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Sample records for cells pathologic mechanism

  1. Pathologic pancreatic endocrine cell hyperplasia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Debra Ouyang; Deepti Dhall; Run Yu

    2011-01-01

    Pathologic hyperplasia of various pancreatic endocrine cells is rare but has been long known. β cell hyperplasia contributes to persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy, which is commonly caused by mutations in the islet ATP-sensitive potassium channel, and to noninsulinoma pancreatogenous hypoglycemia in adults,which may or may not be associated with bariatric surgery.α cell hyperplasia may cause glucagonoma syndrome or induce pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. An inactivating mutation of the glucagon receptor causes α cell hyperplasia and asymptomatic hyperglucagonemia.Pancreatic polypeptide cell hyperplasia has been described without a clearly-characterized clinical syndrome and hyperplasia of other endocrine cells inside the pancreas has not been reported to our knowledge.Based on morphological evidence, the main pathogenetic mechanism for pancreatic endocrine cell hyperplasia is increased endocrine cell neogenesis from exocrine ductal epithelium. Pancreatic endocrine cell hyperplasia should be considered in the diagnosis and management of hypoglycemia, elevated islet hormone levels,and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. Further studies of pathologic pancreatic endocrine cell hyperplasia will likely yield insights into the pathogenesis and treatment of diabetes and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors.

  2. [Vascular Calcification - Pathological Mechanism and Clinical Application - . Role of vascular smooth muscle cells in vascular calcification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurabayashi, Masahiko

    2015-05-01

    Vascular calcification is commonly seen with aging, chronic kidney disese (CKD), diabetes, and atherosclerosis, and is closely associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Vascular calcification has long been regarded as the final stage of degeneration and necrosis of arterial wall and a passive, unregulated process. However, it is now known to be an active and tightly regulated process involved with phenotypic transition of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) that resembles bone mineralization. Briefly, calcium deposits of atherosclerotic plaque consist of hydroxyapatite and may appear identical to fully formed lamellar bone. By using a genetic fate mapping strategy, VSMC of the vascular media give rise to the majority of the osteochondrogenic precursor- and chondrocyte-like cells observed in the calcified arterial media of MGP (- / -) mice. Osteogenic differentiation of VSMC is characterized by the expression of bone-related molecules including bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) -2, Msx2 and osteopontin, which are produced by osteoblasts and chondrocytes. Our recent findings are that (i) Runx2 and Notch1 induce osteogenic differentiation, and (ii) advanced glycation end-product (AGE) /receptor for AGE (RAGE) and palmitic acid promote osteogenic differentiation of VSMC. To understand of the molecular mechanisms of vascular calcification is now under intensive research area.

  3. The Role of Laminin α4 in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells and Pathological Mechanism of Preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Nan; Zhang, Xuemei; Xiao, Xiaoqiu; Zhang, Hua; Chen, Ying; Luo, Xin; Liu, Xiru; Zhuang, Baimei; Peng, Wei; Qi, Hongbo

    2015-08-01

    Preeclampsia (PE) is associated with defective placental angiogenesis and poor placentation. Laminins are the main noncollagenous glycoproteins in basement membranes, and laminin α4 (LAMA4) promotes the migration, proliferation, and survival of various cells. The primary purpose of this study is to investigate the role of LAMA4 in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) function during the development of PE. We found expression levels of LAMA4 in human PE placentas were significantly lower compared to the control placentas. The LAMA4 small-interfering RNA transfection and hypoxia-reoxygenation (H/R) intervention reduced the migratory and tube formation abilities of HUVECs. The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways interacted with LAMA4 expression and H/Rexposure led to MAPK pathways activation in HUVECs. We demonstrated that LAMA4 is very crucial in promoting the functions of endothelial cells. Oxidative stress plays a vital role in controlling expression of LAMA4 through MAPK signaling pathways, which suggests a possible pathological mechanism of PE.

  4. Myoepithelial cells in pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balachander, N; Masthan, K M K; Babu, N Aravindha; Anbazhagan, V

    2015-04-01

    Myoepithelial cells are a normal constituent of the salivary acini and ducts and are found between the epithelial cells and the basement membrane. Microscopically myoepithelial cells are thin and spindle-shaped and ultrastructurally they possess a number of Cytoplasmic processes that extend between and over the acinar and ductal-lining cells, and they show features of both smooth muscle and epithelium. They play a vital role during expulsion of saliva and regulates the electrolytic exchange. They also perform as tumor suppressors and are considered to play a very important role in differentiation of various salivary gland tumors and help in the diagnosis of tumors. Neoplastic myoepithelial cells in both benign and malignant tumors can take numerous forms including epithelioid, plasmacytoid, spindle and clear cell variant, and this variability largely accounts for difficulties in histopathological diagnosis.

  5. Myoepithelial cells in pathology

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    N Balachander

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Myoepithelial cells are a normal constituent of the salivary acini and ducts and are found between the epithelial cells and the basement membrane. Microscopically myoepithelial cells are thin and spindle-shaped and ultrastructurally they possess a number of Cytoplasmic processes that extend between and over the acinar and ductal-lining cells, and they show features of both smooth muscle and epithelium. They play a vital role during expulsion of saliva and regulates the electrolytic exchange. They also perform as tumor suppressors and are considered to play a very important role in differentiation of various salivary gland tumors and help in the diagnosis of tumors. Neoplastic myoepithelial cells in both benign and malignant tumors can take numerous forms including epithelioid, plasmacytoid, spindle and clear cell variant, and this variability largely accounts for difficulties in histopathological diagnosis.

  6. Synaptic Contacts Enhance Cell-to-Cell Tau Pathology Propagation

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    Sara Calafate

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Accumulation of insoluble Tau protein aggregates and stereotypical propagation of Tau pathology through the brain are common hallmarks of tauopathies, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD. Propagation of Tau pathology appears to occur along connected neurons, but whether synaptic contacts between neurons are facilitating propagation has not been demonstrated. Using quantitative in vitro models, we demonstrate that, in parallel to non-synaptic mechanisms, synapses, but not merely the close distance between the cells, enhance the propagation of Tau pathology between acceptor hippocampal neurons and Tau donor cells. Similarly, in an artificial neuronal network using microfluidic devices, synapses and synaptic activity are promoting neuronal Tau pathology propagation in parallel to the non-synaptic mechanisms. Our work indicates that the physical presence of synaptic contacts between neurons facilitate Tau pathology propagation. These findings can have implications for synaptic repair therapies, which may turn out to have adverse effects by promoting propagation of Tau pathology.

  7. Synaptic Contacts Enhance Cell-to-Cell Tau Pathology Propagation.

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    Calafate, Sara; Buist, Arjan; Miskiewicz, Katarzyna; Vijayan, Vinoy; Daneels, Guy; de Strooper, Bart; de Wit, Joris; Verstreken, Patrik; Moechars, Diederik

    2015-05-26

    Accumulation of insoluble Tau protein aggregates and stereotypical propagation of Tau pathology through the brain are common hallmarks of tauopathies, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Propagation of Tau pathology appears to occur along connected neurons, but whether synaptic contacts between neurons are facilitating propagation has not been demonstrated. Using quantitative in vitro models, we demonstrate that, in parallel to non-synaptic mechanisms, synapses, but not merely the close distance between the cells, enhance the propagation of Tau pathology between acceptor hippocampal neurons and Tau donor cells. Similarly, in an artificial neuronal network using microfluidic devices, synapses and synaptic activity are promoting neuronal Tau pathology propagation in parallel to the non-synaptic mechanisms. Our work indicates that the physical presence of synaptic contacts between neurons facilitate Tau pathology propagation. These findings can have implications for synaptic repair therapies, which may turn out to have adverse effects by promoting propagation of Tau pathology.

  8. Mast cells in pathological and surgical scars

    OpenAIRE

    Beer, T; Baldwin, H; West, L; Gallagher, P.; Wright, D.

    1998-01-01

    AIM—To investigate the role of mast cells in surgical and pathological scar reactions by their identification and quantification using immunohistochemistry.
METHODS—Surgical scars and pathological scar reactions were stained immunohistochemically for tryptase to identify mast cells. These were quantified in the scar tissue and surrounding dermis. Statistical analyses were performed to test the hypothesis that mast cell numbers were different in the varying types of scar reaction.
RESULTS—A si...

  9. The "Shaken Baby" syndrome: pathology and mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squier, Waney

    2011-11-01

    The "Shaken Baby" syndrome (SBS) is the subject of intense controversy; the diagnosis has in the past depended on the triad of subdural haemorrhage (SDH), retinal haemorrhage and encephalopathy. While there is no doubt that infants do suffer abusive injury at the hands of their carers and that impact can cause catastrophic intracranial damage, research has repeatedly undermined the hypothesis that shaking per se can cause this triad. The term non-accidental head injury has therefore been widely adopted. This review will focus on the pathology and mechanisms of the three physiologically associated findings which constitute the "triad" and are seen in infants suffering from a wide range of non-traumatic as well as traumatic conditions. "Sub" dural bleeding in fact originates within the deep layers of the dura. The potential sources of SDH include: the bridging veins, small vessels within the dura itself, a granulating haemorrhagic membrane and ruptured intracranial aneurysm. Most neuropathologists do not routinely examine eyes, but the significance of this second arm of the triad in the diagnosis of Shaken Baby syndrome is such that it merits consideration in the context of this review. While retinal haemorrhage can be seen clinically, dural and subarachnoid optic nerve sheath haemorrhage is usually seen exclusively by the pathologist and only rarely described by the neuroradiologist. The term encephalopathy is used loosely in the context of SBS. It may encompass anything from vomiting, irritability, feeding difficulties or floppiness to seizures, apnoea and fulminant brain swelling. The spectrum of brain pathology associated with retinal and subdural bleeding from a variety of causes is described. The most important cerebral pathology is swelling and hypoxic-ischaemic injury. Mechanical shearing injury is rare and contusions, the hallmark of adult traumatic brain damage, are vanishingly rare in infants under 1 year of age. Clefts and haemorrhages in the immediate

  10. Neuronal trafficking: basic mechanisms and ALS pathology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijpers, M.

    2014-01-01

    A cell is divided into different compartments and organelles, which enables the cell to create specialized environments for specific functions. To perform these functions, organelles need a unique composition of proteins and lipids. By actively controlling the trafficking of proteins and membrane li

  11. Immunohistochemistry of Programmed Cell Death in Archival Human Pathology Specimens

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    Takami Matsuyama

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Immunohistochemistry (IHC for detecting key signal molecules involved in programmed cell death (PCD in archival human pathology specimens is fairly well established. Detection of cleaved caspase-3 in lymphocytes in rheumatoid arthritis (RA and gastric surface foveolar glandular epithelia but not in synoviocytes in RA, gastric fundic glandular epithelia, or nasal NK/T-cell lymphoma (NKTCL cells suggests anti-apoptotic mechanisms in cell differentiation and in oncogenesis such as the induction of survivin. Enzymatically pretreated and ultra-super sensitive detection of beclin-1 in synoviocytes in RA and gastric fundic glandular epithelia suggests enhanced autophagy. The deposition of beclin-1 in fibrinoid necrosis in RA and expression of beclin-1 in detached gastric fundic glandular cells suggest that enhanced autophagy undergoes autophagic cell death (ACD. NKTCL exhibited enhanced autophagy through LC3 labeling and showed densely LC3 labeled cell-debris in regions of peculiar necrosis without deposition of beclin-1, indicating massive ACD in NKTCL and the alternative pathway enhancing autophagy following autophagic vesicle nucleation. Autophagy progression was monitored by labeling aggregated mitochondria and cathepsin D. The cell-debris in massive ACD in NKTCL were positive for 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, suggesting DNA oxidation occurred in ACD. Immunohistochemical autophagy and PCD analysis in archival human pathology specimens may offer new insights into autophagy in humans.

  12. An Analysis of Pathological Activities of CCN Proteins in Joint Disorders: Mechanical Stretch-Mediated CCN2 Expression in Cultured Meniscus Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furumatsu, Takayuki; Ozaki, Toshifumi

    2017-01-01

    The multifunctional growth factor CYR61/CTGF/NOV (CCN) 2, also known as connective tissue growth factor, regulates cellular proliferation, differentiation, and tissue regeneration. Recent literatures have described important roles of CCN2 in the meniscus metabolism. However, the mechanical stress-mediated transcriptional regulation of CCN2 in the meniscus remains unclear. The meniscus is a fibrocartilaginous tissue that controls complex biomechanics of the knee joint. Therefore, the injured unstable meniscus has a poor healing potential especially in the avascular inner region. In addition, dysfunction of the meniscus correlates with the progression of degenerative knee joint disorders and joint space narrowing. Here, we describe an experimental approach that investigates the distinct cellular behavior of inner and outer meniscus cells in response to mechanical stretch. Our experimental model can analyze the relationships between stretch-induced CCN2 expression and its functional role in the meniscus homeostasis.

  13. The mechanism of pathological changes of intraventricular hemorrhage in dogs

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    Dai Jiong

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Background : Intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH is an independent risk factor for both morbidity and mortality in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage and subarchnoid hemorrhage. The pathophysiological mechanisms by which blood within the ventricles causes brain damage are still poorly understood. Settings and Design : We developed a canine (dog model with long-term survival. Aims : To study the mechanisms of pathological changes associated with IVH. Materials and Methods : The neurological status, cranial computed tomographic findings, and the pathological changes were studied in the dogs with IVH and also in the control dogs, intraventiricular saline injection. Results : In all the dogs in the control group there were no abnormalities in all the three parameters studied. The dogs in the IVH group developed neurological deficits after the blood injection. There was linear relationship between the ventricular volume and blood clot volume in the first week. After the first week, there was progressive enlargement of the ventricular volume, while the clots continued to shrink. There was complete lysis of the clots within 4 weeks. Pathological studies showed distruction of the ependymal lining of the ventricular system, subependymal gliosis and ischemia of the neurons in the subependymal areas, prominently around the aqueduct. Conclusion : Ventricular dilation was the prominent feature following intraventricular injection of the blood. The other pathological features included disruption of ependymal lining, subependymal gliosis, and ischemic necrosis of neurons in the periventricular tissue of the third ventricle, aqueduct, and the fourth ventricle. These pathological may have some role in the ventricular dilatation following IVH.

  14. A classification of the mechanisms producing pathological tissue changes.

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    Grippo, John O; Oh, Daniel S

    2013-05-01

    The objectives are to present a classification of mechanisms which can produce pathological changes in body tissues and fluids, as well as to clarify and define the term biocorrosion, which has had a singular use in engineering. Considering the emerging field of biomedical engineering, it is essential to use precise definitions in the lexicons of engineering, bioengineering and related sciences such as medicine, dentistry and veterinary medicine. The mechanisms of stress, friction and biocorrosion and their pathological effects on tissues are described. Biocorrosion refers to the chemical, biochemical and electrochemical changes by degradation or induced growth of living body tissues and fluids. Various agents which can affect living tissues causing biocorrosion are enumerated which support the necessity and justify the use of this encompassing and more precise definition of biocorrosion. A distinction is made between the mechanisms of corrosion and biocorrosion.

  15. Omnis cellula e cellula revisited: cell biology as the foundation of pathology.

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    Wright, Nicholas A; Poulsom, Richard

    2012-01-01

    This 2012 Annual Review Issue of The Journal of Pathology argues strongly that cell biology, in its many disciplines, underpins the foundation of our understanding of the mechanisms of disease-the holy grail of pathology. Our increasing knowledge of the human genome will not be enough to attain this goal without parallel developments in our comprehension of the results, at the cellular level, of these genetic changes. In the end, it is cell biology and cell biologists who will deliver this mission.

  16. MECHANISM OF PATHOLOGICAL CHANGES OF INTRAVENTRICULAR HEMORRHAGE IN DOGS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戴炯; 李善泉; 李骁雄; 徐斌斌; 熊文浩; 王勇; 张晓华; 沈加林

    2004-01-01

    Objective To probe the mechanism of pathological changes of intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH). Methods The evaluation of neurological status, serial CT scans and pathological examination were ap plied on the canine model of lVH. The ventricular volume and blood clot volume were measured based on the CT images. Results The normal adult canine ventricle tend to be slitlike. After injection, the ventricle was obviously dilated by the blood clot. The linear regression of ventricular volume against blood clot volume was significant in the first week. From then on, however, while the clots continued to shrink, the ventricular volume showed progressive enlargement. The clots were lysed completely within 3 to 4 weeks. The linear regression of the degree of ventricular dilatation against the first clot volume was also significant. In the pathological examination, we found the ependymal lining of ventricular system was destroyed and neurons in the subependymal areas developed acidophil necrosis, which was prominent around Sylvian aqueduct. Conclusion Hemorrhagic ventricular dilatation(HVD) is a prominent feature of IVH and also is a strong indicator for poor prognosis. lschemic changes of periventricular neurons in some important structures may be the most direct cause for poor outcome of IVH. It may be induced by periventricular vascular structures compressed by HVD, increased intracranial pressure ,cerebral vasospasm and others.

  17. Mechanical Properties of Cells

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    Bradley, Robert; Becerril, Joseph; Jeevarajan, Anthony

    2007-01-01

    Many physiologic and pathologic processes alter the biomechanical properties of the tissue they affect, and these changes may be manifest at the single cell level. The normal and abnormal mechanical properties of a given cell type can be established with the aid of an atomic force microscope (AFM), nonetheless, consistency in the area of the tip has been a mayor limitation of using the AFM for quantitative measurements of mechanical properties. This project attempts to overcome this limitation by using materials with a known elastic modulus, which resembles the one of the cell, to create force-deformation curves to calculate the area of indentation by means of Hooke s Law (sigma = E(epsilon)), which states that stress (sigma) is proportional to the strain (epsilon) where the constant of proportionality, E, is called the Young s modulus, also referred as the elastic modulus. Hook s Law can be rearranged to find the area of indentation (Area= Force/ E(epsilon)), where the indentation force is defined by the means of the added mass spring calibration method.

  18. Stem cell applications for pathologies of the urinary bladder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    New stem cell based therapies are undergoing intenseresearch and are widely investigated in clinical fieldsincluding the urinary system. The urinary bladderperforms critical complex functions that rely on its highlycoordinated anatomical composition and multiplex ofregulatory mechanisms. Bladder pathologies resulting insevere dysfunction are common clinical encounter andoften cause significant impairment of patient's quality oflife. Current surgical and medical interventions to correcturinary dysfunction or to replace an absent or defectivebladder are sub-optimal and are associated with notablecomplications. As a result, stem cell based therapiesfor the urinary bladder are hoped to offer new venuesthat could make up for limitations of existing therapies.In this article, we review research efforts that describethe use of different types of stem cells in bladderreconstruction, urinary incontinence and retentiondisorders. In particular, stress urinary incontinence hasbeen a popular target for stem cell based therapiesin reported clinical trials. Furthermore, we discuss therelevance of the cancer stem cell hypothesis to thedevelopment of bladder cancer. A key subject thatshould not be overlooked is the safety and quality ofstem cell based therapies introduced to human subjectseither in a research or a clinical context.

  19. What understanding tendon cell differentiation can teach us about pathological tendon ossification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magne, D; Bougault, C

    2015-08-01

    Tendons are the structures that attach muscles to bones and transmit mechanical forces. Tendon cells are composed of mature tenocytes and a rare population of tendon stem cells. Both cell types ensure homeostasis and repair of tendon extracellular matrix to guarantee its specific mechanical properties. Moreover, tendon cells seem to present a marked potential for trans-differentiation, predominantly into the chondrocyte and osteoblast lineages. In this review article, we first present chronic tendon pathologies associated with abnormal ossification, such as spondyloarthritis and calcifying tendinopathy, and discuss how tendon cell differentiation and trans-differentiation may participate in these diseases. We moreover present the factors known to influence tendon cell differentiation and trans-differentiation, with a particular emphasis on extracellular environment, mechanical stimulation and several soluble factors that can tip the balance toward one or another lineage. A better understanding of the neglected tendon cell biology may be extremely useful to understand the pathological mechanisms of spondyloarthritis and calcifying tendinopathy.

  20. Immunogenetics and the Pathological Mechanisms of Human T-Cell Leukemia Virus Type 1- (HTLV-1-Associated Myelopathy/Tropical Spastic Paraparesis (HAM/TSP

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    Mineki Saito

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1 is a replication-competent human retrovirus associated with two distinct types of disease only in a minority of infected individuals: the malignancy known as adult T-cell leukemia (ATL and a chronic inflammatory central nervous system disease HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP. Although the factors that cause these different manifestations of HTLV-1 infection are not fully understood, accumulating evidence suggests that complex virus-host interactions play an important role in determining the risk of HAM/TSP. This review focuses on the role of the immune response in controlling or limiting viral persistence in HAM/TSP patients, and the reason why some HTLV-1-infected people develop HAM/TSP whereas the majority remains asymptomatic carriers of the virus.

  1. Radiation-Induced Heart Disease: Pathologic Abnormalities and Putative Mechanisms

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    Neil K Taunk

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is a common diagnosis in women. Breast radiation has become a critical in managing patients who receive breast conserving surgery, or have certain high-risk features after mastectomy. Most patients have an excellent prognosis, therefore understanding the late effects of radiation to the chest is important. Radiation induced heart disease (RIHD comprises a spectrum of cardiac pathology including myocardial fibrosis and cardiomyopathy, coronary artery disease, valvular disease, pericardial disease, and arrhythmias. Tissue fibrosis is a common mediator in RIHD. Multiple pathways converge with both acute and chronic cellular, molecular, and genetic changes to result in fibrosis. In this article, we review the pathophysiology of cardiac disease related to radiation therapy to the chest. Our understanding of these mechanisms has improved substantially, but much work remains to further refine radiation delivery techniques and develop therapeutics to battle late effects of radiation.

  2. Pathological modifications of plant stem cell destiny

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    In higher plants, the shoot apex contains undifferentiated stem cells that give rise to various tissues and organs. The fate of these stem cells determines the pattern of plant growth as well as reproduction; and such fate is genetically preprogrammed. We found that a bacterial infection can derai...

  3. Cell mechanics: a dialogue

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    Tao, Jiaxiang; Li, Yizeng; Vig, Dhruv K.; Sun, Sean X.

    2017-03-01

    Under the microscope, eukaryotic animal cells can adopt a variety of different shapes and sizes. These cells also move and deform, and the physical mechanisms driving these movements and shape changes are important in fundamental cell biology, tissue mechanics, as well as disease biology. This article reviews some of the basic mechanical concepts in cells, emphasizing continuum mechanics description of cytoskeletal networks and hydrodynamic flows across the cell membrane. We discuss how cells can generate movement and shape changes by controlling mass fluxes at the cell boundary. These mass fluxes can come from polymerization/depolymerization of actin cytoskeleton, as well as osmotic and hydraulic pressure-driven flow of water across the cell membrane. By combining hydraulic pressure control with force balance conditions at the cell surface, we discuss a quantitative mechanism of cell shape and volume control. The broad consequences of this model on cell mechanosensation and tissue mechanics are outlined.

  4. Mechanics rules cell biology

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    Wang James HC

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cells in the musculoskeletal system are subjected to various mechanical forces in vivo. Years of research have shown that these mechanical forces, including tension and compression, greatly influence various cellular functions such as gene expression, cell proliferation and differentiation, and secretion of matrix proteins. Cells also use mechanotransduction mechanisms to convert mechanical signals into a cascade of cellular and molecular events. This mini-review provides an overview of cell mechanobiology to highlight the notion that mechanics, mainly in the form of mechanical forces, dictates cell behaviors in terms of both cellular mechanobiological responses and mechanotransduction.

  5. Physiological Function and Pathological Mechanisms of Liver Sinusoidal Endothelial Cell%肝窦内皮细胞生理功能及病理过程的分子机制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    劳远翔; 贺福初; 姜颖

    2012-01-01

    Liver sinusoidal endothelial cell ( LSEC ) is a main population of liver non-parenchymal cells. LSEC has a number of important functions, such as filtration, phagocytosis, antigen presentation, immune tolerance. When liver is invaded by a variety of pathogens, LSECs lose fenestrations and form an underlying basement membrane, which are the characteristics of continuous endothelial cells, this process was called capillarization. LSEC capillarization is a complex life activity induced by several factors, and exists in the early stage of diverse liver diseases, thus attracted much attention on such a study. Herein, the research progress in the studies on the physiological function of LSEC and the molecular mechanisms of sinusoidal endothelial cell pathology were introduced in detail. First, the function of LSEC was summarized. Second, in addition to studies on the mechanisms of sinusoidal capillarization, the roles of sinusoidal capillarization in the mechanisms of diverse liver diseases were also showed. Finally, It would hopeful that this review can help to promote the studies on sinusoidal endothelial cells.%肝窦内皮细胞(liver sinusoidal endothelial cell,LSEC)是肝非实质细胞的主要细胞群,具有物质转运、吞噬、抗原提呈、免疫耐受等功能.肝在遭到多种病原侵袭时,肝窦内皮细胞窗孔逐渐减少或消失,内皮下基膜形成,产生类似于连续型毛细血管的结构,这一过程称为肝窦毛细血管化.它由多种因素引起,其过程极复杂,在多种肝病的发病前期阶段均有出现,近年来受到广泛关注.而目前关于肝窦内皮细胞的生理功能及病理机制研究方面的系统总结仍少有报道.本文对肝窦内皮细胞的生理功能及肝窦病理机制作一较为全面的综述.除了阐述肝窦毛细血管化自身分子机制的研究进展外,还重点介绍了肝窦毛细血管化参与肝多种疾病发病过程的作用机制.此外,对肝窦内皮细胞相关的研究

  6. Physiological and pathological factors and mechanisms in the process of root resorption in primary teeth

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    Bianca Zimmermann Santos

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Tooth resorption is essential in the process of root resorption in primary teeth. However, pathological root resorption, mainly the inflammatory one, is a consequence and/or complication of several clinical conditions, such as dental trauma and periapical inflammatory lesions from dental caries, thus becoming a common cause of tooth loss. Objective: To present and discuss a literature review regarding the mechanisms of physiological and inflammatory pathological root resorption in primary teeth, emphasizing their biochemical and cellular events. Literature review: The odontoclasts cells are responsible for resorption of dental tissues, and they are influenced by several stimuli and molecular signals derived from cytokines, neuropeptides, hormones and degradation products released when tissue is injured. However, so far it is not clear what leads to the differentiation of the precursor cells of odontoclasts, what gives them the signal to start the resorption in a specific place and time (especially in primary teeth and why they are activated in some pathological conditions,but not in others.Conclusion: The knowledge regarding molecular mechanisms and factors that regulate the process of root resorption is still meager.Research in this area is of great relevance,since new knowledge about the molecular pathway(s involved in root resorption may allow the development of different therapies, more biological ones, in order to control or prevent resorption, thus preventing tooth loss and its consequences.

  7. Molecular modifiers reveal a mechanism of pathological crystal growth inhibition

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    Chung, Jihae; Granja, Ignacio; Taylor, Michael G.; Mpourmpakis, Giannis; Asplin, John R.; Rimer, Jeffrey D.

    2016-08-01

    Crystalline materials are crucial to the function of living organisms, in the shells of molluscs, the matrix of bone, the teeth of sea urchins, and the exoskeletons of coccoliths. However, pathological biomineralization can be an undesirable crystallization process associated with human diseases. The crystal growth of biogenic, natural and synthetic materials may be regulated by the action of modifiers, most commonly inhibitors, which range from small ions and molecules to large macromolecules. Inhibitors adsorb on crystal surfaces and impede the addition of solute, thereby reducing the rate of growth. Complex inhibitor-crystal interactions in biomineralization are often not well elucidated. Here we show that two molecular inhibitors of calcium oxalate monohydrate crystallization—citrate and hydroxycitrate—exhibit a mechanism that differs from classical theory in that inhibitor adsorption on crystal surfaces induces dissolution of the crystal under specific conditions rather than a reduced rate of crystal growth. This phenomenon occurs even in supersaturated solutions where inhibitor concentration is three orders of magnitude less than that of the solute. The results of bulk crystallization, in situ atomic force microscopy, and density functional theory studies are qualitatively consistent with a hypothesis that inhibitor-crystal interactions impart localized strain to the crystal lattice and that oxalate and calcium ions are released into solution to alleviate this strain. Calcium oxalate monohydrate is the principal component of human kidney stones and citrate is an often-used therapy, but hydroxycitrate is not. For hydroxycitrate to function as a kidney stone treatment, it must be excreted in urine. We report that hydroxycitrate ingested by non-stone-forming humans at an often-recommended dose leads to substantial urinary excretion. In vitro assays using human urine reveal that the molecular modifier hydroxycitrate is as effective an inhibitor of nucleation

  8. Parkinson disease: from pathology to molecular disease mechanisms.

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    Dexter, David T; Jenner, Peter

    2013-09-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a complex neurodegenerative disorder with both motor and nonmotor symptoms owing to a spreading process of neuronal loss in the brain. At present, only symptomatic treatment exists and nothing can be done to halt the degenerative process, as its cause remains unclear. Risk factors such as aging, genetic susceptibility, and environmental factors all play a role in the onset of the pathogenic process but how these interlink to cause neuronal loss is not known. There have been major advances in the understanding of mechanisms that contribute to nigral dopaminergic cell death, including mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, altered protein handling, and inflammation. However, it is not known if the same processes are responsible for neuronal loss in nondopaminergic brain regions. Many of the known mechanisms of cell death are mirrored in toxin-based models of PD, but neuronal loss is rapid and not progressive and limited to dopaminergic cells, and drugs that protect against toxin-induced cell death have not translated into neuroprotective therapies in humans. Gene mutations identified in rare familial forms of PD encode proteins whose functions overlap widely with the known molecular pathways in sporadic disease and these have again expanded our knowledge of the neurodegenerative process but again have so far failed to yield effective models of sporadic disease when translated into animals. We seem to be missing some key parts of the jigsaw, the trigger event starting many years earlier in the disease process, and what we are looking at now is merely part of a downstream process that is the end stage of neuronal death.

  9. Novel mechanism of arenavirus-induced liver pathology.

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    Juliane I Beier

    Full Text Available Viral hemorrhagic fevers (VHFs encompass a group of diseases with cardinal symptoms of fever, hemorrhage, and shock. The liver is a critical mediator of VHF disease pathogenesis and high levels of ALT/AST transaminases in plasma correlate with poor prognosis. In fact, Lassa Fever (LF, the most prevalent VHF in Africa, was initially clinically described as hepatitis. Previous studies in non-human primate (NHP models also correlated LF pathogenesis with a robust proliferative response in the liver. The purpose of the current study was to gain insight into the mechanism of liver injury and to determine the potential role of proliferation in LF pathogenesis. C57Bl/6J mice were infected with either the pathogenic (for NHPs strain of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV, the prototypic arenavirus, LCMV-WE, or with the non-pathogenic strain, LCMV-ARM. As expected, LCMV-WE, but not ARM, caused a hepatitis-like infection. LCMV-WE also induced a robust increase in the number of actively cycling hepatocytes. Despite this increase in proliferation, there was no significant difference in liver size between LCMV-WE and LCMV-ARM, suggesting that cell cycle was incomplete. Indeed, cells appeared arrested in the G1 phase and LCMV-WE infection increased the number of hepatocytes that were simultaneously stained for proliferation and apoptosis. LCMV-WE infection also induced expression of a non-conventional virus receptor, AXL-1, from the TAM (TYRO3/AXL/MERTK family of receptor tyrosine kinases and this expression correlated with proliferation. Taken together, these results shed new light on the mechanism of liver involvement in VHF pathogenesis. Specifically, it is hypothesized that the induction of hepatocyte proliferation contributes to expansion of the infection to parenchymal cells. Elevated levels of plasma transaminases are likely explained, at least in part, by abortive cell cycle arrest induced by the infection. These results may lead to the

  10. Update in large cell lymphoma: understanding the pathology report.

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    Hsi, Eric D

    2015-01-01

    The diffuse aggressive large B-cell lymphomas are a heterogeneous group of B-cell malignancies. Although many are readily recognized due to characteristic clinical and pathologic features, several problematic areas still exist in diagnosis of these lymphomas due to a variety of reasons that include imprecise or difficult-to-apply diagnostic criteria, gaps in our understanding of lymphoma biology, and limitations in technologies available in the clinical laboratory compared to the research laboratory. This may result in some degree of confusion in the pathology report, particularly if the issues are not clearly explained, leading to frustration or misinterpretation on the part of the reader. In this review, I will discuss the pathologic features of a subset of the WHO 2008 classification diffuse aggressive large B-cell lymphomas, focusing on areas in which difficulties exist in diagnosis and/or biomarker marker assessment. A deeper understanding of the issues and areas of uncertainty due to limitations in our knowledge about the biology of these diseases should lead to better communication between pathologists and clinicians.

  11. Natural killer T (NKT cells accelerate Shiga toxin type 2 (Stx2 pathology in mice

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    Fumiko eObata

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC is a leading cause of childhood renal disease He-molytic Uremic Syndrome (HUS. The involvement of renal cytokines and chemokines is sus-pected to play a critical role in disease progression. In current article, we tested the hypothesis that NKT cells are involved in Stx2-induced pathology in vivo. To address this hypothesis we compared Stx2 toxicity in WT and CD1 knockout (KO mice. In CD1KO mice, which lack nat-ural killer T (NKT cells, Stx2-induced pathologies such as weight loss, renal failure, and death were delayed. In WT mice, Stx2-specific selective increase in urinary albumin occurs in later time points, and this was also delayed in NKT cell deficient mice. NKT cell-associated cytokines such as IL-2, IL-4, IFN-γ and IL-17 were detected in kidney lysates of Stx2-injected WT mice with the peak around 36 h after Stx2 injection. In CD1KO, there was a delay in the kinetics, and increases in these cytokines were observed 60 h post Stx2 injection. These data suggest that NKT cells accelerate Stx2-induced pathology in mouse kidneys. To determine the mechanism by which NKT cells promote Stx2-associated disease, in vitro studies were performed using murine renal cells. We found that murine glomerular endothelial cells and podocytes express functional CD1d molecules and can present exogenous antigen to NKT cells. Moreover, we observed the direct interaction between Stx2 and the receptor Gb3 on the surface of mouse renal cells by 3D STORM-TIRF which provides single molecule imaging. Collectively, these data suggest that Stx2 binds to Gb3 on renal cells and leads to aberrant CD1d-mediated NKT cell activation. Therefore, strategies targeting NKT cells could have a significant impact on Stx2-associated renal pathology in STEC disease.

  12. Mechanical plasticity of cells

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    Bonakdar, Navid; Gerum, Richard; Kuhn, Michael; Spörrer, Marina; Lippert, Anna; Schneider, Werner; Aifantis, Katerina E.; Fabry, Ben

    2016-10-01

    Under mechanical loading, most living cells show a viscoelastic deformation that follows a power law in time. After removal of the mechanical load, the cell shape recovers only incompletely to its original undeformed configuration. Here, we show that incomplete shape recovery is due to an additive plastic deformation that displays the same power-law dynamics as the fully reversible viscoelastic deformation response. Moreover, the plastic deformation is a constant fraction of the total cell deformation and originates from bond ruptures within the cytoskeleton. A simple extension of the prevailing viscoelastic power-law response theory with a plastic element correctly predicts the cell behaviour under cyclic loading. Our findings show that plastic energy dissipation during cell deformation is tightly linked to elastic cytoskeletal stresses, which suggests the existence of an adaptive mechanism that protects the cell against mechanical damage.

  13. Consensus paper: pathological mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration in spinocerebellar ataxias.

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    Matilla-Dueñas, A; Ashizawa, T; Brice, A; Magri, S; McFarland, K N; Pandolfo, M; Pulst, S M; Riess, O; Rubinsztein, D C; Schmidt, J; Schmidt, T; Scoles, D R; Stevanin, G; Taroni, F; Underwood, B R; Sánchez, I

    2014-04-01

    Intensive scientific research devoted in the recent years to understand the molecular mechanisms or neurodegeneration in spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) are identifying new pathways and targets providing new insights and a better understanding of the molecular pathogenesis in these diseases. In this consensus manuscript, the authors discuss their current views on the identified molecular processes causing or modulating the neurodegenerative phenotype in spinocerebellar ataxias with the common opinion of translating the new knowledge acquired into candidate targets for therapy. The following topics are discussed: transcription dysregulation, protein aggregation, autophagy, ion channels, the role of mitochondria, RNA toxicity, modulators of neurodegeneration and current therapeutic approaches. Overall point of consensus includes the common vision of neurodegeneration in SCAs as a multifactorial, progressive and reversible process, at least in early stages. Specific points of consensus include the role of the dysregulation of protein folding, transcription, bioenergetics, calcium handling and eventual cell death with apoptotic features of neurons during SCA disease progression. Unresolved questions include how the dysregulation of these pathways triggers the onset of symptoms and mediates disease progression since this understanding may allow effective treatments of SCAs within the window of reversibility to prevent early neuronal damage. Common opinions also include the need for clinical detection of early neuronal dysfunction, for more basic research to decipher the early neurodegenerative process in SCAs in order to give rise to new concepts for treatment strategies and for the translation of the results to preclinical studies and, thereafter, in clinical practice.

  14. Developments in the pathology of penile squamous cell carcinomas.

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    Chaux, Alcides; Velazquez, Elsa F; Algaba, Ferran; Ayala, Gustavo; Cubilla, Antonio L

    2010-08-01

    Most penile cancers are squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) originating in the epithelium covering glans, coronal sulcus, and foreskin. Several histologic subtypes have been described, each with distinctive clinicopathologic and outcome features. The most common subtype is the usual SCC, representing one half to two thirds of penile carcinomas. Penile verruciform tumors encompass verrucous, warty (condylomatous), and papillary, not otherwise specified, carcinomas. As a group, verruciform tumors are low grade, with low metastatic and mortality rates. In contrast, basaloid and sarcomatoid carcinomas are among the most aggressive penile tumors. Other SCC variants, such as carcinoma cuniculatum and pseudohyperplastic, adenosquamous and acantholytic carcinomas, are rare. The most relevant clinicopathologic and outcome features are outlined for each of these SCC subtypes, and an algorithm that might aid the pathologist in the histologic classification is presented. In addition, recommendations for handling penile cancer specimens, frozen section specimens, and pathology reports are provided.

  15. Pathological cyclic strain-induced apoptosis in human periodontal ligament cells through the RhoGDIα/caspase-3/PARP pathway.

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    Li Wang

    Full Text Available AIM: Human periodontal ligament (PDL cells incur changes in morphology and express proteins in response to cyclic strain. However, it is not clear whether cyclic strain, especially excessive cyclic strain, induces PDL cell apoptosis and if so, what mechanism(s are responsible. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the molecular mechanisms by which pathological levels of cyclic strain induce human PDL cell apoptosis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Human PDL cells were obtained from healthy premolar tissue. After three to five passages in culture, the cells were subjected to 20% cyclic strain at a frequency of 0.1 Hz for 6 or 24 h using an FX-5000T system. Morphological changes of the cells were assessed by inverted phase-contrast microscopy, and apoptosis was detected by fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC-conjugated annexin V and propidium iodide staining followed by flow cytometry. Protein expression was evaluated by Western blot analysis. RESULTS: The number of apoptotic human PDL cells increased in a time-dependent manner in response to pathological cyclic strain. The stretched cells were oriented parallel to each another with their long axes perpendicular to the strain force vector. Cleaved caspase-3 and poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP protein levels increased in response to pathological cyclic strain over time, while Rho GDP dissociation inhibitor alpha (RhoGDIα decreased. Furthermore, knock-down of RhoGDIα by targeted siRNA transfection increased stretch-induced apoptosis and upregulated cleaved caspase-3 and PARP protein levels. Inhibition of caspase-3 prevented stretch-induced apoptosis, but did not change RhoGDIα protein levels. CONCLUSION: The overall results suggest that pathological-level cyclic strain not only influenced morphology but also induced apoptosis in human PDL cells through the RhoGDIα/caspase-3/PARP pathway. Our findings provide novel insight into the mechanism of apoptosis induced by pathological cyclic strain in

  16. Mechanisms of tumor cell necrosis.

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    Proskuryakov, Sergey Y; Gabai, Vladimir L

    2010-01-01

    Until recently, necrosis, unlike apoptosis, was considered as passive and unregulated form of cell death. However, during the last decade a number of experimental data demonstrated that, except under extreme conditions, necrosis may be a well-regulated process activated by rather specific physiological and pathological stimuli. In this review, we consider mechanisms and the role of necrosis in tumor cells. It became recently clear that the major player in necrotic cascade is a protein kinase RIP1, which can be activated by number of stumuli including TNF, TRAIL, and LPS, oxidative stress, or DNA damage (via poly-ADP-ribose polymerase). RIP1 kinase directly (or indirectly via another kinase JNK) transduces signal to mitochondria and causes specific damage (mitochondrial permeability transition). Mitochondrial collapse activates various proteases (e.g., calpains, cathepsin) and phospholipases, and eventually leads to plasma membrane destruction, a hallmark of necrotic cell death. Necrosis, in contrast to apoptosis, usually evokes powerful inflammatory response, which may participate in tumor regression during anticancer therapy. On the other hand, excessive spontaneous necrosis during tumor development may lead to more aggressive tumors due to stimulatory role of necrosis-induced inflammation on their growth.

  17. The Pathology of T Cells in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

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    Anselm Mak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is characterized by the production of a wide array of autoantibodies. Thus, the condition was traditionally classified as a “B-cell disease”. Compelling evidence has however shown that without the assistance of the helper T lymphocytes, it is indeed difficult for the “helpless” B cells to become functional enough to trigger SLE-related inflammation. T cells have been recognized to be crucial in the pathogenicity of SLE through their capabilities to communicate with and offer enormous help to B cells for driving autoantibody production. Recently, a number of phenotypic and functional alterations which increase the propensity to trigger lupus-related inflammation have been identified in lupus T cells. Here, potential mechanisms involving alterations in T-cell receptor expressions, postreceptor downstream signalling, epigenetics, and oxidative stress which favour activation of lupus T cells will be discussed. Additionally, how regulatory CD4+, CD8+, and γδ T cells tune down lupus-related inflammation will be highlighted. Lastly, while currently available outcomes of clinical trials evaluating therapeutic agents which manipulate the T cells such as calcineurin inhibitors indicate that they are at least as efficacious and safe as conventional immunosuppressants in treating lupus glomerulonephritis, larger clinical trials are undoubtedly required to validate these as-yet favourable findings.

  18. Energy change in the formation of conjugated bilirubin: A possible responsive mechanism for liver cell pathology Cambio energético durante la conjugación de la bilirrubina: un posible mecanismo de lesión hepatocelular

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    V. Wiwanitkit

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Bilirubin is formed when red blood cells die and their hemoglobin is broken down within the macrophages into heme and globins. In the liver, bilirubin is conjugated with UDP-glucuronate, making it water-soluble diglucuronide. Concerning this conjugation, a molecule of bilirubin reacts with two molecules of glucoronic acid. However, the nature of this energy-consuming reaction in the formation of conjugated bilirubin has never been reported, and this can be important for its potential implication in hyperbilirubinemia. In this work, the author calculated the energy required by conjugated-bilirubin formation per molecule. The energy required for complex formation is -22 kCal/mol. The nature of this energy-producing reaction can be a good explanation. Increased energy delivery in conjugated hyperbilirubinemia in liver disease might be a responsive mechanism to hepatic damage.

  19. Glioma-initiating cells and molecular pathology: implications for therapy.

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    Natsume, Atsushi; Kinjo, Sayano; Yuki, Kanako; Kato, Takenori; Ohno, Masasuke; Motomura, Kazuya; Iwami, Kenichiro; Wakabayashi, Toshihiko

    2011-02-01

    There is now compelling evidence that gliomas harbor a small population of cells, termed glioma-initiating cells (GICs), characterized by their ability to undergo self-renewal and initiate tumorigenesis. The development of therapeutic strategies targeted toward GIC signaling may improve the treatment of malignant gliomas. The characterization of GICs provides a clue to elucidating histological heterogeneity and treatment failure. The role of the stem cell marker CD133 in the initiation and progression of brain tumors is still uncertain. Here, we review some of the signaling mechanisms involved in GIC biology, such as phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN), sonic hedgehog, Notch, and WNT signaling pathways, maternal embryonic leucine-zipper kinase (MELK), BMI1, and Janus kinase signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK-STAT) signaling. In addition, we discuss the role of microRNAs in GICs by focusing on microRNA-21 regulation by type I interferon.

  20. Cell mechanics: integrating cell responses to mechanical stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janmey, Paul A; McCulloch, Christopher A

    2007-01-01

    Forces are increasingly recognized as major regulators of cell structure and function, and the mechanical properties of cells are essential to the mechanisms by which cells sense forces, transmit them to the cell interior or to other cells, and transduce them into chemical signals that impact a spectrum of cellular responses. Comparison of the mechanical properties of intact cells with those of the purified cytoskeletal biopolymers that are thought to dominate their elasticity reveal the extent to which the studies of purified systems can account for the mechanical properties of the much more heterogeneous and complex cell. This review summarizes selected aspects of current work on cell mechanics with an emphasis on the structures that are activated in cell-cell contacts, that regulate ion flow across the plasma membrane, and that may sense fluid flow that produces low levels of shear stress.

  1. Phospholipases of Mineralization Competent Cells and Matrix Vesicles: Roles in Physiological and Pathological Mineralizations

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    René Buchet

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The present review aims to systematically and critically analyze the current knowledge on phospholipases and their role in physiological and pathological mineralization undertaken by mineralization competent cells. Cellular lipid metabolism plays an important role in biological mineralization. The physiological mechanisms of mineralization are likely to take place in tissues other than in bones and teeth under specific pathological conditions. For instance, vascular calcification in arteries of patients with renal failure, diabetes mellitus or atherosclerosis recapitulates the mechanisms of bone formation. Osteoporosis—a bone resorbing disease—and rheumatoid arthritis originating from the inflammation in the synovium are also affected by cellular lipid metabolism. The focus is on the lipid metabolism due to the effects of dietary lipids on bone health. These and other phenomena indicate that phospholipases may participate in bone remodelling as evidenced by their expression in smooth muscle cells, in bone forming osteoblasts, chondrocytes and in bone resorbing osteoclasts. Among various enzymes involved, phospholipases A1 or A2, phospholipase C, phospholipase D, autotaxin and sphingomyelinase are engaged in membrane lipid remodelling during early stages of mineralization and cell maturation in mineralization-competent cells. Numerous experimental evidences suggested that phospholipases exert their action at various stages of mineralization by affecting intracellular signaling and cell differentiation. The lipid metabolites—such as arachidonic acid, lysophospholipids, and sphingosine-1-phosphate are involved in cell signaling and inflammation reactions. Phospholipases are also important members of the cellular machinery engaged in matrix vesicle (MV biogenesis and exocytosis. They may favour mineral formation inside MVs, may catalyse MV membrane breakdown necessary for the release of mineral deposits into extracellular matrix (ECM, or

  2. Chitin recognition via chitotriosidase promotes pathologic type-2 helper T cell responses to cryptococcal infection.

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    Darin L Wiesner

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary mycoses are often associated with type-2 helper T (Th2 cell responses. However, mechanisms of Th2 cell accumulation are multifactorial and incompletely known. To investigate Th2 cell responses to pulmonary fungal infection, we developed a peptide-MHCII tetramer to track antigen-specific CD4+ T cells produced in response to infection with the fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans. We noted massive accruement of pathologic cryptococcal antigen-specific Th2 cells in the lungs following infection that was coordinated by lung-resident CD11b+ IRF4-dependent conventional dendritic cells. Other researchers have demonstrated that this dendritic cell subset is also capable of priming protective Th17 cell responses to another pulmonary fungal infection, Aspergillus fumigatus. Thus, higher order detection of specific features of fungal infection by these dendritic cells must direct Th2 cell lineage commitment. Since chitin-containing parasites commonly elicit Th2 responses, we hypothesized that recognition of fungal chitin is an important determinant of Th2 cell-mediated mycosis. Using C. neoformans mutants or purified chitin, we found that chitin abundance impacted Th2 cell accumulation and disease. Importantly, we determined Th2 cell induction depended on cleavage of chitin via the mammalian chitinase, chitotriosidase, an enzyme that was also prevalent in humans experiencing overt cryptococcosis. The data presented herein offers a new perspective on fungal disease susceptibility, whereby chitin recognition via chitotriosidase leads to the initiation of harmful Th2 cell differentiation by CD11b+ conventional dendritic cells in response to pulmonary fungal infection.

  3. B-cell lymphomas with features intermediate between distinct pathologic entities. From pathogenesis to pathology.

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    Carbone, Antonino; Gloghini, Annunziata; Aiello, Antonella; Testi, Adele; Cabras, Antonello

    2010-05-01

    Published in September 2008, the updated World Health Organization Classification of Tumors of Hematopoietic and Lymphoid Tissues introduces provisional borderline categories for lymphoma cases that demonstrate overlapping clinical, morphological, and/or immunophenotypic features between well-established entities. These overlapping features pose real diagnostic challenges especially in identifying atypical cases of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, Hodgkin lymphoma, and Burkitt lymphoma. Lymphoma cases showing borderline features between T-cell/histiocyte-rich large B-cell lymphoma and nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphoma are not included within the borderline categories provisionally recognized by the updated classification. Within the borderline categories, there are cases combining features of primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma and classical Hodgkin lymphoma. Many of these cases resemble classical Hodgkin lymphoma but have a large number of tumor cells expressing CD20, CD45, and B-cell transcription factors. Alternatively, these cases may resemble primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma but contain tumor cells resembling Reed-Sternberg cells and displaying an aberrant phenotype such as CD20(-), CD15(-/+) CD45(+), CD30(+), Pax5(+), OCT2(+/-), and BOB1(+/-). Another new borderline category defining B-cell lymphoma, unclassifiable, with features intermediate between diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and Burkitt lymphoma, represents a biologically heterogeneous group. Cases with morphologic features intermediate and with CD10/BCL6 coexpression should be placed in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma/Burkitt lymphoma category if tumor cells also show strong BCL2 staining and/or a Ki67 proliferation index of less than 90%. When MYC rearrangements are present in these cases, the lymphomas often have atypical features, including concurrent rearrangements of BCL2 and/or BCL6 genes (so-called double/triple-hit lymphomas) and more aggressive behavior. For the

  4. Structure-mechanism-based engineering of chemical regulators targeting distinct pathological factors in Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Michael W.; Derrick, Jeffrey S.; Kerr, Richard A.; Oh, Shin Bi; Cho, Woo Jong; Lee, Shin Jung C.; Ji, Yonghwan; Han, Jiyeon; Tehrani, Zahra Aliakbar; Suh, Nayoung; Kim, Sujeong; Larsen, Scott D.; Kim, Kwang S.; Lee, Joo-Yong; Ruotolo, Brandon T.; Lim, Mi Hee

    2016-10-01

    The absence of effective therapeutics against Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a result of the limited understanding of its multifaceted aetiology. Because of the lack of chemical tools to identify pathological factors, investigations into AD pathogenesis have also been insubstantial. Here we report chemical regulators that demonstrate distinct specificity towards targets linked to AD pathology, including metals, amyloid-β (Aβ), metal-Aβ, reactive oxygen species, and free organic radicals. We obtained these chemical regulators through a rational structure-mechanism-based design strategy. We performed structural variations of small molecules for fine-tuning their electronic properties, such as ionization potentials and mechanistic pathways for reactivity towards different targets. We established in vitro and/or in vivo efficacies of the regulators for modulating their targets' reactivities, ameliorating toxicity, reducing amyloid pathology, and improving cognitive deficits. Our chemical tools show promise for deciphering AD pathogenesis and discovering effective drugs.

  5. Structure-mechanism-based engineering of chemical regulators targeting distinct pathological factors in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Michael W; Derrick, Jeffrey S; Kerr, Richard A; Oh, Shin Bi; Cho, Woo Jong; Lee, Shin Jung C; Ji, Yonghwan; Han, Jiyeon; Tehrani, Zahra Aliakbar; Suh, Nayoung; Kim, Sujeong; Larsen, Scott D; Kim, Kwang S; Lee, Joo-Yong; Ruotolo, Brandon T; Lim, Mi Hee

    2016-10-13

    The absence of effective therapeutics against Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a result of the limited understanding of its multifaceted aetiology. Because of the lack of chemical tools to identify pathological factors, investigations into AD pathogenesis have also been insubstantial. Here we report chemical regulators that demonstrate distinct specificity towards targets linked to AD pathology, including metals, amyloid-β (Aβ), metal-Aβ, reactive oxygen species, and free organic radicals. We obtained these chemical regulators through a rational structure-mechanism-based design strategy. We performed structural variations of small molecules for fine-tuning their electronic properties, such as ionization potentials and mechanistic pathways for reactivity towards different targets. We established in vitro and/or in vivo efficacies of the regulators for modulating their targets' reactivities, ameliorating toxicity, reducing amyloid pathology, and improving cognitive deficits. Our chemical tools show promise for deciphering AD pathogenesis and discovering effective drugs.

  6. Design of CMOS Based Image Sensor with Cantilever Mechanism for Smart Pathological Detection with Opto-Mechanical System

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    Rajeshlaik

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available patient immobilized on slide under the microscope is extracted with imaging device. Similar kind of setup is designed to detect object with analog transducer circuit system which the mines worker use torchlight over the helmet underground with 4.5 volt of light, with 1 watt bulb is sufficient our Eye can recognize the object, but with CFL it is more brighter in dark condition to detect the object. Here the biomechanical action of the miners Eye & brain coordination inside the mining region where it is very dark to focus the object, the inverter like headlight operates in this condition and helps him to work smoothly for his neural coordination works in balanced. Focal length inversely proportional to the magnification is required to clearly visualize any object, Physically when we see any object we move nearer or far-away and maintain the distance from the object, if any person cannot clearly identify they wear glass of varying power as per their disorder, Electronic CMOS Biosensor with signal conditioning OPAMP gives the strong power to the eye to visualize the image under the microscope converting the charge of APS into the voltage amplified in a nano-second time response. The inverting action of the Eye with 01,which is simulated for Photo-sensor circuit, with equivalent silicon-on-chip based CMOS combination. Thus the detection of cancer cells is very cheap and efficient way in pathological laboratory with CMOS microscope. Comparative studies makes the efficient detection of morphological features of gross tissue section of tumor Cells clearly detected when magnified under 40 x,with CMOS biosensor phototransistor. Patient requires to check his or her body weight, prior to pathological check up, therefore the weighing machine is the very important piezo convertor of mechanical energy of the body into weight and when the smart nano-mechanical cantilever sensor chip integrates with this machine the signal will be more fast .The PH paper as a

  7. Follicular helper T cells promote liver pathology in mice during Schistosoma japonicum infection.

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    Xiaojun Chen

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Following Schistosoma japonicum (S. japonicum infection, granulomatous responses are induced by parasite eggs trapped in host organs, particular in the liver, during the acute stage of disease. While excessive liver granulomatous responses can lead to more severe fibrosis and circulatory impairment in chronically infected host. However, the exact mechanism of hepatic granuloma formation has remained obscure. In this study, we for the first time showed that follicular helper T (Tfh cells are recruited to the liver to upregulate hepatic granuloma formation and liver injury in S. japonicum-infected mice, and identified a novel function of macrophages in Tfh cell induction. In addition, our results showed that the generation of Tfh cells driven by macrophages is dependent on cell-cell contact and the level of inducible costimulator ligand (ICOSL on macrophages which is regulated by CD40-CD40L signaling. Our findings uncovered a previously unappreciated role for Tfh cells in liver pathology caused by S. japonicum infection in mice.

  8. In vitro pathological modelling using patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells: the case of progeria.

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    Nissan, Xavier; Blondel, Sophie; Peschanski, Marc

    2011-12-01

    Progeria, also known as HGPS (Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome), is a rare fatal genetic disease characterized by an appearance of accelerated aging in children. This syndrome is typically caused by mutations in codon 608 (C1804T) of the gene encoding lamins A and C, LMNA, leading to the production of a truncated form of the protein called progerin. Owing to their unique potential to self-renew and to differentiate into any cell types of the organism, pluripotent stem cells offer a unique tool to study molecular and cellular mechanisms related to this global and systemic disease. Recent studies have exploited this potential by generating human induced pluripotent stem cells from HGPS patients' fibroblasts displaying several phenotypic defects characteristic of HGPS such as nuclear abnormalities, progerin expression, altered DNA-repair mechanisms and premature senescence. Altogether, these findings provide new insights on the use of pluripotent stem cells for pathological modelling and may open original therapeutic perspectives for diseases that lack pre-clinical in vitro human models, such as HGPS.

  9. Placental vascular pathology and increased thrombin generation as mechanisms of disease in obstetrical syndromes

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    Salvatore Andrea Mastrolia

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Obstetrical complications including preeclampsia, fetal growth restriction, preterm labor, preterm prelabor rupture of membranes and fetal demise are all the clinical endpoint of several underlying mechanisms (i.e., infection, inflammation, thrombosis, endocrine disorder, immunologic rejection, genetic, and environmental, therefore, they may be regarded as syndromes. Placental vascular pathology and increased thrombin generation were reported in all of these obstetrical syndromes. Moreover, elevated concentrations of thrombin-anti thrombin III complexes and changes in the coagulation as well as anticoagulation factors can be detected in the maternal circulation prior to the clinical development of the disease in some of these syndromes. In this review, we will assess the changes in the hemostatic system during normal and complicated pregnancy in maternal blood, maternal–fetal interface and amniotic fluid, and describe the contribution of thrombosis and vascular pathology to the development of the great obstetrical syndromes.

  10. Bone marrow-derived cells are differentially involved in pathological and physiological retinal angiogenesis in mice

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    Zou, He [Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Otani, Atsushi, E-mail: otan@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Oishi, Akio; Yodoi, Yuko; Kameda, Takanori; Kojima, Hiroshi; Yoshimura, Nagahisa [Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan)

    2010-01-08

    Purpose: Bone marrow-derived cells have been shown to play roles in angiogenesis. Although these cells have been shown to promote angiogenesis, it is not yet clear whether these cells affect all types of angiogenesis. This study investigated the involvement of bone marrow-derived cells in pathological and physiological angiogenesis in the murine retina. Materials and methods: The oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR) model was used as a retinal angiogenesis model in newborn mice. To block the influence of bone marrow-derived cells, the mice were irradiated with a 4-Gy dose of radiation from a {sup 137}Cs source. Irradiation was performed in four different conditions with radio dense 2-cm thick lead disks; (1) H group, the head were covered with these discs to protect the eyes from radiation; (2) A group, all of the body was covered with these discs; (3) N group, mice were completely unshielded; (4) C group, mice were put in the irradiator but were not irradiated. On P17, the retinal areas showing pathological and physiological retinal angiogenesis were measured and compared to the retinas of nonirradiated mice. Results: Although irradiation induced leukocyte depletion, it did not affect the number of other cell types or body weight. Retinal nonperfusion areas were significantly larger in irradiated mice than in control mice (P < 0.05), indicating that physiological angiogenesis was impaired. However, the formation of tuft-like angiogenesis processes was more prominent in the irradiated mice (P < 0.05), indicating that pathological angiogenesis was intact. Conclusions: Bone marrow-derived cells seem to be differentially involved in the formation of physiological and pathological retinal vessels. Pathological angiogenesis in the murine retina does not require functional bone marrow-derived cells, but these cells are important for the formation of physiological vessels. Our results add a new insight into the pathology of retinal angiogenesis and bolster the hypothesis that

  11. Pathology of porcine peripheral white blood cells during infection with African swine fever virus

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    Karalyan Zaven

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background African swine fever virus (ASFV is the causative agent of African swine fever (ASF that is the significant disease of domestic pigs. Several studies showed that ASFV can influence on porcine blood cells in vitro. Thus, we asked ourselves whether ASFV infection results in changes in porcine blood cells in vivo. A series of experiments were performed in order to investigate the effects of ASFV infection on porcine peripheral white blood cells. Nine pigs were inoculated by intramuscular injection with 104 50% hemadsorbing doses of virus (genotype II distributed in Armenia and Georgia. The total number of fifteen cell types was calculated during experimental infection. Results Although band-to-segmented neutrophils ratio became much higher (3.5 in infected pigs than in control group (0.3, marked neutropenia and lymphopenia were detected from 2 to 3 days post-infection. In addition to band neutrophils, the high number of other immature white blood cells, such as metamyelocytes, was observed during the course of infection. From the beginning of infection, atypical lymphocytes, with altered nuclear shape, arose and became 15% of total cells in the final phase of infection. Image scanning cytometry revealed hyperdiploid DNA content in atypical lymphocytes only from 5 days post-infection, indicating that DNA synthesis in pathological lymphocytes occurred in the later stages of infection. Conclusion From this study, it can be concluded that ASFV infection leads to serious changes in composition of white blood cells. Particularly, acute ASFV infection in vivo is accompanied with the emergence of immature cells and atypical lymphocytes in the host blood. The mechanisms underlying atypical cell formation remain to be elucidated.

  12. Mechanisms of diabetic neuropathy: Schwann cells.

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    Mizisin, Andrew P

    2014-01-01

    As ensheathing and secretory cells, Schwann cells are a ubiquitous and vital component of the endoneurial microenvironment of peripheral nerves. The interdependence of axons and their ensheathing Schwann cells predisposes each to the impact of injury in the other. Further, the dependence of the blood-nerve interface on trophic support from Schwann cells during development, adulthood, and after injury suggests these glial cells promote the structural and functional integrity of nerve trunks. Here, the developmental origin, injury-induced changes, and mature myelinating and nonmyelinating phenotypes of Schwann cells are reviewed prior to a description of nerve fiber pathology and consideration of pathogenic mechanisms in human and experimental diabetic neuropathy. A fundamental role for aldose-reductase-containing Schwann cells in the pathogenesis of diabetic neuropathy, as well as the interrelationship of pathogenic mechanisms, is indicated by the sensitivity of hyperglycemia-induced biochemical alterations, such as polyol pathway flux, formation of reactive oxygen species, generation of advanced glycosylation end products (AGEs) and deficient neurotrophic support, to blocking polyol pathway flux.

  13. Size- and density-dependent elution of normal and pathological red blood cells by gravitational field-flow fractionation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardot, P J; Elgéa, C; Guernet, M; Godet, D; Andreux, J P

    1994-04-01

    Elution of normal and pathological human red blood cells (RBCs) was performed by gravitational field-flow fractionation (GFFF). The reproducibility of the retention factor was lower than 10% and elution at high and low flow-rates confirmed the existence of "lifting forces". No direct correlation between size and retention was observed for normal RBCs in the absence of density information. Elution of pathological human RBCs, known to be modified in shape, density and rigidity, was performed. The elution parameters confirmed that the retention mechanism of RBCs is at least density dependent but that other factors can be involved, such as shape or deformity. Moreover, peak profile description parameters (standard deviation and asymmetry) can be qualitatively related to some biophysical parameters. Numerous elution characteristics can be linked to cell properties described in the literature and although GFFF appeared to have limited capabilities in terms of size analysis it appeared to be a versatile tool for studying cell biophysical characteristics.

  14. Pathology of cell nucleus in the experimental morphogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maradi A. Burduli

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available There was conducted an experiment on the underbred stray dog. There was used blood plasma of a dog as a food area. The spermatids received from the dog’s seed are arranged in the food area. Under the pressure there is received their mutual assimilation. The received hibridoma is entered in the seed parks, which are previously sewed. After two weeks from starting of experiment, on the front wall of the stomach there are fixed some dense knots of different size. After 3 weeks from the beginning of experiment there was adopted the material, which was learned by electron microscopy method. As a result, there are received the morphogenesis by organizmodal growth tendency, there is characterized a tumor-specific cellular pathology.

  15. MR imaging of renal cell carcinoma: associations among signal intensity, tumor enhancement, and pathologic findings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yabuki T

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to compare the MR characteristics of renal cell carcinomas against histologic findings and to assess the correlations among signal intensity, tumor enhancement, and pathologic findings. Fifty-four patients (56 lesions were examined by MR imaging and then underwent partial or radical nephrectomy. The pathologic diagnosis of all lesions was renal cell carcinoma. All MR examinations were performed as dynamic studies using the same 1.5-T scanner. MR characteristics were compared against pathologic findings after resection, and the correlations among signal intensity, tumor enhancement, and pathologic findings were then assessed. A significant correlation was observed between tumor grade and tumor enhancement, with G3 lesions tending to show little enhancement. Regardless of the histologic classification, G3 tumors were found to contain highly heterotypic cancer cells and very few vessels by histopathologic examination. No significant correlations were noted between the other MR characteristics and pathologic findings. Renal cell carcinomas showing little enhancement tend to be highly malignant lesions based on the pathologic findings. Special consideration is required for these tumors with regard to the selection of surgical intervention and follow-up observation.

  16. Müller glial cells--the mediators of vascular disorders with vitreomacular interface pathology in diabetic maculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robaszkiewicz, Jacek; Chmielewska, Katarzyna; Figurska, Małgorzata; Wierzbowska, Joanna; Stankiewicz, Andrzej

    2010-01-01

    The key to identifying the type of diabetic maculopathy is determining the status of posterior vitreous adhesion. In the pathological state, the breakdown of the internal and external blood-retina barrier is evident, however the mechanism is usually complex. The common denominator for these disorders are Müller glial cells, which mediate in maintaining the blood-retina barrier by linking the vessels, neurons and the vitreous in anatomical network and into functional dependence. The breakdown of the blood-retina barrier results in proliferation of Müller cells. Molecular changes in these cells increase endothelial barrier properties, but also induce pathological processes on the vitreo-retinal junction, resulting in increased adhesiveness of the collagen fibers of vitreous to retinal internal limiting membrane. The ability of Müller cells to reactive gliosis is influenced by the healthy functioning of the retinal pigment epithelium, which is a source of trophic factors necessary for appropriate Müller cells morphogenesis. Vitrectomy with the removal of ILM eliminates the vitreofoveal interface pathology, additionally provoking reactive gliosis within the macula. Intraoperative use of anti-VEGF supports short-term tightness of the blood-retina barrier in the perioperative neuralgic period. In the future, supplying astrocytes may be a strategy that will allow not only the inhibition of pathological neovascularization but also the restoration of the physiological network of capillaries in avascular retina areas. The delivery of recombinant PEDF allows for the recovery of Müller cells, and thus creates the conditions favourable for the survival of nerve cells in loss of retinal homeostasis.

  17. Tumor necrosis factor alpha production from CD8+ T cells mediates oviduct pathological sequelae following primary genital Chlamydia muridarum infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Ashlesh K; Li, Weidang; Chaganty, Bharat K R; Kamalakaran, Sangamithra; Guentzel, M Neal; Seshu, J; Forsthuber, Thomas G; Zhong, Guangming; Arulanandam, Bernard P

    2011-07-01

    The immunopathogenesis of Chlamydia trachomatis-induced oviduct pathological sequelae is not well understood. Mice genetically deficient in perforin (perforin(-/-) mice) or tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) production (TNF-α(-/-) mice) displayed comparable vaginal chlamydial clearance rates but significantly reduced oviduct pathology (hydrosalpinx) compared to that of wild-type mice. Since both perforin and TNF-α are effector mechanisms of CD8(+) T cells, we evaluated the role of CD8(+) T cells during genital Chlamydia muridarum infection and oviduct sequelae. Following vaginal chlamydial challenge, (i) mice deficient in TAP I (and therefore the major histocompatibility complex [MHC] I pathway and CD8(+) T cells), (ii) wild-type mice depleted of CD8(+) T cells, and (iii) mice genetically deficient in CD8 (CD8(-/-) mice) all displayed similar levels of vaginal chlamydial clearance but significantly reduced hydrosalpinx, compared to those of wild-type C57BL/6 mice, suggesting a role for CD8(+) T cells in chlamydial pathogenesis. Repletion of CD8(-/-) mice with wild-type or perforin(-/-), but not TNF-α(-/-), CD8(+) T cells at the time of challenge restored hydrosalpinx to levels observed in wild-type C57BL/6 mice, suggesting that TNF-α production from CD8(+) T cells is important for pathogenesis. Additionally, repletion of TNF-α(-/-) mice with TNF-α(+/+) CD8(+) T cells significantly enhanced the incidence of hydrosalpinx and oviduct dilatation compared to those of TNF-α(-/-) mice but not to the levels found in wild-type mice, suggesting that TNF-α production from CD8(+) T cells and non-CD8(+) cells cooperates to induce optimal oviduct pathology following genital chlamydial infection. These results provide compelling new evidence supporting the contribution of CD8(+) T cells and TNF-α production to Chlamydia-induced reproductive tract sequelae.

