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  1. Improved cellular uptake of antisense Peptide nucleic acids by conjugation to a cell-penetrating Peptide and a lipid domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shiraishi, Takehiko; Nielsen, Peter E

    2011-01-01

    peptides known as cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) is attracting wide attention for a variety of biologically active molecules. CPP-mediated delivery is typically based on the covalent conjugation of the (therapeutic) cargo to CPPs, and is particularly relevant for the delivery of noncharged RNA...... interference agents such as peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) and morpholino oligomers. Although chemical conjugation to a variety of CPPs significantly improves the cellular uptake of PNAs, the bioavailability (and hence antisense activity) of CPP-PNA -conjugates is still highly limited by endocytotic entrapment...

  2. Cell Surface Enzymatic Engineering-Based Approaches to Improve Cellular Therapies

    KAUST Repository

    Abuelela, Ayman F.

    2014-06-06

    The cell surface represents the interface between the cell and its environment. As such, the cell surface controls cell–cell interactions and functions such as adhesion and migration, and will transfer external cues to regulate processes such as survival, death, and differentiation. Redefining the cell surface by temporarily (or permanently) modifying the molecular landscape of the plasma membrane affects the way in which the cell interacts with its environment and influences the information that is relayed into the cell along downstream signaling pathways. This chapter outlines the role of key enzymes, the glycosyltransferases, in posttranslationally modifying proteins and lipids to fine-tune cells, ability to migrate. These enzymes are critical in controlling the formation of a platform structure, sialyl Lewis x (sLex), on circulating cells that plays a central role in the recognition and recruitment by selectin counter receptors on endothelial cells that line blood vessels of tissues throughout the body. By developing methods to manipulate the activity of these enzymes and hence the cell surface structures that result, treatments can be envisioned that direct the migration of therapeutic cells to specific locations throughout the body and also to inhibit metastasis of detrimental cells such as circulating tumor cells.

  3. Cellular Cell Bifurcation of Cylindrical Detonations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Gui-Lai; JIANG Zong-Lin; WANG Chun; ZHANG Fan

    2008-01-01

    Cellular cell pattern evolution of cylindrically-diverging detonations is numerically simulated successfully by solving two-dimensional Euler equations implemented with an improved two-step chemical kinetic model. From the simulation, three cell bifurcation modes are observed during the evolution and referred to as concave front focusing, kinked and wrinkled wave front instability, and self-merging of cellular cells. Numerical research demonstrates that the wave front expansion resulted from detonation front diverging plays a major role in the cellular cell bifurcation, which can disturb the nonlinearly self-sustained mechanism of detonations and finally lead to cell bifurcations.

  4. Improving cellular function and immune protection via layer-by-layer nanocoating of pancreatic islet β-cell spheroids cocultured with mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaiji, Tasneem; Zhi, Zheng-Liang; Pickup, John C

    2012-06-01

    Islet transplantation as a therapy for type 1 diabetes is currently limited by lack of primary transplant material from human donors and post-transplantation loss of islets caused by adverse immune and nonimmune reactions. This study aimed to develop a novel strategy to create microenvironment for islets via integration of nanoencapsulation with cell cocultures, thereby enhancing their survival and function. The nanoencapsulation was achieved via layer-by-layer deposition of phosphorycholine-modified poly-L-lysine/heparin leading to the formation of nanometer-thick multilayer coating on islets. Spheroids formed by coculturing MIN6 β-cells with mesenchymal stem cells in suspension were used as the tool for testing encapsulation. Coculturing MSCs with MIN6 cells allowed the cell constructs to enhance structural and morphologic stability with improved insulin secretory function and render them less susceptible to inflammatory cytokine-induced apoptosis. Combining nanoencapsulation with coculture of MSCs/MIN6 resulted in higher glucose responsiveness, and lower antibody binding and apoptosis-inducing effects of cytokines. This strategy of nanoencapsulating islet cocultures appears promising to improve cellular delivery of insulin for treating type 1 diabetes. PMID:22447690

  5. Cellular renewal and improvement of local cell effector activity in peritoneal cavity in response to infectious stimuli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra dos Anjos Cassado

    Full Text Available The peritoneal cavity (PerC is a singular compartment where many cell populations reside and interact. Despite the widely adopted experimental approach of intraperitoneal (i.p. inoculation, little is known about the behavior of the different cell populations within the PerC. To evaluate the dynamics of peritoneal macrophage (MØ subsets, namely small peritoneal MØ (SPM and large peritoneal MØ (LPM, in response to infectious stimuli, C57BL/6 mice were injected i.p. with zymosan or Trypanosoma cruzi. These conditions resulted in the marked modification of the PerC myelo-monocytic compartment characterized by the disappearance of LPM and the accumulation of SPM and monocytes. In parallel, adherent cells isolated from stimulated PerC displayed reduced staining for β-galactosidase, a biomarker for senescence. Further, the adherent cells showed increased nitric oxide (NO and higher frequency of IL-12-producing cells in response to subsequent LPS and IFN-γ stimulation. Among myelo-monocytic cells, SPM rather than LPM or monocytes, appear to be the central effectors of the activated PerC; they display higher phagocytic activity and are the main source of IL-12. Thus, our data provide a first demonstration of the consequences of the dynamics between peritoneal MØ subpopulations by showing that substitution of LPM by a robust SPM and monocytes in response to infectious stimuli greatly improves PerC effector activity.

  6. Targeting CD44 expressing cancer cells with anti-CD44 monoclonal antibody improves cellular uptake and antitumor efficacy of liposomal doxorubicin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arabi, Leila; Badiee, Ali; Mosaffa, Fatemeh; Jaafari, Mahmoud Reza

    2015-12-28

    Although liposomes improve the safety and pharmacokinetic properties of free drugs, they have not sufficiently enhanced the therapeutic efficacy compared to them. To address this problem, targeted therapy of tumor cells holds great promise to further enhance therapeutic index and decreases off-target effects compared with non-targeted liposomes. In the context of antibody-mediated targeted cancer therapy, we evaluated the anti-tumor activity and therapeutic efficacy of Doxil, and that of Doxil modified with a monoclonal antibody (mAb) against CD44, which is one of the most well-known surface markers associated with Cancer Stem Cells (CSCs). Flow cytometry analyses and confocal laser scanning microscopy results showed significant enhanced cellular uptake of CD44-targeted Doxil (CD44-Doxil) in CD44-positive C-26 cells compared to Doxil. However, CD44-negative NIH-3T3 cells showed a similar uptake and in vitro cytotoxicity with both CD44-Doxil and non-targeted Doxil. In BALB/c mice bearing C-26 murine carcinoma, CD44-Doxil groups exhibited significantly higher doxorubicin concentration (than Doxil) inside the tumor cells, while their circulation time and distribution profile remained comparable. CD44-Doxil at doses of either 10 or 15 mg/kg resulted in superior tumor growth inhibition and higher inclination to tumor, indicating the potential of anti-CD44 mAb targeting in therapeutic efficacy improvement. This study provides proof-of-principle for actively tumor-targeting concept and merits further investigations. PMID:26518722

  7. Tuneable nanoparticle-nanofiber composite substrate for improved cellular adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolini, Ariana M; Toth, Tyler D; Yoon, Jeong-Yeol

    2016-09-01

    This work presents a novel technique using a reverse potential electrospinning mode for fabricating nanoparticle-embedded composites that can be tailored to represent various fiber diameters, surface morphologies, and functional groups necessary for improved cellular adhesion. Polycaprolactone (PCL) nanofibers were electrospun in both traditional positive (PP) and reverse potential (RP) electrical fields. The fibers were incorporated with 300nm polystyrene (PS) fluorescent particles, which contained carboxyl, amine groups, and surfactants. In the unconventional RP, the charged colloidal particles and surfactants were shown to have an exaggerated effect on Taylor cone morphology and fiber diameter caused by the changes in charge density and surface tension of the bulk solution. The RP mode was shown to lead to a decrease in fiber diameter from 1200±100nm (diameter±SE) for the nanofibers made with PCL alone to 440±80nm with the incorporation of colloidal particles, compared to the PP mode ranging from 530±90nm to 350±50nm, respectively. The nanoparticle-nanofiber composite substrates were cultured with human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and evaluated for cellular viability and adhesion for up to 5 days. Adhesion to the nanofibrous substrates was improved by 180±10% with the addition of carboxylated particles and by 480±60% with the functionalization of an RGD ligand compared to the PCL nanofibers. The novel approach of electrospinning in the RP mode with the addition of colloids in order to alter charge density and surface tension could be utilized towards many applications, one being implantable biomaterials and tissue engineered scaffolds as demonstrated in this work. PMID:27315331

  8. Comparison of Cell formation techniques in Cellular manufacturing using three cell formation algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhat Kumar Giri

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present era of globalization and competitive market, cellular manufacturing has become a vital tool for meeting the challenges of improving productivity, which is the way to sustain growth. Getting best results of cellular manufacturing depends on the formation of the machine cells and part families. This paper examines advantages of ART method of cell formation over array based clustering algorithms, namely ROC-2 and DCA. The comparison and evaluation of the cell formation methods has been carried out in the study. The most appropriate approach is selected and used to form the cellular manufacturing system. The comparison and evaluation is done on the basis of performance measure as grouping efficiency and improvements over the existing cellular manufacturing system is presented.

  9. Influence of cell size on cellular uptake of gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinlong; Hu, Xiaohong; Li, Jingchao; Russe, Adriana C Mulero; Kawazoe, Naoki; Yang, Yingnan; Chen, Guoping

    2016-06-24

    Nanoparticles (NPs) have shown great potential for biomedical applications because of their unique physical and structural properties. A critical aspect for their clinical applications is cellular uptake that depends on both particle properties and the cell mechanical state. Despite the numerous studies trying to disclose the influencing factors, the role of cell size on cellular uptake remains unclear. In this study, poly(vinyl alcohol) was micropatterned on tissue culture polystyrene surfaces using UV photolithography to control the cell size, and the influence of cell size on the cellular uptake of gold NPs was investigated. Cells with a large size had a high total cellular uptake, but showed a low average uptake per unit area of cells. Cells with a small size showed opposite behaviors. The results were related to both cell/NP contacting area and membrane tension. A large cell size was beneficial for a high total cellular uptake due to the large contact area with the NPs. On the other hand, the large cell size resulted in high membrane tension that required high wrapping energy for engulfing of NPs and thus reduced the uptake. The two oppositely working effects decided the cellular uptake of NPs. The results would shed light on the influence of the cellular microenvironment on cellular uptake behavior. PMID:27095054

  10. Half-Cell Law of Regular Cellular Detonations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Chun; JIANG Zong-Lin; GAO Yun-Liang

    2008-01-01

    Numerical simulations illustrate the half-cell law of regular cellular detonations propagating in confined space,i.e., the number of cells always maintains an integral multiple of half cell. The cells adapt themselves larger or smaller to the size of the unconfined space by maintaining the cell scale larger or smaller than the original cells of detonation.

  11. Live cell tracking based on cellular state recognition from microscopic images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Y-N; Lin, C-H; Kuo, C-C; Ho, C-L; Lin, C-J

    2009-07-01

    The analysis of cell motion is an essential process in fundamental medical studies because most active cellular functions involve motion. In this paper, a computer-assisted motion analysis system is proposed for cell tracking. In the proposed tracking process, unlike in conventional tracking methods, cellular states referring to the cellular life cycle are defined and appropriate strategies are adopted for cells at different states. The use of cellular state recognition allows detection of possible cell division and hence can improve the robustness of cell tracking. Experimental results show that cells can be successfully segmented and tracked over a long period of time, and the proposed system is found to be as accurate as manual tracking. Various quantitative analyses and visualizations are used to represent cell motion, which demonstrates the usefulness of the proposed system in the study of cell dynamics. PMID:19566631

  12. Radiation and chemical interactions producing cellular and subcellular damage and their repair. Coordinated programme on improvement in radiotherapy of cancer using modifiers of radiosensitivity of cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a result of biochemical studies on the DNA repair of damages induced by ionizing radiation as well as on the radiosensitization with chemicals containing halogen atoms, it was suggested that inhibition of the post-irradiation repair by chemical factors may be useful in improving the radiotherapy. It was possbile to prepare an in vitro repair system in combination with transforming DNA of Bacillus subtilis as well as human placenta extracts; it was shown that certain radiosensitizers worked actually as repair inhibitors in this in vitro system

  13. Improving Quality of Clustering using Cellular Automata for Information retrieval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. K. Sree

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Clustering has been widely applied to Information Retrieval (IR on the grounds of its potential improved effectiveness over inverted file search. Clustering is a mostly unsupervised procedure and the majority of the clustering algorithms depend on certain assumptions in order to define the subgroups present in a data set .A clustering quality measure is a function that, given a data set and its partition into clusters, returns a non-negative real number representing the quality of that clustering. Moreover, they may behave in a different way depending on the features of the data set and their input parameters values. Therefore, in most applications the resulting clustering scheme requires some sort of evaluation as regards its validity. The quality of clustering can be enhanced by using a Cellular Automata Classifier for information retrieval. In this study we take the view that if cellular automata with clustering is applied to search results (query-specific clustering, then it has the potential to increase the retrieval effectiveness compared both to that of static clustering and of conventional inverted file search. We conducted a number of experiments using ten document collections and eight hierarchic clustering methods. Our results show that the effectiveness of query-specific clustering with cellular automata is indeed higher and suggest that there is scope for its application to IR.

  14. Cellular bridges: Routes for intercellular communication and cell migration

    OpenAIRE

    Zani, Brett G.; Edelman, Elazer R.

    2010-01-01

    Cell-to-cell communication is the basis of all biology in multicellular organisms, allowing evolution of complex forms and viability in dynamic environments. Though biochemical interactions occur over distances, physical continuity remains the most direct means of cellular interactions. Cellular bridging through thin cytoplasmic channels—plasmodesmata in plants and tunneling nanotubes in animals—creates direct routes for transfer of signals and components, even pathogens, between cells. Recen...

  15. Cellular pressure and volume regulation and implications for cell mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hongyuan; Sun, Sean X

    2013-08-01

    In eukaryotic cells, small changes in cell volume can serve as important signals for cell proliferation, death, and migration. Volume and shape regulation also directly impacts the mechanics of cells and tissues. Here, we develop a mathematical model of cellular volume and pressure regulation, incorporating essential elements such as water permeation, mechanosensitive channels, active ion pumps, and active stresses in the cortex. The model can fully explain recent experimental data, and it predicts cellular volume and pressure for several models of cell cortical mechanics. Moreover, we show that when cells are subjected to an externally applied load, such as in an atomic force microscopy indentation experiment, active regulation of volume and pressure leads to a complex cellular response. Instead of the passive mechanics of the cortex, the observed cell stiffness depends on several factors working together. This provides a mathematical explanation of rate-dependent response of cells under force. PMID:23931309

  16. Cell Surface Sensors: Lightning the Cellular Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Ali, Md Monsur; Kang, Dong-Ku; Tsang, Kyle; Fu, Moyu; Karp, Jeffrey M; Zhao, Weian

    2012-01-01

    Cell surface sensors are powerful tools to elucidate cell functions including cell signaling, metabolism and cell-to-cell communication. These sensors not only facilitate our understanding in basic biology but also advance the development of effective therapeutics and diagnostics. While genetically encoded fluorescent protein/peptide sensors have been most popular, emerging cell surface sensor systems including polymer-, nanoparticle-, and nucleic acid aptamer-based sensors have largely expan...

  17. A sub-cellular viscoelastic model for cell population mechanics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousef Jamali

    Full Text Available Understanding the biomechanical properties and the effect of biomechanical force on epithelial cells is key to understanding how epithelial cells form uniquely shaped structures in two or three-dimensional space. Nevertheless, with the limitations and challenges posed by biological experiments at this scale, it becomes advantageous to use mathematical and 'in silico' (computational models as an alternate solution. This paper introduces a single-cell-based model representing the cross section of a typical tissue. Each cell in this model is an individual unit containing several sub-cellular elements, such as the elastic plasma membrane, enclosed viscoelastic elements that play the role of cytoskeleton, and the viscoelastic elements of the cell nucleus. The cell membrane is divided into segments where each segment (or point incorporates the cell's interaction and communication with other cells and its environment. The model is capable of simulating how cells cooperate and contribute to the overall structure and function of a particular tissue; it mimics many aspects of cellular behavior such as cell growth, division, apoptosis and polarization. The model allows for investigation of the biomechanical properties of cells, cell-cell interactions, effect of environment on cellular clusters, and how individual cells work together and contribute to the structure and function of a particular tissue. To evaluate the current approach in modeling different topologies of growing tissues in distinct biochemical conditions of the surrounding media, we model several key cellular phenomena, namely monolayer cell culture, effects of adhesion intensity, growth of epithelial cell through interaction with extra-cellular matrix (ECM, effects of a gap in the ECM, tensegrity and tissue morphogenesis and formation of hollow epithelial acini. The proposed computational model enables one to isolate the effects of biomechanical properties of individual cells and the

  18. SoftCell: Taking Control of Cellular Core Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, Xin; Li, Li Erran; Vanbever, Laurent; Rexford, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Existing cellular networks suffer from inflexible and expensive equipment, and complex control-plane protocols. To address these challenges, we present SoftCell, a scalable architecture for supporting fine-grained policies for mobile devices in cellular core networks. The SoftCell controller realizes high-level service polices by directing traffic over paths that traverse a sequence of middleboxes, optimized to the network conditions and user locations. To ensure scalability, the core switche...

  19. Targeted cellular ablation based on the morphology of malignant cells

    OpenAIRE

    Ivey, Jill W.; Eduardo L. Latouche; Sano, Michael B.; John H. Rossmeisl; Davalos, Rafael V.; Verbridge, Scott S.

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is especially challenging due to a shortage of methods to preferentially target diffuse infiltrative cells, and therapy-resistant glioma stem cell populations. Here we report a physical treatment method based on electrical disruption of cells, whose action depends strongly on cellular morphology. Interestingly, numerical modeling suggests that while outer lipid bilayer disruption induced by long pulses (~100 μs) is enhanced for larger cells, short pu...

  20. Cellular Pressure and Volume Regulation and Implications for Cell Mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Hongyuan; Sun, Sean X.

    2013-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, small changes in cell volume can serve as important signals for cell proliferation, death, and migration. Volume and shape regulation also directly impacts the mechanics of cells and tissues. Here, we develop a mathematical model of cellular volume and pressure regulation, incorporating essential elements such as water permeation, mechanosensitive channels, active ion pumps, and active stresses in the cortex. The model can fully explain recent experimental data, and it pr...

  1. Monkey hybrid stem cells develop cellular features of Huntington's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorthongpanich Chanchao

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pluripotent stem cells that are capable of differentiating into different cell types and develop robust hallmark cellular features are useful tools for clarifying the impact of developmental events on neurodegenerative diseases such as Huntington's disease. Additionally, a Huntington's cell model that develops robust pathological features of Huntington's disease would be valuable for drug discovery research. Results To test this hypothesis, a pluripotent Huntington's disease monkey hybrid cell line (TrES1 was established from a tetraploid Huntington's disease monkey blastocyst generated by the fusion of transgenic Huntington's monkey skin fibroblast and a wild-type non-transgenic monkey oocyte. The TrES1 developed key Huntington's disease cellular pathological features that paralleled neural development. It expressed mutant huntingtin and stem cell markers, was capable of differentiating to neural cells, and developed teratoma in severely compromised immune deficient (SCID mice. Interestingly, the expression of mutant htt, the accumulation of oligomeric mutant htt and the formation of intranuclear inclusions paralleled neural development in vitro , and even mutant htt was ubiquitously expressed. This suggests the development of Huntington's disease cellular features is influenced by neural developmental events. Conclusions Huntington's disease cellular features is influenced by neural developmental events. These results are the first to demonstrate that a pluripotent stem cell line is able to mimic Huntington's disease progression that parallels neural development, which could be a useful cell model for investigating the developmental impact on Huntington's disease pathogenesis.

  2. Macromolecular cell surface engineering for accelerated and reversible cellular aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, Adérito J R; Pasparakis, George

    2015-12-25

    We report the synthesis of two simple copolymers that induce rapid cell aggregation within minutes in a fully reversible manner. The polymers can act as self-supporting "cellular glues" or as "drivers" of 3D cell spheroids/aggregates formation at minute concentrations. PMID:26478926

  3. Cellular memory and, hematopoietic stem cell aging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamminga, Leonie M.; de Haan, Gerald

    2006-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) balance self-renewal and differentiation in order to sustain lifelong blood production and simultaneously maintain the HSC pool. However, there is clear evidence that HSCs are subject to quantitative and qualitative exhaustion. In this review, we briefly discuss sever

  4. Cell-to-cell communication and cellular environment alter the somatostatin status of delta cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → TGP52 cells display enhanced functionality in pseudoislet form. → Somatostatin content was reduced, but secretion increased in high glucose conditions. → Cellular interactions and environment alter the somatostatin status of TGP52 cells. -- Abstract: Introduction: Somatostatin, released from pancreatic delta cells, is a potent paracrine inhibitor of insulin and glucagon secretion. Islet cellular interactions and glucose homeostasis are essential to maintain normal patterns of insulin secretion. However, the importance of cell-to-cell communication and cellular environment in the regulation of somatostatin release remains unclear. Methods: This study employed the somatostatin-secreting TGP52 cell line maintained in DMEM:F12 (17.5 mM glucose) or DMEM (25 mM glucose) culture media. The effect of pseudoislet formation and culture medium on somatostatin content and release in response to a variety of stimuli was measured by somatostatin EIA. In addition, the effect of pseudoislet formation on cellular viability (MTT and LDH assays) and proliferation (BrdU ELISA) was determined. Results: TGP52 cells readily formed pseudoislets and showed enhanced functionality in three-dimensional form with increased E-cadherin expression irrespective of the culture environment used. However, culture in DMEM decreased cellular somatostatin content (P < 0.01) and increased somatostatin secretion in response to a variety of stimuli including arginine, calcium and PMA (P < 0.001) when compared with cells grown in DMEM:F12. Configuration of TGP52 cells as pseudoislets reduced the proliferative rate and increased cellular cytotoxicity irrespective of culture medium used. Conclusions: Somatostatin secretion is greatly facilitated by cell-to-cell interactions and E-cadherin expression. Cellular environment and extracellular glucose also significantly influence the function of delta cells.

  5. Simulations of Living Cell Origins Using a Cellular Automata Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Takeshi

    2014-04-01

    Understanding the generalized mechanisms of cell self-assembly is fundamental for applications in various fields, such as mass producing molecular machines in nanotechnology. Thus, the details of real cellular reaction networks and the necessary conditions for self-organized cells must be elucidated. We constructed a 2-dimensional cellular automata model to investigate the emergence of biological cell formation, which incorporated a looped membrane and a membrane-bound information system (akin to a genetic code and gene expression system). In particular, with an artificial reaction system coupled with a thermal system, the simultaneous formation of a looped membrane and an inner reaction process resulted in a more stable structure. These double structures inspired the primitive biological cell formation process from chemical evolution stage. With a model to simulate cellular self-organization in a 2-dimensional cellular automata model, 3 phenomena could be realized: (1) an inner reaction system developed as an information carrier precursor (akin to DNA); (2) a cell border emerged (akin to a cell membrane); and (3) these cell structures could divide into 2. This double-structured cell was considered to be a primary biological cell. The outer loop evolved toward a lipid bilayer membrane, and inner polymeric particles evolved toward precursor information carriers (evolved toward DNA). This model did not completely clarify all the necessary and sufficient conditions for biological cell self-organization. Further, our virtual cells remained unstable and fragile. However, the "garbage bag model" of Dyson proposed that the first living cells were deficient; thus, it would be reasonable that the earliest cells were more unstable and fragile than the simplest current unicellular organisms.

  6. An improved multi-value cellular automata model for heterogeneous bicycle traffic flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This letter develops an improved multi-value cellular automata model for heterogeneous bicycle traffic flow taking the higher maximum speed of electric bicycles into consideration. The update rules of both regular and electric bicycles are improved, with maximum speeds of two and three cells per second respectively. Numerical simulation results for deterministic and stochastic cases are obtained. The fundamental diagrams and multiple states effects under different model parameters are analyzed and discussed. Field observations were made to calibrate the slowdown probabilities. The results imply that the improved extended Burgers cellular automata (IEBCA) model is more consistent with the field observations than previous models and greatly enhances the realism of the bicycle traffic model. - Highlights: • We proposed an improved multi-value CA model with higher maximum speed. • Update rules are introduced for heterogeneous bicycle traffic with maximum speed 2 and 3 cells/s. • Simulation results of the proposed model are consistent with field bicycle data. • Slowdown probabilities of both regular and electric bicycles are calibrated

  7. An improved multi-value cellular automata model for heterogeneous bicycle traffic flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Sheng [College of Civil Engineering and Architecture, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310058 China (China); Qu, Xiaobo [Griffith School of Engineering, Griffith University, Gold Coast, 4222 Australia (Australia); Xu, Cheng [Department of Transportation Management Engineering, Zhejiang Police College, Hangzhou, 310053 China (China); College of Transportation, Jilin University, Changchun, 130022 China (China); Ma, Dongfang, E-mail: mdf2004@zju.edu.cn [Ocean College, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310058 China (China); Wang, Dianhai [College of Civil Engineering and Architecture, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310058 China (China)

    2015-10-16

    This letter develops an improved multi-value cellular automata model for heterogeneous bicycle traffic flow taking the higher maximum speed of electric bicycles into consideration. The update rules of both regular and electric bicycles are improved, with maximum speeds of two and three cells per second respectively. Numerical simulation results for deterministic and stochastic cases are obtained. The fundamental diagrams and multiple states effects under different model parameters are analyzed and discussed. Field observations were made to calibrate the slowdown probabilities. The results imply that the improved extended Burgers cellular automata (IEBCA) model is more consistent with the field observations than previous models and greatly enhances the realism of the bicycle traffic model. - Highlights: • We proposed an improved multi-value CA model with higher maximum speed. • Update rules are introduced for heterogeneous bicycle traffic with maximum speed 2 and 3 cells/s. • Simulation results of the proposed model are consistent with field bicycle data. • Slowdown probabilities of both regular and electric bicycles are calibrated.

  8. Cellular response after irradiation: Cell cycle control and apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The importance of apoptotic death was assessed in a set of experiments, involving eight human tumour cell lines (breast cancer, bladder carcinoma, medulloblastoma). Various aspects of the quantitative study of apoptosis and methods based on the detection of DNA fragmentation (in situ tailing and comet assay) are described and discussed. Data obtained support the hypothesis that apoptosis is not crucial for cellular radiosensitivity and that the relationship between p53 functionality or clonogenic survival and apoptosis may bee cell type specific. (author)

  9. Cellular Magnetic Resonance Imaging: In Vivo Imaging of Melanoma Cells in Lymph Nodes of Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula J Foster

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Metastasis is responsible for most deaths due to malignant melanoma. The clinical significance of micrometastases in the lymph is a hotly debated topic, but an improved understanding of the lymphatic spread of cancer remains important for improving cancer survival. Cellular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is a newly emerging field of imaging research that is expected to have a large impact on cancer research. In this study, we demonstrate the cellular MRI technology required to reliably image the lymphatic system in mice and to detect iron-labeled metastatic melanoma cells within the mouse lymph nodes. Melanoma cells were implanted directly into the inguinal lymph nodes in mice, and micro-MRI was performed using a customized 1.5-T clinical MRI system. We show cell detection of as few as 100 iron-labeled cells within the lymph node, with injections of larger cell numbers producing increasingly obvious regions of signal void. In addition, we show that cellular MRI allows monitoring of the fate of these cells over time as they develop into intranodal tumors. This technology will allow noninvasive investigations of cellular events in cancer metastasis within an entire animal and will facilitate progress in understanding the mechanisms of metastasis within the lymphatic system.

  10. Myosins and cell dynamics in cellular slime molds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yumura, Shigehiko; Uyeda, Taro Q P

    2003-01-01

    Myosin is a mechanochemical transducer and serves as a motor for various motile activities such as cell migration, cytokinesis, maintenance of cell shape, phagocytosis, and morphogenesis. Nonmuscle myosin in vivo does not either stay static at specific subcellular regions or construct highly organized structures, such as sarcomere in skeletal muscle cells. The cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum is an ideal "model organism" for the investigation of cell movement and cytokinesis. The advantages of this organism prompted researchers to carry out pioneering cell biological, biochemical, and molecular genetic studies on myosin II, which resulted in elucidation of many fundamental features of function and regulation of this most abundant molecular motor. Furthermore, recent molecular biological research has revealed that many unconventional myosins play various functions in vivo. In this article, how myosins are organized and regulated in a dynamic manner in Dictyostelium cells is reviewed and discussed. PMID:12722951

  11. Typing of murine cell-surface antigens by cellular radioimmunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A cellular radioimmunoassay utilizing 125I-labelled Protein A was used for detecting antigen-antibody complexes on gultaraldehyde fixed cells attached to microtiter plates. This method is rapid, sensitive and specific for revealing H-2 private and public specificities as well as Ia and Lyt antigens. As plates may be kept for months, several reactivities can be tested in one step on a large panel rendering a regular supply of animals unnecessary. (Auth.)

  12. Cellular automaton model of cell response to targeted radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been shown that the response of cells to low doses of radiation is not linear and cannot be accurately extrapolated from the high dose response. To investigate possible mechanisms involved in the behaviour of cells under very low doses of radiation, a cellular automaton (CA) model was created. The diffusion and consumption of glucose in the culture dish were computed in parallel to the growth of cells. A new model for calculating survival probability was introduced; the communication between targeted and non-targeted cells was also included. Early results on the response of non-confluent cells to targeted irradiation showed the capability of the model to take account for the non-linear response in the low-dose domain

  13. Enhanced cellular delivery of cell-penetrating peptide-peptide nucleic acid conjugates by photochemical internalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shiraishi, Takehiko; Nielsen, Peter E

    2011-01-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) have been widely used for a cellular delivery of biologically relevant cargoes including antisense peptide nucleic acids (PNAs). Although chemical conjugation of PNA to a variety of CPPs significantly improves the cellular uptake of the PNAs, bioavailability...... (antisense activity) is still limited by endocytotic entrapment. We have shown that this low bioavailability can be greatly improved by combining CPP-PNA conjugate administration with a photochemical internalization technique using photosensitizers such as aluminum phthalocyanine (AlPcS(2a)) or...... cellular efficacy of CPP conjugates were evaluated by measuring luciferase activity as a result of splicing correction and was also confirmed by RT-PCR analysis of luciferase pre-mRNA....

  14. Mitochondria in mesenchymal stem cell biology and cell therapy: From cellular differentiation to mitochondrial transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Yi-Chao; Wu, Yu-Ting; Yu, Ting-Hsien; Wei, Yau-Huei

    2016-04-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are characterized to have the capacity of self-renewal and the potential to differentiate into mesoderm, ectoderm-like and endoderm-like cells. MSCs hold great promise for cell therapies due to their multipotency in vitro and therapeutic advantage of hypo-immunogenicity and lower tumorigenicity. Moreover, it has been shown that MSCs can serve as a vehicle to transfer mitochondria into cells after cell transplantation. Mitochondria produce most of the energy through oxidative phosphorylation in differentiated cells. It has been increasingly clear that the switch of energy supply from glycolysis to aerobic metabolism is essential for successful differentiation of MSCs. Post-translational modifications of proteins have been established to regulate mitochondrial function and metabolic shift during MSCs differentiation. In this article, we review and provide an integrated view on the roles of different protein kinases and sirtuins in the maintenance and differentiation of MSCs. Importantly, we provide evidence to suggest that alteration in the expression of Sirt3 and Sirt5 and relative changes in the acylation levels of mitochondrial proteins might be involved in the activation of mitochondrial function and adipogenic differentiation of adipose-derived MSCs. We summarize their roles in the regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis and metabolism, oxidative responses and differentiation of MSCs. On the other hand, we discuss recent advances in the study of mitochondrial dynamics and mitochondrial transfer as well as their roles in the differentiation and therapeutic application of MSCs to improve cell function in vitro and in animal models. Accumulating evidence has substantiated that the therapeutic potential of MSCs is conferred not only by cell replacement and paracrine effects but also by transferring mitochondria into injured tissues or cells to modulate the cellular metabolism in situ. Therefore, elucidation of the underlying mechanisms

  15. Targeted cellular ablation based on the morphology of malignant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivey, Jill W; Latouche, Eduardo L; Sano, Michael B; Rossmeisl, John H; Davalos, Rafael V; Verbridge, Scott S

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is especially challenging due to a shortage of methods to preferentially target diffuse infiltrative cells, and therapy-resistant glioma stem cell populations. Here we report a physical treatment method based on electrical disruption of cells, whose action depends strongly on cellular morphology. Interestingly, numerical modeling suggests that while outer lipid bilayer disruption induced by long pulses (~100 μs) is enhanced for larger cells, short pulses (~1 μs) preferentially result in high fields within the cell interior, which scale in magnitude with nucleus size. Because enlarged nuclei represent a reliable indicator of malignancy, this suggested a means of preferentially targeting malignant cells. While we demonstrate killing of both normal and malignant cells using pulsed electric fields (PEFs) to treat spontaneous canine GBM, we proposed that properly tuned PEFs might provide targeted ablation based on nuclear size. Using 3D hydrogel models of normal and malignant brain tissues, which permit high-resolution interrogation during treatment testing, we confirmed that PEFs could be tuned to preferentially kill cancerous cells. Finally, we estimated the nuclear envelope electric potential disruption needed for cell death from PEFs. Our results may be useful in safely targeting the therapy-resistant cell niches that cause recurrence of GBM tumors. PMID:26596248

  16. Cellular and Nuclear Alignment Analysis for Determining Epithelial Cell Chirality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, Michael J; Ray, Poulomi; Kaur, Gurleen; Singh, Ajay V; Wan, Leo Q

    2016-05-01

    Left-right (LR) asymmetry is a biologically conserved property in living organisms that can be observed in the asymmetrical arrangement of organs and tissues and in tissue morphogenesis, such as the directional looping of the gastrointestinal tract and heart. The expression of LR asymmetry in embryonic tissues can be appreciated in biased cell alignment. Previously an in vitro chirality assay was reported by patterning multiple cells on microscale defined geometries and quantified the cell phenotype-dependent LR asymmetry, or cell chirality. However, morphology and chirality of individual cells on micropatterned surfaces has not been well characterized. Here, a Python-based algorithm was developed to identify and quantify immunofluorescence stained individual epithelial cells on multicellular patterns. This approach not only produces results similar to the image intensity gradient-based method reported previously, but also can capture properties of single cells such as area and aspect ratio. We also found that cell nuclei exhibited biased alignment. Around 35% cells were misaligned and were typically smaller and less elongated. This new imaging analysis approach is an effective tool for measuring single cell chirality inside multicellular structures and can potentially help unveil biophysical mechanisms underlying cellular chiral bias both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26294010

  17. Targeted cellular ablation based on the morphology of malignant cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivey, Jill W.; Latouche, Eduardo L.; Sano, Michael B.; Rossmeisl, John H.; Davalos, Rafael V.; Verbridge, Scott S.

    2015-11-01

    Treatment of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is especially challenging due to a shortage of methods to preferentially target diffuse infiltrative cells, and therapy-resistant glioma stem cell populations. Here we report a physical treatment method based on electrical disruption of cells, whose action depends strongly on cellular morphology. Interestingly, numerical modeling suggests that while outer lipid bilayer disruption induced by long pulses (~100 μs) is enhanced for larger cells, short pulses (~1 μs) preferentially result in high fields within the cell interior, which scale in magnitude with nucleus size. Because enlarged nuclei represent a reliable indicator of malignancy, this suggested a means of preferentially targeting malignant cells. While we demonstrate killing of both normal and malignant cells using pulsed electric fields (PEFs) to treat spontaneous canine GBM, we proposed that properly tuned PEFs might provide targeted ablation based on nuclear size. Using 3D hydrogel models of normal and malignant brain tissues, which permit high-resolution interrogation during treatment testing, we confirmed that PEFs could be tuned to preferentially kill cancerous cells. Finally, we estimated the nuclear envelope electric potential disruption needed for cell death from PEFs. Our results may be useful in safely targeting the therapy-resistant cell niches that cause recurrence of GBM tumors.

  18. Improved localization of cellular membrane receptors using combined fluorescence microscopy and simultaneous topography and recognition imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duman, M; Pfleger, M; Chtcheglova, L A; Neundlinger, I; Bozna, B L; Ebner, A; Schuetz, G J; Hinterdorfer, P [Institute for Biophysics, University of Linz, Altenbergerstrasse 69, A-4040 Linz (Austria); Zhu, R; Mayer, B [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Nanoscopic Methods in Biophysics, Institute for Biophysics, University of Linz, Altenbergerstrasse 69, A-4040 Linz (Austria); Rankl, C; Moertelmaier, M; Kada, G; Kienberger, F [Agilent Technologies Austria GmbH, Aubrunnerweg 11, A-4040 Linz (Austria); Salio, M; Shepherd, D; Polzella, P; Cerundolo, V [Cancer Research UK Tumor Immunology Group, Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Nuffield Department of Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford OX3 9DS (United Kingdom); Dieudonne, M, E-mail: ferry_kienberger@agilent.com [Agilent Technologies Belgium, Wingepark 51, Rotselaar, AN B-3110 (Belgium)

    2010-03-19

    The combination of fluorescence microscopy and atomic force microscopy has a great potential in single-molecule-detection applications, overcoming many of the limitations coming from each individual technique. Here we present a new platform of combined fluorescence and simultaneous topography and recognition imaging (TREC) for improved localization of cellular receptors. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) labeled human sodium-glucose cotransporter (hSGLT1) expressed Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells and endothelial cells (MyEnd) from mouse myocardium stained with phalloidin-rhodamine were used as cell systems to study AFM topography and fluorescence microscopy on the same surface area. Topographical AFM images revealed membrane features such as lamellipodia, cytoskeleton fibers, F-actin filaments and small globular structures with heights ranging from 20 to 30 nm. Combined fluorescence and TREC imaging was applied to detect density, distribution and localization of YFP-labeled CD1d molecules on {alpha}-galactosylceramide ({alpha}GalCer)-loaded THP1 cells. While the expression level, distribution and localization of CD1d molecules on THP1 cells were detected with fluorescence microscopy, the nanoscale distribution of binding sites was investigated with molecular recognition imaging by using a chemically modified AFM tip. Using TREC on the inverted light microscope, the recognition sites of cell receptors were detected in recognition images with domain sizes ranging from {approx} 25 to {approx} 160 nm, with the smaller domains corresponding to a single CD1d molecule.

  19. Cellular radiosensitivity of small-cell lung cancer cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, M; Poulsen, H S; Spang-Thomsen, M

    1997-01-01

    PURPOSE: The objective of this study was to determine the radiobiological characteristics of a panel of small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) cell lines by use of a clonogenic assay. In addition, we tested whether comparable results could be obtained by employing a growth extrapolation method based on the...

  20. Cellular Dewetting: Opening of Macroapertures in Endothelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Rodriguez, David; Maddugoda, Madhavi P.; Stefani, Caroline; Janel, Sebastien; Lafont, Frank; Cuvelier, Damien; Lemichez, Emmanuel; Brochard-Wyart, Françoise

    2012-05-01

    Pathogenic bacteria can cross from blood vessels to host tissues by opening transendothelial cell macroapertures (TEMs). To induce TEM opening, bacteria intoxicate endothelial cells with proteins that disrupt the contractile cytoskeletal network. Cell membrane tension is no longer resisted by contractile fibers, leading to the opening of TEMs. Here we model the opening of TEMs as a new form of dewetting. While liquid dewetting is irreversible, we show that cellular dewetting is transient. Our model predicts the minimum radius for hole nucleation, the maximum TEM size, and the dynamics of TEM opening, in good agreement with experimental data. The physical model is then coupled with biological experimental data to reveal that the protein missing in metastasis (MIM) controls the line tension at the rim of the TEM and opposes its opening.

  1. Mitochondria, cellular stress resistance, somatic cell depletion and lifespan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robb, Ellen L; Page, Melissa M; Stuart, Jeffrey A

    2009-03-01

    The causes of aging and determinants of maximum lifespan in animal species are multifaceted and complex. However, a wealth of experimental data suggests that mitochondria are involved both in the aging process and in regulating lifespan. Here we outline a somatic cell depletion (SCD) model to account for correlations between: (1) mitochondrial reactive oxygen species and lifespan; (2) mitochondrial antioxidant enzymes and lifespan; (3) mitochondrial DNA mutation and lifespan and (4) cellular stress resistance and lifespan. We examine the available data from within the framework of the SCD model, in which mitochondrial dysfunction leading to cell death and gradual loss of essential somatic cells eventually contributes to the decline in physiological performance that limits lifespan. This model is useful in explaining many of the mitochondrial manipulations that alter maximum lifespan in a variety of animal species; however, there are a number of caveats and critical experiments outstanding, and these are outlined in this review. PMID:20021396

  2. Cellular islet autoimmunity associates with clinical outcome of islet cell transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volkert A L Huurman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Islet cell transplantation can cure type 1 diabetes (T1D, but only a minority of recipients remains insulin-independent in the following years. We tested the hypothesis that allograft rejection and recurrent autoimmunity contribute to this progressive loss of islet allograft function. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Twenty-one T1D patients received cultured islet cell grafts prepared from multiple donors and transplanted under anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG induction and tacrolimus plus mycophenolate mofetil (MMF maintenance immunosuppression. Immunity against auto- and alloantigens was measured before and during one year after transplantation. Cellular auto- and alloreactivity was assessed by lymphocyte stimulation tests against autoantigens and cytotoxic T lymphocyte precursor assays, respectively. Humoral reactivity was measured by auto- and alloantibodies. Clinical outcome parameters--including time until insulin independence, insulin independence at one year, and C-peptide levels over one year--remained blinded until their correlation with immunological parameters. All patients showed significant improvement of metabolic control and 13 out of 21 became insulin-independent. Multivariate analyses showed that presence of cellular autoimmunity before and after transplantation is associated with delayed insulin-independence (p = 0.001 and p = 0.01, respectively and lower circulating C-peptide levels during the first year after transplantation (p = 0.002 and p = 0.02, respectively. Seven out of eight patients without pre-existent T-cell autoreactivity became insulin-independent, versus none of the four patients reactive to both islet autoantigens GAD and IA-2 before transplantation. Autoantibody levels and cellular alloreactivity had no significant association with outcome. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In this cohort study, cellular islet-specific autoimmunity associates with clinical outcome of islet cell transplantation under ATG

  3. Improving Quality of Clustering using Cellular Automata for Information retrieval

    OpenAIRE

    Sree, Pokkuluri Kiran; Babu, Inampudi Ramesh

    2014-01-01

    Clustering has been widely applied to Information Retrieval (IR) on the grounds of its potential improved effectiveness over inverted file search. Clustering is a mostly unsupervised procedure and the majority of the clustering algorithms depend on certain assumptions in order to define the subgroups present in a data set .A clustering quality measure is a function that, given a data set and its partition into clusters, returns a non-negative real number representing the quality of that clust...

  4. Overcoming cellular and tissue barriers to improve liposomal drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohli, Aditya G.

    Forty years of liposome research have demonstrated that the anti-tumor efficacy of liposomal therapies is, in part, driven by three parameters: 1) liposome formulation and lipid biophysics, 2) accumulation and distribution in the tumor, and 3) release of the payload at the site of interest. This thesis outlines three studies that improve on each of these delivery steps. In the first study, we engineer a novel class of zwitterlipids with an inverted headgroup architecture that have remarkable biophysical properties and may be useful for drug delivery applications. After intravenous administration, liposomes accumulate in the tumor by the enhanced permeability and retention effect. However, the tumor stroma often limits liposome efficacy by preventing distribution into the tumor. In the second study, we demonstrate that depletion of hyaluronan in the tumor stroma improves the distribution and efficacy of DoxilRTM in murine 4T1 tumors. Once a liposome has distributed to the therapeutic site, it must release its payload over the correct timescale. Few facile methods exist to quantify the release of liposome therapeutics in vivo. In the third study, we outline and validate a simple, robust, and quantitative method for tracking the rate and extent of release of liposome contents in vivo. This tool should facilitate a better understanding of the pharmacodynamics of liposome-encapsulated drugs in animals. This work highlights aspects of liposome behavior that have prevented successful clinical translation and proposes alternative approaches to improve liposome drug delivery.

  5. AdCell: Ad Allocation in Cellular Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Alaei, Saeed; Liaghat, Vahid; Pei, Dan; Saha, Barna

    2011-01-01

    With more than four billion usage of cellular phones worldwide, mobile advertising has become an attractive alternative to online advertisements. In this paper, we propose a new targeted advertising policy for Wireless Service Providers (WSPs) via SMS or MMS- namely {\\em AdCell}. In our model, a WSP charges the advertisers for showing their ads. Each advertiser has a valuation for specific types of customers in various times and locations and has a limit on the maximum available budget. Each query is in the form of time and location and is associated with one individual customer. In order to achieve a non-intrusive delivery, only a limited number of ads can be sent to each customer. Recently, new services have been introduced that offer location-based advertising over cellular network that fit in our model (e.g., ShopAlerts by AT&T) . We consider both online and offline version of the AdCell problem and develop approximation algorithms with constant competitive ratio. For the online version, we assume tha...

  6. The Use of Amnion-Derived Cellular Cytokine Solution to Improve Healing in Acute and Chronic Wound Models

    OpenAIRE

    Franz, Michael G.; Payne, Wyatt G.; Xing, Liyu; Naidu, D. K; Salas, R. E; Marshall, Vivienne S.; Trumpower, C. J; Smith, Charlotte A; Steed, David L.; Robson, M. C.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Growth factors demonstrate mixed results improving wound healing. Amnion-derived multipotent cells release physiologic levels of growth factors and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases. This solution was tested in models of acute and chronic wound healing. Methods: Acute model: Sprague-Dawley rats underwent laparotomy incisions. The midline fascia was primed with phosphate-buffered saline, unconditioned media, or amnion-derived cellular cytokine suspension prior to incision. Bre...

  7. Improved 3D cellular imaging by multispectral focus assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Tong; Xiong, Yizhi; Chung, Alice P.; Wachman, Elliot S.; Farkas, Daniel L.

    2005-03-01

    Biological specimens are three-dimensional structures. However, when capturing their images through a microscope, there is only one plane in the field of view that is in focus, and out-of-focus portions of the specimen affect image quality in the in-focus plane. It is well-established that the microscope"s point spread function (PSF) can be used for blur quantitation, for the restoration of real images. However, this is an ill-posed problem, with no unique solution and with high computational complexity. In this work, instead of estimating and using the PSF, we studied focus quantitation in multi-spectral image sets. A gradient map we designed was used to evaluate the sharpness degree of each pixel, in order to identify blurred areas not to be considered. Experiments with realistic multi-spectral Pap smear images showed that measurement of their sharp gradients can provide depth information roughly comparable to human perception (through a microscope), while avoiding PSF estimation. Spectrum and morphometrics-based statistical analysis for abnormal cell detection can then be implemented in an image database where the axial structure has been refined.

  8. Definition and evolution of quantum cellular automata with two qubits per cell

    OpenAIRE

    Karafyllidis, Ioannis G.

    2008-01-01

    Studies of quantum computer implementations suggest cellular quantum computer architectures. These architectures can simulate the evolution of quantum cellular automata, which can possibly simulate both quantum and classical physical systems and processes. It is however known that except for the trivial case, unitary evolution of one-dimensional homogeneous quantum cellular automata with one qubit per cell is not possible. Quantum cellular automata that comprise two qubits per cell are define...

  9. Area Spectral and Energy Efficiency Analysis of Cellular Networks with Cell DTX

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Peiliang; Miao, Guowang

    2015-01-01

    Cell discontinuous transmission (DTX) has been proposed as an effective solution to reduce energy consumption of cellular networks. In this paper, we investigate the impact of network traffic load on area spectral efficiency (ASE) and energy efficiency (EE) of cellular networks with cell DTX. Closedform expressions of ASE and EE as functions of traffic load for cellular networks with cell DTX are derived. It is shown that ASE increases monotonically in traffic load, while EE depends on the po...

  10. Optimization of Cellular Resources Evading Intra and Inter Tier Interference in Femto cells Equipped Macro cell Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Shakhakarmi, Niraj

    2012-01-01

    Cellular network resources are essential to be optimized in Femto cells equipped macro cell networks. This is achieved by increasing the cellular coverage and channel capacity, and reducing power usage and interference between femto cells and macro cells. In this paper, the optimization approach for cellular resources with installed femto cells in macro cell networks has been addressed by deploying smart antennas applications and effect power adaptation method which significantly optimize the cellular coverage, channel capacity, power usage, and intra and inter tier interference. The simulation results also illustrate the outstanding performance of this optimization methodology.

  11. Network signatures of cellular immortalization in human lymphoblastoid cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shim, Sung-Mi; Jung, So-Young; Nam, Hye-Young; Kim, Hye-Ryun; Lee, Mee-Hee; Kim, Jun-Woo; Han, Bok-Ghee [National Biobank of Korea, Center for Genome Science, Korea National Institute of Health, Osong 363-951 (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Jae-Pil, E-mail: jaepiljeon@hanmail.net [Division of Brain Diseases, Center for Biomedical Science, Korea National Institute of Health, Osong 363-951 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: •We identified network signatures of LCL immortalization from transcriptomic profiles. •More than 41% of DEGs are possibly regulated by miRNAs in LCLs. •MicroRNA target genes in LCLs are involved in apoptosis and immune-related functions. •This approach is useful to find functional miRNA targets in specific cell conditions. -- Abstract: Human lymphoblastoid cell line (LCL) has been used as an in vitro cell model in genetic and pharmacogenomic studies, as well as a good model for studying gene expression regulatory machinery using integrated genomic analyses. In this study, we aimed to identify biological networks of LCL immortalization from transcriptomic profiles of microRNAs and their target genes in LCLs. We first selected differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and microRNAs (DEmiRs) between early passage LCLs (eLCLs) and terminally differentiated late passage LCLs (tLCLs). The in silico and correlation analysis of these DEGs and DEmiRs revealed that 1098 DEG–DEmiR pairs were found to be positively (n = 591 pairs) or negatively (n = 507 pairs) correlated with each other. More than 41% of DEGs are possibly regulated by miRNAs in LCL immortalizations. The target DEGs of DEmiRs were enriched for cellular functions associated with apoptosis, immune response, cell death, JAK–STAT cascade and lymphocyte activation while non-miRNA target DEGs were over-represented for basic cell metabolisms. The target DEGs correlated negatively with miR-548a-3p and miR-219-5p were significantly associated with protein kinase cascade, and the lymphocyte proliferation and apoptosis, respectively. In addition, the miR-106a and miR-424 clusters located in the X chromosome were enriched in DEmiR–mRNA pairs for LCL immortalization. In this study, the integrated transcriptomic analysis of LCLs could identify functional networks of biologically active microRNAs and their target genes involved in LCL immortalization.

  12. Multifunctional non-viral gene vectors with enhanced stability, improved cellular and nuclear uptake capability, and increased transfection efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhe; Jiang, Zhaozhong; Cao, Zhong; Zhang, Chao; Gao, Di; Luo, Xingen; Zhang, Xiaofang; Luo, Huiyan; Jiang, Qing; Liu, Jie

    2014-08-01

    We have developed a new multifunctional, non-viral gene delivery platform consisting of cationic poly(amine-co-ester) (PPMS) for DNA condensation, PEG shell for nanoparticle stabilization, poly(γ-glutamic acid) (γ-PGA) and mTAT (a cell-penetrating peptide) for accelerated cellular uptake, and a nuclear localization signal peptide (NLS) for enhanced intracellular transport of DNA to the nucleus. In vitro study showed that coating of the binary PPMS/DNA polyplex with γ-PGA promotes cellular uptake of the polyplex particles, particularly by γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT)-positive cells through the GGT-mediated endocytosis pathway. Conjugating PEG to the γ-PGA led to the formation of a ternary PPMS/DNA/PGA-g-PEG polyplex with decreased positive charges on the surface of the polyplex particles and substantially higher stability in serum-containing aqueous medium. The cellular uptake rate was further improved by incorporating mTAT into the ternary polyplex system. Addition of the NLS peptide was designed to facilitate intracellular delivery of the plasmid to the nucleus--a rate-limiting step in the gene transfection process. As a result, compared with the binary PPMS/LucDNA polyplex, the new mTAT-quaternary PPMS/LucDNA/NLS/PGA-g-PEG-mTAT system exhibited reduced cytotoxicity, remarkably faster cellular uptake rate, and enhanced transport of DNA to the nucleus. All these advantageous functionalities contribute to the remarkable gene transfection efficiency of the mTAT-quaternary polyplex both in vitro and in vivo, which exceeds that of the binary polyplex and commercial Lipofectamine™ 2000/DNA lipoplex. The multifunctional mTAT-quaternary polyplex system with improved efficiency and reduced cytotoxicity represents a new type of promising non-viral vectors for the delivery of therapeutic genes to treat tumors.We have developed a new multifunctional, non-viral gene delivery platform consisting of cationic poly(amine-co-ester) (PPMS) for DNA condensation, PEG shell

  13. Analytical Results to Improve the Capacity of A Cellular System In Frequency Selective Rayleigh Fading Channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pravindra Kumar

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available One of the biggest draw back of wireless environment is the limited bandwidth. However, the users sharing this limited bandwidth have been increased considerably by using SDMA technique that can enhancethe capacity of communication system. There are some techniques that can increase the capacity of the cellular system, these are- Spreading Technique, Error Control Coding Technique, Multipath Diversity Technique ( i.e. Rake Receiver, Smart Antenna Technique. In this paper we have used all these technique and examined how thecapacity of cellular system vary with varying the different parameters such as- the value of spreading factor, the number of Rake fingers, the number of interfering cells, value of directivity of Adaptive Antenna at base station. In the results we find that the capacity of a cellular system is varying with these parameters.

  14. Hetero-cellular prototyping by synchronized multi-material bioprinting for rotary cell culture system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Jessica; Son, Ae Rin; Hamid, Qudus; Wu, Honglu; Sun, Wei

    2016-03-01

    Bottom-up tissue engineering requires methodological progress of biofabrication to capture key design facets of anatomical arrangements across micro, meso and macro-scales. The diffusive mass transfer properties necessary to elicit stability and functionality require hetero-typic contact, cell-to-cell signaling and uniform nutrient diffusion. Bioprinting techniques successfully build mathematically defined porous architecture to diminish resistance to mass transfer. Current limitations of bioprinted cell assemblies include poor micro-scale formability of cell-laden soft gels and asymmetrical macro-scale diffusion through 3D volumes. The objective of this work is to engineer a synchronized multi-material bioprinter (SMMB) system which improves the resolution and expands the capability of existing bioprinting systems by packaging multiple cell types in heterotypic arrays prior to deposition. This unit cell approach to arranging multiple cell-laden solutions is integrated with a motion system to print heterogeneous filaments as tissue engineered scaffolds and nanoliter droplets. The set of SMMB process parameters control the geometric arrangement of the combined flow's internal features and constituent material's volume fractions. SMMB printed hepatocyte-endothelial laden 200 nl droplets are cultured in a rotary cell culture system (RCCS) to study the effect of microgravity on an in vitro model of the human hepatic lobule. RCCS conditioning for 48 h increased hepatocyte cytoplasm diameter 2 μm, increased metabolic rate, and decreased drug half-life. SMMB hetero-cellular models present a 10-fold increase in metabolic rate, compared to SMMB mono-culture models. Improved bioprinting resolution due to process control of cell-laden matrix packaging as well as nanoliter droplet printing capability identify SMMB as a viable technique to improve in vitro model efficacy. PMID:26759993

  15. Whole genome bisulfite sequencing of cell-free DNA and its cellular contributors uncovers placenta hypomethylated domains

    OpenAIRE

    Jensen, Taylor J.; Kim, Sung K; Zhu, Zhanyang; Chin, Christine; Gebhard, Claudia; Lu, Tim; Deciu, Cosmin; Van den Boom, Dirk; Ehrich, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    Background Circulating cell-free fetal DNA has enabled non-invasive prenatal fetal aneuploidy testing without direct discrimination of the maternal and fetal DNA. Testing may be improved by specifically enriching the sample material for fetal DNA. DNA methylation may allow for such a separation of DNA; however, this depends on knowledge of the methylomes of circulating cell-free DNA and its cellular contributors. Results We perform whole genome bisulfite sequencing on a set of unmatched sampl...

  16. The influence of the cellular phone radiation on the growth of mark145 cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To explore the effects of radiation of cellular phone on the growth of cells. Methods: A radiation cycle was designed as working 25 minutes and then resting for 5 minutes for cellular phone. The Mark145 cell bottles were divided into six groups. The first two groups were radiated for two cycles, and the second two groups for four cycles, and the third two groups for five cycles. Each two groups were put 10cm far away from cellular phone and attach to it separately. Results: After culturing for 3 days there are many dead cells in the bottles. After culturing for 6 days, there is few living cells. Conclusions: cellular phone radiation is fatal to Mark145 cells, and the quantity of the dead cells change with the radiation time and the distance to radiation. That is to say, with the prolonging of radiation time and the shortening of the distance, the quantity of the dead cells is increasing. (authors)

  17. The induction of cellular senescence in dental follicle cells inhibits the osteogenic differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morsczeck, Christian; Gresser, Jan; Ettl, Tobias

    2016-06-01

    Dental stem cells such as human dental follicle cells (DFCs) have opened new promising treatment alternatives for today's dental health issues such as periodontal tissue regeneration. However, cellular senescence represents a restricting factor to cultured stem cells, resulting in limited lifespan and reduced cell differentiation potential. Therefore, this study evaluated if and how DFCs exhibit features of cellular senescence after being expanded in cell culture. The cell proliferation of DFCs decreased, while the cell size increased during prolonged cell culture. Moreover, DFCs expressed the senescence-associated β-galactosidase after a prolonged cell culture. The onset of senescence inhibited both the induction of osteoblast markers RUNX2 and osteopontin and the biomineralization of DFCs after stimulation of the osteogenic differentiation. In conclusion, we showed that a prolonged cell culture induces cellular senescence and inhibits the osteogenic differentiation in DFCs. PMID:27165403

  18. The Improved Cellular Automata and Its Application in Delineation of Urban Spheres of Influence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Deng

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The issue of spatial diffusion and pattern division of traditional cellular automata (CA has drawn widespread attention and generated extensive work by scholars. However, there are many deficiencies in traditional configurations of CA neighborhoods, which reduce simulation accuracy. The effect of improved methods of traditional configurations of CA neighborhoods is not obvious, and its interoperability is not strong. Therefore, this paper firstly puts forward the concept of the circular neighborhood of CA constrained by the space metric method based on map algebra, and compares the spatial division pattern and anisotropy of different types of neighborhoods in detail. Then, the CA’s weighted diffusion model is discussed to delineate urban spheres of influence in Henan Province. Finally, Weibo data is used to justify a reasonable delineation of urban spheres of influence and can correctly reflect the state of regional development, further proving that improved cellular automata in algorithms and applications have great significance.

  19. Improved Analysis of Co-Channel Interference in Cellular Communications Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zu-fan; DU Hui-ping; ZHU Wei-le

    2005-01-01

    In terms of the carrier-to-interference-ratio, the performance of co-channel interference in cellular communications systems is studied. The approach is based on an improved analysis, which allows to take into account some area in the desired sector may not be interfered by some co-channel sectors with exact geometrical analysis, instead of the entire sector interfered by some co-channel sectors. Other features, such as power control and the number of interferences are also included.

  20. An overview on "cellular cannibalism" with special reference to oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, M

    2015-12-01

    Cellular cannibalism has been defined as a large cell engulfing a slightly smaller one within its cytoplasm. It has been described in various cancers like bladder cancer, breast cancer, lung cancer, gastric cancer, oral squamous cell carcinoma. Cellular cannibalism has been well correlated with anaplasia, tumor aggressiveness, grading and metastatic potential. Present review focuses on significance of cannibalism in relation to cancer with special emphasis on oral squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:26710834

  1. CellFIT: A Cellular Force-Inference Toolkit Using Curvilinear Cell Boundaries

    OpenAIRE

    Brodland, G. Wayne; Veldhuis, Jim H.; Kim, Steven; Perrone, Matthew; Mashburn, David; Hutson, M. Shane

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical forces play a key role in a wide range of biological processes, from embryogenesis to cancer metastasis, and there is considerable interest in the intuitive question, “Can cellular forces be inferred from cell shapes?” Although several groups have posited affirmative answers to this stimulating question, nagging issues remained regarding equation structure, solution uniqueness and noise sensitivity. Here we show that the mechanical and mathematical factors behind these issues can b...

  2. CellFIT: a cellular force-inference toolkit using curvilinear cell boundaries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Wayne Brodland

    Full Text Available Mechanical forces play a key role in a wide range of biological processes, from embryogenesis to cancer metastasis, and there is considerable interest in the intuitive question, "Can cellular forces be inferred from cell shapes?" Although several groups have posited affirmative answers to this stimulating question, nagging issues remained regarding equation structure, solution uniqueness and noise sensitivity. Here we show that the mechanical and mathematical factors behind these issues can be resolved by using curved cell edges rather than straight ones. We present a new package of force-inference equations and assessment tools and denote this new package CellFIT, the Cellular Force Inference Toolkit. In this approach, cells in an image are segmented and equilibrium equations are constructed for each triple junction based solely on edge tensions and the limiting angles at which edges approach each junction. The resulting system of tension equations is generally overdetermined. As a result, solutions can be obtained even when a modest number of edges need to be removed from the analysis due to short length, poor definition, image clarity or other factors. Solving these equations yields a set of relative edge tensions whose scaling must be determined from data external to the image. In cases where intracellular pressures are also of interest, Laplace equations are constructed to relate the edge tensions, curvatures and cellular pressure differences. That system is also generally overdetermined and its solution yields a set of pressures whose offset requires reference to the surrounding medium, an open wound, or information external to the image. We show that condition numbers, residual analyses and standard errors can provide confidence information about the inferred forces and pressures. Application of CellFIT to several live and fixed biological tissues reveals considerable force variability within a cell population, significant differences

  3. Cellular localization of BARF1 oncoprotein and its cell stimulating activity in human epithelial cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakka, Emna; Zur Hausen, Axel; Houali, Karim; Liu, Haying; Fiorini, Sylvie; Ooka, Tadamasa

    2013-06-01

    BARF1 gene encoded by Epstein-Barr virus is capable of immortalizing the primary monkey epithelial cells and of inducing malignant transformation in human EBV-negative B cell lines as well as rodent fibroblast. This oncoprotein is a secreted protein capable of acting as a powerful mitogen. We have studied the effect of BARF1 protein in transfected or BARF1 protein treated human HaCaT epithelial cells. In BARF1-transfected cells, cell growth was activated and its protein was found both in culture medium and cellular compartment (membrane, cytoplasm and nuclei). When purified BARF1 protein was exogenously added in the cell culture medium of HaCaT cells in absence of fetal calf serum led to its entrance into cells and its intracellular localization in cytoplasm, nuclear periphery and nuclei at 14h treatment, determined by confocal and immunoelectron microscopy. Cell fractionation confirmed its nuclear localization. Nuclear localization was observed in both systems. More interestingly, purified BARF1 protein p29 exogenously added in the cell culture medium activated cell passage of G1 to S phase. S phase activation by its autocrine activity and its tumorigenic activity would be associated with the development of EBV-associated carcinomas. PMID:23458996

  4. Accurate assessment of cell density in low cellular liquid-based cervical cytology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siebers, A.G.; Laak, J.A.W.M. van der; Huberts-Manders, R.; Vedder, J.E.M.; Bulten, J.

    2013-01-01

    A. G. Siebers, J. A. W. M. van der Laak, R. Huberts-Manders, J. E. M. Vedder and J. Bulten Accurate assessment of cell density in low cellular liquid-based cervical cytology Objective: Scant cellularity is the most important source of unsatisfactory liquid-based cytology. Although still being debate

  5. Quantum Dots Encapsulated with Canine Parvovirus-Like Particles Improving the Cellular Targeted Labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Dan; Wang, Bin; Sun, Shiqi; Feng, Xia; Jin, Ye; Yao, Xueping; Cao, Suizhong; Guo, Huichen

    2015-01-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) have a promising prospect in live-cell imaging and sensing because of unique fluorescence features. QDs aroused significant interest in the bio-imaging field through integrating the fluorescence properties of QDs and the delivery function of biomaterial. The natural tropism of Canine Parvovirus (CPV) to the transferrin receptor can target specific cells to increase the targeting ability of QDs in cell imaging. CPV virus-like particles (VLPs) from the expression of the CPV-VP2 capsid protein in a prokaryotic expression system were examined to encapsulate the QDs and deliver to cells with an expressed transferrin receptor. CPV-VLPs were used to encapsulate QDs that were modified using 3-mercaptopropionic acid. Gel electrophoresis, fluorescence spectrum, particle size, and transmission electron microscopy verified the conformation of a complex, in which QDs were encapsulated in CPV-VLPs (CPV-VLPs-QDs). When incubated with different cell lines, CPV-VLPs-QDs significantly reduced the cytotoxicity of QDs and selectively labeled the cells with high-level transferrin receptors. Cell-targeted labeling was achieved by utilizing the specific binding between the CPV capsid protein VP2 of VLPs and cellular receptors. CPV-VLPs-QDs, which can mimic the native CPV infection, can recognize and attach to the transferrin receptors on cellular membrane. Therefore, CPV-VLPs can be used as carriers to facilitate the targeted delivery of encapsulated nanomaterials into cells via receptor-mediated pathways. This study confirmed that CPV-VLPs can significantly promote the biocompatibility of nanomaterials and could expand the application of CPV-VLPs in biological medicine. PMID:26398132

  6. Quantum Dots Encapsulated with Canine Parvovirus-Like Particles Improving the Cellular Targeted Labeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Yan

    Full Text Available Quantum dots (QDs have a promising prospect in live-cell imaging and sensing because of unique fluorescence features. QDs aroused significant interest in the bio-imaging field through integrating the fluorescence properties of QDs and the delivery function of biomaterial. The natural tropism of Canine Parvovirus (CPV to the transferrin receptor can target specific cells to increase the targeting ability of QDs in cell imaging. CPV virus-like particles (VLPs from the expression of the CPV-VP2 capsid protein in a prokaryotic expression system were examined to encapsulate the QDs and deliver to cells with an expressed transferrin receptor. CPV-VLPs were used to encapsulate QDs that were modified using 3-mercaptopropionic acid. Gel electrophoresis, fluorescence spectrum, particle size, and transmission electron microscopy verified the conformation of a complex, in which QDs were encapsulated in CPV-VLPs (CPV-VLPs-QDs. When incubated with different cell lines, CPV-VLPs-QDs significantly reduced the cytotoxicity of QDs and selectively labeled the cells with high-level transferrin receptors. Cell-targeted labeling was achieved by utilizing the specific binding between the CPV capsid protein VP2 of VLPs and cellular receptors. CPV-VLPs-QDs, which can mimic the native CPV infection, can recognize and attach to the transferrin receptors on cellular membrane. Therefore, CPV-VLPs can be used as carriers to facilitate the targeted delivery of encapsulated nanomaterials into cells via receptor-mediated pathways. This study confirmed that CPV-VLPs can significantly promote the biocompatibility of nanomaterials and could expand the application of CPV-VLPs in biological medicine.

  7. Cellular Phone Towers, Cell Towers, Published in unknown, Norton County Appraisal Office.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Cellular Phone Towers dataset, was produced all or in part from Other information as of unknown. It is described as 'Cell Towers'. Data by this publisher are...

  8. An improved assay for antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity based on time resolved fluorometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, A K; Boyd, P N

    1995-07-17

    A new and faster assay for antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity based on release of europium from target cells is described. This has a number of important advantages over the traditional assays based on release of chromium-51 (51Cr). The new method involves labelling of Wein 133 target cells (B cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma cells) which express the antigen, CDw52, with the chelate europium diethylenetriaminopentaacetic acid (EuDTPA) according to the method of Blomberg et al. (1986). Labelled cells are sensitised (coated) with the anti-lymphocytic monoclonal antibody, Campath-1H. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells are added to mediate lysis of EuDTPA labelled Wein 133 cells by ADCC. Release of EuDTPA from lysed cells is determined by mixing supernatants with enhancement solution containing 2-naphthoyl trifluoroacetone, 2-NTA, to form a highly fluorescent chelate which is measured using time resolved fluorometry. Results obtained with the new EuDPTA release assays were comparable to traditional assays based on the release of the radioisotope 51Cr. It is anticipated that this assay will have a widespread application among laboratories performing ADCC assays. The method is non-hazardous and has been used routinely for over 2 years to monitor production and purification of Campath-1H. PMID:7622867

  9. Multispectral fingerprinting for improved in vivo cell dynamics analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cooper Cameron HJ

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tracing cell dynamics in the embryo becomes tremendously difficult when cell trajectories cross in space and time and tissue density obscure individual cell borders. Here, we used the chick neural crest (NC as a model to test multicolor cell labeling and multispectral confocal imaging strategies to overcome these roadblocks. Results We found that multicolor nuclear cell labeling and multispectral imaging led to improved resolution of in vivo NC cell identification by providing a unique spectral identity for each cell. NC cell spectral identity allowed for more accurate cell tracking and was consistent during short term time-lapse imaging sessions. Computer model simulations predicted significantly better object counting for increasing cell densities in 3-color compared to 1-color nuclear cell labeling. To better resolve cell contacts, we show that a combination of 2-color membrane and 1-color nuclear cell labeling dramatically improved the semi-automated analysis of NC cell interactions, yet preserved the ability to track cell movements. We also found channel versus lambda scanning of multicolor labeled embryos significantly reduced the time and effort of image acquisition and analysis of large 3D volume data sets. Conclusions Our results reveal that multicolor cell labeling and multispectral imaging provide a cellular fingerprint that may uniquely determine a cell's position within the embryo. Together, these methods offer a spectral toolbox to resolve in vivo cell dynamics in unprecedented detail.

