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  1. Potential role of stem cells in management of COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tillie L Hackett

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Tillie L Hackett1,2, Darryl A Knight1,2, Don D Sin1,31UBC James Hogg Research Centre, Heart and Lung Institute, St Paul’s Hospital, Vancouver, BC, Canada, V6Z 1Y6; 2Department of Anesthesiology, Pharmacology and Therapeutics, 3Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC CanadaAbstract: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a worldwide epidemic affecting over 200 million people and accounting for more than three million deaths annually. The disease is characterized by chronic inflammation of the airways and progressive destruction of lung parenchyma, a process that in most cases is initiated by cigarette smoking. Unfortunately, there are no interventions that have been unequivocally shown to prolong survival in patients with COPD. Regeneration of lung tissue by stem cells from endogenous and exogenous sources is a promising therapeutic strategy. Herein we review the current literature on the characterization of resident stem and progenitor cell niches within the lung, the contribution of mesenchymal stem cells to lung regeneration, and advances in bioengineering of lung tissue.Keywords: COPD, stem cell therapy, epithelial repair, regenerative medicine

  2. Potential roles of self-reactive T cells in autoimmunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads Hald

    2014-01-01

    The immune system is a complex arrangement of cells and molecules that preserve the integrity of the organism by eliminating all elements judged to be dangerous. Several regulatory mechanisms function to terminate immune responses to antigens, return the immune system to a basal state after the a...

  3. Treatment of systemic sclerosis: potential role for stem cell transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Wen Xiong; Derk, Chris T.

    2009-01-01

    Wen Xiong, Chris T DerkDivision of Rheumatology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA, 19107, USAAbstract: Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation may “reset” the immune reconstitution and induce self tolerance of autoreactive lymphocytes, and has been explored in the treatments for systemic sclerosis. Phase I/II trials have shown a satisfactory risk benefit ratio. The true benefit will be identified by two ongoing prospective, randomized phase III trials. Multipo...

  4. Role of COX-2 in the regulation of the metastatic potential of human breast tumor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Taipov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The expression of СOX-2, VEGF, VEGFR-1, VEGFR-2, VEGFR-3, EGFR, endoglin (СD105, and IL-6 was analyzed in the human breast tumor cells having a varying metastatic potential. The role of these factors in the regulation of the metastatic potential of breast cancer cells, as well as that of COX-2 in the regulation of metastatic processes at the cellular level were examined. The potential capacity of human breast tumor cells to elaborate factors that stimulate tumor growth, angiogenesis, and metastasis was evaluated.

  5. MicroRNA profiling of antler stem cells in potentiated and dormant states and their potential roles in antler regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ba, Hengxing; Wang, Datao; Li, Chunyi

    2016-04-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) can effectively regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level and play a critical role in tissue growth, development and regeneration. Our previous studies showed that antler regeneration is a stem cell-based process and antler stem cells reside in the periosteum of a pedicle, the permanent bony protuberance, from which antler regeneration takes place. Antlers are the only mammalian organ that can fully regenerate and hence provide a unique opportunity to identify miRNAs that are involved in organ regeneration. In the present study, we used next generation sequencing technology sequenced miRNAs of the stem cells derived from either the potentiated or the dormant pedicle periosteum. A population of both conserved and 20 deer-specific miRNAs was identified. These conserved miRNAs were derived from 453 homologous hairpin precursors across 88 animal species, and were further grouped into 167 miRNA families. Among them, the miR-296 is embryonic stem cell-specific. The potentiation process resulted in the significant regulation (>±2 Fold, q value stem cell potentiation process. This research has identified miRNAs that are associated either with the dormant or the potentiated antler stem cells and identified some target miRNAs for further research into their role played in mammalian organ regeneration. PMID:26738876

  6. The Role and Potential Therapeutic Application of Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells in Allo- and Autoimmunity

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    Qi Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs are a heterogeneous population of cells that consists of myeloid progenitor cells and immature myeloid cells. They have been identified as a cell population that may affect the activation of CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells to regulate the immune response negatively, which makes them attractive targets for the treatment of transplantation and autoimmune diseases. Several studies have suggested the potential suppressive effect of MDSCs on allo- and autoimmune responses. Conversely, MDSCs have also been found at various stages of differentiation, accumulating during pathological situations, not only during tumor development but also in a variety of inflammatory immune responses, bone marrow transplantation, and some autoimmune diseases. These findings appear to be contradictory. In this review, we summarize the roles of MDSCs in different transplantation and autoimmune diseases models as well as the potential to target these cells for therapeutic benefit.

  7. Role of membrane potential in the regulation of cell proliferation and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundelacruz, Sarah; Levin, Michael; Kaplan, David L

    2009-09-01

    Biophysical signaling, an integral regulator of long-term cell behavior in both excitable and non-excitable cell types, offers enormous potential for modulation of important cell functions. Of particular interest to current regenerative medicine efforts, we review several examples that support the functional role of transmembrane potential (V(mem)) in the regulation of proliferation and differentiation. Interestingly, distinct V(mem) controls are found in many cancer cell and precursor cell systems, which are known for their proliferative and differentiation capacities, respectively. Collectively, the data demonstrate that bioelectric properties can serve as markers for cell characterization and can control cell mitotic activity, cell cycle progression, and differentiation. The ability to control cell functions by modulating bioelectric properties such as V(mem) would be an invaluable tool for directing stem cell behavior toward therapeutic goals. Biophysical properties of stem cells have only recently begun to be studied and are thus in need of further characterization. Understanding the molecular and mechanistic basis of biophysical regulation will point the way toward novel ways to rationally direct cell functions, allowing us to capitalize upon the potential of biophysical signaling for regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. PMID:19562527

  8. Potential primary roles of glial cells in the mechanisms of psychiatric disorders

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    Kazuhiko eYamamuro

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available While neurons have long been considered the major player in multiple brain functions such as perception, emotion and memory, glial cells have been relegated to a far lesser position, acting as merely a glue to support neurons. Multiple lines of recent evidence however, have revealed that glial cells such as oligodendrocytes, astrocytes and microglia, substantially impact on neuronal function and activities and are significantly involved in the underlying pathobiology of psychiatric disorders. Indeed, a growing body of evidence indicates that glial cells interact extensively with neurons both chemically (e.g. through neurotransmitters, neurotrophic factors and cytokines and physically (e.g. through gap junctions, supporting a role for these cells as likely significant modifiers not only of neural function in brain development but also disease pathobiology. Since questions have lingered as to whether glial dysfunction plays a primary role in the biology of neuropsychiatric disorders or a role related solely to their support of neuronal physiology in these diseases, informative and predictive animal models have been developed over the last decade. In this article, we review recent findings uncovered using glia-specific genetically modified mice with which we can evaluate both the causation of glia dysfunction and its potential role in neuropsychiatric disorders such as autism and schizophrenia.

  9. Potential primary roles of glial cells in the mechanisms of psychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamuro, Kazuhiko; Kimoto, Sohei; Rosen, Kenneth M; Kishimoto, Toshifumi; Makinodan, Manabu

    2015-01-01

    While neurons have long been considered the major player in multiple brain functions such as perception, emotion, and memory, glial cells have been relegated to a far lesser position, acting as merely a "glue" to support neurons. Multiple lines of recent evidence, however, have revealed that glial cells such as oligodendrocytes, astrocytes, and microglia, substantially impact on neuronal function and activities and are significantly involved in the underlying pathobiology of psychiatric disorders. Indeed, a growing body of evidence indicates that glial cells interact extensively with neurons both chemically (e.g., through neurotransmitters, neurotrophic factors, and cytokines) and physically (e.g., through gap junctions), supporting a role for these cells as likely significant modifiers not only of neural function in brain development but also disease pathobiology. Since questions have lingered as to whether glial dysfunction plays a primary role in the biology of neuropsychiatric disorders or a role related solely to their support of neuronal physiology in these diseases, informative and predictive animal models have been developed over the last decade. In this article, we review recent findings uncovered using glia-specific genetically modified mice with which we can evaluate both the causation of glia dysfunction and its potential role in neuropsychiatric disorders such as autism and schizophrenia. PMID:26029044

  10. Regulation and functional roles of rebound potentiation at cerebellar stellate cell - Purkinje cell synapses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoo eHirano

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Purkinje cells receive both excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs and send sole output from the cerebellar cortex. Long-term depression, a type of synaptic plasticity, at excitatory parallel fiber–Purkinje cell synapses has been studied extensively as a primary cellular mechanism of motor learning. On the other hand, at inhibitory synapses on a Purkinje cell, postsynaptic depolarization induces long-lasting potentiation of GABAergic synaptic transmission. This synaptic plasticity is called rebound potentiation (RP, and its molecular regulatory mechanisms have been studied. The increase in intracellular Ca2+ concentration caused by depolarization induces RP through enhancement of GABAA receptor (GABAAR responsiveness. RP induction depends on binding of GABAAR with GABAAR associated protein (GABARAP which is regulated by Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII. Whether RP is induced or not is determined by the balance between phosphorylation and de-phosphorylation activities regulated by intracellular Ca2+ and by metabotropic GABA and glutamate receptors. Recent studies have revealed that the subunit composition of CaMKII has significant impact on RP induction. A Purkinje cell expresses both alpha- and beta-CaMKII, and the latter has much higher affinity for Ca2+/calmodulin than the former. It was shown that when the relative amount of alpha- to beta-CaMKII is large, RP induction is suppressed. The functional significance of RP has also been studied using transgenic mice in which a peptide inhibiting association of GABARAP and GABAAR is expressed selectively in Purkinje cells. The transgenic mice show abrogation of RP and subnormal adaptation of vestibulo-ocular reflex, a type of motor learning. Thus, RP is involved in a certain type of motor learning.

  11. Extraction and identification of exosomes from drug-resistant breast cancer cells and their potential role in cell-to-cell drug-resistance transfer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许金金

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore whether docetaxel-resistant cells(MCF-7/Doc)and doxorubicin-resistant cells(MCF-7/ADM)can secrete Exosomes and their potential role in cell-cell drug-resistance transfer.Methods Exosomes were extracted from the cell culture supernatants of MCF-7/Doc and MCF-7/ADM cells by fractionation ultracentrifugation,and were identified by transmission

  12. Apoptotic potential role of Agave palmeri and Tulbaghia violacea extracts in cervical cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mthembu, Nonkululeko N; Motadi, Lesetja Raymond

    2014-09-01

    Cervical cancer, a gynaecological malignant disorder, is a common cause of death in females in Sub-Saharan Africa, striking nearly half a million of lives each year worldwide. Currently, more than 50 % of all modern drugs in clinical use are of natural products, many of which have an ability to control cancer cells (Madhuri and Pandey, Curr Sci 96:779-783, 2009; Richter, Traditional medicines and traditional healers in South Africa, 2003). In South Africa, plants used to treat cancer are rare even though majority of our population continue to put their trust in traditional medicine. In this study we aimed to screen Agave palmeri (AG) and Tulbaghia violacea (TV) for potential role in inducing cell death in cervical cancer cell lines HeLa and ME-180, and in normal human fibroblast cell line KMST-6 cell lines. To achieve this, AG and TV crude extracts were utilized to screen for apoptosis induction, inhibition of cell proliferation followed by elucidation of the role of Bax, Bcl-2, p53, Rb, RBBP and Mdm2 genes in cervical cancer. In brief, plant leaves and roots were collected, crushed and methanolic extracts obtained. Different concentrations of the stock extracts were used to treat cancer cells and measure cell death using the [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide] assay and flow cytometry. Western blot was applied to measure gene expression at protein level using RBBP6, p53, Mdm2, Rb, Bax, Bcl-2 and β-actin mouse monoclonal primary antibodies (IgG) and goat anti mouse coupled with horseradish peroxidase secondary antibody from Santa Cruz Biotechnology and real time-PCR was used for mRNA expression level. Plant extracts of AG and TV were time (24 h) and dose (50, 100, 150 μg/ml) dependent in their induction of cell death with an IC50 ~ 150 μg/ml. A further mixed respond by several genes was observed following treatment with the two plant extracts where RBBP6 was seen to be spliced in cancer cells while Bax was induced and Bcl-2 was

  13. Interleukin-37 expression and its potential role in oral leukoplakia and oral squamous cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Lin Lin; Jiayi Wang; Dongjuan Liu; Sai Liu; Hao Xu; Ning Ji; Min Zhou; Xin Zeng; Dunfang Zhang; Jing Li; Qianming Chen

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin 37 (IL-37) has been reported to play a significant role in innate immune response and to be involved in several kinds of cancers. However, the investigation of association between IL-37 and oral mucosa carcinogenesis hasn't been clearly established. The aim of the study was to assess IL-37 expression and explore its role in oral mucosa carcinogenesis. The expression of IL-37 increased from normal control (NC) to Oral leukoplakia (OLK) and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Moreo...

  14. Dental pulp stem cells and their potential roles in central nervous system regeneration and repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Fraser; Sloan, Alastair; Song, Bing

    2013-11-01

    Functional recovery from injuries to the brain or spinal cord represents a major clinical challenge. The transplantation of stem cells, traditionally isolated from embryonic tissue, may help to reduce damage following such events and promote regeneration and repair through both direct cell replacement and neurotrophic mechanisms. However, the therapeutic potential of using embryonic stem/progenitor cells is significantly restricted by the availability of embryonic tissues and associated ethical issues. Populations of stem cells reside within the dental pulp, representing an alternative source of cells that can be isolated with minimal invasiveness, and thus should illicit fewer moral objections, as a replacement for embryonic/fetal-derived stem cells. Here we discuss the similarities between dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) and the endogenous stem cells of the central nervous system (CNS) and their ability to differentiate into neuronal cell types. We also consider in vitro and in vivo studies demonstrating the ability of DPSCs to help protect against and repair neuronal damage, suggesting that dental pulp may provide a viable alternative source of stem cells for replacement therapy following CNS damage.

  15. Potential role of stem cells in severe spinal cord injury: current perspectives and clinical data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paspala SA

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Syed AB Paspala,1,2 Sandeep K Vishwakarma,1 Tenneti VRK Murthy,2 Thiriveedi N Rao,2 Aleem A Khan11PAN Research Foundation, CARE, 2The Institute of Medical Sciences, Hyderabad, IndiaAbstract: Stem cell transplantation for spinal cord injury (SCI along with new pharmacotherapy research offers the potential to restore function and ease the associated social and economic burden in the years ahead. Various sources of stem cells have been used in the treatment of SCI, but the most convincing results have been obtained with neural progenitor cells in preclinical models. Although the use of cell-based transplantation strategies for the repair of chronic SCI remains the long sought after holy grail, these approaches have been to date the most successful when applied in the subacute phase of injury. Application of cell-based strategies for the repair and regeneration of the chronically injured spinal cord will require a combinational strategy that may need to include approaches to overcome the effects of the glial scar, inhibitory molecules, and use of tissue engineering strategies to bridge the lesion. Nonetheless, cell transplantation strategies are promising, and it is anticipated that the Phase I clinical trials of some form of neural stem cell-based approach in SCI will commence very soon.Keywords: stem cell therapy, regeneration, spinal cord injury, cell dosing, cell tracking

  16. Potential role of endometrial stem/progenitor cells in the pathogenesis of early-onset endometriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargett, C E; Schwab, K E; Brosens, J J; Puttemans, P; Benagiano, G; Brosens, I

    2014-07-01

    The pathogenesis of early-onset endometriosis has recently been revisited, sparked by the discovery of endometrial stem/progenitor cells and their possible role in endometriosis, and because maternal pregnancy hormone withdrawal following delivery induces uterine bleeding in the neonate. The neonatal uterus has a large cervix to corpus ratio which is functionally blocked with mucous, supporting the concept of retrograde shedding of neonatal endometrium. Only 5% show overt bleeding. Furthermore, the presence of endometriosis in pre-menarcheal girls and even in severe stage in adolescents supports the theory that early-onset endometriosis may originate from retrograde uterine bleeding soon after birth. Endometrial stem/progenitor cells have been identified in menstrual blood suggesting that they may also be shed during neonatal uterine bleeding. Thus, we hypothesized that stem/progenitor cells present in shedding endometrium may have a role in the pathogenesis of early-onset endometriosis through retrograde neonatal uterine bleeding. During the neonatal and pre-pubertal period, shed endometrial stem/progenitor cells are postulated to survive in the pelvic cavity in the absence of circulating estrogens supported by niche cells also shed during neonatal uterine bleeding. According to this hypothesis, during thelarche, under the influence of rising estrogen levels, endometrial stem/progenitor cells proliferate and establish ectopic endometrial lesions characteristic of endometriosis. This New Research Horizon review builds on recent discussions on the pathogenesis of early-onset endometriosis and raises new avenues for research into this costly condition. PMID:24674992

  17. Potential role of curcumin and taurine combination therapy on human myeloid leukemic cells propagated in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Houseini, Motawa E; Refaei, Mohammed Osman; Amin, Ahmed Ibrahim; Abol-Ftouh, Mahmoud A

    2013-10-01

    Curcumin and taurine are natural products that have been used in this study evaluating their therapeutic effect on myeloid leukemic cells propagated in vitro. Sixty patients with myeloid leukemia and 30 healthy volunteers were enrolled in the study. All patient groups were admitted to the Medical Oncology Department of the National Cancer Institute, Cairo University. There were statistically significant differences between treated leukemic cells compared to normal mononuclear leukocytes in cell density, interferon-γ and immunophenotypic profile, mainly CD4+, CD8 + and CD25+. This work highlights the possibility of using curcumin and taurine as a potential useful therapy in the management of patients suffering from chronic and acute myeloid leukemias.

  18. Potential role of Th17 cells in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhan-Ju Liu; Praveen K Yadav; Jing-Ling Su; Jun-Shan Wang; Ke Fei

    2009-01-01

    The etiopathology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) remains elusive. Accumulating evidence suggests that the abnormality of innate and adaptive immunity responses plays an important role in intestinal inflammation. IBD including Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the gastrointestinal tract, which is implicated in an inappropriate and overactive mucosal immune response to luminal flora. Traditionally, CD is regarded as a Th1mediated inflammatory disorder while UC is regarded as a Th2like disease. Recently, Th17 cells were identified as a new subset of T helper cells unrelated to Th1 or Th2 cells, and several cytokines [e.g. interleukin (IL)-21, IL-23] are involved in regulating their activation and differentiation. They not only play an important role in host defense against extracellular pathogens, but are also associated with the development of autoimmunity and inflammatory response such as IBD. The identification of Th17 cells helps us to explain some of the anomalies seen in the Th1/Th2 axis and has broadened our understanding of the immunopathological effects of Th17 cells in the development of IBD.

  19. Potential role of NKT regulatory cell ligands for the treatment of immune mediated colitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Natural killer T lymphocytes (NKT) have been implicated in the regulation of autoimmune processes in both mice and humans. In response to stimuli, this subset of cells rapidly produces large amounts of cytokines thereby provoking immune responses, including protection against autoimmune diseases. NKT cells are present in all lymphoid compartments, but are most abundant in the liver and bone marrow. They are activated by interaction of their T-cell receptor with glycolipids presented by CD1d, a nonpolymorphic, major histocompatibility complex class Mike molecule expressed by antigen presenting cells. Several possible ligands for NKT cells have recently been suggested, p-glucosylceramide, a naturally occurring glycolipid, is a metabolic intermediate in the anabolic and catabolic pathways of complex glycosphingolipids. Like other p-glycolipids, p-glucosylceramide has an immunomodulatory effect in several immune mediated disorders, including immune mediated colitis. Due to the broad impact that NKT cells have on the immune system, there is intense interest in understanding how NKT cells are stimulated and the extent to which NKT cell responses can be controlled. These novel ligands are currently being evaluated in animal models of colitis. Here, we discuss strategies to alter NKT lymphocyte function in various settings and the potential clinical applications of natural glycolipids.

  20. Potential role of curcumin and taurine combination therapy on human myeloid leukemic cells propagated in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Houseini, Motawa E; Refaei, Mohammed Osman; Amin, Ahmed Ibrahim; Abol-Ftouh, Mahmoud A

    2013-10-01

    Curcumin and taurine are natural products that have been used in this study evaluating their therapeutic effect on myeloid leukemic cells propagated in vitro. Sixty patients with myeloid leukemia and 30 healthy volunteers were enrolled in the study. All patient groups were admitted to the Medical Oncology Department of the National Cancer Institute, Cairo University. There were statistically significant differences between treated leukemic cells compared to normal mononuclear leukocytes in cell density, interferon-γ and immunophenotypic profile, mainly CD4+, CD8 + and CD25+. This work highlights the possibility of using curcumin and taurine as a potential useful therapy in the management of patients suffering from chronic and acute myeloid leukemias. PMID:23418874

  1. Involvement of platelet-tumor cell interaction in immune evasion. Potential role of podocalyxin-like protein 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura eAmo

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Besides their essential role in hemostasis and thrombosis, platelets are involved in the onset of cancer metastasis by interacting with tumor cells. Platelets release secretory factors that promote tumor growth, angiogenesis, and metastasis. Furthermore, the formation of platelet-tumor cell aggregates in the bloodstream provides cancer cells with an immune escape mechanism by protecting circulating malignant cells from immune-mediated lysis by natural killer (NK cells. Platelet-tumor cell interaction is accomplished by specific adhesion molecules, including integrins, selectins, and their ligands. Podocalyxin-like protein 1 (PCLP1 is a selectin ligand protein which overexpression has been associated with several aggressive cancers. PCLP1 expression enhances cell adherence to platelets in an integrin-dependent process and through the interaction with P-selectin expressed on activated platelets. However, the involvement of PCLP1-induced tumor-platelet interaction in tumor immune evasion still remains unexplored. The identification of selectin ligands involved in the interaction of platelets with tumor cells may provide help for the development of effective therapies to restrain cancer cell dissemination. This article summarizes the current knowledge on molecules that participate in platelet-tumor cell interaction as well as discusses the potential role of PCLP1 as a molecule implicated in tumor immune evasion.

  2. Potential Role of Omega-3 Fatty Acids on the Myogenic Program of Satellite Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhullar, Amritpal S; Putman, Charles T; Mazurak, Vera C

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle loss is associated with aging as well as pathological conditions. Satellite cells (SCs) play an important role in muscle regeneration. Omega-3 fatty acids are widely studied in a variety of muscle wasting diseases; however, little is known about their impact on skeletal muscle regeneration. The aim of this review is to evaluate studies examining the effect of omega-3 fatty acids, α-linolenic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid, and docosahexaenoic acid on the regulation of SC proliferation and differentiation. This review highlights mechanisms by which omega-3 fatty acids may modulate the myogenic program of the stem cell population within skeletal muscles and identifies considerations for future studies. It is proposed that minimally three myogenic transcriptional regulatory factors, paired box 7 (Pax7), myogenic differentiation 1 protein, and myogenin, should be measured to confirm the stage of SCs within the myogenic program affected by omega-3 fatty acids.

  3. Potential gene regulatory role for cyclin D3 in muscle cells

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fathima Athar; Veena K Parnaik

    2015-09-01

    Cyclin D3 is important for muscle development and regeneration, and is involved in post-mitotic arrest of muscle cells. Cyclin D3 also has cell-cycle-independent functions such as regulation of specific genes in other tissues. Ectopic expression of cyclin D3 in myoblasts, where it is normally undetectable, promotes muscle gene expression and faster differentiation kinetics upon serum depletion. In the present study, we investigated the mechanistic role of cyclin D3 in muscle gene regulation. We initially showed by mutational analysis that a stable and functional cyclin D3 was required for promoting muscle differentiation. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, we demonstrated that expression of cyclin D3 in undifferentiated myoblasts altered histone epigenetic marks at promoters of muscle-specific genes like MyoD, Pax7, myogenin and muscle creatine kinase but not non-muscle genes. Cyclin D3 expression also reduced the mRNA levels of certain epigenetic modifier genes. Our data suggest that epigenetic modulation of muscle-specific genes in cyclin-D3-expressing myoblasts may be responsible for faster differentiation kinetics upon serum depletion. Our results have implications for a regulatory role for cyclin D3 in muscle-specific gene activation.

  4. The potential role of curcumin (diferuloylmethane) in plasma cell dyscrasias/paraproteinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golombick, Terry; Diamond, Terry

    2008-03-01

    Plasma cell dyscrasias, most commonly associated with paraproteinemia, are a diverse group of diseases. Monoclonal gammopathy of undefined significance (MGUS) can precede multiple myeloma, a progressive neoplastic disease. MGUS occurs in association with a variety of other diseases and currently no treatment is recommended but rather "watchful waiting". Given that the size of the M-protein is a risk factor for disease progression, early intervention with the aim of reducing the paraprotein load would provide an innovative therapeutic tool. Preliminary results from our pilot study show a drop of between 5% and 30% serum paraprotein in patients taking curcumin compared with patients on placebo. Curcumin is a diferuloylmethane present in extracts of the rhizome of the Curcuma longa plant. As a natural product, this has exciting potential in the treatment of plasma cell dyscrasias. PMID:19707439

  5. Mesenchymal stem cells: Potential role in corneal wound repair and transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fei; Li; Shao-Zhen; Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Corneal diseases are a major cause of blindness in the world. Although great progress has been achieved in the treatment of corneal diseases, wound healing after severe corneal damage and immunosuppressive therapy after corneal transplantation remain prob-lematic. Mesenchymal stem cells(MSCs) derived from bone marrow or other adult tissues can differentiate into various types of mesenchymal lineages, such as osteocytes, adipocytes, and chondrocytes, both in vivo and in vitro. These cells can further differentiate into specific cell types under specific conditions. MSCs migrate to injury sites and promote wound healing by secreting anti-inflammatory and growth factors. In ad-dition, MSCs interact with innate and acquired immune cells and modulate the immune response through their powerful paracrine function. Over the last decade, MSCs have drawn considerable attention because of their beneficial properties and promising therapeutic prospective. Furthermore, MSCs have been applied to various studies related to wound healing, autoim-mune diseases, and organ transplantation. This review discusses the potential functions of MSCs in protecting corneal tissue and their possible mechanisms in corneal wound healing and corneal transplantation.

  6. The potential role of curcumin (diferuloylmethane in plasma cell dyscrasias/paraproteinemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terry Golombick

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Terry Golombick, Terry DiamondDepartment of Endocrinology, St George Hospital, Kogarah, AustraliaAbstract: Plasma cell dyscrasias, most commonly associated with paraproteinemia, are a diverse group of diseases. Monoclonal gammopathy of undefined significance (MGUS can precede multiple myeloma, a progressive neoplastic disease. MGUS occurs in association with a variety of other diseases and currently no treatment is recommended but rather “watchful waiting”. Given that the size of the M-protein is a risk factor for disease progression, early intervention with the aim of reducing the paraprotein load would provide an innovative therapeutic tool. Preliminary results from our pilot study show a drop of between 5% and 30% serum paraprotein in patients taking curcumin compared with patients on placebo. Curcumin is a diferuloylmethane present in extracts of the rhizome of the Curcuma longa plant. As a natural product, this has exciting potential in the treatment of plasma cell dyscrasias.Keywords: plasma cell dyscrasias, MGUS, myeloma, curcumin, paraproteinemia

  7. Potential role of mesenchymal stem cells in alleviating intestinal ischemia/reperfusion impairment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haitao Jiang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Transplantation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs provides a promising therapeutic efficiency for a variety of disorders caused by ischemia or reperfusion impairment. We have previously demonstrated the efficacy of MSCs in mitigating intestinal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R injuries in rats, but the mechanism by which MSCs engraft ameliorates I/R injuries has largely been unknown. The present study aimed at investigating probable mechanisms by which MSCs exert their function. METHODS: Male donor derived rat MSCs were implanted into intestine of female recipient rat by direct submucosal injection after superior mesenteric artery clamping and unclamping. The homed MSCs were detected by Y chromosome in situ hybridization probe, and the tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α content in intestinal mucosa was determined by ELISA. Expression of proliferative cell nuclear antigen (PCNA in bowel mucosa was assayed by real-time PCR and intestinal mucosa expression of phosphorylation extracellular signal-regulated kinase (pERK1/2 and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB were evaluated by western blot. RESULTS: Four and seven days after MSCs transplantation, the TNF-α content of bowel mucosa in MSCs group was significantly lower than that in saline group. The PCNA in bowel mucosa showed higher expression in MSCs treated group than the saline group, both at 4 and 7 days after cell transplantation. The expression of intestinal mucosal pERK1/2 in MSCs treated group was markedly higher than that in saline group, and the expression of NF-κB in MSCs treated group was noticeably decreased than that in saline group at 4 and 7 days post MSCs transplantation. CONCLUSION: The present investigation provides novel evidence that MSCs have the potential to reduce intestinal I/R injuries probably due to their ability to accelerate cell proliferation and decrease the inflammatory response within intestinal mucosa after ischemia and reperfusion.

  8. Potential role of differentially expressed lncRNAs in the pathogenesis of oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shanchuan; Tian, Lili; Ma, Penghua; Sun, Qiang; Zhang, Kai; GuanchaoWang; Liu, Hongchen; Xu, Baohua

    2015-10-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have recently attracted more attention about the role in a broad range of biological processes and complex cancers. We aimed to identify differentially expressed lncRNAs that play an important role in the pathogenesis of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Microarray data GSE25099 consisting of 57 samples from patients with OSCC and 22 normal samples were downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus database. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and lncRNAs were identified between OSCC samples and control using samr package in R and noncoder software. Co-expression network was constructed for lncRNAs and candidate target DEGs, followed by functional and pathway enrichment analysis using the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery online tool. OSCC-related genes were screened by Genetic-Association-DB-Database analysis, and then protein-protein interaction (PPI) network construction of OSCC-related and co-expressed genes. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that there were 998 DEGs and 160 differentially expressed lncRNAs between OSCC and normal control. We found LOC100130547, FTH1P3, PDIA3F and GTF2IRD2P1 targeted most of DEGs. Predicted targets-related functional annotation showed significant changes in inflammation-related functions and Toll-like receptor signaling pathway. By further conducting PPI network with lncRNA co-expressed DEGs, we found that OSCC-associated genes including MMP1 (matrix metallopeptidase), MMP3, MMP9, PLAU (plasminogen activator, urokinase) and IL8 (interleukin 8) were targeted by FTH1P3, PDIA3F and GTF2IRD2P1. Our results indicate that lncRNAs FTH1P3, PDIA3F and GTF2IRD2P1 may responsible for progression and metastasis of OSCC via targeting MMP1, MMP3, MMP9, PLAU and IL8 which are key regulators of tumorigenesis. PMID:26276270

  9. The Potential Role of Th9 Cell Related Cytokine and Transcription Factors in Patients with Hepatic Alveolar Echinococcosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuxun, Tuerhongjiang; Apaer, Shadike; Ma, Hai-Zhang; Zhang, Heng; Aierken, Amina; Lin, Ren-Yong; Wen, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Human alveolar echinococcosis (AE) is a lethal parasitic infectious disease which may lead to liver failure if left untreated. It is caused by the larval stage of the fox tapeworm Echinococcus multilocularis and usually develops a substantial infiltrative occupation in solid organs. During the infection, T helper subsets are known to play crucial role in crosstalk between the parasite and human host. Th9 cells, a new member of CD4(+) T cell family which is characterized by its specific cytokine IL-9 and transcription factors PU.1 and IRF-4, have been known recently to have a critical role in allergic diseases, and cancers as well as the parasitic infection. To assess the potential role of Th9 cells during the infection, the mRNA levels of IL-9, PU.1, and IRF-4 both in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and in liver tissues were, respectively, detected by using real-time PCR. The plasma concentration levels of IL-9 were detected by using enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Th9 related cytokine IL-9 and transcription factors PU.1 and IRF-4 mRNA levels elevated both in PBMCs, and in hepatic lesion and paralesion tissues in AE patients. This may facilitate the infiltrative growth of the parasite and its persistence in human host. PMID:26509179

  10. The Potential Role of Th9 Cell Related Cytokine and Transcription Factors in Patients with Hepatic Alveolar Echinococcosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuerhongjiang Tuxun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Human alveolar echinococcosis (AE is a lethal parasitic infectious disease which may lead to liver failure if left untreated. It is caused by the larval stage of the fox tapeworm Echinococcus multilocularis and usually develops a substantial infiltrative occupation in solid organs. During the infection, T helper subsets are known to play crucial role in crosstalk between the parasite and human host. Th9 cells, a new member of CD4+ T cell family which is characterized by its specific cytokine IL-9 and transcription factors PU.1 and IRF-4, have been known recently to have a critical role in allergic diseases, and cancers as well as the parasitic infection. To assess the potential role of Th9 cells during the infection, the mRNA levels of IL-9, PU.1, and IRF-4 both in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and in liver tissues were, respectively, detected by using real-time PCR. The plasma concentration levels of IL-9 were detected by using enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Th9 related cytokine IL-9 and transcription factors PU.1 and IRF-4 mRNA levels elevated both in PBMCs, and in hepatic lesion and paralesion tissues in AE patients. This may facilitate the infiltrative growth of the parasite and its persistence in human host.

  11. Potential role of herbal remedies in stem cell therapy: proliferation and differentiation of human mesenchymal stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udalamaththa, Vindya Lankika; Jayasinghe, Chanika Dilumi; Udagama, Preethi Vidya

    2016-08-11

    Stem cell therapy has revolutionized modern clinical therapy with the potential of stem cells to differentiate into many different cell types which may help to replace different cell lines of an organism. Innumerous trials are carried out to merge new scientific knowledge and techniques with traditional herbal extracts that may result in less toxic, affordable, and highly available natural alternative therapeutics. Currently, mesenchyamal stromal cell (MSC) lines are treated with individual and mixtures of crude herbal extracts, as well as with purified compounds from herbal extracts, to investigate the mechanisms and effects of these on stem cell growth and differentiation. Human MSCs (hMSCs) possess multilineage, i.e., osteogenic, neurogenic, adipogenic, chondrogenic, and myogenic, differentiation abilities. The proliferative and differentiation properties of hMSCs treated with herbal extracts have shown promise in diseases such as osteoporosis, neurodegenerative disorders, and other tissue degenerative disorders. Well characterized herbal extracts that result in increased rates of tissue regeneration may be used in both stem cell therapy and tissue engineering for replacement therapy, where the use of scaffolds and vesicles with enhanced attaching and proliferative properties could be highly advantageous in the latter. Although the clinical application of herbal extracts is still in progress due to the variability and complexity of bioactive constituents, standardized herbal preparations will strengthen their application in the clinical context. We have critically reviewed the proliferative and differentiation effects of individual herbal extracts on hMSCs mainly derived from bone marrow and elaborated on the plausible underlying mechanisms of action. To be fruitfully used in reparative and regenerative therapy, future directions in this area of study should (i) make use of hMSCs derived from different non-traditional sources, including medical waste material

  12. The potential role of /sup 111/In white blood cell scans in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kipper, M.S.; Williams, R.J.

    1982-10-01

    In many institutions, the use of /sup 111/In white blood cell (WBC) scans have become routine for abscess detection. Its use for the detection of bone and joint inflammation, renal disease, and myocardial infarction has also been reported. Two patients are presented whose /sup 111/In studies were of major clinical value in the management of their inflammatory bowel disease. In one, the diagnosis was suggested, and in the second, the extent of disease was defined. The potential role of /sup 111/In WBC imaging in inflammatory bowel disease--for diagnosis, staging, and monitoring response to therapy--are discussed. Possible pitfalls as well as a comprehensive prospective study are suggested.

  13. Chitosan scaffolds induce human dental pulp stem cells to neural differentiation: potential roles for spinal cord injury therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinlong; Lu, Xiaohui; Feng, Guijuan; Gu, Zhifeng; Sun, Yuyu; Bao, Guofeng; Xu, Guanhua; Lu, Yuanzhou; Chen, Jiajia; Xu, Lingfeng; Feng, Xingmei; Cui, Zhiming

    2016-10-01

    Cell-based transplantation strategies hold great potential for spinal cord injury (SCI) repair. Chitosan scaffolds have therapeutic benefits for spinal cord regeneration. Human dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) are abundant available stem cells with low immunological incompatibility and can be considered for cell replacement therapy. The purpose of this study is to investigate the role of chitosan scaffolds in the neural differentiation of DPSCs in vitro and to assess the supportive effects of chitosan scaffolds in an animal model of SCI. DPSCs were incubated with chitosan scaffolds. Cell viability and the secretion of neurotrophic factors were analyzed. DPSCs incubated with chitosan scaffolds were treated with neural differentiation medium for 14 days and then neural genes and protein markers were analyzed by Western blot and reverse transcription plus the polymerase chain reaction. Our study revealed a higher cell viability and neural differentiation in the DPSC/chitosan-scaffold group. Compared with the control group, the levels of BDNF, GDNF, b-NGF, and NT-3 were significantly increased in the DPSC/chitosan-scaffold group. The Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway played a key role in the neural differentiation of DPSCs combined with chitosan scaffolds. Transplantation of DPSCs together with chitosan scaffolds into an SCI rat model resulted in the marked recovery of hind limb locomotor functions. Thus, chitosan scaffolds were non-cytotoxic and provided a conducive and favorable microenvironment for the survival and neural differentiation of DPSCs. Transplantation of DPSCs might therefore be a suitable candidate for treating SCI and other neuronal degenerative diseases. PMID:27147262

  14. Ectopic Expression of Testis Germ Cell Proteins in Cancer and Its Potential Role in Genomic Instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaraby Yoheswaran Nielsen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Genomic instability is a hallmark of human cancer and an enabling factor for the genetic alterations that drive cancer development. The processes involved in genomic instability resemble those of meiosis, where genetic material is interchanged between homologous chromosomes. In most types of human cancer, epigenetic changes, including hypomethylation of gene promoters, lead to the ectopic expression of a large number of proteins normally restricted to the germ cells of the testis. Due to the similarities between meiosis and genomic instability, it has been proposed that activation of meiotic programs may drive genomic instability in cancer cells. Some germ cell proteins with ectopic expression in cancer cells indeed seem to promote genomic instability, while others reduce polyploidy and maintain mitotic fidelity. Furthermore, oncogenic germ cell proteins may indirectly contribute to genomic instability through induction of replication stress, similar to classic oncogenes. Thus, current evidence suggests that testis germ cell proteins are implicated in cancer development by regulating genomic instability during tumorigenesis, and these proteins therefore represent promising targets for novel therapeutic strategies.

  15. PPARy phosphorylation mediated by JNK MAPK: a potential role in macrophage-derived foam cell formation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ran YIN; Yu-gang DONG; Hong-lang LI

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To investigate whether oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) modulates peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) activity through phosphorylation in macrophages, and the effect of PPARy phosphorylation on macrophages-derived foam cell formation. Methods: After exposing the cultured THP-1 cells to ox-LDL in the presence or absence of different mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitors, PPARγ and phosphorylated PPARγ protein levels were detected by Western blot. MAPK activity was analyzed using MAP Kinase Assay Kit. Intracellular cholesterol accumulation was assessed by Oil red O staining and cholesterol oxidase enzymatic method. The Mrna level of PPARγ target gene was determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Results: ox-LDL evaluated PPARγ phosphorylation status and subsequently decreased PPARγ target gene expression in a dose-dependent manner. Ox-LDL also induced MAPK activation. Treatment of THP-1 cells with c-Jun N-terminal kinase-, but not p38- or extracellular signal-regulated kinase-MAPK inhibitor, significantly suppressed PPARγ phosphorylation induced by ox-LDL, which in turn inhibited foam cell formation. Conclusion: In addition to its ligand-dependent activation, ox-LDL modulates PPARγ activity through phosphorylation, which is mediated by MAPK activation. PPARγ phosphorylation mediated by MAPK facilitates foam cell formation from macrophages exposed to ox-LDL.

  16. Potential for bispecific T-cell engagers: role of blinatumomab in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Jeune, Caroline; Thomas, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Patients with relapsed/refractory (R/R) B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and patients whose minimal residual disease persists during treatment have a poor leukemia-free survival. Despite improvements in front-line therapy, the outcome in these patients remains poor, especially after relapse. As there are no standard chemotherapeutic regimens for the treatment of patients with R/R B-precursor ALL, T-cell-based therapeutic approaches have recently come to the forefront in ALL therapy. Recently, monoclonal antibodies have been developed to target specific antigens expressed in B-lineage blast cells. In this setting, CD19 is of great interest as this antigen is expressed in B-lineage cells. Therefore, it has been selected as the target antigen for blinatumomab, a new bi-specific T-cell engager antibody. This sophisticated antibody binds sites for both CD19 and CD3, leading to T-cell proliferation and activation and B-cell apoptosis. Owing to its short serum half-life, blinatumomab has been administrated by continuous intravenous infusion with a favorable safety profile. The most significant toxicities were central nervous system events and the cytokine release syndrome. This new therapeutic approach using blinatumomab has been shown to be effective in patients with positive minimal residual disease and in patients with R/R B-precursor ALL leading to a recent approval by the US Food and Drug Administration after an accelerated review process. This review focuses on the profile of blinatumomab and its efficacy and safety.

  17. Ectopic Expression of Testis Germ Cell Proteins in Cancer and Its Potential Role in Genomic Instability

    OpenAIRE

    Aaraby Yoheswaran Nielsen; Morten Frier Gjerstorff

    2016-01-01

    Genomic instability is a hallmark of human cancer and an enabling factor for the genetic alterations that drive cancer development. The processes involved in genomic instability resemble those of meiosis, where genetic material is interchanged between homologous chromosomes. In most types of human cancer, epigenetic changes, including hypomethylation of gene promoters, lead to the ectopic expression of a large number of proteins normally restricted to the germ cells of the testis. Due to the ...

  18. The potential role of curcumin (diferuloylmethane) in plasma cell dyscrasias/paraproteinemia

    OpenAIRE

    Golombick, Terry

    2008-01-01

    Terry Golombick, Terry DiamondDepartment of Endocrinology, St George Hospital, Kogarah, AustraliaAbstract: Plasma cell dyscrasias, most commonly associated with paraproteinemia, are a diverse group of diseases. Monoclonal gammopathy of undefined significance (MGUS) can precede multiple myeloma, a progressive neoplastic disease. MGUS occurs in association with a variety of other diseases and currently no treatment is recommended but rather “watchful waiting”. Given that the...

  19. Translational potential of cancer stem cells: A review of the detection of cancer stem cells and their roles in cancer recurrence and cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Farhadul; Gopalan, Vinod; Smith, Robert A; Lam, Alfred K-Y

    2015-07-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are a subpopulation of cancer cells with many clinical implications in most cancer types. One important clinical implication of CSCs is their role in cancer metastases, as reflected by their ability to initiate and drive micro and macro-metastases. The other important contributing factor for CSCs in cancer management is their function in causing treatment resistance and recurrence in cancer via their activation of different signalling pathways such as Notch, Wnt/β-catenin, TGF-β, Hedgehog, PI3K/Akt/mTOR and JAK/STAT pathways. Thus, many different therapeutic approaches are being tested for prevention and treatment of cancer recurrence. These may include treatment strategies targeting altered genetic signalling pathways by blocking specific cell surface molecules, altering the cancer microenvironments that nurture cancer stem cells, inducing differentiation of CSCs, immunotherapy based on CSCs associated antigens, exploiting metabolites to kill CSCs, and designing small interfering RNA/DNA molecules that especially target CSCs. Because of the huge potential of these approaches to improve cancer management, it is important to identify and isolate cancer stem cells for precise study and application of prior the research on their role in cancer. Commonly used methodologies for detection and isolation of CSCs include functional, image-based, molecular, cytological sorting and filtration approaches, the use of different surface markers and xenotransplantation. Overall, given their significance in cancer biology, refining the isolation and targeting of CSCs will play an important role in future management of cancer.

  20. Potential role of 20S proteasome in maintaining stem cell integrity of human bone marrow stromal cells in prolonged culture expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Prolonged culture expansion retards proliferation and induces senescence of hBMSCs. ► Reduced 20S proteasomal activity and expression potentially contribute to cell aging. ► MG132-mediated 20S proteasomal inhibition induces senescence-like phenotype. ► 18α-GA stimulates proteasomal activity and restores replicative senescence. ► 18α-GA retains differentiation without affecting stem cell characterizations. -- Abstract: Human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) could be used in clinics as precursors of multiple cell lineages following proper induction. Such application is impeded by their characteristically short lifespan, together with the increasing loss of proliferation capability and progressive reduction of differentiation potential after the prolonged culture expansion. In the current study, we addressed the possible role of 20S proteasomes in this process. Consistent with prior reports, long-term in vitro expansion of hBMSCs decreased cell proliferation and increased replicative senescence, accompanied by reduced activity and expression of the catalytic subunits PSMB5 and PSMB1, and the 20S proteasome overall. Application of the proteasome inhibitor MG132 produced a senescence-like phenotype in early passages, whereas treating late-passage cells with 18α-glycyrrhetinic acid (18α-GA), an agonist of 20S proteasomes, delayed the senescence progress, enhancing the proliferation and recovering the capability of differentiation. The data demonstrate that activation of 20S proteasomes assists in counteracting replicative senescence of hBMSCs expanded in vitro.

  1. [The role of carriers of intracellular fixed charges in the regulation of the resting potential of cells with ion pumps].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaser, R

    1976-01-01

    The living cell is considered as a nonideal phase, surrounded by an anion-permeable membrane in a stationary state. Ionic pumps maintain a nonequilibrium state for Na+ and K+. When assuming the water inside and outside the cell to be in thermodynamic equilibrium and the cell without wall not to resist the hydrostatic pressure difference, it is possible to calculate a membrane potential which strongly depends on the concentration of charged nonpenetrating molecules inside the cell. Living cells with a high resting potential should therefore contain a high inner charge density (nerve cells) or must be resistant to an inner hydrostatic pressure (plant cells). Cells in isotonic solutions with low ionic strength are not able to attain a stationary state. The regulations derived here are applied to the concrete conditions of human red cells.

  2. Potential Role of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (IPSCs for Cell-Based Therapy of the Ocular Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo P. Casaroli-Marano

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The integrity and normal function of the corneal epithelium are crucial for maintaining the cornea’s transparency and vision. The existence of a cell population with progenitor characteristics in the limbus maintains a dynamic of constant epithelial repair and renewal. Currently, cell-based therapies for bio replacement—cultured limbal epithelial transplantation (CLET and cultured oral mucosal epithelial transplantation (COMET—present very encouraging clinical results for treating limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD and restoring vision. Another emerging therapeutic approach consists of obtaining and implementing human progenitor cells of different origins in association with tissue engineering methods. The development of cell-based therapies using stem cells, such as human adult mesenchymal or induced pluripotent stem cells (IPSCs, represent a significant breakthrough in the treatment of certain eye diseases, offering a more rational, less invasive, and better physiological treatment option in regenerative medicine for the ocular surface. This review will focus on the main concepts of cell-based therapies for the ocular surface and the future use of IPSCs to treat LSCD.

  3. Cell Wall Biomolecular Composition Plays a Potential Role in the Host Type II Resistance to Fusarium Head Blight in Wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahlali, Rachid; Kumar, Saroj; Wang, Lipu; Forseille, Li; Sylvain, Nicole; Korbas, Malgorzata; Muir, David; Swerhone, George; Lawrence, John R; Fobert, Pierre R; Peng, Gary; Karunakaran, Chithra

    2016-01-01

    Fusarium head blight (FHB) is a serious disease of wheat worldwide. Cultivar resistance to FHB depends on biochemical factors that confine the pathogen spread in spikes. Breeding for cultivar resistance is considered the most practical way to manage this disease. In this study, different spectroscopy and microscopy techniques were applied to discriminate resistance in wheat genotypes against FHB. Synchrotron-based spectroscopy and imaging techniques, including focal plane array infrared and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy were used to understand changes in biochemical and nutrients in rachis following FHB infection. Sumai3 and Muchmore were used to represent resistant and susceptible cultivars to FHB, respectively, in this study. The histological comparison of rachis showed substantial differences in the cell wall thickness between the cultivars after infection. Synchrotron-based infrared imaging emphasized substantial difference in biochemical composition of rachis samples between the two cultivars prior to visible symptoms; in the resistant Sumai3, infrared bands representing lignin and hemicellulose were stronger and more persistent compared to the susceptible cultivar. These bands may be the candidates of biochemical markers for FHB resistance. Focal plane array infrared imaging (FPA) spectra from the rachis epidermis and vascular bundles revealed a new band (1710 cm(-1)) related to the oxidative stress on the susceptible cultivar only. XRF spectroscopy data revealed differences in nutrients composition between cultivars, and between controls and inoculated samples, with substantial increases observed for Ca, K, Mn, Fe, Zn, and Si in the resistant cultivar. These nutrients are related to cell wall stability, metabolic process, and plant defense mechanisms such as lignification pathway and callose deposition. The combination of cell wall composition and lignification plays a role in the mechanism of type II host resistance to FHB. Biochemical profiling

  4. Cell Wall Biomolecular Composition Plays a Potential Role in the Host Type II Resistance to Fusarium Head Blight in Wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahlali, Rachid; Kumar, Saroj; Wang, Lipu; Forseille, Li; Sylvain, Nicole; Korbas, Malgorzata; Muir, David; Swerhone, George; Lawrence, John R.; Fobert, Pierre R.; Peng, Gary; Karunakaran, Chithra

    2016-01-01

    Fusarium head blight (FHB) is a serious disease of wheat worldwide. Cultivar resistance to FHB depends on biochemical factors that confine the pathogen spread in spikes. Breeding for cultivar resistance is considered the most practical way to manage this disease. In this study, different spectroscopy and microscopy techniques were applied to discriminate resistance in wheat genotypes against FHB. Synchrotron-based spectroscopy and imaging techniques, including focal plane array infrared and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy were used to understand changes in biochemical and nutrients in rachis following FHB infection. Sumai3 and Muchmore were used to represent resistant and susceptible cultivars to FHB, respectively, in this study. The histological comparison of rachis showed substantial differences in the cell wall thickness between the cultivars after infection. Synchrotron-based infrared imaging emphasized substantial difference in biochemical composition of rachis samples between the two cultivars prior to visible symptoms; in the resistant Sumai3, infrared bands representing lignin and hemicellulose were stronger and more persistent compared to the susceptible cultivar. These bands may be the candidates of biochemical markers for FHB resistance. Focal plane array infrared imaging (FPA) spectra from the rachis epidermis and vascular bundles revealed a new band (1710 cm−1) related to the oxidative stress on the susceptible cultivar only. XRF spectroscopy data revealed differences in nutrients composition between cultivars, and between controls and inoculated samples, with substantial increases observed for Ca, K, Mn, Fe, Zn, and Si in the resistant cultivar. These nutrients are related to cell wall stability, metabolic process, and plant defense mechanisms such as lignification pathway and callose deposition. The combination of cell wall composition and lignification plays a role in the mechanism of type II host resistance to FHB. Biochemical profiling

  5. Potential role of 20S proteasome in maintaining stem cell integrity of human bone marrow stromal cells in prolonged culture expansion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Li, E-mail: luli7300@126.com [Department of Anatomy, Shanxi Medical University, Taiyuan 030001 (China); Song, Hui-Fang; Zhang, Wei-Guo; Liu, Xue-Qin; Zhu, Qian; Cheng, Xiao-Long; Yang, Gui-Jiao [Department of Anatomy, Shanxi Medical University, Taiyuan 030001 (China); Li, Ang [Department of Anatomy, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (Hong Kong); Xiao, Zhi-Cheng, E-mail: zhicheng.xiao@monash.edu [Key Laboratory of Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine, Institute of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Kunming Medical College, Kunming 650031 (China); Monash Immunology and Stem Cell Laboratories, Monash University, Clayton, Melbourne 3800 (Australia)

    2012-05-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Prolonged culture expansion retards proliferation and induces senescence of hBMSCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reduced 20S proteasomal activity and expression potentially contribute to cell aging. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MG132-mediated 20S proteasomal inhibition induces senescence-like phenotype. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 18{alpha}-GA stimulates proteasomal activity and restores replicative senescence. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 18{alpha}-GA retains differentiation without affecting stem cell characterizations. -- Abstract: Human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) could be used in clinics as precursors of multiple cell lineages following proper induction. Such application is impeded by their characteristically short lifespan, together with the increasing loss of proliferation capability and progressive reduction of differentiation potential after the prolonged culture expansion. In the current study, we addressed the possible role of 20S proteasomes in this process. Consistent with prior reports, long-term in vitro expansion of hBMSCs decreased cell proliferation and increased replicative senescence, accompanied by reduced activity and expression of the catalytic subunits PSMB5 and PSMB1, and the 20S proteasome overall. Application of the proteasome inhibitor MG132 produced a senescence-like phenotype in early passages, whereas treating late-passage cells with 18{alpha}-glycyrrhetinic acid (18{alpha}-GA), an agonist of 20S proteasomes, delayed the senescence progress, enhancing the proliferation and recovering the capability of differentiation. The data demonstrate that activation of 20S proteasomes assists in counteracting replicative senescence of hBMSCs expanded in vitro.

  6. Human and rat mesangial cell receptors for glucose-modified proteins: potential role in kidney tissue remodelling and diabetic nephropathy

    OpenAIRE

    1991-01-01

    Advanced glycosylation endproducts (AGEs) are derived from the nonenzymatic addition of glucose to proteins. AGEs have been found to accumulate on tissue proteins in patients with diabetes, and their accumulation is thought to play a role in the development of diabetic complications. The finding that macrophages and endothelial cells contain AGE-specific receptors led us to examine whether mesangial cells (MCs) also possess a mechanism for recognizing and processing AGEs. Membrane extracts is...

  7. The Potential Role of Th9 Cell Related Cytokine and Transcription Factors in Patients with Hepatic Alveolar Echinococcosis

    OpenAIRE

    Tuerhongjiang Tuxun; Shadike Apaer; Hai-Zhang Ma; Heng Zhang; Amina Aierken; Ren-Yong Lin; Hao Wen

    2015-01-01

    Human alveolar echinococcosis (AE) is a lethal parasitic infectious disease which may lead to liver failure if left untreated. It is caused by the larval stage of the fox tapeworm Echinococcus multilocularis and usually develops a substantial infiltrative occupation in solid organs. During the infection, T helper subsets are known to play crucial role in crosstalk between the parasite and human host. Th9 cells, a new member of CD4+ T cell family which is characterized by its specific cytokine...

  8. Genomic analysis reveals a potential role for cell cycle perturbation in HCV-mediated apoptosis of cultured hepatocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathie-Anne Walters

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms of liver injury associated with chronic HCV infection, as well as the individual roles of both viral and host factors, are not clearly defined. However, it is becoming increasingly clear that direct cytopathic effects, in addition to immune-mediated processes, play an important role in liver injury. Gene expression profiling during multiple time-points of acute HCV infection of cultured Huh-7.5 cells was performed to gain insight into the cellular mechanism of HCV-associated cytopathic effect. Maximal induction of cell-death-related genes and appearance of activated caspase-3 in HCV-infected cells coincided with peak viral replication, suggesting a link between viral load and apoptosis. Gene ontology analysis revealed that many of the cell-death genes function to induce apoptosis in response to cell cycle arrest. Labeling of dividing cells in culture followed by flow cytometry also demonstrated the presence of significantly fewer cells in S-phase in HCV-infected relative to mock cultures, suggesting HCV infection is associated with delayed cell cycle progression. Regulation of numerous genes involved in anti-oxidative stress response and TGF-beta1 signaling suggest these as possible causes of delayed cell cycle progression. Significantly, a subset of cell-death genes regulated during in vitro HCV infection was similarly regulated specifically in liver tissue from a cohort of HCV-infected liver transplant patients with rapidly progressive fibrosis. Collectively, these data suggest that HCV mediates direct cytopathic effects through deregulation of the cell cycle and that this process may contribute to liver disease progression. This in vitro system could be utilized to further define the cellular mechanism of this perturbation.

  9. The role of CD4 T cell memory in generating protective immunity to novel and potentially pandemic strains of influenza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony eDiPiazza

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent events have made it clear that potentially pandemic strains of influenza regularly pose a threat to human populations. Therefore, it is essential that we develop better strategies to enhance vaccine design and evaluation, to predict those that will be poor responders to vaccination and to identify those that are at particular risk of disease-associated complications following infection. Simplified animal models have revealed the discrete functions that CD4 T cells play in the developing immune response and to influenza immunity. However, humans have a complex immunological history with influenza through periodic infection and vaccination with seasonal variants, leading to the establishment of heterogeneous memory populations of CD4 T cells that participate in subsequent responses. The continual evolution of the influenza-specific CD4 T cell repertoire involves both specificity and function and overlays other restrictions on CD4 T cell activity derived from viral antigen handling and MHC class II:peptide epitope display. Together, these complexities in the influenza-specific CD4 T cell repertoire constitute a formidable obstacle to predicting protective immune response to potentially pandemic strains of influenza and in devising optimal vaccine strategies to potentiate these responses. We suggest that more precise efforts to identify and enumerate both the positive and negative contributors within the CD4 T cell compartment will aid significantly in achievement of these goals.

  10. Cell cycle- and cancer-associated gene networks activated by Dsg2: evidence of cystatin A deregulation and a potential role in cell-cell adhesion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhilasha Gupta

    Full Text Available Cell-cell adhesion is paramount in providing and maintaining multicellular structure and signal transmission between cells. In the skin, disruption to desmosomal regulated intercellular connectivity may lead to disorders of keratinization and hyperproliferative disease including cancer. Recently we showed transgenic mice overexpressing desmoglein 2 (Dsg2 in the epidermis develop hyperplasia. Following microarray and gene network analysis, we demonstrate that Dsg2 caused a profound change in the transcriptome of keratinocytes in vivo and altered a number of genes important in epithelial dysplasia including: calcium-binding proteins (S100A8 and S100A9, members of the cyclin protein family, and the cysteine protease inhibitor cystatin A (CSTA. CSTA is deregulated in several skin cancers, including squamous cell carcinomas (SCC and loss of function mutations lead to recessive skin fragility disorders. The microarray results were confirmed by qPCR, immunoblotting, and immunohistochemistry. CSTA was detected at high level throughout the newborn mouse epidermis but dramatically decreased with development and was detected predominantly in the differentiated layers. In human keratinocytes, knockdown of Dsg2 by siRNA or shRNA reduced CSTA expression. Furthermore, siRNA knockdown of CSTA resulted in cytoplasmic localization of Dsg2, perturbed cytokeratin 14 staining and reduced levels of desmoplakin in response to mechanical stretching. Both knockdown of either Dsg2 or CSTA induced loss of cell adhesion in a dispase-based assay and the effect was synergistic. Our findings here offer a novel pathway of CSTA regulation involving Dsg2 and a potential crosstalk between Dsg2 and CSTA that modulates cell adhesion. These results further support the recent human genetic findings that loss of function mutations in the CSTA gene result in skin fragility due to impaired cell-cell adhesion: autosomal-recessive exfoliative ichthyosis or acral peeling skin syndrome.

  11. Role of the Na+/K+-ATPase in regulating the membrane potential in rat peritoneal mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friis, U G; Praetorius, H A; Knudsen, T; Johansen, T

    1997-10-01

    1. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the Na+/K+-ATPase on the membrane potential of peritoneal mast cells isolated from male Sprague-Dawley SPF-rats. 2. Experiments were performed at 22-26 degrees C in the tight-seal whole-cell configuration of the patch-clamp technique by use of Sylgard-coated patch pipettes (3-6 M[omega]). High-resolution membrane currents were recorded with an EPC-9 patch-clamp amplifier controlled by the 'E9SCREEN' software. In addition, a charting programme on another computer synchronously recorded at low resolution (2 Hz) membrane potential and holding current (low-pass filtered at 500 Hz). 3. Na+/K+-ATPase activity was measured as the ouabain-sensitive change in the zero-current potential. The zero-current potential in rat peritoneal mast cells measured 2 min after obtaining whole-cell configuration amounted to 1.7 +/- 2.5 mV (n = 21). Ouabain (5 mM), a Na+/K+-ATPase-inhibitor, had only a very minor effect upon the membrane potential under resting conditions (n = 3). 4. When mast cells were superfused with nominal calcium-free external solution, the cells hyperpolarized (delta mV: 20.2 +/- 3.8 mV (n = 5)). In addition, when the mast cells were preincubated in nominal calcium-free external solution for 12 +/- 1.6 min before whole-cell configuration, the membrane potential amounted to -53.7 +/- 9.8 mV (n = 8). A subsequent superfusion with ouabain (5 mM) depolarized the membrane potential (ouabain-sensitive hyperpolarization (delta mV): 23.0 +/- 8.4 mV (n = 8)). 5. A high intracellular concentration of Na+ ([Na+]i) (26.6 mM) also resulted in hyperpolarization (delta mV: 20.2 +/- 9.1 mV (n = 7)), but only when ATP was present. A subsequent superfusion with ouabain (5 mM) repolarized these cells to -1.2 +/- 14 mV (ouabain-sensitive hyperpolarization (delta mV): 19.7 +/- 7.7 mV (n = 7)). 6. The size of the [Na+]i-dependent hyperpolarization was dose-dependent. Low [Na+]i (1 mM) had no effect on membrane potential and these

  12. Potential role of nuclear PD-L1 expression in cell-surface vimentin positive circulating tumor cells as a prognostic marker in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satelli, Arun; Batth, Izhar Singh; Brownlee, Zachary; Rojas, Christina; Meng, Qing H; Kopetz, Scott; Li, Shulin

    2016-01-01

    Although circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have potential as diagnostic biomarkers for cancer, determining their prognostic role in cancer patients undergoing treatment is a challenge. We evaluated the prognostic value of programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) expression in CTCs in colorectal and prostate cancer patients undergoing treatment. Peripheral blood samples were collected from 62 metastatic colorectal cancer patients and 30 metastatic prostate cancer patients. CTCs were isolated from the samples using magnetic separation with the cell-surface vimentin(CSV)-specific 84-1 monoclonal antibody that detects epithelial-mesenchymal transitioned (EMT) CTCs. CTCs were enumerated and analyzed for PD-L1 expression using confocal microscopy. PD-L1 expression was detectable in CTCs and was localized in the membrane and/or cytoplasm and nucleus. CTC detection alone was not associated with poor progression-free or overall survival in colorectal cancer or prostate cancer patients, but nuclear PD-L1 (nPD-L1) expression in these patients was significantly associated with short survival durations. These results demonstrated that nPD-L1 has potential as a clinically relevant prognostic biomarker for colorectal and prostate cancer. Our data thus suggested that use of CTC-based models of cancer for risk assessment can improve the standard cancer staging criteria and supported the incorporation of nPD-L1 expression detection in CTCs detection in such models. PMID:27363678

  13. Potential role of nuclear PD-L1 expression in cell-surface vimentin positive circulating tumor cells as a prognostic marker in cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satelli, Arun; Batth, Izhar Singh; Brownlee, Zachary; Rojas, Christina; Meng, Qing H.; Kopetz, Scott; Li, Shulin

    2016-01-01

    Although circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have potential as diagnostic biomarkers for cancer, determining their prognostic role in cancer patients undergoing treatment is a challenge. We evaluated the prognostic value of programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) expression in CTCs in colorectal and prostate cancer patients undergoing treatment. Peripheral blood samples were collected from 62 metastatic colorectal cancer patients and 30 metastatic prostate cancer patients. CTCs were isolated from the samples using magnetic separation with the cell-surface vimentin(CSV)-specific 84-1 monoclonal antibody that detects epithelial-mesenchymal transitioned (EMT) CTCs. CTCs were enumerated and analyzed for PD-L1 expression using confocal microscopy. PD-L1 expression was detectable in CTCs and was localized in the membrane and/or cytoplasm and nucleus. CTC detection alone was not associated with poor progression-free or overall survival in colorectal cancer or prostate cancer patients, but nuclear PD-L1 (nPD-L1) expression in these patients was significantly associated with short survival durations. These results demonstrated that nPD-L1 has potential as a clinically relevant prognostic biomarker for colorectal and prostate cancer. Our data thus suggested that use of CTC-based models of cancer for risk assessment can improve the standard cancer staging criteria and supported the incorporation of nPD-L1 expression detection in CTCs detection in such models. PMID:27363678

  14. Potential Role of NO in Modulation of COX-2 Expression and PGE2 Production in Pancreatic β-cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia-Jian LING; Yu-Jie SUN; Dong-Ya ZHU; Qi CHEN; Xiao HAN

    2005-01-01

    Cytokines have been implicated in pancreatic β-cell destruction leading to type 1 diabetes.Exposure to interleuken-1 β (IL-1 β) of pancreatic β-cells induces expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Subsequent formation of nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) may impair β-cell function. Using NOS inhibitor NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA), we have further investigated the relation between NO formation and COX-2 expression. IL-1 β stimulated the formation of NO and PGE2 by pancreatic β-cells. L-NMMA completely inhibited IL- 1 β-induced NO formation and attenuated PGE2 production. COX-2 gene transcription level and protein expression were determined by real-time PCR, Western blot and luciferase analysis. L-NMMA inhibited IL-1 β-induced promoter activity, gene transcription and protein expression of COX-2 in pancreatic β-cells. Therefore, we concluded that NO-affected COX-2 activity is directly linked to COX-2 gene transcription and protein expression in pancreatic β-cells. The identification of a novel interaction of NO on the COX signaling pathway in β-cells provides a strategy of intervention for further evaluating the role of NO and PGE2 in autoimmune diabetes.

  15. The secret role of microRNAs in cancer stem cell development and potential therapy: A Notch-pathway approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianna eProkopi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs have been implicated in the development of some if not all cancer types and have been identified as attractive targets for prognosis, diagnosis and therapy of the disease. MiRNAs are a class of small non-coding RNAs (20-22 nucleotides in length that bind imperfectly to the 3’-untranslated region of target mRNA regulating gene expression. Aberrantly expressed miRNAs in cancer, sometimes known as oncomiRNAs, have been shown to play a major role in oncogenesis, metastasis and drug resistance. Amplification of oncomiRNAs during cancer development correlates with the silencing of tumor suppressor genes; on the other hand, down-regulation of miRNAs has also been observed in cancer and cancer stem cells (CSCs. In both cases, miRNA regulation is inversely correlated with cancer progression. Growing evidence indicates that miRNAs are also involved in the metastatic process by either suppressing or promoting metastasis-related genes leading to the reduction or activation of cancer cell migration and invasion processes. In particular, circulating miRNAs (vesicle-encapsulated or non-encapsulated have significant effects on tumorigenesis: membrane-particles, apoptotic bodies and exosomes have been described as providers of a cell-to-cell communication system transporting oncogenic miRNAs from tumors to neighboring cells and distant metastatic sites. It is hypothesized that MiRNAs control cancer development in a traditional manner, by regulating signaling pathways and factors. In addition, recent developments indicate a non-conventional mechanism of cancer regulation by stem cell reprogramming via a regulatory network consisting of miRNAs and Wnt/β-catenin, Notch, and Hedgehog signaling pathways, all of which are involved in controlling stem cell functions of CSCs. In this review, we focus on the role of miRNAs in the Notch pathway and how they regulate CSC self-renewal, differentiation and tumorigenesis by direct/indirect targeting of

  16. Metalloproteinase activity secreted by fibrogenic cells in the processing of prolysyl oxidase. Potential role of procollagen C-proteinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchenko, M V; Stetler-Stevenson, W G; Trubetskoy, O V; Gacheru, S N; Kagan, H M

    1996-03-22

    Lysyl oxidase is secreted from fibrogenic cells as a 50-kDa proenzyme that is proteolytically processed to the mature enzyme in the extracellular space. To characterize the secreted proteinase activity, a truncated, recombinant form of lysyl oxidase was prepared as a proteinase substrate containing the sequence of the propeptide cleavage region. The processing proteinase activity secreted by cultured fibrogenic cells resists inhibitors of serine or aspartyl proteinases as well as tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases-2 (MMP-2) but is completely inhibited by metal ion chelators. Known metalloproteinases were tested for their activity toward this substrate. Carboxyl-terminal procollagen proteinase (C-proteinase), MMP-2, and conditioned fibrogenic cell culture medium cleave the lysyl oxidase substrate to the size of the mature enzyme. The NH2-terminal sequence generated by arterial smooth muscle conditioned medium and the C-proteinase but not by MMP-2, i.e. Asp-Asp-Pro-Tyr, was identical to that previously identified in mature lysyl oxidase isolated from connective tissue. The C-proteinase activity against the model substrate was inhibited by a synthetic oligopeptide mimic of the cleavage sequence (Ac-Met-Val-Gly-Asp-Asp-Pro-Tyr-Asn-amide), whereas this peptide also inhibited the generation of lysyl oxidase activity in the medium of fetal rat lung fibroblasts in culture. In toto, these results identify a secreted metalloproteinase activity participating in the activation of prolysyl oxidase, identify inhibitors of the processing activity, and implicate procollagen C-proteinase in this role.

  17. Oncogenic potential of histone-variant H2A.Z.1 and its regulatory role in cell cycle and epithelial-mesenchymal transition in liver cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eun, Jung Woo; Shen, Qingyu; Kim, Hyung Seok; Shin, Woo Chan; Ahn, Young Min; Park, Won Sang; Lee, Jung Young; Nam, Suk Woo

    2016-01-01

    H2A.Z is a highly conserved H2A variant, and two distinct H2A.Z isoforms, H2A.Z.1 and H2A.Z.2, have been identified as products of two non-allelic genes, H2AFZ and H2AFV. H2A.Z has been reported to be overexpressed in breast, prostate and bladder cancers, but most studies did not clearly distinguish between isoforms. One recent study reported a unique role for the H2A.Z isoform H2A.Z.2 as a driver of malignant melanoma. Here we first report that H2A.Z.1 plays a pivotal role in the liver tumorigenesis by selectively regulating key molecules in cell cycle and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). H2AFZ expression was significantly overexpressed in a large cohort of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients, and high expression of H2AFZ was significantly associated with their poor prognosis. H2A.Z.1 overexpression was demonstrated in a subset of human HCC and cell lines. H2A.Z.1 knockdown suppressed HCC cell growth by transcriptional deregulation of cell cycle proteins and caused apoptotic cell death of HCC cells. We also observed that H2A.Z.1 knockdown reduced the metastatic potential of HCC cells by selectively modulating epithelial-mesenchymal transition regulatory proteins such as E-cadherin and fibronectin. In addition, H2A.Z.1 knockdown reduced the in vivo tumor growth rate in a mouse xenograft model. In conclusion, our findings suggest the oncogenic potential of H2A.Z.1 in liver tumorigenesis and that it plays established role in accelerating cell cycle transition and EMT during hepatocarcinogenesis. This makes H2A.Z.1 a promising target in liver cancer therapy. PMID:26863632

  18. The potential role of cell surface complement regulators and circulating CD4+ CD25+ T-cells in the development of autoimmune myasthenia gravis

    OpenAIRE

    Hamdoon, Mohamed Nasreldin Thabit; Fattouh, Mona; El-din, Asmaa Nasr; Elnady, Hassan M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction CD4+CD25+ regulatory T-lymphocytes (T-regs) and regulators of complement activity (RCA) involving CD55 and CD59 play an important role in the prevention of autoimmune diseases. However, their role in the pathogenesis of human autoimmune myasthenia gravis (MG) remains unclear. This study aimed to determine the frequency of peripheral blood T-regs and CD4+ T-helper (T-helper) cells and the red blood cells (RBCs) level of expression of CD55 and CD59 in MG patients. Methods Fourteen ...