  18. Oxidative stress regulated genes in nigral dopaminergic neuronal cells: correlation with the known pathology in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Myung S; Chun, Hong S; Son, Jessica J; DeGiorgio, Lorraine A; Kim, Dae J; Peng, Chu; Son, Jin H

    2003-01-31

    Oxidative stress (OS) is a primary pathogenic mechanism of nigral dopaminergic (DA) cell death in Parkinson's disease (PD). Oxidative damage, Lewy body formation and decreased mitochondrial complex I activity are the consistent pathological findings in PD. In nigral DA neurons, however, it is unknown whether any gene expressional changes induced by OS contribute to the typical PD pathology. Here, using microarray analysis, we identified several groups of genes in the nigral DA cell line, SN4741 [J. Neurosci. 19 (1999) 10; J. Neurochem. 76 (2001) 1010], that were regulated by OS. Approximately 36 significantly regulated genes that encode functional molecules of nuclear subunits of mitochondrial complex I, exocytosis and membrane trafficking proteins, markers for OS and oxidoreductases, regulatory molecules of apoptosis and unidentified EST clones were further analysed. OS modulated the expression of specific genes, of which physiological dysfunctions have been implicated in PD. For instance, the expression of the nuclear-encoded subunits of mitochondrial complex I, B8 and B17, were significantly down-regulated by OS, possibly contributing to selective defect in mitochondrial complex I activity in PD. Furthermore, syntaxin 8 and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) are most dramatically up-regulated by OS in DA cells. Syntaxin 8 is a SNARE protein, regulating lipid vesicle docking and fusion as well as early endosome membrane recycling. Lipid membranes are significantly oxidative-damaged in PD. HO-1 is an important cytoplasmic constituent of Lewy bodies, a pathological hallmark of idiopathic PD. Thus, our findings provide novel molecular probes that may be useful in unraveling the molecular mechanism(s) of OS-induced pathogenesis in PD. Further functional characterization of the affected genes including ESTs can help elucidate the underlying molecular pathology as well as develop biomarkers for monitoring degenerating DA neurons in PD.

  19. Application of non-small cell lung cancer pleural effusion cell blocks in molecular pathological detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying Zhang; Nan Jiang; Dongdong Qian; Xiangzhou Li; Yu Zhou; Jia Mei; Xiaohui Cao

    2014-01-01

    Objective:The tumor tissues used in molecular pathological detection were usual y obtained by surgery, which would cause trauma and may not be suitable for the terminal cancer patients. This paper evaluated the value of the non-smal celllung cancer (NSCLC) pleural ef usion cellblocks as tumor tissues replacement materials in the application of molecular pathological detection. Methods: Tumor cells were made into cellblocks through stratified centrifugal from 30 NSCLC pa-tients with the pleural ef usion. The immunohistochemistry, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and gene sequencing methods were employed in our experiments. Results:The tumor cells of cellblock section were rich and could keep part of histological structure. Immunohistochemistry staining could assist diagnosis and tumor parting. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) FISH-positive was found in 33.33%of the group, high polysomy in 6 cases, amplification in 4 cases. EGFR gene mutations were found in 8 cases of 30 samples, with an incidence of 26.67%, 6 cases were detected in the exon 19, and 2 cases were detected in the exon 21. Conclusion:The NSCLC pleural ef usion cellblocks are useful for the diagnosis and determining the primary source of tumor, instructed targeted therapy.

  20. A review of novel optical imaging strategies of the stroke pathology and stem cell therapy in stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus eAswendt

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Transplanted stem cells can induce and enhance functional recovery in experimental stroke. Invasive analysis has been extensively used to provide detailed cellular and molecular characterization of the stroke pathology and engrafted stem cells. But post mortem analysis is not appropriate to reveal the time scale of the dynamic interplay between the cell graft, the ischemic lesion and the endogenous repair mechanisms. This review describes non-invasive imaging techniques which have been developed to provide complementary in vivo information. Recent advances were made in analyzing simultaneously different aspects of the cell graft (e.g. number of cells, viability state and cell fate, the ischemic lesion (e.g. blood brain barrier consistency, hypoxic and necrotic areas and the neuronal and vascular network. We focus on optical methods, which permit simple animal preparation, repetitive experimental conditions, relatively medium-cost instrumentation and are performed under mild anesthesia, thus nearly under physiological conditions. A selection of recent examples of optical intrinsic imaging, fluorescence imaging (FLI and bioluminescence imaging (BLI to characterize the stroke pathology and engrafted stem cells are discussed. Special attention is paid to novel optimal reporter genes/probes for genetic labeling and tracking of stem cells and appropriate transgenic animal models. Requirements, advantages and limitations of these imaging platforms are critically discussed and placed into the context of other non-invasive techniques, e.g. magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and positron emission tomography (PET, which can be joined with optical imaging in multimodal approaches.

  1. Pathological mechanisms of alcohol-induced hepatic portal hypertension in early stage fibrosis rat model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Li; Jian-Zhao Niu; Ji-Feng Wang; Yu Li; Xiao-Hua Tao

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To study the role of hepatic sinusoidal capillarization and perisinusoidal fibrosis in rats with alcohol-induced portal hypertension and to discuss the pathological mechanisms of alcohol-induced hepatic portal hypertension.METHODS: Fifty SD rats were divided into control group (n=20) and model group (n=30). Alcoholic liver fibrosis rat model was induced by intragastric infusion of a mixture containing alcohol, corn oil and pyrazole (1 000:250:3). Fifteen rats in each group were killed at wk 16. The diameter and pressure of portal vein were measured. Plasma hyaluronic acid (HA), type Ⅳ collagen (CoⅣ) and laminin (LN) were determined by radioimmunoassay. Liver tissue was fixed in formalin (10%) and 6-μm thick sectiors were routinely stained with Mallory and Sirius Red. Liver tissue was treated with rabbit polyclonal antibody against LN and ColⅣ. Hepatic non-parenchymal cells were isolated,total protein was extracted and separated by SDS-PAGE.MMP-2 and TIMP-1 protein expression was estimated by Western blotting.RESULTS: The diameter (2.207 ± 0.096 vs 1.528 ± 0.054 mm, P<0.01) and pressure (11.014±0.395 vs 8.533±0.274 mmHg, P<0.01) of portal vein were significantly higher in model group than those in the control group. Plasma HA (129.97±16.10 vs 73.09±2.38 ng/mL, P<0.01), ColⅣ (210.49±4.36 vs 89.65±4.42 ng/mL, P<0.01) and LN (105.00±7.29 vs 55.70±4.32 ng/mL, P<0.01) were upregulated in model group. Abundant collagen deposited around the central vein of lobules, hepatic sinusoids and hepatocytes in model group. ColⅠ and ColⅢ increased remarkably and perisinusoids were almost surrounded by ColⅢ.Immunohistochemical staining showed that ColⅣ protein level (0.130±0.007 vs 0.032±0.004, P<0.01) and LN protein level (0.152±0.005 vs 0.029±0.005, P<0.01)were up-regulated remarkably in model group. MMP-2 protein expression (2.306±1.089 vs 0.612±0.081,P<0.01) and TIMP-1 protein expression (3.015±1.364 vs 0.446±0.009, P<0

  2. Mediastinal germ cell tumors: a radiologic-pathologic review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drevelegas, A. [Dept. of Radiology, Aristoteles Univ., Thessaloniki (Greece); Palladas, P. [Dept. of Radiology, G. Papanicolaou Hospital, Thessaloniki (Greece); Scordalaki, A. [Dept. of Pathology, G. Papanicolaou Hospital, Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2001-10-01

    Germ cell tumors of the mediastinum are histologically identical to those found in the testes and ovaries. Early diagnosis and treatment improve the survival rate. Imaging studies of teratoma demonstrate a rounded, often lobulated heterogeneous mass containing soft tissue elements with fluid and fat attenuation. Calcification is present in 20-43% of cases. Seminomas are large masses of homogeneous soft tissue attenuation. Malignant nonseminomatous germ cell tumors are heterogeneous tumors with irregular borders due to invasion of adjacent structures. CT shows the location and extent of the tumors as well as intrinsic elements including soft tissue, fat, fluid, and calcification. CT is the modality of choice for the diagnostic evaluation of these tumors. MRI reveals masses of heterogeneous signal intensity, is more sensitive in depicting infiltration of the adjacent structures by fat plane obliteration, and is performed as an ancillary study. (orig.)

  3. The Microscope against Cell Theory: Cancer Research in Nineteenth-Century Parisian Anatomical Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loison, Laurent

    2016-07-01

    This paper examines the reception of cell theory in the field of French anatomical pathology. This reception is studied under the lens of the concept of the cancer cell, which was developed in Paris in the 1840s. In the medical field, cell theory was quickly accessible, understood, and discussed. In the wake of research by Hermann Lebert, the cancer cell concept was supported by a wealth of high-quality microscopic observations. The concept was constructed in opposition to cell theory, which appears retrospectively paradoxical and surprising. Indeed, the biological atomism inherent in cell theory, according to which the cell is the elementary unit of all organs of living bodies, appeared at the time incompatible with the possible existence of pathological cells without equivalent in healthy tissues. Thus, the postulate of atomism was used as an argument by Parisian clinicians who denied the value of the cancer cell. This study shows that at least in the field of anatomical pathology, cell theory did not directly result from the use of the microscope but was actually hindered by it.

  4. Gene Expression Analysis of Human Vascular Endothelial Cells Treated by Ouabain in Pathological Concentration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任延平; 吕卓人

    2004-01-01

    Objectives To study the gene expression of human vascular endothelial cells (HUVEC) treated by ouabain in pathological concentration. Methods The response of endothelial cells to ouabain of 1.8 nmol/L was explored with a complementary DNA microarray representing 8 464 different human genes. Results The results of mRNA profiles analysis indicated that 129 of the genes were differently expressed, 26 were upregulated. Conclusions The pathological role of ouabain on HUVEC may be involved in the controlling of DNA transcription、protein translation、 metabolism and signal transduction.

  5. In Vitro Model of Physiological and Pathological Blood Flow with Application to Investigations of Vascular Cell Remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Winston; Scott-Drechsel, Devon; Tan, Wei

    2015-11-03

    Vascular disease is a common cause of death within the United States. Herein, we present a method to examine the contribution of flow dynamics towards vascular disease pathologies. Unhealthy arteries often present with wall stiffening, scarring, or partial stenosis which may all affect fluid flow rates, and the magnitude of pulsatile flow, or pulsatility index. Replication of various flow conditions is the result of tuning a flow pressure damping chamber downstream of a blood pump. Introduction of air within a closed flow system allows for a compressible medium to absorb pulsatile pressure from the pump, and therefore vary the pulsatility index. The method described herein is simply reproduced, with highly controllable input, and easily measurable results. Some limitations are recreation of the complex physiological pulse waveform, which is only approximated by the system. Endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, and fibroblasts are affected by the blood flow through the artery. The dynamic component of blood flow is determined by the cardiac output and arterial wall compliance. Vascular cell mechano-transduction of flow dynamics may trigger cytokine release and cross-talk between cell types within the artery. Co-culture of vascular cells is a more accurate picture reflecting cell-cell interaction on the blood vessel wall and vascular response to mechanical signaling. Contribution of flow dynamics, including the cell response to the dynamic and mean (or steady) components of flow, is therefore an important metric in determining disease pathology and treatment efficacy. Through introducing an in vitro co-culture model and pressure damping downstream of blood pump which produces simulated cardiac output, various arterial disease pathologies may be investigated.

  6. Single cell mechanics of keratinocyte cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lulevich, Valentin; Yang, Hsin-ya; Isseroff, R Rivkah; Liu, Gang-yu

    2010-11-01

    Keratinocytes represent the major cell type of the uppermost layer of human skin, the epidermis. Using AFM-based single cell compression, the ability of individual keratinocytes to resist external pressure and global rupturing forces is investigated and compared with various cell types. Keratinocytes are found to be 6-70 times stiffer than other cell types, such as white blood, breast epithelial, fibroblast, or neuronal cells, and in contrast to other cell types they retain high mechanic strength even after the cell's death. The absence of membrane rupturing peaks in the force-deformation profiles of keratinocytes and their high stiffness during a second load cycle suggests that their unique mechanical resistance is dictated by the cytoskeleton. A simple analytical model enables the quantification of Young's modulus of keratinocyte cytoskeleton, as high as 120-340 Pa. Selective disruption of the two major cytoskeletal networks, actin filaments and microtubules, does not significantly affect keratinocyte mechanics. F-actin is found to impact cell deformation under pressure. During keratinocyte compression, the plasma membrane stretches to form peripheral blebs. Instead of blebbing, cells with depolymerized F-actin respond to pressure by detaching the plasma membrane from the cytoskeleton underneath. On the other hand, the compression force of keratinocytes expressing a mutated keratin (cell line, KEB-7) is 1.6-2.2 times less than that for the control cell line that has normal keratin networks. Therefore, we infer that the keratin intermediate filament network is responsible for the extremely high keratinocyte stiffness and resilience. This could manifest into the rugged protective nature of the human epidermis.

  7. [Intestinal-brain axis. Neuronal and immune-inflammatory mechanisms of brain and intestine pathology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondarenko, V M; Riabichenko, E V

    2013-01-01

    Mutually directed connections between intestine and brain are implemented by endocrine, neural and immune systems and nonspecific natural immunity. Intestine micro flora as an active participant of intestine-brain axis not only influences intestine functions but also stimulates the development of CNS in perinatal period and interacts with higher nervous centers causing depression and cognitive disorders in pathology. A special role belongs to intestine microglia. Apart from mechanic (protective) and trophic functions for intestine neurons, glia implements neurotransmitter, immunologic, barrier and motoric functions in the intestine. An interconnection between intestine barrier function and hematoencephalic barrier regulation exists. Chronic endotoxinemia as a result of intestine barrier dysfunction forms sustained inflammation state in periventricular zone of the brain with consequent destabilization of hematoencephalic barriers and spread oF inflammation to other parts of the brain resulting in neurodegradation development.

  8. Endotoxin-induced basal respiration alterations of renal HK-2 cells: A sign of pathologic metabolism down-regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quoilin, C., E-mail: cquoilin@ulg.ac.be [Laboratory of Biomedical Spectroscopy, Department of Physics, University of Liege, 4000 Liege (Belgium); Mouithys-Mickalad, A. [Center of Oxygen Research and Development, Department of Chemistry, University of Liege, 4000 Liege (Belgium); Duranteau, J. [Department of Anaesthesia and Surgical ICU, CHU Bicetre, University Paris XI Sud, 94275 Le Kremlin Bicetre (France); Gallez, B. [Biomedical Magnetic Resonance Group, Louvain Drug Research Institute, Universite catholique de Louvain, 1200 Brussels (Belgium); Hoebeke, M. [Laboratory of Biomedical Spectroscopy, Department of Physics, University of Liege, 4000 Liege (Belgium)

    2012-06-29

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A HK-2 cells model of inflammation-induced acute kidney injury. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two oximetry methods: high resolution respirometry and ESR spectroscopy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oxygen consumption rates of renal cells decrease when treated with LPS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cells do not recover normal respiration when the LPS treatment is removed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This basal respiration alteration is a sign of pathologic metabolism down-regulation. -- Abstract: To study the mechanism of oxygen regulation in inflammation-induced acute kidney injury, we investigate the effects of a bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide, LPS) on the basal respiration of proximal tubular epithelial cells (HK-2) both by high-resolution respirometry and electron spin resonance spectroscopy. These two complementary methods have shown that HK-2 cells exhibit a decreased oxygen consumption rate when treated with LPS. Surprisingly, this cellular respiration alteration persists even after the stress factor was removed. We suggested that this irreversible decrease in renal oxygen consumption after LPS challenge is related to a pathologic metabolic down-regulation such as a lack of oxygen utilization by cells.

  9. Exploration of a Novel Persistent Reversal of Pathological Pain: Mechanisms and Mediators

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    cultured glial cells blocked TNF and but not IL-10 production , suggesting that while PKA and PKC may play a role in A2AR agonist effects, there are also...models of neuropathic pain and to elucidate the underlying mechanisms that result in the production of IL-10 and subsequent reversal of the allodynia. 15...translated to numerous animal models of neuropathic pain and to elucidate the underlying mechanisms that result in the production of IL-10 and

  10. T cell mediated pathogenesis in EAE: Molecular mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian C Kurschus

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available T cells are major initiators and mediators of disease in multiple sclerosis (MS and in its animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE. EAE is an antigen-driven autoimmune model in which immunization against myelin autoantigens elicits strong T cell responses which initiate its pathology with CNS myelin destruction. T cells cause pathogenic events by several mechanisms; some work in a direct fashion in the CNS, such as direct cytokine-induced damage, granzyme-mediated killing, or glutamate-induced neurotoxicity, whereas most are indirect mechanisms, such as activation of other cell types like macrophages, B cells, or neutrophils. This review aims to describe and discuss the molecular effector mechanism by which T cells harm the CNS during EAE.

  11. Characterization of T cell clones from chagasic patients: predominance of CD8 surface phenotype in clones from patients with pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Washington R. Cuna

    1995-08-01

    Full Text Available Human Chagas' disease, caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, is associated with pathological processes whose mechanisms are not known. To address this question, T cell lines were developed from chronic chagasic patients peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC and cloned. These T cell clones (TCC were analyzed phenotypically with monoclonal antibodies by the use of a fluorescence microscope. The surface phenotype of the TCC from the asymptomatic patient were predominantly CD4 positive (86%. On the contrary, the surface phenotype CD8 was predominant in the TCC from the patients suffering from cardiomegaly with right bundle branch block (83%, bradycardia with megacolon (75 % and bradycardia (75%. Future studies will be developed in order to identify the antigens eliciting these T cell subpopulations.

  12. B-Cell Depletion Attenuates White and Gray Matter Pathology in Marmoset Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kap, Yolanda S.; Bauer, Jan; van Driel, Nikki; Bleeker, Wim K.; Parren, Paul W. H. I.; Kooi, Evert-Jan; Geurts, Jeroen J. G.; Laman, Jon D.; Craigen, Jenny L.; Blezer, Erwin; 't Hart, Bert A.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of CD20-positive B-cell depletion on central nervous system (CNS) white and gray matter pathology in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in common marmosets, a relevant preclinical model of multiple sclerosis. Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis was ind

  13. Balancing immune protection and immune pathology by CD8+ T cell responses to influenza infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susu eDuan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Influenza A virus (IAV is a significant human pathogen causing annual epidemics and periodic pandemics. CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL-mediated immunity contributes to clearance of virus-infected cells; CTL immunity targeting the conserved internal proteins of IAVs is a key protection mechanism when neutralizing antibodies are absent during heterosubtypic IAV infection. However, CTL infiltration into the airways, their cytotoxicity, and the effects of produced pro-inflammatory cytokines can cause severe lung tissue injury, thereby contributing to immunopathology. Studies have discovered complicated and exquisite stimulatory and inhibitory mechanisms that regulate CTL magnitude and effector activities during IAV infection. Here, we review the state of knowledge on the roles of IAV-specific CTLs in immune protection and immunopathology during IAV infection in animal models, highlighting the key findings of various requirements and constraints regulating the balance of immune protection and pathology involved in CTL immunity. We also discuss the evidence of cross-reactive CTL immunity as a positive correlate of cross-subtype protection during secondary IAV infection in both animal and human studies. We argue that the effects of CTL immunity on protection and immunopathology depend on multiple layers of host and viral factors, including complex host mechanisms to regulate CTL magnitude and effector activity, the pathogenic nature of the IAV, the innate response milieu, and the host historical immune context of influenza infection. Future efforts are needed to further understand these key host and viral factors, especially to differentiate those that constrain optimally effective CTL anti-viral immunity from those necessary to restrain CTL-mediated nonspecific immunopathology in the various contexts of IAV infection, in order to develop better vaccination and therapeutic strategies for modifying protective CTL immunity.

  14. Inhibitory effect of human telomerase antisense oligodeoxyribonucleotides on the growth of gastric cancer cell lines in variant tumor pathological subtype

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Ye; Yun-Lin Wu; Shu Zhang; Zi Chen; Li-Xia Guo; Ruo-Yu Zhou; Hong Xie

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the inhibitory effect of specialized human telomerase antisense oligodeoxyribonucleotides on the growth of well (MKN-28), moderately (SGC-7901)and poorly (MKN-45) differentiated gastric cancer cell lines under specific conditions and its inhibition mechanism,and to observe the correlation between the growth inhibition ratio and the tumor pathologic subtype of gastric cancer cells.METHODS: Telomerase activity in three gastric cancer cell lines of variant tumor pathologic subtype was determined by modified TRAP assay before and after the specialized human telomerase antisense oligodeoxyribonucleotides were dealt with under specific conditions. Effect of antisense oligomer under specific conditions of the growth and viability of gastric cancer cell lines was explored by using trypan blue dye exclusion assay, and cell apoptosis was detected by cell morphology observation, flow cytometry and TUNEL assay.RESULTS: Telomerase activity was detected in well,moderately and poorly differentiated gastric cancer cell lines (the quantification expression of telomerase activity was 43.7TPG, 56.5TPG, 76.7TPG, respectively).Telomerase activity was controlled to 30.2TPG, 36.3TPG and 35.2TPG for MKN-28, SGC-7901 and MKN-45 cell lines respectively after treatment with human telomerase antisense oligomers at the concentration of 5 μmol/L, and was entirely inhibited at 10 μmol/L, against the template region of telomerase RNA component, whereas no inhibition effect was detected in missense oligomers (P<0.05). After treatment with antisense oligomers at different concentrations under specific conditions for 96 h, significant growth inhibition effects were found in MKN-45 and SGC-7901gastric cancer cell lines (the inhibition ratio was 40.89%and 71.28%), but not in MKN-28 cell lines (15.86%). The ratio of inactive SGC-7901 cells increased according to the prolongation of treatment from 48 to 96 h. Missense oligomers could not lead to the same effect (P<0

  15. Cell Interactomics and Carcinogenetic Mechanisms

    CERN Document Server

    Baianu, IC; Report to the Institute of Genomics

    2004-01-01

    Single cell interactomics in simpler organisms, as well as somatic cell interactomics in multicellular organisms, involve biomolecular interactions in complex signalling pathways that were recently represented in modular terms by quantum automata with ‘reversible behavior’ representing normal cell cycling and division. Other implications of such quantum automata, modular modeling of signaling pathways and cell differentiation during development are in the fields of neural plasticity and brain development leading to quantum-weave dynamic patterns and specific molecular processes underlying extensive memory, learning, anticipation mechanisms and the emergence of human consciousness during the early brain development in children. Cell interactomics is here represented for the first time as a mixture of ‘classical’ states that determine molecular dynamics subject to Boltzmann statistics and ‘steady-state’, metabolic (multi-stable) manifolds, together with ‘configuration’ spaces of metastable quant...

  16. A diagnostic dilemma in breast pathology – benign fibroadenoma with multinucleated stromal giant cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobbia Igdam

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Fibroadenomas are common benign breast tumours that display a characteristic pathological morphology, although several epithelial and stromal variations exist. A very rare histological finding is the presence of multinucleated giant cells throughout the stroma of a benign fibroadenoma. Cells of this type, which are more commonly found incidentally within the interlobular stroma of breast tissue, are benign and should not be mistaken for malignant cells on microscopic examination. Unfortunately a lack of awareness of this pathological entity can lead to diagnostic confusion amongst pathologists resulting in the multinucleate giant cells being mistaken for highly mitotic cells and consequently the fibroadenoma being mistaken for a malignant lesion. This may have serious implications for the subsequent management of the patient. The presence of this unusual cell type in the stroma does not alter the prognosis of otherwise benign lesion. We encountered two such cases at our institution in a six month period recently. We present their histories along with relevant radiological, microscopic and immunohistochemical features, followed by a discussion of this unusual pathological entity.

  17. Physiological and pathological role of local and immigrating colonic stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ferenc Sipos; Gábor Valcz; Béla Molnár

    2012-01-01

    The latest avenue of research is revealing the existence of and role for the colonic stem cells in the physiological renewal of the mucosa and in pathological circumstances where they have both positive and negative effects. In the case of human colon, different levels of stem cell compartments exist. First, the crypt epithelial stem cells, which have a role in the normal crypt epithelial cell dynamics and in colorectal carcinogenesis. Close to the crypts, the second layer of stem cells can be found; the local subepithelial stem cell niche, including the pericryptic subepithelial myofibroblasts that regulate the epithelial cell differentiation and have a crucial role in cancer progression and chronic inflammation-related fibrosis. The third level of stem cell compartment is the immigrating bone-marrow-derived stem cells, which have an important role in wound healing after severe mucosal inflammation, but are also involved in cancer invasion. This paper focuses on stem cell biology in the context of physiological and pathological processes in the human colon.

  18. Biopsy-verified bronchiolitis obliterans and other noninfectious lung pathologies after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlving, Hilde Hylland; Andersen, Claus B; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Gormsen, Magdalena; Pedersen, Karen Damgaard; Buchvald, Frederik; Heilmann, Carsten; Nielsen, Kim Gjerum; Mortensen, Jann; Moser, Claus; Sengeløv, Henrik; Müller, Klaus Gottlob

    2015-03-01

    Bronchiolitis obliterans (BO) is a serious complication of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Lung biopsy is the gold standard for diagnosis. This study describes the course of BO and assesses the congruity between biopsy-verified BO and a modified version of the National Institutes of Health's consensus criteria for BO syndrome (BOS) based exclusively on noninvasive measures. We included 44 patients transplanted between 2000 and 2010 who underwent lung biopsy for suspected BO. Of those, 23 were diagnosed with BO and 21 presented other noninfectious pulmonary pathologies, such as cryptogenic organizing pneumonia, diffuse alveolar damage, interstitial pneumonia, and nonspecific interstitial fibrosis. Compared with patients with other noninfectious pulmonary pathologies, BO patients had significantly lower values of forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), FEV1/forced vital capacity, and maximal mid-expiratory flow throughout follow-up, but there was no difference in the change in pulmonary function from the time of lung biopsy. The BO diagnosis was not associated with poorer overall survival. Fifty-two percent of patients with biopsy-verified BO and 24% of patients with other noninfectious pulmonary pathology fulfilled the BOS criteria. Pathological BO diagnosis was not superior to BOS criteria in predicting decrease in pulmonary function beyond the time of biopsy. A lung biopsy may provide a characterization of pathological patterns that can extend our knowledge on the pathophysiology of HSCT-related lung diseases.

  19. Plasmacytoid Transitional Cell Carcinoma of Bladder: A Clinico-pathological Study and Review of Literatures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Xiaoli; ZHANG Hongtu; SUN Yuntian; LIU Xiuyun

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study the pathologic features of plasmacytoid transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder, and to analyze the diagnostic features, criteria for differential diagnosis and the clinical significance of the tumor. Methods: Two cases of bladder plasmacytoid transitional cell carcinoma were studied. Routine paraffin sections with HE staining, Pap smear and immunohistochemistry by S-P method were observed under a light microscope. Pathological and clinical data were analyzed by comparison with early reported cases in literatures. Results: A characteristic feature of this tumor was of deep invasion in the lamina propria and/or muscularis propria, in addition to the component of carcinoma in situ in the mucosa, when tumors were diagnosed. The histological pattern and cytological features showed similarity to a plasmacytoid tumor. The tumor cells were strongly positive for AE1/AE3, CEA and CK18. The prognosis appeared to be worse than ordinary transitional cell carcinoma. Conclusion: The plasmacytoid transitional cell carcinoma of bladder is rare but has typical pathological, immunohistological and clinical features. Pathologists should be aware of this kind of primary tumor of bladder.

  20. Posttraumatic elbow joint contractures: defining pathologic capsular mechanisms and potential future treatment paradigms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrand, Kevin A

    2013-11-01

    The Andrew J. Weiland Medal is presented by the American Society for Surgery of the Hand to a midcareer researcher who is dedicated to advancing patient care in the field of hand surgery. This essay, awarded the Weiland Medal in 2012, focuses on posttraumatic elbow joint contractures. Joint contractures are well known to hand surgeons because they limit function of our patients. There is a thorough understanding of the pathoanatomy underlying joint contractures. However, the mechanisms leading to the pathoanatomy are either unknown or partially understood, depending on the etiology of the particular clinical condition. This review describes our research over the past 14 years on posttraumatic elbow joint contractures. It defines pathologic cellular, matrix, and growth factor changes in the joint capsule, elaborates on the development of an animal model of posttraumatic joint contractures, presents an evaluation of a potential prevention strategy based on our research, and outlines future plans to bring this work to the clinical realm for the benefit of patients.

  1. Novel frataxin isoforms may contribute to the pathological mechanism of Friedreich ataxia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiyan Xia

    Full Text Available Friedreich ataxia (FRDA is an inherited neurodegenerative disease caused by frataxin (FXN deficiency. The nervous system and heart are the most severely affected tissues. However, highly mitochondria-dependent tissues, such as kidney and liver, are not obviously affected, although the abundance of FXN is normally high in these tissues. In this study we have revealed two novel FXN isoforms (II and III, which are specifically expressed in affected cerebellum and heart tissues, respectively, and are functional in vitro and in vivo. Increasing the abundance of the heart-specific isoform III significantly increased the mitochondrial aconitase activity, while over-expression of the cerebellum-specific isoform II protected against oxidative damage of Fe-S cluster-containing aconitase. Further, we observed that the protein level of isoform III decreased in FRDA patient heart, while the mRNA level of isoform II decreased more in FRDA patient cerebellum compared to total FXN mRNA. Our novel findings are highly relevant to understanding the mechanism of tissue-specific pathology in FRDA.

  2. Nuclear Mechanics and Stem Cell Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xinjian; Gavara, Nuria; Song, Guanbin

    2015-12-01

    Stem cells are characterized by their self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation potential. Stem cell differentiation is a prerequisite for the application of stem cells in regenerative medicine and clinical therapy. In addition to chemical stimulation, mechanical cues play a significant role in regulating stem cell differentiation. The integrity of mechanical sensors is necessary for the ability of cells to respond to mechanical signals. The nucleus, the largest and stiffest cellular organelle, interacts with the cytoskeleton as a key mediator of cell mechanics. Nuclear mechanics are involved in the complicated interactions of lamins, chromatin and nucleoskeleton-related proteins. Thus, stem cell differentiation is intimately associated with nuclear mechanics due to its indispensable role in mechanotransduction and mechanical response. This paper reviews several main contributions of nuclear mechanics, highlights the hallmarks of the nuclear mechanics of stem cells, and provides insight into the relationship between nuclear mechanics and stem cell differentiation, which may guide clinical applications in the future.

  3. Cancer Stem Cells in Primary Liver Cancers: Pathological Concepts and Imaging Findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joo, Ijin [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Haeryoung [Department of Pathology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam 463-707 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jeong Min [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-01

    There is accumulating evidence that cancer stem cells (CSCs) play an integral role in the initiation of hepatocarcinogenesis and the maintaining of tumor growth. Liver CSCs derived from hepatic stem/progenitor cells have the potential to differentiate into either hepatocytes or cholangiocytes. Primary liver cancers originating from CSCs constitute a heterogeneous histopathologic spectrum, including hepatocellular carcinoma, combined hepatocellular-cholangiocarcinoma, and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma with various radiologic manifestations. In this article, we reviewed the recent concepts of CSCs in the development of primary liver cancers, focusing on their pathological and radiological findings. Awareness of the pathological concepts and imaging findings of primary liver cancers with features of CSCs is critical for accurate diagnosis, prediction of outcome, and appropriate treatment options for patients.

  4. System in biology leading to cell pathology: stable protein-protein interactions after covalent modifications by small molecules or in transgenic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malina Halina Z

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The physiological processes in the cell are regulated by reversible, electrostatic protein-protein interactions. Apoptosis is such a regulated process, which is critically important in tissue homeostasis and development and leads to complete disintegration of the cell. Pathological apoptosis, a process similar to apoptosis, is associated with aging and infection. The current study shows that pathological apoptosis is a process caused by the covalent interactions between the signaling proteins, and a characteristic of this pathological network is the covalent binding of calmodulin to regulatory sequences. Results Small molecules able to bind covalently to the amino group of lysine, histidine, arginine, or glutamine modify the regulatory sequences of the proteins. The present study analyzed the interaction of calmodulin with the BH3 sequence of Bax, and the calmodulin-binding sequence of myristoylated alanine-rich C-kinase substrate in the presence of xanthurenic acid in primary retinal epithelium cell cultures and murine epithelial fibroblast cell lines transformed with SV40 (wild type [WT], Bid knockout [Bid-/-], and Bax-/-/Bak-/- double knockout [DKO]. Cell death was observed to be associated with the covalent binding of calmodulin, in parallel, to the regulatory sequences of proteins. Xanthurenic acid is known to activate caspase-3 in primary cell cultures, and the results showed that this activation is also observed in WT and Bid-/- cells, but not in DKO cells. However, DKO cells were not protected against death, but high rates of cell death occurred by detachment. Conclusions The results showed that small molecules modify the basic amino acids in the regulatory sequences of proteins leading to covalent interactions between the modified sequences (e.g., calmodulin to calmodulin-binding sites. The formation of these polymers (aggregates leads to an unregulated and, consequently, pathological protein network. The results

  5. Mechanical Cell-Cell Communication in Fibrous Networks: The Importance of Network Geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, D L; Grogan, J A; Gaffney, E A

    2017-03-01

    Cells contracting in extracellular matrix (ECM) can transmit stress over long distances, communicating their position and orientation to cells many tens of micrometres away. Such phenomena are not observed when cells are seeded on substrates with linear elastic properties, such as polyacrylamide (PA) gel. The ability for fibrous substrates to support far reaching stress and strain fields has implications for many physiological processes, while the mechanical properties of ECM are central to several pathological processes, including tumour invasion and fibrosis. Theoretical models have investigated the properties of ECM in a variety of network geometries. However, the effects of network architecture on mechanical cell-cell communication have received little attention. This work investigates the effects of geometry on network mechanics, and thus the ability for cells to communicate mechanically through different networks. Cell-derived displacement fields are quantified for various network geometries while controlling for network topology, cross-link density and micromechanical properties. We find that the heterogeneity of response, fibre alignment, and substrate displacement fields are sensitive to network choice. Further, we show that certain geometries support mechanical communication over longer distances than others. As such, we predict that the choice of network geometry is important in fundamental modelling of cell-cell interactions in fibrous substrates, as well as in experimental settings, where mechanical signalling at the cellular scale plays an important role. This work thus informs the construction of theoretical models for substrate mechanics and experimental explorations of mechanical cell-cell communication.

  6. Catalase overexpression in aortic smooth muscle prevents pathological mechanical changes underlying abdominal aortic aneurysm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiellaro-Rafferty, Kathryn; Weiss, Daiana; Joseph, Giji; Wan, William; Gleason, Rudolph L; Taylor, W Robert

    2011-08-01

    The causality of the associations between cellular and mechanical mechanisms of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) formation has not been completely defined. Because reactive oxygen species are established mediators of AAA growth and remodeling, our objective was to investigate oxidative stress-induced alterations in aortic biomechanics and microstructure during subclinical AAA development. We investigated the mechanisms of AAA in an angiotensin II (ANG II) infusion model of AAA in apolipoprotein E-deficient (apoE(-/-)) mice that overexpress catalase in vascular smooth muscle cells (apoE(-/-)xTg(SMC-Cat)). At baseline, aortas from apoE(-/-)xTg(SMC-Cat) exhibited increased stiffness and the microstructure was characterized by 50% more collagen content and less elastin fragmentation. ANG II treatment for 7 days in apoE(-/-) mice altered the transmural distribution of suprarenal aortic circumferential strain (quantified by opening angle, which increased from 130 ± 1° at baseline to 198 ± 8° after 7 days of ANG II treatment) without obvious changes in the aortic microstructure. No differences in aortic mechanical behavior or suprarenal opening angle were observed in apoE(-/-)xTg(SMC-Cat) after 7 days of ANG II treatment. These data suggest that at the earliest stages of AAA development H(2)O(2) is functionally important and is involved in the control of local variations in remodeling across the vessel wall. They further suggest that reduced elastin integrity at baseline may predispose the abdominal aorta to aneurysmal mechanical remodeling.

  7. Pathological factors, behavior, and histological prognostic risk groups in subtypes of penile squamous cell carcinomas (SCC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Diego F; Soares, Fernando; Alvarado-Cabrero, Isabel; Cañete, Sofía; Fernández-Nestosa, María José; Rodríguez, Ingrid M; Barreto, José; Cubilla, Antonio L

    2015-05-01

    Pathologists' contribution in the determination of prognosis in invasive penile squamous cell carcinoma is crucial. The TNM staging system is based on the identification of pathological data. There are multiple pathologically based factors believed to be important in relation to the rates of regional inguinal lymph node and specific cancer death. Among them are tumor site, size, histological subtypes, thickness or anatomical level of invasion, tumor front, and vascular or perineural invasion. The identification of these factors determines the prognostic profile of patients with penile cancer. These factors are used for the construction of pathological risk groups, prognostic index, or nomograms and are helpful in the prediction of nodal metastasis or patients' outcome. This review will describe in detail the influential pathological prognostic factors present in each tumor category emphasizing the impact of especial histological subtypes in tumor spread and final outcome. There are few studies comprehensibly addressing the relation of tumor morphology and prognosis according to histological types. We are summarizing findings of prognostic factors in 3 different series for the most common types and individual series in more recently described tumor entities. We had found a broad correlation of special subtypes of penile squamous cell carcinomas that made regional nodal status and final outcome predictable according to histological features of the tumor. These findings permitted grouping special subtypes of squamous cell carcinomas into prognosis risk groups of low, intermediate, and high. In the first category of excellent prognoses are the usual grade I, verrucous, papillary NOS, pseudohyperplastic and cuniculatum carcinomas. In the second group, there are the grade II usual, mixed and warty carcinomas. The third category of tumors, with the worst prognosis is composed of high grade usual, basaloid, warty-basaloid, papillary basaloid, and sarcomatoid carcinomas. We

  8. Increased protein kinase C gamma activity induces Purkinje cell pathology in a mouse model of spinocerebellar ataxia 14.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Jingmin; Hassler, Melanie L; Shimobayashi, Etsuko; Paka, Nagendher; Streit, Raphael; Kapfhammer, Josef P

    2014-10-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) are hereditary diseases leading to Purkinje cell degeneration and cerebellar dysfunction. Most forms of SCA are caused by expansion of CAG repeats similar to other polyglutamine disorders such as Huntington's disease. In contrast, in the autosomal dominant SCA-14 the disease is caused by mutations in the protein kinase C gamma (PKCγ) gene which is a well characterized signaling molecule in cerebellar Purkinje cells. The study of SCA-14, therefore, offers the unique opportunity to reveal the molecular and pathological mechanism eventually leading to Purkinje cell dysfunction and degeneration. We have created a mouse model of SCA-14 in which PKCγ protein with a mutation found in SCA-14 is specifically expressed in cerebellar Purkinje cells. We find that in mice expressing the mutated PKCγ protein the morphology of Purkinje cells in cerebellar slice cultures is drastically altered and mimics closely the morphology seen after pharmacological PKC activation. Similar morphological abnormalities were seen in localized areas of the cerebellum of juvenile transgenic mice in vivo. In adult transgenic mice there is evidence for some localized loss of Purkinje cells but there is no overall cerebellar atrophy. Transgenic mice show a mild cerebellar ataxia revealed by testing on the rotarod and on the walking beam. Our findings provide evidence for both an increased PKCγ activity in Purkinje cells in vivo and for pathological changes typical for cerebellar disease thus linking the increased and dysregulated activity of PKCγ tightly to the development of cerebellar disease in SCA-14 and possibly also in other forms of SCA.

  9. Morphological and pathologic changes of experimental chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG) and the regulating mechanism of protein expression in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Liang-jing; CHEN Shu-jie; CHEN Zhe; CAI Jian-ting; SI Jian-min

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study the pathologic change and molecular regulation in cell proliferation and apoptosis of gastric mucosa in rats with chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG), and evaluate the possible mechanisms. Methods: Rats were administered with 60% alcohol or 2% salicylate sodium, 20 mmol/L deoxycholate sodium and 0.1% ammonia water to establish chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG) models. The gastric specimens were prepared for microscopic view with hematoxylin and eosin (H-E)and alcian blue (A-B) stain. The number of infiltrated inflammatory cells, the thickness of the mucosa gland layer (μm) and the number of gastric glands were calculated. The damage of barrier in mucosa with erosion or ulceration, and the thickness of mucin were examined by scanned electron microscope (SEM). The levels of PGE2, EGF (epiderminal growth factor) and gastrin in the serum were measured with radioimmunoassay or ELISA method. The immunohistochemistry method was used to observe the number of G cells, the expression of protein of EGFR (EGF receptor), C-erbB-2, p53, p16 and bcl-2 in gastric tissue. Results:Under SEM observation, the gastric mucosa was diffused erosion or ulceration and the thickness of mucin was decreased. Compared with normal rats, the grade of inflammatory cell infiltration in CAG rats was elevated, whereas the thickness and number of gastric gland were significantly lower (P<0.05). Compared with normal level of (0.61+0.28) μg/L, EGF in CAG (2.2±0.83) μg/L was significantly higher (P<0.05). The levels of PGE2 and gastrin in serum were significantly lower in CAG rats than that in normal rats (P<0.05). Immunohistochemistry detection showed that the number of G cell in antrum was lower in CAG group (P<0.05). Immuno-stain showed EGFR protein expression in the basal and bilateral membrane, and the cytoplasma in atrophic gastric gland, while negative expression was observed in normal gastric epithelial cells. Positive staining of p53 and p16 protein was localized in

  10. Prognostic implications of cell kinetics, histopathology and pathologic stage in non-Hodgkin's lymphomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestrini, R; Costa, A; Giardini, R; Boracchi, P; Del Bino, G; Marubini, E; Rilke, F

    1989-01-01

    Cell kinetics ([3H]-thymidine labelling index, [3H]-Thy LI) were determined on pathologic lymph nodes from 175 untreated adult patients. [3H]-Thy LI significantly differed in low-grade and high-grade malignancy groups according to the Kiel classification (median values, 1.8 per cent and 10.4 per cent, respectively) and in low, intermediate, high grade according to the Working Formulation (median values: 1.7 per cent, 4.8 per cent and 14.2 per cent, respectively) but was unrelated to pathologic stage or patient's age. Cell kinetics, histopathology, pathologic stage and patient's age were significant discriminants of 6-year survival. Multivariate analysis was performed by Cox's proportional hazard model to investigate the role of [3H]-Thy LI after making allowance for the other prognostic factors. When [3H]-Thy LI was added to the model, a large increase (chi square = 29.94) contributed by the cell kinetic variable in identifying patients at different risk was revealed.

  11. Microfluidic device with dual mechanical cues for cell migration investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chin-Hsiung; Kuo, Po-Ling

    2013-01-01

    Cell migration plays an important role in numerous physiological and pathological conditions, such as angiogenesis, wound healing and cancer metastasis. Understanding the fundamental mechanisms of cell migration is crucial to develop strategies for disease treatment and regenerative medicine. Several biomechanical cues have been well studied about their effects on guiding cell migration. However, the effects of dual or multiple cues on cell migration are barely addressed. In this work, we developed a microfluidic-based device to study the combinatory effects of osmotic and stiffness gradient on cell migration. Computer simulation and experimental validation showed that the device was capable of providing stable osmotic and stiffness gradient to cultured cells at the same time. Preliminary results suggest that our device has a valuable potential in studying cell migration in complex conditions which better recapitulate the complex environmental conditions in vivo.

  12. Determinants of pathologic mineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsch, Thorsten

    2008-01-01

    Physiologic mineralization is necessary for the formation of skeletal tissues and for their appropriate functions during adulthood. Mineralization has to be controlled and restricted to specific regions. If the mineralization process occurs in regions that normally do not mineralize, there can be severe consequences (pathologic or ectopic mineralization). Recent findings have indicated that physiologic and pathologic mineralization events are initiated by matrix vesicles, membrane-enclosed particles released from the plasma membranes of mineralization-competent cells. The understanding of how these vesicles are released from the plasma membrane and initiate the mineralization process may provide novel therapeutic strategies to prevent pathologic mineralization. In addition, other regulators (activators and inhibitors) of physiologic mineralization have been identified and characterized, and there is evidence that the same factors also contribute to the regulation of pathologic mineralization. Finally, programmed cell death (apoptosis) may be a contributor to physiologic mineralization and if occurring after tissue injury may induce pathologic mineralization and mineralization-related differentiation events in the injured and surrounding areas. This review describes how the understanding of mechanisms and factors regulating physiologic mineralization can be used to develop new therapeutic strategies to prevent pathologic or ectopic mineralization events.

  13. Characteristics and pathological mechanism on magnetic resonance diffusion-weighted imaging after chemoembolization in rabbit liver VX-2 tumor model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate dynamic characteristics and pathological mechanism of signal in rabbit VX-2 tumor model on diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) after chemoembolization.METHODS: Forty New Zealand rabbits were included in the study and forty-seven rabbit VX-2 tumor models were raised by implanting directly and intrahepatically after abdominal cavity opened. Forty VX-2 tumor models from them were divided into four groups. DWI was performed periodically and respectively for each group after chemoembolization. All VX-2 tumor samples of each group were studied by pathology. The distinction of VX-2tumors on DWI was assessed by their apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values. The statistical significance between different time groups, different area groups or different b-value groups was calculated by using SPSS12.0 software.RESULTS: Under b-value of 100 s/mm2, ADC values were lowest at 16 h after chemoembolization in area of VX-2 tumor periphery, central, and normal liver parenchyma around tumor, but turned to increase with further elongation of chemoembolization treatment. The distinction of ADC between different time groups was significant respectively (F = 7.325, P < 0.001; F = 2.496,P < 0.048; F = 6.856, P < 0.001). Cellular edema in the area of VX-2 tumor periphery or normal liver parenchyma around tumor, increased quickly in sixteen h after chemoembolization but, from the 16th h to the 48th h, cellular edema in the area of normal liver parenchyma around tumor decreased gradually and that in the area of VX-2 tumor periphery decreased lightly at, and then increased continually. After chemoembolization, Cellular necrosis in the area of VX-2 tumor periphery was more significantly high than that before chemoembolization. The areas of dead cells in VX-2 tumors manifested low signal and high ADC value, while the areas of viable cells manifested high signal and low ADC value.CONCLUSION: DWI is able to detect and differentiate tumor necrotic areas from viable

  14. Cell mechanics in biomedical cavitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qianxi; Manmi, Kawa; Liu, Kuo-Kang

    2015-01-01

    Studies on the deformation behaviours of cellular entities, such as coated microbubbles and liposomes subject to a cavitation flow, become increasingly important for the advancement of ultrasonic imaging and drug delivery. Numerical simulations for bubble dynamics of ultrasound contrast agents based on the boundary integral method are presented in this work. The effects of the encapsulating shell are estimated by adapting Hoff's model used for thin-shell contrast agents. The viscosity effects are estimated by including the normal viscous stress in the boundary condition. In parallel, mechanical models of cell membranes and liposomes as well as state-of-the-art techniques for quantitative measurement of viscoelasticity for a single cell or coated microbubbles are reviewed. The future developments regarding modelling and measurement of the material properties of the cellular entities for cutting-edge biomedical applications are also discussed. PMID:26442142

  15. Alteration of chaperonin60 and pancreatic enzyme in pancreatic acinar cell under pathological condition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-Yu Li; Moise Bendayan

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the changes of chaperonin60 (Cpn60)and pancreatic enzymes in pancreatic acinar cells, and to explore their roles in the development of experimental diabetes and acute pancreatitis (AP).METHODS: Two different pathological models were replicated in Sprague-Dawley rats: streptozotocininduced diabetes and sodium deoxycholate-induced AP. The contents of Cpn60 and pancreatic enzymes in different compartments of the acinar cells were measured by quantitative immunocytochemistry.RESULTS: The levels of Cpn60 significantly increased in diabetes, but decreased in AP, especially in the zymogen granules of the pancreatic acinar cells. The elevation of Cpn60 was accompanied with the increased levels of pancreatic lipase and chymotrypsinogen in diabetes.However, a decreased Cpn60 level was accompanied by high levels of lipase and chymotrypsinogen in AP.The amylase level was markedly reduced in both the pathological conditions.CONCLUSION: The equilibrium between Cpn60 and pancreatic enzymes in the acinar cells breaks in AP, and Cpn60 content decreases, suggesting an insufficient chaperone capacity. This may promote the aggregation and autoactivation of the premature enzymes in the pancreatic acinar cells and play roles in the development of AP.

  16. Th1 and Th17 Cells in Tuberculosis: Protection, Pathology, and Biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Lyadova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The outcome of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb infection ranges from a complete pathogen clearance through asymptomatic latent infection (LTBI to active tuberculosis (TB disease. It is now understood that LTBI and active TB represent a continuous spectrum of states with different degrees of pathogen “activity,” host pathology, and immune reactivity. Therefore, it is important to differentiate LTBI and active TB and identify active TB stages. CD4+ T cells play critical role during Mtb infection by mediating protection, contributing to inflammation, and regulating immune response. Th1 and Th17 cells are the main effector CD4+ T cells during TB. Th1 cells have been shown to contribute to TB protection by secreting IFN-γ and activating antimycobacterial action in macrophages. Th17 induce neutrophilic inflammation, mediate tissue damage, and thus have been implicated in TB pathology. In recent years new findings have accumulated that alter our view on the role of Th1 and Th17 cells during Mtb infection. This review discusses these new results and how they can be implemented for TB diagnosis and monitoring.

  17. 肿瘤坏死因子α诱导脑血管内皮细胞产生病理性一氧化氮的实验研究%Mechanism of TNF-α acting on cerebrovascular endothelial cells and producing pathological nitric oxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张洁; 邢岩

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the mechanism of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) acting on cerebrovascular endothelial cells and producing pathological nitric oxide (NO). Methods Brain vascular endothelial cell (BVEC/RI) of TNFR1 gene knockout mice in vitro and brain vascular endothelial cell (BVEC) of wild-type mice were stimulated by a dose of 5 ng/mL TNF-α for 24 hours respectively. PCR technique, Western blot and nitrate reductase were used to detect 2 inducible nitric oxide synthases (iNOS) gene mRNA and the protein expression levels as well as the secreted nitric oxide (NO) levels. Results ①After TNF-α stimulation, the expression of iNOS mRNA of wild-type mice BVEC increased. The iNOS mRNA expression of BVEC/RI did not have any significant change. ②After TNF-α stimulation, the iNOS protein expression level of wild-type mice BVEC (0.91 ±0.08) was higher than that did not receive BVEC (0. 15 ±0.02) of TNF-α. There was significant difference (P<0.05); there was no significant difference between the iNOS protein expression level of BVEC/RI (0. 21 ±0.06) and those not receiving BVEC/RI of TNF-α (0.30 ± 0.05) (P > 0. 05 ). ③After TNF-α stimulation, the NO level 58.6 ± 2.6 μ mmol/L of wild-type mice BVEC was higher than that not receiving BVEC 18.1 ±4.3 μmmol/L of TNF-α. There was significant difference ( P < 0.05 ); there was no significant difference between the NO level 21.2 ± 3.5 μmmol/L of BVEC/RI and that not receiving BVEC/RI 16.9 ± 3.4 μmmol/L of TNF-α (P > 0. 05). Conclusion TNF-α may increase the expression of iNOS by acting on cerebrovascular endothelial cell TNFR1, and thereby increasing the production of pathological NO.%目的 探讨肿瘤坏死因子α(TNF-α)作用于脑血管内皮细胞产生病理性一氧化氮(NO)的机制.方法 体外培养肿瘤坏死因子受体(TNFR1)基因敲除的小鼠脑血管内皮细胞(BVEC/RI)和野生型小鼠脑血管内皮细胞(BVEC),分别给予5 ng/ml TNF-α刺激24 h

  18. Blimp-1-Dependent IL-10 Production by Tr1 Cells Regulates TNF-Mediated Tissue Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes de Oca, Marcela; Kumar, Rajiv; de Labastida Rivera, Fabian; Amante, Fiona H; Sheel, Meru; Faleiro, Rebecca J; Bunn, Patrick T; Best, Shannon E; Beattie, Lynette; Ng, Susanna S; Edwards, Chelsea L; Muller, Werner; Cretney, Erika; Nutt, Stephen L; Smyth, Mark J; Haque, Ashraful; Hill, Geoffrey R; Sundar, Shyam; Kallies, Axel; Engwerda, Christian R

    2016-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is critical for controlling many intracellular infections, but can also contribute to inflammation. It can promote the destruction of important cell populations and trigger dramatic tissue remodeling following establishment of chronic disease. Therefore, a better understanding of TNF regulation is needed to allow pathogen control without causing or exacerbating disease. IL-10 is an important regulatory cytokine with broad activities, including the suppression of inflammation. IL-10 is produced by different immune cells; however, its regulation and function appears to be cell-specific and context-dependent. Recently, IL-10 produced by Th1 (Tr1) cells was shown to protect host tissues from inflammation induced following infection. Here, we identify a novel pathway of TNF regulation by IL-10 from Tr1 cells during parasitic infection. We report elevated Blimp-1 mRNA levels in CD4+ T cells from visceral leishmaniasis (VL) patients, and demonstrate IL-12 was essential for Blimp-1 expression and Tr1 cell development in experimental VL. Critically, we show Blimp-1-dependent IL-10 production by Tr1 cells prevents tissue damage caused by IFNγ-dependent TNF production. Therefore, we identify Blimp-1-dependent IL-10 produced by Tr1 cells as a key regulator of TNF-mediated pathology and identify Tr1 cells as potential therapeutic tools to control inflammation.

  19. Blimp-1-Dependent IL-10 Production by Tr1 Cells Regulates TNF-Mediated Tissue Pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes de Oca, Marcela; Kumar, Rajiv; de Labastida Rivera, Fabian; Amante, Fiona H; Sheel, Meru; Faleiro, Rebecca J.; Bunn, Patrick T.; Best, Shannon E.; Beattie, Lynette; Ng, Susanna S.; Edwards, Chelsea L.; Muller, Werner; Cretney, Erika; Nutt, Stephen L.; Smyth, Mark J.; Haque, Ashraful; Hill, Geoffrey R.; Sundar, Shyam; Kallies, Axel; Engwerda, Christian R.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is critical for controlling many intracellular infections, but can also contribute to inflammation. It can promote the destruction of important cell populations and trigger dramatic tissue remodeling following establishment of chronic disease. Therefore, a better understanding of TNF regulation is needed to allow pathogen control without causing or exacerbating disease. IL-10 is an important regulatory cytokine with broad activities, including the suppression of inflammation. IL-10 is produced by different immune cells; however, its regulation and function appears to be cell-specific and context-dependent. Recently, IL-10 produced by Th1 (Tr1) cells was shown to protect host tissues from inflammation induced following infection. Here, we identify a novel pathway of TNF regulation by IL-10 from Tr1 cells during parasitic infection. We report elevated Blimp-1 mRNA levels in CD4+ T cells from visceral leishmaniasis (VL) patients, and demonstrate IL-12 was essential for Blimp-1 expression and Tr1 cell development in experimental VL. Critically, we show Blimp-1-dependent IL-10 production by Tr1 cells prevents tissue damage caused by IFNγ-dependent TNF production. Therefore, we identify Blimp-1-dependent IL-10 produced by Tr1 cells as a key regulator of TNF-mediated pathology and identify Tr1 cells as potential therapeutic tools to control inflammation. PMID:26765224

  20. Coincident expression of the chemokine receptors CCR6 and CCR7 by pathologic Langerhans cells in Langerhans cell histiocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Mark D; Pinkus, Jack L; Fournier, Marcia V; Alexander, Sarah W; Tam, Carmen; Loda, Massimo; Sallan, Stephen E; Nichols, Kim E; Carpentieri, David F; Pinkus, Geraldine S; Rollins, Barrett J

    2003-04-01

    It has been suggested that a switch in chemokine receptor expression underlies Langerhans cell migration from skin to lymphoid tissue. Activated cells are thought to down-regulate CCR6, whose ligand macrophage inflammatory protein-3 alpha (MIP-3 alpha)/CCL20 is expressed in skin, and up-regulate CCR7, whose ligands are in lymphoid tissues. In Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH), pathologic Langerhans cells (LCs) accumulate in several tissues, including skin, bone, and lymphoid organs. We have examined 24 LCH cases and find that pathologic LCs expressed CCR6 and CCR7 coincidentally in all cases. Furthermore, MIP-3 alpha/CCL20 is expressed by keratinocytes in involved skin and by macrophages and osteoblasts in involved bone. Expression of CCR6 by pathologic LCs may contribute to their accumulation in nonlymphoid organs such as skin and bone, whereas CCR7 expression may direct them to lymphoid tissue. Histiocytes in Rosai-Dorfman disease and hemophagocytic syndrome also coexpressed CCR6 and CCR7, suggesting that this may be a general attribute of abnormal histiocytes.

  1. Energy metabolism drives myeloid-derived suppressor cell differentiation and functions in pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sica, Antonio; Strauss, Laura

    2017-02-21

    Over the last decade, a heterogeneous population of immature myeloid cells with major regulatory functions has been described in cancer and other pathologic conditions and ultimately defined as MDSCs. Most of the early work on the origins and functions of MDSCs has been in murine and human tumor bearers in which MDSCs are known to be immunosuppressive and to result in both reduced immune surveillance and antitumor cytotoxicity. More recent studies, however, suggest that expansion of these immature myeloid cells may be linked to most, if not all, chronic and acute inflammatory processes. The universal expansion to inflammatory stimuli of MDSCs suggests that these cells may be more of a normal component of the inflammatory response (emergency myelopoiesis) than simply a pathologic response to a growing tumor. Instead of an adverse immunosuppressive response, expansion of these immature myeloid cell populations may result from a complex balance between increased immune surveillance and dampened adaptive immune responses that are common to many inflammatory responses. Within this scenario, new pathways of metabolic reprogramming are emerging as drivers of MDSC differentiation and functions in cancer and inflammatory disorders, crucially linking metabolic syndrome to inflammatory processes.

  2. A mouse model of pathological small intestinal epithelial cell apoptosis and shedding induced by systemic administration of lipopolysaccharide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan M. Williams

    2013-11-01

    The gut barrier, composed of a single layer of intestinal epithelial cells (IECs held together by tight junctions, prevents the entrance of harmful microorganisms, antigens and toxins from the gut lumen into the blood. Small intestinal homeostasis is normally maintained by the rate of shedding of senescent enterocytes from the villus tip exactly matching the rate of generation of new cells in the crypt. However, in various localized and systemic inflammatory conditions, intestinal homeostasis can be disturbed as a result of increased IEC shedding. Such pathological IEC shedding can cause transient gaps to develop in the epithelial barrier and result in increased intestinal permeability. Although pathological IEC shedding has been implicated in the pathogenesis of conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease, our understanding of the underlying mechanisms remains limited. We have therefore developed a murine model to study this phenomenon, because IEC shedding in this species is morphologically analogous to humans. IEC shedding was induced by systemic lipopolysaccharide (LPS administration in wild-type C57BL/6 mice, and in mice deficient in TNF-receptor 1 (Tnfr1−/−, Tnfr2 (Tnfr2−/−, nuclear factor kappa B1 (Nfκb1−/− or Nfĸb2 (Nfĸb2−/−. Apoptosis and cell shedding was quantified using immunohistochemistry for active caspase-3, and gut-to-circulation permeability was assessed by measuring plasma fluorescence following fluorescein-isothiocyanate–dextran gavage. LPS, at doses ≥0.125 mg/kg body weight, induced rapid villus IEC apoptosis, with peak cell shedding occurring at 1.5 hours after treatment. This coincided with significant villus shortening, fluid exudation into the gut lumen and diarrhea. A significant increase in gut-to-circulation permeability was observed at 5 hours. TNFR1 was essential for LPS-induced IEC apoptosis and shedding, and the fate of the IECs was also dependent on NFκB, with signaling via NFκB1 favoring cell survival and

  3. A systems biology approach to understand the pathophysiological mechanisms of cardiac pathological hypertrophy associated with rosiglitazone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschuren, L.; Wielinga, P.Y.; Kelder, T.; Radonjic, M.; Salic, K.; Kleemann, R.; Ommen, B. van; Kooistra, T.

    2014-01-01

    Background : Cardiac pathological hypertrophy is associated with a significantly increased risk of coronary heart disease and has been observed in diabetic patients treated with rosiglitazone whereas most published studies do not suggest a similar increase in risk of cardiovascular events in pioglit

  4. Extracellular Membrane Vesicles as Vehicles for Brain Cell-to-Cell Interactions in Physiological as well as Pathological Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriella Schiera

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles are involved in a great variety of physiological events occurring in the nervous system, such as cross talk among neurons and glial cells in synapse development and function, integrated neuronal plasticity, neuronal-glial metabolic exchanges, and synthesis and dynamic renewal of myelin. Many of these EV-mediated processes depend on the exchange of proteins, mRNAs, and noncoding RNAs, including miRNAs, which occurs among glial and neuronal cells. In addition, production and exchange of EVs can be modified under pathological conditions, such as brain cancer and neurodegeneration. Like other cancer cells, brain tumours can use EVs to secrete factors, which allow escaping from immune surveillance, and to transfer molecules into the surrounding cells, thus transforming their phenotype. Moreover, EVs can function as a way to discard material dangerous to cancer cells, such as differentiation-inducing proteins, and even drugs. Intriguingly, EVs seem to be also involved in spreading through the brain of aggregated proteins, such as prions and aggregated tau protein. Finally, EVs can carry useful biomarkers for the early diagnosis of diseases. Herein we summarize possible roles of EVs in brain physiological functions and discuss their involvement in the horizontal spreading, from cell to cell, of both cancer and neurodegenerative pathologies.

  5. Umbilical cord as a mesenchymal stem cell source for treating joint pathologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arufe, Maria Carmen; De la Fuente, Alexandre; Fuentes, Isaac; Toro, Francisco Javier De; Blanco, Francisco Javier

    2011-06-18

    Articular cartilage disorders and injuries often result in life-long chronic pain and compromised quality of life. Regrettably, the regeneration of articular cartilage is a continuing challenge for biomedical research. One of the most promising therapeutic approaches is cell-based tissue engineering, which provides a healthy population of cells to the injured site but requires differentiated chondrocytes from an uninjured site. The use of healthy chondrocytes has been found to have limitations. A promising alternative cell population is mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), known to possess excellent proliferation potential and proven capability for differentiation into chondrocytes. The "immunosuppressive" property of human MSCs makes them an important candidate for allogeneic cell therapy. The use of allogeneic MSCs to repair large defects may prove to be an alternative to current autologous and allogeneic tissue-grafting procedures. An allogeneic cell-based approach would enable MSCs to be isolated from any donor, expanded and cryopreserved in allogeneic MSC banks, providing a readily available source of progenitors for cell replacement therapy. These possibilities have spawned the current exponential growth in stem cell research in pharmaceutical and biotechnology communities. Our objective in this review is to summarize the knowledge about MSCs from umbilical cord stroma and focus mainly on their applications for joint pathologies.

  6. Apical dendrite degeneration, a novel cellular pathology for Betz cells in ALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genç, Barış; Jara, Javier H.; Lagrimas, Amiko K. B.; Pytel, Peter; Roos, Raymond P.; Mesulam, M. Marsel; Geula, Changiz; Bigio, Eileen H.; Özdinler, P. Hande

    2017-01-01

    Apical dendrites of Betz cells are important sites for the integration of cortical input, however their health has not been fully assessed in ALS patients. We investigated the primary motor cortices isolated from post-mortem normal control subjects, patients with familial ALS (fALS), sporadic ALS (sALS), ALS with frontotemporal dementia (FTD-ALS), and Alzheimer’s disease (AD), and found profound apical dendrite degeneration of Betz cells in both fALS and sALS, as well as FTD-ALS patients. In contrast, Betz cells of AD patients and normal controls retain cellular integrity in the motor cortex, and CA1 pyramidal neurons show abnormalities predominantly within their soma, rather than the apical dendrite. In line with extensive vacuolation and cytoarchitectural disintegration, the numbers of synapses were also significantly reduced only in ALS patients. Our findings indicate apical dendrite degeneration as a novel cellular pathology that distinguishes ALS and further support the importance of cortical dysfunction for disease pathology. PMID:28165465

  7. Bioluminescence imaging of β cells and intrahepatic insulin gene activity under normal and pathological conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tokio Katsumata

    Full Text Available In diabetes research, bioluminescence imaging (BLI has been applied in studies of β-cell impairment, development, and islet transplantation. To develop a mouse model that enables noninvasive imaging of β cells, we generated a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC transgenic mouse in which a mouse 200-kbp genomic fragment comprising the insulin I gene drives luciferase expression (Ins1-luc BAC transgenic mouse. BLI of mice was performed using the IVIS Spectrum system after intraperitoneal injection of luciferin, and the bioluminescence signal from the pancreatic region analyzed. When compared with MIP-Luc-VU mice [FVB/N-Tg(Ins1-lucVUPwrs/J] expressing luciferase under the control of the 9.2-kbp mouse insulin I promoter (MIP, the bioluminescence emission from Ins1-luc BAC transgenic mice was enhanced approximately 4-fold. Streptozotocin-treated Ins1-luc BAC transgenic mice developed severe diabetes concomitant with a sharp decline in the BLI signal intensity in the pancreas. Conversely, mice fed a high-fat diet for 8 weeks showed an increase in the signal, reflecting a decrease or increase in the β-cell mass. Although the bioluminescence intensity of the islets correlated well with the number of isolated islets in vitro, the intensity obtained from a living mouse in vivo did not necessarily reflect an absolute quantification of the β-cell mass under pathological conditions. On the other hand, adenovirus-mediated gene transduction of β-cell-related transcription factors in Ins1-luc BAC transgenic mice generated luminescence from the hepatic region for more than 1 week. These results demonstrate that BLI in Ins1-luc BAC transgenic mice provides a noninvasive method of imaging islet β cells and extrapancreatic activity of the insulin gene in the liver under normal and pathological conditions.

  8. Evidence from human and animal studies: Pathological roles of CD8+ T cells in autoimmune peripheral neuropathies

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    Mu eYang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune peripheral neuropathies such as Guillain Barre Syndrome (GBS and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP affect millions of people worldwide. Despite significant advances in understanding the pathology, the molecular and cellular mechanisms of immune-mediated neuropathies remain elusive. T lymphocytes definitely play an important role in disease pathogenesis and CD4+ T cells have been the main area of research for decades. This is partly due to the fact that the most frequent animal model to study autoimmune peripheral neuropathy is experimental allergic neuritis (EAN. As it is induced commonly by immunization with peripheral nerve proteins, EAN is driven mainly by CD4+ T cells. However, similarly to what has been reported for patients suffering from multiple sclerosis, a significant body of evidence indicate that CD8+ T cells may play a pathogenic role in GBS and CIDP disease development and/or progression. Here, we summarize clinical studies pertaining to the presence and potential role of CD8+ T cells in autoimmune peripheral neuropathy. We also discuss the findings from our most recent studies using a transgenic mouse line (L31 mice in which the T cell co-stimulator molecule B7.2 (CD86 is constitutively expressed in antigen presenting cells of the nervous tissues. L31 mice spontaneously develop peripheral neuropathy, and CD8+ T cells are found accumulating in peripheral nerves of symptomatic animals. Interestingly, depletion of CD4+ T cells accelerates disease onset and increases disease prevalence. Finally, we point out some unanswered questions for future research to dissect the critical roles of CD8+ T cells in autoimmune peripheral neuropathies.

  9. Alzheimer’s Disease: Mechanism and Approach to Cell Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Amemori

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is the most common form of dementia. The risk of AD increases with age. Although two of the main pathological features of AD, amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, were already recognized by Alois Alzheimer at the beginning of the 20th century, the pathogenesis of the disease remains unsettled. Therapeutic approaches targeting plaques or tangles have not yet resulted in satisfactory improvements in AD treatment. This may, in part, be due to early-onset and late-onset AD pathogenesis being underpinned by different mechanisms. Most animal models of AD are generated from gene mutations involved in early onset familial AD, accounting for only 1% of all cases, which may consequently complicate our understanding of AD mechanisms. In this article, the authors discuss the pathogenesis of AD according to the two main neuropathologies, including senescence-related mechanisms and possible treatments using stem cells, namely mesenchymal and neural stem cells.

  10. Alzheimer's Disease: Mechanism and Approach to Cell Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amemori, Takashi; Jendelova, Pavla; Ruzicka, Jiri; Urdzikova, Lucia Machova; Sykova, Eva

    2015-11-04

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia. The risk of AD increases with age. Although two of the main pathological features of AD, amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, were already recognized by Alois Alzheimer at the beginning of the 20th century, the pathogenesis of the disease remains unsettled. Therapeutic approaches targeting plaques or tangles have not yet resulted in satisfactory improvements in AD treatment. This may, in part, be due to early-onset and late-onset AD pathogenesis being underpinned by different mechanisms. Most animal models of AD are generated from gene mutations involved in early onset familial AD, accounting for only 1% of all cases, which may consequently complicate our understanding of AD mechanisms. In this article, the authors discuss the pathogenesis of AD according to the two main neuropathologies, including senescence-related mechanisms and possible treatments using stem cells, namely mesenchymal and neural stem cells.

  11. Molecular mechanisms controlling the cell cycle in embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelalim, Essam M

    2013-12-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells are originated from the inner cell mass of a blastocyst stage embryo. They can proliferate indefinitely, maintain an undifferentiated state (self-renewal), and differentiate into any cell type (pluripotency). ES cells have an unusual cell cycle structure, consists mainly of S phase cells, a short G1 phase and absence of G1/S checkpoint. Cell division and cell cycle progression are controlled by mechanisms ensuring the accurate transmission of genetic information from generation to generation. Therefore, control of cell cycle is a complicated process, involving several signaling pathways. Although great progress has been made on the molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of ES cell cycle, many regulatory mechanisms remain unknown. This review summarizes the current knowledge about the molecular mechanisms regulating the cell cycle of ES cells and describes the relationship existing between cell cycle progression and the self-renewal.

