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  1. Lck is involved in interleukin-2 induced proliferation but not cell survival in human T cells through a MAP kinase-independent pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brockdorff, J; Nielsen, M; Kaltoft, K;

    2000-01-01

    found that an IL-2-sensitive, human mycosis fungoides-derived tumor T cell line is Lck negative, and that the IL-2-induced MAP kinase activation is comparable to non-cancerous T cells, although a little delayed in kinetics. An Lck expressing clone was established by transfecting Lck into mycosis...... fungoides tumor T cells, but Lck had no influence on the delayed kinetics of MAP kinase activation, indicating that Lck is not essential for MAP kinase activation in mycosis fungoides tumor T cells or in non-cancerous T cells. Taken together, this indicates that Lck is involved in IL-2-induced proliferation...

  2. Involvement of MAK-1 and MAK-2 MAP kinases in cell wall integrity in Neurospora crassa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamei, Masayuki; Yamashita, Kazuhiro; Takahashi, Masakazu; Fukumori, Fumiyasu; Ichiishi, Akihiko; Fujimura, Makoto

    2016-09-01

    Among three MAPK disruptants of Neurospora crassa, Δmak-1 was sensitive and Δmak-2 was hypersensitive to micafungin, a beta-1,3-glucan synthase inhibitor, than the wild-type or Δos-2 strains. We identified six micafungin-inducible genes that are involved in cell wall integrity (CWI) and found that MAK-1 regulated the transcription of non-anchored cell wall protein gene, ncw-1, and the beta-1,3-endoglucanase gene, bgt-2, whereas MAK-2 controlled the expression of the glycosylhydrolase-like protein gene, gh76-5, and the C4-dicarboxylate transporter gene, tdt-1. Western blotting analysis revealed that, in the wild-type strain, MAK-1 was constitutively phosphorylated from conidial germination to hyphal development. In contrast, the phosphorylation of MAK-2 was growth phase-dependent, and micafungin induced the phosphorylation of unphosphorylated MAK-2. It should be noted that the phosphorylation of MAK-1 was virtually abolished in the Δmak-2 strain, but was significantly induced by micafungin, suggesting functional cross talk between MAK-1 and MAK-2 signalling pathway in CWI. PMID:27268441

  3. Involvement of the mitogen-activated protein (MAP kinase signalling pathway in host cell invasion by Toxoplasma gondii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert-Gangneux F.

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about signalling in Toxoplasma gondii, but it is likely that protein kinases might play a key role in the parasite proliferation, differentiation and probably invasion. We previously characterized Mitogen-Activated Protein (MAP kinases in T. gondii lysates. In this study, cultured cells were tested for their susceptibility to Toxoplasma gondii infection after tachyzoite pretreatment with drugs interfering with AMP kinase activation pathways. Protein kinases inhibitors, i.e. genistein, R031-8220 and PD098059, reduced tachyzoite infectivity by 38 ± 4.5 %, 85.5 ± 9 % and 56 ± 10 %, respectively. Conversely, protein kinases activators, i.e. bombesin and PMA, markedly increased infectivity (by 202 ± 37 % and 258 ± 14 %, respectively. These results suggest that signalling pathways involving PKC and AAAP kinases play a role in host cell invasion by Toxoplasma.

  4. Receptor tyrosine and MAP kinase are involved in effects of H2O2 on interstitial cells of Cajal in murine intestine

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Seok; Yeum, Cheol Ho; Kim, Young Dae; Park, Chan Guk; Kim, Man Yoo; Park, Jong-Seong; Jeong, Han-Seong; Kim, Byung Joo; So, Insuk; Kim, Ki Whan; Jun, Jae Yeoul

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is involved in intestinal motility through changes of smooth muscle activity. However, there is no report as to the modulatory effects of H2O2 on interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC). We investigated the H2O2 effects and signal transductions to determine whether the intestinal motility can be modulated through ICC. We performed whole-cell patch clamp in cultured ICC from murine intestine and molecular analyses. H2O2 hyperpolarized the membrane and inhibited pace...

  5. Paroxetine-induced apoptosis in human osteosarcoma cells: Activation of p38 MAP kinase and caspase-3 pathways without involvement of [Ca2+]i elevation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), a group of antidepressants, are generally used for treatment of various mood and anxiety disorders. There has been much research showing the anti-tumor and cytotoxic activities of some antidepressants; but the detailed mechanisms were unclear. In cultured human osteosarcoma cells (MG63), paroxetine reduced cell viability in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Paroxetine caused apoptosis as assessed by propidium iodide-stained cells and increased caspase-3 activation. Although immunoblotting data revealed that paroxetine could activate the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK), only SB203580 (a p38 MAPK inhibitor) partially prevented cells from apoptosis. Paroxetine also induced [Ca2+]i increases which involved the mobilization of intracellular Ca2+ stored in the endoplasmic reticulum and Ca2+ influx from extracellular medium. However, pretreatment with BAPTA/AM, a Ca2+ chelator, to prevent paroxetine-induced [Ca2+]i increases did not protect cells from death. The results suggest that in MG63 cells, paroxetine caused Ca2+-independent apoptosis via inducing p38 MAPK-associated caspase-3 activation

  6. Fate mapping of dendritic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Ursula Schraml

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs are a heterogeneous group of mononuclear phagocytes with versatile roles in immunity. They are classified predominantly based on phenotypic and functional properties, namely their stellate morphology, expression of the integrin CD11c and major histocompatibility class II molecules, as well as their superior capacity to migrate to secondary lymphoid organs and stimulate naïve T cells. However, these attributes are not exclusive to DCs and often change within inflammatory or infectious environments. This led to debates over cell identification and questioned even the mere existence of DCs as distinct leukocyte lineage. Here, we review experimental approaches taken to fate map DCs and discuss how these have shaped our understanding of DC ontogeny and lineage affiliation. Considering the ontogenetic properties of DCs will help to overcome the inherent shortcomings of purely phenotypic- and function-based approaches to cell definition and will yield a more robust way of DC classification.

  7. Ion Channels Involved in Cell Volume Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Else Kay

    2011-01-01

    regulatory ion channels involved, and the mechanisms (cellular signalling pathways) that regulate these channels. Finally, I shall also briefly review current investigations in these two cell lines that focuses on how changes in cell volume can regulate cell functions such as cell migration, proliferation...

  8. Multisystem Langerhans' cell histiocytosis with pancreatic involvement.

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, R C; Attra, A; Quinn, C M; Krausz, T; Chu, A C

    1993-01-01

    Langerhans' cell histiocytosis, a rare disorder of unknown cause affecting both children and adults, can affect many different organs and present to a wide range of medical specialties. An infant with fatal multisystem Langerhans' cell histiocytosis in whom the pancreas and the intestine were extensively affected is reported. The direct pancreatic involvement by this disease has not previously been described.

  9. Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis Involving Maxilla and Mandible

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Guna Shekhar

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Langerhans cell histiocytosis is a relatively rare unique disease process characterized by an abnormal proliferation of immature dendritic cells usually affecting children and young adults. Jaws are involved in less than 10% of children with the disease while mandibular involvement in young children is uncommon and bilateral affection is very rare. The purpose of this report is to describe a unique and very rare case of simultaneous and bilateral occurrence of Langerhans cell histiocytosis in both the jaws of a four-year-old boy.

  10. Liver involvement in Langerhans cell histiocytosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Adelaine; Ortiz-Neira, Clara L.; Abou Reslan, Walid; Kaura, Deepak [Alberta Children' s Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Sharon, Raphael; Anderson, Ronald [Alberta Children' s Hospital, Department of Oncology, Calgary, AB (Canada); Pinto-Rojas, Alfredo [Alberta Children' s Hospital, Department of Pathology, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2006-10-15

    Liver involvement in Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) typically presents with hepatomegaly and other signs of liver dysfunction. We present an 11-month-old child having only minimally elevated liver enzymes as an indication of liver involvement. Using sonography as the initial diagnostic tool followed by MRI, LCH of the liver was revealed. A review of sonographic, CT, MRI and MR cholangiopancreatography findings in liver LCH is presented. We recommend that physicians consider sonography and MRI screening for liver involvement in patients with newly diagnosed LCH, as periportal involvement may be present with little or no liver function abnormality present, as in this patient. (orig.)

  11. Liver involvement in Langerhans cell histiocytosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liver involvement in Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) typically presents with hepatomegaly and other signs of liver dysfunction. We present an 11-month-old child having only minimally elevated liver enzymes as an indication of liver involvement. Using sonography as the initial diagnostic tool followed by MRI, LCH of the liver was revealed. A review of sonographic, CT, MRI and MR cholangiopancreatography findings in liver LCH is presented. We recommend that physicians consider sonography and MRI screening for liver involvement in patients with newly diagnosed LCH, as periportal involvement may be present with little or no liver function abnormality present, as in this patient. (orig.)

  12. Generalized Asymptotic Pointwise Contractions and Nonexpansive Mappings Involving Orbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolae Adriana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We give fixed point results for classes of mappings that generalize pointwise contractions, asymptotic contractions, asymptotic pointwise contractions, and nonexpansive and asymptotic nonexpansive mappings. We consider the case of metric spaces and, in particular, CAT spaces. We also study the well-posedness of these fixed point problems.

  13. Glial cells are involved in itch processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Hjalte H.; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Gazerani, Parisa

    2016-01-01

    Recent discoveries in itch neurophysiology include itch-selective neuronal pathways, the clinically relevant non-histaminergic pathway, and elucidation of the notable similarities and differences between itch and pain. Potential involvement of glial cells in itch processing and the possibility...

  14. Extracellular Molecules Involved in Cancer Cell Invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodora Stivarou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays it is perfectly clear that understanding and eradicating cancer cell invasion and metastasis represent the crucial, definitive points in cancer therapeutics. During the last two decades there has been a great interest in the understanding of the extracellular molecular mechanisms involved in cancer cell invasion. In this review, we highlight the findings concerning these processes, focusing in particular on extracellular molecules, including extracellular matrix proteins and their receptors, growth factors and their receptors, matrix metalloproteinases and extracellular chaperones. We report the molecular mechanisms underlying the important contribution of this pool of molecules to the complex, multi-step phenomenon of cancer cell invasion.

  15. Extracellular Molecules Involved in Cancer Cell Invasion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stivarou, Theodora; Patsavoudi, Evangelia, E-mail: epatsavoudi@pasteur.gr [Department of Biochemistry, Hellenic Pasteur Institute, Athens 11521 (Greece); Technological Educational Institute of Athens, Egaleo, Athens 12210 (Greece)

    2015-01-26

    Nowadays it is perfectly clear that understanding and eradicating cancer cell invasion and metastasis represent the crucial, definitive points in cancer therapeutics. During the last two decades there has been a great interest in the understanding of the extracellular molecular mechanisms involved in cancer cell invasion. In this review, we highlight the findings concerning these processes, focusing in particular on extracellular molecules, including extracellular matrix proteins and their receptors, growth factors and their receptors, matrix metalloproteinases and extracellular chaperones. We report the molecular mechanisms underlying the important contribution of this pool of molecules to the complex, multi-step phenomenon of cancer cell invasion.

  16. Langerhans cell histiocytosis with multiple spinal involvement

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Liang; Liu, Xiao Guang; Zhong, Wo Quan; Ma, Qing Jun; Wei, Feng; Yuan, Hui Shu; Dang, Geng Ting; Liu, Zhong Jun

    2010-01-01

    To stress the clinical and radiologic presentation and treatment outcome of Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) with multiple spinal involvements. A total of 42 cases with spinal LCH were reviewed in our hospital and 5 had multifocal spinal lesions. Multiple spinal LCH has been reported in 50 cases in the literature. All cases including ours were analyzed concerning age, sex, clinical and radiologic presentation, therapy and outcome. Of our five cases, three had neurological symptom, four sof...

  17. Innate lymphoid cells involve in tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Zhiqiang; van Velkinburgh, Jennifer C; Wu, Yuzhang; Ni, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) promptly initiate cytokine responses to pathogen exposure in the mucosa and mucosal-associated lymphoid tissues. ILCs were recently categorized as being of the lymphoid lineage and have been classified into three groups. ILCs play important roles in immunity against pathogens, and an anti-tumor immune-related function was recently demonstrated. In this review we discuss whether and how ILCs involve in the tumorigenesis, providing new insights into the mechanisms underlying the particular functions of ILCs as well as the potential targets for tumor intervention.

  18. Langerhans cell histiocytosis with multiple spinal involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Liang; Liu, Xiao Guang; Zhong, Wo Quan; Ma, Qing Jun; Wei, Feng; Yuan, Hui Shu; Dang, Geng Ting; Liu, Zhong Jun

    2011-11-01

    To stress the clinical and radiologic presentation and treatment outcome of Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) with multiple spinal involvements. A total of 42 cases with spinal LCH were reviewed in our hospital and 5 had multifocal spinal lesions. Multiple spinal LCH has been reported in 50 cases in the literature. All cases including ours were analyzed concerning age, sex, clinical and radiologic presentation, therapy and outcome. Of our five cases, three had neurological symptom, four soft tissue involvement and three had posterior arch extension. Compiling data from the eight largest case series of the spinal LCH reveals that 27.2% multiple vertebrae lesions. In these 55 cases, there were 26 female and 29 male with the mean age of 7.4 years (range 0.2-37). A total of 182 vertebrae were involved including 28.0% in the cervical spine, 47.8% in thoracic and 24.2% in the lumbar spine. Extraspinal LCH lesion was documented in 54.2% cases, visceral involvement in 31.1% and vertebra plana in 50% cases. Paravertebral and epidural extension were not documented in most cases. Pathological diagnosis was achieved in 47 cases including 8 open spine biopsy. The treatment strategy varied depending on different hospitals. One patient died, two had recurrence and the others had no evidence of the disease with an average of 7.2 years (range 1-21) of follow-up. Asymptomatic spinal lesions could be simply observed with or without bracing and chemotherapy is justified for multiple lesions. Surgical decompression should be reserved for the uncommon cases in which neurologic compromise does not respond to radiotherapy or progresses too rapidly for radiotherapy. PMID:20496040

  19. Molecular mapping of brain areas involved in parrot vocal communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, E D; Mello, C V

    2000-03-27

    Auditory and vocal regulation of gene expression occurs in separate discrete regions of the songbird brain. Here we demonstrate that regulated gene expression also occurs during vocal communication in a parrot, belonging to an order whose ability to learn vocalizations is thought to have evolved independently of songbirds. Adult male budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus) were stimulated to vocalize with playbacks of conspecific vocalizations (warbles), and their brains were analyzed for expression of the transcriptional regulator ZENK. The results showed that there was distinct separation of brain areas that had hearing- or vocalizing-induced ZENK expression. Hearing warbles resulted in ZENK induction in large parts of the caudal medial forebrain and in 1 midbrain region, with a pattern highly reminiscent of that observed in songbirds. Vocalizing resulted in ZENK induction in nine brain structures, seven restricted to the lateral and anterior telencephalon, one in the thalamus, and one in the midbrain, with a pattern partially reminiscent of that observed in songbirds. Five of the telencephalic structures had been previously described as part of the budgerigar vocal control pathway. However, functional boundaries defined by the gene expression patterns for some of these structures were much larger and different in shape than previously reported anatomical boundaries. Our results provide the first functional demonstration of brain areas involved in vocalizing and auditory processing of conspecific sounds in budgerigars. They also indicate that, whether or not vocal learning evolved independently, some of the gene regulatory mechanisms that accompany learned vocal communication are similar in songbirds and parrots.

  20. Improved generalized cell mapping for global analysis of dynamical systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Three main parts of generalized cell mapping are improved for global analysis. A simple method, which is not based on the theory of digraphs, is presented to locate complete self-cycling sets that corre- spond to attractors and unstable invariant sets involving saddle, unstable periodic orbit and chaotic saddle. Refinement for complete self-cycling sets is developed to locate attractors and unstable in- variant sets with high degree of accuracy, which can start with a coarse cell structure. A nonuniformly interior-and-boundary sampling technique is used to make the refinement robust. For homeomorphic dissipative dynamical systems, a controlled boundary sampling technique is presented to make gen- eralized cell mapping method with refinement extremely accurate to obtain invariant sets. Recursive laws of group absorption probability and expected absorption time are introduced into generalized cell mapping, and then an optimal order for quantitative analysis of transient cells is established, which leads to the minimal computational work. The improved method is applied to four examples to show its effectiveness in global analysis of dynamical systems.

  1. Cranial involvement in sickle cell disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alkan, Ozlem, E-mail: yalinozlem@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Baskent University, Ankara (Turkey); Kizilkilic, Ebru, E-mail: ebru90@yahoo.com [Department of Hematology, Faculty of Medicine, Baskent University, Ankara (Turkey); Kizilkilic, Osman, E-mail: ebos90@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Baskent University, Ankara (Turkey); Yildirim, Tulin, E-mail: ytulin@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Baskent University, Ankara (Turkey); Karaca, Sibel, E-mail: sibelkaraca@hotmail.com [Department of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Baskent University, Ankara (Turkey); Yeral, Mahmut, E-mail: mahmutyeral@hotmail.com [Department of Hematology, Faculty of Medicine, Baskent University, Ankara (Turkey); Kasar, Mutlu, E-mail: mutlukasar@hotmail.com [Department of Hematology, Faculty of Medicine, Baskent University, Ankara (Turkey); Ozdogu, Hakan, E-mail: hakanozdogu@hotmail.com [Department of Hematology, Faculty of Medicine, Baskent University, Ankara (Turkey)

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate cranial findings in patients with neurologically symptomatic sickle cell disease (SCD). Materials and methods: We studied 50 consecutive patients with SCD and neurologic symptoms. All patients underwent brain MR examinations: all 50 underwent classic MR imaging; 42, diffusion-weighted MR imaging; 10, MR angiography; four, MR venography; and three patients, digital subtraction angiography. Results: Of the 50 SCD patients, 19 (38%) had normal MR findings, and 31 (62%) showed abnormalities on brain MR images. Of the 50 patients, 16 (32%) had ischemic lesions; two (4%), subarachnoid hemorrhage; one (2%), moya-moya pattern; one (2%), posterior reversible encephalopathy; one (2%), dural venous sinus thrombosis; 12 (24%), low marrow signal intensity and thickness of the diploic space; 12 (24%), cerebral atrophy; and two (4%), osteomyelitis. Twenty-seven patients (54%) presented with headache, which was the most common clinical finding. Conclusions: The cranial involvement is one of the most devastating complications of SCD. Early and accurate diagnosis is important in the management of cranial complications of SCD.

  2. Are hematopoietic stem cells involved in hepatocarcinogenesis?

    OpenAIRE

    Facciorusso, Antonio; Antonino, Matteo; Del Prete, Valentina; Neve, Viviana; Scavo, Maria Principia; Barone, Michele

    2014-01-01

    The liver has three cell lineages able to proliferate after a hepatic injury: the mature hepatocyte, the ductular “bipolar” progenitor cell termed “oval cell” and the putative periductular stem cell. Hepatocytes can only produce other hepatocytes whereas ductular progenitor cells are considerate bipolar since they can give rise to biliary cells or hepatocytes. Periductular stem cells are rare in the liver, have a very long proliferation potential and may be multipotent, being this aspect stil...

  3. Signaling involved in stem cell reprogramming and differentiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shihori; Tanabe

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell differentiation is regulated by multiple signaling events. Recent technical advances have reve-aled that differentiated cells can be reprogrammed into stem cells. The signals involved in stem cell pro-gramming are of major interest in stem cell research. The signaling mechanisms involved in regulating stem cell reprogramming and differentiation are the subject of intense study in the field of life sciences. In this review,the molecular interactions and signaling pathways related to stem cell differentiation are discussed.

  4. Signaling involved in stem cell reprogramming and differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Tanabe, Shihori

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell differentiation is regulated by multiple signaling events. Recent technical advances have revealed that differentiated cells can be reprogrammed into stem cells. The signals involved in stem cell programming are of major interest in stem cell research. The signaling mechanisms involved in regulating stem cell reprogramming and differentiation are the subject of intense study in the field of life sciences. In this review, the molecular interactions and signaling pathways related to s...

  5. Myosin is involved in postmitotic cell spreading

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    We have investigated a role for myosin in postmitotic Potoroo tridactylis kidney (PtK2) cell spreading by inhibitor studies, time- lapse video microscopy, and immunofluorescence. We have also determined the spatial organization and polarity of actin filaments in postmitotic spreading cells. We show that butanedione monoxime (BDM), a known inhibitor of muscle myosin II, inhibits nonmuscle myosin II and myosin V adenosine triphosphatases. BDM reversibly inhibits PtK2 postmitotic cell spreading....

  6. Cell culture monitoring by impedance mapping using a multielectrode scanning impedance spectroscopy system (CellMap)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the impedance mapping of in vitro cellular morphology by electrical impedance spectroscopy, using microelectrodes. A micro multielectrode system was designed, fabricated, assembled, tested and demonstrated for the monitoring of anchorage-dependent cell behavior and morphology. This system allowed continuous, label-free, quantitative monitoring and visualization of cell adhesion, spreading, proliferation and detachment due to cell cycle processes as well as cell–drug interaction, with spatio-temporal resolution. OvCa429 ovarian cancer cells were monitored in vitro over a period of 70 hours by inoculating the cell suspension directly on the multielectrode device. The phase angle of impedance was observed to develop a distinctive shape as a result of cell attachment and proliferation. The shape of the phase angle curve reverted back to the pre-attachment shape upon detachment of cells from the substrate, caused by the addition of trypsin to the cell culture medium. The impedance data of the cell culture were then successfully modeled as a multi-parametric equivalent circuit. The model incorporated both interfacial and cell-layer impedance parameters. Upon addition of trypsin, the cell-layer parameters showed a marked decline and were eventually eliminated from the multi-parametric model, confirming the correlation of the model to the electrode–cell–electrolyte system. These experiments demonstrate the applicability of the impedance mapping technique in visualizing and quantifying physiological changes in the cell layer due to cellular processes as well as the effect of external chemical stimulus on cells (cell–drug interaction)

  7. Pancreatic involvement in small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Few data are available concerning incidence, clinical picture, and prognosis for pancreatic metastases of small cell lung carcinoma. In this paper we review the related literature available in English language. Although pancreatic metastases are generally asymptomatic, they can rarely produce clinical symptoms or functional abnormalities. The widespread use of multi-detector computerised tomography (CT) in contemporary medical practice has led to an increased detection of pancreatic metastases in oncology patients. Tissue diagnosis is imperative because radiological techniques alone are incapable of differentiating them from primary pancreatic tumours. Pancreatic metastases occur in the relative end stage of small cell lung cancer. The main complications of these lesions, although rare, are acute pancreatitis and obstructive jaundice. Early chemotherapy can provide a survival benefit even in patients with mild acute pancreatitis or extrahepatic biliary obstruction

  8. Pancreatic involvement in small cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Gonlugur, Ugur; Mirici, Arzu; Karaayvaz, Muammer

    2014-01-01

    Background Few data are available concerning incidence, clinical picture, and prognosis for pancreatic metastases of small cell lung carcinoma. In this paper we review the related literature available in English language. Conclusions Although pancreatic metastases are generally asymptomatic, they can rarely produce clinical symptoms or functional abnormalities. The widespread use of multi-detector computerised tomography (CT) in contemporary medical practice has led to an increased detection ...

  9. Syncytin is involved in breast cancer-endothelial cell fusions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Bolette; Holck, S.; Christensen, I.J.;

    2006-01-01

    Cancer cells can fuse spontaneously with normal host cells, including endothelial cells, and such fusions may strongly modulate the biological behaviour of tumors. However, the underlying mechanisms are unknown. We now show that human breast cancer cell lines and 63 out of 165 (38%) breast cancer...... and inhibits fusions between breast cancer cells and endothelial cells. Moreover, a syncytin inhibitory peptide also inhibits fusions between cancer and endothelial cells. These results are the first to show that syncytin is expressed by human cancer cells and is involved in cancer-endothelial cell fusions....

  10. A proteome map of primary cultured rat Schwann cells

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    Shen Mi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Schwann cells (SCs are the principal glial cells of the peripheral nervous system with a wide range of biological functions. SCs play a key role in peripheral nerve regeneration and are involved in several hereditary peripheral neuropathies. The objective of this study was to gain new insight into the whole protein composition of SCs. Results Two-dimensional liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (2D LC-MS/MS was performed to identify the protein expressions in primary cultured SCs of rats. We identified a total of 1,232 proteins, which were categorized into 20 functional classes. We also used quantitative real time RT-PCR and Western blot analysis to validate some of proteomics-identified proteins. Conclusion We showed for the first time the proteome map of SCs. Our data could serve as a reference library to provide basic information for understanding SC biology.

  11. Langerhans cell histiocytosis with involvement of the pons: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vourtsi, A. [Xatzopoulou, Athens (Greece)]|[Department of Radiology, University of Athens Medical School, Athens (Greece); Papadopoulos, A.; Moulopoulos, L.A.; Vlahos, L. [Department of Radiology, University of Athens Medical School, Athens (Greece); Xenellis, J. [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University of Athens Medical School, Athens (Greece)

    1998-03-01

    Central nervous system involvement is uncommon in Langerhans cell histiocytosis. The suprasellar region is more frequently affected. There have been few reports of involvement of the brain parenchyma shown on CT or MRI. We present a case of involvement of the pons, showing marked contrast enhancement on MRI. (orig.) With 2 figs., 17 refs.

  12. Langerhans cell histiocytosis with involvement of the pons: case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Central nervous system involvement is uncommon in Langerhans cell histiocytosis. The suprasellar region is more frequently affected. There have been few reports of involvement of the brain parenchyma shown on CT or MRI. We present a case of involvement of the pons, showing marked contrast enhancement on MRI. (orig.)

  13. Potential Mechanisms Involved in Ceramide-induced Apoptosis in Human Colon Cancer HT29 Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JING WANG; XIAO-WEN LV; YU-GUO DU

    2009-01-01

    Objective To investigate the potential mechanisms of cell death after the treatment with ceramide. Methods MTT assay,DNA ladder, reporter assay, FACS and Western blot assay were employed to investigate the potential mechanisms of cell death after the treatment with C2-ceramide. Results A short-time treatment with C2-ceramide induced cell death, which was associated with p38 MAP kinase activation, but had no links with typical caspase activation or PARP degradation. Rather than caspase inhibitor, Inhibitor of p38 MAP kinase blocked cell death induced by a short-time treatment with ceramide (12 h). Moreover, incubation of cells with ceramide for a long time (>12 h) increased subGl, but reduced S phase accompanied by caspase-dependent and caspase-independent changes including NFκB activation. Conclusion Ceramide-induced cell apoptosis involves both caspase-dependent and -independent signaling pathway. Caspase-independent cell death occurring in a relatively early stage, which is mediated via p38 MAP kinase, can progress into a stage involving both caspase-dependent and -independent mechanisms accompanied by cell signaling of MAPKs and NFκB.

  14. Basaloid squamous cell carcinoma involving floor of the mouth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sah Kunal

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Basaloid squamous cell carcinomas of oral mucosa are uncommon. Majority of them can be differentiated from squamous cell carcinoma by their aggressive clinical course and their histopathological features. This case report presents a case of 70-year-old male with basaloid squamous cell carcinoma involving the floor of the mouth.

  15. Crises in a driven Josephson junction studied by cell mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mads Peter; Davidson, A.; Pedersen, Niels Falsig;

    1988-01-01

    We use the method of cell-to-cell mapping to locate attractors, basins, and saddle nodes in the phase plane of a driven Josephson junction. The cell-mapping method is discussed in some detail, emphasizing its ability to provide a global view of the phase plane. Our computations confirm...... the existence of a previously reported interior crisis. In addition, we observe a boundary crisis for a small shift in one parameter. The cell-mapping method allows us to show both crises explicitly in the phase plane, at low computational cost....

  16. Adult Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis with Hepatic and Pulmonary Involvement

    OpenAIRE

    Bruno Araujo; Francisco Costa; Joanne Lopes; Ricardo Castro

    2015-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a rare proliferative disorder of Langerhans cells of unknown etiology. It can involve multiple organ systems with different clinical presentation, which complicates the diagnosis. It can range from isolated to multisystem disease with different prognosis. Although common among children, liver involvement is relatively rare in adults and frequently overlooked. Natural history of liver LCH fits into two stages: an early stage with infiltration by histiocyt...

  17. Mapping of Candidate Genes Involved in Bud Dormancy and Flowering Time in Sweet Cherry (Prunus avium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Castède

    Full Text Available The timing of flowering in perennial plants is crucial for their survival in temperate climates and is regulated by the duration of bud dormancy. Bud dormancy release and bud break depend on the perception of cumulative chilling during endodormancy and heat during the bud development. The objectives of this work were to identify candidate genes involved in dormancy and flowering processes in sweet cherry, their mapping in two mapping progenies 'Regina' × 'Garnet' and 'Regina' × 'Lapins', and to select those candidate genes which co-localized with quantitative trait loci (QTLs associated with temperature requirements for bud dormancy release and flowering. Based on available data on flowering processes in various species, a list of 79 candidate genes was established. The peach and sweet cherry orthologs were identified and primers were designed to amplify sweet cherry candidate gene fragments. Based on the amplified sequences of the three parents of the mapping progenies, SNPs segregations in the progenies were identified. Thirty five candidate genes were genetically mapped in at least one of the two progenies and all were in silico mapped. Co-localization between candidate genes and QTLs associated with temperature requirements and flowering date were identified for the first time in sweet cherry. The allelic composition of the candidate genes located in the major QTL for heat requirements and flowering date located on linkage group 4 have a significant effect on these two traits indicating their potential use for breeding programs in sweet cherry to select new varieties adapted to putative future climatic conditions.

  18. Mapping of Candidate Genes Involved in Bud Dormancy and Flowering Time in Sweet Cherry (Prunus avium).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castède, Sophie; Campoy, José Antonio; Le Dantec, Loïck; Quero-García, José; Barreneche, Teresa; Wenden, Bénédicte; Dirlewanger, Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    The timing of flowering in perennial plants is crucial for their survival in temperate climates and is regulated by the duration of bud dormancy. Bud dormancy release and bud break depend on the perception of cumulative chilling during endodormancy and heat during the bud development. The objectives of this work were to identify candidate genes involved in dormancy and flowering processes in sweet cherry, their mapping in two mapping progenies 'Regina' × 'Garnet' and 'Regina' × 'Lapins', and to select those candidate genes which co-localized with quantitative trait loci (QTLs) associated with temperature requirements for bud dormancy release and flowering. Based on available data on flowering processes in various species, a list of 79 candidate genes was established. The peach and sweet cherry orthologs were identified and primers were designed to amplify sweet cherry candidate gene fragments. Based on the amplified sequences of the three parents of the mapping progenies, SNPs segregations in the progenies were identified. Thirty five candidate genes were genetically mapped in at least one of the two progenies and all were in silico mapped. Co-localization between candidate genes and QTLs associated with temperature requirements and flowering date were identified for the first time in sweet cherry. The allelic composition of the candidate genes located in the major QTL for heat requirements and flowering date located on linkage group 4 have a significant effect on these two traits indicating their potential use for breeding programs in sweet cherry to select new varieties adapted to putative future climatic conditions. PMID:26587668

  19. Langerhans cell histiocytosis involving central nervous system: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Won Jin; Park, Dong Woo; Lee, Seung Ro; Hahm, Chang Kok; Ju, Kyung Bin [Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung Tae [Ulsan University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis(LCH) is a systemic disorder characterized by idiopathic proliferation of histiocytes in the reticuloendothelial system; CNS involvement outside the hypothalamus or pituitary gland is uncommon. We present a case of LCH involving the brainstem, cerebellum, and temporal lobes, and also showing hypothalamic involvement. The lesions were isointense or hypointense on T1WI and hyperintense on T2WI, and showed multifocal enhancing nodules on post-contrast CT and Gd-enhanced MRI.

  20. Langerhans cell histiocytosis involving central nervous system: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis(LCH) is a systemic disorder characterized by idiopathic proliferation of histiocytes in the reticuloendothelial system; CNS involvement outside the hypothalamus or pituitary gland is uncommon. We present a case of LCH involving the brainstem, cerebellum, and temporal lobes, and also showing hypothalamic involvement. The lesions were isointense or hypointense on T1WI and hyperintense on T2WI, and showed multifocal enhancing nodules on post-contrast CT and Gd-enhanced MRI

  1. Specificity of MAP kinase signaling in yeast differentiation involves transient versus sustained MAPK activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbagh, W; Flatauer, L J; Bardwell, A J; Bardwell, L

    2001-09-01

    Signals transmitted by common components often elicit distinct (yet appropriate) outcomes. In yeast, two developmental options-mating and invasive growth-are both regulated by the same MAP kinase cascade. Specificity has been thought to result from specialized roles for the two MAP kinases, Kss1 and Fus3, and because Fus3 prevents Kss1 from gaining access to the mating pathway. Kss1 has been thought to participate in mating only when Fus3 is absent. Instead, we show that Kss1 is rapidly phosphorylated and potently activated by mating pheromone in wild-type cells, and that this is required for normal pheromone-induced gene expression. Signal identity is apparently maintained because active Fus3 limits the extent of Kss1 activation, thereby preventing inappropriate signal crossover. PMID:11583629

  2. New protein involved in the replacement of cell molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Jesper Buchhave

    2011-01-01

    In collaboration with colleagues from La Trobe University, Australia, scientists at Aarhus University have discovered and defined a novel enzyme involved in the replacement and renewal of cell molecules. The enzyme exerts its function within the so-called mitochondria - small “enclosed” compartme......In collaboration with colleagues from La Trobe University, Australia, scientists at Aarhus University have discovered and defined a novel enzyme involved in the replacement and renewal of cell molecules. The enzyme exerts its function within the so-called mitochondria - small “enclosed...

  3. Global behavior of gear system using mixed cell mapping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN; Yunwen; LIU; Mengjun; DONG; Haijun

    2004-01-01

    In some mechanical nonlinear systems, the transient motion will be undergoing a very long process and the attractor-basin boundaries are so complicated that some difficulties occur in analyzing the system global behavior. To solve this problem a mixed cell mapping method based on the point mapping and the principle of simple cell mapping is developed. The algorithm of the mixed cell mapping is studied. A dynamic model of a gear pair is established with the backlash, damping, transmission error and the time-varying stiffness taken into consideration. The global behaviors of this system are analyzed. The coexistence of the system attractors and the respective attractor-basin of each attractor with different parameters are obtained, thus laying a theoretical basis for improvement of the dynamic behaviors of gear system.

  4. Involvement of dendritic cells in autoimmune diseases in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reed Ann M

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dendritic cells (DCs are professional antigen-presenting cells that are specialized in the uptake of antigens and their transport from peripheral tissues to the lymphoid organs. Over the last decades, the properties of DCs have been intensely studied and much knowledge has been gained about the role of DCs in various diseases and health conditions where the immune system is involved, particularly in cancer and autoimmune disorders. Emerging clues in autoimmune diseases, suggest that dendritic cell dysregulation might be involved in the development of various autoimmune disorders in both adults and children. However, studies investigating a possible contribution of DCs in autoimmune diseases in the pediatric population alone are scanty. The purpose of this review is to give a general overview of the current literature on the relevance of dendritic cells in the most common autoimmune conditions of childhood.

  5. Concomitant nodal involvement by Langerhans cell histiocytosis and Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geurten, Claire; Thiry, Albert; Jamblin, Paul; Demarche, Martine; Hoyoux, Claire

    2015-12-01

    A 10-year-old girl with a family history of Hodgkin's lymphoma presented with a 2 month history of cervical lymphadenopathy and weight loss. Biopsy indicated concomitant nodal involvement by Langerhans cell histiocytosis and Hodgkin's lymphoma. Such an association is rare, especially so in children, but is not an isolated phenomenon, thereby prompting the question of whether Langerhans cell histiocytosis is a reactive or a neoplastic process. PMID:26556799

  6. Adult Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis with Hepatic and Pulmonary Involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, Bruno; Costa, Francisco; Lopes, Joanne; Castro, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a rare proliferative disorder of Langerhans cells of unknown etiology. It can involve multiple organ systems with different clinical presentation, which complicates the diagnosis. It can range from isolated to multisystem disease with different prognosis. Although common among children, liver involvement is relatively rare in adults and frequently overlooked. Natural history of liver LCH fits into two stages: an early stage with infiltration by histiocytes and a late stage with sclerosis of the biliary tree. Pulmonary findings are more common and include multiple nodules in different stages of cavitation, predominantly in the upper lobes. We present a case of adult LCH with pulmonary and biopsy proven liver involvement with resolution of the hepatic findings after treatment. PMID:25977828

  7. Adult Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis with Hepatic and Pulmonary Involvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Araujo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH is a rare proliferative disorder of Langerhans cells of unknown etiology. It can involve multiple organ systems with different clinical presentation, which complicates the diagnosis. It can range from isolated to multisystem disease with different prognosis. Although common among children, liver involvement is relatively rare in adults and frequently overlooked. Natural history of liver LCH fits into two stages: an early stage with infiltration by histiocytes and a late stage with sclerosis of the biliary tree. Pulmonary findings are more common and include multiple nodules in different stages of cavitation, predominantly in the upper lobes. We present a case of adult LCH with pulmonary and biopsy proven liver involvement with resolution of the hepatic findings after treatment.

  8. Adult langerhans cell histiocytosis with hepatic and pulmonary involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, Bruno; Costa, Francisco; Lopes, Joanne; Castro, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a rare proliferative disorder of Langerhans cells of unknown etiology. It can involve multiple organ systems with different clinical presentation, which complicates the diagnosis. It can range from isolated to multisystem disease with different prognosis. Although common among children, liver involvement is relatively rare in adults and frequently overlooked. Natural history of liver LCH fits into two stages: an early stage with infiltration by histiocytes and a late stage with sclerosis of the biliary tree. Pulmonary findings are more common and include multiple nodules in different stages of cavitation, predominantly in the upper lobes. We present a case of adult LCH with pulmonary and biopsy proven liver involvement with resolution of the hepatic findings after treatment. PMID:25977828

  9. Cellular intrinsic factors involved in the resistance of squamous cell carcinoma to photodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilaberte, Yolanda; Milla, Laura; Salazar, Nerea; Vera-Alvarez, Jesús; Kourani, Omar; Damian, Alejandra; Rivarola, Viviana; Roca, Maria José; Espada, Jesús; González, Salvador; Juarranz, Angeles

    2014-09-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is widely used to treat non-melanoma skin cancer. However, some patients affected with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) do not respond adequately to PDT with methyl-δ-aminolevulinic acid (MAL-PDT) and the tumors acquire an infiltrative phenotype and became histologically more aggressive, less differentiated, and more fibroblastic. To search for potential factors implicated in SCC resistance to PDT, we have used the SCC-13 cell line (parental) and resistant SCC-13 cells obtained by repeated MAL-PDT treatments (5th and 10th PDT-resistant generations). Xenografts assays in immunodeficient mice showed that the tumors generated by resistant cells were bigger than those induced by parental cells. Comparative genomic hybridization array (aCGH) showed that the three cell types presented amplicons in 3p12.1 CADM2, 7p11.2 EFGR, and 11q13.3 CCND1 genes. The 5th and 10th PDT-resistant cells showed an amplicon in 5q11.2 MAP3K1, which was not present in parental cells. The changes detected by aCGH on CCND1, EFGR, and MAP3K1 were confirmed in extracts of SCC-13 cells by reverse-transcriptase PCR and by western blot, and by immunohistochemistry in human biopsies from persistent tumors after MAL-PDT. Our data suggest that genomic imbalances related to CCND1, EFGR, and particularly MAP3K1 seem to be involved in the development of the resistance of SCC to PDT.

  10. Aspects of Information Architecture involved in process mapping in Military Organizations under the semiotic perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mac Amaral Cartaxo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The description of the processes to represent the activities in an organization has important call semiotic, It is the flowcharts of uses, management reports and the various forms of representation of the strategies used. The subsequent interpretation of the organization's employees involved in learning tasks and the symbols used to translate the meanings of management practices is essential role for the organization. Objective: The objective of this study was to identify evidence of conceptual and empirical, on aspects of information architecture involved in the mapping process carried out in military organizations under the semiotic perspective. Methodology: The research is characterized as qualitative, case study and the data collection technique was the semi-structured interview, applied to management advisors. Results: The main results indicate that management practices described with the use of pictorial symbols and different layouts have greater impact to explain the relevance of management practices and indicators. Conclusion: With regard to the semiotic appeal, it was found that the impact of a management report is significant due to the use of signs and layout that stimulate further reading by simplifying complex concepts in tables, diagrams summarizing lengthy descriptions.

  11. Metabolic mapping reveals sex-dependent involvement of default mode and salience network in alexithymia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colic, L; Demenescu, L R; Li, M; Kaufmann, J; Krause, A L; Metzger, C; Walter, M

    2016-02-01

    Alexithymia, a personality construct marked by difficulties in processing one's emotions, has been linked to the altered activity in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). Although longitudinal studies reported sex differences in alexithymia, what mediates them is not known. To investigate sex-specific associations of alexithymia and neuronal markers, we mapped metabolites in four brain regions involved differentially in emotion processing using a point-resolved spectroscopy MRS sequence in 3 Tesla. Both sexes showed negative correlations between alexithymia and N-acetylaspartate (NAA) in pregenual ACC (pgACC). Women showed a robust negative correlation of the joint measure of glutamate and glutamine (Glx) to NAA in posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), whereas men showed a weak positive association of Glx to NAA in dorsal ACC (dACC). Our results suggest that lowered neuronal integrity in pgACC, a region of the default mode network (DMN), might primarily account for the general difficulties in emotional processing in alexithymia. Association of alexithymia in women extends to another region in the DMN-PCC, while in men a region in the salience network (SN) was involved. These observations could be representative of sex specific regulation strategies that include diminished internal evaluation of feelings in women and cognitive emotion suppression in men. PMID:26341904

  12. Langerhans' cell histiocytosis: pathology, imaging and treatment of skeletal involvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langerhans' cell histiocytosis (LCH) is manifested in a variety of ways, the most common being the eosinophilic granuloma, a localized, often solitary bone lesion that occurs predominantly in the pediatric age group. The hallmark of LCH is the proliferation and accumulation of a specific histiocyte: the Langerhans' cell. In bone this may cause pain and adjacent soft-tissue swelling, but some lesions are asymptomatic. LCH can involve any bone, but most lesions occur in the skull (especially the calvarium and temporal bones), the pelvis, spine, mandible, ribs, and tubular bones. Imaging diagnosis of the disease in bone is first based on the plain radiographic appearance, which is usually a central destructive, aggressive-looking lesion. In the skull, the lesions develop in the diploic space, are lytic, and their edges may be beveled, scalloped or confluent (geographic), or show a ''button sequestrum.'' Vertebral body involvement usually causes collapse, resulting in vertebra plana. With significant recent improvements in the quality of gamma cameras, imaging techniques, and in studying children, bone scintigraphy at diagnosis and on follow-up usually reveals the sites of active disease, especially when the involvement is polyostotic. CT and MR imaging are very useful in providing detailed cross-sectional anatomic detail of the involved bone, including the bone marrow and the adjacent soft tissues. CT is better suited for demonstrating bone detail and MR imaging for bone marrow and soft-tissue involvement. (orig.)

  13. Extra-osseous involvement of Langerhans' cell histiocytosis in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The predominant clinical and radiological features of Langerhans' cell histiocytosis (LCH) in children are due to osseous involvement. Extra-osseous disease is far less common, occurring in association with bone disease or in isolation; nearly all anatomical sites may be affected and in very various combinations. The following article is based on a multicentre review of 31 children with extra-osseous LCH. The objective is to summarise the diverse possibilities of organ involvement. The radiological manifestations using different imaging modalities are rarely pathognomonic on their own. Nevertheless, familiarity with the imaging findings, especially in children with systemic disease, may be essential for early diagnosis. (orig.)

  14. Cerebellar and basal ganglion involvement in Langerhans cell histiocytosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saatci, I.; Baskan, O.; Haliloglu, M.; Aydingoz, U. [Department of Radiology, Hacettepe University Hospital, Sihhiye 06100, Ankara (Turkey)

    1999-06-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a disease of unknown cause characterised by proliferation of histiocytic granulomas in tissues; the primary cerebral manifestation is diabetes insipidus caused by hypothalamic infiltration. We present a patient in whom, except for the absence of high signal on T 1 weighting in the posterior pituitary, consistent with central diabetes insipidus, MRI showed no evidence of hypothalamic involvement by histiocytosis, despite the long duration of the disease. However, there was bilateral, symmetrical involvement of the cerebellum and globus pallidus in addition to a calvarial lesion. High signal in the cerebellar white matter on T 2-weighted images may represent demyelination, gliosis and cell loss, as previously reported on pathologic examination. (orig.) With 5 figs., 22 refs.

  15. Cerebellar and basal ganglion involvement in Langerhans cell histiocytosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a disease of unknown cause characterised by proliferation of histiocytic granulomas in tissues; the primary cerebral manifestation is diabetes insipidus caused by hypothalamic infiltration. We present a patient in whom, except for the absence of high signal on T 1 weighting in the posterior pituitary, consistent with central diabetes insipidus, MRI showed no evidence of hypothalamic involvement by histiocytosis, despite the long duration of the disease. However, there was bilateral, symmetrical involvement of the cerebellum and globus pallidus in addition to a calvarial lesion. High signal in the cerebellar white matter on T 2-weighted images may represent demyelination, gliosis and cell loss, as previously reported on pathologic examination. (orig.)

  16. Lipid raft involvement in yeast cell growth and death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollinedo, Faustino

    2012-01-01

    The notion that cellular membranes contain distinct microdomains, acting as scaffolds for signal transduction processes, has gained considerable momentum. In particular, a class of such domains that is rich in sphingolipids and cholesterol, termed as lipid rafts, is thought to compartmentalize the plasma membrane, and to have important roles in survival and cell death signaling in mammalian cells. Likewise, yeast lipid rafts are membrane domains enriched in sphingolipids and ergosterol, the yeast counterpart of mammalian cholesterol. Sterol-rich membrane domains have been identified in several fungal species, including the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe as well as the pathogens Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans. Yeast rafts have been mainly involved in membrane trafficking, but increasing evidence implicates rafts in a wide range of additional cellular processes. Yeast lipid rafts house biologically important proteins involved in the proper function of yeast, such as proteins that control Na(+), K(+), and pH homeostasis, which influence many cellular processes, including cell growth and death. Membrane raft constituents affect drug susceptibility, and drugs interacting with sterols alter raft composition and membrane integrity, leading to yeast cell death. Because of the genetic tractability of yeast, analysis of yeast rafts could be an excellent model to approach unanswered questions of mammalian raft biology, and to understand the role of lipid rafts in the regulation of cell death and survival in human cells. A better insight in raft biology might lead to envisage new raft-mediated approaches to the treatment of human diseases where regulation of cell death and survival is critical, such as cancer and neurodegenerative diseases.

  17. Lipid raft involvement in yeast cell growth and death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faustino eMollinedo

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The notion that cellular membranes contain distinct microdomains, acting as scaffolds for signal transduction processes, has gained considerable momentum. In particular, a class of such domains that is rich in sphingolipids and cholesterol, termed as lipid rafts, is thought to compartmentalize the plasma membrane, and to have important roles in survival and cell death signaling in mammalian cells. Likewise, yeast lipid rafts are membrane domains enriched in sphingolipids and ergosterol, the yeast counterpart of mammalian cholesterol. Sterol-rich membrane domains have been identified in several fungal species, including the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe as well as the pathogens Candida albicans and Crytococcus neoformans. Yeast rafts have been mainly involved in membrane trafficking, but increasing evidence implicates rafts in a wide range of additional cellular processes. Yeast lipid rafts house biologically important proteins involved in the proper function of yeast, such as proteins that control Na+, K+ and pH homeostasis, which influence many cellular processes, including cell growth and death. Membrane raft constituents affect drug susceptibility, and drugs interacting with sterols alter raft composition and membrane integrity, leading to yeast cell death. Because of the genetic tractability of yeast, analysis of yeast rafts could be an excellent model to approach unanswered questions of mammalian raft biology, and to understand the role of lipid rafts in the regulation of cell death and survival in human cells. A better insight in raft biology might lead to envisage new raft-mediated approaches to the treatment of human diseases where regulation of cell death and survival is critical, such as cancer and neurodegenerative diseases.

  18. Mapping of Genes Involved in Bardet-Biedl Syndrome (BBS in Pakistani Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiraz Ahmad

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Bardet-Biedl Syndrome (BBS, one of an autosomal recessive or clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorder, which prevails all over the world and results due to increased rate of consanguinity. All of these BBS genes are involved either directly or indirectly in signaling pathways such as Leptin receptor signaling pathway and Wnt signaling pathway. The study presented here includes genetic mapping of two consanguineous families (A & B with BBS. (21.63-Mb region was found to be critical as it was gene rich and contains approximately eighty known and predicted genes. Out of eighty genes six (FGF2, BBS7, BBS12, NUDT6, SPATA5 and SPRY1 were found to be candidate genes. On mutations screening, sequencing of the coding exon 2 of BBS12 in affected individuals identified a novel homozygous c.2103C 1 A mutation, which is predicted to insert a stop codon at position 701 of the BBS12 protein (p.S701X. Identification of BBS12 mutation in families B can increase our understanding of molecular genetics and pathophysiology of BBS.

  19. Glycosytransferases involved in arabinosylation of cell wall extensins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Bent L; Harholt, Jesper; Jørgensen, Bodil;

    2011-01-01

    Extensins are a group of ancient hydroxyproline rich cell wall glycoproteins that are found in some chlorophyte algae (such as Chlamydomonas), where they constitute the main wall building block, as well as in higher plant cell walls, where they constitute a relatively minor component of particular...... al (2007) Molecular characterization of two Arabidopsis thaliana glycosyltransferase mutants, rra-1 and -2, which have a reduced content of arabinose in a polymer tightly associated with the cellulose residue. Plant Mol. Biol. 64:439-451 Gille et al (2009) Identification of plant cell wall mutants...... importance to wall assembly. The GlycosylTransferase family 77 (GT-family-77) rra1-2 (Egelund et al. 2007) and xeg113 (Gille et al. 2009) Arabidopsis, mutants have been suggested to be arabinosyltransferases involved in arabinosylation of extensins. We have now isolated extensins from these mutants and a new...

  20. RNAi screen reveals host cell kinases specifically involved in Listeria monocytogenes spread from cell to cell.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Chong

    Full Text Available Intracellular bacterial pathogens, such as Listeria monocytogenes and Rickettsia conorii display actin-based motility in the cytosol of infected cells and spread from cell to cell through the formation of membrane protrusions at the cell cortex. Whereas the mechanisms supporting cytosolic actin-based motility are fairly well understood, it is unclear whether specific host factors may be required for supporting the formation and resolution of membrane protrusions. To address this gap in knowledge, we have developed high-throughput fluorescence microscopy and computer-assisted image analysis procedures to quantify pathogen spread in human epithelial cells. We used the approach to screen a siRNA library covering the human kinome and identified 7 candidate kinases whose depletion led to severe spreading defects in cells infected with L. monocytogenes. We conducted systematic validation procedures with redundant silencing reagents and confirmed the involvement of the serine/threonine kinases, CSNK1A1 and CSNK2B. We conducted secondary assays showing that, in contrast with the situation observed in CSNK2B-depleted cells, L. monocytogenes formed wild-type cytosolic tails and displayed wild-type actin-based motility in the cytosol of CSNK1A1-depleted cells. Furthermore, we developed a protrusion formation assay and showed that the spreading defect observed in CSNK1A1-depleted cells correlated with the formation of protrusion that did not resolve into double-membrane vacuoles. Moreover, we developed sending and receiving cell-specific RNAi procedures and showed that CSNK1A was required in the sending cells, but was dispensable in the receiving cells, for protrusion resolution. Finally, we showed that the observed defects were specific to Listeria monocytogenes, as Rickettsia conorii displayed wild-type cell-to-cell spread in CSNK1A1- and CSNK2B-depleted cells. We conclude that, in addition to the specific host factors supporting cytosolic actin

  1. Liver involvement of Langerhans’ cell histiocytosis in children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Xiaoping; Han, Tong; Zai, Hongyan; Long, Xueying; Wang, Xiaoyi; Li, Wenzheng

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Liver involvement is relatively frequent in children with Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH). Its features remain poorly defined. Methods: A retrospective study was carried out on 14 hepatic LCH children in our hospital. The Clinicopathological and radiological features of this disease was discussed. Results: The rate of liver involvement in children LCH patients is 51.9%. Majority of the patients were disseminated cases. Hepatomegaly was clinically confirmed in 11 cases (78.6%). Liver function dysfunction was seen in nine (64.3%) children. The association of multi-modal imaging significantly yielded more diagnostic information. There are some imaging characteristics of this disease, CT and MRI could help to assess the staging, extent of the hepatic lesions. We found that liver involvement had a significant impact on survival. Patients treated with systemic chemotherapy earlier from time of diagnosis had a relatively better outcome. Conclusions: The rate of liver involvement in children LCH patients maybe much higher than that of expected. We suggest that clinical and biological liver evaluation and abdominal imaging must be performed regularly onwards to screen every LCH children patient from the time of the initial diagnosis. Patient should be treated with systemic chemotherapy earlier. PMID:26221247

  2. Genome-wide maps of nuclear lamina interactions in single human cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kind, Jop; Pagie, Ludo; de Vries, Sandra S.; Nahidiazar, Leila; Dey, Siddharth S.; Bienko, Magda; Zhan, Ye; Lajoie, Bryan; de Graaf, Carolyn A.; Amendola, Mario; Fudenberg, Geoffrey; Imakaev, Maxim; Mirny, Leonid A.; Jalink, Kees; Dekker, Job; van Oudenaarden, Alexander; van Steensel, Bas

    2015-01-01

    Summary Mammalian interphase chromosomes interact with the nuclear lamina (NL) through hundreds of large Lamina Associated Domains (LADs). We report a method to map NL contacts genome-wide in single human cells. Analysis of nearly 400 maps reveals a core architecture of gene-poor LADs that contact the NL with high cell-to-cell consistency, interspersed by LADs with more variable NL interactions. The variable contacts tend to be cell-type specific and are more sensitive to changes in genome ploidy than the consistent contacts. Single-cell maps indicate that NL contacts involve multivalent interactions over hundreds of kilobases. Moreover, we observe extensive intra-chromosomal coordination of NL contacts, even over tens of megabases. Such coordinated loci exhibit preferential interactions as detected by Hi-C. Finally, consistency of NL contacts is inversely linked to gene activity in single cells, and correlates positively with the heterochromatic histone modification H3K9me3. These results highlight fundamental principles of single cell chromatin organization. PMID:26365489

  3. Mapping Conceptual Understanding of Algebraic Concepts: An Exploratory Investigation Involving Grade 8 Chinese Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Haiyue; Wong, Khoon Yoong

    2015-01-01

    Conceptual understanding is a major aim of mathematics education, and concept map has been used in non-mathematics research to uncover the relations among concepts held by students. This article presents the results of using concept map to assess conceptual understanding of basic algebraic concepts held by a group of 48 grade 8 Chinese students.…

  4. Integrated map of the chromosome 8p12-p21 region, a region involved in human cancers and Werner syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imbert, A.; Chaffanet, M.; Birnbaum, D.; Pebusque, M.J. [INSERM, Marseille (France)] [and others

    1996-02-15

    This article discusses the genetic mapping of the specific region on human chromosome 8, 8p12-p21, and its implications to human hereditary cancers and diseases. The localization of disease genes such as NEFL and FGFR1 are given, accomplished using contigs which span the region of deletion involved in these hereditary diseases. 59 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Signals and Cells Involved in Regulating Liver Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang-I. Kang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Liver regeneration is a complex phenomenon aimed at maintaining a constant liver mass in the event of injury resulting in loss of hepatic parenchyma. Partial hepatectomy is followed by a series of events involving multiple signaling pathways controlled by mitogenic growth factors (HGF, EGF and their receptors (MET and EGFR. In addition multiple cytokines and other signaling molecules contribute to the orchestration of a signal which drives hepatocytes into DNA synthesis. The other cell types of the liver receive and transmit to hepatocytes complex signals so that, in the end of the regenerative process, complete hepatic tissue is assembled and regeneration is terminated at the proper time and at the right liver size. If hepatocytes fail to participate in this process, the biliary compartment is mobilized to generate populations of progenitor cells which transdifferentiate into hepatocytes and restore liver size.

  6. Mechanisms involved in alternariol-induced cell cycle arrest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alternariol (AOH), a mycotoxin produced by Alternaria sp, is often found as a contaminant in fruit and cereal products. Here we employed the murine macrophage cell line RAW 264.7 to test the hypothesis that AOH causes toxicity as a response to DNA damage. AOH at concentrations of 15–30 μM almost completely blocked cell proliferation. Within 30 min treatment, AOH (30 μM) significantly increased the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Furthermore, DNA base oxidations as well as DNA strand breaks and/or alkaline labile sites were detected by the comet assay after 2 h exposure of AOH. Cell death (mostly necrosis) was observed after prolonged exposure to the highest concentration of AOH (60 μM for 24 and 48 h) in our study. The DNA damage response involved phosphorylation (activation) of histone H2AX and check point kinase-1- and 2 (Chk-1/2). Moreover, AOH activated p53 and increased the expression of p21, Cyclin B, MDM2, and Sestrin 2; likewise the level of several miRNA was affected. AOH-induced Sestrin 2 expression was regulated by p53 and could at least partly be inhibited by antioxidants, suggesting a role of ROS in the response. Interestingly, the addition of antioxidants did not inhibit cell cycle arrest. Although the formation of ROS by itself was not directly linked cell proliferation, AOH-induced DNA damage and resulting transcriptional changes in p21, MDM2, and Cyclin B likely contribute to the reduced cell proliferation; while Sestrin 2 would contribute to the oxidant defense.

  7. Mechanisms involved in alternariol-induced cell cycle arrest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solhaug, A., E-mail: Anita.Solhaug@vetinst.no [Norwegian Veterinary Institute, Oslo (Norway); Vines, L.L. [Michigan State University, Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, East Lansing, MI (United States); Ivanova, L.; Spilsberg, B. [Norwegian Veterinary Institute, Oslo (Norway); Holme, J.A. [Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Division of Environmental Medicine, Oslo (Norway); Pestka, J. [Michigan State University, Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, East Lansing, MI (United States); Collins, A. [University of Oslo, Department of Nutrition, Faculty of Medicine, Oslo (Norway); Eriksen, G.S. [Norwegian Veterinary Institute, Oslo (Norway)

    2012-10-15

    Alternariol (AOH), a mycotoxin produced by Alternaria sp, is often found as a contaminant in fruit and cereal products. Here we employed the murine macrophage cell line RAW 264.7 to test the hypothesis that AOH causes toxicity as a response to DNA damage. AOH at concentrations of 15-30 {mu}M almost completely blocked cell proliferation. Within 30 min treatment, AOH (30 {mu}M) significantly increased the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Furthermore, DNA base oxidations as well as DNA strand breaks and/or alkaline labile sites were detected by the comet assay after 2 h exposure of AOH. Cell death (mostly necrosis) was observed after prolonged exposure to the highest concentration of AOH (60 {mu}M for 24 and 48 h) in our study. The DNA damage response involved phosphorylation (activation) of histone H2AX and check point kinase-1- and 2 (Chk-1/2). Moreover, AOH activated p53 and increased the expression of p21, Cyclin B, MDM2, and Sestrin 2; likewise the level of several miRNA was affected. AOH-induced Sestrin 2 expression was regulated by p53 and could at least partly be inhibited by antioxidants, suggesting a role of ROS in the response. Interestingly, the addition of antioxidants did not inhibit cell cycle arrest. Although the formation of ROS by itself was not directly linked cell proliferation, AOH-induced DNA damage and resulting transcriptional changes in p21, MDM2, and Cyclin B likely contribute to the reduced cell proliferation; while Sestrin 2 would contribute to the oxidant defense.

  8. Proteins interacting with mitochondrial ATP-dependent Lon protease (MAP1) in Magnaporthe oryzae are involved in rice blast disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xiao; Wei, Yi; Wang, Yu-Han; Li, Jian; Wong, Fuk-Ling; Zheng, Ya-Jie; Yan, Hai; Liu, Shao-Shuai; Liu, Jin-Liang; Jia, Bao-Lei; Zhang, Shi-Hong

    2015-10-01

    The ATP-dependent Lon protease is involved in many physiological processes. In bacteria, Lon regulates pathogenesis and, in yeast, Lon protects mitochondia from oxidative damage. However, little is known about Lon in fungal phytopathogens. MAP1, a homologue of Lon in Magnaporthe oryzae, was recently identified to be important for stress resistance and pathogenesis. Here, we focus on a novel pathogenic pathway mediated by MAP1. Based on an interaction system between rice and a tandem affinity purification (TAP)-tagged MAP1 complementation strain, we identified 23 novel fungal proteins from infected leaves using a TAP approach with mass spectrometry, and confirmed that 14 of these proteins physically interact with MAP1 in vivo. Among these 14 proteins, 11 candidates, presumably localized to the mitochondria, were biochemically determined to be substrates of MAP1 hydrolysis. Deletion mutants were created and functionally analysed to further confirm the involvement of these proteins in pathogenesis. The results indicated that all mutants showed reduced conidiation and sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide. Appressorial formations were not affected, although conidia from certain mutants were morphologically altered. In addition, virulence was reduced in four mutants, enhanced (with lesions forming earlier) in two mutants and remained unchanged in one mutant. Together with the known virulence-related proteins alternative oxidase and enoyl-CoA hydratase, we propose that most of the Lon-interacting proteins are involved in the pathogenic regulation pathway mediated by MAP1 in M. oryzae. Perturbation of this pathway may represent an effective approach for the inhibition of rice blast disease. PMID:25605006

  9. Synthetic protein interactions reveal a functional map of the cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Lisa K; Ólafsson, Guðjón; Ledesma-Fernández, Elena; Thorpe, Peter H

    2016-01-01

    To understand the function of eukaryotic cells, it is critical to understand the role of protein-protein interactions and protein localization. Currently, we do not know the importance of global protein localization nor do we understand to what extent the cell is permissive for new protein associations – a key requirement for the evolution of new protein functions. To answer this question, we fused every protein in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae with a partner from each of the major cellular compartments and quantitatively assessed the effects upon growth. This analysis reveals that cells have a remarkable and unanticipated tolerance for forced protein associations, even if these associations lead to a proportion of the protein moving compartments within the cell. Furthermore, the interactions that do perturb growth provide a functional map of spatial protein regulation, identifying key regulatory complexes for the normal homeostasis of eukaryotic cells. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13053.001 PMID:27098839

  10. Mapping the development of cerebellar Purkinje cells in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamling, Kyla R; Tobias, Zachary J C; Weissman, Tamily A

    2015-11-01

    The cells that comprise the cerebellum perform a complex integration of neural inputs to influence motor control and coordination. The functioning of this circuit depends upon Purkinje cells and other cerebellar neurons forming in the precise place and time during development. Zebrafish provide a useful platform for modeling disease and studying gene function, thus a quantitative metric of normal zebrafish cerebellar development is key for understanding how gene mutations affect the cerebellum. To begin to quantitatively measure cerebellar development in zebrafish, we have characterized the spatial and temporal patterning of Purkinje cells during the first 2 weeks of development. Differentiated Purkinje cells first emerged by 2.8 days post fertilization and were spatially patterned into separate dorsomedial and ventrolateral clusters that merged at around 4 days. Quantification of the Purkinje cell layer revealed that there was a logarithmic increase in both Purkinje cell number as well as overall volume during the first 2 weeks, while the entire region curved forward in an anterior, then ventral direction. Purkinje cell dendrites were positioned next to parallel fibers as early as 3.3 days, and Purkinje cell diameter decreased significantly from 3.3 to 14 days, possibly due to cytoplasmic reappropriation into maturing dendritic arbors. A nearest neighbor analysis showed that Purkinje cells moved slightly apart from each other from 3 to 14 days, perhaps spreading as the organized monolayer forms. This study establishes a quantitative spatiotemporal map of Purkinje cell development in zebrafish that provides an important metric for studies of cerebellar development and disease.

  11. Multifocal Extranodal Involvement of Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devrim Cabuk

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Endobronchial involvement of extrapulmonary malignant tumors is uncommon and mostly associated with breast, kidney, colon, and rectum carcinomas. A 68-year-old male with a prior diagnosis of colon non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL was admitted to the hospital with a complaint of cough, sputum, and dyspnea. The chest radiograph showed right hilar enlargement and opacity at the right middle zone suggestive of a mass lesion. Computed tomography of thorax revealed a right-sided mass lesion extending to thoracic wall with the destruction of the third and the fourth ribs and a right hilar mass lesion. Fiberoptic bronchoscopy was performed in order to evaluate endobronchial involvement and showed stenosis with mucosal tumor infiltration in right upper lobe bronchus. The pathological examination of bronchoscopic biopsy specimen reported diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and the patient was accepted as the endobronchial recurrence of sigmoid colon NHL. The patient is still under treatment of R-ICE (rituximab-ifosfamide-carboplatin-etoposide chemotherapy and partial regression of pulmonary lesions was noted after 3 courses of treatment.

  12. Specificity of MAP Kinase Signaling in Yeast Differentiation Involves Transient versus Sustained MAPK Activation

    OpenAIRE

    Sabbagh, Walid; Flatauer, Laura J.; Bardwell, A. Jane; Bardwell, Lee

    2001-01-01

    Signals transmitted by common components often elicit distinct (yet appropriate) outcomes. In yeast, two developmental options—mating and invasive growth—are both regulated by the same MAP kinase cascade. Specificity has been thought to result from specialized roles for the two MAP kinases, Kss1 and Fus3, and because Fus3 prevents Kss1 from gaining access to the mating pathway. Kss1 has been thought to participate in mating only when Fus3 is absent. Instead, we show that Kss1 is rapidly phosp...

  13. Acinar Cell Carcinoma of the Pancreas with Colon Involvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Asayama

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of acinar cell carcinoma of the pancreas with colon involvement that was difficult to distinguish from primary colon cancer. A 60-year-old man was admitted with a 1-month history of diarrhea. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT revealed a large tumor (10.6×11.6 cm at the splenic flexure of the colon. Colonoscopy showed completely round ulcerative lesions, and biopsy revealed poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma. Left hemicolectomy, resection of the jejunum and pancreas body and tail, and splenectomy were performed based on a diagnosis of descending colon cancer (cT4N0M0, stage IIB, and surgery was considered to be curative. Diagnosis was subsequently confirmed as moderately differentiated acinar cell carcinoma of the pancreas by immunohistochemical staining (pT3N0M0, stage IIA. Multiple liver metastases with portal thrombosis were found 8 weeks postoperatively. Despite combination chemotherapy with oral S-1 and gemcitabine, the patient died of hepatic failure with no effect of chemotherapy 14 weeks postoperatively. Correct diagnosis was difficult to determine preoperatively from the clinical, CT, and colonoscopy findings. Moreover, the disease was extremely aggressive even after curative resection. Physicians should consider pancreatic cancer in the differential diagnosis of similar cases.

  14. Convergence of Iterative Sequences for Generalized Equilibrium Problems Involving Inverse-Strongly Monotone Mappings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cho SunYoung

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The purpose of this paper is to consider the weak convergence of an iterative sequence for finding a common element in the set of solutions of generalized equilibrium problems, in the set of solutions of classical variational inequalities, and in the set of fixed points of nonexpansive mappings.

  15. Superoxide anions and hydrogen peroxide induce hepatocyte death by different mechanisms : Involvement of JNK and ERK MAP kinases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Conde de la Rosa, L; Schoemaker, MH; Vrenken, TE; Buist-Homan, M; Havinga, R; Jansen, PLM; Moshage, H

    2006-01-01

    Background/Aims: In liver diseases, reactive oxygen species (ROS) are involved in cell death and liver injury, but the mechanisms are not completely elucidated. To elucidate the mechanisms of hepatocyte cell death induced by the ROS superoxide anions and hydrogen peroxide, primary cultures of hepato

  16. Fine-mapping of an Arabidopsis cell death mutation locus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    An Arabidopsis cell death mutation locus was mapped to chromosome 2 between IGS1 and mi421. The YAC clone ends, CIC9A3R, CIC11C7L, CIC2G5R and RFLP marker CDs3 within this interval, were used to probe TAMU BAC library and 31 BAC clones were obtained. A BAC contig encompassing the mutation locus, which consists of T6P5, T7M23, T12A21, T8L6 and T18A18, was identified by Southern hybridization with the BAC ends as probes. 11 CAPS and 12 STS markers were developed in this region. These results will facilitate map-based cloning of the genes and sequencing of the genomic DNA in this region.

  17. Fine-mapping of an Arabidopsis cell death mutation locus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    牟中林; 戴亚; 李家洋

    2000-01-01

    An Arabidopsis cell death mutation locus was mapped to chromosome 2 between lGS1 and mi421. The YAC clone ends, CIC9A3R, CIC11C7L, CIC2G5R and RFLP marker CDs3 within this interval, were used to probe TAMU BAC library and 31 BAC clones were obtained. A BAC contig encompassing the mutation locus, which consists of T6P5, T7M23, T12A21, T8L6 and T18A18, was identified by Southern hybridization with the BAC ends as probes. 11 CAPS and 12 STS markers were developed in this region. These results will facilitate map-based cloning of the genes and sequencing of the genomic DNA in this region.

  18. Activation of the unliganded estrogen receptor by EGF involves the MAP kinase pathway and direct phosphorylation.

    OpenAIRE

    Bunone, G; Briand, P A; Miksicek, R J; Picard, D.

    1996-01-01

    The estrogen receptor (ER) can be activated as a transcription factor either by binding of cognate estrogenic ligand or, indirectly, by a variety of other extracellular signals. As a first step towards elucidating the mechanism of 'steroid-independent activation' of the ER by the epidermal growth factor (EGF), we have mapped the ER target domain and determined the signaling pathway. We show that the N-terminal transcriptional activation function AF-1, but not the C-terminal AF-2, is necessary...

  19. Some generalization of integral inequalities for twice differentiable mappings involving fractional integrals

    OpenAIRE

    Sarikaya Mehmet Zeki; Budak Huseyin

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a general integral identity involving Riemann- Liouville fractional integrals is derived. By use this identity, we establish new some generalized inequalities of the Hermite-Hadamard’s type for functions whose absolute values of derivatives are convex.

  20. DMPD: Signals and receptors involved in recruitment of inflammatory cells. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 7744810 Signals and receptors involved in recruitment of inflammatory cells. Ben-Ba...ow Signals and receptors involved in recruitment of inflammatory cells. PubmedID 7744810 Title Signals and r...eceptors involved in recruitment of inflammatory cells. Authors Ben-Baruch A, Mic

  1. Involvement of the right inferior longitudinal fascicle in visual hemiagnosia: a brain stimulation mapping study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández Coello, Alejandro; Duvaux, Sophie; De Benedictis, Alessandro; Matsuda, Ryosuke; Duffau, Hugues

    2013-01-01

    Neural foundations underlying visual agnosia are poorly understood. The authors present the case of a patient who underwent awake surgery for a right basal temporooccipital low-grade glioma in which direct electrostimulation was used both at the cortical and subcortical level. Brain mapping over the inferior longitudinal fascicle generated contralateral visual hemiagnosia. These original findings are in agreement with recent tractography data that have confirmed the existence of an occipitotemporal pathway connecting occipital visual input to higher-level processing in temporal lobe structures. This is the first report of a true transient visual hemiagnosia elicited through electrostimulation, supporting the crucial role of inferior longitudinal fascicle in visual recognition.

  2. What Happens Inside a Fuel Cell? Developing an Experimental Functional Map of Fuel Cell Performance

    KAUST Repository

    Brett, Daniel J. L.

    2010-08-20

    Fuel cell performance is determined by the complex interplay of mass transport, energy transfer and electrochemical processes. The convolution of these processes leads to spatial heterogeneity in the way that fuel cells perform, particularly due to reactant consumption, water management and the design of fluid-flow plates. It is therefore unlikely that any bulk measurement made on a fuel cell will accurately represent performance at all parts of the cell. The ability to make spatially resolved measurements in a fuel cell provides one of the most useful ways in which to monitor and optimise performance. This Minireview explores a range of in situ techniques being used to study fuel cells and describes the use of novel experimental techniques that the authors have used to develop an \\'experimental functional map\\' of fuel cell performance. These techniques include the mapping of current density, electrochemical impedance, electrolyte conductivity, contact resistance and CO poisoning distribution within working PEFCs, as well as mapping the flow of reactant in gas channels using laser Doppler anemometry (LDA). For the high-temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), temperature mapping, reference electrode placement and the use of Raman spectroscopy are described along with methods to map the microstructural features of electrodes. The combination of these techniques, applied across a range of fuel cell operating conditions, allows a unique picture of the internal workings of fuel cells to be obtained and have been used to validate both numerical and analytical models. © 2010 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH& Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. A genetic interaction map of cell cycle regulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billmann, Maximilian; Horn, Thomas; Fischer, Bernd; Sandmann, Thomas; Huber, Wolfgang; Boutros, Michael

    2016-04-15

    Cell-based RNA interference (RNAi) is a powerful approach to screen for modulators of many cellular processes. However, resulting candidate gene lists from cell-based assays comprise diverse effectors, both direct and indirect, and further dissecting their functions can be challenging. Here we screened a genome-wide RNAi library for modulators of mitosis and cytokinesis inDrosophilaS2 cells. The screen identified many previously known genes as well as modulators that have previously not been connected to cell cycle control. We then characterized ∼300 candidate modifiers further by genetic interaction analysis using double RNAi and a multiparametric, imaging-based assay. We found that analyzing cell cycle-relevant phenotypes increased the sensitivity for associating novel gene function. Genetic interaction maps based on mitotic index and nuclear size grouped candidates into known regulatory complexes of mitosis or cytokinesis, respectively, and predicted previously uncharacterized components of known processes. For example, we confirmed a role for theDrosophilaCCR4 mRNA processing complex componentl(2)NC136during the mitotic exit. Our results show that the combination of genome-scale RNAi screening and genetic interaction analysis using process-directed phenotypes provides a powerful two-step approach to assigning components to specific pathways and complexes. PMID:26912791

  4. Some generalization of integral inequalities for twice differentiable mappings involving fractional integrals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarikaya Mehmet Zeki

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a general integral identity involving Riemann- Liouville fractional integrals is derived. By use this identity, we establish new some generalized inequalities of the Hermite-Hadamard’s type for functions whose absolute values of derivatives are convex.

