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Sample records for cells lacking recg

  1. RecQ-dependent death-by-recombination in cells lacking RecG and UvrD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonville, Natalie C; Blankschien, Matthew D; Magner, Daniel B; Rosenberg, Susan M

    2010-04-01

    Maintenance of genomic stability is critical for all cells. Homologous recombination (HR) pathways promote genome stability using evolutionarily conserved proteins such as RecA, SSB, and RecQ, the Escherichia coli homologue of five human proteins at least three of which suppress genome instability and cancer. A previous report indicated that RecQ promotes the net accumulation in cells of intermolecular HR intermediates (IRIs), a net effect opposite that of the yeast and two human RecQ homologues. Here we extend those conclusions. We demonstrate that cells that lack both UvrD, an inhibitor of RecA-mediated strand exchange, and RecG, a DNA helicase implicated in IRI resolution, are inviable. We show that the uvrD recG cells die a "death-by-recombination" in which IRIs accumulate blocking chromosome segregation. First, their death requires RecA HR protein. Second, the death is accompanied by cytogenetically visible failure to segregate chromosomes. Third, FISH analyses show that the unsegregated chromosomes have completed replication, supporting the hypothesis that unresolved IRIs prevented the segregation. Fourth, we show that RecQ and induction of the SOS response are required for the accumulation of replicated, unsegregated chromosomes and death, as are RecF, RecO, and RecJ. ExoI exonuclease and MutL mismatch-repair protein are partially required. This set of genes is similar but not identical to those that promote death-by-recombination of DeltauvrD Deltaruv cells. The data support models in which RecQ promotes the net accumulation in cells of IRIs and RecG promotes resolution of IRIs that form via pathways not wholly identical to those that produce the IRIs resolved by RuvABC. This implies that RecG resolves intermediates other than or in addition to standard Holliday junctions resolved by RuvABC. The role of RecQ in net accumulation of IRIs may be shared by one or more of its human homologues. PMID:20138014

  2. RecG protein and single-strand DNA exonucleases avoid cell lethality associated with PriA helicase activity in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolph, Christian J; Mahdi, Akeel A; Upton, Amy L; Lloyd, Robert G

    2010-10-01

    Replication of the Escherichia coli chromosome usually initiates at a single origin (oriC) under control of DnaA. Two forks are established and move away in opposite directions. Replication is completed when these meet in a broadly defined terminus area half way around the circular chromosome. RecG appears to consolidate this arrangement by unwinding D-loops and R-loops that PriA might otherwise exploit to initiate replication at other sites. It has been suggested that without RecG such replication generates 3' flaps as the additional forks collide and displace nascent leading strands, providing yet more potential targets for PriA. Here we show that, to stay alive, cells must have either RecG or a 3' single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) exonuclease, which can be exonuclease I, exonuclease VII, or SbcCD. Cells lacking all three nucleases are inviable without RecG. They also need RecA recombinase and a Holliday junction resolvase to survive rapid growth, but SOS induction, although elevated, is not required. Additional requirements for Rep and UvrD are identified and linked with defects in DNA mismatch repair and with the ability to cope with conflicts between replication and transcription, respectively. Eliminating PriA helicase activity removes the requirement for RecG. The data are consistent with RecG and ssDNA exonucleases acting to limit PriA-mediated re-replication of the chromosome and the consequent generation of linear DNA branches that provoke recombination and delay chromosome segregation. PMID:20647503

  3. RECG maintains plastid and mitochondrial genome stability by suppressing extensive recombination between short dispersed repeats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaki Odahara

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Maintenance of plastid and mitochondrial genome stability is crucial for photosynthesis and respiration, respectively. Recently, we have reported that RECA1 maintains mitochondrial genome stability by suppressing gross rearrangements induced by aberrant recombination between short dispersed repeats in the moss Physcomitrella patens. In this study, we studied a newly identified P. patens homolog of bacterial RecG helicase, RECG, some of which is localized in both plastid and mitochondrial nucleoids. RECG partially complements recG deficiency in Escherichia coli cells. A knockout (KO mutation of RECG caused characteristic phenotypes including growth delay and developmental and mitochondrial defects, which are similar to those of the RECA1 KO mutant. The RECG KO cells showed heterogeneity in these phenotypes. Analyses of RECG KO plants showed that mitochondrial genome was destabilized due to a recombination between 8-79 bp repeats and the pattern of the recombination partly differed from that observed in the RECA1 KO mutants. The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA instability was greater in severe phenotypic RECG KO cells than that in mild phenotypic ones. This result suggests that mitochondrial genomic instability is responsible for the defective phenotypes of RECG KO plants. Some of the induced recombination caused efficient genomic rearrangements in RECG KO mitochondria. Such loci were sometimes associated with a decrease in the levels of normal mtDNA and significant decrease in the number of transcripts derived from the loci. In addition, the RECG KO mutation caused remarkable plastid abnormalities and induced recombination between short repeats (12-63 bp in the plastid DNA. These results suggest that RECG plays a role in the maintenance of both plastid and mitochondrial genome stability by suppressing aberrant recombination between dispersed short repeats; this role is crucial for plastid and mitochondrial functions.

  4. Salt stress causes cell wall damage in yeast cells lacking mitochondrial DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Qiuqiang Gao; Liang-Chun Liou; Qun Ren; Xiaoming Bao; Zhaojie Zhang

    2015-01-01

    The yeast cell wall plays an important role in maintaining cell morphology, cell integrity and response to environmental stresses. Here, we report that salt stress causes cell wall damage in yeast cells lacking mitochondrial DNA (ρ0). Upon salt treatment, the cell wall is thickened, broken and becomes more sensitive to the cell wall-perturbing agent sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Also, SCW11 mRNA levels are elevated in ρ0 cells. Deletion of SCW11 significantly decreases the sensitivity of ρ0 c...

  5. Murine fertilized ovum, blastomere and morula cells lacking SP phenotype

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In the field of stem cell research, SP (side population) phenotype is used to define the property that cells maintain a high efflux capability for some fluorescent dye, such as Hoechst 33342. Recently, many researches proposed that SP phenotype is a phenotype shared by some stem cells and some progenitor cells, and that SP phenotype is regarded as a candidate purification marker for stem cells. In this research, murine fertilized ova (including conjugate and single nucleus fertilized ova), 2-cell stage and 8-cell stage blastomeres, morulas and blastocysts were isolated and directly stained by Hoechst 33342 dye. The results show that fertilized ovum, blastomere and morula cells do not demonstrate any ability to efflux the dye. However, the inner cell mass (ICM) cells of blastocyst exhibit SP phenotype, which is consistent with the result of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) in vitro. These results indicate that the SP phenotype of ICM-derived ESCs is an intrinsic property and independent of the culture condition in vitro, and that SP phenotype is one of the characteristics of at least some pluripotent stem cells, but is not shared by totipotent stem cells. In addition, the result that the SP phenotype of ICM cells disappeared when the inhibitor verapamil was added into medium implies that the SP phenotype is directly associated with ABCG2. These results suggest that not all the stem cells demonstrate SP phenotype, and that SP phenotype might act as a purification marker for partial stem cells such as some pluripotent embryonic stem cells and multipotent adult stem cells, but not for all stem cells exampled by the totipotent stem cells in the very early stage of mouse embryos.

  6. Lack of vimentin impairs endothelial differentiation of embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boraas, Liana C; Ahsan, Tabassum

    2016-01-01

    The cytoskeletal filament vimentin is inherent to the endothelial phenotype and is critical for the proper function of endothelial cells in adult mice. It is unclear, however, if the presence of vimentin is necessary during differentiation to the endothelial phenotype. Here we evaluated gene and protein expression of differentiating wild type embryonic stem cells (WT ESCs) and vimentin knockout embryonic stem cells (VIM -/- ESCs) using embryoid bodies (EBs) formed from both cell types. Over seven days of differentiation VIM -/- EBs had altered morphology compared to WT EBs, with a rippled outer surface and a smaller size due to decreased proliferation. Gene expression of pluripotency markers decreased similarly for EBs of both cell types; however, VIM -/- EBs had impaired differentiation towards the endothelial phenotype. This was quantified with decreased expression of markers along the specification pathway, specifically the early mesodermal marker Brachy-T, the lateral plate mesodermal marker FLK1, and the endothelial-specific markers TIE2, PECAM, and VE-CADHERIN. Taken together, these results indicate that the absence of vimentin impairs spontaneous differentiation of ESCs to the endothelial phenotype in vitro. PMID:27480130

  7. Promoting and avoiding recombination: contrasting activities of the Escherichia coli RuvABC Holliday junction resolvase and RecG DNA translocase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Mahdi, Akeel A; Briggs, Geoffrey S; Lloyd, Robert G

    2010-05-01

    RuvABC and RecG are thought to provide alternative pathways for the late stages of recombination in Escherichia coli. Inactivation of both blocks the recovery of recombinants in genetic crosses. RuvABC resolves Holliday junctions, with RuvAB driving branch migration and RuvC catalyzing junction cleavage. RecG also drives branch migration, but no nuclease has been identified that might act with RecG to cleave junctions, apart from RusA, which is not normally expressed. We searched for an alternative nuclease using a synthetic lethality assay to screen for mutations causing inviability in the absence of RuvC, on the premise that a strain without any ability to cut junctions might be inviable. All the mutations identified mapped to polA, dam, or uvrD. None of these genes encodes a nuclease that cleaves Holliday junctions. Probing the reason for the inviability using the RusA Holliday junction resolvase provided strong evidence in each case that the RecG pathway is very ineffective at removing junctions and indicated that a nuclease component most probably does not exist. It also revealed new suppressors of recG, which were located to the ssb gene. Taken together with the results from the synthetic lethality assays, the properties of the mutant SSB proteins provide evidence that, rather than promoting recombination, a major function of RecG is to curb potentially pathological replication initiated via PriA protein at sites remote from oriC. PMID:20157002

  8. Chronic morphine treatment up-regulates mu opioid receptor binding in cells lacking Filamin A

    OpenAIRE

    Onoprishvili, Irma; Simon, Eric J.

    2007-01-01

    We investigated the effects of morphine and other agonists on the human mu opioid receptor (MOP) expressed in M2 melanoma cells, lacking the actin cytoskeleton protein filamin A and in A7, a sub clone of the M2 melanoma cells, stably transfected with filamin A cDNA. The results of binding experiments showed, that after chronic morphine treatment (24 hr) of A7 cells, MOP binding sites were down-regulated to 63% of control, whereas, unexpectedly, in M2 cells, MOP binding was up-regulated to 188...

  9. PROPOSED CARDIAC STEM CELLS DERIVED FROM “CARDIOSPHERES” LACK CARDIOMYOGENIC POTENTIAL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ditte Caroline

    that injuried heart tissue may be repaired by stem cell therapy using autologous CS derived cells, and pre-clinical studies have already been described in literature.    Herein, we established CSs from neonatal rats, and by immunofluorescence, qRT-PCR, and microscopic examination we demonstrated......   Recent studies have reported that clinical relevant numbers of cardiac stem cells (CSCs) with cardiomyogenic potential can be obtained from small heart tissue biopsies, by an intrinsic ability of CSCs to form beating cardiospheres (CSs) during ex vivo culture. Such data have provided optimism...... to form CSs by themselves. Phenotypically, CS cells largely resembled fibroblasts, and they lacked cardiomyogenic as well as endothelial differentiation potential.    Our data imply that at least the murine cardiosphere model seems unsuitable for enrichment of cardiac stem cells with cardiomyogenic...

  10. Defective Differentiation of Adipose Precursor Cells from Lipodystrophic Mice Lacking Perilipin 1

    OpenAIRE

    Ying Lyu; Xueying Su; Jingna Deng; Shangxin Liu; Liangqiang Zou; Xiaojing Zhao; Suning Wei; Bin Geng; Guoheng Xu

    2015-01-01

    Perilipin 1 (Plin1) localizes at the surface of lipid droplets to regulate triglyceride storage and hydrolysis in adipocytes. Plin1 defect leads to low adiposity in mice and partial lipodystrophy in human. This study investigated the roles of Plin1 in adipocyte differentiation. Plin1 null (-/-) mice showed plenty of multilocular adipocytes and small unilocular adipocytes in adipose tissue, along with lack of a subpopulation of adipose progenitor cells capable of in vivo adipogenesis and along...

  11. Lack of correlation of stem cell markers in breast cancer stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Y; Nenutil, R; Appleyard, M V; Murray, K; Boylan, M; Thompson, A. M.; Coates, P J

    2014-01-01

    Background: Various markers are used to identify the unique sub-population of breast cancer cells with stem cell properties. Whether these markers are expressed in all breast cancers, identify the same population of cells, or equate to therapeutic response is controversial. Methods: We investigated the expression of multiple cancer stem cell markers in human breast cancer samples and cell lines in vitro and in vivo, comparing across and within samples and relating expression with growth and t...

  12. NEK9-dependent proliferation of cancer cells lacking functional p53.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurioka, Daisuke; Takeshita, Fumitaka; Tsuta, Koji; Sakamoto, Hiromi; Watanabe, Shun-ichi; Matsumoto, Kenji; Watanabe, Masatoshi; Nakagama, Hitoshi; Ochiya, Takahiro; Yokota, Jun; Kohno, Takashi; Tsuchiya, Naoto

    2014-01-01

    Dysfunction of the p53 network is a major cause of cancer development, and selective elimination of p53-inactivated cancer cells therefore represents an ideal therapeutic strategy. In this study, we performed a microRNA target screen that identified NEK9 (NIMA-related kinase 9) as a crucial regulator of cell-cycle progression in p53-inactivated cancer cells. NEK9 depletion selectively inhibited proliferation in p53-deficient cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo. The resultant cell-cycle arrest occurred predominantly in G1 phase, and exhibited senescence-like features. Furthermore, NEK9 repression affected expression of a broad range of genes encoding cell-cycle regulators and factors involved in mRNA processing, suggesting a novel role for NEK9 in p53-deficient cells. Lung adenocarcinoma patients with positive staining for NEK9 and mutant p53 proteins exhibited significantly poorer prognoses, suggesting that expression of both proteins promotes tumor growth. Our findings demonstrate that a novel NEK9 network regulates the growth of cancer cells lacking functional p53. PMID:25131192

  13. Cells bearing chromosome aberrations lacking one telomere are selectively blocked at the G2/M checkpoint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cell cycle checkpoints are part of the cellular mechanisms to maintain genomic integrity. After ionizing radiation exposure, the cells can show delay or arrest in their progression through the cell cycle, as well as an activation of the DNA repair machinery in order to reduce the damage. The G2/M checkpoint prevents G2 cells entering mitosis until the DNA damage has been reduced. The present study evaluates which G0 radiation-induced chromosome aberrations are negatively selected in the G2/M checkpoint. For this purpose, peripheral blood samples were irradiated at 1 and 3 Gy of γ-rays, and lymphocytes were cultured for 48 h. Calyculin-A and Colcemid were used to analyze, in the same slide, cells in G2 and M. Chromosome spreads were consecutively analyzed by solid stain, pancentromeric and pantelomeric FISH and mFISH. The results show that the frequency of incomplete chromosome elements, those lacking a telomeric signal at one end, decreases abruptly from G2 to M. This indicates that cells with incomplete chromosome elements can progress from G0 to G2, but at the G2/M checkpoint suffer a strong negative selection.

  14. Cells bearing chromosome aberrations lacking one telomere are selectively blocked at the G2/M checkpoint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, Pilar [Unitat de Biologia Cel.lular, Departament de Biologia Cel.lular, Fisiologia i Immunologia, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Barquinero, Joan Francesc [Unitat d' Antropologia Biologica, Departament de Biologia Animal, Biologia Vegetal i Ecologia, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Duran, Assumpta [Unitat de Biologia Cel.lular, Departament de Biologia Cel.lular, Fisiologia i Immunologia, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Caballin, Maria Rosa [Unitat d' Antropologia Biologica, Departament de Biologia Animal, Biologia Vegetal i Ecologia, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Ribas, Montserrat [Servei de Radiofisica i Radioproteccio de l' Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, 08025 Barcelona (Spain); Barrios, Leonardo, E-mail: Lleonard.Barrios@uab.cat [Unitat de Biologia Cel.lular, Departament de Biologia Cel.lular, Fisiologia i Immunologia, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain)

    2009-11-02

    Cell cycle checkpoints are part of the cellular mechanisms to maintain genomic integrity. After ionizing radiation exposure, the cells can show delay or arrest in their progression through the cell cycle, as well as an activation of the DNA repair machinery in order to reduce the damage. The G2/M checkpoint prevents G2 cells entering mitosis until the DNA damage has been reduced. The present study evaluates which G0 radiation-induced chromosome aberrations are negatively selected in the G2/M checkpoint. For this purpose, peripheral blood samples were irradiated at 1 and 3 Gy of {gamma}-rays, and lymphocytes were cultured for 48 h. Calyculin-A and Colcemid were used to analyze, in the same slide, cells in G2 and M. Chromosome spreads were consecutively analyzed by solid stain, pancentromeric and pantelomeric FISH and mFISH. The results show that the frequency of incomplete chromosome elements, those lacking a telomeric signal at one end, decreases abruptly from G2 to M. This indicates that cells with incomplete chromosome elements can progress from G0 to G2, but at the G2/M checkpoint suffer a strong negative selection.

  15. RecQ Promotes Toxic Recombination in Cells Lacking Recombination-Intermediate-Removal Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Magner, Daniel B.; Blankschien, Matthew D.; Lee, Jennifer A.; Pennington, Jeanine M.; James R. Lupski; Rosenberg, Susan M.

    2007-01-01

    The RecQ-helicase family is widespread, highly conserved, and includes human orthologues that suppress genomic instability and cancer. In vivo, some RecQ homologues promote reduction of steady-state levels of bimolecular recombination intermediates (BRIs), which block chromosome segregation if not resolved. We find that in vivo, E. coli RecQ can promote the opposite: the net accumulation of BRIs. We report that cells lacking Ruv and UvrD BRI-resolution and -prevention proteins die and display...

  16. Tc17 cells mediate vaccine immunity against lethal fungal pneumonia in immune deficient hosts lacking CD4+ T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Som Gowda Nanjappa

    Full Text Available Vaccines may help reduce the growing incidence of fungal infections in immune-suppressed patients. We have found that, even in the absence of CD4(+ T-cell help, vaccine-induced CD8(+ T cells persist and confer resistance against Blastomyces dermatitidis and Histoplasma capsulatum. Type 1 cytokines contribute to that resistance, but they also are dispensable. Although the role of T helper 17 cells in immunity to fungi is debated, IL-17 producing CD8(+ T cells (Tc17 cells have not been investigated. Here, we show that Tc17 cells are indispensable in antifungal vaccine immunity in hosts lacking CD4(+ T cells. Tc17 cells are induced upon vaccination, recruited to the lung on pulmonary infection, and act non-redundantly in mediating protection in a manner that requires neutrophils. Tc17 cells did not influence type I immunity, nor did the lack of IL-12 signaling augment Tc17 cells, indicating a distinct lineage and function. IL-6 was required for Tc17 differentiation and immunity, but IL-1R1 and Dectin-1 signaling was unexpectedly dispensable. Tc17 cells expressed surface CXCR3 and CCR6, but only the latter was essential in recruitment to the lung. Although IL-17 producing T cells are believed to be short-lived, effector Tc17 cells expressed low levels of KLRG1 and high levels of the transcription factor TCF-1, predicting their long-term survival and stem-cell like behavior. Our work has implications for designing vaccines against fungal infections in immune suppressed patients.

  17. Tc17 cells mediate vaccine immunity against lethal fungal pneumonia in immune deficient hosts lacking CD4+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanjappa, Som Gowda; Heninger, Erika; Wüthrich, Marcel; Gasper, David Joseph; Klein, Bruce S

    2012-01-01

    Vaccines may help reduce the growing incidence of fungal infections in immune-suppressed patients. We have found that, even in the absence of CD4(+) T-cell help, vaccine-induced CD8(+) T cells persist and confer resistance against Blastomyces dermatitidis and Histoplasma capsulatum. Type 1 cytokines contribute to that resistance, but they also are dispensable. Although the role of T helper 17 cells in immunity to fungi is debated, IL-17 producing CD8(+) T cells (Tc17 cells) have not been investigated. Here, we show that Tc17 cells are indispensable in antifungal vaccine immunity in hosts lacking CD4(+) T cells. Tc17 cells are induced upon vaccination, recruited to the lung on pulmonary infection, and act non-redundantly in mediating protection in a manner that requires neutrophils. Tc17 cells did not influence type I immunity, nor did the lack of IL-12 signaling augment Tc17 cells, indicating a distinct lineage and function. IL-6 was required for Tc17 differentiation and immunity, but IL-1R1 and Dectin-1 signaling was unexpectedly dispensable. Tc17 cells expressed surface CXCR3 and CCR6, but only the latter was essential in recruitment to the lung. Although IL-17 producing T cells are believed to be short-lived, effector Tc17 cells expressed low levels of KLRG1 and high levels of the transcription factor TCF-1, predicting their long-term survival and stem-cell like behavior. Our work has implications for designing vaccines against fungal infections in immune suppressed patients.

  18. How do CD4+ T cells detect and eliminate tumor cells that either lack or express MHC class II molecules?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ole Audun Werner Haabeth

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available CD4+ T cells contribute to tumor eradication, even in the absence of CD8+ T cells. Cytotoxic CD4+ T cells can directly kill MHC class II positive tumor cells. More surprisingly, CD4+ T cells can indirectly eliminate tumor cells that lack MHC class II expression. Here, we review the mechanisms of direct and indirect CD4+ T cell-mediated elimination of tumor cells. An emphasis is put on T cell receptor (TCR transgenic models, where anti-tumor responses of naïve CD4+ T cells of defined specificity can be tracked. Some generalizations can tentatively be made. For both MHCIIPOS and MHCIINEG tumors, presentation of tumor specific antigen by host antigen presenting cells (APCs appears to be required for CD4+ T cell priming. This has been extensively studied in a myeloma model (MOPC315, where host APCs in tumor-draining lymph nodes are primed with secreted tumor antigen. Upon antigen recognition, naïve CD4+ T cells differentiate into Th1 cells and migrate to the tumor. At the tumor site, the mechanisms for elimination of MHCIIPOS and MHCIINEG tumor cells differ. In a TCR transgenic B16 melanoma model, MHCIIPOS melanoma cells are directly killed by cytotoxic CD4+ T cells in a perforin/granzyme B-dependent manner. By contrast, MHCIINEG myeloma cells are killed by IFN-g stimulated M1-like macrophages. In summary, while the priming phase of CD4+ T cells appears similar for MHCIIPOS and MHCIINEG tumors, the killing mechanisms are different. Unresolved issues and directions for future research are addressed.

  19. Cerebellar transcriptional alterations with Purkinje cell dysfunction and loss in mice lacking PGC-1α

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth K Lucas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Alterations in the expression and activity of the transcriptional coactivator peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (ppargc1a or PGC-1α have been reported in multiple movement disorders, yet it is unclear how a lack of PGC-1α impacts transcription and function of the cerebellum, a region with high PGC-1α expression. We show here that mice lacking PGC-1α exhibit ataxia in addition to the previously described deficits in motor coordination. Using q-RT-PCR in cerebellar homogenates from PGC-1α -/- mice, we measured expression of 37 microarray-identified transcripts upregulated by PGC-1α in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells with neuroanatomical overlap with PGC-1α or parvalbumin (PV, a calcium buffer highly expressed by Purkinje cells. We found significant reductions in transcripts with synaptic (complexin1, Cplx1; Pacsin2, structural (neurofilament heavy chain, Nefh, and metabolic (isocitrate dehydrogenase 3a, Idh3a; neutral cholesterol ester hydrolase 1, Nceh1; pyruvate dehydrogenase alpha 1, Pdha1; phytanoyl-CoA hydroxylase, Phyh; ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase, Rieske iron-sulfur polypeptide 1, Uqcrfs1 functions. Using conditional deletion of PGC-1α in PV-positive neurons, we determined that 50% of PGC-1α expression and a reduction in a subset of these transcripts could be explained by its concentration in PV-positive neuronal populations in the cerbellum. To determine whether there were functional consequences associated with these changes, we conducted stereological counts and spike rate analysis in Purkinje cells, a cell type rich in PV, from PGC-1α -/- mice. We observed a significant loss of Purkinje cells by six weeks of age, and the remaining Purkinje cells exhibited a 50% reduction in spike rate. Together, these data highlight the complexity of PGC-1α’s actions in the central nervous system and suggest that dysfunction in multiple cell types contribute to motor deficits in the context of PGC-1α deficiency.

  20. Cerebellar transcriptional alterations with Purkinje cell dysfunction and loss in mice lacking PGC-1α

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Elizabeth K.; Reid, Courtney S.; McMeekin, Laura J.; Dougherty, Sarah E.; Floyd, Candace L.; Cowell, Rita M.

    2014-01-01

    Alterations in the expression and activity of the transcriptional coactivator peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (ppargc1a or PGC-1α) have been reported in multiple movement disorders, yet it is unclear how a lack of PGC-1α impacts transcription and function of the cerebellum, a region with high PGC-1α expression. We show here that mice lacking PGC-1α exhibit ataxia in addition to the previously described deficits in motor coordination. Using q-RT-PCR in cerebellar homogenates from PGC-1α−/− mice, we measured expression of 37 microarray-identified transcripts upregulated by PGC-1α in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells with neuroanatomical overlap with PGC-1α or parvalbumin (PV), a calcium buffer highly expressed by Purkinje cells. We found significant reductions in transcripts with synaptic (complexin1, Cplx1; Pacsin2), structural (neurofilament heavy chain, Nefh), and metabolic (isocitrate dehydrogenase 3a, Idh3a; neutral cholesterol ester hydrolase 1, Nceh1; pyruvate dehydrogenase alpha 1, Pdha1; phytanoyl-CoA hydroxylase, Phyh; ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase, Rieske iron-sulfur polypeptide 1, Uqcrfs1) functions. Using conditional deletion of PGC-1α in PV-positive neurons, we determined that 50% of PGC-1α expression and a reduction in a subset of these transcripts could be explained by its concentration in PV-positive neuronal populations in the cerbellum. To determine whether there were functional consequences associated with these changes, we conducted stereological counts and spike rate analysis in Purkinje cells, a cell type rich in PV, from PGC-1α−/− mice. We observed a significant loss of Purkinje cells by 6 weeks of age, and the remaining Purkinje cells exhibited a 50% reduction in spike rate. Together, these data highlight the complexity of PGC-1α's actions in the central nervous system and suggest that dysfunction in multiple cell types contribute to motor deficits in the context of PGC-1α deficiency. PMID

  1. Vascular endothelial cells express a functional fas-receptor due to lack of hemodynamic forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freyberg, M A; Kaiser, D; Graf, R; Friedl, P

    2001-10-01

    The fas system is present in atherosclerotic lesions. However, its role in the initiation and progression is still unclear. Here we show that in endothelial cells (EC) the expression of the fas receptor is regulated by flow conditions. The EC of the vascular system are regularly exposed to a range of hemodynamic forces with great impact on cellular structures and functions. Recently it was reported that in endothelial cells the lack of hemodynamic forces as well as irregular flow conditions trigger apoptosis by induction of a mechanosensitive autocrine loop of thrombospondin-1 and the alpha(V)beta(3) integrin/integrin-associated protein complex. Here we show that EC cultivated under regular laminar flow conditions are devoid of the fas-receptor whereas cultivation under static conditions as well as under turbulence leads to its expression. Stimulation of the fas-receptor by its ligand increases the amount of apoptotic cells by twofold; the increase can be prevented by blocking the fas-receptor. The availability of the expressed fas receptor for stimulation by its ligand hints at a role as a tool for progression of atherosclerosis. PMID:11483857

  2. Are the SSB-Interacting Proteins RecO, RecG, PriA and the DnaB-Interacting Protein Rep Bound to Progressing Replication Forks in Escherichia coli?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esma Bentchikou

    Full Text Available In all organisms several enzymes that are needed upon replication impediment are targeted to replication forks by interaction with a replication protein. In most cases these proteins interact with the polymerase clamp or with single-stranded DNA binding proteins (SSB. In Escherichia coli an accessory replicative helicase was also shown to interact with the DnaB replicative helicase. Here we have used cytological observation of Venus fluorescent fusion proteins expressed from their endogenous loci in live E. coli cells to determine whether DNA repair and replication restart proteins that interact with a replication protein travel with replication forks. A custom-made microscope that detects active replisome molecules provided that they are present in at least three copies was used. Neither the recombination proteins RecO and RecG, nor the replication accessory helicase Rep are detected specifically in replicating cells in our assay, indicating that either they are not present at progressing replication forks or they are present in less than three copies. The Venus-PriA fusion protein formed foci even in the absence of replication forks, which prevented us from reaching a conclusion.

  3. Are the SSB-Interacting Proteins RecO, RecG, PriA and the DnaB-Interacting Protein Rep Bound to Progressing Replication Forks in Escherichia coli?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentchikou, Esma; Chagneau, Carine; Long, Emilie; Matelot, Mélody; Allemand, Jean-François; Michel, Bénédicte

    2015-01-01

    In all organisms several enzymes that are needed upon replication impediment are targeted to replication forks by interaction with a replication protein. In most cases these proteins interact with the polymerase clamp or with single-stranded DNA binding proteins (SSB). In Escherichia coli an accessory replicative helicase was also shown to interact with the DnaB replicative helicase. Here we have used cytological observation of Venus fluorescent fusion proteins expressed from their endogenous loci in live E. coli cells to determine whether DNA repair and replication restart proteins that interact with a replication protein travel with replication forks. A custom-made microscope that detects active replisome molecules provided that they are present in at least three copies was used. Neither the recombination proteins RecO and RecG, nor the replication accessory helicase Rep are detected specifically in replicating cells in our assay, indicating that either they are not present at progressing replication forks or they are present in less than three copies. The Venus-PriA fusion protein formed foci even in the absence of replication forks, which prevented us from reaching a conclusion. PMID:26244508

  4. Fibroblast growth factor rescues brain endothelial cells lacking presenilin 1 from apoptotic cell death following serum starvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gama Sosa, Miguel A; De Gasperi, Rita; Hof, Patrick R; Elder, Gregory A

    2016-01-01

    Presenilin 1 (Psen1) is important for vascular brain development and is known to influence cellular stress responses. To understand the role of Psen1 in endothelial stress responses, we investigated the effects of serum withdrawal on wild type (wt) and Psen1-/- embryonic brain endothelial cells. Serum starvation induced apoptosis in Psen1-/- cells but did not affect wt cells. PI3K/AKT signaling was reduced in serum-starved Psen1-/- cells, and this was associated with elevated levels of phospho-p38 consistent with decreased pro-survival AKT signaling in the absence of Psen1. Fibroblast growth factor (FGF1 and FGF2), but not vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) rescued Psen1-/- cells from serum starvation induced apoptosis. Inhibition of FGF signaling induced apoptosis in wt cells under serum withdrawal, while blocking γ-secretase activity had no effect. In the absence of serum, FGF2 immunoreactivity was distributed diffusely in cytoplasmic and nuclear vesicles of wt and Psen1-/- cells, as levels of FGF2 in nuclear and cytosolic fractions were not significantly different. Thus, sensitivity of Psen1-/- cells to serum starvation is not due to lack of FGF synthesis but likely to effects of Psen1 on FGF release onto the cell surface and impaired activation of the PI3K/AKT survival pathway. PMID:27443835

  5. Defective differentiation of adipose precursor cells from lipodystrophic mice lacking perilipin 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Lyu

    Full Text Available Perilipin 1 (Plin1 localizes at the surface of lipid droplets to regulate triglyceride storage and hydrolysis in adipocytes. Plin1 defect leads to low adiposity in mice and partial lipodystrophy in human. This study investigated the roles of Plin1 in adipocyte differentiation. Plin1 null (-/- mice showed plenty of multilocular adipocytes and small unilocular adipocytes in adipose tissue, along with lack of a subpopulation of adipose progenitor cells capable of in vivo adipogenesis and along with downregulation of adipogenic pathway. Before initiation of differentiation, adipose stromal-vascular cells (SVCs from Plin1-/- mice already accumulated numerous tiny lipid droplets, which increased in number and size during the first 12-h induction but thereafter became disappeared at day 1 of differentiation. The adipogenic signaling was dysregulated despite protein level of PPARγ was near normal in Plin1-/- SVCs like in Plin1-/- adipose tissue. Heterozygous Plin1+/- SVCs were able to develop lipid droplets, with both the number and size more than in Plin1-/- SVCs but less than in Plin1+/+ SVCs, indicating that Plin1 haploinsufficiency accounts for attenuated adipogenesis. Aberrant lipid droplet growth and differentiation of Plin1-/- SVCs were rescued by adenoviral Plin1 expression and were ameliorated by enhanced or prolonged adipogenic stimulation. Our finding suggests that Plin1 plays an important role in adipocyte differentiation and provides an insight into the pathology of partial lipodystrophy in patients with Plin1 mutation.

  6. Newly generated cells are increased in hippocampus of adult mice lacking a serine protease inhibitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sticker Melanie

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus and the subventricular zone occurs throughout the life of mammals and newly generated neurons can integrate functionally into established neuronal circuits. Neurogenesis levels in the dentate gyrus are modulated by changes in the environment (enrichment, exercise, hippocampal-dependent tasks, NMDA receptor (NMDAR activity, sonic hedgehog (SHH and/or other factors. Results previously, we showed that Protease Nexin-1 (PN-1, a potent serine protease inhibitor, regulates the NMDAR availability and activity as well as SHH signaling. Compared with wild-type (WT, we detected a significant increase in BrdU-labeled cells in the dentate gyrus of mice lacking PN-1 (PN-1 -/- both in controls and after running exercise. Patched homologue 1 (Ptc1 and Gli1 mRNA levels were higher and Gli3 down-regulated in mutant mice under standard conditions and to a lesser extent after running exercise. However, the number of surviving BrdU-positive cells did not differ between WT and PN-1 -/- animals. NMDAR availability was altered in the hippocampus of mutant animals after exercise. Conclusion All together our results indicate that PN-1 controls progenitors proliferation through an effect on the SHH pathway and suggest an influence of the serpin on the survival of newly generated neurons through modulation of NMDAR availability.

  7. RecJ, ExoI and RecG are required for genome maintenance but not for generation of genetic diversity by repeat-mediated phase variation in Haemophilus influenzae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Gaurav A.; Woodhall, Mark R.; Hood, Derek W.; Moxon, E. Richard [Molecular Infectious Diseases Group, Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, John Radcliffe Hospital, Headington, Oxford OX3 9DS (United Kingdom); Bayliss, Christopher D. [Department of Genetics, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom)], E-mail: cdb12@le.ac.uk

    2008-04-02

    High levels of genetic diversity are generated in Haemophilus influenzae populations through DNA repeat-mediated phase variation and recombination with DNA fragments acquired by uptake from the external milieu. Conversely, multiple pathways for maintenance of the genome sequence are encoded in H. influenzae genomes. In Escherichia coli, mutations in single-stranded-DNA exonucleases destabilise tandem DNA repeats whilst inactivation of recG can stabilise repeat tracts. These enzymes also have varying effects on recombination. Deletion mutations were constructed in H. influenzae genes encoding homologs of ExoI, RecJ and RecG whilst ExoVII was refractory to mutation. Inactivation of RecJ and RecG, but not ExoI, increased sensitivity to irradiation with ultraviolet light. An increase in spontaneous mutation rate was not observed in single mutants but only when both RecJ and ExoI were mutated. None of the single- or double-mutations increased or decreased the rates of slippage in tetranucleotide repeat tracts. Furthermore, the exonuclease mutants did not exhibit significant defects in horizontal gene transfer. We conclude that RecJ, ExoI and RecG are required for maintenance of the H. influenzae genome but none of these enzymes influence the generation of genetic diversity through mutations in the tetranucleotide repeat tracts of this species.

  8. Lack of robust satellite cell activation and muscle regeneration during the progression of Pompe disease

    OpenAIRE

    Schaaf, Gerben J.; van Gestel, Tom JM; Brusse, Esther; Verdijk, Robert M.; de Coo, Irenaeus FM; Doorn Van, Pieter A; Ploeg, Ans T van der; Pijnappel, WWM Pim

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Muscle stem cells termed satellite cells are essential for muscle regeneration. A central question in many neuromuscular disorders is why satellite cells are unable to prevent progressive muscle wasting. We have analyzed muscle fiber pathology and the satellite cell response in Pompe disease, a metabolic myopathy caused by acid alpha-glucosidase deficiency and lysosomal glycogen accumulation. Pathology included muscle fiber vacuolization, loss of cross striation, and immune cell ...

  9. The Cell Wall Polymer Lipoteichoic Acid Becomes Nonessential in Staphylococcus aureus Cells Lacking the ClpX Chaperone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Lisa; Millership, Charlotte; Dupont Søgaard, Mia; Kaever, Volkhard; Siljamäki, Pia; Savijoki, Kirsi; Varmanen, Pekka; Nyman, Tuula A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lipoteichoic acid (LTA) is an important cell wall component of Gram-positive bacteria and a promising target for the development of vaccines and antimicrobial compounds against Staphylococcus aureus. Here we demonstrate that mutations in the conditionally essential ltaS (LTA synthase) gene arise spontaneously in an S. aureus mutant lacking the ClpX chaperone. A wide variety of ltaS mutations were selected, and among these, a substantial portion resulted in premature stop codons and other changes predicted to abolish LtaS synthesis. Consistent with this assumption, the clpX ltaS double mutants did not produce LTA, and genetic analyses confirmed that LTA becomes nonessential in the absence of the ClpX chaperone. In fact, inactivation of ltaS alleviated the severe growth defect conferred by the clpX deletion. Microscopic analyses showed that the absence of ClpX partly alleviates the septum placement defects of an LTA-depleted strain, while other phenotypes typical of LTA-negative S. aureus mutants, including increased cell size and decreased autolytic activity, are retained. In conclusion, our results indicate that LTA has an essential role in septum placement that can be bypassed by inactivating the ClpX chaperone. PMID:27507828

  10. Silencing of Taxol-Sensitizer Genes in Cancer Cells: Lack of Sensitization Effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Shang-Lang [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Chao, Chuck C.-K., E-mail: cckchao@mail.cgu.edu.tw [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Biomedical Sciences, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Research and Development, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China)

    2015-06-16

    A previous genome-wide screening analysis identified a panel of genes that sensitize the human non-small-cell lung carcinoma cell line NCI-H1155 to taxol. However, whether the identified genes sensitize other cancer cells to taxol has not been examined. Here, we silenced the taxol-sensitizer genes identified (acrbp, atp6v0d2, fgd4, hs6st2, psma6, and tubgcp2) in nine other cancer cell types (including lung, cervical, ovarian, and hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines) that showed reduced cell viability in the presence of a sub-lethal concentration of taxol. Surprisingly, none of the genes studied increased sensitivity to taxol in the tested panel of cell lines. As observed in H1155 cells, SKOV3 cells displayed induction of five of the six genes studied in response to a cell killing dose of taxol. The other cell types were much less responsive to taxol. Notably, four of the five inducible taxol-sensitizer genes tested (acrbp, atp6v0d2, psma6, and tubgcp2) were upregulated in a taxol-resistant ovarian cancer cell line. These results indicate that the previously identified taxol-sensitizer loci are not conserved genetic targets involved in inhibiting cell proliferation in response to taxol. Our findings also suggest that regulation of taxol-sensitizer genes by taxol may be critical for acquired cell resistance to the drug.

  11. Silencing of Taxol-Sensitizer Genes in Cancer Cells: Lack of Sensitization Effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A previous genome-wide screening analysis identified a panel of genes that sensitize the human non-small-cell lung carcinoma cell line NCI-H1155 to taxol. However, whether the identified genes sensitize other cancer cells to taxol has not been examined. Here, we silenced the taxol-sensitizer genes identified (acrbp, atp6v0d2, fgd4, hs6st2, psma6, and tubgcp2) in nine other cancer cell types (including lung, cervical, ovarian, and hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines) that showed reduced cell viability in the presence of a sub-lethal concentration of taxol. Surprisingly, none of the genes studied increased sensitivity to taxol in the tested panel of cell lines. As observed in H1155 cells, SKOV3 cells displayed induction of five of the six genes studied in response to a cell killing dose of taxol. The other cell types were much less responsive to taxol. Notably, four of the five inducible taxol-sensitizer genes tested (acrbp, atp6v0d2, psma6, and tubgcp2) were upregulated in a taxol-resistant ovarian cancer cell line. These results indicate that the previously identified taxol-sensitizer loci are not conserved genetic targets involved in inhibiting cell proliferation in response to taxol. Our findings also suggest that regulation of taxol-sensitizer genes by taxol may be critical for acquired cell resistance to the drug

  12. Increased survival of muscle stem cells lacking the MyoD gene after transplantation into regenerating skeletal muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Asakura, Atsushi; Hirai, Hiroyuki; Kablar, Boris; Morita, Shigeru; Ishibashi, Jeff; Piras, Bryan A.; Christ, Amanda J.; Verma, Mayank; Vineretsky, Karin A.; Rudnicki, Michael A.

    2007-01-01

    MyoD is a myogenic master transcription factor that plays an essential role in muscle satellite cell (muscle stem cell) differentiation. To further investigate the function of MyoD in satellite cells, we examined the transplantation of satellite cell-derived myoblasts lacking the MyoD gene into regenerating skeletal muscle. After injection into injured muscle, MyoD−/− myoblasts engrafted with significantly higher efficiency compared with wild-type myoblasts. In addition, MyoD−/− myoblast-deri...

  13. The Drosophila hindgut lacks constitutively active adult stem cells but proliferates in response to tissue damage

    OpenAIRE

    D.T., Fox; Spradling, A.C.

    2009-01-01

    The adult Drosophila hindgut was recently reported to contain active, tissue-replenishing stem cells, like those of the midgut, but located within an anterior ring so as to comprise a single giant crypt. In contrast to this view, we observed no active stem cells and little cell turnover in adult hindgut tissue based on clonal marking and BrdU incorporation studies. Again contradicting the previous proposal, we showed that the adult hindgut is not generated by anterior stem cells during larval...

  14. NEK9-dependent proliferation of cancer cells lacking functional p53

    OpenAIRE

    Daisuke Kurioka; Fumitaka Takeshita; Koji Tsuta; Hiromi Sakamoto; Shun-ichi Watanabe; Kenji Matsumoto; Masatoshi Watanabe; Hitoshi Nakagama; Takahiro Ochiya; Jun Yokota; Takashi Kohno; Naoto Tsuchiya

    2014-01-01

    Dysfunction of the p53 network is a major cause of cancer development, and selective elimination of p53-inactivated cancer cells therefore represents an ideal therapeutic strategy. In this study, we performed a microRNA target screen that identified NEK9 (NIMA-related kinase 9) as a crucial regulator of cell-cycle progression in p53-inactivated cancer cells. NEK9 depletion selectively inhibited proliferation in p53-deficient cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo. The resultant cell-cycle arr...

  15. A lack of commitment for over 500 million years: conserved animal stem cell pluripotency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboobaker, A Aziz; Kao, Damian

    2012-06-13

    Stem cells, both adult and germline, are the key cells underpinning animal evolution. Yet, surprisingly little is known about the evolution of their shared key feature: pluripotency. Now using genome-wide expression profiling of pluripotent planarian adult stem cells (pASCs), Önal et al (2012) present evidence for deep molecular conservation of pluripotency. They characterise the expression profile of pASCs and identify conserved expression profiles and functions for genes required for mammalian pluripotency. Their analyses suggest that molecular pluripotency mechanisms may be conserved, and tantalisingly that pluripotency in germ stem cells (GSCs) and somatic stem cells (SSCs) may have had shared common evolutionary origins.

  16. Lack of FasL expression in cultured human retinal pigment epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaestel, C G; Madsen, H O; Prause, J U;

    2001-01-01

    Retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells have been proposed to play a part in maintaining the eye as an immune privileged organ. However, our knowledge of the implicated mechanism is still sparse. Fas ligand (FasL) expression of RPE cells is generally recognized to be essential for the immune...... privilege of the eye, but due to contradictory published results, it is unclear whether RPE cells express this molecule. The purpose of this study was to investigate the expression of FasL in RPE cells in vitro and in vivo. Cultured human fetal and adult RPE cells were examined by flow cytometry, Western...... blotting, RT-PCR and RNase Protection assay for FasL expression. Additionally, sections of ocular tissue were stained for FasL by immunohistochemistry. None of the used methods indicated FasL expression in cultured fetal or adult RPE cells of various passages. However, RPE cells in vivo, as judged from...

  17. Lack of p53 Augments Antitumor Functions in Cytolytic T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Anirban; Thyagarajan, Krishnamurthy; Chatterjee, Shilpak; Chakraborty, Paramita; Kesarwani, Pravin; Soloshchenko, Myroslawa; Al-Hommrani, Mazen; Andrijauskaite, Kristina; Moxley, Kelly; Janakiraman, Harinarayanan; Scheffel, Matthew J; Helke, Kristi; Armenson, Kent; Palanisamy, Viswanathan; Rubinstein, Mark P; Mayer, Elizabeth-Garrett; Cole, David J; Paulos, Chrystal M; Voelkel-Johnson, Christina; Nishimura, Michael I; Mehrotra, Shikhar

    2016-09-15

    Repetitive stimulation of T-cell receptor (TCR) with cognate antigen results in robust proliferation and expansion of the T cells, and also imprints them with replicative senescence signatures. Our previous studies have shown that life-span and antitumor function of T cells can be enhanced by inhibiting reactive oxygen species (ROS) or intervening with ROS-dependent JNK activation that leads to its activation-induced cell death. Because tumor suppressor protein p53 is also a redox active transcription factor that regulates cellular ROS generation that triggers downstream factor-mediating apoptosis, we determined if p53 levels could influence persistence and function of tumor-reactive T cells. Using h3T TCR transgenic mice, with human tyrosinase epitope-reactive T cells developed on p53 knockout (KO) background, we determined its role in regulating antitumor T-cell function. Our data show that as compared with h3T cells, h3T-p53 KO T cells exhibited enhanced glycolytic commitment that correlated with increased proliferation, IFNγ secretion, cytolytic capacity, expression of stemness gene signature, and decreased TGF-β signaling. This increased effector function correlated to the improved control of subcutaneously established murine melanoma after adoptive transfer of p53-KO T cells. Pharmacological inhibition of human TCR-transduced T cells using a combination of p53 inhibitors also potentiated the T-cell effector function and improved persistence. Thus, our data highlight the key role of p53 in regulating the tumor-reactive T-cell response and that targeting this pathway could have potential translational significance in adoptive T-cell therapy. Cancer Res; 76(18); 5229-40. ©2016 AACR.

  18. Arrest of Myelination and Reduced Axon Growth when Schwann Cells Lack mTOR

    OpenAIRE

    Sherman, Diane L.; Krols, Michiel; Wu, Lai-Man N.; Grove, Matthew; Nave, Klaus-Armin; Gangloff, Yann-Gaël; Brophy, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    In developing peripheral nerves differentiating Schwann cells sort individual axons from bundles and ensheath them to generate multiple layers of myelin. In recent years there has been an increasing understanding of the extracellular and intracellular factors that initiate and stimulate Schwann cell myelination together with a growing appreciation of some of the signalling pathways involved. However, our knowledge of how Schwann cell growth is regulated during myelination is still incomplete....

  19. Cells Lacking mtDNA Display Increased dNTP Pools upon DNA Damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Tine; Rasmussen, Lene Juel; Munch-Petersen, Birgitte

    and mitochondrial function we have examined the effect of DNA damage on dNTP pools in cells deficient of mtDNA. We show that DNA damage induced by UV irradiation, in a dose corresponding to LD50, induces cell cycle synchronization in different human osteosarcoma cell lines. The UV pulse also has a destabilizing......Imbalanced dNTP pools are highly mutagenic due to a deleterious effect on DNA polymerase fidelity. Mitochondrial DNA defects, including mutations and deletions, are commonly found in a wide variety of different cancer types. In order to further study the interconnection between dNTP pools......-synthase. As a result of this the rho0 cells have much lower ATP levels than rho+ cells. In order to mimic the ATP situation in rho0 cells the rho+ cells are incubated with the ATP synthase inhibitor, oligomycin. Similar to the rho0 cells the oligomycin incubated rho+ cells display destabilized dNTP pools upon UV...

  20. Lack of IL-15 results in the suboptimal priming of CD4+ T cell response against an intracellular parasite

    OpenAIRE

    Combe, Crescent L; Moretto, Magali M.; Schwartzman, Joseph D; Gigley, Jason P.; Bzik, David J.; Khan, Imtiaz A.

    2006-01-01

    IFN-γ-producing CD4+ T cells, although important for protection against acute Toxoplasma gondii infection, can cause gut pathology, which may prove to be detrimental for host survival. Here we show that mice lacking IL-15 gene develop a down-regulated IFN-γ-producing CD4+ T cell response against the parasite, which leads to a reduction in gut necrosis and increased level of survival against infection. Moreover, transfer of immune CD4+ T cells from WT to IL-15−/− mice reversed inhibition of gu...

  1. Cells Lacking mtDNA Display Increased dNTP Pools upon DNA Damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Tine; Rasmussen, Lene Juel; Munch-Petersen, Birgitte

    and mitochondrial function we have examined the effect of DNA damage on dNTP pools in cells deficient of mtDNA. We show that DNA damage induced by UV irradiation, in a dose corresponding to LD50, induces an S phase delay in different human osteosarcoma cell lines. The UV pulse also has a destabilizing effect......Imbalanced dNTP pools are highly mutagenic due to a deleterious effect on DNA polymerase fidelity. Mitochondrial DNA defects, including mutations and deletions, are commonly found in a wide variety of different cancer types. In order to further study the interconnection between dNTP pools...... of this the rho0 cells have much lower ATP levels than rho+ cells. In order to mimic the ATP situation in rho0 cells the rho+ cells are incubated with the ATP synthase inhibitor, oligomycin. Similar to the rho0 cells the oligomycin incubated rho+ cells display increased dNTP pools upon UV irradiation. Our data...

  2. Recombinant interleukin-24 lacks apoptosis-inducing properties in melanoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Kreis

    Full Text Available IL-24, also known as melanoma differentiation antigen 7 (mda-7, is a member of the IL-10 family of cytokines and is mainly produced by Th(2 cells as well as by activated monocytes. Binding of IL-24 to either of its two possible heterodimeric receptors IL-20R1/IL-20R2 and IL-22R/IL-20R2 activates STAT3 and/or STAT1 in target tissues such as lung, testis, ovary, keratinocytes and skin. To date, the physiological properties of IL-24 are still not well understood but available data suggest that IL-24 affects epidermal functions by increasing proliferation of dermal cells. In stark contrast to its "normal" and physiological behaviour, IL-24 has been reported to selectively and efficiently kill a vast variety of cancer cells, especially melanoma cells, independent of receptor expression and Jak-STAT signalling. These intriguing properties have led to the development of adenovirally-expressed IL-24, which is currently being evaluated in clinical trials. Using three different methods, we have analysed a large panel of melanoma cell lines with respect to IL-24 and IL-24 receptor expression and found that none of the investigated cell lines expressed sufficient amounts of functional receptor pairs and therefore did not react to IL-24 stimulation with Jak/STAT activation. Results for three cell lines contrasted with previous studies, which reported presence of IL-24 receptors and activation of STAT3 following IL-24 stimulation. Furthermore, evaluating four different sources and modes of IL-24 administration (commercial recombinant IL-24, bacterially expressed GST-IL-24 fusion protein, IL-24 produced from transfected Hek cells, transiently over-expressed IL-24 no induction or increase in cell death was detected when compared to appropriate control treatments. Thus, we conclude that the cytokine IL-24 itself has no cancer-specific apoptosis-inducing properties in melanoma cells.

  3. Lack of telomerase activity in rabbit bone marrow stromal cells during differentiation along neural pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Zhen-zhou; XU Ru-xiang; JIANG Xiao-dan; TENG Xiao-hua; LI Gui-tao; ZHOU Yü-xi

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate telomerase activity in rabbit bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) during their committed differentiation in vitro along neural pathway and the effect of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) on the expression of telomerase.Methods: BMSCs were acquired from rabbit marrow and divided into control group, GDNF (10 ng/ml) group.No. ZL02134314. 4) supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) was used to induce BMSCs differentiation along neural pathway. Fluorescent immunocytochemistry was employed to identify the expressions of Nestin, neuronspecific endase (NSE), and gial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). The growth curves of the cells and the status of cell cycles were analyzed, respectively. During the differentiation, telomerase activitys were detected using the telomeric repeat amplification protocol-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (TRAP-ELISA).Results: BMSCs were successfully induced to differentiate along neural pathway and expressed specific markers of fetal neural epithelium, mature neuron and glial cells. Telomerase activities were undetectable in BMSCs during differentiation along neural pathway. Similar changes of cell growth curves, cell cycle status and telomerase expression were observed in the two groups.Conclusions: Rabbit BMSCs do not display telomerase activity during differentiation along neural pathway. GDNF shows little impact on proliferation and telomerase activity of BMSCs.

  4. Resistance to mTOR kinase inhibitors in lymphoma cells lacking 4EBP1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharmila Mallya

    Full Text Available Inhibitors of the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR hold promise for treatment of hematological malignancies. Analogs of the allosteric mTOR inhibitor rapamycin are approved for mantle cell lymphoma but have limited efficacy in other blood cancers. ATP-competitive "active-site" mTOR inhibitors produce more complete mTOR inhibition and are more effective than rapamycin in preclinical models of leukemia, lymphoma and multiple myeloma. In parallel to clinical trials of active-site mTOR inhibitors, it will be important to identify resistance mechanisms that might limit drug efficacy in certain patients. From a panel of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma cell lines, we found that the VAL cell line is particularly resistant to apoptosis in the presence of active-site mTOR inhibitors. Mechanistic investigation showed that VAL does not express eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding protein-1 (4EBP1, a key negative regulator of translation controlled by mTOR. Although VAL cells express the related protein 4EBP2, mTOR inhibitor treatment fails to displace eukaryotic initiation factor 4G from the mRNA cap-binding complex. Knockdown of eukaryotic initiation factor 4E, or re-expression of 4EBP1, sensitizes cells to apoptosis when treated with active-site mTOR inhibitors. These findings provide a naturally occurring example of 4EBP deficiency driving lymphoma cell resistance to active-site mTOR inhibitors.

  5. Human cells lacking coilin and Cajal bodies are proficient in telomerase assembly, trafficking and telomere maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanlian; Deng, Zhiqiang; Jiang, Shuai; Hu, Qian; Liu, Haiying; Songyang, Zhou; Ma, Wenbin; Chen, Shi; Zhao, Yong

    2015-01-01

    The RNA component of human telomerase (hTR) localizes to Cajal bodies, and it has been proposed that Cajal bodies play a role in the assembly of telomerase holoenzyme and telomerase trafficking. Here, the role of Cajal bodies was examined in Human cells deficient of coilin (i.e. coilin-knockout (KO) cells), in which no Cajal bodies are detected. In coilin-KO cells, a normal level of telomerase activity is detected and interactions between core factors of holoenzyme are preserved, indicating that telomerase assembly occurs in the absence of Cajal bodies. Moreover, dispersed hTR aggregates and forms foci specifically during S and G2 phase in coilin-KO cells. Colocalization of these hTR foci with telomeres implies proper telomerase trafficking, independent of Cajal bodies. Therefore, telomerase adds similar numbers of TTAGGG repeats to telomeres in coilin-KO and controls cells. Overexpression of TPP1-OB-fold blocks cell cycle-dependent formation of hTR foci and inhibits telomere extension. These findings suggest that telomerase assembly, trafficking and extension occur with normal efficiency in Cajal bodies deficient human cells. Thus, Cajal bodies, as such, are not essential in these processes, although it remains possible that non-coilin components of Cajal bodies and/or telomere binding proteins (e.g. TPP1) do play roles in telomerase biogenesis and telomere homeostasis.

  6. How do taste cells lacking synapses mediate neurotransmission? CALHM1, a voltage-gated ATP channel

    OpenAIRE

    Taruno, Akiyuki; Matsumoto, Ichiro; Ma, Zhongming; Marambaud, Philippe; Foskett, J. Kevin

    2013-01-01

    CALHM1 was recently demonstrated to be a voltage-gated ATP-permeable ion channel and to serve as a bona fide conduit for ATP release from sweet-, umami-, and bitter-sensing type II taste cells. Calhm1 is expressed in taste buds exclusively in type II cells and its product has structural and functional similarities with connexins and pannexins, two families of channel protein candidates for ATP release by type II cells. Calhm1 knockout in mice leads to loss of perception of sweet, umami, and b...

  7. EFFECTS OF QUERCETIN ON MEMBRANE FLUIDITY OF INJURED VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL CELLS WITH HYPOXIA AND THE LACK OF GLUCOSE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林蓉; 刘俊田; 甘伟杰

    2003-01-01

    Objective To study the effects of different concentrations of Quercetin on nitric oxide (NO) production and membrane fluidity of the injured human umbilical vein vascular endothelial cell line(ECV-304) with hypoxia and the lack of glucose. Methods The experiments were performed in the culture of ECV-304 injured with hypoxia and the lack of glucose in vitro. The releases of intracellular lactate dehydrogenase(LDH) of ECV-304 was measured with automatic biochemistry analysis. NO level of ECV-304 was monitored with colorimetry. The membrane fluidity of ECV-304 was measured with the fluorescence polarization method. Results After ECV-304 was cultured in hypoxia and the the lack of glucose for 24 hours, the release of LDH and the membrane fluidity were increased significantly; NO level was decreased. Preincubation of ECV-304 with 20, 80,160μmol*L-1 of Quercetin for 24 hours reduced LDH activity, membrane fluidity and increased the level of NO in hypoxia and the lack of glucose induced ECV-304. Conclusion These results demonstrate that Quercetin can produce the protective effect on hypoxia and the lack of glucose induced injury of ECV-304 by increasing release of NO and changing membrane fluidity.

  8. Circulating human basophils lack the features of professional antigen presenting cells

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Meenu; Hegde, Pushpa; Aimanianda, Vishukumar; Beau, Remi; Sénéchal, Helene; Poncet, Pascal; Latgé, Jean-Paul; Kaveri, Srini V; Bayry, Jagadeesh

    2013-01-01

    Recent reports in mice demonstrate that basophils function as antigen presenting cells (APC). They express MHC class II and co-stimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86, capture and present soluble antigens or IgE-antigen complexes and polarize Th2 responses. Therefore, we explored whether human circulating basophils possess the features of professional APC. We found that unlike dendritic cells (DC) and monocytes, steady-state circulating human basophils did not express HLA-DR and co-stimulatory mo...

  9. Aberrant Neural Stem Cell Proliferation and Increased Adult Neurogenesis in Mice Lacking Chromatin Protein HMGB2

    OpenAIRE

    Abraham, Ariel B; Robert Bronstein; Avanish S Reddy; Mirjana Maletic-Savatic; Adan Aguirre; Tsirka, Stella E.

    2013-01-01

    Neural stem and progenitor cells (NSCs/NPCs) are distinct groups of cells found in the mammalian central nervous system (CNS). Previously we determined that members of the High Mobility Group (HMG) B family of chromatin structural proteins modulate NSC proliferation and self-renewal. Among them HMGB2 was found to be dynamically expressed in proliferating and differentiating NSCs, suggesting that it may regulate NSC maintenance. We report now that Hmgb2(-/-) mice exhibit SVZ hyperproliferation...

  10. Lack of functional relevance of isolated cell damage in transplants of Parkinson's disease patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cooper, Oliver; Astradsson, Arnar; Hallett, Penny;

    2009-01-01

    Postmortem analyses from clinical neural transplantation trials of several subjects with Parkinson's disease revealed surviving grafted dopaminergic neurons after more than a decade. A subset of these subjects displayed isolated dopaminergic neurons within the grafts that contained Lewy body......-like structures. In this review, we discuss why this isolated cell damage is unlikely to affect the overall graft function and how we can use these observations to help us to understand age-related neurodegeneration and refine our future cell replacement therapies....

  11. Lack of p53 function promotes radiation-induced mitotic catastrophe in mouse embryonic fibroblast cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillips Stacia L

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have demonstrated that in some human cancer cells both chronic mild heat and ionizing radiation exposures induce a transient block in S and G2 phases of the cell cycle. During this delay, cyclin B1 protein accumulates to supranormal levels, cyclin B1-dependent kinase is activated, and abrogation of the G2/M checkpoint control occurs resulting in mitotic catastrophe (MC. Results Using syngenic mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF with wild-type or mutant p53, we now show that, while both cell lines exhibit delays in S/G2 phase post-irradiation, the mutant p53 cells show elevated levels of cyclin B1 followed by MC, while the wild-type p53 cells present both a lower accumulation of cyclin B1 and a lower frequency of MC. Conclusion These results are in line with studies reporting the role of p53 as a post-transcriptional regulator of cyclin B1 protein and confirm that dysregulation of cyclin B1 promote radiation-induced MC. These findings might be exploited to design strategies to augment the yield of MC in tumor cells that are resistant to radiation-induced apoptosis.

  12. Gastro-electric dysrhythm and lack of gastric interstitial cells of cajal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing-Lin Long; Dian-Chun Fang; Hong-Tao Shi; Yuan-Hui Luo

    2004-01-01

    AIM: The pathophysiology underlying gastrointestinal complications of long-standing diabetes is poody understood.Recent evidence suggests an important role of intestitial cells of cajal in controlling gastrointestinal motility. The aim of this study was to clarify the changes of ultrastructural characteristics of interstitial cells of cajal in stomach of diabetic gastro-electric dysrhythmic rats.METHODS: Rats were randomly divided into diabetic group and control group, the model of diabetic rats was established by peritoneally injection of streptozotocin. Electrogastrograms were recorded and intestitial cells of cajal in antrum were observed by electrictelescopy after diabetic model rat was established for 3 mo.RESULTS: In the rats of diabetic group, the gastro-electric dysrhythmia was increased compared with control group,the abnormal rhythm index and the cofficient of variation of slow wave frequency were significantly higher than those of normal rats. The number of the gap junctions of interstitial cells of cajal in antrum of diabetic rats was significantly decreased, and the remaining structures were damaged.The organelles were also damaged, and vacuoles were formed.CONCLUSION: It is possible that changes in ultrastructural characteristics of interstitial cells of cajal in stomach are one of the mechanisms underlying gastro-electric dysrhythm in diabetic rats.

  13. Rett Syndrome Mutant Neural Cells Lacks MeCP2 Immunoreactive Bands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, Carlos; Tabares-Seisdedos, Rafael; Moraleda, Jose M; Martinez, Salvador

    2016-01-01

    Dysfunctions of MeCP2 protein lead to various neurological disorders such as Rett syndrome and Autism. The exact functions of MeCP2 protein is still far from clear. At a molecular level, there exist contradictory data. MeCP2 protein is considered a single immunoreactive band around 75 kDa by western-blot analysis but several reports have revealed the existence of multiple MeCP2 immunoreactive bands above and below the level where MeCP2 is expected. MeCP2 immunoreactive bands have been interpreted in different ways. Some researchers suggest that multiple MeCP2 immunoreactive bands are unidentified proteins that cross-react with the MeCP2 antibody or degradation product of MeCP2, while others suggest that MeCP2 post-transcriptional processing generates multiple molecular forms linked to cell signaling, but so far they have not been properly analyzed in relation to Rett syndrome experimental models. The purpose of this study is to advance understanding of multiple MeCP2 immunoreactive bands in control neural cells and p.T158M MeCP2e1 mutant cells. We have generated stable wild-type and p.T158M MeCP2e1-RFP mutant expressing cells. Application of N- and C- terminal MeCP2 antibodies, and also, RFP antibody minimized concerns about nonspecific cross-reactivity, since they react with the same antigen at different epitopes. We report the existence of multiple MeCP2 immunoreactive bands in control cells, stable wild-type and p.T158M MeCP2e1-RFP mutant expressing cells. Also, MeCP2 immunoreactive bands differences were found between wild-type and p.T158M MeCP2e1-RFP mutant expressing cells. Slower migration phosphorylated band around 70kDa disappeared in p.T158M MeCP2e1-RFP mutant expressing cells. These data suggest that threonine 158 could represent an important phosphorylation site potentially involved in protein function. Our results clearly indicate that MeCP2 antibodies have no cross-reactivity with similar epitopes on others proteins, supporting the idea that MeCP2 may

  14. Rett Syndrome Mutant Neural Cells Lacks MeCP2 Immunoreactive Bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, Carlos; Tabares-Seisdedos, Rafael; Moraleda, Jose M.; Martinez, Salvador

    2016-01-01

    Dysfunctions of MeCP2 protein lead to various neurological disorders such as Rett syndrome and Autism. The exact functions of MeCP2 protein is still far from clear. At a molecular level, there exist contradictory data. MeCP2 protein is considered a single immunoreactive band around 75 kDa by western-blot analysis but several reports have revealed the existence of multiple MeCP2 immunoreactive bands above and below the level where MeCP2 is expected. MeCP2 immunoreactive bands have been interpreted in different ways. Some researchers suggest that multiple MeCP2 immunoreactive bands are unidentified proteins that cross-react with the MeCP2 antibody or degradation product of MeCP2, while others suggest that MeCP2 post-transcriptional processing generates multiple molecular forms linked to cell signaling, but so far they have not been properly analyzed in relation to Rett syndrome experimental models. The purpose of this study is to advance understanding of multiple MeCP2 immunoreactive bands in control neural cells and p.T158M MeCP2e1 mutant cells. We have generated stable wild-type and p.T158M MeCP2e1-RFP mutant expressing cells. Application of N- and C- terminal MeCP2 antibodies, and also, RFP antibody minimized concerns about nonspecific cross-reactivity, since they react with the same antigen at different epitopes. We report the existence of multiple MeCP2 immunoreactive bands in control cells, stable wild-type and p.T158M MeCP2e1-RFP mutant expressing cells. Also, MeCP2 immunoreactive bands differences were found between wild-type and p.T158M MeCP2e1-RFP mutant expressing cells. Slower migration phosphorylated band around 70kDa disappeared in p.T158M MeCP2e1-RFP mutant expressing cells. These data suggest that threonine 158 could represent an important phosphorylation site potentially involved in protein function. Our results clearly indicate that MeCP2 antibodies have no cross-reactivity with similar epitopes on others proteins, supporting the idea that MeCP2 may

  15. Rett Syndrome Mutant Neural Cells Lacks MeCP2 Immunoreactive Bands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Bueno

    Full Text Available Dysfunctions of MeCP2 protein lead to various neurological disorders such as Rett syndrome and Autism. The exact functions of MeCP2 protein is still far from clear. At a molecular level, there exist contradictory data. MeCP2 protein is considered a single immunoreactive band around 75 kDa by western-blot analysis but several reports have revealed the existence of multiple MeCP2 immunoreactive bands above and below the level where MeCP2 is expected. MeCP2 immunoreactive bands have been interpreted in different ways. Some researchers suggest that multiple MeCP2 immunoreactive bands are unidentified proteins that cross-react with the MeCP2 antibody or degradation product of MeCP2, while others suggest that MeCP2 post-transcriptional processing generates multiple molecular forms linked to cell signaling, but so far they have not been properly analyzed in relation to Rett syndrome experimental models. The purpose of this study is to advance understanding of multiple MeCP2 immunoreactive bands in control neural cells and p.T158M MeCP2e1 mutant cells. We have generated stable wild-type and p.T158M MeCP2e1-RFP mutant expressing cells. Application of N- and C- terminal MeCP2 antibodies, and also, RFP antibody minimized concerns about nonspecific cross-reactivity, since they react with the same antigen at different epitopes. We report the existence of multiple MeCP2 immunoreactive bands in control cells, stable wild-type and p.T158M MeCP2e1-RFP mutant expressing cells. Also, MeCP2 immunoreactive bands differences were found between wild-type and p.T158M MeCP2e1-RFP mutant expressing cells. Slower migration phosphorylated band around 70kDa disappeared in p.T158M MeCP2e1-RFP mutant expressing cells. These data suggest that threonine 158 could represent an important phosphorylation site potentially involved in protein function. Our results clearly indicate that MeCP2 antibodies have no cross-reactivity with similar epitopes on others proteins, supporting the

  16. Rett Syndrome Mutant Neural Cells Lacks MeCP2 Immunoreactive Bands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, Carlos; Tabares-Seisdedos, Rafael; Moraleda, Jose M; Martinez, Salvador

    2016-01-01

    Dysfunctions of MeCP2 protein lead to various neurological disorders such as Rett syndrome and Autism. The exact functions of MeCP2 protein is still far from clear. At a molecular level, there exist contradictory data. MeCP2 protein is considered a single immunoreactive band around 75 kDa by western-blot analysis but several reports have revealed the existence of multiple MeCP2 immunoreactive bands above and below the level where MeCP2 is expected. MeCP2 immunoreactive bands have been interpreted in different ways. Some researchers suggest that multiple MeCP2 immunoreactive bands are unidentified proteins that cross-react with the MeCP2 antibody or degradation product of MeCP2, while others suggest that MeCP2 post-transcriptional processing generates multiple molecular forms linked to cell signaling, but so far they have not been properly analyzed in relation to Rett syndrome experimental models. The purpose of this study is to advance understanding of multiple MeCP2 immunoreactive bands in control neural cells and p.T158M MeCP2e1 mutant cells. We have generated stable wild-type and p.T158M MeCP2e1-RFP mutant expressing cells. Application of N- and C- terminal MeCP2 antibodies, and also, RFP antibody minimized concerns about nonspecific cross-reactivity, since they react with the same antigen at different epitopes. We report the existence of multiple MeCP2 immunoreactive bands in control cells, stable wild-type and p.T158M MeCP2e1-RFP mutant expressing cells. Also, MeCP2 immunoreactive bands differences were found between wild-type and p.T158M MeCP2e1-RFP mutant expressing cells. Slower migration phosphorylated band around 70kDa disappeared in p.T158M MeCP2e1-RFP mutant expressing cells. These data suggest that threonine 158 could represent an important phosphorylation site potentially involved in protein function. Our results clearly indicate that MeCP2 antibodies have no cross-reactivity with similar epitopes on others proteins, supporting the idea that MeCP2 may

  17. Impaired Ca(2+ signaling in β-cells lacking leptin receptors by Cre-loxP recombination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Tudurí

    Full Text Available Obesity is a major risk factor for diabetes and is typically associated with hyperleptinemia and a state of leptin resistance. The impact of chronically elevated leptin levels on the function of insulin-secreting β-cells has not been elucidated. We previously generated mice lacking leptin signaling in β-cells by using the Cre-loxP strategy and showed that these animals develop increased body weight and adiposity, hyperinsulinemia, impaired glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and insulin resistance. Here, we performed several in vitro studies and observed that β-cells lacking leptin signaling in this model are capable of properly metabolizing glucose, but show impaired intracellular Ca(2+ oscillations and lack of synchrony within the islets in response to glucose, display reduced response to tolbutamide and exhibit morphological abnormalities including increased autophagy. Defects in intracellular Ca(2+ signaling were observed even in neonatal islets, ruling out the possible contribution of obesity to the β-cell irregularities observed in adults. In parallel, we also detected a disrupted intracellular Ca(2+ pattern in response to glucose and tolbutamide in control islets from adult transgenic mice expressing Cre recombinase under the rat insulin promoter, despite these animals being glucose tolerant and secreting normal levels of insulin in response to glucose. This unexpected observation impeded us from discerning the consequences of impaired leptin signaling as opposed to long-term Cre expression in the function of insulin-secreting cells. These findings highlight the need to generate improved Cre-driver mouse models or new tools to induce Cre recombination in β-cells.

