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Sample records for cells mediate protective

  1. Glycan elongation beyond the mucin associated Tn antigen protects tumor cells from immune-mediated killing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Caroline B; Lavrsen, Kirstine; Steentoft, Catharina; Vester-Christensen, Malene B; Clausen, Henrik; Wandall, Hans H; Pedersen, Anders Elm

    2013-01-01

    recognized as cancer associated truncated glycans, and are expressed in many adenocarcinomas, e.g. breast- and pancreatic cancer cells. To investigate the role of the cancer associated glycan truncations in immune-mediated killing we created glyco-engineered breast- and pancreatic cancer cells expressing...... and pancreatic cancer cell lines T47D and Capan-1 increases sensitivity to both NK cell mediated antibody-dependent cellular-cytotoxicity (ADCC) and cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL)-mediated killing. In addition, we investigated the association between total cell surface expression of MUC1/MUC16 and NK or...... CTL mediated killing, and observed an inverse correlation between MUC16/MUC1 expression and the sensitivity to ADCC and CTL-mediated killing. Together, these data suggest that up-regulation of membrane bound mucins protects cells from immune mediated killing, and that particular glycosylation steps...

  2. Protection against murine disseminated candidiasis mediated by a Candida albicans-specific T-cell line.

    OpenAIRE

    Sieck, T G; Moors, M A; Buckley, H R; Blank, K J

    1993-01-01

    The role of T lymphocytes in disseminated candidiasis in a mouse model of irradiation-induced immunosuppression was investigated. A continuously cultured Candida albicans-specific T-cell line mediated protection of sublethally irradiated mice from disseminated candidiasis as measured by both the fungal load in the kidneys and mortality. These results are the first to demonstrate directly a role for antigen-specific T cells in the protective immune response against murine disseminated candidia...

  3. Activation of glutathione peroxidase via Nrf1 mediates genistein's protection against oxidative endothelial cell injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cellular actions of isoflavones may mediate the beneficial health effects associated with high soy consumption. We have investigated protection by genistein and daidzein against oxidative stress-induced endothelial injury. Genistein but not daidzein protected endothelial cells from damage induced by oxidative stress. This protection was accompanied by decreases in intracellular glutathione levels that could be explained by the generation of glutathionyl conjugates of the oxidised genistein metabolite, 5,7,3',4'-tetrahydroxyisoflavone. Both isoflavones evoked increased protein expression of γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase-heavy subunit (γ-GCS-HS) and increased cytosolic accumulation and nuclear translocation of Nrf2. However, only genistein led to increases in the cytosolic accumulation and nuclear translocation of Nrf1 and the increased expression of and activity of glutathione peroxidase. These results suggest that genistein-induced protective effects depend primarily on the activation of glutathione peroxidase mediated by Nrf1 activation, and not on Nrf2 activation or increases in glutathione synthesis

  4. SOD2 Mediates Amifostine-Induced Protection against Glutamate in PC12 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Jia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Cytoprotectant amifostine attenuates radiation-induced oxidative injury by increasing intracellular manganese superoxide dismutase (SOD2 in peripheral tissue. However, whether amifostine could protect neuronal cells against oxidative injury has not been reported. The purpose of this study is to explore the protection of amifostine in PC12 cells. Methods. PC12 cells exposed to glutamate were used to mimic neuronal oxidative injury. SOD assay kit was taken to evaluate intracellular Cu/Zn SOD (SOD1 and SOD2 activities; western blot analysis and immunofluorescence staining were performed to investigate SOD2 protein expression; MTT, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, release and cell morphology were used to evaluate cell injury degree, and apoptotic rate and cleaved caspase-3 expression were taken to assess apoptosis; mitochondrial superoxide production, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS, and glutathione (GSH and catalase (CAT levels were evaluated by reagent kits. Results. Amifostine increased SOD2 activity and expression, decreased cell injury and apoptosis, reduced mitochondrial superoxide production and intracellular ROS generation, and restored intracellular GSH and CAT levels in PC12 cells exposed to glutamate. SOD2-siRNA, however, significantly reversed the amifostine-induced cytoprotective and antioxidative actions. Conclusion. SOD2 mediates amifostine-induced protection in PC12 cells exposed to glutamate.

  5. Heat-preconditioning confers protection from Ca2+-mediated cell toxicity in renal tubular epithelial cells (BSC-1)

    OpenAIRE

    Kuhlmann, Martin K.; Betz, Regina; Hanselmann, Rainer; Köhler, Hans

    1997-01-01

    A rise in intracellular calcium may mediate ischemic damage by phospholipid hydrolysis and proteolysis Heat shock proteins have been shown to provide protection from various forms of cell stress, but not from models of Ca2+-mediated injury. The effect of heat preconditioning in a model of ionomycin-induced injury in cultured renal tubular epitheliaal cells (BSC-1) was examined. Hsp70-mRNA expression was induced by hyperthermia (HT) (42°C, 60 min). Hsp70 protein accumulation was maximal after ...

  6. Pinosylvin-mediated protection against oxidative stress in human retinal pigment epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskela, Ali; Reinisalo, Mika; Hyttinen, Juha M. T.; Kaarniranta, Kai

    2014-01-01

    Purpose In this work, we investigated the ability of pinosylvin (PS), 3,5-dihydroxy-trans-stilbene, to modulate oxidative stress in human RPE cells. PS, a stilbenoid polyphenol, occurs in high concentrations in bark byproducts and therefore represents an attractive bioactive compound for health-promoting applications. Methods First, we evaluated the toxicity range of PS by exposing ARPE-19 cells to 0.1–200 µM concentrations of PS for 24 h followed by the cell viability test. In the next stage, the ARPE-19 cells were preincubated in PS for 24 h followed by hydroquinone (HQ) exposure without PS for another 24 h. The cell viability test was conducted after HQ exposure. To elucidate the potential mechanisms behind PS-mediated protection against oxidative stress, the ARPE-19 cells were treated with 5 µM PS for 6 h, and mRNA was extracted at four time points (2 h, 6 h, 12 h, 24 h) to determine changes in the expression of nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor-2 (Nrf2), sequestosome 1 (p62/SQSTM1), heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), and glutathione S-transferase pi 1 (GSTP1) genes. To clarify the molecular mechanism behind PS-mediated protection further, the ARPE-19 cells were transfected with p62 and Nrf2 siRNAs for 24 h, and the roles of p62, Nrf2, and its target gene HO-1 in conferring protection against oxidative stress were studied with quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) and the cell viability test. Results PS treatment at concentrations of 5 and 10 µM significantly enhanced cell survival from oxidative stress. The expression levels of an enzyme with antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, and immunomodulatory properties, HO-1, were increased by PS treatment and correlated strongly with cell survival. PS treatment did not elevate the expression levels of Nrf2 or its target genes, p62 or GSTP1, even though it had a clear effect on the expression of HO-1, another gene controlled by Nrf2. RNA interference analysis further confirmed the important role of Nrf2 and HO-1 in PS-mediated

  7. Painting factor H onto mesenchymal stem cells protects the cells from complement- and neutrophil-mediated damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Qiu, Wen; Zhang, Lingjun; Fung, John; Lin, Feng

    2016-09-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are undergoing intensive testing in clinical trials as a promising new therapy for many inflammatory diseases and for regenerative medicine, but further optimization of current MSC-based therapies is required. In this study, we found that in addition to direct complement-mediated attack through the assembly of membrane attack complexes (MACs) that we and others have recently reported, of the released complement activation products, C5a, but not C3a, activates neutrophils in the blood to further damage MSCs through oxidative burst. In addition, we have developed a simple method for painting factor H, a native complement inhibitor, onto MSCs to locally inhibit complement activation on MSCs. MSCs painted with factor H are protected from both MAC- and neutrophil-mediated attack and are significantly more effective in inhibiting antigen-specific T cell responses than the mock-painted MSCs both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:27343468

  8. PACAP protects against inflammatory-mediated toxicity in dopaminergic SH-SY5Y cells: implication for Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Dwayne; Tamas, Andrea; Reglodi, Dora; Tizabi, Yousef

    2014-10-01

    There has been a growing recognition of the role of neuroinflammation caused by microglia-exaggerated release of inflammatory mediators in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) is an endogenous 38 amino acid containing neuropeptide that has been shown to possess neurotrophic as well as neuroprotective properties. In this study, we sought to determine whether PACAP could protect SH-SY5Y dopaminergic cells against toxicity induced by inflammatory mediators. For this purpose, THP-1 cells which possess microglia-like property were stimulated by a combination of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and interferon gamma (IFN-γ), and the media containing inflammatory mediators were isolated and applied to SH-SY5Y cells. Such treatment resulted in approximately 54 % cell death as well as a reduction in brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and phosphorylated cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (p-CREB). Pretreatment of the SH-SY5Y cells with PACAP (1-38) dose-dependently attenuated toxicity induced by the inflammatory mediators. PACAP effects, in turn, were dose-dependently blocked by the PACAP receptor antagonist (PACAP 6-38). These results suggest protective effects of PACAP against inflammatory-induced toxicity in a cellular model of PD that is likely mediated by enhancement of cell survival markers through activation of PACAP receptors. Hence, PACAP or its agonists could be of therapeutic benefit in inflammatory-mediated PD. PMID:24740430

  9. SOD2 Mediates Amifostine-Induced Protection against Glutamate in PC12 Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Ji Jia; Lei Zhang; Xiaolei Shi; Mingchun Wu; Xiang Zhou; Xiaonan Liu; Tingting Huo

    2016-01-01

    Background. Cytoprotectant amifostine attenuates radiation-induced oxidative injury by increasing intracellular manganese superoxide dismutase (SOD2) in peripheral tissue. However, whether amifostine could protect neuronal cells against oxidative injury has not been reported. The purpose of this study is to explore the protection of amifostine in PC12 cells. Methods. PC12 cells exposed to glutamate were used to mimic neuronal oxidative injury. SOD assay kit was taken to evaluate intracellular...

  10. Melatonin protects skin keratinocyte from hydrogen peroxide-mediated cell death via the SIRT1 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ju-Hee; Moon, Ji-Hong; Nazim, Uddin Md; Lee, You-Jin; Seol, Jae-Won; Eo, Seong-Kug; Lee, John-Hwa; Park, Sang-Youel

    2016-03-15

    Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine), which is primarily synthesized in and secreted from the pineal gland, plays a pivotal role in cell proliferation as well as in the regulation of cell metastasis and cell survival in a diverse range of cells. The aim of this study is to investigate protection effect of melatonin on H2O2-induced cell damage and the mechanisms of melatonin in human keratinocytes. Hydrogen peroxide dose-dependently induced cell damages in human keratinocytes and co-treatment of melatonin protected the keratinocytes against H2O2-induced cell damage. Melatonin treatment activated the autophagy flux signals, which were identified by the decreased levels of p62 protein. Inhibition of autophagy flux via an autophagy inhibitor and ATG5 siRNA technique blocked the protective effects of melatonin against H2O2-induced cell death in human keratinocytes. And we found the inhibition of sirt1 using sirtinol and sirt1 siRNA reversed the protective effects of melatonin and induces the autophagy process in H2O2-treated cells. This is the first report demonstrating that autophagy flux activated by melatonin protects human keratinocytes through sirt1 pathway against hydrogen peroxide-induced damages. And this study also suggest that melatonin could potentially be utilized as a therapeutic agent in skin disease. PMID:26918354

  11. Melatonin protects skin keratinocyte from hydrogen peroxide-mediated cell death via the SIRT1 pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ju-Hee; Moon, Ji-Hong; Nazim, Uddin MD.; Lee, You-Jin; Seol, Jae-Won; Eo, Seong-Kug; Lee, John-Hwa; Park, Sang-Youel

    2016-01-01

    Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine), which is primarily synthesized in and secreted from the pineal gland, plays a pivotal role in cell proliferation as well as in the regulation of cell metastasis and cell survival in a diverse range of cells. The aim of this study is to investigate protection effect of melatonin on H2O2-induced cell damage and the mechanisms of melatonin in human keratinocytes. Hydrogen peroxide dose-dependently induced cell damages in human keratinocytes and co-treatment of melatonin protected the keratinocytes against H2O2-induced cell damage. Melatonin treatment activated the autophagy flux signals, which were identified by the decreased levels of p62 protein. Inhibition of autophagy flux via an autophagy inhibitor and ATG5 siRNA technique blocked the protective effects of melatonin against H2O2-induced cell death in human keratinocytes. And we found the inhibition of sirt1 using sirtinol and sirt1 siRNA reversed the protective effects of melatonin and induces the autophagy process in H2O2-treated cells. This is the first report demonstrating that autophagy flux activated by melatonin protects human keratinocytes through sirt1 pathway against hydrogen peroxide-induced damages. And this study also suggest that melatonin could potentially be utilized as a therapeutic agent in skin disease. PMID:26918354

  12. NK Cell-Mediated Regulation of Protective Memory Responses against Intracellular Ehrlichial Pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samar Habib

    Full Text Available Ehrlichiae are gram-negative obligate intracellular bacteria that cause potentially fatal human monocytic ehrlichiosis. We previously showed that natural killer (NK cells play a critical role in host defense against Ehrlichia during primary infection. However, the contribution of NK cells to the memory response against Ehrlichia remains elusive. Primary infection of C57BL/6 mice with Ehrlichia muris provides long-term protection against a second challenge with the highly virulent Ixodes ovatus Ehrlichia (IOE, which ordinarily causes fatal disease in naïve mice. Here, we show that the depletion of NK cells in E. muris-primed mice abrogates the protective memory response against IOE. Approximately, 80% of NK cell-depleted E. muris-primed mice succumbed to lethal IOE infection on days 8-10 after IOE infection, similar to naïve mice infected with the same dose of IOE. The lack of a recall response in NK cell-depleted mice correlated with an increased bacterial burden, extensive liver injury, decreased frequency of Ehrlichia-specific IFN-γ-producing memory CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells, and a low titer of Ehrlichia-specific antibodies. Intraperitoneal infection of mice with E. muris resulted in the production of IL-15, IL-12, and IFN-γ as well as an expansion of activated NKG2D+ NK cells. The adoptive transfer of purified E. muris-primed hepatic and splenic NK cells into Rag2-/-Il2rg-/- recipient mice provided protective immunity against challenge with E. muris. Together, these data suggest that E. muris-induced memory-like NK cells, which contribute to the protective, recall response against Ehrlichia.

  13. SGLT-1-mediated glucose uptake protects human intestinal epithelial cells against Giardia duodenalis-induced apoptosis

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Linda C.H.; Huang, Ching-ying; Kuo, Wei-ting; Sayer, Heather; Turner, Jerrold R; Buret, Andre G

    2008-01-01

    Infection with Giardia duodenalis is one of the most common causes of waterborne diarrheal disease worldwide. Mechanisms of pathogenesis and host response in giardiasis remain incompletely understood. Previous studies have shown that exposure to G. duodenalis products induce apoptosis in enterocytes. We recently discovered that sodium-dependent glucose cotransporter (SGLT)-1-mediated glucose uptake modulates enterocytic cell death induced by bacterial lipopolysaccharide. The aim of this study...

  14. C-Phycocyanin Confers Protection against Oxalate-Mediated Oxidative Stress and Mitochondrial Dysfunctions in MDCK Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooq, Shukkur M.; Boppana, Nithin B.; Asokan, Devarajan; Sekaran, Shamala D.; Shankar, Esaki M.; Li, Chunying; Gopal, Kaliappan; Bakar, Sazaly A.; Karthik, Harve S.; Ebrahim, Abdul S.

    2014-01-01

    Oxalate toxicity is mediated through generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) via a process that is partly dependent on mitochondrial dysfunction. Here, we investigated whether C-phycocyanin (CP) could protect against oxidative stress-mediated intracellular damage triggered by oxalate in MDCK cells. DCFDA, a fluorescence-based probe and hexanoyl-lysine adduct (HEL), an oxidative stress marker were used to investigate the effect of CP on oxalate-induced ROS production and membrane lipid peroxidation (LPO). The role of CP against oxalate-induced oxidative stress was studied by the evaluation of mitochondrial membrane potential by JC1 fluorescein staining, quantification of ATP synthesis and stress-induced MAP kinases (JNK/SAPK and ERK1/2). Our results revealed that oxalate-induced cells show markedly increased ROS levels and HEL protein expression that were significantly decreased following pre-treatment with CP. Further, JC1 staining showed that CP pre-treatment conferred significant protection from mitochondrial membrane permeability and increased ATP production in CP-treated cells than oxalate-alone-treated cells. In addition, CP treated cells significantly decreased the expression of phosphorylated JNK/SAPK and ERK1/2 as compared to oxalate-alone-treated cells. We concluded that CP could be used as a potential free radical-scavenging therapeutic strategy against oxidative stress-associated diseases including urolithiasis. PMID:24691130

  15. C-phycocyanin confers protection against oxalate-mediated oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunctions in MDCK cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shukkur M Farooq

    Full Text Available Oxalate toxicity is mediated through generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS via a process that is partly dependent on mitochondrial dysfunction. Here, we investigated whether C-phycocyanin (CP could protect against oxidative stress-mediated intracellular damage triggered by oxalate in MDCK cells. DCFDA, a fluorescence-based probe and hexanoyl-lysine adduct (HEL, an oxidative stress marker were used to investigate the effect of CP on oxalate-induced ROS production and membrane lipid peroxidation (LPO. The role of CP against oxalate-induced oxidative stress was studied by the evaluation of mitochondrial membrane potential by JC1 fluorescein staining, quantification of ATP synthesis and stress-induced MAP kinases (JNK/SAPK and ERK1/2. Our results revealed that oxalate-induced cells show markedly increased ROS levels and HEL protein expression that were significantly decreased following pre-treatment with CP. Further, JC1 staining showed that CP pre-treatment conferred significant protection from mitochondrial membrane permeability and increased ATP production in CP-treated cells than oxalate-alone-treated cells. In addition, CP treated cells significantly decreased the expression of phosphorylated JNK/SAPK and ERK1/2 as compared to oxalate-alone-treated cells. We concluded that CP could be used as a potential free radical-scavenging therapeutic strategy against oxidative stress-associated diseases including urolithiasis.

  16. Salvianolic acid B protects endothelial cells from oxidant-mediated damage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xue-jun

    2008-01-01

    Objective To investigate the protective effects of Salvianolic acid B(Sal B) on hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced injury in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Sal B is considered as one of the most active anti-oxidant and the major pharmacological component of the herb, Salvia miltiorrhiza. Its beneficial effects include hepatoprotection, elicitation of endothelium-dependent vasodilation, lowering blood pressure in hypertension, inhibition of HIV-1 replication and suppressing inflammatory cytokine- stimulated endothelial adhesiveness to human monocytie cells by its strong antioxidant activities. Methods Treatment with H2O2 significantly decreased the cell viability and increased the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage that is an apoptotic feature. Pretreatment with Sal B prevented significantly from H2O2-induced cell apoptosis and other damages in a concentration-dependent manner. The mechanism of Sal B protection was studied with two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) coupled to hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (Q-TOF) mass spectrometer. Results Data base searching implicated glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78), a central regulator for ER stress, was up-regulated in Sal B-exposed HUVECs. After exposure to Sal B, the level of activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) was raised, with a transient phosphorylation of the α subunit of eukaryotic translation initiation factor (eIF2α). Knock-down of GRP78 by siRNA significantly reduced protective effects of Sal B. Conclusions These results suggest that Sal B-induced GRP78 upregulation via phosphorylation of eIF2α and resultant translation of ATF4. And up-regulation of ER chaperones induced by Sal B may play an important role in protecting human endothelial cells from oxidative stress-induced cellular damage.

  17. Peptide micelle-mediated curcumin delivery for protection of islet β-cells under hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jaesik; Oh, Jungju; Ihm, Sung-Hee; Lee, Minhyung

    2016-08-01

    Islet transplantation is one of many therapeutic approaches for the treatment of diabetes. During transplant procedures, the isolated islets are subjected to hypoxic conditions, and undergo the apoptotic process. Curcumin has a cytoprotective effect, and may therefore be useful for the protection of islets under hypoxia. However, curcumin is hydrophobic, and an efficient curcumin carrier is required for effective treatment. In this study, R3V6 peptide micelles, composed of a 3-arginine stretch and 6-valine stretch, were evaluated as a curcumin carrier to INS-1 insulinoma cells. Curcumin was loaded into R3V6 micelles at a weight ratio of 10:3 (R3V6:curcumin). The size and surface charge of the curcumin-loaded R3V6 micelles (R3V6-curcumin) were approximately 250 nm and 17.49 mV, respectively. R3V6-curcumin delivered curcumin to the INS-1 cells more efficiently than either curcumin alone or a simple mixture of R3V6 and curcumin. MTT assay indicated that under hypoxia, R3V6-curcumin protected INS-1 cells more efficiently than curcumin alone. TUNEL and reactive oxygen species (ROS) assays suggested that R3V6-curcumin reduced INS-1 cell apoptosis under hypoxia. These results demonstrate that R3V6 peptide micelles are an effective carrier of curcumin, and that R3V6-curcumin may improve the viability of pancreatic β-cells in islet transplantation. PMID:26768151

  18. Latent infection of myeloid progenitors by human cytomegalovirus protects cells from FAS-mediated apoptosis through the cellular IL-10/PEA-15 pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Jonathan C. H.; Sinclair, John

    2015-01-01

    Latent infection of primary CD34+ progenitor cells by human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) results in their increased survival in the face of pro-apoptotic signals. For instance, we have shown previously that primary myeloid cells are refractory to FAS-mediated killing and that cellular IL-10 (cIL-10) is an important survival factor for this effect. However, how cIL-10 mediates this protection is unclear. Here, we have shown that cIL-10 signalling leading to upregulation of the cellular factor PEA-15 mediates latency-associated protection of CD34+ progenitor cells from the extrinsic death pathway. PMID:25957098

  19. A novel liposome adjuvant DPC mediates Mycobacterium tuberculosis subunit vaccine well to induce cell-mediated immunity and high protective efficacy in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xun; Da, Zejiao; Wang, Yue; Niu, Hongxia; Li, Ruiying; Yu, Hongjuan; He, Shanshan; Guo, Ming; Wang, Yong; Luo, Yanping; Ma, Xingming; Zhu, Bingdong

    2016-03-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a serious disease around the world, and protein based subunit vaccine is supposed to be a kind of promising novel vaccine against it. However, there is no effective adjuvant available in clinic to activate cell-mediated immune responses which is required for TB subunit vaccine. Therefore, it is imperative to develop new adjuvant. Here we reported an adjuvant composed of dimethyl dioctadecylammonium (DDA), Poly I:C and cholesterol (DPC for short). DDA can form a kind of cationic liposome with the ability to deliver and present antigen and can induce Th1 type cell-mediated immune response. Poly I:C, a ligand of TLR3 receptor, could attenuate the pathologic reaction induced by following Mycobacterium tuberculosis challenge. Cholesterol, which could enhance rigidity of lipid bilayer, is added to DDA and Poly I:C to improve the stability of the adjuvant. The particle size and Zeta-potential of DPC were analyzed in vitro. Furthermore, DPC was mixed with a TB fusion protein ESAT6-Ag85B-MPT64(190-198)-Mtb8.4-Rv2626c (LT70) to construct a subunit vaccine. The subunit vaccine-induced immune responses and protective efficacy against M. tuberculosis H37Rv infection in C57BL/6 mice were investigated. The results showed that the DPC adjuvant with particle size of 400nm and zeta potential of 40mV was in good stability. LT70 in the adjuvant of DPC generated strong antigen-specific humoral and cell-mediated immunity, and induced long-term higher protective efficacy against M. tuberculosis infection (5.41±0.38log10CFU) than traditional vaccine Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) (6.01±0.33log10CFU) and PBS control (6.53±0.26log10CFU) at 30 weeks post-vaccination. In conclusion, DPC would be a promising vaccine adjuvant with the ability to stimulate Th1 type cell-mediated immunity, and could be used in TB subunit vaccine. PMID:26845736

  20. Recombinant AAV-mediated Expression of Human BDNF Protects Neurons against Cell Apoptosis in Aβ-induced Neuronal Damage Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Zhaohui; MA Dongliang; FENG Gaifeng; MA Yanbing; HU Haitao

    2007-01-01

    The human brain-derived neurotrophic factor (hBDNF) gene was cloned by polymerase chain reaction and the recombinant adeno-associated viral vector inserted with hBDNF gene (AAV-hBDNF) was constructed. Cultured rat hippocampal neurons were treated with Aβ25-35 and serued as the experimental Aβ-induced neuronal damage model (AD model), and the AD model was infected with AAV-hBDNF to explore neuroprotective effects of expression of BDNF. Cell viability was assayed by MTT. The expression of bcl-2 anti-apoptosis protein was detected by immunocytochemical staining. The change of intracellular free Ca ion ([Ca2+]i) was measured by laser scanning confocal microscopy. The results showed that BDNF had protective effects against Aβ-induced neuronal damage. The expression of the bcl-2 anti-apoptosis protein was raised significantly and the balance of [Ca2+]i was maintained in the AAV-hBDNF treatment group as compared with AD model group. These data suggested that recombinant AAV mediated a stable expression of hBDNF in cultured hippocampal neurons and resulted in significant neuron protective effects in AD model. The BDNF may reduce neuron apoptosis through increasing the expression of the bcl-2 anti-apoptosis protein and inhibiting intracellular calcium overload. The viral vector-mediated gene expression of BDNF may pave the way of a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease.

  1. Berberine Protects Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells against LPS-Induced Apoptosis by Blocking JNK-Mediated Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Junping; Wang, Lijun; Wang, Linyao; Qian, Senmi; Fang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is a critical factor during the initiation of atherosclerosis. Berberine has a beneficial effect on endothelial function; however, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the effects of berberine on lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) induced apoptosis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and the molecular mechanisms mediating the effect. The effects of berberine on LPS-induced cell apoptosis and viability were measured with 5-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine staining, flow cytometry, and Cell Counting Kit-8 assays. The expression and/or activation of proapoptotic and antiapoptotic proteins or signaling pathways, including caspase-3, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, myeloid cell leukemia-1 (MCL-1), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, C-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and extracellular signal-regulated kinase, were determined with western blotting. The malondialdehyde levels, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, and production of proinflammatory cytokines were measured with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. The results demonstrated that berberine pretreatment protected HUVECs from LPS-induced apoptosis, attenuated LPS-induced injury, inhibited LPS-induced JNK phosphorylation, increased MCL-1 expression and SOD activity, and decreased proinflammatory cytokine production. The effects of berberine on LPS-treated HUVECs were prevented by SP600125, a JNK-specific inhibitor. Thus, berberine might be a potential candidate in the treatment of endothelial cell injury-related vascular diseases. PMID:27478481

  2. RNA Sensors Enable Human Mast Cell Anti-Viral Chemokine Production and IFN-Mediated Protection in Response to Antibody-Enhanced Dengue Virus Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Michael G.; McAlpine, Sarah M.; Huang, Yan Y.; Haidl, Ian D.; Al-Afif, Ayham; Jean S Marshall; Anderson, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Dengue hemorrhagic fever and/or dengue shock syndrome represent the most serious pathophysiological manifestations of human dengue virus infection. Despite intensive research, the mechanisms and important cellular players that contribute to dengue disease are unclear. Mast cells are tissue-resident innate immune cells that play a sentinel cell role in host protection against infectious agents via pathogen-recognition receptors by producing potent mediators that modulate inflammation, cell rec...

  3. Resveratrol self-emulsifying system increases the uptake by endothelial cells and improves protection against oxidative stress-mediated death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amri, Ahmed; Le Clanche, Solenn; Thérond, Patrice; Bonnefont-Rousselot, Dominique; Borderie, Didier; Lai-Kuen, René; Chaumeil, Jean-Claude; Sfar, Souad; Charrueau, Christine

    2014-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to develop and characterize a resveratrol self-emulsifying drug delivery system (Res-SEDDS), and to compare the uptake of resveratrol by bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECs), and the protection of these cells against hydrogen peroxide-mediated cell death, versus a control resveratrol ethanolic solution. Three Res-SEDDSs were prepared and evaluated. The in vitro self-emulsification properties of these formulations, the droplet size and the zeta potential of the nanoemulsions formed on adding them to water under mild agitation conditions were studied, together with their toxicity on BAECs. An optimal atoxic formulation (20% Miglyol® 812, 70% Montanox® 80, 10% ethanol 96% v/v) was selected and further studied. Pre-incubation of BAECs for 180 min with 25 μM resveratrol in the nanoemulsion obtained from the selected SEDDS significantly increased the membrane and intracellular concentrations of resveratrol (for example, 0.076±0.015 vs. ethanolic solution 0.041±0.016 nmol/mg of protein after 60 min incubation, p<0.05). Resveratrol intracellular localization was confirmed by fluorescence confocal microscopy. Resveratrol nanoemulsion significantly improved the endothelial cell protection from H2O2-induced injury (750, 1000 and 1500 μM H2O2) in comparison with incubation with the control resveratrol ethanolic solution (for example, 55±6% vs. 38±5% viability after 1500 μM H2O2 challenge, p<0.05). In conclusion, formulation of resveratrol as a SEDDS significantly improved its cellular uptake and potentiated its antioxidant properties on BAECs. PMID:24184672

  4. Commensal-induced regulatory T cells mediate protection against pathogen-stimulated NF-kappaB activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caitlin O'Mahony

    Full Text Available Host defence against infection requires a range of innate and adaptive immune responses that may lead to tissue damage. Such immune-mediated pathologies can be controlled with appropriate T regulatory (Treg activity. The aim of the present study was to determine the influence of gut microbiota composition on Treg cellular activity and NF-kappaB activation associated with infection. Mice consumed the commensal microbe Bifidobacterium infantis 35624 followed by infection with Salmonella typhimurium or injection with LPS. In vivo NF-kappaB activation was quantified using biophotonic imaging. CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T cell phenotypes and cytokine levels were assessed using flow cytometry while CD4+ T cells were isolated using magnetic beads for adoptive transfer to naïve animals. In vivo imaging revealed profound inhibition of infection and LPS induced NF-kappaB activity that preceded a reduction in S. typhimurium numbers and murine sickness behaviour scores in B. infantis-fed mice. In addition, pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion, T cell proliferation, and dendritic cell co-stimulatory molecule expression were significantly reduced. In contrast, CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T cell numbers were significantly increased in the mucosa and spleen of mice fed B. infantis. Adoptive transfer of CD4+CD25+ T cells transferred the NF-kappaB inhibitory activity. Consumption of a single commensal micro-organism drives the generation and function of Treg cells which control excessive NF-kappaB activation in vivo. These cellular interactions provide the basis for a more complete understanding of the commensal-host-pathogen trilogue that contribute to host homeostatic mechanisms underpinning protection against aberrant activation of the innate immune system in response to a translocating pathogen or systemic LPS.

  5. T- and B-Cell-Mediated Protection Induced by Novel, Live Attenuated Pertussis Vaccine in Mice. Cross Protection against Parapertussis

    OpenAIRE

    Pascal Feunou Feunou; Julie Bertout; Camille Locht

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite the extensive use of efficacious vaccines, pertussis still ranks among the major causes of childhood mortality worldwide. Two types of pertussis vaccines are currently available, whole-cell, and the more recent acellular vaccines. Because of reduced reactogenicity and comparable efficacy acellular vaccines progressively replace whole-cell vaccines. However, both types require repeated administrations for optimal efficacy. We have recently developed a live attenuated vaccin...

  6. TCR down-regulation boosts T-cell-mediated cytotoxicity and protection against poxvirus infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ann K; Regner, Matthias; Bonefeld, Charlotte M;

    2011-01-01

    Cytotoxic T (Tc) cells play a key role in the defense against virus infections. Tc cells recognize infected cells via the T-cell receptor (TCR) and subsequently kill the target cells by one or more cytotoxic mechanisms. Induction of the cytotoxic mechanisms is finely tuned by the activation signals...... from the TCR. To determine whether TCR down-regulation affects the cytotoxicity of Tc cells, we studied TCR down-regulation-deficient CD3¿LLAA mice. We found that Tc cells from CD3¿LLAA mice have reduced cytotoxicity due to a specific deficiency in exocytosis of lytic granules. To determine whether....... Finally, we found that TCR signaling in CD3¿LLAA Tc cells caused highly increased tyrosine phosphorylation and activation of the c-Cbl ubiquitin ligase, and that the impaired exocytosis of lytic granules could be rescued by the knockdown of c-Cbl. Thus, our work demonstrates that TCR down-regulation...

  7. Helicobacter pylori-Mediated Protection from Allergy Is Associated with IL-10-Secreting Peripheral Blood Regulatory T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Khiyam; Letley, Darren P; Greenaway, A Borgel; Kenefeck, Rupert; Winter, Jody A; Tomlinson, William; Rhead, Joanne; Staples, Emily; Kaneko, Kazuyo; Atherton, John C; Robinson, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infections are usually established in early childhood and continuously stimulate immunity, including T-helper 1 (Th1), Th17, and regulatory T-cell (Treg) responses, throughout life. Although known to be the major cause of peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer, disease occurs in a minority of those who are infected. Recently, there has been much interest in beneficial effects arising from infection with this pathogen. Published data robustly show that the infection is protective against asthma in mouse models. Epidemiological studies show that H. pylori is inversely associated with human allergy and asthma, but there is a paucity of mechanistic data to explain this. Since Th1 and Treg responses are reported to protect against allergic responses, we investigated if there were links between the human systemic Th1 and Treg response to H. pylori and allergen-specific IgE levels. The human cytokine and T-cell responses were examined using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from 49 infected and 58 uninfected adult patients. Concentrations of total and allergen-specific plasma IgE were determined by ELISA and ImmunoCAP assays. These responses were analyzed according to major virulence factor genotypes of the patients' colonizing H. pylori strains. An in vitro assay was employed, using PBMCs from infected and uninfected donors, to determine the role of Treg cytokines in the suppression of IgE. Significantly higher frequencies of IL-10-secreting CD4(+)CD25(hi) Tregs, but not H. pylori-specific Th1 cells, were present in the peripheral blood of infected patients. Total and allergen-specific IgE concentrations were lower when there was a strong Treg response, and blocking IL-10 in vitro dramatically restored IgE responses. IgE concentrations were also significantly lower when patients were infected with CagA(+) strains or those expressing the more active i1 form of VacA. The systemic IL-10(+) Treg response is therefore likely to play a role in H

  8. Helicobacter pylori-mediated protection from allergy is associated with IL-10-secreting peripheral blood regulatory T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khiyam eHussain

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori infections are usually established in early childhood and continuously stimulate immunity, including T-helper 1 (Th1, Th17 and regulatory T-cell (Treg responses, throughout life. Although known to be the major cause of peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer, disease occurs in a minority of those who are infected. Recently there has been much interest in beneficial effects arising from infection with this pathogen. Published data robustly show that the infection is protective against asthma in mouse models. Epidemiological studies show that H. pylori is inversely associated with human allergy and asthma, but there is a paucity of mechanistic data to explain this. Since Th1 and Treg responses are reported to protect against allergic responses, we investigated if there were links between the human systemic Th1 and Treg response to H. pylori and allergen-specific IgE levels. The human cytokine and T-cell responses were examined using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs from 49 infected and 58 uninfected adult patients. Concentrations of total and allergen-specific plasma IgE were determined by ELISA and ImmunoCAP assays. These responses were analysed according to major virulence factor genotypes of the patients’ colonizing H. pylori strains. An in vitro assay was employed, using PBMCs from infected and uninfected donors, to determine the role of Treg cytokines in the suppression of IgE. Significantly higher frequencies of IL-10-secreting CD4+CD25hi Tregs, but not H. pylori-specific Th1 cells, were present in the peripheral blood of infected patients. Total and allergen-specific IgE concentrations were lower when there was a strong Treg response, and blocking IL-10 in vitro dramatically restored IgE responses. IgE concentrations were also significantly lower when patients were infected with CagA+ strains or those expressing the more active i1 form of VacA. The systemic IL-10+ Treg response is therefore likely to play a

  9. Vaccine-induced T cell-mediated immunity plays a critical role in early protection against pseudorabies virus (suid herpes virus type 1) infection in pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rooij, van E.M.A.; Bruin, de M.G.M.; Visser-Hendriksen, de Y.E.; Middel, W.G.; Boersma, W.J.A.; Bianchi, A.T.J.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the relative importance of antibody and T cell-mediated immunity in protection against pseudorabies virus (suid herpes virus type 1) infection in pigs. We induced different levels of immune responses by using: (1) a modified live vaccine; (2) the same modified li

  10. Absence of Nucks1 enhances mesenchymal stem cells mediated cardiac protection

    OpenAIRE

    Chiu, Sin-ming; 趙善明

    2013-01-01

    Despite major advances in diagnosis and prevention of coronary artery disease (CAD), the development of therapies to regenerate functional cardiomyocytes after myocardial infarction (MI) is very challenging. Studies have demonstrated that bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) secrete a panel of growth factors and anti-inflammatory cytokines to activate resident cardiomyocytes and cardiac stem cells in myocardial repair after MI. However, the mechanisms of modulating BM-MSC secr...

  11. Leflunomide or A77 1726 protect from acetaminophen-induced cell injury through inhibition of JNK-mediated mitochondrial permeability transition in immortalized human hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leflunomide, a disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug, protects against T-cell-mediated liver injury by poorly understood mechanisms. The active metabolite of leflunomide, A77 1726 (teriflunomide) has been shown to inhibit stress-activated protein kinases (JNK pathway), which are key regulators of mitochondria-mediated cell death. Therefore, we hypothesized that leflunomide may protect from drugs that induce the mitochondrial permeability transition (mPT) by blocking the JNK signaling pathway. To this end, we exposed cultured immortalized human hepatocytes (HC-04) to the standard protoxicant drug acetaminophen (APAP), which induces CsA-sensitive mPT-mediated cell death. We determined the effects of leflunomide on the extent of APAP-induced hepatocyte injury and the upstream JNK-mediated mitochondrial signaling pathways. We found that leflunomide or A77 1726 concentration-dependently protected hepatocytes from APAP (1 mM)-induced mitochondrial permeabilization and lethal cell injury. This was not due to proximal inhibition of CYP-catalyzed APAP bioactivation to its thiol-reactive metabolite. Instead, we demonstrate that leflunomide (20 μM) inhibited the APAP-induced early (3 h) activation (phosphorylation) of JNK1/2, thus inhibiting phosphorylation of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 and preventing P-Bcl-2-mediated induction of the mPT. This greatly attenuated mitochondrial cytochrome c release, which we used as a marker for mitochondrial permeabilization. The specific JNK2 inhibitor SP600125 similarly protected from APAP-induced cell death. In conclusion, these findings are consistent with our hypothesis that leflunomide protects from protoxicant-induced hepatocyte injury by inhibiting JNK signaling and preventing mPT induction

  12. JNK1 protects against glucolipotoxicity-mediated beta-cell apoptosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prause, Michala; Christensen, Dan Ploug; Billestrup, Nils;

    2014-01-01

    . Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and oxidative stress are elicited by palmitate and high glucose concentrations further potentiating JNK activity. Our aim was to determine the role of the JNK subtypes JNK1, JNK2 and JNK3 in palmitate and high glucose-induced β-cell apoptosis. We established insulin-producing INS1...

  13. PDGF-mediated protection of SH-SY5Y cells against Tat toxin involves regulation of extracellular glutamate and intracellular calcium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) protein Tat has been implicated in mediating neuronal apoptosis, one of the hallmark features of HIV-associated dementia (HAD). Mitigation of the toxic effects of Tat could thus be a potential mechanism for reducing HIV toxicity in the brain. In this study we demonstrated that Tat-induced neurotoxicity was abolished by NMDA antagonist-MK801, suggesting the role of glutamate in this process. Furthermore, we also found that pretreatment of SH-SY5Y cells with PDGF exerted protection against Tat toxicity by decreasing extracellular glutamate levels. We also demonstrated that extracellular calcium chelator EGTA was able to abolish PDGF-mediated neuroprotection, thereby underscoring the role of calcium signaling in PDGF-mediated neuroprotection. We also showed that Erk signaling pathway was critical for PDGF-mediated protection of cells. Additionally, blocking calcium entry with EGTA resulted in suppression of PDGF-induced Erk activation. These findings thus underscore the role of PDGF-mediated calcium signaling and Erk phosphorylation in the protection of cells against HIV Tat toxicity.

  14. Caveolin-1 protects against hepatic ischemia/reperfusion injury through ameliorating peroxynitrite-mediated cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lei; Chen, Xingmiao; Peng, Tao; Yang, Dan; Wang, Qi; Lv, Zhiping; Shen, Jiangang

    2016-06-01

    Nitrative stress is considered as an important pathological process of hepatic ischemia and reperfusion injury but its regulating mechanisms are largely unknown. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that caveolin-1 (Cav-1), a plasma membrane scaffolding protein, could be an important cellular signaling against hepatic I/R injury through inhibiting peroxynitrite (ONOO(-))-induced cellular damage. Male wild-type mice and Cav-1 knockout (Cav-1(-/-)) were subjected to 1h hepatic ischemia following 1, 6 and 12h of reperfusion by clipping and releasing portal vessels respectively. Immortalized human hepatocyte cell line (L02) was subjected to 1h hypoxia and 6h reoxygenation and treated with Cav-1 scaffolding domain peptide. The major discoveries included: (1) the expression of Cav-1 in serum and liver tissues of wild-type mice was time-dependently elevated during hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury. (2) Cav-1 scaffolding domain peptide treatment inhibited cleaved caspase-3 expression in the hypoxia-reoxygenated L02 cells; (3) Cav-1 knockout (Cav-1(-/-)) mice had significantly higher levels of serum transaminases (ALT&AST) and TNF-α, and higher rates of apoptotic cell death in liver tissues than wild-type mice after subjected to 1h hepatic ischemia and 6hour reperfusion; (4) Cav-1(-/-) mice revealed higher expression levels of iNOS, ONOO(-) and 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT) in the liver than wild-type mice, and Fe-TMPyP, a representative peroxynitrite decomposition catalyst (PDC), remarkably reduced level of ONOO(-) and 3-NT and ameliorated the serum ALT, AST and TNF-α levels in both wild-type and Cav-1(-/-) mice. Taken together, we conclude that Cav-1 could play a critical role in preventing nitrative stress-induced liver damage during hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury. PMID:27021966

  15. Gene delivery of the elastase inhibitor elafin protects macrophages from neutrophil elastase-mediated impairment of apoptotic cell recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksen, Peter A; Devitt, Andrew; Kotelevtsev, Yuri; Sallenave, Jean-Michel

    2004-09-10

    The resolution of inflammation is dependent on recognition and phagocytic removal of apoptotic cells by macrophages. Receptors for apoptotic cells are sensitive to degradation by human neutrophil elastase (HNE). We show in the present study that HNE cleaves macrophage cell surface CD14 and in so doing, reduces phagocytic recognition of apoptotic lymphocytic cells (Mutu 1). Using an improved method of adenovirus-mediated transfection of macrophages with the HNE inhibitor elafin, we demonstrate that elafin overexpression prevents CD14 cleavage and restores apoptotic cell recognition by macrophages. This approach of genetic modification of macrophages could be used to restore apoptotic cell recognition in inflammatory conditions. PMID:15358543

  16. Phloroglucinols inhibit chemical mediators and xanthine oxidase, and protect cisplatin-induced cell death by reducing reactive oxygen species in normal human urothelial and bladder cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kai-Wei; Huang, A-Mei; Tu, Huang-Yao; Weng, Jing-Ru; Hour, Tzyh-Chyuan; Wei, Bai-Luh; Yang, Shyh-Chyun; Wang, Jih-Pyang; Pu, Yeong-Shiau; Lin, Chun-Nan

    2009-10-14

    Phloroglucinols, garcinielliptones HA-HE (1-5), and C (6) were studied in vitro for their inhibitory effects on chemical mediators released from mast cells, neutrophils, and macrophages. Compound 6 revealed significant inhibitory effect on release of lysozyme from rat neutrophils stimulated with formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLP)/cytochalasin B (CB). Compounds 3, 4, and 6 showed significant inhibitory effects on superoxide anion generation in rat neutrophils stimulated with (fMLP)/(CB), while compounds 1 and 5 revealed inhibitory effects on tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) formation in macrophages stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Compounds 1 and 3-6 showed inhibitory effects on xanthine oxidase (XO) and could inhibit the DNA breakage caused by O2(-*). Treatment of NTUB1 with 2 to 60 microM compound 3 and 5 microM cisplatin and SV-HUC1 with 9 to 60 microM 3 and 5 microM cisplatin, respectively, resulted in an increase of viability of cells. These results indicated that compounds 1 and 3-6 showed anti-inflammatory effects and antioxidant activities. Compound 3 mediates through the suppression of XO activity and reduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and protection of subsequent cell death. PMID:19754119

  17. Isoflavone genistein protects high glucose-induced human aortic endothelial cell apoptosis through estrogen receptor-mediated pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenwen Zhong; Yang Liu; Guang Yang; Hui Tian

    2008-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to determine if isoflavone genistien has protective effects against high glucose-induced cell apoptosis in human aortic endlthelial cells,and investigate the possible mechanism for this protection.Methods Human aortic endothelial cells subjected to normal (5mmol/L) or high glucose (25mmol/L) were treated with genistein at 0,50,100nmol/L.Parallel experiments were performed with 100nM 17b-estradiol,and also in the presence and absence of the pure anti-estrogen ICI-182,780 (100nmol/L).The effects on cell apoptotic DNA fragmentation were determined using cell death ELISA,and the effects on cellular proliferation were determined using tritiated thymidine incorporation assay.Estrogen receptor expression was detected by Taqman quantitative PCR.Results Genistein at 100nmol/L significantly reduced high glucose-induced DNA fragmentation,and reversed cell DNA synthesis inhibition (P<0.001) after 24 hours' incubation.The effect of genistein was completely blocked by ICI-182,780administration.Estrogen receptor beta,but not alpha was found to be expressed in these cells.Conclusion Isoflavone genistein shows protection against high glucose-induced cell damage through estrogen receptor beta,reducing apoptotic DNA damage and protecting from the inhibition of cell proliferation.

  18. Early Cellular Responses of Purine Nucleoside-mediated Protection of Hypoxia-induced Injuries of Neuronal PC12 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bettina Tomaselli

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxia in brain may lead to cell death by apoptosis and necrosis. In parallel adenosine, a powerful endogenous neuroprotectant is formed. We wanted to investigate the effect of adenosine and its purine nucleoside relatives, inosine and guanosine on early cellular responses to hypoxia. O2-sensitive neuronal PC12-cells were subjected to chemical hypoxia induced with rotenone, an inhibitor of mitochondrial complex I. Loss of viability after hypoxic insult was impressively rescued by adenosine, guanosine and inosine. PC12-cells mainly express the A2A adenosine receptor. Its inhibition with a specific antagonist (CSC induced cell death of PC12-cells, which could be salvaged by adenosine but not with guanosine or inosine. We have previously demonstrated the important role of mitogen activated protein kinases 1/2 (p42/44 MAPK in purine-mediated rescue. In this study we were interested in the involvement of protein kinases whose activities mediate these processes, including protein kinase A (PKA, phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3-K and protein kinase C-related kinases (PRK 1/2. Pharmacological inhibition of PKA and PI3-K increased hypoxia-induced toxicity and likewise also affected the rescue by purine nucleosides. Nerve growth factor (NGF and purine nucleosides induced an activation of PRK 1/2, which to our knowledge indicates for the first time that these kinases are potentially involved in purine nucleoside-mediated rescue of hypoxic neuronal cells. Results suggest that A2A receptor expressing cells are mainly dependent on the purine nucleoside adenosine for their rescue after hypoxic insult. In addition to PKA, PI3-K is an important effector molecule in A2A-mediated signaling and for the rescue of PC12-cells after hypoxic insult.

  19. Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Protects Human Islets against Cytokine-Mediated β-Cell Dysfunction and Death: A Proteomic Study of the Pathways Involved

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rondas, Dieter; Bugliani, Marco; D’Hertog, Wannes;

    2013-01-01

    -treated human islets with GLP-1 resulted in a marked protection of β-cells against cytokine-induced apoptosis and significantly attenuated cytokine-mediated inhibition of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. The cytoprotective effects of GLP-1 coincided with substantial alterations in the protein expression...... profile of cytokine-treated human islets, illustrating a counteracting effect on proteins from different functional classes such as actin cytoskeleton, chaperones, metabolic proteins, and islet regenerating proteins. In summary, GLP-1 alters in an integrated manner protein networks in cytokine......-exposed human islets while protecting them against cytokine-mediated cell death and dysfunction. These data illustrate the beneficial effects of GLP-1 on human islets under immune attack, leading to a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms involved, a prerequisite for improving therapies for diabetic...

  20. IL-33-mediated protection against experimental cerebral malaria is linked to induction of type 2 innate lymphoid cells, M2 macrophages and regulatory T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Gaelle Besnard

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral malaria (CM is a complex parasitic disease caused by Plasmodium sp. Failure to establish an appropriate balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory immune responses is believed to contribute to the development of cerebral pathology. Using the blood-stage PbA (Plasmodium berghei ANKA model of infection, we show here that administration of the pro-Th2 cytokine, IL-33, prevents the development of experimental cerebral malaria (ECM in C57BL/6 mice and reduces the production of inflammatory mediators IFN-γ, IL-12 and TNF-α. IL-33 drives the expansion of type-2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2 that produce Type-2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13, leading to the polarization of the anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages, which in turn expand Foxp3 regulatory T cells (Tregs. PbA-infected mice adoptively transferred with ILC2 have elevated frequency of M2 and Tregs and are protected from ECM. Importantly, IL-33-treated mice deleted of Tregs (DEREG mice are no longer able to resist ECM. Our data therefore provide evidence that IL-33 can prevent the development of ECM by orchestrating a protective immune response via ILC2, M2 macrophages and Tregs.

  1. CD8 T cell-mediated protection against liver-stage malaria: Lessons from a mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John eHarty

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Malaria is a major global health problem, with severe mortality in children living is Sub-Saharan Africa, and there is currently no licensed effective vaccine. However, vaccine-induced protection from Plasmodium infection, the causative agent of malaria, was established for humans in small clinical trials and for rodents in the 1960’s. Soon after, a critical role for memory CD8 T cells in vaccine induced protection against Plasmodium liver-stage infection was established in rodent models and is assumed to apply to humans. However, these seminal early studies have led to only modest advances over the ensuing years in our understanding the basic features of memory CD8 T cells required for protection against liver-stage Plasmodium infection, an issue which has likely impeded the development of effective vaccines for humans. Given the ethical and practical limitations in gaining mechanistic insight from human vaccine and challenge studies, animal models still have an important role in dissecting the basic parameters underlying memory CD8 T cell immunity to Plasmodium. Here, we will highlight recent data from our own work in the mouse model of Plasmodium infection that identify quantitative and qualitative features of protective memory CD8 T cell responses. Finally, these lessons will be discussed in the context of recent findings from clinical trials of vaccine–induced protection in controlled human challenge models.

  2. CD8 T-cell-mediated protection against liver-stage malaria: lessons from a mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Braeckel-Budimir, Natalija; Harty, John T.

    2014-01-01

    Malaria is a major global health problem, with severe mortality in children living in sub-Saharan Africa, and there is currently no licensed, effective vaccine. However, vaccine-induced protection from Plasmodium infection, the causative agent of malaria, was established for humans in small clinical trials and for rodents in the 1960s. Soon after, a critical role for memory CD8 T cells in vaccine-induced protection against Plasmodium liver-stage infection was established in rodent models and is assumed to apply to humans. However, these seminal early studies have led to only modest advances over the ensuing years in our understanding the basic features of memory CD8 T cells required for protection against liver-stage Plasmodium infection, an issue which has likely impeded the development of effective vaccines for humans. Given the ethical and practical limitations in gaining mechanistic insight from human vaccine and challenge studies, animal models still have an important role in dissecting the basic parameters underlying memory CD8 T-cell immunity to Plasmodium. Here, we will highlight recent data from our own work in the mouse model of Plasmodium infection that identify quantitative and qualitative features of protective memory CD8 T-cell responses. Finally, these lessons will be discussed in the context of recent findings from clinical trials of vaccine-induced protection in controlled human challenge models. PMID:24936199

  3. SIRT Is Required for EDP-Mediated Protective Responses toward Hypoxia–Reoxygenation Injury in Cardiac Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samokhvalov, Victor; Jamieson, Kristi L.; Fedotov, Ilia; Endo, Tomoko; Seubert, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia–reoxygenation (H/R) injury is known to cause extensive injury to cardiac myocardium promoting development of cardiac dysfunction. Despite the vast number of studies dedicated to studying H/R injury, the molecular mechanisms behind it are multiple, complex, and remain very poorly understood, which makes development of novel pharmacological agents challenging. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n3) is an n - 3 polyunsaturated fatty acid obtained from dietary sources, which produces numerous effects including regulation of cell survival and death mechanisms. The beneficial effects of DHA toward the cardiovascular system are well documented but the relative role of DHA or one of its more potent metabolites is unresolved. Emerging evidence indicates that cytochrome P450 (CYP) epoxygenase metabolites of DHA, epoxydocosapentaenoic acids (EDPs), have more potent biological activity than DHA in cardiac cells. In this study we examined whether EDPs protect HL-1 cardiac cells from H/R injury. Our observations demonstrate that treatment with 19,20-EDP protected HL-1 cardiac cells from H/R damage through a mechanism(s) protecting and enhancing mitochondrial quality. EDP treatment increased the relative rates of mitobiogenesis and mitochondrial respiration in control and H/R exposed cardiac cells. The observed EDP protective response toward H/R injury involved SIRT1-dependent pathways. PMID:27242531

  4. Inducible nitric-oxide synthase plays a minimal role in lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus-induced, T cell-mediated protective immunity and immunopathology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartholdy, C; Nansen, A; Christensen, Jeanette Erbo; Marker, O; Thomsen, Allan Randrup

    . This might suggest a role of NO in regulating vascular reactivity in the context of T cell-mediated inflammation. In conclusion, these findings indicate a minimal role for iNOS/NO in the host response to LCMV. Except for a reduced local oedema in the knockout mice, iNOS/NO seems to be redundant in......By using mice with a targetted disruption in the gene encoding inducible nitric-oxide synthase (iNOS), we have studied the role of nitric oxide (NO) in lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV)-induced, T cell-mediated protective immunity and immunopathology. The afferent phase of the T cell...... the up-regulation of proinflammatory cytokine/chemokine genes significantly, nor did it influence the development of fatal meningitis. However, a reduced virus-specific delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction was observed in iNOS-deficient mice compared with both IFN-gamma-deficient and wild-type mice...

  5. Immune Privilege as an Intrinsic CNS Property: Astrocytes Protect the CNS against T-Cell-Mediated Neuroinflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrike Gimsa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Astrocytes have many functions in the central nervous system (CNS. They support differentiation and homeostasis of neurons and influence synaptic activity. They are responsible for formation of the blood-brain barrier (BBB and make up the glia limitans. Here, we review their contribution to neuroimmune interactions and in particular to those induced by the invasion of activated T cells. We discuss the mechanisms by which astrocytes regulate pro- and anti-inflammatory aspects of T-cell responses within the CNS. Depending on the microenvironment, they may become potent antigen-presenting cells for T cells and they may contribute to inflammatory processes. They are also able to abrogate or reprogram T-cell responses by inducing apoptosis or secreting inhibitory mediators. We consider apparently contradictory functions of astrocytes in health and disease, particularly in their interaction with lymphocytes, which may either aggravate or suppress neuroinflammation.

  6. Induction of protective CD4+ T cell-mediated immunity by a Leishmania peptide delivered in recombinant influenza viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Kedzierska

    Full Text Available The available evidence suggests that protective immunity to Leishmania is achieved by priming the CD4(+ Th1 response. Therefore, we utilised a reverse genetics strategy to generate influenza A viruses to deliver an immunogenic Leishmania peptide. The single, immunodominant Leishmania-specific LACK(158-173 CD4(+ peptide was engineered into the neuraminidase stalk of H1N1 and H3N2 influenza A viruses. These recombinant viruses were used to vaccinate susceptible BALB/c mice to determine whether the resultant LACK(158-173-specific CD4(+ T cell responses protected against live L. major infection. We show that vaccination with influenza-LACK(158-173 triggers LACK(158-173-specific Th1-biased CD4(+ T cell responses within an appropriate cytokine milieu (IFN-γ, IL-12, essential for the magnitude and quality of the Th1 response. A single intraperitoneal exposure (non-replicative route of immunisation to recombinant influenza delivers immunogenic peptides, leading to a marked reduction (2-4 log in parasite burden, albeit without reduction in lesion size. This correlated with increased numbers of IFN-γ-producing CD4(+ T cells in vaccinated mice compared to controls. Importantly, the subsequent prime-boost approach with a serologically distinct strain of influenza (H1N1->H3N2 expressing LACK(158-173 led to a marked reduction in both lesion size and parasite burdens in vaccination trials. This protection correlated with high levels of IFN-γ producing cells in the spleen, which were maintained for 6 weeks post-challenge indicating the longevity of this protective effector response. Thus, these experiments show that Leishmania-derived peptides delivered in the context of recombinant influenza viruses are immunogenic in vivo, and warrant investigation of similar vaccine strategies to generate parasite-specific immunity.

  7. Surgical Stress Abrogates Pre-Existing Protective T Cell Mediated Anti-Tumor Immunity Leading to Postoperative Cancer Recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananth, Abhirami A; Tai, Lee-Hwa; Lansdell, Casey; Alkayyal, Almohanad A; Baxter, Katherine E; Angka, Leonard; Zhang, Jiqing; Tanese de Souza, Christiano; Stephenson, Kyle B; Parato, Kelley; Bramson, Jonathan L; Bell, John C; Lichty, Brian D; Auer, Rebecca C

    2016-01-01

    Anti-tumor CD8+ T cells are a key determinant for overall survival in patients following surgical resection for solid malignancies. Using a mouse model of cancer vaccination (adenovirus expressing melanoma tumor-associated antigen (TAA)-dopachrome tautomerase (AdDCT) and resection resulting in major surgical stress (abdominal nephrectomy), we demonstrate that surgical stress results in a reduction in the number of CD8+ T cell that produce cytokines (IFNγ, TNFα, Granzyme B) in response to TAA. This effect is secondary to both reduced proliferation and impaired T cell function following antigen binding. In a prophylactic model, surgical stress completely abrogates tumor protection conferred by vaccination in the immediate postoperative period. In a clinically relevant surgical resection model, vaccinated mice undergoing a positive margin resection with surgical stress had decreased survival compared to mice with positive margin resection alone. Preoperative immunotherapy with IFNα significantly extends survival in surgically stressed mice. Importantly, myeloid derived suppressor cell (MDSC) population numbers and functional impairment of TAA-specific CD8+ T cell were altered in surgically stressed mice. Our observations suggest that cancer progression may result from surgery-induced suppression of tumor-specific CD8+ T cells. Preoperative immunotherapies aimed at targeting the prometastatic effects of cancer surgery will reduce recurrence and improve survival in cancer surgery patients. PMID:27196057

  8. Neonatal Fc Receptor-Mediated IgG Transport Across Porcine Intestinal Epithelial Cells: Potentially Provide the Mucosal Protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jinyue; Li, Fei; He, Qigai; Jin, Hui; Liu, Mei; Li, Shaowen; Hu, Sishun; Xiao, Yuncai; Bi, Dingren; Li, Zili

    2016-06-01

    It has been well characterized that piglets can absorb colostrum IgG across the intestine to neonatal bloodstream and a certain level of IgG has been found in the mucosal secretions of the porcine intestinal tract. However, little is known about how the maternal IgG transport across the intestinal barrier and how IgG enter the lumen of intestinal tract. In this study, we demonstrated that the porcine neonatal Fc receptor (pFcRn) was expressed in a model of normal porcine intestinal epithelial cells (IPEC-J2) as well as in kidney cells (PK-15), and pFcRn was mainly distributed in the apical side of the polarized IPEC-J2 cells. Analyzing the phylogenetic relatedness of this gene we found that swine and human neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) amino acid sequence are closer than rodents. We also showed that pFcRn mediated bidirectional IgG transport across polarized IPEC-J2 cells and bound to IgG in a pH-dependent manner. Furthermore, pFcRn-transcytosed viral-specific IgG reduced the transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) yield from the luminal direction by a 50% tissue culture infective dose (TCID50) assay. Our results indicate that pFcRn-dependent bidirectional IgG transport across the intestinal epithelium plays critical role in the acquisition of humoral immunity in early life and in host defense at mucosal surfaces. PMID:26982157

  9. The Bone Marrow-Mediated Protection of Myeloproliferative Neoplastic Cells to Vorinostat and Ruxolitinib Relies on the Activation of JNK and PI3K Signalling Pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno A Cardoso

    Full Text Available The classical BCR-ABL-negative Myeloproliferative Neoplasms (MPN are a group of heterogeneous haematological diseases characterized by constitutive JAK-STAT pathway activation. Targeted therapy with Ruxolitinib, a JAK1/2-specific inhibitor, achieves symptomatic improvement but does not eliminate the neoplastic clone. Similar effects are seen with histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi, albeit with poorer tolerance. Here, we show that bone marrow (BM stromal cells (HS-5 protected MPN-derived cell lines (SET-2; HEL and UKE-1 and MPN patient-derived BM cells from the cytotoxic effects of Ruxolitinib and the HDACi Vorinostat. This protective effect was mediated, at least in part, by the secretion of soluble factors from the BM stroma. In addition, it correlated with the activation of signalling pathways important for cellular homeostasis, such as JAK-STAT, PI3K, JNK, MEK-ERK and NF-κB. Importantly, the pharmacological inhibition of JNK and PI3K pathways completely abrogated the BM protective effect on MPN cell lines and MPN patient samples. Our findings shed light on mechanisms of tumour survival and may indicate novel therapeutic approaches for the treatment of MPN.

  10. HIV-TAT mediated protein transduction of Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD1) protects skin cells from ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation-induced skin injury remains a serious concern during radiotherapy. Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase (Cu/Zn-SOD, SOD1) is a conserved enzyme for scavenging superoxide radical in cells. Because of the integrity of cell membranes, exogenous molecule is not able to be incorporated into cells, which limited the application of natural SOD1. The aim of this study was to evaluate the protective role of HIV-TAT protein transduction domain mediated protein transduction of SOD1 (TAT-SOD1) against ionizing radiation. The recombinant TAT-SOD1 and SOD1 were obtained by prokaryotic–based protein expression system. The transduction effect and biological activity of TAT-SOD1 was measured by immunofluorescence and antioxidant capability assays in human keratinocyte HaCaT cells. Mito-Tracker staining, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation assay, cell apoptosis analysis and malondialdehyde (MDA) assay were used to access the protective effect of TAT- SOD1. Uptake of TAT-SOD1 by HaCaT cells retained its biological activity. Compared with natural SOD1, the application of TAT-SOD1 significantly enhanced the viability and decreased the apoptosis induced by X-ray irradiation. Moreover, TAT-SOD1 reduced ROS and preserved mitochondrial integrity after radiation exposure in HaCaT cells. Radiation-induced γH2AX foci, which are representative of DNA double strand breaks, were decreased by pretreatment with TAT-SOD1. Furthermore, subcutaneous application of TAT-SOD1 resulted in a significant decrease in 45 Gy electron beam-induced ROS and MDA concentration in the skins of rats. This study provides evidences for the protective role of TAT-SOD1 in alleviating radiation-induced damage in HaCaT cells and rat skins, which suggests a new therapeutic strategy for radiation-induced skin injury

  11. Rhein Protects Pancreatic β-Cells From Dynamin-Related Protein-1–Mediated Mitochondrial Fission and Cell Apoptosis Under Hyperglycemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Chen, Zhaohong; Zhang, Yujing; Zhang, Mingchao; Zhu, Xiaodong; Fan, Yun; Shi, Shaolin; Zen, Ke; Liu, Zhihong

    2013-01-01

    Rhein, an anthraquinone compound isolated from rhubarb, has been shown to improve glucose metabolism disorders in diabetic mice. The mechanism underlying the protective effect of rhein, however, remains unknown. Here, we demonstrate that rhein can protect the pancreatic β-cells against hyperglycemia-induced cell apoptosis through stabilizing mitochondrial morphology. Oral administration of rhein for 8 or 16 weeks in db/db mice significantly reduced fasting blood glucose (FBG) level and improved glucose tolerance. Cell apoptosis assay using both pancreatic sections and cultured pancreatic β-cells indicated that rhein strongly inhibited β-cell apoptosis. Morphological study showed that rhein was mainly localized at β-cell mitochondria and rhein could preserve mitochondrial ultrastructure by abolishing hyperglycemia-induced mitochondrial fission protein dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) expression. Western blot and functional analysis confirmed that rhein protected the pancreatic β-cells against hyperglycemia-induced apoptosis via suppressing mitochondrial Drp1 level. Finally, mechanistic study further suggested that decreased Drp1 level by rhein might be due to its effect on reducing cellular reactive oxygen species. Taken together, our study demonstrates for the first time that rhein can serve as a novel therapeutic agent for hyperglycemia treatment and rhein protects pancreatic β-cells from apoptosis by blocking the hyperglycemia-induced Drp1 expression. PMID:23919963

  12. Adenovirus-Mediated Over-Expression of Nrf2 Within Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs Protected Rats Against Acute Kidney Injury

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    Mohammad Mohammadzadeh-Vardin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Recent developments in the field of cell therapy have led to a renewed interest in treatment of acute kidney injury (AKI. However, the early death of transplanted mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs in stressful microenvironment of a recipient tissue is a major problem with this kind of treatment. The objective of this study was to determine whether overexpression of a cytoprotective factor, nuclear factor erythroid-2 related factor 2 (Nrf2, in MSCs could protect rats against AKI. Methods: The Nrf2 was overexpressed in MSCs by recombinant adenoviruses, and the MSCs were implanted to rats suffering from cisplatin-induced AKI. Results: The obtained results showed that transplantation with the engineered MSCs ameliorates cisplatin-induced AKI. Morphologic features of the investigated kidneys showed that transplantation with the MSCs in which Nrf2 had been overexpressed significantly improved the complications of AKI. Conclusion: These findings suggested that the engineered MSCs might be a good candidate to be further evaluated in clinical trials. However, detailed studies must be performed to investigate the possible carcinogenic effect of Nrf2 overexpression.

  13. Protective effect of whey protein hydrolysates on H₂O₂-induced PC12 cells oxidative stress via a mitochondria-mediated pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Man-Man; Zhang, Li; Yu, Hui-Xin; Meng, Jun; Sun, Zhen; Lu, Rong-Rong

    2013-11-15

    Whey protein hydrolysates (WPHs) were prepared with pepsin and trypsin. A PC12 cell model was built to observe the protective effect of WPHs against H2O2-induced oxidative stress. The results indicated that WPHs reduced apoptosis by 14% and increased antioxidant enzyme activities. Flow cytometry was used to assess the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), Ca(2+) levels and the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP). The results showed that WPHs suppressed ROS elevation and Ca(2+) levels and stabilised MMP by 16%. The anti-apoptosis/pro-apoptosis proteins Bcl-2/Bax and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) were investigated by Western-blot analysis, which indicated that WPHs increased the expression of Bcl-2 while inhibiting the expression of Bax and the degradation of PARP. WPHs also blocked Caspase-3 activation by 62%. The results demonstrate that WPHs can significantly protect PC12 cells against oxidative stress via a mitochondria-mediated pathway. These findings indicate the potential benefits of WPHs as valuable food antioxidative additives. PMID:23790857

  14. Proteomic Identification of Nrf2-Mediated Phase II Enzymes Critical for Protection of Tao Hong Si Wu Decoction against Oxygen Glucose Deprivation Injury in PC12 Cells

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    Hong-yi Qi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chinese herbal medicine formula Tao Hong Si Wu decoction (THSWD is traditionally used in China for cerebrovascular diseases. However, the molecular mechanisms of THSWD associated with the cerebral ischemia reperfusion injury are largely unknown. The current study applied the two-dimensional gel electrophoresis-based proteomics to investigate the different protein profiles in PC12 cells with and without the treatment of THSWD. Twenty-six proteins affected by THSWD were identified by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. Gene ontology analysis showed that those proteins participated in several important biological processes and exhibited diverse molecular functions. In particular, six of them were found to be phase II antioxidant enzymes, which were regulated by NF-E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2. Quantitative PCR further confirmed a dose-dependent induction of the six phase II enzymes by THSWD at the transcription level. Moreover, the individual ingredients of THSWD were discovered to synergistically contribute to the induction of phase II enzymes. Importantly, THSWD’s protection against oxygen-glucose deprivation-reperfusion (OGD-Rep induced cell death was significantly attenuated by antioxidant response element (ARE decoy oligonucleotides, suggesting the protection of THSWD may be likely regulated at least in part by Nrf2-mediated phase II enzymes. Thus, our data will help to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying the neuroprotective effect of THSWD.

  15. Protective role of adenovirus vector-mediated interleukin-10 gene therapy on endogenous islet β-cells in recent-onset type 1 diabetes in NOD mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    LI, CHENG; ZHANG, LIJUAN; CHEN, YANYAN; LIN, XIAOJIE; LI, TANG

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to provide an animal experimental basis for the protective effect of the adenoviral vector-mediated interleukin-10 (Ad-mIL-10) gene on islet β-cells during the early stages of type 1 diabetes (T1D) in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice. A total of 24 female NOD mice at the onset of diabetes were allocated at random into three groups (n=8 per group): Group 1, intraperitoneally injected with 0.1 ml Ad-mIL-10; group 2, intraperitoneally injected with 0.1 ml adenovirus vector; and group 3, was a diabetic control. In addition to groups 1, 2 and 3, 8 age- and gender-matched NOD mice were intraperitoneally injected with 0.1 ml PBS and assigned to group 4 as a normal control. All mice were examined weekly for body weight, urine glucose and blood glucose values prior to onset of diabetes, and at 1, 2 and 3 weeks after that, and all mice were sacrificed 3 weeks after injection. Serum levels of interleukin (IL)-10, interferon (IFN)-γ, IL-4, insulin and C-peptide were evaluated, and in addition the degree of insulitis and the local expression of IL-10 gene in the pancreas were detected. The apoptosis rate of pancreatic β-cells was determined using a TUNEL assay. Compared with groups 2 and 3, IL-10 levels in the serum and pancreas were elevated in group 1. Serum IFN-γ levels were decreased while serum IL-4 levels and IFN-γ/IL-4 ratio were significantly increased in group 1 (P0.05). The administration of the Ad-mIL-10 gene induced limited immune regulatory and protective effects on islet β-cell function in NOD mice with early T1D, while no significant reduction in insulitis, islet β-cell apoptosis rate and blood glucose was observed.

  16. Tomatine Adjuvantation of Protective Immunity to a Major Pre-erythrocytic Vaccine Candidate of Malaria is Mediated via CD8+ T Cell Release of IFN-γ

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    Karen G. Heal

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The glycoalkaloid tomatine, derived from the wild tomato, can act as a powerful adjuvant to elicit an antigen-specific cell-mediated immune response to the circumsporozoite (CS protein, a major pre-erythrocytic stage malaria vaccine candidate antigen. Using a defined MHC-class-I-restricted CS epitope in a Plasmodium berghei rodent model, antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity and IFN-γ secretion ex vivo were both significantly enhanced compared to responses detected from similarly stimulated splenocytes from naive and tomatine-saline-immunized mice. Further, through lymphocyte depletion it is demonstrated that antigen-specific IFN-γ is produced exclusively by the CD8+ T cell subset. We conclude that the processing of the P. berghei CS peptide as an exogenous antigen and its presentation via MHC class I molecules to CD8+ T cells leads to an immune response that is an in vitro correlate of protection against pre-erythrocytic malaria. Further characterization of tomatine as an adjuvant in malaria vaccine development is indicated.