  5. Mapping Escherichia coli elongation factor Tu residues involved in binding of aminoacyl-tRNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiborg, Ove; Andersen, C; Knudsen, Charlotte Rohde;

    1996-01-01

    Two residues of Escherichia coli elongation factor Tu involved in binding of aminoacyl-tRNA were identified and subjected to mutational analysis. Lys-89 and Asn-90 were each replaced by either Ala or Glu. The four single mutants were denoted K89A, K89E, N90A, and N90E, respectively. The mutants w...

  6. Valproate inhibits MAP kinase signalling and cell cycle progression in S. cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desfossés-Baron, Kristelle; Hammond-Martel, Ian; Simoneau, Antoine; Sellam, Adnane; Roberts, Stephen; Wurtele, Hugo

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism of action of valproate (VPA), a widely prescribed short chain fatty acid with anticonvulsant and anticancer properties, remains poorly understood. Here, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was used as model to investigate the biological consequences of VPA exposure. We found that low pH strongly potentiates VPA-induced growth inhibition. Transcriptional profiling revealed that under these conditions, VPA modulates the expression of genes involved in diverse cellular processes including protein folding, cell wall organisation, sexual reproduction, and cell cycle progression. We further investigated the impact of VPA on selected processes and found that this drug: i) activates markers of the unfolded protein stress response such as Hac1 mRNA splicing; ii) modulates the cell wall integrity pathway by inhibiting the activation of the Slt2 MAP kinase, and synergizes with cell wall stressors such as micafungin and calcofluor white in preventing yeast growth; iii) prevents activation of the Kss1 and Fus3 MAP kinases of the mating pheromone pathway, which in turn abolishes cellular responses to alpha factor; and iv) blocks cell cycle progression and DNA replication. Overall, our data identify heretofore unknown biological responses to VPA in budding yeast, and highlight the broad spectrum of cellular pathways influenced by this chemical in eukaryotes. PMID:27782169

  7. Involvement of Plant Stem Cells or Stem Cell-Like Cells in Dedifferentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Fangwei; Feng, Zhenhua; Liu, Hailiang; Zhu, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Dedifferentiation is the transformation of cells from a given differentiated state to a less differentiated or stem cell-like state. Stem cell-related genes play important roles in dedifferentiation, which exhibits similar histone modification and DNA methylation features to stem cell maintenance. Hence, stem cell-related factors possibly synergistically function to provide a specific niche beneficial to dedifferentiation. During callus formation in Arabidopsis petioles, cells adjacent to pro...

  8. Concomitant nodal involvement by Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis and Hodgkin Lymphoma

    OpenAIRE

    Geurten, Claire; Thiry, Albert; Jamblin, Paul; Demarche, Martine; Hoyoux, Claire

    2015-01-01

    Introduction : Langerhans cell histiocytosis is defined as a clonal neoplastic proliferation of myeloid dendritic cells that upon activation migrate from the mucosal to lymph nodes. Definitive diagnosis is made by anatomo-pathological and immunohistochemical analysis. Langerhans cell histiocytosis is rarely, yet not exceptionally, found coexisting with other malignant neoplasms, suggesting it might arise in reaction to the cytokinic secretion of malignant cells. Case : We report the case o...

  9. Involvement and prognosis value of CD8(+) T cells in giant cell arteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samson, Maxime; Ly, Kim Heang; Tournier, Benjamin; Janikashvili, Nona; Trad, Malika; Ciudad, Marion; Gautheron, Alexandrine; Devilliers, Hervé; Quipourt, Valérie; Maurier, François; Meaux-Ruault, Nadine; Magy-Bertrand, Nadine; Manckoundia, Patrick; Ornetti, Paul; Maillefert, Jean-Francis; Besancenot, Jean-François; Ferrand, Christophe; Mesturoux, Laura; Labrousse, François; Fauchais, Anne-Laure; Saas, Philippe; Martin, Laurent; Audia, Sylvain; Bonnotte, Bernard

    2016-08-01

    CD8(+) T cells participate in the pathogenesis of some vasculitides. However, little is known about their role in Giant Cell Arteritis (GCA). This study was conducted to investigate CD8(+) T cell involvement in the pathogenesis of GCA. Analyses were performed at diagnosis and after 3 months of glucocorticoid treatment in 34 GCA patients and 26 age-matched healthy volunteers. Percentages of CD8(+) T-cell subsets, spectratype analysis of the TCR Vβ families of CD8(+) T cells, levels of cytokines and chemokines and immunohistochemistry of temporal artery biopsies (TAB) were assessed. Among total CD8(+) T cells, percentages of circulating cytotoxic CD8 T lymphocytes (CTL, CD3(+)CD8(+)perforin(+)granzymeB(+)), Tc17 (CD3(+)CD8(+)IL-17(+)), CD63(+)CD8(+) T cells and levels of soluble granzymes A and B were higher in patients than in controls, whereas the percentage of Tc1 cells (CD3(+)CD8(+)IFN-γ(+)) was similar. Moreover, CD8(+) T cells displayed a restricted TCR repertoire in GCA patients. Percentages of circulating CTL, Tc17 and soluble levels of granzymes A and B decreased after treatment. CXCR3 expression on CD8(+) T cells and its serum ligands (CXCL9, -10, -11) were higher in patients. Analyses of TAB revealed high expression of CXCL9 and -10 associated with infiltration by CXCR3(+)CD8(+) T cells expressing granzyme B and TiA1. The intensity of the CD8 T-cell infiltrate in TAB was predictive of the severity of the disease. This study demonstrates the implication and the prognostic value of CD8(+) T-cells in GCA and suggests that CD8(+) T-cells are recruited within the vascular wall through an interaction between CXCR3 and its ligands. PMID:27236507

  10. Consultancy Designer Involvement in New Product Development: Mapping a Novel Design Leadership Process

    OpenAIRE

    Maciver, Fiona; O'Driscoll, Aidan

    2010-01-01

    The role of design and designers in new product development (NPD) has always been problematic and complex in its approach and in the extent of its involvement (Leenders et al., 2007; Murray and O’Driscoll, 1996; Veryzer and Borja de Mozota, 2005). As the industrial design profession seeks to confront the challenges of a recessionary environment, both the designer led ‘intuitive’ approach to NPD, and the marketer led ‘systematic’ approach become outmoded (Cross, 2001; Martin, 2007). There is s...

  11. Involvement of mast cells in adipose tissue fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirai, Shizuka; Ohyane, Chie; Kim, Young-Il; Lin, Shan; Goto, Tsuyoshi; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Kim, Chu-Sook; Kang, Jihey; Yu, Rina; Kawada, Teruo

    2014-02-01

    Recently, fibrosis is observed in obese adipose tissue; however, the pathogenesis remains to be clarified. Obese adipose tissue is characterized by chronic inflammation with massive accumulation of immune cells including mast cells. The objective of the present study was to clarify the relationship between fibrosis and mast cells in obese adipose tissue, as well as to determine the origin of infiltrating mast cells. We observed the enhancement of mast cell accumulation and fibrosis in adipose tissue of severely obese diabetic db/db mice. Furthermore, adipose tissue-conditioned medium (ATCM) from severely obese diabetic db/db mice significantly enhanced collagen 5 mRNA expression in NIH-3T3 fibroblasts, and this enhancement was suppressed by the addition of an anti-mast cell protease 6 (MCP-6) antibody. An in vitro study showed that only collagen V among various types of collagen inhibited preadipocyte differentiation. Moreover, we found that ATCM from the nonobese but not obese stages of db/db mice significantly enhanced the migration of bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs). These findings suggest that immature mast cells that infiltrate into adipose tissue at the nonobese stage gradually mature with the progression of obesity and diabetes and that MCP-6 secreted from mature mast cells induces collagen V expression in obese adipose tissue, which may contribute to the process of adipose tissue fibrosis. Induction of collagen V by MCP-6 might accelerate insulin resistance via the suppression of preadipocyte differentiation.

  12. A single-cell resolution map of mouse hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestorowa, Sonia; Hamey, Fiona K; Pijuan Sala, Blanca; Diamanti, Evangelia; Shepherd, Mairi; Laurenti, Elisa; Wilson, Nicola K; Kent, David G; Göttgens, Berthold

    2016-08-25

    Maintenance of the blood system requires balanced cell fate decisions by hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs). Because cell fate choices are executed at the individual cell level, new single-cell profiling technologies offer exciting possibilities for mapping the dynamic molecular changes underlying HSPC differentiation. Here, we have used single-cell RNA sequencing to profile more than 1600 single HSPCs, and deep sequencing has enabled detection of an average of 6558 protein-coding genes per cell. Index sorting, in combination with broad sorting gates, allowed us to retrospectively assign cells to 12 commonly sorted HSPC phenotypes while also capturing intermediate cells typically excluded by conventional gating. We further show that independently generated single-cell data sets can be projected onto the single-cell resolution expression map to directly compare data from multiple groups and to build and refine new hypotheses. Reconstruction of differentiation trajectories reveals dynamic expression changes associated with early lymphoid, erythroid, and granulocyte-macrophage differentiation. The latter two trajectories were characterized by common upregulation of cell cycle and oxidative phosphorylation transcriptional programs. By using external spike-in controls, we estimate absolute messenger RNA (mRNA) levels per cell, showing for the first time that despite a general reduction in total mRNA, a subset of genes shows higher expression levels in immature stem cells consistent with active maintenance of the stem-cell state. Finally, we report the development of an intuitive Web interface as a new community resource to permit visualization of gene expression in HSPCs at single-cell resolution for any gene of choice. PMID:27365425

  13. Autophagy involved in resveratrol increased radiosensitivity in glioma stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the effect of Resveratrol combined with X-ray on radiosensitivity in glioma stem cells. Methods: The proliferation inhibition of glioma stem cells induced by X-rays and Resveratrol was assessed with MTT assay. The activation of proapoptotic effect was characterized by Hoechst 33258 stain. MDC stain and Western blot analysis were used to analyze the autophagy mechanism in X-rays-induced death of glioma stem cells. Results: MTT assay indicated that X-rays and Resveratrol decreased the viability of glioma stem cells (P<0.05); we found the proliferative inhibition of glioma stem cells was declined when we used 3-MA to inhibit autophagy(P<0.05). When the cells were treated by the Resveratrol and x-rays, their spherical shape were changed. Apoptosis was induced in glioma stem cells by combined X-rays and Resveratrol as detected by Hoechst 33258 staining. In addition, autophagy was induced in glioma stem cells in the combined treatment group as detected by MDC staining. Western blotting showed that Bcl-2 expression was decreased. in the combined treatment group (P<0.01), and the LC3-Ⅱ expression was increased in the combined treatment group (P<0.01). Conclusion: Resveratrol can increased the radiation sensitivity of glioma stem cells, the apoptosis and autophagy was induced in the glioma stem cells in the combined treatment X-rays and Resveratrol. Our results suggest that autophagy plays an essential role in the regulation of radiosensitization of glioma stem cells. (authors)

  14. Mapping of the molecular determinants involved in the interaction between eps15 and AP-2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iannolo, G; Salcini, A E; Gaidarov, I;

    1997-01-01

    domain, located in its NH2-terminal region. In addition, a proline-rich region, located in the COOH-terminal portion of eps15, can bind to the Src homology 3 domain of the crk proto-oncogene product in vitro. Recently, coimmunoprecipitation between eps15 and AP-2, a major component of coated pits......, was reported. Here, we characterize the molecular determinants of the eps15/AP-2 interaction. The AP-2 binding region of eps15 is localized in its COOH-terminal region and spans approximately 80 amino acids. At least three molecular determinants, located at residues 650-660, 680-690, and 720-730, are involved...... in the binding. AP-2 binds to eps15 through its alpha subunit (alpha-adaptin); in particular, the COOH-terminal region of alpha-adaptin, the so-called alpha-ear, contains the eps15 binding region....

  15. Genes involved in immortalization of human mammary cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stampfer, Martha R.; Yaswen, Paul

    2001-09-27

    Breast cancer progression is characterized by inappropriate cell growth. Normal cells cease growth after a limited number of cell divisions--a process called cellular senescence-while tumor cells may acquire the ability to proliferate indefinitely (immortality). Inappropriate expression of specific oncogenes in a key cellular signaling pathway (Ras, Raf) can promote tumorigenicity in immortal cells, while causing finite lifespan cells to undergo a rapid senescence-like arrest. We have studied when in the course of transformation of cultured human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC), the response to overexpressed oncogenic Raf changes from being tumor-suppressive to tumor enhancing, and what are the molecular underpinnings of this response. Our data indicate: (1) HMEC acquire the ability to maintain growth in the presence of oncogenic Raf not simply as a consequence of overcoming senescence, but as a result of a newly discovered step in the process of immortal transformation uncovered by our lab, termed conversion. Immortal cells that have not undergone conversion (e.g., cells immortalized by exogenous introduction of the immortalizing enzyme, telomerase) remain growth inhibited. (2) Finite lifespan HMEC growth arrest in response to oncogenic Raf using mediators of growth inhibition that are very different from those used in response to oncogenic Raf by rodent cells and certain other human cell types, including the connective tissue cells from the same breast tissue. While many diverse cell types appear to have in common a tumor-suppressive response to this oncogenic signal, they also have developed multiple mechanisms to elicit this response. Understanding how cancer cells acquire the crucial capacity to be immortal and to abrogate normal tumor-suppressive mechanisms may serve both to increase our understanding of breast cancer progression, and to provide new targets for therapeutic intervention. Our results indicate that normal HMEC have novel means of enforcing a Raf

  16. Cell Mapping for Nanohybrid Circuit Architecture Using Genetic Algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhu-Fei Chu; Yin-Shui Xia; Lun-Yao Wang

    2012-01-01

    Nanoelectronics constructed by nanoscale devices seems promising for the advanced development of integrated circuits (ICs). However,the lack of computer aided design (CAD) tools seriously hinders its development and applications.To investigate the cell mapping task in CAD flow,we present a genetic algorithm (GA) based method for Cmos/nanowire/MOLecular hybrid (CMOL),which is a nanohybrid circuit architecture.By designing several crossover operators and analyzing their performance,an efficient crossover operator is proposed.Combining a mutation operator,a GA based algorithm is presented and tested on the International Symposium on Circuits and Systems (ISCAS) benchmarks.The results show that the proposed method not only can obtain better area utilization and smaller delay,but also can handle larger benchmarks with CPU time improvement compared with the published methods.

  17. Inferring maps of forces inside cell membrane microdomains

    CERN Document Server

    Masson, J -B; Tuerkcan, S; Voisinne, G; Popoff, M R; Vergassola, M; Alexandrou, A

    2015-01-01

    Mapping of the forces on biomolecules in cell membranes has spurred the development of effective labels, e.g. organic fluorophores and nanoparticles, to track trajectories of single biomolecules. Standard methods use particular statistics, namely the mean square displacement, to analyze the underlying dynamics. Here, we introduce general inference methods to fully exploit information in the experimental trajectories, providing sharp estimates of the forces and the diffusion coefficients in membrane microdomains. Rapid and reliable convergence of the inference scheme is demonstrated on trajectories generated numerically. The method is then applied to infer forces and potentials acting on the receptor of the $\\epsilon$-toxin labeled by lanthanide-ion nanoparticles. Our scheme is applicable to any labeled biomolecule and results show show its general relevance for membrane compartmentation.

  18. Langerhans cell histiocytosis involving the liver of a male smoker: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Savva-Bordalo Joana; Freitas-Silva Margarida

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Langerhans' cell histiocytosis is a proliferative histiocytic disorder of unknown cause originating from dendritic cells. Case presentation The authors report a case of Langerhans' cell histiocytosis in a 48-year-old man with multisystemic disease presentation, including liver involvement. Conclusion Hepatic involvement is an uncommon feature in this rare disease and there is no consensus on the most effective therapeutic approach.

  19. Involvement of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (cyclin) in DNA replication in living cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Zuber, M; Tan, E M; Ryoji, M

    1989-01-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) (also called cyclin) is known to stimulate the activity of DNA polymerase delta but not the other DNA polymerases in vitro. We injected a human autoimmune antibody against PCNA into unfertilized eggs of Xenopus laevis and examined the effects of this antibody on the replication of injected plasmid DNA as well as egg chromosomes. The anti-PCNA antibody inhibited plasmid replication by up to 67%, demonstrating that PCNA is involved in plasmid replicatio...

  20. Mechanisms involved in ceramide-induced cell cycle arrest in human hepatocarcinoma cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Wang; Xiao-Wen Lv; Jie-Ping Shi; Xiao-Song Hu

    2007-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the effect of ceramide on the cell cycle in human hepatocarcinoma Bel7402 cells.Possible molecular mechanisms were explored.METHODS:[3-(4,5)-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide(MTT)assay,plasmid transfection,reporter assay,FACS and Western blotting analyses were employed to investigate the effect and the related molecular mechanisms of C2-ceramide on the cell cycle of Bel7402 cells.RESULTS:C2-ceramide was found to inhibit the growth of Bel7402 cells by inducing cell cycle arrest.During the process,the expression of p21 protein increased,while that of cyclinD1,phospho-ERK1/2 and c-myc decreased.Furthermore,the level of CDK7 was downregulated,while the transcriptional activity of PPARγ was upregulated.Addition of GW9662,which is a PPARγ specific antagonist,could reserve the modulation action on CDK7.CONCLUSION:Our results support the hypothesis that cell cycle arrest induced by C2-ceramide may be mediated via accumulation of p21 and reduction of cyclinD1 and CDK7,at least partly,through PPARγ activation.The ERK signaling pathway was involved in this process.

  1. Quantitative trait loci mapping reveals candidate pathways regulating cell cycle duration in Plasmodium falciparum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siwo Geoffrey

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Elevated parasite biomass in the human red blood cells can lead to increased malaria morbidity. The genes and mechanisms regulating growth and development of Plasmodium falciparum through its erythrocytic cycle are not well understood. We previously showed that strains HB3 and Dd2 diverge in their proliferation rates, and here use quantitative trait loci mapping in 34 progeny from a cross between these parent clones along with integrative bioinformatics to identify genetic loci and candidate genes that control divergences in cell cycle duration. Results Genetic mapping of cell cycle duration revealed a four-locus genetic model, including a major genetic effect on chromosome 12, which accounts for 75% of the inherited phenotype variation. These QTL span 165 genes, the majority of which have no predicted function based on homology. We present a method to systematically prioritize candidate genes using the extensive sequence and transcriptional information available for the parent lines. Putative functions were assigned to the prioritized genes based on protein interaction networks and expression eQTL from our earlier study. DNA metabolism or antigenic variation functional categories were enriched among our prioritized candidate genes. Genes were then analyzed to determine if they interact with cyclins or other proteins known to be involved in the regulation of cell cycle. Conclusions We show that the divergent proliferation rate between a drug resistant and drug sensitive parent clone is under genetic regulation and is segregating as a complex trait in 34 progeny. We map a major locus along with additional secondary effects, and use the wealth of genome data to identify key candidate genes. Of particular interest are a nucleosome assembly protein (PFL0185c, a Zinc finger transcription factor (PFL0465c both on chromosome 12 and a ribosomal protein L7Ae-related on chromosome 4 (PFD0960c.

  2. ERK is involved in the reorganization of somatosensory cortical maps in adult rats submitted to hindlimb unloading.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erwan Dupont

    Full Text Available Sensorimotor restriction by a 14-day period of hindlimb unloading (HU in the adult rat induces a reorganization of topographic maps and receptive fields. However, the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. Interest was turned towards a possible implication of intracellular MAPK signaling pathway since Extracellular-signal-Regulated Kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2 is known to play a significant role in the control of synaptic plasticity. In order to better understand the mechanisms underlying cortical plasticity in adult rats submitted to a sensorimotor restriction, we analyzed the time-course of ERK1/2 activation by immunoblot and of cortical reorganization by electrophysiological recordings, on rats submitted to hindlimb unloading over four weeks. Immunohistochemistry analysis provided evidence that ERK1/2 phosphorylation was increased in layer III neurons of the somatosensory cortex. This increase was transient, and parallel to the changes in hindpaw cortical map area (layer IV. By contrast, receptive fields were progressively enlarged from 7 to 28 days of hindlimb unloading. To determine whether ERK1/2 was involved in cortical remapping, we administered a specific ERK1/2 inhibitor (PD-98059 through osmotic mini-pump in rats hindlimb unloaded for 14 days. Results demonstrate that focal inhibition of ERK1/2 pathway prevents cortical reorganization, but had no effect on receptive fields. These results suggest that ERK1/2 plays a role in the induction of cortical plasticity during hindlimb unloading.

  3. Granular cell tumor with orbital involvement in a child

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reis, Fabiano [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (FCM/UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Fac. de Ciencias Medicas. Dept. de Radiologia; Iyeyasu, Josie Naomi; Carvalho, Keila Monteiro de [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (FCM/UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Fac. de Ciencias Medicas. Dept. de Oftalmo-Otorrinolaringologia; Altemani, Albina Messias [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (FCM/UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Fac. de Ciencias Medicas. Dept. de Anatomia Patologica

    2011-09-15

    The authors report a rare case of granular cell tumor in the left medial rectus muscle of a seven-year-old boy. Clinical, pathologic and radiologic findings of the present case are described and a brief literature review is undertaken. (author)

  4. Neurorestorative Role of Stem Cells in Alzheimer's Disease: Astrocyte Involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sung S; Lee, Sang-Rae; Lee, Hong J

    2016-01-01

    Neurogenesis is maintained in both neonatal and adult brain, although it is dramatically reduced in aged neurogenic brain region such as the subgranular layer and subventricular zone of the dentate gyrus (DG). Astrocytes play important roles for survival and maintenance of neurons as well as maintenance of neurogenic niche in quiescent state. Aβ can induce astrocyte activation which give rise to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cytotoxic cytokines and chemokines, and subsequently induce neuronal death. Unfortunately, the current therapeutic medicines have been limited to reduce the symptoms and delay the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD), but not to cure it. Stem cells enhance neurogenesis and Aβ clearing as well as improved cognitive impairment. Neurotrophins and growth factors which are produced from both stem cells and astrocytes also have neuroprotective effects via neurogenesis. Secreted factors from both astrocytes and neural stem cells also are influenced in neurogenesis and neuron survival in neurodegenerative diseases. Transplanted stem cells overexpressing neurogenic factors may be an effective and therapeutic tool to enhance neurogenesis for AD. PMID:27018261

  5. Involvement of epigenetic modifiers in the pathogenesis of testicular dysgenesis and germ cell cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lawaetz, Andreas C.; Almstrup, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    cell is a fetal germ cell that has been arrested during development due to testicular dysgenesis. CIS cells retain a fetal and open chromatin structure, and recently several epigenetic modifiers have been suggested to be involved in testicular dysgenesis in mice. We here review the possible involvement...... of epigenetic modifiers with a focus on jumonji C enzymes in the development of testicular dysgenesis and germ cell cancer in men....

  6. HAM-5 functions as a MAP kinase scaffold during cell fusion in Neurospora crassa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilfried Jonkers

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Cell fusion in genetically identical Neurospora crassa germlings and in hyphae is a highly regulated process involving the activation of a conserved MAP kinase cascade that includes NRC-1, MEK-2 and MAK-2. During chemotrophic growth in germlings, the MAP kinase cascade members localize to conidial anastomosis tube (CAT tips every ∼8 minutes, perfectly out of phase with another protein that is recruited to the tip: SOFT, a recently identified scaffold for the MAK-1 MAP kinase pathway in Sordaria macrospora. How the MAK-2 oscillation process is initiated, maintained and what proteins regulate the MAP kinase cascade is currently unclear. A global phosphoproteomics approach using an allele of mak-2 (mak-2Q100G that can be specifically inhibited by the ATP analog 1NM-PP1 was utilized to identify MAK-2 kinase targets in germlings that were potentially involved in this process. One such putative target was HAM-5, a protein of unknown biochemical function. Previously, Δham-5 mutants were shown to be deficient for hyphal fusion. Here we show that HAM-5-GFP co-localized with NRC-1, MEK-2 and MAK-2 and oscillated with identical dynamics from the cytoplasm to CAT tips during chemotropic interactions. In the Δmak-2 strain, HAM-5-GFP localized to punctate complexes that did not oscillate, but still localized to the germling tip, suggesting that MAK-2 activity influences HAM-5 function/localization. However, MAK-2-GFP showed cytoplasmic and nuclear localization in a Δham-5 strain and did not localize to puncta. Via co-immunoprecipitation experiments, HAM-5 was shown to physically interact with NRC-1, MEK-2 and MAK-2, suggesting that it functions as a scaffold/transport hub for the MAP kinase cascade members for oscillation and chemotropic interactions during germling and hyphal fusion in N. crassa. The identification of HAM-5 as a scaffold-like protein will help to link the activation of MAK-2 cascade to upstream factors and proteins involved in this

  7. NRF2 activation is involved in ozonated human serum upregulation of HO-1 in endothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pecorelli, Alessandra [Department of Molecular and Developmental Medicine, University of Siena (Italy); Child Neuropsychiatry Unit, University Hospital, AOUS, Siena (Italy); Bocci, Velio [Department of Physiology, University of Siena (Italy); Acquaviva, Alessandra [Department of Molecular and Developmental Medicine, University of Siena (Italy); Belmonte, Giuseppe [Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Siena (Italy); Gardi, Concetta [Department of Molecular and Developmental Medicine, University of Siena (Italy); Virgili, Fabio [INRAN, Rome (Italy); Ciccoli, Lucia [Department of Molecular and Developmental Medicine, University of Siena (Italy); Valacchi, Giuseppe, E-mail: giuseppe.valacchi@unife.it [Department of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, University of Ferrara (Italy); Department of Food and Nutrition, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-02-15

    During the last decade, it has been shown that the activation of NRF2 and the binding to electrophile-responsive element (EpREs), stimulates the expression of a great number of genes responsible for the synthesis of phase I and phase II proteins, including antioxidants enzymes and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). This critical cell response occurs in cardiovascular, degenerative and chronic infective diseases aggravated by a chronic oxidative stress. In our previous reports we have shown that ozonated plasma is able to up-regulate HO-1 expression in endothelial cells. In the present work we investigated a candidate mechanism involved in this process. After treatment with increasing doses of ozonated serum (20, 40 and 80 μg/mL O{sub 3} per mL of serum), a clear dose dependent activation of NRF2 and the subsequent induction of HO-1 and NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1(NQO1) was observed. This effect was also present when cells were treated with serum and hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) or serum and 4-hydroxynonenal (4HNE). Moreover, the treatment with ozonated serum was associated with a dose-dependent activation of extracellular-signal-regulated kinases (ERK1/2) and p38 MAP kinases (p38), not directly involved in NRF2 activation. These data, provide a new insight on the mechanism responsible for the induction of HO-1 expression by ozonated serum in the endothelium, and have a practical importance as an expedient approach to the treatment of patients with both effective orthodox drugs and ozonated autohemotherapy, targeted to the restoration of redox homeostasis. - Highlights: ► Endothelial HO1 is upregulated by ozonated plasma ► This activation is induced by NRF2 and it is ERK independent. ► 4HNE and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} are the main molecules involved in this process. ► Ozonated plasma induced a hormetic effect ► Combination of orthodox medicine and ozonated plasma can be a useful treatment.

  8. Cytological diagnosis of Langerhans cell histiocytosis with cutaneous involvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushama A Chandekar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH is a rare disease affecting predominantly children. The course of the disease varies, from spontaneous resolution to a progressive multisystem disorder with organ dysfunction and potential life-threatening complications. Diagnosis of LCH is often difficult and may be delayed because of its rarity and especially so if it occurs with unusual presentation. Fine needle aspiration cytology of a 4 year old male child, a case of LCH is presented with a purpose of highlighting the characteristic cytological features. A high index of suspicion, awareness of characteristic cytological features of LCH and its differential diagnoses is necessary. This can obviate the need of biopsy and electron microscopy. Immunohistochemistry if available can be performed on cytology smear and cell block.

  9. Mediastinal germ cell tumour with massive pulmonary involvement

    OpenAIRE

    Kawamukai, Kenji; Di Saverio, Salomone; Antonacci, Filippo; Lacava, Nicola; Boaron, Maurizio

    2011-01-01

    Multimodality treatment, with chemotherapy and surgery, is potentially curative in case of non-seminomatous germ cell tumours. The authors present the case of a primitive mediastinal GTC with bilateral lung metastases. The patient was treated with five cycles of chemotherapy. Restaging showed reduction of the extent and of 18 FDG intake and β-HCG serum levels. The patient underwent two-step surgical excision of the tumours: mediastinal lesion and 35 lung metastases were resected by a right th...

  10. Crypt cells are involved in kin recognition in larval zebrafish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biechl, Daniela; Tietje, Kristin; Gerlach, Gabriele; Wullimann, Mario F.

    2016-01-01

    Zebrafish larvae imprint on visual and olfactory kin cues at day 5 and 6 postfertilization, respectively, resulting in kin recognition later in life. Exposure to non-kin cues prevents imprinting and kin recognition. Imprinting depends on MHC class II related signals and only larvae sharing MHC class II alleles can imprint on each other. Here, we analyzed which type of olfactory sensory neuron (OSN) detects kin odor. The single teleost olfactory epithelium harbors ciliated OSNs carrying OR and TAAR gene family receptors (mammals: main olfactory epithelium) and microvillous OSNs with V1R and V2R gene family receptors (mammals: vomeronasal organ). Additionally, teleosts exhibit crypt cells which possess microvilli and cilia. We used the activity marker pERK (phosphorylated extracellular signal regulated kinase) after stimulating 9 day old zebrafish larvae with either non-kin conspecific or food odor. While food odor activated both ciliated and microvillous OSNs, only the latter were activated by conspecific odor, crypt cells showed no activation to both stimuli. Then, we tested imprinted and non-imprinted larvae (full siblings) for kin odor detection. We provide the first direct evidence that crypt cells, and likely a subpopulation of microvillous OSNs, but not ciliated OSNs, play a role in detecting a kin odor related signal. PMID:27087508

  11. Crypt cells are involved in kin recognition in larval zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biechl, Daniela; Tietje, Kristin; Gerlach, Gabriele; Wullimann, Mario F

    2016-01-01

    Zebrafish larvae imprint on visual and olfactory kin cues at day 5 and 6 postfertilization, respectively, resulting in kin recognition later in life. Exposure to non-kin cues prevents imprinting and kin recognition. Imprinting depends on MHC class II related signals and only larvae sharing MHC class II alleles can imprint on each other. Here, we analyzed which type of olfactory sensory neuron (OSN) detects kin odor. The single teleost olfactory epithelium harbors ciliated OSNs carrying OR and TAAR gene family receptors (mammals: main olfactory epithelium) and microvillous OSNs with V1R and V2R gene family receptors (mammals: vomeronasal organ). Additionally, teleosts exhibit crypt cells which possess microvilli and cilia. We used the activity marker pERK (phosphorylated extracellular signal regulated kinase) after stimulating 9 day old zebrafish larvae with either non-kin conspecific or food odor. While food odor activated both ciliated and microvillous OSNs, only the latter were activated by conspecific odor, crypt cells showed no activation to both stimuli. Then, we tested imprinted and non-imprinted larvae (full siblings) for kin odor detection. We provide the first direct evidence that crypt cells, and likely a subpopulation of microvillous OSNs, but not ciliated OSNs, play a role in detecting a kin odor related signal. PMID:27087508

  12. Ion channels involved in cell volume regulation: effects on migration, proliferation, and programmed cell death in non adherent EAT cells and adherent ELA cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Else Kay

    2011-01-01

    This mini review outlines studies of cell volume regulation in two closely related mammalian cell lines: nonadherent Ehrlich ascites tumour cells (EATC) and adherent Ehrlich Lettre ascites (ELA) cells. Focus is on the regulatory volume decrease (RVD) that occurs after cell swelling, the volume regulatory ion channels involved, and the mechanisms (cellular signalling pathways) that regulate these channels. Finally, I shall also briefly review current investigations in these two cell lines that focuses on how changes in cell volume can regulate cell functions such as cell migration, proliferation, and programmed cell death.

  13. MAP4K4 deficiency in CD4(+) T cells aggravates lung damage induced by ozone-oxidized black carbon particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Ming; Chu, Hongqian; Li, Yuan; Tao, Xi; Cheng, Zhiyuan; Pan, Yao; Meng, Qinghe; Li, Leilei; Hou, Xiaohong; Chen, Yueyue; Huang, Hongpeng; Jia, Guang; Shang, Jing; Zhu, Tong; Shang, Lanqin; Hao, Weidong; Wei, Xuetao

    2016-09-01

    As the main composition of combustion, black carbon (BC) is becoming more and more noticeable at home and abroad. Ozone-oxidized black carbon (oBC) was produced through aging of ozone, one of the near-surface pollutants, to black carbon. And oBC was found to be more oxidation and cell toxicity when compared with BC. Besides, as a key cell of immunity, whether CD4(+) T cell would involve in lung inflammation induced by particular matter is still unclear. This study aims to observe the effect of oBC on lung damage in mice and discuss how the functional MAP4K4 defect CD4(+) T cells (conditional knockout of MAP4K4) presents its role in this process. In our study, MAP4K4 deletion in CD4(+) T cells (MAP4K4 cKO) could increase cell number of macrophages, lymphocytes and neutrophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) exposed to oBC. MAP4K4 deletion in CD4(+) T cell also affected CD4(+) T cell differentiation in mediastinal lymph nodes after oBC stimulation. The number of CD4(+) IL17(+) T cell increased obviously. The levels of IL-6 mRNA of lung in MAP4K4 cKO mice was higher than that in wild type mice after exposed to oBC, while the level of IL-6 in BALF had the same trend. Histological examination showed that MAP4K4 deletion in CD4(+) T cells affected lung inflammation induced by oBC. Results indicated that MAP4K4 cKO in CD4(+) T cells upgraded the level of inflammation in lung when exposed to oBC, which may be connected to the CD4(+) T cell differentiation and JNK, ERK and P38 pathways. PMID:27504712

  14. Maid (GCIP) is involved in cell cycle control of hepatocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnenberg-Riethmacher, Eva; Wüstefeld, Torsten; Miehe, Michaela;

    2007-01-01

    The function of Maid (GCIP), a cyclinD-binding helix-loop-helix protein, was analyzed by targeted disruption in mice. We show that Maid function is not required for normal embryonic development. However, older Maid-deficient mice-in contrast to wild-type controls--develop hepatocellular carcinomas....... Therefore, we studied the role of Maid during cell cycle progression after partial hepatectomy (PH). Lack of Maid expression after PH was associated with a delay in G1/S-phase progression as evidenced by delayed cyclinA expression and DNA replication in Maid-deficient mice. However, at later time points...

  15. Rydberg and valence state excitation dynamics: a velocity map imaging study involving the E-V state interaction in HBr.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaouris, Dimitris; Kartakoullis, Andreas; Glodic, Pavle; Samartzis, Peter C; Rafn Hróðmarsson, Helgi; Kvaran, Ágúst

    2015-04-28

    Photoexcitation dynamics of the E((1)Σ(+)) (v' = 0) Rydberg state and the V((1)Σ(+)) (v') ion-pair vibrational states of HBr are investigated by velocity map imaging (VMI). H(+) photoions, produced through a number of vibrational and rotational levels of the two states were imaged and kinetic energy release (KER) and angular distributions were extracted from the data. In agreement with previous work, we found the photodissociation channels forming H*(n = 2) + Br((2)P3/2)/Br*((2)P1/2) to be dominant. Autoionization pathways leading to H(+) + Br((2)P3/2)/Br*((2)P1/2) via either HBr(+)((2)Π3/2) or HBr(+)*((2)Π1/2) formation were also present. The analysis of KER and angular distributions and comparison with rotationally and mass resolved resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) spectra revealed the excitation transition mechanisms and characteristics of states involved as well as the involvement of the E-V state interactions and their v' and J' dependence. PMID:25801122

  16. Direct observation of catch bonds involving cell-adhesion molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Bryan T.; Long, Mian; Piper, James W.; Yago, Tadayuki; McEver, Rodger P.; Zhu, Cheng

    2003-05-01

    Bonds between adhesion molecules are often mechanically stressed. A striking example is the tensile force applied to selectin-ligand bonds, which mediate the tethering and rolling of flowing leukocytes on vascular surfaces. It has been suggested that force could either shorten bond lifetimes, because work done by the force could lower the energy barrier between the bound and free states (`slip'), or prolong bond lifetimes by deforming the molecules such that they lock more tightly (`catch'). Whereas slip bonds have been widely observed, catch bonds have not been demonstrated experimentally. Here, using atomic force microscopy and flow-chamber experiments, we show that increasing force first prolonged and then shortened the lifetimes of P-selectin complexes with P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1, revealing both catch and slip bond behaviour. Transitions between catch and slip bonds might explain why leukocyte rolling on selectins first increases and then decreases as wall shear stress increases. This dual response to force provides a mechanism for regulating cell adhesion under conditions of variable mechanical stress.

  17. Over half of breakpoints in gene pairs involved in cancer-specific recurrent translocations are mapped to human chromosomal fragile sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierce Levi CT

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene rearrangements such as chromosomal translocations have been shown to contribute to cancer development. Human chromosomal fragile sites are regions of the genome especially prone to breakage, and have been implicated in various chromosome abnormalities found in cancer. However, there has been no comprehensive and quantitative examination of the location of fragile sites in relation to all chromosomal aberrations. Results Using up-to-date databases containing all cancer-specific recurrent translocations, we have examined 444 unique pairs of genes involved in these translocations to determine the correlation of translocation breakpoints and fragile sites in the gene pairs. We found that over half (52% of translocation breakpoints in at least one gene of these gene pairs are mapped to fragile sites. Among these, we examined the DNA sequences within and flanking three randomly selected pairs of translocation-prone genes, and found that they exhibit characteristic features of fragile DNA, with frequent AT-rich flexibility islands and the potential of forming highly stable secondary structures. Conclusion Our study is the first to examine gene pairs involved in all recurrent chromosomal translocations observed in tumor cells, and to correlate the location of more than half of breakpoints to positions of known fragile sites. These results provide strong evidence to support a causative role for fragile sites in the generation of cancer-specific chromosomal rearrangements.

  18. A novel isoform of MAP4 organises the paraxial microtubule array required for muscle cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogessie, Binyam; Roth, Daniel; Rahil, Zainab; Straube, Anne

    2015-01-01

    The microtubule cytoskeleton is critical for muscle cell differentiation and undergoes reorganisation into an array of paraxial microtubules, which serves as template for contractile sarcomere formation. In this study, we identify a previously uncharacterised isoform of microtubule-associated protein MAP4, oMAP4, as a microtubule organising factor that is crucial for myogenesis. We show that oMAP4 is expressed upon muscle cell differentiation and is the only MAP4 isoform essential for normal progression of the myogenic differentiation programme. Depletion of oMAP4 impairs cell elongation and cell-cell fusion. Most notably, oMAP4 is required for paraxial microtubule organisation in muscle cells and prevents dynein- and kinesin-driven microtubule-microtubule sliding. Purified oMAP4 aligns dynamic microtubules into antiparallel bundles that withstand motor forces in vitro. We propose a model in which the cooperation of dynein-mediated microtubule transport and oMAP4-mediated zippering of microtubules drives formation of a paraxial microtubule array that provides critical support for the polarisation and elongation of myotubes. PMID:25898002

  19. Mapping interactions between mRNA export factors in living cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I-Fang Teng

    Full Text Available The TREX complex couples nuclear mRNA processing events with subsequent export to the cytoplasm. TREX also acts as a binding platform for the mRNA export receptor Nxf1. The sites of mRNA transcription and processing within the nucleus have been studied extensively. However, little is known about where TREX assembly takes place and where Nxf1 is recruited to TREX to form the export competent mRNP. Here we have used sensitized emission Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET and fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM-FRET, to produce a spatial map in living cells of the sites for the interaction of two TREX subunits, Alyref and Chtop, with Nxf1. Prominent assembly sites for export factors are found in the vicinity of nuclear speckles in regions known to be involved in transcription, splicing and exon junction complex formation highlighting the close coupling of mRNA export with mRNP biogenesis.

  20. The involvement of glucose-6-phosphatase in mucilage secretion by root cap cells of Zea mays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R.; McClelen, C. E.

    1985-01-01

    In order to determine the involvement of glucose-6-phosphatase in mucilage secretion by root cap cells, we have cytochemically localized the enzyme in columella and peripheral cells of root caps of Zea mays. Glucose-6-phosphatase is associated with the plasmalemma and cell wall of columella cells. As columella cells differentiate into peripheral cells and begin to produce and secrete mucilage, glucose-6-phosphatase staining intensifies and becomes associated with the mucilage and, to a lesser extent, the cell wall. Cells being sloughed from the cap are characterized by glucose-6-phosphatase staining being associated with the vacuole and plasmalemma. These changes in enzyme localization during cellular differentiation in root caps suggest that glucose-6-phosphatase is involved in the production and/or secretion of mucilage by peripheral cells of Z. mays.

  1. The Hagfish Gland Thread Cell: A Fiber-Producing Cell Involved in Predator Defense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas S. Fudge

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Fibers are ubiquitous in biology, and include tensile materials produced by specialized glands (such as silks, extracellular fibrils that reinforce exoskeletons and connective tissues (such as chitin and collagen, as well as intracellular filaments that make up the metazoan cytoskeleton (such as F-actin, microtubules, and intermediate filaments. Hagfish gland thread cells are unique in that they produce a high aspect ratio fiber from cytoskeletal building blocks within the confines of their cytoplasm. These threads are elaborately coiled into structures that readily unravel when they are ejected into seawater from the slime glands. In this review we summarize what is currently known about the structure and function of gland thread cells and we speculate about the mechanism that these cells use to produce a mechanically robust fiber that is almost one hundred thousand times longer than it is wide. We propose that a key feature of this mechanism involves the unidirectional rotation of the cell’s nucleus, which would serve to twist disorganized filaments into a coherent thread and impart a torsional stress on the thread that would both facilitate coiling and drive energetic unravelling in seawater.

  2. Map service: United States Decadal Production History Cells

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This map service displays present and past oil and gas production in the United States, as well as the location and intensity of exploratory drilling outside...

  3. Molecular pathways involved in neuronal cell adhesion and membrane scaffolding contribute to schizophrenia and bipolar disorder susceptibility.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Dushlaine, C

    2011-03-01

    Susceptibility to schizophrenia and bipolar disorder may involve a substantial, shared contribution from thousands of common genetic variants, each of small effect. Identifying whether risk variants map to specific molecular pathways is potentially biologically informative. We report a molecular pathway analysis using the single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) ratio test, which compares the ratio of nominally significant (P<0.05) to nonsignificant SNPs in a given pathway to identify the \\'enrichment\\' for association signals. We applied this approach to the discovery (the International Schizophrenia Consortium (n=6909)) and validation (Genetic Association Information Network (n=2729)) of schizophrenia genome-wide association study (GWAS) data sets. We investigated each of the 212 experimentally validated pathways described in the Kyoto Encyclopaedia of Genes and Genomes in the discovery sample. Nominally significant pathways were tested in the validation sample, and five pathways were found to be significant (P=0.03-0.001); only the cell adhesion molecule (CAM) pathway withstood conservative correction for multiple testing. Interestingly, this pathway was also significantly associated with bipolar disorder (Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium (n=4847)) (P=0.01). At a gene level, CAM genes associated in all three samples (NRXN1 and CNTNAP2), which were previously implicated in specific language disorder, autism and schizophrenia. The CAM pathway functions in neuronal cell adhesion, which is critical for synaptic formation and normal cell signaling. Similar pathways have also emerged from a pathway analysis of autism, suggesting that mechanisms involved in neuronal cell adhesion may contribute broadly to neurodevelopmental psychiatric phenotypes.

  4. P12 - PTHC1: A Continuing Cell Line Expressing PTH and Genes Involved in Calcium Homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Fabbri, S.; Mazzotta, C.; Ciuffi, S.; Mavilia, C.; Galli, G.; Zonefrati, R; Strigoli, D.; Cavalli, L.; Cavalli, T.; Brandi, M.L.

    2010-01-01

    The main organs regulating serum levels of ionised calcium (Ca2+) are the parathyroids, which are composed of two different cell types: chief cells and oxyphil cells. Chief cells, through the calcium sensing receptor (CaSR), are affected by changes in calcium concentration, modifying PTH secretion in proportion to calcium levels. Current understanding of calcium regulation mechanisms connected to PTH and of the signalling pathways involved derive from in vitro studies carried out on primary c...

  5. Pulmonary Involvement of Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma, Unspecified: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Jin; Shim, Hyo Sub; Ham, Seok Jin; Kim, Tae Hoon; Kim, Sang Jin [Gangnam Severance Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-01-15

    Peripheral T-cell lymphoma is a rare type of lymphoma that's derived from postthymic lymphoid T cells. Pulmonary involvement of peripheral T-cell lymphoma of the unspecified type is very rare and the imaging findings of this illness have rarely been reported. We present here a case of peripheral T-cell lymphoma of the unspecified type with a cavitary lesion in the lung parenchyma, and we pathologically confirmed this illness by performing video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery.

  6. Involvement of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (Cyclin) in DNA replication in living cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuber, M.; Tan, E.M.; Ryoji, M.

    1989-01-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) (also called cyclin) is known to stimulate the activity of DNA polymerase /delta/ but not the other DNA polymerases in vitro. The authors injected a human autoimmune antibody against PCNA into unfertilized eggs of Xenopus laevis and examined the effects of this antibody on the replication of injected plasmid DNA as well as egg chromosomes. The anti-PCNA antibody inhibited plasmid replication by up to 67%, demonstrating that PCNA is involved in plasmid replication in living cells. This result further implies that DNA polymerase /delta/ is necessary for plasmid replication in vivo, Anti-PCNA antibody alone did not block plasmid replication completely, but the residual replication was abolished by coinjection of a monoclonal antibody against DNA polymerase /alpha/. Anti-DNA polymerase /alpha/ alone inhibited plasmid replication by 63%. Thus, DNA ploymerase /alpha/ is also required for plasmid replication in this system. In similar studies on the replication of egg chromosomes, the inhibition by anti-PCNA antibody was only 30%, while anti-DNA polymerase /alpha/ antibody blocked 73% of replication. They concluded that the replication machineries of chromosomes and plasmid differ in their relative content of DNA polymerase /delta/. In addition, they obtained evidence through the use of phenylbutyl deoxyguanosine, an inhibitor of DNA polymearse /alpha/, that the structure of DNA polymerase /alpha/ holoenzyme for chromosome replication is significantly different from that for plasmid replication.

  7. Anatomical Mapping and Density of Merkel Cells in Skin and Mucosae of the Dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, Gustavo A; Rodríguez, Francisco; Quesada, Óscar; Herráez, Pedro; Fernández, Antonio; Espinosa-de-Los-Monteros, Antonio

    2016-09-01

    Merkel cells (MCs) are specialized cutaneous receptor cells involved with tactile sense. Although the distribution of MCs has been extensively studied in humans and rodents, their precise distribution and density throughout skin in the dog has not previously been determined. Knowledge of their distribution could facilitate understanding of their functions. By using of immunohistochemistry, density, and anatomical mapping of the MCs population in the dog skin was determined. Assessment of the MCs innervation was also achieved. Different patterns were noted in epidermis, hair follicles, or mucosa, including variable-sized clusters, linear or horse-shaped arrangements, and scattered and individualized cells. MCs revealed great variations in density and distribution over the body surface, with the highest numbers in oral mucosa and facial skin. There was no correlation of MCs density with age, sex, type of breed, coat type or pigmentation. Between 41 and 65% of MCs in hairy and glabrous skin and 8-18% of MCs in oral mucosa were in intimate contact with intraepithelial axon terminals. These findings indicate that canine MCs are numerous in sensory receptive areas and may be associated with the tactile sense in the dog. The present article enhances the knowledge of the skin structure in this species. Anat Rec, 299:1157-1164, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27341526

  8. Identification and Characterization of Genes Involved in Embryonic Crystal Cell Formation During Drosophila Hematopoiesis

    OpenAIRE

    Milchanowski, Allison B.; Henkenius, Amy L.; Narayanan, Maya; Hartenstein, Volker; Banerjee, Utpal

    2004-01-01

    Parallels between vertebrate and Drosophila hematopoiesis add to the value of flies as a model organism to gain insights into blood development. The Drosophila hematopoietic system is composed of at least three classes of terminally differentiated blood cells: plasmatocytes, crystal cells, and lamellocytes. Recent studies have identified transcriptional and signaling pathways in Drosophila involving proteins similar to those seen in human blood development. To identify additional genes involv...

  9. Identification and Characterization of Genes Involved in Embryonic Crystal Cell Formation During Drosophila Hematopoiesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milchanowski, Allison B.; Henkenius, Amy L.; Narayanan, Maya; Hartenstein, Volker; Banerjee, Utpal

    2004-01-01

    Parallels between vertebrate and Drosophila hematopoiesis add to the value of flies as a model organism to gain insights into blood development. The Drosophila hematopoietic system is composed of at least three classes of terminally differentiated blood cells: plasmatocytes, crystal cells, and lamellocytes. Recent studies have identified transcriptional and signaling pathways in Drosophila involving proteins similar to those seen in human blood development. To identify additional genes involved in Drosophila hematopoiesis, we have conducted a P-element-based genetic screen to isolate mutations that affect embryonic crystal cell development. Using a marker of terminally differentiated crystal cells, we screened 1040 P-element-lethal lines located on the second and third chromosomes and identified 44 individual lines that affect crystal cell development. Identifying novel genes and pathways involved in Drosophila hematopoiesis is likely to provide further insights into mammalian hematopoietic development and disorders. PMID:15454546

  10. Mitochondria are involved in apoptosis induced by ultraviolet radiation in lepidopteran Spodoptera litura cell line

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shigang Shan; Kaiyu Liu; Jianxin Peng; Hanchao Yao; Yi Li; Huazhu Hong

    2009-01-01

    Mitochondria are involved in apoptosis of mammalian cells and even single-cell organisms, but mitochondria are not required in apoptosis in cultured Drosophila cells such as S2 and BG2 cell lines. It is not very clear whether mitochondria are involved in apoptosis in other insect cells such as lepidopteran cell lines. Thus, we determined to elucidate the role of mitochondria in apoptosis induced by ultraviolet radiation in Spodoptera litura (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) cell line (SL-ZSU-1). The Western blot results suggested that cytochrome c in the ultraviolet-treated SL-1 cells was released from the mitochondria to cytosol as early as 4 h after the induction of ultraviolet radiation and increased in the cytosolic fractions in a time-dependent manner. Flow cytometric analysis of mitochondrial membrane potential (△Ψm) of SL-ZSU-1 cell treated with ultraviolet-C (UV-C) light indicated the decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential was dependent on the times of ultraviolet treatment. Both of them are different from apoptosis in cultured Drosophila melanogaster cell lines (S2 and BG2) and it appears evident mitochondria are involved in apoptosis of the studied lepidopteran cells.

  11. [Helper T cell paradigm: Th17 and regulatory T cells involved in autoimmune inflammatory disorders, pathogen defense and allergic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noma, Takeshi

    2010-01-01

    The helper T cell paradigm, divided into two distinct subsets, Th1 and Th2 cells, characterized by distinct cytokine and functions, has been expanded to IL-17-producing Th17 cells. Th1 cells producing IFN-γ are involved in delayed-type hypersensitivity, effective in intracellular pathogens defense, while Th2 cells secrete IL-4, IL-5, IL-13 and IL-25 and has a central role in IgE production, eosinophilic inflammation, and the protection for helminthic parasite infection. Th17 cell lineages, expressing IL-17 family of cytokines and IL-23-mediated functions on T cells, plays a role in immune response to fungi and extracellular pathogens and autoimmune inflammatory disorders. Th17 cells are required the combination of IL-6 and TGF-β and the transcription factors, RORC2/RORgt (mice) and STAT3 for differentiation, and produce IL-17, IL-22, IL-17F, IL-21 and CCL20. FOXP3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells produce TGF-β and IL-10, which regulate effector T cells, and thus maintain peripheral tolerance. Four functionally unique CD4+ T cells, including the regulatory T (Treg) cells are now involved in the regulation of immune responses to pathogens, self-antigens and allergens. Any defect in the entire CD4+T cell population might results in human diseases. In this review, the biology of Th17 cells and Treg cells and their role in immune diseases are presented.

  12. Identification of novel genes involved in the commitment of endodermal cells to the thymic epithelial cell fate

    OpenAIRE

    Mathieu, Yves D.

    2006-01-01

    The thymus provides the microenvironment for the maturation and selection of the majority of peripheral T cells. Endodermal cells of the ventral aspect of the third pharyngeal pouch (3rdpp) at 10.5 days of mouse gestation (E10.5) adopt a thymic epithelial cell fate while cells of the dorsal part of the 3rdpp give rise to the parathyroid glands. To identify novel genes potentially involved in the commitment of endodermal cells to the thymic epithelial cell fate, the transcriptome o...

  13. Transcription factors involved in the regulation of natural killer cell development and function: an update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Elia Luevano

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Natural Killer (NK cells belong to the innate immune system and are key effectors in the immune response against cancer and infection. Recent studies have contributed to the knowledge of events controlling NK cell fate. The use of knockout mice has enabled the discovery of key transcription factors (TFs essential for NK cell development and function. Yet, unwrapping the downstream targets of these TFs and their influence on NK cells remains a challenge. In this review we discuss the latest TFs described to be involved in the regulation of NK cell development and maturation.

  14. Protein micro patterned lattices to probe a fundamental lengthscale involved in cell adhesion

    CERN Document Server

    Guillou, Herve; Chaussy, Jacques; Block, Marc R

    2009-01-01

    Cell adhesion, a fundamental process of cell biology is involved in the embryo development and in numerous pathologies especially those related to cancers. We constrained cells to adhere on extracellular matrix proteins patterned in a micro lattices. The actin cytoskeleton is particularly sensitive to this constraint and reproducibly self organizes in simple geometrical patterns. Such highly organized cells are functional and proliferate. We performed statistical analysis of spread cells morphologies and discuss the existence of a fundamental lengthscale associated with active processes required for spreading.

  15. Chemical -induced apoptotic cell death in tomato cells : involvement of caspase-like proteases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, de A.J.; Hoeberichts, F.A.; Yakimova, E.T.; Maximova, E.; Woltering, E.J.

    2000-01-01

    A new system to study programmed cell death in plants is described. Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) suspension cells were induced to undergo programmed cell death by treatment with known inducers of apoptosis in mammalian cells. This chemical-induced cell death was accompanied by the characte

  16. Nanoscale mapping and organization analysis of target proteins on cancer cells from B-cell lymphoma patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CD20, a membrane protein highly expressed on most B-cell lymphomas, is an effective target demonstrated in clinical practice for treating B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). Rituximab is a monoclonal antibody against CD20. In this work, we applied atomic force microscopy (AFM) to map the nanoscale distribution of CD20 molecules on the surface of cancer cells from clinical B-cell NHL patients under the assistance of ROR1 fluorescence recognition (ROR1 is a specific cell surface marker exclusively expressed on cancer cells). First, the ROR1 fluorescence labeling experiments showed that ROR1 was expressed on cancer cells from B-cell lymphoma patients, but not on normal cells from healthy volunteers. Next, under the guidance of ROR1 fluorescence, the rituximab-conjugated AFM tips were moved to cancer cells to image the cellular morphologies and detect the CD20-rituximab interactions on the cell surfaces. The distribution maps of CD20 on cancer cells were constructed by obtaining arrays of (16×16) force curves in local areas (500×500 nm2) on the cell surfaces. The experimental results provide a new approach to directly investigate the nanoscale distribution of target protein on single clinical cancer cells. - Highlights: • Cancer cells were recognized from healthy cells by ROR1 fluorescence labeling. • The nanoscale distribution of CD20 on cancer cells was characterized. • The distribution of CD20 was non-uniform on the surface of cancer cells

  17. Nanoscale mapping and organization analysis of target proteins on cancer cells from B-cell lymphoma patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Mi [State Key Laboratory of Robotics, Shenyang Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Xiao, Xiubin [Department of Lymphoma, Affiliated Hospital of Military Medical Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100071 (China); Liu, Lianqing, E-mail: lqliu@sia.cn [State Key Laboratory of Robotics, Shenyang Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Xi, Ning, E-mail: xin@egr.msu.edu [State Key Laboratory of Robotics, Shenyang Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Department of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Wang, Yuechao; Dong, Zaili [State Key Laboratory of Robotics, Shenyang Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Zhang, Weijing, E-mail: zhangwj3072@163.com [Department of Lymphoma, Affiliated Hospital of Military Medical Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100071 (China)

    2013-11-01

    CD20, a membrane protein highly expressed on most B-cell lymphomas, is an effective target demonstrated in clinical practice for treating B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). Rituximab is a monoclonal antibody against CD20. In this work, we applied atomic force microscopy (AFM) to map the nanoscale distribution of CD20 molecules on the surface of cancer cells from clinical B-cell NHL patients under the assistance of ROR1 fluorescence recognition (ROR1 is a specific cell surface marker exclusively expressed on cancer cells). First, the ROR1 fluorescence labeling experiments showed that ROR1 was expressed on cancer cells from B-cell lymphoma patients, but not on normal cells from healthy volunteers. Next, under the guidance of ROR1 fluorescence, the rituximab-conjugated AFM tips were moved to cancer cells to image the cellular morphologies and detect the CD20-rituximab interactions on the cell surfaces. The distribution maps of CD20 on cancer cells were constructed by obtaining arrays of (16×16) force curves in local areas (500×500 nm{sup 2}) on the cell surfaces. The experimental results provide a new approach to directly investigate the nanoscale distribution of target protein on single clinical cancer cells. - Highlights: • Cancer cells were recognized from healthy cells by ROR1 fluorescence labeling. • The nanoscale distribution of CD20 on cancer cells was characterized. • The distribution of CD20 was non-uniform on the surface of cancer cells.

  18. Mapping the distinctive populations of lymphatic endothelial cells in different zones of human lymph nodes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saem Mul Park

    Full Text Available The lymphatic sinuses in human lymph nodes (LNs are crucial to LN function yet their structure remains poorly defined. Much of our current knowledge of lymphatic sinuses derives from rodent models, however human LNs differ substantially in their sinus structure, most notably due to the presence of trabeculae and trabecular lymphatic sinuses that rodent LNs lack. Lymphatic sinuses are bounded and traversed by lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs. A better understanding of LECs in human LNs is likely to improve our understanding of the regulation of cell trafficking within LNs, now an important therapeutic target, as well as disease processes that involve lymphatic sinuses. We therefore sought to map all the LECs within human LNs using multicolor immunofluorescence microscopy to visualize the distribution of a range of putative markers. PROX1 was the only marker that uniquely identified the LECs lining and traversing all the sinuses in human LNs. In contrast, LYVE1 and STAB2 were only expressed by LECs in the paracortical and medullary sinuses in the vast majority of LNs studied, whilst the subcapsular and trabecular sinuses lacked these molecules. These data highlight the existence of at least two distinctive populations of LECs within human LNs. Of the other LEC markers, we confirmed VEGFR3 was not specific for LECs, and CD144 and CD31 stained both LECs and blood vascular endothelial cells (BECs; in contrast, CD59 and CD105 stained BECs but not LECs. We also showed that antigen-presenting cells (APCs in the sinuses could be clearly distinguished from LECs by their expression of CD169, and their lack of expression of PROX1 and STAB2, or endothelial markers such as CD144. However, both LECs and sinus APCs were stained with DCN46, an antibody commonly used to detect CD209.

  19. Ethylene is involved in stress responses induced by fusicoccin in sycamore cultured cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malerba, Massimo; Crosti, Paolo; Cerana, Raffaella

    2010-11-15

    The phytohormone ethylene is involved in many physiological and developmental processes of plants, as well as in stress responses and in the development of disease resistance. Fusicoccin (FC) is a well-known phytotoxin, that in sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus L.) cultured cells, induces a set of stress responses, including synthesis of ethylene. In this study, we investigated the possible involvement of ethylene in the FC-induced stress responses of sycamore cells by means of Co(2+), a well-known specific inhibitor of ethylene biosynthesis. Co(2+) inhibited the accumulation of dead cells in the culture, the production of nitric oxide (NO) and of the molecular chaperone Binding Protein (BiP) in the endoplasmic reticulum induced by FC. By contrast, Co(2+) was ineffective on the FC-induced accumulation of cells with fragmented DNA, production of H(2)O(2) and release of cytochrome c from the mitochondrion, and only partially reduced the accumulation of regulative 14-3-3 proteins in the cytosol. In addition, we compared the effect of FC on the above parameters with that of the ethylene-releasing compound ethephon (2-chloroethane phosphonic acid). The results suggest that ethylene is involved in several stress responses induced by FC in sycamore cells, including a form of cell death that does not show apoptotic features and possibly involves NO as a signaling molecule.

  20. A genome-wide RNAi screen reveals MAP kinase phosphatases as key ERK pathway regulators during embryonic stem cell differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen-Hsi Yang

    Full Text Available Embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells represent potentially important therapeutic agents in regenerative medicine. Complex interlinked transcriptional and signaling networks control the fate of these cells towards maintenance of pluripotency or differentiation. In this study we have focused on how mouse embryonic stem cells begin to differentiate and lose pluripotency and, in particular, the role that the ERK MAP kinase and GSK3 signaling pathways play in this process. Through a genome-wide siRNA screen we have identified more than 400 genes involved in loss of pluripotency and promoting the onset of differentiation. These genes were functionally associated with the ERK and/or GSK3 pathways, providing an important resource for studying the roles of these pathways in controlling escape from the pluripotent ground state. More detailed analysis identified MAP kinase phosphatases as a focal point of regulation and demonstrated an important role for these enzymes in controlling ERK activation kinetics and subsequently determining early embryonic stem cell fate decisions.

  1. Implications for the offspring of circulating factors involved in beta cell adaptation in pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nalla, Amarnadh; Ringholm, Lene; Søstrup, Birgitte;

    2014-01-01

    there are other circulating factors involved in beta cell adaptation to pregnancy. This study aimed at screening for potential pregnancy-associated circulating beta cell growth factors. SAMPLES: Serum samples from nonpregnant and pregnant women. METHODS: The effect of serum from pregnant women...... is able to stimulate proliferation of rat beta cells. We have identified several circulating factors that may contribute to beta cell adaptation to pregnancy. Further studies are needed to elucidate their possible role in glucose homeostasis in the mother and her offspring....

  2. Isolated cutaneous involvement in a child with nodal anaplastic large cell lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vibhu Mendiratta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-Hodgkin lymphoma is a common childhood T-cell and B-cell neoplasm that originates primarily from lymphoid tissue. Cutaneous involvement can be in the form of a primary extranodal lymphoma, or secondary to metastasis from a non-cutaneous location. The latter is uncommon, and isolated cutaneous involvement is rarely reported. We report a case of isolated secondary cutaneous involvement from nodal anaplastic large cell lymphoma (CD30 + and ALK + in a 7-year-old boy who was on chemotherapy. This case is reported for its unusual clinical presentation as an acute febrile, generalized papulonodular eruption that mimicked deep fungal infection, with the absence of other foci of systemic metastasis.

  3. Acute respiratory distress syndrome due to pulmonary involvement by neoplastic plasma cells in multiple myeloma

    OpenAIRE

    Marmor, D B; Farber, J. L.; Gottlieb, J E

    2006-01-01

    Pulmonary involvement with multiple myeloma occurs infrequently and may be difficult to distinguish from more common primary lung tumours, metastatic disease, or other pleural and parenchymal abnormalities. A patient who developed acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) was subsequently found to have multiple myeloma with involvement of lung parenchyma by neoplastic plasma cells. Only one other report of ARDS in association with multiple myeloma was found, and there are no previous reports...

  4. Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms Involved in the Trypanosoma cruzi/Host Cell Interplay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Patricia Silvia; Cueto, Juan Agustín; Casassa, Ana Florencia; Vanrell, María Cristina; Gottlieb, Roberta A.; Colombo, María Isabel

    2013-01-01

    Summary The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi has a complex bi-ological cycle that involves vertebrate and invertebrate hosts. In mammals, the infective trypomastigote form of this parasite can invade several cell types by exploiting phagocytic-like or non-phagocytic mechanisms depending on the class of cell involved. Morphological studies showed that when trypomastigotes contact macrophages, they induce the formation of plasma membrane protrusions that differ from the canonical phagocytosis that occurs in the case of noninfective epimastigotes. In contrast, when trypomastigotes infect epithelial or muscle cells, the cell surface is minimally modified, suggesting the induction of a different class of process. Lysosomal-dependent or -independent T. cruzi invasion of host cells are two different models that describe the molecular and cellular events activated during parasite entry into nonphagocytic cells. In this context, we have previously shown that induction of autophagy in host cells before infection favors T. cruzi invasion. Furthermore, we demonstrate that autophagosomes and the autophagosomal protein LC3 are recruited to the T. cruzi entry sites and that the newly formed T. cruzi parasitophorous vacuole has characteristics of an autophagolysosome. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the molecular and cellular mechanisms of T. cruzi invasion in nonphagocytic cells. Based on our findings, we propose a new model in which T. cruzi takes advantage of the up-regulation of autophagy during starvation to increase its successful colonization of host cells. PMID:22454195

  5. Involvement of regulatory volume decrease in the migration of nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Wen MAO; Li Xin CHEN; Li Wei WANG; Tim JACOB; Xue Rong SUN; Hui LI; Lin Yan ZHU; Pan LI; Ping ZHONG; Si Huai NIE

    2005-01-01

    The transwell chamber migration assay and CCD digital camera imaging techniques were used to investigate the relationship between regulatory volume decrease (RVD) and cell migration in nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells (CNE-2Z cells). Both migrated and non-migrated CNE-2Z cells, when swollen by 47% hypotonic solution, exhibited RVD which was inhibited by extracellular application of chloride channel blockers adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP), 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino) benzoic acid (NPPB) and tamoxifen. However, RVD rate in migrated CNE-2Z cells was bigger than that of non-migrated cells and the sensitivity of migrated cells to NPPB and tamoxifen was higher than that of nonmigrated cells. ATP, NPPB and tamoxifen also inhibited migration of CNE-2Z cells. The inhibition of migration was positively correlated to the blockage of RVD, with a correlation coefficient (r) = 0.99, suggesting a functional relationship between RVD and cell migration. We conclude that RVD is involved in cell migration and RVD may play an important role in migratory process in CNE-2Z cells.

  6. Cell resistance to the Cytolethal Distending Toxin involves an association of DNA repair mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezine, Elisabeth; Malaisé, Yann; Loeuillet, Aurore; Chevalier, Marianne; Boutet-Robinet, Elisa; Salles, Bernard; Mirey, Gladys; Vignard, Julien

    2016-01-01

    The Cytolethal Distending Toxin (CDT), produced by many bacteria, has been associated with various diseases including cancer. CDT induces DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), leading to cell death or mutagenesis if misrepaired. At low doses of CDT, other DNA lesions precede replication-dependent DSB formation, implying that non-DSB repair mechanisms may contribute to CDT cell resistance. To address this question, we developed a proliferation assay using human cell lines specifically depleted in each of the main DNA repair pathways. Here, we validate the involvement of the two major DSB repair mechanisms, Homologous Recombination and Non Homologous End Joining, in the management of CDT-induced lesions. We show that impairment of single-strand break repair (SSBR), but not nucleotide excision repair, sensitizes cells to CDT, and we explore the interplay of SSBR with the DSB repair mechanisms. Finally, we document the role of the replicative stress response and demonstrate the involvement of the Fanconi Anemia repair pathway in response to CDT. In conclusion, our work indicates that cellular survival to CDT-induced DNA damage involves different repair pathways, in particular SSBR. This reinforces a model where CDT-related genotoxicity primarily involves SSBs rather than DSBs, underlining the importance of cell proliferation during CDT intoxication and pathogenicity. PMID:27775089

  7. Systemic Sclerosis Patients Present Alterations in the Expression of Molecules Involved in B-Cell Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Lilian; Ferrier, Ashley; Aravena, Octavio; Fonseca, Elianet; Berendsen, Jorge; Biere, Andrea; Bueno, Daniel; Ramos, Verónica; Aguillón, Juan Carlos; Catalán, Diego

    2015-01-01

    The activation threshold of B cells is tightly regulated by an array of inhibitory and activator receptors in such a way that disturbances in their expression can lead to the appearance of autoimmunity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the expression of activating and inhibitory molecules involved in the modulation of B cell functions in transitional, naive, and memory B-cell subpopulations from systemic sclerosis patients. To achieve this, blood samples were drawn from 31 systemic sclerosis patients and 53 healthy individuals. Surface expression of CD86, MHC II, CD19, CD21, CD40, CD22, Siglec 10, CD35, and FcγRIIB was determined by flow cytometry. IL-10 production was evaluated by intracellular flow cytometry from isolated B cells. Soluble IL-6 and IL-10 levels were measured by ELISA from supernatants of stimulated B cells. Systemic sclerosis patients exhibit an increased frequency of transitional and naive B cells related to memory B cells compared with healthy controls. Transitional and naive B cells from patients express higher levels of CD86 and FcγRIIB than healthy donors. Also, B cells from patients show high expression of CD19 and CD40, whereas memory cells from systemic sclerosis patients show reduced expression of CD35. CD19 and CD35 expression levels associate with different autoantibody profiles. IL-10+ B cells and secreted levels of IL-10 were markedly reduced in patients. In conclusion, systemic sclerosis patients show alterations in the expression of molecules involved in B-cell regulation. These abnormalities may be determinant in the B-cell hyperactivation observed in systemic sclerosis. PMID:26483788

  8. CXCL2 synthesized by oral squamous cell carcinoma is involved in cancer-associated bone destruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oue, Erika [Section of Oral Pathology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (Japan); Section of Maxillofacial Surgery, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (Japan); Global Center of Excellence (GCOE) Program, International Research Center for Molecular Science in Tooth and Bone Diseases, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Lee, Ji-Won; Sakamoto, Kei [Section of Oral Pathology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (Japan); Iimura, Tadahiro [Section of Oral Pathology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (Japan); Global Center of Excellence (GCOE) Program, International Research Center for Molecular Science in Tooth and Bone Diseases, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Aoki, Kazuhiro [Section of Pharmacology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (Japan); Kayamori, Kou [Section of Diagnostic Oral Pathology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (Japan); Department of Pathology, Ome Municipal General Hospital, Ome, Tokyo (Japan); Michi, Yasuyuki; Yamashiro, Masashi; Harada, Kiyoshi; Amagasa, Teruo [Section of Maxillofacial Surgery, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (Japan); Yamaguchi, Akira, E-mail: akira.mpa@tmd.ac.jp [Section of Oral Pathology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (Japan); Global Center of Excellence (GCOE) Program, International Research Center for Molecular Science in Tooth and Bone Diseases, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan)

    2012-08-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oral cancer cells synthesize CXCL2. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CXCL2 synthesized by oral cancer is involved in osteoclastogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CXCL2-neutralizing antibody inhibited osteoclastogenesis induced by oral cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We first report the role of CXCL2 in cancer-associated bone destruction. -- Abstract: To explore the mechanism of bone destruction associated with oral cancer, we identified factors that stimulate osteoclastic bone resorption in oral squamous cell carcinoma. Two clonal cell lines, HSC3-C13 and HSC3-C17, were isolated from the maternal oral cancer cell line, HSC3. The conditioned medium from HSC3-C13 cells showed the highest induction of Rankl expression in the mouse stromal cell lines ST2 and UAMS-32 as compared to that in maternal HSC3 cells and HSC3-C17 cells, which showed similar activity. The conditioned medium from HSC3-C13 cells significantly increased the number of osteoclasts in a co-culture with mouse bone marrow cells and UAMS-32 cells. Xenograft tumors generated from these clonal cell lines into the periosteal region of the parietal bone in athymic mice showed that HSC3-C13 cells caused extensive bone destruction and a significant increase in osteoclast numbers as compared to HSC3-C17 cells. Gene expression was compared between HSC3-C13 and HSC3-C17 cells by using microarray analysis, which showed that CXCL2 gene was highly expressed in HSC3-C13 cells as compared to HSC3-C17 cells. Immunohistochemical staining revealed the localization of CXCL2 in human oral squamous cell carcinomas. The increase in osteoclast numbers induced by the HSC3-C13-conditioned medium was dose-dependently inhibited by addition of anti-human CXCL2-neutralizing antibody in a co-culture system. Recombinant CXCL2 increased the expression of Rankl in UAMS-32 cells. These results indicate that CXCL2 is involved in bone destruction induced by oral cancer. This is the first

  9. CXCL2 synthesized by oral squamous cell carcinoma is involved in cancer-associated bone destruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Oral cancer cells synthesize CXCL2. ► CXCL2 synthesized by oral cancer is involved in osteoclastogenesis. ► CXCL2-neutralizing antibody inhibited osteoclastogenesis induced by oral cancer cells. ► We first report the role of CXCL2 in cancer-associated bone destruction. -- Abstract: To explore the mechanism of bone destruction associated with oral cancer, we identified factors that stimulate osteoclastic bone resorption in oral squamous cell carcinoma. Two clonal cell lines, HSC3-C13 and HSC3-C17, were isolated from the maternal oral cancer cell line, HSC3. The conditioned medium from HSC3-C13 cells showed the highest induction of Rankl expression in the mouse stromal cell lines ST2 and UAMS-32 as compared to that in maternal HSC3 cells and HSC3-C17 cells, which showed similar activity. The conditioned medium from HSC3-C13 cells significantly increased the number of osteoclasts in a co-culture with mouse bone marrow cells and UAMS-32 cells. Xenograft tumors generated from these clonal cell lines into the periosteal region of the parietal bone in athymic mice showed that HSC3-C13 cells caused extensive bone destruction and a significant increase in osteoclast numbers as compared to HSC3-C17 cells. Gene expression was compared between HSC3-C13 and HSC3-C17 cells by using microarray analysis, which showed that CXCL2 gene was highly expressed in HSC3-C13 cells as compared to HSC3-C17 cells. Immunohistochemical staining revealed the localization of CXCL2 in human oral squamous cell carcinomas. The increase in osteoclast numbers induced by the HSC3-C13-conditioned medium was dose-dependently inhibited by addition of anti-human CXCL2-neutralizing antibody in a co-culture system. Recombinant CXCL2 increased the expression of Rankl in UAMS-32 cells. These results indicate that CXCL2 is involved in bone destruction induced by oral cancer. This is the first report showing the role of CXCL2 in cancer-associated bone destruction.