  18. Aberrant neural stem cell proliferation and increased adult neurogenesis in mice lacking chromatin protein HMGB2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariel B Abraham

    Full Text Available Neural stem and progenitor cells (NSCs/NPCs are distinct groups of cells found in the mammalian central nervous system (CNS. Previously we determined that members of the High Mobility Group (HMG B family of chromatin structural proteins modulate NSC proliferation and self-renewal. Among them HMGB2 was found to be dynamically expressed in proliferating and differentiating NSCs, suggesting that it may regulate NSC maintenance. We report now that Hmgb2(-/- mice exhibit SVZ hyperproliferation, increased numbers of SVZ NSCs, and a trend towards aberrant increases in newly born neurons in the olfactory bulb (OB granule cell layer. Increases in the levels of the transcription factor p21 and the Neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM, along with down-regulation of the transcription/pluripotency factor Oct4 in the Hmgb2-/- SVZ point to a possible pathway for this increased proliferation/differentiation. Our findings suggest that HMGB2 functions as a modulator of neurogenesis in young adult mice through regulation of NSC proliferation, and identify a potential target via which CNS repair could be amplified following trauma or disease-based neuronal degeneration.

  19. Renal cell carcinoma with rhabdoid-like features lack intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies and show aggressive behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Masaaki; Kohashi, Kenichi; Kuroiwa, Kentaro; Abe, Tatsuro; Yamada, Yuichi; Shiota, Masaki; Imada, Kenjiro; Naito, Seiji; Oda, Yoshinao

    2016-03-01

    In renal cell carcinoma (RCC), tumor cells with rhabdoid features are characterized by eccentric nuclei, prominent nucleoli, and eosinophilic cytoplasm with intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies. In RCC, tumor cells have also been observed resembling rhabdomyoblasts or rhabdoid but without intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies, and here, we defined these rhabdoid-like features of these cells. To this end, we studied a series of clear cell RCC (ccRCC) with rhabdoid features and compared them with a series of ccRCC with rhabdoid-like features to clarify the differences in the immunohistochemical profile and biological behavior. From 695 cases of ccRCC (80.8 % of all RCCs), 18 cases with rhabdoid features (2.1 % of all RCCs) and 25 cases with rhabdoid-like features (2.9 % of all RCCs) were investigated. The 5-year survival rate for ccRCC with rhabdoid features was 44.7 % and for ccRCC with rhabdoid-like features 30.3 %. Although ccRCC with rhabdoid features showed immunohistochemical co-expression of epithelial markers and vimentin as seen in malignant rhabdoid tumors, ccRCC with rhabdoid-like features showed no such co-expression. Multivariate analyses of cancer-specific survival revealed that perinephric tissues invasion was an independent prognostic factor in ccRCC with rhabdoid features (p = 0.0253) but not in ccRCC with rhabdoid-like features. In summary, although their prognosis is similar, the marker profile and pattern of extension of ccRCC with rhabdoid-like is different from that of ccRCC with rhabdoid features. Therefore, ccRCC with rhabdoid-like features should be distinguished from ccRCC with rhabdoid features.

  20. Inhibition of Malaria Infection in Transgenic Anopheline Mosquitoes Lacking Salivary Gland Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Daisuke S; Sumitani, Megumi; Kasashima, Katsumi; Sezutsu, Hideki; Matsuoka, Hiroyuki

    2016-09-01

    Malaria is an important global public health challenge, and is transmitted by anopheline mosquitoes during blood feeding. Mosquito vector control is one of the most effective methods to control malaria, and population replacement with genetically engineered mosquitoes to block its transmission is expected to become a new vector control strategy. The salivary glands are an effective target tissue for the expression of molecules that kill or inactivate malaria parasites. Moreover, salivary gland cells express a large number of molecules that facilitate blood feeding and parasite transmission to hosts. In the present study, we adapted a functional deficiency system in specific tissues by inducing cell death using the mouse Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax) to the Asian malaria vector mosquito, Anopheles stephensi. We applied this technique to salivary gland cells, and produced a transgenic strain containing extremely low amounts of saliva. Although probing times for feeding on mice were longer in transgenic mosquitoes than in wild-type mosquitoes, transgenic mosquitoes still successfully ingested blood. Transgenic mosquitoes also exhibited a significant reduction in oocyst formation in the midgut in a rodent malaria model. These results indicate that mosquito saliva plays an important role in malaria infection in the midgut of anopheline mosquitoes. The dysfunction in the salivary glands enabled the inhibition of malaria transmission from hosts to mosquito midguts. Therefore, salivary components have potential in the development of new drugs or genetically engineered mosquitoes for malaria control. PMID:27598328

  1. Lack of interaction between digoxin and quinidine in cultured heart cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous investigations have raised the possibility that the digoxin-quinidine interaction is associated with a reduction in the positive inotropic effect of digoxin due to displacement of digoxin from cardiac as well as skeletal muscle. To circumvent some of the complexities presented by intact animal models, this interaction was investigated in cultured chick embryo ventricular cells. Quinidine, even at relatively high concentrations (10(-4)--2 x 10(-3) M), did not significantly affect positive inotropic effects of digoxin and did not protect against cellular contracture induced by toxic digoxin concentrations, despite preincubation of cells with quinidine for 60 min. The effects of digoxin on monovalent cation transport, as judged by active uptake of the K analog 86Rb, were also not altered by 10(-4) M to 2 x 10(-3) M quinidine. These data suggest that quinidine does not displace digoxin from Na, K adenosine triphosphatase binding sites in this preparation. Although these data must be extrapolated to the intact animal with caution, our findings suggest that changes in digoxin clearance are more likely of primary importance in the digoxin-quinidine interaction, and indicate that the approximately 2-fold increase in serum digoxin concentration observed after addition of quinidine would be expected to have direct effects on myocardial cells comparable with those seen with increased digoxin concentration in the absence of quinidine

  2. Monocyte/macrophage lineage commitment and distribution are affected by the lack of regulatory T cells in scurfy mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skuljec, Jelena; Cabanski, Maciej; Surdziel, Ewa; Lachmann, Nico; Brennig, Sebastian; Pul, Refik; Jirmo, Adan C; Habener, Anika; Visic, Julia; Dalüge, Kathleen; Hennig, Christian; Moritz, Thomas; Happle, Christine; Hansen, Gesine

    2016-07-01

    Foxp3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells play a pivotal role in maintaining immunological tolerance. Loss-of-function mutations in the Foxp3 gene result in multiorgan inflammation known as immunodysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked syndrome in humans and scurfy (Sf) disease in mice. While the impact of missing Treg cells on adaptive immune cells is well documented, their role in regulation of myeloid cells remains unclear. Here we report that Sf mice exhibit an altered composition of stem and progenitor cells, characterized by increased numbers of myeloid precursors and higher efficiency of macrophage generation ex vivo. The proportion of monocytes/macrophages in the bone marrow, blood, and spleen was significantly elevated in Sf mice, which was accompanied with tissue-specific monocyte expression of homing receptor and phagocytic activity. Sf mice displayed high levels of M-CSF and other inflammatory cytokines, including monocyte-recruiting chemokines. Adoptive transfer of WT CD4(+) cells and in vivo neutralization of M-CSF normalized frequencies of monocyte subsets and their progenitors and reduced high levels of monocyte-related cytokines in Sf mice, while Treg cell transfer to RAG2(-/-) mice had no effect on myelopoiesis and monocyte/macrophage counts. Our findings illustrate that deregulated myelopoiesis in Sf mice is mainly caused by the inflammatory reaction resulting from the lack of Treg cells.

  3. Recombinant interleukin-24 lacks apoptosis-inducing properties in melanoma cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Stephanie Kreis; Demetra Philippidou; Christiane Margue; Catherine Rolvering; Claude Haan; Laure Dumoutier; Jean-Christophe Renauld; Iris Behrmann

    2007-01-01

    IL-24, also known as melanoma differentiation antigen 7 (mda-7), is a member of the IL-10 family of cytokines and is mainly produced by Th(2) cells as well as by activated monocytes. Binding of IL-24 to either of its two possible heterodimeric receptors IL-20R1/IL-20R2 and IL-22R/IL-20R2 activates STAT3 and/or STAT1 in target tissues such as lung, testis, ovary, keratinocytes and skin. To date, the physiological properties of IL-24 are still not well understood but available data suggest that...

  4. Mouse taste cells with G protein-coupled taste receptors lack voltage-gated calcium channels and SNAP-25

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medler Kathryn F

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Taste receptor cells are responsible for transducing chemical stimuli from the environment and relaying information to the nervous system. Bitter, sweet and umami stimuli utilize G-protein coupled receptors which activate the phospholipase C (PLC signaling pathway in Type II taste cells. However, it is not known how these cells communicate with the nervous system. Previous studies have shown that the subset of taste cells that expresses the T2R bitter receptors lack voltage-gated Ca2+ channels, which are normally required for synaptic transmission at conventional synapses. Here we use two lines of transgenic mice expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP from two taste-specific promoters to examine Ca2+ signaling in subsets of Type II cells: T1R3-GFP mice were used to identify sweet- and umami-sensitive taste cells, while TRPM5-GFP mice were used to identify all cells that utilize the PLC signaling pathway for transduction. Voltage-gated Ca2+ currents were assessed with Ca2+ imaging and whole cell recording, while immunocytochemistry was used to detect expression of SNAP-25, a presynaptic SNARE protein that is associated with conventional synapses in taste cells. Results Depolarization with high K+ resulted in an increase in intracellular Ca2+ in a small subset of non-GFP labeled cells of both transgenic mouse lines. In contrast, no depolarization-evoked Ca2+ responses were observed in GFP-expressing taste cells of either genotype, but GFP-labeled cells responded to the PLC activator m-3M3FBS, suggesting that these cells were viable. Whole cell recording indicated that the GFP-labeled cells of both genotypes had small voltage-dependent Na+ and K+ currents, but no evidence of Ca2+ currents. A subset of non-GFP labeled taste cells exhibited large voltage-dependent Na+ and K+ currents and a high threshold voltage-gated Ca2+ current. Immunocytochemistry indicated that SNAP-25 was expressed in a separate population of taste cells

  5. Lack of IL-15 results in the suboptimal priming of CD4+ T cell response against an intracellular parasite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combe, Crescent L; Moretto, Magali M; Schwartzman, Joseph D; Gigley, Jason P; Bzik, David J; Khan, Imtiaz A

    2006-04-25

    IFN-gamma-producing CD4+ T cells, although important for protection against acute Toxoplasma gondii infection, can cause gut pathology, which may prove to be detrimental for host survival. Here we show that mice lacking IL-15 gene develop a down-regulated IFN-gamma-producing CD4+ T cell response against the parasite, which leads to a reduction in gut necrosis and increased level of survival against infection. Moreover, transfer of immune CD4+ T cells from WT to IL-15-/- mice reversed inhibition of gut pathology and caused mortality equivalent to levels of parental WT mice. Down-regulated CD4+ T cell response in the absence of IL-15, manifested as reduced antigen-specific proliferation, was due to defective priming of the T cell subset by dendritic cells (DCs) of these animals. When stimulated with antigen-pulsed DCs from WT mice, CD4+ T cells from IL-15-/- mice were primed optimally, and robust proliferation of these cells was observed. A defect in the DCs of knockout mice was further confirmed by their reduced ability to produce IL-12 upon stimulation with Toxoplasma lysate antigen. Addition of exogenous IL-15 to DC cultures from knockout mice led to increased IL-12 production by these cells and restored their ability to prime an optimal parasite-specific CD4+ T cell response. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of the role of IL-15 in the development of CD4+ T cell immunity against an intracellular pathogen. Furthermore, based on these observations, targeting of IL-15 should have a beneficial effect on individuals suffering from CD4+ T cell-mediated autoimmune diseases. PMID:16614074

  6. Isoeugenol is a selective potentiator of camptothecin cytotoxicity in vertebrate cells lacking TDP1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsayed, Waheba; El-Shafie, Lamia; Hassan, Mohamed K; Farag, Mohamed A; El-Khamisy, Sherif F

    2016-01-01

    Camptothecin (CPT), a topoisomerase I (TOP1) inhibitor, exhibits anti-tumor activity against a wide range of tumors. Redundancy of TOP1-mediated repair mechanisms is a major challenge facing the efficiency of TOP1-targetting therapies. This study aims to uncover new TOP1 targeting approaches utilising a selection of natural compounds in the presence or absence of tyrosyl DNA phosphodiesterase I (TDP1); a key TOP1-mediated protein-linked DNA break (PDB) repair enzyme. We identify, isoeugenol, a phenolic ether found in plant essential oils, as a potentiator of CPT cytotoxicity in Tdp1 deficient but not proficient cells. Consistent with our cellular data, isoeugenol did not inhibit Tdp1 enzymatic activity in vitro nor it sensitized cells to the PARP1 inhibitor olaparib. However, biochemical analyses suggest that isoeugenol inhibits TDP2 catalytic activity; a pathway that can compensate for the absence of TDP1. Consistent with this, isoeugenol exacerbated etoposide-induced cytotoxicity, which generates TOP2-mediated PDBs for which TDP2 is required for processing. Together, these findings identify isoeugenol as a potential lead compound for developing TDP2 inhibitors and encourage structure-activity relationship studies to shed more light on its utility in drug discovery programs. PMID:27220325

  7. Establishment of a Human Conjunctival Epithelial Cell Line Lacking the Functional Tacstd2 Gene (An American Ophthalmological Society Thesis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Shigeru; Kawasaki, Satoshi; Kitazawa, Koji; Shinomiya, Katsuhiko

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To report the establishment of a human conjunctival epithelial cell line lacking the functional tumor-associated calcium signal transducer 2 (TACSTD2) gene to be used as an in vitro model of gelatinous drop-like corneal dystrophy (GDLD), a rare disease in which the corneal epithelial barrier function is significantly compromized by the loss of function mutation of the TACSTD2 gene. Methods: A small piece of conjunctival tissue was obtained from a GDLD patient. The conjunctival epithelial cells were enzymatically separated and dissociated from the tissue and immortalized by the lentiviral introduction of the SV40 large T antigen and human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) genes. Population doubling, protein expression, and transepithelial resistance (TER) analyses were performed to assess the appropriateness of the established cell line as an in vitro model for GDLD. Results: The life span of the established cell line was found to be significantly elongated compared to nontransfected conjunctival epithelial cells. The SV40 large T antigen and hTERT genes were stably expressed in the established cell line. The protein expression level of the tight junction–related proteins was significantly low compared to the immortalized normal conjunctival epithelial cell line. TER of the established cell line was found to be significantly low compared to the immortalized normal conjunctival epithelial cell line. Conclusions: Our conjunctival epithelial cell line was successfully immortalized and well mimicked several features of GDLD corneas. This cell line may be useful for the elucidation of the pathogenesis of GDLD and for the development of novel treatments for GDLD. PMID:23818740

  8. Mice lacking natural killer T cells are more susceptible to metabolic alterations following high fat diet feeding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brittany V Martin-Murphy

    Full Text Available Current estimates suggest that over one-third of the adult population has metabolic syndrome and three-fourths of the obese population has non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD. Inflammation in metabolic tissues has emerged as a universal feature of obesity and its co-morbidities, including NAFLD. Natural Killer T (NKT cells are a subset of innate immune cells that abundantly reside within the liver and are readily activated by lipid antigens. There is general consensus that NKT cells are pivotal regulators of inflammation; however, disagreement exists as to whether NKT cells exert pathogenic or suppressive functions in obesity. Here we demonstrate that CD1d(-/- mice, which lack NKT cells, were more susceptible to weight gain and fatty liver following high fat diet (HFD feeding. Compared with their WT counterparts, CD1d(-/- mice displayed increased adiposity and greater induction of inflammatory genes in the liver suggestive of the precursors of NAFLD. Calorimetry studies revealed a significant increase in food intake and trends toward decreased metabolic rate and activity in CD1d(-/- mice compared with WT mice. Based on these findings, our results suggest that NKT cells play a regulatory role that helps to prevent diet-induced obesity and metabolic dysfunction and may play an important role in mechanisms governing cross-talk between metabolism and the immune system to regulate energy balance and liver health.

  9. Diagnostic utility of hepatocyte nuclear factor 1-beta immunoreactivity in endometrial carcinomas: lack of specificity for endometrial clear cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadare, Oluwole; Liang, Sharon X

    2012-12-01

    cell metaplasia) displayed some degree of HNF1β immunoreactivity, with an average nuclear staining score of 7.3. We conclude that although HNF1β is frequently expressed in clear cell carcinomas, it should be used with caution as a diagnostic marker because of its lack of specificity. It neither distinguishes endometrial serous carcinomas from clear cell carcinomas nor clear cell carcinomas from its benign mimics. The greatest diagnostic utility of HNF1β expression may be in a supportive evidentiary role favoring clear cell carcinoma when the principal differential diagnostic consideration is endometrioid carcinoma.

  10. Epithelial cell stretching and luminal acidification lead to a retarded development of stria vascularis and deafness in mice lacking pendrin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyoung-Mi Kim

    Full Text Available Loss-of-function mutations of SLC26A4/pendrin are among the most prevalent causes of deafness. Deafness and vestibular dysfunction in the corresponding mouse model, Slc26a4(-/-, are associated with an enlargement and acidification of the membranous labyrinth. Here we relate the onset of expression of the HCO(3 (- transporter pendrin to the luminal pH and to enlargement-associated epithelial cell stretching. We determined expression with immunocytochemistry, cell stretching by digital morphometry and pH with double-barreled ion-selective electrodes. Pendrin was first expressed in the endolymphatic sac at embryonic day (E 11.5, in the cochlear hook-region at E13.5, in the utricle and saccule at E14.5, in ampullae at E16.5, and in the upper turn of the cochlea at E17.5. Epithelial cell stretching in Slc26a4(-/- mice began at E14.5. pH changes occurred first in the cochlea at E15.5 and in the endolymphatic sac at E17.5. At postnatal day 2, stria vascularis, outer sulcus and Reissner's membrane epithelial cells, and utricular and saccular transitional cells were stretched, whereas sensory cells in the cochlea, utricle and saccule did not differ between Slc26a4(+/- and Slc26a4(-/- mice. Structural development of stria vascularis, including vascularization, was retarded in Slc26a4(-/- mice. In conclusion, the data demonstrate that the enlargement and stretching of non-sensory epithelial cells precedes luminal acidification in the cochlea and the endolymphatic sac. Stretching and luminal acidification may alter cell-to-cell communication and lead to the observed retarded development of stria vascularis, which may be an important step on the path to deafness in Slc26a4(-/- mice, and possibly in humans, lacking functional pendrin expression.

  11. Lack of PD-L1 expression by iNKT cells improves the course of influenza A infection.

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    Hadi Maazi

    Full Text Available There is evidence indicating that invariant Natural Killer T (iNKT cells play an important role in defense against influenza A virus (IAV. However, the effect of inhibitory receptor, programmed death-1 (PD-1, and its ligands, programmed death ligand (PD-L 1 and 2 on iNKT cells in protection against IAV remains to be elucidated. Here we investigated the effects of these co-stimulatory molecules on iNKT cells in the response to influenza. We discovered that compare to the wild type, PD-L1 deficient mice show reduced sensitivity to IAV infection as evident by reduced weight loss, decreased pulmonary inflammation and cellular infiltration. In contrast, PD-L2 deficient mice showed augmented weight loss, pulmonary inflammation and cellular infiltration compare to the wild type mice after influenza infection. Adoptive transfer of iNKT cells from wild type, PD-L1 or PD-L2 deficient mice into iNKT cell deficient mice recapitulated these findings. Interestingly, in our transfer system PD-L1(-/--derived iNKT cells produced high levels of interferon-gamma whereas PD-L2(-/--derived iNKT cells produced high amounts of interleukin-4 and 13 suggesting a role for these cytokines in sensitivity to influenza. We identified that PD-L1 negatively regulates the frequency of iNKT cell subsets in the lungs of IAV infected mice. Altogether, these results demonstrate that lack of PD-L1 expression by iNKT cells reduces the sensitivity to IAV and that the presence of PD-L2 is important for dampening the deleterious inflammatory responses after IAV infection. Our findings potentially have clinical implications for developing new therapies for influenza.

  12. Tc17 Cells Mediate Vaccine Immunity against Lethal Fungal Pneumonia in Immune Deficient Hosts Lacking CD4+ T Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Som Gowda Nanjappa; Erika Heninger; Marcel Wüthrich; David Joseph Gasper; Bruce S Klein

    2012-01-01

    Vaccines may help reduce the growing incidence of fungal infections in immune-suppressed patients. We have found that, even in the absence of CD4(+) T-cell help, vaccine-induced CD8(+) T cells persist and confer resistance against Blastomyces dermatitidis and Histoplasma capsulatum. Type 1 cytokines contribute to that resistance, but they also are dispensable. Although the role of T helper 17 cells in immunity to fungi is debated, IL-17 producing CD8(+) T cells (Tc17 cells) have not been inve...

  13. Female mice lacking cholecystokinin 1 receptors have compromised neurogenesis, and fewer dopaminergic cells in the olfactory bulb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi eSui

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Neurogenesis in the adult rodent brain is largely restricted to the subependymal zone (SVZ of the lateral ventricle and subgranular zone (SGZ of the dentate gyrus (DG. We examined whether cholecystokinin (CCK through actions mediated by CCK1 receptors (CCK1R is involved in regulating neurogenesis. Proliferating cells in the SVZ, measured by 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU injected 2 hours prior to death or by immunoreactivity against Ki67, were reduced by 37% and 42%, respectively, in female (but not male mice lacking CCK1Rs (CCK1R-/- compared to wild-type (WT. Generation of neuroblasts in the SVZ and rostral migratory stream was also affected, since the number of doublecortin (DCX-immunoreactive (ir neuroblasts in these regions decreased by 29%. In the SGZ of female CCK1R-/- mice, BrdU-positive (+ and Ki67-ir cells were reduced by 38% and 56%, respectively, while DCX-ir neuroblasts were down 80%. Subsequently, the effect of reduced SVZ/SGZ proliferation on the generation and survival of mature adult-born cells in female CCK1R-/- mice was examined. In the OB granule cell layer (GCL, the number of neuronal nuclei (NeuN-ir and calretinin-ir cells was stable compared to WT, and 42 days after BrdU injections, the number of BrdU+ cells co-expressing GABA- or NeuN-like immunoreactivity (LI was similar. Compared to WT, the granule cell layer of the DG in female CCK1R-/- mice had a similar number of calbindin-ir cells and BrdU+ cells co-expressing calbindin-LI 42 days after BrdU injections. However, the OB glomerular layer (GL of CCK1R-/- female mice had 11% fewer NeuN-ir cells, 23% less TH-ir cells, and a 38% and 29% reduction in BrdU+ cells that co-expressed TH-LI or GABA-LI, respectively. We conclude that CCK, via CCK1Rs, is involved in regulating the generation of proliferating cells and neuroblasts in the adult female mouse brain, and mechanisms are in place to maintain steady neuronal populations in the OB and DG when the rate of proliferation is

  14. Serum-free microcarrier based production of replication deficient Influenza vaccine candidate virus lacking NS1 using Vero cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Mylene L

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Influenza virus is a major health concern that has huge impacts on the human society, and vaccination remains as one of the most effective ways to mitigate this disease. Comparing the two types of commercially available Influenza vaccine, the live attenuated virus vaccine is more cross-reactive and easier to administer than the traditional inactivated vaccines. One promising live attenuated Influenza vaccine that has completed Phase I clinical trial is deltaFLU, a deletion mutant lacking the viral Nonstructural Protein 1 (NS1 gene. As a consequence of this gene deletion, this mutant virus can only propagate effectively in cells with a deficient interferon-mediated antiviral response. To demonstrate the manufacturability of this vaccine candidate, a batch bioreactor production process using adherent Vero cells on microcarriers in commercially available animal-component free, serum-free media is described. Results Five commercially available animal-component free, serum-free media (SFM were evaluated for growth of Vero cells in agitated Cytodex 1 spinner flask microcarrier cultures. EX-CELL Vero SFM achieved the highest cell concentration of 2.6 × 10^6 cells/ml, whereas other SFM achieved about 1.2 × 10^6 cells/ml. Time points for infection between the late exponential and stationary phases of cell growth had no significant effect in the final virus titres. A virus yield of 7.6 Log10 TCID50/ml was achieved using trypsin concentration of 10 μg/ml and MOI of 0.001. The Influenza vaccine production process was scaled up to a 3 liter controlled stirred tank bioreactor to achieve a cell density of 2.7 × 10^6 cells/ml and virus titre of 8.3 Log10 TCID50/ml. Finally, the bioreactor system was tested for the production of the corresponding wild type H1N1 Influenza virus, which is conventionally used in the production of inactivated vaccine. High virus titres of up to 10 Log10 TCID50/ml were achieved. Conclusions We describe for the

  15. Lack of RsmA-mediated control results in constant hypervirulence, cell elongation, and hyperflagellation in Pectobacterium wasabiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kõiv, Viia; Andresen, Liis; Broberg, Martin; Frolova, Jekaterina; Somervuo, Panu; Auvinen, Petri; Pirhonen, Minna; Tenson, Tanel; Mäe, Andres

    2013-01-01

    The posttranscriptional regulator RsmA controls the production of plant cell wall degrading enzymes (PCWDE) and cell motility in the Pectobacterium genus of plant pathogens. In this study the physiological role of gene regulation by RsmA is under investigation. Disruption of rsmA gene of the Pectobacterium wasabiae strain, SCC3193 resulted in 3-fold decrease in growth rate and increased virulence. The comparison of mRNA levels of the rsmA(-) mutant and wild-type using a genome-wide microarray showed, that genes responsible for successful infection, i.e. virulence factors, motility, butanediol fermentation, various secretion systems etc. were up-regulated in the rsmA(-) strain. The rsmA(-) strain exhibited a higher propensity to swarm and produce PCWDE compared to the wild-type strain. Virulence experiments in potato tubers demonstrated that in spite of its more efficient tissue maceration, the rsmA(-) strain's ability to survive within the host is reduced and the infection site is taken over by resident bacteria. Taken together, in the absence of RsmA, cells revert to a constitutively infective phenotype characterized by expression of virulence factors and swarming. We hypothesize that lack of control over these costly energetic processes results in decreased growth rate and fitness. In addition, our findings suggest a relationship between swarming and virulence in plant pathogens. PMID:23372695

  16. Lack of RsmA-mediated control results in constant hypervirulence, cell elongation, and hyperflagellation in Pectobacterium wasabiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viia Kõiv

    Full Text Available The posttranscriptional regulator RsmA controls the production of plant cell wall degrading enzymes (PCWDE and cell motility in the Pectobacterium genus of plant pathogens. In this study the physiological role of gene regulation by RsmA is under investigation. Disruption of rsmA gene of the Pectobacterium wasabiae strain, SCC3193 resulted in 3-fold decrease in growth rate and increased virulence. The comparison of mRNA levels of the rsmA(- mutant and wild-type using a genome-wide microarray showed, that genes responsible for successful infection, i.e. virulence factors, motility, butanediol fermentation, various secretion systems etc. were up-regulated in the rsmA(- strain. The rsmA(- strain exhibited a higher propensity to swarm and produce PCWDE compared to the wild-type strain. Virulence experiments in potato tubers demonstrated that in spite of its more efficient tissue maceration, the rsmA(- strain's ability to survive within the host is reduced and the infection site is taken over by resident bacteria. Taken together, in the absence of RsmA, cells revert to a constitutively infective phenotype characterized by expression of virulence factors and swarming. We hypothesize that lack of control over these costly energetic processes results in decreased growth rate and fitness. In addition, our findings suggest a relationship between swarming and virulence in plant pathogens.

  17. Abnormal anxiety- and depression-like behaviors in mice lacking both central serotonergic neurons and pancreatic islet cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yun-Fang; Song, Ning-Ning; Mao, Rong-Rong; Li, Jin-Nan; Zhang, Qiong; Huang, Ying; Zhang, Lei; Han, Hui-Li; Ding, Yu-Qiang; Xu, Lin

    2014-01-01

    Dysfunction of central serotonin (5-HT) system has been proposed to be one of the underlying mechanisms for anxiety and depression, and the association of diabetes mellitus and psychiatric disorders has been noticed by the high prevalence of anxiety/depression in patients with diabetes mellitus. This promoted us to examine these behaviors in central 5-HT-deficient mice and those also suffering with diabetes mellitus. Mice lacking either 5-HT or central serotonergic neurons were generated by conditional deletion of Tph2 or Lmx1b respectively. Simultaneous depletion of both central serotonergic neurons and pancreatic islet cells was achieved by administration of diphtheria toxin (DT) in Pet1-Cre;Rosa26-DT receptor (DTR) mice. The central 5-HT-deficient mice showed reduced anxiety-like behaviors as they spent more time in and entered more often into the light box in the light/dark box test compared with controls; similar results were observed in the elevated plus maze test. However, they displayed no differences in the immobility time of the forced swimming and tail suspension tests suggesting normal depression-like behaviors in central 5-HT-deficient mice. As expected, DT-treated Pet1-Cre;Rosa26-DTR mice lacking both central serotonergic neurons and pancreatic islet endocrine cells exhibited several classic diabetic symptoms. Interestingly, they displayed increased anxiety-like behaviors but reduced immobility time in the forced swimming and tail suspension tests. Furthermore, the hippocampal neurogenesis was dramatically enhanced in these mice. These results suggest that the deficiency of central 5-HT may not be sufficient to induce anxiety/depression-like behaviors in mice, and the enhanced hippocampal neurogenesis may contribute to the altered depression-like behaviors in the 5-HT-deficient mice with diabetes. Our current investigation provides understanding the relationship between diabetes mellitus and psychiatric disorders.

  18. Abnormal anxiety- and depression-like behaviors in mice lacking both central serotonergic neurons and pancreatic islet cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Fang eJia

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Dysfunction of central serotonin (5-HT system has been proposed to be one of the underlying mechanisms for anxiety and depression, and the association of diabetes mellitus and psychiatric disorders has been noticed by the high prevalence of anxiety/depression in patients with diabetes mellitus. This promoted us to examine these behaviors in central 5-HT-deficient mice and those also suffering with diabetes mellitus. Mice lacking either 5-HT or central serotonergic neurons were generated by conditional deletion of Tph2 or Lmx1b respectively. Simultaneous depletion of both central serotonergic neurons and pancreatic islet cells was achieved by administration of diphtheria toxin (DT in Pet1-Cre;Rosa26-DT receptor (DTR mice. The central 5-HT-deficient mice showed reduced anxiety-like behaviors as they spent more time in and entered more often into the light box in the light/dark box test compared with controls; similar results were observed in the elevated plus maze test. However, they displayed no differences in the immobility time of the forced swimming and tail suspension tests suggesting normal depression-like behaviors in central 5-HT-deficient mice. As expected, DT-treated Pet1-Cre;Rosa26-DTR mice lacking both central serotonergic neurons and pancreatic islet endocrine cells exhibited several classic diabetic symptoms. Interestingly, they displayed increased anxiety-like behaviors but reduced immobility time in the forced swimming and tail suspension tests. Furthermore, the hippocampal neurogenesis was dramatically enhanced in these mice. These results suggest that the deficiency of central 5-HT may not be sufficient to induce anxiety/depression-like behaviors in mice, and the enhanced hippocampal neurogenesis may contribute to the altered depression-like behaviors in the 5-HT-deficient mice with diabetes. Our current investigation provides a novel insight into understanding the relationship between diabetes mellitus and psychiatric disorders.

  19. Lack of liver X receptors leads to cell proliferation in a model of mouse dorsal prostate epithelial cell.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Dufour

    Full Text Available Recent studies underline the implication of Liver X Receptors (LXRs in several prostate diseases such as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH and prostate cancer. In order to understand the molecular mechanisms involved, we derived epithelial cells from dorsal prostate (MPECs of wild type (WT or Lxrαβ-/- mice. In the WT MPECs, our results show that LXR activation reduces proliferation and correlates with the modification of the AKT-survival pathway. Moreover, LXRs regulate lipid homeostasis with the regulation of Abca1, Abcg1 and Idol, and, in a lesser extent, Srebp1, Fas and Acc. Conversely cells derived from Lxrαβ-/- mice show a higher basal phosphorylation and consequently activation of the survival/proliferation transduction pathways AKT and MAPK. Altogether, our data point out that the cell model we developed allows deciphering the molecular mechanisms inducing the cell cycle arrest. Besides, we show that activated LXRs regulate AKT and MAPK transduction pathways and demonstrate that LXRs could be good pharmacological targets in prostate disease such as cancer.

  20. Lack of Phosphotyrosine Phosphatase SHP-1 Expression in Malignant T-Cell Lymphoma Cells Results from Methylation of the SHP-1 Promoter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Q; Raghunath, P N; Vonderheid, E;

    2000-01-01

    SHP-1 is an important negative regulator of signaling by several receptors including receptors for interleukin-2 (IL-2R) and other cytokines. SHP-1 acts by dephosphorylating the receptors and receptor-associated kinases such as IL-2R-associated Jak3 kinase. We found that SHP-1 protein was not...... lack of SHP-1 expression is frequent in malignant T cells and results from methylation of the SHP-1 gene promoter. Furthermore, they indicate that SHP-1 loss may play a role in the pathogenesis of T cell lymphomas by permitting persistence of signals generated by IL-2R and, possibly, other receptor...

  1. Lymphatic endothelial cells induce tolerance via PD-L1 and lack of costimulation leading to high-level PD-1 expression on CD8 T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tewalt, Eric F.; Cohen, Jarish N.; Rouhani, Sherin J.; Guidi, Cynthia J.; Qiao, Hui; Fahl, Shawn P.; Conaway, Mark R.; Bender, Timothy P.; Tung, Kenneth S.; Vella, Anthony T.; Adler, Adam J.; Chen, Lieping

    2012-01-01

    Lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) induce peripheral tolerance by direct presentation to CD8 T cells (TCD8). We demonstrate that LECs mediate deletion only via programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) ligand 1, despite expressing ligands for the CD160, B- and T-lymphocyte attenuator, and lymphocyte activation gene-3 inhibitory pathways. LECs induce activation and proliferation of TCD8, but lack of costimulation through 4-1BB leads to rapid high-level expression of PD-1, which in turn inhibits up-regulation of the high-affinity IL-2 receptor that is necessary for TCD8 survival. Rescue of tyrosinase-specific TCD8 by interference with PD-1 or provision of costimulation results in autoimmune vitiligo, demonstrating that LECs are significant, albeit suboptimal, antigen-presenting cells. Because LECs express numerous peripheral tissue antigens, lack of costimulation coupled to rapid high-level up-regulation of inhibitory receptors may be generally important in systemic peripheral tolerance. PMID:22993390

  2. Antiretroviral intensification and valproic acid lack sustained effect on residual HIV-1 viremia or resting CD4+ cell infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancie M Archin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection that persists despite antiretroviral therapy (ART is a daunting problem. Given the limited evidence that resting CD4+ T cell infection (RCI is affected by the histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitor valproic acid (VPA, we measured the stability of RCI and residual viremia in patients who added VPA with or without raltegravir (RAL, or enfuvirtide (ENF with or without VPA, to standard ART. METHODS: Patients with plasma HIV RNA50% was seen in six volunteers after the addition of RAL and VPA. In 4 of the 6 patients this lack of effect might be attributed to intermittent viremia, low VPA levels, or intermittent study therapy adherence. Overall, there was no effect of the addition of RAL or ENF on low-level viremia measured by SCA. CONCLUSIONS: The prospective addition of VPA and RAL, VPA and ENF, or ENF failed to progressively reduce the frequency of RCI, or ablate intermittent and low-level viremia. New approaches such as more potent HDAC inhibition, alone or in combination with intensified ART or other agents that may disrupt proviral latency must be pursued.

  3. Lack of adrenomedullin in mouse endothelial cells results in defective angiogenesis, enhanced vascular permeability, less metastasis, and more brain damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa-Callejero, Laura; Pozo-Rodrigálvarez, Andrea; Martínez-Murillo, Ricardo; Martínez, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Adrenomedullin (AM) is a vasodilating peptide involved in the regulation of circulatory homeostasis and in the pathophysiology of certain cardiovascular diseases. AM plays critical roles in blood vessels, including regulation of vascular stability and permeability. To elucidate the autocrine/paracrine function of AM in endothelial cells (EC) in vivo, a conditional knockout of AM in EC (AM(EC-KO)) was used. The amount of vascularization of the matrigel implants was lower in AM(EC-KO) mice indicating a defective angiogenesis. Moreover, ablation of AM in EC revealed increased vascular permeability in comparison with wild type (WT) littermates. In addition, AM(EC-KO) lungs exhibited significantly less tumor growth than littermate WT mice using a syngeneic model of metastasis. Furthermore, following middle cerebral artery permanent occlusion, there was a significant infarct size decrease in animals lacking endothelial AM when compared to their WT counterparts. AM is an important regulator of EC function, angiogenesis, tumorigenesis, and brain response to ischemia. Studies of AM should bring novel approaches to the treatment of vascular diseases. PMID:27640364

  4. Lack of suppressive CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ T cells in advanced stages of primary cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiemessen, Machteld M; Mitchell, Tracey J; Hendry, Lisa; Whittaker, Sean J; Taams, Leonie S; John, Susan

    2006-10-01

    Mycosis fungoides and its leukemic variant, Sezary syndrome, are the most common primary cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCLs). In an ex vivo study, we investigated the percentage, phenotype, and suppressive function of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) from peripheral blood of CTCL patients. The percentage of Tregs did not differ significantly between patients and controls. Functional assays demonstrated a dichotomy in Treg function: in four out of 10 patients CD4+CD25+ T cells were incapable of suppressing autologous CD4+CD25- T-cell proliferation, whereas suppressive function was intact in the other six patients. Suppressive activity of Tregs inversely correlated with the peripheral blood tumor burden. T-plastin gene expression, used as a Sezary cell marker, confirmed that Sezary cells were heterogeneous for CD25 expression. Mixed lymphocyte reactions demonstrated that CD4+CD25- T cells from patients who lacked functional Tregs were susceptible to suppression by Tregs from healthy controls, and had not become suppressive themselves. Furthermore, we found reduced expression of Foxp3 in the CD4+CD25+ Tregs of these patients relative to the other six CTCL patients and controls. Our findings thus indicate a dysfunction of peripheral Tregs in certain CTCL patients, which correlates with tumor burden.

  5. A novel antibody for human induced pluripotent stem cells and embryonic stem cells recognizes a type of keratan sulfate lacking oversulfated structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawabe, Keiko; Tateyama, Daiki; Toyoda, Hidenao; Kawasaki, Nana; Hashii, Noritaka; Nakao, Hiromi; Matsumoto, Shogo; Nonaka, Motohiro; Matsumura, Hiroko; Hirose, Yoshinori; Morita, Ayaha; Katayama, Madoka; Sakuma, Makoto; Kawasaki, Nobuko; Furue, Miho Kusuda; Kawasaki, Toshisuke

    2013-03-01

    We have generated a monoclonal antibody (R-10G) specific to human induced pluripotent stem (hiPS)/embryonic stem (hES) cells by using hiPS cells (Tic) as an antigen, followed by differential screening of mouse hybridomas with hiPS and human embryonal carcinoma (hEC) cells. Upon western blotting with R-10G, hiPS/ES cell lysates gave a single but an unusually diffuse band at a position corresponding to >250 kDa. The antigen protein was isolated from the induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell lysates with an affinity column of R-10G. The R-10G positive band was resistant to digestion with peptide N-glycanase F (PNGase F), neuraminidase, fucosidase, chondrotinase ABC and heparinase mix, but it disappeared almost completely on digestion with keratanase, keratanase II and endo-β-galactosidase, indicating that the R-10G epitope is a keratan sulfate. The carrier protein of the R-10G epitope was identified as podocalyxin by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) analysis of the R-10G positive-protein band material obtained on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The R-10G epitope is a type of keratan sulfate with some unique properties. (1) The epitope is expressed only on hiPS/ES cells, i.e. not on hEC cells, unlike those recognized by the conventional hiPS/ES marker antibodies. (2) The epitope is a type of keratan sulfate lacking oversulfated structures and is not immunologically cross-reactive with high-sulfated keratan sulfate. (3) The R-10G epitope is distributed heterogeneously on hiPS cells, suggesting that a single colony of undifferentiated hiPS cells consists of different cell subtypes. Thus, R-10G is a novel antibody recognizing hiPS/ES cells, and should be a new molecular probe for disclosing the roles of glycans on these cells.

  6. Premature aging phenotype in mice lacking high affinity nicotinic receptors: region specific changes in layer V pyramidal cell morphology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleni Konsolaki

    2014-02-01

    accelerated cognitive aging, based on structural alterations and spatial learning deficits only evident in old animals (Zoli et al., 1999; Picciotto and Zoli, 2002. However a systematic comparison of neuronal microanatomy in adult and aged animals has not been done to date. In the present study adult (4-6months and old (22-24months WT and β2-/- animals were used to examine the respective contributions of age and genotype on neuronal structure. We focus on layer V pyramidal cells because: (i they constitute the main cortical output (DeFelipe and Farinas, 1992; Romand et al., 2011 (ii they are often reported to exhibit increased sensitivity to aging (Nakamura et al., 1985; Baskys et al., 1990; De Brabander et al., 1998; Turner et al., 2005; (iii they possess a high density of cholinergic terminals (Houser et al., 1985 and, in contrast to layer III cells, they exhibit strong presynaptic modulation by β2 containing nAChRs and are activated by nAChR stimulation (Poorthuis et al., 2013; hence they would be a sensitive readout for the lack of high affinity nicotinic receptors. Furthermore, to examine the degree of age-related vulnerability across distinct cortical areas we used YFP-H mice that express yellow fluorescent protein (YFP in specific populations of thick-tufted layer V pyramidal neurons across the cortical mantle (Feng et al., 2000; Sugino et al., 2006. We used mutants crossed with YFP+ mice in order to have the same labeled populations in both genotypes, and we examined cells in primary visual cortex (V1 and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC, two cortical regions that receive similar cholinergic inputs (McKinney et al., 1983; Jacobowitz and Creed, 1983; Everitt and Robbins, 1997; Laplante et al., 2005 but have distinct cytoarchitecture and functional role (Elston et al., 2005. We ask whether neurons in old β2-/- mice exhibit greater structural deficits than aged-matched controls and whether deficits appear in old age or are already present earlier. Brains from 21 adult

  7. Frequent lack of translation of antigen presentation-associated molecules MHC class I, CD1a and Beta(2)-microglobulin in Reed-Sternberg cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, A.; Visser, L; Eberwine, J; Dadvand, L; Poppema, S

    2000-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is present in Reed-Sternberg (RS) cells of a substantial proportion of Hodgkin's lymphoma cases. Most EBV-positive cases are also MHC class I-positive, whereas the majority of EBV-negative cases lack detectable levels of MHC class I expression. Application of the SAGE techni

  8. Deficient CD4+ T cell priming and regression of CD8+ T cell functionality in virus-infected mice lacking a normal B cell compartment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Kauffmann, Susanne Ørding; Thomsen, Allan Randrup

    2003-01-01

    precedes recrudescence of detectable virus, indicating that the T cell defect is not simply a secondary event due to virus buildup resulting from the failure of B(-/-) mice to produce neutralizing Abs. In contrast with CD8(+) T cells, which initially respond almost as in wild-type mice, the priming...... of virus-specific CD4(+) T cells was markedly impaired in B(-/-) mice infected with either virus strain. Thus, our results indicate that B cells play an important role in antiviral immunity not only as Ab producers, but also in promoting an optimal and sustained T cell response. The T cell defects...

  9. Lack of lysosomal fusion with phagosomes containing Ehrlichia risticii in P388D1 cells: abrogation of inhibition with oxytetracycline.

    OpenAIRE

    Wells, M Y; Rikihisa, Y

    1988-01-01

    Fusion of lysosomes with phagosomes containing Ehrlichia risticii, an obligate intracellular parasite, was evaluated in P388D1 murine macrophagelike cells. Lysosomes in cells ranging in infectivity from 30 to 70% were labeled cytochemically with acid phosphatase or via endocytosis of thorium dioxide or cationized ferritin to document phagosome-lysosome (P-L) fusion in untreated cells and cells treated with oxytetracycline. Regardless of the marker used, P-L fusion was generally not observed i...

  10. Adhesion to human cells by Escherichia coli lacking the major subunit of a digalactoside-specific pilus-adhesin.

    OpenAIRE

    Uhlin, B E; Norgren, M; Båga, M; Normark, S

    1985-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria frequently possess pili with specific binding properties that allow them to attach to epithelial tissue. In Escherichia coli, the pili associated with pyelonephritis (Pap pili) bind to digalactoside-containing glycolipids on the uroepithelium. Transposon-insertion mutants and deletion mutants of the cloned genetic determinant encoding synthesis of such digalactoside-binding Pap pili have been studied in E. coli K-12. Mutants that completely lack synthesis of the major Pap ...

  11. Lack of influence of fetal hemoglobin levels or erythrocyte indices on the severity of sickle cell anemia.

    OpenAIRE

    Powars, D R; Schroeder, W. A.; Weiss, J N; Chan, L S; Azen, S P

    1980-01-01

    Persons with sickle cell anemia who have elevated fetal hemoglobin or lowered erythrocyte mean corpuscular volume are reputed to have less severe clinical manifestations and a greater probability of survival. This study examines the relationship between seven clinical indicators of morbidity in sickle cell anemia and seven hematological parameters that were collected from 214 patients. Risks of sickle cell crisis, acute chest syndrome, hospital admissions, cerebrovascular accident, aseptic ne...

  12. "The preadipocyte factor" DLK1 marks adult mouse adipose tissue residing vascular cells that lack in vitro adipogenic differentiation potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ditte Caroline; Jensen, Line; Schrøder, Henrik Daa;

    2009-01-01

    Delta-like 1 (Dlk1) is expressed in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes and has frequently been referred to as "the" preadipocyte marker, yet the phenotype of DLK1(+) cells in adipose tissue remains undetermined. Herein, we demonstrate that DLK1(+) cells encompass around 1-2% of the adult mouse adipose stromal......, generation of tube-like structures on matrigel, and uptake of Acetylated Low Density-Lipoprotein, all characteristics of endothelial cells. We therefore suggest that DLK1(+)SVF cells are of a vascular origin and not them-selves committed preadipocytes as assumed hitherto....

  13. LACK OF INHIBITORY ACTION OF OXYTOCIN,VASOTOCIN AND VASOPRESSIN ON PROGESTERONE PRODUCTION BY HUMAN LUTEAL CELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGHan-Zheng; HANXiang-Jun; LUShu-Hua; SUNZhi-Da; SHENWei-Xiong; ZHOUWei

    1989-01-01

    The direct effects of oxytocin and relatcd peptides on human luteal cells were attudied Suslxmsions of luteal cells were prepared enzymatically from human corpora htae, obtained during cycle days 19-25. Afar incubation with hCG (liu / ml) for 3 h, the

  14. Airway eosinophils accumulate in the mediastinal lymph nodes but lack antigen-presenting potential for naive T cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.S. van Rijt (Leonie); N. Vos (Nanda); D. Hijdra; V.C. de Vries (Victor); H.C. Hoogsteden (Henk); B.N.M. Lambrecht (Bart)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractAsthma is characterized by infiltration of the airway wall with eosinophils. Although eosinophils are considered to be effector cells, recent studies have reported their ability to activate primed Th2 cells. In this study, we investigated whether eosinophils are capable

  15. Lack of beta1 integrins in enteric neural crest cells leads to a Hirschsprung-like phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breau, Marie A; Pietri, Thomas; Eder, Olivier;

    2006-01-01

    The enteric nervous system arises mainly from vagal and sacral neural crest cells that colonise the gut between 9.5 and 14 days of development in mice. Using the Cre-LoxP system, we removed beta1 integrins in the neural crest cells when they emerge from the neural tube. beta1-null enteric neural ...

  16. Lacking deoxygenation-linked interaction between cytoplasmic domain of band 3 and HbF from fetal red blood cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weber, Roy E.

    2007-01-01

    Aim: Several of the red blood cell's metabolic and membrane functions display dependence on haemoglobin oxygenation. In adult human red cells, the increased glycolytic rate at low O2 tension results from binding of deoxygenated HbA at negatively charged, N-terminal, cytoplasmic domain of the...

  17. Co-existence of intact stemness and priming of neural differentiation programs in mES cells lacking Trim71.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitschka, Sibylle; Ulas, Thomas; Goller, Tobias; Schneider, Karin; Egert, Angela; Mertens, Jérôme; Brüstle, Oliver; Schorle, Hubert; Beyer, Marc; Klee, Kathrin; Xue, Jia; Günther, Patrick; Bassler, Kevin; Schultze, Joachim L; Kolanus, Waldemar

    2015-06-09

    Regulatory networks for differentiation and pluripotency in embryonic stem (ES) cells have long been suggested to be mutually exclusive. However, with the identification of many new components of these networks ranging from epigenetic, transcriptional, and translational to even post-translational mechanisms, the cellular states of pluripotency and early differentiation might not be strictly bi-modal, but differentiating stem cells appear to go through phases of simultaneous expression of stemness and differentiation genes. Translational regulators such as RNA binding proteins (RBPs) and micro RNAs (miRNAs) might be prime candidates for guiding a cell from pluripotency to differentiation. Using Trim71, one of two members of the Tripartite motif (Trim) protein family with RNA binding activity expressed in murine ES cells, we demonstrate that Trim71 is not involved in regulatory networks of pluripotency but regulates neural differentiation. Loss of Trim71 in mES cells leaves stemness and self-maintenance of these cells intact, but many genes required for neural development are up-regulated at the same time. Concordantly, Trim71(-/-) mES show increased neural marker expression following treatment with retinoic acid. Our findings strongly suggest that Trim71 keeps priming steps of differentiation in check, which do not pre-require a loss of the pluripotency network in ES cells.

  18. Lack of claudin-7 is a strong predictor of regional recurrence in oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melchers, L. J.; de Bruin, L. Bruine; Schnell, U.; Slagter-Menkema, L.; Mastik, M. F.; de Bock, G. H.; van Dijk, B. A. C.; Giepmans, B. N. G.; van der Laan, B. F. A. M.; van der Wal, J. E.; Roodenburg, J. L. N.; Schuuring, E.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Adequate treatment of oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is dependent on correctly predicting the presence of lymph node metastases. Current methods to diagnose nodal metastases partly result in overtreatment with associated morbidity and undertreatment with decreased

  19. Excitatory Synaptic Inputs to Mouse On-Off Direction-Selective Retinal Ganglion Cells Lack Direction Tuning

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Silvia J.H.; Kim, In-Jung; Loren L Looger; Demb, Jonathan B; Borghuis, Bart G.

    2014-01-01

    Direction selectivity represents a fundamental visual computation. In mammalian retina, On-Off direction-selective ganglion cells (DSGCs) respond strongly to motion in a preferred direction and weakly to motion in the opposite, null direction. Electrical recordings suggested three direction-selective (DS) synaptic mechanisms: DS GABA release during null-direction motion from starburst amacrine cells (SACs) and DS acetylcholine and glutamate release during preferred direction motion from SACs ...

  20. Neutrophils lacking platelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 exhibit loss of directionality and motility in CXCR2-mediated chemotaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yue; Stabach, Paul; Michaud, Michael; Madri, Joseph A

    2005-09-15

    Time-lapsed videomicroscopy was used to study the migration of platelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1-deficient (PECAM-1(-/-)) murine neutrophils undergoing chemotaxis in Zigmond chambers containing IL-8, KC, or fMLP gradients. PECAM-1(-/-) neutrophils failed to translocate up the IL-8, KC, and fMLP gradients. Significant reductions in cell motility and cell spreading were also observed in IL-8 or KC gradients. In wild-type neutrophils, PECAM-1 and F-actin were colocalized at the leading fronts of polarized cells toward the gradient. In contrast, in PECAM-1(-/-) neutrophils, although F-actin also localized to the leading front of migrating cells, F-actin polymerization was unstable, and cycling was remarkably increased compared with that of wild-type neutrophils. This may be due to the decreased cytokine-induced mobilization of the actin-binding protein, moesin, into the cytoskeleton of PECAM-1(-/-) neutrophils. PECAM-1(-/-) neutrophils also exhibited intracellularly dislocalized Src homology 2 domain containing phosphatase 1 (SHP-1) and had less IL-8-induced SHP-1 phosphatase activity. These results suggest that PECAM-1 regulates neutrophil chemotaxis by modulating cell motility and directionality, in part through its effects on SHP-1 localization and activation. PMID:16148090

  1. Immortalized MH-S cells lack defining features of primary alveolar macrophages and do not support mouse pneumovirus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Todd A; Rice, Tyler A; Anderson, Erik D; Percopo, Caroline M; Rosenberg, Helene F

    2016-04-01

    The SV-40-transformed MH-S cell line maintains some, but not all, features of primary alveolar macrophages (AMs) from BALB/c mice. We show here that MH-S cells produce inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and CXCL10 in response to challenge with Gram-positive Lactobacillus reuteri, and to TLR2 and NOD2 ligands Pam3CSK4 and MDP, respectively. In contrast, although wild-type AMs are infected in vivo by pneumonia virus of mice (PVM), no virus replication was detected in MH-S cells. Interestingly, the surface immunophenotype of MH-S cells (CD11c(+)Siglec F(-)) differs from that of wild-type AMs (CD11c(+) Siglec F(+)) and is similar to that of immature AMs isolated from granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) gene-deleted mice; AMs from GM-CSF(-/-) mice also support PVM replication. However, MH-S cells do not express the GM-CSF receptor alpha chain (CD116) and do not respond to GM-CSF. Due to these unusual features, MH-S cells should be used with caution as experimental models of AMs. PMID:26916143

  2. Cells lacking Rieske iron-sulfur protein have a reactive oxygen species-associated decrease in respiratory complexes I and IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Francisca; Enríquez, José Antonio; Moraes, Carlos T

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial respiratory complexes of the electron transport chain (CI, CIII, and CIV) can be assembled into larger structures forming supercomplexes. We analyzed the assembly/stability of respiratory complexes in mouse lung fibroblasts lacking the Rieske iron-sulfur protein (RISP knockout [KO]cells), one of the catalytic subunits of CIII. In the absence of RISP, most of the remaining CIII subunits were able to assemble into a large precomplex that lacked enzymatic activity. CI, CIV, and supercomplexes were decreased in the RISP-deficient cells. Reintroduction of RISP into KO cells restored CIII activity and increased the levels of active CI, CIV, and supercomplexes. We found that hypoxia (1% O(2)) resulted in increased levels of CI, CIV, and supercomplex assembly in RISP KO cells. In addition, treatment of control cells with different oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) inhibitors showed that compounds known to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) (e.g., antimycin A and oligomycin) had a negative impact on CI and supercomplex levels. Accordingly, a superoxide dismutase (SOD) mimetic compound and SOD2 overexpression provided a partial increase in supercomplex levels in the RISP KO cells. Our data suggest that the stability of CI, CIV, and supercomplexes is regulated by ROS in the context of defective oxidative phosphorylation.

  3. T cell clones from Schistosoma haematobium infected and exposed individuals lacking distinct cytokine profiles for Th1/Th2 polarisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mduluza T

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available T cell clones were derived from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of Schistosoma haematobium infected and uninfected individuals living in an endemic area. The clones were stimulated with S. haematobium worm and egg antigens and purified protein derivative. Attempts were made to classify the T cell clones according to production of the cytokines IL-4, IL-5 and IFN-gamma. All the T cell clones derived were observed to produce cytokines used as markers for the classification of Th1/Th2 subsets. However, the 'signature' cytokines marking each subset were produced at different levels. The classification depended on the dominating cytokine type, which was having either Th0/1 or Th0/2 subsets. The results indicated that no distinct cytokine profiles for polarisation of Th1/Th2 subsets were detected in these S. haematobium infected humans. The balance in the profiles of cytokines marking each subset were related to infection and re-infection status after treatment with praziquantel. In the present study, as judged by the changes in infection status with time, the T cell responses appeared to be less stable and more dynamic, suggesting that small quantitative changes in the balance of the cytokines response could result in either susceptibility or resistant to S. haematobium infection.

  4. Lack of TAK1 in dendritic cells inhibits the contact hypersensitivity response induced by trichloroethylene in local lymph node assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Pan; Hongqian, Chu; Qinghe, Meng; Lanqin, Shang; Jianjun, Jiang; Xiaohua, Yang; Xuetao, Wei; Weidong, Hao

    2016-09-15

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a ubiquitous environmental contaminant. Occupational TCE exposure has been associated with severe, generalized contact hypersensitivity (CHS) skin disorder. The development of CHS depends on innate and adaptive immune functions. Transforming growth factor-β activated kinase-1 (TAK1) controls the survival of dendritic cells (DCs) that affect the immune system homeostasis. We aimed to investigate the role of TAK1 activity in DC on TCE-induced CHS response. Control mice and DC-specific TAK1 deletion mice were treated with 80% (v/v) TCE using local lymph node assay (LLNA) to establish a TCE-induced CHS model. The draining lymph nodes (DLNs) were excised and the lymphocytes were measure for proliferation by BrdU-ELISA, T-cell phenotype analysis by flow cytometry and signaling pathway activation by western blot. The ears were harvested for histopathological analysis. Control mice in the 80% TCE group displayed an inflammatory response in the ears, increased lymphocyte proliferation, elevated regulatory T-cell and activated T-cell percentages, and more IFN-γ producing CD8(+) T cells in DLNs. In contrast to control mice, DC-specific TAK1 deletion mice in the 80% TCE group showed an abolished CHS response and this was associated with defective T-cell expansion, activation and IFN-γ production. This effect may occur through Jnk and NF-κB signaling pathways. Overall, this study demonstrates a pivotal role of TAK1 in DCs in controlling TCE-induced CHS response and suggests that targeting TAK1 function in DCs may be a viable approach to preventing and treating TCE-related occupational health hazards. PMID:27473013

  5. Lack of RsmA-Mediated Control Results in Constant Hypervirulence, Cell Elongation, and Hyperflagellation in Pectobacterium wasabiae

    OpenAIRE

    Viia Kõiv; Liis Andresen; Martin Broberg; Jekaterina Frolova; Panu Somervuo; Petri Auvinen; Minna Pirhonen; Tanel Tenson; Andres Mäe

    2013-01-01

    The posttranscriptional regulator RsmA controls the production of plant cell wall degrading enzymes (PCWDE) and cell motility in the Pectobacterium genus of plant pathogens. In this study the physiological role of gene regulation by RsmA is under investigation. Disruption of rsmA gene of the Pectobacterium wasabiae strain, SCC3193 resulted in 3-fold decrease in growth rate and increased virulence. The comparison of mRNA levels of the rsmA(-) mutant and wild-type using a genome-wide microarray...

  6. Lacking "Lack": A Reply to Joldersma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, James D.

    2007-01-01

    First I would like to thank Clarence Joldersma for his review of our "Poststructuralism, Philosophy, Pedagogy" (Marshall, 2004-PPP). In particular, I would thank him for his opening sentence: "[t]his book is a response to a lack." It is the notion of a lack, noted again later in his review, which I wish to take up mainly in this response. Rather…

  7. Lack of relationship between TIMP-1 tumour cell immunoreactivity, treatment efficacy and prognosis in patients with advanced epithelial ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffensen, Karina Dahl; Waldstrøm, Marianne; Christensen, Rikke Kølby;

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1) is a natural inhibitor of the matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) which are proteolytic enzymes involved in degradation of extracellular matrix thereby favoring tumour cell invasion and metastasis. TIMP-1 activity in tumour tissue may...

  8. Differential regulation of cell proliferation in neurogenic zones in mice lacking cystine transport by xCT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cystine/glutamate exchanger (xCT) supplies intracellular cyst(e)ine for the production of glutathione, a major cellular anti-oxidant. xCT is enriched in brain regions associated with neurogenesis. Previous studies have shown that the malfunction of this protein greatly attenuates cell proliferation in vitro and is associated with brain atrophy in vivo. Using mice that are homozygous for a function-blocking deletion in xCT (Sut mice), we examined in vivo the role of xCT in cell proliferation in neurogenic regions of the subventricular zone (SVZ) and denate gyrus (DG) in the adult brain. Our results indicate that a high level of cellular proliferation in the adult brain persists even in the absence of functional xCT. Furthermore, in both young adult and middle-aged mice (3 and 11 months old), rates of SVZ cell proliferation were comparable between Sut and wild-type controls, although there was trend towards reduced proliferation in Sut mice (12% and 9% reduction, respectively). To our surprise, rates of cell proliferation in the DG were elevated in both 3- and 11-month-old Sut mice relative to controls (22% and 28% increase, respectively). These results demonstrate that xCT expression plays a role in regulating cellular proliferation in the DG, but not the SVZ of adult mice. Furthermore, unlike previous in vitro studies, our in vivo observations clearly indicate that xCT is not essential for ongoing cellular proliferation

  9. Lack of CCR5 on dendritic cells promotes a proinflammatory environment in submandibular glands of the NOD mouse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.E. Wildenberg; C.G. van Helden-Meeuwsen; J.P. van de Merwe (Joop); C. Moreno (Christophe); H.A. Drexhage (Hemmo); M.A. Versnel (Marjan)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractSjögren's syndrome is an autoimmune disease characterized by lymphocytic infiltration of the salivary glands. In the NOD mouse, a model for this disease, the development of lymphocytic infiltrates in the salivary glands is preceded by an accumulation of dendritic cells (DC). Given the ke

  10. Lowering GTP level increases survival of amino acid starvation but slows growth rate for Bacillus subtilis cells lacking (p)ppGpp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittner, Alycia N; Kriel, Allison; Wang, Jue D

    2014-06-01

    Bacterial cells sense external nutrient availability to regulate macromolecular synthesis and consequently their growth. In the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis, the starvation-inducible nucleotide (p)ppGpp negatively regulates GTP levels, both to resist nutritional stress and to maintain GTP homeostasis during growth. Here, we quantitatively investigated the relationship between GTP level, survival of amino acid starvation, and growth rate when GTP synthesis is uncoupled from its major homeostatic regulator, (p)ppGpp. We analyzed growth and nucleotide levels in cells that lack (p)ppGpp and found that their survival of treatment with a nonfunctional amino acid analog negatively correlates with both growth rate and GTP level. Manipulation of GTP levels modulates the exponential growth rate of these cells in a positive dose-dependent manner, such that increasing the GTP level increases growth rate. However, accumulation of GTP levels above a threshold inhibits growth, suggesting a toxic effect. Strikingly, adenine counteracts GTP stress by preventing GTP accumulation in cells lacking (p)ppGpp. Our results emphasize the importance of maintaining appropriate levels of GTP to maximize growth: cells can survive amino acid starvation by decreasing GTP level, which comes at a cost to growth, while (p)ppGpp enables rapid adjustment to nutritional stress by adjusting GTP level, thus maximizing fitness.

  11. Holliday junction-containing DNA structures persist in cells lacking Sgs1 or Top3 following exposure to DNA damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mankouri, Hocine W; Ashton, Thomas M; Hickson, Ian D

    2011-01-01

    The Sgs1-Rmi1-Top3 "dissolvasome" is required for the maintenance of genome stability and has been implicated in the processing of various types of DNA structures arising during DNA replication. Previous investigations have revealed that unprocessed (X-shaped) homologous recombination repair (HRR......) intermediates persist when S-phase is perturbed by using methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells with impaired Sgs1 or Top3. However, the precise nature of these persistent DNA structures remains poorly characterized. Here, we report that ectopic expression of either of two heterologous...... to RusA or GEN1(1-527), demonstrating specificity of these HJ resolvases for MMS-induced X-structures in vivo. These data suggest that the X-structures persisting in cells with impaired Sgs1 or Top3 contain HJs. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Sgs1 directly promotes X-structure removal, because the...

  12. Lack of Protective Osmolytes Limits Final Cell Density and Volumetric Productivity of Ethanologenic Escherichia coli KO11 during Xylose Fermentation†

    OpenAIRE

    Underwood, S. A.; Buszko, M. L.; Shanmugam, K. T.; Ingram, L. O.

    2004-01-01

    Limited cell growth and the resulting low volumetric productivity of ethanologenic Escherichia coli KO11 in mineral salts medium containing xylose have been attributed to inadequate partitioning of carbon skeletons into the synthesis of glutamate and other products derived from the citrate arm of the anaerobic tricarboxylic acid pathway. The results of nuclear magnetic resonance investigations of intracellular osmolytes under different growth conditions coupled with those of studies using gen...

  13. Efficient CRISPR-Cas9-Mediated Generation of Knockin Human Pluripotent Stem Cells Lacking Undesired Mutations at the Targeted Locus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian T. Merkle

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The CRISPR-Cas9 system has the potential to revolutionize genome editing in human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs, but its advantages and pitfalls are still poorly understood. We systematically tested the ability of CRISPR-Cas9 to mediate reporter gene knockin at 16 distinct genomic sites in hPSCs. We observed efficient gene targeting but found that targeted clones carried an unexpectedly high frequency of insertion and deletion (indel mutations at both alleles of the targeted gene. These indels were induced by Cas9 nuclease, as well as Cas9-D10A single or dual nickases, and often disrupted gene function. To overcome this problem, we designed strategies to physically destroy or separate CRISPR target sites at the targeted allele and developed a bioinformatic pipeline to identify and eliminate clones harboring deleterious indels at the other allele. This two-pronged approach enables the reliable generation of knockin hPSC reporter cell lines free of unwanted mutations at the targeted locus.

  14. A form of mitofusin 2 (Mfn2) lacking the transmembrane domains and the COOH-terminal end stimulates metabolism in muscle and liver cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segalés, Jessica; Paz, José C; Hernández-Alvarez, María Isabel; Sala, David; Muñoz, Juan Pablo; Noguera, Eduard; Pich, Sara; Palacín, Manuel; Enríquez, José Antonio; Zorzano, Antonio

    2013-11-15

    Mitofusin 2 (Mfn2), a protein that participates in mitochondrial fusion, is required to maintain normal mitochondrial metabolism in skeletal muscle and liver. Given that muscle Mfn2 is repressed in obese or type 2 diabetic subjects, this protein may have a potential pathophysiological role in these conditions. To evaluate whether the metabolic effects of Mfn2 can be dissociated from its function in mitochondrial dynamics, we studied a form of human Mfn2, lacking the two transmembrane domains and the COOH-terminal coiled coil (ΔMfn2). This form localized in mitochondria but did not alter mitochondrial morphology in cells or in skeletal muscle fibers. The expression of ΔMfn2 in mouse skeletal muscle stimulated glucose oxidation and enhanced respiratory control ratio, which occurred in the absence of changes in mitochondrial mass. ΔMfn2 did not stimulate mitochondrial respiration in Mfn2-deficient muscle cells. The expression of ΔMfn2 in mouse liver or in hepatoma cells stimulated gluconeogenesis. In addition, ΔMfn2 activated basal and maximal respiration both in muscle and liver cells. In all, we show that a form of Mfn2 lacking mitochondrial fusion activity stimulates mitochondrial function and enhances glucose metabolism in muscle and liver tissues. This study suggests that Mfn2 regulates metabolism independently of changes in mitochondrial morphology.

  15. Participation of liver progenitor cells in liver regeneration: lack of evidence in the AAF/PH rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusabineza, Ange-Clarisse; Van Hul, Noémi K; Abarca-Quinones, Jorge; Starkel, Peter; Najimi, Mustapha; Leclercq, Isabelle A

    2012-01-01

    When hepatocyte proliferation is impaired, liver progenitor cells (LPC) are activated to participate in liver regeneration. We used the 2-acetaminofluorene/partial hepatectomy (AAF/PH) model to evaluate the contribution of LPC to liver cell replacement and function restoration. Fischer rats subjected to AAF/PH (or PH alone) were investigated 7, 10 and 14 days post-hepatectomy. Liver mass recovery (LMR) was estimated, and the liver mass to body weight ratio calculated. We used serum albumin and bilirubin levels, and liver albumin mRNA levels to assess the liver function. LPC expansion was analyzed by cytokeratin 19 (CK19), glutathione S-transferase protein (GSTp) immunohistochemistry and by CK19, CD133, transforming growth factor-β1 and hepatocyte growth factor mRNA expression in livers. Cell proliferation was evaluated by Ki67 and BrdU immunostaining. Compared with PH alone where LMR was ∼100% 14 days post-PH, LMR was defective in AAF/PH rats (64.1±15.5%, P=0.0004). LPC expansion was scarce in PH livers (0.5±0.4% of CK19(+) area), but significant in AAF/PH livers (8.5±7.2% of CK19(+)), and inversely correlated to LMR (r(2)=0.63, PPH animals presented liver failure (low serum albumin and high serum bilirubin) 14 days post-PH. Compared with animals with preserved function, this was associated with a lower LMR (50±6.8 vs 74.6±9.4%, P=0.0005), a decreased liver to body weight ratio (2±0.3 vs 3.5±0.6%, P=0.001), and a larger LPC expansion such as proliferating Ki67(+) LPC covered 17.4±4.2% of the liver parenchyma vs 3.1±1.5%, (Plivers with preserved function. These observations suggest that, in this model, the efficient recovery of the liver function was ensured rather by the proliferation of mature hepatocytes than by the LPC expansion and differentiation into hepatocytes.

  16. Lack of topoisomerase copy number changes in patients with de novo and relapsed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mette Ø; Poulsen, Tim S; Gang, Anne O;

    2015-01-01

    Topoisomerase (TOP) gene copy number changes may predict response to treatment with TOP-targeting drugs in cancer treatment. This was first described in patients with breast cancer and is currently being investigated in other malignant diseases. TOP-targeting drugs may induce TOP gene copy number...... changes at relapse, with possible implications for relapse therapy efficacy. TOP gene alterations in lymphoma are poorly investigated. In this study, TOP1 and TOP2A gene alterations were investigated in patients with de novo diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) (n = 33) and relapsed DLBCL treated...... with chemotherapy regimens including TOP2-targeting drugs (n = 16). No TOP1 or TOP2A copy number changes were found. Polysomy of chromosomes 20 and 17 was seen in 3 of 25 patients (12%) and 2 of 32 patients (6%) with de novo DLBCL. Among relapsed patients, chromosome polysomy was more frequently observed in 5 of 13...