  19. Sucrose transport and phloem unloading in peach fruit: potential role of two transporters localized in different cell types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanon, Laura; Falchi, Rachele; Santi, Simonetta; Vizzotto, Giannina

    2015-06-01

    Several complex physiological processes, which include long-distance translocation in the phloem and unloading in sink tissues, govern the partitioning of sugars in economically important organs, such as peach fruit. In this study, we took advantage of a symplastic tracer, carboxyfluorescein (CF), providing evidence for an apoplastic sucrose transfer in the early (SI) and middle (SIII) phases of peach fruit development. Moreover, using a combination of in situ hybridization and laser microdissection-assisted expression analysis, three putative sucrose transporters encoding genes (PpSUT1, PpSUT2, PpSUT4) were transcriptionally analyzed to relate their expression with sucrose storage in this organ. Our study revealed that PpSUT2 and PpSUT4 are the genes predominantly expressed in fruit flesh, and the detailed analysis of their expression pattern in the different cell types enabled us to suggest a specialized role in sucrose distribution. Both PpSUTs transporters could be involved in the retrieval of sucrose lost from the symplastic continuum of the phloem and, when expressed in parenchyma cells, they could be active in the import of sucrose into sink tissues, via symport from the apoplast. An alternative hypothesis has been proposed and discussed for PpSUT4 because of its putative tonoplastic localization. Taken together, our results provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms underpinning sucrose unloading and accumulation in peach fruit.

  20. Sucrose transport and phloem unloading in peach fruit: potential role of two transporters localized in different cell types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanon, Laura; Falchi, Rachele; Santi, Simonetta; Vizzotto, Giannina

    2015-06-01

    Several complex physiological processes, which include long-distance translocation in the phloem and unloading in sink tissues, govern the partitioning of sugars in economically important organs, such as peach fruit. In this study, we took advantage of a symplastic tracer, carboxyfluorescein (CF), providing evidence for an apoplastic sucrose transfer in the early (SI) and middle (SIII) phases of peach fruit development. Moreover, using a combination of in situ hybridization and laser microdissection-assisted expression analysis, three putative sucrose transporters encoding genes (PpSUT1, PpSUT2, PpSUT4) were transcriptionally analyzed to relate their expression with sucrose storage in this organ. Our study revealed that PpSUT2 and PpSUT4 are the genes predominantly expressed in fruit flesh, and the detailed analysis of their expression pattern in the different cell types enabled us to suggest a specialized role in sucrose distribution. Both PpSUTs transporters could be involved in the retrieval of sucrose lost from the symplastic continuum of the phloem and, when expressed in parenchyma cells, they could be active in the import of sucrose into sink tissues, via symport from the apoplast. An alternative hypothesis has been proposed and discussed for PpSUT4 because of its putative tonoplastic localization. Taken together, our results provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms underpinning sucrose unloading and accumulation in peach fruit. PMID:25348206

  1. A potential role of karyopherin a2 in the impaired maturation of dendritic cells observed in glioblastoma patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Gousias

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Patients with glioblastomas demonstrate well-documented immunological impairments including decreased numbers of mature dendritic cells (DCs. Recent data identified karyopherin a2 (KPNA2, a nucleocytoplasmic shuttling receptor, as diagnostic and prognostic biomarker for gliomas. The aim of this ongoing study is to correlate parameters of immunity and nucleocytoplasmic transport in glioblastoma patients. Methods: We preoperatively collected serum from 17 patients with glioblastomas and determined DC subsets (HLA DR+ Lin-, CD34-, CD45+, CD123+, CD11+ were analyzed using a 6-color flow cytometry panel. Expression levels of KPNA2 and nuclear accumulation of p53 were evaluated semi-quantitatively by immunohistochemistry. O6-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT and isocitrate dehydrogenase-1 (IDH-1 status were assessed by pyrosequencing and immunohistochemistry, respectively. Results: Median expression levels for both KPNA2 and p53 were 5-10%. IDH-1-R132H mutation and MGMT promoter hypermethylation was detected in 3/16 and 1/9 patients, respectively. Mean counts of total mature DCs, myeloid DCs and plasmacytoid DCs were 9.6, 2.1, 3.4 cells/μL. A preliminary analysis suggests an association between low KPNA2 nuclear expression and increased numbers of mature DCs. However, this correlation did not reach statistical significance so far (P = 0.077. Conclusion: Our preliminary data may indicate a role of KPNA2 in the impaired maturation of DCs observed in glioblastoma patients.

  2. Preferential expression of functional IL-17R in glioma stem cells: potential role in self-renewal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parajuli, Prahlad; Anand, Rohit; Mandalaparty, Chandramouli; Suryadevara, Raviteja; Sriranga, Preethi U.; Michelhaugh, Sharon K.; Cazacu, Simona; Finniss, Susan; Thakur, Archana; Lum, Lawrence G.; Schalk, Dana; Brodie, Chaya; Mittal, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Gliomas are the most common primary brain tumor and one of the most lethal solid tumors. Mechanistic studies into identification of novel biomarkers are needed to develop new therapeutic strategies for this deadly disease. The objective for this study was to explore the potential direct impact of IL-17−IL-17R interaction in gliomas. Immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry analysis of 12 tumor samples obtained from patients with high grade gliomas revealed that a considerable population (2–19%) of cells in all malignant gliomas expressed IL-17RA, with remarkable co-expression of the glioma stem cell (GSC) markers CD133, Nestin, and Sox2. IL-17 enhanced the self-renewal of GSCs as determined by proliferation and Matrigel® colony assays. IL-17 also induced cytokine/chemokine (IL-6, IL-8, interferon-γ-inducible protein [IP-10], and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 [MCP-1]) secretion in GSCs, which were differentially blocked by antibodies against IL-17R and IL-6R. Western blot analysis showed that IL-17 modulated the activity of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB), glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) and β-catenin in GSCs. While IL-17R-mediated secretion of IL-6 and IL-8 were significantly blocked by inhibitors of NF-κB and STAT3; NF-κB inhibitor was more potent than STAT3 inhibitor in blocking IL-17-induced MCP-1 secretion. Overall, our results suggest that IL-17–IL-17R interaction in GSCs induces an autocrine/paracrine cytokine feedback loop, which may provide an important signaling component for maintenance/self-renewal of GSCs via constitutive activation of both NF-κB and STAT3. The results also strongly implicate IL-17R as an important functional biomarker for therapeutic targeting of GSCs. PMID:26755664

  3. Comparative proteomics of exosomes secreted by tumoral Jurkat T cells and normal human T cell blasts unravels a potential tumorigenic role for valosin-containing protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanclemente, Manuel; Iturralde, María; Naval, Javier; Alava, María Angeles; Martínez-Lostao, Luis; Thierse, Hermann-Josef; Anel, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    We have previously characterized that FasL and Apo2L/TRAIL are stored in their bioactive form inside human T cell blasts in intraluminal vesicles present in multivesicular bodies. These vesicles are rapidly released to the supernatant in the form of exosomes upon re-activation of T cells. In this study we have compared for the first time proteomics of exosomes produced by normal human T cell blasts with those produced by tumoral Jurkat cells, with the objective of identify proteins associated with tumoral exosomes that could have a previously unrecognized role in malignancy. We have identified 359 and 418 proteins in exosomes from T cell blasts and Jurkat cells, respectively. Interestingly, only 145 (around a 40%) are common. The major proteins in both cases are actin and tubulin isoforms and the common interaction nodes correspond to these cytoskeleton and related proteins, as well as to ribosomal and mRNA granule proteins. We detected 14 membrane proteins that were especially enriched in exosomes from Jurkat cells as compared with T cell blasts. The most abundant of these proteins was valosin-containing protein (VCP), a membrane ATPase involved in ER homeostasis and ubiquitination. In this work, we also show that leukemic cells are more sensitive to cell death induced by the VCP inhibitor DBeQ than normal T cells. Furthermore, VCP inhibition prevents functional exosome secretion only in Jurkat cells, but not in T cell blasts. These results suggest VCP targeting as a new selective pathway to exploit in cancer treatment to prevent tumoral exosome secretion. PMID:27086912

  4. Personalized treatment options for ALK-positive metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer: potential role for Ceritinib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Osta H

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Hazem El-Osta,1 Rodney Shackelford2 1Department of Medicine, 2Department of Pathology, Feist-Weiller Cancer Center, Louisiana State University Health Science Center-Shreveport, Shreveport, LA, USA Abstract: The fusion of echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 with the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (EML4-ALK is found in 3%–7% of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC cases and confers sensitivity to crizotinib, the first United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA-approved ALK inhibitor drug. Although crizotinib has an excellent initial therapeutic effect, acquired resistance to this drug invariably develops within the first year of treatment. Resistance may involve secondary gatekeeper mutations within the ALK gene interfering with crizotinib–ALK interactions, or compensatory activation of aberrant bypass signaling pathways. New therapeutic strategies to overcome crizotinib resistance are needed. Ceritinib, a second-generation ALK inhibitor, overcomes several crizotinib-resistant ALK mutations and has demonstrated efficacy against tumor growth in several in vitro and in vivo preclinical models of crizotinib resistance. Notably, the dose-escalation Phase I ASCEND-1 trial has shown a marked activity of ceritinib in both crizotinib-naïve and crizotinib-resistant ALK-rearranged lung cancer. The overall response rate was 58% in a subgroup of patients with ALK-rearranged late-stage NSCLC. Drug discontinuation rate due to toxicity was 10%. The standard dose was established at 750 mg daily. This paper outlines the pathogenesis and treatment of ALK-positive lung cancer, focuses on the preclinical and clinical results surrounding the accelerated FDA approval of ceritinib for the treatment of ALK-positive metastatic NSCLC patients who have progressed on/or are crizotinib intolerant, and discusses the potential efforts seeking to maximize ceritinib efficacy and expand its usage to other indications in cancer therapy. Keywords: crizotinib, EML4

  5. Endogenous bone marrow stem cell mobilization in rats: Its potential role in homing and repair of damaged inner ear

    OpenAIRE

    Elbana, Ahmed M.; Seddik Abdel-Salam; Ghada M. Morad; Mohamed Ibrahim; Ahmed A. Omran

    2015-01-01

    The stem cells are widely used in the last few years in different fields of medicine, either by external transplantation or endogenous mobilization, most of these studies are still experimental on animals; few were tried on humans as in the spinal cord injury or myocardial infarction. As regards its use in the inner ear, stem cell transplantation was examined in many previous studies, while the mobilization idea is a new method to be experimented in inner ear hair cell regeneration. The ai...

  6. MicroRNA 145 may play an important role in uveal melanoma cell growth by potentially targeting insulin receptor substrate-1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Yang; Huang Qiming; Shi Xuehui; Jin Xiang; Shen Li; Xu Xiaolin; Wei Wenbin

    2014-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) contribute to tumorigenesis by acting as either oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes.In this study,we investigated the role of miR-145 in the pathogenesis of uveal melanoma.Methods Expression profiles of miRNAs in uveal melanoma were performed using Agilent miRNA array.Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to screen the expression levels of miR-145 in normal uveal tissue,uveal melanoma tissue,and uveal melanoma cell lines.Lenti-virus expression system was used to construct MUM-2B and OCM-1 cell lines with stable overexpression of miR-145.Cell proliferation,cell cycle,and cell apoptosis of these miR-145 overexpression cell lines were examined by MTT assay and flow cytometry respectively.The target genes of miR-145 were predicted by bioinformatics and confirmed using a luciferase reporter assay.The expression of insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R),insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) proteins was determined by Western blotting analysis.IRS-1 was knocked down in OCM-1 cells.TUNEL,BrdU,and flow cytometry assay were performed in IRS-1 knocked down OCM-1 cell lines to analyze its function.Results Forty-seven miRNAs were up regulated in uveal melanoma and 61 were down regulated.miR-145 expression was significantly lower in uveal melanoma sample and the cell lines were compared with normal uveal sample.Overexpression of miR-145 suppressed cell proliferation by blocking the G1 phase entering S phase in uveal melanoma cells,and promoted uveal melanoma cell apoptosis.IRS-1 was identified as a potential target of miR-145 by dual luciferase reporter assay.Knocking down of IRS-1 had similar effect as overexpression of miR-145.Conclusion miR-145 might act as a tumor suppressor in uveal melanoma,and downregulation of the target IRS-1 might be a potential mechanism.

  7. Red wine polyphenolics reduce the expression of inflammation markers in human colon-derived CCD-18Co myofibroblast cells: potential role of microRNA-126.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angel-Morales, Gabriela; Noratto, Giuliana; Mertens-Talcott, Susanne

    2012-07-01

    Chronic intestinal inflammation is an established risk factor for colon cancer. Polyphenolic compounds from fruit and vegetables have been shown to have anti-inflammatory properties in several cell lines and tissues. However, their anti-inflammatory mechanisms, involving microRNAs in the regulation of inflammation, have not been extensively investigated. The goal of this research was to assess the chemopreventive potential of polyphenolics extracted from red wine made with Lenoir grapes (Vitis aestivalis hybrid) in human colon-derived CCD-18Co myofibroblasts cells, and to assess the potential involvement of microRNA-126 (miR-126) in the underlying mechanisms. The results show that the polyphenolic red wine extract (WE) decreased mRNA expression of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory mediators NF-kB, ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and PECAM-1 by 1.95-, 1.98-, 1.52-, and 1.84-fold respectively, in a dose dependent manner (0-100 μg of gallic acid equivalent (GAE) mL(-1)) down to 0.80-, 0.79-, 0.66-, and 0.68-fold in DMSO-treated control cells not challenged with LPS, respectively. Correspondingly, miR-126, which has a target region within the 3'-UTR of VCAM-1 mRNA, was increased 2.79-fold by the WE at 100 μg GAE mL(-1). The potential role of miR-126 was confirmed by transfecting cells with a specific miR-126-antagomir, as-miR-126. Transfection with as-miR-126 down-regulated miR-126 to 0.71-fold in the control cells and up-regulated mRNA levels of NF-kB, ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and PECAM-1 to 1.80-, 1.49-, 2.30-, and 1.95-fold of controls, respectively. WE at 100 μg GAE mL(-1) partially reversed the effects of the as-miR-126 to 1.02-, 1.01-, 1.04-, and 1.05-fold, for mRNA levels of NF-kB, ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and PECAM-1 respectively. This indicates the potential role of miR-126 in the anti-inflammatory properties of polyphenolics from red wine in CCD-18Co myofibroblasts cells. PMID:22572890

  8. Cross-Platform Assessment of Genomic Imbalance Confirms the Clinical Relevance of Genomic Complexity and Reveals Loci with Potential Pathogenic Roles in Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Lizalynn M.; Thodima, Venkata; Friedman, Julia; Ma, Charles; Guttapalli, Asha; Mendiratta, Geetu; Siddiqi, Imran N.; Syrbu, Sergei; Chaganti, R. S. K.; Houldsworth, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Genomic copy number alterations (CNAs) in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) have roles in disease pathogenesis but overall clinical relevance remains unclear. Herein, an unbiased algorithm was uniformly applied across three genome profiling datasets comprising 392 newly-diagnosed DLBCL specimens that defined 32 overlapping CNAs, involving 36 minimal common regions (MCRs). Scoring criteria were established for 50 aberrations within the MCRs while considering peak gains/losses. Application of these criteria to independent datasets revealed novel candidate genes with coordinated expression, such as CNOT2, potentially with pathogenic roles. No one single aberration significantly associated with patient outcome across datasets, but genomic complexity, defined by imbalance in more than one MCR, significantly portended adverse outcome in two of three independent datasets. Thus, the standardized scoring of CNAs currently developed can be uniformly applied across platforms, affording robust validation of genomic imbalance and complexity in DLBCL and overall clinical utility as biomarkers of patient outcome. PMID:26294112

  9. Potential therapeutic role of cisplatinum in autologous bone marrow transplantation: in vitro eradication of neuroblastoma cells from bone marrow.

    OpenAIRE

    Bettan-Renaud, L.; De Vathaire, F.; Bénard, J.; Morardet, N.; Pauzie, N.; Bayet, S.; Hartmann, O; Parmentier, C.

    1989-01-01

    Cisplatinum may prove to be a valuable agent for the elimination of diseased cells in the bone marrow of patients with neuroblastoma. In this study, we measured the efficacy of cisplatinum on human neuroblastoma cell lines and on normal human bone marrow progenitors, GM-CFC and CFU-F. Data indicate that the therapeutic index of cisplatinum is high. We set up an experimental model consisting of a mixture of human bone marrow and human neuroblastoma cells in order to confirm these preliminary r...

  10. Phosphoproteome analysis demonstrates the potential role of THRAP3 phosphorylation in androgen-independent prostate cancer cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ino, Yoko; Arakawa, Noriaki; Ishiguro, Hitoshi; Uemura, Hiroji; Kubota, Yoshinobu; Hirano, Hisashi; Toda, Tosifusa

    2016-04-01

    Elucidating the androgen-independent growth mechanism is critical for developing effective treatment strategies to combat androgen-independent prostate cancer. We performed a comparative phosphoproteome analysis using a prostate cancer cell line, LNCaP, and an LNCaP-derived androgen-independent cell line, LNCaP-AI, to identify phosphoproteins involved in this mechanism. We performed quantitative comparisons of the phosphopeptide levels in tryptic digests of protein extracts from these cell lines using MS. We found that the levels of 69 phosphopeptides in 66 proteins significantly differed between LNCaP and LNCaP-AI. In particular, we focused on thyroid hormone receptor associated protein 3 (THRAP3), which is a known transcriptional coactivator of the androgen receptor. The phosphorylation level of THRAP3 was significantly lower at S248 and S253 in LNCaP-AI cells. Furthermore, pull-down assays showed that 32 proteins uniquely bound to the nonphosphorylatable mutant form of THRAP3, whereas 31 other proteins uniquely bound to the phosphorylation-mimic form. Many of the differentially interacting proteins were identified as being involved with RNA splicing and processing. These results suggest that the phosphorylation state of THRAP3 at S248 and S253 might be involved in the mechanism of androgen-independent prostate cancer cell growth by changing the interaction partners.

  11. Role of the Na+/K+-ATPase in regulating the membrane potential in rat peritoneal mast cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, U G; Praetorius, Birger Hans; Knudsen, T;

    1997-01-01

    of Sylgard-coated patch pipettes (3-6 M[omega]). High-resolution membrane currents were recorded with an EPC-9 patch-clamp amplifier controlled by the 'E9SCREEN' software. In addition, a charting programme on another computer synchronously recorded at low resolution (2 Hz) membrane potential and holding...

  12. Aspirin and salicylic acid decrease c-Myc expression in cancer cells: a potential role in chemoprevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Guoqiang; Dachineni, Rakesh; Muley, Pratik; Tummala, Hemachand; Bhat, G Jayarama

    2016-02-01

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated a significant correlation between regular aspirin use and reduced colon cancer incidence and mortality; however, the pathways by which it exerts its anti-cancer effects are still not fully explored. We hypothesized that aspirin's anti-cancer effect may occur through downregulation of c-Myc gene expression. Here, we demonstrate that aspirin and its primary metabolite, salicylic acid, decrease the c-Myc protein levels in human HCT-116 colon and in few other cancer cell lines. In total cell lysates, both drugs decreased the levels of c-Myc in a concentration-dependent fashion. Greater inhibition was observed in the nucleus than the cytoplasm, and immunofluorescence studies confirmed these observations. Pretreatment of cells with lactacystin, a proteasome inhibitor, partially prevented the downregulatory effect of both aspirin and salicylic acid, suggesting that 26S proteasomal pathway is involved. Both drugs failed to decrease exogenously expressed DDK-tagged c-Myc protein levels; however, under the same conditions, the endogenous c-Myc protein levels were downregulated. Northern blot analysis showed that both drugs caused a decrease in c-Myc mRNA levels in a concentration-dependent fashion. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis showed that aspirin taken up by cells was rapidly metabolized to salicylic acid, suggesting that aspirin's inhibitory effect on c-Myc may occur through formation of salicylic acid. Our result suggests that salicylic acid regulates c-Myc level at both transcriptional and post-transcription levels. Inhibition of c-Myc may represent an important pathway by which aspirin exerts its anti-cancer effect and decrease the occurrence of cancer in epithelial tissues. PMID:26314861

  13. Sexual dimorphism in an animal model of Sjögren's syndrome: a potential role for Th17 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandria Voigt

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Sjögren's syndrome is a complex autoimmune disease with an array of diverse immunological, genetic and environmental etiologies, making identification of the precise autoimmune mechanism difficult to define. One of the most distinctive aspects of Sjögren's syndrome is the high sexual dimorphism with women affected 10-20 times more than men. It is nearly impossible to study the sexual dimorphic development of Sjögren's syndrome in human patients; therefore it is pertinent to develop an appropriate animal model which resembles human disease. The data indicated that female C57BL/6.NOD-Aec1Aec2 mice developed an earlier onset of sialadenitis with a higher composition of CD3+ T cells and a 10-fold increase in glandular infiltration of Th17 cells at the onset of clinical disease compared to male mice. Inflammatory Th17 cells of female mice exhibited a stronger proliferation in response to disease-specific antigen than their male counterpart. At the clinical disease stage, altered autoantibody patterns can be detected in females whereas they are seldom observed in male C57BL/6.NOD-Aec1Aec2 mice. Interestingly, male C57BL/6.NOD-Aec1Aec2 mice developed an earlier loss of secretory function, despite the fact that female C57BL/6.NOD-Aec1Aec2 mice exhibited a more rapid secretory loss. This data indicates the strong sexual dimorphism in the SjS-susceptible C57BL/6.NOD-Aec1Aec2 animal model, making it an appropriate animal model to examine human disease.

  14. Epigallocatechin-gallate (EGCG) regulates autophagy in human retinal pigment epithelial cells: A potential role for reducing UVB light-induced retinal damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Chao-Peng; Yao, Jin; Tao, Zhi-Fu; Li, Xiu-Miao; Jiang, Qin, E-mail: jqin710@vip.sina.com; Yan, Biao, E-mail: yanbiao1982@hotmail.com

    2013-09-06

    Highlights: •UVB irradiation induces RPE autophagy. •EGCG treatment represses UVB-mediated autophagy. •EGCG regulates UVB-mediated autophagy through mTOR signaling pathway. •EGCG sensitizes RPE cells to UVB-induced damage in an autophagy-dependent manner. -- Abstract: Autophagy is an intracellular catabolic process involved in protein and organelle degradation via the lysosomal pathway that has been linked in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). UVB irradiation-mediated degeneration of the macular retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells is an important hallmark of AMD, which is along with the change in RPE autophagy. Thus, pharmacological manipulation of RPE autophagy may offer an alternative therapeutic target in AMD. Here, we found that epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), a polyphenolic compound from green tea, plays a regulatory role in UVB irradiation-induced autophagy in RPE cells. UVB irradiation results in a marked increase in the amount of LC3-II protein in a dose-dependent manner. EGCG administration leads to a significant reduction in the formation of LC3-II and autophagosomes. mTOR signaling activation is required for EGCG-induced LC3-II formation, as evidenced by the fact that EGCG-induced LC3-II formation is significantly impaired by rapamycin administration. Moreover, EGCG significantly alleviates the toxic effects of UVB irradiation on RPE cells in an autophagy-dependent manner. Collectively, our study reveals a novel role of EGCG in RPE autophagy. EGCG may be exploited as a potential therapeutic reagent for the treatment of pathological conditions associated with abnormal autophagy.

  15. The role of hydrogen and fuel cells to store renewable energy in the future energy network – potentials and challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The penetration of renewable energy sources is expected to rapidly increase from 15% to 50% in 2050 due to their vital contribution to the global energy requirements, sustainability and quality of life in economical, environmental and health aspects. This huge rise highlights the necessity of development of energy storage systems, especially for intermittency renewable energies such as solar photovoltaic and wind turbine, in order to balance the energy network. In this study, renewable energy options including pumped hydro, pressurized air, flywheels, Li ion batteries, hydrogen and super-capacitors are compared based on a specific set of criteria. The criteria considered are energy/power density, ease of integration with the existing energy network, cost effectiveness, durability, efficiency and safety. Our study showed that storing renewable energy sources in the form of hydrogen through the electrolysis process is ranked as the most promising option considering the mentioned criteria. It brings about several benefits suggesting that hydrogen and fuel cells are promising contributors towards a more sustainable future, both in energy demand and environmental sustainability. - Highlights: • Energy storage technologies provide the balance in modern energy networks. • Storing renewable energy in the form of hydrogen via the electrolysis process is concluded to be the most promising option. • Hydrogen energy provides high energy density, low capital cost and easy integration with the existing energy network. • Hydrogen and fuel cell contribute to a more sustainable future

  16. A Pilot Study Assessing the Potential Role of non-CD133 Colorectal Cancer Stem Cells as Biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell C. Langan, John E. Mullinax, Satyajit Ray, Manish T. Raiji, Nicholas Schaub, Hong-Wu Xin, Tomotake Koizumi, Seth M. Steinberg, Andrew Anderson, Gordon Wiegand, Donna Butcher, Miriam Anver, Anton J. Bilchik, Alexander Stojadinovic, Udo Rudloff, Itz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Over 50% of patients with colorectal cancer (CRC will progress and/or develop metastases. Biomarkers capable of predicting progression, risk stratification and therapeutic benefit are needed. Cancer stem cells are thought to be responsible for tumor initiation, dissemination and treatment failure. Therefore, we hypothesized that CRC cancer stem cell markers (CRCSC will identify a group of patients at high risk for progression.Methods: Paraffin-embedded tissue cores of normal (n=8, and histopathologically well-defined primary (n= 30 and metastatic (n=10 CRC were arrayed in duplicate on tissue microarrays (TMAs. Expression profiles of non-CD133 CRCSC (CD29, CD44, ALDH1A1, ALDH1B1, EpCam, and CD166 were detected by immunohistochemistry and the association with clinicopathological data and patient outcomes was determined using standard statistical methodology. An independent pathologist, blinded to the clinical data scored the samples. Scoring included percent positive cells (0 to 4, 0 = <10%, 1 = 10 - 24%, 2 = 25 - 49%, 3 = 50 - 74%, 4 = 75 - 100%, and the intensity of positively stained cells (0 to 4; 0 = no staining, 1 = diminutive intensity, 2 = low intensity, 3 = intermediate intensity, 4 = high intensity. The pathologic score represents the sum of these two values, reported in this paper as a combined IHC staining score (CSS.Results: Of 30 patients 7 were AJCC stage IIA, 10 stage IIIB, 7 stage IIIC and 6 stage IV. Median follow-up was 113 months. DFI was 17 months. Median overall survival (OS was not reached. Stage-specific OS was: II - not reached; III - not reached; IV - 11 months. In a univariate analysis, poor OS was associated with loss of CD29 expression; median OS, 32 months vs. not reached for CSS 3-7 vs. >7.5, respectively; p=0.052 comparing entire curves, after adjustment. In a Cox model analysis, loss of CD29 exhibited a trend toward association with survival (p=0.098 after adjusting for the effect of stage (p=0

  17. Glucose generates sub-plasma membrane ATP microdomains in single islet beta-cells. Potential role for strategically located mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, H J; Pouli, A E; Ainscow, E K; Jouaville, L S; Rizzuto, R; Rutter, G A

    1999-05-01

    Increases in the concentration of free ATP within the islet beta-cell may couple elevations in blood glucose to insulin release by closing ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) channels and activating Ca2+ influx. Here, we use recombinant targeted luciferases and photon counting imaging to monitor changes in free [ATP] in subdomains of single living MIN6 and primary beta-cells. Resting [ATP] in the cytosol ([ATP]c), in the mitochondrial matrix ([ATP]m), and beneath the plasma membrane ([ATP]pm) were similar ( approximately 1 mM). Elevations in extracellular glucose concentration (3-30 mM) increased free [ATP] in each domain with distinct kinetics. Thus, sustained increases in [ATP]m and [ATP]pm were observed, but only a transient increase in [ATP]c. However, detectable increases in [ATP]c and [ATP]pm, but not [ATP]m, required extracellular Ca2+. Enhancement of glucose-induced Ca2+ influx with high [K+] had little effect on the apparent [ATP]c and [ATP]m increases but augmented the [ATP]pm increase. Underlying these changes, glucose increased the mitochondrial proton motive force, an effect mimicked by high [K+]. These data support a model in which glucose increases [ATP]m both through enhanced substrate supply and by progressive Ca2+-dependent activation of mitochondrial enzymes. This may then lead to a privileged elevation of [ATP]pm, which may be essential for the sustained closure of KATP channels. Luciferase imaging would appear to be a useful new tool for dynamic in vivo imaging of free ATP concentration.

  18. Potential role of gene-environment interactions in ion transport mechanisms in the etiology of renal cell cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deckers, Ivette A. G.; van den Brandt, Piet A.; van Engeland, Manon; van Schooten, Frederik J.; Godschalk, Roger W. L.; Keszei, András P.; Hogervorst, Janneke G. F.; Schouten, Leo J.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the ion transport mechanism (ITM) in renal cell cancer (RCC) etiology using gene-environment interactions between candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and associated environmental factors, including dietary intakes of sodium, potassium and fluid, hypertension and diuretic medication. A literature-based selection of 13 SNPs in ten ITM genes were successfully genotyped in toenail DNA of 3,048 subcohort members and 419 RCC cases from the Netherlands Cohort Study. Diet and lifestyle were measured with baseline questionnaires. Cox regression analyses were conducted for main effects and gene-environment interactions. ADD1_rs4961 was significantly associated with RCC risk, showing a Hazard Ratio (HR) of 1.24 (95% confidence intervals (CI): 1.01–1.53) for the GT + TT (versus GG) genotype. Four of 65 tested gene-environment interactions were statistically significant. Three of these interactions clustered in SLC9A3_rs4957061, including the ones with fluid and potassium intake, and diuretic medication. For fluid intake, the RCC risk was significantly lower for high versus low intake in participants with the CC genotype (HR(95% CI): 0.47(0.26–0.86)), but not for the CT + TT genotype (P-interaction = 0.002). None of the main genetic effects and gene-environment interactions remained significant after adjustment for multiple testing. Data do not support the general hypothesis that the ITM is a disease mechanism in RCC etiology. PMID:27686058

  19. Role of cancer stem cells in hepatocarcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Bo; Jacob, Samson T.

    2011-01-01

    There has been considerable interest in cancer stem cells (CSCs) among cancer biologists and clinicians, most likely because of their role in the heterogeneity of cancer and their potential application in cancer therapeutics. Recent studies suggest that CSCs play a key role in liver carcinogenesis. A small subpopulation of cancer cells with CSC properties has been identified and characterized from hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell lines, animal models and human primary HCCs. Considering the...

  20. Potentiation of nerve growth factor-induced neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells by ifenprodil: the role of sigma-1 and IP3 receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamaki Ishima

    Full Text Available In addition to both the α1 adrenergic receptor and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor antagonists, ifenprodil binds to the sigma receptor subtypes 1 and 2. In this study, we examined the effects of ifenprodil on nerve growth factor (NGF-induced neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells. Ifenprodil significantly potentiated NGF-induced neurite outgrowth, in a concentration-dependent manner. In contrast, the α1 adrenergic receptor antagonist, prazosin and the NMDA receptor NR2B antagonist, Ro 25-6981 did not alter NGF-induced neurite outgrowth. Potentiation of NGF-induced neurite outgrowth mediated by ifenprodil was significantly antagonized by co-administration of the selective sigma-1 receptor antagonist, NE-100, but not the sigma-2 receptor antagonist, SM-21. Similarly, ifenprodil enhanced NGF-induced neurite outgrowth was again significantly reduced by the inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP(3 receptor antagonists, xestospongin C and 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB treatment. Furthermore, BAPTA-AM, a chelator of intracellular Ca(2+, blocked the effects of ifenprodil on NGF-induced neurite outgrowth, indicating the role of intracellular Ca(2+ in the neurite outgrowth. These findings suggest that activation at sigma-1 receptors and subsequent interaction with IP(3 receptors may mediate the pharmacological effects of ifenprodil on neurite outgrowth.

  1. Potential role of enzastaurin in the treatment of patients with relapsed or refractory advanced cutaneous T-cell lymphomas: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katz DA

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Deborah A Katz, Janet MD Plate, Sunita Nathan, Lydia UshaDivision of Hematology and Oncology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USAAbstract: Cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCLs are rare extranodal non-Hodgkin lymphomas characterized by neoplastic T-lymphocyte accumulation in the skin. The two most common types of CTCLs are mycosis fungoides and the leukemic variant, Sézary syndrome. Prognosis of CTCLs depends on the stage, with a poor prognosis in advanced-stage disease. A number of agents have recently been developed for the treatment of CTCLs: chemotherapeutic agents such as pralatrexate, interferon-alpha, retinoids such as bexarotene, monoclonal antibodies such as alemtuzumab, and histone deacetylase inhibitors such as vorinostat and romidepsin. Nevertheless, there is no cure for CTCLs except for allogeneic stem cell transplant. A promising new drug is enzastaurin. Enzastaurin is a novel serine/threonine kinase inhibitor that binds to protein kinase C-β (PKC-β and inhibits the phosphoinositide-3 kinase (PI3K/AKT/phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN signaling pathway. Enzastaurin induces apoptosis and inhibits angiogenesis; it was also shown to suppress growth of CTCL cell lines in vitro. Given its low toxicity, enzastaurin has been tested against both solid tumors and hematologic malignancies. This article is focused on the potential role of enzastaurin in the treatment of CTCLs. A phase II multicenter trial evaluated enzastaurin monotherapy in patients with CTCLs. However, the results from this study were disappointing, demonstrating that enzastaurin had only modest clinical activity. Hence, enzastaurin is not currently developed for treating CTCLs. Potential strategies to improve enzastaurin efficacy against CTCLs are discussed: validation of enzastaurin targets such as PKC-β expression in CTCL lesions and or/blood; measurement of serum vascular endothelial growth factor levels; dose optimization; combining enzastaurin with

  2. Tanshinone I induces human colorectal cancer cell apoptosis: The potential roles of Aurora A-p53 and survivin-mediated signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Mingjie; Wang, Chen; Wang, Jian

    2016-08-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common malignancies worldwide and a leading cause of cancer death. Despite decades of intensive investigations, effective interventional options are still limited and patient prognosis remains poor. Tanshinone I, an active compound from traditional Chinese herbal medicine Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge, has been shown to inhibit cell growth of leukemia, lung, and breast cancers. However, whether and how Tanshinone I exerts similar effects on CRC needs to be elucidated. Tanshinone I induced CRC cell apoptosis was characterized and the roles of Aurora A-p53 and survivin-mediated pathways were analyzed in different CRC cell lines. Tanshinone I markedly inhibited CRC cell growth and induced apoptosis in CRC cells with functional p53 protein. Interestingly, Tanshinone I did not exert as much inhibitory effect on normal colon epithelial cells or CRC cells with mutant p53, indicating relative selectivity toward colorectal cancer cells with full presence of p53. In tse cells with wild-type p53, data showed that Tanshinone I mediated Aurora A inhibition results in p53 upregulation, which is required for cell apoptosis. In CRC cells with mutant p53 protein (not able to localize to the nucleus), however, Aurora A knockdown failed to induce CRC cell apoptosis. Instead, data showed that protein level of survivin decreased following Tanshinone I treatment. These observations were further substantiated by the pivotal role of survivin in Tanshinone I mediated apoptosis in CRC cells with p53 mutant. Tanshinone I, a novel natural compound, exerts significant inhibitory effect on CRC cell growth via a mechanism involving either Aurora A-p53 axis or survivin-involving mechanism depending on different intrinsic characteristics of tumor cells. PMID:27279458

  3. LITHOCHOLIC ACID DECREASES EXPRESSION OF UGT2B7 IN CACO-2 CELLS: A POTENTIAL ROLE FOR A NEGATIVE FARNESOID X RECEPTOR RESPONSE ELEMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Yuan; Heydel, Jean-Marie; LI, XIN; Bratton, Stacie; Lindblom, Tim; Radominska-Pandya, Anna

    2005-01-01

    Human UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) 2B7 is the major isoform catalyzing the glucuronidation of a variety of endogenous compounds including bile acids. To determine the role of bile acids in the regulation of UGT2B7 expression, Caco-2 cells were incubated with the natural human farnesoid X receptor (hFXR) ligand, chenodeoxycholic acid, as well as the secondary bile acid, lithocholic acid, derived from chenodeoxycholic acid. Incubation of Caco-2 cells with lithocholic acid in the absence of...

  4. Understanding migraine: Potential role of neurogenic inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh Malhotra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurogenic inflammation, a well-defined pathophysiologial process is characterized by the release of potent vasoactive neuropeptides, predominantly calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP, substance P (SP, and neurokinin A from activated peripheral nociceptive sensory nerve terminals (usually C and A delta-fibers. These peptides lead to a cascade of inflammatory tissue responses including arteriolar vasodilation, plasma protein extravasation, and degranulation of mast cells in their peripheral target tissue. Neurogenic inflammatory processes have long been implicated as a possible mechanism involved in the pathophysiology of various human diseases of the nervous system, respiratory system, gastrointestinal tract, urogenital tract, and skin. The recent development of several innovative experimental migraine models has provided evidence suggestive of the involvement of neuropeptides (SP, neurokinin A, and CGRP in migraine headache. Antidromic stimulation of nociceptive fibers of the trigeminal nerve resulted in a neurogenic inflammatory response with marked increase in plasma protein extravasation from dural blood vessels by the release of various sensory neuropeptides. Several clinically effective abortive antimigraine medications, such as ergots and triptans, have been shown to attenuate the release of neuropeptide and neurogenic plasma protein extravasation. These findings provide support for the validity of using animal models to investigate mechanisms of neurogenic inflammation in migraine. These also further strengthen the notion of migraine being a neuroinflammatory disease. In the clinical context, there is a paucity of knowledge and awareness among physicians regarding the role of neurogenic inflammation in migraine. Improved understanding of the molecular biology, pharmacology, and pathophysiology of neurogenic inflammation may provide the practitioner the context-specific feedback to identify the novel and most effective therapeutic

  5. Understanding migraine: Potential role of neurogenic inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Rakesh

    2016-01-01

    Neurogenic inflammation, a well-defined pathophysiologial process is characterized by the release of potent vasoactive neuropeptides, predominantly calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), substance P (SP), and neurokinin A from activated peripheral nociceptive sensory nerve terminals (usually C and A delta-fibers). These peptides lead to a cascade of inflammatory tissue responses including arteriolar vasodilation, plasma protein extravasation, and degranulation of mast cells in their peripheral target tissue. Neurogenic inflammatory processes have long been implicated as a possible mechanism involved in the pathophysiology of various human diseases of the nervous system, respiratory system, gastrointestinal tract, urogenital tract, and skin. The recent development of several innovative experimental migraine models has provided evidence suggestive of the involvement of neuropeptides (SP, neurokinin A, and CGRP) in migraine headache. Antidromic stimulation of nociceptive fibers of the trigeminal nerve resulted in a neurogenic inflammatory response with marked increase in plasma protein extravasation from dural blood vessels by the release of various sensory neuropeptides. Several clinically effective abortive antimigraine medications, such as ergots and triptans, have been shown to attenuate the release of neuropeptide and neurogenic plasma protein extravasation. These findings provide support for the validity of using animal models to investigate mechanisms of neurogenic inflammation in migraine. These also further strengthen the notion of migraine being a neuroinflammatory disease. In the clinical context, there is a paucity of knowledge and awareness among physicians regarding the role of neurogenic inflammation in migraine. Improved understanding of the molecular biology, pharmacology, and pathophysiology of neurogenic inflammation may provide the practitioner the context-specific feedback to identify the novel and most effective therapeutic approach to treatment

  6. Long Non-coding RNAs Expression Profile in HepG2 Cells Reveals the Potential Role of Long Non-coding RNAs in the Cholesterol Metabolism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gang Liu; Xinxin Zheng; Yanlu Xu; Jie Lu; Jingzhou Chen; Xiaohong Huang

    2015-01-01

    Background:Green tea has been shown to improve cholesterol metabolism in animal studies,but the molecular mechanisms underlying this function have not been fully understood.Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have recently emerged as a major class of regulatory molecules involved in a broad range of biological processes and complex diseases.Our aim was to identify important lncRNAs that might play an important role in contributing to the benefits of epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) on cholesterol metabolism.Methods:Microarrays was used to reveal the lncRNA and mRNA profiles in green tea polyphenol(-)-epigallocatechin gallate in cultured human liver (HepG2) hepatocytes treated with EGCG and bioinformatic analyses of the predicted target genes were performed to identify lncRNA-mRNA targeting relationships.RNA interference was used to investigate the role of lncRNAs in cholesterol metabolism.Results:The expression levels of 15 genes related to cholesterol metabolism and 285 lncRNAs were changed by EGCG treatment.Bioinformatic analysis found five matched lncRNA-mRNA pairs for five differentially expressed lncRNAs and four differentially expressed mRNA.In particular,the lncRNA4 T102202 and its potential targets mRNA-3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR) were identified.Using a real-time polymerase chain reaction technique,we confirmed that EGCG down-regulated mRNA expression level of the HMGCR and up-regulated expression ofAT102202.After AT102202 knockdown in HepG2,we observed that the level of HMGCR expression was significantly increased relative to the scrambled small interfering RNA control (P < 0.05).Conclusions:Our results indicated that EGCG improved cholesterol metabolism and meanwhile changed the lncRNAs expression profile in HepG2 cells.LncRNAs may play an important role in the cholesterol metabolism.

  7. Stimulation of expression for the adenosine A2A receptor gene by hypoxia in PC12 cells. A potential role in cell protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, S; Millhorn, D E

    1999-07-16

    The purpose of this study was to examine the regulation of adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) gene expression during hypoxia in pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells. Northern blot analysis revealed that the A2AR mRNA level was substantially increased after a 3-h exposure to hypoxia (5% O2), which reached a peak at 12 h. Immunoblot analysis showed that the A2AR protein level was also increased during hypoxia. Inhibition of de novo protein synthesis blocked A2AR induction by hypoxia. In addition, removal of extracellular free Ca2+, chelation of intracellular free Ca2+, and pretreatment with protein kinase C inhibitors prevented A2AR induction by hypoxia. Moreover, depletion of protein kinase C activity by prolonged treatment with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate significantly inhibited the hypoxic induction of A2AR. A2AR antagonists led to a significant enhancement of A2AR mRNA levels during hypoxia, whereas A2AR agonists caused down-regulation of A2AR expression during hypoxia. This suggests that A2AR regulates its own expression during hypoxia by feedback mechanisms. We further found that activation of A2AR enhances cell viability during hypoxia and also inhibits vascular endothelial growth factor expression in PC12 cells. Thus, increased expression of A2AR during hypoxia might protect cells against hypoxia and may act to inhibit hypoxia-induced angiogenic activity mediated by vascular endothelial growth factor. PMID:10400659

  8. Disrupted cell cycle arrest and reduced proliferation in corneal fibroblasts from GCD2 patients: A potential role for altered autophagy flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Seung-il; Dadakhujaev, Shorafidinkhuja; Maeng, Yong-Sun; Ahn, So-yeon; Kim, Tae-im [Department of Ophthalmology, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Corneal Dystrophy Research Institute, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Eung Kweon, E-mail: eungkkim@yuhs.ac [Department of Ophthalmology, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Corneal Dystrophy Research Institute, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); BK21 Plus Project for Medical Science and Severance Biomedical Science Institute, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • Reduced cell proliferation in granular corneal dystrophy type 2. • Abnormal cell cycle arrest by defective autophagy. • Decreased Cyclin A1, B1, and D1 in Atg7 gene knockout cells. • Increase in p16 and p27 expressions were observed in Atg7 gene knockout cells. - Abstract: This study investigates the role of impaired proliferation, altered cell cycle arrest, and defective autophagy flux of corneal fibroblasts in granular corneal dystrophy type 2 (GCD2) pathogenesis. The proliferation rates of homozygous (HO) GCD2 corneal fibroblasts at 72 h, 96 h, and 120 h were significantly lower (1.102 ± 0.027, 1.397 ± 0.039, and 1.527 ± 0.056, respectively) than those observed for the wild-type (WT) controls (1.441 ± 0.029, 1.758 ± 0.043, and 2.003 ± 0.046, respectively). Flow cytometry indicated a decreased G{sub 1} cell cycle progression and the accumulation of cells in the S and G{sub 2}/M phases in GCD2 cells. These accumulations were associated with decreased levels of Cyclin A1, B1, and E1, and increased expression of p16 and p27. p21 and p53 expression was also significantly lower in GCD2 cells compared to the WT. Interestingly, treatment with the autophagy flux inhibitor, bafilomycin A{sub 1}, resulted in similarly decreased Cyclin A1, B1, D1, and p53 expression in WT fibroblasts. Furthermore, similar findings, including a decrease in Cyclin A1, B1, and D1 and an increase in p16 and p27 expression were observed in autophagy-related 7 (Atg7; known to be essential for autophagy) gene knockout cells. These data provide new insight concerning the role of autophagy in cell cycle arrest and cellular proliferation, uncovering a number of novel therapeutic possibilities for GCD2 treatment.

  9. Customer's potential value: The role of learning

    OpenAIRE

    Komulainen, Hanna; Mainela, Tuija; Tähtinen, Jaana

    2013-01-01

    Current views on value creation emphasize the role of the customer, mutual investments, and value co-creation. Nevertheless, at present the customer-focused research concentrates on value expectations and value experiences as outcomes but disregards the analysis of potential value that is dependent on the customer's activity and learning in the process. The present study explores customer perceived value as a multidimensional phenomenon incorporating expected, realized, and potential dimensio...

  10. The role and potential mechanisms of LncRNA-TATDN1 on metastasis and invasion of non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zequn, Niu; Xuemei, Zhang; Wei, Li; Zongjuan, Ming; Yujie, Zhong; Yanli, Hou; Yuping, Zhang; Xia, Meng; Wei, Wang; Wenjing, Deng; Na, Fan; Shuanying, Yang

    2016-04-01

    The invasion and metastasis of malignant tumor cells lead to normal tissue destruction and are major prognostic factors for many malignant cancers. Long non-coding RNA (LncRNA) is associated with occurrence, development and prognoses of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), but its mechanisms of action involved in tumor invasion and metastasis are not clear. In this study, we screened and detected the expression of LncRNA in two NSCLC lines 95D and 95C by using high throughput LncRNA chip. We found that TATDN1 (Homo sapiens TatD DNase domain containing 1, TATDN1), one of LncRNAs, was highly expressed in 95D cells and NSCLC tumor tissues compared to 95C cells. Knockdown of TATDN1-1 by shRNA significantly inhibited cell proliferation, adhesion, migration and invasion in 95D cells. Further mechanism study showed that TATDN1 knockdown suppressed the expression of E-cadherin, HER2, β-catenin and Ezrin. Moreover, knockdown TATDN1 also inhibited tumor growth and metastasis in a 95D mouse model in vivo by inhibiting β-catenin and Ezrin. These data indicate that TATDN1 expression is associated with 95D cells' higher potential of invasion and metastasis, and suggest that TATDN1 may be a potential prognostic factor and therapeutic target for NSCLCs. PMID:26943769

  11. A potential role for tetranectin in mineralization during osteogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer, U M; Ibaraki, K; Schjørring, P;

    1994-01-01

    cartilage or in the surrounding skeletal muscle. Using an in vitro mineralizing system, we examined osteoblastic cells at different times during their growth and differentiation. Tetranectin mRNA appeared in the cultured osteoblastic cells in parallel with mineralization, in a pattern similar...... osteogenesis. In conclusion, we have established a potential role for tetranectin as a bone matrix protein expressed in time and space coincident with mineralization in vivo and in vitro....

  12. HBsAg inhibits the translocation of JTB into mitochondria in HepG2 cells and potentially plays a role in HCC progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Peng Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The expression of the jumping translocation breakpoint (JTB gene is upregulated in malignant liver tissues; however, JTB is associated with unbalanced translocations in many other types of cancer that suppress JTB expression. No comprehensive analysis on its function in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC has been performed to date. We aimed to define the biological consequences for interaction between JTB and HBsAg in HCC cell lines. METHODS: We employed the stable transfection to establish small HBsAg expressing HepG2 cell line, and stably silenced the JTB expression using short hairpin RNA in HepG2 cell line. The effects of JTB and small HBsAg in vitro were determined by assessing cell apoptosis and motility. RESULTS: Silencing of JTB expression promoted cancer cell motility and reduced cell apoptosis, which was significantly enhanced by HBs expression. Expression of HBsAg inhibited the translocation of JTB to the mitochondria. Furthermore, silencing of the JTB resulted in an increase in the phosphorylation of p65 in HepG2 cells and HepG2-HBs cells, whereas HBsAg expression decreased the phosphorylation of p65. The silencing of JTB in HepG2-HBs cells conferred increased advantages in cell motility and anti-apoptosis. CONCLUSION: HBsAg inhibited the translocation of JTB to the mitochondria and decreased the phosphorylation of p65 through the interaction with JTB, After JTB knockdown, HBsAg exhibited a stronger potential to promote tumor progression. Our data suggested that JTB act as a tumor suppressor gene in regards to HBV infection and its activation might be applied as a therapeutic strategy for in control of HBV related HCC development.

  13. Retinoids: present role and future potential

    OpenAIRE

    Evans, T R J; Kaye, S B

    1999-01-01

    Vitamin A and its biologically active derivatives, retinal and retinoic acid (RA), together with a large repertoire of synthetic analogues are collectively referred to as retinoids. Naturally occurring retinoids regulate the growth and differentiation of a wide variety of cell types and play a crucial role in the physiology of vision and as morphogenic agents during embryonic development. Retinoids and their analogues have been evaluated as chemoprevention agents, and also in the management o...

  14. Potential role of sodium-proton exchangers in the low concentration arsenic trioxide-increased intracellular pH and cell proliferation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Aravena

    Full Text Available Arsenic main inorganic compound is arsenic trioxide (ATO presented in solution mainly as arsenite. ATO increases intracellular pH (pHi, cell proliferation and tumor growth. Sodium-proton exchangers (NHEs modulate the pHi, with NHE1 playing significant roles. Whether ATO-increased cell proliferation results from altered NHEs expression and activity is unknown. We hypothesize that ATO increases cell proliferation by altering pHi due to increased NHEs-like transport activity. Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK cells grown in 5 mmol/L D-glucose-containing DMEM were exposed to ATO (0.05, 0.5 or 5 µmol/L, 0-48 hours in the absence or presence of 5-N,N-hexamethylene amiloride (HMA, 5-100 µmol/L, NHEs inhibitor, PD-98059 (30 µmol/L, MAPK1/2 inhibitor, Gö6976 (10 µmol/L, PKCα, βI and μ inhibitor, or Schering 28080 (10 µmol/L, H(+/K(+ATPase inhibitor plus concanamycin (0.1 µmol/L, V type ATPases inhibitor. Incorporation of [(3H]thymidine was used to estimate cell proliferation, and counting cells with a hemocytometer to determine the cell number. The pHi was measured by fluorometry in 2,7-bicarboxyethyl-5,6-carboxyfluorescein loaded cells. The Na(+-dependent HMA-sensitive NHEs-like mediated proton transport kinetics, NHE1 protein abundance in the total, cytoplasm and plasma membrane protein fractions, and phosphorylated and total p42/44 mitogen-activated protein kinases (p42/44(mapk were also determined. Lowest ATO (0.05 µmol/L, ~0.01 ppm used in this study increased cell proliferation, pHi, NHEs-like transport and plasma membrane NHE1 protein abundance, effects blocked by HMA, PD-98059 or Gö6976. Cell-buffering capacity did not change by ATO. The results show that a low ATO concentration increases MDCK cells proliferation by NHEs (probably NHE1-like transport dependent-increased pHi requiring p42/44(mapk and PKCα, βI and/or μ activity. This finding could be crucial in diseases where uncontrolled cell growth occurs, such as tumor growth, and

  15. Signaling mechanism by the Staphylococcus aureus two-component system LytSR: role of acetyl phosphate in bypassing the cell membrane electrical potential sensor LytS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Kevin; Golemi-Kotra, Dasantila

    2015-01-01

    The two-component system LytSR has been linked to the signal transduction of cell membrane electrical potential perturbation and is involved in the adaptation of Staphylococcus aureus to cationic antimicrobial peptides. It consists of a membrane-bound histidine kinase, LytS, which belongs to the family of multiple transmembrane-spanning domains receptors, and a response regulator, LytR, which belongs to the novel family of non-helix-turn-helix DNA-binding domain proteins. LytR regulates the expression of cidABC and lrgAB operons, the gene products of which are involved in programmed cell death and lysis. In vivo studies have demonstrated involvement of two overlapping regulatory networks in regulating the lrgAB operon, both depending on LytR. One regulatory network responds to glucose metabolism and the other responds to changes in the cell membrane potential. Herein, we show that LytS has autokinase activity and can catalyze a fast phosphotransfer reaction, with 50% of its phosphoryl group lost within 1 minute of incubation with LytR. LytS has also phosphatase activity. Notably, LytR undergoes phosphorylation by acetyl phosphate at a rate that is 2-fold faster than the phosphorylation by LytS. This observation is significant in lieu of the in vivo observations that regulation of the lrgAB operon is LytR-dependent in the presence of excess glucose in the medium. The latter condition does not lead to perturbation of the cell membrane potential but rather to the accumulation of acetate in the cell. Our study provides insights into the molecular basis for regulation of lrgAB in a LytR-dependent manner under conditions that do not involve sensing by LytS. PMID:27127614

  16. Interleukins 2, 4, 7, and 15 stimulate tyrosine phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrates 1 and 2 in T cells. Potential role of JAK kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, J A; Wang, L M; Hanson, E P; Sun, X J; White, M F; Oakes, S A; Pierce, J H; O'Shea, J J

    1995-12-01

    The signaling molecules insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-1 and the newly described IRS-2 (4PS) molecule are major insulin and interleukin 4 (IL-4)-dependent phosphoproteins. We report here that IL-2, IL-7, and IL-15, as well as IL-4, rapidly stimulate the tyrosine phosphorylation of IRS-1 and IRS-2 in human peripheral blood T cells, NK cells, and in lymphoid cell lines. In addition, we show that the Janus kinases, JAK1 and JAK3, associate with IRS-1 and IRS-2 in T cells. Coexpression studies demonstrate that these kinases can tyrosine-phosphorylate IRS-2, suggesting a possible mechanism by which cytokine receptors may induce the tyrosine phosphorylation of IRS-1 and IRS-2. We further demonstrate that the p85 subunit of phosphoinositol 3-kinase associates with IRS-1 in response to IL-2 and IL-4 in T cells. Therefore, these data indicate that IRS-1 and IRS-2 may have important roles in T lymphocyte activation not only in response to IL-4, but also in response to IL-2, IL-7, and IL-15.

  17. Potential role of tetrandrine in cancer therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Yu-Jen

    2002-01-01

    Tetrandrine, a bisbenylisoquinoline alkaloid isolated from the dried root of Stephenia tetrandra S Moore, exhibits very broad pharmacological actions, including anti-tumor activity. The beneficial effects of tetrandrine on tumor cell cytotoxicity and radiosensitization, multidrug resistance, normal tissue radioprotection, and angiogenesis are most promising and deserve great attention. Tetrandrine has potential either as a tumoricidal agent or as an adjunct to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. To evaluate the potential clinical efficacy of tetrandrine for cancer therapy,more mechanism-based pharmacological, pharmacokinetic, and pharmacodynamic studies are required.

  18. Exploring the potential role of tungsten carbide cobalt (WC-Co) nanoparticle internalization in observed toxicity toward lung epithelial cells in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstead, Andrea L. [Biomaterials, Bioengineering and Nanotechnology Laboratory, Department of Orthopaedics, School of Medicine, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Pharmaceutical and Pharmacological Sciences Graduate Program, School of Pharmacy, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Arena, Christopher B. [Biomaterials, Bioengineering and Nanotechnology Laboratory, Department of Orthopaedics, School of Medicine, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); E.J. Van Liere Research Program, School of Medicine, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Li, Bingyun, E-mail: bili@hsc.wvu.edu [Biomaterials, Bioengineering and Nanotechnology Laboratory, Department of Orthopaedics, School of Medicine, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Pharmaceutical and Pharmacological Sciences Graduate Program, School of Pharmacy, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); E.J. Van Liere Research Program, School of Medicine, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Mary Babb Randolph Cancer Center, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Tungsten carbide cobalt (WC-Co) has been recognized as a workplace inhalation hazard in the manufacturing, mining and drilling industries by the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health. Exposure to WC-Co is known to cause “hard metal lung disease” but the relationship between exposure, toxicity and development of disease remain poorly understood. To better understand this relationship, the present study examined the role of WC-Co particle size and internalization on toxicity using lung epithelial cells. We demonstrated that nano- and micro-WC-Co particles exerted toxicity in a dose- and time-dependent manner and that nano-WC-Co particles caused significantly greater toxicity at lower concentrations and shorter exposure times compared to micro-WC-Co particles. WC-Co particles in the nano-size range (not micron-sized) were internalized by lung epithelial cells, which suggested that internalization may play a key role in the enhanced toxicity of nano-WC-Co particles over micro-WC-Co particles. Further exploration of the internalization process indicated that there may be multiple mechanisms involved in WC-Co internalization such as actin and microtubule based cytoskeletal rearrangements. These findings support our hypothesis that WC-Co particle internalization contributes to cellular toxicity and suggest that therapeutic treatments inhibiting particle internalization may serve as prophylactic approaches for those at risk of WC-Co particle exposure. - Highlights: • Hard metal (WC-Co) particle toxicity was established in lung epithelial cells. • Nano-WC-Co particles caused greater toxicity than micro-WC-Co particles. • Nano- and micro-WC-Co particles were capable of inducing cellular apoptosis. • Nano-WC-Co particles were internalized by lung epithelial cells. • WC-Co particle internalization was mediated by actin dynamics.

  19. Regulation of epithelium-specific Ets-like factors ESE-1 and ESE-3 in airway epithelial cells:potential roles in airway inflammation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Wu; Martin Post; A Keith Tanswell; Jim Hu; Rongqi Duan; Huibi Cao; Deborah Field; Catherine M Newnham; David R Koehler; Noe Zamel; Melanie A Pritchard; Paul Hertzog

    2008-01-01

    Airway inflammation is the hallmark of many respiratory disorders,such as asthma and cystic fibrosis.Changes in airway gene expression triggered by inflammation play a key role in the pathogenesis of these diseases.Genetic linkage studies suggest that ESE-2 and ESE-3,which encode epithelium-specific Ets-domain-containing transcription factors,are candidate asthma susceptibility genes.We report here that the expression of another member of the Ets family transcription factors ESE-1,as well as ESE-3,is upregulated by the inflammatory cytokines interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-a (TNF-a) in bronchial epithelial cell lines.Treatment of these cells with IL-1β and TNF-a resulted in a dramatic increase in mRNA expression for both ESE-1 and ESE-3.We demonstrate that the induced expression is mediated by activation of the transcription factor NF-kB.We have characterized the ESE-1 and ESE-3 promoters and have identified the NF-kB binding sequences that are required for the cytokine-induced expression.In addition,we also demonstrate that ESE-1 upregulates ESE-3 expression and downregulates its own induction by cytokines.Finally,we have shown that in Elf3 (homologous to human ESE-1) knockout mice,the expression of the inflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) is downregulated.Our findings suggest that ESE-1 and ESE-3 play an important role in airway inflammation.

  20. Exploring the potential role of tungsten carbide cobalt (WC-Co) nanoparticle internalization in observed toxicity toward lung epithelial cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstead, Andrea L; Arena, Christopher B; Li, Bingyun

    2014-07-01

    Tungsten carbide cobalt (WC-Co) has been recognized as a workplace inhalation hazard in the manufacturing, mining and drilling industries by the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health. Exposure to WC-Co is known to cause "hard metal lung disease" but the relationship between exposure, toxicity and development of disease remain poorly understood. To better understand this relationship, the present study examined the role of WC-Co particle size and internalization on toxicity using lung epithelial cells. We demonstrated that nano- and micro-WC-Co particles exerted toxicity in a dose- and time-dependent manner and that nano-WC-Co particles caused significantly greater toxicity at lower concentrations and shorter exposure times compared to micro-WC-Co particles. WC-Co particles in the nano-size range (not micron-sized) were internalized by lung epithelial cells, which suggested that internalization may play a key role in the enhanced toxicity of nano-WC-Co particles over micro-WC-Co particles. Further exploration of the internalization process indicated that there may be multiple mechanisms involved in WC-Co internalization such as actin and microtubule based cytoskeletal rearrangements. These findings support our hypothesis that WC-Co particle internalization contributes to cellular toxicity and suggest that therapeutic treatments inhibiting particle internalization may serve as prophylactic approaches for those at risk of WC-Co particle exposure. PMID:24746988

  1. Potential role of sirtuins in livestock production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghinis-Hozumi, Y; Antaramian, A; Villarroya, F; Piña, E; Mora, O

    2013-01-01

    Sirtuins are NAD(+)-dependent histone and protein deacetylases, which have been studied during the last decade with a focus on their role in lifespan extension and age-related diseases under normal and calorie-restricted or pathological conditions. However, sirtuins also have the ability to regulate energy homeostasis as they can sense the metabolic state of the cell through the NAD(+)/NADH ratio; hence, changes in the diet can modify the expression of these enzymes. Dietary manipulations are a common practice currently being used in livestock production with favorable results, probably due in part to the enhanced activity of sirtuins. Nevertheless, sirtuin expression in livestock species has not been a research target. For these reasons, the goal of this review is to awaken interest in these enzymes for future detailed characterization in livestock species by presenting a general introduction to what sirtuins are, how they work and what is known about their role in livestock. PMID:23031219

  2. A novel role for peptidylarginine deiminases in microvesicle release reveals therapeutic potential of PAD inhibition in sensitizing prostate cancer cells to chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharad Kholia

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Protein deimination, defined as the post-translational conversion of protein-bound arginine to citrulline, is carried out by a family of 5 calcium-dependent enzymes, the peptidylarginine deiminases (PADs and has been linked to various cancers. Cellular microvesicle (MV release, which is involved in cancer progression, and deimination have not been associated before. We hypothesize that elevated PAD expression, observed in cancers, causes increased MV release in cancer cells and contributes to cancer progression. Background: We have previously reported that inhibition of MV release sensitizes cancer cells to chemotherapeutic drugs. PAD2 and PAD4, the isozymes expressed in patients with malignant tumours, can be inhibited with the pan-PAD-inhibitor chloramidine (Cl-am. We sought to investigate whether Cl-am can inhibit MV release and whether this pathway could be utilized to further increase the sensitivity of cancer cells to drug-directed treatment. Methods: Prostate cancer cells (PC3 were induced to release high levels of MVs upon BzATP stimulation of P2X7 receptors. Western blotting with the pan-protein deimination antibody F95 was used to detect a range of deiminated proteins in cells stimulated to microvesiculate. Changes in deiminated proteins during microvesiculation were revealed by immunoprecipitation and immunoblotting, and mass spectrometry identified deiminated target proteins with putative roles in microvesiculation. Conclusion: We report for the first time a novel function of PADs in the biogenesis of MVs in cancer cells. Our results reveal that during the stimulation of prostate cancer cells (PC3 to microvesiculate, PAD2 and PAD4 expression levels and the deimination of cytoskeletal actin are increased. Pharmacological inhibition of PAD enzyme activity using Cl-am significantly reduced MV release and abrogated the deimination of cytoskeletal actin. We demonstrated that combined Cl-am and methotrexate (MTX treatment of

  3. The potential role of functional inhibition of T regulatory cells by anti-TGFβ antibody in photodynamic therapy of renal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mroz, Pawel; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2011-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been shown to be an effective locally ablative anti-cancer treatment that has the additional advantage of inducing tumor-directed immune response. We hypothesized that PDT could be combined with anti-transforming growth factor (TGF) beta antibody that does not significantly affect the population of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) but at the same time, has the potential to decrease the immunosuppressive effects of regulatory T-cells (Treg) mediated by TGF beta. This hypothesis was tested with aTGF-beta antibody combined with BPD-mediated PDT in a BALB/c renal cell carcinoma model. Evidence of positive benefits of the combination therapy over individual treatments alone was obtained.

  4. Holy Basil Leaf Extract Decreases Tumorigenicity and Metastasis of Aggressive Human Pancreatic Cancer Cells in vitro and in vivo: Potential Role in Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Tomohiro; Torres, María P.; Chakraborty, Subhankar; Souchek, Joshua J.; Rachagani, Satyanarayana; Kaur, Sukhwinder; Macha, Muzafar; Ganti, Apar K.; Hauke, Ralph J; Batra, Surinder K.

    2013-01-01

    There is an urgent need to develop alternative therapies against lethal pancreatic cancer (PC). Ocimum sanctum (“Holy Basil”) has been used for thousands of years in traditional Indian medicine, but its anti-tumorigenic effect remains largely unexplored. Here, we show that extracts of O. sanctum leaves inhibit the proliferation, migration, invasion, and induce apoptosis of PC cells in vitro. The expression of genes that promote the proliferation, migration and invasion of PC cells including activated ERK-1/2, FAK, and p65 (subunit of NF-κB), was downregulated in PC cells after O. sanctum treatment. Intraperitoneal injections of the aqueous extract significantly inhibited the growth of orthotopically transplanted PC cells in vivo (p<0.05). Genes that inhibit metastasis (E-cadherin) and induce apoptosis (BAD) were significantly upregulated in tumors isolated from mice treated with O. sanctum extracts, while genes that promote survival (Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL) and chemo/radiation resistance (AURKA, Chk1 and Survivin) were downregulated. Overall, our study suggests that leaves of O. sanctum could be a potential source of novel anticancer compounds in the future. PMID:23523869

  5. Holy Basil leaf extract decreases tumorigenicity and metastasis of aggressive human pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and in vivo: potential role in therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Tomohiro; Torres, María P; Chakraborty, Subhankar; Souchek, Joshua J; Rachagani, Satyanarayana; Kaur, Sukhwinder; Macha, Muzafar; Ganti, Apar K; Hauke, Ralph J; Batra, Surinder K

    2013-08-19

    There is an urgent need to develop alternative therapies against lethal pancreatic cancer (PC). Ocimum sanctum ("Holy Basil") has been used for thousands of years in traditional Indian medicine, but its anti-tumorigenic effect remains largely unexplored. Here, we show that extracts of O. sanctum leaves inhibit the proliferation, migration, invasion, and induce apoptosis of PC cells in vitro. The expression of genes that promote the proliferation, migration and invasion of PC cells including activated ERK-1/2, FAK, and p65 (subunit of NF-κB), was downregulated in PC cells after O. sanctum treatment. Intraperitoneal injections of the aqueous extract significantly inhibited the growth of orthotopically transplanted PC cells in vivo (psanctum extracts, while genes that promote survival (Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL) and chemo/radiation resistance (AURKA, Chk1 and Survivin) were downregulated. Overall, our study suggests that leaves of O. sanctum could be a potential source of novel anticancer compounds in the future. PMID:23523869

  6. Signaling mechanism by the Staphylococcus aureus two-component system LytSR: role of acetyl phosphate in bypassing the cell membrane electrical potential sensor LytS

    OpenAIRE

    Kevin Patel; Dasantila Golemi-Kotra

    2016-01-01

    The two-component system LytSR has been linked to the signal transduction of cell membrane electrical potential perturbation and is involved in the adaptation of Staphylococcus aureus to cationic antimicrobial peptides. It consists of a membrane-bound histidine kinase, LytS, which belongs to the family of multiple transmembrane-spanning domains receptors, and a response regulator, LytR, which belongs to the novel family of non-helix-turn-helix DNA-binding domain proteins. LytR regulates the e...

  7. Potential role of novel hepatocellular carcinoma-associated gene IDD01 in promoting tumorigenesis of HepG2 cell line

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xiang-yu; LI Jian-sheng; MA Jun; DUAN Fang-ling; ZHONG Peng

    2006-01-01

    Background We have used suppression subtractive hybridization to construct a subtracted cDNA library of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and isolated a panel of differential expression sequence tag (ESTs). By using bioinformatics and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE), we found a novel HCC-associated gene IDD01.To further investigate its function, a recombinant eukaryotic vector pEGFP/ORF was constructed and transfected into the HepG2 cell line.Methods The open reading frame (ORF) of IDD01 was amplified by RT-PCR, digested with Bamh I and Hind Ⅲ, and subcloned into the pEGFP-C 1 vector. The ligation reaction was conducted with T4 DNA ligase, and the recombinant vector was named pEGFP/ORF. Untransfer control (control group), pEGFP-C 1 (HepG2/C 1 group)and pEGFP/ORF (HepG2/ORF group) transfer groups were designed. Gene transfer was conducted with lipofectamine. To obtain stable transfection in HepG2 cells, selection was initiated with 500μg/ml G418. Cellular IDD01 mRNA levels were assayed by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. The MTT colorimetric method and flow cytometry were used to determine the cell proliferation. The tumorigenic potential of transformed cells was determined from their ability to grow as anchorage-independent colonies on soft agar. Transient transfections were performed to observe subcellular location of GFP-IDD01 fusion protein.Results A 778 bp specific band of ORF was obtained by RT-PCR, and the positive clone of recombinant plasmid pEGFP/ORF (5.5 Kb) was identified by restriction endonuclease cleavage and sequence. The brighmess ratio of IDD01 mRNA was not obvious between control and pEGFP/C1 groups, whereas the ratio of pEGFP/ORF was higher than that in the other two groups. After culture for 24-72 hours, the A490 values in pEGFP/ORF were higher than those in the other two groups (P<0.01). On histograms of flow cytometry, the S phase ratio of HepG2/ORF cells was significantly higher than that of the control and HepG2/C1 groups. The HepG2/ORF

  8. Potential role of NADPH oxidase in pathogenesis of pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-Li; Cao; Xiao-Hui; Xiang; Kai; Chen; Wei; Xu; Shi-Hai; Xia

    2014-01-01

    Studies have demonstrated that reactive oxygen species(ROS) are closely related to inflammatory disorders. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase(NOX), originally found in phagocytes, is the main source of ROS in nonphagocytic cells. Besides directly producing the detrimental highly reactive ROS to act on biomolecules(lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids), NOX can also activate multiple signal transduction pathways, which regulate cell growth, proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis by producing ROS. Recently, research on pancreatic NOX is no longer limited to inflammatory cells, but extends to the aspect of pancreatic acinar cells and pancreatic stellate cells, which are considered to be potentially associated with pancreatitis. In this review, we summarize the literature on NOX protein structure, activation, function and its role in the pathogenesis of pancreatitis.