  10. Regulation of the MAP kinase cascade in PC12 cells: B-Raf activates MEK-1 (MAP kinase or ERK kinase) and is inhibited by cAMP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peraldi, P; Frödin, M; Barnier, J V;

    1995-01-01

    In PC12 cells, cAMP stimulates the MAP kinase pathway by an unknown mechanism. Firstly, we examined the role of calcium ion mobilization and of protein kinase C in cAMP-stimulated MAP kinase activation. We show that cAMP stimulates p44mapk independently of these events. Secondly, we studied the r...

  11. Bone marrow-derived cells are differentially involved in pathological and physiological retinal angiogenesis in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Bone marrow-derived cells have been shown to play roles in angiogenesis. Although these cells have been shown to promote angiogenesis, it is not yet clear whether these cells affect all types of angiogenesis. This study investigated the involvement of bone marrow-derived cells in pathological and physiological angiogenesis in the murine retina. Materials and methods: The oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR) model was used as a retinal angiogenesis model in newborn mice. To block the influence of bone marrow-derived cells, the mice were irradiated with a 4-Gy dose of radiation from a 137Cs source. Irradiation was performed in four different conditions with radio dense 2-cm thick lead disks; (1) H group, the head were covered with these discs to protect the eyes from radiation; (2) A group, all of the body was covered with these discs; (3) N group, mice were completely unshielded; (4) C group, mice were put in the irradiator but were not irradiated. On P17, the retinal areas showing pathological and physiological retinal angiogenesis were measured and compared to the retinas of nonirradiated mice. Results: Although irradiation induced leukocyte depletion, it did not affect the number of other cell types or body weight. Retinal nonperfusion areas were significantly larger in irradiated mice than in control mice (P < 0.05), indicating that physiological angiogenesis was impaired. However, the formation of tuft-like angiogenesis processes was more prominent in the irradiated mice (P < 0.05), indicating that pathological angiogenesis was intact. Conclusions: Bone marrow-derived cells seem to be differentially involved in the formation of physiological and pathological retinal vessels. Pathological angiogenesis in the murine retina does not require functional bone marrow-derived cells, but these cells are important for the formation of physiological vessels. Our results add a new insight into the pathology of retinal angiogenesis and bolster the hypothesis that bone

  12. Involvement of Heme Oxygenase-1 in Orexin-A-induced Angiogenesis in Vascular Endothelial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Mi-Kyoung; Park, Hyun-Joo; Kim, Su-Ryun; Choi, Yoon Kyung; Bae, Soo-Kyung; Bae, Moon-Kyoung

    2015-01-01

    The cytoprotective enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) influences endothelial cell survival, proliferation, inflammatory response, and angiogenesis in response to various angiogenic stimuli. In this study, we investigate the involvement of HO-1 in the angiogenic activity of orexin-A. We showed that orexin-A stimulates expression and activity of HO-1 in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Furthermore, we showed that inhibition of HO-1 by tin (Sn) protoporphryin-IX (SnPP) reduced orexin...

  13. The Fas pathway is involved in pancreatic beta cell secretory function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schumann, Desiree M; Maedler, Kathrin; Franklin, Isobel;

    2007-01-01

    Pancreatic beta cell mass and function increase in conditions of enhanced insulin demand such as obesity. Failure to adapt leads to diabetes. The molecular mechanisms controlling this adaptive process are unclear. Fas is a death receptor involved in beta cell apoptosis or proliferation, depending...... on the activity of the caspase-8 inhibitor FLIP. Here we show that the Fas pathway also regulates beta cell secretory function. We observed impaired glucose tolerance in Fas-deficient mice due to a delayed and decreased insulin secretory pattern. Expression of PDX-1, a beta cell......-specific transcription factor regulating insulin gene expression and mitochondrial metabolism, was decreased in Fas-deficient beta cells. As a consequence, insulin and ATP production were severely reduced and only partly compensated for by increased beta cell mass. Up-regulation of FLIP enhanced NF-kappaB activity via...

  14. Identification of the cells involved in auxin transport in maize mesocotyl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, A.M. (Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (USA))

    1989-04-01

    A study was undertaken to identify by a direct method the cells involved in auxin transport through maize mesocotyl tissue. The auxin photoaffinity labeling agent, 7-({sup 3}H), 5-azidoindole 3-acetic acid (N{sub 3}IAA), was loaded into excised stem tissue from a cut end. Polar transport of this analog was demonstrated over 4 hours by comparing uptake into tissue loaded with N{sub 3}IAA from the apical vs. the basal end. Triiodobenzoic acid, an auxin transport inhibitor, inhibited N{sub 3}IAA uptake into tissue. Tissue which had taken up the photoaffinity labeling agent was photolyzed to covalently fix the radioisotope within cells. This tissue was sectioned and subjected to in situ autoradiography. The outermost cell of epidermal tissue and certain files of cells in vascular tissue were densely labeled indicating that on a per cell basis these two cell types are most actively transporting auxin.

  15. Resolving Tumor Heterogeneity: Genes Involved in Chordoma Cell Development Identified by Low-Template Analysis of Morphologically Distinct Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Karin; Meditz, Katharina; Kolb, Dagmar; Feichtinger, Julia; Thallinger, Gerhard G.; Quehenberger, Franz; Liegl-Atzwanger, Bernadette; Rinner, Beate

    2014-01-01

    The classical sacrococcygeal chordoma tumor presents with a typical morphology of lobulated myxoid tumor tissue with cords, strands and nests of tumor cells. The population of cells consists of small non-vacuolated cells, intermediate cells with a wide range of vacuolization and large heavily vacuolated (physaliferous) cells. To date analysis was only performed on bulk tumor mass because of its rare incidence, lack of suited model systems and technical limitations thereby neglecting its heterogeneous composition. We intended to clarify whether the observed cell types are derived from genetically distinct clones or represent different phenotypes. Furthermore, we aimed at elucidating the differences between small non-vacuolated and large physaliferous cells on the genomic and transcriptomic level. Phenotype-specific analyses of small non-vacuolated and large physaliferous cells in two independent chordoma cell lines yielded four candidate genes involved in chordoma cell development. UCHL3, coding for an ubiquitin hydrolase, was found to be over-expressed in the large physaliferous cell phenotype of MUG-Chor1 (18.7-fold) and U-CH1 (3.7-fold) cells. The mannosyltransferase ALG11 (695-fold) and the phosphatase subunit PPP2CB (18.6-fold) were found to be up-regulated in large physaliferous MUG-Chor1 cells showing a similar trend in U-CH1 cells. TMEM144, an orphan 10-transmembrane family receptor, yielded contradictory data as cDNA microarray analysis showed up- but RT-qPCR data down-regulation in large physaliferous MUG-Chor1 cells. Isolation of few but morphologically identical cells allowed us to overcome the limitations of bulk analysis in chordoma research. We identified the different chordoma cell phenotypes to be part of a developmental process and discovered new genes linked to chordoma cell development representing potential targets for further research in chordoma tumor biology. PMID:24503940

  16. Resolving tumor heterogeneity: genes involved in chordoma cell development identified by low-template analysis of morphologically distinct cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin El-Heliebi

    Full Text Available The classical sacrococcygeal chordoma tumor presents with a typical morphology of lobulated myxoid tumor tissue with cords, strands and nests of tumor cells. The population of cells consists of small non-vacuolated cells, intermediate cells with a wide range of vacuolization and large heavily vacuolated (physaliferous cells. To date analysis was only performed on bulk tumor mass because of its rare incidence, lack of suited model systems and technical limitations thereby neglecting its heterogeneous composition. We intended to clarify whether the observed cell types are derived from genetically distinct clones or represent different phenotypes. Furthermore, we aimed at elucidating the differences between small non-vacuolated and large physaliferous cells on the genomic and transcriptomic level. Phenotype-specific analyses of small non-vacuolated and large physaliferous cells in two independent chordoma cell lines yielded four candidate genes involved in chordoma cell development. UCHL3, coding for an ubiquitin hydrolase, was found to be over-expressed in the large physaliferous cell phenotype of MUG-Chor1 (18.7-fold and U-CH1 (3.7-fold cells. The mannosyltransferase ALG11 (695-fold and the phosphatase subunit PPP2CB (18.6-fold were found to be up-regulated in large physaliferous MUG-Chor1 cells showing a similar trend in U-CH1 cells. TMEM144, an orphan 10-transmembrane family receptor, yielded contradictory data as cDNA microarray analysis showed up- but RT-qPCR data down-regulation in large physaliferous MUG-Chor1 cells. Isolation of few but morphologically identical cells allowed us to overcome the limitations of bulk analysis in chordoma research. We identified the different chordoma cell phenotypes to be part of a developmental process and discovered new genes linked to chordoma cell development representing potential targets for further research in chordoma tumor biology.

  17. Mapping proteolytic cancer cell-extracellular matrix interfaces.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolf, K.A.; Friedl, P.H.A.

    2009-01-01

    For cancer progression and metastatic dissemination, cancer cells migrate and penetrate through extracellular tissues. Cancer invasion is frequently facilitated by proteolytic processing of components of the extracellular matrix (ECM). The cellular regions mediating proteolysis are diverse and depen

  18. Are testicular mast cells involved in the regulation of germ cells in man?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windschüttl, S; Nettersheim, D; Schlatt, S; Huber, A; Welter, H; Schwarzer, J U; Köhn, F M; Schorle, H; Mayerhofer, A

    2014-07-01

    Protease activated receptor-2 (PAR-2) is the receptor for the prototype mast cell product tryptase. PAR-2 expression by cells of the human germinal epithelium was reported, but the exact cellular sites of testicular expression remained unknown. That became of interest, because mast cells, expressing tryptase, were found in the walls of seminiferous tubules of patients suffering from sub- and infertility. This location suggested that mast cells via tryptase might be able to influence PAR-2-expressing cells in the germinal epithelium. To explore these points, we used testicular paraffin-embedded sections for immunohistochemistry. PAR-2-positive cells were mostly basally located cells of the seminiferous epithelium, namely spermatogonia. Some stained for the receptor for GDNF (GFRalpha-1), and possibly represent spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs). As true human SSCs could not be examined, we turned to TCam-2 seminoma cells, expressing PAR-2 and stem cell markers, including GFRalpha-1. TCam-2 cells robustly responded to stimulation with a specific PAR-2 agonist (SLIGKV) by increased intracellular Ca(2+) levels. Recombinant tryptase and trypsin, but not a control peptide (VKGILS) evoked this response, implying functional PAR-2. Video imaging and caspase 3/7 assays showed that SLIGKV and tryptase prevented spontaneous apoptosis and increased proliferation of TCam-2 cells. The expression of the marker of pluripotency OCT3/4 was unchanged upon activation of PAR-2, suggesting that the stem cell-like character is not changed. Furthermore, human germ cell cancers were examined. A subset of seminoma and carcinoma in situ samples expressed PAR-2, indicating that yet unknown subgroups exist. Collectively, the descriptive data obtained in human testicular sections, in germ cell cancers and the functional results in TCam-2 cells imply a trophic role of mast cell-derived tryptase for human germ cells. This may be relevant for subtypes of human germ cell cancers, and possibly SSCs. It

  19. High-density genetic maps for loci involved in nuclear male sterility (NMS1) and sporophytic self-incompatibility (S-locus) in chicory (Cichorium intybus L., Asteraceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonthier, Lucy; Blassiau, Christelle; Mörchen, Monika; Cadalen, Thierry; Poiret, Matthieu; Hendriks, Theo; Quillet, Marie-Christine

    2013-08-01

    High-density genetic maps were constructed for loci involved in nuclear male sterility (NMS1-locus) and sporophytic self-incompatibility (S-locus) in chicory (Cichorium intybus L.). The mapping population consisted of 389 F1' individuals derived from a cross between two plants, K28 (male-sterile) and K59 (pollen-fertile), both heterozygous at the S-locus. This F1' mapping population segregated for both male sterility (MS) and strong self-incompatibility (SI) phenotypes. Phenotyping F1' individuals for MS allowed us to map the NMS1-locus to linkage group (LG) 5, while controlled diallel and factorial crosses to identify compatible/incompatible phenotypes mapped the S-locus to LG2. To increase the density of markers around these loci, bulked segregant analysis was used. Bulks and parental plants K28 and K59 were screened using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis, with a complete set of 256 primer combinations of EcoRI-ANN and MseI-CNN. A total of 31,000 fragments were generated, of which 2,350 showed polymorphism between K59 and K28. Thirteen AFLP markers were identified close to the NMS1-locus and six in the vicinity of the S-locus. From these AFLP markers, eight were transformed into sequence-characterized amplified region (SCAR) markers and of these five showed co-dominant polymorphism. The chromosomal regions containing the NMS1-locus and the S-locus were each confined to a region of 0.8 cM. In addition, we mapped genes encoding proteins similar to S-receptor kinase, the female determinant of sporophytic SI in the Brasicaceae, and also markers in the vicinity of the putative S-locus of sunflower, but none of these genes or markers mapped close to the chicory S-locus. PMID:23689744

  20. Mapping eGFP Oligomer Mobility in Living Cell Nuclei

    OpenAIRE

    Nicolas Dross; Corentin Spriet; Monika Zwerger; Gabriele Müller; Waldemar Waldeck; Jörg Langowski

    2009-01-01

    Movement of particles in cell nuclei can be affected by viscosity, directed flows, active transport, or the presence of obstacles such as the chromatin network. Here we investigate whether the mobility of small fluorescent proteins is affected by the chromatin density. Diffusion of inert fluorescent proteins was studied in living cell nuclei using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) with a two-color confocal scanning detection system. We first present experiments exposing FCS-specific...

  1. Involvement of MAPKs in ICAM-1 Expression in Glomerular Endothelial Cells in Diabetic Nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watanabe,Naomi

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory processes are involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. The aim of this study was to clarify the role of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathways for induction of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1 expression in glomerular endothelial cells under diabetic conditions. We examined the expression of ICAM-1 in the kidneys of experimental diabetic rats. Human glomerular endothelial cells (GE cells were exposed to normal glucose concentration, high glucose concentration (HG, or high mannitol concentration (HM, and then the expression of the ICAM-1 protein and the phosphorylation of the 3 subfamilies of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK were determined using Western blot analysis. Next, to evaluate the involvement of MAPKs in HG- or HM-induced ICAM-1 expression, we preincubated GE cells with the inhibitors for ERK, p38 or JNK 1h prior to the application of glucose or mannitol. Expression of ICAM-1 was increased in the glomeruli of diabetic rats. Both HG and HM induced ICAM-1 expression and phosphorylation of ERK1/2, p38 and JNK in GE cells. Expression of ICAM-1 was significantly attenuated by inhibitors of ERK, p38 and JNK. We conclude that activation of ERK1/2, p38 and JNK cascades may be involved in ICAM-1 expression in glomerular endothelial cells under diabetic conditions.

  2. [Unresolved issues in the evaluation of research projects involving induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casado, María; de Lecuona, Itziar

    2013-01-01

    This paper identifies problems and analyzes those conflicts posed by the evaluation of research projects involving the collection and use of human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS) in Spain. Current legislation is causing problems of interpretation, circular and unnecessary referrals, legal uncertainty and undue delays. Actually, this situation may cause a lack of control and monitoring, and even some paralysis in regenerative medicine and cell therapy research, that is a priority nowadays. The analysis of the current legislation and its bioethical implications, led us to conclude that the review of iPS research projects cannot be assimilated to the evaluation of research projects that involve human embryonic stem cell (hESC). In this context, our proposal is based on the review by the Research Ethics Committees and the checkout by the Spanish Comission of Guarantees for Donation and Use of Human Cells and Tissues (CGDUCTH) of human iPS cells research projects. Moreover, this article claims for a more transparent research system, by effectively articulating the Registry on Research Projects. Finally, a model of verification protocol (checklist) for checking out biomedical research projects involving human iPS cells is suggested. PMID:24868955

  3. Intracellular signaling pathways involved in the relaxin-induced proliferation of rat Sertoli cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Aline Rosa; Pimenta, Maristela Taliari; Lucas, Thais F G; Royer, Carine; Porto, Catarina Segreti; Lazari, Maria Fatima Magalhaes

    2012-09-15

    Regulation of Sertoli cell number is a key event to determine normal spermatogenesis. We have previously shown that relaxin and its G-protein coupled receptor RXFP1 are expressed in rat Sertoli cells, and that relaxin stimulates Sertoli cell proliferation. This study examined the mechanisms underlying the mitogenic effect of relaxin in a primary culture of Sertoli cells removed from testes of immature rats. Stimulation with exogenous relaxin increased Sertoli cell number and the expression of the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), but did not affect the mRNA level of the differentiation markers cadherins 1 and 2. Relaxin-induced Sertoli cell proliferation was blocked by inhibition of MEK/ERK1/2 or PI3K/AKT pathways, but not by inhibition of PKC or EGFR activity. Relaxin induced a rapid and transient activation of ERK1/2 phosphorylation, which was MEK and SRC-dependent, and involved upstream activation of G(i). AKT activation could be detected 5 min after relaxin stimulation, and was still detected after 24h of stimulation with relaxin. Relaxin-induced AKT phosphorylation was G(i)- but not PKA-dependent, and it was blocked by both PI3K and MEK inhibitors. In conclusion, the mitogenic effect of relaxin in Sertoli cell involves coupling to G(i) and activation of both MEK/ERK1/2 and PI3K/AKT pathways. PMID:22819701

  4. ZFPIP/Zfp462 is involved in P19 cell pluripotency and in their neuronal fate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear zinc finger protein ZFPIP/Zfp462 is an important factor involved in cell division during the early embryonic development of vertebrates. In pluripotent P19 cells, ZFPIP/Zfp462 takes part in cell proliferation, likely via its role in maintaining chromatin structure. To further define the function of ZFPIP/Zfp462 in the mechanisms of pluripotency and cell differentiation, we constructed a stable P19 cell line in which ZFPIP/Zfp462 knockdown is inducible. We report that ZFPIP/Zfp462 was vital for mitosis and self-renewal in pluripotent P19 cells. Its depletion induced substantial decreases in the expression of the pluripotency genes Nanog, Oct4 and Sox2 and was associated with the transient expression of specific neuronal differentiation markers. We also demonstrated that ZFPIP/Zfp462 expression appears to be unnecessary after neuronal differentiation is induced in P19 cells. Taken together, our results strongly suggest that ZFPIP/Zfp462 is a key chromatin factor involved in maintaining P19 pluripotency and in the early mechanisms of neural differentiation but that it is dispensable in differentiated P19 cells.

  5. ZFPIP/Zfp462 is involved in P19 cell pluripotency and in their neuronal fate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masse, Julie [CNRS UMR 6061, Institut de Genetique et Developpement de Rennes (IGDR), Rennes (France); Universite de Rennes 1, 35043 Rennes cedex (France); Piquet-Pellorce, Claire [Universite de Rennes 1, 35043 Rennes cedex, EA 4427 SeRAIC (France); Viet, Justine; Guerrier, Daniel; Pellerin, Isabelle [CNRS UMR 6061, Institut de Genetique et Developpement de Rennes (IGDR), Rennes (France); Universite de Rennes 1, 35043 Rennes cedex (France); Deschamps, Stephane, E-mail: stephane.deschamps@univ-rennes1.fr [CNRS UMR 6061, Institut de Genetique et Developpement de Rennes (IGDR), Rennes (France); Universite de Rennes 1, 35043 Rennes cedex (France)

    2011-08-01

    The nuclear zinc finger protein ZFPIP/Zfp462 is an important factor involved in cell division during the early embryonic development of vertebrates. In pluripotent P19 cells, ZFPIP/Zfp462 takes part in cell proliferation, likely via its role in maintaining chromatin structure. To further define the function of ZFPIP/Zfp462 in the mechanisms of pluripotency and cell differentiation, we constructed a stable P19 cell line in which ZFPIP/Zfp462 knockdown is inducible. We report that ZFPIP/Zfp462 was vital for mitosis and self-renewal in pluripotent P19 cells. Its depletion induced substantial decreases in the expression of the pluripotency genes Nanog, Oct4 and Sox2 and was associated with the transient expression of specific neuronal differentiation markers. We also demonstrated that ZFPIP/Zfp462 expression appears to be unnecessary after neuronal differentiation is induced in P19 cells. Taken together, our results strongly suggest that ZFPIP/Zfp462 is a key chromatin factor involved in maintaining P19 pluripotency and in the early mechanisms of neural differentiation but that it is dispensable in differentiated P19 cells.

  6. Mapping eGFP Oligomer Mobility in Living Cell Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwerger, Monika; Müller, Gabriele; Waldeck, Waldemar; Langowski, Jörg

    2009-01-01

    Movement of particles in cell nuclei can be affected by viscosity, directed flows, active transport, or the presence of obstacles such as the chromatin network. Here we investigate whether the mobility of small fluorescent proteins is affected by the chromatin density. Diffusion of inert fluorescent proteins was studied in living cell nuclei using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) with a two-color confocal scanning detection system. We first present experiments exposing FCS-specific artifacts encountered in live cell studies as well as strategies to prevent them, in particular those arising from the choice of the fluorophore used for calibration of the focal volume, as well as temperature and acquisition conditions used for fluorescence fluctuation measurements. After defining the best acquisition conditions, we show for various human cell lines that the mobility of GFP varies significantly within the cell nucleus, but does not correlate with chromatin density. The intranuclear diffusional mobility strongly depends on protein size: in a series of GFP-oligomers, used as free inert fluorescent tracers, the diffusion coefficient decreased from the monomer to the tetramer much more than expected for molecules free in aqueous solution. Still, the entire intranuclear chromatin network is freely accessible for small proteins up to the size of eGFP-tetramers, regardless of the chromatin density or cell line. Even the densest chromatin regions do not exclude free eGFP-monomers or multimers. PMID:19347038

  7. Mapping eGFP oligomer mobility in living cell nuclei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Dross

    Full Text Available Movement of particles in cell nuclei can be affected by viscosity, directed flows, active transport, or the presence of obstacles such as the chromatin network. Here we investigate whether the mobility of small fluorescent proteins is affected by the chromatin density. Diffusion of inert fluorescent proteins was studied in living cell nuclei using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS with a two-color confocal scanning detection system. We first present experiments exposing FCS-specific artifacts encountered in live cell studies as well as strategies to prevent them, in particular those arising from the choice of the fluorophore used for calibration of the focal volume, as well as temperature and acquisition conditions used for fluorescence fluctuation measurements. After defining the best acquisition conditions, we show for various human cell lines that the mobility of GFP varies significantly within the cell nucleus, but does not correlate with chromatin density. The intranuclear diffusional mobility strongly depends on protein size: in a series of GFP-oligomers, used as free inert fluorescent tracers, the diffusion coefficient decreased from the monomer to the tetramer much more than expected for molecules free in aqueous solution. Still, the entire intranuclear chromatin network is freely accessible for small proteins up to the size of eGFP-tetramers, regardless of the chromatin density or cell line. Even the densest chromatin regions do not exclude free eGFP-monomers or multimers.

  8. Extrinsic Factors Involved in the Differentiation of Stem Cells into Insulin-Producing Cells: An Overview

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, Rebecca S. Y.

    2011-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease with many debilitating complications. Treatment of diabetes mellitus mainly revolves around conventional oral hypoglycaemic agents and insulin replacement therapy. Recently, scientists have turned their attention to the generation of insulin-producing cells (IPCs) from stem cells of various sources. To date, many types of stem cells of human and animal origins have been successfully turned into IPCs in vitro and have been shown to exert glucose-lowering ...

  9. LAMP3 is involved in tamoxifen resistance in breast cancer cells through the modulation of autophagy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Nagelkerke (Anika); A.M. Sieuwerts (Anieta); J. Bussink (Johan); F.C. Sweep (Fred); M.P. Look (Maxime); J.A. Foekens (John); J.W.M. Martens (John); P.N. Span (Paul)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractLysosome-associated membrane protein 3 (LAMP3) is a member of the LAMP-family of proteins, which are involved in the process of autophagy. Autophagy is induced by tamoxifen in breast cancer cells and may contribute to tamoxifen resistance. In this study, the significance of LAMP3 for tam

  10. LAMP3 is involved in tamoxifen resistance in breast cancer cells through the modulation of autophagy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nagelkerke, A.P.; Sieuwerts, A.M.; Bussink, J.; Sweep, F.C.; Look, M.P.; Foekens, J.A.; Martens, J.W.; Span, P.N.

    2014-01-01

    Lysosome-associated membrane protein 3 (LAMP3) is a member of the LAMP-family of proteins, which are involved in the process of autophagy. Autophagy is induced by tamoxifen in breast cancer cells and may contribute to tamoxifen resistance. In this study, the significance of LAMP3 for tamoxifen resis

  11. NDRG2: a Myc-repressed gene involved in cancer and cell stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Libo Yao; Jian Zhang; Xuewu Liu

    2008-01-01

    As a master switch for cell proliferation and differentiation,Myc exerts its biological functions mainly through transcriptional regulation of its target genes,which are involved in cells' interaction and communication with their external environment.The N-Myc downstream-regulated gene (NDRG) family is composed ofNDRG1,NDRG2,NDRG3 and NDRG4,which are important in cell proliferation and differentiation.This review summarizes the recent studies on the structure,tissue distribution and functions of NDRG2 that try to show its significance in studying cancer and its therapeutic potential.

  12. Musashi2 modulates K562 leukemic cell proliferation and apoptosis involving the MAPK pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Huijuan; Tan, Shi; Wang, Juan; Chen, Shana; Quan, Jing; Xian, Jingrong; Zhang, Shuai shuai; He, Jingang; Zhang, Ling, E-mail: lingzhang@cqmu.edu.cn

    2014-01-01

    The RNA-binding protein Musashi2 (Msi2) has been identified as a master regulator within a variety of stem cell populations via the regulation of translational gene expression. A recent study has suggested that Msi2 is strongly expressed in leukemic cells of acute myeloid leukemia patients, and elevated Msi2 is associated with poor prognosis. However, the potential role of Msi2 in leukemogenesis is still not well understood. Here, we investigated the effect of Msi2 knockdown on the biological properties of leukemic cells. High expression of Msi2 was found in K562 and KG-1a leukemic cell lines, and low expression was observed in the U937 cell line. We transduced K562 cells with two independent adenoviral shRNA vectors targeting Msi2 and confirmed knockdown of Msi2 at the mRNA and protein levels. Msi2 silencing inhibited cell growth and caused cell cycle arrest by increasing the expression of p21 and decreasing the expression of cyclin D1 and cdk2. In addition, knockdown of Msi2 promoted cellular apoptosis via the upregulation of Bax and downregulation of Bcl-2 expression. Furthermore, Msi2 knockdown resulted in the inactivation of the ERK/MAPK and p38/MAPK pathways, but no remarkable change in p-AKT was observed. These data provide evidence that Msi2 plays an important role in leukemogenesis involving the MAPK signaling pathway, which indicates that Msi2 may be a novel target for leukemia treatment. - Highlights: • Knockdown of Msi2 inhibited K562 cell growth and arrested cell cycle progression. • Knockdown of Msi2 induced K562 cell apoptosis via the regulation of Bax and Bcl-2. • The MAPK pathway was involved in the process of Msi2-mediated leukemogenesis. • Our data indicate that Msi2 is a potential new target for leukemia treatment.

  13. GLI1 is involved in cell cycle regulation and proliferation of NT2 embryonal carcinoma stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Janni; Lind-Thomsen, Allan; Pedersen, Mikkel W.;

    2008-01-01

    of altered HH signaling are interpreted by specific cell types. We have investigated the role of the HH transcription factor glioma-associated oncogene homolog 1 (GLI1) in the human Ntera2=D1 (NT2) embryonal carcinoma stem cell line. The study revealed that expression of GLI1 and its direct transcriptional......1 phase cyclins. In conclusion, our results suggest that GLI1 is involved in cell cycle and proliferation control in the embryonal carcinoma stem cell line NT2....... target Patched (PTCH) is downregulated in the early stages of retinoic acid-induced neuronal differentiation of NT2 cells. To identify transcriptional targets of the HH transcription factor GLI1 in NT2 cells, we performed global expression profiling following GLI1 RNA interference (RNAi). Of the similar...

  14. Secondary pancreatic involvement by a diffuse large B-cell lymphoma presenting as acute pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M Wasif Saif; Sapna Khubchandani; Marek Walczak

    2007-01-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is the most common type of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. More than 50% of patients have some site of extra-nodal involvement at diagnosis,including the gastrointestinal tract and bone marrow.However, a diffuse large B-cell lymphoma presenting as acute pancreatitis is rare. A 57-year-old female presented with abdominal pain and matted lymph nodes in her axilla. She was admitted with a diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) scan showed diffusely enlarged pancreas due to infiltrative neoplasm and peripancreatic lymphadenopathy. Biopsy of the axillary mass revealed a large B-cell lymphoma.The patient was classified as stage Ⅳ, based on the Ann Arbor Classification, and as having a high-risk lymphoma,based on the International Prognostic Index. She was started on chemotherapy with CHOP (cyclophosphamide,doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisone). Within a week after chemotherapy, the patient's abdominal pain resolved. Follow-up CT scan of the abdomen revealed a marked decrease in the size of the pancreas and peripancreatic lymphadenopathy. A literature search revealed only seven cases of primary involvement of the pancreas in B-cell lymphoma presenting as acute pancreatitis. However, only one case of secondary pancreatic involvement by B-cell lymphoma presenting as acute pancreatitis has been published. Our case appears to be the second report of such a manifestation.Both cases responded well to chemotherapy.

  15. Effect of an Activated Platelet Concentrate on Differentiated Cells Involved in Tissue Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brini, Anna T; Ceci, Caterina; Taschieri, Silvio; Niada, Stefania; Lolato, Alessandra; Giannasi, Chiara; Mortellaro, Carmen; Del Fabbro, Massimo

    2016-05-01

    Tissue healing is a complex process involving several players such as cells and growth factors released from platelets upon activation. Today, platelet concentrates (PCs) are used in many different medical fields including oral, orthopaedic, and reconstructive surgery since they allow growth factors delivery to the injured site, aiming at enhancing tissue regeneration. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of the acellular plasma of an activated platelet concentrate obtained using a manual protocol, on the proliferation, and biological activity of differentiated cells involved in tissue healing. Human osteoblasts and dermal fibroblasts were grown in serum-free medium supplemented with PC derived from several donors. Human osteoblast and human dermal fibroblast proliferation was assessed by MTT test after 7 days and cells were count up to 12-day incubation. Human osteoblast osteo-differentiation was tested after 7 and 14-day incubation by alkaline phosphatase assay. The addition of PC to the culture medium caused an increased proliferation with respect to cells grown in standard condition. The results of the present study suggest that PC supports the proliferation of terminally differentiated cells involved in wound healing and tissue regeneration, confirming its beneficial clinical application in regenerative therapies. PMID:27054419

  16. Transcription factor NF-Y is involved in differentiation of R7 photoreceptor cell in Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    Yasuhide Yoshioka; Luong Linh Ly; Masamitsu Yamaguchi

    2011-01-01

    Summary The CCAAT motif-binding factor NF-Y consists of three different subunits, NF-YA, NF-YB and NF-YC. Knockdown of Drosophila NF-YA (dNF-YA) in eye discs with GMR-GAL4 and UAS-dNF-YAIR resulted in a rough eye phenotype and monitoring of differentiation of photoreceptor cells by LacZ expression in seven up-LacZ and deadpan-lacZ enhancer trap lines revealed associated loss of R7 photoreceptor signals. In line with differentiation of R7 being regulated by the sevenless (sev) gene and the MAP...

  17. The Resource Mapping Algorithm of Wireless Virtualized Networks for Saving Energy in Ultradense Small Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sai Zou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available As the current network is designed for peak loads, it results in insufficient resource utilization and energy waste. Virtualized technology makes it possible that intelligent energy perception network could be deployed and resource sharing could become an effective energy saving technology. How to make more small cells into sleeping state for energy saving in ultradense small cell system has become a research hot spot. Based on the mapping feature of virtualized network, a new wireless resource mapping algorithm for saving energy in ultradense small cells has been put forward when wireless resource amount is satisfied in every small cell. First of all, the method divides the virtual cells. Again through the alternate updating between small cell mapping and wireless resource allocation, least amount of small cells is used and other small cells turn into sleeping state on the premise of guaranteeing users’ QoS. Next, the energy consumption of the wireless access system, wireless resource utilization, and the convergence of the proposed algorithm are analyzed in theory. Finally, the simulation results demonstrate that the algorithm can effectively reduce the system energy consumption and required wireless resource amount under the condition of satisfying users’ QoS.

  18. Involvement of Hydrogen Peroxide in Safingol-Induced Endonuclease G-Mediated Apoptosis of Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masakazu Hamada

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Safingol, a L-threo-dihydrosphingosine, induced the nuclear translocation of a mitochondrial apoptogenic mediator—endonuclease G (endo G—and apoptosis of human oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC cells. Upstream mediators remain largely unknown. The levels of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 in cultured oral SCC cells were measured. Treatment with safingol increased intracellular H2O2 levels but not extracellular H2O2 levels, indicating the production of H2O2. The cell killing effect of safingol and H2O2 was diminished in the presence of reactive oxygen species (ROS scavenger N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC. Dual staining of cells with annexin V and propidium iodide (PI revealed that apoptotic cell death occurred by treatment with H2O2 and safingol. The number of apoptotic cells was reduced in the presence of NAC. In untreated cells, endo G distributed in the cytoplasm and an association of endo G with mitochondria was observed. After treatment with H2O2 and safingol, endo G was distributed to the nucleus and cytoplasm, indicating the nuclear translocation of the mitochondrial factor. NAC prevented the increase of apoptotic cells and the translocation of endo G. Knock down of endo G diminished the cell killing effect of H2O2 and safingol. These results suggest that H2O2 is involved in the endo G-mediated apoptosis of oral SCC cells by safingol.

  19. ERK Is Involved in the Reorganization of Somatosensory Cortical Maps in Adult Rats Submitted to Hindlimb Unloading

    OpenAIRE

    Erwan Dupont; Laurence Stevens; Laetitia Cochon; Maurice Falempin; Bruno Bastide; Marie-Hélène Canu

    2011-01-01

    Sensorimotor restriction by a 14-day period of hindlimb unloading (HU) in the adult rat induces a reorganization of topographic maps and receptive fields. However, the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. Interest was turned towards a possible implication of intracellular MAPK signaling pathway since Extracellular-signal-Regulated Kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) is known to play a significant role in the control of synaptic plasticity. In order to better understand the mechanisms underlying cortical ...

  20. CT and MR findings of langerhans cell histiocytois involving the spleen: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pyun, Hae Wook; Kim, Mee Eun; Kim, Jang Ho [Fatima Hospital, Taegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-02-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is systemic disease resulting from the proliferation and dissemination of abnormal histiocytic cells of the Langerhans cell system. Common sites of involvement include the skin, bone, bone marrow, lung, lymph nodes and central nervous system, and the condition manifests in variety of ways. We present the CT and MR findings of a case of LCH involving the spleen, an organ invloved relatively rarely. Post-contrast CT revealed multiple hypodense nodules. T1-weighted MR images of the spleen depicted no definitive lesion, but T2-weighted images showed abnormal low signals scattered throughout this organ. In addition, post-contrast, fat-saturated T1-weighted MR images lesions showed multiple, low-signal-intensity lesions.

  1. CT and MR findings of langerhans cell histiocytois involving the spleen: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is systemic disease resulting from the proliferation and dissemination of abnormal histiocytic cells of the Langerhans cell system. Common sites of involvement include the skin, bone, bone marrow, lung, lymph nodes and central nervous system, and the condition manifests in variety of ways. We present the CT and MR findings of a case of LCH involving the spleen, an organ invloved relatively rarely. Post-contrast CT revealed multiple hypodense nodules. T1-weighted MR images of the spleen depicted no definitive lesion, but T2-weighted images showed abnormal low signals scattered throughout this organ. In addition, post-contrast, fat-saturated T1-weighted MR images lesions showed multiple, low-signal-intensity lesions

  2. Genetic analysis of the Arabidopsis protein kinases MAP3Kε1 and MAP3Kε2 indicates roles in cell expansion and embryo development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaiwongsar, Suraphon; Strohm, Allison K; Su, Shih-Heng; Krysan, Patrick J

    2012-01-01

    MAP3Kε1 and MAP3Kε2 are a pair of Arabidopsis thaliana genes that encode protein kinases related to cdc7p from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We have previously shown that the map3kε1;map3kε2 double-mutant combination causes pollen lethality. In this study, we have used an ethanol-inducible promoter construct to rescue this lethal phenotype and create map3kε1(-/-);map3kε2(-/-) double-mutant plants in order to examine the function of these genes in the sporophyte. These rescued double-mutant plants carry a yellow fluorescent protein (YFP)-MAP3Kε1 transgene under the control of the alcohol-inducible AlcA promoter from Aspergillus nidulans. The double-mutant plants were significantly smaller and had shorter roots than wild-type when grown in the absence of ethanol treatment. Microscopic analysis indicated that cell elongation was reduced in the roots of the double-mutant plants and cell expansion was reduced in rosette leaves. Treatment with ethanol to induce expression of YFP-MAP3Kε1 largely rescued the leaf phenotypes. The double-mutant combination also caused embryos to arrest in the early stages of development. Through the use of YFP reporter constructs we determined that MAP3Kε1 and MAP3Kε2 are expressed during embryo development, and also in root tissue. Our results indicate that MAP3Kε1 and MAP3Kε2 have roles outside of pollen development and that these genes affect several aspects of sporophyte development.

  3. Immunological tolerance to muscle autoantigens involves peripheral deletion of autoreactive CD8+ T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilie Franck

    Full Text Available Muscle potentially represents the most abundant source of autoantigens of the body and can be targeted by a variety of severe autoimmune diseases. Yet, the mechanisms of immunological tolerance toward muscle autoantigens remain mostly unknown. We investigated this issue in transgenic SM-Ova mice that express an ovalbumin (Ova neo-autoantigen specifically in skeletal muscle. We previously reported that antigen specific CD4(+ T cell are immunologically ignorant to endogenous Ova in this model but can be stimulated upon immunization. In contrast, Ova-specific CD8(+ T cells were suspected to be either unresponsive to Ova challenge or functionally defective. We now extend our investigations on the mechanisms governing CD8(+ tolerance in SM-Ova mice. We show herein that Ova-specific CD8(+ T cells are not detected upon challenge with strongly immunogenic Ova vaccines even after depletion of regulatory T cells. Ova-specific CD8(+ T cells from OT-I mice adoptively transferred to SM-Ova mice started to proliferate in vivo, acquired CD69 and PD-1 but subsequently down-regulated Bcl-2 and disappeared from the periphery, suggesting a mechanism of peripheral deletion. Peripheral deletion of endogenous Ova-specific cells was formally demonstrated in chimeric SM-Ova mice engrafted with bone marrow cells containing T cell precursors from OT-I TCR-transgenic mice. Thus, the present findings demonstrate that immunological tolerance to muscle autoantigens involves peripheral deletion of autoreactive CD8(+ T cells.

  4. Involvement of ZFPIP/Zfp462 in chromatin integrity and survival of P19 pluripotent cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masse, Julie; Laurent, Audrey; Nicol, Barbara; Guerrier, Daniel; Pellerin, Isabelle; Deschamps, Stephane [UMR CNRS 6061, Institut of Genetique et Developpement de Rennes (IGDR), Faculte de Medecine, Universite de Rennes 1, 35043 Rennes cedex (France)

    2010-04-15

    Toti- or pluripotent cells proliferation and/or differentiation have been shown to be strongly related to nuclear chromatin organization and structure over the last past years. We have recently identified ZFPIP/Zfp462 as a zinc finger nuclear factor necessary for correct cell division during early embryonic developmental steps of vertebrates. We thus questioned whether this factor was playing a general role during cell division or if it was somehow involved in embryonic cell fate or differentiation. To achieve this goal, we performed a knock-down experiment in the pluripotent P19 and differentiated 3T3 cell lines, both expressing endogenous ZFPIP/Zfp462. Using specific shRNA directed against ZFPIP/Zfp462 transcripts, we demonstrated that depletion of this protein induced cell death in P19 but had no effect in 3T3 cells. In addition, in the absence of the protein, the P19 cells exhibited a complete destructuration of pericentromeric domains associated with a redistribution of the HP1{alpha} proteins and an increase in DNA satellites transcribed RNAs level. These data suggested an instrumental role of ZFPIP/Zfp462 in maintaining the chromatin structure of pluripotent cells.

  5. Identification, isolation and expansion of myoendothelial cells involved in leech muscle regeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annalisa Grimaldi

    Full Text Available Adult skeletal muscle in vertebrates contains myoendothelial cells that express both myogenic and endothelial markers, and which are able to differentiate into myogenic cells to contribute to muscle regeneration. In spite of intensive research efforts, numerous questions remain regarding the role of cytokine signalling on myoendothelial cell differentiation and muscle regeneration. Here we used Hirudo medicinalis (Annelid, leech as an emerging new model to study myoendothelial cells and muscle regeneration. Although the leech has relative anatomical simplicity, it shows a striking similarity with vertebrate responses and is a reliable model for studying a variety of basic events, such as tissue repair. Double immunohistochemical analysis were used to characterize myoendothelial cells in leeches and, by injecting in vivo the matrigel biopolymer supplemented with the cytokine Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF, we were able to isolate this specific cell population expressing myogenic and endothelial markers. We then evaluated the effect of VEGF on these cells in vitro. Our data indicate that, similar to that proposed for vertebrates, myoendothelial cells of the leech directly participate in myogenesis both in vivo and in vitro, and that VEGF secretion is involved in the recruitment and expansion of these muscle progenitor cells.

  6. Haplotype Map of Sickle Cell Anemia in Tunisia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imen Moumni

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available β-Globin haplotypes are important to establish the ethnic origin and predict the clinical development of sickle cell disease patients (SCD. To determine the chromosomal background of βS Tunisian sickle cell patients, in this first study in Tunisia, we have explored four polymorphic regions of β-globin cluster on chromosome 11. It is the 5′ region of β-LCR-HS2 site, the intervening sequence II (IVSII region of two fetal (γG and γA genes and the 5′ region of β-globin gene. The results reveal a high molecular diversity of a microsatellite configuration describing the sequences haplotypes. The linkage disequilibrium analysis showed various haplotype combinations giving 22 “extended haplotypes”. These results confirm the utility of the β-globin haplotypes for population studies and contribute to knowledge of the Tunisian gene pool, as well as establishing the role of genetic markers in physiopathology of SCD.

  7. Haplotype map of sickle cell anemia in Tunisia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moumni, Imen; Ben Mustapha, Maha; Sassi, Sarra; Zorai, Amine; Ben Mansour, Ikbel; Douzi, Kais; Chouachi, Dorra; Mellouli, Fethi; Bejaoui, Mohamed; Abbes, Salem

    2014-01-01

    β-Globin haplotypes are important to establish the ethnic origin and predict the clinical development of sickle cell disease patients (SCD). To determine the chromosomal background of β (S) Tunisian sickle cell patients, in this first study in Tunisia, we have explored four polymorphic regions of β-globin cluster on chromosome 11. It is the 5' region of β-LCR-HS2 site, the intervening sequence II (IVSII) region of two fetal ((G)γ and (A)γ) genes and the 5' region of β-globin gene. The results reveal a high molecular diversity of a microsatellite configuration describing the sequences haplotypes. The linkage disequilibrium analysis showed various haplotype combinations giving 22 "extended haplotypes". These results confirm the utility of the β-globin haplotypes for population studies and contribute to knowledge of the Tunisian gene pool, as well as establishing the role of genetic markers in physiopathology of SCD. PMID:25197158

  8. Extrinsic Factors Involved in the Differentiation of Stem Cells into Insulin-Producing Cells: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca S. Y. Wong

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease with many debilitating complications. Treatment of diabetes mellitus mainly revolves around conventional oral hypoglycaemic agents and insulin replacement therapy. Recently, scientists have turned their attention to the generation of insulin-producing cells (IPCs from stem cells of various sources. To date, many types of stem cells of human and animal origins have been successfully turned into IPCs in vitro and have been shown to exert glucose-lowering effect in vivo. However, scientists are still faced with the challenge of producing a sufficient number of IPCs that can in turn produce sufficient insulin for clinical use. A careful choice of stem cells, methods, and extrinsic factors for induction may all be contributing factors to successful production of functional beta-islet like IPCs. It is also important that the mechanism of differentiation and mechanism by which IPCs correct hyperglycaemia are carefully studied before they are used in human subjects.

  9. Involvement of IRF4 dependent dendritic cells in T cell dependent colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pool, Lieneke; Rivollier, Aymeric Marie Christian; Agace, William Winston

    in genetically susceptible individuals and pathogenic CD4+ T cells, which accumulate in the inflamed mucosa, are believed to be key drivers of the disease. While dendritic cells (DCs) are important in the priming of intestinal adaptive immunity and tolerance their role in the initiation and perpetuation......Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) is a chronic non-curable inflammatory disease of the intestine that affects as many as 1.4 million persons in the United States and 2.2 million persons in Europe. IBD results from abnormal immune response to bacterial components of the commensal microflora...... of chronic intestinal inflammation remains unclear. In the current study we used the CD45RBhi T cell transfer model of colitis to determine the role of IRF4 dependent DCs in intestinal inflammation. In this model naïve CD4+ T cells when transferred into RAG-/- mice, proliferate and expand in response...

  10. Involvement of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Capsaicin-Induced Apoptosis of Human Pancreatic Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengzhang Lin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Capsaicin, main pungent ingredient of hot chilli peppers, has been shown to have anticarcinogenic effect on various cancer cells through multiple mechanisms. In this study, we investigated the apoptotic effect of capsaicin on human pancreatic cancer cells in both in vitro and in vivo systems, as well as the possible mechanisms involved. In vitro, treatment of both the pancreatic cancer cells (PANC-1 and SW1990 with capsaicin resulted in cells growth inhibition, G0/G1 phase arrest, and apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Knockdown of growth arrest- and DNA damage-inducible gene 153 (GADD153, a marker of the endoplasmic-reticulum-stress- (ERS- mediated apoptosis pathway, by specific siRNA attenuated capsaicin-induced apoptosis both in PANC-1 and SW1990 cells. Moreover, in vivo studies capsaicin effectively inhibited the growth and metabolism of pancreatic cancer and prolonged the survival time of pancreatic cancer xenograft tumor-induced mice. Furthermore, capsaicin increased the expression of some key ERS markers, including glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78, phosphoprotein kinase-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (phosphoPERK, and phosphoeukaryotic initiation factor-2α (phospho-eIF2α, activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4 and GADD153 in tumor tissues. In conclusion, we for the first time provide important evidence to support the involvement of ERS in the induction of apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells by capsaicin.

  11. Bacillus thuringiensis peptidoglycan hydrolase SleB171 involved in daughter cell separation during cell division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hua; Hu, Penggao; Zhao, Xiuyun; Yu, Ziniu; Li, Lin

    2016-04-01

    Whole-genome analyses have revealed a putative cell wall hydrolase gene (sleB171) that constitutes an operon with two other genes (ypeBandyhcN) of unknown function inBacillus thuringiensisBMB171. The putative SleB171 protein consists of 259 amino acids and has a molecular weight of 28.3 kDa. Gene disruption ofsleB171in the BMB171 genome causes the formation of long cell chains during the vegetative growth phase and delays spore formation and spore release, although it has no significant effect on cell growth and the ultimate release of the spores. The inseparable vegetative cells were nearly restored through the complementation ofsleB171expression. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed thatsleB171is mainly active in the vegetative growth phase, with a maximum activity at the early stationary growth phase. Western blot analysis also confirmed thatsleB171is preferentially expressed during the vegetative growth phase. These results demonstrated that SleB171 plays an essential role in the daughter cell separation during cell division.

  12. Dynamic chromatin states in human ES cells reveal potential regulatory sequences and genes involved in pluripotency

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R David Hawkins; Zhen Ye; Samantha Kuan; Pengzhi Yu; Hui Liu; Xinmin Zhang; Roland D Green; Victor V Lobanenkov; Ron Stewart; James A Thomson; Bing Ren; Gary C Hon; Chuhu Yang; Jessica E Antosiewicz-Bourget; LeonardKLee; Que-Minh Ngo; Sarit Klugman; Keith A Ching; Lee E Edsall

    2011-01-01

    Pluripotency,the ability of a cell to differentiate and give rise to all embryonic lineages,defines a small number of mammalian cell types such as embryonic stem (ES) cells.While it has been generally held that pluripotency is the product of a transcriptional regulatory network that activates and maintains the expression of key stem cell genes,accumulating evidence is pointing to a critical role for epigenetic processes in establishing and safeguarding the pluripotency of ES cells,as well as maintaining the identity of differentiated cell types.In order to better understand the role of epigenetic mechanisms in pluripotency,we have examined the dynamics of chromatin modifications genomewide in human ES cells (hESCs) undergoing differentiation into a mesendodermal lineage.We found that chromatin modifications at promoters remain largely invariant during differentiation,except at a small number of promoters where a dynamic switch between acetylation and methylation at H3K27 marks the transition between activation and silencing of gene expression,suggesting a hierarchy in cell fate commitment over most differentially expressed genes.We also mapped over 50 000 potential enhancers,and observed much greater dynamics in chromatin modifications,especially H3K4mel and H3K27ac,which correlate with expression of their potential target genes.Further analysis of these enhancers revealed potentially key transcriptional regulators of pluripotency and a chromatin signature indicative of a poised state that may confer developmental competence in hESCs.Our results provide new evidence supporting the role of chromatin modifications in defining enhancers and pluripotency.

  13. Langerhans' cell histiocytosis: pathology, imaging and treatment of skeletal involvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azouz, E. Michel [University of Miami, Pediatric Radiology Section, Department of Radiology, Miami, FL (United States); Saigal, Gaurav [McGill University, Department of Medical Imaging, Quebec (Canada); Rodriguez, Maria M. [University of Miami, Department of Pathology, Miami, FL (United States); Podda, Antonello [University of Miami, Division of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, Miami, FL (United States)

    2005-02-01

    Langerhans' cell histiocytosis (LCH) is manifested in a variety of ways, the most common being the eosinophilic granuloma, a localized, often solitary bone lesion that occurs predominantly in the pediatric age group. The hallmark of LCH is the proliferation and accumulation of a specific histiocyte: the Langerhans' cell. In bone this may cause pain and adjacent soft-tissue swelling, but some lesions are asymptomatic. LCH can involve any bone, but most lesions occur in the skull (especially the calvarium and temporal bones), the pelvis, spine, mandible, ribs, and tubular bones. Imaging diagnosis of the disease in bone is first based on the plain radiographic appearance, which is usually a central destructive, aggressive-looking lesion. In the skull, the lesions develop in the diploic space, are lytic, and their edges may be beveled, scalloped or confluent (geographic), or show a ''button sequestrum.'' Vertebral body involvement usually causes collapse, resulting in vertebra plana. With significant recent improvements in the quality of gamma cameras, imaging techniques, and in studying children, bone scintigraphy at diagnosis and on follow-up usually reveals the sites of active disease, especially when the involvement is polyostotic. CT and MR imaging are very useful in providing detailed cross-sectional anatomic detail of the involved bone, including the bone marrow and the adjacent soft tissues. CT is better suited for demonstrating bone detail and MR imaging for bone marrow and soft-tissue involvement. (orig.)

  14. BRAF and MAP2K1 mutations in Langerhans cell histiocytosis: a study of 50 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alayed, Khaled; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; Patel, Keyur P; Zuo, Zhuang; Li, Shaoying; Verma, Shalini; Galbincea, John; Cason, R Craig; Luthra, Rajyalakshmi; Yin, C Cameron

    2016-06-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a proliferation of Langerhans cells, often associated with lymphocytes, eosinophils, macrophages, and giant cells. BRAF mutations, usually V600E, have been reported in 40%-70% of cases, and recently, MAP2K1 mutations have been reported in BRAF-negative cases. We assessed 50 cases of LCH for BRAF mutations and assessed a subset of cases for MAP2K1 mutations. The study group included 28 men and 22 women (median age, 36.5 years; range, 1-78 years). BRAF V600E mutation was detected in 8 (16%) cases including 3 (30%) skin, 2 (11%) bone, 1 (50%) colon, 1 (20%) lung, and 1 (33%) extradural, intracranial mass. MAP2K1 mutations were detected in 6 of 13 (46%) BRAF-negative cases including 2 (100%) lymph node, 2 (50%) bone, 1 (25%) skin, and 1 (100%) orbit. Patients with BRAF mutation were younger than patients with wild-type BRAF (median age, 28 versus 38 years; P = .026). The median age of MAP2K1-mutated patients was 34.5 years, similar to patients without MAP2K1 mutation (41 years; P = .368). In agreement with 2 recent studies, we showed a high frequency of MAP2K1 mutations in BRAF-negative LCH cases. Unlike other studies, the overall frequency of BRAF mutation in this cohort is substantially lower than what has been reported in pediatric patients, perhaps because most patients in this study were adults. Moreover, we showed a high concordance between mutational and immunohistochemical analysis for BRAF mutation. There was no statistically significant association between BRAF or MAP2K1 mutation and anatomic site, unifocal versus multifocal presentation, or clinical outcome. PMID:26980021

  15. A fungal cell wall integrity-associated MAP kinase cascade in Coniothyrium minitans is required for conidiation and mycoparasitism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Fanyun; Gong, Xiaoyan; Hamid, Mahammad Imran; Fu, Yanping; Jiatao, Xie; Cheng, Jiasen; Li, Guoqing; Jiang, Daohong

    2012-05-01

    Coniothyrium minitans is an important biocontrol agent against Sclerotinia diseases. Previously, a conidiation-deficient mutant ZS-1T1000 was screened out from a T-DNA insertional library of C. minitans. CmBCK1, encoding MAP kinase kinase kinase and homologous to BCK1 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, was disrupted by T-DNA insertion in this mutant. Targeted disruption of CmBCK1 led to the mutants undergoing autolysis and displaying hypersensitivity to the cell wall-degrading enzymes. The △CmBCK1 mutants lost the ability to produce pycnidia and conidia compared to the wild-type strain ZS-1. △CmBCK1 mutants could grow on the surface of sclerotia of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum but not form conidia, which resulted in much lower ability to reduce the viability of sclerotia of S. sclerotiorum. Furthermore, CmSlt2, a homolog of Slt2 encoding cell wall integrity-related MAP kinase and up-regulated by BCK1 in S. cerevisiae, was identified and targeted disrupted. The △CmSlt2 mutants had a similar phenotype to the △CmBCK1 mutants. The △CmSlt2 mutants also had autolytic aerial hyphae, hypersensitivity to cell wall-degrading enzymes, lack of conidiation and reduction of sclerotial mycoparasitism. Taken together, our results suggest that CmBCK1 and CmSlt2 are involved in conidiation and the hyperparasitic activities of C. minitans. PMID:22426009

  16. Involvement of regulatory T cells and selected cytokines in the pathogenesis of bronchial asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuśka-Prot, Monika; Jaroszewski, Jerzy J; Maślanka, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    Asthma pathogenesis is complex and involves the interplay of many factors and actions. Airway inflammation in allergic asthma is characterized by an exaggerated activation of T helper type 2 cells, IgE production and infiltration and activation of eosinophils. The results of studies conducted in recent years indicate that the deficit of naturally occurring Foxp3+CD25+CD4+ and Foxp3+CD25+CD8+ regulatory T cells and type 1 regulatory T cells plays a pivotal role in the development of this disease. Moreover, numerous studies have provided convincing evidence that a decrease in IL-10 production and an increase in IL-17 production have an important place in the pathophysiology of asthma. TGF-β is another important cytokine involved in this disease. TGF-β has a paradoxical status in relation to asthma pathogenesis because it seems to play a role in both suppressing and promoting asthma development. This review discusses briefly clinical and experimental data concerning the involvement of T regulatory cells and IL-10, IL-17 and TGF-β in the pathogenesis of asthma. PMID:27356599

  17. RNAi screen in Drosophila cells reveals the involvement of the Tom complex in Chlamydia infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Derré

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Chlamydia spp. are intracellular obligate bacterial pathogens that infect a wide range of host cells. Here, we show that C. caviae enters, replicates, and performs a complete developmental cycle in Drosophila SL2 cells. Using this model system, we have performed a genome-wide RNA interference screen and identified 54 factors that, when depleted, inhibit C. caviae infection. By testing the effect of each candidate's knock down on L. monocytogenes infection, we have identified 31 candidates presumably specific of C. caviae infection. We found factors expected to have an effect on Chlamydia infection, such as heparansulfate glycosaminoglycans and actin and microtubule remodeling factors. We also identified factors that were not previously described as involved in Chlamydia infection. For instance, we identified members of the Tim-Tom complex, a multiprotein complex involved in the recognition and import of nuclear-encoded proteins to the mitochondria, as required for C. caviae infection of Drosophila cells. Finally, we confirmed that depletion of either Tom40 or Tom22 also reduced C. caviae infection in mammalian cells. However, C. trachomatis infection was not affected, suggesting that the mechanism involved is C. caviae specific.

  18. ALK-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma with soft tissue involvement in a young woman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao KH

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Kehai Gao, Hongtao Li, Caihong Huang, Huazhuang Li, Jun Fang, Chen Tian Department of Orthopaedics, Yidu Central Hospital, Shandong, People’s Republic of China Introduction: Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL is a type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma that has strong expression of CD30. ALCL can sometimes involve the bone marrow, and in advanced stages, it can produce destructive extranodal lesions. But anaplastic large cell lymphoma kinase (ALK+ ALCL with soft tissue involvement is very rare.Case report: A 35-year-old woman presented with waist pain for over 1 month. The biopsy of soft tissue lesions showed that these cells were positive for ALK-1, CD30, TIA-1, GranzymeB, CD4, CD8, and Ki67 (90%+ and negative for CD3, CD5, CD20, CD10, cytokeratin (CK, TdT, HMB-45, epithelial membrane antigen (EMA, and pan-CK, which identified ALCL. After six cycles of Hyper-CVAD/MA regimen, she achieved partial remission. Three months later, she died due to disease progression.Conclusion: This case illustrates the unusual presentation of ALCL in soft tissue with a bad response to chemotherapy. Because of the tendency for rapid progression, ALCL in young adults with extranodal lesions are often treated with high-grade chemotherapy, such as Hyper-CVAD/MA. Keywords: anaplastic large cell lymphoma, ALK+, soft tissue involvement, Hyper-CVAD/MA

  19. Brain regions involved in voluntary movements as revealed by radioisotopic mapping of CBF or CMR-glucose changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, N A; Ingvar, D H

    1990-01-01

    Mapping of cortical and subcortical grey matter active during voluntary movements by means of measurements of local increases of CBF or CMR-Glucose is reviewed. Most of the studies concern observations in man during hand movements using the intracarotid Xenon-133 injection technique, an approach...... area SMA on both sides increase in CBF/CMR-glucose and even internally ("mentally") going through the trained movements, causes such changes; complex purposeful movements also activate the premotor cortex, a response that is bilateral with greatest response contralaterally. Studies in patients...

  20. Extra-osseous involvement of Langerhans' cell histiocytosis in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, Sabine; Gudinchet, Francois [Departments of Radiology and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Centre - CHUV, Lausanne (Switzerland); Eich, Georg [Department of Paediatric Radiology, Children' s Hospital, Zuerich (Switzerland); Hanquinet, Sylviane [Department of Paediatric Radiology, Hopital Cantonal, Geneva (Switzerland); Tschaeppeler, Heinz [Department of Paediatric Radiology, Children' s Hospital, Bern (Switzerland); Waibel, Peter [Department of Paediatric Radiology, Children' s Hospital, St. Gallen (Switzerland)

    2004-04-01

    The predominant clinical and radiological features of Langerhans' cell histiocytosis (LCH) in children are due to osseous involvement. Extra-osseous disease is far less common, occurring in association with bone disease or in isolation; nearly all anatomical sites may be affected and in very various combinations. The following article is based on a multicentre review of 31 children with extra-osseous LCH. The objective is to summarise the diverse possibilities of organ involvement. The radiological manifestations using different imaging modalities are rarely pathognomonic on their own. Nevertheless, familiarity with the imaging findings, especially in children with systemic disease, may be essential for early diagnosis. (orig.)

  1. Stem-cell dynamics and lineage topology from in vivo fate mapping in the hematopoietic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höfer, Thomas; Barile, Melania; Flossdorf, Michael

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, sophisticated fate-mapping tools have been developed to study the behavior of stem cells in the intact organism. These experimental approaches are beginning to yield a quantitative picture of how cell numbers are regulated during steady state and in response to challenges. Focusing on hematopoiesis and immune responses, we discuss how novel mathematical approaches driven by these fate-mapping data have provided insights into the dynamics and topology of cellular differentiation pathways in vivo. The combination of experiment and theory has allowed to quantify the degree of self-renewal in stem and progenitor cells, shown how native hematopoiesis differs fundamentally from post-transplantation hematopoiesis, and uncovered that the diversification of T lymphocytes during immune responses resembles tissue renewal driven by stem cells. PMID:27107166

  2. LifeMap Discovery™: the embryonic development, stem cells, and regenerative medicine research portal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ron Edgar

    Full Text Available LifeMap Discovery™ provides investigators with an integrated database of embryonic development, stem cell biology and regenerative medicine. The hand-curated reconstruction of cell ontology with stem cell biology; including molecular, cellular, anatomical and disease-related information, provides efficient and easy-to-use, searchable research tools. The database collates in vivo and in vitro gene expression and guides translation from in vitro data to the clinical utility, and thus can be utilized as a powerful tool for research and discovery in stem cell biology, developmental biology, disease mechanisms and therapeutic discovery. LifeMap Discovery is freely available to academic nonprofit institutions at http://discovery.lifemapsc.com.

  3. Involvement of multiple myeloma cell-derived exosomes in osteoclast differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raimondi, Lavinia; De Luca, Angela; Amodio, Nicola; Manno, Mauro; Raccosta, Samuele; Taverna, Simona; Bellavia, Daniele; Naselli, Flores; Fontana, Simona; Schillaci, Odessa; Giardino, Roberto; Fini, Milena; Tassone, Pierfrancesco; Santoro, Alessandra; De Leo, Giacomo; Giavaresi, Gianluca; Alessandro, Riccardo

    2015-05-30

    Bone disease is the most frequent complication in multiple myeloma (MM) resulting in osteolytic lesions, bone pain, hypercalcemia and renal failure. In MM bone disease the perfect balance between bone-resorbing osteoclasts (OCs) and bone-forming osteoblasts (OBs) activity is lost in favour of OCs, thus resulting in skeletal disorders. Since exosomes have been described for their functional role in cancer progression, we here investigate whether MM cell-derived exosomes may be involved in OCs differentiation. We show that MM cells produce exosomes which are actively internalized by Raw264.7 cell line, a cellular model of osteoclast formation. MM cell-derived exosomes positively modulate pre-osteoclast migration, through the increasing of CXCR4 expression and trigger a survival pathway. MM cell-derived exosomes play a significant pro-differentiative role in murine Raw264.7 cells and human primary osteoclasts, inducing the expression of osteoclast markers such as Cathepsin K (CTSK), Matrix Metalloproteinases 9 (MMP9) and Tartrate-resistant Acid Phosphatase (TRAP). Pre-osteoclast treated with MM cell-derived exosomes differentiate in multinuclear OCs able to excavate authentic resorption lacunae. Similar results were obtained with exosomes derived from MM patient's sera. Our data indicate that MM-exosomes modulate OCs function and differentiation. Further studies are needed to identify the OCs activating factors transported by MM cell-derived exosomes.

  4. RP1 is a phosphorylation target of CK2 and is involved in cell adhesion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Stenner

    Full Text Available RP1 (synonym: MAPRE2, EB2 is a member of the microtubule binding EB1 protein family, which interacts with APC, a key regulatory molecule in the Wnt signalling pathway. While the other EB1 proteins are well characterized the cellular function and regulation of RP1 remain speculative to date. However, recently RP1 has been implicated in pancreatic cancerogenesis. CK2 is a pleiotropic kinase involved in adhesion, proliferation and anti-apoptosis. Overexpression of protein kinase CK2 is a hallmark of many cancers and supports the malignant phenotype of tumor cells. In this study we investigate the interaction of protein kinase CK2 with RP1 and demonstrate that CK2 phosphorylates RP1 at Ser(236 in vitro. Stable RP1 expression in cell lines leads to a significant cleavage and down-regulation of N-cadherin and impaired adhesion. Cells expressing a Phospho-mimicking point mutant RP1-ASP(236 show a marked decrease of adhesion to endothelial cells under shear stress. Inversely, we found that the cells under shear stress downregulate endogenous RP1, most likely to improve cellular adhesion. Accordingly, when RP1 expression is suppressed by shRNA, cells lacking RP1 display significantly increased cell adherence to surfaces. In summary, RP1 phosphorylation at Ser(236 by CK2 seems to play a significant role in cell adhesion and might initiate new insights in the CK2 and EB1 family protein association.

  5. Charged MVB protein 5 is involved in T-cell receptor signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wi, Sae Mi; Min, Yoon; Lee, Ki-Young

    2016-01-01

    Charged multivesicular body protein 5 (CHMP5) has a key role in multivesicular body biogenesis and a critical role in the downregulation of signaling pathways through receptor degradation. However, the role of CHMP5 in T-cell receptor (TCR)-mediated signaling has not been previously investigated. In this study, we utilized a short hairpin RNA-based RNA interference approach to investigate the functional role of CHMP5. Upon TCR stimulation, CHMP5-knockdown (CHMP5(KD)) Jurkat T cells exhibited activation of TCR downstream signaling molecules, such as PKCθ and IKKαβ, and resulted in the activation of nuclear factor-κB and the marked upregulation of TCR-induced gene expression. Moreover, we found that activator protein-1 and nuclear factor of activated T-cells transcriptional factors were markedly activated in CHMP5(KD) Jurkat cells in response to TCR stimulation, which led to a significant increase in interleukin-2 secretion. Biochemical studies revealed that CHMP5 endogenously forms high-molecular-weight complexes, including TCR molecules, and specifically interacts with TCRβ. Interestingly, flow cytometry analysis also revealed that CHMP5(KD) Jurkat T cells exhibit upregulation of TCR expression on the cell surface compared with control Jurkat T cells. Taken together, these findings demonstrated that CHMP5 might be involved in the homeostatic regulation of TCR on the cell surface, presumably through TCR recycling or degradation. Thus CHMP5 is implicated in TCR-mediated signaling. PMID:26821576

  6. The mitochondrial phospholipid cardiolipin is involved in the regulation of T-cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mürke, Eik; Stoll, Steffan; Lendeckel, Uwe; Reinhold, Dirk; Schild, Lorenz

    2016-08-01

    Challenge of the immune system with antigens induces a cascade of processes including activation of naïve T cells, induction of proliferation, differentiation into effector cells and finally contraction via apoptosis. To meet the dynamic requirements of an adequate immune response, T cells must metabolically adapt to actual situations by switching between catabolic and anabolic metabolism. In this context mitochondria are hubs of metabolic regulation. The phospholipid cardiolipin (CL) is crucial for the structural and functional integrity and, thus, the metabolism of mitochondria. The aim of this study was to verify a possible interrelationship between T cell proliferation and CL composition. For this purpose, we adjusted the proliferation of peripheral human T cells from volunteers by stimulation with different concentrations of the mitogen phytohaemagglutinin (PHA), inhibition with Cyclosporin A (CsA) and exposure of cells to different free fatty acids and subsequently analysed the composition of CL by LC/MS/MS spectroscopy. All of the treatments had significant effects on CL composition. Correlation analysis of the proliferation rate and CL composition revealed that only the amount of incorporated palmitoleic acid and the content of tetralinoleoyl-CL are significantly associated with the proliferation rate. This observation is strongly suggestive of a regulatory function of these particular CL components/species in the process of T cell proliferation. As CL is crucially involved in mitochondrial function one can speculate that changes in CL composition contribute to vital mitochondria-dependent adaptations of energy metabolism in T cells during immune response. PMID:27163692

  7. Charged MVB protein 5 is involved in T-cell receptor signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wi, Sae Mi; Min, Yoon; Lee, Ki-Young

    2016-01-29

    Charged multivesicular body protein 5 (CHMP5) has a key role in multivesicular body biogenesis and a critical role in the downregulation of signaling pathways through receptor degradation. However, the role of CHMP5 in T-cell receptor (TCR)-mediated signaling has not been previously investigated. In this study, we utilized a short hairpin RNA-based RNA interference approach to investigate the functional role of CHMP5. Upon TCR stimulation, CHMP5-knockdown (CHMP5(KD)) Jurkat T cells exhibited activation of TCR downstream signaling molecules, such as PKCθ and IKKαβ, and resulted in the activation of nuclear factor-κB and the marked upregulation of TCR-induced gene expression. Moreover, we found that activator protein-1 and nuclear factor of activated T-cells transcriptional factors were markedly activated in CHMP5(KD) Jurkat cells in response to TCR stimulation, which led to a significant increase in interleukin-2 secretion. Biochemical studies revealed that CHMP5 endogenously forms high-molecular-weight complexes, including TCR molecules, and specifically interacts with TCRβ. Interestingly, flow cytometry analysis also revealed that CHMP5(KD) Jurkat T cells exhibit upregulation of TCR expression on the cell surface compared with control Jurkat T cells. Taken together, these findings demonstrated that CHMP5 might be involved in the homeostatic regulation of TCR on the cell surface, presumably through TCR recycling or degradation. Thus CHMP5 is implicated in TCR-mediated signaling.