  17. Neutrophil-mediated protection of cultured human vascular endothelial cells from damage by growing Candida albicans hyphae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interactions were studied between human neutrophils and cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells invaded by Candida albicans. In the absence of neutrophils, progressive Candida germination and hyphal growth extensively damaged endothelial cell monolayers over a period of 4 to 6 hours, as determined both by morphological changes and release of 51Cr from radiolabeled endothelial cells. Monolayers were completely destroyed and replaced by hyphae after 18 hours of incubation. In contrast, when added 2 hours after the monolayers had been infected with Candida, neutrophils selectively migrated toward and attached to hyphae at points of hyphal penetration into individual endothelial cells (observed by time-lapse video-microscopy). Attached neutrophils spread over hyphal surfaces both within and beneath the endothelial cells; neutrophil recruitment to initial sites of leukocyte-Candida-endothelial cell interactions continued throughout the first 60 minutes of observation. Neutrophil spreading and stasis were observed only along Candida hyphae and at sites of Candida-endothelial cell interactions. These events resulted in 58.0% killing of Candida at 2 hours and subsequent clearance of Candida from endothelial cell monolayers, as determined by microcolony counts and morphological observation. On introduction of additional neutrophils to yield higher ratios of neutrophils to endothelial cells (10 neutrophils:1 endothelial cell), neutrophil migration toward hyphal elements continued. Despite retraction or displacement of occasional endothelial cells by invading Candida and neutrophils, most endothelial cells remained intact, viable, and motile as verified both by morphological observations and measurement of 51Cr release from radiolabeled monolayers

  18. Moringa oleifera Lam. seed extract prevents fat diet induced oxidative stress in mice and protects liver cell-nuclei from hydroxyl radical mediated damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Nilanjan; Ganguli, Debdutta; Dey, Sanjit

    2015-12-01

    High fat diet (HFD) prompts metabolic pattern inducing reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in mitochondria thereby triggering multitude of chronic disorders in human. Antioxidants from plant sources may be an imperative remedy against this disorder. However, it requires scientific validation. In this study, we explored if (i) Moringa oleifera seed extract (MoSE) can neutralize ROS generated in HFD fed mice; (ii) protect cell-nuclei damage developed by Fenton reaction in vitro. Swiss mice were fed with HFD to develop oxidative stress model (HFD group). Other groups were control, seed extract alone treated, and MoSE simultaneously (HS) treated. Treatment period was of 15 days. Antioxidant enzymes with tissue nitrite content (TNC) and lipid peroxidation (LPO) were estimated from liver homogenate. HS group showed significantly higher (P antioxidant power (FRAP) compared to only HFD fed group. Further, TNC and LPO decreased significantly (P antioxidant prospective to neutralize ROS developed in HFD fed mice and also protected the nuclei damage from hydroxyl radicals. Hence, it can be used as herbal medication against HFD induced ROS mediated disorders. PMID:26742324

  19. Successful Therapy of Murine Visceral Leishmaniasis with Astrakurkurone, a Triterpene Isolated from the Mushroom Astraeus hygrometricus, Involves the Induction of Protective Cell-Mediated Immunity and TLR9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallick, Suvadip; Dutta, Aritri; Chaudhuri, Ankur; Mukherjee, Debasri; Dey, Somaditya; Halder, Subhadra; Ghosh, Joydip; Mukherjee, Debarati; Sultana, Sirin Salma; Biswas, Gunjan; Lai, Tapan Kumar; Patra, Pradyumna; Sarkar, Indranil; Chakraborty, Sibani; Saha, Bhaskar; Acharya, Krishnendu; Pal, Chiranjib

    2016-05-01

    In our previous report, we showed that astrakurkurone, a triterpene isolated from the Indian mushroom Astraeus hygrometricus (Pers.) Morgan, induced reactive oxygen species, leading to apoptosis in Leishmania donovani promastigotes, and also was effective in inhibiting intracellular amastigotes at the 50% inhibitory concentration of 2.5 μg/ml. The aim of the present study is to characterize the associated immunomodulatory potentials and cellular activation provided by astrakurkurone, leading to effective antileishmanial activity in vitro and in vivo Astrakurkurone-mediated antileishmanial activity was evaluated by real-time PCR and flow cytometry. The involvement of Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) was studied by in vitro assay in the presence of a TLR9 agonist and antagonist and by in silico modeling of a three-dimensional structure of the ectodomain of TLR9 and its interaction with astrakurkurone. Astrakurkurone caused a significant increase in TLR9 expression of L. donovani-infected macrophages along with the activation of proinflammatory responses. The involvement of TLR9 in astrakurkurone-mediated amastigote killing has been evidenced from the fact that a TLR9 agonist (CpG, ODN 1826) in combination with astrakurkurone enhanced the amastigote killing, while a TLR9 antagonist (bafilomycin A1) alone or in combination with astrakurkurone curbed the amastigote killing, which could be further justified by in silico evidence of docking between mouse TLR9 and astrakurkurone. Astrakurkurone was found to reduce the parasite burden in vivo by inducing protective cytokines, gamma interferon and interleukin 17. Moreover, astrakurkurone was nontoxic toward peripheral blood mononuclear cells of immunocompromised patients with visceral leishmaniasis. Astrakurkurone, a nontoxic antileishmanial, enhances the immune efficiency of host cells, leading to parasite clearance in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26883702

  20. Hemagglutinin-based polyanhydride nanovaccines against H5N1 influenza elicit protective virus neutralizing titers and cell-mediated immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross KA

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Kathleen A Ross,1 Hyelee Loyd,2 Wuwei Wu,2 Lucas Huntimer,3 Shaheen Ahmed,4 Anthony Sambol,5 Scott Broderick,6 Zachary Flickinger,2 Krishna Rajan,6 Tatiana Bronich,4 Surya Mallapragada,1 Michael J Wannemuehler,3 Susan Carpenter,2 Balaji Narasimhan1 1Chemical and Biological Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, USA; 2Animal Science, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, USA; 3Veterinary Microbiology and Preventive Medicine, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, USA; 4Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, USA; 5Pathology and Microbiology, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, USA; 6Materials Science and Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, USA Abstract: H5N1 avian influenza is a significant global concern with the potential to become the next pandemic threat. Recombinant subunit vaccines are an attractive alternative for pandemic vaccines compared to traditional vaccine technologies. In particular, polyanhydride nanoparticles encapsulating subunit proteins have been shown to enhance humoral and cell-mediated immunity and provide protection upon lethal challenge. In this work, a recombinant H5 hemagglutinin trimer (H53 was produced and encapsulated into polyanhydride nanoparticles. The studies performed indicated that the recombinant H53 antigen was a robust immunogen. Immunizing mice with H53 encapsulated into polyanhydride nanoparticles induced high neutralizing antibody titers and enhanced CD4+ T cell recall responses in mice. Finally, the H53-based polyanhydride nanovaccine induced protective immunity against a low-pathogenic H5N1 viral challenge. Informatics analyses indicated that mice receiving the nanovaccine formulations and subsequently challenged with virus were similar to naïve mice that were not challenged. The current studies provide a basis to further exploit the advantages of polyanhydride nanovaccines in pandemic scenarios. Keywords: polymer, nanoparticle, vaccine, subunit

  1. HPV-E7 Delivered by Engineered Exosomes Elicits a Protective CD8+ T Cell-Mediated Immune Response

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    Paola Di Bonito

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We developed an innovative strategy to induce a cytotoxic T cell (CTL immune response against protein antigens of choice. It relies on the production of exosomes, i.e., nanovesicles spontaneously released by all cell types. We engineered the upload of huge amounts of protein antigens upon fusion with an anchoring protein (i.e., HIV-1 Nefmut, which is an inactive protein incorporating in exosomes at high levels also when fused with foreign proteins. We compared the immunogenicity of engineered exosomes uploading human papillomavirus (HPV-E7 with that of lentiviral virus-like particles (VLPs incorporating equivalent amounts of the same antigen. These exosomes, whose limiting membrane was decorated with VSV-G, i.e., an envelope protein inducing pH-dependent endosomal fusion, proved to be as immunogenic as the cognate VLPs. It is noteworthy that the immunogenicity of the engineered exosomes remained unaltered in the absence of VSV-G. Most important, we provide evidence that the inoculation in mouse of exosomes uploading HPV-E7 induces production of anti-HPV E7 CTLs, blocks the growth of syngeneic tumor cells inoculated after immunization, and controls the development of tumor cells inoculated before the exosome challenge. These results represent the proof-of-concept about both feasibility and efficacy of the Nefmut-based exosome platform for the induction of CD8+ T cell immunity.

  2. Quetiapine, an atypical antipsychotic, is protective against autoimmune-mediated demyelination by inhibiting effector T cell proliferation.

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    Feng Mei

    Full Text Available Quetiapine (Que, a commonly used atypical antipsychotic drug (APD, can prevent myelin from breakdown without immune attack. Multiple sclerosis (MS, an autoimmune reactive inflammation demyelinating disease, is triggered by activated myelin-specific T lymphocytes (T cells. In this study, we investigated the potential efficacy of Que as an immune-modulating therapeutic agent for experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, a mouse model for MS. Que treatment was initiated on the onset of MOG(35-55 peptide induced EAE mice and the efficacy of Que on modulating the immune response was determined by Flow Cytometry through analyzing CD4(+/CD8(+ populations and the proliferation of effector T cells (CD4(+CD25(- in peripheral immune organs. Our results show that Que dramatically attenuates the severity of EAE symptoms. Que treatment decreases the extent of CD4(+/CD8(+ T cell infiltration into the spinal cord and suppresses local glial activation, thereby diminishing the loss of mature oligodendrocytes and myelin breakdown in the spinal cord of EAE mice. Our results further demonstrate that Que treatment decreases the CD4(+/CD8(+ T cell populations in lymph nodes and spleens of EAE mice and inhibits either MOG(35-55 or anti-CD3 induced proliferation as well as IL-2 production of effector T cells (CD4(+CD25(- isolated from EAE mice spleen. Together, these findings suggest that Que displays an immune-modulating role during the course of EAE, and thus may be a promising candidate for treatment of MS.

  3. RNAi-mediated plant protection against aphids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiu-Dao; Liu, Zong-Cai; Huang, Si-Liang; Chen, Zhi-Qin; Sun, Yong-Wei; Duan, Peng-Fei; Ma, You-Zhi; Xia, Lan-Qin

    2016-06-01

    Aphids (Aphididae) are major agricultural pests that cause significant yield losses of crop plants each year by inflicting damage both through the direct effects of feeding and by vectoring harmful plant viruses. Expression of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) directed against suitable insect target genes in transgenic plants has been shown to give protection against pests through plant-mediated RNA interference (RNAi). Thus, as a potential alternative and effective strategy for insect pest management in agricultural practice, plant-mediated RNAi for aphid control has received close attention in recent years. In this review, the mechanism of RNAi in insects and the so far explored effective RNAi target genes in aphids, their potential applications in the development of transgenic plants for aphid control and the major challenges in this regard are reviewed, and the future prospects of using plant-mediated RNAi for aphid control are discussed. This review is intended to be a helpful insight into the generation of aphid-resistant plants through plant-mediated RNAi strategy. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. PMID:26888776

  4. Sperm fucosyltransferase-5 mediates the sperm-oviductal epithelial cell interaction to protect human sperm from oxidative damage

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Wenxin; 黃聞馨

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative damage by reactive oxygen species (ROS) is a major cause of sperm dysfunction. Excessive ROS generation reduces fertilization and enhances DNA damage of spermatozoa. In mammals, including humans, oviduct functions as a sperm reservoir which is created by the binding of spermatozoa to the epithelial lining in the oviduct. Interaction between sperm and oviductal epithelial cells improves the fertilizing ability of and reduces chromatin damage in spermatozoa. However, the mechanism(s) ...

  5. Selective blockade of CD28-mediated T cell costimulation protects rhesus monkeys against acute fatal experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haanstra, Krista G; Dijkman, Karin; Bashir, Noun; Bauer, Jan; Mary, Caroline; Poirier, Nicolas; Baker, Paul; Crossan, Claire L; Scobie, Linda; 't Hart, Bert A; Vanhove, Bernard

    2015-02-15

    Costimulatory and coinhibitory receptor-ligand pairs on T cells and APC control the immune response. We have investigated whether selective blockade of CD28-CD80/86 costimulatory interactions, which preserves the coinhibitory CTLA4-CD80/86 interactions and the function of regulatory T (Treg) cells, abrogates the induction of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in rhesus monkeys. EAE was induced by intracutaneous immunization with recombinant human myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (rhMOG) in CFA on day 0. FR104 is a monovalent, PEGylated-humanized Fab' Ab fragment against human CD28, cross-reactive with rhesus monkey CD28. FR104 or placebo was administered on days 0, 7, 14, and 21. FR104 levels remained high until the end of the study (day 42). Placebo-treated animals all developed clinical EAE between days 12 and 27. FR104-treated animals did not develop clinical EAE and were sacrificed at the end of the study resulting in a significantly prolonged survival. FR104 treatment diminished T and B cell responses against rhMOG, significantly reduced CNS inflammation and prevented demyelination. The inflammatory profile in the cerebrospinal fluid and brain material was also strongly reduced. Recrudescence of latent virus was investigated in blood, spleen, and brain. No differences between groups were observed for the β-herpesvirus CMV and the polyomaviruses SV40 and SA12. Cross-sectional measurement of lymphocryptovirus, the rhesus monkey EBV, demonstrated elevated levels in the blood of FR104-treated animals. Blocking rhesus monkey CD28 with FR104 mitigated autoreactive T and B cell activation and prevented CNS pathology in the rhMOG/CFA EAE model in rhesus monkeys. PMID:25589073

  6. Helicobacter pylori-Mediated Protection from Allergy Is Associated with IL-10-Secreting Peripheral Blood Regulatory T Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Hussain, Khiyam; Letley, Darren P.; Greenaway, A. Borgel; Kenefeck, Rupert; Winter, Jody A.; Tomlinson, William; Rhead, Joanne; Staples, Emily; Kaneko, Kazuyo; Atherton, John C.; Robinson, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infections are usually established in early childhood and continuously stimulate immunity, including T-helper 1 (Th1), Th17, and regulatory T-cell (Treg) responses, throughout life. Although known to be the major cause of peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer, disease occurs in a minority of those who are infected. Recently, there has been much interest in beneficial effects arising from infection with this pathogen. Published data robustly show that the infection is pro...

  7. Helicobacter pylori-mediated protection from allergy is associated with IL-10-secreting peripheral blood regulatory T cells

    OpenAIRE

    Khiyam eHussain; Darren eLetley; Borgel eGreenaway; Rupert eKenefeck; Jody eWinter; William eTomlinson; Joanne eRhead; Emily eStaples; Kazuyo eKaneko; John eAtherton; Karen eRobinson

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infections are usually established in early childhood and continuously stimulate immunity, including T-helper 1 (Th1), Th17 and regulatory T-cell (Treg) responses, throughout life. Although known to be the major cause of peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer, disease occurs in a minority of those who are infected. Recently there has been much interest in beneficial effects arising from infection with this pathogen. Published data robustly show that the infection is prote...

  8. Nizatidine, a small molecular compound, enhances killed H5N1 vaccine cell-mediated responses and protects mice from lethal viral challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuang; Wu, Bing; Xue, Jia; Wang, Ming; Chen, Ruiai; Wang, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Nizatidine (NIZ), closely related to Cimetidine, is a histamine H2 receptor inverse agonist used primarily as an anti-acid drug. Recent studies showed that this class of compounds may also modulate immune responses. To evaluate adjuvant effects of NIZ on vaccine immune modulation, we formulated NIZ with a H5N1 killed viral antigen and tested in vitro and in vivo. NIZ activated DC maturation and stimulated Th1 and Th2 immune responses to H5N1 vaccine. As a result, it enhanced both antibody and T cell-mediated immune responses. We also observed that a single immunization into C57BL/6 mice blocked IL-10 upregulation and potentiated Th1/Th2 dual polarization. Importantly, the inoculation of H5N1 vaccine with NIZ significantly improved protection of animals from death after challenge and reduced virus loads in the lung tissues. Considering its water-soluble nature, compared with Cimetidine, Nizatidine may be a better choice to use as a vaccine adjuvant. PMID:24253609

  9. Lithium-mediated protection against ethanol neurotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JiaLuo

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Lithium has long been used as a mood stabilizer in the treatment of manic-depressive (bipolar disorder. Recent studies suggest that lithium has neuroprotective properties and may be useful in the treatment of acute brain injuries such as ischemia and chronic neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. One of the most important neuroprotective properties of lithium is its anti-apoptotic action. Ethanol is a neuroteratogen and fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD are caused by maternal ethanol exposure during pregnancy. FASD is the leading cause of mental retardation. Ethanol exposure causes neuroapoptosis in the developing brain. Ethanol-induced loss of neurons in the central nervous system underlies many of the behavioral deficits observed in FASD. Excessive alcohol consumption is also associated with Wernicke–Korsakoff syndrome and neurodegeneration in the adult brain. Recent in vivo and in vitro studies indicate that lithium is able to ameliorate ethanol-induced neuroapoptosis. Lithium is an inhibitor of glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3 which has recently been identified as a mediator of ethanol neurotoxicity. Lithium’s neuroprotection may be mediated by its inhibition of GSK3. In addition, lithium also affects many other signaling proteins and pathways that regulate neuronal survival and differentiation. This review discusses the recent evidence of lithium-mediated protection against ethanol neurotoxicity and potential underlying mechanisms.

  10. Elevated glutathione level does not protect against chronic alcohol mediated apoptosis in recombinant human hepatoma cell line VL-17A over-expressing alcohol metabolizing enzymes--alcohol dehydrogenase and Cytochrome P450 2E1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekaran, Karthikeyan; Swaminathan, Kavitha; Kumar, S Mathan; Chatterjee, Suvro; Clemens, Dahn L; Dey, Aparajita

    2011-06-01

    Chronic consumption of alcohol leads to liver injury. Ethanol-inducible Cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1) plays a critical role in alcohol mediated oxidative stress due to its ability to metabolize ethanol. In the present study, using the recombinant human hepatoma cell line VL-17A that over-expresses the alcohol metabolizing enzymes-alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and CYP2E1; and control HepG2 cells, the mechanism and mode of cell death due to chronic ethanol exposure were studied. Untreated VL-17A cells exhibited apoptosis and oxidative stress when compared with untreated HepG2 cells. Chronic alcohol exposure, i.e., 100 mM ethanol treatment for 72 h caused a significant decrease in viability (47%) in VL-17A cells but not in HepG2 cells. Chronic ethanol mediated cell death in VL-17A cells was predominantly apoptotic, with increased oxidative stress as the underlying mechanism. Chronic ethanol exposure of VL-17A cells resulted in 1.1- to 2.5-fold increased levels of ADH and CYP2E1. Interestingly, the level of the antioxidant GSH was found to be 3-fold upregulated in VL-17A cells treated with ethanol, which may be a metabolic adaptation to the persistent and overwhelming oxidative stress. In conclusion, the increased GSH level may not be sufficient enough to protect VL-17A cells from chronic alcohol mediated oxidative stress and resultant apoptosis. PMID:21414402

  11. Differential protection by wildtype vs. organelle-specific Bcl-2 suggests a combined requirement of both the ER and mitochondria in ceramide-mediated caspase-independent programmed cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belka Claus

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Programmed cell death (PCD is essential for development and homeostasis of multicellular organisms and can occur by caspase-dependent apoptosis or alternatively, by caspase-independent PCD (ciPCD. Bcl-2, a central regulator of apoptosis, localizes to both mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER. Whereas a function of mitochondrial and ER-specific Bcl-2 in apoptosis has been established in multiple studies, corresponding data for ciPCD do not exist. Methods We utilized Bcl-2 constructs specifically localizing to mitochondria (Bcl-2 ActA, the ER (Bcl-2 cb5, both (Bcl-2 WT or the cytosol/nucleus (Bcl-2 ΔTM and determined their protective effect on ceramide-mediated ciPCD in transiently and stably transfected Jurkat cells. Expression of the constructs was verified by immunoblots. Ceramide-mediated ciPCD was induced by treatment with human recombinant tumor necrosis factor and determined by flow cytometric measurement of propidium iodide uptake as well as by optical analysis of cell morphology. Results Only wildtype Bcl-2 had the ability to efficiently protect from ceramide-mediated ciPCD, whereas expression of Bcl-2 solely at mitochondria, the ER, or the cytosol/nucleus did not prevent ceramide-mediated ciPCD. Conclusion Our data suggest a combined requirement for both mitochondria and the ER in the induction and the signaling pathways of ciPCD mediated by ceramide.

  12. Differential protection by wildtype vs. organelle-specific Bcl-2 suggests a combined requirement of both the ER and mitochondria in ceramide-mediated caspase-independent programmed cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is essential for development and homeostasis of multicellular organisms and can occur by caspase-dependent apoptosis or alternatively, by caspase-independent PCD (ciPCD). Bcl-2, a central regulator of apoptosis, localizes to both mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Whereas a function of mitochondrial and ER-specific Bcl-2 in apoptosis has been established in multiple studies, corresponding data for ciPCD do not exist. We utilized Bcl-2 constructs specifically localizing to mitochondria (Bcl-2 ActA), the ER (Bcl-2 cb5), both (Bcl-2 WT) or the cytosol/nucleus (Bcl-2 ΔTM) and determined their protective effect on ceramide-mediated ciPCD in transiently and stably transfected Jurkat cells. Expression of the constructs was verified by immunoblots. Ceramide-mediated ciPCD was induced by treatment with human recombinant tumor necrosis factor and determined by flow cytometric measurement of propidium iodide uptake as well as by optical analysis of cell morphology. Only wildtype Bcl-2 had the ability to efficiently protect from ceramide-mediated ciPCD, whereas expression of Bcl-2 solely at mitochondria, the ER, or the cytosol/nucleus did not prevent ceramide-mediated ciPCD. Our data suggest a combined requirement for both mitochondria and the ER in the induction and the signaling pathways of ciPCD mediated by ceramide

  13. Astroglial U87 Cells Protect Neuronal SH-SY5Y Cells from Indirect Effect of Radiation by Reducing DNA Damage and Inhibiting Fas Mediated Apoptotic Pathway in Coculture System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Yasmeen; Rehman, Abdul; Xie, Bingjie; Xu, Jin; Hong, Ma; Hong, Qing; Deng, Yulin

    2015-08-01

    Recent studies provide the evidence that indirect effects of radiation could lead to neuronal cells death but underlying mechanism is not completely understood. On the other hand astroglial cells are known to protect neuronal cells against stress conditions in vivo and invitro. Yet, the fate of neuronal cells and the neuroprotective effect of coculture system (with glial cells) in response to indirect radiation exposure remain rarely discussed. Here, we purpose that the indirect effect of radiation may induce DNA damage by cell cycle arrest and receptor mediated apoptotic cascade which lead to apoptotic death of neuronal SH-SY5Y cells. We also hypothesized that coculture (with glial U87) may relieved the neuronal SH-SY5Y cells from toxicity of indirect effects radiation by reducing DNA damage and expression of apoptotic proteins in vitro. In the present study irradiated cell conditioned medium (ICCM) was used as source of indirect effect of radiation. Neuronal SH-SY5Y cells were exposed to ICCM with and without coculture with (glial U87) in transwell coculture system respectively. Various endpoints such as, cell survival number assay, Annexin V/PI assay, cell cycle analysis by flow cytometer, mRNA level of Fas receptor by q RT-PCR, expression of key apoptotic proteins by western blot and estimation of neurotrophic factors by ELISA method were analyzed into neuronal SH-SY5Y cells with and without co culture after ICCM exposure respectively. We found that ICCM induced DNA damage in neuronal SH-SY5Y cells by significant increase in cell cycle arrest at S-phase (***P cultures system (with glial U87) neuronal SH-SY5Y depicts remarkable resistance against ICCM induced neurotoxicity. PMID:26142731

  14. Assay of mast cell mediators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rådinger, Madeleine; Jensen, Bettina M; Swindle, Emily;

    2015-01-01

    Mediator release from activated mast cells is a major initiator of the symptomology associated with allergic disorders such as anaphylaxis and asthma. Thus, methods to monitor the generation and release of such mediators have widespread applicability in studies designed to understand the processe...

  15. Protection of HepG2 cells against acrolein toxicity by 2-cyano-3,12-dioxooleana-1,9-dien-28-imidazolide via glutathione-mediated mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Halley; Speen, Adam M; Saunders, Christina; Brooke, Elizabeth A S; Nallasamy, Palanisamy; Zhu, Hong; Li, Y Robert; Jia, Zhenquan

    2015-10-01

    Acrolein is an environmental toxicant, mainly found in smoke released from incomplete combustion of organic matter. Several studies showed that exposure to acrolein can lead to liver damage. The mechanisms involved in acrolein-induced hepatocellular toxicity, however, are not completely understood. This study examined the cytotoxic mechanisms of acrolein on HepG2 cells. Acrolein at pathophysiological concentrations was shown to cause apoptotic cell death and an increase in levels of protein carbonyl and thiobarbituric acid reactive acid substances. Acrolein also rapidly depleted intracellular glutathione (GSH), GSH-linked glutathione-S-transferases, and aldose reductase, three critical cellular defenses that detoxify reactive aldehydes. Results further showed that depletion of cellular GSH by acrolein preceded the loss of cell viability. To further determine the role of cellular GSH in acrolein-mediated cytotoxicity, buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) was used to inhibit cellular GSH biosynthesis. It was observed that depletion of cellular GSH by BSO led to a marked potentiation of acrolein-mediated cytotoxicity in HepG2 cells. To further assess the contribution of these events to acrolein-induced cytotoxicity, triterpenoid compound 2-cyano-3,12-dioxooleana-1,9-dien-28-imidazolide (CDDO-Im) was used for induction of GSH. Induction of GSH by CDDO-Im afforded cytoprotection against acrolein toxicity in HepG2 cells. Furthermore, BSO significantly inhibited CDDO-Im-mediated induction in cellular GSH levels and also reversed cytoprotective effects of CDDO-Im in HepG2 cells. These results suggest that GSH is a predominant mechanism underlying acrolein-induced cytotoxicity as well as CDDO-Im-mediated cytoprotection. This study may provide understanding on the molecular action of acrolein which may be important to develop novel strategies for the prevention of acrolein-mediated toxicity. PMID:25504014

  16. CCR5 and CXCR3 are dispensable for liver infiltration, but CCR5 protects against virus-induced T-cell-mediated hepatic steatosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, P J; Orskov, C; Qvortrup, K;

    2007-01-01

    CCR5 and CXCR3 are important molecules in regulating the migration of activated lymphocytes. Thus, the majority of tissue-infiltrating T cells found in the context of autoimmune conditions and viral infections express CCR5 and CXCR3, and the principal chemokine ligands are expressed within inflam...... CCR5 is associated with the induction of CD8(+) T-cell-mediated immunopathology consisting of marked hepatic microvesicular steatosis....

  17. Prophylactic immunization against experimental leishmaniasis. III. Protection against fatal Leishmania tropica infection induced by irradiated promastigotes involves Lyt-1+2- T cells that do not mediate cutaneous DTH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Protective immunity against fatal L. tropica infection in genetically vulnerable BALB/c mice can be induced by prophylactic immunization with irradiated promastigotes even when heat-killed. Such immunity is adoptively transferable transiently into intact or durably into sub-lethally irradiated (200 or 550 rad) syngeneic recipients by splenic T but not B cells. The effector T cells are of the Lyt-1+2- phenotype, devoid of demonstrable cytotoxic activity. The immune splenic T cell population expresses specific helper activity for antibody synthesis. A causal role for helper T cells in this capacity, however, seems unlikely, because it was shown that antibody does not determine the protective immunity against L. tropica. The immunized donors show no detectable cutaneous DTH or its early memory recall in response to live or killed promastigotes or a soluble L. tropica antigen preparation. Spleen, lymph node, and peritoneal exudate cells from protectively immunized donors similarly fail to transfer DTH locally or systemically. These cells also lack demonstrable suppressive activity against the expression or induction of DTH to L. tropica. Thus, protection against L. tropica induced by prophylactic i.v. immunization with irradiated promastigotes appears to be conferred by Lyt-1+2- T cells that are distinguishable from T cells mediating either both DTH and T help, or cytotoxicity

  18. Prophylactic immunization against experimental leishmaniasis. III. Protection against fatal Leishmania tropica infection induced by irradiated promastigotes involves Lyt-1/sup +/2/sup -/ T cells that do not mediate cutaneous DTH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liew, F.Y.; Howard, J.G.; Hale, C.

    1984-01-01

    Protective immunity against fatal L. tropica infection in genetically vulnerable BALB/c mice can be induced by prophylactic immunization with irradiated promastigotes even when heat-killed. Such immunity is adoptively transferable transiently into intact or durably into sub-lethally irradiated (200 or 550 rad) syngeneic recipients by splenic T but not B cells. The effector T cells are of the Lyt-1/sup +/2/sup -/ phenotype, devoid of demonstrable cytotoxic activity. The immune splenic T cell population expresses specific helper activity for antibody synthesis. A causal role for helper T cells in this capacity, however, seems unlikely, because it was shown that antibody does not determine the protective immunity against L. tropica. The immunized donors show no detectable cutaneous DTH or its early memory recall in response to live or killed promastigotes or a soluble L. tropica antigen preparation. Spleen, lymph node, and peritoneal exudate cells from protectively immunized donors similarly fail to transfer DTH locally or systemically. These cells also lack demonstrable suppressive activity against the expression or induction of DTH to L. tropica. Thus, protection against L. tropica induced by prophylactic i.v. immunization with irradiated promastigotes appears to be conferred by Lyt-1/sup +/2/sup -/ T cells that are distinguishable from T cells mediating either both DTH and T help, or cytotoxicity.

  19. Hypoxia inducible factor-1alpha mediates protection of DL-3-n-butylphthalide in brain microvascular endothelial cells against oxygen glucose deprivation-induced injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weihong Yang; Ling Li; Ruxun Huang; Zhong Pei; Songjie Liao; Jinsheng Zeng

    2012-01-01

    Studies have demonstrated that DL-3-n-butylphthalide can significantly alleviate oxygen glucose deprivation-induced injury of human umbilical vein endothelial cells at least partly associated with its enhancement on oxygen glucose deprivation -induced hypoxia inducible factor-1α expression. In this study, we hypothesized that DL-3-n-butylphthalide can protect against oxygen glucose deprivation-induced injury of newborn rat brain microvascular endothelial cells by means of upregulating hypoxia inducible factor-1α expression. MTT assay and Hoechst staining results showed that DL-3-n-butylphthalide protected brain microvascular endothelial cells against oxygen glucose deprivation-induced injury in a dose-dependent manner. Western blot and immunofluorescent staining results further confirmed that the protective effect was related to upregulation of hypoxia inducible factor-1α. Real-time RT-PCR reaction results showed that DL-3-n-butylphthalide reduced apoptosis by inhibiting downregulation of pro-apoptotic gene caspase-3 mRNA expression and upregulation of apoptosis-executive protease bcl-2 mRNA expression; however, DL-3-n-butylphthalide had no protective effects on brain microvascular endothelial cells after knockdown of hypoxia inducible factor-1α by small interfering RNA. These findings suggest that DL-3-n-butylphthalide can protect brain microvascular endothelial cells against oxygen glucose deprivation-induced injury by upregulating bcl-2 expression and downregulating caspase-3 expression though hypoxia inducible factor-1α pathway.

  20. Lithium protects against oxidative stress-mediated cell death in alpha-synuclein over-expressing in vitro and in vivo models of Parkinson’s disease

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Yong-Hwan; Rane, Anand; Lussier, Stephanie; Julie K. Andersen

    2011-01-01

    Lithium has recently been suggested to have neuroprotective properties in relation to several neurodegenerative diseases. In this study, we examined the potential cytoprotective effect of lithium in preventing oxidative stress-induced protein accumulation and neuronal cell death in the presence of increased alpha-synuclein levels in vitro and in vivo. Specifically, lithium administration was found to protect against cell death in a hydrogen peroxide treated, stable alpha-synuclein-EGFP over-e...

  1. CNTF-mediated protection of photoreceptors requires initial activation of the cytokine receptor gp130 in Müller glial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Rhee, Kun Do; Nusinowitz, Steven; Chao, Kevin; Yu, Fei; Bok, Dean; Yang, Xian-Jie

    2013-01-01

    The cytokine CNTF has been approved by the FDA as a neuroprotective treatment for major retinal degenerative diseases. However, the mechanism of CNTF-triggered protection and CNTF-responsive cells in the retina remains unknown. Using molecular genetic analyses in a retinal degeneration mouse model, we identify the Müller glial cell as the direct initial target of exogenous CNTF signals. We provide evidence that CNTF signals stimulate a Müller glia and photoreceptor intercellular signaling loo...

  2. Active Immunization with Extracellular Vesicles Derived from Staphylococcus aureus Effectively Protects against Staphylococcal Lung Infections, Mainly via Th1 Cell-Mediated Immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seng Jin Choi

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is an important pathogenic bacterium that causes various infectious diseases. Extracellular vesicles (EVs released from S. aureus contain bacterial proteins, nucleic acids, and lipids. These EVs can induce immune responses leading to similar symptoms as during staphylococcal infection condition and have the potential as vaccination agent. Here, we show that active immunization (vaccination with S. aureus-derived EVs induce adaptive immunity of antibody and T cell responses. In addition, these EVs have the vaccine adjuvant ability to induce protective immunity such as the up-regulation of co-stimulatory molecules and the expression of T cell polarizing cytokines in antigen-presenting cells. Moreover, vaccination with S. aureus EVs conferred protection against lethality induced by airway challenge with lethal dose of S. aureus and also pneumonia induced by the administration of sub-lethal dose of S. aureus. These protective effects were also found in mice that were adoptively transferred with splenic T cells isolated from S. aureus EV-immunized mice, but not in serum transferred mice. Furthermore, this protective effect of S. aureus EVs was significantly reduced by the absence of interferon-gamma, but not by the absence of interleukin-17. Together, the study herein suggests that S. aureus EVs are a novel vaccine candidate against S. aureus infections, mainly via Th1 cellular response.

  3. Tomatine Adjuvantation of Protective Immunity to a Major Pre-erythrocytic Vaccine Candidate of Malaria is Mediated via CD8+ T Cell Release of IFN-γ

    OpenAIRE

    Heal, Karen G.; Taylor-Robinson, Andrew W.

    2010-01-01

    The glycoalkaloid tomatine, derived from the wild tomato, can act as a powerful adjuvant to elicit an antigen-specific cell-mediated immune response to the circumsporozoite (CS) protein, a major pre-erythrocytic stage malaria vaccine candidate antigen. Using a defined MHC-class-I-restricted CS epitope in a Plasmodium berghei rodent model, antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity and IFN-γ secretion ex vivo were both significantly enhanced compared to responses detected from similarly ...

  4. Protective effect of liposome-mediated glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor gene transfer in vivo on motoneurons following spinal cord injury in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    鲁凯伍; 陈哲宇; 侯铁胜

    2004-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the effect of liposomemediated glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) gene transfer in vivo on spinal cord motoneurons after spinal cord injury (SCI) in adult rats.Methods: Sixty male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided equally into two groups: GDNF group and control group. The SCI model was established according to the method of Nystrom, and then the DC-Chol liposomes and recombinant plasmid pEGFP-GDNF cDNA complexes were injected into the injured spinal cord. The expression of GDNF cDNA 1 week after injection was detected by RTPCR and fluorescence microscope. We observed the remaining motoneurons in the anterior horn and the changes of cholinesterase (CHE) and acid phosphatase (ACP) activity using Nissl and enzyme histochemistry staining. The locomotion function of hind limbs of rats was evaluated using inclined plane test and BBB locomotor scale.Results: RT-PCR and fluorescence observation confirmed the presence of expression of GDNF cDNA 1week and 4 weeks after injection. At 1, 2, 4 weeks after SCI, the number of motoneurons in the anterior horn in GDNF group (20.4±3.2, 21.7±3.6, 22.5±3.4) was more than that in control group ( 16.8±2.8, 17.3 ± 2.7,18.2±3.2, P<0.05). At 1, 2 weeks after SCI, the mean gray of the CHE-stained spinal motoneurons in GDNF group (74.2± 25.8, 98.7± 31.6 was less than that in control group (98.5 ±32.2, 134.6 ±45.2, P<0.01), and the mean gray of ACP in GDNF group (84.5±32.6, 79.5±28.4) was more than that in control group (61.2±24.9,52.6±19.9, P<0.01). The locomotion functional scales in GDNF group were higher than that in control group within 1 to 4 weeks after SCI (P<0.05).Conclusions: GDNF gene transfer in vivo can protect motoneurons from death and degeneration induced by incompleted spinal cord injury as well as enhance locomotion functional restoration of hind limbs. These results suggest that liposome-mediated delivery of GDNF cDNA might be a practical method for treating

  5. Suppressor of cytokine signalling (SOCS)-3 protects beta cells against IL-1beta-mediated toxicity through inhibition of multiple nuclear factor-kappaB-regulated proapoptotic pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsen, Allan Ertman; Heding, P E; Frobøse, H;

    2004-01-01

    The proinflammatory cytokine IL-1beta induces apoptosis in pancreatic beta cells via pathways dependent on nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB), mitogen-activated protein kinase, and protein kinase C. We recently showed suppressor of cytokine signalling (SOCS)-3 to be a natural negative feedback...... regulator of IL-1beta- and IFN-gamma-mediated signalling in rat islets and beta cell lines, preventing their deleterious effects. However, the mechanisms underlying SOCS-3 inhibition of IL-1beta signalling and prevention against apoptosis remain unknown....

  6. APO-9′-Fucoxanthinone Extracted from Undariopsis peteseniana Protects Oxidative Stress-Mediated Apoptosis in Cigarette Smoke-Exposed Human Airway Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Ho Jang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Long-term cigarette smoking increases the risk for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, characterized by irreversible expiratory airflow limitation. The pathogenesis of COPD involves oxidative stress and chronic inflammation. Various natural marine compounds possess both anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, but few have been tested for their efficacy in COPD models. In this study, we conducted an in vitro screening test to identify natural compounds isolated from various brown algae species that might provide protection against cigarette smoke extract (CSE-induced cytotoxicity. Among nine selected natural compounds, apo-9′-fucoxanthinone (Apo9F exhibited the highest protection against CSE-induced cytotoxicity in immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells (HBEC2. Furthermore, the protective effects of Apo9F were observed to be associated with a significant reduction in apoptotic cell death, DNA damage, and the levels of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS released from CSE-exposed HBEC2 cells. These results suggest that Apo9F protects against CSE-induced DNA damage and apoptosis by regulating mitochondrial ROS production.

  7. Identification of 1,2,3-triazole derivatives that protect pancreatic β cells against endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated dysfunction and death through the inhibition of C/EBP-homologous protein expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Hongliang; Arora, Daleep; Li, Yu; Setiadi, Hendra; Xu, Depeng; Lim, Hui-Ying; Wang, Weidong

    2016-06-15

    The C/EBP-homologous protein (CHOP) acts as a mediator of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-induced pancreatic insulin-producing β cell death, a key element in the pathogenesis of diabetes. Chemicals that inhibit the expression of CHOP might therefore protect β cells from ER stress-induced apoptosis and prevent or ameliorate diabetes. Here, we used high-throughput screening to identify a series of 1,2,3-triazole amide derivatives that inhibit ER stress-induced CHOP-luciferase reporter activity. Our SAR studies indicate that compounds with an N,1-diphenyl-5-methyl-1H-1,2,3-triazole-4-carboxamide backbone potently protect β cell against ER stress. Several representative compounds inhibit ER stress-induced up-regulation of CHOP mRNA and protein, without affecting the basal level of CHOP expression. We further show that a 1,2,3-triazole derivative 4e protects β cell function and survival against ER stress in a CHOP-dependent fashion, as it is inactive in CHOP-deficient β cells. Finally, we show that 4e significantly lowers blood glucose levels and increases concomitant β cell survival and number in a streptozotocin-induced diabetic mouse model. Identification of small molecule inhibitors of CHOP expression that prevent ER stress-induced β cell dysfunction and death may provide a new modality for the treatment of diabetes. PMID:27157393

  8. Mitochondria Related Pathway Is Essential for Polysaccharides Purified from Sparassis crispa Mediated Neuro-Protection against Glutamate-Induced Toxicity in Differentiated PC12 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuang Hu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims to explore the neuro-protective effects of purified Sparassis crispa polysaccharides against l-glutamic acid (l-Glu-induced differentiated PC12 (DPC12 cell damages and its underlying mechanisms. The Sparassis crispa water extract was purified by a DEAE-52 cellulose anion exchange column and a Sepharose G-100 column. A fraction with a molecular weight of 75 kDa and a diameter of 88.9 nm, entitled SCWEA, was obtained. SCWEA was identified with a triple helix with (1→3-linked Rha in the backbone, and (1→2 linkages and (1→6 linkages in the side bone. Our results indicated that the pre-treatment of DPC12 cells with SCWEA prior to l-Glu exposure effectively reversed the reduction on cell viability (by 3-(4,5-cimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT assay and reduced l-Glu-induced apoptosis (by Hoechst staining. SCWEA decreased the accumulation of intracellular reactive oxygen species, blocked Ca2+ influx and prevented depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane potential in DPC12 cells. Furthermore, SCWEA normalized expression of anti-apoptotic proteins in l-Glu-explored DPC12 cells. These results suggested that SCWEA protects against l-Glu-induced neuronal apoptosis in DPC12 cells and may be a promising candidate for treatment against neurodegenerative disease.

  9. Significant Impact of Sequence Variations in the Nucleoprotein on CD8 T Cell-Mediated Cross-Protection against Influenza A Virus Infections

    OpenAIRE

    Zhong, Weimin; Dong, Libo; Lu, Xiuhua; Hancock, Kathy; Katz, Jacqueline M.; Sambhara, Suryaprakash; Liu, Feng; Reinherz, Ellis Leonard

    2010-01-01

    Background: Memory CD8 T cells to influenza A viruses are widely detectable in healthy human subjects and broadly cross-reactive for serologically distinct influenza A virus subtypes. However, it is not clear to what extent such pre-existing cellular immunity can provide cross-subtype protection against novel emerging influenza A viruses. Methodology/Principal: Findings We show in the mouse model that naturally occurring sequence variations of the conserved nucleoprotein of the virus signific...

  10. Notch-Mediated Cell Adhesion

    OpenAIRE

    Akihiko Murata; Shin-Ichi Hayashi

    2016-01-01

    Notch family members are generally recognized as signaling molecules that control various cellular responses in metazoan organisms. Early fly studies and our mammalian studies demonstrated that Notch family members are also cell adhesion molecules; however, information on the physiological roles of this function and its origin is limited. In this review, we discuss the potential present and ancestral roles of Notch-mediated cell adhesion in order to explore its origin and the initial roles of...

  11. Taurine protects HK-2 cells from oxidized LDL-induced cytotoxicity via the ROS-mediated mitochondrial and p53-related apoptotic pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Chun-Yu [Graduate Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Shen, Chao-Yu [School of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Imaging, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); School of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Kang, Chao-Kai [Department of Life Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan, (China); Sher, Yuh-Pyng [Graduate Institute of Clinical Medical Science, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Center for Molecular Medicine, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung 404, Taiwan (China); Sheu, Wayne H.-H. [Graduate Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); School of Medicine, National Yang Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); School of Medicine, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chang, Chia-Che, E-mail: chia_che@dragon.nchu.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Agricultural Biotechnology Center, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Lee, Tsung-Han, E-mail: thlee@email.nchu.edu.tw [Department of Life Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan, (China); Graduate Institute of Clinical Medical Science, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Agricultural Biotechnology Center, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Biological Science and Technology, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China)

    2014-09-15

    Oxidized LDL (oxLDL) induces a pro-oxidative environment and promotes apoptosis, causing the progression of renal diseases in humans. Taurine is a semi-essential amino acid in mammals and has been shown to be a potent endogenous antioxidant. The kidney plays a pivotal role in maintaining the balance of taurine. However, the mechanisms underlying the protective effects of taurine against oxLDL-induced injury in renal epithelial cells have not been clarified. In the present study, we investigated the anti-apoptotic effects of taurine on human proximal tubular epithelial (HK-2) cells exposed to oxLDL and explored the related mechanisms. We observed that oxLDL increased the contents of ROS and of malondialdehyde (MDA), which is a lipid peroxidation by-product that acts as an indicator of the cellular oxidation status. In addition, oxLDL induced cell death and apoptosis in HK-2 cells. Pretreatment with taurine at 100 μM significantly attenuated the oxLDL-induced cytotoxicity. We determined that oxLDL triggered the phosphorylation of ERK and, in turn, the activation of p53 and other apoptosis-related events, including calcium accumulation, destabilization of the mitochondrial permeability and disruption of the balance between pro-apoptotic Bax and anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 proteins. The malfunctions induced by oxLDL were effectively blocked by taurine. Thus, our results suggested that taurine exhibits potential therapeutic activity by preventing oxLDL-induced nephrotoxicity. The inhibition of oxLDL-induced epithelial apoptosis by taurine was at least partially due to its anti-oxidant activity and its ability to modulate the ERK and p53 apoptotic pathways. - Highlights: • Oxidized LDL induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis in HK-2 cells. • Pretreatment with taurine attenuated oxLDL-induced nephrotoxicity. • Taurine protected against renal damages through inhibition of ROS generation. • Taurine prevented apoptosis through modulation of the p53 phosphorylation.

  12. Taurine protects HK-2 cells from oxidized LDL-induced cytotoxicity via the ROS-mediated mitochondrial and p53-related apoptotic pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oxidized LDL (oxLDL) induces a pro-oxidative environment and promotes apoptosis, causing the progression of renal diseases in humans. Taurine is a semi-essential amino acid in mammals and has been shown to be a potent endogenous antioxidant. The kidney plays a pivotal role in maintaining the balance of taurine. However, the mechanisms underlying the protective effects of taurine against oxLDL-induced injury in renal epithelial cells have not been clarified. In the present study, we investigated the anti-apoptotic effects of taurine on human proximal tubular epithelial (HK-2) cells exposed to oxLDL and explored the related mechanisms. We observed that oxLDL increased the contents of ROS and of malondialdehyde (MDA), which is a lipid peroxidation by-product that acts as an indicator of the cellular oxidation status. In addition, oxLDL induced cell death and apoptosis in HK-2 cells. Pretreatment with taurine at 100 μM significantly attenuated the oxLDL-induced cytotoxicity. We determined that oxLDL triggered the phosphorylation of ERK and, in turn, the activation of p53 and other apoptosis-related events, including calcium accumulation, destabilization of the mitochondrial permeability and disruption of the balance between pro-apoptotic Bax and anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 proteins. The malfunctions induced by oxLDL were effectively blocked by taurine. Thus, our results suggested that taurine exhibits potential therapeutic activity by preventing oxLDL-induced nephrotoxicity. The inhibition of oxLDL-induced epithelial apoptosis by taurine was at least partially due to its anti-oxidant activity and its ability to modulate the ERK and p53 apoptotic pathways. - Highlights: • Oxidized LDL induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis in HK-2 cells. • Pretreatment with taurine attenuated oxLDL-induced nephrotoxicity. • Taurine protected against renal damages through inhibition of ROS generation. • Taurine prevented apoptosis through modulation of the p53 phosphorylation

  13. Both wheat (Triticum aestivum) bran arabinoxylans and gut flora-mediated fermentation products protect human colon cells from genotoxic activities of 4-hydroxynonenal and hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glei, Michael; Hofmann, Thomas; Küster, Katrin; Hollmann, Jürgen; Lindhauer, Meinolf G; Pool-Zobel, Beatrice L

    2006-03-22

    Dietary fibers are fermented by the gut flora to yield short chain fatty acids (SCFAs), which inhibit the growth of tumor cells, induce glutathione S-transferases (GSTs), and protect cells from the genotoxic activity of 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE). Here, we investigated effects of wheat bran-derived arabinoxylans and fermentation products on these parameters of chemoprevention. Newly isolated water extractable (WeAx) and alkali extractable arabinoxylans (AeAx) were fermented under anaerobic conditions with human feces. Resulting fermentation supernatants (FSs) were analyzed for SCFAs and used to treat HT29 colon cancer cells. Cell growth, cytotoxicity, antigenotoxicity against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) or HNE, and GST activity were determined. Nonfermented WeAx decreased H2O2-induced DNA damage by 64%, thus demonstrating chemoprotective properties by this nonfermented wheat bran fiber. The fermentation of WeAx and AeAx resulted in 3-fold increases of SCFA, but all FSs (including the control without arabinoxylans) inhibited the growth of the HT29 cells, reduced the genotoxicity of HNE, and enhanced the activity of GSTs (FS WeAx, 2-fold; FS AeAx, 1.7-fold; and control FS, 1.4-fold), which detoxify HNE. Thus, increases in SCFAs were not reflected by enhanced functional effects. The conclusion is that fermentation mixtures contain modulatory compounds that arise from the feces and might add to the effectiveness of SCFAs. PMID:16536580

  14. Aconitum carmichaelii protects against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity via B-cell lymphoma-2 protein-mediated inhibition of mitochondrial dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Gunhyuk; Kim, Ki Mo; Choi, Songie; Oh, Dal-Seok

    2016-03-01

    We previously reported the clinical profile of processed Aconitum carmichaelii (AC, Aconibal(®)), which included inhibition of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2E1 activity in healthy male adults. CYP2E1 is recognized as the enzyme that initiates the cascade of events leading to acetaminophen (APAP)-induced toxicity. However, no studies have characterized its role in APAP-induced hepatic injury. Here, we investigated the protective effects of AC on APAP-induced hepatotoxicity via mitochondrial dysfunction. AC (5-500μg/mL) significantly inhibited APAP-induced reduction of glutathione. In addition, AC decreased mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) and B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2)-associated X protein levels (% change 46.63) in mitochondria. Moreover, it increased Bcl-2 (% change 55.39) and cytochrome C levels (% change 38.33) in mitochondria, measured using immunofluorescence or a commercial kit. Furthermore, cell membrane integrity was preserved and nuclear fragmentation inhibited by AC. These results demonstrate that AC protects hepatocytes against APAP-induced toxicity by inhibiting mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:26895385

  15. Protective effects of naringin against gp120-induced injury mediated by P2X7 receptors in BV2 microglial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Q; Hu, J; Qin, S S; Liu, C L; Wu, H; Wang, J R; Lu, X M; Wang, J; Chen, G Q; Liu, Y; Liu, B Y; Xu, C S; Liang, S D

    2016-01-01

    This study was aimed at exploring the effects of P2X7 receptors on gp120-induced injury and naringin's protective effects against gp120-induced injury in BV2 microglia. BV2 microglia injury model was established by gp120 treatment and MTS assay was used to verify whether naringin has a cell-protective effect against gp120-induced injury. Changes in P2X7 receptor expression were assayed using RT-PCR, qPCR, and western blot. Results showed that the ODs of the Ctrl, gp120, gp120+naringin, and gp120+BBG groups were 0.91 ± 0.10, 0.71 ± 0.09, 0.83 ± 0.10, and 0.83 ± 0.10, respectively. Compared to the control group, the gp120 group showed a significantly decreased cell survival rate. Cell survival rates of the gp120+naringin group increased significantly compared to those of the gp120 group, while no difference was observed when compared to the gp120+BBG group. The relative P2X7 mRNA expression levels in the Ctrl, gp120, gp120+naringin, and gp120+BBG groups were 0.73 ± 0.06, 1.05 ± 0.06, 0.78 ± 0.05, and 0.81 ± 0.04, respectively. The corresponding P2X7 protein expression levels were 0.46 ± 0.04, 0.79 ± 0.04, 0.38 ± 0.07, and 0.42 ± 0.06. P2X7 mRNA and protein expression in the gp120 group increased significantly compared to those in the control group, and declined in the gp120+naringin group compared to those in the gp120 group. Therefore, P2X7 receptors might be involved in gp120-induced injury in BV2 microglia, and naringin might play a protective role by inhibiting the up-regulated expression of P2X7 receptors. PMID:27323041

  16. The COP9 signalosome mediates transcriptional and metabolic response to hormones, oxidative stress protection and cell wall rearrangement during fungal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahlik, Krystyna; Dumkow, Marc; Bayram, Ozgür; Helmstaedt, Kerstin; Busch, Silke; Valerius, Oliver; Gerke, Jennifer; Hoppert, Michael; Schwier, Elke; Opitz, Lennart; Westermann, Mieke; Grond, Stephanie; Feussner, Kirstin; Goebel, Cornelia; Kaever, Alexander; Meinicke, Peter; Feussner, Ivo; Braus, Gerhard H

    2010-11-01

    The COP9 signalosome complex (CSN) is a crucial regulator of ubiquitin ligases. Defects in CSN result in embryonic impairment and death in higher eukaryotes, whereas the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans survives without CSN, but is unable to complete sexual development. We investigated overall impact of CSN activity on A. nidulans cells by combined transcriptome, proteome and metabolome analysis. Absence of csn5/csnE affects transcription of at least 15% of genes during development, including numerous oxidoreductases. csnE deletion leads to changes in the fungal proteome indicating impaired redox regulation and hypersensitivity to oxidative stress. CSN promotes the formation of asexual spores by regulating developmental hormones produced by PpoA and PpoC dioxygenases. We identify more than 100 metabolites, including orsellinic acid derivatives, accumulating preferentially in the csnE mutant. We also show that CSN is required to activate glucanases and other cell wall recycling enzymes during development. These findings suggest a dual role for CSN during development: it is required early for protection against oxidative stress and hormone regulation and is later essential for control of the secondary metabolism and cell wall rearrangement. PMID:21062371

  17. Cardiomyocyte protection by GATA-4 gene engineered mesenchymal stem cells is partially mediated by translocation of miR-221 in microvesicles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Yu

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: microRNAs (miRs, a novel class of small non-coding RNAs, are involved in cell proliferation, differentiation, development, and death. In this study, we found that miR-221 translocation by microvesicles (MVs plays an important role in cardioprotection mediated by GATA-4 overexpressed mesenchymal stem cells (MSC. METHODS AND RESULTS: Adult rat bone marrow MSC and neonatal rat ventricle cardiomyocytes (CM were harvested as primary cultures. MSC were transduced with GATA-4 (MSC(GATA-4 using the murine stem cell virus (pMSCV retroviral expression system. Empty vector transfection was used as a control (MSC(Null. The expression of miRs was assessed by real-time PCR and localized using in situ hybridization (ISH. MVs collected from MSC cultures were characterized by expression of CD9, CD63, and HSP70, and photographed with electron microscopy. Cardioprotection during hypoxia afforded by conditioned medium (CdM from MSC cultures was evaluated by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH release, MTS uptake by CM, and caspase 3/7 activity. Expression of miR-221/222 was significantly higher in MSC than in CM and miR-221 was upregulated in MSC(GATA-4. MSC overexpression of miR-221 significantly enhanced cardioprotection by reducing the expression of p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA. Moreover, expression of PUMA was significantly decreased in CM co-cultured with MSC. MVs derived from MSC expressed high levels of miR-221, and were internalized quickly by CM as documented in images obtained from a Time-Lapse Imaging System. CONCLUSIONS: Our results demonstrate that cardioprotection by MSC(GATA-4 may be regulated in part by a transfer of anti-apoptotic miRs contained within MVs.

  18. Mucosal priming of newborn mice with S. Typhi Ty21a expressing anthrax protective antigen (PA) followed by parenteral PA-boost induces B and T cell-mediated immunity that protects against infection bypassing maternal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Karina; Ditamo, Yanina; Galen, James E; Baillie, Les W J; Pasetti, Marcela F

    2010-08-23

    The currently licensed anthrax vaccine has several limitations and its efficacy has been proven only in adults. Effective immunization of newborns and infants requires adequate stimulation of their immune system, which is competent but not fully activated. We explored the use of the licensed live attenuated S. Typhi vaccine strain Ty21a expressing Bacillus anthracis protective antigen [Ty21a(PA)] followed PA-alum as a strategy for immunizing the pediatric population. Newborn mice primed with a single dose of Ty21a(PA) exhibited high frequencies of mucosal IgA-secreting B cells and IFN-gamma-secreting T cells during the neonatal period, none of which was detected in newborns immunized with a single dose of PA-alum. Priming with Ty21a(PA) followed by PA-boost resulted in high levels of PA-specific IgG, toxin neutralizing and opsonophagocytic antibodies and increased frequency of bone marrow IgG plasma cells and memory B cells compared with repeated immunization with PA-alum alone. Robust B and T cell responses developed even in the presence of maternal antibodies. The prime-boost protected against systemic and respiratory infection. Mucosal priming with a safe and effective S. Typhi-based anthrax vaccine followed by PA-boost could serve as a practical and effective prophylactic approach to prevent anthrax early in life. PMID:20619377

  19. Fucoidan from Fucus vesiculosus Protects against Alcohol-Induced Liver Damage by Modulating Inflammatory Mediators in Mice and HepG2 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Dae Lim

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Fucoidan is an l-fucose-enriched sulfated polysaccharide isolated from brown algae and marine invertebrates. In this study, we investigated the protective effect of fucoidan from Fucus vesiculosus on alcohol-induced murine liver damage. Liver injury was induced by oral administration of 25% alcohol with or without fucoidan (30 mg/kg or 60 mg/kg for seven days. Alcohol administration increased serum aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase levels, but these increases were suppressed by the treatment of fucoidan. Transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1, a liver fibrosis-inducing factor, was highly expressed in the alcohol-fed group and human hepatoma HepG2 cell; however, the increase in TGF-β1 expression was reduced following fucoidan administration. Treatment with fucoidan was also found to significantly reduce the production of inflammation-promoting cyclooygenase-2 and nitric oxide, while markedly increasing the expression of the hepatoprotective enzyme, hemeoxygenase-1, on murine liver and HepG2 cells. Taken together, the antifibrotic and anti-inflammatory effects of fucoidan on alcohol-induced liver damage may provide valuable insights into developing new therapeutics or interventions.

  20. Mechanism of protection from graft-vs-host disease in murine mixed allogeneic chimeras. I. Development of a null cell population suppressive of cell-mediated lympholysis responses and derived from the syngeneic bone marrow component

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Splenocyte populations from whole body-irradiated recipients of mixed T cell-depleted (TCD) syngeneic and allogeneic (complete H-2 disparity) bone marrow, or of TCD syngeneic marrow alone, contain cells with the ability to suppress the generation of cell-mediated lympholysis responses in vitro. This activity, which is present by 8 days after bone marrow transplantation and persists for several weeks, has been analyzed for possible veto-like or other specificity. Although reproducible patterns of suppression were observed, depending both on host strain and on the genetic combination of the response examined, the overall suppression in vitro most closely resembles that which has been ascribed to natural suppressor cells in other systems. The suppression appears to be mediated by a non-T cell, non-B cell, nonadherent, asialo GM1-negative population. Cold target inhibition and CTL activity of chimeric cells have been ruled out as factors contributing to the observed suppression. Significantly, in mixed chimeras, suppression was found to be mediated exclusively by cells which were syngeneic to the recipient in both recipient strains tested. The rapid development of this suppressive activity may explain the resistance to graft-vs-host disease conferred on whole body-irradiated mice by the addition of TCD syngeneic marrow to an allogeneic graft-vs-host disease-producing inoculum

  1. Establishment of Stable, Cell-Mediated Immunity that Makes "Susceptible" Mice Resistant to Leishmania major

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretscher, Peter A.; Wei, Guojian; Menon, Juthika N.; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle

    1992-07-01

    Cell-mediated, but not antibody-mediated, immune responses protect humans against certain pathogens that produce chronic diseases such as leishmaniasis. Effective vaccination against such pathogens must therefore produce an immunological "imprint" so that stable, cell-mediated immunity is induced in all individuals after natural infection. BALB/c mice "innately susceptible" to Leishmania major produce antibodies after substantial infection. In the present study, "susceptible" mice injected with a small number of parasites mounted a cell-mediated response and acquired resistance to a larger, normally pathogenic, challenge. This vaccination strategy may be applicable in diseases in which protection is dependent on cell-mediated immunity.

  2. The protective effect of soybean phytochemicals on androgen responsive human prostate cancer cells LNCaP is likely mediated through modulation of hormone/cytokine-dependent pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Population studies suggested that the consumption of a soy rich diet provides protective effects against several chronic diseases including prostate cancer. However, the active components in soy, as well as the mechanisms of action of soy’s protective effects, remain unclear. It would be important t...

  3. Exercise-Dependent Regulation of NK Cells in Cancer Protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idorn, Manja; Hojman, Pernille

    2016-07-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are the most responsive immune cells to exercise, displaying an acute mobilization to the circulation during physical exertion. Recently, exercise-dependent mobilization of NK cells was found to play a central role in exercise-mediated protection against cancer. Here, we review the link between exercise and NK cell function, focusing on circulating exercise factors and additional effects, including vascularization, hypoxia, and body temperature in mediating the effects on NK cell functionality. Exercise-dependent mobilization and activation of NK cells provides a mechanistic explanation for the protective effect of exercise on cancer, and we propose that exercise represents a potential strategy as adjuvant therapy in cancer, by improving NK cell recruitment and infiltration in solid tumors. PMID:27262760

  4. Antibody Titer Threshold Predicts Anti-Candidal Vaccine Efficacy Even though the Mechanism of Protection Is Induction of Cell-Mediated Immunity

    OpenAIRE

    Spellberg, Brad; Ibrahim, Ashraf S.; Lin, Lin; Avanesian, Valentina; Fu, Yue; Lipke, Peter; Otoo, Henry; Ho, Tiffany; Edwards, John E.

    2008-01-01

    We previously reported that vaccination with Freund’s adjuvant plus the recombinant N-terminus of the candidal adhesin, Als3p (rAls3p-N), protects mice from disseminated candidiasis. Here we report that the rAls3p-N vaccine is effective when combined with aluminum hydroxide adjuvant. Antibody titers of ≥1:6400 accurately predicted protection from infection. Nevertheless, neither B lymphocytes nor serum from immunized animals transferred protection to vaccine-naive animals. In contrast, CD3+, ...

  5. Novel Staphylococcal Glycosyltransferases SdgA and SdgB Mediate Immunogenicity and Protection of Virulence-Associated Cell Wall Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Hazenbos, Wouter L. W.; Kimberly K Kajihara; Richard Vandlen; J Hiroshi Morisaki; Lehar, Sophie M.; Kwakkenbos, Mark J.; Tim Beaumont; Bakker, Arjen Q.; Qui Phung; Swem, Lee R.; Satish Ramakrishnan; Janice Kim; Min Xu; Ishita M Shah; Binh An Diep

    2013-01-01

    Infection of host tissues by Staphylococcus aureus and S. epidermidis requires an unusual family of staphylococcal adhesive proteins that contain long stretches of serine-aspartate dipeptide-repeats (SDR). The prototype member of this family is clumping factor A (ClfA), a key virulence factor that mediates adhesion to host tissues by binding to extracellular matrix proteins such as fibrinogen. However, the biological siginificance of the SDR-domain and its implication for pathogenesis remain ...

  6. Estrogen mediated protection of cytoskeleton against oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darshini A Ganatra

    2013-01-01

    Interpretation & conclusions: Our findings showed that E 2 helped in preventing deteriorating effect of H 2 O 2 , inhibited cell death, apoptosis and depolymerisation of cytoskeletal proteins in LECs. However, the exact mechanism by which estrogen renders this protection to cytoskeleton of lens epithelial cells remains to be determined.

  7. Protein kinase C pathway mediates the protective effects of glucagon-like peptide-1 on the apoptosis of islet β-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lihai; Wang, Yuesheng; Wang, Jiao; Liu, Yinglan; Yin, Yanbin

    2015-11-01

    The incidence of diabetes has been increasing over previous years. It is hypothesized that promoting the survival of islet β-cells is a key direction for the treatment of diabetes. Although gastric bypass surgery improves certain types of diabetes and attenuates its progression, there are certain associated disadvantages (including intestinal obstruction and anastomotic leakage), and quality of life and physical status (such as malnutrition) are significantly affected by gastric bypass surgery. Therefore, it is important to determine the mechanisms underlying the improvement of diabetes by gastric bypass surgery and identify novel gene targets for diabetes therapeutics. In the present study, glucagon‑like peptide‑1 (GLP‑1), whose secretion was markedly increased following gastric bypass surgery, increased the activity of protein kinase C (PKC) in islet β‑cells in a dose‑dependent manner. Additionally, treatment with GLP‑1 boosted cell viability and decreased cell death in starved islet β‑cells, and inhibited mitochondria‑dependent apoptosis by regulating the expression levels of Bcl‑2/Bax. These effects were reversed by inhibiting the PKC pathway using hypericin. Therefore, the present study concluded that GLP‑1 may promote the survival and inhibit the apoptosis of islet β‑cells at least in part by activating the PKC pathway, which is an important underlying mechanism and may be exploited in the treatment of diabetes. PMID:26459881

  8. SLA-PGN-primed dendritic cell-based vaccination induces Th17-mediated protective immunity against experimental visceral leishmaniasis: a crucial role of PKCβ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jawed, Junaid Jibran; Majumder, Saikat; Bandyopadhyay, Syamdas; Biswas, Satabdi; Parveen, Shabina; Majumdar, Subrata

    2016-07-01

    Emergence of drug resistance during visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is a major obstacle imposed during successful therapy. An effective vaccine strategy against this disease is therefore necessary. Our present study exploited the SLA (soluble leishmanial antigen) and PGN (peptidoglycan) stimulated bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (DCs) as a suitable vaccine candidate during experimental VL. SLA-PGN-stimulated DCs showed a significant decrease in hepatic and splenic parasite burden, which were associated with increased production of nitric oxide and pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-12, IFN-γ and IL-17. Elevated level of IL-17 was accompanied with the generation of more Th17 cells. Further studies on DC provided the evidence that these SLA-PGN-stimulated DCs played an important role in providing necessary cytokines such as IL-6, IL-23 and TGF-β for the generation of Th17 cells. Interestingly, inhibition of protein kinase C-β (PKCβ) in DCs led to decreased production of Th17 polarizing cytokines, causing reduction of the Th17 population size. Altogether, our finding highlighted the important role of DC-based PKCβ in regulation of the function and generation of Th17 cells. PMID:27150838

  9. Heme oxygenase-1 exerts a protective role in ovalbumin-induced neutrophilic airway inflammation by inhibiting Th17 cell-mediated immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanjie; Zhang, Liya; Wu, Jinhong; Di, Caixia; Xia, Zhenwei

    2013-11-29

    Allergic asthma is conventionally considered as a Th2 immune response characterized by eosinophilic inflammation. Recent investigations revealed that Th17 cells play an important role in the pathogenesis of non-eosinophilic asthma (NEA), resulting in steroid-resistant neutrophilic airway inflammation. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) has anti-inflammation, anti-oxidation, and anti-apoptosis functions. However, its role in NEA is still unclear. Here, we explore the role of HO-1 in a mouse model of NEA. HO-1 inducer hemin or HO-1 inhibitor tin protoporphyrin IX was injected intraperitoneally into ovalbumin-challenged DO11.10 mice. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) was delivered into mice to knock down HO-1 expression. The results show that induction of HO-1 by hemin attenuated airway inflammation and decreased neutrophil infiltration in bronchial alveolar lavage fluid and was accompanied by a lower proportion of Th17 cells in mediastinal lymph nodes and spleen. More importantly, induction of HO-1 down-regulated Th17-related transcription factor retinoic acid-related orphan receptor γt (RORγt) expression and decreased IL-17A levels, all of which correlated with a decrease in phosphorylated STAT3 (p-STAT3) level and inhibition of Th17 cell differentiation. Consistently, the above events could be reversed by tin protoporphyrin IX. Also, HO-1 siRNA transfection abolished the effect of hemin induced HO-1 in vivo. Meanwhile, the hemin treatment promoted the level of Foxp3 expression and enhanced the proportion of regulatory T cells (Tregs). Collectively, our findings indicate that HO-1 exhibits anti-inflammatory activity in the mouse model of NEA via inhibition of the p-STAT3-RORγt pathway, regulating kinetics of RORγt and Foxp3 expression, thus providing a possible novel therapeutic target in asthmatic patients. PMID:24097973

  10. Dimethyl Sulfoxide Protects Escherichia coli from Rapid Antimicrobial-Mediated Killing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Hongfei; Wang, Dai; Xue, Yunxin; Zhang, Zhi; Niu, Jianjun; Hong, Yuzhi; Drlica, Karl; Zhao, Xilin

    2016-08-01

    The contribution of reactive oxygen species (ROS) to antimicrobial lethality was examined by treating Escherichia coli with dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), an antioxidant solvent frequently used in antimicrobial studies. DMSO inhibited killing by ampicillin, kanamycin, and two quinolones and had little effect on MICs. DMSO-mediated protection correlated with decreased ROS accumulation and provided evidence for ROS-mediated programmed cell death. These data support the contribution of ROS to antimicrobial lethality and suggest caution when using DMSO-dissolved antimicrobials for short-time killing assays. PMID:27246776

  11. Sickle cell protection from malaria: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandro Eridani

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available A linkage between presence of Sickle Haemoglobin (HbS and protection from malaria infection and clinical manifestations in certain areas was suspected from early observations and progressively elucidated by more recent studies. Research has confirmed the abovementioned connection, but also clarified how such protection may be abolished by coexistence of sickle cell trait (HbS trait and alpha thalassemia, which may explain the relatively low incidence of HbS trait in the Mediterranean. The mechanisms of such protective effect are now being investigated: factors of genetic, molecular and immunological nature are prominent. As for genetic factors attention is given to the role of the red blood cell (RBC membrane complement regulatory proteins as polymorphisms of these components seem to be associated with resistance to severe malaria; genetic ligands like the Duffy group blood antigen, necessary for erythrocytic invasion, and human protein CD36, a major receptor for P. falciparum-infected RBC‘s, are also under scrutiny: attention is focused also on plasmodium erythrocyte-binding antigens, which bind to RBC surface components. Genome-wide linkage and association studies are now carried out too, in order to identify genes associated with malaria resistance. Only a minor role is attributed to intravascular sickling, phagocytosis and haemolysis, while specific molecular mechanisms are the object of intensive research: among these a decisive role is played by a biochemical sequence, involving activation of haeme oxygenase (HMO-1, whose effect appears mediated by carbon monoxide (CO. A central role in protection from malaria is also played by immunological factors, which may stimulate antibody production to plasmodium antigens in the early years of life; the role of agents like pathogenic CD8 T-cells has been suggested while the effects of molecular actions on the immunity mechanism are presently investigated. It thus appears that protection from

  12. One dose of a porcine circovirus 2 subunit vaccine induces humoral and cell-mediated immunity and protects against porcine circovirus-associated disease under field conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martelli, Paolo; Ferrari, Luca; Morganti, Marina; De Angelis, Elena; Bonilauri, Paolo; Guazzetti, Stefano; Caleffi, Antonio; Borghetti, Paolo

    2011-05-01

    This study investigated the efficacy of a one-dose porcine circovirus 2 (PCV2) subunit vaccine based on the PCV2 Cap protein expressed in a baculovirus system on two different farms at which a history of porcine circovirus-associated disease (PCVD) was present. Morbidity, mortality, average daily weight gain, carcass weight, PCV2 load in serum and vaccine immunogenicity were assessed. Serology to porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae was performed. A double-blind, randomised, and controlled field trial was performed distributing 818 piglets between two treatment groups. At inclusion (weaning at 21 ± 3 days of age), 408 animals (group B) received a 2-mL intramuscular dose of Porcilis PCV(®) (vaccinated group). Controls (group A, 410 pigs) received 2 mL of the adjuvant Diluvac Forte(®) intramuscularly. Weights were recorded at inclusion and at 12 and 26 weeks of age, and the average daily weight gain (ADWG) was calculated. The carcass weights of the pigs from farm 2 were recorded at slaughter (274 days old). All dead animals (died or culled) underwent autopsy to classify them as PMWS-affected or not. At each farm, blood samples were taken from 22 pigs/group for serologic studies. A beneficial effect was found after vaccination with a single dose of a PCV2 Cap vaccine against PCVD. The vaccination reduced the mortality rate and morbidity, reduced PCV2 viremia and viral load, improved productive performances (e.g. ADWG: +70 g/day between 12 and 26 weeks of age when viremia and the specific disease occurred) as well as carcass weight at slaughter age (+4.5 kg). These effects were associated with virologic and clinical protection from the immunogenicity of the vaccine measured as activation of both a humoral and a cellular immune response. PMID:21216540

  13. Fibronectin mediates mesendodermal cell fate decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Paul; Andersen, Peter; Hassel, David; Kaynak, Bogac L.; Limphong, Pattraranee; Juergensen, Lonny; Kwon, Chulan; Srivastava, Deepak

    2013-01-01

    Non-cell-autonomous signals often play crucial roles in cell fate decisions during animal development. Reciprocal signaling between endoderm and mesoderm is vital for embryonic development, yet the key signals and mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we show that endodermal cells efficiently promote the emergence of mesodermal cells in the neighboring population through signals containing an essential short-range component. The endoderm-mesoderm interaction promoted precardiac mesoderm formation in mouse embryonic stem cells and involved endodermal production of fibronectin. In vivo, fibronectin deficiency resulted in a dramatic reduction of mesoderm accompanied by endodermal expansion in zebrafish embryos. This event was mediated by regulation of Wnt signaling in mesodermal cells through activation of integrin-β1. Our findings highlight the importance of the extracellular matrix in mediating short-range signals and reveal a novel function of endoderm, involving fibronectin and its downstream signaling cascades, in promoting the emergence of mesoderm. PMID:23715551

  14. Interleukin-2 protects neonatal mice from lethal herpes simplex virus infection: a macrophage-mediated, gamma interferon-induced mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohl, S; Loo, L S; Drath, D B; Cox, P

    1989-02-01

    Administration of human recombinant interleukin-2 (IL-2) protected neonatal mice from a lethal herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection. Protection was not associated with viral antibody production, enhanced natural killer cell cytotoxicity, or intrinsic resistance of macrophages to viral infection. Protection was associated with increased macrophage-mediated antiviral antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). Spleen cells from IL-2-treated neonatal mice and from neonatal mice that were treated in vitro with IL-2 transferred protection to neonatal mice. These cells, by adherence, silica, and asialo GM 1 antibody treatment, were shown to be macrophages. IL-2 treatment in vitro enhanced the neonatal macrophages' ADCC function and superoxide release. Similar protection was induced by gamma interferon (IFN-gamma)-treated spleen cells. Antibody to IFN-gamma ablated both IFN-gamma- and IL-2-induced protection by adherent spleen cells. Thus, IL-2-mediated protection against murine neonatal HSV infection was affected by stimulated macrophage activity, via helper T cell-produced IFN-gamma. PMID:2492588

  15. Natural killer cell mediated cytotoxic responses in the Tasmanian devil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Gabriella K; Kreiss, Alexandre; Lyons, A Bruce; Woods, Gregory M

    2011-01-01

    The Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii), the world's largest marsupial carnivore, is under threat of extinction following the emergence of an infectious cancer. Devil facial tumour disease (DFTD) is spread between Tasmanian devils during biting. The disease is consistently fatal and devils succumb without developing a protective immune response. The aim of this study was to determine if Tasmanian devils were capable of forming cytotoxic antitumour responses and develop antibodies against DFTD cells and foreign tumour cells. The two Tasmanian devils immunised with irradiated DFTD cells did not form cytotoxic or humoral responses against DFTD cells, even after multiple immunisations. However, following immunisation with xenogenic K562 cells, devils did produce cytotoxic responses and antibodies against this foreign tumour cell line. The cytotoxicity appeared to occur through the activity of natural killer (NK) cells in an antibody dependent manner. Classical NK cell responses, such as innate killing of DFTD and foreign cancer cells, were not observed. Cells with an NK-like phenotype comprised approximately 4 percent of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The results of this study suggest that Tasmanian devils have NK cells with functional cytotoxic pathways. Although devil NK cells do not directly recognise DFTD cancer cells, the development of antibody dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity presents a potential pathway to induce cytotoxic responses against the disease. These findings have positive implications for future DFTD vaccine research. PMID:21957452

  16. Protective Effects of Gastrodin Against Autophagy-Mediated Astrocyte Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin-Shang; Tian, Zhen; Zhang, Nan; Han, Jing; Guo, Hong-Liang; Zhao, Ming-Gao; Liu, Shui-Bing

    2016-03-01

    Gastrodin is an active ingredient derived from the rhizome of Gastrodia elata. This compound is usually used to treat convulsive illness, dizziness, vertigo, and headache. This study aimed to investigate the effect of gastrodin on the autophagy of glial cells exposed to lipopolysaccharides (LPS, 1 µg/mL). Autophagy is a form of programmed cell death, although it also promotes cell survival. In cultured astrocytes, LPS exposure induced excessive autophagy and apoptosis, which were significantly prevented by the pretreatment cells with gastrodin (10 μM). The protective effects of gastrodin via autophagy inhibition were verified by the decreased levels of LC3-II, P62, and Beclin-1, which are classical markers for autophagy. Furthermore, gastrodin protected astrocytes from apoptosis through Bcl-2 and Bax signaling pathway. The treatment of astrocytes with rapamycin (500 nM), wortmannin (100 nM), and LY294002 (10 μM), which are inhibitors of mTOR and PI3K, respectively, eliminated the known effects of gastrodin on the inhibited Beclin-1 expression. Furthermore, gastrodin blocked the down-regulation of glutamine synthetase induced by LPS exposure in astrocytes. Our results suggest that gastrodin can be used as a preventive agent for the excessive autophagy induced by LPS. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26643508

  17. Clostridial glucosylating toxins enter cells via clathrin-mediated endocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papatheodorou, Panagiotis; Zamboglou, Constantinos; Genisyuerek, Selda; Guttenberg, Gregor; Aktories, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    Clostridium difficile toxin A (TcdA) and toxin B (TcdB), C. sordellii lethal toxin (TcsL) and C. novyi alpha-toxin (TcnA) are important pathogenicity factors, which represent the family of the clostridial glucosylating toxins (CGTs). Toxin A and B are associated with antibiotic-associated diarrhea and pseudomembraneous colitis. Lethal toxin is involved in toxic shock syndrome after abortion and alpha-toxin in gas gangrene development. CGTs enter cells via receptor-mediated endocytosis and require an acidified endosome for translocation of the catalytic domain into the cytosol. Here we studied the endocytic processes that mediate cell internalization of the CGTs. Intoxication of cells was monitored by analyzing cell morphology, status of Rac glucosylation in cell lysates and transepithelial resistance of cell monolayers. We found that the intoxication of cultured cells by CGTs was strongly delayed when cells were preincubated with dynasore, a cell-permeable inhibitor of dynamin, or chlorpromazine, an inhibitor of the clathrin-dependent endocytic pathway. Additional evidence about the role of clathrin in the uptake of the prototypical CGT family member toxin B was achieved by expression of a dominant-negative inhibitor of the clathrin-mediated endocytosis (Eps15 DN) or by siRNA against the clathrin heavy chain. Accordingly, cells that expressed dominant-negative caveolin-1 were not protected from toxin B-induced cell rounding. In addition, lipid rafts impairment by exogenous depletion of sphingomyelin did not decelerate intoxication of HeLa cells by CGTs. Taken together, our data indicate that the endocytic uptake of the CGTs involves a dynamin-dependent process that is mainly governed by clathrin. PMID:20498856

  18. Adenoviral augmentation of elafin protects the lung against acute injury mediated by activated neutrophils and bacterial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, A J; Wallace, W A; Marsden, M E; Govan, J R; Porteous, D J; Haslett, C; Sallenave, J M

    2001-08-01

    During acute pulmonary infection, tissue injury may be secondary to the effects of bacterial products or to the effects of the host inflammatory response. An attractive strategy for tissue protection in this setting would combine antimicrobial activity with inhibition of human neutrophil elastase (HNE), a key effector of neutrophil-mediated tissue injury. We postulated that genetic augmentation of elafin (an endogenous inhibitor of HNE with intrinsic antimicrobial activity) could protect the lung against acute inflammatory injury without detriment to host defense. A replication-deficient adenovirus encoding elafin cDNA significantly protected A549 cells against the injurious effects of both HNE and whole activated human neutrophils in vitro. Intratracheal replication-deficient adenovirus encoding elafin cDNA significantly protected murine lungs against injury mediated by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in vivo. Genetic augmentation of elafin therefore has the capacity to protect the lung against the injurious effects of both bacterial pathogens resistant to conventional antibiotics and activated neutrophils. PMID:11466403

  19. Hypoxia preconditioning protects corneal stromal cells against induced apoptosis

    OpenAIRE

    Xing, Dongmei; Sun, Xingcai; Li, Jinhua; CUI, MIAO; Tan-Allen, Kah; Bonanno, Joseph A

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study, was to determine whether hypoxia preconditioning can protect corneal stromal cells from UV stress and cytokine mediated apoptosis. Two models were implemented. First, primary cultured bovine corneal fibroblasts were preconditioned with 0.5–1.5% O2 for 4 hr and stressed with UV-irradiation or stimulation of Fas receptor. Second, bovine eyes were preconditioned with 0.5% O2 for 4 hr and stressed by epithelial scraping to induce anterior keratocyte apoptosis. Cell fate...

