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  1. Reducing macrophages to improve bone marrow stromal cell survival in the contused spinal cord.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ritfeld, G.J.; Nandoe Tewarie, R.D.S.; Rahiem, S.T.; Hurtado, A.; Roos, R.A.; Grotenhuis, A.; Oudega, M.

    2010-01-01

    We tested whether reducing macrophage infiltration would improve the survival of allogeneic bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) transplanted in the contused adult rat thoracic spinal cord. Treatment with cyclosporine, minocycline, or methylprednisolone all resulted in a significant decrease in

  2. Human fetal spinal stem cells improve locomotor function after spinal cord injury in the rat

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Amemori, Takashi; Romanyuk, Nataliya; Jendelová, Pavla; Herynek, V.; Turnovcová, Karolína; Mareková, Dana; Kapcalová, Miroslava; Price, J.; Syková, Eva

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 59, S1 (2011), S84-S85 ISSN 0894-1491. [European meeting on Glia l Cells in Health and Disease /10./. 13.09.2011-17.09.2011, Prague] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC554; GA AV ČR IAA500390902; GA ČR GA203/09/1242 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GD309/08/H079 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390703 Keywords : spinal cord injury Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  3. Suspension Matrices for Improved Schwann-Cell Survival after Implantation into the Injured Rat Spinal Cord

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    Patel, Vivek; Joseph, Gravil; Patel, Amit; Patel, Samik; Bustin, Devin; Mawson, David; Tuesta, Luis M.; Puentes, Rocio; Ghosh, Mousumi

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Trauma to the spinal cord produces endogenously irreversible tissue and functional loss, requiring the application of therapeutic approaches to achieve meaningful restoration. Cellular strategies, in particular Schwann-cell implantation, have shown promise in overcoming many of the obstacles facing successful repair of the injured spinal cord. Here, we show that the implantation of Schwann cells as cell suspensions with in-situ gelling laminin:collagen matrices after spinal-cord contusion significantly enhances long-term cell survival but not proliferation, as well as improves graft vascularization and the degree of axonal in-growth over the standard implantation vehicle, minimal media. The use of a matrix to suspend cells prior to implantation should be an important consideration for achieving improved survival and effectiveness of cellular therapies for future clinical application. PMID:20144012

  4. Improved Neural Regeneration with Olfactory Ensheathing Cell Inoculated PLGA Scaffolds in Spinal Cord Injury Adult Rats

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    Changxing Wang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Every year, around the world, between 250000 and 500000 people suffer from spinal cord injury (SCI. This study investigated the potential for poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA complex inoculated with olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs to treat spinal cord injury in a rat model. Methods: OECs were identified by immunofluorescence based on the nerve growth factor receptor (NGFR p75. The Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan (BBB score, together with an inclined plane (IP test were used to detect functional recovery. Nissl staining along with the luxol fast blue (LFB staining were independently employed to illustrate morphological alterations. More so, immunofluorescence labeling of the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP and the microtubule-associated protein-2 (MAP-2, representing astrocytes and neurons respectively, were investigated at time points of weeks 2 and 8 post-operation. Results: The findings showed enhanced locomotor recovery, axon myelination and better protected neurons post SCI when compared with either PLGA or untreated groups (P < 0.05. Conclusion: PLGA complexes inoculated with OECs improve locomotor functional recovery in transected spinal cord injured rat models, which is most likely due to the fact it is conducive to a relatively benevolent microenvironment, has nerve protective effects, as well as the ability to enhance remyelination, via a promotion of cell differentiation and inhibition of astrocyte formation.

  5. Schwann cell transplantation improves reticulospinal axon growth and forelimb strength after severe cervical spinal cord contusion.

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    Schaal, S M; Kitay, B M; Cho, K S; Lo, T P; Barakat, D J; Marcillo, A E; Sanchez, A R; Andrade, C M; Pearse, D D

    2007-01-01

    Schwann cell (SC) implantation alone has been shown to promote the growth of propriospinal and sensory axons, but not long-tract descending axons, after thoracic spinal cord injury (SCI). In the current study, we examined if an axotomy close to the cell body of origin (so as to enhance the intrinsic growth response) could permit supraspinal axons to grow onto SC grafts. Adult female Fischer rats received a severe (C5) cervical contusion (1.1 mm displacement, 3 KDyn). At 1 week postinjury, 2 million SCs ex vivo transduced with lentiviral vector encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) were implanted within media into the injury epicenter; injury-only animals served as controls. Animals were tested weekly using the BBB score for 7 weeks postimplantation and received at end point tests for upper body strength: self-supported forelimb hanging, forearm grip force, and the incline plane. Following behavioral assessment, animals were anterogradely traced bilaterally from the reticular formation using BDA-Texas Red. Stereological quantification revealed a twofold increase in the numbers of preserved NeuN+ neurons rostral and caudal to the injury/graft site in SC implanted animals, corroborating previous reports of their neuroprotective efficacy. Examination of labeled reticulospinal axon growth revealed that while rarely an axon was present within the lesion site of injury-only controls, numerous reticulospinal axons had penetrated the SC implant/lesion milieu. This has not been observed following implantation of SCs alone into the injured thoracic spinal cord. Significant behavioral improvements over injury-only controls in upper limb strength, including an enhanced grip strength (a 296% increase) and an increased self-supported forelimb hanging, accompanied SC-mediated neuroprotection and reticulospinal axon growth. The current study further supports the neuroprotective efficacy of SC implants after SCI and demonstrates that SCs alone are capable of supporting

  6. Cyclosporin A increases recovery after spinal cord injury but does not improve myelination by oligodendrocyte progenitor cell transplantation

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    Wang Feng-Chao

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transplantation of oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs is an attractive therapy for demyelinating diseases. Cyclosporin A (CsA is one of the foremost immunosuppressive agents and has widespread use in tissue and cell transplantation. However, whether CsA affects survival and differentiation of engrafted OPCs in vivo is unknown. In this study, the effect of CsA on morphological, functional and immunological aspects, as well as survival and differentiation of engrafted OPCs in injured spinal cord was explored. Results We transplanted green fluorescent protein (GFP expressed OPCs (GFP-OPCs into injured spinal cords of rats treated with or without CsA (10 mg/kg. Two weeks after cell transplantation, more GFP-positive cells were found in CsA-treated rats than that in vehicle-treated ones. However, the engrafted cells mostly differentiated into astrocytes, but not oligodendrocytes in both groups. In the CsA-treated group, a significant decrease in spinal cord lesion volume along with increase in spared myelin and neurons were found compared to the control group. Such histological improvement correlated well with an increase in behavioral recovery. Further study suggested that CsA treatment could inhibit infiltration of T cells and activation of resident microglia and/or macrophages derived from infiltrating monocytes in injured spinal cords, which contributes to the survival of engrafted OPCs and repair of spinal cord injury (SCI. Conclusions These results collectively indicate that CsA can promote the survival of engrafted OPCs in injured spinal cords, but has no effect on their differentiation. The engrafted cells mostly differentiated into astrocytes, but not oligodendrocytes. The beneficial effect of CsA on SCI and the survival of engrafted cells may be attributed to its neuroprotective effect.

  7. Human conditionally immortalized neural stem cells improve locomotor function after spinal cord injury in the rat

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Amemori, Takashi; Romanyuk, Nataliya; Jendelová, Pavla; Herynek, V.; Turnovcová, Karolína; Procházka, Pavel; Kapcalová, Miroslava; Cocks, G.; Price, J.; Syková, Eva

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 3 (2013), s. 68 ISSN 1757-6512 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP304/12/1370; GA ČR GA13-00939S; GA MŠk LH12024; GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069 Grant - others:GA MZd(CZ) 00023001IKEM Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : human fetal neural stem cells * spinal cord injury * motor neuron differentiation Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 4.634, year: 2013

  8. Propofol combined with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation improves electrophysiological function in the hindlimb of rats with spinal cord injury better than monotherapy

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    Yue-xin Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The repair effects of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation on nervous system damage are not satisfactory. Propofol has been shown to protect against spinal cord injury. Therefore, this study sought to explore the therapeutic effects of their combination on spinal cord injury. Rat models of spinal cord injury were established using the weight drop method. Rats were subjected to bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation via tail vein injection and/or propofol injection via tail vein using an infusion pump. Four weeks after cell transplantation and/or propofol treatment, the cavity within the spinal cord was reduced. The numbers of PKH-26-positive cells and horseradish peroxidase-positive nerve fibers apparently increased in the spinal cord. Latencies of somatosensory evoked potentials and motor evoked potentials in the hindlimb were noticeably shortened, amplitude was increased and hindlimb motor function was obviously improved. Moreover, the combined effects were better than cell transplantation or propofol injection alone. The above data suggest that the combination of propofol injection and bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation can effectively improve hindlimb electrophysiological function, promote the recovery of motor funtion, and play a neuroprotective role in spinal cord injury in rats.

  9. Spinal cord injury reveals multilineage differentiation of ependymal cells.

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    Konstantinos Meletis

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injury often results in permanent functional impairment. Neural stem cells present in the adult spinal cord can be expanded in vitro and improve recovery when transplanted to the injured spinal cord, demonstrating the presence of cells that can promote regeneration but that normally fail to do so efficiently. Using genetic fate mapping, we show that close to all in vitro neural stem cell potential in the adult spinal cord resides within the population of ependymal cells lining the central canal. These cells are recruited by spinal cord injury and produce not only scar-forming glial cells, but also, to a lesser degree, oligodendrocytes. Modulating the fate of ependymal progeny after spinal cord injury may offer an alternative to cell transplantation for cell replacement therapies in spinal cord injury.

  10. Curcumin Increase the Expression of Neural Stem/Progenitor Cells and Improves Functional Recovery after Spinal Cord Injury

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    Bang, Woo-Seok; Kim, Kyoung-Tae; Seo, Ye Jin; Cho, Dae-Chul; Sung, Joo-Kyung; Kim, Chi Heon

    2018-01-01

    Objective To investigates the effect of curcumin on proliferation of spinal cord neural stem/progenitor cells (SC-NSPCs) and functional outcome in a rat spinal cord injury (SCI) model. Methods Sixty adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly and blindly allocated into three groups (sham control group; curcumin treated group after SCI; vehicle treated group after SCI). Functional recovery was evaluated by the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan (BBB) scale during 6 weeks after SCI. The expression of SC-NSPC proliferation and astrogliosis were analyzed by nestin/Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) and Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) staining. The injured spinal cord was then examined histologically, including quantification of cavitation. Results The BBB score of the SCI-curcumin group was better than that of SCI-vehicle group up to 14 days (p<0.05). The co-immunoreactivity of nestin/BrdU in the SCI-curcumin group was much higher than that of the SCI-vehicle group 1 week after surgery (p<0.05). The GFAP immunoreactivity of the SCI-curcumin group was remarkably lower than that of the SCI-vehicle group 4 weeks after surgery (p<0.05). The lesion cavity was significantly reduced in the curcumin group as compared to the control group (p<0.05). Conclusion These results indicate that curcumin could increase the expression of SC-NSPCs, and reduce the activity of reactive astrogliosis and lesion cavity. Consequently curcumin could improve the functional recovery after SCI via SC-NSPC properties. PMID:29354231

  11. Bone marrow stem cells delivered into the subarachnoid space via cisterna magna improve repair of injured rat spinal cord white matter

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    Marcol, Wiesław; Slusarczyk, Wojciech; Sieroń, Aleksander L; Koryciak-Komarska, Halina; Lewin-Kowalik, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    The influence of bone marrow stem cells on regeneration of spinal cord in rats was investigated. Young adult male Wistar rats were used (n=22). Focal injury of spinal cord white matter at Th10 level was produced using our original non-laminectomy method by means of high-pressured air stream. Cells from tibial and femoral bone marrow of 1-month old rats (n=3) were cultured, labeled with BrdU/Hoechst and injected into cisterna magna (experimental group) three times: immediately after spinal cord injury and 3 as well as 7 days later. Neurons in brain stem and motor cortex were labeled with FluoroGold (FG) delivered caudally from the injury site a week before the end of experiment. Functional outcome and morphological features of regeneration were analyzed during 12-week follow-up. The lesions were characterized by means of MRI. Maximal distance of expansion of implanted cells in the spinal cord was measured and the number of FG-positive neurons in the brain was counted. Rats treated with stem cells presented significant improvement of locomotor performance and spinal cord morphology when compared to the control group. Distance covered by stem cells was 7 mm from the epicenter of the injury. Number of brain stem and motor cortex FG-positive neurons in experimental group was significantly higher than in control. Obtained data showed that bone marrow stem cells are able to induce the repair of injured spinal cord white matter. The route of cells application via cisterna magna appeared to be useful for their delivery in spinal cord injury therapy. PMID:26628950

  12. Intrathecal administration of autologous bone marrow stromal cells improves neuropathic pain in patients with spinal cord injury.

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    Vaquero, J; Zurita, M; Rico, M A; Aguayo, C; Fernández, C; Gutiérrez, R; Rodríguez-Boto, G; Saab, A; Hassan, R; Ortega, C

    2018-03-23

    Neuropathic pain (NP) is highly disabling, responds poorly to pharmacological treatment, and represents a significant cause of decreased quality of life in patients suffering from spinal cord injury (SCI). In recent years, cell therapy with autologous mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) has been considered as a potential therapeutic weapon in this entity. Ten patients suffering chronic SCI received 100 million MSCs into subarachnoid space by lumbar puncture (month 1 of the study) and this procedure was repeated at months 4 and 7 until reaching a total doses of 300 million MSCs. Intensity of NP was measured by standard numerical rating scale (VAS) from 0 to 10, recording scores previous to the first MSCs administration and monthly, until month 10 of follow-up. Months 1, 4, 7 and 10 of the study were selected as time points in order to a statistical analysis by the nonparametric Wilcoxon rank test. Our results showed significant and progressive improvement in NP intensity after the first administration of MSCs (p: 0.003). This study supports the benefit of intrathecal administration of autologous MSCs for the treatment of NP in patients with SCI. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Localized Intrathecal Delivery of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Conditioned Medium Improves Functional Recovery in a Rat Model of Spinal Cord Injury

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    Dasa Cizkova

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available It was recently shown that the conditioned medium (CM of mesenchymal stem cells can enhance viability of neural and glial cell populations. In the present study, we have investigated a cell-free approach via CM from rat bone marrow stromal cells (MScCM applied intrathecally (IT for spinal cord injury (SCI recovery in adult rats. Functional in vitro test on dorsal root ganglion (DRG primary cultures confirmed biological properties of collected MScCM for production of neurosphere-like structures and axon outgrowth. Afterwards, rats underwent SCI and were treated with IT delivery of MScCM or vehicle at postsurgical Days 1, 5, 9, and 13, and left to survive 10 weeks. Rats that received MScCM showed significantly higher motor function recovery, increase in spared spinal cord tissue, enhanced GAP-43 expression and attenuated inflammation in comparison with vehicle-treated rats. Spared tissue around the lesion site was infiltrated with GAP-43-labeled axons at four weeks that gradually decreased at 10 weeks. Finally, a cytokine array performed on spinal cord extracts after MScCM treatment revealed decreased levels of IL-2, IL-6 and TNFα when compared to vehicle group. In conclusion, our results suggest that molecular cocktail found in MScCM is favorable for final neuroregeneration after SCI.

  14. Improvement of renal function after human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cell treatment on chronic renal failure and thoracic spinal cord entrapment: a case report.

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    Rahyussalim, Ahmad Jabir; Saleh, Ifran; Kurniawati, Tri; Lutfi, Andi Praja Wira Yudha

    2017-11-30

    Chronic renal failure is an important clinical problem with significant socioeconomic impact worldwide. Thoracic spinal cord entrapment induced by a metabolic yield deposit in patients with renal failure results in intrusion of nervous tissue and consequently loss of motor and sensory function. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells are immune naïve and they are able to differentiate into other phenotypes, including the neural lineage. Over the past decade, advances in the field of regenerative medicine allowed development of cell therapies suitable for kidney repair. Mesenchymal stem cell studies in animal models of chronic renal failure have uncovered a unique potential of these cells for improving function and regenerating the damaged kidney. We report a case of a 62-year-old ethnic Indonesian woman previously diagnosed as having thoracic spinal cord entrapment with paraplegic condition and chronic renal failure on hemodialysis. She had diabetes mellitus that affected her kidneys and had chronic renal failure for 2 years, with creatinine level of 11 mg/dl, and no urinating since then. She was treated with human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cell implantation protocol. This protocol consists of implantation of 16 million human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells intrathecally and 16 million human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells intravenously. Three weeks after first intrathecal and intravenous implantation she could move her toes and her kidney improved. Her creatinine level decreased to 9 mg/dl. Now after 8 months she can raise her legs and her creatinine level is 2 mg/dl with normal urinating. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cell implantations led to significant improvement for spinal cord entrapment and kidney failure. The major histocompatibility in allogeneic implantation is an important issue to be addressed in the future.

  15. HPMA-RGD Hydrogels Seeded with Mesenchymal Stem Cells Improve Functional Outcome in Chronic Spinal Cord Injury

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hejčl, Aleš; Šedý, Jiří; Kapcalová, Miroslava; Arboleda Toro, David; Amemori, Takashi; Lesný, Petr; Likavčanová, Katarína; Krumbholcová, Eva; Přádný, Martin; Michálek, Jiří; Burian, M.; Hájek, M.; Jendelová, Pavla; Syková, Eva

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 10 (2010), s. 1535-1546 ISSN 1547-3287 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC554; GA AV ČR IAA500390902 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GD309/08/H079; GA MZd(CZ) 1A8697; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0538; EC FP6 project RESCUE(XE) LSHB-CT-2005-518233 Program:1M Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390703; CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : magnetic-resonance tracking * spinal cord injury * stem cells Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 4.791, year: 2010

  16. Transplantation of Human Skin-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Improves Locomotor Recovery After Spinal Cord Injury in Rats.

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    Melo, Fernanda Rosene; Bressan, Raul Bardini; Forner, Stefânia; Martini, Alessandra Cadete; Rode, Michele; Delben, Priscilla Barros; Rae, Giles Alexander; Figueiredo, Claudia Pinto; Trentin, Andrea Gonçalves

    2017-07-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating neurologic disorder with significant impacts on quality of life, life expectancy, and economic burden. Although there are no fully restorative treatments yet available, several animal and small-scale clinical studies have highlighted the therapeutic potential of cellular interventions for SCI. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs)-which are conventionally isolated from the bone marrow-recently emerged as promising candidates for treating SCI and have been shown to provide trophic support, ameliorate inflammatory responses, and reduce cell death following the mechanical trauma. Here we evaluated the human skin as an alternative source of adult MSCs suitable for autologous cell transplantation strategies for SCI. We showed that human skin-derived MSCs (hSD-MSCs) express a range of neural markers under standard culture conditions and are able to survive and respond to neurogenic stimulation in vitro. In addition, using histological analysis and behavioral assessment, we demonstrated as a proof-of-principle that hSD-MSC transplantation reduces the severity of tissue loss and facilitates locomotor recovery in a rat model of SCI. Altogether, the study provides further characterization of skin-derived MSC cultures and indicates that the human skin may represent an attractive source for cell-based therapies for SCI and other neurological disorders. Further investigation is needed to elucidate the mechanisms by which hSD-MSCs elicit tissue repair and/or locomotor recovery.

  17. Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem-Cell Transplantation Promotes Functional Improvement Associated with CNTF-STAT3 Activation after Hemi-Sectioned Spinal Cord Injury in Tree Shrews

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    Liu-Lin Xiong

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Hemi-sectioned spinal cord injury (hSCI can lead to spastic paralysis on the injured side, as well as flaccid paralysis on the contralateral side, which can negatively affect a patient’s daily life. Stem-cell therapy may offer an effective treatment option for individuals with hSCI. To examine the role of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs transplantation on hSCI and explore related mechanisms in the tree shrews, here, we created a model of hSCI by inducing injury at the tenth thoracic vertebra (T10. Hoechst 33342-labeled BMSCs derived from adult tree shrews were isolated, cultured, and implanted into the spinal cord around the injury site at 9 days after injury. The isolated BMSCs were able to survive, proliferate and release a variety of neurotrophic factors (NTFs both in vitro and in vivo. At 28 days after injury, compared with the sham group, the hSCI group displayed scar formation and dramatic elevations in the mean interleukin 1 beta (IL-1β density and cell apoptosis level, whereas the expression of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3 and ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF mRNA was reduced. Following BMSC transplantation, motoneurons extent of shrinkage were reduced and the animals’ Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan (BBB locomotion scale scores were significantly higher at 21 and 28 days after injury when compared with the injured group. Moreover, the hSCI-induced elevations in scar formation, IL-1β, and cell apoptosis were reduced by BMSC transplantation to levels that were close to those of the sham group. Corresponding elevations in the expression of STAT3 and CNTF mRNA were observed in the hSCI + BMSCs group, and the levels were not significantly different from those observed in the sham group. Together, our results support that grafted BMSCs can significantly improve locomotor function in tree shrews subjected to hSCI and that this improvement is associated with the upregulation of CNTF and STAT3

  18. Propofol promotes spinal cord injury repair by bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation

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    Zhou, Ya-jing; Liu, Jian-min; Wei, Shu-ming; Zhang, Yun-hao; Qu, Zhen-hua; Chen, Shu-bo

    2015-01-01

    Propofol is a neuroprotective anesthetic. Whether propofol can promote spinal cord injury repair by bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells remains poorly understood. We used rats to investigate spinal cord injury repair using bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation combined with propofol administration via the tail vein. Rat spinal cord injury was clearly alleviated; a large number of newborn non-myelinated and myelinated nerve fibers appeared in the spinal cord, the numbers of CM-Dil-labeled bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and fluorogold-labeled nerve fibers were increased and hindlimb motor function of spinal cord-injured rats was markedly improved. These improvements were more prominent in rats subjected to bone marrow mesenchymal cell transplantation combined with propofol administration than in rats receiving monotherapy. These results indicate that propofol can enhance the therapeutic effects of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation on spinal cord injury in rats. PMID:26487860

  19. Stem Cells: New Hope For Spinal Cord Injury

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    Gazdic Marina

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell therapy offers several attractive strategies for spinal cord repair. The regenerative potential of pluripotent stem cells was confirmed in an animal model of Spinal Cord Injury (SCI; nevertheless, optimized growth and differentiation protocols along with reliable safety assays should be established prior to the clinical application of hESCs and iPSCs. Th e therapeutic effects of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs in SCI result from neurotrophin secretion, angiogenesis, and antiinflammatory actions. Several preclinical SCI studies have reported that the occurrence of axonal extension, remyelination and neuroprotection occur after the transplantation of olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs. The transplantation of neural stem cells NSCs (NSCs promotes partial functional improvement after SCI because of their potential to differentiate into neurons, oligodendrocytes, and astrocytes. The ideal source of stem cells for safe and efficient cell-based therapy for SCI remains a challenging issue that requires further investigation.

  20. Lavandula angustifolia Extract Improves the Result of Human Umbilical Mesenchymal Wharton’s Jelly Stem Cell Transplantation after Contusive Spinal Cord Injury in Wistar Rats

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    Kayvan Yaghoobi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The primary trauma of spinal cord injury (SCI results in severe damage to nervous functions. At the cellular level, SCI causes astrogliosis. Human umbilical mesenchymal stem cells (HUMSCs, isolated from Wharton’s jelly of the umbilical cord, can be easily obtained. Previously, we showed that the neuroprotective effects of Lavandula angustifolia can lead to improvement in a contusive SCI model in rats. Objective. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of L. angustifolia (Lav on HUMSC transplantation after acute SCI. Materials and Methods. Sixty adult female rats were randomly divided into eight groups. Every week after SCI onset, all animals were evaluated for behavior outcomes. H&E staining was performed to examine the lesions after injury. GFAP expression was assessed for astrogliosis. Somatosensory evoked potential (SEP testing was performed to detect the recovery of neural conduction. Results. Behavioral tests showed that the HUMSC group improved in comparison with the SCI group, but HUMSC + Lav 400 was very effective, resulting in a significant increase in locomotion activity. Sensory tests and histomorphological and immunohistochemistry analyses verified the potentiation effects of Lav extract on HUMSC treatment. Conclusion. Transplantation of HUMSCs is beneficial for SCI in rats, and Lav extract can potentiate the functional and cellular recovery with HUMSC treatment in rats after SCI.

  1. Lavandula angustifolia Extract Improves the Result of Human Umbilical Mesenchymal Wharton's Jelly Stem Cell Transplantation after Contusive Spinal Cord Injury in Wistar Rats

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    Yaghoobi, Kayvan; Kaka, Gholamreza; Mansouri, Korosh; Davoodi, Shaghayegh; Sadraie, Seyed Homayoon; Hosseini, Seyed Ruhollah

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. The primary trauma of spinal cord injury (SCI) results in severe damage to nervous functions. At the cellular level, SCI causes astrogliosis. Human umbilical mesenchymal stem cells (HUMSCs), isolated from Wharton's jelly of the umbilical cord, can be easily obtained. Previously, we showed that the neuroprotective effects of Lavandula angustifolia can lead to improvement in a contusive SCI model in rats. Objective. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of L. angustifolia (Lav) on HUMSC transplantation after acute SCI. Materials and Methods. Sixty adult female rats were randomly divided into eight groups. Every week after SCI onset, all animals were evaluated for behavior outcomes. H&E staining was performed to examine the lesions after injury. GFAP expression was assessed for astrogliosis. Somatosensory evoked potential (SEP) testing was performed to detect the recovery of neural conduction. Results. Behavioral tests showed that the HUMSC group improved in comparison with the SCI group, but HUMSC + Lav 400 was very effective, resulting in a significant increase in locomotion activity. Sensory tests and histomorphological and immunohistochemistry analyses verified the potentiation effects of Lav extract on HUMSC treatment. Conclusion. Transplantation of HUMSCs is beneficial for SCI in rats, and Lav extract can potentiate the functional and cellular recovery with HUMSC treatment in rats after SCI. PMID:27057171

  2. Stromal cell-derived factor-1 alpha (SDF-1 alpha) improves neural recovery after spinal cord contusion in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zendedel, A.; Nobakht, M.; Bakhtiyari, M.; Beyer, C.; Kipp, M.; Baazm, M.; Joghataie, M.T.

    2012-01-01

    Stromal cell-derived factor-1 alpha (SDF-1α) is an important cytokine, implicated in the control of stem cell trafficking and bone marrow-derived stem cell mobilization. Generally, SDF-1α regulates multiple physiological processes such as embryonic development and organ homeostasis. There is also

  3. Improvement of renal function after human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cell treatment on chronic renal failure and thoracic spinal cord entrapment: a case report

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    Rahyussalim, Ahmad Jabir; Saleh, Ifran; Kurniawati, Tri; Lutfi, Andi Praja Wira Yudha

    2017-01-01

    Background Chronic renal failure is an important clinical problem with significant socioeconomic impact worldwide. Thoracic spinal cord entrapment induced by a metabolic yield deposit in patients with renal failure results in intrusion of nervous tissue and consequently loss of motor and sensory function. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells are immune naïve and they are able to differentiate into other phenotypes, including the neural lineage. Over the past decade, advances in the fie...

  4. A Systematic Review of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Spinal Cord Injury, Intervertebral Disc Repair and Spinal Fusion.

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    Khan, Shujhat; Mafi, Pouya; Mafi, Reza; Khan, Wasim

    2018-01-01

    Spinal surgery presents a challenge for both neurosurgery and orthopaedic surgery. Due to the heterogeneous differentiation potential of mesenchymal stem cells, there is much interest in the treatment of spine surgery. Animal and human trials focussing on the efficacy of mesenchymal stem cells in spinal cord injury, spine fusion and disc degeneration were included in this systematic review. Published articles up to January 2016 from MEDLINE, PubMed and Ovid were used by searching for specific terms. Of the 2595 articles found, 53 met the selection criteria and were included for analysis (16 on spinal cord injury, 28 on intervertebral disc repair and 9 on spinal fusion). Numerous studies reported better results when the mesenchymal stem cells were used in co-culture with other cells or used in scaffolds. Mesenchymal stem cells were also found to have an immune-modulatory role, which can improve surgical outcome. This systematic review suggests that mesenchymal stem cells can be used safely and effectively for these spinal surgery treatments. Whilst, in certain studies, mesenchymal stem cells did not necessarily show improved results from existing treatments, they provide an alternative option. This can reduce morbidity that arises from current surgical treatment. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  5. Edaravone combined with Schwann cell transplantation may repair spinal cord injury in rats

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    Shu-quan Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Edaravone has been shown to delay neuronal apoptosis, thereby improving nerve function and the microenvironment after spinal cord injury. Edaravone can provide a favorable environment for the treatment of spinal cord injury using Schwann cell transplantation. This study used rat models of complete spinal cord transection at T 9. Six hours later, Schwann cells were transplanted in the head and tail ends of the injury site. Simultaneously, edaravone was injected through the caudal vein. Eight weeks later, the PKH-26-labeled Schwann cells had survived and migrated to the center of the spinal cord injury region in rats after combined treatment with edaravone and Schwann cells. Moreover, the number of PKH-26-labeled Schwann cells in the rat spinal cord was more than that in rats undergoing Schwann cell transplantation alone or rats without any treatment. Horseradish peroxidase retrograde tracing revealed that the number of horseradish peroxidase-positive nerve fibers was greater in rats treated with edaravone combined withSchwann cells than in rats with Schwann cell transplantation alone. The results demonstrated that lower extremity motor function and neurophysiological function were better in rats treated with edaravone and Schwann cells than in rats with Schwann cell transplantation only. These data confirmed that Schwann cell transplantation combined with edaravone injection promoted the regeneration of nerve fibers of rats with spinal cord injury and improved neurological function.

  6. Bone marrow stromal cell : mediated neuroprotection for spinal cord repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ritfeld, Gaby Jane

    2014-01-01

    Currently, there is no treatment available that restores anatomy and function after spinal cord injury. This thesis explores transplantation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (bone marrow stromal cells; BMSCs) as a therapeutic approach for spinal cord repair. BMSCs secrete neurotrophic

  7. Cell transplantation for the treatment of spinal cord injury - bone marrow stromal cells and choroid plexus epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chizuka Ide

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Transplantation of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs enhanced the outgrowth of regenerating axons and promoted locomotor improvements of rats with spinal cord injury (SCI. BMSCs did not survive long-term, disappearing from the spinal cord within 2-3 weeks after transplantation. Astrocyte-devoid areas, in which no astrocytes or oligodendrocytes were found, formed at the epicenter of the lesion. It was remarkable that numerous regenerating axons extended through such astrocyte-devoid areas. Regenerating axons were associated with Schwann cells embedded in extracellular matrices. Transplantation of choroid plexus epithelial cells (CPECs also enhanced axonal regeneration and locomotor improvements in rats with SCI. Although CPECs disappeared from the spinal cord shortly after transplantation, an extensive outgrowth of regenerating axons occurred through astrocyte-devoid areas, as in the case of BMSC transplantation. These findings suggest that BMSCs and CPECs secret neurotrophic factors that promote tissue repair of the spinal cord, including axonal regeneration and reduced cavity formation. This means that transplantation of BMSCs and CPECs promotes "intrinsic" ability of the spinal cord to regenerate. The treatment to stimulate the intrinsic regeneration ability of the spinal cord is the safest method of clinical application for SCI. It should be emphasized that the generally anticipated long-term survival, proliferation and differentiation of transplanted cells are not necessarily desirable from the clinical point of view of safety.

  8. Are there endogenous stem cells in the spinal cord?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrucci, Michela; Ryskalin, Larisa; Busceti, Carla L; Gaglione, Anderson; Biagioni, Francesca; Fornai, Francesco

    2017-12-01

    Neural progenitor cells (NPC) represent the stem-like niche of the central nervous system that maintains a regenerative potential also in the adult life. Despite NPC in the brain are well documented, the presence of NPC in the spinal cord has been controversial for a long time. This is due to a scarce activity of NPC within spinal cord, which also makes difficult their identification. The present review recapitulates the main experimental studies, which provided evidence for the occurrence of NPC within spinal cord, with a special emphasis on spinal cord injury and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. By using experimental models, here we analyse the site-specificity, the phenotype and the main triggers of spinal cord NPC. Moreover, data are reported on the effect of specific neurogenic stimuli on these spinal cord NPC in an effort to comprehend the endogenous neurogenic potential of this stem cell niche.

  9. Localized giant cell tumors in the spinal column radiologic presentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez Echeverria, M.A.; Parra Blanco, J.A.; Pagola Serrano, M.A.; Mellado Santos, J.M.; Bueno Lopez, J.; Gonzalez Tutor, A.

    1994-01-01

    Given the uncommonness of the location of giant cell tumors (GCT) in the spinal column and the limited number of studies published, we present a case of GCT located in the spinal column, which involved both vertebral bodies and partially destroyed the adjacent rib. (Author)

  10. Biomimetic hydrogels direct spinal progenitor cell differentiation and promote functional recovery after spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissler, Sydney A.; Sabin, Alexandra L.; Besser, Rachel R.; Gooden, Olivia M.; Shirk, Bryce D.; Nguyen, Quan M.; Khaing, Zin Z.; Schmidt, Christine E.

    2018-04-01

    Objective. Demyelination that results from disease or traumatic injury, such as spinal cord injury (SCI), can have a devastating effect on neural function and recovery. Many researchers are examining treatments to minimize demyelination by improving oligodendrocyte availability in vivo. Transplantation of stem and oligodendrocyte progenitor cells is a promising option, however, trials are plagued by undirected differentiation. Here we introduce a biomaterial that has been optimized to direct the differentiation of neural progenitor cells (NPCs) toward oligodendrocytes as a cell delivery vehicle after SCI. Approach. A collagen-based hydrogel was modified to mimic the mechanical properties of the neonatal spinal cord, and components present in the developing extracellular matrix were included to provide appropriate chemical cues to the NPCs to direct their differentiation toward oligodendrocytes. The hydrogel with cells was then transplanted into a unilateral cervical contusion model of SCI to examine the functional recovery with this treatment. Six behavioral tests and histological assessment were performed to examine the in vivo response to this treatment. Main results. Our results demonstrate that we can achieve a significant increase in oligodendrocyte differentiation of NPCs compared to standard culture conditions using a three-component biomaterial composed of collagen, hyaluronic acid, and laminin that has mechanical properties matched to those of neonatal neural tissue. Additionally, SCI rats with hydrogel transplants, with and without NPCs, showed functional recovery. Animals transplanted with hydrogels with NPCs showed significantly increased functional recovery over six weeks compared to the media control group. Significance. The three-component hydrogel presented here has the potential to provide cues to direct differentiation in vivo to encourage regeneration of the central nervous system.

  11. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Therapies for Cervical Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doulames, Vanessa M.; Plant, Giles W.

    2016-01-01

    Cervical-level injuries account for the majority of presented spinal cord injuries (SCIs) to date. Despite the increase in survival rates due to emergency medicine improvements, overall quality of life remains poor, with patients facing variable deficits in respiratory and motor function. Therapies aiming to ameliorate symptoms and restore function, even partially, are urgently needed. Current therapeutic avenues in SCI seek to increase regenerative capacities through trophic and immunomodulatory factors, provide scaffolding to bridge the lesion site and promote regeneration of native axons, and to replace SCI-lost neurons and glia via intraspinal transplantation. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are a clinically viable means to accomplish this; they have no major ethical barriers, sources can be patient-matched and collected using non-invasive methods. In addition, the patient’s own cells can be used to establish a starter population capable of producing multiple cell types. To date, there is only a limited pool of research examining iPSC-derived transplants in SCI—even less research that is specific to cervical injury. The purpose of the review herein is to explore both preclinical and clinical recent advances in iPSC therapies with a detailed focus on cervical spinal cord injury. PMID:27070598

  12. Cell Therapy in Spinal Cord Injury: a Mini- Reivew

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soraya Mehrabi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injury (SCI is a debilitating disease which leads to progressive functional damages. Because of limited axonal regeneration in the central nervous system, there is no or little recovery expected in the patients. Different cellular and molecular approaches were investigated in SCI animal models. Cellular transplantation of stem cells can potentially replace damaged tissue and provide a suitable microenvironment for axons to regenerate. Here, we reviewed the last approaches applied by our colleagues and others in order to improve axonal regeneration following SCI. We used different types of stem cells via different methods. First, fetal olfactory mucosa, schwann, and bone marrow stromal cells were transplanted into the injury sites in SCI models. In later studies, was applied simultaneous transplantation of stem cells with chondroitinase ABC in SCI models with the aid of nanoparticles. Using these approaches, considerable functional recovery was observed. However, considering some challenges in stem cell therapy such as rejection, infection, and development of a new cancer, our more recent strategy was application of cytokines. We observed a significant improvement in motor function of rats when stromal derived factor-1 was used to attract innate stem cells to the injury site. In conclusion, it seems that co-transplantation of different cells accompanies with other factors like enzymes and growth factors via new delivery systems may yield better results in SCI.

  13. Visual bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation in the repair of spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui-ping Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An important factor in improving functional recovery from spinal cord injury using stem cells is maximizing the number of transplanted cells at the lesion site. Here, we established a contusion model of spinal cord injury by dropping a weight onto the spinal cord at T 7-8 . Superparamagnetic iron oxide-labeled bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells were transplanted into the injured spinal cord via the subarachnoid space. An outer magnetic field was used to successfully guide the labeled cells to the lesion site. Prussian blue staining showed that more bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells reached the lesion site in these rats than in those without magnetic guidance or superparamagnetic iron oxide labeling, and immunofluorescence revealed a greater number of complete axons at the lesion site. Moreover, the Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan (BBB locomotor rating scale scores were the highest in rats with superparamagnetic labeling and magnetic guidance. Our data confirm that superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles effectively label bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and impart sufficient magnetism to respond to the external magnetic field guides. More importantly, superparamagnetic iron oxide-labeled bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells can be dynamically and non-invasively tracked in vivo using magnetic resonance imaging. Superparamagnetic iron oxide labeling of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells coupled with magnetic guidance offers a promising avenue for the clinical treatment of spinal cord injury.

  14. Human embryonic stem cell-derived oligodendrocyte progenitor cell transplants remyelinate and restore locomotion after spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keirstead, Hans S; Nistor, Gabriel; Bernal, Giovanna; Totoiu, Minodora; Cloutier, Frank; Sharp, Kelly; Steward, Oswald

    2005-05-11

    Demyelination contributes to loss of function after spinal cord injury, and thus a potential therapeutic strategy involves replacing myelin-forming cells. Here, we show that transplantation of human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-derived oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) into adult rat spinal cord injuries enhances remyelination and promotes improvement of motor function. OPCs were injected 7 d or 10 months after injury. In both cases, transplanted cells survived, redistributed over short distances, and differentiated into oligodendrocytes. Animals that received OPCs 7 d after injury exhibited enhanced remyelination and substantially improved locomotor ability. In contrast, when OPCs were transplanted 10 months after injury, there was no enhanced remyelination or locomotor recovery. These studies document the feasibility of predifferentiating hESCs into functional OPCs and demonstrate their therapeutic potential at early time points after spinal cord injury.

  15. Cell therapy for spinal cord injury informed by electromagnetic waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnegan, Jack; Ye, Hui

    2016-10-01

    Spinal cord injury devastates the CNS, besetting patients with symptoms including but not limited to: paralysis, autonomic nervous dysfunction, pain disorders and depression. Despite the identification of several molecular and genetic factors, a reliable regenerative therapy has yet to be produced for this terminal disease. Perhaps the missing piece of this puzzle will be discovered within endogenous electrotactic cellular behaviors. Neurons and stem cells both show mediated responses (growth rate, migration, differentiation) to electromagnetic waves, including direct current electric fields. This review analyzes the pathophysiology of spinal cord injury, the rationale for regenerative cell therapy and the evidence for directing cell therapy via electromagnetic waves shown by in vitro experiments.

  16. Human neural stem cell replacement therapy for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis by spinal transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P Hefferan

    Full Text Available Mutation in the ubiquitously expressed cytoplasmic superoxide dismutase (SOD1 causes an inherited form of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS. Mutant synthesis in motor neurons drives disease onset and early disease progression. Previous experimental studies have shown that spinal grafting of human fetal spinal neural stem cells (hNSCs into the lumbar spinal cord of SOD1(G93A rats leads to a moderate therapeutical effect as evidenced by local α-motoneuron sparing and extension of lifespan. The aim of the present study was to analyze the degree of therapeutical effect of hNSCs once grafted into the lumbar spinal ventral horn in presymptomatic immunosuppressed SOD1(G93A rats and to assess the presence and functional integrity of the descending motor system in symptomatic SOD1(G93A animals.Presymptomatic SOD1(G93A rats (60-65 days old received spinal lumbar injections of hNSCs. After cell grafting, disease onset, disease progression and lifespan were analyzed. In separate symptomatic SOD1(G93A rats, the presence and functional conductivity of descending motor tracts (corticospinal and rubrospinal was analyzed by spinal surface recording electrodes after electrical stimulation of the motor cortex. Silver impregnation of lumbar spinal cord sections and descending motor axon counting in plastic spinal cord sections were used to validate morphologically the integrity of descending motor tracts. Grafting of hNSCs into the lumbar spinal cord of SOD1(G93A rats protected α-motoneurons in the vicinity of grafted cells, provided transient functional improvement, but offered no protection to α-motoneuron pools distant from grafted lumbar segments. Analysis of motor-evoked potentials recorded from the thoracic spinal cord of symptomatic SOD1(G93A rats showed a near complete loss of descending motor tract conduction, corresponding to a significant (50-65% loss of large caliber descending motor axons.These data demonstrate that in order to achieve a more

  17. Function after spinal treatment, exercise and rehabilitation (FASTER): improving the functional outcome of spinal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, A H; Doré, C J; Morris, T P; Morris, S; Jamrozik, K

    2010-01-26

    The life-time incidence of low back pain is high and diagnoses of spinal stenosis and disc prolapse are increasing. Consequently, there is a steady rise in surgical interventions for these conditions. Current evidence suggests that while the success of surgery is incomplete, it is superior to conservative interventions. A recent survey indicates that there are large differences in the type and intensity of rehabilitation, if any, provided after spinal surgery as well as in the restrictions and advice given to patients in the post-operative period. This trial will test the hypothesis that functional outcome following two common spinal operations can be improved by a programme of post-operative rehabilitation that combines professional support and advice with graded active exercise and/or an educational booklet based on evidence-based messages and advice. The study design is a multi-centre, factorial, randomised controlled trial with patients stratified by surgeon and operative procedure. The trial will compare the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of a rehabilitation programme and an education booklet for the postoperative management of patients undergoing discectomy or lateral nerve root decompression, each compared with "usual care"using a 2 x 2 factorial design. The trial will create 4 sub-groups; rehabilitation-only, booklet-only, rehabilitation-plus-booklet, and usual care only. The trial aims to recruit 344 patients, which equates to 86 patients in each of the four sub-groups. All patients will be assessed for functional ability (through the Oswestry Disability Index - a disease specific functional questionnaire), pain (using visual analogue scales), and satisfaction pre-operatively and then at 6 weeks, 3, 6 and 9 months and 1 year post-operatively. This will be complemented by a formal analysis of cost-effectiveness. This trial will determine whether the outcome of spinal surgery can be enhanced by either a post-operative rehabilitation programme or an

  18. Cellular therapy after spinal cord injury using neural progenitor cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vroemen, Maurice

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis, the possibilities and limitations of cell-based therapies after spinal cord injury are explored. Particularly, the potential of adult derived neural progenitor cell (NPC) grafts to function as a permissive substrate for axonal regeneration was investigated. It was found that syngenic

  19. Combination of edaravone and neural stem cell transplantation repairs injured spinal cord in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Y Y; Peng, C G; Ye, X B

    2015-12-29

    This study sought to observe the effect of the combination of edaravone and neural stem cell (NSC) transplantation on the repair of complete spinal cord transection in rats. Eighty adult female Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were used to establish the injury model of complete spinal cord transection at T9. Animals were divided randomly into four groups (N = 20 each): control, edaravone, transplantation, and edaravone + transplantation. The recovery of spinal function was evaluated with the Basso, Beattie, Bresnahan (BBB) rating scale on days 1, 3, and 7 each week after the surgery. After 8 weeks, the BBB scores of the control, edaravone, transplantation, and combination groups were 4.21 ± 0.11, 8.46 ± 0.1, 8.54 ± 0.13, and 11.21 ± 0.14, respectively. At 8 weeks after surgery, the spinal cord was collected; the survival and transportation of transplanted cells were observed with PKH-26 labeling, and the regeneration and distribution of spinal nerve fibers with fluorescent-gold (FG) retrograde tracing. Five rats died due to the injury. PKH-26-labeled NSCs had migrated into the spinal cord. A few intact nerve fibers and pyramidal neurons passed the injured area in the transplantation and combination groups. The numbers of PKH-26-labeled cells and FG-labeled nerve fibers were in the order: combination group > edaravone group and transplantation group > control group (P edaravone can enhance the survival and differentiation of NSCs in injured areas; edaravone with NSC transplantation can improve the effectiveness of spinal cord injury repair in rats.

  20. Generation of Spinal Motor Neurons from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, David P; Kiskinis, Evangelos

    2017-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are characterized by their unique ability to self-renew indefinitely, as well as to differentiate into any cell type of the human body. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) share these salient characteristics with ESCs and can easily be generated from any given individual by reprogramming somatic cell types such as fibroblasts or blood cells. The spinal motor neuron (MN) is a specialized neuronal subtype that synapses with muscle to control movement. Here, we present a method to generate functional, postmitotic, spinal motor neurons through the directed differentiation of ESCs and iPSCs by the use of small molecules. These cells can be utilized to study the development and function of human motor neurons in healthy and disease states.

  1. Gene expression changes in the injured spinal cord following transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells or olfactory ensheathing cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abel Torres-Espín

    Full Text Available Transplantation of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC or olfactory ensheathing cells (OEC have demonstrated beneficial effects after spinal cord injury (SCI, providing tissue protection and improving the functional recovery. However, the changes induced by these cells after their transplantation into the injured spinal cord remain largely unknown. We analyzed the changes in the spinal cord transcriptome after a contusion injury and MSC or OEC transplantation. The cells were injected immediately or 7 days after the injury. The mRNA of the spinal cord injured segment was extracted and analyzed by microarray at 2 and 7 days after cell grafting. The gene profiles were analyzed by clustering and functional enrichment analysis based on the Gene Ontology database. We found that both MSC and OEC transplanted acutely after injury induce an early up-regulation of genes related to tissue protection and regeneration. In contrast, cells transplanted at 7 days after injury down-regulate genes related to tissue regeneration. The most important change after MSC or OEC transplant was a marked increase in expression of genes associated with foreign body response and adaptive immune response. These data suggest a regulatory effect of MSC and OEC transplantation after SCI regarding tissue repair processes, but a fast rejection response to the grafted cells. Our results provide an initial step to determine the mechanisms of action and to optimize cell therapy for SCI.

  2. Stem cells regenerative properties on new rat spinal fusion model

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klíma, K.; Vaněček, Václav; Kohout, A.; Jiroušek, Ondřej; Foltán, R.; Štulík, J.; Machoň, V.; Pavlíková, G.; Jendelová, Pavla; Syková, Eva; Šedý, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 64, č. 1 (2015), s. 119-128 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NT13477; GA ČR(CZ) GAP304/10/0320 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 ; RVO:68378297 ; RVO:68378041 Keywords : mesenchymal stem cells * bone graft substitute * spinal fusion Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 1.643, year: 2015

  3. Locomotor training improves premotoneuronal control after chronic spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knikou, Maria; Mummidisetty, Chaithanya K

    2014-06-01

    Spinal inhibition is significantly reduced after spinal cord injury (SCI) in humans. In this work, we examined if locomotor training can improve spinal inhibition exerted at a presynaptic level. Sixteen people with chronic SCI received an average of 45 training sessions, 5 days/wk, 1 h/day. The soleus H-reflex depression in response to low-frequency stimulation, presynaptic inhibition of soleus Ia afferent terminals following stimulation of the common peroneal nerve, and bilateral EMG recovery patterns were assessed before and after locomotor training. The soleus H reflexes evoked at 1.0, 0.33, 0.20, 0.14, and 0.11 Hz were normalized to the H reflex evoked at 0.09 Hz. Conditioned H reflexes were normalized to the associated unconditioned H reflex evoked with subjects seated, while during stepping both H reflexes were normalized to the maximal M wave evoked after the test H reflex at each bin of the step cycle. Locomotor training potentiated homosynaptic depression in all participants regardless the type of the SCI. Presynaptic facilitation of soleus Ia afferents remained unaltered in motor complete SCI patients. In motor incomplete SCIs, locomotor training either reduced presynaptic facilitation or replaced presynaptic facilitation with presynaptic inhibition at rest. During stepping, presynaptic inhibition was modulated in a phase-dependent manner. Locomotor training changed the amplitude of locomotor EMG excitability, promoted intralimb and interlimb coordination, and altered cocontraction between knee and ankle antagonistic muscles differently in the more impaired leg compared with the less impaired leg. The results provide strong evidence that locomotor training improves premotoneuronal control after SCI in humans at rest and during walking. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  4. Molecular Imaging in Stem Cell Therapy for Spinal Cord Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahuan Song

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injury (SCI is a serious disease of the center nervous system (CNS. It is a devastating injury with sudden loss of motor, sensory, and autonomic function distal to the level of trauma and produces great personal and societal costs. Currently, there are no remarkable effective therapies for the treatment of SCI. Compared to traditional treatment methods, stem cell transplantation therapy holds potential for repair and functional plasticity after SCI. However, the mechanism of stem cell therapy for SCI remains largely unknown and obscure partly due to the lack of efficient stem cell trafficking methods. Molecular imaging technology including positron emission tomography (PET, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, optical imaging (i.e., bioluminescence imaging (BLI gives the hope to complete the knowledge concerning basic stem cell biology survival, migration, differentiation, and integration in real time when transplanted into damaged spinal cord. In this paper, we mainly review the molecular imaging technology in stem cell therapy for SCI.

  5. Clinical Response of 277 Patients with Spinal Cord Injury to Stem Cell Therapy in Iraq

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammadi, Abdulmajeed Alwan; Marino, Andolina; Farhan, Saad

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Spinal cord injury is a common neurological problem secondary to car accidents, war injuries and other causes, it may lead to varying degrees of neurological disablement, and apart from physiotherapy there is no available treatment to regain neurological function loss. Our aim is to find a new method using autologous hematopoietic stem cells to gain some of the neurologic functions lost after spinal cord injury. Methods and Results: 277 patients suffering from spinal cord injury were submitted to an intrathecally treatment with peripheral stem cells. The cells were harvested from the peripheral blood after a treatment with G-CSF and then concentrated to 4∼ 6 ml. 43% of the patients improved; ASIA score shifted from A to B in 88 and from A to C in 32. The best results were achieved in patients treated within one year from the injury. Conclusions: Since mesenchymal cells increase in the peripheral blood after G-CSF stimulation, a peripheral blood harvest seems easier and cheaper than mesenchymal cell cultivation prior to injection. It seems reasonable treatment for spinal cord injury. PMID:24298358

  6. Human amniotic epithelial cells combined with silk fibroin scaffold in the repair of spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting-gang Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment and functional reconstruction after central nervous system injury is a major medical and social challenge. An increasing number of researchers are attempting to use neural stem cells combined with artificial scaffold materials, such as fibroin, for nerve repair. However, such approaches are challenged by ethical and practical issues. Amniotic tissue, a clinical waste product, is abundant, and amniotic epithelial cells are pluripotent, have low immunogenicity, and are not the subject of ethical debate. We hypothesized that amniotic epithelial cells combined with silk fibroin scaffolds would be conducive to the repair of spinal cord injury. To test this, we isolated and cultured amniotic epithelial cells, and constructed complexes of these cells and silk fibroin scaffolds. Implantation of the cell-scaffold complex into a rat model of spinal cord injury resulted in a smaller glial scar in the damaged cord tissue than in model rats that received a blank scaffold, or amniotic epithelial cells alone. In addition to a milder local immunological reaction, the rats showed less inflammatory cell infiltration at the transplant site, milder host-versus-graft reaction, and a marked improvement in motor function. These findings confirm that the transplantation of amniotic epithelial cells combined with silk fibroin scaffold can promote the repair of spinal cord injury. Silk fibroin scaffold can provide a good nerve regeneration microenvironment for amniotic epithelial cells.

  7. Fluoxetine and vitamin C synergistically inhibits blood-spinal cord barrier disruption and improves functional recovery after spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jee Y; Choi, Hae Y; Yune, Tae Y

    2016-10-01

    Recently we reported that fluoxetine (10 mg/kg) improves functional recovery by attenuating blood spinal cord barrier (BSCB) disruption after spinal cord injury (SCI). Here we investigated whether a low-dose of fluoxetine (1 mg/kg) and vitamin C (100 mg/kg), separately not possessing any protective effect, prevents BSCB disruption and improves functional recovery when combined. After a moderate contusion injury at T9 in rat, a low-dose of fluoxetine and vitamin C, or the combination of both was administered intraperitoneally immediately after SCI and further treated once a day for 14 d. Co-treatment with fluoxetine and vitamin C significantly attenuated BSCB permeability at 1 d after SCI. When only fluoxetine or vitamin C was treated after injury, however, there was no effect on BSCB disruption. Co-treatment with fluoxetine and vitamin C also significantly inhibited the expression and activation of MMP-9 at 8 h and 1 d after injury, respectively, and the infiltration of neutrophils (at 1 d) and macrophages (at 5 d) and the expression of inflammatory mediators (at 2 h, 6 h, 8 h or 24 h after injury) were significantly inhibited by co-treatment with fluoxetine and vitamin C. Furthermore, the combination of fluoxetine and vitamin C attenuated apoptotic cell death at 1 d and 5 d and improved locomotor function at 5 weeks after SCI. These results demonstrate the synergistic effect combination of low-dose fluoxetine and vitamin C on BSCB disruption after SCI and furthermore support the effectiveness of the combination treatment regimen for the management of acute SCI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Autologous Stem Cell Injection for Spinal Cord Injury - A Clinical Study from India.

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    Ravikumar R

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We studied 100 patients with Spinal Cord injury (SCI after Autologous Stem cell Injection in the Spinal fluid with a Follow up of 6 months post Stem cell injection. There were 69 males and 31 females; age ranging from 8 years to 55 years.? Time after Spinal Injury ranged from 11 years - 3 months (Average: 4.5 years. The Level of Injury ranged from Upper Thoracic (T1-T7 - 34 pts, Lower thoracic (T7-T12 -45 pts, Lumbar -12, Cervical-9 pts. All patients had an MRI Scan, urodynamic study and SSEP (somatosensory Evoked Potential tests before and 3 months after Stem cell Injection.80% of patients had Grade 0 power in the Lower limbs and rest had grade 1-2 power before stem cell injections. 70% of cases had complete lack of Bladder control and 95% had reduced detrusor function.We Extracted CD34 and CD 133 marked Stem cells from 100 ml of Bone marrow Aspirate using Ficoll Gradient method with Cell counting done using flowcytometry.15 ml of the Stem cell concentrate was injected into the Lumbar spinal fluid in aseptic conditions. The CD 34/CD45 counts ranged from 120-400 million cells in the total volume.6 months after Injection, 8 patients had more than 2 grades of Motor power improvement, 3 are able to walk with support. 1 patient with T12/L1 injury was able to walk without support. 12 had sensory tactile and Pain perception improvement and 8 had objective improvement in bladder control and Bladder Muscle contractility. A total of 18 patients had reported or observed improvement in Neurological status. 85% of patients who had motor Improvement had Lesions below T8. MRI, SSEP and Urodynamic Study data are gathered at regular intervals. Conclusion: This study shows that Quantitative and qualitative Improvement in the Neurological status of paralyzed patients after Spinal cord injury is possible after autologous bone marrow Stem cell Injections in select patients. There was no report of Allodynia indicating the safety of the procedure. Further studies to

  9. Chondroitinase ABC plus bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells for repair of spinal cord injury☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chun; He, Xijing; Li, Haopeng; Wang, Guoyu

    2013-01-01

    As chondroitinase ABC can improve the hostile microenvironment and cell transplantation is proven to be effective after spinal cord injury, we hypothesized that their combination would be a more effective treatment option. At 5 days after T8 spinal cord crush injury, rats were injected with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell suspension or chondroitinase ABC 1 mm from the edge of spinal cord damage zone. Chondroitinase ABC was first injected, and bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell suspension was injected on the next day in the combination group. At 14 days, the mean Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan score of the rats in the combination group was higher than other groups. Hematoxylin-eosin staining showed that the necrotic area was significantly reduced in the combination group compared with other groups. Glial fibrillary acidic protein-chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan double staining showed that the damage zone of astrocytic scars was significantly reduced without the cavity in the combination group. Glial fibrillary acidic protein/growth associated protein-43 double immunostaining revealed that positive fibers traversed the damage zone in the combination group. These results suggest that the combination of chondroitinase ABC and bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation contributes to the repair of spinal cord injury. PMID:25206389

  10. Propofol promotes spinal cord injury repair by bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Ya-jing; Liu, Jian-min; Wei, Shu-ming; Zhang, Yun-hao; Qu, Zhen-hua; Chen, Shu-bo

    2015-01-01

    Propofol is a neuroprotective anesthetic. Whether propofol can promote spinal cord injury repair by bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells remains poorly understood. We used rats to investigate spinal cord injury repair using bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation combined with propofol administration via the tail vein. Rat spinal cord injury was clearly alleviated; a large number of newborn non-myelinated and myelinated nerve fibers appeared in the spinal cord, the numbers of CM-Dil-l...

  11. Embryonic Cell Grafts in a Culture Model of Spinal Cord Lesion: Neuronal Relay Formation is Essential for Functional Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Tscherter

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Presently there exists no cure for spinal cord injury. However, transplantation of embryonic tissue into spinal cord lesions resulted in axon outgrowth across the lesion site and some functional recovery, fostering hope for future stem cell therapies. Although in vivo evidence for functional recovery is given, the exact cellular mechanism of the graft support remains elusive: either the grafted cells provide a permissive environment for the host tissue to regenerate itself or the grafts actually integrate functionally into the host neuronal network reconnecting the separated spinal cord circuits. We tested the two hypotheses in an in vitro spinal cord lesion model that is based on propagation of activity between two rat organotypic spinal cord slices in culture. Transplantation of dissociated cells from E14 rat spinal cord or forebrain re-established the relay of activity over the lesion site and, thus, provoked functional regeneration. Combining patch-clamp recordings from transplanted cells with network activity measurements from the host tissue on multi-electrode arrays we here show that neurons differentiate from the grafted cells and integrate into the host circuits. Optogenetic silencing of neurons developed from transplanted embryonic mouse forebrain cells provides clear evidence that they replace the lost neuronal connections to relay and synchronize activity between the separated spinal cord circuits. In contrast, transplantation of neurospheres induced neither the differentiation of mature neurons from the grafts nor an improvement of functional regeneration. Together these findings suggest, that the formation of neuronal relays from grafted embryonic cells is essential to re-connect segregated spinal cord circuits.

  12. Electroacupuncture improves microcirculation and neuronal morphology in the spinal cord of a rat model of intervertebral disc extrusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dai-xun Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Most studies on spinal cord neuronal injury have focused on spinal cord tissue histology and the expression of nerve cell damage and repair-related genes. The importance of the microcirculation is often ignored in spinal cord injury and repair research. Therefore, in this study, we established a rat model of intervertebral disc extrusion by inserting a silica gel pad into the left ventral surface of T 13 . Electroacupuncture was used to stimulate the bilateral Zusanli point (ST36 and Neiting point (ST44 for 14 days. Compared with control animals, blood flow in the first lumbar vertebra (L 1 was noticeably increased in rats given electroacupuncture. Microvessel density in the T 13 segment of the spinal cord was increased significantly as well. The number of normal neurons was higher in the ventral horn of the spinal cord. In addition, vacuolation in the white matter was lessened. No obvious glial cell proliferation was visible. Furthermore, hindlimb motor function was improved significantly. Collectively, our results suggest that electroacupuncture can improve neuronal morphology and microcirculation, and promote the recovery of neurological functions in a rat model of intervertebral disc extrusion.

  13. Transplanted Human Stem Cell-Derived Interneuron Precursors Mitigate Mouse Bladder Dysfunction and Central Neuropathic Pain after Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fandel, Thomas M; Trivedi, Alpa; Nicholas, Cory R; Zhang, Haoqian; Chen, Jiadong; Martinez, Aida F; Noble-Haeusslein, Linda J; Kriegstein, Arnold R

    2016-10-06

    Neuropathic pain and bladder dysfunction represent significant quality-of-life issues for many spinal cord injury patients. Loss of GABAergic tone in the injured spinal cord may contribute to the emergence of these symptoms. Previous studies have shown that transplantation of rodent inhibitory interneuron precursors from the medial ganglionic eminence (MGE) enhances GABAergic signaling in the brain and spinal cord. Here we look at whether transplanted MGE-like cells derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESC-MGEs) can mitigate the pathological effects of spinal cord injury. We find that 6 months after transplantation into injured mouse spinal cords, hESC-MGEs differentiate into GABAergic neuron subtypes and receive synaptic inputs, suggesting functional integration into host spinal cord. Moreover, the transplanted animals show improved bladder function and mitigation of pain-related symptoms. Our results therefore suggest that this approach may be a valuable strategy for ameliorating the adverse effects of spinal cord injury. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Spinal cord injury enables aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase cells to synthesize monoamines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wienecke, Jacob; Ren, Li-Qun; Hultborn, Hans

    2014-01-01

    in spinal AADC cells is initiated by the loss of descending 5-HT projections due to spinal cord injury (SCI). By in vivo and in vitro electrophysiology, we show that 5-HT produced by AADC cells increases the excitability of spinal motoneurons. The phenotypic change in AADC cells appears to result from......Serotonin (5-HT), an important modulator of both sensory and motor functions in the mammalian spinal cord, originates mainly in the raphe nuclei of the brainstem. However, following complete transection of the spinal cord, small amounts of 5-HT remain detectable below the lesion. It has been...... zone and dorsal horn of the spinal gray matter. We show that, following complete transection of the rat spinal cord at S2 level, AADC cells distal to the lesion acquire the ability to produce 5-HT from its immediate precursor, 5-hydroxytryptophan. Our results indicate that this phenotypic change...

  15. Bone marrow stromal cells elicit tissue sparing after acute but not delayed transplantation into the contused adult rat thoracic spinal cord.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tewarie, R.D.; Hurtado, A.; Ritfeld, G.J.; Rahiem, S.T.; Wendell, D.F.; Barroso, M.M.; Grotenhuis, J.A.; Oudega, M.

    2009-01-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) transplanted into the contused spinal cord may support repair by improving tissue sparing. We injected allogeneic BMSC into the moderately contused adult rat thoracic spinal cord at 15 min (acute) and at 3, 7, and 21 days (delayed) post-injury and quantified tissue

  16. Spinal spindle cell haemangioma: an atypical location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talan-Hranilović, J; Vucić, M; Sajko, T; Bedek, D; Tomić, K; Lupret, V

    2007-03-01

    We present a case of the 31-year-old male patient who complained of weakness in both legs and progressed slowly. Neuroimagine of the thoracic spine showed an intraspinal, extradural mass lesion, measuring 5.3 x 1.2 cm at the Th1-Th3 level. Histologically the lesion was a spindle cell haemangioma composed of dilated vascular spaces and a proliferation of bland appearing interspersed spindle cells. Immunohistochemical analysis was diffusely positive for VIM, SMA and focally for CD34. This lesion is uncommon and shows a predilection for distal extremities. Spindle cell haemangioma within the spine has not been previously reported in the literature.

  17. Improvement of gastroesophageal reflux disease in Japanese patients with spinal kyphotic deformity who underwent surgical spinal correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Mitsushige; Hasegawa, Tomohiko; Nishino, Masafumi; Sahara, Shu; Uotani, Takahiro; Ichikawa, Hitomi; Kagami, Takuma; Sugimoto, Ken; Yamato, Yu; Togawa, Daisuke; Kobayashi, Sho; Hoshino, Hironobu; Matsuyama, Yukihiro; Furuta, Takahisa

    2016-01-01

    Spinal kyphotic deformity occasionally results in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The effects of acid reflux on the esophagus in kyphotic patients are unclear, however, and it is unknown whether acid reflux, endoscopic GERD, and reflux-related symptoms improve following surgical spinal correction in these patients. Herein, we investigated the characteristics of GERD in kyphotic patients and the improvement in GERD following surgical correction. In 48 patients with severe kyphotic deformity scheduled for surgical spinal correction, we conducted esophagogastroduodenoscopy, 24-h pH monitoring and three questionnaire surveys, including the frequency scale for the symptoms of GERD (FSSG). We repeated these measurements after surgical correction and compared pre- and post-surgery values. Of 48 patients, 70.8% [95% CI: 55.9-83.0%, 34/48] had endoscopically evaluated esophageal mucosal injury. Regarding pH before surgery, 64.9% (CI: 47.5-79.8%, 24/37) had abnormal acid reflux (intraesophageal pH reflux decreased from 66.7% (95% CI: 41.0-86.7%) to 33.3% (95% CI: 13.3-59.0%) (P = 0.045). Surgical spinal correction in kyphosis patients improves not only kyphotic deformity-related disorders but also esophageal mucosal injury, abnormal acid reflux, and reflux-related symptoms. © 2015 Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society.

