons in the hippocampus of mice with impaired learning and memory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiuyun Tu; Xiangqi Tang; Zhiping Hu

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Clinical practice and modern pharmacology have confirmed that ehlorogenic acid can ameliorate learning and memory impairments. OBJECTIVE: To observe the effects of chlorogenic acid on neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS)-positive neurons in the mouse hippocampus, and to investigate the mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of chlorogenic acid on learning and memory. DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: The present randomized, controlled, neural cell morphological observation was performed at the Institute of Neurobiology, Central South University between January and May 2005.MATERIALS: Forty-eight female, healthy, adult, Kunming mice were included in this study. Learning and memory impairment was induced with an injection of 0.5 μL kainic acid (0.4 mg/mL) into the hippocampus.METHODS: The mice were randomized into three groups (n = 16): model, control, and chlorogenic acid-treated. At 2 days following learning and memory impairment induction, intragastric administration of physiological saline or chlorogenic acid was performed in the model and chlorogenic acid-treated groups, respectively. The control mice were administered 0.5 μ L physiological saline into the hippocampus, and 2 days later, they received an intragastric administration of physiological saline. Each mouse received two intragastric administrations (1 mL solution once) per day, for a total of 35 days. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Detection of changes in hippocampal and cerebral cortical nNOS neurons by immunohistochemistry; determination of spatial learning and memory utilizing the Y-maze device.RESULTS: At day 7 and 35 after intervention, there was no significant difference in the number of nNOS-positive neurons in the cerebral cortex between the model, chlorogenic acid, and control groups (P > 0.05). Compared with the control group, the number of nNOS-positive neurons in the hippocampal CA1-4 region was significantly less in the model group (P 0.05). At day 7 following intervention, the number

  1. Electrophysiological changes of CA3 neurons and dentate granule cells following transient forebrain ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, E M; Gao, T M; Pulsinelli, W A; Xu, Z C

    1998-07-06

    The electrophysiological responses of CA3 pyramidal neurons and dentate granule (DG) cells in rat hippocampus were studied after transient forebrain ischemia using intracellular recording and staining techniques in vivo. Approximately 5 min of ischemic depolarization was induced using 4-vessel occlusion method. The spike threshold and rheobase of CA3 neurons remained unchanged up to 12 h following reperfusion. No significant change in spike threshold was observed in DG cells but the rheobase transiently increased 6-9 h after ischemia. The input resistance and time constant of CA3 neurons increased 0-3 h after ischemia and returned to control ranges at later time periods. The spontaneous firing rate in CA3 neurons transiently decreased shortly following reperfusion, while that of DG cells progressively decreased after ischemia. In CA3 neurons, the amplitude and slope of excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) transiently decreased 0-3 h after reperfusion, and the stimulus intensity threshold for EPSPs transiently increased at the same time. No significant changes in amplitude and slope of EPSPs were observed in DG cells, but the stimulus intensity threshold for EPSPs slightly increased shortly after reperfusion. The present study demonstrates that the excitability of CA3 pyramidal neurons and DG cells after 5 min ischemic depolarization is about the same as control levels, whereas the synaptic transmission to these cells was transiently suppressed after the ischemic insult. These results suggest that synaptic transmission is more sensitive to ischemia than membrane properties, and the depression of synaptic transmission may be a protective mechanism against ischemic insults.

  2. Secretory phospholipase A2-mediated neuronal cell death involves glutamate ionotropic receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Turco, Elena B; Diemer, Nils Henrik; Bazan, Nicolas G

    2002-01-01

    To define the significance of glutamate ionotropic receptors in sPLA -mediated neuronal cell death we used the NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 and the AMPA receptor antagonist PNQX. In primary neuronal cell cultures both MK-801 and PNQX inhibited sPLA - and glutamate-induced neuronal death. [ H...... neuronal cell death. We conclude that glutamatergic synaptic activity modulates sPLA -induced neuronal cell death....

  3. Ultrastructure of neuronal-like cells differentiated from adult adipose-derived stromal cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Changqing Ye; Xiaodong Yuan; Hui Liu; Yanan Cai; Ya Ou

    2010-01-01

    β-mercaptoethanol induces in vitro adult adipose-derived stromal cells (ADSCs) to differentiate into neurons. However, the ultrastructural features of the differentiated neuronal-like cells remain unknown. In the present study, inverted phase contrast microscopy was utilized to observe β-mercaptcethanol-induced differentiation of neuronal-like cells from human ADSCs, and immunocytochemistry and real-time polymerase chain reaction were employed to detect expression of a neural stem cells marker (nestin), a neuronal marker (neuron-specific enolase), and a glial marker (glial fibrillary acidic protein). In addition, ultrastructure of neuronal-like cells was observed by transmission election microscopy. Results revealed highest expression rate of nestin and neuron-specific enolase at 3 and 5 hours following induced differentiation; cells in the 5-hour induction group exhibited a neuronal-specific structure, i.e., Nissl bodies. However, when induction solution was replaced by complete culture medium after 8-hour induction, the differentiated cells reverted to the fibroblast-like morphology from day 1. These results demonstrate that β-mercaptoethanol-induced ADSCs induced differentiation into neural stem cells, followed by morphology of neuronal-like cells. However, this differentiation state was not stable.

  4. Neuroprotection via matrix-trophic coupling between cerebral endothelial cells and neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Shuzhen; Kim, Woo Jean; Lok, Josephine; Lee, Sun-Ryung; Besancon, Elaine; Luo, Bing-Hao; Stins, Monique F.; Wang, Xiaoying; Dedhar, Shoukat; Lo, Eng H.

    2008-01-01

    The neurovascular unit is an emerging concept that emphasizes homeostatic interactions between endothelium and cerebral parenchyma. Here, we show that cerebral endothelium are not just inert tubes for delivering blood, but they also secrete trophic factors that can be directly neuroprotective. Conditioned media from cerebral endothelial cells broadly protects neurons against oxygen-glucose deprivation, oxidative damage, endoplasmic reticulum stress, hypoxia, and amyloid neurotoxicity. This ph...

  5. Ganoderma lucidum Protects Dopaminergic Neuron Degeneration through Inhibition of Microglial Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruiping Zhang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abundant evidence has suggested that neuroinflammation participates in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD. The emerging evidence has supported that microglia may play key roles in the progressive neurodegeneration in PD and might be a promising therapeutic target. Ganoderma lucidum (GL, a traditional Chinese medicinal herb, has been shown potential neuroprotective effects in our clinical trials that make us to speculate that it might possess potent anti-inflammatory and immunomodulating properties. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the potential neuroprotective effect of GL and possible underlying mechanism of action through protecting microglial activation using co-cultures of dopaminergic neurons and microglia. The microglia is activated by LPS and MPP+-treated MES 23.5 cell membranes. Meanwhile, GL extracts significantly prevent the production of microglia-derived proinflammatory and cytotoxic factors [nitric oxide, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, interlukin 1β (IL-1β] in a dose-dependent manner and down-regulate the TNF-α and IL-1β expressions on mRNA level as well. In conclusion, our results support that GL may be a promising agent for the treatment of PD through anti-inflammation.

  6. Curcumin Protects Neurons from Glutamate-Induced Excitotoxicity by Membrane Anchored AKAP79-PKA Interaction Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kui Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Now stimulation of AMPA receptor as well as its downstream pathways is considered as potential central mediators in antidepressant mechanisms. As a signal integrator which binds to AMPA receptor, A-kinase anchoring protein 79-(AKAP79- PKA complex is regarded as a potential drug target to exert neuroprotective effects. A well-tolerated and multitarget drug curcumin has been confirmed to exert antidepressant-like effects. To explore whether AKAP79-PKA complex is involved in curcumin-mediated antiexcitotoxicity, we detected calcium signaling, subcellular location of AKAP79-PKA complex, phosphorylation of glutamate receptor, and ERK and AKT cascades. In this study, we found that curcumin protected neurons from glutamate insult by reducing Ca2+ influx and blocking the translocation of AKAP79 from cytomembrane to cytoplasm. In parallel, curcumin enhanced the phosphorylation of AMPA receptor and its downstream pathways in PKA-dependent manner. If we pretreated cells with PKA anchoring inhibitor Ht31 to disassociate PKA from AKAP79, no neuroprotective effects were observed. In conclusion, our results show that AKAP79-anchored PKA facilitated the signal relay from AMPA receptor to AKT and ERK cascades, which may be crucial for curcumin-mediated antiexcitotoxicity.

  7. Optical Imaging for Stem Cell Differentiation to Neuronal Lineage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Do Won; Lee, Dong Soo [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    In regenerative medicine, the prospect of stem cell therapy hold great promise for the recovery of injured tissues and effective treatment of intractable diseases. Tracking stem cell fate provides critical information to understand and evaluate the success of stem cell therapy. The recent emergence of in vivo noninvasive molecular imaging has enabled assessment of the behavior of grafted stem cells in living subjects. In this review, we provide an overview of current optical imaging strategies based on cell or tissue specific reporter gene expression and of in vivo methods to monitor stem cell differentiation into neuronal lineages. These methods use optical reporters either regulated by neuron-specific promoters or containing neuron-specific microRNA binding sites. Both systems revealed dramatic changes in optical reporter imaging signals in cells differentiating a yeast GAL4 amplification system or an engineering-enhanced luciferase reported gene. Furthermore, we propose an advanced imaging system to monitor neuronal differentiation during neurogenesis that uses in vivo multiplexed imaging techniques capable of detecting several targets simultaneously.

  8. IgLON cell adhesion molecules are shed from the cell surface of cortical neurons to promote neuronal growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz, Ricardo; Ferraro, Gino B; Fournier, Alyson E

    2015-02-13

    Matrix metalloproteinases and a disintegrin and metalloproteinases are members of the zinc endopeptidases, which cleave components of the extracellular matrix as well as cell surface proteins resulting in degradation or release of biologically active fragments. Surface ectodomain shedding affects numerous biological processes, including survival, axon outgrowth, axon guidance, and synaptogenesis. In this study, we evaluated the role of metalloproteinases in regulating cortical neurite growth. We found that treatment of mature cortical neurons with pan-metalloproteinase inhibitors or with tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase-3 reduced neurite outgrowth. Through mass spectrometry, we characterized the metalloproteinase-sensitive cell surface proteome of mature cortical neurons. Members of the IgLON family of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored neural cell adhesion molecules were identified and validated as proteins that were shed from the surface of mature cortical neurons in a metalloproteinase-dependent manner. Introduction of two members of the IgLON family, neurotrimin and NEGR1, in early embryonic neurons was sufficient to confer sensitivity to metalloproteinase inhibitors in neurite outgrowth assays. Outgrowth experiments on immobilized IgLON proteins revealed a role for all IgLON family members in promoting neurite extension from cortical neurons. Together, our findings support a role for metalloproteinase-dependent shedding of IgLON family members in regulating neurite outgrowth from mature cortical neurons.

  9. Neural cell protective compounds isolated from Phoenix hanceana var. formosana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi-Pei; Chen, Tai-Yuan; Tseng, Hsiang-Wen; Lee, Mei-Hsien; Chen, Shui-Tein

    2009-06-01

    A platform for screening drugs for their ability to protect neuronal cells against cytotoxicity was developed. Nerve growth factor (NGF) differentiates PC12 cells into nerves, and these differentiated PC12 cells enter apoptosis when challenged with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). A screening spectrophotometer was used to assay cytotoxicity in these cells; pretreatment with test samples allowed identification of compounds that protected against this neuronal cytotoxicity. The 95% ethanol extract of Phoenix hanceana Naudin var. formosana Beccari. (PH) showed potential neuroprotective activity in these assays. The PH ethanol extract was further fractionated by sequential partitioning with n-hexane, ethyl acetate (EtOAc), n-butanol (n-BuOH), and water. Subsequent rounds of assaying resulted in the isolation of ten constituents, and their structures were characterized by various spectroscopic techniques and identified by comparison with previous data as: isoorientin (1), isovitexin (2), veronicastroside (3), luteolin-7-O-beta-d-glucopyranoside (4), isoquercitrin (5), tricin-7-neohesperidoside (6), tricin-7-O-beta-d-gluco-pyranoside (7), (+)-catechin (8), (-)-epicatechin (9), and orientin 7-O-beta-d-glucopyranoside (10). Among these compounds, isovitexin (2), luteolin-7-O-beta-d-glucopyranoside (4) and (+)-catechin (8) showed significant neuroprotective activity in cell viability (WST-8 reduction), anti-apoptosis (Annexin V-FITC/propidium iodide double-labeled flow cytometry), and cellular ROS scavenging assays (besides isovitexin (2)), as well as a decreased caspase-8 activity in 6-OHDA-induced PC12 cells. Hence, isovitexin (2), luteolin-7-O-beta-d-glucopyranoside (4), and (+)-catechin (8) protected PC12 cells from 6-OHDA-induced apoptotic neurotoxicity.

  10. Statins induce differentiation and cell death in neurons and astroglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    März, Pia; Otten, Uwe; Miserez, André R

    2007-01-01

    Statins are potent inhibitors of the hydroxy-methyl-glutaryl-coenzyme A reductase, the rate limiting enzyme for cholesterol biosynthesis. Experimental and clinical studies with statins suggest that they have beneficial effects on neurodegenerative disorders. Thus, it was of interest to characterize the direct effects of statins on CNS neurons and glial cells. We have treated defined cultures of neurons and astrocytes of newborn rats with two lipophilic statins, atorvastatin and simvastatin, and analyzed their effects on morphology and survival. Treatment of astrocytes with statins induced a time- and dose-dependent stellation, followed by apoptosis. Similarly, statins elicited programmed cell death of cerebellar granule neurons but with a higher sensitivity. Analysis of different signaling cascades revealed that statins fail to influence classical pathways such as Akt or MAP kinases, known to be activated in CNS cells. In addition, astrocyte stellation triggered by statins resembled dibutryl-cyclic AMP (db-cAMP) induced morphological differentiation. However, in contrast to db-cAMP, statins induced upregulation of low-density lipoprotein receptors, without affecting GFAP expression, indicating separate underlying mechanisms. Analysis of the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway revealed that lack of mevalonate and of its downstream metabolites, mainly geranylgeranyl-pyrophosphate (GGPP), is responsible for the statin-induced apoptosis of neurons and astrocytes. Moreover, astrocytic stellation triggered by statins was inhibited by mevalonate and GGPP. Interestingly, neuronal cell death was significantly reduced in astrocyte/neuron co-cultures treated with statins. We postulate that under these conditions signals provided by astrocytes, e.g., isoprenoids play a key role in neuronal survival.

  11. Discovery of a novel neuroprotectant, BHDPC, that protects against MPP+/MPTP-induced neuronal death in multiple experimental models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Cheong-Meng; Ma, Dan; Zhao, Chao; Franklin, Robin J M; Zhou, Zhong-Yan; Ai, Nana; Li, Chuwen; Yu, Huidong; Hou, Tingjun; Sa, Fei; Lee, Simon Ming-Yuen

    2015-12-01

    Progressive degeneration and death of neurons are main causes of neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease. Although some current medicines may temporarily improve their symptoms, no treatments can slow or halt the progression of neuronal death. In this study, a pyrimidine derivative, benzyl 7-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-5-methyl-4,7-dihydrotetrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine-6-carboxylate (BHDPC), was found to attenuate dramatically the MPTP-induced death of dopaminergic neurons and improve behavior movement deficiency in zebrafish, supporting its potential neuroprotective activity in vivo. Further study in rat organotypic cerebellar cultures indicated that BHDPC was able to suppress MPP(+)-induced cell death of brain tissue slices ex vivo. The protective effect of BHDPC against MPP(+) toxicity was also effective in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells through restoring abnormal changes in mitochondrial membrane potential and numerous apoptotic regulators. Western blotting analysis indicated that BHDPC was able to activate PKA/CREB survival signaling and further up-regulate Bcl2 expression. However, BHDPC failed to suppress MPP(+)-induced cytotoxicity and the increase of caspase 3 activity in the presence of the PKA inhibitor H89. Taken together, these results suggest that BHDPC is a potential neuroprotectant with prosurvival effects in multiple models of neurodegenerative disease in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo.

  12. Amentoflavone protects hippocampal neurons: anti-inflammatory, antioxidative, and antiapoptotic effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Amentoflavone is a natural biflavone compound with many biological properties, including anti-inflammatory, antioxidative, and neuroprotective effects. We presumed that amentoflavone exerts a neuroprotective effect in epilepsy models. Prior to model establishment, mice were intragastrically administered 25 mg/kg amentoflavone for 3 consecutive days. Amentoflavone effectively prevented pilocarpine-induced epilepsy in a mouse kindling model, suppressed nuclear factor-κB activation and expression, inhibited excessive discharge of hippocampal neurons resulting in a reduction in epileptic seizures, shortened attack time, and diminished loss and apoptosis of hippocampal neurons. Results suggested that amentoflavone protected hippocampal neurons in epilepsy mice via anti-inflammation, antioxidation, and antiapoptosis, and then effectively prevented the occurrence of seizures.

  13. Gentianine protects hippocampal neurons in a rat model of recurrent febrile convulsion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuewei Liu; Shumin Liu; Na Wang; Fang Lu; Min Cao

    2011-01-01

    Gentianine has been shown to have a protective effect on hippocampal CA1 neurons in rats subjected to recurrent febrile convulsion (FC).The present study sought to explore the possible mechanism of gentianine by intraperitoneally injecting gentianine into rats with warm water-induced FC.The results revealed that neuronal organelle injury was slightly ameliorated in the hippocampal CA1 region.The level of glutamate was decreased,but the level of γ-aminobutyric acid was increased,as detected by ninhydrin staining.In addition,glutamate acid decarboxylase expression in hippocampal CA1 was increased,as determined by immunohistochemistry.The results demonstrated that gentianine can ameliorate FC-induced neuronal injury by enhancing glutamate acid decarboxylase activity,decreasing glutamate levels and increasing γ-aminobutyric acid levels.

  14. Ibuprofen protects ischemia-induced neuronal injury via up-regulating interleukin-1 receptor antagonist expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, E-M; Cho, B-P; Volpe, B T; Cruz, M O; Joh, T H; Cho, S

    2005-01-01

    The inflammatory response accompanies and exacerbates the developing injury after cerebral ischemia. Ibuprofen, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, has been shown to attenuate injuries in animal models of various neurological diseases. In the present study, we investigated ibuprofen's neuroprotective effects in rats exposed to transient forebrain ischemia and in cultures exposed to oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD). Rats treated with ibuprofen after transient forebrain ischemia displayed long-lasting protection of CA1 hippocampal neurons. There were selective increases in interleukin-1 receptor antagonist gene and protein expression in ibuprofen-treated OGD microglia. Furthermore, treatment with ibuprofen in neuron/microglia co-cultures increased the number of surviving HC2S2 neurons against OGD whereas IL-1ra neutralizing antibody reversed the ibuprofen-induced neuroprotection. The data indicate that ibuprofen-induced IL-1ra secretion is involved in neuroprotection against ischemic conditions.

  15. Pinacidil and levamisole prevent glutamate-induced death of hippocampal neuronal cells through reducing ROS production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukry, Mustafa; Kamal, Tarek; Ali, Radi; Farrag, Foad; Almadaly, Essam; Saleh, Ayman A; Abu El-Magd, Mohammed

    2015-10-01

    Activators of both adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP)-sensitive K(+) (KATP) channel and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channel have significant in vivo and in vitro neuroprotection against glutamate-induced death of some neuronal cells. Here, the effect of the KATP channel activator, pinacidil, and the CFTR Cl(-) channel opener, levamisole, against glutamate-induced oxidative stress were investigated in mouse hippocampal cells, HT22. The results from cell viability assay (WST-1) showed that pinacidil and levamisole weakly protected cells against glutamate-induced toxicity at 10 μM and their effect increased in a dose-dependent manner till reach maximum protection at 300 μM. Pretreatment with pinacidil or levamisole significantly suppressed the elevation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) triggered by glutamate through stabilising mitochondrial membrane potential and subsequently protected HT22 cells against glutamate-induced death. HT22 cells viability was maintained by pinacidil and levamisole in presence of glutathione inhibitor, BSO. Also, pinacidil and levamisole pretreatment did not induce recovery of glutathione levels decreased by glutamate Expectedly, this protection was abolished by the KATP and CFTR Cl(-) channels blocker, glibenclamide. Thus, both pinacidil and levamisole protect HT22 cells against glutamate-induced cell death through stabilising mitochondrial membrane potential and subsequently decreasing ROS production.

  16. Interleukin-18 directly protects cortical neurons by activating PI3K/AKT/NF-κB/CREB pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jia; Ping, Feng-feng; Lv, Wen-ting; Feng, Jun-yi; Shang, Jing

    2014-09-01

    Interleukin-18 (IL-18), a member of the IL-1 family of cytokines, was initially identified as an interferon (IFN)-γ-inducing factor. IL-18 is expressed in both immune and non-immune cells and participates in the adjustment of multitude cellular functions. Nonetheless, the effects of IL-18 on cortical neurons have not been explored. The present study was conducted to investigate the influence of IL-18 on rat primary cortical neurons and elucidate the underlying mechanisms. We proved that rrIL-18 increased the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in a time-dependent manner. Treatment with rrIL-18 (50 ng/ml) deactivated phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) by facilitating its phosphorylation, enhanced the expression of Phosphoinositide 3-OH kinase (PI3K) and p-Akt, standing for the activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway. As its pivotal downstream pathways, nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB)/Bcl-2 and glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) were examined in further steps. Our data revealed that rrIL-18 stimulated NF-κB activation, improved p-CREB and anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 expression levels. But rrIL-18 had little or no effect on GSK-3β pathway. Besides, rrIL-18 increased levels of BDNF and Bcl-2/Bax ratio and decreased cleaved caspase-3 expression to protect cortical neurons from damage induced by oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD). These results in vitro showed the protection of IL-18 on cortical neurons. And this direct neuroprotective effect of IL-18 is crippled by PI3K inhibitor wortmannin.

  17. Effect of acupuncture on 6-hydroxydopamine-induced nigrostratal dopaminergic neuronal cell death in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeung-Kee; Lim, Hyung-Ho; Song, Yun-Kyung; Lee, Hee-Hyuk; Lim, Sabina; Han, Seung-Moo; Kim, Chang-Ju

    In this study, we investigated the effect of acupuncture at the Zusanli acupoint (ST36) on the nigrostriatal dopaminergic neuronal cell death in the rats with Parkinson's disease. Two weeks after unilateral injection of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) into the striatum, an apomorphine-induced rotational behavior test showed significant rotational asymmetry in the rats with Parkinson's disease. Immunostaining for tyrosine hydroxylase demonstrated a dopaminergic neuronal loss in the substantia nigra and dopaminergic fiber loss in the striatum. Acupuncture at the ST36 for 14 days significantly inhibited rotational asymmetry in the rats with Parkinson's disease, and also protected against 6-OHDA-induced nigrostriatal dopaminergic neuronal loss. These effects of acupuncture were not observed for the non-acupoint (hip) acupuncture. The present study shows that acupuncture at the ST36 acupoint can be used as a useful strategy for the treatment of Parkinson's disease.

  18. Manganese nanoparticle activates mitochondrial dependent apoptotic signaling and autophagy in dopaminergic neuronal cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afeseh Ngwa, Hilary; Kanthasamy, Arthi [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Iowa Center for Advanced Neurotoxicology, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Gu, Yan; Fang, Ning [Department of Chemistry, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Anantharam, Vellareddy [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Iowa Center for Advanced Neurotoxicology, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Kanthasamy, Anumantha G., E-mail: akanthas@iastate.edu [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Iowa Center for Advanced Neurotoxicology, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States)

    2011-11-15

    The production of man-made nanoparticles for various modern applications has increased exponentially in recent years, but the potential health effects of most nanoparticles are not well characterized. Unfortunately, in vitro nanoparticle toxicity studies are extremely limited by yet unresolved problems relating to dosimetry. In the present study, we systematically characterized manganese (Mn) nanoparticle sizes and examined the nanoparticle-induced oxidative signaling in dopaminergic neuronal cells. Differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies revealed that Mn nanoparticles range in size from single nanoparticles ({approx} 25 nM) to larger agglomerates when in treatment media. Manganese nanoparticles were effectively internalized in N27 dopaminergic neuronal cells, and they induced a time-dependent upregulation of the transporter protein transferrin. Exposure to 25-400 {mu}g/mL Mn nanoparticles induced cell death in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Mn nanoparticles also significantly increased ROS, accompanied by a caspase-mediated proteolytic cleavage of proapoptotic protein kinase C{delta} (PKC{delta}), as well as activation loop phosphorylation. Blocking Mn nanoparticle-induced ROS failed to protect against the neurotoxic effects, suggesting the involvement of other pathways. Further mechanistic studies revealed changes in Beclin 1 and LC3, indicating that Mn nanoparticles induce autophagy. Primary mesencephalic neuron exposure to Mn nanoparticles induced loss of TH positive dopaminergic neurons and neuronal processes. Collectively, our results suggest that Mn nanoparticles effectively enter dopaminergic neuronal cells and exert neurotoxic effects by activating an apoptotic signaling pathway and autophagy, emphasizing the need for assessing possible health risks associated with an increased use of Mn nanoparticles in modern applications. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mn nanoparticles

  19. Glutamate increases toxicity of inorganic lead in GT1-7 neurons: partial protection induced by flunarizine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loikkanen, Jarkko; Vaehaekangas, Kirsi H. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Kuopio, PO Box 1627, 70211, Kuopio (Finland); Naarala, Jonne [Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Kuopio, PO Box 1627, 70211, Kuopio (Finland); Savolainen, Kai M. [Department of Industrial Hygiene and Toxicology, Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Topeliuksenkatu 41 aA, 00250, Helsinki (Finland)

    2003-12-01

    Recent studies point to an interaction between the glutamatergic neurotransmitter system and inorganic lead (Pb) neurotoxicity. Pb (1-100 {mu}M) evoked cytotoxicity over the period of 72 h in mouse hypothalamic GT1-7 neurons. Glutamate (0.1 or 1 mM) on its own did not have any effect on cell viability. However, 1 mM glutamate clearly increased Pb-induced cell death at 48 and 72 h. Although flunarizine (0.1-10 {mu}M), an antagonist of L- and T-type voltage-sensitive calcium channels (VSCCs), partially protected from the cytotoxicity induced by co-exposure to Pb (10 or 100 {mu}M) and glutamate (1 mM), it had no protective effect on cytotoxicity induced by Pb alone. The flunarizine-induced protection was dependent on time and observed only at 48 h. Neither verapamil, an antagonist of L-type VSCCs, nor DIDS, an inhibitor of anion exchange, at non-toxic concentrations (0.1-10 {mu}M) had any effect on cytotoxicity induced by Pb alone or together with glutamate at any studied time point. Co-exposure to Pb and glutamate also resulted in more prominent production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) than either of the compounds alone. Interestingly, we observed an increase in intracellular glutathione (GSH) levels in cells exposed to micromolar concentrations of Pb. Glutamate decreased the levels of intracellular GSH and also partially reduced the Pb-induced increase in GSH levels. These results suggest that the interaction of glutamate and Pb results in increased neuronal cell death via mechanisms that involve an increase in ROS production, a decrease in intracellular GSH defense against oxidative stress and probably T-type VSCCs. (orig.)

  20. TGF-β Signaling in Neuronal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chohee Yun

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β signaling has diverse and complex roles in various biological phenomena such as cell growth, differentiation, embryogenesis and morphogenesis. ES cells provide an essential model for understanding the role of TGF-β signaling in lineage specification and differentiation. Recent studies have suggested significant role of TGF-β in stem/progenitor cell biology. Here in this review, we focus on the role of the TGF-β superfamily in neuronal development.

  1. Control of hair cell excitability by vestibular primary sensory neurons.

    OpenAIRE

    Brugeaud, Aurore; Travo, Cécile; Demêmes, Danielle; Lenoir, Marc; Llorens, Jordi; Puel, Jean-Luc; Chabbert, Christian

    2007-01-01

    International audience; In the rat utricle, synaptic contacts between hair cells and the nerve fibers arising from the vestibular primary neurons form during the first week after birth. During that period, the sodium-based excitability that characterizes neonate utricle sensory cells is switched off. To investigate whether the establishment of synaptic contacts was responsible for the modulation of the hair cell excitability, we used an organotypic culture of rat utricle in which the setting ...

  2. Death and survival of neuronal and astrocytic cells in ischemic brain injury: a role of autophagy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min XU; Hui-ling ZHANG

    2011-01-01

    Autophagy is a highly regulated cellular mechanism that leads to degradation of long-lived proteins and dysfunctional organelles. The process has been implicated in a variety of physiological and pathological conditions relevant to neurological diseases. Recent studies show the existence of autophagy in cerebral ischemia, but no consensus has yet been reached regarding the functions of autophagy in this condition. This article highlights the activation of autophagy during cerebral ischemia and/or reperfusion, especially in neurons and astrocytes, as well as the role of autophagy in neuronal or astrocytic cell death and survival. We propose that physiological levels of autophagy, presumably caused by mild to modest hypoxia or ischemia, appear to be protective. However, high levels of autophagy caused by severe hypoxia or ischemia and/or reperfusion may cause self-digestion and eventual neuronal and astrocytic cell death. We also discuss that oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stresses in cerebral hypoxia or ischemia and/or reperfusion are potent stimuli of autophagy in neurons and astrocytes. In addition, we review the evidence suggesting a considerable overlap between autophagy on one hand, and apoptosis, necrosis and necroptosis on the other hand, in determining the outcomes and final morphology of damaged neurons and astrocytes.

  3. Astrocytes require insulin-like growth factor I to protect neurons against oxidative injury [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/2lf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Genis

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is a proposed mechanism in brain aging, making the study of its regulatory processes an important aspect of current neurobiological research. In this regard, the role of the aging regulator insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I in brain responses to oxidative stress remains elusive as both beneficial and detrimental actions have been ascribed to this growth factor. Because astrocytes protect neurons against oxidative injury, we explored whether IGF-I participates in astrocyte neuroprotection and found that blockade of the IGF-I receptor in astrocytes abrogated their rescuing effect on neurons. The protection mediated by IGF-I against oxidative stress (H2O2 in astrocytes is probably needed for these cells to provide adequate neuroprotection. Indeed, in astrocytes but not in neurons, IGF-I helps decrease the pro-oxidant protein thioredoxin-interacting protein 1 and normalizes the levels of reactive oxygen species. Furthermore, IGF-I cooperates with trophic signals produced by astrocytes in response to H2O2 such as stem cell factor (SCF to protect neurons against oxidative insult. After stroke, a condition associated with brain aging where oxidative injury affects peri-infarcted regions, a simultaneous increase in SCF and IGF-I expression was found in the cortex, suggesting that a similar cooperative response takes place in vivo. Cell-specific modulation by IGF-I of brain responses to oxidative stress may contribute in clarifying the role of IGF-I in brain aging.

  4. Neural Progenitor Cells Derived from Human Embryonic Stem Cells as an Origin of Dopaminergic Neurons

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    Parinya Noisa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs are able to proliferate in vitro indefinitely without losing their ability to differentiate into multiple cell types upon exposure to appropriate signals. Particularly, the ability of hESCs to differentiate into neuronal subtypes is fundamental to develop cell-based therapies for several neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer’s disease, Huntington’s disease, and Parkinson’s disease. In this study, we differentiated hESCs to dopaminergic neurons via an intermediate stage, neural progenitor cells (NPCs. hESCs were induced to neural progenitor cells by Dorsomorphin, a small molecule that inhibits BMP signalling. The resulting neural progenitor cells exhibited neural bipolarity with high expression of neural progenitor genes and possessed multipotential differentiation ability. CBF1 and bFGF responsiveness of these hES-NP cells suggested their similarity to embryonic neural progenitor cells. A substantial number of dopaminergic neurons were derived from hES-NP cells upon supplementation of FGF8 and SHH, key dopaminergic neuron inducers. Importantly, multiple markers of midbrain neurons were detected, including NURR1, PITX3, and EN1, suggesting that hESC-derived dopaminergic neurons attained the midbrain identity. Altogether, this work underscored the generation of neural progenitor cells that retain the properties of embryonic neural progenitor cells. These cells will serve as an unlimited source for the derivation of dopaminergic neurons, which might be applicable for treating patients with Parkinson’s disease.

  5. Protection of signal processing at low temperature in baroreceptive neurons in the nucleus tractus solitarius of Syrian hamsters, a hibernating species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekizawa, Shin-Ichi; Horwitz, Barbara A.; Horowitz, John M.