  20. Protective effect of the poly(ADP-ribose polymerase inhibitor PJ34 on mitochondrial depolarization-mediated cell death in hepatocellular carcinoma cells involves attenuation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase-2 and protein kinase B/Akt activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radnai Balazs

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background 2,4-Dimethoxyphenyl-E-4-arylidene-3-isochromanone (IK11 was previously described to induce apoptotic death of A431 tumor cells. In this report, we investigated the molecular action of IK11 in the HepG2 human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line to increase our knowledge of the role of poly (ADP-ribose-polymerase (PARP, protein kinase B/Akt and mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK activation in the survival and death of tumor cells and to highlight the possible role of PARP-inhibitors in co-treatments with different cytotoxic agents in cancer therapy. Results We found that sublethal concentrations of IK11 prevented proliferation, migration and entry of the cells into their G2 phase. At higher concentrations, IK11 induced reactive oxygen species (ROS production, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase 2 (JNK2, and substantial loss of HepG2 cells. ROS production appeared marginal in mediating the cytotoxicity of IK11 since N-acetyl cysteine was unable to prevent it. However, the PARP inhibitor PJ34, although not a ROS scavenger, strongly inhibited both IK11-induced ROS production and cell death. JNK2 activation seemed to be a major mediator of the effect of IK11 since inhibition of JNK resulted in a substantial cytoprotection while inhibitors of the other kinases failed to do so. Inhibition of Akt slightly diminished the effect of IK11, while the JNK and Akt inhibitor and ROS scavenger trans-resveratrol completely protected against it. Conclusions These results indicate significant involvement of PARP, a marginal role of ROS and a pro-apoptotic role of Akt in this system, and raise attention to a novel mechanism that should be considered when cancer therapy is augmented with PARP-inhibition, namely the cytoprotection by inhibition of JNK2.

  1. Cutting edge: TNFR-shedding by CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells inhibits the induction of inflammatory mediators.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mierlo, G.J. van; Scherer, H.U.; Hameetman, M.; Morgan, M.E.; Flierman, R.; Huizinga, T.W.J.; Toes, R.E.

    2008-01-01

    CD4+CD25+ regulatory T (Treg) cells play an essential role in maintaining tolerance to self and nonself. In several models of T cell-mediated (auto) immunity, Treg cells exert protective effects by the inhibition of pathogenic T cell responses. In addition, Treg cells can modulate T cell-independent

  2. Mast Cell-Mediated Mechanisms of Nociception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aich, Anupam; Afrin, Lawrence B.; Gupta, Kalpna

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells are tissue-resident immune cells that release immuno-modulators, chemo-attractants, vasoactive compounds, neuropeptides and growth factors in response to allergens and pathogens constituting a first line of host defense. The neuroimmune interface of immune cells modulating synaptic responses has been of increasing interest, and mast cells have been proposed as key players in orchestrating inflammation-associated pain pathobiology due to their proximity to both vasculature and nerve fibers. Molecular underpinnings of mast cell-mediated pain can be disease-specific. Understanding such mechanisms is critical for developing disease-specific targeted therapeutics to improve analgesic outcomes. We review molecular mechanisms that may contribute to nociception in a disease-specific manner. PMID:26690128

  3. Mast Cell-Mediated Mechanisms of Nociception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anupam Aich

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Mast cells are tissue-resident immune cells that release immuno-modulators, chemo-attractants, vasoactive compounds, neuropeptides and growth factors in response to allergens and pathogens constituting a first line of host defense. The neuroimmune interface of immune cells modulating synaptic responses has been of increasing interest, and mast cells have been proposed as key players in orchestrating inflammation-associated pain pathobiology due to their proximity to both vasculature and nerve fibers. Molecular underpinnings of mast cell-mediated pain can be disease-specific. Understanding such mechanisms is critical for developing disease-specific targeted therapeutics to improve analgesic outcomes. We review molecular mechanisms that may contribute to nociception in a disease-specific manner.

  4. Implications of astrocytes in mediating the protective effects of Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulators upon brain damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George E. Barreto

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulators (SERMs are steroidal or non-steroidal compounds that are already used in clinical practice for the treatment of breast cancer, osteoporosis and menopausal symptoms. While SERMs actions in the breast, bone, and uterus have been well characterized, their actions in the brain are less well understood. Previous works have demonstrated the beneficial effects of SERMs in different chronic neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer, Parkinson’s disease and Multiple sclerosis, as well as acute degeneration as stroke and traumatic brain injury. Moreover, these compounds exhibit similar protective actions as those of estradiol in the Central Nervous System, overt any secondary effect. For these reasons, in the past few years, there has been a growing interest in the neuroprotective effects exerted directly or indirectly by SERMs in the SNC. In this context, astrocytes play an important role in the maintenance of brain metabolism, and antioxidant support to neurons, thus indicating that better protection of astrocytes are an important asset targeting neuronal protection. Moreover, various clinical and experimental studies have reported that astrocytes are essential for the neuroprotective effects of SERMs during neuronal injuries, as these cells express different estrogen receptors in cell membrane, demonstrating that part of SERMs effects upon injury may be mediated by astrocytes. The present work highlights the current evidence on the protective mechanisms of SERMs, such as tamoxifen and raloxifene, in the SNC, and their modulation of astrocytic properties as promising therapeutic targets during brain damage.

  5. NK cell survival mediated through the regulatory synapse with human DCs requires IL-15Rα

    OpenAIRE

    Brilot, Fabienne; Strowig, Till; Roberts, Susanne M.; Arrey, Frida; Münz, Christian

    2007-01-01

    DCs activate NK cells during innate immune responses to viral infections. However, the composition and kinetics of the immunological synapse mediating this interaction are largely unknown. Here, we report the rapid formation of an immunological synapse between human resting NK cells and mature DCs. Although inhibitory NK cell receptors were polarized to this synapse, where they are known to protect mature DCs from NK cell lysis, the NK cell also received activation signals that induced mobili...

  6. Characterization of the mechanism of protection mediated by CS-D7, a monoclonal antibody to Staphylococcus aureus iron regulated surface determinant B (IsdB)

    OpenAIRE

    Gregory ePancari; Hongxia eFan; Sharon eSmith; Amita eJoshi; Robin eHaimbach; Desmond eClark; Yingzhe eLi; Jin eHua; Troy eMcKelvey; Yangsi eOu; James eDrummond; Leslie eCope; Donna eMontgomery; Tessie eMcNeely

    2012-01-01

    We previously reported the development of a human monoclonal antibody (CS-D7, IgG1) with specificity and affinity for the iron regulated surface determinant B (IsdB) of Staphylococcus aureus. CS-D7 mediates opsonophagocytic killing in vitro and protection in a murine sepsis model. In light of recent data indicating that IsdB specific T cells (CD4+, Th17), not Ab, mediate protection after vaccination with IsdB, it is important to investigate the mechanism of protection mediated by CS-D7. Th...

  7. Alpha-lipoic acid and N-acetylcysteine protects intensive swimming exercise-mediated germ-cell depletion, pro-oxidant generation, and alteration of steroidogenesis in rat testis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jana, Kuladip; Dutta, Ananya; Chakraborty, Pratip; Manna, Indranil; Firdaus, Syed Benazir; Bandyopadhyay, Debasish; Chattopadhyay, Ratna; Chakravarty, Baidyanath

    2014-09-01

    Prolonged and strenuous exercise has been proposed as a possible source of male-factor infertility. Forced intensive swimming has also been identified as one source of a dysfunctional male reproduction system. The present study evaluated the possible protective role of α-lipoic acid and N-acetylcysteine (NAC) on intensive swimming-induced germ-cell depletion in adult male rats. Forced exhaustive swimming of 1 hr/day, 6 days/week for 8 consecutive weeks resulted in a significant (P intensive forced swimming causes germ-cell depletion through the generation of ROS and depletion of steroidogenesis in the testis, which can be protected by the co-administration of α-lipoic acid and NAC. PMID:25104294

  8. Nrf2 Protects Against TWEAK-mediated Skeletal Muscle Wasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sawaf, Othman; Fragoulis, Athanassios; Rosen, Christian; Kan, Yuet Wai; Sönmez, Tolga Taha; Pufe, Thomas; Wruck, Christoph Jan

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle (SM) regeneration after injury is impaired by excessive inflammation. Particularly, the inflammatory cytokine tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-like weak inducer of apoptosis (TWEAK) is a potent inducer of skeletal muscle wasting and fibrosis. In this study we investigated the role of Nrf2, a major regulator of oxidative stress defence, in SM ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury and TWEAK induced atrophy. We explored the time-dependent expression of TWEAK after I/R in SM of Nrf2-wildtype (WT) and knockout (KO) mice. Nrf2-KO mice expressed significant higher levels of TWEAK as compared to WT mice. Consequently, Nrf2-KO mice present an insufficient regeneration as compared to Nrf2-WT mice. Moreover, TWEAK stimulation activates Nrf2 in the mouse myoblast cell line C2C12. This Nrf2 activation inhibits TWEAK induced atrophy in C2C12 differentiated myotubes. In summary, we show that Nrf2 protects SM from TWEAK-induced cell death in vitro and that Nrf2-deficient mice therefore have poorer muscle regeneration.

  9. Protective mucosal immunity mediated by epithelial CD1d and IL-10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olszak, Torsten; Neves, Joana F; Dowds, C Marie; Baker, Kristi; Glickman, Jonathan; Davidson, Nicholas O; Lin, Chyuan-Sheng; Jobin, Christian; Brand, Stephan; Sotlar, Karl; Wada, Koichiro; Katayama, Kazufumi; Nakajima, Atsushi; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki; Kawasaki, Kunito; Nagata, Kazuhiro; Müller, Werner; Snapper, Scott B; Schreiber, Stefan; Kaser, Arthur; Zeissig, Sebastian; Blumberg, Richard S

    2014-05-22

    The mechanisms by which mucosal homeostasis is maintained are of central importance to inflammatory bowel disease. Critical to these processes is the intestinal epithelial cell (IEC), which regulates immune responses at the interface between the commensal microbiota and the host. CD1d presents self and microbial lipid antigens to natural killer T (NKT) cells, which are involved in the pathogenesis of colitis in animal models and human inflammatory bowel disease. As CD1d crosslinking on model IECs results in the production of the important regulatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-10 (ref. 9), decreased epithelial CD1d expression--as observed in inflammatory bowel disease--may contribute substantially to intestinal inflammation. Here we show in mice that whereas bone-marrow-derived CD1d signals contribute to NKT-cell-mediated intestinal inflammation, engagement of epithelial CD1d elicits protective effects through the activation of STAT3 and STAT3-dependent transcription of IL-10, heat shock protein 110 (HSP110; also known as HSP105), and CD1d itself. All of these epithelial elements are critically involved in controlling CD1d-mediated intestinal inflammation. This is demonstrated by severe NKT-cell-mediated colitis upon IEC-specific deletion of IL-10, CD1d, and its critical regulator microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP), as well as deletion of HSP110 in the radioresistant compartment. Our studies thus uncover a novel pathway of IEC-dependent regulation of mucosal homeostasis and highlight a critical role of IL-10 in the intestinal epithelium, with broad implications for diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:24717441

  10. Hot electron plasmon-protected solar cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, J; Rose, A H; Yang, C; Wu, X; Merlo, J M; Burns, M J; Naughton, M J; Kempa, K

    2015-09-21

    A solar cell based on a hot electron plasmon protection effect is proposed and made plausible by simulations, non-local modeling of the response, and quantum mechanical calculations. In this cell, a thin-film, plasmonic metamaterial structure acts as both an efficient photon absorber in the visible frequency range and a plasmonic resonator in the IR range, the latter of which absorbs and protects against phonon emission the free energy of the hot electrons in an adjacent semiconductor junction. We show that in this structure, electron-plasmon scattering is much more efficient than electron-phonon scattering in cooling-off hot electrons, and the plasmon-stored energy is recoverable as an additional cell voltage. The proposed structure could become a prototype of a new generation of high efficiency solar cells. PMID:26406739

  11. Tyr Phosphatase-Mediated P-ERK Inhibition Suppresses Senescence in EIA + v-raf Transformed Cells, Which, Paradoxically, Are Apoptosis-Protected in a MEK-Dependent Manner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania De Vitis

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Activation of the Ras-Raf-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK pathway causes not only proliferation and suppression of apoptosis but also the antioncogenic response of senescence. How these contrasting effects are reconciled to achieve cell transformation and cancer formation is poorly understood. In a system of two-step carcinogenesis (dedifferentiated PC EIA, transformed PC EIA-polyoma-middle T [PC EIA + Py] and PC EIA-v-raf [PC EIA + raf] cells], v-raf cooperated with EIA by virtue of a strong prosurvival effect, not elicited by Py-middle T, evident toward serum-deprivation-and H2O2-induced apoptosis. Apoptosis was detected by DNA fragmentation and annexin V staining. The prosurvival function of v-raf was, in part, mitogen-activated protein kinase/ERK kinase (MEK-dependent, as shown by pharmacological MEK inhibition. The MEK-dependent antiapoptotic effect of v-raf was exerted despite a lower level of P-ERK1/2 in EIA + raf cells with respect to EIA + Py/EIA cells, which was dependent on a high tyrosine phosphatase activity, as shown by orthovanadate blockade. An ERK1/2 tyrosine phosphatase was likely involved. The high tyrosine phosphatase activity was instrumental to the complete suppression of senescence, detected by β-galactosidase activity, because tyrosine phosphatase blockade induced senescence in EIA + raf but not in EIA + Py cells. High tyrosine phosphatase activity and evasion from senescence were confirmed in an anaplastic thyroid cancer cell line. Therefore, besides EIA, EIA + raf cells suppress senescence through a new mechanism, namely, phosphatase-mediated P-ERK1/2 inhibition, but, paradoxically, retain the oncogenic effects of the Raf-ERK pathway. We propose that the survival effect of Raf is not a function of absolute P-ERK1/2 levels at a given time but is rather dynamically dependent on greater variations after an apoptotic stimulus.

  12. Protection of cultured mammalian cells by rebamipide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antoku, Shigetoshi; Aramaki, Ryoji [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Medicine; Tanaka, Hisashi; Kusumoto, Naotoshi

    1997-06-01

    Rebamipide which is used as a drug for gastritis and stomach ulcer has large capability for OH radical scavenging. It is expected that rebamipide has protective effect against ionizing radiations. The present paper deals with protective effect of rebamipide for cultured mammalian cells exposed to ionizing radiations. As rebamipide is insoluble in water, three solvents were used to dissolve. Rebamipide dissolved in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), dimethyl formamide (DMFA) and 0.02 N NaOH was added to the cells in Eagle`s minimum essential medium (MEM) supplemented with 10% fetal calf serum and the cells were irradiated with X-rays. After irradiation, the cells were trypsinized, plated in MEM with 10% fetal calf serum and incubated for 7 days in a CO{sub 2} incubator to form colonies. Rebamipide dissolved in 0.02 N NaOH exhibited the protective effect expected its OH radical scavenging capability. However, the protective effect of rebamipide dissolved in DMSO was about half of that expected by its radical scavenging capability and that of rebamipide dissolved in DMFA was not observed. Uptake of rebamipide labeled with {sup 14}C increased with increasing contact time with rebamipide. These rebamipide mainly distributed in nucleus rather than cytoplasm. (author)

  13. Selective induction of cell-mediated immunity and protection of rhesus macaques from chronic SHIVKU2 infection by prophylactic vaccination with a conserved HIV-1 envelope peptide-cocktail

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Infection of Indian-origin rhesus macaques by the simian human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) is considered to be a suitable preclinical model for directly testing efficacy of vaccine candidates based on the HIV-1 envelope. We used this model for prophylactic vaccination with a peptide-cocktail comprised of highly conserved HIV-1 envelope sequences immunogenic/antigenic in macaques and humans. Separate groups of macaques were immunized with the peptide-cocktail by intravenous and subcutaneous routes using autologous dendritic cells (DC) and Freund's adjuvant, respectively. The vaccine elicited antigen specific IFN-γ-producing cells and T-cell proliferation, but not HIV-neutralizing antibodies. The vaccinated animals also exhibited efficient cross-clade cytolytic activity against target cells expressing envelope proteins corresponding to HIV-1 strains representative of multiple clades that increased after intravenous challenge with pathogenic SHIVKU2. Virus-neutralizing antibodies were either undetectable or present only transiently at low levels in the control as well as vaccinated monkeys after infection. Significant control of plasma viremia leading to undetectable levels was achieved in majority of vaccinated monkeys compared to mock-vaccinated controls. Monkeys vaccinated with the peptide-cocktail using autologous DC, compared to Freund's adjuvant, and the mock-vaccinated animals, showed significantly higher IFN-γ production, higher levels of vaccine-specific IFN-γ producing CD4+ cells and significant control of plasma viremia. These results support DC-based vaccine delivery and the utility of the conserved HIV-1 envelope peptide-cocktail, capable of priming strong cell-mediated immunity, for potential inclusion in HIV vaccination strategies

  14. Posttransplantation antibody mediated rejection: new insights into mechanism, treatment and protective strategies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MAO You-ying; CHEN Jiang-hua

    2011-01-01

    @@ Acute antibody mediated rejection (AMR) is receiving more and more attention, which is mediated by different mechanisms from T cell mediated rejection, thereby requiring other approaches to prevention and treatment. Preexisting alloantibodies and pre-transplant sensitization are important risk factors for development of acute AMR early after renal transplantation.

  15. Sesamol protects human embryonic kidney cells from radiation induced cell death: a potential radioprotective agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioprotectors are agents which reduce the radiation effects on cell when applied prior to exposure of radiation. In our earlier studies, we have demonstrated that sesamol protected DNA (plasmid and calf thymus) and V79 cells from radiation induced cell death and the effect was higher (DMF=2) in comparison to melatonin (DMF=1.3). This prompted us to study, sesamol mediated radioprotection in detail to understand the mechanism of action. We have chosen human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells to understand the mechanism of radioprotection. The HEK cells were treated with sesamol before exposure of g rays (60Co teletherapy, Bhabhatron II) in the radiation dose range 0-7 Gy for clonogenic survival. Toxicity, antioxidant enzyme activity other biochemical assays were performed. Flow cytometric analysis (FACS Calibre, BD, USA) was used to determine the apoptotic population and mitochondrial membrane potential (Rh 123, JC-1). ROS was determined using DCFHDA. Cell cycle analysis, caspase 3 activity and cytochrome C were also measured. Results suggested that sesamol protected HEK cells from cell death. The dose modifying factor for sesamol was 1.3, whereas the alpha protection factor was 2. Sesamol inhibited radiation induced cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase; ROS generation and depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential and caspase-3 activity. Sesamol inhibited damage of critical cellular components (protein, lipids, membrane and amino acid) and maintained the redox status of cells. The results will be helpful in understanding the mechanistic aspects and development of sesamol based radioprotector. (author)

  16. The 3 major types of innate and adaptive cell-mediated effector immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annunziato, Francesco; Romagnani, Chiara; Romagnani, Sergio

    2015-03-01

    The immune system has tailored its effector functions to optimally respond to distinct species of microbes. Based on emerging knowledge on the different effector T-cell and innate lymphoid cell (ILC) lineages, it is clear that the innate and adaptive immune systems converge into 3 major kinds of cell-mediated effector immunity, which we propose to categorize as type 1, type 2, and type 3. Type 1 immunity consists of T-bet(+) IFN-γ-producing group 1 ILCs (ILC1 and natural killer cells), CD8(+) cytotoxic T cells (TC1), and CD4(+) TH1 cells, which protect against intracellular microbes through activation of mononuclear phagocytes. Type 2 immunity consists of GATA-3(+) ILC2s, TC2 cells, and TH2 cells producing IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13, which induce mast cell, basophil, and eosinophil activation, as well as IgE antibody production, thus protecting against helminthes and venoms. Type 3 immunity is mediated by retinoic acid-related orphan receptor γt(+) ILC3s, TC17 cells, and TH17 cells producing IL-17, IL-22, or both, which activate mononuclear phagocytes but also recruit neutrophils and induce epithelial antimicrobial responses, thus protecting against extracellular bacteria and fungi. On the other hand, type 1 and 3 immunity mediate autoimmune diseases, whereas type 2 responses can cause allergic diseases. PMID:25528359

  17. Berberine protects against neuronal damage via suppression of glia-mediated inflammation in traumatic brain injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Cheng Chen

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI triggers a series of neuroinflammatory processes that contribute to evolution of neuronal injury. The present study investigated the neuroprotective effects and anti-inflammatory actions of berberine, an isoquinoline alkaloid, in both in vitro and in vivo TBI models. Mice subjected to controlled cortical impact injury were injected with berberine (10 mg·kg(-1 or vehicle 10 min after injury. In addition to behavioral studies and histology analysis, blood-brain barrier (BBB permeability and brain water content were determined. Expression of PI3K/Akt and Erk signaling and inflammatory mediators were also analyzed. The protective effect of berberine was also investigated in cultured neurons either subjected to stretch injury or exposed to conditioned media with activated microglia. Berberine significantly attenuated functional deficits and brain damage associated with TBI up to day 28 post-injury. Berberine also reduced neuronal death, apoptosis, BBB permeability, and brain edema at day 1 post-injury. These changes coincided with a marked reduction in leukocyte infiltration, microglial activation, matrix metalloproteinase-9 activity, and expression of inflammatory mediators. Berberine had no effect on Akt or Erk 1/2 phosphorylation. In mixed glial cultures, berberine reduced TLR4/MyD88/NF-κB signaling. Berberine also attenuated neuronal death induced by microglial conditioned media; however, it did not directly protect cultured neurons subjected to stretch injury. Moreover, administration of berberine at 3 h post-injury also reduced TBI-induced neuronal damage, apoptosis and inflammation in vivo. Berberine reduces TBI-induced brain damage by limiting the production of inflammatory mediators by glial cells, rather than by a direct neuroprotective effect.

  18. Genetically Attenuated Plasmodium berghei Liver Stages Persist and Elicit Sterile Protection Primarily via CD8 T Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Mueller, Ann-Kristin; Deckert, Martina; Heiss, Kirsten; Goetz, Kristin; Matuschewski, Kai; Schlüter, Dirk

    2007-01-01

    Live-attenuated Plasmodium liver stages remain the only experimental model that confers complete sterile protection against malaria. Irradiation-attenuated Plasmodium parasites mediate protection primarily by CD8 T cells. In contrast, it is unknown how genetically attenuated liver stage parasites provide protection. Here, we show that immunization with uis3(−) sporozoites does not cause breakthrough infection in T and B-cell-deficient rag1−/− and IFN-γ−/− mice. However, protection was abolish...

  19. A novel method for detection of dioxins. Exonuclease protection mediated PCR assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, S.Q.; Sun, X.; Li, F.; Li, B.S. [Huazhong Univ. of Science and Technology, Wuhan, HB (China). Tongji Medical College

    2004-09-15

    The aromatic hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-actived transcription factor that mediates many of the biologic and toxicologic effects of dioxin-like chemicals (DLCs), such as 2,3,7,8- tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). Numerous AhR-based bioassays for identification and detection of DLCs have been developed in vitro. Such as the chemical-activated luciferase gene expression (CALUX), ethoxyresolufin-O-deethylase (EROD) activity are sometimes represented as the next best system when compared with whole body or in vivo systems. However, cell systems can be affected by the toxic chemical itself during the assay, thus confusing problems couldn't be avoided in the assay. Incorporation of metabolism in cell systems with uncertain consequences prolongs assay complexity and time. Thus these drawbacks limit the utility of cell systems for screening purposes. Most cell-free bioassays require radioactivity, such as the gel retardation of AhR binding (GRAB) assay, or antibody of AhR or ligand, which are unfeasible for some laboratories. Here a cell-free bioanalysis method, Exonuclease Protection Mediated PCR (EPM-PCR) bioassay, was established for detection of AhR ligands based on the binding of the dioxin:AhR complex to the specific DNA. EPM-PCR can provide indirect detection of ligands by quantification of the specific AhR-binding DNA, no necessary of any DNA labeling and sophisticated equipments. This new bioassay not only has the higher sensitivity and specificity, but it is rapid and easy to perform.

  20. Alpha-adrenergic blocker mediated osteoblastic stem cell differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yoon Jung [Craniomaxillofacial Reconstructive Sciences Major, College of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-749 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jue Yeon [Craniomaxillofacial Reconstructive Sciences Major, College of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-749 (Korea, Republic of); Research Center, Nano Intelligent Biomedical Engineering Corporation (NIBEC), Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seung Jin [Department of Industrial Pharmacy, College of Pharmacy, Ewha Womans University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Research Center, Nano Intelligent Biomedical Engineering Corporation (NIBEC), Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Chong-Pyoung [Department of Periodontology, School of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Research Center, Nano Intelligent Biomedical Engineering Corporation (NIBEC), Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Yoon Jeong, E-mail: parkyj@snu.ac.kr [Craniomaxillofacial Reconstructive Sciences Major, College of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-749 (Korea, Republic of); Research Center, Nano Intelligent Biomedical Engineering Corporation (NIBEC), Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-12-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Doxazocin directly up-regulated bone metabolism at a low dose. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Doxazocin induced osteoblastic stem cell differentiation without affecting cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This osteogenic stem cell differentiation is mediated by ERK-signal dependent pathway. -- Abstract: Recent researches have indicated a role for antihypertensive drugs including alpha- or beta-blockers in the prevention of bone loss. Some epidemiological studies reported the protective effects of those agents on fracture risk. However, there is limited information on the association with those agents especially at the mechanism of action. In the present study, we investigated the effects of doxazosin, an alpha-blocker that is clinically used for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) along with antihypertensive medication, on the osteogenic stem cell differentiation. We found that doxazosin increased osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells, detected by Alizarin red S staining and calcein. Doxazosin not only induced expression of alkaline phosphatase, type I collagen, osteopontin, and osteocalcin, it also resulted in increased phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2), a MAP kinase involved in osteoblastic differentiation. Treatment with U0126, a MAP kinase inhibitor, significantly blocked doxazosin-induced osteoblastic differentiation. Unrelated to activation of osteogenic differentiation by doxazosin, we found that there were no significant changes in adipogenic differentiation or in the expression of adipose-specific genes, including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma}, aP2, or LPL. In this report, we suggest that doxazosin has the ability to increase osteogenic cell differentiation via ERK1/2 activation in osteogenic differentiation of adult stem cells, which supports the protective effects of antihypertensive drug on fracture risk and

  1. The indirect antioxidant sulforaphane protects against thiopurine-mediated photooxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedict, Andrea L; Knatko, Elena V; Dinkova-Kostova, Albena T

    2012-12-01

    Long-term treatment with thiopurines, such as the widely used anticancer, immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory agent azathioprine, combined with exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation is associated with increased oxidative stress, hyperphotosensitivity and high risk for development of aggressive squamous cell carcinomas of the skin. Sulforaphane, an isothiocyanate derived from broccoli, is a potent inducer of endogenous cellular defenses regulated by transcription factor nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), including cytoprotective enzymes and glutathione, which in turn act as efficient indirect and direct antioxidants that have long-lasting effects. Treatment with 6-thioguanine, a surrogate for azathioprine, leads to profound sensitization to oxidative stress and glutathione depletion upon exposure to UVA radiation, the damaging effects of which are primarily mediated by generation of reactive oxygen species. The degree of sensitization is greater for irradiation exposures spanning the absorption spectrum of 6-thioguanine, and is dependent on the length of treatment and the level of guanine substitution with 6-thioguanine, suggesting that the 6-thioguanine that is incorporated in genomic DNA is largely responsible for this sensitization. Sulforaphane provides protection against UVA, but not UVB, radiation without affecting the levels of 6-thioguanine incorporation into DNA. The protective effect is lost under conditions of Nrf2 deficiency, implying that it is due to induction of Nrf2-dependent cytoprotective proteins, and that this strategy could provide protection against any potentially photosensitizing drugs that generate electrophilic or reactive oxygen species. Thus, our findings support the development of Nrf2 activators as protectors against drug-mediated photooxidative stress and encourage future clinical trials in populations at high risk for cutaneous photodamage and photocarcinogenesis. PMID:22983983

  2. Mediated Electrochemical Measurements of Intracellular Catabolic Activities of Yeast Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin Sheng ZHAO; Zhen Yu YANG; Yao LU; Zheng Yu YANG

    2005-01-01

    Coupling with the dual mediator system menadione/ferricyanide, microelectrode voltammetric measurements were undertaken to detect the ferrocyanide accumulations arising from the mediated reduction of ferricyanide by yeast cells. The results indicate that the dual mediator system menadione/ferricyanide could be used as a probe to detect cellular catabolic activities in yeast cells and the electrochemical response has a positive relationship with the specific growth rate of yeast cells.

  3. Dendritic Cell Protection from Cisplatin Nephrotoxicity Is Independent of Neutrophils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghu K. Tadagavadi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Cisplatin is a very effective chemotherapeutic agent used against a wide range of solid tumors. A major adverse effect of cisplatin therapy is acute kidney injury (AKI. Neutrophils are reported to infiltrate and exacerbate injury in a wide range of sterile inflammatory models of tissue injury. Here, we studied the kinetics of neutrophil infiltration into kidneys and their role in cisplatin-mediated AKI. Mice treated with cisplatin showed an increase in circulating neutrophils 24 and 48 h after cisplatin administration. Cisplatin treatment caused an increase in kidney leukocytes with neutrophils accounting for the majority of the infiltrating leukocytes. The extent of neutrophil infiltration coincided with the severity of kidney injury and renal dysfunction. To examine the functional relevance of infiltrating neutrophils in cisplatin nephrotoxicity, we depleted neutrophils using a neutrophil-specific antibody (anti-Ly-6G. This antibody resulted in greater than 90% depletion of neutrophils in both the blood and kidney. Of note, depletion of neutrophils had no impact on the extent of cisplatin-induced AKI as compared to non-depleted mice. Earlier, we reported that dendritic cell depletion in CD11c-DTRtg mice causes exacerbation of AKI and a dramatic increase in renal neutrophils. Thus, we also examined the role of neutrophils in dendritic cell-depleted mice treated with cisplatin. Dendritic cell depletion exacerbated AKI in spite of neutrophil depletion. These data demonstrate that cisplatin nephrotoxicity is not mediated by neutrophils and that dendritic cells protect kidneys via neutrophil-independent mechanisms.

  4. Myeloid HIF-1 is protective in Helicobacter pylori-mediated gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matak, Pavle; Heinis, Mylène; Mathieu, Jacques R R; Corriden, Ross; Cuvellier, Sylvain; Delga, Stéphanie; Mounier, Rémi; Rouquette, Alexandre; Raymond, Josette; Lamarque, Dominique; Emile, Jean-François; Nizet, Victor; Touati, Eliette; Peyssonnaux, Carole

    2015-04-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection triggers chronic inflammation of the gastric mucosa that may progress to gastric cancer. The hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) are the central mediators of cellular adaptation to low oxygen levels (hypoxia), but they have emerged recently as major transcriptional regulators of immunity and inflammation. No studies have investigated whether H. pylori affects HIF signaling in immune cells and a potential role for HIF in H. pylori-mediated gastritis. HIF-1 and HIF-2 expression was examined in human H. pylori-positive gastritis biopsies. Subsequent experiments were performed in naive and polarized bone marrow-derived macrophages from wild-type (WT) and myeloid HIF-1α-null mice (HIF-1(Δmyel)). WT and HIF-1(Δmyel) mice were inoculated with H. pylori by oral gavage and sacrificed 6 mo postinfection. HIF-1 was specifically expressed in macrophages of human H. pylori-positive gastritis biopsies. Macrophage HIF-1 strongly contributed to the induction of proinflammatory genes (IL-6, IL-1β) and inducible NO synthase in response to H. pylori. HIF-2 expression and markers of M2 macrophage differentiation were decreased in response to H. pylori. HIF-1(Δmyel) mice inoculated with H. pylori for 6 mo presented with a similar bacterial colonization than WT mice but, surprisingly, a global increase of inflammation, leading to a worsening of the gastritis, measured by an increased epithelial cell proliferation. In conclusion, myeloid HIF-1 is protective in H. pylori-mediated gastritis, pointing to the complex counterbalancing roles of innate immune and inflammatory phenotypes in driving this pathology. PMID:25710915

  5. NKG2D ligands mediate immunosurveillance of senescent cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagiv, Adi; Burton, Dominick G A; Moshayev, Zhana; Vadai, Ezra; Wensveen, Felix; Ben-Dor, Shifra; Golani, Ofra; Polic, Bojan; Krizhanovsky, Valery

    2016-02-01

    Cellular senescence is a stress response mechanism that limits tumorigenesis and tissue damage. Induction of cellular senescence commonly coincides with an immunogenic phenotype that promotes self-elimination by components of the immune system, thereby facilitating tumor suppression and limiting excess fibrosis during wound repair. The mechanisms by which senescent cells regulate their immune surveillance are not completely understood. Here we show that ligands of an activating Natural Killer (NK) cell receptor (NKG2D), MICA and ULBP2 are consistently up-regulated following induction of replicative senescence, oncogene-induced senescence and DNA damage - induced senescence. MICA and ULBP2 proteins are necessary for efficient NK-mediated cytotoxicity towards senescent fibroblasts. The mechanisms regulating the initial expression of NKG2D ligands in senescent cells are dependent on a DNA damage response, whilst continuous expression of these ligands is regulated by the ERK signaling pathway. In liver fibrosis, the accumulation of senescent activated stellate cells is increased in mice lacking NKG2D receptor leading to increased fibrosis. Overall, our results provide new insights into the mechanisms regulating the expression of immune ligands in senescent cells and reveal the importance of NKG2D receptor-ligand interaction in protecting against liver fibrosis. PMID:26878797

  6. Stem cell factor (SCF) protects osteoblasts from oxidative stress through activating c-Kit-Akt signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Lei [Department of Orthopedics, Changzhou Wujin People’s Hospital-South Division, Affiliated Hospital of Jiangsu University, Changzhou (China); Wu, Zhong [Department of Orthopedics, Shanghai Tenth People’s Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Yin, Gang; Liu, Haifeng; Guan, Xiaojun; Zhao, Xiaoqiang [Department of Orthopedics, Changzhou Wujin People’s Hospital-South Division, Affiliated Hospital of Jiangsu University, Changzhou (China); Wang, Jianguang, E-mail: jianguangwang@163.com [Department of Orthopedics, Shanghai Tenth People’s Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Zhu, Jianguo, E-mail: gehujianguo68@163.com [Department of Orthopedics, Changzhou Wujin People’s Hospital-South Division, Affiliated Hospital of Jiangsu University, Changzhou (China)

    2014-12-12

    Highlights: • SCF receptor c-Kit is functionally expressed in primary and transformed osteoblasts. • SCF protects primary and transformed osteoblasts from H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. • SCF activation of c-Kit in osteoblasts, required for its cyto-protective effects. • c-Kit mediates SCF-induced Akt activation in cultured osteoblasts. • Akt activation is required for SCF-regulated cyto-protective effects in osteoblasts. - Abstract: Osteoblasts regulate bone formation and remodeling, and are main target cells of oxidative stress in the progression of osteonecrosis. The stem cell factor (SCF)-c-Kit pathway plays important roles in the proliferation, differentiation and survival in a range of cell types, but little is known about its functions in osteoblasts. In this study, we found that c-Kit is functionally expressed in both osteoblastic-like MC3T3-E1 cells and primary murine osteoblasts. Its ligand SCF exerted significant cyto-protective effects against hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}). SCF activated its receptor c-Kit in osteoblasts, which was required for its cyto-protective effects against H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Pharmacological inhibition (by Imatinib and Dasatinib) or shRNA-mediated knockdown of c-Kit thus inhibited SCF-mediated osteoblast protection. Further investigations showed that protection by SCF against H{sub 2}O{sub 2} was mediated via activation of c-Kit-dependent Akt pathway. Inhibition of Akt activation, through pharmacological or genetic means, suppressed SCF-mediated anti-H{sub 2}O{sub 2} activity in osteoblasts. In summary, we have identified a new SCF-c-Kit-Akt physiologic pathway that protects osteoblasts from H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced damages, and might minimize the risk of osteonecrosis caused by oxidative stress.

  7. A longitudinal study of cell-mediated immunity in pigs infected with porcine parvovirus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladekjaer-Mikkelsen, A.S.; Nielsen, Jens

    2002-01-01

    Porcine parvovirus (PPV) is an ubiquitous pathogen causing reproductive failure in swine. Protection against reproductive failure caused by acute PPV infection has commonly been related to the presence of specific antibodies in the dam. However, the role of cell-mediated immunity during chronic PPV...

  8. Egg and time limitation mediate an egg protection strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deas, J B; Hunter, M S

    2014-05-01

    The number of mature eggs remaining in the ovaries and the time left for oviposition determine the reproductive decisions of the hyperdiverse guild of insects that require discrete and potentially limiting resources for oviposition (such as seeds, fruits or other insects). A female may run out of eggs before all available oviposition sites are used (egg limitation), or die before using all of her eggs (time limitation). Females are predicted to change clutch size depending on whether eggs or time is the limiting resource. We extend this framework and ask whether the same constraints influence a strategy in which females modify eggs into protective shields. In response to egg parasitism cues, female seed beetles (Mimosestes amicus) lay eggs in vertical groups of 2-4, modifying the top 1-3 eggs into shields in order to protect the bottom egg from attack by parasitoids. We made contrasting predictions of how egg and time limitation would influence egg size and the incidence and level of egg protection. By varying access to seed pods, we manipulated the number of remaining eggs a female had at the time she received a parasitism cue. Although egg size was not affected, our results confirm that egg-limited females protected fewer eggs and time-limited females protected more eggs. Female body size explained the number of eggs in a stack rather than host deprivation or the timing of parasitoid exposure. Our results clearly show that host availability relative to female age influences the incidence of egg protection in M. amicus. Furthermore, our study represents a novel use of life history theory to explain patterns in an unusual but compelling defensive behaviour. PMID:24735410

  9. Cell-mediated immune deficiency in Hodgkin's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, R K; Penny, R

    1982-10-01

    Disturbances of the immune system frequently accompany the development of lymphomas in man. In the early stages of non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, abnormalities of immunological function are usually minimal, but impairment of both antibody- and cell-mediated immunity is often noted in advanced disease. In contrast, while antibody-mediated immune responses in patients with Hodgkin's disease usually remain intact until late in the course of the illness, cell-mediated immune dysfunction is an early and consistent feature. Here Rakesh Kumar and Ronald Penny discuss the abnormalities of cell-mediated immunity in Hodgkin's disease. PMID:25290229

  10. Oncogenic BRAF-Mediated Melanoma Cell Invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hezhe Lu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Melanoma patients with oncogenic BRAFV600E mutation have poor prognoses. While the role of BRAFV600E in tumorigenesis is well established, its involvement in metastasis that is clinically observed in melanoma patients remains a topic of debate. Here, we show that BRAFV600E melanoma cells have extensive invasion activity as assayed by the generation of F-actin and cortactin foci that mediate membrane protrusion, and degradation of the extracellular matrix (ECM. Inhibition of BRAFV600E blocks melanoma cell invasion. In a BRAFV600E-driven murine melanoma model or in patients’ tumor biopsies, cortactin foci decrease upon inhibitor treatment. In addition, genome-wide expression analysis shows that a number of invadopodia-related genes are downregulated after BRAFV600E inhibition. Mechanistically, BRAFV600E induces phosphorylation of cortactin and the exocyst subunit Exo70 through ERK, which regulates actin dynamics and matrix metalloprotease secretion, respectively. Our results provide support for the role of BRAFV600E in metastasis and suggest that inhibiting invasion is a potential therapeutic strategy against melanoma.

  11. TAT-Mediated Delivery of Tousled Protein to Salivary Glands Protects Against Radiation-Induced Hypofunction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sunavala-Dossabhoy, Gulshan, E-mail: gsunav@lsuhsc.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, LA (United States); Palaniyandi, Senthilnathan; Richardson, Charles; De Benedetti, Arrigo [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, LA (United States); Schrott, Lisa [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology, and Neuroscience, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, LA (United States); Caldito, Gloria [Department of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, LA (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Patients treated with radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer invariably suffer its deleterious side effect, xerostomia. Salivary hypofunction ensuing from the irreversible destruction of glands is the most common and debilitating oral complication affecting patients undergoing regional radiotherapy. Given that the current management of xerostomia is palliative and ineffective, efforts are now directed toward preventive measures to preserve gland function. The human homolog of Tousled protein, TLK1B, facilitates chromatin remodeling at DNA repair sites and improves cell survival against ionizing radiation (IR). Therefore, we wanted to determine whether a direct transfer of TLK1B protein to rat salivary glands could protect against IR-induced salivary hypofunction. Methods: The cell-permeable TAT-TLK1B fusion protein was generated. Rat acinar cell line and rat salivary glands were pretreated with TAT peptide or TAT-TLK1B before IR. The acinar cell survival in vitro and salivary function in vivo were assessed after radiation. Results: We demonstrated that rat acinar cells transduced with TAT-TLK1B were more resistant to radiation (D{sub 0} = 4.13 {+-} 1.0 Gy; {alpha}/{beta} = 0 Gy) compared with cells transduced with the TAT peptide (D{sub 0} = 4.91 {+-} 1.0 Gy; {alpha}/{beta} = 20.2 Gy). Correspondingly, retroductal instillation of TAT-TLK1B in rat submandibular glands better preserved salivary flow after IR (89%) compared with animals pretreated with Opti-MEM or TAT peptide (31% and 39%, respectively; p < 0.01). Conclusions: The results demonstrate that a direct transfer of TLK1B protein to the salivary glands effectively attenuates radiation-mediated gland dysfunction. Prophylactic TLK1B-protein therapy could benefit patients undergoing radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer.

  12. TAT-Mediated Delivery of Tousled Protein to Salivary Glands Protects Against Radiation-Induced Hypofunction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Patients treated with radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer invariably suffer its deleterious side effect, xerostomia. Salivary hypofunction ensuing from the irreversible destruction of glands is the most common and debilitating oral complication affecting patients undergoing regional radiotherapy. Given that the current management of xerostomia is palliative and ineffective, efforts are now directed toward preventive measures to preserve gland function. The human homolog of Tousled protein, TLK1B, facilitates chromatin remodeling at DNA repair sites and improves cell survival against ionizing radiation (IR). Therefore, we wanted to determine whether a direct transfer of TLK1B protein to rat salivary glands could protect against IR-induced salivary hypofunction. Methods: The cell-permeable TAT-TLK1B fusion protein was generated. Rat acinar cell line and rat salivary glands were pretreated with TAT peptide or TAT-TLK1B before IR. The acinar cell survival in vitro and salivary function in vivo were assessed after radiation. Results: We demonstrated that rat acinar cells transduced with TAT-TLK1B were more resistant to radiation (D0 = 4.13 ± 1.0 Gy; α/β = 0 Gy) compared with cells transduced with the TAT peptide (D0 = 4.91 ± 1.0 Gy; α/β = 20.2 Gy). Correspondingly, retroductal instillation of TAT-TLK1B in rat submandibular glands better preserved salivary flow after IR (89%) compared with animals pretreated with Opti-MEM or TAT peptide (31% and 39%, respectively; p < 0.01). Conclusions: The results demonstrate that a direct transfer of TLK1B protein to the salivary glands effectively attenuates radiation-mediated gland dysfunction. Prophylactic TLK1B-protein therapy could benefit patients undergoing radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer.

  13. Overexpression of heme oxygenase-1 protects smooth muscle cells against oxidative injury and inhibits cell proliferation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    To investigate whether the expression of exogenous heme oxygenase-1 (HO-l) gene within vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) could protect the cells from free radical attack and inhibit cell proliferation,we established an in vitro transfection of human HO-1 gene into rat VSMC mediated by a retroviral vector.The results showed that the profound expression of HO-1 protein as well as HO activity was 1.8- and 2.0-fold increased respectively in the transfected cells compared to the non-transfected ones. The treatment of VSMC with different concentrations of H2O2 led to the remarkable cell damage as indicated by survival rate and LDH leakage. However, the resistance of the HO-1 transfected VSMC against H2O2 was significantly raised. This protective effect was dramatically diminished when the transfected VSMC were pretreated with ZnPP-IX, a specific inhibitor of HO, for 24 h. In addition, we found that the growth potential of the transfected cells was significantly inhibited directly by increased activity of HO-l, and this effect might be related to decreased phosphorylation of MAPK. These results suggest that the overexpression of introduced hHO-1 is potentially able to reduce the risk factors of atherosclerosis, partially due to its cellular protection against oxidative injury and to its inhibitory effect on cellular proliferation.

  14. Protection against lethal challenge by Ebola virus-like particles produced in insect cells

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Yuliang; Carrion, Ricardo; Ye, Ling; Wen, Zhiyuan; Ro, Young-Tae; Brasky, Kathleen; Ticer, Anysha E.; Schwegler, E. Ellen; Patterson, Jean L.; Compans, Richard W.; Yang, Chinglai

    2008-01-01

    Ebola virus-like particles (VLPs) were produced in insect cells using a recombinant baculovirus expression system and their efficacy for protection against Ebola virus infection was investigated. Two immunizations with 50 ug Ebola VLPs (high dose) induced a high level of antibodies against Ebola GP that exhibited strong neutralizing activity against GP-mediated virus infection and conferred complete protection of vaccinated mice against lethal challenge by a high dose of mouse-adapted Ebola v...

  15. Cannabidiol protects oligodendrocyte progenitor cells from inflammation-induced apoptosis by attenuating endoplasmic reticulum stress

    OpenAIRE

    Mecha, M; Torrao, A S; Mestre, L; Carrillo-Salinas, F J; R Mechoulam; Guaza, C.

    2012-01-01

    Cannabidiol (CBD) is the most abundant cannabinoid in Cannabis sativa that has no psychoactive properties. CBD has been approved to treat inflammation, pain and spasticity associated with multiple sclerosis (MS), of which demyelination and oligodendrocyte loss are hallmarks. Thus, we investigated the protective effects of CBD against the damage to oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) mediated by the immune system. Doses of 1 μM CBD protect OPCs from oxidative stress by decreasing the produ...

  16. Does Splenectomy Protect Against Immune-Mediated Complications in Blunt Trauma Patients?

    OpenAIRE

    Crandall, Marie; Shapiro, Michael B.; West, Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    Activation of the innate immune system results from severe trauma and the resultant systemic inflammatory response is thought to mediate remote organ injury. In animal models, vagal-mediated innate immune responses have been shown to modulate proinflammatory cytokine release in response to trauma or sepsis. In those models, vagal nerve transaction and splenectomy decreased cytokine release and protected against lung injury and mortality. We hypothesized that, if similar mechanisms are active ...

  17. Inflammatory mediators: Parallels between cancer biology and stem cell therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, Shyam A; Heinrich, Andrew C; Bobby Y. Reddy; Rameshwar, Pranela

    2009-01-01

    Inflammation encompasses diverse molecular pathways, and it is intertwined with a wide array of biological processes. Recently, there has been an upsurge of interest in the interactions between mediators of inflammation and other cells such as stem cells and cancer cells. Since tissue injuries are associated with the release of inflammatory mediators, it would be difficult to address this subject without considering the implications of their systemic effects. In this review, we discuss the ef...

  18. IFN-γ signaling to astrocytes protects from autoimmune mediated neurological disability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Hindinger

    Full Text Available Demyelination and axonal degeneration are determinants of progressive neurological disability in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS. Cells resident within the central nervous system (CNS are active participants in development, progression and subsequent control of autoimmune disease; however, their individual contributions are not well understood. Astrocytes, the most abundant CNS cell type, are highly sensitive to environmental cues and are implicated in both detrimental and protective outcomes during autoimmune demyelination. Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE was induced in transgenic mice expressing signaling defective dominant-negative interferon gamma (IFN-γ receptors on astrocytes to determine the influence of inflammation on astrocyte activity. Inhibition of IFN-γ signaling to astrocytes did not influence disease incidence, onset, initial progression of symptoms, blood brain barrier (BBB integrity or the composition of the acute CNS inflammatory response. Nevertheless, increased demyelination at peak acute disease in the absence of IFN-γ signaling to astrocytes correlated with sustained clinical symptoms. Following peak disease, diminished clinical remission, increased mortality and sustained astrocyte activation within the gray matter demonstrate a critical role of IFN-γ signaling to astrocytes in neuroprotection. Diminished disease remission was associated with escalating demyelination, axonal degeneration and sustained inflammation. The CNS infiltrating leukocyte composition was not altered; however, decreased IL-10 and IL-27 correlated with sustained disease. These data indicate that astrocytes play a critical role in limiting CNS autoimmune disease dependent upon a neuroprotective signaling pathway mediated by engagement of IFN-γ receptors.

  19. Novel antimalarial antibodies highlight the importance of the antibody Fc region in mediating protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleass, Richard J; Ogun, Solabomi A; McGuinness, David H; van de Winkel, Jan G J; Holder, Anthony A; Woof, Jenny M

    2003-12-15

    Parasite drug resistance and difficulties in developing effective vaccines have precipitated the search for alternative therapies for malaria. The success of passive immunization suggests that immunoglobulin (Ig)-based therapies are effective. To further explore the mechanism(s) by which antibody mediates its protective effect, we generated human chimeric IgG1 and IgA1 and a single-chain diabody specific for the C-terminal 19-kDa region of Plasmodium yoelii merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP119), a major target of protective immune responses. These novel human reagents triggered in vitro phagocytosis of merozoites but, unlike their parental mouse IgG2b, failed to protect against parasite challenge in vivo. Therefore, the Fc region appears critical for mediating protection in vivo, at least for this MSP119 epitope. Such antibodies may serve as prototype therapeutic agents, and as useful tools in the development of in vitro neutralization assays with Plasmodium parasites. PMID:12855589

  20. Amygdala FAAH and anandamide: mediating protection and recovery from stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunduz-Cinar, Ozge; Hill, Matthew N; McEwen, Bruce S; Holmes, Andrew

    2013-11-01

    A long-standing literature linking endocannabinoids (ECBs) to stress, fear, and anxiety has led to growing interest in developing novel anxiolytics targeting the ECB system. Following rapid on-demand biosynthesis and degradation upon neuronal activation, the ECB N-arachidonoylethanolamide (anandamide, AEA) is actively degraded by the serine hydrolase enzyme, fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH). Exposure to stress rapidly mobilizes FAAH to deplete the signaling pool of AEA and increase neuronal excitability in a key anxiety-mediating region--the basolateral amygdala (BLA). Gene deletion or pharmacological inhibition of FAAH prevents stress-induced reductions in AEA and associated increases in BLA dendritic hypertrophy and anxiety-like behavior. Additionally, inhibition of FAAH facilitates long-term fear extinction and rescues deficient fear extinction in rodent models by enhancing AEA-CB1 (cannabinoid type 1) receptor signaling and synaptic plasticity in the BLA. These preclinical findings propose restoring deficient BLA AEA levels by pharmacologically inhibiting FAAH as a mechanism to therapeutically mitigate the effects of traumatic stress. PMID:24325918

  1. Radiation protection measures for hot cell sanitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cell 5 of the Hot Cell Facility of the Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH (KfK) was to be restored and reequipped after 12 years of operation. The decontamination work was first done remotely controlled and afterwards by 38 persons entering the cell, which took about 2 months. The radiation protection methods and personal dosimetry systems are described. At the beginning of the work the γ-dose rate amounted up to 900 mSv/h. After completion of the remotely controlled decontamination work the γ-dose rate decreased to 1.5 mSv/h. At that time the (α+β-contamination was 105 Bq/cm2. Till the end of the work the removable activity dropped to 102 - 103 Bq/cm2 for β-radiation, to 0.3 - 30 Bq/cm2 for α-radiation and the local dose rate to about 0.03 mSv/h. During the work the accumulated collective doses were listed for breast, hand, head, gonads and foot. In the figure the development with the time of the doses for breast and hand is shown. During restoration work of the cell the accumulated collective whole-body dose amounted to 30 mSv. (orig.)

  2. Astrocytes protect neurons against methylmercury via ATP/P2Y(1 receptor-mediated pathways in astrocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Noguchi

    Full Text Available Methylmercury (MeHg is a well known environmental pollutant that induces serious neuronal damage. Although MeHg readily crosses the blood-brain barrier, and should affect both neurons and glial cells, how it affects glia or neuron-to-glia interactions has received only limited attention. Here, we report that MeHg triggers ATP/P2Y1 receptor signals in astrocytes, thereby protecting neurons against MeHg via interleukin-6 (IL-6-mediated pathways. MeHg increased several mRNAs in astrocytes, among which IL-6 was the highest. For this, ATP/P2Y1 receptor-mediated mechanisms were required because the IL-6 production was (i inhibited by a P2Y1 receptor antagonist, MRS2179, (ii abolished in astrocytes obtained from P2Y1 receptor-knockout mice, and (iii mimicked by exogenously applied ATP. In addition, (iv MeHg released ATP by exocytosis from astrocytes. As for the intracellular mechanisms responsible for IL-6 production, p38 MAP kinase was involved. MeHg-treated astrocyte-conditioned medium (ACM showed neuro-protective effects against MeHg, which was blocked by anti-IL-6 antibody and was mimicked by the application of recombinant IL-6. As for the mechanism of neuro-protection by IL-6, an adenosine A1 receptor-mediated pathway in neurons seems to be involved. Taken together, when astrocytes sense MeHg, they release ATP that autostimulates P2Y1 receptors to upregulate IL-6, thereby leading to A1 receptor-mediated neuro-protection against MeHg.

  3. Protection from Ebola Virus Mediated by Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes Specific for the Viral Nucleoprotein

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, Julie A.; Hart, Mary Kate

    2001-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) are proposed to be critical for protection from intracellular pathogens such as Ebola virus. However, there have been no demonstrations that protection against Ebola virus is mediated by Ebola virus-specific CTLs. Here, we report that C57BL/6 mice vaccinated with Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicons encoding the Ebola virus nucleoprotein (NP) survived lethal challenge with Ebola virus. Vaccination induced both antibodies to the NP and a major histocomp...

  4. Cell-mediated and humoral immune responses in pigs following primary and challenge-exposure to Lawsonia intracellularis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvass, Henriette Cordes; Riber, Ulla; Jensen, Tim Kåre; Jungersen, Gregers

    2012-01-01

    To investigate immune responses upon re-infection with Lawsonia intracellularis, local and peripheral humoral and cell-mediated immune responses to primary and challenge inoculations were studied in 22 pigs. Pigs were orally inoculated with virulent L. intracellularis at the age of 5-6 weeks...... not boosted by the re-inoculation, since identical intestinal IgA responses developed in response to the inoculation in both the susceptible CC pigs and the protected RE pigs. A memory recall cell-mediated immune response developed in RE pigs which was significantly stronger compared to the primary......-mediated immune responses are likely mediators of protective immunity against L. intracellularis, with CD8+ effector cells and CD4+CD8+ double positive memory T cells as main contributors to the antigen-specific IFN-γ production....

  5. Mesenchymal stem cell-mediated functional tooth regeneration in swine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wataru Sonoyama

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cell-mediated tissue regeneration is a promising approach for regenerative medicine for a wide range of applications. Here we report a new population of stem cells isolated from the root apical papilla of human teeth (SCAP, stem cells from apical papilla. Using a minipig model, we transplanted both human SCAP and periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs to generate a root/periodontal complex capable of supporting a porcelain crown, resulting in normal tooth function. This work integrates a stem cell-mediated tissue regeneration strategy, engineered materials for structure, and current dental crown technologies. This hybridized tissue engineering approach led to recovery of tooth strength and appearance.

  6. Conscientiousness, Protective Behavioral Strategies, and Alcohol Use: Testing for Mediated Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Matthew P.; Karakashian, Michael A.; Fleming, Kristie M.; Fowler, Roneferiti M.; Hatchett, E. Suzanne; Cimini, M. Dolores

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if use of protective behavioral strategies mediated the relationship between conscientiousness and alcohol use and alcohol-related problems. Participants were 186 college students at a state university campus in the Northeastern United States participating in a study examining the effectiveness of a brief…

  7. Acid stress adaptation protects saccharomyces cerevisiae from acetic acid-induced programme cell death

    OpenAIRE

    Giannattasio, Sergio; Guaragnella, Nicoletta; Côrte-Real, Manuela; Passarella, Salvatore; Marra, Ersilia

    2005-01-01

    In this work evidence is presented that acid stress adaptation protects Saccharomyces cerevisiae from acetic acid-mediated programmed cell death. Exponential-phase yeast cells, non-adapted or adapted to acid stress by 30 min incubation in rich medium set at pH 3.0 with HCl, have been exposed to increasing concentrations of acetic acid and time course changes of cell viability have been assessed. Adapted cells, in contrast to non-adapted cells, when exposed to 80 mM acetic acid for 200 min ...

  8. Molecular phenotyping of T cell-mediated rejection

    OpenAIRE

    Chong, Anita S.; Perkins, David L.

    2014-01-01

    A new study has reported a molecular signature of T cell-mediated rejection in human kidney transplant biopsy samples that is enriched for effector T cells, interferon-γ and macrophages. Inhibitors of T cell activation, such as CTLA4 and PDL1, were also prominent, raising the possibility that these immunological constrains could be harnessed by therapies for treating rejection.

  9. CHOP Contributes to, But Is Not the Only Mediator of, IAPP Induced β-Cell Apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurlo, T; Rivera, J F; Butler, A E; Cory, M; Hoang, J; Costes, S; Butler, Peter C

    2016-04-01

    The islet in type 2 diabetes is characterized by β-cell loss, increased β-cell apoptosis, and islet amyloid derived from islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP). When protein misfolding protective mechanisms are overcome, human IAPP (h-IAPP) forms membrane permeant toxic oligomers that induce β-cell dysfunction and apoptosis. In humans with type 2 diabetes (T2D) and mice transgenic for h-IAPP, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress has been inferred from nuclear translocation of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein homologous protein (CHOP), an established mediator of ER stress. To establish whether h-IAPP toxicity is mediated by ER stress, we evaluated diabetes onset and β-cell mass in h-IAPP transgenic (h-TG) mice with and without deletion of CHOP in comparison with wild-type controls. Diabetes was delayed in h-TG CHOP(-/-) mice, with relatively preserved β-cell mass and decreased β-cell apoptosis. Deletion of CHOP attenuates dysfunction of the autophagy/lysosomal pathway in β-cells of h-TG mice, uncovering a role for CHOP in mediating h-IAPP-induced dysfunction of autophagy. As deletion of CHOP delayed but did not prevent h-IAPP-induced β-cell loss and diabetes, we examined CHOP-independent stress pathways. JNK, a target of the IRE-1pTRAF2 complex, and the Bcl-2 family proapoptotic mediator BIM, a target of ATF4, were comparably activated by h-IAPP expression in the presence and absence of CHOP. Therefore, although these studies affirm that CHOP is a mediator of h-IAPP-induced ER stress, it is not the only one. Therefore, suppression of CHOP alone is unlikely to be a durable therapeutic strategy to protect against h-IAPP toxicity because multiple stress pathways are activated. PMID:26900721

  10. Semicarbazone EGA Inhibits Uptake of Diphtheria Toxin into Human Cells and Protects Cells from Intoxication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnell, Leonie; Mittler, Ann-Katrin; Mattarei, Andrea; Tehran, Domenico Azarnia; Montecucco, Cesare; Barth, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Diphtheria toxin is a single-chain protein toxin that invades human cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis. In acidic endosomes, its translocation domain inserts into endosomal membranes and facilitates the transport of the catalytic domain (DTA) from endosomal lumen into the host cell cytosol. Here, DTA ADP-ribosylates elongation factor 2 inhibits protein synthesis and leads to cell death. The compound 4-bromobenzaldehyde N-(2,6-dimethylphenyl)semicarbazone (EGA) has been previously shown to protect cells from various bacterial protein toxins which deliver their enzymatic subunits from acidic endosomes to the cytosol, including Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin and the binary clostridial actin ADP-ribosylating toxins C2, iota and Clostridium difficile binary toxin (CDT). Here, we demonstrate that EGA also protects human cells from diphtheria toxin by inhibiting the pH-dependent translocation of DTA across cell membranes. The results suggest that EGA might serve for treatment and/or prevention of the severe disease diphtheria. PMID:27428999

  11. Semicarbazone EGA Inhibits Uptake of Diphtheria Toxin into Human Cells and Protects Cells Articlefrom Intoxication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnell, Leonie; Mittler, Ann-Katrin; Mattarei, Andrea; Tehran, Domenico Azarnia; Montecucco, Cesare; Barth, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Diphtheria toxin is a single-chain protein toxin that invades human cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis. In acidic endosomes, its translocation domain inserts into endosomal membranes and facilitates the transport of the catalytic domain (DTA) from endosomal lumen into the host cell cytosol. Here, DTA ADP-ribosylates elongation factor 2 inhibits protein synthesis and leads to cell death. The compound 4-bromobenzaldehyde N-(2,6-dimethylphenyl)semicarbazone (EGA) has been previously shown to protect cells from various bacterial protein toxins which deliver their enzymatic subunits from acidic endosomes to the cytosol, including Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin and the binary clostridial actin ADP-ribosylating toxins C2, iota and Clostridium difficile binary toxin (CDT). Here, we demonstrate that EGA also protects human cells from diphtheria toxin by inhibiting the pH-dependent translocation of DTA across cell membranes. The results suggest that EGA might serve for treatment and/or prevention of the severe disease diphtheria. PMID:27428999

  12. Integration of B cells and CD8+ T in the protective regulation of systemic epithelial inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Bo; McPherson, Michael; Turovskaya, Olga; Velazquez, Peter; Fujiwara, Daisuke; Brewer, Sarah; Braun, Jonathan

    2008-01-01

    Mechanisms that control abnormal CD4+ T cell-mediated tissue damage are a significant factor in averting and resolving chronic inflammatory epithelial diseases. B cells can promote such immunoregulation, and this is thought to involve interaction with MHC II- or CD1-restricted regulatory T cells. The purpose of this study is to genetically define the interacting cells targeted by protective B cells, and to elucidate their regulatory mechanisms in CD4+ T cell inflammation. Transfer of Gαi2−/− CD3+ T cells into lymphopenic mice causes a dose-dependent multi-organ inflammatory disease including the skin, intestine, and lungs. Disease activity is associated with elevated levels of serum TNF-α and IFN-γ and an activated IL-17 producing CD4+ T cell population. Mesenteric node B cells from wild type mice suppress disease activity, serum cytokine expression, and levels of CD4+ T cells producing TNF-α, IFN-γ, and IL-17. The protective function of B cells requires genetic sufficiency of IL-10, MHC I and TAP1. Regulatory B cells induce the expansion and activation of CD8+ T cells, which is correlated with disease protection. These results demonstrate that CD8+ T cells can ameliorate lymphopenic systemic inflammatory disease, through peptide/MHC I-dependent B cell interaction. PMID:18282744

  13. Immunodominant epitope-specific Th1 but not Th17 responses mediate protection against Helicobacter pylori infection following UreB vaccination of BALB/c mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bin; Chen, Li; Sun, Heqiang; Yang, Wuchen; Hu, Jian; He, Yafei; Wei, Shanshan; Zhao, Zhuo; Zhang, Jinyong; Li, Haibo; Zou, Quanming; Wu, Chao

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infects more than half of the world's population, causing chronic gastritis, peptic ulcers and gastric cancer. Urease B subunit (UreB), a conserved protein of H. pylori, is capable of inducing specific CD4(+) T-cell responses and provides protection against this infection. Previous studies have confirmed the effectiveness of rUreB subunit vaccines in generating CD4(+) T-cell-mediated protection, but less is known regarding the roles of different subtypes of T-cell immunity, such as Th1, Th2 and Th17, particularly the immunodominant epitopes inducing specific CD4(+) T-cell responses, in vaccine-mediated protection. In this study, we demonstrated that the vaccination of BALB/c mice with rUreB resulted in significant antigen-specific Th1 and Th17 immune responses. Importantly, two novel Th epitopes, UreB317-329 and UreB409-421, which are recognized by a major population of CD4(+) T cells, were identified in immunized mice. Our results demonstrated that two novel epitopes can simultaneously induce Th1 and Th17 immune responses; however, only the epitope vaccine-induced CD4(+) T-cells secreting IFN-γ mediated the protection against H. pylori; cells secreting IL-17A did not. Taken together, our results suggest that two novel immunodominant epitopes can induce Th1 and Th17 immune responses, but only the induced Th1 lymphocytes mediate protection against H. pylori. PMID:26434384

  14. Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) protects beta cells against glucotoxicity and increases cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathanoori, Ramasri; Olde, Björn; Erlinge, David; Göransson, Olga; Wierup, Nils

    2013-02-01

    Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) is an islet peptide that promotes glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in beta cells via cAMP/PKA-dependent pathways. In addition, CART is a regulator of neuronal survival. In this study, we examined the effect of exogenous CART 55-102 on beta cell viability and dissected its signaling mechanisms. Evaluation of DNA fragmentation and chromatin condensation revealed that CART 55-102 reduced glucotoxicity-induced apoptosis in both INS-1 (832/13) cells and isolated rat islets. Glucotoxicity in INS-1 (832/13) cells also caused a 50% reduction of endogenous CART protein. We show that CART increased proliferation in INS-1 (832/13) cells, an effect that was blocked by PKA, PKB, and MEK1 inhibitors. In addition, CART induced phosphorylation of CREB, IRS, PKB, FoxO1, p44/42 MAPK, and p90RSK in INS-1 (832/13) cells and isolated rat islets, all key mediators of cell survival and proliferation. Thus, we demonstrate that CART 55-102 protects beta cells against glucotoxicity and promotes proliferation. Taken together our data point to the potential use of CART in therapeutic interventions targeted at enhancing functional beta cell mass and long-term insulin secretion in T2D. PMID:23250745

  15. The anti-cell death FNK protein protects cells from death induced by freezing and thawing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The FNK protein, constructed from anti-apoptotic Bcl-xL with enhanced activity, was fused with the protein transduction domain (PTD) of the HIV/Tat protein to mediate the delivery of FNK into cells. The fusion protein PTD-FNK was introduced into chondrocytes in isolated articular cartilage-bone sections, cultured neurons, and isolated bone marrow mononuclear cells to evaluate its ability to prevent cell death induced by freezing and thawing. PTD-FNK protected the cells from freeze-thaw damage in a concentration-dependent manner. Addition of PTD-FNK with conventional cryoprotectants (dimethyl sulfoxide and hydroxyethyl starch) increased surviving cell numbers around 2-fold compared with controls treated only with the cryoprotectants. Notably, PTD-FNK allowed CD34+ cells among bone marrow mononuclear cells to survive more efficiently (12-fold more than the control cells) from two successive freeze-thaw cycles. Thus, PTD-FNK prevented cell death induced by freezing and thawing, suggesting that it provides for the successful cryopreservation of biological materials

  16. B regulatory cells are increased in hypercholesterolaemic mice and protect from lesion development via IL-10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strom, Asa C; Cross, Amanda J; Cole, Jennifer E; Blair, Paul A; Leib, Christoph; Goddard, Michael E; Rosser, Elizabeth C; Park, Inhye; Hultgårdh Nilsson, Anna; Nilsson, Jan; Mauri, Claudia; Monaco, Claudia

    2015-10-01

    Whilst innate B1-B cells are atheroprotective, adaptive B2-B cells are considered pro-atherogenic. Different subsets of B regulatory cells (B(reg)) have been described. In experimental arthritis and lupus-like disease, B(reg) are contained within the CD21(hi)CD23(hi)CD24(hi) B cell pool. The existence and role of B(reg) in vascular disease is not known. We sought to investigate the existence, identity and location of B(reg) in vascular disease. The representation of B2-B cell subsets in the spleens and lymph nodes (LNs) of Apolipoprotein E(-/-) (ApoE(-/-)) mice compared to controls was characterised by flow cytometry. Additionally, we utilised a model of neointima formation based on the placement of a perivascular collar around the carotid artery in ApoE(-/-) mice to ascertain whether B cells and B cell subsets confer protection against lesion development. Adoptive transfer of B cells was performed from wild type or genetically modified mice. We showed that CD21(hi)CD23(hi)CD24(hi) B cells are unexpectedly increased in the draining LNs of ApoE(-/-) mice. Adoptive transfer of LN-derived B2-B cells or purified CD21(hi)CD23(hi)CD24(hi) B cells to syngeneic mice reduced lesion size and inflammation without changing serum cholesterol levels. Follicular B2-B cells did not confer protection. IL-10 blockade or transfer of IL10-deficient B cells prevented LN-derived B cell-mediated protection. This is the first identification of a specific LN-derived B2-B(reg) subset that confers IL-10 mediated protection from neointima formation. This may open the way for immune modulatory approaches in cardiovascular disease. PMID:26063196

  17. Vanillin protects human keratinocyte stem cells against ultraviolet B irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jienny; Cho, Jae Youl; Lee, Sang Yeol; Lee, Kyung-Woo; Lee, Jongsung; Song, Jae-Young

    2014-01-01

    Ultraviolet-B (UVB) irradiation is one of major factors which induce cellular damages in the epidermis. We investigated protective effects and mechanisms of vanillin, a main constituent of vanilla beans, against UVB-induced cellular damages in keratinocyte stem cells (KSC). Here, vanillin significantly attenuated UVB irradiation-induced cytotoxicity. The vanillin effects were also demonstrated by the results of the senescence-associated β-galactosidase and alkaline comet assays. In addition, vanillin induced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Attempts to elucidate a possible mechanism underlying the vanillin-mediated effects revealed that vanillin significantly reduced UVB-induced phosphorylation of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), serine threonine kinase checkpoint kinase 2 (Chk2), tumor suppressor protein 53 (p53), p38/mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38), c-Jun N-terminal kinase/stress-activated protein kinase (JNK), S6 ribosomal protein (S6RP), and histone 2A family member X (H2A.X). UVB-induced activation of p53 luciferase reporter was also significantly inhibited by vanillin. In addition, while ATM inhibitor had no effect on the vanillin effects, mouse double minute 2 homolog (MDM2) inhibitor significantly attenuated suppressive effects of vanillin on UVB-induced activation of p53 reporter in KSC. Taken together, these findings suggest that vanillin protects KSC from UVB irradiation and its effects may occur through the suppression of downstream step of MDM2 in UVB irradiation-induced p53 activation. PMID:24184596

  18. ZINC-mediated gene expression offers protection against H2O2-induced cytotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ability of zinc to mobilize defense against reactive oxygen species (ROS) and H2O2-induced apoptosis was studied using a primary culture of rainbow trout gill cells. Gill cells were pretreated for 24 h with 100 μM ZnSO4 followed by 24-h exposure to 100 or 200 μM H2O2, or were subjected to 100 μM ZnSO4 together with 100 or 200 μM H2O2. Metallothionein-A (MTA) and metallothionein-B (MTB) mRNA levels were increased after treatment with zinc or H2O2, separately or in combination. Similarly, mRNA for glutathione S-transferase (GST) and glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) were increased in response to either zinc or H2O2, or after sequential treatments with zinc followed by H2O2. The stimulatory effects of zinc or H2O2 on MTA, MTB, GST, and G6PD mRNA levels could be blocked by addition of the membrane permeable zinc chelator, N,N,N',N'-tetrakis(2-pyridylmethyl)ethylenediamine (TPEN), suggesting that H2O2-induced upregulation of these genes is zinc-dependent. Pretreatment with zinc protected the cells from subsequent cell damage and apoptosis, as assessed by lactate dehydrogenase leakage, mitochondrial dehydrogenase activity (MTT assay), caspase-3 activity, and DNA fragmentation. In contrast, when gill cells were coincubated with zinc and H2O2 at the same time, H2O2 toxicity was higher than after treatment with H2O2 alone. It is concluded that zinc had a direct pro-oxidant effect when administered together with H2O2, but that pretreatment of zinc inhibited cytotoxicity and apoptosis through an indirect antioxidant action. We propose that the antioxidant action is manifested through zinc-dependent expression of several genes encoding antioxidant proteins (e.g., MTA, MTB, G6PD, and GST). Furthermore, the apparent zinc-dependency of H2O2-induced expression of antioxidant genes suggests that zinc might act as a physiological signal to mediate the response to oxidative stress

  19. Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Mediated Functional Tooth Regeneration in Swine

    OpenAIRE

    Wataru Sonoyama; Yi Liu; Dianji Fang; Takayoshi Yamaza; Byoung-Moo Seo; Chunmei Zhang; He Liu; Stan Gronthos; Cun-Yu Wang; Songlin Wang; Songtao Shi

    2006-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell-mediated tissue regeneration is a promising approach for regenerative medicine for a wide range of applications. Here we report a new population of stem cells isolated from the root apical papilla of human teeth (SCAP, stem cells from apical papilla). Using a minipig model, we transplanted both human SCAP and periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) to generate a root/periodontal complex capable of supporting a porcelain crown, resulting in normal tooth function. This wo...

