WorldWideScience

Sample records for cells measuring devices

  1. Photovoltaic material and device measurements workshop: focus on polycrystalline thin film cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-01-01

    The general purpose of the workshop was to accelerate the development of thin film solar cells by improving the versatility and reliability of material and device measurement techniques. Papers were presented under the following sessions: structural/chemical session; optical/electro-optical session; charge transport session; and poster session. Each paper was processed for EDB.

  2. Single cell studies of mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC) differentiation by electrical impedance measurements in a microfluidic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ying; Basu, Srinjan; Laue, Ernest; Seshia, Ashwin A.

    2016-01-01

    Biological populations of cells show considerable cell-to-cell variability. Study of single cells and analysis of cell heterogeneity are considered to be critical in understanding biological processes such as stem cell differentiation and cancer development. Recent advances in lab-on-a-chip techniques have allowed single-cell capture in microfluidic channels with the possibility of precise environmental control and high throughput of experiments with minimal usage of samples and reagents. In recent years, label-free techniques such as electrical impedance spectroscopy have emerged as a non-invasive approach to studying cell properties. In this study, we have designed and fabricated a microfluidic device that combines hydrodynamic trapping of single cells in pre-defined locations with the capability of running electrical impedance measurements within the same device. We have measured mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) at different states during differentiation (t=0 h, 24 h and 48 h) and quantitatively analysed the changes in electrical parameters of cells during differentiation. A marked increase in the magnitude of the cell impedance is found during cell differentiation, which can be attributed to an increase in cell size. The analysis of the measurements shows that the nucleus-to-cytoplasm ratio decreases during this process. The degree of cell heterogeneity is observed to be the highest when the cells are at the transition state (24 h), compare with cells at undifferentiated (0 h) and fully differentiated (48 h) states. The device enables highly efficient single cell trapping and provides sensitive, label-free electrical impedance measurements of individual cells, enabling the possibility of quantitatively analysing their physical state as well as studying the associated heterogeneity of a cell population. PMID:26963790

  3. Turnbuckle diamond anvil cell for high-pressure measurements in a superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giriat, Gaétan; Wang, Weiwei; Attfield, J. Paul; Huxley, Andrew D.; Kamenev, Konstantin V.

    2010-07-01

    We have developed a miniature diamond anvil cell for magnetization measurements in a widely used magnetic property measurement system commercial magnetometer built around a superconducting quantum interference device. The design of the pressure cell is based on the turnbuckle principle in which force can be created and maintained by rotating the body of the device while restricting the counterthreaded end-nuts to translational movement. The load on the opposed diamond anvils and the sample between them is generated using a hydraulic press. The load is then locked by rotating the body of the cell with respect to the end-nuts. The dimensions of the pressure cell have been optimized by use of finite element analysis. The cell is approximately a cylinder 7 mm long and 7 mm in diameter and weighs only 1.5 g. Due to its small size the cell thermalizes rapidly. It is capable of achieving pressures in excess of 10 GPa while allowing measurements to be performed with the maximum sensitivity of the magnetometer. The performance of the pressure cell is illustrated by a high pressure magnetic study of Mn3[Cr(CN)6]2ṡxH2O Prussian blue analog up to 10.3 GPa.

  4. For whom the cells pull: Hydrogel and micropost devices for measuring traction forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Alexandre J S; Denisin, Aleksandra K; Wilson, Robin E; Pruitt, Beth L

    2016-02-01

    While performing several functions, adherent cells deform their surrounding substrate via stable adhesions that connect the intracellular cytoskeleton to the extracellular matrix. The traction forces that deform the substrate are studied in mechanotrasduction because they are affected by the mechanics of the extracellular milieu. We review the development and application of two methods widely used to measure traction forces generated by cells on 2D substrates: (i) traction force microscopy with polyacrylamide hydrogels and (ii) calculation of traction forces with arrays of deformable microposts. Measuring forces with these methods relies on measuring substrate displacements and converting them into forces. We describe approaches to determine force from displacements and elaborate on the necessary experimental conditions for this type of analysis. We emphasize device fabrication, mechanical calibration of substrates and covalent attachment of extracellular matrix proteins to substrates as key features in the design of experiments to measure cell traction forces with polyacrylamide hydrogels or microposts. We also report the challenges and achievements in integrating these methods with platforms for the mechanical stimulation of adherent cells. The approaches described here will enable new studies to understand cell mechanical outputs as a function of mechanical inputs and advance the understanding of mechanotransduction mechanisms.

  5. Development of oxide layer thickness measuring device for irradiated nuclear fuel rods in hot cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been known that water side corrosion of fuel rods in nuclear reactor is accompanied with the loss of metallic wall thickness and pickup of hydrogen. This corrosion is one of the important limiting factors in the operating life of fuel rods. In connection with the fuel cladding corrosion, a device to measure the water side oxide layer thickness by means of the eddy current method without destructing the fuel rod was developed by KAERI. The device was installed on the multi function testing bench in the nondestructive test hot cell and its calibration was carried out successfully for the standard rod attached with plastic thin films whose thicknesses are predetermined. It shows good precision within 10% error

  6. Emission rate measuring device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luckat, S.

    1980-09-01

    The development and application of an emission rate measuring device for gaseous components is explored. The device contains absorption fluid from a supply container that moistens a cylindrical paper sleeve. A newer model is provided with a direct current motor requiring less electricity than an older model. The hose pump is modified to avoid changing it and the filter sleeve is fastened more securely to the distributor head. Application of the measuring devices is discussed, particularly at the Cologne Cathedral, where damage to the stone is observed.

  7. A power measuring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a part of the klystron test facility of the Dutch NIKHEF-K accelerator, a sensitive power measuring device has been built. The high-frequency power of a klystron is stored in a water-cooled dummy load. Using a microcomputer, the increase of the water temperature and the water flow rate are transformed to a digital indication of the klystron power. (Auth.)

  8. Monitoring of TGF-β 1-Induced Human Lung Adenocarcinoma A549 Cells Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transformation Process by Measuring Cell Adhesion Force with a Microfluidic Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuan; Gao, AnXiu; Yu, Ling

    2016-01-01

    The epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a process in which epithelial cells lose their cell polarity and cell-cell adhesion, and gain migratory and invasive properties. It is believed that EMT is associated with initiation and completion of the invasion-metastasis cascade. In this study, an economic approach was developed to fabricate a microfluidic device with less instrumentation requirement for the investigation of EMT by quantifying cell adhesion force. Fluid shear force was precisely controlled by a homemade microfluidic perfusion apparatus and interface. The adhesion capability of the human lung adenocarcinoma cell line A549 on different types of extracellular matrix protein was studied. In addition, effects of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) on EMT in A549 cells were investigated by characterizing the adhesion force changes and on-chip fluorescent staining. The results demonstrate that the microfluidic device is a potential tool to characterize the epithelial-mesenchymal transition process by measuring cell adhesion force.

  9. Microfluidic Cell Culture Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, Shuichi (Inventor); Cabrera, Lourdes Marcella (Inventor); Heo, Yun Seok (Inventor); Smith, Gary Daniel (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Microfluidic devices for cell culturing and methods for using the same are disclosed. One device includes a substrate and membrane. The substrate includes a reservoir in fluid communication with a passage. A bio-compatible fluid may be added to the reservoir and passage. The reservoir is configured to receive and retain at least a portion of a cell mass. The membrane acts as a barrier to evaporation of the bio-compatible fluid from the passage. A cover fluid may be added to cover the bio-compatible fluid to prevent evaporation of the bio-compatible fluid.

  10. Optical diffraction tomography using a digital micromirror device for stable measurements of 4-D refractive index tomography of cells

    CERN Document Server

    Shin, Seungwoo; Kim, Taeho; Yoon, Jonghee; Hong, Kihyun; Park, Jinah; Park, YongKeun

    2016-01-01

    Optical diffraction tomography (ODT) is an interferometric microscopy technique capable of measuring 3-D refractive index (RI) distribution of transparent samples. Multiple 2-D holograms of a sample illuminated with various angles are measured, from which 3-D RI map of the sample is reconstructed via the diffraction theory. ODT has been proved as a powerful tool for the study of biological cells, due to its non-invasiveness, label-free and quantitative imaging capability. Recently, our group has demonstrated that a digital micromirror device (DMD) can be exploited for fast and precise control of illumination beams for ODT. In this work, we systematically study the precision and stability of the ODT system equipped with a DMD and present measurements of 3-D and 4-D RI maps of various types of live cells including human red blood cells, white blood cells, hepatocytes, and HeLa cells. Furthermore, we also demonstrate the effective visualization of 3-D RI maps of live cells utilizing the measured information abou...

  11. Optical diffraction tomography using a digital micromirror device for stable measurements of 4D refractive index tomography of cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Seungwoo; Kim, Kyoohyun; Kim, Taeho; Yoon, Jonghee; Hong, Kihyun; Park, Jinah; Park, YongKeun

    2016-03-01

    Optical diffraction tomography (ODT) is an interferometric microscopy technique capable of measuring 3-D refractive index (RI) distribution of transparent samples. Multiple 2-D holograms of a sample illuminated with various angles are measured, from which 3-D RI map of the sample is reconstructed via the diffraction theory. ODT has been proved as a powerful tool for the study of biological cells, due to its non-invasiveness, label-free and quantitative imaging capability. Recently, our group has demonstrated that a digital micromirror device (DMD) can be exploited for fast and precise control of illumination beams for ODT. In this work, we systematically study the precision and stability of the ODT system equipped with a DMD and present measurements of 3-D and 4-D RI maps of various types of live cells including human red blood cells, white blood cells, hepatocytes, and HeLa cells. Furthermore, we also demonstrate the effective visualization of 3-D RI maps of live cells utilizing the measured information about the values and gradient of RI tomograms.

  12. Optical device for straightness measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vekteris, Vladas; Jurevicius, Mindaugas; Turla, Vytautas

    2015-11-01

    The present paper describes the research of the optical device for two-dimensional straightness measurement of technological machines. Mathematical study of an optical device, operating on the phase principle and measuring transversal displacements of machine parts in two directions ( X and Y) during their linear longitudinal motion in a machine (alongside the Z axis), is presented. How to estimate the range of travel along the Z axis is analytically shown. At this range, the measurer gives correct measurements of transverse displacement. The necessary distance from the objective focus to the image plane was defined mathematically. The sample results of measuring the displacement of the table of a technological machine by using the optical device are presented in the paper. This optical device for non-contact straightness measurement can be used for measurement straightness in turning, milling, drilling, grinding machines and other technological machines, also in geodesy and cartography, and for moving accuracy testing of mechatronic devices, robotics and others.

  13. Measuring verification device error rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A verification device generates a Type I (II) error when it recommends to reject (accept) a valid (false) identity claim. For a given identity, the rates or probabilities of these errors quantify random variations of the device from claim to claim. These are intra-identity variations. To some degree, these rates depend on the particular identity being challenged, and there exists a distribution of error rates characterizing inter-identity variations. However, for most security system applications we only need to know averages of this distribution. These averages are called the pooled error rates. In this paper the authors present the statistical underpinnings for the measurement of pooled Type I and Type II error rates. The authors consider a conceptual experiment, ''a crate of biased coins''. This model illustrates the effects of sampling both within trials of the same individual and among trials from different individuals. Application of this simple model to verification devices yields pooled error rate estimates and confidence limits for these estimates. A sample certification procedure for verification devices is given in the appendix

  14. The Biopotentials and Measuring Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Guven

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Many organs in the human body, produces many different types of the electric activity, such as the muscle groups, heart, brain and eyes. These electric activities are also called biopotentials. Measurement of the biopotentials from the human body can indicated vital clues as to normal or pathological functions of the organs. Biopotential signals are small in amplitude and consists of very low frequencies. Therefore, the signals need to be amplified and filtered to make them compatible with devices such as displays, recorders, or analog to digital converters for computerized equipment. In addition, biopotential measurements are corrupted by environmental and biological sources of interference. Amplifiers and filters adequate to measure these signals have to satisfy very specific requirements. This study reviews the origins, acuisition of biopotentials, and design of the medical instruments used in biopotential measurement. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2012; 21(3.000: 174-188

  15. Development of measurement device for evaluation of solar cell module output. 2; Taiyo denchi module shutsuryoku hyokayo sokuteiki no kaihatsu. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minoda, M.; Itsumi, J. [Kumamoto Institute of Technology, Kumamoto (Japan)

    1996-10-27

    Enhancement in design efficiency may be attained as well as utilization in maintenance if on-the-spot data is made available, for the purpose of flexibly dealing with changes in design or matching with a house structure, in calculating the power generation output of a solar cell (PV) module. Under the circumstances, a small-sized compound measuring device was produced as a prototype which, using an I-V curve tracer, measured output and condition of a roof at the time of installation, compared with the optimum operation and predicted the power generation. The device was structured with the main body consisting of a computing part, measurement controller and power supply and with various sensor modules. The electron load control method was employed in order to measure I-V characteristics of the PV module, since it was desirable to use a variable load and to cover the range from the release voltage of a solar cell to the short-circuit state through the maximum output point. The reference module method was used for the system evaluation. The device was presumably applicable to a PV system design by incorporating a sensor module for measuring design environment data, which was essential at the time of a system design, in addition to those for measuring output. 9 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Flow rate measuring devices for gas flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonfig, K. W.

    1985-07-01

    Flowrate measuring devices are described: volume meter with fixed or mobile walls; turbine meter; throttling procedure; ultrasonic and Doppler methods; vortex method; rotary flowmeter; and swinging body flow measuring procedure. Flowrate can also be measured from the force exerted on bodies immersed in a fluid or based on thermodynamical principles. The characteristics and operating envelope of each device/method are given.

  17. Zero G Mass Measurement Device (ZGMMD) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Zero Gravity Mass Measurement Device (ZGMMD) provides the ability to measure the mass of samples in a microgravity environment, like that found on the...

  18. Programmed device for coordinate measuring mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The programmed device providing the automatic measurement of the coordinate of a continuously travelling carriage with stepwise control of the pitch and measurement range in wide limits is described. The matching of measured points at the direct and return travels of the carriage is within 50 mcm. The device was developed to automize the measurement of charged particles tracks by means of floating-wire method. It may be also used in different recorders

  19. Measuring the state of charge of the electrolyte solution in a vanadium redox flow battery using a four-pole cell device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngamsai, Kittima; Arpornwichanop, Amornchai

    2015-12-01

    The decrease in the efficiency and capacity of a vanadium redox flow battery (VRB) caused by an electrolyte imbalance is an important impediment to its long-term operation. Knowing the state of charge (SOC) of an electrolyte solution can quantify the level of the electrolyte imbalance in the VRB. In this study, a four-pole cell device is devised and employed to predict the SOC. The proposed method directly measures the ionic resistance of the electrolyte solution and is sufficiently precise to be applied in real-time mode. Experimental studies on the effects of the operating current on the four-pole cell and the concentrations of vanadium and sulfuric acid in the electrolyte solution are carried out. The results show that the four-pole cell method can be utilized to measure the electrolyte SOC. The concentrations of vanadium and sulfuric acid in the electrolyte solution affect the ionic resistance of the solution. Regarding the capacity and efficiency of the VRB system, the results indicate that the electrical charge is determined from the concentration of vanadium and that the cell voltage depends on the concentration of sulfuric acid in the electrolyte solution. The decreased vanadium concentration and increased sulfuric acid concentration improves the cell voltage efficiency.

  20. Measurement of the hematocrit using paper-based microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Samuel B; Fernandes, Syrena C; Rajaratnam, Anjali; DeChiara, Nicholas S; Mace, Charles R

    2016-10-01

    The quantification of blood cells provides critical information about a patient's health status. Sophisticated analytical equipment, such as hematology analyzers, have been developed to perform these measurements, but limited-resource settings often lack the infrastructure required to purchase, operate, and maintain instrumentation. To address these practical challenges, paper-based microfluidic devices have emerged as a platform to develop diagnostic assays specifically for use at the point-of-care. To date, paper-based microfluidic devices have been used broadly in diagnostic assays that apply immunoassay, clinical chemistry, and electrochemistry techniques. The analysis of cells, however, has been largely overlooked. In this communication, we demonstrate a paper-based microfluidic device that enables the controlled transport of red blood cells (RBCs) and the measurement of the hematocrit-the ratio of RBC packed cell volume to total volume of whole blood. The properties of paper, device treatment, and device geometry affect the overall extent and reproducibility of transport of RBCs. Ultimately, we developed an inexpensive (US$0.03 per device) thermometer-styled device where the distance traveled by RBCs is proportional to the hematocrit. These results provide a foundation for the design of paper-based microfluidic devices that enable the separation and detection of cells in limited-resource settings. PMID:27604182

  1. Improvements in backscatter measurement devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Improvements in measuring the thickness of a coating on a substrate by the technique of backscattered particles are described. These improvements enable the measurements to be carried out continuously as an integral part of the coating production line and also permit measurements where the coated elements are separated from one another by a predetermined distance. The former is achieved by situating the backscatter probe and detector on the rim of the measurement wheel and rotating this wheel at a speed such that the coated element and probe are stationary relative to one another. The latter improvement is achieved by an indexing apparatus which automatically positions the probe beside a coated element. (U.K.)

  2. Simple device measures solar radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, W. R.

    1977-01-01

    Simple inexpensive thermometer, insolated from surroundings by transparent glass or plastic encasement, measures intensities of solar radiation, or radiation from other sources such as furnaces or ovens. Unit can be further modified to accomplish readings from remote locations.

  3. Inter-device reliability of DSI measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aichinger, Philipp; Feichter, Felicitas; Aichstill, Birgitta; Bigenzahn, Wolfgang; Schneider-Stickler, Berit

    2012-12-01

    The Dysphonia Severity Index (DSI) is a measure that quantifies the overall vocal quality. The aim of the study is to evaluate the reliability of DSI measurements. The DSIs of 30 subjects were therefore measured using LingWAVES (WEVOSYS) and DiVAS (XION). To evaluate the inter-device reliability of DSI measurement, the devices' results were compared for each subject. The DSI values of both devices showed great differences. The calculated DSI differences of 95% of the subjects were within the limits of +2.39 and -2.82, which makes a clinical interpretation of severity of voice disorder using different devices questionable. The technical and procedural aspects of measurement divergences are discussed, and the need to define hardware and software standards is shown. PMID:22702894

  4. Zero G Mass Measurement Device (ZGMMD) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Zero G Mass Measurement Device (ZGMMD) will provide the ability to quantify the mass of objects up to 2,000 grams, including live animal specimens in a zero G...

  5. Development of a Novel Solar Radiation Measuring Device

    OpenAIRE

    Samer Alsadi; Tamer Khatib; Sulafa Mallooh

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, a novel solar radiation measuring device is proposed. A solar cell, PIC controller, temperature sensors as well as a memory chip are used. The proposed device measures the solar radiation and the ambient temperature through a specific time period and then the measured data is stored on a memory chip through the PIC controller. After that the stored data can be transferred to a computer in order to be analyzed. However, a calibration of the used solar cell is done first, in orde...

  6. Design of a network performance measuring device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badr, O.A.; Miniesy, M.S.; Labib, G.A.

    1983-01-01

    A network performance measuring device (NPMD) was designed. The NPMD is a multiprocessor built around the 8080a microprocessor. The NPMD can be regarded as a tool for measuring important parameters affecting performance in computer networks as a step to improve computer services to the users. With the aid of the NPMD, optimum design of a data communication network, serviced by an existing computer system, becomes easier. NPMD combines the basic features of terminal and link simulators, data test sets, and data acquisition devices. 4 references.

  7. Presentation of a new BRDF measurement device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrot, Gerard; Bodilis, Madeleine; Briottet, Xavier; Cosnefroy, Helene

    1998-12-01

    The bi-directional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) plays a major role to evaluate or analyze signals reflected by Earth in the solar spectrum. A BRDF measurement device that covers a large spectral and directional domain was recently developed by ONERA/DOTA. It was designed to allow both laboratory and outside measurements. Its main characteristics are a spectral domain: 0.42-0.95 micrometers ; a geometrical domain: 0-60 degrees for zenith angle, 0-180 degrees for azimuth; a maximum target size for nadir measurements: 22 cm. For a given zenith angle of the source, the BRDF device needs about seven minutes to take measurements for a viewing zenith angle varying from 0-60 degrees and relative azimuth angle varying from 0-180 degrees. The performances, imperfections and properties of each component of the measurement chain are studied. A part of the work was devoted to characterize precisely the source, and particularly the spatial variability of the irradiance at the target level, the temporal stability and the spectral profile of the lamp. Some of these imperfections are modeled and taken into account in corrections of BRDF measurements. Concerning the sensor, a calibration in wavelength was done. Measurements of bi- directional reflectance of which is well known. A software was developed to convert all the raw data acquired automatically into BRDF values. To illustrate measurements taken by this device, some results are also presented here. They are taken over sand and short grass, for different wavelengths and geometrical conditions.

  8. Measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Hoi-Kwong; Curty, Marcos; Qi, Bing

    2012-03-30

    How to remove detector side channel attacks has been a notoriously hard problem in quantum cryptography. Here, we propose a simple solution to this problem--measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (QKD). It not only removes all detector side channels, but also doubles the secure distance with conventional lasers. Our proposal can be implemented with standard optical components with low detection efficiency and highly lossy channels. In contrast to the previous solution of full device independent QKD, the realization of our idea does not require detectors of near unity detection efficiency in combination with a qubit amplifier (based on teleportation) or a quantum nondemolition measurement of the number of photons in a pulse. Furthermore, its key generation rate is many orders of magnitude higher than that based on full device independent QKD. The results show that long-distance quantum cryptography over say 200 km will remain secure even with seriously flawed detectors. PMID:22540686

  9. Measurement device independent quantum key distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Lo, Hoi-Kwong; Qi, Bing

    2011-01-01

    How to remove detector side channel attacks has been a notoriously hard problem in quantum cryptography. Here, we propose a simple solution to this problem---*measurement* device independent quantum key distribution. It not only removes all detector side channels, but also doubles the secure distance with conventional lasers. Our proposal can be implemented with standard optical components with low detection efficiency and highly lossy channels. In contrast to the previous solution of full device independent QKD, the realization of our idea does not require detectors of near unity detection efficiency in combination with a qubit amplifier (based on teleportation) or a quantum non-demolition measurement of the number of photons in a pulse. Furthermore, its key generation rate is many orders of magnitude higher than that based on full device independent QKD. The results show that long-distance quantum cryptography over say 200km will remain secure even with seriously flawed detectors.

  10. Coherence measurement with digital micromirror device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partanen, Henri; Turunen, Jari; Tervo, Jani

    2014-02-15

    We measure the complex-valued spatial coherence function of a multimode broad-area laser diode using Young's classical double slit experiment realized with a digital micromirror device. We use this data to construct the coherent modes of the beam and to simulate its propagation before and after the measurement plane. When comparing the results to directly measured intensity profiles, we find excellent correspondence to the extent that even small details of the beam can be predicted. We also consider the number of measurement points required to model the beam with sufficient accuracy.

  11. Performance of an in-plane detection cell with integrated waveguides for UV/Vis absorbance measurements on microfluidic separation devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Nickolaj Jacob; Mogensen, Klaus Bo; Kutter, Jörg Peter

    2002-01-01

    A microfluidic device with integrated waveguides and a long path length detection cell for UV/Vis absorbance detection is presented. The 750 mum U-cell detection geometry was evaluated in terms of its optical performance as well as its influence on efficiency for electrophoretic separations in the...... microdevice. Stray light was found to have a strong effect on both, the sensitivity of the detection and the available linear range. The long path length U-cell showed a 9 times higher sensitivity when compared to a conventional capillary electrophoresis (CE) system with a 75 mum inner diameter (ID) capillary...

  12. 46 CFR 154.1340 - Temperature measuring devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Temperature measuring devices. 154.1340 Section 154.1340... Instrumentation § 154.1340 Temperature measuring devices. (a) Each cargo tank must have devices that measure the... level allowed under § 154.1844. (b) Each device required by paragraph (a) must have a readout at...

  13. MEASUREMENT OF VPN PENFORMANCE BETWEEN DIFFERENT DEVICES

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Chao

    2013-01-01

    Network is becoming more and more important in daily life, the security is most critical issue in networking, however, when you add some security feature on your device, it will cost the resource, in this article we will test and measure how the VPN effect to your network. You can see from this article about the history of Internet and VPN, the architecture of VPN, how it works, and what kind of crypto algorithms VPN uses. The last one and also the most important of this article is the perfor...

  14. Whole Blood Cell Staining Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sams, Clarence F.; Clift, Vaughan L.; McDonald, Kelly E.

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus and method for staining particular cell markers is disclosed. The apparatus includes a flexible tube that is reversibly pinched into compartments with one or more clamps. Each compartment of the tube contains a separate reagent and is in selective fluid communication with adjoining compartments.

  15. Measurement-device-independent quantum digital signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puthoor, Ittoop Vergheese; Amiri, Ryan; Wallden, Petros; Curty, Marcos; Andersson, Erika

    2016-08-01

    Digital signatures play an important role in software distribution, modern communication, and financial transactions, where it is important to detect forgery and tampering. Signatures are a cryptographic technique for validating the authenticity and integrity of messages, software, or digital documents. The security of currently used classical schemes relies on computational assumptions. Quantum digital signatures (QDS), on the other hand, provide information-theoretic security based on the laws of quantum physics. Recent work on QDS Amiri et al., Phys. Rev. A 93, 032325 (2016);, 10.1103/PhysRevA.93.032325 Yin, Fu, and Zeng-Bing, Phys. Rev. A 93, 032316 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevA.93.032316 shows that such schemes do not require trusted quantum channels and are unconditionally secure against general coherent attacks. However, in practical QDS, just as in quantum key distribution (QKD), the detectors can be subjected to side-channel attacks, which can make the actual implementations insecure. Motivated by the idea of measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (MDI-QKD), we present a measurement-device-independent QDS (MDI-QDS) scheme, which is secure against all detector side-channel attacks. Based on the rapid development of practical MDI-QKD, our MDI-QDS protocol could also be experimentally implemented, since it requires a similar experimental setup.

  16. Preliminary design of a new device to measure muscle function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, Jeffrey; Durfee, William

    2015-08-01

    A description and early results are presented for a novel device to estimate the torque-angle and torque-angular velocity properties of the quadriceps muscle group using electrical stimulation. The device straps to the shin and is moved by the operator while pulses of stimulation are applied to the motor point of the quadriceps. During stimulation, the operator raises and lowers the leg to the desired angle, and also can oscillate the leg to generate a rich velocity profile. The resulting muscle force is measured by a load cell contained in the device. In a preliminary study using 11 healthy subjects, normalized torque-angle and torque-velocity data for the quadriceps were consistent with literature results that used maximum voluntary contraction methods. PMID:26737540

  17. Electrical measuring device, method and computer program product

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer G.C.M.; Hilhorst, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    The invention relates to an electrical measuring device for performing an electrical -impedance measurement in a contactless manner. The measuring device comprises a measuring unit which is provided with the impedance (7,8) to be measured and a passive resonance circuit (4) connected thereto for gen

  18. Cell biology apps for Apple devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Louisa A

    2012-01-01

    Apps for touch-pad devices hold promise for guiding and supporting learning. Students may use them in the classroom or on their own for didactic instruction, just-in-time learning, or review. Since Apple touch-pad devices (i.e., iPad and iPhone) have a substantial share of the touch-pad device market (Campbell, 2012), this Feature will explore cell biology apps available from the App Store. My review includes iPad and iPhone apps available in June 2012, but does not include courses, lectures, podcasts, audiobooks, texts, or other books. I rated each app on a five-point scale (1 star = lowest; 5 stars = highest) for educational and production values; I also provide an overall score. PMID:22949420

  19. Cell biology apps for Apple devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Louisa A

    2012-01-01

    Apps for touch-pad devices hold promise for guiding and supporting learning. Students may use them in the classroom or on their own for didactic instruction, just-in-time learning, or review. Since Apple touch-pad devices (i.e., iPad and iPhone) have a substantial share of the touch-pad device market (Campbell, 2012), this Feature will explore cell biology apps available from the App Store. My review includes iPad and iPhone apps available in June 2012, but does not include courses, lectures, podcasts, audiobooks, texts, or other books. I rated each app on a five-point scale (1 star = lowest; 5 stars = highest) for educational and production values; I also provide an overall score.

  20. THE INEXPENSIVE DEVICE FOR SEA LEVEL MEASUREMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Annunziato

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A new mareograph device has been designed at the Joint Research Centre (JRC of the European Commission (EC in order improve the sea level network in use for the Tsunami Hazard monitoring in the Mediterranean Sea and in the North Atlantic area (NEAMTWS area of UNESCO. The instrument has the characteristic to be cheap and very effective but its reliability, duration and quality need to be determined and qualified. For this reason a number of experimental campaigns are being conducted, whose first results are presented here. In collaboration with the UNESCO/IOC (Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission, responsible of the definition of the Tsunami Warning System of this geographical area, a set of 20 devices has been offered by JRC for a period of 1 year of testing of the devices; the surveys for the installation of the devices is under way and the installation should be completed by the end of 2015.

  1. Reversible (unitized) PEM fuel cell devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitlitsky, F; Myers, B; Smith, W F; Weisberg, Molter, T M

    1999-06-01

    Regenerative fuel cells (RFCs) are enabling for many weight-critical portable applications, since the packaged specific energy (>400 Wh/kg) of properly designed lightweight RFC systems is several-fold higher than that of the lightest weight rechargeable batteries. RFC systems can be rapidly refueled (like primary fuel cells), or can be electrically recharged (like secondary batteries) if a refueling infrastructure is not conveniently available. Higher energy capacity systems with higher performance, reduced weight, and freedom from fueling infrastructure are the features that RFCs promise for portable applications. Reversible proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells, also known as unitized regenerative fuel cells (URFCs), or reversible regenerative fuel cells, are RFC systems which use reversible PEM cells, where each cell is capable of operating both as a fuel cell and as an electrolyzer. URFCs further economize portable device weight, volume, and complexity by combining the functions of fuel cells and electrolyzers in the same hardware, generally without any system performance or efficiency reduction. URFCs are being made in many forms, some of which are already small enough to be portable. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has worked with industrial partners to design, develop, and demonstrate high performance and high cycle life URFC systems. LLNL is also working with industrial partners to develop breakthroughs in lightweight pressure vessels that are necessary for URFC systems to achieve the specific energy advantages over rechargeable batteries. Proton Energy Systems, Inc. (Proton) is concurrently developing and commercializing URFC systems (UNIGEN' product line), in addition to PEM electrolyzer systems (HOGEN' product line), and primary PEM fuel cell systems. LLNL is constructing demonstration URFC units in order to persuade potential sponsors, often in their own conference rooms, that advanced applications based on URFC s are

  2. Development of a wireless blood pressure measuring device with smart mobile device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    İlhan, İlhan; Yıldız, İbrahim; Kayrak, Mehmet

    2016-03-01

    Today, smart mobile devices (telephones and tablets) are very commonly used due to their powerful hardware and useful features. According to an eMarketer report, in 2014 there were 1.76 billion smartphone users (excluding users of tablets) in the world; it is predicted that this number will rise by 15.9% to 2.04 billion in 2015. It is thought that these devices can be used successfully in biomedical applications. A wireless blood pressure measuring device used together with a smart mobile device was developed in this study. By means of an interface developed for smart mobile devices with Android and iOS operating systems, a smart mobile device was used both as an indicator and as a control device. The cuff communicating with this device through Bluetooth was designed to measure blood pressure via the arm. A digital filter was used on the cuff instead of the traditional analog signal processing and filtering circuit. The newly developed blood pressure measuring device was tested on 18 patients and 20 healthy individuals of different ages under a physician's supervision. When the test results were compared with the measurements made using a sphygmomanometer, it was shown that an average 93.52% accuracy in sick individuals and 94.53% accuracy in healthy individuals could be achieved with the new device. PMID:26626086

  3. Nanostructured Semiconductor Device Design in Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Hongmei

    We demonstrate the use of embedded CdS nanowires in improving spectral transmission loss and the low mechanical and electrical robustness of planar CdS window layer and thus enhancing the quantum efficiency and the reliability of the CdS-CdTe solar cells. CdS nanowire window layer enables light transmission gain at 300nm-550nm. A nearly ideal spectral response of quantum efficiency at a wide spectrum range provides an evidence for improving light transmission in the window layer and enhancing absorption and carrier generation in absorber. Nanowire CdS/CdTe solar cells with Cu/graphite/silver paste as back contacts, on SnO2/ITO-soda lime glass substrates, yield the highest efficiency of 12% in nanostructured CdS-CdTe solar cells. Reliability is improved by approximately 3 times over the cells with the traditional planar CdS counterpart. Junction transport mechanisms are delineated for advancing the basic understanding of device physics at the interface. Our results prove the efficacy of this nanowire approach for enhancing the quantum efficiency and the reliability in windowabsorber type solar cells (CdS-CdTe, CdS-CIGS and CdS-CZTSSe etc) and other optoelectronic devices. We further introduce MoO3-x as a transparent, low barrier back contact. We design nanowire CdS-CdTe solar cells on flexible foils of metals in a superstrate device structure, which makes low-cost roll-to-roll manufacturing process feasible and greatly reduces the complexity of fabrication. The MoO3 layer reduces the valence band offset relative to the CdTe, and creates improved cell performance. Annealing as-deposited MoO3 in N 2 reduces series resistance from 9.98 O/cm2 to 7.72 O/cm2, and hence efficiency of the nanowire solar cell is improved from 9.9% to 11%, which efficiency comparable to efficiency of planar counterparts. When the nanowire solar cell is illuminated from MoO 3-x /Au side, it yields an efficiency of 8.7%. This reduction in efficiency is attributed to decrease in Jsc from 25.5m

  4. 27 CFR 24.170 - Measuring devices and testing instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Measuring devices and testing instruments. 24.170 Section 24.170 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS WINE Construction and Equipment § 24.170 Measuring devices and testing instruments....

  5. Device to measure elastic modulus of superconducting windings

    CERN Multimedia

    1979-01-01

    This device was made to measure elastic modulus of the Po dipole superconducting coils. More elaborated devices, but based on the same concept, were later used to measure the apparent elastic moduli of the LHC superconducting magnet coils. See also 7903547X, 7901386.

  6. Device for measuring elastic modulus of superconducting coils (See 7903169)

    CERN Multimedia

    1979-01-01

    This device was made to measure elastic modulus of the Po dipole superconducting coils. More elaborated devices, but based on the same concept, were later used to measure the apparent elastic moduli of the LHC superconducting magnet coils. See also 7903169, 7901386.

  7. Measuring directional characteristics of in-ear recording devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Flemming; Hoffmann, Pablo F.; Hammershøi, Dorte

    2013-01-01

    With the availability of small in-ear headphones and miniature microphones it is possible to construct combined in-ear devices for binaural recording and playback. When mounting a microphone on the outside of an insert earphone the microphone position deviates from ideal positions in the ear canal....... The pinna and thereby also the natural sound transmission are altered by the inserted device. This paper presents a methodology for accurately measuring the directional dependent transfer functions of such in-ear devices. Pilot measurements on a commercial available device are presented and possibilities...

  8. Correlation Measurements on Small Mobile Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yanakiev, Boyan Radkov; Nielsen, Jesper Ødum; Christensen, Morten;

    2012-01-01

    Here, analysis of the antenna correlation at the design stage is done, with focus on measurement techniques. Various theoretical definitions of correlations are used with the corresponding measured data required. The problems related to the coaxial measurement cables, when calculating correlation...... through the radiation patterns, are analyzed and an optical solution proposed. It is shown that using optical cable replacement, repeatable and accurate measurements of the envelope correlation coefficient can be made.......Here, analysis of the antenna correlation at the design stage is done, with focus on measurement techniques. Various theoretical definitions of correlations are used with the corresponding measured data required. The problems related to the coaxial measurement cables, when calculating correlation...

  9. Investigation of Electronic Devices for Strain Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ričardas Masiulionis

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Importance of strain measuring for safety of buildings is shown. The strain monitoring should be one of the buildings security systems. Often used balanced and non-balanced Wheatstone bridge strain measurement methods are analyzed. The Wheatstone bridge method with feedback is improved. A new method based on small resistance changes by the digital balancing currents is presented. Computer and experimental models of measurement are investigated. The received results confirm theoretical assumptions.Article in Lithuanian

  10. Test device for measuring permeability of a barrier material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Matthew; Dameron, Arrelaine; Kempe, Michael

    2014-03-04

    A test device for measuring permeability of a barrier material. An exemplary device comprises a test card having a thin-film conductor-pattern formed thereon and an edge seal which seals the test card to the barrier material. Another exemplary embodiment is an electrical calcium test device comprising: a test card an impermeable spacer, an edge seal which seals the test card to the spacer and an edge seal which seals the spacer to the barrier material.

  11. A Strip Cell in Pyroelectric Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siao, An-Shen; Chao, Ching-Kong; Hsiao, Chun-Ching

    2016-01-01

    The pyroelectric effect affords the opportunity to convert temporal temperature fluctuations into usable electrical energy in order to develop abundantly available waste heat. A strip pyroelectric cell, used to enhance temperature variation rates by lateral temperature gradients and to reduce cell capacitance to further promote the induced voltage, is described as a means of improving pyroelectric energy transformation. A precision dicing saw was successfully applied in fabricating the pyroelectric cell with a strip form. The strip pyroelectric cell with a high-narrow cross section is able to greatly absorb thermal energy via the side walls of the strips, thereby inducing lateral temperature gradients and increasing temperature variation rates in a thicker pyroelectric cell. Both simulation and experimentation show that the strip pyroelectric cell improves the electrical outputs of pyroelectric cells and enhances the efficiency of pyroelectric harvesters. The strip-type pyroelectric cell has a larger temperature variation when compared to the trenched electrode and the original type, by about 1.9 and 2.4 times, respectively. The measured electrical output of the strip type demonstrates a conspicuous increase in stored energy as compared to the trenched electrode and the original type, by of about 15.6 and 19.8 times, respectively. PMID:26999134

  12. Device for Measuring Landslide Critical Angle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Xueling; Xia Weisheng; Huang Daoyou; Yu Yun

    2016-01-01

    The mountain landslide has high destructive effects, discussion of its landslide critical angle has always been one of the major concerns, and we designed a system that can automatically measure the landslide critical angle. This equipment consists of the

  13. International Workshop on Magnetic Measurements of Insertion Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-10-01

    The International Workshop on Magnetic Measurements of Insertion Devices was held at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, on September 28--29, 1993. The workshop brought together scientists and engineers from Europe, Japan, and the United States to discuss the following topics: Special techniques for magnetic measurements of insertion devices, magnetic tolerances of the insertion devices for third generation synchrotron radiation sources, methods for and accuracy of the multipole moments measurements, magnetic sensors, among other topics. The workshop included thirteen presentations that are collected in this volume.

  14. Small Device For Short-Range Antenna Measurements Using Optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yanakiev, Boyan Radkov; Nielsen, Jesper Ødum; Christensen, Morten;

    2011-01-01

    This paper gives a practical solution for implementing an antenna radiation pattern measurement device using optical fibers. It is suitable for anechoic chambers as well as short range channel sounding. The device is optimized for small size and provides a cheap and easy way to make optical antenna...

  15. Video integrated measurement system. [Diagnostic display devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spector, B.; Eilbert, L.; Finando, S.; Fukuda, F.

    1982-06-01

    A Video Integrated Measurement (VIM) System is described which incorporates the use of various noninvasive diagnostic procedures (moire contourography, electromyography, posturometry, infrared thermography, etc.), used individually or in combination, for the evaluation of neuromusculoskeletal and other disorders and their management with biofeedback and other therapeutic procedures. The system provides for measuring individual diagnostic and therapeutic modes, or multiple modes by split screen superimposition, of real time (actual) images of the patient and idealized (ideal-normal) models on a video monitor, along with analog and digital data, graphics, color, and other transduced symbolic information. It is concluded that this system provides an innovative and efficient method by which the therapist and patient can interact in biofeedback training/learning processes and holds considerable promise for more effective measurement and treatment of a wide variety of physical and behavioral disorders.

  16. Installation of an infrared measuring device in pressure release phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To analyze the saturated steam density and infrared measuring device was installed in a large scaled test facility. The possibility of accurate measuring of the density of two phase-two component flow and the ability to a rapid reaction on density oscillation are emphasized. In addition, the device allows an exact analysis of the density in two phase-two component flow with detailed information about the nature of condensation phenomena. (orig.)

  17. Accuracy of portable devices in measuring peak cough flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peak cough flow (PCF) measurements can be used as indicators of cough effectiveness. Portable peak flow meters and spirometers have been used to measure PCF, but little is known about their accuracy compared to pneumotachograph systems. The aim of this study was to compare the accuracy of four portable devices (Mini–Wright and Assess peak flow meters, SpiroUSB and Microlab spirometers) in measuring PCF with a calibrated laboratory based pneumotachograph system. Twenty healthy volunteers (mean (SD) age 45 (16) years) coughed through a pneumotachograph connected in series with each portable device in turn, and the differences in PCF readings were analysed. In addition, mechanically generated flow waves of constant peak flow were delivered through each device both independently and when connected in series with the pneumotachograph. Agreement between PCF readings obtained with the pneumotachograph and the portable devices was poor. Peak flow readings were on average lower by approximately 50 L min−1 when measured using the portable devices; 95% limits of agreement spanned approximately 150 L min−1. The findings highlight the potential for inaccuracy when using portable devices for the measurement of PCF. Depending on the measurement instrument used, absolute values of PCF reported in the literature may not be directly comparable. (paper)

  18. Practical, Microfabrication-Free Device for Single-Cell Isolation

    OpenAIRE

    Liang-I Lin; Shih-Hui Chao; Meldrum, Deirdre R.

    2009-01-01

    Microfabricated devices have great potential in cell-level studies, but are not easily accessible for the broad biology community. This paper introduces the Microscale Oil-Covered Cell Array (MOCCA) as a low-cost device for high throughput single-cell analysis that can be easily produced by researchers without microengineering knowledge. Instead of using microfabricated structures to capture cells, MOCCA isolates cells in discrete aqueous droplets that are separated by oil on patterned hydrop...

  19. A Microfluidic Device for Spatiotemporal Delivery of Stimuli to Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zubaidah Ningsih

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Living cells encounter many stimuli from the immediate environment. Receptors recognize these environmental cues and transduce signals to produce cell responses. The frequency of a signal is now emerging as an important factor determining cell responses. As a componentry system in understanding temporal stimulation, microfluidic devices allow the observation of cell behaviour under dynamic stimulation and controllable environment. In this paper we describe the design, construction and characterization of a microfluidic device suitable for cell stimulation studies.

  20. Measurement of Dose Distributions for Useful Utilization of BioBeam 8000 Gamma Irradiation Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamma irradiation device using Cs-137 have been widely utilized to the irradiation of cell, blood, and animal, and the dose measurement and education. Radiation irradiators for cell and blood irradiation used in numerous research institutions has demerits to perform the experiment of large volume objects like as 96 Multiwell Plate. Therefore, KIRAMS (Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences) introduced Gamma irradiation device having large volume capacity (BioBeam 8000, STS Steuerungstechnik and. Strahlenschutz GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany, Cs137, 3.35 Gy/min). In this study, dose the distribution of newly implemented BioBeam 8000 Gamma irradiation device was measured using glass dosimeter and Gafchromic EBT film dosimetry. In addition, an user guideline for useful utilization of the device based on measurement results are presented

  1. Low-cost optoelectronic devices to measure velocity of detonation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Edwin M.; Lee, Vivian; Mickan, Samuel P.; Davies, Phil J.

    2005-02-01

    Velocity of Detonation (VoD) is an important measured characteristic parameter of explosive materials. When new explosives are developed, their VoD must be determined. Devices used to measure VoD are always destroyed in the process, however replacing these devices represents a considerable cost in the characterisation of new explosives. This paper reports the design and performance of three low-cost implementations of a point-to-point VoD measurement system, two using optical fibre and a third using piezoelectric polymers (PolyVinyliDine Flouride, PVDF). The devices were designed for short charges used under controlled laboratory conditions and were tested using the common explosive 'Composition B'. These new devices are a fraction of the cost of currently available VoD sensors and show promise in achieving comparable accuracy. Their future development will dramatically reduce the cost of testing and aid the characterisation of new explosives.

  2. On-Demand Cell Internal Short Circuit Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darcy, Eric; Keyser, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    A device implantable in Li-ion cells that can generate a hard internal short circuit on-demand by exposing the cell to 60?C has been demonstrated to be valuable for expanding our understanding of cell responses. The device provides a negligible impact to cell performance and enables the instigation of the 4 general categories of cell internal shorts to determine relative severity and cell design susceptibility. Tests with a 18650 cell design indicates that the anode active material short to the aluminum cathode current collector tends to be more catastrophic than the 3 other types of internal shorts. Advanced safety features (such as shutdown separators) to prevent or mitigate the severity of cell internal shorts can be verified with this device. The hard short success rate achieved to date in 18650 cells is about 80%, which is sufficient for using these cells in battery assemblies for field-failure-relevant, cell-cell thermal runaway propagation verification tests

  3. Wireless induction heating in a microfluidic device for cell lysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Seung-ki; Min, Junghong; Park, Jung-Hwan

    2010-04-01

    A wireless induction heating system in a microfluidic device was devised for cell lysis to extract DNA and RNA from Escherichia coli. The thermal responses of nickel, iron and copper heating units were studied by applying an alternating magnetic field as a function of geometry of unit, strength of magnetic field, and kind of metal. Heating units were prepared by cutting metal film using a fiber laser, and the units were integrated into a microchannel system using a soft lithographic process. Variation and distribution of temperature on the surface of the heating units was observed using a thermographic camera and temperature labels. The amount of protein released from E. coli by thermal lysis was determined by protein concentration measurement. Hemoglobin released from red blood cells was observed using colorimetric intensity measurement. Extracted DNA was quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction, and the profile was compared with that of a positive control of ultrasonically disrupted E. coli. The stability of RNA extracted by induction heating was quantified by the measurement of 23S/16S rRNA ratio and comparison with that by normal RNA extraction kit as a gold standard. A solid-shaped nickel structure was selected as the induction heating element in the microfluidic device because of the relatively small influence of geometries and faster thermal response.The amount of protein extracted from E. coli and hemoglobin released from red blood cells by induction heating of the nickel unit in the microfluidic device was proportional to the strength of the applied magnetic field. The lysis of E. coli by induction heating was as effective as lysis of DNA by the ultrasonication method because the threshold cycle values of the sample were compatible with those of the positive control as measured by ultrasonication. Thermal lysis of E. coli by induction heating represents a reasonable alternative to a commercial RNA extraction method as shown by the comparative

  4. Electroporation of cells in microfluidic devices: a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fox, M.B.; Esveld, D.C.; Valero, A.; Luttge, R.; Mastwijk, H.C.; Bartels, P.V.; Berg, van den A.; Boom, R.M.

    2006-01-01

    In recent years, several publications on microfluidic devices have focused on the process of electroporation, which results in the poration of the biological cell membrane. The devices involved are designed for cell analysis, transfection or pasteurization. The high electric field strengths needed a

  5. 27 CFR 24.36 - Instruments and measuring devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Instruments and measuring devices. 24.36 Section 24.36 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS WINE Administrative and Miscellaneous Provisions Authorities § 24.36 Instruments and measuring...

  6. Urbmobi. A mobile measurement device for urban environmental monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klok, E.J.; Mark, P.J. van der; Nieuwkoop, E.

    2014-01-01

    Within the Urbmobi research project, a novel mobile measurement device is developed for urban areas. It provides temporally and spatially distributed environmental data and fulfills the need for monitoring at various places without the costs for a large number of fixed measurement stations. Urbmobi

  7. 21 CFR 886.1430 - Ophthalmic contact lens radius measuring device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ophthalmic contact lens radius measuring device... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1430 Ophthalmic contact lens radius measuring device. (a) Identification. An ophthalmic contact lens radius measuring device...

  8. Miniaturized Cell Lysis Device Using Spherically Focused Ultrasound

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李刚; 肖宏; 郭旻; 程京

    2003-01-01

    A prototype of a miniaturized cell lysis device developed using a concave spherical transducer is capable of lysing bacteria without added chemical denaturants, enzymes or microparticles and is capable of efficiently lysing yeast without any mechanical or enzymatic pretreatment.The device is designed for miniature bio-analysis systems where cell lysing is needed to obtain intracellular materials for further analysis such as DNA identification.The device lysis efficiency was evaluated using viable cell counts and microscopy.Additionally, the device efficiency was compared with that of traditional chemical cell lysis methods using standard molecular biological techniques such as agarose gels and ultraviolet (UV) spectroscopy.The results indicate that efficient bacteria and cell disruption can be achieved through a low-voltage-driven and spherically focused high-frequency ultrasonic device.

  9. Measurements of Elastic Moduli of Silicone Gel Substrates with a Microfluidic Device

    OpenAIRE

    Edgar Gutierrez; Alex Groisman

    2011-01-01

    Thin layers of gels with mechanical properties mimicking animal tissues are widely used to study the rigidity sensing of adherent animal cells and to measure forces applied by cells to their substrate with traction force microscopy. The gels are usually based on polyacrylamide and their elastic modulus is measured with an atomic force microscope (AFM). Here we present a simple microfluidic device that generates high shear stresses in a laminar flow above a gel-coated substrate and apply the d...

  10. Measurement-device-independent entanglement-based quantum key distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiuqing; Wei, Kejin; Ma, Haiqiang; Sun, Shihai; Liu, Hongwei; Yin, Zhenqiang; Li, Zuohan; Lian, Shibin; Du, Yungang; Wu, Lingan

    2016-05-01

    We present a quantum key distribution protocol in a model in which the legitimate users gather statistics as in the measurement-device-independent entanglement witness to certify the sources and the measurement devices. We show that the task of measurement-device-independent quantum communication can be accomplished based on monogamy of entanglement, and it is fairly loss tolerate including source and detector flaws. We derive a tight bound for collective attacks on the Holevo information between the authorized parties and the eavesdropper. Then with this bound, the final secret key rate with the source flaws can be obtained. The results show that long-distance quantum cryptography over 144 km can be made secure using only standard threshold detectors.

  11. The wave vane - A device to measure the breaker angle

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chandramohan, P.; Nayak, B.U.; Anand, N.M.

    (1993) 173-181 173 Elsevier Science Publishers B.V., Amsterdam 00036-1 Technical note The wave vane a device to measure the breaker angle P. Chandramohan, B.U. Nayak and N.M. Anand National Institute of Oceanography, Goa 403 004, India (Received... of a wave direction recording instrument, a simple device called the wave vane as described here has been developed to measure the breaking wave angle. The changes in the horizontal component of the orbital velocity under a progressive wave govern...

  12. Adhesion in flexible organic and hybrid organic/inorganic light emitting device and solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the results of an experimental study of the adhesion between bi-material pairs that are relevant to organic light emitting devices, hybrid organic/inorganic light emitting devices, organic bulk heterojunction solar cells, and hybrid organic/inorganic solar cells on flexible substrates. Adhesion between the possible bi-material pairs is measured using force microscopy (AFM) techniques. These include: interfaces that are relevant to organic light emitting devices, hybrid organic/inorganic light emitting devices, bulk heterojunction solar cells, and hybrid combinations of titanium dioxide (TiO2) and poly(3-hexylthiophene). The results of AFM measurements are incorporated into the Derjaguin-Muller-Toporov model for the determination of adhesion energies. The implications of the results are then discussed for the design of robust organic and hybrid organic/inorganic electronic devices

  13. Production, characterization and stability of organic solar cell devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gevorgyan, S.A.

    2010-01-15

    Despite the fact that the field of organic photovoltaics (OPVs) is in a rapid progress, organic solar cells continue taking backstage roll in the growing markets of various solar technologies. The main challenge of the field is to develop devices that would possess all the optimal properties required for efficient, stable and cheap solar cells, i.e. devices that can deliver high photoconversion efficiencies and long lifetimes and can be efficiently produced in large scales using roll-to-roll coating technologies. This dissertation is primarily devoted to the issues of photoconversion efficiency and device lifetimes. In particular, descriptions of some practical approaches for different device designs and processing of active layer for typical small scale OPV devices were presented. The emphasis was put on some optimizing techniques for processing of active layer that can significantly improve the device photoconversion efficiency. The techniques were further applied for manufacturing and characterization of solar cell devices based on various materials. In particular, a number of thermocleavable polymers were studied and devices based on such materials were produced and characterized. The applicability of such materials in photovoltaic devices was shown and further challenges were discussed. Another task of this work was to manufacture and study inverted device structures and compare their properties with normal structure based devices. Device based on both structure were successfully produced with same level of performance in terms of photoconversion efficiency, yet with totally different stability performance. As another task, metal oxides, such as MoO{sub 3} or V{sub 2}O{sub 5} were studied in solar cell devices as buffer layers instead of PEDOT:PSS. Although the device efficiencies obtained with metal oxides were inferior to PEDOT based device, it was shown that such materials can possibly improve the device efficiency if the processing of the layers is

  14. Photon absorption models in nanostructured semiconductor solar cells and devices

    CERN Document Server

    Luque, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    This book is intended to be used by materials and device physicists and also solar cells researchers. It models the performance characteristics of nanostructured solar cells and resolves the dynamics of transitions between several levels of these devices. An outstanding insight into the physical behaviour of these devices is provided, which complements experimental work. This therefore allows a better understanding of the results, enabling the development of new experiments and optimization of new devices. It is intended to be accessible to researchers, but also to provide engineering tools w

  15. Intracavity Microfluidic Laser Device for Single Cell Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourley, Paul

    2015-03-01

    An intracavity microfluidic laser device has been developed to study bioparticles ranging in size from 50 nm to 20 μm (virons to organelles to whole cells). The versatile device can be operated used in several modes including static or flowing fluids, with or without molecular labels, and microscopic imaging and/or spectroscopy. It enables advantageous new ways to perform analyses of bioparticles for applications including cell biology, detection of disease and pathogens, environmental monitoring, pharmaceuticals, agriculture, and food processing. This talk will briefly summarize the physics of the device including its laser optics, fluid dynamics, and intracavity light interaction with cells. The talk will then focus on results of a study of mitochondria in normal and cancer liver cells. The study examines the transformation of intracellular and isolated mitochondria from the normal to disease state. The results highlight the unique utility of the device to rapidly assess biophysical changes arising from altered biomolecular states of cells and organelles.

  16. A new CR-39 nuclear track passive thoron measuring device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calamosca, M., E-mail: calamosc@enea.i [ENEA-ION-IRP, Montecuccolino, V. dei Colli 16, 40136 Bologna (Italy); Penzo, S. [ENEA-ION-IRP, Montecuccolino, V. dei Colli 16, 40136 Bologna (Italy)

    2009-10-15

    {sup 220}Rn monitoring in dwellings and in workplaces is seldom performed, both because usually the associated risk is considered negligible and for the difficulties of properly measuring it. As a consequence the state of art of thoron measurements by using solid-state nuclear track detectors shows a significant lag compared with radon. However the demand of determining the thoron contribution to natural dose assessment is worldwide increasing, and in the presence of some building materials as tuff, should be mandatory. To tackle this problem, the ENEA Radon Measuring Service has developed a dose evaluation procedure based on the measurement of the {sup 220}Rn concentration at a standard distance from the wall, by using a new (patent pending) CR-39 alpha track detector thoron passive device (ATD-TnPD), coupled to our own radon passive device (ATD-RnPD). The two devices are geometrically similar and their responses were extensively evaluated to optimise the uncertainty of the thoron measurement. This paper depicts the prime features of the new device, and the introduced changes aimed at reducing the device's equilibrium time constant from 20.8 min to 3.1 min. Since no reliable thoron calibration facility has resulted available up to now, we had to state the ATD-TnPD's sensitivity parameter by performing the calibration step by our own. A closed circuit thoron exposure facility was set up to provide thoron exposures at 3 different levels. The exposed detectors were chemically etched at 7 increasing etching times to study the relationship between sensitivity and etching conditions, so to optimise the detector response and the measurement uncertainty.

  17. Device simulation of cuprous oxide heterojunction solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takiguchi, Yuki; Miyajima, Shinsuke

    2015-11-01

    We developed a device simulation model of cuprous oxide (Cu2O)-based heterojunction solar cells. The developed model well reproduces the reported experimental current density-voltage characteristics and the external quantum efficiency results. By using the model, we explored structures for high-efficiency Cu2O-based heterojunction solar cells. It was found that the electron affinity of the buffer layer between transparent conducting oxide and Cu2O significantly affects solar cell performance. Surface recombination on the rear side of the device can be suppressed by employing a highly doped back surface layer. Our device simulation demonstrates a conversion efficiency of 16% without any optical confinement structure.

  18. Multichannel measuring device of deformation for research materials of constructions

    OpenAIRE

    Druzhinin A.; Vuitsyk A.; Khoverko Yu.

    2008-01-01

    Possibility of Atmel ATMega microcontrollers use was shown for the interfacing of sensors devices with the modern computer systems. On the basis of Atmel ATMega16 microcontroller the multichannel system of treatment of information was developed for strain gauges, in which the amount of measuring channels is substantially increased.

  19. Multichannel measuring device of deformation for research materials of constructions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Druzhinin A.

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Possibility of Atmel ATMega microcontrollers use was shown for the interfacing of sensors devices with the modern computer systems. On the basis of Atmel ATMega16 microcontroller the multichannel system of treatment of information was developed for strain gauges, in which the amount of measuring channels is substantially increased.

  20. Development of an Ultrasonic Airflow Measurement Device for Ducted Air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew B. Raine

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, an in-duct ultrasonic airflow measurement device has been designed, developed and tested. The airflow measurement results for a small range of airflow velocities and temperatures show that the accuracy was better than 3.5% root mean square (RMS when it was tested within a round or square duct compared to the in-line Venturi tube airflow meter used for reference. This proof of concept device has provided evidence that with further development it could be a low-cost alternative to pressure differential devices such as the orifice plate airflow meter for monitoring energy efficiency performance and reliability of ventilation systems. The design uses a number of techniques and design choices to provide solutions to lower the implementation cost of the device compared to traditional airflow meters. The design choices that were found to work well are the single sided transducer arrangement for a “V” shaped reflective path and the use of square wave transmitter pulses ending with the necessary 180° phase changed pulse train to suppress transducer ringing. The device is also designed so that it does not have to rely on high-speed analogue to digital converters (ADC and intensive digital signal processing, so could be implemented using voltage comparators and low-cost microcontrollers.

  1. Experimental Measurements of Belt Gears in Newly Developed Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jozef Mascenik

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the alternative of determination of state of the belt gear. To realize themeasurements a newly developed device was designed for measurement and diagnostics of the belt gears. The main task is to detect the V-belt slip expressed by the coefficient of elastic creep and of specific slip with a measuring device. The measurements regarding can be performed if input revolutions of the electric motor and torque of the belt gear are constant whereas the tensioning force of the belt gear changes. It is also possible to perform the measurement if the input revolutions of the electric motor and the tensioning forces are constant and the torque changes.

  2. New measuring and on water coaching device for rowing

    OpenAIRE

    Mattes, Klaus; Schaffert, Nina

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a new measuring and on water coaching device for rowing called “Accrow” which measures the boat acceleration with an acceleration sensor (50 Hz) and boat velocity with GPS (4 Hz). The data were analysed with the special software “Regatta”, based on scientific criteria and broad knowledge in biomechanical analysis of rowing training and races. In particular, “Regatta” performs three special analysis routines including every stroke: the boat motion for on-water training or...

  3. An optically induced cell lysis device using dielectrophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yen-Heng; Lee, Gwo-Bin

    2009-01-01

    This letter reports an optically induced cell lysis device that can selectively lyse a single cell within a group of cells, a function which cannot be performed using traditional tools. This chip-scale device was made of a photoconductive material, which can induce a nonuniform electric field at a specific position under illumination of a beam spot generating a transmembrane potential in the cell. With this approach, cell lysis can be performed using the optically induced electric field. Fibroblast cells and oral cancer cells were used to demonstrate the capability of the developed chip. In addition to lysing the whole cell, the developed method also allowed one to selectively disrupt the cell membrane without damaging the nucleus. Operating parameters such as illumination power density and beam spot diameter for cell lysis were systematically investigated.