  8. Involvement of mast cells in the development of fibrosis in rats with postmyocarditis dilated cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaniyandi Selvaraj, Suresh; Watanabe, Kenichi; Ma, Meilei; Tachikawa, Hitoshi; Kodama, Makoto; Aizawa, Yoshifusa

    2005-11-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Occurrence of myocardial fibrosis is an important event in the ventricular remodeling process, which takes place during DCM. Mast cells are well known inflammatory cells implicated in various biological phenomena. The involvement of mast cells in the development of myocardial fibrosis of DCM in rats after autoimmune myocarditis remains unknown. Nine-week-old male Lewis rats were immunized with cardiac myosin and divided into vehicle treated (group V) and disodium cromoglycate (DSCG), a mast cell stabilizer (24 mg/kg i.p.) treated (group DSCG) groups. The animals were sacrificed after 60 d of immunization. The myocardium was excised and preserved for histopathology and protein analysis. Myocardial levels of transforming growth factor (TGF) beta1 and collagen-III were quantified. Staining of mast cells was performed by toluidine blue. A significant correlation was obtained between myocardial fibrosis and cardiac mast cell density. DSCG reduced myocardial fibrosis besides preventing infiltration and degranulation of mast cells. Our findings confirm the active participation of mast cells in the progression of myocardial fibrosis in rats with postmyocarditis DCM. PMID:16272703

  9. Involvement of cell wall beta-glucan in the action of HM-1 killer toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasahara, S; Ben Inoue, S; Mio, T; Yamada, T; Nakajima, T; Ichishima, E; Furuichi, Y; Yamada, H

    1994-07-01

    HM-1 killer toxin secreted from Hansenula mrakii inhibits the growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells by interfering with beta-1,3-glucan synthesis. We found that HM-1 killer toxin killed intact cells but not protoplasts. In addition, cells lacking the functional KRE6 allele (kre6 delta) became resistant to higher concentration of HM-1 killer toxin. As reported by Roemer and Bussey [(1991) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. 88 11295-11299], cells lacking functional KRE6 had a reduced level of the cell wall beta-1,6-glucan compared to that in cells harboring the normal KRE6. These results suggest that the cell wall beta-glucan is involved in the action of HM-1 killer toxin. Addition of HM-1 killer toxin with several kinds of oligosaccharides revealed that either beta-1,3- or beta-1,6-glucan blocked the cytocidal action of HM-1 killer toxin whereas alpha-1,4-glucan and chitin did not. Mannan also interfered with HM-1 killer toxin action, but this inhibitory effect was much weaker than that observed with beta-1,3- or beta-1,6-glucans. Thus, it appears that the cell wall beta-glucan interacts with HM-1 killer toxin, and that this toxin-beta-glucan commitment is required for the action of HM-1 killer toxin. PMID:8026578

  10. Simultaneous Renal Cell Carcinoma and Giant Retroperitoneal Liposarcoma Involving Small Intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reznichenko, Aleksandr A

    2016-01-01

    Background. The concomitant occurrence of a renal cell carcinoma and retroperitoneal sarcoma is extremely rare with only few cases being reported. Methods. We present a case of simultaneous renal cell carcinoma and exceptionally large size retroperitoneal sarcoma involving small intestine. Surgical resection of retroperitoneal sarcoma and simultaneous right nephrectomy were performed. Results. Patient developed recurrent and metastatic disease and underwent debulking surgery following by chemotherapy. Despite aggressive behavior of the retroperitoneal sarcomas, patient is currently (7 years after simultaneous resection and nephrectomy) recurrence-free. Conclusions. Complete surgical resection is the mainstay of therapy for both renal cell carcinoma and retroperitoneal sarcoma. We present a case of simultaneous renal cell carcinoma and exceptionally large size retroperitoneal sarcoma. Debulking surgery and chemotherapy were helpful in our case. PMID:27595033

  11. Involvement of IRF4 dependent dendritic cells in T cell dependent colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pool, Lieneke; Rivollier, Aymeric Marie Christian; Agace, William Winston

    Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) is a chronic non-curable inflammatory disease of the intestine that affects as many as 1.4 million persons in the United States and 2.2 million persons in Europe. IBD results from abnormal immune response to bacterial components of the commensal microflora...... of chronic intestinal inflammation remains unclear. In the current study we used the CD45RBhi T cell transfer model of colitis to determine the role of IRF4 dependent DCs in intestinal inflammation. In this model naïve CD4+ T cells when transferred into RAG-/- mice, proliferate and expand in response...... to bacterial derived luminal antigen, localize to the intestinal mucosa and induce colitis. Adoptive transfer of naïve T cells into CD11cCre.IRF4fl/fl.RAG-1-/- mice resulted in reduced monocyte recruitment to the intestine and mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) compared to Cre- controls. Inflammatory cytokines...

  12. Mapping of T cell epitopes using recombinant antigens and synthetic peptides.

    OpenAIRE

    Lamb, J R; Ivanyi, J.; Rees, A D; Rothbard, J B; Howland, K; Young, R. A.; Young, D B

    1987-01-01

    Two complementary approaches were used to determine the epitope specificity of clonal and polyclonal human T lymphocytes reactive with the 65-kd antigen of Mycobacterium leprae. A recombinant DNA sublibrary constructed from portions of the 65-kd gene was used to map T cell determinants within amino acid sequences 101-146 and 409-526. Independently, potential T cell epitopes within the protein were predicted based on an empirical analysis of specific patterns in the amino acid sequence. Of six...

  13. Probabilistic mapping and image clustering for quantitative assessment of fluorescent protein localizations in Arabidopsis guard cells

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2015-01-01

    Authors: Takumi Higaki, Natsumaro Kutsuna & Seiichiro Hasezawa ### Abstract The protocol reported here describes a method to quantitatively evaluate fluorescently-tagged protein localizations from fluorescent microscopic images with a combination of probabilistic mapping and image clustering. We demonstrate the use of this protocol using kidney-shaped guard cells of plants. ### Introduction Microscopic assessment of protein localizations with fluorescent protein taggin...

  14. A temperature-mapping system for multi-cell SRF accelerating cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Ge, M; Furuta, F; Smith, E; Liepe, M; Posen, S; Padamsee, H; Hartill, D; Mi, X

    2015-01-01

    A Temperature mapping (T-map) system for Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) cavities consists of a thermometer array positioned precisely on an exterior cavity wall, capable of detecting small increases in temperature; therefore it is a powerful tool for research on the quality factor (Q0) of SRF cavities. A new multi-cell T-mapping system is has been developed at Cornell University. The system has nearly two thousand thermometers to cover 7-cell SRF cavities for Cornell ERL project. A new multiplexing scheme was adopted to reduce number of wires. A 1mK resolution of the temperature increase Delta T is achieved. A 9-cell cavity of TESLA geometry was tested with the T-map system. By converting Delta T to power loss and quality factor, it has been found that for this cavity, most surface losses were generated by the first cell when the accelerating gradient is increased above 15MV/m. The comparison of Q-value between with and without hotspots shows the heating on cavity wall degraded cavity Q0 about 1.65 tim...

  15. SOX7 is involved in aspirin-mediated growth inhibition of human colorectal cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin Zhou; Shu-Yan Huang; Jing-Xin Feng; Yan-Yan Gao; Li Zhao; Jun Lu; Bai-Qu Huang; Yu Zhang

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To confirm the role of sex-determining region Y-box 7 (Sox7) in aspirin-mediated growth inhibition of COX-independent human colorectal cancer cells.METHODS: The cell survival percentage was examined by MTT (Moto-nuclear cell direc cytotoxicity) assay.SOX7 expression was assessed by using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting. SB203580 was used to inhibit the p38MAPK signal pathway. SOX7 promoter activity was detected by Luciferase reporter assay.RESULTS: SOX7 was upregulated by aspirin and was involved in aspirin-mediated growth inhibition of SW480 human colorectal cancer cells. The p38MAPK pathway played a role in aspirin-induced SOX7 expression, during which the AP1 transcription factors c-Jun and c-Fos upregulated SOX7 promoter activities.RESULTS: SOX7 is upregulated by aspirin and is involved in aspirin-mediated growth inhibition of human colorectal cancer SW480 cells.

  16. Regulation of genes involved in cell wall synthesis and structure during Ustilago maydis dimorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robledo-Briones, Mariana; Ruiz-Herrera, José

    2013-02-01

    The cell wall is the structure that provides the shape to fungal cells and protects them from the difference in osmotic pressure existing between the cytosol and the external medium. Accordingly, changes in structure and composition of the fungal wall must occur during cell differentiation, including the dimorphic transition of fungi. We analyzed, by use of microarrays, the transcriptional regulation of the 639 genes identified to be involved in cell wall synthesis and structure plus the secretome of the Basidiomycota species Ustilago maydis during its dimorphic transition induced by a change in pH. Of these, 189 were differentially expressed during the process, and using as control two monomorphic mutants, one yeast like and the other mycelium constitutive, 66 genes specific of dimorphism were identified. Most of these genes were up-regulated in the mycelial phase. These included CHS genes, genes involved in β-1,6-glucan synthesis, N-glycosylation, and proteins containing a residue of glycosylphosphatidylinositol, and a number of genes from the secretome. The possible significance of these data on cell wall plasticity is discussed.

  17. Langerhans cell histiocytosis with multisystem involvement in an infant: A case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    BI, LINTAO; SUN, BUTONG; LU, ZHENXIA; SHI, ZHANGZHEN; WANG, DAN; ZHU, ZHENXING

    2015-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a proliferative disease of histiocyte-like cells, with a wide range of clinical presentations that vary from a solitary lesion to more severe multifocal or disseminated lesions. The disease can affect any age group; however, the peak incidence rate is in infants aged between 1 and 3 years-old. Diagnosis of LCH should be based on the synthetical analysis of clinical presentations, in addition to features of imaging and histopathology. Although certain cases regress spontaneously, other patients require systemic chemotherapy together with the administration of steroids. The present study reports the case of an infant with LDH with multisystem involvement, including that of the bone, skin, orbit, spleen and lungs. The patient received chemotherapy and obtained rapid improvement in the involved systems. A total of 2.5 years after completion of the therapy, the patient still remains in follow-up and no evidence of active disease has been noted. PMID:26136948

  18. The prognostic importance of parotid involvement by head and neck squamous cell carcinoma - Case report*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouveia, Bruna Melhoranse; Barbosa, Maria Helena de Magalhães; Carneiro, Leonardo Hoehl; Hadj, Luzia Abrao El; Fernandes, Nurimar Conceição

    2016-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is the second-most common malignant cutaneous cancer, with 60% occurring in the head and neck region. Metastases are uncommon and imply a more conservative prognosis. This report describes a case of parotid-invasive, facial squamous cell carcinoma, highlighting the importance of its prognostic and therapeutic management. The patient is an 81-year-old female, exhibiting extensive tumoral lesions in the pre-auricular region, affecting the parotid parenchyma and implying the metastatic involvement of the intra-parotid lymph node. Parotid involvement caused by SCC in specificity tumors is discussed herein. Parotid invasion is currently recognized as an isolated variable. It affects survival rates and determines certain changes in case management, such as the broadening of resection areas and adjuvant radiotherapy. PMID:27438204

  19. Recombinant expression and purification of a MAP30-cell penetrating peptide fusion protein with higher anti-tumor bioactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Qiang; Yang, Xu-Zhong; Fu, Long-Yun; Lu, Yv-Ting; Lu, Yan-Hua; Zhao, Jian; Wang, Fu-Jun

    2015-07-01

    MAP30 (Momordica Antiviral Protein 30 Kd), a single-stranded type-I ribosome inactivating protein, possesses versatile biological activities including anti-tumor abilities. However, the low efficiency penetrating into tumor cells hampers the tumoricidal effect of MAP30. This paper describes MAP30 fused with a human-derived cell penetrating peptide HBD which overcome the low uptake efficiency by tumor cells and exhibits higher anti-tumor bioactivity. MAP30 gene was cloned from the genomic DNA of Momordica charantia and the recombinant plasmid pET28b-MAP30-HBD was established and transferred into Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). The recombinant MAP30-HBD protein (rMAP30-HBD) was expressed in a soluble form after being induced by 0.5mM IPTG for 14h at 15°C. The recombinant protein was purified to greater than 95% purity with Ni-NTA affinity chromatography. The rMAP30-HBD protein not only has topological inactivation and protein translation inhibition activity but also showed significant improvements in cytotoxic activity compared to that of the rMAP30 protein without HBD in the tested tumor cell lines, and induced higher apoptosis rates in HeLa cells analyzed by Annexin V-FITC with FACS. This paper demonstrated a new method for improving MAP30 protein anti-tumor activity and might have potential applications in cancer therapy area.

  20. Recombinant expression and purification of a MAP30-cell penetrating peptide fusion protein with higher anti-tumor bioactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Qiang; Yang, Xu-Zhong; Fu, Long-Yun; Lu, Yv-Ting; Lu, Yan-Hua; Zhao, Jian; Wang, Fu-Jun

    2015-07-01

    MAP30 (Momordica Antiviral Protein 30 Kd), a single-stranded type-I ribosome inactivating protein, possesses versatile biological activities including anti-tumor abilities. However, the low efficiency penetrating into tumor cells hampers the tumoricidal effect of MAP30. This paper describes MAP30 fused with a human-derived cell penetrating peptide HBD which overcome the low uptake efficiency by tumor cells and exhibits higher anti-tumor bioactivity. MAP30 gene was cloned from the genomic DNA of Momordica charantia and the recombinant plasmid pET28b-MAP30-HBD was established and transferred into Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). The recombinant MAP30-HBD protein (rMAP30-HBD) was expressed in a soluble form after being induced by 0.5mM IPTG for 14h at 15°C. The recombinant protein was purified to greater than 95% purity with Ni-NTA affinity chromatography. The rMAP30-HBD protein not only has topological inactivation and protein translation inhibition activity but also showed significant improvements in cytotoxic activity compared to that of the rMAP30 protein without HBD in the tested tumor cell lines, and induced higher apoptosis rates in HeLa cells analyzed by Annexin V-FITC with FACS. This paper demonstrated a new method for improving MAP30 protein anti-tumor activity and might have potential applications in cancer therapy area. PMID:25797209

  1. Limitations of Data on Cell Phone Involvement in Collisions: A Case Study of California

    OpenAIRE

    Griswold, Julia B. Corresponding author; Grembek, Offer

    2014-01-01

    With the increasing prevalence of mobile technology and high-profile crashes bringing attention to distracted driving, data on cell phone involvement in collisions is critical for understanding the extent of the problem, examining the effectiveness of policies, and developing interventions to improve safety. Some limitations of existing data have been previously identified, but this paper examines the specific case of California’s collision data. Temporal, geographic, and jurisdictional tre...

  2. Involvement of multiple myeloma cell-derived exosomes in osteoclast differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Raimondi, L.; De Luca, A.; Amodio, N; Manno, M.; Raccosta, S; Taverna, S; Bellavia, D; Naselli, F; Fontana, S; Schillaci, O.; Giardino, R.; Fini, M.; Tassone, P; A. Santoro; De Leo, G

    2015-01-01

    Bone disease is the most frequent complication in multiple myeloma (MM) resulting in osteolytic lesions, bone pain, hypercalcemia and renal failure. In MM bone disease the perfect balance between bone-resorbing osteoclasts (OCs) and bone-forming osteoblasts (OBs) activity is lost in favour of OCs, thus resulting in skeletal disorders. Since exosomes have been described for their functional role in cancer progression, we here investigate whether MM cell-derived exosomes may be involved in OCs ...

  3. RAS-RAF-MEK-dependent oxidative cell death involving voltage-dependent anion channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagoda, Nicholas; von Rechenberg, Moritz; Zaganjor, Elma; Bauer, Andras J; Yang, Wan Seok; Fridman, Daniel J; Wolpaw, Adam J; Smukste, Inese; Peltier, John M; Boniface, J Jay; Smith, Richard; Lessnick, Stephen L; Sahasrabudhe, Sudhir; Stockwell, Brent R

    2007-06-14

    Therapeutics that discriminate between the genetic makeup of normal cells and tumour cells are valuable for treating and understanding cancer. Small molecules with oncogene-selective lethality may reveal novel functions of oncoproteins and enable the creation of more selective drugs. Here we describe the mechanism of action of the selective anti-tumour agent erastin, involving the RAS-RAF-MEK signalling pathway functioning in cell proliferation, differentiation and survival. Erastin exhibits greater lethality in human tumour cells harbouring mutations in the oncogenes HRAS, KRAS or BRAF. Using affinity purification and mass spectrometry, we discovered that erastin acts through mitochondrial voltage-dependent anion channels (VDACs)--a novel target for anti-cancer drugs. We show that erastin treatment of cells harbouring oncogenic RAS causes the appearance of oxidative species and subsequent death through an oxidative, non-apoptotic mechanism. RNA-interference-mediated knockdown of VDAC2 or VDAC3 caused resistance to erastin, implicating these two VDAC isoforms in the mechanism of action of erastin. Moreover, using purified mitochondria expressing a single VDAC isoform, we found that erastin alters the permeability of the outer mitochondrial membrane. Finally, using a radiolabelled analogue and a filter-binding assay, we show that erastin binds directly to VDAC2. These results demonstrate that ligands to VDAC proteins can induce non-apoptotic cell death selectively in some tumour cells harbouring activating mutations in the RAS-RAF-MEK pathway.

  4. Follicular variant of peripheral T cell lymphoma with mediastinal involvement in a child: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delas, Audrey; Gaulard, Philippe; Plat, Geneviève; Brousset, Pierre; Laurent, Camille

    2015-03-01

    Peripheral T cell lymphomas are rare in young patients. We report the first case of a follicular variant of peripheral T cell lymphoma not otherwise specified in an 11-year-old boy, who presented with a large mediastinal mass. Microscopic examination of the mediastinal biopsy revealed nodular infiltration of medium- to large-sized atypical lymphocytes. Immunohistochemistry showed expression of follicular helper T cell markers (CD10, PD1, CXCL13, and BCL6) in tumor T cells. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) was not detected by an in situ hybridization assay for EBV-encoded RNA. Interestingly, fluorescence in situ hybridization detected the presence in the tumor cells of the t(5;9)(q33;q22) translocation, involving ITK and SYK rearrangement. T cell clonality was detected by multiplex PCR analysis of TRG and TRD gene rearrangements. After 4 cycles of systemic chemotherapy, the patient was in complete remission. Although this entity is very rare, our observations show that lymphomas arising from T follicular helper cells may occur in children and that this should be distinguished from other lymphomas, such T-lymphoblastic lymphomas, which require a specific therapeutic approach. PMID:25604350

  5. Xanthorrhizol induced DNA fragmentation in HepG2 cells involving Bcl-2 family proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tee, Thiam-Tsui, E-mail: thiamtsu@yahoo.com [School of Biosciences and Biotechnology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Cheah, Yew-Hoong [School of Biosciences and Biotechnology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Bioassay Unit, Herbal Medicine Research Center, Institute for Medical Research, Jalan Pahang, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Meenakshii, Nallappan [Biology Department, Faculty of Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Mohd Sharom, Mohd Yusof; Azimahtol Hawariah, Lope Pihie [School of Biosciences and Biotechnology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2012-04-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We isolated xanthorrhizol, a sesquiterpenoid compound from Curcuma xanthorrhiza. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Xanthorrhizol induced apoptosis in HepG2 cells as observed using SEM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Apoptosis in xanthorrhizol-treated HepG2 cells involved Bcl-2 family proteins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA fragmentation was observed in xanthorrhizol-treated HepG2 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA fragmentation maybe due to cleavage of PARP and DFF45/ICAD proteins. -- Abstract: Xanthorrhizol is a plant-derived pharmacologically active sesquiterpenoid compound isolated from Curcuma xanthorrhiza. Previously, we have reported that xanthorrhizol inhibited the proliferation of HepG2 human hepatoma cells by inducing apoptotic cell death via caspase activation. Here, we attempt to further elucidate the mode of action of xanthorrhizol. Apoptosis in xanthorrhizol-treated HepG2 cells as observed by scanning electron microscopy was accompanied by truncation of BID; reduction of both anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 and Bcl-X{sub L} expression; cleavage of PARP and DFF45/ICAD proteins and DNA fragmentation. Taken together, these results suggest xanthorrhizol as a potent antiproliferative agent on HepG2 cells by inducing apoptosis via Bcl-2 family members. Hence we proposed that xanthorrhizol could be used as an anti-liver cancer drug for future studies.

  6. Spred2 is involved in imatinib-induced cytotoxicity in chronic myeloid leukemia cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xiao-Yun; Yang, Yue-Feng; Wu, Chu-Tse; Xiao, Feng-Jun; Zhang, Qun-Wei [Department of Experimental Hematology, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing 100850 (China); Ma, Xiao-Ni [Lanzhou University of Technology, Lanzhou 730050 (China); Li, Qing-Fang; Yan, Jun [Department of Experimental Hematology, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing 100850 (China); Wang, Hua, E-mail: wanghualjh@gmail.com [Department of Experimental Hematology, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing 100850 (China); Wang, Li-Sheng, E-mail: wangls@nic.bmi.ac.cn [Department of Experimental Hematology, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing 100850 (China)

    2010-03-19

    Spreds, a recently established class of negative regulators of the Ras-ERK (extracellular signal-regulated kinase) pathway, are involved in hematogenesises, allergic disorders and tumourigenesis. However, their role in hematologic neoplasms is largely unknown. Possible effects of Spreds on other signal pathways closely related to Ras-ERK have been poorly investigated. In this study, we investigated the in vitro effects of Spred2 on chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) cells. In addition to inhibiting the well-established Ras-ERK cascade, adenovirus-mediated Spred2 over-expression inhibits constitutive and stem cell factor (SCF)-stimulated sphingosine kinase-1 (SPHK1) and Mcl-1 expression, as well as inhibiting proliferation and inducing apoptosis in CML cells. In K562 cells and primary CML cells, imatinib induces endogenous Spred2 expression. Spred2 silencing by stable RNA interference partly protects K562 cells against imatinib-induced apoptosis. Together, these data implicate Spred2 in imatinib-induced cytotoxicity in CML cells, possibly by inhibiting the Ras-ERK cascade and the pro-survival signaling molecules SPHK1 and Mcl-1. These findings reveal potential targets for selective therapy of CML.

  7. DCD – a novel plant specific domain in proteins involved in development and programmed cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doerks Tobias

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recognition of microbial pathogens by plants triggers the hypersensitive reaction, a common form of programmed cell death in plants. These dying cells generate signals that activate the plant immune system and alarm the neighboring cells as well as the whole plant to activate defense responses to limit the spread of the pathogen. The molecular mechanisms behind the hypersensitive reaction are largely unknown except for the recognition process of pathogens. We delineate the NRP-gene in soybean, which is specifically induced during this programmed cell death and contains a novel protein domain, which is commonly found in different plant proteins. Results The sequence analysis of the protein, encoded by the NRP-gene from soybean, led to the identification of a novel domain, which we named DCD, because it is found in plant proteins involved in development and cell death. The domain is shared by several proteins in the Arabidopsis and the rice genomes, which otherwise show a different protein architecture. Biological studies indicate a role of these proteins in phytohormone response, embryo development and programmed cell by pathogens or ozone. Conclusion It is tempting to speculate, that the DCD domain mediates signaling in plant development and programmed cell death and could thus be used to identify interacting proteins to gain further molecular insights into these processes.

  8. Xanthorrhizol induced DNA fragmentation in HepG2 cells involving Bcl-2 family proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► We isolated xanthorrhizol, a sesquiterpenoid compound from Curcuma xanthorrhiza. ► Xanthorrhizol induced apoptosis in HepG2 cells as observed using SEM. ► Apoptosis in xanthorrhizol-treated HepG2 cells involved Bcl-2 family proteins. ► DNA fragmentation was observed in xanthorrhizol-treated HepG2 cells. ► DNA fragmentation maybe due to cleavage of PARP and DFF45/ICAD proteins. -- Abstract: Xanthorrhizol is a plant-derived pharmacologically active sesquiterpenoid compound isolated from Curcuma xanthorrhiza. Previously, we have reported that xanthorrhizol inhibited the proliferation of HepG2 human hepatoma cells by inducing apoptotic cell death via caspase activation. Here, we attempt to further elucidate the mode of action of xanthorrhizol. Apoptosis in xanthorrhizol-treated HepG2 cells as observed by scanning electron microscopy was accompanied by truncation of BID; reduction of both anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 and Bcl-XL expression; cleavage of PARP and DFF45/ICAD proteins and DNA fragmentation. Taken together, these results suggest xanthorrhizol as a potent antiproliferative agent on HepG2 cells by inducing apoptosis via Bcl-2 family members. Hence we proposed that xanthorrhizol could be used as an anti-liver cancer drug for future studies.

  9. Soluble guanylyl cyclase is involved in PDT-induced injury of crayfish glial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovaleva, V. D.; Uzdensky, A. B.

    2016-04-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a potential tool for selective destruction of malignant brain tumors. However, not only malignant but also healthy neurons and glial cells may be damaged during PDT. Nitric oxide is an important modulator of cell viability and intercellular neuroglial communications. NO have been already shown to participate in PDT-induced injury of neurons and glial cells. As soluble guanylyl cyclase is the only known receptor for NO, we have studied the possible role of soluble guanylyl cyclase in the regulation of survival and death of neurons and surrounding glial cells under photo-oxidative stress induced by photodynamic treatment (PDT). The crayfish stretch receptor consisting of a single identified sensory neuron enveloped by glial cells is a simple but informative model object. It was photosensitized with alumophthalocyanine photosens (10 nM) and irradiated with a laser diode (670 nm, 0.4 W/cm2). Using inhibitory analysis we have shown that during PDT soluble guanylyl cyclase, probably, has proapoptotic and antinecrotic effect on the glial cells of the isolated crayfish stretch receptor. Proapoptotic effect of soluble guanylyl cyclase could be mediated by protein kinase G (PKG). Thus, the involvement of NO/sGC/cGMP/PKG signaling pathway in PDT-induced apoptosis of glial cells was indirectly demonstrated.

  10. Quantitative trait locus mapping identifies candidate alleles involved in adaptive introgression and range expansion in a wild sunflower.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, Kenneth D; Broman, Karl W; Kane, Nolan C; Hovick, Stephen M; Randell, Rebecca A; Rieseberg, Loren H

    2015-05-01

    The wild North American sunflowers Helianthus annuus and H. debilis are participants in one of the earliest identified examples of adaptive trait introgression, and the exchange is hypothesized to have triggered a range expansion in H. annuus. However, the genetic basis of the adaptive exchange has not been examined. Here, we combine quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping with field measurements of fitness to identify candidate H. debilis QTL alleles likely to have introgressed into H. annuus to form the natural hybrid lineage H. a. texanus. Two 500-individual BC1 mapping populations were grown in central Texas, genotyped for 384 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers and then phenotyped in the field for two fitness and 22 herbivore resistance, ecophysiological, phenological and architectural traits. We identified a total of 110 QTL, including at least one QTL for 22 of the 24 traits. Over 75% of traits exhibited at least one H. debilis QTL allele that would shift the trait in the direction of the wild hybrid H. a. texanus. We identified three chromosomal regions where H. debilis alleles increased both female and male components of fitness; these regions are expected to be strongly favoured in the wild. QTL for a number of other ecophysiological, phenological and architectural traits colocalized with these three regions and are candidates for the actual traits driving adaptive shifts. G × E interactions played a modest role, with 17% of the QTL showing potentially divergent phenotypic effects between the two field sites. The candidate adaptive chromosomal regions identified here serve as explicit hypotheses for how the genetic architecture of the hybrid lineage came into existence. PMID:25522096

  11. Conjunctival Involvement of T-Cell Lymphoma in a Patient with Mycosis Fungoides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sultan S. Aldrees

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Ocular involvement in mycosis fungoides (MF cases occurs in one-third of patients with the eyelid being the most frequent site affected; however, conjunctival involvement is rarely reported. Herein, we report a rare case of conjunctival involvement of MF. Case Presentation. A 66-year-old man who was previously diagnosed with MF in 2010 and was treated presented in 2014 complaining of foreign body sensation and redness in both eyes. Slit lamp examination of both eyes showed erythematous conjunctival growth that extended circumferentially. Physical examination revealed erythematous skin lesions on different body parts. Conjunctival biopsy was performed and revealed a dense, highly polymorphic lymphocytic population. The immunophenotype demonstrated a neoplastic T-cell origin consistent with MF. A diagnosis of conjunctival involvement by MF was made. The conjunctiva was treated with radiotherapy resulting in tumor regression. There were no recurrences at the 6-month follow-up. Conclusion. T-cell lymphoma should be considered in patients with a history of MF presenting with conjunctival and skin lesions.

  12. Skeletal Muscle Satellite Cells, Mitochondria, and MicroRNAs: Their Involvement in the Pathogenesis of ALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsitkanou, Stavroula; Della Gatta, Paul A.; Russell, Aaron P.

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as motor neuron disease (MND), is a fatal motor neuron disorder. It results in progressive degeneration and death of upper and lower motor neurons, protein aggregation, severe muscle atrophy and respiratory insufficiency. Median survival with ALS is between 2 and 5 years from the onset of symptoms. ALS manifests as either familial ALS (FALS) (~10% of cases) or sporadic ALS (SALS), (~90% of cases). Mutations in the copper/zinc (CuZn) superoxide dismutase (SOD1) gene account for ~20% of FALS cases and the mutant SOD1 mouse model has been used extensively to help understand the ALS pathology. As the precise mechanisms causing ALS are not well understood there is presently no cure. Recent evidence suggests that motor neuron degradation may involve a cell non-autonomous phenomenon involving numerous cell types within various tissues. Skeletal muscle is now considered as an important tissue involved in the pathogenesis of ALS by activating a retrograde signaling cascade that degrades motor neurons. Skeletal muscle heath and function are regulated by numerous factors including satellite cells, mitochondria and microRNAs. Studies demonstrate that in ALS these factors show various levels of dysregulation within the skeletal muscle. This review provides an overview of their dysregulation in various ALS models as well as how they may contribute individually and/or synergistically to the ALS pathogenesis. PMID:27679581

  13. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma involving the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gualco, Gabriela; Weiss, Lawrence M; Barber, Glen N; Bacchi, Carlos E

    2011-02-01

    Lymphomas involving the central nervous system are recognized increasingly in immunocompetent as well as immunosuppressed individuals, and the majority of the cases are diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). The aim of this study was to compare the immunophenotype, clinicopathological features, and association with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) of DLBCL of the central nervous system (CNS) in 3 different clinical situations: primary, in immunocompetent patients; "primary," in immunosuppressed patients; and in patients with secondary involvement by systemic lymphoma. The authors reviewed the clinicopathological features, morphology, immunophenotype (according to germinal-center B-cell-like and nongerminal B-cell-like subtypes), and association with EBV in 36 cases of DLBCL of the CNS, including 25 primary cases, 5 associated with immunosuppression, and 6 cases with secondary involvement. Survival was evaluated in 15 cases of primary CNS lymphomas. Of the 36 patients, 19 were male and 18 female. Only 2 cases of lymphomas were EBV-positive; both occurred in immunosuppressed patients. Separation into germinal-center and non-germinal center subtypes by an immunohistochemistry panel showed that 68% of primary, 80% of secondary, and 83% of the cases associated with immunosuppression were of non-germinal-center subtype, respectively. Patients with non-germinal-center immunophenotype showed significantly worse survival than those with CNS lymphomas of the germinal-center subtype.

  14. Skeletal Muscle Satellite Cells, Mitochondria, and MicroRNAs: Their Involvement in the Pathogenesis of ALS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsitkanou, Stavroula; Della Gatta, Paul A; Russell, Aaron P

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as motor neuron disease (MND), is a fatal motor neuron disorder. It results in progressive degeneration and death of upper and lower motor neurons, protein aggregation, severe muscle atrophy and respiratory insufficiency. Median survival with ALS is between 2 and 5 years from the onset of symptoms. ALS manifests as either familial ALS (FALS) (~10% of cases) or sporadic ALS (SALS), (~90% of cases). Mutations in the copper/zinc (CuZn) superoxide dismutase (SOD1) gene account for ~20% of FALS cases and the mutant SOD1 mouse model has been used extensively to help understand the ALS pathology. As the precise mechanisms causing ALS are not well understood there is presently no cure. Recent evidence suggests that motor neuron degradation may involve a cell non-autonomous phenomenon involving numerous cell types within various tissues. Skeletal muscle is now considered as an important tissue involved in the pathogenesis of ALS by activating a retrograde signaling cascade that degrades motor neurons. Skeletal muscle heath and function are regulated by numerous factors including satellite cells, mitochondria and microRNAs. Studies demonstrate that in ALS these factors show various levels of dysregulation within the skeletal muscle. This review provides an overview of their dysregulation in various ALS models as well as how they may contribute individually and/or synergistically to the ALS pathogenesis. PMID:27679581

  15. The involvement of human-nuc gene in polyploidization of K562 cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalloni, G; Danè, A; Piacibello, W; Bruno, S; Lamas, E; Bréchot, C; Aglietta, M

    2000-12-01

    During megakaryocyte differentiation, the immature megakaryocyte increases its ploidy to a 2(x) DNA content by a process called endomitosis. This leads to the formation of a giant cell, the mature megakaryocyte, which gives rise to platelets. We investigated the role of human-nuc (h-nuc), a gene involved in septum formation in karyokynesis in yeast, during megakaryocytic polyploidization. Nocodazole and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) were used to induce megakaryocytic differentiation in K562 cell line. The ploidy distribution and CD41 expression of treated K562 cells were evaluated by flow cytometry. Using quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), we analyzed the h-nuc mRNA expression on treated K562 cells. Mature megakaryocyte-like polyploid cells were detected at day 5-7 of treatment with nocodazole. TPA also had a similar effect on K562 cells, but it was much weaker than that of nocodazole. The analysis of ploidy of nocodazole-treated K562 cells showed that nocodazole preferentially induced polyploidization of K562 cell line with a pronounced increase of the cells 8N at day 7 of culture. Expression of CD41, a differentiation-related phenotype, was significantly induced by TPA after 7 days of treatment, showing that functional maturation was mainly induced by TPA. In contrast, there was no significant increase in CD41 expression in nocodazole-treated K562 cells, suggesting that polyploidization and functional maturation are separately regulated during megakaryocytopoiesis. RT-PCR analysis indicated that h-nuc mRNA increased after 72 hours in the presence of nocodazole, preceding the induction of polyploidization. Our data indicate that h-nuc might play a role in polyploidization during megakaryocytic differentiation via inhibition of septum formation.

  16. Calcineurin-NFAT signaling is involved in phenylephrine-induced vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao PANG; Ning-ling SUN

    2009-01-01

    Aim: Catecholamine-induced vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation is one of the major events in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and vascular remodeling. The calcineurin-NFAT pathway plays a role in regulating growth and differentiation in various cell types. We investigated whether the calcineurin-NFAT pathway was involved in the regulation of phenylephrine-induced VSMC proliferation.Methods: Proliferation of VSMC was measured using an MTT assay and cell counts. Localization of NFATcl was detected by immunofluorescence staining. NFATcl-DNA binding was determined by EMSA and luciferase activity analyses.NFATcl and calcineurin levels were assayed by immunoprecipitation.Results: Phenylephrine (PE, an α1-adrenoceptor agonist) increased VSMC proliferation and cell number. Prazosin (an α1-adrenoceptor antagonist), cyclosporin A (CsA, an inhibitor of calcineurin) and chelerythrine (an inhibitor of PKC)decreased PE-induced proliferation and cell number. Additional treatment of VSMC with CsA or chelerythrine further inhibited proliferation and cell number in the chelerythrine-pretreatment group and the CsA-pretreatment group. CsA and chelerythrine alone had no effect on either absorbance or cell number. CsA decreased PE-induced calcineurin levels and activity. NFATc1 was translocated from the cytoplasm to the nucleus upon treatment with PE. This translocation was reversed by CsA. CsA decreased the PE-induced NFATc1 level in the nucleus. PE increased NFAT's DNA binding activity and NFAT-dependent reporter gene expression. CsA blocked these effects.Conclusion: CsA partially suppresses PE-induced VSMC proliferation by inhibiting calcineurin activity and NFATc1 nuclear translocation. The calcineurin-NFATc1 pathway is involved in the hyperplastic growth of VSMC induced by phenylephrine.

  17. PE-induced apoptosis in SMMC-7721 cells: Involvement of Erk and Stat signalling pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    XUE, LI; LI, MING; CHEN, TENG; SUN, HAIFENG; ZHU, JIE; LI, XIA; WU, FENG; WANG, BIAO; LI, JUPING; CHEN, YANJIONG

    2014-01-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that the redistribution of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) across the bilayer of the plasma membrane is an important molecular marker for apoptosis. However, the effect of PE on apoptosis and the underlying mechanism of PE remain unclear. In the current study, MTT and flow cytometric assays were used to examine the effects of PE on apoptosis in SMMC-7721 cells. The level of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and the expression of Bax, Bcl-2, caspase-3, phospho-Erk and phospho-Stat1/2 in SMMC-7721 cells that were exposed to PE were also investigated. The results showed that PE inhibited proliferation, caused G0/G1 phase cell cycle arrest and induced apoptosis in SMMC-7721 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Rhodamine 123 staining showed that the treatment of SMMC-7721 cells with different concentrations of PE for 24 h significantly decreased the level of ΔΨm and exerted dose-dependent effects. Using immunofluorescence and western blotting, we found that the expression of Bax was upregulated, whereas that of Bcl-2 was downregulated in PE-induced apoptotic cells. In addition, these events were accompanied by an increase in caspase-3 expression in a dose-dependent manner following PE treatment. PE-induced apoptosis was accompanied by a decrease in Erk phosphorylation and by the activation of Stat1/2 phosphorylation in SMMC-7721 cells. In conclusion, the results suggested that PE-induced apoptosis is involved in upregulating the Bax/Bcl-2 protein ratio and decreasing the ΔΨm. Moreover, the results showed that the Erk and Stat1/2 signalling pathways may be involved in the process of PE-induced apoptosis. PMID:24821075

  18. Heterotrimeric G-protein is involved in phytochrome A-mediated cell death of Arabidopsis hypocotyls

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing Wei; Wenbin Zhou; Guangzhen Hu; Jiamian Wei; Hongquan Yang; Jirong Huang

    2008-01-01

    The heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G-protein) has been demonstrated to mediate various signaling pathways in plants. However,its role in phytochrome A (phyA) signaling remains elusive. In this study,we discover a new phyA-mediated phenotype designated far-red irradiation (FR) preconditioned cell death,which occurs only in the hypocotyls of FR-grown seedlings following exposure to white light (WL). The cell death is mitigated in the Ga mutant gpal but aggravated in the Gβ mutant agbl in comparison with the wild type (WT),indicative of antagonistic roles of GPAI and AGB1 in the phyA-mediated cell-death pathway. Further investigation indicates that FR-induced accumulation of nonphotoconvertible protochlorophyllide (Pchlide633),which generates reactive oxygen species (ROS)on exposure to WL,is required for FR-preconditioned cell death. Moreover,ROS is mainly detected in chloroplasts using the fluorescent probe. Interestingly,the application of H2O2 to dark-grown seedlings results in a phenotype similar to FR-preconditioned cell death. This reveals that ROS is a critical mediator for the cell death. In addition,we observe that agbl is more sensitive to H2O2 than WT seedlings,indicating that the G-protein may also modify the sensitivity of the seedlings to ROS stress. Taking these results together,we infer that the G-protein may be involved in the phyA signaling pathway to regulate FR-preconditioned cell death of Arabidopsis hypocotyls.Apossible mechanism underlying the involvement of the G-protein in phyA signaling is discussed in this study.

  19. 3-bromopyruvate enhanced daunorubicin-induced cytotoxicity involved in monocarboxylate transporter 1 in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhe; Sun, Yiming; Hong, Haiyu; Zhao, Surong; Zou, Xue; Ma, Renqiang; Jiang, Chenchen; Wang, Zhiwei; Li, Huabin; Liu, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence demonstrates that the hexokinase inhibitor 3-bromopyruvate (3-BrPA) induces the cell apoptotic death by inhibiting ATP generation in human cancer cells. Interestingly, some tumor cell lines are less sensitive to 3-BrPA-induced apoptosis than others. Moreover, the molecular mechanism of 3-BrPA-trigged apoptosis is unclear. In the present study, we examined the effects of 3-BrPA on the viability of the breast cancer cell lines MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7. We further investigated the potential roles of monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1) in drug accumulation and efflux of breast cancer cells. Finally, we explored whether 3-BrPA enhanced daunorubicin (DNR)-induced cytotoxicity through regulation of MCT1 in breast cancer cells. MTT and colony formation assays were used to measure cell viability. Western blot analysis, flow cytometric analysis and fluorescent microscopy were used to determine the molecular mechanism of actions of MCT1 in different breast cancer cell lines. Whole-body bioluminescence imaging was used to investigate the effect of 3-BrPA in vivo. We found that 3-BrPA significantly inhibited cell growth and induced apoptosis in MCF-7 cell line, but not in MDA-MB-231 cells. Moreover, we observed that 3-BrPA efficiently enhanced DNR-induced cytotoxicity in MCF-7 cells by inhibiting the activity of ATP-dependent efflux pumps. We also found that MCT1 overexpression increased the efficacy of 3-BrPA in MDA-MB-231 cells. 3-BrPA markedly suppressed subcutaneous tumor growth in combination with DNR in nude mice implanted with MCF-7 cells. Lastly, our whole-body bioluminescence imaging data indicated that 3-BrPA promoted DNR accumulation in tumors. These findings collectively suggest that 3-BrPA enhanced DNR antitumor activity in breast cancer cells involved MCT-1, suggesting that inhibition of glycolysis could be an effective therapeutic approach for breast cancer treatment. PMID:26609475

  20. Roles for glycosylation of cell surface receptors involved in cellular immune recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudd, P M; Wormald, M R; Stanfield, R L; Huang, M; Mattsson, N; Speir, J A; DiGennaro, J A; Fetrow, J S; Dwek, R A; Wilson, I A

    1999-10-22

    The majority of cell surface receptors involved in antigen recognition by T cells and in the orchestration of the subsequent cell signalling events are glycoproteins. The length of a typical N-linked sugar is comparable with that of an immunoglobulin domain (30 A). Thus, by virtue of their size alone, oligosaccharides may be expected to play a significant role in the functions and properties of the cell surface proteins to which they are attached. A databank of oligosaccharide structures has been constructed from NMR and crystallographic data to aid in the interpretation of crystal structures of glycoproteins. As unambiguous electron density can usually only be assigned to the glycan cores, the remainder of the sugar is then modelled into the crystal lattice by superimposing the appropriate oligosaccharide from the database. This approach provides insights into the roles that glycosylation might play in cell surface receptors, by providing models that delineate potential close packing interactions on the cell surface. It has been proposed that the specific recognition of antigen by T cells results in the formation of an immunological synapse between the T cell and the antigen-presenting cell. The cell adhesion glycoproteins, such as CD2 and CD48, help to form a cell junction, providing a molecular spacer between opposing cells. The oligosaccharides located on the membrane proximal domains of CD2 and CD48 provide a scaffold to orient the binding faces, which leads to increased affinity. In the next step, recruitment of the peptide major histocompatibility complex (pMHC) by the T-cell receptors (TCRs) requires mobility on the membrane surface. The TCR sugars are located such that they could prevent non-specific aggregation. Importantly, the sugars limit the possible geometry and spacing of TCR/MHC clusters which precede cell signalling. We postulate that, in the final stage, the sugars could play a general role in controlling the assembly and stabilisation of the

  1. Collagen cross-linking by adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cells and scar-derived mesenchymal cells : Are mesenchymal stromal cells involved in scar formation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bogaerdt, Antoon J.; van der Veen, Vincent C.; van Zuijlen, Paul P. M.; Reijnen, Linda; Verkerk, Michelle; Bank, Ruud A.; Middelkoop, Esther; Ulrich, Magda M. W.

    2009-01-01

    In this work, different fibroblast-like (mesenchymal) cell populations that might be involved in wound healing were characterized and their involvement in scar formation was studied by determining collagen synthesis and processing. Depending on the physical and mechanical properties of the tissues,

  2. Magnesium intracellular content and distribution map in drug-resistant and -sensitive whole cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emil Malucelli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium (Mg plays crucial structural and regulatory roles within cells. Despite the extensive amount of data about the biochemistry of Mg, a complete picture of its regulation and cellular homeostasis is lacking. Thanks to recent improvements in third generation synchrotron X-ray sources, X-ray fluorescence microscopy (XRFM is becoming a highly sensitive method for mapping elemental distributions in cells. XRFM maps the element content but not the concentration, which is a relevant variable in a biological context. We tackled this issue by combining XRFM with atomic force microscopy that was used to obtain morphological information of the sample. The aim of the present study was to compare the content and the distribution of Mg in drug-resistant and -sensitive tumor cell lines. Our data has shown a massive increase of Mg in LoVo drug-resistant cells. Moreover, the map of intracellular Mg showed marked differences in the pattern distribution between sensitive and resistant cells.

  3. Involvement of cell surface phosphatidylinositol-anchored glycoproteins in cell-cell adhesion of chick embryo myoblasts

    OpenAIRE

    1989-01-01

    During myogenesis myoblasts fuse to form multinucleate cells that express muscle-specific proteins. A specific cell-cell adhesion process precedes lipid bilayer union during myoblast fusion (Knudsen, K. A., and A. F. Horwitz. 1977. Dev. Biol. 58:328-338) and is mediated by cell surface glycoproteins (Knudsen, K. A., 1985. J. Cell Biol. 101:891- 897). In this paper we show that myoblast adhesion and myotube formation are inhibited by treating fusion-competent myoblasts with phosphatidylinosito...

  4. The involvement of heparan sulfate proteoglycans in stem cell differentiation and in malignant glioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Soumi; Xiong, Anqi; Forsberg-Nilsson, Karin

    2016-04-01

    Heparan sulfate (HS) proteoglycans (HSPG) are major components of the extracellular matrix. They interact with a plethora of macromolecules that are of physiological importance. The pattern of sulfation of the HS chain determines the specificity of these interactions. The enzymes that synthesize and degrade HS are thus key regulators of processes ranging from embryonic development to tissue homeostasis and tumor development. Formation of the nervous system is also critically dependent on appropriate HSPGs as shown by several studies on the role of HS in neural induction from embryonic stem cells. High-grade glioma is the most common primary malignant brain tumor among adults, and the prognosis is poor. Neural and glioma stem cells share several traits, including sustained proliferation and highly efficient migration in the brain. There are also similarities between the neurogenic niche where adult neural stem cells reside and the tumorigenic niche, including their interactions with components of the extracellular matrix (ECM). The levels of many of these components, for example HSPGs and enzymes involved in the biosynthesis and modification of HS are attenuated in gliomas. In this paper, HS regulation of pathways involved in neural differentiation and how these may be of importance for brain development are discussed. The literature suggesting that modifications of HS could regulate glioma growth and invasion is reviewed. Targeting the invasiveness of glioma cells by modulating HS may improve upon present therapeutic options, which only marginally enhance the survival of glioma patients.

  5. The involvement of mitochondrial apoptotic pathway in eugenol-induced cell death in human glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Wei-Zhe; Chou, Chiang-Ting; Hsu, Shu-Shong; Liao, Wei-Chuan; Shieh, Pochuen; Kuo, Daih-Huang; Tseng, Hui-Wen; Kuo, Chun-Chi; Jan, Chung-Ren

    2015-01-01

    Eugenol, a natural phenolic constituent of clove oil, has a wide range of applications in medicine as a local antiseptic and anesthetic. However, the effect of eugenol on human glioblastoma is unclear. This study examined whether eugenol elevated intracellular free Ca(2+) levels ([Ca(2+)]i) and induced apoptosis in DBTRG-05MG human glioblastoma cells. Eugenol evoked [Ca(2+)]i rises which were reduced by removing extracellular Ca(2+). Eugenol-induced [Ca(2+)]i rises were not altered by store-operated Ca(2+) channel blockers but were inhibited by the PKC inhibitor GF109203X and the transient receptor potential channel melastatin 8 (TRPM8) antagonist capsazepine. In Ca(2+)-free medium, pretreatment with the endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) pump inhibitor thapsigargin (TG) or 2,5-di-tert-butylhydroquinone (BHQ) abolished eugenol-induced [Ca(2+)]i rises. The phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor U73122 significantly inhibited eugenol-induced [Ca(2+)]i rises. Eugenol killed cells which were not reversed by prechelating cytosolic Ca(2+) with 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy) ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid-acetoxymethyl ester (BAPTA-AM). Eugenol induced apoptosis through increasing reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, decreasing mitochondrial membrane potential, releasing cytochrome c and activating caspase-9/caspase-3. Together, in DBTRG-05MG cells, eugenol evoked [Ca(2+)]i rises by inducing PLC-dependent release of Ca(2+) from the endoplasmic reticulum and caused Ca(2+) influx possibly through TRPM8 or PKC-sensitive channels. Furthermore, eugenol induced the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. PMID:25455450

  6. NF-kappa B modulation is involved in celastrol induced human multiple myeloma cell apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiwen Ni

    Full Text Available Celastrol is an active compound extracted from the root bark of the traditional Chinese medicine Tripterygium wilfordii Hook F. To investigate the effect of celastrol on human multiple myeloma cell cycle arrest and apoptosis and explore its molecular mechanism of action. The activity of celastrol on LP-1 cell proliferation was detected by WST-8 assay. The celastrol-induced cell cycle arrest was analyzed by flow cytometry after propidium iodide staining. Nuclear translocation of the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB was observed by fluorescence microscope. Celastrol inhibited cell proliferation of LP-1 myeloma cell in a dose-dependent manner with IC50 values of 0.8817 µM, which was mediated through G1 cell cycle arrest and p27 induction. Celastrol induced apoptosis in LP-1 and RPMI 8226 myeloma cells in a time and dose dependent manner, and it involved Caspase-3 activation and NF-κB pathway. Celastrol down-modulated antiapoptotic proteins including Bcl-2 and survivin expression. The expression of NF-κB and IKKa were decreased after celastrol treatment. Celastrol effectively blocked the nuclear translocation of the p65 subunit and induced human multiple myeloma cell cycle arrest and apoptosis by p27 upregulation and NF-kB modulation. It has been demonstrated that the effect of celastrol on NF-kB was HO-1-independent by using zinc protoporphyrin-9 (ZnPPIX, a selective heme oxygenase inhibitor. From the results, it could be inferred that celastrol may be used as a NF-kB inhibitor to inhibit myeloma cell proliferation.

  7. Luman recruiting factor is involved in stromal cell proliferation during decidualization in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao; Lin, Pengfei; Chen, Fenglei; Wang, Nan; Zhao, Fan; Wang, Aihua; Jin, Yaping

    2016-08-01

    Decidualization is crucial for successful pregnancy in mice and humans. Although many essential molecular modulators have been identified during decidualization, the precise molecular mechanism of uterine decidualization remains largely unknown. Our previous research indicates that luman recruiting factor (LRF) is strongly expressed in decidual uteri of mice on days 6-8 of pregnancy. In this study, our aim is to determine the biological functions of LRF during decidualization in mice. We used the shLRF lentivirus to attenuate the expression of LRF, which significantly reduced the weight and size of implantation sites on days 7-8 of pregnancy. In a stromal cell culture model, LRF mRNA and protein levels increased significantly during stromal cell decidualization induced by estrogen and progesterone. LRF silencing resulted in the decidual markers decidual prolactin-related protein, insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 1 and progesterone receptor being dramatically reduced, and the decidual process was significantly inhibited. Cell-cycle analysis and cell apoptosis analysis revealed that, although no obvious apoptosis occurred in shLRF-lentivirus-infected stromal cells during decidualization, proliferation was inhibited via S-phase cell-cycle arrest, and the mitotic activity of uterine stromal cells was inhibited. An examination of cell-cycle regulatory factors indicated that the mRNA expression levels of cyclin A and cyclin B1 were significantly down-regulated after treatment with shLRF lentivirus. Thus, LRF seems to be involved in the regulation of decidualization during pregnancy by modulating the expression of the key cell-cycle regulatory factors cyclin A and cyclin B1. PMID:27053244

  8. AKT/GSK3β signaling pathway is critically involved in human pluripotent stem cell survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romorini, Leonardo; Garate, Ximena; Neiman, Gabriel; Luzzani, Carlos; Furmento, Verónica Alejandra; Guberman, Alejandra Sonia; Sevlever, Gustavo Emilio; Scassa, María Elida; Miriuka, Santiago Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    Human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells are self-renewing pluripotent stem cells (PSC) that can differentiate into a wide range of specialized cells. Basic fibroblast growth factor is essential for PSC survival, stemness and self-renewal. PI3K/AKT pathway regulates cell viability and apoptosis in many cell types. Although it has been demonstrated that PI3K/AKT activation by bFGF is relevant for PSC stemness maintenance its role on PSC survival remains elusive. In this study we explored the molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of PSC survival by AKT. We found that inhibition of AKT with three non-structurally related inhibitors (GSK690693, AKT inhibitor VIII and AKT inhibitor IV) decreased cell viability and induced apoptosis. We observed a rapid increase in phosphatidylserine translocation and in the extent of DNA fragmentation after inhibitors addition. Moreover, abrogation of AKT activity led to Caspase-9, Caspase-3, and PARP cleavage. Importantly, we demonstrated by pharmacological inhibition and siRNA knockdown that GSK3β signaling is responsible, at least in part, of the apoptosis triggered by AKT inhibition. Moreover, GSK3β inhibition decreases basal apoptosis rate and promotes PSC proliferation. In conclusion, we demonstrated that AKT activation prevents apoptosis, partly through inhibition of GSK3β, and thus results relevant for PSC survival. PMID:27762303

  9. Oxidative stress is involved in Patulin induced apoptosis in HEK293 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Baigang; Peng, Xiaoli; Li, Guanghui; Xu, Yunfeng; Xia, Xiaodong; Wang, Qian

    2015-02-01

    Patulin (PAT) is one of the most widely disseminated mycotoxins found in agricultural products and could cause renal damage. However, the mechanism of cell damage remains obscure. In this study, the human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293) were treated with PAT (2.5-15 μM). The cytotoxicity was assessed with MTT assay and apoptotic cells were detected by flow cytometry, and further identified by chromatin condensation and nuclear fragmentation with Hoechst 33342 under fluorescence microscope. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) with DCFH-DA was analyzed by fluorometry. The activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione (GSH) and catalase (CAT) and malondialdehyde (MDA) content were determined to reveal the potential mechanism of PAT induced apoptosis. The mitochondrial membrane potential was measured by JC-1 probe. The results showed that PAT dose-dependently inhibited the growth of HEK293 cells and resulted in apoptosis in HEK293 cells. Treatment with PAT could induce ROS and MDA accumulation, accompanied by the losses of SOD, CAT, GSH and disruption of the mitochondrial membrane potential. These data suggest that PAT may induce apoptosis in HEK293 cells, in which oxidative stress is involved.

  10. Signaling pathways involved in megakaryocyte-mediated proliferation of osteoblast lineage cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ying-Hua; Streicher, Drew A; Waning, David L; Chitteti, Brahmananda R; Gerard-O'Riley, Rita; Horowitz, Mark C; Bidwell, Joseph P; Pavalko, Fredrick M; Srour, Edward F; Mayo, Lindsey D; Kacena, Melissa A

    2015-03-01

    Recent studies suggest that megakaryocytes (MKs) may play a significant role in skeletal homeostasis, as evident by the occurrence of osteosclerosis in multiple MK related diseases (Lennert et al., 1975; Thiele et al., 1999; Chagraoui et al., 2006). We previously reported a novel interaction whereby MKs enhanced proliferation of osteoblast lineage/osteoprogenitor cells (OBs) by a mechanism requiring direct cell-cell contact. However, the signal transduction pathways and the downstream effector molecules involved in this process have not been characterized. Here we show that MKs contact with OBs, via beta1 integrin, activate the p38/MAPKAPK2/p90RSK kinase cascade in the bone cells, which causes Mdm2 to neutralizes p53/Rb-mediated check point and allows progression through the G1/S. Interestingly, activation of MAPK (ERK1/2) and AKT, collateral pathways that regulate the cell cycle, remained unchanged with MK stimulation of OBs. The MK-to-OB signaling ultimately results in significant increases in the expression of c-fos and cyclin A, necessary for sustaining the OB proliferation. Overall, our findings show that OBs respond to the presence of MKs, in part, via an integrin-mediated signaling mechanism, activating a novel response axis that de-represses cell cycle activity. Understanding the mechanisms by which MKs enhance OB proliferation will facilitate the development of novel anabolic therapies to treat bone loss associated with osteoporosis and other bone-related diseases. PMID:25160801

  11. Cell shape change and invagination of the cephalic furrow involves reorganization of F-actin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Allison K; Siddiqui, Bilal A; Thomas, Jeffrey H

    2015-06-15

    Invagination of epithelial sheets to form furrows is a fundamental morphogenetic movement and is found in a variety of developmental events including gastrulation and vertebrate neural tube formation. The cephalic furrow is a deep epithelial invagination that forms during Drosophila gastrulation. In the first phase of cephalic furrow formation, the initiator cells that will lead invagination undergo apicobasal shortening and apical constriction in the absence of epithelial invagination. In the second phase of cephalic furrow formation, the epithelium starts to invaginate, accompanied by both basal expansion and continued apicobasal shortening of the initiator cells. The cells adjacent to the initiator cells also adopt wedge shapes, but only after invagination is well underway. Myosin II does not appear to drive apical constriction in cephalic furrow formation. However, cortical F-actin is increased in the apices of the initiator cells and in invaginating cells during both phases of cephalic furrow formation. These findings suggest that a novel mechanism for epithelial invagination is involved in cephalic furrow formation.

  12. Evidence against the involvement of ionically bound cell wall proteins in pea epicotyl growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melan, M. A.; Cosgrove, D. J.

    1988-01-01

    Ionically bound cell wall proteins were extracted from 7 day old etiolated pea (Pisum sativum L. cv Alaska) epicotyls with 3 molar LiCl. Polyclonal antiserum was raised in rabbits against the cell wall proteins. Growth assays showed that treatment of growing region segments (5-7 millimeters) of peas with either dialyzed serum, serum globulin fraction, affinity purified immunoglobulin, or papain-cleaved antibody fragments had no effect on growth. Immunofluorescence microscopy confirmed antibody binding to cell walls and penetration of the antibodies into the tissues. Western blot analysis, immunoassay results, and affinity chromatography utilizing Sepharose-bound antibodies confirmed recognition of the protein preparation by the antibodies. Experiments employing in vitro extension as a screening measure indicated no effect upon extension by antibodies, by 50 millimolar LiCl perfusion of the apoplast or by 3 molar LiCl extraction. Addition of cell wall protein to protease pretreated segments did not restore extension nor did addition of cell wall protein to untreated segments increase extension. It is concluded that, although evidence suggests that protein is responsible for the process of extension, the class(es) of proteins which are extracted from pea cell walls with 3 molar LiCl are probably not involved in this process.

  13. Involvement of flocculin in negative potential-applied ITO electrode adhesion of yeast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Sumihiro; Tsubouchi, Taishi; Usui, Keiko; Uematsu, Katsuyuki; Tame, Akihiro; Nogi, Yuichi; Ohta, Yukari; Hatada, Yuji; Kato, Chiaki; Miwa, Tetsuya; Toyofuku, Takashi; Nagahama, Takehiko; Konishi, Masaaki; Nagano, Yuriko; Abe, Fumiyoshi

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop novel methods for attachment and cultivation of specifically positioned single yeast cells on a microelectrode surface with the application of a weak electrical potential. Saccharomyces cerevisiae diploid strains attached to an indium tin oxide/glass (ITO) electrode to which a negative potential between -0.2 and -0.4 V vs. Ag/AgCl was applied, while they did not adhere to a gallium-doped zinc oxide/glass electrode surface. The yeast cells attached to the negative potential-applied ITO electrodes showed normal cell proliferation. We found that the flocculin FLO10 gene-disrupted diploid BY4743 mutant strain (flo10Δ /flo10Δ) almost completely lost the ability to adhere to the negative potential-applied ITO electrode. Our results indicate that the mechanisms of diploid BY4743 S. cerevisiae adhesion involve interaction between the negative potential-applied ITO electrode and the Flo10 protein on the cell wall surface. A combination of micropatterning techniques of living single yeast cell on the ITO electrode and omics technologies holds potential of novel, highly parallelized, microchip-based single-cell analysis that will contribute to new screening concepts and applications. PMID:26187908

  14. Involvement of promoter methylation in the regulation of Pregnane X receptor in colon cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otsuka Koki

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pregnane X receptor (PXR is a key transcription factor that regulates drug metabolizing enzymes such as cytochrome P450 (CYP 3A4, and plays important roles in intestinal first-pass metabolism. Although there is a large inter-individual heterogeneity with intestinal CYP3A4 expression and activity, the mechanism driving these differences is not sufficiently explained by genetic variability of PXR or CYP3A4. We examined whether epigenetic mechanisms are involved in the regulation of PXR/CYP3A4 pathways in colon cancer cells. Methods mRNA levels of PXR, CYP3A4 and vitamin D receptor (VDR were evaluated by quantitative real-time PCR on 6 colon cancer cell lines (Caco-2, HT29, HCT116, SW48, LS180, and LoVo. DNA methylation status was also examined by bisulfite sequencing of the 6 cell lines and 18 colorectal cancer tissue samples. DNA methylation was reversed by the treatment of these cell lines with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC. Results The 6 colon cancer cell lines were classified into two groups (high or low expression cells based on the basal level of PXR/CYP3A4 mRNA. DNA methylation of the CpG-rich sequence of the PXR promoter was more densely detected in the low expression cells (Caco-2, HT29, HCT116, and SW48 than in the high expression cells (LS180 and LoVo. This methylation was reversed by treatment with 5-aza-dC, in association with re-expression of PXR and CYP3A4 mRNA, but not VDR mRNA. Therefore, PXR transcription was silenced by promoter methylation in the low expression cells, which most likely led to downregulation of CYP3A4 transactivation. Moreover, a lower level of PXR promoter methylation was observed in colorectal cancer tissues compared with adjacent normal mucosa, suggesting upregulation of the PXR/CYP3A4 mRNAs during carcinogenesis. Conclusions PXR promoter methylation is involved in the regulation of intestinal PXR and CYP3A4 mRNA expression and might be associated with the inter-individual variability

  15. CHD7, the gene mutated in CHARGE syndrome, regulates genes involved in neural crest cell guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Yvonne; Wehner, Peter; Opitz, Lennart; Salinas-Riester, Gabriela; Bongers, Ernie M H F; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny M A; Wincent, Josephine; Schoumans, Jacqueline; Kohlhase, Jürgen; Borchers, Annette; Pauli, Silke

    2014-08-01

    Heterozygous loss of function mutations in CHD7 (chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 7) lead to CHARGE syndrome, a complex developmental disorder affecting craniofacial structures, cranial nerves and several organ systems. Recently, it was demonstrated that CHD7 is essential for the formation of multipotent migratory neural crest cells, which migrate from the neural tube to many regions of the embryo, where they differentiate into various tissues including craniofacial and heart structures. So far, only few CHD7 target genes involved in neural crest cell development have been identified and the role of CHD7 in neural crest cell guidance and the regulation of mesenchymal-epithelial transition are unknown. Therefore, we undertook a genome-wide microarray expression analysis on wild-type and CHD7 deficient (Chd7 (Whi/+) and Chd7 (Whi/Whi)) mouse embryos at day 9.5, a time point of neural crest cell migration. We identified 98 differentially expressed genes between wild-type and Chd7 (Whi/Whi) embryos. Interestingly, many misregulated genes are involved in neural crest cell and axon guidance such as semaphorins and ephrin receptors. By performing knockdown experiments for Chd7 in Xenopus laevis embryos, we found abnormalities in the expression pattern of Sema3a, a protein involved in the pathogenesis of Kallmann syndrome, in vivo. In addition, we detected non-synonymous SEMA3A variations in 3 out of 45 CHD7-negative CHARGE patients. In summary, we discovered for the first time that Chd7 regulates genes involved in neural crest cell guidance, demonstrating a new aspect in the pathogenesis of CHARGE syndrome. Furthermore, we showed for Sema3a a conserved regulatory mechanism across different species, highlighting its significance during development. Although we postulated that the non-synonymous SEMA3A variants which we found in CHD7-negative CHARGE patients alone are not sufficient to produce the phenotype, we suggest an important modifier role for SEMA3A in the

  16. Identification of proteins involved in neural progenitor cell targeting of gliomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honeth Gabriella

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glioblastoma are highly aggressive tumors with an average survival time of 12 months with currently available treatment. We have previously shown that specific embryonic neural progenitor cells (NPC have the potential to target glioma growth in the CNS of rats. The neural progenitor cell treatment can cure approximately 40% of the animals with malignant gliomas with no trace of a tumor burden 6 months after finishing the experiment. Furthermore, the NPCs have been shown to respond to signals from the tumor environment resulting in specific migration towards the tumor. Based on these results we wanted to investigate what factors could influence the growth and progression of gliomas in our rodent model. Methods Using microarrays we screened for candidate genes involved in the functional mechanism of tumor inhibition by comparing glioma cell lines to neural progenitor cells with or without anti-tumor activity. The expression of candidate genes was confirmed at RNA level by quantitative RT-PCR and at the protein level by Western blots and immunocytochemistry. Moreover, we have developed in vitro assays to mimic the antitumor effect seen in vivo. Results We identified several targets involved in glioma growth and migration, specifically CXCL1, CD81, TPT1, Gas6 and AXL proteins. We further showed that follistatin secretion from the NPC has the potential to decrease tumor proliferation. In vitro co-cultures of NPC and tumor cells resulted in the inhibition of tumor growth. The addition of antibodies against proteins selected by gene and protein expression analysis either increased or decreased the proliferation rate of the glioma cell lines in vitro. Conclusion These results suggest that these identified factors might be useful starting points for performing future experiments directed towards a potential therapy against malignant gliomas.

  17. A T-cell prolymphocytic leukemia case with central nervous system involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malkan, Umit Yavuz; Gunes, Gursel; Yayar, Okan; Demiroglu, Haluk; Yesilirmak, Aysun; Uner, Aysegul

    2015-01-01

    T-cell prolymphocytic leukemia (T-PLL) is an aggressive mature T cell neoplasm that typically involves peripheral blood, bone marrow, lymph nodes and spleen. It is a rare disease that comprises 2-5% of mature lymphocytic leukemia in adults. Here we present a T-PLL patient with CNS involvement. A 74-year-old man admitted to a hospital in April 2014 with vomiting. He was diagnosed as chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and R-CVP (Rituximab, cyclophosphamide, vincristine and prednisolone) chemotherapy protocol was started. After the first two cycles of chemotherapy, the patient’s mental functions improved. However after the 3rd cycle of chemotherapy was given in July 2014 the general situation of the patient deteriorated and ptosis of the left eye and facial paralysis developed. Then the patient was referred to our medical center. An MR of the brain revealed linear contrast enhancement around the bilateral 3rd, 7th and 8th cranial nerves which indicated cranial involvement by the lymphoproliferative process (Figure 1). Cerebrospinal fluid cytological examination confirmed the diagnosis. Based on these and bone marrow aspiration and biopsy findings a diagnosis of T-PLL was rendered (Figure 3). In September 2014 the patient died suddenly due to a cardiac arrest. Differential diagnosis is very important in T-PLL. Both T-PLL and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) may present with splenomegaly and lymphocytosis as well as circulating prolymphocytes in blood. Typical CLL cells are like mature lymphocytes with dense nucleus and aggregated chromatin. To conclude, CNS involvement in T-PLL is a rare finding and differential diagnosis of T-PLL is very important. PMID:26550397

  18. Expression of human TFF3 in relation to growth of HT-29 cell subpopulations: involvement of PI3-K but not STAT6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durual, Stéphane; Blanchard, Carine; Estienne, Monique; Jacquier, Marie-France; Cuber, Jean-Claude; Perrot, Valérie; Laboisse, Christian; Cuber, Jean-Claude

    2005-02-01

    The trefoil factor family (TFF) peptides 1 and 2 (TFF1 and 2) are expressed in mucus cells of the stomach, whereas TFF3 is localized in goblet cells of the intestine. In the present study, we aimed to determine whether phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K) or signal transducer and activator of transcription protein 6 (STAT6) is involved in the expression of goblet cell specific markers. TFF3 expression was analyzed by RT-PCR, Northern blot, and radioimmunoassay (RIA) in relation to cell growth in subclones of HT-29 cells including the CL.16E and methotrexate (MTX) cell lines, which both exhibit a phenotype of mucus-secreting intestinal cells. A 30-fold increase in TFF3 mRNA levels and a 10-fold increase in TFF3-cell content were observed between the early proliferative and the late confluency states. The levels of MUC2 and MUC3 mRNA were also increased in the course of the differentiation process. A three to fourfold increase in PI3-K and Akt activities was observed in early post-confluent cells as compared with pre-confluent cells. Exposure of pre- and post-confluent cells to LY294002, a specific PI3-K inhibitor, for 1-4 days profoundly reduced TFF3 and MUC2 expression. A marked reduction in mucin granules content was also observed in LY-treated cells. Inhibition of the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase kinase (MEK) with PD98059 did not modify the course of differentiation of the goblet cell lines. Moreover, stable transfection of HT-29 CL.16E cells with a dominant negative form of STAT6 had no effect on TFF3 induction. Together, these data indicate that PI3-K promotes the expression of TFF3 and MUC2 and that the PI3-K/Akt pathway may play a pivotal role in intestinal goblet cell differentiation.

  19. Signals involved in T cell activation. II. Distinct roles of intact accessory cells, phorbol esters, and interleukin 1 in activation and cell cycle progression of resting T lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, L.; Lipsky, P.E.

    1986-05-15

    The signals involved in the initiation of mitogen-induced activation of resting guinea pig T cells were examined. The combination of phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and 4..beta..-phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) stimulated DNA synthesis by accessory cell (AC)-depleted T cells cultured at high density, but the use of low density cultures indicated that intact AC were absolutely necessary for PHA-stimulated T cell DNA synthesis even in the presence of PMA, interleukin 1 (IL 1), or interleukin 2 (IL 2). In contrast, AC-depleted T cells were able to respond to the combination of the calcium ionophore, ionomycin, and PMA regardless of the cell density at which they were cultured. Results of cell cycle analysis support the conclusion that intact AC, IL 1, and a PMA-like signal play distinct roles in the progression of mitogen stimulated T cells through the first round of the cell cycle.

  20. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 is involved in chronic lymphocytic leukemia cell response to fludarabine and arsenic trioxide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Amigo-Jiménez

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9 contributes to chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL pathology by regulating cell migration and preventing spontaneous apoptosis. It is not known if MMP-9 is involved in CLL cell response to chemotherapy and we address this in the present study, using arsenic trioxide (ATO and fludarabine as examples of cytotoxic drugs. METHODS: We used primary cells from the peripheral blood of CLL patients and MEC-1 cells stably transfected with an empty vector or a vector containing MMP-9. The effect of ATO and fludarabine was determined by flow cytometry and by the MTT assay. Expression of mRNA was measured by RT-PCR and qPCR. Secreted and cell-bound MMP-9 was analyzed by gelatin zymography and flow cytometry, respectively. Protein expression was analyzed by Western blotting and immunoprecipitation. Statistical analyses were performed using the two-tailed Student's t-test. RESULTS: In response to ATO or fludarabine, CLL cells transcriptionally upregulated MMP-9, preceding the onset of apoptosis. Upregulated MMP-9 primarily localized to the membrane of early apoptotic cells and blocking apoptosis with Z-VAD prevented MMP-9 upregulation, thus linking MMP-9 to the apoptotic process. Culturing CLL cells on MMP-9 or stromal cells induced drug resistance, which was overcome by anti-MMP-9 antibodies. Accordingly, MMP-9-MEC-1 transfectants showed higher viability upon drug treatment than Mock-MEC-1 cells, and this effect was blocked by silencing MMP-9 with specific siRNAs. Following drug exposure, expression of anti-apoptotic proteins (Mcl-1, Bcl-xL, Bcl-2 and the Mcl-1/Bim, Mcl-1/Noxa, Bcl-2/Bax ratios were higher in MMP-9-cells than in Mock-cells. Similar results were obtained upon culturing primary CLL cells on MMP-9. CONCLUSIONS: Our study describes for the first time that MMP-9 induces drug resistance by modulating proteins of the Bcl-2 family and upregulating the corresponding anti-apoptotic/pro-apoptotic ratios. This

  1. Applying the Intervention Mapping protocol to develop a kindergarten-based, family-involved intervention to increase European preschool children's physical activity levels: the ToyBox-study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Craemer, M; De Decker, E; De Bourdeaudhuij, I; Verloigne, M; Duvinage, K; Koletzko, B; Ibrügger, S; Kreichauf, S; Grammatikaki, E; Moreno, L; Iotova, V; Socha, P; Szott, K; Manios, Y; Cardon, G

    2014-08-01

    Although sufficient physical activity is beneficial for preschoolers' health, activity levels in most preschoolers are low. As preschoolers spend a considerable amount of time at home and at kindergarten, interventions should target both environments to increase their activity levels. The aim of the current paper was to describe the six different steps of the Intervention Mapping protocol towards the systematic development and implementation of the physical activity component of the ToyBox-intervention. This intervention is a kindergarten-based, family-involved intervention implemented across six European countries. Based on the results of literature reviews and focus groups with parents/caregivers and kindergarten teachers, matrices of change objectives were created. Then, theory-based methods and practical strategies were selected to develop intervention materials at three different levels: (i) individual level (preschoolers); (ii) interpersonal level (parents/caregivers) and (iii) organizational level (teachers). This resulted in a standardized intervention with room for local and cultural adaptations in each participating country. Although the Intervention Mapping protocol is a time-consuming process, using this systematic approach may lead to an increase in intervention effectiveness. The presented matrices of change objectives are useful for future programme planners to develop and implement an intervention based on the Intervention Mapping protocol to increase physical activity levels in preschoolers.

  2. Global bifurcations in fractional-order chaotic systems with an extended generalized cell mapping method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaojun; Hong, Ling; Jiang, Jun

    2016-08-01

    Global bifurcations include sudden changes in chaotic sets due to crises. There are three types of crises defined by Grebogi et al. [Physica D 7, 181 (1983)]: boundary crisis, interior crisis, and metamorphosis. In this paper, by means of the extended generalized cell mapping (EGCM), boundary and interior crises of a fractional-order Duffing system are studied as one of the system parameters or the fractional derivative order is varied. It is found that a crisis can be generally defined as a collision between a chaotic basic set and a basic set, either periodic or chaotic, to cause a sudden discontinuous change in chaotic sets. Here chaotic sets involve three different kinds: a chaotic attractor, a chaotic saddle on a fractal basin boundary, and a chaotic saddle in the interior of a basin and disjoint from the attractor. A boundary crisis results from the collision of a periodic (or chaotic) attractor with a chaotic (or regular) saddle in the fractal (or smooth) boundary. In such a case, the attractor, together with its basin of attraction, is suddenly destroyed as the control parameter passes through a critical value, leaving behind a chaotic saddle in the place of the original attractor and saddle after the crisis. An interior crisis happens when an unstable chaotic set in the basin of attraction collides with a periodic attractor, which causes the appearance of a new chaotic attractor, while the original attractor and the unstable chaotic set are converted to the part of the chaotic attractor after the crisis. These results further demonstrate that the EGCM is a powerful tool to reveal the mechanism of crises in fractional-order systems.