  18. Adjusting the Chemical and Physical Properties of Hydrogels Leads to Improved Stem Cell Survival and Tissue Ingrowth in Spinal Cord Injury Reconstruction: A Comparative Study of Four Methacrylate Hydrogels

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hejčl, Aleš; Růžička, Jiří; Kapcalová, Miroslava; Turnovcová, Karolína; Krumbholcová, Eva; Přádný, Martin; Michálek, Jiří; Cihlář, J.; Jendelová, Pavla; Syková, Eva

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 20 (2013), s. 2794-2805 ISSN 1547-3287 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA500390902; GA ČR(CZ) GPP304/11/P633; GA ČR GAP108/10/1560 Grant - others:GA UK(CZ) 521712 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 ; RVO:61389013 Keywords : spinal cord injury * hydrogel * mesenchymal stem cells Subject RIV: FH - Neurology; CD - Macromolecular Chemistry (UMCH-V) Impact factor: 4.202, year: 2013

  19. Bone marrow-derived cells in the population of spinal microglia after peripheral nerve injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashima, Ryoichi; Mikuriya, Satsuki; Tomiyama, Daisuke; Shiratori-Hayashi, Miho; Yamashita, Tomohiro; Kohro, Yuta; Tozaki-Saitoh, Hidetoshi; Inoue, Kazuhide; Tsuda, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that peripheral nerve injury (PNI) activates spinal microglia that are necessary for neuropathic pain. Recent studies using bone marrow (BM) chimeric mice have reported that after PNI, circulating BM-derived cells infiltrate into the spinal cord and differentiate into microglia-like cells. This raises the possibility that the population of spinal microglia after PNI may be heterogeneous. However, the infiltration of BM cells in the spinal cord remains controversial because of experimental adverse effects of strong irradiation used for generating BM chimeric mice. In this study, we evaluated the PNI-induced spinal infiltration of BM-derived cells not only by irradiation-induced myeloablation with various conditioning regimens, but also by parabiosis and mice with genetically labelled microglia, models without irradiation and BM transplantation. Results obtained from these independent approaches provide compelling evidence indicating little contribution of circulating BM-derived cells to the population of spinal microglia after PNI. PMID:27005516

  20. Macrophage depletion and Schwann cell transplantation reduce cyst size after rat contusive spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yee-Shuan; Funk, Lucy H; Lee, Jae K; Bunge, Mary Bartlett

    2018-04-01

    Schwann cell transplantation is a promising therapy for the treatment of spinal cord injury (SCI) and is currently in clinical trials. In our continuing efforts to improve Schwann cell transplantation strategies, we sought to determine the combined effects of Schwann cell transplantation with macrophage depletion. Since macrophages are major inflammatory contributors to the acute spinal cord injury, and are the major phagocytic cells, we hypothesized that transplanting Schwann cells after macrophage depletion will improve cell survival and integration with host tissue after SCI. To test this hypothesis, rat models of contusive SCI at thoracic level 8 were randomly subjected to macrophage depletion or not. In rat subjected to macrophage depletion, liposomes filled with clodronate were intraperitoneally injected at 1, 3, 6, 11, and 18 days post injury. Rats not subjected to macrophage depletion were intraperitoneally injected with liposomes filled with phosphate buffered saline. Schwann cells were transplanted 1 week post injury in all rats. Biotinylated dextran amine (BDA) was injected at thoracic level 5 to evalute axon regeneration. The Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan locomotor test, Gridwalk test, and sensory test using von Frey filaments were performed to assess functional recovery. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect glial fibrillary acidic protein, neurofilament, and green fluorescent protein (GFP), and also to visulize BDA-labelled axons. The GFP labeled Schwann cell and cyst and lesion volumes were quantified using stained slides. The numbers of BDA-positive axons were also quantified. At 8 weeks after Schwann cell transplantation, there was a significant reduction in cyst and lesion volumes in the combined treatment group compared to Schwann cell transplantation alone. These changes were not associated, however, with improved Schwann cell survival, axon growth, or locomotor recovery. Although combining Schwann cell transplantation with macrophage

  1. Macrophage depletion and Schwann cell transplantation reduce cyst size after rat contusive spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yee-Shuan; Funk, Lucy H.; Lee, Jae K.; Bunge, Mary Bartlett

    2018-01-01

    Schwann cell transplantation is a promising therapy for the treatment of spinal cord injury (SCI) and is currently in clinical trials. In our continuing efforts to improve Schwann cell transplantation strategies, we sought to determine the combined effects of Schwann cell transplantation with macrophage depletion. Since macrophages are major inflammatory contributors to the acute spinal cord injury, and are the major phagocytic cells, we hypothesized that transplanting Schwann cells after macrophage depletion will improve cell survival and integration with host tissue after SCI. To test this hypothesis, rat models of contusive SCI at thoracic level 8 were randomly subjected to macrophage depletion or not. In rat subjected to macrophage depletion, liposomes filled with clodronate were intraperitoneally injected at 1, 3, 6, 11, and 18 days post injury. Rats not subjected to macrophage depletion were intraperitoneally injected with liposomes filled with phosphate buffered saline. Schwann cells were transplanted 1 week post injury in all rats. Biotinylated dextran amine (BDA) was injected at thoracic level 5 to evalute axon regeneration. The Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan locomotor test, Gridwalk test, and sensory test using von Frey filaments were performed to assess functional recovery. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect glial fibrillary acidic protein, neurofilament, and green fluorescent protein (GFP), and also to visulize BDA-labelled axons. The GFP labeled Schwann cell and cyst and lesion volumes were quantified using stained slides. The numbers of BDA-positive axons were also quantified. At 8 weeks after Schwann cell transplantation, there was a significant reduction in cyst and lesion volumes in the combined treatment group compared to Schwann cell transplantation alone. These changes were not associated, however, with improved Schwann cell survival, axon growth, or locomotor recovery. Although combining Schwann cell transplantation with macrophage

  2. Macrophage depletion and Schwann cell transplantation reduce cyst size after rat contusive spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yee-Shuan Lee

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Schwann cell transplantation is a promising therapy for the treatment of spinal cord injury (SCI and is currently in clinical trials. In our continuing efforts to improve Schwann cell transplantation strategies, we sought to determine the combined effects of Schwann cell transplantation with macrophage depletion. Since macrophages are major inflammatory contributors to the acute spinal cord injury, and are the major phagocytic cells, we hypothesized that transplanting Schwann cells after macrophage depletion will improve cell survival and integration with host tissue after SCI. To test this hypothesis, rat models of contusive SCI at thoracic level 8 were randomly subjected to macrophage depletion or not. In rat subjected to macrophage depletion, liposomes filled with clodronate were intraperitoneally injected at 1, 3, 6, 11, and 18 days post injury. Rats not subjected to macrophage depletion were intraperitoneally injected with liposomes filled with phosphate buffered saline. Schwann cells were transplanted 1 week post injury in all rats. Biotinylated dextran amine (BDA was injected at thoracic level 5 to evalute axon regeneration. The Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan locomotor test, Gridwalk test, and sensory test using von Frey filaments were performed to assess functional recovery. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect glial fibrillary acidic protein, neurofilament, and green fluorescent protein (GFP, and also to visulize BDA-labelled axons. The GFP labeled Schwann cell and cyst and lesion volumes were quantified using stained slides. The numbers of BDA-positive axons were also quantified. At 8 weeks after Schwann cell transplantation, there was a significant reduction in cyst and lesion volumes in the combined treatment group compared to Schwann cell transplantation alone. These changes were not associated, however, with improved Schwann cell survival, axon growth, or locomotor recovery. Although combining Schwann cell transplantation with

  3. Playing with the cell cycle to build the spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Angie; Pituello, Fabienne

    2017-12-01

    A fundamental issue in nervous system development and homeostasis is to understand the mechanisms governing the balance between the maintenance of proliferating progenitors versus their differentiation into post-mitotic neurons. Accumulating data suggest that the cell cycle and core regulators of the cell cycle machinery play a major role in regulating this fine balance. Here, we focus on the interplay between the cell cycle and cellular and molecular events governing spinal cord development. We describe the existing links between the cell cycle and interkinetic nuclear migration (INM). We show how the different morphogens patterning the neural tube also regulate the cell cycle machinery to coordinate proliferation and patterning. We give examples of how cell cycle core regulators regulate transcriptionally, or post-transcriptionally, genes involved in controlling the maintenance versus the differentiation of neural progenitors. Finally, we describe the changes in cell cycle kinetics occurring during neural tube patterning and at the time of neuronal differentiation, and we discuss future research directions to better understand the role of the cell cycle in cell fate decisions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Effect of intravenous transplantation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on neurotransmitters and synapsins in rats with spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shaoqiang; Wu, Bilian; Lin, Jianhua

    2012-01-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells were isolated, purified and cultured in vitro by Percoll density gradient centrifugation combined with the cell adherence method. Passages 3–5 bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells were transplanted into rats with traumatic spinal cord injury via the caudal vein. Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan scores indicate that neurological function of experimental rats was significantly improved over transplantation time (1–5 weeks). Expressions of choline acetyltransferase, glutamic acid decarboxylase and synapsins in the damaged spinal cord of rats was significantly increased after transplantation, determined by immunofluorescence staining and laser confocal scanning microscopy. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells that had migrated into the damaged area of rats in the experimental group began to express choline acetyltransferase, glutamic acid decarboxylase and synapsins, 3 weeks after transplantation. The Basso-Beattie- Bresnahan scores positively correlated with expression of choline acetyltransferase and synapsins. Experimental findings indicate that intravenously transplanted bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells traverse into the damaged spinal cord of rats, promote expression of choline acetyltransferase, glutamic acid decarboxylase and synapsins, and improve nerve function in rats with spinal cord injury. PMID:25657678

  5. Recapitulation of spinal motor neuron-specific disease phenotypes in a human cell model of spinal muscular atrophy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Bo Wang; Xiaoqing Zhang; Xue-Jun Li

    2013-01-01

    Establishing human cell models of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) to mimic motor neuron-specific phenotypes holds the key to understanding the pathogenesis of this devastating disease.Here,we developed a closely representative cell model of SMA by knocking down the disease-determining gene,survival motor neuron (SMN),in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs).Our study with this cell model demonstrated that knocking down of SMN does not interfere with neural induction or the initial specification of spinal motor neurons.Notably,the axonal outgrowth of spinal motor neurons was significantly impaired and these disease-mimicking neurons subsequently degenerated.Furthermore,these disease phenotypes were caused by SMN-full length (SMN-FL) but not SMN-A7 (lacking exon 7)knockdown,and were specific to spinal motor neurons.Restoring the expression of SMN-FL completely ameliorated all of the disease phenotypes,including specific axonal defects and motor neuron loss.Finally,knockdown of SMNFL led to excessive mitochondrial oxidative stress in human motor neuron progenitors.The involvement of oxidative stress in the degeneration of spinal motor neurons in the SMA cell model was further confirmed by the administration of N-acetylcysteine,a potent antioxidant,which prevented disease-related apoptosis and subsequent motor neuron death.Thus,we report here the successful establishment of an hESC-based SMA model,which exhibits disease gene isoform specificity,cell type specificity,and phenotype reversibility.Our model provides a unique paradigm for studying how motor neurons specifically degenerate and highlights the potential importance of antioxidants for the treatment of SMA.

  6. In delicate balance: stem cells and spinal cord injury advocacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parke, Sara; Illes, Judy

    2011-09-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a major focus for stem cell therapy (SCT). However, the science of SCT has not been well matched with an understanding of perspectives of persons with SCI. The online advocacy community is a key source of health information for primary stakeholders and their caregivers. In this study, we sought to characterize the content of SCI advocacy websites with respect to their discussion of SCT and stem cell tourism. We performed a comprehensive analysis of SCI advocacy websites identified through a web search and verified by expert opinion. Two independent researchers coded the information for major themes (e.g., scientific & clinical facts, research & funding, policy, ethics) and valence (positive, negative, balanced, neutral). Of the 40 SCI advocacy websites that met inclusion criteria, 50% (N=20) contained information about SCT. Less than 18% (N=7) contained information on stem cell tourism. There were more than ten times as many statements about SCT with a positive valence (N=67) as with a negative valence (N=6). Ethics-related SCT information comprised 20% (N=37) of the total content; the largest proportion of ethics-related content was devoted to stem cell tourism (80%, N=30 statements). Of those, the majority focused on the risks of stem cell tourism (N=16). Given the still-developing science behind SCT, the presence of cautionary information about stem cell tourism at advocacy sites is ethically appropriate. The absence of stem cell tourism information at the majority of advocacy sites represents a lost educational opportunity.

  7. Potential of human dental stem cells in repairing the complete transection of rat spinal cord

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chao; Li, Xinghan; Sun, Liang; Guo, Weihua; Tian, Weidong

    2017-04-01

    Objective. The adult spinal cord of mammals contains a certain amount of neural precursor cells, but these endogenous cells have a limited capacity for replacement of lost cells after spinal cord injury. The exogenous stem cells transplantation has become a therapeutic strategy for spinal cord repairing because of their immunomodulatory and differentiation capacity. In addition, dental stem cells originating from the cranial neural crest might be candidate cell sources for neural engineering. Approach. Human dental follicle stem cells (DFSCs), stem cells from apical papilla (SCAPs) and dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) were isolated and identified in vitro, then green GFP-labeled stem cells with pellets were transplanted into completely transected spinal cord. The functional recovery of rats and multiple neuro-regenerative mechanisms were explored. Main results. The dental stem cells, especially DFSCs, demonstrated the potential in repairing the completely transected spinal cord and promote functional recovery after injury. The major involved mechanisms were speculated below: First, dental stem cells inhibited the expression of interleukin-1β to reduce the inflammatory response; second, they inhibited the expression of ras homolog gene family member A (RhoA) to promote neurite regeneration; third, they inhibited the sulfonylurea receptor1 (SUR-1) expression to reduce progressive hemorrhagic necrosis; lastly, parts of the transplanted cells survived and differentiated into mature neurons and oligodendrocytes but not astrocyte, which is beneficial for promoting axons growth. Significance. Dental stem cells presented remarkable tissue regenerative capability after spinal cord injury through immunomodulatory, differentiation and protection capacity.

  8. Neuronal regeneration in injured rat spinal cord after human dental pulp derived neural crest stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabatas, S; Demir, C S; Civelek, E; Yilmaz, I; Kircelli, A; Yilmaz, C; Akyuva, Y; Karaoz, E

    2018-01-01

    This study aimed to analyze the effect of human Dental Pulp-Neural Crest Stem Cells (hDP-NCSCs) delivery on lesion site after spinal cord injury (SCI), and to observe the functional recovery after transplantation. Neural Crest Stem Cells (NCSCs) were isolated from human Dental Pulp (hDP). The experimental rat population was divided into four groups (n = 6/24). Their behavioral motility was scored regularly. After 4-weeks, rats were sacrificed, and their spinal cords were examined for Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) labeled hDP-NCSCs by immunofluorescence (IF) staining. In early post-injury (p.i) period, the ultrastructure of spinal cord tissue was preserved in Group 4. The majority of cells forming the ependymal region around the central canal were found to be hDP-NCSCs. While the grey-and-white-matter around the ependymal region was composed of e.g. GFP cells, with astrocytic-like appearance. The scores showed significant motor recovery in hind limb functions in Group 4. However, no obvious change was observed in other groups. Cells e.g., mesenchymal (Vimentin+) which express GFP+ cells in the gray-and-white-matter around the ependymal region could indicate the potential to self-renewal and plasticity. Thus, transplantation of hDP-NCSCs might be an effective strategy to improve functional recovery following spinal cord trauma (Fig. 10, Ref. 32).

  9. Improving Survival and Promoting Respiratory Motor Function After Cervical Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0378 TITLE: Improving Survival and Promoting Respiratory Motor Function After Cervical Spinal Cord Injury PRINCIPAL...TITLE AND SUBTITLE CordCorInjury 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Improvi g Survival and Promoting Respiratory Motor Function After Cervical Spinal Cord...care. However, despite these drastic interventions, the cervical injured patient is still susceptible to death due to respiratory complications

  10. Craniospinal axis irradiation: an improved electron technique for irradiation of the spinal axis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun Li; Vijayakumar, S.; Myrianthopoulos, L.C.; Kuchnir, F.T.; Muller-Runkel, R.

    1994-01-01

    The authors review dosimetric features of craniospinal axis irradiation in the areas of matching cranial and spinal fields, with reference to normal structures within the spinal field. The implications of the use of photon or electron modalities for the spinal port were evaluated. A novel method of matching the cranial photon and the spinal electron fields involving a computer-aided junction design is presented, involving moving the photon beam in three steps to degrade its penumbra to match that of the electron field. Thermoluminescent dosimetry in a Rando phantom and computed tomography-based dose-volume histogram study for an illustrative paediatric case were used to compare dose to normal structures within the spinal field. Results show that the use of electrons for the spinal field leads to better sparing of deep seated normal structures. For bone marrow, the use of a customized bolus for the spinal field results in an improved dose distribution, making electrons potentially superior to photons for radiobiological reasons. (author)

  11. Spinal cord regeneration in Xenopus tadpoles proceeds through activation of Sox2-positive cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background In contrast to mammals, amphibians, such as adult urodeles (for example, newts) and anuran larvae (for example, Xenopus) can regenerate their spinal cord after injury. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in this process are still poorly understood. Results Here, we report that tail amputation results in a global increase of Sox2 levels and proliferation of Sox2+ cells. Overexpression of a dominant negative form of Sox2 diminished proliferation of spinal cord resident cells affecting tail regeneration after amputation, suggesting that spinal cord regeneration is crucial for the whole process. After spinal cord transection, Sox2+ cells are found in the ablation gap forming aggregates. Furthermore, Sox2 levels correlated with regenerative capabilities during metamorphosis, observing a decrease in Sox2 levels at non-regenerative stages. Conclusions Sox2+ cells contribute to the regeneration of spinal cord after tail amputation and transection. Sox2 levels decreases during metamorphosis concomitantly with the lost of regenerative capabilities. Our results lead to a working hypothesis in which spinal cord damage activates proliferation and/or migration of Sox2+ cells, thus allowing regeneration of the spinal cord after tail amputation or reconstitution of the ependymal epithelium after spinal cord transection. PMID:22537391

  12. Phase 1 Trial of Autologous Bone Marrow Stem Cell Transplantation in Patients with Spinal Cord Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zurab Kakabadze

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. A total of 18 patients, with complete motor deficits and paraplegia caused by thoracic and lumbar spine trauma without muscle atrophy or psychiatric problems, were included into this study. Materials and Methods. The bone marrow was aspirated from the anterior iliac crest under local anesthesia and the mononuclear fraction was isolated by density gradient method. At least 750 million mononuclear-enriched cells, suspended in 2 mL of saline, were infused intrathecally. Results and Discussion. The study reports demonstrated improvement of motor and sensory functions of various degrees observed in 9 of the 18 (50% cases after bone marrow stem cell transplantation. Measured by the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA scale, 7 (78% out of the 9 patients observed an improvement by one grade, while two cases (22% saw an improvement by two grades. However, there were no cases in which the condition was improved by three grades. Conclusions. Analysis of subsequent treatment results indicated that the transplantation of mononuclear-enriched autologous BMSCs is a feasible and safe technique. However, successful application of the BMSCs in the clinical practice is associated with the necessity of executing more detailed examinations to evaluate the effect of BMSCs on the patients with spinal cord injury.

  13. Improving spinal trauma management in non-specialist centres

    OpenAIRE

    Magnussen, Alex; Galloway, Kate; Dinneen, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Fractures of the vertebral column are increasing in incidence. Even though spinal trauma is increasingly being managed in specialist units, these patients often still initially present to district general hospitals. Due to lack of exposure to these patients, the attending Orthopaedic Senior House Officer may not always be aware of current best practice in the acute management of these patients beyond immediate Advance Trauma Life Support measures. There is concern that initiation of managemen...

  14. Regenerative Potential of Ependymal Cells for Spinal Cord Injuries Over Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaofei Li

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells have a high therapeutic potential for the treatment of spinal cord injury (SCI. We have shown previously that endogenous stem cell potential is confined to ependymal cells in the adult spinal cord which could be targeted for non-invasive SCI therapy. However, ependymal cells are an understudied cell population. Taking advantage of transgenic lines, we characterize the appearance and potential of ependymal cells during development. We show that spinal cord stem cell potential in vitro is contained within these cells by birth. Moreover, juvenile cultures generate more neurospheres and more oligodendrocytes than adult ones. Interestingly, juvenile ependymal cells in vivo contribute to glial scar formation after severe but not mild SCI, due to a more effective sealing of the lesion by other glial cells. This study highlights the importance of the age-dependent potential of stem cells and post-SCI environment in order to utilize ependymal cell's regenerative potential.

  15. THE NISSL SUBSTANCE OF LIVING AND FIXED SPINAL GANGLION CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deitch, Arline D.; Moses, Montrose J.

    1957-01-01

    Living chick spinal ganglion neurons grown for 19 to 25 days in vitro were photographed with a color-translating ultraviolet microscope (UV-91) at 265, 287, and 310 mµ. This instrument was unique in permitting rapid accumulation of ultraviolet information with minimal damage to the cell. In the photographs taken at 265 mµ of the living neurons, discrete ultraviolet-absorbing cytoplasmic masses were observed which were found to be virtually unchanged in appearance after formalin fixation. These were identical with the Nissl bodies of the same cells seen after staining with basic dyes. The correlation of ultraviolet absorption, ribonuclease extraction, and staining experiments with acid and basic dyes confirmed the ribonucleoprotein nature of these Nissl bodies in the living and fixed cells. No change in distribution or concentration of ultraviolet-absorbing substance was observed in the first 12 ultraviolet photographs of a neuron, and it is concluded that the cells had not been subjected to significant ultraviolet damage during the period of photography. On the basis of these observations, as well as previous findings with phase contrast microscopy, it is concluded that Nissl bodies preexist in the living neuron as discrete aggregates containing high concentrations of nucleoprotein. PMID:13438929

  16. Rapid generation of OPC-like cells from human pluripotent stem cells for treating spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae-Sung; Jung, Se Jung; Lee, Jae Souk; Lim, Bo Young; Kim, Hyun Ah; Yoo, Jeong-Eun; Kim, Dong-Wook; Leem, Joong Woo

    2017-07-28

    Remyelination via the transplantation of oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) has been considered as a strategy to improve the locomotor deficits caused by traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI). To date, enormous efforts have been made to derive OPCs from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs), and significant progress in the transplantation of such cells in SCI animal models has been reported. The current methods generally require a long period of time (>2 months) to obtain transplantable OPCs, which hampers their clinical utility for patients with SCI. Here we demonstrate a rapid and efficient method to differentiate hPSCs into neural progenitors that retain the features of OPCs (referred to as OPC-like cells). We used cell sorting to select A2B5-positive cells from hPSC-derived neural rosettes and cultured the selected cells in the presence of signaling cues, including sonic hedgehog, PDGF and insulin-like growth factor-1. This method robustly generated neural cells positive for platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α (PDGFRα) and NG2 (~90%) after 4 weeks of differentiation. Behavioral tests revealed that the transplantation of the OPC-like cells into the spinal cords of rats with contusive SCI at the thoracic level significantly improved hindlimb locomotor function. Electrophysiological assessment revealed enhanced neural conduction through the injury site. Histological examination showed increased numbers of axon with myelination at the injury site and graft-derived myelin formation with no evidence of tumor formation. Our method provides a cell source from hPSCs that has the potential to recover motor function following SCI.

  17. Use of Autologous Mesenchymal Stem Cells Derived from Bone Marrow for the Treatment of Naturally Injured Spinal Cord in Dogs

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    Euler Moraes Penha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of stem cells in injury repair has been extensively investigated. Here, we examined the therapeutic effects of autologous bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSC transplantation in four dogs with natural traumatic spinal cord injuries. MSC were cultured in vitro, and proliferation rate and cell viability were evaluated. Cell suspensions were prepared and surgically administered into the spinal cord. The animals were clinically evaluated and examined by nuclear magnetic resonance. Ten days after the surgical procedure and MSC transplantation, we observed a progressive recovery of the panniculus reflex and diminished superficial and deep pain response, although there were still low proprioceptive reflexes in addition to a hyperreflex in the ataxic hind limb movement responses. Each dog demonstrated an improvement in these gains over time. Conscious reflex recovery occurred simultaneously with moderate improvement in intestine and urinary bladder functions in two of the four dogs. By the 18th month of clinical monitoring, we observed a remarkable clinical amelioration accompanied by improved movement, in three of the four dogs. However, no clinical gain was associated with alterations in magnetic resonance imaging. Our results indicate that MSC are potential candidates for the stem cell therapy following spinal cord injury.

  18. Spinal NF-κB and chemokine ligand 5 expression during spinal glial cell activation in a neuropathic pain model.

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    Qin Yin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The NF-κB pathway and chemokine (C-C motif ligand 5 (CCL5 are involved in pain modulation; however, the precise mechanisms of their interactions in chronic neuropathic pain have yet to be established. METHODS: The present study examined the roles of spinal NF-κB and CCL5 in a neuropathic pain model after chronic constriction injury (CCI surgery. CCI-induced pain facilitation was evaluated using the Plantar and von Frey tests. The changes in NF-κB and CCL5 expression were analyzed by immunohistochemistry and Western blot analyses. RESULTS: Spinal NF-κB and CCL5 expression increased after CCI surgery. Repeated intrathecal infusions of pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC, a NF-κB inhibitor decreased CCL5 expression, inhibited the activation of microglia and astrocytes, and attenuated CCI-induced allodynia and hyperalgesia. Intrathecal injection of a CCL5-neutralizing antibody attenuated CCI-induced pain facilitation and also suppressed spinal glial cell activation after CCI surgery. However, the CCL5-neutralizing antibody did not affect NF-κB expression. Furthermore, selective glial inhibitors, minocycline and fluorocitrate, attenuated the hyperalgesia induced by intrathecal CCL5. CONCLUSIONS: The inhibition of spinal CCL5 expression may provide a new method to prevent and treat nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain.

  19. Does timing of transplantation of neural stem cells following spinal cord injury affect outcomes in an animal model?

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    Cheng, Ivan; Park, Don Y; Mayle, Robert E; Githens, Michael; Smith, Robert L; Park, Howard Y; Hu, Serena S; Alamin, Todd F; Wood, Kirkham B; Kharazi, Alexander I

    2017-12-01

    We previously reported that functional recovery of rats with spinal cord contusions can occur after acute transplantation of neural stem cells distal to the site of injury. To investigate the effects of timing of administration of human neural stem cell (hNSC) distal to the site of spinal cord injury on functional outcomes in an animal model. Thirty-six adult female Long-Evans hooded rats were randomized into three experimental and three control groups with six animals in each group. The T10 level was exposed via posterior laminectomy, and a moderate spinal cord contusion was induced by the Multicenter Animal Spinal Cord Injury Study Impactor (MASCIS, W.M. Keck Center for Collaborative Neuroscience, Piscataway, NJ, USA). The animals received either an intrathecal injection of hNSCs or control media through a separate distal laminotomy immediately, one week or four weeks after the induced spinal cord injury. Observers were blinded to the interventions. Functional assessment was measured immediately after injury and weekly using the Basso, Beattie, Bresnahan (BBB) locomotor rating score. A statistically significant functional improvement was seen in all three time groups when compared to their controls (acute, mean 9.2 vs. 4.5, P=0.016; subacute, mean 11.1 vs. 6.8, P=0.042; chronic, mean 11.3 vs. 5.8, P=0.035). Although there was no significant difference in the final BBB scores comparing the groups that received hNSCs, the group which achieved the greatest improvement from the time of cell injection was the subacute group (+10.3) and was significantly greater than the chronic group (+5.1, P=0.02). The distal intrathecal transplantation of hNSCs into the contused spinal cord of a rat led to significant functional recovery of the spinal cord when injected in the acute, subacute and chronic phases of spinal cord injury (SCI), although the greatest gains appeared to be in the subacute timing group.

  20. Unique in vivo properties of olfactory ensheathing cells that may contribute to neural repair and protection following spinal cord injury

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    Kocsis, Jeffery D.; Lankford, Karen L.; Sasaki, Masanori; Radtke, Christine

    2009-01-01

    Olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) are specialized glial cells that guide olfactory receptor axons from the nasal mucosa into the brain where they make synaptic contacts in the olfactory bulb. While a number of studies have demonstrated that in vivo transplantation of OECs into injured spinal cord results in improved functional outcome, precise cellular mechanisms underlying this improvement are not fully understood. Current thinking is that OECs can encourage axonal regeneration, provide trophic support for injured neurons and for angiogenesis, and remyelinate axons. However, Schwann cell (SC) transplantation also results in significant functional improvement in animal models of spinal cord injury. In culture SCs and OECs share a number of phenotypic properties such as expression of the low affinity NGF receptor (p75). An important area of research has been to distinguish potential differences in the in vivo behavior of OECs and SCs to determine if one cell type may offer greater advantage as a cellular therapeutic candidate. In this review we focus on several unique features of OECs when they are transplanted into the spinal cord. PMID:19429149

  1. Changes in the neuroglial cell populations of the rat spinal cord after local X-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubbard, B.M.; Hopewell, J.W.

    1979-01-01

    A 16 mm length of cervical spinal cord of young adult female rats was irradiated with 4000 rad of 250 kV X-rays. Counts of astrocyte and oligodendrocyte nuclei were made in the dorsal columns of both irradiated and control cervical cords during the latent period before the onset of radionecrosis. The numbers of both astrocyte and oligodendrocyte nuclei were reduced one month after exposure to radiation. Both cell populations showed an apparent recovery but this was subsequently followed by a rapid loss of cells prior to the development of white-matter necrosis. The oligodendrocyte population in unirradiated spinal cords increased with age, and mitotic figures were observed among the neuroglia of both irradiated and control cervical spinal cords. A slow, natural turnover of neuroglial cells in the cervical spinal cord is proposed and the relevance of this to the manifestation of delayed white matter necrosis is discussed. (author)

  2. Transplantation of Neural Precursor Cells Attenuates Chronic Immune Environment in Cervical Spinal Cord Injury

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    Lennart Riemann

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation after traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI is non-resolving and thus still present in chronic injury stages. It plays a key role in the pathophysiology of SCI and has been associated with further neurodegeneration and development of neuropathic pain. Neural precursor cells (NPCs have been shown to reduce the acute and sub-acute inflammatory response after SCI. In the present study, we examined effects of NPC transplantation on the immune environment in chronic stages of SCI. SCI was induced in rats by clip-compression of the cervical spinal cord at the level C6-C7. NPCs were transplanted 10 days post-injury. The functional outcome was assessed weekly for 8 weeks using the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan scale, the CatWalk system, and the grid walk test. Afterwards, the rats were sacrificed, and spinal cord sections were examined for M1/M2 macrophages, T lymphocytes, astrogliosis, and apoptosis using immunofluorescence staining. Rats treated with NPCs had compared to the control group significantly fewer pro-inflammatory M1 macrophages and reduced immunodensity for inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS, their marker enzyme. Anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages were rarely present 8 weeks after the SCI. In this model, the sub-acute transplantation of NPCs did not support survival and proliferation of M2 macrophages. Post-traumatic apoptosis, however, was significantly reduced in the NPC group, which might be explained by the altered microenvironment following NPC transplantation. Corresponding to these findings, reactive astrogliosis was significantly reduced in NPC-transplanted animals. Furthermore, we could observe a trend toward smaller cavity sizes and functional improvement following NPC transplantation. Our data suggest that transplantation of NPCs following SCI might attenuate inflammation even in chronic injury stages. This might prevent further neurodegeneration and could also set a stage for improved neuroregeneration after SCI.

  3. Plasticity and regeneration in the injured spinal cord after cell transplantation therapy.

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    Nori, Satoshi; Nakamura, Masaya; Okano, Hideyuki

    2017-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) typically damages the long axonal tracts of the spinal cord which results in permanent disability. However, regeneration of the injured spinal cord is approaching reality according to the advances in stem cell biology. Cell transplantation therapy holds potential to lead to recovery following SCI through some positive mechanisms. Grafted cells induce plasticity and regeneration in the injured spinal cord by promoting remyelination of damaged axons, reconstruction of neural circuits by synapse formation between host neurons and graft-derived neurons, and secreting neurotrophic factors to promote axonal elongation as well as reduce retrograde axonal degeneration. In this review, we will delineate (1) the microenvironment of the injured spinal cord that influence the plasticity and regeneration capacity after SCI, (2) a number of different kinds of cell transplantation therapies for SCI that has been extensively studied by researchers, and (3) potential mechanisms of grafted cell-induced regeneration and plasticity in the injured spinal cord. © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Intravenous Infusion of Magnesium Chloride Improves Epicenter Blood Flow during the Acute Stage of Contusive Spinal Cord Injury in Rats

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    Muradov, Johongir M.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Vasospasm, hemorrhage, and loss of microvessels at the site of contusive or compressive spinal cord injury lead to infarction and initiate secondary degeneration. Here, we used intravenous injection of endothelial-binding lectin followed by histology to show that the number of perfused microvessels at the injury site is decreased by 80–90% as early as 20 min following a moderate T9 contusion in adult female rats. Hemorrhage within the spinal cord also was maximal at 20 min, consistent with its vasoconstrictive actions in the central nervous system (CNS). Microvascular blood flow recovered to up to 50% of normal volume in the injury penumbra by 6 h, but not at the epicenter. A comparison with an endothelial cell marker suggested that many microvessels fail to be reperfused up to 48 h post-injury. The ischemia was probably caused by vasospasm of vessels penetrating the parenchyma, because repeated Doppler measurements over the spinal cord showed a doubling of total blood flow over the first 12 h. Moreover, intravenous infusion of magnesium chloride, used clinically to treat CNS vasospasm, greatly improved the number of perfused microvessels at 24 and 48 h. The magnesium treatment seemed safe as it did not increase hemorrhage, despite the improved parenchymal blood flow. However, the treatment did not reduce acute microvessel, motor neuron or oligodendrocyte loss, and when infused for 7 days did not affect functional recovery or spared epicenter white matter over a 4 week period. These data suggest that microvascular blood flow can be restored with a clinically relevant treatment following spinal cord injury. PMID:23302047

  5. Integration of donor mesenchymal stem cell-derived neuron-like cells into host neural network after rat spinal cord transection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xiang; Qiu, Xue-Cheng; Ma, Yuan-Huan; Duan, Jing-Jing; Chen, Yuan-Feng; Gu, Huai-Yu; Wang, Jun-Mei; Ling, Eng-Ang; Wu, Jin-Lang; Wu, Wutian; Zeng, Yuan-Shan

    2015-06-01

    Functional deficits following spinal cord injury (SCI) primarily attribute to loss of neural connectivity. We therefore tested if novel tissue engineering approaches could enable neural network repair that facilitates functional recovery after spinal cord transection (SCT). Rat bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), genetically engineered to overexpress TrkC, receptor of neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), were pre-differentiated into cells carrying neuronal features via co-culture with NT-3 overproducing Schwann cells in 3-dimensional gelatin sponge (GS) scaffold for 14 days in vitro. Intra-GS formation of MSC assemblies emulating neural network (MSC-GS) were verified morphologically via electron microscopy (EM) and functionally by whole-cell patch clamp recording of spontaneous post-synaptic currents. The differentiated MSCs still partially maintained prototypic property with the expression of some mesodermal cytokines. MSC-GS or GS was then grafted acutely into a 2 mm-wide transection gap in the T9-T10 spinal cord segments of adult rats. Eight weeks later, hindlimb function of the MSC-GS-treated SCT rats was significantly improved relative to controls receiving the GS or lesion only as indicated by BBB score. The MSC-GS transplantation also significantly recovered cortical motor evoked potential (CMEP). Histologically, MSC-derived neuron-like cells maintained their synapse-like structures in vivo; they additionally formed similar connections with host neurites (i.e., mostly serotonergic fibers plus a few corticospinal axons; validated by double-labeled immuno-EM). Moreover, motor cortex electrical stimulation triggered c-fos expression in the grafted and lumbar spinal cord cells of the treated rats only. Our data suggest that MSC-derived neuron-like cells resulting from NT-3-TrkC-induced differentiation can partially integrate into transected spinal cord and this strategy should be further investigated for reconstructing disrupted neural circuits. Copyright

  6. Cell based-gene delivery approaches for the treatment of spinal cord injury and neurodegenerative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Masoumeh Fakhr

    2010-03-01

    Cell based-gene delivery has provided an important therapeutic strategy for different disorders in the recent years. This strategy is based on the transplantation of genetically modified cells to express specific genes and to target the delivery of therapeutic factors, especially for the treatment of cancers and neurological, immunological, cardiovascular and heamatopoietic disorders. Although, preliminary reports are encouraging, and experimental studies indicate functionally and structurally improvements in the animal models of different disorders, universal application of this strategy for human diseases requires more evidence. There are a number of parameters that need to be evaluated, including the optimal cell source, the most effective gene/genes to be delivered, the optimal vector and method of gene delivery into the cells and the most efficient route for the delivery of genetically modified cells into the patient. Also, some obstacles have to be overcome, including the safety and usefulness of the approaches and the stability of the improvements. Here, recent studies concerning with the cell-based gene delivery for spinal cord injury and some neurodegenerative disorders such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease are briefly reviewed, and their exciting consequences are discussed.

  7. Fenbendazole improves pathological and functional recovery following traumatic spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, C G; Singh, R; Crowdus, C; Raza, K; Kincer, J; Geddes, J W

    2014-01-03

    During a study of spinal cord injury (SCI), mice in our colony were treated with the anthelmintic fenbendazole to treat pinworms detected in other mice not involved in the study. As this was not part of the original experimental design, we subsequently compared pathological and functional outcomes of SCI in female C57BL/6 mice who received fenbendazole (150 ppm, 8 mg/kg body weight/day) for 4 weeks prior to moderate contusive SCI (50 kdyn force) as compared to mice on the same diet without added fenbendazole. The fenbendazole-treated mice exhibited improved locomotor function, determined using the Basso mouse scale, as well as improved tissue sparing following contusive SCI. Fenbendazole may exert protective effects through multiple possible mechanisms, one of which is inhibition of the proliferation of B lymphocytes, thereby reducing antibody responses. Autoantibodies produced following SCI contribute to the axon damage and locomotor deficits. Fenbendazole pretreatment reduced the injury-induced CD45R-positive B cell signal intensity and IgG immunoreactivity at the lesion epicenter 6 weeks after contusive SCI in mice, consistent with a possible effect on the immune response to the injury. Fenbendazole and related benzimadole antihelmintics are FDA approved, exhibit minimal toxicity, and represent a novel group of potential therapeutics targeting secondary mechanisms following SCI. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Reduction of microhemorrhages in the spinal cord of symptomatic ALS mice after intravenous human bone marrow stem cell transplantation accompanies repair of the blood-spinal cord barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eve, David J.; Steiner, George; Mahendrasah, Ajay; Sanberg, Paul R.; Kurien, Crupa; Thomson, Avery; Borlongan, Cesar V.; Garbuzova-Davis, Svitlana

    2018-01-01

    Blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB) alterations, including capillary rupture, have been demonstrated in animal models of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and ALS patients. To date, treatment to restore BSCB in ALS is underexplored. Here, we evaluated whether intravenous transplantation of human bone marrow CD34+ (hBM34+) cells into symptomatic ALS mice leads to restoration of capillary integrity in the spinal cord as determined by detection of microhemorrhages. Three different doses of hBM34+ cells (5 × 104, 5 × 105 or 1 × 106) or media were intravenously injected into symptomatic G93A SOD1 mice at 13 weeks of age. Microhemorrhages were determined in the cervical and lumbar spinal cords of mice at 4 weeks post-treatment, as revealed by Perls’ Prussian blue staining for ferric iron. Numerous microhemorrhages were observed in the gray and white matter of the spinal cords in media-treated mice, with a greater number of capillary ruptures within the ventral horn of both segments. In cell-treated mice, microhemorrhage numbers in the cervical and lumbar spinal cords were inversely related to administered cell doses. In particular, the pervasive microvascular ruptures determined in the spinal cords in late symptomatic ALS mice were significantly decreased by the highest cell dose, suggestive of BSCB repair by grafted hBM34+ cells. The study results provide translational outcomes supporting transplantation of hBM34+ cells at an optimal dose as a potential therapeutic strategy for BSCB repair in ALS patients. PMID:29535831

  9. Improvements in the technique of spinal subarachnoid recirculatory perfusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, H.G.; Allison, J.D.; Kingsbury, T.B.; Goode, J.J.; Sims, W.L.

    1984-01-01

    With 14 C-labeled dextran as the tracer, studies of the original configuration of spinal recirculatory perfusion and the original model for data analysis demonstrated that this approach does not yield acceptable accuracy in determining cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) formation (Fcsf) and absorption (Acsf) rates. A significant component of this error was due to the fact that the method of data analysis used originally is not based on a realistic mathematical model of the system. A more realistic mathematical model resulted in two simultaneous differential equations that did not have simple analytical solutions and, therefore, could not be used easily for data analysis. By computer simulation, a comparison of the more realistic model with the original model demonstrated that, under ideal conditions, there was a 10% error inherent in the original data analysis method. A new system configuration and new data analysis methods have been developed. In the new system, the syringe is removed from the external circuit and intracranial pressure is controlled by infusion from a separate reservoir where the pressure head is maintained at any desired level by feedback control. Spectrophotometry is used to measure tracer concentration in the external circuit. Data collection and analysis are fully automated under computer control so that, during an experimental run, the investigators are updated at 1- to 2-second intervals as to the convergence of the data analysis routine. All of the data during the initial period of nonhomogeneous mixing are used to calculate Fcsf and Acsf. With the new system and a simple phantom of the CSF system, the mean error in finding Acsf was 1.7 +/- 1.2% for 27 determinations covering a wide range of absorption rates. Fcsf could be determined to within 0.001 ml/minute. In up to six sequential pressure plateaus, the magnitude of error did not increase with each subsequent run

  10. The upright posture improves plantar stepping and alters responses to serotonergic drugs in spinal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sławińska, Urszula; Majczyński, Henryk; Dai, Yue; Jordan, Larry M

    2012-04-01

    Recent studies on the restoration of locomotion after spinal cord injury have employed robotic means of positioning rats above a treadmill such that the animals are held in an upright posture and engage in bipedal locomotor activity. However, the impact of the upright posture alone, which alters hindlimb loading, an important variable in locomotor control, has not been examined. Here we compared the locomotor capabilities of chronic spinal rats when placed in the horizontal and upright postures. Hindlimb locomotor movements induced by exteroceptive stimulation (tail pinching) were monitored with video and EMG recordings. We found that the upright posture alone significantly improved plantar stepping. Locomotor trials using anaesthesia of the paws and air stepping demonstrated that the cutaneous receptors of the paws are responsible for the improved plantar stepping observed when the animals are placed in the upright posture.We also tested the effectiveness of serotonergic drugs that facilitate locomotor activity in spinal rats in both the horizontal and upright postures. Quipazine and (±)-8-hydroxy-2-(dipropylamino)tetralin hydrobromide (8-OH-DPAT) improved locomotion in the horizontal posture but in the upright posture either interfered with or had no effect on plantar walking. Combined treatment with quipazine and 8-OH-DPAT at lower doses dramatically improved locomotor activity in both postures and mitigated the need to activate the locomotor CPG with exteroceptive stimulation. Our results suggest that afferent input from the paw facilitates the spinal CPG for locomotion. These potent effects of afferent input from the paw should be taken into account when interpreting the results obtained with rats in an upright posture and when designing interventions for restoration of locomotion after spinal cord injury.

  11. Structural and Functional Substitution of Deleted Primary Sensory Neurons by New Growth from Intrinsic Spinal Cord Nerve Cells: An Alternative Concept in Reconstruction of Spinal Cord Circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas D. James

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In a recent clinical report, return of the tendon stretch reflex was demonstrated after spinal cord surgery in a case of total traumatic brachial plexus avulsion injury. Peripheral nerve grafts had been implanted into the spinal cord to reconnect to the peripheral nerves for motor and sensory function. The dorsal root ganglia (DRG containing the primary sensory nerve cells had been surgically removed in order for secondary or spinal cord sensory neurons to extend into the periphery and replace the deleted DRG neurons. The present experimental study uses a rat injury model first to corroborate the clinical finding of a re-established spinal reflex arch, and second, to elucidate some of the potential mechanisms underlying these findings by means of morphological, immunohistochemical, and electrophysiological assessments. Our findings indicate that, after spinal cord surgery, the central nervous system sensory system could replace the traumatically detached original peripheral sensory connections through new neurite growth from dendrites.

  12. Edaravone is a candidate agent for spinal muscular atrophy: In vitro analysis using a human induced pluripotent stem cells-derived disease model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Shiori; Funato, Michinori; Ohuchi, Kazuki; Kameyama, Tsubasa; Inagaki, Satoshi; Seki, Junko; Kawase, Chizuru; Tsuruma, Kazuhiro; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Kaneko, Hideo; Hara, Hideaki

    2017-11-05

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an intractable disease characterized by a progressive loss of spinal motor neurons, which leads to skeletal muscle weakness and atrophy. Currently, there are no curative agents for SMA, although it is understood to be caused by reduced levels of survival motor neuron (SMN) protein. Additionally, why reduced SMN protein level results in selective apoptosis in spinal motor neurons is still not understood. Our purpose in this study was to evaluate the therapeutic potential of edaravone, a free radical scavenger, by using induced pluripotent stem cells from an SMA patient (SMA-iPSCs) and to address oxidative stress-induced apoptosis in spinal motor neurons. We first found that edaravone could improve impaired neural development of SMA-iPSCs-derived spinal motor neurons with limited effect on nuclear SMN protein expression. Furthermore, edaravone inhibited the generation of reactive oxygen species and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species upregulated in SMA-iPSCs-derived spinal motor neurons, and reversed oxidative-stress induced apoptosis. In this study, we suggest that oxidative stress might be partly the reason for selective apoptosis in spinal motor neurons in SMA pathology, and that oxidative stress-induced apoptosis might be the therapeutic target of SMA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Stem cell-derived neurotrophic support for the neuromuscular junction in spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Tanya J; Keirstead, Hans S

    2010-11-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by specific degeneration of α-motor neurons in the spinal cord. The use of cell transplantation to restore lost function through cell replacement or prevent further degeneration of motor neurons and synapses through neurotrophic support heralds tremendous hope in the SMA field. Much research has been carried out in the last decade on the use of embryonic stem cells in cell replacement strategies for various neurodegenerative diseases. Cell replacement is contingent on the ability of transplanted cells to integrate and form new functional connections with host cells. In the case of SMA, cell replacement is a tall order in that axons of transplanted cells would be required to grow over long distances from the spinal cord through growth-averse terrain to synapse with muscles in the periphery. The efficacy of neurotrophic support is contingent on the ability of transplanted cells to secrete neurotrophins appropriate for degenerating motor neurons in the spinal cord or development/stability of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) in the periphery. The reader will gain an understanding of the potential of neurotrophins to promote development of the NMJ in a diseased or injured environment. Neurotrophins play a major role in NMJ development and thus may be a key factor in the pathogenesis of NMJs in SMA. Further research into the signaling mechanisms involved in NMJ maturation may identify additional mechanisms by which transplanted cells may be of therapeutic benefit.

  14. A First-in-Human, Phase I Study of Neural Stem Cell Transplantation for Chronic Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Erik; Martin, Joel R; Gabel, Brandon; Sidhu, Nikki; Rzesiewicz, Teresa K; Mandeville, Ross; Van Gorp, Sebastiaan; Leerink, Marjolein; Tadokoro, Takahiro; Marsala, Silvia; Jamieson, Catriona; Marsala, Martin; Ciacci, Joseph D

    2018-06-01

    We tested the feasibility and safety of human-spinal-cord-derived neural stem cell (NSI-566) transplantation for the treatment of chronic spinal cord injury (SCI). In this clinical trial, four subjects with T2-T12 SCI received treatment consisting of removal of spinal instrumentation, laminectomy, and durotomy, followed by six midline bilateral stereotactic injections of NSI-566 cells. All subjects tolerated the procedure well and there have been no serious adverse events to date (18-27 months post-grafting). In two subjects, one to two levels of neurological improvement were detected using ISNCSCI motor and sensory scores. Our results support the safety of NSI-566 transplantation into the SCI site and early signs of potential efficacy in three of the subjects warrant further exploration of NSI-566 cells in dose escalation studies. Despite these encouraging secondary data, we emphasize that this safety trial lacks statistical power or a control group needed to evaluate functional changes resulting from cell grafting. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Organization of hyperactive microglial cells in trigeminal spinal subnucleus caudalis and upper cervical spinal cord associated with orofacial neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibuta, Kazuo; Suzuki, Ikuko; Shinoda, Masamichi; Tsuboi, Yoshiyuki; Honda, Kuniya; Shimizu, Noriyoshi; Sessle, Barry J; Iwata, Koichi

    2012-04-27

    The aim of this study was to evaluate spatial organization of hyperactive microglial cells in trigeminal spinal subnucleus caudalis (Vc) and upper cervical spinal cord (C1), and to clarify the involvement in mechanisms underlying orofacial secondary hyperalgesia following infraorbital nerve injury. We found that the head-withdrawal threshold to non-noxious mechanical stimulation of the maxillary whisker pad skin was significantly reduced in chronic constriction injury of the infraorbital nerve (ION-CCI) rats from day 1 to day 14 after ION-CCI. On day 3 after ION-CCI, mechanical allodynia was obvious in the orofacial skin areas innervated by the 1st and 3rd branches of the trigeminal nerve as well as the 2nd branch area. Hyperactive microglial cells in Vc and C1 were observed on days 3 and 7 after ION-CCI. On day 3 after ION-CCI, a large number of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (pERK)-immunoreactive (IR) cells were observed in Vc and C1. Many hyperactive microglial cells were also distributed over a wide area of Vc and C1 innervated by the trigeminal nerve. The intraperitoneal administration of minocycline significantly reduced the activation of microglial cells and the number of pERK-IR cells in Vc and C1, and also significantly attenuated the development of mechanical allodynia. Furthermore, enhanced background activity and mechanical evoked responses of Vc wide dynamic range neurons in ION-CCI rats were significantly reversed following minocycline administration. These findings suggest that activation of microglial cells over a wide area of Vc and C1 is involved in the enhancement of Vc and C1 neuronal excitability in the early period after ION-CCI, resulting in the neuropathic pain in orofacial areas innervated by the injured as well as uninjured nerves. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. An ex vivo spinal cord injury model to study ependymal cells in adult mouse tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Zafra, Teresa; Codeluppi, Simone; Uhlén, Per

    2017-08-15

    Traumatic spinal cord injury is characterized by an initial cell loss that is followed by a concerted cellular response in an attempt to restore the damaged tissue. Nevertheless, little is known about the signaling mechanisms governing the cellular response to injury. Here, we have established an adult ex vivo system that exhibits multiple hallmarks of spinal cord injury and allows the study of complex processes that are difficult to address using animal models. We have characterized the ependymal cell response to injury in this model system and found that ependymal cells can become activated, proliferate, migrate out of the central canal lining and differentiate in a manner resembling the in vivo situation. Moreover, we show that these cells respond to external adenosine triphosphate and exhibit spontaneous Ca 2+ activity, processes that may play a significant role in the regulation of their response to spinal cord injury. This model provides an attractive tool to deepen our understanding of the ependymal cell response after spinal cord injury, which may contribute to the development of new treatment options for spinal cord injury. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Nanog interact with CDK6 to regulates astrocyte cells proliferation following spinal cord injury

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    Gu, Jun [Nanjing Medical University, 140 Hanzhong Road, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Department of Orthopaedics, Xishan People' s Hospital, Wuxi, Jiangsu (China); Ni, Yingjie; Xu, Lin; Xu, Hongliang [Department of Orthopaedics, Xishan People' s Hospital, Wuxi, Jiangsu (China); Cai, Zhengdong, E-mail: caizhengdongsh@163.com [Nanjing Medical University, 140 Hanzhong Road, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China)

    2016-01-22

    Previous research had reported transcription factors Nanog expressed in pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCS) that played an important role in regulating the cell proliferation. Nanog levels are frequently elevated in ESCS, but the role in the spinal cord was not clear. To examine the biological relevance of Nanog, we studied its properties in spinal cord injury model. The expression of Nanog and PCNA was gradually increased and reached a peak at 3 day by western blot analysis. The expression of Nanog was further analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Double immunofluorescent staining uncovered that Nanog can co-labeled with PCNA and GFAP in the spinal cord tissue. In vitro, Nanog can promote the proliferation of astrocyte cell by Fluorescence Activating Cell Sorter (FACS) and CCK8. Meanwhile, the cell-cycle protein CDK6 could interact with Nanog in the spinal cord tissue. Taken together, these data suggested that both Nanog may play important roles in spinal cord pathophysiology via interact with CDK6.

  18. Nanog interact with CDK6 to regulates astrocyte cells proliferation following spinal cord injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu, Jun; Ni, Yingjie; Xu, Lin; Xu, Hongliang; Cai, Zhengdong

    2016-01-01

    Previous research had reported transcription factors Nanog expressed in pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCS) that played an important role in regulating the cell proliferation. Nanog levels are frequently elevated in ESCS, but the role in the spinal cord was not clear. To examine the biological relevance of Nanog, we studied its properties in spinal cord injury model. The expression of Nanog and PCNA was gradually increased and reached a peak at 3 day by western blot analysis. The expression of Nanog was further analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Double immunofluorescent staining uncovered that Nanog can co-labeled with PCNA and GFAP in the spinal cord tissue. In vitro, Nanog can promote the proliferation of astrocyte cell by Fluorescence Activating Cell Sorter (FACS) and CCK8. Meanwhile, the cell-cycle protein CDK6 could interact with Nanog in the spinal cord tissue. Taken together, these data suggested that both Nanog may play important roles in spinal cord pathophysiology via interact with CDK6.

  19. Overcoming the Practical Barriers to Spinal Cord Cell Transplantation for ALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    induced pluripotent stem cells from pig somatic cells . (2009) Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 106:10993-10998. 8. Feldman EL, Boulis NM, Hur J...Stice SL. Porcine Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Produce Chimeric Offspring. (2010) Stem Cells Dev. 19(8):1211- 20. 12 LIST OF PERSONNEL RECEIVING PAY...straightforward delivery method and is achieved by directly injecting the spinal cord using a cannula.14,15 Stem cells and derived

  20. Comparison of mesenchymal stem cells derived from fat, bone marrow, Wharton's jelly, and umbilical cord blood for treating spinal cord injuries in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Hak-Hyun; Kang, Byung-Jae; Park, Sung-Su; Kim, Yongsun; Sung, Gyu-Jin; Woo, Heung-Myong; Kim, Wan Hee; Kweon, Oh-Kyeong

    2012-12-01

    Previous animal studies have shown that transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) into spinal cord lesions enhances axonal regeneration and promotes functional recovery. We isolated the MSCs derived from fat, bone marrow, Wharton's jelly and umbilical cord blood (UCB) positive for MSC markers and negative for hematopoietic cell markers. Their effects on the regeneration of injured canine spinal cords were compared. Spinal cord injury was induced by balloon catheter compression. Dogs with injured spinal cords were treated with only matrigel or matrigel mixed with each type of MSCs. Olby and modified Tarlov scores, immunohistochemistry, ELISA and Western blot analysis were used to evaluate the therapeutic effects. The different MSC groups showed significant improvements in locomotion at 8 weeks after transplantation (Pin the lesion site. Compared to the control, the lesion sizes were smaller, and fewer microglia and reactive astrocytes were found in the spinal cord epicenter of all MSC groups. Although there were no significant differences in functional recovery among the MSCs groups, UCB-derived MSCs (UCSCs) induced more nerve regeneration and anti-inflammation activity (Pin the spinal cord. Our data suggest that transplantation of MSCs promotes functional recovery after SCI. Furthermore, application of UCSCs led to more nerve regeneration, neuroprotection and less inflammation compared to other MSCs.

  1. Improving outcome of sensorimotor functions after traumatic spinal cord injury [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volker Dietz

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In the rehabilitation of a patient suffering a spinal cord injury (SCI, the exploitation of neuroplasticity is well established. It can be facilitated through the training of functional movements with technical assistance as needed and can improve outcome after an SCI. The success of such training in individuals with incomplete SCI critically depends on the presence of physiological proprioceptive input to the spinal cord leading to meaningful muscle activations during movement performances. Some actual preclinical approaches to restore function by compensating for the loss of descending input to spinal networks following complete/incomplete SCI are critically discussed in this report. Electrical and pharmacological stimulation of spinal neural networks is still in the experimental stage, and despite promising repair studies in animal models, translations to humans up to now have not been convincing. It is possible that a combination of techniques targeting the promotion of axonal regeneration is necessary to advance the restoration of function. In the future, refinement of animal models according to clinical conditions and requirements may contribute to greater translational success.

  2. Two-step production of monoamines in monoenzymatic cells in the spinal cord: a different control strategy of neurotransmitter supply?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Mengliang

    2016-01-01

    Monoamine neurotransmitters play an important role in the modulation of sensory, motor and autonomic functions in the spinal cord. Although traditionally it is believed that in mammalian spinal cord, monoamine neurotransmitters mainly originate from the brain, accumulating evidence indicates...... that especially when the spinal cord is injured, they can also be produced in the spinal cord. In this review, I will present evidence for a possible pathway for two-step synthesis of dopamine and serotonin in the spinal cord. Published data from different sources and unpublished data from my own ongoing projects...... that dopamine and serotonin could be synthesized sequentially in two monoenzymatic cells in the spinal cord via a TH-AADC and a TPH-AADC cascade respectively. The monoamines synthesized through this pathway may compensate for lost neurotransmitters following spinal cord injury and also may play specific roles...

  3. Electro-acupuncture promotes survival, differentiation of the bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells as well as functional recovery in the spinal cord-transected rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Ying; Yan, Qing; Ruan, Jing-Wen; Zhang, Yan-Qing; Li, Wen-Jie; Zhang, Yu-Jiao; Li, Yan; Dong, Hongxin; Zeng, Yuan-Shan

    2009-01-01

    Background Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are one of the potential tools for treatment of the spinal cord injury; however, the survival and differentiation of MSCs in an injured spinal cord still need to be improved. In the present study, we investigated whether Governor Vessel electro-acupuncture (EA) could efficiently promote bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) survival and differentiation, axonal regeneration and finally, functional recovery in the transected spinal cord. Results The spinal cords of adult Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were completely transected at T10, five experimental groups were performed: 1. sham operated control (Sham-control); 2. operated control (Op-control); 3. electro-acupuncture treatment (EA); 4. MSCs transplantation (MSCs); and 5. MSCs transplantation combined with electro-acupuncture (MSCs+EA). After 2-8 weeks of MSCs transplantation plus EA treatment, we found that the neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), cAMP level, the differentiation of MSCs, the 5-HT positive and CGRP positive nerve fibers in the lesion site and nearby tissue of injured spinal cord were significantly increased in the MSCs+EA group as compared to the group of the MSCs transplantation or the EA treated alone. Furthermore, behavioral test and spinal cord evoked potentials detection demonstrated a significantly functional recovery in the MSCs +EA group. Conclusion These results suggest that EA treatment may promote grafted MSCs survival and differentiation; MSCs transplantation combined with EA treatment could promote axonal regeneration and partial locomotor functional recovery in the transected spinal cord in rats and indicate a promising avenue of treatment of spinal cord injury. PMID:19374777

  4. Timing, severity of deficits, and clinical improvement after surgery for spinal dural arteriovenous fistulas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safaee, Michael M; Clark, Aaron J; Burkhardt, Jan-Karl; Winkler, Ethan A; Lawton, Michael T

    2018-04-20

    OBJECTIVE Spinal dural arteriovenous fistulas (dAVFs) are rare vascular abnormalities caused by arteriovenous shunting. They often form at the dural root sleeve between a radicular feeding artery and draining medullary vein causing venous congestion and edema, decreased perfusion, and ischemia of the spinal cord. Treatment consists of either surgical ligation of the draining vein or selective embolization via an endovascular approach. There is a paucity of data on which modality provides more durable and effective outcomes. METHODS The authors performed a retrospective review of a prospectively maintained database by the senior author to assess clinical outcomes in patients undergoing surgical treatment of spinal dAVFs. Preoperative and postoperative motor and Aminoff-Logue Scale (ALS) scores were collected. RESULTS A total of 41 patients with 44 spinal dAVFs were identified, with a mean patient age of 64 years. The mean symptom duration was 14 months, with weakness (82%), urinary symptoms (47%), and sensory symptoms (29%) at presentation. The fistula locations were as follows: 30 thoracic, 9 lumbar, 3 sacral, and 2 cervical. Five patients had normal motor and ALS scores at presentation. Among the remaining 36 patients with motor deficits or abnormal gait and micturition at presentation, 78% experienced an improvement while the remaining 22% continued to be stable. There was a trend toward improved outcomes in patients with shorter symptom duration; mean symptom duration among patients with clinical improvement was 13 months compared with 22 months among those without improvement. Additionally, rates of improvement were higher for lower thoracic and lumbosacral dAVFs (85% and 83%) compared with those in the upper thoracic spine (57%). No patient developed recurrent fistulas or worsening neurological deficits. CONCLUSIONS Surgery is associated with excellent outcomes in the treatment of spinal dAVFs. Early diagnosis and treatment are critical, with a trend toward

  5. What is the potential of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells to successfully treat human spinal cord injury?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeung Trevor M

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spinal cord injury is a serious and debilitating condition, affecting millions of people worldwide. Long seen as a permanent injury, recent advances in stem cell research have brought closer the possibility of repairing the spinal cord. One such approach involves injecting oligodendrocyte progenitor cells, derived from human embryonic stem cells, into the injured spinal cord in the hope that they will initiate repair. A phase I clinical trial of this therapy was started in mid 2010 and is currently underway. Discussion The theory underlying this approach is that these myelinating progenitors will phenotypically replace myelin lost during injury whilst helping to promote a repair environment in the lesion. However, the importance of demyelination in the pathogenesis of human spinal cord injury is a contentious issue and a body of literature suggests that it is only a minor factor in the overall injury process. Summary This review examines the validity of the theory underpinning the on-going clinical trial as well as analysing published data from animal models and finally discussing issues surrounding safety and purity in order to assess the potential of this approach to successfully treat acute human spinal cord injury.

  6. Human dental pulp stem cells transplantation combined with treadmill training in rats after traumatic spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.C. Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injury (SCI is a disabling condition resulting in deficits of sensory and motor functions, and has no effective treatment. Considering that protocols with stem cell transplantation and treadmill training have shown promising results, the present study evaluated the effectiveness of stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHEDs transplantation combined with treadmill training in rats with experimental spinal cord injury. Fifty-four Wistar rats were spinalized using NYU impactor. The rats were randomly distributed into 5 groups: Sham (laminectomy with no SCI, n=10; SCI (laminectomy followed by SCI, n=12; SHEDs (SCI treated with SHEDs, n=11; TT (SCI treated with treadmill training, n=11; SHEDs+TT (SCI treated with SHEDs and treadmill training; n=10. Treatment with SHEDs alone or in combination with treadmill training promoted functional recovery, reaching scores of 15 and 14, respectively, in the BBB scale, being different from the SCI group, which reached 11. SHEDs treatment was able to reduce the cystic cavity area and glial scar, increase neurofilament. Treadmill training alone had no functional effectiveness or tissue effects. In a second experiment, the SHEDs transplantation reduced the TNF-α levels in the cord tissue measured 6 h after the injury. Contrary to our hypothesis, treadmill training either alone or in combination, caused no functional improvement. However, SHEDs showed to be neuroprotective, by the reduction of TNF-α levels, the cystic cavity and the glial scar associated with the improvement of motor function after SCI. These results provide evidence that grafted SHEDs might be an effective therapy to spinal cord lesions, with possible anti-inflammatory action.

  7. Human dental pulp stem cells transplantation combined with treadmill training in rats after traumatic spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicola, F C; Rodrigues, L P; Crestani, T; Quintiliano, K; Sanches, E F; Willborn, S; Aristimunha, D; Boisserand, L; Pranke, P; Netto, C A

    2016-08-08

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a disabling condition resulting in deficits of sensory and motor functions, and has no effective treatment. Considering that protocols with stem cell transplantation and treadmill training have shown promising results, the present study evaluated the effectiveness of stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHEDs) transplantation combined with treadmill training in rats with experimental spinal cord injury. Fifty-four Wistar rats were spinalized using NYU impactor. The rats were randomly distributed into 5 groups: Sham (laminectomy with no SCI, n=10); SCI (laminectomy followed by SCI, n=12); SHEDs (SCI treated with SHEDs, n=11); TT (SCI treated with treadmill training, n=11); SHEDs+TT (SCI treated with SHEDs and treadmill training; n=10). Treatment with SHEDs alone or in combination with treadmill training promoted functional recovery, reaching scores of 15 and 14, respectively, in the BBB scale, being different from the SCI group, which reached 11. SHEDs treatment was able to reduce the cystic cavity area and glial scar, increase neurofilament. Treadmill training alone had no functional effectiveness or tissue effects. In a second experiment, the SHEDs transplantation reduced the TNF-α levels in the cord tissue measured 6 h after the injury. Contrary to our hypothesis, treadmill training either alone or in combination, caused no functional improvement. However, SHEDs showed to be neuroprotective, by the reduction of TNF-α levels, the cystic cavity and the glial scar associated with the improvement of motor function after SCI. These results provide evidence that grafted SHEDs might be an effective therapy to spinal cord lesions, with possible anti-inflammatory action.