  20. HLA-G inhibits xenogenetic cytotoxicity mediated by human NK cells and T lymphocytes against PECs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    In order to investigate whether the non-classi-cal HLA-G classⅠmolecule protects the porcine endothelial cells (PECs) from the lysis mediated by human immune cells in pig to human discordant xenotransplantation, we have cloned HLA-G cDNA from a human placenta by RT-PCR. Mammalian expression vector, pEFG-neo, was constructed by insertion of HLA-G cDNA in pEF-neo. We obtained efficiently expressed PECs by stable transfection. Cytotoxicity assay showed that overexpression of HLA-G on PECs was sufficient to inhibit human NK-92 cell lysis. The level of lysis was equal to or less than that of the lysis of human umbilical vein endothelial cells mediated by human NK-92 cells. It also indicated that HLA-G inhibited the lysis of PECs mediated by xeno-antigen specific T lymphocytes. The reduction of lysis ranged between 59.1% and 88.9%. These findings suggest that the transgenic approach to overexpress HLA-G is believed to be a new immunotherapy in overcoming the immune rejections in xenotransplantion, including delayed xenograft rejection and cell-mediated rejection.

  1. Protective mechanism against cancer found in progeria patient cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI scientists have studied cells of patients with an extremely rare genetic disease that is characterized by drastic premature aging and discovered a new protective cellular mechanism against cancer. They found that cells from patients with Hutchinson Gi

  2. Polycation-mediated integrated cell death processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parhamifar, Ladan; Andersen, Helene; Wu, Linping;

    2014-01-01

    standard. PEIs are highly efficient transfectants, but depending on their architecture and size they induce cytotoxicity through different modes of cell death pathways. Here, we briefly review dynamic and integrated cell death processes and pathways, and discuss considerations in cell death assay design...

  3. Overexpression of human kynurenine-3-monooxygenase protects against 3-hydroxykynurenine-mediated apoptosis through bidirectional nonlinear feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, K; Auer, M; Binnie, M; Zheng, X; Pham, N T; Iredale, J P; Webster, S P; Mole, D J

    2016-01-01

    Kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO) is a critical regulator of inflammation. The preferred KMO substrate, kynurenine, is converted to 3-hydroxykynurenine (3HK), and this product exhibits cytotoxicity through mechanisms that culminate in apoptosis. Here, we report that overexpression of human KMO with orthotopic localisation to mitochondria creates a metabolic environment during which the cell exhibits increased tolerance for exogenous 3HK-mediated cellular injury. Using the selective KMO inhibitor Ro61-8048, we show that KMO enzyme function is essential for cellular protection. Pan-caspase inhibition with Z-VAD-FMK confirmed apoptosis as the mode of cell death. By defining expression of pathway components upstream and downstream of KMO, we observed alterations in other key kynurenine pathway components, particularly tryptophan-2,3-dioxygenase upregulation, through bidirectional nonlinear feedback. KMO overexpression also increased expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). These changes in gene expression are functionally relevant, because siRNA knockdown of the pathway components kynureninase and quinolinate phosphoribosyl transferase caused cells to revert to a state of susceptibility to 3HK-mediated apoptosis. In summary, KMO overexpression, and importantly KMO activity, have metabolic repercussions that fundamentally affect resistance to cell stress. PMID:27077813

  4. Cell-mediated immunity elicited by the blood stage malaria vaccine apical membrane antigen 1 in Malian adults: Results of a Phase I randomized trial

    OpenAIRE

    Lyke, Kirsten E; Daou, Modibo; DIARRA, ISSA; Kone, Abdoulaye; Kouriba, Bourema; Thera, Mohamadou A.; Dutta, Sheetij; Lanar, David E.; Heppner, D Gray; Doumbo, Ogobara K.; Plowe, Christopher V.; Sztein, Marcelo B.

    2009-01-01

    The development of a safe and effective malaria vaccine is impeded by the complexity of the Plasmodium life cycle. A vaccine that elicits both cell-mediated and humoral immune responses might be needed for protection against this multistage parasitic infection. Apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA-1) plays a key role in erythrocytic invasion but is also expressed in sporozoites and in late stage liver schizonts, where it may provide a target of protective cell-mediated immunity (CMI). A Phase 1 tri...

  5. Multifactorial aspects of antibody-mediated blood cell destruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Kapur

    2014-01-01

    The research described in this thesis focuses on diseases of antibody-mediated blood cell destruction via FcγRs on phagocytes, in particular regarding platelets in fetal or neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT) and red blood cells (RBC) in hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN). Di

  6. Cdc42-mediated tubulogenesis controls cell specification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kesavan, Gokul; Sand, Fredrik Wolfhagen; Greiner, Thomas Uwe;

    2009-01-01

    Understanding how cells polarize and coordinate tubulogenesis during organ formation is a central question in biology. Tubulogenesis often coincides with cell-lineage specification during organ development. Hence, an elementary question is whether these two processes are independently controlled...... later for maintaining apical cell polarity. Finally, we show that Cdc42 controls cell specification non-cell-autonomously by providing the correct microenvironment for proper control of cell-fate choices of multipotent progenitors. For a video summary of this article, see the PaperFlick file with the......, or whether proper cell specification depends on formation of tubes. To address these fundamental questions, we have studied the functional role of Cdc42 in pancreatic tubulogenesis. We present evidence that Cdc42 is essential for tube formation, specifically for initiating microlumen formation and...

  7. CD13 mediates phagocytosis in human monocytic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licona-Limón, Ileana; Garay-Canales, Claudia A; Muñoz-Paleta, Ofelia; Ortega, Enrique

    2015-07-01

    CD13 is a membrane-bound ectopeptidase, highly expressed on monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells. CD13 is involved in diverse functions, including degradation of peptide mediators, cellular adhesion, migration, viral endocytosis, signaling, and positive modulation of phagocytosis mediated by FcγRs and other phagocytic receptors. In this work, we explored whether besides acting as an accessory receptor, CD13 by itself is a primary phagocytic receptor. We found that hCD13 mediates efficient phagocytosis of large particles (erythrocytes) modified so as to interact with the cell only through CD13 in human macrophages and THP-1 monocytic cells. The extent of this phagocytosis is comparable with the phagocytosis mediated through the canonical phagocytic receptor FcγRI. Furthermore, we demonstrated that hCD13 expression in the nonphagocytic cell line HEK293 is sufficient to enable these cells to internalize particles bound through hCD13. CD13-mediated phagocytosis is independent of other phagocytic receptors, as it occurs in the absence of FcγRs, CR3, and most phagocytic receptors. Phagocytosis through CD13 is independent of its enzymatic activity but is dependent on actin rearrangement and activation of PI3K and is partially dependent on Syk activation. Moreover, the cross-linking of CD13 with antibodies rapidly induced pSyk in human macrophages. Finally, we observed that antibody-mediated cross-linking of hCD13, expressed in the murine macrophage-like J774 cell line, induces production of ROS. These results demonstrate that CD13 is a fully competent phagocytic receptor capable of mediating internalization of large particles. PMID:25934926

  8. THE EU DIRECTIVE ON MEDIATION IN CIVIL AND COMMERCIAL MATTERS AND THE PRINCIPLE OF EFFECTIVE JUDICIAL PROTECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Maria MARZOCCO

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The essay concerns the implications of EU Directive 2008/52/EC regarding mediation in civil and commercial matters on the right of effective judicial protection. After having underlined the importance assumed in the European Union by alternative dispute resolution, the essay examines the stages that led European institutions to the adoption of the Directive on mediation in civil and commercial matters. The article addresses the aims and the scope of the Directive and subsequently focuses its attention on Directive dispositions regulating the “key aspects” of civil procedure. The essay emphasizes that the Directive, in substance, allows both optional mediation and compulsory mediation. However, compulsory mediation can contrast with the principle of effective judicial protection. Furthermore, the essay deals with the relationship between compulsory mediation and the principle of effective judicial protection, and identifies, examining a recent pronouncement of the EU Court of Justice, the needed requisites to be respected in order that such contrast does not occur.

  9. Organ-Protective Effects of Red Wine Extract, Resveratrol, in Oxidative Stress-Mediated Reperfusion Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Fu-Chao Liu; Hsin-I Tsai; Huang-Ping Yu

    2015-01-01

    Resveratrol, a polyphenol extracted from red wine, possesses potential antioxidative and anti-inflammatory effects, including the reduction of free radicals and proinflammatory mediators overproduction, the alteration of the expression of adhesion molecules, and the inhibition of neutrophil function. A growing body of evidence indicates that resveratrol plays an important role in reducing organ damage following ischemia- and hemorrhage-induced reperfusion injury. Such protective phenomenon is...

  10. Alert cell strategy: mechanisms of inflammatory response and organ protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatakeyama, Noboru; Matsuda, Naoyuki

    2014-01-01

    Systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) is triggered by various factors such as surgical operation, trauma, burn injury, ischemia, pancreatitis and bacterial translocation. Sepsis is a SIRS associated with bacterial infection. SIRS and sepsis tend to trigger excessive production of inflammatory cytokines and other inflammatory molecules and induce multiple organ failure, such as acute lung injury, acute kidney injury and inflammatory cardiac injury. Epithelial and endothelial cells in some major organs express inflammatory receptors on the plasma membrane and work as alert cells for inflammation, and regulation of these alert cells could have a relieving effect on the inflammatory response. In inflammatory conditions, initial cardiac dysfunction is mediated by decreased preload and adequate infusion therapy is required. Tachyarrhythmia is a complication of inflammatory conditions and early control of the inflammatory reaction would prevent the structural remodeling that is resistant to therapies. Furthermore, there seems to be crosstalk between major organs with a central focus on the kidneys in inflammatory conditions. As an alert cell strategy, volatile anesthetics, sevoflurane and isoflurane, seem to have anti-inflammatory effects, and both experimental and clinical studies have shown the beneficial effects of these drugs in various settings of inflammatory conditions. On the other hand, in terms of intravenous anesthetics, propofol and ketamine, their current status is still controversial as there is a lack of confirmatory evidence on whether they have an organ-protective effect in inflammatory conditions. The local anesthetic lidocaine suppressed inflammatory responses upon both systemic and local administration. For the control of inflammatory conditions, anesthetic agents may be a target of drug development in accordance with other treatments and drugs. PMID:25229471

  11. Glycyrrhizin Protects against Acetaminophen-Induced Acute Liver Injury via Alleviating Tumor Necrosis Factor α-Mediated Apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Tingting; Wang, Hong; Zhao, Min; Yagai, Tomoki; Chai, Yingying; Krausz, Kristopher W; Xie, Cen; Cheng, Xuefang; Zhang, Jun; Che, Yuan; Li, Feiyan; Wu, Yuzheng; Brocker, Chad N; Gonzalez, Frank J; Wang, Guangji; Hao, Haiping

    2016-05-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is the leading cause of drug-induced acute liver failure in Western countries. Glycyrrhizin (GL), a potent hepatoprotective constituent extracted from the traditional Chinese medicine liquorice, has potential clinical use in treating APAP-induced liver failure. The present study determined the hepatoprotective effects and underlying mechanisms of action of GL and its active metabolite glycyrrhetinic acid (GA). Various administration routes and pharmacokinetics-pharmacodynamics analyses were used to differentiate the effects of GL and GA on APAP toxicity in mice. Mice deficient in cytochrome P450 2E1 enzyme (CYP2E1) or receptor interacting protein 3 (RIPK3) and their relative wild-type littermates were subjected to histologic and biochemical analyses to determine the potential mechanisms. Hepatocyte death mediated by tumor necrosis factorα(TNFα)/caspase was analyzed by use of human liver-derived LO2 cells. The pharmacokinetics-pharmacodynamics analysis using various administration routes revealed that GL but not GA potently attenuated APAP-induced liver injury. The protective effect of GL was found only with intraperitoneal and intravenous administration and not with gastric administration. CYP2E1-mediated metabolic activation and RIPK3-mediated necroptosis were unrelated to GL's protective effect. However, GL inhibited hepatocyte apoptosis via interference with TNFα-induced apoptotic hepatocyte death. These results demonstrate that GL rapidly attenuates APAP-induced liver injury by directly inhibiting TNFα-induced hepatocyte apoptosis. The protective effect against APAP-induced liver toxicity by GL in mice suggests the therapeutic potential of GL for the treatment of APAP overdose. PMID:26965985

  12. Snail/beta-catenin signaling protects breast cancer cells from hypoxia attack

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scherbakov, Alexander M., E-mail: alex.scherbakov@gmail.com [Laboratory of Clinical Biochemistry, Institute of Clinical Oncology, N.N. Blokhin Cancer Research Centre, Kashirskoye sh. 24, Moscow 115478 (Russian Federation); Stefanova, Lidia B.; Sorokin, Danila V.; Semina, Svetlana E. [Laboratory of Molecular Endocrinology, Institute of Carcinogenesis, N.N. Blokhin Cancer Research Centre, Kashirskoye sh. 24, Moscow 115478 (Russian Federation); Berstein, Lev M. [Laboratory of Oncoendocrinology, N.N. Petrov Research Institute of Oncology, St. Petersburg 197758 (Russian Federation); Krasil’nikov, Mikhail A. [Laboratory of Molecular Endocrinology, Institute of Carcinogenesis, N.N. Blokhin Cancer Research Centre, Kashirskoye sh. 24, Moscow 115478 (Russian Federation)

    2013-12-10

    The tolerance of cancer cells to hypoxia depends on the combination of different factors – from increase of glycolysis (Warburg Effect) to activation of intracellular growth/apoptotic pathways. Less is known about the influence of epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) and EMT-associated pathways on the cell sensitivity to hypoxia. The aim of this study was to explore the role of Snail signaling, one of the key EMT pathways, in the mediating of hypoxia response and regulation of cell sensitivity to hypoxia, using as a model in vitro cultured breast cancer cells. Earlier we have shown that estrogen-independent HBL-100 breast cancer cells differ from estrogen-dependent MCF-7 cells with increased expression of Snail1, and demonstrated Snail1 involvement into formation of hormone-resistant phenotype. Because Snail1 belongs to hypoxia-activated proteins, here we studied the influence of Snail1 signaling on the cell tolerance to hypoxia. We found that Snail1-enriched HBL-100 cells were less sensitive to hypoxia-induced growth suppression if compared with MCF-7 line (31% MCF-7 vs. 71% HBL-100 cell viability after 1% O{sub 2} atmosphere for 3 days). Snail1 knock-down enhanced the hypoxia-induced inhibition of cell proliferation giving the direct evidence of Snail1 involvement into cell protection from hypoxia attack. The protective effect of Snail1 was shown to be mediated, at least in a part, via beta-catenin which positively regulated expression of HIF-1-dependent genes. Finally, we found that cell tolerance to hypoxia was accompanied with the failure in the phosphorylation of AMPK – the key energy sensor, and demonstrated an inverse relationship between AMPK and Snail/beta-catenin signaling. Totally, our data show that Snail1 and beta-catenin, besides association with loss of hormone dependence, protect cancer cells from hypoxia and may serve as an important target in the treatment of breast cancer. Moreover, we suggest that the level of these proteins as well

  13. Snail/beta-catenin signaling protects breast cancer cells from hypoxia attack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The tolerance of cancer cells to hypoxia depends on the combination of different factors – from increase of glycolysis (Warburg Effect) to activation of intracellular growth/apoptotic pathways. Less is known about the influence of epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) and EMT-associated pathways on the cell sensitivity to hypoxia. The aim of this study was to explore the role of Snail signaling, one of the key EMT pathways, in the mediating of hypoxia response and regulation of cell sensitivity to hypoxia, using as a model in vitro cultured breast cancer cells. Earlier we have shown that estrogen-independent HBL-100 breast cancer cells differ from estrogen-dependent MCF-7 cells with increased expression of Snail1, and demonstrated Snail1 involvement into formation of hormone-resistant phenotype. Because Snail1 belongs to hypoxia-activated proteins, here we studied the influence of Snail1 signaling on the cell tolerance to hypoxia. We found that Snail1-enriched HBL-100 cells were less sensitive to hypoxia-induced growth suppression if compared with MCF-7 line (31% MCF-7 vs. 71% HBL-100 cell viability after 1% O2 atmosphere for 3 days). Snail1 knock-down enhanced the hypoxia-induced inhibition of cell proliferation giving the direct evidence of Snail1 involvement into cell protection from hypoxia attack. The protective effect of Snail1 was shown to be mediated, at least in a part, via beta-catenin which positively regulated expression of HIF-1-dependent genes. Finally, we found that cell tolerance to hypoxia was accompanied with the failure in the phosphorylation of AMPK – the key energy sensor, and demonstrated an inverse relationship between AMPK and Snail/beta-catenin signaling. Totally, our data show that Snail1 and beta-catenin, besides association with loss of hormone dependence, protect cancer cells from hypoxia and may serve as an important target in the treatment of breast cancer. Moreover, we suggest that the level of these proteins as well the

  14. T cell mediated pathogenesis in EAE: Molecular mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian C Kurschus

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available T cells are major initiators and mediators of disease in multiple sclerosis (MS and in its animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE. EAE is an antigen-driven autoimmune model in which immunization against myelin autoantigens elicits strong T cell responses which initiate its pathology with CNS myelin destruction. T cells cause pathogenic events by several mechanisms; some work in a direct fashion in the CNS, such as direct cytokine-induced damage, granzyme-mediated killing, or glutamate-induced neurotoxicity, whereas most are indirect mechanisms, such as activation of other cell types like macrophages, B cells, or neutrophils. This review aims to describe and discuss the molecular effector mechanism by which T cells harm the CNS during EAE.

  15. Bone marrow stromal cell: mediated neuroprotection for spinal cord repair

    OpenAIRE

    Ritfeld, Gaby Jane

    2014-01-01

    Currently, there is no treatment available that restores anatomy and function after spinal cord injury. This thesis explores transplantation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (bone marrow stromal cells; BMSCs) as a therapeutic approach for spinal cord repair. BMSCs secrete neurotrophic factors, enabling neuroprotection/tissue sparing in a rat model of spinal cord injury. In this model system, bone marrow stromal cell-mediated tissue sparing leads to motor and sensory function impr...

  16. Sustainable Redox Mediation for Lithium-Oxygen Batteries by a Composite Protective Layer on the Lithium-Metal Anode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong Jin; Lee, Hongkyung; Kim, Yun-Jung; Park, Jung-Ki; Kim, Hee-Tak

    2016-02-01

    A synergic combination of a soluble -redox mediator and a protected Li metal -electrode to prevent the self-discharge of the redox mediator is realized by -exploiting a 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidinyl 1-oxyl (TEMPO) redox mediator and an Al2 O3 /PVdF-HFP composite -protective layer (CPL). Stabilization of Li metal by simple CPL coating is effective at -suppressing the chemical reduction of the oxidized TEMPO and opens up the possibility of sustainable redox mediation for robust cycling of Li-O2 batteries. PMID:26627981

  17. Insulin Receptor Substrate-1 Activation Mediated p53 Downregulation Protects Against Hypoxic-Ischemia in the Neonatal Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Yi-Fang; Jiang, Si-Tse; Chow, Yen-Hung; Huang, Chao-Ching; Ho, Chien-Jung; Chou, Ya-Ping

    2016-08-01

    This study determined if dietary restriction (DR) protects against hypoxic-ischemia (HI) in the neonatal brain via insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1)/Akt pathway-mediated downregulation of p53 in the neurovascular unit. On postnatal (P) day 7, HI was induced in rat pups grouped from P1 into normal litter size (NL, 12 pups/dam) and increased litter size (DR, 18 pups/dam). In vivo IRS-1 anti-sense oligonucleotide and IRS-1 overexpressed recombinant adenovirus were given, and neurovascular damage was assessed. In vitro models of oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) examined the inhibition and overexpression of IRS-1 on p53 and cell death in neurons and endothelial cells. Compared to NL pups, DR pups had significantly higher IRS-1, p-IRS-1, and pAkt levels, decreased p53, more tight junction proteins, reduced blood-brain barrier (BBB) damage after HI, and less infarct volumes at P21. Immunofluorescence revealed that IRS-1 was upregulated in the endothelial cells and neurons of DR pups. IRS-1 downregulation in DR pups reduced p-Akt, increased p53, worsened BBB damage, and increased brain injury, whereas IRS-1 overexpression in NL pups upregulated p-Akt, decreased p53, attenuated BBB damage, and decreased brain injury. In vitro, IRS-1 downregulation aggravated cell death in neurons and endothelial cells and is associated with decreased p-Akt and increased p53. In contrast, IRS-1 overexpression reduced cell death in endothelial cells with increased p-Akt and decreased p53. In conclusion, DR reduces neurovascular damage after HI in the neonatal brain through an IRS-1/Akt-mediated p53 downregulation, suggesting that IRS-1 signaling is a therapeutic target for hypoxic brain injury in neonates. PMID:26111627

  18. Preconditioning is hormesis part II: How the conditioning dose mediates protection: Dose optimization within temporal and mechanistic frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, Edward J

    2016-08-01

    In Part I, hormetic doses of a variety of agents stimulated adaptive responses that conditioned and protected cells against the subsequent toxicity resulting from a second, higher dose (called a challenging dose) of the same or different agents. Herein (Part II), the optimal conditioning (hormetic) doses of many agents are documented, cellular mechanisms and temporal profiles are examined from which the conditioning (hormetic) responses are elicited, and the optimal conditioning doses are compared to the levels at which optimal protection occurs in response to the toxic challenge dose. Entry criteria for study evaluation required a conditioning mechanism-induced endpoint response, an hormetic/biphasic dose response for the protective response following the challenging dose, and a mechanistic assessment of how the conditioning dose afforded protection against a toxic challenging dose. The conditioning dose that demonstrated the largest increase in a mechanism-related conditioning (hormetic) response (i.e., prior to administration of the challenging dose) was the same dose that was optimally protective following the challenging dose. Specific receptor antagonists and/or inhibitors of cell signaling pathways which blocked the induction of conditioning (hormetic) effects during the conditioning period abolished the protective effects following the application of a challenge dose, thus identifying a specific and essential component of the hormetic mechanism. Conditioning responses often had sufficient doses to assess the nature of the dose response. In each of the cases these mechanism-based endpoints displayed an hormetic dose response. The present analysis reveals that hormetic biphasic dose responses were associated with both the conditioning process and the protective effects elicited following the challenging dose. Furthermore, based on optimal dosage, temporal relationships and the known mediating actions of receptor-based and/or cell signaling-based mechanisms

  19. Laser-mediated perforation of plant cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehner, Martin; Jacobs, Philipp; Esser, Dominik; Schinkel, Helga; Schillberg, Stefan

    2007-07-01

    The functional analysis of plant cells at the cellular and subcellular levels requires novel technologies for the directed manipulation of individual cells. Lasers are increasingly exploited for the manipulation of plant cells, enabling the study of biological processes on a subcellular scale including transformation to generate genetically modified plants. In our setup either a picosecond laser operating at 1064 nm wavelength or a continuous wave laser diode emitting at 405 nm are coupled into an inverse microscope. The beams are focused to a spot size of about 1.5 μm and the tobacco cell protoplasts are irradiated. Optoporation is achieved when targeting the laser focal spot at the outermost edge of the plasma membrane. In case of the picosecond laser a single pulse with energy of about 0.4 μJ was sufficient to perforate the plasma membrane enabling the uptake of dye or DNA from the surrounding medium into the cytosol. When the ultraviolet laser diode at a power level of 17 mW is employed an irradiation time of 200 - 500 milliseconds is necessary to enable the uptake of macromolecules. In the presence of an EYFP encoding plasmid with a C-terminal peroxisomal signal sequence in the surrounding medium transient transformation of tobacco protoplasts could be achieved in up to 2% of the optoporated cells. Single cell perforation using this novel optoporation method shows that isolated plant cells can be permeabilized without direct manipulation. This is a valuable procedure for cell-specific applications, particularly where the import of specific molecules into plant cells is required for functional analysis.

  20. KIS protects against adverse vascular remodeling by opposing stathmin-mediated VSMC migration in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Langenickel, Thomas H.; Olive, Michelle; Boehm, Manfred; San, Hong; Crook, Martin F.; Nabel, Elizabeth G.

    2008-01-01

    Vascular proliferative diseases are characterized by VSMC proliferation and migration. Kinase interacting with stathmin (KIS) targets 2 key regulators of cell proliferation and migration, the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27Kip1 and the microtubule-destabilizing protein stathmin. Phosphorylation of p27Kip1 by KIS leads to cell-cycle progression, whereas the target sequence and the physiological relevance of KIS-mediated stathmin phosphorylation in VSMCs are unknown. Here we demonstrated ...

  1. Amino acids and metal ions protect endothelial cells from lethal injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varani, J.; Ginsburg, I.; Johnson, K.J.; Gibbs, D.F.; Weinberg, J.M.; Ward, P.A. (Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor (United States))

    1991-03-11

    Killing of rat pulmonary artery endothelial cells by activated neutrophils is dependent on generation of hydrogen peroxide and its conversion to a highly toxic radical (presumably the hydroxyl radical) in a ferrous iron-dependent reaction. Glycine (as well as several other amino acids) is capable of inhibiting endothelial cell killing in vitro by either activated neutrophils or reagent hydrogen peroxide. Inhibition of killing is enhanced in the presence of micromolar concentrations of manganous ion (Mn2+). The combined effects of glycine and Mn2+ require concomitant presence of bicarbonate ion and is inhibited by high phosphate levels. Glycine can also protect endothelial cells from lethal injury inducted by ionomycin. There appears to be no enhancement with Mn2+, however against this form of lethal injury. The protective effects of glycine, Mn2+ and bicarbonate ion against injury by hydrogen peroxide is associated with a direct disproportionation of the hydrogen peroxide to water with little generation of molecular oxygen. Either glycine or Mn2+ alone does not have this effect. In addition to protecting endothelial cells from hydrogen peroxide-mediated injury, glycine or MN2+ is almost completely protective. Additionally, treatment of rats with concentrations of EDTA that do not by themselves induce injury greatly accentuates lung injury induced by glucose oxidase. These findings suggest that circulating amino acids in combination with Mn2+ and bicarbonate ions may contribute to the normal anti-oxidant barrier. These findings may also form the basis for a possible new therapeutic approach to oxygen radical-mediated injury.

  2. Sphingolipid mediators in cardiovascular cell biology and pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levade, T; Augé, N; Veldman, R J; Cuvillier, O; Nègre-Salvayre, A; Salvayre, R

    2001-11-23

    Sphingolipids have emerged as a new class of lipid mediators. In response to various extracellular stimuli, sphingolipid turnover can be stimulated in vascular cells and cardiac myocytes. Subsequent generation of sphingolipid molecules such as ceramide, sphingosine, and sphingosine-1-phosphate, is followed by regulation of ion fluxes and activation of various signaling pathways leading to smooth muscle cell proliferation, endothelial cell differentiation or apoptotic cell death, cell contraction, retraction, or migration. The importance of sphingolipids in cardiovascular signaling is illustrated by recent observations implicating them in physiological processes such as vasculogenesis as well as in frequent pathological conditions, including atherosclerosis and its complications. PMID:11717151

  3. Acquired cancer stem cell phenotypes through Oct4-mediated dedifferentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Suresh M.; Liu, Shujing; Lu, Hezhe; Zhang, Hongtao; Zhang, Paul J.; Gimotty, Phyllis A.; Guerra, Matthew; Guo, Wei; Xu, Xiaowei

    2012-01-01

    There is enormous interest to target cancer stem cells (CSCs) for clinical treatment because these cells are highly tumorigenic and resistant to chemotherapy. Oct4 is expressed by CSC-like cells in different types of cancer. However, function of Oct4 in tumor cells is unclear. In this study, we showed that expression of Oct4 gene or transmembrane delivery of Oct4 protein promoted dedifferentiation of melanoma cells to CSC-like cells. The dedifferentiated melanoma cells showed significantly decreased expression of melanocytic markers and acquired the ability to form tumor spheroids. They showed markedly increased resistance to chemotherapeutic agents and hypoxic injury. In the subcutaneous xenograft and tail vein injection assays, these cells had significantly increased tumorigenic capacity. The dedifferentiated melanoma cells acquired features associated with CSCs such as multipotent differentiation capacity and expression of melanoma CSC markers such as ABCB5 and CD271. Mechanistically, Oct4 induced dedifferentiation was associated with increased expression of endogenous Oct4, Nanog and Klf4, and global gene expression changes that enriched for transcription factors. RNAi mediated knockdown of Oct4 in dedifferentiated cells led to diminished CSC phenotypes. Oct4 expression in melanoma was regulated by hypoxia and its expression was detected in a subpopulation of melanoma cells in clinical samples. Our data indicate that Oct4 is a positive regulator of tumor dedifferentiation. The results suggest that CSC phenotype is dynamic and may be acquired through dedifferentiation. Oct4 mediated tumor cell dedifferentiation may play an important role during tumor progression. PMID:22286766

  4. Cortactin mediated morphogenic cell movements during zebrafish (Danio rerio) gastrulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Dan; ZHANG Peijun; ZHAN Xi

    2005-01-01

    Cell migration is essential to direct embryonic cells to specific sites at which their developmental fates are ultimately determined. However, the mechanism by which cell motility is regulated in embryonic development is largely unknown. Cortactin, a filamentous actin binding protein, is an activator of Arp2/3 complex in the nucleation of actin cytoskeleton at the cell leading edge and acts directly on the machinery of cell motility. To determine whether cortactin and Arp2/3 mediated actin assembly plays a role in the morphogenic cell movements during the early development of zebrafish, we initiated a study of cortactin expression in zebrafish embryos at gastrulating stages when massive cell migrations occur. Western blot analysis using a cortactin specific monoclonal antibody demonstrated that cortactin protein is abundantly present in embryos at the most early developmental stages. Immunostaining of whole-mounted embryo showed that cortactin immunoreactivity was associated with the embryonic shield, predominantly at the dorsal side of the embryos during gastrulation. In addition, cortactin was detected in the convergent cells of the epiblast and hypoblast, and later in the central nervous system. Immunofluorescent staining with cortactin and Arp3 antibodies also revealed that cortactin and Arp2/3 complex colocalized at the periphery and many patches associated with the cell-to-cell junction in motile embryonic cells. Therefore, our data suggest that cortactin and Arp2/3 mediated actin polymerization is implicated in the cell movement during gastrulation and perhaps the development of the central neural system as well.

  5. 17β-estradiol protects the lung against acute injury: possible mediation by vasoactive intestinal polypeptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamidi, Sayyed A; Dickman, Kathleen G; Berisha, Hasan; Said, Sami I

    2011-12-01

    Beyond their classical role as a class of female sex hormones, estrogens (e.g. 17β-estradiol) exert important biological actions, both protective and undesirable. We have investigated the ability of estradiol to protect the lung in three models of acute injury induced by 1) oxidant stress due to the herbicide paraquat; 2) excitotoxicity, caused by glutamate agonist N-methyl-d-aspartate; and 3) acute alveolar anoxia. We also assessed the role of estrogen receptors (ER) ERα and ERβ and the neuropeptide vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) in mediating this protection. Isolated guinea pig or rat lungs were perfused in situ at constant flow and mechanically ventilated. The onset and severity of lung injury were monitored by increases in pulmonary arterial and airway pressures, wet/dry lung weight ratio, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid protein content. Estradiol was infused into the pulmonary circulation, beginning 10 min before induction of injury and continued for 60-90 min. Lung injury was marked by significant increases in the above measurements, with paraquat producing the most severe, and excitotoxicity the least severe, injury. Estradiol significantly attenuated the injury in each model. Both ER were constitutively expressed and immunohistochemically demonstrable in normal lung, and their selective agonists reduced anoxic injury, the only model in which they were tested. As it protected against injury, estradiol rapidly and significantly stimulated VIP mRNA expression in rat lung. Estradiol attenuated acute lung injury in three experimental models while stimulating VIP gene expression, a known mechanism of lung protection. The up-regulated VIP expression could have partially mediated the protection by estrogen. PMID:22009726

  6. DNaseI Protects against Paraquat-Induced Acute Lung Injury and Pulmonary Fibrosis Mediated by Mitochondrial DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Paraquat (PQ poisoning is a lethal toxicological challenge that served as a disease model of acute lung injury and pulmonary fibrosis, but the mechanism is undetermined and no effective treatment has been discovered. Methods and Findings. We demonstrated that PQ injures mitochondria and leads to mtDNA release. The mtDNA mediated PBMC recruitment and stimulated the alveolar epithelial cell production of TGF-β1 in vitro. The levels of mtDNA in circulation and bronchial alveolar lavage fluid (BALF were elevated in a mouse of PQ-induced lung injury. DNaseI could protect PQ-induced lung injury and significantly improved survival. Acute lung injury markers, such as TNFα, IL-1β, and IL-6, and marker of fibrosis, collagen I, were downregulated in parallel with the elimination of mtDNA by DNaseI. These data indicate a possible mechanism for PQ-induced, mtDNA-mediated lung injury, which may be shared by other causes of lung injury, as suggested by the same protective effect of DNaseI in bleomycin-induced lung injury model. Interestingly, increased mtDNA in the BALF of patients with amyopathic dermatomyositis-interstitial lung disease can be appreciated. Conclusions. DNaseI targeting mtDNA may be a promising approach for the treatment of PQ-induced acute lung injury and pulmonary fibrosis that merits fast tracking through clinical trials.

  7. Tibolone protects astrocytic cells from glucose deprivation through a mechanism involving estrogen receptor beta and the upregulation of neuroglobin expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila-Rodriguez, Marco; Garcia-Segura, Luis Miguel; Hidalgo-Lanussa, Oscar; Baez, Eliana; Gonzalez, Janneth; Barreto, George E

    2016-09-15

    Tibolone, a synthetic steroid used for the prevention of osteoporosis and the treatment of climacteric symptoms in post-menopausal women, may exert tissue selective estrogenic actions acting on estrogen receptors (ERs). We previously showed that tibolone protects human T98G astroglial cells against glucose deprivation (GD). In this study we have explored whether the protective effect of tibolone on these cells is mediated by ERs. Experimental studies showed that both ERα and ERβ were involved in the protection by tibolone on GD cells, being ERβ preferentially involved on these actions over ERα. Tibolone increased viability of GD cells by a mechanism fully blocked by an ERβ antagonist and partially blocked by an ERα antagonist. Furthermore, ERβ inhibition prevented the effect of tibolone on nuclear fragmentation, ROS and mitochondrial membrane potential in GD cells. The protective effect of tibolone was mediated by neuroglobin. Tibolone upregulated neuroglobin in T98G cells and primary mouse astrocytes by a mechanism involving ERβ and neuroglobin silencing prevented the protective action of tibolone on GD cells. In summary, tibolone protects T98G cells by a mechanism involving ERβ and the upregulation of neuroglobin. PMID:27250720

  8. Glioma cell dispersion is driven by α5 integrin-mediated cell-matrix and cell-cell interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blandin, Anne-Florence; Noulet, Fanny; Renner, Guillaume; Mercier, Marie-Cécile; Choulier, Laurence; Vauchelles, Romain; Ronde, Philippe; Carreiras, Franck; Etienne-Selloum, Nelly; Vereb, Gyorgy; Lelong-Rebel, Isabelle; Martin, Sophie; Dontenwill, Monique; Lehmann, Maxime

    2016-07-01

    Glioblastoma multiform (GBM) is the most common and most aggressive primary brain tumor. The fibronectin receptor, α5 integrin is a pertinent novel therapeutic target. Despite numerous data showing that α5 integrin support tumor cell migration and invasion, it has been reported that α5 integrin can also limit cell dispersion by increasing cell-cell interaction. In this study, we showed that α5 integrin was involved in cell-cell interaction and gliomasphere formation. α5-mediated cell-cell cohesion limited cell dispersion from spheroids in fibronectin-poor microenvironment. However, in fibronectin-rich microenvironment, α5 integrin promoted cell dispersion. Ligand-occupied α5 integrin and fibronectin were distributed in fibril-like pattern at cell-cell junction of evading cells, forming cell-cell fibrillar adhesions. Activated focal adhesion kinase was not present in these adhesions but was progressively relocalized with α5 integrin as cell migrates away from the spheroids. α5 integrin function in GBM appears to be more complex than previously suspected. As GBM overexpressed fibronectin, it is most likely that in vivo, α5-mediated dissemination from the tumor mass overrides α5-mediated tumor cell cohesion. In this respect, α5-integrin antagonists may be useful to limit GBM invasion in brain parenchyma. PMID:27063097

  9. Cell-mediated mutagenesis and cell transformation of mammalian cells by chemical carcinogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed a cell-mediated mutagenesis assay in which cells with the appropriate markers for mutagenesis are co-cultivated with either lethally irradiated rodent embryonic cells that can metabolize carcinogenic hydrocarbons or with primary rat liver cells that can metabolize chemicals carcinogenic to the liver. During co-cultivation, the reactive metabolites of the procarcinogen appear to be transmitted to the mutable cells and induce mutations in them. Assays of this type make it possible to demonstrate a relationship between carcinogenic potency of the chemicals and their ability to induce mutations in mammalian cells. In addition, by simultaneously comparing the frequencies of transformation and mutation induced in normal diploid hamster cells by benzo(a)pyrene (BP) and one of its metabolites, it is possible to estimate the genetic target size for cell transformation in vitro

  10. Ghrelin protects against depleted uranium-induced apoptosis of MC3T3-E1 cells through oxidative stress-mediated p38-mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Yuhui; Liu, Cong; Huang, Jiawei; Gu, Ying; Li, Hong; Yang, Zhangyou; Liu, Jing; Wang, Weidong; Li, Rong

    2016-01-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) mainly accumulates in the bone over the long term. Osteoblast cells are responsible for the formation of bone, and they are sensitive to DU damage. However, studies investigating methods of reducing DU damage in osteoblasts are rarely reported. Ghrelin is a stomach hormone that stimulates growth hormones released from the hypothalamic-pituitary axis, and it is believed to play an important physiological role in bone metabolism. This study evaluates the impact of ghrelin on DU-induced apoptosis of the osteoblast MC3T3-E1 and investigates its underlying mechanisms. The results show that ghrelin relieved the intracellular oxidative stress induced by DU, eliminated reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reduced lipid peroxidation by increasing intracellular GSH levels; in addition, ghrelin effectively suppressed apoptosis, enhanced mitochondrial membrane potential, and inhibited cytochrome c release and caspase-3 activation after DU exposure. Moreover, ghrelin significantly reduced the expression of DU-induced phosphorylated p38-mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). A specific inhibitor (SB203580) or specific siRNA of p38-MAPK could significantly suppress DU-induced apoptosis and related signals, whereas ROS production was not affected. In addition, ghrelin receptor inhibition could reduce the anti-apoptosis effect of ghrelin on DU and reverse the effect of ghrelin on intracellular ROS and p38-MAPK after DU exposure. These results suggest that ghrelin can suppress DU-induced apoptosis of MC3T3-E1 cells, reduce DU-induced oxidative stress by interacting with its receptor, and inhibit downstream p38-MAPK activation, thereby suppressing the mitochondrial-dependent apoptosis pathway. PMID:26529667

  11. Stem cell  mediated liver regeneration:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelnes, Peter

    udformet en strategi som involverede isolering af HPCr vha. Fluorescent Activated Cell Sorting (FACS). Isolerede celler skulle efterfølgende undersøges ved in vitro studier som implicerede tilsætning af specifikke immunrespons relaterede faktorer. Kun få specifikke overflade HPC markører er blevet...

  12. Curcumin protects microglia and primary rat cortical neurons against HIV-1 gp120-mediated inflammation and apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luyan Guo

    Full Text Available Curcumin is a molecule found in turmeric root that has anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and anti-tumor properties and has been widely used as both an herbal drug and a food additive to treat or prevent neurodegenerative diseases. To explore whether curcumin is able to ameliorate HIV-1-associated neurotoxicity, we treated a murine microglial cell line (N9 and primary rat cortical neurons with curcumin in the presence or absence of neurotoxic HIV-1 gp120 (V3 loop protein. We found that HIV-1 gp120 profoundly induced N9 cells to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1. HIV-1 gp120 also induced apoptosis of primary rat cortical neurons. Curcumin exerted a powerful inhibitory effect against HIV-1 gp120-induced neuronal damage, reducing the production of ROS, TNF-α and MCP-1 by N9 cells and inhibiting apoptosis of primary rat cortical neurons. Curcumin may exert its biological activities through inhibition of the delayed rectification and transient outward potassium (K(+ current, as curcumin effectively reduced HIV-1 gp120-mediated elevation of the delayed rectification and transient outward K(+ channel current in neurons. We conclude that HIV-1 gp120 increases ROS, TNF-α and MCP-1 production in microglia, and induces cortical neuron apoptosis by affecting the delayed rectification and transient outward K(+ channel current. Curcumin reduces production of ROS and inflammatory mediators in HIV-1-gp120-stimulated microglia, and protects cortical neurons against HIV-1-mediated apoptosis, most likely through inhibition of HIV-1 gp120-induced elevation of the delayed rectification and transient outward K(+ current.

  13. Cell mediated calcification and matrix vesicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This publication on calcification and the sequence of events directed by the cell to facilitate this process contains the following topics: New Ultrastructural Techniques for Study of Calcification; Mechanisms of Matrix Vesicle Calcification; Role of Mitochondria, Matrix Proteins and Cytokines in Calcification; Role of Phospholipids and Membranes in Calcification; Biogenesis of Matrix Vesicles in Vivo and in Vitro; Calcification and Ossification in Vitro; Calcific Diseases and Abnormal Bone Mineralization. (Auth.)

  14. Biomarkers of CD4+ CTL cell Mediated Immunity to Tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    The immune responses mediated by interactions between T-lymphocyte subsets and mycobacteria-infected macrophages are critical for control of tuberculosis. In these studies, the bovine model was used to characterize the cytolytic and mycobactericidal CD4+ T cell response induced by BCG vaccination. ...

  15. Multifactorial aspects of antibody-mediated blood cell destruction

    OpenAIRE

    Schoot, van der, B.H.; Vidarsson, G.; Kapur, R.

    2014-01-01

    The research described in this thesis focuses on diseases of antibody-mediated blood cell destruction via FcγRs on phagocytes, in particular regarding platelets in fetal or neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT) and red blood cells (RBC) in hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN). Diagnostically, for HDFN laboratory tests are in place in order to predict risk for severe fetal RBC destruction and thereby initiate appropriate treatments. This test is sensitive, but has relativel...

  16. Defective cell mediated immunity in sarcoidosis: effect of interleukin-2.

    OpenAIRE

    Lyons, D J; Gao, L.; Mitchell, E B; Mitchell, D. N.

    1988-01-01

    Interleukin-2 has been reported to enhance the immune response in diseases characterised by defective cell mediated immunity. The effect of exogenous recombinant interleukin-2 was studied on the proliferative and cytotoxic responses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 39 patients with sarcoidosis and 14 healthy control subjects. The proliferative response to purified protein derivative was smaller in patients than in control subjects (p less than 0.001) whereas the response to 80 U int...

  17. Dexamethasone-induced apoptosis of osteocytic and osteoblastic cells is mediated by TAK1 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Heyuan; Wang, Tao; Xu, Dongli; Cha, Bingbing; Liu, Jun; Li, Yiming

    2015-05-01

    Increased apoptosis of osteoblasts and osteocytes is the main mechanism of glucocorticoid (GC)-induced osteonecrosis. In the current study, we investigated whether dexamethasone (Dex)-induced osteoblastic and osteocytic cell apoptosis is mediated through activation of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)-activated kinase 1 (TAK1), and whether TAK1 inhibition could promote survival opposing the deleterious effects of Dex. We found that TAK1 was activated by Dex in both osteocytic MLO-Y4 and osteoblastic OB-6 cells, which was prevented by two known anti-oxidants N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and ebselen. TAK1 inhibitors, including LYTAK1 and 5Z-7-oxozeaenol (57-OZ), inhibited Dex-induced apoptosis of MLO-Y4 and OB-6 cells. Meanwhile shRNA-mediated knockdown of TAK1 also suppressed Dex-induced damages to MLO-Y4 and OB-6 cells. On the other hand, exogenously over-expressing TAK1 enhanced Dex-induced MLO-Y4 and OB-6 cell apoptosis. At the molecular level, we found that TAK1 mediated Dex-induced pro-apoptotic Pyk2-JNK activation. Inhibition or silencing of TAK1 almost abolished Pyk2-JNK phosphorylations by Dex in MLO-Y4 and OB-6 cells. TAK1 over-expression, on the other hand, increased Dex's activity on Pyk2-JNK phosphorylations in above cells. We conclude that part of the pro-apoptotic actions of Dex on osteoblastic and osteocytic cells are mediated through TAK1 activation, and that inhibition of TAK1 might protect from GC-induced damages to osteoblasts and osteocytes. PMID:25753204

  18. Inflammatory mediators: Parallels between cancer biology and stem cell therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Patel

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Shyam A Patel1,2,3, Andrew C Heinrich2,3, Bobby Y Reddy2, Pranela Rameshwar21Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Newark, NJ, USA; 2Department of Medicine – Division of Hematology/Oncology, New Jersey Medical School, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Newark, NJ, USA; 3These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Inflammation encompasses diverse molecular pathways, and it is intertwined with a wide array of biological processes. Recently, there has been an upsurge of interest in the interactions between mediators of inflammation and other cells such as stem cells and cancer cells. Since tissue injuries are associated with the release of inflammatory mediators, it would be difficult to address this subject without considering the implications of their systemic effects. In this review, we discuss the effects of inflammatory reactions on stem cells and extrapolate on information pertaining to cancer biology. The discussion focuses on integrins and cytokines, and identifies the transcription factor, nuclear factor-kappa B (NFκB as central to the inflammatory response. Since stem cell therapy has been proposed for type II diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome, pulmonary edema, these disorders are used as examples to discuss the roles of inflammatory mediators. We propose prospects for future research on targeting the NFκB signaling pathway. Finally, we explore the bridge between inflammation and stem cells, including neural stem cells and adult stem cells from the bone marrow. The implications of mesenchymal stem cells in regenerative medicine as pertaining to inflammation are vast based on their anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive effects. Such features of stem cells offer great potential for therapy in graft-versus-host disease, conditions with a significant inflammatory component, and tissue regeneration.Keywords: mesenchymal stem cells, cancer, cytokines

  19. Neural stem cell-derived exosomes mediate viral entry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sims B

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Brian Sims,1,2,* Linlin Gu,3,* Alexandre Krendelchtchikov,3 Qiana L Matthews3,4 1Division of Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics, 2Department of Cell, Developmental, and Integrative Biology, 3Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, 4Center for AIDS Research, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Viruses enter host cells through interactions of viral ligands with cellular receptors. Viruses can also enter cells in a receptor-independent fashion. Mechanisms regarding the receptor-independent viral entry into cells have not been fully elucidated. Exosomal trafficking between cells may offer a mechanism by which viruses can enter cells.Methods: To investigate the role of exosomes on cellular viral entry, we employed neural stem cell-derived exosomes and adenovirus type 5 (Ad5 for the proof-of-principle study. Results: Exosomes significantly enhanced Ad5 entry in Coxsackie virus and adenovirus receptor (CAR-deficient cells, in which Ad5 only had very limited entry. The exosomes were shown to contain T-cell immunoglobulin mucin protein 4 (TIM-4, which binds phosphatidylserine. Treatment with anti-TIM-4 antibody significantly blocked the exosome-mediated Ad5 entry.Conclusion: Neural stem cell-derived exosomes mediated significant cellular entry of Ad5 in a receptor-independent fashion. This mediation may be hampered by an antibody specifically targeting TIM-4 on exosomes. This set of results will benefit further elucidation of virus/exosome pathways, which would contribute to reducing natural viral infection by developing therapeutic agents or vaccines. Keywords: neural stem cell-derived exosomes, adenovirus type 5, TIM-4, viral entry, phospholipids

  20. Gaseous Mediators Nitric Oxide and Hydrogen Sulfide in the Mechanism of Gastrointestinal Integrity, Protection and Ulcer Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Magierowski

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO and hydrogen sulfide (H2S are known as biological messengers; they play an important role in human organism and contribute to many physiological and pathophysiological processes. NO is produced from l-arginine by constitutive NO synthase (NOS and inducible NOS enzymatic pathways. This gaseous mediator inhibits platelet aggregation, leukocyte adhesion and contributes to the vessel homeostasis. NO is known as a vasodilatory molecule involved in control of the gastric blood flow (GBF and the maintenance of gastric mucosal barrier integrity in either healthy gastric mucosa or that damaged by strong irritants. Biosynthesis of H2S in mammals depends upon two enzymes cystathionine-β-synthase and cystathionine γ-lyase. This gaseous mediator, similarly to NO and carbon monoxide, is involved in neuromodulation, vascular contractility and anti-inflammatory activities. For decades, H2S has been known to inhibit cytochrome c oxidase and reduce cell energy production. Nowadays it is generally considered to act through vascular smooth muscle ATP-dependent K+ channels, interacting with intracellular transcription factors and promote sulfhydration of protein cysteine moieties within the cell, but the mechanism of potential gastroprotective and ulcer healing properties of H2S has not been fully explained. The aim of this review is to compare current results of the studies concerning the role of H2S and NO in gastric mucosa protection and outline areas that may pose new opportunities for further development of novel therapeutic targets.

  1. Mast cell-derived histamine mediates cystitis pain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles N Rudick

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mast cells trigger inflammation that is associated with local pain, but the mechanisms mediating pain are unclear. Interstitial cystitis (IC is a bladder disease that causes debilitating pelvic pain of unknown origin and without consistent inflammation, but IC symptoms correlate with elevated bladder lamina propria mast cell counts. We hypothesized that mast cells mediate pelvic pain directly and examined pain behavior using a murine model that recapitulates key aspects of IC. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Infection of mice with pseudorabies virus (PRV induces a neurogenic cystitis associated with lamina propria mast cell accumulation dependent upon tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF, TNF-mediated bladder barrier dysfunction, and pelvic pain behavior, but the molecular basis for pelvic pain is unknown. In this study, both PRV-induced pelvic pain and bladder pathophysiology were abrogated in mast cell-deficient mice but were restored by reconstitution with wild type bone marrow. Pelvic pain developed normally in TNF- and TNF receptor-deficient mice, while bladder pathophysiology was abrogated. Conversely, genetic or pharmacologic disruption of histamine receptor H1R or H2R attenuated pelvic pain without altering pathophysiology. CONCLUSIONS: These data demonstrate that mast cells promote cystitis pain and bladder pathophysiology through the separable actions of histamine and TNF, respectively. Therefore, pain is independent of pathology and inflammation, and histamine receptors represent direct therapeutic targets for pain in IC and other chronic pain conditions.

  2. Connexins protect mouse pancreatic β cells against apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klee, Philippe; Allagnat, Florent; Pontes, Helena; Cederroth, Manon; Charollais, Anne; Caille, Dorothée; Britan, Aurore; Haefliger, Jacques-Antoine; Meda, Paolo

    2011-12-01

    Type 1 diabetes develops when most insulin-producing β cells of the pancreas are killed by an autoimmune attack. The in vivo conditions modulating the sensitivity and resistance of β cells to this attack remain largely obscure. Here, we show that connexin 36 (Cx36), a trans-membrane protein that forms gap junctions between β cells in the pancreatic islets, protects mouse β cells against both cytotoxic drugs and cytokines that prevail in the islet environment at the onset of type 1 diabetes. We documented that this protection was at least partially dependent on intercellular communication, which Cx36 and other types of connexin channels establish within pancreatic islets. We further found that proinflammatory cytokines decreased expression of Cx36 and that experimental reduction or augmentation of Cx36 levels increased or decreased β cell apoptosis, respectively. Thus, we conclude that Cx36 is central to β cell protection from toxic insults. PMID:22056383

  3. Inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1 glycoprotein-mediated cell-cell fusion by immunor (IM28

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akoume Marie-Yvonne

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Immunor (IM28, an analog of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA, inhibits human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1 by inhibiting reverse transcriptase. We assessed the ability of IM28 to inhibit the cell-cell fusion mediated by HIV envelope glycoprotein in an in vitro system. For this purpose, we co-cultured TF228.1.16, a T-cell line expressing stably HIV-1 glycoprotein envelopes, with an equal number of 293/CD4+, another T cell line expressing CD4, and with the SupT1 cell line with or without IM28. Results In the absence of IM28, TF228.1.16 fused with 293/CD4+, inducing numerous large syncytia. Syncytia appeared more rapidly when TF228.1.16 was co-cultured with SupT1 cells than when it was co-cultured with the 293/CD4+ cell line. IM28 (1.6 – 45 μg/ml completely inhibits cell-cell fusion. IM28 also prevented the development of new syncytia in infected cells and protected naive SupT1 cells from HIV-1 infection. Evaluation of 50% inhibitory dose (IC50 of IM28 revealed a decrease in HIV-1 replication with an IC50 of 22 mM and 50% cytotoxicity dose (CC50 as determined on MT2 cells was 75 mM giving a selectivity index of 3.4 Conclusions These findings suggest that IM28 exerts an inhibitory action on the env proteins that mediate cell-cell fusion between infected and healthy cells. They also suggest that IM28 interferes with biochemical processes to stop the progression of existing syncytia. This property may lead to the development of a new class of therapeutic drug.

  4. Role of paracrine factors in stem and progenitor cell mediated cardiac repair and tissue fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burchfield Jana S

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A new era has begun in the treatment of ischemic disease and heart failure. With the discovery that stem cells from diverse organs and tissues, including bone marrow, adipose tissue, umbilical cord blood, and vessel wall, have the potential to improve cardiac function beyond that of conventional pharmacological therapy comes a new field of research aiming at understanding the precise mechanisms of stem cell-mediated cardiac repair. Not only will it be important to determine the most efficacious cell population for cardiac repair, but also whether overlapping, common mechanisms exist. Increasing evidence suggests that one mechanism of action by which cells provide tissue protection and repair may involve paracrine factors, including cytokines and growth factors, released from transplanted stem cells into the surrounding tissue. These paracrine factors have the potential to directly modify the healing process in the heart, including neovascularization, cardiac myocyte apoptosis, inflammation, fibrosis, contractility, bioenergetics, and endogenous repair.

  5. Fasting-Mimicking Diet Reduces HO-1 to Promote T Cell-Mediated Tumor Cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Biase, Stefano; Lee, Changhan; Brandhorst, Sebastian; Manes, Brianna; Buono, Roberta; Cheng, Chia-Wei; Cacciottolo, Mafalda; Martin-Montalvo, Alejandro; de Cabo, Rafael; Wei, Min; Morgan, Todd E; Longo, Valter D

    2016-07-11

    Immune-based interventions are promising strategies to achieve long-term cancer-free survival. Fasting was previously shown to differentially sensitize tumors to chemotherapy while protecting normal cells, including hematopoietic stem and immune cells, from its toxic side effects. Here, we show that the combination of chemotherapy and a fasting-mimicking diet (FMD) increases the levels of bone marrow common lymphoid progenitor cells and cytotoxic CD8(+) tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs), leading to a major delay in breast cancer and melanoma progression. In breast tumors, this effect is partially mediated by the downregulation of the stress-responsive enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). These data indicate that FMD cycles combined with chemotherapy can enhance T cell-dependent targeted killing of cancer cells both by stimulating the hematopoietic system and by enhancing CD8(+)-dependent tumor cytotoxicity. PMID:27411588

  6. Green tea may protect brain cells against Parkinson's

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ Does the consumption of green tea, widely touted to have beneficial effects on health, also protect brain cells? As reported in the 15 December, 2007 issue of Biological Psychiatry, studies by CAS researchers indicate this may be the case.

  7. Engineering hot-cell windows for radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation protection considerations in the design and construction of hot-cell windows are discussed. The importance of evaluating the potential gamma spectra and neutron source terms is stressed. 11 references

  8. IFN-γ protects from lethal IL-17 mediated viral encephalomyelitis independent of neutrophils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savarin Carine

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The interplay between IFN-γ, IL-17 and neutrophils during CNS inflammatory disease is complex due to cross-regulatory factors affecting both positive and negative feedback loops. These interactions have hindered the ability to distinguish the relative contributions of neutrophils, Th1 and Th17 cell-derived effector molecules from secondary mediators to tissue damage and morbidity. Methods Encephalitis induced by a gliatropic murine coronavirus was used as a model to assess the direct contributions of neutrophils, IFN-γ and IL-17 to virus-induced mortality. CNS inflammatory conditions were selectively manipulated by adoptive transfer of virus-primed wild-type (WT or IFN-γ deficient (GKO memory CD4+ T cells into infected SCID mice, coupled with antibody-mediated neutrophil depletion and cytokine blockade. Results Transfer of GKO memory CD4+ T cells into infected SCID mice induced rapid mortality compared to recipients of WT memory CD4+ T cells, despite similar virus control and demyelination. In contrast to recipients of WT CD4+ T cells, extensive neutrophil infiltration and IL-17 expression within the CNS in recipients of GKO CD4+ T cells provided a model to directly assess their contribution(s to disease. Recipients of WT CD4+ T cells depleted of IFN-γ did not express IL-17 and were spared from mortality despite abundant CNS neutrophil infiltration, indicating that mortality was not mediated by excessive CNS neutrophil accumulation. By contrast, IL-17 depletion rescued recipients of GKO CD4+ T cells from rapid mortality without diminishing neutrophils or reducing GM-CSF, associated with pathogenic Th17 cells in CNS autoimmune models. Furthermore, co-transfer of WT and GKO CD4+ T cells prolonged survival in an IFN-γ dependent manner, although IL-17 transcription was not reduced. Conclusions These data demonstrate that IL-17 mediates detrimental clinical consequences in an IFN-γ-deprived environment, independent of

  9. The protective effect of salicylic acid on lysozyme against riboflavin-mediated photooxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kun; Wang, Hongbao; Cheng, Lingli; Zhu, Hui; Wang, Mei; Wang, Shi-Long

    2011-06-01

    As a metabolite of aspirin in vivo, salicylic acid was proved to protect lysozyme from riboflavin-mediated photooxidation in this study. The antioxidative properties of salicylic acid were further studied by using time-resolved laser flash photolysis of 355 nm. It can quench the triplet state of riboflavin via electron transfer from salicylic acid to the triplet state of riboflavin with a reaction constant of 2.25 × 10 9 M -1 s -1. Mechanism of antioxidant activities of salicylic acid on lysozyme oxidation was discussed. Salicylic acid can serve as a potential antioxidant to quench the triplet state of riboflavin and reduce oxidative pressure.

  10. Potential role of NKT regulatory cell ligands for the treatment of immune mediated colitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Natural killer T lymphocytes (NKT) have been implicated in the regulation of autoimmune processes in both mice and humans. In response to stimuli, this subset of cells rapidly produces large amounts of cytokines thereby provoking immune responses, including protection against autoimmune diseases. NKT cells are present in all lymphoid compartments, but are most abundant in the liver and bone marrow. They are activated by interaction of their T-cell receptor with glycolipids presented by CD1d, a nonpolymorphic, major histocompatibility complex class Mike molecule expressed by antigen presenting cells. Several possible ligands for NKT cells have recently been suggested, p-glucosylceramide, a naturally occurring glycolipid, is a metabolic intermediate in the anabolic and catabolic pathways of complex glycosphingolipids. Like other p-glycolipids, p-glucosylceramide has an immunomodulatory effect in several immune mediated disorders, including immune mediated colitis. Due to the broad impact that NKT cells have on the immune system, there is intense interest in understanding how NKT cells are stimulated and the extent to which NKT cell responses can be controlled. These novel ligands are currently being evaluated in animal models of colitis. Here, we discuss strategies to alter NKT lymphocyte function in various settings and the potential clinical applications of natural glycolipids.

  11. Raji B cells, misidentified as THP-1 cells, stimulate DC-SIGN-mediated HIV transmission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A number of studies examining interactions of dendritic cell (DC)-specific ICAM-3 grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN) with viral pathogens have relied on monocytic transfectants as models for primary DCs. Here we show that the presumed 'THP-1' monocytic cells used in these studies are instead Raji B cells. Moreover, we demonstrate that true THP-1 cells do not support DC-SIGN-mediated HIV-1 transmission, whereas human B cell lines efficiently enhance this process. These data indicate that there are features common to B cells and DCs that facilitate transmission of HIV-1 and provide new insights toward the mechanism of DC-SIGN-mediated HIV-1 transmission

  12. Single cell migration dynamics mediated by geometric confinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hua; Hou, Ruixia; Xiao, Peng; Xing, Rubo; Chen, Tao; Han, Yanchun; Ren, Penggang; Fu, Jun

    2016-09-01

    The migration dynamics of cells plays a key role in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Previous studies mostly focus on regulating stem cell fate and phenotype by biophysical cues. In contrast, less is known about how the geometric cues mediate the migration dynamics of cells. Here, we fabricate graphene oxide (GO) microstripes on cell non-adhesive PEG substrate by using micromolding in capillary (MIMIC) method. Such micropatterns with alternating cell adhesion and cell resistance enable an effective control of selective adhesion and migration of single cells. The sharp contrast in cell adhesion minimizes the invasion of cells into the PEG patterns, and thereby strongly confines the cells on GO microstripes. As a result, the cells are forced to adapt highly polarized, elongated, and oriented geometry to fit the patterns. A series of pattern widths have been fabricated to modulate the extent of cell deformation and polarization. Under strong confinement, the cytoskeleton contractility, intracellular traction, and actin filament elongation are highly promoted, which result in enhanced cell migration along the patterns. This work provides an important insight into developing combinatorial graphene-based patterns for the control of cell migration dynamics, which is of great significance for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. PMID:27137805

  13. Characterization of the mechanism of protection mediated by CS-D7, a monoclonal antibody to Staphylococcus aureus iron regulated surface determinant B (IsdB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory ePancari

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We previously reported the development of a human monoclonal antibody (CS-D7, IgG1 with specificity and affinity for the iron regulated surface determinant B (IsdB of Staphylococcus aureus. CS-D7 mediates opsonophagocytic killing in vitro and protection in a murine sepsis model. In light of recent data indicating that IsdB specific T cells (CD4+, Th17, not Ab, mediate protection after vaccination with IsdB, it is important to investigate the mechanism of protection mediated by CS-D7. The mAb was examined to determine if it blocked heme binding to IsdB in vitro. The mAb was not found to have heme blocking activity, nor did it prevent bacterial growth under in vivo conditions, in an implanted growth chamber. To assess the role of the mAb Fc a point mutation was introduced at aa 297 (CS-D7●N297A. This point mutation removes Fc effector functions. In vitro analysis of the mutein confirmed that it lacked measurable binding to FcγR, and that it did not fix complement. The mutein had dramatically reduced in vitro opsonic OP activity compared to CS-D7. Nonetheless, the mutein conferred protection equivalent to the wild type mAb in the murine sepsis model. Both wild type and mutein mAbs were efficacious in FcγR deletion mice (including both FcγRII-/- mice and FcγRIII-/- mice, indicating that these receptors were not essential for mAb mediated protection in vivo. Protection mediated by CS-D7 was lost in Balb/c mice depleted of C3 with cobra venom factor (CFV, was lost in mice depleted of superoxide dismutase (SOD in P47phox deletion mice, and was absent in SCID mice. Enhanced clearance of S. aureus in the liver of CS-D7 treated mice and enhanced production of INF-γ, but not of IL17, may play a role in the mechanism of protection mediated by the mAb. CS-D7 apparently mediates survival in challenged mice through a mechanism involving complement, phagocytes, and lymphocytes, but which does not depend on interaction with FcγR, or on blocking heme

  14. Constitutive SOCS-3 expression protects T-cell lymphoma against growth inhibition by IFNalpha

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brender, C; Lovato, P; Sommer, V H;

    2005-01-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription (Stat)3 is constitutively activated in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL), where it protects tumour cells against apoptosis. The constitutive activation of Stat3 leads to a constitutive expression of suppressor of cytokine signalling (SOCS)-3. In...... healthy cells, SOCS-3 is transiently expressed following cytokine stimulation and functions as a negative feedback inhibitor of the Stat3-activating kinases. Here, we attempt to resolve the apparent paradox of a simultaneous SOCS-3 expression and Stat3 activation in the same cells. We show that (i) SOCS-3...... expression in tumour cells is equal to or higher than in cytokine-stimulated nonmalignant T cells, (ii) SOCS-3 is not mutated in CTCL, (iii) overexpression of SOCS-3 blocks IFNalpha-mediated growth inhibition without affecting Stat3 activation, growth, and apoptosis, and (iv) inhibition of SOCS-3 by a...

  15. Protective Cytotoxic T-Cell Responses Induced by Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus Replicons Expressing Ebola Virus Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Olinger, Gene G.; Bailey, Michael A.; Dye, John M.; Bakken, Russell; Kuehne, Ana; Kondig, John; Wilson, Julie; Hogan, Robert J.; Hart, Mary Kate

    2005-01-01

    Infection with Ebola virus causes a severe disease accompanied by high mortality rates, and there are no licensed vaccines or therapies available for human use. Filovirus vaccine research efforts still need to determine the roles of humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in protection from Ebola virus infection. Previous studies indicated that exposure to Ebola virus proteins expressed from packaged Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicons elicited protective immunity in mice and th...

  16. Fc receptor-mediated, antibody-dependent enhancement of bacteriophage lambda-mediated gene transfer in mammalian cells

    OpenAIRE

    Sapinoro, Ramil; Volcy, Ketna; Shanaka, W.W.; Rodrigo, I.; Schlesinger, Jacob J.; Dewhurst, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    Lambda phage vectors mediate gene transfer in cultured mammalian cells and in live mice, and in vivo phage-mediated gene expression is increased when mice are pre-immunized with bacteriophage lambda. We now show that, like eukaryotic viruses, bacteriophage vectors are subject to Fc receptor-mediated, antibody-dependent enhancement of infection in mammalian cells. Antibody-dependent enhancement of phage gene transfer required FcγRI, but not its associated γ chain, and was not supported by othe...

  17. Lentiviral-mediated delivery of Bcl-2 or GDNF protects against excitotoxicity in the rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Liang-Fong; Ralph, G Scott; Walmsley, Lucy E; Bienemann, Alison S; Parham, Stephen; Kingsman, Susan M; Uney, James B; Mazarakis, Nicholas D

    2005-01-01

    Nutrient deprivation during ischemia leads to severe insult to neurons causing widespread excitotoxic damage in specific brain regions such as the hippocampus. One possible strategy for preventing neurodegeneration is to express therapeutic proteins in the brain to protect against excitotoxicity. We investigated the utility of equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV)-based vectors as genetic tools for delivery of therapeutic proteins in an in vivo excitotoxicity model. The efficacy of these vectors at preventing cellular loss in target brain areas following excitotoxic insult was also assessed. EIAV vectors generated to overexpress the human antiapoptotic Bcl-2 or growth factor glial-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) genes protected against glutamate-induced toxicity in cultured hippocampal neurons. In an in vivo excitotoxicity model, adult Wistar rats received a unilateral dose of the glutamate receptor agonist N-methyl-D-aspartate to the hippocampus that induced a large lesion in the CA1 region. Neuronal loss could not be protected by prior transduction of a control vector expressing beta-galactosidase. In contrast, EIAV-mediated expression of Bcl-2 and GDNF significantly reduced lesion size thus protecting the hippocampus from excitotoxic damage. These results demonstrate that EIAV vectors can be effectively used to deliver putative neuroprotective genes to target brain areas and prevent cellular loss in the event of a neurological insult. Therefore these lentiviral vectors provide potential therapeutic tools for use in cases of acute neurotrauma such as cerebral ischemia. PMID:15585409

  18. Rapid Antigen Processing and Presentation of a Protective and Immunodominant HLA-B*27-restricted Hepatitis C Virus-specific CD8+ T-cell Epitope

    OpenAIRE

    Julia Schmidt; Iversen, Astrid K N; Stefan Tenzer; Emma Gostick; Price, David A.; Volker Lohmann; Ute Distler; Paul Bowness; Hansjörg Schild; Blum, Hubert E.; Paul Klenerman; Christoph Neumann-Haefelin; Robert Thimme

    2012-01-01

    HLA-B*27 exerts protective effects in hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections. While the immunological and virological features of HLA-B*27-mediated protection are not fully understood, there is growing evidence that the presentation of specific immunodominant HLA-B*27-restricted CD8+ T-cell epitopes contributes to this phenomenon in both infections. Indeed, protection can be linked to single immunodominant CD8+ T-cell epitopes and functional constraints on e...

  19. Development of an edema factor-mediated cAMP-induction bioassay for detecting antibody-mediated neutralization of anthrax protective antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zmuda, Jonathan F; Zhang, Linyi; Richards, Terri; Pham, Quyen; Zukauskas, David; Pierre, Jennifer L; Laird, Michael W; Askins, Janine; Choi, Gil H

    2005-03-01

    Intoxication of mammalian cells by Bacillus anthracis requires the coordinate activity of three distinct bacterial proteins: protective antigen (PA), edema factor (EF), and lethal factor (LF). Among these proteins, PA has become the major focus of work on monoclonal antibodies and vaccines designed to treat or prevent anthrax infection since neither EF nor LF is capable of inducing cellular toxicity in its absence. Here, we present the development of a sensitive, precise, and biologically relevant bioassay platform capable of quantifying antibody-mediated PA neutralization. This bioassay is based on the ability of PA to bind and shuttle EF, a bacterial adenylate cyclase, into mammalian cells leading to an increase in cAMP that can be quantified using a sensitive chemiluminescent ELISA. The results of this study indicate that the cAMP-induction assay possesses the necessary performance characteristics for use as both a potency-indicating release assay in a quality control setting and as a surrogate pharmacodynamic marker for ensuring the continued bioactivity of therapeutic antibodies against PA during clinical trials. PMID:15847796

  20. Mast cells control insulitis and increase Treg cells to confer protection against STZ-induced type 1 diabetes in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlos, Daniela; Yaochite, Juliana N U; Rocha, Fernanda A; Toso, Vanina D; Malmegrim, Kelen C R; Ramos, Simone G; Jamur, Maria C; Oliver, Constance; Camara, Niels O; Andrade, Marcus V M; Cunha, Fernando Q; Silva, João S

    2015-10-01

    Quantitative alterations in mast cell numbers in pancreatic lymph nodes (PLNs) have been reported to be associated with type 1 diabetes (T1D) progression, but their potential role during T1D remains unclear. In this study, we evaluated the role of mast cells in T1D induced by multiple low-dose streptozotocin (MLD-STZ) treatments, using two strains of mast cell-deficient mice (W/W(v) or Wsh/Wsh) and the adoptive transfer of mast cells. Mast cell deficient mice developed severe insulitis and accelerated hyperglycemia, with 100% of mice becoming diabetic compared to their littermates. In parallel, these diabetic mice had decreased numbers of T regulatory (Treg) cells in the PLNs. Additionally, mast cell deficiency caused a significant reduction in IL-10, TGF-β, and IL-6 expression in the pancreatic tissue. Interestingly, IL-6-deficient mice are more susceptible to T1D associated with reduced Treg-cell numbers in the PLNs, but mast cell transfer from wild-type mice induced protection to T1D in these mice. Finally, mast cell adoptive transfer prior to MLD-STZ administration conferred resistance to T1D, promoted increased Treg cells, and decreased IL-17-producing T cells in the PLNs. Taken together, our results indicate that mast cells are implicated in resistance to STZ-induced T1D via an immunological tolerance mechanism mediated by Treg cells. PMID:26234742

  1. Carvedilol-mediated antioxidant protection against doxorubicin-induced cardiac mitochondrial toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cardiotoxicity associated with doxorubicin (DOX) therapy limits the total cumulative dose and therapeutic success of active anticancer chemotherapy. Cardiac mitochondria are implicated as primary targets for DOX toxicity, which is believed to be mediated by the generation of highly reactive free radical species of oxygen from complex I of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. The objective of this study was to determine if the protection demonstrated by carvedilol (CV), a β-adrenergic receptor antagonist with strong antioxidant properties, against DOX-induced mitochondrial-mediated cardiomyopathy [Toxicol. Appl. Pharmacol. 185 (2002) 218] is attributable to its antioxidant properties or its β-adrenergic receptor antagonism. Our results confirm that DOX induces oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and histopathological lesions in the cardiac tissue, all of which are inhibited by carvedilol. In contrast, atenolol (AT), a β-adrenergic receptor antagonist lacking antioxidant properties, preserved phosphate energy charge but failed to protect against any of the indexes of DOX-induced oxidative mitochondrial toxicity. We therefore conclude that the cardioprotective effects of carvedilol against DOX-induced mitochondrial cardiotoxicity are due to its inherent antioxidant activity and not to its β-adrenergic receptor antagonism

  2. Molecular tracking of antigen-specific T cell clones in neurological immune-mediated disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraro, Paolo A.; Wandinger, Klaus-Peter; Bielekova, Bibiana; Gran, Bruno; Marques, Adriana; Utz, Ursula; McFarland, Henry F.; Jacobson, Steve; Martin, Roland

    2016-01-01

    Summary T cells recognizing self or microbial antigens may trigger or reactivate immune-mediated diseases. Monitoring the frequency of specific T cell clonotypes to assess a possible link with the course of disease has been a difficult task with currently available technology. Our goal was to track individual candidate pathogenic T cell clones, selected on the basis of previous extensive studies from patients with immune-mediated disorders of the CNS, including multiple sclerosis, HTLV-I associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/ TSP) and chronic Lyme neuroborreliosis. We developed and applied a highly specific and sensitive technique to track single CD4+ and CD8+ T cell clones through the detection and quantification of T cell receptor (TCR) α or β chain complementarity-determining region 3 transcripts by real-time reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR. We examined the frequency of the candidate pathogenic T cell clones in the peripheral blood and CSF during the course of neurological disease. Using this approach, we detected variations of clonal frequencies that appeared to be related to clinical course, significant enrichment in the CSF, or both. By integrating clono-type tracking with direct visualization of antigen-specific staining, we showed that a single T cell clone contributed substantially to the overall recognition of the viral peptide/MHC complex in a patient with HAM/ TSP. T cell clonotype tracking is a powerful new technology enabling further elucidation of the dynamics of expansion of autoreactive or pathogen-specific T cells that mediate pathological or protective immune responses in neurological disorders. PMID:12477694

  3. HIGH EFFICIENCY RETROVIRUS-MEDIATED GENE TRANSFER TO LEUKEMIA CELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Jian-xin; CHEN Zi-xing; CEN Jian-nong; WANG Wei; RUAN Chang-geng

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To establish an efficient and safe gene transfer system mediated by retrovirus for gene marking and gene therapy of human leukemia. Method: The retroviral vector LXSN, containing the neomycin resistance (NeoR) gene, was transferred into amphotropic packaging cells GP+envAm12 by liposome transfection or by ecotropic retrovirus transduction. Amphotropic retrovirus in supernatants with higher titer was used to infect human leukemic cell lines NB4, U937, and THP-1.The efficiency of gene transfer was assayed on colonies formed by transduced K562 cells. Results: The titer of DOSPER directly transfected GP+envAm12 cells determined on NIH3T3 cells was 8.0×105 CFU/ml, while that of producer infected with retrovirus was 1.6×107CFU/ml. Integration of NeoR gene into all leukemia cells was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR).Absence of replication-competent virus was proved by both nested PCR for env gene and marker gene rescue assay. Gene transfer with the efficiency as high as 93.3 to 100% in K562 cells was verified by seminested PCR for integrated NeoR gene on colonies after 7 days' culture.Conclusion: The efficiency and safety of retrovirus mediated gene transfer system might provide an optimal system in gene therapy for leukemia or genetic diseases.