  3. CD4+ T-cell lines used to evaluate a Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) peptide vaccine

    OpenAIRE

    Lybeck, Kari; Sjurseth, Siri K.; Al-Touama, Zainab; Melvang, Heidi Mikkelsen; Aagaard, Claus; Lundegaard, Claus; Jungersen, Gregers; Andersen, Peter; Olsen, Ingrid; Tollefsen, Stig

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to establish a protocol for generation of MAP-specific T-cell lines and to use these lines for evaluation of a peptide vaccine.A protocol for culturing T-cell lines from peripheral blood of goats naturally infected with MAP was established. CD4+ T cells were positively selected using an anti CD4 mAb and Dynabeads. Sorted CD4+ cells were cultivated with purified protein derivative from MAP (PPDj) or E. coli sonicate, IL-2, and IL-15. After two cultivation cycles, T cel...

  4. Dopamine modulates insulin release and is involved in the survival of rat pancreatic beta cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Jose Garcia Barrado

    Full Text Available The local synthesis of dopamine and its effects on insulin release have been described in isolated islets. Thus, it may be accepted that dopamine exerts an auto-paracrine regulation of insulin secretion from pancreatic beta cells. The aim of the present study is to analyze whether dopamine is a regulator of the proliferation and apoptosis of rat pancreatic beta cells after glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Glucose stimulated pancreatic islets obtained from male Wistar rats were cultured with 1 or 10 μM dopamine from 1 to 12 h. Insulin secretion was analyzed by RIA. The cellular proliferation rate of pancreatic islets and beta cells was studied with immunocytochemical double labelling for both insulin and PCNA (proliferating cell nuclear antigen, and active caspase-3 was detected to evaluate apoptosis. The secretion of insulin from isolated islets was significantly inhibited (p<0.01, by treatment with 1 and 10 μM dopamine, with no differences between either dose as early as 1 h after treatment. The percentage of insulin-positive cells in the islets decreased significantly (p<0.01 after 1 h of treatment up to 12 h. The proliferation rate of insulin-positive cells in the islets decreased significantly (p<0.01 following treatment with dopamine. Apoptosis in pancreatic islets and beta cells was increased by treatment with 1 and 10 μM dopamine along 12 h. In conclusion, these results suggest that dopamine could modulate the proliferation and apoptosis of pancreatic beta cells and that dopamine may be involved in the maintenance of pancreatic islets.

  5. Proteomic analysis of pathways involved in estrogen-induced growth and apoptosis of breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang-Zhi Hu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Estrogen is a known growth promoter for estrogen receptor (ER-positive breast cancer cells. Paradoxically, in breast cancer cells that have been chronically deprived of estrogen stimulation, re-introduction of the hormone can induce apoptosis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we sought to identify signaling networks that are triggered by estradiol (E2 in isogenic MCF-7 breast cancer cells that undergo apoptosis (MCF-7:5C versus cells that proliferate upon exposure to E2 (MCF-7. The nuclear receptor co-activator AIB1 (Amplified in Breast Cancer-1 is known to be rate-limiting for E2-induced cell survival responses in MCF-7 cells and was found here to also be required for the induction of apoptosis by E2 in the MCF-7:5C cells. Proteins that interact with AIB1 as well as complexes that contain tyrosine phosphorylated proteins were isolated by immunoprecipitation and identified by mass spectrometry (MS at baseline and after a brief exposure to E2 for two hours. Bioinformatic network analyses of the identified protein interactions were then used to analyze E2 signaling pathways that trigger apoptosis versus survival. Comparison of MS data with a computationally-predicted AIB1 interaction network showed that 26 proteins identified in this study are within this network, and are involved in signal transduction, transcription, cell cycle regulation and protein degradation. CONCLUSIONS: G-protein-coupled receptors, PI3 kinase, Wnt and Notch signaling pathways were most strongly associated with E2-induced proliferation or apoptosis and are integrated here into a global AIB1 signaling network that controls qualitatively distinct responses to estrogen.

  6. Fine mapping of ZNF804A and genome-wide significant evidence for its involvement in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Williams, H J

    2011-04-01

    A recent genome-wide association study (GWAS) reported evidence for association between rs1344706 within ZNF804A (encoding zinc-finger protein 804A) and schizophrenia (P=1.61 × 10(-7)), and stronger evidence when the phenotype was broadened to include bipolar disorder (P=9.96 × 10(-9)). In this study we provide additional evidence for association through meta-analysis of a larger data set (schizophrenia\\/schizoaffective disorder N=18 945, schizophrenia plus bipolar disorder N=21 274 and controls N=38 675). We also sought to better localize the association signal using a combination of de novo polymorphism discovery in exons, pooled de novo polymorphism discovery spanning the genomic sequence of the locus and high-density linkage disequilibrium (LD) mapping. The meta-analysis provided evidence for association between rs1344706 that surpasses widely accepted benchmarks of significance by several orders of magnitude for both schizophrenia (P=2.5 × 10(-11), odds ratio (OR) 1.10, 95% confidence interval 1.07-1.14) and schizophrenia and bipolar disorder combined (P=4.1 × 10(-13), OR 1.11, 95% confidence interval 1.07-1.14). After de novo polymorphism discovery and detailed association analysis, rs1344706 remained the most strongly associated marker in the gene. The allelic association at the ZNF804A locus is now one of the most compelling in schizophrenia to date, and supports the accumulating data suggesting overlapping genetic risk between schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

  7. Genomic imbalances in esophageal carcinoma cell lines involve Wnt pathway genes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jacqueline Brown; Hannelie Bothma; Robin Veale; Pascale Willem

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To identify molecular markers shared across South African esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) cell lines using cytogenetics, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array copy number analysis. METHODS: We used conventional cytogenetics, FISH, and multicolor FISH to characterize the chromosomal rearrangements of five ESCC cell lines established in South Africa. The whole genome copy number profile was established from 250K SNP arrays, and data was analyzed with the CNAT 4.0 and GISTIC software. RESULTS: We detected common translocation breakpoints involving chromosomes 1p11-12 and 3p11.2, the latter correlated with the deletion, or interruption of the EPHA3 gene. The most significant amplifications involved the following chromosomal regions and genes: 11q13.3 ( CCND1, FGF3, FGF4, FGF19, MYEOV), 8q24.21( C-MYC, FAM84B), 11q22.1-q22.3 ( BIRC2, BIRC3), 5p15.2 ( CTNND2), 3q11.2-q12.2 ( MINA) and 18p11.32 ( TYMS, YES1). The significant deletions included 1p31.2-p31.1 ( CTH, GADD45α, DIRAS3), 2q22.1 ( LRP1B), 3p12.1-p14.2 ( FHIT), 4q22.1-q32.1 ( CASP6, SMAD1), 8p23.2-q11.1 ( BNIP3L) and 18q21.1-q21.2 ( SMAD4, DCC). The 3p11.2 translocation breakpoint was shared across four cell lines, supporting a role for genes involved at this site, in particular, the EPHA3 gene which has previously been reported to be deleted in ESCC. CONCLUSION: The finding that a significant number of genes that were amplified (FGF3 , FGF4 , FGF19 , CCND1 and C-MYC ) or deleted (SFRP2 gene) are involved in the Wnt and fibroblast growth factor signaling pathways, suggests that these pathways may be activated in these cell lines.

  8. Mapping of Variable DNA Methylation Across Multiple Cell Types Defines a Dynamic Regulatory Landscape of the Human Genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Junchen; Stevens, Michael; Xing, Xiaoyun; Li, Daofeng; Zhang, Bo; Payton, Jacqueline E.; Oltz, Eugene M.; Jarvis, James N.; Jiang, Kaiyu; Cicero, Theodore; Costello, Joseph F.; Wang, Ting

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation is an important epigenetic modification involved in many biological processes and diseases. Many studies have mapped DNA methylation changes associated with embryogenesis, cell differentiation, and cancer at a genome-wide scale. Our understanding of genome-wide DNA methylation changes in a developmental or disease-related context has been steadily growing. However, the investigation of which CpGs are variably methylated in different normal cell or tissue types is still limited. Here, we present an in-depth analysis of 54 single-CpG-resolution DNA methylomes of normal human cell types by integrating high-throughput sequencing-based methylation data. We found that the ratio of methylated to unmethylated CpGs is relatively constant regardless of cell type. However, which CpGs made up the unmethylated complement was cell-type specific. We categorized the 26,000,000 human autosomal CpGs based on their methylation levels across multiple cell types to identify variably methylated CpGs and found that 22.6% exhibited variable DNA methylation. These variably methylated CpGs formed 660,000 variably methylated regions (VMRs), encompassing 11% of the genome. By integrating a multitude of genomic data, we found that VMRs enrich for histone modifications indicative of enhancers, suggesting their role as regulatory elements marking cell type specificity. VMRs enriched for transcription factor binding sites in a tissue-dependent manner. Importantly, they enriched for GWAS variants, suggesting that VMRs could potentially be implicated in disease and complex traits. Taken together, our results highlight the link between CpG methylation variation, genetic variation, and disease risk for many human cell types. PMID:26888867

  9. Involvement of Fatty Acid Binding Protein 5 and PPARβ/δ in Prostate Cancer Cell Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elwin Morgan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Fatty acid binding protein 5 (FABP5 delivers ligands from the cytosol directly to the nuclear receptor PPARβ/δ and thus facilitates the ligation and enhances the transcriptional activity of the receptor. We show here that expression levels of both FABP5 and PPARβ/δ are correlated with the tumorigenic potential of prostate cancer cell lines. We show further that FABP5 comprises a direct target gene for PPARβ/δ and thus the binding protein and its cognate receptor are engaged in a positive feedback loop. The observations demonstrate that, similarly to effects observed in mammary carcinomas, activation of the FABP5/PPARβ/δ pathway induces PPARβ/δ target genes involved in cell survival and growth and enhances cell proliferation and anchorage-independent growth in prostate cancer cells. Furthermore, the data show that downregulation of either FABP5 or PPARβ/δ inhibits the growth of the highly malignant prostate cancer PC3M cells. These studies suggest that the FABP5/PPARβ/δ pathway may play a general role in facilitating tumor progression and that inhibition of the pathway may comprise a novel strategy in treatment of cancer.

  10. Evidence for the involvement of NOD2 in regulating colonic epithelial cell growth and survival

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sheena M Cruickshank; Louise Wakenshaw; John Cardone; Peter D Howdle; Peter J Murray; Simon R Carding

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the function of NOD2 in colonic epithelial cells (CEC).METHODS: A combination of in vivo and in vitro analyses of epithelial cell turnover in the presence and absence of a functional NOD2 protein and, in response to enteric Salmonella typhimurium infection, were used. shRNA interference was also used to investigate the consequences of knocking down NOD2 gene expression on the growth and survival of colorectal carcinoma cell lines.RESULTS: In the colonic mucosa the highest levels of NOD2 expression were in proliferating crypt epithelial cells. Muramyl dipeptide (MDP), that is recognized by NOD2, promoted CEC growth in vitro. By contrast, the growth of NOD2-deficient CECs was impaired. In vivo CEC proliferation was also reduced and apoptosis increased in Nod2-/- mice, which were also evident following enteric Salmonella infection. Furthermore, neutralization of NOD2 mRNA expression in human colonic carcinoma cells by shRNA interference resulted in decreased survival due to increased levels of apoptosis.CONCLUSION: These findings are consistent with the involvement of NOD2 protein in promoting CEC growth and survival. Defects in proliferation by CECs in cases of CD may contribute to the underlying pathology of disrupted intestinal homeostasis and excessive inflammation.

  11. Clavulanic acid increases dopamine release in neuronal cells through a mechanism involving enhanced vesicle trafficking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kost, Gina Chun; Selvaraj, Senthil; Lee, Young Bok; Kim, Deog Joong; Ahn, Chang-Ho; Singh, Brij B

    2011-01-01

    Clavulanic acid is a CNS-modulating compound with exceptional blood-brain barrier permeability and safety profile. Clavulanic acid has been proposed to have anti-depressant activity and is currently entering Phase IIb clinical trials for the treatment of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). Studies have also shown that clavulanic acid suppresses anxiety and enhances sexual functions in rodent and primate models by a mechanism involving central nervous system (CNS) modulation, although its detailed mechanism of action has yet to be elucidated. To further examine its potential as a CNS modulating agent as well as its mechanism of action, we investigated the effects of clavulanic acid in neuronal cells. Our results indicate that clavulanic acid enhances dopamine release in PC12 and SH-SY5Y cells without affecting dopamine synthesis. Furthermore, using affinity chromatography we were able to identify two proteins, Munc18-1 and Rab4 that potentially bind to clavulanic acid and play a critical role in neurosecretion and the vesicle trafficking process. Consistent with this result, an increase in the translocation of Munc18-1 and Rab4 from the cytoplasm to the plasma membrane was observed in clavulanic acid treated cells. Overall, these data suggest that clavulanic acid enhances dopamine release in a mechanism involving Munc18-1 and Rab4 modulation and warrants further investigation of its therapeutic use in CNS disorders, such as depression. PMID:21964384

  12. Clavulanic acid increases dopamine release in neuronal cells through a mechanism involving enhanced vesicle trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kost, Gina Chun; Selvaraj, Senthil; Lee, Young Bok; Kim, Deog Joong; Ahn, Chang-Ho; Singh, Brij B

    2011-10-24

    Clavulanic acid is a CNS-modulating compound with exceptional blood-brain barrier permeability and safety profile. Clavulanic acid has been proposed to have anti-depressant activity and is currently entering Phase IIb clinical trials for the treatment of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). Studies have also shown that clavulanic acid suppresses anxiety and enhances sexual functions in rodent and primate models by a mechanism involving central nervous system (CNS) modulation, although its detailed mechanism of action has yet to be elucidated. To further examine its potential as a CNS modulating agent as well as its mechanism of action, we investigated the effects of clavulanic acid in neuronal cells. Our results indicate that clavulanic acid enhances dopamine release in PC12 and SH-SY5Y cells without affecting dopamine synthesis. Furthermore, using affinity chromatography we were able to identify two proteins, Munc18-1 and Rab4 that potentially bind to clavulanic acid and play a critical role in neurosecretion and the vesicle trafficking process. Consistent with this result, an increase in the translocation of Munc18-1 and Rab4 from the cytoplasm to the plasma membrane was observed in clavulanic acid treated cells. Overall, these data suggest that clavulanic acid enhances dopamine release in a mechanism involving Munc18-1 and Rab4 modulation and warrants further investigation of its therapeutic use in CNS disorders, such as depression.

  13. Endoscopic biopsy of a B-cell lymphoma involving the entire ventricular system: A case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    QIN, JIA-ZHEN; WU, YUE-KUI; YANG, ZHI-JUN; LV, JUN; DANG, YUAN-YUAN; ZHANG, HONG-TIAN; DAI, YI-WU

    2016-01-01

    A 62-year-old male suffering from vomiting and mild preceding nausea for 15 days was examined in the present case report. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a homogeneously enhancing cluster-like lesion involving the lateral, third and fourth ventricles. An endoscopic biopsy was performed, and histopathological examination led to the diagnosis of a high-grade diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. To the best of our knowledge, the present study reports the first case of a primary lymphoma involving the entire ventricular system. Therefore, primary lymphomas should be considered in the list of ventricular tumors. An endoscopic biopsy requires minimal invasion to obtain an adequate tissue sample, and frequently leads to the correct diagnosis and subsequent treatment protocols. PMID:26889262

  14. Mapping dynamic protein interactions in MAP kinase signaling using live-cell fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy and imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaughter, Brian D; Schwartz, Joel W; Li, Rong

    2007-12-18

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy (FCCS), and photon counting histograms (PCH) are fluctuation methods that emerged recently as potentially useful tools for obtaining parameters of molecular dynamics, interactions, and oligomerization in vivo. Here, we report the successful implementation of FCS, FCCS, and PCH in live yeast cells using fluorescent protein-tagged proteins expressed from their native chromosomal loci, examining cytosolic dynamics and interactions among components of the mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade, a widely occurring signaling motif, in response to mating pheromone. FCS analysis detailed the diffusion characteristics and mobile concentrations of MAPK proteins. FCCS analysis using EGFP and mCherry-tagged protein pairs observed the interactions of Ste7 (MAPK kinase) with the MAPKs, Fus3 or Kss1, and of the scaffold protein, Ste5, with Ste7 and Ste11 (MAPK kinase kinase) in the cytosol, providing in vivo constants of their binding equilibrium. The interaction of Ste5 with Fus3 in the cytosol was below the limit of detection, suggesting a weak interaction, if it exists, with K(d) >400-500 nM. Using PCH, we show that cytosolic Ste5 were mostly monomers. Artificial dimerization of Ste5, as confirmed by PCH, using a dimerizing tag, stimulated the interaction between Ste5 and Fus3. Native Ste5 was found to bind Fus3 preferentially at the cortex in pheromone-treated cells, as detected by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). These results provide a quantitative spatial map of MAPK complexes in vivo and directly support the model that membrane association and regulation of the Ste5 scaffold are critical steps in MAPK activation. PMID:18077328

  15. In situ spatiotemporal mapping of flow fields around seeded stem cells at the subcellular length scale.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Jae Song

    Full Text Available A major hurdle to understanding and exploiting interactions between the stem cell and its environment is the lack of a tool for precise delivery of mechanical cues concomitant to observing sub-cellular adaptation of structure. These studies demonstrate the use of microscale particle image velocimetry (μ-PIV for in situ spatiotemporal mapping of flow fields around mesenchymal stem cells, i.e. murine embryonic multipotent cell line C3H10T1/2, at the subcellular length scale, providing a tool for real time observation and analysis of stem cell adaptation to the prevailing mechanical milieu. In the absence of cells, computational fluid dynamics (CFD predicts flow regimes within 12% of μ-PIV measures, achieving the technical specifications of the chamber and the flow rates necessary to deliver target shear stresses at a particular height from the base of the flow chamber. However, our μ-PIV studies show that the presence of cells per se as well as the density at which cells are seeded significantly influences local flow fields. Furthermore, for any given cell or cell seeding density, flow regimes vary significantly along the vertical profile of the cell. Hence, the mechanical milieu of the stem cell exposed to shape changing shear stresses, induced by fluid drag, varies with respect to proximity of surrounding cells as well as with respect to apical height. The current study addresses a previously unmet need to predict and observe both flow regimes as well as mechanoadaptation of cells in flow chambers designed to deliver precisely controlled mechanical signals to live cells. An understanding of interactions and adaptation in response to forces at the interface between the surface of the cell and its immediate local environment may be key for de novo engineering of functional tissues from stem cell templates as well as for unraveling the mechanisms underlying multiscale development, growth and adaptation of organisms.

  16. RTP801 Is Involved in Mutant Huntingtin-Induced Cell Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Flores, Núria; Romaní-Aumedes, Joan; Rué, Laura; Canal, Mercè; Sanders, Phil; Straccia, Marco; Allen, Nicholas D; Alberch, Jordi; Canals, Josep M; Pérez-Navarro, Esther; Malagelada, Cristina

    2016-07-01

    RTP801 expression is induced by cellular stress and has a pro-apoptotic function in non-proliferating differentiated cells such as neurons. In several neurodegenerative disorders, including Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease, elevated levels of RTP801 have been observed, which suggests a role for RTP801 in neuronal death. Neuronal death is also a pathological hallmark in Huntington's disease (HD), an inherited neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the huntingtin gene. Currently, the exact mechanisms underlying mutant huntingtin (mhtt)-induced toxicity are still unclear. Here, we investigated whether RTP801 is involved in (mhtt)-induced cell death. Ectopic exon-1 mhtt elevated RTP801 mRNA and protein levels in nerve growth factor (NGF)-differentiated PC12 cells and in rat primary cortical neurons. In neuronal PC12 cells, mhtt also contributed to RTP801 protein elevation by reducing its proteasomal degradation rate, in addition to promoting RTP801 gene expression. Interestingly, silencing RTP801 expression with short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) blocked mhtt-induced cell death in NGF-differentiated PC12 cells. However, RTP801 protein levels were not altered in the striatum of Hdh(Q7/Q111) and R6/1 mice, two HD models that display motor deficits but not neuronal death. Importantly, RTP801 protein levels were elevated in both neural telencephalic progenitors differentiated from HD patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells and in the putamen and cerebellum of human HD postmortem brains. Taken together, our results suggest that RTP801 is a novel downstream effector of mhtt-induced toxicity and that it may be relevant to the human disease. PMID:25876513

  17. FSH and bFGF regulate the expression of genes involved in Sertoli cell energetic metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regueira, Mariana; Riera, María Fernanda; Galardo, María Noel; Camberos, María Del Carmen; Pellizzari, Eliana Herminia; Cigorraga, Selva Beatriz; Meroni, Silvina Beatriz

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate if FSH and bFGF regulate fatty acid (FA) metabolism and mitochondrial biogenesis in Sertoli cells (SC). SC cultures obtained from 20-day-old rats were incubated with 100ng/ml FSH or 30ng/ml bFGF for 6, 12, 24 and 48h. The expression of genes involved in transport and metabolism of FA such as: fatty acid transporter CD36 (FAT/CD36), carnitine-palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT1), long- and medium-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenases (LCAD, MCAD), and of genes involved in mitochondrial biogenesis such as: nuclear respiratory factors 1 and 2 (NRF1, NRF2) and transcription factor A (Tfam), was analyzed. FSH stimulated FAT/CD36, CPT1, MCAD, NRF1, NRF2 and Tfam mRNA levels while bFGF only stimulated CPT1 expression. A possible participation of PPARβ/δ activation in the regulation of gene expression and lactate production was then evaluated. SC cultures were incubated with FSH or bFGF in the presence of the PPARβ/δ antagonist GSK3787 (GSK; 20μM). bFGF stimulation of CPT1 expression and lactate production were inhibited by GSK. On the other hand, FSH effects were not inhibited by GSK indicating that FSH regulates the expression of genes involved in FA transport and metabolism and in mitochondrial biogenesis, independently of PPARβ/δ activation. FA oxidation and mitochondrial biogenesis as well as lactate production are essential for the energetic metabolism of the seminiferous tubule. The fact that these processes are regulated by hormones in a different way reflects the multifarious regulation of molecular mechanisms involved in Sertoli cell function. PMID:26315388

  18. Single Muscle Immobilization Decreases Single-Fibre Myosin Heavy Chain Polymorphism: Possible Involvement of p38 and JNK MAP Kinases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derbré, Frédéric; Droguet, Mickaël; Léon, Karelle; Troadec, Samuel; Pennec, Jean-Pierre; Giroux-Metges, Marie-Agnès; Rannou, Fabrice

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Muscle contractile phenotype is affected during immobilization. Myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms are the major determinant of the muscle contractile phenotype. We therefore sought to evaluate the effects of muscle immobilization on both the MHC composition at single-fibre level and the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), a family of intracellular signaling pathways involved in the stress-induced muscle plasticity. Methods The distal tendon of female Wistar rat Peroneus Longus (PL) was cut and fixed to the adjacent bone at neutral muscle length. Four weeks after the surgery, immobilized and contralateral PL were dissociated and the isolated fibres were sampled to determine MHC composition. Protein kinase 38 (p38), extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK1/2), and c-Jun- NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) phosphorylations were measured in 6- and 15-day immobilized and contralateral PL. Results MHC distribution in immobilized PL was as follows: I = 0%, IIa = 11.8 ± 2.8%, IIx = 53.0 ± 6.1%, IIb = 35.3 ± 7.3% and I = 6.1 ± 3.9%, IIa = 22.1 ± 3.4%, IIx = 46.6 ± 4.5%, IIb = 25.2 ± 6.6% in contralateral muscle. The MHC composition in immobilized muscle is consistent with a faster contractile phenotype according to the Hill’s model of the force-velocity relationship. Immobilized and contralateral muscles displayed a polymorphism index of 31.1% (95% CI 26.1–36.0) and 39.3% (95% CI 37.0–41.5), respectively. Significant increases in p38 and JNK phosphorylation were observed following 6 and 15 days of immobilization. Conclusions Single muscle immobilization at neutral length induces a shift of MHC composition toward a faster contractile phenotype and decreases the polymorphic profile of single fibres. Activation of p38 and JNK could be a potential mechanism involved in these contractile phenotype modifications during muscle immobilization. PMID:27383612

  19. Responses of genes involved in cell cycle control to diverse DNA damaging chemicals in human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gooderham Nigel J

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many anticancer agents and carcinogens are DNA damaging chemicals and exposure to such chemicals results in the deregulation of cell cycle progression. The molecular mechanisms of DNA damage-induced cell cycle alteration are not well understood. We have studied the effects of etoposide (an anticancer agent, cryptolepine (CLP, a cytotoxic alkaloid, benzo [a]pyrene (BaP, a carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon and 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo [4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP, a cooked-meat derived carcinogen on the expression of cell cycle regulatory genes to understand the molecular mechanisms of the cell cycle disturbance. Results A549 cells were treated with DMSO or chemicals for up to 72 h and periodically sampled for cell cycle analysis, mRNA and protein expression. DMSO treated cells showed a dominant G1 peak in cell cycle at all times examined. Etoposide and CLP both induced G2/M phase arrest yet the former altered the expression of genes functioning at multiple phases, whilst the latter was more effective in inhibiting the expression of genes in G2-M transition. Both etoposide and CLP induced an accumulation of p53 protein and upregulation of p53 transcriptional target genes. Neither BaP nor PhIP had substantial phase-specific cell cycle effect, however, they induced distinctive changes in gene expression. BaP upregulated the expression of CYP1B1 at 6–24 h and downregulated many cell cycle regulatory genes at 48–72 h. By contrast, PhIP increased the expression of many cell cycle regulatory genes. Changes in the expression of key mRNAs were confirmed at protein level. Conclusion Our experiments show that DNA damaging agents with different mechanisms of action induced distinctive changes in the expression pattern of a panel of cell cycle regulatory genes. We suggest that examining the genomic response to chemical exposure provides an exceptional opportunity to understand the molecular mechanism involved in cellular

  20. Α-MMC and MAP30, two ribosome-inactivating proteins extracted from Momordica charantia, induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in A549 human lung carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xiang; He, Lingli; Meng, Yao; Li, Gangrui; Li, Linli; Meng, Yanfa

    2015-05-01

    α‑Momorcharin (α‑MMC) and momordica anti‑human immunodeficiency virus protein (MAP30), produced by Momordica charantia, are ribosome‑inactivating proteins, which have been reported to exert inhibitory effects on cultured tumor cells. In order to further elucidate the functions of these agents, the present study aimed to investigate the effects of α‑MMC and MAP30 on cell viability, the induction of apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, DNA integrity and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity. α‑MMC and MAP30 were purified from bitter melon seeds using ammonium sulfate precipitation in combination with sulfopropyl (SP)‑sepharose fast flow, sephacryl S‑100 and macro‑Cap‑SP chromatography. MTT, flow cytometric and DNA fragmentation analyses were then used to determine the effects of α‑MMC and MAP30 on human lung adenocarcinoma epithelial A549 cells. The results revealed that A549 cells were sensitive to α‑MMC and MAP30 cytotoxicity assays in vitro. Cell proliferation was significantly suppressed following α‑MMC and MAP30 treatment in a dose‑ and time‑dependent manner; in addition, the results indicated that MAP30 had a more potent anti‑tumor activity compared with that of α‑MMC. Cell cycle arrest in S phase and a significantly increased apoptotic rate were observed following treatment with α‑MMC and MAP30. Furthermore, DNA integrity analysis revealed that the DNA of A549 cells was degraded following treatment with α‑MMC and MAP30 for 48 h. The pyrogallol autoxidation method and nitrotetrazolium blue chloride staining were used to determine SOD activity, the results of which indicated that α‑MMC and MAP30 did not possess SOD activity. In conclusion, the results of the present study indicated that α‑MMC and MAP30 may have potential as novel therapeutic agents for the prophylaxis and treatment of cancer. PMID:25573293

  1. Effect of malaria components on blood mononuclear cells involved in immune response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chuchard Punsawad

    2013-01-01

    During malaria infection, elevated levels of pro-inflammatory mediators and nitric oxide production have been associated with pathogenesis and disease severity. Previous in vitro and in vivo studies have proposed that both Plasmodium falciparum hemozoin and glycosylphosphatidylinositols are able to modulate blood mononuclear cells, contributing to stimulation of signal transduction and downstream regulation of the NF-κB signaling pathway, and subsequently leading to the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and nitric oxide. The present review summarizes the published in vitro and in vivo studies that have investigated the mechanism of intracellular signal transduction and activation of the NF-κB signaling pathway in blood mononuclear cells after being inducted by Plasmodium falciparum malaria components. Particular attention is paid to hemozoin and glycosylphosphatidylinositols which reflect the important mechanism of signaling pathways involved in immune response.

  2. Coronin 3 involvement in F-actin-dependent processes at the cell cortex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The actin interaction of coronin 3 has been mainly documented by in vitro experiments. Here, we discuss coronin 3 properties in the light of new structural information and focus on assays that reflect in vivo roles of coronin 3 and its impact on F-actin-associated functions. Using GFP-tagged coronin 3 fusion proteins and RNAi silencing we show that coronin 3 has roles in wound healing, protrusion formation, cell proliferation, cytokinesis, endocytosis, axonal growth, and secretion. During formation of cell protrusions actin accumulation precedes the focal enrichment of coronin 3 suggesting a role for coronin 3 in events that follow the initial F-actin assembly. Moreover, we show that coronin 3 similar to other coronins interacts with the Arp2/3-complex and cofilin indicating that this family in general is involved in regulating Arp2/3-mediated events

  3. JNK signaling pathway is involved in piperlongumine-mediated apoptosis in human colorectal cancer HCT116 cells

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Wen; WEN, CHUANGYU; BAI, HAIYAN; Wang, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Xiaoli; HUANG, LANLAN; Yang, Xiangling; Iwamoto, Aikichi; Liu, Huanliang

    2015-01-01

    Piperlongumine (PPLGM), an alkaloid isolated from the long pepper (Piper longum L.), can selectively trigger cancer cell death in colorectal cancer cells. The present study investigated whether the c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling pathway is involved in PPLGM-induced apoptosis in the human colorectal cancer HCT116 cell line. The results demonstrated that PPLGM reduced the cell viability and induced cell apoptosis in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, without a significant ef...

  4. The HP0256 gene product is involved in motility and cell envelope architecture of Helicobacter pylori

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Douillard, Francois P

    2010-04-08

    Abstract Background Helicobacter pylori is the causative agent for gastritis, and peptic and duodenal ulcers. The bacterium displays 5-6 polar sheathed flagella that are essential for colonisation and persistence in the gastric mucosa. The biochemistry and genetics of flagellar biogenesis in H. pylori has not been fully elucidated. Bioinformatics analysis suggested that the gene HP0256, annotated as hypothetical, was a FliJ homologue. In Salmonella, FliJ is a chaperone escort protein for FlgN and FliT, two proteins that themselves display chaperone activity for components of the hook, the rod and the filament. Results Ablation of the HP0256 gene in H. pylori significantly reduced motility. However, flagellin and hook protein synthesis was not affected in the HP0256 mutant. Transmission electron transmission microscopy revealed that the HP0256 mutant cells displayed a normal flagellum configuration, suggesting that HP0256 was not essential for assembly and polar localisation of the flagella in the cell. Interestingly, whole genome microarrays of an HP0256 mutant revealed transcriptional changes in a number of genes associated with the flagellar regulon and the cell envelope, such as outer membrane proteins and adhesins. Consistent with the array data, lack of the HP0256 gene significantly reduced adhesion and the inflammatory response in host cells. Conclusions We conclude that HP0256 is not a functional counterpart of FliJ in H. pylori. However, it is required for full motility and it is involved, possibly indirectly, in expression of outer membrane proteins and adhesins involved in pathogenesis and adhesion.

  5. Mechanisms involved in calcium oxalate endocytosis by Madin-Darby canine kidney cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.H. Campos

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcium oxalate (CaOx crystals adhere to and are internalized by tubular renal cells and it seems that this interaction is related (positively or negatively to the appearance of urinary calculi. The present study analyzes a series of mechanisms possibly involved in CaOx uptake by Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK cells. CaOx crystals were added to MDCK cell cultures and endocytosis was evaluated by polarized light microscopy. This process was inhibited by an increase in intracellular calcium by means of ionomycin (100 nM; N = 6; 43.9% inhibition; P<0.001 or thapsigargin (1 µM; N = 6; 33.3% inhibition; P<0.005 administration, and via blockade of cytoskeleton assembly by the addition of colchicine (10 µM; N = 8; 46.1% inhibition; P<0.001 or cytochalasin B (10 µM; N = 8; 34.2% inhibition; P<0.001. Furthermore, CaOx uptake was reduced when the activity of protein kinase C was inhibited by staurosporine (10 nM; N = 6; 44% inhibition; P<0.01, or that of cyclo-oxygenase by indomethacin (3 µM; N = 12; 17.2% inhibition; P<0.05; however, the uptake was unaffected by modulation of potassium channel activity with glibenclamide (3 µM; N = 6, tetraethylammonium (1 mM; N = 6 or cromakalim (1 µM; N = 6. Taken together, these data indicate that the process of CaOx internalization by renal tubular cells is similar to the endocytosis reported for other systems. These findings may be relevant to cellular phenomena involved in early stages of the formation of renal stones.

  6. Molecular mechanisms of heptaplatin effective against cisplatin-resistant cancer cell lines: less involvement of metallothionein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moon Sung-Pyo

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Heptaplatin is a new platinum derivative with anticancer activity against various cancer cell lines, including cisplatin-resistant cancer cell lines (Cancer Chemother Pharmacol 1995; 35: 441. Methods Molecular mechanisms of heptaplatin effective against cisplatin-resistant cancer cell lines has been investigated in connection with metallothionein (MT. Cytotoxicity was determined by an MTT assay. MT mRNA, was determined by RT-PCR assay. Transfection study was carried out to examine the function of MT. Results Of various gastric cancer cell lines, SNU-638 and SNU-601 showed the highest and lowest levels of MT mRNA, respectively, showing 80-fold difference. The IC50 values of SNU-638 to cisplatin, carboplatin and heptaplatin were 11.2-fold, 5.1-fold and 2.0-fold greater than those of SNU-601, respectively. Heptaplatin was more effective against cisplatin-resistant and MT-transfected gastric cancer sublines than cisplatin or carboplatin was. In addition, heptaplatin attenuated cadmium, but not zinc, induction of MT. Conclusion These results indicate that molecular mechanisms of heptaplatin effective against cisplatin-resistant gastric cancer sublines is at least in part due to the less involvement of MT in heptaplatin resistance as well as its attenuation of MT induction.

  7. CDC27 protein is involved in radiation response in squamous cell cervix carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajkumar, T; Gopal, G; Selvaluxmi, G; Rajalekshmy, K R

    2005-10-01

    In the present study, an attempt was made to identify genes involved in radiation response in cervix carcinoma. Differential display technique was used to study the expression profiles of tumour biopsy samples obtained from patients, responding and not responding to treatment. The samples were obtained prior to radiotherapy and subsequent to treatment with Tele-radiation at 10 Gray (Gy). One of the differentially expressed cDNAs, when sequenced was identified to be CDC27. Immuno-histochemical analysis of pre- and post-treated tumour samples from fifteen patients showed the downregulation of expression of CDC27 protein in seven patients. Down-regulation was associated with poorer response to radiotherapy. Cervical cancer cell lines SiHa and C33A were irradiated and their nuclei were stained for expression of CDC27 and analyzed using fluorescent-activated cell sorting (FACS). Down-regulation of CDC27 protein in the irradiated SiHa cell line was associated with greater survival fraction, compared to the irradiated C33A cell line, which had only slight fall in the level of CDC27 protein. This is the first study to suggest a role for CDC27 in radiation response. However, a larger cohort is needed to further confirm the value of CDC27 protein as a predictive marker, for radiation response in cervix cancer.

  8. Tissue transglutaminase is involved in mechanical load-induced osteogenic differentiation of human ligamentum flavum cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Yuan-Hung; Huang, Shih-Yung; Yang, Ruei-Cheng; Sun, Jui-Sheng

    2016-07-01

    Mechanical load-induced osteogenic differentiation might be the key cellular event in the calcification and ossification of ligamentum flavum. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of tissue transglutaminase (TGM2) on mechanical load-induced osteogenesis of ligamentum flavum cells. Human ligamentum flavum cells were obtained from 12 patients undergoing lumbar spine surgery. Osteogenic phenotypes of ligamentum flavum cells, such as alkaline phosphatase (ALP), Alizarin red-S stain, and gene expression of osteogenic makers were evaluated following the administration of mechanical load and BMP-2 treatment. The expression of TGM2 was evaluated by real-time PCR, Western blotting, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) analysis. Our results showed that mechanical load in combination with BMP-2 enhanced calcium deposition and ALP activity. Mechanical load significantly increased ALP and OC gene expression on day 3, whereas BMP-2 significantly increased ALP, OPN, and Runx2 on day 7. Mechanical load significantly induced TGM2 gene expression and enzyme activity in human ligamentum flavum cells. Exogenous TGM2 increased ALP and OC gene expression; while, inhibited TG activity significantly attenuated mechanical load-induced and TGM2-induced ALP activity. In summary, mechanical load-induced TGM2 expression and enzyme activity is involved in the progression of the calcification of ligamentum flavum.

  9. Regulation of IκBα expression involves both NF-κB and the MAP kinase signaling pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sambucetti Lidia C

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract IκBα is an inhibitor of the nuclear transcription factor NF-κB. Binding of IκBα to NF-κB inactivates the transcriptional activity of NF-κB. Expression of IκBα itself is regulated by NF-κB, which provides auto-regulation of this signaling pathway. Here we present a mouse model for monitoring in vivo IκBα expression by imaging IκBα-luc transgenic mice for IκBα promoter driven luciferase activity. We demonstrated a rapid and systemic induction of IκBα expression in the transgenic mice following treatment with LPS. The induction was high in liver, spleen, lung and intestine and lower in the kidney, heart and brain. The luciferase induction in the liver correlated with increased IκBα mRNA level. Pre-treatment with proteasome inhibitor bortezomib dramatically suppressed LPS-induced luciferase activity. The p38 kinase inhibitor SB203580 also showed moderate inhibition of LPS-induced luciferase activity. Analysis of IκBα mRNA in the liver tissue showed a surprising increase of the IκBα mRNA after bortezomib and SB203580 treatments, which could be due to increased IκBα mRNA stability. Our data demonstrate that regulation of IκBα expression involves both the NF-κB and the p38 signaling pathways. The IκBα-luc transgenic mice are useful for analyzing IκBα expression and the NF-κB transcriptional activity in vivo.

  10. MODELING PHOTONIC CRYSTALS WITH COMPLEX UNIT CELLS BY DIRICHLET-TO-NEUMANN MAPS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuexia Huang; Ya Yan Lu

    2007-01-01

    For a photonic crystal (PhC) of finite size, it is important to calculate its transmission and reflection spectra. For two-dimensional (2-D) PhCs composed of a square lattice of circular cylinders, the problem can be solved by an efficient method based on the Dirichletto-Neumann (DtN) map of the unit cell and a marching scheme using a pair of operators. In this paper, the DtN operator marching method is extended to handle 2-D PhCs with complex unit cells and arbitrary lattice structures.

  11. High-throughput mapping of cell-wall polymers within and between plants using novel microarrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moller, Isabel Eva; Sørensen, Iben; Bernal Giraldo, Adriana Jimena;

    2007-01-01

    We describe here a methodology that enables the occurrence of cell-wall glycans to be systematically mapped throughout plants in a semi-quantitative high-throughput fashion. The technique (comprehensive microarray polymer profiling, or CoMPP) integrates the sequential extraction of glycans from...... analysis of mutant and wild-type plants, as demonstrated here for the Arabidopsis thaliana mutants fra8, mur1 and mur3. CoMPP was also applied to Physcomitrella patens cell walls and was validated by carbohydrate linkage analysis. These data provide new insights into the structure and functions of plant...

  12. Involvement of p63 in the herpes simplex virus-1-induced demise of corneal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mándi Yvette

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The transcription factor p63 plays a pivotal role in the development and maintenance of epithelial tissues, including the ocular surface. In an effort to gain insight into the pathogenesis of keratitis caused by HSV-1, we determined the expression patterns of the p63 and Bax proteins in the Staatens Seruminstitute Rabbit Cornea cell line (SIRC. Methods SIRC cells were infected with HSV-1 at various multiplicities and maintained for different periods of time. Virus replication was measured by indirect immunofluorescence assay and Western blot analysis. Cell viability was determined by MTT assay. The apoptotic response of the infected cells was quantified by ELISA detecting the enrichment of nucleosomes in the cytoplasm. Western blot analysis was used to determine the levels of p63 and Bax proteins. Results Indirect immunofluorescence assays and Western blot analyses demonstrated the presence of HSV-1 glycoprotein D (gD in the infected SIRC cell line, and the pattern of gD expression was consistent with efficient viral replication. The results of MTT and ELISA assays showed that HSV-1 elicited a strong cytopathic effect, and apoptosis played an important role in the demise of the infected cells. Mock-infected SIRC cells displayed the constitutive expression of ΔNp63α. The expressions of the Bax-β and TAp63γ isoforms were considerably increased, whereas the level of ΔNp63α was decreased in the HSV-1-infected SIRC cells. Experiments involving the use of acyclovir showed that viral DNA replication was necessary for the accumulation of TAp63γ. Conclusion These data suggest that a direct, virus-mediated cytopathic effect may play an important role in the pathogenic mechanism of herpetic keratitis. By disturbing the delicate balance between the pro-survival ΔN and the pro-apoptotic TA isoforms, HSV-1 may cause profound alterations in the viability of the ocular cells and in the tissue homeostasis of the ocular surface.

  13. Machine-Part cell formation through visual decipherable clustering of Self Organizing Map

    CERN Document Server

    Chattopadhyay, Manojit; Dan, Pranab K; 10.1007/s00170-010-2802-4

    2011-01-01

    Machine-part cell formation is used in cellular manufacturing in order to process a large variety, quality, lower work in process levels, reducing manufacturing lead-time and customer response time while retaining flexibility for new products. This paper presents a new and novel approach for obtaining machine cells and part families. In the cellular manufacturing the fundamental problem is the formation of part families and machine cells. The present paper deals with the Self Organising Map (SOM) method an unsupervised learning algorithm in Artificial Intelligence, and has been used as a visually decipherable clustering tool of machine-part cell formation. The objective of the paper is to cluster the binary machine-part matrix through visually decipherable cluster of SOM color-coding and labelling via the SOM map nodes in such a way that the part families are processed in that machine cells. The Umatrix, component plane, principal component projection, scatter plot and histogram of SOM have been reported in t...

  14. Fast Stiffness Mapping of Cells Using High-Bandwidth Atomic Force Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Andrew; Vijayraghavan, Karthik; Solgaard, Olav; Butte, Manish J

    2016-01-26

    The cytoskeleton controls cellular morphology and mediates the mechanical interactions between a cell and its environment. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has the unique capability to map cytoskeletal mechanics and structures with nanometer resolution. However, whole-cell cytomechanical imaging with conventional AFM techniques is limited by low imaging speed. Here, we present fast nanomechanical mapping of cells using high-bandwidth AFM (HB-AFM), where >10(6) nanoindentation measurements were acquired in ∼10 min-a task that would take weeks to finish using conventional AFM. High-bandwidth measurements enabled capture of the entire tip-sample interaction for each tap on cells, engendering a new measurement ("force phase") that exceeds the contrast of conventional tapping mode and enabling spectral visualization of >10 harmonics. The abundance of measurements allowed discovery of subtle cytomechanical features, including the stiffness of fibers of the cellular spectrin network in situ. This approach bridges HB-AFM and high-harmonic imaging and opens future opportunities for measuring the dynamic mechanical properties of living cells. PMID:26554581

  15. Piezo1 in Smooth Muscle Cells Is Involved in Hypertension-Dependent Arterial Remodeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Retailleau

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The mechanically activated non-selective cation channel Piezo1 is a determinant of vascular architecture during early development. Piezo1-deficient embryos die at midgestation with disorganized blood vessels. However, the role of stretch-activated ion channels (SACs in arterial smooth muscle cells in the adult remains unknown. Here, we show that Piezo1 is highly expressed in myocytes of small-diameter arteries and that smooth-muscle-specific Piezo1 deletion fully impairs SAC activity. While Piezo1 is dispensable for the arterial myogenic tone, it is involved in the structural remodeling of small arteries. Increased Piezo1 opening has a trophic effect on resistance arteries, influencing both diameter and wall thickness in hypertension. Piezo1 mediates a rise in cytosolic calcium and stimulates activity of transglutaminases, cross-linking enzymes required for the remodeling of small arteries. In conclusion, we have established the connection between an early mechanosensitive process, involving Piezo1 in smooth muscle cells, and a clinically relevant arterial remodeling.

  16. Molecular mechanisms involved in secretory vesicle recruitment to the plasma membrane in beta-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varadi, Aniko; Ainscow, E K; Allan, V J; Rutter, G A

    2002-04-01

    Glucose stimulates the release of insulin in part by activating the recruitment of secretory vesicles to the cell surface. While this movement is known to be microtubule-dependent, the molecular motors involved are undefined. Active kinesin was found to be essential for vesicle translocation in live beta-cells, since microinjection of cDNA encoding dominant-negative KHC(mut) (motor domain of kinesin heavy chain containing a Thr(93)-->Asn point mutation) blocked vesicular movements. Moreover, expression of KHC(mut) strongly inhibited the sustained, but not acute, stimulation of secretion by glucose. Thus, vesicles released during the first phase of insulin secretion exist largely within a translocation-independent pool. Kinesin-driven anterograde movement of vesicles is then necessary for the sustained (second phase) of insulin release. Kinesin may, therefore, represent a novel target for increases in intracellular ATP concentrations in response to elevated extracellular glucose and may be involved in the ATP-sensitive K+channel-independent stimulation of secretion by the sugar.

  17. Carbon Monoxide-induced Stomatal Closure Involves Generation of Hydrogen Peroxide in Vicia faba Guard Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Ping She; Xi-Gui Song

    2008-01-01

    Here the regulatory role of CO during stomatal movement In Vicla faba L. was surveyed. Results Indicated that, like hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), CO donor Hematin induced stomatal closure in dose- and time-dependent manners. These responses were also proven by the addition of gaseous CO aqueous solution with different concentrations, showing the first time that CO and H2O2 exhibit the similar regulation role in the atomatal movement. Moreover, our data showed that ascorbic acid (ASA, an important reducing substrate for H2O2 removal) and diphenylene iodonium (DPI, an inhibitor of the H2O2-generating enzyme NADPH oxidase) not only reversed stomatal closure by CO, but also suppressed the H2O2 fluorescence induced by CO, implying that CO induced-atomatal closure probably involves H2O2 signal. Additionally, the CO/NO scavenger hemoglobin (Hb) and CO specific synthetic inhibitor ZnPPIX, ASA and DPI reversed the darkness-induced stomatal closure and H2O2 fluorescence. These results show that, perhaps like H2O2, the levels of CO in guard cells of V. faba are higher In the dark than in light, HO-1 and NADPH oxidase are the enzyme systems responsible for generating endogenous CO and H2O2 in darkness respectively, and that CO is involved in darkness-induced H2O2 synthesis in V. faba guard cells.

  18. Involvement of ethylene and nitric oxide in cell death in mastoparan-treated unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yordanova, Z.P.; Iakimova, E.T.; Cristescu, S.M.; Harren, F.J.M.; Kapchina-Toteva, V.M.; Woltering, E.J.

    2010-01-01

    This work demonstrates a contribution of ethylene and NO in mastoparan (MP)-induced cell death in the green algae C. reinhardtii. Following MP treatment, C. reinhardtii showed massive cell death, expressing morphological features of programmed cell death (PCD). A pharmacological approach involving c

  19. Genome-Wide Association Mapping for Cell Wall Composition and Properties in Temperate Grasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bellucci, Andrea

    -glucans. Plant cell wall biosynthesis is regulated by a large number of genes and regulatory factors but very few of these are known and characterized. This PhD project aimed to the identification of putative candidate genes involved in plant cell wall composition and properties using a genome wide (GWAS...... with a wide range of chemical bounds. At present the interest in plant cell wall is growing due to the possibility to convert ligno-cellulosic biomass (e.g. agricultural residues) into bioethanol but also for the benefits to human health of some cell wall constituents found in cereals, in particular beta...

  20. Oxidized low density lipoprotein increases RANKL level in human vascular cells. Involvement of oxidative stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazière, Cécile, E-mail: maziere.cecile@chu-amiens.fr [Biochemistry Laboratory, South Hospital University, René Laennec Avenue, Amiens 80000 (France); Salle, Valéry [Internal Medicine, North Hospital University, Place Victor Pauchet, Amiens 80000 (France); INSERM U1088 (EA 4292), SFR CAP-Santé (FED 4231), University of Picardie – Jules Verne (France); Gomila, Cathy; Mazière, Jean-Claude [Biochemistry Laboratory, South Hospital University, René Laennec Avenue, Amiens 80000 (France)

    2013-10-18

    Highlights: •Oxidized LDL enhances RANKL level in human smooth muscle cells. •The effect of OxLDL is mediated by the transcription factor NFAT. •UVA, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and buthionine sulfoximine also increase RANKL level. •All these effects are observed in human fibroblasts and endothelial cells. -- Abstract: Receptor Activator of NFκB Ligand (RANKL) and its decoy receptor osteoprotegerin (OPG) have been shown to play a role not only in bone remodeling but also in inflammation, arterial calcification and atherosclerotic plaque rupture. In human smooth muscle cells, Cu{sup 2+}-oxidized LDL (CuLDL) 10–50 μg/ml increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) and RANKL level in a dose-dependent manner, whereas OPG level was not affected. The lipid extract of CuLDL reproduced the effects of the whole particle. Vivit, an inhibitor of the transcription factor NFAT, reduced the CuLDL-induced increase in RANKL, whereas PKA and NFκB inhibitors were ineffective. LDL oxidized by myeloperoxidase (MPO-LDL), or other pro-oxidant conditions such as ultraviolet A (UVA) irradiation, incubation with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} or with buthionine sulfoximine (BSO), an inhibitor of glutathione synthesis{sub ,} also induced an oxidative stress and enhanced RANKL level. The increase in RANKL in pro-oxidant conditions was also observed in fibroblasts and endothelial cells. Since RANKL is involved in myocardial inflammation, vascular calcification and plaque rupture, this study highlights a new mechanism whereby OxLDL might, by generation of an oxidative stress, exert a deleterious effect on different cell types of the arterial wall.

  1. Involvement of sphingoid bases in mediating reactive oxygen intermediate production and programmed cell death in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lihua Shi; Yusuf A Hannun; Jianru Zuo; Jacek Bielawski; Jinye Mu; Haili Dong; Chong Teng; Jian Zhang; Xiaohui Yang; Nario Tomishige; Kentaro Hanada

    2007-01-01

    Sphingolipids have been suggested to act as second messengers for an array of cellular signaling activities in plant cells, including stress responses and programmed cell death (PCD). However, the mechanisms underpinning these processes are not well understood. Here, we report that an Arabidopsis mutant, fumonisin Bl resistant11-1 (fbr11-1), which fails to generate reactive oxygen intermediates (ROIs), is incapable of initiating PCD when the mutant is challenged by fumonisin B1 (FB1), a specific inhibitor of ceramide synthase. Molecular analysis indicated that FBR11 encodes a long-chain basel (LCB1) subunit of serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT), which catalyzes the first rate-limiting step of de novo sphingolipid synthesis. Mass spectrometric analysis of the sphingolipid concentrations revealed that whereas the fbrll-1 mutation did not affect basal levels of sphingoid bases, the mutant showed attenuated formation of sphingoid bases in response to FB1 By a direct feeding experiment, we show that the free sphingoid bases dihydrosphingosine, phytosphingosine and sphingosine efficiently induce ROI generation followed by cell death. Conversely, ROI generation and cell death induced by dihydrosphingosine were specifically blocked by its phosphorylated form dihydrosphingosine-1 -phosphate in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting that the maintenance of homeostasis between a free sphingoid base and its phosphorylated derivative is critical to determining the cell fate. Because alterations of the sphingolipid level occur prior to the ROI production, we propose that the free sphingoid bases are involved in the control of PCD in Arabidopsis, presumably through the regulation of the ROI level upon receiving different developmental or environmental cues.

  2. Reactive oxygen species are involved in gibberellin/abscisic acid signaling in barley aleurone cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishibashi, Yushi; Tawaratsumida, Tomoya; Kondo, Koji; Kasa, Shinsuke; Sakamoto, Masatsugu; Aoki, Nozomi; Zheng, Shao-Hui; Yuasa, Takashi; Iwaya-Inoue, Mari

    2012-04-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) act as signal molecules for a variety of processes in plants. However, many questions about the roles of ROS in plants remain to be clarified. Here, we report the role of ROS in gibberellin (GA) and abscisic acid (ABA) signaling in barley (Hordeum vulgare) aleurone cells. The production of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), a type of ROS, was induced by GA in aleurone cells but suppressed by ABA. Furthermore, exogenous H2O2 appeared to promote the induction of α-amylases by GA. In contrast, antioxidants suppressed the induction of α-amylases. Therefore, H2O2 seems to function in GA and ABA signaling, and in regulation of α-amylase production, in aleurone cells. To identify the target of H2O2 in GA and ABA signaling, we analyzed the interrelationships between H2O2 and DELLA proteins Slender1 (SLN1), GA-regulated Myb transcription factor (GAmyb), and ABA-responsive protein kinase (PKABA) and their roles in GA and ABA signaling in aleurone cells. In the presence of GA, exogenous H2O2 had little effect on the degradation of SLN1, the primary transcriptional repressor mediating GA signaling, but it promoted the production of the mRNA encoding GAMyb, which acts downstream of SLN1 and involves induction of α-amylase mRNA. Additionally, H2O2 suppressed the production of PKABA mRNA, which is induced by ABA:PKABA represses the production of GAMyb mRNA. From these observations, we concluded that H2O2 released the repression of GAMyb mRNA by PKABA and consequently promoted the production of α-amylase mRNA, thus suggesting that the H2O2 generated by GA in aleurone cells is a signal molecule that antagonizes ABA signaling.

  3. A novel cell binding site in the coiled‐coil domain of laminin involved in capillary morphogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanz, Laura; García-Bermejo, Laura; Blanco, Francisco J;

    2003-01-01

    Recently, we reported the isolation and characterization of an anti‐laminin antibody that modulates the extracellular matrix‐dependent morphogenesis of endothelial cells. Here we use this antibody to precisely map the binding site responsible for mediating this biologically important interaction....

  4. T-cell defect in diffuse large B-cell lymphomas involves expansion of myeloid-derived suppressor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzaoui, Imane; Uhel, Fabrice; Rossille, Delphine; Pangault, Celine; Dulong, Joelle; Le Priol, Jerome; Lamy, Thierry; Houot, Roch; Le Gouill, Steven; Cartron, Guillaume; Godmer, Pascal; Bouabdallah, Krimo; Milpied, Noel; Damaj, Gandhi; Tarte, Karin; Fest, Thierry; Roussel, Mikael

    2016-08-25

    In diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), the number of circulating monocytes and neutrophils represents an independent prognostic factor. These cell subsets include monocytic and granulocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells (M- and G-MDSCs) defined by their ability to suppress T-cell responses. MDSCs are a heterogeneous population described in inflammatory and infectious diseases and in numerous tumors including multiple myeloma, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and DLBCL. However, their mechanisms of action remain unclear. We broadly assessed the presence and mechanisms of suppression of MDSC subsets in DLBCL. First, a myeloid suppressive signature was identified by gene expression profiling in DLBCL peripheral blood. Accordingly, we identified, in a cohort of 66 DLBCL patients, an increase in circulating G-MDSC (Lin(neg)HLA-DR(neg)CD33(pos)CD11b(pos)) and M-MDSC (CD14(pos)HLA-DR(low)) counts. Interestingly, only M-MDSC number was correlated with the International Prognostic Index, event-free survival, and number of circulating Tregs. Furthermore, T-cell proliferation was restored after monocyte depletion. Myeloid-dependent T-cell suppression was attributed to a release of interleukin-10 and S100A12 and increased PD-L1 expression. In summary, we identified expanded MDSC subsets in DLBCL, as well as new mechanisms of immunosuppression in DLBCL. PMID:27338100

  5. Identifying components of the hair-cell interactome involved in cochlear amplification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheatham MaryAnn

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although outer hair cells (OHCs play a key role in cochlear amplification, it is not fully understood how they amplify sound signals by more than 100 fold. Two competing or possibly complementary mechanisms, stereocilia-based and somatic electromotility-based amplification, have been considered. Lacking knowledge about the exceptionally rich protein networks in the OHC plasma membrane, as well as related protein-protein interactions, limits our understanding of cochlear function. Therefore, we focused on finding protein partners for two important membrane proteins: Cadherin 23 (cdh23 and prestin. Cdh23 is one of the tip-link proteins involved in transducer function, a key component of mechanoelectrical transduction and stereocilia-based amplification. Prestin is a basolateral membrane protein responsible for OHC somatic electromotility. Results Using the membrane-based yeast two-hybrid system to screen a newly built cDNA library made predominantly from OHCs, we identified two completely different groups of potential protein partners using prestin and cdh23 as bait. These include both membrane bound and cytoplasmic proteins with 12 being de novo gene products with unknown function(s. In addition, some of these genes are closely associated with deafness loci, implying a potentially important role in hearing. The most abundant prey for prestin (38% is composed of a group of proteins involved in electron transport, which may play a role in OHC survival. The most abundant group of cdh23 prey (55% contains calcium-binding domains. Since calcium performs an important role in hair cell mechanoelectrical transduction and amplification, understanding the interactions between cdh23 and calcium-binding proteins should increase our knowledge of hair cell function at the molecular level. Conclusion The results of this study shed light on some protein networks in cochlear hair cells. Not only was a group of de novo genes closely associated

  6. DUBbing Cancer: Deubiquitylating Enzymes Involved in Epigenetics, DNA Damage and the Cell Cycle As Therapeutic Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto-Fernandez, Adan; Kessler, Benedikt M.

    2016-01-01

    Controlling cell proliferation is one of the hallmarks of cancer. A number of critical checkpoints ascertain progression through the different stages of the cell cycle, which can be aborted when perturbed, for instance by errors in DNA replication and repair. These molecular checkpoints are regulated by a number of proteins that need to be present at the right time and quantity. The ubiquitin system has emerged as a central player controlling the fate and function of such molecules such as cyclins, oncogenes and components of the DNA repair machinery. In particular, proteases that cleave ubiquitin chains, referred to as deubiquitylating enzymes (DUBs), have attracted recent attention due to their accessibility to modulation by small molecules. In this review, we describe recent evidence of the critical role of DUBs in aspects of cell cycle checkpoint control, associated DNA repair mechanisms and regulation of transcription, representing pathways altered in cancer. Therefore, DUBs involved in these processes emerge as potentially critical targets for the treatment of not only hematological, but potentially also solid tumors.

  7. Involvement of Arabidopsis Hexokinase1 in Cell Death Mediated by Myo -Inositol Accumulation

    KAUST Repository

    Bruggeman, Quentin

    2015-06-05

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is essential for several aspects of plant life, including development and stress responses. We recently identified the mips1 mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana, which is deficient for the enzyme catalyzing the limiting step of myo-inositol (MI) synthesis. One of the most striking features of mips1 is the light-dependent formation of lesions on leaves due to salicylic acid (SA)-dependent PCD. Here, we identified a suppressor of PCD by screening for mutations that abolish the mips1 cell death phenotype. Our screen identified the hxk1 mutant, mutated in the gene encoding the hexokinase1 (HXK1) enzyme that catalyzes sugar phosphorylation and acts as a genuine glucose sensor. We show that HXK1 is required for lesion formation in mips1 due to alterations in MI content, via SA-dependant signaling. Using two catalytically inactive HXK1 mutants, we also show that hexokinase catalytic activity is necessary for the establishment of lesions in mips1. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses revealed a restoration of the MI content in mips1 hxk1 that it is due to the activity of the MIPS2 isoform, while MIPS3 is not involved. Our work defines a pathway of HXK1-mediated cell death in plants and demonstrates that two MIPS enzymes act cooperatively under a particular metabolic status, highlighting a novel checkpoint of MI homeostasis in plants. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  8. B-cell epitope mapping for the design of vaccines and effective diagnostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarek A. Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasing resistance of many microbial strains to antibiotics, delayed laboratory results, and side effects of many chemotherapeutics has raised the need to search for sensitive diagnostics and new prophylactic strategies especially prevention by vaccination. Understanding the epitope/antibody interaction is the key to constructing potent vaccines and effective diagnostics. B-cell epitope mapping is a promising approach to identifying the main antigenic determinants of microorganisms, in special concern the discontinuous conformational ones. Epitope-based vaccines have remarkable privilege over the conventional ones since they are specific, able to avoid undesirable immune responses, generate long lasting immunity, and are reasonably cheaper. This up-to-date review discusses and compares the different physical, computational, and molecular methods that have been used in epitope mapping. The role of each method in the identification of potent epitopes in viruses, bacteria, fungi, parasites, as well as human diseases are tagged and documented. Simultaneously, frequent combinatorial methods are highlighted. The article aims to assist researchers to design the most suitable protocol for mapping their B-cell epitopes.

  9. Nucleotide sequence determination of the region in adenovirus 5 DNA involved in cell transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A description is given of investigations into the primary structure of the transforming region of adenovirus type 5 DNA. The phenomenon of cell transformation is discussed in general terms and the principles of a number of fairly recent techniques, which have been in use for DNA sequence determination since 1975 are dealt with. A few of the author's own techniques are described which deal both with nucleotide sequence analysis and with the determination of DNA cleavage sites of restriction endonucleases. The results are given of the mapping of cleavage sites in the HpaI-E fragment of adenovirus DNA of HpaII, HaeIII, AluI, HinfI and TaqI and of the determination of the nucleotide sequence in the transforming region of adenovirus type 5 DNA. The results of the sequence determination of the Ad5 HindIII-G fragment are discussed in relation with the investigation on the transforming proteins isolated from in vitro and in vivo synthesizing systems. Labelling procedures of DNA are described including the exonuclease III/DNA polymerase 1 method and TA polynucleotide kinase labelling of DNA fragments. (Auth.)

  10. Molecular mapping of the cell wall polysaccharides of the human pathogen Streptococcus agalactiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaussart, Audrey; Péchoux, Christine; Trieu-Cuot, Patrick; Hols, Pascal; Mistou, Michel-Yves; Dufrêne, Yves F.

    2014-11-01

    The surface of many bacterial pathogens is covered with polysaccharides that play important roles in mediating pathogen-host interactions. In Streptococcus agalactiae, the capsular polysaccharide (CPS) is recognized as a major virulence factor while the group B carbohydrate (GBC) is crucial for peptidoglycan biosynthesis and cell division. Despite the important roles of CPS and GBC, there is little information available on the molecular organization of these glycopolymers on the cell surface. Here, we use atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to analyze the nanoscale distribution of CPS and GBC in wild-type (WT) and mutant strains of S. agalactiae. TEM analyses reveal that in WT bacteria, peptidoglycan is covered with a very thin (few nm) layer of GBC (the ``pellicle'') overlaid by a 15-45 nm thick layer of CPS (the ``capsule''). AFM-based single-molecule mapping with specific antibody probes shows that CPS is exposed on WT cells, while it is hardly detected on mutant cells impaired in CPS production (ΔcpsE mutant). By contrast, both TEM and AFM show that CPS is over-expressed in mutant cells altered in GBC expression (ΔgbcO mutant), indicating that the production of the two surface glycopolymers is coordinated in WT cells. In addition, AFM topographic imaging and molecular mapping with specific lectin probes demonstrate that removal of CPS (ΔcpsE), but not of GBC (ΔgbcO), leads to the exposure of peptidoglycan, organized into 25 nm wide bands running parallel to the septum. These results indicate that CPS forms a homogeneous barrier protecting the underlying peptidoglycan from environmental exposure, while the presence of GBC does not prevent peptidoglycan detection. This work shows that single-molecule AFM, combined with high-resolution TEM, represents a powerful platform for analysing the molecular arrangement of the cell wall polymers of bacterial pathogens.

  11. High-throughput mapping of origins of replication in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Isabelle; Palakodeti, Aparna; Jiang, Yanwen; Young, David J; Jiang, Nan; Fernald, Anthony A; Le Beau, Michelle M

    2007-08-01

    Mapping origins of replication has been challenging in higher eukaryotes. We have developed a rapid, genome-wide method to map origins of replication in asynchronous human cells by combining the nascent strand abundance assay with a highly tiled microarray platform, and we validated the technique by two independent assays. We applied this method to analyse the enrichment of nascent DNA in three 50-kb regions containing known origins of replication in the MYC, lamin B2 (LMNB2) and haemoglobin beta (HBB) genes, a 200-kb region containing the rare fragile site, FRAXA, and a 1,075-kb region on chromosome 22; we detected most of the known origins and also 28 new origins. Surprisingly, the 28 new origins were small in size and located predominantly within genes. Our study also showed a strong correlation between origin replication timing and chromatin acetylation.

  12. A cell-permeable fluorescent polymeric thermometer for intracellular temperature mapping in mammalian cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teruyuki Hayashi

    Full Text Available Changes in intracellular temperatures reflect the activity of the cell. Thus, the tool to measure intracellular temperatures could provide valuable information about cellular status. We previously reported a method to analyze the intracellular temperature distribution using a fluorescent polymeric thermometer (FPT in combination with fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM. Intracellular delivery of the FPT used in the previous study required microinjection. We now report a novel FPT that is cell permeable and highly photostable, and we describe the application of this FPT to the imaging of intracellular temperature distributions in various types of mammalian cell lines. This cell-permeable FPT displayed a temperature resolution of 0.05°C to 0.54°C within the range from 28°C to 38°C in HeLa cell extracts. Using our optimized protocol, this cell-permeable FPT spontaneously diffused into HeLa cells within 10 min of incubation and exhibited minimal toxicity over several hours of observation. FLIM analysis confirmed a temperature difference between the nucleus and the cytoplasm and heat production near the mitochondria, which were also detected previously using the microinjected FPT. We also showed that this cell-permeable FPT protocol can be applied to other mammalian cell lines, COS7 and NIH/3T3 cells. Thus, this cell-permeable FPT represents a promising tool to study cellular states and functions with respect to temperature.

  13. A cell-permeable fluorescent polymeric thermometer for intracellular temperature mapping in mammalian cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Teruyuki; Fukuda, Nanaho; Uchiyama, Seiichi; Inada, Noriko

    2015-01-01

    Changes in intracellular temperatures reflect the activity of the cell. Thus, the tool to measure intracellular temperatures could provide valuable information about cellular status. We previously reported a method to analyze the intracellular temperature distribution using a fluorescent polymeric thermometer (FPT) in combination with fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). Intracellular delivery of the FPT used in the previous study required microinjection. We now report a novel FPT that is cell permeable and highly photostable, and we describe the application of this FPT to the imaging of intracellular temperature distributions in various types of mammalian cell lines. This cell-permeable FPT displayed a temperature resolution of 0.05°C to 0.54°C within the range from 28°C to 38°C in HeLa cell extracts. Using our optimized protocol, this cell-permeable FPT spontaneously diffused into HeLa cells within 10 min of incubation and exhibited minimal toxicity over several hours of observation. FLIM analysis confirmed a temperature difference between the nucleus and the cytoplasm and heat production near the mitochondria, which were also detected previously using the microinjected FPT. We also showed that this cell-permeable FPT protocol can be applied to other mammalian cell lines, COS7 and NIH/3T3 cells. Thus, this cell-permeable FPT represents a promising tool to study cellular states and functions with respect to temperature.

  14. Genes involved in centrosome-independent mitotic spindle assembly in Drosophila S2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moutinho-Pereira, Sara; Stuurman, Nico; Afonso, Olga; Hornsveld, Marten; Aguiar, Paulo; Goshima, Gohta; Vale, Ronald D; Maiato, Helder

    2013-12-01

    Animal mitotic spindle assembly relies on centrosome-dependent and centrosome-independent mechanisms, but their relative contributions remain unknown. Here, we investigated the molecular basis of the centrosome-independent spindle assembly pathway by performing a whole-genome RNAi screen in Drosophila S2 cells lacking functional centrosomes. This screen identified 197 genes involved in acentrosomal spindle assembly, eight of which had no previously described mitotic phenotypes and produced defective and/or short spindles. All 197 genes also produced RNAi phenotypes when centrosomes were present, indicating that none were entirely selective for the acentrosomal pathway. However, a subset of genes produced a selective defect in pole focusing when centrosomes were absent, suggesting that centrosomes compensate for this shape defect. Another subset of genes was specifically associated with the formation of multipolar spindles only when centrosomes were present. We further show that the chromosomal passenger complex orchestrates multiple centrosome-independent processes required for mitotic spindle assembly/maintenance. On the other hand, despite the formation of a chromosome-enriched RanGTP gradient, S2 cells depleted of RCC1, the guanine-nucleotide exchange factor for Ran on chromosomes, established functional bipolar spindles. Finally, we show that cells without functional centrosomes have a delay in chromosome congression and anaphase onset, which can be explained by the lack of polar ejection forces. Overall, these findings establish the constitutive nature of a centrosome-independent spindle assembly program and how this program is adapted to the presence/absence of centrosomes in animal somatic cells.

  15. Investigation into local cell mechanics by atomic force microscopy mapping and optical tweezer vertical indentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coceano, G; Yousafzai, M S; Ma, W; Ndoye, F; Venturelli, L; Hussain, I; Bonin, S; Niemela, J; Scoles, G; Cojoc, D; Ferrari, E

    2016-02-12

    Investigating the mechanical properties of cells could reveal a potential source of label-free markers of cancer progression, based on measurable viscoelastic parameters. The Young's modulus has proved to be the most thoroughly studied so far, however, even for the same cell type, the elastic modulus reported in different studies spans a wide range of values, mainly due to the application of different experimental conditions. This complicates the reliable use of elasticity for the mechanical phenotyping of cells. Here we combine two complementary techniques, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and optical tweezer microscopy (OTM), providing a comprehensive mechanical comparison of three human breast cell lines: normal myoepithelial (HBL-100), luminal breast cancer (MCF-7) and basal breast cancer (MDA-MB-231) cells. The elastic modulus was measured locally by AFM and OTM on single cells, using similar indentation approaches but different measurement parameters. Peak force tapping AFM was employed at nanonewton forces and high loading rates to draw a viscoelastic map of each cell and the results indicated that the region on top of the nucleus provided the most meaningful results. OTM was employed at those locations at piconewton forces and low loading rates, to measure the elastic modulus in a real elastic regime and rule out the contribution of viscous forces typical of AFM. When measured by either AFM or OTM, the cell lines' elasticity trend was similar for the aggressive MDA-MB-231 cells, which were found to be significantly softer than the other two cell types in both measurements. However, when comparing HBL-100 and MCF-7 cells, we found significant differences only when using OTM. PMID:26683826

  16. Investigation into local cell mechanics by atomic force microscopy mapping and optical tweezer vertical indentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coceano, G.; Yousafzai, M. S.; Ma, W.; Ndoye, F.; Venturelli, L.; Hussain, I.; Bonin, S.; Niemela, J.; Scoles, G.; Cojoc, D.; Ferrari, E.

    2016-02-01

    Investigating the mechanical properties of cells could reveal a potential source of label-free markers of cancer progression, based on measurable viscoelastic parameters. The Young’s modulus has proved to be the most thoroughly studied so far, however, even for the same cell type, the elastic modulus reported in different studies spans a wide range of values, mainly due to the application of different experimental conditions. This complicates the reliable use of elasticity for the mechanical phenotyping of cells. Here we combine two complementary techniques, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and optical tweezer microscopy (OTM), providing a comprehensive mechanical comparison of three human breast cell lines: normal myoepithelial (HBL-100), luminal breast cancer (MCF-7) and basal breast cancer (MDA-MB-231) cells. The elastic modulus was measured locally by AFM and OTM on single cells, using similar indentation approaches but different measurement parameters. Peak force tapping AFM was employed at nanonewton forces and high loading rates to draw a viscoelastic map of each cell and the results indicated that the region on top of the nucleus provided the most meaningful results. OTM was employed at those locations at piconewton forces and low loading rates, to measure the elastic modulus in a real elastic regime and rule out the contribution of viscous forces typical of AFM. When measured by either AFM or OTM, the cell lines’ elasticity trend was similar for the aggressive MDA-MB-231 cells, which were found to be significantly softer than the other two cell types in both measurements. However, when comparing HBL-100 and MCF-7 cells, we found significant differences only when using OTM.