  10. A new method for decreasing cell-load variation in dynamic cellular manufacturing systems

    OpenAIRE

    Aidin Delgoshaei; Mohd Khairol Mohd Ariffin,; Btht Hang Tuah Bin Baharudin; Zulkiflle Leman

    2016-01-01

    Cell load variation is considered a significant shortcoming in scheduling of cellular manufacturing systems. In this article, a new method is proposed for scheduling dynamic cellular manufacturing systems in the presence of bottleneck and parallel machines. The aim of this method is to control cell load variation during the process of determining the best trading off values between in-house manufacturing and outsourcing. A genetic algorithm (GA) is developed because of the high potential of t...

  11. Fast cellular automata with restricted inter-cell communication: computational capacity

    OpenAIRE

    Kutrib, Martin; Malcher, Andreas

    2006-01-01

    A d-dimensional cellular automaton with sequential input mode is a d-dimensional grid of interconnected interacting finite automata. The distinguished automaton at the origin, the communication cell, is connected to the outside world and fetches the input sequentially. Often in the literature this model is referred to as iterative array. We investigate d-dimensional iterative arrays and one-dimensional cellular automata operating in real and linear time, whose inter-cell communicati...

  12. Processing and properties of multiscale cellular thermoplastic fiber reinforced composite (CellFRC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorrentino, L.; Cafiero, L.; D'Auria, M.; Iannace, S.

    2015-12-01

    High performance fiber reinforced polymer composites are made by embedding high strength/modulus fibers in a polymeric matrix. They are a class of materials that owe its success to the impressive specific mechanical properties with respect to metals. In many weight-sensitive applications, where high mechanical properties and low mass are required, properties per unit of mass are more important than absolute properties and further weight reduction is desirable. A route to reach this goal could be the controlled induction of porosity into the polymeric matrix, while still ensuring load transfer to the reinforcing fibers and fiber protection from the environment. Cellular lightweight fiber reinforced composites (CellFRC) were prepared embedding gas bubbles of controlled size within a high performance thermoplastic matrix reinforced with continuous fibers. Pores were induced after the composite was first saturated with CO2 and then foamed by using an in situ foaming/shaping technology based on compression moulding with adjustable mould cavities. The presence of micro- or submicro-sized cells in the new CellFRC reduced the apparent density of the structure and led to significant improvements of its impact properties. Both structural and functional performances were further improved through the use of a platelet-like nanofiller (Expanded Graphite) dispersed into the matrix.

  13. Cellular aging of mitochondrial DNA-depleted cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have reported that mitochondrial DNA-depleted ρ0 cells are resistant to cell death. Because aged cells have frequent mitochondrial DNA mutations, the resistance of ρ0 cells against cell death might be related to the apoptosis resistance of aged cells and frequent development of cancers in aged individuals. We studied if ρ0 cells have features simulating aged cells. SK-Hep1 hepatoma ρ0 cells showed typical morphology associated with aging such as increased size and elongated appearance. They had increased senescence-associated β-Gal activity, lipofuscin pigment, and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 expression. Consistent with their decreased proliferation, the expression of mitotic cyclins was decreased and that of cdk inhibitors was increased. Rb hypophosphorylation and decreased telomerase activity were also noted. Features simulating aged cells were also observed in MDA-MB-435 ρ0 cells. These results support the mitochondrial theory of aging, and suggest that ρ0 cells could serve as an in vitro model for aged cells

  14. Potential cellular receptors involved in hepatitis C virus entry into cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muellhaupt Beat

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hepatitis C virus (HCV infects hepatocytes and leads to permanent, severe liver damage. Since the genomic sequence of HCV was determined, progress has been made towards understanding the functions of the HCV-encoded proteins and identifying the cellular receptor(s responsible for adsorption and penetration of the virus particle into the target cells. Several cellular receptors for HCV have been proposed, all of which are associated with lipid and lipoprotein metabolism. This article reviews the cellular receptors for HCV and suggests a general model for HCV entry into cells, in which lipoproteins play a crucial role.

  15. Cellular Magnetic Resonance Imaging: In Vivo Imaging of Melanoma Cells in Lymph Nodes of Mice1

    OpenAIRE

    Paula J. Foster; Dunn, Elizabeth A; Karl, Kristina E; Snir, Jonatan A; Nycz, Colleen M.; Alfred J Harvey; Ron J Pettis

    2008-01-01

    Metastasis is responsible for most deaths due to malignant melanoma. The clinical significance of micrometastases in the lymph is a hotly debated topic, but an improved understanding of the lymphatic spread of cancer remains important for improving cancer survival. Cellular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a newly emerging field of imaging research that is expected to have a large impact on cancer research. In this study, we demonstrate the cellular MRI technology required to reliably imag...

  16. Towards an Appropriate Beamforming Scheme for Initial Cell Discovery in mmW 5G Cellular Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Abbas, Waqas bin; Zorzi, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Beamforming is an essential requirement to combat high pathloss and to improve signal-to-noise ratio during initial cell discovery in future millimeter wave cellular networks. The choice of an appropriate beamforming is directly coupled with its energy consumption. The energy consumption is even of more concern at a battery limited mobile station (MS). In this work, we provide an energy consumption based comparison of different beamforming schemes while considering both a low power and a high...

  17. Allogeneic cellular immunotherapy for chronic B-cell leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Hoogendoorn, Mels

    2007-01-01

    Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) following reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) as treatment modality has curative potential in patients suffering from chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) or mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), illustrating susceptibility of these leukemic cells for the graft-versus-leukemia (GvL) effect. However, effectiveness of this therapy is limited due to low immunogenicity of leukemic cells and the lack of specificity resulting in concurrent development of graft-versus...

  18. Cellular Adhesion Tripeptide RGD Inhibits Growth of Human Ileocecal Adenocarcinoma Cells HCT-8 and Induces Apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hua; ZENG Hong-bin; YANG Shao-juan; GAO Shen; HUANG Yi-bing; HOU Rui-zhen; ZHAO Mi-feng; XU Li; ZHANG Xue-zhong

    2007-01-01

    The tripeptide, Arg-Gly-Asp(RGD) motif is an integrin-recognition site found in adhesive proteins present in extracellular matrices(ECM) and in the blood. HCT-8 cells were treated with cellular adhesion tripeptide RGD at various concentrations. MTT assay was performed to examine the growth and proliferation of HCT-8 cells after treatment with RGD for 48 h. Haematoxylin and Eosin(HE) staining and electromicroscope were used to observe the morphology of apoptotic cells. Survivin and flow cytometry were also used to analyze the HCT-8 apoptosis. Cellular adhesion tripeptide RGD significantly inhibits the growth and proliferation of HCT-8 cells in a dose-dependent manner and induces apoptosis of HCT-8. These results indicate that cellular adhesion tripeptide RGD inhibits the growth and proliferation of tumor HCT-8 cell, probably by the aid of inducing apoptosis of HCT-8 cell.

  19. Targeted Nanogel Conjugate for Improved Stability and Cellular Permeability of Curcumin: Synthesis, Pharmacokinetics, and Tumor Growth Inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin (CUR) is a unique natural compound with promising anticancer and anti-inflammatory activities. However, the therapeutic efficacy of curcumin was challenged in clinical trials, mostly due to its low bioavailability, rapid metabolism, and elimination. We designed a nanodrug form of curcumin, which makes it stable and substantially enhances cellular permeability and anticancer activity at standard oral administration. Curcumin was conjugated as an ester to cholesteryl-hyaluronic acid (CHA) nanogel that is capable of targeted delivery to CD44-expressing drug-resistant cancer cells. CHA-CUR nanogels demonstrated excellent solubility and sustained drug release in physiological conditions. It induced apoptosis in cancer cells, suppressing the expression of NF-κB, TNF-α, and COX-2 cellular targets similar to free curcumin. Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) studies also revealed improved circulation parameters of CHA-CUR at oral, i.p. and i.v. administration routes. CHA-CUR showed targeted tumor accumulation and effective tumor growth inhibition in human pancreatic adenocarcinoma MiaPaCa-2 and aggressive orthotropic murine mammary carcinoma 4T1 animal models. CHA-CUR treatment was well-tolerated and resulted in up to 13-fold tumor suppression, making this nanodrug a potential candidate for cancer prevention and therapeutic treatment. PMID:25072100

  20. Study on Effect of Aloe Glue on Cytogenetics, Cellular Immunity and Cell Proliferation of Human Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jiahua; WEN Shaluo; XIA Yun; ZHANG Lijun

    2002-01-01

    Objective To provide the scientific evidence for the exploiture of aloe resource. Methods Cytological combined determination was used to study the effect of aloe glue(0.01 ~ 0.3ml) on cytogenetics, cellular immunity and cell proliferation of human cells. Results SCE and MNR in varying dose groups had no significant differences as compared with control group( P > 0.05). LTR was significantly higher than that of control group(P < 0.005). MI was significantly higher than that of control group ( P < 0.05). M3 and PRI in highest dose group had significant differences as compared with control group (P < 0.05). Conclusion Aloe gel had no significant effect on cytogenetics. But it had activating effects on immunity and proliferation of cells.

  1. Creating new β cells: cellular transmutation by genomic alchemy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Larry G

    2013-03-01

    To address insulin insufficiency, diabetes research has long focused on techniques for replacing insulin-producing β cells. Studies in mice have suggested that, under some conditions, α cells possess the capacity to transdifferentiate into β cells, although the mechanisms that drive this conversion are unclear. In this issue, Bramswig et al. analyzed the methylation states of purified human α, β, and acinar cells and found α cells exhibit intrinsic phenotypic plasticity associated with specific histone methylation profiles. In addition to expanding our understanding of this potential source of β cells, this compendium of carefully generated human gene expression and epigenomic data in islet cell subtypes constitutes a truly valuable resource for the field. PMID:23434598

  2. Cellular spectroscopy: applications to cancer stem cell characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegand, G.; Xin, H.; Anderson, A.; Mullinax, J.; Jaiswal, K.; Wiegand, A.; Avital, Itzhak

    2011-02-01

    Spectroscopic and light scattering methods were used to gain insight into the existence and characterization of the cancer stem cell. Fundamental technical description of devices used have been reported elsewhere. We included alterations and implementation of these biophotonic instruments as applied to our objectives. We disassociated human tumor and submitted the cells to optical characterization to support our working hypothesis of stem cell origins to cancer and mechanisms. Single cell combined with population based analysis within the Pancreatic cancer system led us to information regarding the polarization state of cells possessing anchor proteins and drug influx pumps. Multispectral imaging combined with flow cytometry enabled us to target rare cells that appear to retain template DNA. rendering them resistant to anti-cancer drug therapy. In this study we describe an optical method that combines high-throughput population pattern and correlates each cell with an individual fluorescent and bright-field image.

  3. Cellular Interrogation: Exploiting Cell-to-Cell Variability to Discriminate Regulatory Mechanisms in Oscillatory Signalling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Daniel; Chang, Frederick; Gnad, Florian; Gunawardena, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    The molecular complexity within a cell may be seen as an evolutionary response to the external complexity of the cell’s environment. This suggests that the external environment may be harnessed to interrogate the cell’s internal molecular architecture. Cells, however, are not only nonlinear and non-stationary, but also exhibit heterogeneous responses within a clonal, isogenic population. In effect, each cell undertakes its own experiment. Here, we develop a method of cellular interrogation using programmable microfluidic devices which exploits the additional information present in cell-to-cell variation, without requiring model parameters to be fitted to data. We focussed on Ca2+ signalling in response to hormone stimulation, which exhibits oscillatory spiking in many cell types and chose eight models of Ca2+ signalling networks which exhibit similar behaviour in simulation. We developed a nonlinear frequency analysis for non-stationary responses, which could classify models into groups under parameter variation, but found that this question alone was unable to distinguish critical feedback loops. We further developed a nonlinear amplitude analysis and found that the combination of both questions ruled out six of the models as inconsistent with the experimentally-observed dynamics and heterogeneity. The two models that survived the double interrogation were mathematically different but schematically identical and yielded the same unexpected predictions that we confirmed experimentally. Further analysis showed that subtle mathematical details can markedly influence non-stationary responses under parameter variation, emphasising the difficulty of finding a “correct” model. By developing questions for the pathway being studied, and designing more versatile microfluidics, cellular interrogation holds promise as a systematic strategy that can complement direct intervention by genetics or pharmacology. PMID:27367445

  4. Murine cellular cytotoxicity to syngeneic and xenogeneic herpes simplex virus-infected cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Kohl, S; Drath, D B; Loo, L S

    1982-01-01

    Cellular cytotoxicity of C57BL/6 adult mice peritoneal cells to xenogeneic (Chang liver) and syngeneic (BL/6-WT3) herpes simplex virus (HSV)-infected cells was analyzed in a 6-h 51Cr release assay. There was no difference in antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity to either target. There was no natural killer cytotoxicity to targets with cells from uninfected mice except at very high effector cell ratios. HSV-infected (2 X 10(4) PFU intraperitoneally 1 day previously) mice mediated significa...

  5. Stalk cell differentiation without polyketides in the cellular slime mold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Yukie G; Suarez, Teresa; Saito, Tamao

    2016-07-01

    Polyketides induce prestalk cell differentiation in Dictyostelium. In the double-knockout mutant of the SteelyA and B polyketide synthases, most of the pstA cells-the major part of the prestalk cells-are lost, and we show by whole mount in situ hybridization that expression of prestalk genes is also reduced. Treatment of the double-knockout mutant with the PKS inhibitor cerulenin gave a further reduction, but some pstA cells still remained in the tip region, suggesting the existence of a polyketide-independent subtype of pstA cells. The double-knockout mutant and cerulenin-treated parental Ax2 cells form fruiting bodies with fragile, single-cell layered stalks after cerulenin treatment. Our results indicate that most pstA cells are induced by polyketides, but the pstA cells at the very tip of the slug are induced in some other way. In addition, a fruiting body with a single-cell layered, vacuolated stalk can form without polyketides. PMID:27305283

  6. Preplay of future place cell sequences by hippocampal cellular assemblies

    OpenAIRE

    Dragoi, George; Tonegawa, Susumu

    2010-01-01

    During spatial exploration, hippocampal neurons show a sequential firing pattern in which individual neurons fire specifically at particular locations along the animal’s trajectory (place cells1, 2). According to the dominant model of hippocampal cell assembly activity, place cell firing order is established for the first time during exploration, to encode the spatial experience, and is subsequently replayed during rest3, 4, 5, 6 or slow-wave sleep7, 8, 9, 10 for consolidation of the encoded ...

  7. Cell-based biosensors: Towards the development of cellular monitoring

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Cell-based biosensors (CBBs), a research hotspot of biosensors, which treat living cells as sensing elements, can detect the functional information of biologically active analytes. They characterize with high sensitivity, excellent selectivity and rapid response, and have been applied in many fields, such as biomedicine, environmental monitoring and pharmaceutical screening. Recently cell-cultured technology, silicon microfabrication technology and genetic technology have promoted exploration of CBBs dramatically. To elucidate the novel research findings and applications of cell- based biosensors, this paper summarizes various research approaches, presents some challenges and proposes the research trends.

  8. Active Cellular Mechanics and Information Processing in the Living Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, M.

    2014-07-01

    I will present our recent work on the organization of signaling molecules on the surface of living cells. Using novel experimental and theoretical approaches we have found that many cell surface receptors are organized as dynamic clusters driven by active currents and stresses generated by the cortical cytoskeleton adjoining the cell surface. We have shown that this organization is optimal for both information processing and computation. In connecting active mechanics in the cell with information processing and computation, we bring together two of the seminal works of Alan Turing.

  9. Matrix rigidity regulates cancer cell growth and cellular phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert W Tilghman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The mechanical properties of the extracellular matrix have an important role in cell growth and differentiation. However, it is unclear as to what extent cancer cells respond to changes in the mechanical properties (rigidity/stiffness of the microenvironment and how this response varies among cancer cell lines. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study we used a recently developed 96-well plate system that arrays extracellular matrix-conjugated polyacrylamide gels that increase in stiffness by at least 50-fold across the plate. This plate was used to determine how changes in the rigidity of the extracellular matrix modulate the biological properties of tumor cells. The cell lines tested fall into one of two categories based on their proliferation on substrates of differing stiffness: "rigidity dependent" (those which show an increase in cell growth as extracellular rigidity is increased, and "rigidity independent" (those which grow equally on both soft and stiff substrates. Cells which grew poorly on soft gels also showed decreased spreading and migration under these conditions. More importantly, seeding the cell lines into the lungs of nude mice revealed that the ability of cells to grow on soft gels in vitro correlated with their ability to grow in a soft tissue environment in vivo. The lung carcinoma line A549 responded to culture on soft gels by expressing the differentiated epithelial marker E-cadherin and decreasing the expression of the mesenchymal transcription factor Slug. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These observations suggest that the mechanical properties of the matrix environment play a significant role in regulating the proliferation and the morphological properties of cancer cells. Further, the multiwell format of the soft-plate assay is a useful and effective adjunct to established 3-dimensional cell culture models.

  10. Cellular plasticity of CD4+ T cells in the intestine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verena eBrucklacher-Waldert

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Barrier sites such as the gastrointestinal tract are in constant contact with the environment which contains both beneficial and harmful components. The immune system at the epithelia must make the distinction between these components to balance tolerance, protection and immunopathology. This is achieved via multifaceted immune recognition, highly organised lymphoid structures and the interaction of many types of immune cells. The adaptive immune response in the gut is orchestrated by CD4+ helper T (Th cells which are integral to gut immunity. In recent years it has become apparent that the functional identity of these Th cells is not as fixed as initially thought. Plasticity in differentiated T cell subsets has now been firmly established, in both health and disease. The gut, in particular, utilises CD4+ T cell plasticity to mould CD4+ T cell phenotypes to maintain its finely poised balance of tolerance and inflammation and to encourage biodiversity within the enteric microbiome. In this review we will discuss intestinal helper T cell plasticity and our current understanding of its mechanisms, including our growing knowledge of an evolutionarily ancient symbiosis between microbiota and malleable CD4+ T cell effectors.

  11. Radiation effects on membranes - 1. Cellular permeability and cell survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of various doses of γ radiation (5-60 krad) on the membrane permeability and cell survival of Candida albicans, a pathogenic yeast, was investigated. A reduction in the cell survival and in the accumulation of amino acids (proline, glycine, lysine, and glutamic acid) was observed following irradiation. The rate of oxygen uptake, which is often associated with transport, was also reduced. There was no damage to available sulfhydryl groups following the exposure of cells to various doses of γ radiation. The membrane lipid composition of C. albicans cells can be altered by growing them in alkanes of varying chain lengths. The effects of such altered lipid composition on radiosensitivity was examined. It was observed that C. albicans cells with altered lipid content acquire resistance to γ radiation

  12. Cellular Taxonomy of the Mouse Striatum as Revealed by Single-Cell RNA-Seq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokce, Ozgun; Stanley, Geoffrey M; Treutlein, Barbara; Neff, Norma F; Camp, J Gray; Malenka, Robert C; Rothwell, Patrick E; Fuccillo, Marc V; Südhof, Thomas C; Quake, Stephen R

    2016-07-26

    The striatum contributes to many cognitive processes and disorders, but its cell types are incompletely characterized. We show that microfluidic and FACS-based single-cell RNA sequencing of mouse striatum provides a well-resolved classification of striatal cell type diversity. Transcriptome analysis revealed ten differentiated, distinct cell types, including neurons, astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, ependymal, immune, and vascular cells, and enabled the discovery of numerous marker genes. Furthermore, we identified two discrete subtypes of medium spiny neurons (MSNs) that have specific markers and that overexpress genes linked to cognitive disorders and addiction. We also describe continuous cellular identities, which increase heterogeneity within discrete cell types. Finally, we identified cell type-specific transcription and splicing factors that shape cellular identities by regulating splicing and expression patterns. Our findings suggest that functional diversity within a complex tissue arises from a small number of discrete cell types, which can exist in a continuous spectrum of functional states. PMID:27425622

  13. Cellular Taxonomy of the Mouse Striatum as Revealed by Single-Cell RNA-Seq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozgun Gokce

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The striatum contributes to many cognitive processes and disorders, but its cell types are incompletely characterized. We show that microfluidic and FACS-based single-cell RNA sequencing of mouse striatum provides a well-resolved classification of striatal cell type diversity. Transcriptome analysis revealed ten differentiated, distinct cell types, including neurons, astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, ependymal, immune, and vascular cells, and enabled the discovery of numerous marker genes. Furthermore, we identified two discrete subtypes of medium spiny neurons (MSNs that have specific markers and that overexpress genes linked to cognitive disorders and addiction. We also describe continuous cellular identities, which increase heterogeneity within discrete cell types. Finally, we identified cell type-specific transcription and splicing factors that shape cellular identities by regulating splicing and expression patterns. Our findings suggest that functional diversity within a complex tissue arises from a small number of discrete cell types, which can exist in a continuous spectrum of functional states.

  14. Optimizing cell seeding and retention in a three-dimensional bioengineered cardiac ventricle: The two-stage cellularization model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Nikita M; Yazdi, Iman K; Tasciotti, Ennio; Birla, Ravi K

    2016-10-01

    Current cell seeding techniques focus on passively directing cells to a scaffold surface with the addition of dynamic culture to encourage cell permeation. In 3D tissue engineered constructs, cell retention efficiency is dependent on the cell delivery method, and biomaterial properties. Passive cell delivery relies on cell migration to the scaffold surface; biomaterial surface properties and porosity determine cell infiltration capacity. As a result, cell retention efficiencies remain low. The development of an effective two-stage cell seeding technique, coupled with perfusion culture, provides the potential to improve cellularization efficiency, and retention. This study, uses a chitosan bioengineered open ventricle (BEOV) scaffold to produce a two-stage perfusion cultured ventricle (TPCV). TPCV were fabricated by direct injection of 10 million primary rat neonatal cardiac cells, followed by wrapping of the outer scaffold surface with a 3D fibrin gel artificial heart muscle patch; TPCV were perfusion cultured for 3 days. The average biopotential output was 1.731 mV. TPCV cell retention following culture was approximately 5%. Cardiac cells were deposited on the scaffold surface and formed intercellular connections. Histological assessment displayed localized cell clusters, with some dissemination, and validated the observed presence of intercellular and gap-junction interactions. The study demonstrates initial effectiveness of our two-stage cell delivery concept, based on function and biological metrics. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 2275-2285. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27071026

  15. Cellular transfer and AFM imaging of cancer cells using Bioimprint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melville DOS

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A technique for permanently capturing a replica impression of biological cells has been developed to facilitate analysis using nanometer resolution imaging tools, namely the atomic force microscope (AFM. The method, termed Bioimprint™, creates a permanent cell 'footprint' in a non-biohazardous Poly (dimethylsiloxane (PDMS polymer composite. The transfer of nanometer scale biological information is presented as an alternative imaging technique at a resolution beyond that of optical microscopy. By transferring cell topology into a rigid medium more suited for AFM imaging, many of the limitations associated with scanning of biological specimens can be overcome. Potential for this technique is demonstrated by analyzing Bioimprint™ replicas created from human endometrial cancer cells. The high resolution transfer of this process is further detailed by imaging membrane morphological structures consistent with exocytosis. The integration of soft lithography to replicate biological materials presents an enhanced method for the study of biological systems at the nanoscale.

  16. Cellular cardiac electrophysiology modeling with Chaste and CellML

    OpenAIRE

    Cooper, Jonathan; Spiteri, Raymond J.; Mirams, Gary R

    2014-01-01

    Chaste is an open-source C++ library for computational biology that has well-developed cardiac electrophysiology tissue simulation support. In this paper, we introduce the features available for performing cardiac electrophysiology action potential simulations using a wide range of models from the Physiome repository. The mathematics of the models are described in CellML, with units for all quantities. The primary idea is that the model is defined in one place (the CellML file), and all model...

  17. Native cellular fluorescence characteristics of normal and malignant epithelial cells from human larynx

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmeswearan, Diagaradjane; Ganesan, Singaravelu; Nalini, R.; Aruna, Prakasa R.; Veeraganesh, V.; Alfano, Robert R.

    1997-08-01

    Many applications of native fluorescence spectroscopy of intrinsic biomolecules such as Try, Tyr, Phe, NADH and FAD are reported on both the characterization and the discrimination of malignant tissues from the normal. In the field of diagnostic oncology, extensive studies have been made to distinguish the normal from malignant condition in breast, cervix, colon and bronchus. From the studies made by Alfano and co-workers, it was found that the emission at 340 and 440 nm under UV excitation have shown statistically significant difference between normal and malignant tissues. As tissues are highly complex in nature, it is worth to known whether the changes arise from cells or from other extracellular tissue components, so as to enable us to have better understanding on the transformation mechanism of normal into malignant and to go for an improved approach in the effective optical diagnosis. In this context, the present study addresses the question of whether there are differences in the native cellular fluorescence characteristics between normal and malignant epithelial cells from human larynx. With this aim, the UV fluorescence emission spectra in the wavelength region of excitation between 270 - 310 nm and the excitation spectra for 340 nm emission were measured and analyzed. In order to quantify the altered fluorescence signal between the normal and malignant cells, different ratio parameters were introduced.

  18. DNA-damage response network at the crossroads of cell-cycle checkpoints, cellular senescence and apoptosis*

    OpenAIRE

    Schmitt, Estelle; Paquet, Claudie; Beauchemin, Myriam; Bertrand, Richard

    2007-01-01

    Tissue homeostasis requires a carefully-orchestrated balance between cell proliferation, cellular senescence and cell death. Cells proliferate through a cell cycle that is tightly regulated by cyclin-dependent kinase activities. Cellular senescence is a safeguard program limiting the proliferative competence of cells in living organisms. Apoptosis eliminates unwanted cells by the coordinated activity of gene products that regulate and effect cell death. The intimate link between the cell cycl...

  19. From Ancient Pathways to Aging Cells-Connecting Metabolism and Cellular Senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, Christopher D; Campisi, Judith

    2016-06-14

    Cellular senescence is a complex stress response that permanently arrests the proliferation of cells at risk for oncogenic transformation. However, senescent cells can also drive phenotypes associated with aging. Although the senescence-associated growth arrest prevents the development of cancer, and the metabolism of cancer cells has been studied in depth, the metabolic causes and consequences of cellular senescence were largely unexplored until recently. New findings reveal key roles for several aspects of cellular metabolism in the establishment and control of senescent phenotypes. These discoveries have important implications for both cancer and aging. In this review, we highlight some of the recent links between metabolism and phenotypes that are commonly associated with senescent cells. PMID:27304503

  20. Cancer stem cell overexpression of nicotinamide N-methyltransferase enhances cellular radiation resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D’Andrea, Filippo P.; Safwat, Akmal; Kassem, Moustapha; Gautier, Laurent; Overgaard, Jens; Horsman, Michael R.

    2011-01-01

    BackgroundCancer stem cells are thought to be a radioresistant population and may be the seeds for recurrence after radiotherapy. Using tumorigenic clones of retroviral immortalized human mesenchymal stem cell with small differences in their phenotype, we investigated possible genetic expression...... analysis found the genes involved in cancer, proliferation, DNA repair and cell death. ConclusionsThe higher radiation resistance in clone CE8 is likely due to NNMT overexpression. The higher levels of NNMT could affect the cellular damage resistance through depletion of the accessible amounts of...... nicotinamide, which is a known inhibitor of cellular DNA repair mechanisms....

  1. An integrated approach for the cell formation and layout design in cellular manufacturing systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Javadi, Babak; Jolai, Fariborz; Slomp, Jannes; Rabbani, Masoud; Tavakkoli-Moghaddam, Reza

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, a comprehensive model is presented for cell formation and layout design in cellular manufacturing systems (CMS). The proposed model incorporates an extensive coverage of important operational features and especially layout design aspects to determine optimal cell configuration and Int

  2. Cellular and Phenotypic Characterization of Canine Osteosarcoma Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie E. Legare, Jamie Bush, Amanda K. Ashley, Taka Kato, William H. Hanneman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Canine and human osteosarcoma (OSA have many similarities, with the majority of reported cases occurring in the appendicular skeleton, gender predominance noted, high rate of metastasis at the time of presentation, and a lack of known etiology for this devastating disease. Due to poor understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying OSA, we have characterized seven different OSA canine cell lines: Abrams, D17, Grey, Hughes, Ingles, Jarques, and Marisco and compared them to U2, a human OSA cell line, for the following parameters: morphology, growth, contact inhibition, migrational tendencies, alkaline phosphatase staining, heterologous tumor growth, double-strand DNA breaks, and oxidative damage. All results demonstrated the positive characteristics of the Abrams cell line for use in future studies of OSA. Of particular interest, the robust growth of a subcutaneous tumor and rapid pulmonary metastasis of the Abrams cell line in an immunocompromised mouse shows incredible potential for the future use of Abrams as a canine OSA model. Further investigations utilizing a canine cell model of OSA, such as Abrams, will be invaluable to understanding the molecular events underlying OSA, pharmaceutical inhibition of metastasis, and eventual prevention of this devastating disease.

  3. Early B-cell differentiation in Merkel cell carcinomas: clues to cellular ancestry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zur Hausen, Axel; Rennspiess, Dorit; Winnepenninckx, Veronique; Speel, Ernst-Jan; Kurz, Anna Kordelia

    2013-08-15

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a highly malignant neuroendocrine nonmelanoma skin cancer, which is associated with the Merkel cell polyoma virus (MCPyV). Recently, expression of the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT) and the paired box gene 5 (PAX 5) has been consistently reported in the majority of MCCs. We tested 21 MCCs for the expression of MCPyV, TdT, PAX5, IgG, IgM, IgA, kappa, and lambda by immunohistochemistry and assessed IgH and Igk rearrangement in all 21 MCCs. All of the MCCs revealed specific expression of PAX5 and 72.8% of the MCCs expressed TdT. In addition, most of the MCCs revealed specific expression of one or more Ig subclasses and kappa or lambda. One MCC did reveal monoclonal IgH and Igk rearrangement next to two other MCCs showing Igk rearrangement. As coexpression of TdT and PAX5 under physiologic circumstances is restricted to pro/pre- and pre-B cells we propose, on the basis of our results, that the cell of origin of MCCs is a pro/pre- or pre-B cell rather than the postmitotic Merkel cells. MCPyV infection and transformation of pro-/pre-B cells are likely to induce the expression of simple cytokeratins as has been shown for SV40 in other nonepithelial cells. This model of cellular ancestry of MCCs might impact therapy and possibly helps to understand why approximately 20% of MCCs are MCPyV-negative. PMID:23576560

  4. Detection of silent cells, synchronization and modulatory activity in developing cellular networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjorth, Johannes J J; Dawitz, Julia; Kroon, Tim; Pires, Johny; Dassen, Valerie J; Berkhout, Janna A; Emperador Melero, Javier; Nadadhur, Aish G; Alevra, Mihai; Toonen, Ruud F; Heine, Vivi M; Mansvelder, Huibert D; Meredith, Rhiannon M

    2016-04-01

    Developing networks in the immature nervous system and in cellular cultures are characterized by waves of synchronous activity in restricted clusters of cells. Synchronized activity in immature networks is proposed to regulate many different developmental processes, from neuron growth and cell migration, to the refinement of synapses, topographic maps, and the mature composition of ion channels. These emergent activity patterns are not present in all cells simultaneously within the network and more immature "silent" cells, potentially correlated with the presence of silent synapses, are prominent in different networks during early developmental periods. Many current network analyses for detection of synchronous cellular activity utilize activity-based pixel correlations to identify cellular-based regions of interest (ROIs) and coincident cell activity. However, using activity-based correlations, these methods first underestimate or ignore the inactive silent cells within the developing network and second, are difficult to apply within cell-dense regions commonly found in developing brain networks. In addition, previous methods may ignore ROIs within a network that shows transient activity patterns comprising both inactive and active periods. We developed analysis software to semi-automatically detect cells within developing neuronal networks that were imaged using calcium-sensitive reporter dyes. Using an iterative threshold, modulation of activity was tracked within individual cells across the network. The distribution pattern of both inactive and active, including synchronous cells, could be determined based on distance measures to neighboring cells and according to different anatomical layers. PMID:26097169

  5. Lysophosphatidic acid receptor-5 negatively regulates cellular responses in mouse fibroblast 3T3 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • LPA5 inhibits the cell growth and motile activities of 3T3 cells. • LPA5 suppresses the cell motile activities stimulated by hydrogen peroxide in 3T3 cells. • Enhancement of LPA5 on the cell motile activities inhibited by LPA1 in 3T3 cells. • The expression and activation of Mmp-9 were inhibited by LPA5 in 3T3 cells. • LPA signaling via LPA5 acts as a negative regulator of cellular responses in 3T3 cells. - Abstract: Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) signaling via G protein-coupled LPA receptors (LPA1–LPA6) mediates a variety of biological functions, including cell migration. Recently, we have reported that LPA1 inhibited the cell motile activities of mouse fibroblast 3T3 cells. In the present study, to evaluate a role of LPA5 in cellular responses, Lpar5 knockdown (3T3-L5) cells were generated from 3T3 cells. In cell proliferation assays, LPA markedly stimulated the cell proliferation activities of 3T3-L5 cells, compared with control cells. In cell motility assays with Cell Culture Inserts, the cell motile activities of 3T3-L5 cells were significantly higher than those of control cells. The activity levels of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) were measured by gelatin zymography. 3T3-L5 cells stimulated the activation of Mmp-2, correlating with the expression levels of Mmp-2 gene. Moreover, to assess the co-effects of LPA1 and LPA5 on cell motile activities, Lpar5 knockdown (3T3a1-L5) cells were also established from Lpar1 over-expressing (3T3a1) cells. 3T3a1-L5 cells increased the cell motile activities of 3T3a1 cells, while the cell motile activities of 3T3a1 cells were significantly lower than those of control cells. These results suggest that LPA5 may act as a negative regulator of cellular responses in mouse fibroblast 3T3 cells, similar to the case for LPA1

  6. Lysophosphatidic acid receptor-5 negatively regulates cellular responses in mouse fibroblast 3T3 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Yan; Hirane, Miku; Araki, Mutsumi [Division of Cancer Biology and Bioinformatics, Department of Life Science, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Kinki University, 3-4-1, Kowakae, Higashiosaka, Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Fukushima, Nobuyuki [Division of Molecular Neurobiology, Department of Life Science, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Kinki University, 3-4-1, Kowakae, Higashiosaka, Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi, E-mail: ttujiuch@life.kindai.ac.jp [Division of Cancer Biology and Bioinformatics, Department of Life Science, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Kinki University, 3-4-1, Kowakae, Higashiosaka, Osaka 577-8502 (Japan)

    2014-04-04

    Highlights: • LPA{sub 5} inhibits the cell growth and motile activities of 3T3 cells. • LPA{sub 5} suppresses the cell motile activities stimulated by hydrogen peroxide in 3T3 cells. • Enhancement of LPA{sub 5} on the cell motile activities inhibited by LPA{sub 1} in 3T3 cells. • The expression and activation of Mmp-9 were inhibited by LPA{sub 5} in 3T3 cells. • LPA signaling via LPA{sub 5} acts as a negative regulator of cellular responses in 3T3 cells. - Abstract: Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) signaling via G protein-coupled LPA receptors (LPA{sub 1}–LPA{sub 6}) mediates a variety of biological functions, including cell migration. Recently, we have reported that LPA{sub 1} inhibited the cell motile activities of mouse fibroblast 3T3 cells. In the present study, to evaluate a role of LPA{sub 5} in cellular responses, Lpar5 knockdown (3T3-L5) cells were generated from 3T3 cells. In cell proliferation assays, LPA markedly stimulated the cell proliferation activities of 3T3-L5 cells, compared with control cells. In cell motility assays with Cell Culture Inserts, the cell motile activities of 3T3-L5 cells were significantly higher than those of control cells. The activity levels of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) were measured by gelatin zymography. 3T3-L5 cells stimulated the activation of Mmp-2, correlating with the expression levels of Mmp-2 gene. Moreover, to assess the co-effects of LPA{sub 1} and LPA{sub 5} on cell motile activities, Lpar5 knockdown (3T3a1-L5) cells were also established from Lpar1 over-expressing (3T3a1) cells. 3T3a1-L5 cells increased the cell motile activities of 3T3a1 cells, while the cell motile activities of 3T3a1 cells were significantly lower than those of control cells. These results suggest that LPA{sub 5} may act as a negative regulator of cellular responses in mouse fibroblast 3T3 cells, similar to the case for LPA{sub 1}.

  7. Proteomes and Neural Stem Cells: cellular signalling during differentiation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Skalníková, Helena; Halada, Petr; Vodička, Petr; Motlík, Jan; Horning, O.; Jensen, O. N.; Gadher, S. J.; Pelech, S.; Kovářová, Hana

    Cambridge : -, 2007, s. 1-1. [BSPR-EBI Meeting: Integrative Proteomics: From Molecules to Systems,. Cambridge (GB), 25.07.2007-27.07.2007] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515; CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : neural stem cells * differentiation * signalling * proteome Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  8. Molecular and cellular mechanisms of cadmium resistance in cultured cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grady, D.L.; Moyzis, R.K.; Hildebrand, C.E.

    1985-01-01

    Heavy metal induction of the synthesis of metallothioneins (MTs) provides an ideal model system for basic mechanistic studies of gene expression. Cell lines varying in their resistance to heavy metals have been isolated through a regime of exposure to serially increasing levels of Cd followed by clonal isolation. These cell lines have been used to examine the role of methylation and amplification in the Cd-resistant (Cd/sup r/) phenotype. It is suggested that regulation of expression of the MT genes in Cd/sup r/ Chinese hamster cells is modulated at both the transcriptional and translational levels. An analysis of the MT2 gene sequence has uncovered a potential alternative splice site in the first intron. Usage of this site would insert 3 or 12 additional amino acids between amino acids 9 and 10. Analysis of the splicing pattern of the MT2 gene transcript in cultured cells has indicated that the second intron is preferentially removed prior to first intron excision. 34 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Topology optimization of adaptive fluid-actuated cellular structures with arbitrary polygonal motor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Jun; Tang, Liang; Li, Wenbo; Liu, Lei; Zhang, Hongwu

    2016-05-01

    This paper mainly focuses on the fast and efficient design method for plant bioinspired fluidic cellular materials and structures composed of polygonal motor cells. Here we developed a novel structural optimization method with arbitrary polygonal coarse-grid elements based on multiscale finite element frameworks. The fluidic cellular structures are meshed with irregular polygonal coarse-grid elements according to their natural size and the shape of the imbedded motor cells. The multiscale base functions of solid displacement and hydraulic pressure are then constructed to bring the small-scale information of the irregular motor cells to the large-scale simulations on the polygonal coarse-grid elements. On this basis, a new topology optimization method based on the resulting polygonal coarse-grid elements is proposed to determine the optimal distributions or number of motor cells in the smart cellular structures. Three types of optimization problems are solved according to the usages of the fluidic cellular structures. Firstly, the proposed optimization method is utilized to minimize the system compliance of the load-bearing fluidic cellular structures. Second, the method is further extended to design biomimetic compliant actuators of the fluidic cellular materials due to the fact that non-uniform volume expansions of fluid in the cells can induce elastic action. Third, the optimization problem focuses on the weight minimization of the cellular structure under the constraints for the compliance of the whole system. Several representative examples are investigated to validate the effectiveness of the proposed polygon-based topology optimization method of the smart materials.

  10. An improved cellular automaton model considering the effect of traffic lights and driving behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Hong-Di; Lu, Wei-Zhen; Dong, Li-Yun

    2011-04-01

    This paper proposes an improved cellular automaton model to describe the urban traffic flow with the consideration of traffic light and driving behaviour effects. Based on the model, the characteristics of the urban traffic flow on a single-lane road are investigated under three different control strategies, i.e., the synchronized, the green wave and the random strategies. The fundamental diagrams and time-space patterns of the traffic flows are provided for these strategies respectively. It finds that the dynamical transition to the congested flow appears when the vehicle density is higher than a critical level. The saturated flow is less dependent on the cycle time and the strategies of the traffic light control, while the critical vehicle density varies with the cycle time and the strategies. Simulated results indicate that the green wave strategy is proven to be the most effective one among the above three control strategies.

  11. Cellular therapy following allogeneic stem-cell transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Rager, Alison; Porter, David L.

    2011-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT) is the most effective approach for many patients with hematologic malignancies. Unfortunately, relapse remains the most common cause of death after allogeneic HSCT, and the prognosis of relapsed disease is poor for most patients. Induction of a graft-versus-leukemia (GVL), or graft-versus-tumor, effect through the use of donor leukocyte infusion (DLI), or donor lymphocyte infusion, has been remarkably successful for relapsed chronic my...

  12. Murine cellular cytotoxicity to syngeneic and xenogeneic herpes simplex virus-infected cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohl, S; Drath, D B; Loo, L S

    1982-12-01

    Cellular cytotoxicity of C57BL/6 adult mice peritoneal cells to xenogeneic (Chang liver) and syngeneic (BL/6-WT3) herpes simplex virus (HSV)-infected cells was analyzed in a 6-h 51Cr release assay. There was no difference in antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity to either target. There was no natural killer cytotoxicity to targets with cells from uninfected mice except at very high effector cell ratios. HSV-infected (2 X 10(4) PFU intraperitoneally 1 day previously) mice mediated significantly higher antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and required less antibody (10(-5) versus 10(-2) dilution), fewer cells, and less time to kill than cells from uninfected mice. HSV-infected mice mediated natural killer cytotoxicity but preferentially killed syngeneic HSV-infected cells. Stimulation of cytotoxicity was not virus specific since influenza-infected mice mediated similar levels of cytotoxicity to HSV-infected targets. There was no difference in morphology (95% macrophage) or in the percentage of FcR-positive cells, but infected mice had more peritoneal cells and generated higher levels of superoxide in response to opsonized zymosan or phorbolmyristate acetate. These data demonstrate nonspecific virus-stimulated metabolic and effector cell function which may enhance clearance of virus in an infected host. PMID:6295943

  13. Human Cortical Neural Stem Cells Expressing Insulin-Like Growth Factor-I: A Novel Cellular Therapy for Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinley, Lisa M; Sims, Erika; Lunn, J Simon; Kashlan, Osama N; Chen, Kevin S; Bruno, Elizabeth S; Pacut, Crystal M; Hazel, Tom; Johe, Karl; Sakowski, Stacey A; Feldman, Eva L

    2016-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most prevalent age-related neurodegenerative disorder and a leading cause of dementia. Current treatment fails to modify underlying disease pathologies and very little progress has been made to develop effective drug treatments. Cellular therapies impact disease by multiple mechanisms, providing increased efficacy compared with traditional single-target approaches. In amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, we have shown that transplanted spinal neural stem cells (NSCs) integrate into the spinal cord, form synapses with the host, improve inflammation, and reduce disease-associated pathologies. Our current goal is to develop a similar "best in class" cellular therapy for AD. Here, we characterize a novel human cortex-derived NSC line modified to express insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), HK532-IGF-I. Because IGF-I promotes neurogenesis and synaptogenesis in vivo, this enhanced NSC line offers additional environmental enrichment, enhanced neuroprotection, and a multifaceted approach to treating complex AD pathologies. We show that autocrine IGF-I production does not impact the cell secretome or normal cellular functions, including proliferation, migration, or maintenance of progenitor status. However, HK532-IGF-I cells preferentially differentiate into gamma-aminobutyric acid-ergic neurons, a subtype dysregulated in AD; produce increased vascular endothelial growth factor levels; and display an increased neuroprotective capacity in vitro. We also demonstrate that HK532-IGF-I cells survive peri-hippocampal transplantation in a murine AD model and exhibit long-term persistence in targeted brain areas. In conclusion, we believe that harnessing the benefits of cellular and IGF-I therapies together will provide the optimal therapeutic benefit to patients, and our findings support further preclinical development of HK532-IGF-I cells into a disease-modifying intervention for AD. PMID:26744412

  14. A novel cell traction force microscopy to study multi-cellular system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Tang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Traction forces exerted by adherent cells on their microenvironment can mediate many critical cellular functions. Accurate quantification of these forces is essential for mechanistic understanding of mechanotransduction. However, most existing methods of quantifying cellular forces are limited to single cells in isolation, whereas most physiological processes are inherently multi-cellular in nature where cell-cell and cell-microenvironment interactions determine the emergent properties of cell clusters. In the present study, a robust finite-element-method-based cell traction force microscopy technique is developed to estimate the traction forces produced by multiple isolated cells as well as cell clusters on soft substrates. The method accounts for the finite thickness of the substrate. Hence, cell cluster size can be larger than substrate thickness. The method allows computing the traction field from the substrate displacements within the cells' and clusters' boundaries. The displacement data outside these boundaries are not necessary. The utility of the method is demonstrated by computing the traction generated by multiple monkey kidney fibroblasts (MKF and human colon cancerous (HCT-8 cells in close proximity, as well as by large clusters. It is found that cells act as individual contractile groups within clusters for generating traction. There may be multiple of such groups in the cluster, or the entire cluster may behave a single group. Individual cells do not form dipoles, but serve as a conduit of force (transmission lines over long distances in the cluster. The cell-cell force can be either tensile or compressive depending on the cell-microenvironment interactions.

  15. Pulsed Electromagnetic Field Stimulates Cellular Proliferation in Human Intervertebral Disc Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Hwan-Mo; Kwon, Un-Hye; Kim, Hyang; Kim, Ho-Joong; Kim, Boram; Park, Jin-Oh; Moon, Eun-Soo; Moon, Seong-Hwan

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to investigate the mechanism of cellular proliferation of electromagnetic field (EMF) on human intervertebral disc (IVD) cells. Materials and Methods Human IVD cells were cultured three-dimensionally in alginate beads. EMF was exposed to IVD cells with 650Ω, 1.8 millitesla magnetic flux density, 60 Hz sinusoidal wave. Cultures were divided into a control and EMF group. Cytotoxicity, DNA synthesis and proteoglycan synthesis were measured by MTT assay, [3H]-...

  16. Olfactory stem cells, a new cellular model for studying molecular mechanisms underlying familial dysautonomia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Boone

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Familial dysautonomia (FD is a hereditary neuropathy caused by mutations in the IKBKAP gene, the most common of which results in variable tissue-specific mRNA splicing with skipping of exon 20. Defective splicing is especially severe in nervous tissue, leading to incomplete development and progressive degeneration of sensory and autonomic neurons. The specificity of neuron loss in FD is poorly understood due to the lack of an appropriate model system. To better understand and modelize the molecular mechanisms of IKBKAP mRNA splicing, we collected human olfactory ecto-mesenchymal stem cells (hOE-MSC from FD patients. hOE-MSCs have a pluripotent ability to differentiate into various cell lineages, including neurons and glial cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We confirmed IKBKAP mRNA alternative splicing in FD hOE-MSCs and identified 2 novel spliced isoforms also present in control cells. We observed a significant lower expression of both IKBKAP transcript and IKAP/hELP1 protein in FD cells resulting from the degradation of the transcript isoform skipping exon 20. We localized IKAP/hELP1 in different cell compartments, including the nucleus, which supports multiple roles for that protein. We also investigated cellular pathways altered in FD, at the genome-wide level, and confirmed that cell migration and cytoskeleton reorganization were among the processes altered in FD. Indeed, FD hOE-MSCs exhibit impaired migration compared to control cells. Moreover, we showed that kinetin improved exon 20 inclusion and restores a normal level of IKAP/hELP1 in FD hOE-MSCs. Furthermore, we were able to modify the IKBKAP splicing ratio in FD hOE-MSCs, increasing or reducing the WT (exon 20 inclusion:MU (exon 20 skipping ratio respectively, either by producing free-floating spheres, or by inducing cells into neural differentiation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: hOE-MSCs isolated from FD patients represent a new approach for modeling FD to better

  17. Cellular cardiac electrophysiology modeling with Chaste and CellML.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Jonathan; Spiteri, Raymond J; Mirams, Gary R

    2014-01-01

    Chaste is an open-source C++ library for computational biology that has well-developed cardiac electrophysiology tissue simulation support. In this paper, we introduce the features available for performing cardiac electrophysiology action potential simulations using a wide range of models from the Physiome repository. The mathematics of the models are described in CellML, with units for all quantities. The primary idea is that the model is defined in one place (the CellML file), and all model code is auto-generated at compile or run time; it never has to be manually edited. We use ontological annotation to identify model variables describing certain biological quantities (membrane voltage, capacitance, etc.) to allow us to import any relevant CellML models into the Chaste framework in consistent units and to interact with them via consistent interfaces. This approach provides a great deal of flexibility for analysing different models of the same system. Chaste provides a wide choice of numerical methods for solving the ordinary differential equations that describe the models. Fixed-timestep explicit and implicit solvers are provided, as discussed in previous work. Here we introduce the Rush-Larsen and Generalized Rush-Larsen integration techniques, made available via symbolic manipulation of the model equations, which are automatically rearranged into the forms required by these approaches. We have also integrated the CVODE solvers, a 'gold standard' for stiff systems, and we have developed support for symbolic computation of the Jacobian matrix, yielding further increases in the performance and accuracy of CVODE. We discuss some of the technical details of this work and compare the performance of the available numerical methods. Finally, we discuss how this is generalized in our functional curation framework, which uses a domain-specific language for defining complex experiments as a basis for comparison of model behavior. PMID:25610400

  18. Microencapsulation of stem cells to study cellular interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Keith; Vandergriff, Adam; Potts, Jay D

    2013-01-01

    Microencapsulation is a technique used in both controlled delivery of materials over time as well as preservation of these materials while delivery is occurring. The range of materials able to be encapsulated is variable, from drugs to living cells. The latter is described here. Electrospray microencapsulation applies a high-voltage field, through which a polymeric material is extruded. A gelling bath, comprising a cross-linking material, is used to create a stable hydrogel containing secondary substances intended for delivery. Control of extrusion parameters, such as flow rate and voltage, allows for specification of diameter and pore sizes of the microcapsules. PMID:23955738

  19. Neurogenic plasticity of mesenchymal stem cell, an alluring cellular replacement for traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pati, Soumya; Muthuraju, Sangu; Hadi, Raisah Ab; Huat, Tee Jong; Singh, Shailja; Maletic-Savatic, Mirjana; Abdullah, Jafri Malin; Jaafar, Hasnan

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) imposes horrendous neurophysiological alterations leading to most devastating forms of neuro-disability. Which includes impaired cognition, distorted locomotors activity and psychosomatic disability in both youths and adults. Emerging evidence from recent studies has identified mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) as one of the promising category of stem cells having excellent neuroregenerative capability in TBI victims. Some of the clinical and animal studies reported that MSCs transplantation could cure neuronal damage as well as improve cognitive and locomotors behaviors in TBI. However, mechanism behind their broad spectrum neuroregenerative potential in TBI has not been reviewed yet. Therefore, in the present article, we present a comprehensive data on the important attributes of MSCs, such as neurotransdifferentiation, neuroprotection, axonal repair and plasticity, maintenance of blood-brain integrity, reduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and immunomodulation. We have reviewed in detail the crucial neurogenic capabilities of MSCs in vivo and provided consolidated knowledge regarding their cellular remodeling in TBI for future therapeutic implications. PMID:26763886

  20. Sub-cellular force microscopy in single normal and cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babahosseini, H. [VT MEMS Laboratory, The Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Carmichael, B. [Nonlinear Intelligent Structures Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487-0276 (United States); Strobl, J.S. [VT MEMS Laboratory, The Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Mahmoodi, S.N., E-mail: nmahmoodi@eng.ua.edu [Nonlinear Intelligent Structures Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487-0276 (United States); Agah, M., E-mail: agah@vt.edu [VT MEMS Laboratory, The Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States)

    2015-08-07

    This work investigates the biomechanical properties of sub-cellular structures of breast cells using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The cells are modeled as a triple-layered structure where the Generalized Maxwell model is applied to experimental data from AFM stress-relaxation tests to extract the elastic modulus, the apparent viscosity, and the relaxation time of sub-cellular structures. The triple-layered modeling results allow for determination and comparison of the biomechanical properties of the three major sub-cellular structures between normal and cancerous cells: the up plasma membrane/actin cortex, the mid cytoplasm/nucleus, and the low nuclear/integrin sub-domains. The results reveal that the sub-domains become stiffer and significantly more viscous with depth, regardless of cell type. In addition, there is a decreasing trend in the average elastic modulus and apparent viscosity of the all corresponding sub-cellular structures from normal to cancerous cells, which becomes most remarkable in the deeper sub-domain. The presented modeling in this work constitutes a unique AFM-based experimental framework to study the biomechanics of sub-cellular structures. - Highlights: • The cells are modeled as a triple-layered structure using Generalized Maxwell model. • The sub-domains include membrane/cortex, cytoplasm/nucleus, and nuclear/integrin. • Biomechanics of corresponding sub-domains are compared among normal and cancer cells. • Viscoelasticity of sub-domains show a decreasing trend from normal to cancer cells. • The decreasing trend becomes most significant in the deeper sub-domain.

  1. Sub-cellular force microscopy in single normal and cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work investigates the biomechanical properties of sub-cellular structures of breast cells using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The cells are modeled as a triple-layered structure where the Generalized Maxwell model is applied to experimental data from AFM stress-relaxation tests to extract the elastic modulus, the apparent viscosity, and the relaxation time of sub-cellular structures. The triple-layered modeling results allow for determination and comparison of the biomechanical properties of the three major sub-cellular structures between normal and cancerous cells: the up plasma membrane/actin cortex, the mid cytoplasm/nucleus, and the low nuclear/integrin sub-domains. The results reveal that the sub-domains become stiffer and significantly more viscous with depth, regardless of cell type. In addition, there is a decreasing trend in the average elastic modulus and apparent viscosity of the all corresponding sub-cellular structures from normal to cancerous cells, which becomes most remarkable in the deeper sub-domain. The presented modeling in this work constitutes a unique AFM-based experimental framework to study the biomechanics of sub-cellular structures. - Highlights: • The cells are modeled as a triple-layered structure using Generalized Maxwell model. • The sub-domains include membrane/cortex, cytoplasm/nucleus, and nuclear/integrin. • Biomechanics of corresponding sub-domains are compared among normal and cancer cells. • Viscoelasticity of sub-domains show a decreasing trend from normal to cancer cells. • The decreasing trend becomes most significant in the deeper sub-domain

  2. Calculation of cellular S-values using Geant4-DNA: The effect of cell geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Geant4-DNA is used to calculate S-values for different subcellular distributions of low-energy electron sources in various cell geometries. Method: Calculations of cellular S-values for monoenergetic electron sources with energy from 1 to 100 keV and the Auger-electron emitting radionuclides Tc-99m, In-111, and I-125 have been made using the Geant4 Monte Carlo toolkit. The Geant4-DNA low-energy extension is employed for simulating collision-by-collision the complete slowing-down of electron tracks (down to 8 eV) in liquid water, used as a surrogate of human cells. The effect of cell geometry on S-values is examined by simulating electron tracks within different cell geometries, namely, a spherical, two ellipsoidal, and an irregular shape, all having equal cellular and nuclear volumes. Algorithms for randomly sampling the volume of the nucleus, cytoplasm, surface, and whole cell for each cell phantom are presented. Results: Differences between Geant4-DNA and MIRD database up to 50% were found, although, for the present radionuclides, they mostly remain below 10%. For most source–target combinations the S-values for the spherical cell geometry were found to be within 20% of those for the ellipsoidal cell geometries, with a maximum deviation of 32%. Differences between the spherical and irregular geometries are generally larger reaching 100–300%. Most sensitive to the cell geometry is the absorbed dose to the nucleus when the source is localized on the cell surface. Interestingly, two published AAPM spectra for I-125 yield noticeable differences (up to 19%) in cellular S-values. Conclusion: Monte Carlo simulations of cellular S-values with Geant4-DNA reveal that, for the examined radionuclides, the widely used approximation of spherical cells is reasonably accurate (within 20–30%) even for ellipsoidal geometries. For irregular cell geometries the spherical approximation should be used with caution because, as in the present example, it may lead to

  3. Fast intracellular dissolution and persistent cellular uptake of silver nanoparticles in CHO-K1 cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Xiumei; Miclăuş, Teodora; Wang, Liming;

    2015-01-01

    Toxicity of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) has been reported both in vitro and in vivo. However, the intracellular stability and chemical state of Ag NPs are still not very well studied. In this work, we systematically investigated the cellular uptake pathways, intracellular dissolution and chemical...... species, and cytotoxicity of Ag NPs (15.9 ± 7.6 nm) in Chinese hamster ovary cell subclone K1 cells, a cell line recommended by the OECD for genotoxicity studies. Quantification of intracellular nanoparticle uptake and ion release was performed through inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. X......-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) was employed to assess the chemical state of intracellular silver. The toxic potential of Ag NPs and Ag+ was evaluated by cell viability, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and live–dead cell staining. The results suggest that cellular uptake of Ag NPs involves...

  4. Cellular uptake and cytotoxicity of positively charged chitosan gold nanoparticles in human lung adenocarcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cellular uptake, cytotoxicity, and mechanisms of cytotoxicity of the positively charged Au nanoparticles (NPs) were examined in A549 cells, which are one of the most characterized pulmonary cellular systems. Positively charged Au NPs were prepared by chemical reduction using chitosan. The dimension and surface charge of Au NPs were examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering, and zeta potential measurements. The uptake of Au NPs into A549 cells was also monitored using TEM and dark-field microscopy (DFM) and z-stack confocal microRaman spectroscopy. DFM live cell imaging was also performed to monitor the entry of chitosan Au NPs in real time. The cytotoxic assay, using both methylthiazol tetrazolium and lactate dehydrogenase assays revealed that positively charged Au NPs decreased cell viability. Flow cytometry, DNA fragmentation, real-time PCR, and western blot analysis suggest that positively charged chitosan Au NPs provoke cell damage through both apoptotic and necrotic pathways.

  5. Cell-permeable intrinsic cellular inhibitors of apoptosis protect and rescue intestinal epithelial cells from radiation-induced cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the important mechanisms for gastrointestinal (GI) injury following high-dose radiation exposure is apoptosis of epithelial cells. X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP) and cellular IAP2 (cIAP2) are intrinsic cellular inhibitors of apoptosis. In order to study the effects of exogenously added IAPs on apoptosis in intestinal epithelial cells, we constructed bacterial expression plasmids containing genes of XIAP (full-length, BIR2 domain and BIR3-RING domain with and without mutations of auto-ubiquitylation sites) and cIAP2 proteins fused to a protein-transduction domain (PTD) derived from HIV-1 Tat protein (TAT) and purified these cell-permeable recombinant proteins. When the TAT-conjugated IAPs were added to rat intestinal epithelial cells IEC6, these proteins were effectively delivered into the cells and inhibited apoptosis, even when added after irradiation. Our results suggest that PTD-mediated delivery of IAPs may have clinical potential, not only for radioprotection but also for rescuing the GI system from radiation injuries. (author)

  6. Visualization and cellular hierarchy inference of single-cell data using SPADE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anchang, Benedict; Hart, Tom D P; Bendall, Sean C; Qiu, Peng; Bjornson, Zach; Linderman, Michael; Nolan, Garry P; Plevritis, Sylvia K

    2016-07-01

    High-throughput single-cell technologies provide an unprecedented view into cellular heterogeneity, yet they pose new challenges in data analysis and interpretation. In this protocol, we describe the use of Spanning-tree Progression Analysis of Density-normalized Events (SPADE), a density-based algorithm for visualizing single-cell data and enabling cellular hierarchy inference among subpopulations of similar cells. It was initially developed for flow and mass cytometry single-cell data. We describe SPADE's implementation and application using an open-source R package that runs on Mac OS X, Linux and Windows systems. A typical SPADE analysis on a 2.27-GHz processor laptop takes ∼5 min. We demonstrate the applicability of SPADE to single-cell RNA-seq data. We compare SPADE with recently developed single-cell visualization approaches based on the t-distribution stochastic neighborhood embedding (t-SNE) algorithm. We contrast the implementation and outputs of these methods for normal and malignant hematopoietic cells analyzed by mass cytometry and provide recommendations for appropriate use. Finally, we provide an integrative strategy that combines the strengths of t-SNE and SPADE to infer cellular hierarchy from high-dimensional single-cell data. PMID:27310265

  7. Freely Suspended Cellular “Backpacks” Lead to Cell Aggregate Self-Assembly

    OpenAIRE

    Swiston, Albert J., Jr.; Gilbert, Jonathan B.; Irvine, Darrell J.; Cohen, Robert E; Rubner, Michael F.

    2010-01-01

    Cellular “backpacks” are a new type of anisotropic, nanoscale thickness microparticle that may be attached to the surface of living cells creating a “bio-hybrid” material. Previous work has shown that these backpacks do not impair cell viability or native functions such as migration in a B and T cell line, respectively. In the current work, we show that backpacks, when added to a cell suspension, assemble cells into aggregates of reproducible size. We investigate the efficiency of backpack−ce...

  8. Cellular compartments cause multistability and allow cells to process more information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harrington, Heather A; Feliu, Elisenda; Wiuf, Carsten; Stumpf, Michael P H

    2013-01-01

    outcomes for cellular-decision making. We combine different mathematical techniques to provide a heuristic procedure to determine if a system has the capacity for multiple steady states, and find conditions that ensure that multiple steady states cannot occur. Notably, we find that introducing species......Many biological, physical, and social interactions have a particular dependence on where they take place; e.g., in living cells, protein movement between the nucleus and cytoplasm affects cellular responses (i.e., proteins must be present in the nucleus to regulate their target genes). Here we use...... recent developments from dynamical systems and chemical reaction network theory to identify and characterize the key-role of the spatial organization of eukaryotic cells in cellular information processing. In particular, the existence of distinct compartments plays a pivotal role in whether a system is...

  9. Simultaneous characterization of cellular RNA structure and function with in-cell SHAPE-Seq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watters, Kyle E; Abbott, Timothy R; Lucks, Julius B

    2016-01-29

    Many non-coding RNAs form structures that interact with cellular machinery to control gene expression. A central goal of molecular and synthetic biology is to uncover design principles linking RNA structure to function to understand and engineer this relationship. Here we report a simple, high-throughput method called in-cell SHAPE-Seq that combines in-cell probing of RNA structure with a measurement of gene expression to simultaneously characterize RNA structure and function in bacterial cells. We use in-cell SHAPE-Seq to study the structure-function relationship of two RNA mechanisms that regulate translation in Escherichia coli. We find that nucleotides that participate in RNA-RNA interactions are highly accessible when their binding partner is absent and that changes in RNA structure due to RNA-RNA interactions can be quantitatively correlated to changes in gene expression. We also characterize the cellular structures of three endogenously expressed non-coding RNAs: 5S rRNA, RNase P and the btuB riboswitch. Finally, a comparison between in-cell and in vitro folded RNA structures revealed remarkable similarities for synthetic RNAs, but significant differences for RNAs that participate in complex cellular interactions. Thus, in-cell SHAPE-Seq represents an easily approachable tool for biologists and engineers to uncover relationships between sequence, structure and function of RNAs in the cell. PMID:26350218

  10. Plasma Etching Improves Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunyan, S. M.

    1982-01-01

    Etching front surfaces of screen-printed silicon photovoltaic cells with sulfur hexafluoride plasma found to increase cell performance while maintaining integrity of screen-printed silver contacts. Replacement of evaporated-metal contacts with screen-printed metal contacts proposed as one way to reduce cost of solar cells for terrestrial applications.

  11. Embryonic stem cells as an ectodermal cellular model of human p63-related dysplasia syndromes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rostagno, P.; Wolchinsky, Z.; Vigano, A.M.; Shivtiel, S.; Zhou, H.; Bokhoven, J.H.L.M. van; Ferone, G.; Missero, C.; Mantovani, R.; Aberdam, D.; Virolle, T.

    2010-01-01

    Heterozygous mutations in the TP63 transcription factor underlie the molecular basis of several similar autosomal dominant ectodermal dysplasia (ED) syndromes. Here we provide a novel cellular model derived from embryonic stem (ES) cells that recapitulates in vitro the main steps of embryonic skin d

  12. Dissecting cellular states and cell state transitions through integrative analysis of epigenetic dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Ziller, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Understanding how a single genome that is common to all cells in an organism can give rise to many different and highly specialized, cell types has been one of the major questions in biology over the past century and still many aspects remain unanswered. Over the last 15 years, incredible progress has been made in pinpointing the regulatory mechanisms that establish, maintain, and change cellular identities. In particular, the role of histone modifications and DNA methylation in the spatio-te...

  13. Context Information Based Initial Cell Search for Millimeter Wave 5G Cellular Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Abbas, Waqas Bin; Zorzi, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Millimeter wave (mmWave) communication is envisioned as a cornerstone to fulfill the data rate requirements for fifth generation (5G) cellular networks. In mmWave communication, beamforming is considered as a key technology to combat the high path-loss, and unlike in conventional microwave communication, beamforming may be necessary even during initial access/cell search. Among the proposed beamforming schemes for initial cell search, analog beamforming is a power efficient approach but suffe...

  14. Cell fusion induced by ERVWE1 or measles virus causes cellular senescence

    OpenAIRE

    Chuprin, Anna; Gal, Hilah; BIRON-SHENTAL, Tal; Biran, Anat; Amiel, Aliza; Rozenblatt, Shmuel; Krizhanovsky, Valery

    2013-01-01

    Cellular senescence limits proliferation of potentially detrimental cells, preventing tumorigenesis and restricting tissue damage. However, the function of senescence in nonpathological conditions is unknown. Here, Krizhanovsky and colleagues discover a new pathway to activate senescence cell fusion. The authors find that fusion-induced senescence occurs during embryonic development in the placenta. A counterpart of this process is also observed after infection by the measles virus. The resul...

  15. Cellular Levels of Oxidative Stress Affect the Response of Cervical Cancer Cells to Chemotherapeutic Agents

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Filippova; Valery Filippov; Williams, Vonetta M; Kangling Zhang; Anatolii Kokoza; Svetlana Bashkirova; Penelope Duerksen-Hughes

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of advanced and relapsed cervical cancer is frequently ineffective, due in large part to chemoresistance. To examine the pathways responsible, we employed the cervical carcinoma-derived SiHa and CaSki cells as cellular models of resistance and sensitivity, respectively, to treatment with chemotherapeutic agents, doxorubicin, and cisplatin. We compared the proteomic profiles of SiHa and CaSki cells and identified pathways with the potential to contribute to the differential response....

  16. Differential cellular effects of electroporation and electrochemotherapy in monolayers of human microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meulenberg, Cécil J W; Todorovic, Vesna; Cemazar, Maja

    2012-01-01

    In vivo electroporation of tumours shows disruption of blood flow and creates a vascular effect with an initial rapid and transient vasoconstriction phase and a much longer lasting phase with changed microvascular endothelium. These changes are not well understood but are presumed to involve the cytoskeleton. The paper presents for the first time differential in vitro effects describing cytoskeleton changes and monolayer integrity changes by both electroporation and electrochemotherapy of monolayers of human microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1). After the application of electric field pulses, the morphology of cells, and both the F-actin and Beta-tubulin cytoskeleton proteins were affected. During both electroporation and electrochemotherapy, the initial phase of cellular damage was noticed at 10 min as swollen cells and honeycomb-like actin bundles. The electroporation-induced cellular effects, observed from electric pulses >150 V, were voltage-dependent and within 24 hrs partly recoverable. The electrochemotherapy-induced cellular effects developed at 2 hrs in spindle-like cells, and more densely packed F-actin and Beta-tubulin were observed, which were dependent on the amount of bleomycin and the voltages applied (>50 V). In addition, for electrochemotherapy with electric pulses >150 V cellular changes were not recoverable within 24 hrs. The effects on monolayer integrity were reflected in the enhanced monolayer permeability, with the electrochemotherapy showing an earlier onset and synergy. We conclude that electrochemotherapy as compared to electroporation leads within 24 hrs to a quicker and more pronounced monolayer integrity damage and endothelial cell death, which together provide further insight into the cellular changes of the vascular disruption of electrochemotherapy. PMID:23300747

  17. Differential cellular effects of electroporation and electrochemotherapy in monolayers of human microvascular endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cécil J W Meulenberg

    Full Text Available In vivo electroporation of tumours shows disruption of blood flow and creates a vascular effect with an initial rapid and transient vasoconstriction phase and a much longer lasting phase with changed microvascular endothelium. These changes are not well understood but are presumed to involve the cytoskeleton. The paper presents for the first time differential in vitro effects describing cytoskeleton changes and monolayer integrity changes by both electroporation and electrochemotherapy of monolayers of human microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1. After the application of electric field pulses, the morphology of cells, and both the F-actin and Beta-tubulin cytoskeleton proteins were affected. During both electroporation and electrochemotherapy, the initial phase of cellular damage was noticed at 10 min as swollen cells and honeycomb-like actin bundles. The electroporation-induced cellular effects, observed from electric pulses >150 V, were voltage-dependent and within 24 hrs partly recoverable. The electrochemotherapy-induced cellular effects developed at 2 hrs in spindle-like cells, and more densely packed F-actin and Beta-tubulin were observed, which were dependent on the amount of bleomycin and the voltages applied (>50 V. In addition, for electrochemotherapy with electric pulses >150 V cellular changes were not recoverable within 24 hrs. The effects on monolayer integrity were reflected in the enhanced monolayer permeability, with the electrochemotherapy showing an earlier onset and synergy. We conclude that electrochemotherapy as compared to electroporation leads within 24 hrs to a quicker and more pronounced monolayer integrity damage and endothelial cell death, which together provide further insight into the cellular changes of the vascular disruption of electrochemotherapy.

  18. Autophagy and cellular senescence mediated by Sox2 suppress malignancy of cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Yeon Cho

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a critical cellular process required for maintaining cellular homeostasis in health and disease states, but the molecular mechanisms and impact of autophagy on cancer is not fully understood. Here, we found that Sox2, a key transcription factor in the regulation of the "stemness" of embryonic stem cells and induced-pluripotent stem cells, strongly induced autophagic phenomena, including intracellular vacuole formation and lysosomal activation in colon cancer cells. The activation occurred through Sox2-mediated ATG10 gene expression and resulted in the inhibition of cell proliferation and anchorage-independent colony growth ex vivo and tumor growth in vivo. Further, we found that Sox2-induced-autophagy enhanced cellular senescence by up-regulating tumor suppressors or senescence factors, including p16(INK4a, p21 and phosphorylated p53 (Ser15. Notably, knockdown of ATG10 in Sox2-expressing colon cancer cells restored cancer cell properties. Taken together, our results demonstrated that regulation of autophagy mediated by Sox2 is a mechanism-driven novel strategy to treat human colon cancers.