  17. Yeast cells lacking all known ceramide synthases continue to make complex sphingolipids and to incorporate ceramides into glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vionnet, Christine; Roubaty, Carole; Ejsing, Christer S.;

    2010-01-01

    In yeast, the inositolphosphorylceramides mostly contain C26:0 fatty acids. Inositolphosphorylceramides were considered to be important for viability, since the inositolphosphorylceramide synthase AUR1 is essential. Yet, lcb1 cells, unable to make sphingoid bases and inositolphosphorylceramides, ......, are viable if they harbor SLC1-1, a gain of function mutation in the 1-acyl-glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase SLC1. SLC1-1 allows to incorporate C26:0 fatty acids into phosphatidylinositol (PI), thus generating PIii, an abnormal, C26-containing PI, presumably acting as surrogate...... genetic backgrounds but to still make some abnormal uncharacterized inositol-containing sphingolipids. Indeed, we find that 4 quadruple mutants make substantial amounts of unphysiological inositolphosphorylphytosphingosines but that they also still make small amounts of normal inositolphosphorylceramides...

  18. Lack of topoisomerase copy number changes in patients with de novo and relapsed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Mette Ø; Poulsen, Tim S; Gang, Anne O; Knudsen, Helle; Lauritzen, Anne F; Pedersen, Michael; Nielsen, Signe L; Brown, Peter; Høgdall, Estrid; Nørgaard, Peter

    2015-07-01

    Topoisomerase (TOP) gene copy number changes may predict response to treatment with TOP-targeting drugs in cancer treatment. This was first described in patients with breast cancer and is currently being investigated in other malignant diseases. TOP-targeting drugs may induce TOP gene copy number changes at relapse, with possible implications for relapse therapy efficacy. TOP gene alterations in lymphoma are poorly investigated. In this study, TOP1 and TOP2A gene alterations were investigated in patients with de novo diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) (n = 33) and relapsed DLBCL treated with chemotherapy regimens including TOP2-targeting drugs (n = 16). No TOP1 or TOP2A copy number changes were found. Polysomy of chromosomes 20 and 17 was seen in 3 of 25 patients (12%) and 2 of 32 patients (6%) with de novo DLBCL. Among relapsed patients, chromosome polysomy was more frequently observed in 5 of 13 patients (38%) and 4 of 16 patients (25%) harboring chromosome 20 and 17 polysomy, respectively; however, these differences only tended to be significant (p = 0.09 and p = 0.09, respectively). The results suggest that TOP gene copy number changes are very infrequent in DLBCL and not likely induced by TOP2-targeting drugs. Increased polyploidy of chromosomes 17 and 20 among patients with relapsed DLBCL may reflect genetic compensation in the tumor cells after TOP2 inhibition, but is more likely due to the increased genetic instability often seen in progressed cancers. Therefore, it is unlikely that TOP1 and TOP2A gene alterations can be used as predictive markers for response to treatment with TOP2-targeting drugs in patients with DLBCL.

  19. CD8 T-cells from most HIV-infected patients lack ex vivo HIV-suppressive capacity during acute and early infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camille Lécuroux

    Full Text Available The strong CD8+ T-cell-mediated HIV-1-suppressive capacity found in a minority of HIV-infected patients in chronic infection is associated with spontaneous control of viremia. However, it is still unclear whether such capacities were also present earlier in the CD8+ T cells from non controller patients and then lost as a consequence of uncontrolled viral replication. We studied 50 patients with primary HIV-1-infection to determine whether strong CD8+ T-cell-mediated HIV suppression is more often observed at that time. Despite high frequencies of polyfunctional HIV-specific CD8+ T-cells and a strong CD4+ T-helper response, CD8+ T-cells from 48 patients lacked strong HIV-suppressive capacities ex vivo. This indicates that the superior HIV-suppressive capacity of CD8+ T-cells from HIV controllers is not a general characteristic of the HIV-specific CD8+ T cell response in primary HIV infection.

  20. Lack of effect of cell-wall targeted antibacterials on biofilm formation and antifungal susceptibility of Candidaspecies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisela Myrian de Lima Leite

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of central venous catheters (CVC and broad-spectrum antibacterials are among the main risk factors for the development of candidemia in patients admitted to intensive care units (ICU. It is known that some antibacterials increase the resistance of these yeasts to azole antifungals. Thus, the aim of this research was to determine whether yeast present in CVC colonizations previously exposed to cell-wall targeted antibacterials benefit from a reduction in susceptibility to fluconazole and voriconazole, facilitating their ability to form biofilms. Candida albicans, C. tropicalis, C. glabrata, C. parapsilosis and C. guilhermondii were seeded into antibacterial (cefepime, meropenem, vancomycin, and piperacillin-tazobactam gradient plates produced in Mueller-Hinton Agar. The susceptibility to fluconazole and voriconazole and the biofilm formation of the yeasts were tested before and after exposure to the antibacterials. None of the antibacterials exerted a significant effect on the in vitro susceptibility of the yeasts to the antifungal agents or on their ability to form biofilms. These results suggest that increased candidemia in ICU patients is not attributable to possible alterations in the yeasts, but is more likely caused by a weakening of the patient's general condition after long exposure to infection.

  1. Relationship between osteosarcoma and ionizing radiation hypersensitive human B lymphocyte cells lacking RecQL4 helicase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Japanese society is now facing a transition period from aging society to super aging society. Concomitant with this situation, it is estimated that number of cancer patients and the requirement of less invasive Radiation Therapy (RT) for cancers will increase. Therefore, understanding of mechanisms without delay on second cancers caused by RT is indispensable. Osteosarcoma, an aggressive bone tumor frequently occurring 5% of cancers in young adult and children, increase statistically after RT for cancers. Although, mutation in p53, Rb and RecQL4 genes statistically relate with osteosarcoma incidence, precise mechanisms of osteosarcoma development by ionizing Radiation (IR) remain to be elucidated. Genome instability is one of the tumor promoting factors and we focused on RecQL4 in RecQ helicase family, which is involved in aging and cancer. We established RecQL4 knock-in human B lymphocyte Nalm-6 cells and found their hypersensitivity to IR, replication fork stall/collapses after IR. In this review, we summarize recently published studies on genetic cancer-predisposing syndrome and possible origins of bone cancers induced by IR. Then, we discuss what and how we address molecular mechanisms on osteosarcoma induced by IR in the future. (author)

  2. Evidence that in xeroderma pigmentosum variant cells, which lack DNA polymerase eta, DNA polymerase iota causes the very high frequency and unique spectrum of UV-induced mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yun; Woodgate, Roger; McManus, Terrence P; Mead, Samantha; McCormick, J Justin; Maher, Veronica M

    2007-04-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum variant (XPV) patients have normal DNA excision repair, yet are predisposed to develop sunlight-induced cancer. They exhibit a 25-fold higher than normal frequency of UV-induced mutations and very unusual kinds (spectrum), mainly transversions. The primary defect in XPV cells is the lack of functional DNA polymerase (Pol) eta, the translesion synthesis DNA polymerase that readily inserts adenine nucleotides opposite photoproducts involving thymine. The high frequency and striking difference in kinds of UV-induced mutations in XPV cells strongly suggest that, in the absence of Pol eta, an abnormally error-prone polymerase substitutes. In vitro replication studies of Pol iota show that it replicates past 5'T-T3' and 5'T-U3' cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers, incorporating G or T nucleotides opposite the 3' nucleotide. To test the hypothesis that Pol iota causes the high frequency and abnormal spectrum of UV-induced mutations in XPV cells, we identified an unlimited lifespan XPV cell line expressing two forms of Pol iota, whose frequency of UV-induced mutations is twice that of XPV cells expressing one form. We eliminated expression of one form and compared the parental cells and derivatives for the frequency and kinds of UV-induced mutations. All exhibited similar sensitivity to the cytotoxicity of UV((254 nm)), and the kinds of mutations induced were identical, but the frequency of mutations induced in the derivatives was reduced to UV-induced mutations, and ultimately their malignant transformation.

  3. Role of Phospholipase C-L2, a Novel Phospholipase C-Like Protein That Lacks Lipase Activity, in B-Cell Receptor Signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Takenaka, Kei; Fukami, Kiyoko; Otsuki, Makiko; Nakamura, Yoshikazu; Kataoka, Yuki; Wada, Mika; Tsuji, Kohichiro; Nishikawa, Shin-ichi; Yoshida, Nobuaki; Takenawa, Tadaomi

    2003-01-01

    Phospholipase C (PLC) plays important roles in phosphoinositide turnover by regulating the calcium-protein kinase C signaling pathway. PLC-L2 is a novel PLC-like protein which lacks PLC activity, although it is very homologous with PLC δ. PLC-L2 is expressed in hematopoietic cells, but its physiological roles and intracellular functions in the immune system have not yet been clarified. To elucidate the physiological function of PLC-L2, we generated mice which had a genetic PLC-L2 deficiency. ...

  4. Murine bone marrow Lin⁻Sca⁻1⁺CD45⁻ very small embryonic-like (VSEL cells are heterogeneous population lacking Oct-4A expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Szade

    Full Text Available Murine very small embryonic-like (VSEL cells, defined by the Lin(-Sca-1(+CD45(- phenotype and small size, were described as pluripotent cells and proposed to be the most primitive hematopoietic precursors in adult bone marrow. Although their isolation and potential application rely entirely on flow cytometry, the immunophenotype of VSELs has not been extensively characterized. Our aim was to analyze the possible heterogeneity of Lin(-Sca(+CD45(- population and investigate the extent to which VSELs characteristics may overlap with that of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs or endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs. The study evidenced that murine Lin(-Sca-1(+CD45(- population was heterogeneous in terms of c-Kit and KDR expression. Accordingly, the c-Kit(+KDR(-, c-Kit(-KDR(+, and c-Kit(-KDR(- subpopulations could be distinguished, while c-Kit(+KDR(+ events were very rare. The c-Kit(+KDR(- subset contained almost solely small cells, meeting the size criterion of VSELs, in contrast to relatively bigger c-Kit(-KDR(+ cells. The c-Kit(-KDR(-FSC(low subset was highly enriched in Annexin V-positive, apoptotic cells, hence omitted from further analysis. Importantly, using qRT-PCR, we evidenced lack of Oct-4A and Oct-4B mRNA expression either in whole adult murine bone marrow or in the sorted of Lin(-Sca-1(+CD45(-FSC(low population, even by single-cell qRT-PCR. We also found that the Lin(-Sca-1(+CD45(-c-Kit(+ subset did not exhibit hematopoietic potential in a single cell-derived colony in vitro assay, although it comprised the Sca-1(+c-Kit(+Lin(- (SKL CD34(-CD45(-CD105(+ cells, expressing particular HSC markers. Co-culture of Lin(-Sca-1(+CD45(-FSC(low with OP9 cells did not induce hematopoietic potential. Further investigation revealed that SKL CD45(-CD105(+ subset consisted of early apoptotic cells with fragmented chromatin, and could be contaminated with nuclei expelled from erythroblasts. Concluding, murine bone marrow Lin(-Sca-1(+CD45(-FSC(low cells are

  5. Expansion of CD8+ T cells lacking Sema4D/CD100 during HIV-1 infection identifies a subset of T cells with decreased functional capacity

    OpenAIRE

    Eriksson, Emily M.; Milush, Jeffrey M.; Ho, Emily L.; Batista, Mariana D.; Holditch, Sara J.; Keh, Chris E.; Norris, Philip J.; Keating, Sheila M.; Deeks, Steven G; Hunt, Peter W.; Martin, Jeffrey N.; Rosenberg, Michael G.; Hecht, Frederick M.; Nixon, Douglas F.

    2012-01-01

    Sema4D, also known as CD100, is a constitutively expressed immune semaphorin on T cells and NK cells. CD100 has important immune regulatory functions that improve antigen-specific priming by antigen-presenting cells, and can also act as a costimulatory molecule on T cells. We investigated the consequence of HIV-1 infection on CD100 expression by T cells, and whether CD100 expression signifies functionally competent effector cells. CD100 expression on T cells from healthy individuals was compa...

  6. Human haematopoietic stem cells express Oct4 pseudogenes and lack the ability to initiate Oct4 promoter-driven gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strain Alastair J

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The transcription factor Oct4 is well defined as a key regulator of embryonic stem (ES cell pluripotency. In recent years, the role of Oct4 has purportedly extended to the self renewal and maintenance of multipotency in adult stem cell (ASC populations. This profile has arisen mainly from reports utilising reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR based methodologies and has since come under scrutiny following the discovery that many developmental genes have multiple pseudogenes associated with them. Six known pseudogenes exist for Oct4, all of which exhibit very high sequence homology (three >97%, and for this reason the generation of artefacts may have contributed to false identification of Oct4 in somatic cell populations. While ASC lack a molecular blueprint of transcription factors proposed to be involved with 'stemness' as described for ES cells, it is not unreasonable to assume that similar gene patterns may exist. The focus of this work was to corroborate reports that Oct4 is involved in the regulation of ASC self-renewal and differentiation, using a combination of methodologies to rule out pseudogene interference. Haematopoietic stem cells (HSC derived from human umbilical cord blood (UCB and various differentiated cell lines underwent RT-PCR, product sequencing and transfection studies using an Oct4 promoter-driven reporter. In summary, only the positive control expressed Oct4, with all other cell types expressing a variety of Oct4 pseudogenes. Somatic cells were incapable of utilising an exogenous Oct4 promoter construct, leading to the conclusion that Oct4 does not appear involved in the multipotency of human HSC from UCB.

  7. Inability to induce consistent T-cell responses recognizing conserved regions within HIIV-1 antigens: a potential mechanism for lack of vaccine efficacy in the step study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korber, Bette [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Szinger, James [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    T cell based vaccines are based upon the induction of CD8+ T cell memory responses that would be effective in inhibiting infection and subsequent replication of an infecting HIV-1 strain, a process that requires a high probability of matching the epitope induced by vaccination with the infecting viral strain. We compared the frequency and specificity of the CTL epitopes elicited by the replication defective AdS gag/pol/nef vaccine used in the STEP trial with the likelihood of encountering those epitopes among recently sequenced Clade B isolates of HIV-1. On average vaccination elicited only one epitope per gene. Importantly, the highly conserved epitopes in gag, pol, and nef (> 80% of strains in the current collection of the Los Alamos database [www.hiv.lanl.gov]) were rarely elicited by vaccination. Moreover there was a statistically significant skewing of the T cell response to relative variable epitopes of each gene; only 20% of persons possessed > 3 T cell responses to epitopes likely to be found in circulating strains in the CladeB populations in which the Step trial was conducted. This inability to elicit T cell responses likely to be found in circulating viral strains is a likely factor in the lack of efficacy of the vaccine utilized in the STEP trial. Modeling of the epitope specific responses elicited by vaccination, we project that a median of 8-10 CD8+ T cell epitopes are required to provide >80% likelihood of eliciting at least 3 CD8+ T cell epitopes that would be found on a circulating population of viruses. Development of vaccine regimens which elicit either a greater breadth of responses or elicit responses to conserved regions of the HIV-1 genome are needed to fully evaluate the concept of whether induction of T cell immunity can alter HIV-1 in vivo.

  8. A deimmunised form of the ribotoxin, α-sarcin, lacking CD4+ T cell epitopes and its use as an immunotoxin warhead

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Tim D.; Hearn, Arron R.; Holgate, Robert G.E.; Kozub, Dorota; Fogg, Mark H.; Carr, Francis J.; Baker, Matthew P.; Lacadena, Javier; Gehlsen, Kurt R.

    2016-01-01

    Fungal ribotoxins that block protein synthesis can be useful warheads in the context of a targeted immunotoxin. α-Sarcin is a small (17 kDa) fungal ribonuclease produced by Aspergillus giganteus that functions by catalytically cleaving a single phosphodiester bond in the sarcin–ricin loop of the large ribosomal subunit, thus making the ribosome unrecognisable to elongation factors and leading to inhibition of protein synthesis. Peptide mapping using an ex vivo human T cell assay determined that α-sarcin contained two T cell epitopes; one in the N-terminal 20 amino acids and the other in the C-terminal 20 amino acids. Various mutations were tested individually within each epitope and then in combination to isolate deimmunised α-sarcin variants that had the desired properties of silencing T cell epitopes and retention of the ability to inhibit protein synthesis (equivalent to wild-type, WT α-sarcin). A deimmunised variant (D9T/Q142T) demonstrated a complete lack of T cell activation in in vitro whole protein human T cell assays using peripheral blood mononuclear cells from donors with diverse HLA allotypes. Generation of an immunotoxin by fusion of the D9T/Q142T variant to a single-chain Fv targeting Her2 demonstrated potent cell killing equivalent to a fusion protein comprising the WT α-sarcin. These results represent the first fungal ribotoxin to be deimmunised with the potential to construct a new generation of deimmunised immunotoxin therapeutics. PMID:27578884

  9. Synergistic inhibition of the APC/C by the removal of APC15 in HCT116 cells lacking UBE2C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvanska, Dimitriya H.; Larsen, Marie Sofie Yoo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) inhibits the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) in response to unattached kinetochores by generating a diffusible inhibitor termed the mitotic checkpoint complex (MCC). At metaphase, rapid activation of the APC/C requires removal of the MCC, a process that has been shown to depend on the APC/C E2 enzymes, UBE2C and UBE2S. Here we investigate the in vivo role of the APC/C E2 enzymes in SAC silencing using CRISPR/Cas9 genetically engineered HCT116 UBE2C or UBE2S null cell lines. Using live cell assays, we show that UBE2C and UBE2S make a minor contribution to SAC silencing in HCT116 cells. Strikingly, in cells specifically lacking UBE2C, we observe a strong synergistic inhibition of mitotic progression when we stabilize the MCC on the APC/C by depleting APC15, potentially reflecting increased competition between the MCC and the remaining initiating E2 enzyme UBE2D. In conclusion, we provide in vivo insight into the APC/C E2 module and its interplay with SAC silencing components. PMID:27591192

  10. Lack of Suppressive CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ T Cells in Advanced Stages of Primary Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma

    OpenAIRE

    Tiemessen, Machteld M.; Mitchell, Tracey J.; Hendry, Lisa; Whittaker, Sean J; Taams, Leonie S.; John, Susan

    2006-01-01

    Mycosis fungoides and its leukemic variant, Sezary syndrome, are the most common primary cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCLs). In an ex vivo study, we investigated the percentage, phenotype, and suppressive function of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) from peripheral blood of CTCL patients. The percentage of Tregs did not differ significantly between patients and controls. Functional assays demonstrated a dichotomy in Treg function: in four out of 10 patients CD4+CD25+ T cells were incapabl...

  11. Misunderstood or lacking legitimacy?

    OpenAIRE

    Cohen, G.; Sims, D

    2007-01-01

    In spite of the rising interest in marketing within professional service firms in the last twenty years, past research has identified a reluctant acceptance and application of marketing within these organisations. The present paper will debate whether this is due to lack of understanding of the role of marketing, lack of acceptance as a valid management discipline suitable for professional services or lack of legitimacy as a profession in its own right. A brief overview of the role of marketi...

  12. Defining origins of malignant B cells: a new circulating normal human IgM(+)D(+) B-cell subset lacking CD27 expression and displaying somatically mutated IGHV genes as a relevant memory population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weston-Bell, N; Townsend, M; Di Genova, G; Forconi, F; Sahota, S S

    2009-11-01

    In probing the cell of origin in malignant B cells, an imprint of somatic hypermutation (SHM) in immunoglobulin (Ig) variable (V) region genes delineates antigen encounter, and identifying the precise pathway generating SHM in the normal B-cell counterpart becomes relevant. SHM remains the definitive memory imprint in normal human B cells, but CD27 expression also delineates memory. Recently, dye extrusion adenosine triphosphate-binding transporter assays identified circulating isotype-switched memory B cells that lacked CD27, yet exhibited low levels of SHM. To extend findings, we report a pre-switched CD27(-ve) circulating memory B-cell population in normal blood using comparable assays, and isolated CD19(+)IgM(+)D(+)CD27(-ve) cells (>99% purity) for the analysis of IGHV5/IGHV3-IGHM transcripts. Of these (n=334), approximately 78% were germ line and naive B cell derived. Strikingly, 21.9% of the transcripts were mutated. They showed 3-5 mutations (13.5% of sequences) and >5 mutations (8.4% of sequences) per transcript. Accrual of mutations in a subset of CD19(+)IgM(+)D(+)CD27(-ve) cells define a new circulating pre-switched memory B-cell pool, present in substantial numbers in the population harboring naive B cells. These CD19(+)IgM(+)D(+)CD27(-ve) memory B cells may have a distinct lineage and function, and seem relevant to understanding origins of malignant B cells, in particular those of hairy cell leukemia cells, which display mutated V genes yet lack CD27 expression. PMID:19776762

  13. Verrucous carcinomas of the head and neck, including those with associated squamous cell carcinoma, lack transcriptionally active high-risk human papillomavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Kalyani R; Chernock, Rebecca D; Zhang, Tian R; Wang, Xiaowei; El-Mofty, Samir K; Lewis, James S

    2013-11-01

    Most oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) and histologic variants harbor transcriptionally active human papillomavirus (HPV). While HPV DNA can be found in many non-oropharyngeal head and neck carcinomas, transcriptionally active HPV is rare. Verrucous carcinoma is a variant with bland cytology, warty appearance, locally destructive growth, and lack of metastasis when lacking a frankly invasive carcinoma component. Studies have shown variable rates of HPV DNA and p16 protein expression in such tumors but still have not clearly addressed if the virus has biological activity or clinical relevance in the positive cases. Department files were searched for verrucous neoplasms, including pure verrucous carcinoma, verrucous carcinoma with dysplasia or minimal invasion, and SCC arising in verrucous carcinoma (ie, having a major component of frankly invasive carcinoma). p16 immunohistochemistry, HPV DNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and E6/E7 mRNA reverse transcription PCR for high-risk HPV types were performed. Of the 49 cases, 6 (12.2%) showed strong (>50%) staining for p16. HPV DNA was detected in 7/49 (14.3%) cases, but only one case was positive for both p16, and HPV DNA. A total of 36 cases yielded sufficient RNA for RT-PCR (18 verrucous carcinomas, 13 atypical verrucous carcinomas, and 5 SCC arising in verrucous carcinoma). All 36 were negative, including the four p16-positive and three HPV DNA-positive tumors tested. Although a minority of verrucous carcinoma lesions are p16 and HPV DNA positive, transcriptionally active high-risk HPV is uniformly absent. These findings argue that verrucous carcinoma and its related squamous cell carcinomas are not HPV-driven tumors.

  14. GTP dysregulation in Bacillus subtilis cells lacking (p)ppGpp results in phenotypic amino acid auxotrophy and failure to adapt to nutrient downshift and regulate biosynthesis genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriel, Allison; Brinsmade, Shaun R; Tse, Jessica L; Tehranchi, Ashley K; Bittner, Alycia N; Sonenshein, Abraham L; Wang, Jue D

    2014-01-01

    The nucleotide (p)ppGpp inhibits GTP biosynthesis in the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis. Here we examined how this regulation allows cells to grow in the absence of amino acids. We showed that B. subtilis cells lacking (p)ppGpp, due to either deletions or point mutations in all three (p)ppGpp synthetase genes, yjbM, ywaC, and relA, strongly require supplementation of leucine, isoleucine, valine, methionine, and threonine and modestly require three additional amino acids. This polyauxotrophy is rescued by reducing GTP levels. Reduction of GTP levels activates transcription of genes responsible for the biosynthesis of the five strongly required amino acids by inactivating the transcription factor CodY, which represses the ybgE, ilvD, ilvBHC-leuABCD, ilvA, ywaA, and hom-thrCB operons, and by a CodY-independent activation of transcription of the ilvA, ywaA, hom-thrCB, and metE operons. Interestingly, providing the eight required amino acids does not allow for colony formation of (p)ppGpp(0) cells when transitioning from amino acid-replete medium to amino acid-limiting medium, and we found that this is due to an additional role that (p)ppGpp plays in protecting cells during nutrient downshifts. We conclude that (p)ppGpp allows adaptation to amino acid limitation by a combined effect of preventing death during metabolic transitions and sustaining growth by activating amino acid biosynthesis. This ability of (p)ppGpp to integrate a general stress response with a targeted reprogramming of gene regulation allows appropriate adaptation and is likely conserved among diverse bacteria.

  15. Alloactivated HLA class II-positive T-cell lines induce IL-2 reactivity but lack accessory cell function in mixed leukocyte culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odum, N; Dickmeiss, E; Hofmann, B;

    1989-01-01

    ). From 70 to 90% of the Ta were HLA class II-positive as judged by the reactions with HLA class II-reactive monoclonal antibodies, and the Ta carried the DR allospecificities of the original T-cell donor when typed in the microcytotoxic test using DR-specific alloantisera. Neither irradiated nor...... in the primary mixed leukocyte reaction (median counts per minute (cpm) 5.5 x 10(3] was significantly lower than that of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (cpm: 44.0 x 10(3]. The stimulation by Ta was almost only seen when the Ta were specifically directed against the class II antigens of the responder...... peripheral blood mononuclear cells (i.e., in combinations with "backstimulation") (median cpm: 21,000). In mixed leukocyte reaction combinations without backstimulation, significantly weaker reactions were seen (median cpm: 1,000). This observation may explain previous controversies concerning...

  16. Lack of cross-resistance to fostriecin in a human small-cell lung carcinoma cell line showing topoisomerase II-related drug resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Steven; Zijlstra, J G; Mulder, Nanno; de Vries, Liesbeth

    1991-01-01

    Cells exhibiting decreased topoisomerase II (Topo II) activity are resistant to several drugs that require Topo II as an intermediate. These drugs are cytotoxic due to the formation of a cleavable complex between the drug, Topo II and DNA. Fostriecin belongs to a new class of drugs that inhibit Topo

  17. Alkylation base damage is converted into repairable double-strand breaks and complex intermediates in G2 cells lacking AP endonuclease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjian Ma

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs are potent sources of genome instability. While there is considerable genetic and molecular information about the disposition of direct DSBs and breaks that arise during replication, relatively little is known about DSBs derived during processing of single-strand lesions, especially for the case of single-strand breaks (SSBs with 3'-blocked termini generated in vivo. Using our recently developed assay for detecting end-processing at random DSBs in budding yeast, we show that single-strand lesions produced by the alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS can generate DSBs in G2-arrested cells, i.e., S-phase independent. These derived DSBs were observed in apn1/2 endonuclease mutants and resulted from aborted base excision repair leading to 3' blocked single-strand breaks following the creation of abasic (AP sites. DSB formation was reduced by additional mutations that affect processing of AP sites including ntg1, ntg2, and, unexpectedly, ogg1, or by a lack of AP sites due to deletion of the MAG1 glycosylase gene. Similar to direct DSBs, the derived DSBs were subject to MRX (Mre11, Rad50, Xrs2-determined resection and relied upon the recombinational repair genes RAD51, RAD52, as well as on the MCD1 cohesin gene, for repair. In addition, we identified a novel DNA intermediate, detected as slow-moving chromosomal DNA (SMD in pulsed field electrophoresis gels shortly after MMS exposure in apn1/2 cells. The SMD requires nicked AP sites, but is independent of resection/recombination processes, suggesting that it is a novel structure generated during processing of 3'-blocked SSBs. Collectively, this study provides new insights into the potential consequences of alkylation base damage in vivo, including creation of novel structures as well as generation and repair of DSBs in nonreplicating cells.

  18. Excellent outcomes and lack of prognostic impact of cell of origin for localized diffuse large B-cell lymphoma in the rituximab era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anita; Lunning, Matthew A; Zhang, Zhigang; Migliacci, Jocelyn C; Moskowitz, Craig H; Zelenetz, Andrew D

    2015-12-01

    Therapeutic options for limited-stage diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) include short- or full-course R-CHOP (rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, prednisolone) ± radiotherapy. The optimal treatment remains unclear. The prognostic value of cell-of-origin (COO) in early stage DLBCL is unknown. Patients with limited-stage DLBCL (stage I or stage II, non-bulky) treated with R-CHOP ± involved field radiotherapy (IFRT) from 1999 to 2012 were included. COO by the Hans algorithm was analysed in a subset of patients. Of 261 patients, 30% were stage I (N = 82), 37% stage IE (N = 96), IIE (N = 37). The stage-modified International Prognostic Index stratified patients into prognostically relevant groups. There was no significant difference in progression-free survival (PFS) or overall survival (OS) for patients in the germinal centre B-cell-like (GCB; n = 65) and non-GCB cohorts (n = 22). Seventeen patients received R-CHOP × 3-4 cycles (Arm A), 147 received R-CHOP × 3-4 cycles + IFRT (Arm B), 48 received R-CHOP × 6 cycles (Arm C), and 50 received R-CHOP × 6 cycles + IFRT (Arm D). The outcomes were excellent, with 5-year PFS of 82% and 5-year OS of 93%, and were similar across the 4 treatment groups. In the rituximab era, outcomes for limited-stage DLBCL, regardless of treatment approach, were excellent. Baseline COO was not a significant prognostic factor in patients treated with short-course R-CHOP + IFRT. PMID:26456939

  19. Mutations reducing replication from R-loops suppress the defects of growth, chromosome segregation and DNA supercoiling in cells lacking topoisomerase I and RNase HI activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usongo, Valentine; Martel, Makisha; Balleydier, Aurélien; Drolet, Marc

    2016-04-01

    R-loop formation occurs when the nascent RNA hybridizes with the template DNA strand behind the RNA polymerase. R-loops affect a wide range of cellular processes and their use as origins of replication was the first function attributed to them. In Escherichia coli, R-loop formation is promoted by the ATP-dependent negative supercoiling activity of gyrase (gyrA and gyrB) and is inhibited by topoisomerase (topo) I (topA) relaxing transcription-induced negative supercoiling. RNase HI (rnhA) degrades the RNA moiety of R-loops. The depletion of RNase HI activity in topA null mutants was previously shown to lead to extensive DNA relaxation, due to DNA gyrase inhibition, and to severe growth and chromosome segregation defects that were partially corrected by overproducing topo III (topB). Here, DNA gyrase assays in crude cell extracts showed that the ATP-dependent activity (supercoiling) of gyrase but not its ATP-independent activity (relaxation) was inhibited in topA null cells lacking RNase HI. To characterize the cellular event(s) triggered by the absence of RNase HI, we performed a genetic screen for suppressors of the growth defect of topA rnhA null cells. Suppressors affecting genes in replication (holC2::aph and dnaT18::aph) nucleotide metabolism (dcd49::aph), RNA degradation (rne59::aph) and fimbriae synthesis (fimD22::aph) were found to reduce replication from R-loops and to restore supercoiling, thus pointing to a correlation between R-loop-dependent replication in topA rnhA mutants and the inhibition of gyrase activity and growth. Interestingly, the position of fimD on the E. coli chromosome corresponds to the site of one of the five main putative origins of replication from R-loops in rnhA null cells recently identified by next-generation sequencing, thus suggesting that the fimD22::aph mutation inactivated one of these origins. Furthermore, we show that topo III overproduction is unable to complement the growth defect of topA rnhA null mutants at low

  20. Staphylococcus aureus mutants lacking cell wall-bound protein A found in isolates from bacteraemia, MRSA infection and a healthy nasal carrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørum, Marit; Sangvik, Maria; Stegger, Marc; Olsen, Renate S; Johannessen, Mona; Skov, Robert; Sollid, Johanna U E

    2013-02-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen and a multitude of virulence factors enables it to cause infections, from superficial lesions to life-threatening systemic conditions. Staphylococcal protein A (SpA) is a surface protein contributing to S. aureus pathogenesis by interfering with immune responses and activating inflammation. Seven isolates with frameshift mutations in the spa repeat region were investigated to determine whether these mutations lead to truncation and secretion of SpA into the extracellular environment. Five isolates originated from blood cultures, one from an MRSA infection and one from a persistent nasal carrier. Full-length spa genes from the seven isolates were sequenced, and Western blot experiments were performed to localize SpA. Three isolates had identical deviating 25-bp spa repeats, but all isolates displayed different repeat successions. The DNA sequence revealed that the frameshift mutations created premature stop codons in all seven isolates, resulting in truncated SpA of different lengths, however, all lacking the XC region with the C-terminal sorting signal. SpA was detected by Western blot in six of the seven isolates, mainly extracellularly. Our findings demonstrate that S. aureus isolates with truncated SpA, not anchored to the cell wall, can still be found in bacteraemia, infection and among carriers.

  1. Interactions of Escherichia coli strains of non-EPEC serogroups that carry eae and lack the EAF and stx gene sequences with undifferentiated and differentiated intestinal human Caco-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, A C; Vieira, M A; Tibana, A; Gomes, T A; Andrade, J R

    2001-06-12

    Escherichia coli strains of non-EPEC serotypes that carry eae and lack the EAF and the Shiga toxin (stx) gene sequences have been found in acute diarrhea. Both the cell association and the cell entry of these strains in human intestinal epithelial cells were studied as a function of cell differentiation and polarization. The eae+/EAF-/stx- non-EPEC E. coli strains invaded undifferentiated Caco-2 cells more efficiently than differentiated cells. In contrast, prototype EPEC strain E2348/69 did not show significative differences from invasion rates of undifferentiated and differentiated cells. The uptake of these strains was greatly enhanced by pretreatment of differentiated Caco-2 cells with EGTA. These results suggest that the eae+/EAF-/stx- non-EPEC E. coli invasion of intestinal cells may be dependent on receptors expressed on the surface of undifferentiated cells and the basolateral pole of differentiated cells.

  2. Genome Sequence of a Clinical Strain of Acinetobacter baumannii Belonging to the ST79/PFGE-HUI-1 Clone Lacking the AdeABC (Resistance-Nodulation-Cell Division-Type) Efflux Pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, M; Álvarez-Fraga, L; Gato, E; Blasco, L; Poza, M; Fernández-García, L; Bou, G; Tomás, M

    2016-01-01

    Increased expression of chromosomal genes for resistance-nodulation-cell division-type efflux systems plays a major role in the multidrug resistance of Acinetobacter baumannii Little is known about the genetic characteristics of clinical strains of Acinetobacter baumannii lacking the AdeABC pump. In this study, we sequenced the genome of clinical strain Ab421 GEIH-2010 (belonging to clone ST79/PFGE-HUI-1 from the GEIH-REIPI Ab. 2010 project) which lacks this efflux pump. PMID:27609928

  3. Energy brands lack vitality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The three Dutch energy companies (Nuon, Essent and Eneco Energie) have relatively little brand strength. The brands are not perceived to be sufficiently different from one another and are not valued by consumers. With liberalisation imminent, this is hardly a strong starting point. How can you win over consumers if it is not clear what is on offer? In the business market, decision-makers are better placed to distinguish between brands. However, the brands lack vitality in this sector of the market too. The only consolation is that the situation is by no means exclusive to the Netherlands

  4. Effects of T cell depletion in radiation bone marrow chimeras. I. Evidence for a donor cell population which increases allogeneic chimerism but which lacks the potential to produce GVHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The opposing problems of graft-vs-host disease (GVHD) and failure of alloengraftment present major obstacles to the application of bone marrow transplantation (BMT) across complete MHC barriers. The addition of syngeneic T-cell-depleted (TCD) bone marrow (BM) to untreated fully allogeneic marrow inocula in lethally irradiated mice has been previously shown to provide protection from GVHD. We have used this model to study the effects of allogeneic T cells on levels of chimerism in recipients of mixed marrow inocula. The results indicate that T cells in allogeneic BM inocula eliminate both coadministered recipient-strain and radioresistant host hematopoietic elements to produce complete allogeneic chimerism without clinical GVHD. To determine the role of GVH reactivity in this phenomenon, we performed similar studies in an F1 into parent combination, in which the genetic potential for GVHD is lacking. The presence of T cells in F1 marrow inocula led to predominant repopulation with F1 lymphocytes in such chimeras, even when coadministered with TCD-recipient-strain BM. These results imply that the ability of allogeneic BM cells removed by T cell depletion to increase levels of allochimerism may be mediated by a population which is distinct from that which produces GVHD. These results may have implications for clinical BM transplantation

  5. Lack of Orientation and Direction Selectivity in a Subgroup of Fast-Spiking Inhibitory Interneurons: Cellular and Synaptic Mechanisms and Comparison with Other Electrophysiological Cell Types

    OpenAIRE

    Lionel G Nowak; Maria V. Sanchez-Vives; McCormick, David A.

    2007-01-01

    Neurons in cat area 17 can be grouped in 4 different electrophysiological cell classes (regular spiking, intrinsically bursting, chattering, and fast spiking [FS]). However, little is known of the functional properties of these different cell classes. Here we compared orientation and direction selectivity between these cell classes in cat area 17 and found that a subset of FS inhibitory neurons, usually with complex receptive fields, exhibited little selectivity in comparison with other cell ...

  6. Lack of evidence of chalone activity in used medium and extract of JB-1 tumor cells in vitro. A flow cytometry study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeser, F K; Barfod, N M; Bichel, P

    1978-02-14

    In cell-free mouse ascites fluid from the JB-1 ascites tumor in the plateau phase of growth low-molecular chalone substances have been found which reversibly and specifically arrest JB-1 cells in the G1 and G2 phase of the cell cycle. The aim of this study was to investigate whether chalones were involved in the regulation of in vitro growth of JB-1 tumor cells. Used medium and cell extract from confluent, stationary JB-1 cell cultures were investigated for proliferation-inhibitory properties. JB-1 cells from stationary cultures were explanted in test cultures and the traverse of cells through the S phase was investigated by means of flow cytometry (FCM). Inhibition--expressed as a delay of the traverse of cells through the S phase--was not observed when a surplus of used medium, concentrated and fractionated used medium or concentrated and fractionated cell extract from JB-1 cells in vitro was added to test cultures. On the contrary, used medium and concentrated and fractionated used medium stimulated growth. Thus, no involvement of chalones in the growth regulation of JB-1 tumor cells in vitro was detected.

  7. Lack of Control in Inorganic Phosphate Uptake by Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don Cells (Cytoplasmic Inorganic Phosphate Homeostasis Depends on the Tonoplast Inorganic Phosphate Transport System?).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakano, K.; Yazaki, Y.; Okihara, K.; Mimura, T.; Kiyota, S.

    1995-01-01

    Inorganic phosphate (Pi) uptake by Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don cells was studied in relation to its apparent uncontrolled uptake using 31P-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Kinetics of Pi uptake by the cells indicated that apparent Km and Vm were about 7 [mu]M and 20 [mu]mol g-1 fresh weight h-1, respectively. Pi uptake in Murashige-Skoog medium under different Pi concentrations and different initial cell densities followed basically the same kinetics. When supplied with abundant Pi, cells absorbed Pi at a constant rate (Vm) for the first hours and accumulated it in the vacuole. As the endogenous pool expanded, the rate of Pi uptake gradually decreased to nil. Maximum Pi accumulation was 100 to 120 [mu]mol g-1 fresh weight if cell swelling during Pi uptake (about 2-fold in cell volume) was not considered. Results indicated that (a) the rate of Pi uptake by Catharanthus cells was independent of initial cell density and was constant over a wide range of Pi concentrations (2 mM to about 10 [mu]M) unless the cells were preloaded with excess Pi, and (b) there was no apparent feedback control over the Pi uptake process in the plasma membrane to avoid Pi toxicity. The importance of the tonoplast Pi transport system in cytoplasmic Pi homeostasis is discussed. PMID:12228474

  8. Cell-Type Specific Insertion of GluA2-Lacking AMPARs with Cocaine Exposure Leading to Sensitization, Cue-Induced Seeking, and Incubation of Craving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrier, Jean; Lüscher, Christian; Pascoli, Vincent

    2016-06-01

    Addiction is a behavioral disease, of which core components can be modeled in rodents. Much evidence implicates drug-evoked synaptic plasticity in cocaine-evoked locomotor sensitization, cue-induced cocaine seeking, and incubation of cocaine craving. However, the type of plasticity evoked by different modalities of cocaine administration (eg contingent vs non-contingent) and its role in reshaping circuit function remains largely elusive. Here we exposed mice to various regimens of cocaine and recorded excitatory transmission onto identified medium-sized spiny neurons (MSN, expressing fluorescent proteins under the control of either D1R or D2R dopamine receptor promotor) in the nucleus accumbens at time points when behavioral adaptations are observed. In D1-MSN, we found the presence of GluA2-lacking α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors (AMPARs) after single or chronic non-contingent exposure to cocaine as well as after cocaine self-administration (SA). We also report an increase in the AMPA/NMDA ratio (A/N) in D1-MSN, which was observed only after repeated passive injections associated with locomotor sensitization as well as in a condition of SA leading to seeking behavior. Remarkably, insertion of GluA2-lacking AMPARs was also detected in D2-MSN after SA of a high dose of cocaine but not regular dose (1.5 vs 0.75 mg/kg), which was the only condition where incubation of cocaine craving was observed in this study. Moreover, synapses containing GluA2-lacking AMPARs belonged to amygdala inputs in D2-MSN and to medial prefrontal cortex inputs in D1-MSN. Taken together this study allows for a refinement of a circuit model of addiction based on specific synaptic changes induced by cocaine. PMID:26585289

  9. Infection with foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) induces a natural killer (NK) cell response in cattle that is lacking following vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a role in innate antiviral immunity by directly lysing virus-infected cells and producing antiviral cytokines such as interferon gamma (IFNgamma). We developed a system for characterizing the bovine NK response to foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV), which causes a dis...

  10. Synergistic inhibition of the APC/C by the removal of APC15 in HCT116 cells lacking UBE2C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garvanska, Dimitriya H; Larsen, Marie Sofie Yoo; Nilsson, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    that has been shown to depend on the APC/C E2 enzymes, UBE2C and UBE2S. Here we investigate the in vivo role of the APC/C E2 enzymes in SAC silencing using CRISPR/Cas9 genetically engineered HCT116 UBE2C or UBE2S null cell lines. Using live cell assays, we show that UBE2C and UBE2S make a minor...

  11. Lack of sik1 in mouse embryonic stem cells impairs cardiomyogenesis by down-regulating the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p57kip2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Romito

    Full Text Available Sik1 (salt inducible kinase 1 is a serine/threonine kinase that belongs to the stress- and energy-sensing AMP-activated protein kinase family. During murine embryogenesis, sik1 marks the monolayer of future myocardial cells that will populate first the primitive ventricle, and later the primitive atrium suggesting its involvement in cardiac cell differentiation and/or heart development. Despite that observation, the involvement of sik1 in cardiac differentiation is still unknown. We examined the sik1 function during cardiomyocyte differentiation using the ES-derived embryoid bodies. We produced a null embryonic stem cell using a gene-trap cell line carrying an insertion in the sik1 locus. In absence of the sik1 protein, the temporal appearance of cardiomyocytes is delayed. Expression profile analysis revealed sik1 as part of a genetic network that controls the cell cycle, where the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p57(Kip2 is directly involved. Collectively, we provided evidence that sik1-mediated effects are specific for cardiomyogenesis regulating cardiomyoblast cell cycle exit toward terminal differentiation.

  12. Subcellular compartmentalization of 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium with catecholamines in adrenal medullary chromaffin vesicles may explain the lack of toxicity to adrenal chromaffin cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinhard, J.F. Jr.; Diliberto, E.J. Jr.; Viveros, O.H.; Daniels, A.J.

    1987-11-01

    Cultures of bovine adrenomedullary chromaffin cells accumulated 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP/sup +/) in a time- and concentration-dependent manner by a process that was prevented by desmethylimipramine. The subcellular localization of the incorporated (methyl-/sup 3/H)MPP/sup +/ was examined by differential centrifugation and sucrose density gradient fractionation and was found to be predominantly colocalized with catecholamines in chromaffin vesicles, and negligible amounts were detected within the mitochondrial fraction. When chromaffin cell membranes were made permeable with the detergent digitonin the absence of calcium, there was no increase in the release of (/sup 3/H)MPP/sup +/, indicating that there is negligible accumulation of the neurotoxin in the cytosol. Simultaneous exposure to digitonin and calcium induced cosecretion of MPP/sup +/ and catecholamines. Stimulation of the cells with nicotine released both catecholamines and MPP/sup +/ at identical rates and percentages of cellular content in a calcium-dependent manner. Last, when cells were incubated with MPP/sup +/ in the presence of tetrabenazine (an inhibitor of vesicular uptake), the chromaffin cell toxicity of MPP/sup +/ was potentiated. The authors submit that the ability of the chromaffin cells to take up and store MPP/sup +/ in the chromaffin vesicle prevents the toxin's interaction with other structures and, thus, prevents cell damage. As an extension of this hypothesis, the relative resistance of some brain monoaminergic neurons to the toxic actions of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine may result from the subcellular sequestration of MPP/sup +/ in the storage vesicle.

  13. Lack of correlation between membrane CD30 expression and cytokine secretion pattern in allergen-primed naive cord blood T-cell lines and clones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinozzi, F; Agea, E; Piattoni, S; Falini, B; Grignani, F; Bertotto, A

    1997-04-01

    Various surface molecules are expressed by activated T cells. Among them, the CD30 antigen has been proposed as a reproducible marker that identifies a subset of differentiated and/or activated T lymphocytes that produce T helper (Th)-2-type cytokines, i.e. interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-5. However, because CD30 has mainly been detected on established T-cell clones, it is still unclear whether a priming allergen and/or cytokine can induce its membrane expression on naive T cells, perhaps in parallel with the up-regulation of other relevant activation markers, such as CD25, HLA-DR and L-selectin. It is also unknown whether proper allergen stimulation affects the cytokine secretion pattern by CD30+ T-cell clones derived from antigen-unprimed (naive) T lymphocytes. More information on these questions was sought by adopting a model that used cord blood as a source of virgin T cells and exposing them to native cypress allergen or cytokine (IL-2 or IL-4) stimulation, as well as to conventional polyclonal activators such as PHA or anti-CD3. Peripheral blood MC from four adult cypress-sensitive patients was also assayed and used as controls for all culture experiments. Freshly isolated cord and adult T cells did not express the CD30 antigen on their membrane. Many of the stimulating agents tested were able to up-regulate the expression of CD30. However, despite high expression of this molecule, cloned allergen-specific cord CD4+ T lymphocytes were unable to produce IFN-gamma and/or IL-4. In contrast, they retained the capability to produce IL-2. Thus, expression of the CD30 antigen on virgin T cells does not correlate with a polarized model of T helper (Th)-1 or Th-2 cytokine-producing cells, suggesting that these types of lymphokine-secreting lymphocytes are not a paradigmatic example of T-cell subpopulations that display stable phenotypical features. PMID:9105430

  14. Lung metastasis fails in MMTV-PyMT oncomice lacking S100A4 due to a T-cell deficiency in primary tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grum-Schwensen, Birgitte; Klingelhöfer, Jörg; Grigorian, Mariam;

    2010-01-01

    monolayers. In vivo, the presence of S100A4(+/+), but not S100A4(-/-), fibroblasts significantly stimulated the attraction of T lymphocytes to the site of the growing tumor. Increased levels of T cells were also observed in the premetastatic lungs of tumor-bearing mice primed to metastasize by S100A4......Interactions between tumor and stroma cells are essential for the progression of cancer from its initial growth at a primary site to its metastasis to distant organs. The metastasis-stimulating protein S100A4 exerts its function as a stroma cell-derived factor. Genetic depletion of S100A4...... significantly reduced the metastatic burden in lungs of PyMT-induced mammary tumors. In S100A4(+/+) PyMT mice, massive leukocyte infiltration at the site of the growing tumor at the stage of malignant transition was associated with increased concentration of extracellular S100A4 in the tumor microenvironment...

  15. Lack of telomerase RNA gene hTERC expression in alternative lengthening of telomeres cells is associated with methylation of the hTERC promoter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoare, SF; Bryce, LA; Wisman, GBA; Burns, S; Going, JJ; van der Zee, AGJ; Keith, WN

    2001-01-01

    The immortal phenotype of most human cancers is attributable to telomerase expression. However, a number of immortal cell lines and tumors achieve telomere maintenance in the absence of telomerase via alternative mechanisms known as ALT (alternative lengthening of telomeres). Here we show that the p

  16. Lack of TIMP-1 tumour cell immunoreactivity predicts effect of adjuvant anthracycline-based chemotherapy in patients (n=647) with primary breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willemoe, Gro L.; Hertel, Pernille Bræmer; Bartels, Annette;

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: A number of prospective studies have shown that adjuvant CEF significantly improves disease-free and overall survival as compared to CMF in breast cancer patients. Our aim was to determine whether the benefit of epirubicin versus methotrexate differs according to TIMP-1 tumour cell immun...

  17. A candidate HIV/AIDS vaccine (MVA-B lacking vaccinia virus gene C6L enhances memory HIV-1-specific T-cell responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan García-Arriaza

    Full Text Available The vaccinia virus (VACV C6 protein has sequence similarities with the poxvirus family Pox_A46, involved in regulation of host immune responses, but its role is unknown. Here, we have characterized the C6 protein and its effects in virus replication, innate immune sensing and immunogenicity in vivo. C6 is a 18.2 kDa protein, which is expressed early during virus infection and localizes to the cytoplasm of infected cells. Deletion of the C6L gene from the poxvirus vector MVA-B expressing HIV-1 Env, Gag, Pol and Nef antigens from clade B (MVA-B ΔC6L had no effect on virus growth kinetics; therefore C6 protein is not essential for virus replication. The innate immune signals elicited by MVA-B ΔC6L in human macrophages and monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs are characterized by the up-regulation of the expression of IFN-β and IFN-α/β-inducible genes. In a DNA prime/MVA boost immunization protocol in mice, flow cytometry analysis revealed that MVA-B ΔC6L enhanced the magnitude and polyfunctionality of the HIV-1-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell memory immune responses, with most of the HIV-1 responses mediated by the CD8+ T-cell compartment with an effector phenotype. Significantly, while MVA-B induced preferentially Env- and Gag-specific CD8+ T-cell responses, MVA-B ΔC6L induced more Gag-Pol-Nef-specific CD8+ T-cell responses. Furthermore, MVA-B ΔC6L enhanced the levels of antibodies against Env in comparison with MVA-B. These findings revealed that C6 can be considered as an immunomodulator and that deleting C6L gene in MVA-B confers an immunological benefit by enhancing IFN-β-dependent responses and increasing the magnitude and quality of the T-cell memory immune responses to HIV-1 antigens. Our observations are relevant for the improvement of MVA vectors as HIV-1 vaccines.

  18. Site-specific analysis of UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers in nucleotide excision repair-proficient and -deficient hamster cells: Lack of correlation with mutational spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vreeswijk, Maaike P G; Meijers, Caro M; Giphart-Gassler, Micheline; Vrieling, Harry; van Zeeland, Albert A; Mullenders, Leon H F; Loenen, Wil A M

    2009-04-26

    Irradiation of cells with UVC light induces two types of mutagenic DNA photoproducts, i.e. cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD) and pyrimidine (6-4) pyrimidone photoproducts (6-4 PP). To investigate the relationship between the frequency of UV-induced photolesions at specific sites and their ability to induce mutations, we quantified CPD formation at the nucleotide level along exons 3 and 8 of the hprt gene using ligation-mediated PCR, and determined the mutational spectrum of 132 UV-induced hprt mutants in the AA8 hamster cell line and of 165 mutants in its nucleotide excision repair-defective derivative UV5. In AA8 cells, transversions predominated with a strong strand bias towards thymine-containing photolesions in the non-transcribed strand. As hamster AA8 cells are proficient in global genome repair of 6-4 PP but selectively repair CPD from the transcribed strand of active genes, most mutations probably resulted from erroneous bypass of CPD in the non-transcribed strand. However, the relative incidence of CPD and the positions where mutations most frequently arose do not correlate. In fact some major damage sites hardly gave rise to the formation of mutations. In the repair-defective UV5 cells, mutations were almost exclusively C>T transitions caused by photoproducts at PyC sites in the transcribed strand. Even though CPD were formed at high frequencies at some TT sites in UV5, these photoproducts did not contribute to mutation induction at all. We conclude that, even in the absence of repair, large variations in the level of induction of CPD at different sites throughout the two exons do not correspond to frequencies of mutation induction.

  19. Lack of effects of typical and atypical antipsychotics in DARPP-32 and NCS-1 levels in PC12 cells overexpressing NCS-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reis Helton J

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Schizophrenia is the major psychiatry disorder, which the exact cause remains unknown. However, it is well known that dopamine-mediated neurotransmission imbalance is associated with this pathology and the main target of antipsychotics is the dopamine receptor D2. Recently, it was described alteration in levels of two dopamine signaling related proteins in schizophrenic prefrontal cortex (PFC: Neuronal Calcium Sensor-1 (NCS-1 and DARPP-32. NCS-1, which is upregulated in PFC of schizophrenics, inhibits D2 internalization. DARPP-32, which is decreased in PFC of schizophrenics, is a key downstream effector in transducing dopamine signaling. We previously demonstrated that antipsychotics do not change levels of both proteins in rat's brain. However, since NCS-1 and DARPP-32 levels are not altered in wild type rats, we treated wild type PC12 cells (PC12 WT and PC12 cells stably overexpressing NCS-1 (PC12 Clone with antipsychotics to investigate if NCS-1 upregulation modulates DARPP-32 expression in response to antipsychotics treatment. Results We chronically treated both PC12 WT and PC12 Clone cells with typical (Haloperidol or atypical (Clozapine and Risperidone antipsychotics for 14 days. Using western blot technique we observed that there is no change in NCS-1 and DARPP-32 protein levels in both PC12 WT and PC12 Clone cells after typical and atypical antipsychotic treatments. Conclusions Because we observed no alteration in NCS-1 and DARPP-32 levels in both PC12 WT and Clone cells treated with typical or atypical antipsychotics, we suggest that the alteration in levels of both proteins in schizophrenic's PFC is related to psychopathology but not with antipsychotic treatment.

  20. Humans lack iGb3 due to the absence of functional iGb3-synthase: implications for NKT cell development and transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dale Christiansen

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The glycosphingolipid isoglobotrihexosylceramide, or isogloboside 3 (iGb3, is believed to be critical for natural killer T (NKT cell development and self-recognition in mice and humans. Furthermore, iGb3 may represent an important obstacle in xenotransplantation, in which this lipid represents the only other form of the major xenoepitope Galalpha(1,3Gal. The role of iGb3 in NKT cell development is controversial, particularly with one study that suggested that NKT cell development is normal in mice that were rendered deficient for the enzyme iGb3 synthase (iGb3S. We demonstrate that spliced iGb3S mRNA was not detected after extensive analysis of human tissues, and furthermore, the iGb3S gene contains several mutations that render this product nonfunctional. We directly tested the potential functional activity of human iGb3S by expressing chimeric molecules containing the catalytic domain of human iGb3S. These hybrid molecules were unable to synthesize iGb3, due to at least one amino acid substitution. We also demonstrate that purified normal human anti-Gal immunoglobulin G can bind iGb3 lipid and mediate complement lysis of transfected human cells expressing iGb3. Collectively, our data suggest that iGb3S is not expressed in humans, and even if it were expressed, this enzyme would be inactive. Consequently, iGb3 is unlikely to represent a primary natural ligand for NKT cells in humans. Furthermore, the absence of iGb3 in humans implies that it is another source of foreign Galalpha(1,3Gal xenoantigen, with obvious significance in the field of xenotransplantation.

  1. Paucity of CD4+ natural killer T (NKT lymphocytes in sooty mangabeys is associated with lack of NKT cell depletion after SIV infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namita Rout

    Full Text Available Lack of chronic immune activation in the presence of persistent viremia is a key feature that distinguishes nonpathogenic simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV infection in natural hosts from pathogenic SIV and HIV infection. To elucidate novel mechanisms downmodulating immune activation in natural hosts of SIV infection, we investigated natural killer T (NKT lymphocytes in sooty mangabeys. NKT lymphocytes are a potent immunoregulatory arm of the innate immune system that recognize glycolipid antigens presented on the nonpolymorphic MHC-class I-like CD1d molecules. In a cross-sectional analysis of 50 SIV-negative and 50 naturally SIV-infected sooty mangabeys, ligand alpha-galactosylceramide loaded CD1d tetramers co-staining with Valpha24-positive invariant NKT lymphocytes were detected at frequencies >or=0.002% of circulating T lymphocytes in approximately half of the animals. In contrast to published reports in Asian macaques, sooty mangabey NKT lymphocytes consisted of CD8(+ and CD4/CD8 double-negative T lymphocytes that were CXCR3-positive and CCR5-negative suggesting that they trafficked to sites of inflammation without being susceptible to SIV infection. Consistent with these findings, there was no difference in the frequency or phenotype of NKT lymphocytes between SIV-negative and SIV-infected sooty mangabeys. On stimulation with alpha-galactosylceramide loaded on human CD1d molecules, sooty mangabey NKT lymphocytes underwent degranulation and secreted IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, IL-2, IL-13, and IL-10, indicating the presence of both effector and immunoregulatory functional capabilities. The unique absence of CD4(+ NKT lymphocytes in sooty mangabeys, combined with their IL-10 cytokine-secreting ability and preservation following SIV infection, raises the possibility that NKT lymphocytes might play a role in downmodulating immune activation in SIV-infected sooty mangabeys.

  2. The GnRH receptor and the response of gonadotrope cells to GnRH pulse frequency code. A story of an atypical adaptation of cell function relying on a lack of receptor homologous desensitization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Bleux

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain control of the reproductive system is mediated through hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH which activates specific receptors (GnRHR present at the surface of the pituitary gonadotropes to trigger secretion of the two gonadotropins LH and FSH. A unique feature of this system is the high dependence on the secretion mode of GnRH, which is basically pulsatile but undergoes considerable fluctuations in pulse frequency pattern in response to endogenous or external factors. How the physiological fluctuations of GnRH secretion that orchestrate normal reproduction are decoded by the gonadotrope cell machinery to ultimately control gonadotropin release and/or subunit gene transcription has been the subject of intensive studies during the past decades. Surprisingly, the mammalian GnRHR is unique among G protein-coupled receptor family as it lacks the carboxy-terminal tail usually involved in classical endocytotic process. Accordingly, it does not desensitize properly and internalizes very poorly. Both this atypical intrinsic property and post-receptor events may thus contribute to decode the GnRH signal. This includes the participation of a network of signaling pathways that differently respond to GnRH together with a growing amount of genes differentially sensitive to pulse frequency. Among these are two pairs of genes, the transcription factors EGR-1 and NAB, and the regulatory factors activin and follistatin, that function as intracellular autoregulatory feedback loops controlling respectively LHbeta and FSHbeta gene expression and hence, LH and FSH synthesis. Pituitary gonadotropes thus represent a unique model of cells functionally adapted to respond to a considerably fluctuating neuroendocrine stimulation, from short individual pulses to sustained GnRH as observed at the proestrus of ovarian cycle. Altogether, the data emphasize the adaptative reciprocal complementarity of hypothalamic GnRH neurones and pituitary gonadotropes to

  3. Simian virus 40 T antigen can transcriptionally activate and mediate viral DNA replication in cells which lack the retinoblastoma susceptibility gene product.

    OpenAIRE

    Trifillis, P; Picardi, J; Alwine, J C

    1990-01-01

    Simian virus 40 T antigen is a multifunctional protein which has recently been shown to form a complex with the retinoblastoma susceptibility gene product (Rb protein) (J.A. DeCaprio, J.W. Ludlow, J. Figge, J.-Y. Shaw, C.-M. Huang, W.-H. Lee, E. Marsilio, E. Paucha, and D.M. Livingston, Cell 54:275-283, 1988; P. Whyte, K.J. Buchkovich, J.M. Horowitz, S.H. Friend, M. Raybuck, R.A. Weinberg, and E. Harlow, Nature (London) 334:124-129, 1988). This interaction may facilitate some of the functions...

  4. Interactions of Neuropathogenic Escherichia coli K1 (RS218) and Its Derivatives Lacking Genomic Islands with Phagocytic Acanthamoeba castellanii and Nonphagocytic Brain Endothelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousuf, Farzana Abubakar; Yousuf, Zuhair; Iqbal, Junaid; Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Khan, Hafsa; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Here we determined the role of various genomic islands in E. coli K1 interactions with phagocytic A. castellanii and nonphagocytic brain microvascular endothelial cells. The findings revealed that the genomic islands deletion mutants of RS218 related to toxins (peptide toxin, α-hemolysin), adhesins (P fimbriae, F17-like fimbriae, nonfimbrial adhesins, Hek, and hemagglutinin), protein secretion system (T1SS for hemolysin), invasins (IbeA, CNF1), metabolism (D-serine catabolism, dihydroxyacetone, glycerol, and glyoxylate metabolism) showed reduced interactions with both A. castellanii and brain microvascular endothelial cells. Interestingly, the deletion of RS218-derived genomic island 21 containing adhesins (P fimbriae, F17-like fimbriae, nonfimbrial adhesins, Hek, and hemagglutinin), protein secretion system (T1SS for hemolysin), invasins (CNF1), metabolism (D-serine catabolism) abolished E. coli K1-mediated HBMEC cytotoxicity in a CNF1-independent manner. Therefore, the characterization of these genomic islands should reveal mechanisms of evolutionary gain for E. coli K1 pathogenicity. PMID:24818136

  5. Interactions of Neuropathogenic Escherichia coli K1 (RS218 and Its Derivatives Lacking Genomic Islands with Phagocytic Acanthamoeba castellanii and Nonphagocytic Brain Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzana Abubakar Yousuf

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Here we determined the role of various genomic islands in E. coli K1 interactions with phagocytic A. castellanii and nonphagocytic brain microvascular endothelial cells. The findings revealed that the genomic islands deletion mutants of RS218 related to toxins (peptide toxin, α-hemolysin, adhesins (P fimbriae, F17-like fimbriae, nonfimbrial adhesins, Hek, and hemagglutinin, protein secretion system (T1SS for hemolysin, invasins (IbeA, CNF1, metabolism (D-serine catabolism, dihydroxyacetone, glycerol, and glyoxylate metabolism showed reduced interactions with both A. castellanii and brain microvascular endothelial cells. Interestingly, the deletion of RS218-derived genomic island 21 containing adhesins (P fimbriae, F17-like fimbriae, nonfimbrial adhesins, Hek, and hemagglutinin, protein secretion system (T1SS for hemolysin, invasins (CNF1, metabolism (D-serine catabolism abolished E. coli K1-mediated HBMEC cytotoxicity in a CNF1-independent manner. Therefore, the characterization of these genomic islands should reveal mechanisms of evolutionary gain for E. coli K1 pathogenicity.

  6. Generation of H9 T-cells stably expressing a membrane-bound form of the cytoplasmic tail of the Env-glycoprotein: lack of transcomplementation of defective HIV-1 virions encoding C-terminally truncated Env

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bosch Valerie

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract H9-T-cells do not support the replication of mutant HIV-1 encoding Env protein lacking its long cytoplasmic C-terminal domain (Env-CT. Here we describe the generation of a H9-T-cell population constitutively expressing the HIV-1 Env-CT protein domain anchored in the cellular membrane by it homologous membrane-spanning domain (TMD. We confirmed that the Env-TMD-CT protein was associated with cellular membranes, that its expression did not have any obvious cytotoxic effects on the cells and that it did not affect wild-type HIV-1 replication. However, as measured in both a single-round assay as well as in spreading infections, replication competence of mutant pNL-Tr712, lacking the Env-CT, was not restored in this H9 T-cell population. This means that the Env-CT per se cannot transcomplement the replication block of HIV-1 virions encoding C-terminally truncated Env proteins and suggests that the Env-CT likely exerts its function only in the context of the complete Env protein.

  7. When Lack of Evidence Is Evidence of Lack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickering, Neil

    2015-12-01

    In their recent article "A Gentle Ethical Defence of Homeopathy," Levy, Gadd, Kerridge, and Komesaroff use the claim that "lack of evidence is not equivalent to evidence of lack" as a component of their ethical defence of homeopathy. In response, this article argues that they cannot use this claim to shore up their ethical arguments. This is because it is false. PMID:26631232

  8. Lack of organ specific commitment of vagal neural crest cell derivatives as shown by back-transplantation of GFP chicken tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freem, Lucy J; Delalande, Jean Marie; Campbell, Alison M; Thapar, Nikhil; Burns, Alan J

    2012-01-01

    Neural crest cells (NCC) are multipotent progenitors that migrate extensively throughout the developing embryo and generate a diverse range of cell types. Vagal NCC migrate from the hindbrain into the foregut and from there along the gastrointestinal tract to form the enteric nervous system (ENS), the intrinsic innervation of the gut, and into the developing lung buds to form the intrinsic innervation of the lungs. The aim of this study was to determine the developmental potential of vagal NCC that had already colonised the gut or the lungs. We used transgenic chicken embryos that ubiquitously express green fluorescent protein (GFP) to permanently mark and fate-map vagal NCC using intraspecies grafting. This was combined with back-transplantation of gut and lung segments, containing GFP-positive NCC, into the vagal region of a second recipient embryo to determine, using immunohistochemical staining, whether gut or lung NCC are competent of re-colonising both these organs, or whether their fate is restricted. Chick(GFP)-chick intraspecies grafting efficiently labelled NCC within the gut and lung of chick embryos. When segments of embryonic day (E)5.5 pre-umbilical midgut containing GFP-positive NCC were back-transplanted into the vagal region of E1.5 host embryos, the GFP-positive NCC remigrated to colonise both the gut and lungs and differentiated into neurons in stereotypical locations. However, GFP-positive lung NCC did not remigrate when back-transplanted. Our studies suggest that gut NCC are not restricted to colonising only this organ, since upon back-transplantation GFP-positive gut NCC colonised both the gut and the lung.

  9. Lack of a Dose-Effect Relationship for Pulmonary Function Changes After Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Early-Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guckenberger, Matthias, E-mail: Guckenberger_M@klinik.uni-wuerzburg.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Wuerzburg, Wuerzburg (Germany); Klement, Rainer J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Wuerzburg, Wuerzburg (Germany); Kestin, Larry L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Hope, Andrew J. [Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Belderbos, Jose [The Netherlands Cancer Institute–Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Werner-Wasik, Maria [Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Yan, Di [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Sonke, Jan-Jakob [The Netherlands Cancer Institute–Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bissonnette, Jean-Pierre [Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Xiao, Ying [Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Grills, Inga S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the influence of tumor size, prescription dose, and dose to the lungs on posttreatment pulmonary function test (PFT) changes after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: The analysis is based on 191 patients treated at 5 international institutions: inclusion criteria were availability of pre- and post-SBRT PFTs and dose-volume histograms of the lung and planning target volume (PTV); patients treated with more than 1 SBRT course were excluded. Correlation between early (1-6 months, median 3 months) and late (7-24 months, median 12 months) PFT changes and tumor size, planning target volume (PTV) dose, and lung doses was assessed using linear regression analysis, receiver operating characteristics analysis, and Lyman's normal tissue complication probability model. The PTV doses were converted to biologically effective doses and lung doses to 2 Gy equivalent doses before correlation analyses. Results: Up to 6 months after SBRT, forced expiratory volume in 1 second and carbon monoxide diffusion capacity changed by −1.4% (95% confidence interval [CI], −3.4% to 0) and −7.6% (95% CI, −10.2% to −3.4%) compared with pretreatment values, respectively. A modest decrease in PFTs was observed 7-24 months after SBRT, with changes of −8.1% (95% CI, −13.3% to −5.3%) and −12.4% (95% CI, −15.5% to −6.9%), respectively. Using linear regression analysis, receiver operating characteristic analysis, and normal tissue complication probability modeling, all evaluated parameters of tumor size, PTV dose, mean lung dose, and absolute and relative volumes of the lung exposed to minimum doses of 5-70 Gy were not correlated with early and late PFT changes. Subgroup analysis based on pre-SBRT PFTs (greater or equal and less than median) did not identify any dose-effect relationship. Conclusions: This study failed to demonstrate a significant dose-effect relationship for

  10. Dysregulation of crypt cell proliferation and lineage determination, and villus cell migration in the small intestines of mice lacking the intestinal smooth muscle-expressed transcription factor, Krüppel-like factor 9 (Klf9)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüppel-like factor 9 (Klf9), a zinc-finger transcription factor, is implicated in the control of cell proliferation, cell differentiation and cell fate. Mice with targeted inactivation of Klf9 gene exhibit postnatal growth retardation and increased mortality after birth. Using these mice, we have...

  11. The lack of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptor desensitisation in alphaT3-1 cells is not due to GnRH receptor reserve or phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bis-phosphate pool size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest-Owen, W; Willars, G B; Nahorski, S R; Assefa, D; Davidson, J S; Hislop, J; McArdle, C A

    1999-01-25

    shared PtdIns(4,5)P2 pool. Partial depletion of this pool (GnRH pre-treatment in medium with LiCl) reduced the magnitude of the [3H]IP(X) and Ins(1,4,5)P3 responses to methacholine and GnRH, without altering their temporal profiles. Thus the GnRH receptor does not undergo rapid homologous desensitisation in alphaT3-1 cells in spite of the fact that they can desensitise other endogenous (and recombinant) PLC-activating GPCRs, and the lack of desensitisation cannot be attributed to the existence of GnRH receptor reserve or access to an atypically large or rapidly re-cycled PtdIns(4,5)P2 pool. This unique functional characteristic (mammalian GnRH receptors are the only PLC-activating GPCRs known not to rapidly desensitise) almost certainly therefore reflects the atypical structure of these receptors (mammalian GnRH receptors are the only PLC-activating GPCRs known to lack C-terminal tails).

  12. Impaired intestinal proglucagon processing in mice lacking prohormone convertase 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ugleholdt, Randi; Zhu, Xiaorong; Deacon, Carolyn F;

    2003-01-01

    The neuroendocrine prohormone convertases 1 and 2 (PC1 and PC2) are expressed in endocrine intestinal L cells and pancreatic A cells, respectively, and colocalize with proglucagon in secretory granules. Mice lacking PC2 have multiple endocrinopathies and cannot process proglucagon to mature gluca...

  13. Unresolved questions from the analysis of mice lacking MCU expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Elizabeth; Pan, Xin; Nguyen, Tiffany; Liu, Jie; Holmström, Kira M; Finkel, Toren

    2014-07-11

    Entry of mitochondrial calcium is believed to play an essential role in regulating bioenergetics and initiating cell death pathways. We have recently described a mouse model lacking MCU expression. Surprisingly, these mice are viable and the cells and tissues from these animals do not exhibit any marked protection from cell death. Here, we discuss our findings as well as potential explanations for some of the more unexpected results.