  12. LABILE IRON IN CELLS AND BODY FLUIDS . Physiology, Pathology and Pharmacology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zvi Ioav Cabantchik

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In living systems iron appears predominantly associated with proteins, but can also be detected in forms referred as labile iron, which denotes the combined redox properties of iron and its amenability to exchange between ligands, including chelators. The labile cell iron (LCI composition varies with metal concentration and substances with chelating groups but also with pH and the redox potential. Although physiologically in the lower µM range, LCI plays a key role in cell iron economy as cross-roads of metabolic pathways. LCI levels are continually regulated by an iron-responsive machinery that balances iron uptake versus deposition into ferritin. However, LCI rises aberrantly in some cell types due to faulty cell utilization pathways or infiltration by pathological iron forms that are found in hemosiderotic plasma. As LCI attains pathological levels, it can catalyze reactive O species (ROS formation that, at particular threshold, can surpass cellular anti-oxidant capacities and seriously damage its constituents. While in normal plasma and interstitial fluids, virtually all iron is securely carried by circulating transferrin (that renders iron essentially non-labile, in systemic iron overload (IO, the total plasma iron binding capacity is often surpassed by a massive iron influx from hyperabsorptive gut or from erythrocyte overburdened spleen and/or liver. As plasma transferrin approaches iron saturation, labile plasma iron (LPI emerges in forms that can infiltrate cells by unregulated routes and raise LCI to toxic levels. Despite the limited knowledge available on LPI speciation in different types and degrees of iron overload, LPI measurements can be and are in fact used for identifying systemic IO and for initiating/adjusting chelation regimens to attain full-day LPI protection. A recent application of labile iron assay is the detection of labile components in iv iron formulations per se as well as in plasma (LPI following parenteral iron

  13. Molecular Mechanisms of Glutamine Synthetase Mutations that Lead to Clinically Relevant Pathologies.

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    Benedikt Frieg

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Glutamine synthetase (GS catalyzes ATP-dependent ligation of ammonia and glutamate to glutamine. Two mutations of human GS (R324C and R341C were connected to congenital glutamine deficiency with severe brain malformations resulting in neonatal death. Another GS mutation (R324S was identified in a neurologically compromised patient. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the impairment of GS activity by these mutations have remained elusive. Molecular dynamics simulations, free energy calculations, and rigidity analyses suggest that all three mutations influence the first step of GS catalytic cycle. The R324S and R324C mutations deteriorate GS catalytic activity due to loss of direct interactions with ATP. As to R324S, indirect, water-mediated interactions reduce this effect, which may explain the suggested higher GS residual activity. The R341C mutation weakens ATP binding by destabilizing the interacting residue R340 in the apo state of GS. Additionally, the mutation is predicted to result in a significant destabilization of helix H8, which should negatively affect glutamate binding. This prediction was tested in HEK293 cells overexpressing GS by dot-blot analysis: Structural stability of H8 was impaired through mutation of amino acids interacting with R341, as indicated by a loss of masking of an epitope in the glutamate binding pocket for a monoclonal anti-GS antibody by L-methionine-S-sulfoximine; in contrast, cells transfected with wild type GS showed the masking. Our analyses reveal complex molecular effects underlying impaired GS catalytic activity in three clinically relevant mutants. Our findings could stimulate the development of ATP binding-enhancing molecules by which the R324S mutant can be repaired extrinsically.

  14. The human rhinovirus: human-pathological impact, mechanisms of antirhinoviral agents, and strategies for their discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollinger, Judith M; Schmidtke, Michaela

    2011-01-01

    As the major etiological agent of the common cold, human rhinoviruses (HRV) cause millions of lost working and school days annually. Moreover, clinical studies proved an association between harmless upper respiratory tract infections and more severe diseases e.g. sinusitis, asthma, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Both the medicinal and socio-economic impact of HRV infections and the lack of antiviral drugs substantiate the need for intensive antiviral research. A common structural feature of the approximately 100 HRV serotypes is the icosahedrally shaped capsid formed by 60 identical copies of viral capsid proteins VP1-4. The capsid protects the single-stranded, positive sense RNA genome of about 7,400 bases in length. Both structural as well as nonstructural proteins produced during the viral life cycle have been identified as potential targets for blocking viral replication at the step of attachment, entry, uncoating, RNA and protein synthesis by synthetic or natural compounds. Moreover, interferon and phytoceuticals were shown to protect host cells. Most of the known inhibitors of HRV replication were discovered as a result of empirical or semi-empirical screening in cell culture. Structure-activity relationship studies are used for hit optimization and lead structure discovery. The increasing structural insight and molecular understanding of viral proteins on the one hand and the advent of innovative computer-assisted technologies on the other hand have facilitated a rationalized access for the discovery of small chemical entities with antirhinoviral (anti-HRV) activity. This review will (i) summarize existing structural knowledge about HRV, (ii) focus on mechanisms of anti-HRV agents from synthetic and natural origin, and (iii) demonstrate strategies for efficient lead structure discovery.

  15. Molecular Mechanisms of Glutamine Synthetase Mutations that Lead to Clinically Relevant Pathologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frieg, Benedikt; Görg, Boris; Homeyer, Nadine; Keitel, Verena; Häussinger, Dieter; Gohlke, Holger

    2016-02-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) catalyzes ATP-dependent ligation of ammonia and glutamate to glutamine. Two mutations of human GS (R324C and R341C) were connected to congenital glutamine deficiency with severe brain malformations resulting in neonatal death. Another GS mutation (R324S) was identified in a neurologically compromised patient. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the impairment of GS activity by these mutations have remained elusive. Molecular dynamics simulations, free energy calculations, and rigidity analyses suggest that all three mutations influence the first step of GS catalytic cycle. The R324S and R324C mutations deteriorate GS catalytic activity due to loss of direct interactions with ATP. As to R324S, indirect, water-mediated interactions reduce this effect, which may explain the suggested higher GS residual activity. The R341C mutation weakens ATP binding by destabilizing the interacting residue R340 in the apo state of GS. Additionally, the mutation is predicted to result in a significant destabilization of helix H8, which should negatively affect glutamate binding. This prediction was tested in HEK293 cells overexpressing GS by dot-blot analysis: Structural stability of H8 was impaired through mutation of amino acids interacting with R341, as indicated by a loss of masking of an epitope in the glutamate binding pocket for a monoclonal anti-GS antibody by L-methionine-S-sulfoximine; in contrast, cells transfected with wild type GS showed the masking. Our analyses reveal complex molecular effects underlying impaired GS catalytic activity in three clinically relevant mutants. Our findings could stimulate the development of ATP binding-enhancing molecules by which the R324S mutant can be repaired extrinsically.

  16. The pathology of lithium induced nephropathy: a case report and review, with emphasis on the demonstration of mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    B N, Kumarguru; M, Natarajan; Nagarajappa, A H

    2013-02-01

    Lithium is a psychotropic agent which is widely employed in the psychiatric practice throughout the world. The therapeutic index of lithium is low and an acute intoxication may appear, which may lead to death or a permanent disability. A frequent side effect of lithium is renal toxicity. The collecting tubules have been identified as the site of action of lithium, due to the down regulation of Acquaporin-2. The mast cells have been associated with a wide range of human renal diseases. They have been documented to be associated with interstitial fibrosis and an impaired renal function. We are reporting a case of a 42 year old male who was admitted with a history of an altered sensorium of short duration. He had bipolar disorder and was on lithium. Investigations revealed a severely compromised renal function. The patient's condition worsened and he expired. A necropsy was performed. The kidneys and the lungs were subjected to a histopathological examination. The kidneys showed a significant Chronic Tubulointerstitial Nephropathy [CTIN] and a considerable glomerular pathology. Toludine blue [1%] staining demonstrated mast cells in the interstitium and the connective tissue of the renal pelvis. This appears to be the first time that mast cells were demonstrated in a case of lithium induced nephropathy in humans. It may be hypothesized that mast cells may possibly play a role in lithium induced nephropathy as a concurrent mechanism.

  17. Mechanical communication in cardiac cell synchronized beating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitsan, Ido; Drori, Stavit; Lewis, Yair E.; Cohen, Shlomi; Tzlil, Shelly

    2016-05-01

    Cell-cell communication, which enables cells to coordinate their activity and is essential for growth, development and function, is usually ascribed a chemical or electrical origin. However, cells can exert forces and respond to environment elasticity and to mechanical deformations created by their neighbours. The extent to which this mechanosensing ability facilitates intercellular communication remains unclear. Here we demonstrate mechanical communication between cells directly for the first time, providing evidence for a long-range interaction that induces long-lasting alterations in interacting cells. We show that an isolated cardiac cell can be trained to beat at a given frequency by mechanically stimulating the underlying substrate. Deformations are induced using an oscillatory mechanical probe that mimics the deformations generated by a beating neighbouring cardiac cell. Unlike electrical field stimulation, the probe-induced beating rate is maintained by the cell for an hour after the stimulation stops, implying that long-term modifications occur within the cell. These long-term alterations provide a mechanism for cells that communicate mechanically to be less variable in their electromechanical delay. Mechanical coupling between cells therefore ensures that the final outcome of action potential pacing is synchronized beating. We further show that the contractile machinery is essential for mechanical communication.

  18. Novel molecular aberrations and pathologic findings in a tubulocystic variant of renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikhil A Sangle

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tubulocystic renal cell carcinoma (TRCC is an indolent type of renal cell carcinoma with a good prognosis based on the limited number of published cases. Herein, we describe the unusual clinical, pathologic and molecular findings in a case of TRCC. Our patient with TRCC had two local recurrences and a brain metastasis following radical nephrectomy. Unusual histologic findings included focal solid growth pattern and cytologic atypia. A genome-wide molecular inversion probe assay identified copy number (CN loss in three chromosome regions and one region with copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity (copy-neutral LOH. Copy number variations (CNVs were observed (chromosomes 4p16.1 and 17q21.31-q21.32 in both the tumor and the normal tissue, and most likely represents benign variations. The loss of entire chromosomes 9, 18 and 15 and copy-neutral LOH involving 6p22.1 was observed only in the tumor. The presence of these clinical, pathologic and molecular findings could be related to an increased risk for tumor recurrence and poor prognosis. The novel molecular findings described in TRCC might represent new targets for novel therapies.

  19. Molecular Mechanisms of Cell-cell Recognition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jia-Huai

    2004-01-01

    Cell-cell recognition is the key for multicellular organisms to survive. This recognition critically depends on protein-protein interactions from opposing cell surfaces. Recent structural investigations reveal unique features of these cell surface receptors and how they interact. These interactions are specific, but usually relatively weak, with more hydrophilic forces involved in binding. The receptors appear to have specialized ways to present their key interacting elements for ligand-binding from the cell surface. Cell-cell contacts are multivalent. A large group of cell surface molecules are engaged in interactions. Characteristic weak interactions make possible for each individual molecule pair within the group to constantly associate-dissociate-reassociate, such that the cell-cell recognition becomes a dynamic process. The immunological synapse is a good example for immune receptors to be orchestrated in performing immunological function in a collective fashion.

  20. Glioma grading using cell nuclei morphologic features in digital pathology images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reza, Syed M. S.; Iftekharuddin, Khan M.

    2016-03-01

    This work proposes a computationally efficient cell nuclei morphologic feature analysis technique to characterize the brain gliomas in tissue slide images. In this work, our contributions are two-fold: 1) obtain an optimized cell nuclei segmentation method based on the pros and cons of the existing techniques in literature, 2) extract representative features by k-mean clustering of nuclei morphologic features to include area, perimeter, eccentricity, and major axis length. This clustering based representative feature extraction avoids shortcomings of extensive tile [1] [2] and nuclear score [3] based methods for brain glioma grading in pathology images. Multilayer perceptron (MLP) is used to classify extracted features into two tumor types: glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and low grade glioma (LGG). Quantitative scores such as precision, recall, and accuracy are obtained using 66 clinical patients' images from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) [4] dataset. On an average ~94% accuracy from 10 fold crossvalidation confirms the efficacy of the proposed method.

  1. Columnar cell lesions of the canine mammary gland: pathological features and immunophenotypic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassali Geovanni D

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been suggested that columnar cell lesions indicate an alteration of the human mammary gland involved in the development of breast cancer. They have not previously been described in canine mammary gland. The aim of this paper is describe the morphologic spectrum of columnar cell lesions in canine mammary gland specimens and their association with other breast lesions. Methods A total of 126 lesions were subjected to a comprehensive morphological review based upon the human breast classification system for columnar cell lesions. The presence of preinvasive (epithelial hyperplasia and in situ carcinoma and invasive lesions was determined and immunophenotypic analysis (estrogen receptor (ER, progesterone receptor (PgR, high molecular weight cytokeratin (34βE-12, E-cadherin, Ki-67, HER-2 and P53 was perfomed. Results Columnar cell lesions were identified in 67 (53.1% of the 126 canine mammary glands with intraepithelial alterations. They were observed in the terminal duct lobular units and characterized at dilated acini may be lined by several layers of columnar epithelial cells with elongated nuclei. Of the columnar cell lesions identified, 41 (61.2% were without and 26 (38.8% with atypia. Association with ductal hyperplasia was observed in 45/67 (67.1%. Sixty (89.5% of the columnar cell lesions coexisted with neoplastic lesions (20 in situ carcinomas, 19 invasive carcinomas and 21 benign tumors. The columnar cells were ER, PgR and E-cadherin positive but negative for cytokeratin 34βE-12, HER-2 and P53. The proliferation rate as measured by Ki-67 appeared higher in the lesions analyzed than in normal TDLUs. Conclusions Columnar cell lesions in canine mammary gland are pathologically and immunophenotypically similar to those in human breast. This may suggest that dogs are a suitable model for the comparative study of noninvasive breast lesions.

  2. Cell mechanics as a marker for diseases: Biomedical applications of AFM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rianna, Carmela; Radmacher, Manfred

    2016-08-01

    Many diseases are related to changes in cell mechanics. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) is one of the most suitable techniques allowing the investigation of both topography and mechanical properties of adherent cells with high spatial resolution under physiological conditions. Over the years the use of this technique in medical and clinical applications has largely increased, resulting in the notion of cell mechanics as a biomarker to discriminate between different physiological and pathological states of cells. Cell mechanics has proven to be a biophysical fingerprint able discerning between cell phenotypes, unraveling processes in aging or diseases, or even detecting and diagnosing cellular pathologies. We will review in this report some of the works on cell mechanics investigated by AFM with clinical and medical relevance in order to clarify the state of research in this field and to highlight the role of cell mechanics in the study of pathologies, focusing on cancer, blood and cardiovascular diseases. At the request of all authors of the paper, and with the agreement of the Proceedings Editor, an updated version of this article was published on 26 September 2016. The original version supplied to AIP Publishing contained blurred figures introduced during the PDF conversion process. Moreover, Equations (5), (6), and (7) were not correctly cited in the text. These errors have been corrected in the updated and republished article.

  3. Optical coherence tomography segmentation reveals ganglion cell layer pathology after optic neuritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syc, Stephanie B; Saidha, Shiv; Newsome, Scott D; Ratchford, John N; Levy, Michael; Ford, E'tona; Crainiceanu, Ciprian M; Durbin, Mary K; Oakley, Jonathan D; Meyer, Scott A; Frohman, Elliot M; Calabresi, Peter A

    2012-02-01

    Post-mortem ganglion cell dropout has been observed in multiple sclerosis; however, longitudinal in vivo assessment of retinal neuronal layers following acute optic neuritis remains largely unexplored. Peripapillary retinal nerve fibre layer thickness, measured by optical coherence tomography, has been proposed as an outcome measure in studies of neuroprotective agents in multiple sclerosis, yet potential swelling during the acute stages of optic neuritis may confound baseline measurements. The objective of this study was to ascertain whether patients with multiple sclerosis or neuromyelitis optica develop retinal neuronal layer pathology following acute optic neuritis, and to systematically characterize such changes in vivo over time. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography imaging, including automated retinal layer segmentation, was performed serially in 20 participants during the acute phase of optic neuritis, and again 3 and 6 months later. Imaging was performed cross-sectionally in 98 multiple sclerosis participants, 22 neuromyelitis optica participants and 72 healthy controls. Neuronal thinning was observed in the ganglion cell layer of eyes affected by acute optic neuritis 3 and 6 months after onset (P optica, with and without a history of optic neuritis, when compared with healthy controls (P optica and a history of optic neuritis exhibited the greatest reduction in ganglion cell layer thickness. Results from our in vivo longitudinal study demonstrate retinal neuronal layer thinning following acute optic neuritis, corroborating the hypothesis that axonal injury may cause neuronal pathology in multiple sclerosis. Further, these data provide evidence of subclinical disease activity, in both participants with multiple sclerosis and with neuromyelitis optica without a history of optic neuritis, a disease in which subclinical disease activity has not been widely appreciated. No pathology was seen in the inner or outer nuclear layers of eyes with optic

  4. Central nervous system lesions in adult T-cell leukaemia: MRI and pathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitajima, M.; Korogi, Y.; Shigematsu, Y.; Liang, L.; Takahashi, M. [Department of Radiology, Kumamoto University School of Medicine, Honjo, Kumamoto (Japan); Matsuoka, M. [Second Division of Internal Medicine, Kumamoto University School of Medicine, Honjo, Kumamoto (Japan); Yamamoto, T. [Department of Pathology, Kumamoto University School of Medicine, Honjo, Kumamoto (Japan); Jhono, M. [Department of Dermatology, Kumamoto University School of Medicine, Honjo, Kumamoto (Japan); Eto, K. [The National Institute for Minamata Disease, Minamata (Japan)

    2002-07-01

    Adult T-cell leukaemia (ATL) is a T-cell lymphoid neoplasm caused by human T-cell leukaemia virus type I (HTLV-I). Radiological findings in central nervous system (CNS) involvement have not been well characterised. We reviewed the MRI of 18 patients with ATL who developed new neurological symptoms or signs, and pathology specimens from a 53-year-old woman who died of ATL. MRI findings were divided into three categories: definite, probable, and other abnormal. Definite and probable findings were defined as ATL-related. The characteristic findings were multiple parenchymal masses with or without contrast enhancement adjacent to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) spaced and the deep grey matter of both cerebral hemispheres, plus leptomeningeal lesion. One patient had both cerebral and spinal cord lesions. Other abnormal findings in eight patients included one case of leukoencephalopathy caused by methotrexate. The histology findings consisted of clusters of tumour cells along perivascular spaces, and scattered infiltration of the parenchyma, with nests of tumour cells. Leptomeningeal infiltration by tumour spread into the parenchyma and secondary degeneration of the neuronal tracts was observed. MRI was useful for detecting CNS invasion by ATL and differentiating it from other abnormalities. The MRI findings seemed to correlate well with the histological changes. (orig.)

  5. Molecular Mechanisms of HTLV-1 Cell-to-Cell Transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Gross

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The tumorvirus human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1, a member of the delta-retrovirus family, is transmitted via cell-containing body fluids such as blood products, semen, and breast milk. In vivo, HTLV-1 preferentially infects CD4+ T-cells, and to a lesser extent, CD8+ T-cells, dendritic cells, and monocytes. Efficient infection of CD4+ T-cells requires cell-cell contacts while cell-free virus transmission is inefficient. Two types of cell-cell contacts have been described to be critical for HTLV-1 transmission, tight junctions and cellular conduits. Further, two non-exclusive mechanisms of virus transmission at cell-cell contacts have been proposed: (1 polarized budding of HTLV-1 into synaptic clefts; and (2 cell surface transfer of viral biofilms at virological synapses. In contrast to CD4+ T-cells, dendritic cells can be infected cell-free and, to a greater extent, via viral biofilms in vitro. Cell-to-cell transmission of HTLV-1 requires a coordinated action of steps in the virus infectious cycle with events in the cell-cell adhesion process; therefore, virus propagation from cell-to-cell depends on specific interactions between cellular and viral proteins. Here, we review the molecular mechanisms of HTLV-1 transmission with a focus on the HTLV-1-encoded proteins Tax and p8, their impact on host cell factors mediating cell-cell contacts, cytoskeletal remodeling, and thus, virus propagation.

  6. Probing cell mechanical properties with microfluidic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowat, Amy

    2012-02-01

    Exploiting flow on the micron-scale is emerging as a method to probe cell mechanical properties with 10-1000x advances in throughput over existing technologies. The mechanical properties of cells and the cell nucleus are implicated in a wide range of biological contexts: for example, the ability of white blood cells to deform is central to immune response; and malignant cells show decreased stiffness compared to benign cells. We recently developed a microfluidic device to probe cell and nucleus mechanical properties: cells are forced to deform through a narrow constrictions in response to an applied pressure; flowing cells through a series of constrictions enables us to probe the ability of hundreds of cells to deform and relax during flow. By tuning the constriction width so it is narrower than the width of the cell nucleus, we can specifically probe the effects of nuclear physical properties on whole cell deformability. We show that the nucleus is the rate-limiting step in cell passage: inducing a change in its shape to a multilobed structure results in cells that transit more quickly; increased levels of lamin A, a nuclear protein that is key for nuclear shape and mechanical stability, impairs the passage of cells through constrictions. We are currently developing a new class of microfluidic devices to simultaneously probe the deformability of hundreds of cell samples in parallel. Using the same soft lithography techniques, membranes are fabricated to have well-defined pore distribution, width, length, and tortuosity. We design the membranes to interface with a multiwell plate, enabling simultaneous measurement of hundreds of different samples. Given the wide spectrum of diseases where altered cell and nucleus mechanical properties are implicated, such a platform has great potential, for example, to screen cells based on their mechanical phenotype against a library of drugs.

  7. Atypical squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx and hypopharynx: radiologic features and pathologic correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, M.; Ruefenacht, D.A.; Terrier, F. [Geneva Univ. (Switzerland). Dept. de Radiologie; Moulin, G. [Dept. of Radiology, University Hospital La Timone, Marseille (France); Kurt, A.M. [Dept. of Pathology, Geneva University Hospital, Geneva (Switzerland); Zbaeren, P. [Dept. of Head and Neck Surgery, University Hospital Bern (Switzerland); Dulgerov, P.; Marchal, F.; Lehmann, W. [Dept. of Head and Neck Surgery, Geneva University Hospital (Switzerland); Zanaret, P. [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, University Hospital La Timone, Marseille (France)

    1998-12-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the radiologic features of atypical forms of squamous cell cancer and correlate them with clinical, endoscopic, and histopathologic findings. The CT and MRI images of 31 patients with atypical forms of squamous cell carcinoma were reviewed retrospectively and the radiologic findings were correlated with clinical, endoscopic, and histopathologic findings. Histopathologic diagnoses included undifferentiated carcinoma of nasopharyngeal type (n = 8), verrucous carcinoma (n = 18), spindle cell carcinoma (n = 3), and basaloid cell carcinoma (n = 2). Undifferentiated carcinoma of nasopharyngeal type was located in the supraglottis or piriform sinus beneath an intact mucosa and initial endoscopic biopsy was most often negative. The discrepancy between an intact mucosa at endoscopy and a solid mass with homogenous enhancement at CT or MRI was characteristic for these tumors and warranted further investigations to obtain the definitive histologic diagnosis. Verrucous carcinoma displayed characteristic clinical, radiologic, and pathologic features, namely, an exophytic tumor arising from the glottic level displaying a rugged surface with finger-like projections but with only minor submucosal infiltration. Spindle cell carcinoma appeared as a polypoid mass with a thin stalk arising from the supraglottis. Basaloid cell carcinoma displayed a distinct lobulated enhancement pattern which was observed on contrast-enhanced T1-weighted SE images. Although the MR and CT features of atypical forms of squamous cell carcinoma cannot be considered pathognomonic they should raise the differential diagnosis even if endoscopic biopsy has been negative. The radiologist`s awareness of the appearance of these unusual tumors on CT and MR images may greatly facilitate the diagnostic work-up and helps to guide the endoscopist to the adequate biopsy site in order to establish the correct diagnosis. (orig.) With 8 figs., 2 tabs., 39 refs.

  8. Pathologic Rupture of the Spleen in Mantle-Cell-Type Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher B. Tan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL accounts for less than 10 percent of all non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL. Pathologic or spontaneous rupture of the spleen has been reported in patients with lymphoma; however only 5 cases have been reported in patients with MCL. Although splenomegaly occurs frequently in patients with MCL, spontaneous splenic rupture is rare. We present a case of a 51-year-old female with MCL, who presented to the medical emergency room with splenic rupture. This case illustrates that clinicians should be aware of the incidence and presentation of patients with MCL and spontaneous splenic rupture, as early detection and heightened suspicion may prevent potentially fatal outcomes.

  9. Myeloid derived suppressor cells in physiological and pathological conditions: the good, the bad, and the ugly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafini, Paolo

    2013-12-01

    Myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), a heterogeneous population of myeloid progenitors, are recognized as a key element in tumor escape and progression. The importance of MDSCs in human malignancies has been demonstrated in recent years, and new approaches targeting their suppressive/tolerogenic action are currently being tested in both preclinical model and clinical trials. However, emerging evidence suggests that MDSCs may play a prominent role as regulator of the physiologic, the chronic, and the pathologic immune responses. This review will focus on the biology of MDSC in light of these new findings and the possible role of this myeloid population not only in the progression of the tumor but also in its initiation.

  10. Biopsy-verified bronchiolitis obliterans and other noninfectious lung pathologies after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uhlving, Hilde Hylland; Andersen, Claus B; Christensen, Ib Jarle

    2015-01-01

    Bronchiolitis obliterans (BO) is a serious complication of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Lung biopsy is the gold standard for diagnosis. This study describes the course of BO and assesses the congruity between biopsy-verified BO and a modified version of the National...... Institutes of Health's consensus criteria for BO syndrome (BOS) based exclusively on noninvasive measures. We included 44 patients transplanted between 2000 and 2010 who underwent lung biopsy for suspected BO. Of those, 23 were diagnosed with BO and 21 presented other noninfectious pulmonary pathologies......, and maximal mid-expiratory flow throughout follow-up, but there was no difference in the change in pulmonary function from the time of lung biopsy. The BO diagnosis was not associated with poorer overall survival. Fifty-two percent of patients with biopsy-verified BO and 24% of patients with other...

  11. Mechanisms of T regulatory cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askenasy, Nadir; Kaminitz, Ayelet; Yarkoni, Shai

    2008-05-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) play a pivotal role in tolerance to self-antigens and tissue grafts, and suppression of autoimmune reactions. These cells modulate the intensity and quality of immune reactions through attenuation of the cytolytic activities of reactive immune cells. Treg cells operate primarily at the site of inflammation where they modulate the immune reaction through three major mechanisms: a) direct killing of cytotoxic cells through cell-to-cell contact, b) inhibition of cytokine production by cytotoxic cells, in particular interleukin-2, c) direct secretion of immunomodulatory cytokines, in particular TGF-beta and interleukin-10. In addition to differential contributions of these mechanisms under variable inflammatory conditions, mechanistic complexity and diversity evolves from the diverse tasks performed by various Treg cell subsets in different stages of the immune reaction. Here we attempt to integrate the current experimental evidence to delineate the major suppressive pathways of Treg cells.

  12. Molecular pathology of mismatch repair deficient tumours with emphasis on immune escape mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dierssen, Jan Willem Frederik

    2010-01-01

    This thesis describes molecular methods to distinguish separate colon tumour entities. Furthermore, it shows that distinct immune escape mechanisms, in particular distinct mechanisms of corrupting the HLA system, are operational in subsets of colon tumours. The apparent necessity of some colon tumou

  13. Primary stromal cells isolated from human various histological/pathological prostate have different phenotypes and tumor promotion role

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xiao-hai; ZHAO Fu-jun; HAN Bang-min; JIANG Qi; WANG Yong-chuan; WU Jian-hong; TANG Yue-qing; ZHANG Yue-ping; XIA Shu-jie

    2011-01-01

    Background Prostate stromal cells are known to regulate epithelial growth as well as support and maintain epithelial function. However, how stromal cells regulate epithelial cells and what differences among various histological/pathological prostate stromal cells in prostate cancer progression still remain unclear. This study aimed to investigate the different phenotypes of human various histological/pathological prostate stromal cells, and their role in tumor promotion.Methods The different phenotypes of the human normal prostatic peripheral zonal primary stromal cells (NPPF),transitional zonal primary stromal cells (NPTF), and prostate cancer associated primary stromal cells (CAF) were examined with growth curves and Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) assay. The different effects on prostate cancer cell line C4-2B by NPPF, NPTF, and CAF were examined with MTT assay and Annexin V-FITC assay. The gene expression of different histological/pathological prostate stromal cells was profiled by microarray and hierarchical cluster analysis.Results The growth rate of NPPF, NPTF and CAF gradually increased, followed by decreasing apoptosis. In vitro stromal-C4-2B cell line co-culture models, the proliferation and apoptosis of C4-2B cell line were differently affected by human various histological/pathological prostate stromal cells. CAF showed the most powerful effect to C4-2B cell line,as opposed to a weakest effect of NPTF. Microarray and hierarchical cluster analysis showed that the differentially expressed genes of CAF and NPPF were less than NPPF and NPTF, or CAF and NPTF. This was consistent with clinical observations that prostate cancer mostly derived from the peripheral zone and does not usually occur in the transitional zone.Conclusion NPPF, NPTF and CAF possess extremely different biological characteristics and gene expression, which may play an important role in genesis and development of prostate cancer.

  14. Lysosomal cell death mechanisms in aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Sintes, Raquel; Ledesma, María Dolores; Boya, Patricia

    2016-12-01

    Lysosomes are degradative organelles essential for cell homeostasis that regulate a variety of processes, from calcium signaling and nutrient responses to autophagic degradation of intracellular components. Lysosomal cell death is mediated by the lethal effects of cathepsins, which are released into the cytoplasm following lysosomal damage. This process of lysosomal membrane permeabilization and cathepsin release is observed in several physiopathological conditions and plays a role in tissue remodeling, the immune response to intracellular pathogens and neurodegenerative diseases. Many evidences indicate that aging strongly influences lysosomal activity by altering the physical and chemical properties of these organelles, rendering them more sensitive to stress. In this review we focus on how aging alters lysosomal function and increases cell sensitivity to lysosomal membrane permeabilization and lysosomal cell death, both in physiological conditions and age-related pathologies.

  15. Active cell mechanics: Measurement and theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Wylie W; Fodor, Étienne; Betz, Timo

    2015-11-01

    Living cells are active mechanical systems that are able to generate forces. Their structure and shape are primarily determined by biopolymer filaments and molecular motors that form the cytoskeleton. Active force generation requires constant consumption of energy to maintain the nonequilibrium activity to drive organization and transport processes necessary for their function. To understand this activity it is necessary to develop new approaches to probe the underlying physical processes. Active cell mechanics incorporates active molecular-scale force generation into the traditional framework of mechanics of materials. This review highlights recent experimental and theoretical developments towards understanding active cell mechanics. We focus primarily on intracellular mechanical measurements and theoretical advances utilizing the Langevin framework. These developing approaches allow a quantitative understanding of nonequilibrium mechanical activity in living cells. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mechanobiology.

  16. Human NK cell subsets redistribution in pathological conditions: A role for CCR7 receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Pesce

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Innate and adaptive immunity has evolved complex molecular mechanisms regulating immune cell migration to facilitate the dynamic cellular interactions required for its function involving the chemokines and their receptors.One important chemokine receptor in the immune system is represented by CCR7. Together with its ligands CCL19 and CCL21, this chemokine receptor controls different arrays of migratory events, both in innate and adaptive immunity, including homing of CD56bright NK cells, T cells and DCs to lymphoid compartments where T cell priming occurs. Only recently, a key role for CCR7 in promoting CD56dim NK cell migration towards lymphoid tissues has been described. Remarkably, this event can influence the shaping and polarization of adaptive T cell responses.In this review, we describe recent progress in understanding the mechanisms and the site where CD56dim KIR+ NK cells can acquire the capability to migrate towards lymph nodes. The emerging significance of this event in clinical transplantation is also discussed.

  17. Possible role of proteases in preconditioning of brain cells to pathological conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakovlev, A A; Gulyaeva, N V

    2015-02-01

    Preconditioning (PC) is one of the most effective strategies to reduce the severity of cell damage, in particular of nervous tissue cells. Although PC mechanisms are studied insufficiently, it is clear that proteases are involved in them, but their role has yet been not studied in detail. In this work, some mechanisms of a potential recruiting of proteases in PC are considered. Our attention is mainly focused on the protease families of caspases and cathepsins and on protease receptors. We present evidence that just these proteins are involved in the PC of brain cells. A hypothesis is proposed that secreted cathepsin B is involved in the realization of PC through activation of PAR2 receptor.

  18. BASEBALL THROWING MECHANICS AS THEY RELATE TO PATHOLOGY AND PERFORMANCE - A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rod Whiteley

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available It is a commonly held perception amongst biomechanists, sports medicine practitioners, baseball coaches and players, that an individual baseball player's style of throwing or pitching influences their performance and susceptibility to injury. With the results of a series of focus groups with baseball managers and pitching coaches in mind, the available scientific literature was reviewed regarding the contribution of individual aspects of pitching and throwing mechanics to potential for injury and performance. After a discussion of the limitations of kinematic and kinetic analyses, the individual aspects of pitching mechanics are discussed under arbitrary headings: Foot position at stride foot contact; Elbow flexion; Arm rotation; Arm horizontal abduction; Arm abduction; Lead knee position; Pelvic orientation; Deceleration-phase related issues; Curveballs; and Teaching throwing mechanics. In general, popular opinion of baseball coaching staff was found to be largely in concordance with the scientific investigations of biomechanists with several notable exceptions. Some difficulties are identified with the practical implementation of analyzing throwing mechanics in the field by pitching coaches, and with some unquantified aspects of scientific analyses

  19. Nervous system involvement in von Hippel-Lindau disease: pathology and mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vortmeyer, Alexander O; Falke, Eric A; Gläsker, Sven; Li, Jie; Oldfield, Edward H

    2013-03-01

    Patients with von Hippel-Lindau disease carry a germline mutation of the Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumor-suppressor gene. We discuss the molecular consequences of loss of VHL gene function and their impact on the nervous system. Dysfunction of the VHL protein causes accumulation and activation of hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) which can be demonstrated in earliest stages of tumorigenesis and is followed by expression of VEGF, erythropoietin, nitric oxide synthase and glucose transporter 1 in VHL-deficient tumor cells. HIF-independent functions of VHL, epigenetic inactivation of VHL, pVHL proteostasis, and links between loss of VHL function and developmental arrest are also described. A most intriguing feature in VHL disease is the occurrence of primary hemangioblastic tumors in the nervous system, the origin of which has not yet been entirely clarified, and current hypotheses are discussed. Endolymphatic sac tumors may extend into the brain, but originally arise from proliferation of endolymphatic duct/sac epithelium; the exact nature of the proliferating epithelial cell, however, also has remained unclear, as well as the question why tumors almost consistently develop in the intraosseous portion of the endolymphatic sac/duct only. The epitheloid clear cell morphology of both advanced hemangioblastoma and renal clear cell carcinoma can make the differential diagnosis challenging, recent developments in immunohistochemical differentiation are discussed. Finally, metastasis to brain may not only be caused by renal carcinoma, but may derive from VHL disease-associated pheochromocytoma/paraganglioma, or pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor.

  20. Superpulsed CO2 Laser with Intraoperative Pathologic Assessment for Treatment of Periorbital Basal Cell Carcinoma Involving Eyelash Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Ebrahimi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Periorbital basal cell carcinoma (BCC is considered a high risk case because it is associated with high rate of recurrence and complication. Superpulsed CO2 laser with intraoperative pathologic assessment could be an alternative and appropriate treatment for periocular lesions where Mohs micrographic surgery is not available. Objective. To evaluate the efficacy of superpulsed CO2 laser therapy with intraoperative pathologic assessment on periocular BCC involving eyelash line. Method. This follow-up study was performed on 20 patients with a total of 21 BCC lesions that were pathologically documented. Firstly, debulkation of tumoral mass was done by curettage. Then, irradiation and intraoperative pathologic evaluation were done by concurrent CO2 laser. The patients were followed up for a period of 36 months. Results. Out of 21 lesions, the nodular type accounted for 15 (71.4% lesions, and 12 (57.1% lesions were seen in the lower lid as the most common clinical type and site involvement. Twenty BCC lesions (95.2% were treated after one session. Damage to eyelash was seen in 2 (10% patients, but ectropion and other complications were not seen in any patient. Conclusion. Treatment with superpulsed CO2 laser and intraoperative pathologic evaluation for periorbital BCC lesions much close to conjunctiva could be an effective method with minimal complications without major danger of recurrence. This modality can be used with care in the inner canthus and high risk pathologic lesions.

  1. Mechanisms of cell propulsion by active stresses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlsson, A E, E-mail: aec@wustl.edu [Department of Physics, Washington University, Campus Box 1105, One Brookings Drive, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States)

    2011-07-15

    The mechanisms by which cytoskeletal flows and cell-substrate interactions interact to generate cell motion are explored by using a simplified model of the cytoskeleton as a viscous gel containing active stresses. This model yields explicit general results relating cell speed and traction forces to the distributions of active stress and cell-substrate friction. It is found that (i) the cell velocity is given by a function that quantifies the asymmetry of the active-stress distribution, (ii) gradients in cell-substrate friction can induce motion even when the active stresses are symmetrically distributed, (iii) the traction-force dipole is enhanced by protrusive stresses near the cell edges or contractile stresses near the center of the cell and (iv) the cell velocity depends biphasically on the cell-substrate adhesion strength if active stress is enhanced by adhesion. Specific experimental tests of the calculated dependences are proposed.

  2. Synchronous clear cell renal cell carcinoma and multilocular cystic renal cell neoplasia of low malignant potential: A clinico-pathologic and molecular study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raspollini, Maria Rosaria; Castiglione, Francesca; Cheng, Liang; Montironi, Rodolfo; Lopez-Beltran, Antonio

    2016-05-01

    We report a rare case of synchronous clear cell renal cell carcinoma and multilocular cystic renal cell neoplasia of low malignant potential in the same kidney. The tumors were seen incidentally in a 45-year-old man. Pathologic study revealed that the former tumor was nucleolar grade 2, and the multilocular cystic renal cell neoplasia of low malignant potential was nucleolar grade 1. At immunohistochemistry, the clear cells in both tumors were positive for CD10 and CA IX. Interestingly, these uncommon synchronous tumors showed a different KRAS/NRAS mutation analysis that was characterized by KRAS mutation at codon p.G12C in the clear cell renal cell carcinoma, while this mutation was not present in the case of multilocular cystic renal cell neoplasia of low malignant potential. NRAS mutation was not seen in any of the tumors.

  3. Early Biomarkers in 1H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of Striatal Pathological Mechanisms after Acute Carbon Monoxide Poisoning in Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUAN Li; LI Zong Yang; ZHANG Yan Lin; CONG Cui Cui; ZHAO Jin Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Objective In vivo Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (1H-MRS) can be used to evaluate the levels of specific neurochemical biomarkers of pathological mechanisms in the brain. Methods We conducted T2-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and 1H-MRS with a 3.0-Tesla animal MRI system to investigate the early microstructural and metabolic profiles in vivo in the striatum of rats following carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning. Results Compared to baseline, we found significant cortical surface deformation, cerebral edema changes, which were indicated by the unclear gray/white matter border, and lateral ventricular volume changes in the brain. A significant reduction in the metabolite to total creatine (Cr) ratios of N-acetylaspartate (NAA) was observed as early as 1 h after the last CO administration, while the lactate (Lac) levels increased marginally. Both the Lac/Cr and NAA/Cr ratios leveled off at 6 h and showed no subsequent significant changes. In addition, compared to the control, the choline (Cho)/Cr ratio was slightly reduced in the early stages and significantly increased after 6 h. In addition, a pathological examination revealed mild cerebral edema on cessation of the insult and more severe cerebral injury after additional CO poisoning. Conclusion The present study demonstrated that 1H-MRS of the brain identified early metabolic changes after CO poisoning. Notably, the relationship between the increased Cho/Cr ratio in the striatum and delayed neuropsychologic sequelae requires further research.

  4. Pathology and possible mechanisms of nervous system response to disc degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisby, Helena

    2006-04-01

    Degeneration of the intervertebral disc is clinically considered to be an important source of pain in patients with low-back pain. Disc deterioration and/or degeneration may influence the nervous system by stimulation of nociceptors in the anulus fibrosus, causing nociceptive pain that is often referred to as discogenic pain. The stimulation of the nociceptors may be of mechanical or inflammatory origin. Deterioration of a disc with loss of normal structure and weight-bearing properties may lead to abnormal motions that cause mechanical stimulation. This theory is supported by the fact that patients commonly experience an increase in pain with weight-bearing and certain movements. In addition, an ingrowth of vessels and nerve fibers into deeper layers of the anulus fibrosus has been observed in degenerated discs. A large number of inflammatory and signaling substances, such as tumor necrosis factor and interleukins (interleukin-1beta, interleukin-6, and interleukin-8), may also play a role in the development of back pain. Independent of stimulus of the nociceptors, the pain impulses are conducted through myelinated A delta fibers and unmyelinated C fibers to the dorsal root ganglion and continue by way of the spinothalamic tract to the thalamus and the somatosensory cortex. In response to stimulation of the nociceptors in the disc, the somatosensory system may increase its sensitivity, resulting in a nonfunctional response; that is, normally innocuous stimuli may generate an amplified response (peripheral sensitization). When disc degeneration leads to a disc herniation, the adjacent nervous system structures, such as the nerve roots or the dorsal root ganglion, can be affected, causing neuropathic pain of mechanical or biochemical origin. Disc deterioration also influences other spinal structures, such as facet joints, ligaments, and muscles, which can also become pain generators. Thus, disc degeneration may be responsible for the development of chronic low

  5. Famotidine suppresses osteogenic differentiation of tendon cells in vitro and pathological calcification of tendon in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Kenichi; Hojo, Hironori; Koshima, Isao; Chung, Ung-il; Ohba, Shinsuke

    2012-12-01

    Heterotopic ossification or calcification follows any type of musculoskeletal trauma and is known to occur after arthroplasties of hip, knee, shoulder, or elbow; fractures; joint dislocations; or tendon ruptures. Histamine receptor H2 (Hrh2) has been shown to be effective for reducing pain and decreasing calcification in patients with calcifying tendinitis, which suggested that H2 blockers were effective for the treatment of tendon ossification or calcification. However, the detailed mechanisms of its action on tendon remain to be clarified. We investigated the mechanisms underlying H2 blocker-mediated suppression of tendon calcification, with a focus on the direct action of the drug on tendon cells. Famotidine treatment suppressed the mRNA expressions of Col10a1 and osteocalcin, ossification markers, in a tendon-derived cell line TT-D6, as well as a preosteoblastic one MC3T3-E1. Both of the cell lines expressed Hrh2; histamine treatment induced osteocalcin expression in these cells. Famotidine administration suppressed calcification in the Achilles tendon of ttw mice, a mouse model of ectopic ossification. These data suggest that famotidine inhibits osteogenic differentiation of tendon cells in vitro, and this inhibition may underlie the anti-calcification effects of the drug in vivo. This study points to the use of H2 blockers as a promising strategy for treating heterotopic ossification or calcification in tendon, and provides evidence in support of the clinical use of famotidine.

  6. Adrenergic mechanism responsible for pathological alteration in gastric mucosal blood flow in rats with ulcer bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semyachkina-Glushkovskaya, O. V.; Pavlov, A. N.; Semyachkin-Glushkovskiy, I. A.; Gekalyuk, A. S.; Ulanova, M. V.; Lychagov, V. V.; Tuchin, V. V.

    2014-09-01

    The adrenergic system plays an important role in regulation of central and peripheral circulation in normal state and during hemorrhage. Because the impaired gastric mucosal blood flow (GMBF) is the major cause of gastroduodenal lesions, including ulcer bleeding (UB), we studied the adrenergic mechanism responsible for regulation of GMBF in rats with a model of stress-induced UB (SUB) using the laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF). First, we examined the effect of adrenaline on GMBF in rats under normal state and during UB. In all healthy animals the submucosal adrenaline injection caused a decrease in local GMBF. During UB the submucosal injection of adrenaline was accompanied by less pronounced GMBF suppression in 30,3% rats with SUB vs. healthy ones. In 69,7% rats with SUB we observed the increase in local GMBF after submucosal injection of adrenaline. Second, we studied the sensitivity of gastric β2-adrenoreceptors and the activity of two factors which are involved in β2-adrenomediated vasorelaxation-KATP -channels and NO. The effects of submucosal injection of isoproterenol, ICI118551 and glybenclamide on GMBF as well as NO levels in gastric tissue were significantly elevated in rats with SUB vs. healthy rats. Thus, our results indicate that high activation of gastric β2-adrenoreceptors associated with the increased vascular KATP -channels activity and elevated NO production is the important adrenergic mechanism implicated in the pathogenesis of UB.

  7. Nanodiamond internalization in cells and the cell uptake mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perevedentseva, E.; Hong, S.-F.; Huang, K.-J.; Chiang, I.-T.; Lee, C.-Y.; Tseng, Y.-T.; Cheng, C.-L.

    2013-08-01

    Cell type-dependent penetration of nanodiamond in living cells is one of the important factors for using nanodiamond as cellular markers/labels, for drug delivery as well as for other biomedical applications. In this work, internalization of 100 nm nanodiamonds by A549 lung human adenocarcinoma cell, Beas-2b non-tumorigenic human bronchial epithelial cell, and HFL-1 fibroblast-like human fetal lung cell is studied and compared. The penetration of nanodiamond into the cells was observed using confocal fluorescence imaging and Raman imaging methods. Visualization of the nanodiamond in cells allows comparison of the internalization for diamond nanoparticles in cancer A549 cell, non-cancer HFL-1, and Beas-2b cells. The dose-dependent and time-dependent behavior of nanodiamond uptake is observed in both cancer as well as non-cancer cells. The mechanism of nanodiamond uptake by cancer and non-cancer cells is analyzed by blocking different pathways. The uptake of nanodiamond in both cancer and non-cancer cells was found predominantly via clathrin-dependent endocytosis. In spite of observed similarity in the uptake mechanism for cancer and non-cancer cells, the nanodiamond uptake for cancer cell quantitatively exceeds the uptake for non-cancer cells, for the studied cell lines. The observed difference in internalization of nanodiamond by cancer and non-cancer cells is discussed.

  8. Nanodiamond internalization in cells and the cell uptake mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perevedentseva, E. [National Dong Hwa University, Department of Physics (China); Hong, S.-F.; Huang, K.-J. [National Dong Hwa University, Department of Life Sciences (China); Chiang, I.-T.; Lee, C.-Y. [National Dong Hwa University, Department of Physics (China); Tseng, Y.-T. [National Dong Hwa University, Department of Life Sciences (China); Cheng, C.-L., E-mail: clcheng@mail.ndhu.edu.tw [National Dong Hwa University, Department of Physics (China)

    2013-08-15

    Cell type-dependent penetration of nanodiamond in living cells is one of the important factors for using nanodiamond as cellular markers/labels, for drug delivery as well as for other biomedical applications. In this work, internalization of 100 nm nanodiamonds by A549 lung human adenocarcinoma cell, Beas-2b non-tumorigenic human bronchial epithelial cell, and HFL-1 fibroblast-like human fetal lung cell is studied and compared. The penetration of nanodiamond into the cells was observed using confocal fluorescence imaging and Raman imaging methods. Visualization of the nanodiamond in cells allows comparison of the internalization for diamond nanoparticles in cancer A549 cell, non-cancer HFL-1, and Beas-2b cells. The dose-dependent and time-dependent behavior of nanodiamond uptake is observed in both cancer as well as non-cancer cells. The mechanism of nanodiamond uptake by cancer and non-cancer cells is analyzed by blocking different pathways. The uptake of nanodiamond in both cancer and non-cancer cells was found predominantly via clathrin-dependent endocytosis. In spite of observed similarity in the uptake mechanism for cancer and non-cancer cells, the nanodiamond uptake for cancer cell quantitatively exceeds the uptake for non-cancer cells, for the studied cell lines. The observed difference in internalization of nanodiamond by cancer and non-cancer cells is discussed.

  9. Environmental properties set cell mechanics and morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janmey, Paul

    2012-02-01

    Many cell types are sensitive to mechanical signals that are produced either by application of exogenous force to their surfaces, or by the resistance that their surroundings place on forces generated by the cells themselves. Cell morphology, motility, proliferation, and protein expression all change in response to substrate stiffness. Changing the elastic moduli of substrates alters the formation of focal adhesions, the assembly of actin filaments into bundles, and the stability of intermediate filaments. The range of stiffness over which different primary cell types respond can vary over a wide range and generally reflects the elastic modulus of the tissue from which these cells were isolated. Mechanosensing depends on the type of adhesion receptor by which the cell binds, and therefore on both the molecular composition of the extracellular matrix and the nature of its link to the cytoskeleton. Many cell types can alter their own stiffness to match that of the substrate to which they adhere. The maximal elastic modulus that cells such as fibroblasts can attain is similar to that of crosslinked actin networks at the concentrations in the cell cortex. The precise mechanisms of mechanosensing are not well defined, but they presumably require an elastic connection between cell and substrate, mediated by transmembrane proteins. The viscoelastic properties of different extracellular matrices and cytoskeletal elements strongly influence the response of cells to mechanical signals, and the unusual non-linear elasticity of many biopolymer gels, characterized by strain-stiffening, leads to novel mechanisms by which cells alter their stiffness by engagement of molecular motors that produce internal stresses. Cell cortical elasticity is dominated by cytoskeletal polymer networks and can be modulated by internal tension. Simultaneous control of substrate stiffness and adhesive patterns suggests that stiffness sensing occurs on a length scale much larger than single molecular

  10. Polymer microlenses for quantifying cell sheet mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miquelard-Garnier, Guillaume; Zimberlin, Jessica A; Sikora, Christian B; Wadsworth, Patricia; Crosby, Alfred

    2010-01-01

    Mechanical interactions between individual cells and their substrate have been studied extensively over the past decade; however, understanding how these interactions change as cells interact with neighboring cells in the development of a cell sheet, or early stage tissue, is less developed. We use a recently developed experimental technique for quantifying the mechanics of confluent cell sheets. Living cells are cultured on a thin film of polystyrene [PS], which is attached to a patterned substrate of crosslinked poly(dimethyl siloxane) [PDMS] microwells. As cells attach to the substrate and begin to form a sheet, they apply sufficient contractile force to buckle the PS film over individual microwells to form a microlens array. The curvature for each microlens is measured by confocal microscopy and can be related to the strain and stress applied by the cell sheet using simple mechanical analysis for the buckling of thin films. We demonstrate that this technique can provide insight into the important materials properties and length scales that govern cell sheet responses, especially the role of stiffness of the substrate. We show that intercellular forces can lead to significantly different behaviors than the ones observed for individual cells, where focal adhesion is the relevant parameter.

  11. Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor of the Kidney: AIRP Best Cases in Radiologic-Pathologic Correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, William J; Flores, Raina R

    2016-01-01

    Editor's Note.-RadioGraphics continues to publish radiologic-pathologic case material selected from the American Institute for Radiologic Pathology (AIRP) "best case" presentations. The AIRP conducts a 4-week Radiologic Pathology Correlation Course, which is offered five times per year. On the penultimate day of the course, the best case presentation is held at the American Film Institute Silver Theater and Cultural Center in Silver Spring, Md. The AIRP faculty identifies the best cases, from each organ system, brought by the resident attendees. One or more of the best cases from each of the five courses are then solicited for publication in RadioGraphics. These cases emphasize the importance of radiologic-pathologic correlation in the imaging evaluation and diagnosis of diseases encountered at the institute and its predecessor, the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology (AFIP).

  12. Quantitative & qualitative analysis of endothelial cells of donor cornea before & after penetrating keratoplasty in different pathological conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aruna K.R. Gupta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Endothelial cells of the donor cornea are known to be affected quantitatively and qualitatively in different pathological conditions after penetrating keratoplasty (PK and this has direct effect on the clarity of vision obtained after PK. This study was undertaken to analyze the qualitative and quantitative changes in donor endothelial cells before and after PK in different pathological conditions. Methods: A prospective investigational analysis of 100 consecutive donor corneas used for penetrating keratoplasty between June 2006 and June 2008, was conducted. The patients were evaluated on the first day, at the end of first week, first month, third and six months and one year. Results: A decrease was observed in endothelial cell count in all pathological conditions. After one year of follow up the loss was 33.1 per cent in corneal opacity, 45.9 per cent in acute infective keratitis (AIK, 58.5 per cent in regrafts, 28.5 per cent in pseudophakic bullous keratopathy (PBK, 37 per cent in descemetocele, 27 per cent in keratoconus and 35.5 per cent in aphakic bullous keratopathy (ABK cases. Interpretation & conclusions: The endothelial cell loss was highest in regraft cases which was significant (P<0.05, while the least endothelial cell loss was seen in keratoconus cases. The cell loss was associated with increase in coefficient of variation (CV, i.e. polymegathism and pleomorphism. Inspite of this polymegathism and pleomorphism, the clarity of the graft was maintained.

  13. Immunity activation in brain cells in epilepsy: mechanistic insights and pathological consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravizza, Teresa; Kostoula, Chrysaugi; Vezzani, Annamaria

    2013-12-01

    The search of targets for developing novel drugs that can control seizures resistant to available treatments in children and adults represents a great challenge for basic science. In the past decade, emerging evidence pointed out to the crucial role played by glia, the innate immunity brain-resident cells, in the generation of hyperexcitable neuronal networks underlying seizures. Molecular and pharmacological studies targeting glia, and the inflammatory mediators released by these cells in experimental models of epilepsy, highlighted novel targets for drug intervention aimed at interfering with the disease mechanisms, therefore providing putative disease-modifying treatments. This article will focus on the role of immunity activation in the brain and the concomitant release by glia of inflammatory molecules with neuromodulatory properties, in the pathogenesis of epileptic seizures, cell loss, and comorbidities.

  14. Allosuppressor- and allohelper-T cells in acute and chronic graft-vs. -host (GVH) disease. III. Different Lyt subsets of donor T cells induce different pathological syndromes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rolink, A.G.; Gleichmann, E.

    1983-08-01

    Previous work from this laboratory has led to the hypothesis that the stimulatory pathological symptoms of chronic graft-vs.-host disease (GVHD) are caused by alloreactive donor T helper (TH) cells, whereas the suppressive pathological symptoms of acute GVHD are caused by alloreactive T suppressor (TS) cells of the donor. We analyzed the Lyt phenotypes of B10 donor T cells required for the induction of either acute or chronic GVHD in H-2-different (B10 X DBA/2)F1 recipients. When nonirradiated F1 mice were used as the recipients, we found unseparated B10 T cells induced only a moderate formation of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)-like autoantibodies, but a high percentage of lethal GVHD (LGVHD). In contrast, Lyt-1+2- donor T cells were unable to induce LGVHD in these recipients but were capable of inducing a vigorous formation of SLE-like autoantibodies and severe immune-complex glomerulonephritis. Lyt-1-2+ T cells were incapable of inducing either acute or chronic GVHD. The sensitivity and accuracy of the GVH system were increased by using irradiated F1 mice as recipients and then comparing donor-cell inocula that contained similar numbers of T lymphocytes. Donor-cell inocula were used that had been tested for their allohelper and allosuppressor effects on F1 B cells in vitro. In the irradiated F1 recipients unseparated donor T cells were superior to T cell subsets in inducing LGVHD. In contrast Lyt-1+2- T cells, but neither unseparated T cells nor Lyt-1-2+ T cells, were capable of inducing a vigorous formation of SLE-like auto-antibodies. We conclude that the stimulatory pathological symptoms of chronic GVHD are caused by Lyt-1+2- allohelper T cells. In contrast, the development of the suppressive pathological symptoms of acute GVHD appears to involve alloreactive Lyt-1+2+ T suppressor cells.

  15. Renal cell carcinoma: complete pathological response in a patient with gastric metastasis of renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Campelo, Rosario; Quindós, Maria; Vázquez, Diana Dopico; López, Margarita Reboredo; Carral, Alberto; Calvo, Ovidio Fernández; Soto, José Manuel Rois; Grande, Enrique; Durana, Jesús; Antón-Aparicio, Luis Miguel

    2010-01-01

    A 75-year-old-man, with a 2-month history of abdominal pain, underwent a standard diagnostic workup that included a CT scan that showed a large right renal mass and subcentimeter nodes in the right and left lung lobes. In December 2003, the patient underwent right nephrectomy with adrenalectomy and a diagnosis of renal cell carcinoma (pT3N0M0 stage) was made. No further treatment was proposed and patient was followed up regularly. In October 2006, the annual gastrointestinal endoscopy showed asymptomatic multilobulated and polypoid masses in the gastric fundus and gastric body that corresponded to metastasis of the renal carcinoma that had been resected three years ago. Surgical treatment was refused and oral treatment with sunitinib (50 mg/day consecutively for 4 weeks followed by 2 weeks off) was initiated. Patient completed one cycle and development of acute toxicity (grade 3 asthenia, anorexia and mucositis) led to treatment interruption. After recovering from acute toxicity, the patient was proposed to reinitiate treatment with dose reduction, but he refused any medical treatment. At the follow-up visit, three months later, the gastrointestinal endoscopy showed four unspecific 2 mm nodules without malignant evidence. The whole-body CT did not reveal any other abnormality except for the known lung nodes. PET scan six months after treatment confirmed complete gastric response.

  16. Pathological mechanism for delayed hyperenhancement of chronic scarred myocardium in contrast agent enhanced magnetic resonance imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Wang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To evaluate possible mechanism for delayed hyperenhancement of scarred myocardium by investigating the relationship of contrast agent (CA first pass and delayed enhancement patterns with histopathological changes. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Eighteen pigs underwent 4 weeks ligation of 1 or 2 diagonal coronary arteries to induce chronic infarction. The hearts were then removed and perfused in a Langendorff apparatus. The hearts firstly experienced phosphorus 31 MR spectroscopy. The hearts in group I (n = 9 and II (n = 9 then received the bolus injection of Gadolinium diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (0.05 mmol/kg and gadolinium-based macromolecular agent (P792, 15 µmol/kg, respectively. First pass T2* MRI was acquired using a gradient echo sequence. Delayed enhanced T1 MRI was acquired with an inversion recovery sequence. Masson's trichrome and anti- von Willebrand Factor (vWF staining were performed for infarct characterization. RESULTS: Wash-in of both kinds of CA caused the sharp and dramatic T2* signal decrease of scarred myocardium similar to that of normal myocardium. Myocardial blood flow and microvessel density were significantly recovered in 4-week-old scar tissue. Steady state distribution volume (ΔR1 relaxation rate of Gd-DTPA was markedly higher in scarred myocardium than in normal myocardium, whereas ΔR1 relaxation rate of P792 did not differ significantly between scarred and normal myocardium. The ratio of extracellular volume to the total water volume was significantly greater in scarred myocardium than in normal myocardium. Scarred myocardium contained massive residual capillaries and dilated vessels. Histological stains indicated the extensively discrete matrix deposition and lack of cellular structure in scarred myocardium. CONCLUSIONS: Collateral circulation formation and residual vessel effectively delivered CA into scarred myocardium. However, residual vessel without abnormal hyperpermeability allowed Gd

  17. Effect of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells on lung pathology and inflammation in ovalbumin-induced asthma in mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Mohammadian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s:Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs have attracted significant interest to treat asthma and its complication. In this study, the effects of BMSCs on lung pathology and inflammation in an ovalbumin-induced asthma model in mouse were examined. Materials and Methods:BALB/c mice were divided into three groups: control group (animals were not sensitized, asthma group (animals were sensitized by ovalbumin, asthma+BMSC group (animals were sensitized by ovalbumin and treated with BMSCs. BMSCs were isolated and characterized and then labeled with Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU. After that the cells transferred into asthmatic mice. Histopathological changes of the airways, BMSCs migration and total and differential white blood cell (WBC count in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL fluid were evaluated. Results:A large number of BrdU-BMSCs were found in the lungs of mice treated with BMSCs. The histopathological changes, BAL total WBC counts and the percentage of neutrophils and eosinophils were increased in asthma group compared to the control group. Treatment with BMSCs significantly decreased airway pathological indices, inflammatory cell infiltration, and also goblet cell hyperplasia. Conclusion:The results of this study revealed that BMSCs therapy significantly suppressed the lung pathology and inflammation in the ovalbumin induced asthma model in mouse.

  18. MULTICENTRIC GIANT CELL TUMOR OF IPSILATERAL ACETABULUM AND FEMORAL HEAD WITH PATHOLOGICAL FRACTURE OF FEMORAL NECK: A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayant

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Multicentric Giant Cell Tumor is extremely rare; here we are presenting a case of pathological neck femur fracture in case of multicentric giant cell tumor involving ipsilateral acetabulum along with femoral head and neck. CASE PRESENTATION: 24 years old male presented with pain in groin region and inability to walk after he fell down while walking. He had pain in left groin on weight bearing for last six months. Radiological examination shows pathological trans - cervical femoral neck fracture with sub - articular lytic lesion in femoral head and neck suggestive of Giant cell tumor. MRI has been done to define the extent of involvement and to rule out soft tissue infiltration. Fine needle aspiration cytology which was done through anterior route was inconclusive. After review of literature, patient has been planned for excisional biopsy and un - cemented total hip arthroplasty. Intra - operatively, frozen section confirms the giant cell tumor and surprisingly acetabulum was found to be involved which was curetted and hydrogen - peroxide treated. Post - operatively, patient was pain - free with good range of movements at hip. CONCLUSION: Giant cell tumor involving femoral head and neck with pathological fracture though uncommon, but may present as multicentric with acetabular involvement.

  19. [Key molecular mechanisms associated with cell malignant transformation in acute myeloid leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlova, N N; Lebedev, T D; Spirin, P V; Prassolov, V S

    2016-01-01

    Cancer, along with cardiovascular disorders, is one of the most important problems of healthcare. Pathologies of the hematopoietic system are the most prevalent in patients under 30 years of age, including acute myeloid leukemia (AML), which is widespread and difficult to treat. The review considers the mechanisms that play a significant role in AML cell malignant transformation and shows the contributions of certain genes to both remission and resistance of AML cells to various treatments.

  20. Mast Cell-Mediated Mechanisms of Nociception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aich, Anupam; Afrin, Lawrence B; Gupta, Kalpna

    2015-12-04

    Mast cells are tissue-resident immune cells that release immuno-modulators, chemo-attractants, vasoactive compounds, neuropeptides and growth factors in response to allergens and pathogens constituting a first line of host defense. The neuroimmune interface of immune cells modulating synaptic responses has been of increasing interest, and mast cells have been proposed as key players in orchestrating inflammation-associated pain pathobiology due to their proximity to both vasculature and nerve fibers. Molecular underpinnings of mast cell-mediated pain can be disease-specific. Understanding such mechanisms is critical for developing disease-specific targeted therapeutics to improve analgesic outcomes. We review molecular mechanisms that may contribute to nociception in a disease-specific manner.

  1. The cytokines interleukin 27 and interferon-γ promote distinct Treg cell populations required to limit infection-induced pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Aisling O'Hara; Beiting, Daniel P; Tato, Cristina; John, Beena; Oldenhove, Guillaume; Lombana, Claudia Gonzalez; Pritchard, Gretchen Harms; Silver, Jonathan S; Bouladoux, Nicolas; Stumhofer, Jason S; Harris, Tajie H; Grainger, John; Wojno, Elia D Tait; Wagage, Sagie; Roos, David S; Scott, Philip; Turka, Laurence A; Cherry, Sara; Reiner, Steven L; Cua, Daniel; Belkaid, Yasmine; Elloso, M Merle; Hunter, Christopher A

    2012-09-21

    Interferon-γ (IFN-γ) promotes a population of T-bet(+) CXCR3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells that limit T helper 1 (Th1) cell-mediated pathology. Our studies demonstrate that interleukin-27 (IL-27) also promoted expression of T-bet and CXCR3 in Treg cells. During infection with Toxoplasma gondii, a similar population emerged that limited T cell responses and was dependent on IFN-γ in the periphery but on IL-27 at mucosal sites. Transfer of Treg cells ameliorated the infection-induced pathology observed in Il27(-/-) mice, and this was dependent on their ability to produce IL-10. Microarray analysis revealed that Treg cells exposed to either IFN-γ or IL-27 have distinct transcriptional profiles. Thus, IFN-γ and IL-27 have different roles in Treg cell biology and IL-27 is a key cytokine that promotes the development of Treg cells specialized to control Th1 cell-mediated immunity at local sites of inflammation.

  2. Mechanically stacked concentrator tandem solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreev, V. M.; Rumyantsev, V. D.; Karlina, L. B.; Kazantsev, A. B.; Khvostikov, V. P.; Shvarts, M. Z.; Sorokina, S. V.

    1995-01-01

    Four-terminal mechanically stacked solar cells were developed for advanced space arrays with line-focus reflective concentrators. The top cells are based on AlGaAs/GaAs multilayer heterostructures prepared by low temperature liquid phase epitaxy. The bottom cells are based on heteroepitaxial InP/InGaAs liquid phase epitaxy or on homo-junction GaSb, Zn-diffused structures. The sum of the highest reached efficiencies of the top and bottom cells is 29.4 percent. The best four-terminal tandems have an efficiency of 27 to 28 percent. Solar cells were irradiated with 1 MeV electrons and their performances were determined as a function of fluence up to 10(exp 16) cm(exp-2). It was shown that the radiation resistance of developed tandem cells is similar to the most radiative stable AlGaAs/GaAs cells with a thin p-GaAs photoactive layer.

  3. An immunosurveillance mechanism controls cancer cell ploidy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senovilla, Laura; Vitale, Ilio; Martins, Isabelle; Tailler, Maximilien; Pailleret, Claire; Michaud, Mickaël; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Adjemian, Sandy; Kepp, Oliver; Niso-Santano, Mireia; Shen, Shensi; Mariño, Guillermo; Criollo, Alfredo; Boilève, Alice; Job, Bastien; Ladoire, Sylvain; Ghiringhelli, François; Sistigu, Antonella; Yamazaki, Takahiro; Rello-Varona, Santiago; Locher, Clara; Poirier-Colame, Vichnou; Talbot, Monique; Valent, Alexander; Berardinelli, Francesco; Antoccia, Antonio; Ciccosanti, Fabiola; Fimia, Gian Maria; Piacentini, Mauro; Fueyo, Antonio; Messina, Nicole L; Li, Ming; Chan, Christopher J; Sigl, Verena; Pourcher, Guillaume; Ruckenstuhl, Christoph; Carmona-Gutierrez, Didac; Lazar, Vladimir; Penninger, Josef M; Madeo, Frank; López-Otín, Carlos; Smyth, Mark J; Zitvogel, Laurence; Castedo, Maria; Kroemer, Guido

    2012-09-28

    Cancer cells accommodate multiple genetic and epigenetic alterations that initially activate intrinsic (cell-autonomous) and extrinsic (immune-mediated) oncosuppressive mechanisms. Only once these barriers to oncogenesis have been overcome can malignant growth proceed unrestrained. Tetraploidization can contribute to oncogenesis because hyperploid cells are genomically unstable. We report that hyperploid cancer cells become immunogenic because of a constitutive endoplasmic reticulum stress response resulting in the aberrant cell surface exposure of calreticulin. Hyperploid, calreticulin-exposing cancer cells readily proliferated in immunodeficient mice and conserved their increased DNA content. In contrast, hyperploid cells injected into immunocompetent mice generated tumors only after a delay, and such tumors exhibited reduced DNA content, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and calreticulin exposure. Our results unveil an immunosurveillance system that imposes immunoselection against hyperploidy in carcinogen- and oncogene-induced cancers.

  4. Curcumin in Cell Death Processes: A Challenge for CAM of Age-Related Pathologies

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    S. Salvioli

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Curcumin, the yellow pigment from the rhizoma of Curcuma longa, is a widely studied phytochemical which has a variety of biological activities: anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative. In this review we discuss the biological mechanisms and possible clinical effects of curcumin treatment on cancer therapy, and neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's Disease, with particular attention to the cell death processes induced by curcumin. Since oxidative stress and inflammation are major determinants of the aging process, we also argue that curcumin can have a more general effect that slows down the rate of aging. Finally, the effects of curcumin can be described as xenohormetic, since it activates a sort of stress response in mammalian cells.

  5. A systems model for immune cell interactions unravels the mechanism of inflammation in human skin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najl V Valeyev

    Full Text Available Inflammation is characterized by altered cytokine levels produced by cell populations in a highly interdependent manner. To elucidate the mechanism of an inflammatory reaction, we have developed a mathematical model for immune cell interactions via the specific, dose-dependent cytokine production rates of cell populations. The model describes the criteria required for normal and pathological immune system responses and suggests that alterations in the cytokine production rates can lead to various stable levels which manifest themselves in different disease phenotypes. The model predicts that pairs of interacting immune cell populations can maintain homeostatic and elevated extracellular cytokine concentration levels, enabling them to operate as an immune system switch. The concept described here is developed in the context of psoriasis, an immune-mediated disease, but it can also offer mechanistic insights into other inflammatory pathologies as it explains how interactions between immune cell populations can lead to disease phenotypes.