  19. Phenotypic characterization of the bone marrow stem cells used in regenerative cellular therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regenerative medicine is a novel therapeutic method with broad potential for the treatment of various illnesses, based on the use of bone marrow (BM) stem cells, whose phenotypic characterization is limited. The paper deals with the expression of different cell membrane markers in mononuclear BM cells from 14 patients who underwent autologous cell therapy, obtained by medullary puncture and mobilization to peripheral blood, with the purpose of characterizing the different types of cells present in that heterogeneous cellular population and identifying the adhesion molecules involved in their adhesion. A greater presence was observed of adherent stem cells from the marrow stroma in mononuclear cells obtained directly from the BM; a larger population of CD90+cells in mononuclear cells from CD34-/CD45-peripheral blood with a high expression of molecules CD44 and CD62L, which suggests a greater presence of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) in mobilized cells from the marrow stroma. The higher levels of CD34+cells in peripheral blood stem cells with a low expression of molecules CD117-and DR-suggests the presence of hematopoietic stem cells, hemangioblasts and progenitor endothelial cells mobilized to peripheral circulation. It was found that mononuclear cells from both the BM and peripheral blood show a high presence of stem cells with expression of adhesion molecule CD44 (MMC marker), probably involved in their migration, settling and differentiation

  20. High content analysis at single cell level identifies different cellular responses dependent on nanomaterial concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manshian, Bella B.; Munck, Sebastian; Agostinis, Patrizia; Himmelreich, Uwe; Soenen, Stefaan J.

    2015-09-01

    A mechanistic understanding of nanomaterial (NM) interaction with biological environments is pivotal for the safe transition from basic science to applied nanomedicine. NM exposure results in varying levels of internalized NM in different neighboring cells, due to variances in cell size, cell cycle phase and NM agglomeration. Using high-content analysis, we investigated the cytotoxic effects of fluorescent quantum dots on cultured cells, where all effects were correlated with the concentration of NMs at the single cell level. Upon binning the single cell data into different categories related to NM concentration, this study demonstrates, for the first time, that quantum dots activate both cytoprotective and cytotoxic mechanisms, resulting in a zero net result on the overall cell population, yet with significant effects in cells with higher cellular NM levels. Our results suggest that future NM cytotoxicity studies should correlate NM toxicity with cellular NM numbers on the single cell level, as conflicting mechanisms in particular cell subpopulations are commonly overlooked using classical toxicological methods.

  1. Freely suspended cellular "backpacks" lead to cell aggregate self-assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swiston, Albert J; Gilbert, Jonathan B; Irvine, Darrell J; Cohen, Robert E; Rubner, Michael F

    2010-07-12

    Cellular "backpacks" are a new type of anisotropic, nanoscale thickness microparticle that may be attached to the surface of living cells creating a "bio-hybrid" material. Previous work has shown that these backpacks do not impair cell viability or native functions such as migration in a B and T cell line, respectively. In the current work, we show that backpacks, when added to a cell suspension, assemble cells into aggregates of reproducible size. We investigate the efficiency of backpack-cell binding using flow cytometry and laser diffraction, examine the influence of backpack diameter on aggregate size, and show that even when cell-backpack complexes are forced through small pores, backpacks are not removed from the surfaces of cells. PMID:20527876

  2. Nanoparticle-cell interactions: molecular structure of the protein corona and cellular outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischer, Candace C; Payne, Christine K

    2014-08-19

    The use of nanoparticles (NPs) in biology and medicine requires a molecular-level understanding of how NPs interact with cells in a physiological environment. A critical difference between well-controlled in vitro experiments and in vivo applications is the presence of a complex mixture of extracellular proteins. It has been established that extracellular serum proteins present in blood will adsorb onto the surface of NPs, forming a "protein corona". Our goal was to understand how this protein layer affected cellular-level events, including NP binding, internalization, and transport. A combination of microscopy, which provides spatial resolution, and spectroscopy, which provides molecular information, is necessary to probe protein-NP-cell interactions. Initial experiments used a model system composed of polystyrene NPs functionalized with either amine or carboxylate groups to provide a cationic or anionic surface, respectively. Serum proteins adsorb onto the surface of both cationic and anionic NPs, forming a net anionic protein-NP complex. Although these protein-NP complexes have similar diameters and effective surface charges, they show the exact opposite behavior in terms of cellular binding. In the presence of bovine serum albumin (BSA), the cellular binding of BSA-NP complexes formed from cationic NPs is enhanced, whereas the cellular binding of BSA-NP complexes formed from anionic NPs is inhibited. These trends are independent of NP diameter or cell type. Similar results were obtained for anionic quantum dots and colloidal gold nanospheres. Using competition assays, we determined that BSA-NP complexes formed from anionic NPs bind to albumin receptors on the cell surface. BSA-NP complexes formed from cationic NPs are redirected to scavenger receptors. The observation that similar NPs with identical protein corona compositions bind to different cellular receptors suggested that a difference in the structure of the adsorbed protein may be responsible for the

  3. Actual problems of cellular cardiomyoplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bulat Kaupov

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper provides review of cellular technologies used incardiology, describes types of cellular preparations depending onsources of cells and types of compounding cells. The generalmechanisms of therapies with stem cells applications are described.Use of cellular preparations for treatment of cardiovascular diseasesand is improvement of the forecast at patients with heartinsufficiency of various genesis is considered as alternative topractice with organ transplantations. Efforts of biotechnologicallaboratories are directed on search of optimum population of cellsfor application in cardiology and studying of mechanisms andfactors regulating function of cardiac stem cells.

  4. Dexamethasone reduces sensitivity to cisplatin by blunting p53-dependent cellular senescence in non-small cell lung cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiyan Ge

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Dexamethasone (DEX co-treatment has proved beneficial in NSCLC patients, improving clinical symptoms by the reduction of side effects after chemotherapy. However, recent studies have shown that DEX could render cancer cells more insensitive to cytotoxic drug therapy, but it is not known whether DEX co-treatment could influence therapy-induced senescence (TIS, and unknown whether it is in a p53-dependent or p53-independent manner. METHODS: We examined in different human NSCLC cell lines and detected cellular senescence after cisplatin (DDP treatment in the presence or absence of DEX. The in vivo effect of the combination of DEX and DDP was assessed by tumor growth experiments using human lung cancer cell lines growing as xenograft tumors in nude mice. RESULTS: Co-treatment with DEX during chemotherapy in NSCLC resulted in increased tumor cell viability and inhibition of TIS compared with DDP treated group. DEX co-treatment cells exhibited the decrease of DNA damage signaling pathway proteins, the lower expression of p53 and p21(CIP1, the lower cellular secretory program and down-regulation of NF-κB and its signaling cascade. DEX also significantly reduced DDP sensitivity in vivo. CONCLUSIONS: Our results underscore that DEX reduces chemotherapy sensitivity by blunting therapy induced cellular senescence after chemotherapy in NSCLC, which may, at least in part, in a p53-dependent manner. These data therefore raise concerns about the widespread combined use of gluocorticoids (GCs with antineoplastic drugs in the clinical management of cancer patients.

  5. Cellular interactions via conditioned media induce in vivo nephron generation from tubular epithelial cells or mesenchymal stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •We have attempted in vivo nephron generation using conditioned media. •Vascular and tubular cells do cross-talks on cell proliferation and tubular changes. •Tubular cells suppress these changes in mesenchymal stem cells. •Tubular cells differentiate mesenchymal stem cells into tubular cells. •Nephrons can be created from implanted tubular cells or mesenchymal stem cells. -- Abstract: There are some successful reports of kidney generation by utilizing the natural course of kidney development, namely, the use of an artificially treated metanephros, blastocyst or ureteric bud. Under a novel concept of cellular interactions via conditioned media (CMs), we have attempted in vivo nephron generation from tubular epithelial cells (TECs) or mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Here we used 10× CMs of vascular endothelial cells (VECs) and TECs, which is the first to introduce a CM into the field of organ regeneration. We first present stimulative cross-talks induced by these CMs between VECs and TECs on cell proliferation and morphological changes. In MSCs, TEC-CM suppressed these changes, however, induced cytokeratin expression, indicating the differentiation of MSCs into TECs. As a result, glomerular and tubular structures were created following the implantation of TECs or MSCs with both CMs. Our findings suggest that the cellular interactions via CMs might induce in vivo nephron generation from TECs or MSCs. As a promoting factor, CMs could also be applied to the regeneration of other organs and tissues

  6. Cellular interactions via conditioned media induce in vivo nephron generation from tubular epithelial cells or mesenchymal stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machiguchi, Toshihiko, E-mail: machiguchi.toshihiko.23u@st.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Nakamura, Tatsuo, E-mail: nakamura@frontier.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2013-06-07

    Highlights: •We have attempted in vivo nephron generation using conditioned media. •Vascular and tubular cells do cross-talks on cell proliferation and tubular changes. •Tubular cells suppress these changes in mesenchymal stem cells. •Tubular cells differentiate mesenchymal stem cells into tubular cells. •Nephrons can be created from implanted tubular cells or mesenchymal stem cells. -- Abstract: There are some successful reports of kidney generation by utilizing the natural course of kidney development, namely, the use of an artificially treated metanephros, blastocyst or ureteric bud. Under a novel concept of cellular interactions via conditioned media (CMs), we have attempted in vivo nephron generation from tubular epithelial cells (TECs) or mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Here we used 10× CMs of vascular endothelial cells (VECs) and TECs, which is the first to introduce a CM into the field of organ regeneration. We first present stimulative cross-talks induced by these CMs between VECs and TECs on cell proliferation and morphological changes. In MSCs, TEC-CM suppressed these changes, however, induced cytokeratin expression, indicating the differentiation of MSCs into TECs. As a result, glomerular and tubular structures were created following the implantation of TECs or MSCs with both CMs. Our findings suggest that the cellular interactions via CMs might induce in vivo nephron generation from TECs or MSCs. As a promoting factor, CMs could also be applied to the regeneration of other organs and tissues.

  7. Uptake rate of cationic mitochondrial inhibitor MKT-077 determines cellular oxygen consumption change in carcinoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John L Chunta

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Since tumor radiation response is oxygen-dependent, radiosensitivity can be enhanced by increasing tumor oxygenation. Theoretically, inhibiting cellular oxygen consumption is the most efficient way to increase oxygen levels. The cationic, rhodacyanine dye-analog MKT-077 inhibits mitochondrial respiration and could be an effective metabolic inhibitor. However, the relationship between cellular MKT-077 uptake and metabolic inhibition is unknown. We hypothesized that rat and human mammary carcinoma cells would take up MKT-077, causing a decrease in oxygen metabolism related to drug uptake. METHODS: R3230Ac rat breast adenocarcinoma cells were exposed to MKT-077. Cellular MKT-077 concentration was quantified using spectroscopy, and oxygen consumption was measured using polarographic electrodes. MKT-077 uptake kinetics were modeled by accounting for uptake due to both the concentration and potential gradients across the plasma and mitochondrial membranes. These kinetic parameters were used to model the relationship between MKT-077 uptake and metabolic inhibition. MKT-077-induced changes in oxygen consumption were also characterized in MDA-MB231 human breast carcinoma cells. RESULTS: Cells took up MKT-077 with a time constant of ∼1 hr, and modeling showed that over 90% of intracellular MKT-077 was bound or sequestered, likely by the mitochondria. The uptake resulted in a rapid decrease in oxygen consumption, with a time constant of ∼30 minutes. Surprisingly the change in oxygen consumption was proportional to uptake rate, not cellular concentration. MKT-077 proved a potent metabolic inhibitor, with dose-dependent decreases of 45-73% (p = 0.003. CONCLUSIONS: MKT-077 caused an uptake rate-dependent decrease in cellular metabolism, suggesting potential efficacy for increasing tumor oxygen levels and radiosensitivity in vivo.

  8. Frequent biphasic cellular responses of permanent fish cell cultures to deoxynivalenol (DON)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contamination of animal feed with mycotoxins is a major problem for fish feed mainly due to usage of contaminated ingredients for production and inappropriate storage of feed. The use of cereals for fish food production further increases the risk of a potential contamination. Potential contaminants include the mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON) which is synthesized by globally distributed fungi of the genus Fusarium. The toxicity of DON is well recognized in mammals. In this study, we confirm cytotoxic effects of DON in established permanent fish cell lines. We demonstrate that DON is capable of influencing the metabolic activity and cell viability in fish cells as determined by different assays to indicate possible cellular targets of this toxin. Evaluation of cell viability by measurement of membrane integrity, mitochondrial activity and lysosomal function after 24 h of exposure of fish cell lines to DON at a concentration range of 0-3000 ng ml-1 shows a biphasic effect on cells although differences in sensitivity occur. The cell lines derived from rainbow trout are particularly sensitive to DON. The focus of this study lies, furthermore, on the effects of DON at different concentrations on production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the different fish cell lines. The results show that DON mainly reduces ROS production in all cell lines that were used. Thus, our comparative investigations reveal that the fish cell lines show distinct species-related endpoint sensitivities that also depend on the type of tissue from which the cells were derived and the severity of exposure. - Highlights: → DON uptake by cells is not extensive. → All fish cell lines are sensitive to DON. → DON is most cytotoxic to rainbow trout cells. → Biphasic cellular responses were frequently observed. → Our results are similar to studies on mammalian cell lines.

  9. Cell damage from radiation-induced bystander effects for different cell densities simulated by a mathematical model via cellular automata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meireles, Sincler P. de; Santos, Adriano M.; Grynberg, Suely Epsztein, E-mail: spm@cdtn.b, E-mail: amsantos@cdtn.b, E-mail: seg@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Nunes, Maria Eugenia S., E-mail: mariaeugenia@iceb.ufop.b [Universidade Federal de Ouro Preto (UFOP), MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    During recent years, there has been a shift from an approach focused entirely on DNA as the main target of ionizing radiation to a vision that considers complex signaling pathways in cells and among cells within tissues. Several newly recognized responses were classified as the so-called non-target responses in which the biological effects are not directly related to the amount of energy deposited in the DNA of cells that were traversed by radiation. In 1992 the bystander effect was described referring to a series of responses such as death, chromosomal instability or other abnormalities that occur in non-irradiated cells that came into contact with irradiated cells or medium from irradiated cells. In this work, we have developed a mathematical model via cellular automata, to quantify cell death induced by the bystander effect. The model is based on experiments with irradiated cells conditioned medium which suggests that irradiated cells secrete molecules in the medium that are capable of damaging other cells. The computational model consists of two-dimensional cellular automata which is able to simulate the transmission of bystander signals via extrinsic route and via Gap junctions. The model has been validated by experimental results in the literature. The time evolution of the effect and the dose-response curves were obtained in good accordance to them. Simulations were conducted for different values of bystander and irradiated cell densities with constant dose. From this work, we have obtained a relationship between cell density and effect. (author)

  10. Cell damage from radiation-induced bystander effects for different cell densities simulated by a mathematical model via cellular automata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During recent years, there has been a shift from an approach focused entirely on DNA as the main target of ionizing radiation to a vision that considers complex signaling pathways in cells and among cells within tissues. Several newly recognized responses were classified as the so-called non-target responses in which the biological effects are not directly related to the amount of energy deposited in the DNA of cells that were traversed by radiation. In 1992 the bystander effect was described referring to a series of responses such as death, chromosomal instability or other abnormalities that occur in non-irradiated cells that came into contact with irradiated cells or medium from irradiated cells. In this work, we have developed a mathematical model via cellular automata, to quantify cell death induced by the bystander effect. The model is based on experiments with irradiated cells conditioned medium which suggests that irradiated cells secrete molecules in the medium that are capable of damaging other cells. The computational model consists of two-dimensional cellular automata which is able to simulate the transmission of bystander signals via extrinsic route and via Gap junctions. The model has been validated by experimental results in the literature. The time evolution of the effect and the dose-response curves were obtained in good accordance to them. Simulations were conducted for different values of bystander and irradiated cell densities with constant dose. From this work, we have obtained a relationship between cell density and effect. (author)

  11. Improved load-cell compensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egger, R. L.

    1977-01-01

    Improved bridge-compensation circuit saves considerable time in balancing bridge and wiring it for temperature compensation. Large bridge-balance compensation is made before temperature cycling and small adjustments are made with different type of wire.

  12. Revealing the cellular localization of STAT1 during the cell cycle by super-resolution imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jing; Wang, Feng; Liu, Yanhou; Cai, Mingjun; Xu, Haijiao; Jiang, Junguang; Wang, Hongda

    2015-03-01

    Signal transducers and activators of transcription (STATs) can transduce cytokine signals and regulate gene expression. The cellular localization and nuclear trafficking of STAT1, a representative of the STAT family with multiple transcriptional functions, is tightly related with transcription process, which usually happens in the interphase of the cell cycle. However, these priority questions regarding STAT1 distribution and localization at the different cell-cycle stages remain unclear. By using direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM), we found that the nuclear expression level of STAT1 increased gradually as the cell cycle carried out, especially after EGF stimulation. Furthermore, STAT1 formed clusters in the whole cell during the cell cycle, with the size and the number of clusters also increasing significantly from G1 to G2 phase, suggesting that transcription and other cell-cycle related activities can promote STAT1 to form more and larger clusters for fast response to signals. Our work reveals that the cellular localization and clustering distribution of STAT1 are associated with the cell cycle, and further provides an insight into the mechanism of cell-cycle regulated STAT1 signal transduction.

  13. DNA-damage response network at the crossroads of cell-cycle checkpoints,cellular senescence and apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SCHMITT Estelle; PAQUET Claudie; BEAUCHEMIN Myriam; BERTRAND Richard

    2007-01-01

    Tissue homeostasis requires a carefully-orchestrated balance between cell proliferation,cellular senescence and cell death.Cells proliferate through a cell cycle that is tightly regulated by cyclin-dependent kinase activities.Cellular senescence is a safeguard program limiting the proliferative competence of cells in living organisms.Apoptosis eliminates unwanted cells by the coordinated activity of gene products that regulate and effect cell death.The intimate link between the cell cycle,cellular senescence,apoptosis regulation,cancer development and tumor responses to cancer treatment has become eminently apparent.Extensive research on tumor suppressor genes,oncogenes,the cell cycle and apoptosis regulatory genes has revealed how the DNA damage-sensing and -signaling pathways,referred to as the DNA-damage response network,are tied to cell proliferation,cell-cycle arrest,cellular senescence and apoptosis.DNA-damage responses are complex,involving "sensor" proteins that sense the damage,and transmit signals to "transducer" proteins,which,in turn,convey the signals to numerous "effector" proteins implicated in specific cellular pathways,including DNA repair mechanisms,cell-cycle checkpoints,cellular senescence and apoptosis.The Bcl-2 family of proteins stands among the most crucial regulators of apoptosis and performs vital functions in deciding whether a cell will live or die after cancer chemotherapy and irradiation.In addition,several studies have now revealed that members of the Bcl-2 family also interface with the cell cycle,DNA repair/recombination and cellular senescence,effects that are generally distinct from their function in apoptosis.In this review,we report progress in understanding the molecular networks that regulate cell-cycle checkpoints,cellular senescence and apoptosis after DNA damage,and discuss the influence of some Bcl-2 family members on cell-cycle checkpoint regulation.

  14. Decreased GSSG reductase activity enhances cellular zinc toxicity in three human lung cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walther, U.I.; Czermak, A.; Mueckter, H.; Walther, S.C.; Fichtl, B. [Walther-Straub-Institut fuer Pharmakologie und Toxikologie, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Nussbaumstr. 26, 80336, Muenchen (Germany)

    2003-03-01

    Cellular reduced glutathione (GSH) levels have been identified as an essential determinant in zinc-induced cytotoxicity. However, cytotoxic effects of zinc have also been observed without depletion of GSH stores. In a previous study, the intracellular activity of GSSG reductase (GR) has come into focus (Walther et al. 2000, Biol Trace Elem Res 78:163-177). In the present paper we have tried to address this issue more deeply by inhibiting the activity of cellular GR without any appreciable decreases of cellular glutathione. In three pulmonary cell lines, GR activity was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by the alkylating agent carmustine (BCNU), a known inhibitor of GR. Cells were pretreated with BCNU for 14 h, followed by exposure to various concentrations of zinc chloride. Then we determined the incorporation of radiolabelled methionine (to assess protein synthesis), and measured the GSH and oxidized glutathione (GSSG) levels. Additionally, GR activity of controls was measured. IC{sub 50} values for zinc-induced inhibition of methionine incorporation, as well as GSH contents, was strongly correlated to the decreased GR activity. These results firmly suggest that GR is an important factor in the event chain of zinc cytotoxicity. Together with the results from our previously cited study where impaired regeneration of GSH levels were accompanied by a decrease in total cellular glutathione (GSH + GSSG) we conclude that GSSG itself is an important effector in zinc cytotoxicity. (orig.)

  15. Beyond the Cell: Using Multiscalar Topics to Bring Interdisciplinarity into Undergraduate Cellular Biology Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Carolyn F

    2016-01-01

    Western science has grown increasingly reductionistic and, in parallel, the undergraduate life sciences curriculum has become disciplinarily fragmented. While reductionistic approaches have led to landmark discoveries, many of the most exciting scientific advances in the late 20th century have occurred at disciplinary interfaces; work at these interfaces is necessary to manage the world's looming problems, particularly those that are rooted in cellular-level processes but have ecosystem- and even global-scale ramifications (e.g., nonsustainable agriculture, emerging infectious diseases). Managing such problems requires comprehending whole scenarios and their emergent properties as sums of their multiple facets and complex interrelationships, which usually integrate several disciplines across multiple scales (e.g., time, organization, space). This essay discusses bringing interdisciplinarity into undergraduate cellular biology courses through the use of multiscalar topics. Discussing how cellular-level processes impact large-scale phenomena makes them relevant to everyday life and unites diverse disciplines (e.g., sociology, cell biology, physics) as facets of a single system or problem, emphasizing their connections to core concepts in biology. I provide specific examples of multiscalar topics and discuss preliminary evidence that using such topics may increase students' understanding of the cell's position within an ecosystem and how cellular biology interfaces with other disciplines. PMID:27146162

  16. Preparation and evaluation of polymeric microparticulates for improving cellular uptake of gemcitabine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lim JH

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Ji-Ho Lim1,*, Sung-Kyun You1,*, Jong-Suep Baek1, Chan-Ju Hwang1, Young-Guk Na1, Sang-Chul Shin2, Cheong-Weon Cho11College of Pharmacy and Institute of Drug Research and Development, Chungnam National University, Gungdong, Yuseonggu, Daejeon, South Korea, 2College of Pharmacy, Chonnam National University, Buggu, Gwangju, South Korea *These authors contributed equally to this workBackground: Gemcitabine must be administered at high doses to elicit the required therapeutic response because of its very short plasma half-life due to rapid metabolism. These high doses can have severe adverse effects.Methods: In this study, polymeric microparticulate systems of gemcitabine were prepared using chitosan as a mucoadhesive polymer and Eudragit L100-55 as an enteric copolymer. The physicochemical and biopharmaceutical properties of the resulting systems were then evaluated.Results: There was no endothermic peak for gemcitabine in any of the polymeric gemcitabine microparticulate systems, suggesting that gemcitabine was bound to chitosan and Eudragit L100-55 and its crystallinity was changed into an amorphous form. The polymeric gemcitabine microparticulate system showed more than 80% release of gemcitabine in 30 minutes in simulated intestinal fluid. When mucin particles were incubated with gemcitabine polymeric microparticulates, the zeta potential of the mucin particles was increased to 1.57 mV, indicating that the polymeric gemcitabine microparticulates were attached to the mucin particles. Furthermore, the F53 polymeric gemcitabine microparticulates having 150 mg of chitosan showed a 3.8-fold increased uptake of gemcitabine into Caco-2 cells over 72 hours compared with gemcitabine solution alone.Conclusion: Overall, these results suggest that polymeric gemcitabine microparticulate systems could be used as carriers to help oral absorption of gemcitabine.Keywords: gemcitabine, polymeric microparticulates, mucoadhesive, enteric coating, cellular uptake

  17. Raman Spectroscopy and Microscopy of Individual Cells andCellular Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, J; Fore, S; Wachsmann-Hogiu, S; Huser, T

    2008-05-15

    Raman spectroscopy provides the unique opportunity to non-destructively analyze chemical concentrations on the submicron length scale in individual cells without the need for optical labels. This enables the rapid assessment of cellular biochemistry inside living cells, and it allows for their continuous analysis to determine cellular response to external events. Here, we review recent developments in the analysis of single cells, subcellular compartments, and chemical imaging based on Raman spectroscopic techniques. Spontaneous Raman spectroscopy provides for the full spectral assessment of cellular biochemistry, while coherent Raman techniques, such as coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering is primarily used as an imaging tool comparable to confocal fluorescence microscopy. These techniques are complemented by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, which provides higher sensitivity and local specificity, and also extends the techniques to chemical indicators, i.e. pH sensing. We review the strengths and weaknesses of each technique, demonstrate some of their applications and discuss their potential for future research in cell biology and biomedicine.

  18. Agglomeration, sedimentation, and cellular toxicity of alumina nanoparticles in cell culture medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cytotoxicity of alumina nanoparticles (NPs) was investigated for a wide range of concentration (25–200 μg/mL) and incubation time (0–72 h) using floating cells (THP-1) and adherent cells (J774A.1, A549, and 293). Alumina NPs were gradually agglomerated over time although a significant portion of sedimentation occurred at the early stage within 6 h. A decrease of the viability was found in floating (THP-1) and adherent (J774A.1 and A549) cells in a dose-dependent manner. However, the time-dependent decrease in cell viability was observed only in adherent cells (J774A.1 and A549), which is predominantly related with the sedimentation of alumina NPs in cell culture medium. The uptake of alumina NPs in macrophages and an increased cell-to-cell adhesion in adherent cells were observed. There was no significant change in the viability of 293 cells. This in vitro test suggests that the agglomeration and sedimentation of alumina NPs affected cellular viability depending on cell types such as monocytes (THP-1), macrophages (J774A.1), lung carcinoma cells (A549), and embryonic kidney cells (293).

  19. DAMPs and autophagy: cellular adaptation to injury and unscheduled cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiuhong; Kang, Rui; Zeh, Herbert J; Lotze, Michael T; Tang, Daolin

    2013-04-01

    Autophagy is a lysosome-mediated catabolic process involving the degradation of intracellular contents (e.g., proteins and organelles) as well as invading microbes (e.g., parasites, bacteria and viruses). Multiple forms of cellular stress can stimulate this pathway, including nutritional imbalances, oxygen deprivation, immunological response, genetic defects, chromosomal anomalies and cytotoxic stress. Damage-associated molecular pattern molecules (DAMPs) are released by stressed cells undergoing autophagy or injury, and act as endogenous danger signals to regulate the subsequent inflammatory and immune response. A complex relationship exists between DAMPs and autophagy in cellular adaption to injury and unscheduled cell death. Since both autophagy and DAMPs are important for pathogenesis of human disease, it is crucial to understand how they interplay to sustain homeostasis in stressful or dangerous environments. PMID:23388380

  20. Effects of nicotine on cellular proliferation, cell cycle phase distribution, and macromolecular synthesis in human promyelocytic HL-60 leukaemia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Addition of nicotine causes a dose- and time-dependent inhibition of cell growth in the human promyelocytic HL-60 leukemia cells, with 4 mM nicotine resulting in a 50% inhibition of cellular proliferation after 48-50h. Accompanying the anticellular effect of nicotine is a significant change in the cell cycle distribution of HL-60 cells. For example, treatment with 4 mM nicotine for 20h causes an increase in the proportion of G1-phase cells (from 49% to 57%) and a significant decrease in the proportion of S-phase cells (from 41% to 32%). These results suggest that nicotine causes partial cell arrest in the G-1 phase which may in part account for its effects on cell growth. To determine whether nicotine changes the cellular uptake/transport to macromolecular precursors, HL-60 cells were treated with 216 mM nicotine for 30h, at the end of which time cells were labelled with (3H)thymidine, (3H)uridine, (14C)lysine and(35S)methionine, the trichloroacetic acid soluble and insoluble radioactivities from each of the labelling conditions were determined. These studies show that nicotine mainly affects the ''de novo synthesis'' of proteins. (author)

  1. Effects of cellular parameters on the in vitro osteogenic potential of dual-gelling mesenchymal stem cell-laden hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo, Tiffany N; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Mikos, Antonios G

    2016-08-01

    This work investigated the effects of cellular encapsulation density and differentiation stage on the osteogenic capacity of injectable, dual physically and chemically gelling hydrogels comprised of thermogelling macromers and polyamidoamine crosslinkers. Undifferentiated and osteogenically predifferentiated mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were encapsulated within 20 wt% composite hydrogels with gelatin microparticles at densities of six or 15 million cells/mL. We hypothesized that a high encapsulation density and predifferentiation would promote increased cellular interaction and accelerate osteogenesis, leading to enhanced osteogenic potential in vitro. Hydrogels were able to maintain the viability of the encapsulated cells over a period of 28 days, with the high encapsulation density and predifferentiation group possessing the highest DNA content at all time points. Early alkaline phosphatase activity and mineralization were promoted by encapsulation density, whereas this effect by predifferentiation was only observed in the low seeding density groups. Both parameters only demonstrated short-lived effects when examined independently, but jointly led to greater levels of alkaline phosphatase activity and mineralization. The combined effects suggest that there may be optimal encapsulation densities and differentiation periods that need to be investigated to improve MSCs for biomaterial-based therapeutics in bone tissue engineering. PMID:27328947

  2. Techniques to Study Specific Cell-Surface Receptor-Mediated Cellular Vitamin A Uptake

    OpenAIRE

    KAWAGUCHI, RIKI; Sun, Hui

    2010-01-01

    STRA6 is a multitransmembrane domain protein that was recently identified as the cell-surface receptor for plasma retinol binding protein (RBP), the vitamin A carrier protein in the blood. STRA6 binds to RBP with high affinity and mediates cellular uptake of vitamin A from RBP. It is not homologous to any known receptors, transporters, and channels, and it represents a new class of membrane transport protein. Consistent with the diverse physiological functions of vitamin A, STRA6 is widely ex...

  3. Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor 2: Its Contribution to Acute Cellular Rejection and Clear Cell Renal Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Jun Wang; Al-Lamki, Rafia S.

    2013-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor 2 (TNFR2) is a type I transmembrane glycoprotein and one of the two receptors that orchestrate the complex biological functions of tumor necrosis factor (TNF, also designed TNF- α ). Accumulating experimental evidence suggests that TNFR2 plays an important role in renal disorders associated with acute cellular rejection and clear cell renal carcinoma but its exact role in these settings is still not completely understood. This papers reviews the factors that may...

  4. DAMPs and autophagy: Cellular adaptation to injury and unscheduled cell death

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Qiuhong; Kang, Rui; Zeh, III, Herbert J.; Lotze, Michael T; Tang, Daolin

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy is a lysosome-mediated catabolic process involving the degradation of intracellular contents (e.g., proteins and organelles) as well as invading microbes (e.g., parasites, bacteria and viruses). Multiple forms of cellular stress can stimulate this pathway, including nutritional imbalances, oxygen deprivation, immunological response, genetic defects, chromosomal anomalies and cytotoxic stress. Damage-associated molecular pattern molecules (DAMPs) are released by stressed cells underg...

  5. Overexpression of tau in a nonneuronal cell induces long cellular processes

    OpenAIRE

    1991-01-01

    The ways in which the various microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs) contribute to cellular function are unknown beyond the ability of these proteins to modify microtubule dynamics. One member of the MAP family, tau protein, is restricted in its distribution to the axonal compartment of neurons, and has therefore prompted studies that attempt to relate tau function to the generation or maintenance of this structure. Sf9 cells from a moth ovary, when infected with a baculovirus containing a ta...

  6. A Cooperative Reinforcement Learning Approach for Inter-Cell Interference Coordination in OFDMA Cellular Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Dirani, Mariana; Altman, Zwi

    2010-01-01

    Interference Management International audience Inter-Cell Interference Coordination (ICIC) is commonly identified as a key radio resource management mechanism to enhance system performance of 4G networks. This paper addresses the problem of ICIC in the downlink of cellular OFDMA (LTE and WiMAX) systems in the context of Self-Organizing Networks (SON). The problem is posed as a cooperative Multi-Agent control problem. Each base station is an agent that dynamically changes power masks on ...

  7. Indium-111 oxine labelling affects the cellular integrity of haematopoietic progenitor cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nowak, Bernd; Reinartz, Patrick; Schaefer, Wolfgang M.; Buell, Ulrich [University Hospital, RWTH Aachen University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Aachen (Germany); Weber, Christian; Schober, Andreas; Zeiffer, Ute; Liehn, Elisa A.; Hundelshausen, Philipp von [University Hospital, RWTH Aachen University, Department of Molecular Cardiovascular Research, Aachen (Germany)

    2007-05-15

    Cell-based therapy by transplantation of progenitor cells has emerged as a promising development for organ repair, but non-invasive imaging approaches are required to monitor the fate of transplanted cells. Radioactive labelling with {sup 111}In-oxine has been used in preclinical trials. This study aimed to validate {sup 111}In-oxine labelling and subsequent in vivo and ex vivo detection of haematopoietic progenitor cells. Murine haematopoietic progenitor cells (10{sup 6}, FDCPmix) were labelled with 0.1 MBq (low dose) or 1.0 MBq (high dose) {sup 111}In-oxine and compared with unlabelled controls. Cellular retention of {sup 111}In, viability and proliferation were determined up to 48 h after labelling. Labelled cells were injected into the cavity of the left or right cardiac ventricle in mice. Scintigraphic images were acquired 24 h later. Organ samples were harvested to determine the tissue-specific activity. Labelling efficiency was 75 {+-} 14%. Cellular retention of incorporated {sup 111}In after 48 h was 18 {+-} 4%. Percentage viability after 48 h was 90 {+-} 1% (control), 58 {+-} 7% (low dose) and 48 {+-} 8% (high dose) (p<0.0001). Numbers of viable cells after 48 h (normalised to 0 h) were 249 {+-} 51% (control), 42 {+-} 8% (low dose) and 32 {+-} 5% (high dose) (p<0.0001). Cells accumulated in the spleen (86.6 {+-} 27.0% ID/g), bone marrow (59.1 {+-} 16.1% ID/g) and liver (30.3 {+-} 9.5% ID/g) after left ventricular injection, whereas most of the cells were detected in the lungs (42.4 {+-} 21.8% ID/g) after right ventricular injection. Radiolabelling of haematopoietic progenitor cells with {sup 111}In-oxine is feasible, with high labelling efficiency but restricted stability. The integrity of labelled cells is significantly affected, with substantially reduced viability and proliferation and limited migration after systemic transfusion. (orig.)

  8. Cellular responses to low dose heavy-ion exposure in human cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morimoto, S.; Goto, S.; Kato, T.; Izumi, M.; Komiyama-Kobayashi, M.; Fukunishi, N.; Honma, M.; Hanaoka, F.; Yatagai, F

    2002-07-01

    The human lymphoblastoid cell line TK6 was used to study the cellular responses after low-dose (100, 200, 500 mGy) or high-dose (3 Gy) of X rays, C (22 keV.{mu}m{sup -1}) and Fe (1000 keV.{mu}m{sup -1}) ion exposures, p53 protein induction in individual cells was determined by indirect immunofluorescence staining. Cell-cycle progression after heavy-ion exposure was determined by using a laser scanning cytometer. A characteristic pattern of cell-cycle progression was observed with 3 Gy exposure of Fe ions but not with 100 mGy. Similarly such a pattern with 100 mGy C ion exposure did not match that with 3 Gy. The proportion of p53-induced cells is proportional to the probability of cell being hit by a primary heavy ion. The observed low-dose effect can be reflected in the probability of a hit, although detailed nature about their energy deposition must be considered for more precise estimation of such an effect. New detection methodology must be developed for identification of heavy-ion specific cellular responses. (author)

  9. Glucose Oxidase Induces Cellular Senescence in Immortal Renal Cells through ILK by Downregulating Klotho Gene Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troyano-Suárez, Nuria; del Nogal-Avila, María; Mora, Inés; Sosa, Patricia; López-Ongil, Susana; Rodriguez-Puyol, Diego; Olmos, Gemma; Ruíz-Torres, María Piedad

    2015-01-01

    Cellular senescence can be prematurely induced by oxidative stress involved in aging. In this work, we were searching for novel intermediaries in oxidative stress-induced senescence, focusing our interest on integrin-linked kinase (ILK), a scaffold protein at cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) adhesion sites, and on the Klotho gene. Cultured renal cells were treated with glucose oxidase (GOx) for long time periods. GOx induced senescence, increasing senescence associated β-galactosidase activity and the expression of p16. In parallel, GOx increased ILK protein expression and activity. Ectopic overexpression of ILK in cells increased p16 expression, even in the absence of GOx, whereas downregulation of ILK inhibited the increase in p16 due to oxidative stress. Additionally, GOx reduced Klotho gene expression and cells overexpressing Klotho protein did not undergo senescence after GOx addition. We demonstrated a direct link between ILK and Klotho since silencing ILK expression in cells and mice increases Klotho expression and reduces p53 and p16 expression in renal cortex. In conclusion, oxidative stress induces cellular senescence in kidney cells by increasing ILK protein expression and activity, which in turn reduces Klotho expression. We hereby present ILK as a novel downregulator of Klotho gene expression. PMID:26583057

  10. Disruptive environmental chemicals and cellular mechanisms that confer resistance to cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Kannan Badri; Ali, Manaf; Barclay, Barry J; Cheng, Qiang Shawn; D'Abronzo, Leandro; Dornetshuber-Fleiss, Rita; Ghosh, Paramita M; Gonzalez Guzman, Michael J; Lee, Tae-Jin; Leung, Po Sing; Li, Lin; Luanpitpong, Suidjit; Ratovitski, Edward; Rojanasakul, Yon; Romano, Maria Fiammetta; Romano, Simona; Sinha, Ranjeet K; Yedjou, Clement; Al-Mulla, Fahd; Al-Temaimi, Rabeah; Amedei, Amedeo; Brown, Dustin G; Ryan, Elizabeth P; Colacci, Annamaria; Hamid, Roslida A; Mondello, Chiara; Raju, Jayadev; Salem, Hosni K; Woodrick, Jordan; Scovassi, A Ivana; Singh, Neetu; Vaccari, Monica; Roy, Rabindra; Forte, Stefano; Memeo, Lorenzo; Kim, Seo Yun; Bisson, William H; Lowe, Leroy; Park, Hyun Ho

    2015-06-01

    Cell death is a process of dying within biological cells that are ceasing to function. This process is essential in regulating organism development, tissue homeostasis, and to eliminate cells in the body that are irreparably damaged. In general, dysfunction in normal cellular death is tightly linked to cancer progression. Specifically, the up-regulation of pro-survival factors, including oncogenic factors and antiapoptotic signaling pathways, and the down-regulation of pro-apoptotic factors, including tumor suppressive factors, confers resistance to cell death in tumor cells, which supports the emergence of a fully immortalized cellular phenotype. This review considers the potential relevance of ubiquitous environmental chemical exposures that have been shown to disrupt key pathways and mechanisms associated with this sort of dysfunction. Specifically, bisphenol A, chlorothalonil, dibutyl phthalate, dichlorvos, lindane, linuron, methoxychlor and oxyfluorfen are discussed as prototypical chemical disruptors; as their effects relate to resistance to cell death, as constituents within environmental mixtures and as potential contributors to environmental carcinogenesis. PMID:26106145

  11. Cellular responses to low dose heavy-ion exposure in human cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The human lymphoblastoid cell line TK6 was used to study the cellular responses after low-dose (100, 200, 500 mGy) or high-dose (3 Gy) of X rays, C (22 keV.μm-1) and Fe (1000 keV.μm-1) ion exposures, p53 protein induction in individual cells was determined by indirect immunofluorescence staining. Cell-cycle progression after heavy-ion exposure was determined by using a laser scanning cytometer. A characteristic pattern of cell-cycle progression was observed with 3 Gy exposure of Fe ions but not with 100 mGy. Similarly such a pattern with 100 mGy C ion exposure did not match that with 3 Gy. The proportion of p53-induced cells is proportional to the probability of cell being hit by a primary heavy ion. The observed low-dose effect can be reflected in the probability of a hit, although detailed nature about their energy deposition must be considered for more precise estimation of such an effect. New detection methodology must be developed for identification of heavy-ion specific cellular responses. (author)

  12. Genome editing of human pluripotent stem cells to generate human cellular disease models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiran Musunuru

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Disease modeling with human pluripotent stem cells has come into the public spotlight with the awarding of the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for 2012 to Drs John Gurdon and Shinya Yamanaka for the discovery that mature cells can be reprogrammed to become pluripotent. This discovery has opened the door for the generation of pluripotent stem cells from individuals with disease and the differentiation of these cells into somatic cell types for the study of disease pathophysiology. The emergence of genome-editing technology over the past few years has made it feasible to generate and investigate human cellular disease models with even greater speed and efficiency. Here, recent technological advances in genome editing, and its utility in human biology and disease studies, are reviewed.

  13. DNA damage and cellular death in oral mucosa cells of children who have undergone panoramic dental radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite wide use as a diagnostic tool in medical and dental practice, radiography can induce cytotoxic effects and genetic damage. To evaluate DNA damage (micronucleus) and cellular death (pyknosis, karyolysis and karyorrhexis) in exfoliated buccal mucosa cells taken from healthy children following exposure to radiation during dental radiography. A total of 17 children who had undergone panoramic dental radiography were included. We found no statistically significant differences (P > 0.05) between micronucleated oral mucosa cells in children before and after exposure to radiation. On the other hand, radiation did cause other nuclear alterations closely related to cytotoxicity including karyorrhexis, pyknosis and karyolysis. Taken together, these results indicate that panoramic dental radiography might not induce chromosomal damage, but may be cytotoxic. Overall, the results reinforce the importance of evaluating the health side effects of radiography and contribute to the micronucleus database, which will improve our understanding and practice of this methodology in children. (orig.)

  14. DNA damage and cellular death in oral mucosa cells of children who have undergone panoramic dental radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angelieri, Fernanda; Oliveira, Gabriela R. de [Sao Paulo Metodista University (UMESP), Department of Orthodontics, Sao Bernardo do Campo, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Sannomiya, Eduardo K. [Sao Paulo Metodista University (UMESP), Department of Dento-Maxillofacial Radiology, Sao Bernardo do Campo, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Ribeiro, Daniel A. [Federal University of Sao Paulo (UNIFESP), Department of Health Sciences, Santos, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP), Departamento de Ciencias da Saude, Santos, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2007-06-15

    Despite wide use as a diagnostic tool in medical and dental practice, radiography can induce cytotoxic effects and genetic damage. To evaluate DNA damage (micronucleus) and cellular death (pyknosis, karyolysis and karyorrhexis) in exfoliated buccal mucosa cells taken from healthy children following exposure to radiation during dental radiography. A total of 17 children who had undergone panoramic dental radiography were included. We found no statistically significant differences (P > 0.05) between micronucleated oral mucosa cells in children before and after exposure to radiation. On the other hand, radiation did cause other nuclear alterations closely related to cytotoxicity including karyorrhexis, pyknosis and karyolysis. Taken together, these results indicate that panoramic dental radiography might not induce chromosomal damage, but may be cytotoxic. Overall, the results reinforce the importance of evaluating the health side effects of radiography and contribute to the micronucleus database, which will improve our understanding and practice of this methodology in children. (orig.)

  15. Expression weighted cell type enrichments reveal genetic and cellular nature of major brain disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan Gerald Skene

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The cell types that trigger the primary pathology in many brain diseases remain largely unknown. One route to understanding the primary pathological cell type for a particular disease is to identify the cells expressing susceptibility genes. Although this is straightforward for monogenic conditions where the causative mutation may alter expression of a cell type specific marker, methods are required for the common polygenic disorders. We developed the Expression Weighted Cell Type Enrichment (EWCE method that uses single cell transcriptomes to generate the probability distribution associated with a gene list having an average level of expression within a cell type. Following validation, we applied EWCE to human genetic data from cases of epilepsy, Schizophrenia, Autism, Intellectual Disability, Alzheimer’s disease, Multiple Sclerosis and anxiety disorders. Genetic susceptibility primarily affected microglia in Alzheimer’s and Multiple Sclerosis; was shared between interneurons and pyramidal neurons in Autism and Schizophrenia; while intellectual disabilities and epilepsy were attributable to a range of cell-types, with the strongest enrichment in interneurons. We hypothesised that the primary cell type pathology could trigger secondary changes in other cell types and these could be detected by applying EWCE to transcriptome data from diseased tissue. In Autism, Schizophrenia and Alzheimer’s disease we find evidence of pathological changes in all of the major brain cell types. These findings give novel insight into the cellular origins and progression in common brain disorders. The methods can be applied to any tissue and disorder and have applications in validating mouse models.

  16. Effects of brevetoxins on murine myeloma SP2/O cells: aberrant cellular division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Thomas K; Derby, Melissa; Martin, Dean F; Wright, Scott D; Dao, My Lien

    2003-01-01

    Massive deaths of manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris) during the red tide seasons have been attributed to brevetoxins produced by the dinoflagellate Karenia brevis (formerly Ptychodiscus breve and Gymnodinium breve). Although these toxins have been found in macrophages and lymphocytes in the lung, liver, and secondary lymphoid tissues of these animals, the molecular mechanisms of brevetoxicosis have not yet been identified. To investigate the effects of brevetoxins on immune cells, a murine myeloma cell line (SP2/O) was used as a model for in vitro studies. By adding brevetoxins to cultures of the SP2/O cells at concentrations ranging from 20 to 600 ng/ml, an apparent increase in proliferation was observed at around 2 hours post challenge as compared to the unchallenged cell cultures. This was followed by a drop in cell number at around 3 hours, suggesting an aberrant effect of brevetoxins on cellular division, the cells generated at 2 hours being apparently short-lived. In situ immunochemical staining of the SP2/O cells at 1 and 2 hour post challenge showed an accumulation of the toxins in the nucleus. A 21-kDa protein was subsequently isolated from the SP2/O cells as having brevetoxin-binding properties, and immunologically identified as p21, a nuclear factor known to down-regulate cellular proliferation through inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinases. These data are the first on a possible effect of brevetoxins on the cell cycle via binding to p21, a phenomenon that needs to be further investigated and validated in normal immune cells. PMID:12745987

  17. Beyond the Cell: Using Multiscalar Topics to Bring Interdisciplinarity into Undergraduate Cellular Biology Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Carolyn F.

    2016-01-01

    Western science has grown increasingly reductionistic and, in parallel, the undergraduate life sciences curriculum has become disciplinarily fragmented. While reductionistic approaches have led to landmark discoveries, many of the most exciting scientific advances in the late 20th century have occurred at disciplinary interfaces; work at these interfaces is necessary to manage the world’s looming problems, particularly those that are rooted in cellular-level processes but have ecosystem- and even global-scale ramifications (e.g., nonsustainable agriculture, emerging infectious diseases). Managing such problems requires comprehending whole scenarios and their emergent properties as sums of their multiple facets and complex interrelationships, which usually integrate several disciplines across multiple scales (e.g., time, organization, space). This essay discusses bringing interdisciplinarity into undergraduate cellular biology courses through the use of multiscalar topics. Discussing how cellular-level processes impact large-scale phenomena makes them relevant to everyday life and unites diverse disciplines (e.g., sociology, cell biology, physics) as facets of a single system or problem, emphasizing their connections to core concepts in biology. I provide specific examples of multiscalar topics and discuss preliminary evidence that using such topics may increase students’ understanding of the cell’s position within an ecosystem and how cellular biology interfaces with other disciplines. PMID:27146162

  18. A Simple Scheme for Improved Performance of Fixed Outage Rate Cellular System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussein M.A. Basi

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The traffic characteristic of mobile cellular systems is rather distinct from that of a fixed telephone network. However the system planning and design are still carried out with the tools of conventional traffic theory. In the recent days much work is being done in the performance evaluation of mobile or cellular communication systems in order to develop a system with greater efficiency. The useful parameters to estimate the performance of the system are voice quality, frequency spectrum efficiency and Grade of Service (GOS. The grade of service will be affected due to outage of channels. In this study, a new scheme is proposed to reduce lost calls due to channel outage in the fixed rate outage cellular system. In this proposed scheme the call will never dropped but may be delayed. The system performance is evaluated for different conditions and the results are discussed.

  19. Classification of Cells with Membrane Staining and/or Fixation Based on Cellular Specific Membrane Capacitance and Cytoplasm Conductivity

    OpenAIRE

    Song-Bin Huang; Yang Zhao; Deyong Chen; Shing-Lun Liu; Yana Luo; Tzu-Keng Chiu; Junbo Wang; Jian Chen; Min-Hsien Wu

    2015-01-01

    Single-cell electrical properties (e.g., specific membrane capacitance (Cspecific membrane) and cytoplasm conductivity (σcytoplasm)) have been regarded as potential label-free biophysical markers for the evaluation of cellular status. However, whether there exist correlations between these biophysical markers and cellular status (e.g., membrane-associate protein expression) is still unknown. To further validate the utility of single-cell electrical properties in cell type classification, Cspe...

  20. Cellular distribution of inorganic mercury and its relation to cytotoxicity in bovine kidney cell cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A bovine kidney cell culture system was used to assess what relationship mercuric chloride (HgCl2) uptake and subcellular distribution had to cytotoxicity. Twenty-four-hour incubations with 0.05-50 μM HgCl2 elicited a concentration-related cytotoxicity. Cellular accumulation of 203Hg was also concentration-related, with 1.0 nmol/106 cells at the IC50. Measurement of Hg uptake over the 24-h exposure period revealed a multiphasic process. Peak accumulation was attained by 1 h and was followed by extrusion and plateauing of intracellular Hg levels. Least-squares regression analysis of the cytotoxicity and cellular uptake data indicated a potential relationship between the Hg uptake and cytotoxicity. However, the subcellular distribution of Hg was not concentration-related. Mitochondria and soluble protein fractions accounted for greater than 65% of the cell-associated Hg at all concentrations. The remaining Hg was distributed between the microsomal (6-10%) and nuclear and cell debris (11-22%) fractions at all concentrations tested. Less than 20% of the total cell-associated Hg was bound with metallothionein-like protein. 31 references, 4 figures, 3 tables

  1. Dimethylarsenic acid damages cellular DNA and inhibits gap junctional intercellular communication between human skin fibroblast cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GuoXB; DengFR

    2002-01-01

    Although arsenic is identified as a human carcinogen,there is currently no accepted mechanism for its action or an established animal model for evaluating the carcinogenic activity of arsenic.To elucidate the mechanism of arsenic arcinogenesis,we investigated the effect of dimethylarsenic acid(DMAA),the main metabolite of inorganic arsenic in humans,on the cellular DNA and gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) between human skin fibroblast cells.Single-cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) assay was used to detect the DNA damage in human skin fibroblast cells exposed to DMAA,and the GJIC between cells was detected by the scrape loading/dye transfer assay.DMAA at concentrations of 0.01-1.0 mmol·L-1 induced DNA damage in a dose-dependent manner,and GJIC between human skin fibroblast cells was significantly inhibited by DMAA at 1.0 mmol·L-1.Our results suggest that both genotoxic and nongenotoxic mechanism are involved in the mechanism of DMAA-induced cellular toxicity.

  2. Predictive Modelling of Cellular Load

    OpenAIRE

    Carolan, Emmett; McLoone, Seamus; Farrell, Ronan

    2015-01-01

    This work examines the temporal dynamics of cellular load in four Irish regions. Large scale underutilisation of network resources is identified both at the regional level and at the level of individual cells. Cellular load is modeled and prediction intervals are generated. These prediction intervals are used to put an upper bound on usage in a particular cell at a particular time. Opportunities for improvements in network utilization by incorporating these upper bounds on usage are identifie...

  3. Cellular, Molecular Consequences of Peroxisome Proliferator- Activated Receptor-δ Activation in Ovarian Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Vignati

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-δ (PPAR-δ is a ligand-activated transcription factor. In addition to its canonical role in lipid, glucose metabolism, PPAR-δ controls cell proliferation, death, differentiation in several tissues. Here we have examined the expression of PPAR-δ in ovarian tumors, the cellular, molecular consequences of its activation in ovarian cancer cells. PPAR-δ was expressed in a large number of epithelial ovarian tumors, cell lines. The PPAR-δ lig, ciglitazone inhibited the growth, clonogenic survival of ovarian cancer cells, inducing cell cycle arrest, cell death. Growth inhibition by ciglitazone was reversed by the PPAR-δ antagonist GW9662, indicating the involvement of PPAR-δ- dependent mechanisms. Microarray-based gene profiling revealed complex changes in the transcriptional program of ovarian cancer cells on treatment with ciglitazone, identified multiple pathways that may contribute to PPAR-δ ligands' antitumor activity. Genes upregulated by ciglitazone were predominantly associated with metabolic, differentiation, tumorsuppressor pathways, whereas downregulated genes were involved in cell proliferation, cell cycle, cell organization, steroid biosynthesis. Collectively, our data indicate that PPAR-δ activation by selective agonists is a valid strategy for ovarian cancer therapy, prevention, should be tested alone, in combination with other anticancer drugs.

  4. Massive MIMO and Small Cells: Improving Energy Efficiency by Optimal Soft-Cell Coordination

    OpenAIRE

    Bjornson, Emil; Kountouris, Marios; Debbah, Merouane

    2013-01-01

    To improve the cellular energy efficiency, without sacrificing quality-of-service (QoS) at the users, the network topology must be densified to enable higher spatial reuse. We analyze a combination of two densification approaches, namely "massive" multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) base stations and small-cell access points. If the latter are operator-deployed, a spatial soft-cell approach can be taken where the multiple transmitters serve the users by joint non-coherent multiflow beamform...

  5. Extreme cellular adaptations and cell differentiation required by a cyanobacterium for carbonate excavation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guida, Brandon Scott; Garcia-Pichel, Ferran

    2016-05-17

    Some cyanobacteria, known as euendoliths, excavate and grow into calcium carbonates, with their activity leading to significant marine and terrestrial carbonate erosion and to deleterious effects on coral reef and bivalve ecology. Despite their environmental relevance, the mechanisms by which they can bore have remained elusive and paradoxical, in that, as oxygenic phototrophs, cyanobacteria tend to alkalinize their surroundings, which will encourage carbonate precipitation, not dissolution. Therefore, cyanobacteria must rely on unique adaptations to bore. Studies with the filamentous euendolith, Mastigocoleus testarum, indicated that excavation requires both cellular energy and transcellular calcium transport, mediated by P-type ATPases, but the cellular basis for this phenomenon remains obscure. We present evidence that excavation in M. testarum involves two unique cellular adaptations. Long-range calcium transport is based on active pumping at multiple cells along boring filaments, orchestrated by the preferential localization of calcium ATPases at one cell pole, in a ring pattern, facing the cross-walls, and by repeating this placement and polarity, a pattern that breaks at branching and apical cells. In addition, M. testarum differentiates specialized cells we call calcicytes, that which accumulate calcium at concentrations more than 500-fold those found in other cyanobacteria, concomitantly and drastically lowering photosynthetic pigments and enduring severe cytoplasmatic alkalinization. Calcicytes occur commonly, but not exclusively, in apical parts of the filaments distal to the excavation front. We suggest that calcicytes allow for fast calcium flow at low, nontoxic concentrations through undifferentiated cells by providing buffering storage for excess calcium before final excretion to the outside medium. PMID:27140633

  6. Accelerated cellular senescence phenotype of GAPDH-depleted human lung carcinoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phadke, Manali; Krynetskaia, Natalia [Temple University School of Pharmacy, Philadelphia, PA 19140 (United States); Mishra, Anurag [Jayne Haines Center for Pharmacogenomics, Temple University School of Pharmacy, Philadelphia, PA 19140 (United States); Krynetskiy, Evgeny, E-mail: ekrynets@temple.edu [Temple University School of Pharmacy, Philadelphia, PA 19140 (United States); Jayne Haines Center for Pharmacogenomics, Temple University School of Pharmacy, Philadelphia, PA 19140 (United States)

    2011-07-29

    Highlights: {yields} We examined the effect of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate (GAPDH) depletion on proliferation of human carcinoma A549 cells. {yields} GAPDH depletion induces accelerated senescence in tumor cells via AMPK network, in the absence of DNA damage. {yields} Metabolic and genetic rescue experiments indicate that GAPDH has regulatory functions linking energy metabolism and cell cycle. {yields} Induction of senescence in LKB1-deficient lung cancer cells via GAPDH depletion suggests a novel strategy to control tumor cell proliferation. -- Abstract: Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is a pivotal glycolytic enzyme, and a signaling molecule which acts at the interface between stress factors and the cellular apoptotic machinery. Earlier, we found that knockdown of GAPDH in human carcinoma cell lines resulted in cell proliferation arrest and chemoresistance to S phase-specific cytotoxic agents. To elucidate the mechanism by which GAPDH depletion arrests cell proliferation, we examined the effect of GAPDH knockdown on human carcinoma cells A549. Our results show that GAPDH-depleted cells establish senescence phenotype, as revealed by proliferation arrest, changes in morphology, SA-{beta}-galactosidase staining, and more than 2-fold up-regulation of senescence-associated genes DEC1 and GLB1. Accelerated senescence following GAPDH depletion results from compromised glycolysis and energy crisis leading to the sustained AMPK activation via phosphorylation of {alpha} subunit at Thr172. Our findings demonstrate that GAPDH depletion switches human tumor cells to senescent phenotype via AMPK network, in the absence of DNA damage. Rescue experiments using metabolic and genetic models confirmed that GAPDH has important regulatory functions linking the energy metabolism and the cell cycle networks. Induction of senescence in LKB1-deficient non-small cell lung cancer cells via GAPDH depletion suggests a novel strategy to control tumor cell proliferation.

  7. Single-cell bioelectrical impedance platform for monitoring cellular response to drug treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The response of cells to a chemical or biological agent in terms of their impedance changes in real-time is a useful mechanism that can be utilized for a wide variety of biomedical and environmental applications. The use of a single-cell-based analytical platform could be an effective approach to acquiring more sensitive cell impedance measurements, particularly in applications where only diminutive changes in impedance are expected. Here, we report the development of an on-chip cell impedance biosensor with two types of electrodes that host individual cells and cell populations, respectively, to study its efficacy in detecting cellular response. Human glioblastoma (U87MG) cells were patterned on single- and multi-cell electrodes through ligand-mediated natural cell adhesion. We comparatively investigated how these cancer cells on both types of electrodes respond to an ion channel inhibitor, chlorotoxin (CTX), in terms of their shape alternations and impedance changes to exploit the fine detectability of the single-cell-based system. The detecting electrodes hosting single cells exhibited a significant reduction in the real impedance signal, while electrodes hosting confluent monolayer of cells showed little to no impedance change. When single-cell electrodes were treated with CTX of different doses, a dose-dependent impedance change was observed. This enables us to identify the effective dose needed for this particular treatment. Our study demonstrated that this single-cell impedance system may potentially serve as a useful analytical tool for biomedical applications such as environmental toxin detection and drug evaluation

  8. Accelerated cellular senescence phenotype of GAPDH-depleted human lung carcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → We examined the effect of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate (GAPDH) depletion on proliferation of human carcinoma A549 cells. → GAPDH depletion induces accelerated senescence in tumor cells via AMPK network, in the absence of DNA damage. → Metabolic and genetic rescue experiments indicate that GAPDH has regulatory functions linking energy metabolism and cell cycle. → Induction of senescence in LKB1-deficient lung cancer cells via GAPDH depletion suggests a novel strategy to control tumor cell proliferation. -- Abstract: Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is a pivotal glycolytic enzyme, and a signaling molecule which acts at the interface between stress factors and the cellular apoptotic machinery. Earlier, we found that knockdown of GAPDH in human carcinoma cell lines resulted in cell proliferation arrest and chemoresistance to S phase-specific cytotoxic agents. To elucidate the mechanism by which GAPDH depletion arrests cell proliferation, we examined the effect of GAPDH knockdown on human carcinoma cells A549. Our results show that GAPDH-depleted cells establish senescence phenotype, as revealed by proliferation arrest, changes in morphology, SA-β-galactosidase staining, and more than 2-fold up-regulation of senescence-associated genes DEC1 and GLB1. Accelerated senescence following GAPDH depletion results from compromised glycolysis and energy crisis leading to the sustained AMPK activation via phosphorylation of α subunit at Thr172. Our findings demonstrate that GAPDH depletion switches human tumor cells to senescent phenotype via AMPK network, in the absence of DNA damage. Rescue experiments using metabolic and genetic models confirmed that GAPDH has important regulatory functions linking the energy metabolism and the cell cycle networks. Induction of senescence in LKB1-deficient non-small cell lung cancer cells via GAPDH depletion suggests a novel strategy to control tumor cell proliferation.

  9. Ethical Perspectives on Stem Cell-based Cellular Therapies for Neurodegenerative Diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbesen, Mette; Pedersen, Finn Skou; Andersen, Svend;

    2012-01-01

    have benefits for patients. The side effect described most commonly in the literature is the risk of tumor formation by stem cells not fully differentiated into neurons when transplanted or following viral transduction and subsequent differentiation to create induced pluripotent stem cells. This risk...... may be avoided by differentiating stem cells in culture before transplantation. Here we argue that the following ethical considerations are important for clinical trials: Informed consent of research subjects or patients, specification of possible therapeutic effects, risk analysis of possible side......The effect of stem cell-based therapies for neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer disease, Huntington disease, and Parkinson disease are currently being investigated. Here we specify possible therapeutic effects and possible side effects for patients and conclude that cellular therapies may...

  10. Improved Zirconia Oxygen-Separation Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, John V.; Zwissler, James G.

    1988-01-01

    Cell structure distributes feed gas more evenly for more efficent oxygen production. Multilayer cell structure containing passages, channels, tubes, and pores help distribute pressure evenly over zirconia electrolytic membrane. Resulting more uniform pressure distribution expected to improve efficiency of oxygen production.

  11. Improved cellular activity of antisense peptide nucleic acids by conjugation to a cationic peptide-lipid (CatLip) domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koppelhus, Uffe; Shiraishi, Takehiko; Zachar, Vladimir; Pankratova, Stanislava; Nielsen, Peter E

    2008-01-01

    and therefore mechanisms that promote endosomal escape (or avoid the endosomal route) are required for improving bioavailability. A variety of auxiliary agents (chloroquine, calcium ions, or lipophilic photosensitizers) has this effect, but improved, unaided delivery would be highly advantageous in...... particular for future in vivo applications. We find that simply conjugating a lipid domain (fatty acid) to the cationic peptide (a CatLip conjugate) increases the biological effect of the corresponding PNA (CatLip) conjugates in a luciferase cellular antisense assay up to 2 orders of magnitude. The effect...... increases with increasing length of the fatty acid (C8-C16) but in parallel also results in increased cellular toxicity, with decanoic acid being optimal. Furthermore, the relative enhancement is significantly higher for Tat peptide compared to oligoarginine. Confocal microscopy and chloroquine enhancement...

  12. Planes, Trains, and Automobiles: Perspectives on CAR T Cells and Other Cellular Therapies for Hematologic Malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Saar

    2016-08-01

    Hematologic oncologists now have at their disposal (or a referral away) a myriad of new options to get from point A (a patient with relapsed or poor-risk disease) to point B (potential tumor eradication and long-term disease-free survival). In this perspective piece, we discuss the putative mechanisms of action and the relative strengths and weaknesses of currently available cellular therapy approaches. Notably, while many of these approaches have been published in high impact journals, with the exception of allogeneic stem cell transplantation and of checkpoint inhibitors (PD1/PDL1 or CTLA4 blockade), the published clinical trials have mostly been early phase, uncontrolled studies. Therefore, many of the new cellular therapy approaches have yet to demonstrate incontrovertible evidence of enhanced overall survival compared with controls. Nonetheless, the science behind these is sure to advance our understanding of cancer immunology and ultimately to bring us closer to our goal of curing cancer. PMID:27136938

  13. Role of cellular prion proteins in the function of macrophages and dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitta, Kayako; Sakudo, Akikazu; Masuyama, Jun; Xue, Guangai; Sugiura, Katsuaki; Onodera, Takashi

    2009-01-01

    The cellular isoform of prion proteins (PrPC) is expressed in hematopoietic stem cells, granulocytes, T and B lymphocyte natural killer cells, platelets, monocytes, dendritic cells, and follicular dendritic cells, which may act as carrier cells for the spread of its abnormal isoform (PrPSc) before manifesting transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs). In particular, macrophages and dendritic cells seem to be involved in the replication of PrPSc after ingestion. In addition, information on the role of PrPC during phagocytotic activity in these cells has been obtained. A recent study showed that resident macrophages from ZrchI PrP gene (Prnp)-deficient (Prnp-/-) mice show augmented phagocytotic activity compared to Prnp+/+ counterparts. In contrast, our study suggests that Rikn Prnp-/- peritoneal macrophages show pseudopodium extension arrest and up-regulation of phagocytotic activity compared to Prnp+/+ cells. Although reports regarding phagocytotic activity in resident and peritoneal macrophages are inconsistent between ZrchI and Rikn Prnp-/- mice, it seems plausible that PrPC in macrophages could contribute to maintain the immunological environment. This review will introduce the recent progress in understanding the functions of PrPC in macrophages and dendritic cells under physiological conditions and its involvement in the pathogenesis of prion diseases. PMID:19275736

  14. Locally-Delivered T-Cell-Derived Cellular Vehicles Efficiently Track and Deliver Adenovirus Delta24-RGD to Infiltrating Glioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rutger K. Balvers

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Oncolytic adenoviral vectors are a promising alternative for the treatment of glioblastoma. Recent publications have demonstrated the advantages of shielding viral particles within cellular vehicles (CVs, which can be targeted towards the tumor microenvironment. Here, we studied T-cells, often having a natural capacity to target tumors, for their feasibility as a CV to deliver the oncolytic adenovirus, Delta24-RGD, to glioblastoma. The Jurkat T-cell line was assessed in co-culture with the glioblastoma stem cell (GSC line, MGG8, for the optimal transfer conditions of Delta24-RGD in vitro. The effect of intraparenchymal and tail vein injections on intratumoral virus distribution and overall survival was addressed in an orthotopic glioma stem cell (GSC-based xenograft model. Jurkat T-cells were demonstrated to facilitate the amplification and transfer of Delta24-RGD onto GSCs. Delta24-RGD dosing and incubation time were found to influence the migratory ability of T-cells towards GSCs. Injection of Delta24-RGD-loaded T-cells into the brains of GSC-bearing mice led to migration towards the tumor and dispersion of the virus within the tumor core and infiltrative zones. This occurred after injection into the ipsilateral hemisphere, as well as into the non-tumor-bearing hemisphere. We found that T-cell-mediated delivery of Delta24-RGD led to the inhibition of tumor growth compared to non-treated controls, resulting in prolonged survival (p = 0.007. Systemic administration of virus-loaded T-cells resulted in intratumoral viral delivery, albeit at low levels. Based on these findings, we conclude that T-cell-based CVs are a feasible approach to local Delta24-RGD delivery in glioblastoma, although efficient systemic targeting requires further improvement.

  15. Quantification of cellular volume and sub-cellular density fluctuations: comparison of normal peripheral blood cells and circulating tumor cells identified in a breast cancer patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KevinGregoryPhillips

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Cancer metastasis, the leading cause of cancer-related deaths, is facilitated in part by the hematogenous transport of circulating tumor cells (CTCs through the vasculature. Clinical studies have demonstrated that CTCs circulate in the blood of patients with metastatic disease across the major types of carcinomas, and that the number of CTCs in peripheral blood is correlated with overall survival in metastatic breast, colorectal, and prostate cancer. While the potential to monitor metastasis through CTC enumeration exists, the basic physical features of CTCs remain ill defined and moreover, the corresponding clinical utility of these physical parameters is unknown. To elucidate the basic physical features of CTCs we present a label-free imaging technique utilizing differential interference contrast (DIC microscopy to measure cell volume and to quantify sub-cellular mass-density variations as well as the size of subcellular constituents from mass-density spatial correlations. DIC measurements were carried out on CTCs identified in a breast cancer patient using the high-definition (HD CTC detection assay. We compared the biophysical features of HD-CTC to normal blood cell subpopulations including leukocytes, platelets, and red blood cells. HD-CTCs were found to possess larger volumes, decreased mass-density fluctuations, and shorter-range spatial density correlations in comparison to leukocytes. Our results suggest that HD-CTCs exhibit biophysical signatures that might be used to potentially aid in their detection and to monitor responses to treatment in a label-free fashion. The biophysical parameters reported here can be incorporated into computational models of CTC-vascular interactions and in vitro flow models to better understand metastasis.

  16. Analyzing the Influence of Mobile Phone Use of Drivers on Traffic Flow Based on an Improved Cellular Automaton Model

    OpenAIRE

    Yao Xiao; Jing Shi

    2015-01-01

    This paper aimed to analyze the influence of drivers’ behavior of phone use while driving on traffic flow, including both traffic efficiency and traffic safety. An improved cellular automaton model was proposed to simulate traffic flow with distracted drivers based on the Nagel-Schreckenberg model. The driving characters of drivers using a phone were first discussed and a value representing the probability to use a phone while driving was put into the CA model. Simulation results showed that ...

  17. Improving Spectral Capacity and Wireless Network Coverage by Cognitive Radio Technology and Relay Nodes in Cellular Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Flemming Bjerge

    2008-01-01

    Methods to enhance the use of the frequency spectrum by automatical spectrum sensing plus spectrum sharing in a cognitive radio technology context have been presented and discussed in this paper. Ideas to improve the wireless transmission by orthogonal OFDM-based communication and to increase the...... coverage of cellular systems by future wireless networks, relay channels, relay stations and collaborate radio have been presented as well. A revised hierarchical deployment of the future wireless and wired networks are shortly discussed....