  14. Development of ADA Against Recombinant Human Interferon Beta in Immune Tolerant Mice Requires Rapid Recruitment of CD4(+) T Cells, Induces Formation of Germinal Centers but Lacks Susceptibility for (Most) Adjuvants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kijanka, Grzegorz; Sauerborn, Melody; Boon, Louis; Schellekens, Huub; Brinks, Vera

    2015-01-01

    Immunological processes leading to formation of antidrug antibodies (Abs) against recombinant human proteins remain poorly understood. Animal and clinical studies revealed that immunogenicity shares both T-cell-dependent (requirement of CD4(+) T cells, isotype switching) and T-cell-independent (invo

  15. Lack of Set Theory Relevant Prerequisite Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogan-Dunlap, Hamide

    2006-01-01

    Many students struggle with college mathematics topics due to a lack of mastery of prerequisite knowledge. Set theory language is one such prerequisite for linear algebra courses. Many students' mistakes on linear algebra questions reveal a lack of mastery of set theory knowledge. This paper reports the findings of a qualitative analysis of a…

  16. Major role for a 3p21 region and lack of involvement of the t(3;8) breakpoint region in the development of renal cell carcinoma suggested by loss of heterozygosity analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, Anke; Hulsbeek, MMF; deJong, D; Kok, K; Veldhuis, PMJF; Roche, J; Buys, CHCM

    1996-01-01

    In a loss of heterozygosity analysis of 3p, we examined 44 sporadic cases of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and matched normal tissue with 18 markers distributed over the whole p-arm. The majority of these markers clustered in three regions that have been suggested to be involved in the development of R

  17. Lack of detection of negative-strand hepatitis C virus RNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and other extrahepatic tissues by the highly strand-specific rTth reverse transcriptase PCR.

    OpenAIRE

    Lanford, R E; Chavez, D; Chisari, F V; Sureau, C

    1995-01-01

    To further explore the controversial potential for extrahepatic replication of hepatitis C virus (HCV), the highly strand-specific rTth method of reverse transcriptase PCR was used to examine sera, liver, peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and other extrahepatic tissues from HCV-infected chimpanzees and humans. Positive-strand HCV RNA was present in the liver at approximately 10-fold-higher levels than negative-strand HCV RNA. No negative-strand RNA was detected in peripheral blood mononucle...

  18. Lack of prognostic and predictive value of CA IX in radiotherapy of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck with known modifiable hypoxia: An evaluation of the DAHANCA 5 study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Jesper Grau; Overgaard, Jens

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: CA IX is suggested to be an endogenous marker of hypoxia in tumours like squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck (HNSCC). The aim of the present study was to investigate whether CA IX served as a prognostic factor for outcome in a large population of HNSCC and if CA IX......+/-the hypoxic radiosensitizer nimorazole. CA IX was measured using immunohistochemistry and results were divided into four groups of CA IX expression: 30% of the tumour area with positive membrane staining. Locoregional control and disease-specific survival were used as endpoints...... in the head and neck treated with conventional radiotherapy and concomitant nimorazole....

  19. Radiation response and regulation of apoptosis induced by a combination of TRAIL and CHX in cells lacking mitochondrial DNA: A role for NF-{kappa}B-STAT3-directed gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, Vladimir N., E-mail: vni3@columbia.edu; Ghandhi, Shanaz A.; Zhou, Hongning; Huang, Sarah X.; Chai, Yunfei; Amundson, Sally A.; Hei, Tom K.

    2011-07-01

    Mitochondrial DNA depleted ({rho}{sup 0}) human skin fibroblasts (HSF) with suppressed oxidative phosphorylation were characterized by significant changes in the expression of 2100 nuclear genes, encoding numerous protein classes, in NF-{kappa}B and STAT3 signaling pathways, and by decreased activity of mitochondrial death pathway, compared to the parental {rho}{sup +} HSF. In contrast, the extrinsic TRAIL/TRAIL-Receptor mediated death pathway remained highly active, and exogenous TRAIL in a combination with cycloheximide (CHX) induced higher levels of apoptosis in {rho}{sup 0} cells compared to {rho}{sup +} HSF. Global gene expression analysis using microarray and qRT-PCR demonstrated that mRNA expression levels of many growth factors and their adaptor proteins (FGF13, HGF, IGFBP4, IGFBP6, and IGFL2), cytokines (IL6, {Oota}L17{Beta}, {Oota}L18, {Oota}L19, and {Oota}L28{Beta}) and cytokine receptors (IL1R1, IL21R, and IL31RA) were substantially decreased after mitochondrial DNA depletion. Some of these genes were targets of NF-{kappa}B and STAT3, and their protein products could regulate the STAT3 signaling pathway. Alpha-irradiation further induced expression of several NF-{kappa}B/STAT3 target genes, including IL1A, IL1B, IL6, PTGS2/COX2 and MMP12, in {rho}{sup +} HSF, but this response was substantially decreased in {rho}{sup 0} HSF. Suppression of the IKK-NF-{kappa}B pathway by the small molecular inhibitor BMS-345541 and of the JAK2-STAT3 pathway by AG490 dramatically increased TRAIL-induced apoptosis in the control and irradiated {rho}{sup +} HSF. Inhibitory antibodies against IL6, the main activator of JAK2-STAT3 pathway, added into the cell media, also increased TRAIL-induced apoptosis in HSF, especially after alpha-irradiation. Collectively, our results indicated that NF-{kappa}B activation was partially lost in {rho}{sup 0} HSF resulting in downregulation of the basal or radiation-induced expression of numerous NF-{kappa}B targets, further suppressing IL6

  20. Mucosal alpha-papillomaviruses are not associated with esophageal squamous cell carcinomas: Lack of mechanistic evidence from South Africa, China and Iran and from a world-wide meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halec, Gordana; Schmitt, Markus; Egger, Sam; Abnet, Christian C; Babb, Chantal; Dawsey, Sanford M; Flechtenmacher, Christa; Gheit, Tarik; Hale, Martin; Holzinger, Dana; Malekzadeh, Reza; Taylor, Philip R; Tommasino, Massimo; Urban, Margaret I; Waterboer, Tim; Pawlita, Michael; Sitas, Freddy

    2016-07-01

    Epidemiological and mechanistic evidence on the causative role of human papillomaviruses (HPV) in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is unclear. We retrieved alcohol- and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded ESCC tissues from 133 patients seropositive for antibodies against HPV early proteins, from high-incidence ESCC regions: South Africa, China and Iran. With rigorous care to prevent nucleic acid contamination, we analyzed these tissues for the presence of 51 mucosotropic human alpha-papillomaviruses by two sensitive, broad-spectrum genotyping methods, and for the markers of HPV-transformed phenotype: (i) HPV16/18 viral loads by quantitative real-time PCR, (ii) type-specific viral mRNA by E6*I/E6 full-length RT-PCR assays and (iii) expression of cellular protein p16(INK4a) . Of 118 analyzable ESCC tissues, 10 (8%) were positive for DNA of HPV types: 16 (4 tumors); 33, 35, 45 (1 tumor each); 11 (2 tumors) and 16, 70 double infection (1 tumor). Inconsistent HPV DNA+ findings by two genotyping methods and negativity in qPCR indicated very low viral loads. A single HPV16 DNA+ tumor additionally harbored HPV16 E6*I mRNA but was p16(INK4a) negative (HPV16 E1 seropositive patient). Another HPV16 DNA+ tumor from an HPV16 E6 seropositive patient showed p16(INK4a) upregulation but no HPV16 mRNA. In the tumor tissues of these serologically preselected ESCC patients, we did not find consistent presence of HPV DNA, HPV mRNA or p16(INK4a) upregulation. These results were supported by a meta-analysis of 14 other similar studies regarding HPV-transformation of ESCC. Our study does not support the etiological role of the 51 analyzed mucosotropic HPV types in the ESCC carcinogenesis. PMID:26529033

  1. The Lack of Successors in Family Farms

    OpenAIRE

    Alessandro Corsi

    2005-01-01

    The traditional process of farm transmission within the family is threatened by the increasing age of operators and by their children’s preference for other activi-ties. After describing the national patterns of agricultural labour ageing, this es-say aims at quantifying the proportion of those family farms that will probably have no successors and analysing their characteristics, using a random sample of individual farm data from Piedmont drawn from the 2000 Agricultural Census. The lack of ...

  2. Reduced alcohol consumption in mice lacking preprodynorphin.

    OpenAIRE

    Blednov, Yuri A.; Walker, Danielle; Martinez, Marni; Harris, R. Adron

    2006-01-01

    Many studies suggest a role for endogenous opioid peptides and their receptors in regulation of ethanol intake. It is commonly accepted that the κ-opioid receptors and their endogenous ligands, dynorphins, produce a dysphoric state and therefore may be responsible for avoidance of alcohol. We used mutant mice lacking preprodynorphin in a variety of behavioral tests of alcohol actions. Null mutant female, but not male, mice showed significantly lower preference for alcohol and consumed lower a...

  3. Accidents in radiotherapy: Lack of quality assurance?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    About 150 radiological accidents, involving more than 3000 patients with adverse effects, 15 patient's fatalities and about 5000 staff and public exposures have been collected and analysed. Out of 67 analysed accidents in external beam therapy 22% has been caused by wrong calculation of the exposure time or monitor units, 13% by inadequate review of patient's chart, 12% by mistakes in the anatomical area to be treated. The remaining 35% can be attributed to 17 different causes. The most common mistakes in brachytherapy were wrong activities of sources used for treatment (20%), inadequate procedures for placement of sources applicators (14%), mistakes in calculating the treatment time (12%), etc. The direct and contributing causes of radiological accidents have been deduced from each event, when it was possible and categorized into 9 categories: mistakes in procedures (30%), professional mistakes (17%), communication mistakes (15%), lack of training (8.5%), interpretation mistakes (7%), lack of supervision (6%), mistakes in judgement (6%), hardware failures (5%), software and other mistakes (5.5%). Three types of direct and contributing causes responsible for almost 62% of all accidents are directly connected to the quality assurance of treatment. The lessons learnt from the accidents are related to frequencies of direct and contributing factors and show that most of the accident are caused by lack, non-application of quality assurance (QA) procedures or by underestimating of QA procedures. The international system for collection of accidents and dissemination of lessons learnt from the different accidents, proposed by IAEA, can contribute to better practice in many radiotherapy departments. Most of the accidents could have been avoided, had a comprehensive QA programme been established and properly applied in all radiotherapy departments, whatever the size. (author)

  4. Why does Colombia lack agricultural commodity futures?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Moreno-Alemay

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the reasons why futures contracts are not traded as an alternative to price hedging for agricultural goods in Colombia. Based on surveys, interviews and statistical analysis, this study identified that conceptual gaps in contract negotiation, lack of consensus in the agricultural sector regarding the use of financial mechanisms and the sector’s infrequent contact with Colombia’s financial institutions, are the main reasons why a futures contracts market has not emerged.

  5. Sour taste responses in mice lacking PKD channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nao Horio

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The polycystic kidney disease-like ion channel PKD2L1 and its associated partner PKD1L3 are potential candidates for sour taste receptors. PKD2L1 is expressed in type III taste cells that respond to sour stimuli and genetic elimination of cells expressing PKD2L1 substantially reduces chorda tympani nerve responses to sour taste stimuli. However, the contribution of PKD2L1 and PKD1L3 to sour taste responses remains unclear. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We made mice lacking PKD2L1 and/or PKD1L3 gene and investigated whole nerve responses to taste stimuli in the chorda tympani or the glossopharyngeal nerve and taste responses in type III taste cells. In mice lacking PKD2L1 gene, chorda tympani nerve responses to sour, but not sweet, salty, bitter, and umami tastants were reduced by 25-45% compared with those in wild type mice. In contrast, chorda tympani nerve responses in PKD1L3 knock-out mice and glossopharyngeal nerve responses in single- and double-knock-out mice were similar to those in wild type mice. Sour taste responses of type III fungiform taste cells (GAD67-expressing taste cells were also reduced by 25-45% by elimination of PKD2L1. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings suggest that PKD2L1 partly contributes to sour taste responses in mice and that receptors other than PKDs would be involved in sour detection.

  6. Lack of consensus in social systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benczik, I. J.; Benczik, S. Z.; Schmittmann, B.; Zia, R. K. P.

    2008-05-01

    We propose an exactly solvable model for the dynamics of voters in a two-party system. The opinion formation process is modeled on a random network of agents. The dynamical nature of interpersonal relations is also reflected in the model, as the connections in the network evolve with the dynamics of the voters. In the infinite time limit, an exact solution predicts the emergence of consensus, for arbitrary initial conditions. However, before consensus is reached, two different metastable states can persist for exponentially long times. One state reflects a perfect balancing of opinions, the other reflects a completely static situation. An estimate of the associated lifetimes suggests that lack of consensus is typical for large systems.

  7. Denmark lacks coherent policy on basic research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibba, Michael; Bentin, Thomas

    1999-01-01

    suggest that more critical problems exist that must be addressed immediately to ensure the long-term health of Danish science. Chief among these are a poorly funded and misdirected policy on basic research funding, and conditions of employment that restrict the research opportunities of young scientists....... Danish science is moderately well funded 1 . We have modern facilities, an excellent level of technical support and a buoyant biotechnology sector 2 . What is sorely lacking is a coherent policy on the funding and nurturing of basic research. Entry-level appointments (assistant professor) have a heavy......-equipped to adapt to the rapid development of new areas in basic research. The only surprise is that Danish science has remained so competitive for so long. How long this will continue to be the case is unclear when there is little to attract young scientists. Without a competitive basic research component...

  8. Lack of Dystrophin Affects Bronchial Epithelium in mdx Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morici, Giuseppe; Rappa, Francesca; Cappello, Francesco; Pace, Elisabetta; Pace, Andrea; Mudò, Giuseppa; Crescimanno, Grazia; Belluardo, Natale; Bonsignore, Maria R

    2016-10-01

    Mild exercise training may positively affect the course of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD). Training causes mild bronchial epithelial injury in both humans and mice, but no study assessed the effects of exercise in mdx mice, a well known model of DMD. The airway epithelium was examined in mdx (C57BL/10ScSn-Dmdmdx) mice, and in wild type (WT, C57BL/10ScSc) mice either under sedentary conditions (mdx-SD, WT-SD) or during mild exercise training (mdx-EX, WT-EX). At baseline, and after 30 and 45 days of training (5 d/wk for 6 weeks), epithelial morphology and markers of regeneration, apoptosis, and cellular stress were assessed. The number of goblet cells in bronchial epithelium was much lower in mdx than in WT mice under all conditions. At 30 days, epithelial regeneration (PCNA positive cells) was higher in EX than SD animals in both groups; however, at 45 days, epithelial regeneration decreased in mdx mice irrespective of training, and the percentage of apoptotic (TUNEL positive) cells was higher in mdx-EX than in WT-EX mice. Epithelial expression of HSP60 (marker of stress) progressively decreased, and inversely correlated with epithelial apoptosis (r = -0.66, P = 0.01) only in mdx mice. Lack of dystrophin in mdx mice appears associated with defective epithelial differentiation, and transient epithelial regeneration during mild exercise training. Hence, lack of dystrophin might impair repair in bronchial epithelium, with potential clinical consequences in DMD patients. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2218-2223, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26868633

  9. Lack of universal scaling in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouquet, A.; Brachet, M.; Krstulovic, G.; Lee, E.; Mininni, P.; Rosenberg, D. L.

    2012-12-01

    Universality is often viewed as a hallmark of turbulent flows, with a search for scaling exponents that derive from intrinsic dynamics and do not depend on initial conditions or forcing, the Kolmogorov law for the energy spectrum of an incompressible fluid being the best known case. However, in the presence of waves due to an external agent such as rotation, stratification or a strong large-scale magnetic field B0, different regimes -- such as weak or strong turbulence, may arise and thus, different scaling behavior may arise as well. This is observed for example in the ocean, and it leads to different mixing and transport properties. In this talk, we shall first review, in the context of MHD turbulence, the phenomenological models that can be constructed using the following plausible dimensionless parameters: (i) RT, the ratio of characteristic time scales (here, the wave period Tw=L_0/B_0 and the eddy-turn-over time based on large-scale length and velocity, TNL=L0/U_0; (ii) RE, the ratio of magnetic to kinetic energy EM/E_V; and (iii) RA, the degree of alignment between the velocity and the magnetic field \\cos(v,b), or between the magnetic potential and magnetic induction, \\cos(A,b). Note that these ratios can also be defined at scale ℓ of velocity uℓ (as opposed to L0, U0), and thus one can consider as well the variation of such ratios across scales. We shall then contrast these models with data stemming from (mostly) solar observations that indicate a clear lack of universal scaling behavior. Similarly, a number of direct numerical simulations (DNS) including some at high resolution, in the spin-down of forcing case, in the presence of boundaries or not, and with or without an imposed strong external magnetic field B0, all point-out to different energy spectra, although the attainable Reynolds numbers in present-day DNS are still limited when contrasted with geophysical and astrophysical flows. In particular, we shall show that, when using as initial

  10. Differences in the cell wall architecture of melanin lacking and melanin producing Cryptococcus neoformans clinical isolates from India: an electron microscopic study Isolados clínicos de Cryptococcus neoformans, provenientes da Índia, produtores ou não de melanina: um estudo em microscopia eletrônica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piyali Mandal

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Cryptococcus neoformans is an important opportunistic fungal pathogen that causes life-threatening infection of the central nervous system. A major virulence factor for C. neoformans is the production of melanin in the cell wall. Using transmission electron microscopy, we studied the cell walls of three pairs of isolates obtained from patients with dual cryptococcal infections, where a melanotic and an albino strain were isolated from the CSF of each patient. Transmission Electron Microscopy revealed that the albino strains lacked a melanin layer whereas a melanin layer was associated with the cell wall of the melanotic strains, comprising approximately 75% of the cell wall area. The cell wall size of the melanin producing cells was approximately double the size the albino isolates' cell walls (p value Cryptococcus neoformans é um importante fungo oportunista patogênico que causa infecção no sistema nervoso central, e que pode levar o paciente à morte. Um dos principais fatores de virulência do C. neoformans é a produção de melanina na parede celular. Utilizando microscopia eletrônica de transmissão, nós estudamos as paredes celulares de três pares de isolados obtidos de pacientes com dupla infecção pelo fungo, onde um isolado melanizado e um albino foram isolados do líquor de cada paciente. A microscopia eletrônica de transmissão revelou que as cepas albinas não apresentavam a camada de melanina enquanto que uma camada de melanina estava associada com a parede celular de cepas melanóticas, constituindo aproximadamente 75% da área da parede celular. O tamanho da parede celular das células produtoras de melanina foi aproximadamente o dobro do tamanho da parede celular dos isolados albinos (p < 0,003. Neste estudo, a microscopia eletrônica de transmissão revelou que as diferenças na estrutura dos isolados albinos sem melanina e dos isolados produtores de melanina estava associada à parede celular e a camada de melanina.

  11. Thyroid development in zebrafish lacking Taz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappalardo, Andrea; Porreca, Immacolata; Caputi, Luigi; De Felice, Elena; Schulte-Merker, Stephan; Zannini, Mariastella; Sordino, Paolo

    2015-11-01

    Taz is a signal-responsive transcriptional coregulator implicated in several biological functions, from chondrogenesis to regulation of organ size. Less well studied, however, is its role in thyroid formation. Here, we explored the in vivo effects on thyroid development of morpholino (MO)-mediated knockdown of wwtr1, the gene encoding zebrafish Taz. The wwtr1 gene is expressed in the thyroid primordium and pharyngeal tissue of developing zebrafish. Compared to mammalian cells, in which Taz promotes expression of thyroid transcription factors and thyroid differentiation genes, wwtr1 MO injection in zebrafish had little or no effect on the expression of thyroid transcription factors, and differentially altered the expression of thyroid differentiation genes. Analysis of wwtr1 morphants at later stages of development revealed that the number and the lumen of thyroid follicles, and the number of thyroid follicle cells, were significantly smaller. In addition, Taz-depleted larvae displayed patterning defects in ventral cranial vessels that correlate with lateral displacement of thyroid follicles. These findings indicate that the zebrafish Taz protein is needed for the normal differentiation of the thyroid and are the first to suggest that Taz confers growth advantage to the endocrine gland.

  12. Lack of efficacy of ergocalciferol repletion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Wasser

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Vitamin D has become an area of intensive scrutiny, both in medical and lay literature. However, there are limited data to suggest proper repletion regimens for those patients who have hypovitaminosis D. Consequently, various methods are used in clinical practice. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of various treatment strategies for hypovitaminosis D in an ambulatory internal medicine practice. Methods: A retrospective chart review between October 2005 and June 2010 of a suburban internal medicine practice was performed via query of the electronic medical record (Centricity, General Electric Healthcare, UK. Patients with a 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration less than 32 mg/dl were identified and treated. Treatment success was defined as 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations greater than 32 mg/dl. Statistical analysis to assess changes in vitamin D level controlling for season, comorbidities, and demographics were used. Results: A total of 607 treatment episodes were identified, with 395 excluded due to lack of follow-up vitamin D level within 16 weeks, no treatment documented, topical treatment, doxercalciferol treatment, or non-compliance. Of the remaining patients, there were 212 treatment instances on 178 patients. Ergocalciferol 50,000 international units (IU was used most frequently (71.4% of the time.. A higher initial vitamin D level was positively associated with treatment success (adjusted odds ratio = 1.11, p=0.002. Increased doses of ergocalciferol increased the likelihood of treatment success (p=0.0011. Seasonal variation was related to posttreatment 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration as was body mass index (BMI (p=0.003 and p=0.044. Conclusion: Pretreatment levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D, BMI, season, and vitamin D dose are predictors of successful hypovitaminosis D treatment. Our data suggest that patients with initial 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations of <20 should be treated with a higher total dose of

  13. Behavioral characterization of mice lacking Trek channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelsey eMirkovic

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Two-pore domain K+ (K2P channels are thought to underlie background K+ conductance in many cell types. The Trek subfamily of K2P channels consists of three members, Trek1/Kcnk2, Trek2/Kcnk10, and Traak/Kcnk4, all three of which are expressed in the rodent CNS. Constitutive ablation of the Trek1 gene in mice correlates with enhanced sensitivity to ischemia and epilepsy, decreased sensitivity to the effects of inhaled anesthetics, increased sensitivity to thermal and mechanical pain, and resistance to depression. While the distribution of Trek2 mRNA in the CNS is broad, little is known about the relevance of this Trek family member to neurobiology and behavior. Here, we probed the effect of constitutive Trek2 ablation, as well as the simultaneous constitutive ablation of all three Trek family genes, in paradigms that assess motor activity, coordination, anxiety-related behavior, learning and memory, and drug-induced reward-related behavior. No differences were observed between Trek2–/– and Trek1/2/Traak–/– mice in coordination or total distance traveled in an open-field. A gender-dependent impact of Trek ablation on open-field anxiety-related behavior was observed, as female but not male Trek2–/– and Trek1/2/Traak–/– mice spent more time in, and made a greater number of entries into, the center of the open-field than wild-type counterparts. Further evaluation of anxiety-related behavior in the elevated plus maze and light/dark box, however, did not reveal a significant influence of genotype on performance for either gender. Furthermore, Trek–/– mice behaved normally in tests of learning and memory, including contextual fear conditioning and novel object recognition, and with respect to opioid-induced motor stimulation and conditioned place preference. Collectively, these data argue that despite their broad distribution in the CNS, Trek channels exert a minimal influence on a wide-range of behaviors.

  14. Activating Ras mutations fail to ensure efficient replication of adenovirus mutants lacking VA-RNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schümann, Michael; Dobbelstein, Matthias

    2006-01-01

    Adenoviruses lacking their PKR-antagonizing VA RNAs replicate poorly in primary cells. It has been suggested that these virus recombinants still replicate efficiently in tumor cells with Ras mutations and might therefore be useful in tumor therapy. The ability of interferon-sensitive viruses...... to grow in Ras-mutant tumor cells is generally ascribed to a postulated inhibitory effect of mutant Ras on PKR. We have constructed a set of isogenic adenoviruses that lack either or both VA RNA species, and tested virus replication in a variety of cell species with different Ras status. In tendency, VA......-less viruses replicated with higher efficiency in Ras-mutant cells, as compared to cell lines without Ras mutation. However, several exceptions to this rule were observed, arguing against a direct inhibition of PKR by mutant Ras. Phosphorylation of the PKR-substrate eIF2alpha was observed regardless of the Ras...

  15. The physiological role of mitochondrial calcium revealed by mice lacking the mitochondrial calcium uniporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xin; Liu, Jie; Nguyen, Tiffany; Liu, Chengyu; Sun, Junhui; Teng, Yanjie; Fergusson, Maria M; Rovira, Ilsa I; Allen, Michele; Springer, Danielle A; Aponte, Angel M; Gucek, Marjan; Balaban, Robert S; Murphy, Elizabeth; Finkel, Toren

    2013-12-01

    Mitochondrial calcium has been postulated to regulate a wide range of processes from bioenergetics to cell death. Here, we characterize a mouse model that lacks expression of the recently discovered mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU). Mitochondria derived from MCU(-/-) mice have no apparent capacity to rapidly uptake calcium. Whereas basal metabolism seems unaffected, the skeletal muscle of MCU(-/-) mice exhibited alterations in the phosphorylation and activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase. In addition, MCU(-/-) mice exhibited marked impairment in their ability to perform strenuous work. We further show that mitochondria from MCU(-/-) mice lacked evidence for calcium-induced permeability transition pore (PTP) opening. The lack of PTP opening does not seem to protect MCU(-/-) cells and tissues from cell death, although MCU(-/-) hearts fail to respond to the PTP inhibitor cyclosporin A. Taken together, these results clarify how acute alterations in mitochondrial matrix calcium can regulate mammalian physiology.

  16. Association between friction and wear in diarthrodial joints lacking lubricin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jay, Gregory D; Torres, Jahn R; Rhee, David K; Helminen, Heikki J; Hytinnen, Mika M; Cha, Chung-Ja; Elsaid, Khaled; Kim, Kyung-Suk; Cui, Yajun; Warman, Matthew L

    2007-01-01

    Objective The glycoprotein lubricin (encoded by the gene Prg4) is secreted by surface chondrocytes and synovial cells, and has been shown to reduce friction in vitro. In contrast to man-made bearings, mammalian diarthrodial joints must endogenously produce friction-reducing agents. This study was undertaken to investigate whether friction is associated with wear. Methods The lubricating ability of synovial fluid (SF) samples from humans with genetic lubricin deficiency was tested in vitro. The coefficient of friction in the knee joints of normal and lubricin-null mice was measured ex vivo; these joints were also studied by light and electron microscopy. Atomic force microscopy was used to image and measure how lubricin reduces friction in vitro. Results SF lacking lubricin failed to reduce friction in the boundary mode. Joints of lubricin-null mice showed early wear and higher friction than joints from their wild-type counterparts. Lubricin self-organized and reduced the work of adhesion between apposing asperities. Conclusion These data show that friction is coupled with wear at the cartilage surface in vivo. They imply that acquired lubricin degradation occurring in inflammatory joint diseases predisposes the cartilage to damage. Lastly, they suggest that lubricin, or similar biomolecules, will have applications in man-made devices in which reducing friction is essential. PMID:17968947

  17. Microglia Lacking E Prostanoid Receptor Subtype 2 Have Enhanced Aβ Phagocytosis yet Lack Aβ-Activated Neurotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shie, Feng-Shiun; Breyer, Richard M.; Montine, Thomas J.

    2005-01-01

    Experimental therapies for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) are focused on enhanced clearance of neurotoxic Aβ peptides from brain. Microglia can be neuroprotective by phagocytosing Aβ; however, this comes at the cost of activated innate immunity that causes paracrine damage to neurons. Here, we show that ablation of E prostanoid receptor subtype 2 (EP2) significantly increased microglial-mediated clearance of Aβ peptides from AD brain sections and enhanced microglial Aβ phagocytosis in cell culture. The enhanced phagocytosis was PKC-dependent and was associated with elevated microglial secretion of the chemoattractant chemokines, macrophage inflammatory protein-1α and macrophage chemoattractant protein-1. This suggested that microglial activation is negatively regulated by EP2 signaling through suppression of prophagocytic cytokine secretion. However, despite this enhancement of Aβ phagocytosis, lack of EP2 completely suppressed Aβ-activated microglia-mediated paracrine neurotoxicity. These data demonstrate that blockade of microglial EP2 is a highly desirable mechanism for AD therapy that can maximize neuroprotective actions while minimizing bystander damage to neurons. PMID:15793296

  18. 29 CFR 18.602 - Lack of personal knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Lack of personal knowledge. 18.602 Section 18.602 Labor... OFFICE OF ADMINISTRATIVE LAW JUDGES Rules of Evidence Witnesses § 18.602 Lack of personal knowledge. A... witness has personal knowledge of the matter. Evidence to prove personal knowledge may, but need...

  19. Sequencing and Gene Expression Analysis of Leishmania tropica LACK Gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nour Hammoudeh

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Leishmania Homologue of receptors for Activated C Kinase (LACK antigen is a 36-kDa protein, which provokes a very early immune response against Leishmania infection. There are several reports on the expression of LACK through different life-cycle stages of genus Leishmania, but only a few of them have focused on L.tropica.The present study provides details of the cloning, DNA sequencing and gene expression of LACK in this parasite species. First, several local isolates of Leishmania parasites were typed in our laboratory using PCR technique to verify of Leishmania parasite species. After that, LACK gene was amplified and cloned into a vector for sequencing. Finally, the expression of this molecule in logarithmic and stationary growth phase promastigotes, as well as in amastigotes, was evaluated by Reverse Transcription-PCR (RT-PCR technique.The typing result confirmed that all our local isolates belong to L.tropica. LACK gene sequence was determined and high similarity was observed with the sequences of other Leishmania species. Furthermore, the expression of LACK gene in both promastigotes and amastigotes forms was confirmed.Overall, the data set the stage for future studies of the properties and immune role of LACK gene products.

  20. Pleomorphic lipoma lacking mature fat component in extensive myxoid stroma: a great diagnostic challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Xu-Yong

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pleomorphic lipoma is a relatively uncommon entity, and is considered as a variant of spindle cell lipoma. Histologically, spindle cell lipoma/pleomorphic lipoma consists of varying quantity of mature fat, bland spindle cells and ropey collagen. In addition, pleomorphic lipoma is characterized by multinucleate giant cells, which possess the “floret-like” nuclei and marked pleomorphism. So, in contrast to spindle cell lipoma, pleomorphic lipoma is more easily misdiagnosed as a malignant tumor. Herein, we report a peculiar case of pleomorphic lipoma occurring in axilla with entirely devoid of mature fat in a 71-year-old male. The histopathological findings demonstrated the tumor was made up of bland spindle cells admixed with scattered “floret-like” cells and irregular ropey collagen in an extensive myxoid stroma. Immunostaining showed that the tumor was positive for the Vimentin, Bcl-2 and CD34, and was negative for S-100, desmin, CD68, and α–SMA. Although no fat component was found in the whole section, the tumor was still diagnosed as a pelomprphic lipoma. To our knowledge, this is the third reported case of pelomprphic lipoma which entirely lacked lipomatous component. Because of the existence of atypical multinucleate giant cells and lack of mature fat, this tumor may be easily misdiagnosed nonlipomatous lesions, such as myxoid fibrosarcoma, giant cell fibroblastoma. So, it is necessary to pay careful attention to the histological spectrum of pleomorphic lipoma, including the tumor with devoid of fat, and it should be kept in mind that pelomprphic lipoma still can be diagnosed even if lacking lipomatous component. Virtual slides The virtual slide(s for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1967123180611361

  1. 1 in 3 Hospitals in Developing World Lack Running Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/news/fullstory_159695.html 1 in 3 Hospitals in Developing World Lack Running Water Clean water ... HealthDay News) -- Clean running water is essential for hospital sanitation, but a new report finds a third ...

  2. Muscle Regeneration and Myogenic Differentiation Defects in Mice Lacking TIS7

    OpenAIRE

    Vadivelu, Santhosh K.; Kurzbauer, Robert; Dieplinger, Benjamin; ZWEYER, MARGIT; Schafer, Ralf; Wernig, Anton; Vietor, Ilja; Huber, Lukas A.

    2004-01-01

    The tetradecanoyl phorbol acetate-induced sequence 7 gene (tis7) is regulated during cell fate processes and functions as a transcriptional coregulator. Here, we describe the generation and analysis of mice lacking the tis7 gene. Surprisingly, TIS7 knockout mice show no gross histological abnormalities and are fertile. Disruption of the tis7 gene by homologous recombination delayed muscle regeneration and altered the isometric contractile properties of skeletal muscles after muscle crush dama...

  3. Postreceptoral contributions to the light-adapted ERG of mice lacking b-waves

    OpenAIRE

    Shirato, Suguru; Maeda, Hidetaka; Miura, Gen; Frishman, Laura J.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the contributions of postreceptoral neurons to the light-adapted ERG of the Nob mouse, a model for complete-type congenital stationary night blindness (CSNB1) that lacks a b-wave from depolarizing bipolar cells. Ganzfeld ERGs were recorded from anesthetized adult control mice, control mice injected intravitreally with L-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyric acid (Control APB mice) to remove On pathway activity, and Nob mice. ERGs also were recorded after PDA (c...

  4. Visual Responses in Mice Lacking Critical Components of All Known Retinal Phototransduction Cascades

    OpenAIRE

    Annette E Allen; Cameron, Morven A.; Timothy M Brown; Vugler, Anthony A.; Lucas, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    The mammalian visual system relies upon light detection by outer-retinal rod/cone photoreceptors and melanopsin-expressing retinal ganglion cells. Gnat1(-/-); Cnga3(-/-); Opn4(-/-) mice lack critical elements of each of these photoreceptive mechanisms via targeted disruption of genes encoding rod alpha transducin (Gnat1); the cone-specific alpha 3 cyclic nucleotide gated channel subunit (Cnga3); and melanopsin (Opn4). Although assumed blind, we show here that these mice retain sufficiently wi...

  5. Lack of Rev7 function results in development of tubulostromal adenomas in mouse ovary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Abdolrahim; Khalaj, Maryam; Akiyama, Kouyou; Mukai, Yoshiyuki; Matsumoto, Hirokazu; Acosta, Tomas J; Said, Neveen; Yoshida, Midori; Kunieda, Tetsuo

    2015-09-01

    Rev7 is a subunit of Polζ, one of the translesion DNA synthesis (TLS) polymerases involved in DNA damage repair. We recently found that Rev7 is also essential for germ cell development in mouse. In the present study, we found the development of ovarian tumors in Rev7 mutant mouse, suggesting the involvement of TLS deficiency in the etiology of ovarian tumor. The Rev7 mutant mice showed complete lack of oocytes and follicles in the ovary. The lack of follicles causes a significant increase of gonadotropin level and an increase in the proliferation of ovarian cells. As a result, the weight of the ovaries of Rev7 mutant mice increased with age and they developed tubulostromal adenomas. However, the remarkable overgrowth of ovaries occurred after gonadotropin level decreases at older ages, suggesting gonadotropin-independent progression of the ovarian tumors. In addition, the Rev7 mutant fibroblasts and ovarian cells showed significant accumulation of DNA damage. These findings suggest that not only increased gonadotropin levels but also lack of DNA damage repair function could be responsible for the development of ovarian tumors in the Rev7 mutant mouse. PMID:26004212

  6. Bordetella pertussis Strain Lacking Pertactin and Pertussis Toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Margaret M; Sen, Kathryn; Weigand, Michael R; Skoff, Tami H; Cunningham, Victoria A; Halse, Tanya A; Tondella, M Lucia

    2016-02-01

    A Bordetella pertussis strain lacking 2 acellular vaccine immunogens, pertussis toxin and pertactin, was isolated from an unvaccinated infant in New York State in 2013. Comparison with a French strain that was pertussis toxin-deficient, pertactin wild-type showed that the strains carry the same 28-kb deletion in similar genomes.

  7. Garlic exhibits lack of control over gastrointestinal nematodes in goats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastrointestinal nematodes (GIN) continue to hinder small ruminant production because of anthelmintic resistance and lack of effective products for GIN control in organic production. The objective of this study was to examine the effectiveness of a commercially available certified organic garlic pr...

  8. Siim Nestor soovitab : lack of Eoins / Siim Nestor

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Nestor, Siim, 1974-

    2008-01-01

    Väikefirma Seksound annab sel nädalavahetusel välja Viljandi indiebändi Lack of Eoins esikplaadi "Echo Group" (plaadiesitlused 11. dets. Tallinnas Von Krahlis ja 12. dets. Tartus Genialistide klubis, esinevad ka Ans. Andur ja Popidiot, plaate keerutavad Hannes Praks ja Taavi Laatsit)

  9. Lack of peaceful resolution with Israel: economic cost for Palestinians

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.M.C. de Boer (Paul)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractWe propose to estimate the economic cost for Palestine and for Palestinian residents due to the lack of peaceful resolution with Israel. Thereto we make use of the consensus estimates of the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and the World Bank (WB) of real growth rates of economic variab

  10. Replication and virulence of pseudorabies virus mutants lacking glycoprotein gX.

    OpenAIRE

    Thomsen, D R; Marchioli, C C; Yancey, R J; Post, L E

    1987-01-01

    Pseudorabies virus (PRV) glycoprotein gX accumulates in the medium of infected cells. In an attempt to study the function of gX, two viruses were constructed that lacked a functional gX gene. One virus, PRV delta GX1, was derived by insertion of the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene into the gX-coding region. The other virus, PRV delta GXTK-, was derived by subsequent deletion of the inserted herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene. Both viruses replicated in cell cultures but pro...

  11. Differences in the cell wall architecture of melanin lacking and melanin producing Cryptococcus neoformans clinical isolates from India: an electron microscopic study Isolados clínicos de Cryptococcus neoformans, provenientes da Índia, produtores ou não de melanina: um estudo em microscopia eletrônica

    OpenAIRE

    Piyali Mandal; Tara S. Roy; Das, Taposh K.; Uma Banerjee; Immaculata Xess; Nosanchuk, Joshua D.

    2007-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is an important opportunistic fungal pathogen that causes life-threatening infection of the central nervous system. A major virulence factor for C. neoformans is the production of melanin in the cell wall. Using transmission electron microscopy, we studied the cell walls of three pairs of isolates obtained from patients with dual cryptococcal infections, where a melanotic and an albino strain were isolated from the CSF of each patient. Transmission Electron Microscopy ...

  12. Lack of fiscal discipline: Challenges and possible solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Ćirović Nikola

    2013-01-01

    The lack of fiscal discipline is one of the most pressing issues in the framework of various economic systems today. The consequences of the global economic crisis have shown all the weaknesses of measures and mechanisms in terms of decision-making in fiscal policy. This problem can be seen now in almost every country. The problem of inadequate implementation of fiscal policy and the maintenance of fiscal discipline is reflected in the fact that their conse...

  13. Lack of time management as a psychosocial work risk

    OpenAIRE

    Ramon Cladellas

    2008-01-01

    This paper is aimed to explore the possible relationship between workers' lack of time management and several psychosocial risks. The psychosocial risks were assessed by means of the ISTAS21 Questionnaire, the Spanish version of the CoPsoQ (Copenhagen Psychological Questionnaire). More specifically, nine dimensions, which are directly related with time management, satisfaction, health and stress, were selected for evaluation. Time management was measured through the following variables: quant...

  14. The subjetivacion of the lack: between Lacan and Hegel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Souyris Oportot

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The present article develops a reflection concerning the figure of the subjectivation and the statute of the lack  in relation to Jacques Lacan y Hegel's thought . The analysis will be addressed from a philosophical approach as and with a psychoanalytic perspective, to show the need to understand the subjectivity, not already as a "work" of duel, but ligature to the loss and the split. The idea is that the above mentioned significances make possible deconstruir and to rethink the duel in lack, that he structures to the subject in an experience "escripturaire" (escriptural and, for the same thing, of dispossession. So that the figure of the subjetivación "in" lack  will allow to grant an important place to the non-place while I spread where the unthinkable thing and the "Autre" registers.  Once exposed this, the reflection will focus on the tragic exigences behind experience “escripturaire” expressed in the image of Antigone

  15. Evidence for lack of DNA photoreactivating enzyme in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Photoreactivating enzyme (DNA photolyase; deoxyribocyclobutadipyrimidine pyrimidine-lyase, EC 4.1.99.3) repairs uv damage to DNA by utilizing the energy of near-uv/visible light to split pyrimidine dimers into monomers. The enzyme is widespread in nature but is absent in certain species in a seemingly unpredictable manner. Its presence in humans has been a source of considerable controversy. To help resolve the issue the authors used a very specific and sensitive assay to compare photoreactivation activity in human, rattlesnake, yeast, and Escherichia coli cells. Photolyase was easily detectable in E. coli, yeast, and rattlesnake cell-free extracts but none was detected in cell-free extracts from HeLa cells or human white blood cells with an assay capable of detecting 10 molecules per cell. They conclude that humans most likely do not have DNA photolyase. 45 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  16. Meiosis I in Xenopus oocytes is not error-prone despite lacking spindle assembly checkpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dandan; Shao, Hua; Wang, Hongmei; Liu, X Johné

    2014-01-01

    The spindle assembly checkpoint, SAC, is a surveillance mechanism to control the onset of anaphase during cell division. SAC prevents anaphase initiation until all chromosome pairs have achieved bipolar attachment and aligned at the metaphase plate of the spindle. In doing so, SAC is thought to be the key mechanism to prevent chromosome nondisjunction in mitosis and meiosis. We have recently demonstrated that Xenopus oocyte meiosis lacks SAC control. This prompted the question of whether Xenopus oocyte meiosis is particularly error-prone. In this study, we have karyotyped a total of 313 Xenopus eggs following in vitro oocyte maturation. We found no hyperploid egg, out of 204 metaphase II eggs with countable chromosome spreads. Therefore, chromosome nondisjunction is very rare during Xenopus oocyte meiosis I, despite the lack of SAC. PMID:24646611

  17. Deregulated MAPK activity prevents adipocyte differentiation of fibroblasts lacking the retinoblastoma protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jacob B; Petersen, Rasmus K; Jørgensen, Claus;

    2002-01-01

    A functional retinoblastoma protein (pRB) is required for adipose conversion of preadipocyte cell lines and primary mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) in response to treatment with standard adipogenic inducers. Interestingly, lack of functional pRB in MEFs was recently linked to elevated Ras activity....../Akt are significantly increased in pRB-deficient MEFs both before and after the addition of adipogenic inducers. Consistently, we detected higher levels of activated Ras in MEFs lacking pRB. Suppression of ERK1/2 activation by the MEK inhibitor UO126 restored the ability of pRB-deficient MEFs to undergo adipocyte...... differentiation, as manifested by expression of adipocyte marker genes and lipid accumulation. Furthermore and reflecting the elevated levels of activated PKB/Akt in the pRB-deficient MEFs, differentiation proceeded in an insulin-independent manner. In conclusion, we suggest that pRB plays a pivotal role...

  18. Leishmania promastigotes lack phosphatidylserine but bind annexin V upon permeabilization or miltefosine treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrien Weingärtner

    Full Text Available The protozoan parasite Leishmania is an intracellular pathogen infecting and replicating inside vertebrate host macrophages. A recent model suggests that promastigote and amastigote forms of the parasite mimic mammalian apoptotic cells by exposing phosphatidylserine (PS at the cell surface to trigger their phagocytic uptake into host macrophages. PS presentation at the cell surface is typically analyzed using fluorescence-labeled annexin V. Here we show that Leishmania promastigotes can be stained by fluorescence-labeled annexin V upon permeabilization or miltefosine treatment. However, combined lipid analysis by thin-layer chromatography, mass spectrometry and (31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy revealed that Leishmania promastigotes lack any detectable amount of PS. Instead, we identified several other phospholipid classes such phosphatidic acid, phosphatidylethanolamine; phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylinositol as candidate lipids enabling annexin V staining.

  19. LACK OF NOTIFICATION OF COMPULSORY NOTIFICATION DISEASES IN HOSPITAL SETTINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubens Griep

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available This research encompasses the diseases of compulsory lack of notification inhospital settings and its interface with the Health Information System (Sistema de Informaçãode Saúde – SIS developed and implemented by the Welfare System in Brazil (Sistema Únicode Saúde – SUS. It tries to identify the elements epidemiology is based on, referring to itsaspects as basis for the development of epidemiologic monitoring actions of contagiousdiseases in the country. It focuses on the following question: what are the factors thatcontribute and/or determine the flaws in the process of notification for compulsory notificationdiseases? The results obtained through a questionnaire presented to the personnel responsiblefor the Hospital Infection Control Service (Serviço de Controle de Infecção Hospitalar showtheir lack of preparedness and technical knowledge, as well as their team’s, in relation to thedynamic functioning of the Epidemiologic Vigilance Service (Serviço de VigilânciaEpidemiológica. It points to the flaws due to the influence exerted by the public and/or privatecharacter of the institutions and considers the possibility of lack of commitment and responsibility of the multi-professional team in the maintenance of the preestablished flow. As aproposal, we present an adoption of continuous educational actions through the implementationof a Long Distance Post Graduation course, aiming for the development of new possibilities forthe teaching-learning process, characterized by the ongoing quest for new knowledge and focuson the student. The implementation of a local and municipal Permanent Habilitation Programmay complement the need for updating, as well as make the discussion of the cases and dataof the reality possible, thus aiming to adopt joined measures in order to cope with the presentedepidemiologic situations.

  20. Lack of Syneresis during Gelation of Dense Colloidal Suspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helbig; Hütter; Schönholzer

    2000-02-01

    This study reports experimental results about the shrinkage of particle networks produced by pH-induced destabilization of dense colloidal suspensions. The resulting solid networks exhibit no syneresis effects, at least prior to aging of the gel. From this lack of syneresis it is concluded that the solidification in wet particle systems either is not purely determined by energy (but is also influenced by entropic effects) or cannot be explained within the framework of (static) equilibrium thermodynamics at all. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  1. The lack of carbon stars in the Galactic bulge

    OpenAIRE

    Chunhua, Zhu; Guoliang, Lv; Zhaojun, Wang; Jun, Zhang

    2008-01-01

    In order to explain the lack of carbon stars in the Galactic bulge, we have made a detailed study of thermal pulse - asymptotic giant branch stars by using a population synthesis code. The effects of the oxygen overabundance and the mass loss rate on the ratio of the number of carbon stars to that of oxygen stars in the Galactic bulge are discussed. We find that the oxygen overabundance which is about twice as large as that in the solar neighbourhood (close to the present observations) is ins...

  2. Increased sensitivity to kindling in mice lacking TSP1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendus, D; Rankin-Gee, E K; Mustapha, M; Porter, B E

    2015-10-01

    The development of a hyperexcitable neuronal network is thought to be a critical event in epilepsy. Thrombospondins (TSPs) regulate synaptogenesis by binding the neuronal α2δ subunit of the voltage-gated calcium channel. TSPs regulate synapse formation during development and in the mature brain following injury. It is unclear if TSPs are involved in hyperexcitability that contributes to the development of epilepsy. Here we explore the development of epilepsy using a pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) kindling model in mice lacking TSP1 and TSP2. Unexpectedly, we found increased sensitivity to PTZ kindling in mice lacking TSP1, while mice lacking TSP2 kindled similar to wild-type. We found that the increased seizure susceptibility in the TSP1 knockout (KO) mice was not due to a compensatory increase in TSP2 mRNA as TSP1/2 KO mice were sensitive to PTZ, similar to the TSP1 KO mice. Furthermore, there were similar levels of TGF-B signal activation during kindling in the TSP1 KO mice compared to wild-type. We observed decreased expression of voltage-dependent calcium channel subunit CACNA2D1 mRNA in TSP1, TSP2, and TSP1/2 KO mice. Decreased CACNA2D2 mRNA was only detected in mice that lacked TSP1 and α2δ-1/2 protein levels in the cortex were lower in the TSP 1/2 KO mice. CACNA2D2 knockout mice have spontaneous seizures and increased PTZ seizure susceptibility. Here we report similar findings, TSP1, and TSP1/2 KO mice have low levels of CACNA2D2 mRNA expression and α2δ-1/2 receptor level in the cortex, and are more susceptible to seizures. CACNA2D2 mutations in mice and humans can cause epilepsy. Our data suggest TSP1 in particular may control CACNA2D2 levels and could be a modifier of seizure susceptibility.

  3. The lack of autophagy triggers precocious activation of Notch signaling during Drosophila oogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barth Julia MI

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The proper balance of autophagy, a lysosome-mediated degradation process, is indispensable for oogenesis in Drosophila. We recently demonstrated that egg development depends on autophagy in the somatic follicle cells (FC, but not in the germline cells (GCs. However, the lack of autophagy only affects oogenesis when FCs are autophagy-deficient but GCs are wild type, indicating that a dysfunctional signaling between soma and germline may be responsible for the oogenesis defects. Thus, autophagy could play an essential role in modulating signal transduction pathways during egg development. Results Here, we provide further evidence for the necessity of autophagy during oogenesis and demonstrate that autophagy is especially required in subsets of FCs. Generation of autophagy-deficient FCs leads to a wide range of phenotypes that are similar to mutants with defects in the classical cell-cell signaling pathways in the ovary. Interestingly, we observe that loss of autophagy leads to a precocious activation of the Notch pathway in the FCs as monitored by the expression of Cut and Hindsight, two downstream effectors of Notch signaling. Conclusion Our findings point to an unexpected function for autophagy in the modulation of the Notch signaling pathway during Drosophila oogenesis and suggest a function for autophagy in proper receptor activation. Egg development is affected by an imbalance of autophagy between signal sending (germline and signal receiving cell (FC, thus the lack of autophagy in the germline is likely to decrease the amount of active ligand and accordingly compensates for increased signaling in autophagy-defective follicle cells.

  4. Indigenous Traditional Medical Practitioners’ Lack of Formal Medical Education Impacts their Choices of Information Resources for the Treatment of Sickle Cell Anemia. A Review of: Olatokun, W. M., & Ajagbe, E. (2010. Analyzing traditional medical practitioners’ information-seeking behavior using Taylor’s information-use environment model. Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, 42, 122-135.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria C. Melssen

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective – To determine the information seeking behaviours of traditional medical practitioners who treat sickle cell anemia patients.Design – Qualitative, interviewer-administered, structured questionnaire.Setting – City and surrounding rural area of Ibadan, Nigeria.Subjects – The researchers selected for this study 160 indigenous traditional medical practitioners who specialize in the treatment of sickle cell anemia. The majority of the subjects were male, with 96 male and 64 female. The practitioners were selected from four traditional medical practitioner associations in Ibadan, Nigeria. The researchers met with the leaders of the four organizations and identified which of the 420 members specialize in the treatment of sickle cell anemia.Methods – The subjects were asked survey questions orally during face-to-face interviews. The decision to conduct interviews and ask the survey questions orally (rather than having the subjects complete the survey questions on their own was based on the perceived low literacy level of the traditional medical practitioners. Survey questions were written using the analytical framework of Taylor’s information use environment model. According to the authors, the premise of Taylor’s information use environment model is that individuals can be grouped according to their “professional and/or social characteristics” (p. 124. The group is then characterized by the members’ approach to problem solving: the type of problems they encounter, the setting they find themselves in during the problem, and how the group as a whole determines what course of action needs to be taken in order to solve the problem. The problem solving strategy of the group impacts its need for information and how that information is located and used.The questions asked by the researchers fell into one of five research areas:• the environment of the group• the diagnosis and treatment methods of traditional medical

  5. Efficient lighting in buildings: The lack of legislation in Portugal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The behavior of building designers is conditioned by the existing legislation and regulations in the national context in which they operate. However, in the Portuguese legislation there are no rules concerning the use of daylight, and therefore, designers are not stimulated to adopt solutions that make use of the existing potential of sunlight availability. In the same way, it is difficult to understand the lack of specific regulation, with quantified targets, limiting power density of artificial lighting installed inside buildings. The present opportunity, generated by the need to carry out the revision of Portuguese building energy systems regulation, should be used to fill the existing gap in national legislation regarding those matters. In this paper the authors present some proposals for future legislation that will have as central purpose the utilization of efficient lighting systems and the promotion of architectural solutions that optimize the use of daylighting. It is possible, and desirable, to add new directives to national legislation that contribute to the improvement of Portuguese buildings, characterized by its good performance in terms of daylight availability, and at the same time, increasing the energy efficiency and reducing the energy consumption of lighting systems installed in those buildings. - Highlights: • In the Portuguese legislation there are no rules concerning the use of daylight. • Lack of specific regulation limiting power density of artificial lighting. • Revision of Portuguese building energy systems regulation. • Some proposals for future legislation. • Improvement of Portuguese buildings promoting energy efficiency

  6. Sensory quality of soymilk and tofu from soybeans lacking lipoxygenases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Aijun; Smyth, Heather; Chaliha, Mridusmita; James, Andrew

    2016-03-01

    The oxidation of unsaturated lipids by lipoxygenases in soybeans causes undesirable flavors in soy foods. Using a traditional and a nontraditional soy food user group, we examined the cultural difference in perceiving the sensory characteristics of soymilk and tofu produced from soybeans with or without lipoxygenases (Lx123). The two groups described the samples using similar terms. The traditional users preferred the control soy milk and lipoxygenase-free tofu while the nontraditional users preferred the lipoxygenase-free soymilk with no preference for tofu. In a separate study, a trained descriptive taste panel compared the odor of soymilk and tofu from control soybeans or those lacking lipoxygenase-1 and lipoxygenase-2 (Lx12) or all three isomers (Lx123). The rancid/grassy odor was rated the lowest in Lx123 products, followed by Lx12 products with the control products given the highest rating. The Lx12 and Lx123 products were also sweeter and less bitter than the controls. Taken together, our results demonstrated that soybeans lacking lipoxygenases can produce soy foods with less undesirable aromas and are therefore likely more acceptable to the consumers. PMID:27004110

  7. The Obstacle of Remigration Due to the Lack of Revitalisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZSUZSANNA DABASI HALÁSZ

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Spatial differences have become an obstacle for Hungarian competiveness. In addition, the use or little use of brownfields has even more deepened regional inequalities. In our opinion, the lack of brownfields revitalisation and lack of opportunities forced population to migrate. Circular migration would be a solution to decrease regional inequalities. However, the non-revitalisation of rust areas prevents implementation of the process. Circular migration means that the labour force emigrates from the region, but it comes back later and then they use their competent, acquired knowledge (which they got somewhere else successfully to their investments. This process is not fulfilled, as the non-revitalised brownfields are attractive neither for population, nor for investors. Our research is based on 263 questionnaires. The major question groups of the questionnaires are: expectations regarding the labour market, assessment of home environment and related expectations, the history and structure of labour relations, employment-related information, potential employees, interpersonal social capital, income use plans, value system structures. All in all, the rust fields’ revitalisation is essential to keep the workforce and population. Our research aims to contribute to a complex revitalization strategy, which should have a significant role in the retention of labour, and its repatriation.

  8. Possible mechanisms of lack of dentin bridge formation in response to calcium hydroxide in primary teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G R Ravi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The usage of Calcium hydroxide (CaOH2 has wide applications due to the property of osteo-inductive, protective, and antibacterial actions. However, it is not used in primary teeth, as it fails to form reparative dentin and the exact mechanism has not been explained. The hypothesis: The authors propose an explanation that lack of dentin bridge formation in response to (CaOH2 in primary teeth could be multifactorial: inability of the deciduous stem cells to generate complete dentin-pulp-like tissue; the absence of calcium-magnesium-dependent adenosine triphosphatase (Ca-Mg ATPase in the odontoblasts; the pre-existing predilection of deciduous dentine pulp to form odontoclasts; the solubility of (CaOH2. Evaluation of the hypothesis: The hypothesis discusses the innate traits of the deciduous stem cells that lack the ability to form the dentin bridge, the absence of Ca-Mg ATPase enzyme and increased solubility of (CaOH2 together fail to stimulate the odontoblasts. Alternatively, pre-existing progenitor cells with proclivity to change into odontoclasts may cause internal resorption and hamper formation of reparative dentin.

  9. Lack of glutathione peroxidase-1 facilitates a pro-inflammatory and activated vascular endothelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Arpeeta; Yuen, Derek; Huet, Olivier; Pickering, Raelene; Stefanovic, Nada; Bernatchez, Pascal; de Haan, Judy B

    2016-04-01

    A critical early event in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis is vascular inflammation leading to endothelial dysfunction (ED). Reactive oxygen species and inflammation are inextricably linked and declining antioxidant defense is implicated in ED. We have previously shown that Glutathione peroxidase-1 (GPx1) is a crucial antioxidant enzyme in the protection against diabetes-associated atherosclerosis. In this study we aimed to investigate mechanisms by which lack of GPx1 affects pro-inflammatory mediators in primary aortic endothelial cells (PAECs) isolated from GPx1 knockout (GPx1 KO) mice. Herein, we demonstrate that lack of GPx1 prolonged TNF-α induced phosphorylation of P38, ERK and JNK, all of which was reversed upon treatment with the GPx1 mimetic, ebselen. In addition, Akt phosphorylation was reduced in GPx1 KO PAECs, which correlated with decreased nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability as compared to WT PAECs. Furthermore, IκB degradation was prolonged in GPx1 KO PAECS suggesting an augmentation of NF-κB activity. In addition, the expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM-1) was significantly increased in GPx1 KO PAECs and aortas. Static and dynamic flow adhesion assays showed significantly increased adhesion of fluorescently labeled leukocytes to GPx1 KO PAECS and aortas respectively, which were significantly reduced by ebselen treatment. Our results suggest that GPx1 plays a critical role in regulating pro-inflammatory pathways, including MAPK and NF-κB, and down-stream mediators such as VCAM-1, in vascular endothelial cells. Lack of GPx1, via effects on p-AKT also affects signaling to eNOS-derived NO. We speculate based on these results that declining antioxidant defenses as seen in cardiovascular diseases, by failing to regulate these pro-inflammatory pathways, facilitates an inflammatory and activated endothelium leading to ED and atherogenesis. PMID:26569096

  10. Effect of Host Species on RecG Phenotypes in Helicobacter pylori and Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Josephine; Tavakoli, Don; Tschumi, Ariane; Aras, Rahul A.; Martin J Blaser

    2004-01-01

    Recombination is a fundamental mechanism for the generation of genetic variation. Helicobacter pylori strains have different frequencies of intragenomic recombination, arising from deletions and duplications between DNA repeat sequences, as well as intergenomic recombination, facilitated by their natural competence. We identified a gene, hp1523, that influences recombination frequencies in this highly diverse bacterium and demonstrate its importance in maintaining genomic integrity by limitin...

  11. Nonadherence is Associated with Lack of HIV-Related Knowledge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyrehave, Charlotte; Rasmussen, Dlama Nggida; Hønge, Bo Langhoff;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Poor treatment adherence is a main barrier for effective antiretroviral therapy (ART) globally. HIV-related knowledge may affect understanding and utilization of HIV medical information, hence limited health literacy is a known barrier to treatment adherence. DESIGN AND METHODS: A cross......-sectional study included 494 HIV-infected individuals from the Bissau HIV Cohort in Guinea-Bissau. They completed a questionnaire designed for assessment of adherence and HIV-related knowledge. RESULTS: A majority were female, 41% were illiterate, 25% did not take the medicine during the last 4 days, and 23......% skipped their medicine during weekends. The most frequent reasons for not taking medicine were simply forgetting, side effects, lack of food, and being too ill to attend the clinic. Nonadherent patients had a lower level of HIV-related knowledge. CONCLUSION: Main barriers for nonadherence were side...

  12. Lack of time management as a psychosocial work risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramon Cladellas

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper is aimed to explore the possible relationship between workers' lack of time management and several psychosocial risks. The psychosocial risks were assessed by means of the ISTAS21 Questionnaire, the Spanish version of the CoPsoQ (Copenhagen Psychological Questionnaire. More specifically, nine dimensions, which are directly related with time management, satisfaction, health and stress, were selected for evaluation. Time management was measured through the following variables: quantitative demands, influences and control of the time. Drawing on a sample of 142 workers from four departments (development, implantation, support and administration, the research results show that the employees who belong to a department that offers few opportunities for individual time management are less satisfied, have worse general and mental health, and experience more behavioral, symptomatic and cognitive stress than those who can manage their work schedule.

  13. The lack of carbon stars in the Galactic bulge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhu Chun-Hua; Lv Guo-Liang; Wang Zhao-Jun; Zhang Jun

    2008-01-01

    In order to explain the lack of carbon stars in the Galactic bulge, we have made a detailed study of thermal pulseasymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) stars by using a population synthesis code. The effects of the oxygen overabundance and the mass loss rate on the ratio of the number of carbon stars to that of oxygen stars in the Galactic bulge are discussed. We find that the oxygen overabundance which is about twice as large as that in the solar neighbourhood (close to the present observations) is insufficient to explain the rareness of carbon stars in the bulge. We suggest that the large mass loss rate may serve as a controlling factor in the ratio of the number of carbon stars to that of oxygen stars.

  14. Lack of Evidence Supporting the Effectiveness of Disaster Supply Kits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heagele, Tara N

    2016-06-01

    We reviewed the available evidence in support of the effectiveness of disaster supply kits presently used in household emergency preparedness in the United States. The expectation that people should take responsibility for their own disaster preparedness has largely not taken into account contextual influences on disaster preparedness. The efficiency of current disaster supply kits used during critical postdisaster periods has not been empirically tested. Professional recommendations regarding the composition of disaster supply kits containing at least water, food, first aid, hygiene, and clothing have not been universally defined. This lack of consensus may lead to the assembling of disaster supply kits yielding suboptimal results. The use of disaster supply kits should continue to be nationally recommended, although additional research is needed to demonstrate their beneficial impact on survival and resilience after a disaster. PMID:27077362

  15. Lack of Cytochrome c in Mouse Fibroblasts Disrupts Assembly/Stability of Respiratory Complexes I and IV*S⃞

    OpenAIRE

    Vempati, Uma D.; Han, Xianlin; Moraes, Carlos T.

    2009-01-01

    Cytochrome c (cyt c) is a heme-containing protein that participates in electron transport in the respiratory chain and as a signaling molecule in the apoptotic cascade. Here we addressed the effect of removing mammalian cyt c on the integrity of the respiratory complexes in mammalian cells. Mitochondria from cyt c knockout mouse cells lacked fully assembled complexes I and IV and had reduced levels of complex III. A redox-deficient mutant of cyt c was unable to rescue ...

  16. 不同时期失面神经支配肌细胞直径与酶含量变化的研究%Study on the the diameter and enzyme content changes of muscle cells lack of facial-nerve innnervation at different periods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余睿芳; 张宝林; 王峰; 冯瑞铮

    2012-01-01

    目的:观察不同时期大鼠眼轮匝肌失神经支配后肌细胞直径与酶含量的变化,为临床面神经损伤最佳手术修复时机提供理论依据.方法:建立面神经损伤大鼠模型,应用计算机图像分析仪及比色分析技术,分别观察面神经离断术后第1、3天,第1、2、4、6、8周眼轮匝肌肌细胞直径和Ca2+-ATP酶、Na+-K+-ATP酶含量的变化.结果:面神经离断术后眼轮匝肌肌细胞直径从正常值降到只占正常值的20%;Ca2+-ATP酶、Na+-K+-ATP酶的灰度值亦分别从术后1天的(1.24±0.17)、(8.55±0.36)增加到术后8周的(1.42±0.10)、(9.74±0.33),差异均有统计学意义(P<0.05).结论:大鼠面神经离断术后眼轮匝肌肌细胞直径、Ca2+-ATP酶、Na+-K+-ATP酶含量下降,并且随失神经支配时间延长呈进行性下降,提示面神经损伤修复手术应早期进行,有利于面神经功能恢复.%Objective We aimed at the rats orbicularis oculi muscle cell diameter and enzyme content changes atdifferent periods of facial-nerve denervation in order to provide a theoretical basis for the best timing of facial-nervesurgical repair. Methods Rat models of facial nerve injury at different periods (1d, 3d, 1w, 2w, 4w, 6w, 8w) were madeand the changes of orbicularis oculi muscle cell diameter and the Ca2 +-atpases, Na +-K +-atpases content wereobserved by computer image analyzer and colorimetric analysis at different denervation periods. Results After facialnerve denervation, the diameter of muscle cell decreased to 20% of normal amount, and the grey level of Ca2+-atpases,Na+-K+-atpases increased from the first day after surgery(1.24±0.17),(8.55±0.36)to the eighth week(1.42±0.10),(9.74±0.33). The differences were statistically significant(P <0.05). Conclusion The muscle cell diameter,the Ca2+-atpases and Na+-K+-atpases content decreased after facial-nerve denervation and have a progressive decline with thetime extension, which suggests that early facial-nerve surgical

  17. Lack of bcr and abr promotes hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Yu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bcr and Abr are GTPase activating proteins that specifically downregulate activity of the small GTPase Rac in restricted cell types in vivo. Rac1 is expressed in smooth muscle cells, a critical cell type involved in the pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension. The molecular mechanisms that underlie hypoxia-associated pulmonary hypertension are not well-defined. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Bcr and abr null mutant mice were compared to wild type controls for the development of pulmonary hypertension after exposure to hypoxia. Also, pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells from those mice were cultured in hypoxia and examined for proliferation, p38 activation and IL-6 production. Mice lacking Bcr or Abr exposed to hypoxia developed increased right ventricular pressure, hypertrophy and pulmonary vascular remodeling. Perivascular leukocyte infiltration in the lungs was increased, and under hypoxia bcr-/- and abr-/- macrophages generated more reactive oxygen species. Consistent with a contribution of inflammation and oxidative stress in pulmonary hypertension-associated vascular damage, Bcr and Abr-deficient animals showed elevated endothelial leakage after hypoxia exposure. Hypoxia-treated pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells from Bcr- or Abr-deficient mice also proliferated faster than those of wild type mice. Moreover, activated Rac1, phosphorylated p38 and interleukin 6 were increased in these cells in the absence of Bcr or Abr. Inhibition of Rac1 activation with Z62954982, a novel Rac inhibitor, decreased proliferation, p38 phosphorylation and IL-6 levels in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells exposed to hypoxia. CONCLUSIONS: Bcr and Abr play a critical role in down-regulating hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension by deactivating Rac1 and, through this, reducing both oxidative stress generated by leukocytes as well as p38 phosphorylation, IL-6 production and proliferation of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells.

  18. Isolation and characterization of Escherichia coli mutants lacking inducible cyanase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilloton, M; Karst, F

    1987-03-01

    To determine the physiological role of cyanate aminohydrolase (cyanase, EC 3.5.5.3) in bacteria, mutants of Escherichia coli K12 devoid of this inducible activity were isolated and their properties investigated. Five independent mutations were localized next to lac; three of them lay between lacY and codA. Thus cyanase activity could depend on the integrity of one gene or set of clustered genes; we propose for this locus the symbol cnt. Growth of the mutant stains was more sensitive to cyanate than growth of wild-type strains. This difference was noticeable in synthetic medium in the presence of low concentrations of cyanate (less than or equal to 1 mM). Higher concentrations inhibited growth of both wild-type and mutant strains. Urea in aqueous solutions dissociates slowly into ammonium cyanate. Accordingly wild-type strains were able to grow on a synthetic medium containing 0.5 M-urea whereas mutants lacking cyanase were not. We conclude that cyanase could play a role in destroying exogenous cyanate originating from the dissociation of carbamoyl compounds such as urea; alternatively cyanate might constitute a convenient nitrogen source for bacteria able to synthesize cyanase in an inducible way.

  19. Lack of fiscal discipline: Challenges and possible solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ćirović Nikola

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The lack of fiscal discipline is one of the most pressing issues in the framework of various economic systems today. The consequences of the global economic crisis have shown all the weaknesses of measures and mechanisms in terms of decision-making in fiscal policy. This problem can be seen now in almost every country. The problem of inadequate implementation of fiscal policy and the maintenance of fiscal discipline is reflected in the fact that their consequences are not visible right away, but tend to show their negative effects much later. Today, we have a situation where a certain current government suffers badly implemented prior fiscal discipline of a previous government. The paper identified causes of fiscal indiscipline, which is most easily seen in the budget process. In addition to determining the causes of fiscal indiscipline, the author puts forward a set of different possible solutions that could positively affect the stabilization of the growing public debt and eliminate the cause of fiscal indiscipline. Possible solutions are analyzed, as well as the positive and negative aspects of their use, and possible implementation problems of specific solutions.

  20. Vulnerability to schizophrenia and lack of common sense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanghellini, G

    2000-01-01

    This article explores the hypothesis that the relational deficit in schizophrenia is not a consequence of acute symptoms and course but instead is a fundamental aspect of schizophrenic vulnerability. This basic relational deficit could be better understood as disconnectedness from common sense. Common sense is a tool for adaptation whose main scope is establishing cause-and-effect and motivational relationships in the physical and social realms. The common sense deficit appears to involve a lack of intuitive attunement (impaired capacity to accurately typify the mental states of other persons because of the incapacity to be involved in their mental lives) and a damaged social knowledge network (disorders of the background of knowledge useful for organizing everyday experiences). Three dimensions of schizophrenic vulnerability can be distinguished: the sensory, conceptualization, and attitudinal dimensions. Sensory disorders are aberrations of self, body, and world perceptions. Conceptualization disorders are disturbances in the attribution of meanings and intentions. Attitudinal disorders consist of eccentricities in the individual's structure of values and beliefs, characterized by distrust toward conventional knowledge and attunement. This article describes the present state and possible future directions of qualitative analyses and empirical investigations relevant to assessing the interplay between vulnerability dimensions and disorders of common sense.