  8. [Effects of the maca extract on the ultrastructures of mitochondria in the spinal nerve cell and exercise endurance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Fa-Rong; Yang, Bo; Li, Zuo-Ping; Lian, Xiu-Zhen; Xie, Ming-Ren; Li, Deng-Lou; Zhang, Shi-Shuang

    2017-06-08

    To investigate the effects of maca extract on the ultrastructures of mitochondria in the spinal nerve cell and exercise endurance. The Wistar rats were randomly divided into 5 groups, including the control group (no swimming), the swimming group (free swimming), and 3 treatment groups treated with the maca extract at the doses of 4.0, 5.3 and 8.0 g/kg body weight. The animals in swimming and treatment groups were then for free swimming in the circulating water flow daily for 15 days. On the 16 th day after swimming endurance, the spinal and muscular tissues were collected from all groups. The mitochondrial ultrastructures of the neurons of the spinal cells were observed with the projection electron microscope, and the levels of the glycogen, malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), and Ca 2+ in muscle tissues were determined by the RIA method. When rats were treated with maca extract (at 4.0, 5.3, 8.0 g/kg body weight), the total swimming time and the swimming duration before sinking were increased by 19.83%, 60.28%, 77.55%, and 55.34%, 73.91%, 94.47%, respectively, compared with the simple swimming group( P maca extract (4.0, 5.3, 8.0 g/kg body weight) were reduced by 7.79%, 18.18%, 31.17%, 16.95%, 27.34%, 43.31% and 13.51%, 23.19%, 43.15%, respectively. Our results demonstrated the protective effects of maca extract on the mitochondria of spinal cell and suggested that maca extract could improve the muscle antioxidant activity by increasing the levels of SOD, GSH-Px, and muscle glycogen.

  9. Functional Recovery Secondary to Neural Stem/Progenitor Cells Transplantation Combined with Treadmill Training in Mice with Chronic Spinal Cord Injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tashiro, Syoichi; Nishimura, Soraya; Iwai, Hiroki

    are chiefly developed to improve the effect of regenerative therapy for this refractory state, physical training also have attracted the attention as a desirable candidate to combine with cell transplantation. Recently, we have reported that the addition of treadmill training enhances the effect of NS...... in the combined therapy group. Further investigation revealed that NS/PC transplantation improved spinal conductivity and central pattern generator activity, and that training promoted the appropriate inhibitory motor control including spasticity. The combined therapy enhanced these independent effects of each......Rapid progress in stem cell medicine is being realized in neural regeneration also in spinal cord injury (SCI). Researchers have reported remarkable functional recovery with various cell sources including induced Pluripotent Stem cell derived neural stem/progenitor cells (NS/PCs), especially...

  10. Stem cell transplantation for spinal cord injury: a meta-analysis of treatment effectiveness and safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Fan

    2017-01-01

    RESULTS: Ten studies comprising 377 patients were included in the analysis and the overall risk of bias was relatively low level. Four studies did not detail how random sequences were generated, two studies did not clearly state the blinding outcome assessment, two studies lacked blinding outcome assessment, one study lacked follow-up information, and four studies carried out selective reporting. Compared with rehabilitation therapy, stem cell transplantation significantly increased the lower limb light touch score (odds ratio (OR = 3.43, 95% confidence interval (CI: 0.01 – 6.86, P = 0.05, lower limb pinprick score (OR = 3.93, 95%CI: 0.74 – 7.12, P = 0.02, ASI grading rate (relative risk (RR = 2.95, 95%CI: 1.64 – 5.29, P = 0.0003, and notably reduced residual urine volume (OR = –8.10, 95%CI: –15.09 to –1.10, P = 0.02. However, stem cell transplantation did not significantly improve motor score (OR = 1.89, 95%CI: –0.25 to 4.03, P = 0.08 or activities of daily living score (OR = 1.12, 95%CI: –1.17 to 4.04, P = 0.45. Furthermore, stem cell transplantation caused a high rate of mild adverse effects (RR = 14.49, 95%CI: 5.34 – 34.08, P < 0.00001; however, these were alleviated in a short time. CONCLUSION: Stem cell transplantation was determined to be an efficient and safe treatment for SCI and simultaneously improved sensory and bladder functions. Although associated minor and temporary adverse effects were observed with transplanted stem cells, spinal cord repair and axon remyelination were apparent. More randomized controlled trials with larger sample sizes and longer follow-up times are needed to further validate the effectiveness of stem cell transplantation in the treatment of SCI.

  11. Electroacupuncture in the repair of spinal cord injury: inhibiting the Notch signaling pathway and promoting neural stem cell proliferation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Geng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Electroacupuncture for the treatment of spinal cord injury has a good clinical curative effect, but the underlying mechanism is unclear. In our experiments, the spinal cord of adult Sprague-Dawley rats was clamped for 60 seconds. Dazhui (GV14 and Mingmen (GV4 acupoints of rats were subjected to electroacupuncture. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay revealed that the expression of serum inflammatory factors was apparently downregulated in rat models of spinal cord injury after electroacupuncture. Hematoxylin-eosin staining and immunohistochemistry results demonstrated that electroacupuncture contributed to the proliferation of neural stem cells in rat injured spinal cord, and suppressed their differentiation into astrocytes. Real-time quantitative PCR and western blot assays showed that electroacupuncture inhibited activation of the Notch signaling pathway induced by spinal cord injury. These findings indicate that electroacupuncture repaired the injured spinal cord by suppressing the Notch signaling pathway and promoting the proliferation of endogenous neural stem cells.

  12. Wearing an active spinal orthosis improves back extensor strength in women with osteoporotic vertebral fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valentin, Gitte Hoff; Pedersen, Louise Nymann; Maribo, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    .Study design:Experimental follow-up.Methods:The women used the active spinal orthosis for 3 months. Outcomes were changes in isometric back extensor strength, changes in back pain and changes in physical functioning.Results:A total of 13 women were included in the trial. Wearing the orthosis during a 3-month......Background:Vertebral fractures are the most common clinical manifestations of osteoporosis. Vertebral fractures and reduced back extensor strength can result in hyperkyphosis. Hyperkyphosis is associated with diminished daily functioning and an increased risk of falling. Improvements in back...... extensor strength can result in decreased kyphosis and thus a decreased risk of falls and fractures.Objectives:The aim was to examine the effects of an active spinal orthosis - Spinomed III - on back extensor strength, back pain and physical functioning in women with osteoporotic vertebral fractures...

  13. Therapeutic effects of NogoA vaccine and olfactory ensheathing glial cell implantation on acute spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Z

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Zhicheng Zhang, Fang Li, Tiansheng Sun, Dajiang Ren, Xiumei Liu PLA Institute of Orthopedics, Beijing Army General Hospital, Beijing, People's Republic of China Background: Many previous studies have focused on the effects of IN-1, a monoclonal antibody that neutralizes Nogo (a neurite growth inhibitory protein, on neurologic regeneration in spinal cord injury (SCI. However, safety problems and the short half-life of the exogenous antibody are still problematic. In the present study, the NogoA polypeptide was used as an antigen to make a therapeutic NogoA vaccine. Rats were immunized with this vaccine and were able to secrete the polyclonal antibody before SCI. The antibody can block NogoA within the injured spinal cord when the antibody gains access to the spinal cord due to a compromised blood–spinal cord barrier. Olfactory ensheathing glial cell transplantation has been used in a spinal cord contusion model to promote the recovery of SCI. The present study was designed to verify the efficacy and safety of NogoA polypeptide vaccine, the effects of immunotherapy with this vaccine, and the synergistic effects of the vaccine and olfactory ensheathing glial cells in repair of SCI. Methods: A 13-polypeptide fragment of NogoA was synthesized. This fragment was then coupled with keyhole limpet hemocyanin to improve the immunogenicity of the polypeptide vaccine. Immunization via injection into the abdominal cavity was performed in rats before SCI. The serum antibody level and ability of the vaccine to bind with Nogo were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The safety of the vaccine was evaluated according to the incidence and severity of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Olfactory ensheathing glia cells were obtained, purified, and subsequently implanted into a Wistar rat model of thoracic spinal cord contusion injury. The rats were divided into four groups, ie, an SCI model group, an olfactory ensheathing glia group, a vaccine

  14. Structure-function Evaluation of Stem Cell Therapies for Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fuguo

    2018-02-23

    Spinal cord injuries (SCI) are prevalent, devastating for quality and expectancy of life, and cause heavy economic burdens. Stem cell therapies hold promise in complete structural and functional restoration of SCI. This review focuses on the methods currently used to evaluate the stem cell therapies for SCI. Various kinds of stem cells involving embryonic stem cells (ESCs), bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs), neural stem cells (NSCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are extensively used in regenerative research of SCI. For evaluation, the survival and integration of transplanted cells, spinal cord reconstruction and functional recovery all should be considered. Histological and histochemistrical, microscopic, and colorimetric assays, and real-time RT-PCR techniques are applied to determine the outcome. From the three main aspects-transplanted cells, spinal cord structure, and functional recovery-we summarize and discuss these methods with certain instances of applications in SCI models. Importantly, for the evaluations of function, neuronal transmitting, electrophysiological analysis and behavioral score are included. Wider conjunction of established technologies, as well as the further development of nondestructive methods might make a big difference in testing stem cell therapies. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  15. Reduction of microhemorrhages in the spinal cord of symptomatic ALS mice after intravenous human bone marrow stem cell transplantation accompanies repair of the blood-spinal cord barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eve, David J; Steiner, George; Mahendrasah, Ajay; Sanberg, Paul R; Kurien, Crupa; Thomson, Avery; Borlongan, Cesar V; Garbuzova-Davis, Svitlana

    2018-02-13

    Blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB) alterations, including capillary rupture, have been demonstrated in animal models of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and ALS patients. To date, treatment to restore BSCB in ALS is underexplored. Here, we evaluated whether intravenous transplantation of human bone marrow CD34 + (hBM34 + ) cells into symptomatic ALS mice leads to restoration of capillary integrity in the spinal cord as determined by detection of microhemorrhages. Three different doses of hBM34 + cells (5 × 10 4 , 5 × 10 5 or 1 × 10 6 ) or media were intravenously injected into symptomatic G93A SOD1 mice at 13 weeks of age. Microhemorrhages were determined in the cervical and lumbar spinal cords of mice at 4 weeks post-treatment, as revealed by Perls' Prussian blue staining for ferric iron. Numerous microhemorrhages were observed in the gray and white matter of the spinal cords in media-treated mice, with a greater number of capillary ruptures within the ventral horn of both segments. In cell-treated mice, microhemorrhage numbers in the cervical and lumbar spinal cords were inversely related to administered cell doses. In particular, the pervasive microvascular ruptures determined in the spinal cords in late symptomatic ALS mice were significantly decreased by the highest cell dose, suggestive of BSCB repair by grafted hBM34 + cells. The study results provide translational outcomes supporting transplantation of hBM34 + cells at an optimal dose as a potential therapeutic strategy for BSCB repair in ALS patients.

  16. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells with Nogo-66 receptor gene silencing for repair of spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhiyuan; Zhang, Zhanxiu; Zhao, Lili; Li, Hui; Wang, Suxia; Shen, Yong

    2014-01-01

    We hypothesized that RNA interference to silence Nogo-66 receptor gene expression in bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells before transplantation might further improve neurological function in rats with spinal cord transection injury. After 2 weeks, the number of neurons and BrdU-positive cells in the Nogo-66 receptor gene silencing group was higher than in the bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell group, and significantly greater compared with the model group. After 4 weeks, behavioral performance was significantly enhanced in the model group. After 8 weeks, the number of horseradish peroxidase-labeled nerve fibers was higher in the Nogo-66 receptor gene silencing group than in the bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell group, and significantly higher than in the model group. The newly formed nerve fibers and myelinated nerve fibers were detectable in the central transverse plane section in the bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell group and in the Nogo-66 receptor gene silencing group. PMID:25206893

  17. Concise Review: Reactive Astrocytes and Stem Cells in Spinal Cord Injury: Good Guys or Bad Guys?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lukovic, D.; Stojkovic, M.; Moreno-Manzano, V.; Jendelová, Pavla; Syková, Eva; Bhattacharya, S.S.; Erceg, Slaven

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 33, APR (2015), s. 1036-1041 ISSN 1066-5099 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1309 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : glia * induced pluripotent stem cells * neural differentiation * neural stem cell * spinal cord injury * stem cell transplantation Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 5.902, year: 2015

  18. OCAM regulates embryonic spinal cord stem cell proliferation by modulating ErbB2 receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loïc Deleyrolle

    Full Text Available The proliferation and differentiation of neural stem cells are tightly controlled by intrinsic and extrinsic cues. Cell adhesion molecules are increasingly recognized as regulators of these processes. Here we report the expression of the olfactory cell adhesion molecule (OCAM/NCAM2/RNCAM during mouse spinal cord development and in neural stem cells cultured as neurospheres. OCAM is also weakly expressed in the dormant adult stem cell niche around the central canal and is overexpressed after spinal cord injury. Both transmembrane (TM and glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI-linked isoforms are present in neurospheres. Electron microscopy and internalisation experiments revealed a dynamic trafficking of OCAM between the membrane and intracellular compartments. After differentiation, OCAM remains in neurons and oligodendrocytes whereas no expression is detected in astrocytes. Using OCAM knockout (KO mice, we found that mutant spinal cord stem cells showed an increased proliferation and self-renewal rates although no effect on differentiation was observed. This effect was reversed by lentivirus-mediated re-introduction of OCAM. Mechanistically, we identified the ErbB2/Neu/HER2 protein as being implicated in the enhanced proliferation of mutant cells. ErbB2 protein expression and phosphorylation level were significantly increased in KO cells whereas no difference was observed at the mRNA level. Overexpression of ErbB2 in wild-type and mutant cells also increased their growth while reintroduction of OCAM in mutant cells reduced the level of phosphorylated ErbB2. These results indicate that OCAM exerts a posttranscriptional control on the ErbB2 signalling in spinal cord stem cells. This study adds further support for considering cell adhesion molecules as regulators of the ErbB signalling.

  19. Stem cell therapy in spinal cord injury: Hollow promise or promising science?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aimee Goel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injury (SCI remains one of the most physically, psychologically and socially debilitating conditions worldwide. While rehabilitation measures may help limit disability to some extent, there is no effective primary treatment yet available. The efficacy of stem cells as a primary therapeutic option in spinal cord injury is currently an area under much scrutiny and debate. Several laboratory and some primary clinical studies into the use of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells or embryonic stem cell-derived oligodentrocyte precursor cells have shown some promising results in terms of remyelination and regeneration of damaged spinal nerve tracts. More recently,laboratory and early clinical experiments into the use of Olfactory Ensheathing Cells, a type of glial cell derived from olfactory bulb and mucosa have provided some phenomenal preliminary evidence as to their neuroregenerative and neural bridging capacity. This report compares and evaluates some current research into selected forms of embryonic and mesenchymal stem cell therapy as well as olfactory ensheathing cell therapy in SCI, and also highlights some legal and ethical issues surrounding their use. While early results shows promise, more rigorous large scaleclinical trials are needed to shed light on the safety, efficacy and long term viability of stem cell and cellular transplant techniques in SCI.

  20. Effect of transplantation of olfactory ensheathing cell conditioned medium induced bone marrow stromal cells on rats with spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Linjie; Gan, Hongquan; Zhao, Wenguo; Liu, Yingjie

    2017-01-01

    Spinal cord injury is a serious threat to human health and various techniques have been deployed to ameliorate or cure its effects. Stem cells transplantation is one of the promising methods. The primary aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of the transplantation of olfactory ensheathing cell (OEC) conditioned medium-induced bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) on spinal cord injury. Rat spinal cord compression injury animal models were generated, and the rats divided into the following three groups: Group A, (control) Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium-treated group; group B, normal BMSC-treated group; group C, OEC conditioned medium-induced BMSC-treated group. The animals were sacrificed at 2, 4 and 8 weeks following transplantation for hematoxylin and eosin staining, and fluorescence staining of neurofilament protein, growth associated protein-43 and neuron-specific nuclear protein. The cavity area of the spinal cord injury was significantly reduced at 2 and 4 weeks following transplantation in group C, and a significant difference between the Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan score in group C and groups A and B was observed. Regenerated nerve fibers were observed in groups B and C; however, a greater number of regenerated nerve fibers were observed in group C. BMSCs induced by OEC conditioned medium survived in vivo, significantly reduced the cavity area of spinal cord injury, promoted nerve fiber regeneration following spinal cord injury and facilitated recovery of motor function. The present study demonstrated a novel method to repair spinal cord injury by using induced BMSCs, with satisfactory results. PMID:28656221

  1. Stem Cells and Hydrogel Bridges for the Treatment of Acute and Chronic Spinal Cord Injury

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Syková, Eva; Jendelová, Pavla; Hejčl, Aleš; Kozubenko, Nataliya; Amemori, Takashi

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 3 (2010), s. 366-366 ISSN 0963-6897. [Annual Meeting of the American-Society-for- Neural - Therapy - and -Repair /17./. 29.04.2010-01.05.2010, Clearwater Beach] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390703 Keywords : stem cells * chronic spinal cord Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  2. Engineering spinal fusion: evaluating ceramic materials for cell based tissue engineered approaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilson, C.E.

    2011-01-01

    The principal aim of this thesis was to advance the development of tissue engineered posterolateral spinal fusion by investigating the potential of calcium phosphate ceramic materials to support cell based tissue engineered bone formation. This was accomplished by developing several novel model

  3. Combination of autologous bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and cord blood mononuclear cells in the treatment of chronic thoracic spinal cord injury in 27 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lian-zhong WANG

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate and evaluate therapeutic effects of transplantation of autologous bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in conjunction with cord blood mononuclear cells for late thoracic spinal cord injury. Methods Data from 27 patients with late thoracic spinal cord injury who received transplantation of autologous bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in conjunction with cord blood mononuclear cells in Neurosurgery Department of 463rd Hospital of PLA between July 2006 and July 2008 were collected and analyzed. The full treatment course consisted of 4 consecutive injections at one week apart. Indicators for evaluation followed that of the American Spiral Injury Association (ASIA Impairment Scale (AIS grade, ASIA motor and sensory scores, ASIA visual analog score, and the Ashworth score. The follow-up period was 6 months. Evaluations were made 6 weeks and 6 months after the treatment. Results Improvement from AIS A to AIS B was found in 4 patients. In one patient, improvement from AIS A to AIS C and in one patient from AIS B to AIS C was found 6 weeks after the treatment. The AIS improvement rate was 22.2%. In one patient improvement from AIS A to AIS B was found after 6 months. The overall AIS improvement rate was 25.9%. ASIA baseline motor scores of lower extremties were 0.5±1.5, 1.7±2.9, 3.1±3.6 before the treatment, 6 weeks and 6 months after the treatment, respectively, and showed a statistically significant improvement (P < 0.05. ASIA sensory scores including light touch and pinprick were 66.6±13.7 and 67.0±13.6 respectively before treatment, and they became 68.8±14.4, 68.4±14.7 and 70.5±14.4, 70.2±14.4 six weeks and six months after the treatment. The changes were statistically significant (P < 0.05; Modified Ashworth Scale scores were 1.8±1.5, 1.6±1.2,1.1±0.8 respectively at baseline, 6 weeks and 6months after the treatment, and showed a statistically significant descending trend (P < 0.05. Conclusion Transplantation of

  4. Mesenchymal stem cells encapsulated into biomimetic hydrogel scaffold gradually release CCL2 chemokine in situ preserving cytoarchitecture and promoting functional recovery in spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papa, S; Vismara, I; Mariani, A; Barilani, M; Rimondo, S; De Paola, M; Panini, N; Erba, E; Mauri, E; Rossi, F; Forloni, G; Lazzari, L; Veglianese, P

    2018-04-03

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is an acute neurodegenerative disorder caused by traumatic damage of the spinal cord. The neuropathological evolution of the primary trauma involves multifactorial processes that exacerbate the pathology, worsening the neurodegeneration and limiting neuroregeneration. This complexity suggests that multi-therapeutic approaches, rather than any single treatment, might be more effective. Encouraging preclinical results indicate that stem cell-based treatments may improve the disease outcome due to their multi-therapeutic ability. Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs) are currently considered one of the most promising approaches. Significant improvement in the behavioral outcome after MSC treatment sustained by hydrogel has been demonstrated. However, it is still not known how hydrogel contribute to the delivery of factors secreted from MSCs and what factors are released in situ. Among different mediators secreted by MSCs after seeding into hydrogel, we have found CCL2 chemokine, which could account for the neuroprotective mechanisms of these cells. CCL2 secreted from human MSCs is delivered efficaciously in the lesioned spinal cord acting not only on recruitment of macrophages, but driving also their conversion to an M2 neuroprotective phenotype. Surprisingly, human CCL2 delivered also plays a key role in preventing motor neuron degeneration in vitro and after spinal cord trauma in vivo, with a significant improvement of the motor performance of the rodent SCI models. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of spinal cord injuries? play_arrow What does stem-cell research on animals tell us? play_arrow When can we expect stem-cell treatments to become available for spinal cord injuries? ...

  6. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... spinal cord injuries? play_arrow What does stem-cell research on animals tell us? play_arrow When can we expect stem-cell treatments to become available for spinal cord injuries? ...

  7. Lumbar Myeloid Cell Trafficking into Locomotor Networks after Thoracic Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Christopher N.; Norden, Diana M.; Faw, Timothy D.; Deibert, Rochelle; S.Wohleb, Eric; Sheridan, John F.; P.Godbout, Jonathan; Basso, D. Michele

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) promotes inflammation along the neuroaxis that jeopardizes plasticity, intrinsic repair and recovery. While inflammation at the injury site is well-established, less is known within remote spinal networks. The presence of bone marrow-derived immune (myeloid) cells in these areas may further impede functional recovery. Previously, high levels of the gelatinase, matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) occurred within the lumbar enlargement after thoracic SCI and impeded activity-dependent recovery. Since SCI-induced MMP-9 potentially increases vascular permeability, myeloid cell infiltration may drive inflammatory toxicity in locomotor networks. Therefore, we examined neurovascular reactivity and myeloid cell infiltration in the lumbar cord after thoracic SCI. We show evidence of region-specific recruitment of myeloid cells into the lumbar but not cervical region. Myeloid infiltration occurred with concomitant increases in chemoattractants (CCL2) and cell adhesion molecules (ICAM-1) around lumbar vasculature 24 hours and 7 days post injury. Bone marrow GFP chimeric mice established robust infiltration of bone marrow-derived myeloid cells into the lumbar gray matter 24 hours after SCI. This cell infiltration occurred when the blood-spinal cord barrier was intact, suggesting active recruitment across the endothelium. Myeloid cells persisted as ramified macrophages at 7 days post injury in parallel with increased inhibitory GAD67 labeling. Importantly, macrophage infiltration required MMP-9. PMID:27191729

  8. Deriving Dorsal Spinal Sensory Interneurons from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Gupta

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Cellular replacement therapies for neurological conditions use human embryonic stem cell (hESC- or induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC-derived neurons to replace damaged or diseased populations of neurons. For the spinal cord, significant progress has been made generating the in-vitro-derived motor neurons required to restore coordinated movement. However, there is as yet no protocol to generate in-vitro-derived sensory interneurons (INs, which permit perception of the environment. Here, we report on the development of a directed differentiation protocol to derive sensory INs for both hESCs and hiPSCs. Two developmentally relevant factors, retinoic acid in combination with bone morphogenetic protein 4, can be used to generate three classes of sensory INs: the proprioceptive dI1s, the dI2s, and mechanosensory dI3s. Critical to this protocol is the competence state of the neural progenitors, which changes over time. This protocol will facilitate developing cellular replacement therapies to reestablish sensory connections in injured patients. : In this article, Gupta and colleagues describe a robust protocol to derive spinal dorsal sensory interneurons from human pluripotent stem cells using the sequential addition of RA and BMP4. They find that neural progenitors must be in the correct competence state to respond to RA/BMP4 as dorsalizing signals. This competence state changes over time and determines the efficiency of the protocol. Keywords: spinal cord, neurons, sensory interneurons, proprioception, mechanosensation, human embryonic stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, directed differentiation, primate spinal cord, mouse spinal cord

  9. Transplantation of oligodendrocyte precursors and sonic hedgehog results in improved function and white matter sparing in the spinal cords of adult rats after contusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bambakidis, Nicholas C; Miller, Robert H

    2004-01-01

    A substantial cause of neurological disability in spinal cord injury is oligodendrocyte death leading to demyelination and axonal degeneration. Rescuing oligodendrocytes and preserving myelin is expected to result in significant improvement in functional outcome after spinal cord injury. Although previous investigators have used cellular transplantation of xenografted pluripotent embryonic stem cells and observed improved functional outcome, these transplants have required steroid administration and only a minority of these cells develop into oligodendrocytes. The objective of the present study was to determine whether allografts of oligodendrocyte precursors transplanted into an area of incomplete spinal cord contusion would improve behavioral and electrophysiological measures of spinal cord function. Additional treatment incorporated the use of the glycoprotein molecule Sonic hedgehog (Shh), which has been shown to play a critical role in oligodendroglial development and induce proliferation of endogenous neural precursors after spinal cord injury. Laboratory study. Moderate spinal cord contusion injury was produced in 39 adult rats at T9-T10. Ten animals died during the course of the study. Nine rats served as contusion controls (Group 1). Six rats were treated with oligodendrocyte precursor transplantation 5 days after injury (Group 2). The transplanted cells were isolated from newborn rat pups using immunopanning techniques. Another eight rats received an injection of recombinant Shh along with the oligodendrocyte precursors (Group 3), while six more rats were treated with Shh alone (Group 4). Eight additional rats received only T9 laminectomies to serve as noninjured controls (Group 0). Animals were followed for 28 days. After an initial complete hindlimb paralysis, rats of all groups receiving a contusive injury recovered substantial function within 1 week. By 28 days, rats in Groups 2 and 3 scored 4.7 and 5.8 points better on the Basso, Beattie, Bresnahan

  10. Improving self-efficacy in spinal cord injury patients through "design thinking" rehabilitation workshops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolstenholme, Daniel; Downes, Tom; Leaver, Jackie; Partridge, Rebecca; Langley, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Advances in surgical and medical management have significantly reduced the length of time that patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) have to stay in hospital, but has left patients with potentially less time to psychologically adjust. Following a pilot in 2012, this project was designed to test the effect of "design thinking" workshops on the self-efficacy of people undergoing rehabilitation following spinal injuries. Design thinking is about understanding the approaches and methods that designers use and then applying these to think creatively about problems and suggest ways to solve them. In this instance, design thinking is not about designing new products (although the approaches can be used to do this) but about developing a long term creative and explorative mind-set through skills such as lateral thinking, prototyping and verbal and visual communication. The principles of "design thinking" have underpinned design education and practice for many years, it is also recognised in business and innovation for example, but a literature review indicated that there was no evidence of it being used in rehabilitation or spinal injury settings. Twenty participants took part in the study; 13 (65%) were male and the average age was 37 years (range 16 to 72). Statistically significant improvements were seen for EQ-5D score (t = -3.13, p = 0.007) and Patient Activation Measure score (t = -3.85, p = 0.001). Other outcome measures improved but not statistically. There were no statistical effects on length of stay or readmission rates, but qualitative interviews indicated improved patient experience.

  11. Detailed analysis of the clinical effects of cell therapy for thoracolumbar spinal cord injury: an original study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma A

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Alok Sharma,1 Nandini Gokulchandran,1 Hemangi Sane,2 Prerna Badhe,1 Pooja Kulkarni,2 Mamta Lohia,3 Anjana Nagrajan,3 Nancy Thomas3 1Department of Medical Services and Clinical Research, 2Department of Research and Development, 3Department of Neurorehabilitation, NeuroGen Brain and Spine Institute, Surana Sethia Hospital and Research Centre, Chembur, Mumbai, India Background: Cell therapy is amongst the most promising treatment strategies in spinal cord injury (SCI because it focuses on repair. There are many published animal studies and a few human trials showing remarkable results with various cell types. The level of SCI determines whether paraplegia or quadriplegia is present, and greatly influences recovery. The purpose of this study was to determine the significance of the clinical effects and long-term safety of intrathecal administration of autologous bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells, along with changes in functional independence and quality of life in patients with thoracolumbar SCI. Methods: We undertook a retrospective analysis of a clinical study in which a nonrandomized sample of 110 patients with thoracolumbar SCI underwent autologous bone marrow-derived mononuclear cell transplantation intrathecally and subsequent neurorehabilitation, with a mean follow-up of 2 years ± 1 month. Changes on any parameters were recorded at follow-up. The data were analyzed using the Wilcoxon's signed-rank test and McNemar's test. Functional Independence Measure and American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA scores were recorded, and a detailed neurological assessment was performed. Results: Overall improvement was seen in 91% of patients, including reduction in spasticity, partial sensory recovery, and improvement in trunk control, postural hypotension, bladder management, mobility, activities of daily living, and functional independence. A significant association of these symptomatic improvements with the cell therapy intervention was established

  12. Open Access Platforms in Spinal Cord Injury: Existing Clinical Trial Data to Predict and Improve Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, John L K; Geisler, Fred; Ramer, Leanne; Plunet, Ward; Cragg, Jacquelyn J

    2017-05-01

    Recovery from acute spinal cord injury (SCI) is characterized by extensive heterogeneity, resulting in uncertain prognosis. Reliable prediction of recovery in the acute phase benefits patients and their families directly, as well as improves the likelihood of detecting efficacy in clinical trials. This issue of heterogeneity is not unique to SCI. In fields such as traumatic brain injury, Parkinson's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, one approach to understand variability in recovery has been to make clinical trial data widely available to the greater research community. We contend that the SCI community should adopt a similar approach in providing open access clinical trial data.

  13. Self-Assembling Peptide Nanofiber Scaffold Enhanced with RhoA Inhibitor CT04 Improves Axonal Regrowth in the Transected Spinal Cord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwei Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was designed to explore the therapeutic potential of self-assembling peptide nanofiber scaffold (SAPNS delivered RhoA inhibitor to ameliorate the hostile microenvironment of injured spinal cord for axonal regeneration. After a transection was applied to the thoracic spinal cord of mice, the combination of SAPNS and CT04 (a cell permeable RhoA inhibitor, single SAPNS with vehicle, or saline was transplanted into the lesion cavity. Results showed that SAPNS+CT04 implants achieved the best therapeutic outcomes among treatment groups. The novel combination not only reconstructed the injured nerve gap but also elicited significant axonal regeneration and motor functional recovery. Additionally, the combination also effectively reduced the apoptosis and infiltration of activated macrophages in the injured spinal cord. Collectively, the present study demonstrated that SAPNS-based delivery of RhoA inhibitor CT04 presented a highly potential therapeutic strategy for spinal cord injury with reknitting lesion gap, attenuating secondary injury, and improving axonal regrowth.

  14. Self-Assembling Peptide Nanofiber Scaffold Enhanced with RhoA Inhibitor CT04 Improves Axonal Regrowth in the Transected Spinal Cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiwei, Z.; Xiaoduo, Z.; Zhongying, L.

    2012-01-01

    The present study was designed to explore the therapeutic potential of self-assembling peptide nano fiber scaffold (SAPNS) delivered RhoA inhibitor to ameliorate the hostile microenvironment of injured spinal cord for axonal regeneration. After a transection was applied to the thoracic spinal cord of mice, the combination of SAPNS and CT04 (a cell permeable RhoA inhibitor), single SAPNS with vehicle, or saline was transplanted into the lesion cavity. Results showed that SAPNS+CT04 implants achieved the best therapeutic outcomes among treatment groups. The novel combination not only reconstructed the injured nerve gap but also elicited significant axonal regeneration and motor functional recovery. Additionally, the combination also effectively reduced the apoptosis and infiltration of activated macrophages in the injured spinal cord. Collectively, the present study demonstrated that SAPNS-based delivery of RhoA inhibitor CT04 presented a highly potential therapeutic strategy for spinal cord injury with reknitting lesion gap, attenuating secondary injury, and improving axonal regrowth.

  15. Transplantation of neurotrophin-3-transfected bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells for the repair of spinal cord injury

    OpenAIRE

    Dong, Yuzhen; Yang, Libin; Yang, Lin; Zhao, Hongxing; Zhang, Chao; Wu, Dapeng

    2014-01-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation has been shown to be therapeutic in the repair of spinal cord injury. However, the low survival rate of transplanted bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in vivo remains a problem. Neurotrophin-3 promotes motor neuron survival and it is hypothesized that its transfection can enhance the therapeutic effect. We show that in vitro transfection of neurotrophin-3 gene increases the number of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in the region of spinal ...

  16. Spinal cord injury in rats: inability of nimodipine or anti-neutrophil serum to improve spinal cord blood flow or neurologic status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holtz, A.; Nystroem, B.; Gerdin, B.

    1989-01-01

    The role of a calcium-mediated increase in vascular resistance and of vascular damage caused by polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNLs) in the development of neurologic deficit and disturbance of spinal cord circulation following spinal cord compression was studied in the rat. Spinal cord injury was induced by 5 min of compression with a load of 35 g on a 2.2 x 5.0 mm compression plate. This caused transient paraparesis. The rats received either the calcium receptor antagonist nimodipine or an anti-rat neutrophil serum (ANS). Nimodipine was infused i.v. for 4 h in an amount of 1.5 μg/kg/min starting 60 min after trauma. The number of circulating PMNLs was depleted by intraperiotoneal injection of an ANS raised in sheep given 12 h before trauma. This caused a reduction to about 2% of the pre-ANS value. Controls received saline or normal sheep serum. The motor performance was assessed daily on the inclined plane. On day one, the day after injury, the capacity angle had decreased from about 63 deg. preoperatively to close to 32 deg. in the experimental groups. There was then a slow improvement in both the control and experimental groups and on day 4 the capacity angle was close to 43 deg. in all 3 groups. Spinal cord blood flow, as measured with the 14 C-iodoantipyrine autoradiography method, was similar in all groups on day 4. As neither the neurologic dysfunction nor the spinal cord blood flow was affected by post-trauma treatment with nimodipine or pretreatment with ANS, the possibility that calcium-mediated vasoconstriction or PMNLs play a role in the development of posttraumatic neuroligic disability was not supported by this study. (author)

  17. A case of recurrent breast cancer with intramedullary spinal cord metastasis and symptomatic improvement by Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakahara, Makoto; Hosoya, Keiko; Hirooka, Yumi

    2017-01-01

    A 65-year-old woman underwent surgery for right breast cancer (TIN1aM0) in December 2005. In March 2011, the breast cancer recurred with multiple lung and lymph node metastases. In February 2013, because of multiple brain metastases whole-brain radiation therapy was performed. In January 2014, she developed paralysis of the left leg. Spinal cord magnetic resonance imaging revealed a mass lesion (Th12 to L1 level) in the spinal cord, and she was diagnosed with intramedullary spinal cord metastasis (ISCM) from the breast cancer. Spinal cord irradiation reduced the metastasis and improved her paralysis. Although pharmacotherapy was continued, her metastases, with the exception of ISCM, progressed and she died of the disease in November 2014. It is necessary to diagnose ISCM at the time of its onset. Additionally immediate therapeutic intervention can significantly reduce the volume of ISCM, resulting in symptomatic relief from neurological deficit; in this case, radiation therapy was effective. (author)

  18. Low-energy extracorporeal shock wave therapy for promotion of vascular endothelial growth factor expression and angiogenesis and improvement of locomotor and sensory functions after spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahata, Kenichiro; Kanno, Haruo; Ozawa, Hiroshi; Yamaya, Seiji; Tateda, Satoshi; Ito, Kenta; Shimokawa, Hiroaki; Itoi, Eiji

    2016-12-01

    OBJECTIVE Extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) is widely used to treat various human diseases. Low-energy ESWT increases expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in cultured endothelial cells. The VEGF stimulates not only endothelial cells to promote angiogenesis but also neural cells to induce neuroprotective effects. A previous study by these authors demonstrated that low-energy ESWT promoted expression of VEGF in damaged neural tissue and improved locomotor function after spinal cord injury (SCI). However, the neuroprotective mechanisms in the injured spinal cord produced by low-energy ESWT are still unknown. In the present study, the authors investigated the cell specificity of VEGF expression in injured spinal cords and angiogenesis induced by low-energy ESWT. They also examined the neuroprotective effects of low-energy ESWT on cell death, axonal damage, and white matter sparing as well as the therapeutic effect for improvement of sensory function following SCI. METHODS Adult female Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into the SCI group (SCI only) and SCI-SW group (low-energy ESWT applied after SCI). Thoracic SCI was produced using a New York University Impactor. Low-energy ESWT was applied to the injured spinal cord 3 times a week for 3 weeks after SCI. Locomotor function was evaluated using the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan open-field locomotor score for 42 days after SCI. Mechanical and thermal allodynia in the hindpaw were evaluated for 42 days. Double staining for VEGF and various cell-type markers (NeuN, GFAP, and Olig2) was performed at Day 7; TUNEL staining was also performed at Day 7. Immunohistochemical staining for CD31, α-SMA, and 5-HT was performed on spinal cord sections taken 42 days after SCI. Luxol fast blue staining was performed at Day 42. RESULTS Low-energy ESWT significantly improved not only locomotion but also mechanical and thermal allodynia following SCI. In the double staining, expression of VEGF was observed in Neu

  19. Connexin 50 Expression in Ependymal Stem Progenitor Cells after Spinal Cord Injury Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Javier Rodriguez-Jimenez

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Ion channels included in the family of Connexins (Cx help to control cell proliferation and differentiation of neuronal progenitors. Here we explored the role of Connexin 50 (Cx50 in cell fate modulation of adult spinal cord derived neural precursors located in the ependymal canal (epSPC. epSPC from non-injured animals showed high expression levels of Cx50 compared to epSPC from animals with spinal cord injury (SCI (epSPCi. When epSPC or epSPCi were induced to spontaneously differentiate in vitro we found that Cx50 favors glial cell fate, since higher expression levels, endogenous or by over-expression of Cx50, augmented the expression of the astrocyte marker GFAP and impaired the neuronal marker Tuj1. Cx50 was found in both the cytoplasm and nucleus of glial cells, astrocytes and oligodendrocyte-derived cells. Similar expression patterns were found in primary cultures of mature astrocytes. In addition, opposite expression profile for nuclear Cx50 was observed when epSPC and activated epSPCi were conducted to differentiate into mature oligodendrocytes, suggesting a different role for this ion channel in spinal cord beyond cell-to-cell communication. In vivo detection of Cx50 by immunohistochemistry showed a defined location in gray matter in non-injured tissues and at the epicenter of the injury after SCI. epSPCi transplantation, which accelerates locomotion regeneration by a neuroprotective effect after acute SCI is associated with a lower signal of Cx50 within the injured area, suggesting a minor or detrimental contribution of this ion channel in spinal cord regeneration by activated epSPCi.

  20. In vivo tracking of neuronal-like cells by magnetic resonance in rabbit models of spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruiping; Zhang, Kun; Li, Jianding; Liu, Qiang; Xie, Jun

    2013-01-01

    In vitro experiments have demonstrated that neuronal-like cells derived from bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells can survive, migrate, integrate and help to restore the function and behaviors of spinal cord injury models, and that they may serve as a suitable approach to treating spinal cord injury. However, it is very difficult to track transplanted cells in vivo. In this study, we injected superparamagnetic iron oxide-labeled neuronal-like cells into the subarachnoid space in a rabbit model of spinal cord injury. At 7 days after cell transplantation, a small number of dot-shaped low signal intensity shadows were observed in the spinal cord injury region, and at 14 days, the number of these shadows increased on T2-weighted imaging. Perl's Prussian blue staining detected dot-shaped low signal intensity shadows in the spinal cord injury region, indicative of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle-labeled cells. These findings suggest that transplanted neuronal-like cells derived from bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells can migrate to the spinal cord injury region and can be tracked by magnetic resonance in vivo. Magnetic resonance imaging represents an efficient noninvasive technique for visually tracking transplanted cells in vivo. PMID:25206659

  1. Functional Outcomes in Individuals Undergoing Very Early (Spinal Cord Injury: Analysis of Neurological Improvement from the Austrian Spinal Cord Injury Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattiassich, Georg; Gollwitzer, Maria; Gaderer, Franz; Blocher, Martina; Osti, Michael; Lill, Markkus; Ortmaier, Reinhold; Haider, Thomas; Hitzl, Wolfgang; Resch, Herbert; Aschauer-Wallner, Stephanie

    2017-12-15

    Our study aim was to assess the neurological outcomes of surgical decompression and stabilization within 5 and 24 h after injury. We performed a multi-center, retrospective cohort study in adolescents and adults 15-85 years of age presenting cervical spinal cord injury (CSCI) at one of 6 Austrian trauma centers participating in the Austrian Spinal Cord Injury Study (ASCIS). Neurological outcomes were measured using the American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale (AIS) grade according to the International Standards For Neurological Classification Of Spinal Cord Injury (ISNCSCI) form after at least 6 months of follow-up (FU). Of the 49 enrolled patients with acute CSCI, 33 underwent surgical decompression within 5 h (mean 3.2 h ± 1.1 h; very early group) after injury, and 16 underwent surgical decompression between 5 and 24 h (mean 8.6 h ± 5.5 h; early group). Significant neurological improvement was observed among the entire study population between the preoperative assessment and the FU. We identified a significant difference in the AIS grade at the last FU between the groups the using Jonckheere-Terpstra test for doubly ordered crosstabs (p = 0.011) and significantly different AIS improvement rates in the early group (Poisson model, p = 0.018). Improvement by one AIS grade was observed in 31% and 42% of the patients in the early and very early groups, respectively (p = 0.54). Improvement by two AIS grades was observed in 31% and 6% of the patients in the early and very early groups, respectively (p = 0.03; relative risk [RR], 5.2; 95% CI, 1.1-35). Improvement by three AIS grades was observed in 6% and 3% of patients in the early and very early groups, respectively (p = 1.0). Decompression of the spinal cord within 24 h after SCI was associated with an improved neurological outcome. No additional neurological benefit was observed in patients who underwent decompression within 5 h of injury.

  2. Lower Limb Voluntary Movement Improvement Following a Robot-Assisted Locomotor Training in Spinal Cord Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirbagheri Mehdi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI suffer from severe impairments in voluntary movements. Literature reports a reduction in major kinematic and kinetic parameters of lower limbs’ joints. A body weight support treadmill training with robotic assistance has been widely used to improve lower-extremity function and locomotion in persons with SCI. Our objective was to explore the effects of 4-weeks robot-assisted locomotor training on voluntary movement of the ankle musculature in patients with incomplete SCI. In particular, we aimed to characterize the therapeutic effects of Lokomat training on kinematic measures (range of motion, velocity, smoothness during a dorsiflexion movement. We hypothesized that training would improve these measures. Preliminary results show an improvement of kinematic parameters during ankle dorsiflexion voluntary movement after a 4-weeks training in the major part of our participants. Complementary investigations are in progress to confirm these results and understand underlying mechanisms associated with the recovery.

  3. Electroacupuncture improves gait locomotion, H-reflex and ventral root potentials of spinal compression injured rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar-Corona, Carlos; Torres-Castillo, Sergio; Rodríguez-Torres, Erika Elizabeth; Segura-Alegría, Bertha; Jiménez-Estrada, Ismael; Quiroz-González, Salvador

    2017-05-01

    This study explored the effect of electroacupuncture stimulation (EA) on alterations in the Hoffman reflex (H-reflex) response and gait locomotion provoked by spinal cord injury (SCI) in the rat. A compression lesion of the spinal cord was evoked by insufflating a Fogarty balloon located in the epidural space at the T8-9 spinal level of adult Wistar male rats (200-250 gr; n=60). In different groups of SCI rats, EA (frequencies: 2, 50 and 100Hz) was applied simultaneously to Huantiao (GB30), Yinmen (BL37), Jizhong (GV6) and Zhiyang (GV9) acupoints from the third post-injury day until the experimental session. At 1, 2, 3 and 4 post-injury weeks, the BBB scores of the SCI group of rats treated with EA at 50Hz showed a gradual but greater enhancement of locomotor activity than the other groups of rats. Unrestrained gait kinematic analysis of SCI rats treated with EA-50Hz stimulation showed a significant improvement in stride duration, length and speed (p<0.05), whereas a discrete recovery of gait locomotion was observed in the other groups of animals. After four post-injury weeks, the H-reflex amplitude and H-reflex/M wave amplitude ratio obtained in SCI rats had a noticeable enhancement (217%) compared to sham rats (n=10). Meanwhile, SCI rats treated with EA at 50Hz manifested a decreased facilitation of the H-reflex amplitude and H/M amplitude ratio (154%) and a reduced frequency-dependent amplitude depression of the H-reflex (66%). In addition, 50 Hz-EA treatment induced a recovery of the presynaptic depression of the Gs-VRP evoked by PBSt conditioning stimulation in the SCI rat (63.2±8.1%; n=9). In concordance with the latter, it could be suggested that 50 Hz-EA stimulation reduced the hyper-excitability of motoneurons and provokes a partial improvement of the locomotive performance and H reflex responses by a possible recovery of presynaptic mechanisms in the spinal cord of experimentally injured rats. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Melatonin Inhibits Neural Cell Apoptosis and Promotes Locomotor Recovery via Activation of the Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling Pathway After Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Zhaoliang; Zhou, Zipeng; Gao, Shuang; Guo, Yue; Gao, Kai; Wang, Haoyu; Dang, Xiaoqian

    2017-08-01

    The spinal cord is highly sensitive to spinal cord injury (SCI) by external mechanical damage, resulting in irreversible neurological damage. Activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway can effectively reduce apoptosis and protect against SCI. Melatonin, an indoleamine originally isolated from bovine pineal tissue, exerts neuroprotective effects after SCI through activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. In this study, we demonstrated that melatonin exhibited neuroprotective effects on neuronal apoptosis and supported functional recovery in a rat SCI model by activating the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. We found that melatonin administration after SCI significantly upregulated the expression of low-density lipoprotein receptor related protein 6 phosphorylation (p-LRP-6), lymphoid enhancer factor-1 (LEF-1) and β-catenin protein in the spinal cord. Melatonin enhanced motor neuronal survival in the spinal cord ventral horn and improved the locomotor functions of rats after SCI. Melatonin administration after SCI also reduced the expression levels of Bax and cleaved caspase-3 in the spinal cord and the proportion of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick end labeling (TUNEL) positive cells, but increased the expression level of Bcl-2. These results suggest that melatonin attenuated SCI by activating the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway.

  5. Beneficial Effects of Melatonin Combined with Exercise on Endogenous Neural Stem/Progenitor Cells Proliferation after Spinal Cord Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngjeon Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Endogenous neural stem/progenitor cells (eNSPCs proliferate and differentiate into neurons and glial cells after spinal cord injury (SCI. We have previously shown that melatonin (MT plus exercise (Ex had a synergistic effect on functional recovery after SCI. Thus, we hypothesized that combined therapy including melatonin and exercise might exert a beneficial effect on eNSPCs after SCI. Melatonin was administered twice a day and exercise was performed on a treadmill for 15 min, six days per week for 3 weeks after SCI. Immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR analysis were used to determine cell population for late response, in conjunction with histological examination and motor function test. There was marked improvement in hindlimb function in SCI+MT+Ex group at day 14 and 21 after injury, as documented by the reduced size of the spinal lesion and a higher density of dendritic spines and axons; such functional improvements were associated with increased numbers of BrdU-positive cells. Furthermore, MAP2 was increased in the injured thoracic segment, while GFAP was increased in the cervical segment, along with elevated numbers of BrdU-positive nestin-expressing eNSPCs in the SCI+MT+Ex group. The dendritic spine density was augmented markedly in SCI+MT and SCI+MT+Ex groups.These results suggest a synergistic effect of SCI+MT+Ex might create a microenvironment to facilitate proliferation of eNSPCs to effectively replace injured cells and to improve regeneration in SCI.

  6. Combined effects of rat Schwann cells and 17β-estradiol in a spinal cord injury model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namjoo, Zeinab; Moradi, Fateme; Aryanpour, Roya; Piryaei, Abbas; Joghataei, Mohammad Taghi; Abbasi, Yusef; Hosseini, Amir; Hassanzadeh, Sajad; Taklimie, Fatemeh Ranjbar; Beyer, Cordian; Zendedel, Adib

    2018-04-15

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating traumatic event which burdens the affected individuals and the health system. Schwann cell (SC) transplantation is a promising repair strategy after SCI. However, a large number of SCs do not survive following transplantation. Previous studies demonstrated that 17β-estradiol (E2) protects different cell types and reduces tissue damage in SCI experimental animal model. In the current study, we evaluated the protective potential of E2 on SCs in vitro and investigated whether the combination of hormonal and SC therapeutic strategy has a better effect on the outcome after SCI. Primary SC cultures were incubated with E2 for 72 h. In a subsequent experiment, thoracic contusion SCI was induced in male rats followed by sustained administration of E2 or vehicle. Eight days after SCI, DiI-labeled SCs were transplanted into the injury epicenter in vehicle and E2-treated animals. The combinatory regimen decreased neurological and behavioral deficits and protected neurons and oligodendrocytes in comparison to vehicle rats. Moreover, E2 and SC significantly decreased the number of Iba-1+ (microglia) and GFAP + cells (astrocyte) in the SCI group. In addition, we found a significant reduction of mitochondrial fission-markers (Fis1) and an increase of fusion-markers (Mfn1 and Mfn2) in the injured spinal cord after E2 and SC treatment. These data demonstrated that E2 protects SCs against hypoxia-induced SCI and improves the survival of transplanted SCs.

  7. Transplantation of neurotrophin-3-transfected bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells for the repair of spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yuzhen; Yang, Libin; Yang, Lin; Zhao, Hongxing; Zhang, Chao; Wu, Dapeng

    2014-08-15

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation has been shown to be therapeutic in the repair of spinal cord injury. However, the low survival rate of transplanted bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in vivo remains a problem. Neurotrophin-3 promotes motor neuron survival and it is hypothesized that its transfection can enhance the therapeutic effect. We show that in vitro transfection of neurotrophin-3 gene increases the number of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in the region of spinal cord injury. These results indicate that neurotrophin-3 can promote the survival of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells transplanted into the region of spinal cord injury and potentially enhance the therapeutic effect in the repair of spinal cord injury.

  8. Nestin- and doublecortin-positive cells reside in adult spinal cord meninges and participate in injury-induced parenchymal reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decimo, Ilaria; Bifari, Francesco; Rodriguez, Francisco Javier; Malpeli, Giorgio; Dolci, Sissi; Lavarini, Valentina; Pretto, Silvia; Vasquez, Sandra; Sciancalepore, Marina; Montalbano, Alberto; Berton, Valeria; Krampera, Mauro; Fumagalli, Guido

    2011-12-01

    Adult spinal cord has little regenerative potential, thus limiting patient recovery following injury. In this study, we describe a new population of cells resident in the adult rat spinal cord meninges that express the neural stem/precursor markers nestin and doublecortin. Furthermore, from dissociated meningeal tissue a neural stem cell population was cultured in vitro and subsequently shown to differentiate into functional neurons or mature oligodendrocytes. Proliferation rate and number of nestin- and doublecortin-positive cells increased in vivo in meninges following spinal cord injury. By using a lentivirus-labeling approach, we show that meningeal cells, including nestin- and doublecortin-positive cells, migrate in the spinal cord parenchyma and contribute to the glial scar formation. Our data emphasize the multiple roles of meninges in the reaction of the parenchyma to trauma and indicate for the first time that spinal cord meninges are potential niches harboring stem/precursor cells that can be activated by injury. Meninges may be considered as a new source of adult stem/precursor cells to be further tested for use in regenerative medicine applied to neurological disorders, including repair from spinal cord injury. Copyright © 2011 AlphaMed Press.

  9. Adeno-associated viral vector-mediated neurotrophin gene transfer in the injured adult rat spinal cord improves hind-limb function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blits, B; Oudega, M.; Boer, G J; Bartlett Bunge, M; Verhaagen, J

    2003-01-01

    To foster axonal growth from a Schwann cell bridge into the caudal spinal cord, spinal cells caudal to the implant were transduced with adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors encoding for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin-3 (AAV-NT-3). Control rats received AAV vectors encoding

  10. Management of Spinal Metastases From Renal Cell Carcinoma Using Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Quynh-Nhu; Shiu, Almon S.; Rhines, Laurence D.; Wang He; Allen, Pamela K.; Wang, Xin Shelley; Chang, Eric L.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcomes associated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in the management of spinal metastases from renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Methods and Materials: SBRT was used in the treatment of patients with spinal metastases from RCC. Patients received either 24 Gy in a single fraction, 27 Gy in three fractions, or 30 Gy delivered in five fractions. Effectiveness of SBRT with respect to tumor control and palliation of pain was assessed using patient-reported outcomes. Results: A total of 48 patients with 55 spinal metastases were treated with SBRT with a median follow-up time of 13.1 months (range, 3.3-54.5 months). The actuarial 1-year spine tumor progression free survival was 82.1%. At pretreatment baseline, 23% patients were pain free; at 1 month and 12 months post-SBRT, 44% and 52% patients were pain free, respectively. No Grade 3-4 neurologic toxicity was observed. Conclusions: The data support SBRT as a safe and effective treatment modality that can be used to achieve good tumor control and palliation of pain associated with RCC spinal metastases. Further evaluation with randomized trials comparing SBRT to conventional radiotherapy may be warranted.

  11. Implantable porous gelatin microspheres sustained release of bFGF and improved its neuroprotective effect on rats after spinal cord injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Lan

    Full Text Available In this study, porous gelatin microspheres (GMSs were constructed to improve the neuroprotective effect of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF on spinal cord injury. GMSs were prepared by a W/O emulsion template, followed by cross-linking, washing and drying. The particle sizes and surface porosity of the blank GMSs were carefully characterized by scan electronic microscopy. The blank GMSs have a mean particle size of 35μm and theirs surface was coarse and porous. bFGF was easily encapsulated inside the bulk GMSs through diffusion along the porous channel. 200μg of bFGF was completely encapsulated in 100mg of GMSs. The bFGF-loaded GMSs displayed a continuous drug release pattern without an obvious burst release over two weeks in vitro. Moreover, the therapeutic effects of bFGF-loaded GMSs were also evaluated in spinal cord injury rat model. After implantation of bFGF-loaded GMSs, the recovery of the motor function of SCI rats were evaluated by behavioral score and foot print experiment. The motor function of SCI rats treated with bFGF-loaded GMSs was more obvious than that treated with free bFGF solution (P<0.05. At the 28th days after treatment, rats were sacrificed and the injured spinal were removed for histopathological and apoptosis examination. Compared with treatment with free bFGF solution, treatment with bFGF-loaded GMSs resulted in a less necrosis, less infiltration of leukocytes, and a reduced the cavity ratio and less apoptotic cells in injured spinal(P<0.01, indicating its better therapeutic effect. Implantable porous GMSs may be a potential carrier to deliver bFGF for therapy of spinal cord injury.

  12. MeHg Developing Exposure Causes DNA Double-Strand Breaks and Elicits Cell Cycle Arrest in Spinal Cord Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana F. Ferreira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The neurotoxicity caused by methylmercury (MeHg is well documented; however, the developmental neurotoxicity in spinal cord is still not fully understood. Here we investigated whether MeHg affects the spinal cord layers development. Chicken embryos at E3 were treated in ovo with 0.1 μg MeHg/50 μL saline solution and analyzed at E10. Thus, we performed immunostaining using anti-γ-H2A.X to recognize DNA double-strand breaks and antiphosphohistone H3, anti-p21, and anti-cyclin E to identify cells in proliferation and cell cycle proteins. Also, to identify neuronal cells, we used anti-NeuN and anti-βIII-tubulin antibodies. After the MeHg treatment, we observed the increase on γ-H2A.X in response to DNA damage. MeHg caused a decrease in the proliferating cells and in the thickness of spinal cord layers. Moreover, we verified that MeHg induced an increase in the number of p21-positive cells but did not change the cyclin E-positive cells. A significantly high number of TUNEL-positive cells indicating DNA fragmentation were observed in MeHg-treated embryos. Regarding the neuronal differentiation, MeHg induced a decrease in NeuN expression and did not change the expression of βIII-tubulin. These results showed that in ovo MeHg exposure alters spinal cord development by disturbing the cell proliferation and death, also interfering in early neuronal differentiation.

  13. Factors affecting directional migration of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells to the injured spinal cord

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Peng; Pan, Su; Cheng, Jieping; Yang, Maoguang; Qi, Zhiping; Hou, Tingting; Yang, Xiaoyu

    2014-01-01

    Microtubule-associated protein 1B plays an important role in axon guidance and neuronal migration. In the present study, we sought to discover the mechanisms underlying microtubule-associated protein 1B mediation of axon guidance and neuronal migration. We exposed bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells to okadaic acid or N-acetyl-D-erythro-sphingosine (an inhibitor and stimulator, respectively, of protein phosphatase 2A) for 24 hours. The expression of the phosphorylated form of type I microtubule-associated protein 1B in the cells was greater after exposure to okadaic acid and lower after N-acetyl-D-erythro-sphingosine. We then injected the bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells through the ear vein into rabbit models of spinal cord contusion. The migration of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells towards the injured spinal cord was poorer in cells exposed to okadaic acid- and N-acetyl-D-erythro-sphingosine than in non-treated bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. Finally, we blocked phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) pathways in rabbit bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells using the inhibitors LY294002 and U0126, respectively. LY294002 resulted in an elevated expression of phosphorylated type I microtubule-associated protein 1B, whereas U0126 caused a reduction in expression. The present data indicate that PI3K and ERK1/2 in bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells modulate the phosphorylation of microtubule-associated protein 1B via a cross-signaling network, and affect the migratory efficiency of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells towards injured spinal cord. PMID:25374590

  14. Mesenchymal stem cells promote augmented response of endogenous neural stem cells in spinal cord injury of rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Rocha Araujo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic spinal cord injury results in severe neurological deficits, mostly irreversible. The cell therapy represents a strategy for treatment particularly with the use of stem cells with satisfactory results in several experimental models. The aim of the study was to compare the treatment of spinal cord injury (SCI with and without mesenchymal stem cells (MSC, to investigate whether MSCs migrate and/or remain at the site of injury, and to analyze the effects of MSCs on inflammation, astrocytic reactivity and activation of endogenous stem cells. Three hours after SCI, animals received bone marrow-derived MSCs (1×107 in 1mL PBS, IV. Animals were euthanized 24 hours, 7 and 21 days post-injury. The MSC were not present in the site of the lesion and the immunofluorescent evaluation showed significant attenuation of inflammatory response with reduction in macrophages labeled with anti-CD68 antibody (ED1, decreased immunoreactivity of astrocytes (GFAP+ and greater activation of endogenous stem cells (nestin+ in the treated groups. Therefore, cell transplantation have a positive effect on recovery from traumatic spinal cord injury possibly due to the potential of MSCs to attenuate the immune response.

  15. The occult nature of intramedullary spinal cord metastases from renal cell carcinoma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Zakaria, Zaitun

    2012-01-01

    Renal cell carcinomas (RCC) are characterised by a tendency to metastasise widely, often while remaining occult. Intramedullary spinal cord metastases (ISCM) from RCC may be the presenting feature of the disease or present at any time in the disease course. This case report discusses an ISCM from RCC which became manifested at the time of resection of the primary tumour. We review the literature published on ISCM from RCC from 1990 to date comparing disease characteristics and presentations.

  16. Biocompatible macroporous scaffolds can serve as stem cell carriers for the treatment of spinal cord injury

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jendelová, Pavla; Hejčl, Aleš; Amemori, Takashi; Lesný, Petr; Michálek, Jiří; Přádný, Martin; Syková, Eva

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 5 (2008), s. 704-704 ISSN 1937-3341. [Annual Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine International Society European Chapter Meeting. 22.06.2008-26.06.2008, Porto] R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0538; GA ČR GA309/06/1246 Grant - others:GA MZd(CZ) 1A8697 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390703 Keywords : Stem Cell * Spinal cord Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  17. Spinal cord compression caused by anaplastic large cell lymphoma in an HIV infected individual

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Susheel

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Lymphomas occur with an increased frequency in patients with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV infection. These are usually high-grade immunoblastic lymphomas and primary central nervous system lymphomas. Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL is a distinct type of non-Hodgkin′s lymphoma. It is uncommon in HIV infected individuals. We describe here an uncommon presentation of this relatively rare lymphoma in the form of spinal cord compression syndrome in a young HIV infected individual.

  18. High-speed video analysis improves the accuracy of spinal cord compression measurement in a mouse contusion model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournely, Marion; Petit, Yvan; Wagnac, Éric; Laurin, Jérôme; Callot, Virginie; Arnoux, Pierre-Jean

    2018-01-01

    Animal models of spinal cord injuries aim to utilize controlled and reproducible conditions. However, a literature review reveals that mouse contusion studies using equivalent protocols may show large disparities in the observed impact force vs. cord compression relationship. The overall purpose of this study was to investigate possible sources of bias in these measurements. The specific objective was to improve spinal cord compression measurements using a video-based setup to detect the impactor-spinal cord time-to-contact. A force-controlled 30kDyn unilateral contusion at C4 vertebral level was performed in six mice with the Infinite Horizon impactor (IH). High-speed video was used to determine the time-to-contact between the impactor tip and the spinal cord and to compute the related displacement of the tip into the tissue: the spinal cord compression and the compression ratio. Delayed time-to-contact detection with the IH device led to an underestimation of the cord compression. Compression values indicated by the IH were 64% lower than those based on video analysis (0.33mm vs. 0.88mm). Consequently, the mean compression ratio derived from the device was underestimated when compared to the value derived from video analysis (22% vs. 61%). Default time-to-contact detection from the IH led to significant errors in spinal cord compression assessment. Accordingly, this may explain some of the reported data discrepancies in the literature. The proposed setup could be implemented by users of contusion devices to improve the quantative description of the primary injury inflicted to the spinal cord. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Production of dopamine by aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase cells after spinal cord injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ren, Liqun; Wienecke, Jacob; Hultborn, Hans

    2016-01-01

    adopted as we used previously (Wienecke et al., J. Neurosci. 34, 11984, 2014). In the chronic SCI rats (> 45d), no AADC cells expressed DA if there was no exogenous L-dopa application. However, following administration of a peripheral AADC inhibitor (carbidopa) with or without a monoamine oxidase...... inhibitor (pargyline) co-application, systemic administration of L-dopa resulted in ~ 94% of AADC cells to become DA-immunopositive in the spinal cord below the lesion, whereas in normal or sham-operated rats none or very few of AADC cells became DA-immunopositive with the same treatment. Using tail...

  20. Protective effect of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells combined with erythropoietin therapy on spinal cord injury rat model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Xie

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the protective effect of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells combined with erythropoietin therapy on spinal cord injury rat model. Methods: SD rats were selected as experimental animals, spinal cord injury rat model was built by striking spinal cord with Hatteras Instruments PCI3000, and model rats were divided into control group, bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs group, erythropoietin (EPO group and BMSCs combined with EPO group according to different treatment methods. Then number of apoptotic cells in spinal cord tissue, contents of neural markers and neurotrophic factors as well as expression of apoptosis and injury molecules was detected. Results: Number of apoptotic cells as well as mRNA contents of Caspase-3 and c-fos of BMSCs group, EPO group and BMSCs+EPO group was lower than those of control group, and number of apoptotic cells as well as mRNA contents of Caspase-3 and c-fos of BMSCs+EPO group were lower than those of BMSCs group and EPO group; mRNA contents of NF-200 and MBP as well as protein contents of NGF and BDNF in spinal cord tissue of BMSCs group, EPO group and BMSCs+EPO group were higher than those of control group, and mRNA contents of NF-200 and MBP as well as protein contents of NGF and BDNF in spinal cord tissue of BMSCs+EPO group were higher than those of BMSCs group and EPO group. Conclusions: Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells combined with erythropoietin therapy can inhibit cell apoptosis in the injured spinal cord tissue, increase neurotrophic factor levels and inhibit apoptosis and injury molecule expression; it has protective effect on spinal cord injury.

  1. Symptomatic relief precedes improvement of myocardial blood flow in patients under spinal cord stimulation

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    Koulousakis Athanassios

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spinal cord electrical stimulation (SCS has shown to be a treatment option for patients suffering from angina pectoris CCS III-IV although being on optimal medication and not suitable for conventional treatment strategies, e.g. CABG or PTCA. Although many studies demonstrated a clear symptomatic relief under SCS therapy, there are only a few short-term studies that investigated alterations in cardiac ischemia. Therefore doubts remain whether SCS has a direct effect on myocardial perfusion. Methods A prospective study to investigate the short- and long-term effect of spinal cord stimulation (SCS on myocardial ischemia in patients with refractory angina pectoris and coronary multivessel disease was designed. Myocardial ischemia was measured by MIBI-SPECT scintigraphy 3 months and 12 months after the beginning of neurostimulation. To further examine the relation between cardiac perfusion and functional status of the patients we measured exercise capacity (bicycle ergometry and 6-minute walk test, symptoms and quality of life (Seattle Angina Questionnaire [SAQ], as well. Results 31 patients (65 ± 11 SEM years; 25 male, 6 female were included into the study. The average consumption of short acting nitrates (SAN decreased rapidly from 12 ± 1.6 times to 3 ± 1 times per week. The walking distance and the maximum workload increased from 143 ± 22 to 225 ± 24 meters and 68 ± 7 to 96 ± 12 watt after 3 months. Quality of life increased (SAQ significantly after 3 month compared to baseline, as well. No further improvement was observed after one year of treament. Despite the symptomatic relief and the improvement in maximal workload computer based analysis (Emory Cardiac Toolbox of the MIBI-SPECT studies after 3 months of treatment did not show significant alterations of myocardial ischemia compared to baseline (16 patients idem, 7 with increase and 6 with decrease of ischemia, 2 patients dropped out during initial test phase

  2. Biodegradable chitin conduit tubulation combined with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation for treatment of spinal cord injury by reducing glial scar and cavity formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Xue

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We examined the restorative effect of modified biodegradable chitin conduits in combination with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation after right spinal cord hemisection injury. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that biological conduit sleeve bridging reduced glial scar formation and spinal muscular atrophy after spinal cord hemisection. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells survived and proliferated after transplantation in vivo, and differentiated into cells double-positive for S100 (Schwann cell marker and glial fibrillary acidic protein (glial cell marker at 8 weeks. Retrograde tracing showed that more nerve fibers had grown through the injured spinal cord at 14 weeks after combination therapy than either treatment alone. Our findings indicate that a biological conduit combined with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation effectively prevented scar formation and provided a favorable local microenvironment for the proliferation, migration and differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in the spinal cord, thus promoting restoration following spinal cord hemisection injury.