  18. CELLULAR AND POPULATION PLASTICITY OF HELPER CD4 T CELL RESPONSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gesham eMagombedze

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Vertebrates are constantly exposed to pathogens, and the adaptive immunity has most likely evolved to control and clear such infectious agents. CD4 T cells are the major players in the adaptive immune response to pathogens. Following recognition of pathogen-derived antigens naïve CD4 T cells differentiate into effectors which then control pathogen replication either directly by killing pathogen-infected cells or by assisting with generation of cytotoxic T lymphocytes or pathogen-specific antibodies. Pathogen-specific effector CD4 T cells are highly heterogeneous in terms of cytokines they produce. Three major subtypes of effector CD4 T cells have been identified: T-helper 1 (Th1 cells producing IFN-g and TNF-α, Th2 cells producing IL-4 and IL-10, and Th17 cells producing IL-17. How this heterogeneity is maintained and what regulates changes in effector T cell composition during chronic infections remains poorly understood. In this review we discuss recent advances in our understanding of CD4 T cell differentiation in response to microbial infections. We propose that a change in the phenotype of pathogen-specific effector CD4 T cells during chronic infections, for example, from Th1 to Th2 response as observed in Mycobacteriumavium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP infection of ruminants, can be achieved by conversion of T cells from one effector subset to another (cellular plasticity or due to differences in kinetics (differentiation, proliferation, death of different effector T cell subsets (population plasticity. We also shortly review mathematical models aimed at describing CD4 T cell differentiation and outline areas for future experimental and theoretical research.

  19. Nitric oxide-releasing prodrug triggers cancer cell death through deregulation of cellular redox balance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna E. Maciag

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available JS-K is a nitric oxide (NO-releasing prodrug of the O2-arylated diazeniumdiolate family that has demonstrated pronounced cytotoxicity and antitumor properties in a variety of cancer models both in vitro and in vivo. The current study of the metabolic actions of JS-K was undertaken to investigate mechanisms of its cytotoxicity. Consistent with model chemical reactions, the activating step in the metabolism of JS-K in the cell is the dearylation of the diazeniumdiolate by glutathione (GSH via a nucleophilic aromatic substitution reaction. The resulting product (CEP/NO anion spontaneously hydrolyzes, releasing two equivalents of NO. The GSH/GSSG redox couple is considered to be the major redox buffer of the cell, helping maintain a reducing environment under basal conditions. We have quantified the effects of JS-K on cellular GSH content, and show that JS-K markedly depletes GSH, due to JS-K's rapid uptake and cascading release of NO and reactive nitrogen species. The depletion of GSH results in alterations in the redox potential of the cellular environment, initiating MAPK stress signaling pathways, and inducing apoptosis. Microarray analysis confirmed signaling gene changes at the transcriptional level and revealed alteration in the expression of several genes crucial for maintenance of cellular redox homeostasis, as well as cell proliferation and survival, including MYC. Pre-treating cells with the known GSH precursor and nucleophilic reducing agent N-acetylcysteine prevented the signaling events that lead to apoptosis. These data indicate that multiplicative depletion of the reduced glutathione pool and deregulation of intracellular redox balance are important initial steps in the mechanism of JS-K's cytotoxic action.

  20. Effect of verapamil on cellular uptake of Tc-99m MIBI and tetrofosmin on several cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dae Hyun; Yoo, Jung Ah; Bae, Jin Ho; Jeong, Shin Young; Suh, Myung Rang; Ahn, Byeong Cheol; Lee, Kyu Bo; Lee, Jae Tae [School of Medicine, Kyungpook National Univ., Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-02-01

    Cellular uptake of {sup 99}mTc-sestamibi (MIBI) and {sup 99}mTc-tetrofosmin (TF) is low in cancer cells expressing multidrug resistance(MDR) by p-glycoprotein(Pgp) or multidrug related protein(MRP). Verapamil is known to increase cellular uptake of MIBI in MDR cancer cells, but is recently reported to have different effects on tracer uptake in certain cancer cells. This study was prepared to evaluate effects of verapamil on cellular uptake of MIBI and TF in several cancer cells. Cellular uptakes of Tc-99m MIBI and TF were measured in erythroleukemia K562 cell, breast cancer MCF7 cell, and human ovarian cancer SK-OV-3 cells, and data were compared with those of doxorubicin-resistant K562(Ad) cells. RT-PCR and Western blot analysis were used for the detection of mdr1 mRNA and Pgp expression, and to observe changes in isotypes of PKC enzyme. Effects of verapamil on MIBI and TF uptake were evaluated at different concentrations upto 200 {mu}M at 1*10{sup 6} cells/{sup m}l at 37.deg.C. Radioactivity in supernatant and pellet was measured with gamma counter to calculate cellular uptake ratio. Toxicity of verapamil was measured with MTT assay. Cellular uptakes of MIBI and TF were increased by time in four cancer cells studied. Co-incubation with verapamil resulted in an increase in uptake of MIBI and TF in K562(Adr) cell at a concentration of 100 {mu}M and the maximal increase at 50 {mu}M was 10-times to baseline. In contrast, uptakes of MIBI and TF in K562, MCF7m SK-OV3 cells were decreased with verapamil treatment at a concentration over 1 {mu}M. With a concentration of 200 {mu}M verapamil, respectively. Cellular uptakes of MIBI and TF in MCF7 and SK-OV-3 cells were not changed with 10{mu}M, but were also decreased with verapamil higher than 10{mu}M, resulting 40% and 5% of baseline at 50 {mu}M. MTT assay of four cells revealed that K562, MCF7, SK-OV3 were not damaged with verapamil at 200 {mu}M. Although verapamil increases uptake of MIBI and TF in MDR cancer cells

  1. Malignant monoblasts can function as effector cells in natural killer cell and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hokland, P; Hokland, M; Ellegaard, J

    1981-01-01

    This is the first report describing natural killer (NK) and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) of malignant monoblasts. Pure acute monoblastic leukemia was diagnosed in bone marrow aspirations from two patients by use of conventional cytochemical methods as well as multiple immunologic...... modulation was seen in ADCC. These findings are discussed in the light of our present knowledge of lymphoid NK cells. Udgivelsesdato: 1981-May...

  2. Effects of nicotine on cellular proliferation, macromolecular synthesis and cell cycle phase distribution in human and murine cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Addition of nicotine causes a dose- and time-dependent inhibition of cell growth in established human and murine cells. In the human promyelocytic HL-60 leukemic cells, 3 mM nicotine results in a 50% inhibition of cellular proliferation after 80 h. Nicotine was also found to affect the cell cycle distribution of HL-60 cells. Treatment with 4 mM nicotine for 20 h causes an increase in proportion of Gl-phase cells (from 49% to 57%) and a significant decrease in the proportion of S-phase cells (from 41% to 32%). These results suggest that nicotine causes cell arrest in the Gl-phase which may in part account for its effects on cell growth. To determine whether nicotine has a primary effect on the uptake/transport of macromolecular precursors into cells, HL-60 cells were treated with 2-6 mM nicotine for 30 h3 at the end of which time cells were labeled with [3H]thymidine, [3H]uridine, [14C]lysine and [35S]methionine, the trichloroacetic acid (TCA) soluble and insoluble radioactivities from each of the labeling conditions were determined. These studies show that nicotine primarily affect the synthesis of proteins

  3. Activation of human natural killer cells by the soluble form of cellular prion protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cellular prion protein (PrPC) is widely expressed in various cell types, including cells of the immune system. However, the specific roles of PrPC in the immune system have not been clearly elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the effects of a soluble form of recombinant PrPC protein on human natural killer (NK) cells. Recombinant soluble PrPC protein was generated by fusion of human PrPC with the Fc portion of human IgG1 (PrPC-Fc). PrPC-Fc binds to the surface of human NK cells, particularly to CD56dim NK cells. PrPC-Fc induced the production of cytokines and chemokines and the degranulation of granzyme B from NK cells. In addition, PrPC-Fc facilitated the IL-15-induced proliferation of NK cells. PrPC-Fc induced phosphorylation of ERK-1/2 and JNK in NK cells, and inhibitors of the ERK or the JNK pathways abrogated PrPC-Fc-induced cytokine production in NK cells. In conclusion, the soluble form of recombinant PrPC-Fc protein activates human NK cells via the ERK and JNK signaling pathways. - Highlights: • Recombinant soluble PrPC (PrPC-Fc) was generated by fusion of human PrPC with IgG1 Fc portion. • PrPC-Fc protein induces the production of cytokines and degranulation from human NK cells. • PrPC-Fc protein enhances the IL-15-induced proliferation of human NK cells. • PrPC-Fc protein activates human NK cells via the ERK and JNK signaling pathways

  4. Activation of human natural killer cells by the soluble form of cellular prion protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seong, Yeon-Jae [Laboratory of Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Graduate School of Medical Science and Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Hafis Clinic, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Sung, Pil Soo; Jang, Young-Soon; Choi, Young Joon [Laboratory of Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Graduate School of Medical Science and Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Bum-Chan [Aging Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Su-Hyung [Laboratory of Translational Immunology and Vaccinology, Graduate School of Medical Science and Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Young Woo [Aging Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Eui-Cheol, E-mail: ecshin@kaist.ac.kr [Laboratory of Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Graduate School of Medical Science and Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-21

    Cellular prion protein (PrP{sup C}) is widely expressed in various cell types, including cells of the immune system. However, the specific roles of PrP{sup C} in the immune system have not been clearly elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the effects of a soluble form of recombinant PrP{sup C} protein on human natural killer (NK) cells. Recombinant soluble PrP{sup C} protein was generated by fusion of human PrP{sup C} with the Fc portion of human IgG{sub 1} (PrP{sup C}-Fc). PrP{sup C}-Fc binds to the surface of human NK cells, particularly to CD56{sup dim} NK cells. PrP{sup C}-Fc induced the production of cytokines and chemokines and the degranulation of granzyme B from NK cells. In addition, PrP{sup C}-Fc facilitated the IL-15-induced proliferation of NK cells. PrP{sup C}-Fc induced phosphorylation of ERK-1/2 and JNK in NK cells, and inhibitors of the ERK or the JNK pathways abrogated PrP{sup C}-Fc-induced cytokine production in NK cells. In conclusion, the soluble form of recombinant PrP{sup C}-Fc protein activates human NK cells via the ERK and JNK signaling pathways. - Highlights: • Recombinant soluble PrP{sup C} (PrP{sup C}-Fc) was generated by fusion of human PrP{sup C} with IgG1 Fc portion. • PrP{sup C}-Fc protein induces the production of cytokines and degranulation from human NK cells. • PrP{sup C}-Fc protein enhances the IL-15-induced proliferation of human NK cells. • PrP{sup C}-Fc protein activates human NK cells via the ERK and JNK signaling pathways.

  5. Regulatory subunits of PKA define an axis of cellular proliferation/differentiation in ovarian cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hall John C

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The regulatory subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA exists in two isoforms, RI and RII, which distinguish the PKA isozymes, type I (PKA-I and type II (PKA-II. Evidence obtained from a variety of different experimental approaches has shown that the relative levels of type I and type II PKA in cells can play a major role in determining the balance between cell growth and differentiation. In order to characterize the effect of PKA type I and type II regulatory subunits on gene transcription at a global level, the PKA regulatory subunit genes for RIα and RIIβ were stably transfected into cells of the ovarian cancer cell line (OVCAR8. Results RIα transfected cells exhibit hyper-proliferative growth and RIIβ transfected cells revert to a relatively quiescent state. Profiling by microarray revealed equally profound changes in gene expression between RIα, RIIβ, and parental OVCAR cells. Genes specifically up-regulated in RIα cells were highly enriched for pathways involved in cell growth while genes up-regulated in RIIβ cells were enriched for pathways involved in differentiation. A large group of genes (~3600 was regulated along an axis of proliferation/differentiation between RIα, parental, and RIIβ cells. RIα/wt and RIIβ/wt gene regulation was shown by two separate and distinct gene set analytical methods to be strongly cross-correlated with a generic model of cellular differentiation. Conclusion Overexpression of PKA regulatory subunits in an ovarian cancer cell line dramatically influences the cell phenotype. The proliferation phenotype is strongly correlated with recently identified clinical biomarkers predictive of poor prognosis in ovarian cancer suggesting a possible pivotal role for PKA regulation in disease progression.

  6. Comparative Iron Oxide Nanoparticle Cellular Dosimetry and Response in Mice by the Inhalation and Liquid Cell Culture Exposure Routes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teeguarden, Justin G.; Mikheev, Vladimir B.; Minard, Kevin R.; Forsythe, William C.; Wang, Wei; Sharma, Gaurav; Karin, Norman J.; Tilton, Susan C.; Waters, Katrina M.; Asgharian, Bahman; Price, Owen; Pounds, Joel G.; Thrall, Brian D.

    2014-01-01

    testing the rapidly growing number of nanomaterials requires large scale use of in vitro systems under the presumption that these systems are sufficiently predictive or descriptive of responses in in vivo systems for effective use in hazard ranking. We hypothesized that improved relationships between in vitro and in vivo models of experimental toxicology for nanomaterials would result from placing response data in vitro and in vivo on the same dose scale, the amount of material associated with cells (target cell dose). Methods: Balb/c mice were exposed nose-only to an aerosol of 12.8 nm (68.6 nm CMD, 19.9 mg/m3, 4 hours) super paramagnetic iron oxide particles, target cell doses were calculated and biomarkers of response anchored with histological evidence were identified by global transcriptomics. Representative murine epithelial and macrophage cell types were exposed in vitro to the same material in liquid suspension for four hours and levels nanoparticle regulated cytokine transcripts identified in vivo were quantified as a function of measured nanoparticle cellular dose. Results. Target tissue doses of 0.009-0.4 μg SPIO/cm2 lung led to an inflammatory response in the alveolar region characterized by interstitial inflammation and macrophage infiltration. In vitro, higher target tissue doses of ~1.2-4 μg SPIO/ cm2 of cells were required to induce transcriptional regulation of markers of inflammation, CXCL2 CCL3, in C10 lung epithelial cells. Estimated in vivo macrophage SPIO nanoparticle doses ranged from 1-100 pg/cell, and induction of inflammatory markers was observed in vitro in macrophages at doses of 8-35 pg/cell. Conclusions: Application of target tissue dosimetry revealed good correspondence between target cell doses triggering inflammatory processes in vitro and in vivo in the alveolar macrophage population, but not in the epithelial cells of the alveolar region. These findings demonstrate the potential for target tissue dosimetry to enable the more

  7. Cellular processing of 125I- and 111in-labeled epidermal growth factor (EGF) bound to cultured A431 tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low molecular weight of epidermal growth factor (EGF) enables better intratumoral penetration in comparison with larger targeting proteins, but the cellular retention of EGF-associated radioactivity is poor for directly iodinated EGF. An attempt was made to improve intracellular retention by the use of metal-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid or nonphenolic linker (N-succinimidyl-para-iodobenzoate) as labeling agents. The use of nonphenolic linker did not improve retention of the radioactivity in A431 carcinoma cell line. The use of the radiometal label provided an appreciable prolongation of radioactivity residence inside the cell

  8. The cytotoxicity of polycationic iron oxide nanoparticles: Common endpoint assays and alternative approaches for improved understanding of cellular response mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoskins Clare

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (MNP's have an increasing number of biomedical applications. As such in vitro characterisation is essential to ensure the bio-safety of these particles. Little is known on the cellular interaction or effect on membrane integrity upon exposure to these MNPs. Here we synthesised Fe3O4 and surface coated with poly(ethylenimine (PEI and poly(ethylene glycol (PEG to achieve particles of varying surface positive charges and used them as model MNP's to evaluate the relative utility and limitations of cellular assays commonly applied for nanotoxicity assessment. An alternative approach, atomic force microscopy (AFM, was explored for the analysis of membrane structure and cell morphology upon interacting with the MNPs. The particles were tested in vitro on human SH-SY5Y, MCF-7 and U937 cell lines for reactive oxygen species (ROS production and lipid peroxidation (LPO, LDH leakage and their overall cytotoxic effect. These results were compared with AFM topography imaging carried out on fixed cell lines. Results Successful particle synthesis and coating were characterised using FTIR, PCS, TEM and ICP. The particle size from TEM was 30 nm (−16.9 mV which increased to 40 nm (+55.6 mV upon coating with PEI and subsequently 50 nm (+31.2 mV with PEG coating. Both particles showed excellent stability not only at neutral pH but also in acidic environment of pH 4.6 in the presence of sodium citrate. The higher surface charge MNP-PEI resulted in increased cytotoxic effect and ROS production on all cell lines compared with the MNP-PEI-PEG. In general the effect on the cell membrane integrity was observed only in SH-SY5Y and MCF-7 cells by MNP-PEI determined by LDH leakage and LPO production. AFM topography images showed consistently that both the highly charged MNP-PEI and the less charged MNP-PEI-PEG caused cell morphology changes possibly due to membrane disruption and cytoskeleton remodelling. Conclusions

  9. Analysis on Traffic Conflicts of Two-lane Highway Based on Improved Cellular Automation Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiru Tang

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Based on microscopic traffic characteristics of two-lane highway and different driving characteristics for drivers, the characteristics of drivers and vehicle structure are introduced into Cellular Automation model for establishing new Cellular Automation model of two-lane highway. Through computer simulation, the paper analyzes the effect of the promotion of different vehicles, drivers and arrival rates on traffic conflicts of two-lane highway, which gets the relationship between the parameters such as road traffic and velocity variance and collision. The results indicate that the frequency of traffic conflicts has close relationship with the product of traffic flow and velocity variation. When the traffic flow and velocity variation are great, the frequency of the conflict is the greatest, and when the traffic flow and velocity variation are little, the frequency of the conflict is the least.

  10. Signaling pathways involved in PDGF-evoked cellular responses in human RPE cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We examined whether PDGF may directly stimulate the expression of VEGF by retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells in vitro, and the involvement of three signal transduction pathways in the regulation of PDGF-evoked cell proliferation, migration, and production of VEGF-A was investigated. PDGF stimulated the gene and protein expression of VEGF-A by RPE cells, and increased cell proliferation and chemotaxis. PDGF activated all signaling pathways investigated, as determined by increased phosphorylation levels of ERK1/2, p38, and Akt proteins. The three signaling pathways were involved in the mediation of PDGF-evoked cell proliferation, while p38 and PI3K mediated cell migration, and PI3K mediated secretion of VEGF-A. In addition to VEGF-A, the cells expressed mRNAs for various members of the VEGF family and for their receptors, including VEGF-B, -C, -D, flt-1, and KDR. The data indicate that PDGF selectively stimulates the expression of VEGF-A in RPE cells. PDGF evokes at least three signal transduction pathways which are differentially involved in various cellular responses

  11. Cellular and molecular remodelling of a host cell for vertical transmission of bacterial symbionts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Jun-Bo; Shan, Hong-Wei; Isermann, Philipp; Huang, Jia-Hsin; Lammerding, Jan; Liu, Shu-Sheng; Douglas, Angela E.

    2016-01-01

    Various insects require intracellular bacteria that are restricted to specialized cells (bacteriocytes) and are transmitted vertically via the female ovary, but the transmission mechanisms are obscure. We hypothesized that, in the whitefly Bemisia tabaci, where intact bacteriocytes (and not isolated bacteria) are transferred to oocytes, the transmission mechanism would be evident as cellular and molecular differences between the nymph (pre-adult) and adult bacteriocytes. We demonstrate dramatic remodelling of bacteriocytes at the developmental transition from nymph to adulthood. This transition involves the loss of cell–cell adhesion, high division rates to constant cell size and onset of cell mobility, enabling the bacteriocytes to crawl to the ovaries. These changes are accompanied by cytoskeleton reorganization and changes in gene expression: genes functioning in cell–cell adhesion display reduced expression and genes involved in cell division, cell motility and endocytosis/exocytosis have elevated expression in adult bacteriocytes, relative to nymph bacteriocytes. This study demonstrates, for the first time, how developmentally orchestrated remodelling of gene expression and correlated changes in cell behaviour underpin the capacity of bacteriocytes to mediate the vertical transmission and persistence of the symbiotic bacteria on which the insect host depends. PMID:27358364

  12. Precision automation of cell type classification and sub-cellular fluorescence quantification from laser scanning confocal images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hardy Craig Hall

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available While novel whole-plant phenotyping technologies have been successfully implemented into functional genomics and breeding programs, the potential of automated phenotyping with cellular resolution is largely unexploited. Laser scanning confocal microscopy has the potential to close this gap by providing spatially highly resolved images containing anatomic as well as chemical information on a subcellular basis. However, in the absence of automated methods, the assessment of the spatial patterns and abundance of fluorescent markers with subcellular resolution is still largely qualitative and time-consuming. Recent advances in image acquisition and analysis, coupled with improvements in microprocessor performance, have brought such automated methods within reach, so that information from thousands of cells per image for hundreds of images may be derived in an experimentally convenient time-frame. Here, we present a MATLAB-based analytical pipeline to 1 segment radial plant organs into individual cells, 2 classify cells into cell type categories based upon random forest classification, 3 divide each cell into sub-regions, and 4 quantify fluorescence intensity to a subcellular degree of precision for a separate fluorescence channel. In this research advance, we demonstrate the precision of this analytical process for the relatively complex tissues of Arabidopsis hypocotyls at various stages of development. High speed and robustness make our approach suitable for phenotyping of large collections of stem-like material and other tissue types.

  13. Precise quantification of cellular uptake of cell-penetrating peptides using fluorescence-activated cell sorting and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezgui, Rachid; Blumer, Katy; Yeoh-Tan, Gilbert; Trexler, Adam J; Magzoub, Mazin

    2016-07-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) have emerged as a potentially powerful tool for drug delivery due to their ability to efficiently transport a whole host of biologically active cargoes into cells. Although concerted efforts have shed some light on the cellular internalization pathways of CPPs, quantification of CPP uptake has proved problematic. Here we describe an experimental approach that combines two powerful biophysical techniques, fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), to directly, accurately and precisely measure the cellular uptake of fluorescently-labeled molecules. This rapid and technically simple approach is highly versatile and can readily be applied to characterize all major CPP properties that normally require multiple assays, including amount taken up by cells (in moles/cell), uptake efficiency, internalization pathways, intracellular distribution, intracellular degradation and toxicity threshold. The FACS-FCS approach provides a means for quantifying any intracellular biochemical entity, whether expressed in the cell or introduced exogenously and transported across the plasma membrane. PMID:27033412

  14. Improved biolistic transfection of hair cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyu Zhao

    Full Text Available Transient transfection of hair cells has proven challenging. Here we describe modifications to the Bio-Rad Helios Gene Gun that, along with an optimized protocol, improve transfection of bullfrog, chick, and mouse hair cells. The increased penetrating power afforded by our method allowed us to transfect mouse hair cells from the basal side, through the basilar membrane; this configuration protects hair bundles from damage during the procedure. We characterized the efficiency of transfection of mouse hair cells with fluorescently-tagged actin fusion protein using both the optimized procedure and a published procedure; while the efficiency of the two methods was similar, the morphology of transfected hair cells was improved with the new procedure. In addition, using the improved method, we were able to transfect hair cells in the bullfrog sacculus and chick cochlea for the first time. We used fluorescent-protein fusions of harmonin b (USH1C and PMCA2 (ATP2B2; plasma-membrane Ca(2+-ATPase isoform 2 to examine protein distribution in hair cells. While PMCA2-EGFP localization was similar to endogenous PMCA2 detected with antibodies, high levels of harmonin-EGFP were found at stereocilia tapers in bullfrog and chick, but not mouse; by contrast, harmonin-EGFP was concentrated in stereocilia tips in mouse hair cells.

  15. A new adenovirus based vaccine vector expressing an Eimeria tenella derived TLR agonist improves cellular immune responses to an antigenic target.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel M Appledorn

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Adenoviral based vectors remain promising vaccine platforms for use against numerous pathogens, including HIV. Recent vaccine trials utilizing Adenovirus based vaccines expressing HIV antigens confirmed induction of cellular immune responses, but these responses failed to prevent HIV infections in vaccinees. This illustrates the need to develop vaccine formulations capable of generating more potent T-cell responses to HIV antigens, such as HIV-Gag, since robust immune responses to this antigen correlate with improved outcomes in long-term non-progressor HIV infected individuals. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study we designed a novel vaccine strategy utilizing an Ad-based vector expressing a potent TLR agonist derived from Eimeria tenella as an adjuvant to improve immune responses from a [E1-]Ad-based HIV-Gag vaccine. Our results confirm that expression of rEA elicits significantly increased TLR mediated innate immune responses as measured by the influx of plasma cytokines and chemokines, and activation of innate immune responding cells. Furthermore, our data show that the quantity and quality of HIV-Gag specific CD8(+ and CD8(- T-cell responses were significantly improved when coupled with rEA expression. These responses also correlated with a significantly increased number of HIV-Gag derived epitopes being recognized by host T cells. Finally, functional assays confirmed that rEA expression significantly improved antigen specific CTL responses, in vivo. Moreover, we show that these improved responses were dependent upon improved TLR pathway interactions. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The data presented in this study illustrate the potential utility of Ad-based vectors expressing TLR agonists to improve clinical outcomes dependent upon induction of robust, antigen specific immune responses.

  16. A generic screening platform for inhibitors of virus induced cell fusion using cellular electrical impedance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watterson, Daniel; Robinson, Jodie; Chappell, Keith J; Butler, Mark S; Edwards, David J; Fry, Scott R; Bermingham, Imogen M; Cooper, Matthew A; Young, Paul R

    2016-01-01

    Fusion of the viral envelope with host cell membranes is an essential step in the life cycle of all enveloped viruses. Despite such a clear target for antiviral drug development, few anti-fusion drugs have progressed to market. One significant hurdle is the absence of a generic, high-throughput, reproducible fusion assay. Here we report that real time, label-free measurement of cellular electrical impedance can quantify cell-cell fusion mediated by either individually expressed recombinant viral fusion proteins, or native virus infection. We validated this approach for all three classes of viral fusion and demonstrated utility in quantifying fusion inhibition using antibodies and small molecule inhibitors specific for dengue virus and respiratory syncytial virus. PMID:26976324

  17. The effect of diamide on potassium transport and cellular morphology in mouse L-cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of diamide (diazenedicarboxylic acid bis (N,N'-dimethylamide)) on the transport of potassium in mouse L-cells have been investigated using 86Rb+ as a tracer. Active, ouabain-sensitive uptake is reduced after 0.4 to 0.6 mol/L diamide treatment. The size of reduction depends on the temperature and the presence of glucose in the medium. These results suggest that the elimination of reduced glutathione by diamide is the major factor controlling the level of K+ transport in treated L-cells. In addition to decreasing active transport, diamide produces dramatic changes in cellular ultrastructure, probably through altered Na+/K+ balance and its action on tubulin. Clear organelle-free regions appear surrounded by vacuoles and swollen mitkchondria regions. The clear areas of cytoplasm eventually pinch off from the cell

  18. Roles of neural precursor cell expressed, developmentally downregulated 9 in tumor-associated cellular processes (Review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Sisen; Wu, Lihua

    2015-11-01

    Neural precursor cell expressed, developmentally downregulated 9 (NEDD9), a gene exclusively expressed in the brain during embryonic stages but not in brains of adult mice, is an important cytoskeletal protein and regarded as a 'router/hub' in cellular signal transduction processes connecting external stimulation signals with downstream target proteins that can directly promote tumor metastasis. Numerous studies showed that NEDD9 has an essential role in cell proliferation, apoptosis, adhesion, migration and invasion. The roles of NEDD9, including the underlying mechanisms of its regulation of cell migration, its distinctive functions in various tumor stages and its association with other diseases, are required to be elucidated at large. Future studies of NEDD9 may provide a more profound understanding of the development of tumor invasiveness and NEDD9 may serve as a potential novel target for tumor therapy. The present review examined the significant roles of NEDD9 in the abovementioned processes. PMID:26324022

  19. Commonly consumed and specialty dietary mushrooms reduce cellular proliferation in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Keith R; Brophy, Sara K

    2010-11-01

    Worldwide, over one million women will be newly diagnosed with breast cancer in the next year. Moreover, breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in the USA. An accumulating body of evidence suggests that consumption of dietary mushrooms can protect against breast cancer. In this study, we tested and compared the ability of five commonly consumed or specialty mushrooms to modulate cell number balance in the cancer process using MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. Hot water extracts (80°C for 2 h) of maitake (MT, Grifola frondosa), crimini (CRIM, Agaricus bisporus), portabella (PORT, Agaricus bisporus), oyster (OYS, Pleurotus ostreatus) and white button (WB, Agaricus bisporus) mushrooms or water alone (5% v/v) were incubated for 24 h with MCF-7 cells. Cellular proliferation determined by bromodeoxyuridine incorporation was significantly (P mushrooms, with MT and OYS being the most effective. MTT (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) reduction, an often used mitochondrion-dependent marker of proliferation, was unchanged although decreased (P > 0.05) by 15% with OYS extract. Lactate dehydrogenase release, as a marker of necrosis, was significantly increased after incubation with MT but not with other test mushrooms. Furthermore, MT extract significantly increased apoptosis, or programmed cell death, as determined by terminal deoxynucleotidyl end labeling method, whereas other test mushrooms displayed trends of ∼15%. The total numbers of cells per flask, determined by hemacytometry, were not different from control cultures. Overall, all test mushrooms significantly suppressed cellular proliferation, with MT further significantly inducing apoptosis and cytotoxicity in human breast cancer cells. This suggests that both common and specialty mushrooms may be chemoprotective against breast cancer. PMID:20921274

  20. Cellular Response to Bleomycin-Induced DNA Damage in Human Fibroblast Cells in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Tao; Zhang, Ye; Wong, Michael; Stodieck, Louis; Karouia, Fathi; Wu, Honglu

    2015-01-01

    Outside the protection of the geomagnetic field, astronauts and other living organisms are constantly exposed to space radiation that consists of energetic protons and other heavier charged particles. Whether spaceflight factors, microgravity in particular, have effects on cellular responses to DNA damage induced by exposure to radiation or cytotoxic chemicals is still unknown, as is their impact on the radiation risks for astronauts and on the mutation rate in microorganisms. Although possible synergistic effects of space radiation and other spaceflight factors have been investigated since the early days of the human space program, the published results were mostly conflicting and inconsistent. To investigate effects of spaceflight on cellular responses to DNA damages, human fibroblast cells flown to the International Space Station (ISS) were treated with bleomycin for three hours in the true microgravity environment, which induced DNA damages including double-strand breaks (DSB) similar to the ionizing radiation. Damages in the DNA were measured by the phosphorylation of a histone protein H2AX (g-H2AX), which showed slightly more foci in the cells on ISS than in the ground control. The expression of genes involved in DNA damage response was also analyzed using the PCR array. Although a number of the genes, including CDKN1A and PCNA, were significantly altered in the cells after bleomycin treatment, no significant difference in the expression profile of DNA damage response genes was found between the flight and ground samples. At the time of the bleomycin treatment, the cells on the ISS were found to be proliferating faster than the ground control as measured by the percentage of cells containing positive Ki-67 signals. Our results suggested that the difference in g-H2AX focus counts between flight and ground was due to the faster growth rate of the cells in space, but spaceflight did not affect initial transcriptional responses of the DNA damage response genes to

  1. Aldolase B knockdown prevents high glucose-induced methylglyoxal overproduction and cellular dysfunction in endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianghai Liu

    Full Text Available We used cultured endothelial cells as a model to examine whether up-regulation of aldolase B and enhanced methylglyoxal (MG formation play an important role in high glucose-induced overproduction of advanced glycosylation endproducts (AGEs, oxidative stress and cellular dysfunction. High glucose (25 mM incubation up-regulated mRNA levels of aldose reductase (an enzyme converting glucose to fructose and aldolase B (a key enzyme that catalyzes MG formation from fructose and enhanced MG formation in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs and HUVEC-derived EA. hy926 cells. High glucose-increased MG production in EA. hy926 cells was completely prevented by siRNA knockdown of aldolase B, but unaffected by siRNA knockdown of aldolase A, an enzyme responsible for MG formation during glycolysis. In addition, inhibition of cytochrome P450 2E1 or semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase which produces MG during the metabolism of lipid and proteins, respectively, did not alter MG production. Both high glucose (25 mM and MG (30, 100 µM increased the formation of N(ε-carboxyethyl-lysine (CEL, a MG-induced AGE, oxidative stress (determined by the generation of oxidized DCF, H(2O(2, protein carbonyls and 8-oxo-dG, O-GlcNAc modification (product of the hexosamine pathway, membrane protein kinase C activity and nuclear translocation of NF-κB in EA. hy926 cells. However, the above metabolic and signaling alterations induced by high glucose were completely prevented by knockdown of aldolase B and partially by application of aminoguanidine (a MG scavenger or alagebrium (an AGEs breaker. In conclusion, efficient inhibition of aldolase B can prevent high glucose-induced overproduction of MG and related cellular dysfunction in endothelial cells.

  2. Differential Cellular and Molecular Effects of Butyrate and Trichostatin A on Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasturi Ranganna

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitors, butyrate and trichostatin A (TSA, are epigenetic histone modifiers and proliferation inhibitors by downregulating cyclin D1, a positive cell cycle regulator, and upregulating p21Cip1 and INK family of proteins, negative cell cycle regulators. Our recent study indicated cyclin D1 upregulation in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC that are proliferation-arrested by butyrate. Here we investigate whether cyclin D1 upregulation is a unique response of VSMC to butyrate or a general response to HDAC inhibitors (HDACi by evaluating the effects of butyrate and TSA on VSMC. While butyrate and TSA inhibit VSMC proliferation via cytostatic and cytotoxic effects, respectively, they downregulate cdk4, cdk6, and cdk2, and upregulate cyclin D3, p21Cip1 and p15INK4B, and cause similar effects on key histone H3 posttranslational modifications. Conversely, cyclin D1 is upregulated by butyrate and inhibited by TSA. Assessment of glycogen synthase 3-dependent phosphorylation, subcellular localization and transcription of cyclin D1 indicates that differential effects of butyrate and TSA on cyclin D1 levels are linked to disparity in cyclin D1 gene expression. Disparity in butyrate- and TSA-induced cyclin D1 may influence transcriptional regulation of genes that are associated with changes in cellular morphology/cellular effects that these HDACi confer on VSMC, as a transcriptional modulator.

  3. An integrated cellular model to evaluate cytotoxic effects in mammalian cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández Freire, P; Peropadre, A; Pérez Martín, J M; Herrero, O; Hazen, M J

    2009-12-01

    The ever growing anthropogenic pressure to the environment has lead in 2007 to the revision of the existing legislation and the approval of the new European law regarding the production and importation of chemicals, known as REACH. This new legal framework supports the development of alternative methods to animal experimentation encouraging the improvement and/or design of new methodological strategies for the toxicological evaluation of chemical compounds. Even though cytotoxicity studies are a reductionist approach to acute toxicity in vivo, they offer the best agreement between obtaining relevant information about the mechanism of toxic action and the use of alternative methods. Following this trend, this work presents an integrated cellular strategy in order to know the toxicity and mechanism of action of chemical compounds, using simple and reproducible in vitro systems. The experimental procedures are performed in two steps. The first one involves the systematic analysis of the main cellular targets using proliferation, viability and morphological probes. The second step relies upon the results obtained in the first step, including specific assays that focus on the mechanism of toxic action and the cellular response. The benefits of this strategy are exemplified with two real cases: pentachlorophenol and rotenone. PMID:19540333

  4. Early Passage Dependence of Mesenchymal Stem Cell Mechanics Influences Cellular Invasion and Migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spagnol, Stephen T; Lin, Wei-Chun; Booth, Elizabeth A; Ladoux, Benoit; Lazarus, Hillard M; Dahl, Kris Noel

    2016-07-01

    The cellular structures and mechanical properties of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) vary significantly during culture and with differentiation. Previously, studies to measure mechanics have provided divergent results using different quantitative parameters and mechanical models of deformation. Here, we examine hMSCs prepared for clinical use and subject them to mechanical testing conducive to the relevant deformability associated with clinical injection procedures. Micropipette aspiration of hMSCs shows deformation as a viscoelastic fluid, with little variation from cell to cell within a population. After two passages, hMSCs deform as viscoelastic solids. Further, for clinical applicability during stem cell migration in vivo, we investigated the ability of hMSCs to invade into micropillar arrays of increasing confinement from 12 to 8 μm spacing between adjacent micropillars. We find that hMSC samples with reduced deformability and cells that are more solid-like with passage are more easily able to enter the micropillar arrays. Increased cell fluidity is an advantage for injection procedures and optimization of cell selection based on mechanical properties may enhance efficacy of injected hMSC populations. However, the ability to invade and migrate within tight interstitial spaces appears to be increased with a more solidified cytoskeleton, likely from increased force generation and contractility. Thus, there may be a balance between optimal injection survival and in situ tissue invasion. PMID:26581348

  5. Arylamine N-acetyltransferase activity in bronchial epithelial cells and its inhibition by cellular oxidants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bronchial epithelial cells express xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes (XMEs) that are involved in the biotransformation of inhaled toxic compounds. The activities of these XMEs in the lung may modulate respiratory toxicity and have been linked to several diseases of the airways. Arylamine N-acetyltransferases (NAT) are conjugating XMEs that play a key role in the biotransformation of aromatic amine pollutants such as the tobacco-smoke carcinogens 4-aminobiphenyl (4-ABP) and β-naphthylamine (β-NA). We show here that functional human NAT1 or its murine counterpart Nat2 are present in different lung epithelial cells i.e. Clara cells, type II alveolar cells and bronchial epithelial cells, thus indicating that inhaled aromatic amines may undergo NAT-dependent biotransformation in lung epithelium. Exposure of these cells to pathophysiologically relevant amounts of oxidants known to contribute to lung dysfunction, such as H2O2 or peroxynitrite, was found to impair the NAT1/Nat2-dependent cellular biotransformation of aromatic amines. Genetic and non genetic impairment of intracellular NAT enzyme activities has been suggested to compromise the important detoxification pathway of aromatic amine N-acetylation and subsequently to contribute to an exacerbation of untoward effects of these pollutants on health. Our study suggests that oxidative/nitroxidative stress in lung epithelial cells, due to air pollution and/or inflammation, could contribute to local and/or systemic dysfunctions through the alteration of the functions of pulmonary NAT enzymes.

  6. Resveratrol induces cellular senescence with attenuated mono-ubiquitination of histone H2B in glioma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → Resveratrol induces cellular senescence in glioma cell. → Resveratrol inhibits mono-ubiquitination of histone H2B at K120. → Depletion of RNF20, phenocopies the inhibitory effects of resveratrol. → Mono-ubiquitination of histone H2B at K120 is a novel target of resveratrol. → RNF20 inhibits cellular senescence in proliferating glioma cells. -- Abstract: Resveratrol (3,4',5-trihydroxy-trans-stilbene), a polyphenol naturally occurring in grapes and other plants, has cancer chemo-preventive effects and therapeutic potential. Although resveratrol modulates multiple pathways in tumor cells, how resveratrol or its affected pathways converge on chromatin to mediate its effects is not known. Using glioma cells as a model, we showed here that resveratrol inhibited cell proliferation and induced cellular hypertrophy by transforming spindle-shaped cells to enlarged, irregular and flatten-shaped ones. We further showed that resveratrol-induced hypertrophic cells expressed senescence-associated-β-galactosidase, suggesting that resveratrol-induced cellular senescence in glioma cells. Consistent with these observations, we demonstrated that resveratrol inhibited clonogenic efficiencies in vitro and tumor growth in a xenograft model. Furthermore, we found that acute treatment of resveratrol inhibited mono-ubiquitination of histone H2B at K120 (uH2B) in breast, prostate, pancreatic, lung, brain tumor cells as well as primary human cells. Chronic treatment with low doses of resveratrol also inhibited uH2B in the resveratrol-induced senescent glioma cells. Moreover, we showed that depletion of RNF20, a ubiquitin ligase of histone H2B, inhibited uH2B and induced cellular senescence in glioma cells in vitro, thereby recapitulated the effects of resveratrol. Taken together, our results suggest that uH2B is a novel direct or indirect chromatin target of resveratrol and RNF20 plays an important role in inhibiting cellular senescence programs that are

  7. Adsorption of hematite nanoparticles onto Caco-2 cells and the cellular impairments: effect of particle size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The increasing applications of engineered nanomaterials nowadays have elevated the potential of human exposure through various routes including inhalation, skin penetration and digestion. To date there is scarce information on a quantitative description of the interactions between nanoparticles (NPs) and cell surfaces and the detrimental effects from the exposure. The purpose of this work was to study in vitro exposure of Caco-2 cells to hematite (α-Fe2O3) NPs and to determine the particle size effects on the adsorption behaviors. Cellular impairment was also investigated and compared. Hematite NPs were synthesized as part of this study with a discrete size distribution and uniform morphology examined by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Caco-2 cells were cultured as a model epithelium to mirror human intestinal cells and used to evaluate the impacts of the exposure to NPs by measuring transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER). Cell surface disruption, localization and translocation of NPs through the cells were analyzed with immunocytochemical staining and confocal microscopy. Results showed that hematite NPs had mean diameters of 26, 53, 76 and 98 nm and were positively charged with minor aggregation in the buffer solution. Adsorption of the four sizes of NPs on cells reached equilibrium within approximately 5 min but adsorption kinetics were found to be size-dependent. The adsorption rates expressed as mg m-2 min-1 were greater for large NPs (76 and 98 nm) than those for small NPs (26 and 53 nm). However, adsorption rates, expressed in units of m-2 min-1, were much greater for small NPs than large ones. After the adsorption equilibrium was reached, the adsorbed mass of NPs on a unit area of cells was calculated and showed no significant size dependence. Longer exposure time (>3 h) induced adverse cellular effects as indicated by the drop in TEER compared to the control cells without the exposure to NPs

  8. Space experiment "Cellular Responses to Radiation in Space (CellRad)": Hardware and biological system tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellweg, Christine E; Dilruba, Shahana; Adrian, Astrid; Feles, Sebastian; Schmitz, Claudia; Berger, Thomas; Przybyla, Bartos; Briganti, Luca; Franz, Markus; Segerer, Jürgen; Spitta, Luis F; Henschenmacher, Bernd; Konda, Bikash; Diegeler, Sebastian; Baumstark-Khan, Christa; Panitz, Corinna; Reitz, Günther

    2015-11-01

    One factor contributing to the high uncertainty in radiation risk assessment for long-term space missions is the insufficient knowledge about possible interactions of radiation with other spaceflight environmental factors. Such factors, e.g. microgravity, have to be considered as possibly additive or even synergistic factors in cancerogenesis. Regarding the effects of microgravity on signal transduction, it cannot be excluded that microgravity alters the cellular response to cosmic radiation, which comprises a complex network of signaling pathways. The purpose of the experiment "Cellular Responses to Radiation in Space" (CellRad, formerly CERASP) is to study the effects of combined exposure to microgravity, radiation and general space flight conditions on mammalian cells, in particular Human Embryonic Kidney (HEK) cells that are stably transfected with different plasmids allowing monitoring of proliferation and the Nuclear Factor κB (NF-κB) pathway by means of fluorescent proteins. The cells will be seeded on ground in multiwell plate units (MPUs), transported to the ISS, and irradiated by an artificial radiation source after an adaptation period at 0 × g and 1 × g. After different incubation periods, the cells will be fixed by pumping a formaldehyde solution into the MPUs. Ground control samples will be treated in the same way. For implementation of CellRad in the Biolab on the International Space Station (ISS), tests of the hardware and the biological systems were performed. The sequence of different steps in MPU fabrication (cutting, drilling, cleaning, growth surface coating, and sterilization) was optimized in order to reach full biocompatibility. Different coatings of the foil used as growth surface revealed that coating with 0.1 mg/ml poly-D-lysine supports cell attachment better than collagen type I. The tests of prototype hardware (Science Model) proved its full functionality for automated medium change, irradiation and fixation of cells. Exposure of

  9. Assessment of Membrane Fluidity Fluctuations during Cellular Development Reveals Time and Cell Type Specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noutsi, Pakiza; Gratton, Enrico; Chaieb, Sahraoui

    2016-01-01

    Cell membrane is made up of a complex structure of lipids and proteins that diffuse laterally giving rise to what we call membrane fluidity. During cellular development, such as differentiation cell membranes undergo dramatic fluidity changes induced by proteins such as ARC and Cofilin among others. In this study we used the generalized polarization (GP) property of fluorescent probe Laurdan using two-photon microscopy to determine membrane fluidity as a function of time and for various cell lines. A low GP value corresponds to a higher fluidity and a higher GP value is associated with a more rigid membrane. Four different cell lines were monitored such as hN2, NIH3T3, HEK293 and L6 cells. Membrane fluidity was measured at 12h, 72h and 92 h. Our results show significant changes in membrane fluidity among all cell types at different time points. GP values tend to increase significantly within 92 h in hN2 cells and 72 h in NIH3T3 cells and only at 92 h in HEK293 cells. L6 showed a marked decrease in membrane fluidity at 72 h and starts to increase at 92 h. As expected, NIH3T3 cells have more rigid membrane at earlier time points. On the other hand, neurons tend to have the highest membrane fluidity at early time points emphasizing its correlation with plasticity and the need for this malleability during differentiation. This study sheds light on the involvement of membrane fluidity during neuronal differentiation and development of other cell lines. PMID:27362860

  10. Assessment of Membrane Fluidity Fluctuations during Cellular Development Reveals Time and Cell Type Specificity

    KAUST Repository

    Noutsi, Pakiza

    2016-06-30

    Cell membrane is made up of a complex structure of lipids and proteins that diffuse laterally giving rise to what we call membrane fluidity. During cellular development, such as differentiation cell membranes undergo dramatic fluidity changes induced by proteins such as ARC and Cofilin among others. In this study we used the generalized polarization (GP) property of fluorescent probe Laurdan using two-photon microscopy to determine membrane fluidity as a function of time and for various cell lines. A low GP value corresponds to a higher fluidity and a higher GP value is associated with a more rigid membrane. Four different cell lines were monitored such as hN2, NIH3T3, HEK293 and L6 cells. Membrane fluidity was measured at 12h, 72h and 92 h. Our results show significant changes in membrane fluidity among all cell types at different time points. GP values tend to increase significantly within 92 h in hN2 cells and 72 h in NIH3T3 cells and only at 92 h in HEK293 cells. L6 showed a marked decrease in membrane fluidity at 72 h and starts to increase at 92 h. As expected, NIH3T3 cells have more rigid membrane at earlier time points. On the other hand, neurons tend to have the highest membrane fluidity at early time points emphasizing its correlation with plasticity and the need for this malleability during differentiation. This study sheds light on the involvement of membrane fluidity during neuronal differentiation and development of other cell lines.

  11. Nanocoating of single cells: from maintenance of cell viability to manipulation of cellular activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji Hun; Yang, Sung Ho; Lee, Juno; Ko, Eun Hyea; Hong, Daewha; Choi, Insung S

    2014-04-01

    The chronological progresses in single-cell nanocoating are described. The historical developments in the field are divided into biotemplating, cytocompatible nanocoating, and cells in nano-nutshells, depending on the main research focuses. Each subfield is discussed in conjunction with the others, regarding how and why to manipulate living cells by nanocoating at the single-cell level. PMID:24452932

  12. Multi-color fluorescence imaging of sub-cellular dynamics of cancer cells in live mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Robert M.

    2006-02-01

    We have genetically engineered dual-color fluorescent cells with one color in the nucleus and the other in the cytoplasm that enables real-time nuclear-cytoplasmic dynamics to be visualized in living cells in the cytoplasm in vivo as well as in vitro. To obtain the dual-color cells, red fluorescent protein (RFP) was expressed of the cancer cells, and green fluorescent protein (GFP) linked to histone H2B was expressed in the nucleus. Mitotic cells were visualized by whole-body imaging after injection in the mouse ear. Common carotid artery or heart injection of dual-color cells and a reversible skin flap enabled the external visualization of the dual-color cells in microvessels in the mouse where extreme elongation of the cell body as well as the nucleus occurred. The migration velocities of the dual-color cancer cells in the capillaries were measured by capturing individual images of the dual-color fluorescent cells over time. Human HCT-116-GFP-RFP colon cancer and mouse mammary tumor (MMT)-GFP-RFP cells were injected in the portal vein of nude mice. Extensive clasmocytosis (destruction of the cytoplasm) of the HCT-116-GFP-RFP cells occurred within 6 hours. The data suggest rapid death of HCT-116-GFP-RFP cells in the portal vein. In contrast, MMT-GFP-RFP cells injected into the portal vein mostly survived and formed colonies in the liver. However, when the host mice were pretreated with cyclophosphamide, the HCT-116-GFP-RFP cells also survived and formed colonies in the liver after portal vein injection. These results suggest that a cyclophosphamide-sensitive host cellular system attacked the HCT-116-GFP-RFP cells but could not effectively kill the MMT-GFP-RFP cells. With the ability to continuously image cancer cells at the subcellular level in the live animal, our understanding of the complex steps of metastasis will significantly increase. In addition, new drugs can be developed to target these newly visible steps of metastasis.

  13. A mathematical model of radiation-induced responses in a cellular population including cell-to-cell communications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cell-to-cell communication is an important factor for understanding the mechanisms of radiation-induced responses such as bystander effects. In this study, a new mathematical model of intercellular signalling between individual cells in a cellular population is proposed. The authors considered two types of transmission of signals: via culture medium and via gap junction. They focus on the effects that radiation and intercellular signalling have on cell-cycle modification. The cell cycle is represented as a virtual clock that includes several checkpoint pathways within a cyclic process. They also develop a grid model and set up diffusion equations to model the propagation of signals to and from spatially located cells. The authors have also considered the role that DNA damage plays in the cycle of cells which can progress through the cell cycle or stop at the G1, S, G2 or M-phase checkpoints. Results of testing show that the proposed model can simulate intercellular signalling and cell-cycle progression in individual cells during and after irradiation. (authors)

  14. Pb-induced cellular defense system in the root meristematic cells of Allium sativum L

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Donghua

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Electron microscopy (EM techniques enable identification of the main accumulations of lead (Pb in cells and cellular organelles and observations of changes in cell ultrastructure. Although there is extensive literature relating to studies on the influence of heavy metals on plants, Pb tolerance strategies of plants have not yet been fully explained. Allium sativum L. is a potential plant for absorption and accumulation of heavy metals. In previous investigations the effects of different concentrations (10-5 to 10-3 M of Pb were investigated in A. sativum, indicating a significant inhibitory effect on shoot and root growth at 10-3 to 10-4 M Pb. In the present study, we used EM and cytochemistry to investigate ultrastructural alterations, identify the synthesis and distribution of cysteine-rich proteins induced by Pb and explain the possible mechanisms of the Pb-induced cellular defense system in A. sativum. Results After 1 h of Pb treatment, dictyosomes were accompanied by numerous vesicles within cytoplasm. The endoplasm reticulum (ER with swollen cisternae was arranged along the cell wall after 2 h. Some flattened cisternae were broken up into small closed vesicles and the nuclear envelope was generally more dilated after 4 h. During 24-36 h, phenomena appeared such as high vacuolization of cytoplasm and electron-dense granules in cell walls, vacuoles, cytoplasm and mitochondrial membranes. Other changes included mitochondrial swelling and loss of cristae, and vacuolization of ER and dictyosomes during 48-72 h. In the Pb-treatment groups, silver grains were observed in cell walls and in cytoplasm, suggesting the Gomori-Swift reaction can indirectly evaluate the Pb effects on plant cells. Conclusions Cell walls can immobilize some Pb ions. Cysteine-rich proteins in cell walls were confirmed by the Gomori-Swift reaction. The morphological alterations in plasma membrane, dictyosomes and ER reflect the features of detoxification

  15. Highlighting a Need to Distinguish Cell Cycle Signatures from Cellular Responses to Chemotherapeutics in SR-FTIR Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    C Hughes, M D Brown, P Dumas, N W Clarke, K R Flower and P Gardner

    2012-01-01

    Previous research has seen difficulties in establishing clear discrimination by principal component analysis (PCA) between drug-treated cells analysed by single point SR-FTIR spectroscopy, relative to multisampling cell monolayers by conventional FTIR. It is suggested that the issue arises due to signal mixing between cellular-response signatures and cell cycle phase contributions in individual cells. Consequently, chemometric distinction of cell spectra treated with multiple drugs is difficu...

  16. Sodium Glucose Cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) Plays as a Physiological Glucose Sensor and Regulates Cellular Contractility in Rat Mesangial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Masanori Wakisaka; Tetsuhiko Nagao; Mototaka Yoshinari

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Mesangial cells play an important role in regulating glomerular filtration by altering their cellular tone. We report the presence of a sodium glucose cotransporter (SGLT) in rat mesangial cells. This study in rat mesangial cells aimed to evaluate the expression and role of SGLT2. Methods The SGLT2 expression in rat mesangial cells was assessed by Western blotting and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Changes in the mesangial cell surface area at different gluc...

  17. Cellular heredity in haploid cultures of somatic cells. Progress report, August 1978-September 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the past year we have continued our studies of the relation of ultraviolet mutagenesis to DNA repair in cultures of the haploid frog cell line ICR 2A. Our method of irradiation of cells in suspension was improved by construction of an improved detector with major sensitivity to the 254 nm Hg resonance line, to give better estimates of actual exposure of the cells. Using this method, dose-response and dose-fractionation studies on irradiation of ouabain resistance were carried out. The uv induction of this phenotype in the ICR 2A cell line was found to be less than that necessary for adequate analysis of dose-response curves. Cell fusion experiments using frog and mouse cells revealed an enhancement of mutagenesis in the mouse parent that will be explored in further work

  18. Cellular heredity in haploid cultures of somatic cells. Progress report, August 1978-September 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the past year, studies were continued on the relation of ultraviolet mutagenesis to DNA repair in cultures of the haploid frog cell line ICR 2A. The method of irradiation of cells in suspension was improved by construction of an improved detector with major sensitivity to the 254 nm Hg resonance line, to give better estimates of actual exposure of the cells. Using this method, dose-response and dose-fractionation studies on irradiation of ouabain resistance were carried out. The uv induction of this phenotype in the ICR 2A cell line was found to be less than that necessary for adequate analysis of dose-response curves. Cell fusion experiments using frog and mouse cells revealed an enhancement of mutagenesis in the mouse parent that will be explored in further work

  19. Cellular radiosensitivity of primary and metastatic human uveal melanoma cell lines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.J.M.J. van den Aardweg (Gerard J. M.); N.C. Naus (Nicole); A.C. Verhoeven; J.E.M.M. de Klein (Annelies); G.P.M. Luyten (Gré)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractPURPOSE: To investigate the radiosensitivity of uveal melanoma cell lines by a clonogenic survival assay, to improve the efficiency of the radiation regimen. METHODS: Four primary and four metastatic human uveal melanoma cell lines were cultured in the presence of condi

  20. A molecular roadmap of cellular reprogramming into iPS cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polo, Jose M.; Anderssen, Endre; Walsh, Ryan M.; Schwarz, Benjamin A.; Nefzger, Christian M.; Lim, Sue Mei; Borkent, Marti; Apostolou, Effie; Alaei, Sara; Cloutier, Jennifer; Bar-Nur, Ori; Cheloufi, Sihem; Stadtfeld, Matthias; Figueroa, Maria Eugenia; Robinton, Daisy; Natesan, Sridaran; Melnick, Ari; Zhu, Jinfang; Ramaswamy, Sridhar; Hochedlinger, Konrad

    2013-01-01

    Summary Factor-induced reprogramming of somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) is inefficient, complicating mechanistic studies. Here, we studied defined intermediate cell populations poised to becoming iPSCs by genome-wide analyses. We show that induced pluripotency elicits two transcriptional waves, which are driven by c-Myc/Klf4 (first wave) and Oct4/Sox2/Klf4 (second wave). Cells that become refractory to reprogramming activate the first but fail to initiate the second transcriptional wave and can be rescued by elevated expression of all four factors. The establishment of bivalent domains occurs gradually after the first wave, while changes in DNA methylation take place after the second wave when cells acquire stable pluripotency. This integrative analysis allowed us to identify genes that act as roadblocks during reprogramming and surface markers that further enrich for cells prone to forming iPSCs. Collectively, our data offer new mechanistic insights into the nature and sequence of molecular events inherent to cellular reprogramming. PMID:23260147

  1. Stability Analysis of a Hybrid Cellular Automaton Model of Cell Colony Growth

    CERN Document Server

    Gerlee, P

    2007-01-01

    Cell colonies of bacteria, tumour cells and fungi, under nutrient limited growth conditions, exhibit complex branched growth patterns. In order to investigate this phenomenon we present a simple hybrid cellular automaton model of cell colony growth. In the model the growth of the colony is limited by a nutrient that is consumed by the cells and which inhibits cell division if it falls below a certain threshold. Using this model we have investigated how the nutrient consumption rate of the cells affects the growth dynamics of the colony. We found that for low consumption rates the colony takes on a Eden-like morphology, while for higher consumption rates the morphology of the colony is branched with a fractal geometry. These findings are in agreement with previous results, but the simplicity of the model presented here allows for a linear stability analysis of the system. By observing that the local growth of the colony is proportional to the flux of the nutrient we derive an approximate dispersion relation fo...

  2. Direct fuel cell product design improvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maru, H.C.; Farooque, M. [Energy Research Corp., Danbury, CT (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Significant milestones have been attained towards the technology development field testing and commercialization of direct fuel cell power plant since the 1994 Fuel Cell Seminar. Under a 5-year cooperative agreement with the Department of Energy signed in December 1994, Energy Research Corporation (ERC) has been developing the design for a MW-scale direct fuel cell power plant with input from previous technology efforts and the Santa Clara Demonstration Project. The effort encompasses product definition in consultation with the Fuel Cell Commercialization Group, potential customers, as well as extensive system design and packaging. Manufacturing process improvements, test facility construction, cell component scale up, performance and endurance improvements, stack engineering, and critical balance-of-plant development are also addressed. Major emphasis of this product design improvement project is on increased efficiency, compactness and cost reduction to establish a competitive place in the market. A 2.85 MW power plant with an efficiency of 58% and a footprint of 420 m{sup 2} has been designed. Component and subsystem testing is being conducted at various levels. Planning and preparation for verification of a full size prototype unit are in progress. This paper presents the results obtained since the last fuel cell seminar.

  3. Effect of anisotonic NaCl treatment on cellular ultrastructure of V79 Chinese hamster cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ultrastructural modifications produced by anisotonic NaCl treatment of Chinese hamster mitotic cells were observed at three NaCl concentrations which have been frequently used in radiosensitization studies: 0.05, 0.5 and 1.5 M. After exposureto 0.05 M NaCl, many well-spread chromosomes are visible. The chromatin fibres are well dispersed and membraneous material is associated with the chromosomes. After hypertonic treatment with 0.5 M NaCl, the chromosomes have a uniform, structureless appearance with some coalescing into larger anaphase-like masses. At 1.5 M NaCl, large scale cellular dehydration is apparent, and filamentous structures such as microfilaments are tightly constricted. The degree of chromosome staining is also reduced below the level of the cytoplasm. After both hypo- and hypertonic NaCl treatment the chromosomes appear swollen relative to untreated cells, but hypertonic treatment causes chromosome clumping and dissociates chromatin. Conformational changes in the chromatin may restrict the capacity for DNA repair and be related to cellular radiosensitivity. (author)

  4. Improved micromorph tandem cell performance through enhanced top cell currents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platz, R.; Vaucher, N.P.; Fischer, D.; Meier, J.; Shah, A. [Univ. de Neuchatel (Switzerland). Inst. de Microtechnique

    1997-12-31

    Two approaches to increasing the current in the amorphous silicon top cell of an amorphous silicon/microcrystalline silicon (a-Si:H/{micro}c-Si:H) tandem cell are presented. The goal is to raise the stabilized efficiency of such cells. The deposition of the amorphous top cell at higher than standard substrate temperature is shown to reduce the optical gap of the i-layer and to increase the current which is generated with a given i-layer thickness. Furthermore, a selectively reflecting ZnO interface layer between the component cells is presented as a viable tool for enhancing the current generation in the top cell by selective reflection of light. The authors present a micromorph tandem cell containing the amorphous top cell deposited at high substrate temperature, and additionally the ZnO mirror layer. A top cell thickness of 150 nm is shown to be sufficient to provide a current density of 13mA/cm{sup 2} in the top cell. Finally, the influence of such thin top cells on the stabilized efficiency of the tandem cell is investigated by experiment and by means of semi-empirical modeling. Model and experiment confirm that such reduced-gap top cells, together with current enhancement due to the mirror layer, have a high potential for improving the stabilized efficiency of micromorph tandem cells.

  5. Improved Gene Targeting through Cell Cycle Synchronization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasiliki Tsakraklides

    Full Text Available Gene targeting is a challenge in organisms where non-homologous end-joining is the predominant form of recombination. We show that cell division cycle synchronization can be applied to significantly increase the rate of homologous recombination during transformation. Using hydroxyurea-mediated cell cycle arrest, we obtained improved gene targeting rates in Yarrowia lipolytica, Arxula adeninivorans, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Kluyveromyces lactis and Pichia pastoris demonstrating the broad applicability of the method. Hydroxyurea treatment enriches for S-phase cells that are active in homologous recombination and enables previously unattainable genomic modifications.

  6. A Simple BODIPY-Based Viscosity Probe for Imaging of Cellular Viscosity in Live Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Dongdong; Teoh, Chai Lean; Gao, Nengyue; Xu, Qing-Hua; Chang, Young-Tae

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular viscosity is a fundamental physical parameter that indicates the functioning of cells. In this work, we developed a simple boron-dipyrromethene (BODIPY)-based probe, BTV, for cellular mitochondria viscosity imaging by coupling a simple BODIPY rotor with a mitochondria-targeting unit. The BTV exhibited a significant fluorescence intensity enhancement of more than 100-fold as the solvent viscosity increased. Also, the probe showed a direct linear relationship between the fluorescence lifetime and the media viscosity, which makes it possible to trace the change of the medium viscosity. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that BTV could achieve practical applicability in the monitoring of mitochondrial viscosity changes in live cells through fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). PMID:27589762

  7. Efficient decellularization of whole porcine kidneys improves reseeded cell behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poornejad, Nafiseh; Momtahan, Nima; Salehi, Amin S M; Scott, Daniel R; Fronk, Cory A; Roeder, Beverly L; Reynolds, Paul R; Bundy, Bradley C; Cook, Alonzo D

    2016-01-01

    Combining patient-specific cells with the appropriate scaffold to create functional kidneys is a promising technology to provide immunocompatible kidneys for the 100 000+  patients on the organ waiting list. For proper recellularization to occur, the scaffold must possess the critical microstructure and an intact vascular network. Detergent perfusion through the vasculature of a kidney is the preferred method of decellularization; however, harsh detergents could be damaging to the microstructure of the renal tissue and may undesirably solubilize the endogenous growth and signaling factors. In this study, automated decellularization of whole porcine kidneys was performed using an improved method that combined physical and chemical steps to efficiently remove cellular materials while producing minimal damage to the collagenous extracellular matrix (ECM). Freezing/thawing, incremental increases in flow rate under constant pressure, applying osmotic shock to the cellular membranes, and low concentrations of the detergent sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) were factors used to decrease SDS exposure time during the decellularization process from 36 to 5 h, which preserved the microstructure while still removing 99% of the DNA. The well-preserved glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and collagen fibers enhanced cell-ECM interactions. Human renal cortical tubular epithelium (RCTE) cells grew more rapidly when cultured on the ECM obtained from the improved decellularization process and also demonstrated more in vivo-like gene expression patterns. The optimized, automated process that resulted from this work is now used routinely in our laboratory to rapidly decellularize porcine kidneys and could be adapted to other large organs (e.g. heart, liver, and lung). PMID:26963774

  8. SINGLE-CELL LEVEL INVESTIGATION OF CYTOSKELETAL/CELLULAR RESPONSE TO EXTERNAL STIMULI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiddessen, A L

    2007-02-26

    A detailed understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which chemical signals control cell behavior is needed if the complex biological processes of embryogenesis, development, health and disease are to be completely understood. Yet, if we are to fully understand the molecular mechanisms controlling cell behavior, measurements at the single cell level are needed to supplement information gained from population level studies. One of the major challenges to accomplishing studies at the single cell level has been a lack of physical tools to complement the powerful molecular biological assays which have provided much of what we currently know about cell behavior. The goal of this exploratory project is the development of an experimental platform that facilitates integrated observation, tracking and analysis of the responses of many individual cells to controlled environmental factors (e.g. extracellular signals). Toward this goal, we developed chemically-patterned microarrays of both adherent and suspension mammalian cell types. A novel chemical patterning methodology, based on photocatalytic lithography, was developed to construct biomolecule and cell arrays that facilitate analysis of biological function. Our patterning techniques rely on inexpensive stamp materials and visible light, and do not necessitate mass transport or specified substrates. Patterned silicon and glass substrates are modified such that there is a non-biofouling polymer matrix surrounding the adhesive regions that target biomolecules and cells. Fluorescence and reflectance microscopy reveal successful patterning of proteins and single to small clusters of mammalian cells. In vitro assays conducted upon cells on the patterned arrays demonstrate the viability of cells interfacing with this synthetic system. Hence, we have successfully established a versatile cell measurement platform which can be used to characterize the molecular regulators of cellular behavior in a variety of important

  9. Cellular adhesion molecules on endothelial cells participate in radiation-mediated inflammation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The acute and subacute clinical manifestations of ionizing radiation mimic the inflammatory response to a number of stimuli. During the early stages of the inflammatory response, endothelial cells rapidly and transiently express a number of glycoproteins such as E-selectin, P-selectin, ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 which influence leucocyte adhesion. We quantified the expression of these cellular adhesion molecules (CAMs) in irradiated endothelial cells in order to determine whether these glycoproteins participate in radiation-mediated inflammation. Methods: Primary cultures of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and HMEC cells were grown to 90% confluence and irradiated with a GE Maxitron x-ray generator. The cells were incubated with primary IgG1 antibody (mouse anti-human ICAM-1, VCAM-1, P-selectin and E-selectin and incubated with FITC-conjugated secondary antibody (goat anti-mouse IgG1). Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis was utilized for quantitation of receptor expression of each CAM on irradiated endothelial cells. Electrophoretic mobility gel shift assays of nuclear protein extracts from irradiated HUVEC cells were performed using the E-selectin NFkB binding sequence (5'AGCTTAGAGGGGATTTCCGAGAGGA-3'). The E-selectin promoter was ligated to the growth hormone reporter. Plasmids pE-sel(-587 +35)GH or pE-sel(-587 +35)GH Δ NFκB (5 μg) was transfected into HMEC or HUVEC cells by use of lipofection. Transfectants were incubated for 16 h after transfection followed by treatment with 10 Gy (1 Gy/min, GE Maxitron) of ionizing radiation, and or with TNF or IL-1. Leukocyte adhesion to irradiated endothelial cells was quantified by HL-60 binding. Results: The log fluorescence of cells incubated with the antibody to E-selectin shifted by 32% at 4 h after irradiation. In comparison, a shift of 35% occurred 20 h after irradiation for cells incubated with the antibody to ICAM. However, there was no significant increase in P-selectin or VCAM

  10. The effect of changes in cell geometry on the sensitivity to ultraviolet radiation of mammalian cellular capacity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A calcium and magnesium dependent change in cell shape was measured when mammalian cell monolayers were being prepared for irradiation by replacing their growth medium with certain buffers. In some cases, flattened cells (umbonate) assumed a spherical configuration. In order to assume a centrally located target molecule, a DNA-dependent cellular function, i.e. capacity for herpes viral growth, was used as the parameter to measure ultraviolet (UV) sensitivity of cells irradiated while in either of the two shapes. Umbonate cells were more sensitive to UV than were spherical cells. Exposures to the cell that lowered the cellular capacity of umbonate cells to the 10% survival level only lowered spherical cells to the 50% level. Twenty-seven per cent additional UV exposure to spherical cells was required to obtain the same effect as with umbonate cells. Included in the text are photographs of both cell types, survival curves for cellular capacity, a measure of the absorbance of cell homogenates, and a calculation of the relative number of photons absorbed by each cell nucleus. (author)

  11. Host cell cytotoxicity, cellular repopulation dynamics, and phase-specific cell survival in X-irradiated rat rhabdomyosarcoma tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Postirradiation tumor volume response, cellular repopulation dynamics, cell-cycle perturbations, and phase-specific cell survival were characterized in rat rhabdomyosarcoma R-1 tumors (the R2C5 subline) following an in situ 10-Gy dose of 225-kVp X rays. This X-ray dose produced a 7.5-day delay in tumor growth to twice the volume measured at the time of irradiation, and reduced the initial surviving fraction of R2C5 cells to 0.17 as measured by the excision assay procedure. The surviving fraction of R2C5 cells returned to unity by the 16th day after tumor irradiation. On the basis of flow cytometry measurements of DNA content in tumor cells stained with a noncytotoxic concentration of Hoechst 33342, a transient G2 block was observed 1 day after irradiation. Flow cytometry measurements also demonstrated that the tetraploid R2C5 cells constituted only 30% of the total tumor cell population, with the remainder being diploid host cells comprised of macrophages, monocytes, lymphocytes, and granulocytes. Large numbers of host cells infiltrated the irradiated tumors, leading to an increase in the percentage of diploid cells by Day 2 and reaching a level of more than 80% of the total tumor cell population by 4 to 8 days after irradiation. The influx of host cells into irradiated tumors was correlated temporally with a significant 12-fold decrease in the surviving fraction of R2C5 cells that occurred between Days 2 and 4 postirradiation. When the diploid host cell population was removed by cell sorting procedures, the surviving fraction of R2C5 cells at Day 4 substantially greater than that in the presence of the host cells. Experiments involving the mixing of 4/1 and 12/1 ratios of diploid host cells and tetraploid tumor cells isolated from irradiated and unirradiated tumors demonstrated that the cytotoxic effect of the host cells was specific for the irradiated tumor cells

  12. Feasibility study of a mini fuel cell to detect interference from a cellular phone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, M. O.; Gan, Y. K.