  1. Lack of insula reactivity to aversive stimuli in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linnman, Clas; Coombs, Garth; Goff, Donald C; Holt, Daphne J

    2013-01-01

    Patients with schizophrenia may have altered pain perception, as suggested by clinical reports of pain insensitivity, and recent neuroimaging findings. Here, we examined neural responses to an aversive electrical stimulus and the immediate anticipation of such a stimulus using fMRI and a classical conditioning paradigm, which involved pairing an electrical shock with a neutral photograph. Fifteen men with schizophrenia and 13 healthy men, matched for demographic characteristics, electrical stimulation level and scan movement, were studied. The shock induced robust responses in midbrain, thalamus, cingulate gyrus, insula and somatosensory cortex in both groups. However, compared to controls, the schizophrenic patients displayed significantly lower activation of the middle insula (p(FWE)=0.002, T=5.72, cluster size=24 voxels). Moreover, the lack of insula reactivity in the schizophrenia group was predicted by the magnitude of positive symptoms (r=-0.46, p=0.04). In contrast, there were no significant differences between the two groups in the magnitude of neural responses during anticipation of the shock. These findings provide support for the existence of a basic deficit in interoceptive perception in schizophrenia, which could play a role in the generation and/or maintenance of psychotic states. PMID:23201307

  2. Clinical errors as a lack of context responsiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugatti, Matteo; Boswell, James F

    2016-09-01

    Although standardized treatments have the potential to decrease clinical errors, within-session responsiveness is complicated and complementary frameworks may be needed to foster enhanced responsiveness in the context of evidence-based treatments. Recent efforts have targeted the enhancement of flexibility and responsiveness in the delivery of manualized treatments, including the development of transdiagnostic treatments (i.e., protocols that are designed to be used across different diagnoses) intended to tailor intervention principles to the needs of individual patients. Context-Responsive Psychotherapy Integration (Constantino, Boswell, Bernecker, & Castonguay, 2013) offers an framework that supports the utilization of evidence-based clinical strategies in response to the identification of specific process markers. Failure to identify or appropriately respond to such markers may result in negative therapeutic process as well as outcomes. This case study uses the context-response psychotherapy integration framework to understand critical moments of clinical decision-making through examining an individual treatment case that unilaterally terminated after seven sessions of transdiagnostic treatment. This illustrative empirical case analysis focuses on three potential clinical errors, as indicated by a lack of responsiveness to three candidate process markers: (a) low outcome expectations, (b) self-strivings, and (c) outcome monitoring. For each clinical error, alternative clinical strategies are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27631853

  3. Clinical errors as a lack of context responsiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugatti, Matteo; Boswell, James F

    2016-09-01

    Although standardized treatments have the potential to decrease clinical errors, within-session responsiveness is complicated and complementary frameworks may be needed to foster enhanced responsiveness in the context of evidence-based treatments. Recent efforts have targeted the enhancement of flexibility and responsiveness in the delivery of manualized treatments, including the development of transdiagnostic treatments (i.e., protocols that are designed to be used across different diagnoses) intended to tailor intervention principles to the needs of individual patients. Context-Responsive Psychotherapy Integration (Constantino, Boswell, Bernecker, & Castonguay, 2013) offers an framework that supports the utilization of evidence-based clinical strategies in response to the identification of specific process markers. Failure to identify or appropriately respond to such markers may result in negative therapeutic process as well as outcomes. This case study uses the context-response psychotherapy integration framework to understand critical moments of clinical decision-making through examining an individual treatment case that unilaterally terminated after seven sessions of transdiagnostic treatment. This illustrative empirical case analysis focuses on three potential clinical errors, as indicated by a lack of responsiveness to three candidate process markers: (a) low outcome expectations, (b) self-strivings, and (c) outcome monitoring. For each clinical error, alternative clinical strategies are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record

  4. Lack of "immunological fitness" during fasting in metabolically challenged animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asterholm, Ingrid Wernstedt; McDonald, John; Blanchard, Pierre-Gilles; Sinha, Madhur; Xiao, Qiang; Mistry, Jehangir; Rutkowski, Joseph M; Deshaies, Yves; Brekken, Rolf A; Scherer, Philipp E

    2012-07-01

    Subclinical inflammation is frequently associated with obesity. Here, we aim to better define the acute inflammatory response during fasting. To do so, we analyzed representatives of immune-related proteins in circulation and in tissues as potential markers for adipose tissue inflammation and modulation of the immune system. Lipopolysaccharide treatment or high-fat diet led to an increase in circulating serum amyloid (SAA) and α1-acid glycoprotein (AGP), whereas adipsin levels were reduced. Mouse models that are protected against diet-induced challenges, such as adiponectin-overexpressing animals or mice treated with PPARγ agonists, displayed lower SAA levels and higher adip-sin levels. An oral lipid gavage, as well as prolonged fasting, increased circulating SAA concurrent with the elevation of free FA levels. Moreover, prolonged fasting was associated with an increased number of Mac2-positive crown-like structures, an increased capillary permeability, and an increase in several M2-type macrophage markers in adipose tissue. This fasting-induced increase in SAA and M2-type macrophage markers was impaired in metabolically challenged animals. These data suggest that metabolic inflexibility is associated with a lack of "immunological fitness." PMID:22504909

  5. Failures of metacognition and lack of insight in neuropsychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Anthony S; Bedford, Nicholas; Wiffen, Ben; Gilleen, James

    2012-05-19

    Lack of insight or unawareness of illness are the hallmarks of many psychiatric disorders, especially schizophrenia (SCZ) and other psychoses and could be conceived of as a failure in metacognition. Research in this area in the mental health field h as burgeoned with the development and widespread use of standard assessment instruments and the mapping out of the clinical and neuropsychological correlates of insight and its loss. There has been a growing appreciation of the multi-faceted nature of the concept and of the different 'objects' of insight, such as the general awareness that one is ill, to more specific metacognitive awareness of individual symptoms, impairments and performance. This in turn has led to the notion that insight may show modularity and may fractionate across different domains and disorders, supported by work that directly compares metacognition of memory deficits and illness awareness in patients with SCZ, Alzheimer's disease and brain injury. The focus of this paper will be on the varieties of metacognitive failure in psychiatry, particularly the psychoses. We explore cognitive models based on self-reflectiveness and their possible social and neurological bases, including data from structural and functional MRI. The medial frontal cortex appears to play an important role in self-appraisal in health and disease.

  6. Yeast lacking the amphiphysin family protein Rvs167 is sensitive to disruptions in sphingolipid levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toume, Moeko; Tani, Motohiro

    2016-08-01

    Rvs167 and Rvs161 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae are amphiphysin family proteins, which are involved in several important cellular events, such as invagination and scission of endocytic vesicles, and actin cytoskeleton organization. It has been reported that cellular dysfunctions caused by deletion of RVS167 or RVS161 are rescued by deletion of specific nonessential sphingolipid-metabolizing enzyme genes. Here, we found that yeast cells lacking RVS167 or RVS161 exhibit a decrease in sphingolipid levels. In rvs167∆ cells, the expression level of Orm2, a negative regulator of serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT) catalyzing the initial step of sphingolipid biosynthesis, was increased in a calcineurin-dependent manner, and the decrease in sphingolipid levels in rvs167∆ cells was reversed on deletion of ORM2. Moreover, repression of both ORM1 and ORM2 expression or overexpression of SPT caused a strong growth defect of rvs167∆ cells, indicating that enhancement of de novo sphingolipid biosynthesis is detrimental to rvs167∆ cells. In contrast, partial repression of LCB1-encoding SPT suppressed abnormal phenotypes caused by the deletion of RVS167, including supersensitivity to high temperature and salt stress, and impairment of endocytosis and actin cytoskeleton organization. In addition, the partial repression of SPT activity suppressed the temperature supersensitivity and abnormal vacuolar morphology caused by deletion of VPS1 encoding a dynamin-like GTPase, which is required for vesicle scission and is functionally closely related to Rvs167/Rvs161, whereas repression of both ORM1 and ORM2 expression in vps1∆ cells caused a growth defect. Thus, it was suggested that proper regulation of SPT activity is indispensable for amphiphysin-deficient cells. PMID:27312128

  7. Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002 nifJ mutant lacking pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeely, Kelsey; Xu, Yu; Ananyev, Gennady; Bennette, Nicholas; Bryant, Donald A; Dismukes, G Charles

    2011-04-01

    The nifJ gene codes for pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR), which reduces ferredoxin during fermentative catabolism of pyruvate to acetyl-coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA). A nifJ knockout mutant was constructed that lacks one of two pathways for the oxidation of pyruvate in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002. Remarkably, the photoautotrophic growth rate of this mutant increased by 20% relative to the wild-type (WT) rate under conditions of light-dark cycling. This result is attributed to an increase in the quantum yield of photosystem II (PSII) charge separation as measured by photosynthetic electron turnover efficiency determined using fast-repetition-rate fluorometry (F(v)/F(m)). During autofermentation, the excretion of acetate and lactate products by nifJ mutant cells decreased 2-fold and 1.2-fold, respectively. Although nifJ cells displayed higher in vitro hydrogenase activity than WT cells, H(2) production in vivo was 1.3-fold lower than the WT level. Inhibition of acetate-CoA ligase and pyruvate dehydrogenase complex by glycerol eliminated acetate production, with a resulting loss of reductant and a 3-fold decrease in H(2) production by nifJ cells compared to WT cells. Continuous electrochemical detection of dissolved H(2) revealed two temporally resolved phases of H(2) production during autofermentation, a minor first phase and a major second phase. The first phase was attributed to reduction of ferredoxin, because its level decreased 2-fold in nifJ cells. The second phase was attributed to glycolytic NADH production and decreased 20% in nifJ cells. Measurement of the intracellular NADH/NAD(+) ratio revealed that the reductant generated by PFOR contributing to the first phase of H(2) production was not in equilibrium with bulk NADH/NAD(+) and that the second phase corresponded to the equilibrium NADH-mediated process. PMID:21317262

  8. Medullary carcinoma of the breast: a tumour lacking keratin 19.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsimont, D; Lespagnard, L; Degeyter, M; Heimann, R

    1994-06-01

    The presence of keratin 19 (K19) was searched for by immunostaining in 16 medullary carcinomas, comprising 12 typical and four atypical cases, in 29 undifferentiated high-grade carcinomas (NOS-HG) with conspicuous lymphoid response and in 12 well differentiated low-grade carcinomas (NOS-LG). The medullary carcinomas were all negative whereas 23 of the high-grade and all 12 low-grade carcinomas expressed K19. Staining for K19 could be of value in the differential diagnosis of these tumours. Furthermore, these findings, with other observations, raise the possibility that medullary carcinoma cells could be linked to precursor cells of the terminal duct lobular units because both populations share several characteristics. PMID:7520414

  9. Impaired fear response in mice lacking GIT1

    OpenAIRE

    Schmalzigaug, Robert; Rodriguiz, Ramona M.; Bonner, Pamela E.; Davidson, Collin E.; Wetsel, William C.; Premont, Richard T.

    2009-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptor kinase interacting protein 1 (GIT1) belongs to the family of Arf GAP proteins, and has been implicated in the regulation of G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) sequestration, cell migration, synapse formation and dendritic spine morphogenesis in neurons. To extend these cellular studies on GIT1 to an in vivo system, we generated mice with globally inactivated Git1 gene by breeding mice carrying a conditional Git1flox allele with mice expressing the CMV-Cre transgene. ...

  10. Lack of response to unaligned chromosomes in mammalian female gametes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebestova, Jaroslava; Danylevska, Anna; Novakova, Lucia; Kubelka, Michal; Anger, Martin

    2012-08-15

    Chromosome segregation errors are highly frequent in mammalian female meiosis, and their incidence gradually increases with maternal age. The fate of aneuploid eggs is obviously dependent on the stringency of mechanisms for detecting unattached or repairing incorrectly attached kinetochores. In case of their failure, the newly formed embryo will inherit the impaired set of chromosomes, which will have severe consequences for its further development. Whether spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) in oocytes is capable of arresting cell cycle progression in response to unaligned kinetochores was discussed for a long time. It is known that abolishing SAC increases frequency of chromosome segregation errors and causes precocious entry into anaphase; SAC, therefore, seems to be essential for normal chromosome segregation in meiosis I. However, it was also reported that for anaphase-promoting complex (APC) activation, which is a prerequisite for entering anaphase; alignment of only a critical mass of kinetochores on equatorial plane is sufficient. This indicates that the function of SAC and of cooperating chromosome attachment correction mechanisms in oocytes is different from somatic cells. To analyze this phenomenon, we used live cell confocal microscopy to monitor chromosome movements, spindle formation, APC activation and polar body extrusion (PBE) simultaneously in individual oocytes at various time points during first meiotic division. Our results, using oocytes from aged animals and interspecific crosses, demonstrate that multiple unaligned kinetochores and severe congression defects are tolerated at the metaphase to anaphase transition, although such cells retain sensitivity to nocodazole. This indicates that checkpoint mechanisms, operating in oocytes at this point, are essential for accurate timing of APC activation in meiosis I, but they are insufficient in detection or correction of unaligned chromosomes, preparing thus conditions for propagation of the aneuploidy

  11. Lack of plasma kallikrein-kinin system cascade in teleosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Marty Kwok-Shing; Takei, Yoshio

    2013-01-01

    The kallikrein-kinin system (KKS) consists of two major cascades in mammals: "plasma KKS" consisting of high molecular-weight (HMW) kininogen (KNG), plasma kallikrein (KLKB1), and bradykinin (BK); and "tissue KKS" consisting of low molecular-weight (LMW) KNG, tissue kallikreins (KLKs), and [Lys(0)]-BK. Some components of the KKS have been identified in the fishes, but systematic analyses have not been performed, thus this study aims to define the KKS components in teleosts and pave a way for future physiological and evolutionary studies. Through a combination of genomics, molecular, and biochemical methods, we showed that the entire plasma KKS cascade is absent in teleosts. Instead of two KNGs as found in mammals, a single molecular weight KNG was found in various teleosts, which is homologous to the mammalian LMW KNG. Results of molecular phylogenetic and synteny analyses indicated that the all current teleost genomes lack KLKB1, and its unique protein structure, four apple domains and one trypsin domain, could not be identified in any genome or nucleotide databases. We identified some KLK-like proteins in teleost genomes by synteny and conserved domain analyses, which could be the orthologs of tetrapod KLKs. A radioimmunoassay system was established to measure the teleost BK and we found that [Arg(0)]-BK is the major circulating form instead of BK, which supports that the teleost KKS is similar to the mammalian tissue KKS. Coincidently, coelacanths are the earliest vertebrate that possess both HMW KNG and KLKB1, which implies that the plasma KKS could have evolved in the early lobe-finned fish and descended to the tetrapod lineage. The co-evolution of HMW KNG and KLKB1 in lobe-finned fish and early tetrapods may mark the emergence of the plasma KKS and a contact activation system in blood coagulation, while teleosts may have retained a single KKS cascade. PMID:24278376

  12. Lack of plasma kallikrein-kinin system cascade in teleosts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marty Kwok-Shing Wong

    Full Text Available The kallikrein-kinin system (KKS consists of two major cascades in mammals: "plasma KKS" consisting of high molecular-weight (HMW kininogen (KNG, plasma kallikrein (KLKB1, and bradykinin (BK; and "tissue KKS" consisting of low molecular-weight (LMW KNG, tissue kallikreins (KLKs, and [Lys(0]-BK. Some components of the KKS have been identified in the fishes, but systematic analyses have not been performed, thus this study aims to define the KKS components in teleosts and pave a way for future physiological and evolutionary studies. Through a combination of genomics, molecular, and biochemical methods, we showed that the entire plasma KKS cascade is absent in teleosts. Instead of two KNGs as found in mammals, a single molecular weight KNG was found in various teleosts, which is homologous to the mammalian LMW KNG. Results of molecular phylogenetic and synteny analyses indicated that the all current teleost genomes lack KLKB1, and its unique protein structure, four apple domains and one trypsin domain, could not be identified in any genome or nucleotide databases. We identified some KLK-like proteins in teleost genomes by synteny and conserved domain analyses, which could be the orthologs of tetrapod KLKs. A radioimmunoassay system was established to measure the teleost BK and we found that [Arg(0]-BK is the major circulating form instead of BK, which supports that the teleost KKS is similar to the mammalian tissue KKS. Coincidently, coelacanths are the earliest vertebrate that possess both HMW KNG and KLKB1, which implies that the plasma KKS could have evolved in the early lobe-finned fish and descended to the tetrapod lineage. The co-evolution of HMW KNG and KLKB1 in lobe-finned fish and early tetrapods may mark the emergence of the plasma KKS and a contact activation system in blood coagulation, while teleosts may have retained a single KKS cascade.

  13. Implications of the lack of desiccation tolerance in recalcitrant seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia eBerjak

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A suite of interacting processes and mechanisms enables tolerance of desiccation and storage (conservation of orthodox seeds in the dry state. While this is a long-term option under optimised conditions, dry orthodox seeds are not immortal, with life spans having been characterised as short, intermediate and long. Factors facilitating desiccation tolerance are metabolic ‘switch-off’ and intracellular dedifferentiation. Recalcitrant seeds lack these mechanisms, contributing significantly to their desiccation sensitivity.Consequently, recalcitrant seeds, which are shed at high water contents, can be stored only in the short-term, under conditions not allowing dehydration. The periods of such hydrated storage are constrained by germination that occurs without the need for extraneous water, and the proliferation of seed-associated fungi. Cryopreservation is viewed as the only option for long-term conservation of the germplasm of recalcitrant-seeded species. This is not easily achieved, as each of the necessary procedures imposes oxidative damage. Intact recalcitrant seeds cannot be cryopreserved, the common practice being to use excised embryos or embryonic axes as explants. Dehydration is a necessary procedure prior to exposure to cryogenic temperatures, but this is associated with metabolism-linked injury mediated by uncontrolled ROS generation and failing anti-oxidant systems. While the extent to which this occurs can be curtailed by maximising drying rate (flash drying it cannot be completely obviated. Explant cooling for, and rewarming after, cryostorage must necessarily be rapid, to avoid ice crystallisation. The ramifications of desiccation sensitivity are discussed, as are problems involved in cryostorage, particularly those accompanying dehydration and damage consequent upon ice crystallisation. While desiccation sensitivity is a ‘fact’ of seed recalcitrance, resolutions of the difficulties involved germplasm conservation are

  14. Lack of glucagon receptor signaling and its implications beyond glucose homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charron, Maureen J; Vuguin, Patricia M

    2015-03-01

    Glucagon action is transduced by a G protein-coupled receptor located in liver, kidney, intestinal smooth muscle, brain, adipose tissue, heart, pancreatic β-cells, and placenta. Genetically modified animal models have provided important clues about the role of glucagon and its receptor (Gcgr) beyond glucose control. The PubMed database was searched for articles published between 1995 and 2014 using the key terms glucagon, glucagon receptor, signaling, and animal models. Lack of Gcgr signaling has been associated with: i) hypoglycemic pregnancies, altered placentation, poor fetal growth, and increased fetal-neonatal death; ii) pancreatic glucagon cell hyperplasia and hyperglucagonemia; iii) altered body composition, energy state, and protection from diet-induced obesity; iv) impaired hepatocyte survival; v) altered glucose, lipid, and hormonal milieu; vi) altered metabolic response to prolonged fasting and exercise; vii) reduced gastric emptying and increased intestinal length; viii) altered retinal function; and ix) prevention of the development of diabetes in insulin-deficient mice. Similar phenotypic findings were observed in the hepatocyte-specific deletion of Gcgr. Glucagon action has been involved in the modulation of sweet taste responsiveness, inotropic and chronotropic effects in the heart, satiety, glomerular filtration rate, secretion of insulin, cortisol, ghrelin, GH, glucagon, and somatostatin, and hypothalamic signaling to suppress hepatic glucose production. Glucagon (α) cells under certain conditions can transdifferentiate into insulin (β) cells. These findings suggest that glucagon signaling plays an important role in multiple organs. Thus, treatment options designed to block Gcgr activation in diabetics may have implications beyond glucose homeostasis.

  15. The Drosophila Anion Exchanger (DAE lacks a detectable interaction with the spectrin cytoskeleton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Base Christine

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current models suggest that the spectrin cytoskeleton stabilizes interacting ion transport proteins at the plasma membrane. The human erythrocyte anion exchanger (AE1 was the first membrane transport protein found to be associated with the spectrin cytoskeleton. Here we evaluated a conserved anion exchanger from Drosophila (DAE as a marker for studies of the downstream effects of spectrin cytoskeleton mutations. Results Sequence comparisons established that DAE belongs to the SLC4A1-3 subfamily of anion exchangers that includes human AE1. Striking sequence conservation was observed in the C-terminal membrane transport domain and parts of the N-terminal cytoplasmic domain, but not in the proposed ankyrin-binding site. Using an antibody raised against DAE and a recombinant transgene expressed in Drosophila S2 cells DAE was shown to be a 136 kd plasma membrane protein. A major site of expression was found in the stomach acid-secreting region of the larval midgut. DAE codistributed with an infolded subcompartment of the basal plasma membrane of interstitial cells. However, spectrin did not codistribute with DAE at this site or in anterior midgut cells that abundantly expressed both spectrin and DAE. Ubiquitous knockdown of DAE with dsRNA eliminated antibody staining and was lethal, indicating that DAE is an essential gene product in Drosophila. Conclusions Based on the lack of colocalization and the lack of sequence conservation at the ankyrin-binding site, it appears that the well-characterized interaction between AE1 and the spectrin cytoskeleton in erythrocytes is not conserved in Drosophila. The results establish a pattern in which most of the known interactions between the spectrin cytoskeleton and the plasma membrane in mammals do not appear to be conserved in Drosophila.

  16. Anxiety-like behaviors in mice lacking GIT2

    OpenAIRE

    Schmalzigaug, Robert; Rodriguiz, Ramona M.; Phillips, Lindsey E.; Davidson, Collin E.; Wetsel, William C.; Premont, Richard T.

    2008-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptor kinase-interactor 2 (GIT2) is a signaling scaffold protein that also functions as GTPase-activating protein (GAPs) for ADP-ribosylation factor (Arf) small GTP-binding proteins. GIT2 has been implicated in the regulation of G protein-coupled receptor trafficking and cell adhesion and migration. To evaluate possible neurobehavioral functions of GIT2 in vivo, we evaluated GIT2-knockout (KO) mice for abnormalities in emotionality and mood. Male and female GIT2-KO mice p...

  17. Microglia Lacking E Prostanoid Receptor Subtype 2 Have Enhanced Aβ Phagocytosis yet Lack Aβ-Activated Neurotoxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Shie, Feng-Shiun; Breyer, Richard M.; Montine, Thomas J.

    2005-01-01

    Experimental therapies for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) are focused on enhanced clearance of neurotoxic Aβ peptides from brain. Microglia can be neuroprotective by phagocytosing Aβ; however, this comes at the cost of activated innate immunity that causes paracrine damage to neurons. Here, we show that ablation of E prostanoid receptor subtype 2 (EP2) significantly increased microglial-mediated clearance of Aβ peptides from AD brain sections and enhanced microglial Aβ phagocytosis in cell culture....

  18. Differentially expressed genes in embryonic cardiac tissues of mice lacking Folr1 gene activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwartz Robert J

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Heart anomalies are the most frequently observed among all human congenital defects. As with the situation for neural tube defects (NTDs, it has been demonstrated that women who use multivitamins containing folic acid peri-conceptionally have a reduced risk for delivering offspring with conotruncal heart defects 123. Cellular folate transport is mediated by a receptor or binding protein and by an anionic transporter protein system. Defective function of the Folr1 (also known as Folbp1; homologue of human FRα gene in mice results in inadequate transport, accumulation, or metabolism of folate during cardiovascular morphogenesis. Results We have observed cardiovascular abnormalities including outflow tract and aortic arch arterial defects in genetically compromised Folr1 knockout mice. In order to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying the failure to complete development of outflow tract and aortic arch arteries in the Folr1 knockout mouse model, we examined tissue-specific gene expression difference between Folr1 nullizygous embryos and morphologically normal heterozygous embryos during early cardiac development (14-somite stage, heart tube looping (28-somite stage, and outflow track septation (38-somite stage. Microarray analysis was performed as a primary screening, followed by investigation using quantitative real-time PCR assays. Gene ontology analysis highlighted the following ontology groups: cell migration, cell motility and localization of cells, structural constituent of cytoskeleton, cell-cell adhesion, oxidoreductase, protein folding and mRNA processing. This study provided preliminary data and suggested potential candidate genes for further description and investigation. Conclusion The results suggested that Folr1 gene ablation and abnormal folate homeostasis altered gene expression in developing heart and conotruncal tissues. These changes affected normal cytoskeleton structures, cell migration and

  19. Metabolic Catastrophe in Mice Lacking Transferrin Receptor in Muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrientos, Tomasa; Laothamatas, Indira; Koves, Timothy R; Soderblom, Erik J; Bryan, Miles; Moseley, M Arthur; Muoio, Deborah M; Andrews, Nancy C

    2015-11-01

    Transferrin receptor (Tfr1) is ubiquitously expressed, but its roles in non-hematopoietic cells are incompletely understood. We used a tissue-specific conditional knockout strategy to ask whether skeletal muscle required Tfr1 for iron uptake. We found that iron assimilation via Tfr1 was critical for skeletal muscle metabolism, and that iron deficiency in muscle led to dramatic changes, not only in muscle, but also in adipose tissue and liver. Inactivation of Tfr1 incapacitated normal energy production in muscle, leading to growth arrest and a muted attempt to switch to fatty acid β oxidation, using up fat stores. Starvation signals stimulated gluconeogenesis in the liver, but amino acid substrates became limiting and hypoglycemia ensued. Surprisingly, the liver was also iron deficient, and production of the iron regulatory hormone hepcidin was depressed. Our observations reveal a complex interaction between iron homeostasis and metabolism that has implications for metabolic and iron disorders.

  20. Absence of venous valves in mice lacking Connexin37.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munger, Stephanie J; Kanady, John D; Simon, Alexander M

    2013-01-15

    Venous valves play a crucial role in blood circulation, promoting the one-way movement of blood from superficial and deep veins towards the heart. By preventing retrograde flow, venous valves spare capillaries and venules from being subjected to damaging elevations in pressure, especially during skeletal muscle contraction. Pathologically, valvular incompetence or absence of valves are common features of venous disorders such as chronic venous insufficiency and varicose veins. The underlying causes of these conditions are not well understood, but congenital venous valve aplasia or agenesis may play a role in some cases. Despite progress in the study of cardiac and lymphatic valve morphogenesis, the molecular mechanisms controlling the development and maintenance of venous valves remain poorly understood. Here, we show that in valved veins of the mouse, three gap junction proteins (Connexins, Cxs), Cx37, Cx43, and Cx47, are expressed exclusively in the valves in a highly polarized fashion, with Cx43 on the upstream side of the valve leaflet and Cx37 on the downstream side. Surprisingly, Cx43 expression is strongly induced in the non-valve venous endothelium in superficial veins following wounding of the overlying skin. Moreover, we show that in Cx37-deficient mice, venous valves are entirely absent. Thus, Cx37, a protein involved in cell-cell communication, is one of only a few proteins identified so far as critical for the development or maintenance of venous valves. Because Cxs are necessary for the development of valves in lymphatic vessels as well, our results support the notion of common molecular pathways controlling valve development in veins and lymphatic vessels.

  1. Transplanted fetal striatum in Huntington's disease: Phenotypic development and lack of pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Thomas B.; Cicchetti, Francesca; Hauser, Robert A.; Deacon, Terrence W.; Li, Xiao-Jiang; Hersch, Steven M.; Nauert, G. Michael; Sanberg, Paul R.; Kordower, Jeffrey H.; Saporta, Samuel; Isacson, Ole

    2000-01-01

    Neural and stem cell transplantation is emerging as a potential treatment for neurodegenerative diseases. Transplantation of specific committed neuroblasts (fetal neurons) to the adult brain provides such scientific exploration of these new potential therapies. Huntington's disease (HD) is a fatal, incurable autosomal dominant (CAG repeat expansion of huntingtin protein) neurodegenerative disorder with primary neuronal pathology within the caudate–putamen (striatum). In a clinical trial of human fetal striatal tissue transplantation, one patient died 18 months after transplantation from cardiovascular disease, and postmortem histological analysis demonstrated surviving transplanted cells with typical morphology of the developing striatum. Selective markers of both striatal projection and interneurons such as dopamine and c-AMP-related phosphoprotein, calretinin, acetylcholinesterase, choline acetyltransferase, tyrosine hydroxylase, calbindin, enkephalin, and substance P showed positive transplant regions clearly innervated by host tyrosine hydroxylase fibers. There was no histological evidence of immune rejection including microglia and macrophages. Notably, neuronal protein aggregates of mutated huntingtin, which is typical HD neuropathology, were not found within the transplanted fetal tissue. Thus, although there is a genetically predetermined process causing neuronal death within the HD striatum, implanted fetal neural cells lacking the mutant HD gene may be able to replace damaged host neurons and reconstitute damaged neuronal connections. This study demonstrates that grafts derived from human fetal striatal tissue can survive, develop, and are unaffected by the disease process, at least for 18 months, after transplantation into a patient with HD. PMID:11106399

  2. Innate immune restriction and antagonism of viral RNA lacking 2'-O methylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyde, Jennifer L. [Departments of Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis., MO 63110 (United States); Diamond, Michael S., E-mail: diamond@borcim.wustl.edu [Departments of Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis., MO 63110 (United States); Molecular Microbiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis., MO 63110 (United States); Pathology & Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis., MO 63110 (United States); The Center for Human Immunology and Immunotherapy Programs, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis., MO 63110 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    N-7 and 2′-O methylation of host cell mRNA occurs in the nucleus and results in the generation of cap structures (cap 0, m{sup 7}GpppN; cap 1, m{sup 7}GpppNm) that control gene expression by modulating nuclear export, splicing, turnover, and protein synthesis. Remarkably, RNA cap modification also contributes to mammalian cell host defense as viral RNA lacking 2′-O methylation is sensed and inhibited by IFIT1, an interferon (IFN) stimulated gene (ISG). Accordingly, pathogenic viruses that replicate in the cytoplasm have evolved mechanisms to circumvent IFIT1 restriction and facilitate infection of mammalian cells. These include: (a) generating cap 1 structures on their RNA through cap-snatching or virally-encoded 2′-O methyltransferases, (b) using cap-independent means of translation, or (c) using RNA secondary structural motifs to antagonize IFIT1 binding. This review will discuss new insights as to how specific modifications at the 5′-end of viral RNA modulate host pathogen recognition responses to promote infection and disease.

  3. Innate immune restriction and antagonism of viral RNA lacking 2'-O methylation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    N-7 and 2′-O methylation of host cell mRNA occurs in the nucleus and results in the generation of cap structures (cap 0, m7GpppN; cap 1, m7GpppNm) that control gene expression by modulating nuclear export, splicing, turnover, and protein synthesis. Remarkably, RNA cap modification also contributes to mammalian cell host defense as viral RNA lacking 2′-O methylation is sensed and inhibited by IFIT1, an interferon (IFN) stimulated gene (ISG). Accordingly, pathogenic viruses that replicate in the cytoplasm have evolved mechanisms to circumvent IFIT1 restriction and facilitate infection of mammalian cells. These include: (a) generating cap 1 structures on their RNA through cap-snatching or virally-encoded 2′-O methyltransferases, (b) using cap-independent means of translation, or (c) using RNA secondary structural motifs to antagonize IFIT1 binding. This review will discuss new insights as to how specific modifications at the 5′-end of viral RNA modulate host pathogen recognition responses to promote infection and disease

  4. A unique variant of streptococcal group O-antigen (C-polysaccharide) that lacks phosphocholine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergström, N; Jansson, P.-E.; Kilian, Mogens;

    2003-01-01

    previously characterized forms of C-polysaccharide, which all contain one or two choline residues per repeat. The following structure of the repeating unit of the SK598 polysaccharide was established: where AAT is 2-acetamido-4-amino-2,4,6-trideoxy-d-galactose. This structure is identical to the double......Streptococcus mitis strain SK598, which represents a subgroup of biovar 1, possesses a unique variant of the C-polysaccharide found in the cell wall of all strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae and in some strains of S. mitis. This new variant lacks the choline methyl groups in contrast to the...... choline-substituted form of C-polysaccharide, except that it is substituted with ethanolamine instead of choline. This extends the number of recognized C-polysaccharide variants to four....

  5. Involvement of Aif1 in apoptosis triggered by lack of Hxk2 in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amigoni, Loredana; Frigerio, Gianluca; Martegani, Enzo; Colombo, Sonia

    2016-05-01

    We recently showed that in hxk2Δ cells, showing constitutive localization of active Ras at the mitochondria, addition of acetic acid caused an increase of both apoptotic and necrotic cells compared with the wild-type strain, providing a new role for hexokinase 2 (EC 2.7.1.1) as an anti-apoptotic factor, besides its known role as a glycolytic enzyme and as a regulator of gene transcription of several Mig1-regulated genes. We also demonstrated that apoptosis induced by lack of Hxk2 may not require the activation of Yca1. Here, we show that deletion of HXK2 causes hypersensitivity to H2O2 and that addition of this well-known apoptotic stimulus to hxk2Δ cells causes an increase in the level ROS, apoptosis and mitochondrial membrane potential. We also show that deletion of AIF1 in hxk2Δ cells enhances survival after induction of apoptosis with both H2O2 and acetic acid, rescues the reduction of both growth rate and cell size, abrogates both H2O2 and acetic acid-induced ROS accumulation and decreases cell death, suggesting that Aif1 might be involved in both H2O2 and acetic acid-induced cell death in hxk2Δ cells. Moreover, we show that active Ras proteins relocalize to the plasma membrane and to the nucleus in hxk2Δ aif1Δ cells.

  6. Sub-lethal heat stress causes apoptosis in an Antarctic fish that lacks an inducible heat shock response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleadd, Isaac M; Lee, Marissa; Hassumani, Daniel O; Stecyk, Tonya M A; Zeitz, Otto K; Buckley, Bradley A

    2014-08-01

    The endemic fish fauna of the Southern Ocean are cold-adapted stenotherms and are acutely sensitive to elevated temperature. Many of these species lack a heat shock response and cannot increase the production of heat shock proteins in their tissues. However, some species retain the ability to induce other stress-responsive genes, some of which are involved in cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Here, the effect of heat on cell cycle stage and its ability to induce apoptosis were tested in thermally stressed hepatocytes from a common Antarctic fish species from McMurdo Sound in the Ross Sea. Levels of proliferating cell nuclear antigen were also measured as a marker of progression through the cell cycle. The results of these studies demonstrate that even sub-lethal heat stress can have deleterious impacts at the cellular level on these environmentally sensitive species. PMID:25086982

  7. Lack of collagen VI promotes neurodegeneration by impairing autophagy and inducing apoptosis during aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cescon, Matilde; Chen, Peiwen; Castagnaro, Silvia; Gregorio, Ilaria; Bonaldo, Paolo

    2016-05-01

    Collagen VI is an extracellular matrix (ECM) protein with a broad distribution in different tissues and mostly deposited at the close periphery of the cell surface. Previous studies revealed that collagen VI protects neurons from the toxicity of amyloid-βpeptides and from UV-induced damage. However, the physiological role of this protein in the central nervous system (CNS) remains unknown. Here, we established primary neural cultures from murine cortex and hippocampus, and carried out in vitro and in vivo studies in wild-type and collagen VI null (Col6a1-/-) mice. Col6a1-/- neural cultures displayed an increased incidence of spontaneous apoptosis and higher vulnerability to oxidative stress, accompanied by altered regulation of autophagy with increased p62 protein levels and decreased LC3 lipidation. Analysis of brain sections confirmed increased apoptosis and abnormal regulation of autophagy in the CNS of collagen VI-deficient animals. To investigate the in vivo physiological consequences of these CNS defects, we carried out functional studies and found that motor and memory task performances were impaired in aged Col6a1-/-mice. These findings indicate that lack of collagen VI leads to spontaneous apoptosis and defective autophagy in neural cells, and point at a protective role for this ECM protein in the CNS during physiological aging. PMID:27060109

  8. Impaired hair growth and wound healing in mice lacking thyroid hormone receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constanza Contreras-Jurado

    Full Text Available Both clinical and experimental observations show that the skin is affected by the thyroidal status. In hypothyroid patients the epidermis is thin and alopecia is common, indicating that thyroidal status might influence not only skin proliferation but also hair growth. We demonstrate here that the thyroid hormone receptors (TRs mediate these effects of the thyroid hormones on the skin. Mice lacking TRα1 and TRβ (the main thyroid hormone binding isoforms display impaired hair cycling associated to a decrease in follicular hair cell proliferation. This was also observed in hypothyroid mice, indicating the important role of the hormone-bound receptors in hair growth. In contrast, the individual deletion of either TRα1 or TRβ did not impair hair cycling, revealing an overlapping or compensatory role of the receptors in follicular cell proliferation. In support of the role of the receptors in hair growth, TRα1/TRβ-deficient mice developed alopecia after serial depilation. These mice also presented a wound-healing defect, with retarded re-epithelialization and wound gaping, associated to impaired keratinocyte proliferation. These results reinforce the idea that the thyroid hormone nuclear receptors play an important role on skin homeostasis and suggest that they could be targets for the treatment of cutaneous pathologies.

  9. Myelosuppression of Thrombocytes and Monocytes Is Associated with a Lack of Synergy between Chemotherapy and Anti-VEGF Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Starlinger

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Chemotherapeutic agents that have shown improved patient outcome when combined with anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF therapy were recently identified to induce the mobilization of proangiogenic Tie-2-expressing monocytes (TEMs and endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs by platelet release of stromal cell-derived factor 1α (SDF-1α. VEGF blockade was found to counteract cell mobilization. We aimed to determine why agents like gemcitabine do not elicit TEM and EPC recruitment and may therefore lack synergy with anti-VEGF therapy. Experimental Design: Locally advanced pancreatic cancer patients (n = 20 were monitored during 16 weeks of neoadjuvant therapy. Treatment was based on gemcitabine with or without the addition of bevacizumab. Blood levels of proangiogenic cell populations and angiogenesis factors were determined in 2-week intervals. Results: The lack of EPC mobilization during gemcitabine therapy was associated with severe thrombocytopenia and reduced SDF-1α blood concentrations. Furthermore, myelosuppression by gemcitabine correlated significantly with loss of TEMs. With respect to angiogenic factors stored and released by platelets, plasma levels of the angiogenesis inhibitor thrombospondin 1 (TSP-1 were selectively decreased and correlated significantly with thrombocytopenia in response to gemcitabine therapy. Conclusions: A thorough literature screen identified thrombocytopenia as a common feature of chemotherapeutic agents that lack synergy with anti-VEGF treatment. Our results on gemcitabine therapy indicate that myelosuppression (in particular, with respect to thrombocytes and monocytes interferes with the mobilization of proangiogenic cell types targeted by bevacizumab and may further counteract antiangiogenic therapy by substantially reducing the angiogenesis inhibitor TSP-1.

  10. Resilient emotionality and molecular compensation in mice lacking the oligodendrocyte-specific gene Cnp1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgar, N M; Touma, C; Palme, R; Sibille, E

    2011-01-01

    Altered oligodendrocyte structure and function is implicated in major psychiatric illnesses, including low cell number and reduced oligodendrocyte-specific gene expression in major depressive disorder (MDD). These features are also observed in the unpredictable chronic mild stress (UCMS) rodent model of the illness, suggesting that they are consequential to environmental precipitants; however, whether oligodendrocyte changes contribute causally to low emotionality is unknown. Focusing on 2'-3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (Cnp1), a crucial component of axoglial communication dysregulated in the amygdala of MDD subjects and UCMS-exposed mice, we show that altered oligodendrocyte integrity can have an unexpected functional role in affect regulation. Mice lacking Cnp1 (knockout, KO) displayed decreased anxiety- and depressive-like symptoms (i.e., low emotionality) compared with wild-type animals, a phenotypic difference that increased with age (3-9 months). This phenotype was accompanied by increased motor activity, but was evident before neurodegenerative-associated motor coordination deficits (≤ 9-12 months). Notably, Cnp1(KO) mice were less vulnerable to developing a depressive-like syndrome after either UCMS or chronic corticosterone exposure. Cnp1(KO) mice also displayed reduced fear expression during extinction, despite normal amygdala c-Fos induction after acute stress, together implicating dysfunction of an amygdala-related neural network, and consistent with proposed mechanisms for stress resiliency. However, the Cnp1(KO) behavioral phenotype was also accompanied by massive upregulation of oligodendrocyte- and immune-related genes in the basolateral amygdala, suggesting an attempt at functional compensation. Together, we demonstrate that the lack of oligodendrocyte-specific Cnp1 leads to resilient emotionality. However, combined with substantial molecular changes and late-onset neurodegeneration, these results suggest the low Cnp1 seen in MDD may

  11. Ubiquitin reference technique and its use in ubiquitin-lacking prokaryotes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantin Piatkov

    Full Text Available In a pulse-chase assay, the in vivo degradation of a protein is measured through a brief labeling of cells with, for example, a radioactive amino acid, followed by cessation of labeling and analysis of cell extracts prepared at different times afterward ("chase", using immunoprecipitation, electrophoresis and autoradiography of a labeled protein of interest. A conventional pulse-chase assay is fraught with sources of data scatter, as the efficacy of labeling and immunoprecipitation can vary, and sample volumes can vary as well. The ubiquitin reference technique (URT, introduced in 1996, addresses these problems. In eukaryotes, a DNA-encoded linear fusion of ubiquitin to another protein is cleaved by deubiquitylases at the ubiquitin-protein junction. A URT assay uses a fusion in which the ubiquitin moiety is located between a downstream polypeptide (test protein and an upstream polypeptide (a long-lived reference protein. The cotranslational cleavage of a URT fusion by deubiquitylases after the last residue of ubiquitin produces, at the initially equimolar ratio, a test protein with a desired N-terminal residue and a reference protein containing C-terminal ubiquitin moiety. In addition to being more accurate than pulse-chases without a reference, URT makes it possible to detect and measure the degradation of a test protein during the pulse (before the chase. Because prokaryotes, including Gram-negative bacteria such as, for example, Escherichia coli and Vibrio vulnificus, lack the ubiquitin system, the use of URT in such cells requires ectopic expression of a deubiquitylase. We describe designs and applications of plasmid vectors that coexpress, in bacteria, both a URT-type fusion and Ubp1, a deubiquitylase of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This single-plasmid approach extends the accuracy-enhancing URT assay to studies of protein degradation in prokaryotes.

  12. Lack of evidence that avian oncogenic viruses are infectious for humans: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schat, Karel A; Erb, Hollis N

    2014-09-01

    Chickens may be infected with three different oncogenic viruses: avian leukosis virus (ALV), reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV), and Marek's disease herpesvirus (MDV). Several epidemiological studies have suggested a link between these viruses and different types of cancer in people working in poultry processing plants and with multiple sclerosis. In this article, we analyze the epidemiological evidence that these viruses are causative agents for human cancer, followed by description of the relevant key characteristics of ALV, REV, and MDV. Finally, we discuss the biological evidence or lack thereof that avian tumor viruses are involved in the etiology of human cancer and multiple sclerosis (MS). The recent primary epidemiologic articles that we reviewed as examples were only hypothesis-generating studies examining massive numbers of risk factors for associations with various imprecise, non-viral-specific outcomes. The studies lacked precise evidence of exposure to the relevant viruses and the statistical methods failed to adjust for the large risks of false-positive claims. ALV subgroups A-D and J have been eradicated in the United States from the pure lines down to the parent stocks by the breeder companies, which have greatly reduced the incidence of infection in layer flocks and broilers. As a consequence, potential exposure of humans to these viruses has greatly diminished. Infection of humans working in processing plants with ALV-A and ALV-B is unlikely, because broilers are generally resistant to infection with these two subgroups. Moreover, these viruses enter cells by specific receptors present on chicken, but not on mammalian, cells. Infection of mammalian cell cultures or animals with ALV-A, ALV-B, and ALV-J has not been reported. Moreover, humans vaccinated with exogenous or endogenous ALV-contaminated vaccines against yellow fever, measles, and mumps did not become antibody- or virus-positive for ALV. The risks for human infection with REV are similarly

  13. Impaired Glucose Metabolism in Mice Lacking the Tas1r3 Taste Receptor Gene.

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    Vladimir O Murovets

    Full Text Available The G-protein-coupled sweet taste receptor dimer T1R2/T1R3 is expressed in taste bud cells in the oral cavity. In recent years, its involvement in membrane glucose sensing was discovered in endocrine cells regulating glucose homeostasis. We investigated importance of extraorally expressed T1R3 taste receptor protein in age-dependent control of blood glucose homeostasis in vivo, using nonfasted mice with a targeted mutation of the Tas1r3 gene that encodes the T1R3 protein. Glucose and insulin tolerance tests, as well as behavioral tests measuring taste responses to sucrose solutions, were performed with C57BL/6ByJ (Tas1r3+/+ inbred mice bearing the wild-type allele and C57BL/6J-Tas1r3tm1Rfm mice lacking the entire Tas1r3 coding region and devoid of the T1R3 protein (Tas1r3-/-. Compared with Tas1r3+/+ mice, Tas1r3-/- mice lacked attraction to sucrose in brief-access licking tests, had diminished taste preferences for sucrose solutions in the two-bottle tests, and had reduced insulin sensitivity and tolerance to glucose administered intraperitoneally or intragastrically, which suggests that these effects are due to absence of T1R3. Impairment of glucose clearance in Tas1r3-/- mice was exacerbated with age after intraperitoneal but not intragastric administration of glucose, pointing to a compensatory role of extraoral T1R3-dependent mechanisms in offsetting age-dependent decline in regulation of glucose homeostasis. Incretin effects were similar in Tas1r3+/+ and Tas1r3-/- mice, which suggests that control of blood glucose clearance is associated with effects of extraoral T1R3 in tissues other than the gastrointestinal tract. Collectively, the obtained data demonstrate that the T1R3 receptor protein plays an important role in control of glucose homeostasis not only by regulating sugar intake but also via its extraoral function, probably in the pancreas and brain.

  14. Lack of the sodium-driven chloride bicarbonate exchanger NCBE impairs visual function in the mouse retina.

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    Gerrit Hilgen

    Full Text Available Regulation of ion and pH homeostasis is essential for normal neuronal function. The sodium-driven chloride bicarbonate exchanger NCBE (Slc4a10, a member of the SLC4 family of bicarbonate transporters, uses the transmembrane gradient of sodium to drive cellular net uptake of bicarbonate and to extrude chloride, thereby modulating both intracellular pH (pH(i and chloride concentration ([Cl(-](i in neurons. Here we show that NCBE is strongly expressed in the retina. As GABA(A receptors conduct both chloride and bicarbonate, we hypothesized that NCBE may be relevant for GABAergic transmission in the retina. Importantly, we found a differential expression of NCBE in bipolar cells: whereas NCBE was expressed on ON and OFF bipolar cell axon terminals, it only localized to dendrites of OFF bipolar cells. On these compartments, NCBE colocalized with the main neuronal chloride extruder KCC2, which renders GABA hyperpolarizing. NCBE was also expressed in starburst amacrine cells, but was absent from neurons known to depolarize in response to GABA, like horizontal cells. Mice lacking NCBE showed decreased visual acuity and contrast sensitivity in behavioral experiments and smaller b-wave amplitudes and longer latencies in electroretinograms. Ganglion cells from NCBE-deficient mice also showed altered temporal response properties. In summary, our data suggest that NCBE may serve to maintain intracellular chloride and bicarbonate concentration in retinal neurons. Consequently, lack of NCBE in the retina may result in changes in pH(i regulation and chloride-dependent inhibition, leading to altered signal transmission and impaired visual function.

  15. Absence of platelet phenotype in mice lacking the motor protein myosin Va.

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    Matthew T Harper

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The motor protein myosin Va plays an important role in the trafficking of intracellular vesicles. Mutation of the Myo5a gene causes Griscelli syndrome type 1 in humans and the dilute phenotype in mice, which are both characterised by pigment dilution and neurological defects as a result of impaired vesicle transport in melanocytes and neuroendocrine cells. The role of myosin Va in platelets is currently unknown. Rab27 has been shown to be associated with myosin Va cargo vesicles and is known to be important in platelet dense granule biogenesis and secretion, a crucial event in thrombus formation. Therefore, we hypothesised that myosin Va may regulate granule secretion or formation in platelets. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Platelet function was studied in vitro using a novel Myo5a gene deletion mouse model. Myo5a(-/- platelets were devoid of myosin Va, as determined by immunoblotting, and exhibited normal expression of surface markers. We assessed dense granule, α-granule and lysosomal secretion, integrin α(IIbβ(3 activation, Ca(2+ signalling, and spreading on fibrinogen in response to collagen-related peptide or the PAR4 agonist, AYPGKF in washed mouse platelets lacking myosin Va or wild-type platelets. Surprisingly, Myo5a(-/- platelets showed no significant functional defects in these responses, or in the numbers of dense and α-granules expressed. CONCLUSION: Despite the importance of myosin Va in vesicle transport in other cells, our data demonstrate this motor protein has no non-redundant role in the secretion of dense and α-granules or other functional responses in platelets.

  16. A unique hexokinase in Cryptosporidium parvum, an apicomplexan pathogen lacking the Krebs cycle and oxidative phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yonglan; Zhang, Haili; Guo, Fengguang; Sun, Mingfei; Zhu, Guan

    2014-09-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum may cause virtually untreatable infections in AIDS patients, and is recently identified as one of the top four diarrheal pathogens in children in developing countries. Cryptosporidium differs from other apicomplexans (e.g., Plasmodium and Toxoplasma) by lacking many metabolic pathways including the Krebs cycle and cytochrome-based respiratory chain, thus relying mainly on glycolysis for ATP production. Here we report the molecular and biochemical characterizations of a hexokinase in C. parvum (CpHK). Our phylogenetic reconstructions indicated that apicomplexan hexokinases including CpHK were highly divergent from those of humans and animals (i.e., at the base of the eukaryotic clade). CpHK displays unique kinetic features that differ from those in mammals and Toxoplasma gondii (TgHK) in the preference towards various hexoses and its capacity to use ATP and other NTPs. CpHK also displays substrate inhibition by ATP. Moreover, 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2DG) could not only inhibit the CpHK activity, but also the parasite growth in vitro at concentrations nontoxic to host cells (IC(50) = 0.54 mM). While the exact action of 2-deoxy-D-glucose on the parasite is subject to further verification, our data suggest that CpHK and the glycolytic pathway may be explored for developing anti-cryptosporidial therapeutics.

  17. Severely impaired learning and altered neuronal morphology in mice lacking NMDA receptors in medium spiny neurons.

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    Lisa R Beutler

    Full Text Available The striatum is composed predominantly of medium spiny neurons (MSNs that integrate excitatory, glutamatergic inputs from the cortex and thalamus, and modulatory dopaminergic inputs from the ventral midbrain to influence behavior. Glutamatergic activation of AMPA, NMDA, and metabotropic receptors on MSNs is important for striatal development and function, but the roles of each of these receptor classes remain incompletely understood. Signaling through NMDA-type glutamate receptors (NMDARs in the striatum has been implicated in various motor and appetitive learning paradigms. In addition, signaling through NMDARs influences neuronal morphology, which could underlie their role in mediating learned behaviors. To study the role of NMDARs on MSNs in learning and in morphological development, we generated mice lacking the essential NR1 subunit, encoded by the Grin1 gene, selectively in MSNs. Although these knockout mice appear normal and display normal 24-hour locomotion, they have severe deficits in motor learning, operant conditioning and active avoidance. In addition, the MSNs from these knockout mice have smaller cell bodies and decreased dendritic length compared to littermate controls. We conclude that NMDAR signaling in MSNs is critical for normal MSN morphology and many forms of learning.

  18. Lack of lymphangiogenesis in human primary cutaneous melanoma. Consequences for the mechanism of lymphatic dissemination.

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    de Waal, R. M.; van Altena, M. C.; Erhard, H.; Weidle, U. H.; Nooijen, P. T.; Ruiter, D. J.

    1997-01-01

    Cutaneous melanoma has an initial preference for lymphatic spread. Remarkably, melanoma progression toward this metastasizing phenotype is accompanied by intense blood vessel angiogenesis (hemangiogenesis), but lymphangiogenesis, the formation of new lymph vessels in the tumor, has never been reported. To investigate how primary melanoma cells interact with the existing lymphatic microvasculature, and whether lymphangiogenesis occurs, an immunostaining was developed that differentially decorates blood and lymph vessels in frozen tissue sections. The density and distribution of both these vessel types in and around thin ( or = 1.5 mm) primary melanoma lesions and in normal and uninvolved skin were determined. Although especially in thick melanoma lesions a significant increase in blood vessel density was observed, lymphatic density remained unaltered, showing that lymphangiogenesis did not occur. Morphological analysis indicated, however, that melanoma progression is accompanied by a sequence of events that involves hemangiogenesis supporting tumor expansion, especially in the vertical growth phase. Often, stromal sepia are formed around the blood capillaries in the tumor neovasculature protecting them from invasion. Lymph vessels inside the tumor were infrequently observed. However, subepidermal lymph vessels often seemed to be entrapped and penetrated by the expanding tumor mass. In this way, hemangiogenesis, as the driving force behind tumor expansion, might indirectly increase the chance of lymphatic invasion in the absence of lymphangiogenesis. This model explains the paradox that, although melanoma metastasis seems to require angiogenesis, a consistent relation of prognosis with blood capillary density in primary cutaneous melanoma is lacking. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9176389

  19. Cholesteryl ester hydrolase activity is abolished in HSL-/- macrophages but unchanged in macrophages lacking KIAA1363.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchebner, Marlene; Pfeifer, Thomas; Rathke, Nora; Chandak, Prakash G; Lass, Achim; Schreiber, Renate; Kratzer, Adelheid; Zimmermann, Robert; Sattler, Wolfgang; Koefeler, Harald; Fröhlich, Eleonore; Kostner, Gerhard M; Birner-Gruenberger, Ruth; Chiang, Kyle P; Haemmerle, Guenter; Zechner, Rudolf; Levak-Frank, Sanja; Cravatt, Benjamin; Kratky, Dagmar

    2010-10-01

    Cholesteryl ester (CE) accumulation in macrophages represents a crucial event during foam cell formation, a hallmark of atherogenesis. Here we investigated the role of two previously described CE hydrolases, hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) and KIAA1363, in macrophage CE hydrolysis. HSL and KIAA1363 exhibited marked differences in their abilities to hydrolyze CE, triacylglycerol (TG), diacylglycerol (DG), and 2-acetyl monoalkylglycerol ether (AcMAGE), a precursor for biosynthesis of platelet-activating factor (PAF). HSL efficiently cleaved all four substrates, whereas KIAA1363 hydrolyzed only AcMAGE. This contradicts previous studies suggesting that KIAA1363 is a neutral CE hydrolase. Macrophages of KIAA1363(-/-) and wild-type mice exhibited identical neutral CE hydrolase activity, which was almost abolished in tissues and macrophages of HSL(-/-) mice. Conversely, AcMAGE hydrolase activity was diminished in macrophages and some tissues of KIAA1363(-/-) but unchanged in HSL(-/-) mice. CE turnover was unaffected in macrophages lacking KIAA1363 and HSL, whereas cAMP-dependent cholesterol efflux was influenced by HSL but not by KIAA1363. Despite decreased CE hydrolase activities, HSL(-/-) macrophages exhibited CE accumulation similar to wild-type (WT) macrophages. We conclude that additional enzymes must exist that cooperate with HSL to regulate CE levels in macrophages. KIAA1363 affects AcMAGE hydrolase activity but is of minor importance as a direct CE hydrolase in macrophages.

  20. Lack of Evidence for Molecular Mimicry in HIV-Infected Subjects.

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    Peter D Burbelo

    Full Text Available Previous studies in HIV patients have reported autoantibodies to several human proteins, including erythropoietin (EPO, interferon-α (IFN-α, interleukin-2 (IL-2, and HLA-DR, as potential mediators of anemia or immunosuppression. The etiology of these autoantibodies has been attributed to molecular mimicry between HIV epitopes and self-proteins. Here, the Luciferase Immunoprecipitation System (LIPS was used to investigate the presence of such autoantibodies in HIV-infected adults. High levels of antibodies to HIV proteins such as capsid (p24, matrix (p17, envelope (gp41, and reverse transcriptase (RT were detected using LIPS in both untreated and anti-retroviral-treated HIV-infected individuals but not in uninfected controls. LIPS readily detected anti-EPO autoantibodies in serum samples from subjects with presumptive pure red cell aplasia but not in any of the samples from HIV-infected or uninfected individuals. Similarly, subjects with HIV lacked autoantibodies to IFN-α, IL-2, HLA-DR and the immunoglobulin lambda light chain; all purported targets of molecular mimicry. While molecular mimicry between pathogen proteins and self-proteins is a commonly proposed mechanism for autoantibody production, the findings presented here indicate such a process is not common in HIV disease.

  1. Lack of Melanopsin Is Associated with Extreme Weight Loss in Mice upon Dietary Challenge.

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    Didem Göz Aytürk

    Full Text Available Metabolic disorders have been established as major risk factors for ocular complications and poor vision. However, little is known about the inverse possibility that ocular disease may cause metabolic dysfunction. To test this hypothesis, we assessed the metabolic consequences of a robust dietary challenge in several mouse models suffering from retinal mutations. To this end, mice null for melanopsin (Opn4-/-, the photopigment of intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs, were subjected to five weeks of a ketogenic diet. These mice lost significantly more weight than wild-type controls or mice lacking rod and cone photoreceptors (Pde6brd1/rd1. Although ipRGCs are critical for proper circadian entrainment, and circadian misalignment has been implicated in metabolic pathology, we observed no differences in entrainment between Opn4-/- and control mice. Additionally, we observed no differences in any tested metabolic parameter between these mouse strains. Further studies are required to establish the mechanism giving rise to this dramatic phenotype observed in melanopsin-null mice. We conclude that the causality between ocular disease and metabolic disorders merits further investigation due to the popularity of diets that rely on the induction of a ketogenic state. Our study is a first step toward understanding retinal pathology as a potential cause of metabolic dysfunction.

  2. Constitutive Stringent Response Restores Viability of Bacillus subtilis Lacking Structural Maintenance of Chromosome Protein.

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    Camille Benoist

    Full Text Available Bacillus subtilis mutants lacking the SMC-ScpAB complex are severely impaired for chromosome condensation and partitioning, DNA repair, and cells are not viable under standard laboratory conditions. We isolated suppressor mutations that restored the capacity of a smc deletion mutant (Δsmc to grow under standard conditions. These suppressor mutations reduced chromosome segregation defects and abrogated hypersensitivity to gyrase inhibitors of Δsmc. Three suppressor mutations were mapped in genes involved in tRNA aminoacylation and maturation pathways. A transcriptomic survey of isolated suppressor mutations pointed to a potential link between suppression of Δsmc and induction of the stringent response. This link was confirmed by (pppGpp quantification which indicated a constitutive induction of the stringent response in multiple suppressor strains. Furthermore, sublethal concentrations of arginine hydroxamate (RHX, a potent inducer of stringent response, restored growth of Δsmc under non permissive conditions. We showed that production of (pppGpp alone was sufficient to suppress the thermosensitivity exhibited by the Δsmc mutant. Our findings shed new light on the coordination between chromosome dynamics mediated by SMC-ScpAB and other cellular processes during rapid bacterial growth.

  3. THE LEVELS OF VALUE IN BUSINESS VALUATION. THE DISCOUNT FOR LACK OF MARKETABILITY

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    Szatmary Miclea Camelia

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper approaches the subject of levels of value used in business valuation and adjustments (discounts and prime that enable professional business valuers to relate these in order to determine the value of a business or ownerships interests in a business. Marketability and control over business decision have a profound impact on the value of an ownership interest. Valuators, regularly, reduce the value of an investment interest if it lacks a ready market. In this paper, I highlight the difference between the marketability and liquidity and, the differences between the the discount for lack of marketability and discount for lack of control. A discount for lack of marketability is closely associated with, but, conceptually, distinct from, the discount for lack of control. I present the characteristics of discount for lack of marketability and the rational of applying it in valuation of minority and majority interest.

  4. Mice lacking caspase-2 are protected from behavioral changes, but not pathology, in the YAC128 model of Huntington disease

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    Bissada Nagat

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Huntington Disease (HD is a neurodegenerative disorder in which caspase activation and cleavage of substrates, including the huntingtin protein, has been invoked as a pathological mechanism. Specific changes in caspase-2 (casp2 activity have been suggested to contribute to the pathogenesis of HD, however unique casp2 cleavage substrates have remained elusive. We thus utilized mice completely lacking casp2 (casp2-/- to examine the role played by casp2 in the progression of HD. This 'substrate agnostic' approach allows us to query the effect of casp2 on HD progression without pre-defining proteolytic substrates of interest. Results YAC128 HD model mice lacking casp2 show protection from well-validated motor and cognitive features of HD, including performance on rotarod, swimming T-maze, pre-pulse inhibition, spontaneous alternation and locomotor tasks. However, the specific pathological features of the YAC128 mice including striatal volume loss and testicular degeneration are unaltered in mice lacking casp2. The application of high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI techniques validates specific neuropathology in the YAC128 mice that is not altered by ablation of casp2. Conclusions The rescue of behavioral phenotypes in the absence of pathological improvement suggests that different pathways may be operative in the dysfunction of neural circuitry in HD leading to behavioral changes compared to the processes leading to cell death and volume loss. Inhibition of caspase-2 activity may be associated with symptomatic improvement in HD.

  5. 29 CFR 779.317 - Partial list of establishments lacking “retail concept.”

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Partial list of establishments lacking âretail concept.â... establishments lacking “retail concept.” There are types of establishments in industries where it is not readily apparent whether a retail concept exists and whether or not the exemption can apply. It, therefore, is...

  6. Broad host range plasmid-based gene transfer system in the cyanobacterium Gloeobacter violaceus which lacks thylakoids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Haitao; XU Xudong

    2004-01-01

    Gloeobacter violaceus, a cyanobacterium lack of thylakoids, is refractory to genetic manipulations because its cells are enveloped by a thick gelatinous sheath and in colonial form.In this study, a large number of single cells were obtained by repeated pumping with a syringe with the gelatinous sheath removed.And an exogenous broad host range plasmid pKT210 was conjugatively transferred into G.violaceus.Analyses with dot-blot hybridization and restriction mapping showed that the exogenous plasmid pKT210 had been introduced into G.violaceus and stably maintained with no alteration in its structure.pKT210 extracted from G.violaceus exconjugants could be transformed into the mcr- mrr- E.coli strain DH10B but not the mcr+ mrr+ strain DH5α, which suggests that a methylase system may be present in G.violaceus.

  7. Lack of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein leads to increased apoptosis and tissue loss following neonatal brain injury

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    Tim West

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Neurological deficits caused by H-I (hypoxia-ischaemia) to the perinatal brain are often severely debilitating and lead to motor impairment, intellectual disability and seizures. Perinatal brain injury is distinct from adult brain injury in that the developing brain is undergoing the normal process of neuronal elimination by apoptotic cell death and thus the apoptotic machinery is more easily engaged and activated in response to injury. Thus cell death in response to neonatal H-I brain injury is partially due to mitochondrial dysfunction and activation of the apoptosome and caspase 3. An important regulator of the apoptotic response following mitochondrial dysfunction is XIAP (X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein). XIAP inhibits apoptosis at the level of caspase 9 and caspase 3 activation, and lack of XIAP in vitro has been shown to lead to increased apoptotic cell death. In the present study we show that mice lacking the gene encoding the XIAP protein have an exacerbated response to neonatal H-I injury as measured by tissue loss at 7 days following the injury. In addition, when the XIAP-deficient mice were studied at 24 h post-H-I we found that the increase in injury correlates with an increased apoptotic response in the XIAP-deficient mice and also with brain imaging changes in T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and apparent diffusion coefficient that correspond to the location of apoptotic cell death. These results identify a critical role of XIAP in regulating neuronal apoptosis in vivo and demonstrate the enhanced vulnerability of neurons to injury in the absence of XIAP in the developing brain.

  8. Meningiomas With Rhabdoid Features Lacking Other Histologic Features of Malignancy: A Study of 44 Cases and Review of the Literature.

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    Vaubel, Rachael A; Chen, Selby G; Raleigh, David R; Link, Michael J; Chicoine, Michael R; Barani, Igor; Jenkins, Sarah M; Aleff, Patrice Abell; Rodriguez, Fausto J; Burger, Peter C; Dahiya, Sonika; Perry, Arie; Giannini, Caterina

    2016-01-01

    The behavior of rhabdoid meningiomas otherwise lacking malignant features remains unknown as most of the originally reported aggressive cases showed anaplastic histologic features independently of rhabdoid phenotype. We studied 44 patients with rhabdoid meningiomas lacking anaplastic features. Median age at diagnosis was 48.6 years (range 10-79). Location was supratentorial in 28 (63.6%), skull base in 15 (34.1%), and spinal in 1 (2.3%). Tumor grade was otherwise World Health Organization grade I (n = 22, 50%) or II (n = 22, 50%). Rhabdoid cells represented 50% in 14 (31.8%). Median clinical follow-up, available for 38 patients, was 5.0 years (range 0.17-14.2). Recurrence occurred in 9 patients (5-year recurrence-free survival, 73.7%) with a significantly higher risk in subtotally resected tumors (p = 0.043). Rhabdoid cell percentage was not associated with recurrence. Six patients died (4 of disease, 2 of unclear causes); 5-year overall survival was 86.7%, a mortality in excess of that expected in grade I-II meningiomas but much lower than originally reported. Review of 50 similar previously reported cases confirmed our findings. We suggest that rhabdoid meningiomas be graded analogously to nonrhabdoid tumors, with caution that some may still behave aggressively and close follow-up is recommended. PMID:26705409

  9. Analgesic tone conferred by constitutively active mu opioid receptors in mice lacking β-arrestin 2

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    Hales Tim G

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hedonic reward, dependence and addiction are unwanted effects of opioid analgesics, linked to the phasic cycle of μ opioid receptor activation, tolerance and withdrawal. In vitro studies of recombinant G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs over expressed in cell lines reveal an alternative tonic signaling mechanism that is independent of agonist. Such studies demonstrate that constitutive GPCR signaling can be inhibited by inverse agonists but not by neutral antagonists. However, ligand-independent activity has been difficult to examine in vivo, at the systems level, due to relatively low levels of constitutive activity of most GPCRs including μ receptors, often necessitating mutagenesis or pharmacological manipulation to enhance basal signaling. We previously demonstrated that the absence of β-arrestin 2 (β-arr2 augments the constitutive coupling of μ receptors to voltage-activated Ca2+ channels in primary afferent dorsal root ganglion neurons from β-arr2-/- mice. We used this in vitro approach to characterize neutral competitive antagonists and inverse agonists of the constitutively active wild type μ receptors in neurons. We administered these agents to β-arr2-/- mice to explore the role of constitutive μ receptor activity in nociception and hedonic tone. This study demonstrates that the induction of constitutive μ receptor activity in vivo in β-arr2-/- mice prolongs tail withdrawal from noxious heat, a phenomenon that was reversed by inverse agonists, but not by antagonists that lack negative efficacy. By contrast, the aversive effects of inverse agonists were similar in β-arr2-/- and β-arr2+/+ mice, suggesting that hedonic tone was unaffected.

  10. Living invisible: HTLV-1-infected persons and the lack of care in public health.

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    Karina Franco Zihlmann

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1 infection is intractable and endemic in many countries. Although a few individuals have severe symptoms, most patients remain asymptomatic throughout their lives and their infections may be unknown to many health professionals. HTLV-1 can be considered a neglected public health problem and there are not many studies specifically on patients' needs and emotional experiences. OBJECTIVE: To better understand how women and men living with HTLV-1 experience the disease and what issues exist in their healthcare processes. METHODS: A qualitative study using participant observation and life story interview methods was conducted with 13 symptomatic and asymptomatic patients, at the outpatient clinic of the Emilio Ribas Infectious Diseases Institute, in Sao Paulo, Brazil. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: The interviewees stated that HTLV-1 is a largely unknown infection to society and health professionals. Counseling is rare, but when it occurs, focuses on the low probability of developing HTLV-1 related diseases without adequately addressing the risk of infection transmission or reproductive decisions. The diagnosis of HTLV-1 can remain a stigmatized secret as patients deny their situations. As a consequence, the disease remains invisible and there are potentially negative implications for patient self-care and the identification of infected relatives. This perception seems to be shared by some health professionals who do not appear to understand the importance of preventing new infections. CONCLUSIONS: Patients and medical staff referred that the main focus was the illness risk, but not the identification of infected relatives to prevent new infections. This biomedical model of care makes prevention difficult, contributes to the lack of care in public health for HTLV-1, and further perpetuates the infection among populations. Thus, HTLV-1 patients experience an "invisibility" of their complex demands

  11. Male-like sexual behavior of female mouse lacking fucose mutarotase

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    Lim Dae-sik

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutarotases are recently characterized family of enzymes that are involved in the anomeric conversions of monosaccharides. The mammalian fucose mutarotase (FucM was reported in cultured cells to facilitate fucose utilization and incorporation into protein by glycosylation. However, the role of this enzyme in animal has not been elucidated. Results We generated a mutant mouse specifically lacking the fucose mutarotase (FucM gene. The FucM knockout mice displayed an abnormal sexual receptivity with a drastic reduction in lordosis score, although the animals were fertile due to a rare and forced intromission by a typical male. We examined the anteroventral periventricular nucleus (AVPv of the preoptic region in brain and found that the mutant females showed a reduction in tyrosine hydoxylase positive neurons compared to that of a normal female. Furthermore, the mutant females exhibited a masculine behavior, such as mounting to a normal female partner as well as showing a preference to female urine. We found a reduction of fucosylated serum alpha-fetoprotein (AFP in a mutant embryo relative to that of a wild-type embryo. Conclusions The observation that FucM-/- female mouse exhibits a phenotypic similarity to a wild-type male in terms of its sexual behavior appears to be due to the neurodevelopmental changes in preoptic area of mutant brain resembling a wild-type male. Since the previous studies indicate that AFP plays a role in titrating estradiol that are required to consolidate sexual preference of female mice, we speculate that the reduced level of AFP in FucM-/- mouse, presumably resulting from the reduced fucosylation, is responsible for the male-like sexual behavior observed in the FucM knock-out mouse.

  12. Fetal growth retardation and lack of hypotaurine in ezrin knockout mice.

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    Tomohiro Nishimura

    Full Text Available Ezrin is a membrane-associated cytoplasmic protein that serves to link cell-membrane proteins with the actin-based cytoskeleton, and also plays a role in regulation of the functional activities of some transmembrane proteins. It is expressed in placental trophoblasts. We hypothesized that placental ezrin is involved in the supply of nutrients from mother to fetus, thereby influencing fetal growth. The aim of this study was firstly to clarify the effect of ezrin on fetal growth and secondly to determine whether knockout of ezrin is associated with decreased concentrations of serum and placental nutrients. Ezrin knockout mice (Ez(-/- were confirmed to exhibit fetal growth retardation. Metabolome analysis of fetal serum and placental extract of ezrin knockout mice by means of capillary electrophoresis-time-of-flight mass spectrometry revealed a markedly decreased concentration of hypotaurine, a precursor of taurine. However, placental levels of cysteine and cysteine sulfinic acid (precursors of hypotaurine and taurine were not affected. Lack of hypotaurine in Ez(-/- mice was confirmed by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry. Administration of hypotaurine to heterogenous dams significantly decreased the placenta-to-maternal plasma ratio of hypotaurine in wild-type fetuses but only slightly decreased it in ezrin knockout fetuses, indicating that the uptake of hypotaurine from mother to placenta is saturable and that disruption of ezrin impairs the uptake of hypotaurine by placental trophoblasts. These results indicate that ezrin is required for uptake of hypotaurine from maternal serum by placental trophoblasts, and plays an important role in fetal growth.