  3. Biodegradable chitin conduit tubulation combined with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation for treatment of spinal cord injury by reducing glial scar and cavity formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Feng; Wu, Er-jun; Zhang, Pei-xun; Li-ya, A; Kou, Yu-hui; Yin, Xiao-feng; Han, Na

    2015-01-01

    We examined the restorative effect of modified biodegradable chitin conduits in combination with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation after right spinal cord hemisection injury. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that biological conduit sleeve bridging reduced glial scar formation and spinal muscular atrophy after spinal cord hemisection. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells survived and proliferated after transplantation in vivo, and differentiated into cells double-positive for S100 (Schwann cell marker) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (glial cell marker) at 8 weeks. Retrograde tracing showed that more nerve fibers had grown through the injured spinal cord at 14 weeks after combination therapy than either treatment alone. Our findings indicate that a biological conduit combined with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation effectively prevented scar formation and provided a favorable local microenvironment for the proliferation, migration and differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in the spinal cord, thus promoting restoration following spinal cord hemisection injury. PMID:25788929

  4. Transplantation of Nogo-66 receptor gene-silenced cells in a poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) scaffold for the treatment of spinal cord injury★

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong; Fan, Yuhong; Zhang, Jianjun

    2013-01-01

    Inhibition of neurite growth, which is in large part mediated by the Nogo-66 receptor, affects neural regeneration following bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation. The tissue engineering scaffold poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolic acid) has good histocompatibility and can promote the growth of regenerating nerve fibers. The present study used small interfering RNA to silence Nogo-66 receptor gene expression in bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and Schwann cells, which were subsequently transplanted with poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolic acid) into the spinal cord lesion regions in rats. Simultaneously, rats treated with scaffold only were taken as the control group. Hematoxylin-eosin staining and immunohistochemistry revealed that at 4 weeks after transplantation, rats had good motor function of the hind limb after treatment with Nogo-66 receptor gene-silenced cells plus the poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolic acid) scaffold compared with rats treated with scaffold only, and the number of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and neuron-like cells was also increased. At 8 weeks after transplantation, horseradish peroxidase tracing and transmission electron microscopy showed a large number of unmyelinated and myelinated nerve fibers, as well as intact regenerating axonal myelin sheath following spinal cord hemisection injury. These experimental findings indicate that transplantation of Nogo-66 receptor gene-silenced bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and Schwann cells plus a poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolic acid) scaffold can significantly enhance axonal regeneration of spinal cord neurons and improve motor function of the extremities in rats following spinal cord injury. PMID:25206713

  5. Conduction of impulses by axons regenerated in a Schwann cell graft in the transected adult rat thoracic spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinzon, A; Calancie, B; Oudega, M; Noga, B R

    2001-06-01

    Central nervous system axons regenerate into a Schwann cell implant placed in the transected thoracic spinal cord of an adult rat. The present study was designed to test whether these regenerated axons are capable of conducting action potentials. Following the transection and removal of a 4- to 5-mm segment of the thoracic spinal cord (T8-T9), a polymer guidance channel filled with a mixture of adult rat Schwann cells and Matrigel was grafted into a 4- to 5-mm-long gap in the transected thoracic spinal cord. The two cut ends of the spinal cord were eased into the guidance channel openings. Transected control animals received a channel containing Matrigel only. Three months after implantation, electrophysiological studies were performed. Tungsten microelectrodes were used for monopolar stimulation of regenerated axons within the Schwann cell graft. Glass microelectrodes were used to record responses in the spinal cord rostral to the stimulation site. Evoked responses to electrical stimulation of the axon cable were found in two out of nine Schwann cell-grafted animals. These responses had approximate latencies in the range of those of myelinated axons. No responses were seen in any of the Matrigel-grafted animals. Histological analysis revealed that the two cases that showed evoked potentials had the largest number of myelinated axons present in the cable. This study demonstrates that axons regenerating through Schwann cell grafts in the complete transected spinal cord can produce measurable evoked responses following electrical stimulation. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Endogenous stem cell proliferation induced by intravenous hedgehog agonist administration after contusion in the adult rat spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bambakidis, Nicholas C; Horn, Eric M; Nakaji, Peter; Theodore, Nicholas; Bless, Elizabeth; Dellovade, Tammy; Ma, Chiyuan; Wang, Xukui; Preul, Mark C; Coons, Stephen W; Spetzler, Robert F; Sonntag, Volker K H

    2009-02-01

    Sonic hedgehog (Shh) is a glycoprotein molecule that upregulates the transcription factor Gli1. The Shh protein plays a critical role in the proliferation of endogenous neural precursor cells when directly injected into the spinal cord after a spinal cord injury in adult rodents. Small-molecule agonists of the hedgehog (Hh) pathway were used in an attempt to reproduce these findings through intravenous administration. The expression of Gli1 was measured in rat spinal cord after the intravenous administration of an Hh agonist. Ten adult rats received a moderate contusion and were treated with either an Hh agonist (10 mg/kg, intravenously) or vehicle (5 rodents per group) 1 hour and 4 days after injury. The rats were killed 5 days postinjury. Tissue samples were immediately placed in fixative. Samples were immunohistochemically stained for neural precursor cells, and these cells were counted. Systemic dosing with an Hh agonist significantly upregulated Gli1 expression in the spinal cord (p < 0.005). After spinal contusion, animals treated with the Hh agonist had significantly more nestin-positive neural precursor cells around the rim of the lesion cavity than in vehicle-treated controls (means +/- SDs, 46.9 +/- 12.9 vs 20.9 +/- 8.3 cells/hpf, respectively, p < 0.005). There was no significant difference in the area of white matter injury between the groups. An intravenous Hh agonist at doses that upregulate spinal cord Gli1 transcription also increases the population of neural precursor cells after spinal cord injury in adult rats. These data support previous findings based on injections of Shh protein directly into the spinal cord.

  7. Musashi and Plasticity of Xenopus and Axolotl Spinal Cord Ependymal Cells

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    Ellen A. G. Chernoff

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The differentiated state of spinal cord ependymal cells in regeneration-competent amphibians varies between a constitutively active state in what is essentially a developing organism, the tadpole of the frog Xenopus laevis, and a quiescent, activatable state in a slowly growing adult salamander Ambystoma mexicanum, the Axolotl. Ependymal cells are epithelial in intact spinal cord of all vertebrates. After transection, body region ependymal epithelium in both Xenopus and the Axolotl disorganizes for regenerative outgrowth (gap replacement. Injury-reactive ependymal cells serve as a stem/progenitor cell population in regeneration and reconstruct the central canal. Expression patterns of mRNA and protein for the stem/progenitor cell-maintenance Notch signaling pathway mRNA-binding protein Musashi (msi change with life stage and regeneration competence. Msi-1 is missing (immunohistochemistry, or at very low levels (polymerase chain reaction, PCR, in both intact regeneration-competent adult Axolotl cord and intact non-regeneration-competent Xenopus tadpole (Nieuwkoop and Faber stage 62+, NF 62+. The critical correlation for successful regeneration is msi-1 expression/upregulation after injury in the ependymal outgrowth and stump-region ependymal cells. msi-1 and msi-2 isoforms were cloned for the Axolotl as well as previously unknown isoforms of Xenopus msi-2. Intact Xenopus spinal cord ependymal cells show a loss of msi-1 expression between regeneration-competent (NF 50–53 and non-regenerating stages (NF 62+ and in post-metamorphosis froglets, while msi-2 displays a lower molecular weight isoform in non-regenerating cord. In the Axolotl, embryos and juveniles maintain Msi-1 expression in the intact cord. In the adult Axolotl, Msi-1 is absent, but upregulates after injury. Msi-2 levels are more variable among Axolotl life stages: rising between late tailbud embryos and juveniles and decreasing in adult cord. Cultures of regeneration

  8. Musashi and Plasticity of Xenopus and Axolotl Spinal Cord Ependymal Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernoff, Ellen A. G.; Sato, Kazuna; Salfity, Hai V. N.; Sarria, Deborah A.; Belecky-Adams, Teri

    2018-01-01

    The differentiated state of spinal cord ependymal cells in regeneration-competent amphibians varies between a constitutively active state in what is essentially a developing organism, the tadpole of the frog Xenopus laevis, and a quiescent, activatable state in a slowly growing adult salamander Ambystoma mexicanum, the Axolotl. Ependymal cells are epithelial in intact spinal cord of all vertebrates. After transection, body region ependymal epithelium in both Xenopus and the Axolotl disorganizes for regenerative outgrowth (gap replacement). Injury-reactive ependymal cells serve as a stem/progenitor cell population in regeneration and reconstruct the central canal. Expression patterns of mRNA and protein for the stem/progenitor cell-maintenance Notch signaling pathway mRNA-binding protein Musashi (msi) change with life stage and regeneration competence. Msi-1 is missing (immunohistochemistry), or at very low levels (polymerase chain reaction, PCR), in both intact regeneration-competent adult Axolotl cord and intact non-regeneration-competent Xenopus tadpole (Nieuwkoop and Faber stage 62+, NF 62+). The critical correlation for successful regeneration is msi-1 expression/upregulation after injury in the ependymal outgrowth and stump-region ependymal cells. msi-1 and msi-2 isoforms were cloned for the Axolotl as well as previously unknown isoforms of Xenopus msi-2. Intact Xenopus spinal cord ependymal cells show a loss of msi-1 expression between regeneration-competent (NF 50–53) and non-regenerating stages (NF 62+) and in post-metamorphosis froglets, while msi-2 displays a lower molecular weight isoform in non-regenerating cord. In the Axolotl, embryos and juveniles maintain Msi-1 expression in the intact cord. In the adult Axolotl, Msi-1 is absent, but upregulates after injury. Msi-2 levels are more variable among Axolotl life stages: rising between late tailbud embryos and juveniles and decreasing in adult cord. Cultures of regeneration-competent Xenopus tadpole

  9. Stem cell therapy in spinal trauma: Does it have scientific validity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harvinder Singh Chhabra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell-based interventions aim to use special regenerative cells (stem cells to facilitate neuronal function beyond the site of the injury. Many studies involving animal models of spinal cord injury (SCI suggest that certain stem cell-based therapies may restore function after SCI. Currently, in case of spinal cord injuries, new discoveries with clinical implications have been continuously made in basic stem cell research, and stem cell-based approaches are advancing rapidly toward application in patients. There is a huge base of preclinical evidence in vitro and in animal models which suggests the safety and clinical efficacy of cellular therapies after SCI. Despite this, data from clinical studies is not very encouraging and at times confounding. Here, we have attempted to cover preclinical and clinical evidence base dealing with safety, feasibility and efficacy of cell based interventions after SCI. The limitations of preclinical data and the reasons underlying its failure to translate in a clinical setting are also discussed. Based on the evidence base, it is suggested that a multifactorial approach is required to address this situation. Need for standardized, stringently designed multi-centric clinical trials for obtaining validated proof of evidence is also highlighted.

  10. Treatment outcome of radiation therapy and concurrent targeted molecular therapy in spinal metastasis from renal cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sang Joon; Kim, Kyung Hwan; Rhee, Woo Joong; Lee, Jeong Shin; Cho, Yeo Na; Koom, Woong Sub [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    To evaluate the clinical outcomes of patients who underwent radiation therapy with or without targeted molecular therapy for the treatment of spinal metastasis from renal cell carcinoma (RCC). A total of 28 spinal metastatic lesions from RCC patients treated with radiotherapy between June 2009 and June 2015 were retrospectively reviewed. Thirteen lesions were treated concurrently with targeted molecular therapy (concurrent group) and 15 lesions were not (nonconcurrent group). Local control was defined as lack of radiographically evident local progression and neurological deterioration. At a median follow-up of 11 months (range, 2 to 58 months), the 1-year local progression-free rate (LPFR) was 67.0%. The patients with concurrent targeted molecular therapy showed significantly higher LPFR than those without (p = 0.019). After multivariate analysis, use of concurrent targeted molecular therapy showed a tendency towards improved LPFR (hazard ratio, 0.13; 95% confidence interval, 0.01 to 1.16). There was no difference in the incidence of systemic progression between concurrent and nonconcurrent groups. No grade ≥2 toxicities were observed during or after radiotherapy. Our study suggests the possibility that concurrent use of targeted molecular therapy during radiotherapy may improve LPFR. Further study with a large population is required to confirm these results.

  11. Treatment outcome of radiation therapy and concurrent targeted molecular therapy in spinal metastasis from renal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sang Joon; Kim, Kyung Hwan; Rhee, Woo Joong; Lee, Jeong Shin; Cho, Yeo Na; Koom, Woong Sub

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical outcomes of patients who underwent radiation therapy with or without targeted molecular therapy for the treatment of spinal metastasis from renal cell carcinoma (RCC). A total of 28 spinal metastatic lesions from RCC patients treated with radiotherapy between June 2009 and June 2015 were retrospectively reviewed. Thirteen lesions were treated concurrently with targeted molecular therapy (concurrent group) and 15 lesions were not (nonconcurrent group). Local control was defined as lack of radiographically evident local progression and neurological deterioration. At a median follow-up of 11 months (range, 2 to 58 months), the 1-year local progression-free rate (LPFR) was 67.0%. The patients with concurrent targeted molecular therapy showed significantly higher LPFR than those without (p = 0.019). After multivariate analysis, use of concurrent targeted molecular therapy showed a tendency towards improved LPFR (hazard ratio, 0.13; 95% confidence interval, 0.01 to 1.16). There was no difference in the incidence of systemic progression between concurrent and nonconcurrent groups. No grade ≥2 toxicities were observed during or after radiotherapy. Our study suggests the possibility that concurrent use of targeted molecular therapy during radiotherapy may improve LPFR. Further study with a large population is required to confirm these results

  12. A cell population that strongly expresses the CB1 cannabinoid receptor in the ependyma of the rat spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Ovejero, Daniel; Arevalo-Martin, Angel; Paniagua-Torija, Beatriz; Sierra-Palomares, Yolanda; Molina-Holgado, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    The cells surrounding the central canal of the spinal cord are a source of stem/precursor cells that may give rise to neurons, astrocytes, or oligodendrocytes. However, they are a heterogeneous population that remains poorly understood. Here we describe a subpopulation characterized by their strong expression of the CB(1) cannabinoid receptor, oval/round soma, apical nucleus, a variable number of cilia (0, 1, or 2), and the presence of a single short and occasionally ramified basal process. These cells are mainly located in the lateral and dorsal central canal throughout the spinal cord. These CB(1)(HIGH) cells are closely related to the basal lamina labyrinths or fractones derived from subependymal microglia. In addition, CB(1)(HIGH) cells express some stem/precursor cell markers, including vimentin, nestin, Sox2, Sox9, and GLAST, but not others such as CD15 or GFAP. In addition, this cell population does not proliferate in the intact adult spinal cord, although up to 50% of these cells express the proliferation marker Ki67 in newly born rats or after a spinal cord contusion. The present findings contribute to our understanding of the spinal cord central canal structure and reveal the targets for endocannabinoids inside this neurogenic niche. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells repair spinal cord ischemia/reperfusion injury by promoting axonal growth and anti-autophagy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Fei; Meng, Chunyang; Lu, Rifeng; Li, Lei; Zhang, Ying; Chen, Hao; Qin, Yonggang; Guo, Li

    2014-01-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells can differentiate into neurons and astrocytes after transplantation in the spinal cord of rats with ischemia/reperfusion injury. Although bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells are known to protect against spinal cord ischemia/reperfusion injury through anti-apoptotic effects, the precise mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells were cultured and proliferated, then transplanted into rats with ischemia/reperfusion injury via retro-orbital injection. Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence with subsequent quantification revealed that the expression of the axonal regeneration marker, growth associated protein-43, and the neuronal marker, microtubule-associated protein 2, significantly increased in rats with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation compared with those in rats with spinal cord ischemia/reperfusion injury. Furthermore, the expression of the autophagy marker, microtubule-associated protein light chain 3B, and Beclin 1, was significantly reduced in rats with the bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation compared with those in rats with spinal cord ischemia/reperfusion injury. Western blot analysis showed that the expression of growth associated protein-43 and neurofilament-H increased but light chain 3B and Beclin 1 decreased in rats with the bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation. Our results therefore suggest that bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation promotes neurite growth and regeneration and prevents autophagy. These responses may likely be mechanisms underlying the protective effect of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells against spinal cord ischemia/reperfusion injury. PMID:25374587

  14. Ketogenic diet improves forelimb motor function after spinal cord injury in rodents.

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    Femke Streijger

    Full Text Available High fat, low carbohydrate ketogenic diets (KD are validated non-pharmacological treatments for some forms of drug-resistant epilepsy. Ketones reduce neuronal excitation and promote neuroprotection. Here, we investigated the efficacy of KD as a treatment for acute cervical spinal cord injury (SCI in rats. Starting 4 hours following C5 hemi-contusion injury animals were fed either a standard carbohydrate based diet or a KD formulation with lipid to carbohydrate plus protein ratio of 3:1. The forelimb functional recovery was evaluated for 14 weeks, followed by quantitative histopathology. Post-injury 3:1 KD treatment resulted in increased usage and range of motion of the affected forepaw. Furthermore, KD improved pellet retrieval with recovery of wrist and digit movements. Importantly, after returning to a standard diet after 12 weeks of KD treatment, the improved forelimb function remained stable. Histologically, the spinal cords of KD treated animals displayed smaller lesion areas and more grey matter sparing. In addition, KD treatment increased the number of glucose transporter-1 positive blood vessels in the lesion penumbra and monocarboxylate transporter-1 (MCT1 expression. Pharmacological inhibition of MCTs with 4-CIN (α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamate prevented the KD-induced neuroprotection after SCI, In conclusion, post-injury KD effectively promotes functional recovery and is neuroprotective after cervical SCI. These beneficial effects require the function of monocarboxylate transporters responsible for ketone uptake and link the observed neuroprotection directly to the function of ketones, which are known to exert neuroprotection by multiple mechanisms. Our data suggest that current clinical nutritional guidelines, which include relatively high carbohydrate contents, should be revisited.

  15. Intermittent fasting in mice does not improve hindlimb motor performance after spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streijger, Femke; Plunet, Ward T; Plemel, Jason Ryan; Lam, Clarrie K; Liu, Jie; Tetzlaff, Wolfram

    2011-06-01

    Previously, we reported that every-other-day-fasting (EODF) in Sprague-Dawley rats initiated after cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) effectively promoted functional recovery, reduced lesion size, and enhanced sprouting of the corticospinal tract. More recently, we also showed improved behavioral recovery with EODF after a moderate thoracic contusion injury in rats. In order to make use of transgenic mouse models to study molecular mechanisms of EODF, we tested here whether this intermittent fasting regimen was also beneficial in mice after SCI. Starting after SCI, C57BL/6 mice were fed a standard rodent chow diet either with unrestricted access or feeding every other day. Over a 14-week post-injury period, we assessed hindlimb locomotor function with the Basso Mouse Scale (BMS) open-field test and horizontal ladder, and the spinal cords were evaluated histologically to measure white and grey matter sparing. EODF resulted in an overall caloric restriction of 20% compared to animals fed ad libitum (AL). The EODF-treated animals exhibited a ∼ 14% reduction in body weight compared to AL mice, and never recovered to their pre-operative body weight. In contrast to rats on an intermittent fasting regimen, mice exhibited no increase in blood ketone bodies by the end of the second, third, and fourth day of fasting. EODF had no beneficial effect on tissue sparing and failed to improve behavioral recovery of hindlimb function. Hence this observation stands in stark contrast to our earlier observations in Sprague-Dawley rats. This is likely due to the difference in the metabolic response to intermittent fasting as evidenced by different ketone levels during the first week of the EODF regimen.

  16. Transplanted Peripheral Blood Stem Cells Mobilized by Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Promoted Hindlimb Functional Recovery After Spinal Cord Injury in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Hiroshi; Koda, Masao; Hashimoto, Masayuki; Furuya, Takeo; Sakuma, Tsuyoshi; Kato, Kei; Okawa, Akihiko; Inada, Taigo; Kamiya, Koshiro; Ota, Mitsutoshi; Maki, Satoshi; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Yamazaki, Masashi; Mannoji, Chikato

    2016-01-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) mobilizes peripheral blood stem cells (PBSCs) derived from bone marrow. We hypothesized that intraspinal transplantation of PBSCs mobilized by G-CSF could promote functional recovery after spinal cord injury. Spinal cords of adult nonobese diabetes/severe immunodeficiency mice were injured using an Infinite Horizon impactor (60 kdyn). One week after the injury, 3.0 µl of G-CSF-mobilized human mononuclear cells (MNCs; 0.5 × 10(5)/µl), G-CSF-mobilized human CD34-positive PBSCs (CD34; 0.5 × 10(5)/µl), or normal saline was injected to the lesion epicenter. We performed immunohistochemistry. Locomotor recovery was assessed by Basso Mouse Scale. The number of transplanted human cells decreased according to the time course. The CD31-positive area was significantly larger in the MNC and CD34 groups compared with the vehicle group. The number of serotonin-positive fibers was significantly larger in the MNC and CD34 groups than in the vehicle group. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the number of apoptotic oligodendrocytes was significantly smaller in cell-transplanted groups, and the areas of demyelination in the MNC- and CD34-transplanted mice were smaller than that in the vehicle group, indicating that cell transplantation suppressed oligodendrocyte apoptosis and demyelination. Both the MNC and CD34 groups showed significantly better hindlimb functional recovery compared with the vehicle group. There was no significant difference between the two types of transplanted cells. Intraspinal transplantation of G-CSF-mobilized MNCs or CD34-positive cells promoted angiogenesis, serotonergic fiber regeneration/sparing, and preservation of myelin, resulting in improved hindlimb function after spinal cord injury in comparison with vehicle-treated control mice. Transplantation of G-CSF-mobilized PBSCs has advantages for treatment of spinal cord injury in the ethical and immunological viewpoints, although further exploration

  17. Prenatal diagnosis of spinal muscular atrophy in Chinese by genetic analysis of fetal cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Ting; DING Xin-sheng; LI Wen-lei; YAO Juan; DENG Xiao-xuan

    2005-01-01

    Background Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by degeneration of anterior horn cells of the spinal cord.The survival motor neuron gene is SMA-determining gene deleted in approximately 95% of SMA patients.This study was undertaken to predict prenatal SMA efficiently and rapidly in families with previously affected child.Methods Prenatal diagnosis was made in 8 fetuses with a family history of SMA.Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) were used for the detection of the survival motor neuron gene.Results The survival motor neuron gene was not found in 6 fetuses, ruling out the diagnosis of SMA.Two fetuses were detected positive and the pregnancies were terminated.Conclusion Our method is effective and convenient in prenatal diagnosis of SMA.

  18. An update on application of nanotechnology and stem cells in spinal cord injury regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nejati-Koshki, Kazem; Mortazavi, Yousef; Pilehvar-Soltanahmadi, Younes; Sheoran, Sumit; Zarghami, Nosratollah

    2017-06-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is damage to the spinal cord that leads to sudden loss of motor and autonomic function and sensory under the level of the injury. The pathophysiological advancement of SCI is divided into two categories: primary injury and secondary injury. Due to the loss of motor, sensory, or cognitive function, a patient's quality of life is likely reduced and places a great burden on society in order to supply health care costs. Therefore, it is important to develop suitable therapeutic strategies for SCI therapy. Nano biomedical systems and stem cell based therapy have the potential to provide new therapeutic availability and efficacy over conventional medicine. Due to their unique properties, nanomaterials and mesenchymal stem cells can be used to offer efficient treatments. Nanoparticles have a potential to deliver therapeutic molecules to the target tissue of interest, reducing side effects of untargeted therapies in unwanted areas. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can reduce activating inflammation responses that lead to cell death and promote functional recovery and cell growth. We review recent uses of nanomaterials and stem cells in regeneration of SCI. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Patterns of x-radiation-induced Schwann cell development in spinal cords of immature rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilmore, S.A.; Heard, J.K.; Leiting, J.E.

    1983-01-01

    Schwann cells, Schwann cell myelin, and connective tissue components develop in the spinal cord of the immature rat following exposure to x-rays. For the purposes of this paper, these intraspinal peripheral nervous tissue constituents are referred to as IPNT. A series of investigations are in progress to elucidate factors related to the development of IPNT, and the present study is a light microscopic evaluation of the relationship between the amount of radiation administered (1,000-3,000R) to the lumbosacral spinal cord in 3-day-old rats and the incidence and distribution of IPNT at intervals up to 60 days postirradiation (P-I). The results showed that IPNT was present in only 33% of the rats exposed to 1,000R, whereas its presence was observed in 86% or more of those in the 2,000-, 2,500-, and 3,000R groups. The distribution of IPNT was quite limited in the 1,000R group, where it was restricted to the spinal cord-dorsal root junction and was found in only a few sections within the irradiated area. The distribution was more widespread with increasing amounts of radiation, and IPNT occupied substantial portions of the dorsal funiculi and extended into the dorsal gray matter in the 3,000R group. In all aR mals developing IPNT in the groups receiving 2,000R or more, the IPNT was present in essentially all sections from the irradiated area. Further studies will compare in detail spinal cords exposed to 1,000R in which IPNT is an infrequent, limited occurrence with those exposed to higher doses where IPNT occurs in a more widespread fashion in essentially all animals

  20. Stem cells and biomaterials for the treatment of spinal cord injury

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jendelová, Pavla; Hejčl, Aleš; Romanyuk, Nataliya; Amemori, Takashi; Syková, Eva

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 59, S1 (2011), S14-S14 ISSN 0894-1491. [European meeting on Glia l Cells in Health and Disease /10./. 13.09.2011-17.09.2011, Prague] R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0538; GA AV ČR IAA500390902; GA ČR GAP108/10/1560; GA ČR GA203/09/1242 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390703 Keywords : spinal cord injuri * stem cells * regeneration and repair Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  1. Stem cells and treatment of brain and spinal cord injury

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Syková, Eva

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 276, Suppl.1 (2009), s. 40-40 ISSN 1742-464X. [Congress of the Federation-of-European-Biochemical-Societies /34./. 04.07.2009-09.07.2009, Prague] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390703 Keywords : Stem cells Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  2. Effects of bone marrow stromal cell transplantation through CSF on the subacute and chronic spinal cord injury in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norihiko Nakano

    Full Text Available It has been demonstrated that the infusion of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs through the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF has beneficial effects on acute spinal cord injury (SCI in rats. The present study examined whether BMSC infusion into the CSF is effective for subacute (1- and 2-week post-injury, and/or chronic (4-week post-injury SCI in rats. The spinal cord was contused by dropping a weight at the thoracic 8-9 levels. BMSCs cultured from GFP-transgenic rats of the same strain were injected three times (once weekly into the CSF through the fourth ventricle, beginning at 1, 2 and 4 weeks post-injury. At 4 weeks after initial injection, the average BBB score for locomotor assessment increased from 1.0-3.5 points before injection to 9.0-10.9 points in the BMSC-injection subgroups, while, in the PBS (vehicle-injection subgroups, it increased only from 0.5-4.0 points before injection to 3.0-5.1 points. Numerous axons associated with Schwann cells extended longitudinally through the connective tissue matrices in the astrocyte-devoid lesion without being blocked at either the rostral or the caudal borders in the BMSC-injection subgroups. A small number of BMSCs were found to survive within the spinal cord lesion in SCI of the 1-week post-injury at 2 days of injection, but none at 7 days. No BMSCs were found in the spinal cord lesion at 2 days or at 7 days in the SCI of the 2-week and the 4-week post-injury groups. In an in vitro experiment, BMSC-injected CSF promoted the survival and the neurite extension of cultured neurons more effectively than did the PBS-injected CSF. These results indicate that BMSCs had beneficial effects on locomotor improvement as well as on axonal regeneration in both subacute and chronic SCI rats, and the results also suggest that BMSCs might function as neurotrophic sources via the CSF.

  3. Effects of Bone Marrow Stromal Cell Transplantation through CSF on the Subacute and Chronic Spinal Cord Injury in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Norihiko; Nakai, Yoshiyasu; Seo, Tae-Beom; Homma, Tamami; Yamada, Yoshihiro; Ohta, Masayoshi; Suzuki, Yoshihisa; Nakatani, Toshio; Fukushima, Masanori; Hayashibe, Miki; Ide, Chizuka

    2013-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that the infusion of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) through the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) has beneficial effects on acute spinal cord injury (SCI) in rats. The present study examined whether BMSC infusion into the CSF is effective for subacute (1- and 2-week post-injury), and/or chronic (4-week post-injury) SCI in rats. The spinal cord was contused by dropping a weight at the thoracic 8-9 levels. BMSCs cultured from GFP-transgenic rats of the same strain were injected three times (once weekly) into the CSF through the fourth ventricle, beginning at 1, 2 and 4 weeks post-injury. At 4 weeks after initial injection, the average BBB score for locomotor assessment increased from 1.0–3.5 points before injection to 9.0-10.9 points in the BMSC-injection subgroups, while, in the PBS (vehicle)-injection subgroups, it increased only from 0.5–4.0 points before injection to 3.0-5.1 points. Numerous axons associated with Schwann cells extended longitudinally through the connective tissue matrices in the astrocyte-devoid lesion without being blocked at either the rostral or the caudal borders in the BMSC-injection subgroups. A small number of BMSCs were found to survive within the spinal cord lesion in SCI of the 1-week post-injury at 2 days of injection, but none at 7 days. No BMSCs were found in the spinal cord lesion at 2 days or at 7 days in the SCI of the 2-week and the 4-week post-injury groups. In an in vitro experiment, BMSC-injected CSF promoted the survival and the neurite extension of cultured neurons more effectively than did the PBS-injected CSF. These results indicate that BMSCs had beneficial effects on locomotor improvement as well as on axonal regeneration in both subacute and chronic SCI rats, and the results also suggest that BMSCs might function as neurotrophic sources via the CSF. PMID:24039961

  4. Tailless-like (TLX) protein promotes neuronal differentiation of dermal multipotent stem cells and benefits spinal cord injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Ren, Xiaobao; Xiong, Jianqiong; Zhang, Lei; Qu, Jifu; Xu, Wenyue

    2011-04-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) remains a formidable challenge in the clinic. In the current study, we examined the effects of the TLX gene on the proliferation and neuronal differentiation of dermal multipotent stem cells (DMSCs) in vitro and the potential of these cells to improve SCI in rats in vivo. DMSCs were stably transfected with TLX-expressing plasmid (TLX/DMSCs). Cell proliferation was examined using the MTT assay, and neuronal differentiation was characterized by morphological observation combined with immunocytochemical/immunofluorescent staining. The in vivo functions of these cells were evaluated by transplantation into rats with SCI, followed by analysis of hindlimb locomotion and post-mortem histology. Compared to parental DMSCs, TLX/DMSCs showed enhanced proliferation and preferential differentiation into NF200-positive neurons in contrast to GFAP-positive astrocytes. When the undifferentiated cells were transplanted into rats with SCI injury, TLX/DMSCs led to significant improvement in locomotor recovery and healing of SCI, as evidenced by reduction in scar tissues and cavities, increase in continuous nerve fibers/axons and enrichment of NF200-positive neurons on the histological level. In conclusion, TLX promotes the proliferation and neuronal differentiation of DMSCs and thus, may serve as a promising therapy for SCI in the clinic.

  5. Intralesional Application of Autologous Bone Marrow Stem Cells with Scaffold in Canine for Spinal Cord Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin William B

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A three year old male non-descriptive companion dog was presented to the Small Animal Orthopedic Unit of Madras Veterinary College Teaching Hospital (MVC with paraplegia of fourth degree neurological deficit of hind limbs due to automobile trauma. Radiographic views were suggestive of dislocation at T8-T9 vertebral segment with fracture of L2 vertebra. Myelography confirmed the signs of abrupt stoppage of the contrast column cranial to dislocated area and was interpretive of transected spinal cord at L2 level. Construct was prepared with bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMNC isolated from bone marrow aspirate of femur and the cells were seeded in Thermoreversible Gelatin Polymer (TGP at the cell processing facility of Nichi-In Centre for Regenerative Medicine (NCRM as per GMP protocols and was engrafted after hemilaminectomy and durotomy procedures in the MVC. Postoperatively the animal was clinically stable; however the animal died on the 7th day. Autopsy revealed co-morbid conditions like cystitis, nephritis and transmissible venereal tumor. Histopathology of the engrafted area revealed sustainability of aggregated stem cells that were transplanted revealing an ideal biocompatibility of the construct prepared with bone marrow mononuclear cells and polymer hydrogel for spinal cord regeneration in dogs. Further studies in similar cases will have to be undertaken to prove the long term efficacy.

  6. Improving outcomes following reconstruction of pressure sores in spinal injury patients: A multidisciplinary approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadiparthi, S; Hartley, A; Alzweri, L; Mecci, M; Siddiqui, H

    2016-07-01

    Pressure sore treatment in spinal injury patients is challenging. A multidisciplinary approach with joint management by the plastic surgery and spinal injury teams was initiated at our institution in 2005 to improve patient care and surgical outcomes following reconstruction. This study assessed the surgical outcomes following reconstruction using the team approach and to compare inpatient stay and readmissions for complications before and after the multidisciplinary protocol was introduced. A retrospective review of consecutive patients in the multidisciplinary pressure sore clinic was performed. Data were collected on patient demographics, reconstructive techniques, surgical outcomes and readmission for any complications. In total, 45 patients with 60 pressure sores (grade 3 or 4) were reviewed in the joint clinic between 2005 and 2011. The majority of patients were paraplegic (78%), while the remaining 22% were tetraplegic. Ischial sores were the most common (45%) followed by trochanteric (23%) and sacral (20%) sores. Multiple sores were noted in 44% of patients. Flap reconstruction was required in 32 patients (71%); after a mean follow-up time of 33 months (range 25-72 months), there were three (9%) major complications (two recurrences of pressure sores and one sinus) and seven (22%) minor complications. After introduction of patient care pathways through the multidisciplinary approach, the rate of readmission for complications decreased from 14% to 5.5% and inpatient stay upon readmission reduced from 65 to 45 days. Implementation of a multidisciplinary approach was key to optimising surgical outcomes, achieving a low recurrence rate (6%) and reducing readmissions. Copyright © 2016 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Orbiter fuel cell improvement assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.E.

    1981-08-01

    The history of fuel cells and the theory of fuel cells is given. Expressions for thermodynamic and electrical efficiencies are developed. The voltage losses due to electrode activation, ohmic resistance and ionic diffusion are discussed. Present limitations of the Orbiter Fuel Cell, as well as proposed enhancements, are given. These enhancements are then evaluated and recommendations are given for fuel cell enhancement both for short-range as well as long-range performance improvement. Estimates of reliability and cost savings are given for enhancements where possible

  8. Transplantation of human embryonic stem cell-derived oligodendrocyte progenitors into rat spinal cord injuries does not cause harm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloutier, Frank; Siegenthaler, Monica M; Nistor, Gabriel; Keirstead, Hans S

    2006-07-01

    Demyelination contributes to loss of function following spinal cord injury. We have shown previously that transplantation of human embryonic stem cell-derived oligodendrocyte progenitors into adult rat 200 kD contusive spinal cord injury sites enhances remyelination and promotes recovery of motor function. Previous studies using oligodendrocyte lineage cells have noted a correlation between the presence of demyelinating pathology and the survival and migration rate of the transplanted cells. The present study compared the survival and migration of human embryonic stem cell-derived oligodendrocyte progenitors injected 7 days after a 200 or 50 kD contusive spinal cord injury, as well as the locomotor outcome of transplantation. Our findings indicate that a 200 kD spinal cord injury induces extensive demyelination, whereas a 50 kD spinal cord injury induces no detectable demyelination. Cells transplanted into the 200 kD injury group survived, migrated, and resulted in robust remyelination, replicating our previous studies. In contrast, cells transplanted into the 50 kD injury group survived, exhibited limited migration, and failed to induce remyelination as demyelination in this injury group was absent. Animals that received a 50 kD injury displayed only a transient decline in locomotor function as a result of the injury. Importantly, human embryonic stem cell-derived oligodendrocyte progenitor transplants into the 50 kD injury group did not cause a further decline in locomotion. Our studies highlight the importance of a demyelinating pathology as a prerequisite for the function of transplanted myelinogenic cells. In addition, our results indicate that transplantation of human embryonic stem cell-derived oligodendrocyte progenitor cells into the injured spinal cord is not associated with a decline in locomotor function.

  9. Epidural Spinal Stimulation to Improve Bladder, Bowel, and Sexual Function in Individuals With Spinal Cord Injuries: A Framework for Clinical Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettigrew, Roderic I; Heetderks, William J; Kelley, Christine A; Peng, Grace C Y; Krosnick, Steven H; Jakeman, Lyn B; Egan, Katharine D; Marge, Michael

    2017-02-01

    While some recent studies that apply epidural spinal cord stimulation (SCS) have demonstrated a breakthrough in improvement of the health and quality of the life of persons with spinal cord injury (SCI), the numbers of people who have received SCS are small. This is in sharp contrast to the thousands of persons worldwide living with SCI who have no practical recourse or hope of recovery of lost functions. Thus, the vision is to understand the full potential of this new intervention and to determine if it is safe and effective in a larger cohort, and if it is scalable so that it can be made available to all those who might benefit. To achieve this vision, the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering called for and organized a consortium of multiple stakeholder groups: foundations addressing paralysis, federal and public agencies, industrial partners, academicians, and researchers, all interested in the same goal. Based on input from consortium participants, we have reasoned that a first step is to define a scalable SCS approach that is effective in restoring lost autonomic physiology, specifically bladder, bowel, and sexual function. These functions are most critical for improving the quality of life of persons living with SCI. This report outlines a framework for conducting the research needed to define such an effective SCS procedure that might seek Food and Drug Administration approval and be implemented at the population level.

  10. Spinal cord transection before scoliosis correction in myelomeningocele may improve bladder function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linthorst, Josephine I.; Veenboer, Paul W.; Dik, Pieter; Pruijs, Hans E. H.; Han, Sen K. S.; de Kort, Laetitia M. O.; de Jong, Tom P. V. M.

    2014-01-01

    In patients with myelomeningocele (MMC) and coexistent scoliosis, a spinal cord transection (SC-transection) is sometimes performed before scoliosis correction to prevent traction on the myelum after stretching the spinal column. Performing a SC-transection may have positive effects on bladder

  11. Neural progenitor cells but not astrocytes respond distally to thoracic spinal cord injury in rat models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tara Nguyen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI is a detrimental condition that causes loss of sensory and motor function in an individual. Many complex secondary injury cascades occur after SCI and they offer great potential for therapeutic targeting. In this study, we investigated the response of endogenous neural progenitor cells, astrocytes, and microglia to a localized thoracic SCI throughout the neuroaxis. Twenty-five adult female Sprague-Dawley rats underwent mild-contusion thoracic SCI (n = 9, sham surgery (n = 8, or no surgery (n = 8. Spinal cord and brain tissues were fixed and cut at six regions of the neuroaxis. Immunohistochemistry showed increased reactivity of neural progenitor cell marker nestin in the central canal at all levels of the spinal cord. Increased reactivity of astrocyte-specific marker glial fibrillary acidic protein was found only at the lesion epicenter. The number of activated microglia was significantly increased at the lesion site, and activated microglia extended to the lumbar enlargement. Phagocytic microglia and macrophages were significantly increased only at the lesion site. There were no changes in nestin, glial fibrillary acidic protein, microglia and macrophage response in the third ventricle of rats subjected to mild-contusion thoracic SCI compared to the sham surgery or no surgery. These findings indicate that neural progenitor cells, astrocytes and microglia respond differently to a localized SCI, presumably due to differences in inflammatory signaling. These different cellular responses may have implications in the way that neural progenitor cells can be manipulated for neuroregeneration after SCI. This needs to be further investigated.

  12. Combined polymer-curcumin conjugate and ependymal progenitor/stem cell treatment enhances spinal cord injury functional recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Requejo-Aguilar, Raquel; Alastrue-Agudo, Ana; Cases-Villar, Marta; Lopez-Mocholi, Eric; England, Richard; Vicent, María J; Moreno-Manzano, Victoria

    2017-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) suffers from a lack of effective therapeutic strategies. Animal models of acute SCI have provided evidence that transplantation of ependymal stem/progenitor cells of the spinal cord (epSPCs) induces functional recovery, while systemic administration of the anti-inflammatory curcumin provides neuroprotection. However, functional recovery from chronic stage SCI requires additional enhancements in available therapeutic strategies. Herein, we report on a combination treatment for SCI using epSPCs and a pH-responsive polymer-curcumin conjugate. The incorporation of curcumin in a pH-responsive polymeric carrier mainchain, a polyacetal (PA), enhances blood bioavailability, stability, and provides a means for highly localized delivery. We find that PA-curcumin enhances neuroprotection, increases axonal growth, and can improve functional recovery in acute SCI. However, when combined with epSPCs, PA-curcumin also enhances functional recovery in a rodent model of chronic SCI. This suggests that combination therapy may be an exciting new therapeutic option for the treatment of chronic SCI in humans. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The Healing of Bone Marrow-Derived Stem Cells on Motor Functions in Acute Spinal Cord Injury of Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Gashmardi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: Spinal cord injury is a devastating damage that can cause motor and sensory deficits reducing quality of life and life expectancy of patients. Stem cell transplantation can be one of the promising therapeutic strategies. Bone marrow is a rich source of stem cells that is able to differentiate into various cell types. In this study, bone marrow stem cells were transplanted into mice spinal cord injury model to evaluate the motor function test. Methods: Bone marrow stem cells were isolated from 3 mice. Thirty six mice were randomly divided into 3 groups: the control, sham and experimental. In sham group, mice were subjected to spinal cord compression. In experimental group, one day after lesion, isolated stem cells (200,000 were injected intravenously. Assessment of locomotor function was done by Toyama Mouse Score (TMS after 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 week post-injury. The data were analyzed using one-way Analysis of Variance and Tukey tests and statistical software Graph Pad and SPSS.P > 0/05 was considered as significant difference.  Results: The score of TMS after cell transplantation was higher in cell transplantation group (experimental, while it was significantly higher after fifth week when compared to other groups. Conclusion: The increase in TMS score in cell transplantation group showed that injection of stem cells in acute spinal cord injury can have a therapeutic effect and promote locomotor function.

  14. Spinal Cord Stimulation Provides Pain Relief with Improved Psychosocial Function: Results from EMP3OWER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Jason; Fabi, Alain; Candido, Kenneth; Knezevic, Nick; Creamer, Michael; Carayannopoulos, Alexios; Ghodsi, Abdi; Nelson, Christopher; Bennett, Matthew

    2016-12-01

    The EMP 3 OWER™ study evaluated spinal cord stimulation (SCS) safety and efficacy and the associated changes in psychosocial and functional outcomes. Upon informed consent and IRB approval, 620 eligible subjects were enrolled prior to SCS trial evaluation and were assessed at baseline, 3, 6 and 12 months post-implant. Patient-reported pain relief (PRP), numerical rating scale (NRS), satisfaction, quality of life (QOL), and pain disability index (PDI) were assessed at all follow-up visits while the pain catastrophizing scale (PCS), short form-36 (SF-36), short form-McGill pain questionnaire version 2 (SF-MPQ-2), and the state-trait anxiety inventory (STAI) were assessed at the 6- and 12-month follow-up visits. Device and/or procedure-related adverse events were also recorded and reported. Subjects reporting a PRP ≥ 50% were considered responders. Repeated measures analysis of variance (RMANOVA) examined the changes across time for all continuous measures. A total of 401 (71%) subjects received a permanent implant. Mean (±SD) patient-reported pain relief was 59.3% (±26.2), 59.2% (±28.9), and 58.2% (±32.0) at 3, 6, and 12 months, respectively. A majority of enrolled subjects were responders at 3 (75.5%), 6 (74.7%), and 12 months (69.7%). RMANOVA revealed a statistically significant change for NRS, PCS, PDI, SF-36, SF-MPQ-2, and STAI scores. At 3 months, the majority of subjects (85.7%) were either very satisfied or satisfied with their device, with similar results at 6 and 12 months. At 3 months, the majority of subjects (73.3%) reported greatly improved or improved QOL with similar results at 6 and 12 months. Spinal cord stimulation provided pain relief and significant improvement of patient psychological and functional outcome measures. © 2016 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Multidisciplinary team approach to traumatic spinal cord injuries: a single institution's quality improvement project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizo, Georgina; Sciarretta, Jason D; Gibson, Stefanie; Muertos, Keely; Holmes, Sharon; Denittis, Felicia; Cheatle, Joseph; Davis, John; Pepe, Antonio

    2018-04-01

    A stepwise multidisciplinary team (MDT) approach to the injured trauma patient has been reported to have an overall benefit, with reduction in mortality and improved morbidity. Based on clinical experience, we hypothesized that implementation of a dedicated Spinal Cord Injury Service (SCIS) would impact outcomes of a patient specific population on the trauma service. The trauma center registry was retrospectively queried, from January 2011 through December 2015, for patients presenting with a spinal cord injury. In 2013, a twice weekly rounding SCIS MDT was initiated. This new multidisciplinary service, the post-SCIS, was compared to the 2011-2012 pre-SCIS. The two groups were compared across patient demographics, mechanism of injury, surgical procedures, and disposition at discharge. The primary outcome was mortality. Secondary endpoints also included the incidence of complications, hospital length of stay (HLOS), ICU LOS, ventilator free days, and all hospital-acquired infectious complications. Logistic regression and Student's t test were used to analyze data. Ninety-five patients were identified. Of these patients, 41 (43%) pre-SCIS and 54 (57%) post-SCIS patients were compared. Mean age was 46.9 years and 79% male. Overall, adjusted mortality rate between the two groups was significant with the implementation of the post-SCIS (p = 0.033). In comparison, the post-SCIS revealed shorter HLOS (23 vs 34.8 days, p = 0.004), increased ventilator free days (20.2 vs 63.3 days, p < 0.001), and less nosocomial infections (1.8 vs 22%, p = 0.002). While the post-SCIS mean ICU LOS was shorter (12 vs 17.9 days, p = 0.089), this relationship was not significant. The application of an SCIS team in addition to the trauma service suggests that a structured coordinated approach can have an expected improvement in hospital outcomes and shorter length of stays. We believe that this clinical collaboration provides distinct specialist perspectives and, therefore

  16. Genetic and Pharmacological Inhibition of p38α Improves Locomotor Recovery after Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umezawa, Hiroki; Naito, Yusuke; Tanaka, Kensuke; Yoshioka, Kento; Suzuki, Kenichi; Sudo, Tatsuhiko; Hagihara, Masahiko; Hatano, Masahiko; Tatsumi, Koichiro; Kasuya, Yoshitoshi

    2017-01-01

    One of the mitogen-activated protein kinases, p38α plays a crucial role in various inflammatory diseases and apoptosis of various types of cells. In this study, we investigated the pathophysiological roles of p38α in spinal cord injury (SCI), using a mouse model. Lateral hemisection at T9 of the SC was performed in wild type (WT) and p38α+/- mice (p38α-/- showed embryonic lethality). p38α+/- mice showed a better functional recovery from SCI-associated paralyzed hindlimbs compared to WT mice at 7 days post-injury (dpi), which remained until 28 dpi (an end time point of monitoring the behavior). In histopathological analysis at 28 dpi, there was more axonal regeneration with remyelination on the caudal side of the lesion epicenter in p38α+/- mice than in WT mice. At 7 dpi, infiltration of inflammatory cells into the lesion and expression of cytokines in the lesion were reduced in p38α+/- mice compared with WT mice. At the same time point, the number of apoptotic oligodendrocytes in the white matter at the caudal boarder of the lesion of p38α+/- mice was lower than that of WT mice. At 14 dpi, more neural and oligodendrocyte precursor cells in the gray matter and white matter, respectively, were observed around the lesion epicenter of p38α+/- mice compared with the case of WT mice. At the same time point, astrocytic scar formation was less apparent in p38α+/- than in WT mice, while compaction of inflammatory immune cells associated with the wound contraction was more apparent in p38α+/- than in WT mice. Furthermore, we verified the effectiveness of oral administration of SB239063, a p38α inhibitor on the hindlimb locomotor recovery after SCI. These results suggest that p38α deeply contributes to the pathogenesis of SCI and that inhibition of p38α is a beneficial strategy to recovery from SCI. PMID:28261102

  17. An effective strategy of magnetic stem cell delivery for spinal cord injury therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tukmachev, Dmitry; Lunov, Oleg; Zablotskii, Vitalii; Dejneka, Alexandr; Babic, Michal; Syková, Eva; Kubinová, Šárka

    2015-02-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a condition that results in significant mortality and morbidity. Treatment of SCI utilizing stem cell transplantation represents a promising therapy. However, current conventional treatments are limited by inefficient delivery strategies of cells into the injured tissue. In this study, we designed a magnetic system and used it to accumulate stem cells labelled with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) at a specific site of a SCI lesion. The loading of stem cells with engineered SPIONs that guarantees sufficient attractive magnetic forces was achieved. Further, the magnetic system allowed rapid guidance of the SPION-labelled cells precisely to the lesion location. Histological analysis of cell distribution throughout the cerebrospinal channel showed a good correlation with the calculated distribution of magnetic forces exerted onto the transplanted cells. The results suggest that focused targeting and fast delivery of stem cells can be achieved using the proposed non-invasive magnetic system. With future implementation the proposed targeting and delivery strategy bears advantages for the treatment of disease requiring fast stem cell transplantation.Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a condition that results in significant mortality and morbidity. Treatment of SCI utilizing stem cell transplantation represents a promising therapy. However, current conventional treatments are limited by inefficient delivery strategies of cells into the injured tissue. In this study, we designed a magnetic system and used it to accumulate stem cells labelled with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) at a specific site of a SCI lesion. The loading of stem cells with engineered SPIONs that guarantees sufficient attractive magnetic forces was achieved. Further, the magnetic system allowed rapid guidance of the SPION-labelled cells precisely to the lesion location. Histological analysis of cell distribution throughout the cerebrospinal

  18. Twisted tail: spinal epidural lipomatosis responding to chemotherapy in a patient with non-small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasoodi, A.; McAleese, J.; Grey, A.; Stranex, S.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Spinal epidural lipomatosis is a rare condition, described in corticoadrenal hyperactivity. It is most commonly seen in association with steroid administration and occasionally with Cushing's syndrome. This is the first case report of spinal epidural lipomatosis as presenting finding in a patient with non-small-cell lung carcinoma without any evidence of endogenous or exogenous hypercortisolism. The additional interesting feature is the paraneoplastic behaviour of this condition and even more interestingly its resolution following chemo-treatment of the primary cancer. Spinal epidural lipomatosis is a benign condition, which must be considered in the differential diagnosis of spinal cord compression in this category of patients. Its pathophysiology remains to be discovered in future.

  19. Spinal dual-energy computed tomography: improved visualisation of spinal tumorous growth with a noise-optimised advanced monoenergetic post-processing algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraus, Mareen; Weiss, Jakob; Selo, Nadja; Notohamiprodjo, Mike; Bamberg, Fabian; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Othman, Ahmed E. [Eberhard Karls University Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Flohr, Thomas [Siemens Healthcare GmbH, Erlangen (Germany)

    2016-11-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of advanced monoenergetic post-processing (MEI+) on the visualisation of spinal growth in contrast-enhanced dual-energy CT (DE-CT). Twenty-six oncologic patients (age, 61 ± 17 years) with spinal tumorous growth were included. Patients underwent contrast-enhanced dual-energy CT on a third-generation dual-source CT scanner. Image acquisition was in dual-energy mode (100/Sn150kV), and scans were initiated 90 s after contrast agent administration. Virtual monoenergetic images (MEI+) were reconstructed at four different kiloelectron volts (keV) levels (40, 60, 80, 100) and compared to the standard blended portal venous computed tomography (CT{sub pv}). Image quality was assessed qualitatively (conspicuity, delineation, sharpness, noise, confidence; two independent readers; 5-point Likert scale; 5 = excellent) and quantitatively by calculating signal-to-noise (SNR) and contrast-to-noise-ratios (CNR). For a subgroup of 10 patients with MR imaging within 4 months of the DE-CT, we compared the monoenergetic images to the MRIs qualitatively. Highest contrast of spinal growth was observed in MEI+ at 40 keV, with significant differences to CT{sub pv} and all other keV reconstructions (60, 80, 100; p < 0.01). Highest conspicuity, delineation and sharpness were observed in MEI+ at 40 keV, with significant differences to CT{sub pv} (p < 0.001). Similarly, MEI+ at 40 keV yielded highest diagnostic confidence (4.6 ± 0.6), also with significant differences to CT{sub pv} (3.45 ± 0.9, p < 0.001) and to high keV reconstructions (80, 100; p ≤ 0.001). Similarly, CNR calculations revealed highest scores for MEI+ at 40 keV followed by 60 keV and CT{sub pv}, with significant differences to high keV MEI+ reconstructions. Qualitative analysis scores peaked for MR images followed by the MEI+ 40-keV reconstructions. MEI+ at low keV levels can significantly improve image quality and delineation of spinal growth in patients with portal

  20. Astrocytes from the Contused Spinal Cord Inhibit Oligodendrocyte Differentiation of Adult Oligodendrocyte Precursor Cells by Increasing the Expression of Bone Morphogenetic Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yaping; Cheng, Xiaoxin; He, Qian; Zheng, Yiyan; Kim, Dong H.; Whittemore, Scott R.; Cao, Qilin L.

    2011-01-01

    Promotion of remyelination is an important therapeutic strategy to facilitate functional recovery after traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI). Transplantation of neural stem cells (NSCs) or oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) has been used to enhance remyelination after SCI. However, the microenvironment in the injured spinal cord is inhibitory for oligodendrocyte (OL) differentiation of NSCs or OPCs. Identifying the signaling pathways that inhibit OL differentiation in the injured spinal cor...

  1. Remyelination of the injured spinal cord

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Masanori; Li, Bingcang; Lankford, Karen L.; Radtke, Christine; Kocsis, Jeffery D.

    2008-01-01

    Contusive spinal cord injury (SCI) can result in necrosis of the spinal cord, but often long white matter tracts outside of the central necrotic core are demyelinated. One experimental strategy to improve functional outcome following SCI is to transplant myelin-forming cells to remyelinate these axons and improve conduction. This review focuses on transplantation studies using olfactory ensheathing cell (OEC) to improve functional outcome in experimental models of SCI and demyelination. The biology of the OEC, and recent experimental research and clinical studies using OECs as a potential cell therapy candidate are discussed. PMID:17618995

  2. Human mesenchymal stem cells modulate inflammatory cytokines after spinal cord injury in rat

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Machová-Urdzíková, Lucia; Růžička, Jiří; LaBagnara, M.; Kárová, Kristýna; Kubinová, Šárka; Jiráková, Klára; Murali, R.; Syková, Eva; Jhanwar-Uniyal, M.; Jendelová, Pavla

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 7 (2014), s. 11275-11293 E-ISSN 1422-0067 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP13-15031P; GA ČR(CZ) GA13-00939S; GA MŠk LH12024; GA MŠk EE2.3.30.0018; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Grant - others:GAUK(CZ) 521712 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : mesenchymal stem cells * spinal cord injury * inflammatory cytokines Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 2.862, year: 2014

  3. Biomaterials combined with cell therapy for treatment of spinal cord injury

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kubinová, Šárka; Syková, Eva

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 2 (2012), s. 207-224 ISSN 1746-0751 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/10/1560; GA ČR(CZ) GAP304/11/0731; GA ČR(CZ) GAP304/11/0653; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA500390902; GA AV ČR(CZ) KAN200520804; GA MŠk 1M0538 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512; CEZ:AV0Z50390703 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : biomaterial cell therapy * scaffold * spinal cord injury Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 3.873, year: 2012

  4. Benzodiazepine receptor turnover in embryonic chick brain and spinal cord cell cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borden, L.A.

    1985-01-01

    The turnover (synthesis and degradation) of the benzodiazepine receptor (BZD-R) in embryonic chick brain and spinal cord cell cultures was monitored using flunitrazepam (GNZM) as a photoaffinity label. To measure BZD-R appearance, intact cell cultures were incubated with 100 nM RNZM and irradiated with ultraviolet light; this process, referred to as photoinactivation, resulted in a 75% decrease in the subsequent reversible binding of 5 nM [ 3 H]FNZM. Following photoinactivation, [ 3 H]FNZM binding sites reappeared at a rate of 6 +/- 1.5%/hour (n = 7) in brain cultures and at 8%/hour (n = 2) in spinal cord cultures. Reappearance reflects de novo receptors synthesis. To examine the degradation of existing receptors, cultures were photolabeled with 5 nM [ 3 H]FNZM, washed, and then the decrease in cell-associated radioactivity, or the efflux of radioactivity into the medium, was monitored. The released radioactivity did not comigrate with authentic FNZM on thin-layer-chromatographs, indicating that release did not represent dissociation of ligand from the photolabeled receptor. The BZD-R appears to be degraded by an energy-dependent, non-lysosomal pathway. These experiments represent the first direct examination of the turnover of a neurotransmitter receptor localized to the central nervous system; this information will be valuable in elucidating the mechanisms by which receptor levels are altered following chronic drug treatment

  5. Adult-type myogenesis of the frog Xenopus laevis specifically suppressed by notochord cells but promoted by spinal cord cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamane, Hitomi; Ihara, Setsunosuke; Kuroda, Masaaki; Nishikawa, Akio

    2011-08-01

    Larval-to-adult myogenic conversion occurs in the dorsal muscle but not in the tail muscle during Xenopus laevis metamorphosis. To know the mechanism for tail-specific suppression of adult myogenesis, response character was compared between adult myogenic cells (Ad-cells) and larval tail myogenic cells (La-cells) to a Sonic hedgehog (Shh) inhibitor, notochord (Nc) cells, and spinal cord (SC) cells in vitro. Cyclopamine, an Shh inhibitor, suppressed the differentiation of cultured Ad (but not La) cells, suggesting the significance of Shh signaling in promoting adult myogenesis. To test the possibility that Shh-producing axial elements (notochord and spinal cord) regulate adult myogenesis, Ad-cells or La-cells were co-cultured with Nc or SC cells. The results showed that differentiation of Ad-cells were strongly inhibited by Nc cells but promoted by SC cells. If Ad-cells were "separately" co-cultured with Nc cells without direct cell-cell interactions, adult differentiation was not inhibited but rather promoted, suggesting that Nc cells have two roles, one is a short-range suppression and another is a long-range promotion for adult myogenesis. Immunohistochemical analysis showed both notochord and spinal cord express the N-terminal Shh fragment throughout metamorphosis. The "spinal cord-promotion" and long-range effect by Nc cells on adult myogenesis is thus involved in Shh signaling, while the signaling concerning the short-range "Nc suppression" will be determined by future studies. Interestingly, these effects, "Nc suppression" and "SC promotion" were not observed for La-cells. Situation where the spinal cord/notochord cross-sectional ratio is quite larger in tadpole trunk than in the tail seems to contribute to trunk-specific promotion and tail-specific suppression of adult myogenesis during Xenopus metamorphosis.

  6. Transplantation of mononuclear cells from human umbilical cord blood promotes functional recovery after traumatic spinal cord injury in Wistar rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, L.P.; Iglesias, D.; Nicola, F.C.; Steffens, D.; Valentim, L.; Witczak, A.; Zanatta, G.; Achaval, M.; Pranke, P.; Netto, C.A.

    2011-01-01

    Cell transplantation is a promising experimental treatment for spinal cord injury. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of mononuclear cells from human umbilical cord blood in promoting functional recovery when transplanted after a contusion spinal cord injury. Female Wistar rats (12 weeks old) were submitted to spinal injury with a MASCIS impactor and divided into 4 groups: control, surgical control, spinal cord injury, and one cell-treated lesion group. Mononuclear cells from umbilical cord blood of human male neonates were transplanted in two experiments: a) 1 h after surgery, into the injury site at a concentration of 5 x 10 6 cells diluted in 10 µL 0.9% NaCl (N = 8-10 per group); b) into the cisterna magna, 9 days after lesion at a concentration of 5 x 10 6 cells diluted in 150 µL 0.9% NaCl (N = 12-14 per group). The transplanted animals were immunosuppressed with cyclosporin-A (10 mg/kg per day). The BBB scale was used to evaluate motor behavior and the injury site was analyzed with immunofluorescent markers to label human transplanted cells, oligodendrocytes, neurons, and astrocytes. Spinal cord injury rats had 25% loss of cord tissue and cell treatment did not affect lesion extension. Transplanted cells survived in the injured area for 6 weeks after the procedure and both transplanted groups showed better motor recovery than the untreated ones (P < 0.05). The transplantation of mononuclear cells from human umbilical cord blood promoted functional recovery with no evidence of cell differentiation

  7. Transplantation of mononuclear cells from human umbilical cord blood promotes functional recovery after traumatic spinal cord injury in Wistar rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, L.P. [Programa de Pós-Graduação em Neurociências, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Iglesias, D. [Laboratório de Hematologia e Células-Tronco, Faculdade de Farmácia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Nicola, F.C. [Departamento de Bioquímica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Steffens, D. [Laboratório de Hematologia e Células-Tronco, Faculdade de Farmácia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Valentim, L.; Witczak, A.; Zanatta, G. [Departamento de Bioquímica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Achaval, M. [Departamento de Ciências Morfológicas, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Pranke, P. [Laboratório de Hematologia e Células-Tronco, Faculdade de Farmácia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Netto, C.A. [Departamento de Bioquímica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2011-12-23

    Cell transplantation is a promising experimental treatment for spinal cord injury. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of mononuclear cells from human umbilical cord blood in promoting functional recovery when transplanted after a contusion spinal cord injury. Female Wistar rats (12 weeks old) were submitted to spinal injury with a MASCIS impactor and divided into 4 groups: control, surgical control, spinal cord injury, and one cell-treated lesion group. Mononuclear cells from umbilical cord blood of human male neonates were transplanted in two experiments: a) 1 h after surgery, into the injury site at a concentration of 5 x 10{sup 6} cells diluted in 10 µL 0.9% NaCl (N = 8-10 per group); b) into the cisterna magna, 9 days after lesion at a concentration of 5 x 10{sup 6} cells diluted in 150 µL 0.9% NaCl (N = 12-14 per group). The transplanted animals were immunosuppressed with cyclosporin-A (10 mg/kg per day). The BBB scale was used to evaluate motor behavior and the injury site was analyzed with immunofluorescent markers to label human transplanted cells, oligodendrocytes, neurons, and astrocytes. Spinal cord injury rats had 25% loss of cord tissue and cell treatment did not affect lesion extension. Transplanted cells survived in the injured area for 6 weeks after the procedure and both transplanted groups showed better motor recovery than the untreated ones (P < 0.05). The transplantation of mononuclear cells from human umbilical cord blood promoted functional recovery with no evidence of cell differentiation.

  8. Isolation of mineralizing Nestin+ Nkx6.1+ vascular muscular cells from the adult human spinal cord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillon Hélène

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The adult central nervous system (CNS contains different populations of immature cells that could possibly be used to repair brain and spinal cord lesions. The diversity and the properties of these cells in the human adult CNS remain to be fully explored. We previously isolated Nestin+ Sox2+ neural multipotential cells from the adult human spinal cord using the neurosphere method (i.e. non adherent conditions and defined medium. Results Here we report the isolation and long term propagation of another population of Nestin+ cells from this tissue using adherent culture conditions and serum. QPCR and immunofluorescence indicated that these cells had mesenchymal features as evidenced by the expression of Snai2 and Twist1 and lack of expression of neural markers such as Sox2, Olig2 or GFAP. Indeed, these cells expressed markers typical of smooth muscle vascular cells such as Calponin, Caldesmone and Acta2 (Smooth muscle actin. These cells could not differentiate into chondrocytes, adipocytes, neuronal and glial cells, however they readily mineralized when placed in osteogenic conditions. Further characterization allowed us to identify the Nkx6.1 transcription factor as a marker for these cells. Nkx6.1 was expressed in vivo by CNS vascular muscular cells located in the parenchyma and the meninges. Conclusion Smooth muscle cells expressing Nestin and Nkx6.1 is the main cell population derived from culturing human spinal cord cells in adherent conditions with serum. Mineralization of these cells in vitro could represent a valuable model for studying calcifications of CNS vessels which are observed in pathological situations or as part of the normal aging. In addition, long term propagation of these cells will allow the study of their interaction with other CNS cells and their implication in scar formation during spinal cord injury.

  9. Combining neurotrophin-transduced schwann cells and rolipram to promote functional recovery from subacute spinal cord injury.

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    Flora, Govinder; Joseph, Gravil; Patel, Samik; Singh, Amanpreet; Bleicher, Drew; Barakat, David J; Louro, Jack; Fenton, Stephanie; Garg, Maneesh; Bunge, Mary Bartlett; Pearse, Damien D

    2013-01-01

    Following spinal cord injury (SCI), both an inhibitory environment and lack of intrinsic growth capacity impede axonal regeneration. In a previous study, prevention of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (AMP) hydrolysis by the phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitor rolipram, in combination with Schwann cell (SC) grafts, promoted significant supraspinal and proprioceptive fiber growth and/or sparing and improved locomotion. In another study, transplanted SCs transduced to generate a bifunctional neurotrophin (D15A) led to significant increases in graft SCs and axons, including supraspinal and myelinated axons. Here we studied the growth and myelination of local and supraspinal axons and functional outcome following the combination of rolipram administration and neurotrophin-transduced SC implantation after SCI. Rolipram was administered subcutaneously for 4 weeks immediately after contusion at vertebral T8 (25.0-mm weight drop, MASCIS impactor). GFP or GFP-D15A-transduced SCs were injected into the injury epicenter 1 week after SCI. GFP-D15A SC grafts and GFP SC grafts with rolipram contained significantly more serotonergic fibers compared to GFP SCs. SC myelinated axons were increased significantly in GFP SC with rolipram-treated animals compared to animals receiving SCI alone. Rolipram administered with either GFP or GFP-D15A SCs significantly increased numbers of brain stem-derived axons below the lesion/implant area and improved hindlimb function. Compared to the single treatments, the combination led to the largest SC grafts, the highest numbers of serotonergic fibers in the grafts, and increased numbers of axons from the reticular formation below the lesion/implant area and provided the greatest improvement in hindlimb function. These findings demonstrate the therapeutic potential for a combination therapy involving the maintenance of cyclic AMP levels and neurotrophin-transduced SCs to repair the subacutely injured spinal cord.