  4. The optimization of measurement device independent quantum key distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Feng; Ma, Hai-Qiang; Jiao, Rong-Zhen

    2016-04-01

    Measurement device independent quantum key distribution (MDI-QKD) is a promising method for realistic quantum communication which could remove all the side-channel attacks from the imperfections of the devices. Here in this study, we theoretically analyzed the performance of the MDI-QKD system. The asymptotic case rate with the increment of the transmission distance at different polarization misalignment, background count rate and intensity is calculated respectively. The result may provide important parameters for practical application of quantum communications.

  5. Assembly for electrical conductivity measurements in the piston cylinder device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Heather Christine; Roberts, Jeffrey James

    2012-06-05

    An assembly apparatus for measurement of electrical conductivity or other properties of a sample in a piston cylinder device wherein pressure and heat are applied to the sample by the piston cylinder device. The assembly apparatus includes a body, a first electrode in the body, the first electrode operatively connected to the sample, a first electrical conductor connected to the first electrode, a washer constructed of a hard conducting material, the washer surrounding the first electrical conductor in the body, a second electrode in the body, the second electrode operatively connected to the sample, and a second electrical conductor connected to the second electrode.

  6. Device operation of organic tandem solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hadipour, A.; de Boer, B.; Blom, P. W. M.

    2008-01-01

    A generalized methodology is developed to obtain the current-voltage characteristic of polymer tandem solar cells by knowing the electrical performance of both sub cells. We demonstrate that the electrical characteristics of polymer tandem solar cells are correctly predicted for both the series and

  7. Single cell electroporation using microfluidic devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Le Gac, S.; Berg, van den A.; Lindstrom, S.; Andersson-Svahn, S.M.H.

    2012-01-01

    Electroporation is a powerful technique to increase the permeability of cell membranes and subsequently introduce foreign materials into cells. Pores are created in the cell membrane upon application of an electric fi eld (kV/cm). Most applications employ bulk electroporation, at the scale of 1 mL o

  8. Device and materials modeling in PEM fuel cells

    CERN Document Server

    Promislow, Keith

    2009-01-01

    Device and Materials Modeling in PEM Fuel Cells is a specialized text that compiles the mathematical details and results of both device and materials modeling in a single volume. Proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells will likely have an impact on our way of life similar to the integrated circuit. The potential applications range from the micron scale to large scale industrial production. Successful integration of PEM fuel cells into the mass market will require new materials and a deeper understanding of the balance required to maintain various operational states. This book contains articles from scientists who contribute to fuel cell models from both the materials and device perspectives. Topics such as catalyst layer performance and operation, reactor dynamics, macroscopic transport, and analytical models are covered under device modeling. Materials modeling include subjects relating to the membrane and the catalyst such as proton conduction, atomistic structural modeling, quantum molecular dynamics, an...

  9. Liquid Drop Measuring Device for Analyzing Liquid Properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Based on the correlation between certain properties of liquid and the properties of the corresponding liquid drop formed under given conditions, a liquid drop measuring device is utilized to monitor the drop formation process of the liquid sample with photoelectric measuring methods. The mechanical and optical characteristic of the liquid is explored with the optical fibers from the internal of the liquid drop during its formation. The drop head capacitor is utilized to monitor the growth process of the liquid drop to gain the drop volume information related to the physical property of liquid. The unique liquid drop trace containing the integrated properties of liquid is generated, and it is proved by experiment that for different liquids their liquid drop traces are different. The analysis on liquid properties and discrimination between different liquids can be proceeded with the liquid drop trace obtained by the liquid drop measuring device.

  10. Device for measurement of thermal emissivity at cryogenic temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Kralik, Tomas; Musilova, Vera; Srnka, Ales

    2016-01-01

    In the described device, the thermal emissivity or absorptivity of the sample is measured by substitution of the radiative heat flow between two parallel surfaces by thermal output of a heater. Fast measurements of the mutual emissivity for the range of the temperature of the radiating surface 25 K-150 K are possible. The absorbing surface has a temperature between 5 K and 10 K when LHe is used as cryoliquid. The desired measurement sensitivity is 1 mK for temperature and 0.1 {\\mu}W for heat power, respectively. The diameter of the whole device is 50 mm and so it is possible to use a commercial dewar can for the cooling. The form of the sample is a round plate 40 mm in diameter and 1 mm in thickness with one tested side. The emissivity and its temperature dependency for various surface treatments can be checked immediately before application in a cryogenic system.

  11. Advanced Measurement Devices for the Microgravity Electromagnetic Levitation Facility EML

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brillo, Jurgen; Fritze, Holger; Lohofer, Georg; Schulz, Michal; Stenzel, Christian

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on two advanced measurement devices for the microgravity electromagnetic levitation facility (EML), which is currently under construction for the use onboard the "International Space Station (ISS)": the "Sample Coupling Electronics (SCE)" and the "Oxygen Sensing and Control Unit (OSC)". The SCE measures by a contactless, inductive method the electrical resistivity and the diameter of a spherical levitated metallic droplet by evaluating the voltage and electrical current applied to the levitation coil. The necessity of the OSC comes from the insight that properties like surface tension or, eventually, viscosity cannot seriously be determined by the oscillating drop method in the EML facility without knowing the conditions of the surrounding atmosphere. In the following both measurement devices are explained and laboratory test results are presented.

  12. Implementation of a measurement-device-independent entanglement witness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ping; Yuan, Xiao; Chen, Luo-Kan; Lu, He; Yao, Xing-Can; Ma, Xiongfeng; Chen, Yu-Ao; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2014-04-11

    Entanglement, the essential resource in quantum information processing, should be witnessed in many tasks such as quantum computing and quantum communication. The conventional entanglement witness method, relying on an idealized implementation of measurements, could wrongly conclude a separable state to be entangled due to imperfect detections. Inspired by the idea of a time-shift attack, we construct an attack on the conventional entanglement witness process and demonstrate that a separable state can be falsely identified to be entangled. To close such detection loopholes, based on a recently proposed measurement-device-independent entanglement witness method, we design and experimentally demonstrate a measurement-device-independent entanglement witness for a variety of two-qubit states. By the new scheme, we show that an entanglement witness can be realized without detection loopholes.

  13. Methods of measurement for semiconductor materials, process control, and devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullis, W. M. (Editor)

    1972-01-01

    Significant accomplishments include development of a procedure to correct for the substantial differences of transistor delay time as measured with different instruments or with the same instrument at different frequencies; association of infrared response spectra of poor quality germanium gamma ray detectors with spectra of detectors fabricated from portions of a good crystal that had been degraded in known ways; and confirmation of the excellent quality and cosmetic appearance of ultrasonic bonds made with aluminum ribbon wire. Work is continuing on measurement of resistivity of semiconductor crystals; study of gold-doped silicon, development of the infrared response technique; evaluation of wire bonds and die attachment; and measurement of thermal properties of semiconductor devices, delay time and related carrier transport properties in junction devices, and noise properties of microwave diodes.

  14. Improving the accuracy of smart devices to measure noise exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Benjamin; Kardous, Chucri; Neitzel, Richard

    2016-11-01

    Occupational noise exposure is one of the most frequent hazards present in the workplace; up to 22 million workers have potentially hazardous noise exposures in the U.S. As a result, noise-induced hearing loss is one of the most common occupational injuries in the U.S. Workers in manufacturing, construction, and the military are at the highest risk for hearing loss. Despite the large number of people exposed to high levels of noise at work, many occupations have not been adequately evaluated for noise exposure. The objective of this experiment was to investigate whether or not iOS smartphones and other smart devices (Apple iPhones and iPods) could be used as reliable instruments to measure noise exposures. For this experiment three different types of microphones were tested with a single model of iPod and three generations of iPhones: the internal microphones on the device, a low-end lapel microphone, and a high-end lapel microphone marketed as being compliant with the International Electrotechnical Commission's (IEC) standard for a Class 2-microphone. All possible combinations of microphones and noise measurement applications were tested in a controlled environment using several different levels of pink noise ranging from 60-100 dBA. Results were compared to simultaneous measurements made using a Type 1 sound level measurement system. Analysis of variance and Tukey's honest significant difference (HSD) test were used to determine if the results differed by microphone or noise measurement application. Levels measured with external microphones combined with certain noise measurement applications did not differ significantly from levels measured with the Type 1 sound measurement system. Results showed that it may be possible to use iOS smartphones and smart devices, with specific combinations of measurement applications and calibrated external microphones, to collect reliable, occupational noise exposure data under certain conditions and within the limitations of the

  15. Real-time precision measuring device of tree diameter growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Mingming; Chen, Aijun; Li, Dongsheng; Liu, Nan; Yao, Jingyuan

    2016-01-01

    DBH(diameter at breast height) is an important factor to reflect of the quality of plant growth, also an important parameter indispensable in forest resources inventory and forest carbon sink, the accurate measurement of DBH or not is directly related to the research of forest resources inventory and forest carbon sink. In this paper, the principle and the mathematical model of DBH measurement device were introduced, the fixture measuring device and the hardware circuit for this tree diameter were designed, the measurement software programs were compiled, and the precision measuring device of tree diameter growth was developed. Some experiments with Australia fir were conducted. Based on experiment data, the correlations among the DBH variation of Australian fir, the environment temperature, air humility and PAR(photosynthetically active radiation) were obtained. The effects of environmental parameters (environment temperature, air humility and PAR) on tree diameter were analyzed. Experimental results show that there is a positive correlation between DBH variation of Australian fir and environment temperature, a negative correlation between DBH variation of Australian fir and air humility , so is PAR.

  16. Femtosecond laser fabrication of optofluidic devices for single cell manipulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bragheri Francesca

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work we fabricate and validate two optofludic devices for the manipulation and analysis of single cells. The chips are fabricated by femtosecond laser micromachining exploiting the 3D capabilities of the technique and the inherent perfect alignment between microfluidic channels and optical networks. Both devices have been validated by probing the mechanical properties of different cancer cell lines, which are expected to show different elasticity because of their different metastatic potential.

  17. Biomechanical Measurement of Rabbit Cornea by a Modified Scheimpflug Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bo; Gu, Jianjun; Zhang, Xiaoxiao; Yang, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To explore the probability and variation in biomechanical measurements of rabbit cornea by a modified Scheimpflug device. Methods. A modified Scheimpflug device was developed by imaging anterior segment of the model imitating the intact eye at various posterior pressures. The eight isolated rabbit corneas were mounted on the Barron artificial chamber and images of the anterior segment were taken at posterior pressures of 15, 30, 45, 60, and 75 mmHg by the device. The repeatability and reliability of the parameters including CCT, ACD, ACV, and CV were evaluated at each posterior pressure. All the variations of the parameters at the different posterior pressures were calculated. Results. All parameters showed good intraobserver reliability (Cronbach's alpha; intraclass correlation coefficient, α, ICC > 0.96) and repeatability in the modified Scheimpflug device. With the increase of posterior pressures, the ratio of CCT decreased linearly and the bulk modulus gradually reduced to a platform. The increase of ACD was almost linear with the posterior pressures elevated. Conclusions. The modified Scheimpflug device was a valuable tool to investigate the biomechanics of the cornea. The posterior pressure 15–75 mmHg range produced small viscoelastic deformations and nearly linear pressure-deformation response in the rabbit cornea. PMID:27446608

  18. A new 3D levitation force measuring device for REBCO bulk superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, S.L. [School of Physics, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi’an 710062 (China); Yang, W.M., E-mail: yangwm@snnu.edu.cn [School of Physics, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi’an 710062 (China); Li, J.W.; Yuan, X.C. [School of Physics, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi’an 710062 (China); Ma, J. [School of Physics, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi’an 710062 (China); Department of Physics, Qinghai Normal University, Xining 810008 (China); Wang, M. [School of Physics, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi’an 710062 (China)

    2014-01-15

    Highlights: •A new 3D levitation force measuring device has been designed and constructed. •It can measure the 3D real-time interaction force simultaneously and directly. •Performance, accuracy and effectiveness has been demonstrate by tests. -- Abstract: A new 3D levitation force measuring device for ReBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7−x} (REBCO) bulk superconductors has been designed and constructed. Three pull pressure load cells are orthogonally set on a fixing bracket to test the interaction force between a bulk superconductor and a magnet in three dimensions. To realize the simple, rapid and accurate measurement of the levitation force, a non-magnetic hollow cylinder flange, three pull pressure load cells, a piece of iron plate, a NbFeB permanent magnet (PM) and some steel balls are elaborately constructed with the fixing bracket, thus the magnet or REBCO bulk superconductor can be well and rigidly connected with the load cells, and the mutual interference from the three pull pressure load cells can be effectively avoided during the levitation force measuring processes. This device can be used to measure the interaction (or levitation) force between a superconductor and a magnet, that between a magnet and a magnet, or the magnetic force among magnetic materials in three dimensions.

  19. Radiation detection and measurement concepts, methods and devices

    CERN Document Server

    McGregor, Douglas

    2017-01-01

    This text on radiation detection and measurement is a response to numerous requests expressed by students at various universities, in which the most popularly used books do not provide adequate background material, nor explain matters in understandable terms. This work provides a modern overview of radiation detection devices and radiation measurement methods. The topics selected in the book have been selected on the basis of the author’s many years of experience designing radiation detectors and teaching radiation detection and measurement in a classroom environment.

  20. Device for measuring charge density distribution in charged particle beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A device to measure charge density distribution in charged particle beams has been described. The device contains a set of hollow interinsulated current-receiving electrodes, recording system, and cooling system. The invention is aimed at the increase of admissible capacity of the beams measured at the expense of cooling efficiency increase. The aim is achieved by the fact, that in the device a dynamic evaporating-condensational cooling of electrodes is realized by means of cooling agent supply in perpendicular to their planes through the tubes introduced inside special cups. Spreading in radial direction over electrode surface the cooling agent gradually and intensively washes the side surface of the cup, after that, it enters the cooling cavity in the form of vapour-liquid mixture. In the cavity the cooling agent, supplied using dispensina and receiving collectors in which vapoUr is condensed, circulates. In the device suggested the surface of electrode cooling is decreased significantly at the expense of side surface of the cups which receives the electrode heat

  1. A Novel Device for Measuring Forces in Endoluminal Procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tommaso Ranzani

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a simple but effective measuring system for endoluminal procedures is presented. The device allows measuring forces during the endoluminal manipulation of tissues with a standard surgical instrument for laparoscopic procedures. The force measurement is performed by recording both the forces applied directly by the surgeon at the instrument handle and the reaction forces on the access port. The measuring system was used to measure the forces necessary for appropriate surgical manipulation of tissues during transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM. Ex-vivo and in-vivo measurements were performed, reported and discussed. The obtained data can be used for developing and appropriately dimensioning novel dedicated instrumentation for TEM procedures.

  2. Fractional exhaled nitric oxide measurement with a handheld device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magori, Erhard; Hiltawsky, Karsten; Fleischer, Maximilian; Simon, Elfriede; Pohle, Roland; von Sicard, Oliver; Tawil, Angelika

    2011-06-01

    A sensing system for fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) measurement is presented, which is characterized by a compact setup and a cost potential to be made available for the patient at home. The sensing is based on the work function measurement of a phthalocyanine-type sensing material, which is shown to be sufficiently sensitive for NO(2) in the ppb range. The transducer used to measure the work function is a field effect transistor with a suspended gate electrode. Selectivity is given with respect to other breath components including typically metabolic by-products. The measurement system includes breath treatments in a simple setup, which essentially are dehumidification and a quantitative conversion of NO to NO(2) with a conversion rate of approx. 95%, using a disposable oxidation catalyst. The accomplishment of the correct exhalation maneuver and feeding of the suited portion of exhaled air to the sensor is provided by breath sampling means. The sensor is not gas consuming. This allows us to fill the measurement chamber once, instead of establishing a gas flow for the measurement. This feature simplifies the device architecture. In this paper, we report on sensor characteristics, system architecture and measurement with artificial breath-gas as well as with human breath with the device. PMID:21646688

  3. Surface photovoltage measurements and finite element modeling of SAW devices.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donnelly, Christine

    2012-03-01

    Over the course of a Summer 2011 internship with the MEMS department of Sandia National Laboratories, work was completed on two major projects. The first and main project of the summer involved taking surface photovoltage measurements for silicon samples, and using these measurements to determine surface recombination velocities and minority carrier diffusion lengths of the materials. The SPV method was used to fill gaps in the knowledge of material parameters that had not been determined successfully by other characterization methods. The second project involved creating a 2D finite element model of a surface acoustic wave device. A basic form of the model with the expected impedance response curve was completed, and the model is ready to be further developed for analysis of MEMS photonic resonator devices.

  4. Optical Measurement Techniques for Optical Fiber and Waveguide Devices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    D.Y.; Kim; Y.; Park; N.H.; Seong; Y.C.Youk; J.Y.; Lee; S.; Moon; I.H.; Shin; H.S.; Ryu

    2003-01-01

    We describe three major optical characterization methods for fiber and fiber devices. A simple servo controlled scanning fiber-optic confocal microscope is proposed for determining the refractive index profile of an optical fiber. To measure the chromatic dispersion of a short length fiber a Mach-Zehnder fiber interferometer with a novel interferometric distance meter is introduced. At the end, a tomographic method is demonstrated for determining the 2-D stress profile of a fiber.

  5. A Device for Measurement of Capillary Refilling Time

    OpenAIRE

    Shamsudin, Nebil

    2012-01-01

    The main objective of this project is to design, construct and validate a portable prototype of a device that is capable of performing a test to accurately measure Capillary Refilling Time (CRT), and to analyze the results with defined parameters; force, area, pressure (compression) and time. This prototype is dedicated to study and evaluate CRT readouts for different pressure values, collected from healthy subjects.The presented prototype of this study is capable of producing skin compressin...

  6. Organic solar cells fundamentals, devices, and upscaling

    CERN Document Server

    Rand, Barry P

    2014-01-01

    Solution-Processed DonorsB. Burkhart, B. C. ThompsonSmall-Molecule and Vapor-Deposited Organic Photovoltaics R. R. Lunt, R. J. HolmesAcceptor Materials for Solution-Processed Solar Cells Y. HeInterfacial Layers R. Po, C. Carbonera, A. BernardiElectrodes in Organic Photovoltaic Cells S. Yoo, J.-Y. Lee, H. Kim, J. LeeTandem and Multi-Junction Organic Solar Cells J. Gilot, R. A. J. JanssenBulk Heterojunction Morphology Control and Characterization T. Wang, D. G. LidzeyOptical Modeling and Light Management

  7. Improved Radiometric Calibrations and Measurements for Evaluating Photovoltaic Devices; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Photovoltaic Radiometric Measurements Task has improved broadband and spectral measurement capabilities at NREL. These improved NREL's capabilities affect the Photovoltaic Module and Array Performance and Reliability and Photovoltaic Measurements and Characterization Projects. Recent improvements (during 2000) in broadband radiometer calibrations result in the removal of bias errors on the order of 20 watts per square meter (W/m(sup 2)) in the measurement of global-hemispherical solar radiation. The improvements described are partially due to technical interactions by members of the Measurements and Instrumentation Team with the U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Earth Observing System (EOS) Validation Program, World Meteorological Organization (WMO) Baseline Surface Measurement Network (BSRN), and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Solar Radiation Research Branch (SRRB). New equipment has been purchased and techniques have been developed to characterize pulsed solar simulator spectral distributions. New equipment has been purchased and will be installed in the redesigned Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL) Baseline Measurement System (BMS). Expanded measurement capability, including sky radiance mapping, extensive ultraviolet and infrared radiation measurements, and routine spectral sampling will provide a unique complement of data for investigating PV device, module, and system design and performance, model development and validation, and for evaluating new measurement systems

  8. Device and method for measuring radioactive particles in oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A device for wear measurement of machine parts labelled with radioactive material is improved in such a way that a filter may be installed in the oil flow transporting the wear particles containing the radioisotopes to the place of measurement. It is then possible to study the wear behavior of intricate internal-combustion engines. For this purpose either the total oil flow or only part of it is conducted through the filter. Design details are exhaustively presented. (10 sub-claims). (UWI) 891 HP

  9. Different Device Architectures for Bulk-Heterojunction Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Getachew Adam

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We report different solar cell designs which allow a simple electrical connection of subsequent devices deposited on the same substrate. By arranging so-called standard and inverted solar-cell architectures next to each other, a serial connection of the two devices can easily be realized by a single compound electrode. In this work, we tested different interfacial layer materials like polyethylenimine (PEI and PEDOT:PSS, and silver as a non-transparent electrode material. We also built organic light emitting diodes applying the same device designs demonstrating the versatility of applied layer stacks. The proposed design should allow the preparation of organic bulk-heterojunction modules with minimized photovoltaically inactive regions at the interconnection of individual devices.

  10. Novel measure for the calibration of laser Doppler flowmetry devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunaev, Andrey V.; Zherebtsov, Evgeny A.; Rogatkin, Dmitrii A.; Stewart, Neil A.; Sokolovski, Sergei G.; Rafailov, Edik U.

    2014-03-01

    The metrological basis for optical non-invasive diagnostic devices is an unresolved issue. A major challenge for laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) is the need to compare the outputs from individual devices and various manufacturers to identify variations useful in clinical diagnostics. The most common methods for instrument calibration are simulants or phantoms composed of colloids of light-scattering particles which simulate the motion of red blood cells based on Brownian motion. However, such systems have limited accuracy or stability and cannot calibrate for the known rhythmic components of perfusion (0.0095-1.6 Hz). To solve this problem, we propose the design of a novel technique based on the simulation of moving particles using an electromechanical transducer, in which a precision piezoelectric actuator is used (e.g., P-602.8SL with maximum movement less than 1 mm). In this system, Doppler shift is generated in the layered structure of different solid materials with different optical light diffusing properties. This comprises a fixed, light transparent upper plane-parallel plate and an oscillating fluoroplastic (PTFE) disk. Preliminary studies on this experimental setup using the LDF-channel of a "LAKK-M" system demonstrated the detection of the linear portion (0-10 Hz with a maximum signal corresponding to Doppler shift of about 20 kHz) of the LDF-signal from the oscillating frequency of the moving layer. The results suggest the possibility of applying this technique for the calibration of LDF devices.

  11. Magnetic field measurements in the electron cooling device for LEAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The field of the solenoid magnet to be used in the electron cooling device for LEAR has been investigated by careful field mapping. The magnetic field guiding the electron beam was measured in a volume with a cross-section of 6 x 6 cm2 around the electron beam axis, which is 4.5 m long and bent twice in toroidal sections. A Hall-plate field scanner designed for the mapping of dipole magnets was used to obtain separate field maps of all Cartesian field components in rectangular boxes covering the aforementioned measuring region. For merging these maps into a consistent overall field table, an evaluation procedure has been developed that includes careful survey and the correction of errors inherent in Hall-probe measurements. The measured data are presented in plots of field components and of field lines, and the magnetic field properties of the electron cooling device are discussed. A short description of the computer programs produced during this work is also given. (orig.)

  12. An unheated permeation device for calibrating atmospheric VOC measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Brito

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The development of an unpowered permeation device for continuous calibration of in-situ instruments measuring atmospheric volatile organic compounds (VOCs is described. Being lightweight and compact, and containing only negligible amounts of chemicals, the device is especially suited for field use such as on board aircraft. Its speciality is to maintain the permeation process in thermal equilibrium, so that the instantaneous permeation rate can be ascribed to a simple temperature measurement. This equilibrium state is maintained by a combination of three features: (i a thin PTFE membrane as permeation medium which guarantees short stabilization times, (ii a water bath as heat buffer, and (iii a vacuum-panel based insulation, in which features (ii and (iii minimize temperature drifts to ~30 mK h−1 per Kelvin temperature difference to the environment. The respective uncertainty of the permeation rate due to thermal non-equilibrium is kept below 1%. An extensive theory part details the major permeation processes of gases through porous polymers, being Fick's diffusion, Knudsen flow, and viscous flow. Both the measured stabilization time and the measured temperature dependence of the permeation rate independently indicate that the permeation can be described by a viscous flow model, where diffusion of the gas molecules in large pores (having a diameter of >0.05 μm dominates.

  13. An unheated permeation device for calibrating atmospheric VOC measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Brito

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The development of an unpowered permeation device for continuous calibration of in-situ instruments measuring atmospheric volatile organic compounds (VOCs is described. Being lightweight and compact, and containing only negligible amounts of chemicals, the device is especially suited for field use such as onboard aircraft. Its speciality is to maintain the permeation process in thermal equilibrium, i.e. the instantaneous permeation rate can be ascribed via a simple temperature measurement. This equilibrium state is maintained by a combination of three features: (i a thin PTFE membrane as permeation medium which guarantees short stabilization times, (ii a water bath as heat buffer, and (iii a vacuum-panel based insulation, in which features (ii and (iii minimize temperature drifts. The uncertainty of the permeation rate due to thermal non-equilibrium is kept below 1 %. An extensive theory part details the major permeation processes of gases through porous polymers, being Fick's diffusion, Knudsen flow, and viscous flow. Both the measured stabilization time and the measured temperature dependence of the permeation rate independently indicate that the permeation can be described by a viscous flow model, where diffusion of the gas molecules in large pores (having a diameter of >0.05 μm dominates.

  14. Characterization of structural defects in GST based nano-PCM devices through resistance drift measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinar, Ibrahim; Cogulu, Egecan; Gokce, Aisha; Stipe, Barry; Katine, Jordan; Aktas, Gulen; Ozatay, Ozhan

    2015-03-01

    Phase change memory (PCM) is a promising nonvolatile data storage technology with its high signal to noise ratio and superior scalability. Resistance drift in amorphous phase of the phase change material poses a crucial reliability problem, especially in multiple-bit-per cell PCM devices. The resistance of the amorphous phase uncontrollably increases with time after a reset operation which alters the read/write conditions of the device. Structural relaxation (SR) through a defect annihilation process is considered to be the underlying physical mechanism for resistance drift. Here, we report on our measurements of the resistance drift in a phase change memory device with a single layer Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST) material not only in the amorphous state but also in the intermediate resistance state in devices with square top contact geometry which enables us to assess the reliability of multiple-bit per cell PCM memory devices. Through an analysis of electrical measurements as a function of time and temperature for increasing annealing times, we estimate a rate of change in trap density for both amorphous and mixed phases of the GST material after a switching operation. Our study allows engineering the phase change materials and optimizing programing conditions for future PCM applications. TUBITAK under Contract Number 113F385, Bogazici University Research Fund, 12B03M1, and European Union FP7 Marie Curie International Re-integration Grant PCM-256281.

  15. Effect of bottom cell properties on micromorph tandem device performance

    OpenAIRE

    Delli Veneri, Paola; Mercaldo, Lucia Vittoria; PRIVATO Carlo

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Micromorph tandem solar cells represent an elegant way of overcoming the efficiency limits of single-junction solar cells and reducing the light-induced degradation of amorphous silicon films. Micromorph devices have been realized on Asahi U-type TCO-covered glass substrates by very high frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (VHF-PECVD) at 100 MHz at low substrate temperature (150 ?C). For the bottom cell different growth regimes have been explored by changi...

  16. Design and Fabrication a Microfluidic Device for Fetal Cells Dielectrophoretic Properties Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Guolin [Institute of Bioengineering and Nanotechnologies, 31 Biopolis, Way, The Nanos, hashmark 04-01, Singapore 138669 (Singapore); Chan, M B [Nanyang Technological University, Singapore. 16 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637722 (Singapore); Yang, Charles [Nanyang Technological University, Singapore. 16 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637722 (Singapore); Sukumar, P [National University Hospital, Singapore. 10 Medical Drive, Singapore 117597 (Singapore); Choolani, M [National University Hospital, Singapore. 10 Medical Drive, Singapore 117597 (Singapore); Ying, Jackie Y [Institute of Bioengineering and Nanotechnologies, 31 Biopolis, Way, The Nanos, hashmark 04-01, Singapore 138669 (Singapore)

    2006-04-01

    The present work presents a microfluidic device with interdigitated microelectrode and microchannel for fetal nucleated red blood cell dielectrophoresis properties characterization using crossover frequency method. To obtain the electric field and its gradient along the microchannel, simulation study was done by using MAXWELL{sup TM} software. Results show maximum electric field and gradient are obtained near the electrode edge and they are affected by electrode width and the electrode gap. The crossover frequency should be obtained by keeping the cell moving near the electrode edge. The device has been successfully used in fetal cell characterization with better than 1KHz frequency repeatability, which is about 2% of the measured crossover frequency.

  17. Flow measurements in a centrifugal diffusor test device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitting, T.

    1985-06-01

    This work sought to verify concepts used in the design of a large scale, low speed, radial cascade wind tunnel which was to be used to investigate flow phenomena in and the performance of vaned radial diffusors. A major contributor to centrifugal compressor efficiency is the performance of the vaned diffusor which closely follows the impeller of the compressor. The purpose of this diffusor is to efficiently convert most of the kinetic energy of the transonic flow entering the vane into pressure. The need for an experimental facility which could simulate adequately, at low cost and in a controlled way, the environment of the centrifugal compressor motivated the development of the Centrifugal Diffusor Test Device (CDTD). It was expected that the generation of a three dimensional flow would provide improved empirical data on annular cascade performance. This measurement program surveyed the axial and circumferential uniformity of the flow at the inlet of a transonic wedge-type blading mounted in the device. Evaluation of the results showed the flow uniformity to be unsatisfactory. Leakage and other small perturbations in the flow field in the swirl generator are believed to be amplified by the basic flow configuration of the device.

  18. PARduino: A Simple Device Measuring and Logging Photosynthetically Active Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, H. R.; Findley, M. C.

    2013-12-01

    Photosynthetically Active Radiation (PAR, 400 to 700 nm) is one of the primary controls of forest carbon and water relations. In complex terrain, PAR has high spatial-variability. Given the high cost of commercial datalogging equipment, spatially-distributed measurements of PAR have been typically modeled using geographic coordinates and terrain indices. Here, we present a design for a low cost, field-deployable device for measuring and logging PAR built around an Arduino microcontroller (we named it PARduino). PARduino provides for widely distributed sensor arrays and tests the feasibility of using hobbyist-grade electronics for collecting scientific data. PARduino components include a LiCor quantum sensor, EME Systems signal converter/amplifier, and Sparkfun's Arduino Pro Mini microcontroller. Additional components include a real time clock, a microSD flash memory card, and a custom printed circuit board (PCB). We selected the components with an eye towards ease of assembly. Everything can be connected to the PCB using through-hole soldering techniques. Since the device will be deployed in remote research plots that lack easy access to line power, battery life was also a consideration in the design. Extended deployment is possible because PARduino's software keeps it in a low-power sleep mode until ready to make a measurement. PARduino will be open-source hardware for use and improvement by others.

  19. Alternative schemes for measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Xiongfeng

    2012-01-01

    A practical scheme for measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution using phase and path/time encoding is presented. In addition to immunity to existing loopholes in detection systems, our setup employs simple encoding and decoding modules without relying on polarization maintenance or optical switches. Moreover, by handling, with a modified sifting technique, the dead time limitations in single-photon detectors, our scheme can be run with only two single-photon detectors. With a phase-post-selection technique, a decoy-state variant of our scheme is also proposed, whose secret key generation rate scales linearly with the channel transmittance.

  20. Design of a Device for Sky Light Polarization Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yujie Wang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available ky polarization patterns can be used both as indicators of atmospheric turbidity and as a sun compass for navigation. The objective of this study is to improve the precision of sky light polarization measurements by optimal design of the device used. The central part of the system is composed of a Charge Coupled Device (CCD camera; a fish-eye lens and a linear polarizer. Algorithms for estimating parameters of the polarized light based on three images are derived and the optimal alignments of the polarizer are analyzed. The least-squares estimation is introduced for sky light polarization pattern measurement. The polarization patterns of sky light are obtained using the designed system and they follow almost the same patterns of the single-scattering Rayleigh model. Deviations of polarization angles between observation and the theory are analyzed. The largest deviations occur near the sun and anti-sun directions. Ninety percent of the deviations are less than 5° and 40% percent of them are less than 1°. The deviations decrease evidently as the degree of polarization increases. It also shows that the polarization pattern of the cloudy sky is almost identical as in the blue sky.

  1. A Device to Measure the Propulsive Power of Nematodes

    CERN Document Server

    Yuan, J; Gnatt, M; Raizen, D M; Bau, H H

    2011-01-01

    In the fluid dynamics video, we present a microfluidic device to measure the propulsive power of nematodes. The device consists of a tapered conduit filled with aqueous solution. The conduit is subjected to a DC electric field with the negative pole at the narrow end and to pressure-driven flow directed from the narrow end. The nematode is inserted at the conduit's wide end. Directed by the electric field (through electrotaxis), the nematode swims deliberately upstream toward the negative pole of the DC field. As the conduit narrows, the average fluid velocity and the drag force on the nematode increase. Eventually, the nematode arrives at an equilibrium position, at which its propulsive force balances the viscous drag force induced by the adverse flow. The equilibrium position of different animals, with similar body lengths, was measured as a function of the flow rate. The flow field around the nematode was obtained by direct numerical simulations with the experimentally imaged gait and the tapered geometry ...

  2. High-rate measurement-device-independent quantum cryptography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirandola, Stefano; Ottaviani, Carlo; Spedalieri, Gaetana; Weedbrook, Christian; Braunstein, Samuel L.; Lloyd, Seth; Gehring, Tobias; Jacobsen, Christian S.; Andersen, Ulrik L.

    2015-06-01

    Quantum cryptography achieves a formidable task—the remote distribution of secret keys by exploiting the fundamental laws of physics. Quantum cryptography is now headed towards solving the practical problem of constructing scalable and secure quantum networks. A significant step in this direction has been the introduction of measurement-device independence, where the secret key between two parties is established by the measurement of an untrusted relay. Unfortunately, although qubit-implemented protocols can reach long distances, their key rates are typically very low, unsuitable for the demands of a metropolitan network. Here we show, theoretically and experimentally, that a solution can come from the use of continuous-variable systems. We design a coherent-state network protocol able to achieve remarkably high key rates at metropolitan distances, in fact three orders of magnitude higher than those currently achieved. Our protocol could be employed to build high-rate quantum networks where devices securely connect to nearby access points or proxy servers.

  3. Dynamic monitoring of single cell lysis in an impedance-based microfluidic device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ying; Basu, Srinjan; Laue, Ernest D; Seshia, Ashwin A

    2016-08-01

    A microfluidic device that is capable of trapping and sensing dynamic variations in the electrical properties of individual cells is demonstrated. The device is applied to the real-time recording of impedance measurements of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) during the process of membrane lysis, with the resulting changes in the electrical properties of cells during this process being quantitatively tracked over time. It is observed that the impedance magnitude decreases dramatically after cell membrane lysis. A significant shift in the phase spectrum is also observed during the time course of this process. By fitting experimental data to physical models, the electrical parameters of cells can be extracted and parameter variations quantified during the process. In the cell lysis experiments, the equivalent conductivity of the cell membrane is found to increase significantly due to pore formation in the membrane during lysis. An increase in the specific capacitance of the membrane is also observed. On the other hand, the conductivity of the cytoplasm is observed to decrease, which may be explained the fact that excess water enters the cell through the gradual permeabilization of the membrane during lysis. Cells can be trapped in the device for periods up to several days, and their electrical response can be monitored by real-time impedance measurements in a label-free and non-invasive manner. Furthermore, due to the highly efficient single cell trapping capacity of the device, a number of cells can be trapped and held in separate wells for concurrent parallel experiments, allowing for the possibility of stepped parametric experiments and studying cell heterogeneity by combining measurements across the array. PMID:27299468

  4. Practical, microfabrication-free device for single-cell isolation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang-I Lin

    Full Text Available Microfabricated devices have great potential in cell-level studies, but are not easily accessible for the broad biology community. This paper introduces the Microscale Oil-Covered Cell Array (MOCCA as a low-cost device for high throughput single-cell analysis that can be easily produced by researchers without microengineering knowledge. Instead of using microfabricated structures to capture cells, MOCCA isolates cells in discrete aqueous droplets that are separated by oil on patterned hydrophilic areas across a relatively more hydrophobic substrate. The number of randomly seeded Escherichia coli bacteria in each discrete droplet approaches single-cell levels. The cell distribution on MOCCA is well-fit with Poisson distribution. In this pioneer study, we created an array of 900-picoliter droplets. The total time needed to seed cells in approximately 3000 droplets was less than 10 minutes. Compared to traditional microfabrication techniques, MOCCA dramatically lowers the cost of microscale cell arrays, yet enhances the fabrication and operational efficiency for single-cell analysis.

  5. A device model for the tandem junction solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matzen, W. T.; Chiang, S. Y.; Carbajal, B. G.

    1979-01-01

    A conceptual device model has been developed to explain operation of the tandem junction cell (TJC) when back contacts only are used. Operation and parameters of the cell are explained by transistor action. Experimental observations are presented which confirm that current is collected for carrier generation in the front uncontacted n(plus) region. The model should be useful as a guideline to optimize the TJC by application of transistor design principles.

  6. Testing limits to airflow perturbation device (APD measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamshidi Shaya

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Airflow Perturbation Device (APD is a lightweight, portable device that can be used to measure total respiratory resistance as well as inhalation and exhalation resistances. There is a need to determine limits to the accuracy of APD measurements for different conditions likely to occur: leaks around the mouthpiece, use of an oronasal mask, and the addition of resistance in the respiratory system. Also, there is a need for resistance measurements in patients who are ventilated. Method Ten subjects between the ages of 18 and 35 were tested for each station in the experiment. The first station involved testing the effects of leaks of known sizes on APD measurements. The second station tested the use of an oronasal mask used in conjunction with the APD during nose and mouth breathing. The third station tested the effects of two different resistances added in series with the APD mouthpiece. The fourth station tested the usage of a flexible ventilator tube in conjunction with the APD. Results All leaks reduced APD resistance measurement values. Leaks represented by two 3.2 mm diameter tubes reduced measured resistance by about 10% (4.2 cmH2O·sec/L for control and 3.9 cm H2O·sec/L for the leak. This was not statistically significant. Larger leaks given by 4.8 and 6.4 mm tubes reduced measurements significantly (3.4 and 3.0 cm cmH2O·sec/L, respectively. Mouth resistance measured with a cardboard mouthpiece gave an APD measurement of 4.2 cm H2O·sec/L and mouth resistance measured with an oronasal mask was 4.5 cm H2O·sec/L; the two were not significantly different. Nose resistance measured with the oronasal mask was 7.6 cm H2O·sec/L. Adding airflow resistances of 1.12 and 2.10 cm H2O·sec/L to the breathing circuit between the mouth and APD yielded respiratory resistance values higher than the control by 0.7 and 2.0 cm H2O·sec/L. Although breathing through a 52 cm length of flexible ventilator tubing reduced the APD

  7. Microfluidic Devices for the Measurement of Cellular Secretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrell, Adrian M.; Mukhitov, Nikita; Yi, Lian; Wang, Xue; Roper, Michael G.

    2016-06-01

    The release of chemical information from cells and tissues holds the key to understanding cellular behavior and dysfunction. The development of methodologies that can measure cellular secretion in a time-dependent fashion is therefore essential. Often these measurements are made difficult by the high-salt conditions of the cellular environment, the presence of numerous other secreted factors, and the small mass samples that are produced when frequent sampling is used to resolve secretory dynamics. In this review, the methods that we have developed for measuring hormone release from islets of Langerhans are dissected to illustrate the practical difficulties of studying cellular secretions. Other methods from the literature are presented that provide alternative approaches to particularly challenging areas of monitoring cellular secretion. The examples presented in this review serve as case studies and should be adaptable to other cell types and systems for unique applications.

  8. Measurements of elastic moduli of silicone gel substrates with a microfluidic device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Edgar; Groisman, Alex

    2011-01-01

    Thin layers of gels with mechanical properties mimicking animal tissues are widely used to study the rigidity sensing of adherent animal cells and to measure forces applied by cells to their substrate with traction force microscopy. The gels are usually based on polyacrylamide and their elastic modulus is measured with an atomic force microscope (AFM). Here we present a simple microfluidic device that generates high shear stresses in a laminar flow above a gel-coated substrate and apply the device to gels with elastic moduli in a range from 0.4 to 300 kPa that are all prepared by mixing two components of a transparent commercial silicone Sylgard 184. The elastic modulus is measured by tracking beads on the gel surface under a wide-field fluorescence microscope without any other specialized equipment. The measurements have small and simple to estimate errors and their results are confirmed by conventional tensile tests. A master curve is obtained relating the mixing ratios of the two components of Sylgard 184 with the resulting elastic moduli of the gels. The rigidity of the silicone gels is less susceptible to effects from drying, swelling, and aging than polyacrylamide gels and can be easily coated with fluorescent tracer particles and with molecules promoting cellular adhesion. This work can lead to broader use of silicone gels in the cell biology laboratory and to improved repeatability and accuracy of cell traction force microscopy and rigidity sensing experiments.

  9. Measurements of elastic moduli of silicone gel substrates with a microfluidic device.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgar Gutierrez

    Full Text Available Thin layers of gels with mechanical properties mimicking animal tissues are widely used to study the rigidity sensing of adherent animal cells and to measure forces applied by cells to their substrate with traction force microscopy. The gels are usually based on polyacrylamide and their elastic modulus is measured with an atomic force microscope (AFM. Here we present a simple microfluidic device that generates high shear stresses in a laminar flow above a gel-coated substrate and apply the device to gels with elastic moduli in a range from 0.4 to 300 kPa that are all prepared by mixing two components of a transparent commercial silicone Sylgard 184. The elastic modulus is measured by tracking beads on the gel surface under a wide-field fluorescence microscope without any other specialized equipment. The measurements have small and simple to estimate errors and their results are confirmed by conventional tensile tests. A master curve is obtained relating the mixing ratios of the two components of Sylgard 184 with the resulting elastic moduli of the gels. The rigidity of the silicone gels is less susceptible to effects from drying, swelling, and aging than polyacrylamide gels and can be easily coated with fluorescent tracer particles and with molecules promoting cellular adhesion. This work can lead to broader use of silicone gels in the cell biology laboratory and to improved repeatability and accuracy of cell traction force microscopy and rigidity sensing experiments.

  10. Characterization of perovskite solar cells: Towards a reliable measurement protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Eugen; Wong, Ka Kan; Müller, Michael; Hu, Hao; Ehrenreich, Philipp; Kohlstädt, Markus; Würfel, Uli; Mastroianni, Simone; Mathiazhagan, Gayathri; Hinsch, Andreas; Gujar, Tanaji P.; Thelakkat, Mukundan; Pfadler, Thomas; Schmidt-Mende, Lukas

    2016-09-01

    Lead halide perovskite solar cells have shown a tremendous rise in power conversion efficiency with reported record efficiencies of over 20% making this material very promising as a low cost alternative to conventional inorganic solar cells. However, due to a differently severe "hysteretic" behaviour during current density-voltage measurements, which strongly depends on scan rate, device and measurement history, preparation method, device architecture, etc., commonly used solar cell measurements do not give reliable or even reproducible results. For the aspect of commercialization and the possibility to compare results of different devices among different laboratories, it is necessary to establish a measurement protocol which gives reproducible results. Therefore, we compare device characteristics derived from standard current density-voltage measurements with stabilized values obtained from an adaptive tracking of the maximum power point and the open circuit voltage as well as characteristics extracted from time resolved current density-voltage measurements. Our results provide insight into the challenges of a correct determination of device performance and propose a measurement protocol for a reliable characterisation which is easy to implement and has been tested on varying perovskite solar cells fabricated in different laboratories.

  11. A review of impedance measurements of whole cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Youchun; Xie, Xinwu; Duan, Yong; Wang, Lei; Cheng, Zhen; Cheng, Jing

    2016-03-15

    Impedance measurement of live biological cells is widely accepted as a label free, non-invasive and quantitative analytical method to assess cell status. This method is easy-to-use and flexible for device design and fabrication. In this review, three typical techniques for impedance measurement, i.e., electric cell-substrate impedance sensing, Impedance flow cytometry and electric impedance spectroscopy, are reviewed from the aspects of theory, to electrode design and fabrication, and applications. Benefiting from the integration of microelectronic and microfluidic techniques, impedance sensing methods have expanded their applications to nearly all aspects of biology, including living cell counting and analysis, cell biology research, cancer research, drug screening, and food and environmental safety monitoring. The integration with other techniques, the fabrication of devices for certain biological assays, and the development of point-of-need diagnosis devices is predicted to be future trend for impedance sensing techniques. PMID:26513290

  12. Infrared Emissivity Measurements of Building and Civil Engineering Materials: A New Device for Measuring Emissivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monchau, Jean-Pierre; Marchetti, Mario; Ibos, Laurent; Dumoulin, Jean; Feuillet, Vincent; Candau, Yves

    2014-10-01

    The knowledge of the infrared emissivity of materials used in buildings and civil engineering structures is useful for two specific approaches. First, quantitative diagnosis of buildings or civil engineering infrastructures by infrared thermography requires emissivity values in the spectral bandwidth of the camera used for measurements, in order to obtain accurate surface temperatures; for instance, emissivity in the band III domain is required when using cameras with uncooled detectors (such as micro-bolometer arrays). Second, setting up accurate thermal balances by numerical modeling requires the total emissivity value for a large wavelength domain; this is, for instance, the case for computing the road surface temperature to predict ice occurrence. Furthermore, periodical surveys of emissivity variations due to aging or soiling of surfaces could be useful in many situations such as thermal mapping of roads or building insulation diagnosis. The use of portable emissivity measurement devices is required for that purpose. A device using an indirect measurement method was previously developed in our lab; the method uses measurement of the reflectivity from a modulated IR source and requires calibration with a highly reflective surface. However, that device uses a low-frequency, thermal modulation well adapted to laboratory measurements but unfit for fast and in situ measurements. Therefore, a new, portable system which retains the principle of an indirect measurement but uses a faster-frequency, mechanical modulation more appropriate to outdoor measurements was developed. Both devices allow measurements in the broad m to m) and narrow m to m) bands. Experiments were performed on a large number of materials commonly used in buildings and civil engineering structures. The final objective of this work is to build a database of emissivity of these materials. A comparison of laboratory and on-site measurements of emissivity values obtained in both spectral bands will be

  13. Acoustic Devices for Particle and Cell Manipulation and Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongqiang Qiu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available An emerging demand for the precise manipulation of cells and particles for applications in cell biology and analytical chemistry has driven rapid development of ultrasonic manipulation technology. Compared to the other manipulation technologies, such as magnetic tweezing, dielectrophoresis and optical tweezing, ultrasonic manipulation has shown potential in a variety of applications, with its advantages of versatile, inexpensive and easy integration into microfluidic systems, maintenance of cell viability, and generation of sufficient forces to handle particles, cells and their agglomerates. This article briefly reviews current practice and reports our development of various ultrasonic standing wave manipulation devices, including simple devices integrated with high frequency (>20 MHz ultrasonic transducers for the investigation of biological cells and complex ultrasonic transducer array systems to explore the feasibility of electronically controlled 2-D and 3-D manipulation. Piezoelectric and passive materials, fabrication techniques, characterization methods and possible applications are discussed. The behavior and performance of the devices have been investigated and predicted with computer simulations, and verified experimentally. Issues met during development are highlighted and discussed. To assist long term practical adoption, approaches to low-cost, wafer level batch-production and commercialization potential are also addressed.

  14. Memory-assisted measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panayi, Christiana; Razavi, Mohsen; Ma, Xiongfeng; Lütkenhaus, Norbert

    2014-04-01

    A protocol with the potential of beating the existing distance records for conventional quantum key distribution (QKD) systems is proposed. It borrows ideas from quantum repeaters by using memories in the middle of the link, and that of measurement-device-independent QKD, which only requires optical source equipment at the user's end. For certain memories with short access times, our scheme allows a higher repetition rate than that of quantum repeaters with single-mode memories, thereby requiring lower coherence times. By accounting for various sources of nonideality, such as memory decoherence, dark counts, misalignment errors, and background noise, as well as timing issues with memories, we develop a mathematical framework within which we can compare QKD systems with and without memories. In particular, we show that with the state-of-the-art technology for quantum memories, it is potentially possible to devise memory-assisted QKD systems that, at certain distances of practical interest, outperform current QKD implementations.

  15. Novel dynamic fatigue-testing device: design and measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foong, Chee-Hoe; Wiercigroch, Marian; Deans, William F.

    2006-08-01

    The influence of dynamics on a propagating fatigue crack has not been studied experimentally yet mainly due to quasi-static loading from traditional fatigue-testing machines. To overcome this serious drawback, a novel base-excited fatigue-testing device was designed and built to allow measurement of the dynamic responses of a single-edge-notch beam (SENB) under a growing fatigue crack. In this paper, the details of the novel test rig including initial development, modification and instrumentation are given. The experimental time histories obtained for harmonic and chaotic excitations have shown that the fatigue rig is capable of generating a wide range of loading patterns. Moreover, the experimental crack growth curves and features of the fracture surface have confirmed that the rig is capable of inducing proper fatigue cracks.

  16. Novel Hydrogen Purification Device Integrated with PEM Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseph Schwartz; Hankwon Lim; Raymond Drnevich

    2010-12-31

    A prototype device containing twelve membrane tubes was designed, built, and demonstrated. The device produced almost 300 scfh of purified hydrogen at 200 psig feed pressure. The extent of purification met the program target of selectively removing enough impurities to enable industrial-grade hydrogen to meet purity specifications for PEM fuel cells. An extrusion process was developed to produce substrate tubes. Membranes met several test objectives, including completing 20 thermal cycles, exceeding 250 hours of operating life, and demonstrating a flux of 965 scfh/ft2 at 200 psid and 400 C.

  17. Integrated Love Wave Device Dedicated to Biomolecular Interactions Measurements in Aqueous Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvain Ballandras

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Mass-sensitive electro-acoustic devices such as surface acoustic wave (SAWmicro-balances, capable to operate with aqueous media are particularly favorable for thedevelopment of biosensors. Their dimensions and physical properties offer a large potentialin biological fluid investigations, especially for measuring physical phenomenon (massdeposition, adsorption, pressure.... In this work, we propose a specific gratingconfiguration to lower the influence of viscosity of fluids which reduces the signal dynamicsof the surface wave transducers. A dedicated liquid cell also has been developed to isolatethe electro-active part of the device. The fabrication of the cell is achieved using theSU-8TMphoto-resist, allowing for manufacturing thick structures preventing any contact between thetested liquids and the transducers. Furthermore, the sensing area has been optimized tooptimize the sensor gravimetric sensitivity. The operation of the sensor is illustrated bydetecting bovine serum albumin (BSA adsorption in the sensing area.

  18. Single cell analysis of yeast replicative aging using a new generation of microfluidic device.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Zhang

    Full Text Available A major limitation to yeast aging study has been the inability to track mother cells and observe molecular markers during the aging process. The traditional lifespan assay relies on manual micro-manipulation to remove daughter cells from the mother, which is laborious, time consuming, and does not allow long term tracking with high resolution microscopy. Recently, we have developed a microfluidic system capable of retaining mother cells in the microfluidic chambers while removing daughter cells automatically, making it possible to observe fluorescent reporters in single cells throughout their lifespan. Here we report the development of a new generation of microfluidic device that overcomes several limitations of the previous system, making it easier to fabricate and operate, and allowing functions not possible with the previous design. The basic unit of the device consists of microfluidic channels with pensile columns that can physically trap the mother cells while allowing the removal of daughter cells automatically by the flow of the fresh media. The whole microfluidic device contains multiple independent units operating in parallel, allowing simultaneous analysis of multiple strains. Using this system, we have reproduced the lifespan curves for the known long and short-lived mutants, demonstrating the power of the device for automated lifespan measurement. Following fluorescent reporters in single mother cells throughout their lifespan, we discovered a surprising change of expression of the translation elongation factor TEF2 during aging, suggesting altered translational control in aged mother cells. Utilizing the capability of the new device to trap mother-daughter pairs, we analyzed mother-daughter inheritance and found age dependent asymmetric partitioning of a general stress response reporter between mother and daughter cells.

  19. [Mobile Health: IEEE Standard for Wearable Cuffless Blood Pressure Measuring Devices].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xia; Wu, Wenli; Bao, Shudi

    2015-07-01

    IEEE Std 1708-2014 breaks through the traditional standards of cuff based blood pressure measuring devices and establishes a normative definition of wearable cuffless blood pressure measuring devices and the objective performance evaluation of this kind of devices. This study firstly introduces the background of the new standard. Then, the standard details will be described, and the impact of cuffless blood pressure measuring devices with the new standard on manufacturers and end users will be addressed.

  20. Evaluation of spectrum measurement devices for operational use

    CERN Document Server

    Devine, R T; Gray, D W; Seagraves, D T; Olsher, R H; Johnson, J P

    2002-01-01

    Several neutron spectrometers manufactured by Bubble Technology Industries (BTI) were tested and evaluated in a variety of neutron fields. Findings and conclusions are presented for the following BTI instruments: a modification of the Rotational Spectrometer (ROSPEC) that includes a thermal and epithermal capability, the Simple Scintillation Spectrometer that is used in conjunction with the ROSPEC to extend its high-energy range, and the MICROSPEC N-Probe which is capable of providing a crude spectrum over the energy range from thermal to 18 MeV. The main objective of these measurements was to determine the accuracy of both the energy spectrum and dose equivalent information generated by these devices. In addition, the dose response of the Wide-Energy Neutron Detection Instrument (WENDI-II) was measured in all neutron fields relative to a bare sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf calibration. The performance of the WENDI-II rem meter was compared to the dose information generated by the neutron spectrometers. The instruments...

  1. Measurement of subcellular texture by optical Gabor-like filtering with a digital micromirror device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasternack, Robert M.; Qian, Zhen; Zheng, Jing-Yi; Metaxas, Dimitris N.; White, Eileen; Boustany, Nada N.

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate an optical Fourier processing method to quantify object texture arising from subcellular feature orientation within unstained living cells. Using a digital micromirror device as a Fourier spatial filter, we measured cellular responses to two-dimensional optical Gabor-like filters optimized to sense orientation of nonspherical particles, such as mitochondria, with a width around 0.45 μm. Our method showed significantly rounder structures within apoptosis-defective cells lacking the proapoptotic mitochondrial effectors Bax and Bak, when compared with Bax/Bak expressing cells functional for apoptosis, consistent with reported differences in mitochondrial shape in these cells. By decoupling spatial frequency resolution from image resolution, this method enables rapid analysis of nonspherical submicrometer scatterers in an under-sampled large field of view and yields spatially localized morphometric parameters that improve the quantitative assessment of biological function. PMID:18830354

  2. A device for rapid and quantitative measurement of cardiac myocyte contractility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaitas, Angelo; Malhotra, Ricky; Li, Tao; Herron, Todd; Jalife, José

    2015-03-01

    Cardiac contractility is the hallmark of cardiac function and is a predictor of healthy or diseased cardiac muscle. Despite advancements over the last two decades, the techniques and tools available to cardiovascular scientists are limited in their utility to accurately and reliably measure the amplitude and frequency of cardiomyocyte contractions. Isometric force measurements in the past have entailed cumbersome attachment of isolated and permeabilized cardiomyocytes to a force transducer followed by measurements of sarcomere lengths under conditions of submaximal and maximal Ca2+ activation. These techniques have the inherent disadvantages of being labor intensive and costly. We have engineered a micro-machined cantilever sensor with an embedded deflection-sensing element that, in preliminary experiments, has demonstrated to reliably measure cardiac cell contractions in real-time. Here, we describe this new bioengineering tool with applicability in the cardiovascular research field to effectively and reliably measure cardiac cell contractility in a quantitative manner. We measured contractility in both primary neonatal rat heart cardiomyocyte monolayers that demonstrated a beat frequency of 3 Hz as well as human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes with a contractile frequency of about 1 Hz. We also employed the β-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol (100 nmol l-1) and observed that our cantilever demonstrated high sensitivity in detecting subtle changes in both chronotropic and inotropic responses of monolayers. This report describes the utility of our micro-device in both basic cardiovascular research as well as in small molecule drug discovery to monitor cardiac cell contractions.

  3. Development of a microfluidic device for cell concentration and blood cell-plasma separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maria, M Sneha; Kumar, B S; Chandra, T S; Sen, A K

    2015-12-01

    This work presents design, fabrication and test of a microfluidic device which employs Fahraeus-Lindqvist and Zweifach-Fung effects for cell concentration and blood cell-plasma separation. The device design comprises a straight main channel with a series of branched channels placed symmetrically on both sides of the main channel. The design implements constrictions before each junction (branching point) in order to direct cells that would have migrated closer to the wall (naturally or after liquid extraction at a junction) towards the centre of the main channel. Theoretical and numerical analysis are performed for design of the microchannel network to ensure that a minimum flow rate ratio (of 2.5:1, main channel-to-side channels) is maintained at each junction and predict flow rate at the plasma outlet. The dimensions and location of the constrictions were determined using numerical simulations. The effect of presence of constrictions before the junctions was demonstrated by comparing the performances of the device with and without constrictions. To demonstrate the performance of the device, initial experiments were performed with polystyrene microbeads (10 and 15 μm size) and droplets. Finally, the device was used for concentration of HL60 cells and separation of plasma and cells in diluted blood samples. The cell concentration and blood-plasma purification efficiency was quantified using Haemocytometer and Fluorescence-Activated Cell Sorter (FACS). A seven-fold cell concentration was obtained with HL60 cells and a purification efficiency of 70 % and plasma recovery of 80 % was observed for diluted (1:20) blood sample. FACS was used to identify cell lysis and the cell viability was checked using Trypan Blue test which showed that more than 99 % cells are alive indicating the suitability of the device for practical use. The proposed device has potential to be used as a sample preparation module in lab on chip based diagnostic platforms.

  4. Annealing of Solar Cells and Other Thin Film Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar, Hector; Kuhlman, Franz; Dils, D. W.; Lush, G. B.; Mackey, Willie R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Annealing is a key step in most semiconductor fabrication processes, especially for thin films where annealing enhances performance by healing defects and increasing grain sizes. We have employed a new annealing oven for the annealing of CdTe-based solar cells and have been using this system in an attempt to grow US on top of CdTe by annealing in the presence of H2S gas. Preliminary results of this process on CdTe solar cells and other thin-film devices will be presented.

  5. Design and testing of an innovative solar radiation measurement device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After review of studies conducted on the solar radiation measuring systems, a new innovative instrument that would help in measuring the accurate solar radiation on horizontal surfaces has been designed and tested. An advanced instrument with ease of use and high precision that would enable the user to take the readings in terms of solar intensity (W/m2) has been tested. Also, the innovative instrument can record instantaneous readings of the solar intensities as well as the averages value of the solar radiation flux during certain periods of time. The instrument based in its design on being programmed by programmable interfacing controller (PIC). Furthermore, the power supply circuit is fed by the solar energy cells and does not need an external power source.