  9. Myogenic potential of canine craniofacial satellite cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Maria Laura La Rovere

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The skeletal fibres have different embryological origin; the extraocular and jaw-closer muscles develop from prechordal mesoderm while the limb and trunk muscles from somites. These different origins characterise also the adult muscle stem cells, known as satellite cells (SCs and responsible for the fibre growth and regeneration. The physiological properties of presomitic SCs and their epigenetics are poorly studied despite their peculiar characteristics to preserve muscle integrity during chronic muscle degeneration. Here we isolated SCs from canine somitic (SDM: vastus lateralis, rectus abdominus, gluteus superficialis, biceps femoris, psoas and presomitic (PSDM: lateral rectus, temporalis and retractor bulbi muscles as myogenic progenitor cells from young and old animals. In addition, SDM and PSDM satellite cells were obtained also from Golden retrievers affected by muscular dystrophy (GRMD. We characterised the lifespan, the myogenic potential and functions and oxidative stress of both somitic and presomitic SCs with the aim to reveal differences with ageing and between healthy and dystrophic animals. The different proliferation rate was consistent with higher telomerase activity in PSDM-SCs compared to SDM-SCs, although restricted at early passages. SDM-SCs express early (Pax7, MyoD and late (MyHC, Myogenin myogenic markers differently from PSDM-SCs resulting in a more efficient and faster cell differentiation. Taken together our results showed that PSDM-SCs elicit a stronger stem cell phenotype compared to SDM ones. Finally, myomiR expression profile reveals a unique epigenetic signature in GRMD satellite cells and miR-206, highly expressed in dystrophic SCs, seems to play a critical role in muscle degeneration. Thus, miR-206 could represent a potential target for novel therapeutic approaches.

  10. Exosomes and Their Therapeutic Potentials of Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Chao Han; Xuan Sun; Ling Liu; Haiyang Jiang; Yan Shen; Xiaoyun Xu; Jie Li; Guoxin Zhang; Jinsha Huang; Zhicheng Lin; Nian Xiong; Tao Wang

    2015-01-01

    Exosomes, a group of vesicles originating from the multivesicular bodies (MVBs), are released into the extracellular space when MVBs fuse with the plasma membrane. Numerous studies indicate that exosomes play important roles in cell-to-cell communication, and exosomes from specific cell types and conditions display multiple functions such as exerting positive effects on regeneration in many tissues. It is widely accepted that the therapeutic potential of stem cells may be mediated largely by ...

  11. Exosomes and Their Therapeutic Potentials of Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Chao; Sun, Xuan; Liu, Ling; Jiang, Haiyang; Shen, Yan; Xu, Xiaoyun; Li, Jie; Zhang, Guoxin; Huang, Jinsha; Lin, Zhicheng; Xiong, Nian; Tao WANG

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes, a group of vesicles originating from the multivesicular bodies (MVBs), are released into the extracellular space when MVBs fuse with the plasma membrane. Numerous studies indicate that exosomes play important roles in cell-to-cell communication, and exosomes from specific cell types and conditions display multiple functions such as exerting positive effects on regeneration in many tissues. It is widely accepted that the therapeutic potential of stem cells may be mediated largely by ...

  12. Detection of clonal immunoglobulin gene rearrangements in the peripheral blood progenitor cells of patients with multiple myeloma: the potential role of purging with CD34 positive selection

    OpenAIRE

    Owen, R. G.; Haynes, A P; Evans, P A; R. J. Johnson; Rawstron, A. C.; McQuaker, G; Smith, G.M; Galvin, M. C.; Barnard, D L; Russell, N H; Child, J. A.; Morgan, G J

    1996-01-01

    Aims—To determine the extent of clonal cell contamination of peripheral blood progenitor cell (PBPC) collections in patients with multiple myeloma (MM) and to assess the purging efficacy of CD34 positive selection.

  13. The role of physiological elements in future therapies of rheumatoid arthritis. III. The role of the electromagnetic field in regulation of redox potential and life cycle of inflammatory cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajewski, Michał; Rzodkiewicz, Przemysław; Maśliński, Sławomir; Wojtecka-Łukasik, Elżbieta

    2015-01-01

    Each material consisting of charged particles can be influenced by a magnetic field. Polarized particles play an essential role in almost all physiological processes. Locally generated electromagnetic fields several physiological processes within the human body, for example: stimulation of nerves, muscles, and cardiac electrical activity. This phenomenon is used today in many medical applications. In this article, we discuss ways in which electromagnetic field affects the physiological and pathological processes in cells and tissues. This knowledge will help to better understand the electrophysiological phenomenon in connective tissue diseases and can bring new therapeutic strategies (in the form of "invisible drugs") for the treatment of rheumatic diseases?

  14. Endothelial potential of human embryonic stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Levenberg, Shulamit; Zoldan, Janet; Basevitch, Yaara; Langer, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Growing interest in using endothelial cells for therapeutic purposes has led to exploring human embryonic stem cells as a potential source for endothelial progenitor cells. Embryonic stem cells are advantageous when compared with other endothelial cell origins, due to their high proliferation capability, pluripotency, and low immunogenity. However, there are many challenges and obstacles to overcome before the vision of using embryonic endothelial progenitor cells in the clinic can be realize...

  15. Role of liver stem cells in hepatocarcinogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei-Bo; Xu; Chao; Liu

    2014-01-01

    Liver cancer is an aggressive disease with a high mortality rate. Management of liver cancer is strongly dependent on the tumor stage and underlying liver disease. Unfortunately, most cases are discovered when the cancer is already advanced, missing the opportunity for surgical resection. Thus, an improved understanding of the mechanisms responsible for liver cancer initiation and progression will facilitate the detection of more reliable tumor markers and the development of new small molecules for targeted therapy of liver cancer. Recently, there is increasing evidence for the "cancer stem cell hypothesis", which postulates that liver cancer originates from the malignant transformation of liver stem/progenitor cells(liver cancer stem cells). This cancer stem cell model has important significance for understanding the basic biology of liver cancer and has profound importance for the development of new strategies for cancer prevention and treatment. In this review, we highlight recent advances in the role of liver stem cells in hepatocarcinogenesis. Our review of the literature shows that identification of the cellular origin and the signaling pathways involved is challenging issues in liver cancer with pivotal implications in therapeutic perspectives. Although the dedifferentiation of mature hepatocytes/cholangiocytes in hepatocarcinogenesis cannot be excluded, neoplastic transformation of a stem cell subpopulation more easily explains hepatocarcinogenesis. Elimination of liver cancer stem cells in liver cancer could result in the degeneration of downstream cells, which makes them potential targets for liver cancer therapies. Therefore, liver stem cells could represent a new target for therapeutic approaches to liver cancer in the near future.

  16. Potential targets for lung squamous cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Researchers have identified potential therapeutic targets in lung squamous cell carcinoma, the second most common form of lung cancer. The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Research Network study comprehensively characterized the lung squamous cell carcinoma gen

  17. Involvement of gap junctions between smooth muscle cells in sustained hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction development: a potential role for 15-HETE and 20-HETE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kizub, Igor V; Lakhkar, Anand; Dhagia, Vidhi; Joshi, Sachindra R; Jiang, Houli; Wolin, Michael S; Falck, John R; Koduru, Sreenivasulu Reddy; Errabelli, Ramu; Jacobs, Elizabeth R; Schwartzman, Michal L; Gupte, Sachin A

    2016-04-15

    In response to hypoxia, the pulmonary artery normally constricts to maintain optimal ventilation-perfusion matching in the lung, but chronic hypoxia leads to the development of pulmonary hypertension. The mechanisms of sustained hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) remain unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the role of gap junctions (GJs) between smooth muscle cells (SMCs) in the sustained HPV development and involvement of arachidonic acid (AA) metabolites in GJ-mediated signaling. Vascular tone was measured in bovine intrapulmonary arteries (BIPAs) using isometric force measurement technique. Expression of contractile proteins was determined by Western blot. AA metabolites in the bath fluid were analyzed by mass spectrometry. Prolonged hypoxia elicited endothelium-independent sustained HPV in BIPAs. Inhibition of GJs by 18β-glycyrrhetinic acid (18β-GA) and heptanol, nonspecific blockers, and Gap-27, a specific blocker, decreased HPV in deendothelized BIPAs. The sustained HPV was not dependent on Ca(2+) entry but decreased by removal of Ca(2+) and by Rho-kinase inhibition with Y-27632. Furthermore, inhibition of GJs decreased smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (SM-MHC) expression and myosin light chain phosphorylation in BIPAs. Interestingly, inhibition of 15- and 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (HETE) synthesis decreased HPV in deendothelized BIPAs. 15-HETE- and 20-HETE-stimulated constriction of BIPAs was inhibited by 18β-GA and Gap-27. Application of 15-HETE and 20-HETE to BIPAs increased SM-MHC expression, which was also suppressed by 18β-GA and by inhibitors of lipoxygenase and cytochrome P450 monooxygenases. More interestingly, 15,20-dihydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid and 20-OH-prostaglandin E2, novel derivatives of 20-HETE, were detected in tissue bath fluid and synthesis of these derivatives was almost completely abolished by 18β-GA. Taken together, our novel findings show that GJs between SMCs are involved in the sustained HPV in BIPAs, and

  18. Cell-specific activation and detoxification of benzene metabolites in mouse and human bone marrow: Identification of target cells and a potential role for modulation of apoptosis in benzene toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, D.; Siegel, D.; Schattenberg, D.G. [Univ. of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Denver, CO (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-01

    The role of cell-specific metabolism in benzene toxicity was examined in both murine and human bone marrow. Hemopoietic progenitor cells and stromal cells are important control points for regulation of hemopoiesis. We show that the selective toxicity of hydroquinone at the level of the macrophage in murine bone marrow stroma may be explained by a high peroxidase/nicotanimicle adenine dinucleotide phosphate, reduced [NAD(P)H]:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1) ratio. Peroxidases metabolize hydroquinone to the reactive 1,4-benzoquinone, whereas NQO1 reduces the quinones formed, resulting in detoxification. Peroxidase and NQO1 activity in human stromal cultures vary as a function of time in culture, with peroxidase activity decreasing and NQO1 activity increasing with time. Peroxidase activity and, more specifically, myeloperoxidase, which had previously been considered to be expressed at the promyelocyte level, was detected in murine lineage-negative and human CD34{sup +} progenitor cells. This provides a metabolic mechanism whereby phenolic metabolites of benzene can be bioactivated in progenitor cells, which are considered initial target cells for the development of leukemias. Consequences of a high peroxidase/NQO1 ratio in HL-60 cells were shown to include hydroquinone-induced apoptosis. Hydroquinone can also inhibit proteases known to play a role in induction of apoptosis, suggesting that it may be able to inhibit apoptosis induced by other stimuli. Modulation of apoptosis may lead to aberrant hemopoiesis and neoplastic progression. This enzyme-directed approach has identified target cells of the phenolic metabolites of benzene in bone marrow and provided a metabolic basis for benzene-induced toxicity at the level of the progenitor cell in both murine and human bone marrow. 60 refs., 8 figs.

  19. Enhanced expression of extracellular calcium sensing receptor in monocyte-differentiated versus undifferentiated HL-60 cells: potential role in regulation of a nonselective cation channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, T.; Ye, C.; Chattopadhyay, N.; Sanders, J. L.; Vassilev, P. M.; Brown, E. M.; O'Malley, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    Human promyelocytic leukemia cells (HL-60) have been used widely as a model for studying the differentiation of hematopoietic progenitor cells in vitro. After treatment with phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) or 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) [1,25(OH)(2)D(3)], HL-60 cells differentiate into cells with the phenotype of monocytes/macrophages. We previously showed that peripheral blood monocytes and the murine J774 monocytic cell line express the CaR, and myeloid progenitors in the bone marrow and myeloid cells in peripheral blood other than monocytes express lower levels of the CaR. Therefore, we investigated whether undifferentiated HL-60 cells express a functional G protein-coupled, extracellular calcium (Ca(2+)(o))-sensing receptor (CaR) and if the expression of the CaR increases as these cells differentiate along the monocytic lineage. The use of reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with CaR-specific primers, followed by sequencing of the amplified products, identified an authentic CaR transcript in undifferentiated HL-60 cells. Both immunocytochemistry and Western blot analysis using a CaR-specific antiserum detected low levels of CaR protein expression in undifferentiated HL-60 cells. The levels of CaR protein increased considerably following treatment of the cells with PMA (50 nM) or 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) (100 nM) for 5 days. Northern analysis using a CaR-specific riboprobe identified CaR transcripts in undifferentiated HL-60 cells, but CaR mRNA levels did not change appreciably after treatment with either agent, suggesting that upregulation of CaR protein occurs at a translational level. PMA-treated HL-60 cells expressed a nonselective cation channel (NCC), and the calcimimetic CaR activator, NPS R-467, but not its less active stereoisomer, NPS S-467, as well as the polycationic CaR agonist, neomycin, activated this NCC, demonstrating that the CaR expressed in these cells is functionally active. Therefore, HL-60 cells exhibit an increase in Ca

  20. The potential role of SOCS-3 in the interleukin-1beta-induced desensitization of insulin signaling in pancreatic beta-cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emanuelli, Brice; Glondu, Murielle; Filloux, Chantal;

    2004-01-01

    ) proteins as well as phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) activation, and that this action is not due to the IL-1beta-dependent nitric oxide (NO) production in RINm5F cells. We next analyzed if suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS)-3, which can be induced by multiple cytokines and which we identified......Defects in insulin secretion, resulting from loss of function or destruction of pancreatic beta-cells, trigger diabetes. Interleukin (IL)-1beta is a proinflammatory cytokine that is involved in type 1 and type 2 diabetes development and impairs beta-cell survival and function. Because effective...... insulin signaling is required for the optimal beta-cell function, we assessed the effect of IL-1beta on the insulin pathway in a rat pancreatic beta-cell line. We show that IL-1beta decreases insulin-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of the insulin receptor (IR) and insulin receptor substrate (IRS...

  1. Cell-type specific photoreceptors and light signaling pathways in the multicellular green alga volvox carteri and their potential role in cellular differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Kianianmomeni, Arash

    2015-01-01

    The formation of multicellular organisms requires genetically predefined signaling pathways in various cell types. Besides differences in size, energy balance and life time, cell types should be enable to modulate appropriate developmental and adaptive responses in ever-changing surrounding environment. One of the most important environmental cues is light which regulates a variety of physiological and cellular processes. During evolution, diverse light-sensitive proteins, so-called photorece...

  2. Potential of optical design in tandem micromorph silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krc, J.; Campa, A.; Smole, F.; Topic, M.

    2006-04-01

    The potential of three advanced optical designs in tandem micromorph silicon solar cells are analysed by means of optical simulations: enhanced light scattering, intermediate reflector (interlayer) and antireflective coating (ARC) on glass. The effects on quantum efficiency, QE, and short circuit current density, J SC, of the top and bottom cell are investigated. In case of enhanced light scattering, the role of haze parameter and angular distribution function of scattered light is analysed separately. High haze parameter improves light trapping in top and bottom cell. However, the improvement in QE and J SC of the bottom cell is limited at higher haze parameters due to increased absorption in top cell and increased optical losses in realistic textured ZnO/Ag back contact. Broad ADF plays an important role for improving the performances of both, top and bottom cell. The role of refractive index of an interlayer between top and bottom cell is analysed. Significant increases in QE and J SC of the top cell are revealed for small refractive indexes of the interlayer (n cell is observed. Optimisation of thickness and refractive index of a single-layer ARC on glass is carried out in order to obtain maximal J SC either in top or in bottom cell. Moderate increases in J SC and QE are obtained for optimised ARC parameters. Among the three optical designs, the greatest potential, considering the improvements in both cells, is revealed for enhanced light scattering.

  3. Therapeutic potential of mesenchymal stem cell-derived microvesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biancone, Luigi; Bruno, Stefania; Deregibus, Maria Chiara; Tetta, Ciro; Camussi, Giovanni

    2012-08-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that mesenchymal stem cells have the capacity to reverse acute and chronic kidney injury in different experimental models by paracrine mechanisms. This paracrine action may be accounted for, at least in part, by microvesicles (MVs) released from mesenchymal stem cells, resulting in a horizontal transfer of mRNA, microRNA and proteins. MVs, released as exosomes from the endosomal compartment, or as shedding vesicles from the cell surface, are now recognized as being an integral component of the intercellular microenvironment. By acting as vehicles for information transfer, MVs play a pivotal role in cell-to-cell communication. This exchange of information between the injured cells and stem cells has the potential to be bi-directional. Thus, MVs may either transfer transcripts from injured cells to stem cells, resulting in reprogramming of their phenotype to acquire specific features of the tissue, or conversely, transcripts could be transferred from stem cells to injured cells, restraining tissue injury and inducing cell cycle re-entry of resident cells, leading to tissue self-repair. Upon administration with a therapeutic regimen, MVs mimic the effect of mesenchymal stem cells in various experimental models by inhibiting apoptosis and stimulating cell proliferation. In this review, we discuss whether MVs released from mesenchymal stem cells have the potential to be exploited in novel therapeutic approaches in regenerative medicine to repair damaged tissues, as an alternative to stem cell-based therapy. PMID:22851627

  4. Latent progenitor cells as potential regulators for tympanic membrane regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seung Won; Kim, Jangho; Seonwoo, Hoon; Jang, Kyung-Jin; Kim, Yeon Ju; Lim, Hye Jin; Lim, Ki-Taek; Tian, Chunjie; Chung, Jong Hoon; Choung, Yun-Hoon

    2015-06-01

    Tympanic membrane (TM) perforation, in particular chronic otitis media, is one of the most common clinical problems in the world and can present with sensorineural healing loss. Here, we explored an approach for TM regeneration where the latent progenitor or stem cells within TM epithelial layers may play an important regulatory role. We showed that potential TM stem cells present highly positive staining for epithelial stem cell markers in all areas of normal TM tissue. Additionally, they are present at high levels in perforated TMs, especially in proximity to the holes, regardless of acute or chronic status, suggesting that TM stem cells may be a potential factor for TM regeneration. Our study suggests that latent TM stem cells could be potential regulators of regeneration, which provides a new insight into this clinically important process and a potential target for new therapies for chronic otitis media and other eardrum injuries.

  5. AMPK inhibits MTDH expression via GSK3β and SIRT1 activation: potential role in triple negative breast cancer cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gollavilli, Paradesi Naidu; Kanugula, Anantha Koteswararao; Koyyada, Rajeswari; Karnewar, Santosh; Neeli, Praveen Kumar; Kotamraju, Srigiridhar

    2015-10-01

    Recent studies have highlighted the involvement of metadherin (MTDH), an oncogenic protein, in promoting cancer progression, metastasis and chemoresistance in many cancers including mammary carcinomas. However, the molecular regulation of MTDH is still not completely understood. In this study we document that AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation-induced anti-proliferative effects are, in part, mediated by inhibiting MTDH expression in MDA-MB-231 and BT-549 triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) cells. 5-Aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide (AICAR), an AMPK activator, caused growth arrest, inhibition of migration and invasion of TNBC cells. Intriguingly, AICAR or metformin treatment resulted in significant downregulation of MTDH expression via inhibiting c-Myc expression. In contrast, treatment of cells with compound C, an inhibitor of AMPK, increased both c-Myc and MTDH expressions in TNBC cells. Also, AMPK activation caused increased glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) activity by inhibiting the inactive phosphorylation at Ser9, on the one hand, and activation of sirtuin1 (SIRT1) by inhibiting Ser47 phosphorylation, as evidenced by deacetylation of p53, on the other hand. Moreover, AMPK-induced GSK3β and SIRT1 activities were found to be responsible for inhibiting c-Myc-mediated upregulation of MTDH, as LiCl (an inhibitor of GSK3β) and EX-527 (an inhibitor of SIRT1) reversed AICAR-mediated downregulation of c-Myc and MTDH expressions. Similar results were observed with siSIRT1 treatment. Furthermore, AICAR and EX-527 treatments caused increased cell death under MTDH-depleted conditions. Finally, we uncovered a novel regulation of MTDH expression and showed that AMPK activation by inducing GSK3β and SIRT1 downregulates MTDH expression via inhibiting c-Myc in TNBC cells. PMID:26236947

  6. The role of cytokines in immunological tolerance: potential for therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harber, M; Sundstedt, A; Wraith, D

    2000-11-27

    Current immunosuppression protocols, although often effective, are nonspecific and therefore hazardous. Consequently, immunological tolerance that is antigen specific and does not globally depress the patient's immune system has become one of the Holy Grails of immunology. Since the discovery that cytokines have immunomodulatory effects, extensive research has investigated the potential of these molecules to induce and maintain specific immunological tolerance in the context of transplantation, allergy and autoimmunity. In this article, we review the possible mechanisms by which cytokines can modulate the immune response and the animal models that frequently confound the theory that a single cytokine, or group of cytokines, can induce tolerance in a predictable manner. Finally, we discuss the role of cytokines at a paracrine level, particularly in the context of inducing and maintaining antigen-specific, regulatory T cells with the clinical potential to suppress specific immune responses.

  7. Potential Role of Activating Transcription Factor 5 during Osteogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Vicari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Human adipose-derived stem cells are an abundant population of stem cells readily isolated from human adipose tissue that can differentiate into connective tissue lineages including bone, cartilage, fat, and muscle. Activating transcription factor 5 is a transcription factor of the ATF/cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB family. It is transcribed in two types of mRNAs (activating transcription factor 5 isoform 1 and activating transcription factor 5 isoform 2, encoding the same single 30-kDa protein. Although it is well demonstrated that it regulates the proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis, little is known about its potential role in osteogenic differentiation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the expression levels of the two isoforms and protein during osteogenic differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells. Our data indicate that activating transcription factor 5 is differentially expressed reaching a peak of expression at the stage of bone mineralization. These findings suggest that activating transcription factor 5 could play an interesting regulatory role during osteogenesis, which would provide a powerful tool to study bone physiology.

  8. KRAS Genotype Correlates with Proteasome Inhibitor Ixazomib Activity in Preclinical In Vivo Models of Colon and Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Potential Role of Tumor Metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nibedita Chattopadhyay

    Full Text Available In non-clinical studies, the proteasome inhibitor ixazomib inhibits cell growth in a broad panel of solid tumor cell lines in vitro. In contrast, antitumor activity in xenograft tumors is model-dependent, with some solid tumors showing no response to ixazomib. In this study we examined factors responsible for ixazomib sensitivity or resistance using mouse xenograft models. A survey of 14 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC and 6 colon xenografts showed a striking relationship between ixazomib activity and KRAS genotype; tumors with wild-type (WT KRAS were more sensitive to ixazomib than tumors harboring KRAS activating mutations. To confirm the association between KRAS genotype and ixazomib sensitivity, we used SW48 isogenic colon cancer cell lines. Either KRAS-G13D or KRAS-G12V mutations were introduced into KRAS-WT SW48 cells to generate cells that stably express activated KRAS. SW48 KRAS WT tumors, but neither SW48-KRAS-G13D tumors nor SW48-KRAS-G12V tumors, were sensitive to ixazomib in vivo. Since activated KRAS is known to be associated with metabolic reprogramming, we compared metabolite profiling of SW48-WT and SW48-KRAS-G13D tumors treated with or without ixazomib. Prior to treatment there were significant metabolic differences between SW48 WT and SW48-KRAS-G13D tumors, reflecting higher oxidative stress and glucose utilization in the KRAS-G13D tumors. Ixazomib treatment resulted in significant metabolic regulation, and some of these changes were specific to KRAS WT tumors. Depletion of free amino acid pools and activation of GCN2-eIF2α-pathways were observed both in tumor types. However, changes in lipid beta oxidation were observed in only the KRAS WT tumors. The non-clinical data presented here show a correlation between KRAS genotype and ixazomib sensitivity in NSCLC and colon xenografts and provide new evidence of regulation of key metabolic pathways by proteasome inhibition.

  9. KRAS Genotype Correlates with Proteasome Inhibitor Ixazomib Activity in Preclinical In Vivo Models of Colon and Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Potential Role of Tumor Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Nibedita; Berger, Allison J; Koenig, Erik; Bannerman, Bret; Garnsey, James; Bernard, Hugues; Hales, Paul; Maldonado Lopez, Angel; Yang, Yu; Donelan, Jill; Jordan, Kristen; Tirrell, Stephen; Stringer, Bradley; Xia, Cindy; Hather, Greg; Galvin, Katherine; Manfredi, Mark; Rhodes, Nelson; Amidon, Ben

    2015-01-01

    In non-clinical studies, the proteasome inhibitor ixazomib inhibits cell growth in a broad panel of solid tumor cell lines in vitro. In contrast, antitumor activity in xenograft tumors is model-dependent, with some solid tumors showing no response to ixazomib. In this study we examined factors responsible for ixazomib sensitivity or resistance using mouse xenograft models. A survey of 14 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and 6 colon xenografts showed a striking relationship between ixazomib activity and KRAS genotype; tumors with wild-type (WT) KRAS were more sensitive to ixazomib than tumors harboring KRAS activating mutations. To confirm the association between KRAS genotype and ixazomib sensitivity, we used SW48 isogenic colon cancer cell lines. Either KRAS-G13D or KRAS-G12V mutations were introduced into KRAS-WT SW48 cells to generate cells that stably express activated KRAS. SW48 KRAS WT tumors, but neither SW48-KRAS-G13D tumors nor SW48-KRAS-G12V tumors, were sensitive to ixazomib in vivo. Since activated KRAS is known to be associated with metabolic reprogramming, we compared metabolite profiling of SW48-WT and SW48-KRAS-G13D tumors treated with or without ixazomib. Prior to treatment there were significant metabolic differences between SW48 WT and SW48-KRAS-G13D tumors, reflecting higher oxidative stress and glucose utilization in the KRAS-G13D tumors. Ixazomib treatment resulted in significant metabolic regulation, and some of these changes were specific to KRAS WT tumors. Depletion of free amino acid pools and activation of GCN2-eIF2α-pathways were observed both in tumor types. However, changes in lipid beta oxidation were observed in only the KRAS WT tumors. The non-clinical data presented here show a correlation between KRAS genotype and ixazomib sensitivity in NSCLC and colon xenografts and provide new evidence of regulation of key metabolic pathways by proteasome inhibition.

  10. Therapeutic potential of amniotic fluid stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulrazzak, Hassan; De Coppi, Paolo; Guillot, Pascale V

    2013-03-01

    Human amniotic fluid cells have been used traditionally as a diagnostic tool for genetic anomalies. More recently it has been recognized that amniotic fluid contains populations of stem cells. Mesenchymal stem cells (AFMSC) were first to be described. These cells are able to differentiate towards mesodermal lineages. More recently cells with broader potential, defined as amniotic fluid stem cells (AFSC), were also isolated. They have intermediate characteristics between embryonic and adult stem cells and are able to differentiate into lineages representative of all three germ layers but unlike ES cells they do not form tumours in vivo. Furthermore, AFSC have been reverted to functional pluripotency in a transgene-free approach using an epigenetics modifier. These characteristics, together with absence of ethical issues concerning their employment, have made stem cells from amniotic fluid a promising candidate for cell therapy and tissue engineering.

  11. Adipose-derived stem cells cooperate with fractional carbon dioxide laser in antagonizing photoaging: a potential role of Wnt and β-catenin signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Xiao; Wang, Hong-yi; Zhang, Yu; Liu, Yang; Li, Yan-qi; Tao, Kai; Wu, Chu-Tse; Jin, Ji-De; Liu, Xiao-Yan

    2014-01-01

    Background It is well established that adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) produce and secrete cytokines/growth factors that antagonize UV-induced photoaging of skin. However, the exact molecular basis underlying the anti-photoaging effects exerted by ADSCs is not well understood, and whether ADSCs cooperate with fractional carbon dioxide (CO2) laser to facilitate photoaging skin healing process has not been explored. Here, we investigated the impacts of ADSCs on photoaging in a photoaging ani...

  12. Antiferroelectric-to-Ferroelectric Switching in CH3NH3PbI3 Perovskite and Its Potential Role in Effective Charge Separation in Perovskite Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sewvandi, Galhenage A.; Hu, Dengwei; Chen, Changdong; Ma, Hao; Kusunose, Takafumi; Tanaka, Yasuhiro; Nakanishi, Shunsuke; Feng, Qi

    2016-08-01

    Perovskite solar cells (PSCs) often suffer from large performance variations which impede to define a clear charge-transfer mechanism. Ferroelectric polarization is measured numerically using CH3NH3PbI3 (M A PbI3 ) pellets to overcome the measurement issues such as pinholes and low uniformity of thickness, etc., with M A PbI3 thin films. M A PbI3 perovskite is an antiferroelectric semiconductor which is different from typical semiconducting materials and ferroelectric materials. The effect of polarization carrier separation on the charge-transfer mechanism in the PSCs is elucidated by using the results of ferroelectric and structural studies on the perovskite. The ferroelectric polarization contributes to an inherent carrier-separation effect and the I - V hysteresis. The ferroelectric and semiconducting synergistic charge-separation effect gives an alternative category of solar cells, ferroelectric semiconductor solar cells. Our findings identify the ferroelectric semiconducting behavior of the perovskite absorber as being significant to the improvement of the ferroelectric PSCs performances in future developments.

  13. Plasmacytoid dendritic cell role in cutaneous malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadeh, Dana; Kurban, Mazen; Abbas, Ossama

    2016-07-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) correspond to a specialized dendritic cell population that exhibit plasma cell morphology, express CD4, CD123, HLA-DR, blood-derived dendritic cell antigen-2 (BDCA-2), and Toll-like receptor (TLR)7 and TLR9 within endosomal compartments. Through their production of type I interferons (IFNs) and other pro-inflammatory cytokines, pDCs provide anti-viral resistance and link the innate and adaptive immunity by controlling the function of myeloid DCs, lymphocytes, and natural killer (NK) cells. While lacking from normal skin, pDCs are usually recruited to the skin in several cutaneous pathologies where they appear to be involved in the pathogenesis of several infectious, inflammatory/autoimmune, and neoplastic entities. Among the latter group, pDCs have the potential to induce anti-tumour immunity; however, the complex interaction of pDCs with tumor cells and their micro-environment appears to contribute to immunologic tolerance. In this review, we aim at highlighting the role played by pDCs in cutaneous malignancies with special emphasis on the underlying mechanisms.

  14. Metallothioneins in human tumors and potential roles in carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherian, M. George; Jayasurya, A.; Bay, Boon-Huat

    2003-12-10

    Metallothioneins (MT) are a group of low-molecular weight, cysteine rich intracellular proteins, which are encoded by a family of genes containing at least 10 functional isoforms in human. The expression and induction of these proteins have been associated with protection against DNA damage, oxidative stress and apoptosis. Moreover, MT may potentially activate certain transcriptional factors by donating zinc. Although MT is a cytosolic protein in resting cells, it can be translocated transiently to the cell nucleus during cell proliferation and differentiation. A number of studies have shown an increased expression of MT in various human tumors of the breast, colon, kidney, liver, lung, nasopharynx, ovary, prostate, salivary gland, testes, thyroid and urinary bladder. However, MT is down-regulated in certain tumors such as hepatocellular carcinoma and liver adenocarcinoma. Hence, the expression of MT is not universal to all human tumors, but may depend on the differentiation status and proliferative index of tumors, along with other tissue factors and gene mutations. In certain tumors such as germ cell carcinoma, the expression of MT is closely related to the tumor grade and proliferative activity. Increased expression of MT has also been observed in less differentiated tumors. Thus, expression of MT may be a potential prognostic marker for certain tumors. There are few reports on the expression of the different isoforms of MT which have been analyzed by specific gene probes. They reveal that certain isoforms are expressed in specific cell types. The factors which can influence MT induction in human tumors are not yet understood. Down-regulation of MT synthesis in hepatic tumors may be related to hypermethylation of the MT-promoter or mutation of other genes such as the p53 tumor suppressor gene. In vitro studies using human cancer cells suggest a possible role for p53 and the estrogen-receptor on the expression and induction of MT in epithelial neoplastic cells

  15. Metallothioneins in human tumors and potential roles in carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metallothioneins (MT) are a group of low-molecular weight, cysteine rich intracellular proteins, which are encoded by a family of genes containing at least 10 functional isoforms in human. The expression and induction of these proteins have been associated with protection against DNA damage, oxidative stress and apoptosis. Moreover, MT may potentially activate certain transcriptional factors by donating zinc. Although MT is a cytosolic protein in resting cells, it can be translocated transiently to the cell nucleus during cell proliferation and differentiation. A number of studies have shown an increased expression of MT in various human tumors of the breast, colon, kidney, liver, lung, nasopharynx, ovary, prostate, salivary gland, testes, thyroid and urinary bladder. However, MT is down-regulated in certain tumors such as hepatocellular carcinoma and liver adenocarcinoma. Hence, the expression of MT is not universal to all human tumors, but may depend on the differentiation status and proliferative index of tumors, along with other tissue factors and gene mutations. In certain tumors such as germ cell carcinoma, the expression of MT is closely related to the tumor grade and proliferative activity. Increased expression of MT has also been observed in less differentiated tumors. Thus, expression of MT may be a potential prognostic marker for certain tumors. There are few reports on the expression of the different isoforms of MT which have been analyzed by specific gene probes. They reveal that certain isoforms are expressed in specific cell types. The factors which can influence MT induction in human tumors are not yet understood. Down-regulation of MT synthesis in hepatic tumors may be related to hypermethylation of the MT-promoter or mutation of other genes such as the p53 tumor suppressor gene. In vitro studies using human cancer cells suggest a possible role for p53 and the estrogen-receptor on the expression and induction of MT in epithelial neoplastic cells

  16. Therapeutic potential of adult stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serakinci, Nedime; Keith, W. Nicol

    2006-01-01

    lineages are an attractive alternative to human embryonic stem cells (hES) in regenerative medicine. In many countries, present legislation surrounding hES cells makes their use problematic, and indeed the origin of hES cells may represent a controversial issue for many communities. However, adult stem...... is the necessity to be able to identify, select, expand and manipulate cells outside the body. Recent advances in adult stem cell technologies and basic biology have accelerated therapeutic opportunities aimed at eventual clinical applications. Adult stem cells with the ability to differentiate down multiple...... cells are not subject to these issues. This review will therefore focus on adult stem cells. Based on their extensive differentiation potential and, in some cases, the relative ease of their isolation, adult stem cells are appropriate for clinical development. Recently, several observations suggest...

  17. Understanding migraine: Potential role of neurogenic inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Rakesh Malhotra

    2016-01-01

    Neurogenic inflammation, a well-defined pathophysiologial process is characterized by the release of potent vasoactive neuropeptides, predominantly calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), substance P (SP), and neurokinin A from activated peripheral nociceptive sensory nerve terminals (usually C and A delta-fibers). These peptides lead to a cascade of inflammatory tissue responses including arteriolar vasodilation, plasma protein extravasation, and degranulation of mast cells in their peripher...

  18. Expression Patterns and Potential Biological Roles of Dip2a.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luqing Zhang

    Full Text Available Disconnected (disco-interacting protein 2 homolog A is a member of the DIP2 protein family encoded by Dip2a gene. Dip2a expression pattern has never been systematically studied. Functions of Dip2a in embryonic development and adult are not known. To investigate Dip2a gene expression and function in embryo and adult, a Dip2a-LacZ mouse model was generated by insertion of β-Gal cDNA after Dip2a promoter using CRISPR/Cas9 technology. Dip2a-LacZ mouse was designed to be a lacZ reporter mouse as well as a Dip2a knockout mouse. Heterozygous mice were used to study endogenous Dip2a expression and homozygotes to study DIP2A-associated structure and function. LacZ staining indicated that Dip2a is broadly expressed in neuronal, reproductive and vascular tissues, as well as in heart, kidney, liver and lung. Results demonstrate that Dip2a is expressed in ectoderm-derived tissues in developing embryos. Adult tissues showed rich staining in neurons, mesenchymal, endothelial, smooth muscle cells and cardiomyocytes by cell types. The expression pattern highly overlaps with FSTL1 and supports previous report that DIP2A to be potential receptor of FSTL1 and its protective roles of cardiomyocytes. Broad and intense embryonic and adult expression of Dip2a has implied their multiple structural and physiological roles.

  19. Mesenchymal stem cells: cell biology and potential use in therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kassem, Moustapha; Kristiansen, Malthe; Abdallah, Basem M

    2004-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells are clonogenic, non-haematopoietic stem cells present in the bone marrow and are able to differentiate into multiple mesoderm-type cell lineages e.g. osteoblasts, chondrocytes, endothelial-cells and also non-mesoderm-type lineages e.g. neuronal-like cells. Several methods...... are currently available for isolation of the mesenchymal stem cells based on their physical and immunological characteristics. Because of the ease of their isolation and their extensive differentiation potential, mesenchymal stem cells are among the first stem cell types to be introduced in the clinic. Recent...... studies have demonstrated that the life span of mesenchymal stem cells in vitro can be extended by increasing the levels of telomerase expression in the cells and thus allowing culture of large number of cells needed for therapy. In addition, it has been shown that it is possible to culture the cells...

  20. Review of UK fuel cell. Commercial potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-11-15

    The advancement of fuel cell technology in recent years has made commercial viability a reality in many disciplines in the UK. The Carbon Trust and the Department of Trade and Industry have jointly undertaken a study to facilitate and encourage the penetration of fuel cells into the commercial market both at home and overseas. This document summarises the findings of the study and concludes that stationary fuel cells have the greatest potential for market stimulation.

  1. Daclatasvir: potential role in hepatitis C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee C

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Choongho Lee College of Pharmacy, Dongguk University-Seoul, Goyang, Republic of Korea  Abstract: Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is responsible for the development of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. It has been a tremendous burden on global health care systems. With the advent of a number of new direct-acting and host-targeting antiviral agents, current interferon-α- and ribavirin-based HCV therapy has started to move towards an interferon-sparing or even interferon-free strategy. In this regard, a recently identified NS5A inhibitor, daclatasvir, showed a great promise in clinical trials as another new class of direct-acting anti-HCV therapeutics, with a distinct mechanism of action. In this review, a variety of preclinical as well as clinical proof-of-concept studies of daclatasvir, including the studies of its discovery, mechanism of action, viral resistance, and host polymorphism profiles are reviewed. In addition, a role of daclatasvir in the future therapy for HCV patients is discussed briefly. Keywords: hepatitis C virus, nonstructural protein 5A, NS5A inhibitor, hepatitis C treatment

  2. Magnesium: Potential Roles in Neurovascular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason J Chang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Magnesium therapy has been studied extensively in pre-clinical and clinical trials in multiple organ systems. Cerebrovascular diseases are particularly likely to benefit from its neuroprotective properties. This review summarizes current studies of magnesium in a wide range of neurovascular diseases.Methods: We searched relevant terms in the National Library of Medicine PubMed database and selected research including basic science, translational reports, meta-analyses, and clinical studies.Results: Studies examining magnesium administration in ischemic stroke have failed to show any benefit in clinical outcome. Data on magnesium for intracerebral hemorrhage is limited. Preliminary investigations in subarachnoid hemorrhage were promising, but definitive studies did not reveal differences in clinical outcome between magnesium and placebo-treated groups. Studies examining magnesium administration in global ischemia following cardiac arrest suggest a trend toward improved clinical outcome. The strongest evidence for clinically relevant neuroprotection following magnesium administration derives from studies of pre-term infants and patients undergoing cardiac bypass and carotid endarterectomy procedures. Magnesium was found to have an excellent safety profile across all investigations.Conclusions: Magnesium is easy to administer and possesses a favorable safety profile. Its utility as a neuroprotectant in cardiac surgery, carotid enderaterectomy, and pre-term infant hypoxia remain promising. Value as a therapeutic agent in ischemic stroke, intracerebral hemorrhage and subarachnoid hemorrhage is unclear and appears to be limited by late administration. Ongoing clinical trials assessing magnesium administration in the first hours following symptom onset may help clarify the role of magnesium therapy in these disease processes.

  3. In vitro cell motility as a potential mesenchymal stem cell marker for multipotency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertolo, Alessandro; Gemperli, Armin; Gruber, Marco; Gantenbein, Benjamin; Baur, Martin; Pötzel, Tobias; Stoyanov, Jivko

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are expected to have a fundamental role in future cell-based therapies because of their high proliferative ability, multilineage potential, and immunomodulatory properties. Autologous transplantations have the "elephant in the room" problem of wide donor variability, reflected by variability in MSC quality and characteristics, leading to uncertain outcomes in the use of these cells. We propose life imaging as a tool to characterize populations of human MSCs. Bone marrow MSCs from various donors and in vitro passages were evaluated for their in vitro motility, and the distances were correlated to the adipogenic, chondrogenic, and osteogenic differentiation potentials and the levels of senescence and cell size. Using life-image measuring of track lengths of 70 cells per population for a period of 24 hours, we observed that slow-moving cells had the higher proportion of senescent cells compared with fast ones. Larger cells moved less than smaller ones, and spindle-shaped cells had an average speed. Both fast cells and slow cells were characterized by a low differentiation potential, and average-moving cells were more effective in undergoing all three lineage differentiations. Furthermore, heterogeneity in single cell motility within a population correlated with the average-moving cells, and fast- and slow-moving cells tended toward homogeneity (i.e., a monotonous moving pattern). In conclusion, in vitro cell motility might be a useful tool to quickly characterize and distinguish the MSC population's differentiation potential before additional use. PMID:25473086

  4. The Role of Flavonoids as Potential Radioprotectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Investigations for effective and non toxic compounds with radioprotection capability led to increasing interest in naturally occurring antioxidants since most of known chemical radioprotectors (AET, WR2721, WR 1065, etc.) express toxic side effects that limit their use in medical practice. Among the promissing compounds there are flavonoids, whosentioxidant activity is based on ability of direct free radicals scavenging or stabilizing the reactive oxygen species (ROS) by interacting with the reactive compound of the radical. Because of the high reactivity of the hydroxyl substituents of flavonoids, radicals are made inactive. Flavonoids can also increase the function of the endogenous antioxidant enzyme systems: superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GR) and gluthation. Antioxidant effects may be also a combined result of radical scavenging and interaction with enzyme functions. Flavonoids induce activities of the immune system as well. Increased hematopoietic activity could account for the improved hematopoietic tolerance to radiotherapy. In this study we evaluated radioprotective effects of selected flavonoids (caffeic acid, chrysin, naringin and quercetin) administered to mice prior to whole-body irradiation with γ-rays (absorbed dose was 9 Gy). The survival analysis and alkaline comet assay on white blood cells were employed both on irradiated and non-irradiated animals. Blood samples were taken 30 min. after irradiation. Appropriate negative and positive control groups (administered chemical radioprotector AET, S-(2-Aminoethyl) isothiouronium bromide hydrobromide, i. p. at a dose of 281 mg kg-1 body weight) were also selected and handled in the same manner. We observed statistically significant difference in surviving time of mice pre-treated with test components and the most effective radioprotector was quercetin. Tested flavonoids were not genotoxic to non-irradiated mice and offered good

  5. Extracellular Vesicles: Role in Inflammatory Responses and Potential Uses in Vaccination in Cancer and Infectious Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, João Henrique; Soares, Rodrigo Pedro; Ribeiro, Kleber; Cronemberger Andrade, André; Batista, Wagner Luiz; Torrecilhas, Ana Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Almost all cells and organisms release membrane structures containing proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids called extracellular vesicles (EVs), which have a wide range of functions concerning intercellular communication and signaling events. Recently, the characterization and understanding of their biological role have become a main research area due to their potential role in vaccination, as biomarkers antigens, early diagnostic tools, and therapeutic applications. Here, we will overview the recent advances and studies of Evs shed by tumor cells, bacteria, parasites, and fungi, focusing on their inflammatory role and their potential use in vaccination and diagnostic of cancer and infectious diseases. PMID:26380326

  6. Potential Role of Epigenetic Mechanism in Manganese Induced Neurotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarale, Prashant; Chakrabarti, Tapan; Sivanesan, Saravanadevi; Naoghare, Pravin; Bafana, Amit; Krishnamurthi, Kannan

    2016-01-01

    Manganese is a vital nutrient and is maintained at an optimal level (2.5–5 mg/day) in human body. Chronic exposure to manganese is associated with neurotoxicity and correlated with the development of various neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease. Oxidative stress mediated apoptotic cell death has been well established mechanism in manganese induced toxicity. Oxidative stress has a potential to alter the epigenetic mechanism of gene regulation. Epigenetic insight of manganese neurotoxicity in context of its correlation with the development of parkinsonism is poorly understood. Parkinson's disease is characterized by the α-synuclein aggregation in the form of Lewy bodies in neuronal cells. Recent findings illustrate that manganese can cause overexpression of α-synuclein. α-Synuclein acts epigenetically via interaction with histone proteins in regulating apoptosis. α-Synuclein also causes global DNA hypomethylation through sequestration of DNA methyltransferase in cytoplasm. An individual genetic difference may also have an influence on epigenetic susceptibility to manganese neurotoxicity and the development of Parkinson's disease. This review presents the current state of findings in relation to role of epigenetic mechanism in manganese induced neurotoxicity, with a special emphasis on the development of Parkinson's disease. PMID:27314012

  7. Potential Role of Epigenetic Mechanism in Manganese Induced Neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarale, Prashant; Chakrabarti, Tapan; Sivanesan, Saravanadevi; Naoghare, Pravin; Bafana, Amit; Krishnamurthi, Kannan

    2016-01-01

    Manganese is a vital nutrient and is maintained at an optimal level (2.5-5 mg/day) in human body. Chronic exposure to manganese is associated with neurotoxicity and correlated with the development of various neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease. Oxidative stress mediated apoptotic cell death has been well established mechanism in manganese induced toxicity. Oxidative stress has a potential to alter the epigenetic mechanism of gene regulation. Epigenetic insight of manganese neurotoxicity in context of its correlation with the development of parkinsonism is poorly understood. Parkinson's disease is characterized by the α-synuclein aggregation in the form of Lewy bodies in neuronal cells. Recent findings illustrate that manganese can cause overexpression of α-synuclein. α-Synuclein acts epigenetically via interaction with histone proteins in regulating apoptosis. α-Synuclein also causes global DNA hypomethylation through sequestration of DNA methyltransferase in cytoplasm. An individual genetic difference may also have an influence on epigenetic susceptibility to manganese neurotoxicity and the development of Parkinson's disease. This review presents the current state of findings in relation to role of epigenetic mechanism in manganese induced neurotoxicity, with a special emphasis on the development of Parkinson's disease. PMID:27314012

  8. Porifera Lectins: Diversity, Physiological Roles and Biotechnological Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Gardères

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available An overview on the diversity of 39 lectins from the phylum Porifera is presented, including 38 lectins, which were identified from the class of demosponges, and one lectin from the class of hexactinellida. Their purification from crude extracts was mainly performed by using affinity chromatography and gel filtration techniques. Other protocols were also developed in order to collect and study sponge lectins, including screening of sponge genomes and expression in heterologous bacterial systems. The characterization of the lectins was performed by Edman degradation or mass spectrometry. Regarding their physiological roles, sponge lectins showed to be involved in morphogenesis and cell interaction, biomineralization and spiculogenesis, as well as host defense mechanisms and potentially in the association between the sponge and its microorganisms. In addition, these lectins exhibited a broad range of bioactivities, including modulation of inflammatory response, antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities, as well as anticancer and neuromodulatory activity. In view of their potential pharmacological applications, sponge lectins constitute promising molecules of biotechnological interest.

  9. Potential effects of CRM1 inhibition in mantle cell lymphoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ke-Jie Zhang; Michael Wang

    2012-01-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is an aggressive histotype of B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma.The disease has no known cure,which prompts the urgent need for novel therapeutic agents.Chromosomal region maintenance 1 (CRM1) may play a role in human neoplasia and serve as a novel target of cancer treatment.This study summarizes MCL pathogenesis and determines the involvement of CRM1 in the regulation of several vital signaling pathways contributing to MCL pathogenesis,including the pathways of cell cycle progression,DNA damage response,phosphoinositide kinase-3,nuclear factor-κB activation,and chromosomal stability.A preclinical study is also presented to compare the CRM1 status in MCL cell lines and primary MCL cells with normal B cells,as well as the therapeutic efficiency of CRM1 inhibition in MCL in vitro and in vivo,which make these agents potential targets of novel MCL treatments.

  10. Role of Exosome Shuttle RNA in Cell-to-Cell Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Peng, Peng; Shen, Keng

    2016-08-01

    There are several ways that transpire in cell-to-cell communication,with or without cell contact. Exosomes play an important role in cell-to-cell communication,which do not need cell contact,as that can result in a relatively long-distance influence. Exosome contains RNA components including mRNA and micro-RNA,which are protected by exosomes rigid membranes. This allows those components be passed long distance through the circulatory system. The mRNA components are far different from their donor cells,and the micro-RNA components may reflect the cell they originated. In this article we review the role of exosomes in cell-to-cell communication,with particular focus on their potentials in both diagnostic and therapeutic applications. PMID:27594165

  11. Potential cell-specific functions of CXCR4 in atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Christian; Döring, Yvonne; Noels, Heidi

    2016-05-10

    The chemokine CXCL12 and its receptor CXCR4 form an important axis contributing to cellular functions in homeostasis and disease. In addition, the atypical CXCL12 receptor CXCR7 may shape the availability and function of CXCL12. Further to their role through progenitor cell mobilization, CXCL12 and CXCR4 may affect native atherogenesis by modifying atherosclerosis-relevant cellular functions. This short review intends to provide a concise summary of current knowledge with regards to cell-specific functions of CXCL12 and its receptors CXCR4 and CXCR7 with potential implications for the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis. PMID:25586789

  12. Expression and Fuactional Role of HERG1, K+ Channels in Leukemic Cells and Leukemic Stem Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Huiyu; LIU Liqiong; GUO Tiannan; ZHANG Jiahua; LI Xiaoqing; DU Wen; LIU Wei; CHEN Xiangjun; HUANG Shi'ang

    2007-01-01

    In order to investigate the expression and functional role of HERG1 K+ channels in leukemic cells and leukemic stem cells (LSCs), RT-PCR was used to detect the HERG1 K+ channels expression in leukemic cells and LSCs. The functional role of HERG1 K+ channels in leukemic cell proliferation was measured by MTT assay, and cell cycle and apoptosis were analyzed by flow cytometry. The results showed that herg mRNA was expressed in CD34+/CD38-, CD123+ LSCs but not in circulating CD34+ cells. Herg mRNA was also up-regulated in leukemia cell lines K562 and HL60 as well as almost all the primary leukemic cells while not in normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNCs) and the expression of herg mRNA was not associated with the clinical and cytogenetic features of leukemia. In addition, leukemic cell proliferation was dramatically inhibited by HERG K+ channel special inhibitor E-4031. Moreover, E-4031 suppressed the cell growth by inducing a specific block at the G1/S transition phase of the cell cycle but had no effect on apoptosis in leukemic cells. The results suggested that HERG1 K+ channels could regulate leukemic cells proliferation and were necessary for leukemic cells to proceed with the cell cycle. HERG1 K+ channels may also have oncogenic potential and may be a biomarker for diagnosis of leukemia and a novel potential pharmacological target for leukemia therapy.

  13. Modelling Action Potential Generation and Propagation in Fibroblastic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, J. J.; Cornelisse, L. N.; Harks, E. G. A.; Theuvenet, A. P. R.; Ypey, D. L.

    2003-04-01

    Using a standard Hodgkin-Huxley (HH) formalism, we present a mathematical model for action potential (AP) generation and intercellular AP propagation in quiescent (serum-deprived) normal rat kidney (NRK) fibroblasts [1], based on the recent experimental identification of the ion channels involved [2]. The principal ion channels described are those of an inwardly rectifying K+ conductance (GKIR), an L-type calcium conductance (GCaL), an intracellular calcium activated Cl- conductance (GCl(Ca)), a residual leak conductance Gleak, and gap junctional channels between the cells (Ggj). The role of each one of these components in the particular shape of the AP wave-form has been analyzed and compared with experimental observations. In addition, we have studied the role of subcellular processes like intracellular calcium dynamics and calcium buffering in AP generation. AP propagation between cells was reconstructed in a hexagonal model of cells coupled by Ggj with physiological conductance values. The model revealed an excitability mechanism of quiescent NRK cells with a particular role of intracellular calcium dynamics. It allows further explorations of the mechanism of signal generation and transmission in NRK cell cultures and its dependence on growth conditions.

  14. Roles of transient receptor potential channels in pain

    OpenAIRE

    Cheryl L Stucky; Dubin, Adrienne E.; Jeske, Nathaniel A; Malin, Sacha A.; McKemy, David D.; Gina M Story

    2008-01-01

    Pain perception begins with the activation of primary sensory nociceptors. Over the past decade, flourishing research has revealed that members of the Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) ion channel family are fundamental molecules that detect noxious stimuli and transduce a diverse range of physical and chemical energy into action potentials in somatosensory nociceptors. Here we highlight the roles of TRP vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), TRP melastatin 8 (TRPM8) and TRP ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) in the activatio...

  15. Survivin: Potential role in diagnosis, prognosis and targeted therapy of gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ting-Ting Wang; Xiao-Ping Qian; Bao-Rui Liu

    2007-01-01

    Survivin is a protein that is highly expressed in a vast number of malignancies, but is minimally expressed in normal tissues. It plays a role as an inhibitor of cell death in cancer cells, thus facilitating the growth of these cells.Tn the case of gastric cancer, survivin is over-expressed in tumor cells and plays a role in the carcinogenesis process. Several studies on gastric cancer have indicated that there is a relationship between survivin expression and the ultimate behavior of the carcinoma. Since the expression pattern of survivin is selective to cancer cells,it has been described as an "ideal target" for cancer therapy. Currently, several pre-clinical and clinical trials are on-going to investigate the effects of interfering with survivin function in cancer cells as a biologic therapy. Survivin is a potentially significant protein in the diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of gastric tumors.

  16. The Potential Role of Artificial Intelligence Technology in Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Abdel-Badeeh M.

    The field of Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Education has traditionally a technology-based focus, looking at the ways in which AI can be used in building intelligent educational software. In addition AI can also provide an excellent methodology for learning and reasoning from the human experiences. This paper presents the potential role of AI in…

  17. Conceptualising the Potential Role of L1 in CLIL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Angel M. Y.

    2015-01-01

    Content and language integrated learning (CLIL) is a rapidly growing area of both research and practice in all parts of the world, especially in Europe and Asia. As a young discipline, CLIL has a good potential of distinguishing itself from monolingual L2 immersion education models by becoming more flexible and balanced about the role of L1 in…

  18. Role of Sodium Channel on Cardiac Action Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. H. Sabzpoushan

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Sudden cardiac death is a major cause of death worldwide. In most cases, it's caused by abnormal action potential propagation that leads to cardiac arrhythmia. The aim of this article is to study the abnormal action potential propagation through sodium ion concentration variations. We use a new electrophysiological model that is both detailed and computationally efficient. This efficient model is based on the partial differential equation method. The central finite difference method is used for numerical solving of the two-dimensional (2D wave propagation equation. Simulations are implemented in two stages, as a single cardiac cell and as a two-dimensional grid of cells. In both stages, the normal action potential formation in case of a single cell and it's normal propagation in case of a two-dimensional grid of cells were simulated with nominal sodium ion conductance. Then, the effect of sodium ion concentration on the action potential signal was studied by reducing the sodium ion conductance. It is concluded that reducing the sodium ion conductance, decreases both passing ability and conduction velocity of the action potential wave front.

  19. Biosensoric potential of microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, György; Kovács, Tamás; Rákhely, Gábor; Czeller, Miklós

    2016-08-01

    Recent progress in microbial fuel cell (MFC) technology has highlighted the potential of these devices to be used as biosensors. The advantages of MFC-based biosensors are that they are phenotypic and can function in either assay- or flow-through formats. These features make them appropriate for contiguous on-line monitoring in laboratories and for in-field applications. The selectivity of an MFC biosensor depends on the applied microorganisms in the anodic compartment where electron transfer (ET) between the artificial surface (anode) and bacterium occurs. This process strongly determines the internal resistance of the sensoric system and thus influences signal outcome and response time. Despite their beneficial characteristics, the number of MFC-based biosensoric applications has been limited until now. The aim of this mini-review is to turn attention to the biosensoric potential of MFCs by summarizing ET mechanisms on which recently established and future sensoric devices are based. PMID:27401925

  20. Integrative analyses of gene expression and DNA methylation profiles in breast cancer cell line models of tamoxifen-resistance indicate a potential role of cells with stem-like properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, Xue; Li, Jian; Yin, Guangliang;

    2013-01-01

    Development of resistance to tamoxifen is an important clinical issue in the treatment of breast cancer. Tamoxifen resistance may be the result of acquisition of epigenetic regulation within breast cancer cells, such as DNA methylation, resulting in changed mRNA expression of genes pivotal for es...

  1. The role of local field potential coupling in epileptic synchronization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiongxing Wu; Heng Yang; Yufeng Peng; Liangjuan Fang; Wen Zheng; Zhi Song

    2013-01-01

    This review hopes to clearly explain the following viewpoints: (1) Neuronal synchronization underlies brain functioning, and it seems possible that blocking excessive synchronization in an epileptic neural network could reduce or even control seizures. (2) Local field potential coupling is a very common phenomenon during synchr in networks. Removal of neurons or neuronal networks that are coupled can significantly alter the extracellular field potential. Interventions of coupling mediated by local field potentials could result in desynchronization of epileptic seizures. (3) The synchronized electrical activity generated by neurons is sensitive to changes in the size of the extracellular space, which affects the efficiency of field potential transmission and the threshold of cell excitability. (4) Manipulations of the field potential fluctuations could help block synchronization at seizure onset.

  2. Decursin Isolated from Angelica gigas Nakai Rescues PC12 Cells from Amyloid β-Protein-Induced Neurotoxicity through Nrf2-Mediated Upregulation of Heme Oxygenase-1: Potential Roles of MAPK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Decursin (D, purified from Angelica gigas Nakai, has been proven to exert neuroprotective property. Previous study revealed that D reduced Aβ25‒35-induced cytotoxicity in PC12 cells. Our study explored the underlying mechanisms by which D mediates its therapeutic effects in vitro. Pretreatment of cells with D diminished intracellular generation of ROS in response to Aβ25‒35. Western blot revealed that D significantly increased the expression and activity of HO-1, which was correlated with its protection against Aβ25‒35-induced injury. Addition of ZnPP, an HO-1 competitive inhibitor, significantly attenuated its protective effect in Aβ25‒35-treated cells, indicating the vital role of HO-1 resistance to oxidative injury. Moreover, D induced Nrf2 nuclear translocation, the upstream of HO-1 expression. While investigating the signaling pathways responsible for HO-1 induction, D activated ERK and dephosphorylated p38 in PC12 cells. Addition of U0126, a selective inhibitor of ERK, blocked D-induced Nrf2 activation and HO-1 induction and meanwhile reversed the protection of D against Aβ25‒35-induced cell death. These findings suggest D augments cellular antioxidant defense capacity through both intrinsic free radical scavenging activity and activation of MAPK signal pathways that leads to Nrf2 activation, and subsequently HO-1 induction, thereby protecting the PC12 cells from Aβ25‒35-induced oxidative cytotoxicity.

  3. Normal chemotaxis in Dictyostelium discoideum cells with a depolarized plasma membrane potential

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijn, Bert van; Vogelzang, Sake A.; Ypey, Dirk L.; Molen, Loek G. van der; Haastert, Peter J.M. van

    1990-01-01

    We examined a possible role for the plasma membrane potential in signal transduction during cyclic AMP-induced chemotaxis in the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum. Chemotaxis, cyclic GMP and cyclic AMP responses in cells with a depolarized membrane potential were measured. Cells can be co

  4. A common signaling pathway is activated in erythroid cells expressing high levels of fetal hemoglobin: a potential role for cAMP-elevating agents in β-globin disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikuta T

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Tohru Ikuta,1 Yuichi Kuroyanagi,1 Nadine Odo,1 Siyang Liu21Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine, 2Department of Physiology, Medical College of Georgia, Georgia Regents University, Augusta, GA, USABackground: Although erythroid cells prepared from fetal liver, cord blood, or blood from β-thalassemia patients are known to express fetal hemoglobin at high levels, the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. We previously showed that cyclic nucleotides such as cAMP and cGMP induce fetal hemoglobin expression in primary erythroid cells. Here we report that cAMP signaling contributes to high-level fetal hemoglobin expression in erythroid cells prepared from cord blood and β-thalassemia.Methods: The status of the cAMP signaling pathway was investigated using primary erythroid cells prepared from cord blood and the mononuclear cells of patients with β-thalassemia; erythroid cells from adult bone marrow mononuclear cells served as the control.Results: We found that intracellular cAMP levels were higher in erythroid cells from cord blood and β-thalassemia than from adult bone marrow. Protein kinase A activity levels and cAMP-response element binding protein phosphorylation were higher in erythroid cells from cord blood or β-thalassemia than in adult bone marrow progenitors. Mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways, which play a role in fetal hemoglobin expression, were not consistently activated in cord blood or β-thalassemia erythroid cells. When cAMP signaling was activated in adult erythroid cells, fetal hemoglobin was induced at high levels and associated with reduced expression of BCL11A, a silencer of the β-globin gene.Conclusion: These results suggest that activated cAMP signaling may be a common mechanism among erythroid cells with high fetal hemoglobin levels, in part because of downregulation of BCL11A. Activation of the cAMP signaling pathway with cAMP-elevating agents may prove to be an important signaling mechanism to

  5. Therapeutic Potential of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Regenerative Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devang M. Patel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are stromal cells that have the ability to self-renew and also exhibit multilineage differentiation into both mesenchymal and nonmesenchymal lineages. The intrinsic properties of these cells make them an attractive candidate for clinical applications. MSCs are of keen interest because they can be isolated from a small aspirate of bone marrow or adipose tissues and can be easily expanded in vitro. Moreover, their ability to modulate immune responses makes them an even more attractive candidate for regenerative medicine as allogeneic transplant of these cells is feasible without a substantial risk of immune rejection. MSCs secrete various immunomodulatory molecules which provide a regenerative microenvironment for a variety of injured tissues or organ to limit the damage and to increase self-regulated tissue regeneration. Autologous/allogeneic MSCs delivered via the bloodstream augment the titers of MSCs that are drawn to sites of tissue injury and can accelerate the tissue repair process. MSCs are currently being tested for their potential use in cell and gene therapy for a number of human debilitating diseases and genetic disorders. This paper summarizes the current clinical and nonclinical data for the use of MSCs in tissue repair and potential therapeutic role in various diseases.

  6. Potential roles of optical interconnections within broadband switching modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalk, Gail R.; Habiby, Sarry F.; Hartman, Davis H.; Krchnavek, Robert R.; Wilson, Donald K.; Young, Kenneth C., Jr.

    1991-04-01

    An investigation of potential physical design bottlenecks in future broadband telecommunication switches has led to the identification of several areas where optical interconnections may play a role in the practical realization of required system performance. In the model used the speed and interconnection densities as well as requirements for ease-of-access and efficient power utilization challenge conventional partitioning and packaging strategies. Potential areas where optical interconnections may relieve some of the physical design bottlenecks include fiber management at the customer interface to the switch routing and distribution of high-density interconnections within the fabric of the switch and backplane interconnections to increase system throughput.

  7. The Potential Role for Fusion Power in Future Energy Markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: In order to explore the potential role for fusion in a future energy market, and clarify the conditions under which fusion may be important in different world regions, a global energy scenario model, based on the model generator TIMES supplied by the International Energy Agency, has been developed. The model covers the whole of this century and includes fusion technologies. Results are reported here. (author)

  8. Potential role of ticks as vectors of bluetongue virus

    OpenAIRE

    Bouwknegt, C.; Rijn, van, Michela; Schipper, J.M.J.; Holzel, D.R.; Boonstra, J.; Nijhof, A.; de, Rooij, R.; Jongejan, F.

    2010-01-01

    When the first outbreak of bluetongue virus serotype 8 (BTV8) was recorded in North-West Europe in August 2006 and renewed outbreaks occurred in the summer of 2007 and again in 2008, the question was raised how the virus survived the winter. Since most adult Culicoides vector midges are assumed not to survive the northern European winter, and transovarial transmission in Culicoides is not recorded, we examined the potential vector role of ixodid and argasid ticks for bluetongue virus. Four sp...

  9. Signaling mechanism by the Staphylococcus aureus two-component system LytSR: role of acetyl phosphate in bypassing the cell membrane electrical potential sensor LytS [version 2; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Patel

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The two-component system LytSR has been linked to the signal transduction of cell membrane electrical potential perturbation and is involved in the adaptation of Staphylococcus aureus to cationic antimicrobial peptides. It consists of a membrane-bound histidine kinase, LytS, which belongs to the family of multiple transmembrane-spanning domains receptors, and a response regulator, LytR, which belongs to the novel family of non-helix-turn-helix DNA-binding domain proteins. LytR regulates the expression of cidABC and lrgAB operons, the gene products of which are involved in programmed cell death and lysis. In vivo studies have demonstrated involvement of two overlapping regulatory networks in regulating the lrgAB operon, both depending on LytR. One regulatory network responds to glucose metabolism and the other responds to changes in the cell membrane potential. Herein, we show that LytS has autokinase activity and can catalyze a fast phosphotransfer reaction, with 50% of its phosphoryl group lost within 1 minute of incubation with LytR. LytS has also phosphatase activity. Notably, LytR undergoes phosphorylation by acetyl phosphate at a rate that is 2-fold faster than the phosphorylation by LytS. This observation is significant in lieu of the in vivo observations that regulation of the lrgAB operon is LytR-dependent in the presence of excess glucose in the medium. The latter condition does not lead to perturbation of the cell membrane potential but rather to the accumulation of acetate in the cell. Our study provides insights into the molecular basis for regulation of lrgAB in a LytR-dependent manner under conditions that do not involve sensing by LytS.

  10. Potential Role of Probiotics in Mechanism of Intestinal Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imran Rashid Rajput and Wei Fen Li*

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Probiotics are nonpathogenic bacteria exert a constructive influence on health or physiology of the host. Effect of probiotics in the intestinal defense against variety of diseases is well known. The probiotics are involved in the mechanism of intestinal defense, support as antagonist against pathogens, improve intestinal epithelial layer and boost the innate as well as adaptive immunity. However these responses are also exerted by intestinal components. The intestinal components as well as probiotics play a reciprocal role to enhance the immune response of the individual. The possibilities of mechanism of action include the stimulation of epithelial cells, activation of dendritic cells via toll-like receptors (TLRs, conversely produce cytokines. These observations reviewed together advocate that specific immunomodulatory properties of probiotic bacteria should be focusing on mechanism of action via antigen presenting cells (APC.

  11. Potential Role of Aminoprocalcitonin in the Pathogenesis of Alzheimer Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares, Eva; Antequera, Desiree; López-González, Irene; Ferrer, Isidro; Miñano, Francisco J; Carro, Eva

    2016-10-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that inflammatory responses cause brain atrophy and play a prominent and early role in the progression of Alzheimer disease. Recent findings show that the neuroendocrine peptide aminoprocalcitonin (NPCT) plays a critical role in the development of systemic inflammatory response; however, the presence, possible function, regulation, and mechanisms by which NPCT may be involved in Alzheimer disease neuropathology remain unknown. We explored the expression of NPCT and its interaction with amyloid-β (Aβ), and proinflammatory and neurogenic effects. By using brain samples of Alzheimer disease patients and APP/PS1 transgenic mice, we evaluated the potential role of NPCT on Aβ-related pathology. We found that NPCT is expressed in hippocampal and cortical neurons and Aβ-induced up-regulation of NPCT expression. Peripherally administered antibodies against NPCT decreased microglial activation, decreased circulating levels of proinflammatory cytokines, and prevented Aβ-induced neurotoxicity in experimental models of Alzheimer disease. Remarkably, anti-NPTC therapy resulted in a significant improvement in the behavioral status of APP/PS1 mice. Our results indicate a central role of NPCT in Alzheimer disease pathogenesis and suggest NPCT as a potential biomarker and therapeutic target. PMID:27497681

  12. Loss of Cell Adhesion Increases Tumorigenic Potential of Polarity Deficient Scribble Mutant Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indrayani Waghmare

    Full Text Available Epithelial polarity genes are important for maintaining tissue architecture, and regulating growth. The Drosophila neoplastic tumor suppressor gene scribble (scrib belongs to the basolateral polarity complex. Loss of scrib results in disruption of its growth regulatory functions, and downregulation or mislocalization of Scrib is correlated to tumor growth. Somatic scribble mutant cells (scrib- surrounded by wild-type cells undergo apoptosis, which can be prevented by introduction of secondary mutations that provide a growth advantage. Using genetic tools in Drosophila, we analyzed the phenotypic effects of loss of scrib in different growth promoting backgrounds. We investigated if a central mechanism that regulates cell adhesion governs the growth and invasive potential of scrib mutant cells. Here we show that increased proliferation, and survival abilities of scrib- cells in different genetic backgrounds affect their differentiation, and intercellular adhesion. Further, loss of scrib is sufficient to cause reduced cell survival, activation of the JNK pathway and a mild reduction of cell adhesion. Our data show that for scrib cells to induce aggressive tumor growth characterized by loss of differentiation, cell adhesion, increased proliferation and invasion, cooperative interactions that derail signaling pathways play an essential role in the mechanisms leading to tumorigenesis. Thus, our study provides new insights on the effects of loss of scrib and the modification of these effects via cooperative interactions that enhance the overall tumorigenic potential of scrib deficient cells.