    2013-01-01

    We previously described synaptic currents between baroreceptor fibers and second-order neurons in the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) that were larger in Syrian hamsters than in rats. This suggested that although electrical activity throughout the hamster brain decreased as brain temperature declined, the greater synaptic input to its NTS would support continued operation of cardiorespiratory reflexes at low body temperatures. Here, we focused on properties that would protect these neurons against potential damage from the larger synaptic inputs, testing the hypotheses that hamster NTS neurons exhibit: 1) intrinsic N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) properties that limit Ca2+ influx to a greater degree than do rat NTS neurons and 2) properties that reduce gating signals to NMDARs to a greater degree than in rat NTS neurons. Whole cell patch-clamp recordings on anatomically identified second-order NTS baroreceptive neurons showed that NMDAR-mediated synaptic currents between sensory fibers and second-order NTS neurons were larger in hamsters than in rats at 33°C and 15°C, with no difference in their permeability to Ca2+. However, at 15°C, but not at 33°C, non-NMDAR currents evoked by glutamate released from baroreceptor fibers had significantly shorter durations in hamsters than in rats. Thus, hamster NMDARs did not exhibit lower Ca2+ influx than did rats (negating hypothesis 1), but they did exhibit significant differences in non-NMDAR neuronal properties at low temperature (consistent with hypothesis 2). The latter (shorter duration of non-NMDAR currents) would likely limit NMDAR coincidence gating and may help protect hamster NTS neurons, enabling them to contribute to signal processing at low body temperatures. PMID:24068050

  6. Protection against Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation/Reperfusion Injury in Cortical Neurons by Combining Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Acid with Lyciumbarbarum Polysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Zhe; Wu, Di; Yao, Jian-Ping; Yao, Xiaoli; Huang, Zhijian; Li, Peng; Wan, Jian-Bo; He, Chengwei; Su, Huanxing

    2016-01-13

    Ischemic stroke, characterized by the disturbance of the blood supply to the brain, is a severe worldwide health threat with high mortality and morbidity. However, there is no effective pharmacotherapy for ischemic injury. Currently, combined treatment is highly recommended for this devastating injury. In the present study, we investigated neuroprotective effects of the combination of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFAs) and Lyciumbarbarum polysaccharide (LBP) on cortical neurons using an in vitro ischemic model. Our study demonstrated that treatment with docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), a major component of the ω-3 PUFAs family, significantly inhibited the increase of intracellular Ca(2+) in cultured wild type (WT) cortical neurons subjected to oxygen-glucose deprivation/reperfusion (OGD/R) injury and promoted their survival compared with the vehicle-treated control. The protective effects were further confirmed in cultured neurons with high endogenous ω-3 PUFAs that were isolated from fat-1 mice, in that a higher survival rate was found in fat-1 neurons compared with wild-type neurons after OGD/R injury. Our study also found that treatment with LBP (50 mg/L) activated Trk-B signaling in cortical neurons and significantly attenuated OGD/R-induced cell apoptosis compared with the control. Notably, both combining LBP treatment with ω-3 PUFAs administration to WT neurons and adding LBP to fat-1 neurons showed enhanced effects on protecting cortical neurons against OGD/R injury via concurrently regulating the intracellular calcium overload and neurotrophic pathway. The results of the study suggest that ω-3 PUFAs and LBP are promising candidates for combined pharmacotherapy for ischemic stroke.

  7. Inhibition of Autophagy via Activation of PI3K/Akt Pathway Contributes to the Protection of Ginsenoside Rb1 against Neuronal Death Caused by Ischemic Insults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianfei Luo

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Lethal autophagy is a pathway leading to neuronal death caused by transient global ischemia. In this study, we examined the effect of Ginsenoside Rb1 (GRb1 on ischemia/reperfusion-induced autophagic neuronal death and investigated the role of PI3K/Akt. Ischemic neuronal death in vitro was induced by using oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD in SH-SY5Y cells, and transient global ischemia was produced by using two vessels occlusion in rats. Cellular viability of SH-SY5Y cells was assessed by MTT assay, and CA1 neuronal death was evaluated by Hematoxylin-eosin staining. Autophagic vacuoles were detected by using both fluorescent microscopy in combination with acridine orange (AO and Monodansylcadaverine (MDC staining and transmission electronic microscopy. Protein levels of LC3II, Beclin1, total Akt and phosphor-Akt at Ser473 were examined by western blotting analysis. GRb1 inhibited both OGD and transient ischemia-induced neuronal death and mitigated OGD-induced autophagic vacuoles in SH-SY5Y cells. By contrast, PI3K inhibitor LY294002 counteracted the protection of GRb1 against neuronal death caused by either OGD or transient ischemia. LY294002 not only mitigated the up-regulated protein level of phosphor Akt at Ser473 caused by GRb1, but also reversed the inhibitory effect of GRb1 on OGD and transient ischemia-induced elevation in protein levels of LC3II and Beclin1.

  8. Testosterone Protects Mitochondrial Function and Regulates Neuroglobin Expression in Astrocytic Cells Exposed to Glucose Deprivation

    OpenAIRE

    Toro-Urrego, Nicolas; Garcia-Segura, Luis M.; Echeverria, Valentina; Barreto, George E.

    2016-01-01

    Testosterone is a hormone that has been shown to confer neuroprotection from different insults affecting the central nervous system (CNS). Testosterone induces this protection by different mechanisms that include the activation of anti-apoptotic pathways that are directly implicated in neuronal survival. However, little attention has been devoted to its actions on glial cells. In the present study, we have assessed whether testosterone exerts protection in a human astrocyte cell model, the T9...

  9. Erythropoietin-mediated protection of insect brain neurons involves JAK and STAT but not PI3K transduction pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miljus, N; Heibeck, S; Jarrar, M; Micke, M; Ostrowski, D; Ehrenreich, H; Heinrich, R

    2014-01-31

    The cytokine erythropoietin (Epo) initiates adaptive cellular responses to both moderate environmental challenges and tissue damaging insults in various non-hematopoietic mammalian tissues including the nervous system. Neuroprotective and neuroregenerative functions of Epo in mammals are mediated through receptor-associated Janus kinase 2 and intracellular signaling cascades that modify the transcription of Epo-regulated genes. Signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT) and phosphoinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) represent key components of two important Epo-induced transduction pathways. Our previous study on insects revealed neuroprotective and regenerative functions of recombinant human Epo (rhEpo) similar to those in mammalian nervous tissues. Here we demonstrate that rhEpo effectively rescues primary cultured locust brain neurons from apoptotic cell death induced by hypoxia or the chemical compound H-7. The Janus kinase inhibitor AG-490 and the STAT inhibitor sc-355797 abolished protective effects of rhEpo on locust brain neurons. In contrast, inhibition of PI3K with LY294002 had no effect on rhEpo-mediated neuroprotection. The results indicate that rhEpo mediates the protection of locust brain neurons through interference with apoptotic pathways by the activation of a Janus kinase-associated receptor and STAT transcription factor(s). The involvement of similar transduction pathways in mammals and insects for the mediation of neuroprotection and support of neural regeneration by Epo indicates that an Epo/Epo receptor-like signaling system with high structural and functional similarity exists in both groups of animals. Epo-like signaling involved in tissue protection appears to be an ancient beneficial function shared by vertebrates and invertebrates.

  10. Low-Dose Ethanol Preconditioning Protects Against Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation/Reoxygenation-Induced Neuronal Injury By Activating Large Conductance, Ca(2+)-Activated K(+) Channels In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Fang; Guo, An-Chen; Li, Wei-Wei; Zhao, Yi-Long; Qu, Zheng-Yi; Wang, Yong-Jun; Wang, Qun; Zhu, Yu-Lan

    2017-02-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that low to moderate ethanol ingestion protects against the deleterious effects of subsequent ischemia/reperfusion; however, the underlying mechanism has not been elucidated. In the present study, we showed that expression of the neuronal large-conductance, Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel (BKCa) α-subunit was upregulated in cultured neurons exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation/reoxygenation (OGD/R) compared with controls. Preconditioning with low-dose ethanol (10 mmol/L) increased cell survival rate in neurons subjected to OGD/R, attenuated the OGD/R-induced elevation of cytosolic Ca(2+) levels, and reduced the number of apoptotic neurons. Western blots revealed that ethanol preconditioning upregulated expression of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 and downregulated the pro-apoptotic protein Bax. The protective effect of ethanol preconditioning was antagonized by a BKCa channel inhibitor, paxilline. Inside-out patches in primary neurons also demonstrated the direct activation of the BKCa channel by 10 mmol/L ethanol. The above results indicated that low-dose ethanol preconditioning exerts its neuroprotective effects by attenuating the elevation of cytosolic Ca(2+) and preventing neuronal apoptosis, and this is mediated by BKCa channel activation.

  11. Neuron-NG2 Cell Synapses: Novel Functions for Regulating NG2 Cell Proliferation and Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian-Kun Yang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available NG2 cells are a population of CNS cells that are distinct from neurons, mature oligodendrocytes, astrocytes, and microglia. These cells can be identified by their NG2 proteoglycan expression. NG2 cells have a highly branched morphology, with abundant processes radiating from the cell body, and express a complex set of voltage-gated channels, AMPA/kainate, and GABA receptors. Neurons notably form classical and nonclassical synapses with NG2 cells, which have varied characteristics and functions. Neuron-NG2 cell synapses could fine-tune NG2 cell activities, including the NG2 cell cycle, differentiation, migration, and myelination, and may be a novel potential therapeutic target for NG2 cell-related diseases, such as hypoxia-ischemia injury and periventricular leukomalacia. Furthermore, neuron-NG2 cell synapses may be correlated with the plasticity of CNS in adulthood with the synaptic contacts passing onto their progenies during proliferation, and synaptic contacts decrease rapidly upon NG2 cell differentiation. In this review, we highlight the characteristics of classical and nonclassical neuron-NG2 cell synapses, the potential functions, and the fate of synaptic contacts during proliferation and differentiation, with the emphasis on the regulation of the NG2 cell cycle by neuron-NG2 cell synapses and their potential underlying mechanisms.

  12. Differentiation of Dental Pulp Stem Cells into Neuron-Like Cells in Serum-Free Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahrul Hisham Zainal Ariffin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental pulp tissue contains dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs. Dental pulp cells (also known as dental pulp-derived mesenchymal stem cells are capable of differentiating into multilineage cells including neuron-like cells. The aim of this study was to examine the capability of DPSCs to differentiate into neuron-like cells without using any reagents or growth factors. DPSCs were isolated from teeth extracted from 6- to 8-week-old mice and maintained in complete medium. The cells from the fourth passage were induced to differentiate by culturing in medium without serum or growth factors. RT-PCR molecular analysis showed characteristics of Cd146+, Cd166+, and Cd31− in DPSCs, indicating that these cells are mesenchymal stem cells rather than hematopoietic stem cells. After 5 days of neuronal differentiation, the cells showed neuron-like morphological changes and expressed MAP2 protein. The activation of Nestin was observed at low level prior to differentiation and increased after 5 days of culture in differentiation medium, whereas Tub3 was activated only after 5 days of neuronal differentiation. The proliferation of the differentiated cells decreased in comparison to that of the control cells. Dental pulp stem cells are induced to differentiate into neuron-like cells when cultured in serum- and growth factor-free medium.

  13. Acetyl L-carnitine protects motor neurons and Rohon-Beard sensory neurons against ketamine-induced neurotoxicity in zebrafish embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuevas, Elvis; Trickler, William J; Guo, Xiaoqing; Ali, Syed F; Paule, Merle G; Kanungo, Jyotshna

    2013-01-01

    Ketamine, a non-competitive antagonist of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) type glutamate receptors is commonly used as a pediatric anesthetic. Multiple studies have shown ketamine to be neurotoxic, particularly when administered during the brain growth spurt. Previously, we have shown that ketamine is detrimental to motor neuron development in the zebrafish embryos. Here, using both wild type (WT) and transgenic (hb9:GFP) zebrafish embryos, we demonstrate that ketamine is neurotoxic to both motor and sensory neurons. Drug absorption studies showed that in the WT embryos, ketamine accumulation was approximately 0.4% of the original dose added to the exposure medium. The transgenic embryos express green fluorescent protein (GFP) localized in the motor neurons making them ideal for evaluating motor neuron development and toxicities in vivo. The hb9:GFP zebrafish embryos (28 h post fertilization) treated with 2 mM ketamine for 20 h demonstrated significant reductions in spinal motor neuron numbers, while co-treatment with acetyl L-carnitine proved to be neuroprotective. In whole mount immunohistochemical studies using WT embryos, a similar effect was observed for the primary sensory neurons. In the ketamine-treated WT embryos, the number of primary sensory Rohon-Beard (RB) neurons was significantly reduced compared to that in controls. However, acetyl L-carnitine co-treatment prevented ketamine-induced adverse effects on the RB neurons. These results suggest that acetyl L-carnitine protects both motor and sensory neurons from ketamine-induced neurotoxicity.

  14. Mechanisms of Neuronal Protection against Excitotoxicity, Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress, and Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Stroke and Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howard Prentice

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In stroke and neurodegenerative disease, neuronal excitotoxicity, caused by increased extracellular glutamate levels, is known to result in calcium overload and mitochondrial dysfunction. Mitochondrial deficits may involve a deficiency in energy supply as well as generation of high levels of oxidants which are key contributors to neuronal cell death through necrotic and apoptotic mechanisms. Excessive glutamate receptor stimulation also results in increased nitric oxide generation which can be detrimental to cells as nitric oxide interacts with superoxide to form the toxic molecule peroxynitrite. High level oxidant production elicits neuronal apoptosis through the actions of proapoptotic Bcl-2 family members resulting in mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening. In addition to apoptotic responses to severe stress, accumulation of misfolded proteins and high levels of oxidants can elicit endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress pathways which may also contribute to induction of apoptosis. Two categories of therapeutics are discussed that impact major pro-death events that include induction of oxidants, calcium overload, and ER stress. The first category of therapeutic agent includes the amino acid taurine which prevents calcium overload and is also capable of preventing ER stress by inhibiting specific ER stress pathways. The second category involves N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDA receptor partial antagonists illustrated by S-Methyl-N, N-diethyldithiocarbamate sulfoxide (DETC-MeSO, and memantine. DETC-MeSO is protective through preventing excitotoxicity and calcium overload and by blocking specific ER stress pathways. Another NMDA receptor partial antagonist is memantine which prevents excessive glutamate excitation but also remarkably allows maintenance of physiological neurotransmission. Targeting of these major sites of neuronal damage using pharmacological agents is discussed in terms of potential therapeutic approaches for

  15. Protection of neurons and microglia against ethanol in a mouse model of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ agonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Cynthia J M; Phelan, Kevin D; Han, Lihong; Smith, Renea R; Xie, Jin; Douglas, James C; Drew, Paul D

    2011-06-01

    Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) result from ethanol exposure to the developing fetus and are the most common cause of mental retardation in the United States. These disorders are characterized by a variety of neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative anomalies which result in significant lifetime disabilities. Thus, novel therapies are required to limit the devastating consequences of FASD. Neuropathology associated with FASD can occur throughout the central nervous system (CNS), but is particularly well characterized in the developing cerebellum. Rodent models of FASD have previously demonstrated that both Purkinje cells and granule cells, which are the two major types of neurons in the cerebellum, are highly susceptible to the toxic effects of ethanol. The current studies demonstrate that ethanol decreases the viability of cultured cerebellar granule cells and microglial cells. Interestingly, microglia have dual functionality in the CNS. They provide trophic and protective support to neurons. However, they may also become pathologically activated and produce inflammatory molecules toxic to parenchymal cells including neurons. The findings in this study demonstrate that the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ agonists 15-deoxy-Δ12,15 prostaglandin J2 and pioglitazone protect cultured granule cells and microglia from the toxic effects of ethanol. Furthermore, investigations using a newly developed mouse model of FASD and stereological cell counting methods in the cerebellum elucidate that ethanol administration to neonates is toxic to both Purkinje cell neurons as well as microglia, and that in vivo administration of PPAR-γ agonists protects these cells. In composite, these studies suggest that PPAR-γ agonists may be effective in limiting ethanol-induced toxicity to the developing CNS.

  16. Fractalkine/CX3CL1 protects striatal neurons from synergistic morphine and HIV-1 Tat-induced dendritic losses and death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzuki Masami

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fractalkine/CX3CL1 and its cognate receptor CX3CR1 are abundantly expressed in the CNS. Fractalkine is an unusual C-X3-C motif chemokine that is important in neuron-microglial communication, a co-receptor for HIV infection, and can be neuroprotective. To assess the effects of fractalkine on opiate-HIV interactive neurotoxicity, wild-type murine striatal neurons were co-cultured with mixed glia from the striata of wild-type or Cx3cr1 knockout mice ± HIV-1 Tat and/or morphine. Time-lapse digital images were continuously recorded at 20 min intervals for up to 72 h using computer-aided microscopy to track the same cells repeatedly. Results Co-exposure to Tat and morphine caused synergistic increases in neuron death, dendritic pruning, and microglial motility as previously reported. Exogenous fractalkine prevented synergistic Tat and morphine-induced dendritic losses and neuron death even though the inflammatory mediator TNF-α remained significantly elevated. Antibody blockade of CX3CR1 mimicked the toxic effects of morphine plus Tat, but did not add to their toxicity; while fractalkine failed to protect wild-type neurons co-cultured with Cx3cr1-/--null glia against morphine and Tat toxicity. Exogenous fractalkine also normalized microglial motility, which is elevated by Tat and morphine co-exposure, presumably limiting microglial surveillance that may lead to toxic effects on neurons. Fractalkine immunofluorescence was expressed in neurons and to a lesser extent by other cell types, whereas CX3CR1 immunoreactivity or GFP fluorescence in cells cultured from the striatum of Cx3cr1-/- (Cx3cr1GFP/GFP mice were associated with microglia. Immunoblotting shows that fractalkine levels were unchanged following Tat and/or morphine exposure and there was no increase in released fractalkine as determined by ELISA. By contrast, CX3CR1 protein levels were markedly downregulated. Conclusions The results suggest that deficits in fractalkine

  17. A major role for Tau in neuronal DNA and RNA protection in vivo under physiological and hyperthermic conditions

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    Marie eViolet

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Nucleic acid protection is a substantial challenge for neurons, which are continuously exposed to oxidative stress in the brain. Neurons require powerful mechanisms to protect DNA and RNA integrity and ensure their functionality and longevity. Beside its well known role in microtubule dynamics, we recently discovered that Tau is also a key nuclear player in the protection of neuronal genomic DNA integrity under reactive oxygen species (ROS-inducing heat stress (HS conditions in primary neuronal cultures. In this report, we analyzed the capacity of Tau to protect neuronal DNA integrity in vivo in adult mice under physiological and HS conditions. We designed an in vivo mouse model of hyperthermia/HS to induce a transient increase in ROS production in the brain. Comet and TUNEL assays demonstrated that Tau protected genomic DNA in adult cortical and hippocampal neurons in vivo under physiological conditions in wild-type and Tau-deficient (KO-Tau mice. HS increased DNA breaks in KO-Tau neurons. Notably, KO-Tau hippocampal neurons in the CA1 subfield restored DNA integrity after HS more weakly than the dentate gyrus neurons. The formation of phosphorylated histone H2AX foci, a double-strand break marker, was observed in KO-Tau neurons only after HS, indicating that Tau deletion did not trigger similar DNA damage under physiological or HS conditions. Moreover, genomic DNA and cytoplasmic and nuclear RNA integrity were altered under HS in hippocampal neurons exhibiting Tau deficiency, which suggests that Tau also modulates RNA metabolism. Our results suggest that Tau alterations lead to a loss of its nucleic acid safeguarding functions and participate in the accumulation of DNA and RNA oxidative damage observed in the Alzheimer’s disease brain.

  18. 星形胶质细胞通过谷胱甘肽保护MN9D细胞抵抗鱼藤酮所致氧化应激%Astrocytes protect MN9D neuronal cells against rotenone-induced oxidative stress by a glutathione-dependent mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹倩; 魏灵荣; 鲁玲玲; 赵春礼; 赵焕英; 杨慧

    2007-01-01

    星形胶质细胞维持神经元微环境,给予营养和代谢支持,并调节其对损伤的反应.鱼藤酮特异阻断线粒体复合物I,长期暴露于鱼藤酮可能增加患帕金森病的几率,并引起帕金森综合征.然而,星形胶质细胞在鱼藤酮所致多巴胺能神经元损伤过程中的作用尚无报道.本研究采用多巴胺能神经元细胞系MN9D细胞模型,将经过或未经过星形胶质细胞条件培养基处理的MN9D细胞暴露于不同浓度的鱼藤酮中,用计数法测生长曲线,MTT法测细胞活性,DCFH染色流式细胞仪测氧化应激水平,比色法测还原型谷胱甘肽含量.结果显示,MN9D细胞在条件和普通培养基培养条件下生长曲线无明显差别;鱼藤酮浓度依赖性地降低细胞活性;不同浓度鱼藤酮作用24、48h后,经条件培养基处理的细胞其活性显著高于普通培养基培养的细胞;不同浓度的条件培养基都有保护作用,纯的条件培养基保护作用稍弱;预先24h条件培养基处理或同时给予鱼藤酮和条件培养基处理都有保护作用,鱼藤酮作用12h后再给予条件培养基则无保护作用;经条件培养基处理的细胞氧化应激水平降低;另外,条件培养基提高了细胞内还原型谷胱甘肽含量,缓解了鱼藤酮所致的谷胱甘肽耗竭.结果提示,星形胶质细胞可保护MN9D细胞抵抗鱼藤酮所致的氧化应激,还原型谷胱甘肽可能参与了该保护过程.%Astrocytes maintain homeostasis of neuronal microenvironment, provide metabolic and trophic support to neurons and modulate neuronal responses to injury. Rotenone specifically inhibits mitochondrial complex I, and long exposure to rotenone may increase the risk for Parkinson's disease (PD) and cause Parkinsonism. However,little is known about the role of astrocytes in the process of rotenone-induced dopaminergic neuron injury. In order to investigate this issue, we used MN9D cells as a cell model of dopaminergic neurons and

  19. Protective effect of melatonin on myenteric neuron damage in experimental colitis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Boxin; Shi, Haitao; Wang, Xiaoyan; Guo, Xiaoyan; Wang, Nan; Wang, Yan; Dong, Lei

    2016-04-01

    Inflammation of the colon in patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) causes pain and altered motility, at least in part through the damage of the myenteric neurons (MNs). Thus, it is important to evaluate new drugs for UC treatment that could also protect myenteric neurons efficiently. As a well-known neural protective and anti-inflammatory agent, melatonin could protect neurons from damage through the activation of the nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 and antioxidant responsive element (Nrf2-ARE) signaling pathway. Therefore, we investigated the potential protective effect of melatonin against MN damage during colitis induced by 2,4-dinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (DNBS) in rats. Colitis was induced by intracolonic (i.c.) instillation of DNBS and treated with melatonin at a dose of 2.5 mg/kg for 4 days. The damage of MN in the left colon was immunohistochemically evaluated in different groups. Ulcerations and inflammation in the colon were semiquantitatively observed. Myeloperoxidase (MPO), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were detected to evaluate the inflammatory and oxidative stress status. The protein and mRNA expressions of Nrf2 and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in the colon were detected by Western blot and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), respectively. Melatonin partially prevented the loss of MN and alleviated the inflammation and oxidative stress induced by DNBS. In addition, melatonin markedly increased the Nrf2 and HO-1 level in the colitis. These results indicate that melatonin protects MN from damage by reducing inflammation and oxidative stress, effects that are partly mediated by the Nrf2-ARE pathway.

  20. Differentiation of neuroepithelial stem cells into functional dopaminergic neurons in 3D microfluidic cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Edinson Lucumi; Hachi, Siham; Hemmer, Kathrin; Trietsch, Sebastiaan J; Baumuratov, Aidos S; Hankemeier, Thomas; Vulto, Paul; Schwamborn, Jens C; Fleming, Ronan M T

    2015-06-07

    A hallmark of Parkinson's disease is the progressive loss of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons. We derived human neuroepithelial cells from induced pluripotent stem cells and successfully differentiated them into dopaminergic neurons within phase-guided, three-dimensional microfluidic cell culture bioreactors. After 30 days of differentiation within the microfluidic bioreactors, in situ morphological, immunocytochemical and calcium imaging confirmed the presence of dopaminergic neurons that were spontaneously electrophysiologically active, a characteristic feature of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons in vivo. Differentiation was as efficient as in macroscopic culture, with up to 19% of differentiated neurons immunoreactive for tyrosine hydroxylase, the penultimate enzyme in the synthesis of dopamine. This new microfluidic cell culture model integrates the latest innovations in developmental biology and microfluidic cell culture to generate a biologically realistic and economically efficient route to personalised drug discovery for Parkinson's disease.

  1. Magnolol protects neurons against ischemia injury via the downregulation of p38/MAPK, CHOP and nitrotyrosine

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    Chen, Jiann-Hwa [Institute of Traditional Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); School of Medicine, Fu-Jen Catholic University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Emergency Medicine, Cathay General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Kuo, Hsing-Chun [Institute of Nursing and Department of Nursing, Chang Gung University of Science and Technology, Taiwan (China); Chronic Diseases and Health Promotion Research Center, CGUST, Taiwan (China); Research Center for Industry of Human Ecology, Chang Gung University of Science and Technology, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Lee, Kam-Fai [Department of Pathology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital at Chiayi, Taiwan (China); Tsai, Tung-Hu, E-mail: thtsai@ym.edu.tw [Institute of Traditional Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Acupuncture Science, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Education and Research, Taipei City Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2014-09-15

    Magnolol is isolated from the herb Magnolia officinalis, which has been demonstrated to exert pharmacological effects. Our aim was to investigate whether magnolol is able to act as an anti-inflammatory agent that brings about neuroprotection using a global ischemic stroke model and to determine the mechanisms involved. Rats were treated with and without magnolol after ischemia reperfusion brain injury by occlusion of the two common carotid arteries. The inflammatory cytokine production in serum and the volume of infarction in the brain were measured. The proteins present in the brains obtained from the stroke animal model (SAM) and control animal groups with and without magnolol treatment were compared. Magnolol reduces the total infarcted volume by 15% and 30% at dosages of 10 and 30 mg/kg, respectively, compared to the untreated SAM group. The levels of acute inflammatory cytokines, including interleukin-1 beta, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and interleukin-6 were attenuated by magnolol. Magnolol was also able to suppress the production of nitrotyrosine, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE), inducible NO synthase (iNOS), various phosphorylated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases and various C/EBP homologues. Furthermore, this modulation of ischemia injury factors in the SAM model group treated with magnolol seems to result from a suppression of reactive oxygen species production and the upregulation of p-Akt and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB). These findings confirm the anti-oxidative properties of magnolol, including the inhibition of ischemic injury to neurons; this protective effect seems to involve changes in the in vivo activity of Akt, GSK3β and NF-κB. - Graphical abstract: Schematic presentation of the signaling pathways involved in magnolol inhibited transient global ischemia brain apoptosis and inflammation in rats. The effect of magnolol on the scavenger of ROS, which inhibits p38 MAPK and CHOP protein inactivation

  2. Bmi1 is down-regulated in the aging brain and displays antioxidant and protective activities in neurons.

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    Mohamed Abdouh

    Full Text Available Aging increases the risk to develop several neurodegenerative diseases, although the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Inactivation of the Polycomb group gene Bmi1 in mice results in growth retardation, cerebellar degeneration, and development of a premature aging-like phenotype. This progeroid phenotype is characterized by formation of lens cataracts, apoptosis of cortical neurons, and increase of reactive oxygen species (ROS concentrations, owing to p53-mediated repression of antioxidant response (AOR genes. Herein we report that Bmi1 expression progressively declines in the neurons of aging mouse and human brains. In old brains, p53 accumulates at the promoter of AOR genes, correlating with a repressed chromatin state, down-regulation of AOR genes, and increased oxidative damages to lipids and DNA. Comparative gene expression analysis further revealed that aging brains display an up-regulation of the senescence-associated genes IL-6, p19(Arf and p16(Ink4a, along with the pro-apoptotic gene Noxa, as seen in Bmi1-null mice. Increasing Bmi1 expression in cortical neurons conferred robust protection against DNA damage-induced cell death or mitochondrial poisoning, and resulted in suppression of ROS through activation of AOR genes. These observations unveil that Bmi1 genetic deficiency recapitulates aspects of physiological brain aging and that Bmi1 over-expression is a potential therapeutic modality against neurodegeneration.

  3. Neuropharmacological properties of neurons derived from human stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyne, Leanne; Shan, Mu; Przyborski, Stefan A; Hirakawa, Ryoko; Halliwell, Robert F

    2011-09-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells have enormous potential value in neuropharmacology and drug discovery yet there is little data on the major classes and properties of receptors and ion channels expressed by neurons derived from these stem cells. Recent studies in this lab have therefore used conventional patch-clamp electrophysiology to investigate the pharmacological properties of the ligand and voltage-gated ion channels in neurons derived and maintained in vitro from the human stem cell (hSC) line, TERA2.cl.SP12. TERA2.cl.SP12 stem cells were differentiated with retinoic acid and used in electrophysiological experiments 28-50 days after beginning differentiation. HSC-derived neurons generated large whole cell currents with depolarizing voltage steps (-80 to 30 mV) comprised of an inward, rapidly inactivating component and a delayed, slowly deactivating outward component. The fast inward current was blocked by the sodium channel blocker tetrodotoxin (0.1 μM) and the outward currents were significantly reduced by tetraethylammonium ions (TEA, 5 mM) consistent with the presence of functional Na and K ion channels. Application of the inhibitory neurotransmitters, GABA (0.1-1000 μM) or glycine (0.1-1000 μM) evoked concentration dependent currents. The GABA currents were inhibited by the convulsants, picrotoxin (10 μM) and bicuculline (3 μM), potentiated by the NSAID mefenamic acid (10-100 μM), the general anaesthetic pentobarbital (100 μM), the neurosteroid allopregnanolone and the anxiolytics chlordiazepoxide (10 μM) and diazepam (10 μM) all consistent with the expression of GABA(A) receptors. Responses to glycine were reversibly blocked by strychnine (10 μM) consistent with glycine-gated chloride channels. The excitatory agonists, glutamate (1-1000 μM) and NMDA (1-1000 μM) activated concentration-dependent responses from hSC-derived neurons. Glutamate currents were inhibited by kynurenic acid (1 mM) and NMDA responses were blocked by MgCl(2) (2 mM) in a

  4. Near infrared radiation protects against oxygen-glucose deprivation-induced neurotoxicity by down-regulating neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) activity in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhanyang; Li, Zhaoyu; Liu, Ning; Jizhang, Yunneng; McCarthy, Thomas J; Tedford, Clark E; Lo, Eng H; Wang, Xiaoying

    2015-06-01

    Near infrared radiation (NIR) has been shown to be neuroprotective against neurological diseases including stroke and brain trauma, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. In the current study we aimed to investigate the hypothesis that NIR may protect neurons by attenuating oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD)-induced nitric oxide (NO) production and modulating cell survival/death signaling. Primary mouse cortical neurons were subjected to 4 h OGD and NIR was applied at 2 h reoxygenation. OGD significantly increased NO level in primary neurons compared to normal control, which was significantly ameliorated by NIR at 5 and 30 min post-NIR. Neither OGD nor NIR significantly changed neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) mRNA or total protein levels compared to control groups. However, OGD significantly increased nNOS activity compared to normal control, and this effect was significantly diminished by NIR. Moreover, NIR significantly ameliorated the neuronal death induced by S-Nitroso-N-acetyl-DL-penicillamine (SNAP), a NO donor. Finally, NIR significantly rescued OGD-induced suppression of p-Akt and Bcl-2 expression, and attenuated OGD-induced upregulation of Bax, BAD and caspase-3 activation. These results suggest NIR may protect against OGD at least partially through reducing NO production by down-regulating nNOS activity, and modulating cell survival/death signaling.

  5. Interleukin-1beta but not tumor necrosis factor-alpha potentiates neuronal damage by quinolinic acid: protection by an adenosine A2A receptor antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Trevor W; Behan, Wilhelmina M H

    2007-04-01

    Quinolinic acid is an agonist at glutamate receptors sensitive to N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA). It has been implicated in neural dysfunction associated with infections, trauma, and ischemia, although its neurotoxic potency is relatively low. This study was designed to examine the effects of a combination of quinolinic acid and the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). Compounds were administered to the hippocampus of anesthetized male rats, animals being allowed to recover for 7 days before histological analysis of the hippocampus for neuronal damage estimated by counting of intact, healthy neurons. A low dose of quinolinic acid or IL-1beta produced no damage by itself, but the two together induced a significant loss of pyramidal neurons in the hippocampus. Higher doses produced almost total loss of pyramidal cells. Intrahippocampal TNF-alpha produced no effect alone but significantly reduced the neuronal loss produced by quinolinic acid. The adenosine A(2A) receptor antagonist ZM241385 reduced neuronal loss produced by the combinations of quinolinic acid and IL-1beta. The results suggest that simultaneous quinolinic acid and IL-1beta, both being induced by cerebral infection or injury, are synergistic in the production of neuronal damage and could together contribute substantially to traumatic, infective, or ischemic cerebral damage. Antagonism of adenosine A(2A) receptors protects neurons against the combination of quinolinic acid and IL-1beta.