    Fuel cells produce electricity without involving combustion processes. They generate no noise, vibration or air pollution and are therefore suitable for use in many vibration-free power-generating applications. In this study, a mini alkaline fuel cell signal detector system has been designed, constructed and tested. The initial results have shown the applicability of such system for used as an indicator of signal disturbance from cellular phones. A small disturbance even at 4 mV cm -1, corresponding to an amplitude of 12-18 mG in terms of electromagnetic field, can be well detected by such a device. Subsequently, a thermodynamics model has been developed to provide a parametric study by simulation to show the likely performance of the fuel cell alone in other environments. As such the model can provide many useful generic design data for alkaline fuel cells. Two general conclusions can be drawn from the present theoretical study: (i) fuel cell performance increases with temperature, pressure and correction factor, Cf; (ii) the temperature factor ( E/ T) increases with increasing temperature and with increasing pressure factor.

  13. Feasibility study of a mini fuel cell to detect interference from a cellular phone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdullah, M.O.; Gan, Y.K. [Mechanical and Manufacturing System Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Universiti Malaysia Sarawak, 94300 Kota Samarahan, Sarawak (Malaysia)

    2006-04-21

    Fuel cells produce electricity without involving combustion processes. They generate no noise, vibration or air pollution and are therefore suitable for use in many vibration-free power-generating applications. In this study, a mini alkaline fuel cell signal detector system has been designed, constructed and tested. The initial results have shown the applicability of such system for used as an indicator of signal disturbance from cellular phones. A small disturbance even at 4mVcm{sup -1}, corresponding to an amplitude of 12-18mG in terms of electromagnetic field, can be well detected by such a device. Subsequently, a thermodynamics model has been developed to provide a parametric study by simulation to show the likely performance of the fuel cell alone in other environments. As such the model can provide many useful generic design data for alkaline fuel cells. Two general conclusions can be drawn from the present theoretical study: (i) fuel cell performance increases with temperature, pressure and correction factor, C{sub f}; (ii) the temperature factor (E/T) increases with increasing temperature and with increasing pressure factor. (author)

  14. Rhizobacterial Strain Bacillus megaterium BOFC15 Induces Cellular Polyamine Changes that Improve Plant Growth and Drought Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Cheng; Ma, Zhongyou; Zhu, Lin; Xiao, Xin; Xie, Yue; Zhu, Jian; Wang, Jianfei

    2016-01-01

    Plant-growth-promoting rhizobacteria can improve plant growth, development, and stress adaptation. However, the underlying mechanisms are still largely unclear. We investigated the effects of Bacillus megaterium BOFC15 on Arabidopsis plants. BOFC15 produced and secreted spermidine (Spd), a type of polyamine (PA) that plays an important role in plant growth. Moreover, BOFC15 induced changes in the cellular PAs of plants that promoted an increase of free Spd and spermine levels. However, these effects were remarkably abolished by the addition of dicyclohexylamine (DCHA), a Spd biosynthetic inhibitor. Additionally, the inoculation with BOFC15 remarkably increased plant biomass, improved root system architecture, and augmented photosynthetic capacity. Inoculated plants also displayed stronger ability to tolerate drought stress than non-inoculated (control) plants. Abscisic acid (ABA) content was notably higher in the inoculated plants than in the control plants under drought stress and polyethylene glycol (PEG)-induced stress conditions. However, the BOFC15-induced ABA synthesis was markedly inhibited by DCHA. Thus, microbial Spd participated in the modulation of the ABA levels. The Spd-producing BOFC15 improved plant drought tolerance, which was associated with altered cellular ABA levels and activated adaptive responses. PMID:27338359

  15. NR4A2 is regulated by gastrin and influences cellular responses of gastric adenocarcinoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristine Misund

    Full Text Available The peptide hormone gastrin is known to play a role in differentiation, growth and apoptosis of cells in the gastric mucosa. In this study we demonstrate that gastrin induces Nuclear Receptor 4A2 (NR4A2 expression in the adenocarcinoma cell lines AR42J and AGS-GR, which both possess the gastrin/CCK2 receptor. In vivo, NR4A2 is strongly expressed in the gastrin responsive neuroendocrine ECL cells in normal mucosa, whereas gastric adenocarcinoma tissue reveals a more diffuse and variable expression in tumor cells. We show that NR4A2 is a primary early transient gastrin induced gene in adenocarcinoma cell lines, and that NR4A2 expression is negatively regulated by inducible cAMP early repressor (ICER and zinc finger protein 36, C3H1 type-like 1 (Zfp36l1, suggesting that these gastrin regulated proteins exert a negative feedback control of NR4A2 activated responses. FRAP analyses indicate that gastrin also modifies the nucleus-cytosol shuttling of NR4A2, with more NR4A2 localized to cytoplasm upon gastrin treatment. Knock-down experiments with siRNA targeting NR4A2 increase migration of gastrin treated adenocarcinoma AGS-GR cells, while ectopically expressed NR4A2 increases apoptosis and hampers gastrin induced invasion, indicating a tumor suppressor function of NR4A2. Collectively, our results uncover a role of NR4A2 in gastric adenocarcinoma cells, and suggest that both the level and the localization of NR4A2 protein are of importance regarding the cellular responses of these cells.

  16. Time- and polarization-resolved cellular autofluorescence towards quantitative biochemistry on living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfveby, John; TImerman, Randi; Soto Velasquez, Monica P.; Wickramasinghe, Dhanushka W. P. M.; Bartusek, Jillian; Heikal, Ahmed A.

    2014-09-01

    Native coenzymes such as the reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and oxidized flavin adenine dinucleotide play pivotal roles in energy metabolism and a myriad of biochemical reactions in living cells/tissues. These coenzymes are naturally fluorescent and, therefore, have the potential to serve as intrinsic biomarkers for mitochondrial activities, programmed cell death (apoptosis), oxidative stress, aging, and neurodegenerative disease. In this contribution, we employ two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) and time-resolved anisotropy imaging of intracellular NADH for quantitative, non-invasive biochemistry on living cells in response to hydrogenperoxide- induced oxidative stress. In contrast with steady-state one-photon, UV-excited autofluorescence, two-photon FLIM is sensitive to both molecular conformation and stimuli-induced changes in the local environment in living cells with minimum photodamage and inherently enhanced spatial resolution. On the other hand, time-resolved, two-photon anisotropy imaging of cellular autofluorescence allows for quantitative assessment of binding state and environmental restrictions on the tumbling mobility of intrinsic NADH. Our measurements reveal that free and enzyme-bound NADH exist at equilibrium, with a dominant autofluorescence contribution of the bound fraction in living cells. Parallel studies on NADH-enzyme binding in controlled environments serve as a point of reference in analyzing autofluorescence in living cells. These autofluorescence-based approaches complement the conventional analytical biochemistry methods that require the destruction of cells/tissues, while serving as an important step towards establishing intracellular NADH as a natural biomarker for monitoring changes in energy metabolism and redox state of living cells in response to environmental hazards.

  17. Identification of human genes involved in cellular responses to ionizing radiation: molecular and cellular studies of gene encoding the p68 helicase in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cells submitted to genotoxic factors -like IR- activate several and important mechanisms such as repair, cell cycle arrest or 'apoptosis' to maintain genetic integrity. So, the damaged cells will induce many and different genes. The human transcriptome analysis by 'SSH' method in a human breast carcinoma cell line MCF7 γ-irradiated versus not irradiated, allowed to identify about one hundred genes. Among of these genes, we have focused our study on a radio-induced gene encoding the p68 helicase. In the conditions of irradiation used, our results show that the kinetic and the regulation of this gene expression differs between the nature of radiations used. Indeed, in γ-irradiated mammalian cells, ATM, a protein kinase activated by DSB and IR, is required to induce quickly P68 gene via the important transcription factor p53 stabilized by IR. In the case of UVC-irradiated cells, the P68 gene induction is late and the intracellular signalling pathway that lead to this induction is independent from the p53 protein. Finally, we show that the p68 protein under-expression is responsible for an increased radiosensitivity of MCF7 cells. Consequently, we can postulate that the p68 protein is involved in cellular responses to radiations to reduce the increased radiosensitivity of cells exposed to γ-rays. (author)

  18. Cellular Programming and Reprogramming: Sculpting Cell Fate for the Production of Dopamine Neurons for Cell Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio C. Aguila

    2012-01-01

    success of clinical applications depends on our ability to steer pluripotent stem cells towards the right neuronal identity. In Parkinson disease, the loss of dopamine neurons is more pronounced in the ventrolateral population that projects to the sensorimotor striatum. Because synapses are highly specific, only neurons with this precise identity will contribute, upon transplantation, to the synaptic reconstruction of the dorsal striatum. Thus, understanding the developmental cell program of the mesostriatal dopamine neurons is critical for the identification of the extrinsic signals and cell-intrinsic factors that instruct and, ultimately, determine cell identity. Here, we review how extrinsic signals and transcription factors act together during development to shape midbrain cell fates. Further, we discuss how these same factors can be applied in vitro to induce, select, and reprogram cells to the mesostriatal dopamine fate.

  19. The Rho GTPase Cdc42 regulates hair cell planar polarity and cellular patterning in the developing cochlea

    OpenAIRE

    Anna Kirjavainen; Maarja Laos; Tommi Anttonen; Ulla Pirvola

    2015-01-01

    Hair cells of the organ of Corti (OC) of the cochlea exhibit distinct planar polarity, both at the tissue and cellular level. Planar polarity at tissue level is manifested as uniform orientation of the hair cell stereociliary bundles. Hair cell intrinsic polarity is defined as structural hair bundle asymmetry; positioning of the kinocilium/basal body complex at the vertex of the V-shaped bundle. Consistent with strong apical polarity, the hair cell apex displays prominent actin and microtubul...

  20. Midkine secretion protects Hep3B cells from cadmium induced cellular damage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nuray Yazihan; Haluk Ataoglu; Ethem Akcil; Burcu Yener; Bulent Salman; Cengiz Aydin

    2008-01-01

    AIM:To evaluate role of midkine secretion during Cadmium (Cd) exposure in the human hepatocyte cell line Hep3B cells.METHODS: Different dosages of Cd (0.5-1-5-10 μg/mL) were applied to Hep3B cells and their effects to apoptosis, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage and midkine secretion were evaluated as time dependent manner. Same experiments were repeated with exogenously applied midkine (250-5000 pg/mL) and/or 5μg/mL Cd.RESULTS: Cd exposure induced prominent apoptosis and LDH leakage beginning from lower dosages at the 48th h. Cd induced midkine secretion with higher dosages (P < 0.001), (control, Cd 0.5-1-5-10μg/mL respectively: 1123±73, 1157±63, 1242±90, 1886± 175, 1712±166 pg/mL). Exogenous 500-5000 pg/mL midkine application during 5 μg/mL Cd toxicity prevented caspase-3 activation (control, Cd toxicity, 250, 500, 1000, 2500, 5000 pg/mL midkine+ Cd toxicity, respectively:374±64, 1786±156, 1545±179, 1203±113, 974±116, 646±56, 556±63 cfu) LDH leakage and cell death in Hep3B cells (P < 0.001).CONCLUSION: Our results showed that midkine secretion from Hep3B cells during Cd exposure protects liver cells from Cd induced cellular damage. Midkine has anti-apoptotic and cytoprotective role during Cd toxicity. Further studies are needed to explain the mechanism of midkine secretion and cytoprotective role of midkine during Cd exposure. Midkine may be a promising theurapatic agent in different toxic hepatic diseases.

  1. PEM fuel cells performance improvements by CFD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    , efficiency and accuracy will become one of the most cost effective ways of assisting in the development of new fuel cell technologies. Fuel cell technology presents huge economical and environmental potential in the next generation of power systems, from small portable fuel cells to large residential power plants. In the development of this new technology, detailed and accurate CFD modeling can effectively guide the improvements in fuel cell design so that optimal flow and energy management within fuel cells may be achieved. A comprehensive fuel cell modeling capability, which accounts for the detailed processes of the chemistry, electrochemistry, electric transport, heat generation and material stresses in the fuel cell, as well as the validated fuel cell modeling methodology, has not yet been fully established, so more work is required. (authors)

  2. Cysteine modified polyaniline films improve biocompatibility for two cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work focuses on one of the most exciting application areas of conjugated conducting polymers, which is cell culture and tissue engineering. To improve the biocompatibility of conducting polymers we present an easy method that involves the modification of the polymer backbone using L-cysteine. In this publication, we show the synthesis of polyaniline (PANI) films supported onto Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) films, and modified using cysteine (PANI-Cys) in order to generate a biocompatible substrate for cell culture. The PANI-Cys films are characterized by Fourier Transform infrared and UV–visible spectroscopy. The changes in the hydrophilicity of the polymer films after and before the modification were tested using contact angle measurements. After modification the contact angle changes from 86° ± 1 to 90° ± 1, suggesting a more hydrophylic surface. The adhesion properties of LM2 and HaCaT cell lines on the surface of PANI-Cys films in comparison with tissue culture plastic (TCP) are studied. The PANI-Cys film shows better biocompatibility than PANI film for both cell lines. The cell morphologies on the TCP and PANI-Cys film were examined by florescence and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). Microscopic observations show normal cellular behavior when PANI-Cys is used as a substrate of both cell lines (HaCaT and LM2) as when they are cultured on TCP. The ability of these PANI-Cys films to support cell attachment and growth indicates their potential use as biocompatible surfaces and in tissue engineering. - Highlights: • A new surface PANI-Cys was produced on films of polyethylene terephthalate. • The relationship between surface characteristics and biocompatibility is analyzed. • The PANI-Cys film presents good biocompatibility for two cell lines

  3. Cysteine modified polyaniline films improve biocompatibility for two cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yslas, Edith I., E-mail: eyslas@exa.unrc.edu.ar [Departamento de Biología Molecular, Universidad Nacional de Río Cuarto, Agencia Postal Nro3, X580BYA Río Cuarto (Argentina); Cavallo, Pablo; Acevedo, Diego F.; Barbero, César A. [Departamento de Química, Universidad Nacional de Río Cuarto, Agencia Postal Nro3, X580BYA Río Cuarto (Argentina); Rivarola, Viviana A. [Departamento de Biología Molecular, Universidad Nacional de Río Cuarto, Agencia Postal Nro3, X580BYA Río Cuarto (Argentina)

    2015-06-01

    This work focuses on one of the most exciting application areas of conjugated conducting polymers, which is cell culture and tissue engineering. To improve the biocompatibility of conducting polymers we present an easy method that involves the modification of the polymer backbone using L-cysteine. In this publication, we show the synthesis of polyaniline (PANI) films supported onto Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) films, and modified using cysteine (PANI-Cys) in order to generate a biocompatible substrate for cell culture. The PANI-Cys films are characterized by Fourier Transform infrared and UV–visible spectroscopy. The changes in the hydrophilicity of the polymer films after and before the modification were tested using contact angle measurements. After modification the contact angle changes from 86° ± 1 to 90° ± 1, suggesting a more hydrophylic surface. The adhesion properties of LM2 and HaCaT cell lines on the surface of PANI-Cys films in comparison with tissue culture plastic (TCP) are studied. The PANI-Cys film shows better biocompatibility than PANI film for both cell lines. The cell morphologies on the TCP and PANI-Cys film were examined by florescence and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). Microscopic observations show normal cellular behavior when PANI-Cys is used as a substrate of both cell lines (HaCaT and LM2) as when they are cultured on TCP. The ability of these PANI-Cys films to support cell attachment and growth indicates their potential use as biocompatible surfaces and in tissue engineering. - Highlights: • A new surface PANI-Cys was produced on films of polyethylene terephthalate. • The relationship between surface characteristics and biocompatibility is analyzed. • The PANI-Cys film presents good biocompatibility for two cell lines.

  4. Activation of arylhydrocarbon receptor (AhR) in T lineage cells inhibits cellular growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nohara, K.; Tomohiro, I.; Chiharu, T. [National Institute for Environmental Studies, Tsukuba (Japan)

    2004-09-15

    Dioxins, including the most toxic congener, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), exert their toxic effects by binding and activating the arylhydrocarbon receptor (AhR), a liganddependent transcription factor. Upon binding dioxins, the AhR in the cytoplasm is activated and translocated to the nucleus, where it heterodimerizes with another transcription factor, ARNT. The AhR/ARNT heterodimer modulates expressions of various genes by binding xenobiotic responsive elements (XREs) in their enhancer regions or modifies cellular functions through protein-protein interactions. The AhR activation by TCDD exposure induces various immunotoxic reactions including thymus involution and suppression of T cell-dependent antibody production. We have investigated the roles of AhR activation in T lineage cells and their underlying mechanisms by generating transgenic (Tg) mice expressing a constitutively active AhR (CA-AhR) mutant specifically in T cells and by transiently expressing the CA-AhR mutant in Jurkat T cells.

  5. CellLab-CTS 2015: continuous-time stochastic cellular automaton modeling using Landlab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Gregory E.; Hobley, Daniel E. J.; Hutton, Eric; Gasparini, Nicole M.; Istanbulluoglu, Erkan; Adams, Jordan M.; Siddartha Nudurupati, Sai

    2016-02-01

    CellLab-CTS 2015 is a Python-language software library for creating two-dimensional, continuous-time stochastic (CTS) cellular automaton models. The model domain consists of a set of grid nodes, with each node assigned an integer state code that represents its condition or composition. Adjacent pairs of nodes may undergo transitions to different states, according to a user-defined average transition rate. A model is created by writing a Python code that defines the possible states, the transitions, and the rates of those transitions. The code instantiates, initializes, and runs one of four object classes that represent different types of CTS models. CellLab-CTS provides the option of using either square or hexagonal grid cells. The software provides the ability to treat particular grid-node states as moving particles, and to track their position over time. Grid nodes may also be assigned user-defined properties, which the user can update after each transition through the use of a callback function. As a component of the Landlab modeling framework, CellLab-CTS models take advantage of a suite of Landlab's tools and capabilities, such as support for standardized input and output.

  6. HPV16 E2 could act as down-regulator in cellular genes implicated in apoptosis, proliferation and cell differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valencia-Hernández Armando

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human Papillomavirus (HPV E2 plays several important roles in the viral cycle, including the transcriptional regulation of the oncogenes E6 and E7, the regulation of the viral genome replication by its association with E1 helicase and participates in the viral genome segregation during mitosis by its association with the cellular protein Brd4. It has been shown that E2 protein can regulate negative or positively the activity of several cellular promoters, although the precise mechanism of this regulation is uncertain. In this work we constructed a recombinant adenoviral vector to overexpress HPV16 E2 and evaluated the global pattern of biological processes regulated by E2 using microarrays expression analysis. Results The gene expression profile was strongly modified in cells expressing HPV16 E2, finding 1048 down-regulated genes, and 581 up-regulated. The main cellular pathway modified was WNT since we found 28 genes down-regulated and 15 up-regulated. Interestingly, this pathway is a convergence point for regulating the expression of genes involved in several cellular processes, including apoptosis, proliferation and cell differentiation; MYCN, JAG1 and MAPK13 genes were selected to validate by RT-qPCR the microarray data as these genes in an altered level of expression, modify very important cellular processes. Additionally, we found that a large number of genes from pathways such as PDGF, angiogenesis and cytokines and chemokines mediated inflammation, were also modified in their expression. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that HPV16 E2 has regulatory effects on cellular gene expression in HPV negative cells, independent of the other HPV proteins, and the gene profile observed indicates that these effects could be mediated by interactions with cellular proteins. The cellular processes affected suggest that E2 expression leads to the cells in to a convenient environment for a replicative cycle of the virus.

  7. Mechanisms of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity: the use of effector cells from chronic granulomatous disease patients as investigative probes.

    OpenAIRE

    Katz, P.; Simone, C B; Henkart, P A; Fauci, A S

    1980-01-01

    The present study characterized the antibody-dependent cellular cytoxicity (ADCC) of leukocyte effector cells (neutrophils, lymphocytes, and monocytes) from normal subjects and from chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) patients. CGD phagocytic cells (neutrophils and monocytes) had depressed ADCC activity against antibody-coated human erythrocyte (HRBC) targets in suspension cultures indicative of abnormal intracellular postphagocytic killing. However, when phagocytosis was prevented by using a...

  8. Improving the development of early bovine somatic-cell nuclear transfer embryos by treating adult donor cells with vitamin C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huanhuan; Zhang, Lei; Guo, Zekun; Wang, Yongsheng; He, Rongjun; Qin, Yumin; Quan, Fusheng; Zhang, Yong

    2015-11-01

    Vitamin C (Vc) has been widely studied in cell and embryo culture, and has recently been demonstrated to promote cellular reprogramming. The objective of this study was to identify a suitable Vc concentration that, when used to treat adult bovine fibroblasts serving as donor cells for nuclear transfer, improved donor-cell physiology and the developmental potential of the cloned embryos that the donor nuclei were used to create. A Vc concentration of 0.15 mM promoted cell proliferation and increased donor-cell 5-hydroxy methyl cytosine levels 2.73-fold (P DNA methylation levels in donor cells, and improves the developmental competence of bovine somatic-cell nuclear transfer embryos. PMID:26212732

  9. Prostaglandin E2 promotes cellular recovery from established nephrotoxic serum nephritis in mice, prosurvival, and regenerative effects on glomerular cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kvirkvelia, Nino; McMenamin, Malgorzata; Chaudhary, Kapil; Bartoli, Manuela; Madaio, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    We postulated that prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), which exhibits regulatory functions to control immune-mediated inflammation, fibrosis, oxidative stress, and tissue/cellular regeneration, has the potential to improve the course of nephritis. Therefore, the therapeutic potential of prostanoid on established nephritis in mice was evaluated focusing on its role on renal cellular recovery, with emphasis on its cytoprotecting and growth-promoting effects. Acute nephritis was induced in mice by single i...

  10. Targeted cellular ionic calcium chelation by oxalates: Implications for the treatment of tumor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Embi Abraham

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In malignant melanoma, it has been published that up to 40% of cancer patients will suffer from brain metastasis. The prognosis for these patients is poor, with a life expectancy of 4 to 6 months. Calcium exchange is involved in numerous cell functions. Recently, three types of cellular calcium sequestration have been reported in the medical literature. The first describes a transgenic mouse model in which an increase of aberrant calcium channels triggers hypertrophy and apoptosis. The second provides a protective mechanism whereby astrocytes in the brain inhibit apoptosis of tumor cells by moving ionic calcium out of the tumor cells thru gap junctions. The third is via calcium chelation, which causes cell apoptosis by converting ionic calcium into a calcium salt. This process has been shown to operate in atrial myocardial cells, thus not allowing the intracellular calcium stores to flow through the myocytes intercalated discs. Ideally chemotherapeutic agents would be those that initiate apoptosis in tumor cells. Presentation of the Hypothesis We hypothesize that the recent reported intracellular calcium sequestration by oxalate chelation, due to its chemical process of converting ionic calcium into a calcium salt, may inhibit the protective effect of astrocytes on brain tumor metastasized melanoma cells by not allowing free calcium to leave the metastatic cells, simultaneously apoptosis of tumor and some healthy adjacent cells could occur. This hypothesis could be extended to include other cancerous tumors such as skin cancers amongst others. Testing the hypothesis Using the experimental model showing the protective mechanism of co-cultured reactive astrocytes and tumor cells treated with oxalates could be used to test this hypothesis in vitro. The calcium specific von Kossa technique could be used to confirm the presence of chelated intracellular calcium architecture of the metastatic cells (which is a sign of apoptosis

  11. Comparative evaluation of nano-CuO crossing Caco-2 cell monolayers and cellular uptake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Different concentrations of CuSO4, micro-CuO, and nano-CuO were added to Caco-2 cell monolayers to study the absorption and transport characteristics in this epithelial cell model. Nano-CuO nanoparticles had a diameter of 10–20 nm. Inhibitors of endocytosis were used to explore whether nano-CuO could enter the Caco-2 cell in the form of nanoparticles, and to ascertain the endocytotic pathway that is involved in the transport process. The apparent permeability coefficient (Papp) of CuSO4 and nano-CuO increased with the Cu concentration in the culture medium (p < 0.05). The micro-CuO of different concentrations had no significant impact on the Papp value of Caco-2 cells (p > 0.05). When the Cu concentration in the culture medium was in the range 31.25–500 μM, the Papp value of Caco-2 cells incubated with nano-CuO was significantly higher than that obtained with CuSO4. The latter was also significantly higher than that when cells were incubated with micro-CuO (p < 0.05). The amount of Cu transport increased with the increase of CuSO4 concentration in the culture medium. After 90 min, the amount of transport began to saturate, and the transport rate of Cu declined with the increase of CuSO4 concentration. For the cells incubated with nano-CuO, the amount of Cu transport increased with the increase of nano-CuO concentration, but did not show an obvious saturation with the extension of transport time. Nano-CuO could enter the Caco-2 cell in the form of nanoparticles, and were found in the cytoplasm, vesicles, lysosomes, and cell nuclei. Several inhibitors of endocytosis effectively prevented the entry of nano-CuO into the Caco-2 cells. It was concluded that nano-CuO particles can enter the Caco-2 cells through several cellular endocytotic pathways

  12. Comparative evaluation of nano-CuO crossing Caco-2 cell monolayers and cellular uptake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Gao; Lianqin, Zhu, E-mail: lianqinz1963@163.com; Fenghua, Zhu [Qingdao Agricultural University, College of Animal Science and Veterinary Medicine (China); Fang, Zheng [Dezhou University, College of Agriculture (China); Mingming, Song; Kai, Huang [Qingdao Agricultural University, College of Animal Science and Veterinary Medicine (China)

    2015-04-15

    Different concentrations of CuSO{sub 4}, micro-CuO, and nano-CuO were added to Caco-2 cell monolayers to study the absorption and transport characteristics in this epithelial cell model. Nano-CuO nanoparticles had a diameter of 10–20 nm. Inhibitors of endocytosis were used to explore whether nano-CuO could enter the Caco-2 cell in the form of nanoparticles, and to ascertain the endocytotic pathway that is involved in the transport process. The apparent permeability coefficient (P{sub app}) of CuSO{sub 4} and nano-CuO increased with the Cu concentration in the culture medium (p < 0.05). The micro-CuO of different concentrations had no significant impact on the P{sub app} value of Caco-2 cells (p > 0.05). When the Cu concentration in the culture medium was in the range 31.25–500 μM, the P{sub app} value of Caco-2 cells incubated with nano-CuO was significantly higher than that obtained with CuSO{sub 4}. The latter was also significantly higher than that when cells were incubated with micro-CuO (p < 0.05). The amount of Cu transport increased with the increase of CuSO{sub 4} concentration in the culture medium. After 90 min, the amount of transport began to saturate, and the transport rate of Cu declined with the increase of CuSO{sub 4} concentration. For the cells incubated with nano-CuO, the amount of Cu transport increased with the increase of nano-CuO concentration, but did not show an obvious saturation with the extension of transport time. Nano-CuO could enter the Caco-2 cell in the form of nanoparticles, and were found in the cytoplasm, vesicles, lysosomes, and cell nuclei. Several inhibitors of endocytosis effectively prevented the entry of nano-CuO into the Caco-2 cells. It was concluded that nano-CuO particles can enter the Caco-2 cells through several cellular endocytotic pathways.

  13. Increased SHP-1 expression results in radioresistance, inhibition of cellular senescence, and cell cycle redistribution in nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioresistance is the main limit to the efficacy of radiotherapy in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). SHP-1 is involved in cancer progression, but its role in radioresistance and senescence of NPC is not well understood. This study aimed to assess the role of SHP-1 in the radioresistance and senescence of NPC cells. SHP-1 was knocked-down and overexpressed in CNE-1 and CNE-2 cells using lentiviruses. Cells were irradiated to observe their radiosensitivity by colony forming assay. BrdU incorporation assay and flow cytometry were used to monitor cell cycle. A β-galactosidase assay was used to assess senescence. Western blot was used to assess SHP-1, p21, p53, pRb, Rb, H3K9Me3, HP1γ, CDK4, cyclin D1, cyclin E, and p16 protein expressions. Compared with CNE-1-scramble shRNA cells, SHP-1 downregulation resulted in increased senescence (+107 %, P < 0.001), increased radiosensitivity, higher proportion of cells in G0/G1 (+33 %, P < 0.001), decreased expressions of CDK4 (−44 %, P < 0.001), cyclin D1 (−41 %, P = 0.001), cyclin E (−97 %, P < 0.001), Rb (−79 %, P < 0.001), and pRb (−76 %, P = 0.001), and increased expression of p16 (+120 %, P = 0.02). Furthermore, SHP-1 overexpression resulted in radioresistance, inhibition of cellular senescence, and cell cycle arrest in the S phase. Levels of p53 and p21 were unchanged in both cell lines (all P > 0.05). SHP-1 has a critical role in radioresistance, cell cycle progression, and senescence of NPC cells. Down-regulating SHP-1 may be a promising therapeutic approach for treating patients with NPC

  14. Scotblood 2015: Improving and delivering blood products, novel cellular therapies, and celebrating patients and donor engagement within transfusion services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colligan, David; McGowan, Neil; Seghatchian, Jerard

    2016-08-01

    Blood Transfusion Services are striving to continually improve the efficacy and quality of their blood products whilst also simultaneously diversifying into novel cellular products. For this to be successful the relationships between the various arms of the organisation must be strong and interlinked. As new technologies impact on the products that blood transfusion services supply it should be noted that the interaction between the service and its donor base is also affected by advancing technologies. Social media has fundamentally altered the way in which the public can access information and news, as such blood services must engage and interact appropriately with these new forms of media. As a reflection of these challenges the Scotblood 2015 programme was focussed on service and product improvement, donor engagement and people centred transfusion. This commentary comprises summaries of the presentations, based in part on the abstracts provided by the speakers. PMID:27524267

  15. New TLR7 agonists with improved humoral and cellular immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upchurch, Katherine C; Boquín, José R; Yin, Wenjie; Xue, Yaming; Joo, HyeMee; Kane, Robert R; Oh, SangKon

    2015-11-01

    Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) agonists are of interest as vaccine adjuvants and cancer therapeutics. Therefore, development of new TLR7 agonists that can efficiently promote host immune responses without evoking side effects is of great importance. Here, we describe two new compounds, J4 and F4, which elicit intracellular signaling exclusively via TLR7. Interestingly, both J4 and F4 induced less cytokine secretion (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12p40, TNFα, and IL-12p70) from myeloid dendritic cells (mDCs) and monocytes than CL075 and R848; however, they all generated similar levels of phenotype maturation of antigen presenting cells (APCs), including plasmacytoid DCs. We further found that J4- and F4-induced APC activation was largely dependent on the activation of NF-κB and p38. Lastly, J4 and F4 could efficiently promote B cell proliferation and plasmablast differentiation as well as antigen-specific CD8(+) T cell responses in human in vitro. Therefore, these new TLR7 agonists could be employed to facilitate the development of new therapeutics and vaccine adjuvants against cancers and microbial infections. PMID:26381186

  16. Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 tax attenuates the ATM-mediated cellular DNA damage response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandhasin, Chandtip; Ducu, Razvan I; Berkovich, Elijahu; Kastan, Michael B; Marriott, Susan J

    2008-07-01

    Genomic instability, a hallmark of leukemic cells, is associated with malfunctioning cellular responses to DNA damage caused by defective cell cycle checkpoints and/or DNA repair. Adult T-cell leukemia, which can result from infection with human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1), is associated with extensive genomic instability that has been attributed to the viral oncoprotein Tax. How Tax influences cellular responses to DNA damage to mediate genomic instability, however, remains unclear. Therefore, we investigated the effect of Tax on cellular pathways involved in recognition and repair of DNA double-strand breaks. Premature attenuation of ATM kinase activity and reduced association of MDC1 with repair foci were observed in Tax-expressing cells. Following ionizing radiation-induced S-phase checkpoint activation, Tax-expressing cells progressed more rapidly than non-Tax-expressing cells toward DNA replication. These results demonstrate that Tax expression may allow premature DNA replication in the presence of genomic lesions. Attempts to replicate in the presence of these lesions would result in gradual accumulation of mutations, leading to genome instability and cellular transformation. PMID:18434398

  17. Aiolos transcription factor controls cell death in T cells by regulating Bcl-2 expression and its cellular localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, F; Martínez-A, C; Camonis, J; Rebollo, A

    1999-01-01

    We searched for proteins that interact with Ras in interleukin (IL)-2-stimulated or IL-2-deprived cells, and found that the transcription factor Aiolos interacts with Ras. The Ras-Aiolos interaction was confirmed in vitro and in vivo by co-immunoprecipitation. Indirect immunofluorescence shows that IL-2 controls the cellular distribution of Aiolos and induces its tyrosine phosphorylation, required for dissociation from Ras. We also identified functional Aiolos-binding sites in the Bcl-2 promoter, which are able to activate the luciferase reporter gene. Mutation of Aiolos-binding sites within the Bcl-2 promoter inhibits transactivation of the reporter gene luciferase, suggesting direct control of Bcl-2 expression by Aiolos. Co-transfection experiments confirm that Aiolos induces Bcl-2 expression and prevents apoptosis in IL-2-deprived cells. We propose a model for the regulation of Bcl-2 expression via Aiolos. PMID:10369681

  18. Effects of ethanol on hepatic cellular replication and cell cycle progression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Ethanol is a hepatotoxin. It appears that the liver is the target of ethanol induced toxicity primarily because it is the major site of ethanol metabolism. Metabolism of ethanol results in a number of biochemical changes that are thought to mediate the toxicity associated with ethanol abuse. These include the production of acetaldehyde and reactive oxygen species, as well as an accumulation of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide(NADH). These biochemical changes are associated with the accumulation of fat and mitochondrial dysfunction in the liver. If these changes are severe enough they can themselves cause hepatotoxicity, or they can sensitize the liver to more severe damage by other hepatotoxins.Whether liver damage is the result of ethanol metabolism or some other hepatotoxin, recovery of the liver from damage requires replacement of cells that have been destroyed. It is now apparent that ethanol metabolism not only causes hepatotoxicity but also impairs the replication of normal hepatocytes. This impairment has been shown to occur at both the G1/S, and the G2/M transitions of the cell cycle. These impairments may be the result of activation of the checkpoint kinases, which can mediate cell cycle arrest at both of these transitions.Conversely, because ethanol metabolism results in a number of biochemical changes, there may be a number of mechanisms by which ethanol metabolism impairs cellular replication. It is the goal of this article to review the mechanisms by which ethanol metabolism mediates impairment of hepatic replication.

  19. Arbutin encapsulated micelles improved transdermal delivery and suppression of cellular melanin production

    OpenAIRE

    Liang, Ke; Xu, Keming; Bessarab, Dmitri; Obaje, Jonathan; Xu, Chenjie

    2016-01-01

    Background Hyperpigmentation is a skin disorder characterized by elevated production of melanin. Current treatment approaches mainly rely on the application of skin lightening chemicals, most of which have safety issues. Efficacy of delivery of the active ingredients to the target organ has also been a challenge. Transdermal based drug delivery platform has been shown to improve drug bioavailability, avoiding the hepatic first pass metabolism, decrease gastrointestinal side effects, and event...

  20. Magnolol Affects Cellular Proliferation, Polyamine Biosynthesis and Catabolism-Linked Protein Expression and Associated Cellular Signaling Pathways in Human Prostate Cancer Cells in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brendan T. McKeown

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed form of cancer in men in Canada and the United States. Both genetic and environmental factors contribute to the development and progression of many cancers, including prostate cancer. Context and purpose of this study: This study investigated the effects of magnolol, a compound found in the roots and bark of the magnolia tree Magnolia officinalis, on cellular proliferation and proliferation-linked activities of PC3 human prostate cancer cells in vitro. Results: PC3 cells exposed to magnolol at a concentration of 80 μM for 6 hours exhibited decreased protein expression of ornithine decarboxylase, a key regulator in polyamine biosynthesis, as well as affecting the expression of other proteins involved in polyamine biosynthesis and catabolism. Furthermore, protein expression of the R2 subunit of ribonucleotide reductase, a key regulatory protein associated with DNA synthesis, was significantly decreased. Finally, the MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase, PI3K (phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, NFκB (nuclear factor of kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells and AP-1 (activator protein 1 cellular signaling pathways were assayed to determine which, if any, of these pathways magnolol exposure would alter. Protein expressions of p-JNK-1 and c-jun were significantly increased while p-p38, JNK-1/2, PI3Kp85, p-PI3Kp85, p-Akt, NFκBp65, p-IκBα and IκBα protein expressions were significantly decreased. Conclusions: These alterations further support the anti-proliferative effects of magnolol on PC3 human prostate cancer cells in vitro and suggest that magnolol may have potential as a novel anti-prostate cancer agent.

  1. Targeting Cells With MR Imaging Probes: Cellular Interaction And Intracellular Magnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Uptake In Brain Capillary Endothelial and Choroidal Plexus Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambianica, I.; Bossi, M.; Gasco, P.; Gonzalez, W.; Idee, J. M.; Miserocchi, G.; Rigolio, R.; Chanana, M.; Morjan, I.; Wang, D.; Sancini, G.

    2010-10-01

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) are considered for various diagnostic and therapeutic applications in brain including their use as contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging. In delivery application, the critical step is the transport across cell layers and the internalization of NPs into specific cells, a process often limited by poor targeting specificity and low internalization efficiency. The development of the models of brain endothelial cells and choroidal plexus epithelial cells in culture has allowed us to investigate into these mechanisms. Our strategy is aimed at exploring different routes to the entrapment of iron oxide NPs in these brain related cells. Here we demonstrated that not only cells endowed with a good phagocytic activity like activated macrophages but also endothelial brain capillary and choroidal plexus epithelial cells do internalize iron oxide NPs. Our study of the intracellular trafficking of NPs by TEM, and confocal microscopy revealed that NPs are mainly internalized by the endocytic pathway. Iron oxide NPs were dispersed in water and coated with 3,4-dihydroxyl-L-phenylalanine (L-DOPA) using standard procedures. Magnetic lipid NPs were prepared by NANOVECTOR: water in oil in water (W/O/W) microemulsion process has been applied to directly coat different iron based NPs by lipid layer or to encapsulate them into Solid Lipid Nanoparticles (SLNs). By these coating/loading the colloidal stability was improved without strong alteration of the particle size distribution. Magnetic lipid NPs could be reconstituted after freeze drying without appreciable changes in stability. L-DOPA coated NPs are stable in PBS and in MEM (Modified Eagle Medium) medium. The magnetic properties of these NPs were not altered by the coating processes. We investigated the cellular uptake, cytotoxicity, and interaction of these NPs with rat brain capillary endothelial (REB4) and choroidal plexus epithelial (Z310) cells. By means of widefield, confocal

  2. Role of cell cycle on the cellular uptake and dilution of nanoparticles in a cell population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kim, Jong Ah; Åberg, Christoffer; Salvati, Anna; Dawson, Kenneth A

    2012-01-01

    Nanoparticles are considered a primary vehicle for targeted therapies because they can pass biological barriers and enter and distribute within cells by energy-dependent pathways(1-3). So far, most studies have shown that nanoparticle properties, such as size(4-6) and surface(7,8), can influence how

  3. Real-time monitoring of cellular dynamics using a microfluidic cell culture system with integrated electrode array and potentiostat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zor, Kinga; Vergani, M.; Heiskanen, Arto;

    2011-01-01

    A versatile microfluidic, multichamber cell culture and analysis system with an integrated electrode array and potentiostat suitable for electrochemical detection and microscopic imaging is presented in this paper. The system, which allows on-line electrode cleaning and modification, was developed...... for real-time monitoring of cellular dynamics, exemplified in this work by monitoring of redox metabolism inside living yeast cells and dopamine release from PC12 cells....

  4. Cellular Localization of the Molecular Forms of Acetylcholinesterase in rat Pheochromocytoma Pc12 Cells Treated with Nerve Growth Factor1

    OpenAIRE

    Inestrosa, Nibaldo C; Reiness, C. Gary; Reichardt, Louis F.; Hall, Zach W

    1981-01-01

    In rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells treated with nerve growth factor (NGF), there are several molecular forms of the enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE) which sediment on sucrose density gradients at 4 to 6, 10, and 16 S, respectively. We have investigated the cellular localization of these forms in PC12 cells. In order to determine which forms are soluble and which are membrane bound, we extracted PC12 cells in buffers of various ionic strengths and detergent compositions. To distinguish int...

  5. Backbone rigidity and static presentation of guanidinium groups increases cellular uptake of arginine-rich cell-penetrating peptides

    OpenAIRE

    Lättig-Tünnemann, Gisela; Prinz, Manuel; Hoffmann, Daniel; Behlke, Joachim; Palm-Apergi, Caroline; Morano, Ingo; Herce, Henry D.; Cardoso, M. Cristina

    2011-01-01

    In addition to endocytosis-mediated cellular uptake, hydrophilic cell-penetrating peptides are able to traverse biological membranes in a non-endocytic mode termed transduction, resulting in immediate bioavailability. Here we analysed structural requirements for the non-endocytic uptake mode of arginine-rich cell-penetrating peptides, by a combination of live-cell microscopy, molecular dynamics simulations and analytical ultracentrifugation. We demonstrate that the transduction efficiency of ...

  6. Micro 3D cell culture systems for cellular behavior studies: Culture matrices, devices, substrates, and in-situ sensing methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jonghoon; Lee, Eun Kyu; Choo, Jaebum; Yuh, Junhan; Hong, Jong Wook

    2015-09-01

    Microfabricated systems equipped with 3D cell culture devices and in-situ cellular biosensing tools can be a powerful bionanotechnology platform to investigate a variety of biomedical applications. Various construction substrates such as plastics, glass, and paper are used for microstructures. When selecting a construction substrate, a key consideration is a porous microenvironment that allows for spheroid growth and mimics the extracellular matrix (ECM) of cell aggregates. Various bio-functionalized hydrogels are ideal candidates that mimic the natural ECM for 3D cell culture. When selecting an optimal and appropriate microfabrication method, both the intended use of the system and the characteristics and restrictions of the target cells should be carefully considered. For highly sensitive and near-cell surface detection of excreted cellular compounds, SERS-based microsystems capable of dual modal imaging have the potential to be powerful tools; however, the development of optical reporters and nanoprobes remains a key challenge. We expect that the microsystems capable of both 3D cell culture and cellular response monitoring would serve as excellent tools to provide fundamental cellular behavior information for various biomedical applications such as metastasis, wound healing, high throughput screening, tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, and drug discovery and development. PMID:26358782

  7. Positive and negative regulatory mechanisms for fine-tuning cellularity and functions of medullary thymic epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taishin eAkiyama

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Self-tolerant T cells and regulatory T cells develop in the thymus. A wide variety of cell-cell interactions in the thymus is required for the differentiation, proliferation, and repertoire selection of T cells. Various secreted and cell surface molecules expressed in thymic epithelial cells mediate these processes. Moreover, cytokines expressed by cells of hematopoietic origin regulate the cellularity of thymic epithelial cells (TECs. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF family RANK ligand, lymphotoxin, and CD40 ligand, expressed in T cells and innate lymphoid cells (ILCs, promote the differentiation and proliferation of medullary TECs (mTECs that play critical roles in the induction of immune tolerance. A recent study suggests that interleukin-22 (IL-22 produced by ILCs promotes regeneration of TECs after irradiation. Intriguingly, TGF-β and osteoprotegerin limit cellularity of mTECs, thereby attenuating regulatory T cell generation. We will review recent insights into the molecular basis for cell-cell interactions regulating differentiation and proliferation of mTECs and also discuss about a perspective on use of mathematical models for understanding this complicated system.

  8. Radiation improves gene transfer into human ovarian carcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose/Objective: Poor gene transfer is the major stumbling block to successful gene therapy today. We hypothesized that ionizing radiation might activate cellular recombination, and so improve stable gene transfer. During studies to quantitate radiation activated recombination, we also found that both plasmid and adenoviral vector transduction could be increased by irradiation. The studies presented here describe the effects of irradiation on gene transduction efficiency (both transient and stable transduction) in several human ovarian carcinoma lines, as a prelude to in vivo animal studies. Materials and Methods: The effect of irradiation on stable gene transfer efficiency was determined in human ovarian carcinoma cell lines (SKOV3, CAOV3 and PA1). Either irradiated or unirradiated cells were transfected with pRSVZ plasmid (containing a LacZ expression cassette) in either the supercoiled and linearized (XmnI) forms and β-galactosidase expression followed with time. Transfection efficiency was measured by flow cytometry following FDG staining at 0, 48, and 96 hours after irradiation. FDG is converted to a fluorescent metabolite by LacZ, and thus reflects the transfection efficiency of the LacZ containing vector. Vector quantitation was also performed by southern hybridization. Stable transduction efficiency was measured 14 -35 days after irradiation. Optimization of the time of irradiation with respect to transfection was performed. Since cells demonstrated increased stable recombination for as long as 96 hours after irradiation, continuous low dose rate and multiple radiation fractions were also tested. These experiments were repeated using the Ad5CMVlacZ. Dividing cells were exposed to Ad5CMVlacZ at an MOI of 0.1,1,5,10 and 100 to determine optimum transfection concentration. Transduction efficiency was again measured at various intervals to determine the radiation dose and interval post transfection which provides the maximum increase in transfection

  9. Effects of in vitro Brevetoxin Exposure on Apoptosis and Cellular Metabolism in a Leukemic T Cell Line (Jurkat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John W. Sleasman

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Harmful algal blooms (HABs of the toxic dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis, produce red tide toxins, or brevetoxins. Significant health effects associated with red tide toxin exposure have been reported in sea life and in humans, with brevetoxins documented within immune cells from many species. The objective of this research was to investigate potential immunotoxic effects of brevetoxins using a leukemic T cell line (Jurkat as an in vitro model system. Viability, cell proliferation, and apoptosis assays were conducted using brevetoxin congeners PbTx-2, PbTx-3, and PbTx-6. The effects of in vitro brevetoxin exposure on cell viability and cellular metabolism or proliferation were determined using trypan blue and MTT (1-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-3,5- diphenylformazan, respectively. Using MTT, cellular metabolic activity was decreased in Jurkat cells exposed to 5 - 10 μg/ml PbTx-2 or PbTx-6. After 3 h, no significant effects on cell viability were observed with any toxin congener in concentrations up to 10 μg/ml. Viability decreased dramatically after 24 h in cells treated with PbTx-2 or -6. Apoptosis, as measured by caspase-3 activity, was significantly increased in cells exposed to PbTx-2 or PbTx-6. In summary, brevetoxin congeners varied in effects on Jurkat cells, with PbTx-2 and PbTx-6 eliciting greater cellular effects compared to PbTx-3.

  10. Reversibility of cellular aging by reprogramming through an embryonic-like state : a new paradigm for human cell rejuvenation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Marc Lemaitre

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Direct reprogramming of somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs provides a unique opportunity to derive patient-specific stem cells with potential application in autologous tissue replacement therapies and without the ethical concerns of Embryonic Stem Cells (hESC. However, this strategy still suffers from several hurdles that need to be overcome before clinical applications. Among them, cellular senescence, which contributes to aging and restricted longevity, has been described as a barrier to the derivation of iPSCs. This suggests that aging might be an important limitation for therapeutic purposes for elderly individuals. Senescence is characterized by an irreversible cell cycle arrest in response to various forms of stress, including activation of oncogenes, shortened telomeres, DNA damage, oxidative stress, and mitochondrial dysfunction. To overcome this barrier, we developed an optimized 6-factor-based reprogramming protocol that is able to cause efficient reversing of cellular senescence and reprogramming into iPSCs. We demonstrated that iPSCs derived from senescent and centenarian fibroblasts have reset telomere size, gene expression profiles, oxidative stress, and mitochondrial metabolism, and are indistinguishable from hESC. Finally, we demonstrate that re-differentiation led to rejuvenated cells with a reset cellular physiology, defining a new paradigm for human cell rejuvenation. We discuss the molecular mechanisms involved in cell reprogramming of senescent cells

  11. Dietary nitrate improves cardiac contractility via enhanced cellular Ca(2+) signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pironti, Gianluigi; Ivarsson, Niklas; Yang, Jiangning; Farinotti, Alex Bersellini; Jonsson, William; Zhang, Shi-Jin; Bas, Duygu; Svensson, Camilla I; Westerblad, Håkan; Weitzberg, Eddie; Lundberg, Jon O; Pernow, John; Lanner, Johanna; Andersson, Daniel C

    2016-05-01

    The inorganic anion nitrate (NO3 (-)), which is naturally enriched in certain vegetables (e.g., spinach and beetroot), has emerged as a dietary component that can regulate diverse bodily functions, including blood pressure, mitochondrial efficiency, and skeletal muscle force. It is not known if dietary nitrate improves cardiac contractility. To test this, mice were supplemented for 1-2 weeks with sodium nitrate in the drinking water at a dose similar to a green diet. The hearts from nitrate-treated mice showed increased left ventricular pressure and peak rate of pressure development as measured with the Langendorff heart technique. Cardiomyocytes from hearts of nitrate-treated and control animals were incubated with the fluorescent indicator Fluo-3 to measure cytoplasmic free [Ca(2+)] and fractional shortening. Cardiomyocytes from nitrate-treated mice displayed increased fractional shortening, which was linked to larger Ca(2+) transients. Moreover, nitrate hearts displayed increased protein expression of the L-type Ca(2+) channel/dihydropyridine receptor and peak L-type Ca(2+) channel currents. The nitrate-treated hearts displayed increased concentration of cAMP but unchanged levels of cGMP compared with controls. These findings provide the first evidence that dietary nitrate can affect the expression of important Ca(2+) handling proteins in the heart, resulting in increased cardiomyocyte Ca(2+) signaling and improved left ventricular contractile function. Our observation shows that dietary nitrate impacts cardiac function and adds understanding to inorganic nitrate as a physiological modulator. PMID:27071401

  12. Sodium Glucose Cotransporter 2 (SGLT2 Plays as a Physiological Glucose Sensor and Regulates Cellular Contractility in Rat Mesangial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masanori Wakisaka

    Full Text Available Mesangial cells play an important role in regulating glomerular filtration by altering their cellular tone. We report the presence of a sodium glucose cotransporter (SGLT in rat mesangial cells. This study in rat mesangial cells aimed to evaluate the expression and role of SGLT2.The SGLT2 expression in rat mesangial cells was assessed by Western blotting and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Changes in the mesangial cell surface area at different glucose concentrations and the effects of extracellular Na+ and Ca2+ and of SGLT and Na+/Ca2+ exchanger (NCX inhibitors on cellular size were determined. The cellular sizes and the contractile response were examined during a 6-day incubation with high glucose with or without phlorizin, an SGLT inhibitor.Western blotting revealed an SGLT2 band, and RT-PCR analysis of SGLT2 revealed the predicted 422-bp band in both rat mesangial and renal proximal tubular epithelial cells. The cell surface area changed according to the extracellular glucose concentration. The glucose-induced contraction was abolished by the absence of either extracellular Na+ or Ca2+ and by SGLT and NCX inhibitors. Under the high glucose condition, the cell size decreased for 2 days and increased afterwards; these cells did not contract in response to angiotensin II, and the SGLT inhibitor restored the abolished contraction.These data suggest that SGLT2 is expressed in rat mesangial cells, acts as a normal physiological glucose sensor and regulates cellular contractility in rat mesangial cells.

  13. Comparative transcriptome analyses indicate enhanced cellular protection against FMDV in PK15 cells pretreated with IFN-γ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yin; Zhu, Zesen; Chang, Huiyun; Liu, Zaixin; Liu, Jing; Chen, Huiyong

    2016-07-25

    Interferon gamma (IFN-γ) can induce a host antiviral response to foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV) in vivo and in vitro. To elucidate the mechanism of IFN-γ anti FMDV infection in host cells, high-throughput RNA sequencing was analyzed for systemic changes in gene expression profiles in PK15 cells infected by FMDV with or without IFN-γ pretreatment. More than 25 million reads, covering 1.2-1.5 Gb, were analyzed from each experiment panel. FMDV challenge altered the transcription of genes involved in positively and negatively regulating cell death or apoptosis; however, the expected immune suppression response was not obvious. IFN-γ pretreatment combined with FMDV infection normalized the increase in apoptosis. Furthermore, the transcription factors required for IFN-γ functioning, STAT1 and IRF1 were up-regulated by IFN-γ pretreatment and stimulated downstream IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs). These induced ISGs are mainly responsible for antigen processing, antigen presentation or antiviral defense. Interestingly, a synergistic effect on some ISGs, including OAS1, OAS2, MX1, MX2, RIG-I and IFIT1, was observed in the combined treatment compared to the IFN-γ treatment alone. The suggested effects identified by RNA sequencing were consistent with cellular morphology changes and confirmed by related protein markers. This is the first report exploring transcriptome alterations introduced by FMDV infection with or without IFN-γ pretreatment. The identified key host genes that control cell survival in vitro broaden our comprehensive understanding of how IFN-γ inhibits FMDV infection and may shed light on developing improved FMD control approaches. PMID:27018244

  14. Characterization of clear cell renal cell carcinoma with diffusion kurtosis imaging: correlation between diffusion kurtosis parameters and tumor cellularity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Yongming; Yao, Qiuying; Wu, Guangyu; Wu, Dongmei; Wu, Lianming; Zhu, Li; Xue, Rong; Xu, Jianrong

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI) in the characterization of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) and to correlate DKI parameters with tumor cellularity. Fifty-nine patients with pathologically diagnosed ccRCCs were evaluated by DKI on a 3-T scanner. Regions of interest were drawn on the maps of the mean diffusion coefficient (MD) and mean diffusion kurtosis (MK). All ccRCCs were histologically graded according to the Fuhrman classification system. Tumor cellularity was measured by the nuclear-to-cytoplasm (N/C) ratio and the number of tumor cell nuclei (NTCN). ccRCCs were classified as grade 1 (n = 23), grade 2 (n = 24), grade 3 (n = 10) and grade 4 (n = 3). Both MD and MK could readily discriminate between normal renal parenchyma and ccRCCs (p  0.05) for both MD and MK. With regard to NTCN, no significant difference was found between any two grades (p > 0.05), and the N/C ratio changed significantly with grade (p correlations were found between MK and MD (r = -0.56, p r = -0.36, p correlated (r = 0.45, p = 0.003). DKI could quantitatively characterize ccRCC with different grades by probing non-Gaussian diffusion properties related to changes in the tumor microenvironment or tissue complexities in the tumor. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27119793

  15. MOLTEN CARBONATE FUEL CELL PRODUCT DESIGN IMPROVEMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H.C. Maru; M. Farooque

    2004-08-01

    The ongoing program is designed to advance the carbonate fuel cell technology from full-size proof-of-concept field test to the commercial design. DOE has been funding Direct FuelCell{reg_sign} (DFC{reg_sign}) development at FuelCell Energy, Inc. (FCE) for stationary power plant applications. The program efforts are focused on technology and system optimization for cost reduction, leading to commercial design development and prototype system field trials. FCE, Danbury, CT, is a world-recognized leader for the development and commercialization of high efficiency fuel cells that can generate clean electricity at power stations, or at distributed locations near the customers such as hospitals, schools, universities, hotels and other commercial and industrial applications. FCE has designed three different fuel cell power plant models (DFC300A, DFC1500 and DFC3000). FCE's power plants are based on its patented DFC{reg_sign} technology, where the fuel is directly fed to the fuel cell and hydrogen is generated internally. These power plants offer significant advantages compared to the existing power generation technologies--higher fuel efficiency, significantly lower emissions, quieter operation, flexible siting and permitting requirements, scalability and potentially lower operating costs. Also, the exhaust heat by-product can be used for cogeneration applications such as high-pressure steam, district heating and air conditioning. Several FCE sub-megawatt power plants are currently operating in Europe, Japan and the US. Because hydrogen is generated directly within the fuel cell module from readily available fuels such as natural gas and waste water treatment gas, DFC power plants are ready today and do not require the creation of a hydrogen infrastructure. Product improvement progress made during the reporting period in the areas of technology, manufacturing processes, cost reduction and balance of plant equipment designs is discussed in this report.

  16. Cellular resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnova, Lena; Harris, Georgina; Leist, Marcel; Hartung, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Cellular resilience describes the ability of a cell to cope with environmental changes such as toxicant exposure. If cellular metabolism does not collapse directly after the hit or end in programmed cell death, the ensuing stress responses promote a new homeostasis under stress. The processes of reverting "back to normal" and reversal of apoptosis ("anastasis") have been studied little at the cellular level. Cell types show astonishingly similar vulnerability to most toxicants, except for those that require a very specific target, metabolism or mechanism present only in specific cell types. The majority of chemicals triggers "general cytotoxicity" in any cell at similar concentrations. We hypothesize that cells differ less in their vulnerability to a given toxicant than in their resilience (coping with the "hit"). In many cases, cells do not return to the naive state after a toxic insult. The phenomena of "pre-conditioning", "tolerance" and "hormesis" describe this for low-dose exposures to toxicants that render the cell more resistant to subsequent hits. The defense and resilience programs include epigenetic changes that leave a "memory/scar" - an alteration as a consequence of the stress the cell has experienced. These memories might have long-term consequences, both positive (resistance) and negative, that contribute to chronic and delayed manifestations of hazard and, ultimately, disease. This article calls for more systematic analyses of how cells cope with toxic perturbations in the long-term after stressor withdrawal. A technical prerequisite for these are stable (organotypic) cultures and a characterization of stress response molecular networks. PMID:26536287

  17. Backbone rigidity and static presentation of guanidinium groups increases cellular uptake of arginine-rich cell-penetrating peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lättig-Tünnemann, Gisela; Prinz, Manuel; Hoffmann, Daniel; Behlke, Joachim; Palm-Apergi, Caroline; Morano, Ingo; Herce, Henry D; Cardoso, M Cristina

    2011-01-01

    In addition to endocytosis-mediated cellular uptake, hydrophilic cell-penetrating peptides are able to traverse biological membranes in a non-endocytic mode termed transduction, resulting in immediate bioavailability. Here we analysed structural requirements for the non-endocytic uptake mode of arginine-rich cell-penetrating peptides, by a combination of live-cell microscopy, molecular dynamics simulations and analytical ultracentrifugation. We demonstrate that the transduction efficiency of arginine-rich peptides increases with higher peptide structural rigidity. Consequently, cyclic arginine-rich cell-penetrating peptides showed enhanced cellular uptake kinetics relative to their linear and more flexible counterpart. We propose that guanidinium groups are forced into maximally distant positions by cyclization. This orientation increases membrane contacts leading to enhanced cell penetration. PMID:21878907

  18. Elemental mapping by synchrotron radiation X-Ray microfluorescence in cellular spheroid of prostate tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prostate cancer is the sixth most common type of cancer and the third most common in males in Western industrialized countries. Cellular spheroid serves as excellent physiologic tumor models as they mimic avascular tumors and micrometastases. Trace elements play a significant role in biological processes. They are capable of affecting human health by competing with essential elements for available binding sites and by the activation or inhibition of reactions between metabolic enzymes. It is well known that zinc levels in the peripheral zone of dorsal and lateral lobes of the prostate are almost 10 times higher than in other soft tissues. Prostate tumor cells were isolated of the prostate tissue samples that were collected from patients submitted to surgery. The measurements were performed in XRF beam line at the Synchrotron Light National Laboratory (LNLS) in Campinas, Brazil. The results showed that all elements were heterogeneously distributed in different areas of the spheroids analyzed. P, S and Cl showed similar elemental distribution in all the samples analyzed while K, Ca, Fe, and Cu showed different elemental distribution. In all spheroids analyzed, Zn presented more intense distributions in the central region of the spheroid. The relationship between the function of Zn in the secretory epithelial cells and the carcinogenic process suggests that more studies on elemental mapping in spheroids are necessary. (author)

  19. Elemental mapping by synchrotron radiation X-Ray microfluorescence in cellular spheroid of prostate tumor cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leitao, R.G.; Anjos, M.J.; Lopes, R.T., E-mail: roberta@lin.ufrj.br [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Instrumentacao Nuclear; Santos, C.A.N. [Instituto Nacional de Metrologia, Qualidade e Tecnologia (INMETRO), Duque de Caxias, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Biotecnologia; Palumbo Junior, A.; Souza, P.A.V.R.; Nasciutti, L.E. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Instituto de Ciencias Biomedicas; Pereira, G.R. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Ensaios Nao Destrutivos, Corrosao e Soldagem

    2013-08-15

    Prostate cancer is the sixth most common type of cancer and the third most common in males in Western industrialized countries. Cellular spheroid serves as excellent physiologic tumor models as they mimic avascular tumors and micrometastases. Trace elements play a significant role in biological processes. They are capable of affecting human health by competing with essential elements for available binding sites and by the activation or inhibition of reactions between metabolic enzymes. It is well known that zinc levels in the peripheral zone of dorsal and lateral lobes of the prostate are almost 10 times higher than in other soft tissues. Prostate tumor cells were isolated of the prostate tissue samples that were collected from patients submitted to surgery. The measurements were performed in XRF beam line at the Synchrotron Light National Laboratory (LNLS) in Campinas, Brazil. The results showed that all elements were heterogeneously distributed in different areas of the spheroids analyzed. P, S and Cl showed similar elemental distribution in all the samples analyzed while K, Ca, Fe, and Cu showed different elemental distribution. In all spheroids analyzed, Zn presented more intense distributions in the central region of the spheroid. The relationship between the function of Zn in the secretory epithelial cells and the carcinogenic process suggests that more studies on elemental mapping in spheroids are necessary. (author)

  20. Cell Identification based on Received Signal Strength Fingerprints: Concept and Application towards Energy Saving in Cellular Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elke Roth-Mandutz

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The increasing deployment of small cells aimed at off-loading data traffic from macrocells in heterogeneous networks has resulted in a drastic increase in energy consumption in cellular networks. Energy consumption can be optimized in a selforganized way by adapting the number of active cells in response to the current traffic demand. In this paper we concentrate on the complex problem of how to identify small cells to be reactivated in situations where multiple cells are concurrently inactive. Solely based on the received signal strength, we present cell-specific patterns for the generation of unique cell fingerprints. The cell fingerprints of the deactivated cells are matched with measurements from a high data rate demanding mobile device to identify the most appropriate candidate. Our scheme results in a matching success rate of up to 100% to identify the best cell depending on the number of cells to be activated.

  1. Analyzing the Influence of Mobile Phone Use of Drivers on Traffic Flow Based on an Improved Cellular Automaton Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Xiao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aimed to analyze the influence of drivers’ behavior of phone use while driving on traffic flow, including both traffic efficiency and traffic safety. An improved cellular automaton model was proposed to simulate traffic flow with distracted drivers based on the Nagel-Schreckenberg model. The driving characters of drivers using a phone were first discussed and a value representing the probability to use a phone while driving was put into the CA model. Simulation results showed that traffic flow rate was significantly reduced if some drivers used a phone compared to no phone use. The flow rate and velocity decreased as the proportion of drivers using a phone increased. While, under low density, the risk of traffic decreased first and then increased as the distracted drivers increased, the distracted behavior of drivers, like using a phone, could reduce the flow rate by 5 percent according to the simulation.

  2. EFFICIENT NANO-SCALE ADMIXTURE FOR FOAM STABILITY IMPROVEMENT OF CELLULAR CONCRETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grishina Аnna Nikolaevna

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The authors present their methodology of synthesis of a nano-scale additive designated for the stabilization of synthetic foaming agents. The nano-scale admixture is composed of iron hydroxide (III sol and aqueous sodium hydro silicates (water glass. Besides the above method, the topological structural model of the nano-scale additive is proposed. The additive stability was assessed upon its one-day storage (with the foaming agent added, and the assessment data are provided in the article. The authors have discovered that it is advisable to use an iron chloride solution in the concentration of 1 % to manufacture the iron hydroxide (III sol. The authors have also discovered that the rate of jellification goes up in the process of injecting the foaming agent into the foam that contains the nano-scale admixture developed by the authors. Dependence between the amount of sodium hydro silicate and the viscosity of the system composed of the water glass and the sol of iron hydroxide (III is examined in detail. The authors have identified that the average water glass viscosity curve demonstrates an extreme nature. The additive is used for the stabilization of the foam generated by synthetic foaming agents. The injection of the proposed additive improves foam stability. It is noteworthy that this positive result is free from any negative side effects.

  3. Induction of vascular endothelial phenotype and cellular proliferation from human cord blood stem cells cultured in simulated microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Brian; Z-M Wan, Jim; Abley, Doris; Akabutu, John

    2005-05-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that stem cells derived from adult hematopoietic tissues are capable of trans-differentiation into non-hematopoietic cells, and that the culture in microgravity ( μg) may modulate the proliferation and differentiation. We investigated the application of μg to human umbilical cord blood stem cells (CBSC) in the induction of vascular endothelial phenotype expression and cellular proliferation. CD34+ mononuclear cells were isolated from waste human umbilical cord blood samples and cultured in simulated μg for 14 days. The cells were seeded in rotary wall vessels (RWV) with or without microcarrier beads (MCB) and vascular endothelial growth factor was added during culture. Controls consisted of culture in 1 G. The cell cultures in RWV were examined by inverted microscopy. Cell counts, endothelial cell and leukocyte markers performed by flow-cytometry and FACS scan were assayed at days 1, 4, 7 and at the termination of the experiments. Culture in RWV revealed significantly increased cellular proliferation with three-dimensional (3D) tissue-like aggregates. At day 4, CD34+ cells cultured in RWV bioreactor without MCB developed vascular tubular assemblies and exhibited endothelial phenotypic markers. These data suggest that CD34+ human umbilical cord blood progenitors are capable of trans-differentiation into vascular endothelial cell phenotype and assemble into 3D tissue structures. Culture of CBSC in simulated μg may be potentially beneficial in the fields of stem cell biology and somatic cell therapy.

  4. Cellular interaction between fixed and living cells; transfer of radioactive materials from living cells to fixed cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakiyama, H.; Otsu, H.; Kanegasaki, S.

    1979-06-01

    Transfer of radioactive materials to fixed cells from an overlying layer of living cells has been examined to determine whether fixed cells can act as acceptors of glycosyltransferases of living cells. After the incubation of living cells were removed by EDTA treatment, and the radioactivity associated with the fixed cells was determined. Lipids, proteins and carbohydrates were found to be transfered from the living cells to the fixed cells. The amount of radioactivity transferred to the fixed cells was dependent on the number of both fixed and living cells and increased with the time of incubation. When fixed cells were treated with chloroform-methanol before the addition of living cells, the transfer of both lipids and proteins to the fixed cells decreased drastically, but only a slight decrease in carbohydrate transfer was observed. Most of the radioactive materials transferred from living cells labeled with glucosamine or fucose to chloroform-methanol-treated fixed cells were solubilized by trypsin but not by the detergents tested. Approximately 55% of the materials transferred from the cells labeled with glucosamine could be solubilized by hyaluronidase and chondroitinase, and the rest was solubilized by neuraminidase and a glycosidase mixture. The treatment of chloroform-methanol-extracted fixed cells with trypsin caused a significant decrease in the transfer from cells labeled with glucosamine. When nucleotide sugars were used as the radioactive precursor, no significant amount of radioactivity was transferred to the fixed cells.

  5. Cellular and molecular effects of accelerated heavy ions on cultivated mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the study described here the capacity of mammalian cells to recover from irradiation with heavy ions was determined from the survival rates observed following irradiation and incubation during damage repair. While the number of surviving cells was seen to increase considerably during the first four hours after X-irradiation, no such signs of recovery were detectable following exposure to heavy ions. Two experiments even pointed to a drastic loss of cells in the initial hours after exposure. In order to assess the degree of molecular damage, total strand breaks and double strand breaks of the DNA were measured. Taking account also of findings revealed in other studies on the induction of DNA strand breaks, it was found that the efficiency curves for the different particles vary according to LET (range investigated between 300 and 16000 kev./μm), which is an observation also made in connection with other endpoints. Notably, DNA double-strand breaks measured for Ne ions (between 300 and 400 kev./μm) pointed to a relative biological effectiveness of greater than One. The nature of DNA damage inflicted was ascertained on the basis of the ratio between double-strand breaks and single-strand breaks. Like the findings on strand break induction, the dependence of the DSB-SSB ratio on the LET was seen to be largely consistent with intracellular measurements in mammalian DNA and with values determined for virus or phage DNA in solutions containing radical scavengers. This congruence appears to be suggestive of radioprotective effects of the cellular matrix. There was no evidence in confirmation of the theory that the high ionisation densities occurring in the path of heavy ions primarily lead to complex damage. (orig./MG)

  6. Cellular Barcoding Links B-1a B Cell Potential to a Fetal Hematopoietic Stem Cell State at the Single-Cell Level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Trine A; Jaensson Gyllenbäck, Elin; Zriwil, Alya;

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) undergo a functional switch in neonatal mice hallmarked by a decrease in self-renewing divisions and entry into quiescence. Here, we investigated whether the developmental attenuation of B-1a cell output is a consequence of a shift in stem cell state during ontogeny....... Using cellular barcoding for in vivo single-cell fate analyses, we found that fetal liver definitive HSCs gave rise to both B-1a and B-2 cells. Whereas B-1a potential diminished in all HSCs with time, B-2 output was maintained. B-1a and B-2 plasticity could be reinitiated in a subset of adult HSCs...... by ectopic expression of the RNA binding protein LIN28B, a key regulator of fetal hematopoiesis, and this coincided with the clonal reversal to fetal-like elevated self-renewal and repopulation potential. These results anchor the attenuation of B-1a cell output to fetal HSC behavior and demonstrate...