  13. The potential application of stem cell in dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ketut Suardita

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells are generally defined as cells that have the capacity to self-renewal and differentiate to specialize cell. There are two kinds of stem cell, embryonic stem cell and adult stem cells. Stem cell therapy has been used to treat diseases including Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases, spinal cord injury, stroke, burns, heart diseases, diabetes, osteoarthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis. Stem cells were found in dental pulp, periodontal ligament, and alveolar bone marrow. Because of their potential in medical therapy, stem cells were used to regenerate lost or damage teeth and periodontal structures. This article discusses the potential application of stem cells for dental field.

  14. The potential role of electrolytic hydrogen in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The potential role of electrolytic hydrogen in Canada is assessed for the period 1980 to 2025 for large-scale uses only. Present uses of hydrogen, and specifically electrolytic hydrogen, are discussed briefly and hydrogen production processes are summarized. Only hydrogen derived from natural gas, coal, or electrolysis of sater are considered. Cost estimates of electrolytic hydrogen are obtained from a parametric equation, comparing values for unipolar water elecctrklyser technologies with those for bipolar electrolysers. Both by-products of electrolytic hydrogen production, namely heavy water and oxygen, are evaluated. Electrolytic hydrogen, based on non-fossil primary energy sources, is also considered as ankther 'liquid fuel option' for Canada along with the alcohols. The market potential for hydrogen in general and electrolytic hydrogen is assessed. Results show that the market potential for electrolytic hydrogen is large by the year 2025

  15. The Anticancer Activity of Organotelluranes: Potential Role in Integrin Inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberman, Alon; Kalechman, Yona; Hirsch, Shira; Erlich, Ziv; Sredni, Benjamin; Albeck, Amnon

    2016-05-17

    Organic Te(IV) compounds (organotelluranes) differing in their labile ligands exhibited anti-integrin activities in vitro and anti-metastatic properties in vivo. They underwent ligand substitution with l-cysteine, as a thiol model compound. Unlike inorganic Te(IV) compounds, the organotelluranes did not form a stable complex with cysteine, but rather immediately oxidized it. The organotelluranes inhibited integrin functions, such as adhesion, migration, and metalloproteinase secretion mediation in B16F10 murine melanoma cells. In comparison, a reduced derivative with no labile ligand inhibited adhesion of B16F10 cells to a significantly lower extent, thus pointing to the importance of the labile ligands of the Te(IV) atom. One of the organotelluranes inhibited circulating cancer cells in vivo, possibly by integrin inhibition. Our results extend the current knowledge on the reactivity and mechanism of organotelluranes with different labile ligands and highlight their clinical potential.

  16. Role of stem/progenitor cells in reparative disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pretheeban Thavaneetharajah

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Adult stem cells are activated to proliferate and differentiate during normal tissue homeostasis as well as in disease states and injury. This activation is a vital component in the restoration of function to damaged tissue via either complete or partial regeneration. When regeneration does not fully occur, reparative processes involving an overproduction of stromal components ensure the continuity of tissue at the expense of its normal structure and function, resulting in a “reparative disorder”. Adult stem cells from multiple organs have been identified as being involved in this process and their role in tissue repair is being investigated. Evidence for the participation of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs in the tissue repair process across multiple tissues is overwhelming and their role in reparative disorders is clearly demonstrated, as is the involvement of a number of specific signaling pathways. Transforming growth factor beta, bone morphogenic protein and Wnt pathways interact to form a complex signaling network that is critical in regulating the fate choices of both stromal and tissue-specific resident stem cells (TSCs, determining whether functional regeneration or the formation of scar tissue follows an injury. A growing understanding of both TSCs, MSCs and the complex cascade of signals regulating both cell populations have, therefore, emerged as potential therapeutic targets to treat reparative disorders. This review focuses on recent advances on the role of these cells in skeletal muscle, heart and lung tissues.

  17. 乳腺癌耐药细胞来源的Exosomes的分离鉴定及其在耐药传递中的作用%Extraction and identification of exosomes from drug-resistant breast cancer cells and their potential role in cell-to-cell drug-resistance transfer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许金金; 李文静; 钟山亮; 李秀娟; 陈志远; 胡清; 唐金海; 赵建华

    2014-01-01

    ) and doxorubicinresistant cells (MCF-7/ADM) can secrete Exosomes and their potential role in cell-cell drug-resistance transfer.Methods Exosomes were extracted from the cell culture supernatants of MCF-7/Doc and MCF-7/ ADM cells by fractionation ultracentrifugation,and were identified by transmission electron microscopy and Western blot analysis.GFP-MCF-7/S,a breast cancer parental sensitive cell line stably expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP),was constructed by recombinant lentiviral vector with GFP.Then the resistance experiment of cells and the experiment of resistance transfer by exosomes were designed to observe the phenomenon of cell-to-cell drug-resistance transfer.Results Similar to the breast cancer parental sensitive cells (MCF-7/S),the breast cancer resistant sublines could secrete exosomes,which exhibited round or elliptic shape ranging from 30 to 100 nm in diameter with intact membrane,and only expressed the protein marker of exosomes,Tsg101,did not express the endoplasmic reticulum marker calnexin.After MGF-7/S,MCF-7/DOC and MCF-7/ADM cells we cocultured with GFP-MCF-7/S cells for 72 h,there were no significant differences in the expression of fluorescence-labeled cells among the four groups.When treated by the drug ADM or DOC for24 hours,the MCF-7/DOC + GFP-MCF-7/S group was in favor of a significant higher survival rate of fluorescence-labeled cells compared with the MCF-7/S + GFP-MCF-7/S group (65.5% vs.25.5%,P < 0.001),and so did the MCF-7/ADM + GFP-MCF-7/S group (53.6% vs.25.4%,P < 0.001).The exosomes extracted from MCF-7/S,MCF-7/DOC and MCF-7/ADM cells were cultured with the GFP-MCF-7/S cells for 48 h.Among these groups,no significant differences in the expression of fluorescence-labeled cells were found.After treated by the drug ADM or DOC for 24 hours,the exosomes extracted from MCF-7/DOC + GFP-MCF-7/S group was associated with a significant higher survival rate of fluorescence-labeled cells compared with the exosomes extracted

  18. Angiogenic Potential of Human Neonatal Foreskin Stromal Cells in the Chick Embryo Chorioallantoic Membrane Model

    OpenAIRE

    Radhakrishnan Vishnubalaji; Muhammad Atteya; May Al-Nbaheen; Richard O. C. Oreffo; Abdullah Aldahmash; Alajez, Nehad M.

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated the multipotentiality of human neonatal foreskin stromal cells (hNSSCs) as being able to differentiate into adipocytes and osteoblasts and potentially other cell types. Recently, we demonstrated that hNSSCs play a role during in vitro angiogenesis and appear to possess a capacity to differentiate into endothelial-like cells; however, their angiogenic potential within an ex vivo environment remains unclear. Current study shows hNSSCs to display significant mig...

  19. Caspase-14 expression impairs retinal pigment epithelium barrier function: potential role in diabetic macular edema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beasley, Selina; El-Sherbiny, Mohamed; Megyerdi, Sylvia; El-Shafey, Sally; Choksi, Karishma; Kaddour-Djebbar, Ismail; Sheibani, Nader; Hsu, Stephen; Al-Shabrawey, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    We recently showed that caspase-14 is a novel molecule in retina with potential role in accelerated vascular cell death during diabetic retinopathy (DR). Here, we evaluated whether caspase-14 is implicated in retinal pigment epithelial cells (RPE) dysfunction under hyperglycemia. The impact of high glucose (HG, 30 mM D-glucose) on caspase-14 expression in human RPE (ARPE-19) cells was tested, which showed significant increase in caspase-14 expression compared with normal glucose (5 mM D-glucose + 25 mM L-glucose). We also evaluated the impact of modulating caspase-14 expression on RPE cells barrier function, phagocytosis, and activation of other caspases using ARPE-19 cells transfected with caspase-14 plasmid or caspase-14 siRNA. We used FITC-dextran flux assay and electric cell substrate impedance sensing (ECIS) to test the changes in RPE cell barrier function. Similar to HG, caspase-14 expression in ARPE-19 cells increased FITC-dextran leakage through the confluent monolayer and decreased the transcellular electrical resistance (TER). These effects of HG were prevented by caspase-14 knockdown. Furthermore, caspase-14 knockdown prevented the HG-induced activation of caspase-1 and caspase-9, the only activated caspases by HG. Phagocytic activity was unaffected by caspase-14 expression. Our results suggest that caspase-14 contributes to RPE cell barrier disruption under hyperglycemic conditions and thus plays a role in the development of diabetic macular edema. PMID:25121097

  20. Caspase-14 Expression Impairs Retinal Pigment Epithelium Barrier Function: Potential Role in Diabetic Macular Edema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selina Beasley

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We recently showed that caspase-14 is a novel molecule in retina with potential role in accelerated vascular cell death during diabetic retinopathy (DR. Here, we evaluated whether caspase-14 is implicated in retinal pigment epithelial cells (RPE dysfunction under hyperglycemia. The impact of high glucose (HG, 30 mM D-glucose on caspase-14 expression in human RPE (ARPE-19 cells was tested, which showed significant increase in caspase-14 expression compared with normal glucose (5 mM D-glucose + 25 mM L-glucose. We also evaluated the impact of modulating caspase-14 expression on RPE cells barrier function, phagocytosis, and activation of other caspases using ARPE-19 cells transfected with caspase-14 plasmid or caspase-14 siRNA. We used FITC-dextran flux assay and electric cell substrate impedance sensing (ECIS to test the changes in RPE cell barrier function. Similar to HG, caspase-14 expression in ARPE-19 cells increased FITC-dextran leakage through the confluent monolayer and decreased the transcellular electrical resistance (TER. These effects of HG were prevented by caspase-14 knockdown. Furthermore, caspase-14 knockdown prevented the HG-induced activation of caspase-1 and caspase-9, the only activated caspases by HG. Phagocytic activity was unaffected by caspase-14 expression. Our results suggest that caspase-14 contributes to RPE cell barrier disruption under hyperglycemic conditions and thus plays a role in the development of diabetic macular edema.

  1. Multilineage Potential Research of Bovine Amniotic Fluid Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuhua Gao

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The use of amnion and amniotic fluid (AF are abundant sources of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs that can be harvested at low cost and do not pose ethical conflicts. In human and veterinary research, stem cells derived from these tissues are promising candidates for disease treatment, specifically for their plasticity, their reduced immunogenicity, and high anti-inflammatory potential. This work aimed to obtain and characterize bovine amniotic fluid mesenchymal stem cells (AFMSC. The bovine AF from the amniotic cavity of pregnant gilts in the early stages of gestation (3- and 4-m-old bovine embryos was collected. AFMSCs exhibit a fibroblastic-like morphology only starting from the fourth passage, being heterogeneous during the primary culture. Immunofluorescence results showed that AFMSCs were positive for β-integrin, CD44, CD73 and CD166, but negative for CD34, CD45. Meanwhile, AFMSCs expressed ES cell markers, such as Oct4, and when appropriately induced, are capable of differentiating into ectodermal and mesodermal lineages. This study reinforces the emerging importance of these cells as ideal tools in veterinary medicine; future studies aimed at a deeper evaluation of their immunological properties will allow a better understanding of their role in cellular therapy.

  2. Role of transdermal potential difference during iontophoretic drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandrivskyy, Andriy; Bernjak, Alan; McClintock, Peter V E; Stefanovska, Aneta

    2004-09-01

    Potential differences have been measured during transdermal iontophoresis in order to establish the effect of voltage, as opposed to current, on cutaneous blood flow. It is known that, even in the absence of drugs, the iontophoresis current can sometimes produce increased blood flow. The role of voltage in this process is studied through single-ended measurements (between electrode and body) of the potential difference during iontophoresis with 100-microA, 20-s current pulses through deionized water, saturated 20.4% NaCl solution, 1% acetylcholine, and 1% sodium nitroprusside. It is found that the voltage needed to deliver the current varied by orders of magnitudes less than the differences in the conductance of these different electrolytes, and it is concluded that, at least for the present current protocol, the voltage as such is not an important factor in increasing the blood flow.

  3. Immune responses in multiple myeloma: role of the natural immune surveillance and potential of immunotherapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillerey, Camille; Nakamura, Kyohei; Vuckovic, Slavica; Hill, Geoffrey R; Smyth, Mark J

    2016-04-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a tumor of terminally differentiated B cells that arises in the bone marrow. Immune interactions appear as key determinants of MM progression. While myeloid cells foster myeloma-promoting inflammation, Natural Killer cells and T lymphocytes mediate protective anti-myeloma responses. The profound immune deregulation occurring in MM patients may be involved in the transition from a premalignant to a malignant stage of the disease. In the last decades, the advent of stem cell transplantation and new therapeutic agents including proteasome inhibitors and immunoregulatory drugs has dramatically improved patient outcomes, suggesting potentially key roles for innate and adaptive immunity in disease control. Nevertheless, MM remains largely incurable for the vast majority of patients. A better understanding of the complex interplay between myeloma cells and their immune environment should pave the way for designing better immunotherapies with the potential of very long term disease control. Here, we review the immunological microenvironment in myeloma. We discuss the role of naturally arising anti-myeloma immune responses and their potential corruption in MM patients. Finally, we detail the numerous promising immune-targeting strategies approved or in clinical trials for the treatment of MM. PMID:26801219

  4. Potential Immune Modularly Role of Glycine in Oral Gingival Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Schaumann

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gingival epithelial cells (GECs represent a physical barrier against bacteria and are involved in the processes of innate immunity. Recently, an anti-inflammatory and immune-modulatory effect of the amino acid glycine has been demonstrated. However, there is only little information about the immune-modulatory effects of glycine in oral tissues. This study aimed to investigate the existence and role of the glycine receptor in gingival tissue analyzing tissues/cells from extracted human molars via immunohistochemical analysis. In vitro, GECs were challenged by inflammatory conditions with IL-1β alone or in combination with glycine and analyzed for cytokine expression of IL6/IL8 via real-time PCR. On protein level, the effect of nuclear translocalization of NFκB protein p65 was analyzed using immunofluorescence analysis. A distinct proof of the GlyR in oral gingival tissue and keratinocytes could be demonstrated. Isolated challenge of the keratinocytes with IL-1β as well as with glycine resulted in an upregulation of IL6 and IL8 mRNA expression and activation of NFκB pathway. The presence of glycine in combination with the inflammatory stimulus led to a significant decrease in inflammatory parameters. These results indicate a possible anti-inflammatory role of glycine in gingival inflammation and encourage further research on the utility of glycine in the prevention or therapy of inflammatory periodontitis.

  5. Differentiation potential of the fetal rat liver-derived cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Zygmunt Pojda; Jerzy Moraczewski; Tomasz Oldak; Marzena Jastrzewska; Agnieszka Gajkowska; Iwona Grabowska; Eugeniusz K Machaj

    2005-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells derived from bone marrow or several fetal tissues can be expanded and differentiated into other cell lines. The fetal liver is the source of early hematopoietic cells and also, as a fetal tissue, may be considered as a source of pluripotent stem cells. The differentiation potential of fetal rat liver cells have been examined. Freshly isolated liver cells from 14-d fetuses were cultured in Dulbecco medium supplemented with 10% FCS. The plastic-adherent cells were then pa...

  6. Vascular Potential of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Iacobas, Ionela; Vats, Archana; Hirschi, Karen K.

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the number one cause of death and disability in the US. Understanding the biological activity of stem and progenitor cells, and their ability to contribute to the repair, regeneration and remodeling of the heart and blood vessels affected by pathologic processes is an essential part of the paradigm in enabling us to achieve a reduction in related deaths. Both human embryonic stem (ES) cells and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are promising sources of cells for c...

  7. The Potential Roles of Bisphenol A (BPA Pathogenesis in Autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Datis Kharrazian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bisphenol A (BPA is a monomer found in commonly used consumer plastic goods. Although much attention in recent years has been placed on BPA’s impact as an endocrine disruptor, it also appears to activate many immune pathways involved in both autoimmune disease development and autoimmune reactivity provocation. The current scientific literature is void of research papers linking BPA directly to human or animal onset of autoimmunity. This paper explores the impact of BPA on immune reactivity and the potential roles these mechanisms may have on the development or provocation of autoimmune diseases. Potential mechanisms by which BPA may be a contributing risk factor to autoimmune disease development and progression include its impact on hyperprolactinemia, estrogenic immune signaling, cytochrome P450 enzyme disruption, immune signal transduction pathway alteration, cytokine polarization, aryl hydrocarbon activation of Th-17 receptors, molecular mimicry, macrophage activation, lipopolysaccharide activation, and immunoglobulin pathophysiology. In this paper a review of these known autoimmune triggering mechanisms will be correlated with BPA exposure, thereby suggesting that BPA has a role in the pathogenesis of autoimmunity.

  8. The Potential Roles of Bisphenol A (BPA) Pathogenesis in Autoimmunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a monomer found in commonly used consumer plastic goods. Although much attention in recent years has been placed on BPA's impact as an endocrine disruptor, it also appears to activate many immune pathways involved in both autoimmune disease development and autoimmune reactivity provocation. The current scientific literature is void of research papers linking BPA directly to human or animal onset of autoimmunity. This paper explores the impact of BPA on immune reactivity and the potential roles these mechanisms may have on the development or provocation of autoimmune diseases. Potential mechanisms by which BPA may be a contributing risk factor to autoimmune disease development and progression include its impact on hyperprolactinemia, estrogenic immune signaling, cytochrome P450 enzyme disruption, immune signal transduction pathway alteration, cytokine polarization, aryl hydrocarbon activation of Th-17 receptors, molecular mimicry, macrophage activation, lipopolysaccharide activation, and immunoglobulin pathophysiology. In this paper a review of these known autoimmune triggering mechanisms will be correlated with BPA exposure, thereby suggesting that BPA has a role in the pathogenesis of autoimmunity. PMID:24804084

  9. Menopause and sarcopenia: A potential role for sex hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messier, Virginie; Rabasa-Lhoret, Rémi; Barbat-Artigas, Sébastien; Elisha, Belinda; Karelis, Antony D; Aubertin-Leheudre, Mylène

    2011-04-01

    Menopause is associated with a decline in estrogen levels, which could lead to an increase in visceral adiposity as well as a decrease in bone density, muscle mass and muscle strength. This decline in muscle mass, known as sarcopenia, is frequently observed in postmenopausal women. Potential causes of sarcopenia include age-related changes in the hormonal status, low levels of physical activity, reduced protein intake and increased oxidative stress. However, the role of sex hormones, specifically estrogens, on the onset of sarcopenia is controversial. Preventing sarcopenia and preserving muscle strength are highly relevant in order to prevent functional impairment and physical disability. To date, resistance training has been shown to be effective in attenuating age-related muscle loss and strength. However, results on the effect of hormonal supplementation to treat or prevent sarcopenia are contradictory. Further research is needed to identify other potential mechanisms of sarcopenia as well as effective interventions for the prevention and treatment of sarcopenia. Therefore, the purpose of this review will be to examine the role of sex hormonal status in the development of sarcopenia. We will also overview the physical as well as metabolic consequences of sarcopenia and the efficiency of different interventions for the prevention and treatment of sarcopenia. PMID:21353405

  10. Bacteriophage and their potential roles in the human oral cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edlund, Anna; Santiago-Rodriguez, Tasha M.; Boehm, Tobias K.; Pride, David T.

    2015-01-01

    The human oral cavity provides the perfect portal of entry for viruses and bacteria in the environment to access new hosts. Hence, the oral cavity is one of the most densely populated habitats of the human body containing some 6 billion bacteria and potentially 35 times that many viruses. The role of these viral communities remains unclear; however, many are bacteriophage that may have active roles in shaping the ecology of oral bacterial communities. Other implications for the presence of such vast oral phage communities include accelerating the molecular diversity of their bacterial hosts as both host and phage mutate to gain evolutionary advantages. Additional roles include the acquisitions of new gene functions through lysogenic conversions that may provide selective advantages to host bacteria in response to antibiotics or other types of disturbances, and protection of the human host from invading pathogens by binding to and preventing pathogens from crossing oral mucosal barriers. Recent evidence suggests that phage may be more involved in periodontal diseases than were previously thought, as their compositions in the subgingival crevice in moderate to severe periodontitis are known to be significantly altered. However, it is unclear to what extent they contribute to dysbiosis or the transition of the microbial community into a state promoting oral disease. Bacteriophage communities are distinct in saliva compared to sub- and supragingival areas, suggesting that different oral biogeographic niches have unique phage ecology shaping their bacterial biota. In this review, we summarize what is known about phage communities in the oral cavity, the possible contributions of phage in shaping oral bacterial ecology, and the risks to public health oral phage may pose through their potential to spread antibiotic resistance gene functions to close contacts. PMID:25861745

  11. Bacteriophage and their potential roles in the human oral cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edlund, Anna; Santiago-Rodriguez, Tasha M; Boehm, Tobias K; Pride, David T

    2015-01-01

    The human oral cavity provides the perfect portal of entry for viruses and bacteria in the environment to access new hosts. Hence, the oral cavity is one of the most densely populated habitats of the human body containing some 6 billion bacteria and potentially 35 times that many viruses. The role of these viral communities remains unclear; however, many are bacteriophage that may have active roles in shaping the ecology of oral bacterial communities. Other implications for the presence of such vast oral phage communities include accelerating the molecular diversity of their bacterial hosts as both host and phage mutate to gain evolutionary advantages. Additional roles include the acquisitions of new gene functions through lysogenic conversions that may provide selective advantages to host bacteria in response to antibiotics or other types of disturbances, and protection of the human host from invading pathogens by binding to and preventing pathogens from crossing oral mucosal barriers. Recent evidence suggests that phage may be more involved in periodontal diseases than were previously thought, as their compositions in the subgingival crevice in moderate to severe periodontitis are known to be significantly altered. However, it is unclear to what extent they contribute to dysbiosis or the transition of the microbial community into a state promoting oral disease. Bacteriophage communities are distinct in saliva compared to sub- and supragingival areas, suggesting that different oral biogeographic niches have unique phage ecology shaping their bacterial biota. In this review, we summarize what is known about phage communities in the oral cavity, the possible contributions of phage in shaping oral bacterial ecology, and the risks to public health oral phage may pose through their potential to spread antibiotic resistance gene functions to close contacts. PMID:25861745

  12. Bacteriophage and their potential roles in the human oral cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Edlund

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The human oral cavity provides the perfect portal of entry for viruses and bacteria in the environment to access new hosts. Hence, the oral cavity is one of the most densely populated habitats of the human body containing some 6 billion bacteria and potentially 35 times that many viruses. The role of these viral communities remains unclear; however, many are bacteriophage that may have active roles in shaping the ecology of oral bacterial communities. Other implications for the presence of such vast oral phage communities include accelerating the molecular diversity of their bacterial hosts as both host and phage mutate to gain evolutionary advantages. Additional roles include the acquisitions of new gene functions through lysogenic conversions that may provide selective advantages to host bacteria in response to antibiotics or other types of disturbances, and protection of the human host from invading pathogens by binding to and preventing pathogens from crossing oral mucosal barriers. Recent evidence suggests that phage may be more involved in periodontal diseases than were previously thought, as their compositions in the subgingival crevice in moderate to severe periodontitis are known to be significantly altered. However, it is unclear to what extent they contribute to dysbiosis or the transition of the microbial community into a state promoting oral disease. Bacteriophage communities are distinct in saliva compared to sub- and supragingival areas, suggesting that different oral biogeographic niches have unique phage ecology shaping their bacterial biota. In this review, we summarize what is known about phage communities in the oral cavity, the possible contributions of phage in shaping oral bacterial ecology, and the risks to public health oral phage may pose through their potential to spread antibiotic resistance gene functions to close contacts.

  13. Diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease: Potential role of molecular biometrics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Amosy; E; M’Koma

    2014-01-01

    Accurate diagnosis of predominantly colonic inflammatory bowel disease(IBD) is not possible in 30% of patients. For decades, scientists have worked to find a solution to improve diagnostic accuracy for IBD, encompassing Crohn’s colitis and ulcerative colitis. Evaluating protein patterns in surgical pathology colectomy specimens of colonic mucosal and submucosal compartments, individually, has potential for diagnostic medicine by identifying integrally independent, phenotype-specific cellular and molecular characteristics. Mass spectrometry(MS) and imaging(I) MS are analytical technologies that directly measure molecular species in clinical specimens, contributing to the in-depth understanding of biological molecules. The biometric-system complexity and functional diversity is well suited to proteomic and diagnostic studies. The direct analysis of cells and tissues by Matrix-Assisted-Laser Desorption/Ionization (MALDI) MS/IMS has relevant medical diagnostic potential. MALDI-MS/IMS detection generates molecular signatures obtained from specific cell types within tissue sections. Herein discussed is a perspective on the use of MALDI-MS/IMS and bioinformatics technologies for detection of molecular-biometric patterns and identification of differentiating proteins. I also discuss a perspective on the global challenge of transferring technologies to clinical laboratories dealing with IBD issues. The significance of serologic-immunometric advances is also discussed.

  14. Combination high-dose omega-3 fatty acids and high-dose cholecalciferol in new onset type 1 diabetes: a potential role in preservation of beta-cell mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baidal, D A; Ricordi, C; Garcia-Contreras, M; Sonnino, A; Fabbri, A

    2016-07-01

    Several studies have evaluated the role of inflammation in type 1 diabetes (T1D). The safety profile and anti-inflammatory properties of high dose omega-3 fatty acids combined with Vitamin D supplementation make this therapy a possible candidate for T1D intervention trials. Herein, we describe the case of a 14-year-old boy with new onset T1D treated with high dose Omega-3 and vitamin D3. By 12 months, peak C-peptide increased to 0.55 nmol/L (1.66 ng/mL) corresponding to a 20% increment from baseline and AUC C-peptide was slightly higher compared to 9 months (0.33 vs. 0.30 nmol/L/min) although remaining slightly lower than baseline. Combination high-dose Omega-3 fatty acids and high-dose vitamin D3 therapy was well tolerated and may have beneficial effects on beta-cell function. Randomized controlled trials could be of assistance to determine whether this therapy may result in the preservation of beta-cell function in patients with new onset T1D.

  15. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder: Potential Role of Endocannabinoids Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balapal S. Basavarajappa

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available One of the unique features of prenatal alcohol exposure in humans is impaired cognitive and behavioral function resulting from damage to the central nervous system (CNS, which leads to a spectrum of impairments referred to as fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD. Human FASD phenotypes can be reproduced in the rodent CNS following prenatal ethanol exposure. Several mechanisms are expected to contribute to the detrimental effects of prenatal alcohol exposure on the developing fetus, particularly in the developing CNS. These mechanisms may act simultaneously or consecutively and differ among a variety of cell types at specific developmental stages in particular brain regions. Studies have identified numerous potential mechanisms through which alcohol can act on the fetus. Among these mechanisms are increased oxidative stress, mitochondrial damage, interference with the activity of growth factors, glia cells, cell adhesion molecules, gene expression during CNS development and impaired function of signaling molecules involved in neuronal communication and circuit formation. These alcohol-induced deficits result in long-lasting abnormalities in neuronal plasticity and learning and memory and can explain many of the neurobehavioral abnormalities found in FASD. In this review, the author discusses the mechanisms that are associated with FASD and provides a current status on the endocannabinoid system in the development of FASD.

  16. Potential Use of Stem Cells for Kidney Regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Takashi Yokoo; Kei Matsumoto; Shinya Yokote

    2011-01-01

    Significant advances have been made in stem cell research over the past decade. A number of nonhematopoietic sources of stem cells (or progenitor cells) have been identified, including endothelial stem cells and neural stem cells. These discoveries have been a major step toward the use of stem cells for potential clinical applications of organ regeneration. Accordingly, kidney regeneration is currently gaining considerable attention to replace kidney dialysis as the ultimate therapeutic strat...

  17. Role of polyphenols in cell death control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovannini, Claudio; Masella, Roberta

    2012-05-01

    Dietary consumption of fruit, vegetables, fish, and olive oil has been demonstrated to exert beneficial effects on human health. This finding may be due to the high content of antioxidant compounds including polyphenols. Current evidence strongly supports a contribution of polyphenols to the prevention of several chronic degenerative diseases such as cancer, atherosclerosis and cardiovascular diseases, central nervous system disorders, as well as aging. Apoptosis is a genetically controlled and evolutionarily conserved form of cell death of critical importance for the maintenance of tissue homeostasis in the adult organism. The malfunction of the death machinery may play a primary role in various pathologic processes, leading to proliferative or degenerative diseases. Polyphenols can interact with specific steps and/or proteins regulating the apoptotic process in different ways depending on their concentration, the cell system, the type or stage of the pathological process. Because of their ability to modulate cell death, polyphenols have been proposed as chemopreventive and therapeutic agents. This paper reviews and discusses the last 3-year findings related to the principal molecular mechanisms involved in the control of the balance between apoptosis and cell proliferation exerted by polyphenols. PMID:22584012

  18. The enigmatic role of mast cells in dominant tolerance

    OpenAIRE

    de Vries, Victor C.; Pino-Lagos, Karina; Elgueta, Raul; Noelle, Randolph J.

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The role of regulatory T cells (Treg) in peripheral tolerance has been studied extensively in transplantation research. Recently, mast cells have been shown to play an indispensable role in allograft tolerance. The purpose of this review is to inform the reader on the current standings of the role of mast cells in dominant tolerance with an emphasis on the interaction of mast cells with Treg.RECENT FINDINGS: Mast cells are required to sustain peripheral tolerance via Treg. ...

  19. Peritoneal mast cell stabilization potential of Pothos scandens L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Gupta

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: This finding provides evidence that the P. scandens L. inhibits mast cell-derived immediate-type allergic reactions and mast cell degranulation. P. scandens has a potential as allergic anti- asthmatic agent.

  20. Potential role of microorganisms in the pathogenesis of rosacea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Anna D

    2013-12-01

    Rosacea is a skin condition of abnormal inflammation and vascular dysfunction. The active contribution of a microbial agent in the development or progression of rosacea continues to be debated. Research supports the presence of commensal Demodex folliculorum mites at increased density in the skin and associates Helicobacter pylori infection of the gut with rosacea. Fewer studies implicate Staphylococcus epidermidis, Chlamydophila pneumoniae, and the Demodex-associated bacteria Bacillus oleronius. No research, however, provides a mechanism by which colonization by a microorganism translates to manifestation of the condition. Prevailing and emerging principles in the biology of the microbiome and the pathophysiology of rosacea may help to reconcile these lingering questions. Here the microorganisms implicated in rosacea are reviewed and the reaction of the microbiome to inflammation and to changes in microenvironments and macroenvironments are discussed to explain potential roles for microorganisms in rosacea pathophysiology.

  1. The potential role of biomarkers in predicting gestational diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huguette S Brink

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Gestational diabetes (GD is a frequent complication during pregnancy and is associated with maternal and neonatal complications. It is suggested that a disturbing environment for the foetus, such as impaired glucose metabolism during intrauterine life, may result in enduring epigenetic changes leading to increased disease risk in adult life. Hence, early prediction of GD is vital. Current risk prediction models are based on maternal and clinical parameters, lacking a strong predictive value. Adipokines are mainly produced by adipocytes and suggested to be a link between obesity and its cardiovascular complications. Various adipokines, including adiponectin, leptin and TNFα, have shown to be dysregulated in GD. This review aims to outline biomarkers potentially associated with the pathophysiology of GD and discuss the role of integrating predictive biomarkers in current clinical risk prediction models, in order to enhance the identification of those at risk.

  2. The potential role of biomarkers in predicting gestational diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brink, Huguette S; van der Lely, Aart Jan; van der Linden, Joke

    2016-09-01

    Gestational diabetes (GD) is a frequent complication during pregnancy and is associated with maternal and neonatal complications. It is suggested that a disturbing environment for the foetus, such as impaired glucose metabolism during intrauterine life, may result in enduring epigenetic changes leading to increased disease risk in adult life. Hence, early prediction of GD is vital. Current risk prediction models are based on maternal and clinical parameters, lacking a strong predictive value. Adipokines are mainly produced by adipocytes and suggested to be a link between obesity and its cardiovascular complications. Various adipokines, including adiponectin, leptin and TNF&, have shown to be dysregulated in GD. This review aims to outline biomarkers potentially associated with the pathophysiology of GD and discuss the role of integrating predictive biomarkers in current clinical risk prediction models, in order to enhance the identification of those at risk. PMID:27492245

  3. Group 2 innate lymphoid cells license dendritic cells to potentiate memory TH2 cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halim, Timotheus Y F; Hwang, You Yi; Scanlon, Seth T; Zaghouani, Habib; Garbi, Natalio; Fallon, Padraic G; McKenzie, Andrew N J

    2016-01-01

    Rapid activation of memory CD4(+) T helper 2 (TH2) cells during allergic inflammation requires their recruitment into the affected tissue. Here we demonstrate that group 2 innate lymphoid (ILC2) cells have a crucial role in memory TH2 cell responses, with targeted depletion of ILC2 cells profoundly impairing TH2 cell localization to the lungs and skin of sensitized mice after allergen re-challenge. ILC2-derived interleukin 13 (IL-13) is critical for eliciting production of the TH2 cell-attracting chemokine CCL17 by IRF4(+)CD11b(+)CD103(-) dendritic cells (DCs). Consequently, the sentinel function of DCs is contingent on ILC2 cells for the generation of an efficient memory TH2 cell response. These results elucidate a key innate mechanism in the regulation of the immune memory response to allergens.

  4. The Potential Role of DNA Methylation in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evan J. Ryer

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA is a complex disorder that has a significant impact on the aging population. While both genetic and environmental risk factors have been implicated in AAA formation, the precise genetic markers involved and the factors influencing their expression remain an area of ongoing investigation. DNA methylation has been previously used to study gene silencing in other inflammatory disorders and since AAA has an extensive inflammatory component, we sought to examine the genome-wide DNA methylation profiles in mononuclear blood cells of AAA cases and matched non-AAA controls. To this end, we collected blood samples and isolated mononuclear cells for DNA and RNA extraction from four all male groups: AAA smokers (n = 11, AAA non-smokers (n = 9, control smokers (n = 10 and control non-smokers (n = 11. Methylation data were obtained using the Illumina 450k Human Methylation Bead Chip and analyzed using the R language and multiple Bioconductor packages. Principal component analysis and linear analysis of CpG island subsets identified four regions with significant differences in methylation with respect to AAA: kelch-like family member 35 (KLHL35, calponin 2 (CNN2, serpin peptidase inhibitor clade B (ovalbumin member 9 (SERPINB9, and adenylate cyclase 10 pseudogene 1 (ADCY10P1. Follow-up studies included RT-PCR and immunostaining for CNN2 and SERPINB9. These findings are novel and suggest DNA methylation may play a role in AAA pathobiology.

  5. The potential role of DNA methylation in abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryer, Evan J; Ronning, Kaitryn E; Erdman, Robert; Schworer, Charles M; Elmore, James R; Peeler, Thomas C; Nevius, Christopher D; Lillvis, John H; Garvin, Robert P; Franklin, David P; Kuivaniemi, Helena; Tromp, Gerard

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a complex disorder that has a significant impact on the aging population. While both genetic and environmental risk factors have been implicated in AAA formation, the precise genetic markers involved and the factors influencing their expression remain an area of ongoing investigation. DNA methylation has been previously used to study gene silencing in other inflammatory disorders and since AAA has an extensive inflammatory component, we sought to examine the genome-wide DNA methylation profiles in mononuclear blood cells of AAA cases and matched non-AAA controls. To this end, we collected blood samples and isolated mononuclear cells for DNA and RNA extraction from four all male groups: AAA smokers (n = 11), AAA non-smokers (n = 9), control smokers (n = 10) and control non-smokers (n = 11). Methylation data were obtained using the Illumina 450k Human Methylation Bead Chip and analyzed using the R language and multiple Bioconductor packages. Principal component analysis and linear analysis of CpG island subsets identified four regions with significant differences in methylation with respect to AAA: kelch-like family member 35 (KLHL35), calponin 2 (CNN2), serpin peptidase inhibitor clade B (ovalbumin) member 9 (SERPINB9), and adenylate cyclase 10 pseudogene 1 (ADCY10P1). Follow-up studies included RT-PCR and immunostaining for CNN2 and SERPINB9. These findings are novel and suggest DNA methylation may play a role in AAA pathobiology. PMID:25993294

  6. The potential role of carbon labeling in a green economy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the past several years, labeling schemes that focus on a wide range of environmental and social metrics have proliferated. Although little empirical evidence has been generated yet with respect to carbon footprint labels, much can be learned from our experience with similar product labels. We first review the theory and evidence on the role of product labeling in affecting consumer and firm behavior. Next, we consider the role of governments and nongovernmental organizations, concluding that international, multistakeholder organizations have a critical part to play in setting protocols and standards. We argue that it is important to consider the entire life cycle of a product being labeled and develop an international standard for measurement and reporting. Finally, we examine the potential impact of carbon product labeling, discussing methodological and trade challenges and proposing a framework for choosing products best suited for labeling. - Highlights: ► Economic theory provides rationale for product information on carbon footprint. ► Small but growing evidence that labels will affect demand and product choice. ► International protocol using multi-stakeholder process is needed. ► Product priority should be based on life-cycle emissions and likely behavior changes. ► International trade law poses low risk for voluntary private carbon footprint labels.

  7. Cell therapy for ischaemic heart disease: focus on the role of resident cardiac stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamuleau, S A J; Vrijsen, K R; Rokosh, D G; Tang, X L; Piek, J J; Bolli, R

    2009-05-01

    Myocardial infarction results in loss of cardiomyocytes, scar formation, ventricular remodelling, and eventually heart failure. In recent years, cell therapy has emerged as a potential new strategy for patients with ischaemic heart disease. This includes embryonic and bone marrow derived stem cells. Recent clinical studies showed ostensibly conflicting results of intracoronary infusion of autologous bone marrow derived stem cells in patients with acute or chronic myocardial infarction. Anyway, these results have stimulated additional clinical and pre-clinical studies to further enhance the beneficial effects of stem cell therapy. Recently, the existence of cardiac stem cells that reside in the heart itself was demonstrated. Their discovery has sparked intense hope for myocardial regeneration with cells that are obtained from the heart itself and are thereby inherently programmed to reconstitute cardiac tissue. These cells can be detected by several surface markers (e.g. c-kit, Sca-1, MDR1, Isl-1). Both in vitro and in vivo differentiation into cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells has been demonstrated, and animal studies showed promising results on improvement of left ventricular function. This review will discuss current views regarding the feasibility of cardiac repair, and focus on the potential role of the resident cardiac stem and progenitor cells. (Neth Heart J 2009;17:199-207.).

  8. The potential roles of nanobiomaterials in distraction osteogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhdom, Asim M; Nayef, Lamees; Tabrizian, Maryam; Hamdy, Reggie C

    2015-01-01

    Distraction osteogenesis (DO) technique is used worldwide to treat many orthopedic conditions. Although successful, one limitation of this technique is the extended period of fixators until the bone is consolidated. The application of growth factors (GFs) is one promising approach to accelerate bone regeneration during DO. Despite promising in vivo results, its use is still limited in the clinic. This is secondary to inherent limitations of these GFs. Therefore, a development of delivery systems that allow sustained sequential release is necessary. Nanoparticles and nanocomposites have prevailing properties that can overcome the limitations of the current delivery systems. In addition, their use can overcome the current challenges associated with the insufficient mechanical properties of scaffolds and suboptimal osteogenic differentiation of transplanted cells in the distraction gap. We discuss the clinical implications, and potential early applications of the nanoparticles and nanocomposites for developing new treatments to accelerate bone regeneration in DO.

  9. Inhibitory Role of Pentraxin-3 in Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Dan; Zong, Ye; Zhu, Sheng-Tao; Wang, Yong-Jun; Li, Peng; Zhang, Shu-Tian

    2016-01-01

    Background: Esophageal cancer is the sixth leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Pentraxin-3 (PTX3) is a member of the PTX superfamily. Here, we investigated the role of PTX3 in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Methods: The effect of PTX3 on ESCC cell proliferation, colony formation, apoptosis, migration, and invasion was investigated using cell viability assays, colony formation assays, flow cytometry, and migration and invasion assays. The effect of PTX3 on the tumorigenicity of ESCC in vivo was investigated with xenograft studies in nude mice. Results: PTX3 overexpression in ESCC cells reduced cellular proliferation and colony formation (P apoptosis (P < 0.05). PTX3 expression had no significant effect on the migratory or invasive potential of ESCC cells. In our mouse model of human ESCC, we achieved 100% successful tumor establishment. Compared with the control and empty vector-expressing groups, the PTX3-expressing group formed significantly smaller tumors (P < 0.05). Conclusions: This study indicates that PTX3 might play an inhibitory role in ESCC. PMID:27625097

  10. Role And Relevance Of Mast Cells In Fungal Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohit eSaluja

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In addition to their detrimental role in allergic diseases, mast cells (MCs are well known to be important cells of the innate immune system. In the last decade, they have been shown to contribute significantly to optimal host defense against numerous pathogens including parasites, bacteria, and viruses. The contribution of MCs to the immune responses in fungal infections, however, is largely unknown. In this review, we first discuss key features of mast cell responses to pathogens in general and then summarize the current knowledge on the function of MCs in the defense against fungal pathogens. We especially focus on the potential and proven mechanisms by which MC can detect fungal infections and on possible MC effector mechanisms in protecting from fungal infections.

  11. The potential diagnostic power of circulating tumor cell analysis for non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Kirsty; Pailler, Emma; Faugeroux, Vincent; Taylor, Melissa; Oulhen, Marianne; Auger, Nathalie; Planchard, David; Soria, Jean-Charles; Lindsay, Colin R; Besse, Benjamin; Vielh, Philippe; Farace, Françoise

    2015-01-01

    In non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), genotyping tumor biopsies for targetable somatic alterations has become routine practice. However, serial biopsies have limitations: they may be technically difficult or impossible and could incur serious risks to patients. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) offer an alternative source for tumor analysis that is easily accessible and presents the potential to identify predictive biomarkers to tailor therapies on a personalized basis. Examined here is our current knowledge of CTC detection and characterization in NSCLC and their potential role in EGFR-mutant, ALK-rearranged and ROS1-rearranged patients. This is followed by discussion of the ongoing issues such as the question of CTC partnership as diagnostic tools in NSCLC. PMID:26564313

  12. The stem cell factor SOX2 regulates the tumorigenic potential in human gastric cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hütz, Katharina; Mejías-Luque, Raquel; Farsakova, Katarina; Ogris, Manfred; Krebs, Stefan; Anton, Martina; Vieth, Michael; Schüller, Ulrich; Schneider, Marlon R; Blum, Helmut; Wagner, Ernst; Jung, Andreas; Gerhard, Markus

    2014-04-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is still one of the most common causes of cancer-related death worldwide, which is mainly attributable to late diagnosis and poor treatment options. Infection with Helicobacter pylori, different environmental factors and genetic alterations are known to influence the risk of developing gastric tumors. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in gastric carcinogenesis are still not fully understood, making it difficult to design targeted therapeutic approaches. Aberrant expression of the specific gastric differentiation marker SOX2 has been observed in stomach cancer. However, the role of SOX2 in gastric tumors has not been well established to date. To elucidate the role of SOX2 in gastric tumorigenesis, SOX2 transcriptional activity was blocked in AZ-521 cells. Interestingly, inhibition of SOX2 reduced cell proliferation and migration, increased apoptosis and induced changes in cell cycle. Blocking of SOX2 also reduced the tumorigenic potential of AZ-521 cells in vivo. In addition, correlation of SOX2 expression and proliferation was observed in a subset of human gastric tumors. Finally, target genes of SOX2 were for the first time identified by RNA microarray in GC cells. Taken together, the results presented here indicate that SOX2 controls several aspects related to GC development and progression by regulating the expression of members of important signaling pathways. These findings could provide new therapeutic options for a subset of GCs exhibiting SOX2 deregulation.

  13. A potential role for Helicobacter pylori heat shock protein 60 in gastric tumorigenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helicobacter pylori has been found to promote the malignant process leading to gastric cancer. Heat shock protein 60 of H. pylori (HpHSP60) was previously been identified as a potent immunogene. This study investigates the role of HpHSP60 in gastric cancer carcinogenesis. The effect of HpHSP60 on cell proliferation, anti-death activity, angiogenesis and cell migration were explored. The results showed that HpHSP60 enhanced migration by gastric cancer cells and promoted tube formation by umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs); however, HpHSP60 did not increase cell proliferation nor was this protein able to rescue gastric cancer cells from death. Moreover, the results also indicated HpHSP60 had different effects on AGS gastric cancer cells or THP-1 monocytic cells in terms of their expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, which are known to be important to cancer development. We propose that HpHSP60 may trigger the initiation of carcinogenesis by inducing pro-inflammatory cytokine release and by promoting angiogenesis and metastasis. Thus, this extracellular pathogen-derived HSP60 is potentially a vigorous virulence factor that can act as a carcinogen during gastric tumorigenesis.

  14. A potential oncogenic role of the commonly observed E2F5 overexpression in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuzhu Jiang; Seon-Hee Yim; Hai-Dong Xu; Seung-Hyun Jung; So Young Yang; Hae-Jin Hu; Chan-Kwon Jung; Yeun-Jun Chung

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To explore the expression pattern of E2F5 in primary hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) and elucidate the roles of E2F5 in hepatocarcinogenesis. METHODS: E2F5 expression was analyzed in 120 primary HCCs and 29 normal liver tissues by immunohistochemistry analysis. E2F5-small interfering RNA was transfected into HepG2, an E2F5-overexpressed HCC cell line. After E2F5 knockdown, cell growth capacity and migrating potential were examined. RESULTS: E2F5 was significantly overexpressed in primary HCCs compared with normal liver tissues (P = 0.008). The E2F5-silenced cells showed significantly reduced proliferation (P = 0.004). On the colony formation and soft agar assays, the number of colonies was significantly reduced in E2F5-silenced cells (P = 0.004 and P = 0.009, respectively). E2F5 knockdown resulted in the accumulation of G0/G1 phase cells and a reduction of S phase cells. The number of migrating/invading cells was also reduced after E2F5 knockdown (P = 0.021). CONCLUSION: To our knowledge, this is the first evidence that E2F5 is commonly overexpressed in primary HCC and that E2F5 knockdown significantly repressed the growth of HCC cells.

  15. A potential role for Helicobacter pylori heat shock protein 60 in gastric tumorigenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Chen-Si [Department of Biological Science and Technology, National Chiao-Tung University, Hsin-Chu, Taiwan (China); School of Veterinary Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); He, Pei-Juin [Department of Biological Science and Technology, National Chiao-Tung University, Hsin-Chu, Taiwan (China); Tsai, Nu-Man [School of Medical Laboratory and Biotechnology, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Li, Chi-Han; Yang, Shang-Chih; Hsu, Wei-Tung [Department of Biological Science and Technology, National Chiao-Tung University, Hsin-Chu, Taiwan (China); Wu, Ming-Shiang [Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Wu, Chang-Jer [Department of Food Science, National Taiwan Ocean University, Keelung, Taiwan (China); Cheng, Tain-Lu [Department of Biotechnology, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Liao, Kuang-Wen, E-mail: kitchhen@yahoo.com.tw [Department of Biological Science and Technology, National Chiao-Tung University, Hsin-Chu, Taiwan (China)

    2010-02-05

    Helicobacter pylori has been found to promote the malignant process leading to gastric cancer. Heat shock protein 60 of H. pylori (HpHSP60) was previously been identified as a potent immunogene. This study investigates the role of HpHSP60 in gastric cancer carcinogenesis. The effect of HpHSP60 on cell proliferation, anti-death activity, angiogenesis and cell migration were explored. The results showed that HpHSP60 enhanced migration by gastric cancer cells and promoted tube formation by umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs); however, HpHSP60 did not increase cell proliferation nor was this protein able to rescue gastric cancer cells from death. Moreover, the results also indicated HpHSP60 had different effects on AGS gastric cancer cells or THP-1 monocytic cells in terms of their expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, which are known to be important to cancer development. We propose that HpHSP60 may trigger the initiation of carcinogenesis by inducing pro-inflammatory cytokine release and by promoting angiogenesis and metastasis. Thus, this extracellular pathogen-derived HSP60 is potentially a vigorous virulence factor that can act as a carcinogen during gastric tumorigenesis.

  16. The Variation of Electrochemical Cell Potentials with Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peckham, Gavin D.; McNaught, Ian J.

    2011-01-01

    Electrochemical cell potentials have no simple relationship with temperature but depend on the interplay between the sign and magnitude of the isothermal temperature coefficient, dE[degrees]/dT, and on the magnitude of the reaction quotient, Q. The variations in possible responses of standard and non-standard cell potentials to changes in the…

  17. Therapeutic potential of stem cells in auditory hair cell repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryuji Hata

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of acquired hearing loss is very high. About 10% of the total population and more than one third of the population over 65 years suffer from debilitating hearing loss. The most common type of hearing loss in adults is idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSHL. In the majority of cases, ISSHL is permanent and typically associated with loss of sensory hair cells in the organ of Corti. Following the loss of sensory hair cells, the auditory neurons undergo secondary degeneration. Sensory hair cells and auditory neurons do not regenerate throughout life, and loss of these cells is irreversible and cumulative. However, recent advances in stem cell biology have gained hope that stem cell therapy comes closer to regenerating sensory hair cells in humans. A major advance in the prospects for the use of stem cells to restore normal hearing comes with the recent discovery that hair cells can be generated ex vivo from embryonic stem (ES cells, adult inner ear stem cells and neural stem cells. Furthermore, there is increasing evidence that stem cells can promote damaged cell repair in part by secreting diffusible molecules such as growth factors. These results suggest that stem-cell-based treatment regimens can be applicable to the damaged inner ear as future clinical applications.Previously we have established an animal model of cochlear ischemia in gerbils and showed progressive hair cell loss up to 4 days after ischemia. Auditory brain stem response (ABR recordings have demonstrated that this gerbil model displays severe deafness just after cochlear ischemia and gradually recovers thereafter. These pathological findings and clinical manifestations are reminiscent of ISSHL in humans. In this study, we have shown the effectiveness of stem cell therapy by using this animal model of ISSHL.

  18. Potential role of probiotics on colorectal cancer prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uccello Mario

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Colorectal cancer represents the most common malignancy of the gastrointestinal tract. Owing to differences in dietary habits and lifestyle, this neoplasm is more common in industrialized countries than in developing ones. Evidence from a wide range of sources supports the assumption that the link between diet and colorectal cancer may be due to an imbalance of the intestinal microflora. Discussion Probiotic bacteria are live microorganisms that, when administered in adequate amounts, confer a healthy benefit on the host, and they have been investigated for their protective anti-tumor effects. In vivo and molecular studies have displayed encouraging findings that support a role of probiotics in colorectal cancer prevention. Summary Several mechanisms could explain the preventive action of probiotics against colorectal cancer onset. They include: alteration of the intestinal microflora; inactivation of cancerogenic compounds; competition with putrefactive and pathogenic microbiota; improvement of the host’s immune response; anti-proliferative effects via regulation of apoptosis and cell differentiation; fermentation of undigested food; inhibition of tyrosine kinase signaling pathways.

  19. Potential Role of Honey in Learning and Memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahiruddin Othman

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The composition and physicochemical properties of honey are variable depending on its floral source and often named according to the geographical location. The potential medicinal benefits of Tualang honey, a multifloral jungle honey found in Malaysia, have recently been attracting attention because of its reported beneficial effects in various diseases. This paper reviews the effects of honey, particularly Tualang honey, on learning and memory. Information regarding the effects of Tualang honey on learning and memory in human as well as animal models is gleaned to hypothesize its underlying mechanisms. These studies show that Tualang honey improves morphology of memory-related brain areas, reduces brain oxidative stress, increases brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and acetylcholine (ACh concentrations, and reduces acetylcholinesterase (AChE in the brain homogenates. Its anti-inflammatory roles in reducing inflammatory trigger and microglial activation have yet to be investigated. It is hypothesized that the improvement in learning and memory following Tualang honey supplementation is due to the significant improvement in brain morphology and enhancement of brain cholinergic system secondary to reduction in brain oxidative damage and/or upregulation of BDNF concentration. Further studies are imperative to elucidate the molecular mechanism of actions.

  20. Potential Antidepressant Role of Neurotransmitter CART: Implications for Mental Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peizhong Mao

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Depression is one of the most prevalent and debilitating public health concerns. Although no single cause of depression has been identified, it appears that interaction among genetic, epigenetic, biochemical, environmental, and psychosocial factors may explain its etiology. Further, only a fraction of depressed patients show full remission while using current antidepressants. Therefore, identifying common pathways of the disorder and using that knowledge to develop more effective pharmacological treatments are two primary targets of research in this field. Brain-enriched neurotransmitter CART (cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript has multiple functions related to emotions. It is a potential neurotrophic factor and is involved in the regulation of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and stress response as well as in energy homeostasis. CART is also highly expressed in limbic system, which is considered to have an important role in regulating mood. Notably, adolescents carrying a missense mutation in the CART gene exhibit increased depression and anxiety. Hence, CART peptide may be a novel promising antidepressant agent. In this paper, we summarize recent progress in depression and CART. In particular, we emphasize a new antidepressant function for CART.

  1. A potential role for bat tail membranes in flight control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James D Gardiner

    Full Text Available Wind tunnel tests conducted on a model based on the long-eared bat Plecotus auritus indicated that the positioning of the tail membrane (uropatagium can significantly influence flight control. Adjusting tail position by increasing the angle of the legs ventrally relative to the body has a two-fold effect; increasing leg-induced wing camber (i.e., locally increased camber of the inner wing surface and increasing the angle of attack of the tail membrane. We also used our model to examine the effects of flying with and without a tail membrane. For the bat model with a tail membrane increasing leg angle increased the lift, drag and pitching moment (nose-down produced. However, removing the tail membrane significantly reduced the change in pitching moment with increasing leg angle, but it had no significant effect on the level of lift produced. The drag on the model also significantly increased with the removal of the tail membrane. The tail membrane, therefore, is potentially important for controlling the level of pitching moment produced by bats and an aid to flight control, specifically improving agility and manoeuvrability. Although the tail of bats is different from that of birds, in that it is only divided from the wings by the legs, it nonetheless, may, in addition to its prey capturing function, fulfil a similar role in aiding flight control.

  2. The role of Cajal cells in chronic prostatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haki Yuksel, Ozgur; Urkmez, Ahmet; Verit, Ayhan

    2016-01-01

    Types of prostatitis can be defined as groups of syndromes in adult men associated with infectious and noninfectious causes characterized frequently by lower abdominal and perineal signs and diverse clinical symptoms and complications. Etiopathogenesis of chronic prostatitis is not well defined. Moreover, its treatment outcomes are not satisfactory. Presence of c-kit positive interstitial cells in human prostate is already known. It has been demonstrated that these cells can be pacemaker cells which trigger spontaneous slow-wave electrical activity in the prostate and can be responsible for the transport of glandular secretion from acinar cells into major and minor prostatic ducts and finally into urethra. In the light of all these data, when presence of a possible inflammatory pathology is thought to involve prostate that secretes and has a reservoir which drains its secretion (for prostate, prostatic urethra), two points are worth mentioning. Impairment of secretion mechanism and collection of secretion within the organ with reflux of the microbial material from its reservoir back into prostate gland. Both of these potential conditions can be explained by ductal neuromuscular mechanism, which induces secretion. We think that in this neuromuscular mechanism interstitial Cajal cells have an important role in chronic prostatitis. Our hypothesis is that curability of prostatitis is correlated with the number of Cajal cells not subjected to apoptosis. PMID:27377090

  3. Cardiac stem cells and their roles in myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jingying; Wang, Lingyun; Jiang, Jieyu; Zhou, Changqing; Guo, Tianzhu; Zheng, Shaoxin; Wang, Tong

    2013-06-01

    Myocardial infarction leads to loss of cardiomyocytes, scar formation, ventricular remodeling and eventually deterioration of heart function. Over the past decade, stem cell therapy has emerged as a novel strategy for patients with ischemic heart disease and its beneficial effects have been demonstrated by substantial preclinical and clinical studies. Efficacy of several types of stem cells in the therapy of cardiovascular diseases has already been evaluated. However, repair of injured myocardium through stem cell transplantation is restricted by critical safety issues and ethic concerns. Recently, the discovery of cardiac stem cells (CSCs) that reside in the heart itself brings new prospects for myocardial regeneration and reconstitution of cardiac tissues. CSCs are positive for various stem cell markers and have the potential of self-renewal and multilineage differentiation. They play a pivotal role in the maintenance of heart homeostasis and cardiac repair. Elucidation of their biological characteristics and functions they exert in myocardial infarction are very crucial to further investigations on them. This review will focus on the field of cardiac stem cells and discuss technical and practical issues that may involve in their clinical applications in myocardial infarction.

  4. Functional role of regulatory T cells in B cell lymphoma and related mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wei; Wan, Jun; Xia, Ruixiang; Huang, Zhenqi; Ni, Jing; Yang, Mingzhen

    2015-01-01

    B cell lymphoma (BCL) has a higher degree of malignancy and complicated pathogenic mechanism. Regulatory T cells (Treg cells) are known to exert certain immune suppression functions, in addition to immune mediating effects. Recent studies have revealed the role of Treg cells in pathogenesis and progression of multiple malignant tumors. This study therefore investigated the functional role and related mechanism of Treg cells in BCL. A cohort of thirty patients who were diagnosed with BCL in our hospital between January 2013 and December 2014. Another thirty healthy individuals were recruited. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were separated and analyzed for the ratio of CD4+/CD25+ Treg cells. The mRNA expression levels of Foxp3, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 and interleukin (IL)-10 genes were quantified by real-time PCR, while their serum levels were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Meanwhile all laboratory indexes for patients were monitored during the complete remission (CR) stage. BCL patients significantly elevated ratio of CD4+/CD25+ Treg cells, which were decreased at CR stage. mRNA levels of Foxp3, TGF-β1 and IL-10, in addition to protein levels of TGF-β1 and IL-10 were potentiated in lymphoma patients but decreased in CR patients (Pregulating cytokines, thereby facilitating the pathogenesis and progression of lymphoma. PMID:26464657

  5. Physical role for the nucleus in cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruleux, Antoine; Hawkins, Rhoda J

    2016-09-14

    Cell migration is important for the function of many eukaryotic cells. Recently the nucleus has been shown to play an important role in cell motility. After giving an overview of cell motility mechanisms we review what is currently known about the mechanical properties of the nucleus and the connections between it and the cytoskeleton. We also discuss connections to the extracellular matrix and mechanotransduction. We identify key physical roles of the nucleus in cell migration. PMID:27406341

  6. Physical role for the nucleus in cell migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruleux, Antoine; Hawkins, Rhoda J.

    2016-09-01

    Cell migration is important for the function of many eukaryotic cells. Recently the nucleus has been shown to play an important role in cell motility. After giving an overview of cell motility mechanisms we review what is currently known about the mechanical properties of the nucleus and the connections between it and the cytoskeleton. We also discuss connections to the extracellular matrix and mechanotransduction. We identify key physical roles of the nucleus in cell migration.

  7. Differentiation potential of the fetal rat liver-derived cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zygmunt Pojda

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells derived from bone marrow or several fetal tissues can be expanded and differentiated into other cell lines. The fetal liver is the source of early hematopoietic cells and also, as a fetal tissue, may be considered as a source of pluripotent stem cells. The differentiation potential of fetal rat liver cells have been examined. Freshly isolated liver cells from 14-d fetuses were cultured in Dulbecco medium supplemented with 10% FCS. The plastic-adherent cells were then passaged up to 10 times. Freshly isolated cells and cells from every passage were cultured in hematopoiesis-promoting environment that consists of methylcelulose supplemented with FCS, rat IL-3, human IL-6 and Epo. Parallely these cells were incubated in co-culture with rat muscle satellite cells (Dulbecco medium with 10% FCS and 10% HS to examine their myogenic potential. Culture in methylcelulose resulted in a high number of GM and Mix colonies in case of freshly isolated liver cells and the number of colonies decreased according to the number of passages. In case of cells from 4th passage, there ware no hematopoietic colonies in culture. In contrast--freshly isolated cells were not able to fuse with rat satellite cells and form the myotubes. This ability appeared in plastic-adherent cells just from the second passage and increases to 5th passage. The cells from every next passage up to 10th when co-cultured with satellite cells participated in myotube formation at the same high level. This result may suggest that in the 14-d rat liver there exist at least two subpopulations of cells: the non-adherent hematopoietic cell population, and the population of plastic-adherent cells capable of differentiating into myotubes. Since the attempts to redifferentiate hematopoietic subpopulation into myopoiesis, or myopoietic subpopulation into hematopoiesis failed, it may be concluded that at least under our experimental conditions the fetal liver cells do not reveal the

  8. Modeling and simulation of ion channels and action potentials in taste receptor cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN PeiHua; LIU Xiaodong; ZHANG Wei; ZHOU Jun; WANG Ping; YANG Wei; LUO JianHong

    2009-01-01

    Based on patch clamp data on the ionic currents of rat taste receptor cells,a mathematical model of mammalian taste receptor cells was constructed to simulate the action potentials of taste receptor cells and their corresponding ionic components,including voltage-gated Na~+ currents and outward delayed rectifier K~+ currents.Our simulations reproduced the action potentials of taste receptor cells in response to electrical stimuli or sour tastants.The kinetics of ion channels and their roles in action potentials of taste receptor cells were also analyzed.Our prototype model of single taste receptor cell and simulation results presented in this paper provide the basis for the further study of taste information processing in the gustatory system.

  9. Modeling and simulation of ion channels and action potentials in taste receptor cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Based on patch clamp data on the ionic currents of rat taste receptor cells, a mathematical model of mammalian taste receptor cells was constructed to simulate the action potentials of taste receptor cells and their corresponding ionic components, including voltage-gated Na+ currents and outward delayed rectifier K+ currents. Our simulations reproduced the action potentials of taste receptor cells in response to electrical stimuli or sour tastants. The kinetics of ion channels and their roles in action potentials of taste receptor cells were also analyzed. Our prototype model of single taste receptor cell and simulation results presented in this paper provide the basis for the further study of taste information processing in the gustatory system.

  10. On the potential role of glutamate transport in mental fatigue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hansson Elisabeth

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Mental fatigue, with decreased concentration capacity, is common in neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases, often appearing prior to other major mental or physical neurological symptoms. Mental fatigue also makes rehabilitation more difficult after a stroke, brain trauma, meningitis or encephalitis. As increased levels of proinflammatory cytokines are reported in these disorders, we wanted to explore whether or not proinflammatory cytokines could induce mental fatigue, and if so, by what mechanisms. It is well known that proinflammatory cytokines are increased in major depression, "sickness behavior" and sleep deprivation, which are all disorders associated with mental fatigue. Furthermore, an influence by specific proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin (IL-1, on learning and memory capacities has been observed in several experimental systems. As glutamate signaling is crucial for information intake and processing within the brain, and due to the pivotal role for glutamate in brain metabolism, dynamic alterations in glutamate transmission could be of pathophysiological importance in mental fatigue. Based on this literature and observations from our own laboratory and others on the role of astroglial cells in the fine-tuning of glutamate neurotransmission we present the hypothesis that the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-1β and IL-6 could be involved in the pathophysiology of mental fatigue through their ability to attenuate the astroglial clearance of extracellular glutamate, their disintegration of the blood brain barrier, and effects on astroglial metabolism and metabolic supply for the neurons, thereby attenuating glutamate transmission. To test whether our hypothesis is valid or not, brain imaging techniques should be applied with the ability to register, over time and with increasing cognitive loading, the extracellular concentrations of glutamate and potassium (K+ in humans suffering from

  11. Targeting cancer stem cells: emerging role of Nanog transcription factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang ML

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Mong-Lien Wang,1 Shih-Hwa Chiou,2,3 Cheng-Wen Wu1,4–61Institute of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 2Institute of Pharmacology, National Yang Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan; 3Department of Medical Research and Education, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; 4Institute of Microbiology and Immunology, 5Institute of Clinical Medicine, National Yang Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan; 6Institute of Biomedical Science, Academia Sinica, Taipei, TaiwanAbstract: The involvement of stemness factors in cancer initiation and progression has drawn much attention recently, especially after the finding that introducing four stemness factors in somatic cells is able to reprogram the cells back to an embryonic stem cell-like state. Following accumulating data revealing abnormal elevated expression levels of key stemness factors, like Nanog, Oct4, and Sox2, in several types of cancer stem cells; the importance and therapeutic potential of targeting these stemness regulators in cancers has turned to research focus. Nanog determines cell fate in both embryonic and cancer stem cells; activating Nanog at an inappropriate time would result in cancer stem cells rather than normal pluripotent stem cells or differentiated somatic cells. Upregulated Nanog is correlated with poor survival outcome of patients with various types of cancer. The discoveries of downstream regulatory pathways directly or indirectly mediated by Nanog indicate that Nanog regulates several aspects of cancer development such as tumor cell proliferation, self-renewal, motility, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, immune evasion, and drug-resistance, which are all defined features for cancer stem cells. The current review paper illustrates the central role of Nanog in the regulatory networks of cancer malignant development and stemness acquirement, as well as in the communication between cancer cells and the surrounding stroma. Though a more defined model is needed to test the

  12. Hematopoietic potential cells in skeletal muscle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Atsushi Asakura

    2007-01-01

    @@ During mouse embryogenesis,the formation of primi-tive hematopoiesis begins in the yolk sac on embryonic day 7.5(E7.5).Thereafter,definitive hematopoietic stem cell(HSC)activity is first detectable in the aorta-gonad-mesonephros(AGM)region on E10,followed by fetal liver and yolk sac.Subsequently,the fetal liver by E12 becomes the main tissue for definitive hematopoiesis.At a later time,HSC population in the fetal liver migrates to the bone marrow,which becomes the maior site of he-matopoiesis throughout normal adult life[1].

  13. Neural crest stem cells: discovery, properties and potential for therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Annita Achilleos; Paul A Trainor

    2012-01-01

    Neural crest (NC) cells are a migratory cell population synonymous with vertebrate evolution.They generate a wide variety of cell and tissue types during embryonic and adult development including cartilage and bone,connective tissue,pigment and endocrine cells as well as neurons and glia amongst many others.Such incredible lineage potential combined with a limited capacity for self-renewal,which persists even into adult life,demonstrates that NC cells bear the key hallmarks of stem and progenitor cells.In this review,we describe the identification,characterization and isolation of NC stem and progenitor cells from different tissues in both embryo and adult organisms.We discuss their specific properties and their potential application in cell-based tissue and disease-specific repair.

  14. Potential of embryonic and adult stem cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czyz, Jaroslaw; Wiese, Cornelia; Rolletschek, Alexandra; Blyszczuk, Przemyslaw; Cross, Michael; Wobus, Anna M

    2003-01-01

    Recent developments in the field of stem cell research indicate their enormous potential as a source of tissue for regenerative therapies. The success of such applications will depend on the precise properties and potentials of stem cells isolated either from embryonic, fetal or adult tissues. Embryonic stem cells established from the inner cell mass of early mouse embryos are characterized by nearly unlimited proliferation, and the capacity to differentiate into derivatives of essentially all lineages. The recent isolation and culture of human embryonic stem cell lines presents new opportunities for reconstructive medicine. However, important problems remain; first, the derivation of human embryonic stem cells from in vitro fertilized blastocysts creates ethical problems, and second, the current techniques for the directed differentiation into somatic cell populations yield impure products with tumorigenic potential. Recent studies have also suggested an unexpectedly wide developmental potential of adult tissue-specific stem cells. Here too, many questions remain concerning the nature and status of adult stem cells both in vivo and in vitro and their proliferation and differentiation/transdifferentiation capacity. This review focuses on those issues of embryonic and adult stem cell biology most relevant to their in vitro propagation and differentiation. Questions and problems related to the use of human embryonic and adult stem cells in tissue regeneration and transplantation are discussed.