  13. Murine Norovirus Infection Variably Alters Atherosclerosis in Mice Lacking Apolipoprotein E.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Charlie C; Paik, Jisun; Brabb, Thea L; O'Brien, Kevin D; Kim, Jinkyu; Sullivan, Brittany G; Hudkins, Kelly L; Seamons, Audrey; Finley, Jennifer C; Meeker, Stacey M; Maggio-Price, Lillian

    2015-10-01

    Macrophages play a key role in the development of atherosclerosis. Murine noroviruses (MNV) are highly prevalent in research mouse colonies and infect macrophages and dendritic cells. Our laboratory found that MNV4 infection in mice lacking the LDL receptor alters the development of atherosclerosis, potentially confounding research outcomes. Therefore, we investigated whether MNV4 likewise altered atherosclerosis in ApoE(-/-) mice. In the presence of oxidized LDL, MNV4 infection of ApoE(-/-) bone marrow-derived macrophages increased the gene expression of the inflammatory markers inducible nitric oxide synthase, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1, and IL6. In addition, proteins involved in cholesterol transport were altered in MNV4-infected ApoE -/- bone marrow-derived macrophages and consisted of increased CD36 and decreased ATP-binding cassette transporter A1. MNV4 infection of ApoE(-/-) mice at 12 wk of age (during the development of atherosclerosis) had a variable effect on atherosclerotic lesion size. In one study, MNV4 significantly increased atherosclerotic plaque area whereas in a second study, no effect was observed. Compared with controls, MNV4-infected mice had higher circulating Ly6C-positive monocytes, and viral RNA was detected in the aortas of some mice, suggesting potential mechanisms by which MNV4 alters disease progression. Plaque size did not differ when ApoE -/- mice were infected at 4 wk of age (early during disease development) or in ApoE -/- mice maintained on a high-fat, high-cholesterol diet. Therefore, these data show that MNV4 has the potential to exert a variable and unpredictable effect on atherosclerosis in ApoE(-/-) mice. We therefore propose that performing experiments in MNV-free mouse colonies is warranted. PMID:26473341

  14. Entrainment and phase-shifting by centrifugation abolished in mice lacking functional vestibular input

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Charles; Ringgold, Kristyn

    The circadian pacemaker can be phase shifted and entrained by appropriately timed locomotor activity, however the mechanism(s) involved remain poorly understood. Recent work in our lab has suggested the involvement of the vestibular otolith organs in activity-induced changes within the circadian timing system (CTS). For example, we have shown that changes in circa-dian period and phase in response to locomotion (wheel running) require functional macular gravity receptors. We believe the neurovestibular system is responsible for the transduction of gravitoinertial input associated with the types of locomotor activity that are known to af-fect the pacemaker. This study investigated the hypothesis that daily, timed gravitoinertial stimuli, as applied by centrifugation. would induce entrainment of circadian rhythms in only those animals with functional afferent vestibular input. To test this hypothesis, , chemically labyrinthectomized (Labx) mice, mice lacking macular vestibular input (head tilt or hets) and wildtype (WT) littermates were implanted i.p. with biotelemetry and individually housed in a 4-meter diameter centrifuge in constant darkness (DD). After 2 weeks in DD, the mice were exposed daily to 2G via centrifugation from 1000-1200 for 9 weeks. Only WT mice showed entrainment to the daily 2G pulse. The 2G pulse was then re-set to occur at 1200-1400 for 4 weeks. Only WT mice demonstrated a phase shift in response to the re-setting of the 2G pulse and subsequent re-entrainment to the new centrifugation schedule. These results provide further evidence that gravitoinertial stimuli require a functional vestibular system to both en-train and phase shift the CTS. Entrainment among only WT mice supports the role of macular gravity receptive cells in modulation of the CTS while also providing a functional mechanism by which gravitoinertial stimuli, including locomotor activity, may affect the pacemaker.

  15. Cadmium toxicity to Microcystis aeruginosa PCC 7806 and its microcystin-lacking mutant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Huang

    Full Text Available The adverse effects of microcystin (MC produced by cyanobacteria have drawn considerable attention from the public. Yet it remains unclear whether MC confers any benefits to the cyanobacteria themselves. One suggested function of MC is complexation, which may influence the bioaccumulation and toxicity of trace metals. To test this hypothesis, we examined Cd toxicity to wild-type Microcystis aeruginosa PCC 7806 (WT and its MC-lacking mutant (MT under nutrient-enriched (+NP, phosphorus-limited (-P, and nitrogen-limited (-N conditions. The accumulation of Cd and the biochemical parameters associated with its detoxification [total phosphorus (TP, inorganic polyphosphate (Poly-P, and glutathione (GSH in the cells as well as intra- and extra-cellular carbohydrates] were quantified. Although the -P cyanobacteria accumulated less Cd than their +NP and -N counterparts, the different nutrient-conditioned cyanobacteria were similarly inhibited by similar free ion concentration of Cd in the medium ([Cd2+]F. Such good toxicity predictability of [Cd2+]F was ascribed to the synchronous decrease in the intracellular concentrations of Cd and TP. Nevertheless, Cd toxicity was still determined by the intracellular Cd to phosphorus ratio (Cd/P, in accordance with what has been reported in the literature. On the other hand, the concentrations of TP, Poly-P, and carbohydrates went up, but GSH concentration dropped down with the enhancement of [Cd2+]F, indicating their association with Cd detoxification. Although the inactivation of MC peptide synthetase gene had some nutrient and Cd concentration dependent effects on the parameters above, both cyanobacterial strains showed the same Cd accumulation ability and displayed similar Cd sensitivity. These results suggest that MC cannot affect metal toxicity either by regulating metal accumulation or by altering the detoxification ability of the cyanobacteria. Other possible functions of MC need to be further investigated.

  16. Development of a lack of appetite item bank for computer-adaptive testing (CAT)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thamsborg, Lise Laurberg Holst; Petersen, Morten Aa; Aaronson, Neil K;

    2015-01-01

    measurement precision. The EORTC Quality of Life Group is developing a CAT version of the widely used EORTC QLQ-C30 questionnaire. Here, we report on the development of the lack of appetite CAT. METHODS: The EORTC approach to CAT development comprises four phases: literature search, operationalization, pre...... to 12 lack of appetite items. CONCLUSIONS: Phases 1-3 resulted in 12 lack of appetite candidate items. Based on a field testing (phase 4), the psychometric characteristics of the items will be assessed and the final item bank will be generated. This CAT item bank is expected to provide precise...

  17. Whole Body Cryotherapy (WBC): A "Cool" Trend that Lacks Evidence, Poses Risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Whole Body Cryotherapy (WBC): A "Cool" Trend that Lacks Evidence, Poses Risks Share Tweet Linkedin ...

  18. Lack of Pharmacy Access May Send Some Seniors Back to Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160255.html Lack of Pharmacy Access May Send Some Seniors Back to Hospital ... Aug. 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Limited access to pharmacies may be one reason hospital readmission is more ...

  19. Q&A. Does lack of product management impact the users of open source?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Young

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Most commercial software companies employ product managers to handle the planning and marketing of software products, whereas few open source projects have a product manager. Does lack of product management impact the users of open source?

  20. Terminal Bacteroid Differentiation Is Associated With Variable Morphological Changes in Legume Species Belonging to the Inverted Repeat-Lacking Clade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montiel, Jesús; Szűcs, Attila; Boboescu, Iulian Z; Gherman, Vasile D; Kondorosi, Éva; Kereszt, Attila

    2016-03-01

    Medicago and closely related legume species from the inverted repeat-lacking clade (IRLC) impose terminal differentiation onto their bacterial endosymbionts, manifested in genome endoreduplication, cell enlargement, and loss of cell-division capacity. Nodule-specific cysteine-rich (NCR) secreted host peptides are plant effectors of this process. As bacteroids in other IRLC legumes, such as Cicer arietinum and Glycyrrhiza lepidota, were reported not to display features of terminal differentiation, we investigated the fate of bacteroids in species from these genera as well as in four other species representing distinct genera of the phylogenetic tree for this clade. Bacteroids in all tested legumes proved to be larger in size and DNA content than cultured cells; however, the degree of cell elongation was rather variable in the different species. In addition, the reproductive ability of the bacteroids isolated from these legumes was remarkably reduced. In all IRLC species with available sequence data, the existence of NCR genes was found. These results indicate that IRLC legumes provoke terminal differentiation of their endosymbionts with different morphotypes, probably with the help of NCR peptides.

  1. Predictors and Consequences of Perceived Lack of Choice in Becoming an Informal Caregiver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Richard; Beach, Scott R.; Cook, Thomas B.; Martire, Lynn M.; Tomlinson, Jennifer M.; Monin, Joan K.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Using data from a national sample of informal caregivers to older adults, we identify predictors of lack of choice and the consequences of lack of choice in taking on the caregiving role. Methods A national telephone survey with 1397 caregivers was carried out to assess whether respondents had a choice in taking on the caregiving role, their demographic characteristics, the nature and duration of their caregiving experience, and its impact on their physical and psychological well-being. We compare caregivers who felt they had no choice in taking on the caregiving role to those who did. Results Forty-four percent of caregivers reported a lack of choice in taking on the caregiving role. Highly educated, older caregivers caring for a younger care recipient with emotional or behavioral problems were most likely to report that they had no choice in taking on the caregiving role. Lack of choice is associated with higher levels of emotional stress, physical strain, and negative health impacts, after controlling for multiple confounds including level of care provided, relationship type, primary health condition of the care recipient, and demographic characteristics. Conclusion Lack of choice is an independent risk factor for the negative effects of caregiving, and clinicians should be vigilant to lack of choice as a marker of caregiver distress. PMID:22360296

  2. Unique carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions are required for high affinity binding between FcgammaRIII and antibodies lacking core fucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrara, Claudia; Grau, Sandra; Jäger, Christiane; Sondermann, Peter; Brünker, Peter; Waldhauer, Inja; Hennig, Michael; Ruf, Armin; Rufer, Arne Christian; Stihle, Martine; Umaña, Pablo; Benz, Jörg

    2011-08-01

    Antibody-mediated cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), a key immune effector mechanism, relies on the binding of antigen-antibody complexes to Fcγ receptors expressed on immune cells. Antibodies lacking core fucosylation show a large increase in affinity for FcγRIIIa leading to an improved receptor-mediated effector function. Although afucosylated IgGs exist naturally, a next generation of recombinant therapeutic, glycoenginereed antibodies is currently being developed to exploit this finding. In this study, the crystal structures of a glycosylated Fcγ receptor complexed with either afucosylated or fucosylated Fc were determined allowing a detailed, molecular understanding of the regulatory role of Fc-oligosaccharide core fucosylation in improving ADCC. The structures reveal a unique type of interface consisting of carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions between glycans of the receptor and the afucosylated Fc. In contrast, in the complex structure with fucosylated Fc, these contacts are weakened or nonexistent, explaining the decreased affinity for the receptor. These findings allow us to understand the higher efficacy of therapeutic antibodies lacking the core fucose and also suggest a unique mechanism by which the immune system can regulate antibody-mediated effector functions.

  3. 涂鸦者的“缺失”刍议%Discussion on Graffiti's"Lack"

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘红兵; 吴鹏; 王芳; 段纯

    2014-01-01

    Graffiti have a negative impact on both public environment and public life. Graffiti's behavior could be as minor as contrary to moral conscience, or even as severe as violating the law. The important cause of this unstoppable, repeated, even spreading Graffiti's behavior is lack of education, lack of self-discipline, lack of aesthetic, and lack of supervision. The continuous education can make up for most of"lacks"mentioned above, the strict supervision can cure the graffiti phenomenon. They will be united during the harmonious social construction and the environmental construction.%涂鸦对公共环境和公众生活造成了消极的影响,涂鸦者的行为,轻者有悖道德良知,重者触犯法律。教育缺失、自律缺失、审美缺失、监管缺失是涂鸦屡禁不止、甚或有蔓延之势的重要原因。接力教育可弥补涂鸦者众多缺失,严格监管可对涂鸦现象进行根治,二者统一于和谐社会建设和环保建设之中。

  4. Mice lacking the synaptic adhesion molecule Neph2/Kirrel3 display moderate hyperactivity and defective novel object preference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Yeon eChoi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Synaptic adhesion molecules regulate diverse aspects of neuronal synapse development, including synapse specificity, formation, and maturation. Neph2, also known as Kirrel3, is an immunoglobulin superfamily adhesion molecule implicated in intellectual disability, neurocognitive delay associated with Jacobsen syndrome, and autism spectrum disorders. We here report mice lacking Neph2 (Neph2–/– mice display moderate hyperactivity in a familiar but not novel environment and novel object recognition deficit with normal performances in Morris water maze spatial learning and memory, contextual fear conditioning and extinction, and pattern separation tests. These mice show normal levels of anxiety-like behaviors, social interaction, and repetitive behaviors. At the synapse level, Neph2–/– dentate gyrus granule cells exhibit unaltered dendritic spine density and spontaneous excitatory synaptic transmission. These results suggest that Neph2 is important for normal locomotor activity and object recognition memory.

  5. Lack of potassium channel induces proliferation and survival causing increased neurogenesis and two-fold hippocampus enlargement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almgren, Malin; Persson, Ann-Sophie; Fenghua, Chen;

    2007-01-01

    The megencephaly mice show dramatic progressive increase in brain size and seizures. The overgrowth affects primarily the hippocampus and ventral cortex. The phenotype originates from a mutation in the Shaker-like voltage-gated potassium channel Kv1.1 brain, which results in a malfunctioning...... protein. A key question in elucidating the mechanism behind the unique brain overgrowth is whether it is caused by an increase in cell number. By applying stereological techniques, we found that the number of both neurons and astrocytes, as well as structure volume, was increased approximately two...... lower in mceph/mceph supporting additional overgrowth mechanism than induced by seizures. In conclusion, lack of a functional Kv1.1 ion channel subunit in the mceph/mceph mice causes a unique neuronal hyperplasia in distinct hippocampal regions and consequently hippocampal enlargement from 2 to 3 weeks...

  6. Human NKCC2 cation–Cl– co-transporter complements lack of Vhc1 transporter in yeast vacuolar membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrezselyova, Silvia; Dominguez, Angel; Herynkova, Pavla; Macias, Juan F; Sychrova, Hana

    2013-10-01

    Cation–chloride co-transporters serve to transport Cl– and alkali metal cations. Whereas a large family of these exists in higher eukaryotes, yeasts only possess one cation–chloride co-transporter, Vhc1, localized to the vacuolar membrane. In this study, the human cation–chloride co-transporter NKCC2 complemented the phenotype of VHC1 deletion in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and its activity controlled the growth of salt-sensitive yeast cells in the presence of high KCl, NaCl and LiCl. A S. cerevisiae mutant lacking plasma-membrane alkali–metal cation exporters Nha1 and Ena1-5 and the vacuolar cation–chloride co-transporter Vhc1 is highly sensitive to increased concentrations of alkali–metal cations, and it proved to be a suitable model for characterizing the substrate specificity and transport activity of human wild-type and mutated cation–chloride co-transporters.

  7. Predictors of lack of serological response to syphilis treatment in HIV-infected subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Spagnuolo

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of this study was to determine factors associated with lack of serological response (LSR to treatment of syphilis among HIV-infected subjects. Materials and Methods: Retrospective, longitudinal study on HIV-infected subjects diagnosed and treated for syphilis and with an assessable serological response between 1 January 2004 and 15 September 2013. LSR was defined as a <4-fold decline of rapid plasma reagin (RPR titer or a failed reversion to nonreactive (if RPR ≤1:4 at diagnosis after one year since treatment. Diagnoses of syphilis were staged in early syphilis (primary, secondary and early latent or late syphilis (tertiary and late latent according to clinical examination and patient's history. Syphilis was classified in new infections [NI: positive RPR and TPHA (Treponema pallidum Haemagglutination assay titers in subjects without previous history of syphilis] or re-infections [ReI: a ≥4-fold increase of RPR titer in subjects previously successfully treated for syphilis]. Syphilis treatment was prescribed according to CDC guidelines. The crude incidence rates (IRs of LSR were calculated per 1000-person months of follow-up (PMFU as the total number of LSR episodes divided by the cumulative time contributed by all subjects (interval time since each syphilis diagnosis and the date of ascertainment of response. Results are described as median (IQR or frequency (%. Results: 565 diagnoses of syphilis with an assessable serological response in 421 patients; 458 (81% were early syphilis, 189 (33% were NI, 376 (67% were ReI. At first, diagnosis of syphilis median age was 41 (36–47 years, 419 (99.5% males, 391 (93% MSM, HIV-infected since 7.7 (3.5–12.9 years, 75 (18% HCV or HBV co-infected, 56 (13% with a previous AIDS diagnosis, 82 (19% antiretroviral treatment naïve, 102 (24% with HIV-RNA ≥50 cp/mL, CD4+=576 (437–749 cells/mm3, nadir CD4+=308 (194–406 cells/mm3. LSRs were observed in 70/565 (12.4% treated syphilis

  8. Role of the RuvAB protein in avoiding spontaneous formation of deletion mutations in the Escherichia coli K-12 endogenous tonB gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashimo, Kazumi; Nagata, Yuki; Kawata, Masakado; Iwasaki, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Kazuo

    2004-10-01

    The endogenous tonB gene of Escherichia coli was used as a target for spontaneous deletion mutations which were isolated from ruvAB-, recG-, and ruvC- cells. The rates of tonB mutation were essentially the same in ruv+, ruvAB-, recG-, and ruvC- cells. We analyzed tonB mutants by sequencing. In the ruv+, recG-, and ruvC- strains, the spectra were different from those obtained from the ruvAB- cells, where deletions dominated followed by IS insertions, base substitutions, and frameshifts, in that order. We then analyzed the tonB-trp large deletion, due to simultaneous mutations of the trp operon, and found that the frequency in ruvAB- was higher than those in ruv+, recG-, and ruvC- cells. To characterize deletion formation further, we analyzed all the tonB mutants from one colicin plate. Seven deletions were identified at five sites from the 45 tonB mutants of ruv+ cells and 24 deletions at 11 sites from the 43 tonB mutants of ruvAB- cells. Thus, the ruvAB- strain is a deletion mutator. We discuss the role of RuvAB in avoiding deletions. PMID:15351721

  9. Competency to stand trial and defendants who lack insight into their mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisner, Andrew D; Piel, Jennifer; Makey, Miller

    2013-01-01

    Forensic evaluators often assess patients who lack insight into their mental illnesses. This lack of insight can have a significant impact on the defendant's ability to make legal strategy decisions that rely on their acceptance of their mental illness. In this article, the relationship between refusing an insanity plea and competency to stand trial will be explored in the context of defendants who lack insight into their mental illness. The authors argue that an adequate competency assessment should take into account the defendant's ability to consider his available pleas rationally. Such evaluations may have the effect of negating the necessity of a Frendak inquiry in those jurisdictions that can impose the insanity defense on defendants.

  10. Expansion of the lateral ventricles and ependymal deficits underlie the hydrocephalus evident in mice lacking the transcription factor NFIX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidovic, Diana; Harris, Lachlan; Harvey, Tracey J; Evelyn Heng, Yee Hsieh; Smith, Aaron G; Osinski, Jason; Hughes, James; Thomas, Paul; Gronostajski, Richard M; Bailey, Timothy L; Piper, Michael

    2015-08-01

    Nuclear factor one X (NFIX) has been shown to play a pivotal role during the development of many regions of the brain, including the neocortex, the hippocampus and the cerebellum. Mechanistically, NFIX has been shown to promote neural stem cell differentiation through the activation of astrocyte-specific genes and via the repression of genes central to progenitor cell self-renewal. Interestingly, mice lacking Nfix also exhibit other phenotypes with respect to development of the central nervous system, and whose underlying causes have yet to be determined. Here we examine one of the phenotypes displayed by Nfix(-/-) mice, namely hydrocephalus. Through the examination of embryonic and postnatal Nfix(-/-) mice we reveal that hydrocephalus is first seen at around postnatal day (P) 10 in mice lacking Nfix, and is fully penetrant by P20. Furthermore, we examined the subcommissural organ (SCO), the Sylvian aqueduct and the ependymal layer of the lateral ventricles, regions that when malformed and functionally perturbed have previously been implicated in the development of hydrocephalus. SOX3 is a factor known to regulate SCO development. Although we revealed that NFIX could repress Sox3-promoter-driven transcriptional activity in vitro, SOX3 expression within the SCO was normal within Nfix(-/-) mice, and Nfix mutant mice showed no abnormalities in the structure or function of the SCO. Moreover, these mutant mice exhibited no overt blockage of the Sylvian aqueduct. However, the ependymal layer of the lateral ventricles was frequently absent in Nfix(-/-) mice, suggesting that this phenotype may underlie the development of hydrocephalus within these knockout mice.

  11. C60-Fullerenes: detection of intracellular photoluminescence and lack of cytotoxic effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carroll David L

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We have developed a new method of application of C60 to cultured cells that does not require water-solubilization techniques. Normal and malignant cells take-up C60 and the inherent photoluminescence of C60 is detected within multiple cell lines. Treatment of cells with up to 200 μg/ml (200 ppm of C60 does not alter morphology, cytoskeletal organization, cell cycle dynamics nor does it inhibit cell proliferation. Our work shows that pristine C60 is non-toxic to the cells, and suggests that fullerene-based nanocarriers may be used for biomedical applications.

  12. Mice Lacking the Giant Protocadherin mFAT1 Exhibit Renal Slit Junction Abnormalities and a Partially Penetrant Cyclopia and Anophthalmia Phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    Ciani, Lorenza; Patel, Anjla; Allen, Nicholas D.; ffrench-Constant, Charles

    2003-01-01

    While roles in adhesion and morphogenesis have been documented for classical cadherins, the nonclassical cadherins are much less well understood. Here we have examined the functions of the giant protocadherin FAT by generating a transgenic mouse lacking mFAT1. These mice exhibit perinatal lethality, most probably caused by loss of the renal glomerular slit junctions and fusion of glomerular epithelial cell processes (podocytes). In addition, some mFAT1−/− mice show defects in forebrain develo...

  13. The cytoplasmic location of chicken mx is not the determining factor for its lack of antiviral activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilla T O Benfield

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chicken Mx belongs to the Mx family of interferon-induced dynamin-like GTPases, which in some species possess potent antiviral properties. Conflicting data exist for the antiviral capability of chicken Mx. Reports of anti-influenza activity of alleles encoding an Asn631 polymorphism have not been supported by subsequent studies. The normal cytoplasmic localisation of chicken Mx may influence its antiviral capacity. Here we report further studies to determine the antiviral potential of chicken Mx against Newcastle disease virus (NDV, an economically important cytoplasmic RNA virus of chickens, and Thogoto virus, an orthomyxovirus known to be exquisitely sensitive to the cytoplasmic MxA protein from humans. We also report the consequences of re-locating chicken Mx to the nucleus. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Chicken Mx was tested in virus infection assays using NDV. Neither the Asn631 nor Ser631 Mx alleles (when transfected into 293T cells showed inhibition of virus-directed gene expression when the cells were subsequently infected with NDV. Human MxA however did show significant inhibition of NDV-directed gene expression. Chicken Mx failed to inhibit a Thogoto virus (THOV minireplicon system in which the cytoplasmic human MxA protein showed potent and specific inhibition. Relocalisation of chicken Mx to the nucleus was achieved by inserting the Simian Virus 40 large T antigen nuclear localisation sequence (SV40 NLS at the N-terminus of chicken Mx. Nuclear re-localised chicken Mx did not inhibit influenza (A/PR/8/34 gene expression during virus infection in cell culture or influenza polymerase activity in A/PR/8/34 or A/Turkey/50-92/91 minireplicon systems. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The chicken Mx protein (Asn631 lacks inhibitory effects against THOV and NDV, and is unable to suppress influenza replication when artificially re-localised to the cell nucleus. Thus, the natural cytoplasmic localisation of the chicken Mx protein does

  14. The lack of theoretical support for using person trade-offs in QALY-type models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østerdal, Lars Peter Raahave

    2009-01-01

    -adjusted life years (DALYs). This paper discusses the theoretical support for the use of person trade-offs in QALY-type measurement of (changes in) population health. It argues that measures of this type based on such quality-adjustment factors almost always violate the Pareto principle, and so lack normative...

  15. 22 CFR 225.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 225.118 Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. Certain types of applications for grants, cooperative agreements, or contracts are submitted to departments or agencies with the knowledge that subjects may...

  16. Defective tubulin organization and proplatelet formation in murine megakaryocytes lacking Rac1 and Cdc42

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pleines, Irina; Dütting, Sebastian; Cherpokova, Deya;

    2013-01-01

    normally in vivo but displayed highly abnormal morphology and uncontrolled fragmentation. Consistently, a lack of Rac1/Cdc42 virtually abrogated proplatelet formation in vitro. Strikingly, this phenotype was associated with severely defective tubulin organization, whereas actin assembly and structure were...

  17. Tools to Assess Pain or Lack of Comfort in Dementia: A Content Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steen, J.T. van der; Sampson, E.L.; Block, L. Van den; Lord, K.; Vankova, H.; Pautex, S.; Vandervoort, A.; Radbruch, L.; Shvartzman, P.; Sacchi, V.; Vet, H.C. de; Noortgate, N.J. Van Den

    2015-01-01

    CONTEXT: There is need for tools to help detect pain or lack of comfort in persons unable to communicate. However, pain and (dis)comfort tools have not been compared, and it is unclear to what extent they discriminate between pain and other possible sources of discomfort, or even if items differ. OB

  18. Barriers to Faculty Pedagogical Change: Lack of Training, Time, Incentives, and. . .Tensions with Professional Identity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownell, Sara E.; Tanner, Kimberly D.

    2012-01-01

    A substantial body of literature has highlighted many factors that impede faculty change, the most common of which are a lack of training, time, and incentives. However, there may be other barriers--unacknowledged and unexamined barriers--that might prove to be equally important. In particular, the tensions between a scientist's professional…

  19. Quantitative trait loci for a neurocranium deformity, lack of operculum, in gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrín-Báez, D; Navarro, A; Afonso, J M; Toro, M A; Zamorano, M J

    2016-04-01

    Lack of operculum, a neurocranial deformity, is the most common external abnormality to be found among industrially produced gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata L.), and this entails significant financial losses. This study conducts, for the first time in this species, a quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis of the lack of operculum. A total of 142 individuals from a paternal half-sibling family (six full-sibling families) were selected for QTL mapping. They had previously shown a highly significant association with the prevalence of lack of operculum in a segregation analysis. All the fish were genotyped for 106 microsatellite markers using a set of multiplex PCRs (ReMsa1-ReMsa13). A linear regression methodology was used for the QTL analysis. Four QTL were detected for this deformity, two of which (QTLOP1 and QTLOP2) were significant. They were located at LG (linkage group) nine and LG10 respectively. Both QTL showed a large effect (about 27%), and furthermore, the association between lack of operculum and sire allelic segregation observed was statistically significant in the QTLOP1 analysis. These results represent a significant step towards including marker-assisted selection for this deformity in genetic breeding programmes to reduce the incidence of the deformity in the species. PMID:26995565

  20. Mind Maps to Modify Lack of Attention among Saudi Kindergarten Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daghistan, Bulquees Ismail Abdul Majid

    2016-01-01

    This research study aims at investigating the impact of Mind Maps on modifying the lack of attention in Arabic language class among Saudi Kindergarten children. To achieve the goals of this study the researcher used an experimental design with a random sample from AlRae'd Kindergarten's children in Riyadh -Saudi Arabia for the academic year…

  1. 25 CFR 170.811 - What happens if lack of funds results in inadequate maintenance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... maintenance? 170.811 Section 170.811 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM BIA Road Maintenance § 170.811 What happens if lack of funds results in inadequate maintenance? If BIA determines that an IRR transportation facility is not...

  2. Non-Native Student's Communication Is Affected Due to the Lack of Pragmatic Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latha, V. G.; Rajan, Premalatha

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims at focusing how the lack of pragmatic competence affects student's communication in L2 (Second language) at tertiary level. The city based Indian students learn English which is their second language from 3 years onwards whereas the rural based students learn English only from 6 years onwards. This exposure of the L2 shows the…

  3. Do semantic standards lack quality? : a survey among 34 semantic standards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Folmer, Erwin; Oude Luttighuis, Paul; Hillegersberg, van Jos

    2011-01-01

    The adoption of standards to improve interoperability in the automotive, aerospace, shipbuilding and other sectors could save billions. While interoperability standards have been created for a number of industries, problems persist, suggesting a lack of quality of the standards themselves. The issue

  4. Regulation of Amidase Formation in Mutants from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO Lacking Glutamine Synthetase Activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Dick B.; Herst, Patricia M.; Joosten, Han M.L.J.; Drift, Chris van der

    1982-01-01

    The formation of amidase was studied in mutants from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO lacking glutamine synthetase activity. It appeared that catabolite repression of amidase synthesis by succinate was partially relieved when cellular growth was limited by glutamine. Under these conditions, a correlation

  5. Lack of Emotional Support from Parents Early in Life and Alcohol Abuse Later in Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Benjamin A.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the association between lacking emotional support from parents early in life and adult alcohol abuse. A series of logistic regression models were run with data collected from a nationally representative sample of over 2,500 adults ages 25-74. The findings reveal a linear relationship between level of…

  6. Mutant Mice Lacking the p53 C-Terminal Domain Model Telomere Syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simeonova, I.; Jaber, S.; Draskovic, I.; Bardot, B.; Fang, M.; Bouarich-Bourimi, R.; Lejour, V.; Charbonnier, L.; Soudais, C.; Bourdon, J.C.; Huerre, M.; Londono-Vallejo, A.; Toledo, F.

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in p53, although frequent in human cancers, have not been implicated in telomere-related syndromes. Here, we show that homozygous mutant mice expressing p53(Delta31), a p53 lacking the C-terminal domain, exhibit increased p53 activity and suffer from aplastic anemia and pulmonary fibrosis,

  7. Cyanobacterial contribution to the genomes of the plastid-lacking protists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matsuzaki Motomichi

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Eukaryotic genes with cyanobacterial ancestry in plastid-lacking protists have been regarded as important evolutionary markers implicating the presence of plastids in the early evolution of eukaryotes. Although recent genomic surveys demonstrated the presence of cyanobacterial and algal ancestry genes in the genomes of plastid-lacking protists, comparative analyses on the origin and distribution of those genes are still limited. Results We identified 12 gene families with cyanobacterial ancestry in the genomes of a taxonomically wide range of plastid-lacking eukaryotes (Phytophthora [Chromalveolata], Naegleria [Excavata], Dictyostelium [Amoebozoa], Saccharomyces and Monosiga [Opisthokonta] using a novel phylogenetic pipeline. The eukaryotic gene clades with cyanobacterial ancestry were mostly composed of genes from bikonts (Archaeplastida, Chromalveolata, Rhizaria and Excavata. We failed to find genes with cyanobacterial ancestry in Saccharomyces and Dictyostelium, except for a photorespiratory enzyme conserved among fungi. Meanwhile, we found several Monosiga genes with cyanobacterial ancestry, which were unrelated to other Opisthokonta genes. Conclusion Our data demonstrate that a considerable number of genes with cyanobacterial ancestry have contributed to the genome composition of the plastid-lacking protists, especially bikonts. The origins of those genes might be due to lateral gene transfer events, or an ancient primary or secondary endosymbiosis before the diversification of bikonts. Our data also show that all genes identified in this study constitute multi-gene families with punctate distribution among eukaryotes, suggesting that the transferred genes could have survived through rounds of gene family expansion and differential reduction.

  8. Lack of credibility in food markets - driving medium quality food out of the market

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jan; Graversen, Jesper Tranbjerg

    Some food markets are dominated by high quality and standard quality segments, whereas me-dium quality products are almost absent. A modeling framework with asymmetric information regard-ing true quality of the products and the resulting lack of consumer confidence is presented. Uncer...

  9. Stabilization of oral anticoagulant therapy in hospitalized patients and characteristics associated with lack of stabilization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bemt, PMLA; Joosten, P; Risselada, A; van den Boogaart, MHA; Egberts, ACG; Brouwers, JRBJ

    2000-01-01

    The initiation and stabilization of oral anticoagulant therapy in hospitalized patients in a setting without specialized medical or pharmaceutical advice, was studied. In addition, potential risk factors for lack of stabilization were studied. All patients from three wards (orthopaedic surgery, gene

  10. Do semantic standards lack quality? A survey among 34 semantic standards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Folmer, E.J.A.; Oude Luttighuis, P.H.W.M.; Hillegersberg, J. van

    2011-01-01

    The adoption of standards to improve interoperability in the automotive, aerospace, shipbuilding and other sectors could save billions. While interoperability standards have been created for a number of industries, problems persist, suggesting a lack of quality of the standards themselves. The issue

  11. The Lack of Political Cartoons in the People's Republic of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnell, Jim

    Political cartoons do not appear in the government-controlled press in the People's Republic of China. The cartoons that do appear in newspapers are good-natured and lacking in any type of political message. Chinese civilization has a 5,000-year history that is grounded in feudalism and must be considered in any analysis of Chinese society. Since…

  12. Some remarks on the effects of drugs, lack of sleep and loud noise on human performance.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanders, A.F. & A.A. Bunt.

    1971-01-01

    Some literature is reviewed on the effect of some drugs, (amphetamine, hypnotics, alcohol), loud noise and sleep loss in test of time estimation, decision making, long term performance and short term memory. Results are most clear with respect to amphetamine, hypnotics and lack of sleep, in that amp

  13. Who Lacks Support and Why? An Examination of Mothers' Personal Safety Nets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harknett, Kristen S.; Hartnett, Caroline Sten

    2011-01-01

    We use data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study (N = 12,140 person-waves) to identify characteristics associated with mothers' having or lacking "personal safety net" support from family and friends. We focus on characteristics that are likely to increase the importance of having support available but may also interfere with the…

  14. Predictors of lack of serological response to syphilis treatment in HIV-infected subjects

    OpenAIRE

    Vincenzo Spagnuolo; Andrea Poli; Laura Galli; Massimo Cernuschi; Silvia Nozza; Myriam Maillard; Nicola Gianotti; Hamid Hasson; Simona Bossolasco; Adriano Lazzarin; Antonella Castagna

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to determine factors associated with lack of serological response (LSR) to treatment of syphilis among HIV-infected subjects. Materials and Methods: Retrospective, longitudinal study on HIV-infected subjects diagnosed and treated for syphilis and with an assessable serological response between 1 January 2004 and 15 September 2013. LSR was defined as a

  15. Lack of diffuseness in wave propagation in lightweight joist-floors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunskog, Jonas; Chung, Hyuck

    2007-01-01

    . The structures under consideration are rib-reinforced plate structures. These may be a lightweight floor/joist structure in a building or hull of a ship. The diffuseness or rather the lack of diffuseness, in such 'ribbed-plate' structures is examined. The amount of power transported at an angle is...

  16. Draft Genome Sequence of an Invasive Streptococcus agalactiae Isolate Lacking Pigmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Pallavi; Aronoff, David M; Davies, H Dele; Manning, Shannon D

    2016-01-01

    This report provides the whole-genome sequence of Streptococcus agalactiae isolate GB00037 isolated from a newborn in Calgary, Canada. This serotype V isolate is unique because it lacks pigment production previously shown to be critical for S. agalactiae virulence. PMID:26950320

  17. Draft Genome Sequence of an Invasive Streptococcus agalactiae Isolate Lacking Pigmentation

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Pallavi; Aronoff, David M.; Davies, H Dele; Manning, Shannon D.

    2016-01-01

    This report provides the whole-genome sequence of Streptococcus agalactiae isolate GB00037 isolated from a newborn in Calgary, Canada. This serotype V isolate is unique because it lacks pigment production previously shown to be critical for S. agalactiae virulence.

  18. Loss of (2'-5')oligoadenylate synthetase activity by production of antisense RNA results in lack of protection by interferon from viral infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Benedetti, A.; Pytel, B.A.; Baglioni, C.

    1987-02-01

    An expression vector was constructed that carries part of the human BK papovavirus with 0.5 kilobases of (2'-5')oligoadenylate (2-5A) synthetase cDNA inserted in inverted orientation downstream from the virion proteins (VP) promoter and the neomycin-resistance gene neo under the control of a simian virus 40 promoter. Cells transfected with this vector and selected for resistance to the neomycin derivative G418 synthesized RNA complementary to 2-5A synthetase mRNA. These cells lacked 2-5A synthetase activity, and the enzyme was not inducible by interferon. In contrast, 2-5A synthetase was induced in cells transfected with a control vector without the cDNA insert. Such cells were protected by interferon from RNA viruses, whereas cells lacking 2-5A synthetase were not protected from encephalomyocarditis virus, vesicular stomatitis virus, and Sindbis virus but were fully protected from influenza virus. These findings show that a high level of 2-5A synthetase is required for interferon-induced protection from the cytoplasmic RNA viruses tested.

  19. Loss of (2'-5')oligoadenylate synthetase activity by production of antisense RNA results in lack of protection by interferon from viral infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Benedetti, A; Pytel, B A; Baglioni, C

    1987-01-01

    An expression vector was constructed that carries part of the human BK papovavirus with 0.5 kilobases of (2'-5')oligoadenylate (2-5A) synthetase cDNA inserted in inverted orientation downstream from the virion proteins (VP) promoter and the neomycin-resistance gene neo under the control of a simian virus 40 promoter. Cells transfected with this vector and selected for resistance to the neomycin derivative G418 synthesized RNA complementary to 2-5A synthetase mRNA. These cells lacked 2-5A synthetase activity, and the enzyme was not inducible by interferon. In contrast, 2-5A synthetase was induced in cells transfected with a control vector without the cDNA insert. Such cells were protected by interferon from RNA viruses, whereas cells lacking 2-5A synthetase were not protected from encephalomyocarditis virus, vesicular stomatitis virus, and Sindbis virus but were fully protected from influenza virus. These findings show that a high level of 2-5A synthetase is required for interferon-induced protection from the cytoplasmic RNA viruses tested. Images PMID:2433688

  20. Impaired Lymphoid Organ Development in Mice Lacking the Heparan Sulfate Modifying Enzyme Glucuronyl C5-Epimerase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.M. Reijmers; M.F.R. Vondenhoff; R. Roozendaal; A. Kuil; J.P. Li; M. Spaargaren; S.T. Pals; R.E. Mebius

    2010-01-01

    The development of lymphoid organs depends on cross talk between hematopoietic cells and mesenchymal stromal cells and on vascularization of the lymphoid primordia. These processes are orchestrated by cytokines, chemokines, and angiogenic factors that require tight spatiotemporal regulation. Heparan

  1. Normal autophagic activity in macrophages from mice lacking Gαi3, AGS3, or RGS19.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Vural

    Full Text Available In macrophages autophagy assists antigen presentation, affects cytokine release, and promotes intracellular pathogen elimination. In some cells autophagy is modulated by a signaling pathway that employs Gαi3, Activator of G-protein Signaling-3 (AGS3/GPSM1, and Regulator of G-protein Signaling 19 (RGS19. As macrophages express each of these proteins, we tested their importance in regulating macrophage autophagy. We assessed LC3 processing and the formation of LC3 puncta in bone marrow derived macrophages prepared from wild type, Gnai3(-/-, Gpsm1(-/-, or Rgs19(-/- mice following amino acid starvation or Nigericin treatment. In addition, we evaluated rapamycin-induced autophagic proteolysis rates by long-lived protein degradation assays and anti-autophagic action after rapamycin induction in wild type, Gnai3(-/-, and Gpsm1(-/- macrophages. In similar assays we compared macrophages treated or not with pertussis toxin, an inhibitor of GPCR (G-protein couple receptor triggered Gαi nucleotide exchange. Despite previous findings, the level of basal autophagy, autophagic induction, autophagic flux, autophagic degradation and the anti-autophagic action in macrophages that lacked Gαi3, AGS3, or RGS19; or had been treated with pertussis toxin, were similar to controls. These results indicate that while Gαi signaling may impact autophagy in some cell types it does not in macrophages.

  2. 37 CFR 1.489 - Protest to lack of unity of invention before the International Preliminary Examining Authority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Protest to lack of unity of... Protest to lack of unity of invention before the International Preliminary Examining Authority. (a) If the applicant disagrees with the holding of lack of unity of invention by the International...

  3. 37 CFR 1.477 - Protest to lack of unity of invention before the International Searching Authority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Protest to lack of unity of... PATENT CASES International Processing Provisions Unity of Invention § 1.477 Protest to lack of unity of... lack of unity of invention by the International Searching Authority, additional fees may be paid...

  4. Lack of Bystander Effects From High LET Radiation For Early Cytogenetic Endpoints.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groesser, Torsten; Cooper, Brian; Rydberg, Bjorn

    2008-05-07

    The aim of this work was to study radiation-induced bystander effects for early cytogenetic end points in various cell lines using the medium transfer technique after exposure to high- and low-LET radiation. Cells were exposed to 20 MeV/ nucleon nitrogen ions, 968 MeV/nucleon iron ions, or 575 MeV/nucleon iron ions followed by transfer of the conditioned medium from the irradiated cells to unirradiated test cells. The effects studied included DNA double-strand break induction, {gamma}-H2AX focus formation, induction of chromatid breaks in prematurely condensed chromosomes, and micronucleus formation using DNA repair-proficient and -deficient hamster and human cell lines (xrs6, V79, SW48, MO59K and MO59J). Cell survival was also measured in SW48 bystander cells using X rays. Although it was occasionally possible to detect an increase in chromatid break levels using nitrogen ions and to see a higher number of {gamma}-H2AX foci using nitrogen and iron ions in xrs6 bystander cells in single experiments, the results were not reproducible. After we pooled all the data, we could not verify a significant bystander effect for any of these end points. Also, we did not detect a significant bystander effect for DSB induction or micronucleus formation in these cell lines or for clonogenic survival in SW48 cells. The data suggest that DNA damage and cytogenetic changes are not induced in bystander cells. In contrast, data in the literature show pronounced bystander effects in a variety of cell lines, including clonogenic survival in SW48 cells and induction of chromatid breaks and micronuclei in hamster cells. To reconcile these conflicting data, it is possible that the epigenetic status of the specific cell line or the precise culture conditions and medium supplements, such as serum, may be critical for inducing bystander effects.

  5. Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ca-resistant Spodoptera exigua lacks expression of one of four Aminopeptidase N genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moar William J

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Insecticidal toxins from Bacillus thuringiensis bind to receptors on midgut epithelial cells of susceptible insect larvae. Aminopeptidases N (APNs from several insect species have been shown to be putative receptors for these toxins. Here we report the cloning and expression analysis of four APN cDNAs from Spodoptera exigua. Results Suppression Subtractive Hybridization (SSH was used to construct cDNA libraries of genes that are up-and down-regulated in the midgut of last instar larvae of beet armyworm, S. exigua exposed to B. thuringiensis Cry1Ca toxin. Among the clones from the SSH libraries, cDNA fragments coding for two different APNs were obtained (APN2 and APN4. A similar procedure was employed to compare mRNA differences between susceptible and Cry1Ca resistant S. exigua. Among the clones from this last comparison, cDNA fragments belonging to a third APN (APN1 were detected. Using sequences obtained from the three APN cDNA fragments and degenerate primers for a fourth APN (APN3, the full length sequences of four S. exigua APN cDNAs were obtained. Northern blot analysis of expression of the four APNs showed complete absence of APN1 expression in the resistant insects, while the other three APNs showed similar expression levels in the resistant and susceptible insects. Conclusion We have cloned and characterized four different midgut APN cDNAs from S. exigua. Expression analysis revealed the lack of expression of one of these APNs in the larvae of a Cry1Ca-resistant colony. Combined with previous evidence that shows the importance of APN in the mode of action of B. thuringiensis toxins, these results suggest that the lack of APN1 expression plays a role in the resistance to Cry1Ca in this S. exigua colony.

  6. Edentulism, Severe Tooth Loss and Lack of Functional Dentition in Elders: A Study in Southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Camila Garcez; Cascaes, Andreia Morales; Silva, Alexandre Emídio Ribeiro; Seerig, Lenise Menezes; Nascimento, Gustavo Giacomelli; Demarco, Flávio Fernando

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate self-reported prevalence of edentulism, severe tooth loss and lack of functional dentition in elders, and to identify potential associated factors. A population based cross-sectional study was carried out with 1,451 elders (≥60 years), in Pelotas, RS, Brazil. Crude and adjusted prevalence ratios were estimated using Poisson regressions. The prevalence of edentulism, severe tooth loss and lack of functional dentition was 39.3%, 60.9% and 82.7%, respectively. The factors positively associated with tooth loss in the three-degree severity were sex (females), older individuals, low familial income, low level of schooling and having the last dental visit longer than 24 months ago. The high prevalence of tooth loss in its different degrees of severity and the association with preventable factors highlight the need of programs focused on elders, emphasizing the prevention of tooth loss and need for prosthetic rehabilitation. PMID:27224572

  7. Nuclear Energy is the Answer to Cope with the Lack of Energy and Global Warming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper of nuclear energy is the answer to cope with the lack of energy and global warming based on the analysis of energy demand which is increasing rapidly, meanwhile the energy reserve is limited and decreased. Mostly world′s energy is generated by fossil fuel energy, mainly oil and coal. Fossil fuel energy and industrial activities produce green house gases (GHG) such as : COx, CH4, N2O, and CFC which cause of global warming. Global warming gives bad impact to environment and to human being. Every country in the world needs sufficient energy, but the energy resources is limited and decreased. The answer for this solution must be an energy source which does not produce green house gases. Why nuclear energy is chosen to cope with the lack of energy and global warming will be explained briefly in this paper. (author)

  8. The potential contribution of MVR-PCR to paternity probabilities in a case lacking a mother.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamaki, K; Huang, X L; Mizutani, M; Yamamoto, T; Katsumata, R; Uchihi, R; Katsumata, Y; Jeffreys, A J

    1999-07-01

    Minisatellite variant repeat (MVR) mapping using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was applied to a paternity case lacking a mother to evaluate the paternity probability. After three flanking polymorphic sites at each of MS31A and MS32 loci were investigated from the child and alleged father, allele-specific MVR-PCR was performed using genomic DNA. It was confirmed that one allele in the child was identical to that in the alleged father at both loci. Mapped allele codes were compared with allele structures established from population surveys. No perfect matches were found although some motifs were shared with other Japanese alleles. The paternity index and probability of paternity exclusion at these two MVR loci were then estimated, establishing the power of MVR-PCR even in paternity cases lacking a mother.

  9. Concomitant lack of MMP9 and uPA disturbs physiological tissue remodeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Ida K; Nielsen, Boye S; Almholt, Kasper;

    2011-01-01

    -type plasminogen activator (tPA)-catalyzed plasminogen activation is critical to accomplish normal gestation in mice. Gestation was also affected by simultaneous lack of MMP9 and the uPA receptor (uPAR). Interestingly, uPA-deficiency additionally exacerbated the effect of MMP9-deficiency on bone growth...... and an additive effect caused by combined lack in MMP9 and uPA was observed during healing of cutaneous wounds. By comparison, MMP9-deficiency combined with absence of either tPA or uPAR resulted in no significant effect on wound healing, indicating that the role of uPA during wound healing is independent of u...

  10. Automated analysis of radar imagery of Venus: handling lack of ground truth

    OpenAIRE

    Burl, M. C.; Fayyad, Usama M.; Perona, Pietro; Smyth, Padhraic

    1994-01-01

    Lack of verifiable ground truth is a common problem in remote sensing image analysis. For example, consider the synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image data of Venus obtained by the Magellan spacecraft. Planetary scientists are interested in automatically cataloging the locations of all the small volcanoes in this data set; however, the problem is very difficult and cannot be performed with perfect reliability even by human experts. Thus, training and evaluating the performance of an automatic a...

  11. Early Signs of Pathological Cognitive Aging in Mice Lacking High-Affinity Nicotinic Receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Konsolaki, Eleni; Tsakanikas, Panagiotis; Polissidis, Alexia V.; Stamatakis, Antonios; Skaliora, Irini

    2016-01-01

    In order to address pathological cognitive decline effectively, it is critical to adopt early preventive measures in individuals considered at risk. It is therefore essential to develop approaches that identify such individuals before the onset of irreversible dementia. A deficient cholinergic system has been consistently implicated as one of the main factors associated with a heightened vulnerability to the aging process. In the present study we used mice lacking high affinity nicotinic rece...

  12. Growth retardation and altered autonomic control in mice lacking brain serotonin

    OpenAIRE

    Alenina, Natalia; Kikic, Dana; Todiras, Mihail; Mosienko, Valentina; Qadri, Fatimunnisa; Plehm, Ralph; Boyé, Philipp; Vilianovitch, Larissa; Sohr, Reinhard; Tenner, Katja; Hörtnagl, Heide; Bader, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Serotonin synthesis in mammals is initiated by 2 distinct tryptophan hydroxylases (TPH), TPH1 and TPH2. By genetically ablating TPH2, we created mice (Tph2−/−) that lack serotonin in the central nervous system. Surprisingly, these mice can be born and survive until adulthood. However, depletion of serotonin signaling in the brain leads to growth retardation and 50% lethality in the first 4 weeks of postnatal life. Telemetric monitoring revealed more extended daytime sleep, suppressed respirat...

  13. LACK OF INTERNATIONAL PRICING RIGHT OF COMMODITIES IN CHINA AND RESEARCH ON ITS RELEVANT STRATEGIES

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Yanwei; WANG FENGBAO ZHANG CHENHONG

    2006-01-01

    First, the article introduces the international pricing procedure and mechanism of commodities, and the capture of the pricing right. Therefore, it can be found that futures market plays a central part in the process of pricing. Then, through a series of authoritative data it investigates the lack of the international pricing right in China, which leads to the whole economy and many relevant industries being faced with great losses. Finally, it discusses the defensive strategies for China on ...

  14. Essays in dynamic macroeconomics: public policy, household savings, and lack of commitment

    OpenAIRE

    Röttger, Joost

    2015-01-01

    This dissertation consists of three chapters that study how public and private agents make decisions in the absence of commitment. Chapter 1 investigates how the option to default on debt payments affects the conduct of public policy when the government lacks commitment. It studies optimal monetary and fiscal policy without commitment for a cash-credit good economy that is extended by incorporating a discrete default choice. When the government can default on its debt, public policy is shown ...

  15. A Large and Phylogenetically Diverse Class of Type 1 Opsins Lacking a Canonical Retinal Binding Site

    OpenAIRE

    Becker, EA; Yao, AI; Seitzer, PM; Kind, T; Wang, T.; Eigenheer, R; Shao, KSY; Yarov-Yarovoy, V; Facciotti, MT

    2016-01-01

    Opsins are photosensitive proteins catalyzing light-dependent processes across the tree of life. For both microbial (type 1) and metazoan (type 2) opsins, photosensing depends upon covalent interaction between a retinal chromophore and a conserved lysine residue. Despite recent discoveries of potential opsin homologs lacking this residue, phylogenetic dispersal and functional significance of these abnormal sequences have not yet been investigated. We report discovery of a large group of putat...

  16. Lack of Credibility in Food Markets - Driving Medium Quality Food Out of the Market

    OpenAIRE

    Christensen, Jan; Graversen, Jesper T.

    2005-01-01

    Some food markets are dominated by high quality and standard quality segments, whereas medium quality products are almost absent. A modeling framework with asymmetric information regarding true quality of the products and the resulting lack of consumer confidence is presented. Uncertainty regarding the quality of alleged medium quality products provides certain consumer groups to divert consumptions away from medium quality to either standard or high quality products. These countervailing inc...

  17. Functional alterations to the nigrostriatal system in mice lacking all three members of the synuclein family

    OpenAIRE

    Anwar, Sabina; Peters, Owen; Millership, Steven; Ninkina, Natalia; Doig, Natalie; Connor-Robson, Natalie; Threlfell, Sarah; Kooner, Gurdeep; Deacon, Robert M.; Bannerman, David M.; Bolam, J. Paul; Chandra, Sreeganga S.; Cragg, Stephanie J.; Wade-Martins, Richard; Buchman, Vladimir L.

    2011-01-01

    The synucleins (α, β and γ) are highly homologous proteins thought to play a role in regulating neurotransmission and are found abundantly in presynaptic terminals. To overcome functional overlap between synuclein proteins and to understand their role in presynaptic signalling from mesostriatal dopaminergic neurons, we produced mice lacking all three members of the synuclein family. The effect on the mesostriatal system was assessed in adult (4-14 month old) animals using a combination of beh...

  18. A Spline-Based Lack-Of-Fit Test for Independent Variable Effect in Poisson Regression

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Chin-Shang; Tu, Wanzhu

    2007-01-01

    In regression analysis of count data, independent variables are often modeled by their linear effects under the assumption of log-linearity. In reality, the validity of such an assumption is rarely tested, and its use is at times unjustifiable. A lack-of-fit test is proposed for the adequacy of a postulated functional form of an independent variable within the framework of semiparametric Poisson regression models based on penalized splines. It offers added flexibility in accommodating the pot...

  19. Trade Mark Coexistence Agreements: What is all the (lack of) fuss about?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elsmore, Matthew J.

    2008-01-01

    Traditionally, it is understood that trade mark law tackles the prospect of damage resulting from the use of confusingly similar trade marks. The aim is broadly to ensure commercial origin is differentiated and proprietary rights secured. A lot is written on this in Europe. In contrast, very litt...... marks, the article deepens the discussion. Starting from concepts and commercial realities, the analysis proceeds to case law and underlying legal and economic rationale to determine whether the lack of fuss is justified....

  20. Listeria monocytogenes mutants lacking phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C are avirulent

    OpenAIRE

    1991-01-01

    A number of bacterial species secrete phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC). In this report, we show that the facultative intracellular bacterial pathogen, Listeria monocytogenes, contains a gene, plcA, predicting a polypeptide with 31% amino acid identity to a Bacillus thuringiensis PI-PLC. Accordingly, L. monocytogenes secretes PI-PLC activity, while a mutant with a transposon insertion in plcA lacks detectable PI-PLC activity. In addition, expression of plcA in B. subtilis...

  1. Attenuated Host Resistance against Mycobacterium bovis BCG Infection in Mice Lacking Osteopontin

    OpenAIRE

    Nau, Gerard J.; Liaw, Lucy; Chupp, Geoffrey L.; Berman, Jeffrey S.; Hogan, Brigid L.M.; Young, Richard A.

    1999-01-01

    Expression of the cytokine osteopontin (OPN) is elevated in granulomas caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We tested the hypothesis that OPN contributes to host protection in a mouse model of mycobacterial infection. When infected with Mycobacterium bovis BCG, mice lacking a functional OPN gene had more severe infections characterized by heavier bacterial loads and a delayed clearance of the bacteria. The OPN-null mice had greater granuloma burdens consistent with the elevated bacterial loa...

  2. Lack of Equal Treatment and Access to Equal Opportunity for LGTBQ People in the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Andrew; Halawi, Firass

    2014-01-01

    The lack of protections against employment discrimination and inattention to the causes and patterns of LGBT poverty constitute human rights violations.  Based on social science research and legal analysis, the United States is failing to comply with its international human rights commitments, particularly in the areas of employment, health, youth and violence against LGBT people. In its last review, the United States accepted recommendations to address discrimination against LGBT people in o...

  3. Supramolecular assembly of electrostatically stabilized, hydroxyproline-lacking collagen-mimetic peptides

    OpenAIRE

    Krishna, Ohm D.; Kiick, Kristi L.

    2009-01-01

    The mechanical and biological functions of the native collagens remain an inspiration in materials design, but widespread application of de novo collagens has been limited in part by the need for hydroxylated proline in the formation of stable triple helical structures. In order to address this continued need and to expand the potential for recombinant expression of functional, hydroxyproline-lacking collagen-mimetic peptides, we have designed a hydrophilic, non-repetitive, and thermally stab...

  4. Myocardial Ischemia: Lack of Coronary Blood Flow or Myocardial Oxygen Supply/Demand Imbalance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heusch, Gerd

    2016-07-01

    Regional myocardial blood flow and contractile function in ischemic myocardium are well matched, and there is no evidence for an oxygen supply/demand imbalance. Thus, myocardial ischemia is lack of coronary blood flow with electric, functional, metabolic, and structural consequences for the myocardium. All therapeutic interventions must aim to improve blood flow to ischemic myocardium as much and as quickly as possible. PMID:27390331

  5. Development of botanical principles for clinical use in cancer: Where are we lacking?

    OpenAIRE

    R J Poojari; A G Patil; V S Gota

    2012-01-01

    Development of drugs from plant sources (botanicals) for the treatment of cancer has not been successful in India, despite a plethora of medicinal plants and an equal number of experiments demonstrating anti-cancer activity of plant principles in vitro. There are several pitfalls in our approach to botanical drug development. Foremost is the lack of industry-academia collaborations in this field. Research goals in Indian academic institutions are generally short-term and mostly aimed at fulfi...

  6. ANALYSIS OF A NETWORK OF COOPERATION IN MISIONES, ARGENTINA: BENEFITS AND LACKS FOR LOCAL SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos, Michalus

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case study of a network of existing cooperation in the province of Misiones, Argentina, composed of Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs Elaboration of black tea and a group of SMEs from sawn wood, formed from the particular initiative of the tea entrepreneur. The aim is to identify the benefits of working in cooperation and, in turn, highlight the lacks when these processes are not performed in a planned and sustainable local oriented development. The case study that is exposed is a unique, contemporary data survey with establishments belonging to the cooperative network, interviews with entrepreneurs and managers of production, which led to evidence the benefits of cooperation, which include: use of waste, generation of trust between employers and contribution to environmental stewardship. There were also major shortcomings that prevent greater profit derived from the lack of an appropriate methodological instrument to implement this type of cooperative enterprises, among which stands out: poor use of idle resources, lack of process improvements through innovations joint, non-participation of major players and systematic orientation towards the local sustainable development.

  7. Lack of genetic polymorphism among peregrine falcons Falco peregrinus of Fiji

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot, S.L.; Palmer, A.G.; Sage, G.K.; Sonsthagen, S.A.; Swem, T.; Brimm, D.J.; White, C.M.

    2011-01-01

    We compared levels of genetic diversity and isolation among peregrine falcons Falco peregrinus from two South Pacific island complexes (Fiji and Vanuatu: F. p. nesiotes), relative to other island and mainland populations. Fragment data from 12 microsatellite loci and sequence information from the control region of the mitochondrial DNA indicated levels of genetic variation in the South Pacific populations were lower than other island and mainland populations. Indeed, diversity varied from extremely low (Vanuatu) to completely absent (Fiji). We find little support for a hypothesis that populations on Fiji or Vanuatu were colonized via Australia. The complete lack of polymorphism in peregrine falcons of Fiji is remarkable, and to our knowledge has not been observed in a natural avian population. This lack of polymorphism, and the inability to test for decrease in polymorphism using museum samples, precludes testing whether the lack of genetic diversity in the population on Fiji is due to a recent bottleneck, or sustained isolation over evolutionary time. Increased fertility in eggs of Fiji peregrines upon outbreeding with males from other areas is consistent with inbreeding depression within a population typified by heterozygote deficiency. ?? 2011 The Authors.

  8. Lack of genetic polymorphism among peregrine falcons Falco peregrinus of Fiji

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot, Sandra; Palmer, A.G.; Sage, G.K.; Sonsthagen, Sarah A.; Swem, T.; Brimm, D.J.

    2014-01-01

    We compared levels of genetic diversity and isolation among peregrine falcons Falco peregrinus from two South Pacific island complexes (Fiji and Vanuatu: F. p. nesiotes), relative to other island and mainland populations. Fragment data from 12 microsatellite loci and sequence information from the control region of the mitochondrial DNA indicated levels of genetic variation in the South Pacific populations were lower than other island and mainland populations. Indeed, diversity varied from extremely low (Vanuatu) to completely absent (Fiji). We find little support for a hypothesis that populations on Fiji or Vanuatu were colonized via Australia. The complete lack of polymorphism in peregrine falcons of Fiji is remarkable, and to our knowledge has not been observed in a natural avian population. This lack of polymorphism, and the inability to test for decrease in polymorphism using museum samples, precludes testing whether the lack of genetic diversity in the population on Fiji is due to a recent bottleneck, or sustained isolation over evolutionary time. Increased fertility in eggs of Fiji peregrines upon outbreeding with males from other areas is consistent with inbreeding depression within a population typified by heterozygote deficiency.

  9. Choroidal neovascularization is inhibited via an intraocular decrease of inflammatory cells in mice lacking complement component C3

    OpenAIRE

    Xue Tan; Katsuhito Fujiu; Ichiro Manabe; Junko Nishida; Reiko Yamagishi; Ryozo Nagai; Yasuo Yanagi

    2015-01-01

    In early age-related macular degeneration (AMD), complement component C3 can be observed in drusen, which is the accumulation of material beneath the retinal pigment epithelium. The complement pathways, via the activation of C3, can upregulate the expression of cytokines and their receptors and the recruitment of inflammatory leukocytes, both of which play an important role in the development of choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in exudative AMD. Laser-induced CNV lesions were found to be si...

  10. Lack of effects of atomic bomb radiation on genetic instability of tandem-repetitive elements in human germ cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Kodaira, M; Satoh, C; Hiyama, K; Toyama, K.

    1995-01-01

    In a pilot study to detect the potential effects of atomic bomb radiation on germ-line instability, we screened 64 children from 50 exposed families and 60 from 50 control families for mutations at six minisatellite loci by using Southern blot analysis with Pc-1, lambda TM-18, ChdTC-15, p lambda 3, lambda MS-1, and CEB-1 probes. In the exposed families, one or both parents received a radiation dose > 0.01 Sv. Among the 64 children, only one child had parents who were both exposed. Thus, of a ...

  11. Lack of Kinase Regulation of Canonical Transient Receptor Potential 3 (TRPC3) Channel-dependent Currents in Cerebellar Purkinje Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, Charmaine; Glitsch, Maike D.

    2011-01-01

    Background: TRPC3 channels are inhibited by PKC and PKG, which also induce cerebellar LTD. We investigate if PKC- and PKG-mediated modulation of cerebellar TRPC3 channels contributes to cerebellar LTD.

  12. Fertility potential after unilateral orchiopexy: an age independent risk of subsequent infertility when biopsies at surgery lack germ cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cortes, Dina; Thorup, J M; Lindenberg, S

    1996-01-01

    We evaluated whether adult fertility potential was better when unilateral orchiopexy was done at ages 2 to 6 years or later, and we identified those at risk for infertility.......We evaluated whether adult fertility potential was better when unilateral orchiopexy was done at ages 2 to 6 years or later, and we identified those at risk for infertility....

  13. Erythropoietic defect associated with reduced cell proliferation in mice lacking the 26S proteasome shuttling factor Rad23b

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Bergink (Steven); A.F. Theil (Arjan); W. Toussaint (Wendy); I.M. de Cuyper (Iris); D.I. Kulu (Divine); T. Clapes (Thomas); R. van der Linden (Reinier); J.A.A. Demmers (Jeroen); E.P. Mul (Eric); F.P. van Alphen (Floris); J.A. Marteijn (Jurgen); T. van Gent (Teus); A. Maas (Alex); C. Robin (Catherine); J.N.J. Philipsen (Sjaak); W. Vermeulen (Wim); J.R. Mitchell (James); L. Gutiérrez (Laura)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractRad23a and Rad23b proteins are linked to nucleotide excision DNA repair (NER) via association with the DNA damage recognition protein xeroderma pigmentosum group C (XPC) are and known to be implicated in protein turnover by the 26S proteasome. Rad23b-null mice are NER proficient, likely

  14. Erythropoietic Defect Associated with Reduced Cell Proliferation in Mice Lacking the 26S Proteasome Shuttling Factor Rad23b

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergink, Steven; Theil, Arjan F.; Toussaint, Wendy; De Cuyper, Iris M.; Kulu, Divine I.; Clapes, Thomas; van der Linden, Reinier; Demmers, Jeroen A.; Mul, Eric P.; van Alphen, Floris P.; Marteijn, Jurgen A.; van Gent, Teus; Maas, Alex; Robin, Catherine; Philipsen, Sjaak; Vermeulen, Wim; Mitchell, James R.; Gutierrez, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Rad23a and Rad23b proteins are linked to nucleotide excision DNA repair (NER) via association with the DNA damage recognition protein xeroderma pigmentosum group C (XPC) are and known to be implicated in protein turnover by the 26S proteasome. Rad23b-null mice are NER proficient, likely due to the r

  15. Cell Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    A NASA contract led to the development of faster and more energy efficient semiconductor materials for digital integrated circuits. Gallium arsenide (GaAs) conducts electrons 4-6 times faster than silicon and uses less power at frequencies above 100-150 megahertz. However, the material is expensive, brittle, fragile and has lacked computer automated engineering tools to solve this problem. Systems & Processes Engineering Corporation (SPEC) developed a series of GaAs cell libraries for cell layout, design rule checking, logic synthesis, placement and routing, simulation and chip assembly. The system is marketed by Compare Design Automation.

  16. Accelerated tumor progression in mice lacking the ATP receptor P2X7

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adinolfi, Elena; Capece, Marina; Franceschini, Alessia;

    2015-01-01

    cells. Tumor size and metastatic dissemination were assessed by in vivo calliper and luciferase luminescence emission measurements along with postmortem examination. In P2X7R-deficient mice, tumor growth and metastatic spreading were accelerated strongly, compared with wild-type (wt) mice. Intratumoral...... IL-1β and VEGF release were drastically reduced, and inflammatory cell infiltration was abrogated nearly completely. Similarly, tumor growth was also greatly accelerated in wt chimeric mice implanted with P2X7R-deficient bone marrow cells, defining hematopoietic cells as a sufficient site of P2X7R...

  17. Life without complex I: proteome analyses of an Arabidopsis mutant lacking the mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromm, Steffanie; Senkler, Jennifer; Eubel, Holger; Peterhänsel, Christoph; Braun, Hans-Peter

    2016-05-01

    The mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase complex (complex I) is of particular importance for the respiratory chain in mitochondria. It is the major electron entry site for the mitochondrial electron transport chain (mETC) and therefore of great significance for mitochondrial ATP generation. We recently described an Arabidopsis thaliana double-mutant lacking the genes encoding the carbonic anhydrases CA1 and CA2, which both form part of a plant-specific 'carbonic anhydrase domain' of mitochondrial complex I. The mutant lacks complex I completely. Here we report extended analyses for systematically characterizing the proteome of the ca1ca2 mutant. Using various proteomic tools, we show that lack of complex I causes reorganization of the cellular respiration system. Reduced electron entry into the respiratory chain at the first segment of the mETC leads to induction of complexes II and IV as well as alternative oxidase. Increased electron entry at later segments of the mETC requires an increase in oxidation of organic substrates. This is reflected by higher abundance of proteins involved in glycolysis, the tricarboxylic acid cycle and branched-chain amino acid catabolism. Proteins involved in the light reaction of photosynthesis, the Calvin cycle, tetrapyrrole biosynthesis, and photorespiration are clearly reduced, contributing to the significant delay in growth and development of the double-mutant. Finally, enzymes involved in defense against reactive oxygen species and stress symptoms are much induced. These together with previously reported insights into the function of plant complex I, which were obtained by analysing other complex I mutants, are integrated in order to comprehensively describe 'life without complex I'.

  18. On the cell biology of pit cells, the liver-specific NK cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dian Zhong Luo; David Vermijlen; Bülent Ahishali; Vasilis Triantis; Georgia Plakoutsi; Filip Braet; Karin Vanderkerken; Eddie Wisse

    2000-01-01

    @@ INTRODUCTION Natural killer (NK) cells are functionally defined by their ability to kill certain tumor cells and virusinfected cells without prior sensitization[1]. NK cells comprise about 10% to 15% of lymphocytes in the peripheral blood and most of these cells in human and rat have the morphology of large granular lymphocytes ( LGL )[2]. However, recent studies have demonstrated that small agranular lymphocytes, lacking CD3 expression, have cytolytic activity comparable to NK cells[3].

  19. Lack of association between connexin40 polymorphisms and coronary artery disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pfenniger, Anna; van der Laan, Sander W.; Foglia, Bernard; Dunoyer-Geindre, Sylvie; Haefliger, Jacques-Antoine; Winnik, Stephan; Mach, Francois; Pasterkamp, Gerard; James, Richard W.; Kwak, Brenda R.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Cx40 is a gap junction protein important for cell-cell communication in the endothelium. Polymorphisms in the promoter region of the human Cx40 gene, -44G>A and +71A>G, were shown to reduce Cx40 transcription by half. As mice with an endothelial-specific deletion of Cx40 are more suscepti

  20. Lack of metabolic ageing in the long-lived flatworm Schmidtea polychroa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mouton, Stijn; Willems, Maxime; Houthoofd, Wouter; Bert, Wim; Braeckman, Bart P.

    2011-01-01

    Freshwater planarians have a large totipotent stem cell population allowing high rates of cell renewal and morphological plasticity. It is often suggested that they are able to rejuvenate during fission, regeneration and starvation. These features, together with the rapidly expanding molecular tools

  1. Increased consumption of ethanol and sugar water in mice lacking the dopamine D2 long receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Bulwa, Zachary B.; Sharlin, Jordan A.; Clark, Peter J.; Bhattacharya, Tushar K.; Kilby, Chessa N.; Wang, Yanyan; Rhodes, Justin S.

    2011-01-01

    Individual differences in dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) expression in the brain are thought to influence motivation and reinforcement for ethanol and other rewards. D2R exists in two isoforms, D2 long (D2LR) and D2 short (D2SR), produced by alternative splicing of the same gene. The relative contributions of D2LR versus D2SR to ethanol and sugar water drinking are not known. Genetic engineering was used to produce a line of knockout (KO) mice that lack D2LR and consequently have increased expres...