  6. Activin A prevents neuron-like PC12 cell apoptosis after oxygen-glucose deprivation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guihua Xu; Zhongxin Xu; Jinting He; Hongliang Guo; Chunli Mei; Jiaoqi Wang; Zhongshu Li; Han Chen; Jing Mang; Hong Yang

    2013-01-01

    In this study, PC12 cells were induced to differentiate into neuron-like cells using nerve growth factor, and were subjected to oxygen-glucose deprivation. Cells were treated with 0, 10, 20, 30, 50, 100 ng/mL exogenous Activin A. The 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay and Hoechst 33324 staining showed that the survival percentage of PC12 cells significantly decreased and the rate of apoptosis significantly increased after oxygen-glucose deprivation. Exogenous Activin A significantly increased the survival percentage of PC12 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Reverse transcription-PCR results revealed a significant increase in Activin receptor IIA, Smad3 and Smad4 mRNA levels, which are key sites in the Activin A/Smads signaling pathway, in neuron-like cells subjected to oxygen-glucose deprivation, while mRNA expression of the apoptosis-regulation gene caspase-3 decreased. Our experimental findings indicate that exogenous Activin A plays an anti-apoptotic role and protects neurons by means of activating the Activin A/Smads signaling pathway.

  7. Astrocytes require insulin-like growth factor I to protect neurons against oxidative injury [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/38u

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    Laura Genis

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is a proposed mechanism in brain aging, making the study of its regulatory processes an important aspect of current neurobiological research. In this regard, the role of the aging regulator insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I in brain responses to oxidative stress remains elusive as both beneficial and detrimental actions have been ascribed to this growth factor. Because astrocytes protect neurons against oxidative injury, we explored whether IGF-I participates in astrocyte neuroprotection and found that blockade of the IGF-I receptor in astrocytes abrogated their rescuing effect on neurons. We found that IGF-I directly protects astrocytes against oxidative stress (H2O2. Indeed, in astrocytes but not in neurons, IGF-I decreases the pro-oxidant protein thioredoxin-interacting protein 1 and normalizes the levels of reactive oxygen species. Furthermore, IGF-I cooperates with trophic signals produced by astrocytes in response to H2O2 such as stem cell factor (SCF to protect neurons against oxidative insult. After stroke, a condition associated with brain aging where oxidative injury affects peri-infarcted regions, a simultaneous increase in SCF and IGF-I expression was found in the cortex, suggesting that a similar cooperative response takes place in vivo. Cell-specific modulation by IGF-I of brain responses to oxidative stress may contribute in clarifying the role of IGF-I in brain aging.

  8. FDA-approved drugs that protect mammalian neurons from glucose toxicity slow aging dependent on cbp and protect against proteotoxicity.

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    Alex Lublin

    Full Text Available Screening a library of drugs with known safety profiles in humans yielded 30 drugs that reliably protected mammalian neurons against glucose toxicity. Subsequent screening demonstrated that 6 of these 30 drugs increase lifespan in C. elegans: caffeine, ciclopirox olamine, tannic acid, acetaminophen, bacitracin, and baicalein. Every drug significantly reduced the age-dependent acceleration of mortality rate. These protective effects were blocked by RNAi inhibition of cbp-1 in adults only, which also blocks protective effects of dietary restriction. Only 2 drugs, caffeine and tannic acid, exhibited a similar dependency on DAF-16. Caffeine, tannic acid, and bacitracin also reduced pathology in a transgenic model of proteotoxicity associated with Alzheimer's disease. These results further support a key role for glucose toxicity in driving age-related pathologies and for CBP-1 in protection against age-related pathologies. These results also provide novel lead compounds with known safety profiles in human for treatment of age-related diseases, including Alzheimer's disease and diabetic complications.

  9. Human pluripotent stem cell differentiation into authentic striatal projection neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delli Carri, Alessia; Onorati, Marco; Castiglioni, Valentina; Faedo, Andrea; Camnasio, Stefano; Toselli, Mauro; Biella, Gerardo; Cattaneo, Elena

    2013-08-01

    Here we present the principles and steps of a protocol that we have recently developed for the differentiation of hES/iPS cells into the authentic human striatal projection medium spiny neurons (MSNs) that die in Huntington's Disease (HD). Authenticity is judged by the convergence of multiple features within individual cells. Our procedure lasts 80 days and couples neural induction via BMP/TGF-β inhibition with exposure to the developmental factors sonic hedgehog (SHH) and dickkopf1 (DKK-1) to drive ventral telencephalic specification, followed by terminal differentiation [1]. Authenticity of the resulting neuronal population is monitored by the appearance of FOXG1(+)/GSX2(+) progenitor cells of the lateral ganglionic eminence (LGE) at day 15-25 of differentiation, followed by appearance of CTIP2-, FOXP1- and FOXP2-positive cells at day 45. These precursor cells then mature into MAP2(+)/GABA(+) neurons with 20 % of them ultimately co-expressing the DARPP-32 and CTIP2 diagnostic markers and carrying electrophysiological properties expected for fully functional MSNs.The protocol is characterized by its replicability in at least three human pluripotent cell lines. Altogether this protocol defines a useful platform for in vitro developmental neurobiology studies, drug screening, and regenerative medicine approaches.

  10. Protective effect of sodium valproate on motor neurons in the spinal cord following sciatic nerve injury in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fei Wu; Danmou Xing; Zhengren Peng; Wusheng Kan

    2006-01-01

    /total number of cells× 100%) was calculated.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: A value of neurons with positive Bcl-2 expression and apoptotic rate in spinal cord of rats in the two groups.RESULTS: A total of 30 SD rats were involved in the result analysis. ①expression of positive Bcl-2 neurons: A value of positive Bcl-2 neurons were 0.71 ±0.02, 0.86±0.04, 1.02±0.06 at days 4, 7 and 14, respectively after operation in the treatment group, which were obviously higher than those in the model group (0.62±0.03, 0.71±0.05, 0.89±0.04, t = 3.10-4.50, P < 0.05). ②apoptotic result of motor neurons: Apoptotic rate of motor neurons in spinal cord was (6.91±0.89)% and (15.12±2.34)% at days 7 and 14 in the treatment group, which was significantly lower than those in the model group [(9.45±1.61)%, (19.35±0.92)%, t= 2.39, 3.03. P< 0.05].CONCLUSION: VPA can increase expression of Bcl-2 in spinal cord and reduce neuronal apoptosis in rats following sciatic nerve injury, and has protective effect on motor neuron in spinal cord of rats.

  11. Septo-hippocampal deafferentation protects CA1 neurons against ischemic injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchan, A M; Pulsinelli, W A

    1990-03-26

    Excessive synaptic excitation caused by transient cerebral ischemia has been proposed to explain the greater vulnerability of specific neuronal populations to ischemic injury. We tested this hypothesis in rats by cutting, alone or in combination, the afferent fibers that travel in the fimbria/fornix, the perforant, or the Schäffer collateral pathways and innervate the right CA1 hippocampus. Seven to twelve days later the animals were subjected to 30 min of reversible forebrain ischemia. Irreversible damage to the CA1 neurons was assessed with the light microscope after 70-120 h of cerebral reperfusion. The left, unlesioned hippocampus served as a control. Simultaneous cutting of the 3 major afferent pathways significantly reduced CA1 neuronal damage compared to the unlesioned side (P less than 0.001) or to sham-lesioned controls (P less than 0.001). Selective lesions of the fimbria/fornix but not the perforant or the Schäffer collateral pathways also protected against ischemic CA1 damage. These data indicate that afferent fiber input modulates hippocampal damage caused by ischemia, but they are inconsistent with the hypothesis that excitatory afferent fibers, travelling in either the perforant or the Schäffer collateral pathways alone, play a major role. Neurotransmitters, other than those activating excitatory amino acid receptors or yet-to-be-identified synaptic events, may be invoked to explain the spatial and temporal sensitivity of hippocampal CA1 neurons to ischemia.

  12. Protection from neuronal damage induced by combined oxygen and glucose deprivation in organotypic hippocampal cultures by glutamate receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strasser, U; Fischer, G

    1995-07-31

    Organotypic hippocampal cultures were exposed to defined periods (30 and 60 min) of combined oxygen and glucose deprivation, mimicking transient ischemic conditions. The involvement of different glutamate receptors in individual hippocampal subfields (CA1, CA3 and dentate gyrus) was studied using antagonists of NMDA (dizocilpine) and AMPA/kainate receptors (CNQX and GYKI 52466). Staining with the fluorescent dye propidium iodide (PI) allowed detection of damaged cells. For quantitative determination of neuronal damage, fluorescence intensity was measured after a 22 h recovery period and was related to maximal fluorescence intensity measured after fixation and PI restaining of the cultures at the end of the experiment. Dizocilpine (10 microM), CNQX (100 microM) and GYKI 52466 (100 microM) provided complete protection in CA1, CA3 and dentate gyrus following the moderate ischemic insult, when the antagonists were present permanently. This indicates that none of the ionotropic glutamate receptor subtypes dominated toxicity in the most sensitive subpopulation of neurons. When applied only during the recovery period protection with dizocilpine (10 microM) or CNQX (100 microM) was drastically reduced by about 60% in the most sensitive area (CA1), but only slightly by 15% in CA3. Therefore the onset of irreversible damage seems to occur earlier in CA1 than in CA3. Blockade of AMPA/kainate receptors by GYKI 52466 (100 microM) offered no neuroprotection if the compound was applied only during the recovery period.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Liposomes to target peripheral neurons and Schwann cells.

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    Sooyeon Lee

    Full Text Available While a wealth of literature for tissue-specific liposomes is emerging, optimal formulations to target the cells of the peripheral nervous system (PNS are lacking. In this study, we asked whether a novel formulation of phospholipid-based liposomes could be optimized for preferential uptake by microvascular endothelia, peripheral neurons and Schwann cells. Here, we report a unique formulation consisting of a phospholipid, a polymer surfactant and cholesterol that result in enhanced uptake by targeted cells. Using fluorescently labeled liposomes, we followed particle internalization and trafficking through a distinct route from dextran and escape from degradative compartments, such as lysosomes. In cultures of non-myelinating Schwann cells, liposomes associate with the lipid raft marker Cholera toxin, and their internalization is inhibited by disruption of lipid rafts or actin polymerization. In contrast, pharmacological inhibition of clathrin-mediated endocytosis does not significantly impact liposome entry. To evaluate the efficacy of liposome targeting in tissues, we utilized myelinating explant cultures of dorsal root ganglia and isolated diaphragm preparations, both of which contain peripheral neurons and myelinating Schwann cells. In these models, we detected preferential liposome uptake into neurons and glial cells in comparison to surrounding muscle tissue. Furthermore, in vivo liposome administration by intramuscular or intravenous injection confirmed that the particles were delivered to myelinated peripheral nerves. Within the CNS, we detected the liposomes in choroid epithelium, but not in myelinated white matter regions or in brain parenchyma. The described nanoparticles represent a novel neurophilic delivery vehicle for targeting small therapeutic compounds, biological molecules, or imaging reagents into peripheral neurons and Schwann cells, and provide a major advancement toward developing effective therapies for peripheral

  14. Human neuronal cell protein responses to Nipah virus infection

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    Hassan Sharifah

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nipah virus (NiV, a recently discovered zoonotic virus infects and replicates in several human cell types. Its replication in human neuronal cells, however, is less efficient in comparison to other fully susceptible cells. In the present study, the SK-N-MC human neuronal cell protein response to NiV infection is examined using proteomic approaches. Results Method for separation of the NiV-infected human neuronal cell proteins using two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE was established. At least 800 protein spots were resolved of which seven were unique, six were significantly up-regulated and eight were significantly down-regulated. Six of these altered proteins were identified using mass spectrometry (MS and confirmed using MS/MS. The heterogenous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP F, guanine nucleotide binding protein (G protein, voltage-dependent anion channel 2 (VDAC2 and cytochrome bc1 were present in abundance in the NiV-infected SK-N-MC cells in contrast to hnRNPs H and H2 that were significantly down-regulated. Conclusion Several human neuronal cell proteins that are differentially expressed following NiV infection are identified. The proteins are associated with various cellular functions and their abundance reflects their significance in the cytopathologic responses to the infection and the regulation of NiV replication. The potential importance of the ratio of hnRNP F, and hnRNPs H and H2 in regulation of NiV replication, the association of the mitochondrial protein with the cytopathologic responses to the infection and induction of apoptosis are highlighted.

  15. EGFR mediates astragaloside IV-induced Nrf2 activation to protect cortical neurons against in vitro ischemia/reperfusion damages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, Da-min [Department of Anesthesiology, Affiliated Yixing People' s Hospital, Jiangsu University, Yixing (China); Lu, Pei-Hua, E-mail: lphty1_1@163.com [Department of Medical Oncology, Wuxi People' s Hospital Affiliated to Nanjing Medical University, Wuxi (China); Zhang, Ke; Wang, Xiang [Department of Anesthesiology, Affiliated Yixing People' s Hospital, Jiangsu University, Yixing (China); Sun, Min [Department of General Surgery, Affiliated Yixing People' s Hospital, Jiangsu University, Yixing (China); Chen, Guo-Qian [Department of Clinical Laboratory, Wuxi People' s Hospital Affiliated to Nanjing Medical University, Wuxi (China); Wang, Qiong, E-mail: WangQiongprof1@126.com [Department of Clinical Laboratory, Wuxi People' s Hospital Affiliated to Nanjing Medical University, Wuxi (China)

    2015-02-13

    In this study, we tested the potential role of astragaloside IV (AS-IV) against oxygen and glucose deprivation/re-oxygenation (OGD/R)-induced damages in murine cortical neurons, and studied the associated signaling mechanisms. AS-IV exerted significant neuroprotective effects against OGD/R by reducing reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation, thereby attenuating oxidative stress and neuronal cell death. We found that AS-IV treatment in cortical neurons resulted in NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) signaling activation, evidenced by Nrf2 Ser-40 phosphorylation, and its nuclear localization, as well as transcription of antioxidant-responsive element (ARE)-regulated genes: heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO-1) and sulphiredoxin 1 (SRXN-1). Knockdown of Nrf2 through lentiviral shRNAs prevented AS-IV-induced ARE genes transcription, and abolished its anti-oxidant and neuroprotective activities. Further, we discovered that AS-IV stimulated heparin-binding-epidermal growth factor (HB-EGF) release to trans-activate epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in cortical neurons. Blockage or silencing EGFR prevented Nrf2 activation by AS-IV, thus inhibiting AS-IV-mediated anti-oxidant and neuroprotective activities against OGD/R. In summary, AS-IV protects cortical neurons against OGD/R damages through activating of EGFR-Nrf2 signaling. - Highlights: • Pre-treatment of astragaloside IV (AS-IV) protects murine cortical neurons from OGD/R. • AS-IV activates Nrf2-ARE signaling in murine cortical neurons. • Nrf2 is required for AS-IV-mediated anti-oxidant and neuroprotective activities. • AS-IV stimulates HB-EGF release to trans-activate EGFR in murine cortical neurons. • EGFR mediates AS-IV-induced Nrf2 activation and neuroprotection against OGD/R.

  16. Prohibitin reduces mitochondrial free radical production and protects brain cells from different injury modalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ping; Qian, Liping; D’Aurelio, Marilena; Cho, Sunghee; Wang, Gang; Manfredi, Giovanni; Pickel, Virginia; Iadecola, Costantino

    2012-01-01

    Prohibitin is an essential mitochondrial protein that has been implicated in a wide variety of functions in many cell types, but its role in neurons remains unclear. In a proteomic screen of rat brains in which ischemic tolerance was induced by electrical stimulation of the cerebellar fastigial nucleus, we found that prohibitin is upregulated in mitochondria. This observation prompted us to investigate the role of prohibitin in neuronal death and survival. We found that prohibitin is upregulated also in the ischemic tolerance induced by transient ischemia in vivo, or oxygen-glucose deprivation in neuronal cultures. Cell fractionation and electron microscopic immunolabeling studies demonstrated that prohibitin is localized to neuronal mitochondria. Upregulation of prohibitin in neuronal cultures or hippocampal slices was markedly neuroprotective, whereas prohibitin gene-silencing increased neuronal vulnerability, an effect associated with loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and increased mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species. Prohibitin upregulation was associated with reduced production of reactive oxygen species in mitochondria exposed to the complex I inhibitor rotenone. In addition, prohibitin protected complex I activity from the inhibitory effects of rotenone. These observations, collectively, establish prohibitin as an endogenous neuroprotective protein involved in ischemic tolerance. Prohibitin exerts beneficial effects on neurons by reducing mitochondrial free radical production. The data with complex I activity suggest that prohibitin may stabilize the function of complex I. The protective effect of prohibitin has potential translational relevance in diseases of the nervous system associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress. PMID:22238093

  17. Major histocompatibility complex class I molecules protect motor neurons from astrocyte-induced toxicity in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, SungWon; Miranda, Carlos J; Braun, Lyndsey; Meyer, Kathrin; Frakes, Ashley E; Ferraiuolo, Laura; Likhite, Shibi; Bevan, Adam K; Foust, Kevin D; McConnell, Michael J; Walker, Christopher M; Kaspar, Brian K

    2016-04-01

    Astrocytes isolated from individuals with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) are toxic to motor neurons (MNs) and play a non-cell autonomous role in disease pathogenesis. The mechanisms underlying the susceptibility of MNs to cell death remain unclear. Here we report that astrocytes derived from either mice bearing mutations in genes associated with ALS or human subjects with ALS reduce the expression of major histocompatibility complex class I (MHCI) molecules on MNs; reduced MHCI expression makes these MNs susceptible to astrocyte-induced cell death. Increasing MHCI expression on MNs increases survival and motor performance in a mouse model of ALS and protects MNs against astrocyte toxicity. Overexpression of a single MHCI molecule, HLA-F, protects human MNs from ALS astrocyte-mediated toxicity, whereas knockdown of its receptor, the killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor KIR3DL2, on human astrocytes results in enhanced MN death. Thus, our data indicate that, in ALS, loss of MHCI expression on MNs renders them more vulnerable to astrocyte-mediated toxicity.

  18. MHC mismatch inhibits neurogenesis and neuron maturation in stem cell allografts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiguo Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The role of histocompatibility and immune recognition in stem cell transplant therapy has been controversial, with many reports arguing that undifferentiated stem cells are protected from immune recognition due to the absence of major histocompatibility complex (MHC markers. This argument is even more persuasive in transplantation into the central nervous system (CNS where the graft rejection response is minimal. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we evaluate graft survival and neuron production in perfectly matched vs. strongly mismatched neural stem cells transplanted into the hippocampus in mice. Although allogeneic cells survive, we observe that MHC-mismatch decreases surviving cell numbers and strongly inhibits the differentiation and retention of graft-derived as well as endogenously produced new neurons. Immune suppression with cyclosporine-A did not improve outcome but non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, indomethacin or rosiglitazone, were able to restore allogeneic neuron production, integration and retention to the level of syngeneic grafts. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest an important but unsuspected role for innate, rather than adaptive, immunity in the survival and function of MHC-mismatched cellular grafts in the CNS.

  19. Photoresist Derived Carbon for Growth and Differentiation of Neuronal Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tie Zou

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis or necrosis of neurons in the central nervous system (CNS is thehallmark of many neurodegenerative diseases and Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI. Theinability to regenerate in CNS offers little hope for naturally repairing the damagedneurons. However, with the rapid development of new technologies, regenerative medicineoffers great promises to patients with these disorders. Among many events for furtheradvancement of regenerative medicine, extracellular matrix (ECM plays a critical role forcellular migration and differentiation. To develop a biocompatible and electricallyconductive substrate that can be potentially used to promote growth and regeneration ofneurons and to record intracellular and multisite signals from brain as a probe, a polymericprecursor – SPR 220.7 was fabricated by pyrolysis at temperatures higher than 700 oC.Human Neuroblastoma cells - SK-N-MC, SY5Y, mouse teratocarcinoma cells P-19 and ratPC12 cells were found to attach and proliferate on photoresist derived carbon film.Significantly, neuronal differentiation of PC12 cells induced by NGF was demonstrated byobserving cell shape and size, and measuring the length of neurites under SEM. Our resultsindicated that fabricated carbon could potentially be explored in regenerative medicine forpromoting neuronal growth and differentiation in CNS with neurodegeneration.

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  16. Cellular model of neuronal atrophy induced by DYNC1I1 deficiency reveals protective roles of RAS-RAF-MEK signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Dong Liu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Neuronal atrophy is a common pathological feature occurred in aging and neurodegenerative diseases. A variety of abnormalities including motor protein malfunction and mitochondrial dysfunction contribute to the loss of neuronal architecture; however, less is known about the intracellular signaling pathways that can protect against or delay this pathogenic process. Here, we show that the DYNC1I1 deficiency, a neuron-specific dynein intermediate chain, causes neuronal atrophy in primary hippocampal neurons. With this cellular model, we are able to find that activation of RAS-RAF-MEK signaling protects against neuronal atrophy induced by DYNC1I1 deficiency, which relies on MEK-dependent autophagy in neuron. Moreover, we further reveal that BRAF also protects against neuronal atrophy induced by mitochondrial impairment. These findings demonstrate protective roles of the RAS-RAF-MEK axis against neuronal atrophy, and imply a new therapeutic target for clinical intervention.

  17. Cellular Programming and Reprogramming: Sculpting Cell Fate for the Production of Dopamine Neurons for Cell Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio C. Aguila

    2012-01-01

    success of clinical applications depends on our ability to steer pluripotent stem cells towards the right neuronal identity. In Parkinson disease, the loss of dopamine neurons is more pronounced in the ventrolateral population that projects to the sensorimotor striatum. Because synapses are highly specific, only neurons with this precise identity will contribute, upon transplantation, to the synaptic reconstruction of the dorsal striatum. Thus, understanding the developmental cell program of the mesostriatal dopamine neurons is critical for the identification of the extrinsic signals and cell-intrinsic factors that instruct and, ultimately, determine cell identity. Here, we review how extrinsic signals and transcription factors act together during development to shape midbrain cell fates. Further, we discuss how these same factors can be applied in vitro to induce, select, and reprogram cells to the mesostriatal dopamine fate.

  18. Neuron-mediated generation of regulatory T cells from encephalitogenic T cells suppresses EAE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Yawei; Teige, Ingrid; Birnir, Bryndis

    2006-01-01

    Neurons have been neglected as cells with a major immune-regulatory function because they do not express major histocompatibility complex class II. Our data show that neurons are highly immune regulatory, having a crucial role in governing T-cell response and central nervous system (CNS) inflamma......Neurons have been neglected as cells with a major immune-regulatory function because they do not express major histocompatibility complex class II. Our data show that neurons are highly immune regulatory, having a crucial role in governing T-cell response and central nervous system (CNS......) inflammation. Neurons induce the proliferation of activated CD4+ T cells through B7-CD28 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1-TGF-beta receptor signaling pathways, resulting in amplification of T-cell receptor signaling through phosphorylated ZAP-70, interleukin (IL)-2 and IL-9. The interaction between...... neurons and T cells results in the conversion of encephalitogenic T cells to CD25+ TGF-beta1+ CTLA-4+ FoxP3+ T regulatory (Treg) cells that suppress encephalitogenic T cells and inhibit experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Suppression is dependent on cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen (CTLA)-4...

  19. Neuronal erythropoietin overexpression protects mice against age-related hearing loss (presbycusis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naldi, Arianne Monge; Belfrage, Celina; Jain, Neha; Wei, Eric T; Martorell, Belén Canto; Gassmann, Max; Vogel, Johannes

    2015-12-01

    So far, typical causes of presbycusis such as degeneration of hair cells and/or primary auditory (spiral ganglion) neurons cannot be treated. Because erythropoietin's (Epo) neuroprotective potential has been shown previously, we determined hearing thresholds of juvenile and aged mice overexpressing Epo in neuronal tissues. Behavioral audiometry revealed in contrast to 5 months of age, that 11-month-old Epo-transgenic mice had up to 35 dB lower hearing thresholds between 1.4 and 32 kHz, and at the highest frequencies (50-80 kHz), thresholds could be obtained in aged Epo-transgenic only but not anymore in old C57BL6 control mice. Click-evoked auditory brainstem response showed similar results. Numbers of spiral ganglion neurons in aged C57BL6 but not Epo-transgenic mice were dramatically reduced mainly in the basal turn, the location of high frequencies. In addition, there was a tendency to better preservation of inner and outer hair cells in Epo-transgenic mice. Hence, Epo's known neuroprotective action effectively suppresses the loss of spiral ganglion cells and probably also hair cells and, thus, development of presbycusis in mice.

  20. Neuronal cell fate decisions:  O2 and CO2 sensing neurons require egl-13/Sox5

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gramstrup Petersen, Jakob; Pocock, Roger David John

    2013-01-01

    We recently conducted a study that aimed to describe the differentiation mechanisms used to generate O2 and CO2 sensing neurons in C. elegans. We identified egl-13/Sox5 to be required for the differentiation of both O2 and CO2 sensing neurons. We found that egl-13 functions cell autonomously...... to drive O2 and CO2 sensing neuron fate and is therefore essential for O2 and CO2 sensing-induced behaviors. Through systematic dissection of the egl-13 promoter we identified upstream regulators of egl-13 and proposed a model of how differentiation of O2 and CO2 sensing neurons is regulated...

  1. L-carnitine protects neurons from 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium-induced neuronal apoptosis in rat forebrain culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C; Sadovova, N; Ali, H K; Duhart, H M; Fu, X; Zou, X; Patterson, T A; Binienda, Z K; Virmani, A; Paule, M G; Slikker, W; Ali, S F

    2007-01-05

    1-Methyl-4-phenylpyridinium ion (MPP+), an inhibitor of mitochondrial complex I, has been widely used as a neurotoxin because it elicits a severe Parkinson's disease-like syndrome with an elevation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and apoptosis. L-carnitine plays an integral role in attenuating the brain injury associated with mitochondrial neurodegenerative disorders. The present study investigates the effects of L-carnitine against the toxicity of MPP+ in rat forebrain primary cultures. Cells in culture were treated for 24 h with 100, 250, 500 and 1000 microM MPP+ alone or co-incubated with L-carnitine. MPP+ produced a dose-related increase in DNA fragmentation as measured by cell death ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay), an increase in the number of TUNEL (terminal dUTP nick-end labeling)-positive cells and a reduction in the mitochondrial metabolism of 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT). No significant effect was observed with the release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), indicating that cell death presumably occurred via apoptotic mechanisms. Co-incubation of MPP+ with L-carnitine significantly reduced MPP+-induced apoptosis. Western blot analyses showed that neurotoxic concentrations of MPP+ decreased the ratio of BCL-X(L) to Bax and decreased the protein levels of polysialic acid neural cell adhesion molecules (PSA-NCAM), a neuron specific marker. L-carnitine blocked these effects of MPP+ suggesting its potential therapeutic utility in degenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency and other mitochondrial diseases.

  2. Cerebrospinal lfuid from rats given hypoxic preconditioning protects neurons from oxygen-glucose deprivation-induced injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-bo Zhang; Zheng-dong Guo; Mei-yi Li; Si-jie Li; Jing-zhong Niu; Ming-feng Yang; Xun-ming Ji; Guo-wei Lv

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxic preconditioning activates endogenous mechanisms that protect against cerebral isch-emic and hypoxic injury. To better understand these protective mechanisms, adult rats were housed in a hypoxic environment (8% O2/92% N2) for 3 hours, and then in a normal oxygen environment for 12 hours. Their cerebrospinal fluid was obtained to culture cortical neurons from newborn rats for 1 day, and then the neurons were exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation for 1.5 hours. The cerebrospinal lfuid from rats subjected to hypoxic preconditioning reduced oxygen-glucose deprivation-induced injury, increased survival rate, upregulated Bcl-2 expression and downregulated Bax expression in the cultured cortical neurons, compared with control. These results indicate that cerebrospinal lfuid from rats given hypoxic preconditioning protects against oxygen-glucose deprivation-induced injury by affecting apoptosis-related protein expres-sion in neurons from newborn rats.

  3. Cerebrospinal fluid from rats given hypoxic preconditioning protects neurons from oxygen-glucose deprivation-induced injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan-Bo; Guo, Zheng-Dong; Li, Mei-Yi; Li, Si-Jie; Niu, Jing-Zhong; Yang, Ming-Feng; Ji, Xun-Ming; Lv, Guo-Wei

    2015-09-01

    Hypoxic preconditioning activates endogenous mechanisms that protect against cerebral ischemic and hypoxic injury. To better understand these protective mechanisms, adult rats were housed in a hypoxic environment (8% O2/92% N2) for 3 hours, and then in a normal oxygen environment for 12 hours. Their cerebrospinal fluid was obtained to culture cortical neurons from newborn rats for 1 day, and then the neurons were exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation for 1.5 hours. The cerebrospinal fluid from rats subjected to hypoxic preconditioning reduced oxygen-glucose deprivation-induced injury, increased survival rate, upregulated Bcl-2 expression and downregulated Bax expression in the cultured cortical neurons, compared with control. These results indicate that cerebrospinal fluid from rats given hypoxic preconditioning protects against oxygen-glucose deprivation-induced injury by affecting apoptosis-related protein expression in neurons from newborn rats.

  4. Tff3 is Expressed in Neurons and Microglial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Fu

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The trefoil factor family (TFF peptide TFF3 is typically secreted by mucous epithelia, but is also expressed in the immune system and the brain. It was the aim of this study to determine the cerebral cell types which express Tff3. Methods: Primary cultures from rat embryonic or neonatal cerebral cortex and hippocampus, respectively, were studied by means of RT-PCR and immunofluorescence. Moreover, Tff3 expression was localized by immunocytochemistry in sections of adult rat cerebellum. Results: Tff3 transcripts were detectable in neural cultures of both the cortex and the hippocampus as well as in glial cell-enriched cultures. Tff3 peptide co-localized with Map2 indicating an expression in neurons in vitro. The neuronal expression was confirmed by immunofluorescence studies of adult rat cerebellum. Furthermore, Tff3 peptide showed also a clear co-localization with Iba-1 in vitro typical of activated microglial cells. Conclusion: The neuronal expression of Tff3 is in line with a function of a typical neuropeptide influencing, e.g., fear, memory, depression and motoric skills. The expression in activated microglial cells, which is demonstrated here for the first time, points towards a possible function for Tff3 in immune reactions in the CNS. This opens a plethora of additional possible functions for Tff3 including synaptic plasticity and cognition as well as during neuroinflammatory diseases and psychiatric disorders.

  5. Hypergravity Stimulation Enhances PC12 Neuron-Like Cell Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giada Graziana Genchi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Altered gravity is a strong physical cue able to elicit different cellular responses, representing a largely uninvestigated opportunity for tissue engineering/regenerative medicine applications. Our recent studies have shown that both proliferation and differentiation of C2C12 skeletal muscle cells can be enhanced by hypergravity treatment; given these results, PC12 neuron-like cells were chosen to test the hypothesis that hypergravity stimulation might also affect the behavior of neuronal cells, in particular promoting an enhanced differentiated phenotype. PC12 cells were thus cultured under differentiating conditions for either 12 h or 72 h before being stimulated with different values of hypergravity (50 g and 150 g. Effects of hypergravity were evaluated at transcriptional level 1 h and 48 h after the stimulation, and at protein level 48 h from hypergravity exposure, to assess its influence on neurite development over increasing differentiation times. PC12 differentiation resulted strongly affected by the hypergravity treatments; in particular, neurite length was significantly enhanced after exposure to high acceleration values. The achieved results suggest that hypergravity might induce a faster and higher neuronal differentiation and encourage further investigations on the potential of hypergravity in the preparation of cellular constructs for regenerative medicine and tissue engineering purposes.