  15. Pathophysiology of hypophosphatasia and the potential role of asfotase alfa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orimo, Hideo

    2016-01-01

    Hypophosphatasia (HPP) is an inherited systemic bone disease that is characterized by bone hypomineralization. HPP is classified into six forms according to the age of onset and severity as perinatal (lethal), perinatal benign, infantile, childhood, adult, and odontohypophosphatasia. The causative gene of the disease is the ALPL gene that encodes tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP). TNAP is expressed ubiquitously, and its physiological role is apparent in bone mineralization. A defect in bone mineralization can manifest in several ways, including rickets or osteomalacia in HPP patients. Patients with severe forms suffer from respiratory failure because of hypoplastic chest, which is the main cause of death. They sometimes present with seizures due to a defect in vitamin B6 metabolism resulting from the lack of alkaline phosphatase activity in neuronal cells, which is also lethal. Patients with a mild form of the disease exhibit rickets or osteomalacia and a functional defect of exercise. Odontohypophosphatasia shows only dental manifestations. To date, 302 mutations in the ALPL gene have been reported, mainly single-nucleotide substitutions, and the relationships between phenotype and genotype have been partially elucidated. An established treatment for HPP was not available until the recent development of enzyme replacement therapy. The first successful enzyme replacement therapy in model mice using a modified human TNAP protein (asfotase alfa) was reported in 2008, and subsequently success in patients with severe form of the disease was reported in 2012. In 2015, asfotase alfa was approved in Japan in July, followed by in the EU and Canada in August, and then by the US Food and Drug Administration in the USA in October. It is expected that therapy with asfotase alfa will drastically change treatments and prognosis of HPP. PMID:27274262

  16. Pathophysiology of hypophosphatasia and the potential role of asfotase alfa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orimo H

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Hideo Orimo Division of Metabolism and Nutrition, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Nippon Medical School, Tokyo, Japan Abstract: Hypophosphatasia (HPP is an inherited systemic bone disease that is characterized by bone hypomineralization. HPP is classified into six forms according to the age of onset and severity as perinatal (lethal, perinatal benign, infantile, childhood, adult, and odontohypophosphatasia. The causative gene of the disease is the ALPL gene that encodes tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP. TNAP is expressed ubiquitously, and its physiological role is apparent in bone mineralization. A defect in bone mineralization can manifest in several ways, including rickets or osteomalacia in HPP patients. Patients with severe forms suffer from respiratory failure because of hypoplastic chest, which is the main cause of death. They sometimes present with seizures due to a defect in vitamin B6 metabolism resulting from the lack of alkaline phosphatase activity in neuronal cells, which is also lethal. Patients with a mild form of the disease exhibit rickets or osteomalacia and a functional defect of exercise. Odontohypophosphatasia shows only dental manifestations. To date, 302 mutations in the ALPL gene have been reported, mainly single-nucleotide substitutions, and the relationships between phenotype and genotype have been partially elucidated. An established treatment for HPP was not available until the recent development of enzyme replacement therapy. The first successful enzyme replacement therapy in model mice using a modified human TNAP protein (asfotase alfa was reported in 2008, and subsequently success in patients with severe form of the disease was reported in 2012. In 2015, asfotase alfa was approved in Japan in July, followed by in the EU and Canada in August, and then by the US Food and Drug Administration in the USA in October. It is expected that therapy with asfotase alfa will drastically change

  17. Pathophysiology of hypophosphatasia and the potential role of asfotase alfa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orimo, Hideo

    2016-01-01

    Hypophosphatasia (HPP) is an inherited systemic bone disease that is characterized by bone hypomineralization. HPP is classified into six forms according to the age of onset and severity as perinatal (lethal), perinatal benign, infantile, childhood, adult, and odontohypophosphatasia. The causative gene of the disease is the ALPL gene that encodes tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP). TNAP is expressed ubiquitously, and its physiological role is apparent in bone mineralization. A defect in bone mineralization can manifest in several ways, including rickets or osteomalacia in HPP patients. Patients with severe forms suffer from respiratory failure because of hypoplastic chest, which is the main cause of death. They sometimes present with seizures due to a defect in vitamin B6 metabolism resulting from the lack of alkaline phosphatase activity in neuronal cells, which is also lethal. Patients with a mild form of the disease exhibit rickets or osteomalacia and a functional defect of exercise. Odontohypophosphatasia shows only dental manifestations. To date, 302 mutations in the ALPL gene have been reported, mainly single-nucleotide substitutions, and the relationships between phenotype and genotype have been partially elucidated. An established treatment for HPP was not available until the recent development of enzyme replacement therapy. The first successful enzyme replacement therapy in model mice using a modified human TNAP protein (asfotase alfa) was reported in 2008, and subsequently success in patients with severe form of the disease was reported in 2012. In 2015, asfotase alfa was approved in Japan in July, followed by in the EU and Canada in August, and then by the US Food and Drug Administration in the USA in October. It is expected that therapy with asfotase alfa will drastically change treatments and prognosis of HPP. PMID:27274262

  18. A Student-Constructed Galvanic Cell for the Measurement of Cell Potentials at Different Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubowska, Anna

    2016-01-01

    A student-made galvanic cell is proposed for temperature measurements of cell potential. This cell can be easily constructed by students, the materials needed are readily available and nontoxic, and the solution applied is in an attractive color. For this cell, the potential values are excellently reproducible at each temperature, and the…

  19. Role of Stem Cells in Treatment of Neurological Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Ul Hassan, Ashfaq; Hassan, Ghulam; Rasool, Zahida

    2009-01-01

    Stem cells or mother or queen of all cells are pleuropotent and have the remarkable potential to develop into many different cell types in the body. Serving as a sort of repair system for the body, they can theoretically divide without limit to replenish other cells as long as the person or animal is alive. When a stem cell divides, each new cell has the potential to either remain a stem cell or become another type of cell with a more specialized function, such as a muscle cell, a red blood c...

  20. Transient Receptor Potential Channels in Microglia: Roles in Physiology and Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echeverry, Santiago; Rodriguez, María Juliana; Torres, Yolima P

    2016-10-01

    Microglia modulate the nervous system cellular environment and induce neuroprotective and neurotoxic effects. Various molecules are involved in these processes, including families of ion channels expressed in microglial cells, such as transient receptor potential (TRP) channels. TRP channels comprise a family of non-selective cation channels that can be activated by mechanical, thermal, and chemical stimuli, and which contribute to the regulation of intracellular calcium concentrations. TRP channels have been shown to be involved in cellular processes such as osmotic regulation, cytokine production, proliferation, activation, cell death, and oxidative stress responses. Given the significance of these processes in microglial activity, studies of TRP channels in microglia have focused on determining their roles in both neuroprotective and neurotoxic processes. TRP channel activity has been proposed to play an important function in neurodegenerative diseases, ischemia, inflammatory responses, and neuropathic pain. Modulation of TRP channel activity may thus be considered as a potential therapeutic strategy for the treatment of various diseases associated with alterations of the central nervous system (CNS). In this review, we describe the expression of different subfamilies of TRP channels in microglia, focusing on their physiological and pathophysiological roles, and consider their potential use as therapeutic targets in CNS diseases. PMID:27260222

  1. Role of Calmodulin in Cell Proliferation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chafouleas, J.

    1983-01-01

    Calmodulin levels were found to increase as cells enter plateau. The data suggest that the cells are exiting the cell cycle late in the G sub 1 phase, or that the calmodulin levels in plateau cells are uncoupled to progression into S phase in plateau cells. Upon release, calmodulin levels rapidly decrease. Following this decrease, there is a increase prior to S phase.

  2. Role of mitochondrial function in cell death and body metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myung-Shik

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are the key players in apoptosis and necrosis. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)-depleted r0 cells were resistant to diverse apoptosis inducers such as TNF-alpha, TNFSF10, staurosporine and p53. Apoptosis resistance was accompanied by the absence of mitochondrial potential loss or cytochrome c translocation. r0 cells were also resistant to necrosis induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS) donors due to upregulation of antioxidant enzymes such as manganese superoxide dismutase. Mitochondria also has a close relationship with autophagy that plays a critical role in the turnover of senescent organelles or dysfunctional proteins and may be included in 'cell death' category. It was demonstrated that autophagy deficiency in insulin target tissues such as skeletal muscle induces mitochondrial stress response, which leads to the induction of FGF21 as a 'mitokine' and affects the whole body metabolism. These results show that mitochondria are not simply the power plants of cells generating ATP, but are closely related to several types of cell death and autophagy. Mitochondria affect various pathophysiological events related to diverse disorders such as cancer, metabolic disorders and aging. PMID:27100503

  3. Angiogenic Potential of Human Neonatal Foreskin Stromal Cells in the Chick Embryo Chorioallantoic Membrane Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radhakrishnan Vishnubalaji

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have demonstrated the multipotentiality of human neonatal foreskin stromal cells (hNSSCs as being able to differentiate into adipocytes and osteoblasts and potentially other cell types. Recently, we demonstrated that hNSSCs play a role during in vitro angiogenesis and appear to possess a capacity to differentiate into endothelial-like cells; however, their angiogenic potential within an ex vivo environment remains unclear. Current study shows hNSSCs to display significant migration potential in the undifferentiated state and high responsiveness in the in vitro wound healing scratch assay. When hNSSCs were seeded onto the top of the CAM, human von Willebrand factor (hVWF, CD31, smooth muscle actin (SMA, and factor XIIIa positive cells were observed in the chick endothelium. CAMs transplanted with endothelial-differentiated hNSSCs displayed a higher number of blood vessels containing hNSSCs compared to CAMs transplanted with undifferentiated hNSSCs. Interestingly, undifferentiated hNSSCs showed a propensity to differentiate towards ectoderm with indication of epidermal formation with cells positive for CD1a, CK5/6, CK19, FXIIIa, and S-100 cells, which warrant further investigation. Our findings imply a potential angiogenic role for hNSSCs ex vivo in the differentiated and undifferentiated state, with potential contribution to blood vessel formation and potential application in tissue regeneration and vascularization.

  4. POTENTIAL CELL LINE TOXICITY OF ENVIRONMENTAL NANOPARTICLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohan Durga

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In India, the unprecedented growth rate and urbanization along with the rapid increase in motor vehicle activity and industrialization are contributing to high levels of urban air pollution. The population is mainly exposed to high air pollution concentrations, where motor vehicle emissions constitute the main source of fine and ultrafine particles. Motor exhaust emissions is a mixture of gases and Particulate Matter (PM. Diesel and petrol fuels in vehicles produce combustion-derived particles as a result of combustion. Vehicle exhaust particles are the main constituents of environmental nanoparticles. In the present investigation, environmental nanoparticles such as Diesel Exhaust Particles (DEP and Petrol Exhaust Particles (PEP were collected from on-road vehicles using a specially designed collection chamber. The surface morphology of the collected particles was analyzed through Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM, and the elemental mapping was performed through EDAX analysis. Results indicated the presence of nanometer-size particles in both the categories of vehicle exhaust. These small-size particles of respirable range can enter the respiratory tract of humans and get deposited in the lungs and cause various effects inside the human body. The aim of this study is to assess the cytotoxicity of the collected Diesel Exhaust Nanoparticles (DENPs and Petrol Exhaust Nanoparticles (PENPs. Cytotoxicity endpoint, such as IC50 (50% Inhibitory Concentration, was determined after a 24-h exposure. Results of this study indicated that all five cell lines were sensitive to these vehicle exhaust nanoparticles at varying levels.

  5. Potential of thin-film solar cell module technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, K.; Ferber, R. R.; Costogue, E. N.

    1985-01-01

    During the past five years, thin-film cell technology has made remarkable progress as a potential alternative to crystalline silicon cell technology. The efficiency of a single-junction thin-film cell, which is the most promising for use in flat-plate modules, is now in the range of 11 percent with 1-sq cm cells consisting of amorphous silicon, CuInSe2 or CdTe materials. Cell efficiencies higher than 18 percent, suitable for 15 percent-efficient flat plate modules, would require a multijunction configuration such as the CdTe/CuInSe2 and tandem amorphous-silicon (a-Si) alloy cells. Assessments are presented of the technology status of thin-film-cell module research and the potential of achieving the higher efficiencies required for large-scale penetration into the photovoltaic (PV) energy market.

  6. Stem cells: Potential therapy for age-related diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kassem, Moustapha

    2006-01-01

    -engineered organs) to restore the functions of damaged or defective tissues and organs and thus to "rejuvenate" the failing aging body. One of the most important sources for cellular medicine is embryonic and adult (somatic) stem cells (SSCs). One example of SCCs with enormous clinical potential is the mesenchymal......Aging is associated with a progressive failing of tissues and organs of the human body leading to a large number of age-related diseases. Regenerative medicine is an emerging clinical discipline that aims to employ cellular medicines (normal cells, ex vivo expanded cells, or tissue...... stem cells (MSCs) that are present in the bone marrow and are able to differentiate into cell types such as osteoblasts, chondrocytes, endothelial cells, and probably also neuron-like cells. Because of the ease of their isolation and their extensive differentiation potential, MSCs are among the first...

  7. Potential Use of Stem Cells for Kidney Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Yokoo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Significant advances have been made in stem cell research over the past decade. A number of nonhematopoietic sources of stem cells (or progenitor cells have been identified, including endothelial stem cells and neural stem cells. These discoveries have been a major step toward the use of stem cells for potential clinical applications of organ regeneration. Accordingly, kidney regeneration is currently gaining considerable attention to replace kidney dialysis as the ultimate therapeutic strategy for renal failure. However, due to anatomic complications, the kidney is believed to be the hardest organ to regenerate; it is virtually impossible to imagine such a complicated organ being completely rebuilt from pluripotent stem cells by gene or chemical manipulation. Nevertheless, several groups are taking on this big challenge. In this manuscript, current advances in renal stem cell research are reviewed and their usefulness for kidney regeneration discussed. We also reviewed the current knowledge of the emerging field of renal stem cell biology.

  8. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 activity controls cell motility and metastatic potential of prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strock, Christopher J; Park, Jong-In; Nakakura, Eric K; Bova, G Steven; Isaacs, John T; Ball, Douglas W; Nelkin, Barry D

    2006-08-01

    We show here that cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5), a known regulator of migration in neuronal development, plays an important role in prostate cancer motility and metastasis. P35, an activator of CDK5 that is indicative of its activity, is expressed in a panel of human and rat prostate cancer cell lines, and is also expressed in 87.5% of the human metastatic prostate cancers we examined. Blocking of CDK5 activity with a dominant-negative CDK5 construct, small interfering RNA, or roscovitine resulted in changes in the microtubule cytoskeleton, loss of cellular polarity, and loss of motility. Expression of a dominant-negative CDK5 in the highly metastatic Dunning AT6.3 prostate cancer cell line also greatly impaired invasive capacity. CDK5 activity was important for spontaneous metastasis in vivo; xenografts of AT6.3 cells expressing dominant-negative CDK5 had less than one-fourth the number of lung metastases exhibited by AT6.3 cells expressing the empty vector. These results show that CDK5 activity controls cell motility and metastatic potential in prostate cancer.

  9. Potential role of aromatase inhibitors in the treatment of endometriosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abu Hashim H

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Hatem Abu HashimDepartment of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine, Mansoura University, Mansoura, EgyptAbstract: Endometriosis is an estrogen-dependent chronic inflammatory disease affecting 5%–10% of reproductive-age women, with a prevalence of 5%–50% in infertile women and >33% of women with chronic pelvic pain. Third-generation aromatase inhibitors (AIs are approved adjuvants for the treatment of estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer. Molecular studies have revealed the presence of aromatase P450, the key enzyme in the biosynthesis of ovarian estradiol, inside the endometriotic tissue, indicating local synthesis of estradiol. Thereby, AIs represent an appealing medical option for the management of different aspects of this enigmatic disease, especially pelvic pain and infertility. Accordingly, this review aims to evaluate the potential role of AIs in the treatment of endometriosis-associated symptoms, mainly pain and infertility. Notably, several studies have demonstrated that the combination of AIs with conventional therapy as oral contraceptive pills, progestins, or gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogs can be used to control endometriosis-associated pain and pain recurrence in premenopausal women, particularly those with pain due to rectovaginal endometriosis refractory to other medical or surgical treatment. Some case reports have shown promising results in the treatment of postmenopausal endometriosis as first-line treatment, when surgery is contraindicated, or as second-line treatment in the case of postoperative recurrence. Third-generation AIs, especially letrozole, have challenged clomiphene citrate as an ovulation-induction agent in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome and in cases of unexplained infertility. However, few studies are available regarding the use of AIs to treat endometriosis-associated infertility. Therefore, larger multicenter randomized trials using AIs for the treatment of endometriosis

  10. Role of Vibrational Spectroscopy in Stem Cell Research

    OpenAIRE

    AKSOY, Ceren; Severcan, Feride

    2012-01-01

    Recent researches have mainly displayed the significant role of stem cells in tissue renewal and homeostasis with their unique capacity to develop different cell types. These findings have clarified the importance of stem cells to improve the effectiveness of any cell therapy for regenerative medicine. Identification of purity and differentiation stages of stem cells are the greatest challenges of stem cell biology and regenerative medicine. The existing methods to carefully monitor and chara...

  11. Induction of chemokines and prostaglandin synthesis pathways in luteinized human granulosa cells: potential role of luteotropin withdrawal and prostaglandin F2α in regression of the human corpus luteum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Wenxiang; Salih, Sana M; Bormann, Charles L; Wiltbank, Milo C

    2015-12-01

    Our objective was to determine the effects of prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α) and withdrawal of luteotropic stimulants (forskolin or hCG) on expression of chemokines and prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (PTGS2) in luteinized human granulosa cells. Human granulosa cells were collected from 12 women undergoing oocyte retrieval and were luteinized in vitro with forskolin or hCG. In first experiment, granulosa-lutein cells were treated with PGF2α, the primary luteolytic hormone in most species. In second experiment, granulosa cells that had been luteinized for 8 d had luteotropins withdrawn for 1, 2, or 3 d. Treatment with PGF2α induced mRNA for chemokine (c-x-c motif) ligand 2 (CXCL2) and CXC ligand 8 (CXCL8; also known as interleukin-8) in granulosa cells luteinized for 8 d but not in cells that were only luteinized for 2 d. Similarly, luteinization of human granulosa cells for 8 d with forskolin or hCG followed by withdrawal of luteotropic stimulants, not only decreased P4 production, but also increased mRNA concentrations for CXCL8, CXCL-2 (after forskolin withdrawal), and PTGS2. These results provide evidence for two key steps in differentiation of luteolytic capability in human granulosa cells. During 8 d of luteinization, granulosa cells acquire the ability to respond to luteolytic factors, such as PGF2α, with induction of genes involved in immune function and PG synthesis. Finally, a decline in luteotropic stimuli triggers similar pathways leading to induction of PTGS2 and possibly intraluteal PGF2α production, chemokine expression, leukocyte infiltration and activation, and ultimately luteal regression. PMID:26679166

  12. Ca2+-mediated potentiation of the swelling-induced taurine efflux from HeLa cells: On the role of calmodulin and novel protein kinase C isoforms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falktoft, Birgitte; Lambert, Ian H.

    2004-01-01

    The present work sets out to investigate how Ca2+ regulates the volume-sensitive taurine-release pathway in HeLa cells. Addition of Ca2+-mobilizing agonists at the time of exposure to hypotonic NaCl medium augments the swelling-induced taurine release and subsequently accelerates the inactivation...... of the release pathway. The accelerated inactivation is not observed in hypotonic Ca2+-free or high-K+ media. Addition of Ca2+-mobilizing agonists also accelerates the regulatory volume decrease, which probably reflects activation of Ca2+-activated K+ channels. The taurine release from control cells...... and cells exposed to Ca2+ agonists is equally affected by changes in cell volume, application of DIDS and arachidonic acid, indicating that the volume-sensitive taurine leak pathway mediates the Ca2+-augmented taurine release. Exposure to Ca2+-mobilizing agonists prior to a hypotonic challenge also...

  13. Role of the potential landscape on the single-file diffusion through channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldt, S. D.; Terentjev, E. M. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, JJ Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom)

    2014-12-14

    Transport of colloid particles through narrow channels is ubiquitous in cell biology as well as becoming increasingly important for microfluidic applications or targeted drug delivery. Membrane channels in cells are useful models for artificial designs because of their high efficiency, selectivity, and robustness to external fluctuations. Here, we model the passive channels that let cargo simply diffuse through them, affected by a potential profile along the way. Passive transporters achieve high levels of efficiency and specificity from binding interactions with the cargo inside the channel. This however leads to a paradox: why should channels which are so narrow that they are blocked by their cargo evolve to have binding regions for their cargo if that will effectively block them? Using Brownian dynamics simulations, we show that different potentials, notably symmetric, increase the flux through narrow passive channels – and investigate how shape and depth of potentials influence the flux. We find that there exist optimal depths for certain potential shapes and that it is most efficient to apply a small force over an extended region of the channel. On the other hand, having several spatially discrete binding pockets will not alter the flux significantly. We also explore the role of many-particle effects arising from pairwise particle interactions with their neighbours and demonstrate that the relative changes in flux can be accounted for by the kinetics of the absorption reaction at the end of the channel.

  14. STEM CELLS: Differentiated cells in a back-up role

    OpenAIRE

    Desai, Tushar J.; Krasnow, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    Two independent studies show that, if push comes to shove, differentiated cells of the stomach and lung can act as adult stem cells generating various cell types of the tissue, including a pool of stem cells.

  15. Th9 lymphocytes: A recent history from IL-9 to its potential role in rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-Zuleta, Wilmer Gerardo; Vásquez, Gloria

    2016-07-01

    Various subtypes of effector T cells have been described up to date, and each one has its specific immunological function and a defined cytokine secretion profile. Th9 lymphocytes, recently described, are characterized by a high IL-9 expression. Their differentiation requires the integration of IL-4 and TGF-β signaling pathways and the coordinated participation of multiple transcription factors. Their role has been mainly found in immunity against parasites and in allergic inflammatory processes. Nevertheless, they have been implicated in processes as autoimmunity, cancer and recently in rheumatic diseases. The objective of this review is to describe the discovery of this cellular subtype, its differentiation, expression regulation and its potential role in rheumatic diseases.

  16. Role of inositol phospholipid signaling in natural killer cell biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew eGumbleton

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Natural Killer (NK cells are important in the host defense against malignancy and infection. At a cellular level NK cells are activated when signals from activating receptors exceed signaling from inhibitory receptors. At a molecular level NK cells undergo an education process to prevent autoimmunity. Mouse models have shown important roles for inositol phospholipid signaling in lymphocytes. NK cells from mice with deletion in different members of the PI3K signaling pathway have defective development, natural killer cell repertoire expression (NKRR and effector function. Here we review the role of inositol phospholipid signaling in NK cell biology.

  17. Stratification of yeast cells during chronological aging by size points to the role of trehalose in cell vitality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svenkrtova, Andrea; Belicova, Lenka; Volejnikova, Andrea; Sigler, Karel; Jazwinski, S Michal; Pichova, Alena

    2016-04-01

    Cells of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae undergo a process akin to differentiation during prolonged culture without medium replenishment. Various methods have been used to separate and determine the potential role and fate of the different cell species. We have stratified chronologically-aged yeast cultures into cells of different sizes, using centrifugal elutriation, and characterized these subpopulations physiologically. We distinguish two extreme cell types, very small (XS) and very large (L) cells. L cells display higher viability based on two separate criteria. They respire much more actively, but produce lower levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). L cells are capable of dividing, albeit slowly, giving rise to XS cells which do not divide. L cells are more resistant to osmotic stress and they have higher trehalose content, a storage carbohydrate often connected to stress resistance. Depletion of trehalose by deletion of TPS2 does not affect the vital characteristics of L cells, but it improves some of these characteristics in XS cells. Therefore, we propose that the response of L and XS cells to the trehalose produced in the former differs in a way that lowers the vitality of the latter. We compare our XS- and L-fraction cell characteristics with those of cells isolated from stationary cultures by others based on density. This comparison suggests that the cells have some similarities but also differences that may prove useful in addressing whether it is the segregation or the response to trehalose that may play the predominant role in cell division from stationary culture.

  18. The Potential Role of Kallistatin in the Development of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiaze; Krishna, Smriti Murali; Golledge, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a vascular condition that causes permanent dilation of the abdominal aorta, which can lead to death due to aortic rupture. The only treatment for AAA is surgical repair, and there is no current drug treatment for AAA. Aortic inflammation, vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis, angiogenesis, oxidative stress and vascular remodeling are implicated in AAA pathogenesis. Kallistatin is a serine proteinase inhibitor, which has been shown to have a variety of functions, potentially relevant in AAA pathogenesis. Kallistatin has been reported to have inhibitory effects on tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) signaling induced oxidative stress and apoptosis. Kallistatin also inhibits vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and Wnt canonical signaling, which promote inflammation, angiogenesis, and vascular remodeling in various pre-clinical experimental models. This review explores the potential protective role of kallistatin in AAA pathogenesis. PMID:27529213

  19. The Potential Role of Kallistatin in the Development of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiaze; Krishna, Smriti Murali; Golledge, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a vascular condition that causes permanent dilation of the abdominal aorta, which can lead to death due to aortic rupture. The only treatment for AAA is surgical repair, and there is no current drug treatment for AAA. Aortic inflammation, vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis, angiogenesis, oxidative stress and vascular remodeling are implicated in AAA pathogenesis. Kallistatin is a serine proteinase inhibitor, which has been shown to have a variety of functions, potentially relevant in AAA pathogenesis. Kallistatin has been reported to have inhibitory effects on tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) signaling induced oxidative stress and apoptosis. Kallistatin also inhibits vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and Wnt canonical signaling, which promote inflammation, angiogenesis, and vascular remodeling in various pre-clinical experimental models. This review explores the potential protective role of kallistatin in AAA pathogenesis. PMID:27529213

  20. Membrane potential and ion transport in lung epithelial type II cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The alveolar type II pneumocyte is critically important to the function and maintenance of pulmonary epithelium. To investigate the nature of the response of type II cells to membrane injury, and describe a possible mechanism by which these cells regulate surfactant secretion, the membrane potential of isolated rabbit type II cells was characterized. This evaluation was accomplished by measurements of the accumulation of the membrane potential probes: [3H]triphenylmethylphosphonium ([3H]TPMP+), rubidium 86, and the fluorescent dye DiOC5. A compartmental analysis of probe uptake into mitochondrial, cytoplasmic, and non-membrane potential dependent stores was made through the use of selective membrane depolarizations with carbonycyanide M-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP), and lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC). These techniques and population analysis with flow cytometry, permitted the accurate evaluation of type II cell membrane potential under control conditions and under conditions which stimulated cell activity. Further analysis of ion transport by cells exposed to radiation or adrenergic stimulation revealed a common increase in Na+/K+ ATPase activity, and an increase in sodium influx across the plasma membrane. This sodium influx was found to be a critical step in the initiation of surfactant secretion. It is concluded that radiation exposure as well as other pulmonary toxicants can directly affect the membrane potential and ionic regulation of type II cells. Ion transport, particularly of sodium, plays an important role in the regulation of type II cell function

  1. In vitro interactions of extracellular histones with LDL suggest a potential pro-atherogenic role.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan D Pemberton

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nuclear histones have previously been shown to aggregate LDL in vitro, suggestive of a possible pro-atherogenic role. Recent studies indicate that histones are released during acute inflammation, and therefore might interact with circulating lipoproteins in vivo. In view of the associative link between inflammation and cardiovascular disease, the behaviour of histones was investigated using in vitro models of LDL retention and foam cell formation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Heparin agarose beads were used as a model of a matrix rich in sulphated glycosaminoglycans, to which histones bind strongly. Histone-modified beads were observed to pull down more LDL from solution than untreated beads, indicating that histones can function as bridging molecules, enhancing LDL retention. Furthermore, addition of heparin inhibited histone-induced aggregation of LDL. To model foam cell formation, murine RAW 264.7 macrophages were incubated for 24 h in the presence of LDL, histones, LDL plus histones or vehicle control. Cells incubated with LDL in the presence of histones accumulated significantly more intracellular lipid than with LDL or histone alone. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results are consistent with a potential pro-atherogenic role for extracellular histones, which should be investigated further.

  2. Altered Membrane Potential and Electrolyte in Sickle Cell Anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JK Nnodim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study has been to evaluate the level of membrane potential and electrolyte in sickle cell disease patients. Material and methods: 100 sickle cell patients in steady state ages 5 to 30 years attending General Hospital Owerri were used in the study while 100 normal subjects (HbAA were used as control. Also 30 HbSS in crisis have been involved. Results: The results obtained showed that the level of membrane potential was significantly lower in sickle cell anemia as compared to the controls. Also, the level of the electrolyte was found significantly decreased in HbSS when compared with HbAA at P<0.05. Conclusion: The membrane potential translates to energy which means that there is less energy in sickle cell disease which is linked to electrolyte imbalance. Hence people with sickle disease should be monitored closely for their electrolytes to avoid crisis.

  3. Cellular transcriptional profiling in influenza A virus-infected lung epithelial cells: The role of the nonstructural NS1 protein in the evasion of the host innate defense and its potential contribution to pandemic influenza

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiss, Gary K.; Salvatore, Mirella; Tumpey, Terrence M.; Carter, Victoria S.; Wang, Xiuyan; Basler, Christopher F.; Taubenberger, Jeffery K.; Bumgarner, Roger E.; Palese, Peter; Katze, Michael G.; García-Sastre, Adolfo

    2002-08-01

    The NS1 protein of influenza A virus contributes to viral pathogenesis, primarily by enabling the virus to disarm the host cell type IFN defense system. We examined the downstream effects of NS1 protein expression during influenza A virus infection on global cellular mRNA levels by measuring expression of over 13,000 cellular genes in response to infection with wild-type and mutant viruses in human lung epithelial cells. Influenza A/PR/8/34 virus infection resulted in a significant induction of genes involved in the IFN pathway. Deletion of the viral NS1 gene increased the number and magnitude of expression of cellular genes implicated in the IFN, NF-B, and other antiviral pathways. Interestingly, different IFN-induced genes showed different sensitivities to NS1-mediated inhibition of their expression. A recombinant virus with a C-terminal deletion in its NS1 gene induced an intermediate cellular mRNA expression pattern between wild-type and NS1 knockout viruses. Most significantly, a virus containing the 1918 pandemic NS1 gene was more efficient at blocking the expression of IFN-regulated genes than its parental influenza A/WSN/33 virus. Taken together, our results suggest that the cellular response to influenza A virus infection in human lung cells is significantly influenced by the sequence of the NS1 gene, demonstrating the importance of the NS1 protein in regulating the host cell response triggered by virus infection.

  4. The potential role of sports psychology in the obesity epidemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morelli, Vincent; Davis, Carolyn

    2013-06-01

    Sports psychologists play an important role in enhancing performance among athletes. In conjunction with team physicians, they can also shed light on psychological disorders common in athletes, such as mood and eating disorders, and overtraining syndrome. Sports psychologists can also lend their expertise to assist with injury prevention and recovery and compliance issues. Sports psychology has a role in helping to reverse the growing obesity epidemic among school-aged children. These professionals, working with coaches, can increase children's levels of physical activity. Cognitive-behavioral techniques could lead to enhanced enjoyment, increased participation, improved school performance, and a reduction in obesity.

  5. Potential role of DNA-dependent protein kinase in cellular resistance to ionizing radiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ning; ZHANG Hong; WANG Yanling; WANG Xiaohu; HAO Jifang

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we study the ability of DNA-PK-deficient (M059J) and -proficient (M059K) cells to undergo the rate of cellular proliferation, cell cycle distribution and apoptosis after 10 Gy X-ray irradiation, and the role of DNA-PK in radiosensitivity. The results showed that M059J cells exhibited hyper-radiosensitivity compared with M059K cells. A strong G2 phase arrest was observed in M059J cells post irradiation. Significant accumulation in the G2 phase in M059J cells was accompanied by apoptosis at 12 h. Altogether, the data suggested that DNA-PK may have two roles in mammalian cells after DNA damage, a role in DNA DSB repair and a second role in DNA-damaged cells to traverse a G2 checkpoint, by which DNA-PK may affect cellular sensitivity to ionizing radiation.

  6. Stem cells from amniotic fluid--Potential for regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loukogeorgakis, Stavros P; De Coppi, Paolo

    2016-02-01

    Regenerative medicine has recently been established as an emerging field focussing on repair, replacement or regeneration of cells, tissues and whole organs. The significant recent advances in the field have intensified the search for novel sources of stem cells with potential for therapy. Recently, researchers have identified the amniotic fluid as an untapped source of stem cells that are multipotent, possess immunomodulatory properties and do not have the ethical and legal limitations of embryonic stem cells. Stem cells from the amniotic fluid have been shown to differentiate into cell lineages representing all three embryonic germ layers without generating tumours, which make them an ideal candidate for tissue engineering applications. In addition, their ability to engraft in injured organs and modulate immune and repair responses of host tissues suggest that transplantation of such cells may be useful for the treatment of various degenerative and inflammatory diseases affecting major tissues/organs. This review summarises the evidence on amniotic fluid cells over the past 15 years and explores the potential therapeutic applications of amniotic fluid stem cells and amniotic fluid mesenchymal stem cells.

  7. The secretome of mesenchymal stem cells: potential implications for neuroregeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Gesine; Anisimov, Sergey V

    2013-12-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells have shown regenerative properties in many tissues. This feature had originally been ascribed to their multipotency and thus their ability to differentiate into tissue-specific cells. However, many researchers consider the secretome of mesenchymal stem cells the most important player in the observed reparative effects of these cells. In this review, we specifically focus on the potential neuroregenerative effect of mesenchymal stem cells, summarize several possible mechanisms of neuroregeneration and list key factors mediating this effect. We illustrate examples of mesenchymal stem cell treatment in central nervous system disorders including stroke, neurodegenerative disorders (such as Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, multiple system atrophy and cerebellar ataxia) and inflammatory disease (such as multiple sclerosis). We specifically highlight studies where mesenchymal stem cells have entered clinical trials.

  8. The role of transient receptor potential channels in metabolic syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Daoyan; Zhu, Zhiming; Tepel, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is correlated with increased cardiovascular risk and characterized by several factors, including visceral obesity, hypertension, insulin resistance, and dyslipidemia. Several members of a large family of nonselective cation entry channels, e.g., transient receptor potential (TRP...

  9. The role of dental stem cells in regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    MAXIM, MONICA ANGELA; Soritau, Olga; BACIUT, MIHAELA; BRAN, SIMION; BACIUT, GRIGORE

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are adult stem cells that have the capacity of rising multiple cell types. A rich source of mesenchymal stem cells is represented by the dental tissues: the periodontal ligament, the dental pulp, the apical papilla, the dental follicle and the deciduous teeth. The aim of this review is to characterize the main dental- derived mesenchymal stem cell population, and to show their important role in tissue regeneration based on their properties : the multi-potency, th...

  10. Adult neural stem cells-Functional potential and therapeutic applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Lin; ZHU Jianhong

    2004-01-01

    The adult brain has been thought traditionally as a structure with a very limited regenerative capacity. It is now evident that neurogenesis in adult mammalian brain is a prevailing phenomenon. Neural stem cells with the ability to self-renew, differentiate into neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes reside in some regions of the adult brain. Adult neurogenesis can be stimulated by many physiological factors including pregnancy. More strikingly, newborn neurons in hippocampus integrally function with local neurons, thus neural stem cells might play important roles in memory and learning function. It seems that neural stem cells could transdifferentiate into other tissues, such as blood cells and muscles. Although there are some impediments in this field, some attempts have been made to employ adult neural stem cells in the cell replacement therapy for traumatic and ischemic brain injuries.

  11. Mesenchymal stem cell subpopulations: phenotype, property and therapeutic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Miaohua; Wang, Shan; Zhou, Ying; Li, Hong; Wu, Yaojiong

    2016-09-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are capable of differentiating into cells of multiple cell lineages and have potent paracrine effects. Due to their easy preparation and low immunogenicity, MSC have emerged as an extremely promising therapeutic agent in regenerative medicine for diverse diseases. However, MSC are heterogeneous with respect to phenotype and function in current isolation and cultivation regimes, which often lead to incomparable experimental results. In addition, there may be specific stem cell subpopulations with definite differentiation capacity toward certain lineages in addition to stem cells with multi-differentiation potential. Recent studies have identified several subsets of MSC which exhibit distinct features and biological activities, and enhanced therapeutic potentials for certain diseases. In this review, we give an overview of these subsets for their phenotypic, biological and functional properties. PMID:27141940

  12. Novel role of cold/menthol-sensitive transient receptor potential melastatine family member 8 (TRPM8) in the activation of store-operated channels in LNCaP human prostate cancer epithelial cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thebault, S.C.; Lemonnier, L.; Bidaux, G.; Flourakis, M.; Bavencoffe, A.; Gordienko, D.; Roudbaraki, M.; Delcourt, P.; Panchin, Y.; Shuba, Y.; Skryma, R.; Prevarskaya, N.

    2005-01-01

    Recent cloning of a cold/menthol-sensitive TRPM8 channel (transient receptor potential melastatine family member 8) from rodent sensory neurons has provided the molecular basis for the cold sensation. Surprisingly, the human orthologue of rodent TRPM8 also appears to be strongly expressed in the pro

  13. Therapeutic potential of stem cells in veterinary practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitin E Gade

    Full Text Available Stem cell research acquired great attention during last decade inspite of incredible therapeutic potential of these cells the ethical controversies exists. Stem cells have enormous uses in animal cloning, drug discovery, gene targeting, transgenic production and regenerative therapy. Stem cells are the naïve cells of body which can self-renew and differentiate into other cell types to carry out multiple functions, these properties have been utilized in therapeutic application of stem cells in human and veterinary medicine. The application of stem cells in human medicine is well established and it is commonly used for chronic and accidental injuries. In Veterinary sciences previous studies mostly focused on establishing protocols for isolation and their characterization but with advancement in array of techniques for in vitro studies, stem cells rapidly became a viable tool for regenerative therapy of chronic, debilitating and various unresponsive clinical diseases and disorders. Multipotent adult stem cells have certain advantages over embryonic stem cells like easy isolation and expansion from numerous sources, less immunogenicity and no risk of teratoma formation hence their use is preferred in therapeutics. Adult stem cells have been utilized for treatment of spinal injuries, tendonitis, cartilage defects, osteoarthritis and ligament defects, liver diseases, wounds, cardiac and bone defects in animals. The multi-potential capability of these cells can be better utilized in near future to overcome the challenges faced by the clinicians. This review will emphasize on the therapeutic utilization and success of stem cell therapies in animals. [Vet. World 2012; 5(8.000: 499-507

  14. Universities Potential Role in Local and Regional Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moesby, Egon; Rolim, Cassio

    2013-01-01

    and highly skilled and competent staff, it could be anticipated that universities should play a key role in facilitating such growth and development. At Aalborg University, such cooperation is taking place, and this paper sums up the practices and experiences gained therefrom. Findings: Universities have...

  15. Potential benefits of cell therapy in coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimaldi, Vincenzo; Mancini, Francesco Paolo; Casamassimi, Amelia; Al-Omran, Mohammed; Zullo, Alberto; Infante, Teresa; Napoli, Claudio

    2013-11-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the world. In recent years, there has been an increasing interest both in basic and clinical research regarding the field of cell therapy for coronary heart disease (CHD). Several preclinical models of CHD have suggested that regenerative properties of stem and progenitor cells might help restoring myocardial functions in the event of cardiac diseases. Here, we summarize different types of stem/progenitor cells that have been tested in experimental and clinical settings of cardiac regeneration, from embryonic stem cells to induced pluripotent stem cells. Then, we provide a comprehensive description of the most common cell delivery strategies with their major pros and cons and underline the potential of tissue engineering and injectable matrices to address the crucial issue of restoring the three-dimensional structure of the injured myocardial region. Due to the encouraging results from preclinical models, the number of clinical trials with cell therapy is continuously increasing and includes patients with CHD and congestive heart failure. Most of the already published trials have demonstrated safety and feasibility of cell therapies in these clinical conditions. Several studies have also suggested that cell therapy results in improved clinical outcomes. Numerous ongoing clinical trials utilizing this therapy for CHD will address fundamental issues concerning cell source and population utilized, as well as the use of imaging techniques to assess cell homing and survival, all factors that affect the efficacy of different cell therapy strategies. PMID:23834957

  16. Potential benefits of cell therapy in coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimaldi, Vincenzo; Mancini, Francesco Paolo; Casamassimi, Amelia; Al-Omran, Mohammed; Zullo, Alberto; Infante, Teresa; Napoli, Claudio

    2013-11-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the world. In recent years, there has been an increasing interest both in basic and clinical research regarding the field of cell therapy for coronary heart disease (CHD). Several preclinical models of CHD have suggested that regenerative properties of stem and progenitor cells might help restoring myocardial functions in the event of cardiac diseases. Here, we summarize different types of stem/progenitor cells that have been tested in experimental and clinical settings of cardiac regeneration, from embryonic stem cells to induced pluripotent stem cells. Then, we provide a comprehensive description of the most common cell delivery strategies with their major pros and cons and underline the potential of tissue engineering and injectable matrices to address the crucial issue of restoring the three-dimensional structure of the injured myocardial region. Due to the encouraging results from preclinical models, the number of clinical trials with cell therapy is continuously increasing and includes patients with CHD and congestive heart failure. Most of the already published trials have demonstrated safety and feasibility of cell therapies in these clinical conditions. Several studies have also suggested that cell therapy results in improved clinical outcomes. Numerous ongoing clinical trials utilizing this therapy for CHD will address fundamental issues concerning cell source and population utilized, as well as the use of imaging techniques to assess cell homing and survival, all factors that affect the efficacy of different cell therapy strategies.

  17. Bladder Cancer and Urothelial Impairment: The Role of TRPV1 as Potential Drug Target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Mistretta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Urothelium, in addition to its primary function of barrier, is now understood to act as a complex system of cell communication that exhibits specialized sensory properties in the regulation of physiological or pathological stimuli. Furthermore, it has been hypothesized that bladder inflammation and neoplastic cell growth, the two most representative pathological conditions of the lower urinary tract, may arise from a primary defective urothelial lining. Transient receptor potential vanilloid channel 1 (TRPV1, a receptor widely distributed in lower urinary tract structures and involved in the physiological micturition reflex, was described to have a pathophysiological role in inflammatory conditions and in the genesis and development of urothelial cancer. In our opinion new compounds, such as curcumin, the major component of turmeric Curcuma longa, reported to potentiate the effects of the chemotherapeutic agents used in the management of recurrent urothelial cancer in vitro and also identified as one of several compounds to own the vanillyl structure required to work like a TRPV1 agonist, could be thought as complementary in the clinical management of both the recurrences and the inflammatory effects caused by the endoscopic resection or intravesical chemotherapy administration or could be combined with adjuvant agents to potentiate their antitumoral effect.

  18. Bone marrow concentrate for autologous transplantation in minipigs. Characterization and osteogenic potential of mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herten, M; Grassmann, J P; Sager, M; Benga, L; Fischer, J C; Jäger, M; Betsch, M; Wild, M; Hakimi, M; Jungbluth, P

    2013-01-01

    Autologous bone marrow plays an increasing role in the treatment of bone, cartilage and tendon healing disorders. Cell-based therapies display promising results in the support of local regeneration, especially therapies using intra-operative one-step treatments with autologous progenitor cells. In the present study, bone marrow-derived cells were concentrated in a point-of-care device and investigated for their mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) characteristics and their osteogenic potential. Bone marrow was harvested from the iliac crest of 16 minipigs. The mononucleated cells (MNC) were concentrated by gradient density centrifugation, cultivated, characterized by flow cytometry and stimulated into osteoblasts, adipocytes, and chondrocytes. Cell differentiation was investigated by histological and immunohistological staining of relevant lineage markers. The proliferation capacity was determined via colony forming units of fibroblast and of osteogenic alkaline-phosphatase-positive-cells. The MNC could be enriched 3.5-fold in nucleated cell concentrate in comparison to bone marrow. Flow cytometry analysis revealed a positive signal for the MSC markers. Cells could be differentiated into the three lines confirming the MSC character. The cellular osteogenic potential correlated significantly with the percentage of newly formed bone in vivo in a porcine metaphyseal long-bone defect model. This study demonstrates that bone marrow concentrate from minipigs display cells with MSC character and their osteogenic differentiation potential can be used for osseous defect repair in autologous transplantations.

  19. Cells as Active Particles in Asymmetric Potentials: Motility under External Gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comelles, Jordi; Caballero, David; Voituriez, Raphaël; Hortigüela, Verónica; Wollrab, Viktoria; Godeau, Amélie Luise; Samitier, Josep; Martínez, Elena; Riveline, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Cell migration is a crucial event during development and in disease. Mechanical constraints and chemical gradients can contribute to the establishment of cell direction, but their respective roles remain poorly understood. Using a microfabricated topographical ratchet, we show that the nucleus dictates the direction of cell movement through mechanical guidance by its environment. We demonstrate that this direction can be tuned by combining the topographical ratchet with a biochemical gradient of fibronectin adhesion. We report competition and cooperation between the two external cues. We also quantitatively compare the measurements associated with the trajectory of a model that treats cells as fluctuating particles trapped in a periodic asymmetric potential. We show that the cell nucleus contributes to the strength of the trap, whereas cell protrusions guided by the adhesive gradients add a constant tunable bias to the direction of cell motion. PMID:25296303

  20. Small Buccal Fat Pad Cells Have High Osteogenic Differentiation Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsurumachi, Niina; Akita, Daisuke; Kano, Koichiro; Matsumoto, Taro; Toriumi, Taku; Kazama, Tomohiko; Oki, Yoshinao; Tamura, Yoko; Tonogi, Morio; Isokawa, Keitaro; Shimizu, Noriyoshi; Honda, Masaki

    2016-03-01

    Dedifferentiated fat (DFAT) cells derived from mature adipocytes have mesenchymal stem cells' (MSCs) characteristics. Generally, mature adipocytes are 60-110 μm in diameter; however, association between adipocyte size and dedifferentiation efficiency is still unknown. This study, therefore, investigated the dedifferentiation efficiency of adipocytes based on cell diameter. Buccal fat pad was harvested from five human donors and dissociated by collagenase digestion. After exclusion of unwanted stromal cells by centrifugation, floating adipocytes were collected and their size distribution was analyzed. The floating adipocytes were then separated into two groups depending on cell size using 40- and 100-μm nylon mesh filters: cell diameters less than 40 μm (small adipocytes: S-adipocytes) and cell diameters of 40-100 μm (large adipocytes: L-adipocytes). Finally, we evaluated the efficiency of adipocyte dedifferentiation and then characterized the resultant DFAT cells. The S-adipocytes showed a higher capacity to dedifferentiate into DFAT cells (S-DFAT cells) compared to the L-adipocytes (L-DFAT cells). The S-DFAT cells also showed a relatively higher proportion of CD146-positive cells than L-DFAT cells, and exhibited more osteogenic differentiation ability based on the alkaline phosphatase activity and amount of calcium deposition. These results suggested that the S- and L-DFAT cells had distinct characteristics, and that the higher dedifferentiation potential of S-adipocytes compared to L-adipocytes gives the former group an advantage in yielding DFAT cells. PMID:26651216

  1. The role of fullerene shell upon stuffed atom polarization potential

    CERN Document Server

    Amusia, M Ya

    2015-01-01

    We have demonstrated that the polarization of the fullerene shell considerably alters the polarization potential of an atom, stuffed inside a fullerene. This essentially affects the electron elastic scattering phases as well as corresponding cross-sections. We illustrate the general trend by concrete examples of electron scattering by endohedrals of Neon and Argon. To obtain the presented results, we have suggested a simplified approach that permits to incorporate the effect of fullerenes polarizability into the Neon and Argon endohedrals polarization potential. As a result, we obtained numeric results that show strong variations in shape and magnitudes of scattering phases and cross-sections due to effect of fullerene polarization upon the endohedral polarization potential.

  2. The role of local voltage potentials in outflow tract ectopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, P.E.B.; Johannessen, A.; Jons, C.;

    2010-01-01

    Discrete, fragmented, local voltage potentials (LVPs) have been observed in electrograms recorded at the ablation site in patients undergoing radiofrequency ablation for arrhythmias originating in both the right and left ventricular outflow tract; however, the incidence and the significance...... for supraventricular arrhythmias served as controls. During sinus rhythm, LVPs were recorded in 24 of the 25 patients, 10-85 ms (41 +/- 19 ms) after the onset of the QRS complex, duration 33 +/- 11 ms, voltage 2.0 +/- 1.5 mV. The same potential was recorded 10-52 ms (mean 37 +/- 11 ms) prior to the V potential...... in the ventricular premature beats. In 10 patients, ventricular parasystole was suggested by varying coupling intervals > 100 ms, and fusion beats allowing for the estimation of the least common denominator of R-R intervals. In 23 of the 25 patients, the 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) and intracardiac contact...

  3. The role of fullerene shell upon stuffed atom polarization potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amusia, Miron; Chernysheva, Larissa

    2016-05-01

    We have demonstrated that the polarization of the fullerene shell considerably alters the polarization potential of an atom, stuffed inside a fullerene. This essentially affects the electron elastic scattering phases as well as corresponding cross-sections. We illustrate the general trend by concrete examples of electron scattering upon endohedrals that are formed when Ne and Ar atom are stuffed inside fullerene C60. To obtain the presented results, we have suggested a simplified approach that permits to incorporate the effect of fullerenes polarizability into the endohedrals polarization potential. By applying this approach, we obtained numeric results that show strong variations in shape and magnitudes of scattering phases and cross-sections due to effect of fullerene polarization upon the endohedral polarization potential. Using concrete examples we have demonstrated that the elastic scattering of electrons upon endohedrals is an entirely quantum mechanical process, where addition of even a single atom can qualitatively alter the multi-particle cross-section.

  4. Potential immune modularly role of glycine in oral gingival inflammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaumann, T.; Kraus, D.; Winter, J.; Wolf, M.; Deschner, J.; Jager, A.

    2013-01-01

    Gingival epithelial cells (GECs) represent a physical barrier against bacteria and are involved in the processes of innate immunity. Recently, an anti-inflammatory and immune-modulatory effect of the amino acid glycine has been demonstrated. However, there is only little information about the immune

  5. Role of TRPM2 in H(2O(2-induced cell apoptosis in endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Sun

    Full Text Available Melastatin-like transient receptor potential channel 2 (TRPM2 is an oxidant-sensitive and cationic non-selective channel that is expressed in mammalian vascular endothelium. Here we investigated the functional role of TRPM2 channels in hydrogen peroxide (H(2O(2-induced cytosolic Ca(2+ ([Ca(2+](i elavation, whole-cell current increase, and apoptotic cell death in murine heart microvessel endothelial cell line H5V. A TRPM2 blocking antibody (TM2E3, which targets the E3 region near the ion permeation pore of TRPM2, was developed. Treatment of H5V cells with TM2E3 reduced the [Ca(2+](i rise and whole-cell current change in response to H(2O(2. Suppressing TRPM2 expression using TRPM2-specific short hairpin RNA (shRNA had similar inhibitory effect. H(2O(2-induced apoptotic cell death in H5V cells was examined using MTT assay, DNA ladder formation analysis, and DAPI-based nuclear DNA condensation assay. Based on these assays, TM2E3 and TRPM2-specific shRNA both showed protective effect against H(2O(2-induced apoptotic cell death. TM2E3 and TRPM2-specific shRNA also protect the cells from tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α-induced cell death in MTT assay. In contrast, overexpression of TRPM2 in H5V cells resulted in an increased response in [Ca(2+](i and whole-cell currents to H(2O(2. TRPM2 overexpression also aggravated the H(2O(2-induced apoptotic cell death. Downstream pathways following TRPM2 activation was examined. Results showed that TRPM2 activity stimulated caspase-8, caspase-9 and caspase-3. These findings strongly suggest that TRPM2 channel mediates cellular Ca(2+ overload in response to H(2O(2 and contribute to oxidant-induced apoptotic cell death in vascular endothelial cells. Down-regulating endogenous TRPM2 could be a means to protect the vascular endothelial cells from apoptotic cell death.

  6. The role of transient receptor potential channels in kidney disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woudenberg-Vrenken, T.E.; Bindels, R.J.M.; Hoenderop, J.G.J.

    2009-01-01

    The transient receptor potential (TRP) superfamily consists, in mammals, of six protein subfamilies, TRPC, TRPM, TRPV, TRPA, TRPML and TRPP. TRPs are cation channels involved in many physiological processes and in the pathogenesis of various disorders. In the kidney, TRP channels are expressed along

  7. Breast cancer associated a2 isoform vacuolar ATPase immunomodulates neutrophils: potential role in tumor progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Safaa A; Katara, Gajendra K; Kulshrestha, Arpita; Jaiswal, Mukesh K; Amin, Magdy A; Beaman, Kenneth D

    2015-10-20

    In invasive breast cancer, tumor associated neutrophils (TAN) represent a significant portion of the tumor mass and are associated with increased angiogenesis and metastasis. Identifying the regulatory factors that control TAN behavior will help in developing ideal immunotherapies. Vacuolar ATPases (V-ATPases), multi-subunit proton pumps, are highly expressed in metastatic breast cancer cells. A cleaved peptide from a2 isoform V-ATPase (a2NTD) has immunomodulatory role in tumor microenvironment. Here, we report for the first time the role of V-ATPase in neutrophils modulation. In invasive breast cancer cells, a2NTD was detected and a2V was highly expressed on the surface. Immunohistochemical analysis of invasive breast cancer tissues revealed that increased neutrophil recruitment and blood vessel density correlated with increased a2NTD levels. In order to determine the direct regulatory role of a2NTD on neutrophils, recombinant a2NTD was used for the treatment of neutrophils isolated from the peripheral blood of healthy volunteers. Neutrophils treated with a2NTD (a2Neuɸ) showed increased secretion of IL-1RA, IL-10, CCL-2 and IL-6 that are important mediators in cancer related inflammation. Moreover, a2Neuɸ exhibited an increased production of protumorigenic factors including IL-8, matrix metaloprotinase-9 and vascular endothelial growth factor. Further, functional characterization of a2Neuɸ revealed that a2Neuɸ derived products induce in vitro angiogenesis as well as increase the invasiveness of breast cancer cells. This study establishes the modulatory effect of breast cancer associated a2V on neutrophils, by the action of a2NTD, which has a positive impact on tumor progression, supporting that a2V can be a potential selective target for breast cancer therapy.

  8. A theory for the membrane potential of cells

    CERN Document Server

    Endresen, L P; Endresen, Lars Petter; Hall, Kevin

    1997-01-01

    We give an explicit formula for the membrane potential of cells in terms of the intracellular and extracellular ionic concentrations, and derive equations for the ionic currents that flow through channels, exchangers and electrogenic pumps based on simple energy considerations and conservation laws. We demonstrate that the work done by the pump is equal to the potential energy of the cell plus the energy loss due to the downhill ionic fluxes through the channels and the exchanger. Our equations predict osmotic pressure variations. The theory is illustrated in a simple model of spontaneously active cells in the cardiac pacemaker. The simulated action potential and the five currents in the model are in excellent agreement with experiments. The model predicts the experimental observed intracellular ionic concentration of potassium, calcium and sodium. We do not see any drift of the values for the concentrations in a long time simulation, instead we can obtain the same asymptotic values starting with equal intrac...

  9. A Theory for the Membrane Potential of Living Cells

    CERN Document Server

    Endresen, L P; Høye, J S; Myrheim, Jan

    1998-01-01

    We give an explicit formula for the membrane potential of cells in terms of the intracellular and extracellular ionic concentrations, and derive equations for the ionic currents that flow through channels, exchangers and electrogenic pumps. We demonstrate that the work done by the pumps equals the change in potential energy of the cell, plus the energy lost in downhill ionic fluxes through the channels and exchangers. The theory is illustrated in a simple model of spontaneously active cells in the cardiac pacemaker. The model predicts the experimentally observed intracellular ionic concentration of potassium, calcium, and sodium. Likewise the shapes of the simulated action potential and five membrane currents are in good agreement with experiments. We do not see any drift in the values of the concentrations in a long time simulation, and we obtain the same asymptotic values when starting from the full equilibrium situation with equal intracellular and extracellular ionic concentrations.

  10. The origin of life and the potential role of soaps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanczyc, Martin M.; Monnard, Pierre-Alain

    2016-01-01

    Single chain amphiphiles, such as fatty acids and alkyl sulfates, have found industrial uses as emulsifying agents, lubricants, detergents and soaps. Fatty acids are also used as excipients and, because of their biochemical activity, even as active ingredients in drug formulations. The applicatio...... of chemical model systems, so called protocells, aiming at understanding how cellular life emerged on the early Earth, at the time abiotic environment, and could evolve toward contemporary cells....

  11. Harnessing the Therapeutic Potential of Th17 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Bystrom

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Th17 cells provide protective immunity to infections by fungi and extracellular bacteria as well as cancer but are also involved in chronic inflammation. The cells were first identified by their ability to produce interleukin 17A (IL-17A and, subsequently, associated with chronic inflammation and autoimmunity. Th17 cells have some gene profile similarity with stem cells and can remain dormant in mucosal tissues for long periods. Indeed, recent studies suggest that functionally distinct subsets of pro- and anti-inflammatory Th17 cells can interchange phenotype and functions. For development, Th17 cells require activation of the transcription factors STAT3 and RORγt while RUNX1, c-Maf, and Aiolos are involved in changes of phenotype/functions. Attempts to harness Th17 cells against pathogens and cancer using vaccination strategies are being explored. The cells gain protective abilities when induced to produce interferon γ (IFNγ. In addition, treatment with antibodies to IL-17 is effective in treating patients with psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, and refectory rheumatoid arthritis. Moreover, since RORγt is a nuclear receptor, it is likely to be a potential future drug target for modulating Th17 functions. This review explores pathways through which Th17 subsets are induced, the molecular basis of their plasticity, and potential therapeutic strategies for their modulation in diseases.

  12. Harnessing the Therapeutic Potential of Th17 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bystrom, Jonas; Taher, Taher E; Muhyaddin, M Sherwan; Clanchy, Felix I; Mangat, Pamela; Jawad, Ali S; Williams, Richard O; Mageed, Rizgar A

    2015-01-01

    Th17 cells provide protective immunity to infections by fungi and extracellular bacteria as well as cancer but are also involved in chronic inflammation. The cells were first identified by their ability to produce interleukin 17A (IL-17A) and, subsequently, associated with chronic inflammation and autoimmunity. Th17 cells have some gene profile similarity with stem cells and can remain dormant in mucosal tissues for long periods. Indeed, recent studies suggest that functionally distinct subsets of pro- and anti-inflammatory Th17 cells can interchange phenotype and functions. For development, Th17 cells require activation of the transcription factors STAT3 and RORγt while RUNX1, c-Maf, and Aiolos are involved in changes of phenotype/functions. Attempts to harness Th17 cells against pathogens and cancer using vaccination strategies are being explored. The cells gain protective abilities when induced to produce interferon γ (IFNγ). In addition, treatment with antibodies to IL-17 is effective in treating patients with psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, and refectory rheumatoid arthritis. Moreover, since RORγt is a nuclear receptor, it is likely to be a potential future drug target for modulating Th17 functions. This review explores pathways through which Th17 subsets are induced, the molecular basis of their plasticity, and potential therapeutic strategies for their modulation in diseases.

  13. Potential cancer-related role of circadian gene TIMELESS suggested by expression profiling and in vitro analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The circadian clock and cell cycle are two global regulatory systems that have pervasive behavioral and physiological effects on eukaryotic cells, and both play a role in cancer development. Recent studies have indicated that the circadian and cell cycle regulator, TIMELESS, may serve as a molecular bridge between these two regulatory systems. To assess the role of TIMELESS in tumorigenesis, we analyzed TIMELESS expression data from publically accessible online databases. A loss-of-function analysis was then performed using TIMELESS-targeting siRNA oligos followed by a whole-genome expression microarray and network analysis. We further tested the effect of TIMELESS down-regulation on cell proliferation rates of a breast and cervical cancer cell line, as suggested by the results of our network analysis. TIMELESS was found to be frequently overexpressed in different tumor types compared to normal controls. Elevated expression of TIMELESS was significantly associated with more advanced tumor stage and poorer breast cancer prognosis. We identified a cancer-relevant network of transcripts with altered expression following TIMELESS knockdown which contained many genes with known functions in cancer development and progression. Furthermore, we observed that TIMELESS knockdown significantly decreased cell proliferation rate. Our results suggest a potential role for TIMELESS in tumorigenesis, which warrants further investigation of TIMELESS expression as a potential biomarker of cancer susceptibility and prognostic outcome

  14. MYC activates stem-like cell potential in hepatocarcinoma by a p53-dependent mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Akita, Hirofumi; Marquardt, Jens U; Durkin, Marian E;

    2014-01-01

    Activation of c-MYC is an oncogenic hallmark of many cancers including liver cancer, and is associated with a variety of adverse prognostic characteristics. Despite a causative role during malignant transformation and progression in hepatocarcinogenesis, consequences of c-MYC activation......-MYC induced a pro-apoptotic program and loss of CSC potential both in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistically, c-MYC induced self-renewal capacity of liver cancer cells was exerted in a p53 dependent manner. Low c-MYC activation increased spheroid formation in p53-deficient tumor cells, whereas p53-dependent...... effects were blunted in the absence of MYC overexpression. Together, our results confirm the role of c-MYC as a master regulator during hepatocarcinogenesis and establish a new gatekeeper role for p53 in repressing c-MYC induced CSC phenotype in liver cancer cells....

  15. Potential Role of Honey in Learning and Memory

    OpenAIRE

    Zahiruddin Othman; Rahimah Zakaria; Nik Hazlina Nik Hussain; Asma' Hassan; Nazlahshaniza Shafin; Badriya Al-Rahbi; Asma Hayati Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    The composition and physicochemical properties of honey are variable depending on its floral source and often named according to the geographical location. The potential medicinal benefits of Tualang honey, a multifloral jungle honey found in Malaysia, have recently been attracting attention because of its reported beneficial effects in various diseases. This paper reviews the effects of honey, particularly Tualang honey, on learning and memory. Information regarding the effects of Tualang ho...

  16. Raxibacumab: potential role in the treatment of inhalational anthrax

    OpenAIRE

    Kummerfeldt, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Carlos E KummerfeldtDivision of Pulmonary, Critical Care, Allergy and Sleep Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, USAAbstract: Anthrax is a highly contagious and potentially fatal human disease caused by Bacillus anthracis, an aerobic, Gram-positive, spore-forming rod-shaped bacterium with worldwide distribution as a zoonotic infection in herbivore animals. Bioterrorist attacks with inhalational anthrax have prompted the development of more effective treatments. Anti...

  17. Recollision scenario without tunneling : Role of the ionic core potential

    OpenAIRE

    Kamor, Adam; Chandre, Cristel; UZer, Turgay; Mauger, Francois

    2013-01-01

    The standard model of strong laser physics, the recollision scenario, omits the ionic core potential after tunneling. Strikingly, although the Coulomb interaction drives all stages of recollision, the maximum energy the electrons bring back to the core is found by ignoring it. We resolve this long-standing paradox by showing that this good agreement stems from a fortuitous cancellation at high intensities. Instead of the three step model, we ?nd that the Coulomb interaction can be fully integ...

  18. Potential role of odanacatib in the treatment of osteoporosis

    OpenAIRE

    Ng KW

    2012-01-01

    Kong Wah NgDepartment of Endocrinology and Diabetes and St Vincent’s Institute, St Vincent’s Hospital, Fitzroy, Victoria, AustraliaAbstract: Cathepsin K is a key enzyme involved in the degradation of organic bone matrix by osteoclasts. Inhibition of bone resorption observed in human and animal models deficient for cathepsin K has identified this enzyme as a suitable target for intervention by small molecules with the potential to be used as therapeutic agents in the treatm...

  19. Cancer Cell Adhesion and Metastasis: Selectins, Integrins, and the Inhibitory Potential of Heparins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerd Bendas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell adhesion molecules play a significant role in cancer progression and metastasis. Cell-cell interactions of cancer cells with endothelium determine the metastatic spread. In addition, direct tumor cell interactions with platelets, leukocytes, and soluble components significantly contribute to cancer cell adhesion, extravasation, and the establishment of metastatic lesions. Clinical evidence indicates that heparin, commonly used for treatment of thromboembolic events in cancer patients, is beneficial for their survival. Preclinical studies confirm that heparin possesses antimetastatic activities that lead to attenuation of metastasis in various animal models. Heparin contains several biological activities that may affect several steps in metastatic cascade. Here we focus on the role of cellular adhesion receptors in the metastatic cascade and discuss evidence for heparin as an inhibitor of cell adhesion. While P- and L-selectin facilitation of cellular contacts during hematogenous metastasis is being accepted as a potential target of heparin, here we propose that heparin may also interfere with integrin activity and thereby affect cancer progression. This review summarizes recent findings about potential mechanisms of tumor cell interactions in the vasculature and antimetastatic activities of heparin.

  20. Protective role of Th17 cells in pulmonary infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathore, Jitendra Singh; Wang, Yan

    2016-03-18

    Th17 cells are characterized as preferential producer of interleukins including IL-17A, IL-17F, IL-21 and IL-22. Corresponding receptors of these cytokines are expressed on number of cell types found in the mucosa, including epithelial cells and fibroblasts which constitute the prime targets of the Th17-associated cytokines. Binding of IL-17 family members to their corresponding receptors lead to modulation of antimicrobial functions of target cells including alveolar epithelial cells. Stimulated alveolar epithelial cells produce antimicrobial peptides and are involved in granulepoesis, neutrophil recruitment and tissue repair. Mucosal immunity mediated by Th17 cells is protective against numerous pulmonary pathogens including extracellular bacterial and fungal pathogens. This review focuses on the protective role of Th17 cells during pulmonary infection, highlighting subset differentiation, effector cytokines production, followed by study of the binding of these cytokines to their corresponding receptors, the subsequent signaling pathway they engender and their effector role in host defense.

  1. Giant Cell Tumor: Role of Conservative Treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anatolii Diedkov[1; Pavlo Kovalchuk[1; Marija Kukushkina[2; Sergey Bojchuk[1; Viktor Kostyuk[1

    2014-01-01

    Giant cell tumor is aggressive bone tumor. Surgical treatment is considered to be the only effective method of treatment ofthese tumors. The problem of inoperable patients with giant cell tumors is a challenge. A total of 8 patients had giant cell bone tumorsof pelvis and sacrum. 3 patients were treated by bisphosphonates, radiation therapy and embolization of tumor-nutrient arteries. 5patients received denosumab. The efficiency was assessed according to clinical data and CT scan control. Median follow up is 28months. All 8 patients had reduction of pain intensity. Treatment with denosumab demonstrated more than 30% tumor regression. Allof the patients are in remission.

  2. Role of stem cells in large bowel carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Nefedova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Сancer stem cells (CSC play a significant role in the development and progression of colorectal cancer. They are capable of self-senewal and multipotent differentiation. CSC can be formed from stem cells or mutant by dedifferentiation of crypt epithelial cells. Recently, much attention is paid to CSC in colon cancer, but very little has been published regarding their expression in colon polyps. In 2010 The World Health Organization attributed the so-called serrated lesions, including hyperplastic polyp, serrated sessile adenoma and traditional serrated adenoma to a group of precancerous lesions of the colon in addition to the classical tubular, villous and tubulo-villous adenomas. Despite the large number of publications devoted to the newly selected category, a full understanding of the processes involved in the formation of polyps and their progression into colon cancer, there is still no. Identification of CSC in colon polyps will assess their potential malignancy conduct adequate therapy, determine the amount of the operation and further treatment strategy. This in turn will contribute to the early detection and prevention of cancer. Identification of CSC, an assessment of their localization and distribution in tubular adenomas, serrated adenoma broad-based, traditional serrated adenoma and hyperplastic polyps allow to evaluate the potential of malignancy and prognosis for each of the polyps. In this regard, the definition of markers characteristic of colon CSC, is interesting not only from a scientific, but also from a practical point of view.

  3. Potential Role of Dipeptidyl Peptidase IV in the Pathophysiology of Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago A. Salles

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPPIV is a widely expressed multifunctional serine peptidase that exists as a membrane-anchored cell surface protein or in a soluble form in the plasma and other body fluids. Numerous substrates are cleaved at the penultimate amino acid by DPPIV, including glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1, brain natriuretic peptide (BNP and stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-α, all of which play important roles in the cardiovascular system. In this regard, recent reports have documented that circulating DPPIV activity correlates with poorer cardiovascular outcomes in human and experimental heart failure (HF. Moreover, emerging evidence indicates that DPPIV inhibitors exert cardioprotective and renoprotective actions in a variety of experimental models of cardiac dysfunction. On the other hand, conflicting results have been found when translating these promising findings from preclinical animal models to clinical therapy. In this review, we discuss how DPPIV might be involved in the cardio-renal axis in HF. In addition, the potential role for DPPIV inhibitors in ameliorating heart disease is revised, focusing on the effects of the main DPPIV substrates on cardiac remodeling and renal handling of salt and water.

  4. Role of inositol phospholipid signaling in natural killer cell biology

    OpenAIRE

    Gumbleton, Matthew; Kerr, William G.

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are important for host defense against malignancy and infection. At a cellular level NK cells are activated when signals from activating receptors exceed signaling from inhibitory receptors. At a molecular level NK cells undergo an education process to both prevent autoimmunity and acquire lytic capacity. Mouse models have shown important roles for inositol phospholipid signaling in lymphocytes. NK cells from mice with deletion in different members of the inositol ph...

  5. Adhesion in the stem cell niche: biological roles and regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Shuyi; Lewallen, Michelle; Xie, Ting

    2013-01-01

    Stem cell self-renewal is tightly controlled by the concerted action of stem cell-intrinsic factors and signals within the niche. Niche signals often function within a short range, allowing cells in the niche to self-renew while their daughters outside the niche differentiate. Thus, in order for stem cells to continuously self-renew, they are often anchored in the niche via adhesion molecules. In addition to niche anchoring, however, recent studies have revealed other important roles for adhe...

  6. Stem cell function and maintenance - ends that matter: Role of telomeres and telomerase

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hamid Saeed; Mehwish Iqtedar

    2013-09-01

    Stem cell research holds a promise to treat and prevent age-related degenerative changes in humans. Literature is replete with studies showing that stem cell function declines with aging, especially in highly proliferative tissues/organs. Among others, telomerase and telomere damage is one of the intrinsic physical instigators that drive agerelated degenerative changes. In this review we provide brief overview of telomerase-deficient aging affects in diverse stem cells populations. Furthermore, potential disease phenotypes associated with telomerase dysregulation in a specific stem cell population is also discussed in this review. Additionally, the role of telomerase in stem cell driven cancer is also briefly touched upon.

  7. [Helicobacter pylori morphological forms and their potential role in the transmission of infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudnicka, Karolina; Graczykowski, Maciej; Tenderenda, Michał; Chmiela, Magdalena

    2014-03-04

    More than 50% of the world's population is infected with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) - a Gram negative bacterium, which persists in the human stomach and duodenum, causing gastric or duodenal ulcers and gastric cancer. The majority of H. pylori cells demonstrate rod-shape morphology occurring in two subtypes: spiral and S-shaped. Both are isolated from mucus layer biopsy specimens of the stomach or from short-term cultures. However, results obtained from electron microscopy revealed that H. pylori long-term cultures not only consist of classic, spiral shaped bacteria, but also contain alternative forms of coccoid cells. Further investigations showed that coccoid forms of H. pylori may be divided into two types: viable but non-culturable coccus (VBnC) and a degenerative form, coccoid stage which is probably the effect of bacterial cell death. Transformation from spiral to coccoid form is induced under stress conditions, such as the presence of antibiotics. But still there is no evidence for reversion from the coccoid state to the viable and infectious spiral form. Besides the planktonic form, H. pylori also forms homo-, and heterogenic biofilms, which may constitute a potential environmental reservoir of this bacterium. The antigenic repertoire and the immunomodulatory and infectious properties of different H. pylori forms differ greatly. The variation in those properties suggests that morphological forms of H. pylori are potentially involved in the transmission of the infection. This review presents recent findings on the variability, antigenicity and infectious properties of H. pylori morphological forms and their potential role in the transmission of the infection.