  7. Acute dyskerin depletion triggers cellular senescence and renders osteosarcoma cells resistant to genotoxic stress-induced apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Ping; Mobasher, Maral E.; Alawi, Faizan, E-mail: falawi@upenn.edu

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • Dyskerin depletion triggers cellular senescence in U2OS osteosarcoma cells. • Dyskerin-depleted cells are resistant to apoptosis induced by genotoxic stress. • Chromatin relaxation sensitizes dyskerin-depleted cells to apoptosis. - Abstract: Dyskerin is a conserved, nucleolar RNA-binding protein implicated in an increasing array of fundamental cellular processes. Germline mutation in the dyskerin gene (DKC1) is the cause of X-linked dyskeratosis congenita (DC). Conversely, wild-type dyskerin is overexpressed in sporadic cancers, and high-levels may be associated with poor prognosis. It was previously reported that acute loss of dyskerin function via siRNA-mediated depletion slowed the proliferation of transformed cell lines. However, the mechanisms remained unclear. Using human U2OS osteosarcoma cells, we show that siRNA-mediated dyskerin depletion induced cellular senescence as evidenced by proliferative arrest, senescence-associated heterochromatinization and a senescence-associated molecular profile. Senescence can render cells resistant to apoptosis. Conversely, chromatin relaxation can reverse the repressive effects of senescence-associated heterochromatinization on apoptosis. To this end, genotoxic stress-induced apoptosis was suppressed in dyskerin-depleted cells. In contrast, agents that induce chromatin relaxation, including histone deacetylase inhibitors and the DNA intercalator chloroquine, sensitized dyskerin-depleted cells to apoptosis. Dyskerin is a core component of the telomerase complex and plays an important role in telomere homeostasis. Defective telomere maintenance resulting in premature senescence is thought to primarily underlie the pathogenesis of X-linked DC. Since U2OS cells are telomerase-negative, this leads us to conclude that loss of dyskerin function can also induce cellular senescence via mechanisms independent of telomere shortening.

  8. Butyrate plays differential roles in cellular signaling in cancerous HCT116 and noncancerous NCM460 colon cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butyrate, an intestinal microbiota metabolite of dietary fiber, exhibits chemoprevention effects in colon. However, the mechanistic action of butyrate at the cellular level remains to be determined. We hypothesize that butyrate plays differential roles in cancerous and non-cancerous cells through si...

  9. Cellular Modulation of Polymeric Device Surfaces: Promise of Adult Stem Cells for Neuro-Prosthetics

    OpenAIRE

    Richter, Anja; Kruse, Charli; Moser, Andreas; Hofmann, Ulrich G.; Danner, Sandra

    2011-01-01

    Minimizing the foreign body response is seen as one critical research strategy for implants especially when designed for immune-privileged organs like the brain. The context of this work is to improve deep brain stimulating devices used in a consistently growing spectrum of psychomotor and psychiatric diseases mainly in form of stiff electrodes. Based on the compliance match hypothesis of biocompatibility we present another step forward using flexible implant materials covered with brain cell...

  10. Dexamethasone alone and in combination with desipramine, phenytoin, valproic acid or levetiracetam interferes with 5-ALA-mediated PpIX production and cellular retention in glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Johnathan E; Steele, Christopher J; Rovin, Richard A; Belton, Robert J; Winn, Robert J

    2016-03-01

    Extent of resection of glioblastoma (GBM) correlates with overall survival. Fluorescence-guided resection (FGR) using 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) can improve the extent of resection. Unfortunately not all patients given 5-ALA accumulate sufficient quantities of protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) for successful FGR. In this study, we investigated the effects of dexamethasone, desipramine, phenytoin, valproic acid, and levetiracetam on the production and accumulation of PpIX in U87MG cells. All of these drugs, except levetiracetam, reduce the total amount of PpIX produced by GBM cells (p < 0.05). When dexamethasone is mixed with another drug (desipramine, phenytoin, valproic acid or levetiracetam) the amount of PpIX produced is further decreased (p < 0.01). However, when cells are analyzed for PpIX cellular retention, dexamethasone accumulated significantly more PpIX than the vehicle control (p < 0.05). Cellular retention of PpIX was not different from controls in cells treated with dexamethasone plus desipramine, valproic acid or levetiracetam, but was significantly less for dexamethasone plus phenytoin (p < 0.01). These data suggest that medications given before and during surgery may interfere with PpIX accumulation in malignant cells. At this time, levetiracetam appears to be the best medication in its class (anticonvulsants) for patients undergoing 5-ALA-mediated FGR. PMID:26643803

  11. Cellular trafficking determines the exon skipping activity of Pip6a-PMO in mdx skeletal and cardiac muscle cells

    OpenAIRE

    Lehto, Taavi; Castillo Alvarez, Alejandra; Gauck, Sarah; Gait, Michael J.; Coursindel, Thibault; Matthew J A Wood; Lebleu, Bernard; Boisguerin, Prisca

    2013-01-01

    Cell-penetrating peptide-mediated delivery of phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers (PMOs) has shown great promise for exon-skipping therapy of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD). Pip6a-PMO, a recently developed conjugate, is particularly efficient in a murine DMD model, although mechanisms responsible for its increased biological activity have not been studied. Here, we evaluate the cellular trafficking and the biological activity of Pip6a-PMO in skeletal muscle cells and primary cardiomyoc...

  12. Cyclic RGD peptide-modified liposomal drug delivery system: enhanced cellular uptake in vitro and improved pharmacokinetics in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Z

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Zhongya Chen,1,2 Jiaxin Deng,1,2 Yan Zhao,1,2 Tao Tao1,21National Pharmaceutical Engineering Research Center, 2Shanghai Institute of Pharmaceutical Industry, China State Institute of Pharmaceutical Industry, Shanghai, People's Republic of ChinaBackground: Integrins αvβ3 and αvβ5, both of which specifically recognize the Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD motif, are overexpressed on many solid tumors and in tumor neovasculature. Thus, coupling the RGD motif to the liposomal surface for achieving active targeting can be a promising strategy for the treatment of tumors.Methods: Cyclo(Arg-Gly-Asp-D-Phe-Cys (cRGD was covalently coupled with the liposomal membrane surface, followed by coating with poly(ethylene glycol (PEG using the post-insertion technique. The coupling efficiency of cRGD was determined. Doxorubicin as a model anticancer drug was loaded into liposomes using an ammonium sulfate gradient method to investigate the encapsulation efficiency, cellular uptake by the integrin-overexpressing human glioma cell line U87MG in vitro, and pharmacokinetic properties in Sprague-Dawley rats.Results: cRGD was conjugated to the liposomal surface by a thiol-maleimide coupling reaction. The coupling efficiency reached 98%. The encapsulation efficiency of doxorubicin in liposomes was more than 98%. The flow cytometry test result showed that cRGD-modified liposomes (RGD-DXRL-PEG had higher cell uptake by U87MG cells, compared with nontargeted liposomes (DXRL-PEG. The cellular uptake was significantly inhibited in the presence of excess free cRGD. Both the targeted (t1/2 = 24.10 hours and non-targeted (t1/2 = 25.32 hours liposomes showed long circulating properties in rat plasma. The area under the curve of the targeted and nontargeted liposomes was 6.4-fold and 8.3-fold higher than that of doxorubicin solution, respectively.Conclusion: This study indicates preferential targeting and long circulating properties for cRGD-modified liposomes in vivo, which could be used as

  13. MOLTEN CARBONATE FUEL CELL PRODUCT DESIGN IMPROVEMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H.C. Maru; M. Farooque

    2005-03-01

    The program was designed to advance the carbonate fuel cell technology from full-size proof-of-concept field test to the commercial design. DOE has been funding Direct FuelCell{reg_sign} (DFC{reg_sign}) development at FuelCell Energy, Inc. (FCE, formerly Energy Research Corporation) from an early state of development for stationary power plant applications. The current program efforts were focused on technology and system development, and cost reduction, leading to commercial design development and prototype system field trials. FCE, in Danbury, CT, is a world-recognized leader for the development and commercialization of high efficiency fuel cells that can generate clean electricity at power stations, or at distributed locations near the customers such as hospitals, schools, universities, hotels and other commercial and industrial applications. FCE has designed three different fuel cell power plant models (DFC300A, DFC1500 and DFC3000). FCE's power plants are based on its patented DFC{reg_sign} technology, where a hydrocarbon fuel is directly fed to the fuel cell and hydrogen is generated internally. These power plants offer significant advantages compared to the existing power generation technologies--higher fuel efficiency, significantly lower emissions, quieter operation, flexible siting and permitting requirements, scalability and potentially lower operating costs. Also, the exhaust heat by-product can be used for cogeneration applications such as high-pressure steam, district heating and air conditioning. Several sub-MW power plants based on the DFC design are currently operating in Europe, Japan and the US. Several one-megawatt power plant design was verified by operation on natural gas at FCE. This plant is currently installed at a customer site in King County, WA under another US government program and is currently in operation. Because hydrogen is generated directly within the fuel cell module from readily available fuels such as natural gas and

  14. Induction of cellular deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis in butyrate-treated cells by simian virus 40 deoxyribonucleic acid.

    OpenAIRE

    Kawasaki, S; Diamond, L; Baserga, R

    1981-01-01

    Sodium butyrate (3 mM) inhibited the entry into the S phase of quiescent 3T3 cells stimulated by serum, but had no effect on the accumulation of cellular ribonucleic acid. Simian virus 40 infection or manual microinjection of cloned fragments from the simian virus 40 A gene caused quiescent 3T3 cells to enter the S phase even in the presence of butyrate. NGI cells, a line of 3T3 cells transformed by simian virus 40, grew vigorously in 3 mM butyrate. Homokaryons were formed between G1 and S-ph...

  15. An improved method for quantification of extra domain A-containing cellular fibronectin (EDAcFN) in different body fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ylätupa, S; Mertaniemi, P; Haglund, C; Partanen, P

    1995-01-31

    A quantitative direct enzyme immunoassay for the extra domain A-containing isoform of cellular fibronectin (EDAcFN) was established for screening of large series of blood samples and various body fluids of different pH and viscosity. The method is based on the monoclonal antibody DH1 recognizing the extra domain A in cellular fibronectin (EDAcFN). Studies on the effect of dilution of plasma and serum samples in this direct assay indicated that the measured concentration of cFN in the samples greatly depend on the ratio of sample dilution. The linearity of the assay was improved with sample dilution and the optimal dilution was 1:5. Stored diluted samples retained their cFN content at +4 degrees C, and -20 degrees C and -70 degrees C for months in contrast to samples stored undiluted. With this direct EIA the detection limit was 0.05 micrograms/ml and the linear portion of the standard curve could be extended above 30 micrograms/ml. Thus, the cFN concentration of blood samples could be measured reliably without inhibition also in samples with very high concentration of cFN. This is particularly important when measuring blood samples from cancer patients, since these samples may contain more than 20 micrograms/ml EDAcFN. The assay was standardized for blood samples but, due to the possibility of sample dilution, it also enabled reliable quantification of EDAcFN in various other body fluids. Undiluted some of the samples with non-neutral pH (urine, bile) or with high viscosity (seminal plasma) interfered with the assay. In addition to blood samples, the EDAcFN concentration was determined in samples of urine, bile, amniotic fluid, cervicovaginal secretions, seminal fluid, cerebrospinal fluid, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, pleural fluid and saliva. Thereby, this modified method was shown to be applicable to various body fluids. PMID:7758225

  16. The Rho GTPase Cdc42 regulates hair cell planar polarity and cellular patterning in the developing cochlea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kirjavainen

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Hair cells of the organ of Corti (OC of the cochlea exhibit distinct planar polarity, both at the tissue and cellular level. Planar polarity at tissue level is manifested as uniform orientation of the hair cell stereociliary bundles. Hair cell intrinsic polarity is defined as structural hair bundle asymmetry; positioning of the kinocilium/basal body complex at the vertex of the V-shaped bundle. Consistent with strong apical polarity, the hair cell apex displays prominent actin and microtubule cytoskeletons. The Rho GTPase Cdc42 regulates cytoskeletal dynamics and polarization of various cell types, and, thus, serves as a candidate regulator of hair cell polarity. We have here induced Cdc42 inactivation in the late-embryonic OC. We show the role of Cdc42 in the establishment of planar polarity of hair cells and in cellular patterning. Abnormal planar polarity was displayed as disturbances in hair bundle orientation and morphology and in kinocilium/basal body positioning. These defects were accompanied by a disorganized cell-surface microtubule network. Atypical protein kinase C (aPKC, a putative Cdc42 effector, colocalized with Cdc42 at the hair cell apex, and aPKC expression was altered upon Cdc42 depletion. Our data suggest that Cdc42 together with aPKC is part of the machinery establishing hair cell planar polarity and that Cdc42 acts on polarity through the cell-surface microtubule network. The data also suggest that defects in apical polarization are influenced by disturbed cellular patterning in the OC. In addition, our data demonstrates that Cdc42 is required for stereociliogenesis in the immature cochlea.

  17. Structure of modified [epsilon]-polylysine micelles and their application in improving cellular antioxidant activity of curcuminoids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Hailong; Li, Ji; Shi, Ke; Huang, Qingrong (Rutgers)

    2015-10-15

    The micelle structure of octenyl succinic anhydride modified {var_epsilon}-polylysine (M-EPL), an anti-microbial surfactant prepared from natural peptide {var_epsilon}-polylysine in aqueous solution has been studied using synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Our results revealed that M-EPLs formed spherical micelles with individual size of 24-26 {angstrom} in aqueous solution which could further aggregate to form a larger dimension with averaged radius of 268-308 {angstrom}. Furthermore, M-EPL micelle was able to encapsulate curcuminoids, a group of poorly-soluble bioactive compounds from turmeric with poor oral bioavailability, and improve their water solubility. Three loading methods, including solvent evaporation, dialysis, and high-speed homogenization were compared. The results indicated that the dialysis method generated the highest loading capacity and curcuminoids water solubility. The micelle encapsulation was confirmed as there were no free curcuminoid crystals detected in the differential scanning calorimetry analysis. It was also demonstrated that M-EPL encapsulation stabilized curcuminoids against hydrolysis at pH 7.4 and the encapsulated curcuminoids showed elevated cellular antioxidant activity compared with free curcuminoids. This work suggested that M-EPL could be used as new biopolymer micelles for delivering poorly soluble drugs/phytochemicals and improving their bioactivities.

  18. Adult neural precursor cells form connexin-dependent networks that improve their survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravella, Ajaya; Ringstedt, Thomas; Brion, Jean-Pierre; Pandolfo, Massimo; Herlenius, Eric

    2015-10-21

    Establishment of cellular networks and calcium homeostasis are essential for embryonic stem cell proliferation and differentiation. We also hypothesized that adult neural progenitor cells form functional cellular networks relevant for their development. We isolated neuronal progenitor cells from the subventricular zone of 5-week-old mice to investigate the role of gap junctions, calcium homeostasis, and cellular networks in cell differentiation and survival. Western blotting and reverse transcription-PCR showed that the cells expressed the gap junction components connexin 26, 36, 43, and 45, and that expression of connexin 43 increased in early (8 days) differentiated cells. Transmission electron microscopy and immunocytochemistry also indicated that gap junctions were present. Scrape-loading experiments showed dye transfer between cells that could be prevented by gapjunction blockers; thus, functional intercellular gap junctions had been established. However, dye transfer was four times stronger in differentiated cultures, correlating with the increased connexin 43 expression. During time-lapse calcium imaging, both differentiated and undifferentiated cultures showed spontaneous calcium activity that was reduced by gap junction blockers. Cross-correlation analysis of the calcium recordings showed that the cells were interconnected through gap junctions and that the early-differentiated cells were organized in small-world networks. Gap junction blockers did not affect proliferation and differentiation, but resulted in twice as many apoptotic cells. mRNAi knockdown of connexin 43 also doubled the number of apoptotic cells. We conclude that adult neural progenitor cells form networks in vitro that are strengthened during early differentiation by increased expression of connexin 43. The networks are functional and improve cell survival. PMID:26351758

  19. An evaluation of the mechanism of ABCA7 on cellular lipid release in ABCA7-HEC293 cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Cheng-ai; WANG Na; ZHAO Dan-hui

    2013-01-01

    Background ABCA7 is a member of the ABCA subfamily that shows a high degree of homology to ABCA1 and,like ABCA1,mediates cellular cholesterol and phospholipid release by apolipoproteins when transfected in vitro.However,expression of ABCA7 has been shown to be downregulated by increased cellular cholesterol while ABCA1 was upregulated.Methods The underlying mechanism for this effect was examined in ABCA1 or ABCA7-transfected HEC293.Lipid content in the medium and cells was determined by enzymatic assays.Gene expression was quantitated by real time PCR,and protein content was determined by Western blotting.Results While ABCA7 mRNA was decreased by 25-hydroxycholesterol treatment,ABCA1 was apparently increased.Treatment with the synthetic LXR agonist T0901317 (T09) upregulated ABCA1 expression and apoAI-mediated cellular lipid release in ABCA1-transfected HEC293 cells,but ABCA7 expression and cellular lipid release in ABCA7-transfected HEC293 cells showed no obvious changes.Conclusion The ABCA7 gene is regulated by sterol in a direction opposite to that of ABCA1.

  20. The cellular uptake mechanism, intracellular transportation, and exocytosis of polyamidoamine dendrimers in multidrug-resistant breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Liu, Dan; Zhang, Mengjun; Sun, Yuqi; Zhang, Xiaojun; Guan, Guannan; Zhao, Xiuli; Qiao, Mingxi; Chen, Dawei; Hu, Haiyang

    2016-01-01

    Polyamidoamine dendrimers, which can deliver drugs and genetic materials to resistant cells, are attracting increased research attention, but their transportation behavior in resistant cells remains unclear. In this paper, we performed a systematic analysis of the cellular uptake, intracellular transportation, and efflux of PAMAM-NH2 dendrimers in multidrug-resistant breast cancer cells (MCF-7/ADR cells) using sensitive breast cancer cells (MCF-7 cells) as the control. We found that the uptake rate of PAMAM-NH2 was much lower and exocytosis of PAMAM-NH2 was much greater in MCF-7/ADR cells than in MCF-7 cells due to the elimination of PAMAM-NH2 from P-glycoprotein and the multidrug resistance-associated protein in MCF-7/ADR cells. Macropinocytosis played a more important role in its uptake in MCF-7/ADR cells than in MCF-7 cells. PAMAM-NH2 aggregated and became more degraded in the lysosomal vesicles of the MCF-7/ADR cells than in those of the MCF-7 cells. The endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi complex were found to participate in the exocytosis rather than endocytosis process of PAMAM-NH2 in both types of cells. Our findings clearly showed the intracellular transportation process of PAMAM-NH2 in MCF-7/ADR cells and provided a guide of using PAMAM-NH2 as a drug and gene vector in resistant cells. PMID:27536106

  1. Use of single cell micro-gel electrophoresis to detect the cellular radiosensitivity of two fibroblast strains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Single cell micro-gel electrophoresis (SCGE) and MTT assay were used to determine the relationships between radiation-induced initial DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), the ability of cells to repair DSBs and cellular radiosensitivity in both AT5BIVA and GM637 cell lines. The results demonstrated that AT5BIVA cell line was significantly more radiosensitive than GM637. The initial DSBs in both AT5BIVA and GM637 lines increased with the rise of irradiation dose, and showed significant dependence on dose. At a given dose of 20 Gy, radiation-induced initial DSBs in AT5BIVA cell line was significantly higher than those in GM637. The ability of AT5BIVA cell line to repair DSBs was more powerful than that of GM637. The results suggested that the radiation-induced initial DSBs in cells and the ability of cells to repair DSBs both correlated with cellular radiosensitivity to a certain extent, and could be used as potential predictors of intrinsic radiosensitivity of cells

  2. Inter-cellular nanovesicle mediated microRNA transfer: a mechanism of environmental modulation of hepatocellular cancer cell growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogure, Takayuki; Lin, Wen-Lang; Yan, Irene K.; Braconi, Chiara; Patel, Tushar

    2011-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is characterized by a propensity for multifocality, growth by local spread, and dysregulation of multiple signaling pathways. These features may be determined by the tumoral microenvironment. The potential of tumor cells to modulate HCC growth and behavior by secreted proteins has been extensively studied. In contrast the potential for genetic modulation is poorly understood. We investigated the role and involvement of tumor derived nanovesicles capable of altering gene expression, and characterized their ability to modulate cell signaling and biological effects in other cells. We show that HCC cells can produce nanovesicles, exosomes, that differ in both RNA and protein content from their cells of origin. These can be taken up and internalized by other cells, and can transmit a functional transgene. The microRNA content of these exosomes was examined, and a subset that is highly enriched within exosomes was identified. A combinatorial approach to identify potential targets identified transforming growth factor β activated kinase-1 (TAK1) as the most likely candidate pathway that could be modulated by these miRNA. Loss of TAK1 has been implicated in hepatocarcinogenesis and is a biologically plausible target for inter-cellular modulation. We showed that HCC cell derived exosomes can modulate TAK1 expression and associated signaling and enhance transformed cell growth in recipient cells. Conclusion: Exosome mediated miRNA transfer is an important mechanism of inter-cellular communication in HCC cells. These observations identify a unique inter-cellular mechanism that could potentially contribute to local spread, intrahepatic metastases or multifocal growth in HCC. PMID:21721029

  3. Oligonol suppresses lipid accumulation and improves insulin resistance in a palmitate-induced in HepG2 hepatocytes as a cellular steatosis model

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Jae-Yeo; Kim, Younghwa; Im, Jee Ae; Lee, Hyangkyu

    2015-01-01

    Background Oligonol is a low molecular weight form of polyphenol polymers derived from lychee fruits. Several studies suggest that Oligonol has an anti-obesity effect. Since obesity is tightly associated with insulin resistance, we investigated a possible remission effect of Oligonol on lipid accumulation and insulin resistance in human hepatic HepG2 cells. Methods HepG2 cells were treated with palmitate for 24 h to induce cellular hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance. The cells were then...

  4. Data set for comparison of cellular dynamics between human AAVS1 locus-modified and wild-type cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeomi Mizutani

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This data article describes cellular dynamics, such as migration speed and mobility of the cytoskeletal protein, of wild-type human fibroblast cells and cells with a modified adeno-associated virus integration site 1 (AAVS1 locus on human chromosome 19. Insertion of exogenous gene into the AAVS1 locus has been conducted in recent biological researches. Previously, our data showed that the AAVS1-modification changes cellular contractile force (Mizutani et al., 2015 [1]. To assess if this AAVS1-modification affects cell migration, we compared cellular migration speed and turnover of cytoskeletal protein in human fibroblasts and fibroblasts with a green fluorescent protein gene knocked-in at the AAVS1 locus in this data article. Cell nuclei were stained and changes in their position attributable to cell migration were analyzed. Fluorescence recovery was observed after photobleaching for the fluorescent protein-tagged myosin regulatory light chain. Data here are related to the research article “Transgene Integration into the Human AAVS1 Locus Enhances Myosin II-Dependent Contractile Force by Reducing Expression of Myosin Binding Subunit 85” [1].

  5. Cellular Damage in Diabetic Wounded Fibroblast Cells following Phototherapy at 632.8, 830, and 1064 nm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study aimed to establish if laser irradiation induces cellular and genetic damage. Background. Phototherapy has been shown to induce wound healing in diabetic wounds, however little information is known regarding light-induced damage. Methods. Diabetic wounded fibroblasts were irradiated with 5 or 16 J/cm2 at 632.8, 830, and 1064 nm. Damage was assessed by measuring membrane and DNA damages. Cellular migration was determined by microscopy. Results. Cells irradiated with 5J/cm2 at 632.8 and 830 nm showed a significant decrease in DNA damage while all cells irradiated with a fluence of 16 J/cm2 showed an increase in membrane and DNA damages. Conclusion. This study showed that the comet assay and LDH release were sensitive enough to pick up changes in laser-irradiated cells. This study also showed that cellular and genetic damage inflicted on diabetic wounded cells was dependent on dose and wavelength and that cells are able to recover and respond.

  6. Possible improvement of solar cell efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the development of a new solar cell prototype in order to improve photovoltaic efficiency. In this model we show that the material can have three successive incident ray absorptions instead of two currently, by varying the incidence angle, the aperture between the summits of two neighbouring pyramids and their height. This study concerns in particular the photovoltaic parameters such as the spectral response. This model was checked for angles varying between 54 and 60 deg and for pyramid heights between 5 and 10 μm. For these values of incidence angle, the apertures between the summits of two neighbouring pyramids varied respectively from 14.54 to 11.54 μm for a pyramid angle height of 10 μm

  7. Cellular uptake but low permeation of human calcitonin-derived cell penetrating peptides and Tat(47-57) through well-differentiated epithelial models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tréhin, Rachel; Krauss, Ulrike; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G;

    2004-01-01

    To investigate whether cell penetrating peptides (CPP) derived from human calcitonin (hCT) possess, in addition to cellular uptake, the capacity to deliver their cargo through epithelial barriers.......To investigate whether cell penetrating peptides (CPP) derived from human calcitonin (hCT) possess, in addition to cellular uptake, the capacity to deliver their cargo through epithelial barriers....

  8. The regeneration of epidermal cells of Saintpaulia leaves as a new plant-tissue system for cellular radiation biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engels, F M; van der Laan, F M; Leenhouts, H P; Chadwick, K H

    1980-09-01

    Investigation of the nucleus of epidermal cells of the petioles of Saintpaulia leaves by cytofluorimetry revealed that all cells are in a non-cycling pre DNA synthesis phase. Cultivation of dissected leaves results in a synchronous regeneration process of a defined number of cells. Five days after onset of cultivation the cells reach the first mitosis. The nuclear development during the regeneration process is described. Irradiation of the leaves results in a directly visible inhibition of this regenerating capability which is used to quantify cell survival in a tissue. The data show that the radiation response has a similar shape to that of the survival of single cells in culture. This response can be observed before the first mitosis of the cells and its application as a new plant tissue system for cellular radiation research is discussed. PMID:7012060

  9. A new cell line for high throughput HIV-specific antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and cell-to-cell virus transmission studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlandi, Chiara; Flinko, Robin; Lewis, George K.

    2016-01-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate that antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (Wren et al., 2013) is important in the pathogenesis of HIV-1 infection. Namely, ADCC is induced during natural HIV-1 infection or in HIV-1 vaccine studies, the latter demonstrated by the RV144 vaccine trial. To expedite the assessment of ADCC in studies of HIV, we have developed a high throughput assay. We have optimized the rapid fluorometric antibody-mediated cytotoxicity assay (RFADCC) by transfecting the EGFP-CEM-NKr cell line to constitutively express SNAP-tagged CCR5. This cell line can then serve as a source of HIV-specific targets when coated with monomeric gp120, spinoculated with inactivated intact virions, infected by cell-free viral diffusion or infected by cell-to-cell transmission of virus. The optimized strategy has two significant advantages over the original RFADCC method: First, the preparation of detectable target cells is less labor intensive and faster as it does not rely on multiple staining and washing steps for target cells. Second, because the target cell markers GFP and SNAP are constitutively expressed, the assay provides highly reproducible data. These strengths make the optimized RFADCC assay suitable not only for studies of HIV-1 specific cytotoxicity but also for studies of cell–cell transmission of virus. In conclusion, this assay provides a new generation T cell line that can expedite large clinical studies as well as research studies in humans or non-human primates. PMID:26969387

  10. Evaluation of in-vitro cytotoxicity and cellular uptake efficiency of zidovudine-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles modified with Aloe Vera in glioma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    K S, Joshy; Sharma, Chandra P; Kalarikkal, Nandakumar; Sandeep, K; Thomas, Sabu; Pothen, Laly A

    2016-09-01

    Zidovudine loaded solid lipid nanoparticles of stearic acid modified with Aloe Vera (AV) have been prepared via simple emulsion solvent evaporation method which showed excellent stability at room temperature and refrigerated condition. The nanoparticles were examined by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), which revealed the overlap of the AV absorption peak with the absorption peak of modified stearic acid nanoparticles. The inclusion of AV to stearic acid decreased the crystallinity and improved the hydrophilicity of lipid nanoparticles and thereby improved the drug loading efficacy of lipid nanoparticles. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) imaging revealed that, the average particle size of unmodified (bare) nanoparticles was 45.66±12.22nm and modified solid lipid nanoparticles showed an average size of 265.61±80.44nm. Solid lipid nanoparticles with well-defined morphology were tested in vitro for their possible application in drug delivery. Cell culture studies using C6 glioma cells on the nanoparticles showed enhanced growth and proliferation of cells without exhibiting any toxicity. In addition, normal cell morphology and improved uptake were observed by fluorescence microscopy images of rhodamine labeled modified solid lipid nanoparticles compared with unmodified nanoparticles. The cellular uptake study suggested that these nanoparticles could be a promising drug delivery system to enhance the uptake of antiviral drug by brain cells and it could be a suitable drug carrier system for the treatment of HIV. PMID:27207037

  11. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 can superinfect HIV-2-infected cells: pseudotype virions produced with expanded cellular host range.

    OpenAIRE

    Le Guern, M; Levy, J A

    1992-01-01

    In studies on viral interference, cloned T-cell lines chronically infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 or HIV-2 were inoculated with several strains of these two AIDS retrovirus subtypes. HIV-2UC1-infected cells, which still express the CD4 receptor, could be superinfected with a variety of HIV-1 and HIV-2 strains. This event was accompanied by cytopathic effects in the cells and production of pseudotype virions with an expanded cellular host range. HIV-1- or HIV-2-infected...

  12. Cellular and Molecular Consequences of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor-γ Activation in Ovarian Cancer Cells1*

    OpenAIRE

    Vignati, Sara; Albertini, Veronica; Rinaldi, Andrea; Kwee, Ivo; RIVA Cristina; Oldrini, Rita; Capella, Carlo; Bertoni, Francesco; Carbone, Giuseppina M; Catapano, Carlo V.

    2006-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ) is a ligand-activated transcription factor. In addition to its canonical role in lipid and glucose metabolism, PPAR-γ controls cell proliferation, death, and differentiation in several tissues. Here we have examined the expression of PPAR-γ in ovarian tumors and the cellular and molecular consequences of its activation in ovarian cancer cells. PPAR-γ was expressed in a large number of epithelial ovarian tumors and cell lines. The PPAR-γ li...

  13. Transcriptional control of fungal cell cycle and cellular events by Fkh2, a forkhead transcription factor in an insect pathogen

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Juan-juan; Qiu, Lei; Cai, Qing; Ying, Sheng-Hua; Feng, Ming-Guang

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptional control of the cell cycle by forkhead (Fkh) transcription factors is likely associated with fungal adaptation to host and environment. Here we show that Fkh2, an ortholog of yeast Fkh1/2, orchestrates cell cycle and many cellular events of Beauveria bassiana, a filamentous fungal insect pathogen. Deletion of Fkh2 in B. bassiana resulted in dramatic down-regulation of the cyclin-B gene cluster and hence altered cell cycle (longer G2/M and S, but shorter G0/G1, phases) in unicel...

  14. Novel and improved yeast cell factories for biosustainable processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Workman, Mhairi

    2014-01-01

    with relevant applications as cell factories (including Pichia spp. and Yarrowia lipolytica) and other less well characterized strains (e.g. Pachysolen tannophilus). This presentation will address how we evaluate cellular performance with a view to utilizing yeast species in industrial biotechnology...

  15. Myocardin inhibits cellular proliferation by inhibiting NF-κB(p65)-dependent cell cycle progression

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Ru-hang; Zheng, Xi-Long; Callis, Thomas E.; Stansfield, William E.; He, Jiayin; Baldwin, Albert S.; Wang, Da-Zhi; Selzman, Craig H.

    2008-01-01

    We previously reported the importance of the serum response factor (SRF) cofactor myocardin in controlling muscle gene expression as well as the fundamental role for the inflammatory transcription factor NF-κB in governing cellular fate. Inactivation of myocardin has been implicated in malignant tumor growth. However, the underlying mechanism of myocardin regulation of cellular growth remains unclear. Here we show that NF-κB(p65) represses myocardin activation of cardiac and smooth muscle gen...

  16. An improved Cellular Automata model to simulate the behavior of high density crowd and validation by experimental data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feliciani, Claudio; Nishinari, Katsuhiro

    2016-06-01

    In this article we present an improved version of the Cellular Automata floor field model making use of a sub-mesh system to increase the maximum density allowed during simulation and reproduce phenomena observed in dense crowds. In order to calibrate the model's parameters and to validate it we used data obtained from an empirical observation of bidirectional pedestrian flow. A good agreement was found between numerical simulation and experimental data and, in particular, the double outflow peak observed during the formation of deadlocks could be reproduced in numerical simulations, thus allowing the analysis of deadlock formation and dissolution. Finally, we used the developed high density model to compute the flow-ratio dependent fundamental diagram of bidirectional flow, demonstrating the instability of balanced flow and predicting the bidirectional flow behavior at very high densities. The model we presented here can be used to prevent dense crowd accidents in the future and to investigate the dynamics of the accidents which already occurred in the past. Additionally, fields such as granular and active matter physics may benefit from the developed framework to study different collective phenomena.

  17. In vivo and in vitro analysis of age-associated changes and somatic cellular senescence in renal epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgit Berkenkamp

    Full Text Available Acute kidney injury is a major clinical problem and advanced age is associated with ineffective renal regeneration and poor functional outcome. Data from kidney injury models suggest that a loss of tubular epithelial proliferation contributes to a decrease in renal repair capacity with aging, but aging can also lead to a higher severity of inflammation and damage which may influence repair. In this study we tested intrinsic age-dependent changes in tubular epithelial proliferation in young and old mice, by injecting low-dose lead acetate as a non-injurious mitogen. In parallel, we explored in vitro techniques of studying cellular senescence in primary tubular epithelial cells (PTEC. Lead acetate induced tubular epithelial proliferation at a significantly higher rate in young as compared to old mice. Old kidneys showed significantly more senescence as demonstrated by increased p16 (INK4a, senescence associated β-galactosidase, and γH2AX(+/Ki-67(- cells. This was paralleled in old kidneys by a higher number of Cyclin D1 positive tubular cells. This finding was corroborated by a positive correlation between Cyclin D1 positivity and age in human renal biopsies. When tubular cells were isolated from mouse kidneys they rapidly lost their age-associated differences under culture conditions. However, senescence was readily induced in PTEC by γ-irradiation representing a future model for study of cellular senescence in the renal epithelium. Together, our data indicate that the tubular epithelium of aged kidney has an intrinsically reduced proliferative capacity probably due to a higher load of senescent cells. Moreover, stress induced models of cellular senescence are preferable for study of the renal epithelium in vitro. Finally, the positive correlation of Cyclin D1 with age and cellular senescence in PTEC needs further evaluation as to a functional role of renal epithelial aging.

  18. Specific cellular accumulation of photofrin-II in EC cells promotes photodynamic treatment efficacy in esophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shegan; Liang, Shuo; Ding, Kaili; Qu, Zhifeng; Wang, Ying; Feng, Xiaoshan

    2016-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT), which uses a light-sensitive compound and laser irradiation, is a light-based oncological treatment modality. PDT offers an alternative, less invasive treatment for various malignant tumors, such as esophageal cancer (EC), through a photochemical reaction induced by photofrin-II or other oncotropic photosensitizers without severe complications. Previous studies has shown that cancerous tissues accumulated more photosensitizers than paired normal tissues, however, whether it is cellular or vascular mechanisms remains unknown. Herein, in vivo and in vitro examinations were performed to study the mechanisms by which photofrin-II effectively and specifically killed EC cells. In this study, EC tissue of patients treated with photofrin-II, human ESCC cellline SHEEC and parental normal cellline SHEE, primary culture cells of EC tissue were used. The concentration of photofrin-II in cells were evaluated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The results exhibited that accumulation of photofrin-II in cancerous cells were significantly higher than that in non-cancerous cells (p<0.05) under certain dose and time period of incubation of photofrin-II. In summary, our study showed that, photofrin-II specifically accumulated in EC cells in vivo and in vitro after controlling for vascular factors, which provided strong evidence that maybe the cellular factor is the main mechanism by which photofrin-II-mediated PDT selectively caused EC cells death. PMID:26829562

  19. Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) cell penetrating peptide (CPP) conjugates as carriers for cellular delivery of antisense oligomers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shiraishi, Takehiko; Nielsen, Peter E

    2012-01-01

    We have explored the merits of a novel delivery strategy for the antisense oligomers based on cell penetrating peptide (CPP) conjugated to a carrier PNA with sequence complementary to part of the antisense oligomer. The effect of these carrier CPP-PNAs was evaluated by using antisense PNA targeting...... splicing correction of the mutated luciferase gene in the HeLa pLuc705 cell line, reporting cellular (nuclear) uptake of the antisense PNA via luciferase activity measurement. Carrier CPP-PNA constructs were studied in terms of construct modification (with octaarginine and/or decanoic acid) and carrier PNA...... length (to adjust binding affinity). In general, the carrier CPP-PNA constructs including the ones with decanoyl modification provided significant increase of the activity of unmodified antisense PNA as well as of antisense octaarginine-PNA conjugates. Antisense activity, and by inference cellular...

  20. Two-dimensional fluid-filled closed-cell cellular solid as an acoustic metamaterial with negative index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorodnitsyn, V.; Van Damme, B.

    2016-04-01

    A concept for acoustic metamaterials consisting of a cellular medium with fluid-filled cells is fabricated and studied experimentally. In such a system, the fluid and solid structure explicitly interact, and elastic wave propagation is coupled to both phases. Focusing here on shear wave behavior, we confirm previous numerical studies in three steps. We first measure the material deformations pertaining to three qualitatively different shear wave modes in the frequency range below 3.5 kHz. We then measure the group velocity and demonstrate that, within a certain frequency interval, the group and phase velocity have opposite signs. This shows that the system acts as a negative-index metamaterial. Finally, we confirm the presence of band gaps due to the locally resonant behavior of the cell walls. The demonstrated concept of a closed, fluid-filled cellular material as an acoustic metamaterial opens a wide space for applications.

  1. Reconstitution of the cellular response to DNA damage in vitro using damage-activated extracts from mammalian cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roper, Katherine; Coverley, Dawn, E-mail: dc17@york.ac.uk

    2012-03-10

    In proliferating mammalian cells, DNA damage is detected by sensors that elicit a cellular response which arrests the cell cycle and repairs the damage. As part of the DNA damage response, DNA replication is inhibited and, within seconds, histone H2AX is phosphorylated. Here we describe a cell-free system that reconstitutes the cellular response to DNA double strand breaks using damage-activated cell extracts and naieve nuclei. Using this system the effect of damage signalling on nuclei that do not contain DNA lesions can be studied, thereby uncoupling signalling and repair. Soluble extracts from G1/S phase cells that were treated with etoposide before isolation, or pre-incubated with nuclei from etoposide-treated cells during an in vitro activation reaction, restrain both initiation and elongation of DNA replication in naieve nuclei. At the same time, H2AX is phosphorylated in naieve nuclei in a manner that is dependent upon the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-like protein kinases. Notably, phosphorylated H2AX is not focal in naieve nuclei, but is evident throughout the nucleus suggesting that in the absence of DNA lesions the signal is not amplified such that discrete foci can be detected. This system offers a novel screening approach for inhibitors of DNA damage response kinases, which we demonstrate using the inhibitors wortmannin and LY294002. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A cell free system that reconstitutes the response to DNA damage in the absence of DNA lesions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Damage-activated extracts impose the cellular response to DNA damage on naieve nuclei. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PIKK-dependent response impacts positively and negatively on two separate fluorescent outputs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Can be used to screen for inhibitors that impact on the response to damage but not on DNA repair. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LY294002 and wortmannin demonstrate the system's potential as a pathway focused screening

  2. [Cellular distribution and behavior of metallothionein in mammalian cells following exposure to silver nanoparticles and silver ions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyayama, Takamitsu; Arai, Yuta; Suzuki, Noriyuki; Hirano, Seishiro

    2014-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are commercially used mainly as antibacterial reagents in wound dressing and deodorant powders. However, the mechanisms underlying Ag toxicity in mammals are not fully understood. In the present study, we assessed cellular distribution and toxicity of AgNPs and AgNO3 in mouse macrophage cell line (J774.1) and those of AgNO3 in human bronchial epithelial cell line (BEAS-2B) focusing on behavior of metallothionein (MT). J774.1 cells were exposed to 0-100 μg Ag/mL AgNPs or AgNO3 and BEAS-2B cells were exposed to 0-100 μM AgNO3 for 24 h. The cytotoxicity was assayed by a modified MTT method. The cellular concentration and distribution of Ag were evaluated by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectorometry (ICP-MS) and laser scanning microscopy. Distribution of Ag to MT and other proteins was determined using HPLC-ICP-MS. Most AgNPs were found in lysosomes in J774.1 at 3 h after post exposure. Ag was distributed to high molecular weight proteins in AgNPs-exposed cells, while most Ag was bound to MT in AgNO3-exposed cells. In AgNO3-exposed BEAS-2B cells cellular Ag concentration and Ag-bound MT (Ag-MT) were sharply increased up to 3 h and then decreased. ROS production appeared to cause relocation of MT-bound Ag to mitochondria, which evoked inhibition of electron transport chain. AgNPs were sequestered by high-molecular weight proteins rather than MT, probably because they were taken up by lysosomes before induction of MT. PMID:24882648

  3. Reconstitution of the cellular response to DNA damage in vitro using damage-activated extracts from mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In proliferating mammalian cells, DNA damage is detected by sensors that elicit a cellular response which arrests the cell cycle and repairs the damage. As part of the DNA damage response, DNA replication is inhibited and, within seconds, histone H2AX is phosphorylated. Here we describe a cell-free system that reconstitutes the cellular response to DNA double strand breaks using damage-activated cell extracts and naïve nuclei. Using this system the effect of damage signalling on nuclei that do not contain DNA lesions can be studied, thereby uncoupling signalling and repair. Soluble extracts from G1/S phase cells that were treated with etoposide before isolation, or pre-incubated with nuclei from etoposide-treated cells during an in vitro activation reaction, restrain both initiation and elongation of DNA replication in naïve nuclei. At the same time, H2AX is phosphorylated in naïve nuclei in a manner that is dependent upon the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-like protein kinases. Notably, phosphorylated H2AX is not focal in naïve nuclei, but is evident throughout the nucleus suggesting that in the absence of DNA lesions the signal is not amplified such that discrete foci can be detected. This system offers a novel screening approach for inhibitors of DNA damage response kinases, which we demonstrate using the inhibitors wortmannin and LY294002. -- Highlights: ► A cell free system that reconstitutes the response to DNA damage in the absence of DNA lesions. ► Damage-activated extracts impose the cellular response to DNA damage on naïve nuclei. ► PIKK-dependent response impacts positively and negatively on two separate fluorescent outputs. ► Can be used to screen for inhibitors that impact on the response to damage but not on DNA repair. ► LY294002 and wortmannin demonstrate the system's potential as a pathway focused screening approach.

  4. Cross acclimation between heat and hypoxia: Heat acclimation improves cellular tolerance and exercise performance in acute normobaric hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben James Lee

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. The potential for cross acclimation between environmental stressors is not well understood. Thus the aim of this investigation was to determine the effect of fixed-workload heat or hypoxic acclimation on cellular, physiological and performance responses during post acclimation hypoxic exercise in humans. Method. Twenty-one males (age 22 ± 5 years; stature 1.76 ± 0.07m; mass 71.8 ± 7.9kg; V ̇O2 peak 51 ± 7mL.kg-1.min-1 completed a cycling hypoxic stress test (HST and self-paced 16.1km time trial (TT before (HST1, TT1, and after (HST2, TT2 a series of 10 daily 60 min training sessions (50% N V ̇O2peak in control (CON, n = 7; 18°C, 35%RH, hypoxic (HYP, n = 7; or hot (HOT, n = 7; 40°C, 25% RH conditions. Results. TT performance in hypoxia was improved following both acclimation treatments, HYP (-3:16 ± 3:10 mins:sec; p = 0.0006 and HOT (-2:02 ± 1:02 mins:sec; p = 0.005, but unchanged after CON (+0:31 ± 1:42 mins:sec. Resting monocyte heat shock protein 72 (mHSP72 increased prior to HST2 in HOT (62 ± 46% and HYP (58 ± 52%, but was unchanged after CON (9 ± 46%, leading to an attenuated mHSP72 response to hypoxic exercise in HOT and HYP HST2 compared to HST1 (p < 0.01. Changes in extracellular hypoxia-inducible factor 1-α followed a similar pattern to those of mHSP72. Physiological strain index (PSI was attenuated in HOT (HST1 = 4.12 ± 0.58, HST2 = 3.60 ± 0.42; p = 0.007 as a result of a reduced HR (HST1 = 140 ± 14 b.min-1; HST2 131 ± 9 b.min-1 p = 0.0006 and Trectal (HST1 = 37.55 ± 0.18°C; HST2 37.45 ± 0.14°C; p = 0.018 during exercise. Whereas PSI did not change in HYP (HST1 = 4.82 ± 0.64, HST2 4.83 ± 0.63. Conclusion. Heat acclimation improved cellular and systemic physiological tolerance to steady state exercise in moderate hypoxia. Additionally we show, for the first time, that heat acclimation improved cycling time trial performance to a magnitude similar to that achieved by hypoxic acclimation.

  5. Multi-cellular rosettes in the mouse visceral endoderm facilitate the ordered migration of anterior visceral endoderm cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgios Trichas

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The visceral endoderm (VE is a simple epithelium that forms the outer layer of the egg-cylinder stage mouse embryo. The anterior visceral endoderm (AVE, a specialised subset of VE cells, is responsible for specifying anterior pattern. AVE cells show a stereotypic migratory behaviour within the VE, which is responsible for correctly orientating the anterior-posterior axis. The epithelial integrity of the VE is maintained during the course of AVE migration, which takes place by intercalation of AVE and other VE cells. Though a continuous epithelial sheet, the VE is characterised by two regions of dramatically different behaviour, one showing robust cell movement and intercalation (in which the AVE migrates and one that is static, with relatively little cell movement and mixing. Little is known about the cellular rearrangements that accommodate and influence the sustained directional movement of subsets of cells (such as the AVE within epithelia like the VE. This study uses an interdisciplinary approach to further our understanding of cell movement in epithelia. Using both wild-type embryos as well as mutants in which AVE migration is abnormal or arrested, we show that AVE migration is specifically linked to changes in cell packing in the VE and an increase in multi-cellular rosette arrangements (five or more cells meeting at a point. To probe the role of rosettes during AVE migration, we develop a mathematical model of cell movement in the VE. To do this, we use a vertex-based model, implemented on an ellipsoidal surface to represent a realistic geometry for the mouse egg-cylinder. The potential for rosette formation is included, along with various junctional rearrangements. Simulations suggest that while rosettes are not essential for AVE migration, they are crucial for the orderliness of this migration observed in embryos. Our simulations are similar to results from transgenic embryos in which Planar Cell Polarity (PCP signalling is disrupted

  6. Improved cell activity on biodegradable photopolymer scaffolds using titanate nanotube coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of bioactive materials is in the premise of tissue engineering. For several years, surface functionalization of scaffolds has been one of the most promising approaches to stimulate cellular activity and finally improve implant success. Herein, we describe the development of a bioactive composite scaffold composed of a biodegradable photopolymer scaffold and titanate nanotubes (TNTs). The biodegradable photopolymer scaffolds were fabricated by applying mask-projection excimer laser photocuring at 308 nm. TNTs were synthesized and then spin-coated on the porous scaffolds. Upon culturing fibroblast cells on scaffolds, we found that nanotubes coating affects cell viability and proliferation demonstrating that TNT coatings enhance cell growth on the scaffolds by further improving their surface topography. - Highlights: • Biodegradable scaffolds were produced by mask-assisted UV laser photocuring. • Titanate nanotube deposition was carried out without binding compounds or additives. • Titanate nanotube coatings enhanced cell viability and proliferation

  7. Improved cell activity on biodegradable photopolymer scaffolds using titanate nanotube coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beke, S., E-mail: szabolcs.beke@iit.it [Nanophysics, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Via Morego 30, 16163 Genova (Italy); Barenghi, R. [IEIIT, National Research Council (CNR), Via De Marini 6, 16149 Genova (Italy); Farkas, B.; Romano, I. [Nanophysics, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Via Morego 30, 16163 Genova (Italy); Kőrösi, L. [Department of Biotechnology, Nanophage Therapy Center, Enviroinvest Corporation, Kertváros u. 2, H-7632 Pécs (Hungary); Scaglione, S. [IEIIT, National Research Council (CNR), Via De Marini 6, 16149 Genova (Italy); Brandi, F. [Nanophysics, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Via Morego 30, 16163 Genova (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Ottica, CNR, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124-Pisa (Italy)

    2014-11-01

    The development of bioactive materials is in the premise of tissue engineering. For several years, surface functionalization of scaffolds has been one of the most promising approaches to stimulate cellular activity and finally improve implant success. Herein, we describe the development of a bioactive composite scaffold composed of a biodegradable photopolymer scaffold and titanate nanotubes (TNTs). The biodegradable photopolymer scaffolds were fabricated by applying mask-projection excimer laser photocuring at 308 nm. TNTs were synthesized and then spin-coated on the porous scaffolds. Upon culturing fibroblast cells on scaffolds, we found that nanotubes coating affects cell viability and proliferation demonstrating that TNT coatings enhance cell growth on the scaffolds by further improving their surface topography. - Highlights: • Biodegradable scaffolds were produced by mask-assisted UV laser photocuring. • Titanate nanotube deposition was carried out without binding compounds or additives. • Titanate nanotube coatings enhanced cell viability and proliferation.

  8. Cellular Architecture of Treponema pallidum: Novel Flagellum, Periplasmic Cone, and Cell Envelope as Revealed by Cryo-Electron Tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Jun; Howell, Jerrilyn K.; Bradley, Sherille D.; Zheng, Yesha; Zhou, Z. Hong; Norris, Steven J

    2010-01-01

    High resolution cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET) was utilized to visualize Treponema pallidum, the causative agent of syphilis, at the molecular level. Three-dimensional (3-D) reconstructions from 304 infectious organisms revealed unprecedented cellular structures of this unusual member in the spirochetal family. High resolution cryo-ET reconstructions provided the detailed structures of the cell envelope, which is significantly different from that of gram-negative bacteria. The 4 nm lipid ...

  9. Increased cellular uptake of biocompatible superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles into malignant cells by an external magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prijic, Sara; Scancar, Janez; Romih, Rok; Cemazar, Maja; Bregar, Vladimir B; Znidarsic, Andrej; Sersa, Gregor

    2010-07-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) are used as delivery systems for different therapeutics including nucleic acids for magnetofection-mediated gene therapy. The aim of our study was to evaluate physicochemical properties, biocompatibility, cellular uptake and trafficking pathways of the custom-synthesized SPIONs for their potential use in magnetofection. Custom-synthesized SPIONs were tested for size, shape, crystalline composition and magnetic behavior using a transmission electron microscope, X-ray diffractometer and magnetometer. SPIONs were dispersed in different aqueous media to obtain ferrofluids, which were tested for pH and stability using a pH meter and zetameter. Cytotoxicity was determined using the MTS and clonogenic assays. Cellular uptake and trafficking pathways were qualitatively evaluated by transmission electron microscopy and quantitatively by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry. SPIONs were composed of an iron oxide core with a diameter of 8-9 nm, coated with a 2-nm-thick layer of silica. SPIONs, dispersed in 0.9% NaCl solution, resulted in a stable ferrofluid at physiological pH for several months. SPIONs were not cytotoxic in a broad range of concentrations and were readily internalized into different cells by endocytosis. Exposure to neodymium-iron-boron magnets significantly increased the cellular uptake of SPIONs, predominantly into malignant cells. The prepared SPIONs displayed adequate physicochemical and biomedical properties for potential use in magnetofection. Their cellular uptake was dependent on the cell type, and their accumulation within the cells was dependent on the duration of exposure to an external magnetic field. PMID:20602230

  10. Off the shelf cellular therapeutics: Factors to consider during cryopreservation and storage of human cells for clinical use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Erik J; Thirumala, Sreedhar; Badhe-Buchanan, Sandhya S; Clarke, Dominic; Mathew, Aby J

    2016-06-01

    The field of cellular therapeutics has immense potential, affording an exciting array of applications in unmet medical needs. One of several key issues is an emphasis on getting these therapies from bench to bedside without compromising safety and efficacy. The successful commercialization of cellular therapeutics will require many to extend the shelf-life of these therapies beyond shipping "fresh" at ambient or chilled temperatures for "just in time" infusion. Cryopreservation is an attractive option and offers potential advantages, such as storing and retaining patient samples in case of a relapse, banking large quantities of allogeneic cells for broader distribution and use and retaining testing samples for leukocyte antigen typing and matching. However, cryopreservation is only useful if cells can be reanimated to physiological life with negligible loss of viability and functionality. Also critical is the logistics of storing, processing and transporting cells in clinically appropriate packaging systems and storage devices consistent with quality and regulatory standards. Rationalized approaches to develop commercial-scale cell therapies require an efficient cryopreservation system that provides the ability to inventory standardized products with maximized shelf life for later on-demand distribution and use, as well as a method that is scientifically sound and optimized for the cell of interest. The objective of this review is to bridge this gap between the basic science of cryobiology and its application in this context by identifying several key aspects of cryopreservation science in a format that may be easily integrated into mainstream cell therapy manufacture. PMID:27173747

  11. Cellular uptake of 125I-mIBG and of 111In-pentetreotide by human neuroblastoma cells in culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim. Neuroblastoma have various prognosis, leading or not to heavy therapeutics. MIBG scan is the reference for assessment of the disease extent, but somatostatin analogs are promising as somatostatin receptors expression might indicate neuroendocrine tumoral cell differentiation. The aim of our study was to establish an experimental model to assess cellular uptake of 125I-meta-iodo-benzyl-guanidine (125I-mIBG) and of 111In pentetreotide (111In-OCT), by neuroblastoma cells culture. Material and methods. We compared the uptake of these tracers by SK-N-SH human neuroblastoma cell line in monolayer culture. After cell characterization, toxicity of ligands and of their competitive inhibitors was studied. Experiments with separate incubation of each tracer, using different times and concentrations, determined optimal conditions, which were then applied to simultaneous incubation studies. Results. Total uptakes after simultaneous 3 h-incubation with 125I-mIBG (106 M) and 111In-OCT (108 M) (respectively 3.5 % and 0.03 % of administered activity per 105 cells) were not different from total uptake with separate incubation. Conclusions. Our results confirms the validity of the methodology which is now under use to study the influence of cell differentiation on cellular uptake. (authors)

  12. The cytotoxicity of lead and uranium on rat osteoblastic cells is highly dependent on chemical speciation and cellular accumulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milgram, S.; Carriere, M.; Thiebault, C.; Gouget, B. [CEA Saclay, CNRS - UMR9956, Lab Pierre Sue, F-91198 Gif Sur Yvette, (France); Malval, L. [INSERM, E366, Lab Biol Tissue Osseux, St Etienne, (France)

    2007-07-01

    Complete text of publication follows: Uranium (U) and lead (Pb), as other heavy metals, present a strong chemical toxicity. After blood contamination, U and Pb, complexed with proteins or inorganic molecules are conveyed to target organs, the skeleton being the major long-term storage site. Once in bones, both metals are incorporated in the hydroxyapatite matrix by substitution with calcium. They can thus be released during re-modelling, which explains in part their toxicity. Although the clinical effects of these metals are well known, the cellular mechanisms of their action are not well understood. To investigate the biological effects of U and Pb acute exposure on osteoblasts, ROS17/2.8 cells were exposed to Pb or U [0-1 mM] for 24 h. The most relevant chemical and physical states, namely the most likely forms (species) of the toxics in contact with cells after blood contamination were selected for cell exposure. For each metal species, Pb and U toxicity were assessed through cell viability assay. The results show that whatever the speciation, U chemical toxicity to bone cells is far lower than Pb toxicity. Pb appears to be cytotoxic when left free in the exposure medium or when it is complexed with bicarbonate, cysteine or citrate, but not with albumin or phosphate (an insoluble form of Pb). In order to explain these differences in sensitivity between different metals and metal chemical species, time-course and dose-response curves of cellular accumulation at lethal or sub-lethal doses were drawn by direct elemental analysis of metal concentrations in digested cell pellets, using Inductive Coupling Plasma Mass Spectroscopy. These showed a clear correlation between toxicity and cellular accumulation. Also, Pb induces an inhibition of ALP activity after 24 h exposure to sub-lethal doses, which is speciation-dependent and again correlates with cellular accumulation. Phenotypic effects of U are under investigation. In addition, electron-microscopic observation of

  13. pH effect on cellular uptake of Sn(IV) chlorine e6 dichloride trisodium salt by cancer cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khaza'leh, Khaled A; Omar, Khalid; Jaafar, M S

    2011-01-01

    The effects of pH value and presence of serum in an incubation medium on photosensitizer drug cellular uptake in MCF7 cancer cells have been investigated. The results showed that the presence of serum in an incubation medium reduced the drug cellular uptake at all pH values. It has been found that decreasing on pH values of the incubation medium increased the cellular uptake of the drug, demonstrating selective uptake of the sensitizer. The HepG2 liver cancer cells exhibited more drug cellular uptake than CCD-18CO normal colon cells, which assessed the selectivity uptake of photosensitizer on cancerous cells. The concentration of photosensitizer measured in 10(6) cells showed a good correlation to the incubation time. Fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy been have used to examine the cells. PMID:22210969

  14. Performance improvement of silicon solar cells by nanoporous silicon coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dzhafarov T. D.

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper the method is shown to improve the photovoltaic parameters of screen-printed silicon solar cells by nanoporous silicon film formation on the frontal surface of the cell using the electrochemical etching. The possible mechanisms responsible for observed improvement of silicon solar cell performance are discussed.

  15. Cellular Interactions and Biological Responses to Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles in HepG2 and BEAS-2B Cells: Role of Cell Culture Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    ABSTRACT We have shown previously that the composition of the biological medium used in vitro can affect the cellular interaction and biological response of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nano-TiO2) in human lung epithelial cells. However, it is unclear if these effects are co...

  16. Positively charged and pH self-buffering quantum dots for efficient cellular uptake by charge mediation and monitoring cell membrane permeability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Suhua; Song Haipeng; Huang Dejian [Department of Chemistry, National University of Singapore, 3 Science Drive 3, 117543 (Singapore); Ong Weiyi [Department of Anatomy, National University of Singapore, 119260 (Singapore); Han Mingyong, E-mail: chmhdj@nus.edu.s [Institute of Materials Research and Engineering, 3 Research Link, 117602 (Singapore)

    2009-10-21

    Positively charged and pH self-buffering quantum dots (Tren-QDs) were achieved by surface functionalization with tris(2-aminoethyl)amine (Tren) derivatives, which are attached to the inorganic cores of QDs through bidentate chelating of dithiocarbamates. The Tren-QDs exhibit pH buffering capability by absorbing or releasing protons due to the surface polyamine groups as the surrounding pH fluctuates. Such self-buffering capability stabilizes the photoluminescence of the Tren-QDs against acid. The Tren-QDs bear positive charges through protonation of the surface polyamine groups under physiological conditions and the surface positive charges improve their cellular uptake efficiency by charge mediation, which has been demonstrated by BV-2 microglia cells. The photoluminescence of Tren-QDs shows a selective Stern-Volmer response to copper ions and this property has been preliminarily evaluated for investigating the BV-2 cell membrane structure by monitoring the photoluminescence of intracellular Tren-QDs.

  17. Positively charged and pH self-buffering quantum dots for efficient cellular uptake by charge mediation and monitoring cell membrane permeability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Suhua; Song, Haipeng; Ong, Wei Yi; Han, Ming Yong; Huang, Dejian

    2009-10-01

    Positively charged and pH self-buffering quantum dots (Tren-QDs) were achieved by surface functionalization with tris(2-aminoethyl)amine (Tren) derivatives, which are attached to the inorganic cores of QDs through bidentate chelating of dithiocarbamates. The Tren-QDs exhibit pH buffering capability by absorbing or releasing protons due to the surface polyamine groups as the surrounding pH fluctuates. Such self-buffering capability stabilizes the photoluminescence of the Tren-QDs against acid. The Tren-QDs bear positive charges through protonation of the surface polyamine groups under physiological conditions and the surface positive charges improve their cellular uptake efficiency by charge mediation, which has been demonstrated by BV-2 microglia cells. The photoluminescence of Tren-QDs shows a selective Stern-Volmer response to copper ions and this property has been preliminarily evaluated for investigating the BV-2 cell membrane structure by monitoring the photoluminescence of intracellular Tren-QDs.

  18. Positively charged and pH self-buffering quantum dots for efficient cellular uptake by charge mediation and monitoring cell membrane permeability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positively charged and pH self-buffering quantum dots (Tren-QDs) were achieved by surface functionalization with tris(2-aminoethyl)amine (Tren) derivatives, which are attached to the inorganic cores of QDs through bidentate chelating of dithiocarbamates. The Tren-QDs exhibit pH buffering capability by absorbing or releasing protons due to the surface polyamine groups as the surrounding pH fluctuates. Such self-buffering capability stabilizes the photoluminescence of the Tren-QDs against acid. The Tren-QDs bear positive charges through protonation of the surface polyamine groups under physiological conditions and the surface positive charges improve their cellular uptake efficiency by charge mediation, which has been demonstrated by BV-2 microglia cells. The photoluminescence of Tren-QDs shows a selective Stern-Volmer response to copper ions and this property has been preliminarily evaluated for investigating the BV-2 cell membrane structure by monitoring the photoluminescence of intracellular Tren-QDs.

  19. Awakened by cellular stress: isolation and characterization of a novel population of pluripotent stem cells derived from human adipose tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleh Heneidi

    Full Text Available Advances in stem cell therapy face major clinical limitations, particularly challenged by low rates of post-transplant cell survival. Hostile host factors of the engraftment microenvironment such as hypoxia, nutrition deprivation, pro-inflammatory cytokines, and reactive oxygen species can each contribute to unwanted differentiation or apoptosis. In this report, we describe the isolation and characterization of a new population of adipose tissue (AT derived pluripotent stem cells, termed Multilineage Differentiating Stress-Enduring (Muse Cells, which are isolated using severe cellular stress conditions, including long-term exposure to the proteolytic enzyme collagenase, serum deprivation, low temperatures and hypoxia. Under these conditions, a highly purified population of Muse-AT cells is isolated without the utilization of cell sorting methods. Muse-AT cells grow in suspension as cell spheres reminiscent of embryonic stem cell clusters. Muse-AT cells are positive for the pluripotency markers SSEA3, TR-1-60, Oct3/4, Nanog and Sox2, and can spontaneously differentiate into mesenchymal, endodermal and ectodermal cell lineages with an efficiency of 23%, 20% and 22%, respectively. When using specific differentiation media, differentiation efficiency is greatly enhanced in Muse-AT cells (82% for mesenchymal, 75% for endodermal and 78% for ectodermal. When compared to adipose stem cells (ASCs, microarray data indicate a substantial up-regulation of Sox2, Oct3/4, and Rex1. Muse-ATs also exhibit gene expression patterns associated with the down-regulation of genes involved in cell death and survival, embryonic development, DNA replication and repair, cell cycle and potential factors related to oncogenecity. Gene expression analysis indicates that Muse-ATs and ASCs are mesenchymal in origin; however, Muse-ATs also express numerous lymphocytic and hematopoietic genes, such as CCR1 and CXCL2, encoding chemokine receptors and ligands involved in stem cell

  20. Cellular and molecular properties of {sup 90}Y-labeled cetuximab in combination with radiotherapy on human tumor cells in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saki, M.; Toulany, M.; Rodemann, H.P. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Div. of Radiobiology and Molecular Environmental Research; Sihver, W.; Zenker, M.; Heldt, J.M.; Mosch, B.; Pietzsch, H.J.; Steinbach, J. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) e.V., Dresden (Germany). Inst. of Radiopharmacy; Baumann, M. [Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2012-09-15

    Purpose: Anti-EGFR antibody cetuximab (C225) is used in combination with radiotherapy of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients. We investigated whether conjugation of cetuximab with trans-cyclohexyl-diethylene-triamine-pentaacetic acid (CHX-A''-DTPA) and radiolabeling with {sup 90}Yttrium affect the molecular and cellular function of cetuximab and improve its combined effect with external-beam irradiation (EBI). Methods: The following cell lines were used: HNSCC UT5, SAS, FaDu, as well as A43, Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO), and human skin fibroblast HSF7. Binding affinity and kinetics, specificity, retention, and the combination of {sup 90}Y-cetuximab with EBI were evaluated. Results: Control cetuximab and CHX-A''-DTPA-cetuximab blocked the proliferation activity of UT5 cells. In combination with EBI, CHX-A''-DTPA-cetuximab increased the radiosensitivity of UT5 to a similar degree as control cetuximab did. In contrast, in SAS and HSF7 cells neither proliferation nor radiosensitivity was affected by either of the antibodies. Binding [{sup 90}Y]Y-CHX-A''-DTPA-cetuximab ({sup 90}Y-cetuximab) to EGFR in HNSCC cells occurred time dependently with a maximum binding at 24 h. Retention of {sup 90}Y-cetuximab was similar in both HNSCC cell lines; 24 h after treatment, approximately 90% of bound activity remained in the cell layer. Competition assays, using cell membranes in the absence of an internalized fraction of cetuximab, showed that the cetuximab affinity is not lost as a result of conjugation with CHX-A''-DTPA. Cetuximab and CHX-A''-DTPA-cetuximab blocked EGF-induced Y1068 phosphorylation of EGFR. The lack of an effect of cetuximab on EGF-induced Akt and ERK1/2 phosphorylation and the inhibition of irradiation (IR)-induced Akt and ERK1/2 phosphorylation by cetuximab were not affected by DTPA conjugation. {sup 90}Y-cetuximab in combination with EBI resulted in a pronounced inhibition of

  1. Involvement of oxygen reactive species in the cellular response of carcinoma cells to irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After a presentation of oxygen reactive species and their sources, the author describes the enzymatic and non-enzymatic anti-oxidative defenses, the physiological roles of oxygen reactive species, the oxidative stress, the water radiolysis, the anti-oxidative enzymes and the effects of ionizing radiations. The author then reports an investigation on the contribution of oxygen reactive species in the cellular response to irradiation, and an investigation on the influence of the breathing chain on the persistence of a radio-induced oxidative stress. He also reports a research on molecular mechanisms involved in the cellular radio-sensitivity

  2. Integrated cellular systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Jason C.

    The generation of new three-dimensional (3D) matrices that enable integration of biomolecular components and whole cells into device architectures, without adversely altering their morphology or activity, continues to be an expanding and challenging field of research. This research is driven by the promise that encapsulated biomolecules and cells can significantly impact areas as diverse as biocatalysis, controlled delivery of therapeutics, environmental and industrial process monitoring, early warning of warfare agents, bioelectronics, photonics, smart prosthetics, advanced physiological sensors, portable medical diagnostic devices, and tissue/organ replacement. This work focuses on the development of a fundamental understanding of the biochemical and nanomaterial mechanisms that govern the cell directed assembly and integration process. It was shown that this integration process relies on the ability of cells to actively develop a pH gradient in response to evaporation induced osmotic stress, which catalyzes silica condensation within a thin 3D volume surrounding the cells, creating a functional bio/nano interface. The mechanism responsible for introducing functional foreign membrane-bound proteins via proteoliposome addition to the silica-lipid-cell matrix was also determined. Utilizing this new understanding, 3D cellular immobilization capabilities were extended using sol-gel matrices endowed with glycerol, trehalose, and media components. The effects of these additives, and the metabolic phase of encapsulated S. cerivisiase cells, on long-term viability and the rate of inducible gene expression was studied. This enabled the entrapment of cells within a novel microfluidic platform capable of simultaneous colorimetric, fluorescent, and electrochemical detection of a single analyte, significantly improving confidence in the biosensor output. As a complementary approach, multiphoton protein lithography was utilized to engineer 3D protein matrices in which to

  3. Effects of toxic cellular stresses and divalent cations on the human P2X7 cell death receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Dutot, Mélody; Liang, Hong; Pauloin, Thierry; Brignole-Baudouin, Françoise; Baudouin, Christophe; Warnet, Jean-Michel; Rat, Patrice

    2008-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate responses to toxic cellular stresses in different human ocular epithelia. Methods Reactivity with a specific anti-P2X7 antibody was studied using confocal fluorescence microscopy on conjunctival, corneal, lens, and retinal cell lines as well as using impression cytology on human ocular cells. Activation of the P2X7 receptor by selective agonists (ATP and benzoylbenzoyl-ATP) and inhibition by antagonists (oATP, KN-62, and PPADS) were evaluat...

  4. IL-12 directs further maturation of ex vivo differentiated NK cells with improved therapeutic potential.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorit Lehmann

    Full Text Available The possibility to modulate ex vivo human NK cell differentiation towards specific phenotypes will contribute to a better understanding of NK cell differentiation and facilitate tailored production of NK cells for immunotherapy. In this study, we show that addition of a specific low dose of IL-12 to an ex vivo NK cell differentiation system from cord blood CD34(+ stem cells will result in significantly increased proportions of cells with expression of CD62L as well as KIRs and CD16 which are preferentially expressed on mature CD56(dim peripheral blood NK cells. In addition, the cells displayed decreased expression of receptors such as CCR6 and CXCR3, which are typically expressed to a lower extent by CD56(dim than CD56(bright peripheral blood NK cells. The increased number of CD62L and KIR positive cells prevailed in a population of CD33(+NKG2A(+ NK cells, supporting that maturation occurs via this subtype. Among a series of transcription factors tested we found Gata3 and TOX to be significantly downregulated, whereas ID3 was upregulated in the IL-12-modulated ex vivo NK cells, implicating these factors in the observed changes. Importantly, the cells differentiated in the presence of IL-12 showed enhanced cytokine production and cytolytic activity against MHC class I negative and positive targets. Moreover, in line with the enhanced CD16 expression, these cells exhibited improved antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity for B-cell leukemia target cells in the presence of the clinically applied antibody rituximab. Altogether, these data provide evidence that IL-12 directs human ex vivo NK cell differentiation towards more mature NK cells with improved properties for potential cancer therapies.

  5. Peripubertal ovariectomy provides long-term postponement of age-associated decline in thymic cellularity and T-cell output

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perišić Milica

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was undertaken to reassess the recently challenged role of ovarian hormones in age-associated thymic involution. For this purpose, in eleven-month-old peripubertally ovariectomized (Ox rats we analyzed: i thymic weight and cellularity, ii size of CD4+CD8+ double-positive (DP thymocyte population, which is believed to correlate to the thymic capacity to export mature T cells, iii number of recent thymic emigrants (RTEs, and iv number of peripheral blood CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocytes. It was found that both thymic weight and cellularity were greater in Ox than in control rats. In addition, in Ox rats the numbers of DP thymocytes and both CD4+ and CD8+ RTEs, were significantly greater than in controls, indicating a more efficient generation of T cells in these rats. Furthermore, these findings, coupled with data indicating that the number of neither CD4+ nor CD8+ peripheral blood lymphocytes was affected by ovariectomy, most likely, suggest a reduced homeostatic proliferation of memory cells in Ox rats, i.e. broadening of TCR peripheral repertoire without changes in the overall number of T cells leading to a more efficient response to newly encountered antigens. The results indicate that the ovarian steroid deprivation from early peripubertal period leads to a long lasting postponement/alleviation of age-associated decline in T-cell mediated immune response.