  6. Contribution of dendritic cells to the autoimmune pathology of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackern-Oberti, Juan P; Llanos, Carolina; Riedel, Claudia A; Bueno, Susan M; Kalergis, Alexis M

    2015-12-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a heterogeneous disease in which excessive inflammation, autoantibodies and complement activation lead to multisystem tissue damage. The contribution of the individual genetic composition has been extensively studied, and several susceptibility genes related to immune pathways that participate in SLE pathogenesis have been identified. It has been proposed that SLE takes place when susceptibility factors interact with environmental stimuli leading to a deregulated immune response. Experimental evidence suggests that such events are related to the failure of T-cell and B-cell suppression mediated by defects in cell signalling, immune tolerance and apoptotic mechanism promoting autoimmunity. In addition, it has been reported that dendritic cells (DCs) from SLE patients, which are crucial in the modulation of peripheral tolerance to self-antigens, show an increased ratio of activating/inhibitory receptors on their surfaces. This phenotype and an augmented expression of co-stimulatory molecules is thought to be critical for disease pathogenesis. Accordingly, tolerogenic DCs can be a potential strategy for developing antigen-specific therapies to reduce detrimental inflammation without causing systemic immunosuppression. In this review article we discuss the most relevant data relative to the contribution of DCs to the triggering of SLE.

  7. Mechanics of the foot Part 2: A coupled solid-fluid model to investigate blood transport in the pathologic foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mithraratne, K; Ho, H; Hunter, P J; Fernandez, J W

    2012-10-01

    A coupled computational model of the foot consisting of a three-dimensional soft tissue continuum and a one-dimensional (1D) transient blood flow network is presented in this article. The primary aim of the model is to investigate the blood flow in major arteries of the pathologic foot where the soft tissue stiffening occurs. It has been reported in the literature that there could be up to about five-fold increase in the mechanical stiffness of the plantar soft tissues in pathologic (e.g. diabetic) feet compared with healthy ones. The increased stiffness results in higher tissue hydrostatic pressure within the plantar area of the foot when loaded. The hydrostatic pressure acts on the external surface of blood vessels and tend to reduce the flow cross-section area and hence the blood supply. The soft tissue continuum model of the foot was modelled as a tricubic Hermite finite element mesh representing all the muscles, skin and fat of the foot and treated as incompressible with transversely isotropic properties. The details of the mechanical model of soft tissue are presented in the companion paper, Part 1. The deformed state of the soft tissue continuum because of the applied ground reaction force at three foot positions (heel-strike, midstance and toe-off) was obtained by solving the Cauchy equations based on the theory of finite elasticity using the Galerkin finite element method. The geometry of the main arterial network in the foot was represented using a 1D Hermite cubic finite element mesh. The flow model consists of 1D Navier-Stokes equations and a nonlinear constitutive equation to describe vessel radius-transmural pressure relation. The latter was defined as the difference between the fluid and soft tissue hydrostatic pressure. Transient flow governing equations were numerically solved using the two-step Lax-Wendroff finite difference method. The geometry of both the soft tissue continuum and arterial network is anatomically-based and was developed using

  8. Cell tracing dyes significantly change single cell mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lulevich, Valentin; Shih, Yi-Ping; Lo, Su Hao; Liu, Gang-Yu

    2009-05-07

    Cell tracing dyes are very frequently utilized in cellular biology research because they provide highly sensitive fluorescent tags that do not compromise cellular functions such as growth and proliferation. In many investigations concerning cellular adhesion and mechanics, fluorescent dyes have been employed with the assumption of little impact on the results. Using the single cell compression technique developed by our team, the single cell mechanics of MDA-MB-468 and MLC-SV40 cells were investigated as a function of dye uptake. Cell tracing dyes increase living cell stiffness 3-6 times and cell-to-probe adhesion up to 7 times. These results suggest a more significant effect than toxins, such as thrombin. A simple analytical model was derived to enable the extraction of the Young's moduli of the cell membrane and cytoskeleton from the force-deformation profiles measured for individual cells. The increase in Young's modulus of the membrane is 3-7 times, which is more significant than that of the cytoskeleton (1.1-3.4 times). We propose that changes in cell mechanics upon the addition of fluorescent tracing dye are primarily due to the incorporation of amphiphilic dye molecules into the cellular plasma membrane, which increases the lateral interaction among phospholipid chains and thus enhances their rigidity and adhesion.

  9. Zebrafish gastrulation: cell movements, signals, and mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohde, Laurel A; Heisenberg, Carl-Philipp

    2007-01-01

    Gastrulation is a morphogenetic process that results in the formation of the embryonic germ layers. Here we detail the major cell movements that occur during zebrafish gastrulation: epiboly, internalization, and convergent extension. Although gastrulation is known to be regulated by signaling pathways such as the Wnt/planar cell polarity pathway, many questions remain about the underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms. Key factors that may play a role in gastrulation cell movements are cell adhesion and cytoskeletal rearrangement. In addition, some of the driving force for gastrulation may derive from tissue interactions such as those described between the enveloping layer and the yolk syncytial layer. Future exploration of gastrulation mechanisms relies on the development of sensitive and quantitative techniques to characterize embryonic germ-layer properties.

  10. ETosis: A Microbicidal Mechanism beyond Cell Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson B. Guimarães-Costa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Netosis is a recently described type of neutrophil death occurring with the release to the extracellular milieu of a lattice composed of DNA associated with histones and granular and cytoplasmic proteins. These webs, initially named neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs, ensnare and kill microorganisms. Similarly, other cell types, such as eosinophils, mast cells, and macrophages, can also dye by this mechanism; thus, it was renamed as ETosis, meaning death with release of extracellular traps (ETs. Here, we review the mechanism of NETosis/etosis, emphasizing its role in diseases caused by protozoan parasites, fungi, and viruses.

  11. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurement of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of tissue water and its relationship to cell volume changes in pathological states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotak, Christopher H

    2004-09-01

    Diffusion-weighted nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging (DWI) is sensitive to the random translational motion of water molecules due to Brownian motion. Although the mechanism is still not completely understood, the cellular swelling that accompanies cell membrane depolarization results in a reduction in the net displacement of diffusing water molecules and thus a concomitant reduction in the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of tissue water. Cerebral regions of reduced ADC appear hyperintense in a DWI and this technique has been used extensively to study acute stroke. In addition to cerebral ischemia, reductions in the ADC of cerebral water have been observed following cortical spreading depression, ischemic depolarizations (IDs), transient ischemic attack (TIA), status epilepticus, and hypoglycemia. Although the mechanism responsible for initiating membrane depolarization varies in each case, the ensuing cell volume changes follow a similar pattern. Water ADC values are also affected by the presence and orientation of barriers to translational motion (such as cell membranes and myelin fibers) and thus NMR measures of anisotropic diffusion are sensitive to more chronic pathological states where the integrity of these structures is modified by disease. Both theoretical prediction and experimental evidence suggest that the ADC of tissue water is related to the volume fraction of the interstitial space via the electrical conductivity of the tissue. The implication is that acute neurological disorders that exhibit electrical conductivity changes should also exhibit ADC changes that are detectable by DWI. A qualitative correlation between electrical conductivity and the ADC of water has been demonstrated in a number of animal model studies and the results indicate that reduced ADC values are associated with reductions in the extracellular volume fraction and increased extracellular tortuosity. The close relationship between ADC changes and cell volume changes in

  12. Cell mechanics through analysis of cell trajectories in microfluidic channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowie, Samuel; Alexeev, Alexander; Sulchek, Todd

    The understanding of dynamic cell behavior can aid in research ranging from the mechanistic causes of diseases to the development of microfluidic devices for cancer detection. Through analysis of trajectories captured from video of the cells moving in a specially designed microfluidic device, insight into the dynamic viscoelastic nature of cells can be found. The microfluidic device distinguishes cells viscoelastic properties through the use of angled ridges causing a series of compressions, resulting in differences in trajectories based on cell stiffness. Trajectories of cell passing through the device are collected using image processing methods and data mining techniques are used to relate the trajectories to cell properties obtained from experiments. Furthermore, numerical simulation of the cell and microfluidic device are used to match the experimental results from the trajectory analysis. Combination of the modeling and experimental data help to uncover how changes in cellular structures result in changes in mechanical properties.

  13. Relevance ofEGFR gene mutation with pathological features and prognosis in patients with non-small-cell lung carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng-De Wang; Xin-Rong Wang; Chao-Yang Wang; Yi-Jun Tang; Ming-Wen Hao

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To study the relevance ofEGFR gene mutation with pathological features and prognosis in patients with non-small-cell lung carcinoma.Methods: A total of 297 patients from July 2009 to May 2013 were chosen as objects.EGFRgene mutation were detected with fluorescence quantitative PCR. Relevance ofEGFR gene mutation with clinical and pathological features was analyzed, and the prognosis of EGFR- mutant-patients and that of EGFR- wide type-patients was compared.Results:In 297 patients, 136 (45.79%) showed EGFR gene mutation.EGFR gene mutation had no significant relevance with age, gender, smoking history, family history of cancer and clinical stage (P>0.05); there was significant relevance betweenEGFR gene mutation and blood type, pathologic types, differentiation and diameter of cancer (P<0.05). The difference between prognosis of EGFR- mutant-patients and that of EGFR- wide type-patients was statistical significance (P<0.05).Conclusions:EGFR gene mutation has significant relevance with pathological features, the prognosis of EGFR- mutant-patients is better than that of EGFR- wide type-patients.

  14. Mechanically activated artificial cell by using microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Kenneth K Y; Lee, Lap Man; Liu, Allen P

    2016-01-01

    All living organisms sense mechanical forces. Engineering mechanosensitive artificial cell through bottom-up in vitro reconstitution offers a way to understand how mixtures of macromolecules assemble and organize into a complex system that responds to forces. We use stable double emulsion droplets (aqueous/oil/aqueous) to prototype mechanosensitive artificial cells. In order to demonstrate mechanosensation in artificial cells, we develop a novel microfluidic device that is capable of trapping double emulsions into designated chambers, followed by compression and aspiration in a parallel manner. The microfluidic device is fabricated using multilayer soft lithography technology, and consists of a control layer and a deformable flow channel. Deflections of the PDMS membrane above the main microfluidic flow channels and trapping chamber array are independently regulated pneumatically by two sets of integrated microfluidic valves. We successfully compress and aspirate the double emulsions, which result in transient increase and permanent decrease in oil thickness, respectively. Finally, we demonstrate the influx of calcium ions as a response of our mechanically activated artificial cell through thinning of oil. The development of a microfluidic device to mechanically activate artificial cells creates new opportunities in force-activated synthetic biology.

  15. Mechanically activated artificial cell by using microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Kenneth K. Y.; Lee, Lap Man; Liu, Allen P.

    2016-01-01

    All living organisms sense mechanical forces. Engineering mechanosensitive artificial cell through bottom-up in vitro reconstitution offers a way to understand how mixtures of macromolecules assemble and organize into a complex system that responds to forces. We use stable double emulsion droplets (aqueous/oil/aqueous) to prototype mechanosensitive artificial cells. In order to demonstrate mechanosensation in artificial cells, we develop a novel microfluidic device that is capable of trapping double emulsions into designated chambers, followed by compression and aspiration in a parallel manner. The microfluidic device is fabricated using multilayer soft lithography technology, and consists of a control layer and a deformable flow channel. Deflections of the PDMS membrane above the main microfluidic flow channels and trapping chamber array are independently regulated pneumatically by two sets of integrated microfluidic valves. We successfully compress and aspirate the double emulsions, which result in transient increase and permanent decrease in oil thickness, respectively. Finally, we demonstrate the influx of calcium ions as a response of our mechanically activated artificial cell through thinning of oil. The development of a microfluidic device to mechanically activate artificial cells creates new opportunities in force-activated synthetic biology. PMID:27610921

  16. Mechanically activated artificial cell by using microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Kenneth K. Y.; Lee, Lap Man; Liu, Allen P.

    2016-09-01

    All living organisms sense mechanical forces. Engineering mechanosensitive artificial cell through bottom-up in vitro reconstitution offers a way to understand how mixtures of macromolecules assemble and organize into a complex system that responds to forces. We use stable double emulsion droplets (aqueous/oil/aqueous) to prototype mechanosensitive artificial cells. In order to demonstrate mechanosensation in artificial cells, we develop a novel microfluidic device that is capable of trapping double emulsions into designated chambers, followed by compression and aspiration in a parallel manner. The microfluidic device is fabricated using multilayer soft lithography technology, and consists of a control layer and a deformable flow channel. Deflections of the PDMS membrane above the main microfluidic flow channels and trapping chamber array are independently regulated pneumatically by two sets of integrated microfluidic valves. We successfully compress and aspirate the double emulsions, which result in transient increase and permanent decrease in oil thickness, respectively. Finally, we demonstrate the influx of calcium ions as a response of our mechanically activated artificial cell through thinning of oil. The development of a microfluidic device to mechanically activate artificial cells creates new opportunities in force-activated synthetic biology.

  17. Modeling pathological brain rhythms: constructing a neural mass model from single cell dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zandt, B.J.; Visser, S.; Putten, van M.J.A.M.; Haken, ten B.

    2013-01-01

    Neural mass models (NMM) describe neural activity on a macroscopic scale, which can be compared to the electroencephalogram (EEG). This allows a better understanding of the processes responsible for various EEG patterns, including pathological rhythms as diffuse slowing or burst-suppression [1]. U

  18. Myofiber-specific TEAD1 overexpression drives satellite cell hyperplasia and counters pathological effects of dystrophin deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southard, Sheryl; Kim, Ju-Ryoung; Low, SiewHui; Tsika, Richard W; Lepper, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    When unperturbed, somatic stem cells are poised to affect immediate tissue restoration upon trauma. Yet, little is known regarding the mechanistic basis controlling initial and homeostatic ‘scaling’ of stem cell pool sizes relative to their target tissues for effective regeneration. Here, we show that TEAD1-expressing skeletal muscle of transgenic mice features a dramatic hyperplasia of muscle stem cells (i.e. satellite cells, SCs) but surprisingly without affecting muscle tissue size. Super-numeral SCs attain a ‘normal’ quiescent state, accelerate regeneration, and maintain regenerative capacity over several injury-induced regeneration bouts. In dystrophic muscle, the TEAD1 transgene also ameliorated the pathology. We further demonstrate that hyperplastic SCs accumulate non-cell-autonomously via signal(s) from the TEAD1-expressing myofiber, suggesting that myofiber-specific TEAD1 overexpression activates a physiological signaling pathway(s) that determines initial and homeostatic SC pool size. We propose that TEAD1 and its downstream effectors are medically relevant targets for enhancing muscle regeneration and ameliorating muscle pathology. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15461.001 PMID:27725085

  19. Ultrastructural changes in aster yellows phytoplasma affected Limonium sinuatum Mill. plants II. Pathology of cortex parenchyma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Rudzińska-Langwald

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In Limonium sinuatum Mill, plants with severe symptoms of aster yellows infection phytoplasmas were present not only in the phloem but also in some cortex parenchymas cells. These parenchyma cells were situated at some distance from the conducting bundles. The phytoplasmas were observed directly in parenchyma cells cytoplasm. The number of phytoplasmas present in each selected cell varies. The cells with a small number of phytoplasmas show little pathological changes compared with the unaffected cells of the same zone of the stem as well with the cells of healthy plants. The cells filled with a number of phytoplasmas had their protoplast very much changed. The vacuole was reduced and in the cytoplasm a reduction of the number of ribosomes was noted and regions of homogenous structure appeared. Mitochondria were moved in the direction of the tonoplast and plasma membrane. Compared to the cells unaffected by phytoplasma, the mitochondria were smaller and had an enlarged cristae internal space. The chloroplasts from affected cells had a very significant reduction in size and the tylacoids system had disappeared. The role of these changes for creating phytoplasma friendly enviroment is discused.

  20. Mechanics and polarity in cell motility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosi, D.; Zanzottera, A.

    2016-09-01

    The motility of a fish keratocyte on a flat substrate exhibits two distinct regimes: the non-migrating and the migrating one. In both configurations the shape is fixed in time and, when the cell is moving, the velocity is constant in magnitude and direction. Transition from a stable configuration to the other one can be produced by a mechanical or chemotactic perturbation. In order to point out the mechanical nature of such a bistable behaviour, we focus on the actin dynamics inside the cell using a minimal mathematical model. While the protein diffusion, recruitment and segregation govern the polarization process, we show that the free actin mass balance, driven by diffusion, and the polymerized actin retrograde flow, regulated by the active stress, are sufficient ingredients to account for the motile bistability. The length and velocity of the cell are predicted on the basis of the parameters of the substrate and of the cell itself. The key physical ingredient of the theory is the exchange among actin phases at the edges of the cell, that plays a central role both in kinematics and in dynamics.

  1. Molecular mechanisms of male germ cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecht, N B

    1998-07-01

    During spermatogenesis, diploid stem cells differentiate, undergo meiosis, and transform into haploid spermatozoa. As this precisely timed series of events proceeds, chromosomal ploidy is reduced and the nucleosomes of the chromatin are replaced by a transcriptionally quiescent protamine-containing nucleus. The premature termination of transcription during the haploid phase of spermatogenesis necessitates an especially prominent role for posttranscriptional regulation in the temporal and spatial expression of many testis-specific proteins and isozymes. In this review article, discussion will focus on novel mechanisms regulating gene expression in mammalian male germ cells from genome to protein.

  2. Age-associated and cell-type-specific neurofibrillary pathology in transgenic mice expressing the human midsized neurofilament subunit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, J C; Morrison, J H; Friedrich, V L; Elder, G A; Perl, D P; Katz, R N; Lazzarini, R A

    1994-09-01

    Alterations in neurofilaments are a common occurrence in neurons of the human nervous system during aging and diseases associated with aging. Such pathologic changes may be attributed to species-specific properties of human neurofilaments as well as cell-type-specific regulation of this element of the cytoskeleton. The development of transgenic animals containing human neurofilament subunits offers an opportunity to study the effects of aging and other experimental conditions on the human-specific form of these proteins in a rodent model. The present study shows that mice from the transgenic line NF(M)27, which express the human midsized neurofilament subunit at low levels (2-25% of the endogenous NF-M), develop neurofilamentous accumulations in specific subgroups of neurons that are age dependent, affecting 78% of transgenic mice over 12 months of age. Similar accumulations do not occur in age-matched, wild-type littermates or in 3-month-old transgenic mice. In 12-month-old transgenic mice, somatic neurofilament accumulations resembling neurofibrillary tangles were present predominantly in layers III and V of the neocortex, as well as in select subpopulations of subcortical neurons. Intraperikaryal, spherical neurofilamentous accumulations were particularly abundant in cell bodies in layer II of the neocortex, and neurofilament-containing distentions of Purkinje cell proximal axons occurred in the cerebellum. These pathological accumulations contained mouse as well as human NF subunits, but could be distinguished by their content of phosphorylation-dependent NF epitopes. These cytoskeletal alterations closely resemble the cell-type-specific alterations in neurofilaments that occur during normal human aging and in diseases associated with aging, indicating that these transgenic animals may serve as models of some aspects of the pathologic features of human neurodegenerative diseases.

  3. Cell shape, cytoskeletal mechanics, and cell cycle control in angiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingber, D. E.; Prusty, D.; Sun, Z.; Betensky, H.; Wang, N.

    1995-01-01

    Capillary endothelial cells can be switched between growth and differentiation by altering cell-extracellular matrix interactions and thereby, modulating cell shape. Studies were carried out to determine when cell shape exerts its growth-regulatory influence during cell cycle progression and to explore the role of cytoskeletal structure and mechanics in this control mechanism. When G0-synchronized cells were cultured in basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-containing defined medium on dishes coated with increasing densities of fibronectin or a synthetic integrin ligand (RGD-containing peptide), cell spreading, nuclear extension, and DNA synthesis all increased in parallel. To determine the minimum time cells must be adherent and spread on extracellular matrix (ECM) to gain entry into S phase, cells were removed with trypsin or induced to retract using cytochalasin D at different times after plating. Both approaches revealed that cells must remain extended for approximately 12-15 h and hence, most of G1, in order to enter S phase. After this restriction point was passed, normally 'anchorage-dependent' endothelial cells turned on DNA synthesis even when round and in suspension. The importance of actin-containing microfilaments in shape-dependent growth control was confirmed by culturing cells in the presence of cytochalasin D (25-1000 ng ml-1): dose-dependent inhibition of cell spreading, nuclear extension, and DNA synthesis resulted. In contrast, induction of microtubule disassembly using nocodazole had little effect on cell or nuclear spreading and only partially inhibited DNA synthesis. Interestingly, combination of nocodazole with a suboptimal dose of cytochalasin D (100 ng ml-1) resulted in potent inhibition of both spreading and growth, suggesting that microtubules are redundant structural elements which can provide critical load-bearing functions when microfilaments are partially compromised. Similar synergism between nocodazole and cytochalasin D was observed

  4. 18-F fluorodeoxyglucose uptake in positron emission tomography as a pathological grade predictor for renal clear cell carcinomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noda, Yoshifumi; Goshima, Satoshi; Kondo, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Haruo; Kawada, Hiroshi; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Tanahashi, Yukichi [Gifu University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Gifu (Japan); Kanematsu, Masayuki [Gifu University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Gifu (Japan); Gifu University Hospital, Department of Radiology Services, Gifu (Japan); Suzui, Natsuko [Gifu University Hospital, Department of Pathology, Gifu (Japan); Hirose, Yoshinobu [Osaka Medical College, Department of Pathology, Osaka (Japan); Matsunaga, Kengo [Kizawa Memorial Hospital, Department of Pathology, Minokamo (Japan); Nishibori, Hironori [Kizawa Memorial Hospital, Department of Radiology, Minokamo (Japan); Bae, Kyongtae T. [University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2015-10-15

    To evaluate the usefulness of Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18-F FDG-PET/CT) in the prediction of Fuhrman pathological grades of renal clear cell carcinoma (cRCC). This retrospective study was approved by our institutional review board, and written informed consent was waived. Thirty-one patients with pathologically proven cRCC underwent 18-F FDG-PET/CT for tumour staging. Maximum standardized uptake value of cRCC (tumour SUV{sub max}) and mean SUV of the liver and spleen (liver and spleen SUV{sub mean}) were measured by two independent observers. Tumour SUV{sub max}, tumour-to-liver SUV ratio, and tumour-to-spleen SUV ratio were correlated with the pathological grades. Logistic analysis demonstrated that only the tumour-to-liver SUV ratio was a significant parameter for differentiating high-grade (Fuhrman grades 3 and 4) tumours from low-grade (Fuhrman grades 1 and 2) tumours (P = 0.007 and 0.010 for observers 1 and 2, respectively). Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values for detecting tumours of Fuhrman grades 3 and 4 were 64, 100, 100, and 77 %, respectively, for observer 1, and 79, 88, 85, and 83 %, respectively, for observer 2. The tumour-to-liver SUV ratio with 18-F FDG-PET/CT appeared to be a valuable imaging biomarker in the prediction of high-grade cRCC. (orig.)

  5. Molecular Pathways Regulating Macrovascular Pathology and Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Phenotype in Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Casella

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM is a disease reaching a pandemic proportion in developed countries and a major risk factor for almost all cardiovascular diseases and their adverse clinical manifestations. T2DM leads to several macrovascular and microvascular alterations that influence the progression of cardiovascular diseases. Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs are fundamental players in macrovascular alterations of T2DM patients. VSMCs display phenotypic and functional alterations that reflect an altered intracellular biomolecular scenario of great vessels of T2DM patients. Hyperglycemia itself and through intraparietal accumulation of advanced glycation-end products (AGEs activate different pathways, in particular nuclear factor-κB and MAPKs, while insulin and insulin growth-factor receptors (IGFR are implicated in the activation of Akt and extracellular-signal-regulated kinases (ERK 1/2. Nuclear factor-κB is also responsible of increased susceptibility of VSMCs to pro-apoptotic stimuli. Down-regulation of insulin growth-factor 1 receptors (IGFR-1R activity in diabetic vessels also influences negatively miR-133a levels, so increasing apoptotic susceptibility of VSMCs. Alterations of those bimolecular pathways and related genes associate to the prevalence of a synthetic phenotype of VSMCs induces extracellular matrix alterations of great vessels. A better knowledge of those biomolecular pathways and related genes in VSMCs will help to understand the mechanisms leading to macrovascular alterations in T2DM patients and to suggest new targeted therapies.

  6. Adrenomedullin promotes differentiation of oligodendrocyte precursor cells into myelin-basic-protein expressing oligodendrocytes under pathological conditions in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maki, Takakuni; Takahashi, Yoko; Miyamoto, Nobukazu; Liang, Anna C; Ihara, Masafumi; Lo, Eng H; Arai, Ken

    2015-07-01

    Oligodendrocytes, which are the main cell type in cerebral white matter, are generated from their precursor cells (oligodendrocyte precursor cells: OPCs). However, the differentiation from OPCs to oligodendrocytes is disturbed under stressed conditions. Therefore, drugs that can improve oligodendrocyte regeneration may be effective for white matter-related diseases. Here we show that a vasoactive peptide adrenomedullin (AM) promotes the in vitro differentiation of OPCs under pathological conditions. Primary OPCs were prepared from neonatal rat brains, and differentiated into myelin-basic-protein expressing oligodendrocytes over time. This in vitro OPC differentiation was inhibited by prolonged chemical hypoxic stress induced by non-lethal CoCl(2) treatment. However, AM promoted the OPC differentiation under the hypoxic stress conditions, and the AM receptor antagonist AM(22-52) canceled the AM-induced OPC differentiation. In addition, AM treatment increased the phosphorylation level of Akt in OPC cultures, and correspondingly, the PI3K/Akt inhibitor LY294002 blocked the AM-induced OPC differentiation. Taken together, AM treatment rescued OPC maturation under pathological conditions via an AM-receptor-PI3K/Akt pathway. Oligodendrocytes play critical roles in white matter by forming myelin sheath. Therefore, AM signaling may be a promising therapeutic target to boost oligodendrocyte regeneration in CNS disorders.

  7. Review paper: a review of the pathology of abnormal placentae of somatic cell nuclear transfer clone pregnancies in cattle, sheep, and mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmieri, C; Loi, P; Ptak, G; Della Salda, L

    2008-11-01

    Cloning of cattle, sheep, and mice by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) can result in apparently healthy offspring, but the probability of a successful and complete pregnancy is less than 5%. Failures of SCNT pregnancy are associated with placental abnormalities, such as placentomegaly, reduced vascularisation, hypoplasia of trophoblastic epithelium, and altered basement membrane. The pathogenesis of these changes is poorly understood, but current evidence implicates aberrant reprogramming of donor nuclei by the recipient oocyte cytoplast, resulting in epigenetic modifications of key regulatory genes essential for normal placental development. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of the anatomic pathology of abnormal placentae of SCNT clones and to summarize current knowledge concerning underlying pathogenetic mechanisms.

  8. Epidermal stem cells - role in normal, wounded and pathological psoriatic and cancer skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamstrup, M.; Faurschou, A.; Gniadecki, R.

    2008-01-01

    In this review we focus on epidermal stem cells in the normal regeneration of the skin as well as in wounded and psoriatic skin. Furthermore, we discuss current data supporting the idea of cancer stem cells in the pathogenesis of skin carcinoma and malignant melanoma. Epidermal stem cells present...... or transit amplifying cells constitute a primary pathogenetic factor in the epidermal hyperproliferation seen in psoriasis. In cutaneous malignancies mounting evidence supports a stem cell origin in skin carcinoma and malignant melanoma and a possible existence of cancer stem cells Udgivelsesdato: 2008/5...

  9. Osler's pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, S A

    2000-12-01

    Sir William Osler, one of the giants of clinical medicine, had his initial training as a pathologist. He was one of the physicians responsible for the impact that autopsies have had on medicine. He also contributed to the development of laboratory medicine. Osler made significant discoveries in anatomic pathology and hematology. His expertise was restricted not just to human pathology, but also to veterinary pathology. His mentors played a fundamental role in his achievements in academics.

  10. [Pathological jealousy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacher, A

    2004-10-28

    Pathological jealousy can make life unbearable for all concerned. The proximity of this condition to obsessive-compulsive phenomena has given rise to the notion that it might respond to substances of proven value in the treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorders. This case history exemplifies the successful treatment of pathological jealousy with the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) fluoxetine. The substance not only proved to be a successful antidepressant, but also effectively mitigated the anguish of the patient's pathological jealousy. On the basis of these findings, fluoxetine--as also other SSRIs--should always be considered as a possible effective pharmacological strategy for the treatment of pathological jealousy.

  11. CXCR4/CXCL12 Axis in Non Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC Pathologic Roles and Therapeutic Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ori Wald, Oz M. Shapira, Uzi Izhar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the second most common malignancy and the leading cause of cancer-related death in the western world. Moreover, despite advances in surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy, the death rate from lung cancer remains high and the reported overall five-year survival rate is only 15%. Thus, novel treatments for this devastating disease are urgently needed. Chemokines, a family of 48 chemotactic cytokines interacts with their 7 transmembrane G-protein-coupled receptors, to guide immune cell trafficking in the body under both physiologic and pathologic conditions. Tumor cells, which express a relatively restricted repertoire of chemokine and chemokine receptors, utilize and manipulate the chemokine system in a manner that benefits both local tumor growth and distant dissemination. Among the 19 chemokine receptors, CXCR4 is the receptor most widely expressed by malignant tumors and whose role in tumor biology is most thoroughly studied. The chemokine CXCL12, which is the sole ligand of CXCR4, is highly expressed in primary lung cancer as well as in the bone marrow, liver, adrenal glands and brain, which are all sites for lung cancer metastasis. This review focuses on the pathologic role of the CXCR4/CXCL12 axis in NSCLC and on the potential therapeutic implication of targeting this axis for the treatment of NSCLC.

  12. Clinico-pathological correlation of micronuclei in oral squamous cell carcinoma by exfoliative cytology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palve Devendra

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral squamous cell carcinoma accounts for 90% to 95% of all oral malignancies. Though its diagnosis seldom presents difficulty, it is the cancer staging and histopathological grading that are important to prognostication; and micronuclei are good prognostic indicators. Micronucleus frequencies in oral exfoliated cells stained with papanicolaou stain were counted and correlated with the histopathological grades and clinical stages of squamous cell carcinoma patients. They were also compared with healthy control subjects. Micronuclei (MN frequencies were found higher in squamous cell carcinoma patients than in control subjects. MN frequencies were also found to be raised with increasing histological grades of squamous cell carcinoma.

  13. 病理性赌博的发生机制研究综述%A Review on the Mechanism of Pathological Gambling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶绿; 马红宇; 史文文; 李娜; 王斌

    2013-01-01

    Pathological gambling refers to a gambling behavior conducted by the individuals who can't control the impulse and then addict to gamble,which adversely affects individuals,families and society.On the basis of referring to relevant literatures,it was found that the mechanism of pathological gambling may be attributed to the interaction of three factors,including biologic,psychological and social facets.Future research should pay attention to the building of the causal model of pathological gambling,and strengthening the study of pathological gambling intervention and prevention.%病理性赌博是指个体难以控制赌博冲动,使其持久地沉溺于赌博中,以致个人、家庭和社会受到不良影响的赌博行为.本研究在参阅病理性赌博和其它行为成瘾相关文献的基础上,对病理性赌博的发生机制进行探讨,指出其是生物、心理和社会因素共同作用的结果.未来研究应注重构建病理性赌博的成因模型、加强病理性赌博的干预和预防研究.

  14. Particle-Rich Cytoplasmic Structure (PaCS: Identification, Natural History, Role in Cell Biology and Pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico Solcia

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Cytoplasmic structures showing a selective concentration of both polyubiquitinated proteins and proteasome have been described in various epithelial, hematopoietic, mesenchymal and neural cells in vitro or in fetal tissues, as well as in chronically-infected, mutated preneoplastic and neoplastic tissues. These cytoplasmic structures differ from other ubiquitin-reactive cytoplasmic bodies, like sequestosomes, aggresome-like-induced structures in dendritic cells (DALIS/non-dendritic cells (ALIS and aggresomes in showing distinctive ultrastructural organization (particle-rich cytoplasmic structure or PaCS, a cytochemical pattern and a functional profile. Their formation can be induced in vitro in dendritic or natural killer cells by trophic factors and interleukin treatment. They originate in close connection with ribosomes, while, as a result of their growth, the cytoskeleton and other surrounding organelles are usually dislocated outside their core. Interestingly, these particulate cytoplasmic structures are often found to fill cytoplasmic blebs forming proteasome- and polyubiquitinated protein-discharging vesicles, called ectosomes, which are found to detach from the cell and freely float in the extracellular space. To clearly point out the importance of the polyubiquitinated proteins and proteasome containing cytoplasmic structures, their role in cell biology and pathology has been carefully analyzed.

  15. Particle-rich cytoplasmic structure (PaCS): identification, natural history, role in cell biology and pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solcia, Enrico; Sommi, Patrizia; Necchi, Vittorio; Vitali, Agostina; Manca, Rachele; Ricci, Vittorio

    2014-09-22

    Cytoplasmic structures showing a selective concentration of both polyubiquitinated proteins and proteasome have been described in various epithelial, hematopoietic, mesenchymal and neural cells in vitro or in fetal tissues, as well as in chronically-infected, mutated preneoplastic and neoplastic tissues. These cytoplasmic structures differ from other ubiquitin-reactive cytoplasmic bodies, like sequestosomes, aggresome-like-induced structures in dendritic cells (DALIS)/non-dendritic cells (ALIS) and aggresomes in showing distinctive ultrastructural organization (particle-rich cytoplasmic structure or PaCS), a cytochemical pattern and a functional profile. Their formation can be induced in vitro in dendritic or natural killer cells by trophic factors and interleukin treatment. They originate in close connection with ribosomes, while, as a result of their growth, the cytoskeleton and other surrounding organelles are usually dislocated outside their core. Interestingly, these particulate cytoplasmic structures are often found to fill cytoplasmic blebs forming proteasome- and polyubiquitinated protein-discharging vesicles, called ectosomes, which are found to detach from the cell and freely float in the extracellular space. To clearly point out the importance of the polyubiquitinated proteins and proteasome containing cytoplasmic structures, their role in cell biology and pathology has been carefully analyzed.

  16. Electrophysiological properties of rat retinal Müller (glial) cells in postnatally developing and in pathologically altered retinae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felmy, F; Pannicke, T; Richt, J A; Reichenbach, A; Guenther, E

    2001-05-01

    Retinal glial Müller cells are characterized by dominant K(+) conductances. The cells may undergo changes of their membrane currents during ontogeny and gliosis as described in rabbit and man. Although the rat retina is often used in physiological experiments, the electrophysiology of rat Müller cells is less well studied. The aim of the present study was to characterize their membrane currents in postnatal development and in two models of retinal degeneration. Freshly isolated cells were subjected to whole-cell patch clamp recordings. During the first 4 weeks after birth of rats, their Müller cells displayed an increase in all membrane currents, particularly in the inward currents elicited at hyperpolarizing potentials. The decrease of the membrane resistance from more than 760 MOmega to less than 50 MOmega was accompanied by a shift of the zero current potential from about -20 mV to -80 mV, similar as earlier observed in developing rabbit Müller cells. These developmental changes were found in pigmented Brown Norway rats as well as in rats with inherited retinal dystrophy (RCS rats). Moreover, an infection of Lewis rats with the Borna disease virus caused substantial neuroretinal degeneration but did not result in a strong reduction of inward currents and of the zero current potential of the Müller cells. Thus, rat Müller cells fail to change their basic membrane properties in two different models of retinal pathology. This is in contrast to human and rabbit Müller cells, which have been shown to undergo dramatic changes of their membrane physiology in response to retinal diseases and injuries.

  17. Diabetes Pathology and Risk of Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma: Evaluating Causal Mechanisms by Using Genetic Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ling; Walter, Stefan; Melles, Ronald B; Glymour, M Maria; Jorgenson, Eric

    2016-01-15

    Although type 2 diabetes (T2D) predicts glaucoma, the potential for unmeasured confounding has hampered causal conclusions. We performed separate sample genetic instrumental variable analyses using the Genetic Epidemiology Research Study on Adult Health and Aging cohort (n = 69,685; 1995-2013) to estimate effects of T2D on primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG; 3,554 cases). Genetic instrumental variables for overall and mechanism-specific (i.e., linked to T2D via influences on adiposity, β-cell function, insulin regulation, or other metabolic processes) T2D risk were constructed by using 39 genetic polymorphisms established to predict T2D in other samples. Instrumental variable estimates indicated that T2D increased POAG risk (odds ratio = 2.53, 95% confidence interval: 1.04, 6.11). The instrumental variable for β-cell dysregulation also significantly predicted POAG (odds ratioβ-cell = 5.26, 95% confidence interval: 1.75, 15.85), even among individuals without diagnosed T2D, suggesting that metabolic dysregulation may increase POAG risk prior to T2D diagnosis. The T2D risk variant in the melatonin receptor 1B gene (MTNR1B) predicted risk of POAG independently of T2D status, indicating possible pleiotropic physiological functions of melatonin, but instrumental variable effect estimates were significant even excluding MTNR1B variants. To our knowledge, this is the first genetic instrumental variable study of T2D and glaucoma, providing a novel approach to evaluating this hypothesized relationship. Our findings substantially bolster observational evidence that T2D increases POAG risk.

  18. Expression patterns of DLK1 and INSL3 identify stages of Leydig cell differentiation during normal development and in testicular pathologies, including testicular cancer and Klinefelter syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lottrup, G; Nielsen, J E; Maroun, L L

    2014-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION: What is the differentiation stage of human testicular interstitial cells, in particular Leydig cells (LC), within micronodules found in patients with infertility, testicular cancer and Klinefelter syndrome? SUMMARY ANSWER: The Leydig- and peritubular-cell populations in testes...... and pathology and was the best general LC marker examined here. SMA was weakly expressed in peritubular cells in the fetal and infantile testis, but strongly expressed in the adult testis. In pathological testes, the numbers of DLK1-positive interstitial cells were increased. The proportion of DLK1-positive LCs...... in adult men with testicular pathologies including testis cancer and Klinefelter syndrome. STUDY FUNDING/COMPETING INTERESTS: This work was funded by Rigshospitalet's research funds, the Danish Cancer Society and Kirsten and Freddy Johansen's foundation. The authors have no conflicts of interest....

  19. Pathological clavicular fracture as ifrst presentation of renal cell carcinoma:a case report and literature review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Kong; Jin Wang; Huan Li; Peng Guo; Jian-Fa Xu; He-Lin Feng

    2015-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) accounts for approximately 3%of all cancer cases. RCCs usually metastasize to the lungs, bones, liver, or brain. Only<1%of patients with bone metastases manifested clavicular RCC metastases. hTus, clavicular metastasis as the initial presentation of RCC is extremely rare. We report a patient with RCC metastasis to the letf clavicle, which was ifrst presented with pain caused by a pathological fracture. Magnetic resonance image revealed a renal tumor, and technetium-99m–methylene diphosphonate bone scintigraphy showed multiple osseous metastases. The patient eventually underwent surgery to remove the lateral end of the letf clavicle and right kidney. Histopathology revealed renal tumor and clear cell carcinoma in the clavicle. Finally, we review 17 cases of clavicular metastases originating from different malignancies.

  20. The protective effect of a constant magnetic field. [reduction of molecular cell pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosunov, A. V.; Tripuzov, A. N.

    1974-01-01

    The protective effect of a constant magnetic field sharply reduced spontaneous lysis of E. coli cells when subjected to ultraviolet radiation. A protective effect of a CMF was found in a study of tissue cultures of normally growing cells (kidney epithelium) and cancer cells (cells from a cancer of the larynx). The protective effect of a CMF is also seen in a combined exposure of tissue cultures to X-rays and CMF energy (strength of the CMF was 2000 oersteds with a gradient of 500 oersteds/cm). The data obtained are of interest to experimental oncology (development of new methods of treating malignant tumors).

  1. Numerical estimation of 3D mechanical forces exerted by cells on non-linear materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacio, J; Jorge-Peñas, A; Muñoz-Barrutia, A; Ortiz-de-Solorzano, C; de Juan-Pardo, E; García-Aznar, J M

    2013-01-04

    The exchange of physical forces in both cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions play a significant role in a variety of physiological and pathological processes, such as cell migration, cancer metastasis, inflammation and wound healing. Therefore, great interest exists in accurately quantifying the forces that cells exert on their substrate during migration. Traction Force Microscopy (TFM) is the most widely used method for measuring cell traction forces. Several mathematical techniques have been developed to estimate forces from TFM experiments. However, certain simplifications are commonly assumed, such as linear elasticity of the materials and/or free geometries, which in some cases may lead to inaccurate results. Here, cellular forces are numerically estimated by solving a minimization problem that combines multiple non-linear FEM solutions. Our simulations, free from constraints on the geometrical and the mechanical conditions, show that forces are predicted with higher accuracy than when using the standard approaches.

  2. Dynamic simulation of red blood cell metabolism and its application to the analysis of a pathological condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kinoshita Ayako

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cell simulation, which aims to predict the complex and dynamic behavior of living cells, is becoming a valuable tool. In silico models of human red blood cell (RBC metabolism have been developed by several laboratories. An RBC model using the E-Cell simulation system has been developed. This prototype model consists of three major metabolic pathways, namely, the glycolytic pathway, the pentose phosphate pathway and the nucleotide metabolic pathway. Like the previous model by Joshi and Palsson, it also models physical effects such as osmotic balance. This model was used here to reconstruct the pathology arising from hereditary glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD deficiency, which is the most common deficiency in human RBC. Results Since the prototype model could not reproduce the state of G6PD deficiency, the model was modified to include a pathway for de novo glutathione synthesis and a glutathione disulfide (GSSG export system. The de novo glutathione (GSH synthesis pathway was found to compensate partially for the lowered GSH concentrations resulting from G6PD deficiency, with the result that GSSG could be maintained at a very low concentration due to the active export system. Conclusion The results of the simulation were consistent with the estimated situation of real G6PD-deficient cells. These results suggest that the de novo glutathione synthesis pathway and the GSSG export system play an important role in alleviating the consequences of G6PD deficiency.

  3. Astrocyte pathology in a human neural stem cell model of frontotemporal dementia caused by mutant TAU protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallmann, Anna-Lena; Araúzo-Bravo, Marcos J.; Mavrommatis, Lampros; Ehrlich, Marc; Röpke, Albrecht; Brockhaus, Johannes; Missler, Markus; Sterneckert, Jared; Schöler, Hans R.; Kuhlmann, Tanja; Zaehres, Holm; Hargus, Gunnar

    2017-01-01

    Astroglial pathology is seen in various neurodegenerative diseases including frontotemporal dementia (FTD), which can be caused by mutations in the gene encoding the microtubule-associated protein TAU (MAPT). Here, we applied a stem cell model of FTD to examine if FTD astrocytes carry an intrinsic propensity to degeneration and to determine if they can induce non-cell-autonomous effects in neighboring neurons. We utilized CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing in human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell-derived neural progenitor cells (NPCs) to repair the FTD-associated N279K MAPT mutation. While astrocytic differentiation was not impaired in FTD NPCs derived from one patient carrying the N279K MAPT mutation, FTD astrocytes appeared larger, expressed increased levels of 4R-TAU isoforms, demonstrated increased vulnerability to oxidative stress and elevated protein ubiquitination and exhibited disease-associated changes in transcriptome profiles when compared to astrocytes derived from one control individual and to the isogenic control. Interestingly, co-culture experiments with FTD astrocytes revealed increased oxidative stress and robust changes in whole genome expression in previously healthy neurons. Our study highlights the utility of iPS cell-derived NPCs to elucidate the role of astrocytes in the pathogenesis of FTD. PMID:28256506

  4. Dendritic cells and their potential implication in pathology and treatment of rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wenink, M.H.; Han, W.; Toes, R.E.; Radstake, T.R.D.J.

    2009-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are the professional antigen presenting cells that protect us against invading organisms. On the other hand, they uphold tolerance thereby avoiding the initiation of autoimmunity. In performing these contrasting but essential tasks DC are unique and divide these processes in tim

  5. Clinical and pathological features of testicular diffuse large B-cell lymphoma : a heterogeneous disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuper-Hommel, Marion J. J.; Janssen-Heijnen, Maryska L. G.; Vreugdenhil, Gerard; Krol, Augustinus D. G.; Kluin-Nelemans, Hanneke C.; Coebergh, Jan-Willem W.; van Krieken, J. Han J. M.

    2012-01-01

    Most testicular lymphomas are of diffuse large B-cell (DLBCL) type with an outcome inferior to nodal DLBCL. Within an apparently homogeneous group of testicular DLBCLs, small cell components, plasmacytoid differentiation and lymphoepithelial lesions (LELs), features of extranodal marginal zone lymph

  6. BDNF and its receptors in human myasthenic thymus: implications for cell fate in thymic pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berzi, Angela; Ayata, C Korcan; Cavalcante, Paola; Falcone, Chiara; Candiago, Elisabetta; Motta, Teresio; Bernasconi, Pia; Hohlfeld, Reinhard; Mantegazza, Renato; Meinl, Edgar; Farina, Cinthia

    2008-07-15

    Here we show that in myasthenic thymus several cell types, including thymic epithelial cells (TEC) and immune cells, were the source and the target of the neurotrophic factor brain-derived growth factor (BDNF). Interestingly, many actively proliferating medullary thymocytes expressed the receptor TrkB in vivo in involuted thymus, while this population was lost in hyperplastic or neoplastic thymuses. Furthermore, in hyperplastic thymuses the robust coordinated expression of BDNF in the germinal centers together with the receptor p75NTR on all proliferating B cells strongly suggests that this factor regulates germinal center reaction. Finally, all TEC dying of apoptosis expressed BDNF receptors, indicating that this neurotrophin is involved in TEC turnover. In thymomas both BDNF production and receptor expression in TEC were strongly hindered. This may represent an attempt of tumour escape from cell death.

  7. Tissue microarrays in pathological examination of apoptotic acinar cells induced by dexamethasone in the pancreas of rats with severe acute pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xi-Ping Zhang; Hua Tian; Bei Lu; Li Chen; Ru-Jun Xu; Ke-Yi Wang; Zhi-Wei Wang; Qi-Hui Cheng; Hai-Ping Shen

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND:The good therapeutic effects of large dose of dexamethasone on severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) patients have been proved. This study was designed to investigate the inlfuence of dexamethasone on apoptosis of acinar cells in the pancreas of rats with SAP and the protein expression of the apoptosis-regulating genes Bax and Bcl-2. METHODS: Ninety Sprague-Dawley rats with SAP were randomly divided into a model group and a dexamethasone treated group (45 rats in each group), and another 45 rats formed the sham operation group. Survival rates were calculated and gross pathological changes in the pancreas of each group were observed under a light microscope 3, 6 and 12 hours after operation. Tissue microarray technology was applied to prepare pancreatic tissue sections. The changes in Bax and Bcl-2 protein expression levels of pancreatic tissues from each group were assessed by immunohistochemical staining, and TUNEL staining was used to evaluate changes in apoptosis index. RESULTS: The model and treated groups did not differ in mortality at each time point. The pathological score for the pancreas in the treated group was signiifcantly lower than that in the model group at 3 and 6 hours. The positive rates of Bax protein expression in the head and tail of the pancreas in the treated group at all time points were all markedly higher than those of the model group. The positive rate of Bcl-2 protein expression in the head of the pancreas in the treated group was signiifcantly higher than that of the model group at 3 hours. TUNEL staining showed that the pancreas head and tail apoptosis indices of the treated group were markedly higher than those of the model group after 6 hours. CONCLUSIONS: Apoptosis may be a protective response to pancreatic cell injury. The mechanism of action of dexamethasone in treating SAP may be related to the apoptosis of acinar cells in the pancreas induced by apoptosis-regulating genes such as Bax and Bcl-2. The advantages of tissue

  8. Differential expression of Yes-associated protein is correlated with expression of cell cycle markers and pathologic TNM staging in non-small-cell lung carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Man; Kang, Dong Wook; Long, Liang Zhe; Huang, Song-Mei; Yeo, Min-Kyung; Yi, Eunhee S; Kim, Kyung-Hee

    2011-03-01

    Yes-associated protein, a downstream effector of the Hippo signaling pathway, has been linked to progression of non-small-cell lung carcinoma. The aim of this study was to investigate expression of Yes-associated protein in lung adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. Associations of Yes-associated protein expression with clinicopathologic parameters, expression of cell cycle-specific markers, and epidermal growth factor receptor gene amplification were also analyzed. In a univariate analysis of the 66 adenocarcinomas, high nuclear expression of Yes-associated protein was significantly correlated with expression of cyclin A and mitogen-activated protein kinase. Multivariate analysis, including age and sex, showed that cyclin A expression was independently correlated with nuclear expression of Yes-associated protein in adenocarcinomas. Furthermore, high nuclear expression of Yes-associated protein was also a significant predictor of epidermal growth factor receptor gene amplification for adenocarcinoma. For the 102 squamous cell carcinomas, univariate analysis revealed that high cytoplasmic expression of Yes-associated protein was correlated with the low pathologic TNM staging (stage I) and histologic grading. Multivariate analysis, including age and sex, showed that cytoplasmic expression of Yes-associated protein was an independent predictor of low pathologic TNM staging. These results indicate that nuclear overexpression of Yes-associated protein contributes to pulmonary adenocarcinoma growth and that high cytoplasmic expression of Yes-associated protein is an independent predictor of low pathologic TNM staging and histologic grading. The differential effects of Yes-associated protein expression patterns in adenocarcinomas and squamous cell carcinomas suggest that Yes-associated protein may play important roles in different pathways in distinct tumor subtypes. These observations may, therefore, lead to new perspectives on therapeutic targeting of these tumor

  9. An epidemiologic clinical and pathological study of basal cell epithelioma (BCE in Razi Dermatological Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhyani M

    1998-08-01

    Full Text Available Our purpose was demographic clinical and pathological aspect of BCE in patients seen in Razi Hospital, during a six-month period (75.8.12 to 76.2.12. Results: From the total 20000 patients, 103 cases of BCE were detected. (0.5%. The male female ratio was 1.71 BCE was more frequent in sixth decade. 40.8% of patients were fair skin (Type II, 54.4% tawny (Type III and 4.9% brown (Type IV, V. 15.5% of patients had a past history of freckles and history of radiotherapy in childhood was present in 41.7% 89.3% had no history of acne and seborrhea. The scalp was the most common site of BCE. The most common clinical type was nodular BCE and solid BCE was the dominant histological feature. Conclusion: BCE was more common in male and fair skin patients with dry skin. In those having history of radiotherapy of the scalp, lesions were seen mostly on the scalp, forehead and neck: pigmented BCE was predominant in this group.

  10. Ovarian Germline Stem Cells (OGSCs and the Hippo Signaling Pathway Association with Physiological and Pathological Ovarian Aging in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Li

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Hippo signaling pathway plays fundamental roles in stem cell maintenance in a variety of tissues and has thus implications for stem cell biology. Key components of this recently discovered pathway have been shown to be associated with primordial follicle activation. However, whether the Hippo signaling pathway plays a role in the development of Ovarian Germline Stem Cells (OGSCs during physiological and pathological ovarian aging in mice is unknown. Methods: Mice at the age of 7 days (7D, or of 2, 10, or 20 months (2M, 10M, 20M and mice at 2M treated with TPT and CY/BUS drugs were selected as physiological and pathological ovarian aging models, respectively. Immunohistochemistry was used to assess the development of follicles, and the co-localization of genes characteristic of OGSCs with MST1, LATS2 and YAP1 was assessed by immunofluorescence, western blotting and real-time PCR methods. Results: The Hippo signal pathway and MVH/OCT4 genes were co-expressed in the mouse ovarian cortex. The level and co-localization of LATS2, MST1, MVH, and OCT4 were significantly decreased with increased age, but YAP1 was more prevalent in the mouse ovarian cortex of 2M mice than 7D mice and was not observed in 20M mice. Furthermore, YAP1, MVH, and OCT4 were gradually decreased after TPT and CY/BUS treatment, and LATS2 mRNA and protein up-regulation persisted in TPT- and CY/BUS-treated mice. However, the expression of MST1 was lower in the TPT and CY/BUS groups compared with the control group. In addition, pYAP1 protein showed the highest expression in the ovarian cortexes of 7D mice compared with 20M mice, and the value of pYAP1/YAP1 decreased from 7D to 20M. Moreover, pYAP1 decreased in the TPT- and CY/BUS-treated groups, but the value of pYAP1/YAP1 increased in these groups. Conclusion: Taken together, our results show that the Hippo signaling pathway is associated with the changes that take place in OGSCs during physiological and pathological

  11. Pathological Assessment of Rectal Cancer after Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy: Distribution of Residual Cancer Cells and Accuracy of Biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Lin; Yu, Xin; Deng, Wenjing; Feng, Huixia; Chang, Hui; Xiao, Weiwei; Zhang, Huizhong; Xi, Shaoyan; Liu, Mengzhong; Zhu, Yujia; Gao, Yuanhong

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the distribution of residual cancer cells (RCCs) within different layers of the bowel wall in surgical specimens and the value of biopsies of primary rectal lesion after preoperative volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) with concurrent chemotherapy in patients with rectal cancer. Between April 2011 and April 2013, 178 patients with rectal cancer who received preoperative VMAT, concurrent chemotherapy, and surgery were evaluated; 79 of the patients received a biopsy of the primary lesion after chemoradiotherapy and prior to surgery. The distribution of RCCs in the surgical specimens and the sensitivity and specificity of the biopsy of primary rectal lesions for pathological response were evaluated. Fifty-two patients had a complete pathological response in the bowel wall. Of the 120 patients with ypT2-4, the rate of detection of RCCs in the mucosa, submucosa, and muscularis propria was 20%, 36.7%, 69.2%, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of biopsies of primary rectal lesions was 12.9% and 94.1%, respectively. After chemoradiotherapy, the RCCs were primarily located in the deeper layers of the bowel wall, and the biopsy results for primary rectal lesions were unreliable due to poor sensitivity. PMID:27721486

  12. The Spectrum of Kidney Pathology in B-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia / Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma: A 25-Year Multicenter Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poitou-Verkinder, Anne-Laure; Francois, Arnaud; Drieux, Fanny; Lepretre, Stéphane; Legallicier, Bruno; Moulin, Bruno; Godin, Michel; Guerrot, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic lymphocytic leukemia and small lymphocytic lymphoma are 2 different presentations of the most common B-cell neoplasm in western countries (CLL/SLL). In this disease, kidney involvement is usually silent, and is rarely reported in the literature. This study provides a clinicopathological analysis of all-cause kidney disease in CLL/SLL patients. Methods Fifteen CLL/SLL patients with kidney biopsy were identified retrospectively. Demographic, clinical, pathological and laboratory data were assessed at biopsy, and during follow-up. Results At biopsy 11 patients presented impaired renal function, 7 patients nephrotic syndrome, 6 patients dysproteinemia, and 3 patients cryoglobulinemia. Kidney pathology revealed CLL/SLL-specific monoclonal infiltrate in 10 biopsies, glomerulopathy in 9 biopsies (5 membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis, 2 minimal change disease, 1 glomerulonephritis with organized microtubular monoclonal immunoglobulin deposits, 1 AHL amyloidosis). Five patients presented interstitial granulomas attributed to CLL/SLL. After treatment of the hematological disease, improvement of renal function was observed in 7/11 patients, and remission of nephrotic syndrome in 5/7 patients. During follow-up, aggravation of the kidney disease systematically occurred in the absence of favorable response to hematological treatment. Conclusions A broad spectrum of kidney diseases is associated with CLL/SLL. In this setting, kidney biopsy can provide important information for diagnosis and therapeutic guidance. PMID:25811382

  13. Histone acetylation is essential for ANG-II-induced IGF-IIR gene expression in H9c2 cardiomyoblast cells and pathologically hypertensive rat heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Chun-Hsien; Lo, Jeng-Fan; Hu, Wei-Syun; Lu, Ru-Band; Chang, Mu-Hsin; Tsai, Fuu-Jen; Tsai, Chang-Hai; Weng, Yueh-Shan; Tzang, Bor-Show; Huang, Chih-Yang

    2012-01-01

    The IGF-II/mannose 6-phosphate receptor (IGF-IIR/Man-6-P) up-regulation correlates with heart disease progression and its signaling cascades directly trigger pathological cardiac hypertrophy, fibrosis, and cardiomyocytes apoptosis. IGF-IIR gene expression/ suppression is able to prevent myocardial remodeling. However, the regulating mechanisms for the IGF-IIR gene remain unclear. This study performed reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) and methylation-specific PCR (MS-PCR) to detect expression and DNA methylation of CpG islands within the IGF-IIR genomic DNA region. Our finding revealed that the IGF-IIR gene was up-regulated both in H9c2 cells treated with tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), lipopolysaccharide (LPS), angiotensin II (ANGII) and inomycin, and age-dependently in spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) heart. For the DNA methylation study, although there were four CpG islands within IGF-IIR genomic regions, the DNA methylation distribution showed no change either in cells treated with ANGII or in the SHR heart. Using chemical inhibitors to individually block histone acetyltransferase (HAT) and histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity, we found that histone acetylation was essential for ANGII-induced IGF-IIR gene expression using RT-PCR and luciferase assay. The Chromatin immuno-precipitation assay indicated that acetyl-Histone H3 and acetyl-Histone H4 associated with the IGF-IIR promoter increased in the presence of ANGII, otherwise methyl-CpG binding domain protein 2 (MeCP2) is disassociated with this. Taken together, this study demonstrates that histone acetylation plays a critical role in IGF-IIR up-regulation during pathological cardiac diseases and might provide a targeting gene in transcriptional therapies for the failing heart.

  14. ROADS LESS TRAVELLED: SEXUAL DIMORPHISM AND MAST CELL CONTRIBUTIONS TO MIGRAINE PATHOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Ivonne Loewendorf

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Migraine is a common, little understood, and debilitating disease. It is much more prominent in women than in men (~2/3 are women but the reasons for female preponderance are not clear. Migraineurs frequently experience severe comorbidities such as allergies, depression, irritable bowel syndrome and others; many of the comorbities are more common in females. Current treatments for migraine are not gender-specific, and rarely are migraine and its comorbidities considered and treated by the same specialist. Thus, migraine treatments represent a huge unmet medical need, which will only be addressed with greater understanding of its underlying pathophysiology. We discuss the current knowledge about sex differences in migraine and its comorbidities, and focus in on the potential role of mast cells in both. Sex-based differences in pain recognition and drug responses, fluid balance, and the blood brain barrier are recognized but their impact on migraine is not well studied. Further, mast cells are well recognized for their prominent role in allergies but much less is known about their contributions to pain pathways in general and migraine specifically. Mast cell-neuron bidirectional communication uniquely positions these cells as potential initiators and/or perpetuators of pain. Mast cells can secrete nociceptor sensitizing and activating agents such as serotonin, prostaglandins, histamine and proteolytic enzymes that can also activate the pain-mediating transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV channels. Mast cells express receptors for both estrogen and progesterone that induce degranulation upon binding. Further, environmental estrogens such as Bisphenol A activate mast cells in preclinical models but their impact on pain pathways or migraine is understudied. We hope that this discussion will encourage scientists and physicians alike to bridge the knowledge gaps linking sex, mast cells and migraine to develop better, more comprehensive

  15. Pathological Impairment, Cell Cycle Arrest and Apoptosis of Thymus and Bursa of Fabricius Induced by Aflatoxin-Contaminated Corn in Broilers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xi; Bai, Shiping; Ding, Xuemei; Zhang, Keying

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the comparative effects of aflatoxin-contaminated corn on the thymus and bursa of Fabricius (BF) in chickens by detecting histopathological lesions, cell cycle phase distribution and apoptosis. A total of 900 COBB500 male broilers were randomly allocated into five groups. The experiment lasted for six weeks and the five dietary treatments consisted of uncontaminated corn (control), 25% contaminated corn, 50% contaminated corn, 75% contaminated corn and 100% contaminated corn groups. The gross changes showed the decreased size of the thymus and BF, as well as the pale color of the BF in the broilers after aflatoxin contaminated diet exposure. There were more nuclear debris in the thymus and BF of birds in the 50%, 75%, and 100% contaminated corn groups, but the pathological impairments of the BF were more obvious than those of the thymus, which showed as more obvious lymphocyte depletion and the proliferation of reticulocytes and fibroblasts. At 21 days of age, the percentage of thymocytes and BF cells in the G2M phase was increased in a dose-dependent manner in the four AFB-contaminated corn groups. However, at 42 days of age, dietary AFB1 induced cell cycle perturbation at the G0G1 phase in thymocytes, but at the G2M phase in BF cells. The increased percentage of apoptotic cells in the thymus and BF were similarly observed in the AFB groups. According to these results, the severity of histopathological lesions may be correlated with the different sensitivity of the two central immune organs when exposed to AFB; different arrested cell cycle phases suggest that different mechanisms may be involved in the lesions of the thymus and BF, which need to be further researched.

  16. Nanoparticle-Based and Bioengineered Probes and Sensors to Detect Physiological and Pathological Biomarkers in Neural Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maysinger, Dusica; Ji, Jeff; Hutter, Eliza; Cooper, Elis

    2015-01-01

    Nanotechnology, a rapidly evolving field, provides simple and practical tools to investigate the nervous system in health and disease. Among these tools are nanoparticle-based probes and sensors that detect biochemical and physiological properties of neurons and glia, and generate signals proportionate to physical, chemical, and/or electrical changes in these cells. In this context, quantum dots (QDs), carbon-based structures (C-dots, grapheme, and nanodiamonds) and gold nanoparticles are the most commonly used nanostructures. They can detect and measure enzymatic activities of proteases (metalloproteinases, caspases), ions, metabolites, and other biomolecules under physiological or pathological conditions in neural cells. Here, we provide some examples of nanoparticle-based and genetically engineered probes and sensors that are used to reveal changes in protease activities and calcium ion concentrations. Although significant progress in developing these tools has been made for probing neural cells, several challenges remain. We review many common hurdles in sensor development, while highlighting certain advances. In the end, we propose some future directions and ideas for developing practical tools for neural cell investigations, based on the maxim "Measure what is measurable, and make measurable what is not so" (Galileo Galilei).

  17. Nanoparticle-based and bioengineered probes and sensors to detect physiological and pathological biomarkers in neural cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dusica eMaysinger

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Nanotechnology, a rapidly evolving field, provides simple and practical tools to investigate the nervous system in health and disease. Among these tools are nanoparticle-based probes and sensors that detect biochemical and physiological properties of neurons and glia, and generate signals proportionate to physical, chemical, and/or electrical changes in these cells. In this context, quantum dots (QDs, carbon-based structures (C-dots, graphene and nanodiamonds and gold nanoparticles are the most commonly used nanostructures. They can detect and measure enzymatic activities of proteases (metalloproteinases, caspases, ions, metabolites, and other biomolecules under physiological or pathological conditions in neural cells. Here, we provide some examples of nanoparticle-based and genetically engineered probes and sensors that are used to reveal changes in protease activities and calcium ion concentrations. Although significant progress in developing these tools has been made for probing neural cells, several challenges remain. We review many common hurdles in sensor development, while highlighting certain advances. In the end, we propose some future directions and ideas for developing practical tools for neural cell investigations, based on the maxim Measure what is measurable, and make measurable what is not so (Galileo Galilei.

  18. The International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) grading system for renal cell carcinoma and other prognostic parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delahunt, Brett; Cheville, John C; Martignoni, Guido; Humphrey, Peter A; Magi-Galluzzi, Cristina; McKenney, Jesse; Egevad, Lars; Algaba, Ferran; Moch, Holger; Grignon, David J; Montironi, Rodolfo; Srigley, John R

    2013-10-01

    The International Society of Urological Pathology 2012 Consensus Conference made recommendations regarding classification, prognostic factors, staging, and immunohistochemical and molecular assessment of adult renal tumors. Issues relating to prognostic factors were coordinated by a workgroup who identified tumor morphotype, sarcomatoid/rhabdoid differentiation, tumor necrosis, grading, and microvascular invasion as potential prognostic parameters. There was consensus that the main morphotypes of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) were of prognostic significance, that subtyping of papillary RCC (types 1 and 2) provided additional prognostic information, and that clear cell tubulopapillary RCC was associated with a more favorable outcome. For tumors showing sarcomatoid or rhabdoid differentiation, there was consensus that a minimum proportion of tumor was not required for diagnostic purposes. It was also agreed upon that the underlying subtype of carcinoma should be reported. For sarcomatoid carcinoma, it was further agreed upon that if the underlying carcinoma subtype was absent the tumor should be classified as a grade 4 unclassified carcinoma with a sarcomatoid component. Tumor necrosis was considered to have prognostic significance, with assessment based on macroscopic and microscopic examination of the tumor. It was recommended that for clear cell RCC the amount of necrosis should be quantified. There was consensus that nucleolar prominence defined grades 1 to 3 of clear cell and papillary RCCs, whereas extreme nuclear pleomorphism or sarcomatoid and/or rhabdoid differentiation defined grade 4 tumors. It was agreed upon that chromophobe RCC should not be graded. There was consensus that microvascular invasion should not be included as a staging criterion for RCC.

  19. Oral pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemiec, Brook A

    2008-05-01

    Oral disease is exceedingly common in small animal patients. In addition, there is a very wide variety of pathologies that are encountered within the oral cavity. These conditions often cause significant pain and/or localized and systemic infection; however, the majority of these conditions have little to no obvious clinical signs. Therefore, diagnosis is not typically made until late in the disease course. Knowledge of these diseases will better equip the practitioner to effectively treat them. This article covers the more common forms of oral pathology in the dog and cat, excluding periodontal disease, which is covered in its own chapter. The various pathologies are presented in graphic form, and the etiology, clinical signs, recommended diagnostic tests, and treatment options are discussed. Pathologies that are covered include: persistent deciduous teeth, fractured teeth, intrinsically stained teeth, feline tooth resorption, caries, oral neoplasia, eosinophilic granuloma complex, lymphoplasmacytic gingivostomatitis, enamel hypoplasia, and "missing" teeth.

  20. Matter, metaphors, and mechanisms: rethinking cell theories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller-Strahl, Gerhard

    2014-12-01

    This study analyzes the logical structure of classical cell theory (CCT) by pointing out that CCT conceives the properties of organic cellular matter as supervenient to successively emerging states of quasi-crystalline atoms. This concept supports the design of a metaphorical space the intelligible components of which display an explanatory structure in accordance with the contemporary complex-systems approach of mechanisms. These findings support the thesis of an explanatory turn within the life-sciences due to a conflict between anti-classificatory (Buffon), analogous (Wolff, Reil, Weber), and causal-mechanical (Kepler) strategies of explanation. The continuous process underlying these diverse discontinuities is taken to be the immanent process of objectifying scientific concepts for the need of explanation. This process repeatedly provides concepts which are identified as nomadic concepts. The meta-analysis of their interactions reveals that concepts of matter are obtained by idealizations which entertain one process with three dimensions: atomization originating from empirical classificatory regularities (classification) and aiming at an explanation of changing phenomena (dynamization). These dimensions are successfully incorporated into the explanatory scheme of CCT. The migrations of a second group of nomadic concepts beyond this historical point of transition are made responsible for blurring the explanatory turn.

  1. Of Amoebae and Men: Extracellular DNA Traps as an Ancient Cell-Intrinsic Defense Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuezhi; Soldati, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Since the discovery of the formation of DNA-based extracellular traps (ETs) by neutrophils as an innate immune defense mechanism (1), hundreds of articles describe the involvement of ETs in physiological and pathological human and animal conditions [reviewed in Ref. (2), and the previous Frontiers Research Topic on NETosis: http://www.frontiersin.org/books/NETosis_At_the_Intersection_of_Cell_Biology_Microbiology_and_Immunology/195]. Interestingly, a few reports reveal that ETs can be formed by immune cells of more ancient organisms, as far back as the common ancestor of vertebrates and invertebrates (3). Recently, we reported that the Sentinel cells of the multicellular slug of the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum also produce ETs to trap and kill slug-invading bacteria [see Box 1; and Figure 1 Ref. (4)]. This is a strong evidence that DNA-based cell-intrinsic defense mechanisms emerged much earlier than thought, about 1.3 billion years ago. Amazingly, using extrusion of DNA as a weapon to capture and kill uningestable microbes has its rationale. During the emergence of multicellularity, a primitive innate immune system developed in the form of a dedicated set of specialized phagocytic cells. This professionalization of immunity allowed the evolution of sophisticated defense mechanisms including the sacrifice of a small set of cells by a mechanism related to NETosis. This altruistic behavior likely emerged in steps, starting from the release of “dispensable” mitochondrial DNA by D. discoideum Sentinel cells. Grounded in this realization, one can anticipate that in the near future, many more examples of the invention and fine-tuning of ETs by early metazoan ancestors will be identified. Consequently, it can be expected that this more complete picture of the evolution of ETs will impact our views of the involvement and pathologies linked to ETs in human and animals. PMID:27458458

  2. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen immunostaining in breast carcinoma and its relationship to clinical and pathological variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, S; Jain, R; Rusia, U; Gupta, R L

    1997-01-01

    Tumour proliferative activity of 74 breast lesions was assessed by determining mitotic index and immunostaining for proliferative cell nuclear antigen using Peroxidase antiperoxidase method. The indices were correlated with histomorphology and clinical stage of the disease. Positively stained nuclei and mitotic figures were counted per 1000 cells to calculate Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA) and mitotic index respectively. Sixty four cases stained positive for PCNA. The index ranged between 0 to 98. PCNA index was significantly low in benign lesions as compared to malignant lesions (p < 0.0002). There was a linear correlation between the mitotic index and PCNA index. PCNA index also showed significant correlation with tumour size and histologic grade; however, it had no correlation with axillary lymph node status.