  6. Design and testing of an innovative solar radiation measurement device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badran, Omar; El-Tous, Yousif; Abdala, Wasfi [Faculty of Engineering Technology, Al-Balqa Applied University, Amman 11134 (Jordan); Al-Salaymeh, Ahmed [Mechanical Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering and Technology, University of Jordan, Amman 11942 (Jordan)

    2010-08-15

    After review of studies conducted on the solar radiation measuring systems, a new innovative instrument that would help in measuring the accurate solar radiation on horizontal surfaces has been designed and tested. An advanced instrument with ease of use and high precision that would enable the user to take the readings in terms of solar intensity (W/m{sup 2}) has been tested. Also, the innovative instrument can record instantaneous readings of the solar intensities as well as the averages value of the solar radiation flux during certain periods of time. The instrument based in its design on being programmed by programmable interfacing controller (PIC). Furthermore, the power supply circuit is fed by the solar energy cells and does not need an external power source. (author)

  7. Simple uniaxial pressure device for ac-susceptibility measurements suitable for closed cycle refrigerator system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arumugam, S; Manivannan, N; Murugeswari, A

    2007-06-01

    A simple design of the uniaxial pressure device for the measurement of ac-susceptibility at low temperatures using closed cycle refrigerator system is presented for the first time. This device consists of disc micrometer, spring holder attachment, uniaxial pressure cell, and the ac-susceptibility coil wound on stycast bobbin. It can work under pressure till 0.5 GPa and at the temperature range of 30-300 K. The performance of the system at ambient pressure is tested and calibrated with standard paramagnetic salts [Gd(2)O(3), Er(2)O(3), and Fe(NH(4)SO(4))(2)6H(2)O], Fe(3)O(4), Gd metal, Dy metal, superconductor (YBa(2)Cu(3)O(7)), manganite (La(1.85)Ba(0.15)MnO(3)), and spin glass material (Pr(0.8)Sr(0.2)MnO(3)). The performance of the uniaxial pressure device is demonstrated by investigating the uniaxial pressure dependence of La(1.85)Ba(0.15)MnO(3) single crystal with P||c axis. The Curie temperature (T(c)) decreases as a function of pressure with P||c axis (dT(c)dP(||c axis)=-11.65 KGPa) up to 46 MPa. The design is simple, is user friendly, and does not require pressure calibration. Measurement can even be made on thin and small size oriented crystals. The failure of the coil is remote under uniaxial pressure. The present setup can be used as a multipurpose uniaxial pressure device for the measurement of Hall effect and thermoelectric power with a small modification in the pressure cell. PMID:17614625

  8. A simple indentation device for measuring micrometer-scale tissue stiffness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levental, I; Levental, K R; Janmey, P A [Institute for Medicine and Engineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Klein, E A; Assoian, R [Department of Pharmacology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Miller, R T [Departments of Medicine and Physiology, Louis Stokes VAMC, Cleveland, OH (United States); Wells, R G, E-mail: janmey@mail.med.upenn.ed [Department of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)

    2010-05-19

    Mechanical properties of cells and extracellular matrices are critical determinants of function in contexts including oncogenic transformation, neuronal synapse formation, hepatic fibrosis and stem cell differentiation. The size and heterogeneity of biological specimens and the importance of measuring their mechanical properties under conditions that resemble their environments in vivo present a challenge for quantitative measurement. Centimeter-scale tissue samples can be measured by commercial instruments, whereas properties at the subcellular (nm) scale are accessible by atomic force microscopy, optical trapping, or magnetic bead microrheometry; however many tissues are heterogeneous on a length scale between micrometers and millimeters which is not accessible to most current instrumentation. The device described here combines two commercially available technologies, a micronewton resolution force probe and a micromanipulator for probing soft biological samples at sub-millimeter spatial resolution. Several applications of the device are described. These include the first measurement of the stiffness of an intact, isolated mouse glomerulus, quantification of the inner wall stiffness of healthy and diseased mouse aortas, and evaluation of the lateral heterogeneity in the stiffness of mouse mammary glands and rat livers with correlation of this heterogeneity with malignant or fibrotic pathology as evaluated by histology.

  9. Method and device for bio-impedance measurement with hard-tissue applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bio-impedance measurements can be used to detect and monitor several properties of living hard-tissues, some of which include bone mineral density, bone fracture healing or dental caries detection. In this paper a simple method and hardware architecture for hard tissue bio-impedance measurement is proposed. The key design aspects of such architecture are discussed and a commercial handheld ac impedance device is presented that is fully certified to international medical standards. It includes a 4-channel multiplexer and is capable of measuring impedances from 10 kΩ to 10 MΩ across a frequency range of 100 Hz to 100 kHz with a maximum error of 5%. The device incorporates several user interface methods and a Bluetooth link for bi-directional wireless data transfer. Low-power design techniques have been implemented, ensuring the device exceeds 8 h of continuous use. Finally, bench test results using dummy cells consisting of parallel connected resistors and capacitors, from 10 kΩ to 10 MΩ and from 20 pF to 100 pF, are discussed

  10. Evaluating the performance of microbial fuel cells powering electronic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewan, Alim; Beyenal, Haluk [Gene and Linda Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering, Center for Environmental, Sediment and Aquatic Research, Pullman, WA (United States); Donovan, Conrad; Heo, Deukhyoun [School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99163-2710 (United States)

    2010-01-01

    A microbial fuel cell (MFC) is capable of powering an electronic device if we store the energy in an external storage device, such as a capacitor, and dispense that energy intermittently in bursts of high-power when needed. Therefore its performance needs to be evaluated using an energy-storing device such as a capacitor which can be charged and discharged rather than other evaluation techniques, such as continuous energy dissipation through a resistor. In this study, we develop a method of testing microbial fuel cell performance based on storing energy in a capacitor. When a capacitor is connected to a MFC it acts like a variable resistor and stores energy from the MFC at a variable rate. In practice the application of this method to testing microbial fuel cells is very challenging and time consuming; therefore we have custom-designed a microbial fuel cell tester (MFCT). The MFCT evaluates the performance of a MFC as a power source. It uses a capacitor as an energy storing device and waits until a desired amount of energy is stored then discharges the capacitor. The entire process is controlled using an analog-to-digital converter (ADC) board controlled by a custom-written computer program. The utility of our method and the MFCT is demonstrated using a laboratory microbial fuel cell (LMFC) and a sediment microbial fuel cell (SMFC). We determine (1) how frequently a MFC can charge a capacitor, (2) which electrode is current-limiting, (3) what capacitor value will allow the maximum harvested energy from a MFC, which is called the ''optimum charging capacitor value,'' and (4) what capacitor charging potential will harvest the maximum energy from a MFC, which is called the ''optimum charging potential.'' Using a LMFC we find that (1) the time needed to charge a 3-F capacitor from 0 to 500 mV is 108 min, (2) the optimum charging capacitor value is 3 F, and (3) the optimum charging potential is 300 mV. Using a SMFC we find that (1

  11. Development of microarray device for functional evaluation of PC12D cell axonal extension ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamachi, Eiji; Yanagimoto, Junpei; Murakami, Shinya; Morita, Yusuke

    2014-04-01

    In this study, we developed a microarray bio-MEMS device that could trap PC12D (rat pheochromocytoma cells) cells to examine the intercellular interaction effect on the cell activation and the axonal extension ability. This is needed to assign particular patterns of PC12D cells to establish a cell functional evaluation technique. This experimental observation-based technique can be used for design of the cell sheet and scaffold for peripheral and central nerve regeneration. We have fabricated a micropillar-array bio-MEMS device, whose diameter was approximately 10 μm, by using thick photoresist SU-8 on the glass slide substrate. A maximum trapped PC12D cell ratio, 48.5%, was achieved. Through experimental observation of patterned PC12D "bi-cells" activation, we obtained the following results. Most of the PC12D "bi-cells" which had distances between 40 and 100 μm were connected after 24 h with a high probability. On the other hand, "bi-cells" which had distances between 110 and 200 μm were not connected. In addition, we measured axonal extension velocities in cases where the intercellular distance was between 40 and 100 μm. A maximum axonal extension velocity, 86.4 μm/h, was obtained at the intercellular distance of 40 μm.

  12. 78 FR 27441 - NIJ Evaluation of Hand-Held Cell Phone Detector Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-10

    ... of Justice Programs NIJ Evaluation of Hand-Held Cell Phone Detector Devices AGENCY: National...) is soliciting interest in supplying hand-held cell phone detector devices for participation in an... soliciting interest in supplying hand-held cell phone detector devices for participation in an evaluation...

  13. Field Measurements of a Full Scale Tidal Device

    OpenAIRE

    Jeffcoate, Penny; Starzmann, Ralf; Elsaesser, Bjoern; Scholl, Stefan; Bischoff, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Field testing studies are required for tidal turbine device developers to determine the performance of their turbines in tidal flows. Full-scale testing of the SCHOTTEL tidal turbine has been conducted at Queen’s University Belfast’s tidal site at Strangford Lough, NI. The device was mounted on a floating barge. Testing was conducted over 48 days, for 288 h, during flood tides in daylight hours. Several instruments were deployed, resulting in an expansive data set. The performance results fro...

  14. Particle Trajectories in Rotating Wall Cell Culture Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran N.; Downey, J. P.

    1999-01-01

    Cell cultures are extremely important to the medical community since such cultures provide an opportunity to perform research on human tissue without the concerns inherent in experiments on individual humans. Development of cells in cultures has been found to be greatly influenced by the conditions of the culture. Much work has focused on the effect of the motions of cells in the culture relative to the solution. Recently rotating wall vessels have been used with success in achieving improved cellular cultures. Speculation and limited research have focused on the low shear environment and the ability of rotating vessels to keep cells suspended in solution rather than floating or sedimenting as the primary reasons for the improved cellular cultures using these devices. It is widely believed that the cultures obtained using a rotating wall vessel simulates to some degree the effect of microgravity on cultures. It has also been speculated that the microgravity environment may provide the ideal acceleration environment for culturing of cellular tissues due to the nearly negligible levels of sedimentation and shear possible. This work predicts particle trajectories of cells in rotating wall vessels of cylindrical and annular design consistent with the estimated properties of typical cellular cultures. Estimates of the shear encountered by cells in solution and the interactions with walls are studied. Comparisons of potential experiments in ground and microgravity environments are performed.

  15. Advanced materials and processes for polymer solar cell devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Martin Helgesen; Søndergaard, Roar; Krebs, Frederik C

    2010-01-01

    The rapidly expanding field of polymer and organic solar cells is reviewed in the context of materials, processes and devices that significantly deviate from the standard approach which involves rigid glass substrates, indium-tin-oxide electrodes, spincoated layers of conjugated polymer....../fullerene mixtures and evaporated metal electrodes in a flat multilayer geometry. It is likely that significant advances can be found by pursuing many of these novel ideas further and the purpose of this review is to highlight these reports and hopefully spark new interest in materials and methods that may...

  16. Design and Functional Validation of a Complex Impedance Measurement Device for Characterization of Ultrasonic Transducers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the design and practical implementation of a complex impedance measurement device capable of characterization of ultrasonic transducers. The device works in the frequency range used by industrial ultrasonic transducers which is below the measurement range of modern high end network analyzers. The device uses the Goertzel algorithm instead of the more common FFT algorithm to calculate the magnitude and phase component of the impedance under test. A theoretical overview is given followed by a practical approach and measurement results. (authors)

  17. Comparing pulmonary resistance measured with an esophageal balloon to resistance measurements with an airflow perturbation device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The airflow perturbation device (APD) perturbs flow and mouth pressure during regular breathing. Ratios of mouth pressure perturbation magnitudes to flow perturbation magnitudes were used to calculate inspiratory, expiratory and average respiratory resistances. Resistance measurements with the APD were compared to pulmonary resistances directly measured with an esophageal balloon. Six healthy subjects were tested during tidal breathing when known external resistances were added during inspiration, during expiration and during both inspiration and expiration. When the baseline averaged balloon measured pulmonary resistance was subtracted from the baseline averaged APD measured resistance, the difference between them was 0.92 ± 1.25 (mean ± SD) cmH2O L–1 s–1. Compared to the magnitude of the known increase in the added resistance, the APD measured resistance increased by 79%, whereas directly measured pulmonary resistance increased only by 56%. During addition of external resistances to both inspiration and expiration, the changes in inspiratory and expiratory pulmonary resistance were only 36% and 62% of the added resistance, respectively. On the other hand, the APD inhalation and exhalation resistance measured between 82% and 76% of the added resistance. We conclude that the APD detects changes in external resistance at least as well as, and probably better than, classical measurements of pulmonary resistance

  18. Dielectric response of doped organic semiconductor devices: P3HT:PCBM solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armbruster, Oskar; Lungenschmied, Christoph; Bauer, Siegfried

    2011-08-01

    We introduce a model to account for the dielectric response of doped organic semiconductor devices. In addition to the phenomena observed for undoped devices, mobile charge carriers created by doping can alter the dielectric function of the organic material and hence the dielectric response of the devices. These extrinsic charges may be trapped and contribute to the capacitance on re-emission. We directly model the real part of the dielectric function based on this phenomenon. The imaginary part is obtained via the application of the Kramers-Kronig transformation. We use oxygen-doped poly(3-hexylthiophene):[6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester- (P3HT:PCBM) based organic solar cells as a model system to test our approach and hence contribute to the understanding of oxygen-induced degradation in these devices. We fit our equations to the measured dielectric data and compare it to Debye relaxation as well as two widely used equivalent circuit models. Together with the device resistance determined from the steady-state current-voltage characteristic around 0V an excellent agreement between the experimental data and our model is achieved for both the real and the imaginary part of the dielectric function over a frequency range covering five orders of magnitude. Unlike the Debye relaxation model or the equivalent circuit approach, our model yields important device parameters such as the dopant concentration.

  19. A microfluidic device integrating plasmonic nanodevices for Raman spectroscopy analysis on trapped single living cells

    KAUST Repository

    Perozziello, Gerardo

    2013-11-01

    In this work we developed a microfluidic device integrating nanoplasmonic devices combined with fluidic trapping regions. The microfuidic traps allow to capture single cells in areas where plasmonic sensors are placed. In this way it is possible to perform Enhanced Raman analysis on the cell membranes. Moreover, by changing direction of the flux it is possible to change the orientation of the cell in the trap, so that it is possible to analyze different points of the membrane of the same cell. We shows an innovative procedure to fabricate and assembly the microfluidic device which combine photolithography, focused ion beam machining, and hybrid bonding between a polymer substrate and lid of Calcium fluoride. This procedure is compatible with the fabrication of the plasmonic sensors in close proximity of the microfluidic traps. Moreover, the use of Calcium fluoride as lid allows full compatibility with Raman measurements producing negligible Raman background signal and avoids Raman artifacts. Finally, we performed Raman analysis on cells to monitor their oxidative stress under particular non physiological conditions. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Design and dynamic analysis of single-axis integrated inertia measurement device

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The structure and measurement theory of a single-axis integrated inertia measurement device are discussed in this paper.The acceleration and angle velocity can be detected by the proposed sensor at the same time.The kinetic model of the device is also established.In addition,the signal generation of the single-axis integrated inertiameasurement device is analyzed and simulated.The results of the model are consistent with simulation result.

  1. Quantitative electrochemical measurements using in situ ec-S/TEM devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unocic, Raymond R; Sacci, Robert L; Brown, Gilbert M; Veith, Gabriel M; Dudney, Nancy J; More, Karren L; Walden, Franklin S; Gardiner, Daniel S; Damiano, John; Nackashi, David P

    2014-04-01

    Insight into dynamic electrochemical processes can be obtained with in situ electrochemical-scanning/transmission electron microscopy (ec-S/TEM), a technique that utilizes microfluidic electrochemical cells to characterize electrochemical processes with S/TEM imaging, diffraction, or spectroscopy. The microfluidic electrochemical cell is composed of microfabricated devices with glassy carbon and platinum microband electrodes in a three-electrode cell configuration. To establish the validity of this method for quantitative in situ electrochemistry research, cyclic voltammetry (CV), choronoamperometry (CA), and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were performed using a standard one electron transfer redox couple [Fe(CN)6]3-/4--based electrolyte. Established relationships of the electrode geometry and microfluidic conditions were fitted with CV and chronoamperometic measurements of analyte diffusion coefficients and were found to agree with well-accepted values that are on the order of 10-5 cm2/s. Influence of the electron beam on electrochemical measurements was found to be negligible during CV scans where the current profile varied only within a few nA with the electron beam on and off, which is well within the hysteresis between multiple CV scans. The combination of experimental results provides a validation that quantitative electrochemistry experiments can be performed with these small-scale microfluidic electrochemical cells provided that accurate geometrical electrode configurations, diffusion boundary layers, and microfluidic conditions are accounted for.

  2. 75 FR 11624 - Highway Safety Programs; Conforming Products List of Evidential Breath Alcohol Measurement Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-11

    ... Register on December 17, 2007 (72 FR 71480) for instruments that conform to the Model Specifications for Evidential Breath Alcohol Measurement Devices (58 FR 48705). DATES: Effective Date: March 11, 2010. FOR... Administration (NHTSA) published the Standards for Devices to Measure Breath Alcohol (38 FR 30459). A...

  3. 77 FR 35747 - Highway Safety Programs; Conforming Products List of Evidential Breath Alcohol Measurement Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-14

    ...) published in the Federal Register on March 11, 2010 (75 FR 11624) for instruments that conform to the Model Specifications for Evidential Breath Alcohol Measurement Devices dated, September 17, 1993 (58 FR 48705). DATES... Alcohol (38 FR 30459). A Qualified Products List of Evidential Breath Measurement Devices comprised...

  4. Cancer Cell Analyses at the Single Cell-Level Using Electroactive Microwell Array Device.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Kobayashi

    Full Text Available Circulating tumor cells (CTCs, shed from primary tumors and disseminated into peripheral blood, are playing a major role in metastasis. Even after isolation of CTCs from blood, the target cells are mixed with a population of other cell types. Here, we propose a new method for analyses of cell mixture at the single-cell level using a microfluidic device that contains arrayed electroactive microwells. Dielectrophoretic (DEP force, induced by the electrodes patterned on the bottom surface of the microwells, allows efficient trapping and stable positioning of single cells for high-throughput biochemical analyses. We demonstrated that various on-chip analyses including immunostaining, viability/apoptosis assay and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH at the single-cell level could be conducted just by applying specific reagents for each assay. Our simple method should greatly help discrimination and analysis of rare cancer cells among a population of blood cells.

  5. Radiometric modulation measuring device of intensity of optical radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Yanenko

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The paper proposed a block diagram of radiometric measuring the intensity of optical radiation from modulation conversion parameter input . To assess the intensity of use periodically comparing the reference signal (shaded and measurement (open photodi-odes. Studies. The proposed radiometric modulation meter provides increased sensitivity and measurement accuracy by reducing the influence of dark current measurement and reference photodiodes and compensation intrinsic noise measuring channel through their periodic anti-phase comparison.

  6. Device Modeling and Characterization for CIGS Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Sang Ho

    We studied the way to achieve high efficiency and low cost of CuIn1-xGaxSe2 (CIGS) solar cells. The Fowler-Nordheim (F-N) tunneling currents at low bias decreased the shunt resistances and degraded the fill factor and efficiency. The activation energies of majority traps were directly related with F-N tunneling currents by the energy barriers. Air anneals decreased the efficiency from 7.74% to 5.18% after a 150 °C, 1000 hour anneal. The decrease of shunt resistance due to F-N tunneling and the increase of series resistance degrade the efficiencies of solar cells. Air anneal reduces the free carrier densities by the newly generated Cu interstitial defects (Cui). Mobile Cui defects induce the metastability in CIGS solar cell. Since oxygen atoms are preferred to passivate the Se vacancies thus Cu interstitial defects explains well metastability of CIGS solar cells. Lattice mismatch and misfit stress between layers in CIGS solar cells can explain the particular effects of CIGS solar cells. The misfits of 35.08° rotated (220/204) CIGS to r-plane (102) MoSe2 layers are 1% ˜ -4% lower than other orientation and the lattice constants of two layers in short direction are matched at Ga composition x=0.35. This explains well the preferred orientation and the maximum efficiency of Ga composition effects. Misfit between CIGS and CdS generated the dislocations in CdS layer as the interface traps. Thermionic emission currents due to interface traps limit the open circuit voltage at high Ga composition. The trap densities were calculated by critical thickness and dislocation spacing and the numerical device simulation results were well matched with the experimental results. A metal oxide broken-gap p-n heterojunction is suggested for tunnel junction for multi-junction polycrystalline solar cells and we examined the characteristics of broken-gap tunnel junction by numerical simulation. Ballistic transport mechanism explains well I-V characteristics of broken-gap junction. P

  7. Semi-empirical device model for Cu2ZnSn(S,Se)4 solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokmen, Tayfun; Gunawan, Oki; Mitzi, David B.

    2014-07-01

    We present a device model for the hydrazine processed kesterite Cu2ZnSn(S,Se)4 (CZTSSe) solar cell with a world record efficiency of ˜12.6%. Detailed comparison of the simulation results, performed using wxAMPS software, to the measured device parameters shows that our model captures the vast majority of experimental observations, including VOC, JSC, FF, and efficiency under normal operating conditions, and temperature vs. VOC, sun intensity vs. VOC, and quantum efficiency. Moreover, our model is consistent with material properties derived from various techniques. Interestingly, this model does not have any interface defects/states, suggesting that all the experimentally observed features can be accounted for by the bulk properties of CZTSSe. An electrical (mobility) gap that is smaller than the optical gap is critical to fit the VOC data. These findings point to the importance of tail states in CZTSSe solar cells.

  8. Influence of Biphasic Stimulation on Olfactory Ensheathing Cells for Neuroprosthetic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassarati, Rachelle T.; Foster, L. John R.; Green, Rylie A.

    2016-01-01

    The recent success of olfactory ensheathing cell (OEC) assisted regeneration of injured spinal cord has seen a rising interest in the use of these cells in tissue-engineered systems. Previously shown to support neural cell growth through glial scar tissue, OECs have the potential to assist neural network formation in living electrode systems to produce superior neuroprosthetic electrode surfaces. The following study sought to understand the influence of biphasic electrical stimulation (ES), inherent to bionic devices, on cell survival and function, with respect to conventional metallic and developmental conductive hydrogel (CH) coated electrodes. The CH utilized in this study was a biosynthetic hydrogel consisting of methacrylated poly(vinyl-alcohol) (PVA), heparin and gelatin through which poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) was electropolymerised. OECs cultured on Pt and CH surfaces were subjected to biphasic ES. Image-based cytometry yielded little significant difference between the viability and cell cycle of OECs cultured on the stimulated and passive samples. The significantly lower voltages measured across the CH electrodes (147 ± 3 mV) compared to the Pt (317 ± 5 mV), had shown to influence a higher percentage of viable cells on CH (91–93%) compared to Pt (78–81%). To determine the functionality of these cells following electrical stimulation, OECs co-cultured with PC12 cells were found to support neural cell differentiation (an indirect measure of neurotrophic factor production) following ES. PMID:27757072

  9. Single Glucose Biofuel Cells Implanted in Rats Power Electronic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zebda, A.; Cosnier, S.; Alcaraz, J.-P.; Holzinger, M.; Le Goff, A.; Gondran, C.; Boucher, F.; Giroud, F.; Gorgy, K.; Lamraoui, H.; Cinquin, P.

    2013-01-01

    We describe the first implanted glucose biofuel cell (GBFC) that is capable of generating sufficient power from a mammal's body fluids to act as the sole power source for electronic devices. This GBFC is based on carbon nanotube/enzyme electrodes, which utilize glucose oxidase for glucose oxidation and laccase for dioxygen reduction. The GBFC, implanted in the abdominal cavity of a rat, produces an average open-circuit voltage of 0.57 V. This implanted GBFC delivered a power output of 38.7 μW, which corresponded to a power density of 193.5 μW cm−2 and a volumetric power of 161 μW mL−1. We demonstrate that one single implanted enzymatic GBFC can power a light-emitting diode (LED), or a digital thermometer. In addition, no signs of rejection or inflammation were observed after 110 days implantation in the rat. PMID:23519113

  10. Noninvasive Diagnostic Devices for Diabetes through Measuring Tear Glucose

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Jin; Hodge, William; Hutnick, Cindy; Wang, Xianbin

    2011-01-01

    This article reviews the development of a noninvasive diagnostic for diabetes by detecting ocular glucose. Early diagnosis and daily management are very important to diabetes patients to ensure a healthy life. Commercial blood glucose sensors have been used since the 1970s. Millions of diabetes patients have to prick their finger for a drop of blood 4–5 times a day to check blood glucose levels—almost 1800 times annually. There is a strong need to have a noninvasive device to help patients to...

  11. Collection, Measurement and Treatment of Microorganism Using Dielectrophoretic Micro Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Satoshi

    Constant monitoring of manufacturing processes has been essential in food industry because of global expansion of microbial infection. Micro-scale dielectrophoretic method is an attractive technique for direct operation and quantitative detection of bioparticles. The electrical system is capable of rapid and simple treatments corresponding to severe legal control for food safety. In this paper, newly developed techniques are reviewed for bacterial concentration, detection and sterilization using dielectrophoresis in a micro reactor. The perspective to an integrated micro device of those components is also discussed.

  12. Measurement of active shoulder proprioception: dedicated system and device

    OpenAIRE

    Lubiatowski, Przemyslaw; Ogrodowicz, Piotr; Wojtaszek, Marcin; Kaniewski, Ryszard; Stefaniak, Jakub; Dudziński, Witold; Romanowski, Leszek

    2012-01-01

    Proprioception is an essential part of shoulder stability and neuromuscular control. The purpose of the study was the development of a precise system of shoulder proprioception assessment in the active mode (Propriometr). For that purpose, devices such as the electronic goniometer and computer software had been designed. A pilot study was carried out on a control group of 27 healthy subjects, the average age being 23.8 (22–29) in order to test the system. The result of the assessment was the ...

  13. Localized corrosion information using high resolution measurement devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambat, Rajan

    2005-01-01

    High performance demand for several engineering alloys and components, and miniaturization of electronics and development of MEMS requires better understanding of local corrosion characteristics frequently down to µm scale. This is because in metallic materials corrosion is a sensitive function o...... the methods and the results of local corrosion investigations of aluminium alloy microstructure, friction stir welds, spot-welds, cast components and microelectronic devices....... in engineering components, structural heterogeneities of a higher scale could be produced by joining and processing techniques such as welding (eg. heat affected zone and nugget), cutting and machining operations. In all these cases understanding the corrosion properties of an individual microstructural region...

  14. A novel closed cell culture device for fabrication of corneal epithelial cell sheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Ryota; Kobayashi, Toyoshige; Moriya, Noboru; Mizutani, Manabu; Kan, Kazutoshi; Nozaki, Takayuki; Saitoh, Kazuo; Yamato, Masayuki; Okano, Teruo; Takeda, Shizu

    2015-11-01

    Automation technology for cell sheet-based tissue engineering would need to optimize the cell sheet fabrication process, stabilize cell sheet quality and reduce biological contamination risks. Biological contamination must be avoided in clinical settings. A closed culture system provides a solution for this. In the present study, we developed a closed culture device called a cell cartridge, to be used in a closed cell culture system for fabricating corneal epithelial cell sheets. Rabbit limbal epithelial cells were cultured on the surface of a porous membrane with 3T3 feeder cells, which are separate from the epithelial cells in the cell cartridges and in the cell-culture inserts as a control. To fabricate the stratified cell sheets, five different thicknesses of the membranes which were welded to the cell cartridge, were examined. Multilayered corneal epithelial cell sheets were fabricated in cell cartridges that were welded to a 25 µm-thick gas-permeable membrane, which was similar to the results with the cell-culture inserts. However, stratification of corneal epithelial cell sheets did not occur with cell cartridges that were welded to 100-300 µm-thick gas-permeable membranes. The fabricated cell sheets were evaluated by histological analyses to examine the expression of corneal epithelial-specific markers. Immunohistochemical analyses showed that a putative stem cell marker, p63, a corneal epithelial differentiation maker, CK3, and a barrier function marker, Claudin-1, were expressed in the appropriate position in the cell sheets. These results suggest that the cell cartridge is effective for fabricating corneal epithelial cell sheets.

  15. New device for time-averaged measurement of volatile organic compounds (VOCs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santiago Sánchez, Noemí; Tejada Alarcón, Sergio; Tortajada Santonja, Rafael; Llorca-Pórcel, Julio, E-mail: julio.llorca@aqualogy.net

    2014-07-01

    Contamination by volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the environment is an increasing concern since these compounds are harmful to ecosystems and even to human health. Actually, many of them are considered toxic and/or carcinogenic. The main sources of pollution come from very diffuse focal points such as industrial discharges, urban water and accidental spills as these compounds may be present in many products and processes (i.e., paints, fuels, petroleum products, raw materials, solvents, etc.) making their control difficult. The presence of these compounds in groundwater, influenced by discharges, leachate or effluents of WWTPs is especially problematic. In recent years, law has been increasingly restrictive with the emissions of these compounds. From an environmental point of view, the European Water Framework Directive (2000/60/EC) sets out some VOCs as priority substances. This binding directive sets guidelines to control compounds such as benzene, chloroform, and carbon tetrachloride to be at a very low level of concentration and with a very high frequency of analysis. The presence of VOCs in the various effluents is often highly variable and discontinuous since it depends on the variability of the sources of contamination. Therefore, in order to have complete information of the presence of these contaminants and to effectively take preventive measures, it is important to continuously control, requiring the development of new devices which obtain average concentrations over time. As of today, due to technical limitations, there are no devices on the market that allow continuous sampling of these compounds in an efficient way and to facilitate sufficient detection limits to meet the legal requirements which are capable of detecting very sporadic and of short duration discharges. LABAQUA has developed a device which consists of a small peristaltic pump controlled by an electronic board that governs its operation by pre-programming. A constant flow passes

  16. Automated measurement of cell motility and proliferation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goff Julie

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Time-lapse microscopic imaging provides a powerful approach for following changes in cell phenotype over time. Visible responses of whole cells can yield insight into functional changes that underlie physiological processes in health and disease. For example, features of cell motility accompany molecular changes that are central to the immune response, to carcinogenesis and metastasis, to wound healing and tissue regeneration, and to the myriad developmental processes that generate an organism. Previously reported image processing methods for motility analysis required custom viewing devices and manual interactions that may introduce bias, that slow throughput, and that constrain the scope of experiments in terms of the number of treatment variables, time period of observation, replication and statistical options. Here we describe a fully automated system in which images are acquired 24/7 from 384 well plates and are automatically processed to yield high-content motility and morphological data. Results We have applied this technology to study the effects of different extracellular matrix compounds on human osteoblast-like cell lines to explore functional changes that may underlie processes involved in bone formation and maintenance. We show dose-response and kinetic data for induction of increased motility by laminin and collagen type I without significant effects on growth rate. Differential motility response was evident within 4 hours of plating cells; long-term responses differed depending upon cell type and surface coating. Average velocities were increased approximately 0.1 um/min by ten-fold increases in laminin coating concentration in some cases. Comparison with manual tracking demonstrated the accuracy of the automated method and highlighted the comparative imprecision of human tracking for analysis of cell motility data. Quality statistics are reported that associate with stage noise, interference by non-cell

  17. A Simple Laser-Based Device for Simultaneous Microbial Culture and Absorbance Measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Abrevaya, X C; Areso, O; Mauas, P J D

    2012-01-01

    In this work we present a device specifically designed to study microbial growth with several applications related to environmental microbiology and other areas of research as astrobiology. The Automated Measuring and Cultivation device (AMC-d) enables semi-continuous absorbance measurements directly during cultivation. It can measure simultaneously up to 16 samples. Growth curves using low and fast growing microorganism were plotted, including: Escherichia coli, and Haloferax volcanii, an halophilic archaeon.

  18. A Simple Laser-Based Device for Simultaneous Microbial Culture and Absorbance Measurement

    OpenAIRE

    Abrevaya, X. C.; Cortón, E.; Areso, O.; Mauas, P. J. D

    2012-01-01

    In this work we present a device specifically designed to study microbial growth with several applications related to environmental microbiology and other areas of research as astrobiology. The Automated Measuring and Cultivation device (AMC-d) enables semi-continuous absorbance measurements directly during cultivation. It can measure simultaneously up to 16 samples. Growth curves using low and fast growing microorganism were plotted, including: Escherichia coli, and Haloferax volcanii, an ha...

  19. Calculation of smoke plume mass from passive UV satellite measurements by GOME-2 polarization measurement devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penning de Vries, M. J. M.; Tuinder, O. N. E.; Wagner, T.; Fromm, M.

    2012-04-01

    The Wallow wildfire of 2011 was one of the most devastating fires ever in Arizona, burning over 2,000 km2 in the states of Arizona and New Mexico. The fire originated in the Bear Wallow Wilderness area in June, 2011, and raged for more than a month. The intense heat of the fire caused the formation of a pyro-convective cloud. The resulting smoke plume, partially located above low-lying clouds, was detected by several satellite instruments, including GOME-2 on June 2. The UV Aerosol Index, indicative of aerosol absorption, reached a maximum of 12 on that day, pointing to an elevated plume with moderately absorbing aerosols. We have performed extensive model calculations assuming different aerosol optical properties to determine the total aerosol optical depth of the plume. The plume altitude, needed to constrain the aerosol optical depth, was obtained from independent satellite measurements. The model results were compared with UV Aerosol Index and UV reflectances measured by the GOME-2 polarization measurement devices, which have a spatial resolution of roughly 10x40 km2. Although neither the exact aerosol optical properties nor optical depth can be obtained with this method, the range in aerosol optical depth values that we calculate, combined with the assumed specific extinction mass factor of 5 m2/kg lead us to a rough estimate of the smoke plume mass that cannot, at present, be assessed in another way.

  20. Classification of methods for measuring current-voltage characteristics of semiconductor devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iermolenko Ia. O.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available It is shown that computer systems for measuring current-voltage characteristics are very important for semiconductor devices production. The main criteria of efficiency of such systems are defined. It is shown that efficiency of such systems significantly depends on the methods for measuring current-voltage characteristics of semiconductor devices. The aim of this work is to analyze existing methods for measuring current-voltage characteristics of semiconductor devices and to create the classification of these methods in order to specify the most effective solutions in terms of defined criteria. To achieve this aim, the most common classifications of methods for measuring current-voltage characteristics of semiconductor devices and their main disadvantages are considered. Automated and manual, continuous, pulse, mixed, isothermal and isodynamic methods for measuring current-voltage characteristics are analyzed. As a result of the analysis and generalization of existing methods the next classification criteria are defined: the level of automation, the form of measurement signals, the condition of semiconductor device during the measurements, and the use of mathematical processing of the measurement results. With the use of these criteria the classification scheme of methods for measuring current-voltage characteristics of semiconductor devices is composed and the most effective methods are specified.

  1. Lacto-corder - a new measurement device for cow milk productivity control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pero Mijić

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available LactoCorder is a new measurement device for cow milk productivitycontrol and sample isolation. As a measurement device it has been recognized by ICAR (Internacional Committee for Animal Recording and is used as an official control device in a German province – Bavaria, The device is composed of two parts: hydraulic one including milk flow through the measuring area and electronic part comprising operational area where data is input and stored. Producer paid special attention to milking traits (average and maximun milk flow as well as graphicall display of each part of the milking phase: preparation, basic, blind and additional one. Initial equipment purchase investments are large ones. However, taking into account available information obtained by this device invested means would be profitable wery soon. The Faculty of Agriculture in Osijek has been started a scientific – investigation project aimin at study milking traits and their correlation with cows udder health.

  2. 27 CFR 19.277 - Measuring devices and proofing instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... those prescribed in 27 CFR part 30. Proprietors shall make frequent tests of their hydrometers and... person. (c) Meters. The appropriate TTB officer may approve applications to measure spirits by meter...

  3. Methods and devices used to measure friction in rolling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeswiet, J.; Arentoft, Mogens; Henningsen, Poul

    2006-01-01

    Friction at the workpiece-die boundary, in both bulk forming and sheet forming is, arguably, the single most important physical parameter influencing the processing of metals; yet it remains the least understood. Hence there is a need for basic research into metal-die interface mechanisms. To gain...... to measure friction in rolling in the past and discusses some of the recent sensor designs that can now be used to measure friction both in production situations and for research purposes....

  4. A Modular High-Temperature Measurement Set-Up for Semiconductor Device Characterization

    CERN Document Server

    Borthen, P

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate the capabilities of a high temperature measurement set-up recently developed at our institute. It is dedicated to the characterization of semiconductor devices and test structures in the temperature range from room temperature up to 500 degrees C and higher. A detailed description of the experimental aquipment is given. Its practical use is demonstrated by measuring temperature-dependent charcteristics of silicon VDMOSFET and IGBT devices as well as SiC-diodes. For the silicon devices, numerical simulations based on recently developed high temperature physical models were also performed in order to gain a deeper understanding of the measured data, together with a revalidation of the model parameters.

  5. Compact disk (CD)-shaped device for single cell isolation and PCR of a specific gene in the isolated cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furutani, Shunsuke; Nagai, Hidenori; Takamura, Yuzuru; Kubo, Izumi

    2010-12-01

    For immediate discrimination among isolated cells we propose a novel device and technique for isolation of cells and sequential detection of specific gene(s) within them by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In this study, we isolated Salmonella enterica cells and detected the Salmonella-specific invA gene from isolated cells by PCR on a compact disk (CD)-shaped device. This device enabled liquid flow by centrifugal force without a micro pump, and was fabricated from silicon wafer and glass to avoid evaporation of a small amount of reagent. One device has 24 microchannels, and 313 microchambers integrated on each microchannel. One microliter of PCR mixture containing cells was separated into microchambers on the device at 5000 rpm for 30 s. Each microchamber contained approximately 1.5 nL PCR mixture. A Poisson distribution of S. enterica cells was observed for different densities of cell suspension. At 200 cells μL(-1) of S. enterica or less, isolated single cells could be determined on the device by amplification of DNA of the invA gene; at 400 cells μL(-1), chambers containing no, one, two, or three cells could be determined on the device. Selective detection of S. enterica was achieved by PCR from a mixture of S. enterica and Escherichia coli on the CD-shaped device.

  6. Noninvasive diagnostic devices for diabetes through measuring tear glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin; Hodge, William; Hutnick, Cindy; Wang, Xianbin

    2011-01-01

    This article reviews the development of a noninvasive diagnostic for diabetes by detecting ocular glucose. Early diagnosis and daily management are very important to diabetes patients to ensure a healthy life. Commercial blood glucose sensors have been used since the 1970s. Millions of diabetes patients have to prick their finger for a drop of blood 4-5 times a day to check blood glucose levels--almost 1800 times annually. There is a strong need to have a noninvasive device to help patients to manage the disease easily and painlessly. Instead of detecting the glucose in blood, monitoring the glucose level in other body fluids may provide a feasible approach for noninvasive diagnosis and diabetes control. Tear glucose has been studied for several decades. This article reviews studies on ocular glucose and its monitoring methods. Attempts to continuously monitor the concentration of tear glucose by using contact lens-based sensors are discussed as well as our current development of a nanostructured lens-based sensor for diabetes. This disposable biosensor for the detection of tear glucose may provide an alternative method to help patients manage the disease conveniently. PMID:21303640

  7. Certifying entangled measurements in a device-independent way

    CERN Document Server

    Vertesi, Tamas

    2011-01-01

    We study under which conditions it is possible to assert that a joint demolition measurement cannot be simulated by Local Operations and Classical Communication. More concretely, we consider a scenario where two parties, Alice and Bob, send each an unknown state to a third party, Charlie, who in turn interacts with the states in some undisclosed way and then announces an outcome. We show that, under the assumption that Alice and Bob know the dimensionality of their systems, there exist situations where the statistics of the outcomes reveals the nature of Charlie's measurement.

  8. Bring-Your-Own-Device: Turning Cell Phones into Forces for Good

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imazeki, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Over the last few years, classroom response systems (or "clickers") have become increasingly common. Although most systems require students to use a standalone handheld device, bring-your-own-device (BYOD) systems allow students to use devices they already own (e.g., a cell phone, tablet or laptop) to submit responses via text message or…

  9. 32 CFR 634.27 - Speed-measuring devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MOTOR VEHICLE TRAFFIC SUPERVISION Traffic Supervision § 634.27 Speed-measuring.... (v) Demonstrate basic skills in checking calibration and operating the specific radar instrument(s). (vi) Demonstrate basic skills in preparing and presenting records and courtroom testimony relating...

  10. 40 CFR 1065.275 - N2O measurement devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... infra-red (NDIR) analyzer. You may use an NDIR analyzer that has compensation algorithms that are... for any compensation algorithm is 0.0% (that is, no bias high and no bias low), regardless of the... has compensation algorithms that are functions of other gaseous measurements and the engine's known...

  11. Measuring device for effective multiplication factors of a fuel assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueda, Makoto

    1988-11-14

    Purpose: To measure the effective multiplication factor of a fuel assembly without using an external neutron source. Constitution: Neutron absorbers disposed on the surface of a fuel assembly incorporating a spontaneous neutron source so as to put the surface of the assembly therebetween is moved. As the neutron absorber, a cadmium plate is most suitable, but boron, gadolinium or disprosium may also be used. Neutron counting rate phi upon setting the distance between the neutron absorbers and the surface of the fuel assembly to greater than 2 cm and neutron counting rate phi' upon setting it to less than 2 cm are measured by neutron detectors. The effective multiplication factor of the fuel assembly is calculated based on the results of both of the measurements according to the following equation: K = (A(phi/phi')-1)/(AB(phi/phi'-1)) According to this method, exchange for the external neutron source is no more required, and the maintenance is easier and working efficiency is higher as compared with the prior art. Further, since phi/phi' can be determined in one identical detector in a short period of time, the measuring error can be reduced. (Horiuchi, T.).

  12. Device for Measuring Low Flow Speed in a Duct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Frank; Magee, Kevin

    2009-01-01

    A multiple-throat venturi system has been invented for measuring laminar flow of air or other gas at low speed (1 to 30 cm/s) in a duct while preserving the laminar nature of the flow and keeping the velocity profile across the duct as nearly flat as possible. While means for measuring flows at higher speeds are well established, heretofore, there have been no reliable means for making consistent, accurate measurements in this speed range. In the original application for which this system was invented, the duct leads into the test section of a low-speed wind tunnel wherein uniform, low-speed, laminar flow is required for scientific experiments. The system could also be used to monitor a slow flow of gas in an industrial process like chemical vapor deposition. In the original application, the multiple- throat venturi system is mounted at the inlet end of the duct having a rectangular cross section of 19 by 14 cm, just upstream of an assembly of inlet screens and flow straighteners that help to suppress undesired flow fluctuations (see Figure 1). The basic venturi measurement principle is well established: One measures the difference in pressure between (1) a point just outside the inlet, where the pressure is highest and the kinetic energy lowest; and (2) the narrowest part (the throat) of the venturi passage, where the kinetic energy is highest and the pressure is lowest. Then by use of Bernoulli s equation for the relationship between pressure and kinetic energy, the volumetric flow speed in the duct can be calculated from the pressure difference and the inlet and throat widths. The design of this system represents a compromise among length, pressure recovery, uniformity of flow, and complexity of assembly. Traditionally, venturis are used to measure faster flows in narrower cross sections, with longer upstream and downstream passages to maintain accuracy. The dimensions of the passages of the present venturi system are sized to provide a readily measurable

  13. Evaluation of oscillometric and Doppler ultrasonic devices for blood pressure measurements in anesthetized and conscious dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vachon, Catherine; Belanger, Marie C; Burns, Patrick M

    2014-08-01

    Two non-invasive blood pressure (NIBP) devices (oscillometry and Doppler) were compared to invasive blood pressure using a Bland-Altman analysis, in anesthetized and conscious dogs. When considering the systolic arterial pressure only during general anesthesia, both NIBP devices slightly underestimated the systolic arterial blood pressure however the precision and the limits of agreement for the Doppler were of a greater magnitude. This indicates a worse clinical performance by the Doppler. The performance of both NIBP devices deteriorated as measured in conscious animals. In general, for the oscillometric device, determination of invasive diastolic and mean arterial pressures was better than the invasive systolic arterial pressure. Overall, the oscillometric device satisfied more of the criteria set by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine consensus statement. Based upon these results, the oscillometric device is more reliable than the Doppler in the determination of blood pressure in healthy medium to large breed dogs. PMID:24924217

  14. Strategies to Optimizing Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells: Organic Sensitizers, Tandem Device Structures, and Numerical Device Modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Wenger, Sophie

    2010-01-01

    Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) constitute a novel class of hybrid organic-inorganic solar cells. At the heart of the device is a mesoporous film of titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles, which are coated with a monolayer of dye sensitive to the visible region of the solar spectrum. The role of the dye is similar to the role of chlorophyll in plants; it harvests solar light and transfers the energy via electron transfer to a suitable material (here ...

  15. Characterizing heralded single-photon sources with imperfect measurement devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Razavi, M; Soellner, I; Bocquillon, E; Couteau, C; Laflamme, R; Weihs, G [Institute for Quantum Computing, University of Waterloo, 200 University Ave. W, Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1 (Canada)], E-mail: mrazavi@iqc.ca

    2009-06-14

    Any characterization of a single-photon source is not complete without specifying its second-order degree of coherence, i.e., its g{sup (2)} function. An accurate measurement of such coherence functions commonly requires high-precision single-photon detectors, in whose absence only time-averaged measurements are possible. It is not clear, however, how the resulting time-averaged quantities can be used to properly characterize the source. In this paper, we investigate this issue for a heralded source of single photons that relies on continuous-wave parametric down-conversion. By accounting for major shortcomings of the source and the detectors-i.e., the multiple-photon emissions of the source, the time resolution of photodetectors and our chosen width of coincidence window-our theory enables us to infer the true source properties from imperfect measurements. Our theoretical results are corroborated by an experimental demonstration using a PPKTP crystal pumped by a blue laser that results in a single-photon generation rate about 1.2 millions per second per milliwatt of pump power. This work takes an important step towards the standardization of such heralded single-photon sources.

  16. Light collection optics for measuring flux and spectrum from light-emitting devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCord, Mark A.; DiRegolo, Joseph A.; Gluszczak, Michael R.

    2016-05-24

    Systems and methods for accurately measuring the luminous flux and color (spectra) from light-emitting devices are disclosed. An integrating sphere may be utilized to directly receive a first portion of light emitted by a light-emitting device through an opening defined on the integrating sphere. A light collector may be utilized to collect a second portion of light emitted by the light-emitting device and direct the second portion of light into the integrating sphere through the opening defined on the integrating sphere. A spectrometer may be utilized to measure at least one property of the first portion and the second portion of light received by the integrating sphere.

  17. Device for acoustic measurement of food texture using a piezoelectric sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Taniwaki, Mitsuru; Hanada, Takanori; Sakurai, Naoki

    2006-01-01

    We have developed a device that enables direct measurement of food texture. The device inserts a probe into a food sample and detects the vibration caused by the sample's fracture. A piezoelectric sensor was used to detect that vibration. The frequency response of the piezoelectric sensor was measured. Results showed that the sensor covered the full audio frequency range up to 20 kHz. The device probe was designed so that its resonance was not in the signal detection band. An octave multi-fil...

  18. Design and measurement of a four-port device using metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Zachary; Grzegorczyk, Tomasz; Wu, Bae-Ian; Chen, Xudong; Kong, Jin Au

    2005-06-13

    A band separating device that uses an anisotropic metamaterial exhibiting negative refraction is designed and measured. The metamaterial has frequency dispersion in one component of the permeability tensor. A beam is incident onto the metamaterial and undergoes frequency dependent reflection and refraction directing different bandwidths towards three distinct measurement ports. Design issues are discussed, and measurement results are presented. PMID:19495391

  19. Experimental and theoretical study of hydrodynamic cell lysing of cancer cells in a high-throughput Circular Multi-Channel Microfiltration device

    KAUST Repository

    Ma, W.

    2013-04-01

    Microfiltration is an important microfluidic technique suitable for enrichment and isolation of cells. However, cell lysing could occur due to hydrodynamic damage that may be detrimental for medical diagnostics. Therefore, we conducted a systematic study of hydrodynamic cell lysing in a high-throughput Circular Multi-Channel Microfiltration (CMCM) device integrated with a polycarbonate membrane. HeLa cells (cervical cancer cells) were driven into the CMCM at different flow rates. The viability of the cells in the CMCM was examined by fluorescence microscopy using Acridine Orange (AO)/Ethidium Bromide (EB) as a marker for viable/dead cells. A simple analytical cell viability model was derived and a 3D numerical model was constructed to examine the correlation of between cell lysing and applied shear stress under varying flow rate and Reynolds number. The measured cell viability as a function of the shear stress was consistent with theoretical and numerical predictions when accounting for cell size distribution. © 2013 IEEE.

  20. The TESS camera: modeling and measurements with deep depletion devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Deborah F.; Vanderspek, Roland; MacDonald, Robert; Morgan, Edward; Villasenor, Joel; Thayer, Carolyn; Burke, Barry; Chesbrough, Christian; Chrisp, Michael; Clark, Kristin; Furesz, Gabor; Gonzales, Alexandria; Nguyen, Tam; Prigozhin, Gregory; Primeau, Brian; Ricker, George; Sauerwein, Timothy; Suntharalingam, Vyshnavi

    2016-07-01

    The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite, a NASA Explorer-class mission in development, will discover planets around nearby stars, most notably Earth-like planets with potential for follow up characterization. The all-sky survey requires a suite of four wide field-of-view cameras with sensitivity across a broad spectrum. Deep depletion CCDs with a silicon layer of 100 μm thickness serve as the camera detectors, providing enhanced performance in the red wavelengths for sensitivity to cooler stars. The performance of the camera is critical for the mission objectives, with both the optical system and the CCD detectors contributing to the realized image quality. Expectations for image quality are studied using a combination of optical ray tracing in Zemax and simulations in Matlab to account for the interaction of the incoming photons with the 100 μm silicon layer. The simulations include a probabilistic model to determine the depth of travel in the silicon before the photons are converted to photo-electrons, and a Monte Carlo approach to charge diffusion. The charge diffusion model varies with the remaining depth for the photo-electron to traverse and the strength of the intermediate electric field. The simulations are compared with laboratory measurements acquired by an engineering unit camera with the TESS optical design and deep depletion CCDs. In this paper we describe the performance simulations and the corresponding measurements taken with the engineering unit camera, and discuss where the models agree well in predicted trends and where there are differences compared to observations.

  1. Radioimmunoassay to quantitatively measure cell surface immunoglobulins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A radioimmunoassay techniques developed to quantitatively measure the presence of immunoglobulins on the surface of cells, is described. The amount of immunoglobulins found on different tumor cells varied from 200 to 1140 ng/106 cells. Determination of immunoglobulins on the peripheral lymphocytes obtained from different cancer patients varied between 340 to 1040 ng/106 cells. Cultured tumor cells, on the other hand, were found to contain negligible quantities of human IgG

  2. Metabolic measurements in cell culture and tissue constructs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolfe, P.

    2008-10-01

    This paper concerns the study and use of biological cells in which there is a need for sensors and assemblies for the measurement of a diverse range of physical and chemical variables. In this field cell culture is used for basic research and for applications such as protein and drug synthesis, and in cell, tissue and organ engineering. Metabolic processes are fundamental to cell behaviour and must therefore be monitored reliably. Basic metabolic studies measure the transport of oxygen, glucose, carbon dioxide, lactic acid to, from, or within cells, whilst more advanced research requires examination of energy storage and utilisation. Assemblies are designed to incorporate bioreactor functions for cell culture together with appropriate sensing devices. Oxygen consumption by populations of cells is achieved in a flowthrough assembly that incorporates O2 micro-sensors based on either amperometry or fluorescence. Measurements in single cell are possible with intra-cellular fluorophores acting as biosensors together with optical stimulation and detection. Near infra-red spectroscopy (NIRS) is used for analysis within culture fluid, for example for estimation of glucose levels, as well as within cell populations, for example to study the respiratory enzymes.Â#

  3. Integrated microfluidic device for single-cell trapping and spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Liberale, Carlo

    2013-02-13

    Optofluidic microsystems are key components towards lab-on-a-chip devices for manipulation and analysis of biological specimens. In particular, the integration of optical tweezers (OT) in these devices allows stable sample trapping, while making available mechanical, chemical and spectroscopic analyses.

  4. Microfluidic application-specific integrated device for monitoring direct cell-cell communication via gap junctions between individual cell pairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Philip J.; Hung, Paul J.; Shaw, Robin; Jan, Lily; Lee, Luke P.

    2005-05-01

    Direct cell-cell communication between adjacent cells is vital for the development and regulation of functional tissues. However, current biological techniques are difficult to scale up for high-throughput screening of cell-cell communication in an array format. In order to provide an effective biophysical tool for the analysis of molecular mechanisms of gap junctions that underlie intercellular communication, we have developed a microfluidic device for selective trapping of cell-pairs and simultaneous optical characterizations. Two different cell populations can be brought into membrane contact using an array of trapping channels with a 2μm by 2μm cross section. Device operation was verified by observation of dye transfer between mouse fibroblasts (NIH3T3) placed in membrane contact. Integration with lab-on-a-chip technologies offers promising applications for cell-based analytical tools such as drug screening, clinical diagnostics, and soft-state biophysical devices for the study of gap junction protein channels in cellular communications. Understanding electrical transport mechanisms via gap junctions in soft membranes will impact quantitative biomedical sciences as well as clinical applications.

  5. Acoustical measurements of expression devices in pipe organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braasch, Jonas

    2008-03-01

    In this investigation, three different swell systems known in pipe organs, the swell box, the crescendo wheel, and the historic wind swell were measured and compared to each other. The dynamic range of the crescendo wheel was found to be most effective, and for frequencies near 2 kHz the increase in sound pressure level could be up to 50 dB between the softest and the loudest adjustment. The maximum dynamic range for the wind swell and the swell box were found to be 10-20 dB in the same frequency range. With its step-wise crescendo procedure, the crescendo wheel simulates the type of orchestra crescendo which is reached by successively adding further musical instruments. In contrast, the swell box and the wind swell produce a crescendo effect similar to the crescendo in which individual musical instruments perform a dynamic movement. This type of crescendo requires a continuous level increase but allows a smaller dynamic range. The disappearance of the wind swell is not surprising because it offers no advantage over the swell box, while being restricted to stops with free reeds.

  6. Rotational knee laxity: Reliability of a simple measurement device in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zantop Thore

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Double bundle ACL reconstruction has been demonstrated to decrease rotational knee laxity. However, there is no simple, commercially-available device to measure knee rotation. The investigators developed a simple, non-invasive device to measure knee rotation. In conjunction with a rigid boot to rotate the tibia and a force/moment sensor to allow precise determination of torque about the knee, a magnetic tracking system measures the axial rotation of the tibia with respect to the femur. This device has been shown to have acceptable levels of test re-test reliability to measure knee rotation in cadaveric knees. Methods The objective of this study was to determine reliability of the device in measuring knee rotation of human subjects. Specifically, the intra-tester reliability within a single testing session, test-retest reliability between two testing sessions, and inter-tester reliability were assessed for 11 male subjects with normal knees. Results The 95% confidence interval for rotation was less than 5° for intra-tester, test-retest, and inter-tester reliability, and the standard error of measurement for the differences between left and right knees was found to be less than 3°. Conclusion It was found that the knee rotation measurements obtained with this device have acceptable limits of reliability for clinical use and interpretation.

  7. A co-culture device with a tunable stiffness to understand combinatorial cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Nikhil; Grover, Gregory N.; Vincent, Ludovic G.; Evans, Samantha C.; Choi, Yu Suk; Vincent, Ludovic G.; Spencer, Katrina H.; Hui, Elliot E.; Engler, Adam J.; Christman, Karen L.

    2013-01-01

    Cell behavior on 2-D in vitro cultures is continually being improved to better mimic in vivo physiological conditions by combining niche cues including multiple cell types and substrate stiffness, which are well known to impact cell phenotype. However, no system exists in which a user can systematically examine cell behavior on a substrate with a specific stiffness (elastic modulus) in culture with a different cell type, while maintaining distinct cell populations. We demonstrate the modification of a silicon reconfigurable co-culture system with a covalently linked hydrogel of user-defined stiffness. This device allows the user to control whether two separate cell populations are in contact with each other or only experience paracrine interactions on substrates of controllable stiffness. To illustrate the utility of this device, we examined the role of substrate stiffness combined with myoblast co-culture on adipose derived stem cell (ASC) differentiation and found that the presence of myoblasts and a 10 kPa substrate stiffness increased ASC myogenesis versus co-culture on stiff substrates. As this example highlights, this technology better controls the in vitro microenvironment, allowing the user to develop a more thorough understanding of the combined effects of cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. PMID:24061208

  8. Measuring p53 Binding to Single DNA Molecules in a Nanofluidic Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whelsky, Amber; Gonzalez, Nicholas, Jr.; Gal, Susannah; Levy, Stephen

    2012-02-01

    Protein-DNA binding is central to several important cellular processes, for instance, the transfer of genetic information into proteins. The p53 protein plays a central role in regulating several major cell cycle pathways, in part by binding to well-characterized DNA sequences in the promoters of specific genes. Recent studies show that the most common mutation to the protein occurs in the region responsible for its binding to DNA. We have fabricated slit-like nanofluidic devices that allow us to trap and stretch single molecules of DNA containing a known recognition sequence of p53. We use fluorescent microscopy to observe the diffusion of a single p53 protein as it searches for its DNA recognition site. We measure the reaction rates of binding to selected DNA sequences as well as the one-dimensional, non-sequence specific diffusion of p53 along a stretched DNA molecule as a function of salt concentration. The mechanism of facilitated diffusion attempts to explain how proteins seem able to find their DNA target sequences much more quickly than would be expected from three-dimensional diffusion alone. We compare the observed search mechanism used by normal and mutated p53 from cancer cells to predictions based on this theory.

  9. Device physics of thin-film polycrystalline cells and modules. Annual subcontract report, December 6, 1993--December 5, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sites, J.R.

    1995-05-01

    Progress has been made in several applications of device physics to thin-film polycrystalline cells and modules. At the cell level, results include a more quantitative separation of photon losses, the impact of second barriers on cell operation, and preliminary studies of how current-voltage curves are affected by band offsets. Module analysis includes the effects of the typical monolithic, series-connected cell geometry, analytical techniques when only the two module leads are accessible, and the impact of chopping frequency, local defects, and high-intensity beams on laser-scanning measurements.

  10. Measuring The Contact Resistances Of Photovoltaic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, D. R.

    1985-01-01

    Simple method devised to measure contact resistances of photovoltaic solar cells. Method uses readily available equipment and applicable at any time during life of cell. Enables evaluation of cell contact resistance, contact-end resistance, contact resistivity, sheet resistivity, and sheet resistivity under contact.

  11. Concordance of adherence measurement using self-reported adherence questionnaires and medication monitoring devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Lizheng; Liu, Jinan; Koleva, Yordanka; Fonseca, Vivian; Kalsekar, Anupama; Pawaskar, Manjiri

    2010-01-01

    The primary objective of this review was to identify and examine the literature on the association between medication adherence self-reported questionnaires (SRQs) and medication monitoring devices. The primary literature search was performed for 1980-2009 using PubMed, PubMed In Process and Non-Indexed, Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process, PsycINFO (EBSCO), CINAHL (EBSCO), Ovid HealthStar, EMBASE (Elsevier) and Cochrane Databases and using the following search terms: 'patient compliance', 'medication adherence', 'treatment compliance', 'drug monitoring', 'drug therapy', 'electronic', 'digital', 'computer', 'monitor', 'monitoring', 'drug', 'drugs', 'pharmaceutical preparations', 'compliance' and 'medications'. We identified studies that included SRQs and electronic monitoring devices to measure adherence and focused on the SRQs that were found to be moderately to highly correlated with the monitoring devices. Of the 1679 citations found via the primary search, 41 full-text articles were reviewed for correlation between monitoring devices and SRQs. A majority (68%) of articles reported high (27%), moderate (29%) or significant (12%) correlation between monitoring devices (37 using Medication Event Monitoring System [MEMS®] and four using other devices) and SRQs (11 identified and numerous other unnamed SRQs). The most commonly used SRQs were the Adult/Pediatric AIDS Clinical Trial Group (AACTG/PACTG; 24.4%, 10/41) followed by the 4-item Morisky (9.8%, 4/41), Brief Medication Questionnaire (9.8%, 4/41) and visual analogue scale (VAS; 7.3%, 3/41). Although study designs differed across the articles, SRQs appeared to report a higher rate of medication adherence (+14.9%) than monitoring devices. In conclusion, several medication adherence SRQs were validated using electronic monitoring devices. A majority of them showed high or moderate correlation with medication adherence measured using monitoring devices, and could be considered for measuring patient

  12. Development of a rare cell fractionation device: application for cancer detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Hisham; McCurdy, Leslie D; Szarowski, Donald H; Duva, Salvatore; Turner, James N; Caggana, Michele

    2004-12-01

    Isolating rare cells from biological fluids including whole blood or bone marrow is an interesting biological problem. Characterization of a few metastatic cells from cancer patients for further study is desirable for prognosis/diagnosis. Traditional methods have not proven adequate, due to the compositional complexity of blood, with its large numbers of cell types. To separate individual cells based on their mechanical characteristics, we have developed a series of massively parallel microfabricated sieving device. These devices were constructed with four successively narrower regions of channels numbering approximately 1800 per region. As cells traversed the device, they encountered each region and stopped at a gap width that prohibited passage due to their size. Cultured neuroblastoma cells, when mixed with whole blood and applied to the device, were retained in the 10-microm-wide by 20-microm-deep channels. All other cells migrated to the output. A derivative of the same device was utilized to characterize migration of whole blood. Adult white blood cells were retained at the 2.5-microm-wide by 5-microm-deep channels, while red blood cells passed through these channels. Devices designed to capture rare cells in peripheral circulation for downstream analysis will provide an important tool for diagnosis and treatment.