  2. Lack of Buffering by Composites Promotes Shift to More Cariogenic Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedeljkovic, I; De Munck, J; Slomka, V; Van Meerbeek, B; Teughels, W; Van Landuyt, K L

    2016-07-01

    Secondary caries (SC) remains a very important problem with composite restorations. The objectives of this study were to test the acid-buffering ability of several restorative materials and to evaluate whether buffering of the restorative material has an impact on the microbial composition of the biofilm. Disk-shaped specimens of conventional composite, composite with surface prereacted glass-ionomer filler particles (so-called giomer), glass-ionomer cement (GIC), amalgam, and hydroxyapatite (HAp) (control) were exposed to aqueous solutions with pH 4, 5, 6, and 7 and to the medium containing bacteria-produced acids, and pH changes were recorded over several days. Next, material specimens were immersed in bacterial growth medium with pH adjusted to 5. After a 24-h incubation, the extracts were collected and inoculated with a cariogenic (Streptococcus mutans) and a noncariogenic (Streptococcus sanguinis) species. The bacterial growth was monitored both in a single-species model by spectrophotometry and in a dual-species model by viability quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Amalgam and HAp showed the strongest acid-buffering ability, followed by the GIC and the giomer, while the conventional composite did not exhibit any buffering capacity. Furthermore, due to the lack of acid-buffering abilities, composite was not able to increase the pH of the medium (pH 5), which, in the absence of antibacterial properties, allowed the growth of S. mutans, while the growth of S. sanguinis, a less aciduric species, was completely inhibited. A similar effect was observed when bacteria were cultured together: there was a higher percentage of S. mutans and lower percentage of S. sanguinis with the conventional composite than with other materials and HAp. In conclusion, conventional composites lack the ability to increase the local pH, which leads to the outgrowth of more acidogenic/aciduric bacteria and higher cariogenicity of the biofilm. Together with lack of antibacterial

  3. CONGENITAL CATARACT – LACK OF AWARENESS: EFFECTS ON DELAYED HOSPITALIZATION & TREAMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjaneyulu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Study on congenital cataract conducted at regional eye hospital and in coordination with paediatric department. Histry, symptomatology and observations taken inconsideration within days , weeks , months after year. Daignosed by Torch Light examination and s lit lamp examination and B - SCAN examination. Very low number of cases detected out of large number of children screened . It may be due lack of awareness of parents to bring the children to the hospital and health personel. After diagnosing surgical interve ntion done. Post - operative visual prognosis good in some cases and some are amblyopic

  4. Lack of association between schizophrenia and the CYP2D6 gene polymorphisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pirmohamed, M.; Wild, M.J.; Kitteringham, N.R. [Univ. of Liverpool (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1996-04-09

    Approximately 5-10% of the Caucasian population lack the P450 isoform, CYP2D6. This polymorphism may be of importance in determining individual susceptibility to Parkinson`s disease. In this journal, Daniels et al. recently reported a negative association between the CYP2D6 gene locus and schizophrenia, a disease characterized by dopamine overactivity. It is important to exclude such an association because CYP2D6 is expressed in the brain and it is involved in dopamine catabolism. Between 1992 and 1993, we also performed a study similar to that, and reached the same conclusion. 7 refs., 1 tab.

  5. Lack of stimulation of 24-hour growth hormone release by hypocaloric diet in obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, M H; Juul, A; Kjems, L L;

    1995-01-01

    -I (IGF-I), IGF-binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1), IGF-binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3), insulin, pro-insulin, and blood glucose were measured during habitual energy intake as well as during the hypocaloric diet. Twenty-four-hour GH release profiles and IGFBP-1 were decreased, and insulin as well as proinsulin...... suggests a reversible defect in GH release, rather than a persistent preexisting disorder. It is hypothesized that enhanced bioavailability of IGF-I, acting in concert with elevated proinsulin and insulin levels, may account for the lack of stimulation of 24-hr GH release by the hypocaloric diet in obese...

  6. The elusiveness of masculinity: primordial vulnerability, lack, and the challenges of male development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamond, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Reaching beyond the Oedipus prototype to address the unrepresentable vulnerability founded on the boy's infantile helplessness in contact with the mother's body, the author aims to identify the inherent tensions and enigmas of being male. He proposes that both the repudiation of femininity and the overvaluation of phallicity are unconsciously constructed to withstand the fundamental deficiency grounded in the asymmetry of the boy's prephallic relation with his primary object. This bodily based primordial vulnerability, marked by absence and lack, remains elusive-an unsymbolizable experience that provides the archaic matrix for adaptive and defensive phallicism, the oedipal complex, and genital progression. A clinical vignette is presented to illustrate these concepts.

  7. Expression and characterization of recombinant human factor V and a mutant lacking a major portion of the connecting region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kane, W.H.; Devore-Carter, D.; Ortel, T.L. (Duke Univ. Medical Center, Durham, NC (USA))

    1990-07-24

    Human coagulation factor V is a protein cofactor that is an essential component of the prothrombinase complex. A full-length factor V cDNA has been subcloned into the mammalian expression vector pDX and used to transfect COS cells. Approximately 95 {plus minus} 4% of the recombinant human factor V (rHFV) synthesized in COS cells is secreted into the culture medium. Factor V activity determined by fibrometer assay increased approximately 5-fold from 0.027 {plus minus} 0.012 to 0.124 {plus minus} 0.044 unit/mL following activation by the factor V activating enzyme from Russell's viper venom (RVV-V). A chromogenic assay specific for factor Va indicated that recombinant factor V had 3.8 {plus minus} 1.3% of the activity of the activated protein. The estimated specific activity of the recombinant factor Va was approximately 1,800 {plus minus} 500 units/mg, which is similar to the specific activity of purified plasma factor Va of 1,700-2,000 units/mg. Immunoprecipitation of ({sup 35}S)methionine-labeled rHFV revealed a single high molecular mass component. Treatment of rHFV with thrombin or RVV-V resulted in the formation of proteolytic products that were similar to those seen with plasma factor V. The authors have also expressed a mutant, rHFV-des-B{sub 811-1441}, that lacks a large portion of the highly glycosylated connecting region that is present in factor V. This mutant constitutively expressed 38 {plus minus} 7% of the activity of the RVV-V-activated protein. These results suggest that one of the functions of the large connecting region in factor V is to inhibit constitutive procoagulant activity.

  8. Depletion of RNase HI activity in Escherichia coli lacking DNA topoisomerase I leads to defects in DNA supercoiling and segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usongo, Valentine; Nolent, Flora; Sanscartier, Patrick; Tanguay, Cynthia; Broccoli, Sonia; Baaklini, Imad; Drlica, Karl; Drolet, Marc

    2008-08-01

    Gyrase-mediated hypernegative supercoiling is one manifestation of R-loop formation, a phenomenon that is normally suppressed by topoisomerase I (topA) in Escherichia coli. Overproduction of RNase HI (rnhA), an enzyme that removes the RNA moiety of R-loops, prevents hypernegative supercoiling and allows growth of topA null mutants. We previously showed that topA and rnhA null mutations are incompatible. We now report that such mutants were viable when RNase HI or topoisomerase III was expressed from a plasmid-borne gene. Surprisingly, DNA of topA null mutants became relaxed rather than hypernegatively supercoiled following depletion of RNase HI activity. This result failed to correlate with the cellular concentration of gyrase or topoisomerase IV (the other relaxing enzyme in the cell) or with transcription-induced supercoiling. Rather, intracellular DNA relaxation in the absence of RNase HI was related to inhibition of gyrase activity both in vivo and in extracts. Cells lacking topA and rnhA also exhibited properties consistent with segregation defects. Overproduction of topoisomerase III, an enzyme that can carry out DNA decatenation, corrected the segregation defects without restoring supercoiling activity. Collectively these data reveal (i) the existence of a cellular response to loss of RNase HI that counters the supercoiling activity of gyrase, and (ii) supercoiling-independent segregation defects due to loss of RNase HI from topA null mutants. Thus RNase HI plays a more central role in DNA topology than previously thought. PMID:18554330

  9. Lack of Matrilin-2 favors liver tumor development via Erk1/2 and GSK-3β pathways in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Fullár

    Full Text Available Matrilin-2 (Matn2 is a multidomain adaptor protein which plays a role in the assembly of extracellular matrix (ECM. It is produced by oval cells during stem cell-driven liver regeneration. In our study, the impact of Matn2 on hepatocarcinogenesis was investigated in Matn2(-/- mice comparing them with wild-type (WT mice in a diethylnitrosamine (DEN model. The liver tissue was analyzed macroscopically, histologically and immunohistochemically, at protein level by Proteome Profiler Arrays and Western blot analysis. Matn2(-/- mice exhibited higher susceptibility to hepatocarcinogenesis compared to wild-type mice. In the liver of Matn2(-/- mice, spontaneous microscopic tumor foci were detected without DEN treatment. After 15 μg/g body weight DEN treatment, the liver of Matn2(-/- mice contained macroscopic tumors of both larger number and size than the WT liver. In contrast with the WT liver, spontaneous phosphorylation of EGFR, Erk1/2 GSK-3α/β and retinoblastoma protein (p-Rb, decrease in p21/CIP1 level, and increase in β-Catenin protein expression were detected in Matn2(-/- livers. Focal Ki-67 positivity of these samples provided additional support to our presumption that the lack of Matn2 drives the liver into a pro-proliferatory state, making it prone to tumor development. This enhanced proliferative capacity was further increased in the tumor nodules of DEN-treated Matn2(-/- livers. Our study suggests that Matn2 functions as a tumor suppressor in hepatocarcinogenesis, and in this process activation of EGFR together with that of Erk1/2, as well as inactivation of GSK-3β, play strategic roles.

  10. Mice lacking the transcriptional coactivator PGC-1α exhibit alterations in inhibitory synaptic transmission in the motor cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, S E; Bartley, A F; Lucas, E K; Hablitz, J J; Dobrunz, L E; Cowell, R M

    2014-06-20

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) is a transcriptional coactivator known to regulate gene programs in a cell-specific manner in energy-demanding tissues, and its dysfunction has been implicated in numerous neurological and psychiatric disorders. Previous work from the Cowell laboratory indicates that PGC-1α is concentrated in inhibitory interneurons and is required for the expression of the calcium buffer parvalbumin (PV) in the cortex; however, the impact of PGC-1α deficiency on inhibitory neurotransmission in the motor cortex is not known. Here, we show that mice lacking PGC-1α exhibit increased amplitudes and decreased frequency of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents in layer V pyramidal neurons. Upon repetitive train stimulation at the gamma frequency, decreased GABA release is observed. Furthermore, PV-positive interneurons in PGC-1α -/- mice display reductions in intrinsic excitability and excitatory input without changes in gross interneuron morphology. Taken together, these data show that PGC-1α is required for normal inhibitory neurotransmission and cortical PV-positive interneuron function. Given the pronounced motor dysfunction in PGC-1α -/- mice and the essential role of PV-positive interneurons in maintenance of cortical excitatory:inhibitory balance, it is possible that deficiencies in PGC-1α expression could contribute to cortical hyperexcitability and motor abnormalities in multiple neurological disorders.

  11. Marines, medics, and machismo: lack of fit with masculine occupational stereotypes discourages men's participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Kim; Ryan, Michelle K; Haslam, S Alexander

    2015-11-01

    Women have made substantial inroads into some traditionally masculine occupations (e.g., accounting, journalism) but not into others (e.g., military, surgery). Evidence suggests the latter group of occupations is characterized by hyper-masculine 'macho' stereotypes that are especially disadvantageous to women. Here, we explore whether such macho occupational stereotypes may be especially tenacious, not just because of their impact on women, but also because of their impact on men. We examined whether macho stereotypes associated with marine commandos and surgeons discourage men who feel that they are 'not man enough'. Study 1 demonstrates that male new recruits' (N = 218) perceived lack of fit with masculine commandos was associated with reduced occupational identification and motivation. Study 2 demonstrates that male surgical trainees' (N = 117) perceived lack of fit with masculine surgeons was associated with reduced identification and increased psychological exit a year later. Together, this suggests that macho occupational stereotypes may discourage the very men who may challenge them.

  12. Compensatory evolution of gene regulation in response to stress by Escherichia coli lacking RpoS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel M Stoebel

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The RpoS sigma factor protein of Escherichia coli RNA polymerase is the master transcriptional regulator of physiological responses to a variety of stresses. This stress response comes at the expense of scavenging for scarce resources, causing a trade-off between stress tolerance and nutrient acquisition. This trade-off favors non-functional rpoS alleles in nutrient-poor environments. We used experimental evolution to explore how natural selection modifies the regulatory network of strains lacking RpoS when they evolve in an osmotically stressful environment. We found that strains lacking RpoS adapt less variably, in terms of both fitness increase and changes in patterns of transcription, than strains with functional RpoS. This phenotypic uniformity was caused by the same adaptive mutation in every independent population: the insertion of IS10 into the promoter of the otsBA operon. OtsA and OtsB are required to synthesize the osmoprotectant trehalose, and transcription of otsBA requires RpoS in the wild-type genetic background. The evolved IS10 insertion rewires expression of otsBA from RpoS-dependent to RpoS-independent, allowing for partial restoration of wild-type response to osmotic stress. Our results show that the regulatory networks of bacteria can evolve new structures in ways that are both rapid and repeatable.

  13. Contractile function is unaltered in diaphragm from mice lacking calcium release channel isoform 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancy, J. S.; Takeshima, H.; Hamilton, S. L.; Reid, M. B.

    1999-01-01

    Skeletal muscle expresses at least two isoforms of the calcium release channel in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (RyR1 and RyR3). Whereas the function of RyR1 is well defined, the physiological significance of RyR3 is unclear. Some authors have suggested that RyR3 participates in excitation-contraction coupling and that RyR3 may specifically confer resistance to fatigue. To test this hypothesis, we measured contractile function of diaphragm strips from adult RyR3-deficient mice (exon 2-targeted mutation) and their heterozygous and wild-type littermates. In unfatigued diaphragm, there were no differences in isometric contractile properties (twitch characteristics, force-frequency relationships, maximal force) among the three groups. Our fatigue protocol (30 Hz, 0.25 duty cycle, 37 degrees C) depressed force to 25% of the initial force; however, lack of RyR3 did not accelerate the decline in force production. The force-frequency relationship was shifted to higher frequencies and was depressed in fatigued diaphragm; lack of RyR3 did not exaggerate these changes. We therefore provide evidence that RyR3 deficiency does not alter contractile function of adult muscle before, during, or after fatigue.

  14. The importance of imagination (or lack thereof) in artificial, human and quantum decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafson, Karl

    2016-01-13

    Enlarging upon experiments and analysis that I did jointly some years ago, in which artificial (symbolic, neural-net and pattern) learning and generalization were compared with that of humans, I will emphasize the role of imagination (or lack thereof) in artificial, human and quantum cognition and decision-making processes. Then I will look in more detail at some of the 'engineering details' of its implementation (or lack thereof) in each of these settings. In other words, the question posed is: What is actually happening? For example, we previously found that humans overwhelmingly seek, create or imagine context in order to provide meaning when presented with abstract, apparently incomplete, contradictory or otherwise untenable decision-making situations. Humans are intolerant of contradiction and will greatly simplify to avoid it. They can partially correlate but do not average. Human learning is not Boolean. These and other human reasoning properties will then be taken to critique how well artificial intelligence methods and quantum mechanical modelling might compete with them in decision-making tasks within psychology and economics.

  15. Loneliness in patients with rheumatic diseases: the significance of invalidation and lack of social support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kool, Marianne B; Geenen, Rinie

    2012-01-01

    Rheumatic diseases affect about 20% of the population, leading to common symptoms such as joint problems, pain, fatigue, and stiffness. Loneliness is prevalent in individuals with rheumatic diseases. This could be due to not receiving social support and being stigmatized and invalidated, which might be most common in fibromyalgia, a rheumatic disease that lacks medical evidence. The aim of this study was to compare loneliness in distinct rheumatic diseases and to examine the association of loneliness with social support and invalidation. Participants were 927 patients with ankylosing spondylitis (n = 152), fibromyalgia (n = 341), osteoarthritis (n = 150), rheumatoid arthritis (n = 171), or systemic diseases (n = 113). They completed online questionnaires including an 11-point Likert scale assessing loneliness, the Illness Invalidation Inventory (3*1; Kool et al., 2010), and the Social Support Survey (SSS; De Boer, Wijker, Speelman, & De Haes, 1996; Sherbourne & Stewart, 1991). Patients with fibromyalgia experienced significantly more loneliness than patients with ankylosing spondylitis and patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Besides being younger, having lower education, and not working, in multiple regression analyses both lack of social support and invalidation were independently correlated with loneliness. This suggests that to decrease loneliness, therapeutic attention should be given to both increasing social support as well as decreasing invalidation in patients with rheumatic diseases, especially in patients with fibromyalgia. PMID:22303622

  16. Withdrawal, apathy and lack of vigor in late life depression: factorial validity and relationship to diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Sheung-Tak; Chan, Alfred C M

    2007-09-01

    Withdrawal, apathy and lack of vigor (WAV) describe a pattern of lack of vitality and dropping of interests and activities in later life, which may or may not indicate depression. This study examines (a) whether the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) contains a measure of this symptom cluster, and if so, (b) whether the presence of WAV leads to more false positive predictions by the GDS. A total of 444 Chinese older persons responded to the GDS and the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), and were independently assessed by psychiatrists for depression and other diagnoses. Confirmatory factor analysis showed that six WAV symptoms formed a distinct cluster on the GDS. WAV was positively correlated with age and MMSE but most other symptom clusters measured on the GDS were not. Nonetheless, the ROC curves were essentially the same, regardless of whether the WAV items were included or not. Further analysis revealed that the optimal cutoff for the GDS without WAV produced fewer false positives, but also missed more true cases, than the full scale. The extent to which false positives become an issue depends on the specific threshold chosen (which entails a tradeoff with sensitivity) rather than the presence of WAV items.

  17. Scaffold proteins LACK and TRACK as potential drug targets in kinetoplastid parasites: Development of inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nir Qvit

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Parasitic diseases cause ∼500,000 deaths annually and remain a major challenge for therapeutic development. Using a rational design based approach, we developed peptide inhibitors with anti-parasitic activity that were derived from the sequences of parasite scaffold proteins LACK (Leishmania's receptor for activated C-kinase and TRACK (Trypanosoma receptor for activated C-kinase. We hypothesized that sequences in LACK and TRACK that are conserved in the parasites, but not in the mammalian ortholog, RACK (Receptor for activated C-kinase, may be interaction sites for signaling proteins that are critical for the parasites' viability. One of these peptides exhibited leishmanicidal and trypanocidal activity in culture. Moreover, in infected mice, this peptide was also effective in reducing parasitemia and increasing survival without toxic effects. The identified peptide is a promising new anti-parasitic drug lead, as its unique features may limit toxicity and drug-resistance, thus overcoming central limitations of most anti-parasitic drugs.

  18. Poor social performance of lonely people: lacking a skill or adopting a role?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitkus, J; Horowitz, L M

    1987-06-01

    A substantial literature has shown that lonely people differ from nonlonely people on a variety of measures of social performance. These differences have usually been conceptualized as a social skills deficit, which implies that lonely people lack the ability to perform appropriate and effective social behavior. Rather than a lack of this ability, the authors hypothesize that the adoption of passive interpersonal roles predisposes lonely people to exhibit inadequate performance. In order to test this hypothesis, lonely and nonlonely subjects were assigned to one of two roles: They either listened (Condition Li) to an interaction partner describe a personal problem or they themselves described a personal problem (Condition Pr) to their partner. The subjects' interpersonal role produced a substantial effect on their social behavior. Subjects who listened to their partner describe a problem generated more solutions to a set of hypothetical situations, attended to their partners more adequately, and conversed longer than did subjects who described a personal problem. In contrast, lonely subjects did not differ from nonlonely subjects in their social performance within each particular role. Lonely and nonlonely subjects did differ, however, in their subjective evaluations of themselves and of their performance. These results illustrate the need for research to address both the interpersonal and the intrapersonal bases of social performance.

  19. Migrant Workers’ Lack of Cultural Rights and Interests and Government Safeguard Measures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    This paper analyses the status quo of migrant workers’ lack of cultural rights and interests as follows:the holistic cultural life of migrant workers is scant and monotonous;the cultural facilities provided by the majority of enterprises are critically short;the cultural life of migrant workers has the characteristic of closeness to some extent;the holistic cultural consuming capacity of migrant workers is very low,and they are not satisfied with their own cultural life.This paper puts forward the measures that the government should adopt to make up for the lack of migrant workers’ cultural rights and interests as follows:first,it should eliminate discrimination in terms of system,and incorporate migrant workers’ cultural rights and interests into the building scope of urban public culture;second,it should establish a variety of free public culture facilities,to adapt to the needs of migrant workers;third,it should formulate various kinds of laws and regulations,to effectively safeguard migrant workers’ cultural rights and interests.

  20. Lack of Preparation: Iranian Nurses' Experiences During Transition From College to Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamanzadeh, Vahid; Jasemi, Madineh; Valizadeh, Leila; Keogh, Brian; Taleghani, Fariba

    2015-01-01

    Graduate nurse transition from college to professional practice is an important matter in a nurse's professional life. In many cases, this period is characterized by unhealthy physical and mental reactions, loss of interest in one's profession, and unacceptable caregiving. By examining the phenomenon from the point of view of experienced nurses, we can recognize the major factors in a successful transition from college life to professional life. This is a qualitative study and was conducted based on conventional qualitative content analysis method; 14 nurses were selected through purposive sampling, and the data were collected using semistructured interviews in teaching hospitals in Iran. Eight subthemes emerged from the analysis of the interviews: lack of practical skills, limited academic knowledge, inadequate social skills, poor self-confidence, lack of independence, frustration, stress, and loneliness. These items, in turn, fall under 3 themes: poor efficiency, low self-assurance, and unhealthy emotional reactions. The findings of this study indicate that the participants were not well prepared to assume their clinical roles, which in turn gives rise to other problems; to eliminate this defect, the curriculum needs to be revised, proper training programs should accompany the students' studies, and management in clinical environments recommended should be improved in order to facilitate nurses' transition from college to practice. PMID:26194969

  1. Dopamine pathway imbalance in mice lacking Magel2, a Prader-Willi syndrome candidate gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luck, Chloe; Vitaterna, Martha H; Wevrick, Rachel

    2016-08-01

    The etiology of abnormal eating behaviors, including binge-eating disorder, is poorly understood. The neural circuits modulating the activities of the neurotransmitters dopamine and serotonin are proposed to be dysfunctional in individuals suffering from eating disorders. Prader-Willi syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder that causes extreme food seeking and binge-eating behaviors together with reduced satiety. One of the genes implicated in Prader-Willi syndrome, Magel2, is highly expressed in the regions of the brain that control appetite. Our objective was to examine behaviors relevant to feeding and the neural circuits controlling feeding in a mouse model of Prader-Willi syndrome that lacks expression of the Magel2 gene. We performed behavioral tests related to dopaminergic function, measuring cocaine-induced hyperlocomotion, binge eating, and saccharin-induced anhedonia in Magel2-deficient mice. Next, we analyzed dopaminergic neurons in various brain regions and compared these findings between genotypes. Finally, we examined biochemical markers in the brain under standard diet, high-fat diet, and withdrawal from a high-fat diet conditions. We identified abnormal behaviors and biomarkers reflecting dopaminergic dysfunction in mice lacking Magel2. Our results provide a biological framework for clinical studies of dopaminergic function in children with Prader-Willi syndrome, and may also provide insight into binge-eating disorders that occur in the general population. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27254754

  2. On the lack of consensus over the meaning of openness: an empirical study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia M Grubb

    Full Text Available This study set out to explore the views and motivations of those involved in a number of recent and current advocacy efforts (such as open science, computational provenance, and reproducible research aimed at making science and scientific artifacts accessible to a wider audience. Using a exploratory approach, the study tested whether a consensus exists among advocates of these initiatives about the key concepts, exploring the meanings that scientists attach to the various mechanisms for sharing their work, and the social context in which this takes place. The study used a purposive sampling strategy to target scientists who have been active participants in these advocacy efforts, and an open-ended questionnaire to collect detailed opinions on the topics of reproducibility, credibility, scooping, data sharing, results sharing, and the effectiveness of the peer review process. We found evidence of a lack of agreement on the meaning of key terminology, and a lack of consensus on some of the broader goals of these advocacy efforts. These results can be explained through a closer examination of the divergent goals and approaches adopted by different advocacy efforts. We suggest that the scientific community could benefit from a broader discussion of what it means to make scientific research more accessible and how this might best be achieved.

  3. TAp73 is one of the genes responsible for the lack of response to chemotherapy depending on B-Raf mutational status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cavia-Saiz Mónica

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although there have been many studies on the p73 gene, some of its functions still remain unclear. There is little research on the relationship between p73 gene transcription and its protein expression and the response to certain drugs such as oxaliplatin and cetuximab, which are drugs currently used in colorectal cancer. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of TAp73 expression on oxaliplatin and cetuximab-based chemotherapy in colorectal cancer cell lines with different K-Ras and B-Raf mutational status. Methods TAp73 was analyzed in three colorectal tumor cell lines HT-29, SW-480 and Caco-2. mRNA TAp73 was determined using Real time PCR; TAp73 protein by immunoblotting and cell viability was analyzed by the MTT method. Results We found that mRNA and TAp73 protein were decreased in cells treated with oxaliplatin (in monotherapy or combined with cetuximab when B-Raf is mutated. This was statistically significant and was also associated with higher cell viability after the treatment. Conclusions Here, for the first time we report, that there is a signaling loop between B-Raf activation and p73 function. Low expression of TAp73 in colorectal cancer cell lines with mutated B-Raf may be involved in the lack of response to oxaliplatin in monotherapy or combined with cetuximab.

  4. RNA polymerase mutations that facilitate replication progression in the rep uvrD recF mutant lacking two accessory replicative helicases

    OpenAIRE

    Baharoglu, Zeynep; Lestini, Roxane; Duigou, Stéphane; Michel, Bénédicte

    2010-01-01

    Abstract We observed that cells lacking Rep and UvrD, two replication accessory helicases, and the recombination protein RecF are cryo-sensitive on rich medium. We isolated five mutations that suppress this LB-cryo-sensitivity and show that they map in the genes encoding the RNA polymerase subunits RpoB and RpoC. These rpoB (D444G, H447R and N518D) and rpoC mutants (H113R and P451L) were characterized. rpoBH447R and rpoBD444G prevent activation of the Prrn core promoter in rich med...

  5. Lack of myristoylation of poliovirus capsid polypeptide VP0 prevents the formation of virions or results in the assembly of noninfectious virus particles.

    OpenAIRE

    Marc, D.; Masson, G.; Girard, M.; Van Der Werf, S.

    1990-01-01

    We previously described the generation of a set of mutations into a cDNA of poliovirus type 1 in the myristoylation signal of the capsid polypeptide VP4 (D. Marc, G. Drugeon, A.-L. Haenni, M. Girard, and S. van der Werf, EMBO J. 8:2661, 1989). Genomic transcripts synthesized in vitro from the mutated cDNAs were found to be noninfectious upon transfection of permissive cells, and this property correlated with the lack of VP0 myristoylation in vivo. In the study presented here, we analyzed the ...

  6. Nucleolar protein PinX1p regulates telomerase by sequestering its protein catalytic subunit in an inactive complex lacking telomerase RNA

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Jue; Elizabeth H. Blackburn

    2004-01-01

    Human TRF1-binding protein PinX1 inhibits telomerase activity. Here we report that overexpression of yeast PinX1p (yPinX1p) results in shortened telomeres and decreased in vitro telomerase activity. yPinX1p coimmunoprecipitated withyeast telomerase protein Est2p even in cells lacking the telomerase RNA TLC1, or the telomerase-associated proteins Est1p and Est3p. Est2p regions required for binding to yPinX1p or TLC1 were similar. Furthermore, we found two distinct Est2p complexes exist, contai...

  7. Inducible error-prone repair in B. subtilis. Progress report, September 1, 1981-April 30, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Considerable progress has been made on determining the mechanisms of mutagenesis in B. subtilis and on elucidating the interactions between DNA repair systems and mutagenesis in this bacterium. Specifically, the B. subtilis W-reactivation system has been shown to involve a damage-specific (pyrimidine dimer) repair mechanism which may or may not be error-free. On the other hand, error-prone repair (as defined by the ability of cells to be mutated by low doses of uv) has been definitively established in this bacterium. The investigation of the genes controlling the error-prone repair system has revealed that uv mutagenesis is significantly decreased in cells carrying the recG13 mutation. In addition, cells lacking a functional excision repair system are hypermutable to EMS, although these cells are not hypersensitive to the killing activity of EMS. Both EMS and uv generate the same spectrum of mutants (reversions vs suppressors); however, cells lacking a functional excision repair system apparently generate more suppressor mutations when exposed to uv as compared to the other strains tested. A genomic library for B. subtilis has been established. This library will be specifically used to isolate a cloned fragment of DNA which codes for the major subunit of the Bacillus DNA polymerase III. However, this bank can also be used to isolate Bacillus genes which control most of the repair functions. Furthermore, we have begun the process of cloning the E. coli phr+ gene in to B. subtilis

  8. LONG-DURATION RADIO TRANSIENTS LACKING OPTICAL COUNTERPARTS ARE POSSIBLY GALACTIC NEUTRON STARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, a new class of radio transients in the 5 GHz band and with durations of the order of hours to days, lacking any visible-light counterparts, was detected by Bower and collaborators. We present new deep near-infrared (IR) observations of the field containing these transients, and find no counterparts down to a limiting magnitude of K = 20.4 mag. We argue that the bright (>1 Jy) radio transients recently reported by Kida et al. are consistent with being additional examples of the Bower et al. transients. We refer to these groups of events as 'long-duration radio transients'. The main characteristics of this population are: timescales longer than 30 minutes but shorter than several days; very large rate, ∼103 deg-2 yr-1; progenitor's sky surface density of >60 deg-2 (at 95% confidence) at Galactic latitude ∼400; 1.4-5 GHz spectral slopes, fν ∝ να, with α ∼> 0; and most notably the lack of any X-ray, visible-light, near-IR, and radio counterparts in quiescence. We discuss putative known astrophysical objects that may be related to these transients and rule out an association with many types of objects including supernovae, gamma-ray bursts, quasars, pulsars, and M-dwarf flare stars. Galactic brown dwarfs or some sort of exotic explosions in the intergalactic medium remain plausible (though speculative) options. We argue that an attractive progenitor candidate for these radio transients is the class of Galactic isolated old neutron stars (NSs). We confront this hypothesis with Monte Carlo simulations of the space distribution of old NSs, and find satisfactory agreement for the large areal density. Furthermore, the lack of quiescent counterparts is explained quite naturally. In this framework, we find: the mean distance to events in the Bower et al. sample is of order kpc; the typical distance to the Kida et al. transients are constrained to be between 45 pc and 2 kpc (at the 95% confidence level); these events should repeat with a timescale of order

  9. Urokinase-type Plasminogen Activator-like Proteases in Teleosts Lack Genuine Receptor-binding Epidermal Growth Factor-like Domains*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bager, René; Kristensen, Thomas K.; Jensen, Jan K.; Szczur, Agnieszka; Christensen, Anni; Andersen, Lisbeth M.; Johansen, Jesper S.; Larsen, Niels; Baatrup, Erik; Huang, Mingdong; Ploug, Michael; Andreasen, Peter A.

    2012-01-01

    Plasminogen activation catalyzed by urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) plays an important role in normal and pathological tissue remodeling processes. Since its discovery in the mid-1980s, the cell membrane-anchored urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) has been believed to be central to the functions of uPA, as uPA-catalyzed plasminogen activation activity appeared to be confined to cell surfaces through the binding of uPA to uPAR. However, a functional uPAR has so far only been identified in mammals. We have now cloned, recombinantly produced, and characterized two zebrafish proteases, zfuPA-a and zfuPA-b, which by several criteria are the fish orthologs of mammalian uPA. Thus, both proteases catalyze the activation of fish plasminogen efficiently and both proteases are inhibited rapidly by plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1). But zfuPA-a differs from mammalian uPA by lacking the exon encoding the uPAR-binding epidermal growth factor-like domain; zfuPA-b differs from mammalian uPA by lacking two cysteines of the epidermal growth factor-like domain and a uPAR-binding sequence comparable with that found in mammalian uPA. Accordingly, no zfuPA-b binding activity could be found in fish white blood cells or fish cell lines. We therefore propose that the current consensus of uPA-catalyzed plasminogen activation taking place on cell surfaces, derived from observations with mammals, is too narrow. Fish uPAs appear incapable of receptor binding in the manner known from mammals and uPA-catalyzed plasminogen activation in fish may occur mainly in solution. Studies with nonmammalian vertebrate species are needed to obtain a comprehensive understanding of the mechanism of plasminogen activation. PMID:22733817

  10. Primary hepatocytes from mice lacking cysteine dioxygenase show increased cysteine concentrations and higher rates of metabolism of cysteine to hydrogen sulfide and thiosulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurkowska, Halina; Roman, Heather B; Hirschberger, Lawrence L; Sasakura, Kiyoshi; Nagano, Tetsuo; Hanaoka, Kenjiro; Krijt, Jakub; Stipanuk, Martha H

    2014-05-01

    The oxidation of cysteine in mammalian cells occurs by two routes: a highly regulated direct oxidation pathway in which the first step is catalyzed by cysteine dioxygenase (CDO) and by desulfhydration-oxidation pathways in which the sulfur is released in a reduced oxidation state. To assess the effect of a lack of CDO on production of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and thiosulfate (an intermediate in the oxidation of H2S to sulfate) and to explore the roles of both cystathionine γ-lyase (CTH) and cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) in cysteine desulfhydration by liver, we investigated the metabolism of cysteine in hepatocytes isolated from Cdo1-null and wild-type mice. Hepatocytes from Cdo1-null mice produced more H2S and thiosulfate than did hepatocytes from wild-type mice. The greater flux of cysteine through the cysteine desulfhydration reactions catalyzed by CTH and CBS in hepatocytes from Cdo1-null mice appeared to be the consequence of their higher cysteine levels, which were due to the lack of CDO and hence lack of catabolism of cysteine by the cysteinesulfinate-dependent pathways. Both CBS and CTH appeared to contribute substantially to cysteine desulfhydration, with estimates of 56 % by CBS and 44 % by CTH in hepatocytes from wild-type mice, and 63 % by CBS and 37 % by CTH in hepatocytes from Cdo1-null mice.

  11. [Sodium bicarbonate infusion for intoxication with tricyclic antidepressives: recommended inspite of lack of scientific evidence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrijlandt, P J; Bosch, T M; Zijlstra, J G; Tulleken, J E; Ligtenberg, J J; van der Werf, T S

    2001-09-01

    Sodium bicarbonate infusion is widely recommended in textbooks for patients who present with self-poisoning from tricyclic antidepressives. Cardiac conduction disorders could also be treated or prevented by means of such an infusion. The scientific basis for these recommendations was investigated by using Medline to search for publications about clinical studies that supported the use of sodium carbonate; 111 articles were scrutinized. Observational studies and case reports mention a rapid improvement in hypotension and cardiac arrhythmias following the administration of sodium bicarbonate. Results from animal experiments are contentious; it is not clear whether alkalinisation or the administration of extra sodium causes the effect. Randomized studies in patients have not been carried out. As the toxicity of sodium bicarbonate is low, and its potential benefit appears to be high, we recommend its use, despite the lack of scientific evidence. No recommendations concerning dosing, concentration and the length of the therapy can be provided on the basis of the literature. PMID:11561485

  12. Walk-based measure of balance in signed networks: detecting lack of balance in social networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, Ernesto; Benzi, Michele

    2014-10-01

    There is a longstanding belief that in social networks with simultaneous friendly and hostile interactions (signed networks) there is a general tendency to a global balance. Balance represents a state of the network with a lack of contentious situations. Here we introduce a method to quantify the degree of balance of any signed (social) network. It accounts for the contribution of all signed cycles in the network and gives, in agreement with empirical evidence, more weight to the shorter cycles than to the longer ones. We found that, contrary to what is generally believed, many signed social networks, in particular very large directed online social networks, are in general very poorly balanced. We also show that unbalanced states can be changed by tuning the weights of the social interactions among the agents in the network.

  13. Testing Lack-of-fit for a Polynomial Errors-in-variables Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-xing Zhu; Wei-xing Song; Heng-jian Gui

    2003-01-01

    When a regression model is applied as an approximation of underlying model of data, the model checking is important and relevant. In this paper, we investigate the lack-of-fit test for a polynomial errorin-variables model. As the ordinary residuals are biased when there exist measurement errors in covariables,we correct them and then construct a residual-based test of score type. The constructed test is asymptotically chi-squared under null hypotheses. Simulation study shows that the test can maintain the significance level well.The choice of weight functions involved in the test statistic and the related power study are also investigated.The application to two examples is illustrated. The approach can be readily extended to handle more general models.

  14. A Study on the Lack of Enforcement of Data Protection Acts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burghardt, Thorben; Böhm, Klemens; Buchmann, Erik; Kühling, Jürgen; Sivridis, Anastasios

    Data privacy is a fundamental human right, not only according to the EU perspective. Each EU state implements sophisticated data protection acts. Nevertheless, there are frequent media reports on data privacy violations. The scientific and the political community assume that data protection acts suffer from a lack of enforcement. This paper is an interdisciplinary study that examines this hypothesis by means of empirical facts on juridical assessment criteria - and validates it. We have inspected 100 service providers, from social online platforms to web shops. Our study considers legal requirements of the privacy policy and how providers ask for consent and react to requests for information or deletion of personal data. Our study is based on articles of German law that have a counterpart in the EU Directive 95/46/EC. Thus, our study is relevant for all EU states and all countries with similar regulations.

  15. The Lack of Social Well-Being in Two Disadvantaged Hungarian Micro-Regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nóra Baranyai

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this paper is to reveal the crucial economic and social factors determining the lack of social well-being in two disadvantaged micro-regions of different geographical locations in Hungary, and to summarize the similarities and differences between them. The study also compares the two analysed cases in terms of subjective well-being, as well as indicators of micro-regions and urban areas located in the same county in order to demonstrate the inter- and intraregional differences. According to the hypothesis, basically the east-west determined spatial inequalities of objective social well-being emerge also in connection with subjective well-being issues. The results are based on an empirical research using qualitative and quantitative methods conducted in 2014.

  16. Double gene deletion reveals the lack of cooperation between PPARα and PPARβ in skeletal muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are involved in the regulation of most of the pathways linked to lipid metabolism. PPARα and PPARβ isotypes are known to regulate muscle fatty acid oxidation and a reciprocal compensation of their function has been proposed. Herein, we investigated muscle contractile and metabolic phenotypes in PPARα-/-, PPARβ-/-, and double PPARα-/- β-/- mice. Heart and soleus muscle analyses show that the deletion of PPARα induces a decrease of the HAD activity (β-oxidation) while soleus contractile phenotype remains unchanged. A PPARβ deletion alone has no effect. However, these mild phenotypes are not due to a reciprocal compensation of PPARβ and PPARα functions since double gene deletion PPARα-PPARβ mostly reproduces the null PPARα-mediated reduced β-oxidation, in addition to a shift from fast to slow fibers. In conclusion, PPARβ is not required for maintaining skeletal muscle metabolic activity and does not compensate the lack of PPARα in PPARα null mice

  17. Lack of new antiinfective agents: Passing into the pre-antibiotic age?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Klaus; Brandenburg; Tobias; Schürholz

    2015-01-01

    The lack of newly developed antibiotics, together with the increase in multi-resistance of relevant pathogenic bacteria in the last decades, represents an alarming signal for human health care worldwide. The number of severely infected persons increases not only in developing but also in highly industrialized countries. This relates in first line to the most severe form of a bacterial infection, sepsis and the septic shock syndrome, with high mortality on critical care units. No particular anti-sepsis drug is available, and the therapy with conventional antibiotics more and more fails to provide a survival benefit. Due to the fact that the pharmaceutical industry has withdrawn to a high degree from the development of anti-infectious agents, a huge challenge for health care is approaching in the 21 st century. In this article, these problems are outlined and possible alternatives are presented which may be helpful to solve the problem.

  18. Lack of blinding of outcome assessors in animal model experiments implies risk of observer bias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bello, Segun; Krogsbøll, Lasse T; Gruber, Jan;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To examine the impact of not blinding outcome assessors on estimates of intervention effects in animal experiments modeling human clinical conditions. STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: We searched PubMed, Biosis, Google Scholar, and HighWire Press and included animal model experiments with both...... 10 (2,450 animals) experiments in the main meta-analysis. Outcomes were subjective in most experiments. The pooled ROR was 0.41 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.20, 0.82; I(2) = 75%; P ... and caused by three pesticides experiments with very large observer bias, pooled ROR was 0.20 (95% CI, 0.07, 0.59) in contrast to the pooled ROR in the other seven experiments, 0.82 (95% CI, 0.57, 1.17). CONCLUSION: Lack of blinding of outcome assessors in animal model experiments with subjective outcomes...

  19. Some Properties of A Lack-of-Fit Test for a Linear Errors in Variables Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-xing Zhu; Heng-jian Cui; K.W.Ng

    2004-01-01

    The relationship between the linear errors-in-variables model and the corresponding ordinary linear model in statistical inference is studied.It is shown that normality of the distribution of covariate is a necessary and su cient condition for the equivalence.Therefore,testing for lack-of-t in linear errors-in-variables model can be converted into testing for it in the corresponding ordinary linear model under normality assumption.A test of score type is constructed and the limiting chi-squared distribution is derived under the null hypothesis.Furthermore,we discuss the power of the test and the choice of the weight function involved in the test statistic.

  20. Analysis of complete mitochondrial genomes from extinct and extant rhinoceroses reveals lack of phylogenetic resolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willerslev, Eske; Gilbert, Tom; Binladen, Jonas;

    2009-01-01

    several contradictory phylogenies were proposed on the basis of morphology, then apparently resolved using mitochondrial DNA fragments. RESULTS: In this study we report the first complete mitochondrial genome sequences of the extinct ice-age woolly rhinoceros (Coelodonta antiquitatis), and the threatened...... reconstruction of the rhinoceros phylogeny. While the six species cluster into three strongly supported sister-pairings: (i) The black/white, (ii) the woolly/Sumatran, and (iii) the Javan/Indian, resolution of the higher-level relationships has no statistical support. The phylogenetic signal from individual...... genes is highly diffuse, with mixed topological support from different genes. Furthermore, the choice of outgroup (horse vs tapir) has considerable effect on reconstruction of the phylogeny. The lack of resolution is suggestive of a hard polytomy at the base of crown-group Rhinocerotidae...

  1. Lack of stimulation of 24-hour growth hormone release by hypocaloric diet in obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, M H; Juul, A; Kjems, L L;

    1995-01-01

    -I (IGF-I), IGF-binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1), IGF-binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3), insulin, pro-insulin, and blood glucose were measured during habitual energy intake as well as during the hypocaloric diet. Twenty-four-hour GH release profiles and IGFBP-1 were decreased, and insulin as well as proinsulin...... suggests a reversible defect in GH release, rather than a persistent preexisting disorder. It is hypothesized that enhanced bioavailability of IGF-I, acting in concert with elevated proinsulin and insulin levels, may account for the lack of stimulation of 24-hr GH release by the hypocaloric diet in obese...... 6 obese subjects, 5 obese subjects after weight loss, and 5 normal, age- and sex-matched control subjects. Integrated 20-min samples were obtained over 24-h on two occasions in each subject using a constant blood withdrawal technique. In addition, basal levels of serum insulin-like growth factor...

  2. Telemedicine: The legal framework (or the lack of it) in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raposo, Vera Lúcia

    2016-01-01

    In the framework of European law telemedicine is, simultaneously, a health service and an information service, therefore, both regulations apply. In what concerns healthcare and the practice of medicine there are no uniform regulations at the European level. Concerning health services the most relevant achievement to regulate this domain is Directive 2011/24/EU. In what regards information and telecommunications we must have in consideration Directive 95/46/EU, Directive 2000/31/EC and Directive 2002/58/EC. However, many issues still lack uniform regulation, mainly the domain of medical liability and of medical leges artis. Probably such standardization will never take place, since the European Union does not have, until now, a common set of norms regarding tort and criminal liability, much less specific legal norms on medical liability. These gaps may jeopardize a truly European internal market in health services and hamper the development of telemedicine in the European zone. PMID:27579146

  3. Lack of founding Amerindian mitochondrial DNA lineages in extinct aborigines from Tierra del Fuego-Patagonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalueza, C; Pérez-Pérez, A; Prats, E; Cornudella, L; Turbón, D

    1997-01-01

    Ancient DNA from bones and teeth of 60 individuals from four extinct human populations from Tierra del Fuego-Patagonia (Selknam, Yamana, Kaweskar and Aonikenk) has been extracted and the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) amplified by using the polymerase chain reaction. High-resolution analysis of endonuclease restriction site variation in the mtDNA and sequencing of its hypervariable non-coding control region, revealed complete absence of two of the four primary mitochondrial haplotype groups present in contemporary Amerinds, namely A and B. In contrast, haplogroups C and D were found in all but one sample with frequencies of approximately 38% and 60%. These results, together with the decreasing incidence of group A in more southerly latitudes in the American continent and the absence of cluster B above 55 degrees North in America and Asia, argue that the first settlers entering America 21000-14000 years ago already lacked both mtDNA lineages.

  4. The diageotropica mutant of tomato lacks high specific activity auxin sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hicks, G.R.; Lomax, T.L. (Oregon State Univ., Corvallis (USA)); Rayle, D.L. (San Diego State Univ., CA (USA))

    1989-04-01

    Tomato (Lycopersicum esculentum, Mill) plants homozygous for the single gene diageotropica (dgt) mutation have reduced shoot growth, abnormal vascular tissue, altered leaf morphology, and lack of lateral root branching. These and other morphological and physiological abnormalities suggest that dgt plants are unable to respond to the plant growth hormone auxin (indole-3-acetic acid, IAA). The photoaffinity auxin analogue {sup 3}H-5N{sub 3}-IAA specifically labels a polypeptide doublet of 40 ad 42 kD in membrane preparations from stems of the parental variety VFN8, but not from stems of dgt. In elongation tests, excised dgt roots respond in the same manner to IAA an VFN8 roots. These data suggest that the two polypeptides are part of a physiologically important auxin receptor system which is altered in a tissue-specific manner in the mutant.

  5. Lack of phylogeographic structure in the freshwater cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa suggests global dispersal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ineke van Gremberghe

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Free-living microorganisms have long been assumed to have ubiquitous distributions with little biogeographic signature because they typically exhibit high dispersal potential and large population sizes. However, molecular data provide contrasting results and it is far from clear to what extent dispersal limitation determines geographic structuring of microbial populations. We aimed to determine biogeographical patterns of the bloom-forming freshwater cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa. Being widely distributed on a global scale but patchily on a regional scale, this prokaryote is an ideal model organism to study microbial dispersal and biogeography. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The phylogeography of M. aeruginosa was studied based on a dataset of 311 rDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS sequences sampled from six continents. Richness of ITS sequences was high (239 ITS types were detected. Genetic divergence among ITS types averaged 4% (maximum pairwise divergence was 13%. Preliminary analyses revealed nearly completely unresolved phylogenetic relationships and a lack of genetic structure among all sequences due to extensive homoplasy at multiple hypervariable sites. After correcting for this, still no clear phylogeographic structure was detected, and no pattern of isolation by distance was found on a global scale. Concomitantly, genetic differentiation among continents was marginal, whereas variation within continents was high and was mostly shared with all other continents. Similarly, no genetic structure across climate zones was detected. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The high overall diversity and wide global distribution of common ITS types in combination with the lack of phylogeographic structure suggest that intercontinental dispersal of M. aeruginosa ITS types is not rare, and that this species might have a truly cosmopolitan distribution.

  6. Myocardial mitochondrial and contractile function are preserved in mice lacking adiponectin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Braun

    Full Text Available Adiponectin deficiency leads to increased myocardial infarct size following ischemia reperfusion and to exaggerated cardiac hypertrophy following pressure overload, entities that are causally linked to mitochondrial dysfunction. In skeletal muscle, lack of adiponectin results in impaired mitochondrial function. Thus, it was our objective to investigate whether adiponectin deficiency impairs mitochondrial energetics in the heart. At 8 weeks of age, heart weight-to-body weight ratios were not different between adiponectin knockout (ADQ-/- mice and wildtypes (WT. In isolated working hearts, cardiac output, aortic developed pressure and cardiac power were preserved in ADQ-/- mice. Rates of fatty acid oxidation, glucose oxidation and glycolysis were unchanged between groups. While myocardial oxygen consumption was slightly reduced (-24% in ADQ-/- mice in isolated working hearts, rates of maximal ADP-stimulated mitochondrial oxygen consumption and ATP synthesis in saponin-permeabilized cardiac fibers were preserved in ADQ-/- mice with glutamate, pyruvate or palmitoyl-carnitine as a substrate. In addition, enzymatic activity of respiratory complexes I and II was unchanged between groups. Phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase and SIRT1 activity were not decreased, expression and acetylation of PGC-1α were unchanged, and mitochondrial content of OXPHOS subunits was not decreased in ADQ-/- mice. Finally, increasing energy demands due to prolonged subcutaneous infusion of isoproterenol did not differentially affect cardiac contractility or mitochondrial function in ADQ-/- mice compared to WT. Thus, mitochondrial and contractile function are preserved in hearts of mice lacking adiponectin, suggesting that adiponectin may be expendable in the regulation of mitochondrial energetics and contractile function in the heart under non-pathological conditions.

  7. Predicting Effects of Ocean Acidification and Warming on Algae Lacking Carbon Concentrating Mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet E Kübler

    Full Text Available Seaweeds that lack carbon-concentrating mechanisms are potentially inorganic carbon-limited under current air equilibrium conditions. To estimate effects of increased atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration and ocean acidification on photosynthetic rates, we modeled rates of photosynthesis in response to pCO2, temperature, and their interaction under limiting and saturating photon flux densities. We synthesized the available data for photosynthetic responses of red seaweeds lacking carbon-concentrating mechanisms to light and temperature. The model was parameterized with published data and known carbonate system dynamics. The model predicts that direction and magnitude of response to pCO2 and temperature, depend on photon flux density. At sub-saturating light intensities, photosynthetic rates are predicted to be low and respond positively to increasing pCO2, and negatively to increasing temperature. Consequently, pCO2 and temperature are predicted to interact antagonistically to influence photosynthetic rates at low PFD. The model predicts that pCO2 will have a much larger effect than temperature at sub-saturating light intensities. However, photosynthetic rates under low light will not increase proportionately as pCO2 in seawater continues to rise. In the range of light saturation (Ik, both CO2 and temperature have positive effects on photosynthetic rate and correspondingly strong predicted synergistic effects. At saturating light intensities, the response of photosynthetic rates to increasing pCO2 approaches linearity, but the model also predicts increased importance of thermal over pCO2 effects, with effects acting additively. Increasing boundary layer thickness decreased the effect of added pCO2 and, for very thick boundary layers, overwhelmed the effect of temperature on photosynthetic rates. The maximum photosynthetic rates of strictly CO2-using algae are low, so even large percentage increases in rates with climate change will not

  8. Getting what we pay for: innovations lacking in provider payment reform for chronic disease care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tynan, Ann; Draper, Debra A

    2008-06-01

    Despite wide recognition that existing physician and hospital payment methods used by health plans and other payers do not foster high-quality and efficient care for people with chronic conditions, little innovation in provider payment strategies is occurring, according to a new study by the Center for Studying Health System Change (HSC) commissioned by the California HealthCare Foundation. This is particularly disconcerting because the nation faces an increasing prevalence of chronic disease, resulting in continued escalation of related health care costs and diminished quality of life for more Americans. To date, most efforts to improve care of patients with chronic conditions have focused on paying vendors, such as disease management firms, to intervene with patients or redesigning care delivery without reforming underlying physician and hospital payment methods. While there is active discussion and anticipation of physician and hospital payment reform, current efforts are limited largely to experimental or small-scale pilot programs. More fundamental payment reform efforts in practice are virtually nonexistent. Existing payment systems, primarily fee for service, encourage a piecemeal approach to care delivery rather than a coordinated approach appropriate for patients with chronic conditions. While there is broad agreement that existing provider payment methods are not well aligned with optimal chronic disease care, there are significant barriers to reforming payment for chronic disease care, including: (1) fragmented care delivery; (2) lack of payment for non-physician providers and services supportive of chronic disease care; (3) potential for revenue reductions for some providers; and (4) lack of a viable reform champion. Absent such reform, however, efforts to improve the quality and efficiency of care for chronically ill patients are likely to be of limited success.

  9. Can Species Distribution Models Aid Bioassessment when Reference Sites are Lacking? Tests Based on Freshwater Fishes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labay, Ben J.; Hendrickson, Dean A.; Cohen, Adam E.; Bonner, Timothy H.; King, Ryan S.; Kleinsasser, Leroy J.; Linam, Gordon W.; Winemiller, Kirk O.

    2015-10-01

    Recent literature reviews of bioassessment methods raise questions about use of least-impacted reference sites to characterize natural conditions that no longer exist within contemporary landscapes. We explore an alternate approach for bioassessment that uses species site occupancy data from museum archives as input for species distribution models (SDMs) stacked to predict species assemblages of freshwater fishes in Texas. When data for estimating reference conditions are lacking, deviation between richness of contemporary versus modeled species assemblages could provide a means to infer relative biological integrity at appropriate spatial scales. We constructed SDMs for 100 freshwater fish species to compare predicted species assemblages to data on contemporary assemblages acquired by four independent surveys that sampled 269 sites. We then compared site-specific observed/predicted ratios of the number of species at sites to scores from a multimetric index of biotic integrity (IBI). Predicted numbers of species were moderately to strongly correlated with the numbers observed by the four surveys. We found significant, though weak, relationships between observed/predicted ratios and IBI scores. SDM-based assessments identified patterns of local assemblage change that were congruent with IBI inferences; however, modeling artifacts that likely contributed to over-prediction of species presence may restrict the stand-alone use of SDM-derived patterns for bioassessment and therefore warrant examination. Our results suggest that when extensive standardized survey data that include reference sites are lacking, as is commonly the case, SDMs derived from generally much more readily available species site occupancy data could be used to provide a complementary tool for bioassessment.

  10. Getting what we pay for: innovations lacking in provider payment reform for chronic disease care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tynan, Ann; Draper, Debra A

    2008-06-01

    Despite wide recognition that existing physician and hospital payment methods used by health plans and other payers do not foster high-quality and efficient care for people with chronic conditions, little innovation in provider payment strategies is occurring, according to a new study by the Center for Studying Health System Change (HSC) commissioned by the California HealthCare Foundation. This is particularly disconcerting because the nation faces an increasing prevalence of chronic disease, resulting in continued escalation of related health care costs and diminished quality of life for more Americans. To date, most efforts to improve care of patients with chronic conditions have focused on paying vendors, such as disease management firms, to intervene with patients or redesigning care delivery without reforming underlying physician and hospital payment methods. While there is active discussion and anticipation of physician and hospital payment reform, current efforts are limited largely to experimental or small-scale pilot programs. More fundamental payment reform efforts in practice are virtually nonexistent. Existing payment systems, primarily fee for service, encourage a piecemeal approach to care delivery rather than a coordinated approach appropriate for patients with chronic conditions. While there is broad agreement that existing provider payment methods are not well aligned with optimal chronic disease care, there are significant barriers to reforming payment for chronic disease care, including: (1) fragmented care delivery; (2) lack of payment for non-physician providers and services supportive of chronic disease care; (3) potential for revenue reductions for some providers; and (4) lack of a viable reform champion. Absent such reform, however, efforts to improve the quality and efficiency of care for chronically ill patients are likely to be of limited success. PMID:18630402

  11. Antibody-induced down-regulation of a mutated insulin receptor lacking an intact cytoplasmic domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Insulin receptor down-regulation was studied in various Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell lines expressing transfected human insulin receptor cDNAs. In addition to a cell line expressing the normal receptor (CHO.T line), three lines expressing mutated receptors were studied: the CHO.T-t line, which expresses a receptor with a degraded cytoplasmic domain due to the removal of the C-terminal 112 amino acids, and the CHO.YF1 and CHO.YF3 lines, in which important autophosphorylation sites of the receptor kinase (tyrosines-1162 and -1163) have been replaced by phenylalanine. A monoclonal anti-receptor antibody, but not insulin itself, was found to down-regulate cell surface receptor levels in all four cell lines by 60-80% after 18-h treatment at 370C. Down-regulation of the CHO.T and CHO.T-t receptors occurred at similar antibody concentrations and with a similar time course, although the maximum level of CHO.T-t down-regulation (60%) was generally lower than the level of CHO.T down-regulation (80%). Pulse-chase labeling of these two cell types with [35S]methionine revealed that antibody treatment of both CHO.T and CHO.T-t cells resulted in a similar increase in the rate of degradation of mature receptor subunits. These results indicate that antibody-induced down-regulation of the insulin receptor in these cells can occur in the absence of various autophosphorylation sites of the receptor and that the mechanism of antibody-induced down-regulation is different from that for insulin

  12. Regional Fluctuation in the Functional Consequence of LINE-1 Insertion in the Mitf Gene: The Black Spotting Phenotype Arisen from the Mitfmi-bw Mouse Lacking Melanocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhisa Takeda

    Full Text Available Microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (Mitf is a key regulator for differentiation of melanoblasts, precursors to melanocytes. The mouse homozygous for the black-eyed white (Mitfmi-bw allele is characterized by the white-coat color and deafness with black eyes due to the lack of melanocytes. The Mitfmi-bw allele carries LINE-1, a retrotransposable element, which results in the Mitf deficiency. Here, we have established the black spotting mouse that was spontaneously arisen from the homozygous Mitfmi-bw mouse lacking melanocytes. The black spotting mouse shows multiple black patches on the white coat, with age-related graying. Importantly, each black patch also contains hair follicles lacking melanocytes, whereas the white-coat area completely lacks melanocytes. RT-PCR analyses of the pigmented patches confirmed that the LINE-1 insertion is retained in the Mitf gene of the black spotting mouse, thereby excluding the possibility of the somatic reversion of the Mitfmi-bw allele. The immunohistochemical analysis revealed that the staining intensity for beta-catenin was noticeably lower in hair follicles lacking melanocytes of the homozygous Mitfmi-bw mouse and the black spotting mouse, compared to the control mouse. In contrast, the staining intensity for beta-catenin and cyclin D1 was higher in keratinocytes of the black spotting mouse, compared to keratinocytes of the control mouse and the Mitfmi-bw mouse. Moreover, the keratinocyte layer appears thicker in the Mitfmi-bw mouse, with the overexpression of Ki-67, a marker for cell proliferation. We also show that the presumptive black spots are formed by embryonic day 15.5. Thus, the black spotting mouse provides the unique model to explore the molecular basis for the survival and death of developing melanoblasts and melanocyte stem cells in the epidermis. These results indicate that follicular melanocytes are responsible for maintaining the epidermal homeostasis; namely, the present study

  13. A human polymorphism affects NEDD4L subcellular targeting by leading to two isoforms that contain or lack a C2 domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lalouel Jean-Marc

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ubiquitination serves multiple cellular functions, including proteasomal degradation and the control of stability, function, and intracellular localization of a wide variety of proteins. NEDD4L is a member of the HECT class of E3 ubiquitin ligases. A defining feature of NEDD4L protein isoforms is the presence or absence of an amino-terminal C2 domain, a class of subcellular, calcium-dependent targeting domains. We previously identified a common variant in human NEDD4L that generates isoforms that contain or lack a C2 domain. Results To address the potential functional significance of the NEDD4L common variant on NEDD4L subcellular localization, NEDD4L isoforms that either contained or lacked a C2 domain were tagged with enhanced green fluorescent protein, transfected into Xenopus laevis kidney epithelial cells, and imaged by performing confocal microscopy on live cells. We report that the presence or absence of this C2 domain exerts differential effects on the subcellular distribution of NEDD4L, the ability of C2 containing and lacking NEDD4L isoforms to mobilize in response to a calcium stimulus, and the intracellular transport of subunits of the NEDD4L substrate, ENaC. Furthermore, the ability of the C2-containing isoform to influence β-ENaC mobilization from intracellular pools involves the NEDD4L active site for ubiquitination. We propose a model to account for the potential impact of this common genetic variant on protein function at the cellular level. Conclusion NEDD4L isoforms that contain or lack a C2 domain target different intracellular locations. Additionally, whereas the C2-containing NEDD4L isoform is capable of shuttling between the plasma membrane and intracellular compartments in response to calcium stimulus the C2-lacking isoform can not. The C2-containing isoform differentially affects the mobilization of ENaC subunits from intracellular pools and this trafficking step requires NEDD4L ubiquitin ligase

  14. The Impact of Lack of Resources on Declining Students' Enrolments in Design and Technology in Botswana Junior Secondary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaotlhobogwe, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Lack of resources has resulted in declining students' enrolment in design and technology in Botswana junior secondary schools by up to 6% per year over 10 years, despite positive encouragement by the government. Based on the PATT (pupils' attitude towards technology) theoretical framework this study indicated how a lack of resources in Botswana…

  15. Thymineless death is inhibited by CsrA in Escherichia coli lacking the SOS response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Holly M; Wilson, Ray; Blythe, Martin; Nehring, Ralf B; Fonville, Natalie C; Louis, Edward J; Rosenberg, Susan M

    2013-11-01

    Thymineless death (TLD) is the rapid loss of colony-forming ability in bacterial, yeast and human cells starved for thymine, and is the mechanism of action of common chemotherapeutic drugs. In Escherichia coli, significant loss of viability during TLD requires the SOS replication-stress/DNA-damage response, specifically its role in inducing the inhibitor of cell division, SulA. An independent RecQ- and RecJ-dependent TLD pathway accounts for a similarly large additional component of TLD, and a third SOS- and RecQ/J-independent TLD pathway has also been observed. Although two groups have implicated the SOS-response in TLD, an SOS-deficient mutant strain from an earlier study was found to be sensitive to thymine deprivation. We performed whole-genome resequencing on that SOS-deficient strain and find that, compared with the SOS-proficient control strain, it contains five mutations in addition to the SOS-blocking lexA(Ind(-)) mutation. One of the additional mutations, csrA, confers TLD sensitivity specifically in SOS-defective strains. We find that CsrA, a carbon storage regulator, reduces TLD in SOS- or SulA-defective cells, and that the increased TLD that occurs in csrA(-) SOS-defective cells is dependent on RecQ. We consider a hypothesis in which the modulation of nucleotide pools by CsrA might inhibit TLD specifically in SOS-deficient (SulA-deficient) cells.

  16. Lack of the architectural factor HMGA1 causes insulin resistance and diabetes in humans and mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foti, Daniela; Chiefari, Eusebio; Fedele, Monica; Iuliano, Rodolfo; Brunetti, Leonardo; Paonessa, Francesco; Manfioletti, Guidalberto; Barbetti, Fabrizio; Brunetti, Arturo; Croce, Carlo M; Fusco, Alfredo; Brunetti, Antonio

    2005-07-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a widespread disease, affecting millions of people globally. Although genetics and environmental factors seem to have a role, the cause of this metabolic disorder is largely unknown. Here we report a genetic flaw that markedly reduced the intracellular expression of the high mobility group A1 (HMGA1) protein, and adversely affected insulin receptor expression in cells and tissues from four subjects with insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Restoration of HMGA1 protein expression in subjects' cells enhanced INSR gene transcription, and restored cell-surface insulin receptor protein expression and insulin-binding capacity. Loss of Hmga1 expression, induced in mice by disrupting the Hmga1 gene, considerably decreased insulin receptor expression in the major targets of insulin action, largely impaired insulin signaling and severely reduced insulin secretion, causing a phenotype characteristic of human type 2 diabetes. PMID:15924147

  17. Lack of permissivity of human monoclonal CD4+ lymphocytes to HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapel, A; Bourges, J F; Bensussan, A; d'Auriol, L; Vilmer, E; Dormont, D

    1990-01-01

    Although knowledge has accumulated about GP110-CD4 interaction, viral penetration into human CD4+ lymphocytes remains unclear, in spite of the fact that all studies on HIV infection were performed on cell-transformed lineages, or on human polyclonal CD4+ cells. In order to investigate this viral entrance into susceptible cells, we studied the permissivity of 13 human monoclonal CD4+ lymphocytes by means of reverse transcriptase (RT) assay and immunocapture. We demonstrated a differential susceptibility to HIV of these CD4+ clones. In a second experiment, HIV infection was studied: (1) sequentially by RT assay and P24 immunocapture on several clones; (2) by cocultivation of infected clones with umbilical cord lymphocytes. These experiments suggested existence of permissive and "nonpermissive" CD4+ monoclonal lymphocytes. Slot blot, then PCR, revealed that proviral DNA sequences were detectable in all clones, but were present at lower levels in nonpermissive clones.

  18. Alteration of complex sphingolipid composition and its physiological significance in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae lacking vacuolar ATPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tani, Motohiro; Toume, Moeko

    2015-12-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, complex sphingolipids have three types of polar head group and five types of ceramide; however, the physiological significance of the structural diversity is not fully understood. Here, we report that deletion of vacuolar H+-ATPase (V-ATPase) in yeast causes dramatic alteration of the complex sphingolipid composition, which includes decreases in hydroxylation at the C-4 position of long-chain bases and the C-2 position of fatty acids in the ceramide moiety, decreases in inositol phosphorylceramide (IPC) levels, and increases in mannosylinositol phosphorylceramide (MIPC) and mannosyldiinositol phosphorylceramide [M(IP)2C] levels. V-ATPase-deleted cells exhibited slow growth at pH 7.2, whereas the increase in MIPC levels was significantly enhanced when V-ATPase-deleted cells were incubated at pH 7.2. The protein expression levels of MIPC and M(IP)2C synthases were significantly increased in V-ATPase-deleted cells incubated at pH 7.2. Loss of MIPC synthesis or an increase in the hydroxylation level of the ceramide moiety of sphingolipids on overexpression of Scs7 and Sur2 sphingolipid hydroxylases enhanced the growth defect of V-ATPase-deleted cells at pH 7.2. On the contrary, the growth rate of V-ATPase-deleted cells was moderately increased on the deletion of SCS7 and SUR2. In addition, supersensitivities to Ca2+, Zn2+ and H2O2, which are typical phenotypes of V-ATPase-deleted cells, were enhanced by the loss of MIPC synthesis. These results indicate the possibility that alteration of the complex sphingolipid composition is an adaptation mechanism for a defect of V-ATPase.

  19. Lack of tumor reduction in hyperprolactinemic women with extrasellar macroadenomas treated with bromocriptine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boulanger, C.M.; Mashchak, C.A.; Chang, R.J.

    1985-10-01

    Three patients with hyperprolactinemia and large extrasellar pituitary macroadenomas were treated with bromocriptine, 10 mg daily, for 8 weeks. In spite of correction of their amenorrhea, galactorrhea, and hyperprolactinemia, radiologic evaluation by CT scan failed to show evidence of tumor shrinkage. After surgical resection, histologic examination revealed that PRL-secreting cells comprised only a small portion of the tumor cell population in two patients and in the third patient were completely absent. These cases illustrate that large nonfunctional pituitary tumors may mimic signs and symptoms of a prolactinoma and stress the importance of adequate radiologic evaluation during medical management. 8 references, 3 figures.

  20. Neurofibromatosis-like phenotype in Drosophila caused by lack of glucosylceramide extension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlgaard, Katja; Jung, Anita; Qvortrup, Klaus;

    2012-01-01

    , controlled by the glycosyltransferase Egghead (Egh). Here we discovered that loss of Egh causes overgrowth of peripheral nerves and attraction of immune cells to the nerves. This phenotype is reminiscent of the human disorder neurofibromatosis type 1, which is characterized by disfiguring nerve sheath tumors...... with mast cell infiltration, increased cancer risk, and learning deficits. Neurofibromatosis type 1 is due to a reduction of the tumor suppressor neurofibromin, a negative regulator of the small GTPase Ras. Enhanced Ras signaling promotes glial growth through activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3...

  1. Photothermal sensitisation: evidence for the lack of oxygen effect on the photosensitising activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camerin, Monica; Rodgers, Michael A J; Kenney, Malcolm E; Jori, Giulio

    2005-03-01

    Irradiation of amelanotic melanoma B78H1 cells in the presence of liposome-delivered Ni(II)-octabutoxy-naphthalocyanine with a Q-switched Ti:sapphire laser operated in a pulsed mode (850 nm, 30 ns pulses, 10 Hz, 120 mJ pulse -1) promotes a photothermal sensitization process leading to extensive cell inactivation. The photoprocess occurs with identical efficiency in N2-saturated and air-equilibrated media, indicating that this photosensitization modality does not require the presence of oxygen. PMID:15738991

  2. Gene expression profiling of gastric mucosa in mice lacking CCK and gastrin receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Chun-Mei; Kodama, Yosuke; Flatberg, Arnar;

    2014-01-01

    The stomach produces acid, which may play an important role in the regulation of bone homeostasis. The aim of this study was to reveal signaling pathways in the gastric mucosa that involve the acid secretion and possibly the bone metabolism in CCK1 and/or CCK2 receptor knockout (KO) mice. Gastric...... acid secretion was impaired and the ECL cell signaling pathway was inhibited in CCK2 receptor KO mice but not in CCK1 receptor KO mice. However, in CCK1+2 receptor double KO mice the acid secretion in response to pylorus ligation-induced vagal stimulation and the ECL cell pathway were partially...

  3. Lack of tumor reduction in hyperprolactinemic women with extrasellar macroadenomas treated with bromocriptine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three patients with hyperprolactinemia and large extrasellar pituitary macroadenomas were treated with bromocriptine, 10 mg daily, for 8 weeks. In spite of correction of their amenorrhea, galactorrhea, and hyperprolactinemia, radiologic evaluation by CT scan failed to show evidence of tumor shrinkage. After surgical resection, histologic examination revealed that PRL-secreting cells comprised only a small portion of the tumor cell population in two patients and in the third patient were completely absent. These cases illustrate that large nonfunctional pituitary tumors may mimic signs and symptoms of a prolactinoma and stress the importance of adequate radiologic evaluation during medical management. 8 references, 3 figures

  4. Co-precipitation of phosphate and iron limits mitochondrial phosphate availability in Saccharomyces cerevisiae lacking the yeast frataxin homologue (YFH1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seguin, Alexandra; Santos, Renata; Pain, Debkumar; Dancis, Andrew; Camadro, Jean-Michel; Lesuisse, Emmanuel

    2011-02-25

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells lacking the yeast frataxin homologue (Δyfh1) accumulate iron in the mitochondria in the form of nanoparticles of ferric phosphate. The phosphate content of Δyfh1 mitochondria was higher than that of wild-type mitochondria, but the proportion of mitochondrial phosphate that was soluble was much lower in Δyfh1 cells. The rates of phosphate and iron uptake in vitro by isolated mitochondria were higher for Δyfh1 than wild-type mitochondria, and a significant proportion of the phosphate and iron rapidly became insoluble in the mitochondrial matrix, suggesting co-precipitation of these species after oxidation of iron by oxygen. Increasing the amount of phosphate in the medium decreased the amount of iron accumulated by Δyfh1 cells and improved their growth in an iron-dependent manner, and this effect was mostly transcriptional. Overexpressing the major mitochondrial phosphate carrier, MIR1, slightly increased the concentration of soluble mitochondrial phosphate and significantly improved various mitochondrial functions (cytochromes, [Fe-S] clusters, and respiration) in Δyfh1 cells. We conclude that in Δyfh1 cells, soluble phosphate is limiting, due to its co-precipitation with iron.