  8. Helicobacter pylori morphological forms and their potential role in the transmission of infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolina Rudnicka,

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available More than 50% of the world’s population is infected with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori – a Gram negative bacterium, which persists in the human stomach and duodenum, causing gastric or duodenal ulcers and gastric cancer. The majority of H. pylori cells demonstrate rod-shape morphology occurring in two subtypes: spiral and S-shaped. Both are isolated from mucus layer biopsy specimens of the stomach or from short-term cultures. However, results obtained from electron microscopy revealed that H. pylori long-term cultures not only consist of classic, spiral shaped bacteria, but also contain alternative forms of coccoid cells. Further investigations showed that coccoid forms of H. pylori may be divided into two types: viable but non-culturable coccus (VBnC and a degenerative form, coccoid stage which is probably the effect of bacterial cell death. Transformation from spiral to coccoid form is induced under stress conditions, such as the presence of antibiotics. But still there is no evidence for reversion from the coccoid state to the viable and infectious spiral form. Besides the planktonic form, H. pylori also forms homo-, and heterogenic biofilms, which may constitute a potential environmental reservoir of this bacterium. The antigenic repertoire and the immunomodulatory and infectious properties of different H. pylori forms differ greatly. The variation in those properties suggests that morphological forms of H. pylori are potentially involved in the transmission of the infection. This review presents recent findings on the variability, antigenicity and infectious properties of H. pylori morphological forms and their potential role in the transmission of the infection.

  9. Electric potential cells at the diverted tokamak separatrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two-dimensional measurements by probes and Thomson scattering reveal unanticipated electric potential and electron pressure (pe) maxima near the divertor X-point in L-mode plasmas in the DIII-D tokamak. The potential hill (∼100 V) drives ExB circulation ('potential cell') of particles, energy and toroidal momentum around the X-point and in and out across the magnetic separatrix. Modeling by the UEDGE two-dimensional edge transport code with plasma drifts shows similar X-point potential and pressure hills. The code predicts additional drift-driven nonuniformity poloidally around the separatrix. Potential cells in UEDGE arises from parallel (to B) viscous stress acting on the Pfirsch-Schlueter ion return flow of the ∇B drift. These experimental and theoretical results demonstrate that the boundary layer just inside the separatrix of low power tokamak plasmas can be far from poloidal uniformity. We speculate that separatrix potential cells might be a major feature of L-mode edge transport and their suppression an important feature of H-mode. (author)

  10. Fibronectin promotes differentiation of neural crest progenitors endowed with smooth muscle cell potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The neural crest (NC) is a model system used to investigate multipotency during vertebrate development. Environmental factors control NC cell fate decisions. Despite the well-known influence of extracellular matrix molecules in NC cell migration, the issue of whether they also influence NC cell differentiation has not been addressed at the single cell level. By analyzing mass and clonal cultures of mouse cephalic and quail trunk NC cells, we show for the first time that fibronectin (FN) promotes differentiation into the smooth muscle cell phenotype without affecting differentiation into glia, neurons, and melanocytes. Time course analysis indicated that the FN-induced effect was not related to massive cell death or proliferation of smooth muscle cells. Finally, by comparing clonal cultures of quail trunk NC cells grown on FN and collagen type IV (CLIV), we found that FN strongly increased both NC cell survival and the proportion of unipotent and oligopotent NC progenitors endowed with smooth muscle potential. In contrast, melanocytic progenitors were prominent in clonogenic NC cells grown on CLIV. Taken together, these results show that FN promotes NC cell differentiation along the smooth muscle lineage, and therefore plays an important role in fate decisions of NC progenitor cells

  11. Role of Pin1 in UVA-induced cell proliferation and malignant transformation in epidermal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Pin1 expression is enhanced by low energy UVA irradiation in both skin tissues of hairless mice and JB6 C141 epidermal cells. → UVA irradiation increases activator protein-1 activity and cyclin D1 in a Pin1-dependent manner. → UVA potentiates EGF-inducible, anchorage-independent growth of epidermal cells, and this is suppressed by Pin1 inhibition or by anti-oxidant. -- Abstract: Ultraviolet A (UVA) radiation (λ = 320-400 nm) is considered a major cause of human skin cancer. Pin1, a peptidyl prolyl isomerase, is overexpressed in most types of cancer tissues and plays an important role in cell proliferation and transformation. Here, we demonstrated that Pin1 expression was enhanced by low energy UVA (300-900 mJ/cm2) irradiation in both skin tissues of hairless mice and JB6 C141 epidermal cells. Exposure of epidermal cells to UVA radiation increased cell proliferation and cyclin D1 expression, and these changes were blocked by Pin1 inhibition. UVA irradiation also increased activator protein-1 (AP-1) minimal reporter activity and nuclear levels of c-Jun, but not c-Fos, in a Pin1-dependent manner. The increases in Pin1 expression and in AP-1 reporter activity in response to UVA were abolished by N-acetylcysteine (NAC) treatment. Finally, we found that pre-exposure of JB6 C141 cells to UVA potentiated EGF-inducible, anchorage-independent growth, and this effect was significantly suppressed by Pin1inhibition or by NAC.

  12. Particle motion in rapidly oscillating potentials: The role of the potential's initial phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rapidly oscillating potentials with a vanishing time average have been used for a long time to trap charged particles in source-free regions. It has been argued that the motion of a particle inside such a potential can be approximately described by a time independent effective potential, which does not depend upon the initial phase of the oscillating potential. However, here we show that the motion of a particle and its trapping condition significantly depend upon this initial phase for arbitrarily high frequencies of the potential's oscillation. We explain this phenomenon by showing that the motion of a particle is determined by the effective potential stated in the literature only if its initial conditions are transformed according to a transformation which we show to significantly depend on the potential's initial phase for arbitrarily high frequencies. We confirm our theoretical findings by numerical simulations. Further, we demonstrate that the found phenomenon offers different ways to manipulate the dynamics of particles which are trapped by rapidly oscillating potentials. Finally, we propose a simple experiment to verify the theoretical findings of this work

  13. Potential role of Borreria hispida in ameliorating cardiovascular risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasanthi, Hannah R; Mukherjee, Subhendu; Lekli, Istvan; Ray, Diptarka; Veeraraghavan, Gayathri; Das, Dipak K

    2009-06-01

    Borreria hispida (BHE), a weed of Rubiaceae family, is being used from time immemorial as an alternative therapy for diabetes. To evaluate the scientific background of using BHE as therapy to reduce cardiovascular risk, a group of rats were given BHE for a period of 30 days, whereas control animals were given the vehicle only. The animals were sacrificed, the hearts were isolated, and perfused with buffer. All the hearts were subjected to 30-minute ischemia followed by 2-hour reperfusion. Compared with vehicle-treated rats, BHE-treated rat hearts showed improved post-ischemic ventricular function and exhibited reduced myocardial infarct size and cardiomyocyte apoptosis. The level of cytochrome c expression and caspase 3 activation was also reduced. BHE elevated antiapoptotic proteins Bcl-2 and heme oxygenase-1 and stimulated the phosphorylation of survival protein Akt simultaneously decreasing the apoptotic proteins Bax and Src. In addition, BHE enhanced the protein expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-delta, and Glut-4, probably revealing the antiobese and antidiabetic potential of BHE. These results indicate that treatment with BHE improves cardiac function and ameliorates various risk factors associated with cardiac disease, suggesting that BHE can be considered as a potential plant-based nutraceutical and pharmaceutical agent for the management of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:19455054

  14. A potential role for Drosophila mucins in development and physiology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zulfeqhar A Syed

    Full Text Available Vital vertebrate organs are protected from the external environment by a barrier that to a large extent consists of mucins. These proteins are characterized by poorly conserved repeated sequences that are rich in prolines and potentially glycosylated threonines and serines (PTS. We have now used the characteristics of the PTS repeat domain to identify Drosophila mucins in a simple bioinformatics approach. Searching the predicted protein database for proteins with at least 4 repeats and a high ST content, more than 30 mucin-like proteins were identified, ranging from 300-23000 amino acids in length. We find that Drosophila mucins are present at all stages of the fly life cycle, and that their transcripts localize to selective organs analogous to sites of vertebrate mucin expression. The results could allow for addressing basic questions about human mucin-related diseases in this model system. Additionally, many of the mucins are expressed in selective tissues during embryogenesis, thus revealing new potential functions for mucins as apical matrix components during organ morphogenesis.

  15. Expanding roles for CD4 T cells and their subpopulations in tumor immunity and therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark J Dobrzanski

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The importance of CD4 T cells in orchestrating the immune system and their role in inducing effective T cell-mediated therapies for the treatment of patients with select established malignancies are undisputable. Through a complex and balanced array of direct and indirect mechanisms of cellular activation and regulation, this functionally diverse family of lymphocytes can potentially promote tumor eradication, long-term tumor immunity and aid in establishing and/or rebalancing immune cell homeostasis through interaction with other immune cell populations within the highly dynamic tumor environment. However, recent studies have uncovered additional functions and roles for CD4 T cells, some of which are independent of other lymphocytes, that can not only influence and contribute to tumor immunity but paradoxically promote tumor growth and progression. Here, we review the recent advances in our understanding of the various CD4 T cell lineages and their signature cytokines in disease progression and/or regression. We discuss their direct and indirect mechanistic interplay among themselves and with other responding cells of the antitumor response, their potential roles and abilities for "plasticity" and memory cell generation within the hostile tumor environment and their potentials in cancer treatment and adoptive immunotherapies.

  16. Role of Common-Gamma Chain Cytokines in NK Cell Development and Function: Perspectives for Immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaella Meazza

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available NK cells are components of the innate immunity system and play an important role as a first-line defense mechanism against viral infections and in tumor immune surveillance. Their development and their functional activities are controlled by several factors among which cytokines sharing the usage of the common cytokine-receptor gamma chain play a pivotal role. In particular, IL-2, IL-7, IL-15, and IL-21 are the members of this family predominantly involved in NK cell biology. In this paper, we will address their role in NK cell ontogeny, regulation of functional activities, development of specialized cell subsets, and acquisition of memory-like functions. Finally, the potential application of these cytokines as recombinant molecules to NK cell-based immunotherapy approaches will be discussed.

  17. Professional Regulation: A Potentially Valuable Tool in Responding to “Stem Cell Tourism”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Zarzeczny

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The growing international market for unproven stem cell-based interventions advertised on a direct-to-consumer basis over the internet (“stem cell tourism” is a source of concern because of the risks it presents to patients as well as their supporters, domestic health care systems, and the stem cell research field. Emerging responses such as public and health provider-focused education and national regulatory efforts are encouraging, but the market continues to grow. Physicians play a number of roles in the stem cell tourism market and, in many jurisdictions, are members of a regulated profession. In this article, we consider the use of professional regulation to address physician involvement in stem cell tourism. Although it is not without its limitations, professional regulation is a potentially valuable tool that can be employed in response to problematic types of physician involvement in the stem cell tourism market.

  18. Professional regulation: a potentially valuable tool in responding to "stem cell tourism".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarzeczny, Amy; Caulfield, Timothy; Ogbogu, Ubaka; Bell, Peter; Crooks, Valorie A; Kamenova, Kalina; Master, Zubin; Rachul, Christen; Snyder, Jeremy; Toews, Maeghan; Zoeller, Sonja

    2014-09-01

    The growing international market for unproven stem cell-based interventions advertised on a direct-to-consumer basis over the internet ("stem cell tourism") is a source of concern because of the risks it presents to patients as well as their supporters, domestic health care systems, and the stem cell research field. Emerging responses such as public and health provider-focused education and national regulatory efforts are encouraging, but the market continues to grow. Physicians play a number of roles in the stem cell tourism market and, in many jurisdictions, are members of a regulated profession. In this article, we consider the use of professional regulation to address physician involvement in stem cell tourism. Although it is not without its limitations, professional regulation is a potentially valuable tool that can be employed in response to problematic types of physician involvement in the stem cell tourism market.

  19. Professional Regulation: A Potentially Valuable Tool in Responding to “Stem Cell Tourism”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarzeczny, Amy; Caulfield, Timothy; Ogbogu, Ubaka; Bell, Peter; Crooks, Valorie A.; Kamenova, Kalina; Master, Zubin; Rachul, Christen; Snyder, Jeremy; Toews, Maeghan; Zoeller, Sonja

    2014-01-01

    The growing international market for unproven stem cell-based interventions advertised on a direct-to-consumer basis over the internet (“stem cell tourism”) is a source of concern because of the risks it presents to patients as well as their supporters, domestic health care systems, and the stem cell research field. Emerging responses such as public and health provider-focused education and national regulatory efforts are encouraging, but the market continues to grow. Physicians play a number of roles in the stem cell tourism market and, in many jurisdictions, are members of a regulated profession. In this article, we consider the use of professional regulation to address physician involvement in stem cell tourism. Although it is not without its limitations, professional regulation is a potentially valuable tool that can be employed in response to problematic types of physician involvement in the stem cell tourism market. PMID:25241736

  20. Photometric recording of transmembrane potential in outer hair cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Takashi; Oghalai, John S.; Saggau, Peter; Rabbitt, Richard D.; Brownell, William E.

    2006-06-01

    Cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs) are polarized epithelial cells that have mechanoelectrical transduction channels within their apical stereocilia and produce electromotile force along their lateral wall. Phase shifts, or time delays, in the transmembrane voltage occurring at different axial locations along the cell may contribute to our understanding of how these cells operate at auditory frequencies. We developed a method to optically measure the phase of the OHC transmembrane potential using the voltage-sensitive dye (VSD) di-8-ANEPPS. The exit aperture of a fibre-optic light source was driven in two dimensions so that a 24 µm spot of excitation light could be positioned along the length of the OHC. We used the whole-cell patch-clamp technique in the current-clamp mode to stimulate the OHC at the base. The photometric response and the voltage response were monitored with a photodetector and patch-clamp amplifier, respectively. The photometric response was used to measure the regional changes in the membrane potential in response to maintained (dc) and sinusoidal (ac) current stimuli applied at the base of the cell. We used a neutral density filter to lower the excitation light intensity and reduce phototoxicity. A sensitive detector and lock-in amplifier were used to measure the small ac VSD signal. This permitted measurements of the ac photometric response below the noise floor of the static fluorescence. The amplitude and phase components of the photometric response were recorded for stimuli up to 800 Hz. VSD data at 400-800 Hz show the presence of a small phase delay between the stimulus voltage at the base of the cell and the local membrane potential measured along the lateral wall. Results are consistent with the hypothesis that OHCs exhibit inhomogeneous membrane potentials that vary with position in analogy with the voltage in nerve axons.

  1. Programmed cell death and its role in inflammation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong Yang; Ge-Ning Jiang; Peng Zhang; Jie Fan

    2015-01-01

    Cell death plays an important role in the regulation of inflammation and may be the result of inflammation. The maintenance of tissue homeostasis necessitates both the recognition and removal of invading microbial pathogens as well as the clearance of dying cells. In the past few decades, emerging knowledge on cell death and inflammation has enriched our molecular understanding of the signaling pathways that mediate various programs of cell death and multiple types of inflammatory responses. This review provides an overview of the major types of cell death related to inflammation. Modification of cell death pathways is likely to be a logical therapeutic target for inflammatory diseases.

  2. Myocardial regeneration potential of adipose tissue-derived stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai, Xiaowen, E-mail: baixw01@yahoo.com [Department of Molecular Pathology, The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Alt, Eckhard, E-mail: ealt@mdanderson.org [Department of Molecular Pathology, The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe, Houston, TX 77030 (United States)

    2010-10-22

    Research highlights: {yields} Various tissue resident stem cells are receiving tremendous attention from basic scientists and clinicians and hold great promise for myocardial regeneration. {yields} For practical reasons, human adipose tissue-derived stem cells are attractive stem cells for future clinical application in repairing damaged myocardium. {yields} This review summarizes the characteristics of cultured and freshly isolated stem cells obtained from adipose tissue, their myocardial regeneration potential and the, underlying mechanisms, and safety issues. -- Abstract: Various tissue resident stem cells are receiving attention from basic scientists and clinicians as they hold promise for myocardial regeneration. For practical reasons, adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ASCs) are attractive cells for clinical application in repairing damaged myocardium based on the following advantages: abundant adipose tissue in most patients and easy accessibility with minimally invasive lipoaspiration procedure. Several recent studies have demonstrated that both cultured and freshly isolated ASCs could improve cardiac function in animal model of myocardial infarction. The mechanisms underlying the beneficial effect of ASCs on myocardial regeneration are not fully understood. Growing evidence indicates that transplantation of ASCs improve cardiac function via the differentiation into cardiomyocytes and vascular cells, and through paracrine pathways. Paracrine factors secreted by injected ASCs enhance angiogenesis, reduce cell apoptosis rates, and promote neuron sprouts in damaged myocardium. In addition, Injection of ASCs increases electrical stability of the injured heart. Furthermore, there are no reported cases of arrhythmia or tumorigenesis in any studies regarding myocardial regeneration with ASCs. This review summarizes the characteristics of both cultured and freshly isolated stem cells obtained from adipose tissue, their myocardial regeneration potential, and the

  3. Myocardial regeneration potential of adipose tissue-derived stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → Various tissue resident stem cells are receiving tremendous attention from basic scientists and clinicians and hold great promise for myocardial regeneration. → For practical reasons, human adipose tissue-derived stem cells are attractive stem cells for future clinical application in repairing damaged myocardium. → This review summarizes the characteristics of cultured and freshly isolated stem cells obtained from adipose tissue, their myocardial regeneration potential and the, underlying mechanisms, and safety issues. -- Abstract: Various tissue resident stem cells are receiving attention from basic scientists and clinicians as they hold promise for myocardial regeneration. For practical reasons, adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ASCs) are attractive cells for clinical application in repairing damaged myocardium based on the following advantages: abundant adipose tissue in most patients and easy accessibility with minimally invasive lipoaspiration procedure. Several recent studies have demonstrated that both cultured and freshly isolated ASCs could improve cardiac function in animal model of myocardial infarction. The mechanisms underlying the beneficial effect of ASCs on myocardial regeneration are not fully understood. Growing evidence indicates that transplantation of ASCs improve cardiac function via the differentiation into cardiomyocytes and vascular cells, and through paracrine pathways. Paracrine factors secreted by injected ASCs enhance angiogenesis, reduce cell apoptosis rates, and promote neuron sprouts in damaged myocardium. In addition, Injection of ASCs increases electrical stability of the injured heart. Furthermore, there are no reported cases of arrhythmia or tumorigenesis in any studies regarding myocardial regeneration with ASCs. This review summarizes the characteristics of both cultured and freshly isolated stem cells obtained from adipose tissue, their myocardial regeneration potential, and the underlying

  4. Dynamic chromatin states in human ES cells reveal potential regulatory sequences and genes involved in pluripotency

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R David Hawkins; Zhen Ye; Samantha Kuan; Pengzhi Yu; Hui Liu; Xinmin Zhang; Roland D Green; Victor V Lobanenkov; Ron Stewart; James A Thomson; Bing Ren; Gary C Hon; Chuhu Yang; Jessica E Antosiewicz-Bourget; LeonardKLee; Que-Minh Ngo; Sarit Klugman; Keith A Ching; Lee E Edsall

    2011-01-01

    Pluripotency,the ability of a cell to differentiate and give rise to all embryonic lineages,defines a small number of mammalian cell types such as embryonic stem (ES) cells.While it has been generally held that pluripotency is the product of a transcriptional regulatory network that activates and maintains the expression of key stem cell genes,accumulating evidence is pointing to a critical role for epigenetic processes in establishing and safeguarding the pluripotency of ES cells,as well as maintaining the identity of differentiated cell types.In order to better understand the role of epigenetic mechanisms in pluripotency,we have examined the dynamics of chromatin modifications genomewide in human ES cells (hESCs) undergoing differentiation into a mesendodermal lineage.We found that chromatin modifications at promoters remain largely invariant during differentiation,except at a small number of promoters where a dynamic switch between acetylation and methylation at H3K27 marks the transition between activation and silencing of gene expression,suggesting a hierarchy in cell fate commitment over most differentially expressed genes.We also mapped over 50 000 potential enhancers,and observed much greater dynamics in chromatin modifications,especially H3K4mel and H3K27ac,which correlate with expression of their potential target genes.Further analysis of these enhancers revealed potentially key transcriptional regulators of pluripotency and a chromatin signature indicative of a poised state that may confer developmental competence in hESCs.Our results provide new evidence supporting the role of chromatin modifications in defining enhancers and pluripotency.

  5. Regenerative potential of human schneiderian membrane: progenitor cells and epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derjac-Aramă, A I; Sarafoleanu, C; Manea, C M; Nicolescu, M I; Vrapciu, A D; Rusu, M C

    2015-12-01

    An innate osteogenic potential of the Schneiderian membrane (SM) is progressively assessed in studies ranging from non-human species to human subjects. It has relevance for endosteal placement and osseointegration. Nestin-expressing osteogenic progenitor cells are allegedly involved in bone formation and remodelling. Nestin phenotype was not assessed previously in human SM. We therefore aimed to fill that particular gap in the literature. Bioptic samples of human adult SM were obtained during surgery from eight adult patients, operated for non-malignant pathologies. Immunohistochemistry on paraffin-embedded tissue samples used primary antibodies against nestin, CD45, CD146, cytokeratin 7 (CK7), and alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA). Nestin expression was consistently found in endothelial cells, and was scarcely encountered in pericytes, putative stromal stem/progenitor cells, as well as in glandular epithelial cells. Moreover, woven bone formation in the periosteal layer of the SM can also be regarded as evidence of the osteogenic potential of this membrane. Nestin and CD45 expression in cells of the primary bone supports the osteogenic potential of SM nestin-expressing cells and a possible involvement of hematopoietic stem cells in maxillary sinus floor remodeling. CD146, a known inducer of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), was expressed in epithelia, as was CK7. Isolated stromal cells were found expressing CD146, CK7 and α-SMA, suggesting that regenerative processes happening in the SM may also involve processes of EMT which generate stem/progenitor cells. This study provides additional evidence for the regenerative potential of the Schneiderian membrane and identifies potential roles for cells of its stem niche in osteogenesis. PMID:26414809

  6. Role of autophagy in the regulation of epithelial cell junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nighot, Prashant; Ma, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is a cell survival mechanism by which bulk cytoplasmic material, including soluble macromolecules and organelles, is targeted for lysosomal degradation. The role of autophagy in diverse cellular processes such as metabolic stress, neurodegeneration, cancer, aging, immunity, and inflammatory diseases is being increasingly recognized. Epithelial cell junctions play an integral role in the cell homeostasis via physical binding, regulating paracellular pathways, integrating extracellular cues into intracellular signaling, and cell-cell communication. Recent data indicates that cell junction composition is very dynamic. The junctional protein complexes are actively regulated in response to various intra- and extra-cellular clues by intracellular trafficking and degradation pathways. This review discusses the recent and emerging information on how autophagy regulates various epithelial cell junctions. The knowledge of autophagy regulation of epithelial junctions will provide further rationale for targeting autophagy in a wide variety of human disease conditions. PMID:27583189

  7. Quantum Dots and their Potential Role in Cancer Theranostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, S K; Kaur, Gurvir; Khurana, Rajneet Kaur; Kapoor, Sonia; Singh, Bhupinder

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of cancer nanomedicine is the result of fruitful advances in the fields of nanotechnology, bioimaging, formulation development, and molecular biology. Quantum dots (QDs) are the luminescent nanocrystals (NCs) that provide a multifunctional platform for imaging the biosystems following controlled delivery of therapeutic drugs, proteins, peptides, oligonucleotides, and genes. These engineered fluorescent probes with integrated imaging and carrier functionalities have become excellent tools for molecular diagnostics and delivery of therapeutics molecules. Flexible surface chemistry, unique optical properties, high sensitivity, and multiplexing capabilities of QDs certainly make them a most promising tool for personalized medicine. This review focuses on state-of-art advances in synthesizing QDs and highlights the approaches used for functionalization of QDs with desired ligands for targeted carriage to specific sites. Discussed is the role of QDs in antitumor therapy through drug delivery and gene delivery and the recently emerged photodynamic therapy (PDT). We also endeavor to critically address the major impediments in the clinical development of these multifunctional nanoplatforms, with a special focus on plausible advancements for the near future. PMID:26559550

  8. Peripheral artery disease: potential role of ACE-inhibitor therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Coppola

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Giuseppe Coppola, Giuseppe Romano, Egle Corrado, Rosa Maria Grisanti, Salvatore NovoDepartment of Internal Medicine, Cardiovascular and Nephro-Urological Diseases, Chair of Cardiovascular Disease, University of Palermo, Palermo, ItalyAbstract: Subjects with peripheral arterial disease (PAD of the lower limbs are at high risk for cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events and the prevalence of coronary artery disease in such patients is elevated. Recent studies have shown that regular use of cardiovascular medications, such as therapeutic and preventive agents for PAD patients, seems to be promising in reducing long-term mortality and morbidity. The angiotensin-converting-enzyme (ACE system plays an important role in the pathogenesis and progression of atherosclerosis, and ACE-inhibitors (ACE-I seem to have vasculoprotective and antiproliferative effects as well as a direct antiatherogenic effect. ACE-I also promote the degradation of bradykinin and the release of nitric oxide, a potent vasodilator; further, thay have shown important implications for vascular oxidative stress. Other studies have suggested that ACE-I may also improve endothelial dysfunction. ACE-I are useful for reducing the risk of cardiovascular events in clinical and subclinical PAD. Particularly, one agent of the class (ie, ramipril has shown in many studies to able to significantly reduce cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients with PAD.Keywords: atherosclerosis, peripheral arterial disease, endothelial dysfunction, ACE-inhibitors

  9. Sustainable life support on Mars - the potential roles of cyanobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verseux, Cyprien; Baqué, Mickael; Lehto, Kirsi; de Vera, Jean-Pierre P.; Rothschild, Lynn J.; Billi, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Even though technological advances could allow humans to reach Mars in the coming decades, launch costs prohibit the establishment of permanent manned outposts for which most consumables would be sent from Earth. This issue can be addressed by in situ resource utilization: producing part or all of these consumables on Mars, from local resources. Biological components are needed, among other reasons because various resources could be efficiently produced only by the use of biological systems. But most plants and microorganisms are unable to exploit Martian resources, and sending substrates from Earth to support their metabolism would strongly limit the cost-effectiveness and sustainability of their cultivation. However, resources needed to grow specific cyanobacteria are available on Mars due to their photosynthetic abilities, nitrogen-fixing activities and lithotrophic lifestyles. They could be used directly for various applications, including the production of food, fuel and oxygen, but also indirectly: products from their culture could support the growth of other organisms, opening the way to a wide range of life-support biological processes based on Martian resources. Here we give insights into how and why cyanobacteria could play a role in the development of self-sustainable manned outposts on Mars.

  10. Lithium inhibits tumorigenic potential of PDA cells through targeting hedgehog-GLI signaling pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhonglu Peng

    Full Text Available Hedgehog signaling pathway plays a critical role in the initiation and development of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA and represents an attractive target for PDA treatment. Lithium, a clinical mood stabilizer for mental disorders, potently inhibits the activity of glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β that promotes the ubiquitin-dependent proteasome degradation of GLI1, an important downstream component of hedgehog signaling. Herein, we report that lithium inhibits cell proliferation, blocks G1/S cell-cycle progression, induces cell apoptosis and suppresses tumorigenic potential of PDA cells through down-regulation of the expression and activity of GLI1. Moreover, lithium synergistically enhances the anti-cancer effect of gemcitabine. These findings further our knowledge of mechanisms of action for lithium and provide a potentially new therapeutic strategy for PDA through targeting GLI1.

  11. Endocytosis and Trafficking of Natriuretic Peptide Receptor-A: Potential Role of Short Sequence Motifs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kailash N. Pandey

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The targeted endocytosis and redistribution of transmembrane receptors among membrane-bound subcellular organelles are vital for their correct signaling and physiological functions. Membrane receptors committed for internalization and trafficking pathways are sorted into coated vesicles. Cardiac hormones, atrial and brain natriuretic peptides (ANP and BNP bind to guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-A (GC-A/NPRA and elicit the generation of intracellular second messenger cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cGMP, which lowers blood pressure and incidence of heart failure. After ligand binding, the receptor is rapidly internalized, sequestrated, and redistributed into intracellular locations. Thus, NPRA is considered a dynamic cellular macromolecule that traverses different subcellular locations through its lifetime. The utilization of pharmacologic and molecular perturbants has helped in delineating the pathways of endocytosis, trafficking, down-regulation, and degradation of membrane receptors in intact cells. This review describes the investigation of the mechanisms of internalization, trafficking, and redistribution of NPRA compared with other cell surface receptors from the plasma membrane into the cell interior. The roles of different short-signal peptide sequence motifs in the internalization and trafficking of other membrane receptors have been briefly reviewed and their potential significance in the internalization and trafficking of NPRA is discussed.

  12. Innate Lymphoid Cells: Roles In Tumour Genesis And Progression

    OpenAIRE

    Jovanovic Ivan; Gajovic Nevena; Radosavljevic Gordana; Pantic Jelena; Pejnovic Nada; Arsenijevic Nebojsa; Lukic Miodrag L.

    2015-01-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) represent the most recently identified members of the innate immune system. These cells play important roles in inflammation, tissue remodelling and metabolic disease. ILCs can be subdivided into three major groups according to their cytokine production. The role of ILCs in tumourigenesis and tumour progression is not completely clarified. In this review, we discuss whether and how ILCs are involved in tumour genesis, growth and metastasis.

  13. Innate Lymphoid Cells: Roles In Tumour Genesis And Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanovic Ivan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs represent the most recently identified members of the innate immune system. These cells play important roles in inflammation, tissue remodelling and metabolic disease. ILCs can be subdivided into three major groups according to their cytokine production. The role of ILCs in tumourigenesis and tumour progression is not completely clarified. In this review, we discuss whether and how ILCs are involved in tumour genesis, growth and metastasis.

  14. Effect of ionizing radiation on hematopoietic stem cells and progenitor cells: Role of apoptosis and potential therapeutic significance of anti-apoptotic treatments; Effet des rayonnements ionisants sur les cellules souches et progeniteurs hematopoietiques : place de l'apoptose et interet therapeutique potentiel des traitements antiapoptotiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drouet, M.; Mourcin, F.; Grenier, N.; Mayol, J.F.; Leroux, V. [Unite de Radiohematologie experimentale, Centre de Recherches du Service de Sante des Armees, La Tronche CEDEX (France); Sotto, J.J. [Inst. Albert Bonniot, La Tronche (France); Herodin, F. [Unite de Radiohematologie experimentale, Centre de Recherches du Service de Sante des Armees, La Tronche CEDEX (France)

    2002-07-01

    Bone marrow aplasia observed following ionizing radiation exposure (Total Body Irradiation; gamma dose range: 2-10 Gy) is a result, in particular, of the radiation-induced (RI) apoptosis in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC). We have previously shown in a baboon model of mobilized peripheral blood CD34{sup +} cell irradiation in vitro that RI apoptosis in HSPC was an early event, mostly occurring within the first 24 hours, which involves the CD95 Fas pathway. Apoptosis may be significantly reduced with a combination of 4 cytokines (4F): Stem Cell Factor (SCF), FLT-3 Ligand (FL), thrombopoietin (TPO), and interleukin-3 (IL-3), each at 50 ng{center_dot}mL{sup -1} (15% survival versus <3% untreated cells, 24 h post-irradiation at 2.5 Gy). In this study we show that addition of TNF-{alpha}(800 IU/ml) induces an increase in 4F efficacy in terms of cell survival 24 h after incubation (26% survival after 24 h irradiation exposure at 2.5 Gy) and amplification (k) of CD34{sup +} cells after 6 days in a serum free culture medium (SFM) (k{sub CD34{sup +}} = 4.3 and 6.3 respectively for 4F and successive 4F + TNF-{alpha}/4F treatments). In addition, the 4F combination allows culture on pre-established allogenic irradiated stromal cells in vitro at 4 Gy (k{sub CD34{sup +}} = 4.5). Overall this study suggests (i) the potential therapeutic interest for an early administration of anti-apoptotic cytokines with or without hematopoiesis inhibitors (emergency cytokine therapy) and (ii) the feasibility in the accidentally irradiated individual, of autologous cell therapy based on ex vivo expansion in order to perform autograft of residual HSPC collected after the accident. (author)

  15. Role of Innate Lymphoid Cells in Lung Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SayedMehran Marashian

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available  Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs are identified as novel population of hematopoietic cells which protect the body by coordinating the innate immune response against a wide range of threats including infections, tissue damages and homeostatic disturbances. ILCs, particularly ILC2 cells, are found throughout the body including the brain. ILCs are morphologically similar to lymphocytes, express and release high levels of T-helper (Th1, Th2 and Th17 cytokines but do not express classical cell-surface markers that are associated with other immune cell lineages.Three types of ILCs (ILC1, 2 & 3 have been reported depending upon the cytokines produced. ILC1 cells encompass natural killer (NK cells and interferon (IFN-g releasing cells; ILC2 cells release the Th2 cytokines, IL-5, IL-9 and IL-13 in response to IL-25 and IL-33; and ILC3 cells which release IL-17 and IL-22. ILC2 cells have been implicated inmucosal reactions occurring in animal models of allergic asthma and virus-induced lung disorders resulting in the regulation of airway remodeling and tissue homeostasis.There is evidence for increased ILC2 cell numbers in allergic responses in man but little is known about the role of ILCs in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Further understanding of the characteristics of ILCs such as their origin, location and phenotypes and function would help to clarify the role of these cells in the pathogenesis of various lung diseases.In this review we will focus on the role of ILC2 cells and consider their origin, function,location and possible role in the pathogenesis of the chronic inflammatory disorders such as asthma and COPD.   

  16. Potential role of rivaroxaban in patients with acute coronary syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fitchett DH

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available David H FitchettDivision of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, St Michael's Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, CanadaAbstract: Patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS continue to be at risk for recurrent ischemic events, despite an early invasive strategy and the use of dual antiplatelet therapy. The anticoagulant pathway remains activated for a prolonged period after ACS and, consequently, has been a target for treatment. Early studies with warfarin indicated its benefit, but the risk of bleeding and the complexities of warfarin anticoagulation resulted in little use of this strategy. Rivaroxaban, apixaban, and dabigatran are new specific inhibitors of anticoagulant factors (Xa or IIa currently available for the prevention of thrombosis and/or thromboembolism. Thus far, studies with dabigatran and apixaban in ACS have shown no clinical benefit and bleeding has been increased. The ATLAS ACS 2-TIMI 51 trial observed the impact of rivaroxaban 2.5 mg and 5 mg twice daily in patients with recent ACS receiving current management (both early invasive strategy and dual antiplatelet therapy with aspirin and clopidogrel over a follow-up period of over 1 year. Rivaroxaban 2.5 mg twice daily reduced cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, or stroke by 16%, and both cardiovascular and all-cause mortality by approximately 20%. Although major bleeding increased from 0.6% to 2.1% and intracranial hemorrhage from 0.2% to 0.6%, there was no increase in fatal bleeding. The role of rivaroxaban in the management of ACS is discussed in this review. The reduction in mortality is the main finding that could lead to the use of rivaroxaban in the management of ACS in high-risk individuals with a low bleeding risk.Keywords: cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, stroke, anticoagulation, bleeding risk

  17. Potential role of punicalagin against oxidative stress induced testicular damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faiza Rao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Punicalagin is isolated from pomegranate and widely used for the treatment of different diseases in Chinese traditional medicine. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of Punicalagin (purity ≥98% on oxidative stress induced testicular damage and its effect on fertility. We detected the antioxidant potential of punicalagin in lipopolysaccharide (LPS induced oxidative stress damage in testes, also tried to uncover the boosting fertility effect of Punicalagin (PU against oxidative stress-induced infertility. Results demonstrated that 9 mg kg−1 for 7 days treatment significantly decreases LPS induced oxidative damage in testes and nitric oxide production. The administration of oxidative stress resulted in a significant reduction in testes antioxidants GSH, T-SOD, and CAT raised LPO, but treatment with punicalagin for 7 days increased antioxidant defense GSH, T-SOD, and CAT by the end of the experiment and reduced LPO level as well. PU also significantly activates Nrf2, which is involved in regulation of antioxidant defense systems. Hence, the present research categorically elucidates the protective effect of punicalagin against LPS induced oxidative stress induced perturbation in the process of spermatogenesis and significantly increased sperm health and number. Moreover, fertility success significantly decreased in LPS-injected mice compared to controls. Mice injected with LPS had fertility indices of 12.5%, while others treated with a combination of PU + LPS exhibited 75% indices. By promoting fertility and eliminating oxidative stress and inflammation, PU may be a useful nutrient for the treatment of infertility.

  18. The Potential Role(s) of Writing in Second Language Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jessica

    2012-01-01

    Writing is often seen as having a minor role in second language learning. This article explores recent research that suggests that writing can have a facilitative role in language development. In particular, it focuses on three features of writing: (1) its slower pace, and (2) the enduring record that it leaves, both of which can encourage…

  19. Potential role of Hedgehog pathway in liver response to radiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sihyung Wang

    Full Text Available Radiation-induced fibrosis constitutes a major problem that is commonly observed in the patients undergoing radiotherapy; therefore, understanding its pathophysiological mechanism is important. The Hedgehog (Hh pathway induces the proliferation of progenitors and myofibroblastic hepatic stellate cells (MF-HSCs and promotes the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT, thereby regulating the repair response in the damaged liver. We examined the response of normal liver to radiation injury. Male mice were sacrificed at 6 weeks and 10 weeks after exposure to a single dose of 6 Gy and the livers were collected for biochemical analysis. Irradiated (IR and control mice were compared for progenitors, fibrosis, Hh pathway, and EMT at 6 and 10 weeks post irradiation. Fatty hepatocytes were observed and the expressions of Hh ligand, Indian Hh. were greater in the livers at 6 weeks, whereas expression of another Hh ligand, Sonic Hh, increased at 10 weeks post irradiation. Both Smoothened, Hh receptor, and Gli2, Hh-target gene, were up-regulated at 6 and 10 weeks after irradiation. Accumulation of progenitors (CD44, Pan-cytokeratin, and Sox9 was significant in IR livers at 6 and 10 weeks. RNA analysis showed enhanced expression of the EMT-stimulating factor, tgf-β, in the IR livers at 6 weeks and the upregulation of mesenchymal markers (α-SMA, collagen, N-cadherin, and s100a4, but down-regulation of EMT inhibitors, in IR mouse livers at 6 and 10 weeks. Increased fibrosis was observed in IR mouse livers at 10 weeks. Treatment of mice with Hh inhibitor, GDC-0449, suppressed Hh activity and block the proliferation of hepatic progenitor and expression of EMT-stimulating genes in irradiated mice. Therefore, those results demonstrated that the Hh pathway increased in response to liver injury by radiation and promoted a compensatory proliferation of MF-HSCs and progenitors, thereby regulating liver remodeling.

  20. Langerhans cells and their role in oral mucosal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Juhi; Upadhyay, Ram B; Agrawal, Pankaj; Jaitley, Shweta; Shekhar, Rhitu

    2013-09-01

    Dendritic cells are arguably the most potent antigen-presenting cells and may be the only cells capable of initiating the adaptive immune response. The epithelial residents of dendritic cells are Langerhans cells, which serve as the "sentinels" of the mucosa, altering the immune system not only to pathogen entry but also of tolerance to self antigen and commensal microbes. Oral mucosal Langerhans cells are capable of engaging and internalizing a wide variety of pathogens and have been found responsive to nickel in patients with nickel allergies, oral Candida species, oral lichen planus, lichenoid drug eruptions, graft versus host diseases, periodontal diseases median rhomboid glossitis, human immunodeficiency virus infection, hairy leukoplakia of the tongue, and oral squamous cell carcinoma. Review focuses on the role of antigen-presenting cells in particular Langerhans cells to better understand the mechanisms underlying immune responses. In this review, comprehensive detail about mucosal diseases has been compiled using the PubMed database and through textbooks. PMID:24251267

  1. Extracellular vesicles from infected cells: potential for direct pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela M Schwab

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Infections that result in natural or manmade spread of lethal biological agents are a concern and require national and focused preparedness. In this manuscript, as part of an early diagnostics and pathogen treatment strategy, we have focused on extracellular vesicles (EVs that arise following infections. Although the field of biodefense does not currently have a rich resource in EVs literature, none the less, similar pathogens belonging to the more classical emerging and non-emerging diseases have been studied in their EV/exosomal contents and function. These exosomes are formed in late endosomes and released from the cell membrane in almost every cell type in vivo. These vesicles contain proteins, RNA, and lipids from the cells they originate from and function in development, signal transduction, cell survival, and transfer of infectious material. The current review focuses on how different forms of infection exploit the exosomal pathway and how exosomes can be exploited artificially to treat infection and disease and potentially also be used as a source of vaccine. Virally-infected cells can secrete viral as well as cellular proteins and RNA in exosomes, allowing viruses to cause latent infection and spread of miRNA to nearby cells prior to a subsequent infection. In addition to virally-infected host cells, bacteria, protozoa, and fungi can all release small vesicles that contain Pathogen-Associated Molecular Patterns (PAMPs, regulating the neighboring uninfected cells. Examples of exosomes from both virally and bacterially infected cells point toward a re-programming network of pathways in the recipient cells. Finally, many of these exosomes contain cytokines and miRNAs that in turn can effect gene expression in the recipient cells through the classical TLR and NFkB pathway. Therefore, although exosomes do not replicate as an independent entity, they however facilitate movement of infectious material through tissues and may be the cause of

  2. The role of liver progenitor cells during liver regeneration, fibrogenesis, and carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhn-Gaone, Julia; Gogoi-Tiwari, Jully; Ramm, Grant A; Olynyk, John K; Tirnitz-Parker, Janina E E

    2016-02-01

    The growing worldwide challenge of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma due to increasing prevalence of excessive alcohol consumption, viral hepatitis, obesity, and the metabolic syndrome has sparked interest in stem cell-like liver progenitor cells (LPCs) as potential candidates for cell therapy and tissue engineering, as an alternative approach to whole organ transplantation. However, LPCs always proliferate in chronic liver diseases with a predisposition to cancer; they have been suggested to play major roles in driving fibrosis, disease progression, and may even represent tumor-initiating cells. Hence, a greater understanding of the factors that govern their activation, communication with other hepatic cell types, and bipotential differentiation as opposed to their potential transformation is needed before their therapeutic potential can be harnessed.

  3. Potential roles of noncoding RNAs in environmental epigenetic transgenerational inheritance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wei

    2014-12-01

    "Epigenetic transgenerational inheritance" (ETI) has been defined as germline (sperm or egg) transmission of epigenetic information between generations in the absence of direct exposures or genetic manipulations. Among reported cases of ETI in mammals, the majority are induced by environmental factors, including environmental toxicants [e.g. agricultural fungicide vinclozolin, plastic additive bisphenol A, pesticide methoxychlor, dioxin, di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate, dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane, and hydrocarbons] and poor nutritional conditions. Although the ETI phenomenon is well established, the underlying mechanism remains elusive. Putative epimutations, including changes in DNA methylation and histone modification patterns, have been reported, but it remains unclear how these epimutations are formed in the first place, and how they are memorized in the germline and then get transmitted to subsequent generations. Based on recent advances in our understanding of regulatory noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs), I propose that ncRNAs are involved in ETI, during both the initial epimutation formation and the subsequent germline transmission of epimutations. ncRNAs can function at epigenetic levels by affecting DNA methylation and histone modifications, thereby changing gene transcriptional activities, which can lead to an altered mRNA transcriptome associated with a disease phenotype. Alternatively, novel or altered ncRNA expression can cause dysregulated post-transcriptional regulation, thus directly affecting the mRNA transcriptome and inducing a disease phenotype. Sperm-borne ncRNAs are potential mediators for epigenetic memory across generations, but they alone may not be sufficient for stable transmission of epimutations across generations. Overall, research on ncRNAs in the context of ETI is urgently needed to shed light on the underlying mechanism of ETI.

  4. Potential renovascular hypertension, space missions, and the role of magnesium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William J Rowe

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available William J RoweFormer Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine, Medical University of Ohio at Toledo, Keswick, VA, USAAbstract: Space flight (SF and dust inhalation in habitats cause hypertension whereas in SF (alone there is no consistent hypertension but reduced diurnal blood pressure (BP variation instead. Current pharmaceutical subcutaneous delivery systems are inadequate and there is impairment in the absorption, metabolism, excretion, and deterioration of some pharmaceuticals. Data obtained from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration through the Freedom of Information Act shows that Irwin returned from his 12-day Apollo 15 mission in 1971 and was administered a bicycle stress test. With just three minutes of exercise, his BP was >275/125 mm Hg (heart rate of only 130 beats per minute. There was no acute renal insult. Irwin’s apparent spontaneous remission is suggested to be related to the increase of a protective vasodilator, and his atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP reduced with SF because of reduced plasma volume. With invariable malabsorption and loss of bone/muscle storage sites, there are significant (P < 0.0001 reductions of magnesium (Mg required for ANP synthesis and release. Reductions of Mg and ANP can trigger pronounced angiotensin (200%, endothelin, and catecholamine elevations (clearly shown in recent years and vicious cycles between the latter and Mg deficits. There is proteinuria, elevated creatinine, and reduced renal concentrating ability with the potential for progressive inflammatory and oxidative stress-induced renal disease and hypertension with vicious cycles. After SF, animals show myocardial endothelial injuries and increased vascular resistance of extremities in humans. Even without dust, hypertension might eventually develop from renovascular hypertension during very long missions. Without sufficient endothelial protection from pharmaceuticals, a comprehensive gene research program should begin now

  5. New insights into the immunopathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus: the role of T follicular helper cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma Huijuan; Wan Suigui; Xia Changqing

    2014-01-01

    Objective To review the development of T follicular helper (TFH) cells and their role in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) pathogenesis,the effect of dendritic cells (DCs) on TFH cells in SLE,as well as the potential use of TFH cells as a new therapeutic target in clinical practice.Data sources The data used in this review were retrieved mainly from the PubMed database (1989-2013).The terms used in the literature search were "T follicular helper cells," "systemic lupus erythematosus," and "dendritic cells." Study selection Relevant publications about the TFH cells development,the interaction between the TFH cells and the DCs,and the clinical applications of TFH cells were identified,retrieved,and reviewed.Results TFH cells,a novel distinct CD4+ T cell subset,are specialized in providing help to B cells in the formation of germinal centers (GCs) and long-term protective humoral immune responses.The development of TFH cells from na(i)ve CD4+ T cell is a multistep process.As the pivot of immunoregulation,DCs are indispensable for TFH cells generation.In addition to receptor-ligand interactions between TFH cells and DCs,the cytokines secreted by DCs are also necessary for TFH cell generation.TFH cell dysregulation has been implicated in the development of SLE.More evidence from animal models of SLE and SLE patients suggests that TFH cells are necessary for pathogenic autoantibody production.Therefore,therapeutically targeting TFH cells can be a promising approach to treat antibody-mediated autoimmune diseases including SLE.Conclusion TFH cells play a critical role in the pathogenesis of SLE,making them attractive therapeutic targets in clinical practice.

  6. BNNT-mediated irreversible electroporatio: its potential on cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vittoria Raffa, Cristina Riggio, Michael W. Smith, Kevin C. Jordan, Wei Cao, Alfred Cuschieri

    2012-10-01

    Tissue ablation, i.e., the destruction of undesirable tissues, has become an important minimally invasive technique alternative to resection surgery for the treatment of tumours. Several methods for tissue ablation are based on thermal techniques using cold, e.g. cryosurgery [1] or heat, e.g. radiofrequency [2] or high-intensity focused ultrasound [3] or nanoparticle-mediated irradiation [4]. Alternatively, irreversible electroporation (IRE) has been proposed as non thermal technique for minimally invasive tissue ablation based on the use of electrical pulses. When the electric field is applied to a cell, a change in transmembrane potential is induced, which can cause biochemical and physiological changes of the cell. When the threshold value of the transmembrane potential is exceeded, the cell membrane becomes permeable, thus allowing entrance of molecules that otherwise cannot cross the membrane [5]. A further increase in the electric field intensity may cause irreversible membrane permeabilization and cell death. These pulses create irreversible defects (pores) in the cell membrane lipid bilayer, causing cell death through loss of cell homeostasis [6]. This is desirable in tumour ablation in order to produce large cell death, without the use of cytostatic drugs. A study of Davalos, Mir and Rubinsky showed that IRE can ablate substantial volumes of tissue without inducing a thermal effect and therefore serve as an independent and new tissue ablation modality; this opened the way to the use of IRE in surgery [7]. Their finding was subsequently confirmed in studies on cells [8], small animal models [9] and in large animal models in the liver [10] and the heart [11]. The most important finding in these papers is that irreversible electroporation produces precisely delineated ablation zones with cell scale resolution between ablated and non-ablated areas, without zones in which the extent of damage changes gradually as during thermal ablation. Furthermore, it is

  7. Optical simulation of the role of reflecting interlayers in tandem micromorph silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krc, J.; Smole, F.; Topic, M. [Ljubljana Univ. (Slovenia). Faculty of Electrical Engineering

    2005-04-01

    The role of a reflecting interlayer in micromorph silicon thin-film solar cells is investigated from the optical point of view. Detailed optical modelling and simulation are used to study the effects of different interlayers on quantum efficiency and short-circuit current of the top, amorphous silicon, and bottom, microcrystalline silicon, solar cell. The role of refractive index of interlayers on quantum efficiency of the top and bottom cell is analysed. Critical issues, such as enhanced total reflection from the solar cell and decreased quantum efficiency of the bottom cell due to interlayer are studied. Besides the single interlayer concept, double and triple interlayer stacks are investigated and improvements in comparison to the single ZnO interlayer are demonstrated. Potential thickness reductions of the top amorphous silicon cell related to different interlayers are presented. (Author)

  8. Role of Dendritic Cells in Immune Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savary, Cherylyn A.

    1997-01-01

    Specific aims include: (1) Application of the bioreactor to enhance cytokine-regulated proliferation and maturation of dendritic cells (DC); (2) Based on clues from spaceflight: compare the frequency and function of DC in normal donors and immunocompromised cancer patients; and (3) Initiate studies on the efficiency of cytokine therapy and DC-assisted immunotherapy (using bioreactor-expanded DC) in animal models of experimental fungal infections.

  9. Potential role of odanacatib in the treatment of osteoporosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ng KW

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Kong Wah NgDepartment of Endocrinology and Diabetes and St Vincent’s Institute, St Vincent’s Hospital, Fitzroy, Victoria, AustraliaAbstract: Cathepsin K is a key enzyme involved in the degradation of organic bone matrix by osteoclasts. Inhibition of bone resorption observed in human and animal models deficient for cathepsin K has identified this enzyme as a suitable target for intervention by small molecules with the potential to be used as therapeutic agents in the treatment of osteoporosis. Odanacatib (ODN is a nonbasic selective cathepsin K inhibitor with good pharmacokinetic parameters such as minimal in vitro metabolism, long half-life, and oral bioavailability. In preclinical studies, ovariectomized monkeys and rabbits treated with ODN showed substantial inhibition of bone resorption markers along with increases in bone mineral density (BMD. Significant differences were observed in the effects of ODN treatment compared with those of other antiresorptive agents such as bisphosphonates and denosumab. ODN displayed compartment-specific effects on trabecular versus cortical bone formation, with treatment resulting in marked increases in periosteal bone formation and cortical thickness in ovariectomized monkeys whereas trabecular bone formation was reduced. Furthermore, osteoclasts remained viable. Phase I and II studies conducted in postmenopausal women showed ODN to be safe and well tolerated. After 5 years, women who received ODN 50 mg weekly continuously from year 1 (n = 13, showed BMD increases from baseline of 11.9% at the lumbar spine, 9.8% at the femoral neck, 10.9% at the hip trochanter, and 8.5% at the total hip. Additionally, these subjects maintained a low level of the urine bone resorption marker N-terminal telopeptide/creatinine (-67.4% from baseline through 5 years of treatment, while levels of serum bone-specific alkaline phosphatase remained only slightly reduced relative to baseline (-15.3%. In women who were switched from

  10. Expression of renal cubilin and its potential role in tubulointerstitial inflammation induced by albumin overload

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jurong YANG; Yani HE; Haiying SHEN; Hanlu DING; Kailong LI; Huiming WANG

    2008-01-01

    Sustained proteinuria is an independent risk factor leading to kidney fibrosis and end-stage renal fail-ure. Over-reabsorption of filtered proteins, notably albu-min, has been proved to trigger interstitial inflammation and fibrosis in proteinuric renal disease. Cubilin, an endo-cytic receptor expressed on the renal tubular brush bor-der, is responsible for albumin reabsorption in physiologic condition. However, little is known about whether it is required for activation of tubular cells induced by albu-min overload. In this work, we investigated the change of cubilin expression and its potential role in albumin-induced up-regulation of chemokines synthesis in vivo and in vitro. Twenty-six patients with nephrotic syndrome were enrolled in this study. Proximal tubule uptake of albumin, expression of apical membrane cubilin and infiltrating cells in kidney interstitium were determined by immunocytochemistry. In vitro, the transcription of cubilin in HK2 cells after exposure to albumin was ana-lyzed by real-time PCR. Endocytosis of albumin in HK2 cells was examined by fluorescent microscope. The influ-ence of inhibition of cubilin on albumin-induced expres-sions of monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) and regulated upon activation normal T-cell expressed and secreted (RANTES) was investigated by Western blot. The intensity of luminal cubilin and tubular accu-mulation of albumin were significantly increased in nephrotic kidneys. The expression of MCP-1 and RANTES was up-regulated, and there were spatial rela-tionships in localization between these chemokines and cubilin as well as intracellular albumin in kidney tissues. Infiltration of CD-3 and ED-1-positive cells was predom-inant in tubulointerstitial areas displaying signs of increases of cubilin expression and albumin accumula-tion. In vitro, the transcription of cubilin mRNA in HK2 cells was enhanced after 24 h exposure to albumin in a dose-dependent manner. Inhibition of endocytosis of albumin by antisense

  11. Secretome of Olfactory Mucosa Mesenchymal Stem Cell, a Multiple Potential Stem Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Lite; Jiang, Miao; Duan, Da; Wang, Zijun; Qi, Linyu; Teng, Xiaohua; Zhao, Zhenyu; Wang, Lei; Zhuo, Yi; Chen, Ping; He, Xijing; Lu, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Nasal olfactory mucosa mesenchymal stem cells (OM-MSCs) have the ability to promote regeneration in the nervous system in vivo. Moreover, with view to the potential for clinical application, OM-MSCs have the advantage of being easily accessible from patients and transplantable in an autologous manner, thus eliminating immune rejection and contentious ethical issues. So far, most studies have been focused on the role of OM-MSCs in central nervous system replacement. However, the secreted proteomics of OM-MSCs have not been reported yet. Here, proteins secreted by OM-MSCs cultured in serum-free conditions were separated on SDS-PAGE and identified by LC-MS/MS. As a result, a total of 274 secreted proteins were identified. These molecules are known to be important in neurotrophy, angiogenesis, cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis, and inflammation which were highly correlated with the repair of central nervous system. The proteomic profiling of the OM-MSCs secretome might provide new insights into their nature in the neural recovery. However, proteomic analysis for clinical biomarkers of OM-MSCs needs to be further studied. PMID:26949398

  12. From regenerative dentistry to regenerative medicine: progress, challenges, and potential applications of oral stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao L

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Li Xiao,1 Masanori Nasu2 1Department of Pharmacology, 2Research Center, The Nippon Dental University, Tokyo, Japan Abstract: Adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs and epithelial stem cells play essential roles in tissue repair and self-healing. Oral MSCs and epithelial stem cells can be isolated from adult human oral tissues, for example, teeth, periodontal ligament, and gingiva. Cocultivated adult oral epithelial stem cells and MSCs could represent some developmental events, such as epithelial invagination and tubular structure formation, signifying their potentials for tissue regeneration. Oral epithelial stem cells have been used in regenerative medicine over 1 decade. They are able to form a stratified cell sheet under three-dimensional culture conditions. Both experimental and clinical data indicate that the cell sheets can not only safely and effectively reconstruct the damaged cornea in humans, but also repair esophageal ulcer in animal models. Oral MSCs include dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs, stem cells from exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED, stem cells from apical papilla (SCAP, periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs, and mesenchymal stem cells from gingiva (GMSCs. They are widely applied in both regenerative dentistry and medicine. DPSCs, SHED, and SCAP are able to form dentin–pulp complex when being transplanted into immunodeficient animals. They have been experimentally used for the regeneration of dental pulp, neuron, bone muscle and blood vessels in animal models and have shown promising results. PDLSCs and GMSCs are demonstrated to be ideal cell sources for repairing the damaged tissues of periodontal, muscle, and tendon. Despite the abovementioned applications of oral stem cells, only a few human clinical trials are now underway to use them for the treatment of certain diseases. Since clinical use is the end goal, their true regenerative power and safety need to be further examined.Keywords: oral mesenchymal stem cells, oral

  13. Wnt/Fz signaling and the cytoskeleton: potential roles in tumorigenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shih-Lei Lai; Andy J Chien; Randall T Moon

    2009-01-01

    Wnt/β-catenin regulates cellular functions related to tumor initiation and progression, cell proliferation, differ-entiation, survival, and adhesion. β-Catenin-independent Wnt pathways have been proposed to regulate cell polarity and migration, including metastasis, In this review, we discuss the possible roles of both β-catenin-dependent and -independent signaling pathways in tumor progression, with an emphasis on their regulation of Rho-family GTPases, cytoskeletal remodeling, and relationships with cell-cell adhesion and cilia/ciliogenesis.

  14. Role of sodium tungstate as a potential antiplatelet agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernández-Ruiz R

    2015-05-01

    slightly this response. In human blood, a dose-dependent effect was observed. At 200 µM, closure times in the PFA-100 were prolonged. On denuded vessels, %SC and thrombi formation (%T decreased with Na2O4W. Neither the aggregating response nor the viscoelastic clot properties were affected.Conclusion: Na2O4W decreases consistently the hemostatic capacity of platelets, inhibiting their adhesive and cohesive properties under flow conditions in mice and in human blood, resulting in smaller thrombi. Although Na2O4W may be acting on platelet PTP1B, other potential targets should not be disregarded. Keywords: sodium tungstate, protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B, platelet adhesion, antiplatelet agents

  15. Regulating Global Sumoylation by a MAP Kinase Hog1 and Its Potential Role in Osmo-Tolerance in Yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Abu Irqeba, Ameair; Li, Yang; Panahi, Mahmoud; Zhu, Ming; Wang, Yuqi

    2014-01-01

    Sumoylation, a post-translational protein modification by small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO), has been implicated in many stress responses. Here we analyzed the potential role of sumoylation in osmo-response in yeast. We find that osmotic stress induces rapid accumulation of sumoylated species in normal yeast cells. Interestingly, disruption of MAP kinase Hog1 leads to a much higher level of accumulation of sumoylated conjugates that are independent of new protein synthesis. We also find th...

  16. Chemical and Physical Approaches to Extend the Replicative and Differentiation Potential of Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Eun Seong; Ok, Jeong Soo; Song, SeonBeom

    2016-06-01

    Cell therapies using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are increasing in regenerative medicine, with applications to a growing number of aging-associated dysfunctions and degenerations. For successful therapies, a certain mass of cells is needed, requiring extensive ex vivo expansion of the cells. However, the proliferation of both MSCs and EPCs is limited as a result of telomere shortening-induced senescence. As cells approach senescence, their proliferation slows down and differentiation potential decreases. Therefore, ways to delay senescence and extend the replicative lifespan these cells are needed. Certain proteins and pathways play key roles in determining the replicative lifespan by regulating ROS generation, damage accumulation, or telomere shortening. And, their agonists and gene activators exert positive effects on lifespan. In many of the treatments, importantly, the lifespan is extended with the retention of differentiation potential. Furthermore, certain culture conditions, including the use of specific atmospheric conditions and culture substrates, exert positive effects on not only the proliferation rate, but also the extent of proliferation and differentiation potential as well as lineage determination. These strategies and known underlying mechanisms are introduced in this review, with an evaluation of their pros and cons in order to facilitate safe and effective MSC expansion ex vivo. PMID:27085715

  17. RNAi-mediated knockdown of FANCF suppresses cell proliferation, migration, invasion, and drug resistance potential of breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Fanconi anemia complementation group F protein (FANCF is a key factor, which maintains the function of FA/BRCA, a DNA damage response pathway. However, the functional role of FANCF in breast cancer has not been elucidated. We performed a specific FANCF-shRNA knockdown of endogenous FANCF in vitro. Cell viability was measured with a CCK-8 assay. DNA damage was assessed with an alkaline comet assay. Apoptosis, cell cycle, and drug accumulation were measured by flow cytometry. The expression levels of protein were determined by Western blot using specific antibodies. Based on these results, we used cell migration and invasion assays to demonstrate a crucial role for FANCF in those processes. FANCF shRNA effectively inhibited expression of FANCF. We found that proliferation of FANCF knockdown breast cancer cells (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-435S was significantly inhibited, with cell cycle arrest in the S phase, induction of apoptosis, and DNA fragmentation. Inhibition of FANCF also resulted in decreased cell migration and invasion. In addition, FANCF knockdown enhanced sensitivity to doxorubicin in breast cancer cells. These results suggest that FANCF may be a potential target for molecular, therapeutic intervention in breast cancer.

  18. RNAi-mediated knockdown of FANCF suppresses cell proliferation, migration, invasion, and drug resistance potential of breast cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, L.; Li, N.; Yu, J.K.; Tang, H.T.; Li, Y.L.; He, M.; Yu, Z.J.; Bai, X.F. [Department of Pharmacology, School of Pharmacy, China Medical University, Heping Ward, Shenyang City, Liaoning (China); Zheng, Z.H.; Wang, E.H. [Institute of Pathology and Pathophysiology, China Medical University, Heping Ward, Shenyang City, Liaoning (China); Wei, M.J. [Department of Pharmacology, School of Pharmacy, China Medical University, Heping Ward, Shenyang City, Liaoning (China)

    2013-12-12

    Fanconi anemia complementation group F protein (FANCF) is a key factor, which maintains the function of FA/BRCA, a DNA damage response pathway. However, the functional role of FANCF in breast cancer has not been elucidated. We performed a specific FANCF-shRNA knockdown of endogenous FANCF in vitro. Cell viability was measured with a CCK-8 assay. DNA damage was assessed with an alkaline comet assay. Apoptosis, cell cycle, and drug accumulation were measured by flow cytometry. The expression levels of protein were determined by Western blot using specific antibodies. Based on these results, we used cell migration and invasion assays to demonstrate a crucial role for FANCF in those processes. FANCF shRNA effectively inhibited expression of FANCF. We found that proliferation of FANCF knockdown breast cancer cells (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-435S) was significantly inhibited, with cell cycle arrest in the S phase, induction of apoptosis, and DNA fragmentation. Inhibition of FANCF also resulted in decreased cell migration and invasion. In addition, FANCF knockdown enhanced sensitivity to doxorubicin in breast cancer cells. These results suggest that FANCF may be a potential target for molecular, therapeutic intervention in breast cancer.

  19. RNAi-mediated knockdown of FANCF suppresses cell proliferation, migration, invasion, and drug resistance potential of breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fanconi anemia complementation group F protein (FANCF) is a key factor, which maintains the function of FA/BRCA, a DNA damage response pathway. However, the functional role of FANCF in breast cancer has not been elucidated. We performed a specific FANCF-shRNA knockdown of endogenous FANCF in vitro. Cell viability was measured with a CCK-8 assay. DNA damage was assessed with an alkaline comet assay. Apoptosis, cell cycle, and drug accumulation were measured by flow cytometry. The expression levels of protein were determined by Western blot using specific antibodies. Based on these results, we used cell migration and invasion assays to demonstrate a crucial role for FANCF in those processes. FANCF shRNA effectively inhibited expression of FANCF. We found that proliferation of FANCF knockdown breast cancer cells (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-435S) was significantly inhibited, with cell cycle arrest in the S phase, induction of apoptosis, and DNA fragmentation. Inhibition of FANCF also resulted in decreased cell migration and invasion. In addition, FANCF knockdown enhanced sensitivity to doxorubicin in breast cancer cells. These results suggest that FANCF may be a potential target for molecular, therapeutic intervention in breast cancer

  20. Role of Fetal Stem Cells in Maternal Tissue Regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Zhong, Jiang F; Weiner, Leslie P.

    2007-01-01

    Microchimerism refers to the status of harboring cells from another individual at low levels. It is well known that cells traffic bidirectionally between fetus and mother during pregnancy. This situation resembles a naturally occurring long lasting fetal stem cell transplantation. The fetus acts as the donor and the mother acts as the recipient. To study the role of microchimerism in tissue regeneration, we constructed a murine microchimerism model with wild type C57BL/6J female mice carrying...

  1. EEN regulates the proliferation and survival of multiple myeloma cells by potentiating IGF-1 secretion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Levels of EEN expression paralleled with the rate of cell proliferation. • EEN was involved in the proliferation and survival of multiple myeloma (MM) cells. • EEN regulated the activity of IGF-1-Akt/mTOR pathway. • EEN regulated proliferation and survival of MM cells by enhancing IGF-1 secretion. - Abstract: The molecular mechanisms of multiple myeloma are not well defined. EEN is an endocytosis-regulating molecule. Here we report that EEN regulates the proliferation and survival of multiple myeloma cells, by regulating IGF-1 secretion. In the present study, we observed that EEN expression paralleled with cell proliferation, EEN accelerated cell proliferation, facilitated cell cycle transition from G1 to S phase by regulating cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) pathway, and delayed cell apoptosis via Bcl2/Bax-mitochondrial pathway. Mechanistically, we found that EEN was indispensable for insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) secretion and the activation of protein kinase B-mammalian target of rapamycin (Akt-mTOR) pathway. Exogenous IGF-1 overcame the phenotype of EEN depletion, while IGF-1 neutralization overcame that of EEN over-expression. Collectively, these data suggest that EEN may play a pivotal role in excessive cell proliferation and insufficient cell apoptosis of bone marrow plasma cells in multiple myeloma. Therefore, EEN may represent a potential diagnostic marker or therapeutic target for multiple myeloma

  2. EEN regulates the proliferation and survival of multiple myeloma cells by potentiating IGF-1 secretion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Er-Wen [Guangzhou Institute of Forensic Science, Guangzhou (China); Department of Forensic Pathology, Zhongshan School of Medicine, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Xue, Sheng-Jiang [Department of Forensic Pathology, Zhongshan School of Medicine, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Li, Xiao-Yan [Department of Pharmacy, The Third Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Xu, Suo-Wen [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Cheng, Jian-Ding; Zheng, Jin-Xiang [Department of Forensic Pathology, Zhongshan School of Medicine, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Shi, He; Lv, Guo-Li; Li, Zhi-Gang; Li, Yue; Liu, Chang-Hui; Chen, Xiao-Hui; Liu, Hong [Guangzhou Institute of Forensic Science, Guangzhou (China); Li, Jie, E-mail: mdlijie@sina.com [Department of Anaesthesiology, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Liu, Chao, E-mail: liuchaogaj@21cn.com [Guangzhou Institute of Forensic Science, Guangzhou (China)

    2014-05-02

    Highlights: • Levels of EEN expression paralleled with the rate of cell proliferation. • EEN was involved in the proliferation and survival of multiple myeloma (MM) cells. • EEN regulated the activity of IGF-1-Akt/mTOR pathway. • EEN regulated proliferation and survival of MM cells by enhancing IGF-1 secretion. - Abstract: The molecular mechanisms of multiple myeloma are not well defined. EEN is an endocytosis-regulating molecule. Here we report that EEN regulates the proliferation and survival of multiple myeloma cells, by regulating IGF-1 secretion. In the present study, we observed that EEN expression paralleled with cell proliferation, EEN accelerated cell proliferation, facilitated cell cycle transition from G1 to S phase by regulating cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) pathway, and delayed cell apoptosis via Bcl2/Bax-mitochondrial pathway. Mechanistically, we found that EEN was indispensable for insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) secretion and the activation of protein kinase B-mammalian target of rapamycin (Akt-mTOR) pathway. Exogenous IGF-1 overcame the phenotype of EEN depletion, while IGF-1 neutralization overcame that of EEN over-expression. Collectively, these data suggest that EEN may play a pivotal role in excessive cell proliferation and insufficient cell apoptosis of bone marrow plasma cells in multiple myeloma. Therefore, EEN may represent a potential diagnostic marker or therapeutic target for multiple myeloma.

  3. GPR43 Potentiates β-Cell Function in Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNelis, Joanne C; Lee, Yun Sok; Mayoral, Rafael; van der Kant, Rik; Johnson, Andrew M F; Wollam, Joshua; Olefsky, Jerrold M

    2015-09-01

    The intestinal microbiome can regulate host energy homeostasis and the development of metabolic disease. Here we identify GPR43, a receptor for bacterially produced short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), as a modulator of microbiota-host interaction. β-Cell expression of GPR43 and serum levels of acetate, an endogenous SCFA, are increased with a high-fat diet (HFD). HFD-fed GPR43 knockout (KO) mice develop glucose intolerance due to a defect in insulin secretion. In vitro treatment of isolated murine islets, human islets, and Min6 cells with (S)-2-(4-chlorophenyl)-3,3-dimethyl-N-(5-phenylthiazol-2-yl)butanamide (PA), a specific agonist of GPR43, increased intracellular inositol triphosphate and Ca(2+) levels, and potentiated insulin secretion in a GPR43-, Gαq-, and phospholipase C-dependent manner. In addition, KO mice fed an HFD displayed reduced β-cell mass and expression of differentiation genes, and the treatment of Min6 cells with PA increased β-cell proliferation and gene expression. Together these findings identify GPR43 as a potential target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:26023106

  4. The Potential of the Cell Processor for Scientific Computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Samuel; Shalf, John; Oliker, Leonid; Husbands, Parry; Kamil, Shoaib; Yelick, Katherine

    2005-10-14

    The slowing pace of commodity microprocessor performance improvements combined with ever-increasing chip power demands has become of utmost concern to computational scientists. As a result, the high performance computing community is examining alternative architectures that address the limitations of modern cache-based designs. In this work, we examine the potential of the using the forth coming STI Cell processor as a building block for future high-end computing systems. Our work contains several novel contributions. We are the first to present quantitative Cell performance data on scientific kernels and show direct comparisons against leading superscalar (AMD Opteron), VLIW (IntelItanium2), and vector (Cray X1) architectures. Since neither Cell hardware nor cycle-accurate simulators are currently publicly available, we develop both analytical models and simulators to predict kernel performance. Our work also explores the complexity of mapping several important scientific algorithms onto the Cells unique architecture. Additionally, we propose modest microarchitectural modifications that could significantly increase the efficiency of double-precision calculations. Overall results demonstrate the tremendous potential of the Cell architecture for scientific computations in terms of both raw performance and power efficiency.