  13. Measuring cell identity in noisy biological systems

    OpenAIRE

    Birnbaum, Kenneth D; Kussell, Edo

    2011-01-01

    Global gene expression measurements are increasingly obtained as a function of cell type, spatial position within a tissue and other biologically meaningful coordinates. Such data should enable quantitative analysis of the cell-type specificity of gene expression, but such analyses can often be confounded by the presence of noise. We introduce a specificity measure Spec that quantifies the information in a gene's complete expression profile regarding any given cell type, and an uncertainty me...

  14. An industrial radiography exposure device based on measurement of transmitted gamma-ray intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polee, C.; Chankow, N.; Srisatit, S.; Thong-Aram, D.

    2015-05-01

    In film radiography, underexposure and overexposure may happen particularly when lacking information of specimen material and hollowness. This paper describes a method and a device for determining exposure in industrial gamma-ray radiography based on quick measurement of transmitted gamma-ray intensity with a small detector. Application software was developed for Android mobile phone to remotely control the device and to display counting data via Bluetooth communication. Prior to film exposure, the device is placed behind a specimen to measure transmitted intensity which is inversely proportional to the exposure. Unlike in using the conventional exposure curve, correction factors for source decay, source-to- film distance, specimen thickness and kind of material are not needed. The developed technique and device make radiographic process economic, convenient and more reliable.

  15. The Measurement of Spectral Characteristics and Composition of Radiation in ATLAS with MEDIPIX2-USB Devices

    CERN Document Server

    Campbell, M.; Greiffenberg, D.; Heijne, E.; Holy, T.; Idárraga, J.; Jakubek, J.; Král, V.; Králík, M.; Lebel, C.; Leroy, C.; Llopart, X.; Lord, G.; Maneuski, D.; Ouellette, O.; Sochor, V.; Prospísil, S.; Suk, M; Tlustos, L.; Vykydal, Z.; Wilhelm, I.

    2008-01-01

    A network of devices to perform real-time measurements of the spectral characteristics and composition of radiation in the ATLAS detector and cavern during its operation is being built. This system of detectors will be a stand alone system fully capable of delivering real-time images of fluxes and spectral composition of different particle species including slow and fast neutrons. The devices are based on MEDIPIX2 pixel silicon detectors that will be operated via active USB cables and USB-Ethernet extenders through an Ethernet network by a PC located in the USA15 ATLAS control room. The installation of 14 devices inside ATLAS (detector and cavern) is in progress.

  16. A radio frequency device for measurement of minute dielectric property changes in microfluidic channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Chunrong; Wang, Pingshan

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate a sensitive radio frequency (rf) device to detect small dielectric property changes in microfluidic channel. The device consists of an on-chip Wilkinson power divider and a rat-race hybrid, which are built with planar microstrip lines and thin film chip resistors. Interference is used to cancel parasitic background signals. As a result, the measurement sensitivity is improved by more than 20 dB compared with conventional transmission lines. Compared with an ultrasensitive slot antenna/cuvette assembly [K. M. Taylor and D. W. van der Weide, IEEE Trans. Microwave Theory Tech. 53, 1576 (2005)], the proposed rf device is two times more sensitive.

  17. A Methodology to Measure the Environmental Impact of ICT Operating Systems across Different Device Platforms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Daniel R. Williams; Yinshan Tang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract-A new methodology was created to measure the energy consumption and related green house gas (GHG) emissions of a computer operating system (OS) across different device platforms. The methodology involved the direct power measurement of devices under different activity states. In order to include all aspects of an OS, the methodology included measurements in various OS modes, whilst uniquely, also incorporating measurements when running an array of defined software activities, so as to include OS application management features. The methodology was demonstrated on a laptop and phone that could each run multiple OSs, results confirmed that OS can significantly impact the energy consumption of devices. In particular, the new versions of the Microsoft Windows OS were tested and highlighted significant differences between the OS versions on the same hardware. The developed methodology could enable a greater awareness of energy consumption, during both the software development and software marketing processes.

  18. Attenuation length measurements of liquid scintillator with LabVIEW and reliability evaluation of the device

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, L; Ding, YY; Zhou, L; Wen, LJ; Xie, YG; Wang, ZG; Cai, X; Sun, XL; Fang, J; Xue, Z; Zhang, AW; LÜ, QW; Sun, LJ; Ge, YS; Liu, YB; Niu, SL; Hu, T; Cao, J; LÜ, JG

    2013-01-01

    The attenuation length measuring device was constructed by using oscilloscope and LabVIEW for signal acquisition and processing. The performance of the device has been tested with a variety of ways, the test results show that the set-up has a good stability and high precision (sigma/mean reached 0.4 percent). Besides, the accuracy of the measurement system will decrease by about 17 percent if a filter is used. The attenuation length of gadolinium-loaded liquid scintillator (Gd-LS) was measured as 15.10 plus or minus 0.35 m where Gd-LS was heavily used in Daya Bay Neutrino Experiment. In addition, one method based on the Beer-Lambert law was proposed to investigate the reliability of the measurement device, the R-square reached 0.9995. Moreover, three purification methods for Linear Alkyl Benzene (LAB) production were compared in the experiment.

  19. Optofluidic Temperature and Pressure Measurements with Fiber Bragg Gratings Embedded in Microfluidic Devices

    CERN Document Server

    Cooksey, Gregory A

    2016-01-01

    The integration of photonic sensors into microfluidic devices provides opportunities for dynamic measurement of chemical and physical properties of fluids in very small volumes. We previously reported on the use of commercially available Fiber Bragg Gratings (FBGs) and on-chip silicon waveguides for temperature sensing. In this report, we demonstrate the integration of FBGs into easy-to-fabricate microfluidic devices and report on their sensitivity for temperature and pressure measurement in microliter volumes. These sensors present new routes to measurement in microfluidic applications such as small-volume calorimetry and microflow metrology.

  20. A new highly adaptable design of shear-flow device for orientation of macromolecules for Linear Dichroism (LD) measurement

    KAUST Repository

    Lundahl, P. Johan

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a new design of flow-orientation device for the study of bio-macromolecules, including DNA and protein complexes, as well as aggregates such as amyloid fibrils and liposome membranes, using Linear Dichroism (LD) spectroscopy. The design provides a number of technical advantages that should make the device inexpensive to manufacture, easier to use and more reliable than existing techniques. The degree of orientation achieved is of the same order of magnitude as that of the commonly used concentric cylinders Couette flow cell, however, since the device exploits a set of flat strain-free quartz plates, a number of problems associated with refraction and birefringence of light are eliminated, increasing the sensitivity and accuracy of measurement. The device provides similar shear rates to those of the Couette cell but is superior in that the shear rate is constant across the gap. Other major advantages of the design is the possibility to change parts and vary sample volume and path length easily and at a low cost. © 2011 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  1. A new device designed for direct yield stress measurements of cement spacer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordon, C.L.; Tonmukayakul, P.; Morgan, R.L. [Halliburton Energy Services, Houston, TX (United States)

    2007-07-01

    The rheological properties of spacer fluids and cement slurries have a significant impact on the hydraulic shear stress of well casing walls. This paper described experimental studies and numerical models of a device designed to measure the yield stress and rheological properties of spacer and cement samples. The device was designed using the Couette principle for rheological measurements, and measured the yield stress of particle-laden samples between 4 and 150 degrees C. A sample contained in a gap between a stator and a blade located along the inside wall of a steel cup was analyzed using the device. A stator was attached to a torque device and remained static during the rheological measurement. Yield stress was measured by rotating the device at a low speed at 3 rpm and at steady state torque. Torque was recorded when the rotation stopped. Two aqueous mixtures of titanium oxide (TiO{sub 2}) particles were used for the experiment. A cement spacer comprised of a blend of barite, citric acid and water was also measured. A volume-averaged shear method was used to calculate shear rate and shear stress. Key dimensionless variables were the impeller Reynolds number; the Froude number; the Weber number; and the Weissenberg number. Accuracy was assessed by examining the data obtained with a model fluid where yield stress data was already determined. Results of the comparison showed that values obtained using the device were consistent and comparable with results obtained using other techniques. It was concluded that further research is needed to characterize the elastic fluids in the device. 13 refs., 2 tabs., 3 figs.

  2. Electrical tissue impedance spectroscopy : a novel device to measure esophageal mucosal integrity changes during endoscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijenborg, P. W.; Rohof, W. O. A.; Akkermans, L. M. A.; Verheij, J.; Smout, A. J. P. M.; Bredenoord, A. J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) have impaired esophageal mucosal integrity. Measurement of the mucosal integrity is complex and time-consuming. Electrical tissue impedance spectroscopy (ETIS) is a device that measures impedance of tissue in vivo during endoscopy. In t

  3. A Charge-Coupled Device CCD line-scan system for road luminance measurement.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreuder, D.A.

    1996-01-01

    The problems involved in measuring road luminance are discussed and a new measuring system described which is based on a line-scan Charge Coupled Device (CCD) configuration. It is designed for the assessment of average road surface luminance and degree of non-uniformity of road lighting. Additionall

  4. Detail of photo 7903109 stack of superconducting cables in the modulus measuring device

    CERN Multimedia

    1979-01-01

    The picture shows an assembly of insulated superconducting cables of the type used in the Po dipole magnet inserted in the elastic modulus measuring device (photos 7903547X and 7903169) in order to measures its mechanical properties under azimuthal compression. See also 7903547X, 7903169, 8307552X.

  5. Device and Method for Continuously Equalizing the Charge State of Lithium Ion Battery Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Paul D. (Inventor); Martin, Mark N. (Inventor); Roufberg, Lewis M. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A method of equalizing charge states of individual cells in a battery includes measuring a previous cell voltage for each cell, measuring a previous shunt current for each cell, calculating, based on the previous cell voltage and the previous shunt current, an adjusted cell voltage for each cell, determining a lowest adjusted cell voltage from among the calculated adjusted cell voltages, and calculating a new shunt current for each cell.

  6. UNIVERSAL AUTO-CALIBRATION FOR A RAPID BATTERY IMPEDANCE SPECTRUM MEASUREMENT DEVICE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jon P. Christophersen; John L. Morrison; William H. Morrison

    2014-03-01

    Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy has been shown to be a valuable tool for diagnostics and prognostics of energy storage devices such as batteries and ultra-capacitors. Although measurements have been typically confined to laboratory environments, rapid impedance spectrum measurement techniques have been developed for on-line, embedded applications as well. The prototype hardware for the rapid technique has been validated using lithium-ion batteries, but issues with calibration had also been identified. A new, universal automatic calibration technique was developed to address the identified issues while also enabling a more simplified approach. A single, broad-frequency range is used to calibrate the system and then scaled to the actual range and conditions used when measuring a device under test. The range used for calibration must be broad relative to the expected measurement conditions for the scaling to be successful. Validation studies were performed by comparing the universal calibration approach with data acquired from targeted calibration ranges based on the expected range of performance for the device under test. First, a mid-level shunt range was used for calibration and used to measure devices with lower and higher impedance. Next, a high excitation current level was used for calibration, followed by measurements using lower currents. Finally, calibration was performed over a wide frequency range and used to measure test articles with a lower set of frequencies. In all cases, the universal calibration approach compared very well with results acquired following a targeted calibration. Additionally, the shunts used for the automated calibration technique were successfully characterized such that the rapid impedance measurements compare very well with laboratory-scale measurements. These data indicate that the universal approach can be successfully used for onboard rapid impedance spectra measurements for a broad set of test devices and range of

  7. Noise trauma induced by a mousetrap--sound pressure level measurement of vole captive bolt devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Matthias; Napp, Matthias; Lange, Joern; Grossjohann, Rico; Ekkernkamp, Axel; Beule, Achim G

    2010-05-01

    While ballistic parameters of vole captive bolt devices have been reported, there is no investigation on their hazardous potential to cause noise trauma. The aim of this experimental study was to measure the sound pressure levels of vole captive bolt devices. Two different shooting devices were examined with a modular precision sound level meter on an outdoor firing range. Measurements were taken in a semi-circular configuration with measuring points 0 degrees in front of the muzzle, 90 degrees at right angle of the muzzle, and 180 degrees behind the shooting device. Distances between muzzle and microphone were 0.5, 1, 2, 10, and 20 m. Sound pressure levels exceeded 130 dB(C) at any measuring point within the 20-m area. Highest measurements (more than 172 dB[C]) were taken in the 0 degrees direction at the 0.5-m distance for both shooting devices proving the hazardous potential of these gadgets to cause noise trauma. PMID:20345785

  8. Measuring turbulence in a flotation cell using electrical resistance tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Jun; Xie, Weiguo; Runge, Kym; Bradshaw, Dee

    2015-11-01

    Measuring turbulence in an industrial flotation environment has long been problematic due to the opaque, aggressive, and abrasive three-phase environment in a flotation cell. One of the promising measurement techniques is electrical resistance tomography (ERT). By measuring the conductivity distribution across a measurement area, ERT has been adopted by many researchers to monitor and investigate many processes involving multiphase flows. In the research outlined in this paper, a compact ERT probe was built and then used to measure the conductivity distribution within a 60 l flotation cell operated with water and air. Two approaches were then developed to process the ERT data and estimate turbulence-related parameters. One is a conductivity variance method and the other is based on the Green-Kubo relations. Both rely on and use the fluctuation in the ERT measurement caused by bubbles moving through the measurement area changing the density of the fluid. The results from both approaches were validated by comparing the results produced by the ERT probe in a 60l flotation cell operated at different air rates and impeller speeds to that measured using an alternative turbulence measurement device. The second approach is considered superior to the first as the first requires the development of auxiliary information which would not usually be known for a new system.

  9. A device to improve the Schleger and Turner method for sweating rate measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Alfredo Manuel Franco; Alves, Alexandre; Infante, Paulo; Titto, Evaldo A. L.; Baccari, Flávio; Almeida, J. A. Afonso

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to test a device developed to improve the functionality, accuracy and precision of the original technique for sweating rate measurements proposed by Schleger and Turner [Schleger AV, Turner HG (1965) Aust J Agric Res 16:92-106]. A device was built for this purpose and tested against the original Schleger and Turner technique. Testing was performed by measuring sweating rates in an experiment involving six Mertolenga heifers subjected to four different thermal levels in a climatic chamber. The device exhibited no functional problems and the results obtained with its use were more consistent than with the Schleger and Turner technique. There was no difference in the reproducibility of the two techniques (same accuracy), but measurements performed with the new device had lower repeatability, corresponding to lower variability and, consequently, to higher precision. When utilizing this device, there is no need for physical contact between the operator and the animal to maintain the filter paper discs in position. This has important advantages: the animals stay quieter, and several animals can be evaluated simultaneously. This is a major advantage because it allows more measurements to be taken in a given period of time, increasing the precision of the observations and diminishing the error associated with temporal hiatus (e.g., the solar angle during field studies). The new device has higher functional versatility when taking measurements in large-scale studies (many animals) under field conditions. The results obtained in this study suggest that the technique using the device presented here could represent an advantageous alternative to the original technique described by Schleger and Turner.

  10. The Architecture of Colloidal Quantum Dot Solar Cells: Materials to Devices

    KAUST Repository

    Kramer, Illan J.

    2014-01-08

    The materials chemistry of Colloidal Quantum Dot (CQDs) suspended in solution and processed into films has provided a foundation onto which useful photovoltaic devices can be built. These active materials offer the benefits of solution processing paired with the flexibility of adjustable bandgaps, tailored to suit a particular need. In parallel with these advances, pursuing device geometries that better leverage the available electronic properties of CQD films has borne fruit in further advancing CQD solar cell performance. For active materials such as CQD films where 1/α, where alpha is the absorption coefficient, is of the same order as the free carrier extraction length, external quantum efficiency (EQE) measurements have proved useful in profiling the effectiveness of each nanometer of device thickness at extracting photogenerated carriers. Because CQD films have the added complications of being made of variable-sized constituent material building blocks as well as being deposited from solution, the nature of charge transport through the films can also be size-dependent and matrix dependent.

  11. Adhesion and Interfacial Fracture: From Organic Light Emitting Devices and Photovoltaic Cells to Solar Lanterns for Developing Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Tiffany Michelle

    From that “ah-ha!” moment when a new technology is first conceived until the time that it reaches the hands of consumers, products undergo numerous iterations of research, development, testing, and redesign in order to create an end-product that is relevant, desirable, functional, and affordable. One crucial step, particularly for electronic devices, is a rigorous testing stage to ensure that a product will be able to withstand regular wear-and-tear. An understanding of how, when, and under what conditions a technology will fail is important in improving device performance and creating high quality products that consumers trust. Understanding that success is inherently tied to failure, this thesis focuses on studies of mechanical failure related to two types of electronic devices: solar cells and light emitting devices. By considering the interfaces that are relevant to the next generation of solar cells and light emitting devices that are built using organic conducting polymers, an atomic force microscopy test is introduced to characterize and rank the relative interfacial adhesion between layers at the nano-scale. These results have implications for material selection that can enhance device processing and performance. This method is then linked to fracture mechanics techniques that determine critical loading forces that induce separation and, hence, mechanical failure between layers of these devices. These results demonstrate the effect of nano-scale interactions on macro-scale behavior, and are particularly valuable in product testing as flexible electronics gain interest. Finally, a case study is conducted in Rural Kenya that measures the impact of commercially-available LED lanterns that are charged by solar panels on a community that is disconnected from the power grid. By demonstrating the value of these lanterns for the community, the role of device reliability and lifetime is examined in underscoring the critical need for proper device testing before

  12. Hard top soft bottom microfluidic devices for cell culture and chemical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Geeta; Lee, Jay; Cha, Wansik; Tung, Yi-Chung; Linderman, Jennifer J; Takayama, Shuichi

    2009-05-15

    We report fabrication and characterization of microfluidic devices made of thermoplastic and elastomeric polymers. These hard-soft hybrid material devices are motivated by the combined need for large scale manufacturability, enhanced barrier properties to gas permeation and evaporation of aqueous solutions compared to poly(dimethyl siloxane) (PDMS) devices, and compatibility with deformation-based actuation. Channel features are created on rigid polymers such as polyethylene terephthalate glycol (PETG), cyclic olefin copolymer (COC), and polystyrene (PS) by hot embossing. These "hard tops" are bonded to elastomeric "soft bottoms" (polyurethane (PU) or PDMS-parylene C-PDMS) to create devices that can be used for microfluidic cell culture where deformation-based fluid actuation schemes are used to perfuse and recirculate media. The higher barrier properties of this device compared to PDMS devices enable cell culture with less evaporation and creation of hypoxic conditions. PMID:19382754

  13. Measurement of inner and/or outer profiles of pipes using ring beam devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakayama, T.; Yoshizawa, T.

    2009-11-01

    Inner profile measurement is an important matter in such fields as medicine, dentistry and anthropology as well as mechanical engineering and industry. Here we propose a measurement method for inner diameter of pipes and/or holes. The key device in this technique is a ring beam device which consists of a conical mirror and a laser diode. And the fundamental principle is based on optical sectioning without any contact probe. The optically sectioned profile of an inner wall of a pipe-like object is analyzed to give the inner profile in addition to the inner diameter. This optical instrument with a simple and small configuration is now under development for practical uses. In the hitherto-tried experimental works, the availability of this instrument has been highly evaluated and usability for practical applications is expected, especially, for measurement and inspection of mechanical components and elements besides pipes. This ring beam device consisting of a conical mirror and a LD is assembled to form a disklike light beam sheet. We show measurement result of pipes and holes, and, at the same time, report a compact inner profile measuring instrument. Both the ring beam device and a miniaturized CCD camera are fabricated in a glass tube. Availability of this instrument is shown by measuring the inner profiles of various pipes. In response to this trial, there appeared a strong request that not only the internal but external profiles should be measured simultaneously. Therefore we propose an improved method for measuring the external profile in addition to the internal profile. In our arrangement, one pair of concaved conical mirrors is used for the external profile measurement. In combination with the inner profile measurement technique, simultaneous measurement of the inner and outer profiles becomes attainable. A measurement result on a bevel gear shows availability of newly proposed principle. Now we are aiming to realize simultaneous measurement of the internal

  14. Nanonet Force Microscopy for Measuring Cell Forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheets, Kevin; Wang, Ji; Zhao, Wei; Kapania, Rakesh; Nain, Amrinder S

    2016-07-12

    The influence of physical forces exerted by or felt by cells on cell shape, migration, and cytoskeleton arrangement is now widely acknowledged and hypothesized to occur due to modulation of cellular inside-out forces in response to changes in the external fibrous environment (outside-in). Our previous work using the non-electrospinning Spinneret-based Tunable Engineered Parameters' suspended fibers has revealed that cells are able to sense and respond to changes in fiber curvature and structural stiffness as evidenced by alterations to focal adhesion cluster lengths. Here, we present the development and application of a suspended nanonet platform for measuring C2C12 mouse myoblast forces attached to fibers of three diameters (250, 400, and 800 nm) representing a wide range of structural stiffness (3-50 nN/μm). The nanonet force microscopy platform measures cell adhesion forces in response to symmetric and asymmetric external perturbation in single and cyclic modes. We find that contractility-based, inside-out forces are evenly distributed at the edges of the cell, and that forces are dependent on fiber structural stiffness. Additionally, external perturbation in symmetric and asymmetric modes biases cell-fiber failure location without affecting the outside-in forces of cell-fiber adhesion. We then extend the platform to measure forces of (1) cell-cell junctions, (2) single cells undergoing cyclic perturbation in the presence of drugs, and (3) cancerous single-cells transitioning from a blebbing to a pseudopodial morphology. PMID:27410747

  15. Sensor Measurement Strategies for Monitoring Offshore Wind and Wave Energy Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Deirdre; Srbinovsky, Bruno; Murphy, Jimmy; Popovici, Emanuel; Pakrashi, Vikram

    2015-07-01

    While the potential of offshore wind and wave energy devices is well established and accepted, operations and maintenance issues are still not very well researched or understood. In this regard, scaled model testing has gained popularity over time for such devices at various technological readiness levels. The dynamic response of these devices are typically measured by different instruments during such scaled tests but agreed sensor choice, measurement and placement guidelines are still not in place. This paper compared the dynamic responses of some of these sensors from a scaled ocean wave testing to highlight the importance of sensor measurement strategies. The possibility of using multiple, cheaper sensors of seemingly inferior performance as opposed to the deployment of a small number of expensive and accurate sensors are also explored. An energy aware adaptive sampling theory is applied to highlight the possibility of more efficient computing when large volumes of data are available from the tested structures. Efficient sensor measurement strategies are expected to have a positive impact on the development of an device at different technological readiness levels while it is expected to be helpful in reducing operation and maintenance costs if such an approach is considered for the devices when they are in operation.

  16. The enhanced measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution with two-intensity decoy states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jian-Rong; Zhu, Feng; Zhou, Xing-Yu; Wang, Qin

    2016-09-01

    We put forward a new scheme for implementing the measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (QKD) with weak coherent source, while using only two different intensities. In the new scheme, we insert a beam splitter and a local detector at both Alice's and Bob's side, and then all the triggering and non-triggering signals could be employed to process parameter estimations, resulting in very precise estimations for the two-single-photon contributions. Besides, we compare its behavior with two other often used methods, i.e., the conventional standard three-intensity decoy-state measurement-device-independent QKD and the passive measurement-device-independent QKD. Through numerical simulations, we demonstrate that our new approach can exhibit outstanding characteristics not only in the secure transmission distance, but also in the final key generation rate.

  17. Measuring Soil Moisture using the Signal Strength of Buried Bluetooth Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hut, R.; Campbell, C. S.

    2015-12-01

    A low power bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) device is burried 20cm into the soil and a smartphone is placed on top of the soil to test if bluetooth signal strength can be related to soil moisture. The smartphone continuesly records and stores bluetooth signal strength of the device. The soil is artifcially wetted and drained. Results show a relation between BLE signal strength and soil moisture that could be used to measure soil moisture using these off-the-shelf consumer electronics. This opens the possibily to develop sensors that can be buried into the soil, possibly below the plow-line. These sensors can measure local parameters such as electric conductivity, ph, pressure, etc. Readings would be uploaded to a device on the surface using BLE. The signal strength of this BLE would be an (additional) measurement of soil moisture.

  18. Design of a microfluidic device to quantify dynamic intra-nuclear deformation during cell migration through confining environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Patricia M; Sliz, Josiah; Isermann, Philipp; Denais, Celine; Lammerding, Jan

    2015-12-01

    The ability of cells to migrate through tissues and interstitial spaces is an essential factor during development and tissue homeostasis, immune cell mobility, and in various human diseases. Deformation of the nucleus and its associated lamina during 3-D migration is gathering increasing interest in the context of cancer metastasis, with the underlying hypothesis that a softer nucleus, resulting from reduced levels of lamin A/C, may aid tumour spreading. However, current methods to study the migration of cells in confining three dimensional (3-D) environments are limited by their imprecise control over the confinement, physiological relevance, and/or compatibility with high resolution imaging techniques. We describe the design of a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic device composed of channels with precisely-defined constrictions mimicking physiological environments that enable high resolution imaging of live and fixed cells. The device promotes easy cell loading and rapid, yet long-lasting (>24 hours) chemotactic gradient formation without the need for continuous perfusion. Using this device, we obtained detailed, quantitative measurements of dynamic nuclear deformation as cells migrate through tight spaces, revealing distinct phases of nuclear translocation through the constriction, buckling of the nuclear lamina, and severe intranuclear strain. Furthermore, we found that lamin A/C-deficient cells exhibited increased and more plastic nuclear deformations compared to wild-type cells but only minimal changes in nuclear volume, implying that low lamin A/C levels facilitate migration through constrictions by increasing nuclear deformability rather than compressibility. The integration of our migration devices with high resolution time-lapse imaging provides a powerful new approach to study intracellular mechanics and dynamics in a variety of physiologically-relevant applications, ranging from cancer cell invasion to immune cell recruitment. PMID:26549481

  19. Single-cell measurement of red blood cell oxygen affinity

    CERN Document Server

    Caprio, Di; Higgins, John M; Schonbrun, Ethan

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen is transported throughout the body by hemoglobin in red blood cells. While the oxygen affinity of blood is well understood and is routinely assessed in patients by pulse oximetry, variability at the single-cell level has not been previously measured. In contrast, single-cell measurements of red blood cell volume and hemoglobin concentration are taken millions of times per day by clinical hematology analyzers and are important factors in determining the health of the hematologic system. To better understand the variability and determinants of oxygen affinity on a cellular level, we have developed a system that quantifies the oxygen saturation, cell volume and hemoglobin concentration for individual red blood cells in high-throughput. We find that the variability in single-cell saturation peaks at an oxygen partial pressure of 2.5%, which corresponds to the maximum slope of the oxygen-hemoglobin dissociation curve. In addition, single-cell oxygen affinity is positively correlated with hemoglobin concentr...

  20. A portable cell-based optical detection device for rapid detection of Listeria and Bacillus toxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Pratik; Banada, Padmapriya P.; Rickus, Jenna L.; Morgan, Mark T.; Bhunia, Arun K.

    2005-11-01

    A mammalian cell-based optical biosensor was built to detect pathogenic Listeria and Bacillus species. This sensor measures the ability of the pathogens to infect and induce cytotoxicity on hybrid lymphocyte cell line (Ped-2E9) resulting in the release of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) that can be detected optically using a portable spectrophotometer. The Ped-2E9 cells were encapsulated in collagen gel matrices and grown in 48-well plates or in specially designed filtration tube units. Toxin preparations or bacterial cells were introduced and ALP release was assayed after 3-5 h. Pathogenic L. monocytogenes strains or the listeriolysin toxins preparation showed cytotoxicity ranging from 55% - 92%. Toxin preparations (~20 μg/ml) from B. cereus strains showed 24 - 98% cytotoxicity. In contrast, a non-pathogenic L. innocua (F4247) and a B. substilis induced only 2% and 8% cytotoxicity, respectively. This cell-based detection device demonstrates its ability to detect the presence of pathogenic Listeria and Bacillus species and can potentially be used onsite for food safety or in biosecurity application.

  1. Cell separator for use in bipolar-stack energy storage devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Steven T.; Feikert, John H.; Kachmitter, James L.; Pekala, Richard W.

    1995-01-01

    An improved multi-cell electrochemical energy storage device, such as a battery, fuel cell, or double layer capacitor using a cell separator which allows cells to be stacked and interconnected with low electrical resistance and high reliability while maximizing packaging efficiency. By adding repeating cells, higher voltages can be obtained. The cell separator is formed by applying an organic adhesive on opposing surfaces of adjacent carbon electrodes or surfaces of aerogel electrodes of a pair of adjacent cells prior to or after pyrolysis thereof to form carbon aerogel electrodes. The cell separator is electronically conductive, but ionically isolating, preventing an electrolytic conduction path between adjacent cells in the stack.

  2. Combining atomic force-fluorescence microscopy with a stretching device for analyzing mechanotransduction processes in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecht, E; Knittel, P; Felder, E; Dietl, P; Mizaikoff, B; Kranz, C

    2012-11-21

    Mechanical forces affect biological systems in their natural environment in a widespread manner. Mechanical stress may either stimulate cells or even induce pathological processes. Cells sensing mechanical stress usually respond to such stressors with proliferation or differentiation. Hence, for in vitro studies, the ability to impose a controlled mechanical stress on cells combined with appropriate analytical tools providing an immediate answer is essential to understand such fundamental processes. Here, we present a novel uniaxial motorized cell stretching device that has been integrated into a combined fluorescence microscope (FM)-atomic force microscope (AFM) system, thereby enabling high-resolution topographic and fluorescent live cell imaging. This unique tool allows the investigation of mechanotransduction processes, as the cells may be exposed to deliberately controlled mechanical stress while simultaneously facilitating fluorescence imaging and AFM studies. The developed stretching device allows applying reproducible uniaxial strain from physiologically relevant to hyperphysiological levels to cultured cells grown on elastic polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membranes. Exemplarily, stretching experiments are shown for transfected squamous cell carcinoma cells (SCC-25) expressing fluorescent labeled cytokeratin, whereby fluorescence imaging and simultaneously performed AFM measurements reveal the cytokeratin (CSK) network. Topographical changes and mechanical characteristics such as elasticity changes were determined via AFM while the cells were exposed to mechanical stress. By applying a cell deformation of approx. 20%, changes in the Young's modulus of the cytoskeletal network due to stretching of the cells were observed. Consequently, integrating a stretching device into the combined atomic force-fluorescence microscope provides a unique tool for dynamically analyzing structural remodeling and mechanical properties in mechanically stressed cells. PMID:22977882

  3. Development of a puncture electronic device for electrical conductivity measurements throughout meat salting

    OpenAIRE

    García Breijo, Eduardo; Barat Baviera, José Manuel; Torres, Olga; Gil Sanchez, Luis; Ibáñez Civera, Javier; Alcañiz, Miguel; Masot, Rafael; Fraile Muñoz, Rubén

    2008-01-01

    Conductivity measurements of food systems are of high interest because they are related with food characteristics such as free water and salt content. Nevertheless, as far as now no devices have been developed for punctual conductivity measurements inside solid foods. The aim of this work was to develop a conductimeter which allows obtaining punctual measurements in different locations of solid foods. The sensor consists of a coaxial needle while an electrical sign controlled by microcontroll...

  4. Characterization of thermoelectric devices by laser induced Seebeck electromotive force (LIS-EMF) measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, Luis-David Patino [Universite de Bordeaux 1, Centre de Physique Moleculaire Optique et Hertzienne, 351, cours de la liberation, 33405 Talence (France); Dilhaire, Stefan [Universite de Bordeaux 1, Centre de Physique Moleculaire Optique et Hertzienne, 351, cours de la liberation, 33405 Talence (France); Grauby, Stephane [Universite de Bordeaux 1, Centre de Physique Moleculaire Optique et Hertzienne, 351, cours de la liberation, 33405 Talence (France); Salhi, M Amine [Universite de Bordeaux 1, Centre de Physique Moleculaire Optique et Hertzienne, 351, cours de la liberation, 33405 Talence (France); Ezzahri, Younes [Universite de Bordeaux 1, Centre de Physique Moleculaire Optique et Hertzienne, 351, cours de la liberation, 33405 Talence (France); Claeys, Wilfrid [Universite de Bordeaux 1, Centre de Physique Moleculaire Optique et Hertzienne, 351, cours de la liberation, 33405 Talence (France); Batsale, Jean-Christophe [Laboratoire TREFLE, Esplanade des Arts et Metiers, 33405 Talence Cedex (France)

    2005-05-21

    An in-depth study related to a new method of characterizing properties in thermoelectrics is proposed in this paper. This technique is appropriate for single or multi-layered thermoelectric devices. A modulated laser beam is used as a heater in order to generate a Seebeck electromotive force (EMF). The laser beam, line shaped, can be focused at any location along the sample surface, allowing spatially resolved measurements. Seebeck EMF measurements, associated with a versatile model based on the thermal quadrupoles method, allow determination of the sample Seebeck EMF profile and identifying of the sample thermal contact resistances, and should be useful for identification of devices and material thermoelectric properties.

  5. Characterization of thermoelectric devices by laser induced Seebeck electromotive force (LIS-EMF) measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patiño Lopez, Luis-David; Dilhaire, Stefan; Grauby, Stéphane; Amine Salhi, M.; Ezzahri, Younès; Claeys, Wilfrid; Batsale, Jean-Christophe

    2005-05-01

    An in-depth study related to a new method of characterizing properties in thermoelectrics is proposed in this paper. This technique is appropriate for single or multi-layered thermoelectric devices. A modulated laser beam is used as a heater in order to generate a Seebeck electromotive force (EMF). The laser beam, line shaped, can be focused at any location along the sample surface, allowing spatially resolved measurements. Seebeck EMF measurements, associated with a versatile model based on the thermal quadrupoles method, allow determination of the sample Seebeck EMF profile and identifying of the sample thermal contact resistances, and should be useful for identification of devices and material thermoelectric properties.

  6. Characterization of thermoelectric devices by laser induced Seebeck electromotive force (LIS-EMF) measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An in-depth study related to a new method of characterizing properties in thermoelectrics is proposed in this paper. This technique is appropriate for single or multi-layered thermoelectric devices. A modulated laser beam is used as a heater in order to generate a Seebeck electromotive force (EMF). The laser beam, line shaped, can be focused at any location along the sample surface, allowing spatially resolved measurements. Seebeck EMF measurements, associated with a versatile model based on the thermal quadrupoles method, allow determination of the sample Seebeck EMF profile and identifying of the sample thermal contact resistances, and should be useful for identification of devices and material thermoelectric properties

  7. Concave cell design for FTIR measurements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang Qin Lin; Zhi Xiang Zhang; Wan Qun Hu

    2011-01-01

    Wedged and V-shaped cells have advantages on depressing strong absorption bands and keeping the photo windows wide open without absorption block. Alternatively, this work presents a concave cell design, which is constructed by a plano-convex CaF2 lens in combination with a flat plate. Mathematical equations have been provided for data treatment with Matlab programs. The result indicates that the concave cell has advantages similar to the V-shaped cell. Reflection-absorption measurements of ethanol have been conducted on the cell in mid-IR region for demonstration. The spectrum obtained from the concave cell can easily be interpreted to regenerate its normal spectrum, which is fitting well with the spectrum taken in a conventional thin-layer cell. The concave cell is easier to construct and more convenient to operate, willing to have popular usages.

  8. Investigation of bias radiation effect on PV cell measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xuebo; Quan, Chenggen; Chan, Joanne; Ng, Patrick

    2013-06-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) cells are photo-electrical devices that convert light energy directly into electricity through the photovoltaic effect. PV cell assemblies are used to make solar modules employed in a variety of ways ranging from space applications to domestic energy consumption. Characterisation and performance testing of PV cells are critical to the development of PV technologies and growth of the solar industry. As new solar products are being developed, its energy conversion efficiency and other critical parameters must be accurately measured and tested against globally recognised metrological standards. The differential spectral responsivity (DSR) measurement is one of the primary methods for calibrating reference PV cells. This is done by calculating its spectral responsivities through measuring the AC short-circuit current produced by a PV cell under a modulated monochromatic radiation and different levels of steady-state broadband bias light radiation. It is observed that different types of bias light source will produce different signal-to-noise levels and significantly influence measurement accuracy. This paper aims to investigate the noise sources caused by different types of bias light sources (e.g. xenon arc and tungsten-halogen lamps) and the relevant measurement uncertainties so as to propose a guideline for selection of bias light source which can improve the signal-to-noise level and measurement uncertainty. The DSRs of the PV cells are measured using a commercial DSR measurement system under different levels of bias radiation from 0 to 1 kWm-2. The data analysis and uncertainty evaluation are presented in this paper using experimental data and mathematical tools.

  9. Process for cooling a solar cell and a combined photovoltaic and photothermic solar device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnould, J.

    1982-07-13

    A solar cell cooling process is disclosed. The device implementing this process comprises a transparent assembly disposed in front of a photovoltaic cell. The transparent assembly, through which flows the cooling fluid leaving a radiator integral with the cell, absorbs the wavelengths greater than 1.1 micron. Thus, heating of the cell is limited and the fluid leaving the radiator is heated by the beam striking the cell.

  10. Reliability Through Life of Internal Protection Devices in Small-Cell ABSL Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubauer, Jeremy; Ng, Ka Lok; Bennetti, Andrea; Pearson, Chris; Rao, gopal

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews a reliability analysis of small cell protection batteries. The contents include: 1) The s-p Topology; 2) Cell Level Protection Devices; 3) Battery Level Fault Protection; 4) Large Cell Comparison; and 5) Battery Level Testing and Results.

  11. Non-Destructive Detection and Separation of Radiation Damaged Cells in Miniaturized, Inexpensive Device Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Our objective is to develop and demonstrate a novel microfluidic device for non-destructive identification, sorting and counting of radiation damaged cells. A major...

  12. Non-Contact Stiffness Measurement of a Suspended Single Walled Carbon Nanotube Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yun; Su, Chanmin; Getty, Stephanie

    2010-01-01

    A new nanoscale electric field sensor was developed for studying triboelectric charging in terrestrial and Martian dust devils. This sensor is capable to measure the large electric fields for large dust devils without saturation. However, to quantify the electric charges and the field strength it is critical to calibrate the mechanical stiffness of the sensor devices. We performed a technical feasibility study of the Nano E-field Sensor stiffness by a non-contact stiffness measurement method. The measurement is based on laser Doppler vibrometer measurement of the thermal noise due to energy flunctuations in the devices. The experiment method provides a novel approach to acquire data that is essential in analyzing the quantitative performance of the E-field Nano Sensor. To carry out the non-contact stiffness measurement, we fabricated a new Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube (SWCNT) E-field sensor with different SWCNTs suspension conditions. The power spectra of the thermal induced displacement in the nano E-field sensor were measured at the accuracy of picometer. The power spectra were then used to derive the mechanical stiffness of the sensors. Effect of suspension conditions on stiffness and sensor sensitivty was discussed. After combined deformation and resistivity measurement, we can compare with our laboratory testing and field testing results. This new non-contact measurement technology can also help to explore to other nano and MEMS devices in the future.

  13. Measurement of mean arterial pressure: comparison of the Vasotrac monitor with the finger differential oscillometric device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagomägi, K; Raamat, R; Talts, J; Ragun, U; Tähepõld, P

    2010-01-01

    The Vasotrac monitor provides non-invasive near-continuous blood pressure monitoring and is designed to be an alternative to direct intra-arterial blood pressure (BP) measurement. As compared to radial artery invasive BP and upper arm non-invasive BP, Vasotrac readings have been found to have a good agreement with them. However, discrepancies have been reported when rapid changes in BP exist. In the present study we compared BP measured by the Vasotrac monitor on the radial artery with that recorded on the finger arteries by the differential oscillometric device allowing measurement on the beat-to-beat basis. Comparisons were performed on the mean arterial pressure (MAP) level. Special attention was paid to the signal conditioning before comparison of pressures of different temporal resolution. Altogether 383 paired MAP measurements were made in 14 healthy subjects. Based on all 383 paired measurements, the MAP values measured at the radial artery at rest were 4.8+/-6.0 mm Hg higher than those measured on fingers. The observed difference between the Vasotrac and differential oscillometric device can be explained by different measurement sites. This result is consistent with previous investigations, and the Vasotrac monitor can be considered to adequately track relatively rapid MAP changes on the radial artery. Attention should be paid to a proper signal conditioning before comparison of results obtained by different devices. PMID:20406039

  14. The cell-stretcher: A novel device for the mechanical stimulation of cell populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seriani, S.; Del Favero, G.; Mahaffey, J.; Marko, D.; Gallina, P.; Long, C. S.; Mestroni, L.; Sbaizero, O.

    2016-08-01

    Mechanical stimulation appears to be a critical modulator for many aspects of biology, both of living tissue and cells. The cell-stretcher, a novel device for the mechanical uniaxial stimulation of populations of cells, is described. The system is based on a variable stroke cam-lever-tappet mechanism which allows the delivery of cyclic stimuli with frequencies of up to 10 Hz and deformation between 1% and 20%. The kinematics is presented and a simulation of the dynamics of the system is shown, in order to compute the contact forces in the mechanism. The cells, following cultivation and preparation, are plated on an ad hoc polydimethylsiloxane membrane which is then loaded on the clamps of the cell-stretcher via force-adjustable magnetic couplings. In order to show the viability of the experimentation and biocompatibility of the cell-stretcher, a set of two in vitro tests were performed. Human epithelial carcinoma cell line A431 and Adult Mouse Ventricular Fibroblasts (AMVFs) from a dual reporter mouse were subject to 0.5 Hz, 24 h cyclic stretching at 15% strain, and to 48 h stimulation at 0.5 Hz and 15% strain, respectively. Visual analysis was performed on A431, showing definite morphological changes in the form of cellular extroflections in the direction of stimulation compared to an unstimulated control. A cytometric analysis was performed on the AMVF population. Results show a post-stimulation live-dead ratio deviance of less than 6% compared to control, which proves that the environment created by the cell-stretcher is suitable for in vitro experimentation.

  15. Electrical Characterization of Organic Devices and Solar Cells by Impedance Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Burtone, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    In this work, the capacitive response of organic electronic devices is analysed. Particular attention is given to small-molecule organic solar cells, with the purpose of deriving an equivalent circuit for the small-signal response of these devices. The different components characterising the solar cells electrical response are individuated and discussed and a specific physical meaning is associated with each element of the equivalent circuit. In the experimental section, the capacitive e...

  16. Reliability and comparability of the accelerometer and the linear position measuring device in resistance training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Piriz, Pedro T; Sanchez, Eva T; Manrique, David C; Gonzalez, Esther P

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the intermachine reliability attained from devices used to measure the common variables in sports performance. Repeatability conditions were established by creating a similar set of conditions under which the measurements were taken from both devices. The objectives of this research were to demonstrate the reliability between two devices in a bench press movement--the linear position measuring device (LPM) isoinertial dynamometer (T-Force) and the 3D (Myotest) accelerometer (AC)--and to compare the existing correlations between maximum velocity, maximum estimated strength, and peak power estimate variables in the bench press exercise. Forty bench press exercise trials were analyzed simultaneously, performed by 3 different subjects (age: 26.74 ± 1.2 years, height: 175.74 ± 4.04 cm, weight: 78.7 ± 3.35 kg) at maximum velocity (25 kg additional load). Three simple linear regression models were developed, supplied by the LPM on the basis of the AC data. The assumption of independence of errors was compared by means of the Durban-Watson test, and partial autocorrelation coefficients were established at an overall p < 0.05 significance level. It has not been possible to confirm the presence of a general correlation between the measurements of both devices. Regarding the assumption of independence of errors, the presence of generalized autocorrelation was confirmed. Linear regression analysis revealed an intermachine correlation in one of the nonconclusive cases, (peak power) variable and subject 1, r (10) = 0.640, p = 0.024. No partial autocorrelation was found. The devices should not be used interchangeably as instruments. PMID:22847523

  17. Verification of scattering parameter measurements in waveguides up to 325 GHz including highly-reflective devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrader, T.; Kuhlmann, K.; Dickhoff, R.; Dittmer, J.; Hiebel, M.

    2011-07-01

    Radio-frequency (RF) scattering parameters (S-parameters) play an important role to characterise RF signal transmission and reflection of active and passive devices such as transmission lines, components, and small-signal amplifiers. Vector network analysers (VNAs) are employed as instrumentation for such measurements. During the last years, the upper frequency limit of this instrumentation has been extended up to several hundreds of GHz for waveguide measurements. Calibration and verification procedures are obligatory prior to the VNA measurement to achieve accurate results and/or to obtain traceability to the International System of Units (SI). Usually, verification is performed by measuring well-matched devices with known S-parameters such as attenuators or short precision waveguide sections (shims). In waveguides, especially above 110 GHz, such devices may not exist and/or are not traceably calibrated. In some cases, e.g. filter networks, the devices under test (DUT) are partly highly reflective. This paper describes the dependency of the S-parameters a) on the calibration procedure, b) on the applied torque to the flange screws during the mating process of the single waveguide elements. It describes further c) how highly-reflective devices (HRD) can be used to verify a calibrated VNA, and d) how a measured attenuation at several hundreds of GHz can be substituted by a well-known coaxial attenuation at 279 MHz, the intermediate frequency (IF) of the VNA, to verify the linearity. This work is a contribution towards traceability and to obtain knowledge about the measurement uncertainty of VNA instrumentation in the millimetre-wave range.

  18. Development path and current status of the NANIVID: a new device for cancer cell studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja, Waseem Khan; Padgen, Michael R.; Williams, James K.; Wyckoff, Jeffrey; Condeelis, John; Castracane, James

    2011-02-01

    Cancer cells create a unique microenvironment in vivo which enables migration to distant organs. To better understand the tumor microenvironment, special tools and devices are required to monitor the interactions between different cell types and the effects of particular chemical gradients. This study presents the design and optimization of a new, versatile chemotaxis device called the NANIVID (NANo IntraVital Device). The device is fabricated using BioMEMS techniques and consists of etched and bonded Pyrex substrates, a soluble factor reservoir, fluorescent tracking beads and a microelectrode array for cell quantification. The reservoir contains a customized hydrogel blend loaded with EGF which diffuses out of the hydrogel to create a chemotactic gradient. This reservoir sustains a steady release of growth factor into the surrounding environment for many hours and establishes a concentration gradient that attracts specific cells to the device. In addition to a cell collection tool, the NANIVID can be modified to act as a delivery vehicle for the local generation of alternate soluble factor gradients to initiate controlled changes to the microenvironment such as hypoxia, ECM stiffness and etc. The focus of this study is to design and optimize the new device for wide ranging studies of breast cancer cell dynamics in vitro and ultimately, implantation for in vivo work.

  19. Photon and neutron doses of the personnel using moisture and density measurement devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carinou, E.; Papadomarkaki, E.; Tritakis, P.; Hourdakis, C.I.; Kamenopoulou, V. [Greek Atomic Energy Commission, Agia Paraskevi, Attiki, 60092 (Greece)

    2006-07-01

    The objective of this study is to present the evolution of the photon doses received by the workers who use mobile devices for measuring the moisture and the density in various materials and to estimate the neutron doses. The workers employed in more than 30 construction companies in Greece were 76 in 2004. The devices used for that purpose incorporate a {sup 137}Cs source for density measurements and an {sup 241}Am-Be source for moisture measurements of soil, asphalt or concrete. Photon and neutron measurements were performed occasionally during the on site inspections. The results of the measurements showed that the photon and neutron dose rates were not negligible. The workers were monitored for photon radiation using film badges (Kodak Type 2, Holder NRPB type) till the year 2000 and then TLD badges issued by the Greek Atomic Energy Commission (GAEC), on a monthly basis. Since the neutron dose rates measured by a rem-meter were not so high, no neutron dosemeters were issued for them. Their personal dose equivalent data for photons are kept in the National Dose Registry Information System (N.D.R.I.S.) in G.A.E.C. and were used for statistical analysis for the period from 1997 till 2004. As far as the neutrons are concerned, a Monte Carlo code was used to simulate the measuring devices and the working positions in order to calculate the neutron individual doses. (authors)

  20. Quantitative Determination of Luminescent Coupling in Multijunction Solar Cells from Spectral Photovoltage Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuertes Marrón, D.; Barrigón, E.; Ochoa, M.; Artacho, I.

    2016-07-01

    We present a simple method to quantify the magnitude of luminescent coupling (LC) between stacked subcells in multijunction photovoltaic devices. The effect of luminescence produced at high-band-gap subcells on underlying low-gap units within the same device can be directly accessed as a measurable open-circuit voltage difference by comparing two photovoltage spectra. Additionally, our study unambiguously identifies LC as the modulation mechanism across multijunction solar cells generating a response from buried subcells in photoreflectance measurements.

  1. A device for spatial, temporal and contrast resolution measurement using a VDU screen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Umbach, F.W.

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes a recently designed electronic eye-test device. It measures spatial, temporal and contrast resolution by means of test pictures presented on a VDU screen. The subject responds using a keyboard. The tests are fully automatic and therefore easily applied in large scale test set-up

  2. A device for spatial, temporal and contrast resolution measurement using a VDU screen

    OpenAIRE

    Umbach, F.W.

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes a recently designed electronic eye-test device. It measures spatial, temporal and contrast resolution by means of test pictures presented on a VDU screen. The subject responds using a keyboard. The tests are fully automatic and therefore easily applied in large scale test set-ups.

  3. The two-probe device for automatic measurement of the reflection coefficient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Л.Я. Ільницький

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available  The two-probe device for automatic measurement of the reflection coefficient in the HF range is proposed and analyzed. The main parts in the instrument control system are the sum-and-difference bridge and the microprocessor.

  4. Design and Study of Data Acquisition System for Pulsed γ Dose Measurement Device

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DOU; Yu-ling; YANG; Shao-hua; ZHANG; Guo-guang

    2012-01-01

    <正>A data acquisition system for online pulsed gamma dose measurement device was designed and developed (Fig. 1), and its performance was tested. The results show that the data acquisition system in both the continued and pulsed input, output electric charges and input energy have a good linear relationship. Experiments were done respectively on the XRS-3 pulsed source and re-frequency

  5. Measurement of Blood Pressure Using an Arterial Pulsimeter Equipped with a Hall Device

    OpenAIRE

    Jong-Gu Choi; Keun-Ho Kim; Woo-Beom Lee; Dong-Hyun Nam; Il-Ho Son; You-Sik Hong; Sang-Suk Lee

    2011-01-01

    To measure precise blood pressure (BP) and pulse rate without using a cuff, we have developed an arterial pulsimeter consisting of a small, portable apparatus incorporating a Hall device. Regression analysis of the pulse wave measured during testing of the arterial pulsimeter was conducted using two equations of the BP algorithm. The estimated values of BP obtained by the cuffless arterial pulsimeter over 5 s were compared with values obtained using electronic or liquid mercury BP meters. The...

  6. Microcontroller based system for electrical breakdown time delay measurement in gas-filled devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents realization of a digital embedded system for measuring electrical breakdown time delay. The proposed system consists of three major parts: dc voltage supply, analog subsystem, and a digital subsystem. Any dc power source with the range from 100 to 1000 V can be used in this application. The analog subsystem should provide fast and accurate voltage switching on the testing device as well as transform the signals that represent the voltage pulse on the device and the device breakdown into the form suitable for detection by a digital subsystem. The insulated gate bipolar transistor IRG4PH40KD driven by TC429 MOSFET driver is used for high voltage switching on the device. The aim of a digital subsystem is to detect the signals from the analog subsystem and to measure the elapsed time between their occurrences. Moreover, the digital subsystem controls various parameters that influence time delay and provides fast data storage for a large number of measured data. For this propose, we used the PIC18F4550 microcontroller with a full-speed compatible universal serial bus (USB) engine. Operation of this system is verified on different commercial and custom made gas devices with different structure and breakdown mechanisms. The electrical breakdown time delay measurements have been carried out as a function of several parameters, which dominantly influence electrical breakdown time delay. The obtained results have been verified using statistical methods, and they show good agreement with the theory. The proposed system shows good repeatability, sensitivity, and stability for measuring the electrical breakdown time delay.

  7. Microcontroller based system for electrical breakdown time delay measurement in gas-filled devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pejović, Milić M; Denić, Dragan B; Pejović, Momčilo M; Nešić, Nikola T; Vasović, Nikola

    2010-10-01

    This paper presents realization of a digital embedded system for measuring electrical breakdown time delay. The proposed system consists of three major parts: dc voltage supply, analog subsystem, and a digital subsystem. Any dc power source with the range from 100 to 1000 V can be used in this application. The analog subsystem should provide fast and accurate voltage switching on the testing device as well as transform the signals that represent the voltage pulse on the device and the device breakdown into the form suitable for detection by a digital subsystem. The insulated gate bipolar transistor IRG4PH40KD driven by TC429 MOSFET driver is used for high voltage switching on the device. The aim of a digital subsystem is to detect the signals from the analog subsystem and to measure the elapsed time between their occurrences. Moreover, the digital subsystem controls various parameters that influence time delay and provides fast data storage for a large number of measured data. For this propose, we used the PIC18F4550 microcontroller with a full-speed compatible universal serial bus (USB) engine. Operation of this system is verified on different commercial and custom made gas devices with different structure and breakdown mechanisms. The electrical breakdown time delay measurements have been carried out as a function of several parameters, which dominantly influence electrical breakdown time delay. The obtained results have been verified using statistical methods, and they show good agreement with the theory. The proposed system shows good repeatability, sensitivity, and stability for measuring the electrical breakdown time delay.

  8. SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES: Optimization of grid design for solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Liu; Yueqiang, Li; Jianjun, Chen; Yanling, Chen; Xiaodong, Wang; Fuhua, Yang

    2010-01-01

    By theoretical simulation of two grid patterns that are often used in concentrator solar cells, we give a detailed and comprehensive analysis of the influence of the metal grid dimension and various losses directly associated with it during optimization of grid design. Furthermore, we also perform the simulation under different concentrator factors, making the optimization of the front contact grid for solar cells complete.

  9. Small size probe for inner profile measurement of pipes using optical fiber ring beam device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakayama, Toshitaka; Machi, Kizuku; Yoshizawa, Toru

    2012-11-01

    The requirements of inner profile measurement of pipes and holes become recently larger and larger, and applications of inner profile measurement have rapidly expanded to medical field as well as industrial fields such as mechanical, automobile and heavy industries. We have proposed measurement method by incorporating a ring beam device that produces a disk beam and have developed various probes for different inner profile measurement. To meet request for applying to smaller diameter pipes, we tried to improve the ring beam light source using a conical mirror, optical fiber collimator and a laser diode. At this moment a probe with the size of 5 mm in diameter has been realized.

  10. Performance of miniaturized direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) devices using micropump for fuel delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Wang, Qing-Ming

    A fuel cell is a device that can convert chemical energy into electricity directly. Among various types of fuel cells, both polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) and direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) can work at low temperature (mini pumps, the size of the piezoelectric micropump is much smaller and the energy consumption is much lower. Thus, it is very viable and effective to use a piezoelectric valveless micropump for fuel delivery in miniaturized DMFC power systems.

  11. Micro and Nanofluidic devices: For Single cell and DNA analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Mokkapati, V.R.S.S.

    2011-01-01

    Research in the field of Micro/nanofluidics has been extensively carried out for the last few years. With the available technological advancements today many complex systems can be fabricated in a more efficient and simpler way. Conventional methods in a laboratory consumes a lot of time, chemicals and in turn generates a lot of waste unlike the Lab-on-a-chip (LOC) devices where all the processes are carried out on a small chip with small drops of chemicals, negligible wastes and in minimum t...

  12. A clip-free eyeglasses-based wearable monitoring device for measuring photoplethysmograhic signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yali; Leung, Billy; Sy, Stanley; Zhang, Yuanting; Poon, Carmen C Y

    2012-01-01

    An eyeglasses-based device has been developed in this work to acquire photoplethysmogram (PPG) from the nose bridge. This device is aimed to provide wearable physiological monitoring without uncomfortable clips frequently used in PPG measurement from finger and ear. Switching control is applied on the LED and photo detector for power saving. An experiment involving postural change and treadmill jogging among 10 healthy young subjects was carried out to evaluate the performance of the device. Electrocardiogram (ECG) and PPG from finger, ear and nose were simultaneously recorded, from which heart rate (HR) and pulse transit time (PTT) were calculated. The results show that PPG measured from nose and ear are more resistant to motion than signal from finger during exercise. In addition, the difference between PTT measured from ear and nose indicates that local vasomotor activities may exist on ear and/or nose channel, and suggests that PPG from different sites should be used for cuff-less PTT-based BP estimation. We conclude that this wearable device has great potential to be used in the healthcare management in the future. PMID:23367056

  13. Comparison of Chip Inlet Geometry in Microfluidic Devices for Cell Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung-Shin Sun

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Micro-fabricated devices integrated with fluidic components provide an in vitro platform for cell studies best mimicking the in vivo micro-environment. These devices are capable of creating precise and controllable surroundings of pH value, temperature, salt concentration, and other physical or chemical stimuli. Various cell studies such as chemotaxis and electrotaxis can be performed by using such devices. Moreover, microfluidic chips are designed and fabricated for applications in cell separations such as circulating tumor cell (CTC chips. Usually, there are two most commonly used inlets in connecting the microfluidic chip to sample/reagent loading tubes: the vertical (top-loading inlet and the parallel (in-line inlet. Designing this macro-to-micro interface is believed to play an important role in device performance. In this study, by using the commercial COMSOL Multiphysics software, we compared the cell capture behavior in microfluidic devices with different inlet types and sample flow velocities. Three different inlets were constructed: the vertical inlet, the parallel inlet, and the vertically parallel inlet. We investigated the velocity field, the flow streamline, the cell capture rate, and the laminar shear stress in these inlets. It was concluded that the inlet should be designed depending on the experimental purpose, i.e., one wants to maximize or minimize cell capture. Also, although increasing the flow velocity could reduce cell sedimentation, too high shear stresses are thought harmful to cells. Our findings indicate that the inlet design and flow velocity are crucial and should be well considered in fabricating microfluidic devices for cell studies.

  14. Comparison of Chip Inlet Geometry in Microfluidic Devices for Cell Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yung-Shin

    2016-01-01

    Micro-fabricated devices integrated with fluidic components provide an in vitro platform for cell studies best mimicking the in vivo micro-environment. These devices are capable of creating precise and controllable surroundings of pH value, temperature, salt concentration, and other physical or chemical stimuli. Various cell studies such as chemotaxis and electrotaxis can be performed by using such devices. Moreover, microfluidic chips are designed and fabricated for applications in cell separations such as circulating tumor cell (CTC) chips. Usually, there are two most commonly used inlets in connecting the microfluidic chip to sample/reagent loading tubes: the vertical (top-loading) inlet and the parallel (in-line) inlet. Designing this macro-to-micro interface is believed to play an important role in device performance. In this study, by using the commercial COMSOL Multiphysics software, we compared the cell capture behavior in microfluidic devices with different inlet types and sample flow velocities. Three different inlets were constructed: the vertical inlet, the parallel inlet, and the vertically parallel inlet. We investigated the velocity field, the flow streamline, the cell capture rate, and the laminar shear stress in these inlets. It was concluded that the inlet should be designed depending on the experimental purpose, i.e., one wants to maximize or minimize cell capture. Also, although increasing the flow velocity could reduce cell sedimentation, too high shear stresses are thought harmful to cells. Our findings indicate that the inlet design and flow velocity are crucial and should be well considered in fabricating microfluidic devices for cell studies. PMID:27314318

  15. Mammosphere culture of cancer stem cells in a microfluidic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadin, Katayoon; White, Ian M.