  4. Protective Role of Sirtuin3 (SIRT3 in Oxidative Stress Mediated by Hepatitis B Virus X Protein Expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Hua Ren

    Full Text Available The hepatitis B virus (HBV infection is accompanied by the induction of oxidative stress, especially mediated by HBV X protein (HBx. Oxidative stress has been implicated in a series of pathological states, such as DNA damage, cell survival and apoptosis. However, the host factor by which cells protect themselves under this oxidative stress is poorly understood.In this study, we first confirmed that HBV infection significantly induced oxidative stress. Moreover, viral protein HBx plays a major role in the oxidative stress induced by HBV. Importantly, we found that mitochondrial protein SIRT3 overexpression could decrease reactive oxygen species (ROS induced by HBx while SIRT3 knockdown increased HBx-induced ROS. Importantly, SIRT3 overexpression abolished oxidative damage of HBx-expressing cells as evidenced by γH2AX and AP sites measurements. In contrast, SIRT3 knockdown promoted HBx-induced oxidative damage. In addition, we also observed that oxidant H2O2 markedly promoted HBV replication while the antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC inhibited HBV replication. Significantly, SIRT3 overexpression inhibited HBV replication by reducing cellular ROS level.Collectively, these data suggest HBx expression induces oxidative stress, which promotes cellular oxidative damage and viral replication during HBV pathogenesis. Mitochondrial protein SIRT3 protected HBx expressing-cells from oxidative damage and inhibited HBV replication possibly by decreased cellular ROS level. These studies shed new light on the physiological significance of SIRT3 on HBx-induced oxidative stress, which can contribute to the liver pathogenesis.

  5. A longitudinal study of cell-mediated immunity in pigs infected with porcine parvovirus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladekjaer-Mikkelsen, A.S.; Nielsen, Jens

    2002-01-01

    Porcine parvovirus (PPV) is an ubiquitous pathogen causing reproductive failure in swine. Protection against reproductive failure caused by acute PPV infection has commonly been related to the presence of specific antibodies in the dam. However, the role of cell-mediated immunity during chronic PPV...... infection remains to be elucidated, and may be relevant to the pathogenesis of novel diseases such as postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS), which may be triggered by coinfection with PPV and porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2). To investigate whether pigs infected with PPV generate a cell...... isolated, and virus-specific lymphoproliferative responses and the cytolytic activities of cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTL) and natural killer (NK) cells were examined. Cytolytic assays were performed by the chromium release method, using as targets a syngeneic porcine kidney cell line established for the...

  6. Extracellular but not cytosolic superoxide dismutase protects against oxidant-mediated endothelial dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin L. Foresman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Superoxide (O2•− contributes to the development of cardiovascular disease. Generation of O2•− occurs in both the intracellular and extracellular compartments. We hypothesized that the gene transfer of cytosolic superoxide dismutase (SOD1 or extracellular SOD (SOD3 to blood vessels would differentially protect against O2•−-mediated endothelial-dependent dysfunction. Aortic ring segments from New Zealand rabbits were incubated with adenovirus (Ad containing the gene for Escherichia coli β-galactosidase, SOD1, or SOD3. Activity assays confirmed functional overexpression of both SOD3 and SOD1 isoforms in aorta 24 h following gene transfer. Histochemical staining for β-galactosidase showed gene transfer occurred in the endothelium and adventitia. Next, vessels were prepared for measurement of isometric tension in Kreb's buffer containing xanthine. After precontraction with phenylephrine, xanthine oxidase impaired relaxation to the endothelium-dependent dilator acetylcholine (ACh, max relaxation 33±4% with XO vs. 64±3% without XO, p<0.05, whereas relaxation to the endothelium-independent dilator sodium nitroprusside was unaffected. In the presence of XO, maximal relaxation to ACh was improved in vessels incubated with AdSOD3 (55±2%, p<0.05 vs. control but not AdSOD1 (34±4%. We conclude that adenoviral-mediated gene transfer of SOD3, but not SOD1, protects the aorta from xanthine/XO-mediated endothelial dysfunction. These data provide important insight into the location and enzymatic source of O2•− production in vascular disease.

  7. 葎草花粉变应原核酸疫苗通过诱导Foxp3+Treg细胞分化介导对哮喘模型小鼠的免疫保护作用%Foxp3+Treg cells mediate immune protection of humulus pollen allergy DNA vaccine pcD-NA3.1-Hum in asthmatic mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢家美; 李满祥; 孙秀珍; 张永红; 刘昀; 徐晶; 张苏梅

    2014-01-01

    Objective To construct a humulus pollen allergy DNA vaccine pcDNA3.1-Hum and investigate its effect for immune protection mediated by Foxp3+Treg cells in asthmatic mice. Methods The target humulus gene obtained from pTripIEx2-Hum plasmid by double enzyme digestion was inserted sequentially into pcDNA3.1(-) vector to generate the recombinant plasmid pcDNA3.1-Hum, which was validated by sequencing. The pcDNA3.1-Hum plasmid was transfected into COS-7 cells and the expression of the ectopic protein was analyzed using Western blotting. Co-cultured dendritic cells and CD4+CD25-T cells were stimulated with the expressed protein to test its efficacy in inducing Foxp3+Treg cells. The levels of humulus-specific IgE and IgG2a were assayed to evaluate the allergenicity and immunogenicity of pcDNA3.1-Hum in mice. The immunoprotective effect of pcDNA3.1-Hum was assessed in a mouse model of humulus-specific asthma. Results The constructed pcDNA3.1-Hum plasmid was validated by sequencing and Western blotting, and the expressed protein was shown to induce Foxp3+Treg cells in the co-culture. In normal mice, pcDNA3.1-Hum induced a significant increase of humulus-specific IgG2a but had no effect on IgE. In the asthmatic mice, pcDNA3.1-Hum significantly decreased inflammatory cell counts and eosinophil percentages in the BALF, ameliorated lung inflammation, and lowered AHR and IL-4 levels; immunization of the mice with pcDNA3.1-Hum reversed humulus-induced reduction of serum IFN-γ and prevented the humulus-triggered reduction of Foxp3+Treg cell percentage in the spleen. Conclusion We have successfully constructed a highly immunogenic pcDNA3.1-Hum DNA vaccine that can mediate immune protection by inducing Foxp3+Treg cells.%目的:构建葎草花粉变应原核酸疫苗pcDNA3.1-Hum,并探讨其是否通过诱导Foxp3+Treg细胞分化介导对哮喘模型小鼠的免疫保护作用。方法双酶切pTripIEx2-Hum质粒以获取目的基因,定向插入pcDNA3.1(-)载

  8. Towards Future T Cell-Mediated Influenza Vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thi H. O. Nguyen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Influenza A virus (IAVs infections impact significantly on global health, being particularly problematic in children, the elderly, pregnant women, indigenous populations and people with co-morbidities. Antibody-based vaccines require annual administration to combat rapidly acquired mutations modifying the surface haemagglutinin (HA and neuraminidase (NA glycoproteins. Conversely, influenza-specific CD8+ T cell responses directed at peptides derived from the more conserved internal virus proteins are known to be protective, suggesting that T cell-based vaccines may provide long-lasting cross-protection. This review outlines the importance of CD8+ T cell immunity to seasonal influenza and pandemic IAVs and summarises current vaccination strategies for inducing durable CD8+ T cell memory. Aspects of future IAV vaccine design and the use of live virus challenge in humans to establish proof of principle are also discussed.

  9. Control of Th2-Mediated Inflammation by Regulatory T Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Poojary, K. Venuprasad; Kong, Yi-chi M.; Farrar, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    Allergic diseases and asthma are caused by dysregulated Th2-type immune responses, which drive disease development in susceptible individuals. Immune tolerance to allergens prevents inflammatory symptoms in the respiratory mucosa and provides protection against inflammation in the airways. Increasing evidence indicates that Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) play a critical role in immune tolerance and control Th2-biased responses. Tregs develop in the thymus from CD4+ T cells (natural Tregs) ...

  10. Access of protective antiviral antibody to neuronal tissues requires CD4 T-cell help.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Norifumi; Iwasaki, Akiko

    2016-05-26

    Circulating antibodies can access most tissues to mediate surveillance and elimination of invading pathogens. Immunoprivileged tissues such as the brain and the peripheral nervous system are shielded from plasma proteins by the blood-brain barrier and blood-nerve barrier, respectively. Yet, circulating antibodies must somehow gain access to these tissues to mediate their antimicrobial functions. Here we examine the mechanism by which antibodies gain access to neuronal tissues to control infection. Using a mouse model of genital herpes infection, we demonstrate that both antibodies and CD4 T cells are required to protect the host after immunization at a distal site. We show that memory CD4 T cells migrate to the dorsal root ganglia and spinal cord in response to infection with herpes simplex virus type 2. Once inside these neuronal tissues, CD4 T cells secrete interferon-γ and mediate local increase in vascular permeability, enabling antibody access for viral control. A similar requirement for CD4 T cells for antibody access to the brain is observed after intranasal challenge with vesicular stomatitis virus. Our results reveal a previously unappreciated role of CD4 T cells in mobilizing antibodies to the peripheral sites of infection where they help to limit viral spread. PMID:27225131

  11. Nitric oxide inhibits calpain-mediated proteolysis of talin in skeletal muscle cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, T. J.; Tidball, J. G.

    2000-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that nitric oxide can inhibit cytoskeletal breakdown in skeletal muscle cells by inhibiting calpain cleavage of talin. The nitric oxide donor sodium nitroprusside prevented many of the effects of calcium ionophore on C(2)C(12) muscle cells, including preventing talin proteolysis and release into the cytosol and reducing loss of vinculin, cell detachment, and loss of cellular protein. These results indicate that nitric oxide inhibition of calpain protected the cells from ionophore-induced proteolysis. Calpain inhibitor I and a cell-permeable calpastatin peptide also protected the cells from proteolysis, confirming that ionophore-induced proteolysis was primarily calpain mediated. The activity of m-calpain in a casein zymogram was inhibited by sodium nitroprusside, and this inhibition was reversed by dithiothreitol. Previous incubation with the active site-targeted calpain inhibitor I prevented most of the sodium nitroprusside-induced inhibition of m-calpain activity. These data suggest that nitric oxide inhibited m-calpain activity via S-nitrosylation of the active site cysteine. The results of this study indicate that nitric oxide produced endogenously by skeletal muscle and other cell types has the potential to inhibit m-calpain activity and cytoskeletal proteolysis.

  12. Nanodrug-Mediated Thermotherapy of Cancer Stem-Like Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Wei; Wang, Hai; Zhong, Allison; Yu, Jianhua; Lu, Xiongbin; He, Xiaoming

    2016-03-01

    Cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) are rare subpopulations of cancer cells that are resistant to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy and contribute to cancer metastases and tumor recurrence. Therefore, it is of significance to develop an effective therapy to eliminate the CSCs. Cancer thermotherapy realized by depositing heat into tumor in a minimally invasive way is a promising alternative to the conventional therapies for cancer treatment. However, this method is limited by its inability to target CSCs, potentially allowing the CSCs to survive and re-initiate tumor growth. More recently, nanodrug-mediated thermotherapy has been explored to selectively eliminate CSCs and specifically deposit heat in tumor to spare healthy tissue. Here, we provide a brief overview of the targeting moieties and nanoplatforms used in developing nanodrug-mediated thermotherapy of cancer with particular emphasis on the CSCs, as well as the challenges and potential directions for future research in this emerging field. PMID:27455612

  13. Regulatory T cells in immune-mediated renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghali, Joanna R; Wang, Yuan Min; Holdsworth, Stephen R; Kitching, A Richard

    2016-02-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are CD4+ T cells that can suppress immune responses by effector T cells, B cells and innate immune cells. This review discusses the role that Tregs play in murine models of immune-mediated renal diseases and acute kidney injury and in human autoimmune kidney disease (such as systemic lupus erythematosus, anti-glomerular basement membrane disease, anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis). Current research suggests that Tregs may be reduced in number and/or have impaired regulatory function in these diseases. Tregs possess several mechanisms by which they can limit renal and systemic inflammatory immune responses. Potential therapeutic applications involving Tregs include in vivo induction of Tregs or inducing Tregs from naïve CD4+ T cells or expanding natural Tregs ex vivo, to use as a cellular therapy. At present, the optimal method of generating a phenotypically stable pool of Tregs with long-lasting suppressive effects is not established, but human studies in renal transplantation are underway exploring the therapeutic potential of Tregs as a cellular therapy, and if successful may have a role as a novel therapy in immune-mediated renal diseases. PMID:26206106

  14. Single-cell force spectroscopy of pili-mediated adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullan, Ruby May A.; Beaussart, Audrey; Tripathi, Prachi; Derclaye, Sylvie; El-Kirat-Chatel, Sofiane; Li, James K.; Schneider, Yves-Jacques; Vanderleyden, Jos; Lebeer, Sarah; Dufrêne, Yves F.

    2013-12-01

    Although bacterial pili are known to mediate cell adhesion to a variety of substrates, the molecular interactions behind this process are poorly understood. We report the direct measurement of the forces guiding pili-mediated adhesion, focusing on the medically important probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG). Using non-invasive single-cell force spectroscopy (SCFS), we quantify the adhesion forces between individual bacteria and biotic (mucin, intestinal cells) or abiotic (hydrophobic monolayers) surfaces. On hydrophobic surfaces, bacterial pili strengthen adhesion through remarkable nanospring properties, which - presumably - enable the bacteria to resist high shear forces under physiological conditions. On mucin, nanosprings are more frequent and adhesion forces larger, reflecting the influence of specific pili-mucin bonds. Interestingly, these mechanical responses are no longer observed on human intestinal Caco-2 cells. Rather, force curves exhibit constant force plateaus with extended ruptures reflecting the extraction of membrane nanotethers. These single-cell analyses provide novel insights into the molecular mechanisms by which piliated bacteria colonize surfaces (nanosprings, nanotethers), and offer exciting avenues in nanomedicine for understanding and controlling the adhesion of microbial cells (probiotics, pathogens).

  15. Atherosclerosis: a chronic inflammatory disease mediated by mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, Pio; Shaik-Dasthagirisaeb, Yazdami

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is a process that plays an important role in the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis and immune disease, involving multiple cell types, including macrophages, T-lymphocytes, endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells and mast cells. The fundamental damage of atherosclerosis is the atheromatous or fibro-fatty plaque which is a lesion that causes several diseases. In atherosclerosis the innate immune response, which involves macrophages, is initiated by the arterial endothelial cells which respond to modified lipoproteins and lead to Th1 cell subset activation and generation of inflammatory cytokines and chemoattractant chemokines. Other immune cells, such as CD4+ T inflammatory cells, which play a critical role in the development and progression of atherosclerosis, and regulatory T cells [Treg], which have a protective effect on the development of atherosclerosis are involved. Considerable evidence indicates that mast cells and their products play a key role in inflammation and atherosclerosis. Activated mast cells can have detrimental effects, provoking matrix degradation, apoptosis, and enhancement as well as recruitment of inflammatory cells, which actively contributes to atherosclerosis and plaque formation. Here we discuss the relationship between atherosclerosis, inflammation and mast cells. PMID:26648785

  16. RNA interference mediated inhibition of dengue virus multiplication and entry in HepG2 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Abdelfatah Alhoot

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dengue virus-host cell interaction initiates when the virus binds to the attachment receptors followed by endocytic internalization of the virus particle. Successful entry into the cell is necessary for infection initiation. Currently, there is no protective vaccine or antiviral treatment for dengue infection. Targeting the viral entry pathway has become an attractive therapeutic strategy to block infection. This study aimed to investigate the effect of silencing the GRP78 and clathrin-mediated endocytosis on dengue virus entry and multiplication into HepG2 cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: HepG2 cells were transfected using specific siRNAs to silence the cellular surface receptor (GRP78 and clathrin-mediated endocytosis pathway. Gene expression analysis showed a marked down-regulation of the targeted genes (87.2%, 90.3%, and 87.8% for GRP78, CLTC, and DNM2 respectively in transfected HepG2 cells when measured by RT-qPCR. Intracellular and extracellular viral RNA loads were quantified by RT-qPCR to investigate the effect of silencing the attachment receptor and clathrin-mediated endocytosis on dengue virus entry. Silenced cells showed a significant reduction of intracellular (92.4% and extracellular viral RNA load (71.4% compared to non-silenced cells. Flow cytometry analysis showed a marked reduction of infected cells (89.7% in silenced HepG2 cells compared to non-silenced cells. Furthermore, the ability to generate infectious virions using the plaque assay was reduced 1.07 log in silenced HepG2 cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Silencing the attachment receptor and clathrin-mediated endocytosis using siRNA could inhibit dengue virus entry and multiplication into HepG2 cells. This leads to reduction of infected cells as well as the viral load, which might function as a unique and promising therapeutic agent for attenuating dengue infection and prevent the development of dengue fever to the severe life-threatening DHF or DSS

  17. Survival of priceless cells: active and passive protection of embryonic stem cells against immune destruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utermöhlen, Olaf; Krönke, Martin

    2007-06-15

    This review focuses on our current knowledge of the mechanisms employed by embryonic stem (ES) cells to avoid destruction by cell-mediated immune responses. Recently, ES cells have been found to shield themselves against cytotoxic effector cells by expressing CD95L and serine protease inhibitor SPI-6 mediating apoptosis of the cytotoxic cells and inactivation of granzyme B, respectively. These findings are discussed in view of their implications for using ES cell-derived transplants in regenerative medicine as well as for our understanding of early embryonic stages during invasion and implantation. PMID:17459325

  18. Factors influencing ER subtype-mediated cell proliferation and apoptosis

    OpenAIRE

    Evers, N.M.

    2014-01-01

      The aim of the current thesis is to elucidate the role of estrogen receptor (ER)αand ERβin cell proliferation and apoptosis induced by estrogenic compounds. Special attention is paid to the importance of the receptor preference of the estrogenic compounds, the cellular ERα/ERβratio, the role of coregulators, and ER-mediated induction of protein expression. In chapter 1 estrogenic compounds and their interaction with estrogen receptors are described and the two dif...

  19. Molecular Signaling Pathways Mediating Osteoclastogenesis Induced by Prostate Cancer Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced prostate cancer commonly metastasizes to bone leading to osteoblastic and osteolytic lesions. Although an osteolytic component governed by activation of bone resorbing osteoclasts is prominent in prostate cancer metastasis, the molecular mechanisms of prostate cancer-induced osteoclastogenesis are not well-understood. We studied the effect of soluble mediators released from human prostate carcinoma cells on osteoclast formation from mouse bone marrow and RAW 264.7 monocytes. Soluble factors released from human prostate carcinoma cells significantly increased viability of naïve bone marrow monocytes, as well as osteoclastogenesis from precursors primed with receptor activator of nuclear factor κ-B ligand (RANKL). The prostate cancer-induced osteoclastogenesis was not mediated by RANKL as it was not inhibited by osteoprotegerin (OPG). However inhibition of TGFβ receptor I (TβRI), or macrophage-colony stimulating factor (MCSF) resulted in attenuation of prostate cancer-induced osteoclastogenesis. We characterized the signaling pathways induced in osteoclast precursors by soluble mediators released from human prostate carcinoma cells. Prostate cancer factors increased basal calcium levels and calcium fluctuations, induced nuclear localization of nuclear factor of activated t-cells (NFAT)c1, and activated prolonged phosphorylation of ERK1/2 in RANKL-primed osteoclast precursors. Inhibition of calcium signaling, NFATc1 activation, and ERK1/2 phosphorylation significantly reduced the ability of prostate cancer mediators to stimulate osteoclastogenesis. This study reveals the molecular mechanisms underlying the direct osteoclastogenic effect of prostate cancer derived factors, which may be beneficial in developing novel osteoclast-targeting therapeutic approaches

  20. TRF2/RAP1 and DNA-PK mediate a double protection against joining at telomeric ends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bombarde, Oriane; Boby, Céline; Gomez, Dennis; Frit, Philippe; Giraud-Panis, Marie-Josèphe; Gilson, Eric; Salles, Bernard; Calsou, Patrick

    2010-05-01

    DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is a double-strand breaks repair complex, the subunits of which (KU and DNA-PKcs) are paradoxically present at mammalian telomeres. Telomere fusion has been reported in cells lacking these proteins, raising two questions: how is DNA-PK prevented from initiating classical ligase IV (LIG4)-dependent non-homologous end-joining (C-NHEJ) at telomeres and how is the backup end-joining (EJ) activity (B-NHEJ) that operates at telomeres under conditions of C-NHEJ deficiency controlled? To address these questions, we have investigated EJ using plasmid substrates bearing double-stranded telomeric tracks and human cell extracts with variable C-NHEJ or B-NHEJ activity. We found that (1) TRF2/RAP1 prevents C-NHEJ-mediated end fusion at the initial DNA-PK end binding and activation step and (2) DNA-PK counteracts a potent LIG4-independent EJ mechanism. Thus, telomeres are protected against EJ by a lock with two bolts. These results account for observations with mammalian models and underline the importance of alternative non-classical EJ pathways for telomere fusions in cells. PMID:20407424

  1. Antioxidant Protection by American Ginseng in Pancreatic ß-Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Elaine; Wang, Yong; Mehendale, Sangeeta; Sun, Shi; Wang, Chong-Zhi; Xie, Jing-Tian; Aung, Han H.; Yuan, Chun-Su

    2008-01-01

    Hyperglycemia in diabetic conditions may cause oxidative stress in pancreatic ß-cells, leading to their dysfunction and insulin resistance within peripheral tissues. Previous studies suggest that American ginseng berry extract may have hypoglycemic effects, as well as offer antioxidant protection. We examined effects of American ginseng berry extract and ginsenoside Re in a pancreatic ß-cell line, MIN-6, to determine if these two properties are related. Cells were exposed to oxidative stress ...

  2. Rapamycin protects against dominant negative-HNF1A-induced apoptosis in INS-1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrelly, Angela M; Kilbride, Seán M; Bonner, Caroline; Prehn, Jochen H M; Byrne, Maria M

    2011-11-01

    HNF1A-maturity onset diabetes of the young (HNF1A-MODY) is caused by mutations in Hnf1a gene encoding the transcription factor hepatocyte nuclear factor 1alpha (HNF1A). An increased rate of apoptosis has been associated with the decrease in beta-cell mass that is a hallmark of HNF1A-MODY and other forms of diabetes. In a cellular model of HNF1A-MODY, we have recently shown that signalling through mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is decreased by the overexpression of a dominant-negative mutant of HNF1A (DN-HNF1A). mTOR is a protein kinase which has important roles in cell metabolism and growth, but also in cell survival, where it has been shown to be both protective and detrimental. Here, we show that pharmacological inhibition of mTOR activity with rapamycin protected INS-1 cells against DN-HNF1A-induced apoptosis. Rapamycin also prevented DN-HNF1A-induced activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), an intracellular energy sensor which we have previously shown to mediate DN-HNF1A-induced apoptosis. Conversely, activation of mTOR with leucine potentiated DN-HNF1A-induced apoptosis. Gene silencing of raptor (regulatory associated protein of mTOR), a subunit of mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1), also conferred protection on INS-1 cells against DN-HNF1A-induced apoptosis, confirming that mTORC1 mediates the protective effect. The potential relevance of this effect with regards to the clinical use of rapamycin as an immunosuppressant in diabetics post-transplantation is discussed. PMID:21874357

  3. Anti-pathogen protection versus survival costs mediated by an ectosymbiont in an ant host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konrad, Matthias; Grasse, Anna V; Tragust, Simon; Cremer, Sylvia

    2015-01-22

    The fitness effects of symbionts on their hosts can be context-dependent, with usually benign symbionts causing detrimental effects when their hosts are stressed, or typically parasitic symbionts providing protection towards their hosts (e.g. against pathogen infection). Here, we studied the novel association between the invasive garden ant Lasius neglectus and its fungal ectosymbiont Laboulbenia formicarum for potential costs and benefits. We tested ants with different Laboulbenia levels for their survival and immunity under resource limitation and exposure to the obligate killing entomopathogen Metarhizium brunneum. While survival of L. neglectus workers under starvation was significantly decreased with increasing Laboulbenia levels, host survival under Metarhizium exposure increased with higher levels of the ectosymbiont, suggesting a symbiont-mediated anti-pathogen protection, which seems to be driven mechanistically by both improved sanitary behaviours and an upregulated immune system. Ants with high Laboulbenia levels showed significantly longer self-grooming and elevated expression of immune genes relevant for wound repair and antifungal responses (β-1,3-glucan binding protein, Prophenoloxidase), compared with ants carrying low Laboulbenia levels. This suggests that the ectosymbiont Laboulbenia formicarum weakens its ant host by either direct resource exploitation or the costs of an upregulated behavioural and immunological response, which, however, provides a prophylactic protection upon later exposure to pathogens. PMID:25473011

  4. Effect of space flight on cell-mediated immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandel, A. D.; Balish, E.

    1977-01-01

    The cell-mediated immune response to Listeria monocytogenes was studied in rats subjected to 20 days of flight aboard the Soviet biosatellite Kosmos 7820. Groups of rats were immunized with 1,000,000 formalin-killed Listeria suspended in Freunds Complete Adjuvant, 5 days prior to flight. Immunized rats subjected to the same environmental factors as the flight rats, except flight itself, and immunized and nonimmunized rats held in a normal animal colony served as controls. Following recovery, lymphocyte cultures were harvested from spleens of all rats, cultured in vitro in the presence of L. monocytogenes antigens, Phytohemagglutinin, Conconavlin A, or purified protein derivative (PPD), and measured for their uptake of H-3-thymidine. Although individual rats varied considerably, all flight and immunized control rats gave a blastogenic response to the Listeria antigens and PPD. With several mitogens, the lymphocytes of flight rats showed a significantly increased blastogenic response over the controls. The results of this study do not support a hypothesis of a detrimental effect of space flight on cell-mediated immunity. The data suggest a possible suppressive effect of stress and gravity on an in vitro correlate of cell-mediated immunity.

  5. Teduglutide ([Gly2]GLP-2) protects small intestinal stem cells from radiation damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, C; Booth, D; Williamson, S; Demchyshyn, L L; Potten, C S

    2004-12-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-2 and its dipeptidyl peptidase (DP-IV) resistant analogue teduglutide are trophic for the gastrointestinal epithelium. Exposure increases villus height and crypt size and results in increased overall intestinal weight. As these effects may be mediated through stimulation of the stem cell compartment, they may promote intestinal healing and act as potential anti-mucositis agents in patients undergoing cancer chemotherapy. A study was initiated to investigate the protective effects of teduglutide on the murine small intestinal epithelium following gamma-irradiation using the crypt microcolony assay as a measure of stem cell survival and functional competence. Teduglutide demonstrated intestinotrophic effects in both CD1 and BDF1 mouse strains. In BDF1 mice, subcutaneous injection of GLP-2 or teduglutide (0.2 mg/kg/day, b.i.d.) for 14 days increased intestinal weight by 28% and resulted in comparable increases in crypt size, villus height and area. Teduglutide given daily for 6 or 14 days prior to whole body, gamma-irradiation significantly increased crypt stem cell survival when compared with vehicle-treated controls. The mean levels of protection over a range of doses provided protection factors from 1.3 to 1.5. A protective effect was only observed when teduglutide was given before irradiation. These results suggest that teduglutide has the ability to modulate clonogenic stem cell survival in the small intestine and this may have a useful clinical application in the prevention of cancer therapy-induced mucositis. PMID:15548172

  6. Chronic Parasitic Infection Maintains High Frequencies of Short-Lived Ly6C+CD4+ Effector T Cells That Are Required for Protection against Re-infection

    OpenAIRE

    Peters, Nathan C.; Pagán, Antonio J.; Lawyer, Phillip G.; Hand, Timothy W.; Henrique Roma, Eric; Stamper, Lisa W.; Romano, Audrey; Sacks, David L.

    2014-01-01

    In contrast to the ability of long-lived CD8+ memory T cells to mediate protection against systemic viral infections, the relationship between CD4+ T cell memory and acquired resistance against infectious pathogens remains poorly defined. This is especially true for T helper 1 (Th1) concomitant immunity, in which protection against reinfection coincides with a persisting primary infection. In these situations, pre-existing effector CD4 T cells generated by ongoing chronic infection, not memor...

  7. Blimp-1-Dependent IL-10 Production by Tr1 Cells Regulates TNF-Mediated Tissue Pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes de Oca, Marcela; Kumar, Rajiv; de Labastida Rivera, Fabian; Amante, Fiona H; Sheel, Meru; Faleiro, Rebecca J.; Bunn, Patrick T.; Best, Shannon E.; Beattie, Lynette; Ng, Susanna S.; Edwards, Chelsea L.; Muller, Werner; Cretney, Erika; Nutt, Stephen L.; Smyth, Mark J.; Haque, Ashraful; Hill, Geoffrey R.; Sundar, Shyam; Kallies, Axel; Engwerda, Christian R.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is critical for controlling many intracellular infections, but can also contribute to inflammation. It can promote the destruction of important cell populations and trigger dramatic tissue remodeling following establishment of chronic disease. Therefore, a better understanding of TNF regulation is needed to allow pathogen control without causing or exacerbating disease. IL-10 is an important regulatory cytokine with broad activities, including the suppression of inflammation. IL-10 is produced by different immune cells; however, its regulation and function appears to be cell-specific and context-dependent. Recently, IL-10 produced by Th1 (Tr1) cells was shown to protect host tissues from inflammation induced following infection. Here, we identify a novel pathway of TNF regulation by IL-10 from Tr1 cells during parasitic infection. We report elevated Blimp-1 mRNA levels in CD4+ T cells from visceral leishmaniasis (VL) patients, and demonstrate IL-12 was essential for Blimp-1 expression and Tr1 cell development in experimental VL. Critically, we show Blimp-1-dependent IL-10 production by Tr1 cells prevents tissue damage caused by IFNγ-dependent TNF production. Therefore, we identify Blimp-1-dependent IL-10 produced by Tr1 cells as a key regulator of TNF-mediated pathology and identify Tr1 cells as potential therapeutic tools to control inflammation. PMID:26765224

  8. Melatonin-mediated cytoprotection against hyperglycemic injury in Muller cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingting Jiang

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is a contributing factor to the development and progression of diabetic retinopathy, a leading cause of blindness in people at working age worldwide. Recent studies showed that Müller cells play key roles in diabetic retinopathy and produce vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF that regulates retinal vascular leakage and proliferation. Melatonin is a potent antioxidant capable of protecting variety of retinal cells from oxidative damage. In addition to the pineal gland, the retina produces melatonin. In the current study, we investigated whether melatonin protects against hyperglycemia-induced oxidative injury to Müller cells and explored the potential underlying mechanisms. Our results show that both melatonin membrane receptors, MT1 and MT2, are expressed in cultured primary Müller cells and are upregulated by elevated glucose levels. Both basal and high glucose-induced VEGF production was attenuated by melatonin treatment in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, we found that melatonin is a potent activator of Akt in Müller cells. Our findings suggest that in addition to functioning as a direct free radical scavenger, melatonin can elicit cellular signaling pathways that are protective against retinal injury during diabetic retinopathy.

  9. Sphingosine kinase-1 mediates androgen-induced osteoblast cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Claire; Lafosse, Jean-Michel; Malavaud, Bernard; Cuvillier, Olivier

    2010-01-01

    Herein we report that the lipid kinase sphingosine kinase-1 (SphK1) is instrumental in mediating androgen-induced cell proliferation in osteoblasts. Dihydrotestosterone (DHT) triggered cell growth in steroid-deprived MC3T3 cells, which was associated with a rapid stimulation of SphK1 and activation of both Akt and ERK signaling pathways. This mechanism relied on functional androgen receptor/PI3K/Akt nongenotropic signaling as pharmacological antagonists could block SphK1 stimulation by DHT and its consequences. Finally, SphK1 inhibition not only abrogated DHT-induced ERK activation but also blocked cell proliferation, while ERK inhibition had no impact, suggesting that SphK1 was critical for DHT signaling yet independently of the ERK. PMID:19932089

  10. Sphingosine kinase-1 mediates androgen-induced osteoblast cell growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herein we report that the lipid kinase sphingosine kinase-1 (SphK1) is instrumental in mediating androgen-induced cell proliferation in osteoblasts. Dihydrotestosterone (DHT) triggered cell growth in steroid-deprived MC3T3 cells, which was associated with a rapid stimulation of SphK1 and activation of both Akt and ERK signaling pathways. This mechanism relied on functional androgen receptor/PI3K/Akt nongenotropic signaling as pharmacological antagonists could block SphK1 stimulation by DHT and its consequences. Finally, SphK1 inhibition not only abrogated DHT-induced ERK activation but also blocked cell proliferation, while ERK inhibition had no impact, suggesting that SphK1 was critical for DHT signaling yet independently of the ERK.

  11. Sphingosine kinase-1 mediates androgen-induced osteoblast cell growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Claire [CNRS, Institut de Pharmacologie et de Biologie Structurale, Toulouse F-31000 (France); Universite de Toulouse, UPS, IPBS, Toulouse F-31000 (France); Lafosse, Jean-Michel [CHU Toulouse, Hopital Rangueil, Service d' orthopedie et Traumatologie, Toulouse F-31000 (France); Malavaud, Bernard [CNRS, Institut de Pharmacologie et de Biologie Structurale, Toulouse F-31000 (France); Universite de Toulouse, UPS, IPBS, Toulouse F-31000 (France); CHU Toulouse, Hopital Rangueil, Service d' Urologie et de Transplantation Renale, Toulouse F-31000 (France); Cuvillier, Olivier, E-mail: olivier.cuvillier@ipbs.fr [CNRS, Institut de Pharmacologie et de Biologie Structurale, Toulouse F-31000 (France); Universite de Toulouse, UPS, IPBS, Toulouse F-31000 (France)

    2010-01-01

    Herein we report that the lipid kinase sphingosine kinase-1 (SphK1) is instrumental in mediating androgen-induced cell proliferation in osteoblasts. Dihydrotestosterone (DHT) triggered cell growth in steroid-deprived MC3T3 cells, which was associated with a rapid stimulation of SphK1 and activation of both Akt and ERK signaling pathways. This mechanism relied on functional androgen receptor/PI3K/Akt nongenotropic signaling as pharmacological antagonists could block SphK1 stimulation by DHT and its consequences. Finally, SphK1 inhibition not only abrogated DHT-induced ERK activation but also blocked cell proliferation, while ERK inhibition had no impact, suggesting that SphK1 was critical for DHT signaling yet independently of the ERK.

  12. Local cell-mediated immune reactions in cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The analysis of 178 cases of stage I-II breast cancer showed morphological features of local cell-mediated immune reactions to be of limited prognostic value. A comparative evaluation of some characteristics of cell surface receptors, such as ability to spontaneous rosette formation with sheep erythrocytes and sensitivty to theophylline, was carried out in lymphocyte samples obtained from tumor tissue and peripheral blood of 76 cancer patients subjected to preoperative radiotherapy. The said parameters were studied in breast cancer patients of rosette-forming cell reaction to theophylline were identified, the incidence of some of them being determined by the presence or absence of regional metastases. The level and functional activity of surface receptors of tumor mononuclear cells proved to influence prognosis

  13. DNA-mediated gene transfer into ataxia-telangiectasia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The complete description of the genetic lesion(s) underlying the AT mutation might, therefore, highlight not only a DNA-repair pathwa, but also an important aspect of the physiology of lymphocytes. DNA-mediated gene transfer into eukaryotic cells has proved a powerful tool for the molecular cloning of certain mammalian genes. The possibility to clone a given gene using this technology depends, basically, on the availability of a selectable marker associated with the expression of the transfected gene in the recipient cell. Recently, a human DNA repair gene has been cloned in CHO mutant cells by taking advantage of the increased resistance to ultraviolet radiation of the transformants. As a preliminary step toward the molecular cloning of the AT gene(s), the authors have attempted to confer radioresistance to AT cells by transfection with normal human DNA

  14. Experimental immunologically mediated aplastic anemia (AA) in mice: cyclosporin A fails to protect against AA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Immunologically mediated aplastic anemia (AA) in mice was induced by the i.v. injection of 10(7) lymph node cells (LNC) from H-2k identical but Mls mismatched CBA/J donor mice into previously irradiated (600 rad total body gamma) C3H/HeJ mice. Cyclosporin A (CsA), 25 mg/kg, was administered subcutaneously from day -1 to day 30. Control mice included C3H/HeJ mice which received 600 rad alone, C3H/HeJ mice which received 600 rad plus CsA as above, and C3H/HeJ mice which received 600 rad total body irradiation followed by 10(7) LNC from CBA/J donors. CsA failed to prevent lethal AA. These results suggest that the pathogenetic mechanisms operating in immunologically mediated AA differ from the mechanisms operating in rodents transplanted with allogeneically mismatched marrow or spleen cells which develop graft-versus-host disease. The results are consistent with a non-T cell-dependent mechanism causing the AA

  15. The Potential Protective Effects of Polyphenols in Asbestos-Mediated Inflammation and Carcinogenesis of Mesothelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benvenuto, Monica; Mattera, Rosanna; Taffera, Gloria; Giganti, Maria Gabriella; Lido, Paolo; Masuelli, Laura; Modesti, Andrea; Bei, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Malignant Mesothelioma (MM) is a tumor of the serous membranes linked to exposure to asbestos. A chronic inflammatory response orchestrated by mesothelial cells contributes to the development and progression of MM. The evidence that: (a) multiple signaling pathways are aberrantly activated in MM cells; (b) asbestos mediated-chronic inflammation has a key role in MM carcinogenesis; (c) the deregulation of the immune system might favor the development of MM; and (d) a drug might have a better efficacy when injected into a serous cavity thus bypassing biotransformation and reaching an effective dose has prompted investigations to evaluate the effects of polyphenols for the therapy and prevention of MM. Dietary polyphenols are able to inhibit cancer cell growth by targeting multiple signaling pathways, reducing inflammation, and modulating immune response. The ability of polyphenols to modulate the production of pro-inflammatory molecules by targeting signaling pathways or ROS might represent a key mechanism to prevent and/or to contrast the development of MM. In this review, we will report the current knowledge on the ability of polyphenols to modulate the immune system and production of mediators of inflammation, thus revealing an important tool in preventing and/or counteracting the growth of MM. PMID:27171110

  16. Protective Effects of Costunolide against Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Injury in PC12 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, Chong-Un; Yeh, Ching-Sheng; Hsieh, Yi-Wen; Lee, Ying-Ray; Lin, Mei-Ying; Chen, Chung-Yi; Lee, Chien-Hsing

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress-mediated cellular injury has been considered as a major cause of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. The scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediated by antioxidants may be a potential strategy for retarding the diseases' progression. Costunolide (CS) is a well-known sesquiterpene lactone, used as a popular herbal remedy, which possesses anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activity. This study aimed to investigate the protective role of CS against the cytotoxicity induced by hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) and to elucidate potential protective mechanisms in PC12 cells. The results showed that the treatment of PC12 cells with CS prior to H₂O₂ exposure effectively increased the cell viability. Furthermore, it decreased the intracellular ROS, stabilized the mitochondria membrane potential (MMP), and reduced apoptosis-related protein such as caspase 3. In addition, CS treatment attenuated the cell injury by H₂O₂ through the inhibition of phosphorylation of p38 and the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). These results demonstrated that CS is promising as a potential therapeutic candidate for neurodegenerative diseases resulting from oxidative damage and further research on this topic should be encouraged. PMID:27409597

  17. Protective Effects of Costunolide against Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Injury in PC12 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong-Un Cheong

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress-mediated cellular injury has been considered as a major cause of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. The scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS mediated by antioxidants may be a potential strategy for retarding the diseases’ progression. Costunolide (CS is a well-known sesquiterpene lactone, used as a popular herbal remedy, which possesses anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activity. This study aimed to investigate the protective role of CS against the cytotoxicity induced by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 and to elucidate potential protective mechanisms in PC12 cells. The results showed that the treatment of PC12 cells with CS prior to H2O2 exposure effectively increased the cell viability. Furthermore, it decreased the intracellular ROS, stabilized the mitochondria membrane potential (MMP, and reduced apoptosis-related protein such as caspase 3. In addition, CS treatment attenuated the cell injury by H2O2 through the inhibition of phosphorylation of p38 and the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK. These results demonstrated that CS is promising as a potential therapeutic candidate for neurodegenerative diseases resulting from oxidative damage and further research on this topic should be encouraged.

  18. Application of interleukin-22 mediates protection in experimental acetaminophen-induced acute liver injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheiermann, Patrick; Bachmann, Malte; Goren, Itamar; Zwissler, Bernhard; Pfeilschifter, Josef; Mühl, Heiko

    2013-04-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP, paracetamol)-induced hepatotoxicity, although treatable by timely application of N-acetylcysteine, can be fatal. Because it is among the common causes of acute liver failure in intensive care units and in light of its gradually increasing incidence, the need for novel therapeutic strategies aimed at severe intoxication is apparent. Recently, it has been shown that IL-22, a STAT3-activating cytokine, has the capability to mediate liver protection. Herein, the protective potential of IL-22 in murine APAP-induced hepatotoxicity was assessed. Intravenous administration of prophylactic IL-22 significantly reduced serum alanine aminotransferase levels and histopathologic damage in APAP-induced liver injury, a process that coincided with increased hepatocyte proliferation in vivo. Concomitant gene expression analysis revealed hepatic induction of genes prototypically up-regulated by the IL-22/STAT3 axis, among others suppressor of cytokine signaling-3, lipocalin-2, and α1-antichymotrypsin. Notably, in a translational setting of therapeutic treatment 2 hours after APAP, IL-22 supported protection in the context of suboptimal N-acetylcysteine dosing. IL-22 likewise connected to augmented hepatocyte proliferation in this experimental setting. As detected by analysis of inflammatory cytokine production, systemically applied IL-22 did not display acute immunomodulation/stimulation in otherwise untreated or endotoxemic mice. Those latter observations clearly confirm acute tolerability of systemically applied IL-22. Observations presented altogether suggest that therapeutic IL-22 administration is a conceivable tissue-protective regimen aimed at hard-to-treat patients with severe APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. PMID:23375450

  19. Cocoa Phenolic Extract Protects Pancreatic Beta Cells against Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Bravo

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is associated with reductions in glutathione, supporting the critical role of oxidative stress in its pathogenesis. Antioxidant food components such as flavonoids have a protective role against oxidative stress-induced degenerative and age-related diseases. Flavonoids constitute an important part of the human diet; they can be found in most plant foods, including green tea, grapes or cocoa and possess multiple biological activities. This study investigates the chemo-protective effect of a cocoa phenolic extract (CPE containing mainly flavonoids against oxidative stress induced by tert-butylhydroperoxide (t-BOOH on Ins-1E pancreatic beta cells. Cell viability and oxidative status were evaluated. Ins-1E cells treatment with 5–20 μg/mL CPE for 20 h evoked no cell damage and did not alter ROS production. Addition of 50 μM t-BOOH for 2 h increased ROS and carbonyl groups content and decreased reduced glutathione level. Pre-treatment of cells with CPE significantly prevented the t-BOOH-induced ROS and carbonyl groups and returned antioxidant defences to adequate levels. Thus, Ins-1E cells treated with CPE showed a remarkable recovery of cell viability damaged by t-BOOH, indicating that integrity of surviving machineries in the CPE-treated cells was notably protected against the oxidative insult.

  20. Inferring RBP-Mediated Regulation in Lung Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafzi, Atefeh; Kazan, Hilal

    2016-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) play key roles in post-transcriptional regulation of mRNAs. Dysregulations in RBP-mediated mechanisms have been found to be associated with many steps of cancer initiation and progression. Despite this, previous studies of gene expression in cancer have ignored the effect of RBPs. To this end, we developed a lasso regression model that predicts gene expression in cancer by incorporating RBP-mediated regulation as well as the effects of other well-studied factors such as copy-number variation, DNA methylation, TFs and miRNAs. As a case study, we applied our model to Lung squamous cell carcinoma (LUSC) data as we found that there are several RBPs differentially expressed in LUSC. Including RBP-mediated regulatory effects in addition to the other features significantly increased the Spearman rank correlation between predicted and measured expression of held-out genes. Using a feature selection procedure that accounts for the adaptive search employed by lasso regularization, we identified the candidate regulators in LUSC. Remarkably, several of these candidate regulators are RBPs. Furthermore, majority of the candidate regulators have been previously found to be associated with lung cancer. To investigate the mechanisms that are controlled by these regulators, we predicted their target gene sets based on our model. We validated the target gene sets by comparing against experimentally verified targets. Our results suggest that the future studies of gene expression in cancer must consider the effect of RBP-mediated regulation. PMID:27186987

  1. Distinct TLR-mediated cytokine production and immunoglobulin secretion in human newborn naïve B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettengill, Matthew A; van Haren, Simon D; Li, Ning; Dowling, David J; Bergelson, Ilana; Jans, Jop; Ferwerda, Gerben; Levy, Ofer

    2016-08-01

    Neonatal innate immunity is distinct from that of adults, which may contribute to increased susceptibility to infection and limit vaccine responses. B cells play critical roles in protection from infection and detect PAMPs via TLRs, that, when co-activated with CD40, can drive B-cell proliferation and Ab production. We characterized the expression of TLRs in circulating B cells from newborns and adults, and evaluated TLR- and CD40-mediated naïve B-cell class-switch recombination (CSR) and cytokine production. Gene expression levels of most TLRs was similar between newborn and adult B cells, except that newborn naïve B cells expressed more TLR9 than adult naïve B cells. Neonatal naïve B cells demonstrated impaired TLR2- and TLR7- but enhanced TLR9-mediated cytokine production. Significantly fewer newborn naïve B cells underwent CSR to produce IgG, an impairment also noted with IL-21 stimulation. Additionally, co-stimulation via CD40 and TLRs induced greater cytokine production in adult B cells. Thus, while newborn naïve B cells demonstrate adult-level expression of TLRs and CD40, the responses to stimulation of these receptors are distinct. Relatively high expression of TLR9 and impaired CD40-mediated Ig secretion contributes to distinct innate and adaptive immunity of human newborns and may inform novel approaches to early-life immunization. PMID:27252169

  2. Differentiation inducing factor 3 mediates its anti-leukemic effect through ROS-dependent DRP1-mediated mitochondrial fission and induction of caspase-independent cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Alix; Ginet, Clemence; Furstoss, Nathan; Belaid, Amine; Hamouda, Mohamed Amine; El Manaa, Wedjene; Cluzeau, Thomas; Marchetti, Sandrine; Ricci, Jean Ehrland; Jacquel, Arnaud; Luciano, Frederic; Driowya, Mohsine; Benhida, Rachid; Auberger, Patrick; Robert, Guillaume

    2016-05-01

    Differentiation-inducing factor (DIF) defines a group of chlorinated hexaphenones that orchestrate stalk-cell differentiation in the slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum (DD). DIF-1 and 3 have also been reported to have tumor inhibiting properties; however, the mechanisms that underlie the effects of these compounds remain poorly defined. Herein, we show that DIF-3 rapidly triggers Ca2+ release and a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) in the absence of cytochrome c and Smac release and without caspase activation. Consistently with these findings, we also detected no evidence of apoptosis in cells treated with DIF-3 but instead found that this compound induced autophagy. In addition, DIF-3 promoted mitochondrial fission in K562 and HeLa cells, as assessed by electron and confocal microscopy analysis. Importantly, DIF-3 mediated the phosphorylation and redistribution of dynamin-related protein 1 (DRP1) from the cytoplasmic to the microsomal fraction of K562 cells. Pharmacological inhibition or siRNA silencing of DRP1 not only inhibited mitochondrial fission but also protected K562 cells from DIF-3-mediated cell death. Furthermore, DIF-3 potently inhibited the growth of imatinib-sensitive and imatinib-resistant K562 cells. It also inhibited tumor formation in athymic mice engrafted with an imatinib-resistant CML cell line. Finally, DIF-3 exhibited a clear selectivity toward CD34+ leukemic cells from CML patients, compared with CD34- cells. In conclusion, we show that the potent anti-leukemic effect of DIF-3 is mediated through the induction of mitochondrial fission and caspase-independent cell death. Our findings may have important therapeutic implications, especially in the treatment of tumors that exhibit defects in apoptosis regulation. PMID:27027430

  3. Combined local and systemic immunization is essential for durable T-cell mediated heterosubtypic immunity against influenza A virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddback, Ida E M; Pedersen, Line M I; Pedersen, Sara R; Steffensen, Maria A; Holst, Peter J; Thomsen, Allan R; Christensen, Jan P

    2016-01-01

    The threat from unpredictable influenza virus pandemics necessitates the development of a new type of influenza vaccine. Since the internal proteins are highly conserved, induction of T cells targeting these antigens may provide the solution. Indeed, adenoviral (Ad) vectors expressing flu nucleoprotein have previously been found to induce short-term protection in mice. In this study we confirm that systemic (subcutaneous (s.c.) immunization rapidly induced heterosubtypic protection predominantly mediated by CD8 T cells, but within three months clinical protection completely disappeared. Local (intranasal (i.n.)) immunization elicited delayed, but more lasting protection despite relatively inefficient immunization. However, by far, the most robust protection was induced by simultaneous, combined (i.n. + s.c.) vaccination, and, notably, in this case clinical protection lasted at least 8 months without showing any evidence of fading. Interestingly, the superior ability of the latter group to resist reinfection correlated with a higher number of antigen-specific CD8 T cells in the spleen. Thus, detailed analysis of the underlying CD8 T cell responses highlights the importance of T cells already positioned in the lungs prior to challenge, but at the same time underscores an important back-up role for circulating antigen-specific cells with the capacity to expand and infiltrate the infected lungs. PMID:26831578

  4. A sterile sperm caste protects brother fertile sperm from female-mediated death in Drosophila pseudoobscura

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holman, Luke; Snook, Rhonda R

    2008-01-01

    antispermicidal mechanisms have been definitively identified. One such adaptation may be the enigmatic infertile sperm morphs or "parasperm" produced by many species, which have been hypothesized to protect their fertile brother "eusperm" from spermicide [2, 3]. Here, we show that female Drosophila pseudoobscura...... reproductive tracts are spermicidal and that the survival of eusperm after exposure to the female tract is highest when males produce many parasperm. This study clarifies the adaptive significance of infertile sperm castes, which has remained elusive in Drosophila and other taxa despite much recent interest [2......Spermicide (i.e., female-mediated sperm death) is an understudied but potentially widespread phenomenon that has important ramifications for the study of sexual conflict, postcopulatory sexual selection, and fertility [1, 2]. Males are predicted to evolve adaptations against spermicide, but few...

  5. Cell contact-mediated regulation of tyrosine hydroxylase synthesis in cultured bovine adrenal chromaffin cells

    OpenAIRE

    1983-01-01

    The specific activity of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) in bovine adrenal chromaffin cells can be controlled by changing cell density. Chromaffin cells initially plated at low density (2-3 X 10(4) cells/cm2), and subsequently replated at a 10-fold higher density showed a sixfold increase in specific TH activity within 48 h, resulting from enhanced synthesis (increased number of TH molecules as demonstrated by immunotitration and blockade by cycloheximide) rather than activation. The density-mediat...

  6. Alcohol inhibits cell-cell adhesion mediated by human L1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanathan, R; Wilkemeyer, M F; Mittal, B; Perides, G; Charness, M E

    1996-04-01

    Mental retardation, hydrocephalus, and agenesis of the corpus callosum are observed both in fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) and in children with mutations in the gene for the cell adhesion molecule L1. We studied the effects of ethanol on cell-cell adhesion in mouse fibroblasts transfected with human L1. L1-transfected fibroblasts exhibited increased cell-cell adhesion compared with wild-type or vector-transfected controls. Ethanol potently and completely inhibited L1-mediated adhesion both in transfected L cells and NIH/3T3 cells. Half-maximal inhibition was observed at 7 mM ethanol, a concentration achieved in blood and brain after ingesting one alcoholic beverage. In contrast, ethanol did not inhibit the adhesion of fibroblasts transfected with vector alone or with N-CAM-140. L1-mediated cell-cell adhesion was inhibited with increasing potency by n-propanol and n-butanol, but was not inhibited at all by n-alcohols of 5 to 8 carbons, acetaldehyde, or acetate, suggesting that ethanol interacts directly with a small hydrophobic pocket within L1. Phenylalanine, teratogenic anticonvulsants, and high concentrations of glucose did not inhibit L1-mediated cell-cell adhesion. Ethanol also inhibited potently the heterotypic adhesion of rat cerebellar granule cells to a monolayer of L1-transfected NIH/3T3 cells, but had no effect on their adhesion to N-CAM-140 or vector-transfected NIH/3T3 cells. Because L1 plays a role in both neural development and learning, ethanol inhibition of L1-mediated cell-cell interactions could contribute to FAS and ethanol-associated memory disorders. PMID:8609170

  7. Induction of leukocyte infiltration at metastatic site mediates the protective effect of NGcGM3-based vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labrada, Mayrel; Pablos, Isabel; Prete, Francesca; Hevia, Giselle; Clavell, Marilyn; Benvenuti, Federica; Fernández, Luis E

    2014-01-01

    While the NGcGM3/VSSP vaccine, a preparation consisting in very small sized proteoliposomes (VSSP) obtained by the incorporation of the NGcGM3 ganglioside into the outer membrane protein (OMP) complex of Neisseria meningitides, is currently studied in late stage clinical trials in breast cancer and melanoma patients, mechanisms involved in the vaccine's antitumor effect are insufficiently understood. Here we have addressed the role of adaptive and innate immune cells in mediating the protective effect of the vaccine. To this aim we selected the 3LL-D122 Lewis lung spontaneous metastasis model. Unexpectedly, inoculation of the vaccine in tumor bearing C57BL/6 mice, either by subcutaneous (sc) or intraperitoneal (ip) routes, induced similar anti-metastatic effect. Regardless the T-independent nature of NGcGM3 ganglioside as antigen, the antimetastatic effect of NGcGM3/VSSP is dependent on CD4(+) T cells. In a further step we found that the vaccine was able to promote the increase, maturation, and cytokine secretion of conventional DCs and the maturation of Bone Marrow-derived plasmacytoid DCs. In line with this result the in vivo IFNα serum level in ip vaccinated mice increased as soon as 2h after treatment. On the other hand the infiltration of NK1.1(+)CD3(-) and NK1.1(+)CD3(+) cells in lungs of vaccinated mice was significantly increased, compared with the presence of these cells in control animal lungs. In the same way NGcGM3/VSSP mobilized acquired immunity effector cells into the lungs of vaccinated tumor bearing mice. Finally and not less noteworthy, leukocyte infiltration in lungs of tumor bearing mice correlates with vaccine induced inhibition of lung metastization. PMID:25424937

  8. Autoradiographic investigations on cell shape-mediated growth regulation of lens epithelial cells in culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An autoradiographic method is described which is well suited for the determination of the labelling index in flattened as well as rounded cells. Using this method DNA synthesis of lens epithelial cells in culture was found to be dependent on cell attachment, cell flattening and intact microfilaments. Thus previous results on cell shape-mediated growth regulation could be confirmed. Moreover, considering the labelling index it was possible to conclude that cell rounding or a disintegration of microfilaments did not impair ongoing DNA synthesis but did prevent cells from entering the S-phase of the cycle. (author)

  9. Extracellular acidification stimulates GPR68 mediated IL-8 production in human pancreatic β cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Vikash; Karamitri, Angeliki; Richards, Paul; Cormier, Françoise; Ramond, Cyrille; Jockers, Ralf; Armanet, Mathieu; Albagli-Curiel, Olivier; Scharfmann, Raphael

    2016-01-01

    Acute or chronic metabolic complications such as diabetic ketoacidosis are often associated with extracellular acidification and pancreatic β-cell dysfunction. However, the mechanisms by which human β-cells sense and respond to acidic pH remain elusive. In this study, using the recently developed human β-cell line EndoC-βH2, we demonstrate that β-cells respond to extracellular acidification through GPR68, which is the predominant proton sensing receptor of human β-cells. Using gain- and loss-of-function studies, we provide evidence that the β-cell enriched transcription factor RFX6 is a major regulator of GPR68. Further, we show that acidic pH stimulates the production and secretion of the chemokine IL-8 by β-cells through NF-кB activation. Blocking of GPR68 or NF-кB activity severely attenuated acidification induced IL-8 production. Thus, we provide mechanistic insights into GPR68 mediated β-cell response to acidic microenvironment, which could be a new target to protect β-cell against acidosis induced inflammation. PMID:27166427

  10. Lactobacillus reuteri protects epidermal keratinocytes from Staphylococcus aureus-induced cell death by competitive exclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, Tessa; McBain, Andrew J; O'Neill, Catherine A

    2012-08-01

    Recent studies have suggested that the topical application of probiotic bacteria can improve skin health or combat disease. We have utilized a primary human keratinocyte culture model to investigate whether probiotic bacteria can inhibit Staphylococcus aureus infection. Evaluation of the candidate probiotics Lactobacillus reuteri ATCC 55730, Lactobacillus rhamnosus AC413, and Lactobacillus salivarius UCC118 demonstrated that both L. reuteri and L. rhamnosus, but not L. salivarius, reduced S. aureus-induced keratinocyte cell death in both undifferentiated and differentiated keratinocytes. Keratinocyte survival was significantly higher if the probiotic was applied prior to (P 0.05). The protective effect of L. reuteri was not dependent on the elaboration of inhibitory substances such as lactic acid. L. reuteri inhibited adherence of S. aureus to keratinocytes by competitive exclusion (P = 0.026). L. salivarius UCC118, however, did not inhibit S. aureus from adhering to keratinocytes (P > 0.05) and did not protect keratinocyte viability. S. aureus utilizes the α5β1 integrin to adhere to keratinocytes, and blocking of this integrin resulted in a protective effect similar to that observed with probiotics (P = 0.03). This suggests that the protective mechanism for L. reuteri-mediated protection of keratinocytes was by competitive exclusion of the pathogen from its binding sites on the cells. Our results suggest that use of a topical probiotic prophylactically could inhibit the colonization of skin by S. aureus and thus aid in the prevention of infection. PMID:22582077

  11. Cerium fluoride nanoparticles protect cells against oxidative stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shcherbakov, Alexander B.; Zholobak, Nadezhda M. [Zabolotny Institute of Microbiology and Virology, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Kyiv D0368 (Ukraine); Baranchikov, Alexander E. [Kurnakov Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Ryabova, Anastasia V. [Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute), Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation); Ivanov, Vladimir K., E-mail: van@igic.ras.ru [Kurnakov Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk State University, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2015-05-01

    A novel facile method of non-doped and fluorescent terbium-doped cerium fluoride stable aqueous sols synthesis is proposed. Intense green luminescence of CeF{sub 3}:Tb nanoparticles can be used to visualize these nanoparticles' accumulation in cells using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Cerium fluoride nanoparticles are shown for the first time to protect both organic molecules and living cells from the oxidative action of hydrogen peroxide. Both non-doped and terbium-doped CeF{sub 3} nanoparticles are shown to provide noteworthy protection to cells against the vesicular stomatitis virus. - Highlights: • Facile method of CeF{sub 3} and CeF{sub 3}:Tb stable aqueous sols synthesis is proposed. • Naked CeF{sub 3} nanoparticles are shown to be non-toxic and to protect cells from the action of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. • CeF{sub 3} and CeF{sub 3}:Tb nanoparticles are shown to protect living cells against the vesicular stomatitis virus.

  12. Cerium fluoride nanoparticles protect cells against oxidative stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel facile method of non-doped and fluorescent terbium-doped cerium fluoride stable aqueous sols synthesis is proposed. Intense green luminescence of CeF3:Tb nanoparticles can be used to visualize these nanoparticles' accumulation in cells using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Cerium fluoride nanoparticles are shown for the first time to protect both organic molecules and living cells from the oxidative action of hydrogen peroxide. Both non-doped and terbium-doped CeF3 nanoparticles are shown to provide noteworthy protection to cells against the vesicular stomatitis virus. - Highlights: • Facile method of CeF3 and CeF3:Tb stable aqueous sols synthesis is proposed. • Naked CeF3 nanoparticles are shown to be non-toxic and to protect cells from the action of H2O2. • CeF3 and CeF3:Tb nanoparticles are shown to protect living cells against the vesicular stomatitis virus

  13. Connexins protect mouse pancreatic β cells against apoptosis

    OpenAIRE

    Klee, Philippe; Allagnat, Florent; Pontes, Helena; Cederroth, Manon; Charollais, Anne; Caille, Dorothée; Britan, Aurore; Haefliger, Jacques-Antoine; Meda, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes develops when most insulin-producing β cells of the pancreas are killed by an autoimmune attack. The in vivo conditions modulating the sensitivity and resistance of β cells to this attack remain largely obscure. Here, we show that connexin 36 (Cx36), a trans-membrane protein that forms gap junctions between β cells in the pancreatic islets, protects mouse β cells against both cytotoxic drugs and cytokines that prevail in the islet environment at the onset of type 1 diabetes. W...

  14. Cytokine-mediated regulation of plasma cell generation: IL-21 takes center stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart G Tangye

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available During our life we are surrounded by continuous threats from a diverse range of invading pathogens. Our immune system has evolved multiple mechanisms to efficiently deal with these threats to prevent them causing disease. Differentiation of mature B cells into plasma cells (PC - the antibody (Ab secreting cells of the immune system - is critical for the generation of protective and long-lived humoral immune responses. Indeed, efficient production of antigen (Ag-specific Ab underlies the success of most currently available vaccines. The mature B cell pool is composed of several subsets, distinguished from one according to size, surface marker expression, location and Ag exposure, and they all have the capacity to differentiate into PCs. For a B cell to acquire the capacity to produce Abs, it must undergo an extensive differentiation process driven by changes in gene expression. Two broad categories of Ag exist that cause B cell activation and differentiation: T cell dependent (TD or T cell independent (TI. In addition to the B cell subset and nature of the Ag, it is important to consider the cytokine environment that also influences how B cell differentiation is achieved. Thus, while many cytokines can induce Ab secretion by B cells after activation with mimics of TD and TI stimuli in vitro, they can have different efficacies and specificities, and can often preferentially induce production of one Ig isotype over another. Here, we will provide an overview of in vitro studies (mouse and human origin that evaluated the role the different cytokines in inducing the differentiation of distinct B cell subsets to the PC lineage. We will place particular emphasis on IL-21, which has emerged as the most potent inducer of terminal B cell differentiation in humans. We will also focus on the role of IL-21 and defects in B-cell function and how these contribute to human immunopathologies such as primary immunodeficiencies and B-cell mediated autoimmune

  15. Curcumin Protects β-Lactoglobulin Fibril Formation and Fibril-Induced Neurotoxicity in PC12 Cells.

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    Mansooreh Mazaheri

    Full Text Available In this study the β-lactoglobulin fibrillation, in the presence or absence of lead ions, aflatoxin M1 and curcumin, was evaluated using ThT fluorescence, Circular dichroism spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. To investigate the toxicity of the different form of β-Lg fibrils, in the presence or absence of above toxins and curcumin, we monitored changes in the level of reactive oxygen species and morphology of the differentiated neuron-like PC12 cells. The cell viability, cell body area, average neurite length, neurite width, number of primary neurites, percent of bipolar cells and node/primary neurite ratios were used to assess the growth and complexity of PC12 cells exposed to different form of β-Lg fibrils. Incubation of β-Lg with curcumin resulted in a significant decrease in ROS levels even in the presence of lead ions and aflatoxin M1. The β-Lg fibrils formed in the presence of lead ions and aflatoxin M1 attenuated the growth and complexity of PC12 cells compared with other form of β-Lg fibrils. However, the adverse effects of these toxins and protein fibrils were negated in the presence of curcumin. Furthermore, the antioxidant and inhibitory effects of curcumin protected PC12 cells against fibril neurotoxicity and enhanced their survival. Thus, curcumin may provide a protective effect toward β-Lg, and perhaps other protein, fibrils mediated neurotoxicity.

  16. Characterization of Liver CD8 T Cell Subsets that are Associated with Protection Against Pre-erythrocytic Plasmodium Parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarling, Stasya; Krzych, Urszula

    2015-01-01

    Murine models of malaria, such as Plasmodium berghei (Pb) and Plasmodium yoelii (Py), have been used for decades to identify correlates of protection associated with immunization using radiation-attenuated sporozoites (RAS). To date, RAS is the only known immunization regimen to consistently deliver 100 % sterilizing immunity and is considered the "gold standard" of protection against malaria. The ability to isolate lymphocytes directly from the liver of immune mice has facilitated the identification of correlates of protection at the site of infection. Liver CD8 T cells have been identified as a key factor in mediating protection against challenge with infectious Plasmodium sporozoites. Liver CD3 + CD8 T cells can further be divided into subsets based on the expression of specific surface molecules and the increase of CD8 effector memory (TEM) cells (identified by the phenotype CD44(+)CD62L(-)) has been shown to mediate protection by releasing of IFN-γ while CD8 central memory (TCM) cells (CD44(+)CD62L(+)) are important for maintaining long-term protection.Identification of multiple CD8 T cell subsets present in the liver relies on the ability to detect multiple surface markers simultaneously. Polychromatic flow cytometry affords the user with the ability to distinguish multiple lymphocyte populations as well as subsets defined within each population. In this chapter we present a basic 9-color surface staining panel that can be used to identify CD8 TEM, CD8 TCM, short-lived effector cells (SLECs), and memory precursor cells (MPECs) as well as identify those cells which have recently undergone degranulation (surface expression of CD107a). This panel has been designed to allow for the addition of intracellular staining for IFN-γ on other available channels (such as PE) as is discussed in another chapter for analysis of functional CD8 T cell responses. PMID:26450377

  17. Overexpression of kinesins mediates docetaxel resistance in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De, Sarmishtha; Cipriano, Rocky; Jackson, Mark W; Stark, George R

    2009-10-15

    Resistance to chemotherapy remains a major barrier to the successful treatment of cancer. To understand mechanisms underlying docetaxel resistance in breast cancer, we used an insertional mutagenesis strategy to identify proteins whose overexpression confers resistance. A strong promoter was inserted approximately randomly into the genomes of tumor-derived breast cancer cells, using a novel lentiviral vector. We isolated a docetaxel-resistant clone in which the level of the kinesin KIFC3 was elevated. When KIFC3 or the additional kinesins KIFC1, KIF1A, or KIF5A were overexpressed in the breast cancer cell lines MDA-MB231 and MDA-MB 468, the cells became more resistant to docetaxel. The binding of kinesins to microtubules opposes the stabilizing effect of docetaxel that prevents cytokinesis and leads to apoptosis. Our finding that kinesins can mediate docetaxel resistance might lead to novel therapeutic approaches in which kinesin inhibitors are paired with taxanes. PMID:19789344

  18. Dysregulation of IRP1-mediated iron metabolism causes gamma ray-specific radioresistance in leukemia cells.

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    Kurtis J Haro

    Full Text Available Iron is required for nearly all organisms, playing important roles in oxygen transport and many enzymatic reactions. Excess iron, however, can be cytotoxic. Emerging evidence suggests that radioresistance can be achieved in lower organisms by the protection of proteins, but not DNA, immediately following ionizing radiation (IR exposure, allowing for improved DNA repair. One potential mechanism for protein protection is controlling and limiting the amount of free iron in cells, as has been demonstrated in the extremophile Deinococcus Radiodurans, reducing the potential for oxidative damage to proteins during exposure to IR. We found that iron regulatory protein 1 (IRP1 expression was markedly reduced in human myeloid leukemia HL60 cells resistant to low linear energy transfer (LET gamma rays, but not to high LET alpha particles. Stable knockdown of IRP1 by short-hairpin RNA (shRNA interference in radiosensitive parental cells led to radioresistance to low LET IR, reduced intracellular Fenton chemistry, reduced protein oxidation, and more rapid DNA double-strand break (DSB repair. The mechanism of radioresistance appeared to be related to attenuated free radical-mediated cell death. Control of intracellular iron by IRPs may be a novel radioresistance mechanism in mammalian cells.

  19. Tc17 cells mediate vaccine immunity against lethal fungal pneumonia in immune deficient hosts lacking CD4+ T cells.

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    Som Gowda Nanjappa

    Full Text Available Vaccines may help reduce the growing incidence of fungal infections in immune-suppressed patients. We have found that, even in the absence of CD4(+ T-cell help, vaccine-induced CD8(+ T cells persist and confer resistance against Blastomyces dermatitidis and Histoplasma capsulatum. Type 1 cytokines contribute to that resistance, but they also are dispensable. Although the role of T helper 17 cells in immunity to fungi is debated, IL-17 producing CD8(+ T cells (Tc17 cells have not been investigated. Here, we show that Tc17 cells are indispensable in antifungal vaccine immunity in hosts lacking CD4(+ T cells. Tc17 cells are induced upon vaccination, recruited to the lung on pulmonary infection, and act non-redundantly in mediating protection in a manner that requires neutrophils. Tc17 cells did not influence type I immunity, nor did the lack of IL-12 signaling augment Tc17 cells, indicating a distinct lineage and function. IL-6 was required for Tc17 differentiation and immunity, but IL-1R1 and Dectin-1 signaling was unexpectedly dispensable. Tc17 cells expressed surface CXCR3 and CCR6, but only the latter was essential in recruitment to the lung. Although IL-17 producing T cells are believed to be short-lived, effector Tc17 cells expressed low levels of KLRG1 and high levels of the transcription factor TCF-1, predicting their long-term survival and stem-cell like behavior. Our work has implications for designing vaccines against fungal infections in immune suppressed patients.

  20. Glycosylation-mediated phenylpropanoid partitioning in Populus tremuloides cell cultures

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    Babst Benjamin A

    2009-12-01

    identified candidate genes for glycosyltransferases that may mediate the glycosylation, and for transporters that mediate the subcellular compartmentalization of sugars and phenolic glycosides. The suspension cells appear to represent a facile system for dissecting the regulation of phenolic carbon partitioning, and in turn, its effects on growth in Populus.

  1. Blockade of Retinol Metabolism Protects T Cell-Induced Hepatitis by Increasing Migration of Regulatory T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young-Sun; Yi, Hyon-Seung; Suh, Yang-Gun; Byun, Jin-Seok; Eun, Hyuk Soo; Kim, So Yeon; Seo, Wonhyo; Jeong, Jong-Min; Choi, Won-Mook; Kim, Myung-Ho; Kim, Ji Hoon; Park, Keun-Gyu; Jeong, Won-Il

    2015-11-01

    Retinols are metabolized into retinoic acids by alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and retinaldehyde dehydrogenase (Raldh). However, their roles have yet to be clarified in hepatitis despite enriched retinols in hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). Therefore, we investigated the effects of retinols on Concanavalin A (Con A)-mediated hepatitis. Con A was injected into wild type (WT), Raldh1 knock-out (Raldh1(-/-)), CCL2(-/-) and CCR2(-/-) mice. For migration study of regulatory T cells (Tregs), we used in vivo and ex vivo adoptive transfer systems. Blockade of retinol metabolism in mice given 4-methylpyrazole, an inhibitor of ADH, and ablated Raldh1 gene manifested increased migration of Tregs, eventually protected against Con A-mediated hepatitis by decreasing interferon-γ in T cells. Moreover, interferon-γ treatment increased the expression of ADH3 and Raldh1, but it suppressed that of CCL2 and IL-6 in HSCs. However, the expression of CCL2 and IL-6 was inversely increased upon the pharmacologic or genetic ablation of ADH3 and Raldh1 in HSCs. Indeed, IL-6 treatment increased CCR2 expression of Tregs. In migration assay, ablated CCR2 in Tregs showed reduced migration to HSCs. In adoptive transfer of Tregs in vivo and ex vivo, Raldh1-deficient mice showed more increased migration of Tregs than WT mice. Furthermore, inhibited retinol metabolism increased survival rate (75%) compared with that of the controls (25%) in Con A-induced hepatitis. These results suggest that blockade of retinol metabolism protects against acute liver injury by increased Treg migration, and it may represent a novel therapeutic strategy to control T cell-mediated acute hepatitis. PMID:26537191

  2. CD1-mediated γ/δ T Cell Maturation of Dendritic Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Leslie, David S; Vincent, Michael S.; Spada, Franca M.; Das, Hiranmoy; Sugita, Masahiko; Morita, Craig T.; Brenner, Michael B.