  17. RKIP regulates MAP kinase signaling in cells with defective B-Raf activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Lingchun; Ehrenreiter, Karin; Menon, Jyotsana; Menard, Ray; Kern, Florian; Nakazawa, Yoko; Bevilacqua, Elena; Imamoto, Akira; Baccarini, Manuela; Rosner, Marsha Rich

    2013-05-01

    MAP kinase (MAPK) signaling results from activation of Raf kinases in response to external or internal stimuli. Here, we demonstrate that Raf kinase inhibitory protein (RKIP) regulates the activation of MAPK when B-Raf signaling is defective. We used multiple models including mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and primary keratinocytes from RKIP- or Raf-deficient mice as well as allografts in mice to investigate the mechanism. Loss of B-Raf protein or activity significantly reduces MAPK activation in these cells. We show that RKIP depletion can rescue the compromised ERK activation and promote proliferation, and this rescue occurs through a Raf-1 dependent mechanism. These results provide formal evidence that RKIP is a bona fide regulator of Raf-1. We propose a new model in which RKIP plays a key role in regulating the ability of cells to signal through Raf-1 to ERK in B-Raf compromised cells.

  18. Deciphering early events involved in hyperosmotic stress-induced programmed cell death in tobacco BY-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monetti, Emanuela; Kadono, Takashi; Tran, Daniel; Azzarello, Elisa; Arbelet-Bonnin, Delphine; Biligui, Bernadette; Briand, Joël; Kawano, Tomonori; Mancuso, Stefano; Bouteau, François

    2014-03-01

    Hyperosmotic stresses represent one of the major constraints that adversely affect plants growth, development, and productivity. In this study, the focus was on early responses to hyperosmotic stress- (NaCl and sorbitol) induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]cyt) increase, ion fluxes, and mitochondrial potential variations, and on their links in pathways leading to programmed cell death (PCD). By using BY-2 tobacco cells, it was shown that both NaCl- and sorbitol-induced PCD seemed to be dependent on superoxide anion (O2·(-)) generation by NADPH-oxidase. In the case of NaCl, an early influx of sodium through non-selective cation channels participates in the development of PCD through mitochondrial dysfunction and NADPH-oxidase-dependent O2·(-) generation. This supports the hypothesis of different pathways in NaCl- and sorbitol-induced cell death. Surprisingly, other shared early responses, such as [Ca(2+)]cyt increase and singlet oxygen production, do not seem to be involved in PCD.

  19. Characterization of Four Outer Membrane Proteins Involved in Binding Starch to the Cell Surface of Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron

    OpenAIRE

    Shipman, Joseph A.; Berleman, James E.; Salyers, Abigail A.

    2000-01-01

    Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, a gram-negative obligate anaerobe, utilizes polysaccharides by binding them to its cell surface and allowing cell-associated enzymes to hydrolyze them into digestible fragments. We use the starch utilization system as a model to analyze the initial steps involved in polysaccharide binding and breakdown. In a recent paper, we reported that one of the outer membrane proteins involved, SusG, had starch-degrading activity but was not sufficient for growth on starch. ...

  20. Involvement of aberrant DNA methylation on reduced expression of lysophosphatidic acid receptor-1 gene in rat tumor cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a bioactive phospholipid that stimulates cell proliferation, migration, and protects cells from apoptosis. It interacts with specific G protein-coupled transmembrane receptors. Recently, it has been reported that alterations of LPA receptor expression might be important in the malignant transformation of tumor cells. Therefore, to assess an involvement of DNA methylation in reduced expression of the LPA receptor-1 (lpa1) gene, we investigated the expression of the lpa1 gene and its DNA methylation patterns in rat tumor cell lines. Both rat brain-derived neuroblastoma B103 and liver-derived hepatoma RH7777 cells used in this study indicated no expression of lpa1. For the analysis of methylation status, bisulfite sequencing was performed with B103 and RH7777 cells, comparing with other lpa1 expressed cells and normal tissues of brain and liver. The lpa1 expressed cells and tissues were all unmethylated in this region of lpa1. In contrast, both B103 and RH7777 cells were highly methylated, correlating with reduced expression of the lpa1. Treatment with 5-aza 2'-deoxycytidine induced expression of lpa1 gene in B103 and RH7777 cells after 24 h. In RH7777 cells treated with 5-aza 2'-deoxycytidine, stress fiber formation was also observed in response to LPA in RH7777 cells, but not in untreated RH7777 cells. These results suggest that aberrant DNA methylation of the lpa1 gene may be involved in its reduced expression in rat tumor cells

  1. Mapping and morphometric analysis of synapses and spines on fusiform cells in the dorsal cochlear nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salloum, Rony H; Chen, Guoyou; Velet, Liliya; Manzoor, Nauman F; Elkin, Rachel; Kidd, Grahame J; Coughlin, John; Yurosko, Christopher; Bou-Anak, Stephanie; Azadi, Shirin; Gohlsch, Stephanie; Schneider, Harold; Kaltenbach, James A

    2014-01-01

    Fusiform cells are the main integrative units of the mammalian dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN), collecting and processing inputs from auditory and other sources before transmitting information to higher levels of the auditory system. Despite much previous work describing these cells and the sources and pharmacological identity of their synaptic inputs, information on the three-dimensional organization and utltrastructure of synapses on these cells is currently very limited. This information is essential since an understanding of synaptic plasticity and remodeling and pathologies underlying disease states and hearing disorders must begin with knowledge of the normal characteristics of synapses on these cells, particularly those features that determine the strength of their influence on the various compartments of the cell. Here, we employed serial block face scanning electron microscopy (SBFSEM) followed by 3D reconstructions to map and quantitatively characterize synaptic features on DCN fusiform cells. Our results reveal a relative sparseness of synapses on the somata of fusiform cells but a dense distribution of synapses on apical and basal dendrites. Synapses on apical dendrites were smaller and more numerous than on basal dendrites. The vast majority of axosomatic terminals were found to be linked to other terminals connected by the same axon or different branches of the same axon, suggesting a high degree of divergent input to fusiform cells. The size of terminals was correlated with the number of mitochondria and with the number of active zones, which was highly correlated with the number of postsynaptic densities, suggesting that larger terminals exert more powerful influence on the cell than smaller terminals. These size differences suggest that the input to basal dendrites, most likely those from the auditory nerve, provide the most powerful sources of input to fusiform cells, while those to apical dendrites (e.g., parallel fiber) are weaker but more

  2. Mapping and Morphometric Analysis of Synapses and Spines on Fusiform Cells in the Dorsal Cochlear Nucleus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rony H. Salloum

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Fusiform cells are the main integrative units of the mammalian dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN, collecting and processing inputs from auditory and other sources before transmitting information to higher levels of the auditory system. Despite much previous work describing these cells and the sources and pharmacological identity of their synaptic inputs, information on the 3- dimensional organization and utltrastructure of synapses on these cells is currently very limited. This information is essential since an understanding of synaptic plasticity and remodeling and pathologies underlying disease states and hearing disorders must begin with knowledge of the normal characteristics of synapses on these cells, particularly those features that determine the strength of their influence on the various compartments of the cell. Here, we employed serial block face scanning electron microscopy (SBFSEM followed by 3D reconstructions to map and quantitatively characterize synaptic features on DCN fusiform cells. Our results reveal a relative sparseness of synapses on the somata of fusiform cells but a dense distribution of synapses on apical and basal dendrites. Synapses on apical dendrites were smaller and more numerous than on basal dendrites. The vast majority of axosomatic terminals were found to be linked to other terminals connected by the same axon or different branches of the same axon, suggesting a high degree of divergent input to fusiform cells. The size of terminals was correlated with the number of mitochondria and with the number of active zones, which was highly correlated with the number of postsynaptic densities, suggesting that larger terminals exert more powerful influence on the cell than smaller terminals. These size differences suggest that the input to basal dendrites, most likely those from the auditory nerve, provide the most powerful sources of input to fusiform cells, while those to apical dendrites (e.g., parallel fiber are weaker

  3. Splenic dendritic cell involvement in FXR-mediated amelioration of DSS colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massafra, Vittoria; Ijssennagger, Noortje; Plantinga, Maud; Milona, Alexandra; Ramos Pittol, José M; Boes, Marianne; van Mil, Saskia W C

    2016-02-01

    Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) is a multifactorial disorder involving dysregulation of the immune response and bacterial translocation through the intestinal mucosal barrier. Previously, we have shown that activation of the bile acid sensor Farnesoid X Receptor (FXR), which belongs to the family of nuclear receptors, improves experimental intestinal inflammation, decreasing expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and protecting the intestinal barrier. Here, we aimed to investigate the immunological mechanisms that ameliorate colitis when FXR is activated. We analyzed by FACS immune cell populations in mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) and in the spleen to understand whether FXR activation alters the systemic immune response. We show that FXR activation by obeticholic acid (OCA) has systemic anti-inflammatory effects that include increased levels of plasma IL-10, inhibition of both DSS-colitis associated decrease in splenic dendritic cells (DCs) and increase in Tregs. Impact of OCA on DC relative abundance was seen in spleen but not MLN, possibly related to the increased FXR expression in splenic DCs compared to MLN DCs. Moreover, FXR activation modulates the chemotactic environment in the colonic site of inflammation, as Madcam1 expression is decreased, while Ccl25 is upregulated. Together, our data suggest that OCA treatment elicits an anti-inflammatory immune status including retention of DCs in the spleen, which is associated with decreased colonic inflammation. Pharmacological FXR activation is therefore an attractive new drug target for treatment of IBD. PMID:26554605

  4. ADAM10 Is Involved in Cell Junction Assembly in Early Porcine Embryo Development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeongwoo Kwon

    Full Text Available ADAM10 (A Disintegrin and Metalloprotease domain-containing protein 10 is a cell surface protein with a unique structure possessing both potential adhesion and protease domains. However, the role of ADAM10 in preimplantation stage embryos is not clear. In this study, we examined the expression patterns and functional roles of ADAM10 in porcine parthenotes during preimplantation development. The transcription level of ADAM10 dramatically increased from the morula stage onward. Immunostaining revealed that ADAM10 was present in both the nucleus and cytoplasm in early cleavage stage embryos, and localized to the apical region of the outer cells in morula and blastocyst embryos. Knockdown (KD of ADAM10 using double strand RNA did not alter preimplantation embryo development until morula stage, but resulted in significantly reduced development to blastocyst stage. Moreover, the KD blastocyst showed a decrease in gene expression of adherens and tight junction (AJ/TJ, and an increase in trophectoderm TJ permeability by disrupting TJ assembly. Treatment with an ADAM10 specific chemical inhibitor, GI254023X, at the morula stage also inhibited blastocyst development and led to disruption of TJ assembly. An in situ proximity ligation assay demonstrated direct interaction of ADAM10 with coxsackie virus and adenovirus receptor (CXADR, supporting the involvement of ADAM10 in TJ assembly. In conclusion, our findings strongly suggest that ADADM10 is important for blastocyst formation rather than compaction, particularly for TJ assembly and stabilization in preimplantation porcine parthenogenetic development.

  5. Involvement of Phosphatases in Proliferation, Maturation, and Hemoglobinization of Developing Erythroid Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eitan Fibach

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Production of RBCs is triggered by the action of erythropoietin (Epo through its binding to surface receptors (Epo-R on erythroid precursors in the bone marrow. The intensity and the duration of the Epo signal are regulated by several factors, including the balance between the activities of kinesase and phosphatases. The Epo signal determines the proliferation and maturation of the precursors into hemoglobin (Hb-containing RBCs. The activity of various protein tyrosine phosphatases, including those involved in the Epo pathway, can be inhibited by sodium orthovanadate (Na3VO4, vanadate. Adding vanadate to cultured erythroid precursors of normal donors and patients with β-thalassemia enhanced cell proliferation and arrested maturation. This was associated with an increased production of fetal hemoglobin (HbF. Increased HbF in patients with β-hemoglobinopathies (β-thalassemia and sickle cell disease ameliorates the clinical symptoms of the disease. These results raise the possibility that specific and nontoxic inhibitors of phosphatases may be considered as a therapeutic modality for elevating HbF in patients with β-hemoglobinopathies as well as for intensifying the Epo response in other forms of anemia.

  6. Let7a involves in neural stem cell differentiation relating with TLX level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) have the potential for differentiation into neurons known as a groundbreaking therapeutic solution for central nervous system (CNS) diseases. To resolve the therapeutic efficiency of NSCs, recent researchers have focused on the study on microRNA's role in CNS. Some micro RNAs have been reported significant functions in NSC self-renewal and differentiation through the post-transcriptional regulation of neurogenesis genes. MicroRNA-Let7a (Let7a) has known as the regulator of diverse cellular mechanisms including cell differentiation and proliferation. In present study, we investigated whether Let7a regulates NSC differentiation by targeting the nuclear receptor TLX, which is an essential regulator of NSC self-renewal, proliferation and differentiation. We performed the following experiments: western blot analysis, TaqMan assay, RT-PCR, and immunocytochemistry to confirm the alteration of NSCs. Our data showed that let7a play important roles in controlling NSC fate determination. Thus, manipulating Let-7A and TLX could be a novel strategy to enhance the efficiency of NSC's neuronal differentiation for CNS disorders. - Highlights: • Let7a influences on NSC differentiation and proliferation. • Let7a involves in mainly NSC differentiation rather than proliferation. • Let7a positively regulates the TLX expression

  7. Mineralocorticoid receptor is involved in the aldosterone pathway in human red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordin, Luciana; Saccardi, Carlo; Donà, Gabriella; Sabbadin, Chiara; Andrisani, Alessandra; Ambrosini, Guido; Plebani, Mario; Brunati, Anna Maria; Ragazzi, Eugenio; Gizzo, Salvatore; Armanini, Decio

    2016-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated that excessive aldosterone (Aldo) secretion in primary aldosteronism (PA) is associated with red blood cells (RBC) senescence. These alterations were prevented/inhibited by cortisol (Cort) or canrenone (Can) raising the hypothesis that Aldo effects in RBC may be mediated by mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), though to date MR has never been demonstrated in human RBC. The aim of this multicenter comparative study was to investigate whether Aldo effects were mediated by MR in these a-nucleated cells. We included 12 healthy controls (HC) and 22 patients with PA. MR presence and activation were evaluated in RBC cytosol by glycerol gradient sedimentation, Western blotting, immuno-precipitation and radioimmunoassay. We demonstrated that RBC contained cytosolic MR, aggregated with HSP90 and other proteins to form multiprotein complex. Aldo induced MR to release from the complex and to form MR dimers which were quickly proteolyzed. Cort induced MR release but not dimers formation while Can was not able to induce MR release. In addition, RBC cytosol from PA patients contained significantly higher amounts of both MR fragments (p<0.0001) and Aldo (p<0.0001) concentrations. In conclusion, in RBC a genomic-like Aldo pathway is proposed involving MR activation, dimerization and proteolysis, but lacking nuclear transcription. In addition, dimers proteolysis may ensure a sort of Aldo scavenging from circulation by entrapping Aldo in MR fragments. PMID:27158328

  8. Let7a involves in neural stem cell differentiation relating with TLX level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Juhyun [Department of Anatomy, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Kyoung Joo; Oh, Yumi [Department of Anatomy, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); BK21 Plus Project for Medical Sciences, and Brain Research Institute, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong Eun, E-mail: jelee@yuhs.ac [Department of Anatomy, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); BK21 Plus Project for Medical Sciences, and Brain Research Institute, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-10

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) have the potential for differentiation into neurons known as a groundbreaking therapeutic solution for central nervous system (CNS) diseases. To resolve the therapeutic efficiency of NSCs, recent researchers have focused on the study on microRNA's role in CNS. Some micro RNAs have been reported significant functions in NSC self-renewal and differentiation through the post-transcriptional regulation of neurogenesis genes. MicroRNA-Let7a (Let7a) has known as the regulator of diverse cellular mechanisms including cell differentiation and proliferation. In present study, we investigated whether Let7a regulates NSC differentiation by targeting the nuclear receptor TLX, which is an essential regulator of NSC self-renewal, proliferation and differentiation. We performed the following experiments: western blot analysis, TaqMan assay, RT-PCR, and immunocytochemistry to confirm the alteration of NSCs. Our data showed that let7a play important roles in controlling NSC fate determination. Thus, manipulating Let-7A and TLX could be a novel strategy to enhance the efficiency of NSC's neuronal differentiation for CNS disorders. - Highlights: • Let7a influences on NSC differentiation and proliferation. • Let7a involves in mainly NSC differentiation rather than proliferation. • Let7a positively regulates the TLX expression.

  9. Scattering of MCF7 cells by heregulin ß-1 depends on the MEK and p38 MAP kinase pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rintaro Okoshi

    Full Text Available Heregulin (HRG β1 signaling promotes scattering of MCF7 cells by inducing breakdown of adherens and tight junctions. Here, we show that stimulation with HRG-β1 causes the F-actin backbone of junctions to destabilize prior to the loss of adherent proteins and scattering of the cells. The adherent proteins dissociate and translocate from cell-cell junctions to the cytosol. Moreover, using inhibitors we show that the MEK1 pathway is required for the disappearance of F-actin from junctions and p38 MAP kinase activity is essential for scattering of the cells. Upon treatment with a p38 MAP kinase inhibitor, adherens junction complexes immediately reassemble, most likely in the cytoplasm, and move to the plasma membrane in cells dissociated by HRG-β1 stimulation. Subsequently, tight junction complexes form, most likely in the cytoplasm, and move to the plasma membrane. Thus, the p38 MAP kinase inhibitor causes a re-aggregation of scattered cells, even in the presence of HRG-β1. These results suggest that p38 MAP kinase signaling to adherens junction proteins regulates cell aggregation, providing a novel understanding of the regulation of cell-cell adhesion.

  10. MicroRNA-148b enhances proliferation and apoptosis in human renal cancer cells via directly targeting MAP3K9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Fang; Liu, Tianming; Zhong, Liang; Yang, Xianggui; Liu, Yunhong; Xia, Hongwei; Liu, Xiaoqiang; Wang, Xiaoyan; Liu, Zhicheng; Zhou, Li; Mao, Zhaomin; Zhou, Qin; Chen, Tingmei

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence revealed that miRNAs, the vital regulators of gene expression, are involved in various cellular processes, including cell growth, differentiation, apoptosis and progression. In addition, miRNAs act as oncogenes and/or tumor suppressors. The present study aimed to verify the potential roles of miR148b in human renal cancer cells. miR‑148b was found to be downregulated in human renal cancel tissues and human renal cancer cell lines. Functional studies demonstrated that plasmid‑mediated overexpression of miR‑148b promoted cell proliferation, increased the S‑phase population of the cell cycle and enhanced apoptosis in the 786‑O and OS‑RC‑2 renal cancer cell lines, while it did not appear to affect the total number of viable cells according to a Cell Counting Kit‑8 assay. Subsequently, a luciferase reporter assay verified that miR148b directly targeted mitogen‑activated protein kinase (MAPK) kinase kinase 9 (MAP3K9), an upstream activator of MAPK kinase/c‑Jun N‑terminal kinase (JNK) signaling, suppressing the protein but not the mRNA levels. Furthermore, western blot analysis indicated that overexpression of miR148b in renal cancer cells inhibited MAPK/JNK signaling by decreasing the expression of phosphorylated (p)JNK. In addition, overexpression of MAP3K9 and pJNK was detected in clinical renal cell carcinoma specimens compared with that in their normal adjacent tissues. The present study therefore suggested that miR‑148b exerts an oncogenic function by enhancing the proliferation and apoptosis of renal cancer cells by inhibiting the MAPK/JNK pathway. PMID:26573018

  11. Osteopontin Involves Cisplatin Resistance and Poor Prognosis in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Dean Luo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Osteopontin (OPN is a multifunctional cytokine involved in cell survival, migration, and adhesion. However, its role in chemosensitivity in locally advanced oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC in humans has not yet been investigated. Methods. We enrolled 121 patients with locally advanced stage IVA/B OSCC receiving cisplatin-based IC followed by CCRT from January 1, 2006, through January 1, 2012. Immunohistochemistry was used to assess OPN expression in OSCC patients’ biopsy specimens from paraffin blocks before treatment. In addition, MTT/colony formation assay was used to estimate the influence of OPN in an oral cancer cell line treated with cisplatin. Results. Of the 121 patients, 94 had positive OPN findings and 52 responded to IC followed by CCRT. Positive osteopontin immunostaining also correlated significantly with positive N status/TNM stage/male gender and smoking. Univariate analyses showed that patients whose tumors had a low expression of OPN were more likely to respond to chemotherapy and have a significantly better OS than those whose tumors had a high expression of OPN. Multivariate analysis revealed that prolonged survival was independently predicted for patients with stage IVA disease, negative lymph nodes, and negative expressions of OPN and for those who received chemotherapy with Docetaxel/cisplatin/fluorouracil (TPF. An oral cancer line stimulated with OPN exhibited a dose-dependent resistance to cisplatin treatment. Conversely, endogenous OPN depletion by OPN-mediated shRNA increased sensitivity to cisplatin. Conclusions. A positive expression of OPN predicts a poor response and survival in patients with locally advanced stage IVA/B OSCC treated with cisplatin-based IC followed by CCRT.

  12. Clinical implications of the involvement of tPA in neuronal cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsirka, S E

    1997-05-01

    Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), the serine protease that converts inactive plasminogen to the protease plasmin, was recently shown to mediate neurodegeneration in the mouse hippocampus. Mice deficient in tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) display a dramatic resistance to a paradigm of excitotoxic neuronal death that involves intrahippocampal injection of the excitotoxin. This model is thought to reproduce the mechanism of neuronal death observed during acute (such as ischemic stroke) and degenerative (such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis) diseases of the nervous system. The requirement for the proteolytic activity of tPA to mediate neuronal death is acute in the adult mouse. Serine protease inhibitors, specific for tPA or the tPA/plasmin proteolytic cascade, are effective in conferring extensive neuroprotection following the excitotoxic injection. These findings suggest possible new ways for interfering with the neuronal death observed in the hippocampus as a result of excitotoxicity. In addition, tPA is produced in the hippocampus primarily by microglial cells, which become activated in response to the neuronal injury. Blocking microglial activation has been shown in other injury paradigms to protect against neuronal death, therefore suggesting another way to retard neurodegeneration in the CNS. Furthermore, after the insult has been inflicted and in the presence of a compromised blood-brain barrier macrophages (cells deriving from the same lineage as microglia) migrate into the brain, where they are thought to contribute to the neuronal cell loss by secreting neurotoxic molecules. If these macrophages/microglia expressed, however, a tPA inhibitor, rather than the possibly neurotoxic tPA, they might be able to protect the neurons from dying.

  13. Involvement of cAMP in the Human Serum-Induced Migration of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Minji; Koh, Wonyoung; Kim, Bomee; Chung, Hyeju; Cho, Gahyang; Kim, Haekwon

    2016-06-01

    Previously we observed that human adipose-derived stem cells (hADSCs) could form aggregation during culture in the presence of human serum (HS). In the present study, we have examined if the aggregation might result from the cell migration and analyzed the difference of cell adhesivity after culture in various conditions. When cells were cultured in fetal bovine serum (FBS) alone, there was no morphological change. Similarly, cells pretreated with FBS for 1 day or cultured in a mixture of FBS and HS showed little change. In contrast, cells cultured in HS alone exhibited formation of cell-free area (spacing) and/or cell aggregation. When cells cultured in FBS or pretreated with FBS were treated with 0.06% trypsin, almost cells remained attached to the dish surfaces. In contrast, when cells cultured in HS alone were examined, most cells detached from the dish by the same treatment. Treatment of cells with forskolin, isobutylmethyl xanthine (IBMX) or LY294002 inhibited the formation of spacing whereas H89 or Y27632 showed little effect. When these cells were treated with 0.06% trypsin after culture, most cells detached from the dishes as cells cultured in HS alone did. However, cells treated with IBMX exhibited weaker adhesivity than HS alone. Based on these observations, it is suggested that HS treatment might decrease the adhesivity and induce three-dimensional migration of hADSCs, in the latter of which cAMP signaling could be involved. PMID:27660827

  14. A novel method, digital genome scanning detects KRAS gene amplification in gastric cancers: involvement of overexpressed wild-type KRAS in downstream signaling and cancer cell growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanagihara Kazuyoshi

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gastric cancer is the third most common malignancy affecting the general population worldwide. Aberrant activation of KRAS is a key factor in the development of many types of tumor, however, oncogenic mutations of KRAS are infrequent in gastric cancer. We have developed a novel quantitative method of analysis of DNA copy number, termed digital genome scanning (DGS, which is based on the enumeration of short restriction fragments, and does not involve PCR or hybridization. In the current study, we used DGS to survey copy-number alterations in gastric cancer cells. Methods DGS of gastric cancer cell lines was performed using the sequences of 5000 to 15000 restriction fragments. We screened 20 gastric cancer cell lines and 86 primary gastric tumors for KRAS amplification by quantitative PCR, and investigated KRAS amplification at the DNA, mRNA and protein levels by mutational analysis, real-time PCR, immunoblot analysis, GTP-RAS pull-down assay and immunohistochemical analysis. The effect of KRAS knock-down on the activation of p44/42 MAP kinase and AKT and on cell growth were examined by immunoblot and colorimetric assay, respectively. Results DGS analysis of the HSC45 gastric cancer cell line revealed the amplification of a 500-kb region on chromosome 12p12.1, which contains the KRAS gene locus. Amplification of the KRAS locus was detected in 15% (3/20 of gastric cancer cell lines (8–18-fold amplification and 4.7% (4/86 of primary gastric tumors (8–50-fold amplification. KRAS mutations were identified in two of the three cell lines in which KRAS was amplified, but were not detected in any of the primary tumors. Overexpression of KRAS protein correlated directly with increased KRAS copy number. The level of GTP-bound KRAS was elevated following serum stimulation in cells with amplified wild-type KRAS, but not in cells with amplified mutant KRAS. Knock-down of KRAS in gastric cancer cells that carried amplified wild

  15. A novel method, digital genome scanning detects KRAS gene amplification in gastric cancers: involvement of overexpressed wild-type KRAS in downstream signaling and cancer cell growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gastric cancer is the third most common malignancy affecting the general population worldwide. Aberrant activation of KRAS is a key factor in the development of many types of tumor, however, oncogenic mutations of KRAS are infrequent in gastric cancer. We have developed a novel quantitative method of analysis of DNA copy number, termed digital genome scanning (DGS), which is based on the enumeration of short restriction fragments, and does not involve PCR or hybridization. In the current study, we used DGS to survey copy-number alterations in gastric cancer cells. DGS of gastric cancer cell lines was performed using the sequences of 5000 to 15000 restriction fragments. We screened 20 gastric cancer cell lines and 86 primary gastric tumors for KRAS amplification by quantitative PCR, and investigated KRAS amplification at the DNA, mRNA and protein levels by mutational analysis, real-time PCR, immunoblot analysis, GTP-RAS pull-down assay and immunohistochemical analysis. The effect of KRAS knock-down on the activation of p44/42 MAP kinase and AKT and on cell growth were examined by immunoblot and colorimetric assay, respectively. DGS analysis of the HSC45 gastric cancer cell line revealed the amplification of a 500-kb region on chromosome 12p12.1, which contains the KRAS gene locus. Amplification of the KRAS locus was detected in 15% (3/20) of gastric cancer cell lines (8–18-fold amplification) and 4.7% (4/86) of primary gastric tumors (8–50-fold amplification). KRAS mutations were identified in two of the three cell lines in which KRAS was amplified, but were not detected in any of the primary tumors. Overexpression of KRAS protein correlated directly with increased KRAS copy number. The level of GTP-bound KRAS was elevated following serum stimulation in cells with amplified wild-type KRAS, but not in cells with amplified mutant KRAS. Knock-down of KRAS in gastric cancer cells that carried amplified wild-type KRAS resulted in the inhibition of cell growth and

  16. Aircraft Landing Gear Control with Multi-Objective Optimization Using Generalized Cell Mapping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙建桥; 贾腾; 熊夫睿; 秦志昌; 吴卫国; 丁千

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a numerical algorithm tuning aircraft landing gear control system with three objectives, including reducing relative vibration, reducing hydraulic strut force and controlling energy consumption. Sliding mode control is applied to the vibration control of a simplified landing gear model with uncertainty. A two-stage generalized cell mapping algorithm is applied to search the Pareto set with gradient-free scheme. Drop test simulations over un-even runway show that the vibration and force interaction can be considerably reduced, and the Pareto optimum form a tight range in time domain.

  17. How can yeast cells decide between three activated MAP kinase pathways? A model approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rensing, Ludger; Ruoff, Peter

    2009-04-21

    In yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), the regulation of three MAP kinase pathways responding to pheromones (Fus3 pathway), carbon/nitrogen starvation (Kss1 pathway), and high osmolarity/osmotic stress (Hog1 pathway) is the subject of intensive research. We were interested in the question how yeast cells would respond when more than one of the MAP kinase pathways are activated simultaneously. Here, we give a brief overview over the regulatory mechanisms of the yeast MAP kinase pathways and investigate a kinetic model based on presently known molecular interactions and feedbacks within and between the three mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) pathways. When two pathways are activated simultaneously with the osmotic stress response as one of them, the model predicts that the osmotic stress response (Hog1 pathway) is turned on first. The same is true when all three pathways are activated at the same time. When testing simultaneous stimulations by low nitrogen and pheromones through the Kss1 and Fus3 pathways, respectively, the low nitrogen response dominates over the pheromone response. Due to its autocatalytic activation mechanism, the pheromone response (Fus3 pathway) shows typical sigmoid response kinetics and excitability. In the presence of a small but sufficient amount of activated Fus3, a stimulation by pheromones will lead to a rapid self-amplification of the pheromone response. This 'excitability' appears to be a feature of the pheromone pathway that has specific biological significance. PMID:19322936

  18. Involvement of platelet-tumor cell interaction in immune evasion. Potential role of podocalyxin-like protein 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura eAmo

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Besides their essential role in hemostasis and thrombosis, platelets are involved in the onset of cancer metastasis by interacting with tumor cells. Platelets release secretory factors that promote tumor growth, angiogenesis, and metastasis. Furthermore, the formation of platelet-tumor cell aggregates in the bloodstream provides cancer cells with an immune escape mechanism by protecting circulating malignant cells from immune-mediated lysis by natural killer (NK cells. Platelet-tumor cell interaction is accomplished by specific adhesion molecules, including integrins, selectins, and their ligands. Podocalyxin-like protein 1 (PCLP1 is a selectin ligand protein which overexpression has been associated with several aggressive cancers. PCLP1 expression enhances cell adherence to platelets in an integrin-dependent process and through the interaction with P-selectin expressed on activated platelets. However, the involvement of PCLP1-induced tumor-platelet interaction in tumor immune evasion still remains unexplored. The identification of selectin ligands involved in the interaction of platelets with tumor cells may provide help for the development of effective therapies to restrain cancer cell dissemination. This article summarizes the current knowledge on molecules that participate in platelet-tumor cell interaction as well as discusses the potential role of PCLP1 as a molecule implicated in tumor immune evasion.

  19. Staphylococcus aureus α-toxin-mediated cation entry depolarizes membrane potential and activates p38 MAP kinase in airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiffler, Ina; Behnke, Jane; Ziesemer, Sabine; Müller, Christian; Hildebrandt, Jan-Peter

    2016-09-01

    Membrane potential (Vm)-, Na(+)-, or Ca(2+)-sensitive fluorescent dyes were used to analyze changes in Vm or intracellular ion concentrations in airway epithelial cells treated with Staphylococcus aureus α-toxin (Hla), a major virulence factor of pathogenic strains of these bacteria. Gramicidin, a channel-forming peptide causing membrane permeability to monovalent cations, a mutated form of Hla, rHla-H35L, which forms oligomers in the plasma membranes of eukaryotic cells but fails to form functional transmembrane pores, or the cyclodextrin-derivative IB201, a blocker of the Hla pore, were used to investigate the permeability of the pore. Na(+) as well as Ca(2+) ions were able to pass the Hla pore and accumulated in the cytosol. The pore-mediated influx of calcium ions was blocked by IB201. Treatment of cells with recombinant Hla resulted in plasma membrane depolarization as well as in increases in the phosphorylation levels of paxillin (signaling pathway mediating disruption of the actin cytoskeleton) and p38 MAP kinase (signaling pathway resulting in defensive actions). p38 MAP kinase phosphorylation, but not paxillin phosphorylation, was elicited by treatment of cells with gramicidin. Although treatment of cells with rHla-H35L resulted in the formation of membrane-associated heptamers, none of these cellular effects were observed in our experiments. This indicates that formation of functional Hla-transmembrane pores is required to induce the cell physiological changes mediated by α-toxin. Specifically, the changes in ion equilibria and plasma membrane potential are important activators of p38 MAP kinase, a signal transduction module involved in host cell defense.

  20. Tibolone protects astrocytic cells from glucose deprivation through a mechanism involving estrogen receptor beta and the upregulation of neuroglobin expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila-Rodriguez, Marco; Garcia-Segura, Luis Miguel; Hidalgo-Lanussa, Oscar; Baez, Eliana; Gonzalez, Janneth; Barreto, George E

    2016-09-15

    Tibolone, a synthetic steroid used for the prevention of osteoporosis and the treatment of climacteric symptoms in post-menopausal women, may exert tissue selective estrogenic actions acting on estrogen receptors (ERs). We previously showed that tibolone protects human T98G astroglial cells against glucose deprivation (GD). In this study we have explored whether the protective effect of tibolone on these cells is mediated by ERs. Experimental studies showed that both ERα and ERβ were involved in the protection by tibolone on GD cells, being ERβ preferentially involved on these actions over ERα. Tibolone increased viability of GD cells by a mechanism fully blocked by an ERβ antagonist and partially blocked by an ERα antagonist. Furthermore, ERβ inhibition prevented the effect of tibolone on nuclear fragmentation, ROS and mitochondrial membrane potential in GD cells. The protective effect of tibolone was mediated by neuroglobin. Tibolone upregulated neuroglobin in T98G cells and primary mouse astrocytes by a mechanism involving ERβ and neuroglobin silencing prevented the protective action of tibolone on GD cells. In summary, tibolone protects T98G cells by a mechanism involving ERβ and the upregulation of neuroglobin. PMID:27250720

  1. Profiling of promoter occupancy by the SND1 transcriptional coactivator identifies downstream glycerolipid metabolic genes involved in TNFα response in human hepatoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arretxe, Enara; Armengol, Sandra; Mula, Sarai; Chico, Yolanda; Ochoa, Begoña; Martínez, María José

    2015-12-15

    The NF-κB-inducible Staphylococcal nuclease and tudor domain-containing 1 gene (SND1) encodes a coactivator involved in inflammatory responses and tumorigenesis. While SND1 is known to interact with certain transcription factors and activate client gene expression, no comprehensive mapping of SND1 target genes has been reported. Here, we have approached this question by performing ChIP-chip assays on human hepatoma HepG2 cells and analyzing SND1 binding modulation by proinflammatory TNFα. We show that SND1 binds 645 gene promoters in control cells and 281 additional genes in TNFα-treated cells. Transcription factor binding site analysis of bound probes identified motifs for established partners and for novel transcription factors including HSF, ATF, STAT3, MEIS1/AHOXA9, E2F and p300/CREB. Major target genes were involved in gene expression and RNA metabolism regulation, as well as development and cellular metabolism. We confirmed SND1 binding to 21 previously unrecognized genes, including a set of glycerolipid genes. Knocking-down experiments revealed that SND1 deficiency compromises the glycerolipid gene reprogramming and lipid phenotypic responses to TNFα. Overall, our findings uncover an unexpected large set of potential SND1 target genes and partners and reveal SND1 to be a determinant downstream effector of TNFα that contributes to support glycerophospholipid homeostasis in human hepatocellular carcinoma during inflammation.

  2. CD4+ T-cell lines used to evaluate a Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) peptide vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lybeck, Kari; Sjurseth, Siri K.; Al-Touama, Zainab;

    The aim of the study was to establish a protocol for generation of MAP-specific T-cell lines and to use these lines for evaluation of a peptide vaccine. A protocol for culturing T-cell lines from peripheral blood of goats naturally infected with MAP was established. CD4+ T cells were positively...... selected using an anti CD4 mAb and Dynabeads. Sorted CD4+ cells were cultivated with purified protein derivative from MAP (PPDj) or E. coli sonicate, IL-2, and IL-15. After two cultivation cycles, T cells were tested for recall responses in a proliferative T-cell assay. T-cell line responses were in...... antigens. T-cell lines were now generated by cultivating CD4+ cells with peptides instead of PPDj. Initially, both healthy and MAP-infected goats were vaccinated with 119 peptides defined by in silico analysis. Cellular responses to the peptides were not detected using standard IFN- γ plasma ELISA. However...

  3. Induction of Macrophage Function in Human THP-1 Cells is Associated with MAPK Signaling and Activation of MAP3K7 (TAK1 Protein Kinase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik eRichter

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages represent the primary human host response to pathogen infection and link the immediate defense to the adaptive immune system. Mature tissue macrophages convert from circulating monocyte precursor cells by terminal differentiation in a process that is not fully understood. Here, we analyzed the protein kinases of the human monocytic cell line THP-1 before and after induction of macrophage differentiation by using kinomics and phosphoproteomics. When comparing the macrophage-like state with the monocytic precursor, 50% of the kinome was altered in expression and even 71% of covered kinase phosphorylation sites were affected. Kinome rearrangements are for example characterized by a shift of overrepresented cycline-dependent kinases associated with cell cycle control in monocytes to calmodulin-dependent kinases and kinases involved in proinflammatory signaling. Eventually, we show that monocyte-to-macrophage differentiation is associated with major rewiring of mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling networks and demonstrate that protein kinase MAP3K7 (TAK1 acts as the key signaling hub in bacterial killing, chemokine production and differentiation. Our study proves the fundamental role of protein kinases and cellular signaling as major drivers of macrophage differentiation and function. The finding that MAP3K7 is central to macrophage function suggests MAP3K7 and its networking partners as promising targets in host-directed therapy for macrophage-associated disease.

  4. Mapping the stem cell state: eight novel human embryonic stem and embryonal carcinoma cell antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wright, A; Andrews, N; Bardsley, K;

    2011-01-01

    The antigenic profile of human embryonic stem (ES) and embryonal carcinoma (EC) cells has served as a key element of their characterization, with a common panel of surface and intracellular markers now widely used. Such markers have been used to identify cells within the 'undifferentiated state...... of reactivity for all antibodies against both ES and EC cells, suggesting that these markers will afford recognition of unique sub-states within the undifferentiated stem cell compartment.......', yet it appears that this categorization may be an oversimplification, because a number of sub-states appear to exist within this state. To increase the resolution of the undifferentiated state, we have generated eight novel monoclonal antibodies, all capable of recognizing undifferentiated human ES...

  5. Repeated Glucose Deprivation/Reperfusion Induced PC-12 Cell Death through the Involvement of FOXO Transcription Factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Na; Kim, You Jeong; Park, Su Min; Kim, Seung Man; Lee, Ji Suk; Jung, Hye Sook; Lee, Eun Ju; Kim, Tae Kyoon; Kim, Tae Nyun; Kwon, Min Jeong; Lee, Soon Hee; Rhee, Byoung Doo

    2016-01-01

    Background Cognitive impairment and brain damage in diabetes is suggested to be associated with hypoglycemia. The mechanisms of hypoglycemia-induced neural death and apoptosis are not clear and reperfusion injury may be involved. Recent studies show that glucose deprivation/reperfusion induced more neuronal cell death than glucose deprivation itself. The forkhead box O (FOXO) transcription factors are implicated in the regulation of cell apoptosis and survival, but their role in neuronal cells remains unclear. We examined the role of FOXO transcription factors and the involvement of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt and apoptosis-related signaling pathways in PC-12 cells exposed to repeated glucose deprivation/reperfusion. Methods PC-12 cells were exposed to control (Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Medium [DMEM] containing 25 mM glucose) or glucose deprivation/reperfusion (DMEM with 0 mM glucose for 6 hours and then DMEM with 25 mM glucose for 18 hours) for 5 days. MTT assay and Western blot analysis were performed for cell viability, apoptosis, and the expression of survival signaling pathways. FOXO3/4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole staining was done to ascertain the involvement of FOXO transcription factors in glucose deprivation/reperfusion conditions. Results Compared to PC-12 cells not exposed to hypoglycemia, cells exposed to glucose deprivation/reperfusion showed a reduction of cell viability, decreased expression of phosphorylated Akt and Bcl-2, and an increase of cleaved caspase-3 expression. Of note, FOXO3 protein was localized in the nuclei of glucose deprivation/reperfusion cells but not in the control cells. Conclusion Repeated glucose deprivation/reperfusion caused the neuronal cell death. Activated FOXO3 via the PI3K/Akt pathway in repeated glucose deprivation/reperfusion was involved in genes related to apoptosis.

  6. Label-free measuring and mapping of binding kinetics of membrane proteins in single living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Yang, Yunze; Wang, Shaopeng; Nagaraj, Vinay J.; Liu, Qiang; Wu, Jie; Tao, Nongjian

    2012-10-01

    Membrane proteins mediate a variety of cellular responses to extracellular signals. Although membrane proteins are studied intensively for their values as disease biomarkers and therapeutic targets, in situ investigation of the binding kinetics of membrane proteins with their ligands has been a challenge. Traditional approaches isolate membrane proteins and then study them ex situ, which does not reflect accurately their native structures and functions. We present a label-free plasmonic microscopy method to map the local binding kinetics of membrane proteins in their native environment. This analytical method can perform simultaneous plasmonic and fluorescence imaging, and thus make it possible to combine the strengths of both label-based and label-free techniques in one system. Using this method, we determined the distribution of membrane proteins on the surface of single cells and the local binding kinetic constants of different membrane proteins. Furthermore, we studied the polarization of the membrane proteins on the cell surface during chemotaxis.

  7. Genetic interaction maps in Escherichia coli reveal functional crosstalk among cell envelope biogenesis pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohan Babu

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available As the interface between a microbe and its environment, the bacterial cell envelope has broad biological and clinical significance. While numerous biosynthesis genes and pathways have been identified and studied in isolation, how these intersect functionally to ensure envelope integrity during adaptive responses to environmental challenge remains unclear. To this end, we performed high-density synthetic genetic screens to generate quantitative functional association maps encompassing virtually the entire cell envelope biosynthetic machinery of Escherichia coli under both auxotrophic (rich medium and prototrophic (minimal medium culture conditions. The differential patterns of genetic interactions detected among > 235,000 digenic mutant combinations tested reveal unexpected condition-specific functional crosstalk and genetic backup mechanisms that ensure stress-resistant envelope assembly and maintenance. These networks also provide insights into the global systems connectivity and dynamic functional reorganization of a universal bacterial structure that is both broadly conserved among eubacteria (including pathogens and an important target.

  8. The X-linked F cell production locus: Genetic mapping and role in fetal hemoglobin production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Y.C.; Smith, K.D.; Moore, R.D. [John Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Postnatal fetal hemoglobin (Hb F) production is confined to a subset of erythocytes termed F-cells. There is a 10-20 fold variation in F-cell production in sickle cell disease (SCD) and normal individuals. Most of the variation in F-cell production has been attributed to a diallelic (High, Low) X-linked gene, the F-cell production (FCP) locus that we recently mapped to Xp22.2-22.3 (LOD=4.56, theta=0.04). Using multiple regression analysis in 262 Jamaican SCD patients we determined the relative contribution of the FCP locus and other variables previously associated with variation in Hb F level (gender, age, beta-globin haplotypes, number of alpha-globin genes and the FCP locus phenotypes). When the FCP locus is in the regression model, the FCP locus alone accounts for approximately 40% of the variation in Hb F level while the contribution of age, alpha-globin gene number, and beta-globin haplotypes was insignificant. When individuals with High FCP allele are removed from the analysis, the beta globin haplotype now contribute to >10% of the Hb F variation. We conclude that the X-linked FCP locus is the major determinant of all known variables in Hb F production. Using 4 highly polymorphic dinucleotide repeat markers that we identified from cosmids in Xp22.2-22.3, have localized the FCP locus to a 1 Mb minimal candidate region between DXS143 and DXS410.

  9. Association Mapping of Cell Wall Synthesis Regulatory Genes and Cell Wall Quality in Switchgrass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartley, Laura [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States). Dept. of Microbiology and Plant Biology; Wu, Y. [Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States); Zhu, L. [Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States); Brummer, E. C. [Noble Foundation, Ardmore, OK (United States); Saha, M. [Noble Foundation, Ardmore, OK (United States)

    2016-05-31

    Inefficient conversion of biomass to biofuels is one of the main barriers for biofuel production from such materials. Approximately half of polysaccharides in biomass remain unused by typical biochemical conversion methods. Conversion efficiency is influenced by the composition and structure of cell walls of biomass. Grasses such as wheat, maize, and rice, as well as dedicated perennial bioenergy crops, like switchgrass, make up ~55% of biomass that can be produced in the United States. Grass cell walls have a different composition and patterning compared with dicotyledonous plants, including the well-studied model plant, Arabidopsis. This project identified genetic determinants of cell wall composition in grasses using both naturally occurring genetic variation of switchgrass and gene network reconstruction and functional assays in rice. In addition, the project linked functional data in rice and other species to switchgrass improvement efforts through curation of the most abundant class of regulators in the switchgrass genome. Characterizing natural diversity of switchgrass for variation in cell wall composition and properties, also known as quality, provides an unbiased avenue for identifying biologically viable diversity in switchgrass cell walls. To characterizing natural diversity, this project generated cell wall composition and enzymatic deconstruction data for ~450 genotypes of the Switchgrass Southern Association Collection (SSAC), a diverse collection composed of 36 switchgrass accessions from the southern U.S. distribution of switchgrass. Comparing these data with other measures of cell wall quality for the same samples demonstrated the complementary nature of the diverse characterization platforms now being used for biomass characterization. Association of the composition data with ~3.2K single nucleotide variant markers identified six significant single nucleotide variant markers co-associated with digestibility and another compositional trait. These

  10. Identification of Target Genes Involved in Wound Healing Angiogenesis of Endothelial Cells with the Treatment of a Chinese 2-Herb Formula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Jacqueline Chor Wing; Ko, Chun Hay; Koon, Chi Man; Cheng, Zhang; Lok, Wong Hing; Lau, Ching Po; Leung, Ping Chung; Fung, Kwok Pui; Chan, Wai Yee; Lau, Clara Bik San

    2015-01-01

    Angiogenesis is vitally important in diabetic wound healing. We had previously demonstrated that a Chinese 2-herb formula (NF3) significantly stimulated angiogenesis of HUVEC in wound healing. However, the molecular mechanism has not yet been elucidated. In line with this, global expression profiling of NF3-treated HUVEC was performed so as to assess the regulatory role of NF3 involved in the underlying signaling pathways in wound healing angiogenesis. The microarray results illustrated that different panels of differentially expressed genes were strictly governed in NF3-treated HUVEC in a time-regulated manner. The microarray analysis followed by qRT-PCR and western blotting verification of NF3-treated HUVEC at 6 h revealed the involvement of various genes in diverse biological process, e.g., MAP3K14 in anti-inflammation; SLC5A8 in anti-tumorogenesis; DNAJB7 in protein translation; BIRC5, EPCAM, INSL4, MMP8 and NPR3 in cell proliferation; CXCR7, EPCAM, HAND1 and MMP8 in migration; CXCR7, EPCAM and MMP8 in tubular formation; and BIRC5, CXCR7, EPCAM, HAND1, MMP8 and UBD in angiogenesis. After 16 h incubation of NF3, other sets of genes were shown with differential expression in HUVEC, e.g., IL1RAPL2 and NR1H4 in anti-inflammation; miR28 in anti-tumorogenesis; GRIN1 and LCN1 in anti-oxidation; EPB41 in intracellular signal transduction; PRL and TFAP2A in cell proliferation; miR28, PRL and SCG2 in cell migration; PRL in tubular formation; and miR28, NR1H4 and PRL in angiogenesis. This study provided concrete scientific evidence in support of the regulatory role of NF3 on endothelial cells involved in wound healing angiogenesis.

  11. Association Mapping of Cell Wall Synthesis Regulatory Genes and Cell Wall Quality in Switchgrass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartley, Laura [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States). Dept. of Microbiology and Plant Biology; Wu, Y. [Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States); Zhu, L. [Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States); Brummer, E. C. [Noble Foundation, Ardmore, OK (United States); Saha, M. [Noble Foundation, Ardmore, OK (United States)

    2016-05-31

    Inefficient conversion of biomass to biofuels is one of the main barriers for biofuel production from such materials. Approximately half of polysaccharides in biomass remain unused by typical biochemical conversion methods. Conversion efficiency is influenced by the composition and structure of cell walls of biomass. Grasses such as wheat, maize, and rice, as well as dedicated perennial bioenergy crops, like switchgrass, make up ~55% of biomass that can be produced in the United States. Grass cell walls have a different composition and patterning compared with dicotyledonous plants, including the well-studied model plant, Arabidopsis. This project identified genetic determinants of cell wall composition in grasses using both naturally occurring genetic variation of switchgrass and gene network reconstruction and functional assays in rice. In addition, the project linked functional data in rice and other species to switchgrass improvement efforts through curation of the most abundant class of regulators in the switchgrass genome. Characterizing natural diversity of switchgrass for variation in cell wall composition and properties, also known as quality, provides an unbiased avenue for identifying biologically viable diversity in switchgrass cell walls. To characterizing natural diversity, this project generated cell wall composition and enzymatic deconstruction data for ~450 genotypes of the Switchgrass Southern Association Collection (SSAC), a diverse collection composed of 36 switchgrass accessions from the southern U.S. distribution of switchgrass. Comparing these data with other measures of cell wall quality for the same samples demonstrated the complementary nature of the diverse characterization platforms now being used for biomass characterization. Association of the composition data with ~3.2K single nucleotide variant markers identified six significant single nucleotide variant markers co-associated with digestibility and another compositional trait. These

  12. Involvement of colicin in the limited protection of the colicin producing cells against bacteriophage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-Hui; Liao, Chen-Chung; Liang, Po-Huang; Yuan, Hanna S; Chak, Kin-Fu

    2004-05-21

    The restriction/modification system is considered to be the most common machinery of microorganisms for protection against bacteriophage infection. However, we found that mitomycin C induced Escherichia coli containing ColE7-K317 can confer limited protection against bacteriophage M13K07 and lambda infection. Our study showed that degree of protection is correlated with the expression level of the ColE7 operon, indicating that colicin E7 alone or the colicin E7-immunity protein complex is directly involved in this protection mechanism. It was also noted that the degree of protection is greater against the single-strand DNA bacteriophage M13K07 than the double-strand bacteriophage(lambda). Coincidently, the K(A) value of ColE7-Im either interacting with single-strand DNA (2.94x10(5)M(-1)) or double-strand DNA (1.75x10(5)M(-1)) reveals that the binding affinity of ColE7-Im with ssDNA is 1.68-fold stronger than that of the protein complex interacting with dsDNA. Interaction between colicin and the DNA may play a central role in this limited protection of the colicin-producing cell against bacteriophages. Based on these observations, we suggest that the colicin exporting pathway may interact to some extent with the bacteriophage infection pathway leading to a limited selective advantage for and limited protection of colicin-producing cells against different bacteriophages. PMID:15110756

  13. Cell adhesion molecules involved in the leukocyte recruitment induced by venom of the snake Bothrops jararaca

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella R. Zamuner

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown that Bothrops jararaca venom (BjV induces a significant leukocyte accumulation, mainly neutrophils, at the local of tissue damage. Therefore, the role of the adhesion molecules intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1, LECAM-1, CD18, leukocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1 and platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1 on the BjV-induced neutrophil accumulation and the correlation with release of LTB4, TXA2, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL-1 and IL-6 have been investigated. Anti-mouse LECAM-1, LFA-1, ICAM-1 and PECAM-1 monoclonal antibody injection resulted in a reduction of 42%, 80%, 66% and 67%, respectively, of neutrophil accumulation induced by BjV (250 μg/kg, intraperitoneal injection in male mice compared with isotype-matched control injected animals. The anti-mouse CD18 monoclonal antibody had no significant effect on venom-induced neutrophil accumulation. Concentrations of LTB4, TXA2, IL-6 and TNF-α were significant increased in the peritoneal exudates of animals injected with venom, whereas no increment in IL-1 was detected. This results suggest that ICAM-1, LECAM-1, LFA-1 and PECAM-1, but not CD18, adhesion molecules are involved in the recruitment of neutrophils into the inflammatory site induced by BjV. This is the first in vivo evidence that snake venom is able to up-regulate the expression of adhesion molecules by both leukocytes and endothelial cells. This venom effect may be indirect, probably through the release of the inflammatory mediators evidenced in the present study.

  14. Fine mapping of the 1q21 breakpoint of the papillary venal cell carcinoma-associated (X;1) translocation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weterman, MAJ; Dijkhuizen, T; vandenBerg, E; vanKessel, AG

    1996-01-01

    A combination of Southern blot analysis on a panel of tumor-derived somatic cell hybrids and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) techniques was used to map a series of DNA markers relative to the 1q21 breakpoint of the renal cell carcinoma (RCC)-associated (X;1)-(p11;q21) translocation. This b

  15. Combining Self-Organizing Mapping and Supervised Affinity Propagation Clustering Approach to Investigate Functional Brain Networks Involved in Motor Imagery and Execution with fMRI Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang eZhang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available AbstractClustering analysis methods have been widely applied to identifying the functional brain networks of a multitask paradigm. However, the previously used clustering analysis techniques are computationally expensive and thus impractical for clinical applications. In this study a novel method, called SOM-SAPC that combines self-organizing mapping (SOM and supervised affinity propagation clustering (SAPC, is proposed and implemented to identify the motor execution (ME and motor imagery (MI networks. In SOM-SAPC, SOM was first performed to process fMRI data and SAPC is further utilized for clustering the patterns of functional networks. As a result, SOM-SAPC is able to significantly reduce the computational cost for brain network analysis. Simulation and clinical tests involving ME and MI were conducted based on SOM-SAPC, and the analysis results indicated that functional brain networks were clearly identified with different response patterns and reduced computational cost. In particular, three activation clusters were clearly revealed, which include parts of the visual, ME and MI functional networks. These findings validated that SOM-SAPC is an effective and robust method to analyze the fMRI data with multitasks.

  16. The Secretome of Endothelial Progenitor Cells Promotes Brain Endothelial Cell Activity through PI3-Kinase and MAP-Kinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Santo, Stefano; Seiler, Stefanie; Fuchs, Anna-Lena; Staudigl, Jennifer; Widmer, Hans Rudolf

    2014-01-01

    Background Angiogenesis and vascular remodelling are crucial events in tissue repair mechanisms promoted by cell transplantation. Current evidence underscores the importance of the soluble factors secreted by stem cells in tissue regeneration. In the present study we investigated the effects of paracrine factors derived from cultured endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) on rat brain endothelial cell properties and addressed the signaling pathways involved. Methods Endothelial cells derived from rat brain (rBCEC4) were incubated with EPC-derived conditioned medium (EPC-CM). The angiogenic response of rBCEC4 to EPC-CM was assessed as effect on cell number, migration and tubular network formation. In addition, we have compared the outcome of the in vitro experiments with the effects on capillary sprouting from rat aortic rings. The specific PI3K/AKT inhibitor LY294002 and the MEK/ERK inhibitor PD98059 were used to study the involvement of these two signaling pathways in the transduction of the angiogenic effects of EPC-CM. Results Viable cell number, migration and tubule network formation were significantly augmented upon incubation with EPC-CM. Similar findings were observed for aortic ring outgrowth with significantly longer sprouts. The EPC-CM-induced activities were significantly reduced by the blockage of the PI3K/AKT and MEK/ERK signaling pathways. Similarly to the outcome of the rBCEC4 experiments, inhibition of the PI3K/AKT and MEK/ERK pathways significantly interfered with capillary sprouting induced by EPC-CM. Conclusion The present study demonstrates that EPC-derived paracrine factors substantially promote the angiogenic response of brain microvascular endothelial cells. In addition, our findings identified the PI3K/AKT and MEK/ERK pathways to play a central role in mediating these effects. PMID:24755675

  17. Identification of a Novel Nucleus Protein Involved in the Regulation of Urokinase in 95D Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang TONG; Li TAN; Ping LI; Yun-Song ZHU

    2005-01-01

    The urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) plays an important role in cellular invasion.By using the downstream part of a 74 bp DNA region called the cooperation mediator (COM) of the uPA promoter as a bait sequence in the yeast one-hybrid screen, a gene called PBK1 was previously cloned from the cDNA library of the 95D lung cancer cell strain. In this study, the intracellular distribution of PBK1 was studied by using the transient transfection of pEGFP-C3-PBK1, and PBK1 was found to be localized in the nucleus. Co-transfection of pEGFP-C3-PBK1 and the deletion mutants of the pGL3-uPA promoter indicated that PBK1 can increase the uPA promoter activity by about 25% and this effect is uPA enhancer-dependent.Western blotting and Enzyme-linked immunoadsordent assay further confirmed that PBK1 can upregulate the expression of uPA. Our results suggest that PBK1 is involved in the regulation of uPA expression, which might provide a new clue to further understanding the regulation mechanism of uPA expression.

  18. Image findings and bone metabolic markers of bone involvement by oral squamous cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kameta, Ayako; Tsuchimochi, Makoto; Harada, Mikiko; Katada, Tsutomu; Sasaki, Yoshihiko; Hayama, Kazuhide [Nippon Dental Univ. (Japan). School of Dentistry at Niigata

    2000-01-01

    Recently it has been reported that the circulating pyridinoline cross-linked carboxyl-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP) and carboxyl-terminal propeptide of type I procollagen (PICP) are useful markers for detecting metastasis of malignancies to bone. Since ICTP and PICP are related to collagen metabolism, respectively breaking down and synthesizing type I collagen, elevated blood concentrations of these markers may reflect direct jaw bone destruction by oral cancer. The purpose of this study was to clarify the relationship between serum ICTP and PICP levels and bone invasion associated with oral cancer. Bone invasion was evaluated in 41 patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) by panoramic radiography and {sup 99m}Tc-methylene diphosphonate (MDP) scintigraphy. We also assayed serum levels of parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) and compared them with concentrations of bone metabolic markers and imaging findings. There was no significant relationship between serum ICTP and PICP levels and bone invasion. However, in three of the five cases that showed remarkably high serum ICTP levels, {sup 99m}Tc-MDP uptake in the lesion was intensely increased. This suggests that serum ICTP levels may be elevated when bone metabolic changes caused by cancer involving the bone are extensive. We could find no significant correlation among serum levels of ICTP, PICP, and PTHrP. ICTP and PICP do not appear to be good indicators of direct bone invasion by oral SCC in early stages. (author)

  19. Secondary Involvement of the Mandible due to Basal Cell Carcinoma: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pegah Mosannen Mozaffary

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Basal cell carcinoma (BCC is the most common cutaneous malignancy among Caucasians. Rare examples of aggressive and neglected BCC have been reported. Here we report a unique case of a neglected BCC with significant jaw involvement. A 50-year-old female, referred by an otorhinologist, presented with a large ulcer on her chin, which was extended to her mandibular vestibule. The ulcer was 9×5.5 cm in size, and tissue destruction, necrosis was observed in the central portion, and the mandibular bone was exposed. On intraoral examination, tooth mobility and severe bone loss were evident. Due to the primary cutaneous origin of the lesion, BCC was considered as preliminary diagnosis. Biopsy was performed and diagnosis of BCC was confirmed. The diseased mandibular bone was resected and reconstructed with a surgical plate. The soft tissue defect was reconstructed with deltopectoral flap. The patient refused secondary stage plastic surgery. Although BCC is not a lethal malignancy, if left untreated and neglected, it can result in severe destruction, disfigurement, and even mortality.

  20. Hypoxic preconditioning involves system Xc- regulation in mouse neural stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Brian; Clarke, Melinda; Francillion, Ludwig; Kindred, Elijah; Hopkins, Elana Shuford; Sontheimer, Harald

    2012-03-01

    In animals, hypoxic preconditioning has been used as a form of neuroprotection. The exact mechanism involved in neuroprotective hypoxic preconditioning has not been described, yet could be valuable for possible neuroprotective strategies. The overexpression of the cystine-glutamate exchanger, system Xc-, has been demonstrated as being neuroprotective (Shih, Erb et al. 2006). Here, using immunohistochemistry, we demonstrate that C57BL/6 mice exposed to hypoxia showed an increase in system Xc- expression, with the highest level of intensity in the hippocampus. Western Blot analysis also showed an almost 2-fold increase in system Xc- protein in hypoxia-exposed versus control mice. The mRNA for the regulatory subunit of system Xc-, xCT, and the xCT/actin ratio were also increased under hypoxic conditions. Experiments using hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1α) siRNA showed a statistically significant decrease in HIF-1α and system Xc- expression. Under hypoxic conditions, system Xc- activity, as determined by cystine uptake, increased 2-fold. Importantly, hypoxic preconditioning was attenuated in neural stem cells by pharmacological inhibition of system Xc- activity with S4-carboxyphenylglycine. These data provide the first evidence of hypoxic regulation of the cystine glutamate exchanger system Xc-.

  1. Combining RNA interference and kinase inhibitors against cell signalling components involved in cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanson Bonnie J

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The transcription factor activator protein-1 (AP-1 has been implicated in a large variety of biological processes including oncogenic transformation. The tyrosine kinases of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR constitute the beginning of one signal transduction cascade leading to AP-1 activation and are known to control cell proliferation and differentiation. Drug discovery efforts targeting this receptor and other pathway components have centred on monoclonal antibodies and small molecule inhibitors. Resistance to such inhibitors has already been observed, guiding the prediction of their use in combination therapies with other targeted agents such as RNA interference (RNAi. This study examines the use of RNAi and kinase inhibitors for qualification of components involved in the EGFR/AP-1 pathway of ME180 cells, and their inhibitory effects when evaluated individually or in tandem against multiple components of this important disease-related pathway. Methods AP-1 activation was assessed using an ME180 cell line stably transfected with a beta-lactamase reporter gene under the control of AP-1 response element following epidermal growth factor (EGF stimulation. Immunocytochemistry allowed for further quantification of small molecule inhibition on a cellular protein level. RNAi and RT-qPCR experiments were performed to assess the amount of knockdown on an mRNA level, and immunocytochemistry was used to reveal cellular protein levels for the targeted pathway components. Results Increased potency of kinase inhibitors was shown by combining RNAi directed towards EGFR and small molecule inhibitors acting at proximal or distal points in the pathway. After cellular stimulation with EGF and analysis at the level of AP-1 activation using a β-lactamase reporter gene, a 10–12 fold shift or 2.5–3 fold shift toward greater potency in the IC50 was observed for EGFR and MEK-1 inhibitors, respectively, in the presence of RNAi

  2. Involvement of aquaporin-3 in epidermal growth factor receptor signaling via hydrogen peroxide transport in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara-Chikuma, Mariko; Watanabe, Sachiko; Satooka, Hiroki

    2016-03-18

    Aquaporin 3 (AQP3), a water/glycerol channel protein, is capable of transporting hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Here, we show that AQP3-mediated intracellular H2O2 is involved in epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced cell signaling and its dependent cell function in the EGF receptor (EGFR)-positive cancer cell lines A431 and H1666. AQP3 knockdown suppressed the transport into the cells of extracellular H2O2 produced in response to EGF in A431 and H1666 cells. EGF-induced Erk and Akt activation, which occurred through SHP2 and/or PTEN modulation, was impaired by AQP3 knockdown. Cell growth and migration induced by EGF stimulation were attenuated in AQP3 knockdown cells compared with those in control cells. Coincidentally, tumor growth of A431 cell xenografts in immunodeficient mice was decreased by AQP3 knockdown. Accordingly, a xenograft with AQP3 knockdown A431 cells significantly enhanced the survival of recipient mice compared with the transplantation with control cells. In addition, AQP3 associated with EGFR and NADPH oxidase 2, which we propose is linked to AQP3 producing a localized increase in intracellular H2O2 to function as a second messenger during EGFR cell signaling. Therefore, our findings suggest that AQP3 is required for EGF-EGFR cell signaling in cancer cells and is a therapeutic target for cancer progression.

  3. Fixed points, periodic points, and coin-tossing sequences for mappings defined on two-dimensional cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zanolin Fabio

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose, in the general setting of topological spaces, a definition of two-dimensional oriented cell and consider maps which possess a property of stretching along the paths with respect to oriented cells. For these maps, we prove some theorems on the existence of fixed points, periodic points, and sequences of iterates which are chaotic in a suitable manner. Our results, motivated by the study of the Poincaré map associated to some nonlinear Hill's equations, extend and improve some recent work. The proofs are elementary in the sense that only well known properties of planar sets and maps and a two-dimensional equivalent version of the Brouwer fixed point theorem are used.

  4. Fixed points, periodic points, and coin-tossing sequences for mappings defined on two-dimensional cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Zanolin

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available We propose, in the general setting of topological spaces, a definition of two-dimensional oriented cell and consider maps which possess a property of stretching along the paths with respect to oriented cells. For these maps, we prove some theorems on the existence of fixed points, periodic points, and sequences of iterates which are chaotic in a suitable manner. Our results, motivated by the study of the Poincaré map associated to some nonlinear Hill's equations, extend and improve some recent work. The proofs are elementary in the sense that only well known properties of planar sets and maps and a two-dimensional equivalent version of the Brouwer fixed point theorem are used.

  5. Cell-permeable p38 MAP kinase promotes migration of adult neural stem/progenitor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamanoue, Makoto; Morioka, Kazuhito; Ohsawa, Ikuroh; Ohsawa, Keiko; Kobayashi, Masaaki; Tsuburaya, Kayo; Akasaka, Yoshikiyo; Mikami, Tetsuo; Ogata, Toru; Takamatsu, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Endogenous neural stem/progenitor cells (NPCs) can migrate toward sites of injury, but the migration activity of NPCs is insufficient to regenerate damaged brain tissue. In this study, we showed that p38 MAP kinase (p38) is expressed in doublecortin-positive adult NPCs. Experiments using the p38 inhibitor SB203580 revealed that endogenous p38 participates in NPC migration. To enhance NPC migration, we generated a cell-permeable wild-type p38 protein (PTD-p38WT) in which the HIV protein transduction domain (PTD) was fused to the N-terminus of p38. Treatment with PTD-p38WT significantly promoted the random migration of adult NPCs without affecting cell survival or differentiation; this effect depended on the cell permeability and kinase activity of the fusion protein. These findings indicate that PTD-p38WT is a novel and useful tool for unraveling the roles of p38, and that this protein provides a reasonable approach for regenerating the injured brain by enhancing NPC migration. PMID:27067799

  6. Half-cell potential mapping to assess repair work on RC structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elsener, B. [Cagliari Univ., Dept. of Materials Science (Italy)

    2000-07-01

    Results on the successful use and on the limitations of half-cell potential mapping as an assessment technique after completion of repair work on a concrete structure are reviewed. Examples of repair discussed include traditional repair, electrochemical chloride removal, electrochemical realkalization and the application of surface applied corrosion inhibitors. Results indicate that half-cell potential measurements after traditional repair work or electrochemical chloride removal provide direct evidence of repassivation of the rebars when performed several weeks after the repair work (readings during the first few days after repair tend to show very negative potentials). Special attention must be given to the use of polymer-modified mortars when used in surface treatment of rebars; half-cell potential could remain permanently negative due to restricted oxygen access. Half-cell potential measurements are not considered effective in measuring the efficiency and durability of surface applied corrosion inhibitors due to pore solution pH and composition, and the mostly unknown mechanism of action of inhibitor blends. 18 refs., 8 figs.

  7. Current Density Distribution Mapping in PEM Fuel Cells as An Instrument for Operational Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Geske

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available A newly developed measurement system for current density distribution mapping has enabled a new approach for operational measurements in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC. Taking into account previously constructed measurement systems, a method based on a multi layer printed circuit board was chosen for the development of the new system. This type of system consists of a sensor, a special electronic device and the control and visualization PC. For the acquisition of the current density distribution values, a sensor device was designed and installed within a multilayer printed circuit board with integrated shunt resistors. Varying shunt values can be taken into consideration with a newly developed and evaluated calibration method. The sensor device was integrated in a PEM fuel cell stack to prove the functionality of the whole measurement system. A software application was implemented to visualize and save the measurement values. Its functionality was verified by operational measurements within a PEMFC system. Measurement accuracy and possible negative reactions of the sensor device during PEMFC operation are discussed in detail in this paper. The developed system enables operational measurements for different operating phases of PEM fuel cells. Additionally, this can be seen as a basis for new opportunities of optimization for fuel cell design and operation modes.

  8. Precision mapping of the human O-GalNAc glycoproteome through SimpleCell technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steentoft, Catharina; Vakhrushev, Sergey Y; Joshi, Hiren J; Kong, Yun; Vester-Christensen, Malene B; Schjoldager, Katrine T-B G; Lavrsen, Kirstine; Dabelsteen, Sally; Pedersen, Nis B; Marcos-Silva, Lara; Gupta, Ramneek; Bennett, Eric Paul; Mandel, Ulla; Brunak, Søren; Wandall, Hans H; Levery, Steven B; Clausen, Henrik

    2013-05-15

    Glycosylation is the most abundant and diverse posttranslational modification of proteins. While several types of glycosylation can be predicted by the protein sequence context, and substantial knowledge of these glycoproteomes is available, our knowledge of the GalNAc-type O-glycosylation is highly limited. This type of glycosylation is unique in being regulated by 20 polypeptide GalNAc-transferases attaching the initiating GalNAc monosaccharides to Ser and Thr (and likely some Tyr) residues. We have developed a genetic engineering approach using human cell lines to simplify O-glycosylation (SimpleCells) that enables proteome-wide discovery of O-glycan sites using 'bottom-up' ETD-based mass spectrometric analysis. We implemented this on 12 human cell lines from different organs, and present a first map of the human O-glycoproteome with almost 3000 glycosites in over 600 O-glycoproteins as well as an improved NetOGlyc4.0 model for prediction of O-glycosylation. The finding of unique subsets of O-glycoproteins in each cell line provides evidence that the O-glycoproteome is differentially regulated and dynamic. The greatly expanded view of the O-glycoproteome should facilitate the exploration of how site-specific O-glycosylation regulates protein function.

  9. Energy Management Strategies based on efficiency map for Fuel Cell Hybrid Vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feroldi, Diego; Serra, Maria; Riera, Jordi [Institut de Robotica i Informatica Industrial (CSIC-UPC), C. Llorens i Artigas 4, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2009-05-15

    The addition of a fast auxiliary power source like a supercapacitor bank in fuel cell-based vehicles has a great potential because permits a significant reduction of the hydrogen consumption and an improvement of the vehicle efficiency. The Energy Management Strategies, commanding the power split between the power sources in the hybrid arrangement to fulfil the power requirement, perform a fundamental role to achieve this objective. In this work, three strategies based on the knowledge of the fuel cell efficiency map are proposed. These strategies are attractive due to the relative simplicity of the real time implementation and the good performance. The strategies are tested both in a simulation environment and in an experimental setup using a 1.2-kW PEM fuel cell. The results, in terms of hydrogen consumption, are compared with an optimal case, which is assessed trough an advantageous technique also introduced in this work and with a pure fuel cell vehicle as well. This comparative reveals high efficiency and good performance, allowing to save up to 26% of hydrogen in urban scenarios. (author)

  10. Experimental and numerical studies of local current mapping on a PEM fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwnag, J.J. [Department of Environment and Energy, National University of Tainan, Tainan 700 (China); Chang, W.R. [Department of Landscape Architecture, Chung-Hua University, Hsinchu 300 (China); Peng, R.G. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Chiao Tong University, Hsinchu 300 (China); Chen, P.Y. [Department of Power Mechanical Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 300 (China); Su, A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Fuel Cell Center, Yuan Ze University, Taoyuan (China)

    2008-10-15

    Local current distribution on a PEM fuel cell has been mapped experimentally by using a special-designed single cell fixture. It is composed of a composite cathodic flow-field plate, a membrane electrode assembly (MEA) and a stainless-steel anodic flow-field plate. An array of 16 individual conductive segments was distributed on the composite plate. A self-made MEA is in direct contact with the segmented current collectors. Regional-averaged current through each segment is determined by using the Hall-effect sensor. To ensure the data reliability, a comparison of polarization curves was made between the composite flow-field plate and the conventional flow-field plate. Then, the effects of flow-field patterns, dew points of the cathodic feedings and cathodic stoichiometrics on the local current distribution were examined. The transient variation of the local current distribution on the cathode under supersaturated conditions was further visualized to illustrate the flooding phenomena in different flow patterns. This technique developed by the present work has contributed to knowledge and understanding the local current distributions in a PEM fuel cell that is helpful in designing the fuel-cell components. (author)

  11. Combinatory action of VEGFR2 and MAP kinase pathways maintains endothelial-cell integrity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hanbing Zhong; Danyang Wang; Nan Wang; Yesenia Rios; Haigen Huang; Song Li; Xinrong Wu; Shuo Lin

    2011-01-01

    Blood vessels normally maintain stereotyped lumen diameters and their stable structures are crucial for vascular function. However, very little is known about the molecular mechanisms controlling the maintenance of vessel diameters and the integrity of endothelial cells. We investigated this issue in zebrafish embryos by a chemical genetics approach. Small molecule libraries were screened using live Tg(kdrl:GRCFP)zn1 transgenic embryos in which endothelial cells are specifically labeled with GFP. By analyzing the effects of compounds on the morphology and function of embryonic blood vessels after lumen formation, PP1, a putative Src kinase inhibitor, was identified as capable of specifically reducing vascular lumen size by interrupting endothelial-cell integrity. The inhibitory effect is not due to Src or general VEGF signaling inhibition because another Src inhibitor and Src morpholino as well as several VEGFR inhibitors failed to produce a similar phenotype. After profiling a panel of 22 representative mammalian kinases and surveying published data, we selected a few possible new candidates. Combinational analysis of these candidate kinase inhibitors established that PP1 induced endothelial collapse by inhibiting both the VEGFR2 and MAP kinase pathways. More importantly, combinatory use of two clinically approved drugs Dasatinib and Sunitinib produced the same phenotype. This is the first study to elucidate the pathways controlling maintenance of endothelial integrity using a chemical genetics approach, indicating that endothelial integrity is controlled by the combined action of the VEGFR2 and MAP kinase pathways. Our results also suggest the possible side effect of the combination of two anticancer drugs on the circulatory system.