  10. Improved photovoltaic cells and electrodes

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    Skotheim, T.A.

    1983-06-29

    Improved photovoltaic cells and electrodes for use therein, particularly electrodes employing amorphous silicon or polyacetylene coating are produced by a process which includes filling pinholes or porous openings in the coatings by electrochemical oxidation of selected monomers to deposit insulating polymer in the openings.

  11. Exoskeleton Training May Improve Level of Physical Activity After Spinal Cord Injury: A Case Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Rodney; Sumrell, Ryan; Villadelgado, Lynette; Khalil, Refka E.; Lavis, Timothy

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To determine whether the use of a powered exoskeleton can improve parameters of physical activity as determined by walking time, stand up time, and number of steps in persons with spinal cord injury (SCI). Methods: Three men with complete (1 C5 AIS A and 2 T4 AIS A) and one man with incomplete (C5 AIS D) SCI participated in a clinical rehabilitation program. In the training program, the participants walked once weekly using a powered exoskeleton (Ekso) for approximately 1 hour over the course of 10 to 15 weeks. Walking time, stand up time, ratio of walking to stand up time, and number of steps were determined. Oxygen uptake (L/min), energy expenditure, and body composition were measured in one participant after training. Results: Over the course of 10 to 15 weeks, the maximum walking time increased from 12 to 57 minutes and the number of steps increased from 59 to 2,284 steps. At the end of the training, the 4 participants were able to exercise for 26 to 59 minutes. For one participant, oxygen uptake increased from 0.27 L/min during rest to 0.55 L/min during walking. Maximum walking speed was 0.24 m/s, and delta energy expenditure increased by 1.4 kcal/min during walking. Body composition showed a modest decrease in absolute fat mass in one participant. Conclusion: Exoskeleton training may improve parameters of physical activity after SCI by increasing the number of steps and walking time. Other benefits may include increasing energy expenditure and improving the profile of body composition. PMID:29339900

  12. Exoskeleton Training May Improve Level of Physical Activity After Spinal Cord Injury: A Case Series.

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    Gorgey, Ashraf S; Wade, Rodney; Sumrell, Ryan; Villadelgado, Lynette; Khalil, Refka E; Lavis, Timothy

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To determine whether the use of a powered exoskeleton can improve parameters of physical activity as determined by walking time, stand up time, and number of steps in persons with spinal cord injury (SCI). Methods: Three men with complete (1 C5 AIS A and 2 T4 AIS A) and one man with incomplete (C5 AIS D) SCI participated in a clinical rehabilitation program. In the training program, the participants walked once weekly using a powered exoskeleton (Ekso) for approximately 1 hour over the course of 10 to 15 weeks. Walking time, stand up time, ratio of walking to stand up time, and number of steps were determined. Oxygen uptake (L/min), energy expenditure, and body composition were measured in one participant after training. Results: Over the course of 10 to 15 weeks, the maximum walking time increased from 12 to 57 minutes and the number of steps increased from 59 to 2,284 steps. At the end of the training, the 4 participants were able to exercise for 26 to 59 minutes. For one participant, oxygen uptake increased from 0.27 L/min during rest to 0.55 L/min during walking. Maximum walking speed was 0.24 m/s, and delta energy expenditure increased by 1.4 kcal/min during walking. Body composition showed a modest decrease in absolute fat mass in one participant. Conclusion: Exoskeleton training may improve parameters of physical activity after SCI by increasing the number of steps and walking time. Other benefits may include increasing energy expenditure and improving the profile of body composition.

  13. The contribution of spinal glial cells to chronic pain behaviour in the monosodium iodoacetate model of osteoarthritic pain

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    Sagar Devi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical studies of osteoarthritis (OA suggest central sensitization may contribute to the chronic pain experienced. This preclinical study used the monosodium iodoacetate (MIA model of OA joint pain to investigate the potential contribution of spinal sensitization, in particular spinal glial cell activation, to pain behaviour in this model. Experimental OA was induced in the rat by the intra-articular injection of MIA and pain behaviour (change in weight bearing and distal allodynia was assessed. Spinal cord microglia (Iba1 staining and astrocyte (GFAP immunofluorescence activation were measured at 7, 14 and 28 days post MIA-treatment. The effects of two known inhibitors of glial activation, nimesulide and minocycline, on pain behaviour and activation of microglia and astrocytes were assessed. Results Seven days following intra-articular injection of MIA, microglia in the ipsilateral spinal cord were activated (p Conclusions Here we provide evidence for a contribution of spinal glial cells to pain behaviour, in particular distal allodynia, in this model of osteoarthritic pain. Our data suggest there is a potential role of glial cells in the central sensitization associated with OA, which may provide a novel analgesic target for the treatment of OA pain.

  14. Observations on the interactions of Schwann cells and astrocytes following x irradiation of neonatal rat spinal cord

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    Blakemore, W F; Patterson, R C

    1975-10-01

    Myelination was inhibited in the spinal cord of three day-old rats with 2000 rads of x irradiation. Myelination subsequently occurred as a result of caudal migration of oligodendrocytes and extensive invasion of the cord by Schwann cells. Although oligodendrocytes were present in areas containing Schwann cells, astrocytes were absent. The presence of Schwann cells in the neuropil of the spinal cord did not stimulate production of basement membrane by astrocytes, so no new glial limiting membrane was formed. Evidence is presented which suggests that if astrocytes do not form a glial limiting membrane when opposed by large numbers of Schwann cells they are destroyed by the invading cells. It is suggested that the glial limiting membrane normally inhibits entry of Schwann cells into the central nervous system; if this is destroyed and not reconstituted, Schwann cells can migrate freely into the neuropil.

  15. Delayed expression of cell cycle proteins contributes to astroglial scar formation and chronic inflammation after rat spinal cord contusion

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    Wu Junfang

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI induces secondary tissue damage that is associated with astrogliosis and inflammation. We previously reported that acute upregulation of a cluster of cell-cycle-related genes contributes to post-mitotic cell death and secondary damage after SCI. However, it remains unclear whether cell cycle activation continues more chronically and contributes to more delayed glial change. Here we examined expression of cell cycle-related proteins up to 4 months following SCI, as well as the effects of the selective cyclin-dependent kinase (CDKs inhibitor CR8, on astrogliosis and microglial activation in a rat SCI contusion model. Methods Adult male rats were subjected to moderate spinal cord contusion injury at T8 using a well-characterized weight-drop model. Tissue from the lesion epicenter was obtained 4 weeks or 4 months post-injury, and processed for protein expression and lesion volume. Functional recovery was assessed over the 4 months after injury. Results Immunoblot analysis demonstrated a marked continued upregulation of cell cycle-related proteins − including cyclin D1 and E, CDK4, E2F5 and PCNA − for 4 months post-injury that were highly expressed by GFAP+ astrocytes and microglia, and co-localized with inflammatory-related proteins. CR8 administrated systemically 3 h post-injury and continued for 7 days limited the sustained elevation of cell cycle proteins and immunoreactivity of GFAP, Iba-1 and p22PHOX − a key component of NADPH oxidase − up to 4 months after SCI. CR8 treatment significantly reduced lesion volume, which typically progressed in untreated animals between 1 and 4 months after trauma. Functional recovery was also significantly improved by CR8 treatment after SCI from week 2 through week 16. Conclusions These data demonstrate that cell cycle-related proteins are chronically upregulated after SCI and may contribute to astroglial scar

  16. Simulating spinal border cells and cerebellar granule cells under locomotion--a case study of spinocerebellar information processing.

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    Anton Spanne

    Full Text Available The spinocerebellar systems are essential for the brain in the performance of coordinated movements, but our knowledge about the spinocerebellar interactions is very limited. Recently, several crucial pieces of information have been acquired for the spinal border cell (SBC component of the ventral spinocerebellar tract (VSCT, as well as the effects of SBC mossy fiber activation in granule cells of the cerebellar cortex. SBCs receive monosynaptic input from the reticulospinal tract (RST, which is an important driving system under locomotion, and disynaptic inhibition from Ib muscle afferents. The patterns of activity of RST neurons and Ib afferents under locomotion are known. The activity of VSCT neurons under fictive locomotion, i.e. without sensory feedback, is also known, but there is little information on how these neurons behave under actual locomotion and for cerebellar granule cells receiving SBC input this is completely unknown. But the available information makes it possible to simulate the interactions between the spinal and cerebellar neuronal circuitries with a relatively large set of biological constraints. Using a model of the various neuronal elements and the network they compose, we simulated the modulation of the SBCs and their target granule cells under locomotion and hence generated testable predictions of their general pattern of modulation under this condition. This particular system offers a unique opportunity to simulate these interactions with a limited number of assumptions, which helps making the model biologically plausible. Similar principles of information processing may be expected to apply to all spinocerebellar systems.

  17. Early Intravenous Delivery of Human Brain Stromal Cells Modulates Systemic Inflammation and Leads to Vasoprotection in Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury.

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    Badner, Anna; Vawda, Reaz; Laliberte, Alex; Hong, James; Mikhail, Mirriam; Jose, Alejandro; Dragas, Rachel; Fehlings, Michael

    2016-08-01

    : Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a life-threatening condition with multifaceted complications and limited treatment options. In SCI, the initial physical trauma is closely followed by a series of secondary events, including inflammation and blood spinal cord barrier (BSCB) disruption, which further exacerbate injury. This secondary pathology is partially mediated by the systemic immune response to trauma, in which cytokine production leads to the recruitment/activation of inflammatory cells. Because early intravenous delivery of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) has been shown to mitigate inflammation in various models of neurologic disease, this study aimed to assess these effects in a rat model of SCI (C7-T1, 35-gram clip compression) using human brain-derived stromal cells. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction for a human-specific DNA sequence was used to assess cell biodistribution/clearance and confirmed that only a small proportion (approximately 0.001%-0.002%) of cells are delivered to the spinal cord, with the majority residing in the lung, liver, and spleen. Intriguingly, although cell populations drastically declined in all aforementioned organs, there remained a persistent population in the spleen at 7 days. Furthermore, the cell infusion significantly increased splenic and circulating levels of interleukin-10-a potent anti-inflammatory cytokine. Through this suppression of the systemic inflammatory response, the cells also reduced acute spinal cord BSCB permeability, hemorrhage, and lesion volume. These early effects further translated into enhanced functional recovery and tissue sparing 10 weeks after SCI. This work demonstrates an exciting therapeutic approach whereby a minimally invasive cell-transplantation procedure can effectively reduce secondary damage after SCI through systemic immunomodulation. Central nervous system pericytes (perivascular stromal cells) have recently gained significant attention within the scientific community. In addition to

  18. Ultrastructural study of myelinating cells and sub-pial astrocytes in developing rat spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagashima, K

    1979-12-01

    The anterior funiculus of the spinal cervical cord of post-natal rats was examined ultrastructurally. The myelinating cells found one day after brith contained a large amount of evenly distributed ribosomes up to the outer tongue of mesaxons, representing the cytoplasmic density. These cells were separated by astrocytic processes from the pial basement membrane, even when they were located on the pial surface. Astrocytes contained glial fibrils from one day onwards and often attached their processes to the pial basement membrane. Although the cytoplasmic processes of astrocytes occasionally wrapped axons, they were never shown to form the initial layer of myelin sheaths. However, the tenuous processes of the sub-pial astrocytes were occasionally rolled in myelin lamellae, as if a part of the myelin sheaths was constructed by astrocytic processes. The interpretation for this finding is discussed in relation to function and potency of the astrocytes, and variations and anomalies of nervous ontogeny.

  19. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells mediate immune suppression in spinal cord injury.

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    Wang, Lei; Yu, Wei-bo; Tao, Lian-yuan; Xu, Qing

    2016-01-15

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is characterized by the loss of motor and sensory functions in areas below the level of the lesion and numerous accompanying deficits. Previous studies have suggested that myeloid-derived suppressor cell (MDSC)-induced immune depression may play a pivotal role in the course of SCI. However, the concrete mechanism of these changes regarding immune suppression remains unknown. Here, we created an SCI mouse model to gain further evidence regarding the relationship between MDSCs following SCI and T lymphocyte suppression. We showed that in the SCI mouse model, the expanding MDSCs have the capacity to suppress T cell proliferation, and this suppression could be reversed by blocking the arginase. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Feasibility of combination allogeneic stem cell therapy for spinal cord injury: a case report

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    Ichim Thomas E

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cellular therapy for spinal cord injury (SCI is overviewed focusing on bone marrow mononuclear cells, olfactory ensheathing cells, and mesenchymal stem cells. A case is made for the possibility of combining cell types, as well as for allogeneic use. We report the case of 29 year old male who suffered a crush fracture of the L1 vertebral body, lacking lower sensorimotor function, being a score A on the ASIA scale. Stem cell therapy comprised of intrathecal administration of allogeneic umbilical cord blood ex-vivo expanded CD34 and umbilical cord matrix MSC was performed 5 months, 8 months, and 14 months after injury. Cell administration was well tolerated with no adverse effects observed. Neuropathic pain subsided from intermittent 10/10 to once a week 3/10 VAS. Recovery of muscle, bowel and sexual function was noted, along with a decrease in ASIA score to "D". This case supports further investigation into allogeneic-based stem cell therapies for SCI.

  1. Therapeutic approaches for spinal cord injury

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    Alexandre Fogaça Cristante

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This study reviews the literature concerning possible therapeutic approaches for spinal cord injury. Spinal cord injury is a disabling and irreversible condition that has high economic and social costs. There are both primary and secondary mechanisms of damage to the spinal cord. The primary lesion is the mechanical injury itself. The secondary lesion results from one or more biochemical and cellular processes that are triggered by the primary lesion. The frustration of health professionals in treating a severe spinal cord injury was described in 1700 BC in an Egyptian surgical papyrus that was translated by Edwin Smith; the papyrus reported spinal fractures as a ''disease that should not be treated.'' Over the last biological or pharmacological treatment method. Science is unraveling the mechanisms of cell protection and neuroregeneration, but clinically, we only provide supportive care for patients with spinal cord injuries. By combining these treatments, researchers attempt to enhance the functional recovery of patients with spinal cord injuries. Advances in the last decade have allowed us to encourage the development of experimental studies in the field of spinal cord regeneration. The combination of several therapeutic strategies should, at minimum, allow for partial functional recoveries for these patients, which could improve their quality of life.

  2. Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Combined with Methylprednisolone Improves Functional Outcomes in Rats with Experimental Acute Spinal Cord Injury

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    William Gemio Jacobsen Teixeira

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effects of combined treatment with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF and methylprednisolone in rats subjected to experimental spinal cord injury. METHODS: Forty Wistar rats received a moderate spinal cord injury and were divided into four groups: control (no treatment; G-CSF (G-CSF at the time of injury and daily over the next five days; methylprednisolone (methylprednisolone for 24 h; and G-CSF/Methylprednisolone (methylprednisolone for 24 h and G-CSF at the time of injury and daily over the next five days. Functional evaluation was performed using the Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan score on days 2, 7, 14, 21, 28, 35 and 42 following injury. Motor-evoked potentials were evaluated. Histological examination of the spinal cord lesion was performed immediately after euthanasia on day 42. RESULTS: Eight animals were excluded (2 from each group due to infection, a normal Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan score at their first evaluation, or autophagy, and 32 were evaluated. The combination of methylprednisolone and G-CSF promoted greater functional improvement than methylprednisolone or G-CSF alone (p<0.001. This combination also exhibited a synergistic effect, with improvements in hyperemia and cellular infiltration at the injury site (p<0.001. The groups displayed no neurophysiological differences (latency p=0.85; amplitude p=0.75. CONCLUSION: Methylprednisolone plus G-CSF promotes functional and histological improvements superior to those achieved by either of these drugs alone when treating spinal cord contusion injuries in rats. Combining the two drugs did have a synergistic effect.

  3. Human dental pulp-derived stem cells promote locomotor recovery after complete transection of the rat spinal cord by multiple neuro-regenerative mechanisms.

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    Sakai, Kiyoshi; Yamamoto, Akihito; Matsubara, Kohki; Nakamura, Shoko; Naruse, Mami; Yamagata, Mari; Sakamoto, Kazuma; Tauchi, Ryoji; Wakao, Norimitsu; Imagama, Shiro; Hibi, Hideharu; Kadomatsu, Kenji; Ishiguro, Naoki; Ueda, Minoru

    2012-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) often leads to persistent functional deficits due to loss of neurons and glia and to limited axonal regeneration after injury. Here we report that transplantation of human dental pulp stem cells into the completely transected adult rat spinal cord resulted in marked recovery of hind limb locomotor functions. Transplantation of human bone marrow stromal cells or skin-derived fibroblasts led to substantially less recovery of locomotor function. The human dental pulp stem cells exhibited three major neuroregenerative activities. First, they inhibited the SCI-induced apoptosis of neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes, which improved the preservation of neuronal filaments and myelin sheaths. Second, they promoted the regeneration of transected axons by directly inhibiting multiple axon growth inhibitors, including chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan and myelin-associated glycoprotein, via paracrine mechanisms. Last, they replaced lost cells by differentiating into mature oligodendrocytes under the extreme conditions of SCI. Our data demonstrate that tooth-derived stem cells may provide therapeutic benefits for treating SCI through both cell-autonomous and paracrine neuroregenerative activities.

  4. Clinical Trial of Human Fetal Brain-Derived Neural Stem/Progenitor Cell Transplantation in Patients with Traumatic Cervical Spinal Cord Injury

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    Ji Cheol Shin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In a phase I/IIa open-label and nonrandomized controlled clinical trial, we sought to assess the safety and neurological effects of human neural stem/progenitor cells (hNSPCs transplanted into the injured cord after traumatic cervical spinal cord injury (SCI. Of 19 treated subjects, 17 were sensorimotor complete and 2 were motor complete and sensory incomplete. hNSPCs derived from the fetal telencephalon were grown as neurospheres and transplanted into the cord. In the control group, who did not receive cell implantation but were otherwise closely matched with the transplantation group, 15 patients with traumatic cervical SCI were included. At 1 year after cell transplantation, there was no evidence of cord damage, syrinx or tumor formation, neurological deterioration, and exacerbating neuropathic pain or spasticity. The American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale (AIS grade improved in 5 of 19 transplanted patients, 2 (A → C, 1 (A → B, and 2 (B → D, whereas only one patient in the control group showed improvement (A → B. Improvements included increased motor scores, recovery of motor levels, and responses to electrophysiological studies in the transplantation group. Therefore, the transplantation of hNSPCs into cervical SCI is safe and well-tolerated and is of modest neurological benefit up to 1 year after transplants. This trial is registered with Clinical Research Information Service (CRIS, Registration Number: KCT0000879.

  5. Spinal Cord Injury Clinical Registries: Improving Care across the SCI Care Continuum by Identifying Knowledge Gaps.

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    Dvorak, Marcel F; Cheng, Christiana L; Fallah, Nader; Santos, Argelio; Atkins, Derek; Humphreys, Suzanne; Rivers, Carly S; White, Barry A B; Ho, Chester; Ahn, Henry; Kwon, Brian K; Christie, Sean; Noonan, Vanessa K

    2017-10-15

    Timely access and ongoing delivery of care and therapeutic interventions is needed to maximize recovery and function after traumatic spinal cord injury (tSCI). To ensure these decisions are evidence-based, access to consistent, reliable, and valid sources of clinical data is required. The Access to Care and Timing Model used data from the Rick Hansen SCI Registry (RHSCIR) to generate a simulation of healthcare delivery for persons after tSCI and to test scenarios aimed at improving outcomes and reducing the economic burden of SCI. Through model development, we identified knowledge gaps and challenges in the literature and current health outcomes data collection throughout the continuum of SCI care. The objectives of this article were to describe these gaps and to provide recommendations for bridging them. Accurate information on injury severity after tSCI was hindered by difficulties in conducting neurological assessments and classifications of SCI (e.g., timing), variations in reporting, and the lack of a validated SCI-specific measure of associated injuries. There was also limited availability of reliable data on patient factors such as multi-morbidity and patient-reported measures. Knowledge gaps related to structures (e.g., protocols) and processes (e.g., costs) at each phase of care have prevented comprehensive evaluation of system performance. Addressing these knowledge gaps will enhance comparative and cost-effectiveness evaluations to inform decision-making and standards of care. Recommendations to do so were: standardize data element collection and facilitate database linkages, validate and adopt more outcome measures for SCI, and increase opportunities for collaborations with stakeholders from diverse backgrounds.

  6. An Intensive Locomotor Training Paradigm Improves Neuropathic Pain following Spinal Cord Compression Injury in Rats.

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    Dugan, Elizabeth A; Sagen, Jacqueline

    2015-05-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is often associated with both locomotor deficits and sensory dysfunction, including debilitating neuropathic pain. Unfortunately, current conventional pharmacological, physiological, or psychological treatments provide only marginal relief for more than two-thirds of patients, highlighting the need for improved treatment options. Locomotor training is often prescribed as an adjunct therapy for peripheral neuropathic pain but is rarely used to treat central neuropathic pain. The goal of this study was to evaluate the potential anti-nociceptive benefits of intensive locomotor training (ILT) on neuropathic pain consequent to traumatic SCI. Using a rodent SCI model for central neuropathic pain, ILT was initiated either 5 d after injury prior to development of neuropathic pain symptoms (the "prevention" group) or delayed until pain symptoms fully developed (∼3 weeks post-injury, the "reversal" group). The training protocol consisted of 5 d/week of a ramping protocol that started with 11 m/min for 5 min and increased in speed (+1 m/min/week) and time (1-4 minutes/week) to a maximum of two 20-min sessions/d at 15 m/min by the fourth week of training. ILT prevented and reversed the development of heat hyperalgesia and cold allodynia, as well as reversed developed tactile allodynia, suggesting analgesic benefits not seen with moderate levels of locomotor training. Further, the analgesic benefits of ILT persisted for several weeks once training had been stopped. The unique ability of an ILT protocol to produce robust and sustained anti-nociceptive effects, as assessed by three distinct outcome measures for below-level SCI neuropathic pain, suggests that this adjunct therapeutic approach has great promise in a comprehensive treatment strategy for SCI pain.

  7. Improvements in bladder, bowel and sexual outcomes following task-specific locomotor training in human spinal cord injury.

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    Charles H Hubscher

    Full Text Available Locomotor training (LT as a therapeutic intervention following spinal cord injury (SCI is an effective rehabilitation strategy for improving motor outcomes, but its impact on non-locomotor functions is unknown. Given recent results of our labs' pre-clinical animal SCI LT studies and existing overlap of lumbosacral spinal circuitries controlling pelvic-visceral and locomotor functions, we addressed whether LT can improve bladder, bowel and sexual function in humans at chronic SCI time-points (> two years post-injury.Prospective cohort study; pilot trial with small sample size.Eight SCI research participants who were undergoing 80 daily one-hour sessions of LT on a treadmill using body-weight support, or one-hour of LT and stand training on alternate days, as part of another research study conducted at the Kentucky Spinal Cord Injury Research Center, University of Louisville, were enrolled in this pilot trial. Urodynamic assessments were performed and International Data Set questionnaire forms completed for bladder, bowel and sexual functions at pre-and post-training time points. Four usual care (non-trained; regular at-home routine research participants were also enrolled in this study and had the same assessments collected twice, at least 3 months apart.Filling cystometry documented significant increases in bladder capacity, voiding efficiency and detrusor contraction time as well as significant decreases in voiding pressure post-training relative to baseline. Questionnaires revealed a decrease in the frequency of nocturia and urinary incontinence for several research participants as well as a significant decrease in time required for defecation and a significant increase in sexual desire post-training. No significant differences were found for usual care research participants.These results suggest that an appropriate level of sensory information provided to the spinal cord, generated through task-specific stepping and/or loading, can positively

  8. Improvements in bladder, bowel and sexual outcomes following task-specific locomotor training in human spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Carolyn S.; Montgomery, Lynnette R.; Willhite, Andrea M.; Angeli, Claudia A.; Harkema, Susan J.

    2018-01-01

    Objective Locomotor training (LT) as a therapeutic intervention following spinal cord injury (SCI) is an effective rehabilitation strategy for improving motor outcomes, but its impact on non-locomotor functions is unknown. Given recent results of our labs’ pre-clinical animal SCI LT studies and existing overlap of lumbosacral spinal circuitries controlling pelvic-visceral and locomotor functions, we addressed whether LT can improve bladder, bowel and sexual function in humans at chronic SCI time-points (> two years post-injury). Study design Prospective cohort study; pilot trial with small sample size. Methods Eight SCI research participants who were undergoing 80 daily one-hour sessions of LT on a treadmill using body-weight support, or one-hour of LT and stand training on alternate days, as part of another research study conducted at the Kentucky Spinal Cord Injury Research Center, University of Louisville, were enrolled in this pilot trial. Urodynamic assessments were performed and International Data Set questionnaire forms completed for bladder, bowel and sexual functions at pre-and post-training time points. Four usual care (non-trained; regular at-home routine) research participants were also enrolled in this study and had the same assessments collected twice, at least 3 months apart. Results Filling cystometry documented significant increases in bladder capacity, voiding efficiency and detrusor contraction time as well as significant decreases in voiding pressure post-training relative to baseline. Questionnaires revealed a decrease in the frequency of nocturia and urinary incontinence for several research participants as well as a significant decrease in time required for defecation and a significant increase in sexual desire post-training. No significant differences were found for usual care research participants. Conclusions These results suggest that an appropriate level of sensory information provided to the spinal cord, generated through task

  9. Anti-apoptotic effect of insulin in the control of cell death and neurologic deficit after acute spinal cord injury in rats.

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    Wu, Xing-Huo; Yang, Shu-Hua; Duan, De-Yu; Cheng, Heng-Hui; Bao, Yu-Ting; Zhang, Yukun

    2007-09-01

    Recent studies confirmed that the new cell survival signal pathway of Insulin-PI3K-Akt exerted cyto-protective actions involving anti-apoptosis. This study was undertaken to investigate the potential neuroprotective effects of insulin in the pathogenesis of spinal cord injury (SCI) and evaluate its therapeutic effects in adult rats. SCI was produced by extradural compression using modified Allen's stall with damage energy of 40 g-cm force. One group of rats was subjected to SCI in combination with the administration of recombinant human insulin dissolved in 50% glucose solution at the dose of 1 IU/kg day, for 7 days. At the same time, another group of rats was subjected to SCI in combination with the administration of an equal volume of sterile saline solution. Functional recovery was evaluated using open-field walking, inclined plane tests, and motor evoked potentials (MEPs) during the first 14 days post-trauma. Levels of protein for B-cell lymphoma/leukemia-2 gene (Bcl-2), Caspase-3, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) were quantified in the injured spinal cord by Western blot analysis. Neuronal apoptosis was detected by TUNEL, and spinal cord blood flow (SCBF) was measured by laser-Doppler flowmetry (LDF). Ultimately, the data established the effectiveness of insulin treatment in improving neurologic recovery, increasing the expression of anti-apoptotic bcl-2 proteins, inhibiting caspase-3 expression decreasing neuronal apoptosis, reducing the expression of proinflammatory cytokines iNOS and COX-2, and ameliorating microcirculation of injured spinal cord after moderate contusive SCI in rats. In sum, this study reported the beneficial effects of insulin in the treatment of SCI, with the suggestion that insulin should be considered as a potential therapeutic agent.

  10. Analysis of dosing regimen and reproducibility of intraspinal grafting of human spinal stem cells in immmunosuppressed minipigs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Usvald, Dušan; Vodička, Petr; Hlučilová, Jana; Procházka, Radek; Motlík, Jan; Kuchorova, K.; Johe, K.; Marsala, S.; Scadeng, M.; Kakinohana, O.; Navarro, R.; Santa, M.; Hefferan, M. P.; Yaksh, T.L.; Marsala, M.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 9 (2010), s. 1103-1122 ISSN 0963-6897 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : minipigs * human spinal stem cells * analysis Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 6.204, year: 2010

  11. An In Vivo Characterization of Trophic Factor Production Following Neural Precursor Cell or Bone Marrow Stromal Cell Transplantation for Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawryluk, Gregory W.J.; Mothe, Andrea; Wang, Jian; Wang, Shelly; Tator, Charles

    2012-01-01

    Cellular transplantation strategies for repairing the injured spinal cord have shown consistent benefit in preclinical models, and human clinical trials have begun. Interactions between transplanted cells and host tissue remain poorly understood. Trophic factor secretion is postulated a primary or supplementary mechanism of action for many transplanted cells, however, there is little direct evidence to support trophin production by transplanted cells in situ. In the present study, trophic factor expression was characterized in uninjured, injured-untreated, injured-treated with transplanted cells, and corresponding control tissue from the adult rat spinal cord. Candidate trophic factors were identified in a literature search, and primers were designed for these genes. We examined in vivo trophin expression in 3 paradigms involving transplantation of either brain or spinal cord-derived neural precursor cells (NPCs) or bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs). Injury without further treatment led to a significant elevation of nerve growth factor (NGF), leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), and lower expression of vascular endothelial growth factor isoform A (VEGF-A) and platelet-derived growth factor-A (PDGF-A). Transplantation of NPCs led to modest changes in trophin expression, and the co-administration of intrathecal trophins resulted in significant elevation of the neurotrophins, glial-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), LIF, and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). BMSCs transplantation upregulated NGF, LIF, and IGF-1. NPCs isolated after transplantation into the injured spinal cord expressed the neurotrophins, ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), epidermal growth factor (EGF), and bFGF at higher levels than host cord. These data show that trophin expression in the spinal cord is influenced by injury and cell transplantation, particularly when combined with intrathecal trophin infusion

  12. Metachronous brain and intramedullary spinal cord metastases from nonsmall-cell lung cancer: A case report

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    Wen-Chih Liu

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available A 44-year-old man had a brain tumor secondary to lung adenocarcinoma and underwent craniectomy to remove the brain tumor. After postoperative whole-brain radiation therapy, he underwent pneumonectomy followed by chemotherapy, mediastinal radiotherapy, and target therapy for lung cancer. Thirty-six months after the initial brain surgery, he suffered from neck pain and right upper limb numbness that rapidly progressed to upper extremity weakness and paralysis in 2 months. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated an intramedullary spinal cord lesion at the C4 level. Laminectomy and gross intramedullary tumor removal were performed. The patient’s neurological function improved after the operation. Nevertheless, 4 months after the intramedullary tumor removal, he began to show multiple metastases. Unfortunately, the patient died from respiratory failure 8 months after diagnosis with intramedullary spinal cord metastasis. In this case, early diagnosis and aggressive surgical treatment combined with postoperative radiotherapy and chemotherapy might have provided this patient with a prolonged survival and better quality of life.

  13. Regulated viral BDNF delivery in combination with Schwann cells promotes axonal regeneration through capillary alginate hydrogels after spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shengwen; Sandner, Beatrice; Schackel, Thomas; Nicholson, LaShae; Chtarto, Abdelwahed; Tenenbaum, Liliane; Puttagunta, Radhika; Müller, Rainer; Weidner, Norbert; Blesch, Armin

    2017-09-15

    Grafting of cell-seeded alginate capillary hydrogels into a spinal cord lesion site provides an axonal bridge while physically directing regenerating axonal growth in a linear pattern. However, without an additional growth stimulus, bridging axons fail to extend into the distal host spinal cord. Here we examined whether a combinatory strategy would support regeneration of descending axons across a cervical (C5) lateral hemisection lesion in the rat spinal cord. Following spinal cord transections, Schwann cell (SC)-seeded alginate hydrogels were grafted to the lesion site and AAV5 expressing brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) under control of a tetracycline-regulated promoter was injected caudally. In addition, we examined whether SC injection into the caudal spinal parenchyma would further enhance regeneration of descending axons to re-enter the host spinal cord. Our data show that both serotonergic and descending axons traced by biotinylated dextran amine (BDA) extend throughout the scaffolds. The number of regenerating axons is significantly increased when caudal BDNF expression is activated and transient BDNF delivery is able to sustain axons after gene expression is switched off. Descending axons are confined to the caudal graft/host interface even with continuous BDNF expression for 8weeks. Only with a caudal injection of SCs, a pathway facilitating axonal regeneration through the host/graft interface is generated allowing axons to successfully re-enter the caudal spinal cord. Recovery from spinal cord injury is poor due to the limited regeneration observed in the adult mammalian central nervous system. Biomaterials, cell transplantation and growth factors that can guide axons across a lesion site, provide a cellular substrate, stimulate axon growth and have shown some promise in increasing the growth distance of regenerating axons. In the present study, we combined an alginate biomaterial with linear channels with transplantation of Schwann cells within

  14. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF improves motor recovery in the rat impactor model for spinal cord injury.

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    Tanjew Dittgen

    Full Text Available Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF improves outcome after experimental SCI by counteracting apoptosis, and enhancing connectivity in the injured spinal cord. Previously we have employed the mouse hemisection SCI model and studied motor function after subcutaneous or transgenic delivery of the protein. To further broaden confidence in animal efficacy data we sought to determine efficacy in a different model and a different species. Here we investigated the effects of G-CSF in Wistar rats using the New York University Impactor. In this model, corroborating our previous data, rats treated subcutaneously with G-CSF over 2 weeks show significant improvement of motor function.

  15. Surgery on spinal epidural metastases (SEM) in renal cell carcinoma: a plea for a new paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, Nicolaas A; Coppes, Maarten H; Vergeer, Rob A; Kuijlen, Jos M A; Groen, Rob J M

    2014-09-01

    Prediction models for outcome of decompressive surgical resection of spinal epidural metastases (SEM) have in common that they have been developed for all types of SEM, irrespective of the type of primary tumor. It is our experience in clinical practice, however, that these models often fail to accurately predict outcome in the individual patient. To investigate whether decision making could be optimized by applying tumor-specific prediction models. For the proof of concept, we analyzed patients with SEM from renal cell carcinoma that we have operated on. Retrospective chart analysis 2006 to 2012. Twenty-one consecutive patients with symptomatic SEM of renal cell carcinoma. Predictive factors for survival. Next to established predictive factors for survival, we analyzed the predictive value of the Motzer criteria in these patients. The Motzer criteria comprise a specific and validated risk model for survival in patients with renal cell carcinoma. After multivariable analysis, only Motzer intermediate (hazard ratio [HR] 17.4, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.82-166, p=.01) and high risk (HR 39.3, 95% CI 3.10-499, p=.005) turned out to be significantly associated with survival in patients with renal cell carcinoma that we have operated on. In this study, we have demonstrated that decision making could have been optimized by implementing the Motzer criteria next to established prediction models. We, therefore, suggest that in future, in patients with SEM from renal cell carcinoma, the Motzer criteria are also taken into account. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Human neural stem cells differentiate and promote locomotor recovery in an early chronic spinal cord injury NOD-scid mouse model.

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    Desirée L Salazar

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI results in partial or complete paralysis and is characterized by a loss of neurons and oligodendrocytes, axonal injury, and demyelination/dysmyelination of spared axons. Approximately 1,250,000 individuals have chronic SCI in the U.S.; therefore treatment in the chronic stages is highly clinically relevant. Human neural stem cells (hCNS-SCns were prospectively isolated based on fluorescence-activated cell sorting for a CD133(+ and CD24(-/lo population from fetal brain, grown as neurospheres, and lineage restricted to generate neurons, oligodendrocytes and astrocytes. hCNS-SCns have recently been transplanted sub-acutely following spinal cord injury and found to promote improved locomotor recovery. We tested the ability of hCNS-SCns transplanted 30 days post SCI to survive, differentiate, migrate, and promote improved locomotor recovery.hCNS-SCns were transplanted into immunodeficient NOD-scid mice 30 days post spinal cord contusion injury. hCNS-SCns transplanted mice demonstrated significantly improved locomotor recovery compared to vehicle controls using open field locomotor testing and CatWalk gait analysis. Transplanted hCNS-SCns exhibited long-term engraftment, migration, limited proliferation, and differentiation predominantly to oligodendrocytes and neurons. Astrocytic differentiation was rare and mice did not exhibit mechanical allodynia. Furthermore, differentiated hCNS-SCns integrated with the host as demonstrated by co-localization of human cytoplasm with discrete staining for the paranodal marker contactin-associated protein.The results suggest that hCNS-SCns are capable of surviving, differentiating, and promoting improved locomotor recovery when transplanted into an early chronic injury microenvironment. These data suggest that hCNS-SCns transplantation has efficacy in an early chronic SCI setting and thus expands the "window of opportunity" for intervention.

  17. A pilot study on the use of cerebrospinal fluid cell-free DNA in intramedullary spinal ependymoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Ian David; Li, Yingmei; Pan, Wenying; Johnson, Eli; You, Linya; Vogel, Hannes; Ratliff, John; Hayden Gephart, Melanie

    2017-10-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) represents a promising source of cell-free DNA (cfDNA) for tumors of the central nervous system. A CSF-based liquid biopsy may obviate the need for riskier tissue biopsies and serve as a means for monitoring tumor recurrence or response to therapy. Spinal ependymomas most commonly occur in adults, and aggressive resection must be delicately balanced with the risk of injury to adjacent normal tissue. In patients with subtotal resection, recurrence commonly occurs. A CSF-based liquid biopsy matched to the patient's spinal ependymoma mutation profile has potential to be more sensitive then surveillance MRI, but the utility has not been well characterized for tumors of the spinal cord. In this study, we collected matched blood, tumor, and CSF samples from three adult patients with WHO grade II intramedullary spinal ependymoma. We performed whole exome sequencing on matched tumor and normal DNA to design Droplet Digital™ PCR (ddPCR) probes for tumor and wild-type mutations. We then interrogated CSF samples for tumor-derived cfDNA by performing ddPCR on extracted cfDNA. Tumor cfDNA was not reliably detected in the CSF of our cohort. Anatomic sequestration and low grade of intramedullary spinal cord tumors likely limits the role of CSF liquid biopsy.

  18. Effects of the Post-Spinal Cord Injury Microenvironment on the Differentiation Capacity of Human Neural Stem Cells Derived from Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Serrano, Clara; Torres-Espín, Abel; Hernández, Joaquim; Alvarez-Palomo, Ana B; Requena, Jordi; Gasull, Xavier; Edel, Michael J; Navarro, Xavier

    2016-10-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) causes loss of neural functions below the level of the lesion due to interruption of spinal pathways and secondary neurodegenerative processes. The transplant of neural stem cells (NSCs) is a promising approach for the repair of SCI. Reprogramming of adult somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) is expected to provide an autologous source of iPSC-derived NSCs, avoiding the immune response as well as ethical issues. However, there is still limited information on the behavior and differentiation pattern of transplanted iPSC-derived NSCs within the damaged spinal cord. We transplanted iPSC-derived NSCs, obtained from adult human somatic cells, into rats at 0 or 7 days after SCI, and evaluated motor-evoked potentials and locomotion of the animals. We histologically analyzed engraftment, proliferation, and differentiation of the iPSC-derived NSCs and the spared tissue in the spinal cords at 7, 21, and 63 days posttransplant. Both transplanted groups showed a late decline in functional recovery compared to vehicle-injected groups. Histological analysis showed proliferation of transplanted cells within the tissue and that cells formed a mass. At the final time point, most grafted cells differentiated to neural and astroglial lineages, but not into oligodendrocytes, while some grafted cells remained undifferentiated and proliferative. The proinflammatory tissue microenviroment of the injured spinal cord induced proliferation of the grafted cells and, therefore, there are possible risks associated with iPSC-derived NSC transplantation. New approaches are needed to promote and guide cell differentiation, as well as reduce their tumorigenicity once the cells are transplanted at the lesion site.

  19. Amelioration of motor/sensory dysfunction and spasticity in a rat model of acute lumbar spinal cord injury by human neural stem cell transplantation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    van Gorp, S.; Leerink, M.; Kakinohana, O.; Platoshyn, O.; Santucci, C.; Galik, J.; Joosten, E. A.; Hruška-Plocháň, Marian; Goldberg, D.; Marsala, S.; Johe, K.; Ciacci, J. D.; Marsala, M.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 57 (2013) ISSN 1757-6512 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : spinal cord injury * human neural stem cells * spinal grafting * functional recovery * rat Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.634, year: 2013

  20. Locomotor recovery after spinal cord contusion injury in rats is improved by spontaneous exercise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gispen, W.H.; Meeteren, N.L. van; Eggers, L.; Lankhorst, A.J.; Hamers, F.P.

    2003-01-01

    We have recently shown that enriched environment (EE) housing significantly enhances locomotor recovery following spinal cord contusion injury (SCI) in rats. As the type and intensity of locomotor training with EE housing are rather poorly characterized, we decided to compare the effectiveness of EE

  1. Improved axonal regeneration of transected spinal cord mediated by multichannel collagen conduits functionalized with neurotrophin-3 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, L; Daly, W; Newland, B; Yao, S; Wang, W; Chen, B K K; Madigan, N; Windebank, A; Pandit, A

    2013-12-01

    Functionalized biomaterial scaffolds targeted at improving axonal regeneration by enhancing guided axonal growth provide a promising approach for the repair of spinal cord injury. Collagen neural conduits provide structural guidance for neural tissue regeneration, and in this study it is shown that these conduits can also act as a reservoir for sustained gene delivery. Either a G-luciferase marker gene or a neurotrophin-3-encoding gene, complexed to a non-viral, cyclized, PEGylated transfection vector, was loaded within a multichannel collagen conduit. The complexed genes were then released in a controlled fashion using a dual release system both in vitro and in vivo. For evaluation of their biological performance, the loaded conduits were implanted into the completely transected rat thoracic spinal cord (T8-T10). Aligned axon regeneration through the channels of conduits was observed one month post-surgery. The conduits delivering neurotrophin-3 polyplexes resulted in significantly increased neurotrophin-3 levels in the surrounding tissue and a statistically higher number of regenerated axons versus the control conduits (P<0.05). This study suggests that collagen neural conduits delivering a highly effective non-viral therapeutic gene may hold promise for repair of the injured spinal cord.

  2. Central canal ependymal cells proliferate extensively in response to traumatic spinal cord injury but not demyelinating lesions.

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    Steve Lacroix

    Full Text Available The adult mammalian spinal cord has limited regenerative capacity in settings such as spinal cord injury (SCI and multiple sclerosis (MS. Recent studies have revealed that ependymal cells lining the central canal possess latent neural stem cell potential, undergoing proliferation and multi-lineage differentiation following experimental SCI. To determine whether reactive ependymal cells are a realistic endogenous cell population to target in order to promote spinal cord repair, we assessed the spatiotemporal dynamics of ependymal cell proliferation for up to 35 days in three models of spinal pathologies: contusion SCI using the Infinite Horizon impactor, focal demyelination by intraspinal injection of lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC, and autoimmune-mediated multi-focal demyelination using the active experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE model of MS. Contusion SCI at the T9-10 thoracic level stimulated a robust, long-lasting and long-distance wave of ependymal proliferation that peaked at 3 days in the lesion segment, 14 days in the rostral segment, and was still detectable at the cervical level, where it peaked at 21 days. This proliferative wave was suppressed distal to the contusion. Unlike SCI, neither chemical- nor autoimmune-mediated demyelination triggered ependymal cell proliferation at any time point, despite the occurrence of demyelination (LPC and EAE, remyelination (LPC and significant locomotor defects (EAE. Thus, traumatic SCI induces widespread and enduring activation of reactive ependymal cells, identifying them as a robust cell population to target for therapeutic manipulation after contusion; conversely, neither demyelination, remyelination nor autoimmunity appears sufficient to trigger proliferation of quiescent ependymal cells in models of MS-like demyelinating diseases.

  3. Regulation of choline acetyltransferase expression by 17 β-oestradiol in NSC-34 cells and in the spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johann, S; Dahm, M; Kipp, M; Zahn, U; Beyer, C

    2011-09-01

    Motoneurones located in the ventral horn of the spinal cord conciliate cholinergic innervation of skeletal muscles. These neurones appear to be exceedingly affected in neurodegenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The dysfunction of motoneurones is typically accompanied by alterations of cholinergic metabolism and signalling, as demonstrated by a decrease in choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) expression. 17 β-Oestradiol (E(2)) is generally accepted as neuroprotective factor in the brain under acute toxic and neurodegenerative conditions and also appears to exert a protective role for motoneurones. In the present study, we attempted to analyse the role of E(2) signalling on ChAT expression in the motoneurone-like cell line NSC-34 and in vivo. In a first step, we demonstrated the presence of oestrogen receptor α and β in NSC-34 cells, as well as in the cervical and lumbar parts, of the male mouse spinal cord. Subsequently, we investigated the effect of E(2) treatment on ChAT expression. The application of E(2) significantly increased the transcription of ChAT in NSC-34 cells and in the cervical but not lumbar part of the spinal cord. Our results indicate that E(2) can influence the cholinergic system by increasing ChAT expression in the mouse spinal cord. This mechanism might support motoneurones, in addition to survival-promoting mechanisms, in the temporal balance toxic or neurodegenerative challenges. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Neuroendocrinology © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Improving access to emergent spinal care through knowledge translation: an ethnographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Fiona; Fehlings, Michael G; Rice, Kathleen; Malempati, Harsha; Fawaz, Khaled; Nicholls, Fred; Baldeo, Navindra; Reeves, Scott; Singh, Anoushka; Ahn, Henry; Ginsberg, Howard; Yee, Albert J

    2014-04-14

    For patients and family members, access to timely specialty medical care for emergent spinal conditions is a significant stressor to an already serious condition. Timing to surgical care for emergent spinal conditions such as spinal trauma is an important predictor of outcome. However, few studies have explored ethnographically the views of surgeons and other key stakeholders on issues related to patient access and care for emergent spine conditions. The primary study objective was to determine the challenges to the provision of timely care as well as to identify areas of opportunities to enhance care delivery. An ethnographic study of key administrative and clinical care providers involved in the triage and care of patients referred through CritiCall Ontario was undertaken utilizing standard methods of qualitative inquiry. This comprised 21 interviews with people involved in varying capacities with the provision of emergent spinal care, as well as qualitative observations on an orthopaedic/neurosurgical ward, in operating theatres, and at CritiCall Ontario's call centre. Several themes were identified and organized into categories that range from inter-professional collaboration through to issues of hospital-level resources and the role of relationships between hospitals and external organizations at the provincial level. Underlying many of these issues is the nature of the medically complex emergent spine patient and the scientific evidentiary base upon which best practice care is delivered. Through the implementation of knowledge translation strategies facilitated from this research, a reduction of patient transfers out of province was observed in the one-year period following program implementation. Our findings suggest that competing priorities at both the hospital and provincial level create challenges in the delivery of spinal care. Key stakeholders recognized spinal care as aligning with multiple priorities such as emergent/critical care, medical through

  5. The Clinical Study On 1 Case for The sensation of patient with Spinal Cord Injury whose is improved by using sweet BV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In-Sun Park

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Obejective : Patients with spinal cord injury are increasing in numbers. However, there is no reliable treatment guide in both conventional & complementory medicine. Also, there are not much clinical case of patients with spina cord injury in oriental medical field. We invesigated effect of sweet BV on subacute stage patient with spinal cord injury. Method : 31-year old female patient with spinal cord injury was treated with herb medicine(TID, electro arcupunture (BID, sweet BV injection(QOD , Physical treatment(QD, and conventionalmedicine. Result : We had a satisfactory result with using sweet BV injection. The patient`s ASIA grade improved from 34 to 52. And Frankle classification of the patient shifted from A to B. Conclusion : We reach a conclusion Using Sweet BV improve the sensation of patient with spinal cord injury. And more study about this disease is needed.

  6. Inhibition of apoptosis blocks human motor neuron cell death in a stem cell model of spinal muscular atrophy.

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    Dhruv Sareen

    Full Text Available Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is a genetic disorder caused by a deletion of the survival motor neuron 1 gene leading to motor neuron loss, muscle atrophy, paralysis, and death. We show here that induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC lines generated from two Type I SMA subjects-one produced with lentiviral constructs and the second using a virus-free plasmid-based approach-recapitulate the disease phenotype and generate significantly fewer motor neurons at later developmental time periods in culture compared to two separate control subject iPSC lines. During motor neuron development, both SMA lines showed an increase in Fas ligand-mediated apoptosis and increased caspase-8 and-3 activation. Importantly, this could be mitigated by addition of either a Fas blocking antibody or a caspase-3 inhibitor. Together, these data further validate this human stem cell model of SMA, suggesting that specific inhibitors of apoptotic pathways may be beneficial for patients.

  7. A neonatal mouse spinal cord injury model for assessing post-injury adaptive plasticity and human stem cell integration.

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    Jean-Luc Boulland

    Full Text Available Despite limited regeneration capacity, partial injuries to the adult mammalian spinal cord can elicit variable degrees of functional recovery, mediated at least in part by reorganization of neuronal circuitry. Underlying mechanisms are believed to include synaptic plasticity and collateral sprouting of spared axons. Because plasticity is higher in young animals, we developed a spinal cord compression (SCC injury model in the neonatal mouse to gain insight into the potential for reorganization during early life. The model provides a platform for high-throughput assessment of functional synaptic connectivity that is also suitable for testing the functional integration of human stem and progenitor cell-derived neurons being considered for clinical cell replacement strategies. SCC was generated at T9-T11 and functional recovery was assessed using an integrated approach including video kinematics, histology, tract tracing, electrophysiology, and high-throughput optical recording of descending inputs to identified spinal neurons. Dramatic degeneration of axons and synaptic contacts was evident within 24 hours of SCC, and loss of neurons in the injured segment was evident for at least a month thereafter. Initial hindlimb paralysis was paralleled by a loss of descending inputs to lumbar motoneurons. Within 4 days of SCC and progressively thereafter, hindlimb motility began to be restored and descending inputs reappeared, but with examples of atypical synaptic connections indicating a reorganization of circuitry. One to two weeks after SCC, hindlimb motility approached sham control levels, and weight-bearing locomotion was virtually indistinguishable in SCC and sham control mice. Genetically labeled human fetal neural progenitor cells injected into the injured spinal cord survived for at least a month, integrated into the host tissue and began to differentiate morphologically. This integrative neonatal mouse model provides opportunities to explore early

  8. MR diffusion tensor imaging in the evaluation of neural progenitor cells transplantation to acute injured canine spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiaoying; Tan Ke; Ni Shilei; Bao Shengde; Jiang Xuexiang

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To observe the effect of transplantation of telomerase immortalized human neural progenitor cells to acute injured canine spinal cord by using MR diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Methods: Telomerase immortalized human neural progenitor cells with expression of green fluorescent protein were prepared for transplantation. Eight adult canines with left spinal cord hemisection at the level of T13 were examined by MR diffusion tensor imaging four times sequentially: prior to injury, one week after injury, one week after transplantation (two weeks after injury), and four weeks after transplantation. Results: The ADC values of the injured spinal cord were (1.00 ± 0.15) x 10 -3 mm 2 /s, (1.65 ± 0.45) x 10 -3 mm 2 /s, (1.44 ± 0.48) xl0 -3 mm 2 /s, and (1.43 ± 0.26) x 10 -3 mm 2 /s, respectively. There was statistically significant difference between the data obtained at different times (F= 6.038, P=0.005). The FA values of the injured spinal cord were 0.59±0.11, 0.30±0.17, 0.36±0.25, and 0.34±0.11, respectively. There was also statistically significant difference between the data obtained at different times (F=5.221, P=0.009). The ADC values of the intact spinal cord were (1.01±0.17) x 10 -3 mm 2 /s, (1.32±0.06) x 10 -3 mm 2 /s, (1.10±0.24) x 10 -3 mm 2 /s, and (1.14±0.22) x 10 -3 mm 2 /s, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference between the data obtained at different times (F=1.303, P=0.306). The FA values of the intact spinal cord were 0.60 ± 0.09, 0.38 ± 0.25, 0.46 ± 0.15, and 0.50 ± 0.21, respectively. There was also no statistically significant difference between the data obtained at different times (F=2.797, P=0.072). Conclusion: DTI can provide useful information for spinal cord injury and regeneration in experimental spinal cord injury. (authors)

  9. Autologous Bone Marrow Stem Cells in Spinal Cord Injury; Our Experience in Clinical Studies, Animal Studies, Obstacles faced and steps for future

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    Ayyappan S

    2010-01-01

    100 Biosafety hood as reported earlier (1 and were injected intrathecally into the subarachnoid space of the patients below L2 level after endotoxin tests and confirming CD34 status using flow cytometry. Study 2: 20-30ml of Bone marrow was tapped from the right posterior iliac crest under local anesthesia of canine spinal injury victims immediately after the injury and the bone marrow processed as reported earlier (6 were injected intralesionally embedded in thermoreversible hydrogel scaffolds at the site of the injury after endotoxin tests and CD34 analysis using flow cytometry. Both the animals had an Olby score of 1 with no CP reflex, Patellar reflex and deep pain reflex. RESULTS:Study-1Parameters 4-6 months follow-up(1 12-36 months follow-up(8 Follow up attrition rate: 14.02% 69% Motor power improvement (atleast 2 grade of power post injection 14.11% 7.69% Motor power improvement resulting in functional recovery 4.70% 3 walk with support, 1 walking without support 5.13% Subjective sensory improvement 16.97% 25.64% Abnormal sensation 0% 0% Autonomic improvement by Urodynamic studies 9.41% 10.26% Study-2: The first canine died due to cystitis on the 7th day after the procedure and the cause of death was confirmed to be unrelated to the procedure by autopsy that revealed co-morbid conditions like cystitis, nephritis and transmissible venereal tumor. Histopathology of the engrafted area revealed sustainability of aggregated stem cells that were transplanted revealing an ideal biocompatibility of the construct prepared with bone marrow mononuclear cells and polymer hydrogel for spinal cord regeneration in dogs. The second canine had complete recovery of hind limb function and coordination after 6 months, Olby score has improved to 14 (normal 15 with normal bowel and bladder control.DISCUSSION: It was hypothesized that intralesional application at time of surgery may be superior to Intrathecal application of bone marrow stem cells simply because the former technique

  10. Exoskeleton-assisted gait training to improve gait in individuals with spinal cord injury: a pilot randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shuo-Hsiu; Afzal, Taimoor; Berliner, Jeffrey; Francisco, Gerard E

    2018-01-01

    Robotic wearable exoskeletons have been utilized as a gait training device in persons with spinal cord injury. This pilot study investigated the feasibility of offering exoskeleton-assisted gait training (EGT) on gait in individuals with incomplete spinal cord injury (iSCI) in preparation for a phase III RCT. The objective was to assess treatment reliability and potential efficacy of EGT and conventional physical therapy (CPT). Forty-four individuals were screened, and 13 were eligible to participate in the study. Nine participants consented and were randomly assigned to receive either EGT or CPT with focus on gait. Subjects received EGT or CPT, five sessions a week (1 h/session daily) for 3 weeks. American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) Lower Extremity Motor Score (LEMS), 10-Meter Walk Test (10MWT), 6-Minute Walk Test (6MWT), Timed Up and Go (TUG) test, and gait characteristics including stride and step length, cadence and stance, and swing phase durations were assessed at the pre- and immediate post- training. Mean difference estimates with 95% confidence intervals were used to analyze the differences. After training, improvement was observed in the 6MWT for the EGT group. The CPT group showed significant improvement in the TUG test. Both the EGT and the CPT groups showed significant increase in the right step length. EGT group also showed improvement in the stride length. EGT could be applied to individuals with iSCI to facilitate gait recovery. The subjects were able to tolerate the treatment; however, exoskeleton size range may be a limiting factor in recruiting larger cohort of patients. Future studies with larger sample size are needed to investigate the effectiveness and efficacy of exoskeleton-assisted gait training as single gait training and combined with other gait training strategies. Clinicaltrials.org, NCT03011099, retrospectively registered on January 3, 2017.

  11. Impacts of Bone Marrow Stem Cells on Caspase-3 Levels after Spinal Cord Injury in Mice

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    Noushin Gashmardi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injury (SCI is a drastic disability that leads to spinal cord impairment. This study sought to determine the effects of bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs on caspase-3 levels after acute SCI in mice. Forty-two mice were randomly divided into 3 groups: control (2 subcategories, subjected to no intervention; sham (3 subcategories, subjected to acute SCI; and experimental (2 subcategories, subjected to SCI and cell transplantation. In the experimental group, 2×105 BMSCs were injected intravenously 1 day after SCI. The mesenchymal property of the cells was assessed. The animals in the 3 groups were sacrificed 1, 21, and 35 days after the induction of injury and caspase-3 levels were evaluated using a caspase-3 assay kit. The obtained values were analyzed with ANOVA and Tukey tests using GraphPad and SPSS. Based on the assessments, the transplanted cells were spindle-shaped and were negative for the hematopoietic markers of CD34 and CD45 and positive for the expression of the mesenchymal marker of CD90 and osteogenic induction. The caspase-3 levels showed a significant increase in the sham and experimental groups in comparison to the control group. One day after SCI, the caspase-3 level was significantly higher in the sham group (1.157±0.117 than in the other groups (P<0.000. Twenty-one days after SCI, the caspase-3 level was significantly lower in the experimental group than in the sham group (0.4±0.095 vs. 0.793±0.076; P˂0.000. Thirty-five days following SCI, the caspase-3 level was lower in the experimental group than in the sham group (0.223±0.027 vs. 0.643±0.058; P˂0.000. We conclude that BMSC transplantation was able to downregulate the caspase-3 level after acute SCI, underscoring the role of caspase-3 as a marker for the assessment of treatment efficacy in acute SCI.

  12. Fluoxetine Prevents Oligodendrocyte Cell Death by Inhibiting Microglia Activation after Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jee Y.; Kang, So R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Oligodendrocyte cell death and axon demyelination after spinal cord injury (SCI) are known to be important secondary injuries contributing to permanent neurological disability. Thus, blocking oligodendrocyte cell death should be considered for therapeutic intervention after SCI. Here, we demonstrated that fluoxetine, an antidepressant drug, alleviates oligodendrocyte cell death by inhibiting microglia activation after SCI. After injury at the T9 level with a Precision Systems and Instrumentation (Lexington, KY) device, fluoxetine (10 mg/kg, intraperitoneal) was administered once a day for the indicated time points. Immunostaining with CD11b (OX-42) antibody and quantification analysis showed that microglia activation was significantly inhibited by fluoxetine at 5 days after injury. Fluoxetine also significantly inhibited activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38-MAPK) and expression of pro-nerve growth factor (pro-NGF), which is known to mediate oligodendrocyte cell death through the p75 neurotrophin receptor after SCI. In addition, fluoxetine attenuated activation of Ras homolog gene family member A and decreased the level of phosphorylated c-Jun and, ultimately, alleviated caspase-3 activation and significantly reduced cell death of oligodendrocytes at 5 days after SCI. Further, the decrease of myelin basic protein, myelin loss, and axon loss in white matter was also significantly blocked by fluoxetine, as compared to vehicle control. These results suggest that fluoxetine inhibits oligodendrocyte cell death by inhibiting microglia activation and p38-MAPK activation, followed by pro-NGF production after SCI, and provide a potential usage of fluoxetine for a therapeutic agent after acute SCI in humans. PMID:25366938

  13. Improvement of neuromuscular synaptic phenotypes without enhanced survival and motor function in severe spinal muscular atrophy mice selectively rescued in motor neurons.

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    Ximena Paez-Colasante

    Full Text Available In the inherited childhood neuromuscular disease spinal muscular atrophy (SMA, lower motor neuron death and severe muscle weakness result from the reduction of the ubiquitously expressed protein survival of motor neuron (SMN. Although SMA mice recapitulate many features of the human disease, it has remained unclear if their short lifespan and motor weakness are primarily due to cell-autonomous defects in motor neurons. Using Hb9(Cre as a driver, we selectively raised SMN expression in motor neurons in conditional SMAΔ7 mice. Unlike a previous study that used choline acetyltransferase (ChAT(Cre+ as a driver on the same mice, and another report that used Hb9(Cre as a driver on a different line of conditional SMA mice, we found no improvement in survival, weight, motor behavior and presynaptic neurofilament accumulation. However, like in ChAT(Cre+ mice, we detected rescue of endplate size and mitigation of neuromuscular junction (NMJ denervation status. The rescue of endplate size occurred in the absence of an increase in myofiber size, suggesting endplate size is determined by the motor neuron in these animals. Real time-PCR showed that the expression of spinal cord SMN transcript was sharply reduced in Hb9(Cre+ SMA mice relative to ChAT(Cre+ SMA mice. This suggests that our lack of overall phenotypic improvement is most likely due to an unexpectedly poor recombination efficiency driven by Hb9(Cre . Nonetheless, the low levels of SMN were sufficient to rescue two NMJ structural parameters indicating that these motor neuron cell autonomous phenotypes are very sensitive to changes in motoneuronal SMN levels. Our results directly suggest that even those therapeutic interventions with very modest effects in raising SMN in motor neurons may provide mitigation of neuromuscular phenotypes in SMA patients.

  14. Matrix Metalloproteinases as a Therapeutic Target to Improve Neurologic Recovery After Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    mice that served as baseline controls. Conducted 3D reconstruction of representative spinal cords from the moderately injured -vehicle and GM6001...Appendices 13 CONCLUSIONS In a preliminary study, GM6001 (dissolved in 4% carboxy methyl cellulose and delivered via intraperitoneal route) when given...exceeded that necessary to block MMP-9 in vitro. As some MMPs modulate the formation of a glial scar and axonal plasticity [4], their subacute/chronic

  15. ASTM F1717 standard for the preclinical evaluation of posterior spinal fixators: can we improve it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Barbera, Luigi; Galbusera, Fabio; Villa, Tomaso; Costa, Francesco; Wilke, Hans-Joachim

    2014-10-01

    Preclinical evaluation of spinal implants is a necessary step to ensure their reliability and safety before implantation. The American Society for Testing and Materials reapproved F1717 standard for the assessment of mechanical properties of posterior spinal fixators, which simulates a vertebrectomy model and recommends mimicking vertebral bodies using polyethylene blocks. This set-up should represent the clinical use, but available data in the literature are few. Anatomical parameters depending on the spinal level were compared to published data or measurements on biplanar stereoradiography on 13 patients. Other mechanical variables, describing implant design were considered, and all parameters were investigated using a numerical parametric finite element model. Stress values were calculated by considering either the combination of the average values for each parameter or their worst-case combination depending on the spinal level. The standard set-up represents quite well the anatomy of an instrumented average thoracolumbar segment. The stress on the pedicular screw is significantly influenced by the lever arm of the applied load, the unsupported screw length, the position of the centre of rotation of the functional spine unit and the pedicular inclination with respect to the sagittal plane. The worst-case combination of parameters demonstrates that devices implanted below T5 could potentially undergo higher stresses than those described in the standard suggestions (maximum increase of 22.2% at L1). We propose to revise F1717 in order to describe the anatomical worst case condition we found at L1 level: this will guarantee higher safety of the implant for a wider population of patients. © IMechE 2014.

  16. Blocking mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) improves neuropathic pain evoked by spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoping; Li, Xiaojia; Huang, Bin; Ma, Shuai

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is an extremely serious type of physical trauma observed in clinics. Neuropathic pain resulting from SCI has a lasting and significant impact on most aspects of daily life. Thus, a better understanding of the molecular pathways responsible for the cause of neuropathic pain observed in SCI is important to develop effective therapeutic agents and treatment strategies. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a serine/threonine protein kinase that is well known for its critical roles in regulating protein synthesis and growth. Furthermore, compelling evidence supports the notion that widespread dysregulation of mTOR and its downstream pathways are involved in neuropathic pain. Thus, in this study we specifically examined the underlying mechanisms by which mTOR and its signaling pathways are involved in SCI-evoked neuropathic pain in a rat model. Overall, we demonstrated that SCI increased the protein expression of p-mTOR, and mTORmediated- phosphorylation of 4E-binding protein 4 (4E-BP1) and p70 ribosomal S6 protein kinase 1 (S6K1) in the superficial dorsal horn of the spinal cord. Also, we showed that blocking spinal mTOR by intrathecal injection of rapamycin significantly inhibited pain responses induced by mechanical and thermal stimulation. In addition, blocking spinal phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase (p-PI3K) pathway significantly attenuated activities of p-mTOR pathways as well as mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in SCI rats. Moreover, blocking mTOR and PI3K decreased the enhanced levels of substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in the dorsal horn of SCI rats. We revealed specific signaling pathways leading to SCI-evoked neuropathic pain, including the activation of PI3K, mTOR and its downstream signaling pathways. Targeting one or more of these signaling molecules may present new opportunities for treatment and management of neuropathic pain often observed in patients with SCI.

  17. Abdominal Manual Therapy Repairs Interstitial Cells of Cajal and Increases Colonic c-Kit Expression When Treating Bowel Dysfunction after Spinal Cord Injury

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    Yi Zhu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. This study aimed to evaluate the therapeutic effects of abdominal manual therapy (AMT on bowel dysfunction after spinal cord injury (SCI, investigating interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs and related c-kit expression. Methods. Model rats were divided as SCI and SCI with drug treatment (intragastric mosapride, low-intensity (SCI + LMT; 50 g, 50 times/min, and high-intensity AMT (SCI + HMT; 100 g, 150 times/min. After 14 days of treatment, weight, improved Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan (BBB locomotor score, and intestinal movement were evaluated. Morphological structure of spinal cord and colon tissues were examined. Immunostaining, RT-PCR, and western blot were used to assess c-kit expression. Results. In SCI rats, AMT could not restore BBB, but it significantly increased weight, shortened time to defecation, increased feces amounts, and improved fecal pellet traits and colon histology. AMT improved the number, distribution, and ultrastructure of colonic ICCs, increasing colonic c-kit mRNA and protein levels. Compared with the SCI + Drug and SCI + LMT groups, the SCI + HMT group showed better therapeutic effect in improving intestinal transmission function and promoting c-kit expression. Conclusions. AMT is an effective therapy for recovery of intestinal transmission function. It could repair ICCs and increase c-kit expression in colon tissues after SCI, in a frequency-dependent and pressure-dependent manner.