  6. Neuronal deletion of caspase 8 protects against brain injury in mouse models of controlled cortical impact and kainic acid-induced excitotoxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryla Krajewska

    Full Text Available Acute brain injury is an important health problem. Given the critical position of caspase 8 at the crossroads of cell death pathways, we generated a new viable mouse line (Ncasp8(-/-, in which the gene encoding caspase 8 was selectively deleted in neurons by cre-lox system.Caspase 8 deletion reduced rates of neuronal cell death in primary neuronal cultures and in whole brain organotypic coronal slice cultures prepared from 4 and 8 month old mice and cultivated up to 14 days in vitro. Treatments of cultures with recombinant murine TNFα (100 ng/ml or TRAIL (250 ng/mL plus cyclohexamide significantly protected neurons against cell death induced by these apoptosis-inducing ligands. A protective role of caspase 8 deletion in vivo was also demonstrated using a controlled cortical impact (CCI model of traumatic brain injury (TBI and seizure-induced brain injury caused by kainic acid (KA. Morphometric analyses were performed using digital imaging in conjunction with image analysis algorithms. By employing virtual images of hundreds of brain sections, we were able to perform quantitative morphometry of histological and immunohistochemical staining data in an unbiased manner. In the TBI model, homozygous deletion of caspase 8 resulted in reduced lesion volumes, improved post-injury motor performance, superior learning and memory retention, decreased apoptosis, diminished proteolytic processing of caspases and caspase substrates, and less neuronal degeneration, compared to wild type, homozygous cre, and caspase 8-floxed control mice. In the KA model, Ncasp8(-/- mice demonstrated superior survival, reduced seizure severity, less apoptosis, and reduced caspase 3 processing. Uninjured aged knockout mice showed improved learning and memory, implicating a possible role for caspase 8 in cognitive decline with aging.Neuron-specific deletion of caspase 8 reduces brain damage and improves post-traumatic functional outcomes, suggesting an important role for this

  7. Tetraspanin (TSP-17 protects dopaminergic neurons against 6-OHDA-induced neurodegeneration in C. elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neda Masoudi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD, the second most prevalent neurodegenerative disease after Alzheimer's disease, is linked to the gradual loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. Disease loci causing hereditary forms of PD are known, but most cases are attributable to a combination of genetic and environmental risk factors. Increased incidence of PD is associated with rural living and pesticide exposure, and dopaminergic neurodegeneration can be triggered by neurotoxins such as 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA. In C. elegans, this drug is taken up by the presynaptic dopamine reuptake transporter (DAT-1 and causes selective death of the eight dopaminergic neurons of the adult hermaphrodite. Using a forward genetic approach to find genes that protect against 6-OHDA-mediated neurodegeneration, we identified tsp-17, which encodes a member of the tetraspanin family of membrane proteins. We show that TSP-17 is expressed in dopaminergic neurons and provide genetic, pharmacological and biochemical evidence that it inhibits DAT-1, thus leading to increased 6-OHDA uptake in tsp-17 loss-of-function mutants. TSP-17 also protects against toxicity conferred by excessive intracellular dopamine. We provide genetic and biochemical evidence that TSP-17 acts partly via the DOP-2 dopamine receptor to negatively regulate DAT-1. tsp-17 mutants also have subtle behavioral phenotypes, some of which are conferred by aberrant dopamine signaling. Incubating mutant worms in liquid medium leads to swimming-induced paralysis. In the L1 larval stage, this phenotype is linked to lethality and cannot be rescued by a dop-3 null mutant. In contrast, mild paralysis occurring in the L4 larval stage is suppressed by dop-3, suggesting defects in dopaminergic signaling. In summary, we show that TSP-17 protects against neurodegeneration and has a role in modulating behaviors linked to dopamine signaling.

  8. Maturation of spinal motor neurons derived from human embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomonori Takazawa

    Full Text Available Our understanding of motor neuron biology in humans is derived mainly from investigation of human postmortem tissue and more indirectly from live animal models such as rodents. Thus generation of motor neurons from human embryonic stem cells and human induced pluripotent stem cells is an important new approach to model motor neuron function. To be useful models of human motor neuron function, cells generated in vitro should develop mature properties that are the hallmarks of motor neurons in vivo such as elaborated neuronal processes and mature electrophysiological characteristics. Here we have investigated changes in morphological and electrophysiological properties associated with maturation of neurons differentiated from human embryonic stem cells expressing GFP driven by a motor neuron specific reporter (Hb9::GFP in culture. We observed maturation in cellular morphology seen as more complex neurite outgrowth and increased soma area over time. Electrophysiological changes included decreasing input resistance and increasing action potential firing frequency over 13 days in vitro. Furthermore, these human embryonic stem cell derived motor neurons acquired two physiological characteristics that are thought to underpin motor neuron integrated function in motor circuits; spike frequency adaptation and rebound action potential firing. These findings show that human embryonic stem cell derived motor neurons develop functional characteristics typical of spinal motor neurons in vivo and suggest that they are a relevant and useful platform for studying motor neuron development and function and for modeling motor neuron diseases.

  9. Astrocytes protect neurons from Aβ1-42 peptide-induced neurotoxicity increasing TFAM and PGC-1 and decreasing PPAR-γ and SIRT-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre-Rueda, Diana; Guerra-Ojeda, Sol; Aldasoro, Martin; Iradi, Antonio; Obrador, Elena; Ortega, Angel; Mauricio, M Dolores; Vila, Jose Ma; Valles, Soraya L

    2015-01-01

    One of the earliest neuropathological events in Alzheimer's disease is accumulation of astrocytes at sites of Aβ1-42 depositions. Our results indicate that Aβ1-42 toxic peptide increases lipid peroxidation, apoptosis and cell death in neurons but not in astrocytes in primary culture. Aβ1-42-induced deleterious neuronal effects are not present when neurons and astrocytes are mixed cultured. Stimulation of astrocytes with toxic Aβ1-42 peptide increased p-65 and decreased IκB resulting in inflammatory process. In astrocytes Aβ1-42 decreases protein expressions of sirtuin 1 (SIRT-1) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPAR-γ) and over-expresses peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1 (PGC-1) and mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM), protecting mitochondria against Aβ1-42-induced damage and promoting mitochondrial biogenesis. In summary our data suggest that astrocytes may have a key role in protecting neurons, increasing neural viability and mitochondrial biogenesis, acquiring better oxidative stress protection and perhaps modulating inflammatory processes against Aβ1-42 toxic peptide. This might be a sign of a complex epigenetic process in Alzheimer's disease development.

  10. Transient maintenance in bioreactor improves health of neuronal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Loreto, Silvia; Sebastiani, Pierluigi; Benedetti, Elisabetta; Zimmitti, Vincenzo; Caracciolo, Valentina; Amicarelli, Fernanda; Cimini, Annamaria; Adorno, Domenico

    2006-01-01

    To examine whether a neuronal cell suspension can be held in vitro for a relatively short period without compromising survival rates and functionality, we have set up an experimental protocol planning 24 h of suspension culture in a rotary wall vessel (RWV) bioreactor before plating in a conventional adherent system. Apoptosis measurement and activated caspase-8, -9, and -3 detection have demonstrated that survey of the cells was not affected. The activity of major antioxidant enzymes (AOE), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), and catalase (CAT), was significantly decreased in RWV-maintained cells. A significant decrease of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) is coupled with a level of activated nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) protein significantly lower in RVW cells than in the control. On the contrary, the level of IL-6 expression did not change between the test and the control. A significant up-regulation of growth-associated protein-43 (GAP-43), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-beta/delta (PPARbeta/delta), and acyl-CoA synthetase 2 (ACS2) in RWV cells has been detected. We provide the evidence that primary neuronal cells, at an early stage of development, can be maintained in a suspension condition before adherent plating. This experimental environment does not induce detrimental effects but may have an activator role, leading cells to development and maturation in a tridimensional state.

  11. Nicotine inhibits potassium currents in Aplysia bag cell neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Sean H; Sturgeon, Raymond M; Magoski, Neil S

    2016-06-01

    Acetylcholine and the archetypal cholinergic agonist, nicotine, are typically associated with the opening of ionotropic receptors. In the bag cell neurons, which govern the reproductive behavior of the marine snail, Aplysia californica, there are two cholinergic responses: a relatively large acetylcholine-induced current and a relatively small nicotine-induced current. Both currents are readily apparent at resting membrane potential and result from the opening of distinct ionotropic receptors. We now report a separate current response elicited by applying nicotine to cultured bag cell neurons under whole cell voltage-clamp. This current was ostensibly inward, best resolved at depolarized voltages, presented a noncooperative dose-response with a half-maximal concentration near 1.5 mM, and associated with a decrease in membrane conductance. The unique nicotine-evoked response was not altered by intracellular perfusion with the G protein blocker GDPβS or exposure to classical nicotinic antagonists but was occluded by replacing intracellular K(+) with Cs(+) Consistent with an underlying mechanism of direct inhibition of one or more K(+) channels, nicotine was found to rapidly reduce the fast-inactivating A-type K(+) current as well as both components of the delayed-rectifier K(+) current. Finally, nicotine increased bag cell neuron excitability, which manifested as reduction in spike threshold, greater action potential height and width, and markedly more spiking to continuous depolarizing current injection. In contrast to conventional transient activation of nicotinic ionotropic receptors, block of K(+) channels could represent a nonstandard means for nicotine to profoundly alter the electrical properties of neurons over prolonged periods of time.

  12. Protective roles of heat stress on the neurons in hippocampal CA1 region of mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Chunxu; WANG Hanxing

    2007-01-01

    The effects of heat stress on the neurons in hippocampal CA1 region of brain ischemia/reperfusion were explored.The mice were pretreated with heat stress followed by ischemia/reperfusion by clipping bilateral cervical common arteries for 7 min.Mice were divided randomly into four groups as follows:(1)normal control group;(2)heat stress pretreated subsequent to ischemia/reperfusion group (HS/IR);(3)ischemia/reperfusion group(IR);and(4)heat stress group(HS).Animals in the last three groups were subdivided into three subgroups:1 d,4 d,14 d respectively.The Morris water maze was used to test the ability of learning and memorizing,Nissl staining was used to count the average number of survived neurons in hippocampal CA1 region,and immunohistochemistry combined with image analysis system to detect the changes of Microtubule associated protein 2 (MAP-2)expression.The results showed that mice in IR group exhibited increased escape latency when compared with that of normal,HS and HS/IR groups(P<0.01),and the mice in IR group adopted an inefficient search strategy,major in circling and restricted searching manners.Nissl staining results showed a significant reduction in the number of pyramidal neurons in hippocampal CA1 regions in HS/IR and IR groups,with a decrease in IR group(P<0.01).Compared with normal group,the expression of MAP-2 in hippocampal CA1 region obviously decreased in IR group(P<0.05).The present results indicate that heat stress pretreatment can improve the spatial learning and memorizing function through protection to hippocampal neurons.

  13. Serotonergic chemosensory neurons modify the C. elegans immune response by regulating G-protein signaling in epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Anderson

    Full Text Available The nervous and immune systems influence each other, allowing animals to rapidly protect themselves from changes in their internal and external environment. However, the complex nature of these systems in mammals makes it difficult to determine how neuronal signaling influences the immune response. Here we show that serotonin, synthesized in Caenorhabditis elegans chemosensory neurons, modulates the immune response. Serotonin released from these cells acts, directly or indirectly, to regulate G-protein signaling in epithelial cells. Signaling in these cells is required for the immune response to infection by the natural pathogen Microbacterium nematophilum. Here we show that serotonin signaling suppresses the innate immune response and limits the rate of pathogen clearance. We show that C. elegans uses classical neurotransmitters to alter the immune response. Serotonin released from sensory neurons may function to modify the immune system in response to changes in the animal's external environment such as the availability, or quality, of food.

  14. 3',4',7-Trihydroxyflavone prevents apoptotic cell death in neuronal cells from hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Seung-Hwan; Hong, Sa-Ik; Ma, Shi-Xun; Lee, Seok-Yong; Jang, Choon-Gon

    2015-06-01

    In this study, we investigated the mechanisms of 3',4',7-trihydroxyflavone (THF) protection of neuronal cells from neuronal cell death induced by the oxidative stress-related neurotoxin hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Pretreatment with THF significantly elevated cell viability, reduced H2O2-induced lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, glutathione (GSH) content, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, catalase (CAT) activity, and mitochondria membrane potential (MMP) loss. Western blot data demonstrated that THF inhibited the H2O2-induced up- or down-regulation of cleaved caspase-3, cleaved caspase-9, cleaved poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP), Bax, Bcl-2, and Bcl-xL, and attenuated the H2O2-induced release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria to the cytosol. In addition, pretreatment with THF attenuated H2O2-induced rapid and significant phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases (PI3K)/Akt. THF also inhibited nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) translocation to the nucleus induced by H2O2, down-stream of H2O2-induced phosphorylation of MAPKs and PI3K/Akt. These data provide the first evidence that THF protects neuronal cells against H2O2-induced oxidative stress, possibly through ROS reduction, mitochondria protection, and NF-κB modulation via MAPKs and PI3K/Akt pathways. The neuroprotective effects of THF make it a promising candidate as a therapeutic agent for neurodegenerative diseases.

  15. A natural compound macelignan protects midbrain dopaminergic neurons from inflammatory degeneration via microglial arginase-1 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyofuji, Kana; Kurauchi, Yuki; Hisatsune, Akinori; Seki, Takahiro; Mishima, Satoshi; Katsuki, Hiroshi

    2015-08-01

    Inflammatory events involving activated microglia have been recognized to play an important role in pathogenesis of various neurodegenerative disorders including Parkinson disease. Compounds regulating activation profiles of microglia may provide therapeutic benefits for Parkinson disease characterized by degeneration of midbrain dopaminergic neurons. Here we examined the effect of macelignan, a compound derived from nutmeg, on inflammatory degeneration of midbrain dopaminergic neurons. Treatment of midbrain slice cultures with interferon (IFN)-γ and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) caused a substantial decrease in viable dopaminergic neurons and an increase in nitric oxide (NO) production indicated by extracellular nitrite accumulation. Application of macelignan (10 μM) concomitantly with LPS prevented the loss of dopaminergic neurons. Besides nitrite accumulation, up-regulation of inducible NO synthase protein expression in response to IFN-γ/LPS was confirmed by Western blotting, and immunohistochemical examination revealed expression of inducible NO synthase in a subpopulation of Iba-1-poitive microglia. However, macelignan did not affect any of these NO-related parameters. On the other hand, macelignan promoted expression of arginase-1 in midbrain slice cultures irrespective of the presence or the absence of IFN-γ/LPS treatment. Arginase-1 expression was mainly localized in a subpopulation of Iba-1-positive cells. Importantly, the neuroprotective effect of macelignan was antagonized by N(ω)-hydroxy-nor-L-arginine, a specific arginase inhibitor. The neuroprotective effect of macelignan was also prevented by GW9662, a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) antagonist. Overall, these results indicate that macelignan, a compound with PPARγ agonist activity, can provide neuroprotective effect on dopaminergic neurons in an arginase-dependent but NO-independent manner.

  16. Beneficial effects of carnosic acid on dieldrin-induced dopaminergic neuronal cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jeong Ae; Kim, Seung; Lee, Sook-Young; Kim, Chun-Sung; Kim, Do Kyung; Kim, Sung-Jun; Chun, Hong Sung

    2008-08-27

    Carnosic acid (CA) is one of the bioactive polyphenols present in extracts of the herb rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis). In this study, we examined possible protective effects of CA on neurotoxicity induced by dieldrin, an organochlorine pesticide implicated in sporadic Parkinson's disease, in cultured dopaminergic cells (SN4741). CA (5-10 muM) pretreatment showed potent protective effects in a concentration-related manner and prevented dieldrin (10 muM)-induced caspase-3 activation, Jun N-terminal kinase phosphorylation, and caspase-12 activation. Furthermore, dieldrin-induced downregulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor production was significantly attenuated by CA. These results suggest that CA may safeguard dopaminergic neuronal cells from environmental neurotoxins by enhancing brain-derived neurotrophic factor and repressing apoptotic molecules.

  17. Rapid method for culturing embryonic neuron-glial cell cocultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenningsen, Åsa Fex; Shan, Wei-Song; Colman, David R;

    2003-01-01

    A streamlined, simple technique for primary cell culture from E17 rat tissue is presented. In an attempt to standardize culturing methods for all neuronal cell types in the embryo, we evaluated a commercial medium without serum and used similar times for trypsinization and tested different surfaces...... for plating. In 1 day, using one method and a single medium, it is possible to produce robust E17 cultures of dorsal root ganglia (DRG), cerebellum, and enteric plexi. Allowing the endogenous glial cells to repopulate the cultures saves time compared with existing techniques, in which glial cells are added...... to cultures first treated with antimitotic agents. It also ensures that all the cells present in vivo will be present in the culture. Myelination commences after approximately 2 weeks in culture for dissociated DRG and 3-4 weeks in cerebellar cultures. In enteric cultures, glial wrapping of the enteric...

  18. Novel culturing platform for brain slices and neuronal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Winnie Edith; Al Atraktchi, Fatima Al-Zahraa; Bakmand, Tanya

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate a novel culturing system for brain slices and neuronal cells, which can control the concentration of nutrients and the waste removal from the culture by adjusting the fluid flow within the device. The entire system can be placed in an incubator. The system has been...... tested successfully with brain slices and PC12 cells. The culture substrate can be modified using metal electrodes and/or nanostructures for conducting electrical measurements while culturing and for better mimicking the in vivo conditions....

  19. The role of mitochondrial function in glutamate-dependent metabolism in neuronal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smaili, S S; Ureshino, R P; Rodrigues, L; Rocha, K K; Carvalho, J T; Oseki, K T; Bincoletto, C; Lopes, G S; Hirata, H

    2011-12-01

    Glutamate is an important neurotransmitter in neurons and glial cells and it is one of the keys to the neuron-glial interaction in the brain. Glutamate transmission is strongly dependent on calcium homeostasis and on mitochondrial function. In the present work we presented several aspects related to the role of mitochondria in glutamate signaling and in brain diseases. We focused on glutamateinduced calcium signaling and its relation to the organelle dysfunction with cell death processes. In addition, we have discussed how alterations in this pathway may lead or aggravate a variety of neurodegenerative diseases. We compiled information on how mitochondria can influence cell fate during glutamate stimulation and calcium signaling. These organelles play a pivotal role in neuron and glial exchange, in synaptic plasticity and several pathological conditions related to Aging, Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases. We have also presented autophagy as a mechanism activated during mitochondrial dysfunction which may function as a protective mechanism during injury. Furthermore, some new perspectives and approaches to treat these neurodegenerative diseases are offered and evaluated.

  20. Antioxidant and Protective Mechanisms against Hypoxia and Hypoglycaemia in Cortical Neurons in Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Joaquín Merino

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, we have studied whether cell death could be induced in cortical neurons from rats subjected to different period of O2 deprivation and low glucose (ODLG. This “in vitro” model is designed to emulate the penumbra area under ischemia. In these conditions, cortical neurons displayed loss of mitochondrial respiratory ability however, nor necrosis neither apoptosis occurred despite ROS production. The absence of cellular death could be a consequence of increased antioxidant responses such as superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD1 and GPX3. In addition, the levels of reduced glutathione were augmented and HIF-1/3α overexpressed. After long periods of ODLG (12–24 h cortical neurons showed cellular and mitochondrial membrane alterations and did not recuperate cellular viability during reperfusion. This could mean that therapies directed toward prevention of cellular and mitochondrial membrane imbalance or cell death through mechanisms other than necrosis or apoptosis, like authophagy, may be a way to prevent ODLG damage.

  1. Protection of cultured mammalian cells by rebamipide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antoku, Shigetoshi; Aramaki, Ryoji [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Medicine; Tanaka, Hisashi; Kusumoto, Naotoshi

    1997-06-01

    Rebamipide which is used as a drug for gastritis and stomach ulcer has large capability for OH radical scavenging. It is expected that rebamipide has protective effect against ionizing radiations. The present paper deals with protective effect of rebamipide for cultured mammalian cells exposed to ionizing radiations. As rebamipide is insoluble in water, three solvents were used to dissolve. Rebamipide dissolved in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), dimethyl formamide (DMFA) and 0.02 N NaOH was added to the cells in Eagle`s minimum essential medium (MEM) supplemented with 10% fetal calf serum and the cells were irradiated with X-rays. After irradiation, the cells were trypsinized, plated in MEM with 10% fetal calf serum and incubated for 7 days in a CO{sub 2} incubator to form colonies. Rebamipide dissolved in 0.02 N NaOH exhibited the protective effect expected its OH radical scavenging capability. However, the protective effect of rebamipide dissolved in DMSO was about half of that expected by its radical scavenging capability and that of rebamipide dissolved in DMFA was not observed. Uptake of rebamipide labeled with {sup 14}C increased with increasing contact time with rebamipide. These rebamipide mainly distributed in nucleus rather than cytoplasm. (author)

  2. Reinnervation of hair cells by neural stem cell-derived neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan Yasheng; Wang Yang; Chi Fanglu

    2014-01-01

    Background Replacement of spiral ganglion neurons would be one prioritized step in an attempt to restore sensory neuronal hearing loss.However,the possibility that transplanted neurons could regenerate new synaptic connections to hair cells has not been explored.The objective of this study was to test whether neural stem cell (NSC)-derived neurons can form synaptic connections with hair cells in vitro.Methods NSCs were mechanically separated from the hippocampus in SD rat embryos (E12-E14) and cultured in a serum-free medium containing basic fibroblast growth factor and epidermal growth factor.Rat NSCs were co-cultured with explants of cochlea sensory epithelia obtained from postnatal Day 3 rats under transway filter membrane.Results At Day 3,the NSCs began to show chemotactic differentiation and grew toward cochlea sensory epithelia.After 9-day co-culture,neurites of NSC-derived neurons predominantly elongated toward hair cells.Immunohistochemical analyses revealed the fibers overlapped with synapsin and hair cells,indicating the formation of new synaptic connections.After 14-day culture,triple staining revealed the fibers overlapped with PSD95 (postsynaptic density) which is juxtaposed with CtBP2 (presynaptic vesicle),indicating the formation of new ribbon synapse.Conclusions NSC-derived neurons can make synaptic connections with hair cells and provide a model for studying synaptic plasticity and regeneration.Whether the newly forming synapse is functional merits further electrophysiological study.

  3. IL-10 Protects Neurites in Oxygen-Glucose-Deprived Cortical Neurons through the PI3K/Akt Pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Longzai Lin

    Full Text Available IL-10, as a cytokine, has an anti-inflammatory cascade following various injuries, but it remains blurred whether IL-10 protects neurites of cortical neurons after oxygen-glucose deprivation injury. Here, we reported that IL-10, in a concentration-dependent manner, reduced neuronal apoptosis and increased neuronal survival in oxygen-glucose-deprived primary cortical neurons, producing an optimal protective effect at 20ng/ml. After staining NF-H and GAP-43, we found that IL-10 significantly protected neurites in terms of axon length and dendrite number by confocal microscopy. Furthermore, it induced the phosphorylation of AKT, suppressed the activation of caspase-3, and up-regulated the protein expression of GAP-43. In contrast, LY294002, a specific inhibitor of PI3K/AKT, reduced the level of AKT phosphorylation and GAP-43 expression, increased active caspase-3 expression and thus significantly weakened IL-10-mediated protective effect in the OGD-induced injury model. IL-10NA, the IL-10 neutralizing antibody, reduced the level of p-PI3K phosphorylation and increased the expression of active caspase-3. These findings suggest that IL-10 provides neuroprotective effects by protecting neurites through PI3K/AKT signaling pathway in oxygen-glucose-deprived primary cortical neurons.

  4. The c-Abl inhibitor, Nilotinib, protects dopaminergic neurons in a preclinical animal model of Parkinson's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karuppagounder, Senthilkumar S.; Brahmachari, Saurav; Lee, Yunjong; Dawson, Valina L.; Dawson, Ted M.; Ko, Han Seok

    2014-01-01

    c-Abl is activated in the brain of Parkinson's disease (PD) patients and in 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-intoxicated mice where it inhibits parkin through tyrosine phosphorylation leading to the accumulation of parkin substrates, and neuronal cell death. In the present study, we evaluated the in vivo efficacy of nilotinib, a brain penetrant c-Abl inhibitor, in the acute MPTP-induced model of PD. Our results show that administration of nilotinib reduces c-Abl activation and the levels of the parkin substrate, PARIS, resulting in prevention of dopamine (DA) neuron loss and behavioral deficits following MPTP intoxication. On the other hand, we observe no reduction in the tyrosine phosphorylation of parkin and the parkin substrate, AIMP2 suggesting that the protective effect of nilotinib may, in part, be parkin-independent or to the pharmacodynamics properties of nilotinib. This study provides a strong rationale for testing other brain permeable c-Abl inhibitors as potential therapeutic agents for the treatment of PD. PMID:24786396

  5. Magnolol reduces glutamate-induced neuronal excitotoxicity and protects against permanent focal cerebral ischemia up to 4 hours.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Ting Lee

    Full Text Available Neuroprotective efficacy of magnolol, 5,5'-dially-2,2'-dihydroxydiphenyl, was investigated in a model of stroke and cultured neurons exposed to glutamate-induced excitotoxicity. Rats were subjected to permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO. Magnolol or vehicle was administered intraperitoneally, at 1 hr pre-insult or 1-6 hrs post-insult. Brain infarction was measured upon sacrifice. Relative to controls, animals pre-treated with magnolol (50-200 mg/kg had significant infarct volume reductions by 30.9-37.8% and improved neurobehavioral outcomes (P<0.05, respectively. Delayed treatment with magnolol (100 mg/kg also protected against ischemic brain damage and improved neurobehavioral scores, even when administered up to 4 hrs post-insult (P<0.05, respectively. Additionally, magnolol (0.1 µM effectively attenuated the rises of intracellular Ca(2+ levels, [Ca(2+](i, in cultured neurons exposed to glutamate. Consequently, magnolol (0.1-1 µM significantly attenuated glutamate-induced cytotoxicity and cell swelling (P<0.05. Thus, magnolol offers neuroprotection against permanent focal cerebral ischemia with a therapeutic window of 4 hrs. This neuroprotection may be, partly, mediated by its ability to limit the glutamate-induced excitotoxicity.

  6. Pedicularioside A from Buddleia lindleyana inhibits cell death induced by 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium ions (MPP+) in primary cultures of rat mesencephalic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan-Yun; Lu, Jiang-Hai; Li, Quan; Zhao, Yu-Ying; Pu, Xiao-Ping

    2008-01-28

    Parkinson's disease is characterized by the progressive degeneration of midbrain dopaminergic neurons. Buddleia lindleyana is a traditional Chinese herb, commonly called Zui Yu Cao. The purification and identification of pedicularioside A and other phenylethanoid glycosides from this plant have been reported. However, their neuroprotective effects on the 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium ion (MPP(+))-induced death of rat mesencephalic neuron primary cultures and the precise mechanism of this protection remains unclear. We used the 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiozol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay for cellular growth to examine the effects of five phenylethanoid glycosides isolated from B. lindleyana, including pedicularioside A, leucosceptoside A, isoacteoside, acteoside, and arenariside, on the viability of mesencephalic neurons treated with MPP(+). Of the compounds tested, pedicularioside A exhibited the greatest degree of protection from MPP(+)-induced cell death. We also observed a marked increase in the number of tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive neurons. Pedicularioside A inhibited expression of the caspase-3 gene and cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) in cultures exposed to MPP(+). Our results suggest that pedicularioside A has a neuroprotective effect to improve the survival of mesencephalic neurons (dopaminergic neurons and non-dopaminergic neurons). The mode of action appears to be the inhibition of caspase-3 gene expression, thereby protecting mesencephalic neurons from MPP(+)-induced cell death.

  7. Galanin Protects from Caspase-8/12-initiated Neuronal Apoptosis in the Ischemic Mouse Brain via GalR1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yun; Mei, Zhu; Liu, Shuiqiao; Wang, Tong; Li, Hui; Li, Xiao-Xiao; Han, Song; Yang, Yutao; Li, Junfa; Xu, Zhi-Qing David

    2017-01-01

    Galanin (GAL) plays key role in many pathophysiological processes, but its role in ischemic stroke remains unclear. Here, the models of 1 h middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO)/1-7 d reperfusion (R)-induced ischemic stroke and in vitro cell ischemia of 1 h oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD)/24 h reoxygenation in primary cultured cortical neurons were used to explore GAL’s effects and its underlying mechanisms. The results showed significant increases of GAL protein levels in the peri-infarct region (P) and infarct core (I) within 48 h R of MCAO mice (p<0.001). The RT-qPCR results also demonstrated significant increases of GAL mRNA during 24-48 h R (p<0.001), and GAL receptors GalR1-2 (but not 3) mRNA levels in the P region at 24 h R of MCAO mice (p<0.001). Furthermore, the significant decrease of infarct volume (p<0.05) and improved neurological outcome (p<0.001-0.05) were observed in MCAO mice following 1 h pre- or 6 h post-treatment of GAL during 1-7 d reperfusion. GalR1 was confirmed as the receptor responsible for GAL-induced neuroprotection by using GalR2/3 agonist AR-M1896 and Lentivirus-based RNAi knockdown of GalR1. GAL treatment inhibited Caspase-3 activation through the upstream initiators Capsases-8/-12 (not Caspase-9) in both P region and OGD-treated cortical neurons. Meanwhile, GAL’s neuroprotective effect was not observed in cortical neurons from conventional protein kinase C (cPKC) γ knockout mice. These results suggested that exogenous GAL protects the brain from ischemic injury by inhibiting Capsase-8/12-initiated apoptosis, possibly mediated by GalR1 via the cPKCγ signaling pathway. PMID:28203483

  8. Effects of Bee Venom on Glutamate-Induced Toxicity in Neuronal and Glial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Min Lee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bee venom (BV, which is extracted from honeybees, is used in traditional Korean medical therapy. Several groups have demonstrated the anti-inflammatory effects of BV in osteoarthritis both in vivo and in vitro. Glutamate is the predominant excitatory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system (CNS. Changes in glutamate release and uptake due to alterations in the activity of glutamate transporters have been reported in many neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. To assess if BV can prevent glutamate-mediated neurotoxicity, we examined cell viability and signal transduction in glutamate-treated neuronal and microglial cells in the presence and absence of BV. We induced glutamatergic toxicity in neuronal cells and microglial cells and found that BV protected against cell death. Furthermore, BV significantly inhibited the cellular toxicity of glutamate, and pretreatment with BV altered MAP kinase activation (e.g., JNK, ERK, and p38 following exposure to glutamate. These findings suggest that treatment with BV may be helpful in reducing glutamatergic cell toxicity in neurodegenerative diseases.

  9. Functional switching of ATM: sensor of DNA damage in proliferating cells and mediator of Akt survival signal in post-mitotic human neuron-like cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Li; Hua Xiong; Da-Qing Yang

    2012-01-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by cerebellar ataxia and oculocutaneous telangiectasias.The gene mutated in this disease,ATM (A-T,mutated),encodes a 370-kDa Ser/Thr protein kinase.ATM not only mediates cellular response to DNA damage but also acts as an activator of Akt in response to insulin.However,despite intensive studies,the mechanism underlying the neuronal degeneration symptoms of human A-T is still poorly understood.We found that the topoisomerase inhibitors etoposide and camptothecin readily induced apoptosis in undifferentiated proliferating SH-SY5Y cells but could not induce apoptosis in neuronally differentiated SH-SY5Y cells.In addition,etoposide induced p53 phosphorylation and H2AX foci formation in proliferating SH-SY5Y cells but failed to do so in differentiated SH-SY5Y cells.Moreover,while inhibition of ATM in undifferentiated SH-SY5Y cells partially protected them from etoposide-induced apoptosis,the same treatment had no effect on cell viability in differentiated SH-SY5Y cells.These results suggest that DNA damage or defective response to DNA damage is not the cause of neuronal cell death in human A-T.In contrast,we discovered that Akt phosphorylation was inhibited when ATM activity was suppressed in differentiated SH-SY5Y cells.Furthermore,inhibition of ATM induced apoptosis following serum starvation in neuronally differentiated SH-SY5Y cells but could not trigger apoptosis under the same conditions in undifferentiated proliferating SH-SY5Y cells.These results demonstrate that ATM mediates the Akt signaling and promotes cell survival in neuron-like human SH-SY5Y cells,suggesting that impaired activation of Akt is the reason for neuronal degeneration in human A-T.

  10. Targeting single neuronal networks for gene expression and cell labeling in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshel, James H; Mori, Takuma; Nielsen, Kristina J; Callaway, Edward M

    2010-08-26

    To understand fine-scale structure and function of single mammalian neuronal networks, we developed and validated a strategy to genetically target and trace monosynaptic inputs to a single neuron in vitro and in vivo. The strategy independently targets a neuron and its presynaptic network for specific gene expression and fine-scale labeling, using single-cell electroporation of DNA to target infection and monosynaptic retrograde spread of a genetically modifiable rabies virus. The technique is highly reliable, with transsynaptic labeling occurring in every electroporated neuron infected by the virus. Targeting single neocortical neuronal networks in vivo, we found clusters of both spiny and aspiny neurons surrounding the electroporated neuron in each case, in addition to intricately labeled distal cortical and subcortical inputs. This technique, broadly applicable for probing and manipulating single neuronal networks with single-cell resolution in vivo, may help shed new light on fundamental mechanisms underlying circuit development and information processing by neuronal networks throughout the brain.