    2002-01-01

    Immature myeloid dendritic cells (DCs) express only low levels of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II but express high levels of CD1 a, b, and c antigen-presenting molecules at the cell surface. As Vδ1+ γ/δ T cells are the main tissue subset of γ/δ T cells and they are known to recognize CD1c in the absence of specific foreign antigen recognition, we examined the possible interaction of these T cells with immature DCs. We show that CD1-restricted γ/δ T cells can mediate the matura...

  3. Integrin Receptors on Tumor Cells Facilitate NK cell-mediated Antibody-dependent Cytotoxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Anikeeva, Nadia; Steblyanko, Maria; Fayngerts, Svetlana; Kopylova, Natalya; Marshall, Deborah J.; Powers, Gordon D.; Sato, Takami; Campbell, Kerry S.; Sykulev, Yuri

    2014-01-01

    NK cells that mediate ADCC play an important role in tumor-specific immunity. We have examined factors limiting specific lysis of tumor cells by CD16.NK-92 cells induced by CNTO 95LF antibodies recognizing αV integrins that are overexpressed on many tumor cells. Although all tested tumor cells were killed by CD16.NK-92 effectors in the presence of the antibodies, the killing of target cells with a low level of ICAM-1 expression revealed a dramatic decrease in their specific lysis at high anti...

  4. Capsaicin protects endothelial cells and macrophage against oxidized low-density lipoprotein-induced injury by direct antioxidant action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kuo-Shuen; Chen, Pei-Ni; Hsieh, Yih-Shou; Lin, Chin-Yin; Lee, Yi-Hsun; Chu, Shu-Chen

    2015-02-25

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory vascular disease. It is characterized by endothelial dysfunction, lipid accumulation, leukocyte activation, and the production of inflammatory mediators and reactive oxygen species (ROS). Capsaicin, a biologically active compound of the red pepper and chili pepper, has several anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, and hypolipidemic biological effects. However, its protective effects on foam cell formation and endothelial injury induced by oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) remain unclear. In this study, we evaluated the anti-oxidative activity of capsaicin, and determined the mechanism by which capsaicin rescues human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) from oxLDL-mediated dysfunction. The anti-oxidative activity of capsaicin was defined by Apo B fragmentation and conjugated diene production of the copper-mediated oxidation of LDL. Capsaicin repressed ROS generation, as well as subsequent mitochondrial membrane potential collapse, cytochrome c expression, chromosome condensation, and caspase-3 activation induced by oxLDL in HUVECs. Capsaicin also protected foam cell formation in macrophage RAW 264.7 cells. Our results suggest that capsaicin may prevent oxLDL-induced cellular dysfunction and protect RAW 264.7 cells from LDL oxidation. PMID:25603234

  5. Selectins mediate small cell lung cancer systemic metastasis.

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    Franziska Heidemann

    Full Text Available Metastasis formation is the major reason for the extremely poor prognosis in small cell lung cancer (SCLC patients. The molecular interaction partners regulating metastasis formation in SCLC are largely unidentified, however, from other tumor entities it is known that tumor cells use the adhesion molecules of the leukocyte adhesion cascade to attach to the endothelium at the site of the future metastasis. Using the human OH-1 SCLC line as a model, we found that these cells expressed E- and P-selectin binding sites, which could be in part attributed to the selectin binding carbohydrate motif sialyl Lewis A. In addition, protein backbones known to carry these glycotopes in other cell lines including PSGL-1, CD44 and CEA could be detected in in vitro and in vivo grown OH1 SCLC cells. By intravital microscopy of murine mesenterial vasculature we could capture SCLC cells while rolling along vessel walls demonstrating that SCLC cells mimic leukocyte rolling behavior in terms of selectin and selectin ligand interaction in vivo indicating that this mechanism might indeed be important for SCLC cells to seed distant metastases. Accordingly, formation of spontaneous distant metastases was reduced by 50% when OH-1 cells were xenografted into E-/P-selectin-deficient mice compared with wild type mice (p = 0.0181. However, as metastasis formation was not completely abrogated in selectin deficient mice, we concluded that this adhesion cascade is redundant and that other molecules of this cascade mediate metastasis formation as well. Using several of these adhesion molecules as interaction partners presumably make SCLC cells so highly metastatic.

  6. T Cell-Mediated Modulation of Mast Cell Function: Heterotypic Adhesion-Induced Stimulatory or Inhibitory Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Mekori, Yoseph A.; Hershko, Alon Y.

    2012-01-01

    Close physical proximity between mast cells and T cells has been demonstrated in several T cell mediated inflammatory processes such as rheumatoid arthritis and sarcoidosis. However, the way by which mast cells are activated in these T cell-mediated immune responses has not been fully elucidated. We have identified and characterized a novel mast cell activation pathway initiated by physical contact with activated T cells, and showed that this pathway is associated with degranulation and cytok...

  7. Inhibition of stress mediated cell death by human lactate dehydrogenase B in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheibani, Sara; Jones, Natalie K; Eid, Rawan; Gharib, Nada; Arab, Nagla T T; Titorenko, Vladimir; Vali, Hojatollah; Young, Paul A; Greenwood, Michael T

    2015-08-01

    We report the identification of human L- lactate dehydrogenase B (LDHB) as a novel Bax suppressor. Yeast heterologously expressing LDHB is also resistant to the lethal effects of copper indicating that it is a general suppressor of stress mediated cell death. To identify potential LDHB targets, LDHB was expressed in yeast mutants defective in apoptosis, necrosis and autophagy. The absence of functional PCD regulators including MCA1, YBH3, cyclophilin (CPR3) and VMA3, as well as the absence of the pro-survival autophagic pathway (ATG1,7) did not interfere with the LDHB mediated protection against copper indicating that LDHB functions independently of known PCD regulators or by simply blocking or stimulating a common PCD promoting or inhibitory pathway. Measurements of lactate levels revealed that short-term copper stress (1.6 mM, 4 h), does not increase intracellular levels of lactate, instead a three-fold increase in extracellular lactate was observed. Thus, yeast cells resemble mammalian cells where different stresses are known to lead to increased lactate production leading to lactic acidosis. In agreement with this, we found that the addition of exogenous lactic acid to growth media was sufficient to induce cell death that could be inhibited by the expression of LDHB. Taken together our results suggest that lactate dehydrogenase is a general suppressor of PCD in yeast. PMID:26032856

  8. CD38 Deficiency Protects the Heart from Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury through Activating SIRT1/FOXOs-Mediated Antioxidative Stress Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Xiao-Hui; Liu, Xiao-Hong; Hong, Xuan; Zhao, Ning; Xiao, Yun-Fei; Wang, Ling-Fang; Qian, Yi-Song; Deng, Ke-Yu; Ji, Guangju; Fu, Mingui

    2016-01-01

    Ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury induces irreversible oxidative stress damage to the cardiac muscle. We previously observed that CD38 deficiency remarkably protects mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) from oxidative stress-induced injury. However, whether CD38 deficiency protects from I/R injury in the heart is not explored. Here, we showed that the hearts of CD38 deficient mice or wild type mice supplied with exogenous NAD were significantly protected from ischemia/reperfusion injury, seen as reduction of the myocardial infarct sizes when the mice were subjected to 30 min ischemia followed by 24 hours of reperfusion. Consistently, the protection of CD38 deficiency on hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) injury was confirmed with a CD38 knockdown H9c2 stable cell line. Furthermore, we observed that knockdown of CD38 remarkably inhibited ROS generation and intracellular Ca2+ overloading induced by H/R in H9c2 cells. The FOXO1 and FOXO3 expressions were significantly elevated by H/R injury in CD38 knockdown cells compared with normal H9c2 cells. The cell immunofluorescence assay showed that FOXO1 nuclear translocation was significantly increased in CD38 knockdown H9c2 cells. In addition, we demonstrated that the increase of FOXO1 nuclear translocation was associated with the increased expressions of antioxidant catalase and SOD2 and the attenuated expression of the ROS generation enzyme NOX4. In conclusion, our results provide new evidence that CD38 deficiency protects the heart from I/R injury through activating SIRT1/FOXOs-mediated antioxidative stress pathway. PMID:27547294

  9. IP-10-mediated T cell homing promotes cerebral inflammation over splenic immunity to malaria infection.

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    Catherine Q Nie

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Plasmodium falciparum malaria causes 660 million clinical cases with over 2 million deaths each year. Acquired host immunity limits the clinical impact of malaria infection and provides protection against parasite replication. Experimental evidence indicates that cell-mediated immune responses also result in detrimental inflammation and contribute to severe disease induction. In both humans and mice, the spleen is a crucial organ involved in blood stage malaria clearance, while organ-specific disease appears to be associated with sequestration of parasitized erythrocytes in vascular beds and subsequent recruitment of inflammatory leukocytes. Using a rodent model of cerebral malaria, we have previously found that the majority of T lymphocytes in intravascular infiltrates of cerebral malaria-affected mice express the chemokine receptor CXCR3. Here we investigated the effect of IP-10 blockade in the development of experimental cerebral malaria and the induction of splenic anti-parasite immunity. We found that specific neutralization of IP-10 over the course of infection and genetic deletion of this chemokine in knockout mice reduces cerebral intravascular inflammation and is sufficient to protect P. berghei ANKA-infected mice from fatality. Furthermore, our results demonstrate that lack of IP-10 during infection significantly reduces peripheral parasitemia. The increased resistance to infection observed in the absence of IP-10-mediated cell trafficking was associated with retention and subsequent expansion of parasite-specific T cells in spleens of infected animals, which appears to be advantageous for the control of parasite burden. Thus, our results demonstrate that modulating homing of cellular immune responses to malaria is critical for reaching a balance between protective immunity and immunopathogenesis.

  10. Balancing immune protection and immune pathology by CD8+ T cell responses to influenza infection

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    Susu eDuan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Influenza A virus (IAV is a significant human pathogen causing annual epidemics and periodic pandemics. CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL-mediated immunity contributes to clearance of virus-infected cells; CTL immunity targeting the conserved internal proteins of IAVs is a key protection mechanism when neutralizing antibodies are absent during heterosubtypic IAV infection. However, CTL infiltration into the airways, their cytotoxicity, and the effects of produced pro-inflammatory cytokines can cause severe lung tissue injury, thereby contributing to immunopathology. Studies have discovered complicated and exquisite stimulatory and inhibitory mechanisms that regulate CTL magnitude and effector activities during IAV infection. Here, we review the state of knowledge on the roles of IAV-specific CTLs in immune protection and immunopathology during IAV infection in animal models, highlighting the key findings of various requirements and constraints regulating the balance of immune protection and pathology involved in CTL immunity. We also discuss the evidence of cross-reactive CTL immunity as a positive correlate of cross-subtype protection during secondary IAV infection in both animal and human studies. We argue that the effects of CTL immunity on protection and immunopathology depend on multiple layers of host and viral factors, including complex host mechanisms to regulate CTL magnitude and effector activity, the pathogenic nature of the IAV, the innate response milieu, and the host historical immune context of influenza infection. Future efforts are needed to further understand these key host and viral factors, especially to differentiate those that constrain optimally effective CTL anti-viral immunity from those necessary to restrain CTL-mediated nonspecific immunopathology in the various contexts of IAV infection, in order to develop better vaccination and therapeutic strategies for modifying protective CTL immunity.

  11. l-carnitine protects human hepatocytes from oxidative stress-induced toxicity through Akt-mediated activation of Nrf2 signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinlian; Zhang, Yanli; Luan, Haiyun; Chen, Xuehong; Han, Yantao; Wang, Chunbo

    2016-05-01

    In our previous study, l-carnitine was shown to have cytoprotective effect against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced injury in human normal HL7702 hepatocytes. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the protective effect of l-carnitine was associated with the nuclear factor erythroid 2 (NFE2)-related factor 2 (Nrf2) pathway. Our results showed that pretreatment with l-carnitine augmented Nrf2 nuclear translocation, DNA binding activity and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression in H2O2-treated HL7702 cells, although l-carnitine treatment alone had no effect on them. Analysis using Nrf2 siRNA demonstrated that Nrf2 activation was involved in l-carnitine-induced HO-1 expression. In addition, l-carnitine-mediated protection against H2O2 toxicity was abrogated by Nrf2 siRNA, indicating the important role of Nrf2 in l-carnitine-induced cytoprotection. Further experiments revealed that l-carnitine pretreatment enhanced the phosphorylation of Akt in H2O2-treated cells. Blocking Akt pathway with inhibitor partly abrogated the protective effect of l-carnitine. Moreover, our finding demonstrated that the induction of Nrf2 translocation and HO-1 expression by l-carnitine directly correlated with the Akt pathway because Akt inhibitor showed inhibitory effects on the Nrf2 translocation and HO-1 expression. Altogether, these results demonstrate that l-carnitine protects HL7702 cells against H2O2-induced cell damage through Akt-mediated activation of Nrf2 signaling pathway. PMID:26889770

  12. Clostridial Glucosylating Toxins Enter Cells via Clathrin-Mediated Endocytosis

    OpenAIRE

    Papatheodorou, Panagiotis; Zamboglou, Constantinos; Genisyuerek, Selda; Guttenberg, Gregor; Aktories, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    Clostridium difficile toxin A (TcdA) and toxin B (TcdB), C. sordellii lethal toxin (TcsL) and C. novyi α-toxin (TcnA) are important pathogenicity factors, which represent the family of the clostridial glucosylating toxins (CGTs). Toxin A and B are associated with antibiotic-associated diarrhea and pseudomembraneous colitis. Lethal toxin is involved in toxic shock syndrome after abortion and α-toxin in gas gangrene development. CGTs enter cells via receptor-mediated endocytosis and require an ...

  13. Epigenetically Mediated Pathogenic Effects of Phenanthrene on Regulatory T Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Phenanthrene (Phe, a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH, is a major constituent of urban air pollution. There have been conflicting results regarding the role of other AhR ligands 2,3,7,8- tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD and 6-formylindolo [3,2-b]carbazole (FICZ in modifying regulatory T cell populations (Treg or T helper (Th17 differentiation, and the effects of Phe have been understudied. We hypothesized that different chemical entities of PAH induce Treg to become either Th2 or Th17 effector T cells through epigenetic modification of FOXP3. To determine specific effects on T cell populations by phenanthrene, primary human Treg were treated with Phe, TCDD, or FICZ and assessed for function, gene expression, and phenotype. Methylation of CpG sites within the FOXP3 locus reduced FOXP3 expression, leading to impaired Treg function and conversion of Treg into a CD4+CD25lo Th2 phenotype in Phe-treated cells. Conversely, TCDD treatment led to epigenetic modification of IL-17A and conversion of Treg to Th17 T cells. These findings present a mechanism by which exposure to AhR-ligands mediates human T cell responses and begins to elucidate the relationship between environmental exposures, immune modulation, and initiation of human disease.

  14. Lung Regeneration: Endogenous and Exogenous Stem Cell Mediated Therapeutic Approaches

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    Khondoker M. Akram

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The tissue turnover of unperturbed adult lung is remarkably slow. However, after injury or insult, a specialised group of facultative lung progenitors become activated to replenish damaged tissue through a reparative process called regeneration. Disruption in this process results in healing by fibrosis causing aberrant lung remodelling and organ dysfunction. Post-insult failure of regeneration leads to various incurable lung diseases including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Therefore, identification of true endogenous lung progenitors/stem cells, and their regenerative pathway are crucial for next-generation therapeutic development. Recent studies provide exciting and novel insights into postnatal lung development and post-injury lung regeneration by native lung progenitors. Furthermore, exogenous application of bone marrow stem cells, embryonic stem cells and inducible pluripotent stem cells (iPSC show evidences of their regenerative capacity in the repair of injured and diseased lungs. With the advent of modern tissue engineering techniques, whole lung regeneration in the lab using de-cellularised tissue scaffold and stem cells is now becoming reality. In this review, we will highlight the advancement of our understanding in lung regeneration and development of stem cell mediated therapeutic strategies in combating incurable lung diseases.

  15. Hydroxytyrosol Protects against Oxidative DNA Damage in Human Breast Cells

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    José J. Gaforio

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Over recent years, several studies have related olive oil ingestion to a low incidence of several diseases, including breast cancer. Hydroxytyrosol and tyrosol are two of the major phenols present in virgin olive oils. Despite the fact that they have been linked to cancer prevention, there is no evidence that clarifies their effect in human breast tumor and non-tumor cells. In the present work, we present hydroxytyrosol and tyrosol’s effects in human breast cell lines. Our results show that hydroxytyrosol acts as a more efficient free radical scavenger than tyrosol, but both fail to affect cell proliferation rates, cell cycle profile or cell apoptosis in human mammary epithelial cells (MCF10A or breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231 and MCF7. We found that hydroxytyrosol decreases the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS level in MCF10A cells but not in MCF7 or MDA-MB-231 cells while very high amounts of tyrosol is needed to decrease the ROS level in MCF10A cells. Interestingly, hydroxytyrosol prevents oxidative DNA damage in the three breast cell lines. Therefore, our data suggest that simple phenol hydroxytyrosol could contribute to a lower incidence of breast cancer in populations that consume virgin olive oil due to its antioxidant activity and its protection against oxidative DNA damage in mammary cells.

  16. B7-H4 as a protective shield for pancreatic islet beta cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Annika; C; Sun; Dawei; Ou; Dan; S; Luciani; Garth; L; Warnock

    2014-01-01

    Auto- and alloreactive T cells are major culprits that damage β-cells in type 1 diabetes(T1D) and islet transplantation. Current immunosuppressive drugs can alleviate immune-mediated attacks on islets. T cell co-stimulation blockade has shown great promise in autoimmunity and transplantation as it solely targets activated T cells, and therefore avoids toxicity of current immunosuppressive drugs. An attractive approach is offered by the newly-identified negative T cell cosignaling molecule B7-H4 which is expressed in normal human islets, and its expression co-localizes with insulin. A concomitant decrease in B7-H4/insulin colocalization is observed in human type 1 diabetic islets. B7-H4 may play protective roles in the pancreatic islets, preserving their function and survival. In this review we outline the protective effect of B7-H4 in the contexts of T1 D, islet cell transplantation, and potentially type 2 diabetes. Current evidence offers encouraging data regarding the role of B7-H4 in reversal of autoimmune diabetes and donor-specific islet allograft tolerance. Additionally, unique expression of B7-H4 may serve as a potential biomarker for the development of T1 D. Futurestudies should continue to focus on the islet-specific effects of B7-H4 with emphasis on mechanistic pathways in order to promote B7-H4 as a potential therapy and cure for T1 D.

  17. IL-22 Restrains Tapeworm-Mediated Protection against Experimental Colitis via Regulation of IL-25 Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, José L.; Fernando, Maria R.; Lopes, Fernando; Leung, Gabriella; Mancini, Nicole L.; Matisz, Chelsea E.; Wang, Arthur; McKay, Derek M.

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-22, an immune cell-derived cytokine whose receptor expression is restricted to non-immune cells (e.g. epithelial cells), can be anti-inflammatory and pro-inflammatory. Mice infected with the tapeworm Hymenolepis diminuta are protected from dinitrobenzene sulphonic acid (DNBS)-induced colitis. Here we assessed expulsion of H. diminuta, the concomitant immune response and the outcome of DNBS-induced colitis in wild-type (WT) and IL-22 deficient mice (IL-22-/-) ± infection. Interleukin-22-/- mice had a mildly impaired ability to expel the worm and this correlated with reduced or delayed induction of TH2 immunity as measured by splenic and mesenteric lymph node production of IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13 and intestinal Muc-2 mRNA and goblet cell hyperplasia; in contrast, IL-25 increased in the small intestine of IL-22-/- mice 8 and 12 days post-infection compared to WT mice. In vitro experiments revealed that H. diminuta directly evoked epithelial production of IL-25 that was inhibited by recombinant IL-22. Also, IL-10 and markers of regulatory T cells were increased in IL-22-/- mice that displayed less DNBS (3 mg, ir. 72h)-induced colitis. Wild-type mice infected with H. diminuta were protected from colitis, as were infected IL-22-/- mice and the latter to a degree that they were almost indistinguishable from control, non-DNBS treated mice. Finally, treatment with anti-IL-25 antibodies exaggerated DNBS-induced colitis in IL-22-/- mice and blocked the anti-colitic effect of infection with H. diminuta. Thus, IL-22 is identified as an endogenous brake on helminth-elicited TH2 immunity, reducing the efficacy of expulsion of H. diminuta and limiting the effectiveness of the anti-colitic events mobilized following infection with H. diminuta in a non-permissive host. PMID:27055194

  18. Peroxiredoxin III protects pancreatic ß cells from apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Gabriele; Aumann, Nicole; Michalska, Marta; Bast, Antje; Sonnemann, Jürgen; Beck, James F; Lendeckel, Uwe; Newsholme, Philip; Walther, Reinhard

    2010-11-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus is characterized by a progressive autoimmune destruction of insulin-producing β cells. Macrophages and T lymphocytes release cytokines, which induce the synthesis of oxygen and nitrogen radicals in the pancreatic islets. The resulting cellular and mitochondrial damage promotes β cell death. β cells are very sensitive to the autoimmune free radical-dependent attack due to their low content of antioxidant enzymes such as glutathione peroxidase and catalase. A focal point of β cell protection should be the control of the mitochondrial redox status, which will result in the preservation of metabolic stimulus-secretion coupling. For this reason, there is a considerable interest in the mitochondrial peroxiredoxin III (PRX III), a thioredoxin-dependent peroxide reductase, which was shown to be able to protect against both oxidative and nitrosative stress. Using the Tet-On-system, we generated stably transfected rat insulinoma cells over- or under-expressing PRX III in a doxycyclin-dependent manner to analyze the effect of increased or decreased amounts of cellular PRX III, following treatment with several stressors. We provide evidence that PRX III protects pancreatic β cells from cell stress induced by accumulation of hydrogen peroxide, or the induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase or caspase-9 and -3 by pro-inflammatory cytokines or streptozotocin. Basal insulin secretion was markedly decreased in cells expressing lower levels of PRX III. We suggest PRX III may be a suitable target for promoting deceleration or even prevention of stress-associated apoptosis in pancreatic β cells and the manifestation of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. PMID:20807727

  19. β-Cell Regeneration Mediated by Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Anna Milanesi; Jang-Won Lee; Zhenhua Li; Stefano Da Sacco; Valentina Villani; Vanessa Cervantes; Laura Perin; Yu, John S.

    2012-01-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) have been shown to ameliorate diabetes in animal models. The mechanism, however, remains largely unknown. An unanswered question is whether BMSCs are able to differentiate into β-cells in vivo, or whether BMSCs are able to mediate recovery and/or regeneration of endogenous β-cells. Here we examined these questions by testing the ability of hBMSCs genetically modified to transiently express vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) or pancreatic-duode...

  20. Resolution of acute malarial infections by T cell-dependent non-antibody-mediated mechanisms of immunity.

    OpenAIRE

    Cavacini, L A; Parke, L A; Weidanz, W P

    1990-01-01

    While it is generally accepted that acute blood stage malarial infections are resolved through the actions of protective antibodies, we observed that resistance to acute infection with Plasmodium chabaudi adami was mediated by T cell-dependent cellular immune mechanisms independent of antibody. We now report that acute blood stage infections caused by three additional murine hemoprotozoan parasites, Plasmodium vinckei petteri, Plasmodium chabaudi chabaudi, and Babesia microti, appear to be co...

  1. Telomere Protection by TPP1 Is Mediated by POT1a and POT1b ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Kibe, Tatsuya; Osawa, Gail A.; Keegan, Catherine E.; de Lange, Titia

    2009-01-01

    Mammalian telomeres are protected by the shelterin complex, which contains single-stranded telomeric DNA binding proteins (POT1a and POT1b in rodents, POT1 in other mammals). Mouse POT1a prevents the activation of the ATR kinase and contributes to the repression of the nonhomologous end-joining pathway (NHEJ) at newly replicated telomeres. POT1b represses unscheduled resection of the 5′-ended telomeric DNA strand, resulting in long 3′ overhangs in POT1b KO cells. Both POT1 proteins bind TPP1,...

  2. Wnt activation protects against neomycin-induced hair cell damage in the mouse cochlea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, L; Chen, Y; Qi, J; Zhang, Y; He, Y; Ni, W; Li, W; Zhang, S; Sun, S; Taketo, M M; Wang, L; Chai, R; Li, H

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have reported the role of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in hair cell (HC) development, regeneration, and differentiation in the mouse cochlea; however, the role of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in HC protection remains unknown. In this study, we took advantage of transgenic mice to specifically knockout or overactivate the canonical Wnt signaling mediator β-catenin in HCs, which allowed us to investigate the role of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in protecting HCs against neomycin-induced damage. We first showed that loss of β-catenin in HCs made them more vulnerable to neomycin-induced injury, while constitutive activation of β-catenin in HCs reduced HC loss both in vivo and in vitro. We then showed that loss of β-catenin in HCs increased caspase-mediated apoptosis induced by neomycin injury, while β-catenin overexpression inhibited caspase-mediated apoptosis. Finally, we demonstrated that loss of β-catenin in HCs led to increased expression of forkhead box O3 transcription factor (Foxo3) and Bim along with decreased expression of antioxidant enzymes; thus, there were increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) after neomycin treatment that might be responsible for the increased aminoglycoside sensitivity of HCs. In contrast, β-catenin overexpression reduced Foxo3 and Bim expression and ROS levels, suggesting that β-catenin is protective against neomycin-induced HC loss. Our findings demonstrate that Wnt/β-catenin signaling has an important role in protecting HCs against neomycin-induced HC loss and thus might be a new therapeutic target for the prevention of HC death. PMID:26962686

  3. Pancreatic beta cell protection/regeneration with phytotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azar Hosseini

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Although currently available drugs are useful in controlling early onset complications of diabetes, serious late onset complications appear in a large number of patients. Considering the physiopathology of diabetes, preventing beta cell degeneration and stimulating the endogenous regeneration of islets will be essential approaches for the treatment of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. The current review focused on phytochemicals, the antidiabetic effect of which has been proved by pancreatic beta cell protection/regeneration. Among the hundreds of plants that have been investigated for diabetes, a small fraction has shown the regenerative property and was described in this paper. Processes of pancreatic beta cell degeneration and regeneration were described. Also, the proposed mechanisms for the protective/regenerative effects of such phytochemicals and their potential side effects were discussed.

  4. Gang Membership, School Violence, and the Mediating Effects of Risk and Protective Behaviors in California High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, Joey Nuñez, Jr.; Gilreath, Tamika D.; Astor, Ron Avi; Benbenishty, Rami

    2014-01-01

    There is insufficient empirical evidence exploring associations between gang membership and school violence behaviors. Using a sample of 272,863 high school students, this study employs a structural equation model to examine how school risk and protective behaviors and attitudes mediate effects of gang members' involvement with school…

  5. Epigallocatechin Gallate-Mediated Alteration of the MicroRNA Expression Profile in 5α-Dihydrotestosterone-Treated Human Dermal Papilla Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Shanghun; Kim, Karam; Lee, Myung Joo; Lee, Jeongju; Choi, Sungjin; Kim, Kyung-Suk; Ko, Jung-Min; Han, Hyunjoo; Kim, Su Young; Youn, Hae Jeong; Ahn, Kyu Joong; An, In-Sook; An, Sungkwan

    2016-01-01

    Background Dihydrotestosterone (DHT) induces androgenic alopecia by shortening the hair follicle growth phase, resulting in hair loss. We previously demonstrated how changes in the microRNA (miRNA) expression profile influenced DHT-mediated cell death, cell cycle arrest, cell viability, the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and senescence. Protective effects against DHT have not, however, been elucidated at the genome level. Objective We showed that epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), a major component of green tea, protects DHT-induced cell death by regulating the cellular miRNA expression profile. Methods We used a miRNA microarray to identify miRNA expression levels in human dermal papilla cells (DPCs). We investigated whether the miRNA expression influenced the protective effects of EGCG against DHT-induced cell death, growth arrest, intracellular ROS levels, and senescence. Results EGCG protected against the effects of DHT by altering the miRNA expression profile in human DPCs. In addition, EGCG attenuated DHT-mediated cell death and growth arrest and decreased intracellular ROS levels and senescence. A bioinformatics analysis elucidated the relationship between the altered miRNA expression and EGCG-mediated protective effects against DHT. Conclusion Overall, our results suggest that EGCG ameliorates the negative effects of DHT by altering the miRNA expression profile in human DPCs. PMID:27274631

  6. Dendritic cells in dengue virus infection: Targets of virus replication and mediators of immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A. Schmid

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs are sentinels of the immune system and detect pathogens at sites of entry, such as the skin. In addition to the ability of DCs to control infections directly via their innate immune functions, DCs help to prime adaptive B and T cell responses via antigen presentation in lymphoid tissues. Infected Aedes aegypti or Ae. albopictus mosquitoes transmit the four dengue virus (DENV serotypes to humans while probing for small blood vessels in the skin. DENV causes the most prevalent arthropod-borne viral disease in humans, yet no vaccine or specific therapeutic is currently approved. Although primary DENV infection confers life-long protective immunity against re-infection with the same DENV serotype, secondary infection with a different DENV serotype can lead to increased disease severity via cross-reactive T cells or enhancing antibodies. This review summarizes recent findings in humans and animal models about DENV infection of DCs, monocytes and macrophages. We discuss the dual role of DCs as both targets of DENV replication and mediators of innate and adaptive immunity, and summarize immune evasion strategies whereby DENV impairs the function of infected DCs. We suggest that DCs play a key role in priming DENV-specific neutralizing or potentially harmful memory B and T cell responses, and that future DC-directed therapies may help induce protective memory responses and reduce dengue pathogenesis.

  7. Protection by polaprezinc against radiation-induced apoptosis in rat jejunal crypt cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polaprezinc, an anti-ulcer drug, is a chelate compound consisting of zinc and L-carnosine. Polaprezinc has been shown to prevent gastric mucosal injury. The anti ulcer effects of polaprezinc have been ascribed to its antioxidative property. The effect of polaprezinc on ionizing radiation-induced apoptosis was studied in the jejunal epithelial crypt cells of rats. Seven-to eight week-old Wistar rats, which were treated with 100 mg/kg of polaprezinc orally 1 h before irradiation or 2% carboxymethyl cellulose sodium in controls, were exposed to whole body X-ray irradiation at 2 Gy. The number of apoptotic cells per jejunum crypt was counted in haematoxylin and eosin stained sections at 0-6 h after irradiation. TdT-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end-labeling (TUNEL) positive cells and immunopositive cells for active caspase-3 per crypt were also counted. Accumulation of p53, p21WAF1/CIP1 and Bax expression in the jejunum after irradiation were examined by Western blot analyses. Polaprezinc treatment given prior to radiation resulted in a significant reduction in numbers of apoptotic cells, TUNEL positive cells and active caspase-3 immunopositive cells in jejunal crypt cells. Polaprezinc treatment resulted in decreases of p53 accumulation, p21WAF1/CIP1 and Bax expression after irradiation. Polaprezinc has a protective effect against ionizing radiation induced apoptosis in rat jejunal crypt cells. (author)

  8. TH17 cells in autoimmunity and immunodeficiency: protective or pathogenic?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish eMarwaha

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In 2005 a newly discovered T helper cell subset that secreted interleukin (IL-17 became the center of attention in immunology. Initial studies painted Th17 cells as the culprit for destruction caused in many different autoimmune and auto-inflammatory diseases. Subsequently, the discovery of patients with primary immunodeficiencies in the IL-17 pathway taught us that Th17 cells have a critical role in defense against certain fungal and bacterial infections. Moreover, the paradoxical exacerbation of Crohn’s disease in the clinical trials of a Secukiumab (AIN457, a fully human neutralizing antibody to IL-17A, has cast into doubt a universal pro-inflammatory and harmful role for Th17 cells. Evidence now suggests that depending on the environment Th17 cell can alter their differentiation program, ultimately giving rise to either protective or pro-inflammatory cells. In this review will summarize the evidence from patients with immunodeficiencies, autoimmune, or auto-inflammatory disease that teaches us how the pro-inflammatory versus protective function of Th17 cells varies within the context of different human diseases.

  9. Changes in cell-mediated immunity in patients undergoing radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cell-mediated immune status of 147 patients who received radiotherapy was evaluated using in vitro tests (PHA, E-rosette, and spontaneous blastogenesis) both before and 6 weeks after the end of radiation. All patients have verified malignancies, involving the bronchus in 29 cases, breast in 28, female genital system in 26, head and neck in 20 and bladder in 15. Patients suffering from bronchogenic carcinomas or malignancies of the head and neck showed a relative high degree of immune suppression. Our findings indicate a trend towards some improvement in PHA reactivity, as well as in the percentage of E-rosette-forming cells after treatment, which is more noticeable in patients with pelvic or breast tumors. A relationship seems to exist between the tumor load and the immune status, which reverts to a normal pattern when the former is extinguished. Moreover, patients with poor clinical response display a profoundly depressed level of immune status without any improvement after treatment

  10. Induction and maintenance of protective CD8+ T cells against malaria liver stages: implications for vaccine development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sze-Wah Tse

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available CD8+ T cells against malaria liver stages represent a major protective immune mechanism against infection. Following induction in the peripheral lymph nodes by dendritic cells (DCs, these CD8+ T cells migrate to the liver and eliminate parasite infected hepatocytes. The processing and presentation of sporozoite antigen requires TAP mediated transport of major histocompatibility complex class I epitopes to the endoplasmic reticulum. Importantly, in DCs this process is also dependent on endosome-mediated cross presentation while this mechanism is not required for epitope presentation on hepatocytes. Protective CD8+ T cell responses are strongly dependent on the presence of CD4+ T cells and the capacity of sporozoite antigen to persist for a prolonged period of time. While human trials with subunit vaccines capable of inducing antibodies and CD4+ T cell responses have yielded encouraging results, an effective anti-malaria vaccine will likely require vaccine constructs designed to induce protective CD8+ T cells against malaria liver stages.

  11. Natural T Cell–mediated Protection against Seasonal and Pandemic Influenza. Results of the Flu Watch Cohort Study

    OpenAIRE

    Hayward, A. C.; Wang, L.; Goonetilleke, N.; Fragaszy, E. B.; Bermingham, A.; Copas, A; Dukes, O.; Millett, E. R.; Nazareth, I; Nguyen-Van-Tam, J. S.; Watson, J M; M. Zambon; Johnson, A. M.; McMichael, A.J.; Flu Watch Group

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: A high proportion of influenza infections are asymptomatic. Animal and human challenge studies and observational studies suggest T cells protect against disease among those infected, but the impact of T-cell immunity at the population level is unknown. / Objectives: To investigate whether naturally preexisting T-cell responses targeting highly conserved internal influenza proteins could provide cross-protective immunity against pandemic and seasonal influenza. / Methods: We quantif...

  12. Interstitial cells of Cajal mediate mechanosensitive responses in the stomach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Kyung-Jong; Sanders, Kenton M.; Ward, Sean M.

    2005-10-01

    Changes in motor activity are a basic response to filling of smooth muscle organs. Responses to gastric filling, for example, are thought to be regulated by neural reflexes. Here, we demonstrate a previously uncharacterized aspect of stretch-dependent responses in visceral smooth muscles that is mediated by mechanosensitive interstitial cells of Cajal. Length ramps were applied to the murine antral muscles while recording intracellular electrical activity and isometric force. Stretching muscles by an average of 27 ± 1% of resting length resulted in 5 mN of force. Increasing length caused membrane depolarization and increased slow-wave frequency. The responses were dependent on the rate of stretch. Stretch-dependent responses were not inhibited by neuronal antagonists or nifedipine. Increases in slow-wave frequency, but not membrane depolarization, were inhibited by reducing external Ca2+ (100 μM) and by Ni2+ (250 μM). Responses to stretch were inhibited by indomethacin (1 μM) and were absent in cyclooxygenase II-deficient mice, suggesting that cyclooxygenase II-derived eicosanoids may mediate these responses. Dual microelectrode impalements of muscle cells within the corpus and antrum showed that stretch-induced changes in slow-wave frequency uncoupled proximal-to-distal propagation of slow waves. This uncoupling could interfere with gastric peristalsis and impede gastric emptying. Stretch of antral muscles of W/WV mice, which lack intramuscular interstitial cells of Cajal, did not affect membrane depolarization or slow-wave frequency. These data demonstrate a previously uncharacterized nonneural stretch reflex in gastric muscles and provide physiological evidence demonstrating a mechanosensitive role for interstitial cells of Cajal in smooth muscle tissues. gastric compliance | pacemaker | stretch | slow waves | propagation

  13. Methyltransferases mediate cell memory of a genotoxic insult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rugo, R E; Mutamba, J T; Mohan, K N; Yee, T; Chaillet, J R; Greenberger, J S; Engelward, B P

    2011-02-10

    Characterization of the direct effects of DNA-damaging agents shows how DNA lesions lead to specific mutations. Yet, serum from Hiroshima survivors, Chernobyl liquidators and radiotherapy patients can induce a clastogenic effect on naive cells, showing indirect induction of genomic instability that persists years after exposure. Such indirect effects are not restricted to ionizing radiation, as chemical genotoxins also induce heritable and transmissible genomic instability phenotypes. Although such indirect induction of genomic instability is well described, the underlying mechanism has remained enigmatic. Here, we show that mouse embryonic stem cells exposed to γ-radiation bear the effects of the insult for weeks. Specifically, conditioned media from the progeny of exposed cells can induce DNA damage and homologous recombination in naive cells. Notably, cells exposed to conditioned media also elicit a genome-destabilizing effect on their neighbouring cells, thus demonstrating transmission of genomic instability. Moreover, we show that the underlying basis for the memory of an insult is completely dependent on two of the major DNA cytosine methyltransferases, Dnmt1 and Dnmt3a. Targeted disruption of these genes in exposed cells completely eliminates transmission of genomic instability. Furthermore, transient inactivation of Dnmt1, using a tet-suppressible allele, clears the memory of the insult, thus protecting neighbouring cells from indirect induction of genomic instability. We have thus demonstrated that a single exposure can lead to long-term, genome-destabilizing effects that spread from cell to cell, and we provide a specific molecular mechanism for these persistent bystander effects. Collectively, our results impact the current understanding of risks from toxin exposures and suggest modes of intervention for suppressing genomic instability in people exposed to carcinogenic genotoxins. PMID:21057543

  14. Simplified Bryostatin Analogues Protect Cells from Chikungunya Virus-Induced Cell Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staveness, Daryl; Abdelnabi, Rana; Schrier, Adam J; Loy, Brian A; Verma, Vishal A; DeChristopher, Brian A; Near, Katherine E; Neyts, Johan; Delang, Leen; Leyssen, Pieter; Wender, Paul A

    2016-04-22

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a mosquito-borne alphavirus showing a recent resurgence and rapid spread worldwide. While vaccines are under development, there are currently no therapies to treat this disease, except for over-the-counter (OTC) analgesics, which alleviate the devastating arthritic and arthralgic symptoms. To identify novel inhibitors of the virus, analogues of the natural product bryostatin 1, a clinical lead for the treatment of cancer, Alzheimer's disease, and HIV eradication, were investigated for in vitro antiviral activity and were found to be among the most potent inhibitors of CHIKV replication reported to date. Bryostatin-based therapeutic efforts and even recent anti-CHIKV strategies have centered on modulation of protein kinase C (PKC). Intriguingly, while the C ring of bryostatin primarily drives interactions with PKC, A- and B-ring functionality in these analogues has a significant effect on the observed cell-protective activity. Significantly, bryostatin 1 itself, a potent pan-PKC modulator, is inactive in these assays. These new findings indicate that the observed anti-CHIKV activity is not solely mediated by PKC modulation, suggesting possible as yet unidentified targets for CHIKV therapeutic intervention. The high potency and low toxicity of these bryologs make them promising new leads for the development of a CHIKV treatment. PMID:26900625

  15. Hepatic non-parenchymal cells and extracellular matrix participate in oval cell-mediated liver regeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Zhang; Xiao-Ping Chen; Wan-Guang Zhang; Feng Zhang; Shuai Xiang; Han-Hua Dong; Lei Zhang

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To elucidate the interaction between nonparenchymal cells, extracellular matrix and oval cells during the restituting process of liver injury induced by partial hepatectomy (PH). METHODS: We examined the localization of oval cells, non-parenchymal cells, and the extracellular matrix components using immunohistochemical and double immunofluorescent analysis during the proliferation and differentiation of oval cells in N-2-acetylaminofluorene (2-AAF)/PH rat model. RESULTS: By day 2 after PH, small oval cells began to proliferate around the portal area. Most of stellate cells and laminin were present along the hepatic sinusoids in the periportal area. Kupffer cells and fibronectin markedly increased in the whole hepatic lobule. From day 4 to 9, oval cells spread further into hepatic parenchyma, closely associated with stellate cells, fibronectin and laminin. Kupffer cells admixed with oval cells by day 6 and then decreased in the periportal zone. From day 12 to 15, most of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), laminin and fibronectin located around the small hepatocyte nodus, and minority of them appeared in the nodus. Kupffer cells were mainly limited in the pericentral sinusoids. After day 18, the normal liver lobule structures began to recover.CONCLUSION: Local hepatic microenvironment may participate in the oval cell-mediated liver regeneration through the cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions.

  16. Enhanced stability of tristetraprolin mRNA protects mice against immune-mediated inflammatory pathologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patial, Sonika; Curtis, Alan D; Lai, Wi S; Stumpo, Deborah J; Hill, Georgette D; Flake, Gordon P; Mannie, Mark D; Blackshear, Perry J

    2016-02-16

    Tristetraprolin (TTP) is an inducible, tandem zinc-finger mRNA binding protein that binds to adenylate-uridylate-rich elements (AREs) in the 3'-untranslated regions (3'UTRs) of specific mRNAs, such as that encoding TNF, and increases their rates of deadenylation and turnover. Stabilization of Tnf mRNA and other cytokine transcripts in TTP-deficient mice results in the development of a profound, chronic inflammatory syndrome characterized by polyarticular arthritis, dermatitis, myeloid hyperplasia, and autoimmunity. To address the hypothesis that increasing endogenous levels of TTP in an intact animal might be beneficial in the treatment of inflammatory diseases, we generated a mouse model (TTPΔARE) in which a 136-base instability motif in the 3'UTR of TTP mRNA was deleted in the endogenous genetic locus. These mice appeared normal, but cultured fibroblasts and macrophages derived from them exhibited increased stability of the otherwise highly labile TTP mRNA. This resulted in increased TTP protein expression in LPS-stimulated macrophages and increased levels of TTP protein in mouse tissues. TTPΔARE mice were protected from collagen antibody-induced arthritis, exhibited significantly reduced inflammation in imiquimod-induced dermatitis, and were resistant to induction of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, presumably by dampening the excessive production of proinflammatory mediators in all cases. These data suggest that increased systemic levels of TTP, secondary to increased stability of its mRNA throughout the body, can be protective against inflammatory disease in certain models and might be viewed as an attractive therapeutic target for the treatment of human inflammatory diseases. PMID:26831084

  17. Immunological mechanisms involved in probiotic-mediated protection against Citrobacter rodentium-induced colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Y; Yang, G; Meng, F; Yang, W; Hu, J; Ye, L; Shi, C; Wang, C

    2016-06-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease is a group of chronic, incurable inflammatory disorders of the gastrointestinal tract that cause severe diarrhoea, intestinal inflammation, pain, fatigue and weight loss. In this study, we first developed a model of Citrobacter rodentium-induced colitis and then evaluated the protective effects of selected probiotics on inflammation. The results showed that administration of a combination of probiotics including Lactobacillus rhamnosus ATCC 53103, Lactobacillus acidophilus ATCC 4356 and Lactobacillus plantarum A significantly increased the production of CD11c(+) dendritic cells in the spleen (3.62% vs phosphate buffered saline (PBS)-treated control, Pprobiotics significantly up-regulated the development of CD4(+)/CD25(+)/Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells in MLNs by approximately 2.07% compared to the effect observed in the PBS-treated control (P<0.01) and down-regulated the expression of inflammatory cytokines, including interleukin-17, tumour necrosis factor-α and interferon-γ, by 0.11, 0.11 and 0.15%, respectively, compared to the effect observed in the PBS-treated control (P<0.01).These effects conferred protection against colitis, as shown by histopathological analyses. PMID:26925601

  18. Quantification of poly(I:C)-mediated protection against genital herpes simplex virus type 2 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbst-Kralovetz, Melissa M; Pyles, Richard B

    2006-10-01

    Alternative strategies for controlling the growing herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) epidemic are needed. A novel class of immunomodulatory microbicides has shown promise as antiherpetics, including intravaginally applied CpG-containing oligodeoxynucleotides that stimulate toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9). In the current study, we quantified protection against experimental genital HSV-2 infection provided by an alternative nucleic acid-based TLR agonist, polyinosine-poly(C) (PIC) (TLR3 agonist). Using a protection quantification paradigm, groups of mice were PIC treated and then subdivided into groups challenged with escalating doses of HSV-2. Using this paradigm, a temporal window of PIC efficacy for single applications was defined as 1 day prior to (prophylactic) through 4 h after (therapeutic) viral challenge. PIC treatment within this window protected against 10-fold-higher HSV-2 challenges, as indicated by increased 50% infectious dose values relative to those for vehicle-treated controls. Disease resolution and survival were significantly enhanced by repetitive PIC doses. Using optimal PIC regimens, cytokine induction was evaluated in murine vaginal lavages and in human vaginal epithelial cells. Similar induction patterns were observed, with kinetics that explained the limited durability of PIC-afforded protection. Daily PIC delivery courses did not generate sustained cytokine levels in murine vaginal fluids that would be indicative of local immunotoxicity. No evidence of immunotoxicity was observed in selected organs that were analyzed following repetitive vaginal PIC doses. Animal and in vitro data indicate that PIC may prove to be a valuable preventative microbicide and/or therapeutic agent against genital herpes by increasing resistance to HSV-2 and enhancing disease resolution following a failure of prevention. PMID:17005677

  19. Histone deacetylases 1 and 3 but not 2 mediate cytokine-induced beta cell apoptosis in INS-1 cells and dispersed primary islets from rats and are differentially regulated in the islets of type 1 diabetic children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lundh, M.; Christensen, D.P.; Damgaard Nielsen, M.; Richardson, S.J.; Dahllof, M.S.; Skovgaard, T.; Berthelsen, J.; Dinarello, C.A.; Stevenazzi, A.; Mascagni, P.; Grunnet, L.G.; Morgan, N.G.; Mandrup-Poulsen, T.

    2012-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are promising pharmacological targets in cancer and autoimmune diseases. All 11 classical HDACs (HDAC1-11) are found in the pancreatic beta cell, and HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) protect beta cells from inflammatory insults. We investigated which HDACs mediat

  20. β-Cell Regeneration Mediated by Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milanesi, Anna; Lee, Jang-Won; Li, Zhenhua; Da Sacco, Stefano; Villani, Valentina; Cervantes, Vanessa; Perin, Laura; Yu, John S.

    2012-01-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) have been shown to ameliorate diabetes in animal models. The mechanism, however, remains largely unknown. An unanswered question is whether BMSCs are able to differentiate into β-cells in vivo, or whether BMSCs are able to mediate recovery and/or regeneration of endogenous β-cells. Here we examined these questions by testing the ability of hBMSCs genetically modified to transiently express vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) or pancreatic-duodenal homeobox 1 (PDX1) to reverse diabetes and whether these cells were differentiated into β-cells or mediated recovery through alternative mechanisms. Human BMSCs expressing VEGF and PDX1 reversed hyperglycemia in more than half of the diabetic mice and induced overall improved survival and weight maintenance in all mice. Recovery was sustained only in the mice treated with hBMSCs-VEGF. However, de novo β-cell differentiation from human cells was observed in mice in both cases, treated with either hBMSCs-VEGF or hBMSCs- PDX1, confirmed by detectable level of serum human insulin. Sustained reversion of diabetes mediated by hBMSCs-VEGF was secondary to endogenous β-cell regeneration and correlated with activation of the insulin/IGF receptor signaling pathway involved in maintaining β-cell mass and function. Our study demonstrated the possible benefit of hBMSCs for the treatment of insulin-dependent diabetes and gives new insight into the mechanism of β-cell recovery after injury mediated by hBMSC therapy. PMID:22879915

  1. β-Cell regeneration mediated by human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Milanesi

    Full Text Available Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs have been shown to ameliorate diabetes in animal models. The mechanism, however, remains largely unknown. An unanswered question is whether BMSCs are able to differentiate into β-cells in vivo, or whether BMSCs are able to mediate recovery and/or regeneration of endogenous β-cells. Here we examined these questions by testing the ability of hBMSCs genetically modified to transiently express vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF or pancreatic-duodenal homeobox 1 (PDX1 to reverse diabetes and whether these cells were differentiated into β-cells or mediated recovery through alternative mechanisms. Human BMSCs expressing VEGF and PDX1 reversed hyperglycemia in more than half of the diabetic mice and induced overall improved survival and weight maintenance in all mice. Recovery was sustained only in the mice treated with hBMSCs-VEGF. However, de novo β-cell differentiation from human cells was observed in mice in both cases, treated with either hBMSCs-VEGF or hBMSCs- PDX1, confirmed by detectable level of serum human insulin. Sustained reversion of diabetes mediated by hBMSCs-VEGF was secondary to endogenous β-cell regeneration and correlated with activation of the insulin/IGF receptor signaling pathway involved in maintaining β-cell mass and function. Our study demonstrated the possible benefit of hBMSCs for the treatment of insulin-dependent diabetes and gives new insight into the mechanism of β-cell recovery after injury mediated by hBMSC therapy.

  2. Tetrandrine protects mouse retinal ganglion cells from ischemic injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li WY

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Weiyi Li,1,2 Chen Yang,2 Jing Lu,2 Ping Huang,1 Colin J Barnstable,2 Chun Zhang,1 Samuel S Zhang2,3 1Department of Ophthalmology, Peking University Third Hospital, Peking University Eye Center, Beijing, People's Republic of China; 2Department of Neural and Behavioral Sciences, Penn State University, Hershey, PA, USA; 3Singapore Eye Research Institute, Singapore National Eye Centre, Singapore Abstract: This study aimed to determine the protective effects of tetrandrine (Tet on murine ischemia-injured retinal ganglion cells (RGCs. For this, we used serum deprivation cell model, glutamate and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2-induced RGC-5 cell death models, and staurosporine-differentiated neuron-like RGC-5 in vitro. We also investigated cell survival of purified primary-cultured RGCs treated with Tet. An in vivo retinal ischemia/reperfusion model was used to examine RGC survival after Tet administration 1 day before ischemia. We found that Tet affected RGC-5 survival in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Compared to dimethyl sulfoxide treatment, Tet increased the numbers of RGC-5 cells by 30% at 72 hours. After 48 hours, Tet protected staurosporine-induced RGC-5 cells from serum deprivation-induced cell death and significantly increased the relative number of cells cultured with 1 mM H2O2 (P<0.01. Several concentrations of Tet significantly prevented 25-mM-glutamate-induced cell death in a dose-dependent manner. Tet also increased primary RGC survival after 72 and 96 hours. Tet administration (10 µM, 2 µL 1 day before retinal ischemia showed RGC layer loss (greater survival, which was less than those in groups with phosphate-buffered saline intravitreal injection plus ischemia in the central (P=0.005, n=6, middle (P=0.018, n=6, and peripheral (P=0.017, n=6 parts of the retina. Thus, Tet conferred protective effects on serum deprivation models of staurosporine-differentiated neuron-like RGC-5 cells and primary cultured murine RGCs. Furthermore, Tet showed

  3. Higher Levels of Protective Parenting are Associated with Better Young Adult Health: Exploration of Mediation through Epigenetic Influences on Pro-Inflammatory Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven R. H. Beach

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The current investigation was designed to examine the association of parenting during late childhood and early adolescence, a time of rapid physical development, with biological propensity for inflammation. Based on life course theory, it was hypothesized that parenting during this period of rapid growth and development would be associated with biological outcomes and self-reported health assessed in young adulthood. It was expected that association of parenting with health would be mediated either by effects on methylation of a key inflammatory factor, Tumor necrosis factor (TNF, or else by association with a pro-inflammatory shift in the distribution of mononuclear blood cells. Supporting expectations, in a sample of 398 African American youth residing in rural Georgia, followed from age 11 to age 19, parenting at ages 11-13 was associated with youth reports of better health at age 19. We found that parenting was associated with changes in TNF methylation as well as with changes in cell-type composition. However, whereas methylation of TNF was a significant mediator of the association of parenting with young adult health, variation in mononuclear white blood cell types was not a significant mediator of the association of parenting with young adult health. The current research suggests the potential value of examining the health-related effects of parenting in late childhood and early adolescence. Further examination of protection against pro-inflammatory tendencies conferred by parenting appears warranted.

  4. Edaravone protects PC12 cells from ischemic-like injury via attenuating the damage to mitochondria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Ying; LI Meng; LI Ji-cheng; WEI Er-qing

    2006-01-01

    Background: Edaravone had been validated to effectively protect against ischemic injuries. In this study, we investigated the protective effect of edaravone by observing the effects on anti-apoptosis, regulation of Bcl-2/Bax protein expression and recovering from damage to mitochondria after OGD (oxygen-glucose deprivation)-reperfusion. Methods: Viability of PC 12cells which were injured at different time of OGD injury, was quantified by measuring MTT (2-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) staining. In addition, PC 12 cells' viability was also quantified after their preincubation in different concentration of edaravone for 30 min followed by (OGD). Furthermore, apoptotic population of PC12 cells that reinsulted from OGD-reperfusion with or without preincubation with edaravone was determined by flow cytometer analysis,electron microscope and Hoechst/PI staining. Finally, change of Bcl-2/Bax protein expression was detected by Westem blot.Results: (1) The viability of PC 12 cells decreased with time (1~12 h) after OGD. We regarded the model of OGD 2 h, then replacing DMEM (Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium) for another 24 h as an OGD-reperfusion in this research. Furthermore,most PC12 cells were in the state of apoptosis after OGD-reperfusion. (2) The viability of PC12 cells preincubated with edaravone at high concentrations (1,0.1, 0.01 μmol/L) increased significantly with edaravone protecting PC 12 cells from apoptosis after OGD-reperfusion injury. (3) Furthermore, edaravone attenuates the damage of OGD-reperfusion on mitochondria and regulated Bcl-2/Bax protein imbalance expression after OGD-reperfusion. Conclusion: Neuroprotective effects of edaravone on ischemic or other brain injuries may be partly mediated through inhibition of Bcl-2/Bax apoptotic pathways by recovering from the damage of mitochondria.

  5. Protection against filarial infection by 45-49 kDa molecules of Brugia malayi via IFN-γ-mediated iNOS induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Shiv K; Joseph, Sujith K; Verma, Richa; Kushwaha, Vikas; Parmar, Naveen; Yadav, Pawan K; Thota, Jagadeshwar Reddy; Kar, Susanta; Murthy, P Kalpana

    2015-01-15

    Nitric oxide (NO) mediated mechanisms have been implicated in killing of some life-stages of Brugia malayi/Wuchereria bancrofti and protect the host through type 1 responses and IFN-γ stimulated toxic mediators' release. However, the identity of NO stimulating molecules of the parasites is not known. Three predominantly NO-stimulating SDS-PAGE resolved fractions F8 (45.24-48.64 kDa), F11 (33.44-38.44 kDa) and F12 (28.44-33.44 kDa) from B. malayi were identified and their proteins were analyzed by 2-DE and MALDI-TOF/TOF. Tropomyosin, calponin and de novo peptides were identified by 2-DE and MALDI-TOF/TOF in F8 and immunization with F8 conferred most significant protection against L3-initiated infection in Mastomys coucha. Immunized animals showed upregulated F8-induced NO, IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-10, TGF-β release, cellular proliferative responses and specific IgG and IgG1. Anti-IFN-γ, anti-TNF-α, and anti-IL-1β significantly reduced F8-mediated NO generation and iNOS induction at protein levels. Anti-IFN-γ treated cells showed maximum reduction (>74%) in NO generation suggesting a predominant role of IFN-γ in iNOS induction. In conclusion, the findings suggest that F8 which contains tropomyosin, calponin and de novo peptides protects the host via IFN-γ mediated iNOS induction and may hold promise as vaccine candidate(s). This is also the first report of identification of tropomyosin and calponin in B. malayi. PMID:25454090

  6. Justification for antioxidant preconditioning (or how to protect insulin-mediated actions under oxidative stress)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Orzechowski

    2003-02-01

    Insulin resistance is characterized by impaired glucose utilization in the peripheral tissues, accelerated muscle protein degradation, impaired antioxidant defences and extensive cell death. Apparently, both insulin and IGF-1 at physiological concentrations support cell survival by phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase-dependent and independent mechanisms. Postprandial hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia are found in insulin resistance, which accompanies the so-called noninsulin dependent diabetes mellitus (diabetes type 2). Evidence also indicates that increased susceptibility of muscle cells and cardiomycoytes to oxidative stress is among the harmful complications of insulin resistance and diabetes. Limited knowledge showing benefits of preconditioning with antioxidants (vitamin C, E, -lipoic acid, -acetylcysteine) in order to protect insulin action under oxidative stress prompted the author to discuss the theoretical background to this approach. It should be stressed that antioxidant preconditioning is relevant to prevention of both diabetes- and insulin resistance-associated side-effects such as low viability and cell deletion. Furthermore, antioxidant conditioning promises to provide higher efficacy for clinical applications in myoblast transfer therapy and cardiomyoplasty.

  7. H4 histamine receptors mediate cell cycle arrest in growth factor-induced murine and human hematopoietic progenitor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-France Petit-Bertron

    Full Text Available The most recently characterized H4 histamine receptor (H4R is expressed preferentially in the bone marrow, raising the question of its role during hematopoiesis. Here we show that both murine and human progenitor cell populations express this receptor subtype on transcriptional and protein levels and respond to its agonists by reduced growth factor-induced cell cycle progression that leads to decreased myeloid, erythroid and lymphoid colony formation. H4R activation prevents the induction of cell cycle genes through a cAMP/PKA-dependent pathway that is not associated with apoptosis. It is mediated specifically through H4R signaling since gene silencing or treatment with selective antagonists restores normal cell cycle progression. The arrest of growth factor-induced G1/S transition protects murine and human progenitor cells from the toxicity of the cell cycle-dependent anticancer drug Ara-C in vitro and reduces aplasia in a murine model of chemotherapy. This first evidence for functional H4R expression in hematopoietic progenitors opens new therapeutic perspectives for alleviating hematotoxic side effects of antineoplastic drugs.

  8. p-Cresol mediates autophagic cell death in renal proximal tubular cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsin-Hung; Huang, Chiu-Ching; Lin, Tze-Yi; Lin, Ching-Yuang

    2015-04-01

    Higher serum level of p-cresol (PC) in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients has been linked with CKD progression. The toxic effect of PC on diverse cells has been reported by prior studies, except for renal tubular cells. Both autophagy and apoptosis contribute to renal tubular cell death, yet evidence of its response to PC is limited and their crosstalk is still unclear. Autophagy is an important cellular process involved in toxin-induced cell death. Renal tubular cell death in tubular injury is thought to be one of the key events causing the progression of CKD. Thus, we treated rat (NRK-52E) and human (HRPTEC) renal proximal tubular cells (RPTC) with PC and found the cell proliferation was significantly decreased. Cell apoptosis was significantly increased and accompanied with the activation of autophagy as evidenced by increases in LC3-II, beclin 1 and Atg 4. We also found an increase of p62 by c-Jun activation. p62 accumulation could mediate the activation of caspase 8-dependent cell apoptosis. Conversely, knockdown of p62 by siRNA of p62 had the opposite effect by arresting LC3-II accumulation and promoting increasing cell viability. We conclude that PC triggered autophagic RPTC death via JNK-mediated p62 accumulation and then activated caspase 8-dependent cell death pathway. PC can be considered as one of the key events causing progression of CKD, which might affect drug disposition in CKD cases. PMID:25668154

  9. Cytosolic peroxidases protect the lysosome of bloodstream African trypanosomes from iron-mediated membrane damage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corinna Hiller

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available African trypanosomes express three virtually identical non-selenium glutathione peroxidase (Px-type enzymes which preferably detoxify lipid-derived hydroperoxides. As shown previously, bloodstream Trypanosoma brucei lacking the mitochondrial Px III display only a weak and transient proliferation defect whereas parasites that lack the cytosolic Px I and Px II undergo extremely fast lipid peroxidation and cell lysis. The phenotype can completely be rescued by supplementing the medium with the α-tocopherol derivative Trolox. The mechanism underlying the rapid cell death remained however elusive. Here we show that the lysosome is the origin of the cellular injury. Feeding the px I-II knockout parasites with Alexa Fluor-conjugated dextran or LysoTracker in the presence of Trolox yielded a discrete lysosomal staining. Yet upon withdrawal of the antioxidant, the signal became progressively spread over the whole cell body and was completely lost, respectively. T. brucei acquire iron by endocytosis of host transferrin. Supplementing the medium with iron or transferrin induced, whereas the iron chelator deferoxamine and apo-transferrin attenuated lysis of the px I-II knockout cells. Immunofluorescence microscopy with MitoTracker and antibodies against the lysosomal marker protein p67 revealed that disintegration of the lysosome precedes mitochondrial damage. In vivo experiments confirmed the negligible role of the mitochondrial peroxidase: Mice infected with px III knockout cells displayed only a slightly delayed disease development compared to wild-type parasites. Our data demonstrate that in bloodstream African trypanosomes, the lysosome, not the mitochondrion, is the primary site of oxidative damage and cytosolic trypanothione/tryparedoxin-dependent peroxidases protect the lysosome from iron-induced membrane peroxidation. This process appears to be closely linked to the high endocytic rate and distinct iron acquisition mechanisms of the infective

  10. A βPIX-PAK2 complex confers protection against Scrib-dependent and cadherin-mediated apoptosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frank, Scott R; Bell, Jennifer H; Frödin, Morten;

    2012-01-01

    . Scrib is also targeted to adherens junctions by E-cadherin, where Scrib strengthens cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion. Although a role for the Scrib-βPIX-PAK signaling complex in promoting membrane protrusion at wound edges has been elucidated, a function for this complex at adherens junctions...

  11. Hydrogen sulfide mediates the protection of dietary restriction against renal senescence in aged F344 rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen-Juan; Cai, Guang-Yan; Ning, Yi-Chun; Cui, Jing; Hong, Quan; Bai, Xue-Yuan; Xu, Xiao-Meng; Bu, Ru; Sun, Xue-Feng; Chen, Xiang-Mei

    2016-01-01

    Renal aging is always accompanied by increased oxidative stress. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) can be up-regulated by 50% dietary restriction (DR) for 7-day and can block mitochondrial oxidative stress. H2S production exerts a critical role in yeast, worm, and fruit fly models of DR-mediated longevity. In this study, we found that renal aging could be attenuated by 30% DR for 6-month (DR-6M) and life-long (DR-LL), but not for 6-week (DR-6W). The expressions of cystathionine-γ-lyase (CGL) and cystathionine-β- synthase (CBS) were improved by DR-6M and DR-LL. Endogenous H2S production shared the same trend with CBS and CGL, while glutathione (GSH) didn't. When comparing efficiencies of DR for different durations, more evident production of H2S was found in DR-6M and DR-LL than in DR-6W. Finally the level of oxidative stress was improved by DR-6M and DR-LL rather than by DR-6W. It concluded that aged rats had the ability to produce enough H2S on 30% DR interventions protecting against renal aging, and the effect of DR for long-term were more significant than that of DR for short-term. PMID:27456368

  12. BNNT-mediated irreversible electroporatio: its potential on cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vittoria Raffa, Cristina Riggio, Michael W. Smith, Kevin C. Jordan, Wei Cao, Alfred Cuschieri

    2012-10-01

    Tissue ablation, i.e., the destruction of undesirable tissues, has become an important minimally invasive technique alternative to resection surgery for the treatment of tumours. Several methods for tissue ablation are based on thermal techniques using cold, e.g. cryosurgery [1] or heat, e.g. radiofrequency [2] or high-intensity focused ultrasound [3] or nanoparticle-mediated irradiation [4]. Alternatively, irreversible electroporation (IRE) has been proposed as non thermal technique for minimally invasive tissue ablation based on the use of electrical pulses. When the electric field is applied to a cell, a change in transmembrane potential is induced, which can cause biochemical and physiological changes of the cell. When the threshold value of the transmembrane potential is exceeded, the cell membrane becomes permeable, thus allowing entrance of molecules that otherwise cannot cross the membrane [5]. A further increase in the electric field intensity may cause irreversible membrane permeabilization and cell death. These pulses create irreversible defects (pores) in the cell membrane lipid bilayer, causing cell death through loss of cell homeostasis [6]. This is desirable in tumour ablation in order to produce large cell death, without the use of cytostatic drugs. A study of Davalos, Mir and Rubinsky showed that IRE can ablate substantial volumes of tissue without inducing a thermal effect and therefore serve as an independent and new tissue ablation modality; this opened the way to the use of IRE in surgery [7]. Their finding was subsequently confirmed in studies on cells [8], small animal models [9] and in large animal models in the liver [10] and the heart [11]. The most important finding in these papers is that irreversible electroporation produces precisely delineated ablation zones with cell scale resolution between ablated and non-ablated areas, without zones in which the extent of damage changes gradually as during thermal ablation. Furthermore, it is

  13. Mast cell mediator tryptase levels after inhalation or intravenous administration of high doses pharmaceutically prepared heroin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.J. Rook; A.P. van Zanten; W. van den Brink; J.M. van Ree; J.H. Beijnen

    2006-01-01

    Background: Opioids like morphine and heroin induce mast cell degranulation in vitro. The release of mast cell mediators like histamine and tryptase may lead to allergic symptoms. In this study it was investigated whether mast cell mediator release also occurs in vivo in addicted patients who partic

  14. DNA From Dead Cancer Cells Induces TLR9-Mediated Invasion and Inflammation In Living Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuomela, Johanna; Sandholm, Jouko; Kaakinen, Mika; Patel, Ankita; Kauppila, Joonas H.; Ilvesaro, Joanna; Chen, Dongquan; Harris, Kevin W.; Graves, David; Selander, Katri S.

    2014-01-01

    TLR9 is a cellular DNA-receptor, which is widely expressed in breast and other cancers. Although synthetic TLR9-ligands induce cancer cell invasion in vitro, the role of TLR9 in cancer pathophysiology has remained unclear. We show here that living cancer cells uptake DNA from chemotherapy-killed cancer cells. We discovered that such DNA induces TLR9- and cathepsin-mediated invasion in living cancer cells. To study whether this phenomenon contributes to treatment responses, triple negative, human MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells stably expressing control or TLR9 siRNA were inoculated orthotopically into nude mice. The mice were treated with vehicle or doxorubicin. The tumor groups exhibited equal decreases in size in response to doxorubicin. However, while the weights of vehicle-treated mice were similar, mice bearing control siRNA tumors became significantly more cachectic in response to doxorubicin, as compared with similarly treated mice bearing TLR9 siRNA tumors, suggesting a TLR9-mediated inflammation at the site of the tumor. In conclusion, our findings propose that DNA released from chemotherapy-killed cancer cells has significant influence on TLR9-mediated biological effects in living cancer cells. Through these mechanisms, tumor TLR9 expression may affect treatment responses to chemotherapy. PMID:24212717

  15. Refined live attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Enteritidis vaccines mediate homologous and heterologous serogroup protection in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennant, Sharon M; Schmidlein, Patrick; Simon, Raphael; Pasetti, Marcela F; Galen, James E; Levine, Myron M

    2015-12-01

    Invasive nontyphoidal Salmonella (NTS) infections constitute a major health problem among infants and toddlers in sub-Saharan Africa; these infections also occur in infants and the elderly in developed countries. We genetically engineered a Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strain of multilocus sequence type 313, the predominant genotype circulating in sub-Saharan Africa. We evaluated the capacities of S. Typhimurium and Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis ΔguaBA ΔclpX live oral vaccines to protect mice against a highly lethal challenge dose of the homologous serovar and determined protection against other group B and D serovars circulating in sub-Saharan Africa. The vaccines S. Typhimurium CVD 1931 and S. Enteritidis CVD 1944 were immunogenic and protected BALB/c mice against 10,000 50% lethal doses (LD50) of S. Typhimurium or S. Enteritidis, respectively. S. Typhimurium CVD 1931 protected mice against the group B serovar Salmonella enterica serovar Stanleyville (91% vaccine efficacy), and S. Enteritidis CVD 1944 protected mice against the group D serovar Salmonella enterica serovar Dublin (85% vaccine efficacy). High rates of survival were observed when mice were infected 12 weeks postimmunization, indicating that the vaccines elicited long-lived protective immunity. Whereas CVD 1931 did not protect against S. Enteritidis R11, CVD 1944 did mediate protection against S. Typhimurium D65 (81% efficacy). These findings suggest that a bivalent (S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis) vaccine would provide broad protection against the majority of invasive NTS infections in sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:26351285

  16. Clausena anisata-mediated protection against lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Chan-Mi; Shin, In-Sik; Shin, Na-Rae; Hong, Ju-Mi; Kwon, Ok-Kyoung; Kim, Jung-Hee; Oh, Sei-Ryang; Bach, Tran-The; Hai, Do-Van; Quang, Bui-Hong; Choi, Sang-Ho; Lee, Joongku; Myung, Pyung-Keun; Ahn, Kyung-Seop

    2016-04-01

    Clausena anisata (Willd.) Hook.f. ex Benth. (CA), which is widely used in traditional medicine, reportedly exerts antitumor, anti-inflammatory and other important therapeutic effects. The aim of the present study was to investigate the potential therapeutic effects of CA in a mouse model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) and in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. Male C57BL/6 mice were administered treatments for 3 days by oral gavage. On day 3, the mice were instilled intranasally with LPS or PBS followed 3 h later by oral CA (30 mg/kg) or vehicle administration. In vitro, CA decreased nitric oxide (NO) production and pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin (IL)-6 and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. CA also reduced the expression of pro-inflammatory mediators, such as cyclooxygenase-2. In vivo, CA administration significantly reduced inflammatory cell numbers in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and suppressed pro-inflammatory cytokine levels, including tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), IL-6, and IL-1β, as well as reactive oxygen species production in the BALF. CA also effectively reduced airway inflammation in mouse lung tissue of an LPS-induced ALI mouse model, in addition to decreasing inhibitor κB (IκB) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) p65 phosphorylation. Taken together, the findings demonstrated that CA inhibited inflammatory responses in a mouse model of LPS-induced ALI and in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. Thus, CA is a potential candidate for development as an adjunctive treatment for inflammatory disorders, such as ALI. PMID:26952971

  17. Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Triggers Protective Pathways in Pancreatic Beta-Cells Exposed to Glycated Serum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Puddu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Advanced glycation end products (AGEs might play a pathophysiological role in the development of diabetes and its complications. AGEs negatively affect pancreatic beta-cell function and the expression of transcriptional factors regulating insulin gene. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1, an incretin hormone that regulates glucose homeostasis, might counteract the harmful effects of AGEs on the beta cells in culture. The aim of this study was to identify the intracellular mechanisms underlying GLP-1-mediated protection from AGE-induced detrimental activities in pancreatic beta cells. HIT-T15 cells were cultured for 5 days with glycated serum (GS, consisting in a pool of AGEs, in the presence or absence of 10 nmol/L GLP-1. After evaluation of oxidative stress, we determined the expression and subcellular localization of proteins involved in maintaining redox balance and insulin gene expression, such as nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2 (Nrf2, glutathione reductase, PDX-1, and MafA. Then, we investigated proinsulin production. The results showed that GS increased oxidative stress, reduced protein expression of all investigated factors through proteasome activation, and decreased proinsulin content. Furthermore, GS reduced ability of PDX-1 and MafA to bind DNA. Coincubation with GLP-1 reversed these GS-mediated detrimental effects. In conclusion, GLP-1, protecting cells against oxidants, triggers protective intercellular pathways in HIT-T15 cells exposed to GS.

  18. Stimulation of TLR7 with Gardiquimod Enhances Protection and Activation of Immune Cells from γ-Irradiation Exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy for cancer patients is based on the radiation-induced cell death, but high dose of radiation is able to cause break of immune system. Thus, protection of immune cells from radiation damage is required to enhance the efficiency and reduce the harmful side effects during cancer radiotherapy. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are important not only in initiating innate immunity against microbial infection, but also inducing Th1-mediated immunity with producing cytokines and chemokines. Cell stimulation via TLRs leads to downstream activation of NF-kB and other transcription factors. Consequently, several genes encoding mediators and effector molecules of the innate as well as the adaptive immune response are transcribed. There are several previous findings that activated immune cells via TLR9 inducing pathways are resistant to chemical or radiation exposure. But it is not clear that the other TLRs also have the same abilities to protect immune cells against cellular damages including γ-irradiation. This research was performed to evaluate protective effect of immune cells from γ-irradiation through TLR-7 activation pathway

  19. Surveillance and radiological protection in the Hot Cell laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Hot Cells Laboratory (LCC) located in the National Institute of Nuclear Research are an installation that was designed for the management at distance of 10,000 Curies of Co-60 or other radioactive materials with different values in activity. The management of such materials in the installation, implies to analyze and to determine the doses that the POE will receive as well as the implementation of protection measures and appropriate radiological safety so that is completed the specified by the ALARA concept. In this work it is carried out an evaluation of the doses to receive for the POE when managing radionuclides with maximum activities that can be allowed in function of the current conditions of the cells and an evaluation of results is made with the program of surveillance and radiological protection implemented for the development of the works that carried out in the installation. (Author)

  20. Guanosine protects glial cells against 6-hydroxydopamine toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuliani, Patricia; Ballerini, Patrizia; Buccella, Silvana; Ciccarelli, Renata; Rathbone, Michel P; Romano, Silvia; D'Alimonte, Iolanda; Caciagli, Francesco; Di Iorio, Patrizia; Pokorski, Mieczyslaw

    2015-01-01

    Increasing body of evidence indicates that neuron-neuroglia interaction may play a key role in determining the progression of neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson's disease (PD), a chronic pathological condition characterized by selective loss of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra. We have previously reported that guanosine (GUO) antagonizes MPP(+)-induced cytotoxicity in neuroblastoma cells and exerts neuroprotective effects against 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) and beta-amyloid-induced apoptosis of SH-SY5Y cells. In the present study we demonstrate that GUO protected C6 glioma cells, taken as a model system for astrocytes, from 6-OHDA-induced neurotoxicity. We show that GUO, either alone or in combination with 6-OHDA activated the cell survival pathways ERK and PI3K/Akt. The involvement of these signaling systems in the mechanism of the nucleoside action was strengthened by a reduction of the protective effect when glial cells were pretreated with U0126 or LY294002, the specific inhibitors of MEK1/2 and PI3K, respectively. Since the protective effect on glial cell death of GUO was not affected by pretreatment with a cocktail of nucleoside transporter blockers, GUO transport and its intracellular accumulation were not at play in our in vitro model of PD. This fits well with our data which pointed to the presence of specific binding sites for GUO on rat brain membranes. On the whole, the results described in the present study, along with our recent evidence showing that GUO when administered to rats via intraperitoneal injection is able to reach the brain and with previous data indicating that it stimulates the release of neurotrophic factors, suggest that GUO, a natural compound, by acting at the glial level could be a promising agent to be tested against neurodegeneration. PMID:25310956

  1. Gene transfection mediated by polyethyleneimine-polyethylene glycol nanocarrier prevents cisplatin-induced spiral ganglion cell damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guan-gui Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyethyleneimine-polyethylene glycol (PEI-PEG, a novel nanocarrier, has been used for transfection and gene therapy in a variety of cells. In our previous study, we successfully carried out PEI-PEG-mediated gene transfer in spiral ganglion cells. It remains unclear whether PEI-PEG could be used for gene therapy with X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP in the inner ear. In the present study, we performed PEI-PEG-mediated XIAP gene transfection in the cochlea of Sprague-Dawley rats, via scala tympani fenestration, before daily cisplatin injections. Auditory brainstem reflex tests demonstrated the protective effects of XIAP gene therapy on auditory function. Immunohistochemical staining revealed XIAP protein expression in the cytoplasm of cells in the spiral ganglion, the organ of Corti and the stria vascularis. Reverse transcription-PCR detected high levels of XIAP mRNA expression in the cochlea. The present findings suggest that PEI-PEG nanocarrier-mediated XIAP gene transfection results in XIAP expression in the cochlea, prevents damage to cochlear spiral ganglion cells, and protects hearing.