  5. The role of stem cells and progenitors in the genesis of medulloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Wechsler-Reya, Robert J

    2014-10-01

    Cancer results from dysregulation of growth and survival pathways in normal stem cells and progenitors. Identifying the cells from which a tumor arises can facilitate the development of animal models and point to novel targets for therapy. Medulloblastoma is an aggressive tumor of the cerebellum that occurs predominantly in children. Recent genomic studies suggest that medulloblastoma consists of 4 major subgroups, each with distinct mutations and signaling pathway deregulations, and each potentially arising from distinct populations of stem cells and progenitors. Here we review the major types of progenitor cells in the cerebellum and discuss their role in the genesis of medulloblastoma.

  6. Therapeutic Efficacy of Stem Cells Transplantation in Diabetes: Role of Heme Oxygenase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffaele, Marco; Li Volti, Giovanni; Barbagallo, Ignazio A.; Vanella, Luca

    2016-01-01

    The growing data obtained from in vivo studies and clinical trials demonstrated the benefit of adult stem cells transplantation in diabetes; although an important limit is represented by their survival after the transplant. To this regard, recent reports suggest that genetic manipulation of stem cells prior to transplantation can lead to enhanced survival and better engraftment. The following review proposes to stimulate interest in the role of heme oxygenase-1 over-expression on transplantation of stem cells in diabetes, focusing on the clinical potential of heme oxygenase protein and activity to restore tissue damage and/or to improve the immunomodulatory properties of transplanted stem cells.

  7. Nox2 NADPH Oxidase Has a Critical Role in Insulin Resistance–Related Endothelial Cell Dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    Sukumar, Piruthivi; Viswambharan, Hema; Imrie, Helen; Cubbon, Richard M.; Yuldasheva, Nadira; Gage, Matthew; Galloway, Stacey; Skromna, Anna; Kandavelu, Parkavi; Santos, Celio X.; Gatenby, V. Kate; Smith, Jessica; Beech, David J; Wheatcroft, Stephen B.; Channon, Keith M.

    2013-01-01

    Insulin resistance is characterized by excessive endothelial cell generation of potentially cytotoxic concentrations of reactive oxygen species. We examined the role of NADPH oxidase (Nox) and specifically Nox2 isoform in superoxide generation in two complementary in vivo models of human insulin resistance (endothelial specific and whole body). Using three complementary methods to measure superoxide, we demonstrated higher levels of superoxide in insulin-resistant endothelial cells, which cou...

  8. Stromal Fibroblast in Age-Related Cancer: Role in Tumorigenesis and Potential as Novel Therapeutic Target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkhattouti, Abdelouahid; Hassan, Mohamed; Gomez, Christian R

    2015-01-01

    Incidence of most common cancers increases with age due to accumulation of damage to cells and tissues. Stroma, the structure close to the basement membrane, is gaining increased attention from clinicians and researchers due to its increasingly, yet incompletely understood role in the development of age-related cancer. With advanced age, stroma generates a pro-tumorigenic microenvironment, exemplified by the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP). Components of the SASP, such as cytokines, chemokines, and high energy metabolites are main drivers of age-related cancer initiation and sustain its progression. Our purpose is to provide insight into the mechanistic role of the stroma, with particular emphasis on stromal fibroblasts, on the development of age-related tumors. We also present evidence of the potential of the stroma as target for tumor therapy. Likewise, a rationale for age-related antitumor therapy targeting the stroma is presented. We expect to foster debate on the underlining basis of age-related cancer pathobiology. We also would like to promote discussion on novel stroma-based anticancer therapeutic strategies tailored to treat the elderly. PMID:26284191

  9. Stromal Fibroblast in Age-related Cancer: Role in Tumorigenesis and Potential as Novel Therapeutic Target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelouahid eElkhattouti

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Incidence of most common cancers increases with age due to accumulation of damage to cells and tissues. Stroma, the structure close to the basement membrane, is gaining increased attention from clinicians and researchers due to its increasingly, yet incompletely understood role in the development of age-related cancer. With advanced age, stroma generates a pro-tumorigenic microenvironment, exemplified by the secretory-associated specific phenotype (SASP. Components of the SASP such as cytokines, chemokines, and high energy metabolites are main drivers of age-related cancer initiation and sustain its progression. Our purpose is to provide insight into the mechanistic role of the stroma, with particular emphasis on stromal fibroblasts, on the development of age-related tumors. We also present evidence of the potential of the stroma as target for tumor therapy. Likewise, a rationale for age-related antitumor therapy targeting the stroma is presented. We expect to foster debate on the underlining basis of age-related cancer pathobiology. We also would like to promote discussion on novel stroma-based anticancer therapeutic strategies tailored to treat the elderly.

  10. Chromium(VI)-induced Production of Reactive Oxygen Species, Change of Plasma Membrane Potential and Dissipation of Mitochondria Membrane Potential in Chinese Hamster Lung Cell Cultures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective To examine whether Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) is generated, and whether plasma membrane potential and mitochondrial membrane potential are depolarized in Chinese Hamster Lung (CHL) cell lines exposed to Cr (VI). Methods CHL cells were incubated with Cr(VI) at 10 μmol/L, 2.5 μmol/L, 0.65 μmol/L for 3 and 6 hours, respectively. The production of ROS was performed by using 2,7_dichlorofluorescin diacetate; The changes in plasma membrane potential were estimated using fluorescent cationic dye DiBAC4; And the changes in mitochondria membrane potential were estimated using fluorescent dye Rhodamine 123. Results The ROS levels in CHL cells increased in all treated groups compared with the control group (P<0.01); The plasma membrane potential and mitochondrial membrane potential in CHL cells dissipated after incubated with Cr(VI) at 10 μmol/L for 3 hours and 6 hours (P<0.01), at 2.5 μmol/L for 6 hours (P<0.01 or 0.05). Conclusion Cr(VI) causes the dissipation of plasma membrane potential and mitochondrial membrane potential in CHL cell cultures, and Cr(VI)_induced ROS may play a role in the injuries.

  11. Characterization of colon cancer cells: a functional approach characterizing CD133 as a potential stem cell marker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isolation and characterization of tumourigenic colon cancer initiating cells may help to develop novel diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. We characterized a panel of fourteen human colon carcinoma cell lines and their corresponding xenografts for the surface expression of potential stem cell markers CD133, CD24, CD44, CDCP1 and CXCR4. In five cell lines and nine xenografts, mRNA expression of these markers was determined. Tumour growth behaviour of CD133+, CD133- and unsorted SW620 cells was evaluated in vivo. All five putative stem cell markers showed distinct expression patterns in the tumours examined. Two patient-derived cell lines highly expressed CD133 (> 85% of positive cells) and three other cell lines had an expression level of about 50% whereas in long-term culture based models CD133 expression ranged only from 0 to 20%. In 8/14 cell lines, more than 80% of the cells were positive for CD24 and 11/14 were over 70% positive for CD44. 10/14 cell lines expressed CDCP1 on ≥ 83% of cells. CXCR4 expression was determined solely on 94 L and SW480. Analyses of the corresponding xenografts revealed a significant reduction of cell numbers expressing the investigated surface markers and showed single cell fractions expressing up to three markers simultaneously. Statistical analysis revealed that the CXCR4 mRNA level correlates negatively with the protein expression of CD133, CD44, CD24 and CDCP1 in cell lines and xenografts. A lower differentiation grade of donor material correlated with a higher CDCP1 mRNA expression level in the respective tumour model. In vivo growth behaviour studies of SW620 revealed significantly higher take rates and shorter doubling times in the tumour growth of CD133 positive subclones in comparison to the unsorted cell line or CD133 negative subclones. Our data revealed correlations in the expression of surface markers CD44 and CD24 as well as CD44 and CDCP1 and strongly suggest that CD133 is a stem cell marker within our colon

  12. Therapeutic potential of umbilical cord blood cells for type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Binbin; Li, Xia; Yu, Haibo; Zhou, Zhiguang

    2015-11-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is a chronic disorder that results from autoimmune-mediated destruction of pancreatic islet β-cells. However, to date, no conventional intervention has successfully treated the disease. The optimal therapeutic method for T1DM should effectively control the autoimmunity, restore immune homeostasis, preserve residual β-cells, reverse β-cell destruction, and protect the regenerated insulin-producing cells against re-attack. Umbilical cord blood is rich in regulatory T (T(reg)) cells and multiple types of stem cells that exhibit immunomodulating potential and hold promise in their ability to restore peripheral tolerance towards pancreatic islet β-cells through remodeling of immune responses and suppression of autoreactive T cells. Recently, reinfusion of autologous umbilical cord blood or immune cells from cord blood has been proposed as a novel therapy for T1DM, with the advantages of no risk to the donors, minimal ethical concerns, a low incidence of graft-versus-host disease and easy accessibility. In this review, we revisit the role of autologous umbilical cord blood or immune cells from cord blood-based applications for the treatment of T1DM.

  13. The significant role of mast cells in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazaie, Khashayarsha; Blatner, Nichole R; Khan, Mohammad Wasim; Gounari, Fotini; Gounaris, Elias; Dennis, Kristen; Bonertz, Andreas; Tsai, Fu-Nien; Strouch, Matthew J; Cheon, Eric; Phillips, Joseph D; Beckhove, Philipp; Bentrem, David J

    2011-03-01

    Mast cells (MC) are a bone marrow-derived, long-lived, heterogeneous cellular population that function both as positive and negative regulators of immune responses. They are arguably the most productive chemical factory in the body and influence other cells through both soluble mediators and cell-to-cell interaction. MC are commonly seen in various tumors and have been attributed alternatively with tumor rejection or tumor promotion. Tumor-infiltrating MC are derived both from sentinel and recruited progenitor cells. MC can directly influence tumor cell proliferation and invasion but also help tumors indirectly by organizing its microenvironment and modulating immune responses to tumor cells. Best known for orchestrating inflammation and angiogenesis, the role of MC in shaping adaptive immune responses has become a focus of recent investigations. MC mobilize T cells and antigen-presenting dendritic cells. They function as intermediaries in regulatory T cells (Treg)-induced tolerance but can also modify or reverse Treg-suppressive properties. The central role of MC in the control of innate and adaptive immunity endows them with the ability to tune the nature of host responses to cancer and ultimately influence the outcome of disease and fate of the cancer patient. PMID:21287360

  14. Role of Kupffer cells in the pathogenesis of liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    George Kolios; Vassilis Valatas; Elias Kouroumalis

    2006-01-01

    Kupffer cells, the resident liver macrophages have long been considered as mostly scavenger cells responsible for removing particulate material from the portal circulation. However, evidence derived mostly from animal models, indicates that Kupffer cells may be implicated in the pathogenesis of various liver diseases including viral hepatitis, steatohepatitis, alcoholic liver disease, intrahepatic cholostasis, activation or rejection of the liver during liver transplantation and liver fibrosis. There is accumulating evidence, reviewed in this paper, suggesting that Kupffer cells may act both as effector cells in the destruction of hepatocytes by producing harmful soluble mediators as well as antigen presenting cells during viral infections of the liver. Moreover they may represent a significant source of chemoattractant molecules for cytotoxic CD8 and regulatory T cells. Their role in fibrosis is well established as they are one of the main sources of TGFβ1 production, which leads to the transformation of stellate cells into myofibroblasts. Whether all these variable functions in the liver are mediated by different Kupffer cell subpopulations remains to be evaluated. In this review we propose a model that demonstrates the role of Kupffer cells in the pathogenesis of liver disease.

  15. Therapeutic Potential of Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation for Cerebral Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaitanya Purandare

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Cerebral palsy (CP is a severe disabling disease with worldwide incidence being 2 to 3 per 1000 live births. CP was considered as a noncurable, nonreparative disorder, but stem cell therapy offers a potential treatment for CP. Objective. The present study evaluates the safety and efficacy of autologous bone-marrow-derived mononuclear cell (BMMNCs transplantation in CP patient. Material and Methods. In the present study, five infusions of autologous stem cells were injected intrathecally. Changes in neurological deficits and improvements in function were assessed using Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS-E&R scale. Results. Significant motor, sensory, cognitive, and speech improvements were observed. Bowel and bladder control has been achieved. On the GMFCS-E&R level, the patient was promoted from grade III to I. Conclusion. In this study, we report that intrathecal infusion of autologous BMMNCs seems to be feasible, effective, and safe with encouraging functional outcome improvements in CP patient.

  16. Flexible graphene transistors for recording cell action potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaschke, Benno M.; Lottner, Martin; Drieschner, Simon; Bonaccini Calia, Andrea; Stoiber, Karolina; Rousseau, Lionel; Lissourges, Gaëlle; Garrido, Jose A.

    2016-06-01

    Graphene solution-gated field-effect transistors (SGFETs) are a promising platform for the recording of cell action potentials due to the intrinsic high signal amplification of graphene transistors. In addition, graphene technology fulfills important key requirements for in-vivo applications, such as biocompability, mechanical flexibility, as well as ease of high density integration. In this paper we demonstrate the fabrication of flexible arrays of graphene SGFETs on polyimide, a biocompatible polymeric substrate. We investigate the transistor’s transconductance and intrinsic electronic noise which are key parameters for the device sensitivity, confirming that the obtained values are comparable to those of rigid graphene SGFETs. Furthermore, we show that the devices do not degrade during repeated bending and the transconductance, governed by the electronic properties of graphene, is unaffected by bending. After cell culture, we demonstrate the recording of cell action potentials from cardiomyocyte-like cells with a high signal-to-noise ratio that is higher or comparable to competing state of the art technologies. Our results highlight the great capabilities of flexible graphene SGFETs in bioelectronics, providing a solid foundation for in-vivo experiments and, eventually, for graphene-based neuroprosthetics.

  17. Subsets of regulatory T cells and their roles in allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huiyun; Kong, Hui; Zeng, Xiaoning; Guo, Lianyi; Sun, Xiaoyun; He, Shaoheng

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, it is recognized that acquired immunity is controlled by regulatory T cell (Treg). Since fundamental pathophysiological changes of allergy are mainly caused by hyperresponsiveness of immune system to allergens that acquires after birth, Tregs likely play key roles in the pathogenesis of allergy, particularly during the sensitization phase. However, accumulated information indicate that there are several distinctive subtypes of Tregs in man, and each of them seems to play different role in controlling immune system, which complicates the involvement of Tregs in allergy. The aim of the present study is to attempt to classify subtypes of Tregs and summarize their roles in allergy. Tregs should include natural Tregs (nTreg) including inducible costimulator (ICOS)(+) Tregs, inducible/adaptive Tregs (iTreg), interleukin (IL)-10-producing type 1 Tregs (Tr1 cells), CD8(+) Tregs and IL-17-producing Tregs. These cells share some common features including expression of Foxp3 (except for Tr1 cells), and secretion of inhibitory cytokine IL-10 and/or TGF-β. Furthermore, it is noticeable that Tregs likely contribute to allergic disorders such as dermatitis and airway inflammation, and play a crucial role in the treatment of allergy through their actions on suppression of effector T cells and inhibition of activation of mast cells and basophils. Modulation of functions of Tregs may provide a novel strategy to prevent and treat allergic diseases. PMID:24886492

  18. Calreticulin: Roles in Cell-Surface Protein Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Jiang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In order to perform their designated functions, proteins require precise subcellular localizations. For cell-surface proteins, such as receptors and channels, they are able to transduce signals only when properly targeted to the cell membrane. Calreticulin is a multi-functional chaperone protein involved in protein folding, maturation, and trafficking. However, evidence has been accumulating that calreticulin can also negatively regulate the surface expression of certain receptors and channels. In these instances, depletion of calreticulin enhances cell-surface expression and function. In this review, we discuss the role of calreticulin with a focus on its negative effects on the expression of cell-surface proteins.

  19. Potential contribution of Type I lung epithelial cells to chronic neonatal lung disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry J. Rozycki

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The alveolar surface is covered by large flat Type I cells (alveolar epithelial cells 1, AEC1. The normal physiological function of AEC1s involves gas exchange, based on their location in approximation to the capillary endothelium and their thinness, and in ion and water flux, as shown by the presence of solute active transport proteins, water channels, and impermeable tight junctions between cells. With the recent ability to produce relatively pure cultures of AEC1 cells, new functions have been described. These may be relevant to lung injury, repair and the abnormal development that characterizes bronchopulmonary dysplasia. To hypothesize a potential role for AEC1 in the development of lung injury and abnormal repair/development in premature lungs, evidence is presented for their presence in the developing lung, how their source may not be the Type II cell (AEC2 as has been assumed for forty years, and how the cell can be damaged by same type of stressors as those which lead to bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD. Recent work shows that the cells are part of the innate immune response, capable of producing pro-inflammatory mediators, which could contribute to the increase in inflammation seen in early bronchopulmonary dysplasia. One of the receptors found exclusively on AEC1 cells in the lung, called RAGE, may also have a role in increased inflammation, and to alveolar simplification. While the current evidence for AEC1 involvement in BPD is circumstantial and limited at present, the accumulating data supports several hypotheses and questions regarding potential differences in the behavior of AEC1 cells from newborn and premature lung compared with the adult lung.

  20. Feline immunodeficiency virus decreases cell-cell communication and mitochondrial membrane potential.

    OpenAIRE

    Danave, I R; Tiffany-Castiglioni, E; Zenger, E; Barhoumi, R.; Burghardt, R C; Collisson, E W

    1994-01-01

    The in vitro effects of viral replication on mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) were evaluated as two parameters of potential cellular injury. Two distinct cell types were infected with the Petaluma strain of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV). Primary astroglia supported acute FIV infection, resulting in syncytia within 3 days of infection, whereas immortalized Crandell feline kidney (CRFK) cells of epithelial origin supported persis...

  1. The potential role of HMGB1 release in peritoneal dialysis-related peritonitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirong Cao

    Full Text Available High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1, a DNA-binding nuclear protein, has been implicated as an endogenous danger signal in the pathogenesis of infection diseases. However, the potential role and source of HMGB1 in the peritoneal dialysis (PD effluence of patients with peritonitis are unknown. First, to evaluate HMDB1 levels in peritoneal dialysis effluence (PDE, a total of 61 PD patients were enrolled in this study, including 42 patients with peritonitis and 19 without peritonitis. Demographic characteristics, symptoms, physical examination findings and laboratory parameters were recorded. HMGB1 levels in PDE were determined by Western blot and ELISA. The concentrations of TNF-α and IL-6 in PDE were quantified by ELISA. By animal model, inhibition of HMGB1 with glycyrrhizin was performed to determine the effects of HMGB1 in LPS-induced mice peritonitis. In vitro, a human peritoneal mesothelial cell line (HMrSV5 was stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS, HMGB1 extracellular content in the culture media and intracellular distribution in various cellular fractions were analyzed by Western blot or immunofluorescence. The results showed that the levels of HMGB1 in PDE were higher in patients with peritonitis than those in controls, and gradually declined during the period of effective antibiotic treatments. Furthermore, the levels of HMGB1 in PDE were positively correlated with white blood cells (WBCs count, TNF-α and IL-6 levels. However, pretreatment with glycyrrhizin attenuated LPS-induced acute peritoneal inflammation and dysfunction in mice. In cultured HMrSV5 cells, LPS actively induced HMGB1 nuclear-cytoplasmic translocation and release in a time and dose-dependent fashion. Moreover, cytosolic HMGB1 was located in lysosomes and secreted via a lysosome-mediated secretory pathway following LPS stimulation. Our study demonstrates that elevated HMGB1 levels in PDE during PD-related peritonitis, at least partially, from peritoneal mesothelial cells

  2. Human parthenogenetic embryonic stem cells: one potential resource for cell therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAO Jie; HU WanWan; SHENG Chao; YU Yang; ZHOU Qi

    2009-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells derived from somatic cells through such processes as nuclear transfer or in duced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells present an important model for biomedical research and provide potential resources for cell replacement therapies. However, the overall efficiency of the conversional nuclear transfer is very low and the safety issue remains a major concern for iPS cells. Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) generated from parthenogenetic embryos are one attractive alternative as a source of histocompatible cells and tissues for cell therapy. Recent studies on human parthenogenetic embryonic stem cells (hPG ESCs) have revealed that these ESCs are very similar to the hESCs derived from IVF or in vivo produced blastocysts in gene expression and other characteristics, but full differentiation and development potential of these hPG ESCs have to be further investigated before clinical research and therapeutic interventions. To generate various pluripotent stem cells, diverse reprogramming techniques and approaches will be developed and integrated. This may help elucidate the fundamental mechanisms underlying reprogramming and stem cell biology, and ultimately benefit cell therapy and regenerative medicine.

  3. Human parthenogenetic embryonic stem cells:one potential resource for cell therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells derived from somatic cells through such processes as nuclear transfer or induced pluripotent stem(iPS) cells present an important model for biomedical research and provide potential resources for cell replacement therapies.However,the overall efficiency of the conversional nuclear transfer is very low and the safety issue remains a major concern for iPS cells.Embryonic stem cells(ESCs) generated from parthenogenetic embryos are one attractive alternative as a source of histocompatible cells and tissues for cell therapy.Recent studies on human parthenogenetic embryonic stem cells(hPG ESCs) have revealed that these ESCs are very similar to the hESCs derived from IVF or in vivo produced blastocysts in gene expression and other characteristics,but full differentiation and development potential of these hPG ESCs have to be further investigated before clinical research and therapeutic interventions.To generate various pluripotent stem cells,diverse reprogramming techniques and approaches will be developed and integrated.This may help elucidate the fundamental mechanisms underlying reprogramming and stem cell biology,and ultimately benefit cell therapy and regenerative medicine.

  4. Family Expressivity and Social Anxiety in Children: The Potential Mediating and Moderating Roles of Emotion Regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Noguchi, Ryoichi J. P.

    2007-01-01

    Family Expressivity and Social Anxiety in Children: The Potential Mediating and Moderating Roles of Emotion Regulation Ryoichi J. P. Noguchi ABSTRACT The role of childrenâ s emotion regulation as a potential mediator or moderator in the relations between a familyâ s emotional expressiveness and their childâ s social anxiety was explored in a sample of clinic-referred children. For the mediational analyses, it was predicted that emotional expressivity in families would be associ...

  5. The Role of TOX in the Development of Innate Lymphoid Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corey R. Seehus

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available TOX, an evolutionarily conserved member of the HMG-box family of proteins, is essential for the development of various cells of both the innate and adaptive immune system. TOX is required for the development of CD4+ T lineage cells in the thymus, including natural killer T and T regulatory cells, as well as development of natural killer cells and fetal lymphoid tissue inducer cells, the latter required for lymph node organogenesis. Recently, we have identified a broader role for TOX in the innate immune system, demonstrating that this nuclear protein is required for generation of bone marrow progenitors that have potential to give rise to all innate lymphoid cells. Innate lymphoid cells, classified according to transcription factor expression and cytokine secretion profiles, derive from common lymphoid progenitors in the bone marrow and require Notch signals for their development. We discuss here the role of TOX in specifying CLP toward an innate lymphoid cell fate and hypothesize a possible role for TOX in regulating Notch gene targets during innate lymphoid cell development.

  6. The Role of TOX in the Development of Innate Lymphoid Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seehus, Corey R; Kaye, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    TOX, an evolutionarily conserved member of the HMG-box family of proteins, is essential for the development of various cells of both the innate and adaptive immune system. TOX is required for the development of CD4(+) T lineage cells in the thymus, including natural killer T and T regulatory cells, as well as development of natural killer cells and fetal lymphoid tissue inducer cells, the latter required for lymph node organogenesis. Recently, we have identified a broader role for TOX in the innate immune system, demonstrating that this nuclear protein is required for generation of bone marrow progenitors that have potential to give rise to all innate lymphoid cells. Innate lymphoid cells, classified according to transcription factor expression and cytokine secretion profiles, derive from common lymphoid progenitors in the bone marrow and require Notch signals for their development. We discuss here the role of TOX in specifying CLP toward an innate lymphoid cell fate and hypothesize a possible role for TOX in regulating Notch gene targets during innate lymphoid cell development.

  7. Media Impact on Fright Reactions and Belief in UFOs: The Potential Role of Mental Imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, Glenn G.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Explores the potential role of mental imagery for media effects in emotional responses to frightening mass media, and in the effects of the media on beliefs in UFOs. Finds that individual differences in vividness of mental imagery may play a crucial role in moderating both types of media impact. (SR)

  8. Regulatory T Cells and Their Role in Animal Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veiga-Parga, T

    2016-07-01

    In humans and mouse models, Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells are known to control all aspects of immune responses. However, only limited information exists on these cells' role in diseases of other animals. In this review, we cover the most important features and different types of regulatory T cells, which include those that are thymus-derived and peripherally induced, the mechanisms by which they control immune responses by targeting effector T cells and antigen-presenting cells, and most important, their role in animal health and diseases including cancer, infections, and other conditions such as hypersensitivities and autoimmunity. Although the literature regarding regulatory T cells in domestic animal species is still limited, multiple articles have recently emerged and are discussed. Moreover, we also discuss the evidence suggesting that regulatory T cells might limit the magnitude of effector responses, which can have either a positive or negative result, depending on the context of animal and human disease. In addition, the issue of plasticity is discussed because plasticity in regulatory T cells can result in the loss of their protective function in some microenvironments during disease. Lastly, the manipulation of regulatory T cells is discussed in assessing the possibility of their use as a treatment in the future. PMID:26945003

  9. Hematopoietic stem cells: potential new applications for translational medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felfly, Hady; Haddad, Gabriel G

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral Artery Occlusion (MCAO). Ischemia/reperfusion resulted in a major infarct that propagated over time to encompass ~70% of the affected hemisphere. When two doses of HSCs were injected at 2h and 24h after the reperfusion, 40% of mice survived, visible neurological defects disappeared, and the infarct size was reduced by two to four fold. Histological examination of brains in surviving mice revealed very few donor cells in the recipient brains, decreased total neurons count and increased glial cell numbers. These data suggest that the neuro-protection was not dependent on cell-supplementation, but rather the protection is manifested likely through growth factor secretion. Combined, these studies create a novel HSCT approach that has proved efficient for the treatment of various disorders. A "window of opportunity" exists for each disease where the donor cells should be administered, and multiple injections of donor HSCs can rescue diseases that would otherwise not be treatable. We hypothesize that the initial injection primes the affected tissue, and subsequent ones help in repair. This new strategy has opened the way for a new era of HSCT for the potential treatments and possibly cures of many diseases.

  10. Vasoactive intestinal peptide induces oxidative stress and suppresses metastatic potential in human clear cell renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacas, Eva; Bajo, Ana M; Schally, Andrew V; Sánchez-Chapado, Manuel; Prieto, Juan C; Carmena, María J

    2013-01-30

    Molecular mechanisms involved in progression of clear-cell renal-cell carcinomas (ccRCCs) are poorly understood. A common genetic mutation found in ccRCC is the loss of the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) gene, which contributes to cancer progression and metastasis. We investigated VIP effects on metastatic and angiogenic factors in human VHL-null A498 ccRCC and HK2 renal cells. VIP increased adhesion but decreased expression of metalloproteinases, MMP2 and MMP9, as well as cell migration and VEGF expression and secretion in A498 but not in HK2 cells. VIP enhanced ROS levels and decreased nuclear levels of β-catenin and NFκB p50-subunit in A498 cells, suggesting neuropeptide involvement in the observed decrease of metastatic ability in clear-cell carcinoma. VIP effects in A498 cells were blocked by the VPAC(1/2)-receptor antagonist JV-1-53. In conclusion, present data point to a role of VIP in preventing invasion and metastasis in ccRCCs and support its potential therapeutic usefulness in this disease.

  11. Potential role for snoRNAs in PKR activation during metabolic stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssef, Osama A.; Safran, Sarah A.; Nix, David A.; Hotamisligil, Gökhan S.; Bass, Brenda L.

    2015-01-01

    Protein kinase RNA-activated (PKR) has long been known to be activated by viral double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) as part of the mammalian immune response. However, in mice PKR is also activated by metabolic stress in the absence of viral infection, and this requires a functional kinase domain, as well as a functional dsRNA-binding domain. The endogenous cellular RNA that potentially leads to PKR activation during metabolic stress is unknown. We investigated this question using mouse embryonic fibroblast cells expressing wild-type PKR (PKRWT) or PKR with a point mutation in each dsRNA-binding motif (PKRRM). Using this system, we identified endogenous RNA that interacts with PKR after induction of metabolic stress by palmitic acid (PA) treatment. Specifically, RIP-Seq analyses showed that the majority of enriched RNAs that interacted with WT PKR (≥twofold, false discovery rate ≤ 5%) were small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs). Immunoprecipitation of PKR in extracts of UV–cross-linked cells, followed by RT-qPCR, confirmed that snoRNAs were enriched in PKRWT samples after PA treatment, but not in the PKRRM samples. We also demonstrated that a subset of identified snoRNAs bind and activate PKR in vitro; the presence of a 5′-triphosphate enhanced PKR activity compared with the activity with a 5′-monophosphate, for some, but not all, snoRNAs. Finally, we demonstrated PKR activation in cells upon snoRNA transfection, supporting our hypothesis that endogenous snoRNAs can activate PKR. Our results suggest an unprecedented and unexpected model whereby snoRNAs play a role in the activation of PKR under metabolic stress. PMID:25848059

  12. Role of extracellular cations in cell motility, polarity, and chemotaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soll D

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available David R Soll1, Deborah Wessels1, Daniel F Lusche1, Spencer Kuhl1, Amanda Scherer1, Shawna Grimm1,21Monoclonal Antibody Research Institute, Developmental Studies, Hybridoma Bank, Department of Biology, University of Iowa, Iowa City; 2Mercy Medical Center, Surgical Residency Program, Des Moines, Iowa, USAAbstract: The concentration of cations in the aqueous environment of free living organisms and cells within the human body influence motility, shape, and chemotaxis. The role of extracellular cations is usually perceived to be the source for intracellular cations in the process of homeostasis. The role of surface molecules that interact with extracellular cations is believed to be that of channels, transporters, and exchangers. However, the role of Ca2+ as a signal and chemoattractant and the discovery of the Ca2+ receptor have demonstrated that extracellular cations can function as signals at the cell surface, and the plasma membrane molecules they interact with can function as bona fide receptors that activate coupled signal transduction pathways, associated molecules in the plasma membrane, or the cytoskeleton. With this perspective in mind, we have reviewed the cationic composition of aqueous environments of free living cells and cells that move in multicellular organisms, most notably humans, the range of molecules interacting with cations at the cell surface, the concept of a cell surface cation receptor, and the roles extracellular cations and plasma membrane proteins that interact with them play in the regulation of motility, shape, and chemotaxis. Hopefully, the perspective of this review will increase awareness of the roles extracellular cations play and the possibility that many of the plasma membrane proteins that interact with them could also play roles as receptors.Keywords: extracellular cations, chemotaxis, transporters, calcium, receptors

  13. Potential of Reversible Solid Oxide Cells as Electricity Storage System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Di Giorgio

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Electrical energy storage (EES systems allow shifting the time of electric power generation from that of consumption, and they are expected to play a major role in future electric grids where the share of intermittent renewable energy systems (RES, and especially solar and wind power plants, is planned to increase. No commercially available technology complies with all the required specifications for an efficient and reliable EES system. Reversible solid oxide cells (ReSOC working in both fuel cell and electrolysis modes could be a cost effective and highly efficient EES, but are not yet ready for the market. In fact, using the system in fuel cell mode produces high temperature heat that can be recovered during electrolysis, when a heat source is necessary. Before ReSOCs can be used as EES systems, many problems have to be solved. This paper presents a new ReSOC concept, where the thermal energy produced during fuel cell mode is stored as sensible or latent heat, respectively, in a high density and high specific heat material and in a phase change material (PCM and used during electrolysis operation. The study of two different storage concepts is performed using a lumped parameters ReSOC stack model coupled with a suitable balance of plant. The optimal roundtrip efficiency calculated for both of the configurations studied is not far from 70% and results from a trade-off between the stack roundtrip efficiency and the energy consumed by the auxiliary power systems.

  14. Microencapsulation technology by nature: Cell derived extracellular vesicles with therapeutic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittel, A; Falus, A; Buzás, E

    2013-06-01

    Cell derived extracellular vesicles are submicron structures surrounded by phospholipid bilayer and released by both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. The sizes of these vesicles roughly fall into the size ranges of microbes, and they represent efficient delivery platforms targeting complex molecular information to professional antigen presenting cells. Critical roles of these naturally formulated units of information have been described in many physiological and pathological processes. Extracellular vesicles are not only potential biomarkers and possible pathogenic factors in numerous diseases, but they are also considered as emerging therapeutic targets and therapeutic vehicles. Strikingly, current drug delivery systems, designed to convey therapeutic proteins and peptides (such as liposomes), show many similarities to extracellular vesicles. Here we review some aspects of therapeutic implementation of natural, cell-derived extracellular vesicles in human diseases. Exploration of molecular and functional details of extracellular vesicle release and action may provide important lessons for the design of future drug delivery systems.

  15. Pluripotent stem cells as a potential tool for disease modelling and cell therapy in diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelalim, Essam M; Bonnefond, Amélie; Bennaceur-Griscelli, Annelise; Froguel, Philippe

    2014-06-01

    Diabetes mellitus is the most prevailing disease with progressive incidence worldwide. To date, the pathogenesis of diabetes is far to be understood, and there is no permanent treatment available for diabetes. One of the promising approaches to understand and cure diabetes is to use pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), including embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced PCSs (iPSCs). ESCs and iPSCs have a great potential to differentiate into all cell types, and they have a high ability to differentiate into insulin-secreting β cells. Obtaining PSCs genetically identical to the patient presenting with diabetes has been a longstanding dream for the in vitro modeling of disease and ultimately cell therapy. For several years, somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) was the method of choice to generate patient-specific ESC lines. However, this technology faces ethical and practical concerns. Interestingly, the recently established iPSC technology overcomes the major problems of other stem cell types including the lack of ethical concern and no risk of immune rejection. Several iPSC lines have been recently generated from patients with different types of diabetes, and most of these cell lines are able to differentiate into insulin-secreting β cells. In this review, we summarize recent advances in the differentiation of pancreatic β cells from PSCs, and describe the challenges for their clinical use in diabetes cell therapy. Furthermore, we discuss the potential use of patient-specific PSCs as an in vitro model, providing new insights into the pathophysiology of diabetes.

  16. Switching roles: the functional plasticity of adult tissue stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wabik, Agnieszka; Jones, Philip H

    2015-05-01

    Adult organisms have to adapt to survive, and the same is true for their tissues. Rates and types of cell production must be rapidly and reversibly adjusted to meet tissue demands in response to both local and systemic challenges. Recent work reveals how stem cell (SC) populations meet these requirements by switching between functional states tuned to homoeostasis or regeneration. This plasticity extends to differentiating cells, which are capable of reverting to SCs after injury. The concept of the niche, the micro-environment that sustains and regulates stem cells, is broadening, with a new appreciation of the role of physical factors and hormonal signals. Here, we review different functions of SCs, the cellular mechanisms that underlie them and the signals that bias the fate of SCs as they switch between roles. PMID:25812989

  17. Role of the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 in inflammation and sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devesa I

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Isabel Devesa1, Rosa Planells-Cases2, Gregorio Fernández-Ballester1, José Manuel González-Ros1, Antonio Ferrer-Montiel1, Asia Fernández-Carvajal11Instituto de Biología Molecular y Celular, Universidad Miguel Hernández, Alicante; 2Centro de Investigación Príncipe Felipe, Valencia, SpainAbstract: The transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1 is a thermoreceptor that responds to noxious temperatures, as well as to chemical agonists, such as vanilloids and protons. In addition, its channel activity is notably potentiated by proinflammatory mediators released upon tissue damage. The TRPV1 contribution to sensory neuron sensitization by proalgesic agents has signaled this receptor as a prime target for analgesic and anti-inflammatory drug intervention. However, TRPV1 antagonists have notably failed in clinical and preclinical studies because of their unwanted side effects. Recent reports have unveiled previously unrecognized anti-inflammatory and protective functions of TRPV1 in several diseases. For instance, this channel has been suggested to play an anti-inflammatory role in sepsis. Therefore, the use of potent TRPV1 antagonists as a general strategy to treat inflammation must be cautiously considered, given the deleterious effects that may arise from inhibiting the population of channels that have a protective function. The use of TRPV1 antagonists may be limited to treating those pathologies where enhanced receptor activity contributes to the inflamed state. Alternatively, therapeutic paradigms, such as reduction of inflammatory-mediated increase of receptor expression in the cell surface, may be a better strategy to prevent abrogation of the TRPV1 subpopulation involved in anti-inflammatory and protective processes.Keywords: transient receptor potential, nociceptor, capsaicin, pain, ion channel, analgesia

  18. Exosomes are fingerprints of originating cells: potential biomarkers for ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kobayashi M

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Miharu Kobayashi, Gregory E Rice, Jorge Tapia, Murray D Mitchell, Carlos Salomon Exosome Biology Laboratory, Centre for Clinical Diagnostics, University of Queensland Centre for Clinical Research, Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. Abstract: The past decade has seen an extraordinary explosion of research in the field of extracellular vesicles, especially in a specific type of extracellular vesicles originating from endosomal compartments, called exosomes. Exosomes are a specific subtype of secreted vesicles that are defined as small (~30–120 nm but very stable membrane vesicles that are released from a wide range of cells, including normal and cancer cells. As the content of exosomes is cell type specific, it is believed that they are a "fingerprint" of the releasing cell and its metabolic status. We hypothesized that the exosomes and their specific exosomal content (eg, microribonucleic acid represent a precious biomedical tool and may be used as biomarkers for the diagnosis and prognosis of malignant tumors. In addition, exosomes may modify the phenotype of the parent and/or target cell by transferring pro-oncogenic molecules to induce cancerous phenotype of recipient cells and contribute to the formation of the premetastatic niche. The mechanism involved in these phenomena remains unclear; however, inclusion of signaling mediators into exosomes or exosome release may reduce their intracellular bioavailability in the parent cell, thereby altering cell phenotype and their metastatic potential. The aim of this review therefore is to analyze the biogenesis and role of exosomes from tumor cells, focusing primarily on ovarian cancer. Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecologic cancer, and an effective early diagnosis has the potential to improve patient survival. Ovarian cancer currently lacks a reliable method for early detection, however, exosomes have received great attention as potential biomarkers and mediators

  19. Fungal chitinases: function, regulation, and potential roles in plant/pathogen interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langner, Thorsten; Göhre, Vera

    2016-05-01

    In the past decades our knowledge about fungal cell wall architecture increased tremendously and led to the identification of many enzymes involved in polysaccharide synthesis and remodeling, which are also of biotechnological interest. Fungal cell walls play an important role in conferring mechanic stability during cell division and polar growth. Additionally, in phytopathogenic fungi the cell wall is the first structure that gets into intimate contact with the host plant. A major constituent of fungal cell walls is chitin, a homopolymer of N-acetylglucosamine units. To ensure plasticity, polymeric chitin needs continuous remodeling which is maintained by chitinolytic enzymes, including lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases N-acetylglucosaminidases, and chitinases. Depending on the species and lifestyle of fungi, there is great variation in the number of encoded chitinases and their function. Chitinases can have housekeeping function in plasticizing the cell wall or can act more specifically during cell separation, nutritional chitin acquisition, or competitive interaction with other fungi. Although chitinase research made huge progress in the last decades, our knowledge about their role in phytopathogenic fungi is still scarce. Recent findings in the dimorphic basidiomycete Ustilago maydis show that chitinases play different physiological functions throughout the life cycle and raise questions about their role during plant-fungus interactions. In this work we summarize these functions, mechanisms of chitinase regulation and their putative role during pathogen/host interactions. PMID:26527115

  20. Linking child maltreatment history with child abuse potential: Relative roles of maltreatment types

    OpenAIRE

    Mitkovic-Voncina Marija; Lecic-Tosevski Dusica; Pejovic-Milovancevic Milica; Popovic-Deusic Smiljka

    2014-01-01

    The independent roles of each childhood maltreatment type on child abuse potential in adults have been insufficiently explored and are inconsistent, with dissociation as one of the possible suggested mediators of intergenerational child abuse. We investigated these effects among 164 non-clinical adult parents, who filled in general questionnaires: Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ), Child Abuse Potential Inventory (CAPI) and Dissociative Experience Scale ...

  1. Role of pancreatic stellate cells in chemoresistance in pancreatic cancer

    OpenAIRE

    McCarroll, Joshua A.; Naim, Stephanie; Sharbeen, George; Russia, Nelson; Lee, Julia; Kavallaris, Maria; Goldstein, David; Phillips, Phoebe A.

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is highly chemoresistant. A major contributing factor is the characteristic extensive stromal or fibrotic reaction, which comprises up to 90% of the tumor volume. Over the last decade there has been intensive research into the role of the pro-fibrogenic pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) and their interaction with pancreatic cancer cells. As a result of the significant alterations in the tumor microenvironment following activation of PSCs, tumor progression, and chemoresistanc...

  2. Role of mitochondrial dysfunction in hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis of intestinal epithelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Ming Li; Hong Zhou; Qian Cai; Guang-Xia Xiao

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To study the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis of intestinal epithelial cells.METHODS: Hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis of human intestinal epithelial cell line SW-480 was established. Cell apoptosis was determined by Annexin-V and PI doublestained flow cytometry and DNA gel electrophoresis.Morphological changes were examined with light and electron microscopy. For other observations, mitochondrial function,cytochrome c release, mitochondrial translocation and membrane potential were determined simultaneously.RESULTS: Percentage of apoptotic cells induced with 400μ mol/L hydrogen peroxide increased significantly at I h or 3h after stimulation and recovered rapidly. Meanwhile percentage of apoptotic cells induced with 4 mmol/L hydrogen peroxide increased with time. In accordance with these changes, we observed decreased mitochondrial function in 400 μmol/L H2O2-stimualted cells at 1 h or 3 h and in 4 mmol/L H2O2-stimualted cells at times examined.Correspondingly, swelling cristae and vacuole-like mitochondria were noted. Release of cytochrome c,decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and mitochondrial translocation were also found to be the early signs of apoptosis.CONCLUSION: Dysfunctional mitochondria play a role in the apoptosis of SW-480 cell line induced by hydrogen peroxide.

  3. Role of gangliosides in the differentiation of human mesenchymal-derived stem cells into osteoblasts and neuronal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussavou, Ghislain; Kwak, Dong Hoon; Lim, Malg-Um; Kim, Ji-Su; Kim, Sun-Uk; Chang, Kyu-Tae; Choo, Young-Kug

    2013-11-01

    Gangliosides are complex glycosphingolipids that are the major component of cytoplasmic cell membranes, and play a role in the control of biological processes. Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) have received considerable attention as alternative sources of adult stem cells because of their potential to differentiate into multiple cell lineages. In this study, we focus on various functional roles of gangliosides in the differentiation of hMSCs into osteoblasts or neuronal cells. A relationship between gangliosides and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation during osteoblastic differentiation of hMSCs was observed, and the gangliosides may play a major role in the regulation of the differentiation. The roles of gangliosides in osteoblast differentiation are dependent on the origin of hMSCs. The reduction of ganglioside biosynthesis inhibited the neuronal differentiation of hMSCs during an early stage of the differentiation process, and the ganglioside expression can be used as a marker for the identification of neuronal differentiation from hMSCs.

  4. Mesenchymal stem cells: potential in treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanna, Tanmay; Sachan, Vatsal

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal Stem Cells or Marrow Stromal Cells (MSCs) have long been viewed as a potent tool for regenerative cell therapy. MSCs are easily accessible from both healthy donor and patient tissue and expandable in vitro on a therapeutic scale without posing significant ethical or procedural problems. MSC based therapies have proven to be effective in preclinical studies for graft versus host disease, stroke, myocardial infarction, pulmonary fibrosis, autoimmune disorders and many other conditions and are currently undergoing clinical trials at a number of centers all over the world. MSCs are also being extensively researched as a therapeutic tool against neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), Huntington's disease (HD) and Multiple Sclerosis (MS). MSCs have been discussed with regard to two aspects in the context of neurodegenerative diseases: their ability to transdifferentiate into neural cells under specific conditions and their neuroprotective and immunomodulatory effects. When transplanted into the brain, MSCs produce neurotrophic and growth factors that protect and induce regeneration of damaged tissue. Additionally, MSCs have also been explored as gene delivery vehicles, for example being genetically engineered to over express glial-derived or brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the brain. Clinical trials involving MSCs are currently underway for MS, ALS, traumatic brain injuries, spinal cord injuries and stroke. In the present review, we explore the potential that MSCs hold with regard to the aforementioned neurodegenerative diseases and the current scenario with reference to the same.

  5. DUAL ROLES OF CANCER CELL-EXPRESSED IMMUNOGLOBULINS IN CANCER IMMUNOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available While the expression of immunoglobulins and T cell receptors on cancer cells has been well-established for decades, the potential roles and mechanisms of action of these cancerous antigen receptors have not been fully elucidated. A monoclonal antibody designated as RP215, which reacts specifically with the carbohydrate-associated epitope located on the heavy chain region of cancerous immunoglobulins and T cell receptors, was used as a unique probe to study the roles of antigen receptors in the immunology of cancer cells. Through extensive cell-based biological and immunological studies, it was found that both anti-antigen receptors and RP215 demonstrated similar actions on the gene regulations involved in the growth/proliferation of cancer cells, as well as on toll-like receptors involved in innate immunity. In addition, RP215-specific cancerous immunoglobulins are believed to capture or neutralize circulating antigen/antibodies which may be harmful to cancer cells within the human body. In contrast to normal B and T cells and their respective receptors in the conventional immune system, cancer cells co-express both immunoglobulins and T cell receptors and immune protection is exercised by unique mechanisms. For example, these cancer cell-expressed antigen receptors display a lack of class switching, limited hyper-mutation, aberrant glycosylations and a strong influence on the toll-like receptors of cancer cells. Therefore, it is hypothesized that both normal and cancerous immune systems may co-exist and operate simultaneously within the human body. The balance of these two immune factors for respective surveillance and protection may be relevant to the outcome of cancer immunotherapy in humans. A potential therapeutic strategy is being developed by using RP215 as a drug candidate to target cancer cells based on these observations.

  6. The therapeutic potential of human olfactory-derived stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, C T; Lu, C; Winstead, W; Zhang, X; Xiao, M; Harding, G; Klueber, K M; Roisen, F J

    2006-06-01

    Stem cells from fetal and adult central nervous system have been isolated and characterized, providing populations for potential replacement therapy for traumatic injury repair and neurodegenerative diseases. The regenerative capacity of the olfactory system has attracted scientific interest. Studies focusing on animal and human olfactory bulb ensheathing cells (OECs) have heightened the expectations that OECs can enhance axonal regeneration and repair demyelinating diseases. Harvest of OECs from the olfactory bulb requires highly invasive surgery, which is a major obstacle. In contrast, olfactory epithelium (OE) has a unique regenerative capacity and is readily accessible from its location in the nasal cavity, allowing for harvest without lasting damage to the donor. Adult OE contains progenitors responsible for the normal life-long continuous replacement of neurons and supporting cells. Culture techniques have been established for human OE that generate populations of mitotically active neural progenitors that form neurospheres (Roisen et al., 2001; Winstead et al., 2005). The potential application of this technology includes autologous transplantation where minimal donor material can be isolated, expanded ex vivo, and lineage restricted to a desired phenotype prior to/or after re-implantation. Furthermore, these strategies circumvent the ethical issues that arise with embryonic or fetal tissues. The long term goal is to develop procedures through which a victim of a spinal cord injury or neurodegenerative condition would serve as a source of progenitors for his/her own regenerative grafts, avoiding the need for immunosuppression and ethical controversy. In addition, these cells can provide populations for pharmacological and/or diagnostic evaluation.

  7. EXAMINATION OF THE GERM CELL CHIMERA FORMING POTENTIAL OF MOUSE EMBRYONIC STEM CELLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CÂRSTEA V. B

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine the factors, which influence the chimeraforming potential of mouse embryonic stem cells (ES cells. In our work, we examinethe chimera producing ability of R1 and R1/E mouse ES cell lines. We found that thepassage number affects chimera-forming capability of the ES cells. With theincreasing of the passage number, it could be getting less chimera animal, and onlythe R1/E ES cell line derived cells could contribute to the germ cells. At first, wecompared the marker of pluripotency using immunostaining and RT PCR, but wecould not find any difference between the R1 and R1/E cell in this way. Atchromosome analysis, we found, that the number of aneuploid cells, in R1 ES cellline, dramatically increased after 10 passages. We thought that the reason is thatduring the cell division Y chromosome could not arrange correctly between the twonewly derived progeny cells. To prove our conception, we made X and YchromosomeFISH analyses. We found, that the aneuploid R1 and R1/E ES cellscontain only one X and one Y chromosome, so not the loss of Y chromosome causethe problem at the germ cell formation. At last, we made the karyotypeanalysis of R1 and R1/E ES cells at different passages. The karyotype analysisdemonstrated that in the case of R1 ES cell line, the 41 and 42-chromosomecontaining cells hold trisomy. With the increasing of the passages number, thenumber of trisomy containing aneuploid cells increased. The aneuploid ES cells cancontribute to the different tissuses of chimera animals, but cannot form viable germcells.

  8. EXAMINATION OF THE GERM CELL CHIMERA FORMING POTENTIAL OF MOUSE EMBRYONIC STEM CELLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.B. CÂRSTEA

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine the factors, which influence the chimeraforming potential of mouse embryonic stem cells (ES cells. In our work, we examinethe chimera producing ability of R1 and R1/E mouse ES cell lines. We found that thepassage number affects chimera-forming capability of the ES cells. With theincreasing of the passage number, it could be getting less chimera animal, and onlythe R1/E ES cell line derived cells could contribute to the germ cells. At first, wecompared the marker of pluripotency using immunostaining and RT PCR, but wecould not find any difference between the R1 and R1/E cell in this way. Atchromosome analysis, we found, that the number of aneuploid cells, in R1 ES cellline, dramatically increased after 10 passages. We thought that the reason is thatduring the cell division Y chromosome could not arrange correctly between the twonewly derived progeny cells. To prove our conception, we made X and YchromosomeFISH analyses. We found, that the aneuploid R1 and R1/E ES cellscontain only one X and one Y chromosome, so not the loss of Y chromosome causethe problem at the germ cell formation. At last, we made the karyotypeanalysis of R1 and R1/E ES cells at different passages. The karyotype analysisdemonstrated that in the case of R1 ES cell line, the 41 and 42-chromosomecontaining cells hold trisomy. With the increasing of the passages number, thenumber of trisomy containing aneuploid cells increased. The aneuploid ES cells cancontribute to the different tissuses of chimera animals, but cannot form viable germcells.

  9. Inflammatory role of the acinar cells during acute pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Isabel; De; Dios

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatic acinar cells are secretory cells whose main function is to synthesize, store and f inally release digestive enzymes into the duodenum. However, in response to noxious stimuli, acinar cells behave like real inflammatory cells because of their ability to activate signalling transduction pathways involved in the expression of inflammatory mediators. Mediated by the kinase cascade, activation of Nuclear factor-κB, Activating factor-1 and Signal transducers and activators of transcription transcription factors has been demonstrated in acinar cells, resulting in overexpression of inflammatory genes. In turn, kinase activity is down-regulated by protein phosphatases and the f inal balance between kinase and phosphatase activity will determine the capability of the acinar cells to produce inflammatory factors. The kinase/ phosphatase pair is a redox-sensitive system in which kinase activation overwhelms phosphatase activity under oxidant conditions. Thus, the oxidative stress developed within acinar cells at early stages of acute pancreatitis triggers the activation of signalling pathways involved in the up-regulation of cytokines, chemokines and adhesion molecules. In this way, acinar cells trigger the release of the f irst inflammatory signals which can mediate the activation and recruitment of circulating inflammatorycells into the injured pancreas. Accordingly, the role of acinar cells as promoters of the inflammatory response in acute pancreatitis may be considered. This concept leads to amplifying the focus from leukocyte to acinar cells themselves, to explain the local inflammation in early pancreatitis.

  10. Role of Ikaros in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Kastner, Philippe; Chan, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Ikaros is a zinc finger transcriptional regulator encoded by the Ikzf1 gene. Ikaros displays crucial functions in the hematopoietic system and its loss of function has been linked to the development of lymphoid leukemia. In particular, Ikaros has been found in recent years to be a major tumor suppressor involved in human B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Its role in T-cell leukemia, however, has been more controversial. While Ikaros deficiency appears to be very frequent in murine T-cell l...

  11. Role of plasmacytoid dendritic cell subsets in allergic asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Maazi, Hadi; Lam, Jonathan; Lombardi, Vincent; Akbari, Omid

    2013-01-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are major type-I interferon producing cells that play important roles in antiviral immunity and tolerance induction. These cells share a common DC progenitor with conventional DCs and Fms-like tyrosine kinase-3 ligand is essential for their development. Several subsets of pDCs have been identified to date including CCR9+, CD9+ and CD2+ pDCs. Recently, three subsets of pDCs were described namely, CD8α−β−, CD8α+β− and CD8α+β+ subsets. Interestingly, CD8α+β− a...

  12. The role of T cells in the pathogenesis of primary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroz, Yasmir; Johnson, Richard J; Rodríguez-Iturbe, Bernardo

    2012-12-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that T cells play an important role in the pathogenesis of hypertension. Here we review the investigations that have shown that T cells are infiltrating the kidney in hypertension. Interstitial accumulation of immune cells is associated with increments in oxidative stress and renal angiotensin II activity that result in the impairment in pressure natriuresis. The severity of salt-sensitive hypertension is directly correlated with the intensity of immune cell infiltration in the kidney. Reducing the renal infiltration of T cells prevents or ameliorates hypertension and the induction of tubulointerstitial inflammation results in salt-sensitive hypertension. The potential participation of autoimmune mechanisms in the renal infiltration of immune competent cells is discussed.

  13. The Role of Plant Hormones in Nematode Feeding Cell Formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goverse, A.; Bird, D.

    2011-01-01

    In this Chapter, we discuss recent advances in the role of plant hormones in the molecular mechanisms underlying feeding cell formation both by cyst (CN) and root-knot nematodes (RKN). Phytohormones are small signalling molecules that regulate plant growth and development, including the formation of

  14. Tetramethylpyrazine potentiates arsenic trioxide activity against HL-60 cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Yuni; Xu, Youhua; Shen, Yali; Wang, Cuicui; Guo, Gaili; Hu, Tiantian [Key Laboratory of Developmental Diseases in Childhood, Chongqing (China); Key Laboratory of Pediatrics in Chongqing, Chongqing (China); Chongqing International Science and Technology Cooperation Center for Child Development and Disorders, Chongqing (China)

    2012-02-17

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of tetramethylpyrazine (TMP) in combination with arsenic trioxide (As{sub 2}O{sub 3}) on the proliferation and differentiation of HL-60 cells. The HL-60 cells were treated with 300 µg/mL TMP, 0.5 µM As{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and 300 µg/mL TMP combined with 0.5 µM As{sub 2}O{sub 3}, respectively. The proliferative inhibition rates were determined with MTT. Differentiation was detected by the nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) reduction test, Wright's staining and the distribution of CD11b and CD14. Flow cytometry was used to analyze cell cycle distribution. RT-PCR and Western blot assays were employed to detect the expressions of c-myc, p27, CDK2, and cyclin E1. Combination treatment had synergistic effects on the proliferative inhibition rates. The rates were increased gradually after the combination treatment, much higher than those treated with the corresponding concentration of As{sub 2}O{sub 3} alone. The cells exhibited characteristics of mature granulocytes and a higher NBT-reducing ability, being a 2.6-fold increase in the rate of NBT-positive ratio of HL-60 cells within the As{sub 2}O{sub 3} treatment versus almost a 13-fold increase in the TMP + As{sub 2}O{sub 3} group. Cells treated with both TMP and As{sub 2}O{sub 3} expressed far more CD11b antigens, almost 2-fold compared with the control group. Small doses of TMP potentiate As{sub 2}O{sub 3}-induced differentiation of HL-60 cells, possibly by regulating the expression and activity of G0/G1 phase-arresting molecules. Combination treatment of TMP with As{sub 2}O{sub 3} has significant synergistic effects on the proliferative inhibition of HL-60 cells.

  15. The role of CD8+ T cells during allograft rejection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bueno V.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Organ transplantation can be considered as replacement therapy for patients with end-stage organ failure. The percent of one-year allograft survival has increased due, among other factors, to a better understanding of the rejection process and new immunosuppressive drugs. Immunosuppressive therapy used in transplantation prevents activation and proliferation of alloreactive T lymphocytes, although not fully preventing chronic rejection. Recognition by recipient T cells of alloantigens expressed by donor tissues initiates immune destruction of allogeneic transplants. However, there is controversy concerning the relative contribution of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells to allograft rejection. Some animal models indicate that there is an absolute requirement for CD4+ T cells in allogeneic rejection, whereas in others CD4-depleted mice reject certain types of allografts. Moreover, there is evidence that CD8+ T cells are more resistant to immunotherapy and tolerance induction protocols. An intense focal infiltration of mainly CD8+CTLA4+ T lymphocytes during kidney rejection has been described in patients. This suggests that CD8+ T cells could escape from immunosuppression and participate in the rejection process. Our group is primarily interested in the immune mechanisms involved in allograft rejection. Thus, we believe that a better understanding of the role of CD8+ T cells in allograft rejection could indicate new targets for immunotherapy in transplantation. Therefore, the objective of the present review was to focus on the role of the CD8+ T cell population in the rejection of allogeneic tissue.

  16. The putative role of mast cells in lung transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungraithmayr, W

    2015-03-01

    Mast cells (MCs) were primarily recognized as effector cells of allergy. These cells are acting predominantly at the interface between the host and the external environment, such as skin, gastrointestinal and the respiratory tract. Only recently, MCs have gained increased recognition as cells of functional plasticity with immune-regulatory properties that influence both the innate and the adaptive immune response in inflammatory disorders, cancer and transplantation. Through the secretion of both proinflammatory and antiinflammatory mediators, MCs can either ameliorate or deteriorate the course and outcome in lung transplantation. Recent research from other models recognized the immune-protective activity of MCs including its role as an important source of IL-10 and TGF-β for the modulation of alloreactive T cell responses or assistance in Treg activity. This paper summarizes the current understanding of MCs in lung transplantation and discusses MC-mediated immune-mechanisms by which the outcome of the engrafted organ is modulated. PMID:25693471

  17. The role of root border cells in plant defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawes, M C; Gunawardena, U; Miyasaka, S; Zhao, X

    2000-03-01

    The survival of a plant depends upon the capacity of root tips to sense and move towards water and other nutrients in the soil. Perhaps because of the root tip's vital role in plant health, it is ensheathed by large populations of detached somatic cells - root 'border' cells - which have the ability to engineer the chemical and physical properties of the external environment. Of particular significance, is the production by border cells of specific chemicals that can dramatically alter the behavior of populations of soilborne microflora. Molecular approaches are being used to identify and manipulate the expression of plant genes that control the production and the specialized properties of border cells in transgenic plants. Such plants can be used to test the hypothesis that these unusual cells act as a phalanx of biological 'goalies', which neutralize dangers to newly generated root tissue as the root tip makes its way through soil.

  18. Role of stem cells in spondyloarthritis: Pathogenesis, treatment and complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Rebecca S Y

    2015-10-01

    Spondyloarthritis (SpA) is a family of interrelated inflammatory arthritis that includes ankylosing spondylitis (AS), psoriatic arthritis, reactive arthritis, arthritis related to inflammatory bowel disease and undifferentiated SpA. The classification, epidemiology, pathogenesis and treatment of SpA have been extensively reviewed in the published literature. Reviews on the use of stem cells in various autoimmune diseases in general are also common. However, a review on the role of stem cells in SpA is currently lacking. This review focuses on the involvement of stem cells in the pathogenesis of SpA and the application of different types of stem cells in the treatment of SpA. It also addresses some of the complications which may arise as a result of the use of stem cells in the treatment of SpA.

  19. [Role of Langerhans cells in the physiopathology of atopic dermatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieber, T

    1995-12-01

    The demonstration of IgE receptors on the surface of epidermal dendritic cells and on other antigen presenting cells is a crucial element in the understanding of the pathophysiological role of these cells in the genesis of atopic disease, and especially the atopic dermatitis (AD). The sensibilisation phase to an aeroallergen at the level of nasal or bronchial mucosa and even at the skin may be mediated by dendritic cells expressing Fc epsilon RI. Distinct forms of AD may then represent the equivalent of the ellicitation phase of the classical allergic contact dermatitis. Fc epsilon RI would lead, via specific IgE, to an efficient antigen capture, to the activation of the dendritic cells and finally to an antigen presentation. Thus, AD may represent the paradigma of an IgE-mediated type IV reaction. PMID:8786892

  20. [Role of Langerhans cells in the physiopathology of atopic dermatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieber, T

    1995-12-01

    The demonstration of IgE receptors on the surface of epidermal dendritic cells and on other antigen presenting cells is a crucial element in the understanding of the pathophysiological role of these cells in the genesis of atopic disease, and especially the atopic dermatitis (AD). The sensibilisation phase to an aeroallergen at the level of nasal or bronchial mucosa and even at the skin may be mediated by dendritic cells expressing Fc epsilon RI. Distinct forms of AD may then represent the equivalent of the ellicitation phase of the classical allergic contact dermatitis. Fc epsilon RI would lead, via specific IgE, to an efficient antigen capture, to the activation of the dendritic cells and finally to an antigen presentation. Thus, AD may represent the paradigma of an IgE-mediated type IV reaction.

  1. Raltegravir permeability across blood-tissue barriers and the potential role of drug efflux transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoque, M Tozammel; Kis, Olena; De Rosa, María F; Bendayan, Reina

    2015-05-01

    cells, respectively. Our data suggest that raltegravir is a substrate but not an inhibitor of the drug efflux transporters P-gp and BCRP. These transporters might play a role in the restriction of raltegravir permeability across the blood-brain, blood-testicular, and blood-intestinal barriers, potentially contributing to its low tissue concentrations and/or low oral bioavailability observed in the clinic setting.

  2. Linking child maltreatment history with child abuse potential: Relative roles of maltreatment types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitkovic-Voncina Marija

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The independent roles of each childhood maltreatment type on child abuse potential in adults have been insufficiently explored and are inconsistent, with dissociation as one of the possible suggested mediators of intergenerational child abuse. We investigated these effects among 164 non-clinical adult parents, who filled in general questionnaires: Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ, Child Abuse Potential Inventory (CAPI and Dissociative Experience Scale (DES. Among all maltreatment types (emotional, physical and sexual abuse, emotional and physical neglect, emotional abuse was the only independent predictor in the regression model of child abuse potential. The relationship between emotional abuse history and child abuse potential was partially mediated by dissociation. The findings could speak in favor of the potentially unique detrimental role of emotional abuse in intergenerational maltreatment, with dissociation as one of the possible mechanisms.

  3. Potential role of antioxidant food supplements, preservatives and colorants in the pathogenesis of allergy and asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaknun, Daniela; Schroecksnadel, Sebastian; Kurz, Katharina; Fuchs, Dietmar

    2012-01-01

    A significant increase in the incidence of allergy and asthma has been observed during the past decades. The background of this phenomenon has not been well explained, but changes in lifestyle and habits are heavily discussed as contributing factors. Among these is a too clean environment, which may predispose individuals to increased sensitivity to allergic responses. Also the increase in dietary supplements including preservatives and colorants may contribute to this. In vitro, we and others have shown in freshly isolated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells that antioxidant compounds like vitamins C and E as well as food preservatives and colorants exert significant suppressive effects on the Th1 immune activation cascade. The effects observed may be based on the interaction of antioxidant compounds with proinflammatory cascades involving important signal transduction elements such as nuclear factor-κB. Although only obtained in vitro, these results show an anti-inflammatory property of compounds which could shift the Th1-Th2-type immune balance towards Th2-type immunity. This review article discusses the potential role of increased use of antioxidant food supplements as well as preservatives and colorants in the increase in allergy and asthma in the Western world.

  4. The Role of Canonical Transient Receptor Potential Channels in Seizure and Excitotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Zheng

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Canonical transient receptor potential (TRPC channels are a family of polymodal cation channels with some degree of Ca2+ permeability. Although initially thought to be channels mediating store-operated Ca2+ influx, TRPC channels can be activated by stimulation of Gq-coupled G-protein coupled receptors, or by an increase in intracellular free Ca2+ concentration. Thus, activation of TRPC channels could be a common downstream event of many signaling pathways that contribute to seizure and excitotoxicity, such as N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor-mediated Ca2+ influx, or metabotropic glutamate receptor activation. Recent studies with genetic ablation of various TRPC family members have demonstrated that TRPC channels, in particular heteromeric TRPC1/4 channels and homomeric TRPC5 channels, play a critical role in both pilocarpine-induced acute seizures and neuronal cell death. However, exact underlying mechanisms remain to be fully elucidated, and selective TRPC modulators and antibodies with better specificity are urgently needed for future research.

  5. The role of starburst amacrine cells in visual signal processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    TAYLOR, W.R.; SMITH, R.G.

    2012-01-01

    Starburst amacrine cells (SBACs) within the adult mammalian retina provide the critical inhibition that underlies the receptive field properties of direction-selective ganglion cells (DSGCs). The SBACs generate direction-selective output of GABA that differentially inhibits the DSGCs. We review the biophysical mechanisms that produce directional GABA release from SBACs and test a network model that predicts the effects of reciprocal inhibition between adjacent SBACs. The results of the model simulations suggest that reciprocal inhibitory connections between closely spaced SBACs should be spatially selective, while connections between more widely spaced cells could be indiscriminate. SBACs were initially identified as cholinergic neurons and were subsequently shown to contain release both acetylcholine and GABA. While the role of the GABAergic transmission is well established, the role of the cholinergic transmission remains unclear. PMID:22310373

  6. Role of calcium in differentiation of murine erythroleukemia cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHUDAN; NONGGAOHE; 等

    1993-01-01

    Calcium plays a crucial role in the normal and abnomal cell metabolism.The role of calcium in the differentiation process of murine erythroleukemia cells(MELC)remains controversial.Here,based upon quantitative measurement of fluorescence in single cells,a method was developed to investigate the intracellular free calcium[Ca2+]i concentration and DNA contents simultaneously,by employing the fluorescent probe,fluo-3 acetoxymethyl ester and DNA dye Hoechst 33342.During MELC differentiation.[Ca2+]i concentration incresed.We also demonstrated that calcium ionophore,A23187,enhanced the HMB-induced MELC differentiation,while verapamil,an inhibitor of calcuim uptake,slightly reduced differentiation.These results suggested that an increase in the [Ca2+]i level was an essential step in HMBA-induced MELC differentiation.

  7. Langerhans cells and their role in oral mucosal diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juhi Upadhyay

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells are arguably the most potent antigen-presenting cells and may be the only cells capable of initiating the adaptive immune response. The epithelial residents of dendritic cells are Langerhans cells, which serve as the "sentinels" of the mucosa, altering the immune system not only to pathogen entry but also of tolerance to self antigen and commensal microbes. Oral mucosal Langerhans cells are capable of engaging and internalizing a wide variety of pathogens and have been found responsive to nickel in patients with nickel allergies, oral Candida species, oral lichen planus, lichenoid drug eruptions, graft versus host diseases, periodontal diseases median rhomboid glossitis, human immunodeficiency virus infection, hairy leukoplakia of the tongue, and oral squamous cell carcinoma. Review focuses on the role of antigen-presenting cells in particular Langerhans cells to better understand the mechanisms underlying immune responses. In this review, comprehensive detail about mucosal diseases has been compiled using the PubMed database and through textbooks.

  8. Effect of simvastatin on vascular tone in porcine coronary artery: Potential role of the mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almukhtar, H; Garle, M J; Smith, P A; Roberts, R E

    2016-08-15

    Statins induce acute vasorelaxation which may contribute to the overall benefits of statins in the treatment of cardiovascular disease. The mechanism underlying this relaxation is unknown. As statins have been shown to alter mitochondrial function, in this study we investigated the role of mitochondria in the relaxation to simvastatin. Relaxation of porcine coronary artery segments by statins was measured using isolated tissue baths. Mitochondrial activity was determined by measuring changes in rhodamine 123 fluorescence. Changes in intracellular calcium levels were determined in freshly isolated smooth muscle cells with Fluo-4 using standard epifluorescent imaging techniques. Simvastatin, but not pravastatin, produced a slow relaxation of the coronary artery, which was independent of the endothelium. The relaxation was attenuated by the mitochondrial complex I inhibitor rotenone (10μM) and the complex III inhibitor myxothiazol (10μM), or a combination of the two. The complex III inhibitor antimycin A (10μM) produced a similar time-dependent relaxation of the porcine coronary artery, which was attenuated by rotenone. Changes in rhodamine 123 fluorescence showed that simvastatin (10μM) depolarized the membrane potential of mitochondria in both isolated mitochondria and intact blood vessels. Simvastatin and antimycin A both inhibited calcium-induced contractions in isolated blood vessels and calcium influx in smooth muscle cells and this inhibition was prevented by rotenone. In conclusion, simvastatin produces an endothelium-independent relaxation of the porcine coronary artery which is dependent, in part, upon effects on the mitochondria. The effects on the mitochondria may lead to a reduction in calcium influx and hence relaxation of the blood vessel. PMID:27343404

  9. 3,4,5-Trichloroaniline nephrotoxicity in vitro: potential role of free radicals and renal biotransformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racine, Christopher; Ward, Dakota; Anestis, Dianne K; Ferguson, Travis; Preston, Deborah; Rankin, Gary O

    2014-11-13

    Chloroanilines are widely used in the manufacture of drugs, pesticides and industrial intermediates. Among the trichloroanilines, 3,4,5-trichloroaniline (TCA) is the most potent nephrotoxicant in vivo. The purpose of this study was to examine the nephrotoxic potential of TCA in vitro and to determine if renal biotransformation and/or free radicals contributed to TCA cytotoxicity using isolated renal cortical cells (IRCC) from male Fischer 344 rats as the animal model. IRCC (~4 million cells/mL; 3 mL) were incubated with TCA (0, 0.1, 0.25, 0.5 or 1.0 mM) for 60-120 min. In some experiments, IRCC were pretreated with an antioxidant or a cytochrome P450 (CYP), flavin monooxygenase (FMO), cyclooxygenase or peroxidase inhibitor prior to incubation with dimethyl sulfoxide (control) or TCA (0.5 mM) for 120 min. At 60 min, TCA did not induce cytotoxicity, but induced cytotoxicity as early as 90 min with 0.5 mM or higher TCA and at 120 min with 0.1 mM or higher TCA, as evidenced by increased lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release. Pretreatment with the CYP inhibitor piperonyl butoxide, the cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin or the peroxidase inhibitor mercaptosuccinate attenuated TCA cytotoxicity, while pretreatment with FMO inhibitors or the CYP inhibitor metyrapone had no effect on TCA nephrotoxicity. Pretreatment with an antioxidant (α-tocopherol, glutathione, ascorbate or N-acetyl-L-cysteine) also reduced or completely blocked TCA cytotoxicity. These results indicate that TCA is directly nephrotoxic to IRCC in a time and concentration dependent manner. Bioactivation of TCA to toxic metabolites by CYP, cyclooxygenase and/or peroxidase contributes to the mechanism of TCA nephrotoxicity. Lastly, free radicals play a role in TCA cytotoxicity, although the exact nature of the origin of these radicals remains to be determined.