  11. Gene expression pattern of functional neuronal cells derived from human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bron Dominique

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuronal tissue has limited potential to self-renew or repair after neurological diseases. Cellular therapies using stem cells are promising approaches for the treatment of neurological diseases. However, the clinical use of embryonic stem cells or foetal tissues is limited by ethical considerations and other scientific problems. Thus, bone marrow mesenchymal stomal cells (BM-MSC could represent an alternative source of stem cells for cell replacement therapies. Indeed, many studies have demonstrated that MSC can give rise to neuronal cells as well as many tissue-specific cell phenotypes. Methods BM-MSC were differentiated in neuron-like cells under specific induction (NPBM + cAMP + IBMX + NGF + Insulin. By day ten, differentiated cells presented an expression profile of real neurons. Functionality of these differentiated cells was evaluated by calcium influx through glutamate receptor AMPA3. Results Using microarray analysis, we compared gene expression profile of these different samples, before and after neurogenic differentiation. Among the 1943 genes differentially expressed, genes down-regulated are involved in osteogenesis, chondrogenesis, adipogenesis, myogenesis and extracellular matrix component (tuftelin, AGC1, FADS3, tropomyosin, fibronectin, ECM2, HAPLN1, vimentin. Interestingly, genes implicated in neurogenesis are increased. Most of them are involved in the synaptic transmission and long term potentialisation as cortactin, CASK, SYNCRIP, SYNTL4 and STX1. Other genes are involved in neurite outgrowth, early neuronal cell development, neuropeptide signaling/synthesis and neuronal receptor (FK506, ARHGAP6, CDKRAP2, PMCH, GFPT2, GRIA3, MCT6, BDNF, PENK, amphiregulin, neurofilament 3, Epha4, synaptotagmin. Using real time RT-PCR, we confirmed the expression of selected neuronal genes: NEGR1, GRIA3 (AMPA3, NEF3, PENK and Epha4. Functionality of these neuron-like cells was demonstrated by Ca2+ influx through glutamate

  12. Mechanism of in Vitro Differentiation of Bone Marrow Stromal Cells into Neuron-like Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    褚倩; 王亚平; 傅新巧; 张苏明

    2004-01-01

    Summary: In order to study whether marrow stromal cells (MSCs) can be induced into nerve-like cells in vitro, and the mechanism, the MSCs in Wistar rats were isolated and cultured, and then induced with DMSO and BHA in vitro. The expression of specific marking proteins in neurons, glia and neural stem cells were detected before preinduction, at 24 h of preinduction, at 6 h, 24 h, and 48 h of neuronal induction by using immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. The ultrastructural changes after the inducement were observed. The results showed that after the inducement, many MSCs turned into bipolar, multipolar and taper, and then intersected as network structure. At the same time, some MSCs had the typical neuron-like ultrastructure. Immunohistochemistry revealed that NeuN and Nestin expression was detectable after inducement, but there was no GFAP and CNP expression. Western blotting showed the expression of Nestin was strong at 6 h of neuronal induction, and decreased at 24 h, 48 h of the induction. NeuN was detectable at 6 h of neuronal induction, and increased at 24 h, 48 h of the induction. It was concluded MSCs were induced intc neural stem cells, and then differentiated into neuron-like cells in vitro.

  13. Protective effects of aloperine on neonatal rat primary cultured hippocampal neurons injured by oxygen-glucose deprivation and reperfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ning-Tian; Zhou, Ru; Chang, Ren-Yuan; Hao, Yin-Ju; Ma, Lin; Jin, Shao-Ju; Du, Juan; Zheng, Jie; Zhao, Cheng-Jun; Niu, Yang; Sun, Tao; Li, Wei; Koike, Kazuo; Yu, Jian-Qiang; Li, Yu-Xiang

    2015-10-01

    Aloperine (ALO), one of the alkaloids isolated from Sophora alopecuroides L., is traditionally used for various diseases including neuronal disorders. This study investigated the protective effects of ALO on neonatal rat primary-cultured hippocampal neurons injured by oxygen-glucose deprivation and reperfusion (OGD/RP). Treatment with ALO (25, 50, and 100 mg/l) attenuated neuronal damage (p oxygen species and malondialdehyde production and enhanced the antioxidant enzymatic activities of catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and the total antioxidant capacity. The results suggested that ALO has significant neuroprotective effects that can be attributed to anti-oxidative stress.

  14. NaHS Protects against the Impairments Induced by Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation in Different Ages of Primary Hippocampal Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qian; Wang, Binrong; Zhao, Tianzhi; Zhang, Xiangnan; Tao, Lei; Shi, Jinshan; Sun, Xude; Ding, Qian

    2017-01-01

    Brain ischemia leads to poor oxygen supply, and is one of the leading causes of brain damage and/or death. Neuroprotective agents are thus in great need for treatment purpose. Using both young and aged primary cultured hippocampal neurons as in vitro models, we investigated the effect of sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS), an exogenous donor of hydrogen sulfide, on oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) damaged neurons that mimick focal cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) induced brain injury. NaHS treatment (250 μM) protected both young and aged hippocampal neurons, as indicated by restoring number of primary dendrites by 43.9 and 68.7%, number of dendritic end tips by 59.8 and 101.1%, neurite length by 36.8 and 66.7%, and spine density by 38.0 and 58.5% in the OGD-damaged young and aged neurons, respectively. NaHS treatment inhibited growth-associated protein 43 downregulation, oxidative stress in both young and aged hippocampal neurons following OGD damage. Further studies revealed that NaHS treatment could restore ERK1/2 activation, which was inhibited by OGD-induced protein phosphatase 2 (PP2A) upregulation. Our results demonstrated that NaHS has potent protective effects against neuron injury induced by OGD in both young and aged hippocampal neurons.

  15. Inhibition of tumor necrosis factor-alpha by sodium ferulate in protecting neurons from beta-amyloid induced damage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Suyan Yao; Deyu Zheng; Zhuo Liu; Ying Jin

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sodium ferulate (SF) has an effect of anti-inflammation; however, whether it can inhibit beta-amyloid (Aβ) induced damage or not should be further studied.OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of SF on neurotoxicity mediated by Aβ-induced macrophage activation via inhibiting tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in vitro.DESTGN: A contrast experiment based on cells.SETTrNG: Departments of Pathophysiology, Pharmacology and Anatomy, Liaoning Medical College.MATERTALS: A total of 36 Kunming mice aged 8-10 weeks and some SD rats aged 2-3 days of both genders were selected in this study. Main reagents were detailed as follows: Aβ peptide (Sigma Company); SF (purity >99%, Suzhou Changtong Chemical Co., Ltd.); lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay kit (Bangding Biological Engineering Co., Beijing, China); microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP-2) monoclonal antibodies and TNF-αmonoclonal antibodies (Boster Biological Engineering Co., Wuhan, China).METHODS: The experiment was carried out in Laboratories of Pharmacology and Anatomy, Liaoning Medical College from May to December 2004. Cerebellum was obtained from rats under sterile condition to culture neurons and macrophages taken from mice abdominal cavity. Later, two parallel experiments were performed as follows: ① Macrophages culture groups: In normal control group, macrophages were cultured in DMEM after being seeded. In Aβ group, neurotoxic form of Aβ was added into DMEM media with final concentration of 10 μmol/L after macrophages were seeded for 24 hours. In Aβ+SF group, ten minutes after Aβ treatment, for 10, 100, 500 μmol/L and 1 mmol/L of SF were added to the media of the macrophages culture. ②Macrophages-neurons co-cultured groups: Control macrophages-neurons were co-cultured. Aβ group:Neurotoxic form of Aβ was added into the media with concentration of 10 iμmol/L after macrophages were seeded in the neurons cultured wells for 24 hours. Aβ±SF group: Ten minutes after Aβ treatment, 10

  16. Efficient Differentiation of Embryonic Stem Cells into Neurons in Glial Cell-conditioned Medium under Attaching Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-Bin TIAN; Zeng-Liang BAI; Hong WANG; Jian-Quan CHEN; Guo-Xiang CHENG

    2005-01-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells can differentiate into neurons in vitro, which provides hope for the treatment of some neurodegenerative diseases through cell transplantation. However, it remains a challenge to efficiently induce ES cells to differentiate into neurons. Here, we show that murine ES cells can efficiently differentiate into neurons when cultured in glial cell- conditioned medium (GCM) under attaching conditions without the formation of embryoid bodies. In comparison with murine embryonic fibroblast-conditioned medium, we found that GCM has a positive effect on limiting the generation of non-neuronal cells, such as astrocytes. In addition, compared with suspension conditions, attaching conditions delay the differentiation process of ES cells.

  17. Application of the Co-culture Membrane System Pointed to a Protective Role of Catestatin on Hippocampal Plus Hypothalamic Neurons Exposed to Oxygen and Glucose Deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mele, Maria; Morelli, Sabrina; Fazzari, Gilda; Avolio, Ennio; Alò, Raffaella; Piscioneri, Antonella; De Bartolo, Loredana; Facciolo, Rosa Maria; Canonaco, Marcello

    2016-11-05

    Depletion of oxygen and glucose even for brief periods is sufficient to cause cerebral ischemia, which is a predominant worldwide cause of motor deficits with the reduction of life quality and subsequently death. Hence, more insights regarding protective measures against ischemic events are becoming a major research goal. Among the many neuronal factors, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDAR), orexinergic neuroreceptors (ORXR), and sympatho-inhibitory neuropeptide catestatin (CST) are widely involved with ischemic episodes. In this study, it was possible to induce in vitro ischemic conditions of the hamster (Mesocricetus auratus) hippocampal and hypothalamic neuronal cultures, grown on a newly compartmentalized membrane system, via oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD). These cultures displayed notably differentiated NMDARergic and ORXergic receptor expression activities along with evident brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plus orexin A (ORX-A) secretion, especially under co-cultured conditions. Interestingly, addition of CST in OGD-insulted hippocampal cells accounted for upregulated GluN1 and ORX1R transcripts that in the case of the latter neuroreceptor was very strongly (p BDNF and ORX-A secretion in the presence of hippocampal cells. Overall, the preferential CST effects on BDNF plus ORX-A production together with altered NMDAR and ORXR levels, especially in co-cultured hypothalamic cells pointed to ORX-containing neurons as major protective constituents against ischemic damages thus opening new scenarios on the cross-talking roles of CST during ischemic disorders.

  18. Immortalized human dorsal root ganglion cells differentiate into neurons with nociceptive properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymon, H K; Thode, S; Zhou, J; Friedman, G C; Pardinas, J R; Barrere, C; Johnson, R M; Sah, D W

    1999-07-01

    A renewable source of human sensory neurons would greatly facilitate basic research and drug development. We had established previously conditionally immortalized human CNS cell lines that can differentiate into functional neurons (). We report here the development of an immortalized human dorsal root ganglion (DRG) clonal cell line, HD10.6, with a tetracycline-regulatable v-myc oncogene. In the proliferative condition, HD10.6 cells have a doubling time of 1.2 d and exhibit a neuronal precursor morphology. After differentiation of clone HD10.6 for 7 d in the presence of tetracycline, v-myc expression was suppressed, and >50% of the cells exhibited typical neuronal morphology, stained positively for neuronal cytoskeletal markers, and fired action potentials in response to current injection. Furthermore, this cell line was fate-restricted to a neuronal phenotype; even in culture conditions that promote Schwann cell or smooth muscle differentiation of neural crest stem cells, HD10.6 differentiated exclusively into neurons. Moreover, differentiated HD10.6 cells expressed sensory neuron-associated transcription factors and exhibited capsaicin sensitivity. Taken together, these data indicate that we have established an immortalized human DRG cell line that can differentiate into sensory neurons with nociceptive properties. The cell line HD10.6 represents the first example of a human sensory neuronal line and will be valuable for basic research, as well as for the discovery of novel drug targets and clinical candidates.

  19. Radial Glial Cell-Neuron Interaction Directs Axon Formation at the Opposite Side of the Neuron from the Contact Site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chundi; Funahashi, Yasuhiro; Watanabe, Takashi; Takano, Tetsuya; Nakamuta, Shinichi; Namba, Takashi; Kaibuchi, Kozo

    2015-10-28

    How extracellular cues direct axon-dendrite polarization in mouse developing neurons is not fully understood. Here, we report that the radial glial cell (RGC)-cortical neuron interaction directs axon formation at the opposite side of the neuron from the contact site. N-cadherin accumulates at the contact site between the RGC and cortical neuron. Inhibition of the N-cadherin-mediated adhesion decreases this oriented axon formation in vitro, and disrupts the axon-dendrite polarization in vivo. Furthermore, the RGC-neuron interaction induces the polarized distribution of active RhoA at the contacting neurite and active Rac1 at the opposite neurite. Inhibition of Rho-Rho-kinase signaling in a neuron impairs the oriented axon formation in vitro, and prevents axon-dendrite polarization in vivo. Collectively, these results suggest that the N-cadherin-mediated radial glia-neuron interaction determines the contacting neurite as the leading process for radial glia-guided neuronal migration and directs axon formation to the opposite side acting through the Rho family GTPases.

  20. Non-cell autonomous influence of the astrocyte system xc− on hypoglycaemic neuronal cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra J Hewett

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Despite longstanding evidence that hypoglycaemic neuronal injury is mediated by glutamate excitotoxicity, the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved remain incompletely defined. Here, we demonstrate that the excitotoxic neuronal death that follows GD (glucose deprivation is initiated by glutamate extruded from astrocytes via system xc− – an amino acid transporter that imports l-cystine and exports l-glutamate. Specifically, we find that depriving mixed cortical cell cultures of glucose for up to 8 h injures neurons, but not astrocytes. Neuronal death is prevented by ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonism and is partially sensitive to tetanus toxin. Removal of amino acids during the deprivation period prevents – whereas addition of l-cystine restores – GD-induced neuronal death, implicating the cystine/glutamate antiporter, system xc−. Indeed, drugs known to inhibit system xc− ameliorate GD-induced neuronal death. Further, a dramatic reduction in neuronal death is observed in chimaeric cultures consisting of neurons derived from WT (wild-type mice plated on top of astrocytes derived from sut mice, which harbour a naturally occurring null mutation in the gene (Slc7a11 that encodes the substrate-specific light chain of system xc− (xCT. Finally, enhancement of astrocytic system xc− expression and function via IL-1β (interleukin-1β exposure potentiates hypoglycaemic neuronal death, the process of which is prevented by removal of l-cystine and/or addition of system xc− inhibitors. Thus, under the conditions of GD, our studies demonstrate that astrocytes, via system xc−, have a direct, non-cell autonomous effect on cortical neuron survival.

  1. Non-cell autonomous influence of the astrocyte system xc- on hypoglycaemic neuronal cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, Nicole A; Melchior, Shannon E; Hewett, James A; Hewett, Sandra J

    2012-02-08

    Despite longstanding evidence that hypoglycaemic neuronal injury is mediated by glutamate excitotoxicity, the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved remain incompletely defined. Here, we demonstrate that the excitotoxic neuronal death that follows GD (glucose deprivation) is initiated by glutamate extruded from astrocytes via system xc---an amino acid transporter that imports L-cystine and exports L-glutamate. Specifically, we find that depriving mixed cortical cell cultures of glucose for up to 8 h injures neurons, but not astrocytes. Neuronal death is prevented by ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonism and is partially sensitive to tetanus toxin. Removal of amino acids during the deprivation period prevents--whereas addition of L-cystine restores--GD-induced neuronal death, implicating the cystine/glutamate antiporter, system xc-. Indeed, drugs known to inhibit system xc- ameliorate GD-induced neuronal death. Further, a dramatic reduction in neuronal death is observed in chimaeric cultures consisting of neurons derived from WT (wild-type) mice plated on top of astrocytes derived from sut mice, which harbour a naturally occurring null mutation in the gene (Slc7a11) that encodes the substrate-specific light chain of system xc- (xCT). Finally, enhancement of astrocytic system xc- expression and function via IL-1β (interleukin-1β) exposure potentiates hypoglycaemic neuronal death, the process of which is prevented by removal of l-cystine and/or addition of system xc- inhibitors. Thus, under the conditions of GD, our studies demonstrate that astrocytes, via system xc-, have a direct, non-cell autonomous effect on cortical neuron survival.

  2. Non-Cell Autonomous Influence of the Astrocyte System xc − on Hypoglycaemic Neuronal Cell Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole A Jackman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite longstanding evidence that hypoglycaemic neuronal injury is mediated by glutamate excitotoxicity, the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved remain incompletely defined. Here, we demonstrate that the excitotoxic neuronal death that follows GD (glucose deprivation is initiated by glutamate extruded from astrocytes via system xc −– – an amino acid transporter that imports L-cystine and exports L-glutamate. Specifically, we find that depriving mixed cortical cell cultures of glucose for up to 8 h injures neurons, but not astrocytes. Neuronal death is prevented by ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonism and is partially sensitive to tetanus toxin. Removal of amino acids during the deprivation period prevents – whereas addition of L-cystine restores – GD-induced neuronal death, implicating the cystine/glutamate antiporter, system xc−–. Indeed, drugs known to inhibit system xc −– ameliorate GD-induced neuronal death. Further, a dramatic reduction in neuronal death is observed in chimaeric cultures consisting of neurons derived from WT (wild-type mice plated on top of astrocytes derived from sut mice, which harbour a naturally occurring null mutation in the gene (Slc7a11 that encodes the substrate-specific light chain of system xc −– (xCT. Finally, enhancement of astrocytic system xc −– expression and function via IL-1β (interleukin-1β exposure potentiates hypoglycaemic neuronal death, the process of which is prevented by removal of L-cystine and/or addition of system xc −– inhibitors. Thus, under the conditions of GD, our studies demonstrate that astrocytes, via system xc −–, have a direct, non-cell autonomous effect on cortical neuron survival.

  3. A physically-modified saline suppresses neuronal apoptosis, attenuates tau phosphorylation and protects memory in an animal model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modi, Khushbu K; Jana, Arundhati; Ghosh, Supurna; Watson, Richard; Pahan, Kalipada

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), the leading cause of dementia in the aging population, is characterized by the presence of neuritic plaques, neurofibrillary tangles and extensive neuronal apoptosis. Neuritic plaques are mainly composed of aggregates of amyloid-β (Aβ) protein while neurofibrillary tangles are composed of the hyperphosphorylated tau protein. Despite intense investigations, no effective therapy is currently available to halt the progression of this disease. Here, we have undertaken a novel approach to attenuate apoptosis and tau phosphorylation in cultured neuronal cells and in a transgenic animal model of AD. RNS60 is a 0.9% saline solution containing oxygenated nanobubbles that is generated by subjecting normal saline to Taylor-Couette-Poiseuille (TCP) flow under elevated oxygen pressure. In our experiments, fibrillar Aβ1-42, but not the reverse peptide Aβ42-1, induced apoptosis and cell death in human SHSY5Y neuronal cells. RNS60, but not NS (normal saline), RNS10.3 (TCP-modified saline without excess oxygen) or PNS60 (saline containing excess oxygen without TCP modification), attenuated Aβ(1-42)-induced cell death. RNS60 inhibited neuronal cell death via activation of the type 1A phosphatidylinositol-3 (PI-3) kinase-Akt-BAD pathway. Furthermore, RNS60 also decreased Aβ(1-42)-induced tau phosphorylation via (PI-3 kinase-Akt)-mediated inhibition of GSK-3β. Similarly, RNS60 treatment suppressed neuronal apoptosis, attenuated Tau phosphorylation, inhibited glial activation, and reduced the burden of Aβ in the hippocampus and protected memory and learning in 5XFAD transgenic mouse model of AD. Therefore, RNS60 may be a promising pharmaceutical candidate in halting or delaying the progression of AD.

  4. A physically-modified saline suppresses neuronal apoptosis, attenuates tau phosphorylation and protects memory in an animal model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khushbu K Modi

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD, the leading cause of dementia in the aging population, is characterized by the presence of neuritic plaques, neurofibrillary tangles and extensive neuronal apoptosis. Neuritic plaques are mainly composed of aggregates of amyloid-β (Aβ protein while neurofibrillary tangles are composed of the hyperphosphorylated tau protein. Despite intense investigations, no effective therapy is currently available to halt the progression of this disease. Here, we have undertaken a novel approach to attenuate apoptosis and tau phosphorylation in cultured neuronal cells and in a transgenic animal model of AD. RNS60 is a 0.9% saline solution containing oxygenated nanobubbles that is generated by subjecting normal saline to Taylor-Couette-Poiseuille (TCP flow under elevated oxygen pressure. In our experiments, fibrillar Aβ1-42, but not the reverse peptide Aβ42-1, induced apoptosis and cell death in human SHSY5Y neuronal cells. RNS60, but not NS (normal saline, RNS10.3 (TCP-modified saline without excess oxygen or PNS60 (saline containing excess oxygen without TCP modification, attenuated Aβ(1-42-induced cell death. RNS60 inhibited neuronal cell death via activation of the type 1A phosphatidylinositol-3 (PI-3 kinase-Akt-BAD pathway. Furthermore, RNS60 also decreased Aβ(1-42-induced tau phosphorylation via (PI-3 kinase-Akt-mediated inhibition of GSK-3β. Similarly, RNS60 treatment suppressed neuronal apoptosis, attenuated Tau phosphorylation, inhibited glial activation, and reduced the burden of Aβ in the hippocampus and protected memory and learning in 5XFAD transgenic mouse model of AD. Therefore, RNS60 may be a promising pharmaceutical candidate in halting or delaying the progression of AD.

  5. Protective effect of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) against spinal cord ischemia-reperfusion injury via reducing oxidative stress-induced neuronal apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Lei; Wang, Zhenfei; Li, Changwei; Yang, Kai; Liang, Yu

    2017-02-01

    As previous studies demonstrate that oxidative stress and apoptosis play crucial roles in ischemic pathogenesis and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) treatment attenuates oxidative stress-induced cell death among primary neurons and astrocytes as well as significantly reduce cerebral ischemic injury in rats. We used a spinal cord ischemia injury (SCII) model in rats to verify our hypothesis that NAD(+) could ameliorate oxidative stress-induced neuronal apoptosis. Adult male rats were subjected to transient spinal cord ischemia for 60min, and different doses of NAD(+) were administered intraperitoneally immediately after the start of reperfusion. Neurological function was determined by Basso, Beattie, Bresnahan (BBB) scores. The oxidative stress level was assessed by superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and malondialdehyde (MDA) content. The degree of apoptosis was analyzed by deoxyuridinetriphosphate nick-end labeling (TUNEL) staining and protein levels of cleaved caspase-3 and AIF (apoptosis inducing factor). The results showed that NAD(+) at 50 or 100mg/kg significantly decreased the oxidative stress level and neuronal apoptosis in the spinal cord of ischemia-reperfusion rats compared with saline, as accompanied with the decreased oxidative stress, NAD(+) administration significantly restrained the neuronal apoptosis after ischemia injury while improved the neurological and motor function. These findings suggested that NAD(+) might protect against spinal cord ischemia-reperfusion via reducing oxidative stress-induced neuronal apoptosis.

  6. 许旺细胞源神经营养因子对脊髓背根节感觉神经元的保护作用%Protective effect of Schwann cell-derived neurotrophic factor on sensory neurons in spinal dorsal root ganglia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘黎军; 朱家恺; 王大平; 肖建德; 杨雷

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Schwann cell-derived neurotrophic factor is a bioactive protein isolated and purified from the kytoplasm of Schwann cell. It can obviously maintain the survival of spinal cord anterior horn motor neuron and promote the regeneration of peripheral nerve.OBJECTIVE: To observe the protective effect of Schwann cell-derived neurotrophic factor on the high injury of peripheral nerve-induced apoptosis of sensory neurons in spinal dorsal root ganglia.DESIGN: Randomized and controlled animal experiment.SETTING: Shenzhen Second People's Hospital.MATERIALS: Totally 30 3-week-old SD infant rats, of clean grade and either gender, were used in this experiment. They were randomly divided into neurotrophic factor group and control group with 15 rats in each one.Left sides of the animals in both two groups were set as normal sides and right sides as injured sides.METHODS: This experiment was carried out at the Experimental Animal Center, Medical College of Sun Yat-sen University from May 2003 to July 2003. ① L4.5 nerve root high-mutilation animal models were developed on the rats in two groups. Proximal nerve stump was connected with silicone tube. According to grouping, 60 mg/L Schwann cell-derived neurotrophic factors and 20 μL normal saline were injected into the silicone tubes respectively. Two ends of silicone tube were enveloped with vaseline.② Sample collecting was conducted at postoperative 4 weeks, survival rate and morphological change of sensory neurons in dorsal root ganglia of injured nerve was observed.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: ① Gross observation of sciatic nerve regeneration at injured side of the rats in two groups ② Survival of sensory neurons in dorsal root ganglia ③ Morphological change of sensory neurons in dorsal root ganglia.RESULTS: All the 30 rats entered the stage of result analysis. ① Gross observation of sciatic nerve regeneration: In the neurotrophic factor group,nerve new born axon grew along silicone tube, with 1cm in length

  7. Protective effects of endoplasmic reticulum stress preconditioning on hippocampal neurons in rats with status epilepticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi ZHANG

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate the protective effects of endoplasmic reticulum stress preconditioning induced by 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG on hippocampal neurons of rats with status epilepticus (SE and the possible mechanism.  Methods Ninety Sprague-Dawley (SD rats were randomly enrolled into preconditioning group (N = 30, SE group (N = 30 and control group (N = 30. Each group was divided into 6 subsets (N = 5 according to six time points (before seizure, 6 h, 12 h, 1 d, 2 d and 7 d after seizure. The preconditioning group was administered 2-DG intraperitoneally with a dose of 150 mg/kg for 7 days, and the lithium-pilocarpine induced SE rat model was established on both preconditioning group and SE group. The rats were sacrificed at the above six time points, and the brains were removed to make paraffin sections. Nissl staining was performed by toluidine blue to evaluate the hippocampal neuronal damage after seizure, and the number of survival neurons in hippocampal CA1 and CA3 regions of the rats were counted. Immunohistochemical staining was performed to detect the expressions of glucose regulated protein 78 (GRP78 and X-box binding protein 1 (XBP-1 in hippocampal CA3 region of the rats.  Results The number of survival neurons in preconditioning group was much more than that in SE group at 7 d after seizure (t = 5.353, P = 0.000, and was more obvious in CA1 region. There was no significant hippocampal neuronal damage in control group. The expressions of GRP78 and XBP-1 in CA3 region of hippocampus in SE group at 6 h after seizure were significantly higher than that in control group (P = 0.000, and then kept increasing until reaching the peak at 2 d (P = 0.000, for all. The expressions of GRP78 and XBP-1 in hippocampal CA3 region in preconditioning group were significantly higher than that in control group before seizure (P = 0.000, for all. The level of GRP78 maintained the highest at 24 h and 2 d after seizure (P = 0.000, for all, while the XBP-1 level

  8. Protection mechanism of brain derived neurotrophic factor on neuron-like cells under serum free condition%脑源性神经营养因子对无血清培养的神经元保护机制的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭斐; 赵琛; 李桂晨; 景良; 郭阳

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨在无血清培养条件下脑源性神经营养因子(BDNF)对神经元样细胞存活的影响及其作用机制.方法 在无血清条件下培养具有BDNF受体TrkB表达的神经母细胞瘤细胞SY5Y-TrkB,在培养液中单独加入BDNF,或联合加入磷脂酰肌醇3-激酶(PI3K)抑制剂/丝裂原活化蛋白激酶(MAPK)抑制剂进行细胞培养,利用细胞活性测定法(MTS)检测活细胞活性.结果 与在10%胎牛血清(FBS)培养液中培养的细胞相比,无血清条件下培养24、48 72 h后,SY5Y-TrkB细胞的存活率分别为51%、38%、25%.若细胞在无血清条件下培养24 h,无处理因素的细胞存活率设定为100%,给予BDNF后的细胞存活率为154%;用10μmol/L PI3K抑制剂LY294002预处理1 h,再给予BDNF后的细胞存活率为100%;而应用80 tmol/LMAPK抑制剂PD98059预处理1 h,再给予BDNF后的细胞存活率为158%.结论 BDNF通过PI3K信号通路保护SY5Y-TrkB细胞免受无血清培养引起的细胞死亡.%Objective To study the effect of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) on neuron-like cell survival under serum free condition and the related mechanism.Methods Tropomyosin receptor kinase (TrkB)expressing neuroblastoma cells SY5Y-TrkB were cultured in serum free media, treated with BDNF, or with a combination of BDNF and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor or mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitor.Cell survival was detected by MTS assay.Results Compared to the cells cultured in 10%FBS medium, the survival rate of SY5Y-TrkB cells in serum free medium decreased to 51% by 24 h, 38% by 48 h,and 25% by 72 h.SY5Y-TrkB cells were cultured in serum-free medium for 24 h; compared to control cells whose survival rate was set as 100%, adding BDNF to the medium increased cell survival rate to 154%.Pretreatment of the cells with P13K inhibitor LY294002 ( 10 μmol/L) for 1 h before BDNF resulted in a cell survival rate of 100% ;while pretreatment of cells with MAPK

  9. Ketogenic diet protects against epileptogenesis as well as neuronal loss in amygdaloid-kindling seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yan; Yang, Yi; Wang, Shuang; Ding, Yao; Guo, Yi; Zhang, Man-Man; Wen, Shu-Qun; Ding, Mei-Ping

    2012-02-01

    Ketogenic diets (KD) have shown beneficial effects in terms of anticonvulsant and anti-epileptogenic properties in several experimental models. However, few studies have investigated the consequences of KD with regards to the anti-epileptogenic and neuroprotective effects in kindling-induced seizures. Here, postnatal day 28 male Sprague-Dawley rats received one of two experimental diets for 4 weeks: (a) a 'classic' 4:1 KD; and (b) a normal regular rodent chow diet (ND). Fully-kindled seizures were achieved by daily electrical stimulation in the amygdala. Seizure stage and after-discharge duration (ADD) were assessed daily. The after-discharge threshold (ADT) was measured every 5 days. The effects of the two diets on neuronal loss were observed before kindling and 20 days after stimulation by Nissl staining. We found that the progression of seizure stage and ADD was delayed by KD. KD prevented the ADT decrease on day 5. The incidence of generalized seizures was lower in the KD group compared to the ND group. The neuronal density was decreased in the ipsilateral hilus of the dentate gyrus (DG) and CA1 area, as well as the contralateral CA1 area before kindling in the KD group. However, KD prevented neuronal loss in the ipsilateral CA1 area 20 days after stimulation. Our data suggest that KD can protect against epileptogenesis by preventing both after-discharge generation and propagation in kindling seizures. In addition, KD also possesses a neuroprotective function during kindling although it changes hippocampal development in early life.

  10. Differentiation of neuron-like cells from mouse parthenogenetic embryonic stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xingrong Yan; Liwen Li; Fulin Chen; Yanhong Yang; Wei Liu; Wenxin Geng; Huichong Du; Jihong Cui; Xin Xie; Jinlian Hua; Shumin Yu

    2013-01-01

    Parthenogenetic embryonic stem cells have pluripotent differentiation potentials, akin to fertilized embryo-derived embryonic stem cells. The aim of this study was to compare the neuronal differentiation potential of parthenogenetic and fertilized embryo-derived embryonic stem cells. Before differentiation, karyotype analysis was performed, with normal karyotypes detected in both parthenogenetic and fertilized embryo-derived embryonic stem cells. Sex chromosomes were identified as XX. Immunocytochemistry and quantitative real-time PCR detected high expression of the pluripotent gene, Oct4, at both the mRNA and protein levels, indicating pluripotent differentiation potential of the two embryonic stem cell subtypes. Embryonic stem cells were induced with retinoic acid to form embryoid bodies, and then dispersed into single cells. Single cells were differentiated in N2 differentiation medium for 9 days. Immunocytochemistry showed parthenogenetic and fertilized embryo-derived embryonic stem cells both express the neuronal cell markers nestin, βIII-tubulin and myelin basic protein. Quantitative real-time PCR found expression of neurogenesis related genes (Sox-1, Nestin, GABA, Pax6, Zic5 and Pitx1) in both types of embryonic stem cells, and Oct4 expression was significantly decreased. Nestin and Pax6 expression in parthenogenetic embryonic stem cells was significantly higher than that in fertilized embryo-derived embryonic stem cells. Thus, our experimental findings indicate that parthenogenetic embryonic stem cells have stronger neuronal differentiation potential than fertilized embryo-derived embryonic stem cells.

  11. Satellite glial cells can promote the extension of neuronal axons in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiu-Hong Zhao; Yi-Di Huang; Xi-Nan Yi; Quan-Peng Zhang; Xian-Fang Zhang; Xu Dong; Gang Luo; Hai-Ying Zhang; Kun-Ju Wang; Mei-Li Lao

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To study the influence of satellite glial cells (SGCs) on the outgrowth of neuronal neurite and the role of Slit1 protein and the contact with neurons in this process, in vitro. Methods: Neurons culture and SGC-neuron co-culture were used as the cell models. The length of axons and dendrites were measured via immunofluorescence to observe the influence of SGCs on the outgrowth of neuronal neurite. The Slit1 protein was added into SGC-neuron co-culture model. The length of dendrites was measured via immunofluorescence at different point times. Result: The anatomical relationship between neurons and SGCs changed as culture period expand. At 12 h after culture, SGCs all surrounded neurons; by 72 h after culture, SGCs were all off neurons. SGCs can promote the growth of neuronal axos, but inhibit the growth of its dendrites; when SGCs closely contact with neurons, the effect of Slit1 on promoting the dendritic growth is not obvious, but when SGCs were off neurons, the effect of Slit1 on promoting the dendritic growth is significant. Conclusion: SGCs can promote the growth of neuronal axos, but inhibit the growth of its dendrites; Slit- Robo signaling pathways and contact with neurons play a role in this process.