  3. Intracellular lipid in papillary renal cell carcinoma (pRCC): T2 weighted (T2W) MRI and pathologic correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schieda, Nicola; Van der Pol, Christian B.; Moosavi, Bardia; McInnes, Matthew D.F. [The Ottawa Hospital, The University of Ottawa, Department of Medical Imaging, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Mai, Kien T.; Flood, Trevor A. [The Ottawa Hospital, The University of Ottawa, Department of Anatomical Pathology, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-07-15

    To evaluate if pRCCs demonstrate intracellular lipid (i-lipid) at chemical-shift (CS) MRI, and assess T2W-MRI and pathologic characteristics. Sixty-two patients with a pRCC diagnosis underwent MRI over 11 years (IRB-approved). Two radiologists independently assessed for presence of i-lipid on CS-MRI and homogeneity on T2W-MRI. Inter-observer agreement was assessed via an intraclass correlation and results were compared using the Chi-square test. Discordant cases were reviewed to establish consensus. T2W SI-ratios (SI.tumor/SI.kidney) and CS-SI index were compared using independent t-tests and Spearman correlation. Two pathologists re-evaluated the histopathology. Nine of the 62 pRCCs (14.5 %) demonstrated i-lipid; agreement was moderate (ICC = 0.63). Pathology review depicted clear cells in four tumours and foamy histiocytes in five tumours. 25.8-35.4 % (ICC = 0.65) of tumours were homogeneous on T2W-MRI. No pRCC with i-lipid was considered homogeneous (p = 0.01-0.04). Overall, T2W SI-ratio and CS-SI index were 0.89 (±0.29) and -3.63 % (-7.27 to 11.42). pRCC with i-lipid had significantly higher T2W SI-ratio (p = 0.003). There was a correlation between the CS-SI index and T2W SI-ratio, (r = 0.44, p < 0.001). Intracellular lipid is uncommonly detected in pRCCs due to clear cell changes and foamy histiocytes. These tumours are associated with heterogeneously-increased SI in T2W-MRI. (orig.)

  4. Correlation between Gli2, FAK expression in colonic adenocarcinoma tissue with different clinical pathological characteristics and cancer cell proliferation, invasion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhe Su

    2017-01-01

    Objective:To study the correlation between glioma-associated oncogene homologue 2 (Gli2), focal adhesion kinase (FAK) expression in colonic adenocarcinoma tissue with different clinical pathological characteristics and cancer cell proliferation, invasion.Methods: 56 patients with colonic adenocarcinoma who received surgical resection in our hospital between May 2012 and December 2015 were selected, cancer tissue and para-carcinoma tissue were collected respectively, immunohistochemical staining was used to detect the Gli2 and FAK protein-positive rate, and fluorescence quantitative PCR was used to determine the mRNA expression of Gli2 and FAK as well as the proliferation and invasionn genes.Results:Gli2 and FAK mRNA expression and protein-positive rate in colonic adenocarcinoma tissues were significantly higher than those in para-carcinoma tissues (P<0.05); Gli2 and FAK mRNA expression and protein-positive rate in colonic adenocarcinoma tissues with low differentiation, no differentiation, extraserosal infiltration and Dukes stage D were significantly higher than those in colonic adenocarcinoma tissues with high differentiation, medium differentiation, intraserosal infiltration, Dukes stage B-C (P<0.05); CyclinD1, CDK4, c-myc, N-cadherin and vimentin mRNA expression in Gli2- and FAK-positive colonic adenocarcinoma tissues were significantly higher than those in Gli2- and FAK-negative colonic adenocarcinoma tissues (P<0.05).Conclusions:Gli2 and FAK expression are high in colonic adenocarcinoma tissues and associated with the clinical pathological staging of tumor, and highly expressed Gli2 and FAK can promote cell proliferation and invasion.

  5. Abnormal changes in NKT cells, the IGF-1 axis, and liver pathology in an animal model of ALS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arseny Finkelstein

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a rapidly progressing fatal neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the selective death of motor neurons (MN in the spinal cord, and is associated with local neuroinflammation. Circulating CD4(+ T cells are required for controlling the local detrimental inflammation in neurodegenerative diseases, and for supporting neuronal survival, including that of MN. T-cell deficiency increases neuronal loss, while boosting T cell levels reduces it. Here, we show that in the mutant superoxide dismutase 1 G93A (mSOD1 mouse model of ALS, the levels of natural killer T (NKT cells increased dramatically, and T-cell distribution was altered both in lymphoid organs and in the spinal cord relative to wild-type mice. The most significant elevation of NKT cells was observed in the liver, concomitant with organ atrophy. Hepatic expression levels of insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1 decreased, while the expression of IGF binding protein (IGFBP-1 was augmented by more than 20-fold in mSOD1 mice relative to wild-type animals. Moreover, hepatic lymphocytes of pre-symptomatic mSOD1 mice were found to secrete significantly higher levels of cytokines when stimulated with an NKT ligand, ex-vivo. Immunomodulation of NKT cells using an analogue of α-galactosyl ceramide (α-GalCer, in a specific regimen, diminished the number of these cells in the periphery, and induced recruitment of T cells into the affected spinal cord, leading to a modest but significant prolongation of life span of mSOD1 mice. These results identify NKT cells as potential players in ALS, and the liver as an additional site of major pathology in this disease, thereby emphasizing that ALS is not only a non-cell autonomous, but a non-tissue autonomous disease, as well. Moreover, the results suggest potential new therapeutic targets such as the liver for immunomodulatory intervention for modifying the disease, in addition to MN-based neuroprotection and systemic

  6. THz spectroscopy of whole blood, plasma and cells in mice of SHR line with various pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchenko, A.; Tyndyk, M.; Smolyanskaya, O.; Sulatskiy, M.; Kravtsenyuk, O.; Balbekin, N.; Khodzitsky, M.

    2016-08-01

    This paper is devoted to studying of optical properties of whole blood and blood plasma in SHR mice grafted Ehrlich's carcinoma and mice with chronic inflammation at the terahertz frequency range. Additionally physiological saline solution suspension of ascites Ehrlich's carcinoma cells was explored.

  7. Involvement of endothelin receptors in normal and pathological development of neural crest cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pla, Patrick; Larue, Lionel

    2003-06-01

    Endothelin receptors (Ednr) are G-protein-coupled receptors with seven membrane-spanning domains and are involved in various physiological processes in adults. We review here the function of these receptors during the development and transformation of the neural crest cell-specific lineage. Neural crest cells (NCC) may be classified according to their location in the body. In particular, there are clear differences between the neural crest cells arising from the cephalic part of the embryo and those arising from the vagal and truncal part. The development of cranial and cardiac NCC requires the endothelin-1/Ednra system to be fully functional whereas the development of more posterior NCC requires full functionality of the endothelin-3/Ednrb system. Mutations have been found in the genes corresponding to these systems in mammals. These mutations principally impair pigmentation and enteric ganglia development. The precise patterns of expression of these receptors and their ligands have been determined in avian and mammalian models. Data obtained in vitro and in vivo have provided insight into the roles of these proteins in cell proliferation, migration, differentiation and transformation.

  8. IL-23 activates innate lymphoid cells to promote neonatal intestinal pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, L; He, Z; Slinger, E; Bongers, G; Lapenda, T Ls; Pacer, M E; Jiao, J; Beltrao, M F; Soto, A J; Harpaz, N; Gordon, R E; Ochando, J C; Oukka, M; Iuga, A C; Chensue, S W; Blander, J M; Furtado, G C; Lira, S A

    2015-03-01

    Interleukin-23 (IL-23) responsive group 3 innate lymphoid cells (ILC3s) have been implicated in immune homeostasis and pathogenesis in the adult, but little is known about their roles in the newborn. Here we show that IL-23 promotes conversion of embryonic intestinal Lin(-)IL-23R(+)Thy1(+) cells into IL-22-producing Thy1(+)Sca-1(hi) ILC3s in vitro. Gut-specific expression of IL-23 also activated and expanded Thy1(+)Sca-1(hi) ILC3s, which produced IL-22, IL-17, interferon gamma (IFN-γ), and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and were distinct from canonical CD4(+) lymphoid tissue inducer (LTi) cells. These ILC3s accumulated under the epithelium in intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1-positive cell aggregates together with neutrophils that disrupted the epithelium, leading to the formation of discrete intestinal erosions, bleeding, and neonatal death. Genetic and antibody depletion of ILC3s rescued the mice from neonatal death. Antibiotic treatment of pregnant mothers and offspring prolonged survival of IL-23 transgenic mice, suggesting a role for the commensal flora on ILC3-induced pathogenesis. Our results reveal a novel role for the IL-23-ILC3s axis in the pathogenesis of neonatal intestinal inflammation.

  9. Application of Molecular Pathology in Endocrine Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linke, Ebru Serinsoz; Tezel, Gaye Güler

    2015-01-01

    Rapid growth in knowledge of cell and molecular biology led to the increased usage of molecular techniques in anatomical pathology. This is also due to the advances achieved in the techniques introduced in the last few years which are less laborious as compared to the techniques used at the beginning of the "molecular era". The initial assays were also very expensive and were not performed except for selected centers. Moreover, the clinicians were not sure how to make use of the accumulating molecular information. That situation has also changed and molecular techniques are being performed in a wide variety of medical settings which also has a reflection on the endocrine system pathology among other organ systems. This review will provide an update of genetic changes observed in different endocrine system pathologies and their diagnostic, therapeutic and prognostic values.

  10. 病理性博彩的神经生物机制研究%Research on the Neurobiological Mechanisms of Pathological Gambling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白彩梅; 王树明; Shane Thomas; Hui Yang; 马文飞

    2016-01-01

    Pathological gambling is an unhealthy behavior in the field of gambling,and this behavior is one of the focus problems in the gambling research field,especially when the pathological gambling was classi-fied in the DSM5 as a behavioral addiction,and thus drew more attention from researchers.By means of literature review,the concept of pathological gambling is illustrated and the assessment criteria of patho-logical gambling are also introduced clearly.Furthermore,the neurobiological mechanisms of pathological gambling are described from the perspectives of cognitive neurology and neurobiology,and it was found out that pathological gamblers are not sensitive to the reward system of brain;gambling clues processing is a key factor inducing gambling behavior;pathological gamblers’neural pathways for impulse control is different from the control groups;there are some obstacles with certain brain functions of the pathological gamblers,which is one of the neural mechanism for causing its decision-making disorder.Finally,sugges-tions for future research are discussed.%病理性博彩是博彩领域中的一种不健康博彩行为,该行为是目前博彩研究领域中所关注的焦点问题之一,尤其是其在DSM5中被归为“行为性成瘾”一类后,业界对该主题的研究更加深入具体。应用文献资料法,对国内外有关病理性博彩的概念、评价标准及其演变过程进行全面的梳理,并从认知神经学、神经生物学角度对病理性博彩的神经生物机制进行综述和评述。研究主要发现:病理性博彩者对脑内负责奖赏系统不敏感;博彩线索加工是诱发博彩行为的一个关键因素;病理性博彩者冲动控制神经通路异于正常群体;病理性博彩者大脑某些功能存在障碍是导致其决策障碍的神经机制之一。文章提出了该课题的未来研究方向。

  11. Common mechanisms linking connexin43 to neural progenitor cell migration and glioma invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naus, Christian C; Aftab, Qurratulain; Sin, Wun Chey

    2016-02-01

    Cell migration is critical for cell differentiation, tissue formation and organ development. Several mechanisms come to play in the process of cell migration, orchestrating changes in cell polarity, adhesion, process extension and motility. Recent findings have shown that gap junctions, and specifically connexin43 (Cx43), can play a significant role in these processes, impacting adhesion and cytoskeletal rearrangements. Thus Cx43 within a cell regulates its motility and migration via intracellular signaling. Furthermore, Cx43 in the host cells can impact the degree of cellular migration through that tissue. Similarities in these connexin-based processes account for both neural progenitor migration in the developing brain, and for glioma cell invasion in the mature brain. In both cases, Cx43 in the tissue ("soil") in which cells ("seeds") exist facilitates their migration and, for glioma cells, tissue invasion. Cx43 mediates these effects through channel- and non-channel-dependent mechanisms which have similarities in both paradigms of cell migration. This provides insight into developmental processes and pathological situations, as well as possible therapeutic approaches regarding specific functional domains of gap junction proteins.

  12. Cell mechanics and mechanotransduction: pathways, probes, and physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hayden; Kamm, Roger D; Lee, Richard T

    2004-07-01

    Cells face not only a complex biochemical environment but also a diverse biomechanical environment. How cells respond to variations in mechanical forces is critical in homeostasis and many diseases. The mechanisms by which mechanical forces lead to eventual biochemical and molecular responses remain undefined, and unraveling this mystery will undoubtedly provide new insight into strengthening bone, growing cartilage, improving cardiac contractility, and constructing tissues for artificial organs. In this article we review the physical bases underlying the mechanotransduction process, techniques used to apply controlled mechanical stresses on living cells and tissues to probe mechanotransduction, and some of the important lessons that we are learning from mechanical stimulation of cells with precisely controlled forces.

  13. Metabolomic Profiling of Pompe Disease-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes Reveals That Oxidative Stress Is Associated With Cardiac and Skeletal Muscle Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Yohei; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Higuchi, Takashi; Shimada, Yohta; Ida, Hiroyuki; Ohashi, Toya

    2016-08-18

    : Pompe disease (PD) is a lysosomal storage disease that is caused by a deficiency of the acid α-glucosidase, which results in glycogen accumulation in the lysosome. The major clinical symptoms of PD include skeletal muscle weakness, respiratory failure, and cardiac hypertrophy. Based on its severity and symptom onset, PD is classified into infantile and late-onset forms. Lysosomal accumulation of glycogen can promote many types of cellular dysfunction, such as autophagic dysfunction, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and abnormal calcium signaling within skeletal muscle. However, the disease mechanism underlying PD cardiomyopathy is not fully understood. Several researchers have shown that PD induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived cardiomyocytes successfully replicate the disease phenotype and are useful disease models. We have analyzed the metabolomic profile of late-onset PD iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes and found that oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction are likely associated with cardiac complications. Furthermore, we have validated that these disease-specific changes were also observed in the cardiomyocytes and skeletal muscle of a genetically engineered murine PD model. Oxidative stress may contribute to skeletal muscle and cardiomyocyte dysfunction in PD mice; however, NF-E2-related factor 2 was downregulated in cardiomyocytes and skeletal muscle, despite evidence of oxidative stress. We hypothesized that oxidative stress and an impaired antioxidative stress response mechanism may underlie the molecular pathology of late-onset PD.

  14. Clinical and Pathological Complete Remission in a Patient With Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma (mRCC Treated With Sunitinib: Is mRCC Curable With Targeted Therapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amishi Y. Shah

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We report a patient with metastatic clear-cell renal cell carcinoma (mRCC who presented with primary tumor in situ in the left kidney and metastases to bone, liver, lungs, and brain. After over 5 years of sunitinib therapy and subsequent cytoreductive left nephrectomy, the patient achieved radiographic complete response (CR and had pathologic CR in the nephrectomy specimen. Durable clinical and pathological CRs are possible with targeted agents, even with primary tumor in situ and widely disseminated metastases. Ongoing research will define the optimal duration of systemic therapy in exceptional responders and identify the molecular determinants of response and resistance.

  15. Common mechanisms regulating cell cortex properties during cell division and cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roubinet, Chantal; Tran, Phong T; Piel, Matthieu

    2012-11-01

    Single cell morphogenesis results from a balance of forces involving internal pressure (also called turgor pressure in plants and fungi) and the plastic and dynamic outer shell of the cell. Dominated by the cell wall in plants and fungi, mechanical properties of the outer shell of animal cells arise from the cell cortex, which is mostly composed of the plasma membrane (and membrane proteins) and the underlying meshwork of actin filaments and myosin motors (and associated proteins). In this review, following Bray and White [1988; Science 239:883-889], we draw a parallel between the regulation of the cell cortex during cell division and cell migration in animal cells. Starting from the similarities in shape changes and underlying mechanical properties, we further propose that the analogy between cell division and cell migration might run deeper, down to the basic molecular mechanisms driving cell cortex remodeling. We focus our attention on how an heterogeneous and dynamic cortex can be generated to allow cell shape changes while preserving cell integrity.

  16. A TNFRSF14-FcɛRI-mast cell pathway contributes to development of multiple features of asthma pathology in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibilano, Riccardo; Gaudenzio, Nicolas; DeGorter, Marianne K.; Reber, Laurent L.; Hernandez, Joseph D.; Starkl, Philipp M.; Zurek, Oliwia W.; Tsai, Mindy; Zahner, Sonja; Montgomery, Stephen B.; Roers, Axel; Kronenberg, Mitchell; Yu, Mang; Galli, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    Asthma has multiple features, including airway hyperreactivity, inflammation and remodelling. The TNF superfamily member TNFSF14 (LIGHT), via interactions with the receptor TNFRSF14 (HVEM), can support TH2 cell generation and longevity and promote airway remodelling in mouse models of asthma, but the mechanisms by which TNFSF14 functions in this setting are incompletely understood. Here we find that mouse and human mast cells (MCs) express TNFRSF14 and that TNFSF14:TNFRSF14 interactions can enhance IgE-mediated MC signalling and mediator production. In mouse models of asthma, TNFRSF14 blockade with a neutralizing antibody administered after antigen sensitization, or genetic deletion of Tnfrsf14, diminishes plasma levels of antigen-specific IgG1 and IgE antibodies, airway hyperreactivity, airway inflammation and airway remodelling. Finally, by analysing two types of genetically MC-deficient mice after engrafting MCs that either do or do not express TNFRSF14, we show that TNFRSF14 expression on MCs significantly contributes to the development of multiple features of asthma pathology. PMID:27982078

  17. Aggregates of mutant CFTR fragments in airway epithelial cells of CF lungs: new pathologic observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Kai; Karp, Philip H; Ackerley, Cameron; Zabner, Joseph; Keshavjee, Shaf; Cutz, Ernest; Yeger, Herman

    2015-03-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by a mutation in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene resulting in a loss of Cl(-) channel function, disrupting ion and fluid homeostasis, leading to severe lung disease with airway obstruction due to mucus plugging and inflammation. The most common CFTR mutation, F508del, occurs in 90% of patients causing the mutant CFTR protein to misfold and trigger an endoplasmic reticulum based recycling response. Despite extensive research into the pathobiology of CF lung disease, little attention has been paid to the cellular changes accounting for the pathogenesis of CF lung disease. Here we report a novel finding of intracellular retention and accumulation of a cleaved fragment of F508del CFTR in concert with autophagic like phagolysosomes in the airway epithelium of patients with F508del CFTR. Aggregates consisting of poly-ubiquitinylated fragments of only the N-terminal domain of F508del CFTR but not the full-length molecule accumulate to appreciable levels. Importantly, these undegraded intracytoplasmic aggregates representing the NT-NBD1 domain of F508del CFTR were found in ciliated, in basal, and in pulmonary neuroendocrine cells. Aggregates were found in both native lung tissues and ex-vivo primary cultures of bronchial epithelial cells from CF donors, but not in normal control lungs. Our findings present a new, heretofore, unrecognized innate CF gene related cell defect and a potential contributing factor to the pathogenesis of CF lung disease. Mutant CFTR intracytoplasmic aggregates could be analogous to the accumulation of misfolded proteins in other degenerative disorders and in pulmonary "conformational protein-associated" diseases. Consequently, potential alterations to the functional integrity of airway epithelium and regenerative capacity may represent a critical new element in the pathogenesis of CF lung disease.

  18. Suture Granuloma Mimicking Renal Cell Carcinoma: Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI and Pathologic Correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İbrahim İlker Öz

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Solid renal masses are generally distinguished with contrast enhancement and intratumoral fatty foci by radiological examinations. The present of enhancement is most important criteria for diagnosis of malignant lesions. Generally, a contrast enhanced solid mass in kidney is accepted as a neoplasm. Foreign body granuloma is an extraordinary cause of enhanced solid renal mass. This case of a renal suture granuloma demonstrated peripheral enhanced exophytic renal mass mimic renal cell carcinoma, and underwent surgery. At the solid renal mass with different radiological features, biopsy is an option to determining the necessity of surgery as well as the surgical approach.

  19. The prognostic index: a useful pathologic guide for prediction of nodal metastases and survival in penile squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaux, Alcides; Caballero, Carmelo; Soares, Fernando; Guimarães, Gustavo C; Cunha, Isabel W; Reuter, Víctor; Barreto, José; Rodríguez, Ingrid; Cubilla, Antonio L

    2009-07-01

    A concern of surgical oncologists has been to find a method to select patients for groin dissection in penile carcinomas considering the high morbidity of this procedure. A promising methodology, in the identification of early metastatic foci by the sentinel lymph node technique (initiated in Paraguay in the 1970s), was found, using a static anatomic approach, to be associated with a recurrence rate of 30%. Later, a dynamic method using radioactive tracers and peritumoral dye injection was introduced with an improvement in patients' outcome. Recurrences, however, remained high in most studies at a rate of about 15% to 20% except in few highly specialized centers with failure rates of 5%. The technical sophistication, lack of multicenter reproduction, and cost of dynamic sentinel node biopsies preclude their routine implementation in developing countries and other approaches are necessary. Because histologic grade, depth of tumor infiltration, and perineural invasion (PNI) are considered among the most important pathologic prognostic parameters in penile cancer, we devised a Prognostic Index combining these 3 factors. In this study, we are evaluating the incidence of nodal metastasis according to the Prognostic Index score. Pathologic materials from 193 patients with penectomy/circumcision and bilateral groin dissections for invasive squamous cell carcinoma were analyzed. The Prognostic Index (ranging from 2 to 7) consisted in the addition of numerical values given to histologic grade (1 to 3), deepest anatomic level involved by cancer (1 to 3), and presence of PNI (0 or 1). Histologic grades were defined as follows: grade 1, carcinomas with minimal to no atypias; grade 3, tumors showing any proportion of anaplastic cells; and grade 2, the remainder tumors. The anatomic levels and their numerical values were: in glans, lamina propria, 1; corpus spongiosum, 2; and corpus cavernosum, 3. In foreskin they were: lamina propria, 1; dartos, 2; and skin, 3. PNI was

  20. Langerhans' cell histiocytosis: pathology, imaging and treatment of skeletal involvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azouz, E. Michel [University of Miami, Pediatric Radiology Section, Department of Radiology, Miami, FL (United States); Saigal, Gaurav [McGill University, Department of Medical Imaging, Quebec (Canada); Rodriguez, Maria M. [University of Miami, Department of Pathology, Miami, FL (United States); Podda, Antonello [University of Miami, Division of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, Miami, FL (United States)

    2005-02-01

    Langerhans' cell histiocytosis (LCH) is manifested in a variety of ways, the most common being the eosinophilic granuloma, a localized, often solitary bone lesion that occurs predominantly in the pediatric age group. The hallmark of LCH is the proliferation and accumulation of a specific histiocyte: the Langerhans' cell. In bone this may cause pain and adjacent soft-tissue swelling, but some lesions are asymptomatic. LCH can involve any bone, but most lesions occur in the skull (especially the calvarium and temporal bones), the pelvis, spine, mandible, ribs, and tubular bones. Imaging diagnosis of the disease in bone is first based on the plain radiographic appearance, which is usually a central destructive, aggressive-looking lesion. In the skull, the lesions develop in the diploic space, are lytic, and their edges may be beveled, scalloped or confluent (geographic), or show a ''button sequestrum.'' Vertebral body involvement usually causes collapse, resulting in vertebra plana. With significant recent improvements in the quality of gamma cameras, imaging techniques, and in studying children, bone scintigraphy at diagnosis and on follow-up usually reveals the sites of active disease, especially when the involvement is polyostotic. CT and MR imaging are very useful in providing detailed cross-sectional anatomic detail of the involved bone, including the bone marrow and the adjacent soft tissues. CT is better suited for demonstrating bone detail and MR imaging for bone marrow and soft-tissue involvement. (orig.)

  1. The Role of RhoJ in Endothelial Cell Biology and Tumor Pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Ting-Ting; Li, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Background. RhoJ, an endothelially expressed member of Cdc42 (cell division cycle 42) subfamily of Rho GTPase, plays an important role in endocytic pathway, adipocyte differentiation, endothelial motility, tube formation, and focal adhesion. RhoJ is a selective and effective therapeutic target in tumor tissues or retinopathy. Methods. A systematic review was related to “small Rho GTPase” or “RhoJ” with “endothelial motility, tube formation and focal adhesion” and “tumor therapy”. This led to many cross-references involving RhoJ and these data have been incorporated into the following study. Results. We have grouped the role of RhoJ according to three main effects: RhoJ regulates endocytic pathway and adipocyte differentiation in early studies, and RhoJ shows an important role in endothelial cell biology; furthermore, RhoJ blockade serves as a target in tumor vasculature and enhances the effects of anticancer drug. Conclusions. More research is necessary to understand the role of RhoJ in many aspects, on the basis of current knowledge of the role of RhoJ blockade in tumor vessels, there are opportunities for the therapy of tumor, and RhoJ is expressed outside tumour vasculature and is involved in wound healing. Taking advantage of the opportunities could result in a development in tumor therapy. PMID:27556037

  2. Clinico-pathological impact of cytogenetic subgroups in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia: Experience from India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PS Kadam Amare

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The present study of 238 B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (B-CLL patients were undertaken to seek the prevalence and to evaluate clinico-pathological significance of recurrent genetic abnormalities such as del(13q14.3, trisomy 12, del(11q22.3 (ATM, TP53 deletion, del(6q21 and IgH translocation/deletion. Materials and Methods: We applied interphase - fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH on total 238 cases of B-CLL. Results: Our study disclosed 69% of patients with genetic aberrations such as 13q deletion (63%, trisomy 12 (28%, 11q deletion (18%, 6q21 deletion (11% with comparatively higher frequency of TP53 deletion (22%. Deletion 13q displayed as a most frequent sole abnormality. In group with coexistence of ≥2 aberrations, 13q deletion was a major clone indicating del(13q as a primary event followed by 11q deletion, TP53 deletion, trisomy 12, 6q deletion as secondary progressive events. In comparison with del(13q, trisomy 12, group with coexistence of ≥2 aberrations associated with poor risk factors such as hyperleukocytosis, advanced stage, and multiple nodes involvement. In a separate study of 116 patients, analysis of IgH abnormalities revealed either partial deletion (24% or translocation (5% and were associated with del(13q, trisomy 12, TP53 and ATM deletion. Two of 7 cases had t(14;18, one case had t(8;14, and four cases had other variant IgH translocation t(?;14. Conclusion: Detail characterization and clinical impact are necessary to ensure that IgH translocation positive CLL is a distinct pathological entity. Our data suggests that CLL with various cytogenetic subsets, group with coexistence of ≥2 aberrations seems to be a complex cytogenetic subset, needs more attention to understand biological significance and to seek clinical impact for better management of disease.

  3. Cerebral pathological and compensatory mechanisms in the premotor phase of leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 parkinsonism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nuenen, B.F.L. van; Helmich, R.C.G.; Ferraye, M.; Thaler, A.; Hendler, T.; Orr-Urtreger, A.; Mirelman, A.; Bressman, S.; Marder, K.S.; Giladi, N.; Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de; Bloem, B.R.; Toni, I.

    2012-01-01

    Compensatory cerebral mechanisms can delay motor symptom onset in Parkinson's disease. We aim to characterize these compensatory mechanisms and early disease-related changes by quantifying movement-related cerebral function in subjects at significantly increased risk of developing Parkinson's diseas

  4. Digital pathology

    CERN Document Server

    Sucaet, Yves

    2014-01-01

    Digital pathology has experienced exponential growth, in terms of its technology and applications, since its inception just over a decade ago. Though it has yet to be approved for primary diagnostics, its values as a teaching tool, facilitator of second opinions and quality assurance reviews and research are becoming, if not already, undeniable. It also offers the hope of providing pathology consultant and educational services to under-served areas, including regions of the world that could not possibly sustain this level of services otherwise. And this is just the beginning, as its adoption b

  5. Cell Junction Pathology of Neural Stem Cells Is Associated With Ventricular Zone Disruption, Hydrocephalus, and Abnormal Neurogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Montserrat Guerra, Maria; Henzi, Roberto; Ortloff, Alexander; Lichtin, Nicole; Vio, Karin; Jimenez, Antonio J.; Dolores Dominguez-Pinos, Maria; Gonzalez, Cesar; Clara Jara, Maria; Hinostroza, Fernando; Rodriguez, Sara; Jara, Maryoris; Ortega, Eduardo; Guerra, Francisco; Sival, Deborah A.; den Dunnen, Wilfred F. A.; Perez-Figares, Jose M.; McAllister, James P.; Johanson, Conrad E.; Rodriguez, Esteban M.

    2015-01-01

    Fetal-onset hydrocephalus affects 1 to 3 per 1,000 live births. It is not only a disorder of cerebrospinal fluid dynamics but also a brain disorder that corrective surgery does not ameliorate. We hypothesized that cell junction abnormalities of neural stem cells (NSCs) lead to the inseparable phenom

  6. Mechanism for collective cell alignment in Myxococcus xanthus bacteria

    CERN Document Server

    Balagam, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    M. xanthus cells self-organize into clusters, aligned cell groups, at various stages of its lifecycle. Formation of these clusters is crucial for complex dynamic multi-cellular behavior of these bacteria. However the mechanism underlying the cell alignment and clustering is not fully understood. Motivated by studies of clustering in self-propelled rods, we hypothesized that M. xanthus cells can align and form clusters through pure mechanical interactions among cells and between cells and substrate. We test this hypothesis using an agent-based simulation framework where each agent is based on biophysical model of individual M. xanthus cell. We show that model agents, under realistic cell flexibility values, can align and form cell clusters but only when periodic reversals of cell directions are suppressed. However, by extending our model to introduce observed ability of cells to lay and follow slime trails, we show that effective trail following leads to clusters in reversing cells. Furthermore, we conclude th...

  7. New mechanism for neural stem cell maintenance in early embryos

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ Teamning up with co-workers from Japan, UK and US,CAS biochemists have revealed a novel mechanism for maintaining neural stem cells in early embryos. Their work was published on the 6 August issue of Cell Development.

  8. Protective mechanism against cancer found in progeria patient cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI scientists have studied cells of patients with an extremely rare genetic disease that is characterized by drastic premature aging and discovered a new protective cellular mechanism against cancer. They found that cells from patients with Hutchinson Gi

  9. Structures and molecular mechanisms for common 15q13.3 microduplications involving CHRNA7: benign or pathological?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szafranski, Przemyslaw; Schaaf, Christian P; Person, Richard E; Gibson, Ian B; Xia, Zhilian; Mahadevan, Sangeetha; Wiszniewska, Joanna; Bacino, Carlos A; Lalani, Seema; Potocki, Lorraine; Kang, Sung-Hae; Patel, Ankita; Cheung, Sau Wai; Probst, Frank J; Graham, Brett H; Shinawi, Marwan; Beaudet, Arthur L; Stankiewicz, Pawel

    2010-07-01

    We have investigated four approximately 1.6-Mb microduplications and 55 smaller 350-680-kb microduplications at 15q13.2-q13.3 involving the CHRNA7 gene that were detected by clinical microarray analysis. Applying high-resolution array-CGH, we mapped all 118 chromosomal breakpoints of these microduplications. We also sequenced 26 small microduplication breakpoints that were clustering at hotspots of nonallelic homologous recombination (NAHR). All four large microduplications likely arose by NAHR between BP4 and BP5 LCRs, and 54 small microduplications arose by NAHR between two CHRNA7-LCR copies. We identified two classes of approximately 1.6-Mb microduplications and five classes of small microduplications differing in duplication size, and show that they duplicate the entire CHRNA7. We propose that size differences among small microduplications result from preexisting heterogeneity of the common BP4-BP5 inversion. Clinical data and family histories of 11 patients with small microduplications involving CHRNA7 suggest that these microduplications might be associated with developmental delay/mental retardation, muscular hypotonia, and a variety of neuropsychiatric disorders. However, we conclude that these microduplications and their associated potential for increased dosage of the CHRNA7-encoded alpha 7 subunit of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors are of uncertain clinical significance at present. Nevertheless, if they prove to have a pathological effects, their high frequency could make them a common risk factor for many neurobehavioral disorders.

  10. Generating and characterizing the mechanical properties of cell-derived matrices using atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tello, Marta; Spenlé, Caroline; Hemmerlé, Joseph; Mercier, Luc; Fabre, Roxane; Allio, Guillaume; Simon-Assmann, Patricia; Goetz, Jacky G

    2016-02-01

    Mechanical interaction between cells and their surrounding extracellular matrix (ECM) controls key processes such as proliferation, differentiation and motility. For many years, two-dimensional (2D) models were used to better understand the interactions between cells and their surrounding ECM. More recently, variation of the mechanical properties of tissues has been reported to play a major role in physiological and pathological scenarios such as cancer progression. The 3D architecture of the ECM finely tunes cellular behavior to perform physiologically relevant tasks. Technical limitations prevented scientists from obtaining accurate assessment of the mechanical properties of physiologically realistic matrices. There is therefore a need for combining the production of high-quality cell-derived 3D matrices (CDMs) and the characterization of their topographical and mechanical properties. Here, we describe methods that allow to accurately measure the young modulus of matrices produced by various cellular types. In the first part, we will describe and review several protocols for generating CDMs matrices from endothelial, epithelial, fibroblastic, muscle and mesenchymal stem cells. We will discuss tools allowing the characterization of the topographical details as well as of the protein content of such CDMs. In a second part, we will report the methodologies that can be used, based on atomic force microscopy, to accurately evaluate the stiffness properties of the CDMs through the quantification of their young modulus. Altogether, such methodologies allow characterizing the stiffness and topography of matrices deposited by the cells, which is key for the understanding of cellular behavior in physiological conditions.

  11. Pathological glycogenesis through glycogen synthase 1 and suppression of excessive AMP kinase activity in myeloid leukemia cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonami, Atsushi; Weisberg, Ellen L.; Bonal, Dennis; Kirschmeier, Paul T.; Salgia, Sabrina; Podar, Klaus; Galinsky, Ilene; Chowdary, Tirumala K.; Neuberg, Donna; Tonon, Giovanni; Stone, Richard M.; Asara, John; Griffin, James D.; Sattler, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The rapid proliferation of myeloid leukemia cells is highly dependent on increased glucose metabolism. Through an unbiased metabolomics analysis of leukemia cells, we found that the glycogenic precursor UDP-D-glucose is pervasively upregulated, despite low glycogen levels. Targeting the rate-limiting glycogen synthase 1 (GYS1) not only decreased glycolytic flux but also increased activation of the glycogen-responsive AMPK (AMP kinase), leading to significant growth suppression. Further, genetic and pharmacological hyper-activation of AMPK was sufficient to induce the changes observed with GYS1 targeting. Cancer genomics data also indicate that elevated levels of the glycogenic enzymes GYS1/2 or GBE1 (glycogen branching enzyme 1) are associated with poor survival in AML. These results suggest a novel mechanism whereby leukemic cells sustain aberrant proliferation by suppressing excess AMPK activity through elevated glycogenic flux and provide a therapeutic entry point for targeting leukemia cell metabolism. PMID:25703587

  12. Nanoscale Mechanical Stimulation of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Nikukar

    2014-05-01

    We observed significant responses after 1 and 2-week stimulations in cell number, cell shapes and phenotypical markers. Microarray was performed for all groups. Cell count showed normal cell growth with stimulation. However, cell surface area, cell perimeter, and arboration after 1-week stimulation showed significant increases. Immunofluorescent studies have showed significant increase in osteocalcin production after stimulation. Conclusions: Nanoscale mechanical vibration showed significant changes in human mesenchymal stem cell behaviours. Cell morphology changed to become more polygonal and increased expression of the osteoblast markers were noted. These findings with gene regulation changes suggesting nanoscale mechanostimulation has stimulated osteoblastogenesis.  Keywords:  Mesenchymal, Nanoscale, Stem Cells.

  13. Microfluidics as a functional tool for cell mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanapalli, Siva A; Duits, Michel H G; Mugele, Frieder

    2009-01-05

    Living cells are a fascinating demonstration of nature's most intricate and well-coordinated micromechanical objects. They crawl, spread, contract, and relax-thus performing a multitude of complex mechanical functions. Alternatively, they also respond to physical and chemical cues that lead to remodeling of the cytoskeleton. To understand this intricate coupling between mechanical properties, mechanical function and force-induced biochemical signaling requires tools that are capable of both controlling and manipulating the cell microenvironment and measuring the resulting mechanical response. In this review, the power of microfluidics as a functional tool for research in cell mechanics is highlighted. In particular, current literature is discussed to show that microfluidics powered by soft lithographic techniques offers the following capabilities that are of significance for understanding the mechanical behavior of cells: (i) Microfluidics enables the creation of in vitro models of physiological environments in which cell mechanics can be probed. (ii) Microfluidics is an excellent means to deliver physical cues that affect cell mechanics, such as cell shape, fluid flow, substrate topography, and stiffness. (iii) Microfluidics can also expose cells to chemical cues, such as growth factors and drugs, which alter their mechanical behavior. Moreover, these chemical cues can be delivered either at the whole cell or subcellular level. (iv) Microfluidic devices offer the possibility of measuring the intrinsic mechanical properties of cells in a high throughput fashion. (v) Finally, microfluidic methods provide exquisite control over drop size, generation, and manipulation. As a result, droplets are being increasingly used to control the physicochemical environment of cells and as biomimetic analogs of living cells. These powerful attributes of microfluidics should further stimulate novel means of investigating the link between physicochemical cues and the biomechanical

  14. Mast Cell-Mediated Mechanisms of Nociception

    OpenAIRE

    Anupam Aich; Afrin, Lawrence B.; Kalpna Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells are tissue-resident immune cells that release immuno-modulators, chemo-attractants, vasoactive compounds, neuropeptides and growth factors in response to allergens and pathogens constituting a first line of host defense. The neuroimmune interface of immune cells modulating synaptic responses has been of increasing interest, and mast cells have been proposed as key players in orchestrating inflammation-associated pain pathobiology due to their proximity to both vasculature and nerve...

  15. Cardiac fibroblast-derived extracellular matrix (biomatrix) as a model for the studies of cardiac primitive cell biological properties in normal and pathological adult human heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castaldo, Clotilde; Di Meglio, Franca; Miraglia, Rita; Sacco, Anna Maria; Romano, Veronica; Bancone, Ciro; Della Corte, Alessandro; Montagnani, Stefania; Nurzynska, Daria

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac tissue regeneration is guided by stem cells and their microenvironment. It has been recently described that both cardiac stem/primitive cells and extracellular matrix (ECM) change in pathological conditions. This study describes the method for the production of ECM typical of adult human heart in the normal and pathological conditions (ischemic heart disease) and highlights the potential use of cardiac fibroblast-derived ECM for in vitro studies of the interactions between ECM components and cardiac primitive cells responsible for tissue regeneration. Fibroblasts isolated from adult human normal and pathological heart with ischemic cardiomyopathy were cultured to obtain extracellular matrix (biomatrix), composed of typical extracellular matrix proteins, such as collagen and fibronectin, and matricellular proteins, laminin, and tenascin. After decellularization, this substrate was used to assess biological properties of cardiac primitive cells: proliferation and migration were stimulated by biomatrix from normal heart, while both types of biomatrix protected cardiac primitive cells from apoptosis. Our model can be used for studies of cell-matrix interactions and help to determine the biochemical cues that regulate cardiac primitive cell biological properties and guide cardiac tissue regeneration.

  16. Cardiac Fibroblast-Derived Extracellular Matrix (Biomatrix as a Model for the Studies of Cardiac Primitive Cell Biological Properties in Normal and Pathological Adult Human Heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clotilde Castaldo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac tissue regeneration is guided by stem cells and their microenvironment. It has been recently described that both cardiac stem/primitive cells and extracellular matrix (ECM change in pathological conditions. This study describes the method for the production of ECM typical of adult human heart in the normal and pathological conditions (ischemic heart disease and highlights the potential use of cardiac fibroblast-derived ECM for in vitro studies of the interactions between ECM components and cardiac primitive cells responsible for tissue regeneration. Fibroblasts isolated from adult human normal and pathological heart with ischemic cardiomyopathy were cultured to obtain extracellular matrix (biomatrix, composed of typical extracellular matrix proteins, such as collagen and fibronectin, and matricellular proteins, laminin, and tenascin. After decellularization, this substrate was used to assess biological properties of cardiac primitive cells: proliferation and migration were stimulated by biomatrix from normal heart, while both types of biomatrix protected cardiac primitive cells from apoptosis. Our model can be used for studies of cell-matrix interactions and help to determine the biochemical cues that regulate cardiac primitive cell biological properties and guide cardiac tissue regeneration.

  17. Analysis of Pathological Diagnosis of Renal Clear Cell Carcinoma%肾脏透明细胞癌的病理诊断分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜晓敏

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the pathological diagnosis of renal clear cell carcinoma. Methods The 163 patients were re-garded as research subjects, which pathological diagnosis of renal clear cell carcinoma in Pathology from 2011 January to 2014 June, and the pathological data were retrospectively analyzed. Results In 163 patients, renal clear cell carcinoma grade I 56 cases, accounting for 34.4%, renal cell carcinoma 43 cases, accounting for 26.4%, clear cell renal III 35 cases, accounting for 21.5%, re-nal clear cell carcinoma grade IV 29 cases, accounting for 17.7%. Under microscope, tumor cells larger, circular or polygonal, abundant cytoplasm, transparent, full of interstitial capillaries and sinuses. Conclusion The pathological diagnosis was observed under microscope in tissue structure and cell lesion characteristics and disease diagnosis made, Renal clear cell carcinoma is the most common malignant tumor, renal cell carcinoma with good prognosis, early pathological diagnosis analysis, can greatly improve the quality of life of the patients.%目的:探讨肾脏透明细胞癌的病理诊断分析。方法整群选取2011年1月-2014年6月在该病理科进行肾脏透明细胞癌的病理诊断的163例患者作为研究对象,并对其病理资料进行回顾性分析。结果163例患者中,肾透明细胞癌玉级56例,占34.4%,肾透明细胞癌Ⅱ级43例,占26.4%,肾透明细胞芋级35例,占21.5%,肾透明细胞癌Ⅳ级29例,占17.7%。镜下可见肿瘤细胞体积较大,圆形或多边形,胞质丰富,透明状,间质富有毛细血管和血窦。结论病理诊断是在镜下观察组织结构和细胞病变特征而做出的疾病诊断,肾脏透明细胞癌是肾癌中最常见的恶性肿瘤,预后较好,及早进行病理诊断分析,可以大大的提高患者的生活质量。

  18. Mechanical Stress Promotes Cisplatin-Induced Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cell Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laila Ziko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cisplatin (CisPt is a commonly used platinum-based chemotherapeutic agent. Its efficacy is limited due to drug resistance and multiple side effects, thereby warranting a new approach to improving the pharmacological effect of CisPt. A newly developed mathematical hypothesis suggested that mechanical loading, when coupled with a chemotherapeutic drug such as CisPt and immune cells, would boost tumor cell death. The current study investigated the aforementioned mathematical hypothesis by exposing human hepatocellular liver carcinoma (HepG2 cells to CisPt, peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and mechanical stress individually and in combination. HepG2 cells were also treated with a mixture of CisPt and carnosine with and without mechanical stress to examine one possible mechanism employed by mechanical stress to enhance CisPt effects. Carnosine is a dipeptide that reportedly sequesters platinum-based drugs away from their pharmacological target-site. Mechanical stress was achieved using an orbital shaker that produced 300 rpm with a horizontal circular motion. Our results demonstrated that mechanical stress promoted CisPt-induced death of HepG2 cells (~35% more cell death. Moreover, results showed that CisPt-induced death was compromised when CisPt was left to mix with carnosine 24 hours preceding treatment. Mechanical stress, however, ameliorated cell death (20% more cell death.

  19. B-cell and T-cell lymphomas of the breast: clinical--pathological features of 53 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gualco, Gabriela; Bacchi, Carlos E

    2008-10-01

    Breast involvement by non-Hodgkin lymphomas is rare. We studied the morphological, immunophenotypical, and clinical features of 53 cases of malignant lymphomas involving the breast in a population of Brazilian patients. Most of the cases were of B-cell phenotype. Four of the patients with primary breast lymphomas had T-cell lymphomas, 3 had CD30-positive anaplastic large cell lymphomas, and 1 had panniculitis-like T-cell lymphoma. Most patients presented with an incidental breast mass. Secondary breast lymphoma was seen in 19 patients and most commonly occurred as part of widespread nodal disease. Two patients presented with bilateral breast involvement. The most prevalent histological subtype was also diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, followed by follicular lymphoma. This study shows that the broad morphological and immunophenotypical spectrum of malignant lymphoma of the breast occurring in a large series of Brazilian patients has many similarities with that seen in Western countries, with a higher proportion of high-grade lymphomas in both primary and secondary cases.

  20. Handling and staging of renal cell carcinoma: the International Society of Urological Pathology Consensus (ISUP) conference recommendations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trpkov, K.; Grignon, D.J.; Bonsib, S.M.; Amin, M.B.; Billis, A.; Lopez-Beltran, A.; Samaratunga, H.; Tamboli, P.; Delahunt, B.; Egevad, L.; Montironi, R.; Srigley, J.R.; Hulsbergen-van de Kaa, C.A.

    2013-01-01

    The International Society of Urologic Pathology 2012 Consensus Conference on renal cancer, through working group 3, focused on the issues of staging and specimen handling of renal tumors. The conference was preceded by an online survey of the International Society of Urologic Pathology members, and

  1. Glial cell lineage expression of mutant ataxin-1 and huntingtin induces developmental and late-onset neuronal pathologies in Drosophila models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takuya Tamura

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In several neurodegenerative disorders, toxic effects of glial cells on neurons are implicated. However the generality of the non-cell autonomous pathologies derived from glial cells has not been established, and the specificity among different neurodegenerative disorders remains unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We newly generated Drosophila models expressing human mutant huntingtin (hHtt103Q or ataxin-1 (hAtx1-82Q in the glial cell lineage at different stages of differentiation, and analyzed their morphological and behavioral phenotypes. To express hHtt103Q and hAtx1-82Q, we used 2 different Gal4 drivers, gcm-Gal4 and repo-Gal4. Gcm-Gal4 is known to be a neuroglioblast/glioblast-specific driver whose effect is limited to development. Repo-Gal4 is known to be a pan-glial driver and the expression starts at glioblasts and continues after terminal differentiation. Gcm-Gal4-induced hHtt103Q was more toxic than repo-Gal4-induced hHtt103Q from the aspects of development, locomotive activity and survival of flies. When hAtx1-82Q was expressed by gcm- or repo-Gal4 driver, no fly became adult. Interestingly, the head and brain sizes were markedly reduced in a part of pupae expressing hAtx1-82Q under the control of gcm-Gal4, and these pupae showed extreme destruction of the brain structure. The other pupae expressing hAtx1-82Q also showed brain shrinkage and abnormal connections of neurons. These results suggested that expression of polyQ proteins in neuroglioblasts provided a remarkable effect on the developmental and adult brains, and that glial cell lineage expression of hAtx1-82Q was more toxic than that of hHtt103Q in our assays. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: All these studies suggested that the non-cell autonomous effect of glial cells might be a common pathology shared by multiple neurodegenerative disorders. In addition, the fly models would be available for analyzing molecular pathologies and developing novel therapeutics against

  2. Pineal Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma Concomitant With Pituitary Prolactinoma: Possible Correlation Between 2 Distinguished Pathologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeong-Jin; Kim, Hee Kyung; Yang, Deok-Hwan; Jung, Shin; Noh, Myung-Giun; Lee, Jae-Hyuk; Lee, Kyung-Hwa; Moon, Kyung-Sub

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This is the first reported case of pineal lymphoma with concomitant prolactin-producing pituitary adenoma. A 51-year-old male experienced worsening headaches accompanied by nausea, diplopia, and memory loss for 1 month. Cranial nerve examination revealed bilateral upward gaze limitation with convergence impairment, which is known as Parinaud syndrome. Magnetic resonance images revealed a mass in the pineal gland with a coexisting mass within the enlarged sella fossa. Hormone analysis revealed hyperprolactinemia. The pineal mass was removed without injuring the hypothalamus, brain stem, or any neighboring vessels. Pathology examination confirmed the diagnosis of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) involving the pineal gland. After further studies, the pineal lymphoma was determined to be a secondary tumor from a gastric primary tumor. The patient died 6 months after diagnosis due to systemic progression of DLBCL. Although the mechanistic link between hyperprolactinemia and lymphoma progression has not been clarified on a clinical basis, high prolactin levels may contribute to the rapid progression and therapeutic resistance of the lymphoma. PMID:26937937

  3. Prognostic significance of telomeric repeat length alterations in pathological stage I-IIIA non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirashima, T; Komiya, T; Nitta, T; Takada, Y; Kobayashi, M; Masuda, N; Matui, K; Takada, M; Kikui, M; Yasumitu, T; Ohno, A; Nakagawa, K; Fukuoka, M; Kawase, I

    2000-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the prognostic significance of alteration in telomere length in pathological stage (p-stage) I-IIIA non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Paired cancer and normal lung tissues were obtained from 72 patients with histologically confirmed p-stage I-IIIA NSCLC. Terminal restriction fragment (TRF) length, which indicates telomere length, was measured by Southern blot analysis. Tumor telomerase activity was also assayed by non-radioactive PCR-ELISA in 55 patients. TRF length (mean +/- SD) in normal tissue was 6.2 +/- 1.1 Kb. Therefore, upper and lower limits of normal range in TRF length was set at 8.4 (mean + 2SD) Kb and 4.0 (mean-2SD) Kb, respectively. A tumor showing TRF length over normal range was defined as positive for the alteration. In 72 patients, 25 (34.7%) with alteration in TRF length had significantly shorter survival durations than those of the others. Telomerase activity did not correlate with survival duration. In multivariate analysis, alteration in TRF length (P = 0.0033) was second to p-stage (P = 0.0004) in importance among the various parameters.

  4. Pineal Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma Concomitant With Pituitary Prolactinoma: Possible Correlation Between 2 Distinguished Pathologies: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeong-Jin; Kim, Hee Kyung; Yang, Deok-Hwan; Jung, Shin; Noh, Myung-Giun; Lee, Jae-Hyuk; Lee, Kyung-Hwa; Moon, Kyung-Sub

    2016-02-01

    This is the first reported case of pineal lymphoma with concomitant prolactin-producing pituitary adenoma.A 51-year-old male experienced worsening headaches accompanied by nausea, diplopia, and memory loss for 1 month. Cranial nerve examination revealed bilateral upward gaze limitation with convergence impairment, which is known as Parinaud syndrome. Magnetic resonance images revealed a mass in the pineal gland with a coexisting mass within the enlarged sella fossa. Hormone analysis revealed hyperprolactinemia. The pineal mass was removed without injuring the hypothalamus, brain stem, or any neighboring vessels. Pathology examination confirmed the diagnosis of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) involving the pineal gland. After further studies, the pineal lymphoma was determined to be a secondary tumor from a gastric primary tumor. The patient died 6 months after diagnosis due to systemic progression of DLBCL.Although the mechanistic link between hyperprolactinemia and lymphoma progression has not been clarified on a clinical basis, high prolactin levels may contribute to the rapid progression and therapeutic resistance of the lymphoma.

  5. The Use of Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells in the Treatment of Physiological and Pathological Vulvar Dystrophies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Giuseppina Onesti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available “Vulvar dystrophy” is characterized by chronic alterations of vulvar trophism, occurring in both physiological (menopause and pathological (lichen sclerosus, vulvar graft-versus-host disease conditions. Associated symptoms are itching, burning, dyspareunia and vaginal dryness. Current treatments often do not imply a complete remission of symptoms. Adipose-Derived Stem Cells (ADSCs injection represents a valid alternative therapy to enhance trophism and tone of dystrophic tissues. We evaluated efficacy of ADSCs-based therapy in the dystrophic areas. From February to April 2013 we enrolled 8 patients with vulvar dystrophy. A biopsy specimen was performed before and after treatment. Digital photographs were taken at baseline and during the follow-up. Pain was detected with Visual Analogue Scale and sexual function was evaluated with Female Sexual Function Index. All patients received 2 treatments in 3 months. Follow-up was at 1 week , 1 and 3 months, and 1 and 2 years. We obtained a significant vulvar trophism enhancement in all patients, who reported pain reduction and sexual function improvement. Objective exam with speculum was easy to perform after treatment. We believe ADSCs-based therapy finds its application in the treatment of vulvar dystrophies, since ADSCs could induce increased vascularization due to their angiogenic properties and tissue trophism improvement thanks to their eutrophic effect.

  6. The pathological changes of inflammatory cells,smooth muscle cell and neo-vessels in the vulnerable carotid atherosclerosis plaque

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕鹤

    2006-01-01

    Objective To study the inflammation, smooth muscle cells and neovessels change in the vulnerable carotid atherosclerosis plaque. Methods 6 male patients, aged between 66~73 years old, had the history of stroke or transient cerebral ischemic attacks of internal carotid artery system in a few days to 5 months. MRI and DSA re-

  7. Cell Death Mechanisms Induced by Cytotoxic Lymphocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ch(a)vez-Gal(a)n L; Arenas-Del Angel MC; Zenteno E; Ch(a)vez R; Lascurain R

    2009-01-01

    One of the functions of the immune system is to recognize and destroy abnormal or infected cells to maintain homeostasis. This is accomplished by cytotoxic lymphocytes. Cytotoxicity is a highly organized multifactor process. Here, we reviewed the apoptosis pathways induced by the two main cytotoxic lymphocyte subsets, natural killer (NK) cells and CD8+T cells. In base to recent experimental evidence, we reviewed NK receptors involved in recognition of target-cell, as well as lytic molecules such as perforin, granzymes-A and -B, and granulysin. In addition, we reviewed the Fas-FasL intercellular linkage mediated pathway, and briefly the cross-linking of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and TNF receptor pathway. We discussed three models of possible molecular interaction between lyric molecules from effector cytotoxic cells and target-cell membrane to induction of apoptosis.

  8. Fluoride inhibits the response of bone cells to mechanical loading

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, H.M.E.; van den Heuvel, E.G.H.M.; Castelein, S.; Keverling Buisman, J.; Bronckers, A.L.J.J.; Bakker, A.D.; Klein-Nulend, J.

    2011-01-01

    The response of bone cells to mechanical loading is mediated by the cytoskeleton. Since the bone anabolic agent fluoride disrupts the cytoskeleton, we investigated whether fluoride affects the response of bone cells to mechanical loading, and whether this is cytoskeleton mediated. The mechano-respon

  9. Mechanisms of Chemoresistance in Breast Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-05-01

    effect on ji-acn f. ........ :.. expression levels of P3-actin. Whether chemical lowering of MDRI expression affects cellular RT-PCR Wester blot ...AdrR/asGCS cells compared with MCF-7-AdrR cells. We confirmed this by Western blot . Whereas, MCF-7-AdrR cells contained characteristically elevated...Research P-glycoprotein expression can be down-regulated by GCS antisense nitrocellulose blot was blocked with 5% fat-free milk powder in PBS

  10. Real-time observations of mechanical stimulus-induced enhancements of mechanical properties in osteoblast cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Xu; Liu Xiaoli; Sun Jialun [State Key Laboratory of Bioactive Materials, School of Physics, Nankai University, Tianjin 300073 (China); He Shuojie [State Key Laboratory of Bioactive Materials, School of Physics, Nankai University, Tianjin 300073 (China); Department of Physics, Pusan National University, Pusan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Imshik [State Key Laboratory of Bioactive Materials, School of Physics, Nankai University, Tianjin 300073 (China)], E-mail: ilee@nankai.edu.cn2; Pak, Hyuk Kyu [Department of Physics, Pusan National University, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-09-15

    Osteoblast, playing a key role in the pathophysiology of osteoporosis, is one of the mechanical stress sensitive cells. The effects of mechanical load-induced changes of mechanical properties in osteoblast cells were studied at real-time. Osteoblasts obtained from young Wister rats were exposed to mechanical loads in different frequencies and resting intervals generated by atomic force microscopy (AFM) probe tip and simultaneously measured the changes of the mechanical properties by AFM. The enhancement of the mechanical properties was observed and quantified by the increment of the apparent Young's modulus, E{sup *}. The observed mechanical property depended on the frequency of applied tapping loads. For the resting interval is 50 s, the mechanical load-induced enhancement of E{sup *}-values disappears. It seems that the enhanced mechanical property was recover able under no additional mechanical stimulus.

  11. Adhesion functions in cell sorting by mechanically coupling the cortices of adhering cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maître, Jean-Léon; Berthoumieux, Hélène; Krens, Simon Frederik Gabriel; Salbreux, Guillaume; Jülicher, Frank; Paluch, Ewa; Heisenberg, Carl-Philipp

    2012-10-12

    Differential cell adhesion and cortex tension are thought to drive cell sorting by controlling cell-cell contact formation. Here, we show that cell adhesion and cortex tension have different mechanical functions in controlling progenitor cell-cell contact formation and sorting during zebrafish gastrulation. Cortex tension controls cell-cell contact expansion by modulating interfacial tension at the contact. By contrast, adhesion has little direct function in contact expansion, but instead is needed to mechanically couple the cortices of adhering cells at their contacts, allowing cortex tension to control contact expansion. The coupling function of adhesion is mediated by E-cadherin and limited by the mechanical anchoring of E-cadherin to the cortex. Thus, cell adhesion provides the mechanical scaffold for cell cortex tension to drive cell sorting during gastrulation.

  12. Lymphoid Cell-Glioma Cell Interaction Enhances Cell Coat Production by Human Gliomas: Novel Suppressor Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, Steven J.; Macchi, Beatrice; Papazoglou, Savvas; Oldfield, Edward H.; Kornblith, Paul L.; Smith, Barry H.; Gately, Maurice K.

    1983-05-01

    Certain human glioma lines produce mucopolysaccharide coats that impair the generation of cytolytic lymphocytes in response to these lines in vitro. Coat production is substantially enhanced by the interaction of glioma cells with a macromolecular factor released by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells in culture. This interaction thus constitutes an unusual mechanism by which inflammatory cells may nonspecifically suppress the cellular immune response to at least one class of solid tumors in humans.

  13. Clinico-pathological analysis of renal cell carcinoma demonstrates decreasing tumour grade over a 17-year period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nason, Gregory J.; McGuire, Barry B.; Kelly, Michael E.; Murphy, Theodore M.; Looney, Aisling T.; Byrne, Damien P.; Mulvin, David W.; Galvin, David J.; Quinlan, David M.; Lennon, Gerald M.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) represents about 3% of adult malignancies in Ireland. Worldwide there is a reported increasing incidence and recent studies report a stage migration towards smaller tumours. We assess the clinico-pathological features and survival of patients with RCC in a surgically treated cohort. Methods: A retrospective analysis of all nephrectomies carried out between 1995 and 2012 was carried out in an Irish tertiary referral university hospital. Data recorded included patient demographics, size of tumour, tumour-node-metastasis (TNM) classification, operative details and final pathology. The data were divided into 3 equal consecutive time periods for comparison purposes: Group 1 (1995–2000), Group 2 (2001–2006) and Group 3 (2007–2012). Survival data were verified with the National Cancer Registry of Ireland. Results: In total, 507 patients underwent nephrectomies in the study period. The median tumour size was 5.8 cm (range: 1.2–20 cm) and there was no statistical reduction in size observed over time (p = 0.477). A total of 142 (28%) RCCs were classified as pT1a, 111 (21.9%) were pT1b, 67 (13.2%) were pT2, 103 (20.3%) were pT3a, 75 (14.8%) were pT3b and 9 (1.8%) were pT4. There was no statistical T-stage migration observed (p = 0.213). There was a significant grade reduction over time (p = 0.017). There was significant differences noted in overall survival between the T-stages (p < 0.001), nuclear grades (p < 0.001) and histological subtypes (p = 0.022). Conclusion: There was a rising incidence in the number of nephrectomies over the study period. Despite previous reports, a stage migration was not evident; however, a grade reduction was apparent in this Irish surgical series. We can demonstrate that tumour stage, nuclear grade and histological subtype are significant prognosticators of relative survival in RCC. PMID:24839483

  14. Early and late-onset acute GvHD following hematopoietic cell transplantation: CT features of gastrointestinal involvement with clinical and pathological correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodoefel, H. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Eberhard-Karls-University, Hoppe-Seyler-Str. 3, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany)], E-mail: h.brodoefel@t-online.de; Bethge, W. [Department of Internal Medicine II, Oncology/Haematology, Eberhard-Karls-University, Otfried-Mueller-Str. 10, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Vogel, M.; Fenchel, M. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Eberhard-Karls-University, Hoppe-Seyler-Str. 3, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Faul, C. [Department of Internal Medicine II, Oncology/Haematology, Eberhard-Karls-University, Otfried-Mueller-Str. 10, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Wehrmann, M. [Department of Pathology, Eberhard-Karls-University, Liebermeister-Str. 8, 72076, Tuebingen (Germany); Claussen, C.; Horger, M. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Eberhard-Karls-University, Hoppe-Seyler-Str. 3, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany)

    2010-03-15

    Objective: With the introduction of non-myeloablative hematopoietic cell transplantation, acute graft-versus-host-disease (GvHD) is frequently observed beyond the traditional 100 days cut-off. The aim of this study was to describe and compare CT features of gastrointestinal early and late-onset GvHD and to correlate findings with clinical and pathology grading. Subjects and methods: Abdominal CT scans were obtained in 20 patients with early and 15 with late-onset GvHD. Examinations were assessed for intestinal and extraintestinal abnormalities and findings compared between the two subgroups of GvHD. Distinct CT abnormalities as well as a CT-score integrating multiple pathologies were correlated with gut, clinical or pathology grading. Results: Frequent intestinal abnormalities included wall thickening, abnormal enhancement, and excessive fluid-filling (94%, 89%, and 94%). 86% of patients showed concomitant small and large bowel involvement. A discontinuous distribution was observed in 54%. Bile tract abnormality was the most common extra-intestinal finding (74%). The distribution of pathologies was equal between subgroups of early or late-onset disease. Wall thickening and mucosal attenuation in non-enhanced scans were significantly related to clinical and pathology scores (P {<=} 0.018). Number of abnormal segments, small bowel dilatation, engorgement of the vasa recta, mesenteric fat stranding and ascites were linked to clinical grading (P {<=} 0.019). A CT-score integrating multiple abnormalities was correlated to gut, overall clinical and pathology grading (r = 0.64, 0.57, 0.50). Conclusion: CT morphology of acute GvHD is independent of its time of onset and, thus, facilitates differential diagnosis of late-onset acute GvHD. Correlation of CT morphology with clinical and pathological grading is important in terms of prognosis and may help guiding the therapeutic approach.

  15. Engineering three-dimensional cell mechanical microenvironment with hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Guoyou; Wang, Lin; Wang, Shuqi; Han, Yulong; Wu, Jinhui; Zhang, Qiancheng; Xu, Feng; Lu, Tian Jian

    2012-12-01

    Cell mechanical microenvironment (CMM) significantly affects cell behaviors such as spreading, migration, proliferation and differentiation. However, most studies on cell response to mechanical stimulation are based on two-dimensional (2D) planar substrates, which cannot mimic native three-dimensional (3D) CMM. Accumulating evidence has shown that there is a significant difference in cell behavior in 2D and 3D microenvironments. Among the materials used for engineering 3D CMM, hydrogels have gained increasing attention due to their tunable properties (e.g. chemical and mechanical properties). In this paper, we provide an overview of recent advances in engineering hydrogel-based 3D CMM. Effects of mechanical cues (e.g. hydrogel stiffness and externally induced stress/strain in hydrogels) on cell behaviors are described. A variety of approaches to load mechanical stimuli in 3D hydrogel-based constructs are also discussed.

  16. Expression of Yes-associated protein in non-small cell lung cancer and its relationship with clinical pathological factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SU Li-li; MA Wei-xia; YUAN Jian-feng; SHAO Yang; XIAO Wei; JIANG Shu-juan

    2012-01-01

    Background Yes-associated protein(YAP)plays an important role in signal transduction and gene transcription regulation in normal cells,with elevated and over-expressed YAP levels observed in various malignant tumors.The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of YAP in non-small cell lung cancer(NSCLC),and to study the possible relationship of YAP expression with the occurrence and development of NSCLC.Methods YAP expression was assessed in 40 cases of NSCLC tumor tissues by immunohistochemistry,and their protein and mRNA levels were evaluated through Western blotting and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction(PCR),respectively.Normal lung tissues obtained from the same patient were used as control.Statistical analysis was performed to correlate the YAP expression to clinical pathological factors,such as tumor type,stage and grade.Results YAP-positive expression was found in 28(70%)of the 40 cases of NSCLC,which included 10 cases of squamous cell carcinoma(25%),17 cases of adenocarcinoma(42.5%)and 1 case of squamous adenocarcinoma(2.5%).In the 28 YAP-positive cases,19 cases showed lymph node metastasis and were classified in TNM stage Ⅱ+Ⅲ(47.5%);the other nine cases showed no lymph node metastasis(22.5%)and were classified in the TNM stage Ⅰ.There was no relationship between YAP expression and patients'age,gender or tumor histological grades.However,YAP showed significant over expression in late period of T stage(P=0.012),TNM stage(P=0.039),and lymph node metastasis(P=0.013),respectively.Notably,YAP-positive expression was significantly higher in adenocarcinoma than that in squamous cell carcinoma(P=0.041).Conclusions Over-expression of YAP was associated with NSCLC,especially lung adenocarcinoma.The high YAP expression in late period of tumor stage and lymph node metastasis may indicate that YAP expression could be an early marker for NSCLC tumorigenesis.

  17. Role of mismatch in mechanical properties in cancer cell migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butcher, Julian; Das, Moumita

    2014-03-01

    Recent experiments suggest that the mechanical stiffness of cells and their interaction with their surroundings undergo remarkable changes during tumor progression. An intriguing experimental result in this area suggests that the mismatch in the elasticity and adhesive properties between cancer cells and cells that have not yet transformed may lead to enhanced cancer cell motility in a binary cell population. Motivated by this, we study the mechanical response and dynamics of a binary system of active and deformable particles using Langevin Dynamics simulations. We characterize their motility by studying particle trajectories, mean square displacements and correlation functions. Our study may provide an understanding of the interplay of mechanical and statistical mechanical properties underlying the enhanced motility of cancer cells during metastasis. This work was partially supported by a D-RIG grant from the College of Science at Rochester Institute of Technology.

  18. Non-invasive in Situ Simultaneous Measurement of Multi-parameter Mechanical Properties of Red Blood Cell Membrane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing LI; Yao-Xiong HUANG; Tao JI; Mei TU; Xuan MAO; Wen-Xin CHEN; Guang-Wei CHEN

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a new dynamic image analyzing technique that will give us the ability to measure the viscoelastic parameters of individual living red blood cells non-invasively, in situ and in real time. With this technique, the bending modulus Kc, the shear elasticityμ and their ratio ε were measured under different temperatures, oxygen partial pressures and osmotic pressures. The results not only show the effects of external conditions on mechanical properties of cell membranes including deformability,flexibility, adhesive ability and plasticity, but also demonstrate that the technique can be used to measure cell membrane parameters continuously under several physiological and pathological conditions.

  19. Cerebral pathological and compensatory mechanisms in the premotor phase of leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 parkinsonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Nuenen, Bart F L; Helmich, Rick C; Ferraye, Murielle; Thaler, Avner; Hendler, Talma; Orr-Urtreger, Avi; Mirelman, Anat; Bressman, Susan; Marder, Karen S; Giladi, Nir; van de Warrenburg, Bart P C; Bloem, Bastiaan R; Toni, Ivan

    2012-12-01

    Compensatory cerebral mechanisms can delay motor symptom onset in Parkinson's disease. We aim to characterize these compensatory mechanisms and early disease-related changes by quantifying movement-related cerebral function in subjects at significantly increased risk of developing Parkinson's disease, namely carriers of a leucine-rich repeat kinase 2-G2019S mutation associated with dominantly inherited parkinsonism. Functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to examine cerebral activity evoked during internal selection of motor representations, a core motor deficit in clinically overt Parkinson's disease. Thirty-nine healthy first-degree relatives of Ashkenazi Jewish patients with Parkinson's disease, who carry the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2-G2019S mutation, participated in this study. Twenty-one carriers of the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2-G2019S mutation and 18 non-carriers of this mutation were engaged in a motor imagery task (laterality judgements of left or right hands) known to be sensitive to motor control parameters. Behavioural performance of both groups was matched. Mutation carriers and non-carriers were equally sensitive to the extent and biomechanical constraints of the imagined movements in relation to the current posture of the participants' hands. Cerebral activity differed between groups, such that leucine-rich repeat kinase 2-G2019S carriers had reduced imagery-related activity in the right caudate nucleus and increased activity in the right dorsal premotor cortex. More severe striatal impairment was associated with stronger effective connectivity between the right dorsal premotor cortex and the right extrastriate body area. These findings suggest that altered movement-related activity in the caudate nuclei of leucine-rich repeat kinase 2-G2019S carriers might remain behaviourally latent by virtue of cortical compensatory mechanisms involving long-range connectivity between the dorsal premotor cortex and posterior sensory regions. These

  20. Mechanisms of regulating cell topology in proliferating epithelia: impact of division plane, mechanical forces, and cell memory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingzi Li

    Full Text Available Regulation of cell growth and cell division has a fundamental role in tissue formation, organ development, and cancer progression. Remarkable similarities in the topological distributions were found in a variety of proliferating epithelia in both animals and plants. At the same time, there are species with significantly varied frequency of hexagonal cells. Moreover, local topology has been shown to be disturbed on the boundary between proliferating and quiescent cells, where cells have fewer sides than natural proliferating epithelia. The mechanisms of regulating these topological changes remain poorly understood. In this study, we use a mechanical model to examine the effects of orientation of division plane, differential proliferation, and mechanical forces on animal epithelial cells. We find that regardless of orientation of division plane, our model can reproduce the commonly observed topological distributions of cells in natural proliferating animal epithelia with the consideration of cell rearrangements. In addition, with different schemes of division plane, we are able to generate different frequency of hexagonal cells, which is consistent with experimental observations. In proliferating cells interfacing quiescent cells, our results show that differential proliferation alone is insufficient to reproduce the local changes in cell topology. Rather, increased tension on the boundary, in conjunction with differential proliferation, can reproduce the observed topological changes. We conclude that both division plane orientation and mechanical forces play important roles in cell topology in animal proliferating epithelia. Moreover, cell memory is also essential for generating specific topological distributions.