  5. What role do annelid neoblasts play? A comparison of the regeneration patterns in a neoblast-bearing and a neoblast-lacking enchytraeid oligochaete.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maroko Myohara

    Full Text Available The term 'neoblast' was originally coined for a particular type of cell that had been observed during annelid regeneration, but is now used to describe the pluripotent/totipotent stem cells that are indispensable for planarian regeneration. Despite having the same name, however, planarian and annelid neoblasts are morphologically and functionally distinct, and many annelid species that lack neoblasts can nonetheless substantially regenerate. To further elucidate the functions of the annelid neoblasts, a comparison was made between the regeneration patterns of two enchytraeid oligochaetes, Enchytraeus japonensis and Enchytraeus buchholzi, which possess and lack neoblasts, respectively. In E. japonensis, which can reproduce asexually by fragmentation and subsequent regeneration, neoblasts are present in all segments except for the eight anterior-most segments including the seven head-specific segments, and all body fragments containing neoblasts can regenerate a complete head and a complete tail, irrespective of the region of the body from which they were originally derived. In E. japonensis, therefore, no antero-posterior gradient of regeneration ability exists in the trunk region. However, when amputation was carried out within the head region, where neoblasts are absent, the number of regenerated segments was found to be dependent on the level of amputation along the body axis. In E. buchholzi, which reproduces only sexually and lacks neoblasts in all segments, complete heads were never regenerated and incomplete (hypomeric heads could be regenerated only from the anterior region of the body. Such an antero-posterior gradient of regeneration ability was observed for both the anterior and posterior regeneration in the whole body of E. buchholzi. These results indicate that the presence of neoblasts correlates with the absence of an antero-posterior gradient of regeneration ability along the body axis, and suggest that the annelid neoblasts are

  6. Lack of effect of ustekinumab in treatment of allergic contact dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsgaard, Nannie; Zachariae, Claus; Menné, Torkil;

    2011-01-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis is a chronic inflammatory T cell mediated disease that can be recalcitrant to existing treatments. Ustekinumab is a monocloncal antibody blocking IL-12 and IL-23, shown to be effective and safe for patients with psoriasis. Despite both IL-12 and IL-23 involvement...... in contact allergy, the effect of Ustekinumab on allergic contact dermatitis has not been reported....

  7. Chemokine expression in GKO mice (lacking interferon-gamma) with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glabinski, A R; Krakowski, M; Han, Y;

    1999-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is an inflammatory disease of the central nervous system (CNS) considered to be an animal model for multiple sclerosis (MS). The detailed mechanism that specifies accumulation of inflammatory cells within the CNS in these conditions remains a subjec...

  8. Lack of upregulation of epidermal fatty acid binding protein in dithranol induced irritation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kucharekova, M.; Vissers, W.H.P.M.; Schalkwijk, J.; Kerkhof, P.C.M. van de; Valk, P.G.M. van der

    2003-01-01

    The exact role of epidermal fatty acid binding protein (E-FABP) in skin is unknown. A restoration of the barrier function may be associated with an upregulation of E-FABP. Moreover, E-FABP is upregulated in a variety of cells in response to oxidative stress. A recent observation that dithranol induc

  9. Marker-free plasmids for gene therapeutic applications--lack of antibiotic resistance gene substantially improves the manufacturing process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mairhofer, Jürgen; Cserjan-Puschmann, Monika; Striedner, Gerald; Nöbauer, Katharina; Razzazi-Fazeli, Ebrahim; Grabherr, Reingard

    2010-04-01

    Plasmid DNA is being considered as a promising alternative to traditional protein vaccines or viral delivery methods for gene therapeutic applications. DNA-based products are highly flexible, stable, are easily stored and can be manufactured on a large scale. Although, much safer than viral approaches, issues have been raised with regard to safety due to possible integration of plasmid DNA into cellular DNA or spread of antibiotic resistance genes to intestinal bacteria by horizontal gene transfer. Accordingly, there is interest in methods for the production of plasmid DNA that lacks the antibiotic resistance gene to further improve their safety profile. Here, we report for the first time the gram-scale manufacturing of a minimized plasmid that is devoid of any additional sequence elements on the plasmid backbone, and merely consists of the target expression cassette and the bacterial origin of replication. Three different host/vector combinations were cultivated in a fed-batch fermentation process, comparing the progenitor strain JM108 to modified strains JM108murselect, hosting a plasmid either containing the aminoglycoside phosphotransferase which provides kanamycin resistance, or a marker-free variant of the same plasmid. The metabolic load exerted by expression of the aminoglycoside phosphotransferase was monitored by measuring ppGpp- and cAMP-levels. Moreover, we revealed that JM108 is deficient of the Lon protease and thereby refined the genotype of JM108. The main consequences of Lon-deficiency with regard to plasmid DNA production are discussed herein. Additionally, we found that the expression of the aminoglycoside phosphotransferase, conferring resistance to kanamycin, was very high in plasmid DNA producing processes that actually inclusion bodies were formed. Thereby, a severe metabolic load on the host cell was imposed, detrimental for overall plasmid yield. Hence, deleting the antibiotic resistance gene from the vector backbone is not only beneficial

  10. Cellular resilience: 5-HT neurons in Tph2(-/-) mice retain normal firing behavior despite the lack of brain 5-HT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montalbano, Alberto; Waider, Jonas; Barbieri, Mario; Baytas, Ozan; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Corradetti, Renato; Mlinar, Boris

    2015-11-01

    Considerable evidence links dysfunction of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) transmission to neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders characterized by compromised "social" cognition and emotion regulation. It is well established that the brain 5-HT system is under autoregulatory control by its principal transmitter 5-HT via its effects on activity and expression of 5-HT system-related proteins. To examine whether 5-HT itself also has a crucial role in the acquisition and maintenance of characteristic rhythmic firing of 5-HT neurons, we compared their intrinsic electrophysiological properties in mice lacking brain 5-HT, i.e. tryptophan hydroxylase-2 null mice (Tph2(-/-)) and their littermates, Tph2(+/-) and Tph2(+/+), by using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings in a brainstem slice preparation and single unit recording in anesthetized animals. We report that the active properties of dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) 5-HT neurons in vivo (firing rate magnitude and variability; the presence of spike doublets) and in vitro (firing in response to depolarizing current pulses; action potential shape) as well as the resting membrane potential remained essentially unchanged across Tph2 genotypes. However, there were subtle differences in subthreshold properties, most notably, an approximately 25% higher input conductance in Tph2(-/-) mice compared with Tph2(+/-) and Tph2(+/+) littermates (p<0.0001). This difference may at least in part be a consequence of slightly bigger size of the DRN 5-HT neurons in Tph2(-/-) mice (approximately 10%, p<0.0001). Taken together, these findings show that 5-HT neurons acquire and maintain their signature firing properties independently of the presence of their principal neurotransmitter 5-HT, displaying an unexpected functional resilience to complete brain 5-HT deficiency. PMID:26409296

  11. Lack of the pattern recognition molecule mannose-binding lectin increases susceptibility to influenza A virus infection

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    Hartshorn Kevan L

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mannose-binding lectin (MBL, a pattern recognition innate immune molecule, inhibits influenza A virus infection in vitro. MBL deficiency due to gene polymorphism in humans has been associated with infection susceptibility. These clinical observations were confirmed by animal model studies, in which mice genetically lacking MBL were susceptible to certain pathogens, including herpes simplex virus 2. Results We demonstrate that MBL is present in the lung of naïve healthy wild type (WT mice and that MBL null mice are more susceptible to IAV infection. Administration of recombinant human MBL (rhMBL reverses the infection phenotype, confirming that the infection susceptibility is MBL-mediated. The anti-viral mechanisms of MBL include activation of the lectin complement pathway and coagulation, requiring serum factors. White blood cells (WBCs in the lung increase in WT mice compared with MBL null mice on day 1 post-infection. In contrast, apoptotic macrophages (MΦs are two-fold higher in the lung of MBL null mice compared with WT mice. Furthermore, MBL deficient macrophages appear to be susceptible to apoptosis in vitro. Lastly, soluble factors, which are associated with lung injury, are increased in the lungs of MBL null mice during IAV infection. These results suggest that MBL plays a key role against IAV infection. Conclusion MBL plays a key role in clearing IAV and maintaining lung homeostasis. In addition, our findings also suggest that MBL deficiency maybe a risk factor in IAV infection and MBL may be a useful adjunctive therapy for IAV infection.

  12. Promoter methylation of CDKN2A and lack of p16 expression characterize patients with hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The product of CDKN2A, p16 is an essential regulator of the cell cycle controlling the entry into the S-phase. Herein, we evaluated CDKN2A promoter methylation and p16 protein expression for the differentiation of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) from other liver tumors. Tumor and corresponding non-tumor liver tissue samples were obtained from 85 patients with liver tumors. CDKN2A promoter methylation was studied using MethyLight technique and methylation-specific PCR (MSP). In the MethyLight analysis, samples with ≥ 4% of PMR (percentage of methylated reference) were regarded as hypermethylated. p16 expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry in tissue sections (n = 148) obtained from 81 patients using an immunoreactivity score (IRS) ranging from 0 (no expression) to 6 (strong expression). Hypermethylation of the CDKN2A promoter was found in 23 HCCs (69.7%; mean PMR = 42.34 ± 27.8%), six (20.7%; mean PMR = 31.85 ± 18%) liver metastases and in the extralesional tissue of only one patient. Using MSP, 32% of the non-tumor (n = 85), 70% of the HCCs, 40% of the CCCs and 24% of the liver metastases were hypermethylated. Correspondingly, nuclear p16 expression was found immunohistochemically in five (10.9%, mean IRS = 0.5) HCCs, 23 (92%; mean IRS = 4.9) metastases and only occasionally in hepatocytes of non-lesional liver tissues (mean IRS = 1.2). The difference of CDKN2A-methylation and p16 protein expression between HCCs and liver metastases was statistically significant (p < 0.01, respectively). Promoter methylation of CDKN2A gene and lack of p16 expression characterize patients with HCC

  13. Lack of adequate appreciation of physical exercise's complexities can pre-empt appropriate design and interpretation in scientific discovery.

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    Booth, F W; Laye, M J

    2009-12-01

    Two major issues are presented. First, a challenge is made by us that a misunderstanding of physiology has led to incomplete or wrong functional designations of genes in some cases. Normal physiological processes are dynamic, integrated and periodic, and, therefore, it is difficult to define normal physiological function by looking at a single time point or single process in a non-stressed subject. The ability of the organism to successfully respond to homeostatic disruptions defines normal physiology. Genes were selected for survival and to appropriately respond to stresses, such as physical activity. Omitting gene functions by restricting them to non-stressful conditions could lead to less than optimal primary preventions, treatments and cures for diseases. Physical exercise, as a stressor, should be used to better demonstrate the complete functional classifications of some genes. Second, the challenge from others of an 'exercise pill' as a mimetic of natural physical activity will be shown to be lacking a scientific basis. The concept of an 'exercise pill'/'exercise mimetic' demonstrates an inadequate appreciation of the complexities in integrating cell, tissue, organ and systems during both acute disruptions in homeostasis by a single bout of exercise, and longer-term chronic adaptations to different types of exercise such as resistance and endurance. It is our opinion that those promoting drugs targeting a single or few molecules should not redefine the term 'exercise' and exercise concepts in an attempt to sensationalize findings. Additionally, the scientific criteria that the authors demand to be met to legitimately use the terms 'exercise pill' and 'exercise mimetic' are presented. PMID:19723782

  14. Modulation of inflammatory reactions by surgical trauma: lack of relationship with corticosteroid secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnaert, P; Van Geertruyden, N; DePauw, L; Van Gansbeke, B; Bournonville, B; DeCoster-Gervy, C

    1989-01-01

    The effect of surgery on inflammation was studied in male Wistar R/A rats using the carrageenin-induced edema model. Swelling of the paw was measured in standardized arbitrary units 2, 4, and 6 hr after a subcutaneous injection of carrageenin iota in the subplantar region of the right hind limb. It was significantly depressed in rats submitted to laparotomy (5.0 +/- 0.4, 8.0 +/- 1.0, 13.7 +/- 1.9) when compared with controls simply anesthetized with ether (6.2 +/- 0.5, 15.5 +/- 1.2, 23.7 +/- 0.6) (p less than 0.001 at 4 and 6 hr). This inhibition lasted for at least 24 hr and was also observed after amputation, although in these experiments, the difference between operated animals and controls was not significant. Alterations of the inflammatory cellular infiltrate were studied using polyurethane sponges soaked with carrageenin lambda implanted subcutaneously in control animals and rats undergoing laparotomy or amputation. The total number of cells recovered from these sponges 5 hr after implantation was smaller in operated rats (2.9 +/- 0.4 x 10(6) cells after laparotomy, 3.1 +/- 1.0 x 10(6) cells after amputation) when compared with controls (11.1 +/- 1.9 x 10(6) cells and 10.3 +/- 1.3 x 10(6) cells) (p less than 0.001 for laparotomy and p less than 0.005 for amputation). The inhibitory effect of operative trauma was not abolished by bilateral adrenalectomy performed 12 days before laparotomy. In rats, surgical trauma induces a depression of remote inflammatory reactions. This phenomenon is not related to increased corticosterone levels. PMID:2773504

  15. High bone mass in mice lacking Cx37 because of defective osteoclast differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco-Costa, Rafael; Hassan, Iraj; Reginato, Rejane D; Davis, Hannah M; Bruzzaniti, Angela; Allen, Matthew R; Plotkin, Lilian I

    2014-03-21

    Connexin (Cx) proteins are essential for cell differentiation, function, and survival in all tissues with Cx43 being the most studied in bone. We now report that Cx37, another member of the connexin family of proteins, is expressed in osteoclasts, osteoblasts, and osteocytes. Mice with global deletion of Cx37 (Cx37(-/-)) exhibit higher bone mineral density, cancellous bone volume, and mechanical strength compared with wild type littermates. Osteoclast number and surface are significantly lower in bone of Cx37(-/-) mice. In contrast, osteoblast number and surface and bone formation rate in bones from Cx37(-/-) mice are unchanged. Moreover, markers of osteoblast activity ex vivo and in vivo are similar to those of Cx37(+/+) littermates. sRANKL/M-CSF treatment of nonadherent Cx37(-/-) bone marrow cells rendered a 5-fold lower level of osteoclast differentiation compared with Cx37(+/+) cell cultures. Further, Cx37(-/-) osteoclasts are smaller and have fewer nuclei per cell. Expression of RANK, TRAP, cathepsin K, calcitonin receptor, matrix metalloproteinase 9, NFATc1, DC-STAMP, ATP6v0d1, and CD44, markers of osteoclast number, fusion, or activity, is lower in Cx37(-/-) osteoclasts compared with controls. In addition, nonadherent bone marrow cells from Cx37(-/-) mice exhibit higher levels of markers for osteoclast precursors, suggesting altered osteoclast differentiation. The reduction of osteoclast differentiation is associated with activation of Notch signaling. We conclude that Cx37 is required for osteoclast differentiation and fusion, and its absence leads to arrested osteoclast maturation and high bone mass in mice. These findings demonstrate a previously unrecognized role of Cx37 in bone homeostasis that is not compensated for by Cx43 in vivo. PMID:24509854

  16. High Bone Mass in Mice Lacking Cx37 Because of Defective Osteoclast Differentiation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco-Costa, Rafael; Hassan, Iraj; Reginato, Rejane D.; Davis, Hannah M.; Bruzzaniti, Angela; Allen, Matthew R.; Plotkin, Lilian I.

    2014-01-01

    Connexin (Cx) proteins are essential for cell differentiation, function, and survival in all tissues with Cx43 being the most studied in bone. We now report that Cx37, another member of the connexin family of proteins, is expressed in osteoclasts, osteoblasts, and osteocytes. Mice with global deletion of Cx37 (Cx37−/−) exhibit higher bone mineral density, cancellous bone volume, and mechanical strength compared with wild type littermates. Osteoclast number and surface are significantly lower in bone of Cx37−/− mice. In contrast, osteoblast number and surface and bone formation rate in bones from Cx37−/− mice are unchanged. Moreover, markers of osteoblast activity ex vivo and in vivo are similar to those of Cx37+/+ littermates. sRANKL/M-CSF treatment of nonadherent Cx37−/− bone marrow cells rendered a 5-fold lower level of osteoclast differentiation compared with Cx37+/+ cell cultures. Further, Cx37−/− osteoclasts are smaller and have fewer nuclei per cell. Expression of RANK, TRAP, cathepsin K, calcitonin receptor, matrix metalloproteinase 9, NFATc1, DC-STAMP, ATP6v0d1, and CD44, markers of osteoclast number, fusion, or activity, is lower in Cx37−/− osteoclasts compared with controls. In addition, nonadherent bone marrow cells from Cx37−/− mice exhibit higher levels of markers for osteoclast precursors, suggesting altered osteoclast differentiation. The reduction of osteoclast differentiation is associated with activation of Notch signaling. We conclude that Cx37 is required for osteoclast differentiation and fusion, and its absence leads to arrested osteoclast maturation and high bone mass in mice. These findings demonstrate a previously unrecognized role of Cx37 in bone homeostasis that is not compensated for by Cx43 in vivo. PMID:24509854

  17. Lack of a Functioning P2X7 Receptor Leads to Increased Susceptibility to Toxoplasmic Ileitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine M Miller

    Full Text Available Oral infection of C57BL/6J mice with the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii leads to a lethal inflammatory ileitis.Mice lacking the purinergic receptor P2X7R are acutely susceptible to toxoplasmic ileitis, losing significantly more weight than C57BL/6J mice and exhibiting much greater intestinal inflammatory pathology in response to infection with only 10 cysts of T. gondii. This susceptibility is not dependent on the ability of P2X7R-deficient mice to control the parasite, which they accomplish just as efficiently as C57BL/6J mice. Rather, susceptibility is associated with elevated ileal concentrations of pro-inflammatory cytokines, reactive nitrogen intermediates and altered regulation of elements of NFκB activation in P2X7R-deficient mice.Our data support the thesis that P2X7R, a well-documented activator of pro-inflammatory cytokine production, also plays an important role in the regulation of intestinal inflammation.

  18. Development of botanical principles for clinical use in cancer: where are we lacking?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poojari, R J; Patil, A G; Gota, V S

    2012-01-01

    Development of drugs from plant sources (botanicals) for the treatment of cancer has not been successful in India, despite a plethora of medicinal plants and an equal number of experiments demonstrating anti-cancer activity of plant principles in vitro. There are several pitfalls in our approach to botanical drug development. Foremost is the lack of industry-academia collaborations in this field. Research goals in Indian academic institutions are generally short-term and mostly aimed at fulfilling the minimum requirements of a doctoral/MD or MPharm thesis. Secondly, quality assurance of herbal formulations is difficult to achieve and good manufacturing practices are expensive to implement. This could introduce bias during the biological evaluation of botanicals. A systematic approach covering a wide range of investigations including but not limited to mechanistic studies, potential herb-drug interactions, pharmacokinetics and bioavailability could help in the optimization of herbal formulations in the preclinical stage of development before they can be considered for clinical trials. Government initiatives such as Ayurveda, Unani, Siddha and Homeopathic have encouraged research in these areas, but are insufficient to promote focused and aggressive evaluation of potential herbs. Particular emphasis should be given to clinical pharmacokinetics, drug interactions and clinical trials in specific cancers for the evaluation of dosage, safety, efficacy and concomitant use with chemotherapy. Only such policies can result in meaningful evaluation of botanicals for cancer therapy.

  19. Polymorphisms in the selenoprotein S gene: lack of association with autoimmune inflammatory diseases

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    Díaz-Rubio Manuel

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Selenoprotein S (SelS protects the functional integrity of the endoplasmic reticulum against the deleterious effects of metabolic stress. SEPS1/SelS polymorphisms have been involved in the increased release of pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL-1β, tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α and IL-6 in macrophages. We aimed at investigating the role of the SEPS1 variants previously associated with higher plasma levels of these cytokines and of the SEPS1 haplotypes in the susceptibility to develop immune-mediated diseases characterized by an inflammatory component. Results Six polymorphisms distributed through the SEPS1 gene (rs11327127, rs28665122, rs4965814, rs12917258, rs4965373 and rs2101171 were genotyped in more than two thousand patients suffering from type 1 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis or inflammatory bowel diseases and 550 healthy controls included in the case-control study. Conclusion Lack of association of SEPS1 polymorphisms or haplotypes precludes a major role of this gene increasing predisposition to these inflammatory diseases.

  20. Hypnotic drug risks of mortality, infection, depression, and cancer: but lack of benefit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kripke, Daniel F.

    2016-01-01

    This is a review of hypnotic drug risks and benefits, reassessing and updating advice presented to the Commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration (United States FDA). Almost every month, new information appears about the risks of hypnotics (sleeping pills). This review includes new information on the growing USA overdose epidemic, eight new epidemiologic studies of hypnotics’ mortality not available for previous compilations, and new emphasis on risks of short-term hypnotic prescription. The most important risks of hypnotics include excess mortality, especially overdose deaths, quiet deaths at night, infections, cancer, depression and suicide, automobile crashes, falls, and other accidents, and hypnotic-withdrawal insomnia. The short-term use of one-two prescriptions is associated with greater risk per dose than long-term use. Hypnotics are usually prescribed without approved indication, most often with specific contraindications, but even when indicated, there is little or no benefit. The recommended doses objectively increase sleep little if at all, daytime performance is often made worse, not better, and the lack of general health benefits is commonly misrepresented in advertising. Treatments such as the cognitive behavioral treatment of insomnia and bright light treatment of circadian rhythm disorders might offer safer and more effective alternative approaches to insomnia. PMID:27303633

  1. Regional Development and Decentralization – two Options to Overcome Lack of Funding

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    Dubravka JURLINA ALIBEGOVIC

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Decentralization can be generally described as a process in which selected functions are assigned to sub-national units. The literature identifies a number of positive consequences of decentralization which all lead to a better satisfaction of citizens’ needs for public services. Although the decentralization process in Croatia started more than ten years ago, it has not yet been completed. While leading to a new allocation of authorities and responsibilities to local government units, the level of fiscal decentralization remained lower than in the EU countries.In this paper we analyze the fiscal capacity of local government units to provide an insight into the main problems of decentralization in Croatia. We show that most local government units have very low fiscal capacity, which is insufficient for financing basic public functions with their own resources. The paper presents the results of a survey relating to the decentralization process conducted among local councilors at the regional level in Croatia. We explore how local councilors at the regional level evaluate different goals of decentralization. With the lack of fiscal capacity in mind, we identify two possible solutions for an optimal provision of public functions. The first one is the level of political will for a joint provision of public functions by different local units, and the second one is a change in the territorial organization of the country. We measure the difference in the attitudes toward these questions across counties.

  2. Lack of protection against gentamicin ototoxicity by auditory conditioning with noise

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    Alex Strose

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Auditory conditioning consists of the pre-exposure to low levels of a potential harmful agent to protect against a subsequent harmful presentation. OBJECTIVE: To confirm if conditioning with an agent different from the used to cause the trauma can also be effective. METHOD: Experimental study with 17 guinea pigs divided as follows: group Som: exposed to 85 dB broadband noise centered at 4 kHz, 30 minutes a day for 10 consecutive days; group Cont: intramuscular administration of gentamicin 160 mg/kg a day for 10 consecutive days; group Expt: conditioned with noise similarly to group Som and, after each noise presentation, received gentamicin similarly to group Cont. The animals were evaluated by distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs, brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEPs and scanning electron microscopy. RESULTS: The animals that were conditioned with noise did not show any protective effect compared to the ones that received only the ototoxic gentamicin administration. This lack of protection was observed functionally and morphologically. CONCLUSION: Conditioning with 85 dB broadband noise, 30 min a day for 10 consecutive days does not protect against an ototoxic gentamicin administration of 160 mg/kg a day for 10 consecutive days in the guinea pig.

  3. Preserved recovery of cardiac function following ischemia-reperfusion in mice lacking SIRT3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koentges, Christoph; Pfeil, Katharina; Meyer-Steenbuck, Maximilian; Lother, Achim; Hoffmann, Michael M; Odening, Katja E; Hein, Lutz; Bode, Christoph; Bugger, Heiko

    2016-01-01

    Lack of the mitochondrial deacetylase sirtuin 3 (SIRT3) impairs mitochondrial function and increases the susceptibility to induction of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore. Because these alterations contribute to myocardial ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury, we hypothesized that SIRT3 deficiency may increase cardiac injury following myocardial IR. Hearts of 10-week-old mice were perfused in the isolated working mode and subjected to 17.5 min of global no-flow ischemia, followed by 30 min of reperfusion. Measurements before ischemia revealed a decrease in cardiac power (-20%) and rate pressure product (-15%) in SIRT3(-/-) mice. Mitochondrial state 3 respiration (-15%), ATP synthesis (-39%), and ATP/O ratios (-29%) were decreased in hearts of SIRT3(-/-) mice. However, percent recovery of cardiac power (WT 94% ± 9%; SIRT3(-/-) 89% ± 9%) and rate pressure product (WT 89% ± 16%; SIRT3(-/-) 96% ± 3%) following IR was similar in both groups. Myocardial infarct size was not increased in SIRT3(-/-) mice following permanent ligation of the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD). Left ventricular pressure and dP/dtmax, and mitochondrial respiration and ATP synthesis were not different between groups following LAD ligation. Thus, despite pre-existing defects in cardiac function and mitochondrial respiratory capacity in SIRT3(-/-) mice, SIRT3 deficiency does not additionally impair cardiac function following IR or following myocardial infarction.

  4. Normal Platelet Integrin Function in Mice Lacking Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Clone-5 (Hic-5.

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    Michael Popp

    Full Text Available Integrin αIIbβ3 plays a central role in the adhesion and aggregation of platelets and thus is essential for hemostasis and thrombosis. Integrin activation requires the transmission of a signal from the small cytoplasmic tails of the α or β subunit to the large extracellular domains resulting in conformational changes of the extracellular domains to enable ligand binding. Hydrogen peroxide-inducible clone-5 (Hic-5, a member of the paxillin family, serves as a focal adhesion adaptor protein associated with αIIbβ3 at its cytoplasmic tails. Previous studies suggested Hic-5 as a novel regulator of integrin αIIbβ3 activation and platelet aggregation in mice. To assess this in more detail, we generated Hic-5-null mice and analyzed activation and aggregation of their platelets in vitro and in vivo. Surprisingly, lack of Hic-5 had no detectable effect on platelet integrin activation and function in vitro and in vivo under all tested conditions. These results indicate that Hic-5 is dispensable for integrin αIIbβ3 activation and consequently for arterial thrombosis and hemostasis in mice.

  5. Lack of correlation of glucose levels in filtered blood plasma to density and conductivity measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, David M; Ash, Stephen R

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this research project was to determine whether the glucose level of a blood plasma sample from a diabetic patient could be predicted by measuring the density and conductivity of ultrafiltrate of plasma created by a 30,000 m.w. cutoff membrane. Conductivity of the plasma filtrate measures electrolyte concentration and should correct density measurements for changes in electrolytes and water concentration. In vitro studies were performed measuring conductivity and density of solutions of varying glucose and sodium chloride concentrations. Plasma from seven hospitalized patients with diabetes was filtered across a 30,000 m.w. cutoff membrane. The filtrate density and conductivity were measured and correlated to glucose levels. In vitro studies confirmed the ability to predict glucose from density and conductivity measurements, in varying concentrations of glucose and saline. In plasma filtrate, the conductivity and density measurements of ultrafiltrate allowed estimation of glucose in some patients with diabetes but not others. The correlation coefficient for the combined patient data was 0.45 which was significant but only explained 20% of the variability in the glucose levels. Individually, the correlation was significant in only two of the seven patients with correlation coefficients of 0.79 and 0.88. The reasons for lack of correlation are not clear, and cannot be explained by generation of idiogenic osmoles, effects of alcohol dehydrogenase, water intake, etc. This combination of physical methods for glucose measurement is not a feasible approach to measuring glucose in plasma filtrate.

  6. A sufficient condition for the lack of cellular convection in a dissipative plasma column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A one-dimensional boundary-value problem of dissipative plasma equilibrium in a cylinder is formulated and analytically solved. As regards the data, axial symmetry and uniformity along the axis of the cylinder are assumed; as regards the solution(s), a given periodicity along the axis of the cylinder is imposed. Viscous stresses and resistance are the dissipation processes taken into account, while a particle source and an externally driven electric field sustain the pressure gradient in the plasma. Plasma density, coefficients of viscosity and resistivity are given smooth functions of the radius. After analytically solving the boundary-value problem, a functional setting of the equations is established and a problem for weak solutions is formulated. The main achievement of the analysis is a rigorous uniqueness and nonlinear stability result for the analytical solution found; since such a solution describes a merely radial flow of the plasma across nested magnetic surfaces, what is derived is a sufficient condition for the lack of cellular convection. Finally, the significance of the physical model introduced in this paper, and herein theoretically analysed, is pointed out in view of possible computational work which might yield valuable insight. (orig.)

  7. Evidence for dynamic network regulation of Drosophila photoreceptor function from mutants lacking the neurotransmitter histamine

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    An eDau

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Synaptic feedback from interneurons to photoreceptors can help to optimize visual information flow by balancing its allocation on retinal pathways under changing light conditions. But little is known about how this critical network operation is regulated dynamically. Here, we investigate this question by comparing signaling properties and performance of wild-type Drosophila R1-R6 photoreceptors to those of the hdcJK910 mutant, which lacks the neurotransmitter histamine and therefore cannot transmit information to interneurons. Recordings show that hdcJK910 photoreceptors sample similar amounts of information from naturalistic stimulation to wild-type photoreceptors, but this information is packaged in smaller responses, especially under bright illumination. Analyses reveal how these altered dynamics primarily resulted from network overload that affected hdcJK910 photoreceptors in two ways. First, the missing inhibitory histamine input to interneurons almost certainly depolarized them irrevocably, which in turn increased their excitatory feedback to hdcJK910 R1-R6s. This tonic excitation depolarized the photoreceptors to artificially high potentials, reducing their operational range. Second, rescuing histamine input to interneurons in hdcJK910 mutant also restored their normal phasic feedback modulation to R1-R6s, causing photoreceptor output to accentuate dynamic intensity differences at bright illumination, similar to the wild-type. These results provide mechanistic explanations of how synaptic feedback connections optimize information packaging in photoreceptor output and novel insight into the operation and design of dynamic network regulation of sensory neurons.

  8. Evidence for Dynamic Network Regulation of Drosophila Photoreceptor Function from Mutants Lacking the Neurotransmitter Histamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dau, An; Friederich, Uwe; Dongre, Sidhartha; Li, Xiaofeng; Bollepalli, Murali K; Hardie, Roger C; Juusola, Mikko

    2016-01-01

    Synaptic feedback from interneurons to photoreceptors can help to optimize visual information flow by balancing its allocation on retinal pathways under changing light conditions. But little is known about how this critical network operation is regulated dynamically. Here, we investigate this question by comparing signaling properties and performance of wild-type Drosophila R1-R6 photoreceptors to those of the hdc (JK910) mutant, which lacks the neurotransmitter histamine and therefore cannot transmit information to interneurons. Recordings show that hdc (JK910) photoreceptors sample similar amounts of information from naturalistic stimulation to wild-type photoreceptors, but this information is packaged in smaller responses, especially under bright illumination. Analyses reveal how these altered dynamics primarily resulted from network overload that affected hdc (JK910) photoreceptors in two ways. First, the missing inhibitory histamine input to interneurons almost certainly depolarized them irrevocably, which in turn increased their excitatory feedback to hdc (JK910) R1-R6s. This tonic excitation depolarized the photoreceptors to artificially high potentials, reducing their operational range. Second, rescuing histamine input to interneurons in hdc (JK910) mutant also restored their normal phasic feedback modulation to R1-R6s, causing photoreceptor output to accentuate dynamic intensity differences at bright illumination, similar to the wild-type. These results provide mechanistic explanations of how synaptic feedback connections optimize information packaging in photoreceptor output and novel insight into the operation and design of dynamic network regulation of sensory neurons. PMID:27047343

  9. Prophylactic platelets in dengue: survey responses highlight lack of an evidence base.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Whitehorn

    Full Text Available Dengue is the most important arboviral infection of humans. Thrombocytopenia is frequently observed in the course of infection and haemorrhage may occur in severe disease. The degree of thrombocytopenia correlates with the severity of infection, and may contribute to the risk of haemorrhage. As a result of this prophylactic platelet transfusions are sometimes advocated for the prevention of haemorrhage. There is currently no evidence to support this practice, and platelet transfusions are costly and sometimes harmful. We conducted a global survey to assess the different approaches to the use of platelets in dengue. Respondents were all physicians involved with the treatment of patients with dengue. Respondents were asked that their answers reflected what they would do if they were the treating physician. We received responses from 306 physicians from 20 different countries. The heterogeneity of the responses highlights the variation in clinical practice and lack of an evidence base in this area and underscores the importance of prospective clinical trials to address this key question in the clinical management of patients with dengue.

  10. Early signs of pathological cognitive aging in mice lacking high-affinity nicotinic receptors.

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    Eleni eKonsolaki

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to address pathological cognitive decline effectively, it is critical to adopt early preventive measures in individuals considered at risk. It is therefore essential to develop approaches that identify such individuals before the onset of irreversible dementia. Α deficient cholinergic system has been consistently implicated as one of the main factors associated with a heightened vulnerability to the aging process. In the present study we used mice lacking high affinity nicotinic receptors (β2-/-, which have been proposed as an animal model of accelerated/premature cognitive aging. Our aim was to identify behavioural signs that could serve as indicators or predictors of impending cognitive decline. We used test batteries in order to assess cognitive functions and additional tasks to investigate spontaneous behaviours, such as species-specific activities and exploration/locomotion in a novel environment. Our data confirm and extend the hypothesis that β2-/- animals exhibit age-related cognitive impairments, manifested in both spatial learning and recognition memory tasks. In addition, we reveal deficits in spontaneous behaviour and habituation processes earlier in life. To our knowledge, this is the first study to perform an extensive behavioural examination of an animal model of premature cognitive aging, and our results suggest that β2-nAChR dependent cognitive deterioration progressively evolves from initial subtle behavioural changes to global dementia due to the combined effect of the neuropathology and aging.

  11. Postmortem carisoprodol and meprobamate concentrations in blood and liver: lack of significant redistribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntyre, Iain M; Sherrard, James; Lucas, Jonathan

    2012-04-01

    Carisoprodol is a therapeutic and occasionally abused centrally acting muscle relaxant. We compare central blood and liver concentrations of carisoprodol and the metabolite meprobamate to concentrations in peripheral blood in 11 medical examiner cases. Specimens were initially screened for alcohol and simple volatiles by gas chromatography (GC)-flame ionization detection headspace analysis, enzyme-linked immunosorbent array for drugs of abuse, and therapeutic drugs by GC-mass spectrometry (MS). Carisoprodol, when detected by the therapeutic drug screen, was confirmed and quantified by a specific GC-MS procedure. The results suggest that when ingested with other medications, carisoprodol may be a contributing factor in death, even when present at therapeutic concentrations. Considering the cases studied, together with previously published therapeutic and fatal concentrations, blood carisoprodol concentrations greater than 15 mg/L and liver concentrations greater than 50 mg/kg may be considered excessive and potentially fatal. Carisoprodol central blood to peripheral blood ratios averaged 1.31 + 0.33 (mean ± standard deviation), and liver to peripheral blood, 2.83 ± 1.51. Meprobamate central blood to peripheral blood ratios averaged 0.92 ± 0.22, and liver to peripheral blood, 1.25 ± 0.69. The low liver to peripheral blood ratio (less than 5), taken together with the low central blood to peripheral blood ratio, is an indicator that both carisoprodol and meprobamate lack the potential to exhibit postmortem redistribution. PMID:22417833

  12. Postprandial Hypotension due to a Lack of Sympathetic Compensation in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yumoto,Akihisa

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Postprandial hypotension is an important hemodynamic abnormality in diabetes mellitus, but few reports are available on the relationship between autonomic dysfunction and postprandial hypotension. Ten diabetic patients and 10 healthy volunteers were recruited for this study. Postural blood pressure and heart rate changes were measured before lunch, and then the hemodynamic responses to a standardized meal were investigated. Holter electrocardiogram (ECG monitoring was conducted for assessing spectral powers and time-domain parameters of RR variations. Postural changes from the supine to the upright position decreased the systolic blood pressure of the diabetics from 133(+-16 to 107(+-20 mmHg (p<0.01, but did not decrease the systolic blood pressure of the controls. The heart rate remained constant in the diabetics but was increased in the controls. Food ingestion decreased systolic blood pressure in the diabetics, with a maximum reduction of 25(+-5 mmHg. This decrease was not associated with any changes in the ratio of low frequency to high frequency, and yet the heart rate remained almost constant. Indexes involving parasympathetic tone were not affected. Food ingestion did not affect blood pressure in the control group. These findings suggest that lack of compensatory sympathetic activation is a factor contributing to postprandial hypotension in diabetics, and that parasympathetic drive does not make a significant contribution to this condition.

  13. Falling Through the Cracks: Lack of Health Insurance Among Elderly Foreign- and Native-Born Blacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Karyn A; London, Andrew S

    2015-10-01

    Little research examines lack of health insurance among elderly Black immigrants in the US. We use data from the 2008 American Community Survey to describe variation in insurance coverage and conduct multivariate logistic regression analyses of uninsurance. Among elderly Blacks, 1.7% of the US-born were uninsured, compared to 8.4% of the Latin American and Caribbean-born, 23.2% of the African-born, and 9.3% of those born in other regions. In multivariate models, relative to the US-born, the odds of being uninsured were significantly higher among each immigrant group. Among immigrants, the odds of being uninsured were 3.80 times higher among African-born than Latin American and Caribbean-born immigrants net of demographic and socioeconomic controls. This difference was explained by the inclusion of either year of immigration or length of residence. Relative to Latin America and Caribbean-born immigrants, the odds of being uninsured were significantly higher among immigrants from "other" regions only in the model that included the immigration-related variables. This suppression effect was evident when either length of residence or citizenship was controlled. Recently-arrived, elderly Black immigrants fall through the cracks of insurance coverage. Results are discussed in relation to public and private safety net options. PMID:25294416

  14. A Large and Phylogenetically Diverse Class of Type 1 Opsins Lacking a Canonical Retinal Binding Site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Erin A; Yao, Andrew I; Seitzer, Phillip M; Kind, Tobias; Wang, Ting; Eigenheer, Rich; Shao, Katie S Y; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Facciotti, Marc T

    2016-01-01

    Opsins are photosensitive proteins catalyzing light-dependent processes across the tree of life. For both microbial (type 1) and metazoan (type 2) opsins, photosensing depends upon covalent interaction between a retinal chromophore and a conserved lysine residue. Despite recent discoveries of potential opsin homologs lacking this residue, phylogenetic dispersal and functional significance of these abnormal sequences have not yet been investigated. We report discovery of a large group of putatively non-retinal binding opsins, present in a number of fungal and microbial genomes and comprising nearly 30% of opsins in the Halobacteriacea, a model clade for opsin photobiology. We report phylogenetic analyses, structural modeling, genomic context analysis and biochemistry, to describe the evolutionary relationship of these recently described proteins with other opsins, show that they are expressed and do not bind retinal in a canonical manner. Given these data, we propose a hypothesis that these abnormal opsin homologs may represent a novel family of sensory opsins which may be involved in taxis response to one or more non-light stimuli. If true, this finding would challenge our current understanding of microbial opsins as a light-specific sensory family, and provides a potential analogy with the highly diverse signaling capabilities of the eukaryotic G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), of which metazoan type 2 opsins are a light-specific sub-clade. PMID:27327432

  15. A Large and Phylogenetically Diverse Class of Type 1 Opsins Lacking a Canonical Retinal Binding Site.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin A Becker

    Full Text Available Opsins are photosensitive proteins catalyzing light-dependent processes across the tree of life. For both microbial (type 1 and metazoan (type 2 opsins, photosensing depends upon covalent interaction between a retinal chromophore and a conserved lysine residue. Despite recent discoveries of potential opsin homologs lacking this residue, phylogenetic dispersal and functional significance of these abnormal sequences have not yet been investigated. We report discovery of a large group of putatively non-retinal binding opsins, present in a number of fungal and microbial genomes and comprising nearly 30% of opsins in the Halobacteriacea, a model clade for opsin photobiology. We report phylogenetic analyses, structural modeling, genomic context analysis and biochemistry, to describe the evolutionary relationship of these recently described proteins with other opsins, show that they are expressed and do not bind retinal in a canonical manner. Given these data, we propose a hypothesis that these abnormal opsin homologs may represent a novel family of sensory opsins which may be involved in taxis response to one or more non-light stimuli. If true, this finding would challenge our current understanding of microbial opsins as a light-specific sensory family, and provides a potential analogy with the highly diverse signaling capabilities of the eukaryotic G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs, of which metazoan type 2 opsins are a light-specific sub-clade.

  16. Lack of efficacy of music to improve sleep: a polysomnographic and quantitative EEG analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazic, Stanley E; Ogilvie, Robert D

    2007-03-01

    An increasing number of studies have been examining non-pharmacological methods to improve the quality of sleep, including the use of music and other types of auditory stimulation. While many of these studies have found significant results, they suffer from a combination of subjective self-report measures as the primary outcome, a lack of proper controls, often combine music with some type of relaxation therapy, or do not randomise subjects to control and treatment conditions. It is therefore difficult to assess the efficacy of music to induce or improve sleep. The present study therefore examined the effects of music using standard polysomnographic measures and quantitative analysis of the electroencephalogram, along with subjective ratings of sleep quality. In addition, a tones condition was used to compare any effects of music with the effects of general auditory stimulation. Using a counter-balanced within-subjects design, the music was not significantly better than the tones or control conditions in improving sleep onset latency, sleep efficiency, wake time after sleep onset, or percent slow wave sleep, as determined by objective physiological criteria. PMID:17123654

  17. Lack of host-dependent genetic structure in ectoparasites of Calonectris shearwaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Díaz, E; González-Solís, J; Peinado, M A; Page, R D M

    2007-12-01

    We compared patterns of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) differentiation in three host-specific lice (Halipeurus abnormis, Austromenopon echinatum and Saemundssonia peusi) and one generalist flea (Xenopsylla gratiosa), parasitizing 22 colonies of Cory's and Cape Verde shearwater (Calonectris). The shearwater hosts show distinct phylogeographic structure corresponding to the three taxa Calonectris d. diomedea, C. d. borealis, and C. edwardsii. The host-specific lice appeared undifferentiated among the three Calonectris taxa, whereas the more generalist flea displayed significant levels of population differentiation. Neither genetic distances among host populations, nor their spatial distribution explained the patterns of genetic variability observed in the ectoparasites. The lack of differentiation among lice is unexpected, given that previous work has found evidence of cospeciation between procellariiform seabirds and their lice, and lice typically have an elevated rate of mtDNA evolution with respect to their hosts. Our results suggest that either rates of evolution in seabird lice are not always as high as previously thought, or that the magnitude of movement of lice between seabird hosts has been substantially underestimated. PMID:18028307

  18. Compost Grown Agaricus bisporus Lacks the Ability to Degrade and Consume Highly Substituted Xylan Fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurak, Edita; Patyshakuliyeva, Aleksandrina; de Vries, Ronald P; Gruppen, Harry; Kabel, Mirjam A

    2015-01-01

    The fungus Agaricus bisporus is commercially grown for the production of edible mushrooms. This cultivation occurs on compost, but not all of this substrate is consumed by the fungus. To determine why certain fractions remain unused, carbohydrate degrading enzymes, water-extracted from mushroom-grown compost at different stages of mycelium growth and fruiting body formation, were analyzed for their ability to degrade a range of polysaccharides. Mainly endo-xylanase, endo-glucanase, β-xylosidase and β-glucanase activities were determined in the compost extracts obtained during mushroom growth. Interestingly, arabinofuranosidase activity able to remove arabinosyl residues from doubly substituted xylose residues and α-glucuronidase activity were not detected in the compost enzyme extracts. This correlates with the observed accumulation of arabinosyl and glucuronic acid substituents on the xylan backbone in the compost towards the end of the cultivation. Hence, it was concluded that compost grown A. bisporus lacks the ability to degrade and consume highly substituted xylan fragments. PMID:26237450

  19. Response spectrum of seismic design code for zones lack of near-fault strong earthquake records

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xin-le; DOU Hui-juan; ZHU Xi; SUN Jian-gang

    2007-01-01

    It was shown from the study on the recently near-fault earthquake ground motions that the near-fault effects were seldom considered in the existing Chinese seismic code. Referring to the UBC97 design concept for near-fault factors, based on the collected world-widely free-site records of near-fault earthquakes ground motions classified by earthquake magnitude and site condition, the attenuation relationship expressions of the acceleration spectrum demand at the key points within the long period and moderate period were established in term of the earthquake magnitude and the site condition. Furthermore, the near-fault factors' expressions about the earthquake magnitude and the fault distance were deduced for the area lack of near-fault strong earthquake records. Based on the current Chinese Building Seismic Design Code, the near-fault effect factors and the modified design spectral curves, which were valuable for the seismic design, were proposed to analyze the seismic response of structures.

  20. A systematic literature search on psychological first aid: lack of evidence to develop guidelines.

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    Tessa Dieltjens

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Providing psychological first aid (PFA is generally considered to be an important element in preliminary care of disaster victims. Using the best available scientific basis for courses and educational materials, the Belgian Red Cross-Flanders wants to ensure that its volunteers are trained in the best way possible. OBJECTIVE: To identify effective PFA practices, by systematically reviewing the evidence in existing guidelines, systematic reviews and individual studies. METHODS: Systematic literature searches in five bibliographic databases (MEDLINE, PsycINFO, The Cochrane Library, PILOTS and G-I-N were conducted from inception to July 2013. RESULTS: Five practice guidelines were included which were found to vary in the development process (AGREE II score 20-53% and evidence base used. None of them provides solid evidence concerning the effectiveness of PFA practices. Additionally, two systematic reviews of PFA were found, both noting a lack of studies on PFA. A complementary search for individual studies, using a more sensitive search strategy, identified 11 237 references of which 102 were included for further full-text examination, none of which ultimately provides solid evidence concerning the effectiveness of PFA practices. CONCLUSION: The scientific literature on psychological first aid available to date, does not provide any evidence about the effectiveness of PFA interventions. Currently it is impossible to make evidence-based guidelines about which practices in psychosocial support are most effective to help disaster and trauma victims.

  1. Lack of evidence for metabolism of p-phenylenediamine by human hepatic cytochrome P450 enzymes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    p-Phenylenediamine (PPD) is a widely used ingredient in permanent hair dyes; however, little has been published on its metabolism, especially with respect to hepatic cytochrome P450 (CYP)-mediated oxidation. This is regarded as a key step in the activation of carcinogenic arylamines that ultimately leads to the development of bladder cancer. Most epidemiology studies show no significant association between personal use of hair dyes and bladder cancer, but one recent study reported an increased risk of bladder cancer in women who were frequent users of permanent hair dyes. The aim of the present study was to use intact human hepatocytes, human liver microsomes, and heterologously expressed human CYPs to determine whether PPD is metabolised by hepatic CYPs to form an N-hydroxylamine. p-Phenylenediamine was N-acetylated by human hepatocytes to form N-acetylated metabolites, but there was no evidence for the formation of mono-oxygenated metabolites or for enzyme-mediated covalent binding of 14C-PPD to microsomal protein. In contrast, 2-aminofluorene underwent CYP-mediated metabolism to ≥4 different hydroxylated metabolites. The lack of evidence for hepatic CYP-mediated metabolism of PPD is inconsistent with the hypothesis that this compound plays a causal role in the development of bladder cancer via a mode of action involving hepatic metabolism to an N-hydroxyarylamine

  2. Lack of strategy holding: a new pattern of learning deficit in cortical dementias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedet, María J; Lauro-Grotto, Rosapia; Giotti, Chiara

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate, by means of systematic research and qualitative data analysis, the presence, among a group of patients with fronto-temporal lobar degeneration of a subgroup that, at variance with the standard pattern, is able to devise and implement learning strategies, but appear impaired at carrying them on from a trial to the next. In order to provide evidence of the existence of a group of patients showing this type of learning disability, that we refer to as lack of strategy holding, we performed a stepwise hierarchical cluster analysis of a set of variables whose scores were selected from the subject's performance at the Test de Aprendizaje Verbal España-Complutense. Results substantiate the segregation of three groups of subjects characterized by the following patterns of performance: normal elderly individuals, who show a quite preserved ability to discover a semantic strategy along the learning trials and to carry it from a trial to the next, patients presenting with a deficit in implementing semantic learning strategies and possibly use of serial and/or phonological strategies to perform the task, and to patients who, although able to generate and implement appropriate learning strategies, appear unable to carry them over the learning trials. The presence of this new pattern raises a few questions that seem worth trying to address.

  3. Modulation of phenolic metabolism under stress conditions in a Lotus japonicus mutant lacking plastidic glutamine synthetase

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    Margarita eGarcía-Calderón

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper was aimed to investigate the possible implications of the lack of plastidic glutamine synthetase (GS2 in phenolic metabolism during stress responses in the model legume Lotus japonicus. Important changes in the transcriptome were detected in a GS2 mutant called Ljgln2-2, compared to the wild type, in response to two separate stress conditions, such as drought or the result of the impairment of the photorespiratory cycle. Detailed transcriptomic analysis showed that the biosynthesis of phenolic compounds was affected in the mutant plants in these two different types of stress situations. For this reason, the genes and metabolites related to this metabolic route were further investigated using a combined approach of gene expression analysis and metabolite profiling. A high induction of the expression of several genes for the biosynthesis of different branches of the phenolic biosynthetic pathway was detected by qRT-PCR. The extent of induction was always higher in Ljgln2-2, probably reflecting the higher stress levels present in this genotype. This was paralleled by accumulation of several kaempferol and quercetine glycosides, some of them described for the first time in L. japonicus, and of high levels of the isoflavonoid vestitol. The results obtained indicate that the absence of GS2 affects different aspects of phenolic metabolism in L .japonicus plants in response to stress.

  4. Prevention of urinary tract infections in nursing homes: lack of evidence-based prescription?

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    Bergman Jenny

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Urinary tract infections (UTIs, including upper and lower symptomatic are the most common infections in nursing homes and prevention may reduce patient suffering, antibiotic use and resistance. The spectre of agents used in preventing UTIs in nursing homes is scarcely documented and the aim of this study was to explore which agents are prescribed for this purpose. Methods We conducted a one-day, point-prevalence study in 44 Norwegian nursing homes during April-May 2006. Nursing home residents prescribed any agent for UTI prophylaxis were included. Information recorded was type of agent and dose, patient age and gender, together with nursing home characteristics. Appropriateness of prophylactic prescribing was evaluated with references to evidence in the literature and current national guidelines. Results The study included 1473 residents. 18% (n = 269 of the residents had at least one agent recorded as prophylaxis of UTI, varying between 0-50% among the nursing homes. Methenamine was used by 48% of residents prescribed prophylaxis, vitamin C by 32%, and cranberry products by 10%. Estrogens were used by 30% but only one third was for vaginal administration. Trimethoprim and nitrofurantoin were used as prophylaxis by 5% and 4%, respectively. Conclusions The agents frequently prescribed to prevent UTIs in Norwegian nursing homes lack documented efficacy including methenamine and vitamin C. Recommended agents like trimethoprim, nitrofurantoin and vaginal estrogens are infrequently used. We conclude that prescribing of prophylactic agents for UTIs in nursing homes is not evidence-based.

  5. Prevention of urinary tract infections in nursing homes: lack of evidence-based prescription?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Urinary tract infections (UTIs, including upper and lower symptomatic) are the most common infections in nursing homes and prevention may reduce patient suffering, antibiotic use and resistance. The spectre of agents used in preventing UTIs in nursing homes is scarcely documented and the aim of this study was to explore which agents are prescribed for this purpose. Methods We conducted a one-day, point-prevalence study in 44 Norwegian nursing homes during April-May 2006. Nursing home residents prescribed any agent for UTI prophylaxis were included. Information recorded was type of agent and dose, patient age and gender, together with nursing home characteristics. Appropriateness of prophylactic prescribing was evaluated with references to evidence in the literature and current national guidelines. Results The study included 1473 residents. 18% (n = 269) of the residents had at least one agent recorded as prophylaxis of UTI, varying between 0-50% among the nursing homes. Methenamine was used by 48% of residents prescribed prophylaxis, vitamin C by 32%, and cranberry products by 10%. Estrogens were used by 30% but only one third was for vaginal administration. Trimethoprim and nitrofurantoin were used as prophylaxis by 5% and 4%, respectively. Conclusions The agents frequently prescribed to prevent UTIs in Norwegian nursing homes lack documented efficacy including methenamine and vitamin C. Recommended agents like trimethoprim, nitrofurantoin and vaginal estrogens are infrequently used. We conclude that prescribing of prophylactic agents for UTIs in nursing homes is not evidence-based. PMID:22040144

  6. Lack of the Lysosomal Membrane Protein, GLMP, in Mice Results in Metabolic Dysregulation in Liver.

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    Xiang Yi Kong

    Full Text Available Ablation of glycosylated lysosomal membrane protein (GLMP, formerly known as NCU-G1 has been shown to cause chronic liver injury which progresses into liver fibrosis in mice. Both lysosomal dysfunction and chronic liver injury can cause metabolic dysregulation. Glmp gt/gt mice (formerly known as Ncu-g1gt/gt mice were studied between 3 weeks and 9 months of age. Body weight gain and feed efficiency of Glmp gt/gt mice were comparable to wild type siblings, only at the age of 9 months the Glmp gt/gt siblings had significantly reduced body weight. Reduced size of epididymal fat pads was accompanied by hepatosplenomegaly in Glmp gt/gt mice. Blood analysis revealed reduced levels of blood glucose, circulating triacylglycerol and non-esterified fatty acids in Glmp gt/gt mice. Increased flux of glucose, increased de novo lipogenesis and lipid accumulation were detected in Glmp gt/gt primary hepatocytes, as well as elevated triacylglycerol levels in Glmp gt/gt liver homogenates, compared to hepatocytes and liver from wild type mice. Gene expression analysis showed an increased expression of genes involved in fatty acid uptake and lipogenesis in Glmp gt/gt liver compared to wild type. Our findings are in agreement with the metabolic alterations observed in other mouse models lacking lysosomal proteins, and with alterations characteristic for advanced chronic liver injury.

  7. Lack of strategy holding: a new pattern of learning deficit in cortical dementias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedet, María J; Lauro-Grotto, Rosapia; Giotti, Chiara

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate, by means of systematic research and qualitative data analysis, the presence, among a group of patients with fronto-temporal lobar degeneration of a subgroup that, at variance with the standard pattern, is able to devise and implement learning strategies, but appear impaired at carrying them on from a trial to the next. In order to provide evidence of the existence of a group of patients showing this type of learning disability, that we refer to as lack of strategy holding, we performed a stepwise hierarchical cluster analysis of a set of variables whose scores were selected from the subject's performance at the Test de Aprendizaje Verbal España-Complutense. Results substantiate the segregation of three groups of subjects characterized by the following patterns of performance: normal elderly individuals, who show a quite preserved ability to discover a semantic strategy along the learning trials and to carry it from a trial to the next, patients presenting with a deficit in implementing semantic learning strategies and possibly use of serial and/or phonological strategies to perform the task, and to patients who, although able to generate and implement appropriate learning strategies, appear unable to carry them over the learning trials. The presence of this new pattern raises a few questions that seem worth trying to address. PMID:19338728

  8. Working principle and application of HEMS with lack of a cold source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi Ping; He Manchao; Meng Li; Chen Chen

    2011-01-01

    With the increase of mining depth,the temperature of the original rock in deep mines increases.High temperature heat hazards at working surfaces and driving faces are becoming increasingly more serious.Given the problem of mine cooling technologies at China and abroad and the actual conditions of a coal mine,we developed HEMS (High Temperature Exchange Machinery System) with inrushing mine water as the source of cold energy.Combined with the characteristics of a shortage of inrushing water in the coal mine.we proposed the Sanhejian model of HEMS with its lack of a cold source.The cooling engineering construction,given the present conditions in the Sanhejian Coal Mine.consisted of two phases.In phase Ⅰ horizontal water circulation was used as cold energy,while phase Ⅱ was the geothermal utilization project.For the key equipment of HEMS-PT or HEMS-T,we provided the operational principle from theory and an actual application.Finally,we analyzed the operational effect of HEMS.After cooling,the temperature at the working face was below 30 ℃,which meets the national regulations.This system opens up new technology to solve the problem of deep mine heat hazards,which makes good sense in energy conservation and pollution reduction,improves the environment and realizes sustainable economic develonment.

  9. Hypnotic drug risks of mortality, infection, depression, and cancer: but lack of benefit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kripke, Daniel F

    2016-01-01

    This is a review of hypnotic drug risks and benefits, reassessing and updating advice presented to the Commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration (United States FDA). Almost every month, new information appears about the risks of hypnotics (sleeping pills). This review includes new information on the growing USA overdose epidemic, eight new epidemiologic studies of hypnotics' mortality not available for previous compilations, and new emphasis on risks of short-term hypnotic prescription. The most important risks of hypnotics include excess mortality, especially overdose deaths, quiet deaths at night, infections, cancer, depression and suicide, automobile crashes, falls, and other accidents, and hypnotic-withdrawal insomnia. The short-term use of one-two prescriptions is associated with greater risk per dose than long-term use. Hypnotics are usually prescribed without approved indication, most often with specific contraindications, but even when indicated, there is little or no benefit. The recommended doses objectively increase sleep little if at all, daytime performance is often made worse, not better, and the lack of general health benefits is commonly misrepresented in advertising. Treatments such as the cognitive behavioral treatment of insomnia and bright light treatment of circadian rhythm disorders might offer safer and more effective alternative approaches to insomnia. PMID:27303633

  10. Xpert MTB/RIF - why the lack of morbidity and mortality impact in intervention trials?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auld, Andrew F; Fielding, Katherine L; Gupta-Wright, Ankur; Lawn, Stephen D

    2016-08-01

    Compared with smear microscopy, the Xpert MTB/RIF assay (Xpert), with superior accuracy and capacity to diagnose rifampicin resistance, has advanced TB diagnostic capability. However, recent trials of Xpert impact have not demonstrated reductions in patient morbidity and mortality. We conducted a narrative review of Xpert impact trials to summarize which patient-relevant outcomes Xpert has improved and explore reasons for no observed morbidity or mortality reductions. We searched PubMed, Google Scholar, Cochrane Library and Embase and identified eight trials meeting inclusion criteria: three individually randomized, three cluster-randomized, and two pre-post trials. In six trials Xpert increased diagnostic yield of bacteriologically-confirmed TB from sputa and in four trials Xpert shortened time to TB treatment. However, all-cause mortality was similar between arms in all six trials reporting this outcome, and the only trial to assess Xpert impact on morbidity reported no impact. Trial characteristics that might explain lack of observed impact on morbidity and mortality include: higher rates of empiric TB treatment in microscopy compared with Xpert arms, enrollment of study populations not comprised exclusively of populations most likely to benefit from Xpert, and health system weaknesses. So far as equipoise exists, future trials that address past limitations are needed to inform Xpert use in resource-limited settings. PMID:27638038

  11. Development of botanical principles for clinical use in cancer: Where are we lacking?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R J Poojari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Development of drugs from plant sources (botanicals for the treatment of cancer has not been successful in India, despite a plethora of medicinal plants and an equal number of experiments demonstrating anti-cancer activity of plant principles in vitro. There are several pitfalls in our approach to botanical drug development. Foremost is the lack of industry-academia collaborations in this field. Research goals in Indian academic institutions are generally short-term and mostly aimed at fulfilling the minimum requirements of a doctoral/MD or MPharm thesis. Secondly, quality assurance of herbal formulations is difficult to achieve and good manufacturing practices are expensive to implement. This could introduce bias during the biological evaluation of botanicals. A systematic approach covering a wide range of investigations including but not limited to mechanistic studies, potential herb-drug interactions, pharmacokinetics and bioavailability could help in the optimization of herbal formulations in the preclinical stage of development before they can be considered for clinical trials. Government initiatives such as Ayurveda, Unani, Siddha and Homeopathic have encouraged research in these areas, but are insufficient to promote focused and aggressive evaluation of potential herbs. Particular emphasis should be given to clinical pharmacokinetics, drug interactions and clinical trials in specific cancers for the evaluation of dosage, safety, efficacy and concomitant use with chemotherapy. Only such policies can result in meaningful evaluation of botanicals for cancer therapy.

  12. A cognitive rehabilitation paradigm effective in male rats lacks efficacy in female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langdon, Kristopher D; Granter-Button, Shirley; Harley, Carolyn W; Moody-Corbett, Frances; Peeling, James; Corbett, Dale

    2014-10-01

    Cognitive dysfunction, as a consequence of dementia, is a significant cause of morbidity lacking efficacious treatment. Females comprise at least half of this demographic but have been vastly underrepresented in preclinical studies. The current study addressed this gap by assessing the protective efficacy of physical exercise and cognitive activity on learning and memory outcomes in a rat model of vascular dementia. Forty ovariectomized Sprague-Dawley rats (∼6 months old) were exposed to either a diet high in saturated fats and refined sugars or standard laboratory chow and underwent either chronic bilateral carotid occlusion or Sham surgery. Learning and memory abilities were evaluated using standard cognitive outcomes over the ensuing 6 months, followed by histologic analyses of hippocampal CA1 neurons. In Experiment 1, we confirmed hypoperfusion-induced cognitive dysfunction using a 2 × 2 (Surgery × Diet) experimental design, without alterations in hippocampal architecture. In Experiment 2, hypoperfused animals were either exposed to alternating days of physical (wheel running) and cognitive activity (modified Hebb-Williams maze) or sedentary housing. In contrast to males, this combination rehabilitation paradigm did not improve cognition or histopathologic outcomes in hypoperfused animals. These findings, highlighting differences between female and male animals, show the necessity of including both sexes in preclinical experimentation.

  13. Lack of CD44 variant 6 expression in rectal cancer invasive front associates with early recurrence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Suvi Tuulia Avoranta; Eija Annika Korkeila; Kari Juhani Syrj(a)nen; Seppo Olavi Pyrh(o)nen; Jari Toivo Tapio Sundstr(o)m

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the prognostic value of CD44 variant 6 (CD44v6),a membranous adhesion molecule,in rectal cancer.METHODS:Altogether,210 rectal cancer samples from 214 patients treated with short-course radiotherapy (RT,n =90),long-course (chemo) RT (n =53) or surgery alone (n =71) were studied with immunohistochemistry for CD44v6.The extent and intensity of membranous and cytoplasmic CD44v6 staining,and the intratumoral membranous staining pattern,were analyzed.RESULTS:Membranous CD44v6 expression was seen in 84% and cytoplasmic expression in 81% of the cases.In 59% of the tumors with membranous CD44v6 expression,the staining pattern in the invasive front was determined as "front-positive" and in 41% as "front-negative".The latter pattern was associated with narrower circumferential margin (P =0.01),infiltrative growth pattern (P < 0.001),and shorter disease-free survival in univariate survival analysis (P =0.022) when compared to the "front-positive" tumors.CONCLUSION:The lack of membranous CD44v6 in the rectal cancer invasive front could be used as a method to identify patients at increased risk for recurrent disease.

  14. Reduced oligodendroglial density in the inferior parietal lobule and lack of insight in schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor M. Vostrikov

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Alterations and deficits of oligodendrocytes reported in the grey and white matter in schizophrenia may contribute to neuronal disconnectivity. Prefrontal-parietal functional disconnections have been implicated in diverse clinical symptoms of schizophrenia, including poor insight. We studied the effects of schizophrenia diagnosis and insight on numerical density (Nv of oligodendrocytes in the inferior parietal lobule (IPL. Methods: Nissl-stained sections from the Stanley "Parietal Collection" from male schizophrenia subjects (n = 24 having poor, fair, or good insight and healthy matched controls (n = 24 were examined. The Nv of oligodendrocytes was estimated in layer 3 of BA 39 and BA 40 of the IPL and in white matter underlying layer 6 by optical dissector method. Results: In BA 39 we found a significant 15% decrease in the Nv of oligodendrocytes in layer 3 in the schizophrenia group. Nv of oligodendrocytes in the poor+fair insight subgroup was 20% lower compared to controls (pR only in the control group. There were no significant group differences in the Nv of oligodendrocytes in BA 40 or in the white matter underlying BA 39/40 areas. Conclusions: Lack of insight in schizophrenia may be associated with a deficit of oligodendroglia in the grey matter of IPL.

  15. Recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus vaccine vectors expressing filovirus glycoproteins lack neurovirulence in nonhuman primates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad E Mire

    Full Text Available The filoviruses, Marburg virus and Ebola virus, cause severe hemorrhagic fever with high mortality in humans and nonhuman primates. Among the most promising filovirus vaccines under development is a system based on recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (rVSV that expresses an individual filovirus glycoprotein (GP in place of the VSV glycoprotein (G. The main concern with all replication-competent vaccines, including the rVSV filovirus GP vectors, is their safety. To address this concern, we performed a neurovirulence study using 21 cynomolgus macaques where the vaccines were administered intrathalamically. Seven animals received a rVSV vector expressing the Zaire ebolavirus (ZEBOV GP; seven animals received a rVSV vector expressing the Lake Victoria marburgvirus (MARV GP; three animals received rVSV-wild type (wt vector, and four animals received vehicle control. Two of three animals given rVSV-wt showed severe neurological symptoms whereas animals receiving vehicle control, rVSV-ZEBOV-GP, or rVSV-MARV-GP did not develop these symptoms. Histological analysis revealed major lesions in neural tissues of all three rVSV-wt animals; however, no significant lesions were observed in any animals from the filovirus vaccine or vehicle control groups. These data strongly suggest that rVSV filovirus GP vaccine vectors lack the neurovirulence properties associated with the rVSV-wt parent vector and support their further development as a vaccine platform for human use.

  16. Lack of mucosal immune reconstitution during prolonged treatment of acute and early HIV-1 infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Mehandru

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: During acute and early HIV-1 infection (AEI, up to 60% of CD4(+ T cells in the lamina propria of the lower gastrointestinal (GI tract are lost as early as 2-4 wk after infection. Reconstitution in the peripheral blood during therapy with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART is well established. However, the extent of immune reconstitution in the GI tract is unknown. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Fifty-four AEI patients and 18 uninfected control participants underwent colonic biopsy. Forty of the 54 AEI patients were followed after initiation of antiretroviral therapy (18 were studied longitudinally with sequential biopsies over a 3-y period after beginning HAART, and 22 were studied cross sectionally after 1-7 y of uninterrupted therapy. Lymphocyte subsets, markers of immune activation and memory in the peripheral blood and GI tract were determined by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry. In situ hybridization was performed in order to identify persistent HIV-1 RNA expression. Of the patients studied, 70% maintained, on average, a 50%-60% depletion of lamina propria lymphocytes despite 1-7 y of HAART. Lymphocytes expressing CCR5 and both CCR5 and CXCR4 were persistently and preferentially depleted. Levels of immune activation in the memory cell population, CD45RO+ HLA-DR+, returned to levels seen in the uninfected control participants in the peripheral blood, but were elevated in the GI tract of patients with persistent CD4+ T cell depletion despite therapy. Rare HIV-1 RNA-expressing cells were detected by in situ hybridization. CONCLUSIONS: Apparently suppressive treatment with HAART during acute and early infection does not lead to complete immune reconstitution in the GI mucosa in the majority of patients studied, despite immune reconstitution in the peripheral blood. Though the mechanism remains obscure, the data suggest that there is either viral or immune-mediated accelerated T cell destruction or, possibly, alterations in T

  17. The Lack, Magill and Bain anaesthetic breathing systems: a direct comparison in spontaneously-breathing anaesthetized adults.

    OpenAIRE

    Humphrey, D.

    1982-01-01

    The performances of the Lack (Mapleson A), Magill (Mapleson A) and Bain (Mapleson D) anaesthetic breathing systems were compared in each of 20 anaesthetized adult patients breathing spontaneously with fresh gas flows of 70 ml kg-1 min-1. In every patient the Lack system caused the least rebreathing, as seen by the lowest inspired and end-expired CO2 tensions using capnography. The Magill caused more rebreathing than the Lack though less than the Bain. Comparative fresh gas flows for each syst...

  18. Sporadic cutaneous angiosarcomas generally lack hypoxia-inducible factor 1alpha: a histologic and immunohistochemical study of 45 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedalthagafi, Malak; Rushing, Elisabeth J; Auerbach, Aaron; Desouki, Mohamed M; Marwaha, Jason; Wang, Zengfeng; Fanburg-Smith, Julie C

    2010-02-01

    solar elastosis in the most evaluable cases. Epithelioid morphology was present in 29% (n = 13) cases. Mild to moderate lymphocytic inflammatory response was noted in 62% (n = 28) cases. CD31 highlighted malignant endothelial cells. SMA (for pericytes) was generally absent. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1alpha was focally positive in cytoplasm of 3 of 18 (17%) cases studied. Treatment and follow-up data were only available on 4 cases: 2 died of disease within 4 years, 2 others had known recurrence within 2 years. Cutaneous angiosarcoma is largely found on the scalp of older individuals. Requirement for diagnosis includes extravascular proliferation of atypical endothelial cells with mitotic activity in vasoformative, solid, and papillary patterns. Absence of SMA can prove extravascular extension of tumor, outside their normal vessel confines. Cutaneous angiosarcoma generally lacks HIF-1alpha expression. Accordingly, the hypoxic response pathway is not thought to be a documentable common mechanism of angiogenesis in this entity. PMID:20123452

  19. Lack of genotoxic potential of acetylated monoglyceride: An alternative plasticiser to phthalates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Alicja; Wedebye, Eva Bay; Niemelä, Jay Russell;

    2011-01-01

    substance and the substances in the training set of the model. The (Q)SAR's prediction was followed by in vitro testing using Salmonella/microsome assay (Ames test) with strains TA 98 and TA 100, with and without metabolic activation. Results: There were no warnings for genotoxic fragments (Ashby......-Tenant rules) and predictions were negative for several assays: Ames test, chromosomal aberration in Chinese hamster lung cells, mouse lymphoma TK cell mutation and unscheduled DNA synthesis in rat hepatocytes. The in vitro Ames test showed that the plasticiser did not induce gene mutations in bacteria....... Presently, an in vivo comet assay to investigate the ability of the plasticiser to induce DNA strand breaks after oral exposure in the liver and kidney of rats is under conduction....

  20. Lack of a Common or Characteristic Cytogenetic Anomaly in Solitary Fibrous Tumor

    OpenAIRE

    Torabi, Alireza; Lele, Subodh M.; DiMaio, Dominick; Pinnt, Jeffrey C.; Hess, Michelle M.; Nelson, Marilu; Bridge, Julia A.

    2008-01-01

    Solitary fibrous tumor is a mesenchymal tumor that was initially described as a pleural-based lesion, but later was discovered in many other locations. The light microscopic appearance of solitary fibrous tumor may overlap with other diagnostic entities; however, consistent tumor cell CD34 immunoreactivity is useful in establishing the diagnosis. Limited data suggest that solitary fibrous tumors are karyotypically diverse; a common or characteristic anomaly has not yet emerged for this entity...