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of rodent spinal cord with an improved performance coil at 7 Tesla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solis-Najera, S. E.; Rodriguez, A. O.

    2014-11-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging of animal models provide reliable means to study human diseases. The image acquisition particularly determined by the radio frequency coil to detect the signal emanated from a particular region of interest. A scaled-down version of the slotted surface coil was built based on the previous results of a magnetron-type surface coil for human applications. Our coil prototype had a 2 cm total diameter and six circular slots and was developed for murine spinal cord at 7 T. Electromagnetic simulations of the slotted and circular coils were also performed to compute the spatially dependent magnetic and electric fields using a simulated saline-solution sphere. The quality factor of both coils was experimentally measured giving a lower noise figure and a higher quality factor for the slotted coil outperforming the circular coil. Images of the spinal cord of a rat were acquired using standard pulse sequences. The slotted surface coil can be a good tool for spinal cord rat imaging using conventional pulse sequences at 7 T.

  19. Myelosuppressive conditioning using busulfan enables bone marrow cell accumulation in the spinal cord of a mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

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    Coral-Ann B Lewis

    Full Text Available Myeloablative preconditioning using irradiation is the most commonly used technique to generate rodents having chimeric bone marrow, employed for the study of bone marrow-derived cell accumulation in the healthy and diseased central nervous system. However, irradiation has been shown to alter the blood-brain barrier, potentially creating confounding artefacts. To better study the potential of bone marrow-derived cells to function as treatment vehicles for neurodegenerative diseases alternative preconditioning regimens must be developed. We treated transgenic mice that over-express human mutant superoxide dismutase 1, a model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, with busulfan to determine whether this commonly used chemotherapeutic leads to stable chimerism and promotes the entry of bone marrow-derived cells into spinal cord. Intraperitoneal treatment with busulfan at 60 mg/kg or 80 mg/kg followed by intravenous injection of green fluorescent protein-expressing bone marrow resulted in sustained levels of chimerism (~80%. Bone marrow-derived cells accumulated in the lumbar spinal cord of diseased mice at advanced stages of pathology at both doses, with limited numbers of bone marrow derived cells observed in the spinal cords of similarly treated, age-matched controls; the majority of bone marrow-derived cells in spinal cord immunolabelled for macrophage antigens. Comparatively, significantly greater numbers of bone marrow-derived cells were observed in lumbar spinal cord following irradiative myeloablation. These results demonstrate bone marrow-derived cell accumulation in diseased spinal cord is possible without irradiative preconditioning.

  20. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... arrow What are the latest developments in the use of electrical stimulation for spinal cord injuries? play_arrow What is “Braingate” research? play_arrow How would stem-cell therapies work in the treatment of spinal cord ...

  1. Transplantation of spinal cord-derived neural stem cells for ALS: Analysis of phase 1 and 2 trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Jonathan D; Hertzberg, Vicki S; Boulis, Nicholas M; Riley, Jonathan; Federici, Thais; Polak, Meraida; Bordeau, Jane; Fournier, Christina; Johe, Karl; Hazel, Tom; Cudkowicz, Merit; Atassi, Nazem; Borges, Lawrence F; Rutkove, Seward B; Duell, Jayna; Patil, Parag G; Goutman, Stephen A; Feldman, Eva L

    2016-07-26

    To test the safety of spinal cord transplantation of human stem cells in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) with escalating doses and expansion of the trial to multiple clinical centers. This open-label trial included 15 participants at 3 academic centers divided into 5 treatment groups receiving increasing doses of stem cells by increasing numbers of cells/injection and increasing numbers of injections. All participants received bilateral injections into the cervical spinal cord (C3-C5). The final group received injections into both the lumbar (L2-L4) and cervical cord through 2 separate surgical procedures. Participants were assessed for adverse events and progression of disease, as measured by the ALS Functional Rating Scale-Revised, forced vital capacity, and quantitative measures of strength. Statistical analysis focused on the slopes of decline of these phase 2 trial participants alone or in combination with the phase 1 participants (previously reported), comparing these groups to 3 separate historical control groups. Adverse events were mostly related to transient pain associated with surgery and to side effects of immunosuppressant medications. There was one incident of acute postoperative deterioration in neurologic function and another incident of a central pain syndrome. We could not discern differences in surgical outcomes between surgeons. Comparisons of the slopes of decline with the 3 separate historical control groups showed no differences in mean rates of progression. Intraspinal transplantation of human spinal cord-derived neural stem cells can be safely accomplished at high doses, including successive lumbar and cervical procedures. The procedure can be expanded safely to multiple surgical centers. This study provides Class IV evidence that for patients with ALS, spinal cord transplantation of human stem cells can be safely accomplished and does not accelerate the progression of the disease. This study lacks the precision to

  2. Cetuximab modified collagen scaffold directs neurogenesis of injury-activated endogenous neural stem cells for acute spinal cord injury repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xing; Zhao, Yannan; Cheng, Shixiang; Han, Sufang; Shu, Muya; Chen, Bing; Chen, Xuyi; Tang, Fengwu; Wang, Nuo; Tu, Yue; Wang, Bin; Xiao, Zhifeng; Zhang, Sai; Dai, Jianwu

    2017-08-01

    Studies have shown that endogenous neural stem cells (NSCs) activated by spinal cord injury (SCI) primarily generate astrocytes to form glial scar. The NSCs do not differentiate into neurons because of the adverse microenvironment. In this study, we defined the activation timeline of endogenous NSCs in rats with severe SCI. These injury-activated NSCs then migrated into the lesion site. Cetuximab, an EGFR signaling antagonist, significantly increased neurogenesis in the lesion site. Meanwhile, implanting cetuximab modified linear ordered collagen scaffolds (LOCS) into SCI lesion sites in dogs resulted in neuronal regeneration, including neuronal differentiation, maturation, myelination, and synapse formation. The neuronal regeneration eventually led to a significant locomotion recovery. Furthermore, LOCS implantation could also greatly decrease chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG) deposition at the lesion site. These findings suggest that endogenous neurogenesis following acute complete SCI is achievable in species ranging from rodents to large animals via functional scaffold implantation. LOCS-based Cetuximab delivery system has a promising therapeutic effect on activating endogenous neurogenesis, reducing CSPGs deposition and improving motor function recovery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. [Effect of electroacupuncture on the expression of oligodendrocyte precursor cells in rats with compressed spinal cord injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Si-qin; Qi, Wei; Zeng, Zhi-hua; Wang, Ke-jian; Wu, Xiu-yu

    2014-11-01

    To investigate the effect of electroacupuncture on the expression of oligodendrocyte precursor cells in rats with compressed spinal cord injury (CSCI) and to explore the mechanism of remyelinization. Thirty-six SD rats were randomly divided into a control group and three treatment groups with 3 d, 7 d and 14 d of treatment respectively. Acupuncture was given to rats in the treatment groups through jiaji point, double zusanli (ST36), and double taixi (KI3). Electroacupuncture (continuous wave, 2 Hz/1. 5 V, 30 min) was applied for the double zusanli (ST36) and double taixi (KI3). Ethological alterations of the rats were observed with quantitative assessment of neurologic function. The ultrastructure changes of nerve fibers in white matter were determined under electronic microscope. Expressions of NG2 protein, an OPC marker, was observed by Western blot. No significant changes in neurologic function and G-ratio were observed after three days and seven days of electroacupuncture treatment (P>0. 05). However, 14 d of electroacupuncture treatment made a significant change compared to the 7 d treatment group and the control group (PElectroacupuncture can improve inflammation and edema in the injured nerve fibers and up regulate NG2 expression and remyelination of the injured nerve fibers in rats with CSCI.

  4. Microarray analysis of expression of cell death-associated genes in rat spinal cord cells exposed to cyclic tensile stresses in vitro

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    Roberts Sally

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The application of mechanical insults to the spinal cord results in profound cellular and molecular changes, including the induction of neuronal cell death and altered gene expression profiles. Previous studies have described alterations in gene expression following spinal cord injury, but the specificity of this response to mechanical stimuli is difficult to investigate in vivo. Therefore, we have investigated the effect of cyclic tensile stresses on cultured spinal cord cells from E15 Sprague-Dawley rats, using the FX3000® Flexercell Strain Unit. We examined cell morphology and viability over a 72 hour time course. Microarray analysis of gene expression was performed using the Affymetrix GeneChip System®, where categorization of identified genes was performed using the Gene Ontology (GO and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG systems. Changes in expression of 12 genes were validated with quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Results The application of cyclic tensile stress reduced the viability of cultured spinal cord cells significantly in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Increasing either the strain or the strain rate independently was associated with significant decreases in spinal cord cell survival. There was no clear evidence of additive effects of strain level with strain rate. GO analysis identified 44 candidate genes which were significantly related to "apoptosis" and 17 genes related to "response to stimulus". KEGG analysis identified changes in the expression levels of 12 genes of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signaling pathway, which were confirmed to be upregulated by RT-PCR analysis. Conclusions We have demonstrated that spinal cord cells undergo cell death in response to cyclic tensile stresses, which were dose- and time-dependent. In addition, we have identified the up regulation of various genes, in particular of the MAPK pathway, which

  5. Anti-Inflammatory Mechanism of Neural Stem Cell Transplantation in Spinal Cord Injury

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    Zhijian Cheng

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Neural stem cell (NSC transplantation has been proposed to promote functional recovery after spinal cord injury. However, a detailed understanding of the mechanisms of how NSCs exert their therapeutic plasticity is lacking. We transplanted mouse NSCs into the injured spinal cord seven days after SCI, and the Basso Mouse Scale (BMS score was performed to assess locomotor function. The anti-inflammatory effects of NSC transplantation was analyzed by immunofluorescence staining of neutrophil and macrophages and the detection of mRNA levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, interleukin-1β (IL-1β, interleukin-6 (IL-6 and interleukin-12 (IL-12. Furthermore, bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs were co-cultured with NSCs and followed by analyzing the mRNA levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS, TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-10 with quantitative real-time PCR. The production of TNF-α and IL-1β by BMDMs was examined using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Transplanted NSCs had significantly increased BMS scores (p < 0.05. Histological results showed that the grafted NSCs migrated from the injection site toward the injured area. NSCs transplantation significantly reduced the number of neutrophils and iNOS+/Mac-2+ cells at the epicenter of the injured area (p < 0.05. Meanwhile, mRNA levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-12 in the NSCs transplantation group were significantly decreased compared to the control group. Furthermore, NSCs inhibited the iNOS expression of BMDMs and the release of inflammatory factors by macrophages in vitro (p < 0.05. These results suggest that NSC transplantation could modulate SCI-induced inflammatory responses and enhance neurological function after SCI via reducing M1 macrophage activation and infiltrating neutrophils. Thus, this study provides a new insight into the mechanisms responsible for the anti-inflammatory effect of NSC transplantation after SCI.

  6. Blocking mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR improves neuropathic pain evoked by spinal cord injury

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    Wang Xiaoping

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injury (SCI is an extremely serious type of physical trauma observed in clinics. Neuropathic pain resulting from SCI has a lasting and significant impact on most aspects of daily life. Thus, a better understanding of the molecular pathways responsible for the cause of neuropathic pain observed in SCI is important to develop effective therapeutic agents and treatment strategies. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR is a serine/threonine protein kinase that is well known for its critical roles in regulating protein synthesis and growth. Furthermore, compelling evidence supports the notion that widespread dysregulation of mTOR and its downstream pathways are involved in neuropathic pain. Thus, in this study we specifically examined the underlying mechanisms by which mTOR and its signaling pathways are involved in SCI-evoked neuropathic pain in a rat model. Overall, we demonstrated that SCI increased the protein expression of p-mTOR, and mTORmediated- phosphorylation of 4E–binding protein 4 (4E-BP1 and p70 ribosomal S6 protein kinase 1 (S6K1 in the superficial dorsal horn of the spinal cord. Also, we showed that blocking spinal mTOR by intrathecal injection of rapamycin significantly inhibited pain responses induced by mechanical and thermal stimulation. In addition, blocking spinal phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase (p-PI3K pathway significantly attenuated activities of p-mTOR pathways as well as mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in SCI rats. Moreover, blocking mTOR and PI3K decreased the enhanced levels of substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP in the dorsal horn of SCI rats. We revealed specific signaling pathways leading to SCI-evoked neuropathic pain, including the activation of PI3K, mTOR and its downstream signaling pathways. Targeting one or more of these signaling molecules may present new opportunities for treatment and management of neuropathic pain often observed in patients with SCI.

  7. A Comparative Study of Three Different Types of Stem Cells for Treatment of Rat Spinal Cord Injury

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Růžička, Jiří; Machová-Urdzíková, Lucia; Gillick, J.; Amemori, Takashi; Romanyuk, Nataliya; Kárová, Kristýna; Závišková, Kristýna; Dubišová, Jana; Kubinová, Šárka; Murali, R.; Syková, Eva; Jhanwar-Uniyal, M.; Jendelová, Pavla

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 4 (2017), s. 585-603 ISSN 0963-6897 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA13-00939S; GA MŠk(CZ) 7F14057; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015064 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : spinal cord injury (SCI) * iPSC-derived human neural progenitors * Inflammatory response Human fetal neural stem cells Subject RIV: FH - Neurology OBOR OECD: Neurosciences (including psychophysiology Impact factor: 3.006, year: 2016

  8. Generation of Oligodendrogenic Spinal Neural Progenitor Cells From Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazaei, Mohamad; Ahuja, Christopher S; Fehlings, Michael G

    2017-08-14

    This unit describes protocols for the efficient generation of oligodendrogenic neural progenitor cells (o-NPCs) from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). Specifically, detailed methods are provided for the maintenance and differentiation of hiPSCs, human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neural progenitor cells (hiPS-NPCs), and human induced pluripotent stem cell-oligodendrogenic neural progenitor cells (hiPSC-o-NPCs) with the final products being suitable for in vitro experimentation or in vivo transplantation. Throughout, cell exposure to growth factors and patterning morphogens has been optimized for both concentration and timing, based on the literature and empirical experience, resulting in a robust and highly efficient protocol. Using this derivation procedure, it is possible to obtain millions of oligodendrogenic-NPCs within 40 days of initial cell plating which is substantially shorter than other protocols for similar cell types. This protocol has also been optimized to use translationally relevant human iPSCs as the parent cell line. The resultant cells have been extensively characterized both in vitro and in vivo and express key markers of an oligodendrogenic lineage. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley and Sons, Inc.

  9. Feasibility of Diffusion Tensor Imaging for Assessing Functional Recovery in Rats with Olfactory Ensheathing Cell Transplantation After Contusive Spinal Cord Injury (SCI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Mengchao; Gao, Zhengchao; Li, Xiaohui; Zhao, Feng; Guo, Lei; Liu, Jiantao; He, Xijing

    2017-06-17

    BACKGROUND Olfactory ensheathing cell transplantation is a promising treatment for spinal cord injury. Diffusion tensor imaging has been applied to assess various kinds of spinal cord injury. However, it has rarely been used to evaluate the beneficial effects of olfactory ensheathing cell transplantation. This study aimed to explore the feasibility of diffusion tensor imaging in the evaluation of functional recovery in rats with olfactory ensheathing cell transplantation after contusive spinal cord injury. MATERIAL AND METHODS Immunofluorescence staining was performed to determine the purity of olfactory ensheathing cells. Rats received cell transplantation at week 1 after injury. Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan score was used to assess the functional recovery. Magnetic resonance imaging was applied weekly, including diffusion tensor imaging. Diffusion tensor tractography was reconstructed to visualize the repair process. RESULTS The results showed that olfactory ensheathing cell transplantation increased the functional and histological recovery and restrained the secondary injury process after the initial spinal cord injury. The fractional anisotropy values in rats with cell transplantation were significantly higher than those in the control group, while the apparent diffusion coefficient values were significantly lower. Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan score was positively and linearly correlated with fractional anisotropy value, and it was negatively and linearly correlated with apparent diffusion coefficient value. CONCLUSIONS These findings suggest that diffusion tensor imaging parameters are sensitive biomarker indices for olfactory ensheathing cell transplantation interventions, and diffusion tensor imaging scan can reflect the functional recovery promoted by the olfactory ensheathing cell transplantation after contusive spinal cord injury.

  10. Recommendations for publishing case studies of cell transplantation for spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobkin, Bruce H

    2010-10-01

    Cellular transplantation for subacute and chronic spinal cord injury (SCI) continues to proceed around the world, but clinicians and patients have only 10 English language publications of case reports and self-serving Web page anecdotes to guide them. Recent publications about the use of olfactory ensheathing, bone marrow stromal, and fetal tissue stem cells in human subjects are examined to assess the adequacy of their designs, conclusions, and interpretation. Case series reports to date reveal adverse responses to cellular therapy when clinicians look for these and no clear functional effects when a matched group that is not treated is compared. Rehabilitation that focuses on potential targets for sensorimotor and functional gains must precede a transplantation until a plateau of change is reached and then continue for at least 6 months if not a year. Criteria are listed as the minimum requirements for any further case series reports to be considered by journals in regard to cellular interventions for SCI. Based on available reports, the published interventions should not be given to additional patients. One or two of the strategies can be considered for testing in a randomized trial with blinded assessors and an independent data monitoring committee to examine for biological activity in patients with motor complete SCI of greater than 4 to 6 months duration.

  11. Virtual reality-augmented neurorehabilitation improves motor function and reduces neuropathic pain in patients with incomplete spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villiger, Michael; Bohli, Dominik; Kiper, Daniel; Pyk, Pawel; Spillmann, Jeremy; Meilick, Bruno; Curt, Armin; Hepp-Reymond, Marie-Claude; Hotz-Boendermaker, Sabina; Eng, Kynan

    2013-10-01

    Neurorehabilitation interventions to improve lower limb function and neuropathic pain have had limited success in people with chronic, incomplete spinal cord injury (iSCI). We hypothesized that intense virtual reality (VR)-augmented training of observed and executed leg movements would improve limb function and neuropathic pain. Patients used a VR system with a first-person view of virtual lower limbs, controlled via movement sensors fitted to the patient's own shoes. Four tasks were used to deliver intensive training of individual muscles (tibialis anterior, quadriceps, leg ad-/abductors). The tasks engaged motivation through feedback of task success. Fourteen chronic iSCI patients were treated over 4 weeks in 16 to 20 sessions of 45 minutes. Outcome measures were 10 Meter Walking Test, Berg Balance Scale, Lower Extremity Motor Score, Spinal Cord Independence Measure, Locomotion and Neuropathic Pain Scale (NPS), obtained at the start and at 4 to 6 weeks before intervention. In addition to positive changes reported by the patients (Patients' Global Impression of Change), measures of walking capacity, balance, and strength revealed improvements in lower limb function. Intensity and unpleasantness of neuropathic pain in half of the affected participants were reduced on the NPS test. Overall findings remained stable 12 to 16 weeks after termination of the training. In a pretest/posttest, uncontrolled design, VR-augmented training was associated with improvements in motor function and neuropathic pain in persons with chronic iSCI, several of which reached the level of a minimal clinically important change. A controlled trial is needed to compare this intervention to active training alone or in combination.

  12. Assessment of Neuroprotective Properties of Melissa officinalis in Combination With Human Umbilical Cord Blood Stem Cells After Spinal Cord Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Ruhollah Hosseini

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The pathophysiology of spinal cord injury (SCI has a classically bad prognosis. It has been demonstrated that human umbilical cord blood stem cells (hUCBSCs and Melissa officinalis (MO are useful for the prevention of neurological disease. Methods Thirty-six adult male rats were randomly divided into intact, sham, control (SCI, MO, hUCBSC, and MO-hUCBSC groups. Intraperitoneal injection of MO (150 mg/kg was commenced 24 hr post-SCI and continued once a day for 14 days. Intraspinal grafting of hUCBSCs was commenced immediately in the next day. The motor and sensory functions of all animals were evaluated once a week after the commencement of SCI. Electromyography (EMG was performed in the last day in order to measure the recruitment index. Immunohistochemistry, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and transmission electron microscopy evaluations were performed to determine the level of astrogliosis and myelination. Results The results revealed that motor function (MO-hUCBSC: 15 ± 0.3, SCI: 8.2 ± 0.37, p < .001, sensory function (MO-hUCBSC: 3.57 ± 0.19, SCI: 6.38 ± 0.23, p < .001, and EMG recruitment index (MO-hUCBSC: 3.71 ± 0.18, SCI: 1.6 ± 0.1, p < .001 were significantly improved in the MO-hUCBSC group compared with SCI group. Mean cavity area (MO-hUCBSC: 0.03 ± 0.03, SCI: 0.07 ± 0.004, p < .001 was reduced and loss of lower motor neurons (MO-hUCBSC: 7.6 ± 0.43, SCI: 3 ± 0.12, p < .001 and astrogliosis density (MO-hUCBSC: 3.1 ± 0.15, SCI: 6.25 ± 1.42, p < 0.001 in the ventral horn of spinal cord were prevented in MO-hUCBSC group compared with SCI group. Conclusion The results revealed that the combination of MO and hUCBSCs in comparison with the control group has neuroprotective effects in SCI.

  13. A toll-like receptor 9 antagonist improves bladder function and white matter sparing in spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Brian T; Sampath, Sujitha; Dong, Wei; Heiman, Adee; Rella, Courtney E; Elkabes, Stella; Heary, Robert F

    2014-11-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) affects motor, sensory, and autonomic functions. As current therapies do not adequately alleviate functional deficits, the development of new and more effective approaches is of critical importance. Our earlier investigations indicated that intrathecal administration of a toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) antagonist, cytidine-phosphate-guanosine oligodeoxynucleotide 2088 (CpG ODN 2088), to mice sustaining a severe, mid-thoracic contusion injury diminished neuropathic pain but did not alter locomotor deficits. These changes were paralleled by a decrease in the pro-inflammatory response at the injury epicenter. Using the same SCI paradigm and treatment regimen, the current studies investigated the effects of the TLR9 antagonist on bladder function. We report that the TLR9 antagonist decreases SCI-elicited urinary retention and ameliorates bladder morphopathology without affecting kidney function. A significant improvement in white matter sparing was also observed, most likely due to alterations in the inflammatory milieu. These findings indicate that the TLR9 antagonist has beneficial effects not only in reducing sensory deficits, but also on bladder dysfunction and tissue preservation. Thus, modulation of innate immune receptor signaling in the spinal cord can impact the effects of SCI.

  14. Plasmid-based genetic modification of human bone marrow-derived stromal cells: analysis of cell survival and transgene expression after transplantation in rat spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronsyn, Mark W; Daans, Jasmijn; Spaepen, Gie; Chatterjee, Shyama; Vermeulen, Katrien; D'Haese, Patrick; Van Tendeloo, Viggo Fi; Van Marck, Eric; Ysebaert, Dirk; Berneman, Zwi N; Jorens, Philippe G; Ponsaerts, Peter

    2007-12-14

    Bone marrow-derived stromal cells (MSC) are attractive targets for ex vivo cell and gene therapy. In this context, we investigated the feasibility of a plasmid-based strategy for genetic modification of human (h)MSC with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and neurotrophin (NT)3. Three genetically modified hMSC lines (EGFP, NT3, NT3-EGFP) were established and used to study cell survival and transgene expression following transplantation in rat spinal cord. First, we demonstrate long-term survival of transplanted hMSC-EGFP cells in rat spinal cord under, but not without, appropriate immune suppression. Next, we examined the stability of EGFP or NT3 transgene expression following transplantation of hMSC-EGFP, hMSC-NT3 and hMSC-NT3-EGFP in rat spinal cord. While in vivo EGFP mRNA and protein expression by transplanted hMSC-EGFP cells was readily detectable at different time points post-transplantation, in vivo NT3 mRNA expression by hMSC-NT3 cells and in vivo EGFP protein expression by hMSC-NT3-EGFP cells was, respectively, undetectable or declined rapidly between day 1 and 7 post-transplantation. Further investigation revealed that the observed in vivo decline of EGFP protein expression by hMSC-NT3-EGFP cells: (i) was associated with a decrease in transgenic NT3-EGFP mRNA expression as suggested following laser capture micro-dissection analysis of hMSC-NT3-EGFP cell transplants at day 1 and day 7 post-transplantation, (ii) did not occur when hMSC-NT3-EGFP cells were transplanted subcutaneously, and (iii) was reversed upon re-establishment of hMSC-NT3-EGFP cell cultures at 2 weeks post-transplantation. Finally, because we observed a slowly progressing tumour growth following transplantation of all our hMSC cell transplants, we here demonstrate that omitting immune suppressive therapy is sufficient to prevent further tumour growth and to eradicate malignant xenogeneic cell transplants. In this study, we demonstrate that genetically modified hMSC lines can survive

  15. Bacterial cells with improved tolerance to polyamines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    Provided are bacterial cells genetically modified to improve their tolerance to certain commodity chemicals, such as polyamines, and methods of preparing and using such bacterial cells for production of polyamines and other compounds.......Provided are bacterial cells genetically modified to improve their tolerance to certain commodity chemicals, such as polyamines, and methods of preparing and using such bacterial cells for production of polyamines and other compounds....

  16. Bacterial cells with improved tolerance to polyols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    The present invention relates to bacterial cells genetically modified to improve their tolerance to certain commodity chemicals, such as diols and other polyols, and to methods of preparing and using such bacterial cells for production of polyols and other compounds.......The present invention relates to bacterial cells genetically modified to improve their tolerance to certain commodity chemicals, such as diols and other polyols, and to methods of preparing and using such bacterial cells for production of polyols and other compounds....

  17. The multifaceted effects of agmatine on functional recovery after spinal cord injury through Modulations of BMP-2/4/7 expressions in neurons and glial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Mi Park

    Full Text Available Presently, few treatments for spinal cord injury (SCI are available and none have facilitated neural regeneration and/or significant functional improvement. Agmatine (Agm, a guanidinium compound formed from decarboxylation of L-arginine by arginine decarboxylase, is a neurotransmitter/neuromodulator and been reported to exert neuroprotective effects in central nervous system injury models including SCI. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the multifaceted effects of Agm on functional recovery and remyelinating events following SCI. Compression SCI in mice was produced by placing a 15 g/mm(2 weight for 1 min at thoracic vertebra (Th 9 segment. Mice that received an intraperitoneal (i.p. injection of Agm (100 mg/kg/day within 1 hour after SCI until 35 days showed improvement in locomotor recovery and bladder function. Emphasis was made on the analysis of remyelination events, neuronal cell preservation and ablation of glial scar area following SCI. Agm treatment significantly inhibited the demyelination events, neuronal loss and glial scar around the lesion site. In light of recent findings that expressions of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs are modulated in the neuronal and glial cell population after SCI, we hypothesized whether Agm could modulate BMP- 2/4/7 expressions in neurons, astrocytes, oligodendrocytes and play key role in promoting the neuronal and glial cell survival in the injured spinal cord. The results from computer assisted stereological toolbox analysis (CAST demonstrate that Agm treatment dramatically increased BMP- 2/7 expressions in neurons and oligodendrocytes. On the other hand, BMP- 4 expressions were significantly decreased in astrocytes and oligodendrocytes around the lesion site. Together, our results reveal that Agm treatment improved neurological and histological outcomes, induced oligodendrogenesis, protected neurons, and decreased glial scar formation through modulating the BMP- 2/4/7 expressions following

  18. The Multifaceted Effects of Agmatine on Functional Recovery after Spinal Cord Injury through Modulations of BMP-2/4/7 Expressions in Neurons and Glial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yu Mi; Lee, Won Taek; Bokara, Kiran Kumar; Seo, Su Kyoung; Park, Seung Hwa; Kim, Jae Hwan; Yenari, Midori A.; Park, Kyung Ah; Lee, Jong Eun

    2013-01-01

    Presently, few treatments for spinal cord injury (SCI) are available and none have facilitated neural regeneration and/or significant functional improvement. Agmatine (Agm), a guanidinium compound formed from decarboxylation of L-arginine by arginine decarboxylase, is a neurotransmitter/neuromodulator and been reported to exert neuroprotective effects in central nervous system injury models including SCI. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the multifaceted effects of Agm on functional recovery and remyelinating events following SCI. Compression SCI in mice was produced by placing a 15 g/mm2 weight for 1 min at thoracic vertebra (Th) 9 segment. Mice that received an intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of Agm (100 mg/kg/day) within 1 hour after SCI until 35 days showed improvement in locomotor recovery and bladder function. Emphasis was made on the analysis of remyelination events, neuronal cell preservation and ablation of glial scar area following SCI. Agm treatment significantly inhibited the demyelination events, neuronal loss and glial scar around the lesion site. In light of recent findings that expressions of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are modulated in the neuronal and glial cell population after SCI, we hypothesized whether Agm could modulate BMP- 2/4/7 expressions in neurons, astrocytes, oligodendrocytes and play key role in promoting the neuronal and glial cell survival in the injured spinal cord. The results from computer assisted stereological toolbox analysis (CAST) demonstrate that Agm treatment dramatically increased BMP- 2/7 expressions in neurons and oligodendrocytes. On the other hand, BMP- 4 expressions were significantly decreased in astrocytes and oligodendrocytes around the lesion site. Together, our results reveal that Agm treatment improved neurological and histological outcomes, induced oligodendrogenesis, protected neurons, and decreased glial scar formation through modulating the BMP- 2/4/7 expressions following SCI. PMID

  19. Complete rat spinal cord transection as a faithful model of spinal cord injury for translational cell transplantation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lukovic, D.; Moreno-Manzano, V.; Lopez-Mocholi, E.; Rodriguez-Jiménez, F.J.; Jendelová, Pavla; Syková, Eva; Erceg, Slaven; Oria, M.; Stojkovic, M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 5, APR 10 (2015), s. 9640 ISSN 2045-2322 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1309; GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : bryonic steemm-cells * motor evoked-potentials * promotes functional recovery * locomotor recovery * bone-marrow * motoneuron progenitors * regeneration * tissue * oligodendrocyte * scaffold Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 5.228, year: 2015

  20. Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Upper Ureter Metastatic to the Thoracic Spine Presenting as a Spinal Cord Compression

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    J. O. Larkin

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We performed a left nephroureterectomy for a gentleman with transitional cell carcinoma of the upper ureter. Histological analysis revealed it to be a T1 lesion, but to be highly mitotically active. The gentleman defaulted on adjuvant therapy and defaulted on follow-up. He represented with symptoms of acute spinal cord compression and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a lesion at T6/7. Neurosurgical resection of the lesion showed it to be a metastatic deposit from the ureteric primary. Despite surgical debulking and subsequent radiotherapy to the lesion, the patient died secondary to metastatic complications. This case report is of interest to the surgeon as it demonstrates both the high metastatic potential of upper tract carcinomas and educates the surgeon on the presentation of acute spinal cord compression.

  1. A Novel Growth-Promoting Pathway Formed by GDNF-Overexpressing Schwann Cells Promotes Propriospinal Axonal Regeneration, Synapse formation, and Partial Recovery of Function after Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Lingxiao; Deng, Ping; Ruan, Yiwen; Xu, Zao Cheng; Liu, Naikui; Wen, Xuejun; Smith, George M.; Xu, Xiao-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Descending propriospinal neurons (DPSN) are known to establish functional relays for supraspinal signals, and they display a greater growth response after injury than do the long projecting axons. However, their regenerative response is still deficient due to their failure to depart from growth supportive cellular transplants back into the host spinal cord, which contains numerous impediments to axon growth. Here we report the construction of a continuous growth-promoting pathway in adult rats, formed by grafted Schwann cells (SCs) overexpressing glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF). We demonstrate that such a growth-promoting pathway, extending from the axonal cut ends to the site of innervation in the distal spinal cord, promoted regeneration of DPSN axons through and beyond the lesion gap of a spinal cord hemisection. Within the distal host spinal cord, regenerated DPSN axons formed synapses with host neurons leading to the restoration of action potentials and partial recovery of function. PMID:23536080

  2. A comparison of commercially available demineralized bone matrices with and without human mesenchymal stem cells in a rodent spinal fusion model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Tetsuo; Lord, Elizabeth L; Suzuki, Akinobu; Takahashi, Shinji; Scott, Trevor P; Phan, Kevin; Tian, Haijun; Daubs, Michael D; Shiba, Keiichiro; Wang, Jeffrey C

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE The efficacy of some demineralized bone matrix (DBM) substances has been demonstrated in the spinal fusion of rats; however, no previous comparative study has reported the efficacy of DBM with human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). There is an added cost to the products with stem cells, which should be justified by improved osteogenic potential. The purpose of this study is to prospectively compare the fusion rates of 3 different commercially available DBM substances, both with and without hMSCs. METHODS Posterolateral fusion was performed in 32 mature athymic nude rats. Three groups of 8 rats were implanted with 1 of 3 DBMs: Trinity Evolution (DBM with stem cells), Grafton (DBM without stem cells), or DBX (DBM without stem cells). A fourth group with no implanted material was used as a control group. Radiographs were obtained at 2, 4, and 8 weeks. The rats were euthanized at 8 weeks. Overall fusion was determined by manual palpation and micro-CT. RESULTS The fusion rates at 8 weeks on the radiographs for Trinity Evolution, Grafton, and DBX were 8 of 8 rats, 3 of 8 rats, and 5 of 8 rats, respectively. A significant difference was found between Trinity Evolution and Grafton (p = 0.01). The overall fusion rates as determined by micro-CT and manual palpation for Trinity Evolution, Grafton, and DBX were 4 of 8 rats, 3 of 8 rats, and 3 of 8 rats, respectively. The Trinity Evolution substance had the highest overall fusion rate, however no significant difference was found between groups. CONCLUSIONS The efficacies of these DBM substances are demonstrated; however, the advantage of DBM with hMSCs could not be found in terms of posterolateral fusion. When evaluating spinal fusion using DBM substances, CT analysis is necessary in order to not overestimate fusion.

  3. MULTIPLE SPINAL CANAL MENINGIOMAS

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    Nandigama Pratap Kumar

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Meningiomas of the spinal canal are common tumours with the incidence of 25 percent of all spinal cord tumours. But multiple spinal canal meningiomas are rare in compare to solitary lesions and account for 2 to 3.5% of all spinal meningiomas. Most of the reported cases are both intra cranial and spinal. Exclusive involvement of the spinal canal by multiple meningiomas are very rare. We could find only sixteen cases in the literature to the best of our knowledge. Exclusive multiple spinal canal meningiomas occurring in the first two decades of life are seldom reported in the literature. We are presenting a case of multiple spinal canal meningiomas in a young patient of 17 years, who was earlier operated for single lesion. We analysed the literature, with illustration of our case. MATERIALS AND METHODS In September 2016, we performed a literature search for multiple spinal canal meningiomas involving exclusively the spinal canal with no limitation for language and publication date. The search was conducted through http://pubmed.com, a wellknown worldwide internet medical address. To the best of our knowledge, we could find only sixteen cases of multiple meningiomas exclusively confined to the spinal canal. Exclusive multiple spinal canal meningiomas occurring in the first two decades of life are seldom reported in the literature. We are presenting a case of multiple spinal canal meningiomas in a young patient of 17 years, who was earlier operated for solitary intradural extra medullary spinal canal meningioma at D4-D6 level, again presented with spastic quadriparesis of two years duration and MRI whole spine demonstrated multiple intradural extra medullary lesions, which were excised completely and the histopathological diagnosis was transitional meningioma. RESULTS Patient recovered from his weakness and sensory symptoms gradually and bladder and bowel symptoms improved gradually over a period of two to three weeks. CONCLUSION Multiple

  4. Comparison of intraspinal and intrathecal implantation of induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neural precursors for the treatment of spinal cord injury in rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Amemori, Takashi; Růžička, Jiří; Romanyuk, Nataliya; Jhanwar-Uniyal, M.; Syková, Eva; Jendelová, Pavla

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 6, Dec (2015), s. 257 ISSN 1757-6512 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LH12024 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : spinal cord injury * human induced pluripotent stem cells * cell therapy * cell application route Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 4.504, year: 2015

  5. Diffusion tensor imaging in spinal cord injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamble, Ravindra B; Venkataramana, Neelam K; Naik, Arun L; Rao, Shailesh V

    2011-01-01

    To assess the feasibility of spinal tractography in patients of spinal cord injury vs a control group and to compare fractional anisotropy (FA) values between the groups. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was performed in the spinal cord of 29 patients (18 patients and 11 controls). DTI was done in the cervical region if the cord injury was at the dorsal or lumbar region and in the conus region if cord injury was in the cervical or dorsal region. FA was calculated for the patients and the controls and the values were compared. The mean FA value was 0.550±0.09 in the control group and 0.367±0.14 in the patients; this difference was statistically significant (P=0.001). Spinal tractography is a feasible technique to assess the extent of spinal cord injury by FA, which is reduced in patients of spinal cord injury, suggesting possible Wallerian degeneration. In future, this technique may become a useful tool for assessing cord injury patients after stem cell therapy, with improvement in FA values indicating axonal regeneration

  6. Increasing Human Neural Stem Cell Transplantation Dose Alters Oligodendroglial and Neuronal Differentiation after Spinal Cord Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja M. Piltti

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Multipotent human central nervous system-derived neural stem cells transplanted at doses ranging from 10,000 (low to 500,000 (very high cells differentiated predominantly into the oligodendroglial lineage. However, while the number of engrafted cells increased linearly in relationship to increasing dose, the proportion of oligodendrocytic cells declined. Increasing dose resulted in a plateau of engraftment, enhanced neuronal differentiation, and increased distal migration caudal to the transplantation sites. Dose had no effect on terminal sensory recovery or open-field locomotor scores. However, total human cell number and decreased oligodendroglial proportion were correlated with hindlimb girdle coupling errors. Conversely, greater oligodendroglial proportion was correlated with increased Ab step pattern, decreased swing speed, and increased paw intensity, consistent with improved recovery. These data suggest that transplant dose, and/or target niche parameters can regulate donor cell engraftment, differentiation/maturation, and lineage-specific migration profiles.

  7. Predictive Factors for Subjective Improvement in Lumbar Spinal Stenosis Patients with Nonsurgical Treatment: A 3-Year Prospective Cohort Study.

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    Ko Matsudaira

    Full Text Available To assess the predictive factors for subjective improvement with nonsurgical treatment in consecutive patients with lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS.Patients with LSS were enrolled from 17 medical centres in Japan. We followed up 274 patients (151 men; mean age, 71 ± 7.4 years for 3 years. A multivariable logistic regression model was used to assess the predictive factors for subjective symptom improvement with nonsurgical treatment.In 30% of patients, conservative treatment led to a subjective improvement in the symptoms; in 70% of patients, the symptoms remained unchanged, worsened, or required surgical treatment. The multivariable analysis of predictive factors for subjective improvement with nonsurgical treatment showed that the absence of cauda equina symptoms (only radicular symptoms had an odds ratio (OR of 3.31 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.50-7.31; absence of degenerative spondylolisthesis/scoliosis had an OR of 2.53 (95% CI: 1.13-5.65; <1-year duration of illness had an OR of 3.81 (95% CI: 1.46-9.98; and hypertension had an OR of 2.09 (95% CI: 0.92-4.78.The predictive factors for subjective symptom improvement with nonsurgical treatment in LSS patients were the presence of only radicular symptoms, absence of degenerative spondylolisthesis/scoliosis, and an illness duration of <1 year.

  8. Does vitamin C have the ability to augment the therapeutic effect of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells on spinal cord injury?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nesrine Salem

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Methylprednisolone (MP is currently the only drug confirmed to exhibit a neuroprotective effect on acute spinal cord injury (SCI. Vitamin C (VC is a natural water-soluble antioxidant that exerts neuroprotective effects through eliminating free radical damage to nerve cells. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs, as multipotent stem cells, are promising candidates in SCI repair. To evaluate the therapeutic effects of MP, VC and BMMSCs on traumatic SCI, 80 adult male rats were randomly divided into seven groups: control, SCI (SCI induction by weight-drop method, MP (SCI induction, followed by administration of 30 mg/kg MP via the tail vein, once every other 6 hours, for five times, VC (SCI induction, followed by intraperitoneal administration of 100 mg/kg VC once a day, for 28 days, MP + VC (SCI induction, followed by administration of MP and VC as the former, BMMSCs (SCI induction, followed by injection of 3 × 106 BMMSCs at the injury site, and BMMSCs + VC (SCI induction, followed by BMMSCs injection and VC administration as the former. Locomotor recovery was assessed using the Basso Mouse Scale. Injured spinal cord tissue was evaluated using hematoxylin-eosin staining and immunohistochemical staining. Expression of transforming growth factor-beta, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and matrix metalloproteinase-2 genes was determined using real-time quantitative PCR. BMMSCs intervention better promoted recovery of nerve function of rats with SCI, mitigated nerve cell damage, and decreased expression of transforming growth factor-beta, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and matrix metalloproteinase-2 genes than MP and/or VC. More importantly, BMMSCs in combination with VC induced more obvious improvements. These results suggest that VC can enhance the neuroprotective effects of BMMSCs against SCI.

  9. FGL-functionalized self-assembling nanofiber hydrogel as a scaffold for spinal cord-derived neural stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jian [Department of Orthopedics, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022 (China); Zheng, Jin [Department of Neurology, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022 (China); Zheng, Qixin, E-mail: zheng-qx@163.com [Department of Orthopedics, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022 (China); Wu, Yongchao; Wu, Bin; Huang, Shuai; Fang, Weizhi; Guo, Xiaodong [Department of Orthopedics, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022 (China)

    2015-01-01

    A class of designed self-assembling peptide nanofiber scaffolds has been shown to be a good biomimetic material in tissue engineering. Here, we specifically made a new peptide hydrogel scaffold FGLmx by mixing the pure RADA{sub 16} and designer functional peptide RADA{sub 16}-FGL solution, and we analyzed the physiochemical properties of each peptide with atomic force microscopy (AFM) and circular dichroism (CD). In addition, we examined the biocompatibility and bioactivity of FGLmx as well as RADA{sub 16} scaffold on spinal cord-derived neural stem cells (SC-NSCs) isolated from neonatal rats. Our results showed that RADA{sub 16}-FGL displayed a weaker β-sheet structure and FGLmx could self-assemble into nanofibrous morphology. Moreover, we found that FGLmx was not only noncytotoxic to SC-NSCs but also promoted SC-NSC proliferation and migration into the three-dimensional (3-D) scaffold, meanwhile, the adhesion and lineage differentiation of SC-NSCs on FGLmx were similar to that on RADA{sub 16}. Our results indicated that the FGL-functionalized peptide scaffold might be very beneficial for tissue engineering and suggested its further application for spinal cord injury (SCI) repair. - Highlights: • RADA{sub 16} and RADA{sub 16}-FGL peptides were synthesized and characterized. • Rat spinal cord neural stem cells were successfully isolated and characterized. • We provided an induction method for mixed differentiation of neural stem cells. • FGL scaffold had good biocompatibility and bioactivity with neural stem cells.

  10. Medical clerks in a national university hospital: improving the quality of medical care with a focus on spinal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Kazuyoshi; Ando, Kei; Noda, Makiko; Ishiguro, Naoki; Imagama, Shiro

    2018-02-01

    In our institution, which is a national university hospital, medical clerks were introduced in 2009 to improve the doctor's working environment. Seventeen clerks were assigned to 9 separate departments and the work content differed greatly among departments, but sufficient professional work was not done efficiently. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of the work of medical clerks on improvement of medical quality in recent years. In 2011, we established a central clerk desk on our outpatient floor to improve efficiency and centralize the clerk work. Since 2013, periodic education of clerks on spine disease has been provided by spine doctors, and this has facilitated sharing of information on spinal surgery from diagnosis to surgical treatment. This has allowed medical clerks to ask patients questions, leading to more efficient medical treatment and a potential reduction of doctors' work. In 2016, a revision of the insurance system by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare of Japan increased the amount of medical work that clerks can perform, and it became possible to increase the number of medical clerks. Currently, we have 30 medical clerks, and this has allowed establishment of new clerk desks in other departments to handle patients. A training curriculum will be developed to reduce the burden on doctors further and to improve the quality of medical treatment.

  11. Balance and ambulation improvements in individuals with chronic incomplete spinal cord injury using locomotor training-based rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkema, Susan J; Schmidt-Read, Mary; Lorenz, Douglas J; Edgerton, V Reggie; Behrman, Andrea L

    2012-09-01

    To evaluate the effects of intensive locomotor training on balance and ambulatory function at enrollment and discharge during outpatient rehabilitation after incomplete SCI. Prospective observational cohort. Seven outpatient rehabilitation centers from the Christopher and Dana Reeve Foundation NeuroRecovery Network (NRN). Patients (N=196) with American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale (AIS) grade C or D SCI who received at least 20 locomotor training treatment sessions in the NRN. Intensive locomotor training, including step training using body-weight support and manual facilitation on a treadmill followed by overground assessment and community integration. Berg Balance Scale; Six-Minute Walk Test; 10-Meter Walk Test. Outcome measures at enrollment showed high variability between patients with AIS grades C and D. Significant improvement from enrollment to final evaluation was observed in balance and walking measures for patients with AIS grades C and D. The magnitude of improvement significantly differed between AIS groups for all measures. Time since SCI was not associated significantly with outcome measures at enrollment, but was related inversely to levels of improvement. Significant variability in baseline values of functional outcome measures is evident after SCI in individuals with AIS grades C and D and significant functional recovery can continue to occur even years after injury when provided with locomotor training. These results indicate that rehabilitation, which provides intensive activity-based therapy, can result in functional improvements in individuals with chronic incomplete SCI. Copyright © 2012 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Improving primary care for persons with spinal cord injury: Development of a toolkit to guide care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milligan, James; Lee, Joseph; Hillier, Loretta M; Slonim, Karen; Craven, Catharine

    2018-05-07

    To identify a set of essential components for primary care for patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) for inclusion in a point-of-practice toolkit for primary care practitioners (PCP) and identification of the essential elements of SCI care that are required in primary care and those that should be the focus of specialist care. Modified Delphi consensus process; survey methodology. Primary care. Three family physicians, six specialist physicians, and five inter-disciplinary health professionals completed surveys. Importance of care elements for inclusion in the toolkit (9-point scale: 1 = lowest level of importance, 9 = greatest level of importance) and identification of most responsible physician (family physician, specialist) for completing key categories of care. Open-ended comments were solicited. There was consensus between the respondent groups on the level of importance of various care elements. Mean importance scores were highest for autonomic dysreflexia, pain, and skin care and lowest for preventive care, social issues, and vital signs. Although, there was agreement across all respondents that family physicians should assume responsibility for assessing mental health, there was variability in who should be responsible for other care categories. Comments were related to the need for shared care approaches and capacity building and lack of knowledge and specialized equipment as barriers to optimal care. This study identified important components of SCI care to be included in a point-of-practice toolkit to facilitate primary care for persons with SCI.

  13. Spinal cord homogenates from SOD1 familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis induce SOD1 aggregation in living cells.

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    Edward Pokrishevsky

    Full Text Available Mutant Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1 can confer its misfolding on wild-type SOD1 in living cells; the propagation of misfolding can also be transmitted between cells in vitro. Recent studies identified fluorescently-tagged SOD1G85R as a promiscuous substrate that is highly prone to aggregate by a variety of templates, in vitro and in vivo. Here, we utilized several SOD1-GFP reporter proteins with G37R, G85R, or G93A mutations in SOD1. We observed that human spinal cord homogenates prepared from SOD1 familial ALS (FALS can induce significantly more intracellular reporter protein aggregation than spinal cord homogenates from sporadic ALS, Alzheimer's disease, multiple system atrophy or healthy control individuals. We also determined that the induction of reporter protein aggregation by SOD1-FALS tissue homogenates can be attenuated by incubating the cells with the SOD1 misfolding-specific antibody 3H1, or the small molecule 5-fluorouridine. Our study further implicates SOD1 as the seeding particle responsible for the spread of SOD1-FALS neurodegeneration from its initial onset site(s, and demonstrates two potential therapeutic strategies for SOD1-mediated disease. This work also comprises a medium-throughput cell-based platform of screening potential therapeutics to attenuate propagated aggregation of SOD1.

  14. Intraspinal cell transplantation for targeting cervical ventral horn in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and traumatic spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepore, Angelo C

    2011-09-18

    Respiratory compromise due to phrenic motor neuron loss is a debilitating consequence of a large proportion of human traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) cases (1) and is the ultimate cause of death in patients with the motor neuron disorder, amyotrophic laterals sclerosis (ALS) (2). ALS is a devastating neurological disorder that is characterized by relatively rapid degeneration of upper and lower motor neurons. Patients ultimately succumb to the disease on average 2-5 years following diagnosis because of respiratory paralysis due to loss of phrenic motor neuron innnervation of the diaphragm (3). The vast majority of cases are sporadic, while 10% are of the familial form. Approximately twenty percent of familial cases are linked to various point mutations in the Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) gene on chromosome 21 (4). Transgenic mice (4,5) and rats (6) carrying mutant human SOD1 genes ((G93A, G37R, G86R, G85R)) have been generated, and, despite the existence of other animal models of motor neuron loss, are currently the most highly used models of the disease. Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a heterogeneous set of conditions resulting from physical trauma to the spinal cord, with functional outcome varying according to the type, location and severity of the injury (7). Nevertheless, approximately half of human SCI cases affect cervical regions, resulting in debilitating respiratory dysfunction due to phrenic motor neuron loss and injury to descending bulbospinal respiratory axons (1). A number of animal models of SCI have been developed, with the most commonly used and clinically-relevant being the contusion (8). Transplantation of various classes of neural precursor cells (NPCs) is a promising therapeutic strategy for treatment of traumatic CNS injuries and neurodegeneration, including ALS and SCI, because of the ability to replace lost or dysfunctional CNS cell types, provide neuroprotection, and deliver gene factors of interest (9). Animal models of both ALS and

  15. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Pediatric Spinal ... Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Pediatric Spinal ...

  16. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Animated Spinal Cord Injury Chart Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal ... Animated Spinal Cord Injury Chart Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal ...

  17. Improvement of lower extremity electrodiagnostic findings following a trial of spinal manipulation and motion-based therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morningstar Mark W

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lumbar disc herniation is a problem frequently encountered in manual medicine. While manual therapy has shown reasonable success in symptomatic management of these cases, little information is known how manual therapy may affect the structure and function of the lumbar disc itself. In cases where lumbar disc herniation is accompanied by radicular symptoms, electrodiagnostic testing has been used to provide objective clinical information on nerve function. This report examines the treatment rendered for a patient with lower extremity neurological deficit, as diagnosed on electrodiagnostic testing. Patient was treated using spinal manipulation and exercises performed on a Pettibon Wobble Chair™, using electrodiagnostic testing as the primary outcome assessment. Case Presentation An elderly male patient presented to a private spine clinic with right-sided foot drop. He had been prescribed an ankle-foot orthosis for this condition. All sensory, motor, and reflex findings in the right leg and foot were absent. This was validated on prior electromyography and nerve conduction velocity testing, performed by a board certified neurologist. Patient was treated using spinal manipulation twice-weekly and wobble chair exercises three times daily for 90 days total. Following this treatment, the patient was referred for follow-up electrodiagnostic studies. Significant improvements were made in these studies as well as self-rated daily function. Conclusion Motion-based therapies, as part of a comprehensive rehabilitation program, may contribute to the restoration of daily function and the reversal of neurological insult as detected by electrodiagnostic testing. Electrodiagnostic testing may be a useful clinical tool to evaluate the progress of chiropractic patients with lumbar disc herniation and radicular pain syndromes.

  18. The small GTPase RhoA is required to maintain spinal cord neuroepithelium organization and the neural stem cell pool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herzog, Dominik; Loetscher, Pirmin; van Hengel, Jolanda

    2011-01-01

    ablation. We show that, in the spinal cord neuroepithelium, RhoA is essential to localize N-cadherin and ß-catenin to AJs and maintain apical-basal polarity of neural progenitor cells. Ablation of RhoA caused the loss of AJs and severe abnormalities in the organization of cells within the neuroepithelium......Dia1), does not localize to apical AJs in which it likely stabilizes intracellular adhesion by promoting local actin polymerization and microtubule organization. Furthermore, expressing a dominant-negative form of mDia1 in neural stem/progenitor cells results in a similar phenotype compared...... with that of the RhoA conditional knock-out, namely the loss of AJs and apical polarity. Together, our data show that RhoA signaling is necessary for AJ regulation and for the maintenance of mammalian neuroepithelium organization preventing precocious cell-cycle exit and differentiation....

  19. Endogenous neural stem cells in central canal of adult rats acquired limited ability to differentiate into neurons following mild spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuan; Tan, Botao; Wang, Li; Long, Zaiyun; Li, Yingyu; Liao, Weihong; Wu, Yamin

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous neural stem cells in central canal of adult mammalian spinal cord exhibit stem cell properties following injury. In the present study, the endogenous neural stem cells were labeled with Dil to track the differentiation of cells after mild spinal cord injury (SCI). Compared with 1 and 14 days post mild injury, the number of endogenous neural stem cells significantly increased at the injured site of spinal cord on 3 and 7 days post-injury. Dil-labeled βIII-tublin and GFAP expressing cells could be detected on 7 days post-injury, which indicated that the endogenous neural stem cells in central canal of spinal cord differentiated into different type of neural cells, but there were more differentiated astrocytes than the neurons after injury. Furthermore, after injury the expression of inhibitory Notch1 and Hes1 mRNA began to increase at 6 hours and was evident at 12 and 24 hours, which maintained high levels up to 7 days post-injury. These results indicated that a mild SCI in rat is sufficient to induce endogenous neural stem cells proliferation and differentiation. However, the ability to differentiate into neurons is limited, which may be, at least in part, due to high expression of inhibitory Notch1 and Hes1 genes after injury. PMID:26097566

  20. Foot salvage and improvement of microvascular blood flow as a result of epidural spinal cord electrical stimulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, M. J.; Jörning, P. J.; Beckers, R. C.; Ubbink, D. T.; van Kleef, Maarten; Slaaf, D. W.; Reneman, R. S.

    1990-01-01

    Epidural spinal cord electrical stimulation has been suggested as an alternative treatment in patients with limb-threatening ischemia in whom vascular reconstructive surgery is not possible anymore. We studied the effects of epidural spinal cord electrical stimulation on microcirculatory blood flow

  1. Needs and requests--patients and physicians voices about improving the management of spinal cord injury neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norrbrink, Cecilia; Löfgren, Monika

    2016-01-01

    The present purpose was to explore patients' and involved physicians' needs and requests for improving their management of neuropathic pain following spinal cord injury (SCI). Sixteen patients with SCI and neuropathic pain, and nine physicians, were interviewed in focus-groups or individual interviews. An emergent design was used and the interviews and analyses were carried out in parallel, making it possible to use and deepen new emerging knowledge. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and processed according to content analysis. A final model with four themes described the results. Three themes covered the current situation: limitations in structure, lack of knowledge and competence, and frustrations. A fourth theme, needs and requests, described suggestions by patients and physicians for future improvements. Suggestions included increased participation, increased patient involvement in the pain rehabilitation process, support in the process of learning to live with pain, implementation of multi-modal pain rehabilitation, and the use of complementary treatments for neuropathic pain. Neuropathic pain following SCI needs to be assessed and treated using a structured, inter-disciplinary, multi-modal rehabilitation approach involving patients in planning and decision-making. For improving SCI neuropathic pain management, there is a great need for individually-tailored management, planned in a dialogue on equal terms between health care and the patient. Patients desire continuity and regularity and the possibility of receiving complementary treatments for SCI neuropathic pain. Access to structured pain rehabilitation is needed. Support and tools need to be provided in the learning-to-live with pain process.

  2. Midodrine improves orgasm in spinal cord-injured men: the effects of autonomic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soler, Jean Marc; Previnaire, Jean Gabriel; Plante, Pierre; Denys, Pierre; Chartier-Kastler, Emmanuel

    2008-12-01

    Orgasm is less frequent in men with spinal cord injury (SCI) than in able-bodied subjects, and is poorly understood. To assess the effect of autonomic stimulation on orgasm in SCI men using midodrine, an alpha1-adrenergic agonist agent. Penile vibratory stimulation (PVS) was performed in 158 SCI men on midodrine as part of a treatment for anejaculation, after they failed a baseline PVS. A maximum of four trials were performed, weekly, with increasing doses of midodrine. The presence and type of ejaculation, orgasm experiences, and cardiovascular data were collected. Ejaculation either antegrade or retrograde was obtained in 102 SCI men (65%). Orgasm without ejaculation was reported by 14 patients (9%) on baseline PVS. Ninety-three patients (59%) experienced orgasm during PVS on midodrine. Orgasm was significantly related to the presence of ejaculation in 86 patients (84%), and more strikingly to antegrade ejaculation (pure or mixed with retrograde), i.e., in 98% of 70 patients. Orgasm was significantly more frequent in patients with upper motor neuron and incomplete lesions who present somatic responses during PVS. There was no effect of the presence of psychogenic erection. There was a significant increase in both systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Sixteen patients, mainly tetraplegics, developed intense autonomic dysreflexia (AD) that required an oral nicardipine chlorhydrate. Orgasm is the brain's cognitive interpretation of genital sensations and somatic responses, AD, and ejaculation. Intact sacral and T10-L2 cord segments are mandatory, allowing coordination between internal and external sphincters. Autonomic stimulation with midodrine enhances orgasm rate, mainly by creating antegrade ejaculation.

  3. Virtual reality improves embodiment and neuropathic pain caused by spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozeg, Polona; Palluel, Estelle; Ronchi, Roberta; Solcà, Marco; Al-Khodairy, Abdul-Wahab; Jordan, Xavier; Kassouha, Ammar; Blanke, Olaf

    2017-10-31

    To investigate changes in body ownership and chronic neuropathic pain in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) using multisensory own body illusions and virtual reality (VR). Twenty patients with SCI with paraplegia and 20 healthy control participants (HC) participated in 2 factorial, randomized, repeated-measures design studies. In the virtual leg illusion (VLI), we applied asynchronous or synchronous visuotactile stimulation to the participant's back (either immediately above the lesion level or at the shoulder) and to the virtual legs as seen on a VR head-mounted display. We tested the effect of the VLI on the sense of leg ownership (questionnaires) and on perceived neuropathic pain (visual analogue scale pain ratings). We compared illusory leg ownership with illusory global body ownership (induced in the full body illusion [FBI]), by applying asynchronous or synchronous visuotactile stimulation to the participant's back and the back of a virtual body as seen on a head-mounted display. Our data show that patients with SCI are less sensitive to multisensory stimulations inducing illusory leg ownership (as compared to HC) and that leg ownership decreased with time since SCI. In contrast, we found no differences between groups in global body ownership as tested in the FBI. VLI and FBI were both associated with mild analgesia that was only during the VLI specific for synchronous visuotactile stimulation and the lower back position. The present findings show that VR exposure using multisensory stimulation differently affected leg vs body ownership, and is associated with mild analgesia with potential for SCI neurorehabilitation protocols. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. on behalf of the American Academy of Neurology.

  4. Treating spinal cord injury in rats with a combination of human fetal neural stem cells and hydrogels modified with serotonin

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Růžička, Jiří; Romanyuk, Nataliya; Hejčl, Aleš; Vetrík, Miroslav; Hrubý, Martin; Cocks, G.; Cihlář, J.; Přádný, Martin; Price, J.; Syková, Eva; Jendelová, Pavla

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 73, č. 1 (2013), s. 102-115 ISSN 0065-1400 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP108/10/1560; GA ČR(CZ) GPP304/11/P633; GA ČR GA13-00939S; GA AV ČR IAA500390902 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) GAUK521712 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 ; RVO:61389013 Keywords : spinal cord hemisection * SPC-01 neural stem cells * hydrogel Subject RIV: FH - Neurology; CD - Macromolecular Chemistry (UMCH-V) Impact factor: 2.244, year: 2013

  5. Beneficial effect of human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neural precursors in spinal cord injury repair

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Romanyuk, Nataliya; Amemori, Takashi; Turnovcová, Karolína; Procházka, Pavel; Onteniente, B.; Syková, Eva; Jendelová, Pavla

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 9 (2015), s. 1781-1797 ISSN 0963-6897 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LH12024; GA ČR(CZ) GA13-00939S; GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1309 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : human induced pluripotent stem cells * neural precursors * spinal cord injury Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 3.427, year: 2015

  6. Maladaptive spinal plasticity opposes spinal learning and recovery in spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam R Ferguson

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Synaptic plasticity within the spinal cord has great potential to facilitate recovery of function after spinal cord injury (SCI. Spinal plasticity can be induced in an activity-dependent manner even without input from the brain after complete SCI. The mechanistic basis for these effects is provided by research demonstrating that spinal synapses have many of the same plasticity mechanisms that are known to underlie learning and memory in the brain. In addition, the lumbar spinal cord can sustain several forms of learning and memory, including limb-position training. However, not all spinal plasticity promotes recovery of function. Central sensitization of nociceptive (pain pathways in the spinal cord may emerge with certain patterns of activity, demonstrating that plasticity within the spinal cord may contribute to maladaptive pain states. In this review we discuss interactions between adaptive and maladaptive forms of activity-dependent plasticity in the spinal cord. The literature demonstrates that activity-dependent plasticity within the spinal cord must be carefully tuned to promote adaptive spinal training. Stimulation that is delivered in a limb position-dependent manner or on a fixed interval can induce adaptive plasticity that promotes future spinal cord learning and reduces nociceptive hyper-reactivity. On the other hand, stimulation that is delivered in an unsynchronized fashion, such as randomized electrical stimulation or peripheral skin injuries, can generate maladaptive spinal plasticity that undermines future spinal cord learning, reduces recovery of locomotor function, and promotes nociceptive hyper-reactivity after spinal cord injury. We review these basic phenomena, discuss the cellular and molecular mechanisms, and discuss implications of these findings for improved rehabilitative therapies after spinal cord injury.

  7. Thoracic rat spinal cord contusion injury induces remote spinal gliogenesis but not neurogenesis or gliogenesis in the brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffen Franz

    Full Text Available After spinal cord injury, transected axons fail to regenerate, yet significant, spontaneous functional improvement can be observed over time. Distinct central nervous system regions retain the capacity to generate new neurons and glia from an endogenous pool of progenitor cells and to compensate neural cell loss following certain lesions. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether endogenous cell replacement (neurogenesis or gliogenesis in the brain (subventricular zone, SVZ; corpus callosum, CC; hippocampus, HC; and motor cortex, MC or cervical spinal cord might represent a structural correlate for spontaneous locomotor recovery after a thoracic spinal cord injury. Adult Fischer 344 rats received severe contusion injuries (200 kDyn of the mid-thoracic spinal cord using an Infinite Horizon Impactor. Uninjured rats served as controls. From 4 to 14 days post-injury, both groups received injections of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU to label dividing cells. Over the course of six weeks post-injury, spontaneous recovery of locomotor function occurred. Survival of newly generated cells was unaltered in the SVZ, HC, CC, and the MC. Neurogenesis, as determined by identification and quantification of doublecortin immunoreactive neuroblasts or BrdU/neuronal nuclear antigen double positive newly generated neurons, was not present in non-neurogenic regions (MC, CC, and cervical spinal cord and unaltered in neurogenic regions (dentate gyrus and SVZ of the brain. The lack of neuronal replacement in the brain and spinal cord after spinal cord injury precludes any relevance for spontaneous recovery of locomotor function. Gliogenesis was increased in the cervical spinal cord remote from the injury site, however, is unlikely to contribute to functional improvement.

  8. Temporomandibular joint inflammation activates glial and immune cells in both the trigeminal ganglia and in the spinal trigeminal nucleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmin Luc

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glial cells have been shown to directly participate to the genesis and maintenance of chronic pain in both the sensory ganglia and the central nervous system (CNS. Indeed, glial cell activation has been reported in both the dorsal root ganglia and the spinal cord following injury or inflammation of the sciatic nerve, but no data are currently available in animal models of trigeminal sensitization. Therefore, in the present study, we evaluated glial cell activation in the trigeminal-spinal system following injection of the Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA into the temporomandibular joint, which generates inflammatory pain and trigeminal hypersensitivity. Results CFA-injected animals showed ipsilateral mechanical allodynia and temporomandibular joint edema, accompanied in the trigeminal ganglion by a strong increase in the number of GFAP-positive satellite glial cells encircling neurons and by the activation of resident macrophages. Seventy-two hours after CFA injection, activated microglial cells were observed in the ipsilateral trigeminal subnucleus caudalis and in the cervical dorsal horn, with a significant up-regulation of Iba1 immunoreactivity, but no signs of reactive astrogliosis were detected in the same areas. Since the purinergic system has been implicated in the activation of microglial cells during neuropathic pain, we have also evaluated the expression of the microglial-specific P2Y12 receptor subtype. No upregulation of this receptor was detected following induction of TMJ inflammation, suggesting that any possible role of P2Y12 in this paradigm of inflammatory pain does not involve changes in receptor expression. Conclusions Our data indicate that specific glial cell populations become activated in both the trigeminal ganglia and the CNS following induction of temporomandibular joint inflammation, and suggest that they might represent innovative targets for controlling pain during trigeminal nerve sensitization.