  12. Vascular Mural Cells Promote Noradrenergic Differentiation of Embryonic Sympathetic Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortuna, Vitor; Pardanaud, Luc; Brunet, Isabelle; Ola, Roxana; Ristori, Emma; Santoro, Massimo M; Nicoli, Stefania; Eichmann, Anne

    2015-06-23

    The sympathetic nervous system controls smooth muscle tone and heart rate in the cardiovascular system. Postganglionic sympathetic neurons (SNs) develop in close proximity to the dorsal aorta (DA) and innervate visceral smooth muscle targets. Here, we use the zebrafish embryo to ask whether the DA is required for SN development. We show that noradrenergic (NA) differentiation of SN precursors temporally coincides with vascular mural cell (VMC) recruitment to the DA and vascular maturation. Blocking vascular maturation inhibits VMC recruitment and blocks NA differentiation of SN precursors. Inhibition of platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) signaling prevents VMC differentiation and also blocks NA differentiation of SN precursors. NA differentiation is normal in cloche mutants that are devoid of endothelial cells but have VMCs. Thus, PDGFR-mediated mural cell recruitment mediates neurovascular interactions between the aorta and sympathetic precursors and promotes their noradrenergic differentiation.

  13. Information in a Network of Neuronal Cells: Effect of Cell Density and Short-Term Depression

    KAUST Repository

    Onesto, Valentina

    2016-05-10

    Neurons are specialized, electrically excitable cells which use electrical to chemical signals to transmit and elaborate information. Understanding how the cooperation of a great many of neurons in a grid may modify and perhaps improve the information quality, in contrast to few neurons in isolation, is critical for the rational design of cell-materials interfaces for applications in regenerative medicine, tissue engineering, and personalized lab-on-a-chips. In the present paper, we couple an integrate-and-fire model with information theory variables to analyse the extent of information in a network of nerve cells. We provide an estimate of the information in the network in bits as a function of cell density and short-term depression time. In the model, neurons are connected through a Delaunay triangulation of not-intersecting edges; in doing so, the number of connecting synapses per neuron is approximately constant to reproduce the early time of network development in planar neural cell cultures. In simulations where the number of nodes is varied, we observe an optimal value of cell density for which information in the grid is maximized. In simulations in which the posttransmission latency time is varied, we observe that information increases as the latency time decreases and, for specific configurations of the grid, it is largely enhanced in a resonance effect.

  14. Direct reprogramming of human fibroblasts into dopaminergic neuron-like cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xinjian Liu; Dabing Zhang; Timothy A Benke; John R Sladek; Nancy R Zahniser; Chuan-Yuan Li; Fang Li; Elizabeth A Stubblefield; Barbara Blanchard; Toni L Richards; Gaynor A Larson; Yujun He; Qian Huang; Aik-Choon Tan

    2012-01-01

    Transplantation of exogenous dopaminergic neuron (DA neurons) is a promising approach for treating Parkinson's disease (PD).However,a major stumbling block has been the lack of a reliable source of donor DA neurons.Here we show that a combination of five transcriptional factors Mash1,Ngn2,Sox2,Nurr1,and Pitx3 can directly and effectively reprogram human fibroblasts into DA neuron-like cells.The reprogrammed cells stained positive for various markers for DA neurons.They also showed characteristic DA uptake and production properties.Moreover,they exhibited DA neuron-specific electrophysiological profiles.Finally,they provided symptomatic relief in a rat PD model.Therefore,our directly reprogrammed DA neuron-like cells are a promising source of cell-replacement therapy for PD.

  15. Topiramate protects against glutamate excitotoxicity via activating BDNF/TrkB-dependent ERK pathway in rodent hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xiao-Yuan; Cao, Yong-Gang; Ji, Zhong; Zhou, Hong-Hao; Liu, Zhao-Qian; Sun, Hong-Li

    2015-07-01

    Topiramate (TPM) was previously found to have neuroprotection against neuronal injury in epileptic and ischemic models. However, whether TPM protects against glutamate-induced excitotoxicity in hippocampal neurons is elusive. Our present work aimed to evaluate the protective effect of TPM against glutamate toxicity in hippocampal neurons and further figure out the potential molecular mechanisms. The in vitro glutamate excitotoxic model was prepared with 125μM glutamate for 20min. 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) analysis and Hoechst 33342 staining were conducted to detect neuronal survival. The protein expressions of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), TrkB, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade (including extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 MAPK), cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB), Bcl-2, Bax and β-actin were detected via Western blot assay. Our results demonstrated that TPM protected hippocampal neurons from glutamate toxicity. Meanwhile, the pretreatment of TPM for 10min significantly prevented the down-regulation of BDNF and the phosphorylation of TrkB. Furthermore, the elevation of phosphorylated EKR expression was significantly inhibited after blockade of TrkB by TrkB IgG, while no alterations of phosphorylated JNK and p38 MAPK were found in the cultured hippocampal neurons. Besides, it was also found that the enhanced phosphorylation of CREB was evidently reversed under excitotoxic conditions after treating with U0126 (the selective inhibitor of ERK). The protein level of Bcl-2 was also observed to be remarkably increased after TPM treatment. In conclusion, these findings implicate that TPM exerts neuroprotective effects against glutamate excitotoxicity in hippocampal neurons and its protection may be modulated through BDNF/TrkB-dependent ERK pathway.

  16. SIRT1 Activating Compounds Reduce Oxidative Stress and Prevent Cell Death in Neuronal Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reas S Khan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Activation of SIRT1, an NAD+-dependent deacetylase, prevents retinal ganglion cell (RGC loss in optic neuritis, an inflammatory demyelinating optic nerve disease. While SIRT1 deacetylates numerous protein targets, downstream mechanisms of SIRT1 activation mediating this neuroprotective effect are unknown. SIRT1 increases mitochondrial function and reduces oxidative stress in muscle and other cells, and oxidative stress occurs in neuronal degeneration. We examined whether SIRT1 activators reduce oxidative stress and promote mitochondrial function in neuronal cells. Oxidative stress, marked by reactive oxygen species (ROS accumulation, was induced in RGC-5 cells by serum deprivation, or addition of doxorubicin or hydrogen peroxide, and resulted in significant cell loss. SIRT1 activators resveratrol and SRTAW04 reduced ROS levels, and promoted cell survival in RGC-5 cells as well as primary RGC cultures. Effects were blocked by SIRT1 siRNA. SIRT1 activators also increased expression of succinate dehydrogenase, a mitochondrial enzyme, and promoted deacetylation of PGC-1α, a co-enzyme involved in mitochondrial function. Results show SIRT1 activators prevent cell loss by reducing oxidative stress and promoting mitochondrial function in a neuronal cell line. Results suggest SIRT1 activators can mediate neuroprotective effects during optic neuritis by these mechanisms, and they have the potential to preserve neurons in other neurodegenerative diseases that involve oxidative stress.

  17. Vascular endothelial growth factor is up-regulated after status epilepticus and protects against seizure-induced neuronal loss in hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoletti, J N; Shah, S K; McCloskey, D P; Goodman, J H; Elkady, A; Atassi, H; Hylton, D; Rudge, J S; Scharfman, H E; Croll, S D

    2008-01-02

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a protein factor which has been found to play a significant role in both normal and pathological states. Its role as an angiogenic factor is well-established. More recently, VEGF has been shown to protect neurons from cell death both in vivo and in vitro. While VEGF's potential as a protective factor has been demonstrated in hypoxia-ischemia, in vitro excitotoxicity, and motor neuron degeneration, its role in seizure-induced cell loss has received little attention. A potential role in seizures is suggested by Newton et al.'s [Newton SS, Collier EF, Hunsberger J, Adams D, Terwilliger R, Selvanayagam E, Duman RS (2003) Gene profile of electroconvulsive seizures: Induction of neurotrophic and angiogenic factors. J Neurosci 23:10841-10851] finding that VEGF mRNA increases in areas of the brain that are susceptible to cell loss after electroconvulsive-shock induced seizures. Because a linear relationship does not always exist between expression of mRNA and protein, we investigated whether VEGF protein expression increased after pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus. In addition, we administered exogenous VEGF in one experiment and blocked endogenous VEGF in another to determine whether VEGF exerts a neuroprotective effect against status epilepticus-induced cell loss in one vulnerable brain region, the rat hippocampus. Our data revealed that VEGF is dramatically up-regulated in neurons and glia in hippocampus, thalamus, amygdala, and neocortex 24 h after status epilepticus. VEGF induced significant preservation of hippocampal neurons, suggesting that VEGF may play a neuroprotective role following status epilepticus.

  18. Ascorbate prevents cell death from prolonged exposure to glutamate in an in vitro model of human dopaminergic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballaz, Santiago; Morales, Ingrid; Rodríguez, Manuel; Obeso, José A

    2013-12-01

    Ascorbate (vitamin C) is a nonenzymatic antioxidant highly concentrated in the brain. In addition to mediating redox balance, ascorbate is linked to glutamate neurotransmission in the striatum, where it renders neuroprotection against excessive glutamate stimulation. Oxidative stress and glutamatergic overactivity are key biochemical features accompanying the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra that characterizes Parkinson's disease (PD). At present, it is not clear whether antiglutamate agents and ascorbate might be neuroprotective agents for PD. Thus, we tested whether ascorbate can prevent cell death from prolonged exposure to glutamate using dopaminergic neurons of human origin. To this purpose, dopamine-like neurons were obtained by differentiation of SH-SY5Y cells and then cultured for 4 days without antioxidant (antiaging) protection to evaluate glutamate toxicity and ascorbate protection as a model system of potential factors contributing to dopaminergic neuron death in PD. Glutamate dose dependently induced toxicity in dopaminergic cells largely by the stimulation of AMPA and metabotropic receptors and to a lesser extent by N-methyl-D-aspartate and kainate receptors. At relatively physiological levels of extracellular concentration, ascorbate protected cells against glutamate excitotoxicity. This neuroprotection apparently relies on the inhibition of oxidative stress, because ascorbate prevented the pro-oxidant action of the scavenging molecule quercetin, which occurred over the course of prolonged exposure, as is also seen with glutamate. Our findings show the relevance of ascorbate as a neuroprotective agent and emphasize an often underappreciated role of oxidative stress in glutamate excitotoxicity. Occurrence of a glutamate-ascorbate link in dopaminergic neurons may explain previous contradictions regarding their putative role in PD.

  19. Adult adipose-derived stromal cells differentiate into neurons with normal electrophysiological functions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaodong Yuan; Yanan Cai; Ya Ou; Yanhui Lu

    2011-01-01

    β-mercaptoethanol was used to induce in vitro neuronal differentiation of adipose-derived stromal cells. Within an 8-hour period post-differentiation, the induced cells exhibited typical neuronal morphology, and expression of microtubule-associated protein 2 and neuron-specific enolase, which are markers of mature neurons, reached a peak at 5 hours. Specific organelle Nissl bodies of neurons were observed under transmission electron microscopy. Results of membrane potential showed that fluorescence intensity of cells was greater after 5 hours than adipose-derived stromal cells prior to induction. In addition, following stimulation with high-concentration potassium solution, fluorescence intensity increased. These experimental findings suggested that neurons differentiated from adipose-derived stromal cells and expressed mature K+ channels. In addition, following stimulation with high potassium solution, the membrane potential depolarized and fired an action potential, confirming that the induced cells possessed electrophysiological functions.

  20. Modeling the electric potential across neuronal membranes: the effect of fixed charges on spinal ganglion neurons and neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Thiago M; Wedemann, Roseli S; Cortez, Célia M

    2014-01-01

    We present a model for the electric potential profile across the membranes of neuronal cells. We considered the resting and action potential states, and analyzed the influence of fixed charges of the membrane on its electric potential, based on experimental values of membrane properties of the spinal ganglion neuron and the neuroblastoma cell. The spinal ganglion neuron represents a healthy neuron, and the neuroblastoma cell, which is tumorous, represents a pathological neuron. We numerically solved the non-linear Poisson-Boltzmann equation for the regions of the membrane model we have adopted, by considering the densities of charges dissolved in an electrolytic solution and fixed on both glycocalyx and cytoplasmic proteins. Our model predicts that there is a difference in the behavior of the electric potential profiles of the two types of cells, in response to changes in charge concentrations in the membrane. Our results also describe an insensitivity of the neuroblastoma cell membrane, as observed in some biological experiments. This electrical property may be responsible for the low pharmacological response of the neuroblastoma to certain chemotherapeutic treatments.

  1. Modeling the electric potential across neuronal membranes: the effect of fixed charges on spinal ganglion neurons and neuroblastoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago M Pinto

    Full Text Available We present a model for the electric potential profile across the membranes of neuronal cells. We considered the resting and action potential states, and analyzed the influence of fixed charges of the membrane on its electric potential, based on experimental values of membrane properties of the spinal ganglion neuron and the neuroblastoma cell. The spinal ganglion neuron represents a healthy neuron, and the neuroblastoma cell, which is tumorous, represents a pathological neuron. We numerically solved the non-linear Poisson-Boltzmann equation for the regions of the membrane model we have adopted, by considering the densities of charges dissolved in an electrolytic solution and fixed on both glycocalyx and cytoplasmic proteins. Our model predicts that there is a difference in the behavior of the electric potential profiles of the two types of cells, in response to changes in charge concentrations in the membrane. Our results also describe an insensitivity of the neuroblastoma cell membrane, as observed in some biological experiments. This electrical property may be responsible for the low pharmacological response of the neuroblastoma to certain chemotherapeutic treatments.

  2. Siah regulation of Pard3A controls neuronal cell adhesion during germinal zone exit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Famulski, Jakub K; Trivedi, Niraj; Howell, Danielle; Yang, Yuan; Tong, Yiai; Gilbertson, Richard; Solecki, David J

    2010-12-24

    The brain's circuitry is established by directed migration and synaptogenesis of neurons during development. Although neurons mature and migrate in specific patterns, little is known about how neurons exit their germinal zone niche. We found that cerebellar granule neuron germinal zone exit is regulated by proteasomal degradation of Pard3A by the Seven in Absentia homolog (Siah) E3 ubiquitin ligase. Pard3A gain of function and Siah loss of function induce precocious radial migration. Time-lapse imaging using a probe to measure neuronal cell contact reveals that Pard3A promotes adhesive interactions needed for germinal zone exit by recruiting the epithelial tight junction adhesion molecule C to the neuronal cell surface. Our findings define a Siah-Pard3A signaling pathway that controls adhesion-dependent exit of neuronal progenitors or immature neurons from a germinal zone niche.

  3. DJ-1 mediates paraquat-induced dopaminergic neuronal cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Hyun Joo; Heo, Jun Young; Shim, Jung Hee; Park, Ji Hoon; Seo, Kang Sik; Ryu, Min Jeong; Han, Jeong Su; Shong, Minho; Son, Jin H; Kweon, Gi Ryang

    2011-04-25

    There are two causes of Parkinson's disease (PD): environmental insults and genetic mutations of PD-associated genes. Environmental insults and genetic mutations lead to mitochondrial dysfunction, and a combination of mitochondrial dysfunction and increased oxidative stress in dopaminergic neurons is thought to contribute to the pathogenesis of PD. Among the PD-associated genes, DJ-1 acts as a redox sensor for oxidative stress and has been also proposed to maintain mitochondrial complex I activity. To understand molecular functions of DJ-1 in the cell, we have generated DJ-1 null cells from the DJ-1(-/-) mouse embryos. Using these null cells, we investigated the susceptibility to an environmental toxin, paraquat, which is known to inhibit mitochondrial complex I. Interestingly, we found that DJ-1 null cells showed a resistance to paraquat-induced apoptosis, including reduced poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase and procaspase-3. Also DJ-1 null cells generated less superoxide than SN4741 cells by paraquat treatment. Consistent with the reduced paraquat sensitivity, DJ-1 null cells showed reduced complex I activity, which was partially rescued by ectopic DJ-I expression. In summary, our results suggest that DJ-1 is critical to maintain mitochondrial complex I and complex I could be a key target in interaction of paraquat toxicity and DJ-1 for giving rise to PD.

  4. Induction of Neuronal Morphology in the 661W Cone Photoreceptor Cell Line with Staurosporine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex F Thompson

    Full Text Available RGC-5 cells undergo differentiation into a neuronal phenotype with low concentrations of staurosporine. Although the RGC-5 cell line was initially thought to be of retinal ganglion cell origin, recent evidence suggests that the RGC-5 line could have been the result of contamination with 661W mouse cone photoreceptor cells. This raised the possibility that a cone photoreceptor cell line could be multipotent and could be differentiated to a neuronal phenotype.661W and RGC-5 cells, non-neuronal retinal astrocytes, retinal endothelial cells, retinal pericytes, M21 melanoma cells, K562 chronic myelogenous leukemia cells, and Daudi Burkitt lymphoma cells, were differentiated with staurosporine. The resulting morphology was quantitated using NeuronJ with respect to neurite counts and topology.Treatment with staurosporine induced similar-appearing morphological differentiation in both 661W and RGC-5 cells. The following measures were not significantly different between 661W and RGC-5 cells: number of neurites per cell, total neurite field length, number of neurite branch points, and cell viability. Neuronal-like differentiation was not observed in the other cell lines tested.661W and RGC-5 cells have virtually identical and distinctive morphology when differentiated with low concentrations of staurosporine. This result demonstrates that a retinal neuronal precursor cell with cone photoreceptor lineage can be differentiated to express a neuronal morphology.

  5. Ischemic Postconditioning Protects Neuronal Death Caused by Cerebral Ischemia and Reperfusion via Attenuating Protein Aggregation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianmin Liang, Jihang Yao, Guangming Wang, Ying Wang, Boyu Wang, Pengfei Ge

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the effect of ischemic postconditioning on protein aggregation caused by transient ischemia and reperfusion and to clarify its underlying mechanism.Methods: Two-vessel-occluded transient global ischemia rat model was used. The rats in ischemic postconditioning group were subjected to three cycles of 30-s/30-s reperfusion/clamping after 15min of ischemia. Neuronal death in the CA1 region was observed by hematoxylin-eosin staining, and number of live neurons was assessed by cell counting under a light microscope. Succinyl-LLVY-AMC was used as substrate to assay proteasome activity in vitro. Protein carbonyl content was spectrophotometrically measured to analyze protein oxidization. Immunochemistry and laser scanning confocal microscopy were used to observe the distribution of ubiquitin in the CA1 neurons. Western blotting was used to analyze the quantitative alterations of protein aggregates, proteasome, hsp70 and hsp40 in cellular fractions under different ischemic conditions.Results: Histological examination showed that the percentage of live neurons in the CA1 region was elevated from 5.21%±1.21% to 55.32%±5.34% after administration of ischemic postconditioning (P=0.0087. Western blotting analysis showed that the protein aggregates in the ischemia group was 32.12±4.87, 41.86±4.71 and 34.51±5.18 times higher than that in the sham group at reperfusion 12h, 24h and 48h, respectively. However, protein aggregates were alleviated significantly by ischemic postconditioning to 2.84±0.97, 13.72±2.13 and 14.37±2.42 times at each indicated time point (P=0.000032, 0.0000051 and 0.0000082. Laser scanning confocal images showed ubiquitin labeled protein aggregates could not be discerned in the ischemic postconditioning group. Further study showed that ischemic postconditioning suppressed the production of carbonyl derivatives, elevated proteasome activity that was damaged by ischemia and reperfusion, increased the expression

  6. Differentiation of Human Cord Blood and Stromal Derived Stem Cells into Neuron Cells

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    Özlem Pamukçu Baran

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The most basic properties of stem cells are the capacities to self-renew indefinitely and to differentiate into multiple cell or tissue types. Umbilical cord blood has been utilized for human hematopoietic stem cell transplantation as an alternative source to bone marrow.The experiments show that Wharton’s jelly cells are easily attainable and can be expanded in vitro, maintained in culture, and induced to differentiate into neural cells. Almost recent studies it has been discovered that the cord blood-derived cells can differantiate not only to blood cells but also to various somatic cells like neuron or muscle cell with the signals taken from the envoirenment.Interestingly, neural cells obtained from umbilical cord blood show a relatively high spontaneous differentiation into oligodendrocytes, Embryonic stem cells proliferate indefinitely and can differentiate spontaneously into all tissue types.It has been shown that embryonic stem cells can be induced to differentiate into neurons and glia by treatment with retinoic acid or basic fibroblast growth factor. It has been studied that the diseases as Motor Neuron Disease, Parkinson, Alzheimer and degeneration of medulla spinalis and also paralysises could be treated with transplantation of cord blood-dericed stem cells.

  7. Mitochondrial function in neuronal cells depends on p97/VCP/Cdc48-mediated quality control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei eFang

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Maintaining mitochondrial function is essential for neuronal survival and offers protection against neurodegeneration. Ubiquitin-mediated, proteasome-dependent protein degradation in the form of outer mitochondrial membrane associated degradation (OMMAD was shown to play roles in maintenance of mitochondria on the level of proteostasis, but also mitophagy and cell death. Recently, the AAA-ATPase p97/VCP/Cdc48 was recognized as part of OMMAD acting as retrotranslocase of ubiquitinated mitochondrial proteins for proteasomal degradation. Thus, p97 likely plays a major role in mitochondrial maintenance. Support for this notion comes from mitochondrial dysfunction associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and hereditary inclusion body myopathy associated with Paget disease of bone and frontotemporal dementia (IBMPFD caused by p97 mutation. Using SH-SY5Y cells stably expressing p97 or dominant-negative p97QQ treated with mitochondrial toxins rotenone, 6-OHDA, or Aβ-peptide as model for neuronal cells suffering from mitochondrial dysfunction, we found mitochondrial fragmentation under normal and stress conditions was significantly increased upon inactivation of p97. Furthermore, inactivation of p97 resulted in loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Under additional stress conditions, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and increased ROS production was even more pronounced. Loss of mitochondrial fidelity upon inactivation of p97 was likely due to disturbed maintenance of mitochondrial proteostasis as the employed treatments neither induced mitophagy nor cell death. This was supported by the accumulation of oxidatively-damaged proteins on mitochondria in response to p97 inactivation. Dysfunction of p97 under normal and stress conditions in neuron-like cells severely impacts mitochondrial function, thus supporting for the first time a role for p97 as a major component of mitochondrial

  8. EGCG Protects against 6-OHDA-Induced Neurotoxicity in a Cell Culture Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Parkinson’s disease (PD is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that causes severe brain dopamine depletion. Disruption of iron metabolism may be involved in the PD progression. Objective. To test the protective effect of (−-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG against 6-hydroxydopamine- (6-OHDA- induced neurotoxicity by regulating iron metabolism in N27 cells. Methods. Protection by EGCG in N27 cells was assessed by SYTOX green assay, MTT, and caspase-3 activity. Iron regulatory gene and protein expression were measured by RT-PCR and Western blotting. Intracellular iron uptake was measured using 55Fe. The EGCG protection was further tested in primary mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons by immunocytochemistry. Results. EGCG protected against 6-OHDA-induced cell toxicity. 6-OHDA treatment significantly (p<0.05 increased divalent metal transporter-1 (DMT1 and hepcidin and decreased ferroportin 1 (Fpn1 level, whereas pretreatment with EGCG counteracted the effects. The increased 55Fe (by 96%, p<0.01 cell uptake confirmed the iron burden by 6-OHDA and was reduced by EGCG by 27% (p<0.05, supporting the DMT1 results. Pretreatment with EGCG and 6-OHDA significantly increased (p<0.0001 TH+ cell count (~3-fold and neurite length (~12-fold compared to 6-OHDA alone in primary mesencephalic neurons. Conclusions. Pretreatment with EGCG protected against 6-OHDA-induced neurotoxicity by regulating genes and proteins involved in brain iron homeostasis, especially modulating hepcidin levels.

  9. Protection of Acanthopanax Senticosus Saponin on Free Radical Injury Induced Aging of Nerve Cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘永进; 顾永健; 顾小苏

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of Acanthopanax senticosus saponin (ASS) on free radical injury induced neuron aging. Methods: On day 7 of fetal mice, cortical neuron primary passage cultures were divided into the normal control group, model group and ASS groups. The model group using free radical (FeSO4 plus H2O2) injury mode prepared in vivo cultured ICR mice cortical neuron aging model; ASS groups: 24 hrs before and after treated with H2O2 and FeSO4, different concentration of ASS was added, according to biochemical parameters such as lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and malondialdehyde (MDA) etc. and histomorphologic change to observe the protection of ASS on aging neurons. Results: The LDH, SOD, MDA of the model group were compared with the normal group, P<0.01; ASS groups added 1.25 mg/100 ml, 2.5 mg/100 ml, 5 mg/100 ml concentration of ASS, their LDH, SOD, MDA compared with the model group P<0.05-0.01, the difference was significant. In medicated groups the SOD activity of oxidization injured nerve cells obviously elevated, LDH activity and MDA content apparently lowered. Microscope and scanning electron microscopic observation showed that supplemented with ASS to protect the nerve cell injury abated, part of the cellular structure tended to normalize. Conclusion: ASS could act against free radical toxic effect, increase the anti-oxidase activity, strengthen the protection of neuron cells. It is assumed that the effect against nerve cell aging was possibly through scavenging oxygen free radical, strengthening the stability of cell membrane, thus delaying the development of aging.

  10. miR-455 inhibits neuronal cell death by targeting TRAF3 in cerebral ischemic stroke

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    Yao ST

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Shengtao Yao,* Bo Tang,* Gang Li, Ruiming Fan, Fang Cao Department of Cerebrovascular Disease, The First Affiliated Hospital of Zunyi Medical College, Zunyi, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Ischemic stroke is one of the leading causes of brain disease, with high morbidity, disability, and mortality. MicroRNAs (miRNAs have been identified as vital gene regulators in various types of human diseases. Accumulating evidence has suggested that aberrant expression of miRNAs play critical roles in the pathologies of ischemic stroke. Yet, the precise mechanism by which miRNAs control cerebral ischemic stroke remains unclear. In the present study, we explored whether miR-455 suppresses neuronal death by targeting TRAF3 in cerebral ischemic stroke. The expression levels of miR-455 and TRAF3 were detected by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot. The role of miR-455 in cell death caused by oxygen–glucose deprivation (OGD was assessed using Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8 assay. The influence of miR-455 on infarct volume was evaluated in mouse brain after middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO. Bioinformatics softwares and luciferase analysis were used to find and confirm the targets of miR-455. The results showed that the expression levels of miR-455 significantly decreased in primary neuronal cells subjected to OGD and mouse brain subjected to MCAO. In addition, forced expression of miR-455 inhibited neuronal death and weakened ischemic brain infarction in focal ischemia-stroked mice. Furthermore, TRAF3 was proved to be a direct target of miR-455, and miR-455 could negatively suppress TRAF3 expression. Biological function analysis showed that TRAF3 silencing displayed the neuroprotective effect in ischemic stroke and could enhance miR-455-induced positive impact on ischemic injury both in vitro and in vivo. Taken together, miR-455 played a vital role in protecting neuronal

  11. Cells from the adult corneal stroma can be reprogrammed to a neuron-like cell using exogenous growth factors

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    Greene, Carol Ann, E-mail: carol.greene@auckland.ac.nz; Chang, Chuan-Yuan; Fraser, Cameron J.; Nelidova, Dasha E.; Chen, Jing A.; Lim, Angela; Brebner, Alex; McGhee, Jennifer; Sherwin, Trevor; Green, Colin R.

    2014-03-10

    Cells thought to be stem cells isolated from the cornea of the eye have been shown to exhibit neurogenic potential. We set out to uncover the identity and location of these cells within the cornea and to elucidate their neuronal protein and gene expression profile during the process of switching to a neuron-like cell. Here we report that every cell of the adult human and rat corneal stroma is capable of differentiating into a neuron-like cell when treated with neurogenic differentiation specifying growth factors. Furthermore, the expression of genes regulating neurogenesis and mature neuronal structure and function was increased. The switch from a corneal stromal cell to a neuron-like cell was also shown to occur in vivo in intact corneas of living rats. Our results clearly indicate that lineage specifying growth factors can affect changes in the protein and gene expression profiles of adult cells, suggesting that possibly many adult cell populations can be made to switch into another type of mature cell by simply modifying the growth factor environment. - Highlights: • Adult corneal stromal cells can differentiated into neuron-like cells. • Neuronal specification of the adult stromal cell population is stochastic. • Neuronal specification in an adult cell population can be brought about by growth factors.

  12. MyosinV controls PTEN function and neuronal cell size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Diepen, Michiel T; Parsons, Maddy; Downes, C Peter; Leslie, Nicholas R; Hindges, Robert; Eickholt, Britta J

    2009-10-01

    The tumour suppressor PTEN can inhibit cell proliferation and migration as well as control cell growth, in different cell types. PTEN functions predominately as a lipid phosphatase, converting PtdIns(3,4,5)P(3) to PtdIns(4,5)P(2), thereby antagonizing PI(3)K (phosphoinositide 3-kinase) and its established downstream effector pathways. However, much is unclear concerning the mechanisms that regulate PTEN movement to the cell membrane, which is necessary for its activity towards PtdIns(3,4,5)P(3) (Refs 3, 4, 5). Here we show a requirement for functional motor proteins in the control of PI3K signalling, involving a previously unknown association between PTEN and myosinV. FRET (Förster resonance energy transfer) measurements revealed that PTEN interacts directly with myosinV, which is dependent on PTEN phosphorylation mediated by CK2 and/or GSK3. Inactivation of myosinV-transport function in neurons increased cell size, which, in line with known attributes of PTEN-loss, required PI(3)K and mTor. Our data demonstrate a myosin-based transport mechanism that regulates PTEN function, providing new insights into the signalling networks regulating cell growth.

  13. Cell divisions are not essential for the direct conversion of fibroblasts into neuronal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, V S; Shnayder, T A; Orishchenko, K E; Bader, M; Alenina, N; Serov, O L

    2015-01-01

    Direct lineage conversion is a promising approach for disease modeling and regenerative medicine. Cell divisions play a key role in reprogramming of somatic cells to pluripotency, however their role in direct lineage conversion is not clear. Here we used transdifferentiation of fibroblasts into neuronal cells by forced expression of defined transcription factors as a model system to study the role of cellular division in the direct conversion process. We have shown that conversion occurs in the presence of the cell cycle inhibitors aphidicolin or mimosine. Moreover, overexpression of the cell cycle activator cMyc negatively influences the process of direct conversion. Overall, our results suggest that cell divisions are not essential for the direct conversion of fibroblasts into neuronal cells.

  14. Alpha-synuclein cell-to-cell transfer and seeding in grafted dopaminergic neurons in vivo.

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    Elodie Angot

    Full Text Available Several people with Parkinson's disease have been treated with intrastriatal grafts of fetal dopaminergic neurons. Following autopsy, 10-22 years after surgery, some of the grafted neurons contained Lewy bodies similar to those observed in the host brain. Numerous studies have attempted to explain these findings in cell and animal models. In cell culture, α-synuclein has been found to transfer from one cell to another, via mechanisms that include exosomal transport and endocytosis, and in certain cases seed aggregation in the recipient cell. In animal models, transfer of α-synuclein from host brain cells to grafted neurons has been shown, but the reported frequency of the event has been relatively low and little is known about the underlying mechanisms as well as the fate of the transferred α-synuclein. We now demonstrate frequent transfer of α-synuclein from a rat brain engineered to overexpress human α-synuclein to grafted dopaminergic neurons. Further, we show that this model can be used to explore mechanisms underlying cell-to-cell transfer of α-synuclein. Thus, we present evidence both for the involvement of endocytosis in α-synuclein uptake in vivo, and for seeding of aggregation of endogenous α-synuclein in the recipient neuron by the transferred α-synuclein. Finally, we show that, at least in a subset of the studied cells, the transmitted α-synuclein is sensitive to proteinase K. Our new model system could be used to test compounds that inhibit cell-to-cell transfer of α-synuclein and therefore might retard progression of Parkinson neuropathology.