    2012-03-01

    It is known that tumor-initiating cells with stem-like properties will form spherical colonies - termed mammospheres - when cultured in serum-free media on low-attachment substrates. Currently this assay is performed in commercially available 96-well trays with low-attachment surfaces. Here we report a novel microsystem that features on-chip mammosphere culture on low attachment surfaces. We have cultured mammospheres in this microsystem from well-studied human breast cancer cell lines. To enable the long-term culture of these unattached cells, we have integrated diffusion-based delivery columns that provide zero-convection delivery of reagents, such as fresh media, staining agents, or drugs. The multi-layer system consists of parallel cell-culture chambers on top of a low-attachment surface, connected vertically with a microfluidic reagent delivery layer. This design incorporates a reagent reservoir, which is necessary to reduce evaporation from the cell culture micro-chambers. The development of this microsystem will lead to the integration of mammosphere culture with other microfluidic functions, including circulating tumor cell recovery and high throughput drug screening. This will enable the cancer research community to achieve a much greater understanding of these tumor initiating cancer stem cells.

  16. Cohesion and device reliability in organic bulk heterojunction photovoltaic cells

    KAUST Repository

    Brand, Vitali

    2012-04-01

    The fracture resistance of P3HT:PC 60BM-based photovoltaic devices are characterized using quantitative adhesion and cohesion metrologies that allow identification of the weakest layer or interface in the device structure. We demonstrate that the phase separated bulk heterojunction layer is the weakest layer and report quantitative cohesion values which ranged from ∼1 to 20 J m -2. The effects of layer thickness, composition, and annealing treatments on layer cohesion are investigated. Using depth profiling and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy on the resulting fracture surfaces, we examine the gradient of molecular components through the thickness of the bulk heterojunction layer. Finally, using atomic force microscopy we show how the topography of the failure path is related to buckling of the metal electrode and how it develops with annealing. The research provides new insights on how the molecular design, structure and composition affect the cohesive properties of organic photovoltaics. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Splicing Regulation: A Molecular Device to Enhance Cancer Cell Adaptation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vittoria Pagliarini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing (AS represents a major resource for eukaryotic cells to expand the coding potential of their genomes and to finely regulate gene expression in response to both intra- and extracellular cues. Cancer cells exploit the flexible nature of the mechanisms controlling AS in order to increase the functional diversity of their proteome. By altering the balance of splice isoforms encoded by human genes or by promoting the expression of aberrant oncogenic splice variants, cancer cells enhance their ability to adapt to the adverse growth conditions of the tumoral microenvironment. Herein, we will review the most relevant cancer-related splicing events and the underlying regulatory mechanisms allowing tumour cells to rapidly adapt to the harsh conditions they may face during the occurrence and development of cancer.

  18. Next Generation Solar Cells Based on Graded Bandgap Device Structures Utilising Rod-Type Nano-Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imyhamy M. Dharmadasa

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Current solar cells under research and development utilise mainly one absorber layer limiting the photon harvesting capabilities. In order to develop next generation solar cells, research should move towards effective photon harvesting methods utilising low-cost solar energy materials. This will lead to reduce the $W−1 figure for direct solar energy conversion to electrical energy. In this work, a graded bandgap solar cell has been designed to absorb all photons from the UV, visible and IR regions. In addition, impurity PV effect and impact ionisation have been incorporated to enhance charge carrier creation within the same device. This new design has been experimentally tested using the most researched MOCVD grown GaAs/AlGaAs system, in order to confirm its validity. Devices with high Voc ~ 1175 mV and the highest possible FF ~ (0.85–0.87 have been produced, increasing the conversion efficiency to ~20% within only two growth runs. These devices were also experimentally tested for the existence of impurity PV effect and impact ionisation. The devices are PV active in complete darkness producing over 800 mV, Voc indicating the harvesting of IR radiation from the surroundings through impurity PV effect. The quantum efficiency measurements show over 140% signal confirming the contribution to PV action from impact ionisation. Since the concept is successfully proven, the low-cost and scalable electrodeposited semiconducting layers are used to produce graded bandgap solar cell structures. The utilisation of nano- and micro-rod type materials in graded bandgap devices are also presented and discussed in this paper. Preliminary work on glass/FTO/n-ZnS/n-CdS/n-CdTe/Au graded bandgap devices show 10%–12% efficient devices indicating extremely high Jsc values ~48 mA·cm−2, showing the high potential of these devices in achieving higher efficiencies. The detailed results on these low-cost and novel graded bandgap devices are presented in a separate

  19. Use of a Computed Tomography Based Approach to Validate Noninvasive Devices to Measure Rotational Knee Laxity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Simon; Maas, Stefan; Waldmann, Danièle; Ricci, Pierre-Louis; Zürbes, Arno; Arnoux, Pierre-Jean; Walter, Frédéric; Kelm, Jens

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to validate a noninvasive rotational knee laxity measuring device called "Rotameter P2" with an approach based on Computed Tomography (CT). This CT-approach using X-rays is hence invasive and can be regarded as a precise reference method that may also be applied to similar devices. An error due to imperfect femur fixation was observed but can be neglected for small torques. The most significant estimation error is due to the unavoidable soft tissues rotation and hence flexibility in the measurement chain. The error increases with the applied torque. The assessment showed that the rotational knee angle measured with the Rotameter is still overestimated because of thigh and femur displacement, soft tissues deformation, and measurement artefacts adding up to a maximum of 285% error at +15 Nm for the Internal Rotation of female volunteers. This may be questioned if such noninvasive devices for measuring the Tibia-Femoral Rotation (TFR) can help diagnosing knee pathologies and investigate ligament reconstructive surgery.

  20. Fiber - Optic Devices as Temperature Sensors for Temperature Measurements in AC Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rablau, Corneliu; Lafrance, Joseph; Sala, Anca

    2007-10-01

    We report on the investigation of several fiber-optic devices as potential sensors for temperature measurements in AC magnetic fields. Common temperature sensors, such as thermocouples, thermistors or diodes, will create random and/or systematic errors when placed in a magnetic field. A DC magnetic field is susceptible to create a systematic offset to the measurement, while in an AC magnetic field of variable frequency random errors which cannot be corrected for can also be introduced. Fiber-Bragg-gratings and thin film filters have an inherent temperature dependence. Detrimental for their primary applications, the same dependence allows one to use such devices as temperature sensors. In an AC magnetic field, they present the advantage of being immune to electromagnetic interference. Moreover, for fiber-Bragg-gratings, the shape factor and small mass of the bare-fiber device make it convenient for temperature measurements on small samples. We studied several thin-film filters and fiber-Bragg-gratings and compared their temperature measurement capabilities in AC magnetic fields of 0 to 150 Gauss, 0 to 20 KHz to the results provided by off-the-shelf thermocouples and thermistor-based temperature measurement systems.

  1. Device for measuring the exposure time in dental X-ray - Cronox

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menezes, Claudio J.M.; Santos, Luiz A.P. dos, E-mail: cjmm@cnen.gov.b [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    The Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE) developed a test device for monitoring the X-ray beam in dental equipment to its application in quality control programs. This device, called Odontologic Dosimetric Card (CDO of Cartao Dosimetrico Odontologico in Portuguese) uses thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) for the measurement of some parameters of the X-ray beam as the entrance surface dose, the peak tension and half value layer (HVL). Radiographic films record the size of the radiation field. However, the TLD does not allow the assessment of exposure time, a parameter that complements the requirements of the Diretrizes de Protecao Radiologica em Radiodiagnostico Medico e Odontologico of Department of Health in Brazil for such equipment. Thus was developed a system based on sensitivity to ionizing radiation of phototransistors for measurement of exposure time when a patient is put in a clinical dental radiography. The system, called CRONOX was sized to be inserted within the CDO. The results showed that the measuring error had developed for less than 3% when compared to reference values obtained with the Tektronix digital oscilloscope, TDS2022 model. The readings obtained with the CRONOX were also compared with the nominal values selected in the X-ray equipment and with the values measured with the instrument of trade PTW Diavolt Universal. The results showed that the measuring device developed showed a maximum deviation of 5.92% on the nominal value selected, while for the instrument of PTW was 17.86%. (author)

  2. A flux extraction device to measure the magnetic moment of large samples; application to bulk superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, R; Philippe, M; Wera, L; Fagnard, J F; Vanderheyden, B; Dennis, A; Shi, Y; Cardwell, D A; Vanderbemden, P

    2015-02-01

    We report the design and construction of a flux extraction device to measure the DC magnetic moment of large samples (i.e., several cm(3)) at cryogenic temperature. The signal is constructed by integrating the electromotive force generated by two coils wound in series-opposition that move around the sample. We show that an octupole expansion of the magnetic vector potential can be used conveniently to treat near-field effects for this geometrical configuration. The resulting expansion is tested for the case of a large, permanently magnetized, type-II superconducting sample. The dimensions of the sensing coils are determined in such a way that the measurement is influenced by the dipole magnetic moment of the sample and not by moments of higher order, within user-determined upper bounds. The device, which is able to measure magnetic moments in excess of 1 A m(2) (1000 emu), is validated by (i) a direct calibration experiment using a small coil driven by a known current and (ii) by comparison with the results of numerical calculations obtained previously using a flux measurement technique. The sensitivity of the device is demonstrated by the measurement of flux-creep relaxation of the magnetization in a large bulk superconductor sample at liquid nitrogen temperature (77 K). PMID:25725888

  3. Gram-scale Plutonium Samples Measured by Experimental Device of Four Detectors Well-type Fast Neutron Coincidence Measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU; Guo-rong; LIANG; Qing-lei; LI; Jing-huai; LI; An-li

    2013-01-01

    Experimental device of four detectors well-type fast neutron coincidence measurement(see Fig.1)consists of four?127 mm×50.8 mm BC501A liquid scintillation detectors,DC271A digitizer and other circuits.Application program simultaneously acquires the waveform of each pulse output from each detector,and identifies each pulse from neutron or?particle by offline model,and gets their arrival timing.

  4. Feasibilty of a Multi-bit Cell Perpendicular Magnetic Tunnel Junction Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chang Soo

    The ultimate objective of this research project was to explore the feasibility of making a multi-bit cell perpendicular magnetic tunnel junction (PMTJ) device to increase the storage density of spin-transfer-torque random access memory (STT-RAM). As a first step toward demonstrating a multi-bit cell device, this dissertation contributed a systematic and detailed study of developing a single cell PMTJ device using L10 FePt films. In the beginning of this research, 13 up-and-coming non-volatile memory (NVM) technologies were investigated and evaluated to see whether one of them might outperform NAND flash memories and even HDDs on a cost-per-TB basis in 2020. This evaluation showed that STT-RAM appears to potentially offer superior power efficiency, among other advantages. It is predicted that STTRAM's density could make it a promising candidate for replacing NAND flash memories and possibly HDDs if STTRAM could be improved to store multiple bits per cell. Ta/Mg0 under-layers were used first in order to develop (001) L1 0 ordering of FePt at a low temperature of below 400 °C. It was found that the tradeoff between surface roughness and (001) L10 ordering of FePt makes it difficult to achieve low surface roughness and good perpendicular magnetic properties simultaneously when Ta/Mg0 under-layers are used. It was, therefore, decided to investigate MgO/CrRu under-layers to simultaneously achieve smooth films with good ordering below 400°C. A well ordered 4 nm L10 FePt film with RMS surface roughness close to 0.4 nm, perpendicular coercivity of about 5 kOe, and perpendicular squareness near 1 was obtained at a deposition temperature of 390 °C on a thermally oxidized Si substrate when MgO/CrRu under-layers are used. A PMTJ device was developed by depositing a thin MgO tunnel barrier layer and a top L10 FePt film and then being postannealed at 450 °C for 30 minutes. It was found that the sputtering power needs to be minimized during the thin MgO tunnel barrier

  5. Precision neutron flux measurements and applications using the Alpha Gamma device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Eamon

    2016-03-01

    The Alpha Gamma device is a totally-absorbing 10 B neutron detector designed to measure the absolute detection efficiency of a thin-film lithium neutron monitor on a monoenergetic neutron beam. The detector has been shown to measure neutron fluence with an absolute accuracy of 0.06%. This capability has been used to perform the first direct, absolute measurement of the 6Li(n,t) 4He cross section at sub-thermal energy, improve the neutron fluence determination in a past beam neutron lifetime measurement by a factor of five, and is being used to calibrate the neutron monitors for use in the upcoming beam neutron lifetime measurement BL2 (NIST Beam Lifetime 2). The principle of the measurement method will presented and the applications will be discussed. We would like to acknowledge support of this research through the NSF-PHY-1068712 Grant as well as the NIST Precision Measurement Grant program.

  6. Measurements of magnetic anisotropy in sickle cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Room temperature magnetic measurements in deoxigenated sickle cells showed the existence of magnetic anisotropy, Δchi=1,29 x 10-3. This effect was supposed paramagnetic and considered to be due to the iron atoms of the hemoglobin molecules which are one over the other, forming ordered chains inside the erythrocytes. Low temperature (liquid He - 4,2K) measurements of the magnetic anisotropy of sickle cells and normal red blood cells diluted in a cryoprotector was made to confirm the paramagnetic origin of the fenomena. For that purpose it was used a superconductor magnetometer coupled to a SQUID, developed in the 'Laboratorio do Estado Solido do Departamento de Fisica da PUC-RJ'. The results obtained seem to confirm the expected paramagnetic anisotropy and, furthermore, suggest the presence of magnetic interactions among the iron atoms in the sickle cells samples. (Author)

  7. Building a better cell trap: Applying Lagrangian modeling to the design of microfluidic devices for cell biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Cheol; Wang, Zhanhui; Lam, Raymond H. W.; Thorsen, Todd

    2008-02-01

    In this report, we show how computational fluid dynamics can be applied to the design of efficient hydrodynamic cell traps in microfluidic devices. Modeled hydrodynamic trap designs included a large, multiple-aperture "C-type" sieve for trapping hundreds of cells, flat single-aperture arrays for single cells, and "U-type" hydrodynamic structures with one or two apertures to confine small clusters of cells (˜10-15 cells per trap). Using 3T3 cells as a model system, the motion of each individual cell was calculated using a one-way coupled Lagrangian method. The cell was assumed to be a solid sphere, and interactions with other cells were only considered when a cell sedimented in the trap. The ordinary differential equations were solved along the cell trajectory for the three components of the velocity and location vector by using the Rosenbrock method based on an adaptive time-stepping technique. Validation of the predictive value of modeling, using 3T3 cells flowed through microfluidic devices containing "U-type sieves" under the simulation flow parameters, showed excellent agreement between experiment and simulation with respect to cell number per trap and the uniformity of cell distribution within individual microchambers. For applications such as on-chip cell culture or high-throughput screening of cell populations within a lab-on-a-chip environment, Lagrangian simulations have the potential to greatly simplify the design process.

  8. New pressure cell for ultrasonic measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kepa, Michal; Huxley, Andrew; Kamenev, Konstantin

    2013-06-01

    Ultrasonic interferometry at high pressure remains a technical challenge as the small sample space requires the application of very high-frequency ultrasound. Here we present the design of a new cell developed specifically for ultrasonic measurements of single crystals at low temperatures (2K) and high pressures (5GPa). The design allows greater sample space (compared to a conventional diamond anvil cell) and simultaneous measurement of ultrasonic attenuation and velocities. Coupling the fine transducers to spherical sapphire anvils reduces background and enables different polarizations of the ultrasonic wave to be measured at the same pressure and temperature conditions. The results are used to deduce the elastic, electronic and magnetic properties of a crystal. The finite element analysis of the cell together with the pressure calibration curves and test data taken on UGe2 are presented.

  9. Measuring enzyme activity in single cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kovarik, Michelle L.; Allbritton, Nancy L.

    2011-01-01

    Seemingly identical cells can differ in their biochemical state, function and fate, and this variability plays an increasingly recognized role in organism-level outcomes. Cellular heterogeneity arises in part from variation in enzyme activity, which results from interplay between biological noise and multiple cellular processes. As a result, single-cell assays of enzyme activity, particularly those that measure product formation directly, are crucial. Recent innovations have yielded a range o...

  10. Measuring chamber of the device for determination of the wear particle radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proposed is a measuring chamber for a device designed for determining radioactivity of wear particles in the system of lubrication of an internal-combustion engine. The chamber consists of of a case with two chambers for supplying oil to a cylindrical cavity of the chamber and of one channel for offtake from the cavity. A characteristic feature of the invention is that for increasing the accuracy of measurements the supplying channels are tangetial relative to the internal surface of the cavity, and the offtake channel is radial and located between them. The application of the chamber decrease measurement errors from 20-30% to 5-6%

  11. Development, validation and application of a device to measure e-cigarette users’ puffing topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Anthony; Slayford, Sandra; Vas, Carl; Gee, Jodie; Costigan, Sandra; Prasad, Krishna

    2016-01-01

    With the rapidly rising popularity and substantial evolution of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) in the past 5–6 years, how these devices are used by vapers and consumers’ exposure to aerosol emissions need to be understood. We used puffing topography to measure directly product use. We adapted a cigarette puffing topography device for use with e-cigarettes. We performed validation using air and e-cigarette aerosol under multiple regimes. Consumer puffing topography was measured for 60 vapers provided with rechargeable “cig-a-like” or larger button-activated e-cigarettes, to use ad-libitum in two sessions. Under all regimes, air puff volumes were within 1 mL of the target and aerosol volumes within 5 mL for all device types, serving to validate the device. Vapers’ mean puff durations (2.0 s and 2.2 s) were similar with both types of e-cigarette, but mean puff volumes (52.2 mL and 83.0 mL) and mean inter-puff intervals (23.2 s and 29.3 s) differed significantly. The differing data show that product characteristics influence puffing topography and, therefore, the results obtained from a given e-cigarette might not read across to other products. Understanding the factors that affect puffing topography will be important for standardising testing protocols for e-cigarette emissions. PMID:27721496

  12. How Cells Measure Length on Subcellular Scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Wallace F

    2015-12-01

    Cells are not just amorphous bags of enzymes, but precise and complex machines. With any machine, it is important that the parts be of the right size, yet our understanding of the mechanisms that control size of cellular structures remains at a rudimentary level in most cases. One problem with studying size control is that many cellular organelles have complex 3D structures that make their size hard to measure. Here we focus on linear structures within cells, for which the problem of size control reduces to the problem of length control. We compare and contrast potential mechanisms for length control to understand how cells solve simple geometry problems. PMID:26437596

  13. Measurements of knee rotation-reliability of an external device in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almquist Per O

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knee rotation plays an important part in knee kinematics during weight-bearing activities. An external device for measuring knee rotation (the Rottometer has previously been evaluated for validity by simultaneous measurements of skeletal movements with Roentgen Stereometric Analysis (RSA. The aim of this study was to investigate the reliability of the device. Method The within-day and test-retest reliability as well as intertester reliability of the device in vivo was calculated. Torques of 3, 6 and 9 Nm and the examiner's apprehension of end-feel were used at 90°, 60° and 30° of knee flexion. Intraclass Correlation Coefficient 2,1 (ICC 2,1, 95% confidence interval (CI of ICC and 95% CI between test trials and examiners were used as statistical tests. Result ICC2,1 ranged from 0.50 to 0.94 at all three flexion angles at 6 and 9 Nm as well as end-feel, and from 0.22 to 0.75 at 3 Nm applied torque. Conclusion The Rottometer was a reliable measurement instrument concerning knee rotation at the three different flexion angles (90°, 60° and 30° with 6 and 9 Nm applied torques as well as the examiner's apprehension of end-feel. Three Nm was not a reliable torque. The most reliable measurements were made at 9 Nm applied torque.

  14. DEVICE FOR MEASURING OF THERMAL LENS PARAMETERS IN LASER ACTIVE ELEMENTS WITH A PROBE BEAM METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Zakharova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a device for measuring of parameters of thermal lens (TL in laser active elements under longitudinal diode pumping. The measurements are based on the probe beam method. This device allows one to determine sign and optical power of the lens in the principal meridional planes, its sensitivity factor with respect to the absorbed pump power and astigmatism degree, fractional heat loading which make it possible to estimate integral impact of the photoelastic effect to the formation of TL in the laser element. The measurements are performed in a linearly polarized light at the wavelength of 532 nm. Pumping of the laser element is performed at 960 nm that makes it possible to study laser materials doped with Yb3+ and (Er3+, Yb3+ ions. The precision of measurements: for sensitivity factor of TL – 0,1 m-1/W, for astigmatism degree – 0,2 m-1/W, for fractional heat loading – 5 %, for the impact of the photoelastic effect – 0,5 × 10-6 K-1. This device is used for characterization of thermal lens in the laser active element from an yttrium vanadate crystal, Er3+,Yb3+:YVO .

  15. Spectroscopic measurement to study two-fluid relaxation in an internal coil device Mini-RT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahajan-Yoshida has developed a new relaxation theory, by taking two-fluid effect into account. This theory indicates that the plasma flow confines high beta plasma. We have constructed an internal coil device Mini-RT with high temperature superconductor (HTS) coil, and are expecting the high beta plasma with the fast toroidal plasma flow by inducing the radial electric field. In order to measure the radial profile of the plasma flow we introduced a spectroscopy. By setting up two cylindrical lenses between a monochromator and a charge-coupled device (CCD) detector, we could not only correct astigmatism of the monochromator but also increase the resolution of wavelength up to 2.55 pm/pixel which is equal to the measurement of the plasma flow up to 1.6 x 103 m/s. Additionally we are setting up an opposed fiber array for an accurate measurement. In the Mini-RT device the plasma was produced by 2.45 GHz ECH (Electron Cyclotron Heating) system with the power of 2.6 kW. Typical electron density and temperature are more than 1016 m-3 and 10-20 eV, respectively. The ion temperature measured by this spectroscopy system was 1.0 ± 0.3 eV and the plasma flow velocity was comparable to the resolution of this spectroscopic system. Although the plasma should flow to the toroidal direction by the ∇B/curvature drift in the internal coil device, the drift velocity of 1.3 x 103 m/s is not detectable with this spectroscopy. If the radial electric field of 160 V/m or more is induced in the plasma, the plasma flow due to the E x B drift could be measured with this system. (author)

  16. Current Density Distribution Mapping in PEM Fuel Cells as An Instrument for Operational Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Geske

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available A newly developed measurement system for current density distribution mapping has enabled a new approach for operational measurements in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC. Taking into account previously constructed measurement systems, a method based on a multi layer printed circuit board was chosen for the development of the new system. This type of system consists of a sensor, a special electronic device and the control and visualization PC. For the acquisition of the current density distribution values, a sensor device was designed and installed within a multilayer printed circuit board with integrated shunt resistors. Varying shunt values can be taken into consideration with a newly developed and evaluated calibration method. The sensor device was integrated in a PEM fuel cell stack to prove the functionality of the whole measurement system. A software application was implemented to visualize and save the measurement values. Its functionality was verified by operational measurements within a PEMFC system. Measurement accuracy and possible negative reactions of the sensor device during PEMFC operation are discussed in detail in this paper. The developed system enables operational measurements for different operating phases of PEM fuel cells. Additionally, this can be seen as a basis for new opportunities of optimization for fuel cell design and operation modes.

  17. Development of an inner profile measurement instrument using a ring beam device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshizawa, T.; Wakayama, T.

    2010-11-01

    Inner profile measurement is an important matter in such fields as medicine, dentistry and anthropology as well as mechanical engineering and other industrial applications. Here we describe recent development of our measurement principle for inner diameter of pipes and/or holes. The key device in this technique is a ring beam device which consists of a conical mirror and a laser diode. And the fundamental principle is based on optical sectioning without using any contact type stylus. The optically sectioned profile of an inner wall of a pipe-like object is analyzed to give the inner profile in addition to the inner diameter. This optical instrument with a simple and small configuration is now under development for practical uses. In our hitherto trial experimental works, the availability of this instrument has been evaluated in many cases and availability for practical applications is expected, especially, for measurement and inspection of mechanical components and elements besides pipes. This ring beam device consisting of a conical mirror and a LD is assembled to form a disk-like light sheet. We show measurement result of pipes and holes, and, at the same time, report a compact inner profile measuring instrument at this point. Both the ring beam device and a miniaturized CCD camera are fabricated into a glass tube. Availability of this instrument is shown by measuring the inner profiles of various pipes. In response to this trial, there appeared a strong request that not only the internal but external profiles should be measured simultaneously. Therefore we propose potentially possible method for measurement of external profile at the same time with internal profile. If one pair of concave mirrors are used in our arrangement, external profile is captured. In combination with inner profile measurement technique, simultaneous measurement of inner and outer profiles becomes attainable. A measurement result on a bevel gear shows availability of here proposed

  18. CdSe Quantum Dots for Solar Cell Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. B. Kashyout

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available CdSe quantum dots have been prepared with different sizes and exploited as inorganic dye to sensitize a wide bandgap TiO2 thin films for QDs solar cells. The synthesis is based on the pyrolysis of organometallic reagents by injection into a hot coordinating solvent. This provides temporally discrete nucleation and permits controlled growth of macroscopic quantities of nanocrystallites. XRD, HRTEM, UV-visible, and PL were used to characterize the synthesized quantum dots. The results showed CdSe quantum dots with sizes ranging from 3 nm to 6 nm which enabled the control of the optical properties and consequently the solar cell performance. Solar cell of 0.08% performance under solar irradiation with a light intensity of 100 mW/cm2 has been obtained. CdSe/TiO2 solar cells without and with using mercaptopropionic acid (MPA as a linker between CdSe and TiO2 particles despite a Voc of 428 mV, Jsc of 0.184 mAcm-2, FF of 0.57, and η of 0.05% but with linker despite a Voc of 543 mV, Jsc of 0.318 mAcm-2 , FF of 0.48, and η of 0.08%, respectively.

  19. A droplet-to-digital (D2D) microfluidic device for single cell assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Steve C C; Gach, Philip C; Sustarich, Jess; Simmons, Blake A; Adams, Paul D; Singh, Seema; Singh, Anup K

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a new hybrid droplet-to-digital microfluidic platform (D2D) that integrates droplet-in-channel microfluidics with digital microfluidics (DMF) for performing multi-step assays. This D2D platform combines the strengths of the two formats-droplets-in-channel for facile generation of droplets containing single cells, and DMF for on-demand manipulation of droplets including control of different droplet volumes (pL-μL), creation of a dilution series of ionic liquid (IL), and parallel single cell culturing and analysis for IL toxicity screening. This D2D device also allows for automated analysis that includes a feedback-controlled system for merging and splitting of droplets to add reagents, an integrated Peltier element for parallel cell culture at optimum temperature, and an impedance sensing mechanism to control the flow rate for droplet generation and preventing droplet evaporation. Droplet-in-channel is well-suited for encapsulation of single cells as it allows the careful manipulation of flow rates of aqueous phase containing cells and oil to optimize encapsulation. Once single cell containing droplets are generated, they are transferred to a DMF chip via a capillary where they are merged with droplets containing IL and cultured at 30 °C. The DMF chip, in addition to permitting cell culture and reagent (ionic liquid/salt) addition, also allows recovery of individual droplets for off-chip analysis such as further culturing and measurement of ethanol production. The D2D chip was used to evaluate the effect of IL/salt type (four types: NaOAc, NaCl, [C2mim] [OAc], [C2mim] [Cl]) and concentration (four concentrations: 0, 37.5, 75, 150 mM) on the growth kinetics and ethanol production of yeast and as expected, increasing IL concentration led to lower biomass and ethanol production. Specifically, [C2mim] [OAc] had inhibitory effects on yeast growth at concentrations 75 and 150 mM and significantly reduced their ethanol production compared to cells grown

  20. Microfluidic device for continuous single cells analysis via Raman spectroscopy enhanced by integrated plasmonic nanodimers

    KAUST Repository

    Perozziello, Gerardo

    2015-12-11

    In this work a Raman flow cytometer is presented. It consists of a microfluidic device that takes advantages of the basic principles of Raman spectroscopy and flow cytometry. The microfluidic device integrates calibrated microfluidic channels- where the cells can flow one-by-one -, allowing single cell Raman analysis. The microfluidic channel integrates plasmonic nanodimers in a fluidic trapping region. In this way it is possible to perform Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy on single cell. These allow a label-free analysis, providing information about the biochemical content of membrane and cytoplasm of the each cell. Experiments are performed on red blood cells (RBCs), peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) and myelogenous leukemia tumor cells (K562). © 2015 Optical Society of America.

  1. W-state Analyzer and Multi-party Measurement-device-independent Quantum Key Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Changhua; Xu, Feihu; Pei, Changxing

    2015-12-01

    W-state is an important resource for many quantum information processing tasks. In this paper, we for the first time propose a multi-party measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (MDI-QKD) protocol based on W-state. With linear optics, we design a W-state analyzer in order to distinguish the four-qubit W-state. This analyzer constructs the measurement device for four-party MDI-QKD. Moreover, we derived a complete security proof of the four-party MDI-QKD, and performed a numerical simulation to study its performance. The results show that four-party MDI-QKD is feasible over 150 km standard telecom fiber with off-the-shelf single photon detectors. This work takes an important step towards multi-party quantum communication and a quantum network.

  2. 3D strain measurement in electronic devices using through-focal annular dark-field imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Suhyun; Jung, Younheum; Lee, Sungho; Jung Kim, Joong; Byun, Gwangseon; Lee, Sunyoung; Lee, Haebum

    2014-11-15

    Spherical aberration correction in high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM) allows us to form an electron probe with reduced depth of field. Using through-focal HAADF imaging, we experimentally demonstrated 3D strain measurement in a strained-channel transistor. The strain field distribution in the channel region was obtained by scanning an electron beam over a plan-view specimen. Furthermore, the decrease in the strain fields toward the silicon substrate was revealed at different focal planes with a 5-nm focal step. These results demonstrate that it is possible to reconstruct the 3D strain field in electronic devices. - Highlights: • Three dimensional strain fields were measured using through-focal HAADF-STEM series. • The technique was applied to the channel of a plan-view strained-silicon device. • The strain values agreed with the results obtained using cross-section specimen.

  3. Tensor product extension of entanglement witnesses and their connection with measurement-device-independent entanglement witnesses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We provide a new extension of entanglement witnesses for Cd1⊗Cd2 systems. Our construction preserves the properties of nondecomposability and spanning property of entanglement witnesses. We show how our concept of extended entanglement witnesses is connected with the idea of measurement device independent entanglement witnesses. - Highlights: • A new extension of entanglement witness (EW) for Cd1⊗Cd2 systems is provided. • This construction preserves the properties of indecomposability of EW. • This construction preserves the properties of spanning property of EW. • The idea of measurement device independent EW (MDIEW) is shown. • The connection of the concept of extended EW with the idea of MDIEW is shown

  4. Cell culture device and microchamber which can be monitored using nuclear magnetic resonance

    OpenAIRE

    Celda-Muñoz, Bernardo; Esteve-Moya, Vicent; Sancho-Bielsa, Francisco; Villa Sanz, Rosa; Fernández Ledesma, Luis José; Berganzo Ruiz, Javier

    2010-01-01

    [EN] The invention relates to a cell culture device and microchamber which can be monitored using nuclear magnetic resonance and other imaging techniques, in which the culture microchamber is encapsulated and housed inside a chip. The microchamber and the device are easy for the user to handle, allowing same to be handled or repositioned without requiring complex mounting operations. In addition, the invention allows cultures to be studied for long periods, great...

  5. Proximity measuring device with backscattering radiation usable noticeably in remote handling or robotics and related data processing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The invention is aimed at a proximity measuring device whose emitter, an electroluminescent diode, is controlled by control means to emit short duration ( 1A) flashes with periods higher than 100 microseconds. Emetter-object distance can be precisely measured on an 0-30 cm interval with the help of data processing of the response given by the proximity device receiver. This device can be used in remote handling and robotics

  6. The Device for Communication in the Tool for Measurement in Boreholes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miloš Slankamenac

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper an implementation and test of the device for communication between Telemetry system and Surface unit with the tool for measurement of pipe diameter, fluid velocity and direction of flow in the borehole (Calliper-Fullbore Flowmeter - CFF are presented. This communication is done according to SIPLOS (Simultaneous Production Logging String protocol and it is used by Hotwell company [1] as a part of a larger system for borehole investigations.

  7. The Magnitude of Errors Associated in Measuring the Loads Applied on an Assistive Device While Walking

    OpenAIRE

    Karimi, Mohammad Taghi; Jamshidi, Nima

    2012-01-01

    Measurement of the loads exerted on the limb is a fundamental part of designing of an assistive device, which has been done by using strain gauges or a transducer. Although calculation of loads applied on an orthosis coefficients achieved from calibration is a standard way, most of researchers determined the loads based on available equations. Therefore, the aim of this research is finding the accuracy of this method with respect to calibration. Some strain gauges were attached on the lateral...

  8. Eddy current nondestructive testing device for measuring variable characteristics of a sample utilizing Walsh functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libby, Hugo L.; Hildebrand, Bernard P.

    1978-01-01

    An eddy current testing device for measuring variable characteristics of a sample generates a signal which varies with variations in such characteristics. A signal expander samples at least a portion of this generated signal and expands the sampled signal on a selected basis of square waves or Walsh functions to produce a plurality of signal components representative of the sampled signal. A network combines these components to provide a display of at least one of the characteristics of the sample.

  9. Measuring knife stab penetration into skin simulant using a novel biaxial tension device

    OpenAIRE

    Gilchrist, M. D.; Keenan, S.; Curtis, Michael; et al.,

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the development and use of a biaxial measurement device to analyse the mechanics of knife stabbings. In medicolegal situations it is typical to describe the consequences of a stabbing incident in relative terms that are qualitative and descriptive without being numerically quantitative. Here, the mechanical variables involved in the possible range of knife-tissue penetration events are considered so as to determine the necessary parameters that would need to be controlled...

  10. A Device for Automatically Measuring and Supervising the Critical Care Patient’S Urine Output

    OpenAIRE

    Roemi Fernández; Francisco Palacios; Teodor Akinfiev; Abraham Otero

    2010-01-01

    Critical care units are equipped with commercial monitoring devices capable of sensing patients’ physiological parameters and supervising the achievement of the established therapeutic goals. This avoids human errors in this task and considerably decreases the workload of the healthcare staff. However, at present there still is a very relevant physiological parameter that is measured and supervised manually by the critical care units’ healthcare staff: urine output. This paper presents a pate...

  11. Use of Surface Enhanced Blocking (SEB) Electrodes for Microbial Cell Lysis in Flow-Through Devices

    OpenAIRE

    Talebpour, Abdossamad; Maaskant, Robert; Khine, Aye Aye; Alavie, Tino

    2014-01-01

    By simultaneously subjecting microbial cells to high amplitude pulsed electric fields and flash heating of the cell suspension fluid, effective release of intracellular contents was achieved. The synergistic effect of the applied electric field and elevated temperature on cell lysis in a flow-through device was demonstrated for Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, and Mycobacterium species. The resulting lysate is suitable for downstream nucleic acid amplification and detection without r...

  12. Efficiency improvement in thin film solar cell devices with oxygen containing absorber layer.

    OpenAIRE

    Emziane, M.; Durose, K; Halliday, D.P.; Bosio, N.; Romeo, N.

    2005-01-01

    The CdTe/CdS solar cell devices were grown using a dry process consisting of sputtering for the transparent conducting oxide and CdS window layers, and close-space sublimation for CdTe absorber layer. These devices were back contacted using Mo/Sb2Te3 sputtered layers following the CdCl2 activation process carried out in air. It was shown that when oxygen is intentionally introduced in the CdTe layer during its growth, this leads to a significant improvement in all the device parameters yieldi...

  13. Heat Transmission Coefficient Measurements in Buildings Utilizing a Heat Loss Measuring Device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lars Schiøtt

    2013-01-01

    building envelopes are of great importance in order to reach the Bologna CO2 emission reduction targets. Upgrading of the energy performance of buildings is a topic of huge global interest these years. Not only heating in the temperate and arctic regions are important, but also air conditioning...... and mechanical ventilation in the “warm countries” contribute to an enormous energy consumption and corresponding CO2 emission. In order to establish the best basis for upgrading the energy performance, it is important to make measurements of the heat losses at different places on a building facade, in order...... to optimize the energy performance. This paper presents a method for measuring the heat loss by utilizing a U-value meter. The U-value meter measures the heat transfer in the unit W/Km2 and has been used in several projects to upgrade the energy performance in temperate regions. The U-value meter was also...

  14. A microfluidic cell-trapping device for single-cell tracking of host-microbe interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delincé, Matthieu J; Bureau, Jean-Baptiste; López-Jiménez, Ana Teresa; Cosson, Pierre; Soldati, Thierry; McKinney, John D

    2016-08-16

    The impact of cellular individuality on host-microbe interactions is increasingly appreciated but studying the temporal dynamics of single-cell behavior in this context remains technically challenging. Here we present a microfluidic platform, InfectChip, to trap motile infected cells for high-resolution time-lapse microscopy. This approach allows the direct visualization of all stages of infection, from bacterial uptake to death of the bacterium or host cell, over extended periods of time. We demonstrate the utility of this approach by co-culturing an established host-cell model, Dictyostelium discoideum, with the extracellular pathogen Klebsiella pneumoniae or the intracellular pathogen Mycobacterium marinum. We show that the outcome of such infections is surprisingly heterogeneous, ranging from abortive infection to death of the bacterium or host cell. InfectChip thus provides a simple method to dissect the time-course of host-microbe interactions at the single-cell level, yielding new insights that could not be gleaned from conventional population-based measurements. PMID:27425421

  15. Autonomous field-deployable device for the measurement of phosphate in natural water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Conor; Cleary, John; McGraw, Christina M.; Yerazunis, William S.; Lau, King Tong; Diamond, Dermot

    2007-09-01

    This work describes the ongoing development of an autonomous platform for the measurement of phosphate levels in river water. This device is designed to operate unassisted for one year, taking a measurement every hour and relaying the result to a laptop computer. A first generation prototype has already been developed and successfully field tested. The system contains the sampling, chemical storage, fluid handling, colorimetric data acquisition and waste storage capabilities necessary to perform the phosphate measurement. In addition to this, the device has the embedded control, GSM communications system and power supply to allow independent operation. The entire system is placed inside a compact and rugged enclosure. Further work discussed here builds on the successes of the prototype design to deliver a system capable of one full year of operation. The second generation system has been built from the ground up. Although identical in operation to the prototype its design has a greater emphasis on power efficient components and power management to allow for a longer lifetime. Other improvements include an automated two-point calibration to compensate for drift and a more rugged design to further increase the lifetime of the device.

  16. Results of the development of electrochemical cells for the measurement of oxygen activity in liquid sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of the development and testing of electrochemical cells for the measurement of oxygen activity in liquid sodium are given. A ThO2-Y2O3 solid electrolyte of high corrosion resistance in liquid sodium has been used for the construction of the cells. A design, which reduces thermal and mechanical stresses to the cells, has been applicated. A device 'Oxylyt' has been developed for reading the cell signals. During the period of development 180 electrochemical cells and about 10 devices 'Oxylyt' have been tested. The investigations were performed at experimental sodium loops, at the radioactive circuit of the reactor BR-10 and at the second circuit of the reactor station BN-350. Recommendation are given for the application of the cells for oxygen measurement in sodium at experimental rigs and industrial stations. (author)

  17. Active cell mechanics: Measurement and theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Wylie W; Fodor, Étienne; Betz, Timo

    2015-11-01

    Living cells are active mechanical systems that are able to generate forces. Their structure and shape are primarily determined by biopolymer filaments and molecular motors that form the cytoskeleton. Active force generation requires constant consumption of energy to maintain the nonequilibrium activity to drive organization and transport processes necessary for their function. To understand this activity it is necessary to develop new approaches to probe the underlying physical processes. Active cell mechanics incorporates active molecular-scale force generation into the traditional framework of mechanics of materials. This review highlights recent experimental and theoretical developments towards understanding active cell mechanics. We focus primarily on intracellular mechanical measurements and theoretical advances utilizing the Langevin framework. These developing approaches allow a quantitative understanding of nonequilibrium mechanical activity in living cells. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mechanobiology.

  18. Measuring receptor recycling in polarized MDCK cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Luciana; Apodaca, Gerard

    2015-01-01

    Recycling of proteins such as channels, pumps, and receptors is critical for epithelial cell function. In this chapter we present a method to measure receptor recycling in polarized Madin-Darby canine kidney cells using an iodinated ligand. We describe a technique to iodinate transferrin (Tf), we discuss how (125)I-Tf can be used to label a cohort of endocytosed Tf receptor, and then we provide methods to measure the rate of recycling of the (125)I-Tf-receptor complex. We also show how this approach, which is easily adaptable to other proteins, can be used to simultaneously measure the normally small amount of (125)I-Tf transcytosis and degradation.

  19. Comparison of Respiratory Resistance Measurements Made with an Airflow Perturbation Device with Those from Impulse Oscillometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Pan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The airflow perturbation device (APD has been developed as a portable, easy to use, and a rapid response instrument for measuring respiratory resistance in humans. However, the APD has limited data validating it against the established techniques. This study used a mechanical system to simulate the normal range of human breathing to validate the APD with the clinically accepted impulse oscillometry (IOS technique. The validation system consisted of a sinusoidal flow generator with ten standardized resistance configurations that were shown to represent a total range of resistances from 0.12 to 0.95 kPa·L−1·s (1.2–9.7 cm H2O·L−1·s. Impulse oscillometry measurements and APD measurements of the mechanical system were recorded and compared at a constant airflow of 0.15 L·s−1. Both the IOS and APD measurments were accurate in assessing nominal resistance. In addition, a strong linear relationship was observed between APD measurements and IOS measurements (R2 = 0.999. A second series of measurements was made on ten human volunteers with external resistors added in their respiratory flow paths. Once calibrated with the mechanical system, the APD gave respiratory resistance measurements within 5% of IOS measurements. Because of their comparability to IOS measurements, APD measurements are shown to be valid representations of respiratory resistance.

  20. Hierarchical structural health monitoring system combining a fiber optic spinal cord network and distributed nerve cell devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minakuchi, Shu; Tsukamoto, Haruka; Takeda, Nobuo

    2009-03-01

    This study proposes novel hierarchical sensing concept for detecting damages in composite structures. In the hierarchical system, numerous three-dimensionally structured sensor devices are distributed throughout the whole structural area and connected with the optical fiber network through transducing mechanisms. The distributed "sensory nerve cell" devices detect the damage, and the fiber optic "spinal cord" network gathers damage signals and transmits the information to a measuring instrument. This study began by discussing the basic concept of the hierarchical sensing system thorough comparison with existing fiber optic based systems and nerve systems in the animal kingdom. Then, in order to validate the proposed sensing concept, impact damage detection system for the composite structure was proposed. The sensor devices were developed based on Comparative Vacuum Monitoring (CVM) system and the Brillouin based distributed strain sensing was utilized to gather the damage signals from the distributed devices. Finally a verification test was conducted using prototype devices. Occurrence of barely visible impact damage was successfully detected and it was clearly indicated that the hierarchical system has better repairability, higher robustness, and wider monitorable area compared to existing systems utilizing embedded optical fiber sensors.

  1. Measurement of electrostatic potential fluctuation using heavy ion beam probe in large helical device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heavy ion beam probe (HIBP) for large helical device (LHD) has been improved to measure the potential fluctuation in high-temperature plasmas. The spatial resolution is improved to about 10 mm by controlling the focus of a probe beam. The HIBP is applied to measure the potential fluctuation in plasmas where the rotational transform is controlled by electron cyclotron current drive. The fluctuations whose frequencies change with the time constant of a few hundreds of milliseconds and that with a constant frequency are observed. The characteristics of the latter fluctuation are similar to those of the geodesic acoustic mode oscillation. The spatial profiles of the fluctuations are also obtained.

  2. Imaging polychromator for density measurements of polystyrene pellet cloud on the Large Helical Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharov, I. A., E-mail: i.sharov@spbstu.ru; Sergeev, V. Yu.; Miroshnikov, I. V. [Saint-Petersburg State Polytechnical University, Saint-Petersburg (Russian Federation); Tamura, N.; Sudo, S. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki (Japan); Kuteev, B. V. [Russian Scientific Centre Kurchatov Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-04-15

    Experimental data on spatial distributions of a pellet cloud electron density are necessary for the development of many applications of pellet injection, namely, plasma fuelling, discharge control, and plasma diagnostics. An improved approach of electron density measurements inside the cloud of a polystyrene pellet ablating in hot plasma of the large helical device is described. Density values of (1-30) × 10{sup 16} cm{sup −3} depending on the background plasma parameters and distance from the solid pellet were measured.

  3. Design and study of data acquisition system for pulsed γ dose measurement device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: A data acquisition system for online pulsed gamma dose measurement device is designed and developed, and its performance is tested. Purpose: The data acquisition system output electric charges and input energies have a good linear relationship in both the continued and pulsed input. Methods: Experiments have been done respectively on the TDL and 'Chen Guang' accelerator. Results: The results show that the relative deviations are less than 5%. Conclusion: This data acquisition system is a new approach for online measurement of single pulsed gamma radiation dose. (authors)

  4. Evaluation of the Solar Water Disinfection Method Using an Ultraviolet Measurement Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, H.

    2015-12-01

    Drinking water security is a growing problem for the population of planet Earth. According to WHO, more than 750 million people on our planet lack access to safe drinking water, resulting in approximately 502,000 diarrhoea deaths in 2012. In order to solve this problem, the Swiss water research institute, Eawag, has developed a method of solar water disinfection, called, "SODIS" The theory of SODIS is simple to understand: a clear plastic bottle filled with water is placed under full sunlight for at least 6 hours. The ultraviolet radiation kills the pathogens in the water, making the originally contaminated water safe for drinking. In order to improve this method, Helioz, an Austrian social enterprise, has created the WADI, a UV measurement device which determines when water is safe for drinking using the SODIS method. When using the WADI, the device should be placed under the sun and surrounded with bottles of water that need to be decontaminated. There is a UV sensor on the WADI, and since the bottles of water and the WADI will have equal exposure to sunlight, the WADI will be able to measure the impact of the sunlight on the contaminated water. This experiment tests the accuracy of the WADI device regarding the time interval needed for contaminated water to be disinfected. The experiment involves using the SODIS method to purify bottles of water contaminated with controlled samples of E. coli. Samples of the water are taken at different time intervals, and the E. coli levels are determined by growing the bacteria from the water samples on agar plates. Ultimately, this helps determine when the water is safe for drinking, and are compared against the WADI's measurements to test the reliability of the device.

  5. Infrared emissivity measurements of building and civil engineering materials: a new device for measuring emissivity

    OpenAIRE

    Monchau, Jean-Pierre; Marchetti, Mario; Ibos, Laurent; Dumoulin, Jean; Feuillet, Vincent; Candau, Yves

    2014-01-01

    The knowledge of the infrared emissivity of materials used in buildings and civil engineering structures is useful for two specific approaches. First, quantitative diagnosis of buildings or civil engineering infrastructures by infrared thermography requires emissivity values in the spectral bandwidth of the camera used for measurements, in order to obtain accurate surface temperatures; for instance, emissivity in the band III domain is required when using cameras with uncooled detectors (such...

  6. Measurement of water balance in soil profile and construction of comparable measuring device

    OpenAIRE

    Mazalin, Domen

    2012-01-01

    Analysis and understanding of water balance in soil profile is an increasing topic as the need for greater water use efficiency escalate. Due to climate changes and the higher frequency of droughts, the adjustments in the use of water are needed. However, these require research and new knowledge. Research and analysis of water balance in soil profile are recently becoming more popular with smaller passive capillary wick lysimeters. Calibration, Installation and measurement a...

  7. An open-chamber flow-focusing device for focal stimulation of micropatterned cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jonathan W; Chang, Tim C; Bhattacharjee, Nirveek; Folch, Albert

    2016-03-01

    Microfluidic devices can deliver soluble factors to cell and tissue culture microenvironments with precise spatiotemporal control. However, enclosed microfluidic environments often have drawbacks such as the need for continuous culture medium perfusion which limits the duration of experiments, incongruity between microculture and macroculture, difficulty in introducing cells and tissues, and high shear stress on cells. Here, we present an open-chamber microfluidic device that delivers hydrodynamically focused streams of soluble reagents to cells over long time periods (i.e., several hours). We demonstrate the advantage of the open chamber by using conventional cell culture techniques to induce the differentiation of myoblasts into myotubes, a process that occurs in 7-10 days and is difficult to achieve in closed chamber microfluidic devices. By controlling the flow rates and altering the device geometry, we produced sharp focal streams with widths ranging from 36 μm to 187 μm. The focal streams were reproducible (∼12% variation between units) and stable (∼20% increase in stream width over 10 h of operation). Furthermore, we integrated trenches for micropatterning myoblasts and microtraps for confining single primary myofibers into the device. We demonstrate with finite element method (FEM) simulations that shear stresses within the cell trench are well below values known to be deleterious to cells, while local concentrations are maintained at ∼22% of the input concentration. Finally, we demonstrated focused delivery of cytoplasmic and nuclear dyes to micropatterned myoblasts and myofibers. The open-chamber microfluidic flow-focusing concept combined with micropatterning may be generalized to other microfluidic applications that require stringent long-term cell culture conditions. PMID:27158290

  8. Towards autonomous lab-on-a-chip devices for cell phone biosensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comina, Germán; Suska, Anke; Filippini, Daniel

    2016-03-15

    Modern cell phones are a ubiquitous resource with a residual capacity to accommodate chemical sensing and biosensing capabilities. From the different approaches explored to capitalize on such resource, the use of autonomous disposable lab-on-a-chip (LOC) devices-conceived as only accessories to complement cell phones-underscores the possibility to entirely retain cell phones' ubiquity for distributed biosensing. The technology and principles exploited for autonomous LOC devices are here selected and reviewed focusing on their potential to serve cell phone readout configurations. Together with this requirement, the central aspects of cell phones' resources that determine their potential for analytical detection are examined. The conversion of these LOC concepts into universal architectures that are readable on unaccessorized phones is discussed within this context. PMID:26569446

  9. Measurement of force sense reproduction in the knee joint: application of a new dynamometric device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavieh,, Minoo Khalkhali; Amirshakeri,, Bahram; Rezasoltani,, Asghar; Talebi,, Ghadam Ali; Kalantari,, Khosro Khademi; Nedaey,, Vahab; Baghban,, Alireza Akbarzadeh

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to determine the reliability of a newly designed dynamometric device for use in frequent force producing/reproducing tasks on the knee joint. [Subjects and Methods] In this cross-sectional study (Development & Reliability), 30 young healthy males and females (age 23.4 ± 2.48 years) were selected among students of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences by simple randomized selection. The study instrument was designed to measure any isometric contraction force exerted by the knee joint flexor/extensor muscles, known as the ipsilateral and contralateral methods. Participant knees were fixed in 60° flexion, and each participant completed the entire set of measurements twice, 72 hours apart. [Results] The findings showed a good intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.73 to 0.81 for all muscle groups. The standard error of measurement and smallest detectable difference for flexor muscle groups were 0.37 and 1.02, respectively, while the values increased to standard error of measurement=0.38 and smallest detectable difference=1.05 for extensor muscle groups. [Conclusion] The device designed could quantify the forces producing/reproducing tasks on the knee joint with a high rate of reliability, and can probably be applied for outcome measurements in proprioceptive assessment of the knee joint.

  10. Design and construction of safety devices utilizing methods of measurement and control engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greiner, B.; Weidlich, S.

    1982-08-01

    This article considers a proposed concept for the design and construction of measurement and control devices for the safety of chemical plants with the aim of preventing danger to persons and the environment and damage. Such measurement and control devices are generally employed when primary measures adopted for plant safety, such as safety valves, collection vessels, etc. are not applicable or insufficient by themselves. The concept regards the new sheet no. 3 of the VDI/VDE code draft 2180 ''Safety of chemical engineering plant'' and proposes a further subdivision of class A into safety classes A0, A1, and A2. Overall, it is possible, on the basis of the measures for raising the availability of measurement and control equipment which are presented in this article, to make selection appropriate to the potential danger involved. The proposed procedure should not, however, be regarded as a rigid scheme but rather as leading to a systematic view and supporting decisions resting on sound operating experience.

  11. On-chip lysis of mammalian cells through a handheld corona device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobedo, C; Bürgel, S C; Kemmerling, S; Sauter, N; Braun, T; Hierlemann, A

    2015-07-21

    On-chip lysis is required in many lab-on-chip applications involving cell studies. In these applications, the complete disruption of the cellular membrane and a high lysis yield is essential. Here, we present a novel approach to lyse cells on-chip through the application of electric discharges from a corona handheld device. The method only requires a microfluidic chip and a low-cost corona device. We demonstrate the effective lysis of BHK and eGFP HCT 116 cells in the sub-second time range using an embedded microelectrode. We also show cell lysis of non-adherent K562 leukemia cells without the use of an electrode in the chip. Cell lysis has been assessed through the use of bright-field microscopy, high-speed imaging and cell-viability fluorescence probes. The experimental results show effective cell lysis without any bubble formation or significant heating. Due to the simplicity of both the components involved and the lysis procedure, this technique offers an inexpensive lysis option with the potential for integration into lab-on-a-chip devices.

  12. The use of an electronic portal imaging device for exit dosimetry and quality control measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine ways in which electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) could be used to (a) measure exit doses for external beam radiotherapy and (b) perform quality control checks on linear accelerators. Methods and Materials: When imaging, our fluoroscopic EPID adjusts the gain, offset, and frame acquisition time of the charge coupled device (CCD) camera automatically, to allow for the range of photon transmissions through the patient, and to optimize the signal-to-noise ratio. However, our EPID can be programmed to act as an integrating dosemeter. EPID dosemeter measurements were made for 20 MV photons, for different field sizes and thicknesses of unit density phantom material placed at varying exit surface to detector distances. These were compared with simultaneous Silicon diode exit dose measurements. Our exit dosimetry technique was verified using an anthropomorphic type phantom, and some initial measurements have been made for patients treated with irregularly shaped 20 MV x-ray fields. In this dosimetry mode, our EPID was also used to measure certain quality control parameters, x-ray field flatness, and the verification of segmented intensity modulated field prescriptions. Results: Configured for dosimetry, our EPID exhibited a highly linear response, capable of resolving individual monitor units. Exit doses could be measured to within about 3% of that measured using Silicon diodes. Field flatness was determined to within 1.5% of Farmer dosemeter measurements. Segmented intensity modulated fields can be easily verified. Conclusions: Our EPID has the versatility to assess a range of parameters pertinent to the delivery of high quality, high precision radiotherapy. When configured appropriately, it can measure exit doses in vivo, with reasonable accuracy, perform certain quick quality control checks, and analyze segmented intensity modulated treatment fields

  13. Design and Reliability of a Novel Heel Rise Test Measuring Device for Plantarflexion Endurance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy D. Sman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Plantarflexion results from the combined action of the soleus and gastrocnemius muscles in the calf. The heel rise test is commonly used to test calf muscle endurance, function, and performance by a wide variety of professionals; however, no uniform description of the test is available. This paper aims to document the construction and reliability of a novel heel rise test device and measurement protocol that is suitable for the needs of most individuals. Methods. This device was constructed from compact and lightweight materials and is fully adjustable, enabling the testing of a wide variety of individuals. It is easy to assemble and disassemble, ensuring that it is portable for use in different settings. Findings. We tested reliability on 40 participants, finding excellent interrater reliability (ICC2,1 0.97, 95% CI: 0.94 to 0.98. Limits of agreement were less than two repetitions in 90% of cases and the Bland-Altman plot showed no bias. Interpretation. We have designed a novel, standardized, simple, and reliable device and measurement protocol for the heel rise test which can be used by researchers and clinicians in a variety of settings.

  14. A Device for Automatically Measuring and Supervising the Critical Care Patient’S Urine Output

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roemi Fernández

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Critical care units are equipped with commercial monitoring devices capable of sensing patients’ physiological parameters and supervising the achievement of the established therapeutic goals. This avoids human errors in this task and considerably decreases the workload of the healthcare staff. However, at present there still is a very relevant physiological parameter that is measured and supervised manually by the critical care units’ healthcare staff: urine output. This paper presents a patent-pending device capable of automatically recording and supervising the urine output of a critical care patient. A high precision scale is used to measure the weight of a commercial urine meter. On the scale’s pan there is a support frame made up of Bosch profiles that isolates the scale from force transmission from the patient’s bed, and guarantees that the urine flows properly through the urine meter input tube. The scale’s readings are sent to a PC via Bluetooth where an application supervises the achievement of the therapeutic goals. The device is currently undergoing tests at a research unit associated with the University Hospital of Getafe in Spain.

  15. Surface EMG and intra-socket force measurement to control a prosthetic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanford, Joe; Patterson, Rita; Popa, Dan

    2015-06-01

    Surface electromyography (SEMG) has been shown to be a robust and reliable interaction method allowing for basic control of powered prosthetic devices. Research has shown a marked decrease in EMG-classification efficiency throughout activities of daily life due to socket shift and movement and fatigue as well as changes in degree of fit of the socket throughout the subject's lifetime. Users with the most severe levels of amputation require the most complex devices with the greatest number of degrees of freedom. Controlling complex dexterous devices with limited available inputs requires the addition of sensing and interaction modalities. However, the larger the amputation severity, the fewer viable SEMG sites are available as control inputs. Previous work reported the use of intra-socket pressure, as measured during wrist flexion and extension, and has shown that it is possible to control a powered prosthetic device with pressure sensors. In this paper, we present data correlations of SEMG data with intra-socket pressure data. Surface EMG sensors and force sensors were housed within a simulated prosthetic cuff fit to a healthy-limbed subject. EMG and intra-socket force data was collected from inside the cuff as a subject performed pre-defined grip motions with their dominant hand. Data fusion algorithms were explored and allowed a subject to use both intra-socket pressure and SEMG data as control inputs for a powered prosthetic device. This additional input modality allows for an improvement in input classification as well as information regarding socket fit through out activities of daily life.

  16. Measurement of Blood Pressure Using an Arterial Pulsimeter Equipped with a Hall Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Gu Choi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available To measure precise blood pressure (BP and pulse rate without using a cuff, we have developed an arterial pulsimeter consisting of a small, portable apparatus incorporating a Hall device. Regression analysis of the pulse wave measured during testing of the arterial pulsimeter was conducted using two equations of the BP algorithm. The estimated values of BP obtained by the cuffless arterial pulsimeter over 5 s were compared with values obtained using electronic or liquid mercury BP meters. The standard deviation between the estimated values and the measured values for systolic and diastolic BP were 8.3 and 4.9, respectively, which are close to the range of values of the BP International Standard. Detailed analysis of the pulse wave measured by the cuffless radial artery pulsimeter by detecting changes in the magnetic field can be used to develop a new diagnostic algorithm for BP, which can be applied to new medical apparatus such as the radial artery pulsimeter.

  17. Measurement of buried undercut structures in microfluidic devices by laser fluorescent confocal microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Shiguang; Liu Jing; Nguyen, Nam-Trung; Fang Zhongping; Yoon, Soon Fatt

    2009-11-20

    Measuring buried, undercut microstructures is a challenging task in metrology. These structures are usually characterized by measuring their cross sections after physically cutting the samples. This method is destructive and the obtained information is incomplete. The distortion due to cutting also affects the measurement accuracy. In this paper, we first apply the laser fluorescent confocal microscopy and intensity differentiation algorithm to obtain the complete three-dimensional profile of the buried, undercut structures in microfluidic devices, which are made by the soft lithography technique and bonded by the oxygen plasma method. The impact of material wettability and the refractive index (n) mismatch among the liquid, samples, cover layer, and objective on the measurement accuracy are experimentally investigated.