  12. Mechanisms of cell signaling by nitric oxide and peroxynitrite: from mitochondria to MAP kinases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levonen, A. L.; Patel, R. P.; Brookes, P.; Go, Y. M.; Jo, H.; Parthasarathy, S.; Anderson, P. G.; Darley-Usmar, V. M.

    2001-01-01

    Many of the biological and pathological effects of nitric oxide (NO) are mediated through cell signaling pathways that are initiated by NO reacting with metalloproteins. More recently, it has been recognized that the reaction of NO with free radicals such as superoxide and the lipid peroxyl radical also has the potential to modulate redox signaling. Although it is clear that NO can exert both cytotoxic and cytoprotective actions, the focus of this overview are those reactions that could lead to protection of the cell against oxidative stress in the vasculature. This will include the induction of antioxidant defenses such as glutathione, activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases in response to blood flow, and modulation of mitochondrial function and its impact on apoptosis. Models are presented that show the increased synthesis of glutathione in response to shear stress and inhibition of cytochrome c release from mitochondria. It appears that in the vasculature NO-dependent signaling pathways are of three types: (i) those involving NO itself, leading to modulation of mitochondrial respiration and soluble guanylate cyclase; (ii) those that involve S-nitrosation, including inhibition of caspases; and (iii) autocrine signaling that involves the intracellular formation of peroxynitrite and the activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinases. Taken together, NO plays a major role in the modulation of redox cell signaling through a number of distinct pathways in a cellular setting.

  13. Cell density-dependent nuclear accumulation of ELK3 is involved in suppression of PAI-1 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Shu; Nakao, Kazuyuki; Sekimoto, Toshihiro; Oka, Masahiro; Yoneda, Yoshihiro

    2013-07-01

    Cell-cell contact regulates the proliferation and differentiation of non-transformed cells, e.g., NIH/3T3 cells show growth arrest at high cell density. However, only a few reports described the dynamic behavior of transcription factors involved in this process. In this study, we showed that the mRNA levels of plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) decreased drastically at high cell density, and that ELK3, a member of the Ets transcription factor family, repressed PAI-1 expression. We also demonstrated that while ELK3 was distributed evenly throughout the cell at low cell density, it accumulated in the nucleus at high cell density, and that binding of DNA by ELK3 at the A domain facilitated its nuclear accumulation. Furthermore, we found that ETS1, a PAI-1 activator, occupied the ELK3-binding site within the PAI-1 promoter at low cell density, while it was released at high cell density. These results suggest that at high cell density, the switching of binding of transcription factors from ETS1 to ELK3 occurs at a specific binding site of the PAI-1 promoter, leading to the cell-density dependent suppression of PAI-1 expression. PMID:23708702

  14. Orbital involvement by basal cell carcinomas: computed tomography study; Comprometimento orbitario por carcinomas basocelulares: estudo por tomografia computadorizada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baptista, Ana Celia [Hospital Universitario Clementino Fraga Filho, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Radiologia; Marchiori, Edson [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Radiologia]. E-mail: edmarchiori@zipmail.com.br; Boasquevisque, Edson [Universidade do Estado, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas; Cabral, Carlos Eduardo Lassance [Instituto Nacional do Cancer, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Hospital do Cancer; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Pires [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina

    2003-03-01

    Basal cell carcinomas of the skin and subcutaneous tissue of the face can spread into to orbit directly through the anterior orbit. Nine patients with radiological evidence of orbital involvement by basal cell carcinoma were studied with computed tomography. None of the patients had any previous treatment of the tumor. Ulcerated lesion of the eyelid was the most common sign of the disease (67%) whereas the inferior eyelid was the most frequent site of origin of the neoplasm (44%). All carcinomas extended into the orbit through the anterior orbit, involving mainly the extraconal space (89%). The orbital regions most frequently involved were the anterior, medial and superior compartments. Orbital extension of these carcinomas can result in orbital exenteration. Computed tomography is a valuable method for evaluating tumoral extension into the orbit and should be done when there is clinical suspicion of orbital involvement. (author)

  15. Involvement of the H1 histamine receptor, p38 MAP kinase, MLCK, and Rho/ROCK in histamine-induced endothelial barrier dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adderley, Shaquria P.; Zhang, Xun E.; Breslin, Jerome W.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The mechanisms by which histamine increases microvascular permeability remain poorly understood. We tested the hypothesis that H1 receptor activation disrupts the endothelial barrier and investigated potential downstream signals. Methods We used confluent endothelial cell (EC) monolayers, assessing transendothelial electrical resistance (TER) as an index of barrier function. Human umbilical vein EC (HUVEC), cardiac microvascular EC (HCMEC), and dermal microvascular EC (HDMEC) were compared. Receptor expression was investigated using Western blotting, immunofluorescence (IF) confocal microscopy and RT-PCR. Receptor function and downstream signaling pathways were tested using pharmacologic antagonists and inhibitors, respectively. Results We identified H1-H4 receptors on all three EC types. H1 antagonists did not affect basal TER but prevented the histamine-induced decrease in TER. Blockade of H2 or H3 attenuated the histamine response only in HDMEC, while inhibition of H4 attenuated the response only in HUVEC. Combined inhibition of both PKC and PI3K caused exaggerated histamine-induced barrier dysfunction in HDMEC, whereas inhibition of p38 MAP kinase attenuated the histamine response in all three EC types. Inhibition of RhoA, ROCK, or MLCK also prevented the histamine-induced decrease in TER in HDMEC. Conclusion The data suggest that multiple signaling pathways contribute to histamine-induced endothelial barrier dysfunction via the H1 receptor. PMID:25582918

  16. Human amniotic fluid stem cells as a model for functional studies of genes involved in human genetic diseases or oncogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, Margit; Dolznig, Helmut; Schipany, Katharina; Mikula, Mario; Brandau, Oliver; Hengstschläger, Markus

    2011-09-01

    Besides their putative usage for therapies, stem cells are a promising tool for functional studies of genes involved in human genetic diseases or oncogenesis. For this purpose induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells can be derived from patients harbouring specific mutations. In contrast to adult stem cells, iPS cells are pluripotent and can efficiently be grown in culture. However, iPS cells are modulated due to the ectopic induction of pluripotency, harbour other somatic mutations accumulated during the life span of the source cells, exhibit only imperfectly cleared epigenetic memory of the source cell, and are often genomically instable. In addition, iPS cells from patients only allow the investigation of mutations, which are not prenatally lethal. Embryonic stem (ES) cells have a high proliferation and differentiation potential, but raise ethical issues. Human embryos, which are not transferred in the course of in vitro fertilization, because of preimplantation genetic diagnosis of a genetic defect, are still rarely donated for the establishment of ES cell lines. In addition, their usage for studies on gene functions for oncogenesis is hampered by the fact the ES cells are already tumorigenic per se. In 2003 amniotic fluid stem (AFS) cells have been discovered, which meanwhile have been demonstrated to harbour the potential to differentiate into cells of all three germ layers. Monoclonal human AFS cell lines derived from amniocenteses have a high proliferative potential, are genomically stable and are not associated with ethical controversies. Worldwide amniocenteses are performed for routine human genetic diagnosis. We here discuss how generation and banking of monoclonal human AFS cell lines with specific chromosomal aberrations or monogenic disease mutations would allow to study the functional consequences of disease causing mutations. In addition, recently a protocol for efficient and highly reproducible siRNA-mediated long-term knockdown of endogenous gene

  17. Bowel perforation from occult ileal involvement after diagnosis in a case of primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Philippis, Chiara; Di Chio, Maria Chiara; Sabattini, Elena; Bolli, Niccolo

    2016-01-01

    Primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma (PMBCL) is confined to the mediastinum or contiguous nodal areas in most cases. Extramediastinal and abdominal involvement, especially at diagnosis, is extremely rare. Our case describes the first case of histologically proven ileal involvement of PMBCL at diagnosis that led to ileal perforation. Positron emission tomography CT could increase the sensitivity of staging by detecting unusual sites of disease localisation, and could impact clinical management. PMID:27417993

  18. MicroRNAs Involved in Asthma After Mesenchymal Stem Cells Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Guan-Nan; Li, Cheng-Lin; Yao, Yin; Xu, Zhi-Bin; Deng, Meng-Xia; Wang, Shu-Yue; Sun, Yue-Qi; Shi, Jian-Bo

    2016-01-01

    Administration of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) significantly alleviates allergic airway inflammation. There are no studies that refer to the role of microRNAs (miRNAs) after the BM-MSCs treatment in airway allergic inflammation. We induced a mouse model of asthma and performed the transplantation of BM-MSCs. We analyzed aberrant miRNAs and key immune regulators using both miRNA and messenger RNA (mRNA) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) arrays. We identified that 296 miRNAs were differently expressed after the induction of asthma and/or the treatment of BM-MSCs, in which 14 miRNAs presented the reverse variation tendency between asthma induction and BM-MSCs transplantation. Mmu-miR-21a-3p, mmu-miR-449c-5p, and mmu-miR-496a-3p were further confirmed to be differently expressed with additional samples and quantitative real-time PCR. With an mRNA PCR array, we identified 19 genes to be involved in the allergy induction and the administration of BM-MSCs. Further target genes analysis revealed that mmu-miR-21a-3p was significantly correlated with the immune regulator activin A receptor, Type IIA (Acvr2a). Mmu-miR-21a-3p had opposite expression with Acvr2a after asthma and BM-MSCs treatment. Acvr2a had binding sites for miR-21a for both mice and human, suggesting that miR-21/Acvr2a axis is conserved between human and mice. Dual-luciferase reporter assay showed that mmu-miR-21a-3p negatively regulated the transcript of Acvr2a. In addition, has-miR-21a inhibitor significantly increased the expression of Acvr2a mRNA in BEAS-2B cells under lipopolysaccharide stimulation. Our results suggest that there were different miRNA and mRNA profiles after asthma induction and BM-MSCs treatment, and the miR-21/Acvr2a axis is an important mechanism for the induction of asthmatic inflammation. PMID:27106170

  19. MicroRNAs Involved in Asthma After Mesenchymal Stem Cells Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Guan-Nan; Li, Cheng-Lin; Yao, Yin; Xu, Zhi-Bin; Deng, Meng-Xia; Wang, Shu-Yue; Sun, Yue-Qi; Shi, Jian-Bo; Fu, Qing-Ling

    2016-06-15

    Administration of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) significantly alleviates allergic airway inflammation. There are no studies that refer to the role of microRNAs (miRNAs) after the BM-MSCs treatment in airway allergic inflammation. We induced a mouse model of asthma and performed the transplantation of BM-MSCs. We analyzed aberrant miRNAs and key immune regulators using both miRNA and messenger RNA (mRNA) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) arrays. We identified that 296 miRNAs were differently expressed after the induction of asthma and/or the treatment of BM-MSCs, in which 14 miRNAs presented the reverse variation tendency between asthma induction and BM-MSCs transplantation. Mmu-miR-21a-3p, mmu-miR-449c-5p, and mmu-miR-496a-3p were further confirmed to be differently expressed with additional samples and quantitative real-time PCR. With an mRNA PCR array, we identified 19 genes to be involved in the allergy induction and the administration of BM-MSCs. Further target genes analysis revealed that mmu-miR-21a-3p was significantly correlated with the immune regulator activin A receptor, Type IIA (Acvr2a). Mmu-miR-21a-3p had opposite expression with Acvr2a after asthma and BM-MSCs treatment. Acvr2a had binding sites for miR-21a for both mice and human, suggesting that miR-21/Acvr2a axis is conserved between human and mice. Dual-luciferase reporter assay showed that mmu-miR-21a-3p negatively regulated the transcript of Acvr2a. In addition, has-miR-21a inhibitor significantly increased the expression of Acvr2a mRNA in BEAS-2B cells under lipopolysaccharide stimulation. Our results suggest that there were different miRNA and mRNA profiles after asthma induction and BM-MSCs treatment, and the miR-21/Acvr2a axis is an important mechanism for the induction of asthmatic inflammation. PMID:27106170

  20. Central Nervous System Involvement of T-cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia Diagnosed with Stereotactic Brain Biopsy: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selçuk Göçmen

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Prolymphocytic leukemia (PLL is a generalized malignancy of the lymphoid tissue characterized by the accumulation of monoclonal lymphocytes, usually of B cell type. Involvement of the central nervous system (CNS is an extremely rare complication of T-cell prolymphocytic leukemia (T-PLL. We describe a case of T-PLL presenting with symptomatic infiltration of the brain that was histopathologically proven by stereotactic brain biopsy. We emphasize the importance of rapid diagnosis and immediate treatment for patients presenting with CNS involvement and a history of leukemia or lymphoma.

  1. Intraoperative radioisotope sentinel lymph node mapping in non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugi, Kazuro; Sudou, Manabu [National Sanyo Hospital, Ube, Yamaguchi (Japan); Kaneda, Yoshikazu; Hamano, Kimikazu [Yamaguchi Univ., Ube (Japan). School of Medicine

    2003-05-01

    We performed intraoperative Technetium (Tc) 99m sentinel lymph node (SN) mapping in patients with clinical T1N0M0 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Twenty patients with clinical T1N0M0 NSCLC were enrolled. Before thoracotomy, the primary tumor was injected with 2 mCi Tc-99m. After dissection, scintigraphic readings of lymph nodes were obtained ex vivo with a handheld gamma counter. The migration of the Tc solution was considered successful if any node registered five times or more count comared with background values. If lymph nodes were found to have the highest or more than 50% of the highest counts and measurements were greater than five times the intrathoracic background, those nodes were classified as sentinel nodes. Four of the 20 patients did not have NSCLC and were excluded. Eleven patients (68.8%) had SNs identified. No inaccurately identified SNs were encountered. Intraoperative SN mapping with Tc-99m is an accurate way to identify the first site of potential nodal metastases of NSCLC. Several technical problems still remain unresolved in this method, however. (author)

  2. Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis of the Thyroid with Multiple Cervical Lymph Node Involvement Accompanying Metastatic Thyroid Papillary Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceyran, A. Bahar; Şenol, Serkan; Bayraktar, Barış; Özkanlı, Şeyma; Cinel, Z. Leyla; Aydın, Abdullah

    2014-01-01

    A 37-year-old male case was admitted with goiter. Ultrasonography of thyroid showed a 5 cm cystic nodule in the left lobe with a 1.5 cm solid component. Fine needle aspiration biopsy revealed atypia of undetermined significance or follicular lesion. The patient was operated on. The pathological diagnosis was reported as papillary thyroid carcinoma. The immunohistochemical examination showed multiple foci of Langerhans cell histiocytosis involving both lobes. The patient died due to cardiac arrest with respiratory causes in the early postoperative period. Langerhans cell histiocytosis is a rare primary condition which involves abnormal clonal proliferation of Langerhans cells in various tissues and organs. Thyroid involvement is infrequently seen. Although the etiology is unknown, genetic components may be linked to the disease. It is also associated with a family history of thyroid disease. Papillary thyroid carcinoma is the most common malignant epithelial tumor of the thyroid gland. Langerhans cell histiocytosis presenting with papillary thyroid carcinoma is rare. The privilege of our case is langerhans cell histiocytosis of the thyroid with multiple cervical lymph node involvement accompanying cervical lymph node metastatic thyroid papillary carcinoma. PMID:25349760

  3. Alternative germ cell death pathway in Drosophila involves HtrA2/Omi, lysosomes, and a caspase-9 counterpart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yacobi-Sharon, Keren; Namdar, Yuval; Arama, Eli

    2013-04-15

    In both flies and mammals, almost one-third of the newly emerging male germ cells are spontaneously eliminated before entering meiosis. Here, we show that in Drosophila, germ cell death (GCD) involves the initiator caspase Dronc independently of the apoptosome and the main executioner caspases. Electron microscopy of dying germ cells revealed mixed morphologies of apoptosis and necrosis. We further show that the lysosomes and their catabolic enzymes, but not macroautophagy, are involved in the execution of GCD. We then identified, in a screen, the Parkinson's disease-associated mitochondrial protease, HtrA2/Omi, as an important mediator of GCD, acting mainly through its catalytic activity rather than by antagonizing inhibitor of apoptosis proteins. Concomitantly, other mitochondrial-associated factors were also implicated in GCD, including Pink1 (but not Parkin), the Bcl-2-related proteins, and endonuclease G, which establish the mitochondria as central mediators of GCD. These findings uncover an alternative developmental cell death pathway in metazoans.

  4. A Case Report: The Diagnosis and Therapeutic Evaluation for a Rare Disease of Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis Involving Thyroid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Ye-Feng; Wang, Qing-Xuan; Ni, Chun-Jue; Dong, Si-Yang; Lv, Lin; Li, Quan; Chen, En-Dong; Zhang, Xiao-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) involving the thyroid gland is extremely rare. Currently, the diagnosis and therapeutic evaluation for LCH involving thyroid is a challenge. We reported a rare case of LCH involving thyroid, presenting as painless thyroid goiters, and successfully performed positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) to make an accurate diagnosis and therapeutic evaluation for LCH. Although the histology or cytology is the golden standard for the diagnosis of LCH involving thyroid, the PET/CT should be keep in mind when LCH involving thyroid with inconclusive cytologic results. During the treatment of LCH, PET/CT can be performed to assess the therapeutic effect and select the most effective and reliable treatment for LCH. PMID:26554785

  5. Connective tissue cells, but not muscle cells, are involved in establishing the proximo-distal outcome of limb regeneration in the axolotl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nacu, Eugen; Glausch, Mareen; Le, Huy Quang; Damanik, Febriyani Fiain Rochel; Schuez, Maritta; Knapp, Dunja; Khattak, Shahryar; Richter, Tobias; Tanaka, Elly M

    2013-02-01

    During salamander limb regeneration, only the structures distal to the amputation plane are regenerated, a property known as the rule of distal transformation. Multiple cell types are involved in limb regeneration; therefore, determining which cell types participate in distal transformation is important for understanding how the proximo-distal outcome of regeneration is achieved. We show that connective tissue-derived blastema cells obey the rule of distal transformation. They also have nuclear MEIS, which can act as an upper arm identity regulator, only upon upper arm amputation. By contrast, myogenic cells do not obey the rule of distal transformation and display nuclear MEIS upon amputation at any proximo-distal level. These results indicate that connective tissue cells, but not myogenic cells, are involved in establishing the proximo-distal outcome of regeneration and are likely to guide muscle patterning. Moreover, we show that, similarly to limb development, muscle patterning in regeneration is influenced by β-catenin signalling.

  6. Mapping the amide I absorption in single bacteria and mammalian cells with resonant infrared nanospectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldassarre, L.; Giliberti, V.; Rosa, A.; Ortolani, M.; Bonamore, A.; Baiocco, P.; Kjoller, K.; Calvani, P.; Nucara, A.

    2016-02-01

    Infrared (IR) nanospectroscopy performed in conjunction with atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a novel, label-free spectroscopic technique that meets the increasing request for nano-imaging tools with chemical specificity in the field of life sciences. In the novel resonant version of AFM-IR, a mid-IR wavelength-tunable quantum cascade laser illuminates the sample below an AFM tip working in contact mode, and the repetition rate of the mid-IR pulses matches the cantilever mechanical resonance frequency. The AFM-IR signal is the amplitude of the cantilever oscillations driven by the thermal expansion of the sample after absorption of mid-IR radiation. Using purposely nanofabricated polymer samples, here we demonstrate that the AFM-IR signal increases linearly with the sample thickness t for t \\gt 50 nm, as expected from the thermal expansion model of the sample volume below the AFM tip. We then show the capability of the apparatus to derive information on the protein distribution in single cells through mapping of the AFM-IR signal related to the amide-I mid-IR absorption band at 1660 cm-1. In Escherichia Coli bacteria we see how the topography changes, observed when the cell hosts a protein over-expression plasmid, are correlated with the amide I signal intensity. In human HeLa cells we obtain evidence that the protein distribution in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus is uneven, with a lateral resolution better than 100 nm.

  7. Molecular mechanisms involved in casein gene expression and secretion in mouse mammary epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mouse mammary epithelial cells (MMEC) secrete a group of milk-specific proteins including various caseins and whey proteins. Dissociated mammary epithelial cells maintain expression of most of their differentiated functions only if cells are plated on a suitable substratum. Casein production and section, cell morphology, and production of α-lactalbumin have been used as markers to assess the degree of differentiation of mammary cells in culture. The general consensus is that cells express their differentiated properties at high levels and for longer periods of time on such substrata. In this paper, the authors demonstrate that modulation of the expression of caseins by floating collagen gels is manifested at several regulatory points

  8. Mapping key regions of the RXFP2 low-density lipoprotein class-A module that are involved in signal activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Roy C K; Bathgate, Ross A D; Bruell, Shoni; Wade, John D; Gooley, Paul R; Petrie, Emma J

    2014-07-22

    The peptide hormone INSL3 and its receptor, RXFP2, have co-evolved alongside relaxin and its receptor, RXFP1. Both RXFP1 and RXFP2 are G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) containing the hallmark seven transmembrane helices in addition to a distinct ectodomain of leucine-rich repeats (LRRs) and a single low-density lipoprotein class-A (LDLa) module at the N-terminus. RXFP1 and RXFP2 are the only mammalian GPCRs known to contain an LDLa, and its removal does not perturb primary ligand binding to the LRRs; however, signaling is abolished. This presents a general mechanism whereby ligand binding induces a conformational change in the receptor to position the LDLa to elicit a signal response. Although the LDLa interaction site has not been identified, the residues important to the action have been mapped within the RXFP1 LDLa module. In this study, we comprehensively study the RXFP2 LDLa module. We determine its structure using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and concurrently investigate the signaling of an RXFP2 with the LDLa removed (RXFP2-short), confirming that the LDLa is essential to signaling. We then replaced the LDLa with the second ligand binding module from the LDL receptor, LB2, creating the RXFP2-LB2 chimera. Unlike that in the equivalent RXFP1-LB2 chimera, signaling is rescued albeit modestly. Guided by the NMR structure, we dissected regions of the RXFP2 LDLa to identify specific residues that are important to signal activation. We determine that although the module is important to the activation of RXFP2, unlike the RXFP1 receptor, specific residues in the N-terminus of the domain are not involved in signal activation. PMID:24983702

  9. Stochastic response and bifurcation of periodically driven nonlinear oscillators by the generalized cell mapping method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Qun; Xu, Wei; Sun, Jian-Qiao

    2016-09-01

    The stochastic response of nonlinear oscillators under periodic and Gaussian white noise excitations is studied with the generalized cell mapping based on short-time Gaussian approximation (GCM/STGA) method. The solutions of the transition probability density functions over a small fraction of the period are constructed by the STGA scheme in order to construct the GCM over one complete period. Both the transient and steady-state probability density functions (PDFs) of a smooth and discontinuous (SD) oscillator are computed to illustrate the application of the method. The accuracy of the results is verified by direct Monte Carlo simulations. The transient responses show the evolution of the PDFs from being Gaussian to non-Gaussian. The effect of a chaotic saddle on the stochastic response is also studied. The stochastic P-bifurcation in terms of the steady-state PDFs occurs with the decrease of the smoothness parameter, which corresponds to the deterministic pitchfork bifurcation.

  10. Glycated LDL increase VCAM-1 expression and secretion in endothelial cells and promote monocyte adhesion through mechanisms involving endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toma, Laura; Sanda, Gabriela M; Deleanu, Mariana; Stancu, Camelia S; Sima, Anca V

    2016-06-01

    Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus is a worldwide epidemic, and its atherosclerotic complications produce morbidity and mortality in affected patients. It is known that the vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) levels are increased in the sera of diabetic patients. Our aim was to investigate the impact of the endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) in VCAM-1 expression and secretion in human endothelial cells (HEC) exposed to glycated low-density lipoproteins (gLDL). The results showed that 24 h incubation of HEC with gLDL induces (i) stimulation of VCAM-1 expression and secretion, determining increased monocyte adhesion to HEC; (ii) RAGE up-regulation and free cholesterol loading; (iii) ERS activation (increased eIF2α phosphorylation and CHOP mRNA levels, and decreased GRP78 protein expression); and (iv) oxidative stress [increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and glutamate cysteine ligase catalytic unit gene expression]. Treatment of gLDL-exposed HEC with ERS inhibitors, salubrinal (Sal) and sodium phenylbutyrate (PBA), decreased intracellular ROS. Incubation of gLDL-exposed cells with the anti-oxidant N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) reduced ERS, revealed by decreased eIF2α phosphorylation and CHOP gene expression and increased GRP78 expression, thus validating the interconnection between ERS and oxidative stress. Sal, PBA, NAC and inhibitors of p38 MAP kinase and NF-kB induced the decrease of VCAM-1 expression and of the ensuing monocyte adhesion induced by gLDL. In conclusion, in HEC, gLDL stimulate the expression of cellular VCAM-1, the secretion of soluble VCAM-1, and the adhesion of monocytes through mechanisms involving p38 MAP kinase and NF-kB signalling pathways activated by RAGE, ERS and oxidative stress, thus contributing to diabetic atherosclerosis. PMID:27206739

  11. Involvement of ethylene and lipid signalling in cadmium-induced programmed cell death in tomato suspension cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakimova, E T; Kapchina-Toteva, V M; Laarhoven, L-J; Harren, F M; Woltering, E J

    2006-10-01

    Cadmium-induced cell death was studied in suspension-cultured tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) cells (line MsK8) treated with CdSO(4). Within 24 h, cadmium treatment induced cell death in a concentration-dependent manner. Cell cultures showed recovery after 2-3 days which indicates the existence of an adaptation mechanism. Cadmium-induced cell death was alleviated by the addition of sub muM concentrations of peptide inhibitors specific to human caspases indicating that cell death proceeds through a mechanism with similarities to animal programmed cell death (PCD, apoptosis). Cadmium-induced cell death was accompanied by an increased production of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and simultaneous addition of antioxidants greatly reduced cell death. Inhibitors of phospholipase C (PLC) and phospholipase D (PLD) signalling pathway intermediates reduced cadmium-induced cell death. Treatment with the G-protein activator mastoparan and a cell permeable analogue of the lipid signal second messenger phosphatidic acid (PA) induced cell death. Ethylene, while not inducing cell death when applied alone, stimulated cadmium-induced cell death. Application of the ethylene biosynthesis inhibitor aminoethoxy vinylglycine (AVG) reduced cadmium-induced cell death, and this effect was alleviated by simultaneous treatment with ethylene. Together the results show that cadmium induces PCD exhibiting apoptotic-like features. The cell death process requires increased H(2)O(2) production and activation of PLC, PLD and ethylene signalling pathways.

  12. Involvement of ethylene and lipid signalling in cadmium-induced programmed cell death in tomato suspension cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yakimova, E.T.; Kapchina-Toteva, V.M.; Laarhoven, L.J.J.; Harren, F.J.M.; Woltering, E.J.

    2006-01-01

    Cadmium-induced cell death was studied in suspension-cultured tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) cells (line MsK8) treated with CdSO4. Within 24 h, cadmium treatment induced cell death in a concentration-dependent manner. Cell cultures showed recovery after 23 days which indicates the existence

  13. Involvement of ethylene and lipid signalling in cadmium-induced programmed cell death in tomato suspension cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iakimova, E.T.; Kapchina-Toteva, V.M.; Laarhoven, L.J.; Harren, F.; Woltering, E.J.

    2006-01-01

    Cadmium-induced cell death was studied in suspension-cultured tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) cells (line MsK8) treated with CdSO4. Within 24 h, cadmium treatment induced cell death in a concentration-dependent manner. Cell cultures showed recovery after 2¿3 days which indicates the existence

  14. Involvement of HIF-2α-mediated inflammation in arsenite-induced transformation of human bronchial epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Yuan; Zhao, Yue; Xu, Wenchao; Luo, Fei; Wang, Bairu; Li, Yuan; Pang, Ying; Liu, Qizhan, E-mail: drqzliu@hotmail.com

    2013-10-15

    Arsenic is a well established human carcinogen that causes diseases of the lung. Some studies have suggested a link between inflammation and lung cancer; however, it is unknown if arsenite-induced inflammation causally contributes to arsenite-caused malignant transformation of cells. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying inflammation during neoplastic transformation induced in human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells by chronic exposure to arsenite. The results showed that, on acute or chronic exposure to arsenite, HBE cells over-expressed the pro-inflammatory cytokines, interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-8 (IL-8), and interleukin-1β (IL-1β). The data also indicated that HIF-2α was involved in arsenite-induced inflammation. Moreover, IL-6 and IL-8 were essential for the malignant progression of arsenite-transformed HBE cells. Thus, these experiments show that HIF-2α mediates arsenite-induced inflammation and that such inflammation is involved in arsenite-induced malignant transformation of HBE cells. The results provide a link between the inflammatory response and the acquisition of a malignant transformed phenotype by cells chronically exposed to arsenite and thus establish a previously unknown mechanism for arsenite-induced carcinogenesis. - Highlights: • Arsenite induces inflammation. • Arsenite-induced the increases of IL-6 and IL-8 via HIF-2α. • Inflammation is involved in arsenite-induced carcinogenesis.

  15. Cytotoxic cell involvement in human cutaneous leishmaniasis: assessments in active disease, under therapy and after clinical cure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, C F; Ferraz, R; Pimentel, M I F; Lyra, M R; Schubach, A O; Da-Cruz, A M; Bertho, A L

    2016-04-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) is an important public health issue worldwide. The control of Leishmania infection depends on cellular immune mechanisms, and the inflammatory response may contribute to pathogenesis. A beneficial role of CD8(+) T lymphocytes has been proposed; nevertheless, other studies suggest a cytotoxic role of CD8(+) T lymphocytes involved in tissue damage, showing controversial role of these cells. The goal of the current study was to understand the immunopathology of CL and determine the profile of cytotoxic cells--such as CD4(+) T, natural killer and natural killer T cells--that might be involved in triggering immunological mechanisms, and may lead to cure or disease progression. The frequencies of cytotoxic cell populations in peripheral blood, obtained from patients with active disease, during treatment and after clinical healing, were assessed by flow cytometry. Cytotoxicity could not be related to a deleterious role in Leishmania braziliensis infection, as patients with active CL showed similar percentages of degranulation to healthy individuals (HI). Cured patients exhibited a lower percentage of degranulating cells, which may be due to a downregulation of the immune response. The understanding of the immunopathological mechanisms involved in CL and the commitment of cytotoxic cells enables improvements in therapeutic strategies.

  16. NIK is involved in constitutive activation of the alternative NF-κB pathway and proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pancreatic cancer has one of the poorest prognoses among human neoplasms. Constitutive activation of NF-κB is frequently observed in pancreatic cancer cells and is involved in their malignancy. However, little is known about the molecular mechanism of this constitutive NF-κB activation. Here, we show that the alternative pathway is constitutively activated and NF-κB-inducing kinase (NIK), a mediator of the alternative pathway, is significantly expressed in pancreatic cancer cells. siRNA-mediated silencing of NIK expression followed by subcellular fractionation revealed that NIK is constitutively involved in the processing of p100 and nuclear transport of p52 and RelB in pancreatic cancer cells. In addition, NIK silencing significantly suppressed proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells. These results clearly indicate that NIK is involved in the constitutive activation of the alternative pathway and controls cell proliferation in pancreatic cancer cells. Therefore, NIK might be a novel target for the treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  17. Oryza sativa H+-ATPase (OSA) is Involved in the Regulation of Dumbbell-Shaped Guard Cells of Rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toda, Yosuke; Wang, Yin; Takahashi, Akira; Kawai, Yuya; Tada, Yasuomi; Yamaji, Naoki; Feng Ma, Jian; Ashikari, Motoyuki; Kinoshita, Toshinori

    2016-06-01

    The stomatal apparatus consists of a pair of guard cells and regulates gas exchange between the leaf and atmosphere. In guard cells, blue light (BL) activates H(+)-ATPase in the plasma membrane through the phosphorylation of its penultimate threonine, mediating stomatal opening. Although this regulation is thought to be widely adopted among kidney-shaped guard cells in dicots, the molecular basis underlying that of dumbbell-shaped guard cells in monocots remains unclear. Here, we show that H(+)-ATPases are involved in the regulation of dumbbell-shaped guard cells. Stomatal opening of rice was promoted by the H(+)-ATPase activator fusicoccin and by BL, and the latter was suppressed by the H(+)-ATPase inhibitor vanadate. Using H(+)-ATPase antibodies, we showed the presence of phosphoregulation of the penultimate threonine in Oryza sativa H(+)-ATPases (OSAs) and localization of OSAs in the plasma membrane of guard cells. Interestingly, we identified one H(+)-ATPase isoform, OSA7, that is preferentially expressed among the OSA genes in guard cells, and found that loss of function of OSA7 resulted in partial insensitivity to BL. We conclude that H(+)-ATPase is involved in BL-induced stomatal opening of dumbbell-shaped guard cells in monocotyledon species. PMID:27048369

  18. Oryza sativa H+-ATPase (OSA) is Involved in the Regulation of Dumbbell-Shaped Guard Cells of Rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toda, Yosuke; Wang, Yin; Takahashi, Akira; Kawai, Yuya; Tada, Yasuomi; Yamaji, Naoki; Feng Ma, Jian; Ashikari, Motoyuki; Kinoshita, Toshinori

    2016-06-01

    The stomatal apparatus consists of a pair of guard cells and regulates gas exchange between the leaf and atmosphere. In guard cells, blue light (BL) activates H(+)-ATPase in the plasma membrane through the phosphorylation of its penultimate threonine, mediating stomatal opening. Although this regulation is thought to be widely adopted among kidney-shaped guard cells in dicots, the molecular basis underlying that of dumbbell-shaped guard cells in monocots remains unclear. Here, we show that H(+)-ATPases are involved in the regulation of dumbbell-shaped guard cells. Stomatal opening of rice was promoted by the H(+)-ATPase activator fusicoccin and by BL, and the latter was suppressed by the H(+)-ATPase inhibitor vanadate. Using H(+)-ATPase antibodies, we showed the presence of phosphoregulation of the penultimate threonine in Oryza sativa H(+)-ATPases (OSAs) and localization of OSAs in the plasma membrane of guard cells. Interestingly, we identified one H(+)-ATPase isoform, OSA7, that is preferentially expressed among the OSA genes in guard cells, and found that loss of function of OSA7 resulted in partial insensitivity to BL. We conclude that H(+)-ATPase is involved in BL-induced stomatal opening of dumbbell-shaped guard cells in monocotyledon species.

  19. Gene expression down-regulation in CD90+ prostate tumor-associated stromal cells involves potential organ-specific genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The prostate stroma is a key mediator of epithelial differentiation and development, and potentially plays a role in the initiation and progression of prostate cancer. The tumor-associated stroma is marked by increased expression of CD90/THY1. Isolation and characterization of these stromal cells could provide valuable insight into the biology of the tumor microenvironment. Prostate CD90+ stromal fibromuscular cells from tumor specimens were isolated by cell-sorting and analyzed by DNA microarray. Dataset analysis was used to compare gene expression between histologically normal and tumor-associated stromal cells. For comparison, stromal cells were also isolated and analyzed from the urinary bladder. The tumor-associated stromal cells were found to have decreased expression of genes involved in smooth muscle differentiation, and those detected in prostate but not bladder. Other differential expression between the stromal cell types included that of the CXC-chemokine genes. CD90+ prostate tumor-associated stromal cells differed from their normal counterpart in expression of multiple genes, some of which are potentially involved in organ development

  20. Lymph node involvement by mycosis fungoides and Sézary syndrome mimicking angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBlanc, Robert E; Lefterova, Martina I; Suarez, Carlos J; Tavallaee, Mahkam; Kim, Youn H; Schrijver, Iris; Kim, Jinah; Gratzinger, Dita

    2015-09-01

    Clinical management of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) and angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma (AITL) differs markedly. Diagnostic distinction is critical. Herein, we describe a series of 4 patients with clinically, molecularly, and histopathologically annotated mycosis fungoides or Sézary syndrome whose nodal disease mimicked AITL. The patients otherwise exhibited classic clinical manifestations of mycosis fungoides/Sézary syndrome preceding the onset of lymphadenopathy by 1 to 5 years. Skin biopsies revealed epidermotropic infiltrates characteristic of CTCL. Lymph node biopsies revealed dense CD4+ T-cell infiltrates that coexpressed follicular helper T-cell markers and were accompanied by proliferations of high endothelial venules and arborizing CD21+ follicular dendritic cell networks. Two patients had T-cell receptor gene rearrangement studies performed on their skin, lymph node, and peripheral blood demonstrating identical polymerase chain reaction clones in all 3 tissues. A small secondary clonal B-cell population was present in 1 patient that mimicked the B-cell proliferations known to accompany AITL and persisted on successive nodal biopsies over several years. This latter phenomenon has not previously been described in CTCL. The potential for patients to be misdiagnosed with AITL for lack of consideration of advanced-stage CTCL with nodal involvement underscores the necessity of information sharing among the various pathologists and clinicians involved in the care of each patient.

  1. Changes in the expression of proteins associated with aerobic glycolysis and cell migration are involved in tumorigenic ability of two glioma cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramão Anelisa

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The most frequent and malignant brain cancer is glioblastoma multiforme (GBM. In gliomas, tumor progression and poor prognosis are associated with the tumorigenic ability of the cells. U87MG cells (wild-type p53 are known to be tumorigenic in nude mice, but T98G cells (mutant p53 are not tumorigenic. We investigated the proteomic profiling of these two cell lines in order to gain new insights into the mechanisms that may be involved in tumorigenesis. Results We found 24 differentially expressed proteins between T98G and U87MG cells. Gene Ontology supports the notion that over-representation of differentially expressed proteins is involved in glycolysis, cell migration and stress oxidative response. Among those associated with the glycolysis pathway, TPIS and LDHB are up-regulated in U87MG cells. Measurement of glucose consumption and lactate production suggests that glycolysis is more effective in U87MG cells. On the other hand, G6PD expression was 3-fold higher in T98G cells and this may indicate a shift to the pentose-phosphate pathway. Moreover, GRP78 expression was also three-fold higher in T98G than in U87MG cells. Under thapsigargin treatment both cell lines showed increased GRP78 expression and the effect of this agent was inversely correlated to cell migration. Quantitative RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry of GRP78 in patient samples indicated a higher level of expression of GRP78 in grade IV tumors compared to grade I and non-neoplastic tissues, respectively. Conclusions Taken together, these results suggest an important role of proteins involved in key functions such as glycolysis and cell migration that may explain the difference in tumorigenic ability between these two glioma cell lines and that may be extrapolated to the differential aggressiveness of glioma tumors.

  2. Melatonin inhibits the migration of human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cell lines involving JNK/MAPK pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiaoyun Zhou

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Melatonin, an indolamine produced and secreted predominately by the pineal gland, exhibits a variety of physiological functions, possesses antioxidant and antitumor properties. But, the mechanisms for the anti-cancer effects are unknown. The present study explored the effects of melatonin on the migration of human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells and its mechanism. METHODS: MTT assay was employed to measure the viability of A549 cells treated with different concentrations of melatonin. The effect of melatonin on the migration of A549 cells was analyzed by wound healing assay. Occludin location was observed by immunofluorescence. The expression of occludin, osteopontin (OPN, myosin light chain kinase (MLCK and phosphorylation of myosin light chain (MLC, JNK were detected by western blots. RESULTS: After A549 cells were treated with melatonin, the viability and migration of the cells were inhibited significantly. The relative migration rate of A549 cells treated with melatonin was only about 20% at 24 h. The expression level of OPN, MLCK and phosphorylation of MLC of A549 cells were reduced, while the expression of occludin was conversely elevated, and occludin located on the cell surface was obviously increased. The phosphorylation status of JNK in A549 cells was also reduced when cells were treated by melatonin. CONCLUSIONS: Melatonin significantly inhibits the migration of A549 cells, and this may be associated with the down-regulation of the expression of OPN, MLCK, phosphorylation of MLC, and up-regulation of the expression of occludin involving JNK/MAPK pathway.

  3. Role of phosphoproteins involved in chemoresistance of colorectal cancer stem cells and immuno phenotypic comparative analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent studies demonstrated that colon cancers contain a cellular subpopulation, with stem cell-like proprieties, able to initiate and sustain tumour growth. These cells, so-called Cancer Initiating Cells (CICs), express the transmembrane antigen CD133. CD133 positive cells show slow proliferation rate, high expression of ABC (ATP-binding cassette) transporters and anti-apoptotic factors making them resistant to conventional therapies

  4. Nectin4 Is an Epithelial Cell Receptor for Canine Distemper Virus and Involved in Neurovirulence

    OpenAIRE

    Pratakpiriya, Watanyoo; Seki, Fumio; Otsuki, Noriyuki; Sakai, Kouji; FUKUHARA, HIDEO; Katamoto, Hiromu; HIRAI, Takuya; Maenaka, Katsumi; Techangamsuwan, Somporn; LAN, Nguyen Thi; Takeda, Makoto; Yamaguchi, Ryoji

    2012-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) uses signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM), expressed on immune cells, as a receptor. However, epithelial and neural cells are also affected by CDV in vivo. Wild-type CDV strains showed efficient replication with syncytia in Vero cells expressing dog nectin4, and the infection was blocked by an anti-nectin4 antibody. In dogs with distemper, CDV antigen was preferentially detected in nectin4-positive neurons and epithelial cells, suggesting that nectin4 i...

  5. Evidence for P-Glycoprotein Involvement in Cell Volume Regulation Using Coulter Sizing in Flow Cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquier, Jennifer; Rioult, Damien; Abu-Kaoud, Nadine; Hoarau-Véchot, Jessica; Marin, Matthieu; Le Foll, Frank

    2015-06-24

    The regulation of cell volume is an essential function that is coupled to a variety of physiological processes such as receptor recycling, excitability and contraction, cell proliferation, migration, and programmed cell death. Under stress, cells undergo emergency swelling and respond to such a phenomenon with a regulatory volume decrease (RVD) where they release cellular ions, and other osmolytes as well as a concomitant loss of water. The link between P-glycoprotein, a transmembrane transporter, and cell volume regulation is controversial, and changes in cells volume are measured using microscopy or electrophysiology. For instance, by using the patch-clamp method, our team demonstrated that chloride currents activated in the RVD were more intense and rapid in a breast cancer cell line overexpressing the P-glycoprotein (P-gp). The Cell Lab Quanta SC is a flow cytometry system that simultaneously measures electronic volume, side scatter and three fluorescent colors; altogether this provides unsurpassed population resolution and accurate cell counting. Therefore, here we propose a novel method to follow cellular volume. By using the Coulter-type channel of the cytometer Cell Lab Quanta SC MPL (multi-platform loading), we demonstrated a role for the P-gp during different osmotic treatments, but also a differential activity of the P-gp through the cell cycle. Altogether, our data strongly suggests a role of P-gp in cell volume regulation.

  6. The viral spike protein is not involved in the polarized sorting of coronaviruses in epithelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossen, J W; de Beer, R; Godeke, G J; Raamsman, M J; Horzinek, M C; Vennema, H; Rottier, P J

    1998-01-01

    Coronaviruses are assembled by budding into a pre-Golgi compartment from which they are transported along the secretory pathway to leave the cell. In cultured epithelial cells, they are released in a polarized fashion; depending on the virus and cell type, they are sorted preferentially either to th

  7. Involvement of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells in the pathogenesis of polycythaemia vera

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Wen-bo; LI Ying; LIU Xin; ZHANG Ling-yan; WANG Xin

    2008-01-01

    Background Regulatory T cells (Treg) have been shown to play an important role in the regulation of hematopoietic activity. However, there is no information about the effect of Treg cells in the pathogenesis of polycythaemia vera (PV).Methods In this study, we investigated the percentage and function of Treg cells in the peripheral blood of 21 PV patients and 25 healthy donors. Treg cells were identified and characterized as CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ by flow cytometry.The suppressive activity of CD4+CD25+ Treg cells was assessed by the proliferation and cytokine secretion of the co-cultured CD4+CD25- fractions.Results The results showed that the percentage of Treg cells in the peripheral blood of PV patients significantly increased compared to healthy controls ((10.93±4.02)% vs (5.86±1.99)%, P <0.05). Moreover, the mRNA and protein expression of FOXP3 was higher in CD4+CD25+ Treg cells. Coordinately, when co-cultured with the activated CD4+CD25-cells, the CD4+CD25+ Treg cells showed enhanced suppressive function in PV. Yet, the underlying mechanism for the increased frequency and function of CD4+CD25+ Treg cells is still to be clarified.Conclusion Treg cells expansion might account for the abnormal T cell immunity in PV patients and thus contribute to the pathogenesis of PV.

  8. A determinant of feline immunodeficiency virus involved in Crandell feline kidney cell tropism.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.H.J. Siebelink (Kees); J.A. Karlas (Jos); G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); M.L. Bosch (Marnix)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractViral progeny of the molecular clone 19k1 of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) can infect feline T-cells but not Crandell feline kidney (CrFK) cells. In contrast, the biological isolate FIV-AM6c, which was CrFK adapted by co-cultivation of FIV-AM6 infected thymocytes with CrFK cells, c

  9. Evidence for P-Glycoprotein Involvement in Cell Volume Regulation Using Coulter Sizing in Flow Cytometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Pasquier

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The regulation of cell volume is an essential function that is coupled to a variety of physiological processes such as receptor recycling, excitability and contraction, cell proliferation, migration, and programmed cell death. Under stress, cells undergo emergency swelling and respond to such a phenomenon with a regulatory volume decrease (RVD where they release cellular ions, and other osmolytes as well as a concomitant loss of water. The link between P-glycoprotein, a transmembrane transporter, and cell volume regulation is controversial, and changes in cells volume are measured using microscopy or electrophysiology. For instance, by using the patch-clamp method, our team demonstrated that chloride currents activated in the RVD were more intense and rapid in a breast cancer cell line overexpressing the P-glycoprotein (P-gp. The Cell Lab Quanta SC is a flow cytometry system that simultaneously measures electronic volume, side scatter and three fluorescent colors; altogether this provides unsurpassed population resolution and accurate cell counting. Therefore, here we propose a novel method to follow cellular volume. By using the Coulter-type channel of the cytometer Cell Lab Quanta SC MPL (multi-platform loading, we demonstrated a role for the P-gp during different osmotic treatments, but also a differential activity of the P-gp through the cell cycle. Altogether, our data strongly suggests a role of P-gp in cell volume regulation.

  10. p75 neurotrophin receptor is involved in proliferation of undifferentiated mouse embryonic stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moscatelli, Ilana; Pierantozzi, Enrico; Camaioni, Antonella; Siracusa, Gregorio [Department of Public Health and Cell Biology, Section of Histology and Embryology, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Via Montpellier 1, 00133 Rome (Italy); Campagnolo, Luisa, E-mail: campagno@med.uniroma2.it [Department of Public Health and Cell Biology, Section of Histology and Embryology, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Via Montpellier 1, 00133 Rome (Italy)

    2009-11-01

    Neurotrophins and their receptors are known to play a role in the proliferation and survival of many different cell types of neuronal and non-neuronal lineages. In addition, there is much evidence in the literature showing that the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75{sup NTR}), alone or in association with members of the family of Trk receptors, is expressed in a wide variety of stem cells, although its role in such cells has not been completely elucidated. In the present work we have investigated the expression of p75{sup NTR} and Trks in totipotent and pluripotent cells, the mouse pre-implantation embryo and embryonic stem and germ cells (ES and EG cells). p75{sup NTR} and TrkA can be first detected in the blastocyst from which ES cell lines are derived. Mouse ES cells retain p75{sup NTR}/TrkA expression. Nerve growth factor is the only neurotrophin able to stimulate ES cell growth in culture, without affecting the expression of stem cell markers, alkaline phosphatase, Oct4 and Nanog. Such proliferation effect was blocked by antagonizing either p75{sup NTR} or TrkA. Interestingly, immunoreactivity to anti-p75{sup NTR} antibodies is lost upon ES cell differentiation. The expression pattern of neurotrophin receptors in murine ES cells differs from human ES cells, that only express TrkB and C, and do not respond to NGF. In this paper we also show that, while primordial germ cells (PGC) do not express p75{sup NTR}, when they are made to revert to an ES-like phenotype, becoming EG cells, expression of p75{sup NTR} is turned on.

  11. IQ domain GTPase-activating protein 1 is involved in shear stress-induced progenitor-derived endothelial cell alignment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lila Rami

    Full Text Available Shear stress is one of mechanical constraints which are exerted by blood flow on endothelial cells (ECs. To adapt to shear stress, ECs align in the direction of flow through adherens junction (AJ remodeling. However, mechanisms regulating ECs alignment under shear stress are poorly understood. The scaffold protein IQ domain GTPase activating protein 1 (IQGAP1 is a scaffold protein which couples cell signaling to the actin and microtubule cytoskeletons and is involved in cell migration and adhesion. IQGAP1 also plays a role in AJ organization in epithelial cells. In this study, we investigated the potential IQGAP1 involvement in the endothelial cells alignment under shear stress. Progenitor-derived endothelial cells (PDECs, transfected (or not with IQGAP1 small interfering RNA, were exposed to a laminar shear stress (1.2 N/m(2 and AJ proteins (VE-cadherin and β-catenin and IQGAP1 were labeled by immunofluorescence. We show that IQGAP1 is essential for ECs alignment under shear stress. We studied the role of IQGAP1 in AJs remodeling of PDECs exposed to shear stress by studying cell localization and IQGAP1 interactions with VE-cadherin and β-catenin by immunofluorescence and Proximity Ligation Assays. In static conditions, IQGAP1 interacts with VE-cadherin but not with β-catenin at the cell membrane. Under shear stress, IQGAP1 lost its interaction from VE-cadherin to β-catenin. This "switch" was concomitant with the loss of β-catenin/VE-cadherin interaction at the cell membrane. This work shows that IQGAP1 is essential to ECs alignment under shear stress and that AJ remodeling represents one of the mechanisms involved. These results provide a new approach to understand ECs alignment under to shear stress.

  12. IQ Domain GTPase-Activating Protein 1 is Involved in Shear Stress-Induced Progenitor-Derived Endothelial Cell Alignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rami, Lila; Auguste, Patrick; Thebaud, Noélie B.; Bareille, Reine; Daculsi, Richard; Ripoche, Jean; Bordenave, Laurence

    2013-01-01

    Shear stress is one of mechanical constraints which are exerted by blood flow on endothelial cells (ECs). To adapt to shear stress, ECs align in the direction of flow through adherens junction (AJ) remodeling. However, mechanisms regulating ECs alignment under shear stress are poorly understood. The scaffold protein IQ domain GTPase activating protein 1 (IQGAP1) is a scaffold protein which couples cell signaling to the actin and microtubule cytoskeletons and is involved in cell migration and adhesion. IQGAP1 also plays a role in AJ organization in epithelial cells. In this study, we investigated the potential IQGAP1 involvement in the endothelial cells alignment under shear stress. Progenitor-derived endothelial cells (PDECs), transfected (or not) with IQGAP1 small interfering RNA, were exposed to a laminar shear stress (1.2 N/m2) and AJ proteins (VE-cadherin and β-catenin) and IQGAP1 were labeled by immunofluorescence. We show that IQGAP1 is essential for ECs alignment under shear stress. We studied the role of IQGAP1 in AJs remodeling of PDECs exposed to shear stress by studying cell localization and IQGAP1 interactions with VE-cadherin and β-catenin by immunofluorescence and Proximity Ligation Assays. In static conditions, IQGAP1 interacts with VE-cadherin but not with β-catenin at the cell membrane. Under shear stress, IQGAP1 lost its interaction from VE-cadherin to β-catenin. This “switch” was concomitant with the loss of β-catenin/VE-cadherin interaction at the cell membrane. This work shows that IQGAP1 is essential to ECs alignment under shear stress and that AJ remodeling represents one of the mechanisms involved. These results provide a new approach to understand ECs alignment under to shear stress. PMID:24278215

  13. Synthesized OVA323-339MAP octamers mitigate OVA-induced airway inflammation by regulating Foxp3 T regulatory cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Wen

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antigen-specific immunotherapy (SIT has been widely practiced in treating allergic diseases such as asthma. However, this therapy may induce a series of allergic adverse events during treatment. Peptide immunotherapy (PIT was explored to overcome these disadvantages. We confirmed that multiple antigen peptides (MAPs do not cause autoimmune responses, which led to the presumption that MAPs intervention could alleviate allergic airway inflammation without inducing adverse effects. Results In this study, synthesized OVA323-339MAP octamers were subcutaneously injected into ovalbumin (OVA-sensitized and -challenged Balb/c mice to observe its effect on allergic airway inflammation, Th2 immune response, and immune regulating function. It was confirmed that OVA sensitization and challenge led to significant peritracheal inflammatory, cell infiltration, and intensive Th2 response. Treatment of OVA323-339MAP octomers in the airway inflammation mice model increased CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T regulatory (Treg cells and their regulatory function in peripheral blood, mediastinal draining lymph nodes, and the spleen. Furthermore, OVA323-339MAP increased IL-10 levels in bronchial alveolar lavage fluid (BALF; up-regulated the expression of IL-10, membrane-bound TGF-β1, as well as Foxp3 in lung tissues; and up-regulated programmed death-1 (PD-1 and cytotoxic T lymphocyte associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4 on the surface of Treg cells. These results were further correlated with the decreased OVA specific immunoglobulin E (sIgE level and the infiltration of inflammatory cells such as eosinophils and lymphocytes in BALF. However, OVA323-339 peptide monomers did not show any of the mentioned effects in the same animal model. Conclusions Our study indicates that OVA323-339MAP had significant therapeutic effects on mice allergic airway inflammation by regulating the balance of Th1/Th2 response through Treg cells in vivo.

  14. Neural tube closure in Xenopus laevis involves medial migration, directed protrusive activity, cell intercalation and convergent extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, L A; Keller, R E

    1999-10-01

    We have characterized the cell movements and prospective cell identities as neural folds fuse during neural tube formation in Xenopus laevis. A newly developed whole-mount, two-color fluorescent RNA in situ hybridization method, visualized with confocal microscopy, shows that the dorsal neural tube gene xpax3 and the neural-crest-specific gene xslug are expressed far lateral to the medial site of neural fold fusion and that expression moves medially after fusion. To determine whether cell movements or dynamic changes in gene expression are responsible, we used low-light videomicroscopy followed by fluorescent in situ and confocal microscopy. These methods revealed that populations of prospective neural crest and dorsal neural tube cells near the lateral margin of the neural plate at the start of neurulation move to the dorsal midline using distinctive forms of motility. Before fold fusion, superficial neural cells apically contract, roll the neural plate into a trough and appear to pull the superficial epidermal cell sheet medially. After neural fold fusion, lateral deep neural cells move medially by radially intercalating between other neural cells using two types of motility. The neural crest cells migrate as individual cells toward the dorsal midline using medially directed monopolar protrusions. These movements combine the two lateral populations of neural crest into a single medial population that form the roof of the neural tube. The remaining cells of the dorsal neural tube extend protrusions both medially and laterally bringing about radial intercalation of deep and superficial cells to form a single-cell-layered, pseudostratified neural tube. While ours is the first description of medially directed cell migration during neural fold fusion and re-establishment of the neural tube, these complex cell behaviors may be involved during cavitation of the zebrafish neural keel and secondary neurulation in the posterior axis of chicken and mouse.

  15. Cell-mediated immunity to Plasmodium falciparum infection: evidence against the involvement of cytotoxic lymphocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theander, T G; Andersen, B J; Pedersen, B K;

    1988-01-01

    by either SPag or PPD in the presence of immune serum. Studies on subpopulations of PBMC indicated that the inhibitory cells resided among the adherent cell fraction. Furthermore we tested PBMC for cytotoxic activity against P. falciparum-infected autologous or heterologous erythrocytes. Experiments were...... done both in the absence and the presence of immune serum. Neither fresh PBMC nor PBMC activated by SPag or PPD for 7 days prior to assay were cytotoxic, indicating that cytotoxic T cells, natural killer (NK) cells, and K cells did not possess cytotoxic activity directed against parasitized...

  16. Chemical proteomic map of dimethyl fumarate-sensitive cysteines in primary human T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blewett, Megan M; Xie, Jiji; Zaro, Balyn W; Backus, Keriann M; Altman, Amnon; Teijaro, John R; Cravatt, Benjamin F

    2016-01-01

    Dimethyl fumarate (DMF) is an electrophilic drug that is used to treat autoimmune conditions, including multiple sclerosis and psoriasis. The mechanism of action of DMF is unclear but may involve the covalent modification of proteins or DMF serving as a prodrug that is converted to monomethyl fumarate (MMF). We found that DMF, but not MMF, blocked the activation of primary human and mouse T cells. Using a quantitative, site-specific chemical proteomic platform, we determined the DMF sensitivity of >2400 cysteine residues in human T cells. Cysteines sensitive to DMF, but not MMF, were identified in several proteins with established biochemical or genetic links to T cell function, including protein kinase Cθ (PKCθ). DMF blocked the association of PKCθ with the costimulatory receptor CD28 by perturbing a CXXC motif in the C2 domain of this kinase. Mutation of these DMF-sensitive cysteines also impaired PKCθ-CD28 interactions and T cell activation, designating the C2 domain of PKCθ as a key functional, electrophile-sensing module important for T cell biology. PMID:27625306

  17. Double stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase is involved in osteoclast differentiation of RAW264.7 cells in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teramachi, Junpei [Department of Histology and Oral Histology, Institute of Health Biosciences, The University of Tokushima Graduate School, Kuramoto, Tokushima 770-8504 (Japan); Morimoto, Hiroyuki; Baba, Ryoko; Doi, Yoshiaki [Department of Anatomy, School of Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Yahatanishi, Kitakyushu 807-8555 (Japan); Hirashima, Kanji [Department of Histology and Oral Histology, Institute of Health Biosciences, The University of Tokushima Graduate School, Kuramoto, Tokushima 770-8504 (Japan); Haneji, Tatsuji, E-mail: tat-hane@dent.tokushima-u.ac.jp [Department of Histology and Oral Histology, Institute of Health Biosciences, The University of Tokushima Graduate School, Kuramoto, Tokushima 770-8504 (Japan)

    2010-11-15

    Double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) plays a critical role in antiviral defence of the host cells. PKR is also involved in cell cycle progression, cell proliferation, cell differentiation, tumorigenesis, and apoptosis. We previously reported that PKR is required for differentiation and calcification of osteoblasts. However, it is unknown about the role of PKR in osteoclast differentiation. A dominant-negative PKR mutant cDNA, in which the amino acid lysine at 296 was replaced with arginine, was transfected into RAW264.7 cells. We have established the cell line that stably expresses the PKR mutant gene (PKR-K/R). Phosphorylation of PKR and {alpha}-subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor 2 was not stimulated by polyinosic-polycytidylic acid in the PKR-K/R cells. RANKL stimulated the formation of TRAP-positive multinuclear cells in RAW264.7 cells. However, TRAP-positive multinuclear cells were not formed in the PKR-K/R cells even when the cells were stimulated with higher doses of RANKL. A specific inhibitor of PKR, 2-aminopurine, also suppressed the RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation in RAW264.7 cells. The expression of macrophage fusion receptor and dendritic cell-specific transmembrane protein significantly decreased in the PKR-K/R cells by real time PCR analysis. The results of RT-PCR revealed that the mRNA expression of osteoclast markers (cathepsin K and calcitonin receptor) was suppressed in the PKR-K/R cells and RAW264.7 cells treated with 2-aminopurine. Expression of NF-{kappa}B protein was suppressed in the PKR-K/R cells and 2-aminopurine-treated RAW264.7 cells. The level of STAT1 protein expression was elevated in the PKR-K/R cells compared with that of the wild-type cells. Immunohistochemical study showed that PKR was localized in osteoclasts of metatarsal bone of newborn mouse. The finding that the PKR-positive multinuclear cells should be osteoclasts was confirmed by TRAP-staining. Our present study indicates that PKR plays important

  18. Hepatic involvement of Langerhans cell histiocytosis in children - imaging findings of computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Yingyan; Qiao, Zhongwei; Gong, Ying; Yang, Haowei; Li, Guoping; Pa, Mier [Children' s Hospital of Fudan University, Department of Radiology, Shanghai (China); Xia, Chunmei [Shanghai Medical College of Fudan University, Physiology and Pathophysiology Department, Shanghai (China)

    2014-06-15

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis is a rare disease that occurs mainly in children, and hepatic involvement is generally a poor prognostic factor. To describe CT and MRI findings of hepatic involvement of Langerhans cell histiocytosis in children, especially the abnormal bile duct manifestation on magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP). Thirteen children (seven boys, six girls; mean age 28.9 months) were diagnosed with disseminated Langerhans cell histiocytosis. They underwent CT (n = 5) or MRI (n = 4), or CT and MRI examinations (n = 4) to evaluate the liver involvement. Periportal abnormalities presented as band-like or nodular lesions on CT and MRI in all 13 children. The hepatic parenchymal lesions were found in the peripheral regions of the liver in seven children, including multiple nodules on MRI (n = 6), and cystic-like lesions on CT and MRI (n = 3). In 11 of the 13 children the dilatations of the bile ducts were observed on CT and MRI. Eight of the 13 children underwent MR cholangiopancreatography, which demonstrated stenoses or segmental stenoses with slight dilatation of the central bile ducts, including the common hepatic duct and its first-order branches. The peripheral bile ducts in these children showed segmental dilatations and stenoses. Stenosis of the central bile ducts revealed by MR cholangiopancreatography was the most significant finding of liver involvement in Langerhans cell histiocytosis in children. (orig.)

  19. Hepatic involvement of Langerhans cell histiocytosis in children - imaging findings of computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis is a rare disease that occurs mainly in children, and hepatic involvement is generally a poor prognostic factor. To describe CT and MRI findings of hepatic involvement of Langerhans cell histiocytosis in children, especially the abnormal bile duct manifestation on magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP). Thirteen children (seven boys, six girls; mean age 28.9 months) were diagnosed with disseminated Langerhans cell histiocytosis. They underwent CT (n = 5) or MRI (n = 4), or CT and MRI examinations (n = 4) to evaluate the liver involvement. Periportal abnormalities presented as band-like or nodular lesions on CT and MRI in all 13 children. The hepatic parenchymal lesions were found in the peripheral regions of the liver in seven children, including multiple nodules on MRI (n = 6), and cystic-like lesions on CT and MRI (n = 3). In 11 of the 13 children the dilatations of the bile ducts were observed on CT and MRI. Eight of the 13 children underwent MR cholangiopancreatography, which demonstrated stenoses or segmental stenoses with slight dilatation of the central bile ducts, including the common hepatic duct and its first-order branches. The peripheral bile ducts in these children showed segmental dilatations and stenoses. Stenosis of the central bile ducts revealed by MR cholangiopancreatography was the most significant finding of liver involvement in Langerhans cell histiocytosis in children. (orig.)

  20. Transient Global Amnesia as the First Clinical Symptom for Malignant B-Cell Lymphoma with Central Nervous System Involvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atif Zafar

    2015-01-01

    be diagnosed with B-cell lymphoma with central nervous system involvement a few weeks later. This is the first ever case reported in literature with lymphoma presenting as TGA. Literature review and pertinent points regarding high-yield imaging protocol for presumed TGA patients are discussed.

  1. HCA520, A NOVEL TUMOR ASSOCIATED ANTIGEN, INVOLVED IN CELL PROLIFERATION AND APOPTOSIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨美香; 曲迅; 刘福利; 郑广娟

    2003-01-01

    Objective: Tumor associated antigen encoding gene HCA520 (AF146019) was identified by screening a human hepatocellular carcinoma expressing cDNA library using SEREX technique. In this experiment we studied the effect of HCA520 on cell proliferation and apoptosis. Methods: Gene HCA520 was gained by PCR and transfected into 293 cells. The stable expression cells were obtained by G418 selection. The cell proliferation was measured by [3H]-TdR uptake and apoptosis assay was measured by FACS. Results: Eukaryotic expression plasmid pcDNA3-HCA520 was constructed and its stable transfectants were obtained. Overexpression of HCA520 inhibited the cell proliferation and enhanced cell apoptosis after serum deprivation. Conclusion: HCA520 is a novel tumor associated antigen that can affect cell proliferation and apoptosis.

  2. NF-KB downregulation may be involved the depression of tumor cell proliferation mediated by human mesenchymal stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ling QIAO; Tie-jun ZHAO; Feng-ze WANG; Chang-liang SHAN; Li-hong YE; Xiao-dong ZHANG

    2008-01-01

    Aim:It has been reported that stem cells are able to home to tumorigenesis and inhibit the proliferation of tumor cells.The purpose of our study was to demon-strate the molecular mechanism of the inhibitory proliferation of hepatoma cells and breast cancer cells mediated by human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs).Methods:The proliferation of H7402 human hepatoma cells and MCF-7 human breast cancer cells was measured by the 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorpora-tion assay and flow cytometry assay after the treatment with conditioned media from hMSCs culture,such as Z3 cells or BMMS-03 cells.The role of NF-kB or the phosphorylation of inhibitor kBoα (p-IkBα) in the depression of hepatoma or breast cancer cells treated with conditioned media from Z3 cells or BMMS-03 cells was examined by reporter gene assay,quantitative real-time PCR,and Western blot analysis,respectively.Results:The proliferation of H7402 cells and MCF-7 cells was decreased significantly by the BrdU incorporation assay and flow cytometry assay after treatment.The transcriptional activity and mRNA level of NF-kB were downregulated in the treated cells by reporter gene assay and quantitative real-time PCR in a dose-dependent manner.At the protein level,NF-kB and p-IkBα decreased in the treated cells by Western blot analysis.Conclusion:Conditioned media from hMSCs are able to inhibit the proliferation of tumor cells.NF-kB downregulation is one of reasons for the depression of tumor cell proliferation mediated by hMSCs.

  3. γδ T cells are involved in acute HIV infection and associated with AIDS progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Early diagnosis is vital to HIV control. γδ T cells play critical roles in viral infections, but their activation in acute HIV infected patients and follow up to 18 months has not been described. METHODS: Changes in γδ T cells, including subsets, function and activation, in treated and untreated acutely HIV-infected patients (n = 79 were compared by cytotoxicity assay and flow cytometry with healthy controls (n = 21 at month 0, 6, 12 and 18. RESULTS: In acutely HIV-infected patients, Vδ1 cell proportion was elevated (P = 0.027 with Vδ2 population reduced (P = 0.002. Effector and central memory γδ T cell factions were decreased (P = 0.006 and P = 0.001, respectively, while proportion of terminal γδ T cells increased (P = 0.002. γδ T cell cytotoxicity was compromised over time. Fraction of IL-17-producing cells increased (P = 0.008, and IFN-γ-producing cells were unaffected (P = 0.115. Elevation of a microbial translocation marker, sCD14, was associated with γδ T cell activation (P = 0.001, which increased in a time-dependent manner, correlating with CD4/CD8 T cell activation set-points and CD4 counts. Antiretroviral therapy did not affect these changes. CONCLUSIONS: γδ T cell subpopulation and functions change significantly in acute HIV infection and over time. Early γδ T cell activation was associated with CD4/CD8 T cell activation set-points, which predict AIDS progression. Therefore, γδ T cell activation represents a potential surrogate marker of AIDS progression.

  4. Immune cell types involved in early uptake and transport of recombinant mouse prion protein in Peyer's patches of calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lwin, Sein; Inoshima, Yasuo; Atoji, Yasuro; Ueno, Hiroshi; Ishiguro, Naotaka

    2009-12-01

    We have previously reported the early uptake and transport of foreign particles into Peyer's patches (PPs) of newborn and 2-month-old calves and shown that the peak uptake of particles occurs 6 h after inoculation, in addition to site- and size-related effects on particle uptake. We now report the distribution of immune cells within PPs of the distal ileum in newborn and 2-month-old calves inoculated with carbon black. The types of immune cells involved in the early uptake and transport of recombinant mouse prion protein (rMPrP) within PPs of newborn calf were investigated by using monoclonal antibodies CD11c, CD14, CD68, CD172a, and CD21. CD11c(+), CD14(+), CD68(+), CD172a(+), and CD21(+) immune cells were widely distributed in four tissue compartments (villi, dome, interfollicular region, and follicles) of PPs in the distal ileum of newborn and 2-month-old calves, whereas CD11c(+), CD14(+), CD172a(+), and CD21(+) immune cells were more prominently distributed in the dome areas of newborn calves than in 2-month-old calves. Moreover, CD11c(+) and CD14(+) dendritic cells, CD172a(+) and CD68(+) macrophages, and CD21(+) follicular dendritic cells containing rMPrP were primarily observed in the dome and inner follicular regions. The deposition of rMPrP within CD11c(+), CD14(+), CD172a(+), and CD68(+) cells, but not CD21(+) cells, was detected in villous regions. rMPrP-positive immune cells within the interfollicular regions included only CD11c(+) and CD172(+) cells. Although the particles used in this investigation do not include the infectious prion protein, PrP(Sc), our experimental setup provides a useful model for studying immune cells involved in the early uptake and transport of PrP(Sc). PMID:19834742

  5. Melatonin sensitizes human breast cancer cells to ionizing radiation by downregulating proteins involved in double-strand DNA break repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-González, Carolina; González, Alicia; Martínez-Campa, Carlos; Gómez-Arozamena, José; Cos, Samuel

    2015-03-01

    Radiation and adjuvant endocrine therapy are nowadays considered a standard treatment option after surgery in breast cancer. Melatonin exerts oncostatic actions on human breast cancer cells. In the current study, we investigated the effects of a combination of radiotherapy and melatonin on human breast cancer cells. Melatonin (1 mm, 10 μm and 1 nm) significantly inhibited the proliferation of MCF-7 cells. Radiation alone inhibited the MCF-7 cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. Pretreatment of breast cancer cells with melatonin 1 wk before radiation led to a significantly greater decrease of MCF-7 cell proliferation compared with radiation alone. Melatonin pretreatment before radiation also decreased G2 -M phase arrest compared with irradiation alone, with a higher percentage of cells in the G0 -G1 phase and a lower percentage of cells in S phase. Radiation alone diminished RAD51 and DNA-protein kinase (PKcs) mRNA expression, two main proteins involved in double-strand DNA break repair. Treatment with melatonin for 7 days before radiation led to a significantly greater decrease in RAD51 and DNA-PKcs mRNA expression compared with radiation alone. Our findings suggest that melatonin pretreatment before radiation sensitizes breast cancer cells to the ionizing effects of radiation by decreasing cell proliferation, inducing cell cycle arrest and downregulating proteins involved in double-strand DNA break repair. These findings may have implications for designing clinical trials using melatonin and radiotherapy. PMID:25623566

  6. Endothelial differentiation gene-1, a new downstream gene is involved in RTEF-1 induced angiogenesis in endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping He

    Full Text Available Related Transcriptional Enhancer Factor-1 (RTEF-1 has been suggested to induce angiogenesis through regulating target genes. Whether RTEF-1 has a direct role in angiogenesis and what specific genes are involved in RTEF-1 driven angiogenisis have not been elucidated. We found that over-expressing RTEF-1 in Human dermal microvascular endothelial cells-1 (HMEC-1 significantly increased endothelial cell aggregation, growth and migration while the processes were inhibited by siRNA of RTEF-1. In addition, we observed that Endothelial differentiation gene-1 (Edg-1 expression was up-regulated by RTEF-1 at the transcriptional level. RTEF-1 could bind to Edg-1 promoter and subsequently induce its activity. Edg-1 siRNA significantly blocked RTEF-1-driven increases in endothelial cell aggregation in a Matrigel assay and retarded RTEF-1-induced endothelial cell growth and migration. Pertussis Toxin (PTX, a Gi/Go protein sensitive inhibitor, was found to inhibit RTEF-1 driven endothelial cell aggregation and migration. Our data demonstrates that Edg-1 is a potential target gene of RTEF-1 and is involved in RTEF-1-induced angiogenesis in endothelial cells. Gi/Go protein coupled receptor pathway plays a role in RTEF-1 driven angiogenesis in endothelial cells.

  7. The light chain 1 subunit of the microtubule-associated protein 1B (MAP1B is responsible for Tiam1 binding and Rac1 activation in neuronal cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel R Henríquez

    Full Text Available Microtubule-associated protein 1B (MAP1B is a neuronal protein involved in the stabilization of microtubules both in the axon and somatodendritic compartments. Acute, genetic inactivation of MAP1B leads to delayed axonal outgrowth, most likely due to changes in the post-translational modification of tubulin subunits, which enhances microtubule polymerization. Furthermore, MAP1B deficiency is accompanied by abnormal actin microfilament polymerization and dramatic changes in the activity of small GTPases controlling the actin cytoskeleton. In this work, we showed that MAP1B interacts with a guanine exchange factor, termed Tiam1, which specifically activates Rac1. These proteins co-segregated in neurons, and interact in both heterologous expression systems and primary neurons. We dissected the molecular domains involved in the MAP1B-Tiam1 interaction, and demonstrated that pleckstrin homology (PH domains in Tiam1 are responsible for MAP1B binding. Interestingly, only the light chain 1 (LC1 of MAP1B was able to interact with Tiam1. Moreover, it was able to increase the activity of the small GTPase, Rac1. These results suggest that the interaction between Tiam1 and MAP1B, is produced by the binding of LC1 with PH domains in Tiam1. The formation of such a complex impacts on the activation levels of Rac1 confirming a novel function of MAP1B related with the control of small GTPases. These results also support the idea of cross-talk between cytoskeleton compartments inside neuronal cells.