  15. Differentiation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Into Dopaminergic Neuron-like Cells in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI GUO; HONG-XUE FAN; FEI YIN; HONG-QI MENG; LING LING; TA-NA HU-HE; PENG LI; CHUN-XIA ZHANG; SHUN YU; DE-SHENG DUAN

    2005-01-01

    Objective To explore the way to induce mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to differentiate into dopaminergic neurons in vitro. Methods MSCs were obtained from rat bone marrow, cultured and passaged. MSCs used in this experiment had multipotency, which was indirectly proved by being induced to differentiate into chondrocytes and adipocytes. MSCs were cultured in medium containing 0.5 mmol/L IBMX for 2 days. Then the medium was replaced with induction medium, which contained GDNF, IL-1β, mesencephalic glial-cell-conditioned medium and flash-frozen mesencephalic membrane fragments. The surface markers of the differentiated neurons, such as NSE, nestin, MAP-2a, b and TH were detected by immunocytochemistry and Western blot after MSCs were cultured in induction medium for 7 days and 15 days. Results MSCs differentiated into neural progenitors and expressed nestin after MSCs were incubated with medium containing IBMX for 2 d. After the medium was replaced with induction medium containing many inducing agents, MSCs differentiated into neuron-like cells and dopaminergic neuron-like cells and expressed NSE, MAP-2a, b and TH. The percentage of NSE-positive cells, MAP-2a, b-positive cells and TH-positive cells was 30.032±2.489%, 41.580±5.101% and 34.958±5.534%, respectively after MSCs were induced in medium containing GDNF, IL-1β, mesencephalic glial-cell-conditioned medium and flash-frozen mesencephalic membrane fragments for 15 days. Conclusion MSCs can differentiate into dopaminergic neuron-like cells and are a new cell source for the treatment of neurodegeneration diseases and have a great potential for wide application.

  16. Neuroprotection via matrix-trophic coupling between cerebral endothelial cells and neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shuzhen; Kim, Woo Jean; Lok, Josephine; Lee, Sun-Ryung; Besancon, Elaine; Luo, Bing-Hao; Stins, Monique F; Wang, Xiaoying; Dedhar, Shoukat; Lo, Eng H

    2008-05-27

    The neurovascular unit is an emerging concept that emphasizes homeostatic interactions between endothelium and cerebral parenchyma. Here, we show that cerebral endothelium are not just inert tubes for delivering blood, but they also secrete trophic factors that can be directly neuroprotective. Conditioned media from cerebral endothelial cells broadly protects neurons against oxygen-glucose deprivation, oxidative damage, endoplasmic reticulum stress, hypoxia, and amyloid neurotoxicity. This phenomenon is largely mediated by endothelial-produced brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) because filtering endothelial-conditioned media with TrkB-Fc eliminates the neuroprotective effect. Endothelial production of BDNF is sustained by beta-1 integrin and integrin-linked kinase (ILK) signaling. Noncytotoxic levels of oxidative stress disrupts ILK signaling and reduces endothelial levels of neuroprotective BDNF. These data suggest that cerebral endothelium provides a critical source of homeostatic support for neurons. Targeting these signals of matrix and trophic coupling between endothelium and neurons may provide new therapeutic opportunities for stroke and other CNS disorders.

  17. Neuroprotective effect of arctigenin via upregulation of P-CREB in mouse primary neurons and human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Nan; Wen, Qingping; Ren, Lu; Liang, Wenbo; Xia, Yang; Zhang, Xiaodan; Zhao, Dan; Sun, Dong; Hu, Yv; Hao, Haiguang; Yan, Yaping; Zhang, Guangxian; Yang, Jingxian; Kang, Tingguo

    2013-09-10

    Arctigenin (Arc) has been shown to act on scopolamine-induced memory deficit mice and to provide a neuroprotective effect on cultured cortical neurons from glutamate-induced neurodegeneration through mechanisms not completely defined. Here, we investigated the neuroprotective effect of Arc on H89-induced cell damage and its potential mechanisms in mouse cortical neurons and human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. We found that Arc prevented cell viability loss induced by H89 in human SH-SY5Y cells. Moreover, Arc reduced intracellular beta amyloid (Aβ) production induced by H89 in neurons and human SH-SY5Y cells, and Arc also inhibited the presenilin 1(PS1) protein level in neurons. In addition, neural apoptosis in both types of cells, inhibition of neurite outgrowth in human SH-SY5Y cells and reduction of synaptic marker synaptophysin (SYN) expression in neurons were also observed after H89 exposure. All these effects induced by H89 were markedly reversed by Arc treatment. Arc also significantly attenuated downregulation of the phosphorylation of CREB (p-CREB) induced by H89, which may contribute to the neuroprotective effects of Arc. These results demonstrated that Arc exerted the ability to protect neurons and SH-SY5Y cells against H89-induced cell injury via upregulation of p-CREB.

  18. Neuroprotective Effect of Arctigenin via Upregulation of P-CREB in Mouse Primary Neurons and Human SH-SY5Y Neuroblastoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingguo Kang

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Arctigenin (Arc has been shown to act on scopolamine-induced memory deficit mice and to provide a neuroprotective effect on cultured cortical neurons from glutamate-induced neurodegeneration through mechanisms not completely defined. Here, we investigated the neuroprotective effect of Arc on H89-induced cell damage and its potential mechanisms in mouse cortical neurons and human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. We found that Arc prevented cell viability loss induced by H89 in human SH-SY5Y cells. Moreover, Arc reduced intracellular beta amyloid (Aβ production induced by H89 in neurons and human SH-SY5Y cells, and Arc also inhibited the presenilin 1(PS1 protein level in neurons. In addition, neural apoptosis in both types of cells, inhibition of neurite outgrowth in human SH-SY5Y cells and reduction of synaptic marker synaptophysin (SYN expression in neurons were also observed after H89 exposure. All these effects induced by H89 were markedly reversed by Arc treatment. Arc also significantly attenuated downregulation of the phosphorylation of CREB (p-CREB induced by H89, which may contribute to the neuroprotective effects of Arc. These results demonstrated that Arc exerted the ability to protect neurons and SH-SY5Y cells against H89-induced cell injury via upregulation of p-CREB.

  19. Geniposide Protects Primary Cortical Neurons against Oligomeric Aβ1-42-Induced Neurotoxicity through a Mitochondrial Pathway.

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    Chunhui Zhao

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dysfunction plays a key role in the progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD. The accumulation of amyloid-beta peptide (Aβ in the brains of AD patients is thought to be closely related to neuronal mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress. Therefore, protecting mitochondria from Aβ-induced neurotoxicity is an effective strategy for AD therapeutics. In a previous study, we found that geniposide, a pharmacologically active compound purified from gardenia fruit, has protective effects on oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in AD transgenic mouse models. However, whether geniposide has a protective effect on Aβ-induced neuronal dysfunction remains unknown. In the present study, we demonstrate that geniposide protects cultured primary cortical neurons from Aβ-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction by recovering ATP generation, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP, and cytochrome c oxidase (CcO and caspase 3/9 activity; by reducing ROS production and cytochrome c leakage; as well as by inhibiting apoptosis. These findings suggest that geniposide may attenuate Aβ-induced neuronal injury by inhibiting mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress.

  20. Role of hippocampal dentate gyrus neurons in the protective effects of heat shock factor 1 on working memory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Peng; Xiongzhao Zhu; Ming Cheng; Xiangyi Chen; Shuqiao Yao

    2011-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that heat shock factor 1 exerts endogenous protective effects on working memory under conditions of chronic psychological stress. However, the precise underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. This study examined the protective factors affecting working memory in heat shock transcription factor 1 gene knockout mice. The results indicated that the number of correct T maze alternations decreased following mild chronic psychological stress in knockout mice. This change was accompanied by a decrease in neurogenesis and an increase in neuronal apoptosis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. The number of correct T maze alternations was positively correlated with neurogenesis in hippocampal dentate gyrus, and negatively correlated with neuronal apoptosis. In wild type mice, no significant difference was detected in the number of correct T maze alternations or neuronal apoptosis in hippocampal dentate gyrus. These results indicate that the heat shock factor 1 gene has an endogenous protective role in working memory during mild chronic psychological stress associated with dentate gyrus neuronal apoptosis.Moreover, dentate gyrus neurogenesis appears to participate in the protective mechanism.

  1. [Neuronal differentiation of human small cell lung cancer cell line PC-6 by Solcoseryl].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, T

    1997-11-01

    Solcoseryl is composed of extracts from calf blood, and is a drug known to activate tissue respiration. In the present study, I demonstrated the cell biological effects of Solcoseryl on a human small cell lung cancer cell line, PC-6, by analyzing cell morphology, cell growth, expression of neuronal differentiation markers, and the ras proto-oncogene product(ras p21). Exposure of PC-6 cells to Solcoseryl at the concentration of 200 microliters/ml induced (1) cell morphological changes, including neurodendrite-like projections from the cell surface, and (2) complete inhibition of cell growth, that was shown by the loss of Ki-67 expression. Solcoseryl also induced the expression of neurofilament protein and acetylcholinesterase, both of which are markers of neuronal differentiation. Moreover, it upregulated the expression of the ras proto-oncogene product, ras p21. Taken together, these data suggest that Solcoseryl is composed of component(s) which can induce neuronal differentiation of the human small cell lung cancer cell line, PC-6.

  2. Embryonic stem cells and prospects for their use in regenerative medicine approaches to motor neurone disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christou, Y A; Moore, H D; Shaw, P J; Monk, P N

    2007-10-01

    Human embryonic stem cells are pluripotent cells with the potential to differentiate into any cell type in the presence of appropriate stimulatory factors and environmental cues. Their broad developmental potential has led to valuable insights into the principles of developmental and cell biology and to the proposed use of human embryonic stem cells or their differentiated progeny in regenerative medicine. This review focuses on the prospects for the use of embryonic stem cells in cell-based therapy for motor neurone disease or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, a progressive neurodegenerative disease that specifically affects upper and lower motor neurones and leads ultimately to death from respiratory failure. Stem cell-derived motor neurones could conceivably be used to replace the degenerated cells, to provide authentic substrates for drug development and screening and for furthering our understanding of disease mechanisms. However, to reliably and accurately culture motor neurones, the complex pathways by which differentiation occurs in vivo must be understood and reiterated in vitro by embryonic stem cells. Here we discuss the need for new therapeutic strategies in the treatment of motor neurone disease, the developmental processes that result in motor neurone formation in vivo, a number of experimental approaches to motor neurone production in vitro and recent progress in the application of stem cells to the treatment and understanding of motor neurone disease.

  3. Synaptic network activity induces neuronal differentiation of adult hippocampal precursor cells through BDNF signaling

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    Harish Babu

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Adult hippocampal neurogenesis is regulated by activity. But how do neural precursor cells in the hippocampus respond to surrounding network activity and translate increased neural activity into a developmental program? Here we show that long-term potential (LTP-like synaptic activity within a cellular network of mature hippocampal neurons promotes neuronal differentiation of newly generated cells. In co-cultures of precursor cells with primary hippocampal neurons, LTP-like synaptic plasticity induced by addition of glycine in Mg2+-free media for 5 min, produced synchronous network activity and subsequently increased synaptic strength between neurons. Furthermore, this synchronous network activity led to a significant increase in neuronal differentiation from the co-cultured neural precursor cells. When applied directly to precursor cells, glycine and Mg2+-free solution did not induce neuronal differentiation. Synaptic plasticity-induced neuronal differentiation of precursor cells was observed in the presence of GABAergic neurotransmission blockers but was dependent on NMDA-mediated Ca2+ influx. Most importantly, neuronal differentiation required the release of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF from the underlying substrate hippocampal neurons as well as TrkB receptor phosphorylation in precursor cells. This suggests that activity-dependent stem cell differentiation within the hippocampal network is mediated via synaptically evoked BDNF signaling.

  4. Sickle cell protection from malaria: a review

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    Sandro Eridani

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available A linkage between presence of Sickle Haemoglobin (HbS and protection from malaria infection and clinical manifestations in certain areas was suspected from early observations and progressively elucidated by more recent studies. Research has confirmed the abovementioned connection, but also clarified how such protection may be abolished by coexistence of sickle cell trait (HbS trait and alpha thalassemia, which may explain the relatively low incidence of HbS trait in the Mediterranean. The mechanisms of such protective effect are now being investigated: factors of genetic, molecular and immunological nature are prominent. As for genetic factors attention is given to the role of the red blood cell (RBC membrane complement regulatory proteins as polymorphisms of these components seem to be associated with resistance to severe malaria; genetic ligands like the Duffy group blood antigen, necessary for erythrocytic invasion, and human protein CD36, a major receptor for P. falciparum-infected RBC‘s, are also under scrutiny: attention is focused also on plasmodium erythrocyte-binding antigens, which bind to RBC surface components. Genome-wide linkage and association studies are now carried out too, in order to identify genes associated with malaria resistance. Only a minor role is attributed to intravascular sickling, phagocytosis and haemolysis, while specific molecular mechanisms are the object of intensive research: among these a decisive role is played by a biochemical sequence, involving activation of haeme oxygenase (HMO-1, whose effect appears mediated by carbon monoxide (CO. A central role in protection from malaria is also played by immunological factors, which may stimulate antibody production to plasmodium antigens in the early years of life; the role of agents like pathogenic CD8 T-cells has been suggested while the effects of molecular actions on the immunity mechanism are presently investigated. It thus appears that protection from

  5. Tamoxifen mediated estrogen receptor activation protects against early impairment of hippocampal neuron excitability in an oxygen/glucose deprivation brain slice ischemia model

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Huaqiu; Xie, Minjie; Gary P. Schools; Feustel, Paul F.; Wang, Wei; Lei, Ting; Kimelberg, Harold K.; Zhou, Min

    2008-01-01

    Pretreatment of ovarectomized rats with estrogen shows long-term protection via activation of the estrogen receptor (ER). However, it remains unknown whether activation of the ER can provide protection against early neuronal damage when given acutely, we simulated ischemic conditions by applying oxygen and glucose deprived (OGD) solution to acute male rat hippocampal slices and examined the neuronal electrophysiological changes. Pyramidal neurons and interneurons showed a time-dependent membr...

  6. Protective action of green tea catechins in neuronal mitochondria during aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assuncao, Marco; Andrade, Jose Paulo

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are central players in the regulation of cell homeostasis. They are essential for energy production but at the same time, reactive oxygen species accumulate as byproducts of the electron transport chain causing mitochondrial damage. In the central nervous system, senescence and neurodegeneration occur as a consequence of mitochondrial oxidative insults and impaired electron transfer. The accumulation of several oxidation products in neurons during aging prompts the idea that consumption of antioxidant compounds may delay neurodegenerative processes. Tea, one of the most consumed beverages in the world, presents benefits to human health that have been associated to its abundance in polyphenols, mainly catechins, that possess powerful antioxidant properties in vivo and in vitro. In this review, the focus will be placed on the effects of green tea catechins in neuronal mitochondria. Although these compounds reach the brain in small quantities, there are several possible targets, signaling pathways and molecular machinery impinging in the mitochondria that will be highlighted. Accumulated evidence thus far seems to indicate that catechins help prevent neurodegeneration and delay brain function decline.

  7. Human dental pulp stem cells express many pluripotency regulators and differentiate into neuronal cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Behnam Ebrahimi; Mohammad Mehdi Yaghoobi; Ali Mohammadi Kamal-abadi; Maryam Raoof

    2011-01-01

    Stem cells were isolated from human dental pulp using an optimized method, in which pulp pieces were digested by enzymes and immobilized to enhance cell outgrowth. Stem cell marker expression was detected by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR), and differentiation markers were detected by real-time quantitative RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry. Results showed that dental pulp stem cells actively expressed nanog, oct4, nucleostemin slain-1, jmjd1a, jmjd2c, and cyclin D1. When stem cells were induced to differentiate into neurons, nucleostemin, nanog, and cyclin D1 expres-sion significantly decreased, whereas expression of neuronal markers, such as microtubule asso-ciated protein-2 and neurofilament-heavy, significantly increased. These results suggested that stem cells exited a pluripotent state and entered a neuronal differentiation pathway. In addition, results demonstrated that human dental pulp serves as a reservoir of stem cells that express defined stem cell markers; these cells were easily isolated and were induced to differentiate towards a desired cell lineage.

  8. Non-Neuronal Cells Are Required to Mediate the Effects of Neuroinflammation: Results from a Neuron-Enriched Culture System.

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    Chin Wai Hui

    Full Text Available Chronic inflammation is associated with activated microglia and reactive astrocytes and plays an important role in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's. Both in vivo and in vitro studies have demonstrated that inflammatory cytokine responses to immune challenges contribute to neuronal death during neurodegeneration. In order to investigate the role of glial cells in this phenomenon, we developed a modified method to remove the non-neuronal cells in primary cultures of E16.5 mouse cortex. We modified previously reported methods as we found that a brief treatment with the thymidine analog, 5-fluorodeoxyuridine (FdU, is sufficient to substantially deplete dividing non-neuronal cells in primary cultures. Cell cycle and glial markers confirm the loss of ~99% of all microglia, astrocytes and oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs. More importantly, under this milder treatment, the neurons suffered neither cell loss nor any morphological defects up to 2.5 weeks later; both pre- and post-synaptic markers were retained. Further, neurons in FdU-treated cultures remained responsive to excitotoxicity induced by glutamate application. The immunobiology of the FdU culture, however, was significantly changed. Compared with mixed culture, the protein levels of NFκB p65 and the gene expression of several cytokine receptors were altered. Individual cytokines or conditioned medium from β-amyloid-stimulated THP-1 cells that were, potent neurotoxins in normal, mixed cultures, were virtually inactive in the absence of glial cells. The results highlight the importance of our glial-depleted culture system and identifies and offer unexpected insights into the complexity of -brain neuroinflammation.

  9. Strategies for Regenerating Striatal Neurons in the Adult Brain by Using Endogenous Neural Stem Cells

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    Kanako Nakaguchi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, there is no effective treatment for the marked neuronal loss caused by neurodegenerative diseases, such as Huntington's disease (HD or ischemic stroke. However, recent studies have shown that new neurons are continuously generated by endogenous neural stem cells in the subventricular zone (SVZ of the adult mammalian brain, including the human brain. Because some of these new neurons migrate to the injured striatum and differentiate into mature neurons, such new neurons may be able to replace degenerated neurons and improve or repair neurological deficits. To establish a neuroregenerative therapy using this endogenous system, endogenous regulatory mechanisms that can be co-opted for efficient regenerative interventions must be understood, along with any potential drawbacks. Here, we review current knowledge on the generation of new neurons in the adult brain and discuss their potential for use in replacing striatal neurons lost to neurodegenerative diseases, including HD, and to ischemic stroke.

  10. CGP37157, an inhibitor of the mitochondrial Na+/Ca2+ exchanger, protects neurons from excitotoxicity by blocking voltage-gated Ca2+ channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, A; Alberdi, E; Matute, C

    2014-04-10

    Inhibition of the mitochondrial Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (NCLX) by CGP37157 is protective in models of neuronal injury that involve disruption of intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis. However, the Ca(2+) signaling pathways and stores underlying neuroprotection by that inhibitor are not well defined. In the present study, we analyzed how intracellular Ca(2+) levels are modulated by CGP37157 (10 μM) during NMDA insults in primary cultures of rat cortical neurons. We initially assessed the presence of NCLX in mitochondria of cultured neurons by immunolabeling, and subsequently, we analyzed the effects of CGP37157 on neuronal Ca(2+) homeostasis using cameleon-based mitochondrial Ca(2+) and cytosolic Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]i) live imaging. We observed that NCLX-driven mitochondrial Ca(2+) exchange occurs in cortical neurons under basal conditions as CGP37157 induced a decrease in [Ca(2)]i concomitant with a Ca(2+) accumulation inside the mitochondria. In turn, CGP37157 also inhibited mitochondrial Ca(2+) efflux after the stimulation of acetylcholine receptors. In contrast, CGP37157 strongly prevented depolarization-induced [Ca(2+)]i increase by blocking voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels (VGCCs), whereas it did not induce depletion of ER Ca(2+) stores. Moreover, mitochondrial Ca(2+) overload was reduced as a consequence of diminished Ca(2+) entry through VGCCs. The decrease in cytosolic and mitochondrial Ca(2+) overload by CGP37157 resulted in a reduction of excitotoxic mitochondrial damage, characterized here by a reduction in mitochondrial membrane depolarization, oxidative stress and calpain activation. In summary, our results provide evidence that during excitotoxicity CGP37157 modulates cytosolic and mitochondrial Ca(2+) dynamics that leads to attenuation of NMDA-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and neuronal cell death by blocking VGCCs.

  11. The Specification and Maturation of Nociceptive Neurons from Human Embryonic Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boisvert, Erin M; Engle, Sandra J; Hallowell, Shawn E; Liu, Ping; Wang, Zhao-Wen; Li, Xue-Jun

    2015-11-19

    Nociceptive neurons play an essential role in pain sensation by transmitting painful stimuli to the central nervous system. However, investigations of nociceptive neuron biology have been hampered by the lack of accessibility of human nociceptive neurons. Here, we describe a system for efficiently guiding human embryonic stem cells into nociceptive neurons by first inducing these cells to the neural lineage. Subsequent addition of retinoic acid and BMP4 at specific time points and concentrations yielded a high population of neural crest progenitor cells (AP2α(+), P75(+)), which further differentiated into nociceptive neurons (TRKA(+), Nav1.7(+), P2X3(+)). The overexpression of Neurogenin 1 (Neurog1) promoted the neurons to express genes related to sensory neurons (Peripherin, TrkA) and to further mature into TRPV1(+) nociceptive neurons. Importantly, the overexpression of Neurog1 increased the response of these neurons to capsaicin stimulation, a hallmark of mature functional nociceptive neurons. Taken together, this study reveals the important role that Neurog1 plays in generating functional human nociceptive neurons.

  12. Minocycline protects the apoptosis of PC12 cells induced by 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To explore the protective effect of minocycline on the apoptosis of cellular parkinsonism models induced by MPP+ . Methods: Using PC12 cells as the apoptotic model of dopaminergic neurons, MC and MPP+ were added into the culture medium of PC12 cells, and using MTT to assay the cell viability and metabolic state; The cells apoptosis was assayed by electrophoresis method and using flow cytometry FACS to assay the apoptosis ratio. Results: Added the MPP+ to get the concentration of 10μmol/L, the cellular parkinsonism model of apoptosis had been prepared. The pre-treatment of MC (100 μmol/L) could significantly increase the PC12 cell viability. The apoptosis ratio of MC + MPP+ group was significantly lower than that of MPP+ group, but was still significantly higher than that of control group. Conclusion: MC may protect the cell apoptosis induced by MPP+ to some extent.

  13. Expression of c-Fos protein and nitricoxide synthase in neurons of cerebral cortex from fetal rats in hypoxia and protective role of Angelica sinensis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong Yu; Hongxian Zhao; Yuling Wu

    2006-01-01

    neurons of cerebral cortex from embryos of rats. OLYMPUS Bx-50 microscope was used to observe sections and DP12 digit camera was also used under 400 times to detect types of cells. Under microscope, the number of c-Fos, NOS, c-Fos/NOS positive neurons in cerebral cortex from embryos of rats were counted in 2 fields with magnification of 400 in one section per animal. ③ The data in experiments were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by q test.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:① Results of immunohistochemical double-label staining of c-Fos/NOS from cerebral cortex; ② Comparison of amount immunohistochemical double-label staining of c-Fos/NOS positive cells from cerebral cortex.RESULTS:① The positive NOS cells and c-Fos/NOS cells in the three groups were mainly distributed in cerebral cortex, but positive c-Fos neurons were not observed. ② Positive NOS cells and c-Fos/NOS cells in hypoxia group were more than those in control group (76.55±12.02, 50.45±10.39; 33.35±7.42, 26.35±6.67, P < 0.05), but those in Angelica group were less than those in hypoxia group (51.70±9.82, 35.65±8.37, P < 0.05).CONCLUSION:Hypoxia can stimulate the increase of expression of c-Fos protein and NOS in neurons of cerebral cortex. However, Angelica sinensis can decrease this expression so as to play a protective role in cerebral neurons of hypoxic fetal rats.

  14. Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) protects beta cells against glucotoxicity and increases cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathanoori, Ramasri; Olde, Björn; Erlinge, David; Göransson, Olga; Wierup, Nils

    2013-02-01

    Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) is an islet peptide that promotes glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in beta cells via cAMP/PKA-dependent pathways. In addition, CART is a regulator of neuronal survival. In this study, we examined the effect of exogenous CART 55-102 on beta cell viability and dissected its signaling mechanisms. Evaluation of DNA fragmentation and chromatin condensation revealed that CART 55-102 reduced glucotoxicity-induced apoptosis in both INS-1 (832/13) cells and isolated rat islets. Glucotoxicity in INS-1 (832/13) cells also caused a 50% reduction of endogenous CART protein. We show that CART increased proliferation in INS-1 (832/13) cells, an effect that was blocked by PKA, PKB, and MEK1 inhibitors. In addition, CART induced phosphorylation of CREB, IRS, PKB, FoxO1, p44/42 MAPK, and p90RSK in INS-1 (832/13) cells and isolated rat islets, all key mediators of cell survival and proliferation. Thus, we demonstrate that CART 55-102 protects beta cells against glucotoxicity and promotes proliferation. Taken together our data point to the potential use of CART in therapeutic interventions targeted at enhancing functional beta cell mass and long-term insulin secretion in T2D.

  15. Self-contained induction of neurons from human embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuyoshi Okuno

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Neurons and glial cells can be efficiently induced from mouse embryonic stem (ES cells in a conditioned medium collected from rat primary-cultured astrocytes (P-ACM. However, the use of rodent primary cells for clinical applications may be hampered by limited supply and risk of contamination with xeno-proteins. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have developed an alternative method for unimpeded production of human neurons under xeno-free conditions. Initially, neural stem cells in sphere-like clusters were induced from human ES (hES cells after being cultured in P-ACM under free-floating conditions. The resultant neural stem cells could circumferentially proliferate under subsequent adhesive culture, and selectively differentiate into neurons or astrocytes by changing the medium to P-ACM or G5, respectively. These hES cell-derived neurons and astrocytes could procure functions similar to those of primary cells. Interestingly, a conditioned medium obtained from the hES cell-derived astrocytes (ES-ACM could successfully be used to substitute P-ACM for induction of neurons. Neurons made by this method could survive in mice brain after xeno-transplantation. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: By inducing astrocytes from hES cells in a chemically defined medium, we could produce human neurons without the use of P-ACM. This self-serving method provides an unlimited source of human neural cells and may facilitate clinical applications of hES cells for neurological diseases.

  16. Characterization and retinal neuron differentiation of WERI-Rb1 cancer stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Huiling; Deng, Fei; Liu, Ying; Chen, Mengfei; Zhang, Xiulan; Sun, Xuerong; Dong, Zhizhang; Xiaohong LIU; Ge, Jian

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The evidence is increasing that cancer stem cells (CSCs) expressing embryonic and neuronal stem cell markers are present in human retinoblastoma (Rb). This study was conducted to determine whether stem-like cancer cells (SLCCs) in Rb express retinal stem cell–related genes and whether SLCCs can directly differentiate into retinal neurons. Methods The cancer stem cell characteristics in WERI-Rb1 cells were determined with Hoechst 33,342 staining, clone formation assay, and CD133 flow c...

  17. Ferroelectric symmetry-protected multibit memory cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudry, Laurent; Lukyanchuk, Igor; Vinokur, Valerii M.

    2017-01-01

    The tunability of electrical polarization in ferroelectrics is instrumental to their applications in information-storage devices. The existing ferroelectric memory cells are based on the two-level storage capacity with the standard binary logics. However, the latter have reached its fundamental limitations. Here we propose ferroelectric multibit cells (FMBC) utilizing the ability of multiaxial ferroelectric materials to pin the polarization at a sequence of the multistable states. Employing the catastrophe theory principles we show that these states are symmetry-protected against the information loss and thus realize novel topologically-controlled access memory (TAM). Our findings enable developing a platform for the emergent many-valued non-Boolean information technology and target challenges posed by needs of quantum and neuromorphic computing. PMID:28176866

  18. Ferroelectric symmetry-protected multibit memory cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudry, Laurent; Lukyanchuk, Igor; Vinokur, Valerii M.

    2017-02-01

    The tunability of electrical polarization in ferroelectrics is instrumental to their applications in information-storage devices. The existing ferroelectric memory cells are based on the two-level storage capacity with the standard binary logics. However, the latter have reached its fundamental limitations. Here we propose ferroelectric multibit cells (FMBC) utilizing the ability of multiaxial ferroelectric materials to pin the polarization at a sequence of the multistable states. Employing the catastrophe theory principles we show that these states are symmetry-protected against the information loss and thus realize novel topologically-controlled access memory (TAM). Our findings enable developing a platform for the emergent many-valued non-Boolean information technology and target challenges posed by needs of quantum and neuromorphic computing.

  19. Antidepressant Potential of Chlorogenic Acid-Enriched Extract from Eucommia ulmoides Oliver Bark with Neuron Protection and Promotion of Serotonin Release through Enhancing Synapsin I Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianming Wu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Eucommia ulmoides Oliver (E. ulmoides is a traditional Chinese medicine with many beneficial effects, used as a tonic medicine in China and other countries. Chlorogenic acid (CGA is an important compound in E. ulmoides with neuroprotective, cognition improvement and other pharmacological effects. However, it is unknown whether chlorogenic acid-enriched Eucommia ulmoides Oliver bark has antidepressant potential through neuron protection, serotonin release promotion and penetration of blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier. In the present study, we demonstrated that CGA could stimulate axon and dendrite growth and promote serotonin release through enhancing synapsin I expression in the cells of fetal rat raphe neurons in vitro. More importantly, CGA-enriched extract of E. ulmoides (EUWE at 200 and 400 mg/kg/day orally administered for 7 days showed antidepressant-like effects in the tail suspension test of KM mice. Furthermore, we also found CGA could be detected in the the cerebrospinal fluid of the rats orally treated with EUWE and reach the level of pharmacological effect for neuroprotection by UHPLC-ESI-MS/MS. The findings indicate CGA is able to cross the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier to exhibit its neuron protection and promotion of serotonin release through enhancing synapsin I expression. This is the first report of the effect of CGA on promoting 5-HT release through enhancing synapsin I expression and CGA-enriched EUWE has antidepressant-like effect in vivo. EUWE may be developed as the natural drugs for the treatment of depression.

  20. Antidepressant Potential of Chlorogenic Acid-Enriched Extract from Eucommia ulmoides Oliver Bark with Neuron Protection and Promotion of Serotonin Release through Enhancing Synapsin I Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jianming; Chen, Haixia; Li, Hua; Tang, Yong; Yang, Le; Cao, Shousong; Qin, Dalian

    2016-02-25

    Eucommia ulmoides Oliver (E. ulmoides) is a traditional Chinese medicine with many beneficial effects, used as a tonic medicine in China and other countries. Chlorogenic acid (CGA) is an important compound in E. ulmoides with neuroprotective, cognition improvement and other pharmacological effects. However, it is unknown whether chlorogenic acid-enriched Eucommia ulmoides Oliver bark has antidepressant potential through neuron protection, serotonin release promotion and penetration of blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier. In the present study, we demonstrated that CGA could stimulate axon and dendrite growth and promote serotonin release through enhancing synapsin I expression in the cells of fetal rat raphe neurons in vitro. More importantly, CGA-enriched extract of E. ulmoides (EUWE) at 200 and 400 mg/kg/day orally administered for 7 days showed antidepressant-like effects in the tail suspension test of KM mice. Furthermore, we also found CGA could be detected in the the cerebrospinal fluid of the rats orally treated with EUWE and reach the level of pharmacological effect for neuroprotection by UHPLC-ESI-MS/MS. The findings indicate CGA is able to cross the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier to exhibit its neuron protection and promotion of serotonin release through enhancing synapsin I expression. This is the first report of the effect of CGA on promoting 5-HT release through enhancing synapsin I expression and CGA-enriched EUWE has antidepressant-like effect in vivo. EUWE may be developed as the natural drugs for the treatment of depression.

  1. Protective mechanisms of microRNA-27a against oxygen-glucose deprivation-induced injuries in hippocampal neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qun Cai; Ting Wang; Wen-jie Yang; Xing Fen

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxic injuries during fetal distress have been shown to cause reduced expression of microRNA-27a (miR-27a), which regulates sensi-tivity of cortical neurons to apoptosis. We hypothesized that miR-27a overexpression attenuates hypoxia-and ischemia-induced neuronal apoptosis by regulating FOXO1, an important transcription factor for regulating the oxidative stress response. miR-27a mimic was transfected into hippocampal neurons to overexpress miR-27a. Results showed increased hippocampal neuronal viability and decreased caspase-3 ex-pression. The luciferase reporter gene system demonstrated that miR-27a directly binded to FOXO1 3′UTR in hippocampal neurons and inhibited FOXO1 expression, suggesting that FOXO1 was the target gene for miR-27a. These ifndings conifrm that miR-27a protects hippo-campal neurons against oxygen-glucose deprivation-induced injuries. The mechanism might be mediated by modulation of FOXO1 and apoptosis-related gene caspase-3 expression.