  18. Device and performance parameters of Cu(In,Ga)(Se,S)2-based solar cells with varying i-ZnO layer thickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In pursuit of low-cost and highly efficient thin film solar cells, Cu(In,Ga)(Se,S)2/CdS/i-ZnO/ZnO:Al (CIGSS) solar cells were fabricated using a two-step process. The thickness of i-ZnO layer was varied from 0 to 454 nm. The current density-voltage (J-V) characteristics of the devices were measured, and the device and performance parameters of the solar cells were obtained from the J-V curves to analyze the effect of varying i-ZnO layer thickness. The device parameters were determined using a parameter extraction method that utilized particle swarm optimization. The method is a curve-fitting routine that employed the two-diode model. The J-V curves of the solar cells were fitted with the model and the parameters were determined. Results show that as the thickness of i-ZnO was increased, the average efficiency and the fill factor (FF) of the solar cells increase. Device parameters reveal that although the series resistance increased with thicker i-ZnO layer, the solar cells absorbed more photons resulting in higher short-circuit current density (Jsc) and, consequently, higher photo-generated current density (JL). For solar cells with 303-454 nm-thick i-ZnO layer, the best devices achieved efficiency between 15.24% and 15.73% and the fill factor varied between 0.65 and 0.67.

  19. Device to measure the position of a movable organ with regard to a fixed equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present device measures the displacement of control rods in nuclear reactors. Whatever, the invention can be applied in all the cases when it is necessary to know with precision the position of a movable equipment in a given direction, even in a hostile environment and without it being too important. The device comprises a magnetic reference point carried by the movable organ, at least one row of magnetic sensors disposed at regular intervals along the said direction; the dimensions of the magnetic reference mark, of the sensors and of the intervals are such that at least one sensor is excited whatever the position of the magnetic reference may be, each sensor comprising an excitation element, a lecture element, and an interconnection circuit of the said sensor

  20. Phase encoding schemes for measurement device independent quantum key distribution and basis-dependent flaw

    CERN Document Server

    Tamaki, Kiyoshi; Fung, Chi-Hang Fred; Qi, Bing

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we study the security of the so-called measurement device independent quantum key distribution (MDIQKD) with the basis-dependent flaw in the context of phase encoding schemes. We propose two schemes for the phase encoding, the first one employs a phase locking technique with the use of non-phase-randomized coherent pulses, and the second one uses conversion of standard BB84 phase encoding pulses into polarization modes. We prove the unconditional security of these schemes and we also simulate the key generation rate based on simple device models that accommodate imperfections. Our simulation results show the feasibility of these schemes with current technologies and highlights the importance of the state preparation with good fidelity between the density matrices in the two bases. Since the basis-dependent flaw is a problem not only for MDIQKD but also for standard QKD, our work highlights the importance of an accurate signal source in practical QKD systems.

  1. Measurements of Charge Transfer Efficiency in a Proton-irradiated Swept Charge Device

    CERN Document Server

    YuSa, Wang; XiaoYan, Liu; WeiWei, Cui; YuPeng, Xu; ChengKui, Li; MaoShun, Li; DaWei, Han; TianXiang, Chen; Jia, Huo; Juan, Wang; Wei, Li; Wei, Hu; Yi, Zhang; Bo, Lu; GuoHe, Yin; Yue, Zhu; ZiLiang, Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Charge Coupled Devices (CCDs) have been successfully used in several low energy X-ray astronomical satellite over the past two decades. Their high energy resolution and high spatial resolution make them an perfect tool for low energy astronomy, such as formation of galaxy clusters and environment of black holes. The Low Energy X-ray Telescope (LE) group is developing Swept Charge Device (SCD) for the Hard X-ray Modulation Telescope (HXMT) satellite. SCD is a special low energy X-ray CCD, which could be read out a thousand times faster than traditional CCDs, simultaneously keeping excellent energy resolution. A test method for measuring the charge transfer efficiency (CTE) of a prototype SCD has been set up. Studies of the charge transfer inefficiency (CTI) have been performed at a temperature range of operation, with a proton-irradiated SCD.

  2. Optomechanical measurement of photon spin angular momentum and optical torque in integrated photonic devices

    CERN Document Server

    He, Li; Li, Mo

    2016-01-01

    Photons carry linear momentum, and spin angular momentum when circularly or elliptically polarized. During light-matter interaction, transfer of linear momentum leads to optical forces, while angular momentum transfer induces optical torque. Optical forces including radiation pressure and gradient forces have long been utilized in optical tweezers and laser cooling. In nanophotonic devices optical forces can be significantly enhanced, leading to unprecedented optomechanical effects in both classical and quantum regimes. In contrast, to date, the angular momentum of light and the optical torque effect remain unexplored in integrated photonics. Here, we demonstrate the measurement of the spin angular momentum of photons propagating in a birefringent waveguide and the use of optical torque to actuate rotational motion of an optomechanical device. We show that the sign and magnitude of the optical torque are determined by the photon polarization states that are synthesized on the chip. Our study reveals the mecha...

  3. Using a Communication Model to Collect Measurement Data through Mobile Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Urzaiz

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Wireless systems and services have undergone remarkable development since the first mobile phone system was introduced in the early 1980s. The use of sensors in an Ambient Intelligence approach is a great solution in a medical environment. We define a communication architecture to facilitate the information transfer between all connected devices. This model is based in layers to allow the collection of measurement data to be used in our framework monitoring architecture. An overlay-based solution is built between network elements in order to provide an efficient and highly functional communication platform that allows the connection of a wide variety of devices and technologies, and serves also to perform additional functions such as the possibility to perform some processing in the network that may help to improve overall performance.

  4. Measurement campaign on connectivity of mesh networks formed by mobile devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pietrarca, Beatrice; Sasso, Giovanni; Perrucci, Gian Paolo;

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a measurement campaign on the connectivity level of mobile devices using Bluetooth (BT) to form cooperative mobile mesh networks. Such mobile mesh networks composed of mobile devices are the basis for any peer-to-peer communication like wireless grids or social...... networks. The results represent typically worst-case situations, as more and more people tend to switch off their short-range technology due to the battery consumption and the possible attacks. We explore typical public places like airports, convention centers, shopping malls and bars and extract from them...... some statistics of the size of the mesh network and type of constituent nodes. This information is essential for analyzing and devising cooperative strategies among the terminals of mesh networks in different scenarios....

  5. Experimental asymmetric plug-and-play measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Guang-Zhao; Sun, Shi-Hai; Xu, Feihu; Chen, Huan; Li, Chun-Yan; Liang, Lin-Mei

    2016-09-01

    Measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (MDI-QKD) is immune to all security loopholes on detection. Previous experiments on MDI-QKD required spatially separated signal lasers and complicated stabilization systems. In this paper, we perform a proof-of-principle experimental demonstration of plug-and-play MDI-QKD over an asymmetric channel setting with a single signal laser in which the whole system is automatically stabilized in spectrum, polarization, arrival time, and phase reference. Both the signal laser and the single-photon detectors are in the possession of a common server. A passive timing-calibration technique is applied to ensure the precise and stable overlap of signal pulses. The results pave the way for the realization of a quantum network in which the users only need the encoding devices.

  6. Measurement of Local Reactive and Resistive Photoresponse of a Superconducting Microwave Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anlage, Steven M.; Zhuravel, Alexander P.; Ustinov, Alexey V.

    2006-03-01

    Despite the voluminous work on the nature of nonlinear effects in high-temperature superconductors (HTS), the causes are not completely clear and remain under debate. The Laser Scanning Microscope (LSM) is a spatially-resolved method that can simultaneously measure optical and high frequency properties of HTS devices. Earlier results showed high resolution images of non-uniform microwave current distributions near the edge of a patterned transmission line structure [A. P. Zhuravel, A. V. Ustinov, K. S. Harshavardhan, and S. M. Anlage, Appl. Phys. Lett. 81, 4979 (2002)]. We have developed a new operational mode in which the microscope separately images the resistive and inductive components of the bolometric photoresponse. The two images show interesting and dramatic differences, leading to new insights about linear and nonlinear properties of HTS microwave devices.

  7. Room-temperature treatments for all-inorganic nanocrystal solar cell devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loiudice, Anna, E-mail: anna.loiudice@iit.it [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica " E. De Giorgi" , Università del Salento, via Arnesano, 73100 Lecce (Italy); CBN — Center for Biomolecular Nanotechnologies, Italian Institute of Technology, Energy Platform, Via Barsanti sn, 73010 Arnesano (Lecce) (Italy); Rizzo, Aurora [CBN — Center for Biomolecular Nanotechnologies, Italian Institute of Technology, Energy Platform, Via Barsanti sn, 73010 Arnesano (Lecce) (Italy); NNL CNR-Istituto Nanoscienze, c/o Distretto Tecnologico, via per Arnesano km. 5, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Corricelli, Michela [Istituto per i Processi Chimico Fisici (IPCF-CNR) Bari, c/o Department of Chemistry, University of Bari, Via Orabona 4, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Department of Chemistry, University of Bari, Via Orabona 4, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Curri, M. Lucia [Istituto per i Processi Chimico Fisici (IPCF-CNR) Bari, c/o Department of Chemistry, University of Bari, Via Orabona 4, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Belviso, Maria R. [NNL CNR-Istituto Nanoscienze, c/o Distretto Tecnologico, via per Arnesano km. 5, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Cozzoli, P. Davide [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica " E. De Giorgi" , Università del Salento, via Arnesano, 73100 Lecce (Italy); NNL CNR-Istituto Nanoscienze, c/o Distretto Tecnologico, via per Arnesano km. 5, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Grancini, Giulia; Petrozza, Annamaria [Center for Nano Science and Technology at PoliMi, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Via Pascoli 70/3, 20133 Milano (Italy); Gigli, Giuseppe [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica " E. De Giorgi" , Università del Salento, via Arnesano, 73100 Lecce (Italy); CBN — Center for Biomolecular Nanotechnologies, Italian Institute of Technology, Energy Platform, Via Barsanti sn, 73010 Arnesano (Lecce) (Italy); NNL CNR-Istituto Nanoscienze, c/o Distretto Tecnologico, via per Arnesano km. 5, 73100 Lecce (Italy)

    2014-06-02

    We have developed a room-temperature solution processing approach to integrate colloidal anatase titanium dioxide nanorods (TiO{sub 2} NRs) and lead sulfide quantum dots (PbS QDs) into a heterostructured p-n junction device. To this aim we have exploited a post-deposition treatment to remove surface-adsorbed ligands by means of UV-light-irradiation of TiO{sub 2} NRs and a dilute acid treatment of PbS QDs. Here we report a systematic study on the optimization of the post-deposition treatments and device fabrication. Our approach is fully compatible with plastic device technology and is potentially useful for the integration of crystalline TiO{sub 2} as active component into disparate solar cell architectures and organic optoelectronic devices. - Highlights: • Colloidal nanocrystals offer path to low-cost manufacturing atop flexible substrates. • We fabricate an all-inorganic solar cell under room temperature treatments. • Our approach is fully compatible with plastic device technology. • It is useful for the integration of nanocrystals into disparate device architectures.

  8. Room-temperature treatments for all-inorganic nanocrystal solar cell devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed a room-temperature solution processing approach to integrate colloidal anatase titanium dioxide nanorods (TiO2 NRs) and lead sulfide quantum dots (PbS QDs) into a heterostructured p-n junction device. To this aim we have exploited a post-deposition treatment to remove surface-adsorbed ligands by means of UV-light-irradiation of TiO2 NRs and a dilute acid treatment of PbS QDs. Here we report a systematic study on the optimization of the post-deposition treatments and device fabrication. Our approach is fully compatible with plastic device technology and is potentially useful for the integration of crystalline TiO2 as active component into disparate solar cell architectures and organic optoelectronic devices. - Highlights: • Colloidal nanocrystals offer path to low-cost manufacturing atop flexible substrates. • We fabricate an all-inorganic solar cell under room temperature treatments. • Our approach is fully compatible with plastic device technology. • It is useful for the integration of nanocrystals into disparate device architectures

  9. CALIBRATION OF DEVICES FOR MEASURING ELEMENTS OF MICRO-ELECTRONIC STRUCTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Trapashko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Development of microelectronics requires solution of the problem ensuring unity of linear measurements in a submicron range. The problem can be solved on the condition that calibration of measuring devices shall be made in accordance with reference samples that is a short length scale.While making calibration of measuring equipment with the help of a reference measure it is important to investigate components of the method accuracy and their influence on measuring results. The paper considers methodical errors which are specific for methods of optical and atomic force microscopy. Calibration results of an optical measuring microscope are given in the paper. The paper reveals that an additive error depends on parameters of a material and the form of measured elements for an optical measuring microscope. The methodical error of atomic force microscopes is predicated on the probe point shape. The paper considers a short length scale used for calibration of optical and atomic force microscopes. Recommendations for users of the measuring equipment are formulated in the paper.

  10. Design of energy spectrum device for radon measuring with electrostatic collection method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: This research is to take energy spectrum of α particle into consideration in the measurement of radon. Purpose: We aim to find the influence factors of screening particle energy. during the process of detector design. Methods: Based on the electrostatic collection radon measurement method, in order to study the influence factors of the measurement such as aluminum foil and air layer, the reasonable radiation source and geometric model are abstracted and calculated with Geant4 software. Results: The best ranges of aluminum foil thickness and air layer thickness are obtained by analyzing their relationship with a energy, the Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM), the energy resolution, the distance of peaks and the peaks screening power. Conclusion: With the results adopted above, the energy spectrum device is fabricated. Based on the α energy spectrum sampled in a radon chamber, the validity of this design has been proved. It provides a set of reliable data for the design of radon measuring device with electrostatic collection method. (authors)

  11. Optically transparent polymer devices for in situ assessment of cell electroporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majhi, Amit Kumar; Thrivikraman, Greeshma; Basu, Bikramjit; Venkataraman, V

    2015-02-01

    In order to study cell electroporation in situ, polymer devices have been fabricated from poly-dimethyl siloxane with transparent indium tin oxide parallel plate electrodes in horizontal geometry. This geometry with cells located on a single focal plane at the interface of the bottom electrode allows a longer observation time in both transmitted bright-field and reflected fluorescence microscopy modes. Using propidium iodide (PI) as a marker dye, the number of electroporated cells in a typical culture volume of 10-100 μl was quantified in situ as a function of applied voltage from 10 to 90 V in a series of ~2-ms pulses across 0.5-mm electrode spacing. The electric field at the interface and device current was calculated using a model that takes into account bulk screening of the transient pulse. The voltage dependence of the number of electroporated cells could be explained using a stochastic model for the electroporation kinetics, and the free energy for pore formation was found to be 45.6 ± 0.5 kT at room temperature. With this device, the optimum electroporation conditions can be quickly determined by monitoring the uptake of PI marker dye in situ under the application of millisecond voltage pulses. The electroporation efficiency was also quantified using an ex situ fluorescence-assisted cell sorter, and the morphology of cultured cells was evaluated after the pulsing experiment. Importantly, the efficacy of the developed device was tested independently using two cell lines (C2C12 mouse myoblast cells and yeast cells) as well as in three different electroporation buffers (phosphate buffer saline, electroporation buffer and 10% glycerol).

  12. CALIBRATION OF X-RAY IMAGING DEVICES FOR ACCURATE INTENSITY MEASUREMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haugh, M J; Charest, M R; Ross, P W; Lee, J J; Schneider, M B; Palmer, N E; Teruya, A T

    2012-02-16

    National Security Technologies (NSTec) has developed calibration procedures for X-ray imaging systems. The X-ray sources that are used for calibration are both diode type and diode/fluorescer combinations. Calibrating the X-ray detectors is key to accurate calibration of the X-ray sources. Both energy dispersive detectors and photodiodes measuring total flux were used. We have developed calibration techniques for the detectors using radioactive sources that are traceable to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The German synchrotron at Physikalische Technische Bundestalt (PTB) is used to calibrate silicon photodiodes over the energy range from 50 eV to 60 keV. The measurements on X-ray cameras made using the NSTec X-ray sources have included quantum efficiency averaged over all pixels, camera counts per photon per pixel, and response variation across the sensor. The instrumentation required to accomplish the calibrations is described. X-ray energies ranged from 720 eV to 22.7 keV. The X-ray sources produce narrow energy bands, allowing us to determine the properties as a function of X-ray energy. The calibrations were done for several types of imaging devices. There were back illuminated and front illuminated CCD (charge coupled device) sensors, and a CID (charge injection device) type camera. The CCD and CID camera types differ significantly in some of their properties that affect the accuracy of X-ray intensity measurements. All cameras discussed here are silicon based. The measurements of quantum efficiency variation with X-ray energy are compared to models for the sensor structure. Cameras that are not back-thinned are compared to those that are.

  13. Enhancement of device performance of organic solar cells by an interfacial perylene derivative layer

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Inho

    2010-05-26

    We report that device performance of organic solar cells consisting of zinc phthalocyanine and fullerene (C60) can be enhanced by insertion of a perylene derivative interfacial layer between fullerene and bathocuproine (BCP) exciton blocking layer (EBL). The morphology of the BCP is influenced by the underlying N,N′-dihexyl-perylene-3,4,9,10-bis(dicarboximide) (PTCDI-C6), which promotes migration of the cathode metal into the BCP layer. Insertion of a PTCDI-C6 layer between fullerene and BCP layers enhances the power conversion efficiency to 2.5%, an improvement of 32% over devices without PTCDI-C6 layer. The enhancement in device performance by insertion of PTCDI-C6 is attributed to a reduction in series resistance due to promoted metal migration into BCP and optimized optical interference effects in multilayered devices. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  14. A new portable device for automatic controlled-gradient cryopreservation of blood mononuclear cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, L; Albeck, G; Hansen, B;

    1993-01-01

    Protection of the functional integrity of mononuclear cells stored in liquid N2 requires careful control of the freezing procedure. Consequently, optimal quality of cryopreserved cells is usually assured by freezing according to a specified time-temperature gradient generated by computer-controll......Protection of the functional integrity of mononuclear cells stored in liquid N2 requires careful control of the freezing procedure. Consequently, optimal quality of cryopreserved cells is usually assured by freezing according to a specified time-temperature gradient generated by computer......-controlled freezing devices. While such equipment offers large capacity and secures maximum survival and functional integrity of the lymphocytes upon thawing, it is quite costly and strictly stationary. We have previously developed and tested an alternative, manual device for controlled-gradient lymphocyte freezing...

  15. Tunable Microfluidic Devices for Hydrodynamic Fractionation of Cells and Beads: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafar Alvankarian

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The adjustable microfluidic devices that have been developed for hydrodynamic-based fractionation of beads and cells are important for fast performance tunability through interaction of mechanical properties of particles in fluid flow and mechanically flexible microstructures. In this review, the research works reported on fabrication and testing of the tunable elastomeric microfluidic devices for applications such as separation, filtration, isolation, and trapping of single or bulk of microbeads or cells are discussed. Such microfluidic systems for rapid performance alteration are classified in two groups of bulk deformation of microdevices using external mechanical forces, and local deformation of microstructures using flexible membrane by pneumatic pressure. The main advantage of membrane-based tunable systems has been addressed to be the high capability of integration with other microdevice components. The stretchable devices based on bulk deformation of microstructures have in common advantage of simplicity in design and fabrication process.

  16. Oxygen-Purged Microfluidic Device to Enhance Cell Viability in Photopolymerized PEG Hydrogel Microparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Bingzhao; Krutkramelis, Kaspars; Oakey, John

    2016-07-11

    Encapsulating cells within biocompatible materials is a widely used strategy for cell delivery and tissue engineering. While cells are commonly suspended within bulk hydrogel-forming solutions during gelation, substantial interest in the microfluidic fabrication of miniaturized cell encapsulation vehicles has more recently emerged. Here, we utilize multiphase microfluidics to encapsulate cells within photopolymerized picoliter-volume water-in-oil droplets at high production rates. The photoinitiated polymerization of polyethylene glycol diacrylate (PEGDA) is used to continuously produce solid particles from aqueous liquid drops containing cells and hydrogel forming solution. It is well understood that this photoinitiated addition reaction is inhibited by oxygen. In contrast to bulk polymerization in which ambient oxygen is rapidly and harmlessly consumed, allowing the polymerization reaction to proceed, photopolymerization within air permeable polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic devices allows oxygen to be replenished by diffusion as it is depleted. This sustained presence of oxygen and the consequential accumulation of peroxy radicals produce a dramatic effect upon both droplet polymerization and post-encapsulation cell viability. In this work we employ a nitrogen microjacketed microfluidic device to purge oxygen from flowing fluids during photopolymerization. By increasing the purging nitrogen pressure, oxygen concentration was attenuated, and increased post-encapsulation cell viability was achieved. A reaction-diffusion model was used to predict the cumulative intradroplet concentration of peroxy radicals, which corresponded directly to post-encapsulation cell viability. The nitrogen-jacketed microfluidic device presented here allows the droplet oxygen concentration to be finely tuned during cell encapsulation, leading to high post-encapsulation cell viability. PMID:27285343

  17. Correlation between dynamic parameters and device performance of organic solar cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kniepert, Juliane

    2015-01-01

    Organic bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells based on polymer:fullerene blends are a promising alternative for a low-cost solar energy conversion. Despite significant improvements of the power conversion efficiency in recent years, the fundamental working principles of these devices are yet not fully understood. In general, the current output of organic solar cells is determined by the generation of free charge carriers upon light absorption and their transport to the electrodes in competiti...

  18. Standard test method for calibration of surface/stress measuring devices

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1997-01-01

    Return to Contents page 1.1 This test method covers calibration or verification of calibration, or both, of surface-stress measuring devices used to measure stress in annealed and heat-strengthened or tempered glass using polariscopic or refractometry based principles. 1.2 This test method is nondestructive. 1.3 This test method uses transmitted light, and therefore, is applicable to light-transmitting glasses. 1.4 This test method is not applicable to chemically tempered glass. 1.5 Using the procedure described, surface stresses can be measured only on the “tin” side of float glass. 1.6 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  19. Development of an automatic sampling device for the continuous measurement of atmospheric carbonyls compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two sampling strategies were studied to develop an automatic instrument for the continuous measurement of atmospheric carbonyl compounds. Because of its specificity towards carbonyls compounds, sampling by using a transfer of gaseous phase in a liquid phase associated with a simultaneous chemical derivatization of the trapped compounds was first studied. However, this method do not allow a quantitative sampling of all studied carbonyl compounds, nor a continuous measurement in the field. To overcome the difficulties, a second strategy was investigated: the cryogenic adsorption onto solid adsorbent followed by thermodesorption and a direct analysis by GC/MS. Collection efficiency using different solid adsorbents was found greater than 95% for carbonyl compounds consisting of 1 to 7 carbons. This work is a successful first step towards the realization of the automatic sampling device for a continuous measurement of atmospheric carbonyls compounds. (author)

  20. Design and testing of an innovative measurement device for tyre-road contact forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheli, F.; Braghin, F.; Brusarosco, M.; Mancosu, F.; Sabbioni, E.

    2011-08-01

    The measurement of tyre-road contact forces is the first step towards the development of new control systems for improving vehicle safety and performances. Tyre-road contact forces measurement systems are very expensive and significantly modify the unsprung masses of the vehicle as well as the rotational inertia of the tyres. Thus, vehicle dynamics results are significantly affected. As a consequence, the measured contact forces do not correspond to the contact forces under real working conditions. A new low-cost tyre-road contact forces measurement system is proposed in this paper that can be applied to passenger cars. Its working principle is based on the measurement of three deformations of the wheel rim through strain gauges. The tyre-rim assembly is thus turned into a sensor for tyre-road contact forces. The influence of the strain gauges position onto the measurement results has been assessed through finite element simulations and experimental tests. It has been proven that, for a large variety of rims, the strain gauge position that leads to high signal-to-noise ratios is almost the same. A dynamic calibration procedure has been developed in order to allow the reconstruction of contact force and torque components once per wheel turn. The capability of the developed device to correctly estimate tyre-road contact forces has been assessed, in a first stage, through indoor laboratory experimental test on an MTS Flat-Trac ® testing machine. Results show that the implemented measuring system allows to reconstruct contact forces once per wheel turn with a precision that is comparable to that of existing high-cost measurement systems. Subsequently, outdoor tests with a vehicle having all four wheels equipped with the developed measuring device have also been performed. Reliability of the measurements provided by the developed sensor has been assessed by comparing the global measured longitudinal/lateral forces and the product of the measured longitudinal

  1. Digital Devices, Distraction, and Student Performance: Does In-Class Cell Phone Use Reduce Learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Douglas K.; Hoekstra, Angel R.; Wilcox, Bethany R.

    2012-01-01

    The recent increase in use of digital devices such as laptop computers, iPads, and web-enabled cell phones has generated concern about how technologies affect student performance. Combining observation, survey, and interview data, this research assesses the effects of technology use on student attitudes and learning. Data were gathered in eight…

  2. A device to facilitate preparation of high-density neural cell cultures in MEAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mok, S Y; Lim, Y M; Goh, S Y

    2009-05-15

    A device to facilitate high-density seeding of dissociated neural cells on planar multi-electrode arrays (MEAs) is presented in this paper. The device comprises a metal cover with two concentric cylinders-the outer cylinder fits tightly on to the external diameter of a MEA to hold it in place and an inner cylinder holds a central glass tube for introducing a cell suspension over the electrode area of the MEA. An O-ring is placed at the bottom of the inner cylinder and the glass tube to provide a fluid-tight seal between the glass tube and the MEA electrode surface. The volume of cell suspension in the glass tube is varied according to the desired plating density. After plating, the device can be lifted from the MEA without leaving any residue on the contact surface. The device has enabled us to increase and control the plating density of neural cell suspension with low viability, and to prepare successful primary cultures from cryopreserved neurons and glia. The cultures of cryopreserved dissociated cortical neurons that we have grown in this manner remained spontaneously active over months, exhibited stable development and similar network characteristics as reported by other researchers. PMID:19428539

  3. Optomechanical measurement of photon spin angular momentum and optical torque in integrated photonic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Li; Li, Huan; Li, Mo

    2016-09-01

    Photons carry linear momentum and spin angular momentum when circularly or elliptically polarized. During light-matter interaction, transfer of linear momentum leads to optical forces, whereas transfer of angular momentum induces optical torque. Optical forces including radiation pressure and gradient forces have long been used in optical tweezers and laser cooling. In nanophotonic devices, optical forces can be significantly enhanced, leading to unprecedented optomechanical effects in both classical and quantum regimes. In contrast, to date, the angular momentum of light and the optical torque effect have only been used in optical tweezers but remain unexplored in integrated photonics. We demonstrate the measurement of the spin angular momentum of photons propagating in a birefringent waveguide and the use of optical torque to actuate rotational motion of an optomechanical device. We show that the sign and magnitude of the optical torque are determined by the photon polarization states that are synthesized on the chip. Our study reveals the mechanical effect of photon's polarization degree of freedom and demonstrates its control in integrated photonic devices. Exploiting optical torque and optomechanical interaction with photon angular momentum can lead to torsional cavity optomechanics and optomechanical photon spin-orbit coupling, as well as applications such as optomechanical gyroscopes and torsional magnetometry.

  4. Reply to: Discrete-variable measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution suitable for metropolitan networks

    CERN Document Server

    Pirandola, Stefano; Spedalieri, Gaetana; Weedbrook, Christian; Braunstein, Samuel L; Lloyd, Seth; Gehring, Tobias; Jacobsen, Christian S; Andersen, Ulrik L

    2015-01-01

    In a recent comment, Xu et al. claimed that discrete-variable (DV) measurement-device-independent (MDI) quantum key distribution (QKD) would compete with its continuous-variable (CV) counterpart at metropolitan distances. Actually, Xu et al.'s analysis supports the opposite by showing that the experimental rate of our CV protocol (achieved with practical room-temperature devices) remains one order of magnitude higher than their purely-numerical and over-optimistic extrapolation for qubits, based on nearly-ideal parameters and cryogenic detectors (clearly unsuitable for the construction of a realistic, cheap and scalable high-rate network, e.g., including mobile devices). The experimental rate of our protocol (bits per relay use) is confirmed to be two-three orders of magnitude higher than the rate of any realistic simulation of practical DV-MDI-QKD over short-medium distances. Of course this does not mean that DV-MDI-QKD networks should not be investigated or built, but increasing their rate is a non-trivial ...

  5. Optomechanical measurement of photon spin angular momentum and optical torque in integrated photonic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Li; Li, Huan; Li, Mo

    2016-01-01

    Photons carry linear momentum and spin angular momentum when circularly or elliptically polarized. During light-matter interaction, transfer of linear momentum leads to optical forces, whereas transfer of angular momentum induces optical torque. Optical forces including radiation pressure and gradient forces have long been used in optical tweezers and laser cooling. In nanophotonic devices, optical forces can be significantly enhanced, leading to unprecedented optomechanical effects in both classical and quantum regimes. In contrast, to date, the angular momentum of light and the optical torque effect have only been used in optical tweezers but remain unexplored in integrated photonics. We demonstrate the measurement of the spin angular momentum of photons propagating in a birefringent waveguide and the use of optical torque to actuate rotational motion of an optomechanical device. We show that the sign and magnitude of the optical torque are determined by the photon polarization states that are synthesized on the chip. Our study reveals the mechanical effect of photon’s polarization degree of freedom and demonstrates its control in integrated photonic devices. Exploiting optical torque and optomechanical interaction with photon angular momentum can lead to torsional cavity optomechanics and optomechanical photon spin-orbit coupling, as well as applications such as optomechanical gyroscopes and torsional magnetometry. PMID:27626072

  6. Optomechanical measurement of photon spin angular momentum and optical torque in integrated photonic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Li; Li, Huan; Li, Mo

    2016-09-01

    Photons carry linear momentum and spin angular momentum when circularly or elliptically polarized. During light-matter interaction, transfer of linear momentum leads to optical forces, whereas transfer of angular momentum induces optical torque. Optical forces including radiation pressure and gradient forces have long been used in optical tweezers and laser cooling. In nanophotonic devices, optical forces can be significantly enhanced, leading to unprecedented optomechanical effects in both classical and quantum regimes. In contrast, to date, the angular momentum of light and the optical torque effect have only been used in optical tweezers but remain unexplored in integrated photonics. We demonstrate the measurement of the spin angular momentum of photons propagating in a birefringent waveguide and the use of optical torque to actuate rotational motion of an optomechanical device. We show that the sign and magnitude of the optical torque are determined by the photon polarization states that are synthesized on the chip. Our study reveals the mechanical effect of photon's polarization degree of freedom and demonstrates its control in integrated photonic devices. Exploiting optical torque and optomechanical interaction with photon angular momentum can lead to torsional cavity optomechanics and optomechanical photon spin-orbit coupling, as well as applications such as optomechanical gyroscopes and torsional magnetometry. PMID:27626072

  7. Simulations and measurements of coupling impedance for modern particle accelerator devices

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2158523; Biancacci, Nicolò; Mostacci, Andrea

    In this document it has been treated the study of the coupling impedance in modern devices, already installed or not, in different particle accelerators. In the specific case: • For a device in-phase of project, several simulations for impedance calculation have been done. • For a component already realized and used, measurements of coupling impedance value have been done. Simulations are used to determine the impact of the interconnect between to magnets, designed for the future particle accelerator FCC, on the overall impedance of the machine which is about 100 km long. In particular has been done a check between theory, simulations and measurements of components already built, allowing a better and deeper study of the component we have analysed. Controls that probably will be helpful to have a clear guideline in future works. The measurements instead concern in an existing component that was already used in LHC, the longest particle accelerator ever realised on the planet, 27 km long. The coupling impe...

  8. Measurement of radon, radon daughters and thoron concentrations by multi-detector devices. No. E/12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is a growing interest in collection of data concerning human exposures to naturally occurring alpha-emitting radionuclides (e.g. in mines, dwellings, building materials, industrial wastes, coal fuel cycle, water supply, soil, plants, etc.). Most of such studies are incomplete for the following reasons: in radon measurements the contribution of thoron is generally neglected, the determination of equilibrium factor is complicated or not possible at all, short- and long-term concentration fluctuations cause difficulties in obtaining representative mean values, the plate-out effect is generally not taken into account. A variety of simple methods were studied that could be used to overcome some of these difficulties by using cups equipped with two or more alpha-sensitive nuclear track detectors. A theoretical foundation of the quantitative measurements with such devices is presented. Experimental data are reported on radon, radon daughters and thoron concentrations measured by multi-detector devices in cave soil gas and in air of Hungarian dwellings. (author)

  9. Lessons from wet gas flow metering systems using differential measurements devices: Testing and flow modelling results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cazin, J.; Couput, J.P.; Dudezert, C. et al

    2005-07-01

    A significant number of wet gas meters used for high GVF and very high GVF are based on differential pressure measurements. Recent high pressure tests performed on a variety of different DP devices on different flow loops are presented. Application of existing correlations is discussed for several DP devices including Venturi meters. For Venturi meters, deviations vary from 9% when using the Murdock correlation to less than 3 % with physical based models. The use of DP system in a large domain of conditions (Water Liquid Ratio) especially for liquid estimation will require information on the WLR This obviously raises the question of the gas and liquid flow metering accuracy in wet gas meters and highlight needs to understand AP systems behaviour in wet gas flows (annular / mist / annular mist). As an example, experimental results obtained on the influence of liquid film characteristics on a Venturi meter are presented. Visualizations of the film upstream and inside the Venturi meter are shown. They are completed by film characterization. The AP measurements indicate that for a same Lockhart Martinelli parameter, the characteristics of the two phase flow have a major influence on the correlation coefficient. A 1D model is defined and the results are compared with the experiments. These results indicate that the flow regime influences the AP measurements and that a better modelling of the flow phenomena is needed even for allocation purposes. Based on that, lessons and way forward in wet gas metering systems improvement for allocation and well metering are discussed and proposed. (author) (tk)

  10. Influence of the Type of Measuring Device in Determining the Static Modulus of Elasticity of Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suélio da Silva Araújo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a comparative analysis of the results obtained in static modulus of elasticity tests of plain concrete cylindrical specimens. The purpose of this study is to identify and evaluate the influence of several factors involved in modulus of elasticity tests such as the strain measurement device used (dial indicators, electrical surface bonded strain gages, externally fixed strain gages and linear variation displacement transducer - LVDT, the type of concrete (Class C30 and Class C60 and cylindrical specimen size (100 mm x 200 mm and 150 mm x 300 mm. The modulus tests were done in two different laboratories in the Goiânia, GO region and were performed according to code ABNT NBR 8522:2008, which describes the initial tangent modulus test, characterized by strains measured at tension values of 0.5 MPa and 30% of the ultimate load. One hundred and sixty specimens were tested with statistically satisfactory results. It was concluded that the type of strain measurement device greatly influenced the modulus of elasticity results. Tests in specimens 100 mm x 200 mm showed highest statistical variation.

  11. An enhanced proposal on decoy-state measurement device-independent quantum key distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qin; Zhang, Chun-Hui; Luo, Shunlong; Guo, Guang-Can

    2016-09-01

    By employing pulses involving three-intensity, we propose a scheme for the measurement device-independent quantum key distribution with heralded single-photon sources. We make a comparative study of this scheme with the standard three-intensity decoy-state scheme using weak coherent sources or heralded single-photon sources. The advantage of this scheme is illustrated through numerical simulations: It can approach very closely the asymptotic case of using an infinite number of decoy-states and exhibits excellent behavior in both the secure transmission distance and the final key generation rate.

  12. Using complete measurement statistics for optimal device-independent randomness evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Nieto-Silleras, Olmo; Pironio, Stefano; Silman, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    The majority of recent works investigating the link between non-locality and randomness, e.g. in the context of device-independent cryptography, do so with respect to some specific Bell inequality, usually the CHSH inequality. However, the joint probabilities characterizing the measurement outcomes of a Bell test are richer than just the degree of violation of a single Bell inequality. In this work we show how to take this extra information into account in a systematic manner in order to opti...

  13. Quantum transport measurement of few-layer WTe2 field effect devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianhao; Liu, Xin; Tian, Shibing; Zhang, Chenglong; Jia, Shuang

    2015-03-01

    We have performed systematic quantum transport measurement on field effect devices fabricated from few-layer WTe2 single crystals. We found that the magnetoresistance of few-layer WTe2 could be very different from that of bulk samples, which may arise from the imbalance of electron and hole carriers in the samples. We shall discuss our findings in more details in light of recent progress in our experiment. This work is supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11374021 and 11327406); by China Ministry of Science and Technology under Contract # 2014CB920900 and 2013CB921900; and by the Young 1000-Talent Program of China.

  14. Development of measuring device for inner surfaces of embedded piping (Contract research)

    CERN Document Server

    Itoh, H; Tachibana, M; Yanagihara, S

    2003-01-01

    The measuring device for inner surfaces of embedded piping (MISE) was developed to evaluate low-level radiological contaminations of inner surfaces of piping. The MISE consists of a cylindrically-formed double layered type detector and a piping crawling robot, which were designed and manufactured separately. In measurements of the contaminations, an outer cylindrical detector close to the surface of piping measures beta-rays and gamma-rays and an inner cylindrical detector set after a shielding plate for shield of beta-rays measures gamma-rays. The beta-ray counting rates are derived by subtracting gamma-ray counts measured by the inner detector from gamma- and beta-ray counts measured by the outer detector. The piping crawling robot transports the cylindrically-formed double layered type detector with observing inner surfaces of piping. The detection limit for the contamination of sup 6 sup 0 Co was found to be about 0.17 Bq/cm sup 2 with measurement time of 30 seconds. It is expected that 0.2 Bq/cm sup 2 co...

  15. A device for in vivo measurements of quantitative ultrasound variables at the human proximal femur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkmann, Reinhard; Laugier, Pascal; Moser, Urs; Dencks, Stefanie; Klausner, Michael; Padilla, Frédéric; Haïat, Guilleaume; Glüer, Claus-C

    2008-01-01

    Quantitative ultrasound (QUS) at the calcaneus has similar power as a bone mineral density (BMD)- measurement using DXA for the prediction of osteoporotic fracture risk. Ultrasound equipment is less expensive than DXA and free of ionizing radiation. As a mechanical wave, QUS has the potential of measuring different bone properties than dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA,) which depends on X-ray attenuation and might be developed into a tool of comprehensive assessment of bone strength. However, site-specific DXA at the proximal femur shows best performance in the prediction of hip fractures. To combine the potential of QUS with measurements directly at the femur, we developed a device for in vivo QUS measurements at this site. Methods comprise ultrasound transmission through the bone, reflection from the bone surface, and backscatter from the inner trabecular structure. The complete area of the proximal femur can be scanned except at the femoral head, which interferes with the ilium. To avoid edge artifacts, a subregion of the proximal femur in the trochanteric region was selected as measurement region. First, in vivo measurements demonstrate a good signal to noise ratio and proper depiction of the proximal femur on an attenuation image. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of in vivo measurements. Further improvements can be expected by refinement of the scanning technique and data evaluation method to enhance the potential of the new method for the estimation of bone strength. PMID:18599408

  16. Microfluidic gradient device for studying mesothelial cell migration and the effect of chronic carbon nanotube exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cell migration is one of the crucial steps in many physiological and pathological processes, including cancer development. Our recent studies have shown that carbon nanotubes (CNTs), similarly to asbestos, can induce accelerated cell growth and invasiveness that contribute to their mesothelioma pathogenicity. Malignant mesothelioma is a very aggressive tumor that develops from cells of the mesothelium, and is most commonly caused by exposure to asbestos. CNTs have a similar structure and mode of exposure to asbestos. This has raised a concern regarding the potential carcinogenicity of CNTs, especially in the pleural area which is a key target for asbestos-related diseases. In this paper, a static microfluidic gradient device was applied to study the migration of human pleural mesothelial cells which had been through a long-term exposure (4 months) to subcytotoxic concentration (0.02 µg cm−2) of single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs). Multiple migration signatures of these cells were investigated using the microfluidic gradient device for the first time. During the migration study, we observed that cell morphologies changed from flattened shapes to spindle shapes prior to their migration after their sensing of the chemical gradient. The migration of chronically SWCNT-exposed mesothelial cells was evaluated under different fetal bovine serum (FBS) concentration gradients, and the migration speeds and number of migrating cells were extracted and compared. The results showed that chronically SWCNT-exposed mesothelial cells are more sensitive to the gradient compared to non-SWCNT-exposed cells. The method described here allows simultaneous detection of cell morphology and migration under chemical gradient conditions, and also allows for real-time monitoring of cell motility that resembles in vivo cell migration. This platform would be much needed for supporting the development of more physiologically relevant cell models for better assessment and characterization of the

  17. Microfluidic gradient device for studying mesothelial cell migration and the effect of chronic carbon nanotube exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hanyuan; Lohcharoenkal, Warangkana; Sun, Jianbo; Li, Xiang; Wang, Liying; Wu, Nianqiang; Rojanasakul, Yon; Liu, Yuxin

    2016-01-01

    Cell migration is one of the crucial steps in many physiological and pathological processes, including cancer development. Our recent studies have shown that carbon nanotubes (CNTs), similarly to asbestos, can induce accelerated cell growth and invasiveness that contribute to their mesothelioma pathogenicity. Malignant mesothelioma is a very aggressive tumor that develops from cells of the mesothelium, and is most commonly caused by exposure to asbestos. CNTs have a similar structure and mode of exposure to asbestos. This has raised a concern regarding the potential carcinogenicity of CNTs, especially in the pleural area which is a key target for asbestos-related diseases. In this paper, a static microfluidic gradient device was applied to study the migration of human pleural mesothelial cells which had been through a long-term exposure (4 months) to subcytotoxic concentration (0.02 μg cm−2) of single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs). Multiple migration signatures of these cells were investigated using the microfluidic gradient device for the first time. During the migration study, we observed that cell morphologies changed from flattened shapes to spindle shapes prior to their migration after their sensing of the chemical gradient. The migration of chronically SWCNT-exposed mesothelial cells was evaluated under different fetal bovine serum (FBS) concentration gradients, and the migration speeds and number of migrating cells were extracted and compared. The results showed that chronically SWCNT-exposed mesothelial cells are more sensitive to the gradient compared to non-SWCNT-exposed cells. The method described here allows simultaneous detection of cell morphology and migration under chemical gradient conditions, and also allows for real-time monitoring of cell motility that resembles in vivo cell migration. This platform would be much needed for supporting the development of more physiologically relevant cell models for better assessment and characterization of the

  18. A system for measuring an optical spectral response and/or IV data of a photoelectric device under test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elshinawy, M.; Heirman, S.G.M.; Melsken, J.; Fischer, M.

    2015-01-01

    A system for measuring an optical spectral response or property and/or IV data of a device or object under test (9), comprising in optically coupled sequence: a broadband light source (1) for emitting light of a prede- fined spectrum, a slit and/or light guide (2), a wavelength dispersive device (3)

  19. High-performance inverted polymer solar cells: device characterization, optical modeling, and hole-transporting modifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, Jingyu; Yip, Hin-Lap; Zhang, Yong; Chien, Shang-Chieh; Chueh, Chu-Chen [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington (United States); Gao, Yan; Chen, Hongzheng [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington (United States); State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, MOE Key Laboratory of Macromolecule Synthesis and Functionalization, Zhejiang-California International Nanosystems Institute, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China); O' Malley, Kevin; Jen, Alex K.Y. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington (United States); Department of Chemistry, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2012-07-10

    Although high power conversion efficiencies (PCE) have already been demonstrated in conventional structure polymer solar cells (PSCs), the development of high performance inverted structure polymer solar cells is still lagging behind despite their demonstrated superior stability and feasibility for roll-to-roll processing. To address this challenge, a detailed study of solution-processed, inverted-structure PSCs based on the blends of a low bandgap polymer, poly(indacenodithiophene-co-phananthrene-quinoxaline) (PIDT-PhanQ) and [6,6]-phenyl-C{sub 71}-butyric acid methyl ester (PC{sub 71}BM) as the bulk heterojunction (BHJ) layer is carried out. Comprehensive characterization and optical modeling of the resulting devices is performed to understand the effect of device geometry on photovoltaic performance. Excellent device performance can be achieved by optimizing the optical field distribution and spatial profiles of excitons generation within the active layer in different device configurations. In the inverted structure, because the peak of the excitons generation is located farther away from the electron-collecting electrode, a higher blending ratio of fullerene is required to provide higher electron mobility in the BHJ for achieving good device performance. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  20. Passive safety device and internal short tested method for energy storage cells and systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyser, Matthew; Darcy, Eric; Long, Dirk; Pesaran, Ahmad

    2015-09-22

    A passive safety device for an energy storage cell for positioning between two electrically conductive layers of the energy storage cell. The safety device also comprising a separator and a non-conductive layer. A first electrically conductive material is provided on the non-conductive layer. A first opening is formed through the separator between the first electrically conductive material and one of the electrically conductive layers of the energy storage device. A second electrically conductive material is provided adjacent the first electrically conductive material on the non-conductive layer, wherein a space is formed on the non-conductive layer between the first and second electrically conductive materials. A second opening is formed through the non-conductive layer between the second electrically conductive material and another of the electrically conductive layers of the energy storage device. The first and second electrically conductive materials combine and exit at least partially through the first and second openings to connect the two electrically conductive layers of the energy storage device at a predetermined temperature.

  1. Resistive switching behavior of reduced graphene oxide memory cells for low power nonvolatile device application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Sangram K.; Xiao, Bo; Mishra, Saswat; Killam, Alex; Pradhan, Aswini K.

    2016-05-01

    Graphene Oxide (GO) based low cost flexible electronics and memory cell have recently attracted more attention for the fabrication of emerging electronic devices. As a suitable candidate for resistive random access memory technology, reduced graphene oxide (RGO) can be widely used for non-volatile switching memory applications because of its large surface area, excellent scalability, retention, and endurance properties. We demonstrated that the fabricated metal/RGO/metal memory device exhibited excellent switching characteristics, with on/off ratio of two orders of magnitude and operated threshold switching voltage of less than 1 V. The studies on different cell diameter, thickness, scan voltages and period of time corroborate the reliability of the device as resistive random access memory. The microscopic origin of switching operation is governed by the establishment of conducting filaments due to the interface amorphous layer rupturing and the movement of oxygen in the GO layer. This interesting experimental finding indicates that device made up of thermally reduced GO shows more reliability for its use in next generation electronics devices.

  2. Comparison of device models for organic solar cells: Band-to-band vs. tail states recombination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soldera, Marcos; Taretto, Kurt [Departamento de Electrotecnia, Universidad Nacional del Comahue, Buenos Aires, Neuquen (Argentina); Kirchartz, Thomas [Department of Physics, Imperial College London, South Kensington (United Kingdom)

    2012-01-15

    The efficiency-limiting recombination mechanism in bulk-heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells is a current topic of investigation and debate in organic photovoltaics. In this work, we simulate state-of-the-art BHJ solar cells using two different models. The first model takes into account band-to-band recombination and field dependent carrier generation. The second model assumes a Shockley-Read-Hall (SRH) recombination mechanism via tail states and field independent carrier generation. Additionally, we include in both cases optical modelling and, thus, position-dependent exciton generation and non-ideal exciton collection. We explore both recombination mechanisms by fitting light and dark current-voltage (JV) characteristics of BHJ cells of five materials: P3HT, MDMO-PPV, MEH-PPV, PCDTBT and PF10TBT, all blended with fullerene derivatives. We show that although main device parameters such as short circuit current, open circuit voltage, fill factor and ideality factor are accurately reproduced by both Langevin and tail recombination, only tail recombination reproduces also the ideality factor of dark characteristics accurately. Nevertheless, the model with SRH recombination via tail states needs the inclusion of external circuitry to account for the heavy shunt present in all the blends, except P3HT:PCBM, when illuminated. Finally, we propose a means to find analytical expressions for the short circuit current by assuming a linear relation between the recombination rate and the concentration of free minority carriers. The model reproduces experimental data of P3HT cells at various thickness values using realistic parameters for this material. Dark JV measurement (circles) of a PCDTBT:PC{sub 70}BM solar cell (Park et al., Nature Photon. 3, 297 (2009) [1]), the fit with the model including recombination via tail states (solid line) and the fit with the model reported by (Koster et al., Phys. Rev. B 72, 085205 (2005) [2]) that includes bimolecular band-to-band recombination

  3. External circuit integration with electromagnetic particle in cell modeling of plasma focus devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pinch performance of a plasma focus (PF) device is sensitive to the physical conditions of the breakdown phase. It is therefore essential to model and study the initial phase in order to optimize device performance. An external circuit is self consistently coupled to the electromagnetic particle in cell code to model the breakdown and initial lift phase of the United Nations University/International Centre for Theoretical Physics (UNU-ICTP) plasma focus device. Gas breakdown during the breakdown phase is simulated successfully, following a drop in the applied voltage across the device and a concurrent substantial rise in the circuit current. As a result, the plasma becomes magnetized, with the growing value of the magnetic field over time leading to the gradual lift off of the well formed current sheath into the axial acceleration phase. This lifting off, with simultaneous outward sheath motion along the anode and vertical cathode, and the strong magnetic fields in the current sheath region, was demonstrated in this work, and hence validates our method of coupling the external circuit to PF devices. Our method produces voltage waveforms that are qualitatively similar to the observed experimental voltage profiles of the UNU-ICTP device. Values of the mean electron energy before and after voltage breakdown turned out to be different, with the values after breakdown being much lower. In both cases, the electron energy density function turned out to be non-Maxwellian

  4. Efficiency improvement in thin-film solar cell devices with oxygen-containing absorber layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CdTe/CdS solar cell devices were grown using a dry process consisting of sputtering for the transparent conducting oxide and CdS window layers, and close-space sublimation for CdTe absorber layer. These devices were back contacted using Mo/Sb2Te3 sputtered layers following the CdCl2 activation process carried out in air. It was shown that when oxygen is intentionally introduced in the CdTe layer during its growth, this leads to a significant improvement in all the device parameters yielding an efficiency of 14% compared to 11.5% for devices fabricated in the same conditions but without intentional oxygen incorporation in CdTe. The data obtained were not altered following a light soaking. The devices were investigated by quantitative secondary ion mass spectrometry, which allowed insight into the distribution and amount of oxygen and chlorine within the entire device structure. Both impurities showed an increased concentration throughout the CdTe absorber layer

  5. Dynamic Diamond Anvil Cell (dDAC): A novel device for studying the dynamic-pressure properties of materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, W J; Yoo, C; Lee, G W; Cynn, H; Lipp, M J; Visbeck, K

    2007-02-23

    We have developed a unique device, a dynamic diamond anvil cell (dDAC), which repetitively applies a time-dependent load/pressure profile to a sample. This capability allows studies of the kinetics of phase transitions and metastable phases at compression (strain) rates of up to 500 GPa/sec ({approx}0.16 s{sup -1} for a metal). Our approach adapts electromechanical piezoelectric actuators to a conventional diamond anvil cell design, which enables precise specification and control of a time-dependent applied load/pressure. Existing DAC instrumentation and experimental techniques are easily adapted to the dDAC to measure the properties of a sample under the varying load/pressure conditions. This capability addresses the sparsely studied regime of dynamic phenomena between static research (diamond anvil cells and large volume presses) and dynamic shock-driven experiments (gas guns, explosive and laser shock). We present an overview of a variety of experimental measurements that can be made with this device.

  6. Characterisation of a micro-plasma device sensor using electrical measurements and emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mariotti, D

    2002-04-01

    This thesis reports on research undertaken on the characterisation of a micro-plasma device to be used for gas analysis by mean of plasma emission spectroscopy. The work covers aspects related to the micro-plasma electrical and optical emission parameters, and their importance for the utilisation of the micro-plasma device in gas analysis. Experimental results have been used to analyse the fundamental micro-plasma processes and to develop a model, which could provide additional information. This dissertation contains a general literature review of topics related to plasma physics, plasma emission spectroscopy, gas analysis (chemical analysis and artificial olfaction) and other micro-plasma applications. Experimental work focuses on two main areas: electrical measurements and emission measurements. Firstly, electrical measurements are taken and interpretations are given. Where necessary, new theoretical treatments are suggested in order to describe better the physical phenomena. Plasma emission has been considered under different working conditions. This allowed the characterisation of the micro-plasma emission and also a better understanding of the micro-plasma processes. On the basis of the experimental data obtained and other assumptions a model has been developed. A computer simulation based on this model provided additional useful information on the micro- plasma behaviour. The first fundamental implication of this new research is the peculiar behaviour of the micro-plasma. This micro-plasma exhibited deviations from Paschen law and strong dependency on cathode material, which contributed to the formation of a low current stable regime. These results have been followed by physical interpretations and theoretical descriptions. The second implication is the establishment of the boundaries and of the influencing parameters for plasma emission spectroscopy as an analytical tool in this particular micro-plasma. From the applied perspective this study has shown that

  7. Designing and modeling a centrifugal microfluidic device to separate target blood cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamloo, Amir; Selahi, AmirAli; Madadelahi, Masoud

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study is to design a novel and efficient portable lab-on-a-CD (LOCD) microfluidic device for separation of specific cells (target cells) using magnetic beads. In this study the results are shown for neutrophils as target cells. However, other kinds of target cells can be separated in a similar approach. The designed microfluidics can be utilized as a point of care system for neutrophil detection. This microfluidic system employs centrifugal and magnetic forces for separation. After model validation by the experimental data in the literature (that may be used as a design tool for developing centrifugo-magnetophoretic devices), two models are presented for separation of target cells using magnetic beads. The first model consists of one container in the inlet section and two containers in the outlets. Initially, the inlet container is filled with diluted blood sample which is a mixture of red blood cells (RBCs) plus neutrophils which are attached to Magnetic beads. It is shown that by using centrifugal and magnetic forces, this model can separate all neutrophils with recovery factor of ~100%. In the second model, due to excess of magnetic beads in usual experimental analysis (to ensure that all target cells are attached to them) the geometry is improved by adding a third outlet for these free magnetic beads. It is shown that at angular velocity of 45 rad s-1, recovery factor of 100% is achievable for RBCs, free magnetic beads and neutrophils as target cells.

  8. Designing and modeling a centrifugal microfluidic device to separate target blood cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study is to design a novel and efficient portable lab-on-a-CD (LOCD) microfluidic device for separation of specific cells (target cells) using magnetic beads. In this study the results are shown for neutrophils as target cells. However, other kinds of target cells can be separated in a similar approach. The designed microfluidics can be utilized as a point of care system for neutrophil detection. This microfluidic system employs centrifugal and magnetic forces for separation. After model validation by the experimental data in the literature (that may be used as a design tool for developing centrifugo-magnetophoretic devices), two models are presented for separation of target cells using magnetic beads. The first model consists of one container in the inlet section and two containers in the outlets. Initially, the inlet container is filled with diluted blood sample which is a mixture of red blood cells (RBCs) plus neutrophils which are attached to Magnetic beads. It is shown that by using centrifugal and magnetic forces, this model can separate all neutrophils with recovery factor of ∼100%. In the second model, due to excess of magnetic beads in usual experimental analysis (to ensure that all target cells are attached to them) the geometry is improved by adding a third outlet for these free magnetic beads. It is shown that at angular velocity of 45 rad s−1, recovery factor of 100% is achievable for RBCs, free magnetic beads and neutrophils as target cells. (paper)

  9. A novel method for assessing adherent single-cell stiffness in tension: design and testing of a substrate-based live cell functional imaging device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartalena, Guido; Grieder, Reto; Sharma, Ram I; Zambelli, Tomaso; Muff, Roman; Snedeker, Jess G

    2011-04-01

    Various micro-devices have been used to assess single cell mechanical properties. Here, we designed and implemented a novel, mechanically actuated, two dimensional cell culture system that enables a measure of cell stiffness based on quantitative functional imaging of cell-substrate interaction. Based on parametric finite element design analysis, we fabricated a soft (5 kPa) polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) cell substrate coated with collagen-I and fluorescent micro-beads, thus providing a favorable terrain for cell adhesion and for substrate deformation quantification, respectively. We employed a real-time tracking system that analyzes high magnification images of living cells under stretch, and compensates for gross substrate motions by dynamic adjustment of the microscope stage. Digital image correlation (DIC) was used to quantify substrate deformation beneath and surrounding the cell, leading to an estimate of cell stiffness based upon the ability of the cell to resist the applied substrate deformation. Sensitivity of the system was tested using chemical treatments to both "soften" and "stiffen" the cell cytoskeleton with either 0.5 μg/ml Cytochalasin-D or 3% Glutaraldehyde, respectively. Results indicate that untreated osteosarcoma cells (SAOS-2) exhibit a 1.5 ± 0.7% difference in strain from an applied target substrate strain of 8%. Compared to untreated cells, those treated with Cyochalasin-D passively followed the substrate (0.5 ± 0.5%, p deformation (2.9 ± 1.6%, p < 0.001). Nano-indentation testing showed differences in cell stiffness based on culture treatment, consistent with DIC findings. Our results indicate that mechanics and image analysis approaches do hold promise as a method to quantitatively assess tensile cell constitutive properties. PMID:21120698

  10. High-throughput blood cell focusing and plasma isolation using spiral inertial microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Nan; Ni, Zhonghua

    2015-12-01

    Herein, we explored the blood cell focusing and plasma isolation using a spiral inertial microfluidic device. First, the flow-rate and concentration effects on the migration dynamics of blood cells were systematically investigated to uncover the focusing mechanisms and steric crowding effects of cells in Dean-coupled inertial flows. A novel phenomenon that the focusing status of discoid red blood cells (RBCs) changes according to the channel height was discovered. These experimental data may provide valuable insights for the high-throughput processing of blood samples using inertial microfluidics. On the basis of the improved understandings on blood cell focusing, efficient isolation of plasma from whole blood with a 20-fold dilution was achieved at a throughput up to 700 μl/min. The purity of the isolated blood plasma was close to 100 %, and the plasma yield was calculated to be 38.5 %. As compared with previously-reported devices, our spiral inertial microfluidic device provides a balanced overall performance, and has overriding advantages in terms of processing throughput and operating efficiency.

  11. A hybrid microfluidic-vacuum device for direct interfacing with conventional cell culture methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monuki Edwin S

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microfluidics is an enabling technology with a number of advantages over traditional tissue culture methods when precise control of cellular microenvironment is required. However, there are a number of practical and technical limitations that impede wider implementation in routine biomedical research. Specialized equipment and protocols required for fabrication and setting up microfluidic experiments present hurdles for routine use by most biology laboratories. Results We have developed and validated a novel microfluidic device that can directly interface with conventional tissue culture methods to generate and maintain controlled soluble environments in a Petri dish. It incorporates separate sets of fluidic channels and vacuum networks on a single device that allows reversible application of microfluidic gradients onto wet cell culture surfaces. Stable, precise concentration gradients of soluble factors were generated using simple microfluidic channels that were attached to a perfusion system. We successfully demonstrated real-time optical live/dead cell imaging of neural stem cells exposed to a hydrogen peroxide gradient and chemotaxis of metastatic breast cancer cells in a growth factor gradient. Conclusion This paper describes the design and application of a versatile microfluidic device that can directly interface with conventional cell culture methods. This platform provides a simple yet versatile tool for incorporating the advantages of a microfluidic approach to biological assays without changing established tissue culture protocols.

  12. High-throughput blood cell focusing and plasma isolation using spiral inertial microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Nan; Ni, Zhonghua

    2015-12-01

    Herein, we explored the blood cell focusing and plasma isolation using a spiral inertial microfluidic device. First, the flow-rate and concentration effects on the migration dynamics of blood cells were systematically investigated to uncover the focusing mechanisms and steric crowding effects of cells in Dean-coupled inertial flows. A novel phenomenon that the focusing status of discoid red blood cells (RBCs) changes according to the channel height was discovered. These experimental data may provide valuable insights for the high-throughput processing of blood samples using inertial microfluidics. On the basis of the improved understandings on blood cell focusing, efficient isolation of plasma from whole blood with a 20-fold dilution was achieved at a throughput up to 700 μl/min. The purity of the isolated blood plasma was close to 100 %, and the plasma yield was calculated to be 38.5 %. As compared with previously-reported devices, our spiral inertial microfluidic device provides a balanced overall performance, and has overriding advantages in terms of processing throughput and operating efficiency. PMID:26553099

  13. A High Power-Density Mediator-Free Microfluidic Biophotovoltaic Device for Cyanobacterial Cells

    CERN Document Server

    Bombelli, Paolo; Herling, Therese W; Howe, Christopher J; Knowles, Tuomas P J

    2014-01-01

    Biophotovoltaics has emerged as a promising technology for generating renewable energy since it relies on living organisms as inexpensive, self-repairing and readily available catalysts to produce electricity from an abundant resource - sunlight. The efficiency of biophotovoltaic cells, however, has remained significantly lower than that achievable through synthetic materials. Here, we devise a platform to harness the large power densities afforded by miniaturised geometries. To this effect, we have developed a soft-lithography approach for the fabrication of microfluidic biophotovoltaic devices that do not require membranes or mediators. Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 cells were injected and allowed to settle on the anode, permitting the physical proximity between cells and electrode required for mediator-free operation. We demonstrate power densities of above 100 mW/m2 for a chlorophyll concentration of 100 {\\mu}M under white light, a high value for biophotovoltaic devices without extrinsic supply of additional...