  2. Statins, Bcl-2 and Apoptosis: Cell Death or Cell Protection?

    OpenAIRE

    Wood, W. Gibson; Igbavboa, Urule; Muller, Walter E.; Gunter P. Eckert

    2013-01-01

    Statins have proven their effectiveness in the treatment of cardiovascular disease. This class of drugs has also attracted attention as a potential treatment for dissimilar diseases such as certain types of cancers and neurodegenerative diseases. What appears to be a contradiction is that in the case of cancer, it has been suggested that statins increase apoptosis and alter levels of Bcl-2 family members (e.g., reduce Bcl-2 and increase Bax) whereas, studies mainly using non-cancerous cells r...

  3. Bystander apoptosis in human cells mediated by irradiated blood plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinnikov, Volodymyr, E-mail: vlad.vinnikov@mail.ru [Grigoriev Institute for Medical Radiology of the National Academy of Medical Science of Ukraine (Ukraine); Lloyd, David; Finnon, Paul [Centre for Radiation, Chemical and Environmental Hazards of the Health Protection Agency of the United Kingdom (United Kingdom)

    2012-03-01

    Following exposure to high doses of ionizing radiation, due to an accident or during radiotherapy, bystander signalling poses a potential hazard to unirradiated cells and tissues. This process can be mediated by factors circulating in blood plasma. Thus, we assessed the ability of plasma taken from in vitro irradiated human blood to produce a direct cytotoxic effect, by inducing apoptosis in primary human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBM), which mainly comprised G{sub 0}-stage lymphocytes. Plasma was collected from healthy donors' blood irradiated in vitro to 0-40 Gy acute {gamma}-rays. Reporter PBM were separated from unirradiated blood with Histopaque and held in medium with the test plasma for 24 h at 37 Degree-Sign C. Additionally, plasma from in vitro irradiated and unirradiated blood was tested against PBM collected from blood given 4 Gy. Apoptosis in reporter PBM was measured by the Annexin V test using flow cytometry. Plasma collected from unirradiated and irradiated blood did not produce any apoptotic response above the control level in unirradiated reporter PBM. Surprisingly, plasma from irradiated blood caused a dose-dependent reduction of apoptosis in irradiated reporter PBM. The yields of radiation-induced cell death in irradiated reporter PBM (after subtracting the respective values in unirradiated reporter PBM) were 22.2 {+-} 1.8% in plasma-free cultures, 21.6 {+-} 1.1% in cultures treated with plasma from unirradiated blood, 20.2 {+-} 1.4% in cultures with plasma from blood given 2-4 Gy and 16.7 {+-} 3.2% in cultures with plasma from blood given 6-10 Gy. These results suggested that irradiated blood plasma did not cause a radiation-induced bystander cell-killing effect. Instead, a reduction of apoptosis in irradiated reporter cells cultured with irradiated blood plasma has implications concerning oncogenic risk from mutated cells surviving after high dose in vivo irradiation (e.g. radiotherapy) and requires further study.

  4. Opposing effects of CXCR3 and CCR5 deficiency on CD8+ T cell-mediated inflammation in the central nervous system of virus-infected mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Lemos, Carina; Christensen, Jeanette Erbo; Nansen, Anneline;

    2005-01-01

    T cells play a key role in the control of viral infection in the CNS but may also contribute to immune-mediated cell damage. To study the redundancy of the chemokine receptors CXCR3 and CCR5 in regulating virus-induced CD8+ T cell-mediated inflammation in the brain, CXCR3/CCR5 double-deficient mice...... and therefore protect mice against the otherwise fatal CD8+ T cell-mediated immune attack. Contrary to expectations, the accumulation of mononuclear cells in cerebrospinal fluid was only slightly delayed compared with mice with normal expression of both receptors. Even more surprising, CXCR3/CCR5...... plays an important role in controlling CNS inflammation, other receptors but not CCR5 also contribute significantly. Additionally, our results suggest that CCR5 primarily functions as a negative regulator of the antiviral CD8+ T cell response....

  5. T-helper cell-mediated proliferation and cytokine responses against recombinant Merkel cell polyomavirus-like particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Arun; Chen, Tingting; Pakkanen, Sari; Kantele, Anu; Söderlund-Venermo, Maria; Hedman, Klaus; Franssila, Rauli

    2011-01-01

    The newly discovered Merkel Cell Polyomavirus (MCPyV) resides in approximately 80% of Merkel cell carcinomas (MCC). Causal role of MCPyV for this rare and aggressive skin cancer is suggested by monoclonal integration and truncation of large T (LT) viral antigen in MCC cells. The mutated MCPyV has recently been found in highly purified leukemic cells from patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), suggesting a pathogenic role also in CLL. About 50-80% of adults display MCPyV-specific antibodies. The humoral immunity does not protect against the development of MCC, as neutralizing MCPyV antibodies occur in higher levels among MCC patients than healthy controls. Impaired T-cell immunity has been linked with aggressive MCC behavior. Therefore, cellular immunity appears to be important in MCPyV infection surveillance. In order to elucidate the role of MCPyV-specific Th-cell immunity, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of healthy adults were stimulated with MCPyV VP1 virus-like particles (VLPs), using human bocavirus (HBoV) VLPs and Candida albicans antigen as positive controls. Proliferation, IFN-γ, IL-13 and IL-10 responses were examined in 15 MCPyV-seropositive and 15 seronegative volunteers. With the MCPyV antigen, significantly stronger Th-cell responses were found in MCPyV-seropositive than MCPyV-seronegative subjects, whereas with the control antigens, the responses were statistically similar. The most readily detectable cytokine was IFN-γ. The MCPyV antigen tended to induce stronger IFN-γ responses than HBoV VLP antigen. Taken together, MCPyV-specific Th-cells elicit vigorous IFN-γ responses. IFN-γ being a cytokine with major antiviral and tumor suppressing functions, Th-cells are suggested to be important mediators of MCPyV-specific immune surveillance. PMID:21991346

  6. T-helper cell-mediated proliferation and cytokine responses against recombinant Merkel cell polyomavirus-like particles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun Kumar

    Full Text Available The newly discovered Merkel Cell Polyomavirus (MCPyV resides in approximately 80% of Merkel cell carcinomas (MCC. Causal role of MCPyV for this rare and aggressive skin cancer is suggested by monoclonal integration and truncation of large T (LT viral antigen in MCC cells. The mutated MCPyV has recently been found in highly purified leukemic cells from patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL, suggesting a pathogenic role also in CLL. About 50-80% of adults display MCPyV-specific antibodies. The humoral immunity does not protect against the development of MCC, as neutralizing MCPyV antibodies occur in higher levels among MCC patients than healthy controls. Impaired T-cell immunity has been linked with aggressive MCC behavior. Therefore, cellular immunity appears to be important in MCPyV infection surveillance. In order to elucidate the role of MCPyV-specific Th-cell immunity, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC of healthy adults were stimulated with MCPyV VP1 virus-like particles (VLPs, using human bocavirus (HBoV VLPs and Candida albicans antigen as positive controls. Proliferation, IFN-γ, IL-13 and IL-10 responses were examined in 15 MCPyV-seropositive and 15 seronegative volunteers. With the MCPyV antigen, significantly stronger Th-cell responses were found in MCPyV-seropositive than MCPyV-seronegative subjects, whereas with the control antigens, the responses were statistically similar. The most readily detectable cytokine was IFN-γ. The MCPyV antigen tended to induce stronger IFN-γ responses than HBoV VLP antigen. Taken together, MCPyV-specific Th-cells elicit vigorous IFN-γ responses. IFN-γ being a cytokine with major antiviral and tumor suppressing functions, Th-cells are suggested to be important mediators of MCPyV-specific immune surveillance.

  7. Silk lutein extract and its combination with vitamin E reduce UVB-mediated oxidative damage to retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aimjongjun, Sathid; Sutheerawattananonda, Manote; Limpeanchob, Nanteetip

    2013-07-01

    Increased exposure to solar ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation may promote age related macular degeneration (AMD). Lutein can protect retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells from various oxidative insults but its direct protection against UVB has not been reported. This study aimed to demonstrate protective effects of silk lutein extract against UVB-induced oxidative damage to RPE cells and compared with standard lutein and Trolox, a vitamin E analog. ARPE-19 cells were treated with luteins with and without Trolox prior to UVB exposure. Cell viability and apoptosis were determined by trypan blue staining and caspase-3 activity, respectively. Oxidative damage was evaluated by measuring intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), lipid peroxidation, and activities of antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and catalase). Levels of lutein remained in culture medium was determined by HPLC. Both luteins reduced cellular ROS levels and lipid peroxidation mediated by UVB, and subsequently increased cell viability and reduced apoptosis. They also restored activities of most tested antioxidant enzymes. Enhancement of lutein antioxidant efficacy was observed in the presence of Trolox. In all these effects, the two lutein preparations had similar effectivenesses. In cell free media, Trolox enhanced the protective effect of lutein probably by reducing its degradation and repairing the oxidized derivatives. Yellow silk cocoon is a potential candidate of lutein for further development as dietary supplement for the prevention of AMD. PMID:23651647

  8. The Protective Effect of Gangliosides on Lead (Pb)-Induced Neurotoxicity Is Mediated by Autophagic Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Hongtao; Wang, Lan; He, Junhong; Wang, Zhufeng

    2016-01-01

    Lead (Pb) is a ubiquitous environmental and industrial pollutant and can affect intelligence development and the learning ability and memory of children. Therefore, necessary measures should be taken to protect the central nervous system (CNS) from Pb toxicity. Gangliosides are sialic acid-containing glycosphingolipids that are constituents of mammalian cell membranes and are more abundantly expressed in the CNS. Studies have shown that gangliosides constitute a useful tool in the attempt to promote functional recovery of CNS and can reverse Pb-induced impairments of synaptic plasticity in rats. However, the detailed mechanisms have yet to be fully understood. In our present study, we tried to investigate the role of gangliosides in Pb-induced injury in hippocampus neurons and to further confirm the detailed mechanism. Our results show that Pb-induced injuries in the spatial reference memory were associated with a reduction of cell viability and cell apoptosis, and treatment with gangliosides markedly ameliorated the Pb-induced injury by inhibition of apoptosis action. Gangliosides further attenuated Pb-induced the abnormal autophagic process by regulation of mTOR pathways. In summary, our study establishes the efficacy of gangliosides as neuroprotective agents and provides a strong rationale for further studies on the underlying mechanisms of their neuroprotective functions. PMID:27023584

  9. The Protective Effect of Gangliosides on Lead (Pb-Induced Neurotoxicity Is Mediated by Autophagic Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongtao Meng

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Lead (Pb is a ubiquitous environmental and industrial pollutant and can affect intelligence development and the learning ability and memory of children. Therefore, necessary measures should be taken to protect the central nervous system (CNS from Pb toxicity. Gangliosides are sialic acid-containing glycosphingolipids that are constituents of mammalian cell membranes and are more abundantly expressed in the CNS. Studies have shown that gangliosides constitute a useful tool in the attempt to promote functional recovery of CNS and can reverse Pb-induced impairments of synaptic plasticity in rats. However, the detailed mechanisms have yet to be fully understood. In our present study, we tried to investigate the role of gangliosides in Pb-induced injury in hippocampus neurons and to further confirm the detailed mechanism. Our results show that Pb-induced injuries in the spatial reference memory were associated with a reduction of cell viability and cell apoptosis, and treatment with gangliosides markedly ameliorated the Pb-induced injury by inhibition of apoptosis action. Gangliosides further attenuated Pb-induced the abnormal autophagic process by regulation of mTOR pathways. In summary, our study establishes the efficacy of gangliosides as neuroprotective agents and provides a strong rationale for further studies on the underlying mechanisms of their neuroprotective functions.

  10. USP7 Enforces Heterochromatinization of p53 Target Promoters by Protecting SUV39H1 from MDM2-Mediated Degradation

    OpenAIRE

    Sathish Kumar Mungamuri; Rui F. Qiao; Shen Yao; James J. Manfredi; Wei Gu; Stuart A. Aaronson

    2016-01-01

    The H3K9me3 repressive histone conformation of p53 target promoters is abrogated in response to p53 activation by MDM2-mediated SUV39H1 degradation. Here, we present evidence that the USP7 deubiquitinase protects SUV39H1 from MDM2-mediated ubiquitination in the absence of p53 stimulus. USP7 occupies p53 target promoters in unstressed conditions, a process that is abrogated with p53 activation associated with loss of the H3K9me3 mark on these same promoters. Mechanistically, USP7 forms a trime...

  11. Diallyl trisulfide protects against ethanol-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis via a hydrogen sulfide-mediated mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lian-Yun; Chen, Qin; Zhu, Xiao-Jing; Kong, De-Song; Wu, Li; Shao, Jiang-Juan; Zheng, Shi-Zhong

    2016-07-01

    Garlic is one natural source of organic sulfur containing compounds and has shown promise in the treatment of chronic liver disease. Dietary garlic consumption is inversely correlated with the progression of alcoholic fatty liver (AFL), although the exact underlying mechanisms are not clear. Our previous studies also have shown that diallyl trisulfide (DATS), the primary organosulfur compound from Allium sativum L, displayed anti-lipid deposition and antioxidant properties in AFL. The aim of the present study was to clarify the underlying mechanisms. In the present study, we used the intragastric infusion model of alcohol administration and human normal liver cell line LO2 cultured with suitable ethanol to mimic the pathological condition of AFL. We showed that accumulation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) was lowered significantly by the administration of DATS, but antioxidant capacity was increased by DATS. Additionally, DATS inhibited hepatocyte apoptosis via down-regulating Bax expression and up-regulating Bcl-2 expression, and attenuated alcohol-induced caspase-dependent apoptosis. More importantly, using iodoacetamide (IAM) to block hydrogen sulfide (H2S) production from DATS, we noted that IAM abolished all the above effects of DATS in ethanol-treated LO2 cells. Lastly, we found DATS could increase the expressions of cystathionine gamma-lyase (CSE) and cystathionine beta-synthase (CBS), the major H2S-producing enzymes. These results demonstrate that DATS protect against alcohol-induced fatty liver via a H2S-mediated mechanism. Therefore, targeting H2S may play a therapeutic role for AFL. PMID:27107369

  12. Type I collagen gel protects murine fibrosarcoma L929 cells from TNFα-induced cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murine fibrosarcoma L929 cells have been used to test efficacy of proinflammatory cytokine TNFα. In the present study, we reported on protective effect of type I collagen gel used as L929 cell culture. L929 cell grew and proliferated well on collagen gel. However, the L929 cells exhibited cobblestone-like morphology which was much different from the spread fusiform shape when cultured on conventional cell dishes as well as the cells tended to aggregate. On conventional cell culture dishes, the cells treated with TNFα became round in shape and eventually died in a necroptotic manner. The cells cultured on collagen gel, however, were completely unaffected. TNFα treatment was reported to induce autophagy in L929 cells on the plastic dish, and therefore we investigated the effect of collagen gel on induction of autophagy. The results indicated that autophagy induced by TNFα treatment was much reduced when the cells were cultured on collagen gel. In conclusion, type I collagen gel protected L929 cell from TNFα-induced cell death. - Highlights: • Collagen gel culture changed the morphology of L929 cells. • L929 cell cultured on collagen gel were resistant to TNFα-induced cell death. • Collagen gel culture inhibited TNFα-induced autophagy in L929 cells

  13. Type I collagen gel protects murine fibrosarcoma L929 cells from TNFα-induced cell death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hong-Ju; He, Wen-Qi; Chen, Ling; Liu, Wei-Wei; Xu, Qian; Xia, Ming-Yu; Hayashi, Toshihiko [China-Japan Research Institute of Medical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Shenyang Pharmaceutical University, Shenyang 110016 (China); Fujisaki, Hitomi; Hattori, Shunji [Nippi Research Institute of Biomatrix, Toride, Ibaraki 302-0017 (Japan); Tashiro, Shin-ichi [Institute for Clinical and Biomedical Sciences, Kyoto 603-8072 (Japan); Onodera, Satoshi [Department of Clinical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Showa Pharmaceutical University, Tokyo 194-8543 (Japan); Ikejima, Takashi, E-mail: ikejimat@vip.sina.com [China-Japan Research Institute of Medical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Shenyang Pharmaceutical University, Shenyang 110016 (China)

    2015-02-20

    Murine fibrosarcoma L929 cells have been used to test efficacy of proinflammatory cytokine TNFα. In the present study, we reported on protective effect of type I collagen gel used as L929 cell culture. L929 cell grew and proliferated well on collagen gel. However, the L929 cells exhibited cobblestone-like morphology which was much different from the spread fusiform shape when cultured on conventional cell dishes as well as the cells tended to aggregate. On conventional cell culture dishes, the cells treated with TNFα became round in shape and eventually died in a necroptotic manner. The cells cultured on collagen gel, however, were completely unaffected. TNFα treatment was reported to induce autophagy in L929 cells on the plastic dish, and therefore we investigated the effect of collagen gel on induction of autophagy. The results indicated that autophagy induced by TNFα treatment was much reduced when the cells were cultured on collagen gel. In conclusion, type I collagen gel protected L929 cell from TNFα-induced cell death. - Highlights: • Collagen gel culture changed the morphology of L929 cells. • L929 cell cultured on collagen gel were resistant to TNFα-induced cell death. • Collagen gel culture inhibited TNFα-induced autophagy in L929 cells.

  14. Cell mediated immune response in human antirabies revaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora Regina Veiga

    1987-04-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of secondary cell mediated immune response (CMI in human antirabies immunization was studied. The Puenzalida & Palácios vaccine was used because it is routinely used in Brazil. CMI was evaluated by lymphoblastic transformation indices obtained in whole blood culture in the presence of rabies and control (nervous tissue antigens. Eleven volunteers submitted to revaccination constituted the group under study, while three other volunteers submitted primo vaccination were utilized as control group. A clear secondary CMI to rabies antigen was detected in all the revaccinated volunteers who showed earlier and more intense response than the control group. Response to the control antigen, however, present in all the components of the first group was not detectable in two out of the three primovaccinated and very low in the third one.

  15. Investigation of anti-WI-1 adhesin antibody-mediated protection in experimental pulmonary blastomycosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wüthrich, M; Klein, B S

    2000-05-01

    Infection with Blastomyces dermatitidis elicits strong antibody responses to the surface adhesin WI-1. The antibodies are directed chiefly against the adhesive domain, a 25-amino-acid repeat. Tandem-repeat-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were studied for their opsonic activity in vitro and their capacity to adoptively transfer protection in murine experimental blastomycosis. mAbs to WI-1 enhanced binding and entry of B. dermatitidis yeasts into J774. 16 cells but did not enhance killing or growth inhibition of the yeast. Passive transfer of 8 mAbs to WI-1 into 3 different inbred strains of mice also did not improve the course of experimental infection and sometimes worsened it. mu-deficient mice were more resistant to experimental blastomycosis than were intact littermates, and passive transfer of the mAbs into these mice did not protect them against experimental infection. Thus, antibody to WI-1 does not appear to improve the outcome of murine blastomycosis and may enhance the infection. PMID:10823774

  16. Gastro-protective action of lafutidine mediated by capsaicin-sensitive afferent neurons without interaction with TRPV1 and involvement of endogenous prostaglandins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kazuhiro Fukushima; Yoko Aoi; Shinichi Kato; Koji Takeuchi

    2006-01-01

    AIM: Lafutidine, a histamine H2 receptor antagonist,exhibits gastro-protective action mediated by capsaicinsensitive afferent neurons (CSN). We compared the effect between lafutidine and capsaicin, with respect to the interaction with endogenous prostaglandins (PG), nitric oxide (NO) and the afferent neurons, including transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1).METHODS: Male SD rats and C57BL/6 mice, both wildtype and prostacyclin IP receptor knockout animals, were used after 18 h of fasting. Gastric lesions were induced by the po administration of HCI/ethanol (60% in 150 mmol/L HCI) in a volume of 1 mL for rats or 0.3 mL for mice.RESULTS: Both lafutidine and capsaicin (1-10 mg/kg,po) afforded dose-dependent protection against HCI/ethanol in rats and mice. The effects were attenuated by both the ablation of CSN and pretreatment with NG-nitroL-arginine methyl ester, yet only the effect of capsaicin was mitigated by prior administration of capsazepine, the TRPV1 antagonist, as well as indomethacin. Lafutidine protected the stomach against HCI/ethanol in IP receptor knockout mice, similar to wild-type animals, while capsaicin failed to afford protection in the animals lacking IP receptors. Neither of these agents affected the mucosal PGE2 or 6-keto PGF1α contents in rat stomachs. Capsaicin evoked an increase in [Ca2+]i in rat TRPV1-transfected HEK293 cells while lafutidine did not.CONCLUSION: These results suggest that although both lafutidine and capsaicin exhibit gastro-protective action mediated by CSN, the mode of their effects differs regarding the dependency on endogenous PGs/IP receptors and TRPV1. It is assumed that lafutidine interacts with CSN at yet unidentified sites other than TRPV1.

  17. Integrin receptors on tumor cells facilitate NK cell-mediated antibody-dependent cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anikeeva, Nadia; Steblyanko, Maria; Fayngerts, Svetlana; Kopylova, Natalya; Marshall, Deborah J; Powers, Gordon D; Sato, Takami; Campbell, Kerry S; Sykulev, Yuri

    2014-08-01

    NK cells that mediate ADCC play an important role in tumor-specific immunity. We have examined factors limiting specific lysis of tumor cells by CD16.NK-92 cells induced by CNTO 95LF antibodies recognizing αV integrins that are overexpressed on many tumor cells. Although all tested tumor cells were killed by CD16.NK-92 effectors in the presence of the antibodies, the killing of target cells with a low level of ICAM-1 expression revealed a dramatic decrease in their specific lysis at high antibody concentration, revealing a dose limiting effect. A similar effect was also observed with primary human NK cells. The effect was erased after IFN-γ treatment of tumor cells resulting in upregulation of ICAM-1. Furthermore, killing of the same tumor cells induced by Herceptin antibody was significantly impaired in the presence of CNTO 95Ala-Ala antibody variant that blocks αV integrins but is incapable of binding to CD16. These data suggest that αV integrins on tumor cells could compensate for the loss of ICAM-1 molecules, thereby facilitating ADCC by NK cells. Thus, NK cells could exercise cytolytic activity against ICAM-1 deficient tumor cells in the absence of proinflammatory cytokines, emphasizing the importance of NK cells in tumor-specific immunity at early stages of cancer. PMID:24810893

  18. Cannabidiol protects oligodendrocyte progenitor cells from inflammation-induced apoptosis by attenuating endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mecha, M; Torrao, A S; Mestre, L; Carrillo-Salinas, F J; Mechoulam, R; Guaza, C

    2012-01-01

    Cannabidiol (CBD) is the most abundant cannabinoid in Cannabis sativa that has no psychoactive properties. CBD has been approved to treat inflammation, pain and spasticity associated with multiple sclerosis (MS), of which demyelination and oligodendrocyte loss are hallmarks. Thus, we investigated the protective effects of CBD against the damage to oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) mediated by the immune system. Doses of 1 μM CBD protect OPCs from oxidative stress by decreasing the production of reactive oxygen species. CBD also protects OPCs from apoptosis induced by LPS/IFNγ through the decrease of caspase 3 induction via mechanisms that do not involve CB1, CB2, TRPV1 or PPARγ receptors. Tunicamycin-induced OPC death was attenuated by CBD, suggesting a role of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in the mode of action of CBD. This protection against ER stress-induced apoptosis was associated with reduced phosphorylation of eiF2α, one of the initiators of the ER stress pathway. Indeed, CBD diminished the phosphorylation of PKR and eiF2α induced by LPS/IFNγ. The pro-survival effects of CBD in OPCs were accompanied by decreases in the expression of ER apoptotic effectors (CHOP, Bax and caspase 12), and increased expression of the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2. These findings suggest that attenuation of the ER stress pathway is involved in the 'oligoprotective' effects of CBD during inflammation. PMID:22739983

  19. Baculovirus-mediated Expression of p35 Confers Resistance to Apoptosis in Human Embryo Kidney 293 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Baculovirus has many advantages as vectors for gene transfer. We demonstrated that recombinant baculovirus vectors expressing p35 (Ac-CMV-p35) and eGFP (Ac-CMV-GFP) could be transduced into human kidney 293 cells efficiently. The level of transgene expression was viral dose dependent and high-level expression of the target gene could be achieved under the heterogonous promoter. MTT assay suggested that both Ac-CMV-p35 and Ac-CMV-GFP did not have cytotoxic effect on human embryo kidney 293 cells. Cell growth curve showed the Ac-CMV-p35 and Ac- CMV-GFP transduced and non-transduced cells had similar proliferation rate, so baculovirus-mediated p35expression had no adverse effect on cell proliferation. In addition, baculovirus-mediated p35 gene expression protected human embryo kidney 293 cells against apoptosis induced by various apoptosis inducers such as Actinomycin D, UV or serum-free media. These results suggested that the baculovirus vector mediated p35 gene expression was functional and it could be widely used in molecular research and even gene therapy.

  20. Effector cell mediated cytotoxicity measured by intracellular Granzyme B release in HIV infected subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahajan Supriya D.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL activity is currently believed to be one of the key immunologic mechanisms responsible for the prevention or attenuation of HIV-1 infection. The induction of CD8+ T cell activation may also result in the production of soluble or non-classical lytic factors that are associated with protection from infection or slower disease progression. Traditionally, CD8+ CTL responses have been measured by the classic chromium release assay, monitoring the ability of T cells (Effector cells to lyse radiolabelled HLA – matched “target cells” that express the appropriate antigen-MHC complex. This method is not only labor intensive, semi quantitative assay at best, but also needs fresh, non-cryopreserved cells. Recently, cytokine specific ELISPOT assays or tetrameric MHC-I/ peptide complexes have utilized to directly quantitate circulating CD8+ effector cells, and these assays are more sensitive, quantitative and reproducible than the traditional CTL lysis assay and can also be performed on cryopreserved cells. Although these are reproducible assays for the assessment of soluble antiviral activity secreted by activated T cell populations they can be extremely expensive to perform. We have used FACS Analysis to measure Granzyme B release as a function of cell mediated cytotoxicity. This method helps quantitate the CTL activity and also identifies the phenotype of the cells elucidating this immune response. The method described not only monitors immunological response but also is also simple to perform, precise and extremely time efficient and is ideal for screening a large number of samples.

  1. The Protecting Effect of Deoxyschisandrin and Schisandrin B on HaCaT Cells against UVB-Induced Damage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Hou

    Full Text Available Schisandra chinensis is a traditional Chinese medicine that has multiple biological activities, including antioxidant, anticancer, tonic, and anti-aging effects. Deoxyschisandrin (SA and schisandrin B (SB, the two major lignans isolated from S. chinensis, exert high antioxidant activities in vitro and in vivo by scavenging free radicals, such as reactive oxygen species (ROS. Ultraviolet B-ray (UVB radiation induces the production of ROS and DNA damage, which eventually leads to cell death by apoptosis. However, it is unknown whether SA or SB protects cells against UVB-induced cellular DNA damage. Our study showed that both SA and SB effectively protected HaCaT cells from UVB-induced cell death by antagonizing UVB-mediated production of ROS and induction of DNA damage. Our results showed that both SA and SB significantly prevented UVB-induced loss of cell viability using 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assays. Dichloro-dihydro-fluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA assays showed that the production of ROS following UVB exposure was inhibited by treatment with SA and SB. Moreover, SA and SB decreased the UVB-induced DNA damage in HaCaT cells by comet assays. In addition, SA and SB also prevented UVB-induced cell apoptosis and the cleavage of caspase-3, caspase-8 and caspase-9. In a word, our results imply that the antioxidants SA and SB could protect cells from UVB-induced cell damage via scavenging ROS.

  2. Ezrin dephosphorylation/downregulation contributes to ursolic acid-mediated cell death in human leukemia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ezrin links the actin filaments with the cell membrane and has a functional role in the apoptotic process. It appears clear that ezrin is directly associated with Fas, leading to activation of caspase cascade and cell death. However, the exact role of ezrin in ursolic acid (UA)-induced apoptosis remains unclear. In this study, we show for the first time that UA induces apoptosis in both transformed and primary leukemia cells through dephosphorylation/downregulation of ezrin, association and polarized colocalization of Fas and ezrin, as well as formation of death-inducing signaling complex. These events are dependent on Rho-ROCK1 signaling pathway. Knockdown of ezrin enhanced cell death mediated by UA, whereas overexpression of ezrin attenuated UA-induced apoptosis. Our in vivo study also showed that UA-mediated inhibition of tumor growth of mouse leukemia xenograft model is in association with the dephosphorylation/downregulation of ezrin. Such findings suggest that the cytoskeletal protein ezrin may represent an attractive target for UA-mediated lethality in human leukemia cells

  3. Retrovirus-mediated conditional immortalization and analysis of established cell lines of osteoclast precursor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osteoclast precursor cells (OPCs) have previously been established from bone marrow cells of SV40 temperature-sensitive T antigen-expressing transgenic mice. Here, we use retrovirus-mediated gene transfer to conditionally immortalize OPCs by expressing temperature-sensitive large T antigen (tsLT) from wild type bone marrow cells. The immortalized OPCs proliferated at the permissive temperature of 33.5 deg. C, but stopped growing at the non-permissive temperature of 39 deg. C. In the presence of receptor activator of NFκB ligand (RANKL), the OPCs differentiated into tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive cells and formed multinucleate osteoclasts at 33.5 deg. C. From these OPCs, we cloned two types of cell lines. Both differentiated into TRAP-positive cells, but one formed multinucleate osteoclasts while the other remained unfused in the presence of RANKL. These results indicate that the established cell lines are useful for analyzing mechanisms of differentiation, particularly multinucleate osteoclast formation. Retrovirus-mediated conditional immortalization should be a useful method to immortalize OPCs from primary bone marrow cells

  4. Visfatin Mediates SCLC Cells Migration across Brain Endothelial Cells through Upregulation of CCL2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingting Liu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC is characterized as an aggressive tumor with brain metastasis. Although preventing SCLC metastasis to the brain is immensely important for survival, the molecular mechanisms of SCLC cells penetrating the blood–brain barrier (BBB are largely unknown. Recently, visfatin has been considered as a novel pro-inflammatory adipocytokine involved in various cancers. Herein, we present evidence that elevated levels of visfatin in the serum of SCLC patients were associated with brain metastasis, and visfain was increased in NCI-H446 cells, a SCLC cell line, during interacting with human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC. Using in vitro BBB model, we found that visfatin could promote NCI-H446 cells migration across HBMEC monolayer, while the effect was inhibited by knockdown of visfatin. Furthermore, our findings indicated that CC chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2 was involved in visfatin-mediated NCI-H446 cells transendothelial migtation. Results also showed that the upregulation of CCL2 in the co-culture system was reversed by blockade of visfatin. In particular, visfatin-induced CCL2 was attenuated by specific inhibitor of PI3K/Akt signaling in NCI-H446 cells. Taken together, we demonstrated that visfatin was a prospective target for SCLC metastasis to brain, and understanding the molecular mediators would lead to effective strategies for inhibition of SCLC brain metastasis.

  5. Galantamine and carbon monoxide protect brain microvascular endothelial cells by heme oxygenase-1 induction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galantamine, a reversible inhibitor of acetylcholine esterase (AChE), is a novel drug treatment for mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia. Interestingly, it has been suggested that galantamine treatment is associated with more clinical benefit in patients with mild-to-moderate Alzheimer disease compared to other AChE inhibitors. We hypothesized that the protective effects of galantamine would involve induction of the protective gene, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), in addition to enhancement of the cholinergic system. Brain microvascular endothelial cells (mvECs) were isolated from spontaneous hypertensive rats. Galantamine significantly reduced H2O2-induced cell death of mvECs in association with HO-1 induction. These protective effects were completely reversed by nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) inhibition or HO inhibition. Furthermore, galantamine failed to induce HO-1 in mvECs which lack inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), supplementation of a nitric oxide (NO) donor or iNOS gene transfection on iNOS-deficient mvECs resulted in HO-1 induction with galantamine. These data suggest that the protective effects of galantamine require NF-κB activation and iNOS expression, in addition to HO-1. Likewise, carbon monoxide (CO), one of the byproducts of HO, up-regulated HO-1 and protected mvECs from oxidative stress in a similar manner. Our data demonstrate that galantamine mediates cytoprotective effects on mvECs through induction HO-1. This pharmacological action of galantamine may, at least in part, account for the superior clinical efficacy of galantamine in vascular dementia and Alzheimer disease

  6. The effect of adenovirus-mediated gene expression of FHIT in small cell lung cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zandi, Roza; Xu, Kai; Poulsen, Hans S;

    2011-01-01

    The candidate tumor suppressor fragile histidine traid (FHIT) is frequently inactivated in small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Mutations in the p53 gene also occur in the majority of SCLC leading to the accumulation of the mutant protein. Here we evaluated the effect of FHIT gene therapy alone or in...... combination with the mutant p53-reactivating molecule, PRIMA-1(Met)/APR-246, in SCLC. Overexpression of FHIT by recombinant adenoviral vector (Ad-FHIT)-mediated gene transfer in SCLC cells inhibited their growth by inducing apoptosis and when combined with PRIMA-1(Met)/APR-246, a synergistic cell growth...

  7. Improved quality of life among adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder is mediated by protective factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schei, Jorun; Nøvik, Torunn Stene; Thomsen, Per Hove; Indredavik, Marit S; Jozefiak, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to assess the role of protective factors as mediators and/or moderators of the relationship between coexisting emotional and conduct problems and quality of life (QoL) among adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). METHODS: The sample...... family cohesion may identify potential treatment goals for adolescents with ADHD and coexisting problems, and may contribute to improvements in QoL....

  8. Reliability Through Life of Internal Protection Devices in Small-Cell ABSL Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubauer, Jeremy; Ng, Ka Lok; Bennetti, Andrea; Pearson, Chris; Rao, gopal

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews a reliability analysis of small cell protection batteries. The contents include: 1) The s-p Topology; 2) Cell Level Protection Devices; 3) Battery Level Fault Protection; 4) Large Cell Comparison; and 5) Battery Level Testing and Results.

  9. Effect of COPD treatments on MRP1-mediated transport in bronchial epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaretha van der Deen

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Margaretha van der Deen1, Sandra Homan1, Hetty Timmer-Bosscha1, Rik J Scheper2, Wim Timens3, Dirkje S Postma4, Elisabeth G de Vries1Departments of 1Medical Oncology, 3Pathology, 4Pulmonary Diseases, University Medical Center Groningen and University of Groningen, The Netherlands; 2Department of Pathology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The NetherlandsBackground: Smoking is the principle risk factor for development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1 is known to protect against toxic compounds and oxidative stress, and might play a role in protection against smoke-induced disease progression. We questioned whether MRP1-mediated transport is influenced by pulmonary drugs that are commonly prescribed in COPD.Methods: The immortalized human bronchial epithelial cell line 16HBE14o- was used to analyze direct in vitro effects of budesonide, formoterol, ipratropium bromide and N-acetylcysteine (NAC on MRP1-mediated transport. Carboxyfluorescein (CF was used as a model MRP1 substrate and was measured with functional flow cytometry.Results: Formoterol had a minor effect, whereas budesonide concentration-dependently decreased CF transport by MRP1. Remarkably, addition of formoterol to the highest concentration of budesonide increased CF transport. Ipratropium bromide inhibited CF transport at low concentrations and tended to increase CF transport at higher levels. NAC increased CF transport by MRP1 in a concentration-dependent manner.Conclusions: Our data suggest that, besides their positive effects on respiratory symptoms, budesonide, formoterol, ipratropium bromide, and NAC modulate MRP1 activity in bronchial epithelial cells. Further studies are required to assess whether stimulation of MRP1 activity is beneficial for long-term treatment of COPD.Keywords: bronchus epithelium, COPD, drugs, MRP1, multidrug resistance, oxidative stress

  10. Measurement of cell mediated cytotoxicity by post-labeling surviving target cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 51Cr release assay (CRA) is the commonly accepted technique for measurement of cell mediated cytotoxicity. This assay shows some disadvantages when mononucleated cells of human peripheral blood (MNC) are used as effector and target cells. The uptake of 51Cr by PHA stimulated lymphocytes is low compared to the spontaneous release. In an attempt to develop a cytotoxicity assay suitable for human lymphocytes we used 14C-TdR to label target cells surviving after contact with effector cells. Cytotoxic lymphocytes were generated by incubation of MNC with irradiated allogeneic MNC for 6 days. On day 6 the effector cells are irradiated and cocultured with PHA stimulated target cells. Twenty-four hours later 14C-TdR is added. After an additional 24 h the cultures are harvested and 14C-TdR taken up by target cells is measured. It is shown that the effector cells are still cytotoxic after irradiation. These cells do not take up 14C-TdR. Cell-free supernatants do not influence the uptake of 14C-TdR by target cells. The results obtained with this assay correlate very well those obtained by the CRA, if the spontaneous release does not exceed 30%. (author)

  11. Role of macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha in T-cell-mediated immunity to viral infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Andreas N; Nansen, Anneline; Christensen, Jan P; Thomsen, Allan R

    2003-01-01

    The immune response to lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus in mice lacking macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha (MIP-1alpha) was evaluated. Generation of virus-specific effector T cells is unimpaired in MIP-1alpha-deficient mice. Furthermore, MIP-1alpha is not required for T-cell-mediated virus...... control or virus-induced T-cell-dependent inflammation. Thus, MIP-1alpha is not mandatory for T-cell-mediated antiviral immunity....

  12. MPG protection and goblet cell kinetics in mouse jejunum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments were undertaken to study the goblet cell changes in the jejunum of mice irradiated in the presence and absence of the protective drug 2-mercaptopropionylglycine (MPG). One group of adult Swiss albino mice of 6 to 8 weeks was injected with the drug (MPG) intraperitoneally and a second group was injected with distilled water in the same manner and served as a control. 15-30 minutes after injection animals from both the groups were exposed to a Co-60 source to give a total dose of 1000 R at the rate of 25 R/min. Three animals from each group were sacrificed at different successive intervals. 5μ paraffin sections of the jejunum were prepared and goblet cells were counted in the crypt and villus region. The results from the two groups were compared. The results from MPG treated mice indicated that there was a protection from the radiation-induced changes. The drug accelerated the regeneration process leading to the restoration of normal number of goblet cells by the last interval studied. (orig.)

  13. Neutrophil mediated smooth muscle cell loss precedes allograft vasculopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Timothy DG

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiac allograft vasculopathy (AV is a pathological process of vascular remodeling leading to late graft loss following cardiac transplantation. While there is consensus that AV is alloimmune mediated, and evidence that the most important alloimmune target is medial smooth muscle cells (SMC, the role of the innate immune response in the initiation of this disease is still being elucidated. As ischemia reperfusion (IR injury plays a pivotal role in the initiation of AV, we hypothesize that IR enhances the early innate response to cardiac allografts. Methods Aortic transplants were performed between fully disparate mouse strains (C3H/HeJ and C57BL/6, in the presence of therapeutic levels of Cyclosporine A, as a model for cardiac AV. Neutrophils were depleted from some recipients using anti-PMN serum. Grafts were harvested at 1,2,3,5d and 1,2wk post-transplant. Ultrastructural integrity was examined by transmission electron microscopy. SMC and neutrophils were quantified from histological sections in a blinded manner. Results Grafts exposed to cold ischemia, but not transplanted, showed no medial SMC loss and normal ultrastructural integrity. In comparison, allografts harvested 1d post-transplant exhibited > 90% loss of SMC (p Conclusions These novel data show that there is extensive damage to medial SMC at 1d post-transplant. By depleting neutrophils from recipients it was demonstrated that a portion of the SMC loss was mediated by neutrophils. These results provide evidence that IR activation of early innate events contributes to the etiology of AV.

  14. Glial cell-expressed mechanosensitive channel TRPV4 mediates infrasound-induced neuronal impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Ming; Du, Fang; Liu, Yang; Li, Li; Cai, Jing; Zhang, Guo-Feng; Xu, Xiao-Fei; Lin, Tian; Cheng, Hao-Ran; Liu, Xue-Dong; Xiong, Li-Ze; Zhao, Gang

    2013-11-01

    Vibroacoustic disease, a progressive and systemic disease, mainly involving the central nervous system, is caused by excessive exposure to low-frequency but high-intensity noise generated by various heavy transportations and machineries. Infrasound is a type of low-frequency noise. Our previous studies demonstrated that infrasound at a certain intensity caused neuronal injury in rats but the underlying mechanism(s) is still largely unknown. Here, we showed that glial cell-expressed TRPV4, a Ca(2+)-permeable mechanosensitive channel, mediated infrasound-induced neuronal injury. Among different frequencies and intensities, infrasound at 16 Hz and 130 dB impaired rat learning and memory abilities most severely after 7-14 days exposure, a time during which a prominent loss of hippocampal CA1 neurons was evident. Infrasound also induced significant astrocytic and microglial activation in hippocampal regions following 1- to 7-day exposure, prior to neuronal apoptosis. Moreover, pharmacological inhibition of glial activation in vivo protected against neuronal apoptosis. In vitro, activated glial cell-released proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β and TNF-α were found to be key factors for this neuronal apoptosis. Importantly, infrasound induced an increase in the expression level of TRPV4 both in vivo and in vitro. Knockdown of TRPV4 expression by siRNA or pharmacological inhibition of TRPV4 in cultured glial cells decreased the levels of IL-1β and TNF-α, attenuated neuronal apoptosis, and reduced TRPV4-mediated Ca(2+) influx and NF-κB nuclear translocation. Finally, using various antagonists we revealed that calmodulin and protein kinase C signaling pathways were involved in TRPV4-triggered NF-κB activation. Thus, our results provide the first evidence that glial cell-expressed TRPV4 is a potential key factor responsible for infrasound-induced neuronal impairment. PMID:24002225

  15. Dendritic cells loaded with apoptotic antibody-coated tumor cells provide protective immunity against B-cell lymphoma in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franki, Suzanne N; Steward, Kristopher K; Betting, David J; Kafi, Kamran; Yamada, Reiko E; Timmerman, John M

    2008-02-01

    The in vitro priming of tumor-specific T cells by dendritic cells (DCs) phagocytosing killed tumor cells can be augmented in the presence of antitumor monoclonal antibody (mAb). We investigated whether DCs phagocytosing killed lymphoma cells coated with tumor-specific antibody could elicit antitumor immunity in vivo. Irradiated murine 38C13 lymphoma cells were cocultured with bone marrow-derived DCs in the presence or absence of tumor-specific mAb. Mice vaccinated with DCs cocultured with mAb-coated tumor cells were protected from tumor challenge (60% long-term survival), whereas DCs loaded with tumor cells alone were much less effective. The opsonized whole tumor cell-DC vaccine elicited significantly better tumor protection than a traditional lymphoma idiotype (Id) protein vaccine, and in combination with chemotherapy could eradicate preexisting tumor. Moreover, the DC vaccine protected animals from both wild-type and Id-negative variant tumor cells, indicating that Id is not a major target of the induced tumor immunity. Protection was critically dependent upon CD8(+) T cells, with lesser contribution by CD4(+) T cells. Importantly, opsonized whole tumor cell-DC vaccination did not result in tissue-specific autoimmunity. Since opsonized whole tumor cell-DC and Id vaccines appear to target distinct tumor antigens, optimal antilymphoma immunity might be achieved by combining these approaches. PMID:17993615

  16. Selenium hyperaccumulation offers protection from cell disruptor herbivores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quinn Colin F

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hyperaccumulation, the rare capacity of certain plant species to accumulate toxic trace elements to levels several orders of magnitude higher than other species growing on the same site, is thought to be an elemental defense mechanism against herbivores and pathogens. Previous research has shown that selenium (Se hyperaccumulation protects plants from a variety of herbivores and pathogens. Selenium hyperaccumulating plants sequester Se in discrete locations in the leaf periphery, making them potentially more susceptible to some herbivore feeding modes than others. In this study we investigate the protective function of Se in the Se hyperaccumulators Stanleya pinnata and Astragalus bisulcatus against two cell disrupting herbivores, the western flower thrips (Frankliniella occidentalis and the two-spotted spider mite (Tetranychus urticae. Results Astragalus bisulcatus and S. pinnata with high Se concentrations (greater than 650 mg Se kg-1 were less subject to thrips herbivory than plants with low Se levels (less than 150 mg Se kg-1. Furthermore, in plants containing elevated Se levels, leaves with higher concentrations of Se suffered less herbivory than leaves with less Se. Spider mites also preferred to feed on low-Se A. bisulcatus and S. pinnata plants rather than high-Se plants. Spider mite populations on A. bisulcatus decreased after plants were given a higher concentration of Se. Interestingly, spider mites could colonize A. bisulcatus plants containing up to 200 mg Se kg-1 dry weight, concentrations which are toxic to many other herbivores. Selenium distribution and speciation studies using micro-focused X-ray fluorescence (μXRF mapping and Se K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy revealed that the spider mites accumulated primarily methylselenocysteine, the relatively non-toxic form of Se that is also the predominant form of Se in hyperaccumulators. Conclusions This is the first reported study investigating the

  17. Manganese oxidation state mediates toxicity in PC12 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The role of the manganese (Mn) oxidation state on cellular Mn uptake and toxicity is not well understood. Therefore, undifferentiated PC12 cells were exposed to 0-200 μM Mn(II)-chloride or Mn(III)-pyrophosphate for 24 h, after which cellular manganese levels were measured along with measures of cell viability, function, and cytotoxicity (trypan blue exclusion, medium lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), 8-isoprostanes, cellular ATP, dopamine, serotonin, H-ferritin, transferrin receptor (TfR), Mn-superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), and copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD) protein levels). Exposures to Mn(III) >10 μM produced 2- to 5-fold higher cellular manganese levels than equimolar exposures to Mn(II). Cell viability and ATP levels both decreased at the highest Mn(II) and Mn(III) exposures (150-200 μM), while Mn(III) exposures produced increases in LDH activity at lower exposures (≥50 μM) than did Mn(II) (200 μM only). Mn(II) reduced cellular dopamine levels more than Mn(III), especially at the highest exposures (50% reduced at 200 μM Mn(II)). In contrast, Mn(III) produced a >70% reduction in cellular serotonin at all exposures compared to Mn(II). Different cellular responses to Mn(II) exposures compared to Mn(III) were also observed for H-ferritin, TfR, and MnSOD protein levels. Notably, these differential effects of Mn(II) versus Mn(III) exposures on cellular toxicity could not simply be accounted for by the different cellular levels of manganese. These results suggest that the oxidation state of manganese exposures plays an important role in mediating manganese cytotoxicity

  18. Terminalia Chebula provides protection against dual modes of necroptotic and apoptotic cell death upon death receptor ligation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yoonjung; Byun, Hee Sun; Seok, Jeong Ho; Park, Kyeong Ah; Won, Minho; Seo, Wonhyoung; Lee, So-Ra; Kang, Kidong; Sohn, Kyung-Cheol; Lee, Ill Young; Kim, Hyeong-Geug; Son, Chang Gue; Shen, Han-Ming; Hur, Gang Min

    2016-01-01

    Death receptor (DR) ligation elicits two different modes of cell death (necroptosis and apoptosis) depending on the cellular context. By screening a plant extract library from cells undergoing necroptosis or apoptosis, we identified a water extract of Terminalia chebula (WETC) as a novel and potent dual inhibitor of DR-mediated cell death. Investigation of the underlying mechanisms of its anti-necroptotic and anti-apoptotic action revealed that WETC or its constituents (e.g., gallic acid) protected against tumor necrosis factor-induced necroptosis via the suppression of TNF-induced ROS without affecting the upstream signaling events. Surprisingly, WETC also provided protection against DR-mediated apoptosis by inhibition of the caspase cascade. Furthermore, it activated the autophagy pathway via suppression of mTOR. Of the WETC constituents, punicalagin and geraniin appeared to possess the most potent anti-apoptotic and autophagy activation effect. Importantly, blockage of autophagy with pharmacological inhibitors or genetic silencing of Atg5 selectively abolished the anti-apoptotic function of WETC. These results suggest that WETC protects against dual modes of cell death upon DR ligation. Therefore, WETC might serve as a potential treatment for diseases characterized by aberrantly sensitized apoptotic or non-apoptotic signaling cascades. PMID:27117478

  19. Damaging and protective bystander cross-talk between human lung cancer and normal cells after proton microbeam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desai, Sejal [Radiation Signalling and Cancer Biology Section, Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Kobayashi, Alisa; Konishi, Teruaki; Oikawa, Masakazu [Radiation System and Engineering Section, Department of Technical Support and Development, Research, Development and Support Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Pandey, Badri N., E-mail: badrinarain@yahoo.co.in [Radiation Signalling and Cancer Biology Section, Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2014-05-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Proton-microbeam irradiated A549 cells send damaging signals to bystander A549 cells. • Irradiated A549–A549 bystander response is through gap junctional communication. • Bystander WI38 cells exert protective signalling in irradiated A549 cells. • Rescue of irradiated A549 cells by WI38 cells is independent of gap junctions. - Abstract: Most of the studies of radiation-induced bystander effects (RIBE) have been focused on understanding the radiobiological changes observed in bystander cells in response to the signals from irradiated cells in a normal cell population with implications to radiation risk assessment. However, reports on RIBE with relevance to cancer radiotherapy especially investigating the bidirectional and criss-cross bystander communications between cancer and normal cells are limited. Hence, in present study employing co-culture approach, we have investigated the bystander cross-talk between lung cancer (A549) and normal (WI38) cells after proton-microbeam irradiation using γ-H2AX foci fluorescence as a measure of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). We observed that in A549–A549 co-cultures, irradiated A549 cells exert damaging effects in bystander A549 cells, which were found to be mediated through gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC). However, in A549–WI38 co-cultures, irradiated A549 did not affect bystander WI38 cells. Rather, bystander WI38 cells induced inverse protective signalling (rescue effect) in irradiated A549 cells, which was independent of GJIC. On the other hand, in response to irradiated WI38 cells neither of the bystander cells (A549 or WI38) showed significant increase in γ-H2AX foci. The observed bystander signalling between tumour and normal cells may have potential implications in therapeutic outcome of cancer radiotherapy.

  20. Damaging and protective bystander cross-talk between human lung cancer and normal cells after proton microbeam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Proton-microbeam irradiated A549 cells send damaging signals to bystander A549 cells. • Irradiated A549–A549 bystander response is through gap junctional communication. • Bystander WI38 cells exert protective signalling in irradiated A549 cells. • Rescue of irradiated A549 cells by WI38 cells is independent of gap junctions. - Abstract: Most of the studies of radiation-induced bystander effects (RIBE) have been focused on understanding the radiobiological changes observed in bystander cells in response to the signals from irradiated cells in a normal cell population with implications to radiation risk assessment. However, reports on RIBE with relevance to cancer radiotherapy especially investigating the bidirectional and criss-cross bystander communications between cancer and normal cells are limited. Hence, in present study employing co-culture approach, we have investigated the bystander cross-talk between lung cancer (A549) and normal (WI38) cells after proton-microbeam irradiation using γ-H2AX foci fluorescence as a measure of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). We observed that in A549–A549 co-cultures, irradiated A549 cells exert damaging effects in bystander A549 cells, which were found to be mediated through gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC). However, in A549–WI38 co-cultures, irradiated A549 did not affect bystander WI38 cells. Rather, bystander WI38 cells induced inverse protective signalling (rescue effect) in irradiated A549 cells, which was independent of GJIC. On the other hand, in response to irradiated WI38 cells neither of the bystander cells (A549 or WI38) showed significant increase in γ-H2AX foci. The observed bystander signalling between tumour and normal cells may have potential implications in therapeutic outcome of cancer radiotherapy

  1. Appraisal of radio-protective potential of Tinospora cordifolia against radiation mediated biochemical alterations in intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the modern technology world, it is important to concern the possible adverse biological effects of radiation due to its widespread use in diverse fields such as medicine for the diagnostic and therapeutic purposes, research, industries and construction site. Radiation injuries to living cells to large extent is attributable to its interaction with biological systems which ultimately unleashes large scale destruction to several essential biological macromolecules like water, nucleic acids, proteins, cellular membrane etc., and cause their dysfunctions and damage. The protection of humans against the harmful effects of radiation is a major challenge that needs an urgent solution. Use of radioprotectors is one among the strategies designed in order to minimize the lethal consequences of radiation exposure to normal cells. Plant products appear to have advantages over the synthetic compounds in terms of low/no toxicity at the effective dose. Large numbers of medicinal and aromatic plants are present in the nature, which are considered as the natural source of antioxidants and used in various Ayurvedic formulations for the treatment of different diseases throughout the centuries. The present study is designed to assess the modulatory effect of Tinospora cordifolia root extract (TCE) against radiation-induced biochemical changes in intestine of Swiss albino mice. For this purpose, one group of male Swiss albino mice was exposed to 5.0 Gy gamma radiation to serve as the irradiated control, while the other group received TCE (75 mg/kg b. wt./day) orally for 5 consecutive days before irradiation to serve as an experimental. Radiation exposure resulted in a significant decline in intestinal proteins, cholesterol, glutathione, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase; whereas, TCE supplementation before irradiation showed a significant elevation in all these parameters. Furthermore, treatment with this plant extract caused a significant fall in the radiation induced lipid

  2. IgE/FcεRI-Mediated Antigen Cross-Presentation by Dendritic Cells Enhances Anti-Tumor Immune Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Platzer

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiologic studies discovered an inverse association between immunoglobulin E (IgE-mediated allergies and cancer, implying tumor-protective properties of IgE. However, the underlying immunologic mechanisms remain poorly understood. Antigen cross-presentation by dendritic cells (DCs is of key importance for anti-tumor immunity because it induces the generation of cytotoxic CD8+ T lymphocytes (CTLs with specificity for tumor antigens. We demonstrate that DCs use IgE and FcεRI, the high-affinity IgE receptor, for cross-presentation and priming of CTLs in response to free soluble antigen at low doses. Importantly, IgE/FcεRI-mediated cross-presentation is a distinct receptor-mediated pathway because it does not require MyD88 signals or IL-12 induction in DCs. Using passive immunization with tumor antigen-specific IgE and DC-based vaccination experiments, we demonstrate that IgE-mediated cross-presentation significantly improves anti-tumor immunity and induces memory responses in vivo. Our findings suggest a cellular mechanism for the tumor-protective features of IgE and expand the known physiological functions of this immunoglobulin.

  3. Protective Effects of Green Tea Polyphenol Against Renal Injury Through ROS-Mediated JNK-MAPK Pathway in Lead Exposed Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haidong; Li, Deyuan; Hu, Zhongze; Zhao, Siming; Zheng, Zhejun; Li, Wei

    2016-06-30

    To investigate the potential therapeutic effects of polyphenols in treating Pb induced renal dysfunction and intoxication and to explore the detailed underlying mechanisms. Wistar rats were divided into four groups: control groups (CT), Pb exposure groups (Pb), Pb plus Polyphenols groups (Pb+PP) and Polyphenols groups (PP). Animals were kept for 60 days and sacrificed for tests of urea, serum blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatinine. Histological evaluations were then performed. In vitro studies were performed using primary kidney mesangial cells to reveal detailed mechanisms. Cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8) was used to evaluate cell viability. Pb induced cell apoptosis was measured by flow cytometry. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and scavenging were tested by DCFH-DA. Expression level of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1-β (IL-1-β) and IL-6 were assayed by ELISA. Western blot and qPCR were used to measure the expression of ERK1/2, JNK1/2 and p38. Polyphenols have obvious protective effects on Pb induced renal dysfunction and intoxication both in vivo and in vitro. Polyphenols reduced Pb concentration and accumulation in kidney. Polyphenols also protected kidney mesangial cells from Pb induced apoptosis. Polyphenols scavenged Pb induced ROS generation and suppressed ROS-mediated ERK/JNK/p38 pathway. Downstream pro-inflammatory cytokines were inhibited in consistency. Polyphenol is protective in Pb induced renal intoxication and inflammatory responses. The underlying mechanisms lie on the antioxidant activity and ROS scavenging activity of polyphenols. PMID:27239812

  4. Dexamethasone mediates protection against acute pancreatitis via upregulation of pancreatitis-associated proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Emad Kandil; Yin-Yao Lin; Martin H Bluth; Hong Zhang; Gabriel Levi; Michael E Zenilman

    2006-01-01

    AIM:To examine the influence of dexamethasone on pancreatitis-associated protein (PAP) gene expression using both in vitro and in vivo models of acute pancreatitis and to study how PAP gene expression correlates with severity of pancreatitis.METHODS:In vifro, IL-6 stimulated pancreas acinar AR42J cells were cultured with increasing concentrations of dexamethasone and assayed for PAP expression (RT-PCR). In vivo, pancreatitis was induced in rats by retrograde injection of 40 g/L taurocholate into the pancreatic duct. Animals were pretreated with dexamethasone (2 mg/kg) daily or saline for 4 d.Pancreata and serum were harvested after 24 h and gene expression levels of PAP Ⅰ , Ⅱ and Ⅲ were measured by RT-PCR. Severity of pancreatitis was based on serum amylase, pancreatic wet weight, and histopathological score.RESULTS:In vitro, dexamethasone and IL-6 induced a marked transcription of PAP Ⅰ, Ⅱ and Ⅲ genes in AR42J cells at 24 h (P < 0.05 for all comparisons). In vivo,pancreas mRNA levels of PAP Ⅰ, Ⅱ or Ⅲ increased by 2.6-fold, 1.9-fold, and 1.3-fold respectively after dexamethasone treatment, compared with saline treated animals. Serum amylase levels and edema were significantly lower in the dexamethasone group compared with the saline group. Histopathologic evaluation revealed less inflammation and necrosis in pancreata obtained from dexamethasone treated animals (P < 0.05).CONCLUSION:Dexamethasone significantly decreases the severity of pancreatitis. The protective mechanism of dexamethasone may be via upregulating PAP gene expression during injury.

  5. Green tea EGCG, T cells, and T cell-mediated autoimmune diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    One of the proposed health benefits of consuming green tea is its protective effect on autoimmune diseases. Research on the immunopathogenesis of autoimmune diseases has made significant progression in the past few years and several key concepts have been revised. T cells, particularly CD4+ T helper...

  6. Cell surface molecules and fibronectin-mediated cell adhesion: effect of proteolytic digestion of membrane proteins

    OpenAIRE

    1982-01-01

    Proteases have been used as a tool to investigate the role of surface molecules in fibronectin-mediated cell adhesion. Proteolytic digestion of membrane-proteins by pronase (1 mg/ml for 20 min at 37 degrees C) completely inhibited adhesion of baby hamster kidney (BHK) fibroblasts on fibronectin-coated plastic dishes. Various degrees of inhibition were also obtained after treatment with proteinase K, chymotrypsin, papain, subtilopeptidase A, and thermolysin. Protein synthesis was required to r...

  7. The protective effect of interleukin-11 on the cell death induced by X-ray irradiation in cultured intestinal epithelial cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interleukin-11 (IL-11) is a well known anti-inflammatory cytokine that is associated with cell growth, and also participates in limiting X-ray irradiation induced intestinal mucosal injury. The aim of this study was to evaluate the protective effect of IL-11 on the cell injury induced by X-ray irradiation in rat intestinal epithelial IEC-18 cells. Recombinant human IL-11 (rhIL-11) treated cells were irradiated and then examined for cell viability. To evaluate irradiation injury, trypan blue staining was used to detect the dead cells. The viability of irradiated cells was up-regulated by rhIL-11 treatment and also resulted in the activation of p90 ribosomal S6 kinase (p90RSK) and S6 ribosomal protein (S6Rp). Wortmannin, a specific inhibitor of PI3K, suppressed the activation of S6Rp in rhIL-11 treated cells, and decreased the up-regulation of viability by rhIL-11 treatment in irradiated cells. The TdT-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end-labeling (TUNEL) assay was also performed to estimate the rate of apoptosis in X-ray induced cell death. There was no difference in the results between trypan blue staining and the TUNEL assay. Further, rhIL-11 down-regulated the expression of cleaved caspase-3 in irradiated cells. These results suggest that rhIL-11 may play an important role in protection from radiation injury. (author)

  8. Lightning protection for roof-mounted solar cell using two masts

    OpenAIRE

    N. Petcharaks

    2013-01-01

    Houses invested in roof-mounted solar cell need protection from direct lightning. This paper presents the application of numerical method in designing the height and location of masts based on protection angle method according to international standard IEC 62305. An isolated external lightning protection system using two isolated masts is designed. The protected zone which is in the volume according to the protection angle method, depends on the protection level, the rolling sphere radius and...

  9. Activation of SK2 channels preserves ER Ca(2+) homeostasis and protects against ER stress-induced cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, M; Vidovic, N; Honrath, B; Mahavadi, P; Dodel, R; Dolga, A M; Culmsee, C

    2016-05-01

    Alteration of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca(2+) homeostasis leads to excessive cytosolic Ca(2+) accumulation and delayed neuronal cell death in acute and chronic neurodegenerative disorders. While our recent studies established a protective role for SK channels against excessive intracellular Ca(2+) accumulation, their functional role in the ER has not been elucidated yet. We show here that SK2 channels are present in ER membranes of neuronal HT-22 cells, and that positive pharmacological modulation of SK2 channels with CyPPA protects against cell death induced by the ER stressors brefeldin A and tunicamycin. Calcium imaging of HT-22 neurons revealed that elevated cytosolic Ca(2+) levels and decreased ER Ca(2+) load during sustained ER stress could be largely prevented by SK2 channel activation. Interestingly, SK2 channel activation reduced the amount of the unfolded protein response transcription factor ATF4, but further enhanced the induction of CHOP. Using siRNA approaches we confirmed a detrimental role for ATF4 in ER stress, whereas CHOP regulation was dispensable for both, brefeldin A toxicity and CyPPA-mediated protection. Cell death induced by blocking Ca(2+) influx into the ER with the SERCA inhibitor thapsigargin was not prevented by CyPPA. Blocking the K(+) efflux via K(+)/H(+) exchangers with quinine inhibited CyPPA-mediated neuroprotection, suggesting an essential role of proton uptake and K(+) release in the SK channel-mediated neuroprotection. Our data demonstrate that ER SK2 channel activation preserves ER Ca(2+) uptake and retention which determines cell survival in conditions where sustained ER stress contributes to progressive neuronal death. PMID:26586570

  10. TRANSFORMING GROWTH FACTOR-BETA MEDIATED SUPPRESSION OF ANTI-TUMOR T CELLS REQUIRES FOXP1 TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR EXPRESSION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen, Tom L.; Rutkowski, Melanie R.; Allegrezza, Michael J.; Perales-Puchalt, Alfredo; Tesone, Amelia J.; Svoronos, Nikolaos; Nguyen, Jenny M.; Sarmin, Fahmida; Borowsky, Mark E.; Tchou, Julia; Conejo-Garcia, Jose R.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Tumor-reactive T cells become unresponsive in advanced tumors. Here we have characterized a common mechanism of T cell unresponsiveness in cancer driven by the up-regulation of the transcription factor Forkhead box protein P1 (Foxp1), which prevents CD8+ T cells from proliferating and up-regulating Granzyme-B and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) in response to tumor antigens. Accordingly, Foxp1-deficient lymphocytes induced rejection of incurable tumors, and promoted protection against tumor re-challenge. Mechanistically, Foxp1 interacted with the transcription factors Smad2 and Smad3 in pre-activated CD8+ T cells in response to microenvironmental transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), and was essential for its suppressive activity. Therefore, Smad2 and Smad3-mediated c-Myc repression requires Foxp1 expression in T cells. Furthermore, Foxp1 directly mediated TGF-β-induced c-Jun transcriptional repression, which abrogated T cell activity. Our results unveil a fundamental mechanism of T cell unresponsiveness different from anergy or exhaustion, driven by TGF-β signaling on tumor-associated lymphocytes undergoing Foxp1-dependent transcriptional regulation. PMID:25238097

  11. Cell mediated therapeutics for cancer treatment: Tumor homing cells as therapeutic delivery vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balivada, Sivasai

    Many cell types were known to have migratory properties towards tumors and different research groups have shown reliable results regarding cells as delivery vehicles of therapeutics for targeted cancer treatment. Present report discusses proof of concept for 1. Cell mediated delivery of Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and targeted Magnetic hyperthermia (MHT) as a cancer treatment by using in vivo mouse cancer models, 2. Cells surface engineering with chimeric proteins for targeted cancer treatment by using in vitro models. 1. Tumor homing cells can carry MNPs specifically to the tumor site and tumor burden will decrease after alternating magnetic field (AMF) exposure. To test this hypothesis, first we loaded Fe/Fe3O4 bi-magnetic NPs into neural progenitor cells (NPCs), which were previously shown to migrate towards melanoma tumors. We observed that NPCs loaded with MNPs travel to subcutaneous melanoma tumors. After alternating magnetic field (AMF) exposure, the targeted delivery of MNPs by the NPCs resulted in a mild decrease in tumor size (Chapter-2). Monocytes/macrophages (Mo/Ma) are known to infiltrate tumor sites, and also have phagocytic activity which can increase their uptake of MNPs. To test Mo/Ma-mediated MHT we transplanted Mo/Ma loaded with MNPs into a mouse model of pancreatic peritoneal carcinomatosis. We observed that MNP-loaded Mo/Ma infiltrated pancreatic tumors and, after AMF treatment, significantly prolonged the lives of mice bearing disseminated intraperitoneal pancreatic tumors (Chapter-3). 2. Targeted cancer treatment could be achieved by engineering tumor homing cell surfaces with tumor proteases cleavable, cancer cell specific recombinant therapeutic proteins. To test this, Urokinase and Calpain (tumor specific proteases) cleavable; prostate cancer cell (CaP) specific (CaP1 targeting peptide); apoptosis inducible (Caspase3 V266ED3)- rCasp3V266ED3 chimeric protein was designed in silico. Hypothesized membrane anchored chimeric protein (rCasp3V

  12. Dynamic Regulation of Activated Leukocyte Cell Adhesion Molecule–mediated Homotypic Cell Adhesion through the Actin CytoskeletonV⃞

    OpenAIRE

    Nelissen, Judith M. D. T.; Peters, Inge M.; de Grooth, Bart G.; Van Kooyk, Yvette; Figdor, Carl G.

    2000-01-01

    Restricted expression of activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM) by hematopoietic cells suggests an important role in the immune system and hematopoiesis. To get insight into the mechanisms that control ALCAM-mediated adhesion we have investigated homotypic ALCAM–ALCAM interactions. Here, we demonstrate that the cytoskeleton regulates ALCAM-mediated cell adhesion because inhibition of actin polymerization by cytochalasin D (CytD) strongly induces homotypic ALCAM–ALCAM interactions....

  13. Acquired Tumor Cell Radiation Resistance at the Treatment Site Is Mediated Through Radiation-Orchestrated Intercellular Communication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aravindan, Natarajan, E-mail: naravind@ouhsc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma (United States); Aravindan, Sheeja; Pandian, Vijayabaskar; Khan, Faizan H.; Ramraj, Satish Kumar; Natt, Praveen [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma (United States); Natarajan, Mohan [Department of Pathology, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: Radiation resistance induced in cancer cells that survive after radiation therapy (RT) could be associated with increased radiation protection, limiting the therapeutic benefit of radiation. Herein we investigated the sequential mechanistic molecular orchestration involved in radiation-induced radiation protection in tumor cells. Results: Radiation, both in the low-dose irradiation (LDIR) range (10, 50, or 100 cGy) or at a higher, challenge dose IR (CDIR), 4 Gy, induced dose-dependent and sustained NFκB-DNA binding activity. However, a robust and consistent increase was seen in CDIR-induced NFκB activity, decreased DNA fragmentation, apoptosis, and cytotoxicity and attenuation of CDIR-inhibited clonal expansion when the cells were primed with LDIR prior to challenge dose. Furthermore, NFκB manipulation studies with small interfering RNA (siRNA) silencing or p50/p65 overexpression unveiled the influence of LDIR-activated NFκB in regulating CDIR-induced DNA fragmentation and apoptosis. LDIR significantly increased the transactivation/translation of the radiation-responsive factors tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1α (IL-1α), cMYC, and SOD2. Coculture experiments exhibit LDIR-influenced radiation protection and increases in cellular expression, secretion, and activation of radiation-responsive molecules in bystander cells. Individual gene-silencing approach with siRNAs coupled with coculture studies showed the influence of LDIR-modulated TNF-α, IL-1α, cMYC, and SOD2 in induced radiation protection in bystander cells. NFκB inhibition/overexpression studies coupled with coculture experiments demonstrated that TNF-α, IL-1α, cMYC, and SOD2 are selectively regulated by LDIR-induced NFκB. Conclusions: Together, these data strongly suggest that scattered LDIR-induced NFκB-dependent TNF-α, IL-1α, cMYC, and SOD2 mediate radiation protection to the subsequent challenge dose in tumor cells.