  10. Potential role of the glycolytic oscillator in acute hypoxia in tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumor acute hypoxia has a dynamic component that is also, at least partially, coherent. Using blood oxygen level dependent magnetic resonance imaging, we observed coherent oscillations in hemoglobin saturation dynamics in cell line xenograft models of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. We posit a well-established biochemical nonlinear oscillatory mechanism called the glycolytic oscillator as a potential cause of the coherent oscillations in tumors. These data suggest that metabolic changes within individual tumor cells may affect the local tumor microenvironment including oxygen availability and therefore radiosensitivity. These individual cells can synchronize the oscillations in patches of similar intermediate glucose levels. These alterations have potentially important implications for radiation therapy and are a potential target for optimizing the cancer response to radiation. (paper)

  11. Potential role of the glycolytic oscillator in acute hypoxia in tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che Fru, Leonard; Adamson, Erin B.; Campos, David D.; Fain, Sean B.; Jacques, Steven L.; van der Kogel, Albert J.; Nickel, Kwang P.; Song, Chihwa; Kimple, Randall J.; Kissick, Michael W.

    2015-12-01

    Tumor acute hypoxia has a dynamic component that is also, at least partially, coherent. Using blood oxygen level dependent magnetic resonance imaging, we observed coherent oscillations in hemoglobin saturation dynamics in cell line xenograft models of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. We posit a well-established biochemical nonlinear oscillatory mechanism called the glycolytic oscillator as a potential cause of the coherent oscillations in tumors. These data suggest that metabolic changes within individual tumor cells may affect the local tumor microenvironment including oxygen availability and therefore radiosensitivity. These individual cells can synchronize the oscillations in patches of similar intermediate glucose levels. These alterations have potentially important implications for radiation therapy and are a potential target for optimizing the cancer response to radiation.

  12. MiRNA-Mediated Macrophage Polarization and its Potential Role in the Regulation of Inflammatory Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essandoh, Kobina; Li, Yutian; Huo, Jiuzhou; Fan, Guo-Chang

    2016-08-01

    Monocytes and macrophages are important components of the immune system, specialized in either removing pathogens as part of innate immunity or contributing to adaptive immunity through antigen presentation. Essential to such functions is classical activation (M1) and alternative activation (M2) of macrophages. M1 polarization of macrophages is characterized by production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, antimicrobial and tumoricidal activity, whereas M2 polarization of macrophages is linked to immunosuppression, tumorigenesis, wound repair, and elimination of parasites. MiRNAs are small non-coding RNAs with the ability to regulate gene expression and network of cellular processes. A number of studies have determined miRNA expression profiles in M1 and M2 polarized human and murine macrophages using microarray and RT-qPCR arrays techniques. More specifically, miR-9, miR-127, miR-155, and miR-125b have been shown to promote M1 polarization while miR-124, miR-223, miR-34a, let-7c, miR-132, miR-146a, and miR-125a-5p induce M2 polarization in macrophages by targeting various transcription factors and adaptor proteins. Further, M1 and M2 phenotypes play distinctive roles in cell growth and progression of inflammation-related diseases such as sepsis, obesity, cancer, and multiple sclerosis. Hence, miRNAs that modulate macrophage polarization may have therapeutic potential in the treatment of inflammation-related diseases. This review highlights recent findings in miRNA expression profiles in polarized macrophages from murine and human sources, and summarizes how these miRNAs regulate macrophage polarization. Last, therapeutic potential of miRNAs in inflammation-related diseases through modulation of macrophage polarization is also discussed. PMID:26954942

  13. The Role and Mechanisms of Double Negative Regulatory T Cells in the Suppression of Immune Responses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenhao Chen; Megan S. Ford; Kevin J. Young; Li Zhang

    2004-01-01

    Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that regulatory T (Treg) cells play an important role in the maintenance of immunologic self-tolerance and in down-regulating various immune responses. Thus, there has recently been an increasing interest in studying the biology of Treg cells as well as their potential application in treating immune diseases. Many types of Treg cell subsets have been reported in a variety of disease models.Among these subsets, αβ-TCR+CD3+CD4-CD8- double negative (DN) Treg cells are defined by their capability of inhibiting immune responses via directly killing effector T cells in an antigen specific fashion. Furthermore,DN Treg cells have been shown to develop regulatory activity after encountering specific antigens, partially mediated by the acquisition of MHC-peptide complexes from antigen presenting cells (APCs). The presentation of acquired alloantigens on DN T cells allows for the specific interaction between DN Treg cells and alloantigen reactive effector T cells. Once the DN Treg and target cells have come into contact, killing is then mediated by Fas/Fas-ligand interactions, and perhaps through other unidentified pathways. Further characterization of the functions, molecular expression and mechanisms of activation of DN Treg cells will help in the development of novel therapies to induce antigen specific tolerance to self and foreign antigens. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2004;1(5):328-335.

  14. The Role and Mechanisms of Double Negative Regulatory T Cells in the Suppression of Immune Responses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WenhaoChen; MeganS.Ford; KevinJ.Young; LiZhang

    2004-01-01

    Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that regulatory T (Treg) cells play an important role in the maintenance of immunologic self-tolerance and in down-regulating various immune responses. Thus, there has recently been an increasing interest in studying the biology of Treg cells as well as their potential application in treating immune diseases. Many types of Treg cell subsets have been reported in a variety of disease models.Among these subsets, αβ-TCR+CD3+CD4*CD8* double negative (DN) Treg cells are defined by their capability of inhibiting immune responses via directly killing effector T cells in an antigen specific fashion. Furthermore,DN Treg cells have been shown to develop regulatory activity after encountering specific antigens, partially mediated by the acquisition of MHC-peptide complexes from antigen presenting cells (APCs). The presentation of acquired alloantigens on DN T cells allows for the specific interaction between DN Treg cells and alloantigen reactive effector T cells. Once the DN Treg and target cells have come into contact, killing is then mediated by Fas/Fas-ligand interactions, and perhaps through other unidentified pathways. Further characterization of the functions, molecular expression and mechanisms of activation of DN Treg cells will help in the development of novel therapies to induce antigen specific tolerance to self and foreign antigens. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2004;1(5):328-335.

  15. Re: Engineered Nanoparticles Induce Cell Apoptosis: Potential for Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fehmi Narter

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Engineered nanoparticles (ENPs have been widely applied in industry, biology and medicine recently (i.e. clothes, sunscreens, cosmetics, foods, diagnostic medicine, imaging and drug delivery. There are many kinds of manufactured nanomaterial products including TiO2, ZnO, CeO2, Fe2O3, and CuO (as metal oxide nanoparticles as well as gold, silver, platinum and palladium (as metal nanoparticles, and other carbon-based ENP’s such as carbon nanotububes and quantum dots. ENPs with their sizes no larger than 100 nm are able to enter the human body and accumulate in organs and cause toxic effects. In many researches, ENP effects on the cancer cells of different organs with related cell apoptosis were noted (AgNP, nano-Cr2O3, Au-Fe2O3 NPs, nano-TiO2, nano-HAP, nano-Se, MoO3 nanoplate, Realgar nanoparticles. ENPs, with their unique properties, such as surface charge, particle size, composition and surface modification with tissue recognition ligands or antibodies, has been increasingly explored as a tool to carry small molecular weight drugs as well as macromolecules for cancer therapy, thus generating the new concept “nanocarrier”. Direct induction of cell apoptosis by ENPs provides an opportunity for cancer treatment. In the century of nanomedicine that depends on development of the nanotechnology, ENPs have a great potential for application in cancer treatment with minimal side effects.

  16. Roles of Sphingolipid Metabolism in Pancreatic β Cell Dysfunction Induced by Lipotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Véret

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic β cells secrete insulin in order to maintain glucose homeostasis. However, various environmental stresses such as obesity have been shown to induce loss of secretory responsiveness in pancreatic β cells and pancreatic β cell apoptosis which can favor the development of type 2 diabetes (T2D. Indeed, elevated levels of free fatty acids (FFAs have been shown to induce β cell apoptosis. Importantly, the chronic adverse effects of FFAs on β cell function and viability are potentiated in the presence of hyperglycaemia, a phenomenon that has been termed gluco-lipotoxicity. The molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of gluco-lipotoxicity in pancreatic β cells are not completely understood. Recent studies have shown that sphingolipid metabolism plays a key role in gluco-lipotoxicity induced apoptosis and loss of function of pancreatic β cells. The present review focuses on how the two main sphingolipid mediators, ceramides and sphingoid base-1-phosphates, regulate the deleterious effects of gluco-lipotoxicity on pancreatic β cells. The review highlights the role of a sphingolipid biostat on the dysregulation of β cell fate and function induced by gluco-lipotoxicity, offering the possibility of new therapeutic targets to prevent the onset of T2D.

  17. A Role of MicroRNAs in Cell Differentiation During Gonad Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Hadas; Shalgi, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a group of small noncoding RNA molecules that play a major role in posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression and are expressed in an organ-specific manner. One miRNA can potentially regulate the expression of several genes, depending on cell type and differentiation stage. miRNAs are differentially expressed in the male and female gonads and have an organ-specific reproductive function. Exerting their affect through germ cells and gonadal somatic cells, miRNAs regulate key proteins necessary for gonad development. The role of miRNAs in the testes is only starting to emerge though they have been shown to be required for adequate spermatogenesis. Widely explored in the ovary, miRNAs were suggested to play a fundamental role in follicles' assembly, growth, differentiation, and ovulation. In this chapter, we focus on data obtained from mice in which distinct proteins that participate in the biosynthesis of miRNAs were conditionally knocked out from germ cells (spermatogonial cells or oocytes) or gonadal somatic cells (Sertoli or granulosa cells). We detail recent advances in identification of particular miRNAs and their significance in the development and function of male and female gonads. miRNAs can serve as biomarkers and therapeutic agents of pathological conditions; thus, elucidating the branched and complex network of reproduction-related miRNAs will aid understanding of gonads' physiology and managing reproduction disorders.

  18. Trichostatin A Enhances the Apoptotic Potential of Palladium Nanoparticles in Human Cervical Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi-Feng Zhang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer ranks seventh overall among all types of cancer in women. Although several treatments, including radiation, surgery and chemotherapy, are available to eradicate or reduce the size of cancer, many cancers eventually relapse. Thus, it is essential to identify possible alternative therapeutic approaches for cancer. We sought to identify alternative and effective therapeutic approaches, by first synthesizing palladium nanoparticles (PdNPs, using a novel biomolecule called saponin. The synthesized PdNPs were characterized by several analytical techniques. They were significantly spherical in shape, with an average size of 5 nm. Recently, PdNPs gained much interest in various therapies of cancer cells. Similarly, histone deacetylase inhibitors are known to play a vital role in anti-proliferative activity, gene expression, cell cycle arrest, differentiation and apoptosis in various cancer cells. Therefore, we selected trichostatin A (TSA and PdNPs and studied their combined effect on apoptosis in cervical cancer cells. Cells treated with either TSA or PdNPs showed a dose-dependent effect on cell viability. The combinatorial effect, tested with 50 nM TSA and 50 nMPdNPs, had a more dramatic inhibitory effect on cell viability, than either TSA or PdNPs alone. The combination of TSA and PdNPs had a more pronounced effect on cytotoxicity, oxidative stress, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP, caspase-3/9 activity and expression of pro- and anti-apoptotic genes. Our data show a strong synergistic interaction between TSA and PdNPs in cervical cancer cells. The combinatorial treatment increased the therapeutic potential and demonstrated relevant targeted therapy for cervical cancer. Furthermore, we provide the first evidence for the combinatory effect and cytotoxicity mechanism of TSA and PdNPs in cervical cancer cells.

  19. Trichostatin A Enhances the Apoptotic Potential of Palladium Nanoparticles in Human Cervical Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xi-Feng; Yan, Qi; Shen, Wei; Gurunathan, Sangiliyandi

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer ranks seventh overall among all types of cancer in women. Although several treatments, including radiation, surgery and chemotherapy, are available to eradicate or reduce the size of cancer, many cancers eventually relapse. Thus, it is essential to identify possible alternative therapeutic approaches for cancer. We sought to identify alternative and effective therapeutic approaches, by first synthesizing palladium nanoparticles (PdNPs), using a novel biomolecule called saponin. The synthesized PdNPs were characterized by several analytical techniques. They were significantly spherical in shape, with an average size of 5 nm. Recently, PdNPs gained much interest in various therapies of cancer cells. Similarly, histone deacetylase inhibitors are known to play a vital role in anti-proliferative activity, gene expression, cell cycle arrest, differentiation and apoptosis in various cancer cells. Therefore, we selected trichostatin A (TSA) and PdNPs and studied their combined effect on apoptosis in cervical cancer cells. Cells treated with either TSA or PdNPs showed a dose-dependent effect on cell viability. The combinatorial effect, tested with 50 nM TSA and 50 nMPdNPs, had a more dramatic inhibitory effect on cell viability, than either TSA or PdNPs alone. The combination of TSA and PdNPs had a more pronounced effect on cytotoxicity, oxidative stress, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), caspase-3/9 activity and expression of pro- and anti-apoptotic genes. Our data show a strong synergistic interaction between TSA and PdNPs in cervical cancer cells. The combinatorial treatment increased the therapeutic potential and demonstrated relevant targeted therapy for cervical cancer. Furthermore, we provide the first evidence for the combinatory effect and cytotoxicity mechanism of TSA and PdNPs in cervical cancer cells. PMID:27548148

  20. Trichostatin A Enhances the Apoptotic Potential of Palladium Nanoparticles in Human Cervical Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xi-Feng; Yan, Qi; Shen, Wei; Gurunathan, Sangiliyandi

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer ranks seventh overall among all types of cancer in women. Although several treatments, including radiation, surgery and chemotherapy, are available to eradicate or reduce the size of cancer, many cancers eventually relapse. Thus, it is essential to identify possible alternative therapeutic approaches for cancer. We sought to identify alternative and effective therapeutic approaches, by first synthesizing palladium nanoparticles (PdNPs), using a novel biomolecule called saponin. The synthesized PdNPs were characterized by several analytical techniques. They were significantly spherical in shape, with an average size of 5 nm. Recently, PdNPs gained much interest in various therapies of cancer cells. Similarly, histone deacetylase inhibitors are known to play a vital role in anti-proliferative activity, gene expression, cell cycle arrest, differentiation and apoptosis in various cancer cells. Therefore, we selected trichostatin A (TSA) and PdNPs and studied their combined effect on apoptosis in cervical cancer cells. Cells treated with either TSA or PdNPs showed a dose-dependent effect on cell viability. The combinatorial effect, tested with 50 nM TSA and 50 nMPdNPs, had a more dramatic inhibitory effect on cell viability, than either TSA or PdNPs alone. The combination of TSA and PdNPs had a more pronounced effect on cytotoxicity, oxidative stress, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), caspase-3/9 activity and expression of pro- and anti-apoptotic genes. Our data show a strong synergistic interaction between TSA and PdNPs in cervical cancer cells. The combinatorial treatment increased the therapeutic potential and demonstrated relevant targeted therapy for cervical cancer. Furthermore, we provide the first evidence for the combinatory effect and cytotoxicity mechanism of TSA and PdNPs in cervical cancer cells. PMID:27548148

  1. Key role of mast cells and their major secretory products in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shao-Heng He

    2004-01-01

    Hirtoncally, mast cells were known as a key cell type involved in type I hypersensitivity Until last two decades, this cell type was recognized to be widely involved in a number of non-allergic diseases including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Markedly increased numbers of mast cells were observed in the mucosa of the iieum and colon of patients with IBD, which was accompanied by great changes of the content in mart cells such as dramatically increaed expression of TNFα, IL-16 and substance P.The evidence of mast cell degranulation was found in the wall of intestine from patients with IBD with immunohistochemistry technique. The highly elevated histamine and tryptase levels were detected in mucosa of petienta with IBD, strongly suggesting that mast cell degranulation is involved in the pathogenesis of IBD.However, Iittle is known of the actions of histamine, tryptase,chymase and carboxypeptidase in IBD. Over the lart decade,heparin has been used to treat IBD in clinical practice. The low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) was effective as adjuvant therapy, and the petienis showed good clinical and laberatory respense with no senous advere effectd. The roles of PGD2, LTC4, PAF and mast cell cytokines in IBD were also discussed. Recently, a series of experiments with dispersed colon mast cells suggested there should be at least two pathways in man for mast colls to amplify their own activationdegranulation signals in an autocrine or paracrine mannec.The hypethesis is that mast cell secretogogues induce mart cell degranulation, release histamine, then stimulate the adjacent mast cells or positively feedback to further stimulate its host mast cells through H1 recepton.Whereas released tryptase acts similarly to hirtamine, but activates mart cells through its receptor PAR-2. The connections between current anti-IBD therapies or potential therapies for IBD with mast cells were discussed, implicating further that mast cell is a key cell type that is involved in the

  2. The role of Protein Kinase Cη in T cell biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas R.J. Gascoigne

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Protein kinase Cη (PKCη is a member of the novel PKC subfamily, which also includes δ, ε, and θ isoforms. Compared to the other novel PKCs, the function of PKCη in the immune system is largely unknown. Several studies have started to reveal the role of PKCη, particularly in T cells. PKCη is highly expressed in T cells, and is upregulated during thymocyte positive selection. Interestingly, like the θ isoform, PKCη is also recruited to the immunological synapse that is formed between a T cell and an antigen-presenting cell. However, unlike PKCθ, which becomes concentrated to the central region of the synapse, PKCη remains in a diffuse pattern over the whole area of the synapse, suggesting distinctive roles of these two isoforms in signal transduction. Although PKCη is dispensable for thymocyte development, further analysis of PKCη− or PKCθ−deficient and double knockout mice revealed the redundancy of these two isoforms in thymocyte development. In contrast, PKCη rather than PKCθ, plays an important role for T cell homeostatic proliferation, which requires recognition of self-antigen. Another piece of evidence demonstrating that PKCη and PKCθ have isoform specific as well as redundant roles come from the analysis of CD4 to CD8 T cell ratios in the periphery of these knockout mice. Deficiency in PKCη or PKCθ had opposing effects as PKCη knockout mice had a higher ratio of CD4 to CD8 T cells compared to that of wild-type mice, whereas PKCθ-deficient mice had a lower ratio. Biochemical studies showed that calcium flux and NFκB translocation is impaired in PKCη-deficient T cells upon TCR crosslinking stimulation, a character shared with PKCθ-deficient T cells. However, unlike the case with PKCθ, the mechanistic study of PKCη is at early stage and the signaling pathways involving PKCη, at least in T cells, are essentially unknown. In this review, we will cover the topics mentioned above as well as provide some

  3. The role of monocyte-lineage cells in human immuno-deficiency virus persistence: mechanisms and progress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Li

    2011-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) persistence is a major barrier to the successful treatment and eradication of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). In addition to resting CD4+ T cells, a significant long-lived compartment of HIV-1 infection in vivo includes blood monocytes and tissue macrophages. Studying HIV-1 persistence in monocyte-lineage cells is critical because these cells are important HIV-1 target cells in vivo. Monocyte-lineage cells, including monocytes, dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages, play a significant role in HIV-1 infection and transmission. These cells have been implicated as viral reservoirs that facilitate HIV-1 latency and persistence. A better understanding of HIV-1 interactions with monocyte-lineage cells can potentially aid in the development of new approaches for intervention. This minireview highlights the latest advances in understanding the role of monocyte-lineage cells in HIV-1 persistence and emphasizes new insights into the mechanisms underlying viral persistence.

  4. Role of Inositol Poly-Phosphatases and Their Targets in T Cell Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neetu eSrivastava

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available T lymphocytes play a critical role in host defense in all anatomical sites including mucosal surfaces. This not only includes the effector arm of the immune system, but also regulation of immune responses in order to prevent autoimmunity. Genetic targeting of PI3K isoforms suggests that generation of PI(3,4,5P3 by PI3K plays a critical role in promoting effector T cell responses. Consequently, the 5’- and 3’-inositol poly-phosphatases SHIP1, SHIP2 and PTEN capable of targeting PI(3,4,5P3 are potential genetic determinants of T cell effector functions in vivo. In addition, the 5’-inositol poly phosphatases SHIP1 and 2 can shunt PI(3,4,5P3 to the rare but potent signaling phosphoinositide species PI(3,4P2 and thus these SHIP1/2, and the INPP4A/B enzymes that deplete PI(3,4P2 may have precise roles in T cell biology to amplify or inhibit effectors of PI3K signaling that are selectively recruited to and activated by PI(3,4P2. Here we summarize recent genetic and chemical evidence that indicates the inositol poly-phosphatases have important roles in both the effector and regulatory functions of the T cell compartment. In addition, we will discuss future genetic studies that might be undertaken to further elaborate the role of these enzymes in T cell biology as well as potential pharmaceutical manipulation of these enzymes for therapeutic purposes in disease settings where T cell function is a key in vivo target.

  5. Therapeutic Potential of Mesenchymal Stem Cells for the Treatment of Airway Remodeling in Pulmonary Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nejad-Moghaddam, Amir; Panahi, Yunes; Abdollahpour Alitappeh, Meghdad; Borna, Hojat; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali; Ghanei, Mostafa

    2015-12-01

    According to significant improvements in the tissue engineering field over the past several years, lung tissue cells have recently attracted more attention due to the high prevalence and diversity in related diseases. However, selection of an appropriate cell type, screening of suitable conditions for growth and proliferation, as well as subsequent implantation into the body to repair and regenerate damaged tissues are considered as important issues in this context. It should also be noted that most studies have been described in animal models, but not in humans. Because of the high regenerative capacity, predominant immunomodulatory feature, and inhibition of T-lymphocyte proliferation, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) may play an important role in the reconstruction of damaged tissues including bronchioles in pulmonary diseases. Interestingly, clinical trial studies demonstrated that MSCs have the significant potential to treat a wide variety of diseases including acute myocardial infarction (AMI), liver cirrhosis, crohn's disease, and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). PMID:26725553

  6. Therapeutic Potential of Mesenchymal Stem Cells for the Treatment of Airway Remodeling in Pulmonary Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Nejad-Moghaddam

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available According to significant improvements in the tissue engineering field over the past several years, lung tissue cells have recently attracted more attention due to the high prevalence and diversity in related diseases. However, selection of an appropriate cell type, screening of suitable conditions for growth and proliferation, as well as subsequent implantation into the body to repair and regenerate damaged tissues are considered as important issues in this context. It should also be noted that most studies have been described in animal models, but not in humans. Because of the high regenerative capacity, predominant immunomodulatory feature, and inhibition of T-lymphocyte proliferation, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs may play an important role in the reconstruction of damaged tissues including bronchioles in pulmonary diseases. Interestingly, clinical trial studies demonstrated that MSCs have the significant potential to treat a wide variety of diseases including acute myocardial infarction (AMI, liver cirrhosis, crohn’s disease, and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD.

  7. Ethanol production potential from fermented rice noodle wastewater treatment using entrapped yeast cell sequencing batch reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siripattanakul-Ratpukdi, Sumana

    2012-03-01

    Fermented rice noodle production generates a large volume of starch-based wastewater. This study investigated the treatment of the fermented rice noodle wastewater using entrapped cell sequencing batch reactor (ECSBR) compared to traditional sequencing batch reactor (SBR). The yeast cells were applied because of their potential to convert reducing sugar in the wastewater to ethanol. In present study, preliminary treatment by acid hydrolysis was performed. A yeast culture, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, with calcium alginate cell entrapment was used. Optimum yeast cell loading in batch experiment and fermented rice noodle treatment performances using ECSBR and SBR systems were examined. In the first part, it was found that the cell loadings (0.6-2.7 × 108 cells/mL) did not play an important role in this study. Treatment reactions followed the second-order kinetics with the treatment efficiencies of 92-95%. In the second part, the result showed that ECSBR performed better than SBR in both treatment efficiency and system stability perspectives. ECSBR maintained glucose removal of 82.5 ± 10% for 5-cycle treatment while glucose removal by SBR declined from 96 to 40% within the 5-cycle treatment. Scanning electron microscopic images supported the treatment results. A number of yeast cells entrapped and attached onto the matrix grew in the entrapment matrix.

  8. Variability of Action Potentials Within and Among Cardiac Cell Clusters Derived from Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Renjun Zhu; Millrod, Michal A.; Zambidis, Elias T.; Leslie Tung

    2016-01-01

    Electrophysiological variability in cardiomyocytes derived from pluripotent stem cells continues to be an impediment for their scientific and translational applications. We studied the variability of action potentials (APs) recorded from clusters of human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hESC-CMs) using high-resolution optical mapping. Over 23,000 APs were analyzed through four parameters: APD30, APD80, triangulation and fractional repolarization. Although measures were taken to re...

  9. Pressure wave model for action potential propagation in excitable cells

    CERN Document Server

    Rvachev, M M

    2003-01-01

    Speed of propagation of small-amplitude pressure waves through the cytoplasmic interior of myelinated and unmyelinated axons of different diameters is theoretically estimated and is found to generally agree with the action potential (AP) conduction velocities. This remarkable coincidence allows to surmise a model in which AP spread along axon is propelled not by straggling ionic currents as in the widely accepted local circuit theory, but by mechanoactivation of the membrane ion channels by a traveling pressure pulse. Hydraulic pulses propagating in the viscous axoplasm are calculated to decay over ~1 mm distances, and it is further hypothesized that it is the role of influxing during the AP calcium ions to activate membrane skeletal protein network attached to the membrane cytoplasmic side for a brief radial contraction amplifying the pressure pulse and preventing its decay. The model correctly predicts that the AP conduction velocity should vary as the one-half power of axon diameter for large unmyelinated ...

  10. Effects of coffees before and after special treatment procedure on cell membrane potentials in stomach cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiebich, B L; Valente, P; Ferrer-Montiel, A; Candelario-Jalil, E; Menthe, J; Luecker, P

    2006-01-01

    Coffee, one of the most excessively used beverages worldwide, commences the risk of gastroesophageal reflux (GER), which may lead to gastric ulcers and increase the risk of gastric cancer. Many attempts have been made by the coffee industry to diminish the irritating effect on mucosa by means of altering the extraction methods concerning gerbic acids and the roasting processes. This paper describes the effect of differently produced coffees involving two brands of Darboven and two brands of other coffee roasters. The aim of this study was to prove the results of gastric potential measurements we found in literature by using human AGS gastric epithelial cells (human adenocarcinoma). All four coffee extracts tested differentially affected the membrane resting potential of AGS cells. Coffees no. 1 and no. 2 depolarized the cells, presumably by increasing the cation entry into the cytosol. In marked contrast, coffee no. 4 hyperpolarizes the cells, possibly by H(+) extrusion and/or Cl(-) influx, suggesting that this coffee might increase acidity in the stomach, which might negatively affect the stomach, especially in people with gastroesophageal reflux symptoms. Overall, our data suggest that different roasting methods of coffees affect the membrane potentials of AGS stomach cells, resulting in increased influx of H+ possibly resulting in decreased stomach acidity and thus reducing GER. These results are in good accordance with clinical pharmacological results from potential difference measurements in healthy volunteers we found in the literature. PMID:16894406

  11. The Regenerative Role of the Fetal and Adult Stem Cell Secretome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sveva Bollini

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available For a long time, the stem cell regenerative paradigm has been based on the assumption that progenitor cells play a critical role in tissue repair by means of their plasticity and differentiation potential. However, recent works suggest that the mechanism underlying the benefits of stem cell transplantation might relate to a paracrine modulatory effect rather than the replacement of affected cells at the site of injury. Therefore, mounting evidence that stem cells may act as a reservoir of trophic signals released to modulate the surrounding tissue has led to a paradigm shift in regenerative medicine. Attention has been shifted from analysis of the stem cell genome to understanding the stem cell “secretome”, which is represented by the growth factors, cytokines and chemokines produced through paracrine secretion. Insights into paracrine-mediated repair support a new approach in regenerative medicine and the isolation and administration of specific stem cell-derived paracrine factors may represent an extremely promising strategy, introducing paracrine-based therapy as a novel and feasible clinical application. In this review, we will discuss the regenerative potential of fetal and adult stem cells, with particular attention to their secretome.

  12. Prenatal tolerance--a role for regulatory T cells?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izcue, Ana; Powrie, Fiona

    2005-02-01

    Regulatory T cells (TR cells) play a major role in controlling immune self reactivity. However, little is known about their occurrence and functions in early developmental stages. In this issue of the European Journal of Immunology, Cupedo et al. report the presence of functional CD4+CD25+ TR cells in the human fetus. In contrast to previous studies, the analysis is performed on fetal thymus, spleen and lymph node samples in addition to cord blood cells. Interestingly, TR cells are present in all these organs from 14 weeks of gestation, along with FoxP3 (forkhead box protein 3) RNA, a marker for naturally arising TR cells. The fetal TR cells show, however, phenotypic differences depending on their location, possibly because of variations in their activation state. The emergence of TR cells so early in fetal development raises a number of questions about the mechanisms of self reactivity and tolerance in the prenatal stages, which may have important implications for our understanding of childhood pathologies. PMID:15682452

  13. In vitro and in vivo neurogenic potential of mesenchymal stem cells isolated from different sources

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ramyani Taran; MamidiMurali Krishna; Gurbind Singh; Susmita Dutta; Ishwar S Parhar; John P John; Ramesh Bhonde; Rajarshi Pal; Anjan Kumar Das

    2014-03-01

    Regenerative medicine is an evolving interdisciplinary topic of research involving numerous technological methods that utilize stem cells to repair damaged tissues. Particularly, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are a great tool in regenerative medicine because of their lack of tumorogenicity, immunogenicity and ability to perform immunomodulatory as well as anti-inflammatory functions. Numerous studies have investigated the role of MSCs in tissue repair and modulation of allogeneic immune responses. MSCs derived from different sources hold unique regenerative potential as they are self-renewing and can differentiate into chondrocytes, osteoblasts, adipocytes, cardiomyocytes, hepatocytes, endothelial and neuronal cells, among which neuronal-like cells have gained special interest. MSCs also have the ability to secrete multiple bioactive molecules capable of stimulating recovery of injured cells and inhibiting inflammation. In this review we focus on neural differentiation potential ofMSCs isolated from different sources and how certain growth factors/small molecules can be used to derive neuronal phenotypes from MSCs. We also discuss the efficacy of MSCs when transplanted in vivo and how they can generate certain neurons and lead to relief or recovery of the diseased condition. Furthermore, we have tried to evaluate the appropriatemerits of different sources of MSCs with respect to their propensity towards neurological differentiation as well as their effectiveness in preclinical studies.

  14. Alcoholic hepatitis: The pivotal role of Kupffer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Duminda; B; Suraweera; Ashley; N; Weeratunga; Robert; W; Hu; Stephen; J; Pandol; Richard; Hu

    2015-01-01

    Kupffer cells play a central role in the pathogenesis of alcoholic hepatitis(AH). It is believed that alcohol increases the gut permeability that results in raised levels of serum endotoxins containing lipopolysaccharides(LPS). LPS binds to LPS-binding proteins and presents it to a membrane glycoprotein called CD14, which then activates Kupffer cells via a receptor called tolllike receptor 4. This endotoxin mediated activation of Kupffer cells plays an important role in the inflammatory process resulting in alcoholic hepatitis. There is no effective treatment for AH, although notable progress has been made over the last decade in understanding the underlying mechanism of alcoholic hepatitis. We specifically review the current research on the role of Kupffer cells in the pathogenesis of AH and the treatment strategies. We suggest that the imbalance between the pro-inflammatory and the anti-inflammatory process as well as the increased production of reactive oxygen species eventually lead to hepatocyte injury, the final event of alcoholic hepatitis.

  15. Roles for microtubule and microfilament cytoskeletons in animal cell cytokinesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Zhongcai; CAI Shang; JIANG Qing; ZHANG Chuanmao; TANG Xiaowei

    2005-01-01

    Microtubule and microfilament cytoskeletons play key roles in the whole process of cytokinesis. Although a number of hypotheses have been proposed to elucidate the mechanism of cytokinesis by microtubule and actin filament cytoskeletons, many reports are conflicting. In our study, combining the cytoskeletons drug treatments with the time-lapse video technology, we retested the key roles of microtubule and actin filament in cytokinesis. The results showed that depolymerization of microtubules by Nocodazole after the initiation of furrowing would not inhibit the furrow ingression, but obviously decrease the stiffness of daughter cells. Depolymerizing actin filaments by Cytochalasin B before metaphase would inhibit the initiation of furrowing but not chromosome segregation, resulting in the formation of binucleate cells; however, depolymerizing actin filaments during anaphase would prevent furrowing and lead to the regress of established furrow, also resulting in the formation of binucleate cells. Further, depolymerizing microtubules and actin filaments simultaneously after metaphase would cause the quick regress of the furrow and the formation of binucleate cells. From these results we propose that a successful cytokinesis requires functions and coordination of both the microtubule and actin filament cytoskeletons. Microtubule cytoskeleton may function in the positioning and initiation of cleavage furrow, and the actin filament cytoskeleton may play key roles in the initiation and ingression of the furrow.

  16. Influence of Five Potential Anticancer Drugs on Wnt Pathway and Cell Survival in Human Biliary Tract Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia WACHTER, Daniel NEUREITER, Beate ALINGER, Martin PICHLER, Julia FUEREDER, Christian OBERDANNER, Pietro Di FAZIO, Matthias OCKER, Frieder BERR, Tobias KIESSLICH

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The role of Wnt signalling in carcinogenesis suggests compounds targeting this pathway as potential anti-cancer drugs. Several studies report activation of Wnt signalling in biliary tract cancer (BTC thus rendering Wnt inhibitory drugs as potential candidates for targeted therapy of this highly chemoresistant disease.Methods: In this study we analysed five compounds with suggested inhibitory effects on Wnt signalling (DMAT, FH535, myricetin, quercetin, and TBB for their cytotoxic efficiency, mode of cell death, time- and cell line-dependent characteristics as well as their effects on Wnt pathway activity in nine different BTC cell lines.Results: Exposure of cancer cells to different concentrations of the compounds results in a clear dose-dependent reduction of viability for all drugs in the order FH535 > DMAT > TBB > myricetin > quercetin. The first three substances show high cytotoxicity in all tested cell lines, cause a direct cytotoxic effect by induction of apoptosis and inhibit pathway-specific signal transduction in a Wnt transcription factor reporter activity assay. Selected target genes such as growth-promoting cyclin D1 and the cell cycle progression inhibitor p27 are down- and up-regulated after treatment, respectively.Conclusions: Taken together, these data demonstrate that the small molecular weight inhibitors DMAT, F535 and TBB have a considerable cytotoxic and possibly Wnt-specific effect on BTC cell lines in vitro. Further in vivo investigation of these drugs as well as of new Wnt inhibitors may provide a promising approach for targeted therapy of this difficult-to-treat tumour.

  17. Role of leptin receptors in granulosa cells during ovulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupuis, Lisa; Schuermann, Yasmin; Cohen, Tamara; Siddappa, Dayananda; Kalaiselvanraja, Anitha; Pansera, Melissa; Bordignon, Vilceu; Duggavathi, Raj

    2014-02-01

    Leptin is an important hormone influencing reproductive function. However, the mechanisms underpinning the role of leptin in the regulation of reproduction remain to be completely deciphered. In this study, our objective is to understand the mechanisms regulating the expression of leptin receptor (Lepr) and its role in ovarian granulosa cells during ovulation. First, granulosa cells were collected from superovulated mice to profile mRNA expression of Lepr isoforms (LeprA and LeprB) throughout follicular development. Expression of LeprA and LeprB was dramatically induced in the granulosa cells of ovulating follicles at 4 h after human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) treatment. Relative abundance of both mRNA and protein of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β (Cebpβ) increased in granulosa cells from 1 to 7 h post-hCG. Furthermore, chromatin immunoprecipitation assay confirmed the recruitment of Cebpβ to Lepr promoter. Thus, hCG-induced transcription of Lepr appears to be regulated by Cebpβ, which led us to hypothesise that Lepr may play a role during ovulation. To test this hypothesis, we used a recently developed pegylated superactive mouse leptin antagonist (PEG-SMLA) to inhibit Lepr signalling during ovulation. I.p. administration of PEG-SMLA (10 μg/g) to superovulated mice reduced ovulation rate by 65% compared with control treatment. Although the maturation stage of the ovulated oocytes remained unaltered, ovulation genes Ptgs2 and Has2 were downregulated in PEG-SMLA-treated mice compared with control mice. These results demonstrate that Lepr is dramatically induced in the granulosa cells of ovulating follicles and this induction of Lepr expression requires the transcription factor Cebpβ. Lepr plays a critical role in the process of ovulation by regulating, at least in part, the expression of the important genes involved in the preovulatory maturation of follicles.

  18. Role of Mitochondrial Translocation of Telomerase in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells with Multidrug Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianlong Ling, Lei Wen, Yuan Zhou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Multidrug resistance (MDR is a major obstacle of cancer chemotherapy. This study aimed to investigate the role of mitochondrial translocation of telomerase (hTERT in MDR of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC cells. In this study, three HCC cell lines (SK-Hep1/CDDP1 cells, SK-Hep1/CDDP2 cells and SK-Hep1/CDDP3 cells with differential resistance index (RI to cisplatin (CDDP were induced by pulse treatment of SK-Hep1 (human hepatocellular cell line with CDDP in vitro. The RI of SK-Hep1/CDDP1 cells, SK-Hep1/CDDP2 cells and SK-Hep1/CDDP3 cells was 5.14, 8.66, and 14.25, respectively, and all the cell lines showed cross-resistance to Doxorubicin (DOX and 5-Fuorouracil (5-FU. The apoptosis rates in drug-resistant cells were significantly reduced. Cell cycle analysis revealed the ratio of drug-resistant cells in G2/M and S phases increased, while that in G1 phase decreased. Immunofluorescence staining and Western blot assay demonstrated, with the gradual elevation in RI, increasing hTERT translocated from the nuclei to the mitochondria, while real-time PCR indicated the shortening of telomere length in drug-resistant cells under the chemotherapeutic stress and the reduction of damaged mtDNA with the increase in RI. Furthermore, JC-1 staining also indicated the reduction of mitochondrial membrane potential in drug-resistant cells. The mitochondrial translocation of hTERT increases in multidrug-resistant cells and exerts protective effect on mitochondrial function. Drug-resistant tumor cells escape from apoptosis through hTERT-mediated mitochondrial protection. Mitochondrial translocation of hTERT may serve as an underlying mechanism of MDR.

  19. Role of mitochondrial translocation of telomerase in hepatocellular carcinoma cells with multidrug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Xianlong; Wen, Lei; Zhou, Yuan

    2012-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a major obstacle of cancer chemotherapy. This study aimed to investigate the role of mitochondrial translocation of telomerase (hTERT) in MDR of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. In this study, three HCC cell lines (SK-Hep1/CDDP1 cells, SK-Hep1/CDDP2 cells and SK-Hep1/CDDP3 cells) with differential resistance index (RI) to cisplatin (CDDP) were induced by pulse treatment of SK-Hep1 (human hepatocellular cell line) with CDDP in vitro. The RI of SK-Hep1/CDDP1 cells, SK-Hep1/CDDP2 cells and SK-Hep1/CDDP3 cells was 5.14, 8.66, and 14.25, respectively, and all the cell lines showed cross-resistance to Doxorubicin (DOX) and 5-Fuorouracil (5-FU). The apoptosis rates in drug-resistant cells were significantly reduced. Cell cycle analysis revealed the ratio of drug-resistant cells in G2/M and S phases increased, while that in G1 phase decreased. Immunofluorescence staining and Western blot assay demonstrated, with the gradual elevation in RI, increasing hTERT translocated from the nuclei to the mitochondria, while real-time PCR indicated the shortening of telomere length in drug-resistant cells under the chemotherapeutic stress and the reduction of damaged mtDNA with the increase in RI. Furthermore, JC-1 staining also indicated the reduction of mitochondrial membrane potential in drug-resistant cells. The mitochondrial translocation of hTERT increases in multidrug-resistant cells and exerts protective effect on mitochondrial function. Drug-resistant tumor cells escape from apoptosis through hTERT-mediated mitochondrial protection. Mitochondrial translocation of hTERT may serve as an underlying mechanism of MDR. PMID:22991493

  20. EGFR kinase-dependent and kinase-independent roles in clear cell renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossu-Rocca, Paolo; Muroni, Maria R; Sanges, Francesca; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Asunis, Anna; Tanca, Luciana; Onnis, Daniela; Pira, Giovanna; Manca, Alessandra; Dore, Simone; Uras, Maria G; Ena, Sara; De Miglio, Maria R

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is associated with progression of many epithelial malignancies and represents a significant therapeutic target. Although clear cell renal cell carcinoma (CCRCC) has been widely investigated for EGFR molecular alterations, genetic evidences of EGFR gene activating mutations and/or gene amplification have been rarely confirmed in the literature. Therefore, until now EGFR-targeted therapies in clinical trials have been demonstrated unsuccessful. New evidence has been given about the interactions between EGFR and the sodium glucose co-transporter-1 (SGLT1) in maintaining the glucose basal intracellular level to favour cancer cell growth and survival; thus a new functional role may be attributed to EGFR, regardless of its kinase activity. To define the role of EGFR in CCRCC an extensive investigation of genetic changes and functional kinase activities was performed in a series of tumors by analyzing the EGFR mutational status and expression profile, together with the protein expression of downstream signaling pathways members. Furthermore, we investigated the co-expression of EGFR and SGLT1 proteins and their relationships with clinic-pathological features in CCRCC. EGFR protein expression was identified in 98.4% of CCRCC. Furthermore, it was described for the first time that SGLT1 is overexpressed in CCRCC (80.9%), and that co-expression with EGFR is appreciable in 79.4% of the tumours. Moreover, the activation of downstream EGFR pathways was found in about 79.4% of SGLT1-positive CCRCCs. The mutational status analysis of EGFR failed to demonstrate mutations on exons 18 to 24 and the presence of EGFR-variantIII (EGFRvIII) in all CCRCCs analyzed. FISH analysis revealed absence of EGFR amplification, and high polysomy of chromosome 7. Finally, the EGFR gene expression profile showed gene overexpression in 38.2% of CCRCCs. Our study contributes to define the complexity of EGFR role in CCRCC, identifying its bivalent kinase

  1. EGFR kinase-dependent and kinase-independent roles in clear cell renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossu-Rocca, Paolo; Muroni, Maria R; Sanges, Francesca; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Asunis, Anna; Tanca, Luciana; Onnis, Daniela; Pira, Giovanna; Manca, Alessandra; Dore, Simone; Uras, Maria G; Ena, Sara; De Miglio, Maria R

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is associated with progression of many epithelial malignancies and represents a significant therapeutic target. Although clear cell renal cell carcinoma (CCRCC) has been widely investigated for EGFR molecular alterations, genetic evidences of EGFR gene activating mutations and/or gene amplification have been rarely confirmed in the literature. Therefore, until now EGFR-targeted therapies in clinical trials have been demonstrated unsuccessful. New evidence has been given about the interactions between EGFR and the sodium glucose co-transporter-1 (SGLT1) in maintaining the glucose basal intracellular level to favour cancer cell growth and survival; thus a new functional role may be attributed to EGFR, regardless of its kinase activity. To define the role of EGFR in CCRCC an extensive investigation of genetic changes and functional kinase activities was performed in a series of tumors by analyzing the EGFR mutational status and expression profile, together with the protein expression of downstream signaling pathways members. Furthermore, we investigated the co-expression of EGFR and SGLT1 proteins and their relationships with clinic-pathological features in CCRCC. EGFR protein expression was identified in 98.4% of CCRCC. Furthermore, it was described for the first time that SGLT1 is overexpressed in CCRCC (80.9%), and that co-expression with EGFR is appreciable in 79.4% of the tumours. Moreover, the activation of downstream EGFR pathways was found in about 79.4% of SGLT1-positive CCRCCs. The mutational status analysis of EGFR failed to demonstrate mutations on exons 18 to 24 and the presence of EGFR-variantIII (EGFRvIII) in all CCRCCs analyzed. FISH analysis revealed absence of EGFR amplification, and high polysomy of chromosome 7. Finally, the EGFR gene expression profile showed gene overexpression in 38.2% of CCRCCs. Our study contributes to define the complexity of EGFR role in CCRCC, identifying its bivalent kinase

  2. Role of Dicer on tumorigenesis in glioma cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anling Zhang; Lei Han; Guangxiu Wang; Zhifan Jia; Peiyu Pu; Chunsheng Kang

    2010-01-01

    Micro RNAs(miRNAs)are non-coding,single-stranded RNAs that regulate target gene expression by repressing translation or promoting RNA cleavage.Recent studies show that miRNA expression is globally decreased in some human tumors.Dicer is an essential component of the miRNA processing machinery.To determine whether global reduction of miRNA effects tumorigenesis,small interfering RNA were designed to target Dicer to restrain whole miRNA expression in the glioblastoma cell line-TJ905.With effective knock-down of Dicer,tumor cells were invasive and proliferative,and globally impaired miRNA processing enhanced proliferation and invasiveness of glioma cells in vitro.Suppression of Dicer expression resulted in a more aggressive glioma phenotype,which suggests that global reduction of miRNA expression could have an oncogenic role in glioblastoma cells.

  3. Role of Ikaros in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Philippe; Kastner; Susan; Chan

    2011-01-01

    Ikaros is a zinc finger transcriptional regulator encoded by the Ikzf1 gene.Ikaros displays crucial functions in the hematopoietic system and its loss of function has been linked to the development of lymphoid leukemia.In particular,Ikaros has been found in recent years to be a major tumor suppressor involved in human B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.Its role in T-cell leukemia,however,has been more controversial.While Ikaros deficiency appears to be very frequent in murine T-cell leukemias,loss of Ikaros appears to be rare in human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL).We review here the evidence linking Ikaros to T-ALL in mouse and human systems.

  4. The Predicting Role of Difficulties in Emotion Regulation and Distress Tolerance in Students’ Addiction Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Esmaeilinasab

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study aimed to determine the predicting role of difficulties in emotion regulation and distress tolerance in addiction potential in university students. Method: The sample included 180 students of Allameh Tabatabaei University (82 males and 88 females who were selected randomly. For this correlational study, the Addiction Potential Scale, Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale, and Distress Tolerance Scale (Simons & Gaher, 2005 were administered among selected sample. Results: The results showed that difficulties in emotion regulation could predict 37.5 percent of addiction potential and between its subscales, lack of emotional clarity, had the most important role. Also, distress tolerance was not significantly related to addiction potential. Conclusion: By considering of results, it can be said students’ training in improving of emotion regulation is useful in preventing of addiction.

  5. Role of plasmacytoid dendritic cells in breast cancer bone dissemination

    OpenAIRE

    Sawant, Anandi; Ponnazhagan, Selvarangan

    2013-01-01

    Elevated levels of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) have been observed as breast cancer disseminates to the bone. The selective depletion of pDC in mice led to a total abrogation of bone metastasis as well as to an increase in TH1 antitumor response, suggesting that pDC may be considered as a potential therapeutic target for metastatic breast cancer.

  6. Potential of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in management of Alzheimer's disease in female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Ahmed M; Ahmed, Hanaa H; Atta, Hazem M; Ghazy, Mohamed A; Aglan, Hadeer A

    2014-12-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been called the disease of the century with significant clinical and socioeconomic impacts. Pharmacological treatment has limited efficacy and only provides symptomatic relief without long-term cure. Accordingly, there is an urgent need to develop novel and effective medications for AD. Stem cell-based therapy is a promising approach to handling neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore, the current study aimed to explore the possible therapeutic role of single intravenous injection of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) after 4 months in management of AD in the experimental model. The work also extended to compare the therapeutic potential of BM-MSCs with 2 conventional therapies of AD; rivastigmine and cerebrolysin administered daily. BM-MSCs were able to home at the injured brains and produced significant increases in the number of positive cells for choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and survivin expression, as well as selective AD indicator-1 (seladin-1) and nestin gene expression. Histopathological examination indicated that BM-MSCs could remove beta-amyloid plaques from hippocampus. Significant improvement in these biomarkers was similar to or better sometimes than the reference drugs, clearly showing the potential therapeutic role of BM-MSCs against AD through their anti-apoptotic, neurogenic and immunomodulatory properties. PMID:25044885

  7. Potential of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in management of Alzheimer's disease in female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Ahmed M; Ahmed, Hanaa H; Atta, Hazem M; Ghazy, Mohamed A; Aglan, Hadeer A

    2014-12-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been called the disease of the century with significant clinical and socioeconomic impacts. Pharmacological treatment has limited efficacy and only provides symptomatic relief without long-term cure. Accordingly, there is an urgent need to develop novel and effective medications for AD. Stem cell-based therapy is a promising approach to handling neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore, the current study aimed to explore the possible therapeutic role of single intravenous injection of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) after 4 months in management of AD in the experimental model. The work also extended to compare the therapeutic potential of BM-MSCs with 2 conventional therapies of AD; rivastigmine and cerebrolysin administered daily. BM-MSCs were able to home at the injured brains and produced significant increases in the number of positive cells for choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and survivin expression, as well as selective AD indicator-1 (seladin-1) and nestin gene expression. Histopathological examination indicated that BM-MSCs could remove beta-amyloid plaques from hippocampus. Significant improvement in these biomarkers was similar to or better sometimes than the reference drugs, clearly showing the potential therapeutic role of BM-MSCs against AD through their anti-apoptotic, neurogenic and immunomodulatory properties.

  8. Bortezomib-Induced Complete Heart Block and Myocardial Scar: The Potential Role of Cardiac Biomarkers in Monitoring Cardiotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachin Diwadkar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bortezomib is a proteasome inhibitor used to treat multiple myeloma and mantle cell lymphoma. Traditionally, bortezomib was thought to have little cardiovascular toxicity; however, there is increasing evidence that bortezomib can lead to cardiac complications including left ventricular dysfunction and atrioventricular block. We present the case of a 66-year-old man with multiple myeloma and persistent asymptomatic elevations of cardiac biomarkers who developed complete heart block and evidence of myocardial scar after his eighth cycle of bortezomib, requiring permanent pacemaker placement. In addition to discussing the cardiovascular complications of bortezomib therapy, we propose a potential role for biomarkers in the prediction and monitoring of bortezomib cardiotoxicity.

  9. The role of fibrocytes in sickle cell lung disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua J Field

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Interstitial lung disease is a frequent complication in sickle cell disease and is characterized by vascular remodeling and interstitial fibrosis. Bone marrow-derived fibrocytes have been shown to contribute to the pathogenesis of other interstitial lung diseases. The goal of this study was to define the contribution of fibrocytes to the pathogenesis of sickle cell lung disease. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Fibrocytes were quantified and characterized in subjects with sickle cell disease or healthy controls, and in a model of sickle cell disease, the NY1DD mouse. The role of the chemokine ligand CXCL12 in trafficking of fibrocytes and phenotype of lung disease was examined in the animal model. We found elevated concentration of activated fibrocytes in the peripheral blood of subjects with sickle cell disease, which increased further during vaso-occlusive crises. There was a similar elevations in the numbers and activation phenotype of fibrocytes in the bone marrow, blood, and lungs of the NY1DD mouse, both at baseline and under conditions of hypoxia/re-oxygenation. In both subjects with sickle cell disease and the mouse model, fibrocytes expressed a hierarchy of chemokine receptors, with CXCR4 expressed on most fibrocytes, and CCR2 and CCR7 expressed on a smaller subset of cells. Depletion of the CXCR4 ligand, CXCL12, in the mouse model resulted in a marked reduction of fibrocyte trafficking into the lungs, reduced lung collagen content and improved lung compliance and histology. CONCLUSIONS: These data support the notion that activated fibrocytes play a significant role in the pathogenesis of sickle cell lung disease.

  10. The Predicting Role of Difficulties in Emotion Regulation and Distress Tolerance in Students’ Addiction Potential

    OpenAIRE

    M Esmaeilinasab; A Andami Khoshk; H Azarmi; A Samar Rakhi

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to determine the predicting role of difficulties in emotion regulation and distress tolerance in addiction potential in university students. Method: The sample included 180 students of Allameh Tabatabaei University (82 males and 88 females) who were selected randomly. For this correlational study, the Addiction Potential Scale, Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale, and Distress Tolerance Scale (Simons & Gaher, 2005) were administered among selected sample. Resu...

  11. Expression and Potential Roles of HLA-G in Human Spermatogenesis and Early Embryonic Development

    OpenAIRE

    Gui-Dong Yao; Yi-Min Shu; Sen-Lin Shi; Zhao-Feng Peng; Wen-Yan Song; Hai-Xia Jin; Ying-Pu Sun

    2014-01-01

    As one of the non-classical major histocompatibility complex(MHC)-1 antigens, Human Leukocyte Antigen G (HLA-G), has been suggested as a prognostic marker to identify the embryo developmental potential. In the present study, we investigated the potential roles of HLA-G in human spermatogenesis and early embryonic development. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis revealed that HLA-G's expression was increased with increased Johnsen score in testicular tissues. There was no significant differenc...

  12. On the potential roles of ticks and migrating birds in the ecology of West Nile virus

    OpenAIRE

    Hagman, Karl; Barboutis, Christos; Ehrenborg, Christian; Fransson, Thord; Thomas G.T. Jaenson; Lindgren, Per-Eric; Lundkvist, Åke; Nyström, Fredrik; Waldenström, Jonas; Salaneck, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Background: Mosquitoes are the primary vectors of West Nile virus (WNV). Ticks have, however, been suggested to be potential reservoirs of WNV. In order to investigate their role in the spread of the virus, ticks, which had been collected from birds migrating northwards from Africa to Europe, were analyzed for the potential presence of WNV-RNA.Methods: On the Mediterranean islands Capri and Antikythira a total of 14,824 birds were captured and investigated from which 747 ticks were collected....

  13. Purkinje cell-specific knockout of the protein phosphatase PP2B impairs potentiation and cerebellar motor learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Schonewille (Martijn); A. Belmeguenai; S.K.E. Koekkoek (Bas); S.H. Houtman (Simone Hendrika); H.J. Boele (Henk-Jan); B.J. van Beugen (Boeke); Z. Gao (Zhenyu); A.M. Badura (Aleksandra); G. Ohtsuki (Gen); W.E. Amerika; E. Hosy; F.E. Hoebeek (Freek); Y. Elgersma (Ype); C.R.W. Hansel (Christian); C.I. de Zeeuw (Chris)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractCerebellar motor learning is required to obtain procedural skills. Studies have provided supportive evidence for a potential role of kinase-mediated long-term depression (LTD) at the parallel fiber to Purkinje cell synapse in cerebellar learning. Recently, phosphatases have been implicat

  14. Role of Toll-like receptors in regulatory functions of T and B cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHANG ZongLiang

    2008-01-01

    Pathogens can find their ways to most sites in the host. Pathogen sensors, such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs), must be equally and broadly distributed on immune cells to combat them through innate and adaptive immunity. Most classes of TLRs are found in innate immune cells to obtain an immediate re-sponse against pathogens, but recent studies indicate that a number of TLRs are wildly expressed in T and B cells, suggesting TLRs also directly regulate adaptive immune responses. Due to the rapid in-crease of new information on the multiple roles of TLRs, in this paper we aim to review several main properties of TLRs and their direct role in T and B cells. This review consists of 6 parts: (ⅰ) Characteris-tics of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and signaling; (ⅱ) signalling pathways of TLRs; (ⅲ) TLR expressions on human leukocytes; (ⅳ) TLR expressions and functions in the Th1, CD4+CD45RO+ memory T cells and regulatory/suppressor T as well as B cell populations; (ⅴ) therapeutic potential of TLR agonists; (ⅵ) discussion and perspective. The latest findings and potential therapeutic applications are discussed. There is growing evidence supporting the concept that TLR activation contributes not only to innate immunity but also to adaptive immunity, including direct regulation of both T and B lymphocytes by TLRs.

  15. TET1 knockdown inhibits the odontogenic differentiation potential of human dental pulp cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Li-Jia; Yi, Bai-Cheng; Li, Qi-Meng; Xu, Qiong

    2016-01-01

    Human dental pulp cells (hDPCs) possess the capacity to differentiate into odontoblast-like cells and generate reparative dentin in response to exogenous stimuli or injury. Ten-eleven translocation 1 (TET1) is a novel DNA methyldioxygenase that plays an important role in the promotion of DNA demethylation and transcriptional regulation in several cell lines. However, the role of TET1 in the biological functions of hDPCs is unknown. To investigate the effect of TET1 on the proliferation and odontogenic differentiation potential of hDPCs, a recombinant shRNA lentiviral vector was used to knock down TET1 expression in hDPCs. Following TET1 knockdown, TET1 was significantly downregulated at both the mRNA and protein levels. Proliferation of the hDPCs was suppressed in the TET1 knockdown groups. Alkaline phosphatase activity, the formation of mineralized nodules, and the expression levels of DSPP and DMP1 were all reduced in the TET1-knockdown hDPCs undergoing odontogenic differentiation. Based on these results, we concluded that TET1 knockdown can prevent the proliferation and odontogenic differentiation of hDPCs, which suggests that TET1 may play an important role in dental pulp repair and regeneration. PMID:27357322

  16. Histone demethylase KDM2B inhibits the chondrogenic differentiation potentials of stem cells from apical papilla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing-Jing; Dong, Rui; Wang, Li-Ping; Wang, Jin-Song; Du, Juan; Wang, Song-Lin; Shan, Zhao-Chen; Fan, Zhi-Peng

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are a reliable resource for tissue regeneration, but the molecular mechanism underlying directed differentiation remains unclear; this has restricted potential MSC applications. Histone methylation, controlled by histone methyltransferases and demethylases, may play a key role in MSCs differentiation. Previous studies determined that KDM2B can regulate the cell proliferation and osteo/dentinogenic differentiation of MSCs. It is not known whether KDM2B is involved in the other cell lineages differentiation of MSCs. Here we used the stem cells from apical papilla (SCAPs) to study the role of KDM2B on the chondrogenic differentiation potentials in MSCs. In this study, Gain- and loss-of-function assays were applied to investigate the role of KDM2B on the chondrogenic differentiation. Alcian Blue Staining and Quantitative Analysis were used to investigate the synthesis of proteoglycans by chondrocytes. Real-time RT-PCR was used to detect the expressions of chondrogenesis related genes. The Alcian Blue staining and Quantitative Analysis results revealed that overexpression of KDM2B decreased the proteoglycans production, and real-time RT-PCR results showed that the expressions of the chondrogenic differentiation markers, COL1, COL2 and SOX9 were inhibited by overexpression of KDM2B in SCAPs. On the contrary, depletion of KDM2B increased the proteoglycans production, and inhibited the expressions of COL1, COL2 and SOX9. In conclusion, our results indicated that KDM2B is a negative regulator of chondrogenic differentiation in SCAPs and suggest that inhibition of KDM2B might improve MSC mediated cartilage regeneration. PMID:25932147

  17. Recent advances in understanding the roles of vascular endothelial cells in allergic inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoda, Tetsuo; Futamura, Kyoko; Orihara, Kanami; Emi-Sugie, Maiko; Saito, Hirohisa; Matsumoto, Kenji; Matsuda, Akio

    2016-01-01

    Allergic disorders commonly involve both chronic tissue inflammation and remodeling caused by immunological reactions to various antigens on tissue surfaces. Due to their anatomical location, vascular endothelial cells are the final responders to interact with various exogenous factors that come into contact with the epithelial surface, such as pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and antigens. Recent studies have shed light on the important roles of endothelial cells in the development and exacerbation of allergic disorders. For instance, endothelial cells have the greatest potential to produce several key molecules that are deeply involved in allergic inflammation, such as periostin and thymus and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC/CCL17). Additionally, endothelial cells were recently shown to be important functional targets for IL-33--an essential regulator of allergic inflammation. Notably, almost all endothelial cell responses and functions involved in allergic inflammation are not suppressed by corticosteroids. These corticosteroid-refractory endothelial cell responses and functions include TNF-α-associated angiogenesis, leukocyte adhesion, IL-33-mediated responses and periostin and TARC production. Therefore, these unique responses and functions of endothelial cells may be critically involved in the pathogenesis of various allergic disorders, especially their refractory processes. Here, we review recent studies, including ours, which have elucidated previously unknown pathophysiological roles of vascular endothelial cells in allergic inflammation and discuss the possibility of endothelium-targeted therapy for allergic disorders.

  18. A Combination of Culture Conditions and Gene Expression Analysis Can Be Used to Investigate and Predict hES Cell Differentiation Potential towards Male Gonadal Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristín Rós Kjartansdóttir

    Full Text Available Human embryonic stem cell differentiation towards various cell types belonging to ecto-, endo- and mesodermal cell lineages has been demonstrated, with high efficiency rates using standardized differentiation protocols. However, germ cell differentiation from human embryonic stem cells has been very inefficient so far. Even though the influence of various growth factors has been evaluated, the gene expression of different cell lines in relation to their differentiation potential has not yet been extensively examined. In this study, the potential of three male human embryonic stem cell lines to differentiate towards male gonadal cells was explored by analysing their gene expression profiles. The human embryonic stem cell lines were cultured for 14 days as monolayers on supporting human foreskin fibroblasts or as spheres in suspension, and were differentiated using BMP7, or spontaneous differentiation by omitting exogenous FGF2. TLDA analysis revealed that in the undifferentiated state, these cell lines have diverse mRNA profiles and exhibit significantly different potentials for differentiation towards the cell types present in the male gonads. This potential was associated with important factors directing the fate of the male primordial germ cells in vivo to form gonocytes, such as SOX17 or genes involved in the NODAL/ACTIVIN pathway, for example. Stimulation with BMP7 in suspension culture resulted in up-regulation of cytoplasmic SOX9 protein expression in all three lines. The observation that human embryonic stem cells differentiate towards germ and somatic cells after spontaneous and BMP7-induced stimulation in suspension emphasizes the important role of somatic cells in germ cell differentiation in vitro.

  19. ACID-EXTRUDING TRANSPORTERS IN MAMMARY AND PANCREATIC ADENOCARCINOMA: REGULATION AND ROLES IN CELL MOTILITY

    OpenAIRE

    Pedersen, S.

    2013-01-01

    A fundamental property of solid tumors is an altered pH-profile compared to normal tissues. This at least in part reflects increased glycolytic metabolism, necessitating increased acid extrusion to maintain survival, and in turn stimulating cancer cell motility [1, 2]. Acid extruding transporters are therefore interesting potential targets in cancer. The overall aim of these studies was to explore the regulation and roles of acid extruding transporters in human mammary and pancreatic adenocar...

  20. An integrative genomic and transcriptomic analysis reveals potential targets associated with cell proliferation in uterine leiomyomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cirilo, Priscila Daniele Ramos; Marchi, Fábio Albuquerque; Barros Filho, Mateus de Camargo;

    2013-01-01

    integrated analysis identified the top 30 significant genes (P<0.01), which comprised genes associated with cancer, whereas the protein-protein interaction analysis indicated a strong association between FANCA and BRCA1. Functional in silico analysis revealed target molecules for drugs involved in cell...... transcriptomic approach indicated that FGFR1 and IGFBP5 amplification, as well as the consequent up-regulation of the protein products, plays an important role in the aetiology of ULs and thus provides data for potential drug therapies development to target genes associated with cellular proliferation in ULs....

  1. Role of cell adhesion signal molecules in hepatocellular carcinoma cell apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Min Su; Li-Ying Wang; Yu-Long Liang; Xi-Liang Zha

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Cell adhesion molecules and their signal molecules play a very important role in carcinogenesis. The aim of this study is to elucidate the role of these molecules and the signal molecules of integrins and E-cadherins, such as (focal adhesion kinase) FAK, (integrin linked kinase)ILK, and β-catenin in hepatocellular carcinoma cell apoptosis.METHODS: We first synthesized the small molecular compound, S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine (DCVC), and identified it, by element analysis and 1H NMR. To establish the apoptosis model of the SMMC-7721 hepatocellular carcinoma cell, we treated cells with DCVC in EBSS for different concentrations or for various length times in the presence of 20 μmol/L N,N-diphenyl-p-phenylenediamine,which blocks necrotic cell death and identified this model by flow cytometry and DNA ladder. Then we studied the changes of FAK, ILK, β-catenin, and PKB in this apoptotic model by Western blot.RESULTS: We found that the loss or decrease of cell adhesion signal molecules is an important reason in apoptosis of SMMC-7721 hepatocellular carcinoma cell and the apoptosis of SMMC-7721 cell was preceded by the loss or decrease of FAK, ILK, PKB, and β-catenin or the damage of cell-matrix and cell-cell adhesion.CONCLUSION: Our results suggested that the decrease of adhesion signal molecules, FAK, ILK, PKB, and β-catenin,could induce hepatocellular carcinoma cell apoptosis.

  2. N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase IVa regulates metastatic potential of mouse hepatocarcinoma cells through glycosylation of CD147.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jianhui; Wang, Shujing; Yu, Shengjin; He, Jingna; Zheng, Weilong; Zhang, Jianing

    2012-08-01

    N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase (GnT)-IV a is a key enzyme that catalyzes the formation of the GlcNAC β1-4 branch on the core structure of complex N-Glycans, which is the common substrate for other N-acetylglucosaminyltransferases, such as GnT-III and GnT-V. Our recent study indicates that the expression of GnT-IVa in Hca-F cells was much higher than that in Hepa1-6 cells, these two mouse hepatocarcinoma cell lines have high and no metastatic potential in lymph nodes respectively. To investigate the effects of GnT-IVa on the metastasis of hepatocarcinoma, exogenous GnT-IVa was introduced into Hepa1-6 cells, and on the other hand, the expression of GnT-IVa was down-regulated in Hca-F cells. The engineered overexpression of GnT-IVa in Hepa1-6 cells increased the antennary branches of complex N-glycans and reduced bisecting branches in vitro and in vivo, which leads to the increase in migration and metastatic capability of hepatocarcinoma cells. Conversely, down-regulated expression of GnT-IVa in Hca-F cells showed reduced tetra-antennary branches of N-Glycans, and significantly decreased the migration and metastatic capability. Furthermore, we found that the regulated GnT-IVa converts the heterogeneous N-glycosylated forms of CD147 in Hepa1-6 and Hca-F cells, and significantly changed the antennary oligosaccharide structures on CD147. These results suggest that GnT-IVa could be acting as a key role in migration and metastasis of mouse hepatocarcinoma cells through altering the glycosylation of CD147. These findings should be valuable in delineating the important function of GnT-IVa during the process of hepatocarcinoma growth and metastasis.

  3. The Role of Myeloma Cells to Osteoclast Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahare Sadeghi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Multiple myeloma (MM is a hematological malignancy characterized by osteolyticbone disease which is associated with severe bone pain and pathological bonefractures. The receptor activator of nuclear factor κB (RANK and receptor activator ofnuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL system has an important role in regulation of boneremodeling process. The aim of this study was to evaluate the expression of the RANK/RANKL molecules by the myeloma cells derived from patients and myeloma cell lineU-266.Materials and Methods: Myeloma cells derived from 7 myeloma patients and plasma cellleukemia were included into this study to evaluate the expression of the RANK/RANKLmolecules by the reverse transcriptions-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR method atthe mRNA level. As well as human myeloma cell line U266, U937, RPMI-8866 and Helawere used as control groups.Results: In this study we show the expression of RANK and its ligand at the mRNA levelin U-266 (myeloma cell line and plasma cells derived from patients by the RT-PCR technique.Conclusion: Our results demonstrate that expression of RANK and RANKL by plasmacells can contribute to induction of osteoclasts and plasma cell activation which elevatesbone resorption in myeloma patients.

  4. Role of Inflammation and Substrate Stiffness in Cancer Cell Transmigration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilla, Susan; Stroka, Kimberly; Aranda-Espinoza, Helim

    2013-03-01

    Cancer metastasis, the ability for cancer cells to break away from the primary tumor site and spread to other organs of the body, is one of the main contributing factors to the deadliness of the disease. One of the rate-limiting steps in cancer metastasis that is not well understood is the adhesion of tumor cells to the endothelium followed by transmigration. Other factors include substrate stiffness and inflammation. To test these parameters, we designed an in vitro model of transendothelial migration. Our results suggest that cancer cell transmigration is a two-step process in which they first incorporate into the endothelium before migrating through. It was observed that the cumulative fraction of cancer cells that incorporate into the endothelium increases over time. Unlike leukocytes, which can directly transmigrate through the endothelium, cancer cells appear to have a two-step process of transmigration. Our results indicate that inflammation does not act as a signal for cancer cells to localize at specific sites and transmigrate similarly to leukocytes. Cancer cell transmigration also does not vary with substrate stiffness indicating that tissue stiffness may not play a role in cancer's propensity to metastasize to certain tissues.