  14. Biased decoy-state measurement-device-independent quantum cryptographic conferencing with finite resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, RuiKe; Bao, WanSu; Zhou, Chun; Li, Hongwei; Wang, Yang; Bao, HaiZe

    2016-03-21

    In recent years, a large quantity of work have been done to narrow the gap between theory and practice in quantum key distribution (QKD). However, most of them are focus on two-party protocols. Very recently, Yao Fu et al proposed a measurement-device-independent quantum cryptographic conferencing (MDI-QCC) protocol and proved its security in the limit of infinitely long keys. As a step towards practical application for MDI-QCC, we design a biased decoy-state measurement-device-independent quantum cryptographic conferencing protocol and analyze the performance of the protocol in both the finite-key and infinite-key regime. From numerical simulations, we show that our decoy-state analysis is tighter than Yao Fu et al. That is, we can achieve the nonzero asymptotic secret key rate in long distance with approximate to 200km and we also demonstrate that with a finite size of data (say 1011 to 1013 signals) it is possible to perform secure MDI-QCC over reasonable distances. PMID:27136849

  15. Characterization of Microfluidic Devices by Measurements with μ-PIV and CLSM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlter, Michael; Hoffmann, Marko; Rbiger, Norbert

    Microfluidic devices are successfully in use for several applications in chemical engineering and biotechnology. Nevertheless, there is still no breakthrough for microprocess engineering because of a huge lack in understanding of the mechanisms on microscales for momentum transfer, hydrodynamics and mass transfer. Some important questions concern the design of a junction to reach acceptable mixing qualities with minimum pressure drop and narrow residence time distribution even under laminar flow conditions. The micro-particle image velocimetry (μ-PIV) in conjunction with confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) have been used for the characterization of momentum and mass transfer at the Institute of Environmental Process Engineering to evaluate microfluidic devices. The calculation of three-dimensional flow and concentration fields is possible with two-dimensional measurement data for common stationary cases. Streamlines out of velocity gradients and isosurfaces out of fields of the same concentration are providing a helpful impression of the performance of microdevices based on highly reliable measurement data. A quantitative analysis of the velocity and concentration fields allows the calculation of residence-time distribution and mixing quality, which enables the adjustment of microreactor geometries for the demands of chemical, and biochemical reactions.

  16. Zeff profile measurement system with an optimized Czerny-Turner visible spectrometer in large helical device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeff measurement system using a visible spectrometer has been newly designed and constructed instead of an old interference filter system to eliminate line emissions from the signal and to measure the Zeff value in low-density plasmas. The system consists of the Czerny-Turner-type spectrometer with a charge-coupled device camera and 44 optical fibers vertical array. The spectrometer is equipped with an additional toroidal mirror for further reduction in the astigmatism in addition to a flat and two spherical mirrors and three gratings (110, 120, and 1200 grooves/mm) with 30 cm focal length. The images from 44 optical fibers can be detected without astigmatism in a wavelength range of 200-900 nm. Combination of the optical fiber (core diameter: 100 μm) with the lens (focal length: 30 mm) provides spatial resolution of 30 mm at the plasma center. Results clearly indicate a very good focus image of the fiber and suggest the absence of the cross-talk between adjacent fiber images. Absolute intensity calibration has been done using a standard tungsten lamp to analyze the Zeff value. The bremsstrahlung profile and resultant Zeff profile have been obtained after Abel inversion of the signals observed in large helical device plasmas with elliptical poloidal cross section.

  17. Measurements of undoped accumulation-mode SiGe quantum dot devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eng, Kevin; Borselli, Mathew; Holabird, Kevin; Milosavljevic, Ivan; Schmitz, Adele; Deelman, Peter; Huang, Biqin; Sokolich, Marko; Warren, Leslie; Hazard, Thomas; Kiselev, Andrey; Ross, Richard; Gyure, Mark; Hunter, Andrew

    2012-02-01

    We report transport measurements of undoped single-well accumulation-mode SiGe quantum dot devices with an integrated dot charge sensor. The device is designed so that individual forward-biased circular gates have dominant control of dot charge occupancy, and separate intervening gates have dominant control of tunnel rates and exchange coupling. We have demonstrated controlled loading of the first electron in single and double quantum dots. We used magneto-spectroscopy to measure singlet-triplet splittings in our quantum dots: values are typically ˜0.1 meV. Tunnel rates of single electrons to the baths can be controlled from less than 1 Hz to greater than 10 MHz. We are able to control the (0,2) to (1,1) coupling in a double quantum dot from under-coupled (tc Public Release, Distribution Unlimited. The views expressed are those of the author and do not reflect the official policy or position of the Department of Defense or the U.S. Government.

  18. A simple device for the measurement of kerma based on commercial PIN photo diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushpil, V.; Kushpil, S.; Huna, Z.

    2012-04-01

    The development of a dose reader for the measurement of the radiation dose from neutron and ionizing radiation is presented. The dose reader (kerma meter) is using as active element commercial PIN diodes with long base, which can provide a maximal dependence of the lifetime of minority carriers from the absorbed dose. We consider a simple theory of PIN diodes for the role of the kerma meter and discuss the idea for optimization of the calibration procedure. The characteristics of the dosimeter were measured for a few types of commercial diodes. The device can be useful for many practical tasks of control for radiation environments in the environment, nuclear physics and for industrial application.

  19. Automatic device for measuring β-emitting sources: P.A.P.A. β-meters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The apparatus described is designed for measuring β-emitting elements by the absorption method; it is suitable for carrying out a large number of routine analyses. A mechanical device pushes an aluminium absorption set automatically between the source and the detector; the movement is programmed for cutting on and off by a transistorized electronic unit, with printing out and punching of the results on tape; then this can be mathematically processed by a computer (tracing of absorption spectra, extrapolation and calculation of the activity). The detector is either a β-probe or a proportional counter with a specially designed loop. For routine measurements, the accuracy obtained, with all corrections made, is from 5 to 8 per cent; the reproducibility is about 2 per cent. (authors)

  20. DANCE device for measurement of (n, {gamma}) reactions on radioactive species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilhelmy, J.B.; Chamberlin, E.P.; Dragowsky, M.R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico (US)] [and others

    2002-08-01

    DANCE (Device for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments) is a 4{pi} 162 element BaF{sub 2} array under development at Los Alamos National Laboratory. It is designed to provide high granularity, fast timing and high photon detection efficiency. It will be located at the Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center where neutrons are produced using 800 MeV proton induced spallation reactions on heavy element production targets. Using the pulsed high neutron fluence available at this facility combined with time of flight techniques it will be possible to make neutron capture measurements in the neutron energy range from eV to 100's keV on rate and radioactive target material at the milligram and below level. These measurements will provide critically needed data for the interpretation of the astrophysical s-process 'branching point' nuclei as well as information for reactions needed in understanding transmutation processes of radioactive species. (author)

  1. DANCE : Device for Measurement of (n.g.) Reactions on radioactive Species /

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chamberlin, E. P. (Edwin P.); Dragowsky, M. (Michael); Fowler, Malcolm M.; Miller, G. G. (Geoffrey G.); Palmer, P. D. (Phillip D.); Pangualt, L. N. (Laurence N.); Rundberg, R. S. (Robert S.); Haight, Robert C.; Seabury, E. H. (Edward H.); Ullmann, J. L. (John L.); Strottman, D. D. (Daniel D.); Heil, M. (Michael); Kaeppeler, F. (Franz K.); Reifarth, R. (Rene); Wisshak, K.; Wilhelmy, J. B. (Jerry B.)

    2001-01-01

    DANCE (Device for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments) is a 4{pi} 162 element BaF{sub 2} array under development at Los Alamos National Laboratory. It is designed to provide high granularity, fast timing and high photon detection efficiency. It will be located at the Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center where neutrons are produced using 800 MeV proton induced spallation reactions on heavy element production targets. Using the pulsed high neutron fluence available at this facility combined with time of flight techniques it will be possible to make neutron capture measurements in the neutron energy range from eV to 100's of keV on rare and radioactive target material at the milligram and below level. These measurements will provide critically needed data for the interpretation of the astrophysical s-process 'branching point' nuclei as well as information for reactions needed in understanding transmutation processes of radioactive species.

  2. DANCE device for measurement of (n, γ) reactions on radioactive species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DANCE (Device for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments) is a 4π 162 element BaF2 array under development at Los Alamos National Laboratory. It is designed to provide high granularity, fast timing and high photon detection efficiency. It will be located at the Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center where neutrons are produced using 800 MeV proton induced spallation reactions on heavy element production targets. Using the pulsed high neutron fluence available at this facility combined with time of flight techniques it will be possible to make neutron capture measurements in the neutron energy range from eV to 100's keV on rate and radioactive target material at the milligram and below level. These measurements will provide critically needed data for the interpretation of the astrophysical s-process 'branching point' nuclei as well as information for reactions needed in understanding transmutation processes of radioactive species. (author)

  3. DANCE: Device for Measurement of (n.g.) Reactions on radioactive Species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DANCE (Device for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments) is a 4π 162 element BaF2 array under development at Los Alamos National Laboratory. It is designed to provide high granularity, fast timing and high photon detection efficiency. It will be located at the Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center where neutrons are produced using 800 MeV proton induced spallation reactions on heavy element production targets. Using the pulsed high neutron fluence available at this facility combined with time of flight techniques it will be possible to make neutron capture measurements in the neutron energy range from eV to 100's of keV on rare and radioactive target material at the milligram and below level. These measurements will provide critically needed data for the interpretation of the astrophysical s-process 'branching point' nuclei as well as information for reactions needed in understanding transmutation processes of radioactive species.

  4. Poster Abstract: Automatic Calibration of Device Attitude in Inertial Measurement Unit Based Traffic Probe Vehicles

    KAUST Repository

    Mousa, Mustafa

    2016-04-28

    Probe vehicles consist in mobile traffic sensor networks that evolve with the flow of vehicles, transmitting velocity and position measurements along their path, generated using GPSs. To address the urban positioning issues of GPSs, we propose to replace them with inertial measurement units onboard vehicles, to estimate vehicle location and attitude using inertial data only. While promising, this technology requires one to carefully calibrate the orientation of the device inside the vehicle to be able to process the acceleration and rate gyro data. In this article, we propose a scheme that can perform this calibration automatically by leveraging the kinematic constraints of ground vehicles, and that can be implemented on low-end computational platforms. Preliminary testing shows that the proposed scheme enables one to accurately estimate the actual accelerations and rotation rates in the vehicle coordinates. © 2016 IEEE.

  5. Out-of-focus effects on microscale schlieren measurements of mass transport in a microfluidic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shao-Tuan; Sun, Chen-li

    2016-08-01

    The microscale schlieren technique provides a means for a non-invasive, full-field measurement for mixing microfluidics with excellent sensitivity and resolution. Nevertheless, an out-of-focus effect due to microscopic optics may lead to undesirable errors in quantifying the gradient information at high degrees of magnification. If the channel in the microfluidic device under study is too deep, light deflection caused by inhomogeneity located far from the focal plane may contributes little to the intensity change on the image plane. To address this issue, we propose the use of a weighting function that approximates a Gaussian profile with an optical-system-dependable width. We assume that the resultant intensity change is proportional to a weighted sum of the gradient across the channel depth and acquire micro-schlieren images of fluid mixing in a T-junction microchannel at various positions along the optical axis. For each objective, the width of the weighting function is then determined iteratively by curve fitting the ratio of changes in grayscale readouts for out-of-focus and focus micro-schlieren images. The standard deviation in the Gaussian distribution facilitates the quantification of the out-of-focus effect. In addition, we measure the sensitivities of a microscale schlieren system equipped with different objectives and compare the values to the model. Despite its better resolution, we find that an objective with higher magnification suffers from a more severe out-of-focus effect and a loss of sensitivity. Equations are proposed for estimations of the standard deviation and the sensitivity of microscale schlieren measurements. The outcome will facilitate the selection of proper microchannel depths for various microscale schlieren systems or vice versa, thus improving the precision of micro-schlieren measurements in microfluidic devices.

  6. Biomechanical analysis of cancerous and normal cells based on bulge generation in a microfluidic device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yu Chang; Park, Sang-Jin; Park, Je-Kyun

    2008-10-01

    This paper presents a new biomechanical analysis method for discrimination between cancerous and normal cells through compression by poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) membrane deflection in a microfluidic device. When a cell is compressed, cellular membrane will expand and then small bulges will appear on the peripheral cell membrane beyond the allowable strain. It is well known that the amount of F-actin in cancer cells is less than that of normal cells and bulges occur at the sites where cytoskeleton becomes detached from the membrane bilayer. Accordingly, we have demonstrated the difference of the bulge generation between breast cancer cells (MCF7) and normal cells (MCF10A). After excessive deformation, the bulges generated in MCF7 cells were not evenly distributed on the cell periphery. Contrary to this, the bulges of MCF10A cells showed an even distribution. In addition, the morphologies of bulges of MCF7 and MCF10A cells looked swollen protrusion and tubular protrusion, respectively. Peripheral strains at the moment of the bulge generation were also 72% in MCF7 and 46% in MCF10A. The results show that the bulge generation can be correlated with the cytoskeleton quantity inside the cell, providing the first step of a new biomechanical approach. PMID:18810292

  7. Measurement of uranium and plutonium content in a fuel assembly using the RPI spent fuel assay device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we report measurements of the significant parameters, the sensitivities of the slowing-down-time assay device to the fissile contents of a boiling water reactor (BWR) assembly mock-up of fresh fuel

  8. Simultaneous optical losses and current measurements in photovoltaic devices at variable angle of the incident light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maddalena, P.; Tortora, P. [Universita di Napoli ' Frederico II' , Napoli (Italy). INFM, Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche; Parretta, A. [Centro Ricerche ENEA, Portici (Italy); Altermatt, P.; Zhao, J. [University of New South Wales, Sydney (Australia). Photovoltaic Special Research Centre

    2003-02-01

    In this work, the apparatus and the method for a simultaneous measurement of the optical losses and short-circuit current in a solar cell, at variable incidence angle of the light, is presented. The method has been applied to an n{sup +}/p c-Si cell with a polished surface. The investigation has been performed over an angular range from 8{sup o} to 80{sup o}, using a linearly polarized laser beam, either normally or parallelly polarized with respect to the incidence plane. The experimental curves of reflectance seem to be in a good agreement with the theoretical ones derived from the Fresnel equations. Since the measurements are performed inside an integrating sphere, a procedure has been developed to derive, from the total current I{sup tot}, the calculated direct one, I{sub dirCal} excluding contributions from the incoming light back-diffused to the cell under investigation; the results are compared with real direct-current measurement. Since with the proposed method both reflectance and current are measured for the same surface region and under identical illumination conditions, the results have been combined to get the internal spectral response of the n{sup +}/p c-Si polished surface solar cell. (author)

  9. Ultrasonic device for real-time sewage velocity and suspended particles concentration measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abda, F; Azbaid, A; Ensminger, D; Fischer, S; François, P; Schmitt, P; Pallarès, A

    2009-01-01

    In the frame of a technological research and innovation network in water and environment technologies (RITEAU, Réseau de Recherche et d'Innovation Technologique Eau et Environnement), our research group, in collaboration with industrial partners and other research institutions, has been in charge of the development of a suitable flowmeter: an ultrasonic device measuring simultaneously the water flow and the concentration of size classes of suspended particles. Working on the pulsed ultrasound principle, our multi-frequency device (1 to 14 MHz) allows flow velocity and water height measurement and estimation of suspended solids concentration. Velocity measurements rely on the coherent Doppler principle. A self developed frequency estimator, so called Spectral Identification method, was used and compared to the classical Pulse-Pair method. Several measurements campaigns on one wastewater collector of the French city of Strasbourg gave very satisfactory results and showed smaller standard deviation values for the Doppler frequency extracted by the Spectral Identification method. A specific algorithm was also developed for the water height measurements. It relies on the water surface acoustic impedance rupture and its peak localisation and behaviour in the collected backscattering data. This algorithm was positively tested on long time measurements on the same wastewater collector. A large part of the article is devoted to the measurements of the suspended solids concentrations. Our data analysis consists in the adaptation of the well described acoustic behaviour of sand to the behaviour of wastewater particles. Both acoustic attenuation and acoustic backscattering data over multiple frequencies are analyzed for the extrapolation of size classes and respective concentrations. Under dry weather conditions, the massic backscattering coefficient and the overall size distribution showed similar evolution whatever the measurement site was and were suggesting a global

  10. Ultrasonic device for real-time sewage velocity and suspended particles concentration measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abda, F; Azbaid, A; Ensminger, D; Fischer, S; François, P; Schmitt, P; Pallarès, A

    2009-01-01

    In the frame of a technological research and innovation network in water and environment technologies (RITEAU, Réseau de Recherche et d'Innovation Technologique Eau et Environnement), our research group, in collaboration with industrial partners and other research institutions, has been in charge of the development of a suitable flowmeter: an ultrasonic device measuring simultaneously the water flow and the concentration of size classes of suspended particles. Working on the pulsed ultrasound principle, our multi-frequency device (1 to 14 MHz) allows flow velocity and water height measurement and estimation of suspended solids concentration. Velocity measurements rely on the coherent Doppler principle. A self developed frequency estimator, so called Spectral Identification method, was used and compared to the classical Pulse-Pair method. Several measurements campaigns on one wastewater collector of the French city of Strasbourg gave very satisfactory results and showed smaller standard deviation values for the Doppler frequency extracted by the Spectral Identification method. A specific algorithm was also developed for the water height measurements. It relies on the water surface acoustic impedance rupture and its peak localisation and behaviour in the collected backscattering data. This algorithm was positively tested on long time measurements on the same wastewater collector. A large part of the article is devoted to the measurements of the suspended solids concentrations. Our data analysis consists in the adaptation of the well described acoustic behaviour of sand to the behaviour of wastewater particles. Both acoustic attenuation and acoustic backscattering data over multiple frequencies are analyzed for the extrapolation of size classes and respective concentrations. Under dry weather conditions, the massic backscattering coefficient and the overall size distribution showed similar evolution whatever the measurement site was and were suggesting a global

  11. Provision Of Carbon Nanotube Bucky Paper Cages For Immune Shielding Of Cells, Tissues, and Medical Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loftus, David J. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    System and method for enclosing cells and/or tissue, for purposes of growth, cell differentiation, suppression of cell differentiation, biological processing and/or transplantation of cells and tissues (biological inserts), and for secretion, sensing and monitoring of selected chemical substances and activation of gene expression of biological inserts implanted into a human body. Selected cells and/or tissue are enveloped in a "cage" that is primarily carbon nanotube Bucky paper, with a selected thickness and porosity. Optionally, selected functional groups, proteins and/or peptides are attached to the carbon nanotube cage, or included within the cage, to enhance the growth and/or differentiation of the cells and/or tissue, to select for certain cellular sub-populations, to optimize certain functions of the cells and/or tissue and/or to optimize the passage of chemicals across the cage surface(s). A cage system is also used as an immuns shield and to control operation of a nano-device or macroscopic device, located within the cage, to provide or transform a selected chemical and/or a selected signal.

  12. Performance evaluation of aluminum/phosphate cell for powering small electronic devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gymama Slaughter

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We report on an innovative membrane-free aluminum/phosphate cell based on the activation of aluminum (Al as anodic material using ZnO nanocrystal in phosphate rich electrolyte that is capable of generating sufficient power to power a light-emitting diode (LED, selected as a model of a small electronic device. The energy from the cell is periodically supplied in high power bursts due to the charge and discharge cycle of the capacitor. The entire process is controlled by a switched capacitor regulator. The Al/phosphate cell was studied in neutral 100 mM phosphate buffer solution (7.4 at a temperature of 25 °C. We demonstrate that two Al/phosphate cells connected in series can generate an open circuit voltage (Voc up to 1.66 V to continuously power a LED via a switched capacitor regulator circuit. The switched capacitor regulator circuit enabled the 1 μF capacitor to store the incoming power from the cell and discharge it in a large power burst to supply the necessary drive strength required by the LED. This new Al/phosphate cell configuration is a ‘green’ alternative to the use of glucose abiotic and biofuel cells for powering ultra-low power implantable electronic devices.

  13. Small and useful. A comparative evaluation of hand radiation measurement devices; Klein und nuetzlich. Handeinstrahlungsmessgeraete im Vergleich

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weinreich, Bernhard

    2009-05-15

    They exist at least as long as the photovoltaic industry itself, however they are not spread too much - we talk about hand radiation measurement devices. These devices originally come from the field of meteorology. Even though they measure the most important magnitude in the field of photovoltaics at all, namely the global radiation, the eke out a wretched existence. Hence it's about high time to draw the attention to these helpers. (orig.)

  14. Experimental device for measurement of dielectronic recombination cross section of C3+: method of confluent beam method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Description of an instrumental device allowing dielectronic recombination cross section measurement is presented. Recombination of C3+ for high quantum number is studied. This device, using the confluent beam method, entailed the development of an electron gun producing weakly divergent beam. A detector of highly excited ion allowing a quick and accurate measurement of ion beam energy is described in detail. Beam-residual gas interaction mechanisms are studied and instrumental incertitudes are calculated

  15. MELIFT - A new device for accurate measurements in a snow rich environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorninger, M.

    2012-04-01

    A deep snow pack, remote locations, no external power supply and very low temperatures are often the main ingredients when it comes to the deployment of meteorological stations in mountainous terrain. The accurate position of the sensor related to the snow surface is normally not known. A new device called METLIFT overcomes the problems. WMO recommends a height between 1.2 m and 2 m above ground level for the measurement of air temperature and humidity. The height above ground level is specified to take care of the possible strong vertical temperature and humidity gradients at the lowest layers in the atmosphere. Especially in snow rich and remote locations it may be hardly possible to follow this advice. Therefore most of the meteorological stations in mountainous terrain are situated at mountain tops where strong winds will blow off the snow or in valleys where a daily inspection of the sensors is possible. In other unpopulated mountainous areas, e.g. basins, plateaus, the distance of the sensor to the snow surface is not known or the sensor will be snow-covered. A new device was developed to guarantee the sensor height above surface within the WMO limits in harsh and remote environments. An ultrasonic snow height sensor measures the distance to the snow surface. If it exceeds certain limits due to snow accumulation or snow melt the lift adapts its height accordingly. The prototype of METLIFT has been installed in Lower Austria at an altitude of 1000m. The lift is 6 m high and can pull out for another 4 m. Sensor arms are mounted every meter to allow the connection of additional sensors or to measure a profile of a certain parameter of the lowest 5 m above surface. Sensors can be added easily since cable wiring is provided to each sensor arm. Horizontal winds are measured at 7 m height above surface. METLIFT is independent of external power supply. Three lead gel accumulators recharged by three solar panels provide the energy necessary for the sensors, the data

  16. Investigation of doxorubicin for multidrug resistance using a fluorescent cytometric imaging system integrated onto cell culture analog devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Donghyun; Xu, Hui; Kim, Sung J.; Shuler, Michael L.

    2004-06-01

    An integrated cytometric fluorescent imaging system is developed for characterizing chemical concentration and cellular status in microscale cell culture analog (μCCA) devices. A μCCA is used to evaluate the potential toxicity and efficacy of proposed pharmaceutical treatment of animals or humans. The imaging system, based on discrete optical components, not only provides a robust and compact tool for real-time measurements, but the modularity of the system also offers flexibility to be applicable to various μCCA structures that may be appropriate to various animal or human models. We investigate the dynamics of doxorubicin, a chemotherapeutic agent, on cultured cells in a μCCA using the integrated cytometric fluorescent imaging system. This study incorporates two uteran cancer cell lines representing a sensitive cell type and a multi-drug resistant (MDR) derivative cell line. The ultimate goal is to test the effect of MDR modulators in combination with doxorubicin to kill cancer cells while not causing undue harm to normal cells.

  17. Overview on the application of direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) for portable electronic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamarudin, S.K. [Fuel Cell Institute, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 UKM Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Department of Chemical and Process Engineering, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 UKM Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Achmad, F.; Daud, W.R.W. [Fuel Cell Institute, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 UKM Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2009-08-15

    Technologically advanced human societies require specialized tools and equipment to enable their diverse and mobile activities. Portable electronic devices like laptop, PDA, handphone, etc. are now an essential tool for many people in their daily lives. The rechargeable batteries used to power the portable electronic devices could be improved upon with regards to power density, and there is a crucial need for efficient, renewable and more environmentally friendly power sources. Many researchers have shown that the direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) is an appropriate alternative to rechargeable battery technology, although many factors must be resolved before it can be commercialized. This paper gives an overview on the possibilities for using the DMFC as portable electronic devices power source along with some views on current and future trends in DMFC development, economic analysis and presents the current problems and solutions by DMFC researchers. (author)

  18. Advances in colloidal quantum dot solar cells: The depleted-heterojunction device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colloidal quantum dot (CQD) photovoltaics combine low-cost solution processibility with quantum size-effect tunability to match absorption with the solar spectrum. Recent advances in CQD photovoltaics have led to 3.6% AM1.5 solar power conversion efficiencies. Here we report CQD photovoltaic devices on transparent conductive oxides and show that our devices rely on the establishment of a depletion region for field-driven charge transport and separation. The resultant depleted-heterojunction solar cells provide a 5.1% AM1.5 power conversion efficiency. The devices employ infrared-bandgap size-effect-tuned PbS colloidal quantum dots, enabling broadband harvesting of the solar spectrum.

  19. RETRACTED: Advances in colloidal quantum dot solar cells: The depleted-heterojunction device

    KAUST Repository

    Kramer, Illan J.

    2011-08-01

    Colloidal quantum dot (CQD) photovoltaics combine low-cost solution processibility with quantum size-effect tunability to match absorption with the solar spectrum. Recent advances in CQD photovoltaics have led to 3.6% AM1.5 solar power conversion efficiencies. Here we report CQD photovoltaic devices on transparent conductive oxides and show that our devices rely on the establishment of a depletion region for field-driven charge transport and separation. The resultant depleted-heterojunction solar cells provide a 5.1% AM1.5 power conversion efficiency. The devices employ infrared-bandgap size-effect-tuned PbS colloidal quantum dots, enabling broadband harvesting of the solar spectrum. © 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  20. Reversible energy storage on a fuel cell-supercapacitor hybrid device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zerpa Unda, Jesus Enrique

    2011-02-18

    A new concept of energy storage based on hydrogen which operates reversibly near ambient conditions and without important energy losses is investigated. This concept involves the hybridization between a proton exchange membrane fuel cell and a supercapacitor. The main idea consists in the electrochemical splitting of hydrogen at a PEM fuel cell-type electrode into protons and electrons and then in the storage of these two species separately in the electrical double layer of a supercapacitor-type electrode which is made of electrically conductive large-surface area carbon materials. The investigation of this concept was performed first using a two-electrode fuel cell-supercapacitor hybrid device. A three-electrode hybrid cell was used to explore the application of this concept as a hydrogen buffer integrated inside a PEM fuel cell to be used in case of peak power demand. (orig.)

  1. Atomistic simulations of electrochemical metallization cells: mechanisms of ultra-fast resistance switching in nanoscale devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onofrio, Nicolas; Guzman, David; Strachan, Alejandro

    2016-07-01

    We describe a new method that enables reactive molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of electrochemical processes and apply it to study electrochemical metallization cells (ECMs). The model, called EChemDID, extends the charge equilibration method to capture the effect of external electrochemical potential on partial atomic charges and describes its equilibration over connected metallic structures, on-the-fly, during the MD simulation. We use EChemDID to simulate resistance switching in nanoscale ECMs; these devices consist of an electroactive metal separated from an inactive electrode by an insulator and can be reversibly switched to a low-resistance state by the electrochemical formation of a conducting filament between electrodes. Our structures use Cu as the active electrode and SiO2 as the dielectric and have dimensions at the foreseen limit of scalability of the technology, with a dielectric thickness of approximately 1 nm. We explore the effect of device geometry on switching timescales and find that nanowires with an electroactive shell, where ions migrate towards a smaller inactive electrode core, result in faster switching than planar devices. We observe significant device-to-device variability in switching timescales and intermittent switching for these nanoscale devices. To characterize the evolution in the electronic structure of the dielectric as dissolved metallic ions switch the device, we perform density functional theory calculations on structures obtained from an EChemDID MD simulation. These results confirm the appearance of states around the Fermi energy as the metallic filament bridges the electrodes and show that the metallic ions and not defects in the dielectric contribute to the majority of those states.

  2. Atomistic simulations of electrochemical metallization cells: mechanisms of ultra-fast resistance switching in nanoscale devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onofrio, Nicolas; Guzman, David; Strachan, Alejandro

    2016-08-01

    We describe a new method that enables reactive molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of electrochemical processes and apply it to study electrochemical metallization cells (ECMs). The model, called EChemDID, extends the charge equilibration method to capture the effect of external electrochemical potential on partial atomic charges and describes its equilibration over connected metallic structures, on-the-fly, during the MD simulation. We use EChemDID to simulate resistance switching in nanoscale ECMs; these devices consist of an electroactive metal separated from an inactive electrode by an insulator and can be reversibly switched to a low-resistance state by the electrochemical formation of a conducting filament between electrodes. Our structures use Cu as the active electrode and SiO2 as the dielectric and have dimensions at the foreseen limit of scalability of the technology, with a dielectric thickness of approximately 1 nm. We explore the effect of device geometry on switching timescales and find that nanowires with an electroactive shell, where ions migrate towards a smaller inactive electrode core, result in faster switching than planar devices. We observe significant device-to-device variability in switching timescales and intermittent switching for these nanoscale devices. To characterize the evolution in the electronic structure of the dielectric as dissolved metallic ions switch the device, we perform density functional theory calculations on structures obtained from an EChemDID MD simulation. These results confirm the appearance of states around the Fermi energy as the metallic filament bridges the electrodes and show that the metallic ions and not defects in the dielectric contribute to the majority of those states. PMID:27218609

  3. Atomistic simulations of electrochemical metallization cells: mechanisms of ultra-fast resistance switching in nanoscale devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onofrio, Nicolas; Guzman, David; Strachan, Alejandro

    2016-08-01

    We describe a new method that enables reactive molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of electrochemical processes and apply it to study electrochemical metallization cells (ECMs). The model, called EChemDID, extends the charge equilibration method to capture the effect of external electrochemical potential on partial atomic charges and describes its equilibration over connected metallic structures, on-the-fly, during the MD simulation. We use EChemDID to simulate resistance switching in nanoscale ECMs; these devices consist of an electroactive metal separated from an inactive electrode by an insulator and can be reversibly switched to a low-resistance state by the electrochemical formation of a conducting filament between electrodes. Our structures use Cu as the active electrode and SiO2 as the dielectric and have dimensions at the foreseen limit of scalability of the technology, with a dielectric thickness of approximately 1 nm. We explore the effect of device geometry on switching timescales and find that nanowires with an electroactive shell, where ions migrate towards a smaller inactive electrode core, result in faster switching than planar devices. We observe significant device-to-device variability in switching timescales and intermittent switching for these nanoscale devices. To characterize the evolution in the electronic structure of the dielectric as dissolved metallic ions switch the device, we perform density functional theory calculations on structures obtained from an EChemDID MD simulation. These results confirm the appearance of states around the Fermi energy as the metallic filament bridges the electrodes and show that the metallic ions and not defects in the dielectric contribute to the majority of those states.

  4. Study of single-event phenomena on recent semiconductor devices. Development of a new measuring method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirao, Toshio; Laird, Jamie S.; Ito, Hisayoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment; Mori, Hidenobu; Onoda, Shinobu [Tokai Univ., Tokyo (Japan)

    2001-02-01

    For practical use of semiconductor devices and integrator circuits in the cosmic environment, it is most important to take measures for the single-event-upset phenomena induced by heavy ion incidence. Transient currents of pico-second in a pn junction diode induced by heavy ion incidence are measured for investigation of single-event-upset mechanism. Transient-ion beam induced charge collection (TIBIC) system which consists of single-event transient current measuring system and a fast beam switch installed in heavy ion beam line is developed for reducing radiation damage of the pn junction diode resulting from heavy ion incidence. The TIBIC system is able to observe a wave form of single-event transient current, as well as an image for location of heavy ion incidence. Silicon and gallium arsenic diodes with sensitive area of 50 {mu} m {phi} are irradiated by 15 MeV carbon ion of 1 {mu} m width. Transient current wave forms of single event at the centre and edge region of the diode are measured. Images produced from the transient current data are taken by a photograph. The TIBIC system is expected to be able to observe directly the charge behaviors of single-event phenomena in semiconductor diode generated by a single ion incidence, and to reduce radiation damage of the diode. (M. Suetake)

  5. Thermal properties measurement of dry bulk materials with a cylindrical three layers device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jannot, Y.; Degiovanni, A.

    2013-09-01

    This paper presents a new method dedicated to thermal properties (conductivity and diffusivity) measurement of dry bulk materials including powders. The cylindrical three layers experimental device (brass/bulk material/stainless steel) and the principle of the measurement method based on a crenel thermal excitation are presented. The one-dimensional modeling of the system is used for a sensitivity analysis and to calculate the standard deviation of the estimation error. Experimental measurements are carried out on three bulk materials: glass beads, cork granules, and expanded polystyrene beads. The estimated thermal properties are compared with the values obtained by other measurement methods. Results are in good agreement with theoretical predictions: both thermal conductivity and diffusivity can be estimated with a good accuracy for low density material like cork granules or expanded polystyrene beads since only thermal diffusivity can be estimated for heavier materials like glass beads. It is finally shown that this method like all transient methods is not suited to the thermal characterization of wet bulk materials.

  6. Device for measuring the ion angular distribution of 2XIIB plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, B.

    1977-04-06

    A device that measures charge-exchange flux to determine the angular distribution of the 2XIIB plasma is described. Charge-exchange products heat circular nickel foils (placed at 15/sup 0/ intervals in theta and at constant radius on an arc parallel to the z-axis) and the voltage drop across the foils (produced by constant-current sources) provides a measure of the changes in resistivity. The charge-exchange flux at each foil is proportional to the plasma distribution at that angle. Use of this technique is limited by the resistivity and heat resistance of the circular nickel foils, but could conceivably be extended to other shapes and materials. The Hall-Simonen and ''time-average'' measurement of angular distribution are compared and the characteristic times of loss (gain) are calculated from theory. The g(..mu..) detector may be used to experimentally verify these times of loss (gain) and also to analyze plasma pressure stability. Current microwave measurements show that plasma has an exponential density dependence in z and assumes a flux tube rather than a p(B) density dependence. A distinct angular distribution (determinable by the detector) is associated with each of these dependencies. The codes to simulate injection and resulting angular distribution, charge-exchange capture, and heating and signal of the detectors are also described.

  7. Energy reduction in buildings in temperate and tropic regions utilizing a heat loss measuring device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lars Schiøtt

    2012-01-01

    losses from building envelopes are of great impor­tance in order to reach the Bologna CO2-emission reduction goals. Energy renovation of buildings is a topic of huge focus around the world these years. Not only expenses for heating in the tempered and arctic regions are of importance, but also expenses...... to ACMV in the "warm countries" contribute to an enormous energy consumption and corresponding CO2 emission. In order to establish the best basis for energy renovation, it is important to have measures of the heat losses on a building façade, for optimizing the energy renovation. This paper will present...... a new method for measuring the heat loss by utilizing a so called U-value Meter [Sørensen 2010]. The U-value Meter is a heat loss measuring device and has been used in several energy renovation projects in tempered regions and is now planned to be utilized in the tropics for measuring the heat...

  8. Field Measurements to Characterize Turbulent Inflow for Marine Hydrokinetic Devices - Marrowstone Island, WA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, M. C.; Thomson, J. M.; Durgesh, V.; Polagye, B. L.

    2011-12-01

    Field measurements are essential for developing an improved understanding of turbulent inflow conditions that affect the design and operation of marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) devices. The Marrowstone Island site in Puget Sound, Washington State is a potential location for installing MHK devices, as it experiences strong tides and associated currents. Here, field measurements from Nodule Point on the eastern side of Marrowstone Island are used to characterize the turbulence in terms of velocity variance as a function of length and time scales. The field measurements were performed using Acoustic Doppler Velocimetry (ADV) and Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) instruments. Both were deployed on a bottom-mounted tripod at the site by the Applied Physics Lab at the University of Washington (APL-UW). The ADV acquired single point, temporally resolved velocity data from 17-21 Feb 2011, at a height of 4.6 m above the seabed at a sampling frequency of 32 Hz. The ADCP measured the velocity profile over the water column from a height of 2.6 m above the seabed up to the sea-surface in 36 bins, with each bin of 0.5 m size. The ADCP acquired data from 11-27 Feb 2011 at a sampling frequency of 2 Hz. Analysis of the ADV measurements shows distinct dynamic regions by scale: anisotropic eddies at large scales, an isotropic turbulent cascade (-5/3 slope in frequency spectra) at mesoscales, and contamination by Doppler noise at small scales. While Doppler noise is an order of magnitude greater for the ADCP measurements, the turbulence bulk statistics are consistent between the two instruments. There are significant variations in turbulence statistics with stage of the tidal currents (i.e., from slack to non-slack tidal conditions), however an average turbulent intensity of 10% is a robust, canonical value for this site. The ADCP velocity profiles are useful in quantifying the variability in velocity along the water column, and the ensemble averaged velocity profiles may be

  9. Experimental measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution with imperfect sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zhiyuan; Wei, Kejin; Bedroya, Olinka; Qian, Li; Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    2016-04-01

    Measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (MDI-QKD), which is immune to all detector side-channel attacks, is the most promising solution to the security issues in practical quantum key distribution systems. Although several experimental demonstrations of MDI-QKD have been reported, they all make one crucial but not yet verified assumption, that is, there are no flaws in state preparation. Such an assumption is unrealistic and security loopholes remain in the source. Here we present a MDI-QKD experiment with the modulation error taken into consideration. By applying the loss-tolerant security proof by Tamaki et al. [Phys. Rev. A 90, 052314 (2014)], 10.1103/PhysRevA.90.052314, we distribute secure keys over fiber links up to 40 km with imperfect sources, which would not have been possible under previous security proofs. By simultaneously closing loopholes at the detectors and a critical loophole—modulation error in the source, our work shows the feasibility of secure QKD with practical imperfect devices.

  10. Novel device for simultaneous volumetric and x-ray diffraction measurements on metal-hydrogen systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talagañis, B. A.; Castro, F. J.; Baruj, A.; Meyer, G.

    2009-07-01

    Hydrogen storage materials can form more than one hydride phase. These different phases, in turn, display different hydrogen absorption/desorption capacities, kinetics, and stabilities. Studies aimed at characterizing and improving these materials usually need to correlate hydrogen intake with the precise determination of the hydride phase involved in the process. Here, we present a device designed to perform measurements of well known volumetric techniques with simultaneous x-ray diffraction on the material under study. The compact design can stand up to 6000 kPa of internal pressure while the sample can be heated up to 450 °C. The design process was assisted by finite element modeling and by the use of mock-up prototypes in order to optimize the thermal and under load behaviors. We provide two examples of use for this new device: (1) hydride decomposition in LaNi5 at 115 °C and (2) formation of MgCo during the programmed thermal desorption of the Mg2CoH5 hydride.

  11. Evolution of the Sensor Fish Device for Measuring Physical Conditions in Severe Hydraulic Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, Thomas J.; Duncan, Joanne P.

    2003-02-28

    To assist in deriving biological specifications for design of turbine rehabilitation measures, new ''fish-friendly'' turbines, and spillway designs and operations, scientists at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) have developed and tested an autonomous multi-sensor device called a Sensor Fish that can acquire pressure and tri-axial linear acceleration data during passage through severe hydraulic conditions. The purpose of the Sensor Fish is to characterize physical conditions fish experience during passage through hydro turbines, spill stilling basins, high-discharge outfalls, and other dam passage routes. The Sensor Fish was developed with the support of the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Hydropower Turbine System program. Field tests of the Sensor Fish at Rock Island, McNary, The Dalles, Bonneville, and Wanapum dams on the Columbia River and the Prosser Irrigation District on the Yakima River have shown that the device can withstand the severe environments of turbine, spill, and fish bypass passage and provide useful environmental data that can ultimately aid in the design and operation of new and existing turbines, spill, and dam fish bypass facilities.

  12. Evolution of the sensor fish device for measuring physical conditions in sever hydraulic environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, Thomas J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Duncan, J. P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2003-03-01

    To assist in deriving biological specifications for design of turbine rehabilitation measures, new “fish-friendly” turbines, and spillway designs and operations, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) scientists have developed and tested an autonomous multi-sensor device called a Sensor Fish that can acquire pressure and tri-axial linear acceleration data during passage through severe hydraulic conditions. The purpose of the Sensor Fish is to characterize physical conditions fish experience during passage through hydro turbines, spill stilling basins, high-discharge outfalls, and other dam passage routes. This report discusses the development and field tests of the Sensor Fish at Rock Island, McNary, The Dalles, Bonneville, and Wanapum dams on the Columbia River and the Prosser Irrigation District on the Yakima River, which have shown that the device can withstand the severe environments of turbine, spill, and fish bypass passage and provide useful environmental data that can ultimately aid in the design and operation of new and existing turbines, spill, and dam fish bypass facilities.

  13. Modeling and Measuring the Interaction between Hydrokinetic Devices and the Hydraulic and Sedimentary Environment of the Tanana River, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravens, T. M.; Kartezhnikova, M.; Edgerly, E.; Opsahl, B.; Hansen, N.; Kasper, J.; Schmid, J.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we report on our efforts to model and measure the interaction between hydrokinetic (HK) devices and the hydraulic and sedimentary environment of the Tanana River, by Nenana Alaska. The Tanana River, by Nenana Alaska, has an open-water median flow rate of about 1325 m3/s, a width of about 200 m, a maximum depth of about 9 m, peak flow velocities of about 2.5 m/s, and suspended sediment concentrations as high as 2 g/L. Preliminary modeling of the hydraulic impact of a 45 KW cross-flow-style HK turbine using SNL-EFDC software found that the device raised water levels upstream of the device by about 0.5 cm. It also led to reductions in velocity of about 0.05 m and enhancements of about 0.01 m/s. In this paper, we will report on ongoing efforts to model the corresponding sedimentary impacts of HK devices at this location. In late August of 2014, a 15 KW open-center-style hydrokinetic turbine (manufactured by Oceana Energy Corporation) was deployed for a three week period at the Tanana River site. Device performance (e.g., power generation and angular frequency (rpm's)) were monitored along with environmental parameters including: velocity as a function of depth upstream and downstream of the device, turbulence at "hub elevation" upstream and downstream of the device, suspended sediment concentration upstream and downstream of the device, and sediment bed elevation before and after testing. In this paper, we will report on all of these data as well as data on the abrasion of device components. Further, we will present data on the dependence of device coefficient of performance and turbulence intensity. Finally, we will compare modeled and measured hydraulic and sedimentary impacts of the HK device.

  14. Solid-state devices for detection of DNA, protein biomarkers and cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asghar, Waseem

    Nanobiotechnology and BioMEMS have had tremendous impact on biosensing in the areas of cancer cell detection and therapeutics, disease diagnostics, proteomics and DNA analysis. Diseases are expressed on all levels including DNA, protein, cell and tissue. Therefore it is very critical to develop biosensors at each level. The power of the nanotechnology lies in the fact that we can fabricate devices on all scales from micro to nano. This dissertation focuses on four areas: 1) Development of nanopore sensors for DNA analysis; 2) Development of micropore sensors for early detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from whole blood; 3) Synthesis of nano-textured substrates for cancer isolation and tissue culture applications; 4) Fabrication of nanoscale break-junctions. All of these sensors are fabricated using standard silicon processing techniques. Pulsed plasma polymer deposition is also utilized to control the density of the biosensor surface charges. These devices are then used for efficient detection of DNA, proteins and cells, and can be potentially used in point-of-care systems. Overall, our designed biosensing platforms offer improved selectivity, yield and reliability. Novel approaches to nanopore shrinking are simple, reliable and do not change the material composition around the pore boundary. The micropores provide a direct interface to distinguish CTCs from normal cell without requiring fluorescent dyes and surface functionalization. Nano-textured surfaces and break-junctions can be used for enhanced adhesion of cells and selective detection of proteins respectively.

  15. Method for contact resistivity measurements on photovoltaic cells and cell adapted for such measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Dale R. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A method is disclosed for scribing at least three grid contacts of a photovoltaic cell to electrically isolate them from the grid contact pattern used to collect solar current generated by the cell, and using the scribed segments for determining parameters of the cell by a combination of contact end resistance (CER) measurements using a minimum of three equally or unequally spaced lines, and transmission line modal (TLM) measurements using a minimum of four unequally spaced lines. TLM measurements may be used to determine sheet resistance under the contact, R.sub.sk, while CER measurements are used to determine contact resistivity, .rho..sub.c, from a nomograph of contact resistivity as a function of contact end resistance and sheet resistivity under the contact. In some cases, such as the case of silicon photovoltaic cells, sheet resistivity under the contact may be assumed to be equal to the known sheet resistance, R.sub.s, of the semiconductor material, thereby obviating the need for TLM measurements to determine R.sub.sk.

  16. Piezoelectric actuator-based cell microstretch device with real-time imaging capability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinji Deguchi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Cellular response to physical stretch has been extensively studied as a regulator of various physiological functions. For live cell microscopy combined with stretch experiments, cells are typically seeded on an extensible elastomer sheet. In this case, the position of the cells of interest tends to shift out of the field of view upon stretch, making real-time imaging of identical cells difficult. To circumvent this situation, here we describe a robust methodology in which these cell shifts are minimized. Cells are plated in a custom-designed stretch chamber with an elastomer sheet of a small cell culture area. The cell-supporting chamber is stretched on an inverted microscope by using a piezoelectric actuator that provides small, but precisely controlled displacements. Even under this small displacement within the filed of view, our device allows the cells to undergo physiologically relevant levels of stretch. Identical cells can thus be continuously observed during stretching, thereby potentially enabling imaging of stretch-triggered fast dynamics.

  17. Cobalt-Based Electrolytes for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells: Recent Advances towards Stable Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Bella

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Redox mediators based on cobalt complexes allowed dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs to achieve efficiencies exceeding 14%, thus challenging the emerging class of perovskite solar cells. Unfortunately, cobalt-based electrolytes demonstrate much lower long-term stability trends if compared to the traditional iodide/triiodide redox couple. In view of the large-scale commercialization of cobalt-based DSCs, the scientific community has recently proposed various approaches and materials to increase the stability of these devices, which comprise gelling agents, crosslinked polymeric matrices and mixtures of solvents (including water. This review summarizes the most significant advances recently focused towards this direction, also suggesting some intriguing way to fabricate third-generation cobalt-based photoelectrochemical devices stable over time.

  18. Materials Research Advances towards High-Capacity Battery/Fuel Cell Devices (Invited paper)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-Dong He; Lu-Han Ye; Ke-Chun Wen; Ya-Chun Liang; Wei-Qiang Lv; Gao-Long Zhu; Kelvin H. L. Zhang

    2016-01-01

    The world has entered an era featured with fast transportations, instant communications, and prompt technological revolutions, the further advancement of which all relies fundamentally, yet, on the development of cost-effective energy resources allowing for durable and high-rate energy supply. Current battery and fuel cell systems are challenged by a few issues characterized either by insufficient energy capacity or by operation instability and, thus, are not ideal for such highly-demanded applications as electrical vehicles and portable electronic devices. In this mini-review, we present, from materials perspectives, a few selected important breakthroughs in energy resources employed in these applications. Prospectives are then given to look towards future research activities for seeking viable materials solutions for addressing the capacity, durability, and cost shortcomings associated with current battery/fuel cell devices.

  19. Microfluidic Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Yu-Chong (Inventor); Zheng, Siyang (Inventor); Lin, Jeffrey Chun-Hui (Inventor); Kasdan, Harvey L. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Described herein are particular embodiments relating to a microfluidic device that may be utilized for cell sensing, counting, and/or sorting. Particular aspects relate to a microfabricated device that is capable of differentiating single cell types from dense cell populations. One particular embodiment relates a device and methods of using the same for sensing, counting, and/or sorting leukocytes from whole, undiluted blood samples.

  20. Measuring the energy consumption of single-phase UPS-devices; Energiemessungen von 1-phasigen USV-Anlagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bush, E. [Bush Energie GmbH, Felsberg (Switzerland); Schalcher, M.; Bruggmann, T.; Kuehne, P.; Kammermann, S. [Hochschule fuer Technik und Wirtschaft Chur, Chur (Switzerland)

    2007-11-15

    In the present measuring project, 46 single-phase uninterruptible power supplies (UPS-devices) in the power range from 350 VA up to 3000 VA could be measured with regard to efficiency and energy consumption, at Testlabor S.A.L.T., Chur, Switzerland. The classification into VFD-, VI- and VFI-devices as well as the carrying out of the measuring was accomplished in compliance with IEC 62040-3 with resistive and nonlinear load. As expected, the VFD-devices showed the best efficiency level, followed by VI- and VFI-devices. The efficiency rate at 50%, 75% and 100% of the nominal power differs only slightly and in most cases exceeds 90%. However, at a load of 25% the efficiency decreases considerably (in individual cases to below 80%). There are large differences in the area of standby losses (switched on, without load) which can only partly be explained by the different technologies of the various types of UPS-devices. Compared to the Code of Conduct for UPS-devices with a power of more than 10 kVA, the devices with lower power compare relatively well, especially because of the small power demands for cooling. (author)

  1. Reliability of Sleep Measures from Four Personal Health Monitoring Devices Compared to Research-Based Actigraphy and Polysomnography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantua, Janna; Gravel, Nickolas; Spencer, Rebecca M C

    2016-01-01

    Polysomnography (PSG) is the "gold standard" for monitoring sleep. Alternatives to PSG are of interest for clinical, research, and personal use. Wrist-worn actigraph devices have been utilized in research settings for measures of sleep for over two decades. Whether sleep measures from commercially available devices are similarly valid is unknown. We sought to determine the validity of five wearable devices: Basis Health Tracker, Misfit Shine, Fitbit Flex, Withings Pulse O2, and a research-based actigraph, Actiwatch Spectrum. We used Wilcoxon Signed Rank tests to assess differences between devices relative to PSG and correlational analysis to assess the strength of the relationship. Data loss was greatest for Fitbit and Misfit. For all devices, we found no difference and strong correlation of total sleep time with PSG. Sleep efficiency differed from PSG for Withings, Misfit, Fitbit, and Basis, while Actiwatch mean values did not differ from that of PSG. Only mean values of sleep efficiency (time asleep/time in bed) from Actiwatch correlated with PSG, yet this correlation was weak. Light sleep time differed from PSG (nREM1 + nREM2) for all devices. Measures of Deep sleep time did not differ from PSG (SWS + REM) for Basis. These results reveal the current strengths and limitations in sleep estimates produced by personal health monitoring devices and point to a need for future development. PMID:27164110

  2. Reliability of Sleep Measures from Four Personal Health Monitoring Devices Compared to Research-Based Actigraphy and Polysomnography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantua, Janna; Gravel, Nickolas; Spencer, Rebecca M C

    2016-05-05

    Polysomnography (PSG) is the "gold standard" for monitoring sleep. Alternatives to PSG are of interest for clinical, research, and personal use. Wrist-worn actigraph devices have been utilized in research settings for measures of sleep for over two decades. Whether sleep measures from commercially available devices are similarly valid is unknown. We sought to determine the validity of five wearable devices: Basis Health Tracker, Misfit Shine, Fitbit Flex, Withings Pulse O2, and a research-based actigraph, Actiwatch Spectrum. We used Wilcoxon Signed Rank tests to assess differences between devices relative to PSG and correlational analysis to assess the strength of the relationship. Data loss was greatest for Fitbit and Misfit. For all devices, we found no difference and strong correlation of total sleep time with PSG. Sleep efficiency differed from PSG for Withings, Misfit, Fitbit, and Basis, while Actiwatch mean values did not differ from that of PSG. Only mean values of sleep efficiency (time asleep/time in bed) from Actiwatch correlated with PSG, yet this correlation was weak. Light sleep time differed from PSG (nREM1 + nREM2) for all devices. Measures of Deep sleep time did not differ from PSG (SWS + REM) for Basis. These results reveal the current strengths and limitations in sleep estimates produced by personal health monitoring devices and point to a need for future development.

  3. Reliability of Sleep Measures from Four Personal Health Monitoring Devices Compared to Research-Based Actigraphy and Polysomnography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janna Mantua

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Polysomnography (PSG is the “gold standard” for monitoring sleep. Alternatives to PSG are of interest for clinical, research, and personal use. Wrist-worn actigraph devices have been utilized in research settings for measures of sleep for over two decades. Whether sleep measures from commercially available devices are similarly valid is unknown. We sought to determine the validity of five wearable devices: Basis Health Tracker, Misfit Shine, Fitbit Flex, Withings Pulse O2, and a research-based actigraph, Actiwatch Spectrum. We used Wilcoxon Signed Rank tests to assess differences between devices relative to PSG and correlational analysis to assess the strength of the relationship. Data loss was greatest for Fitbit and Misfit. For all devices, we found no difference and strong correlation of total sleep time with PSG. Sleep efficiency differed from PSG for Withings, Misfit, Fitbit, and Basis, while Actiwatch mean values did not differ from that of PSG. Only mean values of sleep efficiency (time asleep/time in bed from Actiwatch correlated with PSG, yet this correlation was weak. Light sleep time differed from PSG (nREM1 + nREM2 for all devices. Measures of Deep sleep time did not differ from PSG (SWS + REM for Basis. These results reveal the current strengths and limitations in sleep estimates produced by personal health monitoring devices and point to a need for future development.

  4. Measurement device-independent quantum key distribution with heralded pair coherent state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dong; Shang-Hong, Zhao; Lei, Shi

    2016-10-01

    The original measurement device-independent quantum key distribution is reviewed, and a modified protocol using heralded pair coherent state (HPCS) is proposed to overcome the quantum bit error rate associated with the dark count rate of the detectors in long-distance quantum key distribution. Our simulation indicates that the secure transmission distance can be improved evidently with HPCS owing to the lower probability of vacuum events when compared with weak coherent source scenario, while the secure key rate can be increased with HPCS due to the higher probability of single-photon events when compared with heralded single-photon source scenario. Furthermore, we apply the finite key analysis to the decoy state MDI-QKD with HPCS and obtain a practical key rate.

  5. Cellular Modulation of Polymeric Device Surfaces: Promise of Adult Stem Cells for Neuro-Prosthetics

    OpenAIRE

    Richter, Anja; Kruse, Charli; Moser, Andreas; Hofmann, Ulrich G.; Danner, Sandra

    2011-01-01

    Minimizing the foreign body response is seen as one critical research strategy for implants especially when designed for immune-privileged organs like the brain. The context of this work is to improve deep brain stimulating devices used in a consistently growing spectrum of psychomotor and psychiatric diseases mainly in form of stiff electrodes. Based on the compliance match hypothesis of biocompatibility we present another step forward using flexible implant materials covered with brain cell...

  6. A bioMEMS device for the study of mechanical properties of cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Joseph M.; Butt, Logan; Clark, Ashley; Williams, James; Padgen, Michael; Leung, Edison; Keely, Patricia; Condeelis, John S.; Aguirre-Ghiso, Julio; Castracane, James

    2015-03-01

    The tumor microenvironment is a complex system which is not fully understood. New technologies are needed to provide a better understanding of the role of the tumor microenvironment in promoting metastasis. The Nano Intravital Device, or NANIVID, has been developed as an optically transparent, implantable tool to study the tumor microenvironment. Two etched glass substrates are sealed using a thin polymer membrane to create a reservoir with a single outlet. This reservoir is loaded with a custom hydrogel blend that contains selected factors for delivery to the tumor microenvironment. When the device is implanted in the tumor, the hydrogel swells and releases these entrapped molecules, forming a sustained concentration gradient. The NANIVID has previously been successful in manipulating the tumor microenvironment both in vitro as well as in vivo. As metastatic cells intravasate, it has been shown that some are able to do so unscathed and reach their new location, while others are cleaved during the process1. There appears to be a correlation between cell migration and the mechanical properties of these cells. It is believed that these properties can be detected in real time by atomic force microscopy. In this study, metastatic MTLn3 rat mammary cells are seeded onto 1-dimensional microfibers and directed up a stable gradient of growth factor. The NANIVID device is placed behind our AFM tip, where it generates a stable chemotactic gradient of epidermal growth factor. Scanning confocal laser microscopy is also used to monitor movement of the cells over time. This experiment will shed light on the mechanical changes in metastatic cells as they undergo directed migration.

  7. Cell motility regulation on a stepped micro pillar array device (SMPAD) with a discrete stiffness gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sujin; Hong, Juhee; Lee, Junghoon

    2016-02-28

    Our tissues consist of individual cells that respond to the elasticity of their environment, which varies between and within tissues. To better understand mechanically driven cell migration, it is necessary to manipulate the stiffness gradient across a substrate. Here, we have demonstrated a new variant of the microfabricated polymeric pillar array platform that can decouple the stiffness gradient from the ECM protein area. This goal is achieved via a "stepped" micro pillar array device (SMPAD) in which the contact area with the cell was kept constant while the diameter of the pillar bodies was altered to attain the proper mechanical stiffness. Using double-step SU-8 mold fabrication, the diameter of the top of every pillar was kept uniform, whereas that of the bottom was changed, to achieve the desired substrate rigidity. Fibronectin was immobilized on the pillar tops, providing a focal adhesion site for cells. C2C12, HeLa and NIH3T3 cells were cultured on the SMPAD, and the motion of the cells was observed by time-lapse microscopy. Using this simple platform, which produces a purely physical stimulus, we observed that various types of cell behavior are affected by the mechanical stimulus of the environment. We also demonstrated directed cell migration guided by a discrete rigidity gradient by varying stiffness. Interestingly, cell velocity was highest at the highest stiffness. Our approach enables the regulation of the mechanical properties of the polymeric pillar array device and eliminates the effects of the size of the contact area. This technique is a unique tool for studying cellular motion and behavior relative to various stiffness gradients in the environment. PMID:26787193

  8. A sliding cell technique for diffusion measurements in liquid metals

    OpenAIRE

    Yongliang Geng; Chunao Zhu; Bo Zhang

    2014-01-01

    The long capillary and shear cell techniques are the usual methods for diffusion measurements in liquid metals. Here we present a new “sliding cell technique” to measure interdiffusion in liquid alloys, which combines the merits of these two methods. Instead of a number of shear cells, as used in the shear cell method, only one sliding cell is designed to separate and join the liquid diffusion samples. Using the sliding cell technique, the influence of the heating process (which affects liqui...

  9. Dispersion of heavy ion deposited energy in nanometric electronic devices: Experimental measurements and simulation possibilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raine, M.; Gaillardin, M.; Paillet, P.; Duhamel, O.; Martinez, M.; Bernard, H.

    2015-12-01

    The dispersion of heavy ion deposited energy is explored in nanometric electronic devices. Experimental data are reported, in a large thin SOI diode and in a SOI FinFET device, showing larger distributions of collected charge in the nanometric volume device. Geant4 simulations are then presented, using two different modeling approaches. Both of them seem suitable to evaluate the dispersion of deposited energy induced by heavy ion beams in advanced electronic devices with nanometric dimensions.