  14. Acquired Tumor Cell Radiation Resistance at the Treatment Site Is Mediated Through Radiation-Orchestrated Intercellular Communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Radiation resistance induced in cancer cells that survive after radiation therapy (RT) could be associated with increased radiation protection, limiting the therapeutic benefit of radiation. Herein we investigated the sequential mechanistic molecular orchestration involved in radiation-induced radiation protection in tumor cells. Results: Radiation, both in the low-dose irradiation (LDIR) range (10, 50, or 100 cGy) or at a higher, challenge dose IR (CDIR), 4 Gy, induced dose-dependent and sustained NFκB-DNA binding activity. However, a robust and consistent increase was seen in CDIR-induced NFκB activity, decreased DNA fragmentation, apoptosis, and cytotoxicity and attenuation of CDIR-inhibited clonal expansion when the cells were primed with LDIR prior to challenge dose. Furthermore, NFκB manipulation studies with small interfering RNA (siRNA) silencing or p50/p65 overexpression unveiled the influence of LDIR-activated NFκB in regulating CDIR-induced DNA fragmentation and apoptosis. LDIR significantly increased the transactivation/translation of the radiation-responsive factors tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1α (IL-1α), cMYC, and SOD2. Coculture experiments exhibit LDIR-influenced radiation protection and increases in cellular expression, secretion, and activation of radiation-responsive molecules in bystander cells. Individual gene-silencing approach with siRNAs coupled with coculture studies showed the influence of LDIR-modulated TNF-α, IL-1α, cMYC, and SOD2 in induced radiation protection in bystander cells. NFκB inhibition/overexpression studies coupled with coculture experiments demonstrated that TNF-α, IL-1α, cMYC, and SOD2 are selectively regulated by LDIR-induced NFκB. Conclusions: Together, these data strongly suggest that scattered LDIR-induced NFκB-dependent TNF-α, IL-1α, cMYC, and SOD2 mediate radiation protection to the subsequent challenge dose in tumor cells

  15. Lentivirus-Mediated Knockdown of Myosin VI Inhibits Cell Proliferation of Breast Cancer Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong; Wang, Biyun; Zhu, Wei; Yang, Ziang

    2015-10-01

    Myosin VI (MYO6) is a unique member of the myosin superfamily, and almost no experimental studies link MYO6 to tumorigenesis of breast cancer. However, previous microarray data demonstrated that MYO6 was frequently overexpressed in breast cancer tissues. In this study, to further develop its role in breast cancer, endogenous expression of MYO6 was significantly inhibited in breast cancer ZR-75-30 and MDA-MB-231 cells using lentivirus-mediated RNA interference. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot were applied to detect the expression level of MYO6. Cell viability of both cell lines was measured by methylthiazol tetrazolium and colony formation assays. Besides, cell cycle assay was utilized to acquire the distribution information of cell phase. The results demonstrated that knockdown of MYO6 markedly reduced cell viability and colony formation, as well as suppressed cell cycle progression in breast cancer cells. The results suggested that MYO6 played a vital role in breast cancer cells and might provide useful information for diagnosis and therapy of human breast cancer in future. PMID:26407123

  16. Protection against acetaminophen-induced liver injury by allopurinol is dependent on aldehyde oxidase-mediated liver preconditioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose causes severe and occasionally fatal liver injury. Numerous drugs that attenuate APAP toxicity have been described. However these compounds frequently protect by cytochrome P450 inhibition, thereby preventing the initiating step of toxicity. We have previously shown that pretreatment with allopurinol can effectively protect against APAP toxicity, but the mechanism remains unclear. In the current study, C3HeB/FeJ mice were administered allopurinol 18 h or 1 h prior to an APAP overdose. Administration of allopurinol 18 h prior to APAP overdose resulted in an 88% reduction in liver injury (serum ALT) 6 h after APAP; however, 1 h pretreatment offered no protection. APAP-cysteine adducts and glutathione depletion kinetics were similar with or without allopurinol pretreatment. The phosphorylation and mitochondrial translocation of c-jun-N-terminal-kinase (JNK) have been implicated in the progression of APAP toxicity. In our study we showed equivalent early JNK activation (2 h) however late JNK activation (6 h) was attenuated in allopurinol treated mice, which suggests that later JNK activation is more critical for the toxicity. Additional mice were administered oxypurinol (primary metabolite of allopurinol) 18 h or 1 h pre-APAP, but neither treatment protected. This finding implicated an aldehyde oxidase (AO)-mediated metabolism of allopurinol, so mice were treated with hydralazine to inhibit AO prior to allopurinol/APAP administration, which eliminated the protective effects of allopurinol. We evaluated potential targets of AO-mediated preconditioning and found increased hepatic metallothionein 18 h post-allopurinol. These data show metabolism of allopurinol occurring independent of P450 isoenzymes preconditions the liver and renders the animal less susceptible to an APAP overdose. - Highlights: • 18 h allopurinol pretreatment protects against acetaminophen-induced liver injury. • 1 h allopurinol pretreatment does not protect from APAP

  17. Protection against acetaminophen-induced liver injury by allopurinol is dependent on aldehyde oxidase-mediated liver preconditioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, C. David; McGill, Mitchell R.; Lebofsky, Margitta; Bajt, Mary Lynn; Jaeschke, Hartmut, E-mail: hjaeschke@kumc.edu

    2014-02-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose causes severe and occasionally fatal liver injury. Numerous drugs that attenuate APAP toxicity have been described. However these compounds frequently protect by cytochrome P450 inhibition, thereby preventing the initiating step of toxicity. We have previously shown that pretreatment with allopurinol can effectively protect against APAP toxicity, but the mechanism remains unclear. In the current study, C3HeB/FeJ mice were administered allopurinol 18 h or 1 h prior to an APAP overdose. Administration of allopurinol 18 h prior to APAP overdose resulted in an 88% reduction in liver injury (serum ALT) 6 h after APAP; however, 1 h pretreatment offered no protection. APAP-cysteine adducts and glutathione depletion kinetics were similar with or without allopurinol pretreatment. The phosphorylation and mitochondrial translocation of c-jun-N-terminal-kinase (JNK) have been implicated in the progression of APAP toxicity. In our study we showed equivalent early JNK activation (2 h) however late JNK activation (6 h) was attenuated in allopurinol treated mice, which suggests that later JNK activation is more critical for the toxicity. Additional mice were administered oxypurinol (primary metabolite of allopurinol) 18 h or 1 h pre-APAP, but neither treatment protected. This finding implicated an aldehyde oxidase (AO)-mediated metabolism of allopurinol, so mice were treated with hydralazine to inhibit AO prior to allopurinol/APAP administration, which eliminated the protective effects of allopurinol. We evaluated potential targets of AO-mediated preconditioning and found increased hepatic metallothionein 18 h post-allopurinol. These data show metabolism of allopurinol occurring independent of P450 isoenzymes preconditions the liver and renders the animal less susceptible to an APAP overdose. - Highlights: • 18 h allopurinol pretreatment protects against acetaminophen-induced liver injury. • 1 h allopurinol pretreatment does not protect from APAP

  18. A dramatic effect of oxygen on protection of human cells against γ-radiation by lycopene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, Fritz; Edge, Ruth; Truscott, Terence George; Witt, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Reducing radiation damage is important and dietary antioxidants that can protect cells from such damage are of value. Dietary lycopene, a carotenoid found in tomatoes, protects human lymphoid cell membranes from damage by γ-radiation. We report that such protective effects are remarkably reduced as the oxygen concentration increases - near zero at 100% oxygen from fivefold protection at 20% oxygen and, dramatically, from 50-fold protection at 0% oxygen. Such huge differences imply that under higher oxygen concentrations lycopene could lead to improved cancer therapy using γ-radiation. The cells are not efficiently protected from the superoxide radical by lycopene. Noncellular studies suggest molecular mechanisms for the oxygen effect. PMID:26991327

  19. Oxidative stress due to radiation in CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells. Protection by IGF-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation exerts direct as well as indirect effects on DNA through the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Irradiated hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) experience DNA strand breaks, favoring genetic instability, due to ROS generation. Our aim was to study the effect of a range of radiation doses in HPCs and the possible protective mechanisms activated by insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1). ROS generation was evaluated, in the presence or absence of IGF-1 in liquid cultures of human HPCs-CD34+ irradiated with 1-, 2- and 5-Gy X-rays, using a flow cytometry assay. Manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) expression was studied by western blot analysis and visualized by an immunofluorescence assay. Apoptosis was estimated using the following assays: Annexin-V assay, DNA degradation assay, BCL-2/BAX mRNA and protein levels and caspase-9 protein immunofluorescence visualization. Viability and clonogenic potential were studied in irradiated HPCs. The generation of superoxide anion radicals at an early and a late time point was increased, while the hydrogen peroxide generation at a late time point was stable. IGF-1 presence further enhanced the radiation-induced increase of MnSOD at 24 h post irradiation. IGF-1 inhibited the mitochondria-mediated pathway of apoptosis by regulating the m-RNA and protein expression of BAX, BCL-2 and the BCL-2/BAX ratio and by decreasing caspase-9 protein expression. IGF-1 presence in culture media of irradiated cells restored the clonogenic capacity and the viability of HPCs as well. In conclusion, IGF-1 protects HPCs-CD34+ from radiation effects, by eliminating the oxidative microenvironment through the enhancement of MnSOD activation and by regulating the mitochondria-mediated pathway of apoptosis. (author)

  20. Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Immune-Mediated Bone Marrow Failure Syndromes

    OpenAIRE

    Maria-Christina Kastrinaki; Konstantia Pavlaki; Batsali, Aristea K.; Elisavet Kouvidi; Irene Mavroudi; Charalampos Pontikoglou; Papadaki, Helen A

    2013-01-01

    Immune-mediated bone marrow failure syndromes (BMFS) are characterized by ineffective marrow haemopoiesis and subsequent peripheral cytopenias. Ineffective haemopoiesis is the result of a complex marrow deregulation including genetic, epigenetic, and immune-mediated alterations in haemopoietic stem/progenitor cells, as well as abnormal haemopoietic-to-stromal cell interactions, with abnormal release of haemopoietic growth factors, chemokines, and inhibitors. Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MS...

  1. Antibody-Dependent Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity to Hemagglutinin of Influenza A Viruses After Influenza Vaccination in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Weimin; Liu, Feng; Wilson, Jason R.; Holiday, Crystal; Li, Zhu-Nan; Bai, Yaohui; Tzeng, Wen-Pin; Stevens, James; York, Ian A.; Levine, Min Z.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Detection of neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) to influenza A virus hemagglutinin (HA) antigens by conventional serological assays is currently the main immune correlate of protection for influenza vaccines However, current prepandemic avian influenza vaccines are poorly immunogenic in inducing nAbs despite considerable protection conferred. Recent studies show that Ab-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) to HA antigens are readily detectable in the sera of healthy individuals and patients with influenza infection. Methods. Virus neutralization and ADCC activities of serum samples from individuals who received either seasonal or a stock-piled H5N1 avian influenza vaccine were evaluated by hemagglutination inhibition assay, microneutralization assay, and an improved ADCC natural killer (NK) cell activation assay. Results. Immunization with inactivated seasonal influenza vaccine led to strong expansion of both nAbs and ADCC-mediating antibodies (adccAbs) to H3 antigen of the vaccine virus in 24 postvaccination human sera. In sharp contrast, 18 individuals vaccinated with the adjuvanted H5N1 avian influenza vaccine mounted H5-specific antibodies with strong ADCC activities despite moderate virus neutralization capacity. Strength of HA-specific ADCC activities is largely associated with the titers of HA-binding antibodies and not with the fine antigenic specificity of anti-HA nAbs. Conclusions. Detection of both nAbs and adccAbs may better reflect protective capacity of HA-specific antibodies induced by avian influenza vaccines.

  2. Are natural killer cells protecting the metabolically healthy obese patient?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lynch, Lydia A

    2012-02-01

    With the emerging obesity pandemic, identifying those who appear to be protected from adverse consequences such as type 2 diabetes and certain malignancies will become important. We propose that the circulating immune system plays a role in the development of these comorbidities. Clinical data and blood samples were collected from 52 patients with severe obesity attending a hospital weight-management clinic and 11 lean healthy controls. Patients were classified into metabolically "healthy obese" (n = 26; mean age 42.6 years, mean BMI 46.8 kg\\/m(2)) or "unhealthy obese" (n = 26; mean age 45 years, mean BMI 47.5 kg\\/m(2)) groups, based upon standard cutoff points for blood pressure, lipid profile, and fasting glucose. Circulating lymphoid populations and phenotypes were assessed by flow cytometry. Obese patients had significantly less circulating natural killer (NK) and cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) compared to lean controls. There were significantly higher levels of NK cells and CTLs in the healthy obese group compared to the unhealthy obese group (NK: 11.7% vs. 6.5%, P < 0.0001, CD8 13.4% vs. 9.3%, P = 0.04), independent of age and BMI and these NK cells were also less activated in the healthy compared to the unhealthy group (CD69, 4.1% vs. 11.8%, P = 0.03). This is the first time that quantitative differences in the circulating immune system of obese patients with similar BMI but different metabolic profiles have been described. The significantly higher levels of CTLs and NK cells, which express fewer inhibitory molecules, could protect against malignancy, infection, and metabolic disease seen in obesity.

  3. Trigonelline protects the cardiocyte from hydrogen peroxide induced apoptosis in H9c2 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Soundharrajan Ilavenil; Da Hye Kim; Young-Il Jeong; Mariadhas Valan Arasu; Mayakrishnan Vijayakumar; Ponnuraj Nagendra Prabhu; Srisesharam Srigopalram; Ki Choon Choi

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To elucidate the key parameters associated with hydrogen peroxide induced oxidative stress and investigates the mechanism of trigonelline (TG) for reducing the H2O2 induced toxicity in H9c2 cells. Methods: Cytotoxicity and antioxidant activity of TG was assessed by EZ-CYTOX kit. RNA extraction and cDNA synthesized according to the kit manufacture protocol. Apoptosis was measured by the Flowcytometry, general PCR and qPCR. Results: It was found that the TG significantly rescued the morphology of the H9c2 cells. Treatment of cells with TG attenuated H2O2 induced cell deaths and improved the antioxidant activity. In addition, TG regulated the apoptotic gene caspase-3, caspase-9 and anti-apoptotic gene Bcl-2, Bcl-XL during H2O2 induced oxidative stress in H9c2 cells. These results were comparable with quercetin treatment. For evident, flow cytometer results also confirmed the TG significantly reduced the H2O2 induced necrosis and apoptosis in H9c2 cells. However, further increment of TG concentration against H2O2 could induce the necrosis and apoptosis along with H2O2. Conclusions: It is suggested that less than 125 μM of TG could protect the cells from H2O2 induced cell damage by down regulating the caspases and up regulating the Bcl-2 and Bcl-XL expression. Therefore, we suggest the trigonelline could be useful for treatment of oxidative stress mediated cardiovascular diseases in future.

  4. Natural Products Mediated Regulation of Oxidative Stress and DNA Damage in Ultraviolet Exposed Skin Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooqi, Ammad A; Li, Ruei-Nian; Huang, Hurng-Wern; Ismail, Muhammad; Yuan, Shyng-Shiou F; Wang, Hui-Min D; Liu, Jing-Ru; Tang, Jen-Yang; Chang, Hsueh-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Data obtained through high-throughput technologies have gradually revealed that a unique stratified epithelial architecture of human skin along with the antioxidant-response pathways provided vital defensive mechanisms against UV radiation. However, it is noteworthy that skin is a major target for toxic insult by UV radiations that can alter its structure and function. Substantial fraction of information has been added into the existing pool of knowledge related to natural products mediated biological effects in UV exposed skin cells. Accumulating evidence has started to shed light on the potential of these bioactive ingredients as protective natural products in cosmetics against UV photodamage by exerting biological effects mainly through wide ranging intracellular signalling cascades of oxidative stress and modulation of miRNAs. In this review, we have summarized recently emerging scientific evidences addressing underlying mechanisms of UV induced oxidative stress and deregulation of signalling cascades and how natural products can be used tactfully to protect against UV induced harmful effects. PMID:26238680

  5. Mechanisms of CDDO-imidazolide-mediated cytoprotection against acrolein-induced neurocytotoxicity in SH-SY5Y cells and primary human astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speen, Adam; Jones, Colton; Patel, Ruby; Shah, Halley; Nallasamy, Palanisamy; Brooke, Elizabeth A S; Zhu, Hong; Li, Y Robert; Jia, Zhenquan

    2015-10-01

    Acrolein is a ubiquitous unsaturated aldehyde has been implicated in the pathogenesis of various neurological disorders. However, limited study has been conducted into potential therapeutic protection and underlying mechanism against acrolein-induced cytotoxicity via upregulation of cellular aldehyde-detoxification defenses. In this study we have utilized RA-differentiated human SH-SY5Y cells and primary human astrocytes to investigate the induction of glutathione (GSH) by the synthetic triterpenoid 2-cyano-3,12-dixooleana-1,9-dien-28-imidazolide (CDDO-Im) and the protective effects CDDO-Im-mediated antioxidant defenses on acrolein toxicity. Acrolein exposure to RA-differentiated SH-SY5Y cells resulted in a significant time dependent depletion of cellular GSH preceding a reduction in cell viability and LDH release. Further, we demonstrated the predominance of cellular GSH in protection against acrolein-induced cytotoxicity. Buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) at 25μM dramatically depleted GSH and significantly potentiated acrolein-induced cytotoxicity. Pretreatment of the cells with 100nM CDDO-Im afforded a dramatic protection against acrolein-induced cytotoxicity. Pretreatment of BSO and CDDO was found to prevent the CDDO-Im-mediated GSH induction and partially reversed the cytoprotective effects of CDDO-Im against acrolein cytotoxicity. Overall, this study represents for the first time the CDDO-Im mediated upregulation of GSH is a predominant mechanism against acrolein-induced neurotoxicity. PMID:26200598

  6. Mipu1 Overexpression Protects Macrophages from oxLDL-Induced Foam Cell Formation and Cell Apoptosis

    OpenAIRE

    Qu, Shun-Lin; Fan, Wen-Jing; Zhang, Chi; Guo, Fang; Han, Dan; Pan, Wen-Jun; Li, Wei; Feng, Da-Ming; JIANG, ZHI-SHENG

    2014-01-01

    Mipu1 (myocardial ischemic preconditioning upregulated protein 1) is a novel N-terminal Kruppel-associated box (KRAB)/C2H2 zinc finger superfamily protein, that displays a powerful effect in protecting H9c2 cells from oxidative stress-induced cell apoptosis. The present study aims to investigate the effect of Mipu1 overexpression on oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL)-induced foam cell formation, cell apoptosis, and its possible mechanisms. New Zealand healthy rabbits were used to establ...

  7. Sox17-Mediated XEN Cell Conversion Identifies Dynamic Networks Controlling Cell-Fate Decisions in Embryo-Derived Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela C.H. McDonald

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the gene regulatory networks (GRNs distinguishing extraembryonic endoderm (ExEn stem (XEN cells from those that maintain the extensively characterized embryonic stem cell (ESC. An intriguing network candidate is Sox17, an essential transcription factor for XEN derivation and self-renewal. Here, we show that forced Sox17 expression drives ESCs toward ExEn, generating XEN cells that contribute to ExEn when placed back into early mouse embryos. Transient Sox17 expression is sufficient to drive this fate change during which time cells transit through distinct intermediate states prior to the generation of functional XEN-like cells. To orchestrate this conversion process, Sox17 acts in autoregulatory and feedforward network motifs, regulating dynamic GRNs directing cell fate. Sox17-mediated XEN conversion helps to explain the regulation of cell-fate changes and reveals GRNs regulating lineage decisions in the mouse embryo.

  8. Erythropoietin protects myocardin-expressing cardiac stem cells against cytotoxicity of tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madonna, Rosalinda [The Center for Cardiovascular Biology and Atherosclerosis Research, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Texas (United States); Institute of Cardiology, and Center of Excellence on Aging, ' G. d' Annunzio' University, Chieti (Italy); Shelat, Harnath; Xue, Qun; Willerson, James T. [The Center for Cardiovascular Biology and Atherosclerosis Research, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Texas (United States); The Texas Heart Institute at St. Luke' s Episcopal Hospital, Houston, Texas (United States); De Caterina, Raffaele [Institute of Cardiology, and Center of Excellence on Aging, ' G. d' Annunzio' University, Chieti (Italy); Geng, Yong-Jian, E-mail: yong-jian.geng@uth.tmc.edu [The Center for Cardiovascular Biology and Atherosclerosis Research, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Texas (United States); The Texas Heart Institute at St. Luke' s Episcopal Hospital, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2009-10-15

    Cardiac stem cells are vulnerable to inflammation caused by infarction or ischemic injury. The growth factor, erythropoietin (Epo), ameliorates the inflammatory response of the myocardium to ischemic injury. This study was designed to assess the role of Epo in regulation of expression and activation of the cell death-associated intracellular signaling components in cardiac myoblasts stimulated with the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha}. Cardiac myoblasts isolated from canine embryonic hearts characterized by expression of myocardin A, a promyogenic transcription factor for cardiovascular muscle development were pretreated with Epo and then exposed to TNF-{alpha}. Compared to untreated cells, the Epo-treated cardiac myoblasts exhibited better morphology and viability. Immunoblotting revealed lower levels of active caspase-3 and reductions in iNOS expression and NO production in Epo-treated cells. Furthermore, Epo pretreatment reduced nuclear translocation of NF-{kappa}B and inhibited phosphorylation of inhibitor of kappa B (I{kappa}B) in TNF-{alpha}-stimulated cardiac myoblasts. Thus, Epo protects cardiac myocyte progenitors or myoblasts against the cytotoxic effects of TNF-{alpha} by inhibiting NF-{kappa}B-mediated iNOS expression and NO production and by preventing caspase-3 activation.

  9. Protection of PC12 Cells against Superoxide-induced Damage by Isoflavonoids from Astragalus mongholicus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DE-HONG YU; YONG-MING BAO; LI-JIA AN; MING YANG

    2009-01-01

    Objective To further investigate the neuroprotective effects of five isoflavonoids from Astragalus mongholicus on xanthine (XA)/xanthine oxidase (XO)-induced injury to PC12 cells. Methods PC12 cells were damaged by XA/XO. The activities of antioxidant enzymes, MTT, LDH, and GSH assays were used to evaluate the protection of these five isoflavonoids. Contentsof Bcl-2 family proteins were determined with flow cytometry. Results Among the five isoflavonoids including formononetin, ononin, 9, 10-dimethoxypterocarpan-3-O-β-D-glucoside, calycosin and calycosin-7-O-glucoside, calycosin and calycosin-7-O-glucoside were found to inhibit XA/XO-induced injury to PCI2 cells. Their EC50 values of formononetin and calycosin were 0.05 μg/mL. Moreover, treatment with these three isoflavonoids prevented a decrease in the activities of antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), while formononetin and calycosin could prevent a significant deletion of GSH. In addition, only calycosin and calycosin-7-O-glucoside were shown to inhibit XO activity in cell-free system, with an approximate IC50 value of 10 μg/mL and 50 μg/mL. Formononetin and calycosin had no significant influence on Bcl-2 or Bax protein contents. Conclusion Neuroprotection of formononetin, calycosin and calycosin-7-O-glucoside may be mediated by increasing endogenous antioxidants, rather by inhibiting XO activities or by scavenging free radicals.

  10. Combinations of Ashwagandha leaf extracts protect brain-derived cells against oxidative stress and induce differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navjot Shah

    Full Text Available Ashwagandha, a traditional Indian herb, has been known for its variety of therapeutic activities. We earlier demonstrated anticancer activities in the alcoholic and water extracts of the leaves that were mediated by activation of tumor suppressor functions and oxidative stress in cancer cells. Low doses of these extracts were shown to possess neuroprotective activities in vitro and in vivo assays.We used cultured glioblastoma and neuroblastoma cells to examine the effect of extracts (alcoholic and water as well as their bioactive components for neuroprotective activities against oxidative stress. Various biochemical and imaging assays on the marker proteins of glial and neuronal cells were performed along with their survival profiles in control, stressed and recovered conditions. We found that the extracts and one of the purified components, withanone, when used at a low dose, protected the glial and neuronal cells from oxidative as well as glutamate insult, and induced their differentiation per se. Furthermore, the combinations of extracts and active component were highly potent endorsing the therapeutic merit of the combinational approach.Ashwagandha leaf derived bioactive compounds have neuroprotective potential and may serve as supplement for brain health.

  11. TRAIL-mediated killing of acute lymphoblastic leukemia by plasmacytoid dendritic cell-activated natural killer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Lelaidier, Martin; Dìaz-Rodriguez, Yildian; Cordeau, Martine; Cordeiro, Paulo; Haddad, Elie; Herblot, Sabine; Duval, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) still frequently recurs after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), underscoring the need to improve the graft-versus-leukemia (GvL) effect. Natural killer (NK) cells reconstitute in the first months following HSCT when leukemia burden is at its lowest, but ALL cells have been shown to be resistant to NK cell-mediated killing. We show here that this resistance is overcome by NK cell stimulation with TLR-9-activated plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC...

  12. EGFR mediates astragaloside IV-induced Nrf2 activation to protect cortical neurons against in vitro ischemia/reperfusion damages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, Da-min [Department of Anesthesiology, Affiliated Yixing People' s Hospital, Jiangsu University, Yixing (China); Lu, Pei-Hua, E-mail: lphty1_1@163.com [Department of Medical Oncology, Wuxi People' s Hospital Affiliated to Nanjing Medical University, Wuxi (China); Zhang, Ke; Wang, Xiang [Department of Anesthesiology, Affiliated Yixing People' s Hospital, Jiangsu University, Yixing (China); Sun, Min [Department of General Surgery, Affiliated Yixing People' s Hospital, Jiangsu University, Yixing (China); Chen, Guo-Qian [Department of Clinical Laboratory, Wuxi People' s Hospital Affiliated to Nanjing Medical University, Wuxi (China); Wang, Qiong, E-mail: WangQiongprof1@126.com [Department of Clinical Laboratory, Wuxi People' s Hospital Affiliated to Nanjing Medical University, Wuxi (China)

    2015-02-13

    In this study, we tested the potential role of astragaloside IV (AS-IV) against oxygen and glucose deprivation/re-oxygenation (OGD/R)-induced damages in murine cortical neurons, and studied the associated signaling mechanisms. AS-IV exerted significant neuroprotective effects against OGD/R by reducing reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation, thereby attenuating oxidative stress and neuronal cell death. We found that AS-IV treatment in cortical neurons resulted in NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) signaling activation, evidenced by Nrf2 Ser-40 phosphorylation, and its nuclear localization, as well as transcription of antioxidant-responsive element (ARE)-regulated genes: heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO-1) and sulphiredoxin 1 (SRXN-1). Knockdown of Nrf2 through lentiviral shRNAs prevented AS-IV-induced ARE genes transcription, and abolished its anti-oxidant and neuroprotective activities. Further, we discovered that AS-IV stimulated heparin-binding-epidermal growth factor (HB-EGF) release to trans-activate epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in cortical neurons. Blockage or silencing EGFR prevented Nrf2 activation by AS-IV, thus inhibiting AS-IV-mediated anti-oxidant and neuroprotective activities against OGD/R. In summary, AS-IV protects cortical neurons against OGD/R damages through activating of EGFR-Nrf2 signaling. - Highlights: • Pre-treatment of astragaloside IV (AS-IV) protects murine cortical neurons from OGD/R. • AS-IV activates Nrf2-ARE signaling in murine cortical neurons. • Nrf2 is required for AS-IV-mediated anti-oxidant and neuroprotective activities. • AS-IV stimulates HB-EGF release to trans-activate EGFR in murine cortical neurons. • EGFR mediates AS-IV-induced Nrf2 activation and neuroprotection against OGD/R.

  13. Autophagy protects type II alveolar epithelial cells from Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Xu-Guang [Center for Clinical Laboratory Medicine of PLA, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an (China); Department of Laboratory Medicine, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou (China); Ji, Tian-Xing [Department of Laboratory Medicine, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou (China); Xia, Yong, E-mail: gysyxy@gmail.com [Center for Clinical Laboratory Medicine of PLA, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an (China); Ma, Yue-Yun, E-mail: cmbmayy@fmmu.edu.cn [Center for Clinical Laboratory Medicine of PLA, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an (China)

    2013-03-08

    Highlights: ► We investigated the protective effect of autophagy pathway against MTB infection. ► MTB-infected A549 cells had higher LDH release. ► Inhibition of autophagy signaling significantly enhanced the MTB-induced necrosis. ► Autophagy prevents apoptosis and promotes cell survival in infected cells. -- Abstract: This study was designed to investigate the protective effect of the autophagy signaling pathway against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in type II alveolar epithelial cells. An in vitro M. tuberculosis system was established using human A549 cells. Infection-induced changes in the expression of the autophagic marker LC3 were assessed by reverse transcription-PCR and Western blotting. Morphological changes in autophagosomes were detected by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The function of the autophagy signaling pathway during infection was assessed by measuring the level of cell death and the amount of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) released in the presence or absence of the inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA). In addition, effects on LDH release were assessed after the siRNA-mediated knockdown of the essential autophagosomal structural membrane protein Atg5. LC3 mRNA expression was significantly reduced in M.tuberculosis-infected A549 cells (16888.76 ± 1576.34 vs. uninfected: 12744.29 ± 1089.37; P < 0.05). TEM revealed M.tuberculosis bacilli-containing compartments that were surrounded by double membranes characteristic of the autophagic process. M.tuberculosis-infected A549 cells released more LDH (1.45 ± 0.12 vs. uninfected: 0.45 ± 0.04; P < 0.05). The inhibition of autophagy signaling significantly enhanced M.tuberculosis-induced necrosis (3-MA: 75 ± 5% vs. untreated: 15 ± 1%; P < 0.05) and LDH release (3-MA: 2.50 ± 0.24 vs. untreated: 0.45 ± 0.04; Atg5 knockdown: 3.19 ± 0.29 vs. untreated: 1.28 ± 0.11; P < 0.05). Our results indicate that autophagy signaling pathway prevents apoptosis in type II alveolar epithelial cells

  14. Autophagy protects type II alveolar epithelial cells from Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► We investigated the protective effect of autophagy pathway against MTB infection. ► MTB-infected A549 cells had higher LDH release. ► Inhibition of autophagy signaling significantly enhanced the MTB-induced necrosis. ► Autophagy prevents apoptosis and promotes cell survival in infected cells. -- Abstract: This study was designed to investigate the protective effect of the autophagy signaling pathway against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in type II alveolar epithelial cells. An in vitro M. tuberculosis system was established using human A549 cells. Infection-induced changes in the expression of the autophagic marker LC3 were assessed by reverse transcription-PCR and Western blotting. Morphological changes in autophagosomes were detected by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The function of the autophagy signaling pathway during infection was assessed by measuring the level of cell death and the amount of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) released in the presence or absence of the inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA). In addition, effects on LDH release were assessed after the siRNA-mediated knockdown of the essential autophagosomal structural membrane protein Atg5. LC3 mRNA expression was significantly reduced in M.tuberculosis-infected A549 cells (16888.76 ± 1576.34 vs. uninfected: 12744.29 ± 1089.37; P < 0.05). TEM revealed M.tuberculosis bacilli-containing compartments that were surrounded by double membranes characteristic of the autophagic process. M.tuberculosis-infected A549 cells released more LDH (1.45 ± 0.12 vs. uninfected: 0.45 ± 0.04; P < 0.05). The inhibition of autophagy signaling significantly enhanced M.tuberculosis-induced necrosis (3-MA: 75 ± 5% vs. untreated: 15 ± 1%; P < 0.05) and LDH release (3-MA: 2.50 ± 0.24 vs. untreated: 0.45 ± 0.04; Atg5 knockdown: 3.19 ± 0.29 vs. untreated: 1.28 ± 0.11; P < 0.05). Our results indicate that autophagy signaling pathway prevents apoptosis in type II alveolar epithelial cells

  15. In vivo tumor cell adhesion in the pulmonary microvasculature is exclusively mediated by tumor cell - endothelial cell interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mees Soeren T

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metastasis formation is the leading cause of death among colon cancer patients. We established a new in-situ model of in vivo microscopy of the lung to analyse initiating events of metastatic tumor cell adhesion within this typical metastatic target of colon cancer. Methods Anaesthetized CD rats were mechanically ventilated and 106 human HT-29LMM and T84 colon cancer cells were injected intracardially as single cell suspensions. Quantitative in vivo microscopy of the lung was performed in 10 minute intervals for a total of 40 minutes beginning with the time of injection. Results After vehicle treatment of HT-29LMM controls 15.2 ± 5.3; 14.2 ± 7.5; 11.4 ± 5.5; and 15.4 ± 6.5 cells/20 microscopic fields were found adherent within the pulmonary microvasculature in each 10 minute interval. Similar numbers were found after injection of the lung metastasis derived T84 cell line and after treatment of HT-29LMM with unspecific mouse control-IgG. Subsequently, HT-29LMM cells were treated with function blocking antibodies against β1-, β4-, and αv-integrins wich also did not impair tumor cell adhesion in the lung. In contrast, after hydrolization of sialylated glycoproteins on the cells' surface by neuraminidase, we observed impairment of tumor cell adhesion by more than 50% (p Conclusions These results demonstrate that the initial colon cancer cell adhesion in the capillaries of the lung is predominantly mediated by tumor cell - endothelial cell interactions, possibly supported by platelets. In contrast to reports of earlier studies that metastatic tumor cell adhesion occurs through integrin mediated binding of extracellular matrix proteins in liver, in the lung, the continuously lined endothelium appears to be specifically targeted by circulating tumor cells.

  16. miR-214 protects erythroid cells against oxidative stress by targeting ATF4 and EZH2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ming; Liu, Yun; Chen, Yue; Yin, Chunyang; Chen, Jane-Jane; Liu, Sijin

    2016-03-01

    Nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2) like 2 (Nrf2) is a key regulator in protecting cells against stress by targeting many anti-stress response genes. Recent evidence also reveals that Nrf2 functions partially by targeting mircroRNAs (miRNAs). However, the understanding of Nrf2-mediated cytoprotection through miRNA-dependent mechanisms is largely unknown. In the current study, we identified a direct Nrf2 targeting miRNA, miR-214, and demonstrated a protective role of miR-214 in erythroid cells against oxidative stresses generated by radiation, excess iron and arsenic (As) exposure. miR-214 expression was transcriptionally repressed by Nrf2 through a canonical antioxidant response element (ARE) within its promoter region, and this repression is ROS-dependence. The suppression of miR-214 by Nrf2 could antagonize oxidative stress-induced cell death in erythroid cells by two ways. First, miR-214 directly targeted ATF4, a crucial transcriptional factor involved in anti-stress responses, down regulation of miR-214 releases the repression of ATF4 translation and leads to increased ATF4 protein content. Second, miR-214 was able to prevent cell death by targeting EZH2, the catalytic core component of PRC2 complex that is responsible for tri-methylation reaction at lysine 27 (K27) of histone 3 (H3) (H3K27me3), by which As-induced miR-214 reduction resulted in an increased global H3K27me3 level and a compromised overexpression of a pro-apoptotic gene Bim. These two pathways downstream of miR-214 synergistically cooperated to antagonize erythroid cell death upon oxidative stress. Our combined data revealed a protective role of miR-214 signaling in erythroid cells against oxidative stress, and also shed new light on Nrf2-mediated cytoprotective machinery. PMID:26791102

  17. Type 1 pilus-mediated bacterial invasion of bladder epithelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Martinez, Juan J.; Mulvey, Matthew A.; Schilling, Joel D.; Pinkner, Jerome S.; Hultgren, Scott J.

    2000-01-01

    Most strains of uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) encode filamentous adhesive organelles called type 1 pili. We have determined that the type 1 pilus adhesin, FimH, mediates not only bacterial adherence, but also invasion of human bladder epithelial cells. In contrast, adherence mediated by another pilus adhesin, PapG, did not initiate bacterial internalization. FimH-mediated invasion required localized host actin reorganization, phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase) activation and host...

  18. Protective Role of Cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 in Experimental Lung Injury: Evidence of a Lipoxin A(4)-Mediated Effect.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Polymorphoneutrophils (PMNs) are activated by inflammatory mediators following splanchnic ischemia\\/reperfusion (I\\/R), potentially injuring organs such as the lung. As a result, some patients develop respiratory failure following abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. Pulmonary cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 protects against acid aspiration and bacterial instillation via lipoxins, a family of potent anti-inflammatory lipid mediators. We explored the role of COX-2 and lipoxin A(4) in experimental I\\/R-mediated lung injury. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to one of the following five groups: (1) controls; (2) aortic cross-clamping for 45 min and reperfusion for 4 h (I\\/R group); (3) I\\/R and SC236, a selective COX-2 inhibitor; (4) I\\/R and aspirin; and (5) I\\/R and iloprost, a prostacyclin (PGI(2)) analogue. Lung injury was assessed by wet\\/dry ratio, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) neutrophil counts. BAL levels of thromboxane, PGE(2), 6-keto-PGF(1)alpha (a hydrolysis product of prostacyclin), lipoxin A(4), and 15-epi-lipoxin A(4) were analyzed by enzyme immunoassay (EIA). Immunostaining for COX-2 was performed. RESULTS: I\\/R significantly increased tissue MPO, the wet\\/dry lung ratio, and neutrophil counts. These measures were significantly further aggravated by SC236 and improved by iloprost. I\\/R increased COX-2 immunostaining and both PGE(2) and 6-keto-PGF(1alpha) levels in BAL. SC236 markedly reduced these prostanoids and lipoxin A(4) compared with I\\/R alone. Iloprost markedly increased lipoxin A(4) levels. The deleterious effect of SC236 and the beneficial effect of iloprost was associated with a reduction and an increase, respectively, in lipoxin A(4) levels. CONCLUSIONS: Lipoxin A(4) warrants further evaluation as a mediator of COX-2 regulated lung protection.

  19. HDAC6-mediated EGFR stabilization and activation restrict cell response to sorafenib in non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhihao; Hu, Pengchao; Tang, Fang; Xie, Conghua

    2016-05-01

    Sorafenib is a multi-targeted kinase inhibitor and has been the subject of extensive clinical research in advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, sorafenib fails to improve overall survival of patients with advanced NSCLC. The molecular mechanisms that account for this phenomenon are unclear. Here we show that sorafenib treatment stabilizes epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and activates EGFR pathway. Moreover, this is partly mediated by stabilization of histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6), which has been shown to regulate EGFR endocytic trafficking and degradation. Overexpression of HDAC6 confers resistance to sorafenib in NSCLC cells. Inhibition of HDAC6 with selective inhibitors synergizes with sorafenib to kill NSCLC cells via inhibition of sorafenib-mediated EGFR pathway activation. Taken together, our findings might partly explain the failure of Phase III trial of sorafenib in improving overall survival of advanced NSCLC patients and bear possible implications for the improvement on the efficacy of sorafenib in treatment of NSCLC. PMID:27090797

  20. GRP78 is required for cell proliferation and protection from apoptosis in chicken embryo fibroblast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, M; Choi, H; Lee, S I; Kim, J S; Park, M; Kim, K; Lee, S; Byun, S J

    2016-05-01

    Chicken serum has been suggested as a supplement to promote chicken cell proliferation and development. However, the molecular mechanisms by which chicken serum stimulates chicken cell proliferation remain unknown. Here, we evaluated the effects of chicken serum supplementation on chicken embryo fibroblast (CEF) and DF-1 cell proliferation. We also sought to elucidate the molecular pathways involved in mediating the effects of chicken serum on fibroblasts and DF-1 cells by overexpression of chicken 78 kDa glucose-regulated protein (chGRP78), which is important for cell growth and the prevention of apoptosis. Our data demonstrated that the addition of 5% chicken serum significantly enhanced fibroblast proliferation. Moreover, knockdown of chGRP78 using siRNA decreased fibroblast proliferation and increased apoptosis. Based on these results, we suggest that the chGRP78-mediated signaling pathway plays a critical role in chicken serum-stimulated fibroblast survival and anti-apoptosis. Therefore, our findings have important implications for the maintenance of chicken fibroblast cells through the inhibition of apoptosis and may lead to the development of new treatments for avian disease. PMID:26944959

  1. Functional switching of ATM: sensor of DNA damage in proliferating cells and mediator of Akt survival signal in post-mitotic human neuron-like cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Li; Hua Xiong; Da-Qing Yang

    2012-01-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by cerebellar ataxia and oculocutaneous telangiectasias.The gene mutated in this disease,ATM (A-T,mutated),encodes a 370-kDa Ser/Thr protein kinase.ATM not only mediates cellular response to DNA damage but also acts as an activator of Akt in response to insulin.However,despite intensive studies,the mechanism underlying the neuronal degeneration symptoms of human A-T is still poorly understood.We found that the topoisomerase inhibitors etoposide and camptothecin readily induced apoptosis in undifferentiated proliferating SH-SY5Y cells but could not induce apoptosis in neuronally differentiated SH-SY5Y cells.In addition,etoposide induced p53 phosphorylation and H2AX foci formation in proliferating SH-SY5Y cells but failed to do so in differentiated SH-SY5Y cells.Moreover,while inhibition of ATM in undifferentiated SH-SY5Y cells partially protected them from etoposide-induced apoptosis,the same treatment had no effect on cell viability in differentiated SH-SY5Y cells.These results suggest that DNA damage or defective response to DNA damage is not the cause of neuronal cell death in human A-T.In contrast,we discovered that Akt phosphorylation was inhibited when ATM activity was suppressed in differentiated SH-SY5Y cells.Furthermore,inhibition of ATM induced apoptosis following serum starvation in neuronally differentiated SH-SY5Y cells but could not trigger apoptosis under the same conditions in undifferentiated proliferating SH-SY5Y cells.These results demonstrate that ATM mediates the Akt signaling and promotes cell survival in neuron-like human SH-SY5Y cells,suggesting that impaired activation of Akt is the reason for neuronal degeneration in human A-T.

  2. Protection by 6-aminonicotinamide against oxidative stress in cardiac cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofgaard, Johannes P; Sigurdardottir, Kristin Sigridur; Treiman, Marek

    2006-01-01

    Oxidative stress at the time of reperfusion is a major aspect of ischemia-reperfusion injury in heart as well as in other organs. There is a continuing interest in development of pharmacological approaches to alleviate this injury. 6-Aminonicotinamide (6AN) has been shown to diminish myocardial...... necrosis following global ischemia in an isolated rat heart, apparently by limiting the oxidative injury component. We therefore explored the antioxidative potential of 6AN in a model using H9C2(2-1) rat cardiac myoblasts exposed to H2O2 stress. Dependent on the specific protocol, 6AN pretreatment for 6...... protective effect of 6AN was associated with a decrease in total cell content of the reduced glutathione (GSH) by 15-44%, indicative of an oxidative shift in the GSH/GSSG system redox potential. We propose that this redox shift caused an increased Ca2+ leak through ryanodine receptors, reflecting their known...

  3. Bee Venom Protects against Rotenone-Induced Cell Death in NSC34 Motor Neuron Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, So Young; Lee, Kang-Woo; Choi, Sun-Mi; Yang, Eun Jin

    2015-09-01

    Rotenone, an inhibitor of mitochondrial complex I of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, is known to elevate mitochondrial reactive oxygen species and induce apoptosis via activation of the caspase-3 pathway. Bee venom (BV) extracted from honey bees has been widely used in oriental medicine and contains melittin, apamin, adolapin, mast cell-degranulating peptide, and phospholipase A₂. In this study, we tested the effects of BV on neuronal cell death by examining rotenone-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. NSC34 motor neuron cells were pretreated with 2.5 μg/mL BV and stimulated with 10 μM rotenone to induce cell toxicity. We assessed cell death by Western blotting using specific antibodies, such as phospho-ERK1/2, phospho-JNK, and cleaved capase-3 and performed an MTT assay for evaluation of cell death and mitochondria staining. Pretreatment with 2.5 μg/mL BV had a neuroprotective effect against 10 μM rotenone-induced cell death in NSC34 motor neuron cells. Pre-treatment with BV significantly enhanced cell viability and ameliorated mitochondrial impairment in rotenone-treated cellular model. Moreover, BV treatment inhibited the activation of JNK signaling and cleaved caspase-3 related to cell death and increased ERK phosphorylation involved in cell survival in rotenone-treated NSC34 motor neuron cells. Taken together, we suggest that BV treatment can be useful for protection of neurons against oxidative stress or neurotoxin-induced cell death. PMID:26402700

  4. Bee Venom Protects against Rotenone-Induced Cell Death in NSC34 Motor Neuron Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So Young Jung

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Rotenone, an inhibitor of mitochondrial complex I of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, is known to elevate mitochondrial reactive oxygen species and induce apoptosis via activation of the caspase-3 pathway. Bee venom (BV extracted from honey bees has been widely used in oriental medicine and contains melittin, apamin, adolapin, mast cell-degranulating peptide, and phospholipase A2. In this study, we tested the effects of BV on neuronal cell death by examining rotenone-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. NSC34 motor neuron cells were pretreated with 2.5 μg/mL BV and stimulated with 10 μM rotenone to induce cell toxicity. We assessed cell death by Western blotting using specific antibodies, such as phospho-ERK1/2, phospho-JNK, and cleaved capase-3 and performed an MTT assay for evaluation of cell death and mitochondria staining. Pretreatment with 2.5 μg/mL BV had a neuroprotective effect against 10 μM rotenone-induced cell death in NSC34 motor neuron cells. Pre-treatment with BV significantly enhanced cell viability and ameliorated mitochondrial impairment in rotenone-treated cellular model. Moreover, BV treatment inhibited the activation of JNK signaling and cleaved caspase-3 related to cell death and increased ERK phosphorylation involved in cell survival in rotenone-treated NSC34 motor neuron cells. Taken together, we suggest that BV treatment can be useful for protection of neurons against oxidative stress or neurotoxin-induced cell death.

  5. IL-4 attenuates pulmonary epithelial cell-mediated suppression of T cell priming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Melanie; Arnhold, Markus; Lingner, Sandra; Mahapatra, Subhashree; Bruder, Dunja; Hansen, Gesine; Dittrich, Anna-Maria

    2012-01-01

    We have previously shown that Th2-polarized airway inflammation facilitates sensitization towards new, protein antigens. In this context, we could demonstrate that IL-4 needs to act on cells of the hematopoetic and the structural compartment in order to facilitate sensitization towards new antigens. We thus aimed to elucidate possible mechanisms of action of IL-4 on structural cells choosing to analyze pulmonary epithelial cells as an important part of the lung's structural system. We used a co-culture system of DC- or APC-dependent in vitro priming of T cells, co-cultivated on a layer of cells of a murine pulmonary epithelial cell line (LA-4) pretreated with or without IL-4. Effects on T cell priming were analyzed via CFSE-dilution and flow cytometric assessment of activation status. Pulmonary epithelial cells suppressed T cell proliferation in vitro but this effect was attenuated by pre-treatment of the epithelial cells with IL-4. Transwell experiments suggest that epithelial-mediated suppression of T cell activation is mostly cell-contact dependent and leads to attenuation in an early naive T cell phenotype. Secretion of soluble factors like TARC, TSLP, GM-CSF and CCL20 by epithelial cells did not change after IL-4 treatment. However, analysis of co-stimulatory expression on pulmonary epithelial cells revealed that pre-treatment of epithelial cells with IL-4 changed expression GITR-L, suggesting a possible mechanism for the effects observed. Our studies provide new insight into the role of IL-4 during the early phases of pulmonary sensitization: The inhibitory activity of pulmonary epithelial cells in homeostasis is reversed in the presence of IL-4, which is secreted in the context of Th2-dominated allergic airway inflammation. This mechanism might serve to explain facilitated sensitization in the clinical context of polysensitization where due to a pre-existing sensitization increased levels of IL-4 in the airways might facilitate T cell priming towards new

  6. Remarkable heterogeneity displayed by oval cells in rat and mouse models of stem cell-mediated liver regeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelnes, Peter; Santoni-Rugiu, Eric; Rasmussen, Morten;

    2007-01-01

    The experimental protocols used in the investigation of stem cell-mediated liver regeneration in rodents are characterized by activation of the hepatic stem cell compartment in the canals of Hering followed by transit amplification of oval cells and their subsequent differentiation along hepatic...... the molecular phenotypes of oval cells in several of the most commonly used protocols of stem cell-mediated liver regeneration-namely, treatment with 2-acetylaminofluorene and partial (70%) hepatectomy (AAF/PHx); a choline-deficient, ethionine-supplemented (CDE) diet; a 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-1...... results delineate remarkable phenotypic discrepancies exhibited by oval cells in stem cell-mediated liver regeneration between rats and mice and underline the importance of careful extrapolation between individual species....

  7. Connexin 43 channels protect osteocytes against oxidative stress-induced cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Rekha; Riquelme, Manuel A; Werner, Sherry; Jiang, Jean X

    2013-07-01

    The increased osteocyte death by oxidative stress (OS) during aging is a major cause contributing to the impairment of bone quality and bone loss. However, the underlying molecular mechanism is largely unknown. Here, we show that H₂O₂ induced cell death of primary osteocytes and osteocytic MLO-Y4 cells, and also caused dose-dependent decreased expression of gap junction and hemichannel-forming connexin 43 (Cx43). The decrease of Cx43 expression was also demonstrated with the treatment of other oxidants, rotenone and menadione. Antioxidant reversed the effects of oxidants on Cx43 expression and osteocyte cell death. Cx43 protein was also much lower in the osteocytes from 20-month-old as opposed to the 5-week-old or 20-week old mice. Dye transfer assay showed that H₂O₂ reduced the gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC). In contrast to the effect on GJIC, there was a dose-dependent increase of hemichannel function by H₂O₂, which was correlated with the increased cell surface expression of Cx43. Cx43(E2) antibody, an antibody that specifically blocks Cx43 hemichannel activity but not gap junctions, completely blocked dye uptake induced by H₂O₂ and further exacerbated H₂O₂-induced osteocytic cell death. In addition, knockdown of Cx43 expression by small interfering RNA (siRNA) increased the susceptibility of the cells to OS-induced death. Together, our study provides a novel cell protective mechanism mediated by osteocytic Cx43 channels against OS. PMID:23456878

  8. Natural T Cell–mediated Protection against Seasonal and Pandemic Influenza. Results of the Flu Watch Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lili; Goonetilleke, Nilu; Fragaszy, Ellen B.; Bermingham, Alison; Copas, Andrew; Dukes, Oliver; Millett, Elizabeth R. C.; Nazareth, Irwin; Nguyen-Van-Tam, Jonathan S.; Watson, John M.; Zambon, Maria; Johnson, Anne M.; McMichael, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: A high proportion of influenza infections are asymptomatic. Animal and human challenge studies and observational studies suggest T cells protect against disease among those infected, but the impact of T-cell immunity at the population level is unknown. Objectives: To investigate whether naturally preexisting T-cell responses targeting highly conserved internal influenza proteins could provide cross-protective immunity against pandemic and seasonal influenza. Methods: We quantified influenza A(H3N2) virus–specific T cells in a population cohort during seasonal and pandemic periods between 2006 and 2010. Follow-up included paired serology, symptom reporting, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) investigation of symptomatic cases. Measurements and Main Results: A total of 1,414 unvaccinated individuals had baseline T-cell measurements (1,703 participant observation sets). T-cell responses to A(H3N2) virus nucleoprotein (NP) dominated and strongly cross-reacted with A(H1N1)pdm09 NP (P < 0.001) in participants lacking antibody to A(H1N1)pdm09. Comparison of paired preseason and post-season sera (1,431 sets) showed 205 (14%) had evidence of infection based on fourfold influenza antibody titer rises. The presence of NP-specific T cells before exposure to virus correlated with less symptomatic, PCR-positive influenza A (overall adjusted odds ratio, 0.27; 95% confidence interval, 0.11–0.68; P = 0.005, during pandemic [P = 0.047] and seasonal [P = 0.049] periods). Protection was independent of baseline antibodies. Influenza-specific T-cell responses were detected in 43%, indicating a substantial population impact. Conclusions: Naturally occurring cross-protective T-cell immunity protects against symptomatic PCR-confirmed disease in those with evidence of infection and helps to explain why many infections do not cause symptoms. Vaccines stimulating T cells may provide important cross-protective immunity. PMID:25844934

  9. Iron Prochelator BSIH Protects Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells against Cell Death Induced by Hydrogen Peroxide

    OpenAIRE

    Charkoudian, Louise K.; Dentchev, Tzvete; Lukinova, Nina; Wolkow, Natalie; Dunaief, Joshua L.; Franz, Katherine J.

    2008-01-01

    Dysregulation of localized iron homeostasis is implicated in several degenerative diseases, including Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, and age-related macular degeneration, wherein iron-mediated oxidative stress is hypothesized to contribute to cell death. Inhibiting toxic iron without altering normal metal-dependent processes presents significant challenges for standard small molecule chelating agents. We previously introduced BSIH (isonicotinic acid [2-(4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-[1,3,2]dioxaborolan-2-yl...

  10. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 6 500 meter Grid Cells

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This file geodatabase layer contains 500 meter grid cells for the extent of U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 6, as clipped at shoreline and state...

  11. Dexamethasone protects airway epithelial cell line NCI-H292 against lipopolysaccharide induced endoplasmic reticulum stress and apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHANG Yan; WANG Fang; BAI Chong; HUANG Yi; ZHAO Li-jun; YAO Xiao-peng; LI Qiang; SUN Shu-han

    2011-01-01

    Background Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and ER stress-mediated apoptosis were reported to be involved in the pathogenesis of several diseases. In a recent study, it was reported that the ER stress pathway was activated in the lungs of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated mice. It was also found that the C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP), an apoptosis-related molecule, played a key role in LPS-induced lung damage. The aim of this study was to verify whether LPS could activate the ER stress response in airway epithelial cells and which molecule was involved in the pathway.This study was also aimed at finding new reagents to protect the airway epithelial cells during LPS injury.Methods ER stress markers were observed in LPS-incubated NCI-H292 cells. SiRNA-MUC5AC was transfected into NCI-H292 cells. The effects of dexamethasone and erythromycin were observed in LPS-induced NCI-H292 cells.Results LPS incubation increased the expression of ER stress markers at the protein and mRNA levels. The knockout of MUC5AC in cells attenuated the increase in ER stress markers after incubation with LPS. Dexamethasone and erythromycin decreased caspase-3 activity in LPS-induced NCI-H292 cells.Conclusions LPS may activate ER stress through the overexpression of MUC5AC. Dexamethasone may protect human airway epithelial cells against ER stress-related apoptosis by attenuating the overload of MUC5AC.

  12. Polyol-mediated Synthesis of Chalcogenide Nanoparticles for Thin-film Solar Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Dong, Hailong

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work was polyol-mediated syntheses of chalcogenide nanoparticles for printable thin-film solar cells. In this thesis, chalcogenide nanoparticles, such as Cu2Se, In2Se3, CZTS, Se@CuSe and Te@Bi2Te3, have been successfully synthesized via a polyol-mediated method.

  13. Differential protective effects of antioxidants against cell killing and mutagenesis of Salmonella typhimurium by gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A commercial mixture of phenolic antioxidants containing BHA (butylated hydroxyanisole), BHT (butylated hydroxytoluene) and PG (propyl gallate), commonly used in the food industry, was found to protect Salmonella typhimurium against killing and induction of his+ mutations by gamma radiation. The protective effect was apparent only when irradiation was performed in the presence of oxygen and no protection could be detected in its absence. When each of the components of the antioxidant mixture was tested separately, only PG displayed a protective effects. The amount of protection provided by the mixture of antioxidants was close to the protection afforded by hypoxia. Also, protection against cell killing was very similar in magnitude to protection against induction of mutations. The protective effect could be detected only when antioxidants were added to the cells before irradiation. No protection was afforded upon addition immediately after irradiation. (author)

  14. BM microenvironmental protection of CML cells from imatinib through Stat5/NF-κB signaling and reversal by Wogonin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xuefen; Zhang, Xiaobo; Liu, Yicheng; Yang, Lin; Huang, Shaoliang; Lu, Lu; Wang, Shuhao; Guo, Qinglong; Zhao, Li

    2016-04-26

    Constitutive Stat5 activation enhanced cell survival and resistance to imatinib (IM) in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) cells. However, the mechanism of Stat5 activation in mediating resistance to IM in bone marrow (BM) microenvironment has not been evaluated precisely. In this study, we reported HS-5-derived conditioned medium (CM) significantly enhanced IM resistance in K562 and KU812. Interestingly, upregulation of the proportion of CD34+ subpopulation was found in CML cells. Subsequently, the BCR/ABL-independent activation of Stat5 increased P-glycoprotein (P-gp) activity in CM-mediated protection of CML stem cells (LSCs) from IM. Further research revealed Stat5 activation increased the DNA binding activity of NF-κB though binding of p-Stat5 and p-RelA in nucleus. Moreover, highly acetylated RelA was required for Stat5-mediated RelA nuclear binding. The study further confirmed that Wogonin potentiated the inhibitory effects of IM on leukemia development by suppressing Stat5 pathway both in CM model and the K562 xenograft model. In summary, results clearly demonstrated BCR/ABL-independent Stat5 survival pathway could contribute to resistance of CML LSCs to IM in BM microenvironment and suggested that natural durgs effectively inhibiting Stat5 may be an attractive approach to overcome resistance to BCR/ABL kinase inhibitors. PMID:27027438

  15. GAP junctional intercellular communication confers an enhanced bystander effect as well as a protective effect in HSV-TK/gancyclovir mediated cytotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose/Objective: The 'Bystander Effect' is the phenomenon by which cells which are not transduced with the Herpes Simplex Virus - Thymidine Kinase (HSV-TK) gene are killed by the guanosine analog Gancyclovir (GCV) when they are nearby HSV-TK positive cells. Since currently available gene transfer technologies have a low efficiency (typically less than 10% of cells are transduced), a better understanding of the mechanism underlying the bystander effect is crucial for the success of the HSV-TK/GCV enzyme prodrug gene therapy approach. Gap junctions, which are specialized cell membrane channels allowing the passage of molecules < 1000 daltons in size directly from cell to cell, have been proposed as a possible mediator of the bystander effect. In particular, gap junctions could permit the transfer of toxic metabolites from the HSV-TK positive cells to the bystander cells. Our aim was to assess the role of gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) in the bystander effect. Materials and Methods: Co-culture of an HSV-TK transduced rat liver epithelial cell line (WB-TK), with either its communication competent parental cell line (WB), or an isogenic cell line differing by its communication incompetence (aB1). The ratios of effector cells (WB-TK) to bystander cells (WB or aB1), were (100(0)), (50(50)), (5(95)), or(0(100)) . These various mixed populations were exposed for 24 hours to 10μM GCV and thereafter placed at clonal density into selective media, allowing for growth of either the bystander (TK negative) cells or the effector (TK-positive) cells. Results: 1) When the effector/bystander ratio was (50(50)) the surviving fraction of the bystander cells was 3.5% and 37% for the WB and aB1, respectively. When the effector/bystander ratio was (5(95)), the surviving fraction was 51% and 65% for the WB and aB1, respectively. Either cell line (WB or aB1) cultured alone was unaffected by GCV. These results demonstrate that the bystander effect is much higher when

  16. Reactive oxygen species mediate N-(4-hydroxyphenyl)retinamide-induced cell death in malignant T cells and are inhibited by the HTLV-I oncoprotein Tax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darwiche, N; Abou-Lteif, G; Bazarbachi, A

    2007-02-01

    N-(4-hydroxyphenyl)retinamide (HPR) is a synthetic retinoid that inhibits growth of many human tumor cells, including those resistant to natural retinoids. HPR is an effective chemopreventive agent for prostate, cervix, breast, bladder, skin and lung cancers, and has shown promise for the treatment of neuroblastomas. We have previously shown that HPR inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I)-associated adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) and HTLV-I-negative malignant T cells, whereas no effect is observed on normal lymphocytes. In this report, we identified HPR-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation as the key mediator of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis of malignant T cells. HPR treatment of HTLV-I-negative malignant T cells was associated with a rapid and progressive ROS accumulation. Pre-treatment with the antioxidants vitamin C and dithiothreitol inhibited ROS generation, prevented HPR-induced ceramide accumulation, cell cycle arrest, cytochrome c release, caspase-activation and apoptosis. Therefore, anti-oxidants protected malignant T cells from HPR-induced growth inhibition. The expression of the HTLV-I oncoprotein Tax abrogated HPR-induced ROS accumulation in HTLV-I-infected cells, which explains their lower sensitivity to HPR. Defining the mechanism of free radical induction by HPR may support a potential therapeutic role for this synthetic retinoid in ATL and HTLV-I-negative T-cell lymphomas. PMID:17122865

  17. Cancer Stem Cells Protect Non-Stem Cells From Anoikis: Bystander Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seog-Young; Hong, Se-Hoon; Basse, Per H; Wu, Chuanyue; Bartlett, David L; Kwon, Yong Tae; Lee, Yong J

    2016-10-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are capable of initiation and metastasis of tumors. Therefore, understanding the biology of CSCs and the interaction between CSCs and their counterpart non-stem cells is crucial for developing a novel cancer therapy. We used CSC-like and non-stem breast cancer MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-453 cells to investigate mammosphere formation. We investigated the role of the epithelial cadherin (E-cadherin)-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk) axis in anoikis. Data from E-cadherin small hairpin RNA assay and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) inhibitor study show that activation of Erk, but not modulation of E-cadherin level, may play an important role in anoikis resistance. Next, the two cell subtypes were mixed and the interaction between them during mammosphere culture and xenograft tumor formation was investigated. Unlike CSC-like cells, increased secretion of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and growth-related oncogene (Gro) chemokines was detected during mammosphere culture in non-stem cells. Similar results were observed in mixed cells. Interestingly, CSC-like cells protected non-stem cells from anoikis and promoted tumor growth. Our results suggest bystander effects between CSC-like cells and non-stem cells. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2289-2301, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26918647

  18. Protective and detrimental bystander effects induced by x-irradiation in the limb bud cell cultures of fetal mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Radioadaptive response and bystander effect represent important phenomena in radiobiology with an impact on the novel bioresponse mechanisms and risk estimates. The micromass cultures of limb bud cells (LBCs) provide an in vitro cellular maturation system, in which progress of cellular proliferation and differentiation is comparably paralleled to that of in vivo. This paper reports for the first time the evidential correlation and interaction, which simultaneously exist in the micromass culture system, between radioadaptive response and bystander effect. A radioadaptive response was induced in LBCs of embryonic day 11 (E11) ICR mice. Conditioning irradiation of the E11 cells with 30 cGy resulted in a significant protective effect against the occurrence of apoptosis, inhibition of cellular proliferation and differentiation induced by a challenging dose of 5 Gy given next day. Both protective and detrimental bystander effects were observed, namely, irradiating 50% of the E11 cells with 30 cGy led to a successful induction of radioadaptive response, and irradiating 70% of the E12 cells with 5 Gy produced comparably the detrimental effect to that of when all the cells were irradiated. Further, the bystander effects were markedly vanished by pretreatment of the cells with inhibitors to block the gap junction-mediated intracellular communication. These results indicated that the bystander effect played an important role in both the induction of a protective effect by the conditioning dose and the detrimental effect by the challenging irradiation. Concerning the underlying mechanism, the gap junction-mediated intracellular communication was suggested being involved in the induction of the bystander effects

  19. Overexpression of human kynurenine-3-monooxygenase protects against 3-hydroxykynurenine-mediated apoptosis through bidirectional nonlinear feedback

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, K; Auer, M.; Binnie, M; Zheng, X.; Pham, N.T.; Iredale, J P; Webster, S.P.; Mole, D J

    2016-01-01

    Kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO) is a critical regulator of inflammation. The preferred KMO substrate, kynurenine, is converted to 3-hydroxykynurenine (3HK), and this product exhibits cytotoxicity through mechanisms that culminate in apoptosis. Here, we report that overexpression of human KMO with orthotopic localisation to mitochondria creates a metabolic environment during which the cell exhibits increased tolerance for exogenous 3HK-mediated cellular injury. Using the selective KMO inhibit...

  20. Reactive oxygen species mediates homocysteine-induced mitochondrial biogenesis in human endothelial cells: Modulation by antioxidants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been proposed that homocysteine (Hcy)-induces endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis by generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). A previous report has shown that Hcy promotes mitochondrial damage. Considering that oxidative stress can affect mitochondrial biogenesis, we hypothesized that Hcy-induced ROS in endothelial cells may lead to increased mitochondrial biogenesis. We found that Hcy-induced ROS (1.85-fold), leading to a NF-κB activation and increase the formation of 3-nitrotyrosine. Furthermore, expression of the mitochondrial biogenesis factors, nuclear respiratory factor-1 and mitochondrial transcription factor A, was significantly elevated in Hcy-treated cells. These changes were accompanied by increase in mitochondrial mass and higher mRNA and protein expression of the subunit III of cytochrome c oxidase. These effects were significantly prevented by pretreatment with the antioxidants, catechin and trolox. Taken together, our results suggest that ROS is an important mediator of mitochondrial biogenesis induced by Hcy, and that modulation of oxidative stress by antioxidants may protect against the adverse vascular effects of Hcy

  1. The Growing Complexity of Cancer Cell Response to DNA-Damaging Agents: Caspase 3 Mediates Cell Death or Survival?

    OpenAIRE

    Razmik Mirzayans; Bonnie Andrais; Piyush Kumar; David Murray

    2016-01-01

    It is widely stated that wild-type p53 either mediates the activation of cell cycle checkpoints to facilitate DNA repair and promote cell survival, or orchestrates apoptotic cell death following exposure to cancer therapeutic agents. This reigning paradigm has been challenged by numerous discoveries with different human cell types, including solid tumor-derived cell lines. Thus, activation of the p53 signaling pathway by ionizing radiation and other DNA-damaging agents hinders apoptosis and t...

  2. In vitro cell-mediated immunity assay using 125I-iododeoxyuridine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated an in vitro cell-mediated immunity assay using incorporation of 125I-iododeoxyuridine as an indicator of lymphocyte responsiveness to mitogen stimulation. The system permits the use of whole-blood cultures in rats and dogs

  3. Inflammatory mediators and cell adhesion molecules as indicators of severity of atherosclerosis: the Rotterdam Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.P.M. de Maat (Moniek); M.L. Bots (Michiel); M.M.B. Breteler (Monique); J. Meijer (John); A.J. Kiliaan (Amanda); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); A. Hofman (Albert)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractInflammatory mediators and soluble cell adhesion molecules predict cardiovascular events. It is not clear whether they reflect the severity of underlying atherosclerotic disease. Within the Rotterdam Study, we investigated the associations of C-reactive protein (CRP), i

  4. 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 Protects against Immune-Mediated Killing of Neurons in Culture and in Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Sloka

    Full Text Available Several studies have reported that low vitamin D levels are associated with an increased risk of developing multiple sclerosis (MS. As MS is an inflammatory disorder with degeneration of axons and neurons, we examined whether the biologically active form of vitamin D, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D3, could protect against the T cell-mediated killing of human neurons in culture, and the axonal loss seen in mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE. Human neurons were exposed to activated human T lymphocytes and the loss of neurons was documented 24 hours later by counting the number of microtubule-associated protein-2 positive cells. Mice with EAE were harvested for counts of axonal profiles in the spinal cord. 1,25D3 was exposed to T cells in culture or administered to mice from peak EAE clinical severity when axonal loss was already evolving. Activated T lymphocytes killed human neurons prominently within 24 hours but toxicity was significantly attenuated when T cells were exposed to 1,25D3 prior to the co-culture. In EAE, 1,25D3 treatment initiated from peak clinical severity reduced the extent of clinical disability and mitigated the progressive loss of axons. The reduction of axonal and neuronal loss by 1,25D3 in the context of an inflammatory assault to the central nervous system is a potential contributor to the putative benefits of vitamin D in MS.

  5. Scaffolded Antigens in Yeast Cell Particle Vaccines Provide Protection against Systemic Polyoma Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipper, Donald J; Szomolanyi-Tsuda, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Background. U65, a self-aggregating peptide scaffold, traps fused protein antigens in yeast cells. Conversion to Yeast Cell Particle (YCP) vaccines by partial removal of surface mannoproteins exposes β-glucan, mediating efficient uptake by antigen-presenting cells (APCs). YCP vaccines are inexpensive, capable of rapid large-scale production and have potential for both parenteral and oral use. Results. YCP processing by alkaline hydrolysis exposes up to 20% of the glucan but converts scaffolded antigen and internal yeast proteins into a common aggregate, preventing selective yeast protein removal. For U65-green fluorescent protein (GFP) or U65-Apolipoprotein A1 (ApoA1) subcutaneous vaccines, maximal IgG responses in mice required 10% glucan exposure. IgG responses to yeast proteins were 5-fold lower. Proteolytic mannoprotein removal produced YCPs with only 6% glucan exposure, insufficiently porous for selective removal of even native yeast proteins. Vaccine efficacy was reduced 10-fold. Current YCP formulations, therefore, are not suitable for human use but have considerable potential for use in feed animal vaccines. Significantly, a YCP vaccine expressing a GFP fusion to VP1, the murine polyoma virus major capsid protein, after either oral or subcutaneous administration, protected mice against an intraperitoneal polyoma virus challenge, reducing viral DNA levels in spleen and liver by >98%. PMID:27213160

  6. Scaffolded Antigens in Yeast Cell Particle Vaccines Provide Protection against Systemic Polyoma Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald J. Tipper

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. U65, a self-aggregating peptide scaffold, traps fused protein antigens in yeast cells. Conversion to Yeast Cell Particle (YCP vaccines by partial removal of surface mannoproteins exposes β-glucan, mediating efficient uptake by antigen-presenting cells (APCs. YCP vaccines are inexpensive, capable of rapid large-scale production and have potential for both parenteral and oral use. Results. YCP processing by alkaline hydrolysis exposes up to 20% of the glucan but converts scaffolded antigen and internal yeast proteins into a common aggregate, preventing selective yeast protein removal. For U65-green fluorescent protein (GFP or U65-Apolipoprotein A1 (ApoA1 subcutaneous vaccines, maximal IgG responses in mice required 10% glucan exposure. IgG responses to yeast proteins were 5-fold lower. Proteolytic mannoprotein removal produced YCPs with only 6% glucan exposure, insufficiently porous for selective removal of even native yeast proteins. Vaccine efficacy was reduced 10-fold. Current YCP formulations, therefore, are not suitable for human use but have considerable potential for use in feed animal vaccines. Significantly, a YCP vaccine expressing a GFP fusion to VP1, the murine polyoma virus major capsid protein, after either oral or subcutaneous administration, protected mice against an intraperitoneal polyoma virus challenge, reducing viral DNA levels in spleen and liver by >98%.

  7. Scaffolded Antigens in Yeast Cell Particle Vaccines Provide Protection against Systemic Polyoma Virus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipper, Donald J.; Szomolanyi-Tsuda, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Background. U65, a self-aggregating peptide scaffold, traps fused protein antigens in yeast cells. Conversion to Yeast Cell Particle (YCP) vaccines by partial removal of surface mannoproteins exposes β-glucan, mediating efficient uptake by antigen-presenting cells (APCs). YCP vaccines are inexpensive, capable of rapid large-scale production and have potential for both parenteral and oral use. Results. YCP processing by alkaline hydrolysis exposes up to 20% of the glucan but converts scaffolded antigen and internal yeast proteins into a common aggregate, preventing selective yeast protein removal. For U65-green fluorescent protein (GFP) or U65-Apolipoprotein A1 (ApoA1) subcutaneous vaccines, maximal IgG responses in mice required 10% glucan exposure. IgG responses to yeast proteins were 5-fold lower. Proteolytic mannoprotein removal produced YCPs with only 6% glucan exposure, insufficiently porous for selective removal of even native yeast proteins. Vaccine efficacy was reduced 10-fold. Current YCP formulations, therefore, are not suitable for human use but have considerable potential for use in feed animal vaccines. Significantly, a YCP vaccine expressing a GFP fusion to VP1, the murine polyoma virus major capsid protein, after either oral or subcutaneous administration, protected mice against an intraperitoneal polyoma virus challenge, reducing viral DNA levels in spleen and liver by >98%.

  8. Identification of protective pneumococcal T(H17 antigens from the soluble fraction of a killed whole cell vaccine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin L Moffitt

    Full Text Available Mucosal or parenteral immunization with a killed unencapsulated pneumococcal whole cell antigen (WCA with an adjuvant protects mice from colonization by a T(H17 CD4+ cell-mediated mechanism. Using preparative SDS gels, we separated the soluble proteins that compose the WCA in order to identify fractions that were immunogenic and protective. We screened these fractions for their ability to stimulate IL-17A secretion from splenocytes obtained from mice immunized with WCA and adjuvant. We identified 12 proteins within the stimulatory fractions by mass spectrometry; these proteins were then cloned, recombinantly expressed and purified using an Escherichia coli expression system. The ability of these proteins to induce IL-17A secretion was then evaluated by stimulation of mouse splenocytes. Of the four most stimulatory proteins, three were protective in a mouse pneumococcal serotype 6B colonization model. This work thus describes a method for identifying immunogenic proteins from the soluble fraction of pneumococcus and shows that several of the proteins identified protect mice from colonization when used as mucosal vaccines. We propose that, by providing protection against pneumococcal colonization, one or more of these proteins may serve as components of a multivalent pneumococcal vaccine.

  9. Binding of Candida albicans yeast cells to mouse popliteal lymph node tissue is mediated by macrophages.

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Y.; Van Rooijen, N.; Cutler, J E

    1993-01-01

    We previously reported that Candida albicans yeast cells adhere to the macrophage-rich medullary and subcapsular sinus areas of mouse lymph node tissue. To determine whether the yeast cell-lymph node interaction is mediated by macrophages, the effect of specific elimination of macrophages on yeast cell binding was studied, and yeast cell adherence was correlated with the ingestion of India ink by lymph node cells. Macrophage elimination was done by use of liposome-containing dichloromethylene...

  10. Lis1 mediates planar polarity of auditory hair cells through regulation of microtubule organization

    OpenAIRE

    Sipe, Conor W.; Liu, Lixia; Lee, Jianyi; Grimsley-Myers, Cynthia; Lu, Xiaowei

    2013-01-01

    The V-shaped hair bundles atop auditory hair cells and their uniform orientation are manifestations of epithelial planar cell polarity (PCP) required for proper perception of sound. PCP is regulated at the tissue level by a conserved core Wnt/PCP pathway. However, the hair cell-intrinsic polarity machinery is poorly understood. Recent findings implicate hair cell microtubules in planar polarization of hair cells. To elucidate the microtubule-mediated polarity pathway, we analyzed Lis1 functio...

  11. Transduction of PEP-1-heme oxygenase-1 into insulin-producing INS-1 cells protects them against cytokine-induced cell death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Su Jin; Kang, Hyung Kyung [Department of Physiology, College of Medicine, Hallym University, Chunchon 200-702 (Korea, Republic of); Song, Dong Keun [Department of Pharmacology, College of Medicine, Hallym University, Chunchon 200-702 (Korea, Republic of); Eum, Won Sik; Park, Jinseu [Department of Biomedical Science and Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Hallym University, Chunchon 200-702 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Soo Young, E-mail: sychoi@hallym.ac.kr [Department of Biomedical Science and Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Hallym University, Chunchon 200-702 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Hyeok Yil, E-mail: hykwon@hallym.ac.kr [Department of Physiology, College of Medicine, Hallym University, Chunchon 200-702 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-05

    Pro-inflammatory cytokines play a crucial role in the destruction of pancreatic β-cells, thereby triggering the development of autoimmune diabetes mellitus. We recently developed a cell-permeable fusion protein, PEP-1-heme oxygenase-1 (PEP-1-HO-1) and investigated the anti-inflammatory effects in macrophage cells. In this study, we transduced PEP-1-HO-1 into INS-1 insulinoma cells and examined its protective effect against cytokine-induced cell death. PEP-1-HO-1 was successfully delivered into INS-1 cells in time- and dose-dependent manner and was maintained within the cells for at least 48 h. Pre-treatment with PEP-1-HO-1 increased the survival of INS-1 cells exposed to cytokine mixture (IL-1β, IFN-γ, and TNF-α) in a dose-dependent manner. PEP-1-HO-1 markedly decreased cytokine-induced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), nitric oxide (NO), and malondialdehyde (MDA). These protective effects of PEP-1-HO-1 against cytokines were correlated with the changes in the levels of signaling mediators of inflammation (iNOS and COX-2) and cell apoptosis/survival (Bcl-2, Bax, caspase-3, PARP, JNK, and Akt). These results showed that the transduced PEP-1-HO-1 efficiently prevented cytokine-induced cell death of INS-1 cells by alleviating oxidative/nitrosative stresses and inflammation. Further, these results suggested that PEP-1-mediated HO-1 transduction may be a potential therapeutic strategy to prevent β-cell destruction in patients with autoimmune diabetes mellitus. - Highlights: • We showed that PEP-1-HO-1 was efficiently delivered into INS-1 cells. • Transduced PEP-1-HO-1 exerted a protective effect against cytokine-induced cell death. • Transduced PEP-1-HO-1 inhibited cytokine-induced ROS and NO accumulation. • PEP-1-HO-1 suppressed cytokine-induced expression of iNOS, COX-2, and Bax. • PEP-1-HO-1 transduction may be an efficient tool to prevent β-cell destruction.

  12. Transduction of PEP-1-heme oxygenase-1 into insulin-producing INS-1 cells protects them against cytokine-induced cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pro-inflammatory cytokines play a crucial role in the destruction of pancreatic β-cells, thereby triggering the development of autoimmune diabetes mellitus. We recently developed a cell-permeable fusion protein, PEP-1-heme oxygenase-1 (PEP-1-HO-1) and investigated the anti-inflammatory effects in macrophage cells. In this study, we transduced PEP-1-HO-1 into INS-1 insulinoma cells and examined its protective effect against cytokine-induced cell death. PEP-1-HO-1 was successfully delivered into INS-1 cells in time- and dose-dependent manner and was maintained within the cells for at least 48 h. Pre-treatment with PEP-1-HO-1 increased the survival of INS-1 cells exposed to cytokine mixture (IL-1β, IFN-γ, and TNF-α) in a dose-dependent manner. PEP-1-HO-1 markedly decreased cytokine-induc