  6. A systemic approach to explore the flexibility of energy stores at the cellular scale: Examples from muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghipoor, Masoomeh; van Milgen, Jaap; Gondret, Florence

    2016-09-01

    Variations in energy storage and expenditure are key elements for animals adaptation to rapidly changing environments. Because of the multiplicity of metabolic pathways, metabolic crossroads and interactions between anabolic and catabolic processes within and between different cells, the flexibility of energy stores in animal cells is difficult to describe by simple verbal, textual or graphic terms. We propose a mathematical model to study the influence of internal and external challenges on the dynamic behavior of energy stores and its consequence on cell energy status. The role of the flexibility of energy stores on the energy equilibrium at the cellular level is illustrated through three case studies: variation in eating frequency (i.e., glucose input), level of physical activity (i.e., ATP requirement), and changes in cell characteristics (i.e., maximum capacity of glycogen storage). Sensitivity analysis has been performed to highlight the most relevant parameters of the model; model simulations have then been performed to illustrate how variation in these key parameters affects cellular energy balance. According to this analysis, glycogen maximum accumulation capacity and homeostatic energy demand are among the most important parameters regulating muscle cell metabolism to ensure its energy equilibrium. PMID:27338303

  7. Cellular cooperation during in vivo anti-hapten antibody responses. I. The effect of cell number on the response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cellular interactions in adoptive secondary anti-hapten antibody responses to the hapten 2,4-dinitrophenyl (DNP) have been studied. It was shown that DNP-specific B cells must interact with carrier specific helper T cells to give optimal responses. Independent titration of B cell and helper cell activity in adoptive anti-DNP antibody responses gave the following results: Doubling the number of transferred B cells approximately doubled the subsequent antibody response. Doubling the number of helper cells leads to nearly 4 times as much anti-DNP antibody, measured 7 days after boosting (''premium effect''). This marked effect of helper cell number on the antibody response is thought to be due primarily to the interaction of two populations of carrier-specific cells in the helper effect, or to the interaction of two activities of a single population of helper cells, namely clone activation and clone expansion. Only a very small proportion of the premium effect given by helper cells could be attributed to increases in antibody affinity. (U.S.)

  8. A medaka model of cancer allowing direct observation of transplanted tumor cells in vivo at a cellular-level resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Sumitaka; Maruyama, Kouichi; Takenaka, Hikaru; Furukawa, Takako; Saga, Tsuneo

    2009-08-18

    The recent success with small fish as an animal model of cancer with the aid of fluorescence technique has attracted cancer modelers' attention because it would be possible to directly visualize tumor cells in vivo in real time. Here, we report a medaka model capable of allowing the observation of various cell behaviors of transplanted tumor cells, such as cell proliferation and metastasis, which were visualized easily in vivo. We established medaka melanoma (MM) cells stably expressing GFP and transplanted them into nonirradiated and irradiated medaka. The tumor cells were grown at the injection sites in medaka, and the spatiotemporal changes were visualized under a fluorescence stereoscopic microscope at a cellular-level resolution, and even at a single-cell level. Tumor dormancy and metastasis were also observed. Interestingly, in irradiated medaka, accelerated tumor growth and metastasis of the transplanted tumor cells were directly visualized. Our medaka model provides an opportunity to visualize in vivo tumor cells "as seen in a culture dish" and would be useful for in vivo tumor cell biology. PMID:19666513

  9. Potential for Natural Killer Cell-Mediated Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity for Control of Human Cytomegalovirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca J. Aicheler

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV is an important pathogen that infects the majority of the population worldwide, yet, currently, there is no licensed vaccine. Despite HCMV encoding at least seven Natural Killer (NK cell evasion genes, NK cells remain critical for the control of infection in vivo. Classically Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity (ADCC is mediated by CD16, which is found on the surface of the NK cell in a complex with FcεRI-γ chains and/or CD3ζ chains. Ninety percent of NK cells express the Fc receptor CD16; thus, they have the potential to initiate ADCC. HCMV has a profound effect on the NK cell repertoire, such that up to 10-fold expansions of NKG2C+ cells can be seen in HCMV seropositive individuals. These NKG2C+ cells are reported to be FcεRI-γ deficient and possess variable levels of CD16+, yet have striking ADCC functions. A subset of HCMV cell surface proteins will induce robust antibody responses that could render cells susceptible to ADCC. We will consider how the strong anti-HCMV function of NKG2C+ FcεRI-γ-deficient NK cells could potentially be harnessed in the clinic to treat patients suffering from HCMV disease and in the development of an efficacious HCMV vaccine.

  10. Adult Bone Marrow: Which Stem Cells for Cellular Therapy Protocols in Neurodegenerative Disorders?

    OpenAIRE

    Sabine Wislet-Gendebien; Emerence Laudet; Virginie Neirinckx; Bernard Rogister

    2012-01-01

    The generation of neuronal cells from stem cells obtained from adult bone marrow is of significant clinical interest in order to design new cell therapy protocols for several neurological disorders. The recent identification in adult bone marrow of stem cells derived from the neural crests (NCSCs) might explain the neuronal phenotypic plasticity shown by bone marrow cells. However, little information is available about the nature of these cells compared to mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). In th...

  11. Cellular development of the human cochlea and the regenerative potential of hair follicle bulge stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Locher, heiko

    2015-01-01

    The embryonic development of the human cochlea (the organ of hearing) has been investigated for over one hundred years. However, little is still known about the development on a cellular and protein level, which is important to better understand etiologies and pathologies of various types of sensori

  12. Molecular and cellular targets affected by green tea extracts in vascular cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consumption of green or black tea has been associated with a lower risk for the development of cardiovascular diseases, but despite many studies, a firm connection has not been delineated. Several molecular and cellular mechanisms may play a role in the preventive activity of tea. As reviewed here, ...

  13. In-vivo imaging of cellular proliferation in renal cell carcinoma using 18F-fluorothymidine (FLT) PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text:Background: The ability to measure cellular proliferation non-invasively in renal cell carcinoma may allow prediction of tumour aggressiveness and response to therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the uptake of 18F-fluorothymidine (FLT) in renal cell carcinoma, and to compare this to 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), and to an immunohistochemical measure of cellular proliferation (Ki-67). Methods: Twenty seven patients (16 men, 11 women; age 42-77) with newly diagnosed renal cell carcinoma suitable for resection were prospectively enrolled. All patients had preoperative FLT and FDG PET scans. After surgery tumour was taken for histologic analysis and immunohistochemical staining by Ki-67. Results: The mean SUVmax (maximum standardized uptake value) ± SD for FLT in tumour was 2.53 ± 1.26, compared to normal kidney (2.47 ± 0.34). The mean SUVmax for FDG in tumour was similar to FLT (2.60 ± 1.08). Visual identification of tumour using FLT PET compared to normal kidney was facilitated by the use of a pre-operative contrast enhanced CT scan. There was a significant correlation between FLT uptake and the immunohistochemical marker Ki-67 (r=0.624, p=0.0008) in RCC. Ki-67 labelling index was mean ± SD of 13.3% ± 9.2 (range 2.2% to 36.3%). Conclusion: There is detectable uptake of FLT in primary renal cell carcinoma, which correlates with cellular proliferation as assessed by Ki-67 labelling index. This finding has relevance to the use of FLT PET in molecular imaging studies of renal cell carcinoma biology.

  14. Cellular internalization of LiNbO3 nanocrystals for second harmonic imaging and the effects on stem cell differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianhua; Qiu, Jichuan; Guo, Weibo; Wang, Shu; Ma, Baojin; Mou, Xiaoning; Tanes, Michael; Jiang, Huaidong; Liu, Hong

    2016-03-01

    Second harmonic generation (SHG) nanocrystals have recently been reported to label cancer cells and other functional cell lines due to their unique double-frequency property. In this paper, we report for the first time the use of lithium niobate (LiNbO3, LN) nanocrystals as SHG labels for imaging stem cells. Rat mesenchymal stem cells (rMSCs) were labeled with LN nanocrystals in order to study the cellular internalization of the nanocrystals and the influence on stem cell differentiation. The results showed that LN nanocrystals were endocytosed by the rMSCs and the distribution of the internalized nanoparticles demonstrated a high consistency with the orientation of the actin filaments. Besides, LN-labeled rMSCs showed a concentration-dependent viability. Most importantly, rMSCs labeled with 50 μg per mL of LN nanocrystals retained their ability to differentiate into both osteogenic and adipogenic lineages. The results prove that LN nanocrystals can be used as a cytocompatible, near-infrared (NIR) light driven cell label for long-term imaging, without hindering stem cell differentiation. This work will promote the use of LN nanocrystals to broader applications like deep-tissue tracking, remote drug delivery and stem cell therapy.Second harmonic generation (SHG) nanocrystals have recently been reported to label cancer cells and other functional cell lines due to their unique double-frequency property. In this paper, we report for the first time the use of lithium niobate (LiNbO3, LN) nanocrystals as SHG labels for imaging stem cells. Rat mesenchymal stem cells (rMSCs) were labeled with LN nanocrystals in order to study the cellular internalization of the nanocrystals and the influence on stem cell differentiation. The results showed that LN nanocrystals were endocytosed by the rMSCs and the distribution of the internalized nanoparticles demonstrated a high consistency with the orientation of the actin filaments. Besides, LN-labeled rMSCs showed a concentration

  15. Hormonal and cellular factors affecting immature sertoli cells radiosensitivity in rat fetus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Immature Sertoli cells population was studied after irradiation either in hypophysectomised (decapited) or in germ cell free foetus (busulfan treated embryo). Decapitation did not modify the 10 % reduction of immature Sertoli cells after 1.5 Gy irradiation. But, without germ cells, immature Sertoli cells were more radiosensitive

  16. Depletion of cellular poly (A) binding protein prevents protein synthesis and leads to apoptosis in HeLa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Depletion of cellular PABP level arrests mRNA translation in HeLa cells. → PABP knock down leads to apoptotic cell death. → PABP depletion does not affect transcription. → PABP depletion does not lead to nuclear accumulation of mRNA. -- Abstract: The cytoplasmic poly (A) binding protein (PABP) is important in mRNA translation and stability. In yeast, depletion of PABP leads to translation arrest. Similarly, the PABP gene in Drosophila is important for proper development. It is however uncertain, whether mammalian PABP is essential for mRNA translation. Here we showed the effect of PABP depletion on mRNA metabolism in HeLa cells by using a small interfering RNA. Our results suggest that depletion of PABP prevents protein synthesis and consequently leads to cell death through apoptosis. Interestingly, no detectable effect of PABP depletion on transcription, transport and stability of mRNA was observed.

  17. Depletion of cellular poly (A) binding protein prevents protein synthesis and leads to apoptosis in HeLa cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thangima Zannat, Mst.; Bhattacharjee, Rumpa B. [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada N1G2W1 (Canada); Bag, Jnanankur, E-mail: jbag@uoguelph.ca [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada N1G2W1 (Canada)

    2011-05-13

    Highlights: {yields} Depletion of cellular PABP level arrests mRNA translation in HeLa cells. {yields} PABP knock down leads to apoptotic cell death. {yields} PABP depletion does not affect transcription. {yields} PABP depletion does not lead to nuclear accumulation of mRNA. -- Abstract: The cytoplasmic poly (A) binding protein (PABP) is important in mRNA translation and stability. In yeast, depletion of PABP leads to translation arrest. Similarly, the PABP gene in Drosophila is important for proper development. It is however uncertain, whether mammalian PABP is essential for mRNA translation. Here we showed the effect of PABP depletion on mRNA metabolism in HeLa cells by using a small interfering RNA. Our results suggest that depletion of PABP prevents protein synthesis and consequently leads to cell death through apoptosis. Interestingly, no detectable effect of PABP depletion on transcription, transport and stability of mRNA was observed.

  18. Functionalized Graphitic Supports for Improved Fuel Cell Catalyst Stability Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI) together with the University of Connecticut (UCONN) proposes to demonstrate the improved fuel cell catalyst support durability offered...

  19. Comparing the epidermal growth factor interaction with four different cell lines: intriguing effects imply strong dependency of cellular context.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Björkelund

    Full Text Available The interaction of the epidermal growth factor (EGF with its receptor (EGFR is known to be complex, and the common over-expression of EGF receptor family members in a multitude of tumors makes it important to decipher this interaction and the following signaling pathways. We have investigated the affinity and kinetics of (125I-EGF binding to EGFR in four human tumor cell lines, each using four culturing conditions, in real time by use of LigandTracer®.Highly repeatable and precise measurements show that the overall apparent affinity of the (125I-EGF - EGFR interaction is greatly dependent on cell line at normal culturing conditions, ranging from K(D ≈ 200 pM on SKBR3 cells to K(D≈8 nM on A431 cells. The (125I-EGF - EGFR binding curves (irrespective of cell line have strong signs of multiple simultaneous interactions. Furthermore, for the cell lines A431 and SKOV3, gefitinib treatment increases the (125I-EGF - EGFR affinity, in particular when the cells are starved. The (125I-EGF - EGFR interaction on cell line U343 is sensitive to starvation while as on SKBR3 it is insensitive to gefitinib and starvation.The intriguing pattern of the binding characteristics proves that the cellular context is important when deciphering how EGF interacts with EGFR. From a general perspective, care is advisable when generalizing ligand-receptor interaction results across multiple cell-lines.

  20. Natural killer cell cytotoxicity of breast cancer targets is enhanced by two distinct mechanisms of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity against LFA-3 and HER2/neu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooley, S; Burns, L J; Repka, T; Miller, J S

    1999-10-01

    Treatment of advanced breast cancer with autologous stem cell transplantation is limited by a high probability of disease relapse. In clinical trials, interleukin 2 (IL-2) alone can expand natural killer (NK) cells in vivo and increase their cytotoxic activity against breast cancer cell lines, but this increase is modest. Understanding the mechanisms that mediate NK cell lysis of breast cancer targets may lead to improvements of current immunotherapy strategies. NK cells from normal donors or patients receiving subcutaneous IL-2 were tested in cytotoxicity assays against five breast cancer cell lines. The role of adhesion molecules and antibodies that interact through Fc receptors on NK cells was explored. NK cell lysis of breast cancer targets is variable and is partially dependent on recognition through ICAM-1 and CD18. While blocking CD2 slightly decreased cytotoxicity, contrary to expectations, an antibody against CD58 (the ligand for CD2), failed to block killing and instead mediated an increased cytotoxicity that correlated with target density of CD58. The CD58 antibody-enhanced killing was dependent not only on FcRgammaIII but also on CD2 and ICAM-1/CD18. To further elucidate the mechanism of this CD58 antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), another antibody was tested. Trastuzumab (Herceptin), a humanized antibody against HER2/neu, mediated potent ADCC against all the HER2/neu positive breast cancer targets. Unlike CD58 antibody-mediated ADCC, Herceptin ADCC was minimally affected by blocking antibodies to CD2 or ICAM-1/CD18, which suggests a different mechanism of action. This study shows that multiple mechanisms are involved in NK cell lysis of breast cancer targets, that none of the targets are inherently resistant to killing, and that two distinct mechanisms of ADCC can target immunotherapy to breast cancer cells. PMID:10517495

  1. Cellular uptake and imaging studies of glycosylated silica nanoprobe (GSN in human colon adenocarcinoma (HT 29 cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehravi B

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Bita Mehravi,1 Mohsen Ahmadi,1 Massoud Amanlou,2 Ahmad Mostaar,1 Mehdi Shafiee Ardestani,3 Negar Ghalandarlaki41Biomedical Engineering and Medical Physics Department, Faculty of Medicine, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; 2Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy and Drug Design and Development Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; 3Department of Radiopharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; 4Department of Biological Science, School of Science, Science and Research branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran, IranPurpose: In recent years, molecular imaging by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI has gained prominence in the detection of tumor cells. The scope of this study is on molecular imaging and on the cellular uptake study of a glycosylated silica nanoprobe (GSN.Methods: In this study, intracellular uptake (HT 29 cell line of GSN was analyzed quantitatively and qualitatively with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy, flow cytometry, and fluorescent microscopy. In vitro and in vivo relaxometry of this nanoparticle was determined using a 3 Tesla MRI; biodistribution of GSN and Magnevist® were measured in different tissues.Results: Results suggest that the cellular uptake of GSN was about 70%. The r1 relaxivity of this nanoparticle in the cells was measured to be 12.9 ± 1.6 mM-1 s-1 and on a per lanthanide gadolinium (Gd3+ basis. Results also indicate an average cellular uptake of 0.7 ± 0.009 pg Gd3+ per cell. It should be noted that 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay demonstrated that the cells were effectively labeled without cytotoxicity, and that using MRI for quantitative estimation of delivery and uptake of targeted contrast agents and early detection of human colon cancer cells using targeted contrast agents, is feasible.Conclusion: These results showed that GSN provided a

  2. Epithelial Cell Transforming 2 and Aurora Kinase B Modulate Formation of Stress Granule-Containing Transcripts from Diverse Cellular Pathways in Astrocytoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, Adrienne; Agnihotri, Sameer; Lymer, Jennifer; Chalil, Alan; Diaz, Roberto; Isik, Semra; Smith, Christian; Rutka, James T

    2016-06-01

    Stress granules are small RNA-protein granules that modify the translational landscape during cellular stress to promote survival. The RhoGTPase RhoA is implicated in the formation of RNA stress granules. Our data demonstrate that the cytokinetic proteins epithelial cell transforming 2 and Aurora kinase B (AurkB) are localized to stress granules in human astrocytoma cells. AurkB and its downstream target histone-3 are phosphorylated during arsenite-induced stress. Chemical (AZD1152-HQPA) and siRNA inhibition of AurkB results in fewer and smaller stress granules when analyzed using high-throughput fluorescent-based cellomics assays. RNA immunoprecipitation with the known stress granule aggregates TIAR and G3BP1 was performed on astrocytoma cells, and subsequent analysis revealed that astrocytoma stress granules harbor unique mRNAs for various cellular pathways, including cellular migration, metabolism, translation, and transcriptional regulation. Human astrocytoma cell stress granules contain mRNAs that are known to be involved in glioma signaling and the mammalian target of rapamycin pathway. These data provide evidence that RNA stress granules are a novel form of epigenetic regulation in astrocytoma cells, which may be targetable by chemical inhibitors and enhance astrocytoma susceptibility to conventional therapy, such as radiation and chemotherapy. PMID:27106762

  3. Alteration of cellular lipids and lipid metabolism markers in RTL-W1 cells exposed to model endocrine disrupters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimastrogiovanni, Giorgio; Córdoba, Marlon; Navarro, Isabel; Jáuregui, Olga; Porte, Cinta

    2015-08-01

    This work investigates the suitability of the rainbow trout liver cell line (RTL-W1) as an in-vitro model to study the ability of model endocrine disrupters, namely TBT, TPT, 4-NP, BPA and DEHP, to act as metabolic disrupters by altering cellular lipids and markers of lipid metabolism. Among the tested compounds, BPA and DEHP significantly increased the intracellular accumulation of triacylglycerols (TAGs), while all the compounds -apart from TPT-, altered membrane lipids - phosphatidylcholines (PCs) and plasmalogen PCs - indicating a strong interaction of the toxicants with cell membranes and cell signaling. RTL-W1 expressed a number of genes involved in lipid metabolism that were modulated by exposure to BPA, TBT and TPT (up-regulation of FATP1 and FAS) and 4-NP and DEHP (down-regulation of FAS and LPL). Multiple and complex modes of action of these chemicals were observed in RTL-W1 cells, both in terms of expression of genes related to lipid metabolism and alteration of cellular lipids. Although further characterization is needed, this might be a useful model for the detection of chemicals leading to steatosis or other diseases associated with lipid metabolism in fish. PMID:26143618

  4. Pummelo Protects Doxorubicin-Induced Cardiac Cell Death by Reducing Oxidative Stress, Modifying Glutathione Transferase Expression, and Preventing Cellular Senescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Chularojmontri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Citrus flavonoids have been shown to reduce cardiovascular disease (CVD risks prominently due to their antioxidant effects. Here we investigated the protective effect of pummelo (Citrus maxima, CM fruit juice in rat cardiac H9c2 cells against doxorubicin (DOX- induced cytotoxicity. Four antioxidant compositions (ascorbic acid, hesperidin, naringin, and gallic acid were determined by HPLC. CM significantly increased cardiac cell survival from DOX toxicity as evaluated by MTT assay. Reduction of cellular oxidative stress was monitored by the formation of DCF fluorescent product and total glutathione (GSH levels. The changes in glutathione-S-transferase (GST activity and expression were determined by enzyme activity assay and Western blot analysis, respectively. Influence of CM on senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity (SA-β-gal was also determined. The mechanisms of cytoprotection involved reduction of intracellular oxidative stress, maintaining GSH availability, and enhanced GST enzyme activity and expression. DOX-induced cellular senescence was also attenuated by long-term CM treatment. Thus, CM fruit juice can be promoted as functional fruit to protect cells from oxidative cell death, enhance the phase II GSTP enzyme activity, and decrease senescence phenotype population induced by cardiotoxic agent such as DOX.

  5. An improved hydrothermal diamond anvil cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiankang; Bassett, W. A.; Chou, I.-Ming; Ding, Xin; Li, Shenghu; Wang, Xinyan

    2016-05-01

    A new type of HDAC-V hydrothermal diamond anvil cell (HDAC-VT) has been designed to meet the demands of X-ray research including X-Ray Fluorescence, X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy, and small angle X-ray scattering. The earlier version of HDAC-V that offered a large rectangular solid angle used two posts and two driver screws on both sides of a rectangular body. The new version HDAC-VT in a triangular shape has two alternative guide systems, either three posts inserted into bushings suitable for small anvil faces or linear ball bearings suitable for large anvil faces. The HDAC-VT having three driver screws offers the advantage of greater control and stability even though it sacrifices some of the size of solid angle. The greater control allows better sealing of samples, while greater stability results in longer survival for anvils and ceramic parts. This improved design retains several beneficial features of the original HDAC-V as well. These include the small collar that surrounds the heater and sample chamber forming an Ar + H2 gas chamber to protect diamonds and their heating parts from being oxidized. Three linear ball bearings, when used, fit to the three posts prevent seizing that can result from deterioration of lubricant at high temperatures. Positioning the posts and bearings outside of the gas chamber as in HDAC-V also prevents seizing and possible deformation due to overheating. In order to control the heating rate precisely with computer software, we use Linkam T95 and have replaced the Linkam 1400XY heating stage with the HDAC-VT allowing the HDAC to be heated to 950 °C at a rate from 0.01 °C/min to 50 °C/min. We have used the HDAC-VT and Linkam T95 to observe in situ nucleation and growth of zabuyelite in aqueous fluid and to homogenize melt inclusions in quartz from three porphyry deposits in Shanxi, China.

  6. Preliminary analysis of cellular sociology of co-cultured glioma initiating cells and macrophages in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mingxia Zhang; Xingliang Dai; Xiaonan Li; Qiang Huang; Jun Dong; Junjie Chen; Lin Wang; Xiaoyan Ji; Lin Yang; Yujing Sheng; Hairui Liu; Haiyang Wang; Aidong Wang

    2016-01-01

    Objective:Real-time monitoring of cytokine secretion at the single immunocyte level, based on the concept of immune cells, sociology has been recently reported. However, the relationships between glioma-initiating cells (GICs) and host immune cells and their mutual interactions in the tumor microenvironment have not been directly observed and remain unclear. Methods:The dual fluorescence tracing technique was applied to label the co-cultured GICs and host macrophages (Mø), and the interactions between the two types of cells were observed using a live cell imaging system. Fusion cells in the co-culture system were monocloned and proliferated in vitro and their social interactions were observed and recorded. Results:Using real-time dynamic observation of target cells, 6 types of intercellular conjunction microtubes were found to function in the transfer of intercellular information between GICs and Mø;GICs and host Mø can fuse into hybrid cells after several rounds of mutual interactions, and then these fusion cells fused with each other;Fusion cells generated offspring cells through symmetrical and asymmetrical division or underwent apoptosis. A“cell in cell” phenomenon was observed in the fusion cells, which was often followed by cell release, namely entosis. Conclusions:Preliminary studies revealed the patterns of cell conjunction via microtubes between GICs and host Mø and the processes of cell fusion, division, and entosis. The results revealed malignant transformation of host Mø, induced by GICs, suggesting complex social relationships among tumor-immune cells in gliomas.

  7. Cell adhesion-mediated radioresistance (CAM-RR). Extracellular matrix-dependent improvement of cell survival in human tumor and normal cells in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordes, N.; Meineke, V. [Inst. of Radiobiology, Medical Academy of the German Armed Forces, Munich (Germany)

    2003-05-01

    Background: Cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) contact is thought to have great impact on cellular mechanisms resulting in increased cell survival upon exposure to ionizing radiation. Several human tumor cell lines and normal human fibroblastic cell strains of different origin, all of them expressing the wide-spread and important integrin subunit {beta}1, were irradiated, and clonogenic cell survival, {beta}1-integrin cell surface expression, and adhesive functionality were investigated. Material and Methods: Human tumor cell lines A172 (glioblastoma), PATU8902 (pancreas carcinoma), SKMES1 (lung carcinoma), A549 (lung carcinoma), and IPC298 (melanoma) as well as normal human skin (HSF1) and lung fibroblasts (CCD32) and human keratinocytes (HaCaT) were irradiated with 0-8 Gy. Besides colony formation assays, {beta}1-integrin cell surface expression by flow cytometry and adhesive functionality by adhesion assays were analyzed. Results: All cell lines showed improved clonogenic survival after irradiation in the presence of fibronectin as compared to plastic. Irradiated cells exhibited a significant, dose-dependent increase in {beta}1-integrin cell surface expression following irradiation. As a parameter of the adhesive functionality of the {beta}1-integrin, a radiation-dependent elevation of cell adhesion to fibronectin in comparison with adhesion to plastic was demonstrated. Conclusion: The in vitro cellular radiosensitivity is highly influenced by fibronectin according to the phenomenon of cell adhesion-mediated radioresistance. Additionally, our emerging data question the results of former and current in vitro cytotoxicity studies performed in the absence of an ECM. These findings might also be important for the understanding of malignant transformation, anchorage-independent cell growth, optimization of radiotherapeutic regimes and the prevention of normal tissue side effects on the basis of experimental radiobiological data. (orig.)

  8. Gastric Lgr5(+) stem cells are the cellular origin of invasive intestinal-type gastric cancer in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiu-Bin; Yang, Guan; Zhu, Liang; Tang, Yu-Ling; Zhang, Chong; Ju, Zhenyu; Yang, Xiao; Teng, Yan

    2016-07-01

    The cellular origin of gastric cancer remains elusive. Leucine-rich repeat-containing G-protein-coupled receptor 5 (Lgr5) is the first identified marker of gastric stem cells. However, the role of Lgr5(+) stem cells in driving malignant gastric cancer is not fully validated. Here, we deleted Smad4 and PTEN in murine gastric Lgr5(+) stem cells by the inducible Cre-LoxP system and marked mutant Lgr5(+) stem cells and their progeny with Cre-reporter Rosa26(tdTomato). Rapid onset and progression from microadenoma and macroscopic adenoma to invasive intestinal-type gastric cancer (IGC) were found in the gastric antrum with the loss of Smad4 and PTEN. In addition, invasive IGC developed at the murine gastro-forestomach junction, where a few Lgr5(+) stem cells reside. In contrast, Smad4 and PTEN deletions in differentiated cells, including antral parietal cells, pit cells and corpus Lgr5(+) chief cells, failed to initiate tumor growth. Furthermore, mutant Lgr5(+) cells were involved in IGC growth and progression. In the TCGA (The Cancer Genome Atlas) database, an increase in LGR5 expression was manifested in the human IGC that occurred at the gastric antrum and gastro-esophageal junction. In addition, the concurrent deletion of SMAD4 and PTEN, as well as their reduced expression and deregulated downstream pathways, were associated with human IGC. Thus, we demonstrated that gastric Lgr5(+) stem cells were cancer-initiating cells and might act as cancer-propagating cells to contribute to malignant progression. PMID:27091432

  9. Bioconjugated gold nanoparticles enhance cellular uptake: A proof of concept study for siRNA delivery in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jianfeng; O'Driscoll, Caitriona M; Holmes, Justin D; Rahme, Kamil

    2016-07-25

    The chemistry of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) facilitates surface modifications and thus these bioengineered NPs have been investigated as a means of delivering a variety of therapeutic cargos to treat cancer. In this study we have developed AuNPs conjugated with targeting ligands to enhance cell-specific uptake in prostate cancer cells, with a purpose of providing efficient non-viral gene delivery systems in the treatment of prostate cancer. As a consequence, two novel AuNPs were synthesised namely AuNPs-PEG-Tf (negatively charged AuNPs with the transferrin targeting ligands) and AuNPs-PEI-FA (positively charged AuNPs with the folate-receptor targeting ligands). Both bioconjugated AuNPs demonstrated low cytotoxicity in prostate cancer cells. The attachment of the targeting ligand Tf to AuNPs successfully achieved receptor-mediated cellular uptake in PC-3 cells, a prostate cancer cell line highly expressing Tf receptors. The AuNPs-PEI-FA effectively complexed small interfering RNA (siRNA) through electrostatic interaction. At the cellular level the AuNPs-PEI-FA specifically delivered siRNA into LNCaP cells, a prostate cancer cell line overexpressing prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA, exhibits a hydrolase enzymic activity with a folate substrate). Following endolysosomal escape the AuNPs-PEI-FA.siRNA formulation produced enhanced endogenous gene silencing compared to the non-targeted formulation. Our results suggest both formulations have potential as non-viral gene delivery vectors in the treatment of prostate cancer. PMID:27188645

  10. CellTV - on the Benefit of TV Distribution over Cellular Networks A Case Study

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Lei; Obregon, Evanny; Sung, Ki Won; Zander, Jens; Bostrom, Jan

    2013-01-01

    As mobile IP-access is becoming the dominant technology for providing wireless services, the demand for more spectrum for this type of access is increasing rapidly. Since IP-access can be used for all types of services, instead of a plethora of dedicated, single-service systems, there is a significant potential to make spectrum use more efficient. In this paper, the feasibility and potential benefit of replacing the current terrestrial UHF TV broadcasting system with a mobile, cellular data (...

  11. Model of Handover and Traffic Based on Cellular Geometry with Smart Antenna

    OpenAIRE

    Zufan Zhang; Jie Zhang; Shaohui Sun

    2014-01-01

    Based on the application of smart antennas in cellular mobile communications, this paper introduces the impact of the width of the antenna beams playing on the dwell time probability density function in cellular geometry with smart antenna. The research results indicate that the smart cell structure can improve the dwell time of users within the cell and improve the traffic system performance.

  12. Application of Allogeneic Fibroblast Cells in Cellular Therapy of Recessive Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa

    OpenAIRE

    MR Zare; Ahmadi; Rostamzadeh; Kurd; Hejazi; Fard; Anjomshoa; Nilforoushzadeh

    2015-01-01

    Context Connective tissue cells include fibroblasts, chondrocytes, adipocyte, and osteocytes. These cells are specialized for the secretion of collagenous extracellular matrix and are responsible for the architectural framework of the human body. Evidence Acquisition Connective tissue cells play a central role in supporting as well as repairing tissues and organs. Fibroblast cell therapy could be used for the treatment of burn wou...

  13. Synergistic effect of topography, surface chemistry and conductivity of the electrospun nanofibrous scaffold on cellular response of PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Lingling; Prabhakaran, Molamma P; Hu, Jue; Chen, Menglin; Besenbacher, Flemming; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2016-09-01

    Electrospun nanofibrous nerve implants is a promising therapy for peripheral nerve injury, and its performance can be tailored by chemical cues, topographical features as well as electrical properties. In this paper, a surface modified, electrically conductive, aligned nanofibrous scaffold composed of poly (lactic acid) (PLA) and polypyrrole (Ppy), referred to as o-PLAPpy_A, was fabricated for nerve regeneration. The morphology, surface chemistry and hydrophilicity of nanofibers were characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and water contact angle, respectively. The effects of these nanofibers on neuronal differentiation using PC12 cells were evaluated. A hydrophilic surface was created by Poly-ornithine coating, which was able to provide a better environment for cell attachment, and furthermore aligned fibers were proved to be able to guide PC12 cells grow along the fiber direction and be beneficial for neurite outgrowth. The cellular response of PC12 cells to pulsed electrical stimulation was evaluated by NF 200 and alpha tubulin expression, indicating that electrical stimulation with a voltage of 40mV could enhance the neurite outgrowth. The PC12 cells stimulated with electrical shock showed greater level of neurite outgrowth and smaller cell body size. Moreover, the PC12 cells under electrical stimulation showed better viability. In summary, the o-PLAPpy_A nanofibrous scaffold supported the attachment, proliferation and differentiation of PC12 cells in the absence of electrical stimulation, which could be potential candidate for nerve regeneration applications. PMID:27232305

  14. Development of a cell culture surface conversion technique using alginate thin film for evaluating effect upon cellular differentiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Here, we sought to develop a cell culture surface conversion technique that would not damage living cells. An alginate thin film, formed on a glass plate by spin coating of sodium alginate solution and dipping into calcium chloride solution, was used to inhibit adhesion of cells. The film could be removed by ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) at any time during cell culture, permitting observation of cellular responses to conversion of the culture surface in real time. Additionally, we demonstrated the validity of the alginate thin film coating method and the performance of the film. The thickness of the alginate thin film was controlled by varying the rotation speed during spin coating. Moreover, the alginate thin film completely inhibited the adhesion of cultured cells to the culture surface, irrespective of the thickness of the film. When the alginate thin film was removed from the culture surface by EDTA, the cultured cells adhered to the culture surface, and their morphology changed. Finally, we achieved effective differentiation of C2C12 myoblasts into myotube cells by cell culture on the convertible culture surface, demonstrating the utility of our novel technique

  15. Immunohistochemical characterization of cell types expressing the cellular prion protein in the small intestine of cattle and mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazawa, Kohtaro; Kanaya, Takashi; Tanaka, Sachi; Takakura, Ikuro; Watanabe, Kouichi; Ohwada, Shyuichi; Kitazawa, Haruki; Rose, Michael T; Sakaguchi, Suehiro; Katamine, Shigeru; Yamaguchi, Takahiro; Aso, Hisashi

    2007-03-01

    The gastrointestinal tract is thought to be the main site of entry for the pathological isoform of the prion protein (PrP(Sc)). Prion diseases are believed to result from a conformational change of the cellular prion protein (PrP(c)) to PrP(Sc). Therefore, PrP(c) expression is a prerequisite for the infection and spread of the disease to the central nervous system. However, the distribution of PrP(c) in the gut is still a matter of controversy. We therefore investigated the localization of PrP(c) in the bovine and murine small intestine. In cattle, most PrP(c) positive epithelial cells were detected in the duodenum, while a few positive cells were found in the jejunum. PrP(c) was expressed in serotonin producing cells. In bovine Peyer's patches, PrP(c) was distributed in extrafollicular areas, but not in the germinal centre of the jejunum and ileum. PrP(c) was expressed in myeloid lineage cells such as myeloid dendritic cells and macrophages. In mice, PrP(c) was expressed in some epithelial cells throughout the small intestine as well as in cells such as follicular dendritic cell in the germinal centre of Peyer's patches. In this study, we demonstrate that there are a number of differences in the localization of PrP(c) between the murine and bovine small intestines. PMID:17165097

  16. Thermal conductivity of biological cells at cellular level and correlation with disease state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Byoung Kyoo; Woo, Yunho; Jeong, Dayeong; Park, Jaesung; Choi, Tae-Youl; Simmons, Denise Perry; Ha, Jeonghong; Kim, Dongsik

    2016-06-01

    This paper reports the thermal conductivity k of matched pair cell lines: two pairs of a normal and a cancer cell, one pair of a primary and metastatic cell. The 3ω method with a nanoscale thermal sensor was used to measure k at the single-cell level. To observe the difference in k between normal and cancer cells, the measurements were conducted for Hs 578Bst/Hs 578 T (human breast cells) and TE 353.Sk/TE 354.T (human skin cells). Then k of WM-115/WM-266-4, a primary and metastatic pair of human skin cell, was measured to find the effect of disease progression on k. The measured k data for normal and disease cell samples show statistically meaningful differences. In all cases, k decreased as the disease progressed. This work shows that thermal-analysis schemes, such as the 3ω method, have a potential to detect diseases at the cell level.

  17. Adult Bone Marrow: Which Stem Cells for Cellular Therapy Protocols in Neurodegenerative Disorders?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Wislet-Gendebien

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The generation of neuronal cells from stem cells obtained from adult bone marrow is of significant clinical interest in order to design new cell therapy protocols for several neurological disorders. The recent identification in adult bone marrow of stem cells derived from the neural crests (NCSCs might explain the neuronal phenotypic plasticity shown by bone marrow cells. However, little information is available about the nature of these cells compared to mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs. In this paper, we will review all information available concerning NCSC from adult tissues and their possible use in regenerative medicine. Moreover, as multiple recent studies showed the beneficial effect of bone marrow stromal cells in neurodegenerative diseases, we will discuss which stem cells isolated from adult bone marrow should be more suitable for cell replacement therapy.

  18. Adult bone marrow: which stem cells for cellular therapy protocols in neurodegenerative disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wislet-Gendebien, Sabine; Laudet, Emerence; Neirinckx, Virginie; Rogister, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    The generation of neuronal cells from stem cells obtained from adult bone marrow is of significant clinical interest in order to design new cell therapy protocols for several neurological disorders. The recent identification in adult bone marrow of stem cells derived from the neural crests (NCSCs) might explain the neuronal phenotypic plasticity shown by bone marrow cells. However, little information is available about the nature of these cells compared to mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). In this paper, we will review all information available concerning NCSC from adult tissues and their possible use in regenerative medicine. Moreover, as multiple recent studies showed the beneficial effect of bone marrow stromal cells in neurodegenerative diseases, we will discuss which stem cells isolated from adult bone marrow should be more suitable for cell replacement therapy. PMID:22319243

  19. The surfactant protein C mutation A116D alters cellular processing, stress tolerance, surfactant lipid composition, and immune cell activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zarbock Ralf

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surfactant protein C (SP-C is important for the function of pulmonary surfactant. Heterozygous mutations in SFTPC, the gene encoding SP-C, cause sporadic and familial interstitial lung disease (ILD in children and adults. Mutations mapping to the BRICHOS domain located within the SP-C proprotein result in perinuclear aggregation of the proprotein. In this study, we investigated the effects of the mutation A116D in the BRICHOS domain of SP-C on cellular homeostasis. We also evaluated the ability of drugs currently used in ILD therapy to counteract these effects. Methods SP-CA116D was expressed in MLE-12 alveolar epithelial cells. We assessed in vitro the consequences for cellular homeostasis, immune response and effects of azathioprine, hydroxychloroquine, methylprednisolone and cyclophosphamide. Results Stable expression of SP-CA116D in MLE-12 alveolar epithelial cells resulted in increased intracellular accumulation of proSP-C processing intermediates. SP-CA116D expression further led to reduced cell viability and increased levels of the chaperones Hsp90, Hsp70, calreticulin and calnexin. Lipid analysis revealed decreased intracellular levels of phosphatidylcholine (PC and increased lyso-PC levels. Treatment with methylprednisolone or hydroxychloroquine partially restored these lipid alterations. Furthermore, SP-CA116D cells secreted soluble factors into the medium that modulated surface expression of CCR2 or CXCR1 receptors on CD4+ lymphocytes and neutrophils, suggesting a direct paracrine effect of SP-CA116D on neighboring cells in the alveolar space. Conclusions We show that the A116D mutation leads to impaired processing of proSP-C in alveolar epithelial cells, alters cell viability and lipid composition, and also activates cells of the immune system. In addition, we show that some of the effects of the mutation on cellular homeostasis can be antagonized by application of pharmaceuticals commonly applied in ILD therapy

  20. Cellular Phone Towers, Cell Towers - downloaded from the FCC website, Published in 2010, 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, Effingham County Board Of Commissioners.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Cellular Phone Towers dataset, published at 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2010. It is described as 'Cell...

  1. Salvia fruticosa reduces intrinsic cellular and H2O2-induced DNA oxidation in HEK 293 cells; assessment using flow cytometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleem Bani Hani

    2014-05-01

    Conclusions: The results from this study suggest that the water-soluble extract of S. fruticosa leaves protects against both H2O2-induced and intrinsic cellular DNA oxidation in human embryonic kidney 293 cells.

  2. Cellular Phone Towers, Cell Towers in Lowndes County, GA, Published in 2008, 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, Southern Georgia Regional Commission.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Cellular Phone Towers dataset, published at 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2008. It is described as 'Cell...

  3. Cellular Reflectarray Antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanofsky, Robert R.

    2010-01-01

    The cellular reflectarray antenna is intended to replace conventional parabolic reflectors that must be physically aligned with a particular satellite in geostationary orbit. These arrays are designed for specified geographical locations, defined by latitude and longitude, each called a "cell." A particular cell occupies nominally 1,500 square miles (3,885 sq. km), but this varies according to latitude and longitude. The cellular reflectarray antenna designed for a particular cell is simply positioned to align with magnetic North, and the antenna surface is level (parallel to the ground). A given cellular reflectarray antenna will not operate in any other cell.

  4. A simple tool to improve pluripotent stem cell differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Chetty, Sundari; Pagliuca, Felicia Walton; Honore, Christian; Kweudjeu, Anastasie; Rezania, Alireza; Melton, Douglas A.

    2013-01-01

    We develop a method to overcome previously documented restrictions on the differentiation propensities of pluripotent stem cells. Culturing pluripotent stem cells in dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) activates the retinoblastoma protein, increases the proportion of cells in the early G1 phase of the cell cycle, and subsequently improves their competency for directed differentiation into multiple lineages in more than 25 stem cell lines. DMSO treatment also promotes terminal differentiation into functi...

  5. The mannose receptor LY75 (DEC205/CD205) modulates cellular phenotype and metastatic potential of ovarian cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faddaoui, Adnen; Bachvarova, Magdalena; Plante, Marie; Gregoire, Jean; Renaud, Marie-Claude; Sebastianelli, Alexandra; Gobeil, Stephane; Morin, Chantale; Macdonald, Elizabeth; Vanderhyden, Barbara; Bachvarov, Dimcho

    2016-03-22

    The molecular basis of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) dissemination is still poorly understood. Previously, we identified the mannose receptor LY75 gene as hypomethylated in high-grade (HG) serous EOC tumors, compared to normal ovarian tissues. LY75 represents endocytic receptor expressed on dendritic cells and so far, has been primarily studied for its role in antigen processing and presentation. Here we demonstrate that LY75 is overexpressed in advanced EOC and that LY75 suppression induces mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition (MET) in EOC cell lines with mesenchymal morphology (SKOV3 and TOV112), accompanied by reduction of their migratory and invasive capacity in vitro and enhanced tumor cell colonization and metastatic growth in vivo. LY75 knockdown in SKOV3 cells also resulted in predominant upregulation of functional pathways implicated in cell proliferation and metabolism, while pathways associated with cell signaling and adhesion, complement activation and immune response were mostly suppressed. Moreover, LY75 suppression had an opposite effect on EOC cell lines with epithelial phenotype (A2780s and OV2008), by directing epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) associated with reduced capacity for in vivo EOC cell colonization, as similar/identical signaling pathways were reversely regulated, when compared to mesenchymal LY75 knockdown EOC cells.To our knowledge, this is the first report of a gene displaying such pleiotropic effects in sustaining the cellular phenotype of EOC cells and points to novel functions of this receptor in modulating EOC dissemination. Our data also support previous findings regarding the superior capacity of epithelial cancer cells in metastatic colonization of distant sites, compared to cancer cells with mesenchymal-like morphology. PMID:26871602

  6. Inhibition of Cellular Growth of Melanoma Cells Line by Heterogeneous Beta Chronic Irradiation at Very Low-Dose-Rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioisotopes that decay via beta emission are widely used in science and medicine. The main advantage of beta-emitters is the relatively long path length in biological tissue (in the mm range). The objective of this work was to determine the inhibition of cellular growth of melanoma cells (melanoma cells are one of the most radioresistant tumor cells) by beta irradiation at very low dose rate using a simple and economic device. This irradiation system represents a situation similar to radiodiagnostic, radioimmunotherapy and brachytherapy because there is a continuous emission of exponentially decreasing low-dose-rate irradiation with heterogeneous dose deposition. It permitted us to study different dose rates changing only the activity of beta emitter. We compare it with the high dose rate gamma irradiation. (authors)

  7. PLGA nanoparticles codeliver paclitaxel and Stat3 siRNA to overcome cellular resistance in lung cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su WP

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Wen-Pin Su,1,2 Fong-Yu Cheng,3 Dar-Bin Shieh,3–6 Chen-Sheng Yeh,5–7 Wu-Chou Su1,2,81Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University; 2Department of Internal Medicine, National Cheng Kung University Hospital, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University; 3Institute of Oral Medicine, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University; 4Department of Stomatology, National Cheng Kung University Hospital, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University; 5Advanced Optoelectronic Technology Center; 6Center for Frontier Materials and Micro/Nano Science and Technology, and 7Department of Chemistry, National Cheng Kung University; 8Cancer Center, National Cheng Kung University Hospital, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan.Abstract: Background: Effective cancer chemotherapy remains an important issue in cancer treatment, and signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (Stat3 activation leads to cellular resistance of anticancer agents. Polymers are ideal vectors to carry both chemotherapeutics and small interfering ribonucleic acid (siRNA to enhance antitumor efficacy. In this paper, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA nanoparticles loaded with paclitaxel and Stat3 siRNA were successfully synthesized, and their applications in cancer cells were investigated.Methods: Firstly, paclitaxel was enclosed by PLGA nanoparticles through solvent evaporation. They were then coated with cationic polyethylenimine polymer (PLGA-PEI-TAX, enabling it to carry Stat3 siRNA on its surface through electrostatic interactions (PLGA-PEI-TAX-S3SI. The size, zeta potential, deliver efficacy, and release profile of the PLGA nanocomplexes were characterized in vitro. The cellular uptake, intracellular nanoparticle trajectory, and subsequent cellular events were evaluated after treatment with various PLGA nanocomplexes in human lung cancer A549 cells and A549-derived paclitaxel

  8. Why cellular stress suppresses adipogenesis in skeletal tissue, but is ineffective in adipose tissue: Control of mesenchymal cell differentiation via integrin binding sites in extracellular matrices

    OpenAIRE

    Volloch, Vladimir; Olsen, Bjorn R.

    2013-01-01

    This Perspective addresses one of the major puzzles of adipogenesis in adipose tissue, namely its resistance to cellular stress. It introduces a concept of “density” of integrin binding sites in extracellular matrix, proposes a cellular signaling explanation for the observed effects of matrix elasticity and of cell shape on mesenchymal stem cell differentiation, and discusses how specialized integrin binding sites in collagen IV - containing matrices guard two pivotal physiological and evolut...

  9. Cellular and molecular events on the development of mammalian thyroid C cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameda, Yoko

    2016-03-01

    Thyroid C cells synthesize and secrete calcitonin, a serum calcium-lowering hormone. This review provides our current understanding of mammalian thyroid C cells from the molecular and morphological perspectives. Several transcription factors and signaling molecules involved in the development of C cells have been identified, and genes expressed in the pharyngeal pouch endoderm, neural crest-derived mesenchyme in the pharyngeal arches, and ultimobranchial body play critical roles for the development of C cells. It has been generally accepted, without much-supporting evidence, that mammalian C cells, as well as the avian cells, are derived from the neural crest. However, by fate mapping of neural crest cells in both Wnt1-Cre/R26R and Connexin(Cxn)43-lacZ transgenic mice, we showed that neural crest cells colonize neither the fourth pharyngeal pouch nor the ultimobranchial body. E-cadherin, an epithelial cell marker, is expressed in thyroid C cells and their precursors, the fourth pharyngeal pouch and ultimobranchial body. Furthermore, E-cadherin is colocalized with calcitonin in C cells. Recently, lineage tracing in Sox17-2A-iCre/R26R mice has clarified that the pharyngeal endoderm-derived cells give rise to C cells. Together, these findings indicate that mouse thyroid C cells are endodermal in origin. Developmental Dynamics 245:323-341, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26661795

  10. Optical quantification of cellular mass, volume and density of circulating tumor cells identified in an ovarian cancer patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KevinGregoryPhillips

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Clinical studies have demonstrated that circulating tumor cells (CTCs are present in the blood of cancer patients with known metastatic disease across the major types of epithelial malignancies. Recent studies have shown that the concentration of CTCs in the blood is prognostic of overall survival in breast, prostate, colorectal and non-small cell lung cancer. This study characterizes CTCs identified using the high-definition (HD-CTC assay in an ovarian cancer patient with stage IIIC disease. We characterized the physical properties of 31 HD-CTCs and 50 normal leukocytes from a single blood draw taken just prior to the initial debulking surgery. We utilized a non-interferometric quantitative phase microscopy technique using brightfield imagery to measure cellular dry mass. Next we used a quantitative differential interference contrast microscopy technique to measure cellular volume. These techniques were combined to determine cellular dry mass density. We found that HD-CTCs were more massive than leukocytes: 33.6 ± 3.2 pg (HD-CTC compared to 18.7 ± 0.6 pg (leukocytes, p < 0.001; had greater volumes: 518.3 ± 24.5 fL (HD-CTC compared to 230.9 ± 78.5 fL (leukocyte, p<0.001; and possessed a decreased dry mass density with respect to leukocytes: 0.065 ± 0.006 pg/fL (HD-CTC compared to 0.085 ± 0.004 pg/fL (leukocyte, p < 0.006. Quantification of HD-CTC dry mass content and volume provide key insights into the fluid dynamics of cancer, and may provide the rationale for strategies to isolate, monitor or target CTCs based on their physical properties. The parameters reported here can also be incorporated into blood cell flow models to better understand metastasis.

  11. Didymium compound improves nickel-cadmium cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    1965-01-01

    Nickel electrodes impregnated with an additive solution of didymium hydrate and nitric acid mixed with nickel nitrate increases ampere-hour capacity of cells and does not affect the voltage characteristics.

  12. Fyn is downstream of the HGF/MET signaling axis and affects cellular shape and tropism in PC3 cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Ana R.; Saito, Y. David; Liao, Chuanhong; Dai, Jinlu; Keller, Evan T.; Al-Ahmadie, Hikmat; Haché, Kelly Dakin; Usatyuk, Peter; Sievert, Margarit; Paner, Gladell P.; Yala, Soheil; Cervantes, Gustavo M.; Natarajan, Viswanathan; Salgia, Ravi; Posadas, Edwin M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Fyn is a member of the Src family of kinases that we have previously shown to be overexpressed in prostate cancer. This study defines the biological impact of Fyn inhibition in cancer using a PC3 prostate cancer model. Experimental Design Fyn expression was suppressed in PC3 cells using an shRNA against Fyn (PC3/FYN-). Knockdown cells were characterized using standard growth curves and time-lapse video microscopy of wound assays and Dunn Chamber assays. Tissue microarray analysis was used to verify the physiologic relevance of the HGF/MET axis in human samples. Flank injections of nude mice were performed to assess in vivo growth characteristics. Results HGF was found to be sufficient to drive Fyn mediated events. Compared to control transductants (PC3/Ctrl), PC3/FYN- showed a 21% decrease in growth at 4 days (P=0.05). PC3/FYN- cells were 34% longer than control cells (P=0.018) with 50% increase in overall surface area (P<0.001). Furthermore, when placed in a gradient of HGF, PC3/FYN- cells showed impaired directed chemotaxis down an HGF gradient in comparison to PC3/Ctrl (P=0.001) despite a 41% increase in cellular movement speed. In vivo studies showed 66% difference of PC3/FYN- cell growth at 8 weeks using bidimensional measurements (P=0.002). Conclusions Fyn plays an important role in prostate cancer biology by facilitating cellular growth and by regulating directed chemotaxis- a key component of metastasis. This finding bears particular translational importance when studying the effect of Fyn inhibition in human subjects. PMID:21364031

  13. Cellular High-energy Cavitation Trauma - description of a novel in vitro trauma model in three different cell types.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuli eCao

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms involved in traumatic brain injury (TBI have yet to be fully characterized. One mechanism that, especially in high energy trauma, could be of importance is cavitation. Cavitation can be described as a process of vaporization, bubble generation and bubble implosion as a result of a decrease and subsequent increase in pressure. Cavitation as an injury mechanism is difficult to visualize and model due to its short duration and limited spatial distribution. One strategy to analyze the cellular response of cavitation is to employ suitable in vitro models. The flyer plate is an in vitro high energy trauma model that includes cavitation as a trauma mechanism. A copper fragment is accelerated by means of a laser, hits the bottom of a cell culture well causing cavitation and shock waves inside the well and cell medium. We have found the flyer plate model to be efficient, reproducible and easy to control. In this study we have used the model to analyze the cellular response to microcavitation in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma, Caco-2, and C6 glioma cell lines. Mitotic activity in neuroblastoma and glioma was investigated with BrdU staining, and cell numbers were calculated using automated time-lapse imaging. We found variations between cell types and between different zones surrounding the lesion with these methods. It was also shown that the injured cell cultures released S-100B in a dose dependent manner. Using gene expression microarray a number of gene families of potential interest were found to be strongly, but differently regulated in neuroblastoma and glioma at 24 hr post trauma. The data from the gene expression arrays may be used to identify new candidates for biomarkers in cavitation trauma. We conclude that our model is useful for studies of trauma in vitro and that it could be applied in future treatment studies.

  14. Cellular Mechanism of Newly Synthesized Indoledione Derivative-induced Immunological Death of Tumor Cell

    OpenAIRE

    Oh, Su-Jin; Ryu, Chung-Kyu; Baek, So-Young; Lee, Hyunah

    2011-01-01

    Background EY-6 is one of the newly synthesized indoledione derivatives to induce tumor cell-specific cell death. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of immunological death induced by EY-6 at mouse colon cancer cell as well as at the normal immune cell represented by dendritic cell. Methods C57BL/6 mouse syngeneic colon cancer cell MC38 was treated with EY-6, and analyzed by MTT for viability test, flow cytometry for confirming surface expressing molecules and ELISA for detection of ...

  15. The Loss of Cellular Junctions in Epithelial Lung Cells Induced by Cigarette Smoke Is Attenuated by Corilagin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ximena M. Muresan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cigarette smoke (CS contains over 4700 compounds, many of which can affect cellular redox balance through free radicals production or through the modulation of antioxidant enzymes. The respiratory tract is one of the organs directly exposed to CS and it is known that CS can damage the integrity of lung epithelium by affecting cell junctions and increasing epithelium permeability. In this study, we have used a human lung epithelial cell line, Calu-3, to evaluate the effect of CS on lung epithelial cell junctions levels, with special focus on the expression of two proteins involved in intercellular communication: connexins (Cx 40 and 43. CS exposure increased Cx40 gene expression but not of Cx43. CS also induced NFκB activation and the formation of 4HNE-Cxs adducts. Since corilagin, a natural polyphenol, is able to inhibit NFκB activation, we have determined whether corilagin could counteract the effect of CS on Cxs expression. Corilagin was able to diminish CS induced Cx40 gene expression, 4HNE-Cx40 adducts formation, and NFκB activation. The results of this study demonstrated that CS induced the loss of cellular junctions in lung epithelium, possibly as a consequence of Cx-4HNE adducts formation, and corilagin seems to be able to abolish these CS induced alterations.

  16. Gene Expression Profile Changes and Cellular Responses to Bleomycin-Induced DNA Damage in Human Fibroblast Cells in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Tao; Zhang, Ye; Kidane, Yared; Feiveson, Alan; Stodieck, Louis; Karouia, Fathi; Rohde, Larry; Wu, Honglu

    2016-01-01

    Living organisms are constantly exposed to space radiation that consists of energetic protons and other heavier charged particles. In addition, DNA in space can be damaged by toxic chemicals or reactive oxygen species generated due to increased levels of environmental and psychological stresses. Understanding the impact of spaceflight factors, microgravity in particular, on cellular responses to DNA damage affects the accuracy of the radiation risk assessment for astronauts and the mutation rate in microorganisms. Although possible synergistic effects of space radiation and microgravity have been investigated since the early days of the human space program, the published results were mostly conflicting and inconsistent. To investigate the effects of spaceflight on cellular responses to DNA damage, confluent human fibroblast cells (AG1522) flown on the International Space Station (ISS) were treated with bleomycin for three hours in the true microgravity environment, which induced DNA damages including double-strand breaks (DSB). Damages in the DNA were quantified by immunofluorescence staining for ?-H2AX, which showed similar percentages of different types of stained cells between flight and ground. However, there was a slight shift in the distribution of the ?-H2AX foci number in the flown cells with countable foci. Comparison of the cells in confluent and in exponential growth conditions indicated that the proliferation rate between flight and the ground may be responsible for such a shift. A microarray analysis of gene expressions in response to bleomycin treatment was also performed. Comparison of the responsive pathways between the flown and ground cells showed similar responses with the p53 network being the top upstream regulator. Similar responses at the RNA level between different gravity conditions were also observed with a PCR array analysis containing a set of genes involved in DNA damage signaling; with BBC3, CDKN1A, PCNA and PPM1D being significantly

  17. Immunological characterization of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells--The International Society for Cellular Therapy (ISCT) working proposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krampera, Mauro; Galipeau, Jacques; Shi, Yufang; Tarte, Karin; Sensebe, Luc

    2013-09-01

    Cultured mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) possess immune regulatory properties and are already used for clinical purposes, although preclinical data (both in vitro and in vivo in animal models) are not always homogeneous and unequivocal. However, the various MSC-based clinical approaches to treat immunological diseases would be significantly validated and strengthened by using standardized immune assays aimed at obtaining shared, reproducible and consistent data. Thus, the MSC Committee of the International Society for Cellular Therapy has decided to put forward for general discussion a working proposal for a standardized approach based on a critical view of literature data. PMID:23602578

  18. pH effect on cellular uptake of Sn(IV) chlorine e6 dichloride trisodium salt by cancer cells in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Khaza’leh, Khaled A.; Omar, Khalid; M. S. Jaafar

    2010-01-01

    The effects of pH value and presence of serum in an incubation medium on photosensitizer drug cellular uptake in MCF7 cancer cells have been investigated. The results showed that the presence of serum in an incubation medium reduced the drug cellular uptake at all pH values. It has been found that decreasing on pH values of the incubation medium increased the cellular uptake of the drug, demonstrating selective uptake of the sensitizer. The HepG2 liver cancer cells exhibited more drug cellula...

  19. Heterozygous inactivation of the Nf1 gene in myeloid cells enhances neointima formation via a rosuvastatin-sensitive cellular pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stansfield, Brian K; Bessler, Waylan K; Mali, Raghuveer; Mund, Julie A; Downing, Brandon; Li, Fang; Sarchet, Kara N; DiStasi, Matthew R; Conway, Simon J; Kapur, Reuben; Ingram, David A

    2013-03-01

    Mutations in the NF1 tumor suppressor gene cause Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). Neurofibromin, the protein product of NF1, functions as a negative regulator of Ras activity. Some NF1 patients develop cardiovascular disease, which represents an underrecognized disease complication and contributes to excess morbidity and mortality. Specifically, NF1 patients develop arterial occlusion resulting in tissue ischemia and sudden death. Murine studies demonstrate that heterozygous inactivation of Nf1 (Nf1(+/-)) in bone marrow cells enhances neointima formation following arterial injury. Macrophages infiltrate Nf1(+/-) neointimas, and NF1 patients have increased circulating inflammatory monocytes in their peripheral blood. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that heterozygous inactivation of Nf1 in myeloid cells is sufficient for neointima formation. Specific ablation of a single copy of the Nf1 gene in myeloid cells alone mobilizes a discrete pro-inflammatory murine monocyte population via a cell autonomous and gene-dosage dependent mechanism. Furthermore, lineage-restricted heterozygous inactivation of Nf1 in myeloid cells is sufficient to reproduce the enhanced neointima formation observed in Nf1(+/-) mice when compared with wild-type controls, and homozygous inactivation of Nf1 in myeloid cells amplified the degree of arterial stenosis after arterial injury. Treatment of Nf1(+/-) mice with rosuvastatin, a stain with anti-inflammatory properties, significantly reduced neointima formation when compared with control. These studies identify neurofibromin-deficient myeloid cells as critical cellular effectors of Nf1(+/-) neointima formation and propose a potential therapeutic for NF1 cardiovascular disease. PMID:23197650

  20. The importance of cellular internalization of antibody-targeted carbon nanotubes in the photothermal ablation of breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) convert absorbed near infrared (NIR) light into heat. The use of CNTs in the NIR-mediated photothermal ablation of tumor cells is attractive because the penetration of NIR light through normal tissues is optimal and the side effects are minimal. Targeted thermal ablation with minimal collateral damage can be achieved by using CNTs attached to tumor-specific monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). However, the role that the cellular internalization of CNTs plays in the subsequent sensitivity of the target cells to NIR-mediated photothermal ablation remains undefined. To address this issue, we used CNTs covalently coupled to an anti-Her2 or a control MAb and tested their ability to bind, internalize, and photothermally ablate Her2+ but not Her2- breast cancer cell lines. Using flow cytometry, immunofluorescence, and confocal Raman microscopy, we observed the gradual time-dependent receptor-mediated endocytosis of anti-Her2-CNTs whereas a control MAb-CNT conjugate did not bind to the cells. Most importantly, the Her2+ cells that internalized the MAb-CNTs were more sensitive to NIR-mediated photothermal damage than cells that could bind to, but not internalize the MAb-CNTs. These results suggest that both the targeting and internalization of MAb-CNTs might result in the most effective thermal ablation of tumor cells following their exposure to NIR light.

  1. Snai2 and Snai3 transcriptionally regulate cellular fitness and functionality of T cell lineages through distinct gene programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pioli, Peter D; Whiteside, Sarah K; Weis, Janis J; Weis, John H

    2016-05-01

    T lymphocytes are essential contributors to the adaptive immune system and consist of multiple lineages that serve various effector and regulatory roles. As such, precise control of gene expression is essential to the proper development and function of these cells. Previously, we identified Snai2 and Snai3 as being essential regulators of immune tolerance partly due to the impaired function of CD4(+) regulatory T cells in Snai2/3 conditional double knockout mice. Here we extend those previous findings using a bone marrow transplantation model to provide an environmentally unbiased view of the molecular changes imparted onto various T lymphocyte populations once Snai2 and Snai3 are deleted. The data presented here demonstrate that Snai2 and Snai3 transcriptionally regulate the cellular fitness and functionality of not only CD4(+) regulatory T cells but effector CD8(α+) and CD4(+) conventional T cells as well. This is achieved through the modulation of gene sets unique to each cell type and includes transcriptional targets relevant to the survival and function of each T cell lineage. As such, Snai2 and Snai3 are essential regulators of T cell immunobiology. PMID:26831822

  2. NAD⁺ repletion improves mitochondrial and stem cell function and enhances life span in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongbo; Ryu, Dongryeol; Wu, Yibo; Gariani, Karim; Wang, Xu; Luan, Peiling; D'Amico, Davide; Ropelle, Eduardo R; Lutolf, Matthias P; Aebersold, Ruedi; Schoonjans, Kristina; Menzies, Keir J; Auwerx, Johan

    2016-06-17

    Adult stem cells (SCs) are essential for tissue maintenance and regeneration yet are susceptible to senescence during aging. We demonstrate the importance of the amount of the oxidized form of cellular nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) and its effect on mitochondrial activity as a pivotal switch to modulate muscle SC (MuSC) senescence. Treatment with the NAD(+) precursor nicotinamide riboside (NR) induced the mitochondrial unfolded protein response and synthesis of prohibitin proteins, and this rejuvenated MuSCs in aged mice. NR also prevented MuSC senescence in the mdx (C57BL/10ScSn-Dmd(mdx)/J) mouse model of muscular dystrophy. We furthermore demonstrate that NR delays senescence of neural SCs and melanocyte SCs and increases mouse life span. Strategies that conserve cellular NAD(+) may reprogram dysfunctional SCs and improve life span in mammals. PMID:27127236

  3. Micropatterned co-culture of hepatocyte spheroids layered on non-parenchymal cells to understand heterotypic cellular interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microfabrication and micropatterning techniques in tissue engineering offer great potential for creating and controlling cellular microenvironments including cell–matrix interactions, soluble stimuli and cell–cell interactions. Here, we present a novel approach to generate layered patterning of hepatocyte spheroids on micropatterned non-parenchymal feeder cells using microfabricated poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels. Micropatterned PEG-hydrogel-treated substrates with two-dimensional arrays of gelatin circular domains (ϕ = 100 μm) were prepared by photolithographic method. Only on the critical structure of PEG hydrogel with perfect protein rejection, hepatocytes were co-cultured with non-parenchymal cells to be led to enhanced hepatocyte functions. Then, we investigated the mechanism of the functional enhancement in co-culture with respect to the contributions of soluble factors and direct cell–cell interactions. In particular, to elucidate the influence of soluble factors on hepatocyte function, hepatocyte spheroids underlaid with fibroblasts (NIH/3T3 mouse fibroblasts) or endothelial cells (BAECs: bovine aortic endothelial cells) were compared with physically separated co-culture of hepatocyte monospheroids with NIH3T3 or BAEC using trans-well culture systems. Our results suggested that direct heterotypic cell-to-cell contact and soluble factors, both of these between hepatocytes and fibroblasts, significantly enhanced hepatocyte functions. In contrast, direct heterotypic cell-to-cell contact between hepatocytes and endothelial cells only contributed to enhance hepatocyte functions. This patterning technique can be a useful experimental tool for applications in basic science, drug screening and tissue engineering, as well as in the design of artificial liver devices. (paper)

  4. Cellular heredity in haploid cultures of somatic cells, March 1968-April 1981. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An account is given of the development and application to cell-culture genetics of unique haploid cell lines from frog embryo developed in this laboratory. Since 1968, the main aim of this project has been to develop the haploid cell system for studies of mutagenesis in culture, particularly by ultraviolet radiation. In the course of this work we isolated chromosomally stable cell lines, derived and characterized a number of variants, and adapted cell hybridization and other methods to this material. Particular emphasis was placed on ultraviolet photobiology, including studies of cell survival, mutagenesis, and pathways of repair of uv-damaged DNA. Although at present less widely used for genetic experiments than mammalian cell lines, the frog cells offer the advantages of authentic haploidy and a favorable repertory of DNA repair pathways for study of uv mutagenesis

  5. EFFECT OF DESTRUCTION OF NTS AND PVN ON NEIGUAN (PC 6)ELECTROACUPUNCTURE-INDUCED IMPROVEMENT OF ISCHEMIC MYOCARDIAL CELLULAR MEMBRANE POTENTIALS IN RABBITS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Ze-bin; WANG Shu-ju; WANG Ya-wen; WU Xu-ping; WANG Hua

    2005-01-01

    Objective:To observe the influence of electrolytic destruction of nucleus solitary tract (NTS) and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) on the effect of electroacupuncture (EA) in improving ischemic myocardia cellular transmembrane action potential (TMAP). Methods: 38 Japanese breed big-ear white rabbits (anesthetized with 20% Urethane, 4mL/kg) were randomly divided into acute myocardial ischemia (AMI) group (n=8), PVN destruction group (n=12) and PVN+NTS destruction group (n=18). AMI model was established by occlusion of the descending anterior branch (DAB) of the coronary artery. TMAP of myocytes was recorded by using a glass microelectrode which was fixed to a suspending spring silver wire. Bilateral "Neiguan"(PC 6) in all the 3 groups were punctured and stimulated electrically by using parameters of continuous waves, frequency ECG-ST elevated significantly while APA lowered, APD50 and APD90 shortened of 7 Hz, intensity of 6 mA and duration of 30 minutes. Results: After AMI,clearly in comparison with those of pre-AMI in the 3 groups. Compared with AMI group, ECG-ST values of PVN destruction group and PVN+NTS destruction group were significantly higher (P<0.05~0.01), while APA, APD50 and APD90 all significantly lower in all the recording time courses(P<0.05). The facts displayed that electrolytic destruction of PVN and PVN+NTS could produce ischemic myocardial injury and reduce the protective effect of EA on ischemic myocardial cells. Comparison between PVN destruction and PVN+NTS groups showed that all the 4 indexes of the later group were evidently worse than those of the former group (P<0.05), suggesting after destruction of these two nuclei, the effect of EA was worsened further. Conclusion: Electrolytic destruction of PVN and NTS weakens the protective effect of EA on ischemic myocardial cells, both NTS and PVN take part in the effect of EA of "Neiguan"(PC 6) Point in improving ischemic myocardium.

  6. Single-cell bioelectrical impedance platform for monitoring cellular response to drug treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Asphahani, Fareid; Wang, Kui; Thein, Myo; Veiseh, Omid; Yung, Sandy; Xu, Jian; Zhang, Miqin

    2011-01-01

    The response of cells to a chemical or biological agent in terms of their impedance changes in real-time is a useful mechanism that can be utilized for a wide variety of biomedical and environmental applications. The use of a single-cell based analytical platform could be an effective approach to acquiring more sensitive cell impedance measurements, particularly in applications where only diminutive changes in impedance are expected. Here, we report the development of an on-chip cell impedanc...

  7. A molecular roadmap of cellular reprogramming into iPS cells

    OpenAIRE

    Polo, Jose M.; Anderssen, Endre; Walsh, Ryan M.; Schwarz, Benjamin A.; Nefzger, Christian M.; Lim, Sue Mei; Borkent, Marti; Apostolou, Effie; Alaei, Sara; Cloutier, Jennifer; Bar-Nur, Ori; Cheloufi, Sihem; Stadtfeld, Matthias; Figueroa, Maria Eugenia; Robinton, Daisy

    2012-01-01

    Factor-induced reprogramming of somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) is inefficient, complicating mechanistic studies. Here, we studied defined intermediate cell populations poised to becoming iPSCs by genome-wide analyses. We show that induced pluripotency elicits two transcriptional waves, which are driven by c-Myc/Klf4 (first wave) and Oct4/Sox2/Klf4 (second wave). Cells that become refractory to reprogramming activate the first but fail to initiate the second transcri...