  10. OR.NET - Approaches for Risk Analysis and Measures of Dynamically Interconnected Medical Devices

    OpenAIRE

    Kühn, Franziska; Leucker, Martin; Mildner, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, it lacks an open, standardized and dynamic interconnection of medical devices. All existing combinations of medical devices consist of isolated solutions with proprietary interfaces, as no common standards for networking and the exchange of data of medical devices exist. This situation leads to confusing operating rooms and inefficient operations. Thus, new strategies need to be developed for the authorization of dynamically interconnected medical devices. Primarily, those concern ...

  11. Spine Curvature Analysis between Participants with Obesity and Normal Weight Participants: A Biplanar Electromagnetic Device Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel González-Sánchez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To analyse and compare standing thoracolumbar curves in normal weight participants and participants with obesity, using an electromagnetic device, and to analyse the measurement reliability. Material and Methods. Cross-sectional study was carried out. 36 individuals were divided into two groups (normal-weight and participants with obesity according to their waist circumference. The reference points (T1–T8–L1–L5 and both posterior superior iliac spines were used to perform a description of thoracolumbar curvature in the sagittal and coronal planes. A transformation from the global coordinate system was performed and thoracolumbar curves were adjusted by fifth-order polynomial equations. The tangents of the first and fifth lumbar vertebrae and the first thoracic vertebra were determined from their derivatives. The reliability of the measurement was assessed according to the internal consistency of the measure and the thoracolumbar curvature angles were compared between groups. Results. Cronbach’s alpha values ranged between 0.824 (95% CI: 0.776–0.847 and 0.918 (95% CI: 0.903–0.949. In the coronal plane, no significant differences were found between groups; however, in sagittal plane, significant differences were observed for thoracic kyphosis. Conclusion. There were significant differences in thoracic kyphosis in the sagittal plane between two groups of young adults grouped according to their waist circumference.

  12. New experimental device for high-temperature normal spectral emissivity measurements of coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new experimental device for normal spectral emissivity measurements of coatings in the infrared spectral range from 1.38 μm to 26 μm and in the temperature range from 550 K to 1250 K is presented. A Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR) is used for the detection of sample and blackbody spectral radiation. Sample heating is achieved by a fiber laser with a scanning head. Surface temperature is measured by two methods. The first method uses an infrared camera and a reference coating with known effective emissivity, the second method is based on the combination of Christiansen wavelength with contact and noncontact surface temperature measurement. Application of the method is shown on the example of a high-temperature high-emissivity coating. Experimental results obtained with this apparatus are compared with the results performed by a direct method of Laboratoire National d’Essais (LNE) in France. The differences in the spectra are analyzed. (paper)

  13. OPTIMIZATION OF A MICROFLUIDIC DEVICE FOR DIFFUSION-BASED EXTRACTION OF DMSO FROM A CELL SUSPENSION

    OpenAIRE

    Fleming Glass, K. K.; Longmire, E. K.; Hubel, A.

    2008-01-01

    This study considers the use of a two-stream microfluidic device for extraction of dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO) from a cryopreserved cell suspension. The DMSO diffuses from a cell suspension stream into a neighboring wash stream flowing in parallel. The model of Fleming et al.[14] is employed to determine and discuss optimal geometry and operating conditions for a case requiring removal of 95% DMSO from suspension streams with volumetric flow rates up to 2.5 ml/min. The effects of Peclet number...

  14. Method of fabricating a back-contact solar cell and device thereof

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Bo; Smith, David; Cousins, Peter

    2016-08-02

    Methods of fabricating back-contact solar cells and devices thereof are described. A method of fabricating a back-contact solar cell includes forming an N-type dopant source layer and a P-type dopant source layer above a material layer disposed above a substrate. The N-type dopant source layer is spaced apart from the P-type dopant source layer. The N-type dopant source layer and the P-type dopant source layer are heated. Subsequently, a trench is formed in the material layer, between the N-type and P-type dopant source layers.

  15. Regeneration of the lung: Lung stem cells and the development of lung mimicking devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilders, Kim A A; Eenjes, Evelien; van Riet, Sander; Poot, André A; Stamatialis, Dimitrios; Truckenmüller, Roman; Hiemstra, Pieter S; Rottier, Robbert J

    2016-01-01

    Inspired by the increasing burden of lung associated diseases in society and an growing demand to accommodate patients, great efforts by the scientific community produce an increasing stream of data that are focused on delineating the basic principles of lung development and growth, as well as understanding the biomechanical properties to build artificial lung devices. In addition, the continuing efforts to better define the disease origin, progression and pathology by basic scientists and clinicians contributes to insights in the basic principles of lung biology. However, the use of different model systems, experimental approaches and readout systems may generate somewhat conflicting or contradictory results. In an effort to summarize the latest developments in the lung epithelial stem cell biology, we provide an overview of the current status of the field. We first describe the different stem cells, or progenitor cells, residing in the homeostatic lung. Next, we focus on the plasticity of the different cell types upon several injury-induced activation or repair models, and highlight the regenerative capacity of lung cells. Lastly, we summarize the generation of lung mimics, such as air-liquid interface cultures, organoids and lung on a chip, that are required to test emerging hypotheses. Moreover, the increasing collaboration between distinct specializations will contribute to the eventual development of an artificial lung device capable of assisting reduced lung function and capacity in human patients. PMID:27107715

  16. Photovoltaic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Jason A.; Keenihan, James R.; Gaston, Ryan S.; Kauffmann, Keith L.; Langmaid, Joseph A.; Lopez, Leonardo C.; Maak, Kevin D.; Mills, Michael E.; Ramesh, Narayan; Teli, Samar R.

    2015-06-02

    The present invention is premised upon an improved photovoltaic device ("PV device"), more particularly to an improved photovoltaic device with a multilayered photovoltaic cell assembly and a body portion joined at an interface region and including an intermediate layer, at least one interconnecting structural member, relieving feature, unique component geometry, or any combination thereof.

  17. 3DTouch: A wearable 3D input device with an optical sensor and a 9-DOF inertial measurement unit

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Anh; Banic, Amy

    2014-01-01

    We present 3DTouch, a novel 3D wearable input device worn on the fingertip for 3D manipulation tasks. 3DTouch is designed to fill the missing gap of a 3D input device that is self-contained, mobile, and universally working across various 3D platforms. This paper presents a low-cost solution to designing and implementing such a device. Our approach relies on relative positioning technique using an optical laser sensor and a 9-DOF inertial measurement unit. 3DTouch is self-contained, and design...

  18. Attenuation length measurements of a liquid scintillator with LabVIEW and reliability evaluation of the device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Long; Yu, Bo-Xiang; Ding, Ya-Yun; Zhou, Li; Wen, Liang-Jian; Xie, Yu-Guang; Wang, Zhi-Gang; Cai, Xiao; Sun, Xi-Lei; Fang, Jian; Xue, Zhen; Zhang, Ai-Wu; Lü, Qi-Wen; Sun, Li-Jun; Ge, Yong-Shuai; Liu, Ying-Biao; Niu, Shun-Li; Hu, Tao; Cao, Jun; Lü, Jun-Guang

    2013-07-01

    An attenuation length measurement device was constructed using an oscilloscope and LabVIEW for signal acquisition and processing. The performance of the device has been tested in a variety of ways. The test results show that the set-up has a good stability and high precision (sigma/mean reached 0.4 percent). Besides, the accuracy of the measurement system will decrease by about 17 percent if a filter is used. The attenuation length of a gadolinium-loaded liquid scintillator (Gd-LS) was measured as 15.10±0.35 m where Gd-LS was heavily used in the Daya Bay Neutrino Experiment. In addition, one method based on the Beer-Lambert law was proposed to investigate the reliability of the measurement device, the R-square reached 0.9995. Moreover, three purification methods for Linear Alkyl Benzene (LAB) production were compared in the experiment.

  19. Attenuation length measurements of a liquid scintillator with LabVIEW and reliability evaluation of the device

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Long; YU Bo-Xiang; DING Ya-Yun; ZHOU Li; WEN Liang-Jian; XIE Yu-Guang; WANG Zhi-Gang

    2013-01-01

    An attenuation length measurement device was constructed using an oscilloscope and LabVIEW for signal acquisition and processing.The performance of the device has been tested in a variety of ways.The test results show that the set-up has a good stability and high precision (sigma/mean reached 0.4 percent).Besides,the accuracy of the measurement system will decrease by about 17 percent if a filter is used.The attenuation length of a gadolinium-loaded liquid scintillator (Gd-LS) was measured as 15.10±0.35 m where Gd-LS was heavily used in the Daya Bay Neutrino Experiment.In addition,one method based on the Beer-Lambert law was proposed to investigate the reliability of the measurement device,the R-square reached 0.9995.Moreover,three purification methods for Linear Alkyl Benzene (LAB) production were compared in the experiment.

  20. The intercell dynamics of T cells and dendritic cells in a lymph node-on-a-chip flow device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura Rosa, Patrícia; Gopalakrishnan, Nimi; Ibrahim, Hany; Haug, Markus; Halaas, Øyvind

    2016-10-01

    T cells play a central role in immunity towards cancer and infectious diseases. T cell responses are initiated in the T cell zone of the lymph node (LN), where resident antigen-bearing dendritic cells (DCs) prime and activate antigen-specific T cells passing by. In the present study, we investigated the T cell : DC interaction in a microfluidic device to understand the intercellular dynamics and physiological conditions in the LN. We show random migration of antigen-specific T cells onto the antigen-presenting DC monolayer independent of the flow direction with a mean T cell : DC dwell time of 12.8 min and a mean velocity of 6 μm min(-1). Furthermore, we investigated the antigen specific vs. unspecific attachment and detachment of CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells to DCs under varying shear stress. In our system, CD4(+) T cells showed long stable contacts with APCs, whereas CD8(+) T cells presented transient interactions with DCs. By varying the shear stress from 0.01 to 100 Dyn cm(-2), it was also evident that there was a much stronger attachment of antigen-specific than unspecific T cells to stationary DCs up to 1-12 Dyn cm(-2). The mechanical force of the cell : cell interaction associated with the pMHC-TCR match under controlled tangential shear force was estimated to be in the range of 0.25-4.8 nN. Finally, upon performing attachment & detachment tests, there was a steady accumulation of antigen specific CD8(+) T cells and CD4(+) T cells on DCs at low shear stresses, which were released at a stress of 12 Dyn cm(-2). This microphysiological model provides new possibilities to recreate a controlled mechanical force threshold of pMHC-TCR binding, allowing the investigation of intercellular signalling of immune synapses and therapeutic targets for immunotherapy.

  1. Photometric Compliance of Tablet Screens and Retro-Illuminated Acuity Charts As Visual Acuity Measurement Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingstone, I A T; Tarbert, C M; Giardini, M E; Bastawrous, A; Middleton, D; Hamilton, R

    2016-01-01

    Mobile technology is increasingly used to measure visual acuity. Standards for chart-based acuity tests specify photometric requirements for luminance, optotype contrast and luminance uniformity. Manufacturers provide some photometric data but little is known about tablet performance for visual acuity testing. This study photometrically characterised seven tablet computers (iPad, Apple inc.) and three ETDRS (Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study) visual acuity charts with room lights on and off, and compared findings with visual acuity measurement standards. Tablet screen luminance and contrast were measured using nine points across a black and white checkerboard test screen at five arbitrary brightness levels. ETDRS optotypes and adjacent white background luminance and contrast were measured. All seven tablets (room lights off) exceeded the most stringent requirement for mean luminance (≥ 120 cd/m2) providing the nominal brightness setting was above 50%. All exceeded contrast requirement (Weber ≥ 90%) regardless of brightness setting, and five were marginally below the required luminance uniformity threshold (Lmin/Lmax ≥ 80%). Re-assessing three tablets with room lights on made little difference to mean luminance or contrast, and improved luminance uniformity to exceed the threshold. The three EDTRS charts (room lights off) had adequate mean luminance (≥ 120 cd/m2) and Weber contrast (≥ 90%), but all three charts failed to meet the luminance uniformity standard (Lmin/Lmax ≥ 80%). Two charts were operating beyond manufacturer's recommended lamp replacement schedule. With room lights on, chart mean luminance and Weber contrast increased, but two charts still had inadequate luminance uniformity. Tablet computers showed less inter-device variability, higher contrast, and better luminance uniformity than charts in both lights-on and lights-off environments, providing brightness setting was >50%. Overall, iPad tablets matched or marginally out

  2. Photometric Compliance of Tablet Screens and Retro-Illuminated Acuity Charts As Visual Acuity Measurement Devices.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I A T Livingstone

    Full Text Available Mobile technology is increasingly used to measure visual acuity. Standards for chart-based acuity tests specify photometric requirements for luminance, optotype contrast and luminance uniformity. Manufacturers provide some photometric data but little is known about tablet performance for visual acuity testing. This study photometrically characterised seven tablet computers (iPad, Apple inc. and three ETDRS (Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study visual acuity charts with room lights on and off, and compared findings with visual acuity measurement standards. Tablet screen luminance and contrast were measured using nine points across a black and white checkerboard test screen at five arbitrary brightness levels. ETDRS optotypes and adjacent white background luminance and contrast were measured. All seven tablets (room lights off exceeded the most stringent requirement for mean luminance (≥ 120 cd/m2 providing the nominal brightness setting was above 50%. All exceeded contrast requirement (Weber ≥ 90% regardless of brightness setting, and five were marginally below the required luminance uniformity threshold (Lmin/Lmax ≥ 80%. Re-assessing three tablets with room lights on made little difference to mean luminance or contrast, and improved luminance uniformity to exceed the threshold. The three EDTRS charts (room lights off had adequate mean luminance (≥ 120 cd/m2 and Weber contrast (≥ 90%, but all three charts failed to meet the luminance uniformity standard (Lmin/Lmax ≥ 80%. Two charts were operating beyond manufacturer's recommended lamp replacement schedule. With room lights on, chart mean luminance and Weber contrast increased, but two charts still had inadequate luminance uniformity. Tablet computers showed less inter-device variability, higher contrast, and better luminance uniformity than charts in both lights-on and lights-off environments, providing brightness setting was >50%. Overall, iPad tablets matched or marginally out

  3. Three-dimensional Cell Culture Devices for Cancer Migration and Drug Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Liang

    Porous polymeric materials are widely used to mimic the extracellular matrix (ECM) environment for applications such as 3D cell culturing and tissue engineering. A series of comparative experiments on 3D cell cultures both in PLA porous scaffolds and alginate gels were conducted to create an in vitro tumor model. A novel 3D cell culture device based on porous polymeric material was developed to study cancer migration. Significant cell migration was observed through the porous channel within 1--2 weeks induced by 20% fetal bovine serum (FBS). A three-dimensional micro-scale perfusion-based two-chamber (3D-muPTC) tissue model system was developed to test the cytotoxicity of anticancer drugs by emulating liver metabolism effects in vitro. Hepatoma cells and glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cancer cells were cultured in porous polymeric scaffolds in two separate chambers, representing the liver and tumor, respectively. The cytotoxic effect of temozolomide (TMZ) was first tested using this system. It was found that the GBM cells showed a much higher viability under the TMZ treatment with liver cells in the system, suggesting that the drug metabolism in liver is affecting the efficacy of the drug. The favorable metabolism effect of cytochrome P450 (CYP) was tested using a prodrug ifosfamide (IFO). Without the liver cells, IFO showed only slight toxicity to GBM cells. Moreover, it was shown that different expression levels of CYP 3A4, a major drug metabolizing enzyme, in liver cells caused significantly different levels of GBM cell viability. Simulation of the flow characteristics in the 3D-muPTC system was conducted using the finite-element analysis approach. The shear stress was predicted in the porous scaffolds under different flow rate conditions. The predicted shear stress effects agreed well with an experimental cell viability study. A low cost organic solvent free approach to fabricating tissue engineering scaffolds was developed by combining the twin-screw extrusion

  4. Development of a Handmade Conductivity Measurement Device for a Thin-Film Semiconductor and Its Application to Polypyrrole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seng, Set; Shinpei, Tomita; Yoshihiko, Inada; Masakazu, Kita

    2014-01-01

    The precise measurement of conductivity of a semiconductor film such as polypyrrole (Ppy) should be carried out by the four-point probe method; however, this is difficult for classroom application. This article describes the development of a new, convenient, handmade conductivity device from inexpensive materials that can measure the conductivity…

  5. A device for continuous measurement of head position during PET brain imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldstein, S.R.; Daube-Witherspoon, M.E.; Green, M.V. [National Inst. of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    1994-05-01

    Head motion during PET brain imaging can seriously degrade image quality. We have shown previously (1) that the effects of such movements can be eliminated if the position of the head relative to the scanner is accurately known throughout the study. To this end, we designed, built, and tested a tracking device (TD) and head attachment fixture. The TD consists of 3 miniature lamps, attached to a rigid wire frame, that are sequentially illuminated within the field of view of two positions of the lamps are computed every 5 sec and these values are used to compute the 3 rotational and 3 translational coordinates of the frame. The accuracy of the TD was evaluated by attaching the frame to a precision mechanical rotation-translation apparatus and comparing motions in all coordinate direction. The maximum error observed in the range {plus_minus}10 mm, {plus_minus}4 deg was 0.7 mm and 0.4 deg, with largest uncertainties in the azimuthal direction. The head attachment mechanism was evaluated in 8 subjects by connecting the rigid lamp wire frame to the top of a lightweight tubular structure fitted into the ears and attached by adhesive pads to the forehead. Simultaneously, the transducer of a commercially available tracking system was attached by adhesive to the forehead. With head position being monitored by both systems, each subject was first instructed to perform a set of controlled head movements in each of the coordinate directions and then to rest normally for 5 minutes. The largest angular difference observed between the two devices in these subjects was 2 deg (azimuthal), with most differences being less than 1 deg and less than 10%. These results suggest that the TD is capable of accurately measuring small rotational and translational displacements and that the head attachment mechanism to which the lamp array is fixed follows head movement within acceptable limits.

  6. A nanoparticulate liquid binding phase based DGT device for aquatic arsenic measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shengwen; Qin, Nannan; Song, Jieyao; Zhang, Ya; Cai, Weiping; Zhang, Haimin; Wang, Guozhong; Zhao, Huijun

    2016-11-01

    A nanomaterials-based DGT device constructed with commercial dialysis membrane as diffusive layer and nanoparticulate Fe3O4 aqueous suspension as binding phase is developed and validated for in situ aquatic arsenic measurement. The Fe3O4NPs binding phase is capable of quantitatively accumulated both As(III) and As(V) species. As(III) and As(V) species coexist in the vast majority of environmental water samples. The large difference in diffusion coefficients of As(III) (DAs(III)=3.05×10(-7)cm(2)s(-1)) and As(V) (DAs(V)=1.63×10(-7)cm(2)s(-1)) makes the accurate DGT determination of total arsenic concentration of samples containing both species difficult. An effective diffusion coefficient (DAs¯=DAs(III)[1/(1+x)]+DAs(V)[x/(1+x)],where,x=As(V)/As(III)) approach is therefore proposed and validated for accurate DGT determination of total arsenic when As(III) and As(V) coexist. The experimental results demonstrate that for samples having As(V)/As(III) ratios between 0.1 and 0.9, the DGT determined total arsenic concentrations using DAs¯are within ±93-99% of that determined by ICP-MS. The general principle demonstrated in this work opens up a new avenue of utilizing functional nanomaterials as DGT binding phase, paving a way for developing new generation nanomaterials-based DGT devices that can be readily produced in massive numbers at low costs, facilitating the widespread use of DGT for large-scale environmental assessment and other applications. PMID:27591608

  7. Simultaneous Investigation of Sediment Transport and Water Quality Parameters Using An In Situ Measurement Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prochnow, J. V.

    Though quality of surface waters has improved remarkably over the last twenty years, the contaminant load of soft cohesive sediments remained comparatively unimproved. That is why the new European water framework directive addresses contaminant loaded sediments and postulates criteria for assessing sediment quality. Surveys into contaminated sediment behaviour have revealed adsorption/desorption characteristics of individual toxins. Biomonitoring of pollutant pressure on specific benthic organ- isms on the other hand can be useful to elucidate potential dangers to aquatic ecosys- tems. However, it is yet unknown how a given contaminant loaded sediment will re- spond to different hypercritical flow conditions in terms of release rates and partition- ing of xenobiotica. On this account a small in situ measuring device (EROSIMESS) was constructed, that features simultaneous determination of suspended sediment con- centration (optical turbidity meter), dissolved oxygen levels, pH and temperature (membrane probes) under predefined hydraulic conditions. Samples of the suspen- sion can be withdrawn for subsequent chemical analysis. Bottom shear stresses up to 5N/m2 can be generated by means of a propeller that resides in cylindrical perspex tube (erosion chamber) two centimeters above the sediment bed. Baffles on the in- ner wall of the cylinder prevent a solid body rotation of the suspension by creating additional turbulence and a second propeller straight beneath the concentration me- ter inhibits the development of a concentration gradient within the chamber. A small CCD-camera is used to control positioning of the device. It can be used in water- depths up to 5m. The control unit consists of a trigger box and an ordinary laptop computer running LabView. EROSIMESS has been successfully used in various stud- ies on contaminant release, eutrophication, and SOD (sediment oxygen demand) in rivers (Spree: Germany; Maun: UK), reservoirs (Heimbach, Haus Ley: Germany), and

  8. Comparison of speech intelligibility measures for an electronic amplifying earmuff and an identical passive attenuation device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David C. Byrne

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to identify any differences between speech intelligibility measures obtained with MineEars electronic earmuffs (ProEars, Westcliffe, CO, USA and the Bilsom model 847 (Sperian Hearing Protection, San Diego, CA, USA, which is a conventional passive-attenuation earmuff. These two devices are closely related, since the MineEars device consisted of a Bilsom 847 earmuff with the addition of electronic amplification circuits. Intelligibility scores were obtained by conducting listening tests with 15 normalhearing human subject volunteers wearing the earmuffs. The primary research objective was to determine whether speech understanding differs between the passive earmuffs and the electronic earmuffs (with the volume control set at three different positions in a background of 90 dB(A continuous noise. As expected, results showed that speech intelligibility increased with higher speech-to-noise ratios; however, the electronic earmuff with the volume control set at full-on performed worse than when it was set to off or the lowest on setting. This finding suggests that the maximum volume control setting for these electronic earmuffs may not provide any benefits in terms of increased speech intelligibility in the background noise condition that was tested. Other volume control settings would need to be evaluated for their ability to produce higher speech intelligibility scores. Additionally, since an extensive electro-acoustic evaluation of the electronic earmuff was not performed as a part of this study, the exact cause of the reduced intelligibility scores at full volume remains unknown.

  9. Design and construction of the artificial patient module for testing bioimpedance measuring devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Młyńczak, Marcel; Pariaszewska, Katarzyna; Niewiadomski, Wiktor; Cybulski, Gerard

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the design of the electronic module for testing bioimpedance measuring devices, for example impedance cardiographs or impedance pneumographs. Artificial Patient was conceived as an electronic equivalent of the impedance of skin-electrode interface and the impedance between electrodes - measured one. Different approaches in imitating a resistance of skin and an impedance of electrode-skin connection were presented. The module was adapted for frequently applied tetrapolar electrode configuration. Therefore the design do not enclose the elements simulating impedance between skin and receiver electrodes due to negligible effect of this impedance on the current flow through the receiver. The Artificial Patient enables testing either application generators, or receiver parts, particularly the level of noise and distortions of the signal. Use of digitally controlled potentiometer allows simulating different tissue resistances changes such as constant values, very-low-frequency and low-frequency changes corresponding to those caused by breathing or heart activity. Also it allows distorting signals in order to test algorithms of artifacts attenuation.

  10. Processing and modeling issues for thin-film solar cell devices. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birkmire, R.W.; Phillips, J.E. [Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States). Institute of Energy Conversion

    1997-11-01

    During the third phase of the subcontract, IEC researchers have continued to provide the thin film PV community with greater depth of understanding and insight into a wide variety of issues including: the deposition and characterization of CuIn{sub 1-x}Ga{sub x}Se{sub 2}, a-Si, CdTe, CdS, and TCO thin films; the relationships between film and device properties; and the processing and analysis of thin film PV devices. This has been achieved through the systematic investigation of all aspects of film and device production and through the analysis and quantification of the reaction chemistries involved in thin film deposition. This methodology has led to controlled fabrications of 15% efficient CuIn{sub 1-x}Ga{sub x}Se{sub 2} solar cells over a wide range of Ga compositions, improved process control of the fabrication of 10% efficient a-Si solar cells, and reliable and generally applicable procedures for both contacting and doping films. Additional accomplishments are listed below.

  11. Device and performance parameters of Cu(In,Ga)(Se,S){sub 2}-based solar cells with varying i-ZnO layer thickness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macabebe, E.Q.B. [Department of Physics, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, P.O. Box 77000, Port Elizabeth 6031 (South Africa); Sheppard, C.J. [Department of Physics, University of Johannesburg, P.O. Box 524, Auckland Park 2006 (South Africa); Dyk, E.E. van, E-mail: ernest.vandyk@nmmu.ac.z [Department of Physics, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, P.O. Box 77000, Port Elizabeth 6031 (South Africa)

    2009-12-01

    In pursuit of low-cost and highly efficient thin film solar cells, Cu(In,Ga)(Se,S){sub 2}/CdS/i-ZnO/ZnO:Al (CIGSS) solar cells were fabricated using a two-step process. The thickness of i-ZnO layer was varied from 0 to 454 nm. The current density-voltage (J-V) characteristics of the devices were measured, and the device and performance parameters of the solar cells were obtained from the J-V curves to analyze the effect of varying i-ZnO layer thickness. The device parameters were determined using a parameter extraction method that utilized particle swarm optimization. The method is a curve-fitting routine that employed the two-diode model. The J-V curves of the solar cells were fitted with the model and the parameters were determined. Results show that as the thickness of i-ZnO was increased, the average efficiency and the fill factor (FF) of the solar cells increase. Device parameters reveal that although the series resistance increased with thicker i-ZnO layer, the solar cells absorbed more photons resulting in higher short-circuit current density (J{sub sc}) and, consequently, higher photo-generated current density (J{sub L}). For solar cells with 303-454 nm-thick i-ZnO layer, the best devices achieved efficiency between 15.24% and 15.73% and the fill factor varied between 0.65 and 0.67.

  12. Utility of Ochrobactrum anthropi YC152 in a Microbial Fuel Cell as an Early Warning Device for Hexavalent Chromium Determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guey-Horng; Cheng, Chiu-Yu; Liu, Man-Hai; Chen, Tzu-Yu; Hsieh, Min-Chi; Chung, Ying-Chien

    2016-01-01

    Fast hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) determination is important for environmental risk and health-related considerations. We used a microbial fuel cell-based biosensor inoculated with a facultatively anaerobic, Cr(VI)-reducing, and exoelectrogenic Ochrobactrum anthropi YC152 to determine the Cr(VI) concentration in water. The results indicated that O. anthropi YC152 exhibited high adaptability to pH, temperature, salinity, and water quality under anaerobic conditions. The stable performance of the microbial fuel cell (MFC)-based biosensor indicated its potential as a reliable biosensor system. The MFC voltage decreased as the Cr(VI) concentration in the MFC increased. Two satisfactory linear relationships were observed between the Cr(VI) concentration and voltage output for various Cr(VI) concentration ranges (0.0125-0.3 mg/L and 0.3-5 mg/L). The MFC biosensor is a simple device that can accurately measure Cr(VI) concentrations in drinking water, groundwater, and electroplating wastewater in 45 min with low deviations (water. Thus, the developed MFC biosensor has potential as an early warning detection device for Cr(VI) determination even if O. anthropi YC152 is a possible opportunistic pathogen. PMID:27537887

  13. Utility of Ochrobactrum anthropi YC152 in a Microbial Fuel Cell as an Early Warning Device for Hexavalent Chromium Determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guey-Horng Wang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Fast hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI determination is important for environmental risk and health-related considerations. We used a microbial fuel cell-based biosensor inoculated with a facultatively anaerobic, Cr(VI-reducing, and exoelectrogenic Ochrobactrum anthropi YC152 to determine the Cr(VI concentration in water. The results indicated that O. anthropi YC152 exhibited high adaptability to pH, temperature, salinity, and water quality under anaerobic conditions. The stable performance of the microbial fuel cell (MFC-based biosensor indicated its potential as a reliable biosensor system. The MFC voltage decreased as the Cr(VI concentration in the MFC increased. Two satisfactory linear relationships were observed between the Cr(VI concentration and voltage output for various Cr(VI concentration ranges (0.0125–0.3 mg/L and 0.3–5 mg/L. The MFC biosensor is a simple device that can accurately measure Cr(VI concentrations in drinking water, groundwater, and electroplating wastewater in 45 min with low deviations (<10%. The use of the biosensor can help in preventing the violation of effluent regulations and the maximum allowable concentration of Cr(VI in water. Thus, the developed MFC biosensor has potential as an early warning detection device for Cr(VI determination even if O. anthropi YC152 is a possible opportunistic pathogen.

  14. Heating power lowering by downscaling the cell dimensions in nanoscale filamentary resistive switching devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Qiaonan; Chen, Yan; Xia, Yidong; Xu, Bo; Yin, Jiang; Liu, Zhiguo

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we theoretically investigate the size dependence of the heat process in thermochemical filamentary resistive switching memories of crossbar structure. The equivalent heat resistance of the system increases with the device dimensions scaled down because of the size-dependent electric and thermal conductivity and geometry configurations. The higher equivalent heat resistance by diminishing the cell sizes induces an enhanced self-heating effect of the filament. It promises lower operation voltage and heating power to trigger the thermally activated dissolution of the filament in RESET process. These results strengthen the advantage of filamentary memories in lateral and longitudinal scaling down technologies where less power consumption has long been urged. Our results also show the opposite dependence of the driven electric field on the linewidth and thickness of the device.

  15. A microfluidic device for 2D to 3D and 3D to 3D cell navigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microfluidic devices have received wide attention and shown great potential in the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Investigating cell response to various stimulations is much more accurate and comprehensive with the aid of microfluidic devices. In this study, we introduced a microfluidic device by which the matrix density as a mechanical property and the concentration profile of a biochemical factor as a chemical property could be altered. Our microfluidic device has a cell tank and a cell culture chamber to mimic both 2D to 3D and 3D to 3D migration of three types of cells. Fluid shear stress is negligible on the cells and a stable concentration gradient can be obtained by diffusion. The device was designed by a numerical simulation so that the uniformity of the concentration gradients throughout the cell culture chamber was obtained. Adult neural cells were cultured within this device and they showed different branching and axonal navigation phenotypes within varying nerve growth factor (NGF) concentration profiles. Neural stem cells were also cultured within varying collagen matrix densities while exposed to NGF concentrations and they experienced 3D to 3D collective migration. By generating vascular endothelial growth factor concentration gradients, adult human dermal microvascular endothelial cells also migrated in a 2D to 3D manner and formed a stable lumen within a specific collagen matrix density. It was observed that a minimum absolute concentration and concentration gradient were required to stimulate migration of all types of the cells. This device has the advantage of changing multiple parameters simultaneously and is expected to have wide applicability in cell studies. (paper)

  16. A microfluidic device for 2D to 3D and 3D to 3D cell navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamloo, Amir; Amirifar, Leyla

    2016-01-01

    Microfluidic devices have received wide attention and shown great potential in the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Investigating cell response to various stimulations is much more accurate and comprehensive with the aid of microfluidic devices. In this study, we introduced a microfluidic device by which the matrix density as a mechanical property and the concentration profile of a biochemical factor as a chemical property could be altered. Our microfluidic device has a cell tank and a cell culture chamber to mimic both 2D to 3D and 3D to 3D migration of three types of cells. Fluid shear stress is negligible on the cells and a stable concentration gradient can be obtained by diffusion. The device was designed by a numerical simulation so that the uniformity of the concentration gradients throughout the cell culture chamber was obtained. Adult neural cells were cultured within this device and they showed different branching and axonal navigation phenotypes within varying nerve growth factor (NGF) concentration profiles. Neural stem cells were also cultured within varying collagen matrix densities while exposed to NGF concentrations and they experienced 3D to 3D collective migration. By generating vascular endothelial growth factor concentration gradients, adult human dermal microvascular endothelial cells also migrated in a 2D to 3D manner and formed a stable lumen within a specific collagen matrix density. It was observed that a minimum absolute concentration and concentration gradient were required to stimulate migration of all types of the cells. This device has the advantage of changing multiple parameters simultaneously and is expected to have wide applicability in cell studies.

  17. Measuring knife stab penetration into skin simulant using a novel biaxial tension device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilchrist, M D; Keenan, S; Curtis, M; Cassidy, M; Byrne, G; Destrade, M

    2008-05-01

    This paper describes the development and use of a biaxial measurement device to analyse the mechanics of knife stabbings. In medicolegal situations it is typical to describe the consequences of a stabbing incident in relative terms that are qualitative and descriptive without being numerically quantitative. Here, the mechanical variables involved in the possible range of knife-tissue penetration events are considered so as to determine the necessary parameters that would need to be controlled in a measurement device. These include knife geometry, in-plane mechanical stress state of skin, angle and speed of knife penetration, and underlying fascia such as muscle or cartilage. Four commonly available household knives with different geometries were used: the blade tips in all cases were single-edged, double-sided and without serrations. Appropriate synthetic materials were used to simulate the response of skin, fat and cartilage, namely polyurethane, compliant foam and ballistic soap, respectively. The force and energy applied by the blade of the knife and the out of plane displacement of the skin were all used successfully to identify the occurrence of skin penetration. The skin tension is shown to have a direct effect on both the force and energy for knife penetration and the depth of out of plane displacement of the skin simulant prior to penetration: larger levels of in-plane tension in the skin are associated with lower penetration forces, energies and displacements. Less force and energy are also required to puncture the skin when the plane of the blade is parallel to a direction of greater skin tension than when perpendicular. This is consistent with the observed behaviour when cutting biological skin: less force is required to cut parallel to the Langer lines than perpendicularly and less force is required to cut when the skin is under a greater level of tension. Finally, and perhaps somewhat surprisingly, evidence is shown to suggest that the quality control

  18. Light trapping in thin film solar cells using photonic engineering device concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutitu, James Gichuhi

    In this era of uncertainty concerning future energy solutions, strong reservations have arisen over the continued use and pursuit of fossil fuels and other conventional sources of energy. Moreover, there is currently a strong and global push for the implementation of stringent measures, in order to reduce the amount of green house gases emitted by every nation. As a consequence, there has emerged a sudden and frantic rush for new renewable energy solutions. In this world of renewable energy technologies is where we find photovoltaic (PV) technology today. However, as is, there are still many issues that need to be addressed before solar energy technologies become economically viable and available to all people, in every part of the world. This renewed interest in the development of solar electricity, has led to the advancement of new avenues that address the issues of cost and efficiency associated with PV. To this end, one of the prominent approaches being explored is thin film solar cell (TFSC) technology, which offers prospects of lower material costs and enables larger units of manufacture than conventional wafer based technology. However, TFSC technologies suffer from one major problem; they have lower efficiencies than conventional wafer based solar cell technologies. This lesser efficiency is based on a number of reasons, one of which is that with less material, there is less volume for the absorption of incident photons. This shortcoming leads to the need for optical light trapping; which is concerned with admitting the maximum amount of light into the solar cell and keeping the light within the structure for as long as possible. In this thesis, I present the fundamental scientific ideas, practice and methodology behind the application of photonic engineering device concepts to increase the light trapping capacity of thin film solar cells. In the introductory chapters, I develop the basic ideas behind light trapping in a sequential manner, where the effects

  19. Automatic illumination compensation device based on a photoelectrochemical biofuel cell driven by visible light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, You; Han, Yanchao; Xu, Miao; Zhang, Lingling; Dong, Shaojun

    2016-04-01

    Inverted illumination compensation is important in energy-saving projects, artificial photosynthesis and some forms of agriculture, such as hydroponics. However, only a few illumination adjustments based on self-powered biodetectors that quantitatively detect the intensity of visible light have been reported. We constructed an automatic illumination compensation device based on a photoelectrochemical biofuel cell (PBFC) driven by visible light. The PBFC consisted of a glucose dehydrogenase modified bioanode and a p-type semiconductor cuprous oxide photocathode. The PBFC had a high power output of 161.4 μW cm-2 and an open circuit potential that responded rapidly to visible light. It adjusted the amount of illumination inversely irrespective of how the external illumination was changed. This rational design of utilizing PBFCs provides new insights into automatic light adjustable devices and may be of benefit to intelligent applications.Inverted illumination compensation is important in energy-saving projects, artificial photosynthesis and some forms of agriculture, such as hydroponics. However, only a few illumination adjustments based on self-powered biodetectors that quantitatively detect the intensity of visible light have been reported. We constructed an automatic illumination compensation device based on a photoelectrochemical biofuel cell (PBFC) driven by visible light. The PBFC consisted of a glucose dehydrogenase modified bioanode and a p-type semiconductor cuprous oxide photocathode. The PBFC had a high power output of 161.4 μW cm-2 and an open circuit potential that responded rapidly to visible light. It adjusted the amount of illumination inversely irrespective of how the external illumination was changed. This rational design of utilizing PBFCs provides new insights into automatic light adjustable devices and may be of benefit to intelligent applications. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr00759g

  20. Comparison of two dependent within subject coefficients of variation to evaluate the reproducibility of measurement devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaya Namik

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The within-subject coefficient of variation and intra-class correlation coefficient are commonly used to assess the reliability or reproducibility of interval-scale measurements. Comparison of reproducibility or reliability of measurement devices or methods on the same set of subjects comes down to comparison of dependent reliability or reproducibility parameters. Methods In this paper, we develop several procedures for testing the equality of two dependent within-subject coefficients of variation computed from the same sample of subjects, which is, to the best of our knowledge, has not yet been dealt with in the statistical literature. The Wald test, the likelihood ratio, and the score tests are developed. A simple regression procedure based on results due to Pitman and Morgan is constructed. Furthermore we evaluate the statistical properties of these methods via extensive Monte Carlo simulations. The methodologies are illustrated on two data sets; the first are the microarray gene expressions measured by two plat- forms; the Affymetrix and the Amersham. Because microarray experiments produce expressions for a large number of genes, one would expect that the statistical tests to be asymptotically equivalent. To explore the behaviour of the tests in small or moderate sample sizes, we illustrated the methodologies on data from computer-aided tomographic scans of 50 patients. Results It is shown that the relatively simple Wald's test (WT is as powerful as the likelihood ratio test (LRT and that both have consistently greater power than the score test. The regression test holds its empirical levels, and in some occasions is as powerful as the WT and the LRT. Conclusion A comparison between the reproducibility of two measuring instruments using the same set of subjects leads naturally to a comparison of two correlated indices. The presented methodology overcomes the difficulty noted by data analysts that dependence between

  1. Evaluating and Comparing of Three Penetrability Measuring Devices : Modified Filter Pump, Modified Penetrability Meter, and Short Slot

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Akbar, Saman; Al-Naddaf, Manar

    2015-01-01

    Rock grouting is a commonly used process for sealing rocks in tunnels to reduce water ingress. In order to achieve sufficient sealing level the grout must effectively penetrate into rock fractures while the limiting factor is filtration of cement based grout. Many devices and measuring methods have been developed to study filtration and to measure the penetrability. The filter pump and the penetrability meter are two of the most commonly used instruments for measuring filtration tendency in t...

  2. All polymer photovoltaics: From small inverted devices to large roll-to-roll coated and printed solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Yao; Larsen-Olsen, Thue Trofod; Zhao, Xingang;

    2013-01-01

    Inverted all polymer solar cells based on a blend of a perylene diimide based polymer acceptor and a dithienosilole based polymer donor were fabricated from small area devices to roll-to-roll (R2R) coated and printed large area modules. The device performance was successfully optimized by using...... solution processibility and R2R coated and printed large area (4.2 cm 2) solar cells exhibited a PCE of 0.20%. © 2013 Elsevier B.V....

  3. A microfluidic device for practical label-free CD4+ T cell counting of HIV-infected subjects

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Xuanhong; Irimia, Daniel; Dixon, Meredith; Sekine, Kazuhiko; Demirci, Utkan; Zamir, Lee; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Rodriguez, William; Toner, Mehmet

    2006-01-01

    Practical HIV diagnostics are urgently needed in resource-limited settings. While HIV infection can be diagnosed using simple, rapid, lateral flow immunoassays, HIV disease staging and treatment monitoring require accurate counting of a particular white blood cell subset, the CD4+ T lymphocyte. To address the limitations of current expensive, technically demanding and/or time-consuming approaches, we have developed a simple CD4 counting microfluidic device. This device uses cell affinity chro...

  4. Digital Devices, Distraction and Student Performance - Does Cell Phone Use Reduce Learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Douglas K.; Hoekstra, A. R.; Wilcox, B. R.

    2012-01-01

    The recent increase in the use of digital devices such as laptop computers, iPads and web-enabled cell phones has generated concern about how technologies affect student performance. Combining observation, survey, and interview data, this research assesses the effects of technology use for student attitudes and learning. Data were gathered in eight introductory science courses at one large public university in 2010-2011. Results show a significant negative correlation between in-class cell phone use and overall course grades, corresponding to a drop of 0.36 ± 0.08 on a 4-point scale where 4.0 = A. These findings are consistent with recent research[1] suggesting students cannot multi-task nearly as effectively as they think they can. While 75% of students reported regular cell phone use, observation data suggests undergraduates typically under-report the frequency of in-class digital device use. [1] Ophir, E., Nass, C. and A.D. Wagner. 2009. "Cognitive Control in Media Multi-Taskers.” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 106: 15583-15587.

  5. International scientific consensus on medical plantar pressure measurement devices: technical requirements and performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Giacomozzi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Since 2006, the Italian National Institute of Health (ISS has been conducting independent scientific activities to standardize the technical assessment of plantar pressure measurement devices (PMDs. MATERIAL AND METHODS: On the basis of the ISS results, in 2010 the Pedobarographic Group of the International Foot and Ankle Biomechanics community (i-FAB-PG promoted a consensus activity about the main technical requirements for the appropriate use of PMDs. The activity relied on a moodlebased on-line forum, documents exchange, discussions, reviews, meetings and a final survey. RESULTS: The participation of clinical and technical researchers, users, and manufacturers, contributed to the delivery of the hereby reported recommendations which specifically regard Medical PMDs in the form of platforms. CONCLUSIONS: The i-FAB-PG community reached overall agreement on the recommendations, with a few minor objections which are reported and commented in the document. RELEVANCE: The present document, the highest result achievable within a small scientific community, will hopefully represent the starting point of the wider process of establishing official international guidelines or standards, within scientific communities and standardization organizations.

  6. Thermo-optic coefficient of polyisobutylene ultrathin films measured with integrated photonic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hong Seok; Neiroukh, Dania; Hunt, Heather K; Armani, Andrea M

    2012-01-10

    The optical properties of polymeric materials, such as transmission loss and the thermo-optic coefficient, determine their utility in numerous applications, ranging from nanotechnology to the automotive and aerospace industries. However, because of the wide variation in the physical properties of polymers, many are unsuited for characterization using conventional techniques; consequently, their optical properties are unknown. One such polymer is polyisobutylene, which is viscous at room temperature and therefore is not compatible with conventional transmission loss and the thermo-optic coefficient characterization techniques because they rely on contact measurements. To overcome this, we have developed an integrated, microscale optical sensor that relies on an evanescent wave to study the material's optical behavior. Using this device, we successfully determined the refractive index, the transmission loss, and the thermo-optic coefficient of ultrathin films of polyisobutylene. The films are deposited on the sensor's silica surface using either spin coating or surface-initiated cationic polymerization, demonstrating the flexibility of this approach. PMID:22111576

  7. Development of a non-invasive LED based device for adipose tissue thickness measurements in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volceka, K.; Jakovels, D.; Arina, Z.; Zaharans, J.; Kviesis, E.; Strode, A.; Svampe, E.; Ozolina-Moll, L.; Butnere, M. M.

    2012-06-01

    There are a number of techniques for body composition assessment in clinics and in field-surveys, but in all cases the applied methods have advantages and disadvantages. High precision imaging methods are available, though expensive and non-portable, however, the methods devised for the mass population, often suffer from the lack of precision. Therefore, the development of a safe, mobile, non-invasive, optical method that would be easy to perform, precise and low-cost, but also would offer an accurate assessment of subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) both in lean and in obese persons is required. Thereof, the diffuse optical spectroscopy is advantageous over the aforementioned techniques. A prototype device using an optical method for measurement of the SAT thickness in vivo has been developed. The probe contained multiple LEDs (660nm) distributed at various distances from the photo-detector which allow different light penetration depths into the subcutaneous tissue. The differences of the reflected light intensities were used to create a non-linear model, and the computed values were compared with the corresponding thicknesses of SAT, assessed by B-mode ultrasonography. The results show that with the optical system used in this study, accurate results of different SAT thicknesses can be obtained, and imply a further potential for development of multispectral optical system to observe changes of SAT thickness as well as to determine the percentage of total body fat.

  8. Fully automatic flow-based device for monitoring of drug permeation across a cell monolayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelená, Lucie; Marques, Sara S; Segundo, Marcela A; Miró, Manuel; Pávek, Petr; Sklenářová, Hana; Solich, Petr

    2016-01-01

    A novel flow-programming setup based on the sequential injection principle is herein proposed for on-line monitoring of temporal events in cell permeation studies. The permeation unit consists of a Franz cell with its basolateral compartment mixed under mechanical agitation and thermostated at 37 °C. The apical compartment is replaced by commercially available Transwell inserts with a precultivated cell monolayer. The transport of drug substances across epithelial cells genetically modified with the P-glycoprotein membrane transporter (MDCKII-MDR1) is monitored on-line using rhodamine 123 as a fluorescent marker. The permeation kinetics of the marker is obtained in a fully automated mode by sampling minute volumes of solution from the basolateral compartment in short intervals (10 min) up to 4 h. The effect of a P-glycoprotein transporter inhibitor, verapamil as a model drug, on the efficiency of the marker transport across the cell monolayer is thoroughly investigated. The analytical features of the proposed flow method for cell permeation studies in real time are critically compared against conventional batch-wise procedures and microfluidic devices. PMID:26615589

  9. MEMS device for bending test: measurements of fatigue and creep of electroplated nickel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kristian Pontoppidan; Rasmussen, Anette Alsted; Ravnkilde, Jan Tue;

    2003-01-01

    In situ bending test devices with integrated electrostatic actuator were fabricated in electroplated nanocrystalline nickel. The device features approximately pure in-plane bending of the test beam. The excitation of the test beam has fixed displacement amplitude as the actuation electrodes are o...

  10. Napoleon Cybulski--Polish pioneer in developing of the device for measuring blood flow velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlik, W W; Konturek, S J; Bilski, R

    2006-04-01

    Napoleon Cybulski (1854-1919) was the most prominent Polish physiologist who chaired the Department of Physiology at the Faculty of Medicine of Jagiellonian University between 1885 and 1919. One of his greatest achievements was the construction of a device for precise measurements of blood movement in the vessels - the photohemotachometer, which provided a better insight into the physiology and pathophysiology of the circulatory system. In the field of endocrinology Cybulski together with Szymonowicz, found out that adrenal extracts contain biologically active substances that elevate blood pressure. He was also a constructor of an extremely clever microcalorimeter to measure the quantity of heat produced during isolated muscle contraction. He applied, for the first time, condensator discharges to stimulate nerves and analyzed changes in the excitability of the muscles. Cybulski proved that the cause of the electrical excitability of tissue depends on the electrical energy and the time of its duration. Together with Beck, he performed the experiments on the sensory centers in the central nervous system by means of the observations of the electrical evoked potentials. They discovered the continuous electrical oscillations in the brain - the brain waves and recorded the negative electrical potentials in certain brain areas induced by sensory impulses coming from the periphery. Using this technique Beck and Cybulski localized various centers in the brain of dogs and Macaccus rhesus monkeys. The names of Beck and Cybulski were quoted in many publications on neurophysiology and electroencephalography. The present paper describes Napoleon Cybulski as a constructor of an original instrument for studying the movement of blood under various experimental conditions an emphasizes the contribution of this invention to the development of physiology.

  11. InGaAsP/InGaAs tandem photovoltaic devices for four-junction solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lattice-matched InGaAs(P) photovoltaic devices were grown on InP substrates by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. InGaAsP/InGaAs (1.07/0.74 eV) dual-junction (DJ) solar cells were fabricated and characterized by quantum efficiency and I–V measurements. The open circuit voltage, short circuit current density, fill factor, and efficiency of InGaAsP/InGaAs DJ solar cell are 0.977 V, 10.2 mA/cm2, 80.8%, and 8.94%, respectively, under one sun illumination of the AM 1.5D spectrum. For the InGaAsP/InGaAs DJ solar cell, with increasing concentration, the conversion efficiency first increases steadily and reaches 13% around 280 suns, and finally decreases due to the drop in fill factor at higher concentration ratios. These experimental results demonstrate the promising prospect of GaInP/GaAs/InGaAsP/InGaAs four-junction solar cells. (paper)

  12. Proposal of methodology and test protocol for evaluating and qualifying pH measuring devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niza Helena de Almeida

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a proposal for evaluating and qualifying pH measuring devices based on the requirements of relevant standards. The proposal presented is based on ASTM E70, NBR 7353, JIS Z 8805, BS 3145, DIN 19268, NBR ISO 17025 and other standards, as well as the results of field research carried out in conjunction with professionals performing pH measurements in public health laboratories. Evaluation is performed by inspection of a form which records data from the measuring system. The form gives acceptable variations in the parameters being tested and allows a conclusion to be reached regarding acceptability of the system. Using the proposed protocol allows definition of suitable analysis criteria, while taking into account the influence pH measurement is subject and the need for correct results. This is particularly true when analyzing products already on the market, thus underlining the protocol's importance to the public health area.Este artigo apresenta uma proposta de protocolo de avaliação e qualificação de medidores de pH fundamentada no que prescrevem as normas ASTM E 70, NBR 7353, JIS Z 8805, BS 3145, DIN 19268, NBR ISO 17025 e outras, complementada com os resultados de pesquisa de campo junto a profissionais que realizam ensaio de medição de pH em laboratórios de saúde pública. A proposta consiste em avaliar o medidor de pH com auxílio de um formulário, cujo preenchimento baseia-se, principalmente, na inspeção e ensaios no sistema medidor. O formulário fornece variações aceitáveis para os parâmetros testados, propiciando parecer conclusivo quanto à adequação do instrumento. A aplicação do protocolo permite definir um critério adequado de análise, tendo em vista a influência que sofre tal ensaio de medição, especialmente, em análises de amostras de produtos decorrentes de finalidade fiscal, no âmbito da saúde pública

  13. Lamination of organic solar cells and organic light emitting devices: Models and experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oyewole, O. K. [Department of Theoretical and Applied Physics, African University of Science and Technology, Km 10 Airport Road, Galadimawa, Abuja, Federal Capital Territory (Nigeria); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Kwara State University, P.M.B 1530, Ilorin, Kwara State (Nigeria); Yu, D. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, Olden Street, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Princeton Institute of Science and Technology of Materials, Princeton University, 70 Prospect Street, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Du, J. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, Olden Street, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Princeton Institute of Science and Technology of Materials, Princeton University, 70 Prospect Street, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, 137 Reber Building, University Park, Pennsylvania (United States); Asare, J.; Fashina, A. [Department of Theoretical and Applied Physics, African University of Science and Technology, Km 10 Airport Road, Galadimawa, Abuja, Federal Capital Territory (Nigeria); Anye, V. C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, African University of Science and Technology, Km 10 Airport Road, Galadimawa, Abuja, Federal Capital Territory (Nigeria); Zebaze Kana, M. G. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Kwara State University, P.M.B 1530, Ilorin, Kwara State (Nigeria); Soboyejo, W. O., E-mail: soboyejo@princeton.edu [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, Olden Street, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Princeton Institute of Science and Technology of Materials, Princeton University, 70 Prospect Street, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, African University of Science and Technology, Km 10 Airport Road, Galadimawa, Abuja, Federal Capital Territory (Nigeria)

    2015-08-21

    In this paper, a combined experimental, computational, and analytical approach is used to provide new insights into the lamination of organic solar cells and light emitting devices at macro- and micro-scales. First, the effects of applied lamination force (on contact between the laminated layers) are studied. The crack driving forces associated with the interfacial cracks (at the bi-material interfaces) are estimated along with the critical interfacial crack driving forces associated with the separation of thin films, after layer transfer. The conditions for successful lamination are predicted using a combination of experiments and computational models. Guidelines are developed for the lamination of low-cost organic electronic structures.

  14. Lamination of organic solar cells and organic light emitting devices: Models and experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, a combined experimental, computational, and analytical approach is used to provide new insights into the lamination of organic solar cells and light emitting devices at macro- and micro-scales. First, the effects of applied lamination force (on contact between the laminated layers) are studied. The crack driving forces associated with the interfacial cracks (at the bi-material interfaces) are estimated along with the critical interfacial crack driving forces associated with the separation of thin films, after layer transfer. The conditions for successful lamination are predicted using a combination of experiments and computational models. Guidelines are developed for the lamination of low-cost organic electronic structures

  15. Material characterizations and devices tests of solar cells based on III-V elements nitrides

    OpenAIRE

    Gorge, Vanessa

    2012-01-01

    Among III-V nitrides, the InGaN material has intensively been studied since the year 2000 for photovoltaic applications, in particular for multi-junction solar cells, thanks to its large tunable band gap covering almost the entire solar spectrum. Then, it will be possible to reach high efficiency and low cost. However, one of the problems of InGaN material is the absence of lattice-matched substrate leading to high defect density which limits device performances. We have thus studied the feas...

  16. Apparatus and method for measuring single cell and sub-cellular photosynthetic efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Ryan Wesley; Singh, Seema; Wu, Huawen

    2013-07-09

    Devices for measuring single cell changes in photosynthetic efficiency in algal aquaculture are disclosed that include a combination of modulated LED trans-illumination of different intensities with synchronized through objective laser illumination and confocal detection. Synchronization and intensity modulation of a dual illumination scheme were provided using a custom microcontroller for a laser beam block and constant current LED driver. Therefore, single whole cell photosynthetic efficiency, and subcellular (diffraction limited) photosynthetic efficiency measurement modes are permitted. Wide field rapid light scanning actinic illumination is provided for both by an intensity modulated 470 nm LED. For the whole cell photosynthetic efficiency measurement, the same LED provides saturating pulses for generating photosynthetic induction curves. For the subcellular photosynthetic efficiency measurement, a switched through objective 488 nm laser provides saturating pulses for generating photosynthetic induction curves. A second near IR LED is employed to generate dark adapted states in the system under study.

  17. Validity and Reliability of the PUSH Wearable Device to Measure Movement Velocity During the Back Squat Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsalobre-Fernández, Carlos; Kuzdub, Matt; Poveda-Ortiz, Pedro; Campo-Vecino, Juan Del

    2016-07-01

    Balsalobre-Fernández, C, Kuzdub, M, Poveda-Ortiz, P, and Campo-Vecino, Jd. Validity and reliability of the PUSH wearable device to measure movement velocity during the back squat exercise. J Strength Cond Res 30(7): 1968-1974, 2016-The purpose of this study was to analyze the validity and reliability of a wearable device to measure movement velocity during the back squat exercise. To do this, 10 recreationally active healthy men (age = 23.4 ± 5.2 years; back squat 1 repetition maximum [1RM] = 83 ± 8.2 kg) performed 3 repetitions of the back squat exercise with 5 different loads ranging from 25 to 85% 1RM on a Smith Machine. Movement velocity for each of the total 150 repetitions was simultaneously recorded using the T-Force linear transducer (LT) and the PUSH wearable band. Results showed a high correlation between the LT and the wearable device mean (r = 0.85; standard error of estimate [SEE] = 0.08 m·s) and peak velocity (r = 0.91, SEE = 0.1 m·s). Moreover, there was a very high agreement between these 2 devices for the measurement of mean (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC] = 0.907) and peak velocity (ICC = 0.944), although a systematic bias between devices was observed (PUSH peak velocity being -0.07 ± 0.1 m·s lower, p ≤ 0.05). When measuring the 3 repetitions with each load, both devices displayed almost equal reliability (Test-retest reliability: LT [r = 0.98], PUSH [r = 0.956]; ICC: LT [ICC = 0.989], PUSH [ICC = 0.981]; coefficient of variation [CV]: LT [CV = 4.2%], PUSH [CV = 5.0%]). Finally, individual load-velocity relationships measured with both the LT (R = 0.96) and the PUSH wearable device (R = 0.94) showed similar, very high coefficients of determination. In conclusion, these results support the use of an affordable wearable device to track velocity during back squat training. Wearable devices, such as the one in this study, could have valuable practical applications for strength and conditioning coaches. PMID:26670993

  18. A polystyrene-based microfluidic device with three-dimensional interconnected microporous walls for perfusion cell culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Chung Yu; Goral, Vasiliy N.; DeRosa, Michael E.; Huang, Tony Jun

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we present a simple, rapid prototyped polystyrene-based microfluidic device with three-dimensional (3D) interconnected microporous walls for long term perfusion cell culture. Patterned 3D interconnected microporous structures were created by a chemical treatment together with a protective mask and the native hydrophobic nature of the microporous structures were selectively made hydrophilic using oxygen plasma treatment together with a protective mask. Using this polystyrene-based cell culture microfluidic device, we successfully demonstrated the support of four days perfusion cell culture of hepatocytes (C3A cells). PMID:25379110

  19. The physical origins of transit time measurements for rapid, single cell mechanotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyberg, Kendra D; Scott, Michael B; Bruce, Samuel L; Gopinath, Ajay B; Bikos, Dimitri; Mason, Thomas G; Kim, Jin Woong; Choi, Hong Sung; Rowat, Amy C

    2016-08-16

    The mechanical phenotype or 'mechanotype' of cells is emerging as a potential biomarker for cell types ranging from pluripotent stem cells to cancer cells. Using a microfluidic device, cell mechanotype can be rapidly analyzed by measuring the time required for cells to deform as they flow through constricted channels. While cells typically exhibit deformation timescales, or transit times, on the order of milliseconds to tens of seconds, transit times can span several orders of magnitude and vary from day to day within a population of single cells; this makes it challenging to characterize different cell samples based on transit time data. Here we investigate how variability in transit time measurements depends on both experimental factors and heterogeneity in physical properties across a population of single cells. We find that simultaneous transit events that occur across neighboring constrictions can alter transit time, but only significantly when more than 65% of channels in the parallel array are occluded. Variability in transit time measurements is also affected by the age of the device following plasma treatment, which could be attributed to changes in channel surface properties. We additionally investigate the role of variability in cell physical properties. Transit time depends on cell size; by binning transit time data for cells of similar diameters, we reduce measurement variability by 20%. To gain further insight into the effects of cell-to-cell differences in physical properties, we fabricate a panel of gel particles and oil droplets with tunable mechanical properties. We demonstrate that particles with homogeneous composition exhibit a marked reduction in transit time variability, suggesting that the width of transit time distributions reflects the degree of heterogeneity in subcellular structure and mechanical properties within a cell population. Our results also provide fundamental insight into the physical underpinnings of transit measurements

  20. Two-layer model for electroabsorption and built-in potential measurements on a-Si:H pin solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, L.; Schiff, E.A. [Syracuse Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1996-12-31

    Modulated Electroabsorption (EA) measurements have been widely used to estimate built-in potentials (V{sub bi}) in semiconductor devices. The method is particularly simple in devices for which the built-in potential is dropped in a single layer of the device. However, experimental results in amorphous silicon and organic devices can involve at least 2 layers. In the present paper the authors consider the information which can be obtained about 2-layer semiconductor devices from electroabsorption measurements. In particular they describe a 2-layer EA model appropriate to a-Si:H based pin solar cells, for which both the p{sup +} and i layers contribute to the EA signal. The authors present an analysis of capacitance and second harmonic measurements which yields the EA coefficient for the p{sup +} layer of the device, and they present measurements on a-Si:H pin devices which appear consistent with this analysis. Wavelength dependent EA then yields the built-in potential across the 2-layer device.