  1. Mechanisms of regulating cell topology in proliferating epithelia: impact of division plane, mechanical forces, and cell memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yingzi; Naveed, Hammad; Kachalo, Sema; Xu, Lisa X; Liang, Jie

    2012-01-01

    Regulation of cell growth and cell division has a fundamental role in tissue formation, organ development, and cancer progression. Remarkable similarities in the topological distributions were found in a variety of proliferating epithelia in both animals and plants. At the same time, there are species with significantly varied frequency of hexagonal cells. Moreover, local topology has been shown to be disturbed on the boundary between proliferating and quiescent cells, where cells have fewer sides than natural proliferating epithelia. The mechanisms of regulating these topological changes remain poorly understood. In this study, we use a mechanical model to examine the effects of orientation of division plane, differential proliferation, and mechanical forces on animal epithelial cells. We find that regardless of orientation of division plane, our model can reproduce the commonly observed topological distributions of cells in natural proliferating animal epithelia with the consideration of cell rearrangements. In addition, with different schemes of division plane, we are able to generate different frequency of hexagonal cells, which is consistent with experimental observations. In proliferating cells interfacing quiescent cells, our results show that differential proliferation alone is insufficient to reproduce the local changes in cell topology. Rather, increased tension on the boundary, in conjunction with differential proliferation, can reproduce the observed topological changes. We conclude that both division plane orientation and mechanical forces play important roles in cell topology in animal proliferating epithelia. Moreover, cell memory is also essential for generating specific topological distributions.

  2. Mechanisms underlying KCNQ1channel cell volume sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammami, Sofia

    Cells are constantly exposed to changes in cell volume during cell metabolism, nutrient uptake, cell proliferation, cell migration and salt and water transport. In order to cope with these perturbations, potassium channels in line with chloride channels have been shown to be likely contributors...... to the process of cell volume adjustments. A great diversity of potassium channels being members of either the 6TM, 4 TM or 2 TM K+ channel gene family have been shown to be strictly regulated by small, fast changes in cell volume. However, the precise mechanism underlying the K+ channel sensitivity to cell...... mechanism of regulation. Besides being regulated by cell volume, KCNQ1 is also modulated by the interaction of the ß subunit KCNE1 giving rise to the cardiac IKs delayed rectifier potassium current. Apart from altering the kinetic characteristics of the KCNQ1 channel current, KCNE1 also augments the KCNQ1...

  3. Down-regulation of adipogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells by oscillating high-gradient magnetic fields and mechanical vibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zablotskii, V.; Lunov, O.; Novotná, B.; Churpita, O.; Trošan, P.; HoláÅ, V.; Syková, E.; Dejneka, A.; Kubinová, Š.

    2014-09-01

    Nowadays, the focus in medicine on molecular genetics has resulted in a disregard for the physical basis of treatment even though many diseases originate from changes in cellular mechanics. Perturbations of the cellular nanomechanics promote pathologies, including cardiovascular disease and cancer. Furthermore, whilst the biological and therapeutic effects of magnetic fields are a well-established fact, to date the underlying mechanisms remain obscure. Here, we show that oscillating high-gradient magnetic field (HGMF) and mechanical vibration affect adipogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells by the transmission of mechanical stress to the cell cytoskeleton, resulting in F-actin remodelling and subsequent down-regulation of adipogenic genes adiponectin, PPARγ, and AP2. Our findings propose an insight into the regulation of cellular nanomechanics, and provide a basis for better controlled down-regulation of stem cell adipogenesis by HGMF, which may facilitate the development of challenging therapeutic strategies suitable for the remote control of biological systems.

  4. Do mechanical strain and TNF-α interact to amplify pro-inflammatory cytokine production in human annulus fibrosus cells?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likhitpanichkul, Morakot; Torre, Olivia M; Gruen, Jadry; Walter, Benjamin A; Hecht, Andrew C; Iatridis, James C

    2016-05-03

    During intervertebral disc (IVD) injury and degeneration, annulus fibrosus (AF) cells experience large mechanical strains in a pro-inflammatory milieu. We hypothesized that TNF-α, an initiator of IVD inflammation, modifies AF cell mechanobiology via cytoskeletal changes, and interacts with mechanical strain to enhance pro-inflammatory cytokine production. Human AF cells (N=5, Thompson grades 2-4) were stretched uniaxially on collagen-I coated chambers to 0%, 5% (physiological) or 15% (pathologic) strains at 0.5Hz for 24h under hypoxic conditions with or without TNF-α (10ng/mL). AF cells were treated with anti-TNF-α and anti-IL-6. ELISA assessed IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-8 production and immunocytochemistry measured F-actin, vinculin and α-tubulin in AF cells. TNF-α significantly increased AF cell pro-inflammatory cytokine production compared to basal conditions (IL-1β:2.0±1.4-84.0±77.3, IL-6:10.6±9.9-280.9±214.1, IL-8:23.9±26.0-5125.1±4170.8pg/ml for basal and TNF-α treatment, respectively) as expected, but mechanical strain did not. Pathologic strain in combination with TNF-α increased IL-1β, and IL-8 but not IL-6 production of AF cells. TNF-α treatment altered F-actin and α-tubulin in AF cells, suggestive of altered cytoskeletal stiffness. Anti-TNF-α (infliximab) significantly inhibited pro-inflammatory cytokine production while anti-IL-6 (atlizumab) did not. In conclusion, TNF-α altered AF cell mechanobiology with cytoskeletal remodeling that potentially sensitized AF cells to mechanical strain and increased TNF-α-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine production. Results suggest an interaction between TNF-α and mechanical strain and future mechanistic studies are required to validate these observations.

  5. Cardamonin, a Novel Antagonist of hTRPA1 Cation Channel, Reveals Therapeutic Mechanism of Pathological Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shifeng Wang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The increasing demand for safe and effective treatments of chronic pain has promoted the investigation of novel analgesic drugs. Some herbals have been known to be able to relieve pain, while the chemical basis and target involved in this process remained to be clarified. The current study aimed to find anti-nociceptive candidates targeting transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1, a receptor that implicates in hyperalgesia and neurogenic inflammation. In the current study, 156 chemicals were tested for blocking HEK293/TRPA1 ion channel by calcium-influx assay. Docking study was conducted to predict the binding modes of hit compound with TRPA1 using Discovery Studio. Cytotoxicity in HEK293 was conducted by Cell Titer-Glo assay. Additionally, cardiotoxicity was assessed via xCELLigence RTCA system. We uncovered that cardamonin selectively blocked TRPA1 activation while did not interact with TRPV1 nor TRPV4 channel. A concentration-dependent inhibitory effect was observed with IC50 of 454 nM. Docking analysis of cardamonin demonstrated a compatible interaction with A-967079-binding site of TRPA1. Meanwhile, cardamonin did not significantly reduce HEK293 cell viability, nor did it impair cardiomyocyte constriction. Our data suggest that cardamonin is a selective TRPA1 antagonist, providing novel insight into the target of its anti-nociceptive activity.

  6. ROS, Cell Senescence, and Novel Molecular Mechanisms in Aging and Age-Related Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierpaola Davalli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aging process worsens the human body functions at multiple levels, thus causing its gradual decrease to resist stress, damage, and disease. Besides changes in gene expression and metabolic control, the aging rate has been associated with the production of high levels of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS and/or Reactive Nitrosative Species (RNS. Specific increases of ROS level have been demonstrated as potentially critical for induction and maintenance of cell senescence process. Causal connection between ROS, aging, age-related pathologies, and cell senescence is studied intensely. Senescent cells have been proposed as a target for interventions to delay the aging and its related diseases or to improve the diseases treatment. Therapeutic interventions towards senescent cells might allow restoring the health and curing the diseases that share basal processes, rather than curing each disease in separate and symptomatic way. Here, we review observations on ROS ability of inducing cell senescence through novel mechanisms that underpin aging processes. Particular emphasis is addressed to the novel mechanisms of ROS involvement in epigenetic regulation of cell senescence and aging, with the aim to individuate specific pathways, which might promote healthy lifespan and improve aging.

  7. The International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) grading system for renal cell carcinoma and other prognostic parameters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delahunt, B.; Cheville, J.C.; Martignoni, G.; Humphrey, P.A.; Magi-Galluzzi, C.; McKenney, J.; Egevad, L.; Algaba, F.; Moch, H.; Grignon, D.J.; Montironi, R.; Srigley, J.R.; Hulsbergen-van de Kaa, C.A.

    2013-01-01

    The International Society of Urological Pathology 2012 Consensus Conference made recommendations regarding classification, prognostic factors, staging, and immunohistochemical and molecular assessment of adult renal tumors. Issues relating to prognostic factors were coordinated by a workgroup who id

  8. Multiscale mechanisms of cell migration during development: theory and experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLennan, Rebecca; Dyson, Louise; Prather, Katherine W; Morrison, Jason A; Baker, Ruth E; Maini, Philip K; Kulesa, Paul M

    2012-08-01

    Long-distance cell migration is an important feature of embryonic development, adult morphogenesis and cancer, yet the mechanisms that drive subpopulations of cells to distinct targets are poorly understood. Here, we use the embryonic neural crest (NC) in tandem with theoretical studies to evaluate model mechanisms of long-distance cell migration. We find that a simple chemotaxis model is insufficient to explain our experimental data. Instead, model simulations predict that NC cell migration requires leading cells to respond to long-range guidance signals and trailing cells to short-range cues in order to maintain a directed, multicellular stream. Experiments confirm differences in leading versus trailing NC cell subpopulations, manifested in unique cell orientation and gene expression patterns that respond to non-linear tissue growth of the migratory domain. Ablation experiments that delete the trailing NC cell subpopulation reveal that leading NC cells distribute all along the migratory pathway and develop a leading/trailing cellular orientation and gene expression profile that is predicted by model simulations. Transplantation experiments and model predictions that move trailing NC cells to the migratory front, or vice versa, reveal that cells adopt a gene expression profile and cell behaviors corresponding to the new position within the migratory stream. These results offer a mechanistic model in which leading cells create and respond to a cell-induced chemotactic gradient and transmit guidance information to trailing cells that use short-range signals to move in a directional manner.

  9. Molecular mechanisms of bortezomib resistant adenocarcinoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Suzuki

    Full Text Available Bortezomib (Velcade™ is a reversible proteasome inhibitor that is approved for the treatment of multiple myeloma (MM. Despite its demonstrated clinical success, some patients are deprived of treatment due to primary refractoriness or development of resistance during therapy. To investigate the role of the duration of proteasome inhibition in the anti-tumor response of bortezomib, we established clonal isolates of HT-29 adenocarcinoma cells adapted to continuous exposure of bortezomib. These cells were ~30-fold resistant to bortezomib. Two novel and distinct mutations in the β5 subunit, Cys63Phe, located distal to the binding site in a helix critical for drug binding, and Arg24Cys, found in the propeptide region were found in all resistant clones. The latter mutation is a natural variant found to be elevated in frequency in patients with MM. Proteasome activity and levels of both the constitutive and immunoproteasome were increased in resistant cells, which correlated to an increase in subunit gene expression. These changes correlated with a more rapid recovery of proteasome activity following brief exposure to bortezomib. Increased recovery rate was not due to increased proteasome turnover as similar findings were seen in cells co-treated with cycloheximide. When we exposed resistant cells to the irreversible proteasome inhibitor carfilzomib we noted a slower rate of recovery of proteasome activity as compared to bortezomib in both parental and resistant cells. Importantly, carfilzomib maintained its cytotoxic potential in the bortezomib resistant cell lines. Therefore, resistance to bortezomib, can be overcome with irreversible inhibitors, suggesting prolonged proteasome inhibition induces a more potent anti-tumor response.

  10. [Psychiatric comorbidity in pathological gambling].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skokauskas, Norbertas; Satkeviciūte, Regina; Burba, Benjaminas

    2003-01-01

    In this article the peculiarities of psychiatric comorbidity in pathological gambling were investigated. The authors were based both on the data of many foreign scientists and on their own one. Our data on 77 cases of pathological gambling were collected based on interviews of Lithuanian psychiatrists and psychotherapists about their patients with gambling addiction in period from 1991 to 2001. The data that we publish and analyze allows us to make conclusions that pathological gambling can reveal together with very wide spectrum of psychiatric disorders, but more often with alcoholism and depression. The mechanism of psychiatric comorbidity in pathological gambling is very complex.

  11. Interruption of CXCL13-CXCR5 axis increases upper genital tract pathology and activation of NKT cells following chlamydial genital infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janina Jiang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Regulation of immune responses is critical for controlling inflammation and disruption of this process can lead to tissue damage. We reported that CXCL13 was induced in fallopian tube tissue following C. trachomatis infection. Here, we examined the influence of the CXCL13-CXCR5 axis in chlamydial genital infection. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Disruption of the CXCL13-CXCR5 axis by injecting anti-CXCL13 Ab to BALB/c mice or using Cxcr5-/- mice increased chronic inflammation in the upper genital tract (UGT; uterine horns and oviducts after Chlamydia muridarum genital infection (GT. Further studies in Cxcr5-/- mice showed an elevation in bacterial burden in the GT and increased numbers of neutrophils, activated DCs and activated NKT cells early after infection. After resolution, we noted increased fibrosis and the accumulation of a variety of T cells subsets (CD4-IFNγ, CD4-IL-17, CD4-IL-10 & CD8-TNFα in the oviducts. NKT cell depletion in vitro reduced IL-17α and various cytokines and chemokines, suggesting that activated NKT cells modulate neutrophils and DCs through cytokine/chemokine secretion. Further, chlamydial glycolipids directly activated two distinct types of NKT cell hybridomas in a cell-free CD1d presentation assay and genital infection of Cd1d-/- mice showed reduced oviduct inflammation compared to WT mice. CXCR5 involvement in pathology was also noted using single-nucleotide polymorphism analysis in C. trachomatis infected women attending a sub-fertility clinic. Women who developed tubal pathology after a C. trachomatis infection had a decrease in the frequency of CXCR5 SNP +10950 T>C (rs3922. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These experiments indicate that disruption of the CXCL13-CXCR5 axis permits increased activation of NKT cells by type I and type II glycolipids of Chlamydia muridarum and results in UGT pathology potentially through increased numbers of neutrophils and T cell subsets associated with UGT pathology

  12. Mechanical control of mitotic progression in single animal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattin, Cedric J; Düggelin, Marcel; Martinez-Martin, David; Gerber, Christoph; Müller, Daniel J; Stewart, Martin P

    2015-09-08

    Despite the importance of mitotic cell rounding in tissue development and cell proliferation, there remains a paucity of approaches to investigate the mechanical robustness of cell rounding. Here we introduce ion beam-sculpted microcantilevers that enable precise force-feedback-controlled confinement of single cells while characterizing their progression through mitosis. We identify three force regimes according to the cell response: small forces (∼5 nN) that accelerate mitotic progression, intermediate forces where cells resist confinement (50-100 nN), and yield forces (>100 nN) where a significant decline in cell height impinges on microtubule spindle function, thereby inhibiting mitotic progression. Yield forces are coincident with a nonlinear drop in cell height potentiated by persistent blebbing and loss of cortical F-actin homogeneity. Our results suggest that a buildup of actomyosin-dependent cortical tension and intracellular pressure precedes mechanical failure, or herniation, of the cell cortex at the yield force. Thus, we reveal how the mechanical properties of mitotic cells and their response to external forces are linked to mitotic progression under conditions of mechanical confinement.

  13. Mechanisms of pancreatic beta-cell growth and regeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Høiriis

    1989-01-01

    Information about the mechanism of beta-cell growth and regeneration may be obtained by studies of insulinoma cells. In the present study the growth and function of the rat insulinoma cell lines RINm5F and 5AH were evaluated by addition of serum, hormones, and growth factors. It was found...... of insulin mRNA content showed that the insulinoma cells only contained about 2% of that of normal rat beta-cells. These results are discussed in relation to the role of growth factors, oncogenes, and differentiation in the growth and regeneration of beta-cells....

  14. Cytotoxinic Mechanism of Hydroxyapatite Nanoparticles on Human Hepatoma Cell Lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Xian-ying; QI Zhi-tao; DAI Hong-lian; YAN Yu-hua; LI Shi-pu

    2003-01-01

    Stable and single-dispersed HAP nanoparticles were synthesized with chemical method assisted by ultrasonic treatment.HAP nanoparticles were surveyed by AFM and Zataplus.The effect on the Bel-7402 human hepatoma cell lines treated with HAP nanoparticles was investigated by the MTT methods and observation of morphology,and the mechanism was studied in changes of cell cycle and ultrastructure.The result shows that inhibition of HAP nanoparticles on the Bel-7402 human hepatoma cell lines is obviously in vitro.HAP nanoparticles the entered cancer cytoplasm,and cell proliferation is stopped at G1 phase of cell cycle,thus,cancer cells die directly.

  15. Mechanopathology of red blood cell diseases—Why mechanics matters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    During the onset of a disease a cell may experience alterations in both the composition and organization of its cellular and molecular structures.These alterations may eventually lead to changes in its geometrical and mechanical properties such as cell size and shape,deformability and adhesion.As such,knowing how diseased cells respond to mechanical forces can reveal ways by which they differ from healthy ones.Here,we will present biomechanistic insights into red blood cell related diseases that manifest...

  16. Establishing the Turing mechanism using synthetic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girabawe, Camille; Tompkins, Nathan; Li, Ning; Bard Ermentrout, G.; Epstein, Irving R.; Fraden, Seth

    2013-03-01

    In 1952 Alan Turing published his seminal pape The Chemical Basis of Morphogenesiin which he described a basis for physical morphogenesis due solely to a reaction-diffusion system. His mechanism has been tested extensively but remains controversial and not fully demonstrated for cellular systems. Now 60 years after its debu, we describe an experimental system that demonstrates all six of his phenomenological predictions with additional support that these observations are due specifically to the Turing mechanism itsel. Further we demonstrate a nonlinear phenomena in the same system that was not predicted by Turing and which is not explained by a linear solution analysis of the governing system equations. Finally we also demonstrate that this system undergoes chemical and physical morphogenesis as Turing suggeste.

  17. Bacterial cell curvature through mechanical control of cell growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cabeen, M.; Charbon, Godefroid; Vollmer, W.

    2009-01-01

    The cytoskeleton is a key regulator of cell morphogenesis. Crescentin, a bacterial intermediate filament-like protein, is required for the curved shape of Caulobacter crescentus and localizes to the inner cell curvature. Here, we show that crescentin forms a single filamentous structure...... that collapses into a helix when detached from the cell membrane, suggesting that it is normally maintained in a stretched configuration. Crescentin causes an elongation rate gradient around the circumference of the sidewall, creating a longitudinal cell length differential and hence curvature. Such curvature...... can be produced by physical force alone when cells are grown in circular microchambers. Production of crescentin in Escherichia coli is sufficient to generate cell curvature. Our data argue for a model in which physical strain borne by the crescentin structure anisotropically alters the kinetics...

  18. Clinico-pathological correlation of E-cadherin expression at the invasive tumor front of Indian oral squamous cell carcinomas: An immunohistochemical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehendiratta, Monica; Solomon, Monica Charlotte; Boaz, Karen; Guddattu, Vasudeva; Mohindra, Aashima

    2014-01-01

    Background: Recent studies have indicated that although malignant cells at the invasive tumor front, bare morphological resemblance to the cells at central portion of the tumor, their molecular character differs significantly. E-cadherin is a cell-cell adhesion molecule that connects epithelial cells. This study attempts to correlate the E-cadherin expression at the invasive tumor front with tumor differentiation along with its clinico-pathological parameters. Materials and Methods: Immunohistochemical staining with E-cadherin was carried out on archival cases of primary oral squamous cell carcinomas (n = 30). The E-cadherin expression at the invasive tumor front was analyzed and was linked to clinico-pathological parameters including patient prognosis. Results: The downregulation of E-cadherin expression at the invasive tumor edge when compared with patient's prognosis yielded a significant correlation (P = 0.041) but its correlation with the degree of differentiation determined was not significant (P = 0.27). Also, its association with tumor size and lymph node status was negative. Conclusions: Loss of E-cadherin expression at the invasive tumor front is an important event in the progression of oral squamous cell carcinomas. Tumors with a loss of expression of E-cadherin are those which had a poor prognosis PMID:25328302

  19. Ki-67 as a prognostic marker in mantle cell lymphoma-consensus guidelines of the pathology panel of the European MCL Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klapper, W.; Hoster, E.; Determann, O.;

    2009-01-01

    powerful prognostic biomarker. The pathology panel of the European MCL Network evaluated methods to assess the Ki-67 index including stringent counting, digital image analysis, and estimation by eyeballing. Counting of 2 x 500 lymphoma cells is the gold standard to assess the Ki-67 index since this value.......37 for two methods of digital image analysis, respectively). Counting a reduced number of lymphoma cells (2 x 100 cells) showed high interobserver agreement (CCC = 0.74). Pitfalls of the Ki-67 index are discussed and guidelines and recommendations for assessing the Ki-67 index in MCL are given Udgivelsesdato......Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) has a heterogeneous clinical course and is mainly an aggressive B cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma; however, there are some indolent cases The Ki-67 index, defined by the percentage of Ki-67-positive lymphoma cells on histopathological slides, has been shown to be a very...

  20. Pathologic and Protective Roles for Microglial Subsets and Bone Marrow- and Blood-Derived Myeloid Cells in Central Nervous System Inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wlodarczyk, Agnieszka; Cédile, Oriane; Jensen, Kirstine Nolling;

    2015-01-01

    and also immunoregulation and regenerative processes. Better understanding and characterization of myeloid cell heterogeneity is essential for future development of treatments controlling inflammation and inducing neuroprotection and neuroregeneration in diseased CNS. Here, we describe and compare three......Inflammation is a series of processes designed for eventual clearance of pathogens and repair of damaged tissue. In the context of autoimmune recognition, inflammatory processes are usually considered to be pathological. This is also true for inflammatory responses in the central nervous system...

  1. Alteration in Marrow Stromal Microenvironment and Apoptosis Mechanisms Involved in Aplastic Anemia: An Animal Model to Study the Possible Disease Pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumanta Chatterjee

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aplastic anemia (AA is a heterogeneous disorder of bone marrow failure syndrome. Suggested mechanisms include a primary stem cell deficiency or defect, a secondary stem cell defect due to abnormal regulation between cell death and differentiation, or a deficient microenvironment. In this study, we have tried to investigate the alterations in hematopoietic microenvironment and underlying mechanisms involved in such alterations in an animal model of drug induced AA. We presented the results of studying long term marrow culture, marrow ultra-structure, marrow adherent and hematopoietic progenitor cell colony formation, flowcytometric analysis of marrow stem and stromal progenitor populations and apoptosis mechanism involved in aplastic anemia. The AA marrow showed impairment in cellular proliferation and maturation and failed to generate a functional stromal microenvironment even after 19 days of culture. Ultra-structural analysis showed a degenerated and deformed marrow cellular association in AA. Colony forming units (CFUs were also severely reduced in AA. Significantly decreased marrow stem and stromal progenitor population with subsequently increased expression levels of both the extracellular and intracellular apoptosis inducer markers in the AA marrow cells essentially pointed towards the defective hematopoiesis; moreover, a deficient and apoptotic microenvironment and the microenvironmental components might have played the important role in the possible pathogenesis of AA.

  2. Bartonella entry mechanisms into mammalian host cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eicher, Simone C; Dehio, Christoph

    2012-08-01

    The Gram-negative genus Bartonella comprises arthropod-borne pathogens that typically infect mammals in a host-specific manner. Bartonella bacilliformis and Bartonella quintana are human-specific pathogens, while several zoonotic bartonellae specific for diverse animal hosts infect humans as an incidental host. Clinical manifestations of Bartonella infections range from mild symptoms to life-threatening disease. Following transmission by blood-sucking arthropods or traumatic contact with infected animals, bartonellae display sequential tropisms towards endothelial and possibly other nucleated cells and erythrocytes, the latter in a host-specific manner. Attachment to the extracellular matrix (ECM) and to nucleated cells is mediated by surface-exposed bacterial adhesins, in particular trimeric autotransporter adhesins (TAAs). The subsequent engulfment of the pathogen into a vacuolar structure follows a unique series of events whereby the pathogen avoids the endolysosomal compartments. For Bartonella henselae and assumingly most other species, the infection process is aided at different steps by Bartonella effector proteins (Beps). They are injected into host cells through the type IV secretion system (T4SS) VirB/D4 and subvert host cellular functions to favour pathogen uptake. Bacterial binding to erythrocytes is mediated by Trw, another T4SS, in a strictly host-specific manner, followed by pathogen-forced uptake involving the IalB invasin and subsequent replication and persistence within a membrane-bound intra-erythrocytic compartment.

  3. Effects of estrogen on diverse stem cells and relevant intracellular mechanisms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Sexual dimorphism definitely exists in the pathogenesis of a variety of cardiovascular,neurodegenerative and bone metabolism disorders.Estrogen affects the healing of ischemic myocardium partially through paracrine growth hormone production by bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells(MSCs) and facilitation on mobilization of endothelial progenitors cells(EPCs) to the ischemic myocardium.Estrogen can also inhibit the proliferation of the cardiac fibroblasts.Therefore,estrogen effectively enhances the neovascularization at the ischemic border zone and limits pathological myocardial remodeling.Moreover,estrogen increases proliferation of embryonic neural stem cells and accelerates differentiation of neurons during neurogenesis,suggesting a possible role of estrogen in transplantation of neural stem cells as a therapeutic approach for neurodegenerative diseases.Finally,estrogen can modulate osteogenic progenitors and osteoclasts,preventing the osteoporosis.In general,estrogen offers significant benefits on diverse stem/progenitor cell populations.A great understanding of estrogens on these cells and relevant intracellular mechanisms will allow modulation of the potent stem cells directly for the ultimate clinical applications.

  4. Mechanisms of Oxidative Damage in Multiple Sclerosis and a Cell Therapy Approach to Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Witherick

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Although significant advances have recently been made in the understanding and treatment of multiple sclerosis, reduction of long-term disability remains a key goal. Evidence suggests that inflammation and oxidative stress within the central nervous system are major causes of ongoing tissue damage in the disease. Invading inflammatory cells, as well as resident central nervous system cells, release a number of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species which cause demyelination and axonal destruction, the pathological hallmarks of multiple sclerosis. Reduction in oxidative damage is an important therapeutic strategy to slow or halt disease processes. Many drugs in clinical practice or currently in trial target this mechanism. Cell-based therapies offer an alternative source of antioxidant capability. Classically thought of as being important for myelin or cell replacement in multiple sclerosis, stem cells may, however, have a more important role as providers of supporting factors or direct attenuators of the disease. In this paper we focus on the antioxidant properties of mesenchymal stem cells and discuss their potential importance as a cell-based therapy for multiple sclerosis.

  5. Using cell monolayer rheology to probe average single cell mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, Mathias; Flesch, Julia; Ott, Albrecht

    2015-01-01

    The cell monolayer rheology technique consists of a commercial rotational rheometer that probes the mechanical properties of a monolayer of isolated cells. So far we have described properties of an entire monolayer. In this short communication, we show that we can deduce average single cell properties. Results are in very good agreement with earlier work on single cell mechanics. Our approach provides a mean of 105-106 adherent cells within a single experiment. This makes the results very reproducible. We extend our work on cell adhesion strength and deduce cell adhesion forces of fibroblast cells on fibronectin coated glass substrates.

  6. The relationship between Interleukin 18 expression in laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma and clinical pathology as well as the effect of cetuximab on its expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiu-Ping Liao; Nian Lyu; Sen-Lan Long

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To explore the relationship between Interleukin 18 (IL-18) expression in laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma and clinical pathology as well as the effect of cetuximab on its expression.Methods:40 cases of patients with laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma from January 2010 to June 2014 were chosen as the research group; 40 cases of patients with vocal cord polyp and 40 healthy volunteers were chosen as the control group. Statistical analysis was carried out on clinical pathology of laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma. IL-18, IFN-γ, TNF-αand IL-6 levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells before and after cetuximab application were detected.Results:Detected IL-18 values of laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma group were higher than those of adjacent cancer tissue and vocal cord polyps; IL-18 positive rate (75.0%) of laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma group was higher than that of adjacent cancer tissue (47.5%) and polyp tissue (37.5%); IL-18 expressions of laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma group were related to primary lesion staging, differentiation degree and lymph node metastasis; before cetuximab application, IL-18 levels were significantly higher than those of the control group, and after cetuximab application, IL-18 levels significantly decreased than before. Differences were statistically significant; after cetuximab application, IFN-γ, TNF-αand IL-6 levels in PBMCs supernatant of patients with laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma were significantly lower than before. Differences were statistically significant.Conclusion:IL-18 can be highly expressed in laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma; IL-18 expression is involved in the occurrence and progress of laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma; IL-18 is possible to be involved in the occurrence and progress of laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma through regulating expressions of IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-6, etc; IL-18 can be used as a target of laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma treatment, and cetuximab can inhibit IL-18

  7. Spectroscopic investigation of local mechanical impedance of living cells

    CERN Document Server

    Costa, Luca; Benseny-Cases, Núria; Mayeaux, Véronique; Chevrier, Joël; Comin, Fabio

    2013-01-01

    The mechanical properties of PC12 living cells have been studied at the nanoscale with a Force Feedback Microscope using two experimental approaches. Firstly, the local mechanical impedance of the cell membrane has been mapped simultaneously to the cell morphology at constant force. As the force of the interaction is gradually increased, we observed the appearance of the sub-membrane cytoskeleton. We shall compare the results obtained with this method with the measurement of other existing techniques. Secondly, a spectroscopic investigation has been performed varying the indentation of the tip in the cell membrane and consequently the force applied on it. In contrast with conventional dynamic atomic force microscopy techniques, here the small oscillation amplitude of the tip is not necessarily imposed at the cantilever first eigenmode. This allows the user to arbitrarily choose the excitation frequency in developing spectroscopic AFM techniques. The mechanical response of the PC12 cell membrane is found to be...

  8. Mechanisms behind functional avidity maturation in T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Essen, Marina Rode; Kongsbak, Martin; Geisler, Carsten

    2012-01-01

    During an immune response antigen-primed B-cells increase their antigen responsiveness by affinity maturation mediated by somatic hypermutation of the genes encoding the antigen-specific B-cell receptor (BCR) and by selection of higher-affinity B cell clones. Unlike the BCR, the T-cell receptor...... (TCR) cannot undergo affinity maturation. Nevertheless, antigen-primed T cells significantly increase their antigen responsiveness compared to antigen-inexperienced (naïve) T cells in a process called functional avidity maturation. This paper covers studies that describe differences in T-cell antigen...... responsiveness during T-cell differentiation along with examples of the mechanisms behind functional avidity maturation in T cells....

  9. Mechanisms of renin release from juxtaglomerular cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skøtt, O; Salomonsson, Max; Sellerup Persson, Anja;

    1991-01-01

    In microdissected, nonperfused afferent arterioles changes in intravascular pressure did not affect renin secretion. On the contrary, renin release from isolated afferent arterioles perfused in a free-flow system has been reported to be sensitive to simultaneous changes in luminal pressure and flow....... Hence local blood flow may be involved in the baroreceptor control of renin release. If flow is sensed, the sensor is likely to be located near the endothelial cell layer, where ion channels have been shown to be influenced by variations in shear stress....

  10. The role of biofluid mechanics in the assessment of clinical and pathological observations: sixth International Bio-Fluid Mechanics Symposium and Workshop, March 28-30, 2008 Pasadena, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebes, Maria; Ventikos, Yiannis

    2010-03-01

    Biofluid mechanics is increasingly applied in support of diagnosis and decision-making for treatment of clinical pathologies. Exploring the relationship between blood flow phenomena and pathophysiological observations is enhanced by continuing advances in the imaging modalities, measurement techniques, and capabilities of computational models. When combined with underlying physiological models, a powerful set of tools becomes available to address unmet clinical needs, predominantly in the direction of enhanced diagnosis, as well as assessment and prediction of treatment outcomes. This position paper presents an overview of current approaches and future developments along this theme that were discussed at the 5th International Biofluid Symposium and Workshop held at the California Institute of Technology in 2008. The introduction of novel mechanical biomarkers in device design and optimization, and applications in the characterization of more specific and focal conditions such as aneurysms, are at the center of attention. Further advances in integrative modeling, incorporating multiscale and multiphysics techniques are also discussed.

  11. Fibronectin matrix polymerization regulates smooth muscle cell phenotype through a Rac1 dependent mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Shi

    Full Text Available Smooth muscle cells are maintained in a differentiated state in the vessel wall, but can be modulated to a synthetic phenotype following injury. Smooth muscle phenotypic modulation is thought to play an important role in the pathology of vascular occlusive diseases. Phenotypically modulated smooth muscle cells exhibit increased proliferative and migratory properties that accompany the downregulation of smooth muscle cell marker proteins. Extracellular matrix proteins, including fibronectin, can regulate the smooth muscle phenotype when used as adhesive substrates. However, cells produce and organize a 3-dimensional fibrillar extracellular matrix, which can affect cell behavior in distinct ways from the protomeric 2-dimensional matrix proteins that are used as adhesive substrates. We previously showed that the deposition/polymerization of fibronectin into the extracellular matrix can regulate the deposition and organization of other extracellular matrix molecules in vitro. Further, our published data show that the presence of a fibronectin polymerization inhibitor results in increased expression of smooth muscle cell differentiation proteins and inhibits vascular remodeling in vivo. In this manuscript, we used an in vitro cell culture system to determine the mechanism by which fibronectin polymerization affects smooth muscle phenotypic modulation. Our data show that fibronectin polymerization decreases the mRNA levels of multiple smooth muscle differentiation genes, and downregulates the levels of smooth muscle α-actin and calponin proteins by a Rac1-dependent mechanism. The expression of smooth muscle genes is transcriptionally regulated by fibronectin polymerization, as evidenced by the increased activity of luciferase reporter constructs in the presence of a fibronectin polymerization inhibitor. Fibronectin polymerization also promotes smooth muscle cell growth, and decreases the levels of actin stress fibers. These data define a Rac1

  12. Mechanical Genomics Identifies Diverse Modulators of Bacterial Cell Stiffness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auer, George K; Lee, Timothy K; Rajendram, Manohary; Cesar, Spencer; Miguel, Amanda; Huang, Kerwyn Casey; Weibel, Douglas B

    2016-06-22

    Bacteria must maintain mechanical integrity to withstand the large osmotic pressure differential across the cell membrane and wall. Although maintaining mechanical integrity is critical for proper cellular function, a fact exploited by prominent cell-wall-targeting antibiotics, the proteins that contribute to cellular mechanics remain unidentified. Here, we describe a high-throughput optical method for quantifying cell stiffness and apply this technique to a genome-wide collection of ∼4,000 Escherichia coli mutants. We identify genes with roles in diverse functional processes spanning cell-wall synthesis, energy production, and DNA replication and repair that significantly change cell stiffness when deleted. We observe that proteins with biochemically redundant roles in cell-wall synthesis exhibit different stiffness defects when deleted. Correlating our data with chemical screens reveals that reducing membrane potential generally increases cell stiffness. In total, our work demonstrates that bacterial cell stiffness is a property of both the cell wall and broader cell physiology and lays the groundwork for future systematic studies of mechanoregulation.

  13. The Mechanisms of Plant Cell Wall Deconstruction during Enzymatic Hydrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, Lisbeth Garbrecht; E. Thybring, Emil; Johansen, Katja Salomon;

    2014-01-01

    . Here we put forward a simple model based on mechanical principles capable of capturing the result of the interaction between mechanical forces and cell wall weakening via hydrolysis of glucosidic bonds. This study illustrates that basic material science insights are relevant also within biochemistry......, particularly when it comes to up-scaling of processes based on insoluble feed stocks....

  14. Microfluidics as a functional tool for cell mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Vanapalli, Siva A.; Duits, Michel H.G.; Mugele, Frieder

    2009-01-01

    Living cells are a fascinating demonstration of nature’s most intricate and well-coordinated micromechanical objects. They crawl, spread, contract, and relax—thus performing a multitude of complex mechanical functions. Alternatively, they also respond to physical and chemical cues that lead to remodeling of the cytoskeleton. To understand this intricate coupling between mechanical properties, mechanical function and force-induced biochemical signaling requires tools that are capable of both c...

  15. Northwestern profiling of potential translation-regulatory proteins in human breast epithelial cells and malignant breast tissues: evidence for pathological activation of the IGF1R IRES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blume, Scott W; Jackson, Nateka L; Frost, Andra R; Grizzle, William E; Shcherbakov, Oleg D; Choi, Hyoungsoo; Meng, Zheng

    2010-06-01

    Genes involved in the control of cell proliferation and survival (those genes most important to cancer pathogenesis) are often specifically regulated at the translational level, through RNA-protein interactions involving the 5'-untranslated region of the mRNA. IGF1R is a proto-oncogene strongly implicated in human breast cancer, promoting survival and proliferation of tumor cells, as well as metastasis and chemoresistance. Our lab has focused on the molecular mechanisms regulating IGF1R expression at the translational level. We previously discovered an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) within the 5'-untranslated region of the human IGF1R mRNA, and identified and functionally characterized two individual RNA-binding proteins, HuR and hnRNP C, which bind the IGF1R 5'-UTR and differentially regulate IRES activity. Here we have developed and implemented a high-resolution northwestern profiling strategy to characterize, as a group, the full spectrum of sequence-specific RNA-binding proteins potentially regulating IGF1R translational efficiency through interaction with the 5'-untranslated sequence. The putative IGF1R IRES trans-activating factors (ITAFs) are a heterogeneous group of RNA-binding proteins including hnRNPs originating in the nucleus as well as factors tightly associated with ribosomes in the cytoplasm. The IGF1R ITAFs can be categorized into three distinct groups: (a) high molecular weight external ITAFs, which likely modulate the overall conformation of the 5'-untranslated region of the IGF1R mRNA and thereby the accessibility of the core functional IRES; (b) low molecular weight external ITAFs, which may function as general chaperones to unwind the RNA, and (c) internal ITAFs which may directly facilitate or inhibit the fundamental process of ribosome recruitment to the IRES. We observe dramatic changes in the northwestern profile of non-malignant breast cells downregulating IGF1R expression in association with acinar differentiation in 3-D culture

  16. Investigation of temperature effect on cell mechanics by optofluidic microchips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tie; Nava, Giovanni; Minzioni, Paolo; Veglione, Manuela; Bragheri, Francesca; Lelii, Francesca Demetra; Vazquez, Rebeca Martinez; Osellame, Roberto; Cristiani, Ilaria

    2015-08-01

    Here we present the results of a study concerning the effect of temperature on cell mechanical properties. Two different optofluidic microchips with external temperature control are used to investigate the temperature-induced changes of highly metastatic human melanoma cells (A375MC2) in the range of ~0 - 35 °C. By means of an integrated optical stretcher, we observe that cells' optical deformability is strongly enhanced by increasing cell and buffer-fluid temperature. This finding is supported by the results obtained from a second device, which probes the cells' ability to be squeezed through a constriction. Measured data demonstrate a marked dependence of cell mechanical properties on temperature, thus highlighting the importance of including a proper temperature-control system in the experimental apparatus.

  17. Mechanisms Underlying T Cell Immunosenescence: Aging and Cytomegalovirus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Wenjuan; Rao, Sudha

    2016-01-01

    The ability of the human immune system to protect against infectious disease declines with age and efficacy of vaccination reduces significantly in the elderly. Aging of the immune system, also termed as immunosenescence, involves many changes in human T cell immunity that is characterized by a loss in naïve T cell population and an increase in highly differentiated CD28- memory T cell subset. There is extensive data showing that latent persistent human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection is also associated with age-related immune dysfunction in the T cells, which might enhance immunosenescence. Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying age-related and HCMV-related immunosenescence is critical for the development of effective age-targeted vaccines and immunotherapies. In this review, we will address the role of both aging and HCMV infection that contribute to the T cell senescence and discuss the potential molecular mechanisms in aged T cells. PMID:28082969

  18. Mechanism of regulation of stem cell differentiation by matrix stiffness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Hongwei; Li, Lisha; Sun, Meiyu; Zhang, Yin; Chen, Li; Rong, Yue; Li, Yulin

    2015-05-27

    Stem cell behaviors are regulated by multiple microenvironmental cues. As an external signal, mechanical stiffness of the extracellular matrix is capable of governing stem cell fate determination, but how this biophysical cue is translated into intracellular signaling remains elusive. Here, we elucidate mechanisms by which stem cells respond to microenvironmental stiffness through the dynamics of the cytoskeletal network, leading to changes in gene expression via biophysical transduction signaling pathways in two-dimensional culture. Furthermore, a putative rapid shift from original mechanosensing to de novo cell-derived matrix sensing in more physiologically relevant three-dimensional culture is pointed out. A comprehensive understanding of stem cell responses to this stimulus is essential for designing biomaterials that mimic the physiological environment and advancing stem cell-based clinical applications for tissue engineering.

  19. A possible role of oxidative stress in the switch mechanism of the cell death mode from apoptosis to necrosis--studies on rho0 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wochna, Agnieszka; Niemczyk, Edyta; Kurono, Chieko; Masaoka, Makoto; Kedzior, Jakub; Słomińska, Ewa; Lipiński, Marcin; Wakabayashi, Takashi

    2007-01-01

    Apoptosis is induced not only during morphogenesis and embryogenesis but also under various pathological conditions, especially related to oxidative stress. Apoptotic cells are phagocytized by neighboring cells while necrotic cells cause local and general reactions sometimes lethal to our bodies. Data have been accumulated to demonstrate that the switch of the cell death mode from apoptosis to necrosis does occur. However, detailed mechanisms involved in the switch mechanism remain unsolved although decreases in the intracellular level of ATP and a burst in the cellular level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been proposed. Recently, we have shown that the population of apoptotic cells reaches maximum in human osteosarcoma 143B cells treated for 6h with menadione (MEN) while necrotic cells become predominant at 9h of the treatment. In the present study we have attempted to clarify the role of cellular ATP in the switch mechanism using rho(0) cells derived from human osteosarcoma rho+ cells. Results are summarized as follows: (1) Apoptotic and necrotic changes in rho(0) cells are much faster than rho+ cells after the treatment with MEN. (2) Cellular level of ATP in rho(0) cells remains essentially in the same level before and after the MEN-treatment while intracellular levels of superoxide continuously increase after the MEN-treatment. (3) rho+ cells treated with MEN in the presence of antimycin A plus oligomycin show similar changes to those of MEN-treated rho(0) cells. (4) MEN-induced increases in the cellular level of superoxide are distinctly suppressed by inhibitors of NADPH oxidase. These results suggest that the intracellular level of superoxide may be a key factor directly related to the switch mechanism from apoptosis to necrosis, and that decreases in cellular level of ATP accelerate both apoptotic and necrotic changes of the cells.

  20. Molecular deformation mechanisms of the wood cell wall material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Kai; Qin, Zhao; Buehler, Markus J

    2015-02-01

    Wood is a biological material with outstanding mechanical properties resulting from its hierarchical structure across different scales. Although earlier work has shown that the cellular structure of wood is a key factor that renders it excellent mechanical properties at light weight, the mechanical properties of the wood cell wall material itself still needs to be understood comprehensively. The wood cell wall material features a fiber reinforced composite structure, where cellulose fibrils act as stiff fibers, and hemicellulose and lignin molecules act as soft matrix. The angle between the fiber direction and the loading direction has been found to be the key factor controlling the mechanical properties. However, how the interactions between theses constitutive molecules contribute to the overall properties is still unclear, although the shearing between fibers has been proposed as a primary deformation mechanism. Here we report a molecular model of the wood cell wall material with atomistic resolution, used to assess the mechanical behavior under shear loading in order to understand the deformation mechanisms at the molecular level. The model includes an explicit description of cellulose crystals, hemicellulose, as well as lignin molecules arranged in a layered nanocomposite. The results obtained using this model show that the wood cell wall material under shear loading deforms in an elastic and then plastic manner. The plastic regime can be divided into two parts according to the different deformation mechanisms: yielding of the matrix and sliding of matrix along the cellulose surface. Our molecular dynamics study provides insights of the mechanical behavior of wood cell wall material at the molecular level, and paves a way for the multi-scale understanding of the mechanical properties of wood.

  1. CD4+ T-cell-independent mechanisms suppress reactivation of latent tuberculosis in a macaque model of HIV coinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foreman, Taylor W; Mehra, Smriti; LoBato, Denae N; Malek, Adel; Alvarez, Xavier; Golden, Nadia A; Bucşan, Allison N; Didier, Peter J; Doyle-Meyers, Lara A; Russell-Lodrigue, Kasi E; Roy, Chad J; Blanchard, James; Kuroda, Marcelo J; Lackner, Andrew A; Chan, John; Khader, Shabaana A; Jacobs, William R; Kaushal, Deepak

    2016-09-20

    The synergy between Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) and HIV in coinfected patients has profoundly impacted global mortality because of tuberculosis (TB) and AIDS. HIV significantly increases rates of reactivation of latent TB infection (LTBI) to active disease, with the decline in CD4(+) T cells believed to be the major causality. In this study, nonhuman primates were coinfected with Mtb and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), recapitulating human coinfection. A majority of animals exhibited rapid reactivation of Mtb replication, progressing to disseminated TB and increased SIV-associated pathology. Although a severe loss of pulmonary CD4(+) T cells was observed in all coinfected macaques, a subpopulation of the animals was still able to prevent reactivation and maintain LTBI. Investigation of pulmonary immune responses and pathology in this cohort demonstrated that increased CD8(+) memory T-cell proliferation, higher granzyme B production, and expanded B-cell follicles correlated with protection from reactivation. Our findings reveal mechanisms that control SIV- and TB-associated pathology. These CD4-independent protective immune responses warrant further studies in HIV coinfected humans able to control their TB infection. Moreover, these findings will provide insight into natural immunity to Mtb and will guide development of novel vaccine strategies and immunotherapies.

  2. Mechanisms of planar cell polarity establishment in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvajal-Gonzalez, Jose Maria; Mlodzik, Marek

    2014-01-01

    Correct patterning and polarization of epithelial and mesenchymal cells are essential for morphogenesis and function of all organs and organisms. Epithelial cells are generally polarized in two axes: (a) the ubiquitous apical-basal axis and (b) polarity within the plane of the epithelium. The latter is generally referred to as planar cell polarity (PCP) and also is found in several contexts of mesenchymal cell patterning. In Drosophila, all adult structures display PCP features, and two conserved molecular systems (the Fat [Ft]/Dachsous [Ds] system and the Frizzled [Fz]/PCP pathway) that regulate this process have been identified. Although significant progress has been made in dissecting aspects of PCP signaling within cells, much remains to be discovered about the mechanisms of long-range and local PCP cell-cell interactions. Here, we discuss the current models based on Drosophila studies and incorporate recent insights into this long-standing cell and developmental biology problem.

  3. Long-term follow-up of post hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for Hurler syndrome: Clinical, biochemical, and pathological improvements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eriko Yasuda

    2015-03-01

    In conclusion, this long-term post-HSCT observation should shed light on a new aspect of therapeutic effect associated with skeletal pathology and GAG levels as a biomarker, indicating that HSCT is a primary choice at an early stage for not only CNS but also skeletal system in combination of appropriate surgical procedures.

  4. α-Synuclein vaccination modulates regulatory T cell activation and microglia in the absence of brain pathology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Josefine R; Olesen, Mads N; Otzen, Daniel E;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Passive and active immunization with α-synuclein has been shown to be neuroprotective in animal models of Parkinson's disease. We have previously shown that vaccination with α-synuclein, long before α-synuclein-induced brain pathology, prevents striatal degeneration by inducing regula...

  5. Mechanisms of Organelle Inheritance in Dividing Plant Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Organelles form essential compartments of all eukaryotic cells. Mechanisms that ensure the unbiased inheritance of organelles during cell division are therefore necessary to maintain the viability of future cell generations. Although inheritance of organelles represents a fundamental component of the cell cycle, surprisingly little is known about the underlying mechanisms that facilitate unbiased organelle inheritance. Evidence from a select number of studies, however,indicates that ordered organelle inheritance strategies exist in dividing cells of higher plants. The basic requirement for unbiased organelle inheritance is the duplication of organelle volume and distribution of the resulting organelle populations in a manner that facilitates unbiased partitioning of the organelle population to each daughter cell. Often, partitioning strategies are specific to the organelle, being influenced by the functional requirements of the organelle and whether the cells are mitotically active or re-entering into the cell cycle. Organelle partitioning mechanisms frequently depend on interactions with either the actin or microtubule cytoskeleton. In this focused review, we attempt to summarize key findings regarding organelle partitioning strategies in dividing cells of higher plants. We particularly concentrate on the role of the cytoskeleton in mediating unbiased organelle partitioning.

  6. A Comprehensive Review of Optical Stretcher for Cell Mechanical Characterization at Single-Cell Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tie Yang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a comprehensive review of the development of the optical stretcher, a powerful optofluidic device for single cell mechanical study by using optical force induced cell stretching. The different techniques and the different materials for the fabrication of the optical stretcher are first summarized. A short description of the optical-stretching mechanism is then given, highlighting the optical force calculation and the cell optical deformability characterization. Subsequently, the implementations of the optical stretcher in various cell-mechanics studies are shown on different types of cells. Afterwards, two new advancements on optical stretcher applications are also introduced: the active cell sorting based on cell mechanical characterization and the temperature effect on cell stretching measurement from laser-induced heating. Two examples of new functionalities developed with the optical stretcher are also included. Finally, the current major limitation and the future development possibilities are discussed.

  7. Mechanisms of radiation-induced neoplastic cell transformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, T.C.H.; Tobias, C.A.

    1984-04-01

    Studies with cultured mammalian cells demonstrated clearly that radiation can transform cells directly and can enhance the cell transformation by oncogenic DNA viruses. In general, high-LET heavy-ion radiation can be more effective than X and gamma rays in inducing neoplastic cell transformation. Various experimental results indicate that radiation-induced DNA damage, most likely double-strand breaks, is important for both the initiation of cell transformation and for the enhancement of viral transformation. Some of the transformation and enhancement lesions can be repaired properly in the cell, and the amount of irrepairable lesions produced by a given dose depends on the quality of radiation. An inhibition of repair processes with chemical agents can increase the transformation frequency of cells exposed to radiation and/or oncogenic viruses, suggesting that repair mechanisms may play an important role in the radiation transformation. The progression of radiation-transformed cells appears to be a long and complicated process that can be modulated by some nonmutagenic chemical agents, e.g., DMSO. Normal cells can inhibit the expression of transforming properties of tumorigenic cells through an as yet unknown mechanism. The progression and expression of transformation may involve some epigenetic changes in the irradiated cells. 38 references, 15 figures, 1 table.

  8. Mechanosensitive subcellular rheostasis drives emergent single-cell mechanical homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Shinuo; Shao, Yue; Chen, Weiqiang; Fu, Jianping

    2016-09-01

    Mechanical homeostasis--a fundamental process by which cells maintain stable states under environmental perturbations--is regulated by two subcellular mechanotransducers: cytoskeleton tension and integrin-mediated focal adhesions (FAs). Here, we show that single-cell mechanical homeostasis is collectively driven by the distinct, graduated dynamics (rheostasis) of subcellular cytoskeleton tension and FAs. Such rheostasis involves a mechanosensitive pattern wherein ground states of cytoskeleton tension and FA determine their distinct reactive paths through either relaxation or reinforcement. Pharmacological perturbations of the cytoskeleton and molecularly modulated integrin catch-slip bonds biased the rheostasis and induced non-homeostasis of FAs, but not of cytoskeleton tension, suggesting a unique sensitivity of FAs in regulating homeostasis. Theoretical modelling revealed myosin-mediated cytoskeleton contractility and catch-slip-bond-like behaviours in FAs and the cytoskeleton as sufficient and necessary mechanisms for quantitatively recapitulating mechanosensitive rheostasis. Our findings highlight the previously underappreciated physical nature of the mechanical homeostasis of cells.

  9. Next-Generation Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caie, Peter D; Harrison, David J

    2016-01-01

    The field of pathology is rapidly transforming from a semiquantitative and empirical science toward a big data discipline. Large data sets from across multiple omics fields may now be extracted from a patient's tissue sample. Tissue is, however, complex, heterogeneous, and prone to artifact. A reductionist view of tissue and disease progression, which does not take this complexity into account, may lead to single biomarkers failing in clinical trials. The integration of standardized multi-omics big data and the retention of valuable information on spatial heterogeneity are imperative to model complex disease mechanisms. Mathematical modeling through systems pathology approaches is the ideal medium to distill the significant information from these large, multi-parametric, and hierarchical data sets. Systems pathology may also predict the dynamical response of disease progression or response to therapy regimens from a static tissue sample. Next-generation pathology will incorporate big data with systems medicine in order to personalize clinical practice for both prognostic and predictive patient care.

  10. Mechanism of Suppression on Proliferation of QGY Cell by Oxaliplatin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Song; ZUO Guo-qing; ZHANG Yan; TANG Wei-xue; LIU Chang-an

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To observe the effects of oxaliplatin(L-OHP) on proliferation of human hepatoma cell line QGY in vitro and to investigate the mechanism. Methods: The inhibition of proliferation in QGY cell was assayed by MTT-test. Morphologic changes were observed under light microscope and electronic microscope. Distribution of cell cycle and apoptosis were analyzed using flow cytometry. The expressions of cell cycle proteins and apoptosis-associated proteins were detected with immuno-histochemical technique. Results: Oxaliplatin could inhibit the proliferation of QGY cells and the inhibition depended on the exposure time and dose. The cells showed morphologic changes of the early stage of apoptosis under the light microscope: the shrunk round cells, condensed cytoplasma and pycnosis of nucleus. Apoptotic cells and apoptotic body could be found under the transmission electronic microscope. The analysis of cell cycle indicated that oxaliplatin blocked cells at S and G2/M phases and the cells of G0/Gl phase reduced. When treated with oxaliplatin for 72h, the expressions of cyclin A and Bax were up-regulated, mutant type P53, Bcl-2 and Myc were down-regulated, and Fas was not changed. Conclusion: Oxaliplatin could inhibit the proliferation of the hepatoma cell lines. Cells were blocked at S and G2/M phases. The apoptosis was related to the up-regulation of Bax and down-regulation of mutant type P53, Bcl-2 and Myc. Oxaliplatin could not induce apoptosis through the Fas pathway.

  11. Mechanism of human natural killer cell activation by Haemophilus ducreyi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Janowicz, Diane M; Fortney, Kate R; Katz, Barry P; Spinola, Stanley M

    2009-08-15

    The role of natural killer (NK) cells in the host response to Haemophilus ducreyi infection is unclear. In pustules obtained from infected human volunteers, there was an enrichment of CD56bright NK cells bearing the activation markers CD69 and HLA-DR, compared with peripheral blood. To study the mechanism by which H. ducreyi activated NK cells, we used peripheral blood mononuclear cells from uninfected volunteers. H. ducreyi activated NK cells only in the presence of antigen-presenting cells. H. ducreyi-infected monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages activated NK cells in a contact- and interleukin-18 (IL-18)-dependent manner, whereas monocyte-derived dendritic cells induced NK activation through soluble IL-12. More lesional NK cells than peripheral blood NK cells produced IFN-gamma in response to IL-12 and IL-18. We conclude that NK cells are recruited to experimental lesions and likely are activated by infected macrophages and dendritic cells. IFN-gamma produced by lesional NK cells may facilitate phagocytosis of H. ducreyi.

  12. Interplay of RhoA and mechanical forces in collective cell migration driven by leader cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reffay, M; Parrini, M C; Cochet-Escartin, O; Ladoux, B; Buguin, A; Coscoy, S; Amblard, F; Camonis, J; Silberzan, P

    2014-03-01

    The leading front of a collectively migrating epithelium often destabilizes into multicellular migration fingers where a cell initially similar to the others becomes a leader cell while its neighbours do not alter. The determinants of these leader cells include mechanical and biochemical cues, often under the control of small GTPases. However, an accurate dynamic cartography of both mechanical and biochemical activities remains to be established. Here, by mapping the mechanical traction forces exerted on the surface by MDCK migration fingers, we show that these structures are mechanical global entities with the leader cells exerting a large traction force. Moreover, the spatial distribution of RhoA differential activity at the basal plane strikingly mirrors this force cartography. We propose that RhoA controls the development of these fingers through mechanical cues: the leader cell drags the structure and the peripheral pluricellular acto-myosin cable prevents the initiation of new leader cells.

  13. Towards a statistical mechanics of cell fate decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Ojalvo, Jordi; Martinez Arias, Alfonso

    2012-12-01

    The spatiotemporal organization of a developing organism requires carefully orchestrated sequences of cellular differentiation events. These events are triggered by decisions made by individual cells about their fate, which are in turn controlled by gene and protein regulation processes. While these cell fate decisions are subject to stochasticity and are not reproducible at the single-cell level, they result in highly consistent, almost deterministic patterns at the level of the whole cell population. The question of how this macroscopic order arises from a disordered microscopic behaviour is still outstanding, and is reminiscent of problems in physical systems that are readily addressed by statistical mechanics. Here we review recent studies that are beginning to provide the data needed to address this question and discuss conceptual ideas that might be used in a theoretical understanding of cell fate decision processes, emphasizing the challenges that biology poses to the application of statistical mechanics approaches to developmental biology.

  14. Stability and degradation mechanisms in organic solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ecker, Bernhard

    2012-04-26

    This thesis deals with stability improvements and the investigation of degradation mechanisms in organic solar cells. Organic solar cells have been in the focus of extensive academic research for over almost two decades and are currently entering the market in small scale applications. For successful large scale applications, next to the improvement of the power conversion efficiency, the stability of organic solar cells has to be increased. This thesis is dedicated to the investigation of novel materials and architectures to study stability-related issues and degradation mechanisms in order to contribute to the basic understanding of the working principles of organic solar cells. Here, impedance spectroscopy, a frequency domain technique, is used to gain information about stability and degradation mechanisms in organic solar cells. In combination with systematic variations in the preparation of solar cells, impedance spectroscopy gives the possibility to differentiate between interface and bulk dominated effects. Additionally, impedance spectroscopy gives access to the dielectric properties of the device, such as capacitance. This offers among other things the opportunity to probe the charge carrier concentration and the density of states. Another powerful way of evaluation is the combination of experimentally obtained impedance spectra with equivalent circuit modelling. The thesis presents results on novel materials and solar cell architectures for efficient hole and electron extraction. This indicates the importance of knowledge over interlayers and interfaces for improving both the efficiency and stability of organic solar cells.

  15. Clinical and experimental pathology of Moyamoya disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    饶明俐; 张海鸥; 刘群; 张淑琴; 胡林森; 邓方

    2003-01-01

    Objective To investigate the etiology, pathology, and mechanism of pathogenesis of Moyamoya disease.Methods A total of 15 human autopsies were analyzed. In addition, in order to create an animal model of the disease, 21 Japanese rabbits were divided randomly into two groups and subjected to injections of horse serum either intravenously or locally in the area of the sympathetic ganglia. Pathological and immunohistochemical characteristics were observed.Results The pathological features of the autopsies and the animal models both involved intima hyperplasia and stenosis or even occlusion of the lumen in the terminal ends of the internal carotid artery and the anterior and middle cerebral arteries. Disconnections or even breakages of the inner layer of the lumen were also observed, without an obvious inflammatory response. Hyperplasic smooth muscle cells of the medial membrane had extended inward through broken portions of the internal elastic lamina, with intima cell hyperplasia resulting in lumen stenosis. The hyperplastic vascular walls were positive for IgG and IgM.Conclusions The etiology of Moyamoya disease may involve allergic angiitis. A possible mechanism is that proximal portions of the circle of Willis first develop chronic stenosis or occlusion, leading to compensatory small vessel proliferation, which perforates into the cerebral parenchyma.

  16. Mechanisms of glyceryl trinitrate provoked mast cell degranulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Sara Hougaard; Ramachandran, Roshni; Amrutkar, Dipak Vasantrao;

    2015-01-01

    inflammation and dural mast cell degranulation is supported by the effectiveness of prednisolone on glyceryl trinitrate-induced delayed headache. METHODS: Using a newly developed rat model mimicking the human glyceryl trinitrate headache model, we have investigated the occurrence of dural mast cell...... glyceryl trinitrate-induced mast cell degranulation whereas the calcitonin gene-related peptide-receptor antagonist olcegepant and the substance P receptor antagonist L-733,060 did not affect mast cell degranulation. However, topical application of two different nitric oxide donors did not cause mast cell...... degranulation ex vivo. CONCLUSIONS: Direct application of an exogenous nitric oxide donor on dural mast cells does not cause mast cell degranulation ex vivo. In vivo application of the nitric oxide donor glyceryl trinitrate leads to a prominent level of degranulation via a yet unknown mechanism. This effect can...

  17. Human embryonic stem cell-derived pancreatic endoderm alleviates diabetic pathology and improves reproductive outcome in C57BL/KsJ-Lep(db/+) gestational diabetes mellitus mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Baoheng; Wang, Lili; Li, Qin; Cao, Yalei; Dong, Xiujuan; Liang, Jun; Wu, Xiaohua

    2015-07-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus is a condition commonly encountered during mid to late pregnancy with pathologic manifestations including hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, and fetal maldevelopment. The cause of gestational diabetes mellitus can be attributed to both genetic and environmental factors, hence complicating its diagnosis and treatment. Pancreatic progenitors derived from human embryonic stem cells were shown to be able to effectively treat diabetes in mice. In this study, we have developed a system of treating diabetes using human embryonic stem cell-derived pancreatic endoderm in a mouse model of gestational diabetes mellitus. Human embryonic stem cells were differentiated in vitro into pancreatic endoderm, which were then transplanted into db/+ mice suffering from gestational diabetes mellitus. The transplant greatly improved glucose metabolism and reproductive outcome of the females compared with the control groups. Our findings support the feasibility of using differentiated human embryonic stem cells for treating gestational diabetes mellitus patients.

  18. Intermediate filaments: a dynamic network that controls cell mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruenbaum, Yosef; Aebi, Ueli

    2014-01-01

    In humans the superfamily of intermediate filament (IF) proteins is encoded by more than 70 different genes, which are expressed in a cell- and tissue-specific manner. IFs assemble into approximately 10 nm-wide filaments that account for the principal structural elements at the nuclear periphery, nucleoplasm, and cytoplasm. They are also required for organizing the microtubule and microfilament networks. In this review, we focus on the dynamics of IFs and how modifications regulate it. We also discuss the role of nuclear IF organization in determining nuclear mechanics as well as that of cytoplasmic IFs organization in maintaining cell stiffness, formation of lamellipodia, regulation of cell migration, and permitting cell adhesion.

  19. Active Cellular Mechanics and Information Processing in the Living Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, M.

    2014-07-01

    I will present our recent work on the organization of signaling molecules on the surface of living cells. Using novel experimental and theoretical approaches we have found that many cell surface receptors are organized as dynamic clusters driven by active currents and stresses generated by the cortical cytoskeleton adjoining the cell surface. We have shown that this organization is optimal for both information processing and computation. In connecting active mechanics in the cell with information processing and computation, we bring together two of the seminal works of Alan Turing.

  20. Mechanical memory and dosing influence stem cell fate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chun; Tibbitt, Mark W.; Basta, Lena; Anseth, Kristi S.

    2014-06-01

    We investigated whether stem cells remember past physical signals and whether these can be exploited to dose cells mechanically. We found that the activation of the Yes-associated protein (YAP) and transcriptional coactivator with PDZ-binding domain (TAZ) as well as the pre-osteogenic transcription factor RUNX2 in human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) cultured on soft poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels (Young’s modulus E ~ 2 kPa) depended on previous culture time on stiff tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS; E ~ 3 GPa). In addition, mechanical dosing of hMSCs cultured on initially stiff (E ~ 10 kPa) and then soft (E ~ 2 kPa) phototunable PEG hydrogels resulted in either reversible or—above a threshold mechanical dose—irreversible activation of YAP/TAZ and RUNX2. We also found that increased mechanical dosing on supraphysiologically stiff TCPS biases hMSCs towards osteogenic differentiation. We conclude that stem cells possess mechanical memory—with YAP/TAZ acting as an intracellular mechanical rheostat—that stores information from past physical environments and influences the cells’ fate.

  1. Silk scaffolds with tunable mechanical capability for cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Shumeng; Han, Hongyan; Huang, Xiaowei; Xu, Weian; Kaplan, David L; Zhu, Hesun; Lu, Qiang

    2015-07-01

    Bombyx mori silk fibroin is a promising biomaterial for tissue regeneration and is usually considered an "inert" material with respect to actively regulating cell differentiation due to few specific cell signaling peptide domains in the primary sequence and the generally stiffer mechanical properties due to crystalline content formed in processing. In the present study, silk fibroin porous 3D scaffolds with nanostructures and tunable stiffness were generated via a silk fibroin nanofiber-assisted lyophilization process. The silk fibroin nanofibers with high β-sheet content were added into the silk fibroin solutions to modulate the self-assembly, and to directly induce water-insoluble scaffold formation after lyophilization. Unlike previously reported silk fibroin scaffold formation processes, these new scaffolds had lower overall β-sheet content and softer mechanical properties for improved cell compatibility. The scaffold stiffness could be further tuned to match soft tissue mechanical properties, which resulted in different differentiation outcomes with rat bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells toward myogenic and endothelial cells, respectively. Therefore, these silk fibroin scaffolds regulate cell differentiation outcomes due to their mechanical features.

  2. Bone marrow pathology in dogs and cats with non-regenerative immune-mediated haemolytic anaemia and pure red cell aplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, D J

    2008-01-01

    Many dogs and cats with immune-mediated haemolytic anaemia (IMHA) lack a bone marrow erythroid regenerative response. To better understand the failure of the bone marrow to respond to the anaemia, bone marrow pathology associated with non-regenerative IMHA and pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) was reviewed. Eighty-two affected dogs and 57 affected cats were identified from a population presenting to a referral hospital over a 10-year period. Fifty-five dogs had non-regenerative IMHA (38 had bone marrow erythroid hyperplasia and 17 had erythroid maturation arrest) and 27 had pure red cell aplasia (PRCA). Twenty-eight cats had non-regenerative IMHA (24 had erythroid hyperplasia and 4 had erythroid maturation arrest) and 29 had PRCA. A variety of pathological changes were observed in bone marrow aspirates and core biopsy specimens taken from these animals. These changes included dysmyelopoiesis, myelonecrosis, myelofibrosis, interstitial oedema, haemorrhage, acute inflammation, haemophagocytic syndrome, lymphocyte aggregation, and lymphocyte or plasma cell hyperplasia. In both dogs and cats, dysmyelopoiesis, myelonecrosis, myelofibrosis, interstitial oedema, haemorrhage, acute inflammation and haemophagocytic syndrome were primarily noted in bone marrow specimens where there was evidence of erythroid hyperplasia. These animals were also more often neutropenic and thrombocytopenic, and had decreased 60 day survival when compared with dogs or cats with non-regenerative anaemia associated with erythroid maturation arrest or PRCA. Therefore, the pathogenesis of the non-regenerative anaemia in non-regenerative IMHA may involve both antibody-mediated destruction of bone marrow precursor cells and pathological events within the bone marrow that result in ineffective erythropoiesis.