  9. Olfactory ensheathing cell transplantation for spinal cord injury: An 18-year bibliometric analysis based on the Web of Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Zikuan; He, Xijing; Li, Haopeng; Wang, Dong; Cao, Kai

    2013-05-15

    Olfactory ensheathing cell (OEC) transplantation is a promising new approach for the treatment of spinal cord injury (SCI), and an increasing number of scientific publications are devoted to this treatment strategy. This bibliometric analysis was conducted to assess global research trends in OEC transplantation for SCI. All of the data in this study originate from the Web of Science maintained by the Institute for Scientific Information, USA, and includes SCI-EXPANDED, SSCI, A&HCI, CPCI-S, CPCI-SSH, BKCI-S, BKCI-SSH, CCR-EXPANDED and IC. The Institute for Scientific Information's Web of Science was searched using the keywords "olfactory ensheathing cells" or "OECs" or "olfactory ensheathing glia" or "OEG" or "olfactory ensheathing glial cells" or "OEGs" and "spinal cord injury" or "SCI" or "spinal injury" or "spinal transection" for literature published from January 1898 to May 2012. Original articles, reviews, proceedings papers and meeting abstracts, book chapters and editorial materials on OEC transplantation for SCI were included. Simultaneously, unpublished literature and literature for which manual information retrieval was required were excluded. ALL SELECTED LITERATURES ADDRESSING OEC TRANSPLANTATION FOR SCI WERE EVALUATED IN THE FOLLOWING ASPECTS: publication year, document type, language, author, institution, times cited, Web of Science category, core source title, countries/territories and funding agency. In the Web of Science published by the Institute for Scientific Information, the earliest literature record was in April, 1995. Four hundred and fourteen publications addressing OEC transplantation for SCI were added to the data library in the past 18 years, with an annually increasing trend. Of 415 records, 405 publications were in English. Two hundred and fifty-nine articles ranked first in the distribution of document type, followed by 141 reviews. Thirty articles and 20 reviews, cited more than 55 times by the date the publication data were

  10. ROCK inhibition with Y27632 promotes the proliferation and cell cycle progression of cultured astrocyte from spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhiyuan; Liu, Miao; Fu, Peicai; Xie, Minjie; Wang, Wei; Luo, Xiang

    2012-12-01

    Rho-associated Kinase (ROCK) has been identified as an important regulator of proliferation and cell cycle progression in a number of cell types. Although its effects on astrocyte proliferation have not been well characterized, ROCK has been reported to play important roles in gap junction formation, morphology, and migration of astrocytes. In the present study, our aim was to investigate the effect of ROCK inhibition by [(+)-(R)-trans-4-(1-aminoethyl)-N-(4-pyridyl) cyclohexanecarboxamide dihydrochloride] (Y27632) on proliferation and DNA synthesis in cultured astrocytes from rat spinal cord and the possible mechanism involved. Western blots showed that treatment of astrocytes with Y27632 increased their expression of cyclin D1, CDK4, and cyclin E, thereby causing cell cycle progression. Furthermore, Y27632-induced astrocyte proliferation was mediated through the extracellular-signal-regulated kinase signaling cascade. These results indicate the importance of ROCK in astrocyte proliferation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Interactions between intraspinal Schwann cells and the cellular constituents normally occurring in the spinal cord: an ultrastructural study in the irradiated rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sims, T.J.; Gilmore, S.A.

    1983-01-01

    Relationships between intraspinal Schwann cells and neuroglia, particularly astrocytes, were studied following X-irradiation of the spinal cord in 3-day old rats. Initially, this exposure results in a depletion of the neuroglial population. By 10 days post-irradiation (P-I), gaps occur in the glia limitans, although the overlying basal lamina remains intact. Development of and myelination by intraspinal Schwann cells is well underway by 15 days P-I. These Schwann cell-occupied regions have a paucity of astrocyte processes, a finding which persists throughout the study (60 days P-I), and several types of Schwann cell-neuroglial interfaces are observed. The gaps in the glia limitans widen as the P-I interval increases. At 45 and 60 days P-I, the basal lamina no longer forms a singular, continuous covering over the spinal cord surface, but follows instead a rather tortuous course over the disrupted glia limitans and the intraspinal Schwann cells. Although the mode of initial occurrence of Schwann cells within the spinal cord is not yet understood, the data indicate that the astrocyte population is involved in that process, as well as in limiting the further development of Schwann cells within the substance of the spinal cord. (Auth.)

  12. Transplantation dose alters the dynamics of human neural stem cell engraftment, proliferation and migration after spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja M. Piltti

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The effect of transplantation dose on the spatiotemporal dynamics of human neural stem cell (hNSC engraftment has not been quantitatively evaluated in the central nervous system. We investigated changes over time in engraftment/survival, proliferation, and migration of multipotent human central nervous system-derived neural stem cells (hCNS-SCns transplanted at doses ranging from 10,000 to 500,000 cells in spinal cord injured immunodeficient mice. Transplant dose was inversely correlated with measures of donor cell proliferation at 2 weeks post-transplant (WPT and dose-normalized engraftment at 16 WPT. Critically, mice receiving the highest cell dose exhibited an engraftment plateau, in which the total number of engrafted human cells never exceeded the initial dose. These data suggest that donor cell expansion was inversely regulated by target niche parameters and/or transplantation density. Investigation of the response of donor cells to the host microenvironment should be a key variable in defining target cell dose in pre-clinical models of CNS disease and injury.

  13. Low-energy extracorporeal shock wave therapy promotes vascular endothelial growth factor expression and improves locomotor recovery after spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaya, Seiji; Ozawa, Hiroshi; Kanno, Haruo; Kishimoto, Koshi N; Sekiguchi, Akira; Tateda, Satoshi; Yahata, Kenichiro; Ito, Kenta; Shimokawa, Hiroaki; Itoi, Eiji

    2014-12-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) is widely used for the clinical treatment of various human diseases. Recent studies have demonstrated that low-energy ESWT upregulates the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and promotes angiogenesis and functional recovery in myocardial infarction and peripheral artery disease. Many previous reports suggested that VEGF produces a neuroprotective effect to reduce secondary neural tissue damage after spinal cord injury (SCI). The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether low-energy ESWT promotes VEGF expression and neuroprotection and improves locomotor recovery after SCI. Sixty adult female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 4 groups: sham group (laminectomy only), sham-SW group (low-energy ESWT applied after laminectomy), SCI group (SCI only), and SCI-SW group (low-energy ESWT applied after SCI). Thoracic spinal cord contusion injury was inflicted using an impactor. Low-energy ESWT was applied to the injured spinal cord 3 times a week for 3 weeks. Locomotor function was evaluated using the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan (BBB) Scale (open field locomotor score) at different time points over 42 days after SCI. Hematoxylin and eosin staining was performed to assess neural tissue damage in the spinal cord. Neuronal loss was investigated by immunostaining for NeuN. The mRNA expressions of VEGF and its receptor, Flt-1, in the spinal cord were assessed using real-time polymerase chain reaction. Immunostaining for VEGF was performed to evaluate VEGF protein expression in the spinal cord. In both the sham and sham-SW groups, no animals showed locomotor impairment on BBB scoring. Histological analysis of H & E and NeuN stainings in the sham-SW group confirmed that no neural tissue damage was induced by the low-energy ESWT. Importantly, animals in the SCI-SW group demonstrated significantly better locomotor improvement than those in the SCI group at 7, 35, and 42 days after injury (p

  14. Chitosan scaffolds induce human dental pulp stem cells to neural differentiation: potential roles for spinal cord injury therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinlong; Lu, Xiaohui; Feng, Guijuan; Gu, Zhifeng; Sun, Yuyu; Bao, Guofeng; Xu, Guanhua; Lu, Yuanzhou; Chen, Jiajia; Xu, Lingfeng; Feng, Xingmei; Cui, Zhiming

    2016-10-01

    Cell-based transplantation strategies hold great potential for spinal cord injury (SCI) repair. Chitosan scaffolds have therapeutic benefits for spinal cord regeneration. Human dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) are abundant available stem cells with low immunological incompatibility and can be considered for cell replacement therapy. The purpose of this study is to investigate the role of chitosan scaffolds in the neural differentiation of DPSCs in vitro and to assess the supportive effects of chitosan scaffolds in an animal model of SCI. DPSCs were incubated with chitosan scaffolds. Cell viability and the secretion of neurotrophic factors were analyzed. DPSCs incubated with chitosan scaffolds were treated with neural differentiation medium for 14 days and then neural genes and protein markers were analyzed by Western blot and reverse transcription plus the polymerase chain reaction. Our study revealed a higher cell viability and neural differentiation in the DPSC/chitosan-scaffold group. Compared with the control group, the levels of BDNF, GDNF, b-NGF, and NT-3 were significantly increased in the DPSC/chitosan-scaffold group. The Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway played a key role in the neural differentiation of DPSCs combined with chitosan scaffolds. Transplantation of DPSCs together with chitosan scaffolds into an SCI rat model resulted in the marked recovery of hind limb locomotor functions. Thus, chitosan scaffolds were non-cytotoxic and provided a conducive and favorable microenvironment for the survival and neural differentiation of DPSCs. Transplantation of DPSCs might therefore be a suitable candidate for treating SCI and other neuronal degenerative diseases.

  15. Human bone marrow-derived and umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells for alleviating neuropathic pain in a spinal cord injury model

    OpenAIRE

    Yousefifard, Mahmoud; Nasirinezhad, Farinaz; Shardi Manaheji, Homa; Janzadeh, Atousa; Hosseini, Mostafa; Keshavarz, Mansoor

    2016-01-01

    Background Stem cell therapy can be used for alleviating the neuropathic pain induced by spinal cord injuries (SCIs). However, survival and differentiation of stem cells following their transplantation vary depending on the host and intrinsic factors of the cell. Therefore, the present study aimed to determine the effect of stem cells derived from bone marrow (BM-MSC) and umbilical cord (UC-MSC) on neuropathic pain relief. Methods A compression model was used to induce SCI in a rat model. A w...

  16. Improvement in the Physical and Psychological Well-Being of Persons with Spinal Cord Injuries by Means of Powered Wheelchairs Driven by Dual Power Wheels and Mobile Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yee-Pien Yang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This study unites researchers from the fields of psychology, occupational therapy, and engineering to improve the holistic physical and psychological well-being of persons with spinal cord injury (SCI by using assistive devices (i.e., wheelchairs and mobile technology (i.e., cell phone and network. These technologies are used to bring persons with SCI through the difficult period of rehabilitation and to return them to their daily life in school or the working environment. First, a SpinoAid Application (APP is developed to motivate persons with SCI to participate in the community after their injury. Second, we integrate mobile technology with a mobility assistive device to design a smart wheelchair, which is innovated by transforming the pushrim of a manually driven wheelchair into a rim motor. After the rim motor is combined with a battery, a brake, and a controller to become a power wheel, two power wheels are installed on both sides of the wheelchair to become a powered wheelchair. Third, a SmartChair APP is developed with the main functions of reminding persons with SCI to perform exercises, recording the physical condition and the wheelchair using status, and building up a social network for information sharing to increase their exercise habit, prevent cumulative injuries or discomfort of the upper extremities, and enhance their health and quality of life.

  17. HAL® exoskeleton training improves walking parameters and normalizes cortical excitability in primary somatosensory cortex in spinal cord injury patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sczesny-Kaiser, Matthias; Höffken, Oliver; Aach, Mirko; Cruciger, Oliver; Grasmücke, Dennis; Meindl, Renate; Schildhauer, Thomas A; Schwenkreis, Peter; Tegenthoff, Martin

    2015-08-20

    Reorganization in the sensorimotor cortex accompanied by increased excitability and enlarged body representations is a consequence of spinal cord injury (SCI). Robotic-assisted bodyweight supported treadmill training (BWSTT) was hypothesized to induce reorganization and improve walking function. To assess whether BWSTT with hybrid assistive limb® (HAL®) exoskeleton affects cortical excitability in the primary somatosensory cortex (S1) in SCI patients, as measured by paired-pulse somatosensory evoked potentials (ppSEP) stimulated above the level of injury. Eleven SCI patients took part in HAL® assisted BWSTT for 3 months. PpSEP were conducted before and after this training period, where the amplitude ratios (SEP amplitude following double pulses - SEP amplitude following single pulses) were assessed and compared to eleven healthy control subjects. To assess improvement in walking function, we used the 10-m walk test, timed-up-and-go test, the 6-min walk test, and the lower extremity motor score. PpSEPs were significantly increased in SCI patients as compared to controls at baseline. Following training, ppSEPs were increased from baseline and no longer significantly differed from controls. Walking parameters also showed significant improvements, yet there was no significant correlation between ppSEP measures and walking parameters. The findings suggest that robotic-assisted BWSTT with HAL® in SCI patients is capable of inducing cortical plasticity following highly repetitive, active locomotive use of paretic legs. While there was no significant correlation of excitability with walking parameters, brain areas other than S1 might reflect improvement of walking functions. EEG and neuroimaging studies may provide further information about supraspinal plastic processes and foci in SCI rehabilitation.

  18. Maladaptive spinal plasticity opposes spinal learning and recovery in spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Adam R.; Huie, J. Russell; Crown, Eric D.; Baumbauer, Kyle M.; Hook, Michelle A.; Garraway, Sandra M.; Lee, Kuan H.; Hoy, Kevin C.; Grau, James W.

    2012-01-01

    Synaptic plasticity within the spinal cord has great potential to facilitate recovery of function after spinal cord injury (SCI). Spinal plasticity can be induced in an activity-dependent manner even without input from the brain after complete SCI. A mechanistic basis for these effects is provided by research demonstrating that spinal synapses have many of the same plasticity mechanisms that are known to underlie learning and memory in the brain. In addition, the lumbar spinal cord can sustain several forms of learning and memory, including limb-position training. However, not all spinal plasticity promotes recovery of function. Central sensitization of nociceptive (pain) pathways in the spinal cord may emerge in response to various noxious inputs, demonstrating that plasticity within the spinal cord may contribute to maladaptive pain states. In this review we discuss interactions between adaptive and maladaptive forms of activity-dependent plasticity in the spinal cord below the level of SCI. The literature demonstrates that activity-dependent plasticity within the spinal cord must be carefully tuned to promote adaptive spinal training. Prior work from our group has shown that stimulation that is delivered in a limb position-dependent manner or on a fixed interval can induce adaptive plasticity that promotes future spinal cord learning and reduces nociceptive hyper-reactivity. On the other hand, stimulation that is delivered in an unsynchronized fashion, such as randomized electrical stimulation or peripheral skin injuries, can generate maladaptive spinal plasticity that undermines future spinal cord learning, reduces recovery of locomotor function, and promotes nociceptive hyper-reactivity after SCI. We review these basic phenomena, how these findings relate to the broader spinal plasticity literature, discuss the cellular and molecular mechanisms, and finally discuss implications of these and other findings for improved rehabilitative therapies after SCI. PMID

  19. Survival and differentiation of human embryonic stem cell-derived neural precursors grafted spinally in spinal ischemia-injured rats or in naive immunosuppressed minipigs: a qualitative and quantitative study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kakinohana, O.; Juhásová, Jana; Juhás, Štefan; Motlík, Jan; Platoshyn, O.; Galik, J.; Hefferan, M. P.; Yuan, S. H.; Vidal, J. G.; Carson, C. T.; Van Gorp, S.; Goldberg, D.; Leerink, M.; Lazar, P.; Maršala, S.; Miyanohara, A.; Keshavarzi, S.; Ciacci, J. D.; Maršala, M.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 12 (2012), s. 2603-2619 ISSN 0963-6897 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0538; GA TA ČR TA01011466 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : spinal cord ischemia * human embryonic stem (ES) cells * neuronal precursors (NPCs) Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.422, year: 2012

  20. Improved biolistic transfection of hair cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyu Zhao

    Full Text Available Transient transfection of hair cells has proven challenging. Here we describe modifications to the Bio-Rad Helios Gene Gun that, along with an optimized protocol, improve transfection of bullfrog, chick, and mouse hair cells. The increased penetrating power afforded by our method allowed us to transfect mouse hair cells from the basal side, through the basilar membrane; this configuration protects hair bundles from damage during the procedure. We characterized the efficiency of transfection of mouse hair cells with fluorescently-tagged actin fusion protein using both the optimized procedure and a published procedure; while the efficiency of the two methods was similar, the morphology of transfected hair cells was improved with the new procedure. In addition, using the improved method, we were able to transfect hair cells in the bullfrog sacculus and chick cochlea for the first time. We used fluorescent-protein fusions of harmonin b (USH1C and PMCA2 (ATP2B2; plasma-membrane Ca(2+-ATPase isoform 2 to examine protein distribution in hair cells. While PMCA2-EGFP localization was similar to endogenous PMCA2 detected with antibodies, high levels of harmonin-EGFP were found at stereocilia tapers in bullfrog and chick, but not mouse; by contrast, harmonin-EGFP was concentrated in stereocilia tips in mouse hair cells.

  1. Sensory neurons do not induce motor neuron loss in a human stem cell model of spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwab, Andrew J; Ebert, Allison D

    2014-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive disorder leading to paralysis and early death due to reduced SMN protein. It is unclear why there is such a profound motor neuron loss, but recent evidence from fly and mouse studies indicate that cells comprising the whole sensory-motor circuit may contribute to motor neuron dysfunction and loss. Here, we used induced pluripotent stem cells derived from SMA patients to test whether sensory neurons directly contribute to motor neuron loss. We generated sensory neurons from SMA induced pluripotent stem cells and found no difference in neuron generation or survival, although there was a reduced calcium response to depolarizing stimuli. Using co-culture of SMA induced pluripotent stem cell derived sensory neurons with control induced pluripotent stem cell derived motor neurons, we found no significant reduction in motor neuron number or glutamate transporter boutons on motor neuron cell bodies or neurites. We conclude that SMA sensory neurons do not overtly contribute to motor neuron loss in this human stem cell system.

  2. Sublethal concentration of H2O2 enhances the protective effect of mesenchymal stem cells in rat model of spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, Asrin; Amiri, Iraj; Roushandeh, Amaneh Mohammadi; Choshali, Zoleikha Golipour; Alizadeh, Zohreh; Artimani, Tayebeh; Afshar, Saeid; Asl, Sara Soleimani

    2018-03-01

    To investigate the effect of H 2 O 2 on the migration and antioxidant defense of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and the neurotrophic effects of H 2 O 2 -treated MSCs on spinal cord injury (SCI). Sublethal concentrations of H 2 O 2 decreased cell migration and expression of CXCR4 and CCR2 as well as Nrf2 expression in MSCs. In the second phase, transplantation of treated and untreated MSCs to SCI caused minor changes in locomotor dysfunction. There was a significantly difference between cell-treated and spinal cord injury groups in expression of BDNF (brain-derived neurotrophic factor). Transplantation of H 2 O 2 -treated cells caused an increase in BDNF expression compared to non-treated cells. Transplantation of H 2 O 2 -treated stem cells may have protective effects against SCI through by increasing neurotrophic factors.

  3. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... spinal cord injuries? play_arrow What is “Braingate” research? play_arrow How would stem-cell therapies work ... cord injuries? play_arrow What does stem-cell research on animals tell us? play_arrow When can ...

  4. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... What is “Braingate” research? play_arrow How would stem-cell therapies work in the treatment of spinal cord injuries? play_arrow What does stem-cell research on animals tell us? play_arrow When ...

  5. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is “Braingate” research? play_arrow How would stem-cell therapies work in the treatment of spinal cord injuries? play_arrow What does stem-cell research on animals tell us? play_arrow When ...

  6. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Braingate” research? play_arrow How would stem-cell therapies work in the treatment of spinal cord injuries? play_arrow What does stem-cell research on animals tell us? play_arrow When can we expect ...

  7. Training improves oxidative capacity, but not function, in spinal muscular atrophy type III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Karen Lindhardt; Hansen, Regitze Sølling; Preisler, Nicolai

    2015-01-01

    max (17 ± 2 to 21 ± 2 ml/kg/min, P sleep in 3 patients, and led to training modifications in 2 patients. CONCLUSIONS: Cycle exercise improves VO2max in SMA III without causing muscle...... a 12-week training program, performing 42 30-minute sessions exercising at 65-70% of maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max ). VO2max , muscle strength, functional tests, and self-reported activities of daily living were assessed before and after the training. RESULTS: Training induced a 27 ± 3% increase in VO2...... damage, but it also induces significant fatigue. This warrants study into alternative training methods to improve exercise capacity in SMA III patients....

  8. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available menu Understanding Spinal Cord Injury What is a Spinal Cord Injury Levels of Injury and What They Mean Animated Spinal Cord Injury Chart Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal ...

  9. Optical measurement of blood flow changes in spinal cord injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, J P; Kyriacou, P A; George, K J; Langford, R M

    2010-01-01

    Little is known about cell death in spinal cord tissue following compression injury, despite compression being a key component of spinal injuries. Currently models are used to mimic compression injury in animals and the effects of the compression evaluated by observing the extent and duration of recovery of normal motor function in the days and weeks following the injury. A fibreoptic photoplethysmography system was used to investigate whether pulsation of the small arteries in the spinal cord occurred before, during and after compressive loads were applied to the tissue. It was found that the signal amplitudes were reduced and this reduction persisted for at least five minutes after the compression ceased. It is hoped that results from this preliminary study may improve knowledge of the mechanism of spinal cord injury.

  10. Optical measurement of blood flow changes in spinal cord injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, J P; Kyriacou, P A [Biomedical Engineering Research Group, City University London, Northampton Square, London (United Kingdom); George, K J [Neuroscience Centre, Queen Mary, University of London, Mile End, London (United Kingdom); Langford, R M, E-mail: justin.phillips.1@city.ac.u [Pain and Anaesthesia Research Centre, St Bartholomew' s Hospital, West Smithfield, London (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-01

    Little is known about cell death in spinal cord tissue following compression injury, despite compression being a key component of spinal injuries. Currently models are used to mimic compression injury in animals and the effects of the compression evaluated by observing the extent and duration of recovery of normal motor function in the days and weeks following the injury. A fibreoptic photoplethysmography system was used to investigate whether pulsation of the small arteries in the spinal cord occurred before, during and after compressive loads were applied to the tissue. It was found that the signal amplitudes were reduced and this reduction persisted for at least five minutes after the compression ceased. It is hoped that results from this preliminary study may improve knowledge of the mechanism of spinal cord injury.

  11. Direct fuel cell product design improvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maru, H.C.; Farooque, M. [Energy Research Corp., Danbury, CT (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Significant milestones have been attained towards the technology development field testing and commercialization of direct fuel cell power plant since the 1994 Fuel Cell Seminar. Under a 5-year cooperative agreement with the Department of Energy signed in December 1994, Energy Research Corporation (ERC) has been developing the design for a MW-scale direct fuel cell power plant with input from previous technology efforts and the Santa Clara Demonstration Project. The effort encompasses product definition in consultation with the Fuel Cell Commercialization Group, potential customers, as well as extensive system design and packaging. Manufacturing process improvements, test facility construction, cell component scale up, performance and endurance improvements, stack engineering, and critical balance-of-plant development are also addressed. Major emphasis of this product design improvement project is on increased efficiency, compactness and cost reduction to establish a competitive place in the market. A 2.85 MW power plant with an efficiency of 58% and a footprint of 420 m{sup 2} has been designed. Component and subsystem testing is being conducted at various levels. Planning and preparation for verification of a full size prototype unit are in progress. This paper presents the results obtained since the last fuel cell seminar.

  12. Arm crank ergometry improves cardiovascular disease risk factors and community mobility independent of body composition in high motor complete spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresnahan, James J; Farkas, Gary J; Clasey, Jody L; Yates, James W; Gater, David R

    2018-01-15

    Evaluate the effect of aerobic exercise using arm crank ergometry (ACE) in high motor complete (ISNCSCI A/B) spinal cord injury (SCI) as primarily related to cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors and functional mobility and secondarily to body composition and metabolic profiles. Longitudinal interventional study at an academic medical center. Ten previously untrained participants (M8/F2, Age 36.7 y ± 10.1, BMI 24.5 ± 6.0) with high motor complete SCI (C7-T5) underwent ACE exercise training 30 minutes/day × 3 days/week for 10 weeks at 70% VO 2Peak . Primary outcome measures were pre- and post-intervention changes in markers of cardiovascular fitness (graded exercise testing (GXT): VO 2 , VO 2Peak , respiratory quotient [RQ], GXT time, peak power, and energy expenditure [EE]) and community mobility (time to traverse a 100ft-5° ramp, and 12-minute WC propulsion test). Secondary outcome measures were changes in body composition and metabolic profiles (fasting and area under the curve for glucose and insulin, homeostasis model assessment [HOMA] for %β-cell activity [%β], %insulin sensitivity [%S], and insulin resistance [IR], and Matsuda Index [ISI Matsuda ]). Resting VO 2 , relative VO 2Peak , absolute VO 2Peak , peak power, RQ, 12-minute WC propulsion, fasting insulin, fasting G:I ratio, HOMA-%S, and HOMA-IR all significantly improved following intervention (P 0.05). Ten weeks of ACE at 70% VO 2Peak in high motor complete SCI improves aerobic capacity, community mobility, and metabolic profiles independent of changes in body composition.

  13. The Use of Human-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Neural Precursors in the Treatment of Brain and Spinal Cord Injury

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jendelová, Pavla; Kozubenko, Nataliya; Amemori, Takashi; Turnovcová, Karolína; Seminatore, CH.; Jirák, D.; Onteniente, B.; Syková, Eva

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 4 (2011), s. 564-564 ISSN 0963-6897. [International Neural Transplantatioin and Repair Meeting/18th Annual Meeting of the American-Society-for- Neural - Therapy - and -Repair /11./. 04.05.2011-08.05.2011, Clearwater] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390703 Keywords : spinal cord * stem cell Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  14. Simulation-Based Mastery Learning with Deliberate Practice Improves Clinical Performance in Spinal Anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankeet D. Udani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Properly performing a subarachnoid block (SAB is a competency expected of anesthesiology residents. We aimed to determine if adding simulation-based deliberate practice to a base curriculum improved performance of a SAB. Methods. 21 anesthesia residents were enrolled. After baseline assessment of SAB on a task-trainer, all residents participated in a base curriculum. Residents were then randomized so that half received additional deliberate practice including repetition and expert-guided, real-time feedback. All residents were then retested for technique. SABs on all residents’ next three patients were evaluated in the operating room (OR. Results. Before completing the base curriculum, the control group completed 81% of a 16-item performance checklist on the task-trainer and this increased to 91% after finishing the base curriculum (P<0.02. The intervention group also increased the percentage of checklist tasks properly completed from 73% to 98%, which was a greater increase than observed in the control group (P<0.03. The OR time required to perform SAB was not different between groups. Conclusions. The base curriculum significantly improved resident SAB performance. Deliberate practice training added a significant, independent, incremental benefit. The clinical impact of the deliberate practice intervention in the OR on patient care is unclear.

  15. Simulation-based mastery learning with deliberate practice improves clinical performance in spinal anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udani, Ankeet D; Macario, Alex; Nandagopal, Kiruthiga; Tanaka, Maria A; Tanaka, Pedro P

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Properly performing a subarachnoid block (SAB) is a competency expected of anesthesiology residents. We aimed to determine if adding simulation-based deliberate practice to a base curriculum improved performance of a SAB. Methods. 21 anesthesia residents were enrolled. After baseline assessment of SAB on a task-trainer, all residents participated in a base curriculum. Residents were then randomized so that half received additional deliberate practice including repetition and expert-guided, real-time feedback. All residents were then retested for technique. SABs on all residents' next three patients were evaluated in the operating room (OR). Results. Before completing the base curriculum, the control group completed 81% of a 16-item performance checklist on the task-trainer and this increased to 91% after finishing the base curriculum (P < 0.02). The intervention group also increased the percentage of checklist tasks properly completed from 73% to 98%, which was a greater increase than observed in the control group (P < 0.03). The OR time required to perform SAB was not different between groups. Conclusions. The base curriculum significantly improved resident SAB performance. Deliberate practice training added a significant, independent, incremental benefit. The clinical impact of the deliberate practice intervention in the OR on patient care is unclear.

  16. Improving self-perception and self-efficacy in patients with spinal cord injury: the efficacy of DVD-based instructions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsiao-Yu; Wu, Tzu-Jung; Lin, Chiu-Chu

    2015-06-01

    We assessed the effects of a spinal cord injury home rehabilitation DVD on patients with spinal cord injury. Multimedia have been used widely in health care in the digital age. The provision of rehabilitation instructions is a major responsibility of the rehabilitation staff. This study adopted a quasi-experimental pretest-posttest control group design. We collected data from a rehabilitation nursing ward at a medical centre between October 2011-April 2012. The participants were recruited before being discharged from the hospital. The experimental group (n = 28) received multimedia DVD instructions for three months, in addition to teaching sessions conducted by the researcher, whereas the control group (n = 31) received instructions without a DVD. Both groups completed the self-perception and self-efficacy scales used in this study before and after the intervention. The results indicated that, after the multimedia DVD intervention, the experimental group exhibited a considerably greater improvement in self-perception than did the control group. Although we recorded increased scores for both self-perception and self-efficacy for both groups, no marked differences emerged between the control and the intervention groups by using a generalised estimating equation. These results suggest that the home rehabilitation DVD is an effective instrument for improving self-perception and self-efficacy in patients with spinal cord injury. However, monitoring these patients over the long term is necessary. Our study results confirmed that the spinal cord injury home rehabilitation DVD is a practical health education tool. We plan to use the proposed DVD intervention with a larger number of hospitalised patients, and to continuously monitor their improvement. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. MR imaging and spinal cord injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azar-Kia, B.; Fine, M.; Naheedy, M.; Elias, D.

    1987-01-01

    MR imaging has significantly improved diagnostic capability of spinal cord injuries. Other available diagnostic modalities such as plain films, myelography, CT, and post-CT myelography have failed to consistently show the secific evidence of spinal cord injuries and their true extent. The authors are presenting our experiences with MR imaging in spinal column injury. They have found MR imaging to be the procedure of choice for prognostic evaluation of spinal cord trauma. They are showing examples of recent and old spinal cord injury such as hematomyelia, myelomalacia, transection, spinal cord edema, and cavitation

  18. Intramuscular Neurotrophin-3 normalizes low threshold spinal reflexes, reduces spasms and improves mobility after bilateral corticospinal tract injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathe, Claudia; Hutson, Thomas Haynes; McMahon, Stephen Brendan; Moon, Lawrence David Falcon

    2016-10-19

    Brain and spinal injury reduce mobility and often impair sensorimotor processing in the spinal cord leading to spasticity. Here, we establish that complete transection of corticospinal pathways in the pyramids impairs locomotion and leads to increased spasms and excessive mono- and polysynaptic low threshold spinal reflexes in rats. Treatment of affected forelimb muscles with an adeno-associated viral vector (AAV) encoding human Neurotrophin-3 at a clinically-feasible time-point after injury reduced spasticity. Neurotrophin-3 normalized the short latency Hoffmann reflex to a treated hand muscle as well as low threshold polysynaptic spinal reflexes involving afferents from other treated muscles. Neurotrophin-3 also enhanced locomotor recovery. Furthermore, the balance of inhibitory and excitatory boutons in the spinal cord and the level of an ion co-transporter in motor neuron membranes required for normal reflexes were normalized. Our findings pave the way for Neurotrophin-3 as a therapy that treats the underlying causes of spasticity and not only its symptoms.

  19. Index of CD34+ Cells and Mononuclear Cells in the Bone Marrow of Spinal Cord Injury Patients of Different Age Groups: A Comparative Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidyasagar Devaprasad Dedeepiya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Recent evidence of safety and efficacy of Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cells (BMMNC in spinal cord injury makes the Bone Marrow (BM CD34+ percentage and the BMMNC count gain significance. The indices of BM that change with body mass index and aging in general population have been reported but seldom in Spinal Cord Injury (SCI victims, whose parameters of relevance differ from general population. Herein, we report the indices of BMMNC in SCI victims. Materials and Methods. BMMNCs of 332 SCI patients were isolated under GMP protocols. Cell count by Trypan blue method and CD34+ cells by flow cytometry were documented and analysed across ages and gender. Results. The average BMMNC per ml in the age groups 0–20, 21–40, 41–60, and 61–80 years were 4.71, 4.03, 3.67, and 3.02 million and the CD34+ were 1.05%, 1.04%, 0.94%, and 0.93% respectively. The decline in CD34+ was sharp between 20–40 and 40–60 age groups. Females of reproductive age group had lesser CD34+. Conclusion. The BMMNC and CD34+ percentages decline with aging in SCI victims. Their lower values in females during reproductive age should be analysed for relevance to hormonal influence. This study offers reference values of BMMNC and CD34+ of SCI victims for successful clinical application.

  20. Metastatic spinal cord compression from basal cell carcinoma of the skin treated with surgical decompression and vismodegib: case report and review of Hedgehog signalling pathway inhibition in advanced basal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrane, J; Carswell, S; Talbot, T

    2017-01-01

    We report a case of a 66-year-old man with locally advanced and metastatic basal cell carcinoma (BCC) causing spinal cord compression, which was treated with spinal surgery and subsequent vismodegib. The patient presented with a large fungating chest wall lesion and a metastasis in T8 that was causing cord compression. He had neurosurgical decompression of the T8 lesion and fixation of the spine. Punch biopsy from the fungating chest wall lesion showed a BCC with some malignant squamous differentiation (basosquamous). Histopathological examination of the metastatic lesion in T8 at the time of surgical decompression identified features identical to the punch biopsy. The patient was referred to the oncology clinic for adjuvant treatment. In light of his metastatic disease and the large area over his chest wall that could not fully be covered by radiotherapy, he was treated with the novel oral Hedgehog signalling pathway (HHSP) inhibitor vismodegib, which led to marked improvement. © 2016 British Association of Dermatologists.

  1. Panax ginseng Improves Functional Recovery after Contusive Spinal Cord Injury by Regulating the Inflammatory Response in Rats: An In Vivo Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Ock Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injury (SCI results in permanent loss of motor function below the injured site. Neuroinflammatory reaction following SCI can aggravate neural injury and functional impairment. Ginseng is well known to possess anti-inflammatory effects. The present study investigated the neuroprotective effects of Panax ginseng C.A. Mayer (P. ginseng after SCI. A spinal contusion was made at the T11-12 spinal cord in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats (n=47 using the NYU impactor. Motor function was assessed using the Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan (BBB score in P. ginseng (0.1, 0.5, 1, 3, and 5 mg/kg or vehicle (saline treated after SCI. We also assessed the protein expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS at the lesion site by western blot and then measured the cavity area using luxol fast blue/cresyl violet staining. P. ginseng treated group in SCI showed a significant improvement in locomotor function after the injury. The protein expression of COX-2 and iNOS at the lesion site and the cavity area were decreased following SCI by P. ginseng treatment. These results suggest that P. ginseng may improve the recovery of motor function after SCI which provides neuroprotection by alleviating posttraumatic inflammatory responses.

  2. Spinal stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in the spine that was present from birth Narrow spinal canal that the person was born with Herniated or slipped disk, which ... when you sit down or lean forward. Most people with spinal stenosis cannot walk for a long ... During a physical exam, your health care provider will try to ...

  3. Efficacy of Early Surgery for Neurological Improvement in Spinal Cord Injury without Radiographic Evidence of Trauma in the Elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Tomoo; Suzuki, Shinsuke; Endo, Toshiki; Uenohara, Hiroshi; Tominaga, Teiji

    2017-09-01

    The optimal timing for surgery for patients with spinal cord injury without radiographic evidence of trauma (SCIWORET) remains unclear. This is especially true in the elderly, given that most studies are done with younger patients to avoid age-related comorbidities. We aimed to compare the efficacy of early (24 hours postinjury) surgery in patients with SCIWORET aged ≥65 years. We identified patients aged ≥65 years who underwent surgery for SCIWORET between January 1995 and February 2016. The primary outcome was a change in the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score at discharge, with a recovery of >50% defined as a favorable neurologic outcome. Logistic regression analysis was performed, and model fit was assessed using the Hosmer-Lemeshow test. Eighty patients aged ≥65 years with SCIWORET underwent surgery were enrolled. Favorable neurologic outcomes were seen in 43.3% of those who underwent early surgery, but only in 18.0% of those who underwent late surgery. Logistic regression analysis, adjusted for age, sex, comorbidities (Charlson Comorbidity Index), and JOA score, revealed that early surgery independently predicted favorable outcomes (odds ratio, 4.06; 95% confidence interval, 1.25-13.20), with excellent calibration (Hosmer-Lemeshow, P = 0.857). The present study indicated that early surgery within 24 hours of injury for elderly patients with SCIWORET could lead to more favorable neurologic improvements. We believe that chronological age alone should not be considered sufficient justification to deny patients early surgical decompression for SCIWORET. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Electroacupuncture Improves Bladder and Bowel Function in Patients with Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury: Results from a Prospective Observational Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhishun Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to explore the effect of electroacupuncture (EA for chronic bowel and bladder dysfunction after traumatic spinal cord injury, 14 patients were treated with electroacupuncture once a day, five times a week for the first four weeks, and once every other day, three times a week for the following four weeks. The patients were then followed up for six months. After treatment, four (4/14, 28.57% patients resumed normal voiding; six (6/14, 42.86% resumed normal voiding for no less than half of all micturition behaviors; four (4/14, 28.57% required supplementary urination methods for higher than half of all micturition behaviors. These effects persisted during followup. Mean postvoid RUV decreased by 190.29±101.87 mL (P<0.01 after treatment and by 198.86±112.18 mL (P<0.01 during followup. Patients’ weekly urinary incontinence frequency decreased 7.14±46.34 times/week (P=0.036 after treatment and decreased 49.86±44.38 times/week during followup. After treatment, four (4/14, 28.57% patients resumed normal bowel movements (P=0.025; five (5/14, 35.71% reduced the dependence on supplementary defecation methods; five (5/14, 35.71% had no changes. In patients with chronic bowel and bladder dysfunction after traumatic SCI, EA may provide a valuable alternative tool in improving patients’ self-controlled bowel and bladder functions with minimal side effects.

  5. Comprehensive Effects of Suppression of MicroRNA-383 in Human Bone-Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells on Treating Spinal Cord Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-Jun Wei

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Transplantation of bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs promotes neural cell regeneration after spinal cord injury (SCI. Recently, we showed that suppression of microRNA-383 (miR-383 in MSCs increased the protein levels of glial cell line derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF, resulting in improved therapeutic effects on SCI. However, the overall effects of miR-383 suppression in MSCs on SCI therapy were not determined yet. Here, we addressed this question. Methods: We used bioinformatics tools to predict all miR-383-targeting genes, confirmed the functional bindings in a dual luciferase reporter assay. The effects of alteration of candidate genes in MSCs on cell proliferation were analyzed by MTT assay and by Western blotting for PCNA. The effects on angiogenesis were assessed by HUVEC assay. The effects on SCI in vivo were analyzed by transplantation of the modified MSCs into nude rats that underwent SCI. Results: Suppression of miR-383 in MSCs not only upregulated GDNF protein, but also increased vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A and cyclin-dependent kinase 19 (CDK19, two other miR-383 targets. MiR-383-suppression-induced increases in CDK19 resulted in a slight but significant increase in MSC proliferation, while miR-383-suppression-induced increases in VEGF-A resulted in a slight but significant increase in MSC-mediated angiogenesis. Conclusions: Upregulation of CDK19 and VEGF-A by miR-383 suppression in MSCs further improve the therapeutic potential of MSCs in treating SCI in rats.

  6. Stereotactic radiosurgery for spinal metastases: a literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joaquim, Andrei Fernandes; Ghizoni, Enrico; Tedeschi, Helder; Pereira, Eduardo Baldon; Giacomini, Leonardo Abdala

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The spine is the most common location for bone metastases. Since cure is not possible, local control and relief of symptoms is the basis for treatment, which is grounded on the use of conventional radiotherapy. Recently, spinal radiosurgery has been proposed for the local control of spinal metastases, whether as primary or salvage treatment. Consequently, we carried out a literature review in order to analyze the indications, efficacy, and safety of radiosurgery in the treatment of spinal metastases. Methods: We have reviewed the literature using the PubMed gateway with data from the Medline library on studies related to the use of radiosurgery in treatment of bone metastases in spine. The studies were reviewed by all the authors and classified as to level of evidence, using the criterion defined by Wright. Results: The indications found for radiosurgery were primary control of epidural metastases (evidence level II), myeloma (level III), and metastases known to be poor responders to conventional radiotherapy – melanoma and renal cell carcinoma (level III). Spinal radiosurgery was also proposed for salvage treatment after conventional radiotherapy (level II). There is also some evidence as to the safety and efficacy of radiosurgery in cases of extramedullar and intramedullar intradural metastatic tumors (level III) and after spinal decompression and stabilization surgery. Conclusion: Radiosurgery can be used in primary or salvage treatment of spinal metastases, improving local disease control and patient symptoms. It should also be considered as initial treatment for radioresistant tumors, such as melanoma and renal cell carcinoma. (author)

  7. A Perturbed MicroRNA Expression Pattern Characterizes Embryonic Neural Stem Cells Derived from a Severe Mouse Model of Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Luchetti

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is an inherited neuromuscular disorder and the leading genetic cause of death in infants. Despite the disease-causing gene, survival motor neuron (SMN1, encodes a ubiquitous protein, SMN1 deficiency preferentially affects spinal motor neurons (MNs, leaving the basis of this selective cell damage still unexplained. As neural stem cells (NSCs are multipotent self-renewing cells that can differentiate into neurons, they represent an in vitro model for elucidating the pathogenetic mechanism of neurodegenerative diseases such as SMA. Here we characterize for the first time neural stem cells (NSCs derived from embryonic spinal cords of a severe SMNΔ7 SMA mouse model. SMNΔ7 NSCs behave as their wild type (WT counterparts, when we consider neurosphere formation ability and the expression levels of specific regional and self-renewal markers. However, they show a perturbed cell cycle phase distribution and an increased proliferation rate compared to wild type cells. Moreover, SMNΔ7 NSCs are characterized by the differential expression of a limited number of miRNAs, among which miR-335-5p and miR-100-5p, reduced in SMNΔ7 NSCs compared to WT cells. We suggest that such miRNAs may be related to the proliferation differences characterizing SMNΔ7 NSCs, and may be potentially involved in the molecular mechanisms of SMA.

  8. A Perturbed MicroRNA Expression Pattern Characterizes Embryonic Neural Stem Cells Derived from a Severe Mouse Model of Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchetti, Andrea; Ciafrè, Silvia Anna; Murdocca, Michela; Malgieri, Arianna; Masotti, Andrea; Sanchez, Massimo; Farace, Maria Giulia; Novelli, Giuseppe; Sangiuolo, Federica

    2015-08-06

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an inherited neuromuscular disorder and the leading genetic cause of death in infants. Despite the disease-causing gene, survival motor neuron (SMN1), encodes a ubiquitous protein, SMN1 deficiency preferentially affects spinal motor neurons (MNs), leaving the basis of this selective cell damage still unexplained. As neural stem cells (NSCs) are multipotent self-renewing cells that can differentiate into neurons, they represent an in vitro model for elucidating the pathogenetic mechanism of neurodegenerative diseases such as SMA. Here we characterize for the first time neural stem cells (NSCs) derived from embryonic spinal cords of a severe SMNΔ7 SMA mouse model. SMNΔ7 NSCs behave as their wild type (WT) counterparts, when we consider neurosphere formation ability and the expression levels of specific regional and self-renewal markers. However, they show a perturbed cell cycle phase distribution and an increased proliferation rate compared to wild type cells. Moreover, SMNΔ7 NSCs are characterized by the differential expression of a limited number of miRNAs, among which miR-335-5p and miR-100-5p, reduced in SMNΔ7 NSCs compared to WT cells. We suggest that such miRNAs may be related to the proliferation differences characterizing SMNΔ7 NSCs, and may be potentially involved in the molecular mechanisms of SMA.

  9. Highly Efficient Differentiation and Enrichment of Spinal Motor Neurons Derived from Human and Monkey Embryonic Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Tamaki; Honda, Makoto; Minami, Itsunari; Tooi, Norie; Amagai, Yuji; Nakatsuji, Norio; Aiba, Kazuhiro

    2009-01-01

    Background There are no cures or efficacious treatments for severe motor neuron diseases. It is extremely difficult to obtain naïve spinal motor neurons (sMNs) from human tissues for research due to both technical and ethical reasons. Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are alternative sources. Several methods for MN differentiation have been reported. However, efficient production of naïve sMNs and culture cost were not taken into consideration in most of the methods. Methods/Principal Findings We aimed to establish protocols for efficient production and enrichment of sMNs derived from pluripotent stem cells. Nestin+ neural stem cell (NSC) clusters were induced by Noggin or a small molecule inhibitor of BMP signaling. After dissociation of NSC clusters, neurospheres were formed in a floating culture containing FGF2. The number of NSCs in neurospheres could be expanded more than 30-fold via several passages. More than 33% of HB9+ sMN progenitor cells were observed after differentiation of dissociated neurospheres by all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and a Shh agonist for another week on monolayer culture. HB9+ sMN progenitor cells were enriched by gradient centrifugation up to 80% purity. These HB9+ cells differentiated into electrophysiologically functional cells and formed synapses with myotubes during a few weeks after ATRA/SAG treatment. Conclusions and Significance The series of procedures we established here, namely neural induction, NSC expansion, sMN differentiation and sMN purification, can provide large quantities of naïve sMNs derived from human and monkey pluripotent stem cells. Using small molecule reagents, reduction of culture cost could be achieved. PMID:19701462

  10. Substance P reduces apoptotic cell death possibly by modulating the immune response at the early stage after spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Mei Hua; Lim, Ji Eun; Chi, Guang Fan; Ahn, Woosung; Zhang, Mingzi; Chung, Eunkyung; Son, Youngsook

    2013-10-23

    Previously, we have reported that substance P (SP) enhanced functional recovery from spinal cord injury (SCI) possibly by the anti-inflammatory modulation associated with the induction of M2-type macrophages at the injured lesion. In this study, we explored the cytokine expression profiles and apoptotic cell death in the lesion site of the SCI after an immediate intravenous injection of SP. SP injection increased the levels of interleukin-4 (IL-4), IL-6, and IL-10 at day 1 after the SCI approximately by 2-, 9-, and 10-folds when compared with the control SCI, respectively. On the basis of double immunofluorescence staining with IL-10 and CD11b, activated macrophages or microglia expressing IL-10 appeared in the margin of the lesion site at day 1 only after the SP injection. This SP-mediated alteration in the lesion microenvironment was shown to be associated with the lower cell death of neuronal cells at day 1 and oligodendrocytes at day 5 by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay, which was also accompanied by a decrease in caspase-3 activation. These findings suggest that SP may reduce the inflammation-induced secondary cell death, possibly through immune modulation at an early stage after the SCI.

  11. Effects of Transplanted Heparin-Poloxamer Hydrogel Combining Dental Pulp Stem Cells and bFGF on Spinal Cord Injury Repair

    OpenAIRE

    Luo, Lihua; Albashari, Abdullkhaleg Ali; Wang, Xiaoyan; Jin, Ling; Zhang, Yanni; Zheng, Lina; Xia, Jianjian; Xu, Helin; Zhao, Yingzheng; Xiao, Jian; He, Yan; Ye, Qingsong

    2018-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is one of serious traumatic diseases of the central nervous system and has no effective treatment because of its complicated pathophysiology. Tissue engineering strategy which contains scaffolds, cells, and growth factors can provide a promising treatment for SCI. Hydrogel that has 3D network structure and biomimetic microenvironment can support cellular growth and embed biological macromolecules for sustaining release. Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs), derived from cra...

  12. Systematic review of induced pluripotent stem cell technology as a potential clinical therapy for spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Anne S; Harvey, Alan R; Plant, Giles W; Hodgetts, Stuart I

    2013-01-01

    importance of balancing the promise of this transplantation candidate in the light of these emerging properties is crucial as the potential application in the clinical setting approaches. The first of three sections in this review discusses (A) the pathophysiology of spinal cord injury (SCI) and how stem cell therapies can positively alter the pathology in experimental SCI. Part B summarizes (i) the available technologies to deliver transgenes to generate iPSCs and (ii) recent data comparing iPSCs to ESCs in terms of characteristics and molecular composition. Lastly, in (C) we evaluate iPSC-based therapies as a candidate to treat SCI on the basis of their neurite induction capability compared to embryonic stem cells and provide a summary of available in vivo data of iPSCs used in SCI and other disease models.

  13. Involvement of TRPM2 in peripheral nerve injury-induced infiltration of peripheral immune cells into the spinal cord in mouse neuropathic pain model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kouichi Isami

    Full Text Available Recent evidence suggests that transient receptor potential melastatin 2 (TRPM2 expressed in immune cells plays an important role in immune and inflammatory responses. We recently reported that TRPM2 expressed in macrophages and spinal microglia contributes to the pathogenesis of inflammatory and neuropathic pain aggravating peripheral and central pronociceptive inflammatory responses in mice. To further elucidate the contribution of TRPM2 expressed by peripheral immune cells to neuropathic pain, we examined the development of peripheral nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain and the infiltration of immune cells (particularly macrophages into the injured nerve and spinal cord by using bone marrow (BM chimeric mice by crossing wildtype (WT and TRPM2-knockout (TRPM2-KO mice. Four types of BM chimeric mice were prepared, in which irradiated WT or TRPM2-KO recipient mice were transplanted with either WT-or TRPM2-KO donor mouse-derived green fluorescence protein-positive (GFP(+ BM cells (TRPM2(BM+/Rec+, TRPM2(BM-/Rec+, TRPM2(BM+/Rec-, and TRPM2(BM-/Rec- mice. Mechanical allodynia induced by partial sciatic nerve ligation observed in TRPM2(BM+/Rec+ mice was attenuated in TRPM2(BM-/Rec+, TRPM2(BM+/Rec-, and TRPM2(BM-/Rec- mice. The numbers of GFP(+ BM-derived cells and Iba1/GFP double-positive macrophages in the injured sciatic nerve did not differ among chimeric mice 14 days after the nerve injury. In the spinal cord, the number of GFP(+ BM-derived cells, particularly GFP/Iba1 double-positive macrophages, was significantly decreased in the three TRPM2-KO chimeric mouse groups compared with TRPM2(BM+/Rec+ mice. However, the numbers of GFP(-/Iba1(+ resident microglia did not differ among chimeric mice. These results suggest that TRPM2 plays an important role in the infiltration of peripheral immune cells, particularly macrophages, into the spinal cord, rather than the infiltration of peripheral immune cells into the injured nerves and activation of spinal

  14. Improvement of quality of reporting in randomised controlled trials to prevent hypotension after spinal anaesthesia for caesarean section

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Herdan; R. Roth; D. Grass; M. Klimek (Markus); S. Will; B. Schauf; R. Rossaint; M. Heesen

    2011-01-01

    textabstractHypotension is a frequent complication of spinal anaesthesia for caesarean section and can threaten the well-being of the unborn child. Numerous randomised controlled trials (RCTs) dealt with measures to prevent hypotension. The aim of this study was to determine the reporting quality of

  15. Improving the Efficiency and Efficacy of Glibenclamide in Limiting Progressive Hemorrhagic Necrosis Following Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-01

    microvasculature in the canine spinal cord. Anat. Rec. 200, 102–113.Kilbourne, M., Kuehn, R., Tosun, C., Caridi, J., Keledjian, K., Bochicchio, G...acquisition gradient echo (MP- RAGE ) images were acquired in the axial plane with adequate coverage of the injury using 64 slices over a field of view

  16. A patient presenting with spinal cord compression who had two distinct follicular cell type thyroid carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koca, E; Sokmensuer, C; Yildiz, B O; Engin, H; Bozkurt, M F; Aras, T; Barista, I; Gurlek, A

    2004-06-01

    A 61-yr-old woman presented with complaints of weakness and pain in her legs. A magnetic resonance imaging showed a 3 x 5.6 x 7.8 cm mass lesion destructing the T1 and T2 vertebral bodies and compressing the spinal cord. The mass was excised surgically. It was follicular carcinoma metastasis of the cervicodorsal region. Then, she underwent a total thyroidectomy. Pathological examination showed two different types of carcinomas in two different focuses; follicular carcinoma in the left lobe and follicular variant papillary carcinoma in the isthmic lobe. After the operation she was given 100 mCi 131I. This is the first report of a patient who had both metastatic follicular carcinoma and follicular variant papillary carcinoma together.

  17. Astrocytes from the contused spinal cord inhibit oligodendrocyte differentiation of adult oligodendrocyte precursor cells by increasing the expression of bone morphogenetic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yaping; Cheng, Xiaoxin; He, Qian; Zheng, Yiyan; Kim, Dong H; Whittemore, Scott R; Cao, Qilin L

    2011-04-20

    Promotion of remyelination is an important therapeutic strategy to facilitate functional recovery after traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI). Transplantation of neural stem cells (NSCs) or oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) has been used to enhance remyelination after SCI. However, the microenvironment in the injured spinal cord is inhibitory for oligodendrocyte (OL) differentiation of NSCs or OPCs. Identifying the signaling pathways that inhibit OL differentiation in the injured spinal cord could lead to new therapeutic strategies to enhance remyelination and functional recovery after SCI. In the present study, we show that reactive astrocytes from the injured rat spinal cord or their conditioned media inhibit OL differentiation of adult OPCs with concurrent promotion of astrocyte differentiation. The expression of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMP) is dramatically increased in the reactive astrocytes and their conditioned media. Importantly, blocking BMP activity by BMP receptor antagonist, noggin, reverse the effects of active astrocytes on OPC differentiation by increasing the differentiation of OL from OPCs while decreasing the generation of astrocytes. These data indicate that the upregulated bone morphogenetic proteins in the reactive astrocytes are major factors to inhibit OL differentiation of OPCs and to promote its astrocyte differentiation. These data suggest that manipulation of BMP signaling in the endogenous or grafted NSCs or OPCs may be a useful therapeutic strategy to increase their OL differentiation and remyelination and enhance functional recovery after SCI.

  18. Surgical reconstruction of spinal cord circuit provides functional return in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Carlstedt

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This mini review describes the current surgical strategy for restoring function after traumatic spinal nerve root avulsion in brachial or lumbosacral plexus injury in man. As this lesion is a spinal cord or central nervous injury functional return depends on spinal cord nerve cell growth within the central nervous system. Basic science, clinical research and human application has demonstrated good and useful motor function after ventral root avulsion followed by spinal cord reimplantation. Recently, sensory return could be demonstrated following spinal cord surgery bypassing the injured primary sensory neuron. Experimental data showed that most of the recovery depended on new growth reinnervating peripheral receptors. Restored sensory function and the return of spinal reflex was demonstrated by electrophysiology and functional magnetic resonance imaging of human cortex. This spinal cord surgery is a unique treatment of central nervous system injury resulting in useful functional return. Further improvements will not depend on surgical improvements. Adjuvant therapy aiming at ameliorating the activity in retinoic acid elements in dorsal root ganglion neurons could be a new therapeutic avenue in restoring spinal cord circuits after nerve root avulsion injury.

  19. A novel immune-to-CNS communication pathway: cells of the meninges surrounding the spinal cord CSF space produce proinflammatory cytokines in response to an inflammatory stimulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieseler-Frank, Julie; Jekich, Brian M; Mahoney, John H; Bland, Sondra T; Maier, Steven F; Watkins, Linda R

    2007-07-01

    Pain is enhanced in response to elevations of proinflammatory cytokines in spinal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), following either intrathecal injection of these cytokines or intrathecal immune challenge with HIV-1 gp120 that induces cytokine release. Spinal cord glia have been assumed to be the source of endogenous proinflammatory cytokines that enhance pain. However, assuming that spinal cord glia are the sole source of CSF cytokines may be an underestimate, as the cellular composition of the meninges surrounding the spinal cord CSF space includes several cell types known to produce proinflammatory cytokines. The present experiments provide the first investigation of the immunocompetent nature of the spinal cord meninges. Here, we explore whether rat meninges are responsive to intrathecal gp120. These studies demonstrate that: (a) intrathecal gp120 upregulates meningeal gene expression of proinflammatory signals, including tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), interleukin 6 (IL-6), and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and (b) intrathecal gp120 induces meningeal release of TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, and IL-6. In addition, stimulation of isolated meninges in vitro with gp120 induced the release of TNF-alpha and IL-1beta, indicating that the resident cells of the meninges are able to respond without immune cell recruitment. Taken together, these data document that the meninges are responsive to immunogenic stimuli in the CSF and that the meninges may be a source of immune products detected in CSF. The ability of the meninges to release to proinflammatory signals suggests a potential role in the modulation of pain.

  20. Study of the efficiency of transplantation of human neural stem cells to rats with spinal trauma: the use of functional load tests and BBB test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedev, S V; Karasev, A V; Chekhonin, V P; Savchenko, E A; Viktorov, I V; Chelyshev, Yu A; Shaimardanova, G F

    2010-09-01

    Human ensheating neural stem cells of the olfactory epithelium were transplanted to adult male rats immediately after contusion trauma of the spinal cord at T9 level rostrally and caudally to the injury. Voluntary movements (by a 21-point BBB scale), rota-rod performance, and walking along a narrowing beam were monitored weekly over 60 days. In rats receiving cell transplantation, the mean BBB score significantly increased by 11% by the end of the experiment. The mean parameters of load tests also regularly surpassed the corresponding parameters in controls. The efficiency of transplantation (percent of animals with motor function recovery parameters surpassing the corresponding mean values in the control groups) was 62% by the state of voluntary motions, 37% by the rota-rod test, and 32% by the narrowing beam test. Morphometry revealed considerable shrinking of the zone of traumatic damage in the spinal cord and activation of posttraumatic remyelination in animals receiving transplantation of human neural stem cells.

  1. Spinal injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Dallas, TX: American Red Cross; 2016. Kaji AH, Newton EJ, Hockberger RS. Spinal injuries. In: Marx JA, ... member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health on the Net Foundation (www. ...

  2. MOLTEN CARBONATE FUEL CELL PRODUCT DESIGN IMPROVEMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H.C. Maru; M. Farooque

    2003-03-01

    The program efforts are focused on technology and system optimization for cost reduction, commercial design development, and prototype system field trials. The program is designed to advance the carbonate fuel cell technology from full-size field test to the commercial design. FuelCell Energy, Inc. (FCE) is in the later stage of the multiyear program for development and verification of carbonate fuel cell based power plants supported by DOE/NETL with additional funding from DOD/DARPA and the FuelCell Energy team. FCE has scaled up the technology to full-size and developed DFC{reg_sign} stack and balance-of-plant (BOP) equipment technology to meet product requirements, and acquired high rate manufacturing capabilities to reduce cost. FCE has designed submegawatt (DFC300A) and megawatt (DFC1500 and DFC3000) class fuel cell products for commercialization of its DFC{reg_sign} technology. A significant progress was made during the reporting period. The reforming unit design was optimized using a three-dimensional stack simulation model. Thermal and flow uniformities of the oxidant-In flow in the stack module were improved using computational fluid dynamics based flow simulation model. The manufacturing capacity was increased. The submegawatt stack module overall cost was reduced by {approx}30% on a per kW basis. An integrated deoxidizer-prereformer design was tested successfully at submegawatt scale using fuels simulating digester gas, coal bed methane gas and peak shave (natural) gas.

  3. Pericytes Make Spinal Cord Breathless after Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Viviani M; Paiva, Ana E; Sena, Isadora F G; Mintz, Akiva; Magno, Luiz Alexandre V; Birbrair, Alexander

    2017-09-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injury is a devastating condition that leads to significant neurological deficits and reduced quality of life. Therapeutic interventions after spinal cord lesions are designed to address multiple aspects of the secondary damage. However, the lack of detailed knowledge about the cellular and molecular changes that occur after spinal cord injury restricts the design of effective treatments. Li and colleagues using a rat model of spinal cord injury and in vivo microscopy reveal that pericytes play a key role in the regulation of capillary tone and blood flow in the spinal cord below the site of the lesion. Strikingly, inhibition of specific proteins expressed by pericytes after spinal cord injury diminished hypoxia and improved motor function and locomotion of the injured rats. This work highlights a novel central cellular population that might be pharmacologically targeted in patients with spinal cord trauma. The emerging knowledge from this research may provide new approaches for the treatment of spinal cord injury.

  4. Spinal infections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tali, E. Turgut; Gueltekin, Serap

    2005-01-01

    Spinal infections have an increasing prevalence among the general population. Definitive diagnosis based solely on clinical grounds is usually not possible and radiological imaging is used in almost all patients. The primary aim of the authors is to present an overview of spinal infections located in epidural, intradural and intramedullary compartments and to provide diagnostic clues regarding different imaging modalities, particularly MRI, to the practicing physicians and radiologists. (orig.)

  5. Spinal cysticercosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goedert, A.V.; Silva, S.H.F.

    1990-01-01

    Spinal cysticercosis is an extremely uncommon condition. We have examined four patients with complaints that resembled nervous root compression by disk herniation. Myelography was shown to be an efficient method to evaluate spinal involvement, that was characterized by findings of multiple filling defect images (cysts) plus signs of adhesive arachnoiditis. One cyst was found to be mobile. Because of the recent development of medical treatment, a quick and precise diagnosis is of high importance to determine the prognosis of this condition. (author)

  6. Imaging in spinal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goethem, J.W.M. van; Maes, Menno; Oezsarlak, Oezkan; Hauwe, Luc van den; Parizel, Paul M.

    2005-01-01

    Because it may cause paralysis, injury to the spine is one of the most feared traumas, and spinal cord injury is a major cause of disability. In the USA approximately 10,000 traumatic cervical spine fractures and 4000 traumatic thoracolumbar fractures are diagnosed each year. Although the number of individuals sustaining paralysis is far less than those with moderate or severe brain injury, the socioeconomic costs are significant. Since most of the spinal trauma patients survive their injuries, almost one out of 1000 inhabitants in the USA are currently being cared for partial or complete paralysis. Little controversy exists regarding the need for accurate and emergent imaging assessment of the traumatized spine in order to evaluate spinal stability and integrity of neural elements. Because clinicians fear missing occult spine injuries, they obtain radiographs for nearly all patients who present with blunt trauma. We are influenced on one side by fear of litigation and the possible devastating medical, psychologic and financial consequences of cervical spine injury, and on the other side by pressure to reduce health care costs. A set of clinical and/or anamnestic criteria, however, can be very useful in identifying patients who have an extremely low probability of injury and who consequently have no need for imaging studies. Multidetector (or multislice) computed tomography (MDCT) is the preferred primary imaging modality in blunt spinal trauma patients who do need imaging. Not only is CT more accurate in diagnosing spinal injury, it also reduces imaging time and patient manipulation. Evidence-based research has established that MDCT improves patient outcome and saves money in comparison to plain film. This review discusses the use, advantages and disadvantages of the different imaging techniques used in spinal trauma patients and the criteria used in selecting patients who do not need imaging. Finally an overview of different types of spinal injuries is given

  7. Imaging in spinal trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goethem, J.W.M. van [Universitair Ziekenhuis Antwerpen, University of Antwerp, Belgium, Department of Radiology, Edegem (Belgium); Algemeen Ziekenhuis Maria Middelares, Department of Radiology, Sint-Niklaas (Belgium); Maes, Menno; Oezsarlak, Oezkan; Hauwe, Luc van den; Parizel, Paul M. [Universitair Ziekenhuis Antwerpen, University of Antwerp, Belgium, Department of Radiology, Edegem (Belgium)

    2005-03-01

    Because it may cause paralysis, injury to the spine is one of the most feared traumas, and spinal cord injury is a major cause of disability. In the USA approximately 10,000 traumatic cervical spine fractures and 4000 traumatic thoracolumbar fractures are diagnosed each year. Although the number of individuals sustaining paralysis is far less than those with moderate or severe brain injury, the socioeconomic costs are significant. Since most of the spinal trauma patients survive their injuries, almost one out of 1000 inhabitants in the USA are currently being cared for partial or complete paralysis. Little controversy exists regarding the need for accurate and emergent imaging assessment of the traumatized spine in order to evaluate spinal stability and integrity of neural elements. Because clinicians fear missing occult spine injuries, they obtain radiographs for nearly all patients who present with blunt trauma. We are influenced on one side by fear of litigation and the possible devastating medical, psychologic and financial consequences of cervical spine injury, and on the other side by pressure to reduce health care costs. A set of clinical and/or anamnestic criteria, however, can be very useful in identifying patients who have an extremely low probability of injury and who consequently have no need for imaging studies. Multidetector (or multislice) computed tomography (MDCT) is the preferred primary imaging modality in blunt spinal trauma patients who do need imaging. Not only is CT more accurate in diagnosing spinal injury, it also reduces imaging time and patient manipulation. Evidence-based research has established that MDCT improves patient outcome and saves money in comparison to plain film. This review discusses the use, advantages and disadvantages of the different imaging techniques used in spinal trauma patients and the criteria used in selecting patients who do not need imaging. Finally an overview of different types of spinal injuries is given

  8. Abnormal mitochondrial transport and morphology as early pathological changes in human models of spinal muscular atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong-Chong Xu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA, characterized by specific degeneration of spinal motor neurons, is caused by mutations in the survival of motor neuron 1, telomeric (SMN1 gene and subsequent decreased levels of functional SMN. How the deficiency of SMN, a ubiquitously expressed protein, leads to spinal motor neuron-specific degeneration in individuals affected by SMA remains unknown. In this study, we examined the role of SMN in mitochondrial axonal transport and morphology in human motor neurons by generating SMA type 1 patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs and differentiating these cells into spinal motor neurons. The initial specification of spinal motor neurons was not affected, but these SMA spinal motor neurons specifically degenerated following long-term culture. Moreover, at an early stage in SMA spinal motor neurons, but not in SMA forebrain neurons, the number of mitochondria, mitochondrial area and mitochondrial transport were significantly reduced in axons. Knocking down of SMN expression led to similar mitochondrial defects in spinal motor neurons derived from human embryonic stem cells, confirming that SMN deficiency results in impaired mitochondrial dynamics. Finally, the application of N-acetylcysteine (NAC mitigated the impairment in mitochondrial transport and morphology and rescued motor neuron degeneration in SMA long-term cultures. Furthermore, NAC ameliorated the reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential in SMA spinal motor neurons, suggesting that NAC might rescue apoptosis and motor neuron degeneration by improving mitochondrial health. Overall, our data demonstrate that SMN deficiency results in abnormal mitochondrial transport and morphology and a subsequent reduction in mitochondrial health, which are implicated in the specific degeneration of spinal motor neurons in SMA.