  8. STAT1 is involved in signal transduction in the EPO induced HEL cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANGCHU; CHANGYUNGUI; 等

    1998-01-01

    Erythropoietin(EPO) is the major regulator of mamalian erythropoisis,which stimulates the growth and differentiation of hematopoietic cells through interaction with its receptor(EPO-R),Here we use HEL cells (a human erythro-leukemia cell line) as a model to elucidate the pathway of signal transduction in the EPO-induced HEL cells.Our data show that the EPOR (EPO receptor) on the surface of HEL cells interacts with the Janus tyrosine protein kinase(Jak2) to transduce intracellular signals through phosphorylation of cytoplasmic proteins in EPO-treated HEL cells.Both STAT1 and STAT5 in this cell line are tyrosine-phosphorylated and translocated to nucleus following the dinding of EPO to HEL cells.Furthermore,the dinding of both STAT1 and STAT5 proteins to specific DNA elements(SIE and PIE elements) is revealed in an EPO-dependent manner,Our data demonstrate that the pathway of signal transduction following the binding of EPO to HEL cells is similar to immature eryhroid cell from the spleen of mice infected with anemia strain of Friend virus.

  9. SAP-Dependent and -Independent Regulation of Innate T Cell Development Involving SLAMF Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Calisto, Jaime; Wang, Ninghai; Wang, Guoxing; Yigit, Burcu; Engel, Pablo; Terhorst, Cox

    2014-01-01

    Signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM)-associated protein (SAP) plays an essential role in the immune system mediating the function of several members of the SLAM family (SLAMF) of receptors, whose expression is essential for T, NK, and B-cell responses. Additionally, the expression of SAP in double-positive thymocytes is mandatory for natural killer T (NKT) cells and, in mouse, for innate CD8(+) T cell development. To date, only two members of the SLAMF of receptors, Slamf1 and Slamf6, have been shown to positively cooperate during NKT cell differentiation in mouse. However, it is less clear whether other members of this family may also participate in the development of these innate T cells. Here, we show that Slamf[1 + 6](-/-) and Slamf[1 + 5 + 6](-/-) B6 mice have ~70% reduction of NKT cells compared to wild-type B6 mice. Unexpectedly, the proportion of innate CD8(+) T cells slightly increased in the Slamf[1 + 5 + 6](-/-) , but not in the Slamf[1 + 6](-/-) strain, suggesting that Slamf5 may function as a negative regulator of innate CD8(+) T cell development. Accordingly, Slamf5(-/-) B6 mice showed an exclusive expansion of innate CD8(+) T cells, but not NKT cells. Interestingly, the SAP-independent Slamf7(-/-) strain showed an expansion of both splenic innate CD8(+) T cells and thymic NKT cells. On the other hand, and similar to what was recently shown in Slamf3(-/-) BALB/c mice, the proportions of thymic promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger (PLZF(hi)) NKT cells and innate CD8(+) T cells significantly increased in the SAP-independent Slamf8(-/-) BALB/c strain. In summary, these results show that NKT and innate CD8(+) T cell development can be regulated in a SAP-dependent and -independent fashion by SLAMF receptors, in which Slamf1, Slamf6, and Slamf8 affect development of NKT cells, and that Slamf5, Slamf7, and Slamf8 affect the development of innate CD8(+) T cells.

  10. SAP-independent and -dependent regulation of innate T cell development involving SLAMF receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime eDe Calisto

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM-associated protein (SAP plays an essential role in the immune system mediating the function of several members of the SLAM family (SLAMF of receptors, whose expression is essential for T, NK, and B cell responses. Additionally, the expression of SAP in double-positive (DP thymocytes is mandatory for natural killer T (NKT cells and, in mouse, for innate CD8+ T cell development. To date, only two members of the SLAMF of receptors, Slamf1 and Slamf6, have been shown to positively cooperate during NKT cell differentiation in mouse. However, it is less clear whether other members of this family may also participate in the development of these innate T cells. Here, we show that Slamf[1+6]-/- and Slamf[1+5+6]-/- B6 mice have an approximately 70% reduction of NKT cells compared to wild-type (WT B6 mice. Unexpectedly, the proportion of innate CD8+ T cells slightly increased in the Slamf[1+5+6]-/-, but not in the Slamf[1+6]-/- strain, suggesting that Slamf5 may function as a negative regulator of innate CD8+ T cell development. Accordingly, Slamf5-/- B6 mice showed an exclusive expansion of innate CD8+ T cells, but not NKT cells. Interestingly, the SAP-independent Slamf7-/- strain showed an expansion of both splenic innate CD8+ T cells and thymic NKT cells. On the other hand, and similar to what was recently shown in Slamf3-/- BALB/c mice, the proportions of thymic PLZFhi NKT cells and innate CD8+ T cells significatively increased in the SAP-independent Slamf8-/- BALB/c strain. In summary, these results show that NKT and innate CD8+ T cell development can be regulated in a SAP-dependent and -independent fashion by SLAMF receptors, in which Slamf1, Slamf6, and Slamf8 affect development of NKT cells, and that Slamf5, Slamf7, and Slamf8 affect the development of innate CD8+ T cells.

  11. DIFFERENTIAL EXPRESSION OF GENES INVOLVED IN METABOLISM BETWEEN TUMORIGENITIC HUMAN LEUKEMIA CELL LINES K562 AND K562-n

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕书晴; 许小平; 夏放; 居小萍; 李瑶; 应康; 毛裕民

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To study the molecular mechanism of different tumorigenicity in nude mice of human leukemia cell lines K562-n and K562. Methods: To analyze the genes differently expressed between K562 and K562-n cells by using cDNA microarray technique. Results: Among the 12800 genes detected, some genes involved in material metabolism and material transport were differently expressed between K562-n and K562 cells. These genes include homo sapiens placenta-specific ATP-binding cassette transporter gene, dihydrodiol dehydrogenase gene, hepatic dihydrodiol dehydrogenase gene, NAD-dependent methylene tetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase cyclohydrolase, lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferase, alpha gene, argininosuccinate lyase gene, mitochondrial isocitrtate dehydrogenase, adhesion protein SQM1 gene, dimethylarginine dimethylamino-hydrolase gene, M1 subunit of ribonucleotide reductase and farnesyl pyrophosphate synthetase gene. Conclusion: The high tumorigenicity of K562-n cells is related to the different expression of some genes concerned with cell metabolism and material transpoert.

  12. Involvement of C2H2 zinc finger proteins in the regulation of epidermal cell fate determination in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    An Yan; Minjie Wu; Yongqin Zhao; Aidong Zhang; Bohan Liu; John Schiefelbein; Yinbo Gan

    2014-01-01

    Cell fate determination is a basic developmental process during the growth of multicellular organisms. Trichomes and root hairs of Arabidopsis are both readily accessible structures originating from the epidermal cells of the aerial tissues and roots respectively, and they serve as excellent models for understanding the molecular mecha-nisms controlling cell fate determination and cell morphogen-esis. The regulation of trichome and root hair formation is a complex program that consists of the integration of hormonal signals with a large number of transcriptional factors, including MYB and bHLH transcriptional factors. Studies during recent years have uncovered an important role of C2H2 type zinc finger proteins in the regulation of epidermal cell fate determination. Here in this minireview we briefly summarize the involvement of C2H2 zinc finger proteins in the control of trichome and root hair formation in Arabidopsis.

  13. Bax is not involved in the resveratrol-induced apoptosis in human lung adenocarcinoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei-wei; Wang, Zhi-ping; Chen, Tong-sheng

    2010-02-01

    Resveratrol (RV) is a natural plant polyphenol widely present in foods such as grapes, wine, and peanuts. Previous studies indicate that RV has an ability to inhibit various stages of carcinogenesis and eliminate preneoplastic cells in vitro and in vivo. However, little is known about the molecular mechanism of RV-induced apoptosis in human lung adenocarcinoma (ASTC-a-1) cell. In this report, we analyzed whether Bax translocation from cytoplasm to mitochondria during RV-induced apoptosis in single living cell using onfocal microscopey. Cells were transfected with GFP-Bax plasmid. Cell counting kit (CCK-8) assay was used to assess the inhibition of RV on the cells viability. Apoptotic activity of RV was detected by Hoechst 33258 and propidium iodide (PI) staining. Our results showed that RV induced a dose-dependent apoptosis in which Bax did not translocate to mitochondrias.

  14. Elemental mapping by synchrotron radiation X-Ray microfluorescence in cellular spheroid of prostate tumor cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leitao, R.G.; Anjos, M.J.; Lopes, R.T., E-mail: roberta@lin.ufrj.br [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Instrumentacao Nuclear; Santos, C.A.N. [Instituto Nacional de Metrologia, Qualidade e Tecnologia (INMETRO), Duque de Caxias, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Biotecnologia; Palumbo Junior, A.; Souza, P.A.V.R.; Nasciutti, L.E. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Instituto de Ciencias Biomedicas; Pereira, G.R. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Ensaios Nao Destrutivos, Corrosao e Soldagem

    2013-08-15

    Prostate cancer is the sixth most common type of cancer and the third most common in males in Western industrialized countries. Cellular spheroid serves as excellent physiologic tumor models as they mimic avascular tumors and micrometastases. Trace elements play a significant role in biological processes. They are capable of affecting human health by competing with essential elements for available binding sites and by the activation or inhibition of reactions between metabolic enzymes. It is well known that zinc levels in the peripheral zone of dorsal and lateral lobes of the prostate are almost 10 times higher than in other soft tissues. Prostate tumor cells were isolated of the prostate tissue samples that were collected from patients submitted to surgery. The measurements were performed in XRF beam line at the Synchrotron Light National Laboratory (LNLS) in Campinas, Brazil. The results showed that all elements were heterogeneously distributed in different areas of the spheroids analyzed. P, S and Cl showed similar elemental distribution in all the samples analyzed while K, Ca, Fe, and Cu showed different elemental distribution. In all spheroids analyzed, Zn presented more intense distributions in the central region of the spheroid. The relationship between the function of Zn in the secretory epithelial cells and the carcinogenic process suggests that more studies on elemental mapping in spheroids are necessary. (author)

  15. Mapping of ESE-1 subdomains required to initiate mammary epithelial cell transformation via a cytoplasmic mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tentler John J

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ETS family transcription factor ESE-1 is often overexpressed in human breast cancer. ESE-1 initiates transformation of MCF-12A cells via a non-transcriptional, cytoplasmic process that is mediated by a unique 40-amino acid serine and aspartic acid rich (SAR subdomain, whereas, ESE-1's nuclear transcriptional property is required to maintain the transformed phenotype of MCF7, ZR-75-1 and T47D breast cancer cells. Results To map the minimal functional nuclear localization (NLS and nuclear export (NES signals, we fused in-frame putative NLS and NES motifs between GFP and the SAR domain. Using these GFP constructs as reporters of subcellular localization, we mapped a single NLS to six basic amino acids (242HGKRRR247 in the AT-hook and two CRM1-dependent NES motifs, one to the pointed domain (NES1: 102LCNCALEELRL112 and another to the DNA binding domain (DBD, (NES2: 275LWEFIRDILI284. Moreover, analysis of a putative NLS located in the DBD (316GQKKKNSN323 by a similar GFP-SAR reporter or by internal deletion of the DBD, revealed this sequence to lack NLS activity. To assess the role of NES2 in regulating ESE-1 subcellular localization and subsequent transformation potency, we site-specifically mutagenized NES2, within full-length GFP-ESE-1 and GFP-NES2-SAR reporter constructs. These studies show that site-specific mutation of NES2 completely abrogates ESE-1 transforming activity. Furthermore, we show that exclusive cytoplasmic targeting of the SAR domain is sufficient to initiate transformation, and we report that an intact SAR domain is required, since block mutagenesis reveals that an intact SAR domain is necessary to maintain its full transforming potency. Finally, using a monoclonal antibody targeting the SAR domain, we demonstrate that the SAR domain contains a region accessible for protein - protein interactions. Conclusions These data highlight that ESE-1 contains NLS and NES signals that play a critical role in

  16. Polydatin Protects Bone Marrow Stem Cells against Oxidative Injury: Involvement of Nrf 2/ARE Pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Meihui Chen; Yu Hou; Dingkun Lin

    2016-01-01

    Polydatin, a glucoside of resveratrol, has been reported to possess potent antioxidative effects. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the effects of polydatin in bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) death caused by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), imitating the microenvironment surrounding transplanted cells in the injured spinal cord in vitro. In our study, MTT results showed that polydatin effectively prevented the decrease of cell viability caused by H2O2. Hochest 33258, A...

  17. Pulmonary Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis with Lytic Bone Involvement in an Adult Smoker: Regression following Smoking Cessation

    OpenAIRE

    Routy, B.; J. Hoang; Gruber, J

    2015-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a rare myeloid neoplasm characterized by the proliferation and dissemination of histiocytes. These in turn may cause symptoms ranging from isolated, infiltrative lesions to severe multisystem disease. Pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis (PLCH) presents as a localized polyclonal proliferation of Langerhans cells in the lungs causing bilateral cysts and fibrosis. In adults, this rare condition is considered a reactive process associated with cigarette ...

  18. Involvement of Tspan8 in exosome assembly and target cell selection

    OpenAIRE

    Rana, Sanyukta

    2010-01-01

    Exosomes are the most important intercellular communicators. Tetraspanins/their complexes are suggested to be important in exosomal target cell selection. I showed: changes in Tetraspanin8 associations created from internalization persist upto exosomes and, differences in tetraspanin-complexes on exosomes allow for target cell selectivity.Based on the tetraspanin-complex on exosomes, predictions on potential target cells might be possible, allowing tailored exosome generation for drug delivery.

  19. 3-bromopyruvate enhanced daunorubicin-induced cytotoxicity involved in monocarboxylate transporter 1 in breast cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Zhe LIU; Sun, Yiming; Hong, Haiyu; Zhao, Surong; Zou, Xue; Ma, Renqiang; Jiang, Chenchen; Wang, Zhiwei; Li, Huabin; Liu, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence demonstrates that the hexokinase inhibitor 3-bromopyruvate (3-BrPA) induces the cell apoptotic death by inhibiting ATP generation in human cancer cells. Interestingly, some tumor cell lines are less sensitive to 3-BrPA-induced apoptosis than others. Moreover, the molecular mechanism of 3-BrPA-trigged apoptosis is unclear. In the present study, we examined the effects of 3-BrPA on the viability of the breast cancer cell lines MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7. We further investigated th...

  20. T cell responses to human platelet antigen–1a involve a unique form of indirect allorecognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlen, Maria Therese; Husebekk, Anne; Killie, Ida Løken; Skogen, Bjørn

    2016-01-01

    Fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT) is a pregnancy-related condition caused by maternal antibodies binding an alloantigen on fetal platelets. In most cases the alloantigen is formed by a single amino acid, integrin β3 Leu33, referred to as human platelet antigen–1a (HPA-1a). Production of anti–HPA-1a antibodies likely depends on CD4+ T cells that recognize the same alloantigen in complex with the HLA-DRA/DRB3*01:01 molecule. While this complex is well characterized, T cell recognition of it is not. Here, to examine the nature of antigen recognition by HPA-1a–specific T cells, we assayed native and synthetic variants of the integrin β3 peptide antigen for binding to DRA/DRB3*01:01-positive antigen-presenting cells and for T cell activation. We found that HPA-1a–specific T cells recognize non-allogeneic integrin β3 residues anchored to DRA/DRB3*01:01 by the allogeneic Leu33, which itself is not directly recognized by these T cells. Furthermore, these T cell responses are diverse, with different T cells depending on different residues for recognition. This represents a unique form of indirect allorecognition in which a non-allogeneic peptide sequence becomes immunogenic by stable anchoring to MHC by an allogeneic residue. PMID:27699233

  1. Slit2 involvement in glioma cell migration is mediated by Robo1 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertsch, Sonja; Schmitz, Nicole; Jeibmann, Astrid; Geng, Jian-Guo; Paulus, Werner; Senner, Volker

    2008-03-01

    Slit and Robo proteins are evolutionarily conserved molecules whose interaction underlies axon guidance and neuronal precursor cell migration. During development secreted Slit proteins mediate chemorepulsive signals on cells expressing Robo receptors. Because similar molecular mechanisms may be utilized in glioma cell invasion and neuroblast migration, we studied the expression of Slit2 and its transmembrane receptor Robo1 as well as their functional role in migration in glioma cells. qRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry of human specimens revealed that Slit2 was distinctly expressed by non-neoplastic neurons, but at only very low levels in fibrillary astrocytoma and glioblastoma. Robo1 also was mainly restricted to neurons in the normal brain, whereas astrocytic tumor cells in situ as well as glioblastoma cell lines overexpressed Robo1 at mRNA and protein levels. Recombinant human Slit2 in a concentration of 0.45 nM was repulsive for glioma cell lines in a modified Boyden chamber assay. RNAi-mediated knockdown of Robo1 in glioma cell lines neutralized the repulsive effect of Slit2, demonstrating that Robo1 served as the major Slit2 receptor. Our findings suggest that a chemorepulsive effect mediated by interaction of Slit2 and Robo1 participates in glioma cell guidance in the brain.

  2. Meiotic and Mitotic Cell Cycle Mutants Involved in Gametophyte Development in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jingjing Liu; Li-Jia Qu

    2008-01-01

    The alternation between diploid and haploid generations is fundamentalin the life cycles of both animals and plants.The meiotic cell cycle is common to both animals and plants gamete formation, but in animals the products of meiosis are gametes,whereas for most plants,subsequent mitotic cell cycles are needed for their formation. Clarifying the regulatory mechanisms of mitotic cell cycle progression during gametophyte development will help understanding of sexual reproduction in plants.Many mutants defective in gametophyte development and,in particular,many meiotic and mitotic cell cycle mutants in Arabidopsis male and female gametophyte development were identified through both forward and reverse genetics approaches.

  3. Involvement of gene methylation changes in the differentiation of human amniotic epithelial cells into islet-like cell clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Lin; Wang, Jian; Lu, Guangxiu

    2014-09-01

    Insulin-dependent diabetes results from destruction of the insulin-producing β-cells of the pancreas. Islet cell transplantation is a promising cure for diabetes. Here, we induced human amniotic epithelial cells (hAECs) to differentiate into islet-like cell clusters by nicotinamide plus betacellulin in vitro, and further investigated the DNA methylation status by a Nimble MeDIP microarray before and after cell differentiation to shed light on the molecular mechanisms of this differentiation. In addition, 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine was used to investigate whether the differentiation of hAECs into islet-like cells occurred through demethylation. Purified hAECs (CK18(+)/E-cadherin(+)/CD29(+)/CD90(-)/CD34(-)/CD45(-)) were isolated from human amnia. After induction, hAECs were found to be insulin positive and sensitive to glucose, indicating successful induction to islet-like cells. The methylation status of cell cytoskeleton-related genes was down-regulated and that of negative regulation of cell adhesion-related genes was up-regulated. The methylation status of pancreas development-related genes such as HNF1α and DGAT1 was decreased in hAECs after induction. After brief demethylation, INS gene expression was up-regulated in islet-like cell clusters, suggesting that DNA methylation changes were associated with the differentiation of hAECs into islet-like cell clusters. PMID:24945458

  4. Involvement of CD244 in regulating CD4+ T cell immunity in patients with active tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingfen Yang

    Full Text Available CD244 (2B4 is a member of the signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM family of immune cell receptors and it plays an important role in modulating NK cell and CD8(+ T cell immunity. In this study, we investigated the expression and function of CD244/2B4 on CD4(+ T cells from active TB patients and latent infection individuals. Active TB patients had significantly elevated CD244/2B4 expression on M. tuberculosis antigen-specific CD4(+ T cells compared with latent infection individuals. The frequencies of CD244/2B4-expressing antigen-specific CD4(+ T cells were significantly higher in retreatment active TB patients than in new active TB patients. Compared with CD244/2B4-dull and -middle CD4(+ T cells, CD244/2B4-bright CD4(+ T cell subset had significantly reduced expression of IFN-γ, suggesting that CD244/2B4 expression may modulate IFN-γ production in M. tuberculosis antigen-responsive CD4(+ T cells. Activation of CD244/2B4 signaling by cross-linking led to significantly decreased production of IFN-γ. Blockage of CD244/2B4 signaling pathway of T cells from patients with active TB resulted in significantly increased production of IFN-γ, compared with isotype antibody control. In conclusion, CD244/2B4 signaling pathway has an inhibitory role on M. tuberculosis antigen-specific CD4(+ T cell function.

  5. Common molecular pathways involved in human CD133+/CD34+ progenitor cell expansion and cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vêncio Ricardo Z

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Uncovering the molecular mechanism underlying expansion of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells is critical to extend current therapeutic applications and to understand how its deregulation relates to leukemia. The characterization of genes commonly relevant to stem/progenitor cell expansion and tumor development should facilitate the identification of novel therapeutic targets in cancer. Methods CD34+/CD133+ progenitor cells were purified from human umbilical cord blood and expanded in vitro. Correlated molecular changes were analyzed by gene expression profiling using microarrays covering up to 55,000 transcripts. Genes regulated during progenitor cell expansion were identified and functionally classified. Aberrant expression of such genes in cancer was indicated by in silico SAGE. Differential expression of selected genes was assessed by real-time PCR in hematopoietic cells from chronic myeloid leukemia patients and healthy individuals. Results Several genes and signaling pathways not previously associated with ex vivo expansion of CD133+/CD34+ cells were identified, most of which associated with cancer. Regulation of MEK/ERK and Hedgehog signaling genes in addition to numerous proto-oncogenes was detected during conditions of enhanced progenitor cell expansion. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis confirmed down-regulation of several newly described cancer-associated genes in CD133+/CD34+ cells, including DOCK4 and SPARCL1 tumor suppressors, and parallel results were verified when comparing their expression in cells from chronic myeloid leukemia patients Conclusion Our findings reveal potential molecular targets for oncogenic transformation in CD133+/CD34+ cells and strengthen the link between deregulation of stem/progenitor cell expansion and the malignant process.

  6. CD26 surface molecule involvement in T cell activation and lymphokine synthesis in rheumatoid and other inflammatory synovitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerli, R; Muscat, C; Bertotto, A; Bistoni, O; Agea, E; Tognellini, R; Fiorucci, G; Cesarotti, M; Bombardieri, S

    1996-07-01

    T cell surface expression and the functional role of CD26 antigen (Ag), a surface ectoenzyme involved in T cell activation and migration across the extracellular matrix, were analyzed in the peripheral blood (PB) and synovial fluid (SF) from patients with inflammatory arthritides. CD26 membrane expression on T cells was detected by cytofluorometry using two different monoclonal antibodies, anti-Ta1 and anti-1F7, while cell proliferation and both IL-2 and IFN-gamma production were evaluated in anti-CD3- or anti-CD2-stimulated cell cultures after Ag surface modulation with anti-1F7. The results showed that Ta1 and 1F7 Ag expression were increased on T cells from PB of patients with active, but not inactive, rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Most SF T cells from RA or other inflammatory arthritides displayed the memory marker CD45R0 and the Ta1 Ag, but lacked the 1F7 molecule. In addition, in vitro 1F7 modulation, which enhanced RA PB T cell proliferation and both IL-2 and IFN-gamma synthesis, did not synergize with anti-CD3 or anti-CD2 in inducing IL-2-dependent activation of SF T cells, but reduced IFN-gamma production. A spontaneous reappearance of 1F7 Ag on the SF T cell surface was seen after 2-5 days in culture. Phorbol myristate acetate, able to accelerate its reexpression, also restored a normal response of SF T cells to anti-1F7 comitogenic effects. These data confirm a role of the CD26 surface molecule in regulating T cell activation and lymphokine synthesis. This observation may have important implications in the regulation of T cell activity at the joint level during chronic inflammatory processes. PMID:8674237

  7. Molecular mechanisms involved in TFF3 peptide-mediated modulation of the E-cadherin/catenin cell adhesion complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer zum Büschenfelde, Dirk; Hoschützky, Heinz; Tauber, Rudolf; Huber, Otmar

    2004-05-01

    TFF3 is a member of the TFF-domain peptide family which is constitutively expressed in mucous epithelial tissues where it acts as a motogenic factor and plays an important role during epithelial restitution after wounding and during inflammation. In contrast to these beneficial functions, TFFs were also reported to be involved in cell scattering and tumor invasion. These changes in epithelial cell morphology and motility are associated with a modulation of cell contacts. In this respect, we here investigated the E-cadherin/catenin cell adhesion complex in FLAG-hTFF3-transfected HT29/B6 and MDCK cells. In hTFF3-transfected cells the amount of E-cadherin is reduced with a concomitant reduction of alpha- and beta-catenin levels. On one hand, E-cadherin expression is lowered at the transcriptional level as shown by multiplex RT-PCR analysis. This decrease does not depend on differences in the promoter methylation status as shown by methylation-specific PCR. On the other hand, pulse-chase experiments showed a reduction in the E-cadherin half-life in hTFF3-transfected cells reflecting increased E-cadherin degradation. In summary, hTFF3 induces transcriptional and posttranslational processes resulting in a modulation of E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell contacts that may play an important role in the paradoxical benefical and pathogenic function of TFF peptides.

  8. Exploiting the power of LINE-1 retrotransposon mutagenesis for identification of genes involved in embryonic stem cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenka, Nibedita; Krishnan, Shruthi; Board, Philip; Rangasamy, Danny

    2014-06-01

    Identifying the genes or epigenetic factors that control the self-renewal and differentiation of stem cells is critical to understanding the molecular basis of cell commitment. Although a number of insertional mutagenesis vectors have been developed for identifying gene functions in animal models, the L1 retrotransposition system offers additional advantages as a tool to disrupt genes in embryonic stem cells in order to identify their functions and the phenotypes associated with them. Recent advances in producing synthetic versions of L1 retrotransposon vector system and the optimization of techniques to accurately identify retrotransposon integration sites have increased their utility for gene discovery applications. We have developed a novel episomal, nonviral L1 retrotransposon vector using scaffold/matrix attachment regions that provides stable, sustained levels of retrotransposition in cell cultures without being affected by epigenetic silencing or from some of the common problems of vector integration. This modified vector contains a GFP marker whose expression occurs only after successful gene disruption events and thus the cells with disrupted genes can be easily picked for functional analysis. Here we present a method to disrupt gene function in embryonic stem cells that aid in the identification of genes involved in stem cell differentiation processes. The methods presented here can be easily adapted to the study of other types of cancer stem cells or induced pluripotent stem cells using the L1 retrotransposon as an insertional mutagen.

  9. A cell-regulatory mechanism involving feedback between contraction and tissue formation guides wound healing progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Valero

    Full Text Available Wound healing is a process driven by cells. The ability of cells to sense mechanical stimuli from the extracellular matrix that surrounds them is used to regulate the forces that cells exert on the tissue. Stresses exerted by cells play a central role in wound contraction and have been broadly modelled. Traditionally, these stresses are assumed to be dependent on variables such as the extracellular matrix and cell or collagen densities. However, we postulate that cells are able to regulate the healing process through a mechanosensing mechanism regulated by the contraction that they exert. We propose that cells adjust the contraction level to determine the tissue functions regulating all main activities, such as proliferation, differentiation and matrix production. Hence, a closed-regulatory feedback loop is proposed between contraction and tissue formation. The model consists of a system of partial differential equations that simulates the evolution of fibroblasts, myofibroblasts, collagen and a generic growth factor, as well as the deformation of the extracellular matrix. This model is able to predict the wound healing outcome without requiring the addition of phenomenological laws to describe the time-dependent contraction evolution. We have reproduced two in vivo experiments to evaluate the predictive capacity of the model, and we conclude that there is feedback between the level of cell contraction and the tissue regenerated in the wound.

  10. Secretory phospholipase A2-mediated neuronal cell death involves glutamate ionotropic receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Turco, Elena B; Diemer, Nils Henrik; Bazan, Nicolas G;

    2002-01-01

    To define the significance of glutamate ionotropic receptors in sPLA -mediated neuronal cell death we used the NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 and the AMPA receptor antagonist PNQX. In primary neuronal cell cultures both MK-801 and PNQX inhibited sPLA - and glutamate-induced neuronal death. [ H]A...

  11. Autophagy is involved in doxorubicin induced resistance of human myeloma cell line RP-MI8226

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘耀柱

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the role of autophagy in doxorubicin (DOX) -induced resistance of human myeloma cell line RPMI8226.Methods We established doxorubicin induced resistant subline of myeloma cell line RPMI8226/DOX by drug concentration step-elevation method.Resistant index of DOX was measured by MTT

  12. Involvement of multiple loci on chromosome 3 in renal cell cancer development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, Anke; Buys, CHCM

    1997-01-01

    In renal cell carcinoma (RCC), mostly occurring as sporadic cases, the short arm of chromosome 3 is a frequent target of deletion events. Taking into account cytological classifications of RCC, the deletions appear to be characteristic of clear cell or nonpapillary RCC only. This subtype constitutes

  13. Genome-wide RNAi Screen Identifies Networks Involved in Intestinal Stem Cell Regulation in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiankun Zeng

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The intestinal epithelium is the most rapidly self-renewing tissue in adult animals and maintained by intestinal stem cells (ISCs in both Drosophila and mammals. To comprehensively identify genes and pathways that regulate ISC fates, we performed a genome-wide transgenic RNAi screen in adult Drosophila intestine and identified 405 genes that regulate ISC maintenance and lineage-specific differentiation. By integrating these genes into publicly available interaction databases, we further developed functional networks that regulate ISC self-renewal, ISC proliferation, ISC maintenance of diploid status, ISC survival, ISC-to-enterocyte (EC lineage differentiation, and ISC-to-enteroendocrine (EE lineage differentiation. By comparing regulators among ISCs, female germline stem cells, and neural stem cells, we found that factors related to basic stem cell cellular processes are commonly required in all stem cells, and stem-cell-specific, niche-related signals are required only in the unique stem cell type. Our findings provide valuable insights into stem cell maintenance and lineage-specific differentiation.

  14. The ability of thapsigargin and thapsigargicin to activate cells involved in the inflammatory response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ali, H; Christensen, S B; Foreman, J C;

    1985-01-01

    , and the number of mast cells in suspension. Thapsigargin induced histamine release from human basophil leukocytes. Thapsigargin induced beta-glucuronidase and lysozyme release from human neutrophil leukocytes. Thapsigargin caused a release of histamine from mesentery, lung, and heart mast cells of the rat...

  15. New aspects of vascular remodelling: the involvement of all vascular cell types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, John C; Deighan, Clare; Briones, Ana M; Shafaroudi, Majid Malekzadeh; McBride, Melissa; Adler, Jeremy; Arribas, Silvia M; Vila, Elisabet; Daly, Craig J

    2005-07-01

    Conventionally, the architecture of arteries is based around the close-packed smooth muscle cells and extracellular matrix. However, the adventitia and endothelium are now viewed as key players in vascular growth and repair. A new dynamic picture has emerged of blood vessels in a constant state of self-maintenance. Recent work raises fundamental questions about the cellular heterogeneity of arteries and the time course and triggering of normal and pathological remodelling. A common denominator emerging in hypertensive remodelling is an early increase in adventitial cell density suggesting that adventitial cells drive remodelling and may initiate subsequent changes such as re-arrangement of smooth muscle cells and extracellular matrix. The organization of vascular smooth muscle cells follows regular arrangements that can be modelled mathematically. In hypertension, new patterns can be quantified in these terms and give insights to how structure affects function. As with smooth muscle, little is known about the organization of the vascular endothelium, or its role in vascular remodelling. Current observations suggest that there may be a close relationship between the helical organization of smooth muscle cells and the underlying pattern of endothelial cells. The function of myoendothelial connections is a topic of great current interest and may relate to the structure of the internal elastic lamina through which the connections must pass. In hypertensive remodelling this must present an organizational challenge. The objective of this paper is to show how the functions of blood vessels depend on their architecture and a continuous interaction of different cell types and extracellular proteins.

  16. An adenylate kinase is involved in KATP channel regulation of mouse pancreatic beta cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schulze, D.U.; Dufer, M.; Wieringa, B.; Krippeit-Drews, P.; Drews, G.

    2007-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: In a previous study, we demonstrated that a creatine kinase (CK) modulates K(ATP) channel activity in pancreatic beta cells. To explore phosphotransfer signalling pathways in more detail, we examined whether K(ATP) channel regulation in beta cells is determined by a metabolic intera

  17. The Mannose Receptor Is Involved in the Phagocytosis of Mycobacteria-Induced Apoptotic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Garcia-Aguilar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Upon Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, macrophages may undergo apoptosis, which has been considered an innate immune response. The pathways underlying the removal of dead cells in homeostatic apoptosis have been extensively studied, but little is known regarding how cells that undergo apoptotic death during mycobacterial infection are removed. This study shows that macrophages induced to undergo apoptosis with mycobacteria cell wall proteins are engulfed by J-774A.1 monocytic cells through the mannose receptor. This demonstration was achieved through assays in which phagocytosis was inhibited with a blocking anti-mannose receptor antibody and with mannose receptor competitor sugars. Moreover, elimination of the mannose receptor by a specific siRNA significantly diminished the expression of the mannose receptor and the phagocytosis of apoptotic cells. As shown by immunofluorescence, engulfed apoptotic bodies are initially located in Rab5-positive phagosomes, which mature to express the phagolysosome marker LAMP1. The phagocytosis of dead cells triggered an anti-inflammatory response with the production of TGF-β and IL-10 but not of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-12 and TNF-α. This study documents the previously unreported participation of the mannose receptor in the removal of apoptotic cells in the setting of tuberculosis (TB infection. The results challenge the idea that apoptotic cell phagocytosis in TB has an immunogenic effect.

  18. Involvement of β-catenin in matrine-induced autophagy and apoptosis in WB-F344 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Bu-Shan; He, Xing-Xing; Ai, Zheng-Lin; Yao, Shu-Kun

    2014-06-01

    -α, a chemical inhibitor of p53, revealing that p53, interfering with β-catenin, may not be involved in matrine-induced autophagy in WB-F344 cells. These results demonstrate that β-catenin is involved in matrine-induced autophagy and apoptosis in WB-F344 cells, while β-catenin is negatively regulated by autophagy and positively by p53, indicating that β-catenin may be involved in the crosstalk between autophagy and apoptosis in WB-F344 cells.

  19. Involvement of Activating NK Cell Receptors and Their Modulation in Pathogen Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Marras

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural Killer (NK cells are endowed with cell-structure-sensing receptors providing inhibitory protection from self-destruction (inhibitory NK receptors, iNKRs, including killer inhibitory receptors and other molecules and rapid triggering potential leading to functional cell activation by Toll-like receptors (TLRs, cytokine receptors, and activating NK cell receptors including natural cytotoxicity receptors (NCRs, i.e., NKp46, NKp46, and NKp44. NCR and NKG2D recognize ligands on infected cells which may be endogenous or may directly bind to some structures derived from invading pathogens. In this paper, we address the known direct or indirect interactions between activating receptors and pathogens and their expression during chronic HIV and HCV infections.

  20. [Glial cells are involved in iron accumulation and degeneration of dopamine neurons in Parkinson's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hua-Min; Wang, Jun; Song, Ning; Jiang, Hong; Xie, Jun-Xia

    2016-08-25

    A growing body of evidence suggests that glial cells play an important role in neural development, neural survival, nerve repair and regeneration, synaptic transmission and immune inflammation. As the highest number of cells in the central nervous system, the role of glial cells in Parkinson's disease (PD) has attracted more and more attention. It has been confirmed that nigral iron accumulation contributes to the death of dopamine (DA) neurons in PD. Until now, most researches on nigral iron deposition in PD are focusing on DA neurons, but in fact glial cells in the central nervous system also play an important role in the regulation of iron homeostasis. Therefore, this review describes the role of iron metabolism of glial cells in death of DA neurons in PD, which could provide evidence to reveal the mechanisms underlying nigral iron accumulation of DA neurons in PD and provide the basis for discovering new potential therapeutic targets for PD. PMID:27546505

  1. Mitochondrial calcium uniporter protein MCU is involved in oxidative stress-induced cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yajin; Hao, Yumin; Chen, Hong; He, Qing; Yuan, Zengqiang; Cheng, Jinbo

    2015-06-01

    Mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) is a conserved Ca(2+) transporter at mitochondrial in eukaryotic cells. However, the role of MCU protein in oxidative stress-induced cell death remains unclear. Here, we showed that ectopically expressed MCU is mitochondrial localized in both HeLa and primary cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs). Knockdown of endogenous MCU decreases mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake following histamine stimulation and attenuates cell death induced by oxidative stress in both HeLa cells and CGNs. We also found MCU interacts with VDAC1 and mediates VDAC1 overexpression-induced cell death in CGNs. This finding demonstrates that MCU-VDAC1 complex regulates mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake and oxidative stress-induced apoptosis, which might represent therapeutic targets for oxidative stress related diseases.

  2. Bad is not involved in DHA-induced apoptosis in human lung adenocarcinoma ASTC-a-1 cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Huai-na; Lu, Ying-ying; Chen, Tong-sheng

    2011-03-01

    Dihydroartemisinin (DHA), a first-line anti-malarial drug with low toxicity, has been shown to possess promising anticancer activities and induce cancer cell death through apoptotic pathway, but the molecular mechanisms are not well understood. In this paper, we focus on whether Bad, a BH3-only pro-apoptotic protein, is involved in apoptotic cell death in DHA-treated human lung adenocarcinoma (ASTC-a-1) cells. Confocal fluorescence microscope imaging was used to monitor the temporal and spatial distribution of Bad in single living cells. Our results indicate that Bad is still located in cytoplasm and does not translocate to mitochondria after treatment with DHA for 24 h, while only a small proportion of Bad located in cytoplasm in the STS-treated cells for 6 h. These results show for the first time that Bad is not involved in DHA-induced apoptosis in ASTC-a-1 cells, which could give more evidence for the molecular mechanisms of apoptosis induced by DHA.

  3. Azadirachtin-induced apoptosis involves lysosomal membrane permeabilization and cathepsin L release in Spodoptera frugiperda Sf9 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zheng; Cheng, Xingan; Meng, Qianqian; Wang, Peidan; Shu, Benshui; Hu, Qiongbo; Hu, Meiying; Zhong, Guohua

    2015-07-01

    Azadirachtin as a kind of botanical insecticide has been widely used in pest control. We previously reported that azadirachtin could induce apoptosis of Spodoptera litura cultured cell line Sl-1, which involves in the up-regulation of P53 protein. However, the detailed mechanism of azadirachtin-induced apoptosis is not clearly understood in insect cultured cells. The aim of the present study was to address the involvement of lysosome and lysosomal protease in azadirachtin-induced apoptosis in Sf9 cells. The result confirmed that azadirachtin indeed inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis. The lysosomes were divided into different types as time-dependent manner, which suggested that changes of lysosomes were necessarily physiological processes in azadirachtin-induced apoptosis in Sf9 cells. Interestingly, we noticed that azadirachtin could trigger lysosomal membrane permeabilization and cathepsin L releasing to cytosol. Z-FF-FMK (a cathepsin L inhibitor), but not CA-074me (a cathepsin B inhibitor), could effectively hinder the apoptosis induced by azadirachtin in Sf9 cells. Meanwhile, the activity of caspase-3 could also be inactivated by the inhibition of cathepsin L enzymatic activity induced by Z-FF-FMK. Taken together, our findings suggest that azadirachtin could induce apoptosis in Sf9 cells in a lysosomal pathway, and cathepsin L plays a pro-apoptosis role in this process through releasing to cytosol and activating caspase-3. PMID:25849458

  4. Functional involvement of VAMP/synaptobrevin-2 in cAMP-stimulated aquaporin 2 translocation in renal collecting duct cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouraud, Sabine; Laera, Antonia; Calamita, Giuseppe; Carmosino, Monica; Procino, Giuseppe; Rossetto, Ornella; Mannucci, Roberta; Rosenthal, Walter; Svelto, Maria; Valenti, Giovanna

    2002-09-15

    The involvement of soluble N-ethylmaleimide sensitive factor-attachment protein receptor (SNARE) proteins in the cAMP-induced exocytosis of aquaporin 2 (AQP2)-containing vesicles was investigated in AQP2-transfected renal CD8 cells. RT-PCR and western blot analysis confirmed the presence of the SNARE homologs VAMP/synaptobrevin-2, syntaxin-1, syntaxin-4 and SNAP-23 in CD8 cells. Tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT) was efficient in cleaving synaptobrevin-like protein both in vitro and in intact CD8 cells incubated with the toxin. TeNT treatment in intact CD8 cells completely abolished cAMP-stimulated AQP2 targeting to the plasma membrane, as assessed by quantification of cell-surface immunoreactivity to an anti-AQP2 antibody raised against a peptide reproducing the extracellular AQP2 C-loop. These results represent the first evidence for the functional involvement of VAMP-2 in cAMP-induced AQP2 exocytosis in renal cells.

  5. Proteomics displays cytoskeletal proteins and chaperones involvement in Hedyotis corymbosa-induced photokilling in skin cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Bang-Jau; Wu, Yang-Chang; Wu, Chi-Yu; Bao, Bo-Ying; Chen, Mei-Yu; Chang, Yu-Hao; Lee, Hong-Zin

    2011-08-01

    Photodynamic therapy was found to be an effective therapy for local malignant tumors. This study demonstrated that 80 μg/ml Hedyotis corymbosa extracts with 0.8 J/cm(2) fluence dose caused M21 skin cancer cell death. Photoactivated H. corymbosa-induced M21 cell death is a typical apoptosis that is accompanied by nuclear condensation, externalization of phosphatidylserine and the changes in protein expression of apoptosis-related proteins, such as Bcl-2 and caspase family members. This study applied 2D electrophoresis to analyse the proteins involved in the photoactivated H. corymbosa-induced M21 cell apoptosis. We found 12 proteins to be markedly changed. According to the results of protein sequence analysis of these altered protein spots, we identified that the expression of cytoskeletal proteins and chaperones were involved in the photoactivated H. corymbosa-induced M21 cell apoptosis. We further demonstrated that photoactivated H. corymbosa caused a significant effect on the cytoskeleton distribution and mitochondrial activity in M21 cells. Based on the above findings, this study characterized the effects and mechanisms of the photoactivated H. corymbosa-induced apoptosis in M21 skin cancer cells. PMID:21569101

  6. Involvement of KLF14 and egr-1 in the TGF-beta1 action on Leydig cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, C R; Vallcaneras, S S; Calandra, R S; Gonzalez Calvar, S I

    2013-02-01

    Transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) is a pleiotropic cytokine that modulates cell homeostasis. In Leydig cells, TGF-β1 exerts stimulatory and inhibitory effect depending on the type I receptor involved in the signaling pathway. The aim of the present work was to study the signaling mechanisms and the intermediates involved in the action of TGF-β1 on TM3 Leydig cell proliferation in the presence or absence of progesterone. The MTT assay showed that the presence of progesterone in the culture media lead to a proliferative effect that was blocked by Ru 486, an inhibitor of progesterone receptor; and ALK-5 did not participate in this effect. TGF-β1 (1 ng/ml) increased the expression of p15 (an inhibitor of cell cycle) in TM3 Leydig cells, and this effect was blocked by progesterone (1μM). The expression of PCNA presented a higher increase in the cell cultured with TGF-β1 plus progesterone than in cells cultured only with TGF-β1. Progesterone induced the gene expression of endoglin, a cofactor of TGF-β1 receptor that leads to a stimulatory signaling pathway, despite of the absence of progesterone response element in endoglin gene. In addition, the presence of progesterone induced the gene expression of egr-1 and also KLF14, indicating that this steroid channels the signaling pathway into a non-canonical mechanism. In conclusion, these findings suggest that the proliferative action of TGF-β1 involves endoglin. This co-receptor might be induced by KLF14 which is probably activated by progesterone. PMID:23317878

  7. MicroRNAs involved in neoplastic transformation of liver cancer stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xinchuan

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The existence of cancer stem cells in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC has been verified by characterizing side population (SP cells based on efflux of Hoechst 33342 dye from stem cells. Recent advances in microRNA (miRNA biology have revealed that miRNAs play an important role in embryonic development and tumorigenesis. However, it is still unclear which miRNAs participate in the neoplastic transformation of liver cancer stem cells (LCSCs during hepatocarcinogenesis. Methods To identify the unique set of miRNAs differentially regulated in LCSCs, we applied SP sorting to primary cultures of F344 rat HCC cancer cells treated with diethylnitrosamine (DEN and normal syngenic fetal liver cells, and the stem-like characteristics of SP cells were verified through detecting expression of CD90.1, AFP and CK-7. Global miRNA expression profiles of two groups of SP cells were screened through microarray platform. Results A total of 68 miRNAs, including miR-10b, miR-21, miR-470*, miR-34c-3p, and let-7i*, were identified as overexpressed in SP of HCC cells compared to fetal liver cells. Ten miRNAs were underexpressed, including miR-200a* and miR-148b*. These miRNAs were validated using stem-loop real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Conclusions Our results suggest that LCSCs may have a distinct miRNA expression fingerprint during hepatocarcinogenesis. Dissecting these relationships will provide a new understanding of the function of miRNA in the process of neoplastic transformation of LCSCs.

  8. Inhibition of Myeloid Cell Leukemia 1 and Activation of Caspases Are Critically Involved in Gallotannin-induced Apoptosis in Prostate Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eunkyung; Kwon, Hee Young; Jung, Ji Hoon; Jung, Deok-Beom; Jeong, Arong; Cheon, Jinhong; Kim, Bonglee; Kim, Sung-Hoon

    2015-08-01

    Although gallotannin contained in several medicinal plants was known to have multi-biological activities, such as antioxidant, antiinflammatory, antimicrobial, immunomodulatory, and antitumor effects, the underlying apoptotic mechanism of gallotannin is not fully understood so far. Thus, in the present study, the apoptotic mechanism of gallotannin was elucidated in DU145, PC-3, and M2182 prostate cancer cells in association with myeloid cell leukemia 1 (Mcl-1) signaling. Gallotannin exerted dose-dependent cytotoxicity in DU145, PC-3, and M2182 prostate cancer cells. Also, gallotannin showed apoptotic morphological features and increased the number of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling positive cells and sub-G1 accumulation in three prostate cancer cell lines. Consistently, gallotannin cleaved poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and attenuated the expression of procaspases 9 and 3 in three prostate cancer cell lines. Furthermore, gallotannin attenuated the expression of survival genes such as Mcl-1, B-cell lymphoma 2, and B-cell lymphoma 2 extra large in three prostate cancer cell lines. Interestingly, overexpression of Mcl-1 reversed the ability of gallotannin to cleave PARP and increase sub-G1 population in three prostate cancer cell lines. Conversely, silencing of Mcl-1 enhanced apoptosis by gallotannin in three prostate cancer cell lines by FACSCalibur (Becton Dickinson, Franklin Lakes, NJ, USA). Taken together, our findings demonstrate that inhibition of Mcl-1 and activation of caspases are critically involved in gallotannin-induced apoptosis in prostate cancer cells. PMID:26014377

  9. Identification of three gp350/220 regions involved in Epstein-Barr virus invasion of host cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urquiza, Mauricio; Lopez, Ramses; Patiño, Helena; Rosas, Jaiver E; Patarroyo, Manuel E

    2005-10-21

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) invasion of B-lymphocytes involves EBV gp350/220 binding to B-lymphocyte CR2. The anti-gp350 monoclonal antibody (mAb)-72A1 Fab inhibits this binding and therefore blocks EBV invasion of target cells. However, gp350/220 regions interacting with mAb 72A1 and involved in EBV invasion of target cells have not yet been identified. This work reports three gp350/220 regions, defined by peptide 11382, 11389, and 11416 sequences, that are involved in EBV binding to B-lymphocytes. Peptides 11382, 11389, and 11416 bound to CR2(+) but not to CR2(-) cells, inhibited EBV invasion of cord blood lymphocytes (CBLs), were recognized by mAb 72A1, and inhibited mAb 72A1 binding to EBV. Peptides 11382 and 11416 binding to peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) induced interleukin-6 protein synthesis in these cells, this phenomenon being inhibited by mAb 72A1. The same behavior has been reported for gp350/220 binding to PBLs. Anti-peptide 11382, 11389, and 11416 antibodies inhibited EBV binding and EBV invasion of PBLs and CBLs. Peptide 11382, 11389, and 11416 sequences presented homology with the C3dg regions coming into contact with CR2 (C3dg and gp350 bound to similar CR2 regions). These peptides could be used in designing strategies against EBV infection. PMID:16087675

  10. CyDiv, a Conserved and Novel Filamentous Cyanobacterial Cell Division Protein Involved in Septum Localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandakovic, Dinka; Trigo, Carla; Andrade, Derly; Riquelme, Brenda; Gómez-Lillo, Gabriela; Soto-Liebe, Katia; Díez, Beatriz; Vásquez, Mónica

    2016-01-01

    Cell division in bacteria has been studied mostly in Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis, model organisms for Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, respectively. However, cell division in filamentous cyanobacteria is poorly understood. Here, we identified a novel protein, named CyDiv (Cyanobacterial Division), encoded by the all2320 gene in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120. We show that CyDiv plays a key role during cell division. CyDiv has been previously described only as an exclusive and conserved hypothetical protein in filamentous cyanobacteria. Using polyclonal antibodies against CyDiv, we showed that it localizes at different positions depending on cell division timing: poles, septum, in both daughter cells, but also in only one of the daughter cells. The partial deletion of CyDiv gene generates partial defects in cell division, including severe membrane instability and anomalous septum localization during late division. The inability to complete knock out CyDiv strains suggests that it is an essential gene. In silico structural protein analyses and our experimental results suggest that CyDiv is an FtsB/DivIC-like protein, and could therefore, be part of an essential late divisome complex in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120. PMID:26903973

  11. A novel Drosophila Girdin-like protein is involved in Akt pathway control of cell size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puseenam, Aekkachai [Department of Applied Biology, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Insect Biomedical Research Center, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Yoshioka, Yasuhide [Department of Applied Biology, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Venture Laboratory, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Nagai, Rika [Department of Applied Biology, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Insect Biomedical Research Center, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Hashimoto, Reina [Department of Applied Biology, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Venture Laboratory, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Suyari, Osamu [Insect Biomedical Research Center, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Itoh, Masanobu [Department of Applied Biology, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Insect Biomedical Research Center, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Enomoto, Atsushi [Department of Pathology, Center for Neurological Disease and Cancer, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Showa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 466-8550 (Japan); Takahashi, Masahide [Insect Biomedical Research Center, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Department of Pathology, Center for Neurological Disease and Cancer, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Showa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 466-8550 (Japan); Yamaguchi, Masamitsu, E-mail: myamaguc@kit.ac.jp [Department of Applied Biology, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Insect Biomedical Research Center, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan)

    2009-11-15

    The Akt signaling pathway is well known to regulate cell proliferation and growth. Girdin, a novel substrate of Akt, plays a crucial role in organization of the actin cytoskeleton and cell motility under the control of Akt. We here identified a novel Girdin-like protein in Drosophila (dGirdin), which has two isoforms, dGirdin PA and dGirdin PB. dGirdin shows high homology with human Girdin in the N-terminal and coiled-coil domains, while diverging at the C-terminal domain. On establishment of transgenic fly lines, featuring knockdown or overexpression of dGirdin in vivo, overexpression in the wing disc cells induced ectopic apoptosis, implying a role in directing apoptosis. Knockdown of dGirdin in the Drosophila wing imaginal disc cells resulted in reduction of cell size. Furthermore, this was enhanced by half reduction of the Akt gene dose, suggesting that Akt positively regulates dGirdin. In the wing disc, cells in which dGirdin was knocked down exhibited disruption of actin filaments. From these in vivo analyses, we conclude that dGirdin is required for actin organization and regulation of appropriate cell size under control of the Akt signaling pathway.

  12. CyDiv, a conserved and novel filamentous Cyanobacteria cell division protein involved in septum localization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinka eMandakovic

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Cell division in bacteria has been studied mostly in Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis, model organisms for Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, respectively. However, cell division in filamentous cyanobacteria is poorly understood. Here, we identified a novel protein, named CyDiv (Cyanobacterial Division, encoded by the all2320 gene in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120. We show that CyDiv plays a key role during cell division. CyDiv has been previously described only as an exclusive and conserved hypothetical protein in filamentous cyanobacteria. Using polyclonal antibodies against CyDiv, we showed that it localizes at different positions depending on cell division timing: poles, septum, in both daughter cells, but also in only one of the daughter cells. The partial deletion of CyDiv gene generates partial defects in cell division, including severe membrane instability and anomalous septum localization during late division. The inability to complete knock out CyDiv strains suggests that it is an essential gene. In silico structural protein analyses and our experimental results suggest that CyDiv is an FtsB/DivIC-like protein, and could therefore, be part of an essential late divisome complex in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120.

  13. Inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase promotes tumor cell resistance to chemotherapeutic agents via a mechanism involving delay in cell cycle progression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, Gail T.; Sullivan, Richard; Pare, Genevieve C.; Graham, Charles H., E-mail: grahamc@queensu.ca

    2010-11-15

    Approaches to overcome chemoresistance in cancer cells have involved targeting specific signaling pathways such as the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway, a stress response pathway known to be involved in the regulation of cell survival, apoptosis and growth. The present study determined the effect of PI3K inhibition on the clonogenic survival of human cancer cells following exposure to various chemotherapeutic agents. Treatment with the PI3K inhibitors LY294002 or Compound 15e resulted in increased survival of MDA-MB-231 breast carcinoma cells after exposure to doxorubicin, etoposide, 5-fluorouracil, and vincristine. Increased survival following PI3K inhibition was also observed in DU-145 prostate, HCT-116 colon and A-549 lung carcinoma cell lines exposed to doxorubicin. Increased cell survival mediated by LY294002 was correlated with a decrease in cell proliferation, which was linked to an increase in the proportion of cells in the G{sub 1} phase of the cell cycle. Inhibition of PI3K signaling also resulted in higher levels of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p21{sup Waf1/Cip1} and p27{sup Kip1}; and knockdown of p27{sup kip1} with siRNA attenuated resistance to doxorubicin in cells treated with LY294002. Incubation in the presence of LY294002 after exposure to doxorubicin resulted in decreased cell survival. These findings provide evidence that PI3K inhibition leads to chemoresistance in human cancer cells by causing a delay in cell cycle; however, the timing of PI3K inhibition (either before or after exposure to anti-cancer agents) may be a critical determinant of chemosensitivity.

  14. Ryanodine receptors are involved in nuclear calcium oscillation in primary pancreatic {beta}-cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Ji [Urological Surgery Research Institute, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing (China); National Laboratory of Biomacromolecules, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Chen, Zheng [National Laboratory of Biomacromolecules, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Department of Molecular and Integrative Physiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Yin, Wenxuan; Miao, Lin [National Laboratory of Biomacromolecules, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Zhou, Zhansong, E-mail: Zhouzhansong@sohu.com [Urological Surgery Research Institute, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing (China); Ji, Guangju, E-mail: Gj28@ibp.ac.cn [National Laboratory of Biomacromolecules, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China)

    2012-06-29

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We found that RyRs are expressed on the nuclear envelope in single primary pancreatic {beta}-cells and isolated nuclei. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We showed that the pattern of glucose-induced Ca{sup 2+} oscillation in the nucleus and cytosol was similar. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Our results demonstrate that ryanodine-sensitive Ca{sup 2+} stores exist and have function in the pancreatic {beta}-cell nucleus. -- Abstract: Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) are mainly located on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and play an important role in regulating glucose-induced cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} oscillation in pancreatic {beta}-cells. However, subcellular locations and functions of RyRs on other cell organelles such as nuclear envelope are not well understood. In order to investigate the role of RyRs in nuclear Ca{sup 2+} oscillation we designed and conducted experiments in intact primary pancreatic {beta}-cells. Immunocytochemistry was used to examine the expression of RYRs on the nuclear envelope. Confocal microscopy was used to evaluate the function of RYRs on the nuclear envelope. We found that RyRs are expressed on the nuclear envelope in single primary pancreatic {beta}-cells and isolated nuclei. Laser scanning confocal microscopy studies indicated that application of glucose to the cells co-incubated with Ca{sup 2+} indicator Fluo-4 AM and cell-permeable nuclear indicator Hoechst 33342 resulted in nuclear Ca{sup 2+} oscillation. The pattern of glucose-induced Ca{sup 2+} oscillation in the nucleus and cytosol was similar. The reduction of Ca{sup 2+} oscillation amplitude by ryanodine was much greater in the nucleus though both the cytosol and the nucleus Ca{sup 2+} amplitude decreased by ryanodine. Our results suggest that functional ryanodine receptors not only exist in endoplasmic reticulum but are also expressed in nuclear envelope of pancreatic {beta}-cells.

  15. Mapping Cd²⁺-induced membrane permeability changes of single live cells by means of scanning electrochemical microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filice, Fraser P; Li, Michelle S M; Henderson, Jeffrey D; Ding, Zhifeng

    2016-02-18

    Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy (SECM) is a powerful, non-invasive, analytical methodology that can be used to investigate live cell membrane permeability. Depth scan SECM imaging allowed for the generation of 2D current maps of live cells relative to electrode position in the x-z or y-z plane. Depending on resolution, one depth scan image can contain hundreds of probe approach curves (PACs). Individual PACs were obtained by simply extracting vertical cross-sections from the 2D image. These experimental PACs were overlaid onto theoretically generated PACs simulated at specific geometry conditions. Simulations were carried out using 3D models in COMSOL Multiphysics to determine the cell membrane permeability coefficients at different locations on the surface of the cells. Common in literature, theoretical PACs are generated using a 2D axially symmetric geometry. This saves on both compute time and memory utilization. However, due to symmetry limitations of the model, only one experimental PAC right above the cell can be matched with simulated PAC data. Full 3D models in this article were developed for the SECM system of live cells, allowing all experimental PACs over the entire cell to become usable. Cd(2+)-induced membrane permeability changes of single human bladder (T24) cells were investigated at several positions above the cell, displaced from the central axis. The experimental T24 cells under study were incubated with Cd(2+) in varying concentrations. It is experimentally observed that 50 and 100 μM Cd(2+) caused a decrease in membrane permeability, which was uniform across all locations over the cell regardless of Cd(2+) concentration. The Cd(2+) was found to have detrimental effects on the cell, with cells shrinking in size and volume, and the membrane permeability decreasing. A mapping technique for the analysis of the cell membrane permeability under the Cd(2+) stress is realized by the methodology presented. PMID:26826690

  16. FTIR spectroscopic imaging and mapping with correcting lenses for studies of biological cells and tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimber, James A; Foreman, Liberty; Turner, Benjamin; Rich, Peter; Kazarian, Sergei G

    2016-06-23

    Histopathology of tissue samples is used to determine the progression of cancer usually by staining and visual analysis. It is recognised that disease progression from healthy tissue to cancerous is accompanied by spectral signature changes in the mid-infrared range. In this work, FTIR spectroscopic imaging in transmission mode using a focal plane array (96 × 96 pixels) has been applied to the characterisation of Barrett's oesophageal adenocarcinoma. To correct optical aberrations, infrared transparent lenses were used of the same material (CaF2) as the slide on which biopsies were fixed. The lenses acted as an immersion objective, reducing scattering and improving spatial resolution. A novel mapping approach using a sliding lens is presented where spectral images obtained with added lenses are stitched together such that the dataset contained a representative section of the oesophageal tissue. Images were also acquired in transmission mode using high-magnification optics for enhanced spatial resolution, as well as with a germanium micro-ATR objective. The reduction of scattering was assessed using k-means clustering. The same tissue section map, which contained a region of high grade dysplasia, was analysed using hierarchical clustering analysis. A reduction of the trough at 1077 cm(-1) in the second derivative spectra was identified as an indicator of high grade dysplasia. In addition, the spatial resolution obtained with the lens using high-magnification optics was assessed by measurements of a sharp interface of polymer laminate, which was also compared with that achieved with micro ATR-FTIR imaging. In transmission mode using the lens, it was determined to be 8.5 μm and using micro-ATR imaging, the resolution was 3 μm for the band at a wavelength of ca. 3 μm. The spatial resolution was also assessed with and without the added lens, in normal and high-magnification modes using a USAF target. Spectroscopic images of cells in transmission mode using two

  17. Wounding coordinately induces cell wall protein, cell cycle and pectin methyl esterase genes involved in tuber closing layer and wound periderm development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubauer, Jonathan D; Lulai, Edward C; Thompson, Asunta L; Suttle, Jeffrey C; Bolton, Melvin D

    2012-04-15

    Little is known about the coordinate induction of genes that may be involved in agriculturally important wound-healing events. In this study, wound-healing events were determined together with wound-induced expression profiles of selected cell cycle, cell wall protein, and pectin methyl esterase genes using two diverse potato genotypes and two harvests (NDTX4271-5R and Russet Burbank tubers; 2008 and 2009 harvests). By 5 d after wounding, the closing layer and a nascent phellogen had formed. Phellogen cell divisions generated phellem layers until cessation of cell division at 28 d after wounding for both genotypes and harvests. Cell cycle genes encoding epidermal growth factor binding protein (StEBP), cyclin-dependent kinase B (StCDKB) and cyclin-dependent kinase regulatory subunit (StCKS1At) were induced by 1 d after wounding; these expressions coordinated with related phellogen formation and the induction and cessation of phellem cell formation. Genes encoding the structural cell wall proteins extensin (StExt1) and extensin-like (StExtlk) were dramatically up-regulated by 1-5 d after wounding, suggesting involvement with closing layer and later phellem cell layer formation. Wounding up-regulated pectin methyl esterase genes (StPME and StPrePME); StPME expression increased during closing layer and phellem cell formation, whereas maximum expression of StPrePME occurred at 5-14 d after wounding, implicating involvement in later modifications for closing layer and phellem cell formation. The coordinate induction and expression profile of StTLRP, a gene encoding a cell wall strengthening "tyrosine-and lysine-rich protein," suggested a role in the formation of the closing layer followed by phellem cell generation and maturation. Collectively, the genes monitored were wound-inducible and their expression profiles markedly coordinated with closing layer formation and the index for phellogen layer meristematic activity during wound periderm development; results were more

  18. The involvement of NF-κB in PDT-induced death of crayfish glial and nerve cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berezhnaya, E. V.; Neginskaya, M. A.; Kovaleva, V. D.; Rudkovskii, M. V.; Uzdensky, A. B.

    2015-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is used for selective destruction of cells, in particular, for treatment of brain tumors. However, photodynamic treatment damages not only tumor cells, but also healthy neurons and glial cells. To study the possible role of NF-κB in photodynamic injury of neurons and glial cells, we investigated the combined effect of photodynamic treatment and NF-κB modulators: activator betulinic acid, or inhibitors parthenolide and CAPE on an isolated crayfish stretch receptor consisting of a single neuron surrounded by glial cells. A laser diode (670 nm, 0.4 W/cm2) was used as a light source. The inhibition of NF-κB during PDT increased the duration of neuron firing and glial necrosis and decreased neuron necrosis and glial apoptosis. The activation of NF-κB during PDT increased neuron necrosis and glial apoptosis and decreased glial necrosis. The difference between the effects of NF-κB modulators on photosensitized neurons and glial cells indicates the difference in NF-κB-mediated signaling pathways in these cell types. Thus, NF-κB is involved in PDT-induced shortening of neuron firing, neuronal and glial necrosis, and apoptosis of glial cells.

  19. Polydatin Protects Bone Marrow Stem Cells against Oxidative Injury: Involvement of Nrf 2/ARE Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Meihui; Hou, Yu; Lin, Dingkun

    2016-01-01

    Polydatin, a glucoside of resveratrol, has been reported to possess potent antioxidative effects. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the effects of polydatin in bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) death caused by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), imitating the microenvironment surrounding transplanted cells in the injured spinal cord in vitro. In our study, MTT results showed that polydatin effectively prevented the decrease of cell viability caused by H2O2. Hochest 33258, Annexin V-PI, and Western blot assay showed H2O2-induced apoptosis in BMSCs, which was attenuated by polydatin. Further studies indicated that polydatin significantly protects BMSCs against apoptosis due to its antioxidative effects and the regulation of Nrf 2/ARE pathway. Taken together, our results indicate that polydatin could be used in combination with BMSCs for the treatment of spinal cord injury by improving the cell survival and oxidative stress microenvironments. PMID:27022401

  20. Polydatin Protects Bone Marrow Stem Cells against Oxidative Injury: Involvement of Nrf 2/ARE Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meihui Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Polydatin, a glucoside of resveratrol, has been reported to possess potent antioxidative effects. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the effects of polydatin in bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs death caused by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, imitating the microenvironment surrounding transplanted cells in the injured spinal cord in vitro. In our study, MTT results showed that polydatin effectively prevented the decrease of cell viability caused by H2O2. Hochest 33258, Annexin V-PI, and Western blot assay showed H2O2-induced apoptosis in BMSCs, which was attenuated by polydatin. Further studies indicated that polydatin significantly protects BMSCs against apoptosis due to its antioxidative effects and the regulation of Nrf 2/ARE pathway. Taken together, our results indicate that polydatin could be used in combination with BMSCs for the treatment of spinal cord injury by improving the cell survival and oxidative stress microenvironments.

  1. Gap junctional protein Cx43 is involved in the communication between extracellular vesicles and mammalian cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soares, Ana Rosa; Martins-Marques, Tania; Ribeiro-Rodrigues, Teresa; Ferreira, Joao Vasco; Catarino, Steve; Pinho, Maria Joao; Zuzarte, Monica; Anjo, Sandra Isabel; Manadas, Bruno; Sluijter, Joost P. G.; Pereira, Paulo; Girao, Henrique

    2015-01-01

    Intercellular communication is vital to ensure tissue and organism homeostasis and can occur directly, between neighbour cells via gap junctions (GJ), or indirectly, at longer distances, through extracellular vesicles, including exosomes. Exosomes, as intercellular carriers of messenger molecules, m

  2. Does primary myelofibrosis involve a defective stem cell niche? From concept to evidence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lataillade, J.J.; Pierre-Louis, O.; Uzan, G.;

    2008-01-01

    Primary myelofibrosis (PMF) is the rarest and the most severe Philadelphia-negative chronic myeloproliferative syndrome. By associating a clonal proliferation and a mobilization of hematopoietic stem cells from bone marrow to spleen with profound alterations of the stroma, PMF is a remarkable model...... in which deregulation of the stem cell niche is of utmost importance for the disease development. This paper reviews key data suggesting that an imbalance between endosteal and vascular niches participates in the development of clonal stem cell proliferation. Mechanisms by which bone marrow niches...... are altered with ensuing mobilization and homing of neoplastic hematopoietic stem cells in new or reinitialized niches in the spleen and liver are examined. Differences between signals delivered by both endosteal and vascular niches in the bone marrow and spleen of patients as well as the responsiveness...

  3. Intercellular communication patterns are involved in cell determination in early molluscan development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Laat, S W; Tertoolen, L G; Dorresteijn, A W; van den Biggelaar, J A

    1980-10-01

    The formation of specialized intercellular junctions, allowing the passage of low-molecular weight regulatory molecules, has been considered as a possible mechanism for regulating embryonic development. No direct evidence for this concept has been found in early development. In the mollusc Pattella vulgata it was demonstrated that cell positioning and specific cellular interactions are key factors in the control of early development. We have now investigated the pattern of intercellular communication during early development of this embryo by intracellular iontophoresis of the fluorescent dye Lucifer Yellow CH. We demonstrate that the formation of regional- and temporal-specific cell-to-cell coupling is correlated with the determination of the mesentoblast--the stem cell of the mesoderm--and the establishment of dorso-ventral polarity. PMID:7422006

  4. Retinal Cell Death Caused by Sodium Iodate Involves Multiple Caspase-Dependent and Caspase-Independent Cell-Death Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmin Balmer

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Herein, we have investigated retinal cell-death pathways in response to the retina toxin sodium iodate (NaIO3 both in vivo and in vitro. C57/BL6 mice were treated with a single intravenous injection of NaIO3 (35 mg/kg. Morphological changes in the retina post NaIO3 injection in comparison to untreated controls were assessed using electron microscopy. Cell death was determined by TdT-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL staining. The activation of caspases and calpain was measured using immunohistochemistry. Additionally, cytotoxicity and apoptosis in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE cells, primary retinal cells, and the cone photoreceptor (PRC cell line 661W were assessed in vitro after NaIO3 treatment using the ApoToxGlo™ assay. The 7-AAD/Annexin-V staining was performed and necrostatin (Nec-1 was administered to the NaIO3-treated cells to confirm the results. In vivo, degenerating RPE cells displayed a rounded shape and retracted microvilli, whereas PRCs featured apoptotic nuclei. Caspase and calpain activity was significantly upregulated in retinal sections and protein samples from NaIO3-treated animals. In vitro, NaIO3 induced necrosis in RPE cells and apoptosis in PRCs. Furthermore, Nec-1 significantly decreased NaIO3-induced RPE cell death, but had no rescue effect on treated PRCs. In summary, several different cell-death pathways are activated in retinal cells as a result of NaIO3.

  5. Involvement of miRNAs in the differentiation of human glioblastoma multiforme stem-like cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Aldaz

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM-initiating cells (GICs represent a tumor subpopulation with neural stem cell-like properties that is responsible for the development, progression and therapeutic resistance of human GBM. We have recently shown that blockade of NFκB pathway promotes terminal differentiation and senescence of GICs both in vitro and in vivo, indicating that induction of differentiation may be a potential therapeutic strategy for GBM. MicroRNAs have been implicated in the pathogenesis of GBM, but a high-throughput analysis of their role in GIC differentiation has not been reported. We have established human GIC cell lines that can be efficiently differentiated into cells expressing astrocytic and neuronal lineage markers. Using this in vitro system, a microarray-based high-throughput analysis to determine global expression changes of microRNAs during differentiation of GICs was performed. A number of changes in the levels of microRNAs were detected in differentiating GICs, including over-expression of hsa-miR-21, hsa-miR-29a, hsa-miR-29b, hsa-miR-221 and hsa-miR-222, and down-regulation of hsa-miR-93 and hsa-miR-106a. Functional studies showed that miR-21 over-expression in GICs induced comparable cell differentiation features and targeted SPRY1 mRNA, which encodes for a negative regulator of neural stem-cell differentiation. In addition, miR-221 and miR-222 inhibition in differentiated cells restored the expression of stem cell markers while reducing differentiation markers. Finally, miR-29a and miR-29b targeted MCL1 mRNA in GICs and increased apoptosis. Our study uncovers the microRNA dynamic expression changes occurring during differentiation of GICs, and identifies miR-21 and miR-221/222 as key regulators of this process.

  6. Involvement of miRNAs in the Differentiation of Human Glioblastoma Multiforme Stem-Like Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldaz, Beatriz; Sagardoy, Ainara; Nogueira, Lorena; Guruceaga, Elizabeth; Grande, Lara; Huse, Jason T.; Aznar, Maria A.; Díez-Valle, Ricardo; Tejada-Solís, Sonia; Alonso, Marta M.; Fernandez-Luna, Jose L.

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM)-initiating cells (GICs) represent a tumor subpopulation with neural stem cell-like properties that is responsible for the development, progression and therapeutic resistance of human GBM. We have recently shown that blockade of NFκB pathway promotes terminal differentiation and senescence of GICs both in vitro and in vivo, indicating that induction of differentiation may be a potential therapeutic strategy for GBM. MicroRNAs have been implicated in the pathogenesis of GBM, but a high-throughput analysis of their role in GIC differentiation has not been reported. We have established human GIC cell lines that can be efficiently differentiated into cells expressing astrocytic and neuronal lineage markers. Using this in vitro system, a microarray-based high-throughput analysis to determine global expression changes of microRNAs during differentiation of GICs was performed. A number of changes in the levels of microRNAs were detected in differentiating GICs, including over-expression of hsa-miR-21, hsa-miR-29a, hsa-miR-29b, hsa-miR-221 and hsa-miR-222, and down-regulation of hsa-miR-93 and hsa-miR-106a. Functional studies showed that miR-21 over-expression in GICs induced comparable cell differentiation features and targeted SPRY1 mRNA, which encodes for a negative regulator of neural stem-cell differentiation. In addition, miR-221 and miR-222 inhibition in differentiated cells restored the expression of stem cell markers while reducing differentiation markers. Finally, miR-29a and miR-29b targeted MCL1 mRNA in GICs and increased apoptosis. Our study uncovers the microRNA dynamic expression changes occurring during differentiation of GICs, and identifies miR-21 and miR-221/222 as key regulators of this process. PMID:24155920

  7. Identification of microRNAs involved in osteoblast differentiation of murine embryonic stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kaniowska, Dorota

    2012-01-01

    Skeletal development requires stringent control of programs for gene activation and suppression in response to physiological cues. There has been a principal focus on the identification of the mechanisms by which a particular cell phenotype is activated. MicroRNAs (miRNAs, miRs) have emerged as key negative regulators of diverse biological and pathological processes, including developmental timing, organogenesis, apoptosis, cell proliferation and differentiation; how they regulate osteoblast ...