  8. Efficiency of cellular growth when creating small pockets of electric current along the walls of cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kletetschka, Günther; Žíla, V.; Klímová, Lucie

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 2 (2014), s. 226-228. ISSN 1549-1684 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 ; RVO:68378050 Keywords : magnetic field s * cell division * prokaryotic cells * eukarotic cells Subject RIV: FS - Medical Facilities ; Equipment Impact factor: 3.311, year: 2014

  9. Dependence of anaphylactic histamine release from rat mast cells on cellular energy metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Torben

    1981-01-01

    The relation between anaphylactic histamine release and the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) content of the mast cells was studied. The cells were incubated with glycolytic (2-deoxyglucose) and respiratory inhibitors (antimycin A and oligomycin) in order to decrease the ATP content of the cells prior...

  10. Organic Solar Cells Performances Improvement Induced by Interface Buffer Layers

    OpenAIRE

    Bernède, J. C.; Godoy, A.; Cattin, L; Diaz, F. R.; MORSLI, M; Valle, M. A. del

    2010-01-01

    In the last 22 years that have elapsed since the pioneering work of Tang [Tang, Appl. Phys. Lett., 1986], significant improvement in the fundamental understanding and cells construction have led to efficiencies higher than 6%. The new concept of polymer:fullerene BHJ solar cells has allowed dramatic improvements in devices efficiency. It has induced a healthy competition with the multi-heterojunction devices base on small organic molecules, which induces significant progress in both cells fam...

  11. Stem Cell Imaging: Tools to Improve Cell Delivery and Viability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junxin; Jokerst, Jesse V.

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell therapy (SCT) has shown very promising preclinical results in a variety of regenerative medicine applications. Nevertheless, the complete utility of this technology remains unrealized. Imaging is a potent tool used in multiple stages of SCT and this review describes the role that imaging plays in cell harvest, cell purification, and cell implantation, as well as a discussion of how imaging can be used to assess outcome in SCT. We close with some perspective on potential growth in the field. PMID:26880997

  12. The effect of vitamin E on cellular survival after X irradiation of lymphoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asynchronous cultures of a lymphocytic mouse leukaemic cell line L5178Y were X-irradiated under oxic and hypoxic conditions. The survival curves had almost no shoulder when the cells were grown under normal conditions and then irradiated in the presence of vitamin E, whereas a clear shoulder appeared when the cells were grown and irradiated in a medium supplemented with vitamin E (100 μg/ml). There was no change in the final sensitivity to lethal events in the vitamin E enriched cells. The results suggest that the radioprotective effect of vitamin E depends on its incorporation into the cell membranes. (U.K.)

  13. Feasibility of obtaining breast epithelial cells from healthy women for studies of cellular proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, N A; Thomas, M; Martin, L J; Hedley, D W; Michal, S; Boyd, N F

    1997-05-01

    Increased dietary fat intake and rate of breast epithelial cell proliferation have each been associated with the development of breast cancer. The goal of this study was to measure the effect of a low fat, high carbohydrate diet on the rate of breast epithelial cell proliferation in women at high risk for breast cancer. Women were recruited from the intervention and control groups of a randomized low fat dietary intervention trial, breast epithelial cells were obtained by fine needle aspiration, and cell proliferation was assessed in these samples using immunofluorescent detection of Ki-67 and PCNA. The effects of needle size and study group on cell yield and cytologic features of the cells were also examined. Fifty three women (20 in the intervention group and 33 in the control group) underwent the biopsy procedure. Slides from 38 subjects were stained for Ki-67 and from 14 subjects for PCNA. No cell proliferation (fluorescence) was detected for either Ki-67 or PCNA in any of the slides. Epithelial cell yield and number of stromal fragments were greater with a larger needle size. Numbers of stromal fragments and bipolar naked nuclei were greater in the low fat as compared to the control group but no differences in epithelial cell yield were observed between the two groups. This study confirms that fine needle aspiration biopsy is a feasible method of obtaining epithelial cells from women without discrete breast masses, but suggests that cell proliferation cannot be assessed using Ki-67 and PCNA in such samples. PMID:9150899

  14. Perfluorinated chemicals: Differential toxicity, inhibition of aromatase activity and alteration of cellular lipids in human placental cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorrochategui, Eva; Pérez-Albaladejo, Elisabet [Department of Environmental Chemistry, IDAEA–CSIC, 08034 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Casas, Josefina [Department of Biomedicinal Chemistry, IQAC–CSIC, 08034 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Lacorte, Sílvia, E-mail: slbqam@cid.csic.es [Department of Environmental Chemistry, IDAEA–CSIC, 08034 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Porte, Cinta, E-mail: cinta.porte@cid.csic.es [Department of Environmental Chemistry, IDAEA–CSIC, 08034 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain)

    2014-06-01

    The cytotoxicity of eight perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs), namely, perfluorobutanoic acid (PFBA), perfluorohexanoic acid (PFHxA), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA), perfluorododecanoic acid (PFDoA), perfluorobutanesulfonate (PFBS), perfluorohexanesulfonate (PFHxS) and perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) was assessed in the human placental choriocarcinoma cell line JEG-3. Only the long chain PFCs – PFOS, PFDoA, PFNA, PFOA – showed significant cytotoxicity in JEG-3 cells with EC50 values in the range of 107 to 647 μM. The observed cytotoxicity was to some extent related to a higher uptake of the longer chain PFCs by cells (PFDoA > PFOS ≫ PFNA > PFOA > PFHxA). Moreover, this work evidences a high potential of PFOS, PFOA and PFBS to act as aromatase inhibitors in placental cells with IC50s in the range of 57–80 μM, the inhibitory effect of PFBS being particularly important despite the rather low uptake of the compound by cells. Finally, exposure of JEG-3 cells to a mixture of the eight PFCs (0.6 μM each) led to a relative increase (up to 3.4-fold) of several lipid classes, including phosphatidylcholines (PCs), plasmalogen PC and lyso plasmalogen PC, which suggests an interference of PFCs with membrane lipids. Overall, this work highlights the ability of the PFC mixture to alter cellular lipid pattern at concentrations well below those that generate toxicity, and the potential of the short chain PFBS, often considered a safe substitute of PFOS, to significantly inhibit aromatase activity in placental cells. - Highlights: • Eight perfluorinated chemicals of different chain lengths have been selected. • Long chain ones – PFOS, PFDoA, PFNA, PFOA – were cytotoxic in placenta cells. • The uptake of long chain perfluorinated chemicals by cells was comparatively higher. • PFOS, PFOA and the short chain PFBS significantly inhibited aromatase activity. • A mixture of perfluorinated chemicals significantly altered placenta cell

  15. Perfluorinated chemicals: Differential toxicity, inhibition of aromatase activity and alteration of cellular lipids in human placental cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cytotoxicity of eight perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs), namely, perfluorobutanoic acid (PFBA), perfluorohexanoic acid (PFHxA), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA), perfluorododecanoic acid (PFDoA), perfluorobutanesulfonate (PFBS), perfluorohexanesulfonate (PFHxS) and perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) was assessed in the human placental choriocarcinoma cell line JEG-3. Only the long chain PFCs – PFOS, PFDoA, PFNA, PFOA – showed significant cytotoxicity in JEG-3 cells with EC50 values in the range of 107 to 647 μM. The observed cytotoxicity was to some extent related to a higher uptake of the longer chain PFCs by cells (PFDoA > PFOS ≫ PFNA > PFOA > PFHxA). Moreover, this work evidences a high potential of PFOS, PFOA and PFBS to act as aromatase inhibitors in placental cells with IC50s in the range of 57–80 μM, the inhibitory effect of PFBS being particularly important despite the rather low uptake of the compound by cells. Finally, exposure of JEG-3 cells to a mixture of the eight PFCs (0.6 μM each) led to a relative increase (up to 3.4-fold) of several lipid classes, including phosphatidylcholines (PCs), plasmalogen PC and lyso plasmalogen PC, which suggests an interference of PFCs with membrane lipids. Overall, this work highlights the ability of the PFC mixture to alter cellular lipid pattern at concentrations well below those that generate toxicity, and the potential of the short chain PFBS, often considered a safe substitute of PFOS, to significantly inhibit aromatase activity in placental cells. - Highlights: • Eight perfluorinated chemicals of different chain lengths have been selected. • Long chain ones – PFOS, PFDoA, PFNA, PFOA – were cytotoxic in placenta cells. • The uptake of long chain perfluorinated chemicals by cells was comparatively higher. • PFOS, PFOA and the short chain PFBS significantly inhibited aromatase activity. • A mixture of perfluorinated chemicals significantly altered placenta cell

  16. Accumulation of intra-cellular polyphosphate in Chlorella vulgaris cells is related to indole-3-acetic acid produced by Azospirillum brasilense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meza, Beatriz; de-Bashan, Luz E; Hernandez, Juan-Pablo; Bashan, Yoav

    2015-06-01

    Accumulation of intra-cellular phosphate, as polyphosphate, was measured when the microalga Chlorella vulgaris was immobilized in alginate with either of two wild-type strains of the microalgae growth-promoting bacterium Azospirillum brasilense or their corresponding IAA-attenuated mutants. Wild type strains of A. brasilense induced higher amounts of intra-cellular phosphate in Chlorella than their respective mutants. Calculations comparing intra-cellular phosphate accumulation by culture or net accumulation by the cell and the amount of IAA that was produced by each of these strains revealed that higher IAA was linked to higher accumulations of intra-cellular phosphate. Application of four levels of exogenous IAA reported for A. brasilense and their IAA-attenuated mutants to cultures of C. vulgaris enhanced accumulation of intra-cellular phosphate; the higher the content of IAA per culture or per single cell, the higher was the amount of accumulated phosphate. When an IAA-attenuated mutant was complemented with exogenous IAA, accumulation of intra-cellular phosphate at the culture level was even higher than phosphate accumulation with the respective wild type strains. When calculating the net accumulation of intra-cellular phosphate in the complementation experiment, net intra-cellular phosphate induced by the IAA-attenuated mutant was completely restored and was similar to the wild strains. We propose that IAA produced by A. brasilense is linked to polyphosphate accumulation in C. vulgaris. PMID:25797155

  17. Luciferase mRNA Transfection of Antigen Presenting Cells Permits Sensitive Nonradioactive Measurement of Cellular and Humoral Cytotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tana A. Omokoko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Immunotherapy is rapidly evolving as an effective treatment option for many cancers. With the emerging fields of cancer vaccines and adoptive cell transfer therapies, there is an increasing demand for high-throughput in vitro cytotoxicity assays that efficiently analyze immune effector functions. The gold standard 51Cr-release assay is very accurate but has the major disadvantage of being radioactive. We reveal the development of a versatile and nonradioactive firefly luciferase in vitro transcribed (IVT RNA-based assay. Demonstrating high efficiency, consistency, and excellent target cell viability, our optimized luciferase IVT RNA is used to transfect dividing and nondividing primary antigen presenting cells. Together with the long-lasting expression and minimal background, the direct measurement of intracellular luciferase activity of living cells allows for the monitoring of killing kinetics and displays paramount sensitivity. The ability to cotransfect the IVT RNA of the luciferase reporter and the antigen of interest into the antigen presenting cells and its simple read-out procedure render the assay high-throughput in nature. Results generated were comparable to the 51Cr release and further confirmed the assay’s ability to measure antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity and complement-dependent cytotoxicity. The assay’s combined simplicity, practicality, and efficiency tailor it for the analysis of antigen-specific cellular and humoral effector functions during the development of novel immunotherapies.

  18. Cellular accumulation and distribution of uranium and lead in osteoblastic cells as a function of their speciation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium (U) and lead (Pb) are accumulated and fixed for long periods in bone, impairing remodeling processes. Their toxicity to osteoblasts, the cells responsible for bone formation, is poorly documented. It has been previously shown that cytotoxicity and phenotypic effects of both metals on osteoblasts are highly influenced by metal speciation. Differences in sensitivity between cell types have been underlined as well. In this paper, cellular accumulation of U and Pb in cultured and primary osteoblastic cells was assessed by trace element analysis. Distribution of different species at the cell scale was investigated by electron microscopy. Internalization of both metals was shown to be correlated to cytotoxicity and population growth recovery after exposure. For each metal, the amount of metal uptake leading to 50% cell death was shown to be speciation-dependent. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy showed the formation of precipitates with phosphate in lysosomes for both metals, whose role in toxicity or cell defence remains to be clarified. Although a clear link was established between cytotoxicity and accumulation, differences in sensitivity observed in terms of speciation could not be fully explained and other studies seem necessary

  19. Sponge cell reaggregation: Cellular structure and morphogenetic potencies of multicellular aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavrov, Andrey I; Kosevich, Igor A

    2016-02-01

    Sponges (phylum Porifera) are one of the most ancient extant multicellular animals and can provide valuable insights into origin and early evolution of Metazoa. High plasticity of cell differentiations and anatomical structure is characteristic feature of sponges. Present study deals with sponge cell reaggregation after dissociation as the most outstanding case of sponge plasticity. Dynamic of cell reaggregation and structure of multicellular aggregates of three demosponge species (Halichondria panicea (Pallas, 1766), Haliclona aquaeductus (Sсhmidt, 1862), and Halisarca dujardinii Johnston, 1842) were studied. Sponge tissue dissociation was performed mechanically. Resulting cell suspensions were cultured at 8-10°C for at least 5 days. Structure of multicellular aggregates was studied by light, transmission and scanning electron microscopy. Studied species share common stages of cell reaggregation-primary multicellular aggregates, early-stage primmorphs and primmorphs, but the rate of reaggregation varies considerably among species. Only cells of H. dujardinii are able to reconstruct functional and viable sponge after primmorphs formation. Sponge reconstruction in this species occurs due to active cell locomotion. Development of H. aquaeductus and H. panicea cells ceases at the stages of early primmorphs and primmorphs, respectively. Development of aggregates of these species is most likely arrested due to immobility of the majority of cells inside them. However, the inability of certain sponge species to reconstruct functional and viable individuals during cell reaggregation may be not a permanent species-specific characteristic, but depends on various factors, including the stage of the life cycle and experimental conditions. PMID:26863993

  20. Cell-centred model for the simulation of curved cellular monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosaffa, Payman; Asadipour, Nina; Millán, Daniel; Rodríguez-Ferran, Antonio; J Muñoz, Jose

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents a cell-centred model for the simulation of planar and curved multicellular soft tissues. We propose a computational model that includes stress relaxation due to cell reorganisation (intercellular connectivity changes) and cytoskeleton remodelling (intracellular changes). Cells are represented by their cell centres, and their mechanical interaction is modelled through active non-linear elastic laws with a dynamically changing resting length. Special attention is paid to the handling of connectivity changes between cells, and the relaxation that the tissues exhibit under these topological changes. Cell-cell connectivity is computed by resorting to a Delaunay triangulation, which is combined with a mapping technique in order to obtain triangulations on curved manifolds. Our numerical results show that even a linear elastic cell-cell interaction model may induce a global non-linear response due to the reorganisation of the cell connectivity. This plastic-like behaviour is combined with a non-linear rheological law where the resting length depends on the elastic strain, mimicking the global visco-elastic response of tissues. The model is applied to simulate the elongation of planar and curved monolayers.

  1. Cellular uptake of {sup 212}BiOCl by Ehrlich ascites cells: A dosimetric analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roeske, J.C.; Whitlock, J.L.; Harper, P.V.; Rotmensch, J. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Stinchcomb, T.G. [DePaul Univ., Chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Physics; Schwartz, J.L. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Hines, J.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemistry Div.

    1999-01-01

    Bi-212 is an alpha-emitting radionuclide being investigated as a therapeutic agent in the intraperitoneal treatment of micrometastatic ovarian carcinoma. In evaluating a new therapeutic modality, cell-survival studies are often used as a means of quantifying the biological effects of radiation. In this analysis, Ehrlich ascites cells were irradiated under conditions similar to therapy in various concentrations of Bi-212. Immediately following irradiation, a cell survival assay was performed in which cells were plated and colonies were counted after 10--14 days. Both a macrodosimetric and a microdosimetric approach were used in analyzing these data. These models used as input the fraction of activity within the cell and in solution, the distribution of cell sizes, and the variation of LET along individual alpha-particle tracks. The results indicate that the energy deposited within the nucleus varies significantly among individual cells. There is a small fraction of cell nuclei which receive no hits, while the remaining cells receive energy depositions which can differ significantly from the mean value. These dosimetric parameters are correlated with measured cell survival and will be a useful predictor of outcome for therapeutic doses.

  2. Cellular responses with thymoquinone treatment in human breast cancer cell line MCF-7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjaneh Motaghed

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nigella sativa or black seed extract has been reported to show various medicinal benefits. Thymoquinone which is an active compound of its seed has been reported to contain anti-cancer properties. Objective: The study addressed the anti-cancer efficiency of long-term in vitro treatment with thymoquinone towards human breast cancer cell lines MCF-7. Materials and Methods: Cell proliferation was determined with CellTiter 96 Aqueous. Non-Radioactive Cell Proliferation Assay Kit. It was followed with trypan blue exclusion test to determine the percentage of viable cells. The study incorporated cell cycle assay to distinguish cell distribution at various cell cycle phases using Cycletest Plus DNA Reagent Kit. The apoptosis detection kit was used to determine the percentage of apoptotic and necrotic cells using flow cytometry. Results: The 50% inhibitory concentration (IC 50 value determined using the proliferation assay was 25 μM thymoquinone. Late apoptotic cell percentage increased rapidly when treatment duration was increased to 24 h with 25 and 100 μM thymoquinone. Further analysis using cell cycle assay showed thymoquinone inhibition of breast cancer cell proliferation at minimal dose 25 μM and led to S phase arrest significantly at 72 h treatment (P = 0.009. It was also noted elevation sub-G 1 peak following treatment with 25 μM thymoquinone for 12 h. Increase in thymoquinone to 50 μM caused G 2 phase arrest at each time-point studied. Conclusion: In general thymoquinone showed sustained inhibition of breast cancer cell proliferation with long-term treatment. Specificity of phase arrest was determined by thymoquinone dose.

  3. Evaluation of Cellular Toxicity for Cisplatin, Arsenic And Acetaminophen in the Cancer and Normal Cell Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Saeedi Saravi

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cell culture is a process in which the cells ware isolated from original tissue, dispersed in liquid media and then placed in culture plate where the cells adhere together and propagate. Today, this method is used for assessment of cell toxicity, its mechanisms and effect of different compounds on intracellular components. Methods: Clonogenic assay was used for assessment of cell toxicity and amount of cell death after a specific time during which cells were exposed to different compounds. Thus, IC50 in caner cell lines (HePG2, SKOV3 and A549 and normal cell (LLCPK1, CHO and HGF1 was assessed after exposure to cisplatin, acetaminophen and arsenic. Results: Results showed that acetaminophen has maximum resistance and minimum sensitivity in CHO line with IC50=16.7±1.06 HePG2 with IC50=18.6±1.29. On the other hand, cisplatin showed minimum resistance and maximum sensitivity in HePG2 with IC50 = 0.87±0.07 and HGF1 with IC50 = 1.6±0.21 and lastly, arsenic showed minimum resistance and maximum sensitivity in A549 with IC50 = 4.59±0.29 and LLCPK1 with IC50= 1±0.37. Discussion: According to the evaluated IC50, there were differences between results of sensitivity of cell lines exposed to the three drugs (P<0.05. Entirely, resistance in cancer cell lines was lower than normal cells. The results showed the importance of cell defensive mechanisms encountering different substances like glutathione.

  4. Strategies for selecting recombinant CHO cell lines for cGMP manufacturing: improving the efficiency of cell line generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Alison J; Racher, Andrew J; Preziosi, Richard; Dickson, Alan J

    2010-01-01

    Transfectants with a wide range of cellular phenotypes are obtained during the process of cell line generation. For the successful manufacture of a therapeutic protein, a means is required to identify a cell line with desirable growth and productivity characteristics from this phenotypically wide-ranging transfectant population. This identification process is on the critical path for first-in-human studies. We have stringently examined a typical selection strategy used to isolate cell lines suitable for cGMP manufacturing. One-hundred and seventy-five transfectants were evaluated as they progressed through the different assessment stages of the selection strategy. High producing cell lines, suitable for cGMP manufacturing, were identified. However, our analyses showed that the frequency of isolation of the highest producing cell lines was low and that ranking positions were not consistent between each assessment stage, suggesting that there is potential to improve upon the strategy. Attempts to increase the frequency of isolation of the 10 highest producing cell lines, by in silico analysis of alternative selection strategies, were unsuccessful. We identified alternative strategies with similar predictive capabilities to the typical selection strategy. One alternate strategy required fewer cell lines to be progressed at the assessment stages but the stochastic nature of the models means that cell line numbers are likely to change between programs. In summary, our studies illuminate the potential for improvement to this and future selection strategies, based around use of assessments that are more informative or that reduce variance, paving the way to improved efficiency of generation of manufacturing cell lines. PMID:20623584

  5. Macrophage traits in cancer cells are induced by macrophage-cancer cell fusion and cannot be explained by cellular interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Shabo, Ivan; Midtbö, Kristine Maria; Andersson, Henrik; Åkerlund, Emma; Olsson, Hans; Wegman, Pia; Gunnarsson, Cecilia; Lindström, Annelie

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cell fusion is a natural process in normal development and tissue regeneration. Fusion between cancer cells and macrophages generates metastatic hybrids with genetic and phenotypic characteristics from both maternal cells. However, there are no clinical markers for detecting cell fusion in clinical context. Macrophage-specific antigen CD163 expression in tumor cells is reported in breast and colorectal cancers and proposed being caused by macrophages-cancer cell fusion in tumor st...

  6. Application of Allogeneic Fibroblast Cells in Cellular Therapy of Recessive Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zare

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Context Connective tissue cells include fibroblasts, chondrocytes, adipocyte, and osteocytes. These cells are specialized for the secretion of collagenous extracellular matrix and are responsible for the architectural framework of the human body. Evidence Acquisition Connective tissue cells play a central role in supporting as well as repairing tissues and organs. Fibroblast cell therapy could be used for the treatment of burn wounds, scars, diabetic foot ulcers, acne scars and skin aging. This review focused on biology of fibroblasts and their role in cell therapy of recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB. Results Fibroblasts are known to play a pivotal role in skin structure and integrity, and dermal fibroblasts are believed to promote skin regeneration and rejuvenation via collagen production. Conclusions Fibroblasts can be used in transplantations to ameliorate an immune system response, in order to reduce antigen production. Human fibroblasts suppress ongoing mixed lymphocyte reactions (MLRs between lymphocyte cells from two individuals, and supernatant materials from fibroblast cultures suppress MLRs.

  7. Effect of solid distribution on elastic properties of open-cell cellular solids using numerical and experimental methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zargarian, A; Esfahanian, M; Kadkhodapour, J; Ziaei-Rad, S

    2014-09-01

    Effect of solid distribution between edges and vertices of three-dimensional cellular solid with an open-cell structure was investigated both numerically and experimentally. Finite element analysis (FEA) with continuum elements and appropriate periodic boundary condition was employed to calculate the elastic properties of cellular solids using tetrakaidecahedral (Kelvin) unit cell. Relative densities between 0.01 and 0.1 and various values of solid fractions were considered. In order to validate the numerical model, three scaffolds with the relative density of 0.08, but different amounts of solid in vertices, were fabricated via 3-D printing technique. Good agreement was observed between numerical simulation and experimental results. Results of numerical simulation showed that, at low relative densities (<0.03), Young׳s modulus increased by shifting materials away from edges to vertices at first and then decreased after reaching a critical point. However, for the high values of relative density, Young׳s modulus increased monotonically. Mechanisms of such a behavior were discussed in detail. Results also indicated that Poisson׳s ratio decreased by increasing relative density and solid fraction in vertices. By fitting a curve to the data obtained from the numerical simulation and considering the relative density and solid fraction in vertices, empirical relations were derived for Young׳s modulus and Poisson׳s ratio. PMID:24956160

  8. DNA damage induction and/or repair as mammalian cell biomarker for the prediction of cellular radiation response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumstark-Khan, C.

    DNA damage and its repair processes are key factors in cancer induction and also in the treatment of malignancies. Cancer prevention during extended space missions becomes a topic of great importance for space radiobiology. The knowledge of individual responsiveness would allow the protection strategy to be tailored optimally in each case. Radiobiological analysis of cultured cells derived from tissue explants from individuals has shown that measurement of the surviving fraction after 2 Gy (SF2) may be used to predict the individual responsiveness. However, clonogenic assays are timeconsuming, thus alternative assays for the determination of radiore-sponse are being sought. For that reason CHO cell strains having different repair capacities were used for examining whether DNA strand break repair is a suitable experimental design to allow predictive statements. Cellular survival (CFA assay) and DNA strand breaks (total DNA strand breaks: FADU technique; DSBs: non-denaturing elution) were determined in parallel immediately after irradiation as well as after a 24 hour recovery period according to dose. There were no correlations between the dose-response curves of the initial level of DNA strand breaks and parameters that describe clonogenic survival curves (SF2). A good correlation exists between intrinsic cellular radioresistance and the extent of residual DNA strand breaks.

  9. Technological Improvements in the DARHT II Accelerator Cells

    CERN Document Server

    Prichard, Benjamin A; Bieniosek, Frank; Briggs, Richard J; Chow, Ken; Fawley, William M; Genoni, Thomas E; Henestroza, Enrique; Hughes, Thomas P; Kang, Mike; Nielsen, Kurt; Reginato, Lou; Waldron, William

    2005-01-01

    DARHT employs two perpendicular electron Linear Induction Accelerators to produce intense, bremsstrahlung x-ray pulses for flash radiography. The second axis, DARHT II, features an 18 MeV, 2-kA, 2-microsecond accelerator. DARHT II accelerator cells have undergone a series of test and modeling efforts to fully understand their sub par performance. These R&D efforts have led to a better understanding of Linear Induction Accelerator physics for the unique DARHT II design. Specific improvements have been identified and tested. Improvements in the cell oil region, the cell vacuum region, and the PFNs have been implemented in the prototype units that have doubled the cell's performance. A series of prototype acceptance test are underway on a number of prototype units to demonstrate that the required cell lifetime is met at the improved performance levels. Early acceptance tests indicate that the lifetime requirements are being exceeded. The shortcomings of the previous design are summarized. The improvements to...

  10. Single-Cell Cytokine Profiling to Investigate Cellular Functional Diversity in Hematopoietic Malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jonathan J; Kwak, Minsuk; Fan, Rong

    2016-01-01

    Single-cell analysis of cytokine production is increasingly recognized as an important method to understand the inflammatory microenvironment and hematopoietic disease state. Certain cytokines are critical to the regulation of lineage specification, and the aberrant production of these cytokines can contribute to lineage reprogramming. Here, we describe of a platform combining subnanoliter microchambers and a high-density antibody barcode array for the study of single-cell cytokine secretions in hematopoietic cancer cell populations. PMID:27581152

  11. Investigation of Dendrimer-based nanoparticles cellular uptake and cell tracking in a semiautomated microfluidic platform

    OpenAIRE

    Carvalho, Mariana Rodrigues; Maia, Fátima Raquel; Reis, R. L.; Oliveira, J. M.

    2016-01-01

    A microfluidic device such as Kima Pump and Vena8 biochip is able to realize functions that are not easily imaginable in conventional biological analysis, such as highly parallel, sophisticated high-throughput analysis and single-cell analysis in a well-defined manner [1]. Cancer cell tracking within the microfluidic model will be achieved by grafting fluorescent label probe Fluorescein-5(6)-isothiocyanate (FITC) to dendrimer nanoparticles allowing cell visualization by immunofluorescen...

  12. Longevity of guard cell chloroplasts in falling leaves: implication for stomatal function and cellular aging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeiger, E.; Schwartz, A.

    1982-11-12

    Guard cell chloroplasts in senescing leaves from 12 species of perennial trees and three species of annual plants survived considerably longer than their mesophyll counterparts. In Ginkgo biloba, stomata from yellow leaves opened during the day and closed at night; guard cell chloroplasts from these leaves showed fluorescence transients associated with electron transport and photophosphorylation. These findings indicate that guard cell chloroplasts are highly conserved throughout the life-span of the leaf and that leaves retain stomatal control during senescence.

  13. Hijacking the Cellular Mail: Exosome Mediated Differentiation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Raghuvaran Narayanan; Chun-Chieh Huang; Sriram Ravindran

    2016-01-01

    Bone transplantation is one of the most widely performed clinical procedures. Consequently, bone regeneration using mesenchymal stem cells and tissue engineering strategies is one of the most widely researched fields in regenerative medicine. Recent scientific consensus indicates that a biomimetic approach is required to achieve proper regeneration of any tissue. Exosomes are nanovesicles secreted by cells that act as messengers that influence cell fate. Although exosomal function has been st...

  14. Cellular mechanisms of alpha herpesvirus egress: live cell fluorescence microscopy of pseudorabies virus exocytosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Hogue, Ian B.; Jens B Bosse; Jiun-Ruey Hu; Thiberge, Stephan Y.; Enquist, Lynn W.

    2014-01-01

    Egress of newly assembled herpesvirus particles from infected cells is a highly dynamic process involving the host secretory pathway working in concert with viral components. To elucidate the location, dynamics, and molecular mechanisms of alpha herpesvirus egress, we developed a live-cell fluorescence microscopy method to visualize the final transport and exocytosis of pseudorabies virus (PRV) particles in non-polarized epithelial cells. This method is based on total internal reflection fluo...

  15. Cellular size as a means of tracking mTOR activity and cell fate of CD4+ T cells upon antigen recognition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen N Pollizzi

    Full Text Available mTOR is a central integrator of metabolic and immunological stimuli, dictating immune cell activation, proliferation and differentiation. In this study, we demonstrate that within a clonal population of activated T cells, there exist both mTORhi and mTORlo cells exhibiting highly divergent metabolic and immunologic functions. By taking advantage of the role of mTOR activation in controlling cellular size, we demonstrate that upon antigen recognition, mTORhi CD4+ T cells are destined to become highly glycolytic effector cells. Conversely, mTORlo T cells preferentially develop into long-lived cells that express high levels of Bcl-2, CD25, and CD62L. Furthermore, mTORlo T cells have a greater propensity to differentiate into suppressive Foxp3+ T regulatory cells, and this paradigm was also observed in human CD4+ T cells. Overall, these studies provide the opportunity to track the development of effector and memory T cells from naïve precursors, as well as facilitate the interrogation of immunologic and metabolic programs that inform these fates.

  16. Ebola Virus Failure to Stimulate Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Interferon Responses Correlates With Impaired Cellular Entry

    OpenAIRE

    Leung, Lawrence W.; Martinez, Osvaldo; Reynard, Olivier; Volchkov, Viktor E.; Basler, Christopher F.

    2011-01-01

    We examined the ability of the Ebola virus to elicit an antiviral response from plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs). Exposure of pDCs to Ebola virus did not result in significantly higher levels of interferon-α production than the levels in mock-infected cells. After inoculation with Ebola virus under the same conditions, conventional dendritic cells expressed viral proteins whereas pDCs did not, suggesting that the latter cells were not infected. Assessment of the entry of Ebola virus–like p...

  17. Do Cells Sense Stress or Strain? Measurement of Cellular Orientation Can Provide a Clue☆

    OpenAIRE

    De, Rumi; Zemel, Assaf; Safran, Samuel A.

    2008-01-01

    We predict theoretically the steady-state orientation of cells subject to dynamical stresses that vary more quickly than the cell relaxation time. We show that the orientation is a strong function of the Poisson's ratio, ν, of the matrix when cell activity is governed by the matrix strain; if cell activity is governed by the matrix stress, the orientation depends only weakly on ν. These results can be used to differentiate systems in which the strain or the stress determine the setpoint for t...

  18. Radiation induced bystander effects in modification of cellular radio-sensitivity in human cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation-induced Bystander Effect is manifestation of radiation effects in non-irradiated cells in the population. The phenomenon may have significant implication in risk of radiation induced cancer incidence and outcome of cancer radiotherapy. To understand the bystander interaction in tumor cells, we have studied secretion of diffusible factors from control and irradiated tumor cells of different origin. Our results showed a good correlation between magnitude of secretion of diffusible factors and survival of tumor cells. These diffusible factors are shown to affect proliferation and survival of tumor cells involving regulation of kinases and genes/proteins involved in apoptotic machinery. Our experiments using pharmacological inhibitors showed involvement of activating transcription factor 2 (ATF-2) signaling in survival of tumor cells after treatment with diffusible factors. These factors seem to be involved in exerting radio-resistance in tumor cells. Furthermore, in proton microbeam irradiation studies showed induction of double strand break measured as gH2AX foci in human lung carcinoma cells, which was found to propagate to bystander tumor cells during post-irradiation incubation. Implication of these observations in outcome of cancer radiotherapy scenario would be discussed. (author)

  19. Electric currents and fields induced in cells in the human brain by radiation from hand-held cellular telephones

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Ronold W. P.

    2000-01-01

    After a review of recent work on the interaction of electromagnetic fields from cellular telephones with the human head, the structural and radiating properties of two common types of transceivers are determined. These include the impedance and current amplitude distribution of the antennas. The tangential electric field maintained by the antennas on the adjacent surface of the head is next determined. From this, the electric field propagating through the skull into the brain is analyzed and, from it, the electric field in spherical and long cylindrical cells is determined. It ranges from 27 to 13.5 V/m in the first 3 cm inside the skull. Of interest is the fact that the induced field in the interior of all cells, regardless of their shape, is the same as the incident field in the brain. It is hoped that biomedical scientists will review these results and determine possible biological effects.

  20. [The structure of cellular vaults, their role in the normal cell and in the multidrug resistance of cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szaflarski, Witold; Nowicki, Michał; Zabel, Maciej

    2011-01-01

    The cellular vaults have been described for the first time in 1986 as ribonucleoprotein complexes composed of three proteins, MVP, TEP1 and vPARP and several vRNA strains. Biochemical and structural studies revealed their ubiquitous existence in the cytoplasm of many eukaryotic cells and their barrel-like structure indicating their engagement in the intracellular transport. Furthermore, the high homology between MVP and LRP which was already known to be involved in multidrug resistance mechanism opened a discussion about the role of vaults in both normal and cancer cells. The histopathology research demonstrated an increased amount of MVP/LRP proteins in the cancer as well as showed translocation possibility between cytoplasm and nuclear envelope, which can be of crucial point in the prevention of nucleus against anticancer drugs. PMID:22235652

  1. Cellular uptake of poly(allylamine hydrochloride) microcapsules with different deformability and its influence on cell functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wei; Zhang, Wenbo; Chen, Ying; Song, Xiaoxue; Tong, Weijun; Mao, Zhengwei; Gao, Changyou

    2016-03-01

    It is important to understand the safety issue and cell interaction pattern of polyelectrolyte microcapsules with different deformability before their use in biomedical applications. In this study, SiO2, poly(sodium-p-styrenesulfonate) (PSS) doped CaCO3 and porous CaCO3 spheres, all about 4μm in diameter, were used as templates to prepare microcapsules with different inner structure and subsequent deformability. As a result, three kinds of covalently assembled poly(allylaminehydrochloride)/glutaraldehyde (PAH/GA) microcapsules with similar size but different deformability under external osmotic pressure were prepared. The impact of different microcapsules on cell viability and functions are studied using smooth muscle cells (SMCs), endothelial cells (ECs) and HepG2 cells. The results demonstrated that viabilities of SMCs, ECs and HepG2 cells were not significantly influenced by either of the three kinds of microcapsules. However, the adhesion ability of SMCs and ECs as well as the mobility of SMCs, ECs and HepG2 cells were significantly impaired after treatment with microcapsules in a deformability dependent manner, especially the microcapsules with lower deformability caused higher impairment on cell functions. The cellular uptake kinetics, uptake pathways, intracellular distribution of microcapsules are further investigated in SMCs to reveal the potential mechanism. The SMCs showed faster uptake rate and exocytosis rate of microcapsules with lower deformability (Cap@CaCO3/PSS and Cap@CaCO3), leading to higher intracellular accumulation of microcapsules with lower deformability and possibly larger retardation of cell functions. The results pointed out that the deformability of microcapsules is an important factor governing the biological performance of microcapsules, which requires careful adjustment for further biomedical applications. PMID:26674230

  2. The Multiplicity of Cellular Infection Changes Depending on the Route of Cell Infection in a Plant Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, Serafín; Pirolles, Elodie; Yvon, Michel; Baecker, Volker; Michalakis, Yannis

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The multiplicity of cellular infection (MOI) is the number of virus genomes of a given virus species that infect individual cells. This parameter chiefly impacts the severity of within-host population bottlenecks as well as the intensity of genetic exchange, competition, and complementation among viral genotypes. Only a few formal estimations of the MOI currently are available, and most theoretical reports have considered this parameter as constant within the infected host. Nevertheless, the colonization of a multicellular host is a complex process during which the MOI may dramatically change in different organs and at different stages of the infection. We have used both qualitative and quantitative approaches to analyze the MOI during the colonization of turnip plants by Turnip mosaic virus. Remarkably, different MOIs were observed at two phases of the systemic infection of a leaf. The MOI was very low in primary infections from virus circulating within the vasculature, generally leading to primary foci founded by a single genome. Each lineage then moved from cell to cell at a very high MOI. Despite this elevated MOI during cell-to-cell progression, coinfection of cells by lineages originating in different primary foci is severely limited by the rapid onset of a mechanism inhibiting secondary infection. Thus, our results unveil an intriguing colonization pattern where individual viral genomes initiate distinct lineages within a leaf. Kin genomes then massively coinfect cells, but coinfection by two distinct lineages is strictly limited. IMPORTANCE The MOI is the size of the viral population colonizing cells and defines major phenomena in virus evolution, like the intensity of genetic exchange and the size of within-host population bottlenecks. However, few studies have quantified the MOI, and most consider this parameter as constant during infection. Our results reveal that the MOI can depend largely on the route of cell infection in a systemically

  3. Roles for glycosylation of cell surface receptors involved in cellular immune recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudd, P M; Wormald, M R; Stanfield, R L; Huang, M; Mattsson, N; Speir, J A; DiGennaro, J A; Fetrow, J S; Dwek, R A; Wilson, I A

    1999-10-22

    The majority of cell surface receptors involved in antigen recognition by T cells and in the orchestration of the subsequent cell signalling events are glycoproteins. The length of a typical N-linked sugar is comparable with that of an immunoglobulin domain (30 A). Thus, by virtue of their size alone, oligosaccharides may be expected to play a significant role in the functions and properties of the cell surface proteins to which they are attached. A databank of oligosaccharide structures has been constructed from NMR and crystallographic data to aid in the interpretation of crystal structures of glycoproteins. As unambiguous electron density can usually only be assigned to the glycan cores, the remainder of the sugar is then modelled into the crystal lattice by superimposing the appropriate oligosaccharide from the database. This approach provides insights into the roles that glycosylation might play in cell surface receptors, by providing models that delineate potential close packing interactions on the cell surface. It has been proposed that the specific recognition of antigen by T cells results in the formation of an immunological synapse between the T cell and the antigen-presenting cell. The cell adhesion glycoproteins, such as CD2 and CD48, help to form a cell junction, providing a molecular spacer between opposing cells. The oligosaccharides located on the membrane proximal domains of CD2 and CD48 provide a scaffold to orient the binding faces, which leads to increased affinity. In the next step, recruitment of the peptide major histocompatibility complex (pMHC) by the T-cell receptors (TCRs) requires mobility on the membrane surface. The TCR sugars are located such that they could prevent non-specific aggregation. Importantly, the sugars limit the possible geometry and spacing of TCR/MHC clusters which precede cell signalling. We postulate that, in the final stage, the sugars could play a general role in controlling the assembly and stabilisation of the

  4. Improving the cell distribution in collagen-coated poly-caprolactone knittings

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, W.(Cornell University, Ithaca, USA); Tiemessen, D.M.; Sloff, M.; Lammers, R.; Mulder, E.L. de; Hilborn, J.; Gupta, B.; Feitz, W. F. J.; Daamen, W F; Kuppevelt, A.H.M.S.M. van; Geutjes, P.J.; Oosterwijk, E

    2012-01-01

    Adequate cellular in-growth into biomaterials is one of the fundamental requirements of scaffolds used in regenerative medicine. Type I collagen is the most commonly used material for soft tissue engineering, because it is nonimmunogenic and a highly porous network for cellular support can be produced. However, in general, adequate cell in-growth and cell seeding has been suboptimal. In this study we prepared collagen scaffolds of different collagen densities and investigated the cellular dis...

  5. Pre-oxidation with KMnO4 changes extra-cellular organic matter's secretion characteristics to improve algal removal by coagulation with a low dosage of polyaluminium chloride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Wang; Junlian Qiao; Yinghui Hu; Lei Wang; Long Zhang; Qiaoli Zhou; Naiyun Gao

    2013-01-01

    Microcystis aeruginosa was used to study the effect of KMnO4 pre-oxidation on algal removal through coagulation with polyalurninium chloride (PAC).KMnO4 pre-oxidation improved the coagulation efficiency of algal at a low dosage of PAC.The optimal KMnO4 feeding period was in the stationary growth phase of Microcystis aeruginosa.KMnO4 traumatized the algal cells and stimulated cellular release of organic matter,contributing to the pool of extra-cellular organic matter (EOM).KMnO4 also decomposed EOM,especially small molecular weight EOM.Lower concentrations of KMnO4,such as 2 mg/L,induced algae cells to produce moderate amounts of new EOM with molecular weights of 11,280,and 1500 kDa.These relatively large molecules combined easily with PAC,promoting coagulation and removal of algae.High concentrations of KMnO4 1ysed algae cells and produced much high-molecular-weight EOM that did not enhance flocculation by PAC at lower dosages.

  6. CELLULAR AND MOLECULAR BASIS OF HAPLOIDENTICAL HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION IN THE SUCCESSFUL TREATMENT OF HIGH RISK LEUKEMIAS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FRANCO eLOCATELLI

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Natural Killer (NK cells are involved in innate immune responses and play a major role in tumor surveillance and in defence against viruses. Human NK cells recognize HLA-class I molecules via surface receptors (KIR and NKG2A delivering signals that inhibit NK cell function and kill HLA-class I-deficient target cells, a frequent event in tumors or virus-infected cells. NK cell triggering is mediated by activating receptors that recognize ligands expressed primarily on tumors or virus-infected cells. NK cells play also a key role in the cure of high-risk leukemias. Thus, donor-derived alloreactive NK cells are fundamental effectors in adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML and in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL patients undergoing haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT. Alloreactive NK cells mediate killing of leukemia cells and patient’s DC, thus preventing respectively leukemic relapses and graft-versus-host responses. FACS analysis of KIRs expressed by NK cells allows to define the size of the alloreactive NK subset and the selection of the best potential donor. Recently, it has been shown that also the expression of activating KIRs, in particular the (C2-specific KIR2DS1, may contribute to donor NK alloreactivity. It has also been established a correlation between the size of the alloreactive NK cell population and the clinical outcome. Notably, the alloreactive NK cells derived from donor’s HSC are generated and persist in patients over time. The high survival rates of patients undergoing haploidentical HSCT highlight an important new reality in the setting of allograft performed to cure otherwise fatal leukemias. Novel approaches are in progress to further improve the clinical outcome based on the infusion of donor alloreactive NK cells either as a component of the transplanted cell population or as in vitro expanded NK cells.

  7. "A Cellular Encounter": Constructing the Cell as a Whole System Using Illustrative Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Joel I.

    2014-01-01

    A standard part of biology curricula is a project-based assessment of cell structure and function. However, these are often individual assignments that promote little problem-solving or group learning and avoid the subject of organelle chemical interactions. I evaluate a model-based cell project designed to foster group and individual guided…

  8. Cell-Type Specific DNA Methylation Patterns Define Human Breast Cellular Identity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Novák, Petr; Stampfer, M.R.; Munoz-Rodriguez, J.L.; Garbe, J.C.; Ehrich, M.; Futscher, B. W.; Jensen, T.J.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 12 (2012), e52299. E-ISSN 1932-6203 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50510513 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : MAMMARY EPITHELIAL-CELLS * PLURIPOTENT STEM-CELLS * CPG ISLAND SHORES Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.730, year: 2012

  9. AC133+ progenitor cells as gene delivery vehicle and cellular probe in subcutaneous tumor models: a preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knight Robert A

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite enormous progress in gene therapy for breast cancer, an optimal systemic vehicle for delivering gene products to the target tissue is still lacking. The purpose of this study was to determine whether AC133+ progenitor cells (APC can be used as both gene delivery vehicles and cellular probes for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. In this study, we used superparamagentic iron oxide (SPIO-labeled APCs to carry the human sodium iodide symporter (hNIS gene to the sites of implanted breast cancer in mouse model. In vivo real time tracking of these cells was performed by MRI and expression of hNIS was determined by Tc-99m pertechnetate (Tc-99m scan. Results Three million human breast cancer (MDA-MB-231 cells were subcutaneously implanted in the right flank of nude mice. APCs, isolated from fresh human cord blood, were genetically transformed to carry the hNIS gene using adenoviral vectors and magnetically labeled with ferumoxides-protamine sulfate (FePro complexes. Magnetically labeled genetically transformed cells were administered intravenously in tumor bearing mice when tumors reached 0.5 cm in the largest dimension. MRI and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT images were acquired 3 and 7 days after cell injection, with a 7 Tesla animal MRI system and a custom built micro-SPECT using Tc-99m, respectively. Expression of hNIS in accumulated cells was determined by staining with anti-hNIS antibody. APCs were efficiently labeled with ferumoxide-protamine sulfate (FePro complexes and transduced with hNIS gene. Our study showed not only the accumulation of intravenously administered genetically transformed, magnetically labeled APCs in the implanted breast cancer, but also the expression of hNIS gene at the tumor site. Tc-99m activity ratio (tumor/non-tumor was significantly different between animals that received non-transduced and transduced cells (P Conclusion This study indicates that genetically transformed

  10. Effects of intracellular chelatable iron and oxidative stress on transcription of classical cellular glutathione peroxidase gene in murine erythroleukemia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of intracellular chelatable iron levels and of oxidative stress on nuclear classical cellular glutathione peroxidase (GSHPx-1) RNA nascent chain elongation (run-on transcription) and on the stability of cytoplasmic GSHPx-1 mRNA was investigated in murine erythroleukemia (MEL) cells. The amount in the intracellular low molecular mass iron pool was changed by incubation of MEL cells transformed by Friend virus with iron donors or iron chelators. Transcription in vitro in isolated nuclei from treated cells showed that the treatment with chelators (desferrioxamine (DFO), pyridoxal isonicotinoyl hydrazone) decrease the rate of nuclear GSHPx-1 RNA nascent chain elongation in both un-induced and with 5 mmol hexamethylenebisacetamide to erythroid differentiation induced MEL cells. Iron donors (diferric transferrin,, Fe-PIH or their combination) and t-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BuOOH) had the opposite effect on GSHPx-1 gene transcription in run-on experiments. On the other hand, 50 μmol DFO or 2.5 μmol t-BuOOH did not change the stability of cytoplasmic GSHPx-1 mRNA in both un-induced and induced MEL cells treated with 5 μmol actinomycin D and with or without these agents for 9 h. These findings indicate that iron and oxidative stress play their role at the transcriptional level of GSHPx-1 gene expression. (author)

  11. Optimizing autologous cell grafts to improve stem cell gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psatha, Nikoletta; Karponi, Garyfalia; Yannaki, Evangelia

    2016-07-01

    Over the past decade, stem cell gene therapy has achieved unprecedented curative outcomes for several genetic disorders. Despite the unequivocal success, clinical gene therapy still faces challenges. Genetically engineered hematopoietic stem cells are particularly vulnerable to attenuation of their repopulating capacity once exposed to culture conditions, ultimately leading to low engraftment levels posttransplant. This becomes of particular importance when transduction rates are low or/and competitive transplant conditions are generated by reduced-intensity conditioning in the absence of a selective advantage of the transduced over the unmodified cells. These limitations could partially be overcome by introducing megadoses of genetically modified CD34(+) cells into conditioned patients or by transplanting hematopoietic stem cells hematopoietic stem cells with high engrafting and repopulating potential. On the basis of the lessons gained from cord blood transplantation, we summarize the most promising approaches to date of increasing either the numbers of hematopoietic stem cells for transplantation or/and their engraftability, as a platform toward the optimization of engineered stem cell grafts. PMID:27106799

  12. Early Cellular Responses of Purine Nucleoside-mediated Protection of Hypoxia-induced Injuries of Neuronal PC12 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bettina Tomaselli

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxia in brain may lead to cell death by apoptosis and necrosis. In parallel adenosine, a powerful endogenous neuroprotectant is formed. We wanted to investigate the effect of adenosine and its purine nucleoside relatives, inosine and guanosine on early cellular responses to hypoxia. O2-sensitive neuronal PC12-cells were subjected to chemical hypoxia induced with rotenone, an inhibitor of mitochondrial complex I. Loss of viability after hypoxic insult was impressively rescued by adenosine, guanosine and inosine. PC12-cells mainly express the A2A adenosine receptor. Its inhibition with a specific antagonist (CSC induced cell death of PC12-cells, which could be salvaged by adenosine but not with guanosine or inosine. We have previously demonstrated the important role of mitogen activated protein kinases 1/2 (p42/44 MAPK in purine-mediated rescue. In this study we were interested in the involvement of protein kinases whose activities mediate these processes, including protein kinase A (PKA, phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3-K and protein kinase C-related kinases (PRK 1/2. Pharmacological inhibition of PKA and PI3-K increased hypoxia-induced toxicity and likewise also affected the rescue by purine nucleosides. Nerve growth factor (NGF and purine nucleosides induced an activation of PRK 1/2, which to our knowledge indicates for the first time that these kinases are potentially involved in purine nucleoside-mediated rescue of hypoxic neuronal cells. Results suggest that A2A receptor expressing cells are mainly dependent on the purine nucleoside adenosine for their rescue after hypoxic insult. In addition to PKA, PI3-K is an important effector molecule in A2A-mediated signaling and for the rescue of PC12-cells after hypoxic insult.

  13. Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cell Culture and Cooperation of L-carnitine in Reducing Stress Induced Cellular Damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose was to show that L-carnitine (LC) is capable of reducing non-oxidative stress in the retinal pigment epithelial cells (RPE) of the human eye. The RPE cells were cultured from donor eyes, obtained immediately after post-mortem. The interaction between bovine serum albumin (BSA) and non-oxidative (sodium hydroxide and methyl methane sulphonate) stress-inducers was observed by recording the change in the absorption profiles of the interacting molecules after incubation in light for 5 hours and after treatment with LC. The isolated and cultured RPE cells from the human eyes were treated with sodium hydroxide or methyl methane sulphonate and/or LC for 5 hours under light, and the qualitative effect on cell morphology after treatment was analyzed by staining cells with Giemsa and visualization by light microscopy. The cell morphology was also qualitatively analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). L-carnitine and stress-inducers interact with BSA and bring about changes in the spectral profile of the interacted molecules. Light microscopy as well as SEM show that the changes in the cellular morphology, induced by 100 uM concentrations of non-oxidative stress-inducers, are considerably reduced in the presence of 100 uM LC. However, L-carnitine alone does not cause any qualitative damage to the cell morphology during incubation under similar conditions. The results give a preliminary indication that LC has ability to reduce the changes brought about by the non-oxidative stress-inducers in the RPF cells in culture. (author)

  14. Chinese Medicines Induce Cell Death: The Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms for Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuanbin Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chinese medicines have long history in treating cancer. With the growing scientific evidence of biomedical researches and clinical trials in cancer therapy, they are increasingly accepted as a complementary and alternative treatment. One of the mechanisms is to induce cancer cell death. Aim. To comprehensively review the publications concerning cancer cell death induced by Chinese medicines in recent years and provide insights on anticancer drug discovery from Chinese medicines. Materials and Methods. Chinese medicines (including Chinese medicinal herbs, animal parts, and minerals were used in the study. The key words including “cancer”, “cell death”, “apoptosis”, “autophagy,” “necrosis,” and “Chinese medicine” were used in retrieval of related information from PubMed and other databases. Results. The cell death induced by Chinese medicines is described as apoptotic, autophagic, or necrotic cell death and other types with an emphasis on their mechanisms of anticancer action. The relationship among different types of cell death induced by Chinese medicines is critically reviewed and discussed. Conclusions. This review summarizes that CMs treatment could induce multiple pathways leading to cancer cell death, in which apoptosis is the dominant type. To apply these preclinical researches to clinic application will be a key issue in the future.

  15. A cellular model reflecting the phenotypic heterogeneity of mutant HRAS driven squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantariño, Neus; Fernández-Figueras, M Teresa; Valero, Vanesa; Musulén, Eva; Malinverni, Roberto; Granada, Isabel; Goldie, Stephen J; Martín-Caballero, Juan; Douet, Julien; Forcales, Sonia-Vanina; Buschbeck, Marcus

    2016-09-01

    Squamous cell carcinomas have a range of histopathological manifestations. The parameters that determine this clinically observed heterogeneity are not fully understood. Here, we report the generation of a cell culture model that reflects part of this heterogeneity. We have used the catalytic subunit of human telomerase hTERT and large T to immortalize primary UV-unexposed keratinocytes. Then, mutant HRAS G12V has been introduced to transform these immortal keratinocytes. When injected into immunosuppressed mice, transformed cells grew as xenografts with distinct histopathological characteristics. We observed three major tissue architectures: solid, sarcomatoid and cystic growth types, which were primarily composed of pleomorphic and basaloid cells but in some cases displayed focal apocrine differentiation. We demonstrate that the cells generated represent different stages of skin cancerogenesis and as such can be used to identify novel tumor-promoting alterations such as the overexpression of the PADI2 oncogene in solid-type SCC. Importantly, the cultured cells maintain the characteristics from the xenograft they were derived from while being amenable to manipulation and analysis. The availability of cell lines representing different clinical manifestations opens a new tool to study the stochastic and deterministic factors that cause case-to-case heterogeneity despite departing from the same set of oncogenes and the same genetic background. PMID:27074337

  16. Cerebral transplantation of encapsulated mesenchymal stem cells improves cellular pathology after experimental traumatic brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heile, Anna M B; Wallrapp, Christine; Klinge, Petra M;

    2009-01-01

    -protective substance glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). METHODS: Thirty two Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized to five groups: controls (no CCI), CCI-only, CCI+eMSC, CCI+GLP-1 eMSC, and CCI+empty capsules. On day 14, cisternal cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF) was sampled for measurement of GLP-1 concentration. Brains were...

  17. Effects of ethanolamine and choline on thiotepa cellular accumulation and cytotoxicity in L1210 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The amino alcohols, ethanolamine and choline, were studied for their effects on (a) L1210 cell growth, (b) N,N',N double-prime-triethylenetheiphosphoramide (thiotepa)-induced growth inhibition of L1210 cells, and (c) 14C accumulation by L1210 cells incubated with [14C]thiotepa. Ethanolamine, at concentrations up to 300 microM, had no effect on L1210 cell growth but, at concentrations greater than 300 microM, produced a dose-dependent reduction in cell growth. Choline, at concentrations up to 20 mM, had no effect on L1210 cell growth. Neither ethanolamine, at 250 microM, nor choline, at 10 mM, altered the ability of thiotepa to reduce L1210 cell growth. Neither ethanolamine, at 250 microM, nor choline, at 10 mM, affected the rapid phase of 14C accumulation by L1210 cells incubated with [14C]thiotepa. The slow phase of 14C accumulation by L1210 cells incubated with 5 microM [14C]thiotepa, a process which is 80-85% due to production of [14C]phosphatidylethanolamine, was not affected by 250 microM choline. In contrast, ethanolamine produced a dose-dependent reduction in this slow rate of 14C accumulation. The reduction in the slow rate of 14C accumulation produced by ethanolamine was due almost entirely to a decrease in the accumulation of nonexchangeable 14C. Kinetic analysis of the inhibition of 14C accumulation produced by 25, 100, and 250 microM ethanolamine was compatible with competitive inhibition. Thin layer chromatography of cell extracts showed that the ability of ethanolamine to reduce 14C accumulation by L1210 cells incubated with [14C]thiotepa was due solely to reduction in production of [14C]phosphatidylethanolamine. These results are all compatible with and predicted by our previously described scheme wherein thiotepa enters cells by simple diffusion and serves as a prodrug for aziridine

  18. Gene markers of cellular aging in human multipotent stromal cells in culture

    OpenAIRE

    Bellayr, Ian H.; Catalano, Jennifer G; Lababidi, Samir; Yang, Amy X.; Lo Surdo, Jessica L; Bauer, Steven R.; Puri, Raj K.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Human multipotent stromal cells (MSCs) isolated from bone marrow or other tissue sources have great potential to treat a wide range of injuries and disorders in the field of regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. In particular, MSCs have inherent characteristics to suppress the immune system and are being studied in clinical studies to prevent graft-versus-host disease. MSCs can be expanded in vitro and have potential for differentiation into multiple cell lineages. Howeve...

  19. A Major Cell Surface Antigen of Coccidioides immitis Which Elicits Both Humoral and Cellular Immune Responses

    OpenAIRE

    Hung, Chiung-Yu; Ampel, Neil M.; Christian, Lara; Seshan, Kalpathi R.; Cole, Garry T.

    2000-01-01

    Multinucleate parasitic cells (spherules) of Coccidioides immitis isolates produce a membranous outer wall component (SOW) in vitro which has been reported to be reactive with antibody from patients with coccidioidal infection, elicits a potent proliferative response of murine immune T cells, and has immunoprotective capacity in a murine model of coccidioidomycosis. To identify the antigenic components of SOW, the crude wall material was first subjected to Triton X-114 extraction, and a water...

  20. Chinese Medicines Induce Cell Death: The Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms for Cancer Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Xuanbin Wang; Yibin Feng; Ning Wang; Fan Cheung; Hor Yue Tan; Sen Zhong; Charlie Li; Seiichi Kobayashi

    2014-01-01

    Chinese medicines have long history in treating cancer. With the growing scientific evidence of biomedical researches and clinical trials in cancer therapy, they are increasingly accepted as a complementary and alternative treatment. One of the mechanisms is to induce cancer cell death. Aim. To comprehensively review the publications concerning cancer cell death induced by Chinese medicines in recent years and provide insights on anticancer drug discovery from Chinese medicines. Materials and...

  1. Cellular memory of hypoxia elicits neuroblastoma metastasis and enables invasion by non-aggressive neighbouring cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, A; Rice, M; Lévy, R; Pizer, B L; Losty, P D; Moss, D; Sée, V

    2015-01-01

    Therapies targeting cancer metastasis are challenging owing to the complexity of the metastatic process and the high number of effectors involved. Although tumour hypoxia has previously been associated with increased aggressiveness as well as resistance to radio- and chemotherapy, the understanding of a direct link between the level and duration of hypoxia and the individual steps involved in metastasis is still missing. Using live imaging in a chick embryo model, we have demonstrated that the exposure of neuroblastoma cells to 1% oxygen for 3 days was capable of (1) enabling cell migration towards blood vessels, (2) slowing down their velocity within blood vessels to facilitate extravasation and (3) promoting cell proliferation in primary and secondary sites. We have shown that cells do not have to be hypoxic anymore to exhibit these acquired capabilities as a long-term memory of prior hypoxic exposure is kept. Furthermore, non-hypoxic cells can be influenced by neighbouring hypoxic preconditioned cells and be entrained in the metastatic progression. The acquired aggressive phenotype relies on hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-dependent transcription of a number of genes involved in metastasis and can be impaired by HIF inhibition. Altogether, our results demonstrate the need to consider both temporal and spatial tumour heterogeneity because cells can 'remember' an earlier environment and share their acquired phenotype with their close neighbours. As a consequence, it is necessary to monitor the correct hypoxic markers to be able to predict the consequences of the cells' history on their behaviour and their potential response to therapies. PMID:25664931

  2. Heparan sulfate proteoglycans on the cell surface: versatile coordinators of cellular functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tumova, S; Woods, A; Couchman, J R

    2000-01-01

    , mediates interactions with a variety of extracellular ligands such as growth factors and adhesion molecules. Through these interactions, heparan sulfate proteoglycans participate in many events during cell adhesion, migration, proliferation and differentiation. We are determining the multitude of...... proteoglycan functions, as their intricate roles in many pathways are revealed. They act as coreceptors for growth factors, participate in signalling during cell adhesion, modulate the activity of a broad range of molecules, and partake in many developmental and pathological processes, including tumorigenesis...

  3. The Cellular Basis for Biocide-Induced Fluorescein Hyperfluorescence in Mammalian Cell Culture

    OpenAIRE

    May M Bakkar; Luke Hardaker; Peter March; Morgan, Philip B.; Carole Maldonado-Codina; Dobson, Curtis B

    2014-01-01

    Clinical examination of the ocular surface is commonly carried out after application of sodium fluorescein in both veterinary and medical practice by assessing the resulting 'staining'. Although localized intensely stained regions of the cornea frequently occur after exposure to 'adverse' clinical stimuli, the cell biology underlying this staining is unknown, including whether intense fluorescein staining indicates the presence of damaged cells. Ocular exposure to certain contact lens multipu...

  4. Kalkitoxin Inhibits Angiogenesis, Disrupts Cellular Hypoxic Signaling, and Blocks Mitochondrial Electron Transport in Tumor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Brian Morgan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The biologically active lipopeptide kalkitoxin was previously isolated from the marine cyanobacterium Moorea producens (Lyngbya majuscula. Kalkitoxin exhibited N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA-mediated neurotoxicity and acted as an inhibitory ligand for voltage-sensitive sodium channels in cultured rat cerebellar granule neurons. Subsequent studies revealed that kalkitoxin generated a delayed form of colon tumor cell cytotoxicity in 7-day clonogenic cell survival assays. Cell line- and exposure time-dependent cytostatic/cytotoxic effects were previously observed with mitochondria-targeted inhibitors of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1. The transcription factor HIF-1 functions as a key regulator of oxygen homeostasis. Therefore, we investigated the ability of kalkitoxin to inhibit hypoxic signaling in human tumor cell lines. Kalkitoxin potently and selectively inhibited hypoxia-induced activation of HIF-1 in T47D breast tumor cells (IC50 5.6 nM. Mechanistic studies revealed that kalkitoxin inhibits HIF-1 activation by suppressing mitochondrial oxygen consumption at electron transport chain (ETC complex I (NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase. Further studies indicate that kalkitoxin targets tumor angiogenesis by blocking the induction of angiogenic factors (i.e., VEGF in tumor cells.

  5. Cellular analysis of the histamine H4 receptor in human myeloid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capelo, Ricardo; Lehmann, Christoph; Ahmad, Khalil; Snodgrass, Ryan; Diehl, Olaf; Ringleb, Julia; Flamand, Nicolas; Weigert, Andreas; Stark, Holger; Steinhilber, Dieter; Kahnt, Astrid S

    2016-03-01

    The human histamine H4 receptor (H4R) is a Gαi/o-coupled receptor which is mainly expressed on hematopoietic cells. Accordingly, the receptor is implicated in the pathology of various diseases such as autoimmune disorders, bronchial asthma and pruritus. Due to complicated receptor pharmacology, the lack of a reliable antibody and limited availability of primary cells expressing the receptor the physiology of this receptor is still poorly understood. Therefore, we aimed to assess absolute receptor mRNA expression and functionality (intracellular Ca(2+) release) in various human myeloid cell types such as granulocytes, monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs). This was put into context with the expression of the H1R and H2R. In addition, the influence of various inflammatory stimuli on H4R expression was investigated in macrophages and monocyte-derived DCs. We found that classically activated macrophages treated with pro-inflammatory stimuli down-regulated histamine receptor mRNA expression as did LPS and zymosan A matured monocyte-derived DCs. In contrast, alternatively activated macrophages (IL-4 or IL-13) upregulated H2R and H4R expression compared to controls. Consistent with existing literature, we found eosinophils to be the major source of the H4R. Since availability of primary eosinophils is limited, we developed a cell model based on the differentiated eosinophilic cell line EOL-1, in which H4R pharmacology and physiology may be studied. PMID:26774453

  6. Cellular reactions of osteoblast-like cells to a novel nanocomposite membrane for guided bone regeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng Yao [State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, West China Stomatology Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Department of Orthodontics, West China Stomatology Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Liu Man [State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, West China Stomatology Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Stomatology Health Care Center, Shenzhen Maternity and Child Healthcare Hospital, Shenzhen 518048 (China); Wang Shaoan [State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, West China Stomatology Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Mo Anchun [State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, West China Stomatology Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China)], E-mail: moanchun@163.com; Huang, Cui [State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, West China Stomatology Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Zuo Yi; Li Jidong [Research Center for Nano-biomaterials, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China)

    2008-11-15

    This study investigated the bioactivity and biocompatibility of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles (n-HA)/Polyamide-66 (PA66) nanocomposite membrane and expanded-polytetrafluoroethylene (e-PTFE) membrane (as control) to MG63 osteoblast-like cells. The attachment and proliferation of the cells on the porous surface of nHA/PA66 membrane and the surface of e-PTFE membrane were evaluated by scanning electron microscope (SEM) observation and the MTT assay. The bioactivity of the cells on the surface of the two membranes was evaluated by testing cell viability and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activities. The results suggested that the bioresponse of MG63 osteoblast-like cells on the porous surface of nHA/PA66 membrane was better than the bioresponse on the opposite surface of e-PTFE membrane. Because of a better cell attachment manner, there is a potential utilization of the guided bone regeneration (GBR) membrane to substitute nHA/PA66 membrane for e-PTFE membra0008.

  7. Study of Cellular Experiment of Electric Pulse Imposed on Cancer Cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIONGLan; HUYa; 等

    2002-01-01

    The objective of the study is the cytocidal and inhibitory effect of energy-controllable pulse on ovarian cancer cell line SKOV3.Ovarian cancer cell suspension were treated by electric pulse with different parameters,.The inhibitory rate(IR) was assayed by modified colorimetric MTT methods,the growth curves of two test groups and one control group were also measured.and the ultrasturctureal changes were observed under electron microscopy(EM) and scan electron microscopy (SEM),It was found that the treated SKOV3 cell proliferated more slowly.IR was increased with the enhancement of pulse paramters,The ultrastructural study showed that morphological changes occured obviously.Swollen mitochondria,fracutured ridges,cytoplasmic vacuoles and membrane holes appeard in most of the processed cells,and a part of bilayer membrane was ruptured.It is indicated that irreversible electric breakdown occurred in some of the treated cells,and the electric pulse could kill cancer cell and inhibit its recovery and growth.

  8. Melatonin improves spermatogonial stem cells transplantation efficiency in azoospermic mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadreza Gholami

    2014-02-01

    Conclusion: Administration of melatonin (20 mg/kg simultaneously with transplantation of spermatogonial stem cells in azoospermia mouse testis increases the efficiency of transplantation and improves structural properties of the testes tissue.

  9. Mapping Variation in Cellular and Transcriptional Response to 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kariuki, Silvia N; Maranville, Joseph C; Baxter, Shaneen S; Jeong, Choongwon; Nakagome, Shigeki; Hrusch, Cara L; Witonsky, David B; Sperling, Anne I; Di Rienzo, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The active hormonal form of vitamin D, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25D) is an important modulator of the immune system, inhibiting cellular proliferation and regulating transcription of immune response genes. In order to characterize the genetic basis of variation in the immunomodulatory effects of 1,25D, we mapped quantitative traits of 1,25D response at both the cellular and the transcriptional level. We carried out a genome-wide association scan of percent inhibition of cell proliferation (Imax) induced by 1,25D treatment of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 88 healthy African-American individuals. Two genome-wide significant variants were identified: rs1893662 in a gene desert on chromosome 18 (p = 2.32 x 10-8) and rs6451692 on chromosome 5 (p = 2.55 x 10-8), which may influence the anti-proliferative activity of 1,25D by regulating the expression of nearby genes such as the chemokine gene, CCL28, and the translation initiation gene, PAIP1. We also identified 8 expression quantitative trait loci at a FDRvitamin D receptor binding sites near genes differentially expressed in response to 1,25D, such as FERM Domain Containing 6 (FRMD6), which plays a critical role in regulating both cell proliferation and apoptosis. Combining information from the GWAS of Imax and the response eQTL mapping enabled identification of putative Imax-associated candidate genes such as PAIP1 and the transcriptional repressor gene ZNF649. Overall, the variants identified in this study are strong candidates for immune traits and diseases linked to vitamin D, such as multiple sclerosis. PMID:27454520

  10. Green propolis phenolic compounds act as vaccine adjuvants, improving humoral and cellular responses in mice inoculated with inactivated vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geferson Fischer

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Adjuvants play an important role in vaccine formulations by increasing their immunogenicity. In this study, the phenolic compound-rich J fraction (JFR of a Brazilian green propolis methanolic extract stimulated cellular and humoral immune responses when co-administered with an inactivated vaccine against swine herpesvirus type 1 (SuHV-1. When compared to control vaccines that used aluminium hydroxide as an adjuvant, the use of 10 mg/dose of JFR significantly increased (p < 0.05 neutralizing antibody titres against SuHV-1, as well as the percentage of protected animals following SuHV-1 challenge (p < 0.01. Furthermore, addition of phenolic compounds potentiated the performance of the control vaccine, leading to increased cellular and humoral immune responses and enhanced protection of animals after SuHV-1 challenge (p < 0.05. Prenylated compounds such as Artepillin C that are found in large quantities in JFR are likely to be the substances that are responsible for the adjuvant activity.

  11. On the area spectral efficiency improvement of heterogeneous network by exploiting the integration of macro-femto cellular networks

    KAUST Repository

    Shakir, Muhammad

    2012-06-01

    Heterogeneous networks are an attractive means of expanding mobile network capacity. A heterogeneous network is typically composed of multiple radio access technologies (RATs) where