  2. A histopathological study of premature and mature infants with pontosubicular neuron necrosis: neuronal cell death in perinatal brain damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takizawa, Yuji; Takashima, Sachio; Itoh, Masayuki

    2006-06-20

    Perinatal hypoxic-ischemic brain damage is a major cause of neuronal and behavior deficits, in which the onset of injury can be before, at or after birth, and the effects may be delayed. Pontosubicular neuron necrosis (PSN) is one of perinatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury and its pathological peculiarity is neuronal apoptosis. In this study, we investigated whether apoptotic cascade of PSN used a caspase-pathway or not, and whether hypoglycemia activated apoptosis or not. Sections of the pons of PSN with and without hypoglycemia were stained using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick end labeling (TUNEL) and immunohistochemistry for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), Bcl-2, Bcl-x and activated caspase 3. Additionally, we performed immunoblot analysis of Bcl-2, Bcl-x and activated caspase 3. TUNEL-positive cell was closely associated with the presence of karyorrhexis. Under combination of karyorrhectic and TUNEL-positive cells, number of apoptotic cells in premature brains was significantly more than in mature brains. Hypoxic-ischemic brain injury was considered to easily lead to apoptosis in premature infants. Moreover, as this pathophysiology, caspase-pathway activation contributed to neuronal death from caspase-immunoexpression analyses. PSN with hypoglycemia showed large number of apoptotic cells and higher expression of activated caspase 3. The result may be more severe with the background of hypoglycemia and prematurity complicated by hypoxia and/or ischemia.

  3. Interaction of SH-SY5Y cells with nanogratings during neuronal differentiation: comparison with primary neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonazzini, Ilaria; Cecchini, Alessandra; Elgersma, Ype; Cecchini, Marco

    2014-04-01

    Controlling neuronal cell adhesion, migration, and axonal outgrowth via contact interactions with biomaterials is a critical element for tissue engineering applications and for developing artificial neuronal interfaces. One promising approach relies on the exploitation of nanostructured surfaces. Here, the human neuroblastoma cell line SH-SY5Y is interfaced with plastic nanogratings (NGs; anisotropic topographies composed by alternating lines of grooves and ridges with sub-micrometer lateral dimension). The SH-SY5Y cells' (SHs) contact guidance is investigated under proliferating conditions and upon differentiation after treatment with retinoic acid (RA) and brain-derived neurotrophin factor (BDNF), and compared with mouse primary hippocampal neurons (HNs). Quantitative readouts are obtained by measuring changes in tubulin cytoskeleton organization and cell morphology induced by mechanotransduction. Results demonstrate that SHs effectively retrieve substrate topographical signals, in particular during differentiation. Remarkably, RA/BDNF improves SH responsiveness to NG directional cues, and significantly enhances the alignment to the NG lines. HNs behave similarly, showing a marked change in network organization if cultured on NGs. These results might help the rational engineering of neuro-regenerative scaffolds to improve peripheral nerve wound healing, as well as to investigate the basic mechanisms of neuronal wiring.

  4. Non-Serotonergic Neurotoxicity by MDMA (Ecstasy) in Neurons Derived from Mouse P19 Embryonal Carcinoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popova, Dina; Forsblad, Andréas; Hashemian, Sanaz; Jacobsson, Stig O P

    2016-01-01

    3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA; ecstasy) is a commonly abused recreational drug that causes neurotoxic effects in both humans and animals. The mechanism behind MDMA-induced neurotoxicity is suggested to be species-dependent and needs to be further investigated on the cellular level. In this study, the effects of MDMA in neuronally differentiated P19 mouse embryonal carcinoma cells have been examined. MDMA produces a concentration-, time- and temperature-dependent toxicity in differentiated P19 neurons, as measured by intracellular MTT reduction and extracellular LDH activity assays. The P19-derived neurons express both the serotonin reuptake transporter (SERT), that is functionally active, and the serotonin metabolizing enzyme monoamine oxidase A (MAO-A). The involvement of these proteins in the MDMA-induced toxicity was investigated by a pharmacological approach. The MAO inhibitors clorgyline and deprenyl, and the SERT inhibitor fluoxetine, per se or in combination, were not able to mimic the toxic effects of MDMA in the P19-derived neurons or block the MDMA-induced cell toxicity. Oxidative stress has been implicated in MDMA-induced neurotoxicity, but pre-treatment with the antioxidants α-tocopherol or N-acetylcysteine did not reveal any protective effects in the P19 neurons. Involvement of mitochondria in the MDMA-induced cytotoxicity was also examined, but MDMA did not alter the mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) in the P19 neurons. We conclude that MDMA produce a concentration-, time- and temperature-dependent neurotoxicity and our results suggest that the mechanism behind MDMA-induced toxicity in mouse-derived neurons do not involve the serotonergic system, oxidative stress or mitochondrial dysfunction.

  5. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor up-regulates GTP-cyclohydrolase I activity and tetrahydrobiopterin levels in primary dopaminergic neurones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bauer, M; Suppmann, S; Meyer, M;

    2002-01-01

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) protects dopaminergic neurones against toxic and physical damage. In addition, GDNF promotes differentiation and structural integrity of dopaminergic neurones. Here we show that GDNF can support the function of primary dopaminergic neurones...... by triggering activation of GTP-cyclohydrolase I (GTPCH I), a key enzyme in catecholamine biosynthesis. GDNF stimulation of primary dopaminergic neurones expressing both tyrosine 3-monooxygenase and GTPCH I resulted in a dose-dependent doubling of GTPCH I activity, and a concomitant increase...... in tetrahydrobiopterin levels whereas tyrosine 3-monooxygenase activity was not altered. Actinomycin D, asan inhibitor of de novo biosynthesis, abolished any GDNF-mediated up-regulation of GTPCH I activity. However, GTPCH I mRNA levels in primary dopaminergic neurones were not altered by GDNF treatment, suggesting...

  6. Spongionella Secondary Metabolites Protect Mitochondrial Function in Cortical Neurons against Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Leirós

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The marine habitat provides a large number of structurally-diverse bioactive compounds for drug development. Marine sponges have been studied over many years and are found to be a rich source of these bioactive chemicals. This study is focused on the evaluation of the activity of six diterpene derivatives isolated from Spongionella sp. on mitochondrial function using an oxidative in vitro stress model. The test compounds include the Gracilins (A, H, K, J and L and tetrahydroaplysulphurin-1. Compounds were co-incubated with hydrogen peroxide for 12 hours to determine their protective capacities and their effect on markers of apoptosis and Nrf2/ARE pathways was evaluated. Results conclude that Gracilins preserve neurons against oxidative damage, and that in particular, tetrahydroaplysulphurin-1 shows a complete neuroprotective activity. Oxidative stress is linked to mitochondrial dysfunction and consequently to neurodegenerative disorders like Parkinson and Alzheimer diseases, Friedreich ataxia or Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. This neuroprotection against oxidation conditions suggest that these metabolites could be interesting lead candidates in drug development for neurodegenerative diseases.

  7. Molecular codes for neuronal individuality and cell assembly in the brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi eYagi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The brain contains an enormous, but finite, number of neurons. The ability of this limited number of neurons to produce nearly limitless neural information over a lifetime is typically explained by combinatorial explosion; that is, by the exponential amplification of each neuron’s contribution through its incorporation into cell assemblies and neural networks. In development, each neuron expresses diverse cellular recognition molecules that permit the formation of the appropriate neural cell assemblies to elicit various brain functions. The mechanism for generating neuronal assemblies and networks must involve molecular codes that give neurons individuality and allow them to recognize one another and join appropriate networks. The extensive molecular diversity of cell-surface proteins on neurons is likely to contribute to their individual identities. The cadherin-related neuronal receptors and clustered protocadherins (CNR/Pcdh is a large subfamily within the diverse cadherin superfamily. The CNR/Pcdh genes are encoded in tandem by three gene clusters, and are present in all known vertebrate genomes. The set of CNR/Pcdh genes is expressed in a random and combinatorial manner in each neuron. In addition, cis-tetramers composed of heteromultimeric CNR/Pcdh isoforms represent selective binding units for cell-cell interactions. Here I present the mathematical probabilities for neuronal individuality based on the random and combinatorial expression of CNR/Pcdh isoforms and their formation of cis-tetramers in each neuron. Notably, CNR/Pcdh gene products are known to play crucial roles in correct axonal projections, synaptic formation, and neuronal survival. Their molecular and biological features suggest that the diverse CNR/Pcdh molecules provide the molecular code by which neuronal individuality and cell assembly permit the combinatorial explosion of networks that supports enormous processing capability and plasticity of the brain.

  8. THE PROTECTIVE EFFECTS OF THE TOTAL SAPONIN OF DIPSACUS ASPEROIDES ON THE APOPTOSIS OF HIPPOCAMPAL NEURONS INDUCED BY β-AMYLOID PROTEIN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钱亦华; 杨杰; 胡海涛; 刘勇; 杨广德; 曹云新; 任惠民

    2004-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of the total saponin of Dipsacus asperoides (tSDA) and ginsenoside Rb1 (GRb1) on the apoptosis of primary cultured hippocampal neurons induced by β-amyloid protein (Aβ). Methods Primary cultured hippocampal neurons, the cultures were pretreated with tSDA and GRb1 on 10d for 24 hours respectively. Then the cultures were treated with 35μmol·L-1 Aβ25-35 for 24 hours, observed the changing of survival rate of neurons and the apoptosis of neurons with biochemical analysis combining immunofluorescent cytochemical double-staining technique. Results Hippocampal neurons were treated with 35μmol*L-1 Aβ for 24 hours, and survival rate of neurons downed to 52.6%. When neurons were pretreated by tSDA and GRb1, survival rate of neurons increased 11% to 15%. The findings of immunofluorescent cytochemical double-staining indicated that apoptotic neurons were obviously more than that of the blank group, reaching 43.9%.When neurons were pretreated by tSDA and GRb1, apoptotic neurons were downed to 16.6%, 10.8% respectively. Conclusion tSDA had the same effects as GRb1, protecting the neurons, antagonizing neurotoxicity of Aβ, increasing survival rate of neurons, and reducing apoptotic neurons induced by Aβ.

  9. Fibroblast growth factor 10 protects neuron against oxygen–glucose deprivation injury through inducing heme oxygenase-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yong-Hua; Yang, Li-Ye; Chen, Wei; Li, Ying-Ke, E-mail: liyingke6f@126.com; Yuan, Hong-Bin, E-mail: yuanhongbin6f@126.com

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • FGF10 attenuates OGD induced injury in cortical neuron. • FGF10 reduces OGD triggered ROS level in cortical neuron. • FGF10 induces HO-1 expression upon OGD stimuli in cortical neuron. • Knockdown of HO-1 impairs the neuroprotection of FGF10 in OGD model. - Abstract: Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) are a family of structurally related heparin-binding proteins with diverse biological functions. FGFs participate in mitogenesis, angiogenesis, cell proliferation, development, differentiation and cell migration. Here, we investigated the potential effect of FGF10, a member of FGFs, on neuron survival in oxygen–glucose deprivation (OGD) model. In primary cultured mouse cortical neurons upon OGD, FGF10 treatment (100 and 1000 ng/ml) attenuated the decrease of cell viability and rescued the LDH release. Tuj-1 immunocytochemistry assay showed that FGF10 promoted neuronal survival. Apoptosis assay with Annexin V + PI by flow cytometry demonstrated that FGF10 treatment reduced apoptotic cell proportion. Moreover, immunoblotting showed that FGF10 alleviated the cleaved caspase-3 upregulation caused by OGD. FGF10 treatment also depressed the OGD-induced increase of caspase-3, -8 and -9 activities. At last, we found FGF10 triggered heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) protein expression rather than hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1), AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling and extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) signaling. Knockdown of HO-1 by siRNA partly abolished the neuroprotection of FGF10 in OGD model. In summary, our observations provide the first evidence for the neuroprotective function of FGF10 against ischemic neuronal injury and suggest that FGF10 may be a promising agent for treatment of ischemic stroke.

  10. Oxygen glucose deprivation post-conditioning protects cortical neurons against oxygen-glucose deprivation injury: role of HSP70 and inhibition of apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jian-hua; Meng, Xian-li; Zhang, Jian; Li, Yong-li; Li, Yue-juan; Fan, Zhe-ming

    2014-02-01

    In the present study, we examined the effect of oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD) post-conditioning (PostC) on neural cell apoptosis in OGD-PostC model and the protective effect on primary cortical neurons against OGD injury in vitro. Four-h OGD was induced by OGD by using a specialized and humidified chamber. To initiate OGD, culture medium was replaced with de-oxygenated and glucose-free extracellular solution-Locke's medium. After OGD treatment for 4 h, cells were then allowed to recover for 6 h or 20 h. Then lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release assay, Western blotting and flow cytometry were used to detect cell death, protein levels and apoptotic cells, respectively. For the PostC treatment, three cycles of 15-min OGD, followed by 15 min normal cultivation, were applied immediately after injurious 4-h OGD. Cells were then allowed to recover for 6 h or 20 h, and cell death was assessed by LDH release assay. Apoptotic cells were flow cytometrically evaluated after 4-h OGD, followed by re-oxygenation for 20 h (O4/R20). In addition, Western blotting was used to examine the expression of heat-shock protein 70 (HSP70), Bcl-2 and Bax. The ratio of Bcl-2 expression was (0.44±0.08)% and (0.76±0.10)%, and that of Bax expression was (0.51±0.05)% and (0.39±0.04)%, and that of HSP70 was (0.42±0.031)% and (0.72±0.045)% respectively in OGD group and PostC group. After O4/R6, the rate of neuron death in PostC group and OGD groups was (28.96±3.03)% and (37.02±4.47)%, respectively. Therefore, the PostC treatment could up-regulate the expression of HSP70 and Bcl-2, but down-regulate Bax expression. As compared with OGD group, OGD-induced neuron death and apoptosis were significantly decreased in PostC group (P<0.05). These findings suggest that PostC inhibited OGD-induced neuron death. This neuro-protective effect is likely achieved by anti-apoptotic mechanisms and is associated with over-expression of HSP70.

  11. Polysaccharides purified from Cordyceps cicadae protects PC12 cells against glutamate-induced oxidative damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olatunji, Opeyemi J; Feng, Yan; Olatunji, Oyenike O; Tang, Jian; Wei, Yuan; Ouyang, Zhen; Su, Zhaoliang

    2016-11-20

    Two polysaccharides CPA-1 and CPB-2 were isolated purified from Cordyceps cicadae by hot water extraction, ethanol precipitation and purification using anion exchange and gel filtration chromatography. Preliminary structural characterization of CPA-1 and CPB-2 were performed. The protective effect of CPA-1 and CPB-2 against glutamate-induced oxidative toxicity in PC12 cells was analyzed. The results indicated that pretreatment of PC12 cells with CPA-1 and CPB-2 significantly increased cell survival, Ca(2+) overload and ROS generation. CPA-1 and CPB-2 also markedly up-regulated the antioxidant status of pretreated PC12 cells. Our results suggested that Cordyceps cicadae polysaccharides can protect PC12 cells against glutamate excitotoxicity and might serve as therapeutic agents for neuronal disorders.

  12. Cell biology in neuroscience: Architects in neural circuit design: glia control neuron numbers and connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corty, Megan M; Freeman, Marc R

    2013-11-11

    Glia serve many important functions in the mature nervous system. In addition, these diverse cells have emerged as essential participants in nearly all aspects of neural development. Improved techniques to study neurons in the absence of glia, and to visualize and manipulate glia in vivo, have greatly expanded our knowledge of glial biology and neuron-glia interactions during development. Exciting studies in the last decade have begun to identify the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which glia exert control over neuronal circuit formation. Recent findings illustrate the importance of glial cells in shaping the nervous system by controlling the number and connectivity of neurons.

  13. Protection of ischemic postconditioning against neuronal apoptosis induced by transient focal ischemia is associated with attenuation of NF-κB/p65 activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianmin Liang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Accumulating evidences have demonstrated that nuclear factor κB/p65 plays a protective role in the protection of ischemic preconditioning and detrimental role in lethal ischemia-induced programmed cell death including apoptosis and autophagic death. However, its role in the protection of ischemic postconditioning is still unclear. METHODS: Rat MCAO model was used to produce transient focal ischemia. The procedure of ischemic postconditioning consisted of three cycles of 30 seconds reperfusion/reocclusion of MCA. The volume of cerebral infarction was measured by TTC staining and neuronal apoptosis was detected by TUNEL staining. Western blotting was used to analyze the changes in protein levels of Caspase-3, NF-κB/p65, phosphor- NF-κB/p65, IκBα, phosphor- IκBα, Noxa, Bim and Bax between rats treated with and without ischemic postconditioning. Laser scanning confocal microscopy was used to examine the distribution of NF-κB/p65 and Noxa. RESULTS: Ischemic postconditioning made transient focal ischemia-induced infarct volume decrease obviously from 38.6% ± 5.8% to 23.5% ± 4.3%, and apoptosis rate reduce significantly from 46.5% ± 6.2 to 29.6% ± 5.3% at reperfusion 24 h following 2 h focal cerebral ischemia. Western blotting analysis showed that ischemic postconditioning suppressed markedly the reduction of NF-κB/p65 in cytoplasm, but elevated its content in nucleus either at reperfusion 6 h or 24 h. Moreover, the decrease of IκBα and the increase of phosphorylated IκBα and phosphorylated NF-κB/p65 at indicated reperfusion time were reversed by ischemic postconditioning. Correspondingly, proapoptotic proteins Caspase-3, cleaved Caspase-3, Noxa, Bim and Bax were all mitigated significantly by ischemic postconditioning. Confocal microscopy revealed that ischemic postconditioning not only attenuated ischemia-induced translocation of NF-κB/p65 from neuronal cytoplasm to nucleus, but also inhibited the abnormal

  14. Protective effects of Purendan superfine powder on retinal neuron apoptosis in a rat model of type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhijun Dong; Xiangyi Tao; Xiaoxiao Fu; Haibin Wang; Donghua Wang; Tiemin Zhang

    2012-01-01

    This study sought to investigate the effects of Purendan superfine powder comprised of Momordica charantia, Radix Ginseng, and Radix Salviae Miltiorrhiae on neuronal apoptosis and expression of bcl-2, bax, and caspase-3, which are retinal apoptosis-associated factors in rats with diabetes mellitus induced by continuous intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin. The results showed that Purendan superfine powder could upregulate the expression of bcl-2 protein and mRNA, and downregulate the expression of bax and caspase-3 in the retina of diabetes mellitus rats. In addition, Purendan superfine powder was shown to reduce the number of apoptotic neurons. Our experimental findings indicate that Purendan superfine powder can inhibit neuronal apoptosis in the retina of diabetes mellitus rats and has protective effects on diabetic retinopathy.

  15. Triptolide, a Chinese herbal extract, protects dopaminergic neurons from inflammation-mediated damage through inhibition of microglial activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feng-Qiao; Lu, Xiu-Zhi; Liang, Xi-Bin; Zhou, Hui-Fang; Xue, Bing; Liu, Xian-Yu; Niu, Dong-Bin; Han, Ji-Sheng; Wang, Xiao-Min

    2004-03-01

    Mounting lines of evidence have suggested that brain inflammation participates in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease. Triptolide is one of the major active components of Chinese herb Tripterygium wilfordii Hook F, which possesses potent anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive properties. We found that triptolide concentration-dependently attenuated the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced decrease in [3H]dopamine uptake and loss of tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive neurons in primary mesencephalic neuron/glia mixed culture. Triptolide also blocked LPS-induced activation of microglia and excessive production of TNFalpha and NO. Our data suggests that triptolide may protect dopaminergic neurons from LPS-induced injury and its efficiency in inhibiting microglia activation may underlie the mechanism.

  16. Neural cell co-culture induced differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells into neuronal-like cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nailong Yang; Lili Xu; Fen Yang

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It has been previously demonstrated that the neural cell microenvironment has the ability to induce differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) into the neural cells.OBJECTIVE: To establish a co-culture system of human BMSCs and neural cells, and to observe effects of this co-culture system on differentiation of human BMSCs into neural cells.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: A comparative observation experiment, performed at the Center Laboratory of the Affiliated Hospital of Medical College Qingdao University from October 2006 to December 2007.MATERIALS: Neural cells were obtained from human fetal brain tissue. BMSCs were harvested from female patients that underwent autonomous stem cell transplantation.METHODS: BMSCs in the co-culture group consisted of BMSCs and third passage neural cells. BMSCs in the control group were solely cultured in vitro.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Morphological changes of BMSCs were observed, and expression of the neuronal specific marker, neuron-specific enolase (NSE), was analyzed by immunofluorescence staining after4-5-day co-culture.RESULTS: The number of neural cells in the co-culture group increased and the cells spread on the culture bottle surface. Radial dendrite formed and connected with each other. NSE-immunoreactive cells were also detected. The positive ratio of NSE-positive cells reached (32.7±11.5)%, with morphological characteristics similar to neuronal cells. Human BMSCs did not express NSE in the control group.CONCLUSION: The microenvironment provided by neurons induced differentiation of BMSCs into neuronal-like cells.

  17. Protective effects of antioxidants and anti-inflammatory agents against manganese-induced oxidative damage and neuronal injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milatovic, Dejan, E-mail: dejan.milatovic@vanderbilt.edu [Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Nashville, TN (United States); Gupta, Ramesh C. [Murray State University, Breathitt Veterinary Center, Hopkinsville, KY (United States); Yu, Yingchun; Zaja-Milatovic, Snjezana [Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Nashville, TN (United States); Aschner, Michael [Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Nashville, TN (United States); Pharmacology and the Kennedy Center for Research on Human Development, Nashville, TN (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Exposure to excessive manganese (Mn) levels leads to neurotoxicity, referred to as manganism, which resembles Parkinson's disease (PD). Manganism is caused by neuronal injury in both cortical and subcortical regions, particularly in the basal ganglia. The basis for the selective neurotoxicity of Mn is not yet fully understood. However, several studies suggest that oxidative damage and inflammatory processes play prominent roles in the degeneration of dopamine-containing neurons. In the present study, we assessed the effects of Mn on reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, changes in high-energy phosphates and associated neuronal dysfunctions both in vitro and in vivo. Results from our in vitro study showed a significant (p < 0.01) increase in biomarkers of oxidative damage, F{sub 2}-isoprostanes (F{sub 2}-IsoPs), as well as the depletion of ATP in primary rat cortical neurons following exposure to Mn (500 {mu}M) for 2 h. These effects were protected when neurons were pretreated for 30 min with 100 of an antioxidant, the hydrophilic vitamin E analog, trolox (6-hydroxy-2,5,7,8-tetramethylchroman-2-carboxylic acid), or an anti-inflammatory agent, indomethacin. Results from our in vivo study confirmed a significant increase in F{sub 2}-IsoPs levels in conjunction with the progressive spine degeneration and dendritic damage of the striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs) of mice exposed to Mn (100 mg/kg, s.c.) 24 h. Additionally, pretreatment with vitamin E (100 mg/kg, i.p.) or ibuprofen (140 {mu}g/ml in the drinking water for two weeks) attenuated the Mn-induced increase in cerebral F{sub 2}-IsoPs? and protected the MSNs from dendritic atrophy and dendritic spine loss. Our findings suggest that the mediation of oxidative stress/mitochondrial dysfunction and the control of alterations in biomarkers of oxidative injury, neuroinflammation and synaptodendritic degeneration may provide an effective, multi-pronged therapeutic strategy for protecting dysfunctional

  18. Insulin/PI3K signaling protects dentate neurons from oxygen-glucose deprivation in organotypic slice cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaolu; Yao, Hang; Douglas, Robert M; Gu, Xiang Q; Wang, Juan; Haddad, Gabriel G

    2010-01-01

    It is known that ischemia/reperfusion induces neurodegeneration in the hippocampus in a subregion-dependent manner. This study investigated the mechanism of selective resistance/vulnerability to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) using mouse organotypic hippocampal cultures. Analysis of propidium iodide uptake showed that OGD-induced duration- and subregion-dependent neuronal injury. When compared with the CA1-3 subregions, dentate neuronal survival was more sensitive to inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling under basal conditions. Dentate neuronal sensitivity to PI3K/Akt signaling activation was inversely related to its vulnerability to OGD-induced injury; insulin/insulin-like growth factor 1 pre-treatment conferred neuroprotection to dentate neurons via activation of PI3K/Akt signaling. In contrast, CA1 and CA3 neurons were less sensitive to disruptions of endogenous PI3K/Akt signaling and protective effects of insulin/insulin-like growth factor 1, but more vulnerable to OGD. OGD-induced injury in CA1 was reduced by inhibition of NMDA receptor or mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling, and was prevented by blocking NMDA receptor in the presence of insulin. The CA2 subregion was distinctive in its response to glutamate, OGD, and insulin, compared with other CA subregions. CA2 neurons were sensitive to the protective effects of insulin against OGD-induced injury, but more resistant to glutamate. Distinctive distribution of insulin receptor beta and basal phospho-Akt was detected in our slice cultures. Our results suggest a role for insulin signaling in subregional resistance/vulnerability to cerebral ischemia.

  19. Differentiation of Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells into Dopaminergic Neuron-like Cells in Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, So Young; Soker, Shay; Jang, Yu-Jin; Kwon, Tae Gyun; Yoo, Eun Sang

    2016-02-01

    We investigated the potential of human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) to differentiate into dopaminergic neurons in vitro as an autologous stem cell source for Parkinson's disease treatment. The hDPSCs were expanded in knockout-embryonic stem cell (KO-ES) medium containing leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) on gelatin-coated plates for 3-4 days. Then, the medium was replaced with KO-ES medium without LIF to allow the formation of the neurosphere for 4 days. The neurosphere was transferred into ITS medium, containing ITS (human insulin-transferrin-sodium) and fibronectin, to select for Nestin-positive cells for 6-8 days. The cells were then cultured in N-2 medium containing basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF), FGF-8b, sonic hedgehog-N, and ascorbic acid on poly-l-ornithine/fibronectin-coated plates to expand the Nestin-positive cells for up to 2 weeks. Finally, the cells were transferred into N-2/ascorbic acid medium to allow for their differentiation into dopaminergic neurons for 10-15 days. The differentiation stages were confirmed by morphological, immunocytochemical, flow cytometric, real-time PCR, and ELISA analyses. The expressions of mesenchymal stem cell markers were observed at the early stages. The expressions of early neuronal markers were maintained throughout the differentiation stages. The mature neural markers showed increased expression from stage 3 onwards. The percentage of cells positive for tyrosine hydroxylase was 14.49%, and the amount was 0.526 ± 0.033 ng/mL at the last stage. hDPSCs can differentiate into dopaminergic neural cells under experimental cell differentiation conditions, showing potential as an autologous cell source for the treatment of Parkinson's disease.

  20. Differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells into neuron-like cells by Radix Angelicae Sinensis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiaozhi Wang; Lile Zhou; Yong Guo; Guangyi Liu; Jiyan Cheng; Hong Yu

    2013-01-01

    Human adipose tissues are an ideal source of stem cells. It is important to find inducers that can safely and effectively differentiate stem cells into functional neurons for clinical use. In this study, we investigate the use of Radix Angelicae Sinensis as an inducer of neuronal differentiation. Primary human adipose-derived stem cells were obtained from adult subcutaneous fatty tissue, then pre-induced with 10%Radix Angelicae Sinensis injection for 24 hours, and incubated in serum-free Dulbecco’s modified Eagle’s medium/Nutrient Mixture F-12 containing 40% Radix Angelicae Si-nensis to induce its differentiation into neuron-like cells. Butylated hydroxyanisole, a common in-ducer for neuronal differentiation, was used as the control. After human adipose-derived stem cells differentiated into neuron-like cells under the induction of Radix Angelicae Sinensis for 24 hours, the positive expression of neuron-specific enolase was lower than that of the butylated hydroxyani-sole-induced group, and the expression of glial fibril ary acidic protein was negative. After they were induced for 48 hours, the positive expression of neuron specific enolase in human adipose-derived stem cells was significantly higher than that of the butylated hydroxyanisole-induced group. Our experimental findings indicate that Radix Angelicae Sinensis can induce human adipose-derived stem celldifferentiation into neuron-like cells and produce less cytotoxicity.

  1. Photodynamic injury of isolated crayfish neuron and surrounding glial cells: the role of p53

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifulina, S. A.; Uzdensky, A. B.

    2015-03-01

    The pro-apoptotic transcription factor p53 is involved in cell responses to injurious impacts. Using its inhibitor pifithrin- α and activators tenovin-1, RITA and WR-1065, we studied its potential participation in inactivation and death of isolated crayfish mechanoreceptor neuron and satellite glial cells induced by photodynamic treatment, a strong inducer of oxidative stress. In dark, p53 activation by tenovin-1 or WR-1065 shortened activity of isolated neurons. Tenovin-1 and WR-1065 induced apoptosis of glial cells, whereas pifithrin-α was anti-apoptotic. Therefore, p53 mediated glial apoptosis and suppression of neuronal activity after axotomy. Tenovin-1 but not other p53 modulators induced necrosis of axotomized neurons and surrounding glia, possibly, through p53-independent pathway. Under photodynamic treatment, p53 activators tenovin-1 and RITA enhanced glial apoptosis indicating the pro-apoptotic activity of p53. Photoinduced necrosis of neurons and glia was suppressed by tenovin-1 and, paradoxically, by pifithrin-α. Modulation of photoinduced changes in the neuronal activity and necrosis of neurons and glia was possibly p53-independent. The different effects of p53 modulators on neuronal and glial responses to axotomy and photodynamic impact were apparently associated with different signaling pathways in neurons and glial cells.

  2. Reduced synaptic activity in neuronal networks derived from embryonic stem cells of murine Rett syndrome model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Lydia; Sütterlin, Rosmarie; Nenniger, Markus; Vogt, Kaspar E

    2014-01-01

    Neurodevelopmental diseases such as the Rett syndrome (RTT) have received renewed attention, since the mechanisms involved may underlie a broad range of neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and autism. In vertebrates early stages in the functional development of neurons and neuronal networks are difficult to study. Embryonic stem cell-derived neurons provide an easily accessible tool to investigate neuronal differentiation and early network formation. We used in vitro cultures of neurons derived from murine embryonic stem cells missing the methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2) gene (MeCP2-/y) and from wild type cells of the corresponding background. Cultures were assessed using whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology and immunofluorescence. We studied the functional maturation of developing neurons and the activity of the synaptic connections they formed. Neurons exhibited minor differences in the developmental patterns for their intrinsic parameters, such as resting membrane potential and excitability; with the MeCP2-/y cells showing a slightly accelerated development, with shorter action potential half-widths at early stages. There was no difference in the early phase of synapse development, but as the cultures matured, significant deficits became apparent, particularly for inhibitory synaptic activity. MeCP2-/y embryonic stem cell-derived neuronal cultures show clear developmental deficits that match phenotypes observed in slice preparations and thus provide a compelling tool to further investigate the mechanisms behind RTT pathophysiology.

  3. Imipramine protects against the deleterious effects of chronic corticosterone on depression-like behavior, hippocampal reelin expression, and neuronal maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenton, Erin Y; Fournier, Neil M; Lussier, April L; Romay-Tallon, Raquel; Caruncho, Hector J; Kalynchuk, Lisa E

    2015-07-03

    We have hypothesized that a downregulation of reelin and deficient maturation of adult-born hippocampal neurons are important factors in the pathogenesis of depression. This hypothesis is based on previous work showing that depression-like behavior in rats treated with protracted corticosterone develops in concert with decreased dendritic complexity in newborn hippocampal granule neurons and decreased reelin expression in the proliferative subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus. In addition, heterozygous reeler mice with approximately 50% of normal brain levels of reelin are more vulnerable to the depressogenic effects of corticosterone than wild-type mice. The purpose of this experiment was to provide pharmacological validation for the link between reelin, neuronal maturation, and depression by examining whether the deleterious effects of corticosterone on these measures could be prevented by co-administration of the antidepressant imipramine. Rats received corticosterone injections, corticosterone injections plus either 10 or 15mg/kg imipramine injections, or vehicle injections for 21 consecutive days. They were then subjected to the forced swim test to assess depression-like behavior and sacrificed for immunohistochemical examination of immature neuron number and dendritic complexity and the presence of reelin+cells. We found that corticosterone increases depression-like behavior, decreases the number of reelin+cells in the subgranular zone, and decreases the number and complexity of immature neurons in the granule cell layer. All of these behavioral and cellular phenotypes were prevented by imipramine, providing further support for the idea that reelin is involved in the pathogenesis of depression.

  4. Plantaricin A, a peptide pheromone produced by Lactobacillus plantarum, permeabilizes the cell membrane of both normal and cancerous lymphocytes and neuronal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sand, Sverre L; Oppegård, Camilla; Ohara, Shinya; Iijima, Toshio; Naderi, Soheil; Blomhoff, Heidi K; Nissen-Meyer, Jon; Sand, Olav

    2010-07-01

    Antimicrobial peptides produced by multicellular organisms <