  3. Snail levels control the migration mechanism of mesenchymal tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belgiovine, Cristina; Chiesa, Giulio; Chiodi, Ilaria; Frapolli, Roberta; Bonezzi, Katiuscia; Taraboletti, Giulia; D'Incalci, Maurizio; Mondello, Chiara

    2016-07-01

    Cancer cells use two major types of movement: Mesenchymal, which is typical of cells of mesenchymal origin and depends on matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity, and amoeboid, which is characteristic of cells with a rounded shape and relies on the activity of Rho-associated kinase (ROCK). The present authors previously demonstrated that, during neoplastic transformation, telomerase-immortalized human fibroblasts (cen3tel cells) acquired a ROCK-dependent/MMP independent mechanism of invasion, mediated by the downregulation of the ROCK cellular inhibitor Round (Rnd)3/RhoE. In the present study, cen3tel transformation was also demonstrated to be paralleled by downregulation of Snail, a major determinant of the mesenchymal movement. To test whether Snail levels could determine the type of movement adopted by mesenchymal tumor cells, Snail was ectopically expressed in tumorigenic cells. It was observed that ectopic Snail did not increase the levels of typical mesenchymal markers, but induced cells to adopt an MMP-dependent mechanism of invasion. In cells expressing ectopic Snail, invasion became sensitive to the MMP inhibitor Ro 28-2653 and insensitive to the ROCK inhibitor Y27632, suggesting that, once induced by Snail, the mesenchymal movement prevails over the amoeboid one. Snail-expressing cells had a more aggressive behavior in vivo, and exhibited increased tumor growth rate and metastatic ability. These results confirm the high plasticity of cancer cells, which can adopt different types of movement in response to changes in the expression of specific genes. Furthermore, the present findings indicate that Rnd3 and Snail are possible regulators of the type of invasion mechanism adopted by mesenchymal tumor cells.

  4. Fundamental study of mechanical and chemical degradation mechanisms of PEM fuel cell membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Wonseok

    One of the important factors determining the lifetime of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) is membrane degradation and failure. The lack of effective mitigation methods is largely due to the currently very limited understanding of the underlying mechanisms for mechanical and chemical degradations of fuel cell membranes. In order to understand degradation of membranes in fuel cells, two different experimental approaches were developed; one is fuel cell testing under open circuit voltage (OCV) with bi-layer configuration of the membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) and the other is a modified gas phase Fenton's test. Accelerated degradation tests for polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells are frequently conducted under open circuit voltage (OCV) conditions at low relative humidity (RH) and high temperature. With the bi-layer MEA technique, it was found that membrane degradation is highly localized across thickness direction of the membrane and qualitatively correlated with location of platinum (Pt) band through mechanical testing, Infrared (IR) spectroscopy, fluoride emission, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) measurement. One of the critical experimental observations is that mechanical behavior of membranes subjected to degradation via Fenton's reaction exhibit completely different behavior with that of membranes from the OCV testing. This result led us to believe that other critical factors such as mechanical stress may affect on membrane degradation and therefore, a modified gas phase Fenton's test setup was developed to test the hypothesis. Interestingly, the results showed that mechanical stress directly accelerates the degradation rate of ionomer membranes, implying that the rate constant for the degradation reaction is a function of mechanical stress in addition to commonly known factors such as temperature and humidity. Membrane degradation induced by

  5. Toxic mechanisms of copper oxide nanoparticles in epithelial kidney cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thit, Amalie; Selck, Henriette; Bjerregaard, Henning F.

    2015-01-01

    CuO NPs have previously been reported as toxic to a range of cell cultures including kidney epithelial cells from the frog, Xenopus laevis (A6). Here we examine the molecular mechanisms affecting toxicity of Cu in different forms and particle sizes. A6 cells were exposed to ionic Cu (Cu2+) or CuO...... of the sequence of events explaining Poly toxicity. Briefly, the events include: cellular uptake, most likely via endocytosis, production of ROS, which cause DNA damage that activates a signaling pathway which eventually leads to cell death, mainly via apoptosis......CuO NPs have previously been reported as toxic to a range of cell cultures including kidney epithelial cells from the frog, Xenopus laevis (A6). Here we examine the molecular mechanisms affecting toxicity of Cu in different forms and particle sizes. A6 cells were exposed to ionic Cu (Cu2+) or Cu......O particles of three different sizes: CuO NPs of 6 nm (NP6), larger Poly-dispersed CuO NPs of toxic than NP6, Micro and Cu2+ to A6 cells, causing DNA damage, decreased cell viability...

  6. Membrane curvature in cell biology: An integration of molecular mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarsch, Iris K; Daste, Frederic; Gallop, Jennifer L

    2016-08-15

    Curving biological membranes establishes the complex architecture of the cell and mediates membrane traffic to control flux through subcellular compartments. Common molecular mechanisms for bending membranes are evident in different cell biological contexts across eukaryotic phyla. These mechanisms can be intrinsic to the membrane bilayer (either the lipid or protein components) or can be brought about by extrinsic factors, including the cytoskeleton. Here, we review examples of membrane curvature generation in animals, fungi, and plants. We showcase the molecular mechanisms involved and how they collaborate and go on to highlight contexts of curvature that are exciting areas of future research. Lessons from how membranes are bent in yeast and mammals give hints as to the molecular mechanisms we expect to see used by plants and protists.

  7. Mechanism of T cell regulation by microRNAs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juan Liu; Chang-Ping Wu; Bin-Feng Lu; Jing-Ting Jiang

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding single-stranded RNAs that can modulate target gene expression at post-transcriptional level and participate in cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. T cells have important functions in acquired immune response;miRNAs regulate this immune response by targeting the mRNAs of genes involved in T cell development, proliferation, differentiation, and function. For instance, miR-181 family members function in progression by targeting Bcl2 and CD69, among others. MiR-17 to miR-92 clusters function by binding to CREB1, PTEN, and Bim. Considering that the suppression of T cell-mediated immune responses against tumor cells is involved in cancer progression, we should investigate the mechanism by which miRNA regulates T cells to develop new approaches for cancer treatment.

  8. Mechanism of vaso-occlusion in sickle cell anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Huan; Karniadakis, George

    2012-11-01

    Vaso-occlusion crisis is one of the key hallmark of sickle cell anemia. While early studies suggested that the crisis is caused by blockage of a single elongated cell, recent experimental investigations indicate that vaso-occlusion is a complex process triggered by adhesive interactions among different cell groups in multiple stages. Based on dissipative particle dynamics, a multi-scale model for the sickle red blood cells (SS-RBCs), accounting for diversity in both shapes and cell rigidities, is developed to investigate the mechanism of vaso-occlusion crisis. Using this model, the adhesive dynamics of single SS-RBC was investigated in arterioles. Simulation results indicate that the different cell groups (deformable SS2 RBCs, rigid SS4 RBCs, leukocytes, etc.) exhibit heterogeneous adhesive behavior due to the different cell morphologies and membrane rigidities. We further simulate the tube flow of SS-RBC suspensions with different cell fractions. The more adhesive SS2 cells interact with the vascular endothelium and further trap rigid SS4 cells, resulting in vaso-occlusion in vessels less than 15 μm . Under inflammation, adherent leukocytes may also trap SS4 cells, resulting in vaso-occlusion in even larger vessels. This work was supported by the NSF grant CBET-0852948 and the NIH grant R01HL094270.

  9. Circulating cell-free microRNA as biomarkers for screening, diagnosis and monitoring of neurodegenerative diseases and other neurologic pathologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kira S Sheinerman

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Many neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson disease, vascular and frontotemporal dementias, as well as other chronic neurological pathologies, are characterized by slow development with a long asymptomatic period followed by a stage with mild clinical symptoms. As a consequence, these serious pathologies are diagnosed late in the course of a disease, when massive death of neurons has already occurred and effective therapeutic intervention is problematic. Thus, the development of screening tests capable of detecting neurodegenerative diseases during early, preferably asymptomatic, stages is a high unmet need. Since such tests are to be used for screening of large populations, they should be non-invasive and relatively inexpensive. Further, while subjects identified by screening tests can be further tested with more invasive and expensive methods, e.g. analysis of cerebrospinal fluid or imaging techniques, to be of practical utility screening tests should have high sensitivity and specificity. In this review, we discuss advantages and disadvantages of various approaches to developing screening tests based on analysis of circulating cell-free miRNA. Applications of circulating miRNA-based tests for diagnosis of acute and chronic brain pathologies, for research of normal brain aging, and for disease and treatment monitoring are also discussed.

  10. Mechanical Properties of Plant Cell Walls Probed by Relaxation Spectra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Steen Laugesen; Ray, Peter Martin; Karlsson, Anders Ola

    2011-01-01

    Transformants and mutants with altered cell wall composition are expected to display a biomechanical phenotype due to the structural role of the cell wall. It is often quite difficult, however, to distinguish the mechanical behavior of a mutant's or transformant's cell walls from that of the wild...... type. This may be due to the plant’s ability to compensate for the wall modification or because the biophysical method that is often employed, determination of simple elastic modulus and breakstrength, lacks the resolving power necessary for detecting subtle mechanical phenotypes. Here, we apply...... a method, determination of relaxation spectra, which probes, and can separate, the viscoelastic properties of different cell wall components (i.e. those properties that depend on the elastic behavior of load-bearing wall polymers combined with viscous interactions between them). A computer program, Bayes...

  11. Environmental boundaries as an error correction mechanism for grid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardcastle, Kiah; Ganguli, Surya; Giocomo, Lisa M

    2015-05-06

    Medial entorhinal grid cells fire in periodic, hexagonally patterned locations and are proposed to support path-integration-based navigation. The recursive nature of path integration results in accumulating error and, without a corrective mechanism, a breakdown in the calculation of location. The observed long-term stability of grid patterns necessitates that the system either performs highly precise internal path integration or implements an external landmark-based error correction mechanism. To distinguish these possibilities, we examined grid cells in behaving rodents as they made long trajectories across an open arena. We found that error accumulates relative to time and distance traveled since the animal last encountered a boundary. This error reflects coherent drift in the grid pattern. Further, interactions with boundaries yield direction-dependent error correction, suggesting that border cells serve as a neural substrate for error correction. These observations, combined with simulations of an attractor network grid cell model, demonstrate that landmarks are crucial to grid stability.

  12. Transdifferentiation of pancreatic α-cells into insulinsecreting cells: From experimental models to underlying mechanisms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jieli; Lu; Rami; Jaafer; Rémy; Bonnavion; Philippe; Bertolino; Chang-Xian; Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic insulin-secreting β-cells are essential regulators of glucose metabolism. New strategies are cur-rently being investigated to create insulin-producing β cells to replace deficient β cells, including the differentiation of either stem or progenitor cells, and the newly uncovered transdifferentiation of mature non-β islet cell types. However, in order to correctly drive any cell to adopt a new β-cell fate, a better understanding of the in vivo mechanisms involved in the plasticity and biology of islet cells is urgently required. Here, we review the recent studies reporting the phenomenon of transdifferentiation of α cells into β cells by focusing on the major candidates and contexts revealed to be involved in adult β-cell regeneration through this process. The possible underlying mechanisms of transdifferentiation and the interactions between several key factors involved in the process are also addressed. We propose that it is of importance to further study the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying α- to β-cell transdifferentiation, in order to make β-cell regeneration from α cells a relevant and realizable strategy for developing cell-replacement therapy.

  13. Directionally Solidified Biopolymer Scaffolds: Mechanical Properties and Endothelial Cell Responses

    OpenAIRE

    Meghri, Nichols W.; Donius, Amalie E.; Riblett, Benjamin W.; Martin, Elizabeth J.; Clyne, Alisa Morss; Wegst, Ulrike G.K.

    2010-01-01

    Vascularization is a primary challenge in tissue engineering. To achieve it in a tissue scaffold, an environment with the appropriate structural, mechanical, and biochemical cues must be provided enabling endothelial cells to direct blood vessel growth. While biochemical stimuli such as growth factors can be added through the scaffold material, the culture medium, or both, a well-designed tissue engineering scaffold is required to provide the necessary local structural and mechanical cues. As...

  14. TP53 alterations in pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma: new insights into the molecular pathology of this rare cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Rosa, Stefano; Bernasconi, Barbara; Frattini, Milo; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Molinari, Francesca; Furlan, Daniela; Sahnane, Nora; Vanoli, Alessandro; Albarello, Luca; Zhang, Lizhi; Notohara, Kenji; Casnedi, Selenia; Chenard, Marie-Pierre; Adsay, Volkan; Asioli, Sofia; Capella, Carlo; Sessa, Fausto

    2016-03-01

    The molecular alterations of pancreatic acinar cell carcinomas (ACCs) are poorly understood and have been reported as being different from those in ductal adenocarcinomas. Loss of TP53 gene function in the pathogenesis of ACCs is controversial since contradictory findings have been published. A comprehensive analysis of the different possible genetic and epigenetic mechanisms leading to TP53 alteration in ACC has never been reported and hence the role of TP53 in the pathogenesis and/or progression of ACC remains unclear. We investigated TP53 alterations in 54 tumor samples from 44 patients, including primary and metastatic ACC, using sequencing analysis, methylation-specific multiplex ligation probe amplification, fluorescence in situ hybridization, and immunohistochemistry. TP53 mutations were found in 13 % of primary ACCs and in 31 % of metastases. Primary ACCs and metastases showed the same mutational profile, with the exception of one case, characterized by a wild-type sequence in the primary carcinoma and a mutation in the corresponding metastasis. FISH analysis revealed deletion of the TP53 region in 53 % of primary ACCs and in 50 % of metastases. Promoter hypermethylation was found in one case. The molecular alterations correlated well with the immunohistochemical findings. A statistically significant association was found between the combination of mutation of one allele and loss of the other allele of TP53 and worse survival.

  15. Molecular mechanisms of TRAIL-induced apoptosis of cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@Tumor Necrosis Factor-related Apoptosis-inducing Ligand (TRAIL) is a recently identified member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) family[1]. Numerous studies indicate that TRAIL can induce apoptosis of cancer cells but not of normal cells, pointing to the possibility of de-veloping TRAIL into a cancer drug[2-4]. This review will summary the molecular mechanisms of TRAIL-induced apoptosis and discuss the questions to be resolved in this field.

  16. The molecular mechanism of embryonic stem cell pluripotency maintenance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Qingzhong; LIU Yixun; HAN Chunsheng

    2005-01-01

    In vitro cultured embryonic stem (ES) cells are derived from the inner cell mass (ICM) of pre-implantation embryos, and are capable of giving rise to all cell and tissue types of the three germ layers upon being injected back into blastocysts. These cells are therefore said to possess pluripotency that can be maintained infinitely in culture under optimal conditions. Such pluripotency maintenance is believed to be due to the symmetrical cleavage of the cells in an undifferentiated state. The pluripotency of ES cells is the basis for their various practical and potential applications. ES cells can be used as donor cells to generate knockout or transgenic animals, as in vitro models of mammalian development, and as cell resources for cell therapy in regenerative medicine. The further success in these applications, particularly in the last two, is dependent on the establishment of a culture system with components in the medium clearly defined and the subsequent procedures for controlled differentiation of the cells into specific lineages. In turn, elucidating the molecular mechanism for pluripotency maintenance of ES cells is the prerequisite. This paper summarizes the recent progresses in this area, focusing mainly on the LIF/STAT3, BMPs/Smads, canonical Wnt, TGFβ/activin/nodal, PI3K and FGF signaling pathways and the genes such as oct4, nanog that are crucial in ES cell pluripotency maintenance. The regulatory systems of pluripotency maintenance in both mouse and human ES cells are also discussed. We believe that the cross-talkings between these signaling pathways, as well as the regulatory system underlying pluripotency maintenance will be the main focus in the area of ES cell researches in the future.

  17. Analysis of the histomorphologic profile of invasive cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma from 2002 to 2011 in a pathology laboratory in the region of Campos Gerais, Brazil*

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Fernanda Magri; Baroni, Eloina Do Rocio Valenga; Montemór Netto, Mário Rodrigues

    2017-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma is the second most common type of malignant skin cancer. It is also quite aggressive. The increasing incidence of the disease can be altered given its connection with sun exposure. The aim of this study was to establish the clinical and histomorphological profile of squamous cell carcinoma in the region of Campos Gerais, State of Paraná, Brazil and analyze and compare the features of the disease found in the literature. We conducted a cross-sectional descriptive study in a pathology laboratory with selected invasive cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma reports issued after excisional biopsy from January 2002 to December 2011. We selected 374 cases of head and neck SCC, mean age 71.53 years, with a predominance of male patients, moderate degree of histological differentiation, Clark level IV, and absence of perineural, neural, or angiolymphatic invasions. Our results differ on some points from those found in the literature. PMID:28225961

  18. Ewing's sarcoma, fibrogenic tumors, giant cell tumor, hemangioma of bone. Radiology and pathology; Ewing-Sarkom, fibrogene Tumoren, Riesenzelltumor, Haemangiom des Skeletts. Radiologie und Pathologie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freyschmidt, J. [Beratungsstelle und Referenzzentrum fuer Osteoradiologie, Bremen (Germany); Ostertag, H. [Klinikum Region Hannover GmbH, Pathologisches Institut, Hannover (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    Radiological imaging only reflects the anatomy and its pathological abnormalities. Therefore, the radiologist should be able to recognize the basic features of the pathological anatomy of bone tumors. This can only be learned working closely with a pathologist who is experienced in this field. On the other hand, the pathologist needs from the radiologist their diagnostic assessment with information on size, location, aggressiveness and the existence of a bone tumor's matrix, of the whole lesion, because he usually only receives a small part for examination in the form of a biopsy. In this article, the features and fundamentals (standards) of radiological-pathological cooperation as the mainstay for a precise diagnosis in bone tumors are outlined. The radiological appearance and the histopathological features behind it are presented for Ewing's sarcoma, fibrogenic tumors, giant cell tumor, and hemangioma of the bone. (orig.) [German] Radiologische Bilder spiegeln nichts anderes als die Anatomie und ihre pathologischen Abweichungen wider. Deshalb sollte der Radiologe die Grundzuege der pathologischen Anatomie auch von Knochentumoren kennen. Das kann er nur durch eine enge Zusammenarbeit mit einem auf diesem Gebiet erfahrenen Pathologen erlernen. Andererseits braucht der Pathologe vom Radiologen dessen diagnostische Einschaetzung mit Informationen ueber die Groesse, Lage, Aggressivitaet und das Vorhandensein einer Matrix eines Knochentumors und zwar von der gesamten Laesion, denn er bekommt inform einer Biopsie i. d. R. nur einen mehr oder weniger kleinen Teil zur Untersuchung. In diesem Beitrag werden die Grundzuege und Standards der radiologisch-pathologischen Zusammenarbeit aufgezeigt, auf denen eine praezise Diagnosestellung beruht. Radiologisches Erscheinungsbild und die dahintersteckenden - und erklaerenden - histopathologischen Merkmale werden fuer das Ewing-Sarkom, fuer fibrogene Tumoren, den Riesenzelltumor und das Haemangiom des Knochens

  19. Genetic and Epigenetic Mechanisms That Maintain Hematopoietic Stem Cell Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Kosan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available All hematopoiesis cells develop from multipotent progenitor cells. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC have the ability to develop into all blood lineages but also maintain their stemness. Different molecular mechanisms have been identified that are crucial for regulating quiescence and self-renewal to maintain the stem cell pool and for inducing proliferation and lineage differentiation. The stem cell niche provides the microenvironment to keep HSC in a quiescent state. Furthermore, several transcription factors and epigenetic modifiers are involved in this process. These create modifications that regulate the cell fate in a more or less reversible and dynamic way and contribute to HSC homeostasis. In addition, HSC respond in a unique way to DNA damage. These mechanisms also contribute to the regulation of HSC function and are essential to ensure viability after DNA damage. How HSC maintain their quiescent stage during the entire life is still matter of ongoing research. Here we will focus on the molecular mechanisms that regulate HSC function.

  20. Fuel starvation. Irreversible degradation mechanisms in PEM fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rangel, Carmen M.; Silva, R.A.; Travassos, M.A.; Paiva, T.I.; Fernandes, V.R. [LNEG, National Laboratory for Energy and Geology, Lisboa (Portugal). UPCH Fuel Cells and Hydrogen Unit

    2010-07-01

    PEM fuel cell operates under very aggressive conditions in both anode and cathode. Failure modes and mechanism in PEM fuel cells include those related to thermal, chemical or mechanical issues that may constrain stability, power and lifetime. In this work, the case of fuel starvation is examined. The anode potential may rise to levels compatible with the oxidization of water. If water is not available, oxidation of the carbon support will accelerate catalyst sintering. Diagnostics methods used for in-situ and ex-situ analysis of PEM fuel cells are selected in order to better categorize irreversible changes of the cell. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) is found instrumental in the identification of fuel cell flooding conditions and membrane dehydration associated to mass transport limitations / reactant starvation and protonic conductivity decrease, respectively. Furthermore, it indicates that water electrolysis might happen at the anode. Cross sections of the membrane catalyst and gas diffusion layers examined by scanning electron microscopy indicate electrode thickness reduction as a result of reactions taking place during hydrogen starvation. Catalyst particles are found to migrate outwards and located on carbon backings. Membrane degradation in fuel cell environment is analyzed in terms of the mechanism for fluoride release which is considered an early predictor of membrane degradation. (orig.)

  1. Peripartum Primary Prophylaxis Inferior Vena Cava Filter Placement in a Patient with Stage IV B-Cell Lymphoma Presenting with a Pathologic Femur Fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M. Sherer

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background  -Pulmonary embolus (PE remains a leading etiology of maternal mortality in the developed world. Increasing utilization of retrievable inferior vena cava (IVC filter placement currently includes pregnant patients. Case - A 22-year-old woman at 27 weeks' gestation was diagnosed with Stage IV high-grade malignant B cell lymphoma following pathologic femur fracture. Significant risk factors for PE led to placement of primary prophylaxis IVC filter before cesarean delivery, open reduction and internal fixation of the fractured femur, and chemotherapy. Conclusion - This case supports that primary prophylaxis placement of IVC filters in highly selected pregnant patients may assist in decreasing PE-associated maternal mortality.

  2. Periodontal Ligament Stem Cells in the Periodontitis Microenvironment Are Sensitive to Static Mechanical Strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available During orthodontic treatment, periodontium remodeling of periodontitis patients under mechanical force was abnormal. We have previously confirmed the function impairment of periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs in the periodontitis microenvironment which might be involved in this pathological process. However, the response of PDLSCs in periodontitis microenvironment to mechanical force remains unclear. Therefore, in the present study, we introduced a Flexcell tension apparatus and investigated the response of PDLSCs obtained from periodontal tissues of periodontitis patients (PPDLSCs and of those obtained from healthy periodontal tissues (HPDLSCs to different magnitudes of static mechanical strain (SMS. PPDLSCs showed increased proliferation, decreased osteogenic activity, activated osteoclastogenesis, and greater secretion of inflammatory cytokines. Different magnitudes of SMS exerted distinct effects on HPDLSCs and PPDLSCs. An SMS of 12% induced optimal effects in HPDLSCs, including the highest proliferation, the best osteogenic ability, the lowest osteoclastogenesis, and the lowest secretion of inflammatory cytokines, while the optimal SMS for PPDLSCs was 8%. Excessive SMS damaged PPDLSCs function, including decreased proliferation, an imbalance between osteogenesis and osteoclastogenesis, and an activated inflammatory response. Our data suggest that PPDLSCs are more sensitive and less tolerant to SMS, and this may explain why mechanical force results in undesirable effects in periodontitis patients.

  3. Periodontal Ligament Stem Cells in the Periodontitis Microenvironment Are Sensitive to Static Mechanical Strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jia; Liu, Shiyu; Gao, Jie; Qin, Wen; Song, Yang

    2017-01-01

    During orthodontic treatment, periodontium remodeling of periodontitis patients under mechanical force was abnormal. We have previously confirmed the function impairment of periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) in the periodontitis microenvironment which might be involved in this pathological process. However, the response of PDLSCs in periodontitis microenvironment to mechanical force remains unclear. Therefore, in the present study, we introduced a Flexcell tension apparatus and investigated the response of PDLSCs obtained from periodontal tissues of periodontitis patients (PPDLSCs) and of those obtained from healthy periodontal tissues (HPDLSCs) to different magnitudes of static mechanical strain (SMS). PPDLSCs showed increased proliferation, decreased osteogenic activity, activated osteoclastogenesis, and greater secretion of inflammatory cytokines. Different magnitudes of SMS exerted distinct effects on HPDLSCs and PPDLSCs. An SMS of 12% induced optimal effects in HPDLSCs, including the highest proliferation, the best osteogenic ability, the lowest osteoclastogenesis, and the lowest secretion of inflammatory cytokines, while the optimal SMS for PPDLSCs was 8%. Excessive SMS damaged PPDLSCs function, including decreased proliferation, an imbalance between osteogenesis and osteoclastogenesis, and an activated inflammatory response. Our data suggest that PPDLSCs are more sensitive and less tolerant to SMS, and this may explain why mechanical force results in undesirable effects in periodontitis patients. PMID:28316629

  4. Curriculum Guidelines for Pathology and Oral Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Dental Education, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Guidelines for dental school pathology courses describe the interrelationships of general, systemic, and oral pathology; primary educational goals; prerequisites; a core curriculum outline and behavioral objectives for each type of pathology. Notes on sequencing, faculty, facilities, and occupational hazards are included. (MSE)

  5. Mechanical Response of Single Plant Cells to Cell Poking: A Numerical Simulation Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rong Wang; Qun-Ying Jiao; De-Qiang Wei

    2006-01-01

    Cell poking is an experimental technique that is widely used to study the mechanical properties of plant cells. A full understanding of the mechanical responses of plant cells to poking force is helpful for experimental work. The aim of this study was to numerically investigate the stress distribution of the cell wall,cell turgor, and deformation of plant cells in response to applied poking force. Furthermore, the locations damaged during poking were analyzed. The model simulates cell poking, with the cell treated as a spherical,homogeneous, isotropic elastic membrane, filled with incompressible, highly viscous liquid. Equilibrium equations for the contact region and the non-contact regions were determined by using membrane theory.The boundary conditions and continuity conditions for the solution of the problem were found. The forcedeformation curve, turgor pressure and tension of the cell wall under cell poking conditions were obtained.The tension of the cell wall circumference was larger than that of the meridian. In general, maximal stress occurred at the equator around. When cell deformation increased to a certain level, the tension at the poker tip exceeded that of the equator. Breakage of the cell wall may start from the equator or the poker tip,depending on the deformation. A nonlinear model is suitable for estimating turgor, stress, and stiffness,and numerical simulation is a powerful method for determining plant cell mechanical properties.

  6. Quantum mechanical effects analysis of nanostructured solar cell models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badea Andrei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The quantum mechanical effects resulted from the inclusion of nanostructures, represented by quantum wells and quantum dots, in the i-layer of an intermediate band solar cell will be analyzed. We will discuss the role of these specific nanostructures in the increasing of the solar cells efficiency. InAs quantum wells being placed in the i-layer of a gallium arsenide (GaAs p-i-n cell, we will analyze the quantum confined regions and determine the properties of the eigenstates located therein. Also, we simulate the electroluminescence that occurs due to the nanostructured regions.

  7. Photothermal and mechanical stimulation of cells via dualfunctional nanohybrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chechetka, Svetlana A.; Doi, Motomichi; Pichon, Benoit P.; Bégin-Colin, Sylvie; Miyako, Eijiro

    2016-11-01

    Stimulating cells by light is an attractive technology to investigate cellular function and deliver innovative cell-based therapy. However, current techniques generally use poorly biopermeable light, which prevents broad applicability. Here, we show that a new type of composite nanomaterial, synthesized from multi-walled carbon nanotubes, magnetic iron nanoparticles, and polyglycerol, enables photothermal and mechanical control of Ca2+ influx into cells overexpressing transient receptor potential vanilloid type-2. The nanohybrid is simply operated by application of highly biotransparent near-infrared light and a magnetic field. The technology may revolutionize remote control of cellular function.

  8. Planar cell polarity signaling: a common mechanism for cellular polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenny, Andreas; Mlodzik, Marek

    2006-09-01

    Epithelial cells frequently display--in addition to the common apical-basolateral polarity--a polarization within the plane of the epithelium. This is commonly referred to as planar cell polarity (PCP) or tissue polarity. Examples of vertebrate PCP include epithelial patterning in the skin and inner ear, and also the morphogenetic movements of mesenchymal cells during convergent extension at gastrulation. In Drosophila, all adult epithelial structures of the cuticle are polarized within the plane. This review presents recent results and new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the establishment of PCP, and compares and contrasts the intriguing similarities between PCP signaling in Drosophila and vertebrates.

  9. The Pathological Characteristics of Poorly Differentiated Squamous Cell Carcinoma in Dogs%犬低分化鳞状细胞癌的病理特点

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    祁保民

    2011-01-01

    运用病理组织学方法,观察了3例犬低分化鳞癌的病理特点,结果显示,在犬低分化鳞状细胞癌组织中,癌细胞类似于棘细胞、基底细胞,癌组织中形成癌腔,在一些癌腔内可见角化不全细胞,无癌珠形成.癌腔是低分化鳞状细胞癌的病理特点之一,可作为诊断低分化鳞状细胞癌的依据.%The histopathologic features of poorly differentiated squamous cell carcinoma in 3 dogs were observed by the histopathological method. The results showed that cancer cells were similar to the prickle cells and basal cells, cancer cavity could be seen in the cancer tissues,and parakeratotic cells in some cancer cavity, no cancer pearl occurred. The results suggested that cancer cavity was one pathological characteristic of poorly differentiated squamous cell carcinoma, and could be used as diagnos tic basis of poorly differentiated squamous cell carcinoma.

  10. Microfluidics as a functional tool for cell mechanics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanapalli, Siva A.; Duits, Michel H.G.; Mugele, Frieder

    2009-01-01

    Living cells are a fascinating demonstration of nature’s most intricate and well-coordinated micromechanical objects. They crawl, spread, contract, and relax—thus performing a multitude of complex mechanical functions. Alternatively, they also respond to physical and chemical cues that lead to remod

  11. Giant Glial Cell: New Insight Through Mechanism-Based Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Postnov, D. E.; Ryazanova, L. S.; Brazhe, Nadezda;

    2008-01-01

    The paper describes a detailed mechanism-based model of a tripartite synapse consisting of P- and R-neurons together with a giant glial cell in the ganglia of the medical leech (Hirudo medicinalis), which is a useful object for experimental studies in situ. We describe the two main pathways of th...

  12. A putative viral defence mechanism in archaeal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lillestøl, Reidun K; Redder, Peter; Garrett, Roger Antony

    2006-01-01

    in cells, and that both the mode of inhibition of viral propagation and the mechanism of adding spacer-repeat units to clusters, are dependent on RNAs transcribed from the clusters. Moreover, the putative inhibitory apparatus (piRNA-based) may be evolutionarily related to the interference RNA systems (si...

  13. A multiscale model for red blood cell mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Dirk

    2010-02-01

    The objective of this article is the derivation of a continuum model for mechanics of red blood cells via multiscale analysis. On the microscopic level, we consider realistic discrete models in terms of energy functionals defined on networks/lattices. Using concepts of Gamma-convergence, convergence results as well as explicit homogenisation formulae are derived. Based on a characterisation via energy functionals, appropriate macroscopic stress-strain relationships (constitutive equations) can be determined. Further, mechanical moduli of the derived macroscopic continuum model are directly related to microscopic moduli. As a test case we consider optical tweezers experiments, one of the most common experiments to study mechanical properties of cells. Our simulations of the derived continuum model are based on finite element methods and account explicitly for membrane mechanics and its coupling with bulk mechanics. Since the discretisation of the continuum model can be chosen freely, rather than it is given by the topology of the microscopic cytoskeletal network, the approach allows a significant reduction of computational efforts. Our approach is highly flexible and can be generalised to many other cell models, also including biochemical control.

  14. Copper pathology in vulnerable brain regions in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Katherine M; Bohic, Sylvain; Carmona, Asunción; Ortega, Richard; Cottam, Veronica; Hare, Dominic J; Finberg, John P M; Reyes, Stefanie; Halliday, Glenda M; Mercer, Julian F B; Double, Kay L

    2014-04-01

    Synchrotron-based x-ray fluorescence microscopy, immunofluorescence, and Western blotting were used to investigate changes in copper (Cu) and Cu-associated pathways in the vulnerable substantia nigra (SN) and locus coeruleus (LC) and in nondegenerating brain regions in cases of Parkinson's disease (PD) and appropriate healthy and disease controls. In PD and incidental Lewy body disease, levels of Cu and Cu transporter protein 1, were significantly reduced in surviving neurons in the SN and LC. Specific activity of the cuproprotein superoxide dismutase 1 was unchanged in the SN in PD but was enhanced in the parkinsonian anterior cingulate cortex, a region with α-synuclein pathology, normal Cu, and limited cell loss. These data suggest that regions affected by α-synuclein pathology may display enhanced vulnerability and cell loss if Cu-dependent protective mechanisms are compromised. Additional investigation of copper pathology in PD may identify novel targets for the development of protective therapies for this disorder.

  15. Cell Mechanisms of Bone Tissue Loss Under Space Flight Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodionova, Natalia

    Investigations on the space biosatellites has shown that the bone skeleton is one of the most im-portant targets of the effect space flight factors on the organism. Bone tissue cells were studied by electron microscopy in biosamples of rats' long bones flown on the board american station "SLS-2" and in experiments with modelling of microgravity ("tail suspension" method) with using autoradiography. The analysis of data permits to suppose that the processes of remod-eling in bone tissue at microgravity include the following succession of cell-to-cell interactions. Osteocytes as mechanosensory cells are first who respond to a changing "mechanical field". The next stage is intensification of osteolytic processes in osteocytes, leading to a volume en-largement of the osteocytic lacunae and removal of the "excess bone". Then mechanical signals have been transmitted through a system of canals and processes of the osteocytic syncitium to certain superficial bone zones and are perceived by osteoblasts and bone-lining cells (superficial osteocytes), as well as by the bone-marrow stromal cells. The sensitivity of stromal cells, pre-osteoblasts and osteoblasts, under microgravity was shown in a number of works. As a response to microgravity, the system of stromal cells -preosteoblasts -osteoblasts displays retardation of proliferation, differentiation and specific functions of osteogenetic cells. This is supported by the 3H-thymidine studies of the dynamics of differentiation of osteogenetic cells in remodeling zones. But unloading is not adequate and in part of the osteocytes are apoptotic changes as shown by our electron microscopic investigations. An osteocytic apoptosis can play the role in attraction the osteoclasts and in regulation of bone remodeling. The apoptotic bodies with a liquid flow through a system of canals are transferred to the bone surface, where they fulfil the role of haemoattractants for monocytes come here and form osteoclasts. The osteoclasts destroy

  16. Molecule mechanism of stem cells in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjin Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Plants possess the ability to continually produce new tissues and organs throughout their life. Unlike animals, plants are exposed to extreme variations in environmental conditions over the course of their lives. The vitality of plants is so powerful that they can survive several hundreds of years or even more making it an amazing miracle that comes from plant stem cells. The stem cells continue to divide to renew themselves and provide cells for the formation of leaves, stems, and flowers. Stem cells are not only quiescent but also immortal, pluripotent and homeostatic. Stem cells are the magic cells that repair tissues and regenerate organs. During the past decade, scholars around the world have paid more and more attention toward plant stem cells. At present, the major challenge is in relating molecule action mechanism to root apical meristem, shoot apical meristem and vascular system. The coordination between stem cells maintenance and differentiation is critical for normal plant growth and development. Elements such as phytohormones, transcription factors and some other known or unknown genes cooperate to balance this process. In this review, Arabidopsis thaliana as a pioneer system, we highlight recent developments in molecule modulating, illustrating how plant stem cells generate new mechanistic insights into the regulation of plants growth and development.

  17. Lower activation-induced T-cell apoptosis is related to the pathological immune response in secondary infection with hetero-serotype dengue virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wang; Yan, Huacheng; Ma, Yuling; Yu, Tiantian; Guo, Hongxia; Kuang, Yuchan; Ren, Ruiwen; Li, Jintao

    2016-03-01

    The available evidence suggests that dengue virus-specific T lymphocytes and cytokine storm play a pivotal role in the immunopathogenesis of plasma leakage. Investigations are underway to identify the immune profiles associated with increased or decreased risk for severe disease. In this study, CD14+ cells from the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of patients who recovered from DENV-1 infection were infected with DENV-1 or DENV-2 and co-cultured with memory T cells. We found that secondary infection with DENV-2 suppresses the cell reproductive capacity but forms more cell clones and more functional cells to produce more proinflammatory factors (IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-8, IL-12 and IL-17) and less regulatory cytokines (IL-10, TGF-β) which results in higher viral replication compared to secondary infection with DENV-1. Memory dengue virus-specific T cells which are induced in a primary dengue virus infection are reactivated by the heterologous serotype of dengue virus and antigen-presenting cells (APCs) during a secondary infection. Dramatically, less apoptosis and more continuous activation of T cells in secondary infection with hetero-serotype DENV were observed. This discovery which has not been reported previously may be the reasonable and vital interpretation for the cytokine storm and severe symptoms observed in secondary infection with DENV. In summary, secondary infection with hetero-serotype DENV elicits the relatively pathological immune response while secondary infection with homologous-serotype DENV induces the relatively protective immune response by activation-induced cell death (AICD) of T cells.

  18. Ultrastructural characteristics of novel epithelial cell types identified in human pathologic liver specimens with chronic ductular reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vos, R; Desmet, V

    1992-06-01

    Previous immunohistochemical studies on human liver biopsies with chronic ductular reaction revealed the presence of "small cells" with bile-duct type cytokeratin profile in the periportal area. This study identified similar cells by electron microscopy. The authors studied 13 human liver specimens with various liver diseases, but all characterized by chronic ductular reaction. In all specimens, variable numbers of "small cells" with common epithelial characteristics were identified in the periportal area. They could be classified into three types. Type I cells showed an oval cell shape and oval nucleus, early or established formation of junctional complexes with adjacent cells, a full assortment of cytoplasmic organelles, and bundles of tonofilaments. Type II cells showed features of bile-duct cell differentiation, including lateral interdigitations, apical microvilli, basal pinocytotic vacuoles, and basement membrane formation. In contrast, type III cells displayed additional features indicating hepatocellular differentiation, such as a more prominent nucleus, formation of a hemicanaliculus, and glycogen rosettes. It is concluded that these small cells of epithelial nature display variable differentiation characteristics of either bile-duct type cells or hepatocytes. These findings support the existence of bipotential progenitor epithelial cells in human liver. They may have implications for liver regeneration and carcinogenesis.

  19. Chemo-mechanical control of neural stem cell differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geishecker, Emily R.

    Cellular processes such as adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation are controlled in part by cell interactions with the microenvironment. Cells can sense and respond to a variety of stimuli, including soluble and insoluble factors (such as proteins and small molecules) and externally applied mechanical stresses. Mechanical properties of the environment, such as substrate stiffness, have also been suggested to play an important role in cell processes. The roles of both biochemical and mechanical signaling in fate modification of stem cells have been explored independently. However, very few studies have been performed to study well-controlled chemo-mechanotransduction. The objective of this work is to design, synthesize, and characterize a chemo-mechanical substrate to encourage neuronal differentiation of C17.2 neural stem cells. In Chapter 2, Polyacrylamide (PA) gels of varying stiffnesses are functionalized with differing amounts of whole collagen to investigate the role of protein concentration in combination with substrate stiffness. As expected, neurons on the softest substrate were more in number and neuronal morphology than those on stiffer substrates. Neurons appeared locally aligned with an expansive network of neurites. Additional experiments would allow for statistical analysis to determine if and how collagen density impacts C17.2 differentiation in combination with substrate stiffness. Due to difficulties associated with whole protein approaches, a similar platform was developed using mixed adhesive peptides, derived from fibronectin and laminin, and is presented in Chapter 3. The matrix elasticity and peptide concentration can be individually modulated to systematically probe the effects of chemo-mechanical signaling on differentiation of C17.2 cells. Polyacrylamide gel stiffness was confirmed using rheological techniques and found to support values published by Yeung et al. [1]. Cellular growth and differentiation were assessed by cell counts

  20. [Development of Fluorescence Sensing Mechanism for Cell Functional Analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojida, Akio; Takashima, Ippei

    2016-01-01

      Fluorescence probes are now widely used as indispensable tools in many cell functional analyses. At present, the design of fluorescent probes largely depends on the limited numbers of established sensing mechanisms such as photo-induced electron transfer (PET), photo-induced charge transfer (PCT), and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). Although these mechanisms are versatile in metal ion sensing, introduction of a new sensing mechanism is highly desirable not only to design a more sophisticated probe with high selectivity and sensitivity but also to expand the diversity of the sensing targets to unveil biological phenomena. In this article, we report the design of dual emission fluorescent probes for metal ions based on a unique fluorescence-sensing mechanism. The fluorescent probes incorporating this sensing mechanism displayed a large emission red-shift on complexation with metal ions such as Cd(II) and Ag(I). X-ray crystallography and theoretical computational calculations of the Cd(II) and Ag(I) complexes revealed that the emission shift was induced by non-coordination contact between the aromatic ring of fluorophore and the metal ion (arene-metal ion contact; AM-contact), which modulates the energy levels of molecular orbitals. The fluorescent probe was successfully applied to in cell ratiometric bioimaging of bioactive hydrogen sulfide (H2S). These successful applications highlight the usefulness of this sensing mechanism in biological fluorescence analysis.

  1. Dopaminergic cell death induced by MPP(+), oxidant and specific neurotoxicants shares the common molecular mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, H S; Gibson, G E; DeGiorgio, L A; Zhang, H; Kidd, V J; Son, J H

    2001-02-01

    Recent etiological study in twins (Tanner et al. 1999) strongly suggests that environmental factors play an important role in typical, non-familial Parkinson's disease (PD), beginning after age 50. Epidemiological risk factor analyses of typical PD cases have identified several neurotoxicants, including MPP(+) (the active metabolite of MPTP), paraquat, dieldrin, manganese and salsolinol. Here, we tested the hypothesis that these neurotoxic agents might induce cell death in our nigral dopaminergic cell line, SN4741 (Son et al. 1999) through a common molecular mechanism. Our initial experiments revealed that treatment with both MPP(+) and the other PD-related neurotoxicants induced apoptotic cell death in SN4741 cells, following initial increases of H(2)O(2)-related ROS activity and subsequent activation of JNK1/2 MAP kinases. Moreover, we have demonstrated that during dopaminergic cell death cascades, MPP(+), the neurotoxicants and an oxidant, H(2)O(2) equally induce the ROS-dependent events. Remarkably, the oxidant treatment alone induced similar sequential molecular events: ROS increase, activation of JNK MAP kinases, activation of the PITSLRE kinase, p110, by both Caspase-1 and Caspase-3-like activities and apoptotic cell death. Pharmacological intervention using the combination of the antioxidant Trolox and a pan-caspase inhibitor Boc-(Asp)-fmk (BAF) exerted significant neuroprotection against ROS-induced dopaminergic cell death. Finally, the high throughput cDNA microarray screening using the current model identified downstream response genes, such as heme oxygenase-1, a constituent of Lewy bodies, that can be the useful biomarkers to monitor the pathological conditions of dopaminergic neurons under neurotoxic insult.

  2. Gene expression profiling suggests a pathological role of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells in aging-related skeletal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shih Sheng; Chen, Chung-Hsing; Tseng, Kuo-Yun; Tsai, Fang-Yu; Wang, Ming Jen; Chang, I-Shou; Lin, Jiunn-Liang; Lin, Shankung

    2011-07-01

    Aging is associated with bone loss and degenerative joint diseases, in which the aging of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell (bmMSC)[1] may play an important role. In this study, we analyzed the gene expression profiles of bmMSC from 14 donors between 36 and 74 years old, and obtained age-associated genes (in the background of osteoarthritis) and osteoarthritis-associated genes (in the background of old age). Pathway analysis of these genes suggests that alterations in glycobiology might play an important role in the aging of human bmMSC. On the other hand, antigen presentation and signaling of immune cells were the top pathways enriched by osteoarthritis-associated genes, suggesting that alteration in immunology of bmMSC might be involved in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis. Most intriguingly, we found significant age-associated differential expression of HEXA, HEXB, CTSK, SULF1, ADAMTS5, SPP1, COL8A2, GPNMB, TNFAIP6, and RPL29; those genes have been implicated in the bone loss and the pathology of osteoporosis and osteoarthritis in aging. Collectively, our results suggest a pathological role of bmMSC in aging-related skeletal diseases, and suggest the possibility that alteration in the immunology of bmMSC might also play an important role in the etiology of adult-onset osteoarthritis.

  3. Retinal Angiogenesis Effects of TGF-β1 and Paracrine Factors Secreted From Human Placental Stem Cells in Response to a Pathological Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung-Sul; Park, Ji-Min; Kong, TaeHo; Kim, Chul; Bae, Sang-Hun; Kim, Han Wool; Moon, Jisook

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal angiogenesis is a primary cause of many eye diseases, including diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration, and retinopathy of prematurity. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are currently being investigated as a treatment for several such retinal diseases based on their neuroprotective and angiogenic potentials. In this study, we evaluated the role of systemically injected human placental amniotic membrane-derived MSCs (AMSCs) on pathological neovascularization of proliferative retinopathy. We determined that AMSCs secrete higher levels of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β1) than other MSCs, and the secreted TGF-β1 directly suppresses the proliferation of endothelial cells under pathological conditions in vitro. Moreover, in a mouse model of oxygen-induced retinopathy, intraperitoneally injected AMSCs migrated into the retina and suppressed excessive neovascularization of the vasculature via expression of TGF-β1, and the antineovascular effect of AMSCs was blocked by treatment with TGF-β1 siRNA. These findings are the first to demonstrate that TGF-β1 secreted from AMSCs is one of the key factors to suppress retinal neovascularization in proliferative retinopathy and further elucidate the therapeutic function of AMSCs for the treatment of retinal neovascular diseases.

  4. Notch1-Dll4 signalling and mechanical force regulate leader cell formation during collective cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riahi, Reza; Sun, Jian; Wang, Shue; Long, Min; Zhang, Donna D; Wong, Pak Kin

    2015-03-13

    At the onset of collective cell migration, a subset of cells within an initially homogenous population acquires a distinct 'leader' phenotype with characteristic morphology and motility. However, the factors driving the leader cell formation as well as the mechanisms regulating leader cell density during the migration process remain to be determined. Here we use single-cell gene expression analysis and computational modelling to show that the leader cell identity is dynamically regulated by Dll4 signalling through both Notch1 and cellular stress in a migrating epithelium. Time-lapse microscopy reveals that Dll4 is induced in leader cells after the creation of the cell-free region and leader cells are regulated via Notch1-Dll4 lateral inhibition. Furthermore, mechanical stress inhibits Dll4 expression and leader cell formation in the monolayer. Collectively, our findings suggest that a reduction of mechanical force near the boundary promotes Notch1-Dll4 signalling to dynamically regulate the density of leader cells during collective cell migration.

  5. Cell death mechanisms vary with photodynamic therapy dose and photosensitizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jin; Oleinick, Nancy L.

    1995-03-01

    Mouse lymphoma L5178Y-R cells respond to photodynamic therapy (PDT) by undergoing rapid apoptosis, which is induced by PDT-activated signal transduction initiating in the damaged cellular membranes. To relate the level of PDT damage and photosensitizer to the mechanism of cell death, apoptosis has been detected by agarose gel electrophoresis of fragmented DNA and quantified by flow cytometry of cells after staining with Hoechst33342 and propidium iodide, a technique which can distinguish between live, apoptotic, and necrotic cells. When the silicon phthalocyanine Pc 4 or Pc 12 served as photosensitizer, lethal doses (as defined by clonogenic assay) of PDT induced apoptosis in essentially all cells, whereas supralethal doses prevented the characteristic degradation of DNA into oligonucleosomal fragments. In contrast with aluminum phthalocyanine (AlPc) cells died by apoptosis after all doses studied. It appears that high PDT doses with Pc 4 or Pc 12 damage enzymes needed to carry out the program of apoptosis; the absence of this effect with AlPc suggests either a different intracellular location or different photocytotoxic mechanism for the two photosensitizers.

  6. Interferon Regulator Factor 8 (IRF8 Limits Ocular Pathology during HSV-1 Infection by Restraining the Activation and Expansion of CD8+ T Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Sun

    Full Text Available Interferon Regulatory Factor-8 (IRF8 is constitutively expressed in monocytes and B cell lineages and plays important roles in immunity to pathogens and cancer. Although IRF8 expression is induced in activated T cells, the functional relevance of IRF8 in T cell-mediated immunity is not well understood. In this study, we used mice with targeted deletion of Irf8 in T-cells (IRF8KO to investigate the role of IRF8 in T cell-mediated responses during herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1 infection of the eye. In contrast to wild type mice, HSV-1-infected IRF8KO mice mounted a more robust anti-HSV-1 immune response, which included marked expansion of HSV-1-specific CD8+ T cells, increased infiltration of inflammatory cells into the cornea and trigeminal ganglia (TG and enhanced elimination of virus within the trigeminal ganglion. However, the consequence of the enhanced immunological response was the development of ocular inflammation, limbitis, and neutrophilic infiltration into the cornea of HSV-1-infected IRF8KO mice. Surprisingly, we observed a marked increase in virus-specific memory precursor effector cells (MPEC in IRF8KO mice, suggesting that IRF8 might play a role in regulating the differentiation of effector CD8+ T cells to the memory phenotype. Together, our data suggest that IRF8 might play a role in restraining excess lymphocyte proliferation. Thus, modulating IRF8 levels in T cells can be exploited therapeutically to prevent immune-mediated ocular pathology during autoimmune and infectious diseases of the eye.

  7. Mechanisms and chemical induction of aneuploidy in rodent germ cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mailhes, J B; Marchetti, F

    2004-10-15

    The objective of this review is to suggest that the advances being made in our understanding of the molecular events surrounding chromosome segregation in non-mammalian and somatic cell models be considered when designing experiments for studying aneuploidy in mammalian germ cells. Accurate chromosome segregation requires the temporal control and unique interactions among a vast array of proteins and cellular organelles. Abnormal function and temporal disarray among these, and others to be inidentified, biochemical reactions and cellular organelles have the potential for predisposing cells to aneuploidy. Although numerous studies have demonstrated that certain chemicals (mainly those that alter microtubule function) can induce aneuploidy in mammalian germ cells, it seems relevant to point out that such data can be influenced by gender, meiotic stage, and time of cell-fixation post-treatment. Additionally, a consensus has not been reached regarding which of several germ cell aneuploidy assays most accurately reflects the human condition. More recent studies have shown that certain kinase, phosphatase, proteasome, and topoisomerase inhibitors can also induce aneuploidy in rodent germ cells. We suggest that molecular approaches be prudently incorporated into mammalian germ cell aneuploidy research in order to eventually understand the causes and mechanisms of human aneuploidy. Such an enormous undertaking would benefit from collaboration among scientists representing several disciplines.

  8. Primary and Secondary T-cell Lymphomas of the Breast: Clinico-pathologic Features of 11 Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gualco, Gabriela; Chioato, Lucimara; Harrington, William J.; Weiss, Lawrence M.; Bacchi, Carlos E.

    2009-01-01

    Breast involvement by non-Hodgkin lymphomas is rare, and exceptional for T-cell lymphomas; we studied the morphologic, immunophenotypic, and clinical features of 11 patients with T-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas involving the breast. Four cases fulfilled the definition criteria for primary breast lymphomas, 3 females and 1 male, with a median age of 51 years. One primary breast lymphomas was T-cell lymphoma unspecified, other was subcutaneous panniculitis-like T-cell lymphoma, and 2 cases were anaplastic large cell lymphomas. One of the anaplastic large cell lymphoma cases was found surrounding a silicone breast implant and presented as clinically as mastitis; whereas the other case occurred in a man. T-cell lymphoma secondarily involved the breast in 7 patients, all women and 1 bilateral, with a median age of 29 years. These secondary breast lymphomas occurred as part of widespread nodal or leukemic disease. Three patients had adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma, including the patient with bilateral lesions, 3 others had precursor T-lymphoblastic lymphoma/leukemia, and the other presented with a peripheral-T-cell lymphoma nonotherwise specified type. Breast T-cell lymphomas are very infrequent and are morphologically and clinically heterogeneous. PMID:19318917

  9. Primary and secondary T-cell lymphomas of the breast: clinico-pathologic features of 11 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gualco, Gabriela; Chioato, Lucimara; Harrington, William J; Weiss, Lawrence M; Bacchi, Carlos E

    2009-07-01

    Breast involvement by non-Hodgkin lymphomas is rare, and exceptional for T-cell lymphomas; we studied the morphologic, immunophenotypic, and clinical features of 11 patients with T-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas involving the breast. Four cases fulfilled the definition criteria for primary breast lymphomas, 3 females and 1 male, with a median age of 51 years. One primary breast lymphomas was T-cell lymphoma unspecified, other was subcutaneous panniculitis-like T-cell lymphoma, and 2 cases were anaplastic large cell lymphomas. One of the anaplastic large cell lymphoma cases was found surrounding a silicone breast implant and presented as clinically as mastitis; whereas the other case occurred in a man. T-cell lymphoma secondarily involved the breast in 7 patients, all women and 1 bilateral, with a median age of 29 years. These secondary breast lymphomas occurred as part of widespread nodal or leukemic disease. Three patients had adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma, including the patient with bilateral lesions, 3 others had precursor T-lymphoblastic lymphoma/leukemia, and the other presented with a peripheral-T-cell lymphoma non otherwise specified type. Breast T-cell lymphomas are very infrequent and are morphologically and clinically heterogeneous.

  10. Hip-spine syndrome:pathological base and biomechanics mechanism%髋-腰综合征病理基础及生物力学机制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王强; 赵文杰; 张斌; 戴闽

    2015-01-01

    背景:研究发现,髋关节骨性关节炎患者全髋关节置换后下腰痛的症状得到一定缓解,提示下肢力线的改变对于腰痛症状具有明显的影响。目的:就髋-腰综合征的病理基础与生物力学机制进行综述并予以分析。方法:计算机检索1976年1月至2015年3月PubMed数据库、中国期刊全文数据库的相关文章,英文检索词“low back pain,hip-spine syndrome,hip osteoarthritis,total hip replacement,biomechanics,balance parameters”;中文检索词“下腰痛,髋-腰综合征,髋骨关节炎,髋关节置换,生物力学,平衡参数”。排除重复性研究及部分相关性较低的基础类文章。结果与结论:共计检索出145篇中英文文献,最终选择62篇文献进行综述。在病理生理中,肿瘤坏死因子α、白细胞介素1β和基质金属蛋白酶等对髋-腰综合征的发生发展起着十分重要的作用。而生物力学中,脊柱-骨盆-下肢平衡代偿过程成为髋-腰综合征的主要力学机制,其平衡参数可为髋-腰综合征的诊断,治疗及术后评估提供依据。%BACKGROUND:Low back pain in patients with hip osteoarthritis can be relieved to some extent after total hip arthroplasty, indicating the changes in limb line of force have obvious effects on low back pain. OBJECTIVE:To review and analysis the pathological base and biomechanics mechanism of hip-spine syndrome. METHODS: We retrieved PubMed database and China National Knowledge Infrastructure for related articles published from January 1976 to March 2015. The key words were “low back pain, hip-spine syndrome, hip osteoarthritis, total hip replacement, biomechanics, balance parameters” in English and Chinese, respectively. Repeated studies and unrelated articles were excluded. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION:A total of 145 articles were retrieved, and finaly 62 articles were enroled in result analysis. In the pathophysiology, tumor necrosis

  11. Measuring the Mechanical Properties of Plant Cell Walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannes Vogler

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The size, shape and stability of a plant depend on the flexibility and integrity of its cell walls, which, at the same time, need to allow cell expansion for growth, while maintaining mechanical stability. Biomechanical studies largely vanished from the focus of plant science with the rapid progress of genetics and molecular biology since the mid-twentieth century. However, the development of more sensitive measurement tools renewed the interest in plant biomechanics in recent years, not only to understand the fundamental concepts of growth and morphogenesis, but also with regard to economically important areas in agriculture, forestry and the paper industry. Recent advances have clearly demonstrated that mechanical forces play a crucial role in cell and organ morphogenesis, which ultimately define plant morphology. In this article, we will briefly review the available methods to determine the mechanical properties of cell walls, such as atomic force microscopy (AFM and microindentation assays, and discuss their advantages and disadvantages. But we will focus on a novel methodological approach, called cellular force microscopy (CFM, and its automated successor, real-time CFM (RT-CFM.

  12. B cell epitope spreading: mechanisms and contribution to autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornaby, Caleb; Gibbons, Lauren; Mayhew, Vera; Sloan, Chad S; Welling, Andrew; Poole, Brian D

    2015-01-01

    While a variety of factors act to trigger or initiate autoimmune diseases, the process of epitope spreading is an important contributor in their development. Epitope spreading is a diversification of the epitopes recognized by the immune system. This process happens to both T and B cells, with this review focusing on B cells. Such spreading can progress among multiple epitopes on a single antigen, or from one antigenic molecule to another. Systemic lupus erythematosus, multiple sclerosis, pemphigus, bullous pemphigoid and other autoimmune diseases, are all influenced by intermolecular and intramolecular B cell epitope spreading. Endocytic processing, antigen presentation, and somatic hypermutation act as molecular mechanisms that assist in driving epitope spreading and broadening the immune response in autoimmune diseases. The purpose of this review is to summarize our current understanding of B cell epitope spreading with regard to autoimmunity, how it contributes during the progression of various autoimmune diseases, and treatment options available.

  13. [Sponge cell reaggregation: mechanisms and dynamics of the process].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavrov, A I; Kosevich, I A

    2014-01-01

    Sponges (Porifera) are lower metazoans whose organization is characterized by a high plasticity of anatomical and cellular structures. One of the manifestations of this plasticity is the ability of sponge cells to reaggregate after dissociation of tissues. This review brings together the available data on the reaggregation of sponge cells that have been obtained to date since the beginning of the 20th century. It considers the behavior of dissociated cells in suspension, the mechanisms and factors involved in reaggregation, and the rate and stages of this process in different representatives of this phylum. In addition, this review provides information about the histological structure of multicellular aggregates formed during reaggregation of cells and the regenerative morphogenetic processes leading to the formation of normal sponges from these multicellular aggregates.

  14. A three-dimensional finite element model for the mechanics of cell-cell interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viens, Denis; Brodland, G Wayne

    2007-10-01

    Technical challenges, including significant ones associated with cell rearrangement, have hampered the development of three-dimensional finite element models for the mechanics of embryonic cells. These challenges have been overcome by a new formulation in which the contents of each cell, assumed to have a viscosity mu, are modeled using a system of orthogonal dashpots. This approach overcomes a stiffening artifact that affects more traditional models, in which space-filling viscous elements are used to model the cytoplasm. Cells are assumed to be polyhedral in geometry, and each n-sided polygonal face is subdivided into n triangles with a common node at the face center so that it needs not remain flat. A constant tension gamma is assumed to act along each cell-cell interface, and cell rearrangements occur through one of two complementary topological transformations. The formulation predicts mechanical interactions between pairs of similar or dissimilar cells that are consistent with experiments, two-dimensional simulations, contact angle theory, and intracellular pressure calculations. Simulations of the partial engulfment of one tissue type by another show that the formulation is able to model aggregates of several hundred cells without difficulty. Simulations carried out using this formulation suggest new experimental approaches for measuring cell surface tensions and interfacial tensions. The formulation holds promise as a tool for gaining insight into the mechanics of isolated or aggregated embryonic cells and for the design and interpretation of experiments that involve them.

  15. Ultrastructural characteristics of novel epithelial cell types identified in human pathologic liver specimens with chronic ductular reaction.

    OpenAIRE

    De Vos, R; Desmet, V

    1992-01-01

    Previous immunohistochemical studies on human liver biopsies with chronic ductular reaction revealed the presence of "small cells" with bile-duct type cytokeratin profile in the periportal area. This study identified similar cells by electron microscopy. The authors studied 13 human liver specimens with various liver diseases, but all characterized by chronic ductular reaction. In all specimens, variable numbers of "small cells" with common epithelial characteristics were identified in the pe...

  16. Particle-Rich Cytoplasmic Structure (PaCS): Identification, Natural History, Role in Cell Biology and Pathology

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Cytoplasmic structures showing a selective concentration of both polyubiquitinated proteins and proteasome have been described in various epithelial, hematopoietic, mesenchymal and neural cells in vitro or in fetal tissues, as well as in chronically-infected, mutated preneoplastic and neoplastic tissues. These cytoplasmic structures differ from other ubiquitin-reactive cytoplasmic bodies, like sequestosomes, aggresome-like-induced structures in dendritic cells (DALIS)/non-dendritic cells (AL...

  17. Quantification of stromal vascular cell mechanics with a linear cell monolayer rheometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elkins, Claire M., E-mail: cma9@stanford.edu; Fuller, Gerald G. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Shen, Wen-Jun; Khor, Victor K.; Kraemer, Fredric B. [Division of Endocrinology, Gerontology and Metabolism, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 and Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, California 94304 (United States)

    2015-01-15

    Over the past few decades researchers have developed a variety of methods for measuring the mechanical properties of whole cells, including traction force microscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and single-cell tensile testing. Though each of these techniques provides insight into cell mechanics, most also involve some nonideal conditions for acquiring live cell data, such as probing only one portion of a cell at a time, or placing the cell in a nonrepresentative geometry during testing. In the present work, we describe the development of a linear cell monolayer rheometer (LCMR) and its application to measure the mechanics of a live, confluent monolayer of stromal vascular cells. In the LCMR, a monolayer of cells is contacted on both top and bottom by two collagen-coated plates and allowed to adhere. The top plate then shears the monolayer by stepping forward to induce a predetermined step strain, while a force transducer attached to the top plate collects stress information. The stress and strain data are then used to determine the maximum relaxation modulus recorded after step-strain, G{sub r}{sup 0}, referred to as the zero-time relaxation modulus of the cell monolayer. The present study validates the ability of the LCMR to quantify cell mechanics by measuring the change in G{sub r}{sup 0} of a confluent cell monolayer upon the selective inhibition of three major cytoskeletal components (actin microfilaments, vimentin intermediate filaments, and microtubules). The LCMR results indicate that both actin- and vimentin-deficient cells had ∼50% lower G{sub r}{sup 0} values than wild-type, whereas tubulin deficiency resulted in ∼100% higher G{sub r}{sup 0} values. These findings constitute the first use of a cell monolayer rheometer to quantitatively distinguish the roles of different cytoskeletal elements in maintaining cell stiffness and structure. Significantly, they are consistent with results obtained using single-cell mechanical testing methods

  18. Mechanical behaviour of PEM fuel cell catalyst layers during regular cell operation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maher A.R. Sadiq Al-Baghdadi

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Damage mechanisms in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell are accelerated by mechanical stresses arising during fuel cell assembly (bolt assembling, and the stresses arise during fuel cell running, because it consists of the materials with different thermal expansion and swelling coefficients. Therefore, in order to acquire a complete understanding of the mechanical behaviour of the catalyst layers during regular cell operation, mechanical response under steady-state hygro-thermal stresses should be studied under real cell operating conditions and in real cell geometry (three-dimensional. In this work, full three-dimensional, non-isothermal computational fluid dynamics model of a PEM fuel cell has been developed to investigate the behaviour of the cathode and anode catalyst layers during the cell operation. A unique feature of the present model is to incorporate the effect of hygro and thermal stresses into actual three-dimensional fuel cell model. In addition, the temperature and humidity dependent material properties are utilize in the simulation for the membrane. The model is shown to be able to understand the many interacting, complex electrochemical, transport phenomena, and deformation that have limited experimental data.

  19. Structure and mechanics of proteins from single molecules to cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Andre E.

    2009-07-01

    Physical factors drive evolution and play important roles in motility and attachment as well as in differentiation. As animal cells adhere to survive, they generate force and "feel" various mechanical features of their surroundings and respond to externally applied forces. This mechanosensitivity requires a substrate for cells to adhere to and a mechanism for cells to apply force, followed by a cellular response to the mechanical properties of the substrate. We have taken an outside-in approach to characterize several aspects of cellular mechanosensitivity. First, we used single molecule force spectroscopy to measure how fibrinogen, an extracellular matrix protein that forms the scaffold of blood clots, responds to applied force and found that it rapidly unfolds in 23 nm steps at forces around 100 pN. Second, we used tensile testing to measure the force-extension behavior of fibrin gels and found that they behave almost linearly to strains of over 100%, have extensibilities of 170 +/- 15%, and undergo a large volume decrease that corresponds to a large and negative peak in compressibility at low strain, which indicates a structural transition. Using electron microscopy and X-ray scattering we concluded that these properties are likely due to coiled-coil unfolding, as observed at the single molecule level in fibrinogen. Moving inside cells, we used total internal reflection fluorescence and atomic force microscopy to image self-assembled myosin filaments. These filaments of motor proteins that are responsible for cell and muscle contractility were found to be asymmetric, with an average of 32% more force generating heads on one half than the other. This could imply a force imbalance, so that rather than being simply contractile, myosin filaments may also be motile in cells.

  20. Fundamental electronic mechanisms limiting the performance of solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindholm, F. A.; Sah, C.-T.

    1977-01-01

    Attention is focused on distortion in the energy band, and carrier recombination and generation rates (lifetimes), as the two dominant mechanisms. Spatial dependences associated with these two mechanisms, in the direction normal to the surface illuminated by the sun and in the direction tangential to that surface, are also emphasized as crucial factors in governing the efficiency of solar cells. Electronic parameters for the set of differential equations characterizing transport, recombination, and generation of carriers, and interband and band-bound transition rates, are studied.

  1. The Danish Pathology Register

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Beth; Larsen, Ole B

    2011-01-01

    The National Board of Health, Denmark in 1997 published guidelines for reporting of pathology data and the Danish Pathology Register (DPR) was established.......The National Board of Health, Denmark in 1997 published guidelines for reporting of pathology data and the Danish Pathology Register (DPR) was established....

  2. Mechanical-Electrochemical-Thermal Simulation of Lithium-Ion Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santhanagopalan, Shriram; Zhang, Chao; Sprague, Michael A.; Pesaran, Ahmad

    2016-06-01

    Models capture the force response for single-cell and cell-string levels to within 15%-20% accuracy and predict the location for the origin of failure based on the deformation data from the experiments. At the module level, there is some discrepancy due to poor mechanical characterization of the packaging material between the cells. The thermal response (location and value of maximum temperature) agrees qualitatively with experimental data. In general, the X-plane results agree with model predictions to within 20% (pending faulty thermocouples, etc.); the Z-plane results show a bigger variability both between the models and test-results, as well as among multiple repeats of the tests. The models are able to capture the timing and sequence in voltage drop observed in the multi-cell experiments; the shapes of the current and temperature profiles need more work to better characterize propagation. The cells within packaging experience about 60% less force under identical impact test conditions, so the packaging on the test articles is robust. However, under slow-crush simulations, the maximum deformation of the cell strings with packaging is about twice that of cell strings without packaging.

  3. A novel mechanism of methylglyoxal cytotoxicity in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antognelli, Cinzia; Mezzasoma, Letizia; Fettucciari, Katia; Talesa, Vincenzo Nicola

    2013-04-01

    Methylglyoxal is one of the most powerful glycating agents of proteins and other important cellular components and has been shown to be toxic to cultured cells. Methylglyoxal cytotoxicity appears to occur through cell-cycle arrest but, more often, through induction of apoptosis. In this study we examined whether, and through which molecular mechanism, methylglyoxal affects the growth of poorly aggressive LNCaP and invasive PC3 human prostate cancer cells, where its role has not been exhaustively investigated yet. We demonstrated that methylglyoxal is cytotoxic on LNCaP and PC3 and that such cytotoxicity occurs not via cell proliferation but apoptosis control. Moreover, we demonstrated that methylglyoxal cytotoxicity, potentiated by the silencing of its major scavenging enzyme Glyoxalase I, occurred via different apoptotic responses in LNCaP and PC3 cells that also showed a different susceptibility to this metabolite. Finally, we showed that the observed methylglyoxal apoptogenic role involved different molecular pathways, specifically mediated by methylglyoxal or methylglyoxal-derived argpyrimidine intracellular accumulation and NF-kB signaling-pathway. In particular, in LNCaP cells, methylglyoxal, through the accumulation of argpyrimidine, desensitized the key cell survival NF-kB signaling pathway, which was consistent with the modulation of NF-kB-regulated genes, triggering a mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. The results suggest that this physiological compound merits investigation as a potential chemo-preventive/-therapeutic agent, in differently aggressive prostate cancers.

  4. On the Mechanism of Light Transmission by Muller Cells

    CERN Document Server

    Makarov, Vladimir; Khmelinskii, Igor; Inyushin, Mikhail

    2015-01-01

    We report that Muller cells contain bundles of long specialized intermediate filaments about 10 nm in diameter; most likely, these filaments are the channels providing light transmission to photoreceptor cells in mammalian and avian retinas. We interpret transmission of light in such channels using the notions of quantum confinement, describing energy transport in structures with electro-conductive walls and diameter much smaller than the wavelength of the respective photons. Model calculations produce photon transmission efficiency in such channels exceeding 0.8, in optimized geometry. We infer that protein molecules make up the channels, proposing a qualitative mechanism of light transmission by such structures.

  5. Handling and staging of renal cell carcinoma: the International Society of Urological Pathology Consensus (ISUP) conference recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trpkov, Kiril; Grignon, David J; Bonsib, Stephen M; Amin, Mahul B; Billis, Athanase; Lopez-Beltran, Antonio; Samaratunga, Hemamali; Tamboli, Pheroze; Delahunt, Brett; Egevad, Lars; Montironi, Rodolfo; Srigley, John R

    2013-10-01

    The International Society of Urologic Pathology 2012 Consensus Conference on renal cancer, through working group 3, focused on the issues of staging and specimen handling of renal tumors. The conference was preceded by an online survey of the International Society of Urologic Pathology members, and the results of this were used to inform the focus of conference discussion. On formal voting a ≥65% majority was considered a consensus agreement. For specimen handling it was agreed that with radical nephrectomy specimens the initial cut should be made along the long axis and that both radical and partial nephrectomy specimens should be inked. It was recommended that sampling of renal tumors should follow a general guideline of sampling 1 block/cm with a minimum of 3 blocks (subject to modification as needed in individual cases). When measuring a renal tumor, the length of a renal vein/caval thrombus should not be part of the measurement of the main tumor mass. In cases with multiple tumors, sampling should include at a minimum the 5 largest tumors. There was a consensus that perinephric fat invasion should be determined by examining multiple perpendicular sections of the tumor/perinephric fat interface and by sampling areas suspicious for invasion. Perinephric fat invasion was defined as either the tumor touching the fat or extending as irregular tongues into the perinephric tissue, with or without desmoplasia. It was agreed upon that renal sinus invasion is present when the tumor is in direct contact with the sinus fat or the loose connective tissue of the sinus, clearly beyond the renal parenchyma, or if there is involvement of any endothelium-lined spaces within the renal sinus, regardless of the size. When invasion of the renal sinus is uncertain, it was recommended that at least 3 blocks of the tumor-renal sinus interface should be submitted. If invasion is grossly evident, or obviously not present (small peripheral tumor), it was agreed that only 1 block was

  6. A tale of two plaques: convergent mechanisms of T-cell-mediated inflammation in psoriasis and atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, April W; Voyles, Stephanie V; Armstrong, Ehrin J; Fuller, Erin N; Rutledge, John C

    2011-07-01

    Psoriasis and atherosclerosis are diseases in which effector T lymphocytes such as Helper T cells type 1 (Th1) and 17 (Th17) play integral roles in disease pathogenesis and progression. Regulatory T cells (Treg) also exert clinically important anti-inflammatory effects that are pathologically altered in psoriasis and atherosclerosis. We review the immunological pathways involving Th1, Th17 and Treg cells that are common to psoriasis and atherosclerosis. These shared pathways provide the basis for mechanisms that may explain the epidemiologic observation that patients with psoriasis have an increased risk of heart disease. Improved understanding of these pathways will guide future experiments and may lead to the development of therapeutics that prevent or treat cardiovascular complications in patients with psoriasis.

  7. Pathology of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijgen, Sandrine; Terris, Benoit

    2017-01-01

    Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (iCC) is a primary carcinoma of the liver with increasing significance and major pathogenic, clinical and therapeutic challenges. Classically, it arises from malignant transformation of cholangiocytes bordering small portal bile duct (BD) to second-order segmental large BDs. It has three major macroscopic growth pattern [mass-forming (MF), periductal infiltrative (PI), and intraductal growth (IG)] and histologically is a desmoplastic stroma-rich adenocarcinoma with cholangiocyte differentiation. Recent data pointed out noteworthy degree of heterogeneity in regards of their epidemiology and risk factors, pathological and molecular features, pathogenesis, clinical behaviors and treatment. Notably, several histological variants are described and can coexist within the same tumor. Several different cells of origin have also been depicted in a fraction of iCCs, amongst which malignant transformation of ductules, of hepatic stem/progenitor cells, of periductal glands or through oncogenic reprogramming of adult hepatocytes. A degree of pathological overlap with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) may be observed in a portion of iCC. A series of precursor lesions are today characterized and emphasize the existence of a multistep carcinogenesis process. Overall, these new data have brought up in proposal of new histological or molecular classifications, which could soon replace current anatomic-based classification and could have major impact on establishment of prognosis and on development of novel target treatment approaches. PMID:28261592

  8. Fatigue and Mechanical Damage Propagation in Automotive PEM Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banan, Roshanak

    Polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells are generally exposed to high magnitude road-induced vibrations and impact loads, frequent humidity-temperature loading cycles, and freeze/thaw stresses when employed in automotive applications. The resultant mechanical stresses can play a significant role in the evolution of mechanical defects in the membrane electrode assembly (MEA). The focus of this research is to investigate fatigue challenges due to humidity-temperature (hygrothermal) cycles and vibrations and their effects on damage evolution in PEM fuel cells. To achieve this goal, this thesis is divided into three parts that provide insight into damage propagation in the MEA under i) hygrothermal cycles, ii) external applied vibrations, and iii) a combination of both to simulate realistic automotive conditions. A finite element damage model based on cohesive zone theory was developed to simulate the propagation of micro-scale defects (cracks and delaminations) in the MEA under fuel cell operating conditions. It was found that the micro-defects can propagate to critical states under start-up and shut-down cycles, prior to reaching the desired lifespan of the fuel cell. The simultaneous presence of hygrothermal cycles and vibrations severely intensified damage propagation and resulted in considerably large defects within 75% of the fuel cell life expectancy. However, the order of generated damage was found to be larger under hygrothermal cycles than vibrations. Under hygrothermal cycles, membrane crack propagation was more severe compared to delamination propagation. Conversely, the degrading influence of vibrations was more significant on delaminations. The presence of an anode/cathode channel offset under the combined loadings lead to a 2.5-fold increase in the delamination length compared to the aligned-channel case. The developed model can be used to investigate the damage behaviour of current materials employed in fuel cells as well as to evaluate the

  9. [Mechanism research on the lupeol treatment on MCF-7 breast cancer cells based on cell metabonomics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Dongdong; Kuang, Yuanyuan; Wang, Guiming; Peng, Zhangxiao; Wang, Yan; Yan, Chao

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this research is to investigate the suppressive effects of lupeol on MCF-7 breast cancer cells, and explore its mechanism on inhibiting the proliferation of MCF-7 cells based on cell metabonomics and cell cycle. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was used in the cell metabonomics assay to identify metabolites of MCF-7 cells and MCF-7 cells treated with lupeol. Then, orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) was used to process the metabolic data and model parameters of OPLS-DA were as follows: R2Ycum = 0.988, Q2Ycum = 0.964, which indicated that these two groups could be distinguished clearly. The metabolites (VIP (variable importance in the projection) > 1) were analyzed by t-test, and finally, metabolites (t < 0.05) were identified to be biomarkers. Eleven metabolites such as butanedioic acid, phosphoric acid, L-leucine and isoleucine which had a significant contribution to classification were selected and preliminarily identified due to the accurate mass. Cell cycle assay was analyzed by FACSCalibur. Since the cells in the phase of G1 were increased significantly after the treatment of lupeol, we speculated that lupeol has a blocking effect on the generation of succinyl-CoA and the reaction of substrate phosphorylation of tricarboxylic acid cycle of MCF-7 cells. This study provided a novel approach to the mechanism research on the lupeol treatment on MCF-7 breast cancer cells based on cell metabonomics.

  10. Mechanical behavior of cells within a cell-based model of wheat leaf growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulyana Zubairova

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the principles and mechanisms of cell growth coordination in plant tissue remains an outstanding challenge for modern developmental biology. Cell-based modeling is a widely used technique for studying the geometric and topological features of plant tissue morphology during growth. We developed a quasi-one-dimensional model of unidirectional growth of a tissue layer in a linear leaf blade that takes cell autonomous growth mode into account. The model allows for fitting of the visible cell length using the experimental cell length distribution along the longitudinal axis of a wheat leaf epidermis. Additionally, it describes changes in turgor and osmotic pressures for each cell in the growing tissue. Our numerical experiments show that the pressures in the cell change over the cell cycle, and in symplastically growing tissue, they vary from cell to cell and strongly depend on the leaf growing zone to which the cells belong. Therefore, we believe that the mechanical signals generated by pressures are important to consider in simulations of tissue growth as possible targets for molecular genetic regulators of individual cell growth.

  11. Mechanisms of ethanol-induced death of cerebellar granule cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jia

    2012-03-01

    Maternal ethanol exposure during pregnancy may cause fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). FASD is the leading cause of mental retardation. The most deleterious effect of fetal alcohol exposure is inducing neuroapoptosis in the developing brain. Ethanol-induced loss of neurons in the central nervous system underlies many of the behavioral deficits observed in FASD. The cerebellum is one of the brain areas that are most susceptible to ethanol during development. Ethanol exposure causes a loss of both cerebellar Purkinje cells and granule cells. This review focuses on the toxic effect of ethanol on cerebellar granule cells (CGC) and the underlying mechanisms. Both in vitro and in vivo studies indicate that ethanol induces apoptotic death of CGC. The vulnerability of CGC to ethanol-induced death diminishes over time as neurons mature. Several mechanisms for ethanol-induced apoptosis of CGC have been suggested. These include inhibition of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, interference with signaling by neurotrophic factors, induction of oxidative stress, modulation of retinoid acid signaling, disturbance of potassium channel currents, thiamine deficiency, and disruption of translational regulation. Cultures of CGC provide an excellent system to investigate cellular/molecular mechanisms of ethanol-induced neurodegeneration and to evaluate interventional strategies. This review will also discuss the approaches leading to neuroprotection against ethanol-induced neuroapoptosis.

  12. Molecular mechanisms of cholangiocarcinoma cell inhibition by medicinal plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leelawat, Surang; Leelawat, Kawin

    2017-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is one of the most common causes of cancer-associated mortality in Thailand. Certain phytochemicals have been demonstrated to modulate apoptotic signaling pathways, which may be targeted for the prevention and treatment of cancer. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of specific medicinal plants on the inhibition of CCA cell proliferation, and to identify the molecular mechanisms underlying this. A WST-1 cell proliferation assay was performed using an RMCCA1 cell line, and apoptotic signaling pathways were also investigated using a PathScan Stress and Apoptosis Signaling Antibody Array Kit. The cell proliferation assay indicated that extracts from the Phyllanthus emblica fruit pulp (PEf), Phyllanthus emblica seed (PEs), Terminalia chebula fruit pulp (TCf), Terminalia chebula seed (TCs), Areca catechu seed (ACs), Curcuma longa (CL) and Moringa oleifera seed (MOs) exerted anti-proliferative activity in RMCCA1 cells. In addition, the PathScan assay revealed that certain pro-apoptotic molecules, including caspase-3, poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase, checkpoint kinase 2 and tumor protein 53, exhibited increased activity in RMCCA1 cells treated with the aforementioned selected plant extracts, with the exception of PEf. The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways (including ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK) expression level was significantly increased in RMCCA1 cells pre-treated with extracts of PEs, TCf, CL and MOs. The activation of protein kinase B (Akt) was significantly demonstrated in RMCCA1 cells pre-treated with extracts of TCf, ACs and MOs. In summary, the present study demonstrated that extracts of PEs, TCf, TCs, ACs, CL and MOs exhibited anti-proliferative effects in CCA cells by inducing pro-apoptotic signals and modulating signal transduction molecules. Further studies in vivo are required to demonstrate the potential applications of specific plant extracts for the treatment of human cancer.

  13. Mechanical roles of apical constriction, cell elongation, and cell migration during neural tube formation in Xenopus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Yasuhiro; Suzuki, Makoto; Watanabe, Tadashi; Yasue, Naoko; Tateo, Itsuki; Adachi, Taiji; Ueno, Naoto

    2016-12-01

    Neural tube closure is an important and necessary process during the development of the central nervous system. The formation of the neural tube structure from a flat sheet of neural epithelium requires several cell morphogenetic events and tissue dynamics to account for the mechanics of tissue deformation. Cell elongation changes cuboidal cells into columnar cells, and apical constriction then causes them to adopt apically narrow, wedge-like shapes. In addition, the neural plate in Xenopus is stratified, and the non-neural cells in the deep layer (deep cells) pull the overlying superficial cells, eventually bringing the two layers of cells to the midline. Thus, neural tube closure appears to be a complex event in which these three physical events are considered to play key mechanical roles. To test whether these three physical events are mechanically sufficient to drive neural tube formation, we employed a three-dimensional vertex model and used it to simulate the process of neural tube closure. The results suggest that apical constriction cued the bending of the neural plate by pursing the circumference of the apical surface of the neural cells. Neural cell elongation in concert with apical constriction further narrowed the apical surface of the cells and drove the rapid folding of the neural plate, but was insufficient for complete neural tube closure. Migration of the deep cells provided the additional tissue deformation necessary for closure. To validate the model, apical constriction and cell elongation were inhibited in Xenopus laevis embryos. The resulting cell and tissue shapes resembled the corresponding simulation results.

  14. Cell model for efficient simulation of wave propagation in human ventricular tissue under normal and pathological conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tusscher, K H W J Ten; Panfilov, A V [Department of Theoretical Biology, Utrecht University, Padualaan 8, 3584 CH Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2006-12-07

    In this paper, we formulate a model for human ventricular cells that is efficient enough for whole organ arrhythmia simulations yet detailed enough to capture the effects of cell level processes such as current blocks and channelopathies. The model is obtained from our detailed human ventricular cell model by using mathematical techniques to reduce the number of variables from 19 to nine. We carefully compare our full and reduced model at the single cell, cable and 2D tissue level and show that the reduced model has a very similar behaviour. Importantly, the new model correctly produces the effects of current blocks and channelopathies on AP and spiral wave behaviour, processes at the core of current day arrhythmia research. The new model is well over four times more efficient than the full model. We conclude that the new model can be used for efficient simulations of the effects of current changes on arrhythmias in the human heart.

  15. A Case of Successful Remission of Extensive Primary Gastric Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma: Radiologic, Endoscopic and Pathologic Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mike M. Bismar

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Though rare amongst stomach neoplasms, primary gastric diffuse large B cell lymphoma is one of the commonest extranodal non-Hodgkin lymphomas. If left untreated, it can have a devastating progression and life-threatening consequences. We present the case of a successfully treated large antral ulcer confirmed to be large B cell lymphoma as evidenced by radiologic, endoscopic and histopathologic findings. A brief discussion about the types of gastric lymphoma, their Helicobacter pylori relation and therapeutic modalities follows.

  16. Plasmonic Solar Cells: From Rational Design to Mechanism Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Yoon Hee; Jang, Yu Jin; Kim, Seokhyoung; Quan, Li Na; Chung, Kyungwha; Kim, Dong Ha

    2016-12-28

    Plasmonic effects have been proposed as a solution to overcome the limited light absorption in thin-film photovoltaic devices, and various types of plasmonic solar cells have been developed. This review provides a comprehensive overview of the state-of-the-art progress on the design and fabrication of plasmonic solar cells and their enhancement mechanism. The working principle is first addressed in terms of the combined effects of plasmon decay, scattering, near-field enhancement, and plasmonic energy transfer, including direct hot electron transfer and resonant energy transfer. Then, we summarize recent developments for various types of plasmonic solar cells based on silicon, dye-sensitized, organic photovoltaic, and other types of solar cells, including quantum dot and perovskite variants. We also address several issues regarding the limitations of plasmonic nanostructures, including their electrical, chemical, and physical stability, charge recombination, narrowband absorption, and high cost. Next, we propose a few potentially useful approaches that can improve the performance of plasmonic cells, such as the inclusion of graphene plasmonics, plasmon-upconversion coupling, and coupling between fluorescence resonance energy transfer and plasmon resonance energy transfer. This review is concluded with remarks on future prospects for plasmonic solar cell use.

  17. Obstructive renal injury: from fluid mechanics to molecular cell biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro C Ucero

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Alvaro C Ucero1,*, Sara Gonçalves2,*, Alberto Benito-Martin1, Beatriz Santamaría1, Adrian M Ramos1, Sergio Berzal1, Marta Ruiz-Ortega1, Jesus Egido1, Alberto Ortiz11Fundación Jiménez Díaz, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Fundación Renal Iñigo Alvarez de Toledo, Madrid, Spain; 2Nefrologia e Transplantação Renal, Hospital de Santa Maria EPE, Lisbon, Portugal *Both authors contributed equally to the manuscriptAbstract: Urinary tract obstruction is a frequent cause of renal impairment. The physiopathology of obstructive nephropathy has long been viewed as a mere mechanical problem. However, recent advances in cell and systems biology have disclosed a complex physiopathology involving a high number of molecular mediators of injury that lead to cellular processes of apoptotic cell death, cell injury leading to inflammation and resultant fibrosis. Functional studies in animal models of ureteral obstruction using a variety of techniques that include genetically modified animals have disclosed an important role for the renin-angiotensin system, transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1 and other mediators of inflammation in this process. In addition, high throughput techniques such as proteomics and transcriptomics have identified potential biomarkers that may guide clinical decision-making.Keywords: urinary tract obstruction, renal injury, fluid mechanics, molecular cell biology

  18. Cell Patterning for Liver Tissue Engineering via Dielectrophoretic Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Nurlina Wan Yahya

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Liver transplantation is the most common treatment for patients with end-stage liver failure. However, liver transplantation is greatly limited by a shortage of donors. Liver tissue engineering may offer an alternative by providing an implantable engineered liver. Currently, diverse types of engineering approaches for in vitro liver cell culture are available, including scaffold-based methods, microfluidic platforms, and micropatterning techniques. Active cell patterning via dielectrophoretic (DEP force showed some advantages over other methods, including high speed, ease of handling, high precision and being label-free. This article summarizes liver function and regenerative mechanisms for better understanding in developing engineered liver. We then review recent advances in liver tissue engineering techniques and focus on DEP-based cell patterning, including microelectrode design and patterning configuration.

  19. Obstructive renal injury: from fluid mechanics to molecular cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ucero, Alvaro C; Gonçalves, Sara; Benito-Martin, Alberto; Santamaría, Beatriz; Ramos, Adrian M; Berzal, Sergio; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta; Egido, Jesus; Ortiz, Alberto

    2010-04-22

    Urinary tract obstruction is a frequent cause of renal impairment. The physiopathology of obstructive nephropathy has long been viewed as a mere mechanical problem. However, recent advances in cell and systems biology have disclosed a complex physiopathology involving a high number of molecular mediators of injury that lead to cellular processes of apoptotic cell death, cell injury leading to inflammation and resultant fibrosis. Functional studies in animal models of ureteral obstruction using a variety of techniques that include genetically modified animals have disclosed an important role for the renin-angiotensin system, transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) and other mediators of inflammation in this process. In addition, high throughput techniques such as proteomics and transcriptomics have identified potential biomarkers that may guide clinical decision-making.

  20. Spiral Phyllotaxis Pattern in an Animal Cell: A Fluid- Driven Mechanism for Red Cell Echinocytosis and Programmed Cell Death

    OpenAIRE

    Lofthouse, J. T.

    2004-01-01

    This paper demonstrates that the pattern of lipid spiculesthat emerge on the surface of red blood cells in the classic 'Discocyte to Echinocyte' shape change is a generative spiral, and presents a qualitative, fluid- driven mechanism for their production, compatible with the work of Douady and Couder. Implications for the dynamics of cell growth, plant cell phyllotaxy, programmed cell death and gravity sensitivity are explained in terms of a new qualitative model of cellular fluid dynamics.

  1. Role of ROBO4 Signalling in Developmental and Pathological Angiogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Singh Yadav

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Transmembrane roundabout receptor family members (ROBO1–ROBO4 principally orchestrate the neuronal guidance mechanism of the nervous system. Secreted glycoprotein SLITs are the most appreciated ligands for ROBOs. Recently identified ROBO4 is the key mediator of SLIT-ROBO mediated developmental and pathological angiogenesis. Although SLIT2 has been shown to interact with ROBO4 as ligand, it remains an open question whether this protein is the physiologic partner of ROBO4. The purpose of this review is to summarise how reliable SLIT2 as ligand for ROBO4 is, if not what the other possible mechanisms demonstrated till date for ROBO4 mediated developmental and pathological angiogenesis are. We conclude that ROBO4 is expressed specially in vascular endothelial cells and maintains the vascular integrity via either SLIT2 dependent or SLIT2 independent manner. On the contrary, it promotes the pathological angiogenesis by involving different signalling arm(s/unknown ligand(s. This review explores the interactions SLIT2/ROBO1, SLIT2/ROBO1–ROBO4, ROBO1/ROBO4, and ROBO4/UNC5B which can be promising and potential therapeutic targets for developmental angiogenesis defects and pathological angiogenesis. Finally we have reviewed the ROBO4 signalling pathways and made an effort to elaborate the insight of this signalling as therapeutic target of pathological angiogenesis.

  2. Mechanism of Induction: Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (iPSCs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vimal Kishor; Kumar, Neeraj; Kalsan, Manisha; Saini, Abhishek; Chandra, Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (iPSCs) are self renewable and can differentiate to different types of adult cells, which has shown great promises in the field of regenerative medicine. iPSCs are reprogrammed from human somatic cells through ectopic expression of various transcription factors viz. Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, and c-Myc (OSKM). This novel technology enables derivation of patient specific cells, which possess a potential cure for many diseases. During the last decade, significant progresses have been achieved in enhancing the reprogramming efficiency, safety of iPSCs derivation, development of different delivery techniques by various research groups. Nevertheless, it is important to resolve and define the mechanism underlying the pluripotent stem cells. Major bottleneck which arises during iPSCs generation is the availability of source material (cells/tissues), difficulty to deliver transcription factors with no aberrant genetic modifications and limited reprogramming efficiency. Reprogramming may be achieved by employing different cocktails with number of different transcription factors, application of miRNA and some small molecules such as (Valproic acid, CHiR99021, Sodium butyrate, Vitamin C, Parnate etc). Similarly, various starting source materials have been demonstrated for iPSC based therapies including fibroblasts, cord blood, peripheral blood, keritinocytes, urine, etc., with their specific uses and limitations. Moreover, with the advent of many new reprogramming techniques, various direct delivery methods have been introduced such as using synthetic mRNA expressing pluripotent gene network has been shown to be an appropriate technique to deliver transcription factors and a dozen of small molecules which can replace transcription factors or enhance reprogramming efficiency. This article addresses the iPSCs technology mechanisms, progresses and current perspectives in the field.

  3. Pathological differences between white and grey matter multiple sclerosis lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prins, Marloes; Schul, Emma; Geurts, Jeroen; van der Valk, Paul; Drukarch, Benjamin; van Dam, Anne-Marie

    2015-09-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a debilitating disease characterized by demyelination of the central nervous system (CNS), resulting in widespread formation of white matter lesions (WMLs) and grey matter lesions (GMLs). WMLs are pathologically characterized by the presence of immune cells that infiltrate the CNS, whereas these immune cells are barely present in GMLs. This striking pathological difference between WMLs and GMLs raises questions about the underlying mechanism. It is known that infiltrating leukocytes contribute to the generation of WMLs; however, since GMLs show a paucity of infiltrating immune cells, their importance in GML formation remains to be determined. Here, we review pathological characteristics of WMLs and GMLs, and suggest some possible explanations for the observed pathological differences. In our view, cellular and molecular characteristics of WM and GM, and local differences within WMLs and GMLs (in particular, in glial cell populations and the molecules they express), determine the pathway to demyelination. Further understanding of GML pathogenesis, considered to contribute to chronic MS, may have a direct impact on the development of novel therapeutic targets to counteract this progressive neurological disorder.

  4. Age related changes in pancreatic beta cells: A putative extra-cerebral site of Alzheimer’s pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maj, Magdalena; Ilhan, Aysegul; Neziri, Dashurie; Gartner, Wolfgang; Berggard, Tord; Attems, Johannes; Base, Wolfgang; Wagner, Ludwig

    2011-01-01

    Frequent concomitant manifestation of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and Alzheimer’s disease (AD) has been recently demonstrated by epidemiological studies. This might be due to functional similarities between β-cells and neurons, such as secretion on demand of highly specific molecules in a tightly controlled fashion. An additional similarity represents the age-related alteration of hyperphosphorylated tau in AD patients. Similarly, alterations have been identified in β-cells of T2DM patients. The islet amyloid polypeptide has been associated with β-cell apoptosis. As a consequence of increasing age, the accumulation of highly modified proteins together with decreased regenerative potential might lead to increasing rates of apoptosis. Moreover, reduction of β-cell replication capabilities results in reduction of β-cell mass in mammals, simultaneously with impaired glucose tolerance. The new challenge is to learn much more about age-related protein modifications. This can lead to new treatment strategies for reducing the incidence of T2DM and AD. PMID:21537460

  5. Mechanism of testosterone deficiency in the transgenic sickle cell mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musicki, Biljana; Zhang, Yuxi; Chen, Haolin; Brown, Terry R; Zirkin, Barry R; Burnett, Arthur L

    2015-01-01

    Testosterone deficiency is associated with sickle cell disease (SCD), but its underlying mechanism is not known. We investigated the possible occurrence and mechanism of testosterone deficiency in a mouse model of human SCD. Transgenic sickle male mice (Sickle) exhibited decreased serum and intratesticular testosterone and increased luteinizing hormone (LH) levels compared with wild type (WT) mice, indicating primary hypogonadism in Sickle mice. LH-, dbcAMP-, and pregnenolone- (but not 22-hydroxycholesterol)- stimulated testosterone production by Leydig cells isolated from the Sickle mouse testis was decreased compared to that of WT mice, implying defective Leydig cell steroidogenesis. There also was reduced protein expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (STAR), but not cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc), in the Sickle mouse testis. These data suggest that the capacity of P450scc to support testosterone production may be limited by the supply of cholesterol to the mitochondria in Sickle mice. The sickle mouse testis exhibited upregulated NADPH oxidase subunit gp91phox and increased oxidative stress, measured as 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal, and unchanged protein expression of an antioxidant glutathione peroxidase-1. Mice heterozygous for the human sickle globin (Hemi) exhibited intermediate hypogonadal changes between those of WT and Sickle mice. These results demonstrate that testosterone deficiency occurs in Sickle mice, mimicking the human condition. The defects in the Leydig cell steroidogenic pathway in Sickle mice, mainly due to reduced availability of cholesterol for testosterone production, may be related to NADPH oxidase-derived oxidative stress. Our findings suggest that targeting testicular oxidative stress or steroidogenesis mechanisms in SCD offers a potential treatment for improving phenotypic changes associated with testosterone deficiency in this disease.

  6. Mechanism of testosterone deficiency in the transgenic sickle cell mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biljana Musicki

    Full Text Available Testosterone deficiency is associated with sickle cell disease (SCD, but its underlying mechanism is not known. We investigated the possible occurrence and mechanism of testosterone deficiency in a mouse model of human SCD. Transgenic sickle male mice (Sickle exhibited decreased serum and intratesticular testosterone and increased luteinizing hormone (LH levels compared with wild type (WT mice, indicating primary hypogonadism in Sickle mice. LH-, dbcAMP-, and pregnenolone- (but not 22-hydroxycholesterol- stimulated testosterone production by Leydig cells isolated from the Sickle mouse testis was decreased compared to that of WT mice, implying defective Leydig cell steroidogenesis. There also was reduced protein expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (STAR, but not cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc, in the Sickle mouse testis. These data suggest that the capacity of P450scc to support testosterone production may be limited by the supply of cholesterol to the mitochondria in Sickle mice. The sickle mouse testis exhibited upregulated NADPH oxidase subunit gp91phox and increased oxidative stress, measured as 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal, and unchanged protein expression of an antioxidant glutathione peroxidase-1. Mice heterozygous for the human sickle globin (Hemi exhibited intermediate hypogonadal changes between those of WT and Sickle mice. These results demonstrate that testosterone deficiency occurs in Sickle mice, mimicking the human condition. The defects in the Leydig cell steroidogenic pathway in Sickle mice, mainly due to reduced availability of cholesterol for testosterone production, may be related to NADPH oxidase-derived oxidative stress. Our findings suggest that targeting testicular oxidative stress or steroidogenesis mechanisms in SCD offers a potential treatment for improving phenotypic changes associated with testosterone deficiency in this disease.

  7. A single cell bioengineering approach to elucidate mechanisms of adult stem cell self-renewal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Penney M; Corbel, Stephane; Doyonnas, Regis; Havenstrite, Karen; Magnusson, Klas E G; Blau, Helen M

    2012-04-01

    The goal of regenerative medicine is to restore form and function to damaged and aging tissues. Adult stem cells, present in tissues such as skeletal muscle, comprise a reservoir of cells with a remarkable capacity to proliferate and repair tissue damage. Muscle stem cells, known as satellite cells, reside in a quiescent state in an anatomically distinct compartment, or niche, ensheathed between the membrane of the myofiber and the basal lamina. Recently, procedures for isolating satellite cells were developed and experiments testing their function upon transplantation into muscles revealed an extraordinary potential to contribute to muscle fibers and access and replenish the satellite cell compartment. However, these properties are rapidly lost once satellite cells are plated in culture. Accordingly, elucidating the role of extrinsic factors in controlling muscle stem cell fate, in particular self-renewal, is critical. Through careful design of bioengineered culture platforms, analysis of specific proteins presented to stem cells is possible. Critical to the success of the approach is single cell analysis, as more rapidly proliferating progenitors may mask the behavior of stem cells that proliferate slowly. Bioengineering approaches provide a potent means of gaining insight into the role of extrinsic factors in the stem cell microenvironment on stem cell function and the mechanisms that control their diverse fates. Ultimately, the multidisciplinary approach presented here will lead to novel therapeutic strategies for degenerative diseases.

  8. Cell-structure and mechanical properties of closed-cell aluminum foam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Yun(周芸); ZUO Xiao-qing(左孝青); SUN Jia-lin(孙加林); S.R.Nutt

    2004-01-01

    The density, cell size and structure of closed-cell aluminum foam were measured by optical microscopy and image analysis. The properties and the mechanism of compressive deformation that occur in closed-cell aluminum foam were measured and discussed. The results show that the cell size of foam with density of 0.37 mg/m3 is distributed in the range of 0.5 - 4.0 mm. The cell size of foam with density of 0.33 mg/m3 is distributed in the range of 0.5 - 5.0 mm. The cell wall thickness of both types is 0.1 - 0.3 mm. The closed-cell aluminum foam almost belongs to isotropic one, with a variation of ±15% in elastic modulus and yield strength in longitudinal and transverse direction. Under compressive loading, foam materials show inhomogeneous macroscopic deformation. The site of the onset of local plastic deformation depends on the cell structure. The shape of cell is more important than size in determining the yielding susceptibility of the cells. At early stage of deformation,the deformation is localized in narrow bands having width of one cell's diameter, and outside the bands the cell still remains the original shape. The cells within bands experience large permanent deformation. The band normals are usually within 20° of the loading axis.

  9. Molecular Mechanisms Regulating Impaired Neurogenesis of Fragile X Syndrome Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telias, Michael; Mayshar, Yoav; Amit, Ami

    2015-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common form of inherited cognitive impairment. It is caused by developmental inactivation of the FMR1 gene and the absence of its encoded protein FMRP, which plays pivotal roles in brain development and function. In FXS embryos with full FMR1 mutation, FMRP is expressed during early embryogenesis and is gradually downregulated at the third trimester of pregnancy. FX-human embryonic stem cells (FX-hESCs), derived from FX human blastocysts, demonstrate the same pattern of developmentally regulated FMR1 inactivation when subjected to in vitro neural differentiation (IVND). In this study, we used this in vitro human platform to explore the molecular mechanisms downstream to FMRP in the context of early human embryonic neurogenesis. Our results show a novel role for the SOX superfamily of transcription factors, specifically for SOX2 and SOX9, which could explain the reduced and delayed neurogenesis observed in FX cells. In addition, we assess in this study the “GSK3β theory of FXS” for the first time in a human-based model. We found no evidence for a pathological increase in GSK3β protein levels upon cellular loss of FMRP, in contrast to what was found in the brain of Fmr1 knockout mice. Our study adds novel data on potential downstream targets of FMRP and highlights the importance of the FX-hESC IVND system. PMID:26393806

  10. Mechanics of motility initiation and motility arrest in crawling cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recho, Pierre; Putelat, Thibaut; Truskinovsky, Lev

    2015-11-01

    Motility initiation in crawling cells requires transformation of a symmetric state into a polarized state. In contrast, motility arrest is associated with re-symmetrization of the internal configuration of a cell. Experiments on keratocytes suggest that polarization is triggered by the increased contractility of motor proteins but the conditions of re-symmetrization remain unknown. In this paper we show that if adhesion with the extra-cellular substrate is sufficiently low, the progressive intensification of motor-induced contraction may be responsible for both transitions: from static (symmetric) to motile (polarized) at a lower contractility threshold and from motile (polarized) back to static (symmetric) at a higher contractility threshold. Our model of lamellipodial cell motility is based on a 1D projection of the complex intra-cellular dynamics on the direction of locomotion. In the interest of analytical transparency we also neglect active protrusion and view adhesion as passive. Despite the unavoidable oversimplifications associated with these assumptions, the model reproduces quantitatively the motility initiation pattern in fish keratocytes and reveals a crucial role played in cell motility by the nonlocal feedback between the mechanics and the transport of active agents. A prediction of the model that a crawling cell can stop and re-symmetrize when contractility increases sufficiently far beyond the motility initiation threshold still awaits experimental verification.

  11. Probing mechanical principles of cell-nanomaterial interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Huajian

    2014-01-01

    With the rapid development of nanotechnology, various types of nanoparticles, nanowires, nanofibers, nanotubes, and atomically thin plates and sheets have emerged as candidates for an ever increasing list of potential applications for next generation electronics, microchips, composites, barrier coatings, biosensors, drug delivery, and energy harvesting and conversion systems. There is now an urgent societal need to understand both beneficial and hazardous effects of nanotechnology which is projected to produce and release thousands of tons of nanomaterials into the environment in the coming decades. This paper aims to present an overview of some recent studies conducted at Brown University on the mechanics of cell-nanomaterial interactions, including the modeling of nanoparticles entering cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis and coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations of nanoparticles interacting with cell membranes. The discussions will be organized around the following questions: Why and how does cellular uptake of nanoparticles depend on particle size, shape, elasticity and surface structure? In particular, we will discuss the effect of nanoparticle size on receptor-mediated endocytosis, the effect of elastic stiffness on cell-particle interactions, how high aspect ratio nanomaterials such as carbon nanotubes and graphenes enter cells and how different geometrical patterns of ligands on a nanoparticle can be designed to control the rate of particle uptake.

  12. A kinetic mechanism for cell sorting based on local variations in cell motility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strandkvist, Charlotte; Juul, Jeppe; Baum, Buzz; Kabla, Alexandre J.; Duke, Tom

    2014-01-01

    Our current understanding of cell sorting relies on physical difference, either in the interfacial properties or motile force, between cell types. But is such asymmetry a prerequisite for cell sorting? We test this using a minimal model in which the two cell populations are identical with respect to their physical properties and differences in motility arise solely from how cells interact with their surroundings. The model resembles the Schelling model used in social sciences to study segregation phenomena at the scale of societies. Our results demonstrate that segregation can emerge solely from cell motility being a dynamic property that changes in response to the local environment of the cell, but that additional mechanisms are necessary to reproduce the envelopment behaviour observed in vitro. The time course of segregation follows a power law, in agreement with the scaling reported from experiment and in other models of motility-driven segregation. PMID:25485079

  13. Pulmonary langerhans cell histiocytosis in adults: high-resolution CT - pathology comparisons and evolutional changes at CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyo Jin; Lee, Ho Yun; Kim, Tae Sung [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyung Soo [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Samsung Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Johkoh, Takeshi [Kinki Central Hospital of Mutual Aid Association of Public School Teachers, Department of Radiology, Hyoko (Japan); Tomiyama, Noriyuki [Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Osaka (Japan); Han, Joungho [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-07-15

    To compare high-resolution (HR) CT and histopathological findings and to evaluate serial CT findings in pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis (PLCH). We reviewed CT of lung lesions in 27 adults (M:F = 20:7, mean age, 41 {+-} 12.3 years) with PLCH. After evaluating lung abnormalities including nodules, micronodules, thick-walled, thin-walled, and bizarre-shaped cysts and reticulation, observers compared CT findings obtained at lung biopsy sites with histopathological findings. The final CT was compared with the initial CT to determine disease extent changes. The most frequently observed patterns of lung abnormalities were micronodules (n = 24, 89%), thick-walled (n = 22, 82%), and thin-walled (n = 22, 82%) cysts. Even thin-walled and bizarre cysts harboured active inflammatory Langerhans cell sheets and eosinophils in their walls. In thin-walled cysts, we noted pericystic inflammatory cell infiltrations along the alveolar walls, as well as pericystic emphysema. Thin-walled or bizarre cysts demonstrated a tendency to coalesce with surrounding cysts via their cystic wall destruction. Fourteen (52%) patients showed improvement and nine (33%) showed progressing disease. More than half of patients with pulmonary PLCH show improvement at follow-up CT. Even thin-walled cysts harbour active inflammatory cells on histopathology and exhibit improvement at follow-up CT. (orig.)

  14. Laminin production by human endometrial stromal cells relates to the cyclic and pathologic state of the endometrium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faber, M; Wewer, U M; Berthelsen, J G

    1986-01-01

    hyperplasia and adenocarcinomas did not react with antibody to laminin. The expression of laminin receptor in the stromal cells codistributed with laminin. Basement membranes of the surface epithelium, the glandular epithelium, and the vessels stained strongly with antibodies to laminin. In preneoplastic...

  15. Influence of erythrocyte aggregation at pathological levels on cell-free marginal layer in a narrow circular tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namgung, Bumseok; Sakai, Hiromi; Kim, Sangho

    2015-01-01

    Human red blood cells (RBCs) were perfused in a circular micro-tube (inner diameter of 25 μm) to examine the dynamic changes of cell-free marginal region at both physiological (normal) and pathophysiological (hyper) levels of RBC aggregation. The cell-free area (CFA) was measured to provide additional information on the cell-free layer (CFL) width changes in space and time domains. A prominent enhancement in the mean CFL width was found in hyper-aggregating conditions as compared to that in non-aggregating conditions (P <  0.001). The frequent contacts between RBC and the tube wall were observed and the contact frequency was greatly decreased when the aggregation level was increased from none to normal (P <  0.05) and to hyper (P <  0.001) levels. In addition, the enhanced aggregation from none to hyper levels significantly enlarged the CFA (P <  0.01). We concluded that the RBC aggregation at pathophysiological levels could promote not only the CFL width (one-dimensional parameter) but also the spatiotemporal variation of CFA (two-dimensional parameter).

  16. [Systemic immunological response in children with chronic gingivitis and gastro-intestinal pathology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanenko, E G

    2014-01-01

    Study of the immune system mechanisms in chronic catarrhal gingivitis in children with gastrointestinal pathology was performed in 102 children (49 with chronic gastritis and duodenitis and 53 with no signs of gastrointestinal pathology). Forty-eight children with healthy periodontium constituted control group. Generalized chronic catarrhal gingivitis in children with gastroduodenal pathology is characterized by intense humoral response by simultaneous T-cell immunity suppression. Detection of high serum titers of circulating immune complexes in patients with chronic catarrhal gingivitis suggests a role of immune response in the pathogenesis of periodontal disease increases with concomitant diseases of the upper gastrointestinal tract.

  17. Renal clear cell carcinoma metastasis to salivary glands - a series of 9 cases: clinico-pathological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majewska, H; Skálová, A; Radecka, K; Stodulski, D; Hyrcza, M; Stankiewicz, C; Biernat, W

    2016-03-01

    Metastatic tumors involving salivary glands arising from the non-head and neck area are very rare. Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is known for its high propensity for metastasis to unusual localizations. RCC metastasis to the maxillofacial area is an uncommon event (16%), but metastasis to salivary glands is extremely rare. We report a series of 9 such cases retrieved from two institutions. The group included 6 females and 3 males. The age at diagnosis ranged from 60 to 97 years (mean 72.6 years). The tumors involved the parotid gland in 7 cases, and the submandibular and small salivary gland of the oral cavity in 1 case each. The size of tumors ranged from 0.4 to 5 cm. Total parotidectomy with selective neck dissection was performed in 4 cases, while superficial parotidectomy was performed in 1 case and simple resection in 3 cases. Histologically, all the tumors were clear cell renal cell carcinomas, and therefore the differential diagnosis mainly included clear cell variants of salivary gland carcinomas. The parotid gland was the initial manifestation of renal malignancy in 4 of the cases, while in the remaining 5 cases a history of RCC had been known. The salivary gland involvement developed from 11 months to 13 years after the time of diagnosis of the primary tumor. In 2 cases it was the first site of dissemination. Pathologists need to maintain a high index of suspicion for the possibility of metastasis when confronted with oncocytic or clear cell neoplasms developing in salivary glands. RCC, although rare, should be included in this differential diagnosis.

  18. Pathologic and imunohistochemical characterization of tumoral inflammatory cell infiltrate in invasive penile squamous cell carcinomas: Fox-P3 expression is an independent predictor of recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassallo, José; Rodrigues, André Fellipe Freitas; Campos, Antonio Hugo J F M; Rocha, Rafael Malagoli; da Cunha, Isabela Werneck; Zequi, Stênio Cássio; Guimarães, Gustavo Cardoso; da Fonseca, Francisco Paulo; Lopes, Ademar; Cubilla, Antonio; Soares, Fernando Augusto

    2015-04-01

    Penile carcinomas (PeCa) are relatively rare, but devastating neoplasms, more frequent among people of underprivileged socioeconomic status. There is mounting evidence that immune cells may trigger various mechanisms that enhance tumor growth and metastasis, but no data on the peritumoral inflammation is available for PeCa. The objectives of the present study are to evaluate the immunohistomorphology of tumoral inflammation in PeCa, and to correlate it with clinicopathological parameters, which could contribute to the prognostic evaluation. One hundred and twenty-two patients with the diagnosis of usual-type squamous cell penile carcinoma were included. Paraffin-embedded tissue was submitted to immunohistochemical evaluation of p16 protein, CD3, CD4, CD8, CD20, CD68, CD138, granzyme B, and Fox-P3. The Fisher's exact test was employed for comparison between histological variables and parameters, and the Kaplan-Meier method for the analysis of survival. Improved 5-year overall survival was significantly associated to age ≤60 years, stage I + II, tumor size T1 + T2, lymph node status N0, and absent perineural invasion. In a multivariate analysis age ≥60 years, presence of lymph node metastasis, urethral invasion, and high histologic grade retained a significantly more unfavorable outcome. Improved 5-year failure free survival was associated to stage of the disease I + II, lymph node status N0, absence of perineural, vascular, and urethral invasion, and Fox-P3 expression. In a multivariate analysis, presence of lymph node metastasis, perineural and vascular invasion, and of Fox-P3-positive lymphocytes together with low inflammatory infiltrate retained a significantly more unfavorable outcome. These results support the prognostic value of determining the levels of Fox-P3-positive lymphocytes by immunohistochemistry in PeCa, as this parameter adds value to the traditional clinicopathological features.

  19. Molecular Mechanism of Isocupressic Acid Supresses MA-10 Cell Steroidogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuan-Hao Tsui

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Consumption of ponderosa pine needles causes late-term abortions in cattle and is a serious poisonous plant problem in foothill and mountain rangelands. Isocupressic acid (IA is the component of pine needles responsible for the abortifacient effect, its abortifacient effect may be due to inhibition of steroidogenesis. To investigate the more detail molecular mechanism, we used MA-10 cell, which is wild used to investigate molecular mechanism of steroidogenesis, to characterize the molecular mechanisms underlying the actions of IA in more detail. In this report, we focus on the function of IA on important steroidogenic genes, including steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR, cytochrome P450 cholesterol side-chain cleavage (P450scc, and 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3β-HSD. We found that IA does not affect enzyme activities of these genes but inhibits transcription of P450scc and translation of StAR and P450scc through attenuating cAMP-PKA signaling. Thus, steroid productions of cells were suppressed.

  20. Directionally solidified biopolymer scaffolds: Mechanical properties and endothelial cell responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meghri, Nicholas W.; Donius, Amalie E.; Riblett, Benjamin W.; Martin, Elizabeth J.; Clyne, Alisa Morss; Wegst, Ulrike G. K.

    2010-07-01

    Vascularization is a primary challenge in tissue engineering. To achieve it in a tissue scaffold, an environment with the appropriate structural, mechanical, and biochemical cues must be provided enabling endothelial cells to direct blood vessel growth. While biochemical stimuli such as growth factors can be added through the scaffold material, the culture medium, or both, a well-designed tissue engineering scaffold is required to provide the necessary local structural and mechanical cues. As chitosan is a well-known carrier for biochemical stimuli, the focus of this study was on structure-property correlations, to evaluate the effects of composition and processing conditions on the three-dimensional architecture and properties of freeze-cast scaffolds; to establish whether freeze-east scaffolds are promising candidates as constructs promoting vascularization; and to conduct initial tissue culture studies with endothelial cells on flat substrates of identical compositions as those of the scaffolds to test whether these are biocompatible and promote cell attachment and proliferation.

  1. The mechanism of gene targeting in human somatic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinan Kan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Gene targeting in human somatic cells is of importance because it can be used to either delineate the loss-of-function phenotype of a gene or correct a mutated gene back to wild-type. Both of these outcomes require a form of DNA double-strand break (DSB repair known as homologous recombination (HR. The mechanism of HR leading to gene targeting, however, is not well understood in human cells. Here, we demonstrate that a two-end, ends-out HR intermediate is valid for human gene targeting. Furthermore, the resolution step of this intermediate occurs via the classic DSB repair model of HR while synthesis-dependent strand annealing and Holliday Junction dissolution are, at best, minor pathways. Moreover, and in contrast to other systems, the positions of Holliday Junction resolution are evenly distributed along the homology arms of the targeting vector. Most unexpectedly, we demonstrate that when a meganuclease is used to introduce a chromosomal DSB to augment gene targeting, the mechanism of gene targeting is inverted to an ends-in process. Finally, we demonstrate that the anti-recombination activity of mismatch repair is a significant impediment to gene targeting. These observations significantly advance our understanding of HR and gene targeting in human cells.

  2. The mechanism of gene targeting in human somatic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Yinan; Ruis, Brian; Lin, Sherry; Hendrickson, Eric A

    2014-04-01

    Gene targeting in human somatic cells is of importance because it can be used to either delineate the loss-of-function phenotype of a gene or correct a mutated gene back to wild-type. Both of these outcomes require a form of DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair known as homologous recombination (HR). The mechanism of HR leading to gene targeting, however, is not well understood in human cells. Here, we demonstrate that a two-end, ends-out HR intermediate is valid for human gene targeting. Furthermore, the resolution step of this intermediate occurs via the classic DSB repair model of HR while synthesis-dependent strand annealing and Holliday Junction dissolution are, at best, minor pathways. Moreover, and in contrast to other systems, the positions of Holliday Junction resolution are evenly distributed along the homology arms of the targeting vector. Most unexpectedly, we demonstrate that when a meganuclease is used to introduce a chromosomal DSB to augment gene targeting, the mechanism of gene targeting is inverted to an ends-in process. Finally, we demonstrate that the anti-recombination activity of mismatch repair is a significant impediment to gene targeting. These observations significantly advance our understanding of HR and gene targeting in human cells.

  3. Mechanisms of cell protection by adaptation to chronic and acute hypoxia: molecular biology and clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbucci, G G; Marchi, A; Lettieri, B; Luongo, C

    2005-11-01

    Several experimental and clinical studies have shown that specific biochemical and molecular pathways are involved in the myocardial and skeletal muscle cell tolerance to acute and/or chronic hypoxic injury. A number of different factors were proposed to play a role in the preservation of tissue viability, but to a few of them a pivotal role in the adaptive mechanisms to hypoxic stimuli could be ascribed. Starting from the observation that mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) enzymic complexes are the targets of oxygen reduced availability, most of data are compatible with a mechanism of enzymic adaptation in which the nitric oxide (NO) generation plays the major role. If the partial and reversible NO-induced inhibition of ETC enzymic complexes represents the most rapid and prominent adaptive mechanism in counteracting the damaging effects of hypoxia, the sarcolemmal and mitochondrial K+(ATP) channels activation results to be closely involved in cytoprotection. This process is depending on protein kinase C (PKC) isoform activation triggered by reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) depletion and Ca++ overload. It is well known that all these factors are present in hypoxia-induced oxidative damage and mitochondrial Ca++ altered pools represent powerful stimuli in the damaging processes. The activation of mitochondrial K+(ATP) channels leads to a significant reduction of Ca++ influx and attenuation of mitochondrial Ca++ overload. Closely linked to these adaptive changes signal transduction pathways are involved in the nuclear DNA damage and repair mechanisms. On this context, an essential role is played by the hypoxia-induced factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha) in terms of key transcription factor involved in oxygen-dependent gene regulation. The knowledge of the biochemical and molecular sequences involved in these adaptive processes call for a re-evaluation of the therapeutic approach to hypoxia-induced pathologies. On this light

  4. Investigating the cell death mechanisms in primary prostate cancer cells using low-temperature plasma treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Deborah; Hirst, A. M.; Packer, J. R.; Simms, M. S.; Mann, V. M.; Frame, F. M.; Maitland, N. J.

    2016-09-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasmas have shown considerable promise as a potential cancer therapy. An atmospheric pressure plasma driven with kHz kV excitation, operated with helium and oxygen admixtures is used to investigate the interaction with prostate cancer cells. The cytopathic effect was verified first in two commonly used prostate cancer cell lines (BPH-1 and PC-3 cells) and further extended to examine the effects in paired normal and tumour prostate epithelial cells cultured directly from patient tissues. Through the formation of reactive species in cell culture media, and potentially other plasma components, we observed high levels of DNA damage, together with reduced cell viability and colony-forming ability. We observed differences in response between the prostate cell lines and primary cells, particularly in terms of the mechanism of cell death. The primary cells ultimately undergo necrotic cell death in both the normal and tumour samples, in the complete absence of apoptosis. In addition, we provide the first evidence of an autophagic response in primary cells. This work highlights the importance of studying primary cultures in order to gain a more realistic insight into patient efficacy. EPSRC EP/H003797/1 & EP/K018388/1, Yorkshire Cancer Research: YCR Y257PA.

  5. Mechanisms of rotenone-induced neurotoxicity in PC 12 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Han; Lizhong Sun; Jiafeng Chen; Ming Chang; Hongyan Huo; Linsen Hu

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Rotenone-induced neurotoxicity in PC 12 cells has been widely used to study the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease. However, the precise mechanisms underlying rotenone-induced dopaminergic neuronal degeneration in Parkinson's disease remains unclear.OBJECTIVE: To establish rotenone-induced neurotoxicity in PC 12 cells, and to investigate the possible action pathways to rotenone-induced neural cell injury at the protein level.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: A controlled proteomics study was performed at the Department of Nearology, First Hospital, Jilin University between March 2006 and March 2007.MATERIALS: PC 12 cells were obtained from Shanghai Cell Bank of Chinese Academy of Sciences, China.Rotenone was provided by Sigma, USA.METHODS: PC 12 cells in logarithmic growth phase were treated under experimental and control conditions, respectively. A total of 0.5 μ mol/L rotenone, or the same amount of Dulbecco's modified eagle's medium (DMEM), was added in the experimental and control conditions, respectively.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Following 72 hours of rotenone treatment, cellular survival rate was determined by methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium assay, and apoptotic changes were detected by Hoechst 33342 staining. Total cellular protein was extracted to acquire differential protein expression data utilizing two-dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis. To identify differential protein spots, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) was used.RESULTS: In the MTT assay, the experimental condition induced significantly less cell survival compared to the control condition (P < 0.01 ). Hoechst 33342 staining revealed a larger number of apoptotic cells under the experimental condition compared to the control condition (P < 0.01 ), as determined by the presence of nuclear condensation, pyknosis, and nuclear fragmentation. Two-dimensional electrophoresis results showed that the differential expression of protein

  6. Glycosylation of type II collagen is of major importance for T cell tolerance and pathology in collagen-induced arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bäcklund, Johan; Treschow, Alexandra; Bockermann, Robert;

    2002-01-01

    Type II collagen (CII) is a candidate cartilage-specific autoantigen, which can become post-translationally modified by hydroxylation and glycosylation. T cell recognition of CII is essential for the development of murine collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) and also occurs in rheumatoid arthritis (RA......). The common denominator of murine CIA and human RA is the presentation of an immunodominant CII-derived glycosylated peptide on murine Aq and human DR4 molecules, respectively. To investigate the importance of T cell recognition of glycosylated CII in CIA development after immunization with heterologous CII......, we treated neonatal mice with different heterologous CII-peptides (non-modified, hydroxylated and galactosylated). Treatment with the galactosylated peptide (galactose at position 264) was superior in protecting mice from CIA. Protection was accompanied by a reduced antibody response to CII...

  7. Proteome-wide analysis of SUMO2 targets in response to pathological DNA replication stress in human cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bursomanno, Sara; Beli, Petra; Khan, Asif M;

    2015-01-01

    SUMOylation is a form of post-translational modification involving covalent attachment of SUMO (Small Ubiquitin-like Modifier) polypeptides to specific lysine residues in the target protein. In human cells, there are four SUMO proteins, SUMO1-4, with SUMO2 and SUMO3 forming a closely related...... subfamily. SUMO2/3, in contrast to SUMO1, are predominantly involved in the cellular response to certain stresses, including heat shock. Substantial evidence from studies in yeast has shown that SUMOylation plays an important role in the regulation of DNA replication and repair. Here, we report a proteomic...... repair. We have also shown that deficiency of POLD3 leads to an increase in RPA-bound ssDNA when cells are under replication stress, suggesting that POLD3 plays a role in the cellular response to DNA replication stress. Considering that DNA replication stress is a source of genome instability...

  8. Proteome-wide analysis of SUMO2 targets in response to pathological DNA replication stress in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bursomanno, Sara; Beli, Petra; Khan, Asif M; Minocherhomji, Sheroy; Wagner, Sebastian A; Bekker-Jensen, Simon; Mailand, Niels; Choudhary, Chunaram; Hickson, Ian D; Liu, Ying

    2015-01-01

    SUMOylation is a form of post-translational modification involving covalent attachment of SUMO (Small Ubiquitin-like Modifier) polypeptides to specific lysine residues in the target protein. In human cells, there are four SUMO proteins, SUMO1-4, with SUMO2 and SUMO3 forming a closely related subfamily. SUMO2/3, in contrast to SUMO1, are predominantly involved in the cellular response to certain stresses, including heat shock. Substantial evidence from studies in yeast has shown that SUMOylation plays an important role in the regulation of DNA replication and repair. Here, we report a proteomic analysis of proteins modified by SUMO2 in response to DNA replication stress in S phase in human cells. We have identified a panel of 22 SUMO2 targets with increased SUMOylation during DNA replication stress, many of which play key functions within the DNA replication machinery and/or in the cellular response to DNA damage. Interestingly, POLD3 was found modified most significantly in response to a low dose aphidicolin treatment protocol that promotes common fragile site (CFS) breakage. POLD3 is the human ortholog of POL32 in budding yeast, and has been shown to act during break-induced recombinational repair. We have also shown that deficiency of POLD3 leads to an increase in RPA-bound ssDNA when cells are under replication stress, suggesting that POLD3 plays a role in the cellular response to DNA replication stress. Considering that DNA replication stress is a source of genome instability, and that excessive replication stress is a hallmark of pre-neoplastic and tumor cells, our characterization of SUMO2 targets during a perturbed S-phase should provide a valuable resource for future functional studies in the fields of DNA metabolism and cancer biology.

  9. Pathology of the region of the knee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aufdermaur, M.

    1981-09-01

    Radiological, clinical and pathologic-anatomical findings seen in four types of disorders of the region of the knee jointare described. An attempt is made to explain the clinical symptomatology on the basis of pathologic-anatomical findings. It is demonstrated that the histology of a giant cell neoplasm does not permit conclusions as to prognosis. Etiology and pathogenesis of villonodular synovitis and of chondrocalcinosis are unexplained. Pathologic-anatomical findings of chondromalacia patellae are those of early osteoarthrosis.

  10. Vertex models: from cell mechanics to tissue morphogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alt, Silvanus; Ganguly, Poulami

    2017-01-01

    Tissue morphogenesis requires the collective, coordinated motion and deformation of a large number of cells. Vertex model simulations for tissue mechanics have been developed to bridge the scales between force generation at the cellular level and tissue deformation and flows. We review here various formulations of vertex models that have been proposed for describing tissues in two and three dimensions. We discuss a generic formulation using a virtual work differential, and we review applications of vertex models to biological morphogenetic processes. We also highlight recent efforts to obtain continuum theories of tissue mechanics, which are effective, coarse-grained descriptions of vertex models. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Systems morphodynamics: understanding the development of tissue hardware’. PMID:28348254

  11. Metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer: consensus on pathology and molecular tests, first-line, second-line, and third-line therapy: 1st ESMO Consensus Conference in Lung Cancer; Lugano 2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Felip, E; Gridelli, C; Baas, P;

    2011-01-01

    the conference, the expert panel prepared clinically relevant questions concerning five areas: early and locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), first-line metastatic NSCLC, second-/third-line NSCLC, NSCLC pathology and molecular testing, and small-cell lung cancer to be addressed through discussion......The 1st ESMO Consensus Conference on lung cancer was held in Lugano, Switzerland on 21 and 22 May 2010 with the participation of a multidisciplinary panel of leading professionals in pathology and molecular diagnostics, medical oncology, surgical oncology and radiation oncology. Before...

  12. Enterocolitis induced by autoimmune targeting of enteric glial cells: A possible mechanism in Crohn's disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornet, Anne; Savidge, Tor C.; Cabarrocas, Julie; Deng, Wen-Lin; Colombel, Jean-Frederic; Lassmann, Hans; Desreumaux, Pierre; Liblau, Roland S.

    2001-11-01

    Early pathological manifestations of Crohn's disease (CD) include vascular disruption, T cell infiltration of nerve plexi, neuronal degeneration, and induction of T helper 1 cytokine responses. This study demonstrates that disruption of the enteric glial cell network in CD patients represents another early pathological feature that may be modeled after CD8+ T cell-mediated autoimmune targeting of enteric glia in double transgenic mice. Mice expressing a viral neoself antigen in astrocytes and enteric glia were crossed with specific T cell receptor transgenic mice, resulting in apoptotic depletion of enteric glia to levels comparable in CD patients. Intestinal and mesenteric T cell infiltration, vasculitis, T helper 1 cytokine production, and fulminant bowel inflammation were characteristic hallmarks of disease progression. Immune-mediated damage to enteric glia therefore may participate in the initiation and/or the progression of human inflammatory bowel disease.

  13. General coarse-grained red blood cell models: I. Mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    FEDOSOV, DMITRY A.; Caswell, Bruce; Karniadakis, George E.

    2009-01-01

    We present a rigorous procedure to derive coarse-grained red blood cell (RBC) models, which lead to accurate mechanical properties of realistic RBCs. Based on a semi-analytic theory linear and non-linear elastic properties of the RBC membrane can be matched with those obtained in optical tweezers stretching experiments. In addition, we develop a nearly stress-free model which avoids a number of pitfalls of existing RBC models, such as non-biconcave equilibrium shape and dependence of RBC mech...

  14. Analyses of CD20 Monoclonal Antibody–Mediated Tumor Cell Killing Mechanisms: Rational Design of Dosing Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindorfer, Margaret A.

    2014-01-01

    Since approval of rituximab for treatment of B cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma, development of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) for cancer treatment and elucidation of their cytotoxic mechanisms have been subject to intense investigations. Compelling evidence indicates that rituximab and another CD20 mAb, ofatumumab, must use the body’s cellular and humoral immune effector functions to kill malignant cells. Other U.S. Food and Drug Administration–approved mAbs, including obinutuzumab, cetuximab, and trastuzumab, require, in part, these effector mechanisms to eliminate tumor cells. Although gram quantities of mAbs can be administered to patients, our investigations of CD20 mAb-based therapies for chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), including correlative measurements in clinical trials and studies with primary cells and cell lines, indicate that effector mechanisms necessary for mAb activity can be saturated or exhausted if tumor burdens are high, thus substantially compromising the efficacy of high-dose mAb therapy. Under these conditions, another reaction (trogocytosis) predominates in which bound CD20 mAb and CD20 are removed from targeted cells by effector cells that express Fcγ receptors, thereby allowing malignant cells to escape unharmed and continue to promote disease pathology. To address this problem, we propose that a low-dose strategy, based on administering 30–50 mg of CD20 mAb three times per week, may be far more effective for CLL than standard dosing because it will minimize effector function saturation and reduce trogocytosis. This approach may have general applicability to other mAbs that use immune effector functions, and could be formulated into a subcutaneous treatment strategy that would be more accessible and possibly more efficacious for patients. PMID:24944188

  15. Pathological Plasticity in Fragile X Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon S. Martin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Deficits in neuronal plasticity are common hallmarks of many neurodevelopmental disorders. In the case of fragile-X syndrome (FXS, disruption in the function of a single gene, FMR1, results in a variety of neurological consequences directly related to problems with the development, maintenance, and capacity of plastic neuronal networks. In this paper, we discuss current research illustrating the mechanisms underlying plasticity deficits in FXS. These processes include synaptic, cell intrinsic, and homeostatic mechanisms both dependent on and independent of abnormal metabotropic glutamate receptor transmission. We place particular emphasis on how identified deficits may play a role in developmental critical periods to produce neuronal networks with permanently decreased capacity to dynamically respond to changes in activity central to learning, memory, and cognition in patients with FXS. Characterizing early developmental deficits in plasticity is fundamental to develop therapies that not only treat symptoms but also minimize the developmental pathology of the disease.

  16. Apoptosis transcriptional mechanism of feline infectious peritonitis virus infected cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuid, Ahmad Naqib; Safi, Nikoo; Haghani, Amin; Mehrbod, Parvaneh; Haron, Mohd Syamsul Reza; Tan, Sheau Wei; Omar, Abdul Rahman

    2015-11-01

    Apoptosis has been postulated to play an important role during feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV) infection; however, its mechanism is not well characterized. This study is focused on apoptosis and transcriptional profiling of FIPV-infected cells following in vitro infection of CRFK cells with FIPV 79-1146 WSU. Flow cytometry was used to determine mode of cell death in first 42 h post infection (hpi). FIPV infected cells underwent early apoptosis at 9 hpi (p < 0.05) followed by late apoptosis at 12 hpi (p < 0.05) and necrosis from 24 hpi (p < 0.05). Then, next generation sequencing was performed on 9 hpi and control uninfected cells by Illumina analyzer. An aggregate of 4546 genes (2229 down-regulated and 2317 up-regulated) from 17 cellular process, 11 molecular functions and 130 possible biological pathways were affected by FIPV. 131 genes from apoptosis cluster (80 down-regulated and 51 up-regulated) along with increase of apoptosis, p53, p38 MAPK, VEGF and chemokines/cytokines signaling pathways were probably involved in apoptosis process. Six of the de-regulated genes expression (RASSF1, BATF2, MAGEB16, PDCD5, TNFα and TRAF2) and TNFα protein concentration were analyzed by RT-qPCR and ELISA, respectively, at different time-points. Up-regulations of both pro-apoptotic (i.e. PDCD5) and anti-apoptotic (i.e. TRAF2) were detected from first hpi and continuing to deregulate during apoptosis process in the infected cells.

  17. Mitochondrial and Cell Death Mechanisms in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee J. Martin

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD, Parkinson’s disease (PD and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS are the most common human adult-onset neurodegenerative diseases. They are characterized by prominent age-related neurodegeneration in selectively vulnerable neural systems. Some forms of AD, PD, and ALS are inherited, and genes causing these diseases have been identified. Nevertheless, the mechanisms of the neuronal cell death are unresolved. Morphological, biochemical, genetic, as well as cell and animal model studies reveal that mitochondria could have roles in this neurodegeneration. The functions and properties of mitochondria might render subsets of selectively vulnerable neurons intrinsically susceptible to cellular aging and stress and overlying genetic variations, triggering neurodegeneration according to a cell death matrix theory. In AD, alterations in enzymes involved in oxidative phosphorylation, oxidative damage, and mitochondrial binding of Aβ and amyloid precursor protein have been reported. In PD, mutations in putative mitochondrial proteins have been identified and mitochondrial DNA mutations have been found in neurons in the substantia nigra. In ALS, changes occur in mitochondrial respiratory chain enzymes and mitochondrial cell death proteins. Transgenic mouse models of human neurodegenerative disease are beginning to reveal possible principles governing the biology of selective neuronal vulnerability that implicate mitochondria and the mitochondrial permeability transition pore. This review summarizes how mitochondrial pathobiology might contribute to neuronal death in AD, PD, and ALS and could serve as a target for drug therapy.

  18. Carcinogenesis of basal cell carcinomas: genetics and molecular mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacour, J P

    2002-04-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) of the skin is the most common type of cancer in humans. Like squamous cell carcinomas, they are also believed to be ultraviolet (UV)-induced, but several data suggest that some differences might exist in the mechanisms of their UV induction. The originating cells may arise from interfollicular basal cells, hair follicles or sebaceous glands, thus from a deeper zone than the SCC ones, which probably means exposure to different doses or wavelengths of UV. The p53 gene and the patched gene (PTCH) are major targets of UV for BCC induction. Mutations in p53 are present in about 56% of human BCC, even small early lesions. The "UV signature" is observed in 65% of them. Mutations in the PTCH play also a major role in BCC development, being responsible for hereditary BCCs in Gorlin's syndrome, sporadic BCC, and BCCs isolated from xeroderma pigmentosum, although with a lower incidence of "UV signature". Smoothened-activating mutations and PTCH2 mutations are also involved in BCC formation. Transgenic mice overexpressing Smoothened or Sonic hedgehog in the skin spontaneously produce skin lesions resembling human BCCs, but contrary to findings in the hairless albino mouse and with SCC, no data on experimental UV induction of BCCs are available.

  19. Molecular Mechanisms of Microcystin Toxicity in Animal Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Campos

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Microcystins (MC are potent hepatotoxins produced by the cyanobacteria of the genera Planktothrix, Microcystis, Aphanizomenon, Nostoc and Anabaena. These cyclic heptapeptides have strong affinity to serine/threonine protein phosphatases (PPs thereby acting as an inhibitor of this group of enzymes. Through this interaction a cascade of events responsible for the MC cytotoxic and genotoxic effects in animal cells may take place. Moreover MC induces oxidative stress in animal cells and together with the inhibition of PPs, this pathway is considered to be one of the main mechanisms of MC toxicity. In recent years new insights on the key enzymes involved in the signal-transduction and toxicity have been reported demonstrating the complexity of the interaction of these toxins with animal cells. Key proteins involved in MC up-take, biotransformation and excretion have been identified, demonstrating the ability of aquatic animals to metabolize and excrete the toxin. MC have shown to interact with the mitochondria. The consequences are the dysfunction of the organelle, induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS and cell apoptosis. MC activity leads to the differential expression/activity of transcriptional factors and protein kinases involved in the pathways of cellular differentiation, proliferation and tumor promotion activity. This activity may result from the direct inhibition of the protein phosphatases PP1 and PP2A. This review aims to summarize the increasing data regarding the molecular mechanisms of MC toxicity in animal systems, reporting for direct MC interacting proteins and key enzymes in the process of toxicity biotransformation/excretion of these cyclic peptides.

  20. Mechanical Instabilities of Biological Tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannezo, Edouard; Prost, Jacques; Joanny, Jean-François

    2012-07-01

    We study theoretically the morphologies of biological tubes affected by various pathologies. When epithelial cells grow, the negative tension produced by their division provokes a buckling instability. Several shapes are investigated: varicose, dilated, sinuous, or sausagelike. They are all found in pathologies of tracheal, renal tubes, or arteries. The final shape depends crucially on the mechanical parameters of the tissues: Young’s modulus, wall-to-lumen ratio, homeostatic pressure. We argue that since tissues must be in quasistatic mechanical equilibrium, abnormal shapes convey information as to what causes the pathology. We calculate a phase diagram of tubular instabilities which could be a helpful guide for investigating the underlying genetic regulation.

  1. Xenotransplantation of microencaps bovine chromaffin cells into hemiparkinsonian monkeys:a analyses of behaviour,biochemistry and pathology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE Y. L.; WANG L. N.; WANG Z. F.; ZHONG D. G.; LI X. J.; CUI X.; MA X. J.; ZHU Ming-wei; SUN A. M.

    2001-01-01

    @@ This study examines the effects of xenografts of microencapsulated bovine chromaffin cells (BCCs) on the rotational behavior of hemiparkinsonian monkey recipients. In addition, it determines the content of monoamine neurotransmitters and their major metabolites in the neostriatum in hemiparkinsonian monkeys. The hemiparkinsonian model in monkeys was induced by a unilateral intracarotid injection of methyl-phenyl-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP). Unencapsulated BCCs (n = 2), BCCs microencapsulated (n= 6) in alginate-polylysine-alginate (APA) membranes as well as empty microencapsules (n = 1) were grafted into the neostriatum of the hemiparkinsonian monkeys.

  2. The Pathology of Lithium Induced Nephropathy: A Case Report and Review, with Emphasis on the Demonstration of Mast Cells

    OpenAIRE

    B.N., Kumarguru; M., Natarajan; Nagarajappa, A.H.

    2013-01-01

    Lithium is a psychotropic agent which is widely employed in the psychiatric practice throughout the world. The therapeutic index of lithium is low and an acute intoxication may appear, which may lead to death or a permanent disability. A frequent side effect of lithium is renal toxicity. The collecting tubules have been identified as the site of action of lithium, due to the down regulation of Acquaporin-2. The mast cells have been associated with a wide range of human renal diseases. They ha...

  3. Novel CD47: SIRPα dependent mechanism for the activation of STAT3 in antigen-presenting cell.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natan Toledano

    Full Text Available Cell surface CD47 interacts with its receptor, signal-regulatory-protein α (SIRPα that is expressed predominantly on macrophages, to inhibit phagocytosis of normal, healthy cells. This "don't eat me" signal is mediated through tyrosine phosphorylation of SIRPα at the cytoplasm