  9. ifn-γ-dependent secretion of IL-10 from Th1 cells and microglia/macrophages contributes to functional recovery after spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, H; Tanabe, S; Ueno, M; Kubo, T; Kayama, H; Serada, S; Fujimoto, M; Takeda, K; Naka, T; Yamashita, T

    2013-01-01

    Transfer of type-1 helper T-conditioned (Th1-conditioned) cells promotes functional recovery with enhanced axonal remodeling after spinal cord injury (SCI). This study explored the molecular mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of pro-inflammatory Th1-conditioned cells after SCI. The effect of Th1-conditioned cells from interferon-γ (ifn-γ) knockout mice (ifn-γ−/− Th1 cells) on the recovery after SCI was reduced. Transfer of Th1-conditioned cells led to the activation of microglia (MG) and macrophages (MΦs), with interleukin 10 (IL-10) upregulation. This upregulation of IL-10 was reduced when ifn-γ−/− Th1 cells were transferred. Intrathecal neutralization of IL-10 in the spinal cord attenuated the effects of Th1-conditioned cells. Further, IL-10 is robustly secreted from Th1-conditioned cells in an ifn-γ-dependent manner. Th1-conditioned cells from interleukin 10 knockout (il-10−/−) mice had no effects on recovery from SCI. These findings demonstrate that ifn-γ-dependent secretion of IL-10 from Th1 cells, as well as native MG/MΦs, is required for the promotion of motor recovery after SCI. PMID:23828573

  10. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cord Injury What is a Spinal Cord Injury Levels of Injury and What They Mean Animated Spinal ... Cord Injury What is a Spinal Cord Injury Levels of Injury and What They Mean Animated Spinal ...

  11. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Injury Chart Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation ... Injury Chart Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation ...

  12. Subdural Thoracolumbar Spine Hematoma after Spinal Anesthesia: A Rare Occurrence and Literature Review of Spinal Hematomas after Spinal Anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddali, Prasanthi; Walker, Blake; Fisahn, Christian; Page, Jeni; Diaz, Vicki; Zwillman, Michael E; Oskouian, Rod J; Tubbs, R Shane; Moisi, Marc

    2017-02-16

    Spinal hematomas are a rare but serious complication of spinal epidural anesthesia and are typically seen in the epidural space; however, they have been documented in the subdural space. Spinal subdural hematomas likely exist within a traumatically induced space within the dural border cell layer, rather than an anatomical subdural space. Spinal subdural hematomas present a dangerous clinical situation as they have the potential to cause significant compression of neural elements and can be easily mistaken for spinal epidural hematomas. Ultrasound can be an effective modality to diagnose subdural hematoma when no epidural blood is visualized. We have reviewed the literature and present a full literature review and a case presentation of an 82-year-old male who developed a thoracolumbar spinal subdural hematoma after spinal epidural anesthesia. Anticoagulant therapy is an important predisposing risk factor for spinal epidural hematomas and likely also predispose to spinal subdural hematomas. It is important to consider spinal subdural hematomas in addition to spinal epidural hematomas in patients who develop weakness after spinal epidural anesthesia, especially in patients who have received anticoagulation.

  13. Improving the Efficiency and Efficacy of Glibenclamide in Limiting Progressive Hemorrhagic Necrosis Following Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    signatures of each animal could be used to predict the relative efficacy Glib therapy . Through research funded by the Department of Defense, we have tested...Care and Use Committee. In accor- dance with “good laboratory practice”, different investigators blinded to injury-group conducted behavioral tests and...the in- jured spinal cord. Implications for neuroprotective therapy . Ann. N. Y. Acad. Sci. 890, 366–384. Ichihara, K., Taguchi, T., Shimada, Y

  14. Clinical response to a lomustine/cytarabine-based chemotherapy protocol in a case of canine large granular lymphocyte T-cell lymphoma with spinal involvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabetta Treggiari

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available A 7-year-old, female neutered cross-breed dog was referred to our institution with a history of progressive hind limb weakness, which then progressed to paraplegia. An MRI of the spine revealed severe meningeal infiltrate consistent with lymphoma involvement, located at the level of L2-L7 with concurrent lymph node enlargement and abnormal bone marrow. Abdominal ultrasonography also identified changes in the spleen and confirmed enlargement of the lumbar aortic lymph node. Cytology of lymph nodes and spleen confirmed a high-grade lymphoma with features of a large granular lymphocyte (LGL variant; PCR for antigen receptor re-arrangements (PARR was positive for a clonal T-cell receptor rearrangement. The dog was started on a chemotherapy protocol with lomustine and cytarabine incorporation and had a rapid improvement in neurological status. Chemotherapy was continued until relapse and rescue treatment used at that time. The dog was euthanased at the time of recurrence of neurological signs, 195 days since medical treatment was started. This case report suggests that combination chemotherapy may be of use when treating LGL lymphoma with spinal involvement and survival time may potentially exceed 6 months.

  15. Human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells as a new model of spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Dossena

    Full Text Available Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA or Kennedy's disease is an X-linked CAG/polyglutamine expansion motoneuron disease, in which an elongated polyglutamine tract (polyQ in the N-terminal androgen receptor (ARpolyQ confers toxicity to this protein. Typical markers of SBMA disease are ARpolyQ intranuclear inclusions. These are generated after the ARpolyQ binds to its endogenous ligands, which promotes AR release from chaperones, activation and nuclear translocation, but also cell toxicity. The SBMA mouse models developed so far, and used in preclinical studies, all contain an expanded CAG repeat significantly longer than that of SBMA patients. Here, we propose the use of SBMA patients adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs as a new human in vitro model to study ARpolyQ toxicity. These cells have the advantage to express only ARpolyQ, and not the wild type AR allele. Therefore, we isolated and characterized adipose-derived MSCs from three SBMA patients (ADSC from Kennedy's patients, ADSCK and three control volunteers (ADSCs. We found that both ADSCs and ADSCKs express mesenchymal antigens, even if only ADSCs can differentiate into the three typical cell lineages (adipocytes, chondrocytes and osteocytes, whereas ADSCKs, from SBMA patients, showed a lower growth potential and differentiated only into adipocyte. Moreover, analysing AR expression on our mesenchymal cultures we found lower levels in all ADSCKs than ADSCs, possibly related to negative pressures exerted by toxic ARpolyQ in ADSCKs. In addition, with proteasome inhibition the ARpolyQ levels increased specifically in ADSCKs, inducing the formation of HSP70 and ubiquitin positive nuclear ARpolyQ inclusions. Considering all of this evidence, SBMA patients adipose-derived MSCs cultures should be considered an innovative in vitro human model to understand the molecular mechanisms of ARpolyQ toxicity and to test novel therapeutic approaches in SBMA.

  16. Development and validation of brain and spinal cord vector and cell-delivery techniques in pre-clinical minipig models of neurodegenerative disorders

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Juhás, Štefan; Juhásová, Jana; Klíma, Jiří; Maršala, M.; Maršala, S.; Atsushi, Y.; Johe, K.; Motlík, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 78, Suppl 2 (2015), s. 9-10 ISSN 1210-7859. [Conference on Animal Models for neurodegenerative Diseases /3./. 08.11.2015-10.11.2015, Liblice] R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED2.1.00/03.0124; GA MŠk(CZ) 7F14308 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : minipig models of neurodegenerative disorders * brin and spinal cord cell delivery techniques Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  17. Challenges and potential improvements in the admission process of patients with spinal cord injury in a specialized rehabilitation clinic - an interview based qualitative study of an interdisciplinary team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röthlisberger, Fabian; Boes, Stefan; Rubinelli, Sara; Schmitt, Klaus; Scheel-Sailer, Anke

    2017-06-26

    The admission process of patients to a hospital is the starting point for inpatient services. In order to optimize the quality of the health services provision, one needs a good understanding of the patient admission workflow in a clinic. The aim of this study was to identify challenges and potential improvements in the admission process of spinal cord injury patients at a specialized rehabilitation clinic from the perspective of an interdisciplinary team of health professionals. Semi-structured interviews with eight health professionals (medical doctors, physical therapists, occupational therapists, nurses) at the Swiss Paraplegic Centre (acute and rehabilitation clinic) were conducted based on a maximum variety purposive sampling strategy. The interviews were analyzed using a thematic analysis approach. The interviewees described the challenges and potential improvements in this admission process, focusing on five themes. First, the characteristics of the patient with his/her health condition and personality and his/her family influence different areas in the admission process. Improvements in the exchange of information between the hospital and the patient could speed up and simplify the admission process. In addition, challenges and potential improvements were found concerning the rehabilitation planning, the organization of the admission process and the interdisciplinary work. This study identified five themes of challenges and potential improvements in the admission process of spinal cord injury patients at a specialized rehabilitation clinic. When planning adaptations of process steps in one of the areas, awareness of effects in other fields is necessary. Improved pre-admission information would be a first important step to optimize the admission process. A common IT-system providing an interdisciplinary overview and possibilities for interdisciplinary exchange would support the management of the admission process. Managers of other hospitals can supplement

  18. Regulatory effect of neuroglobin in the recovery of spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Ji-Lin; Lin, Yun; Yuan, Yong-Jian; Xing, Shi-Tong; Xu, Yi; Zhang, Qiang-Hua; Min, Ji-Kang

    2017-11-16

    The present study was aimed to investigate the therapeutic potential of neuroglobin in the recovery of spinal cord injury. The male albino Wistar strain rats were used as an experimental model, and adeno associated virus (AAV) was administered in the T12 section of spinal cord ten days prior to the injury. Basso Beattie Bresnahan (BBB) locomotor rating scale was used to determine the recovery of the hind limb during four weeks post-operation. Malondialdehyde (MDA), catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were determined in the spinal cord tissues. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT) dUTP Nick-End Labeling (TUNEL) assay was carried out to determine the presence of apoptotic cells. Immunofluorescence analysis was carried out to determine the neuroglobin expression. Western blot analysis was carried out to determine the protein expressions of caspase-3, cytochrome c, bax and bcl-2 in the spinal cord tissues. Experimental results showed that rats were recovered from the spinal cord injury due to increased neuroglobin expression. Lipid peroxidation was reduced, whereas catalase and SOD activity were increased in the spinal cord tissues. Apoptosis and lesions were significantly reduced in the spinal cord tissues. Caspase-3, cytochrome c and bax levels were significantly reduced, whereas bcl-2 expression was reduced in the spinal cord tissues. Taking all these data together, it is suggested that the increased neuroglobin expression could improve the locomotor function.

  19. Spinal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goethem, J.W.M. van; Hauwe, L. van den; Oezsarlak, Oe.; Schepper, A.M.A. de; Parizel, P.M.

    2004-01-01

    Spinal tumors are uncommon lesions but may cause significant morbidity in terms of limb dysfunction. In establishing the differential diagnosis for a spinal lesion, location is the most important feature, but the clinical presentation and the patient's age and gender are also important. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging plays a central role in the imaging of spinal tumors, easily allowing tumors to be classified as extradural, intradural-extramedullary or intramedullary, which is very useful in tumor characterization. In the evaluation of lesions of the osseous spine both computed tomography (CT) and MR are important. We describe the most common spinal tumors in detail. In general, extradural lesions are the most common with metastasis being the most frequent. Intradural tumors are rare, and the majority is extramedullary, with meningiomas and nerve sheath tumors being the most frequent. Intramedullary tumors are uncommon spinal tumors. Astrocytomas and ependymomas comprise the majority of the intramedullary tumors. The most important tumors are documented with appropriate high quality CT or MR images and the characteristics of these tumors are also summarized in a comprehensive table. Finally we illustrate the use of the new World Health Organization (WHO) classification of neoplasms affecting the central nervous system

  20. MOLTEN CARBONATE FUEL CELL PRODUCT DESIGN IMPROVEMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H.C. Maru; M. Farooque

    2005-03-01

    The program was designed to advance the carbonate fuel cell technology from full-size proof-of-concept field test to the commercial design. DOE has been funding Direct FuelCell{reg_sign} (DFC{reg_sign}) development at FuelCell Energy, Inc. (FCE, formerly Energy Research Corporation) from an early state of development for stationary power plant applications. The current program efforts were focused on technology and system development, and cost reduction, leading to commercial design development and prototype system field trials. FCE, in Danbury, CT, is a world-recognized leader for the development and commercialization of high efficiency fuel cells that can generate clean electricity at power stations, or at distributed locations near the customers such as hospitals, schools, universities, hotels and other commercial and industrial applications. FCE has designed three different fuel cell power plant models (DFC300A, DFC1500 and DFC3000). FCE's power plants are based on its patented DFC{reg_sign} technology, where a hydrocarbon fuel is directly fed to the fuel cell and hydrogen is generated internally. These power plants offer significant advantages compared to the existing power generation technologies--higher fuel efficiency, significantly lower emissions, quieter operation, flexible siting and permitting requirements, scalability and potentially lower operating costs. Also, the exhaust heat by-product can be used for cogeneration applications such as high-pressure steam, district heating and air conditioning. Several sub-MW power plants based on the DFC design are currently operating in Europe, Japan and the US. Several one-megawatt power plant design was verified by operation on natural gas at FCE. This plant is currently installed at a customer site in King County, WA under another US government program and is currently in operation. Because hydrogen is generated directly within the fuel cell module from readily available fuels such as natural gas and

  1. MRI features of lymphoma in spinal area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Liangping; Peng Weijun; Yang Wentao; Tang Feng

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To analyze MR imaging manifestations of spinal area lymphoma in order to improve the recognition and understanding of the disease. Methods: A group of 45 patients with pathologically or clinically proven spinal area lymphoma were reviewed. Five cases were primary NHL, 40 cases were secondary with 9 HL and 31 NHL (27 B-cell type NHL and 4 T-cell type NHL). MR Imaging findings were analyzed and correlated with clinical and pathologic findings. Results: (1) Location of lesions: 13 cases were focal type and 32 cases were multifocal type. All of the 5 patients with primary lymphoma were focal type, while 32 of 40 eases of secondary lymphoma were multifocal type. (2)Type of lesions: (1) Vertebral destruction: 27 cases manifested as bone destruction with 23 of them had soft tissue mass and the extent of soft tissue masses were larger than that of bone destruction in 18 eases. (2) Soft tissue masses: 6 cases manifested as soft masses without obvious bone destruction, of which 5 cases had soft tissue masses imbedded vertebrae and communicated paravertebral and epidural spaces through intervertebral foramen. (3) Bone marrow infiltration: 9 cases of secondary spinal lymphoma had signal intensity changes of bone marrow without obvious cortical bone destruction and soft tissue mass. (4) Spinal cord infiltration: 3 cases of secondary spinal lymphoma had spinal cord swelling and signal intensity changes. (3) MRI findings: all lesions of bone destruction and marrow infiltration manifested as hypointense on T 1 -weighted images, hypointense, isointense or hyperintense on T 2 -weighted images and hyperintense on T 2 -weighted images with fat-suppression technique. All soft tissue masses were homogeneous hypointense on T 1 -weighted images and hyperintense on T 2 -weighted images. After intravenous injection of contrast media, the lesions of the bone and the soft tissue showed mild or moderate enhancement without remarkable cystic degeneration and necrosis. Conclusions

  2. Isolation and characterization of two kinds of stem cells from the same human skin back sample with therapeutic potential in spinal cord injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaowen Zong

    Full Text Available BACKGROUNDS AND OBJECTIVE: Spinal cord injury remains to be a challenge to clinicians and it is attractive to employ autologous adult stem cell transplantation in its treatment, however, how to harvest cells with therapeutic potential easily and how to get enough number of cells for transplantation are challenging issues. In the present study, we aimed to isolate skin-derived precursors (SKPs and dermal multipotent stem cells (dMSCs simultaneously from single human skin samples from patients with paraplegia. METHODS: Dissociated cells were initially generated from the dermal layer of skin samples from patients with paraplegia and cultured in SKPs proliferation medium. Four hours later, many cells adhered to the base of the flask. The suspended cells were then transferred to another flask for further culture as SKPs, while the adherent cells were cultured in dMSCs proliferation medium. Twenty-four hours later, the adherent cells were harvested and single-cell colonies were generated using serial dilution method. [(3H]thymidine incorporation assay, microchemotaxis Transwell chambers assay, RT-PCR and fluorescent immunocytochemistry were employed to examine the characterizations of the isolated cells. RESULTS: SKPs and dMSCs were isolated simultaneously from a single skin sample. SKPs and dMSCs differed in several respects, including in terms of intermediate protein expression, proliferation capacities, and differentiation tendencies towards mesodermal and neural progenies. However, both SKPs and dMSCs showed high rates of differentiation into neurons and Schwann cells under appropriate inducing conditions. dMSCs isolated by this method showed no overt differences from dMSCs isolated by routine methods. CONCLUSIONS: Two kinds of stem cells, namely SKPs and dMSCs, can be isolated simultaneously from individual human skin sample from paraplegia patients. Both of them show ability to differentiate into neural cells under proper inducing conditions

  3. Bone marrow stromal cells for repair of the spinal cord: towards clinical application.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nandoe, R.D.S.; Hurtado, A.; Levi, A.D.; Grotenhuis, J.A.; Oudega, M.

    2006-01-01

    Stem cells have been recognized and intensively studied for their potential use in restorative approaches for degenerative diseases and traumatic injuries. In the central nervous system (CNS), stem cell-based strategies have been proposed to replace lost neurons in degenerative diseases such as

  4. Dual Differentiation-Exogenous Mesenchymal Stem Cell Therapy for Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury Repair in a Murine Hemisection Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC transplantation has shown tremendous promise as a therapy for repair of various tissues of the musculoskeletal, vascular, and central nervous systems. Based on this success, recent research in this field has focused on complex tissue damage, such as that which occurs from traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI. As the critical event for successful exogenous, MSC therapy is their migration to the injury site, which allows for their anti-inflammatory and morphogenic effects on fracture healing, neuronal regeneration, and functional recover. Thus, there is a need for a cost-effective in vivo model that can faithfully recapitulate the salient features of the injury, therapy, and recovery. To address this, we review the recent advances in exogenous MSC therapy for TSCI and traumatic vertebral fracture repair and the existing challenges regarding their translational applications. We also describe a novel murine model designed to take advantage of multidisciplinary collaborations between musculoskeletal and neuroscience researchers, which is needed to establish an efficacious MSC therapy for TSCI.

  5. Infiltrating blood-derived macrophages are vital cells playing an anti-inflammatory role in recovery from spinal cord injury in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shechter, Ravid; London, Anat; Varol, Chen; Raposo, Catarina; Cusimano, Melania; Yovel, Gili; Rolls, Asya; Mack, Matthias; Pluchino, Stefano; Martino, Gianvito; Jung, Steffen; Schwartz, Michal

    2009-07-01

    Although macrophages (MPhi) are known as essential players in wound healing, their contribution to recovery from spinal cord injury (SCI) is a subject of debate. The difficulties in distinguishing between different MPhi subpopulations at the lesion site have further contributed to the controversy and led to the common view of MPhi as functionally homogenous. Given the massive accumulation in the injured spinal cord of activated resident microglia, which are the native immune occupants of the central nervous system (CNS), the recruitment of additional infiltrating monocytes from the peripheral blood seems puzzling. A key question that remains is whether the infiltrating monocyte-derived MPhi contribute to repair, or represent an unavoidable detrimental response. The hypothesis of the current study is that a specific population of infiltrating monocyte-derived MPhi is functionally distinct from the inflammatory resident microglia and is essential for recovery from SCI. We inflicted SCI in adult mice, and tested the effect of infiltrating monocyte-derived MPhi on the recovery process. Adoptive transfer experiments and bone marrow chimeras were used to functionally distinguish between the resident microglia and the infiltrating monocyte-derived MPhi. We followed the infiltration of the monocyte-derived MPhi to the injured site and characterized their spatial distribution and phenotype. Increasing the naïve monocyte pool by either adoptive transfer or CNS-specific vaccination resulted in a higher number of spontaneously recruited cells and improved recovery. Selective ablation of infiltrating monocyte-derived MPhi following SCI while sparing the resident microglia, using either antibody-mediated depletion or conditional ablation by diphtheria toxin, impaired recovery. Reconstitution of the peripheral blood with monocytes resistant to ablation restored the lost motor functions. Importantly, the infiltrating monocyte-derived MPhi displayed a local anti

  6. Crocin improved locomotor function and mechanical behavior in the rat model of contused spinal cord injury through decreasing calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karami, Masoume; Bathaie, S Zahra; Tiraihi, Taqi; Habibi-Rezaei, Mehran; Arabkheradmand, Jalil; Faghihzadeh, Soghrat

    2013-12-15

    Various approaches have been offered to alleviate chronic pain resulting from spinal cord injuries (SCIs). Application of herbs and natural products, with potentially lower adverse effects, to cure diseases has been recommended in both traditional and modern medicines. Here, the effect of crocin on chronic pain induced by spinal cord contusion was investigated in an animal model. Female Wistar rats were randomly divided into five groups (5 rats in each); three groups were contused at the L1 level. One group was treated with crocin (150mg/kg) two weeks after spinal cord injury; the second group, control, was treated with vehicle only; and the third group was treated with ketoprofen. Two normal groups were also considered with or without crocin treatment. The mechanical behavioral test, the locomotor recovery test and the thermal behavioral test were applied weekly to evaluate the injury and recovery of rats. Significant improvements (plocomotor recovery tests were seen in the rats treated with crocin. Thermal behavioral test did not show any significant changes due to crocin treatment. Plasma concentration of calcitonin-gene related peptide (CGRP) changed from 780.2±2.3 to 1140.3±4.5pg/ml due to SCI and reached 789.1±2.7pg/ml after crocin treatment. These changes were significant at the level of p<0.05. The present study shows the beneficial effects of crocin treatment on chronic pain induced by SCI, through decreasing CGRP as an important mediator of inflammation and pain. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  7. Spinal tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, R N; Ben Husien, M

    2018-04-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains endemic in many parts of the developing world and is increasingly seen in the developed world due to migration. A total of 1.3 million people die annually from the disease. Spinal TB is the most common musculoskeletal manifestation, affecting about 1 to 2% of all cases of TB. The coexistence of HIV, which is endemic in some regions, adds to the burden and the complexity of management. This review discusses the epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, impact of HIV and both the medical and surgical options in the management of spinal TB. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2018;100-B:425-31.

  8. Pain relief and functional improvement in patients with neuropathic pain associated with spinal cord injury: an exploratory analysis of pregabalin clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadosky A

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Alesia Sadosky,1 Bruce Parsons,1 Birol Emir,1 Edward C Nieshoff2 1Pfizer Inc., New York, NY, 2Rehabilitation Institute of Michigan, Detroit, MI, USA Background: Characterizing relationships between pain relief and function can inform patient management decisions. This analysis explored graphically the relationship between pain relief and functional improvement in patients with neuropathic pain associated with spinal cord injury in two clinical trials of pregabalin. Methods: This was a post hoc analysis of two randomized, double-blind, clinical trials in patients who were treated with pregabalin (n=181 or placebo (n=172 for neuropathic pain associated with spinal cord injury. The bivariate relationship between percent pain relief and absolute change in the functional outcomes with placebo and pregabalin was evaluated graphically using scatter plots, and loess curves illustrated the extent of the relationship between pain and function. Linear trend analysis evaluated the statistical significance of these relationships using Initiative on Methods, Measurement, and Pain Assessment in Clinical Trials (IMMPACT-based thresholds of pain reduction (<15%, 15% <30%, 30% to <50%, and ≥50%. Outcome measures included modified Brief Pain Inventory pain interference with function in one of the studies and the Medical Outcomes Study Sleep Scale (an 11-point Numeric Rating Scale and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS for the pooled studies. Results: Data ellipses showed a shift with pregabalin relative to placebo toward greater improvement with increasing pain relief for all outcome measures except HADS. Loess curves suggested a relationship between increased pain relief and improved function except for HADS, with the clearest relationship observed for sleep. Linear trend analysis showed significant relationships between pain and Medical Outcomes Study Sleep Scale (P<0.0001 and between pain and function on the modified Brief Pain Inventory

  9. Stem cells, biomaterials and nanotechnology for the treatment of spinal cord injury

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Syková, Eva

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 5 (2007), s. 517-518 ISSN 1746-0751. [World Congress on Regenerative Medicine /3./. 18.10.2007-20.10.2007, Leipzig] R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0538; GA AV ČR KAN201110651 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : Embryonic stem cells * Olfactory ensheathing glia * Marrow stromal cells Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  10. Established Stem Cell Model of Spinal Muscular Atrophy Is Applicable in the Evaluation of the Efficacy of Thyrotropin-Releasing Hormone Analog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohuchi, Kazuki; Funato, Michinori; Kato, Zenichiro; Seki, Junko; Kawase, Chizuru; Tamai, Yuya; Ono, Yoko; Nagahara, Yuki; Noda, Yasuhiro; Kameyama, Tsubasa; Ando, Shiori; Tsuruma, Kazuhiro; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Hara, Hideaki; Kaneko, Hideo

    2016-02-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive neuromuscular disorder characterized by the degeneration of spinal motor neurons. This disease is mainly caused by mutation or deletion of the survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene. Currently, no effective treatment is available, and only symptomatic treatment can be provided. Our purpose in the present study was to establish a human SMA-derived induced pluripotent stem cell (SMA-iPSC) disease model and assay a therapeutic drug in preparation for the development of a novel treatment of SMA. We generated iPSCs from the skin fibroblasts of a patient with SMA and confirmed that they were pluripotent and undifferentiated. The neural differentiation of SMA-iPSCs shortened the dendrite and axon length and increased the apoptosis of the spinal motor neurons. In addition, we found activated astrocytes in differentiated SMA-iPSCs. Using this model, we confirmed that treatment with the thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) analog, 5-oxo-l-prolyl-l-histidyl-l-prolinamide, which had marginal effects in clinical trials, increases the SMN protein level. This increase was mediated through the transcriptional activation of the SMN2 gene and inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3β activity. Finally, the TRH analog treatment resulted in dendrite and axon development of spinal motor neurons in differentiated SMA-iPSCs. These results suggest that this human in vitro disease model stimulates SMA pathology and reveal the potential efficacy of TRH analog treatment for SMA. Therefore, we can screen novel therapeutic drugs such as TRH for SMA easily and effectively using the human SMA-iPSC model. Significance: Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) has recently been reported to produce the greatest increase in survival motor neuron protein levels by inhibiting glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3β; however, motor neurons lack PDGF receptors. A human in vitro spinal muscular atrophy-derived induced pluripotent stem cell model was

  11. A Fab fragment directed against the neural cell adhesion molecule L1 enhances functional recovery after injury of the adult mouse spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loers, Gabriele; Cui, Yi-Fang; Neumaier, Irmgard; Schachner, Melitta; Skerra, Arne

    2014-06-15

    Lack of permissive mechanisms and abundance of inhibitory molecules in the lesioned central nervous system of adult mammals contribute to the failure of functional recovery, which leads to severe disabilities in motor functions or pain. Previous studies have indicated that the neural cell adhesion molecule L1 constitutes a viable target to promote regeneration. In the present study, we describe the cloning, functional expression in Escherichia coli cells and purification of a recombinant αL1 Fab fragment that binds to L1 with comparable activity as the function-triggering monoclonal antibody 557.B6 and induces neurite outgrowth and neuronal survival in cultured neurons, despite its monovalent function. Infusion of αL1 Fab into the lesioned spinal cord of mice enhanced functional recovery after thoracic spinal cord compression injury. αL1 Fab treatment resulted in reduced scar volume, enhanced number of tyrosine hydroxylase-positive axons and increased linear density of VGLUT1 (vesicular glutamate transporter 1) on motoneurons. Furthermore, the number and soma size of ChAT (choline acetyltransferase)-positive motoneurons and the linear density of ChAT-positive boutons on motoneurons as well as parvalbumin-positive interneurons in the lumbar spinal cord were elevated. Stimulation of endogenous L1 by application of the αL1 Fab opens new avenues for recombinant antibody technology, offering prospects for therapeutic applications after traumatic nervous system lesions.

  12. Dimercaprol is an acrolein scavenger that mitigates acrolein-mediated PC-12 cells toxicity and reduces acrolein in rat following spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Ran; Shi, Riyi

    2017-06-01

    Acrolein is one of the most toxic byproducts of lipid peroxidation, and it has been shown to be associated with multiple pathological processes in trauma and diseases, including spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis, and Alzheimer's disease. Therefore, suppressing acrolein using acrolein scavengers has been suggested as a novel strategy of neuroprotection. In an effort to identify effective acrolein scavengers, we have confirmed that dimercaprol, which possesses thiol functional groups, could bind and trap acrolein. We demonstrated the reaction between acrolein and dimercaprol in an abiotic condition by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Specifically, dimercaprol is able to bind to both the carbon double bond and aldehyde group of acrolein. Its acrolein scavenging capability was further demonstrated by in vitro results that showed that dimercaprol could significantly protect PC-12 cells from acrolein-mediated cell death in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, dimercaprol, when applied systemically through intraperitoneal injection, could significantly reduce acrolein contents in spinal cord tissue following a spinal cord contusion injury in rats, a condition known to have elevated acrolein concentration. Taken together, dimercaprol may be an effective acrolein scavenger and a viable candidate for acrolein detoxification. © 2017 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  13. Improved premises for cell factory development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, Karina Marie

    The sustainable manufacturing of medicines, materials and chemicals is enabled with biotechnology, and the key to the development of new processes, as well as improvement of existing ones, lies in our fundamental understanding of the biological systems we manipulate. Recombinant protein production...... is at the core of biotechnology and numerous molecular tools and bacterial strains have been developed over the past four decades for this purpose. Understanding of the genetic code and our ability to manipulate genetic material, paves the way for the microbial cell factory development that enables production......, and building a platform for enhanced expression of certain plant genes in bacteria. The relevance of the conducted research to the field of biotechnology is covered, as well as necessary scientific background and history. Specifically, the surprisingly minor effects of tRNA overexpression on the production...

  14. Can surgery improve neurological function in penetrating spinal injury? A review of the military and civilian literature and treatment recommendations for military neurosurgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimo, Paul; Ragel, Brian T; Rosner, Michael; Gluf, Wayne; McCafferty, Randall

    2010-05-01

    Penetrating spinal injury (PSI), although an infrequent injury in the civilian population, is not an infrequent injury in military conflicts. Throughout military history, the role of surgery in the treatment of PSI has been controversial. The US is currently involved in 2 military campaigns, the hallmark of both being the widespread use of various explosive devices. The authors reviewed the evidence for or against the use of decompressive laminectomy to treat PSI to provide a triservice (US Army, Navy, and Air Force) consensus and treatment recommendations for military neurosurgeons and spine surgeons. A US National Library of Medicine PubMed database search that identified all literature dealing with acute management of PSI from military conflicts and civilian urban trauma centers in the post-Vietnam War period was undertaken. Nineteen retrospective case series (11 military and 8 civilian) met the study criteria. Eleven military articles covered a 20-year time span that included 782 patients who suffered either gunshot or blast-related projectile wounds. Four papers included sufficient data that analyzed the effectiveness of surgery compared with nonoperative management, 6 papers concluded that surgery was of no benefit, 2 papers indicated that surgery did have a role, and 3 papers made no comment. Eight civilian articles covered a 9-year time span that included 653 patients with spinal gunshot wounds. Two articles lacked any comparative data because of treatment bias. Two papers concluded that decompressive laminectomy had a beneficial role, 1 paper favored the removal of intracanal bullets between T-12 and L-4, and 5 papers indicated that surgery was of no benefit. Based on the authors' military and civilian PubMed literature search, most of the evidence suggests that decompressive laminectomy does not improve neurological function in patients with PSI. However, there are serious methodological shortcomings in both literature groups. For this and other reasons

  15. Histopathological Defects in Intestine in Severe Spinal Muscular Atrophy Mice Are Improved by Systemic Antisense Oligonucleotide Treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palittiya Sintusek

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal (GI defects, including gastroesophageal reflux, constipation and delayed gastric emptying, are common in patients with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA. Similar GI dysmotility has been identified in mouse models with survival of motor neuron (SMN protein deficiency. We previously described vascular defects in skeletal muscle and spinal cord of SMA mice and we hypothesized that similar defects could be involved in the GI pathology observed in these mice. We therefore investigated the gross anatomical structure, enteric vasculature and neurons in the small intestine in a severe mouse model of SMA. We also assessed the therapeutic response of GI histopathology to systemic administration of morpholino antisense oligonucleotide (AON designed to increase SMN protein expression. Significant anatomical and histopathological abnormalities, with striking reduction of vascular density, overabundance of enteric neurons and increased macrophage infiltration, were detected in the small intestine in SMA mice. After systemic AON treatment in neonatal mice, all the abnormalities observed were significantly restored to near-normal levels. We conclude that the observed GI histopathological phenotypes and functional defects observed in these SMA mice are strongly linked to SMN deficiency which can be rescued by systemic administration of AON. This study on the histopathological changes in the gastrointestinal system in severe SMA mice provides further indication of the complex role that SMN plays in multiple tissues and suggests that at least in SMA mice restoration of SMN production in peripheral tissues is essential for optimal outcome.

  16. Histopathological Defects in Intestine in Severe Spinal Muscular Atrophy Mice Are Improved by Systemic Antisense Oligonucleotide Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sintusek, Palittiya; Catapano, Francesco; Angkathunkayul, Napat; Marrosu, Elena; Parson, Simon H.; Morgan, Jennifer E.; Muntoni, Francesco; Zhou, Haiyan

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) defects, including gastroesophageal reflux, constipation and delayed gastric emptying, are common in patients with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). Similar GI dysmotility has been identified in mouse models with survival of motor neuron (SMN) protein deficiency. We previously described vascular defects in skeletal muscle and spinal cord of SMA mice and we hypothesized that similar defects could be involved in the GI pathology observed in these mice. We therefore investigated the gross anatomical structure, enteric vasculature and neurons in the small intestine in a severe mouse model of SMA. We also assessed the therapeutic response of GI histopathology to systemic administration of morpholino antisense oligonucleotide (AON) designed to increase SMN protein expression. Significant anatomical and histopathological abnormalities, with striking reduction of vascular density, overabundance of enteric neurons and increased macrophage infiltration, were detected in the small intestine in SMA mice. After systemic AON treatment in neonatal mice, all the abnormalities observed were significantly restored to near-normal levels. We conclude that the observed GI histopathological phenotypes and functional defects observed in these SMA mice are strongly linked to SMN deficiency which can be rescued by systemic administration of AON. This study on the histopathological changes in the gastrointestinal system in severe SMA mice provides further indication of the complex role that SMN plays in multiple tissues and suggests that at least in SMA mice restoration of SMN production in peripheral tissues is essential for optimal outcome. PMID:27163330

  17. Neural Stem Cells (NSCs in 3D Collagen Scaffolds: developing pharmacologically monitored neuroimplants for Spinal Cord Injury (SCI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Kourgiantaki

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injury, a traumatic disease characterised by a massive degeneration of neural tissue, was recently targeted for neuroregenerative interventions. Our approach is the development of pharmacologically pulsed neuroimplants using 3D collagen scaffolds hosting NSCs. We aim to monitor the properties of NSCs ex vivo and in vivo, using synthetic small molecules with neuroprotective and neurogenic properties. Synthetic, highly lipophilic CNS bioavailable small molecules, synthesized by our group (microneurotrophins, bind to neurotrophins receptors (Gravanis et al, Science Signaling, 2012, Calogeropoulou et al., J Med Chem., 2009. BNN27 can specifically interact with TrkA and p75NTR receptors activating specific signalling pathways controlling neuronal cell survival and neurogenesis (Charalampopoulos et al, PNAS, 2004, Lazaridis et al., PLoS Biol., 2011. We are seeding embryonic and adult mouse NSC on collagen 3D scaffolds of different composition (collagen, chondroitin-6-sulphate and gelatin and construction (size of pores and stiffness, testing cell behaviour (survival, proliferation or differentiation in basal conditions or pulsed with neurotrophins and/or microneurotrophins. Using the knock in sox2-egfp mice strain and fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS analysis, we obtain NSCs cultures with a sox2-positive population more than 90% pure. We evaluate specific markers of proliferation (ki67 and/or differentiation (GFAP for glial cells, Tuj1 for mature neurons and O4 for oligodendrocytes: we are currently testing the possible effect of BNN27 on proliferation of cortical NSCs in 2D cultures (increased numbers of ki67 positive cells up to 12%. The composition and the structure of 3D scaffolds seem to play a significant functional role: scaffolds with a combined composition such as 50% collagen/50% gelatin and 92% collagen/8% chondroitin-6-sulphate support NSC survival since they sustain sox2 expression and propagate neurosphere formation

  18. Improvement of the local control of spinal chordomas treated by surgery and targeted irradiation (CyberKnife{sup R}) on hypoxic cells marked with {sup 18}F-FMiso; Amelioration du controle local des chordomes du rachis traites par chirurgie et une irradiation (CyberKnife{sup R}) ciblee sur les cellules hypoxiques marquees au {sup 18}F-FMiso

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mammar, H.; Kerrou, K.; Bondiau, P.Y.; Angellier, G.; Thariat, J.; Benezery, K.; Heroult, J.; Leysalle, A.; Gerard, J.P. [Centre Antoine-Lacassagne, Nice (France); Talbot, J.N. [Service de medecine nucleaire, Hopital Tenon, AP-HP, Paris (France)

    2011-10-15

    The authors report and comment the treatment of two women suffering from a recurring cervical spine chordoma. Each patient had a first PET (positron emission tomography) with {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose to assess the hyper-metabolic component and PET with {sup 18}F-FMiso to quantify the hypoxic component within the lesion. This last PET allows a non-invasive quantification of the hypoxic component which is potentially radio-resistant in cervical spine chordomas. It also allows an intelligent dose increase to improve the local control rate. Short communication

  19. Pain relief and functional improvement in patients with neuropathic pain associated with spinal cord injury: an exploratory analysis of pregabalin clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadosky, Alesia; Parsons, Bruce; Emir, Birol; Nieshoff, Edward C

    2016-01-01

    Characterizing relationships between pain relief and function can inform patient management decisions. This analysis explored graphically the relationship between pain relief and functional improvement in patients with neuropathic pain associated with spinal cord injury in two clinical trials of pregabalin. This was a post hoc analysis of two randomized, double-blind, clinical trials in patients who were treated with pregabalin (n=181) or placebo (n=172) for neuropathic pain associated with spinal cord injury. The bivariate relationship between percent pain relief and absolute change in the functional outcomes with placebo and pregabalin was evaluated graphically using scatter plots, and loess curves illustrated the extent of the relationship between pain and function. Linear trend analysis evaluated the statistical significance of these relationships using Initiative on Methods, Measurement, and Pain Assessment in Clinical Trials (IMMPACT)-based thresholds of pain reduction (Pain Inventory pain interference with function in one of the studies and the Medical Outcomes Study Sleep Scale (an 11-point Numeric Rating Scale) and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) for the pooled studies. Data ellipses showed a shift with pregabalin relative to placebo toward greater improvement with increasing pain relief for all outcome measures except HADS. Loess curves suggested a relationship between increased pain relief and improved function except for HADS, with the clearest relationship observed for sleep. Linear trend analysis showed significant relationships between pain and Medical Outcomes Study Sleep Scale (Ppain and function on the modified Brief Pain Inventory Interference Index and most individual items (Ppain reduction. Pregabalin resulted in shifts from placebo toward greater functional improvement with greater pain relief.

  20. Interventions Targeting Glucocorticoid-Krüppel-like Factor 15-Branched-Chain Amino Acid Signaling Improve Disease Phenotypes in Spinal Muscular Atrophy Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa M. Walter

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The circadian glucocorticoid-Krüppel-like factor 15-branched-chain amino acid (GC-KLF15-BCAA signaling pathway is a key regulatory axis in muscle, whose imbalance has wide-reaching effects on metabolic homeostasis. Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is a neuromuscular disorder also characterized by intrinsic muscle pathologies, metabolic abnormalities and disrupted sleep patterns, which can influence or be influenced by circadian regulatory networks that control behavioral and metabolic rhythms. We therefore set out to investigate the contribution of the GC-KLF15-BCAA pathway in SMA pathophysiology of Taiwanese Smn−/−;SMN2 and Smn2B/− mouse models. We thus uncover substantial dysregulation of GC-KLF15-BCAA diurnal rhythmicity in serum, skeletal muscle and metabolic tissues of SMA mice. Importantly, modulating the components of the GC-KLF15-BCAA pathway via pharmacological (prednisolone, genetic (muscle-specific Klf15 overexpression and dietary (BCAA supplementation interventions significantly improves disease phenotypes in SMA mice. Our study highlights the GC-KLF15-BCAA pathway as a contributor to SMA pathogenesis and provides several treatment avenues to alleviate peripheral manifestations of the disease. The therapeutic potential of targeting metabolic perturbations by diet and commercially available drugs could have a broader implementation across other neuromuscular and metabolic disorders characterized by altered GC-KLF15-BCAA signaling. Keywords: Spinal muscular atrophy, KLF15, Glucocorticoids, Branched-chain amino acids, Metabolism, Therapy

  1. New, Improved Version of the mCOP-PCR Screening System for Detection of Spinal Muscular Atrophy Gene (SMN1) Deletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinohara, Masakazu; Ar Rochmah, Mawaddah; Nakanishi, Kenta; Harahap, Nur Imma Fatimah; Niba, Emma Tabe Eko; Saito, Toshio; Saito, Kayoko; Takeuchi, Atsuko; Bouike, Yoshihiro; Nishio, Hisahide

    2017-09-07

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a frequent autosomal recessive disorder, characterized by lower motor neuron loss in the spinal cord. More than 95% of SMA patients show homozygous survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1) deletion. We previously developed a screening system for SMN1 deletion based on a modified competitive oligonucleotide priming-PCR (mCOP-PCR) technique. However, non-specific amplification products were observed with mCOP-PCR, which might lead to erroneous interpretation of the screening results. To establish an improved version of the mCOP-PCR screening system without non-specific amplification. DNA samples were assayed using a new version of the mCOP-PCR screening system. DNA samples had already been genotyped by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP), showing the presence or absence of SMN1 exon 7. The new mCOP-PCR method contained a targeted pre-amplification step of the region, including an SMN1-specific nucleotide, prior to the mCOP-PCR step. mCOP-PCR products were electrophoresed on agarose gels. No non-specific amplification products were detected in electrophoresis gels with the new mCOP-PCR screening system. An additional targeted pre-amplification step eliminated non-specific amplification from mCOP-PCR screening.

  2. Immediate Return to Ambulation and Improved Functional Capacity for Rehabilitation in Complex Regional Pain Syndrome following Early Implantation of a Spinal Cord Stimulation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon Jesse Goff

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS is a neuropathic pain condition that is characterized by vasomotor, sensory, sudomotor, and motor symptoms. Spinal cord stimulation (SCS has been successfully utilized for the treatment of pain refractory to conventional therapies. We present a case of a previously highly functioning 54-year-old female who developed a rarely reported case of idiopathic CRPS of the right ankle which spontaneously occurred four months after an uncomplicated anterior cervical disc fusion. This condition resulted in severe pain and functional impairment that was unresponsive to pharmacological management. The patient’s rehabilitation was severely stymied by her excruciating pain. However, with the initiation of spinal cord stimulation, her pain was adequately controlled allowing for progression to full unassisted ambulation, advancing functional capacity, and improving quality of life. This case report supports the concept that rapid progression to neuromodulation, rather than delays that occur due to attempts at serial sympathetic blocks, may better control symptoms leading allowing for a more meaningful recovery.

  3. New Strategy in Spinal Cord Repair with Cryofrozen Primary Cell Cultures in Model In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Margarita Gomez Bello

    2015-02-01

    The results as show evidence that when evaluating the locomotor recuperation, after a medullar section in rats through the implantation of OECs of cryopreserved cells combined with aFGF + FG. In addition, the conclusion it is potencial use in reparative phenomena in the injured medullar tissue but making further studies necessary before considering their use.

  4. Stem cells and biomaterials for the treatment of spinal cord injury

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Syková, Eva

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 110, Suppl.2 (2009), s. 151-151 ISSN 0022-3042. [Biennial Meeting of the International-Society-of-Neurochemistry/Asian-Pacific-Society-for-Neurochemistry /22./. 13.08.2009-29.08.2009, Busan] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390703 Keywords : Stem cells Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  5. Stem cells and biomaterials for the treatment of spinal cord injury

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Syková, Eva

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 5 (2008), s. 779-780 ISSN 1937-3341. [Annual Tissue-Engineering- and -Regenerative-Medicine-International-Society-European-Chapter Meeting. 22.06.2008-26.06.2008, Porto] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390703 Keywords : Stem cells Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  6. Stem Cells and Hydrogel Bridges for the Treatment of Acute and Chronic Spinal Cord Injury

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Syková, Eva; Jendelová, Pavla; Hejčl, Aleš; Kozubenko, Nataliya; Amemori, Takashi

    Roč. 19, č. 3 (366), s. 366 ISSN 0963-6897. [Annual Meeting of the American-Society-for-Neural-Therapy-and-Repair /17./. 29.04.2010-01.05.2010, Clearwater Beach] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390703 Keywords : stem cells * tissue engineering Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  7. Home-Based Virtual Reality-Augmented Training Improves Lower Limb Muscle Strength, Balance, and Functional Mobility following Chronic Incomplete Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villiger, Michael; Liviero, Jasmin; Awai, Lea; Stoop, Rahel; Pyk, Pawel; Clijsen, Ron; Curt, Armin; Eng, Kynan; Bolliger, Marc

    2017-01-01

    Key factors positively influencing rehabilitation and functional recovery after spinal cord injury (SCI) include training variety, intensive movement repetition, and motivating training tasks. Systems supporting these aspects may provide profound gains in rehabilitation, independent of the subject's treatment location. In the present study, we test the hypotheses that virtual reality (VR)-augmented training at home (i.e., unsupervised) is feasible with subjects with an incomplete SCI (iSCI) and that it improves motor functions such as lower limb muscle strength, balance, and functional mobility. In the study, 12 chronic iSCI subjects used a home-based, mobile version of a lower limb VR training system. The system included motivating training scenarios and combined action observation and execution. Virtual representations of the legs and feet were controlled via movement sensors. The subjects performed home-based training over 4 weeks, with 16-20 sessions of 30-45 min each. The outcome measures assessed were the Lower Extremity Motor Score (LEMS), Berg Balance Scale (BBS), Timed Up and Go (TUG), Spinal Cord Independence Measure mobility, Walking Index for Spinal Cord Injury II, and 10 m and 6 min walking tests. Two pre-treatment assessment time points were chosen for outcome stability: 4 weeks before treatment and immediately before treatment. At post-assessment (i.e., immediately after treatment), high motivation and positive changes were reported by the subjects (adapted Patients' Global Impression of Change). Significant improvements were shown in lower limb muscle strength (LEMS, P  = 0.008), balance (BBS, P  = 0.008), and functional mobility (TUG, P  = 0.007). At follow-up assessment (i.e., 2-3 months after treatment), functional mobility (TUG) remained significantly improved ( P  = 0.005) in contrast to the other outcome measures. In summary, unsupervised exercises at home with the VR training system led to beneficial functional

  8. Home-Based Virtual Reality-Augmented Training Improves Lower Limb Muscle Strength, Balance, and Functional Mobility following Chronic Incomplete Spinal Cord Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Villiger

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Key factors positively influencing rehabilitation and functional recovery after spinal cord injury (SCI include training variety, intensive movement repetition, and motivating training tasks. Systems supporting these aspects may provide profound gains in rehabilitation, independent of the subject’s treatment location. In the present study, we test the hypotheses that virtual reality (VR-augmented training at home (i.e., unsupervised is feasible with subjects with an incomplete SCI (iSCI and that it improves motor functions such as lower limb muscle strength, balance, and functional mobility. In the study, 12 chronic iSCI subjects used a home-based, mobile version of a lower limb VR training system. The system included motivating training scenarios and combined action observation and execution. Virtual representations of the legs and feet were controlled via movement sensors. The subjects performed home-based training over 4 weeks, with 16–20 sessions of 30–45 min each. The outcome measures assessed were the Lower Extremity Motor Score (LEMS, Berg Balance Scale (BBS, Timed Up and Go (TUG, Spinal Cord Independence Measure mobility, Walking Index for Spinal Cord Injury II, and 10 m and 6 min walking tests. Two pre-treatment assessment time points were chosen for outcome stability: 4 weeks before treatment and immediately before treatment. At post-assessment (i.e., immediately after treatment, high motivation and positive changes were reported by the subjects (adapted Patients’ Global Impression of Change. Significant improvements were shown in lower limb muscle strength (LEMS, P = 0.008, balance (BBS, P = 0.008, and functional mobility (TUG, P = 0.007. At follow-up assessment (i.e., 2–3 months after treatment, functional mobility (TUG remained significantly improved (P = 0.005 in contrast to the other outcome measures. In summary, unsupervised exercises at home with the VR training system led to beneficial

  9. The artificial somato-autonomic reflex arch does not improve bowel function in subjects with spinal cord injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Mikkel Mylius; Krogh, Klaus; Clemmensen, Dorte

    2015-01-01

    Study design: Prospective cohort study. Objective: Although introduced for neurogenic bladder dysfunction, it has been suggested that the artificial somato-autonomic reflex arch alleviates neurogenic bowel dysfunction (NBD). We aimed at evaluating the effects of the reflex arch on NBD. Setting......: Denmark. Methods: Ten subjects with supraconal spinal cord injury (SCI) (nine males, median age 46 years) had an anastomosis created between the ventral part of the fifth lumbar or first sacral nerve root and the ventral part of the second sacral nerve root. Standardized assessment of segmental colorectal...... sphincter pressures and rectal capacity did not change, and no change was seen in NBD score (median 13.5 (baseline) vs 12.5 (follow-up), P=0.51), St Marks fecal incontinence score (4.5 vs 5.0, P=0.36) and Cleveland constipation score (6.0 vs 8.0, P=0.75). Conclusions: The artificial somato-autonomic reflex...

  10. Biocompatible macroporous scaffolds can serve as stem cell carriers for the treatment of spinal cord injury

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jendelová, Pavla; Hejčl, Aleš; Amemori, Takashi; Lesný, Petr; Michálek, Jiří; Přádný, Martin; Syková, Eva

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 5 (2008), s. 704-704 ISSN 1937-3341. [Annual Tissue-Engineering- and -Regenerative-Medicine-International-Society-European-Chapter Meeting. 22.06.2008-26.06.2008, Porto] R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0538; GA ČR GA309/06/1246; GA MZd(CZ) 1A8697 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390703 Keywords : Stem Cell Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  11. Glia, stem cells and biomaterials - working together to repair spinal cord injury

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Syková, Eva

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 186, Supplement 1 (2006), s. 47-47 ISSN 1748-1708. [The German Society of Physiology The Federation of European Physiological Societies. 26.03.2006-29.03.2006, Mnichov] R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC554; GA MŠk 1M0538 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : Glia * Stem cells Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  12. New mounting improves solar-cell efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepard, N. F., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Method boosts output by about 20 percent by trapping and redirecting solar radiation without increasing module depth. Mounted solar-cell array is covered with internally reflecting plate. Plate is attached to each cell by transparent adhesive, and space between cells is covered with layer of diffusely reflecting material. Solar energy falling on space between cells is diffused and reflected internally by plate until it is reflected onto solar cell.

  13. Impact of Symptomatic Metastatic Spinal Cord Compression on Survival of Patients with Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Gustavo Telles; Bergmann, Anke; Thuler, Luiz Claudio Santos

    2017-12-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is one of the most common primary tumor sites among patients with metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC). This disorder is related to neurologic dysfunction and can reduce the quality of life, but the association between MSCC and death is unclear. The aim of this study was to analyze the impact of the occurrence of symptomatic MSCC on overall survival of patients with NSCLC. A cohort study was carried out involving 1112 patients with NSCLC who were enrolled between 2006 and 2014 in a single cancer center. Clinical and sociodemographic data were extracted from the physical and electronic records. Survival analysis of patients with NSCLC was conducted using the Kaplan-Meier method. A log-rank test was used to assess differences between survival curves. Cox proportional hazards regression analyses were carried out to quantify the relationship between the independent variable (MSCC) and the outcome (overall survival). During the study period, the incidence of MSCC was 4.1%. Patients who presented with MSCC were 1.43 times more likely to die than were those with no history of MSCC (hazard ratio, 1.43; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.03-2.00; P = 0.031). The median survival time was 8.04 months (95% CI, 6.13-9.96) for those who presented MSCC and 11.95 months (95% CI, 10.80-13.11) for those who did not presented MSCC during the course of disease (P = 0.002). MSCC is an important and independent predictor of NSCLC worse survival. This effect was not influenced by sociodemographic and clinical factors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Morphometry study on pre and post-hatching nerve cell bodies of lumbar spinal ganglia of Gallus domesticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio A. Ferraz de Carvalho

    1983-09-01

    Full Text Available A cytomorphometric study was performed in lumbar spinal ganglia neurons of Gallus domesticus on the 10th and 18th incubation days and 8th, 35th, 61st, and 120th post-hatching days. The absolute volume of nucleus and relative volume of cytoplasm were respectively estimated by the Bach² caryometric method and by point-counting volumetry, carried out in 0.5mm thick araldite sections. The relative volume, the surface-to-volume ratio and the total surface of RER, SER, mitochondria, dense bodies, Golgi complex and the relative volume of hyaloplasm inside and outside the Nissl bodies were estimated from electronmicrographs by the Weibel et al.58 method. The conclusions were: a there was an increase of the cell volume and a decrease of the nucleo-cytoplasmic ratio, particularly between the first two ages; b the relative volumes of RER and SER change inversely with respect to each other: the RER increases before hatching, decreasing progressively afterwards; the changes of relative volume of dense bodies are similar to those of the RER, and the mitochondria show relatively small variations concerning the same parameter; c the relative volume of hyaloplasm inside the Nissl bodies decreases while those outside increases; d the surface-to-volume ratio drops sharply for all organelles from the 10th to the 18th day of incubation; after hatching, a tendency to increase is observed; e the membrane surface-to-cytoplasmic volume ratio decreases for all organelles from the 10th to the 18th day of incubation; after hatching, this ratio increases slightly for mitochondria and Golgi complex, sharply for SER, dropping for dense bodies. The RER values alternate regularly.

  15. The loss-of-function disease-mutation G301R in the Na+/K+-ATPase α2 isoform decreases lesion volume and improves functional outcome after acute spinal cord injury in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellman, Ditte Gry; Isaksen, Toke Jost; Lund, Minna Christiansen; Dursun, Safinaz; Wirenfeldt, Martin; Jørgensen, Louise Helskov; Lykke-Hartmann, Karin; Lambertsen, Kate Lykke

    2017-09-08

    The Na + /K + -ATPases are transmembrane ion pumps important for maintenance of ion gradients across the plasma membrane that serve to support multiple cellular functions, such as membrane potentials, regulation of cellular volume and pH, and co-transport of signaling transmitters in all animal cells. The α 2 Na + /K + -ATPase subunit isoform is predominantly expressed in astrocytes, which us the sharp Na + -gradient maintained by the sodium pump necessary for astroglial metabolism. Prolonged ischemia induces an elevation of [Na + ] i , decreased ATP levels and intracellular pH owing to anaerobic metabolism and lactate accumulation. During ischemia, Na + /K + -ATPase-related functions will naturally increase the energy demand of the Na + /K + -ATPase ion pump. However, the role of the α 2 Na + /K + -ATPase in contusion injury to the spinal cord remains unknown. We used mice heterozygous mice for the loss-of-function disease-mutation G301R in the Atp1a2 gene (α 2 +/G301R ) to study the effect of reduced α 2 Na + /K + -ATPase expression in a moderate contusion spinal cord injury (SCI) model. We found that α 2 +/G301R mice display significantly improved functional recovery and decreased lesion volume compared to littermate controls (α 2 +/+ ) 7 days after SCI. The protein level of the α 1 isoform was significantly increased, in contrast to the α 3 isoform that significantly decreased 3 days after SCI in both α 2 +/G301R and α 2 +/+ mice. The level of the α 2 isoform was significantly decreased in α 2 +/G301R mice both under naïve conditions and 3 days after SCI compared to α 2 +/+ mice. We found no differences in astroglial aquaporin 4 levels and no changes in the expression of chemokines (CCL2, CCL5 and CXCL1) and cytokines (TNF, IL-6, IL-1β, IL-10 and IL-5) between genotypes, just as no apparent differences were observed in location and activation of CD45 and F4/80 positive microglia and infiltrating leukocytes. Our proof of concept study

  16. Transplantation of Predifferentiated Adipose-Derived Stromal Cells for the Treatment of Spinal Cord Injury

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Arboleda Toro, David; Forostyak, Serhiy; Jendelová, Pavla; Mareková, Dana; Amemori, Takashi; Pivoňková, Helena; Mašínová, Katarína; Syková, Eva

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 31, č. 7 (2011), s. 1113-1122 ISSN 0272-4340 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA305/09/0717; GA AV ČR IAA500390902 Grant - others:GA MŠk.(CZ) 1M0538; GA ČR(CZ) GD309/08/H079; GA ČR(CZ) GAP304/10/0320 Program:1M Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512; CEZ:AV0Z50390703 Keywords : Adipose tissue * Differentiation * Mesenchymal stromal cells Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 1.969, year: 2011

  17. The role of mesenchymal stromal cells in spinal cord injury, regenerative medicine and possible clinical applications

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Forostyak, Serhiy; Jendelová, Pavla; Syková, Eva

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 95, č. 12 (2013), s. 2257-2270 ISSN 0300-9084 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-00939S; GA ČR GAP304/10/0320; GA ČR(CZ) GAP304/11/0189; GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069; GA MŠk EE2.3.30.0018 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : stem cells * regeneration * clinical trials Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 3.123, year: 2013

  18. An effective strategy of magnetic stem cell delivery for spinal cord injury therapy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tukmachev, Dmitry; Lunov, Oleg; Zablotskyy, Vitaliy A.; Dejneka, Alexandr; Babič, Michal; Syková, Eva; Kubinová, Šárka

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 9 (2015), s. 3954-3958 ISSN 2040-3364 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP304/12/1370; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1309 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) M100101219 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 ; RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61389013 Keywords : mesenchymal stromal cells * iron - oxide nanoparticles * regenerative medicine * cerebrospinal-fluid * axon growth * recovery * repair * transplantation * promote * model Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics; BO - Biophysics (FZU-D); BO - Biophysics (UMCH-V) Impact factor: 7.760, year: 2015

  19. IGF-1 delivery to CNS attenuates motor neuron cell death but does not improve motor function in type III SMA mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Li-Kai; Chen, Yi-Chun; Cheng, Wei-Cheng; Ting, Chen-Hung; Dodge, James C; Hwu, Wuh-Liang; Cheng, Seng H; Passini, Marco A

    2012-01-01

    The efficacy of administering a recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector encoding human IGF-1 (AAV2/1-hIGF-1) into the deep cerebellar nucleus (DCN) of a type III SMA mouse model was evaluated. High levels of IGF-1 transcripts and protein were detected in the spinal cord at 2 months post-injection demonstrating that axonal connections between the cerebellum and spinal cord were able to act as conduits for the viral vector and protein to the spinal cord. Mice treated with AAV2/1-hIGF-1 and analyzed 8 months later showed changes in endogenous Bax and Bcl-xl levels in spinal cord motor neurons that were consistent with IGF-1-mediated anti-apoptotic effects on motor neurons. However, although AAV2/1-hIGF-1 treatment reduced the extent of motor neuron cell death, the majority of rescued motor neurons were non-functional, as they lacked axons that innervated the muscles. Furthermore, treated SMA mice exhibited abnormal muscle fibers, aberrant neuromuscular junction structure, and impaired performance on motor function tests. These data indicate that although CNS-directed expression of IGF-1 could reduce motor neuron cell death, this did not translate to improvements in motor function in an adult mouse model of type III SMA. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Asymmetrical trunk movement during walking improved to normal range at 3 months after corrective posterior spinal fusion in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong-Chung, Daniel A C F; Schimmel, Janneke J P; de Kleuver, Marinus; Keijsers, Noël L W

    2018-02-01

    To investigate the effects of posterior spinal fusion (PSF) and curve type on upper body movements in Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis (AIS) patients during gait. Twenty-four girls (12-18 years) with AIS underwent PSF. 3D-Gait-analyses were performed preoperatively, at 3 months and 1 year postoperatively. Mean position (0° represents symmetry) and range of motion (ROM) of the trunk (thorax-relative-to-pelvis) in all planes were assessed. Lower body kinematics and spatiotemporal parameters were also evaluated. Mean trunk position improved from 7.0° to 2.9° in transversal plane and from 5.0° to - 0.8° in frontal plane at 3 months postoperative (p maintenance of normal gait can explain the rapid recovery and well functioning in daily life of AIS patients, despite undergoing a fusion of large parts of their spine.

  1. Acute spinal cord injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, M.; Izunaga, H.; Sato, R.; Shinzato, I.; Korogi, Y.; Yamashita, Y.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on sequential MR images and neurologic findings that were correlated in 40 acute spinal cord injuries. Within 1 week after injury, frequent initial MR changes appeared isointense on both T1- and T2-weighted images and isointense on T1- and hyperintense on T2-weighted images. After 2 months, hypointensity appeared on T1-weighted images and hyperintensity persisted or appeared on T2-weighted images. Clinical improvements were observed in patients with isointensity on both T1- and T2-weighted images at the initial examination. A larger area of hyperintensity on subsequent T2-weighted images was correlated with no neurologic improvement. MR findings were good indicators of the spinal cord injury

  2. Performance improvement of silicon solar cells by nanoporous silicon coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dzhafarov T. D.

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper the method is shown to improve the photovoltaic parameters of screen-printed silicon solar cells by nanoporous silicon film formation on the frontal surface of the cell using the electrochemical etching. The possible mechanisms responsible for observed improvement of silicon solar cell performance are discussed.

  3. Species-specific control of cellular proliferation and the impact of large animal models for the use of olfactory ensheathing cells and Schwann cells in spinal cord repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wewetzer, Konstantin; Radtke, Christine; Kocsis, Jeffery; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang

    2011-05-01

    Autologous transplantation of olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) and Schwann cells (SCs) is considered a promising option to promote axonal regrowth and remyelination after spinal cord injury in humans. However, if the experimental data from the rodent model can be directly extrapolated to humans, as widely believed, remains to be established. While limitations of the rodent system have recently been discussed with regard to the distinct organization of the motor systems, the question whether OECs and SCs may display species-specific properties has not been fully addressed. Prompted by recent studies on canine and porcine glia, we performed a detailed analysis of the in vitro and in vivo properties of OECs and SCs and show that rodent but not human, monkey, porcine, and canine glia require mitogens for in vitro expansion, display a complex response to elevated intracellular cAMP, and undergo spontaneous immortalization upon prolonged mitogen stimulation. These data indicate fundamental inter-species differences of the control of cellular proliferation. Whether OECs and SCs from large animals and humans share growth-promoting in vivo properties with their rodent counterpart is not yet clear. Autologous implantation studies in humans did not reveal adverse effects of cell transplantation so far. However, in vivo studies of large animal or human glia and rodent recipients mainly focused on the remyelinating potential of the transplanted cells. Thus, further experimental in vivo studies in large animals are essential to fully define the axonal growth-promoting potential of OECs and SCs. Based on the homology of the in vitro growth control between porcine, canine and human glia, it is concluded that these species may serve as valuable translational models for scaling up human procedures. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Understanding olfactory ensheathing glia and their prospect for nervous system repair. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  4. Tamoxifen and estradiol improved locomotor function and increased spared tissue in rats after spinal cord injury: their antioxidant effect and role of estrogen receptor alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosquera, Laurivette; Colón, Jennifer M; Santiago, José M; Torrado, Aranza I; Meléndez, Margarita; Segarra, Annabell C; Rodríguez-Orengo, José F; Miranda, Jorge D

    2014-05-02

    17β-Estradiol is a multi-active steroid that imparts neuroprotection via diverse mechanisms of action. However, its role as a neuroprotective agent after spinal cord injury (SCI), or the involvement of the estrogen receptor-alpha (ER-α) in locomotor recovery, is still a subject of much debate. In this study, we evaluated the effects of estradiol and of Tamoxifen (an estrogen receptor mixed agonist/antagonist) on locomotor recovery following SCI. To control estradiol cyclical variability, ovariectomized female rats received empty or estradiol filled implants, prior to a moderate contusion to the spinal cord. Estradiol improved locomotor function at 7, 14, 21, and 28 days post injury (DPI), when compared to control groups (measured with the BBB open field test). This effect was ER-α mediated, because functional recovery was blocked with an ER-α antagonist. We also observed that ER-α was up-regulated after SCI. Long-term treatment (28 DPI) with estradiol and Tamoxifen reduced the extent of the lesion cavity, an effect also mediated by ER-α. The antioxidant effects of estradiol were seen acutely at 2 DPI but not at 28 DPI, and this acute effect was not receptor mediated. Rats treated with Tamoxifen recovered some locomotor activity at 21 and 28 DPI, which could be related to the antioxidant protection seen at these time points. These results show that estradiol improves functional outcome, and these protective effects are mediated by the ER-α dependent and independent-mechanisms. Tamoxifen׳s effects during late stages of SCI support the use of this drug as a long-term alternative treatment for this condition. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. CRISPR-Mediated Genomic Deletion of Sox2 in the Axolotl Shows a Requirement in Spinal Cord Neural Stem Cell Amplification during Tail Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Feng Fei

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The salamander is the only tetrapod that functionally regenerates all cell types of the limb and spinal cord (SC and thus represents an important regeneration model, but the lack of gene-knockout technology has limited molecular analysis. We compared transcriptional activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs in the knockout of three loci in the axolotl and find that CRISPRs show highly penetrant knockout with less toxic effects compared to TALENs. Deletion of Sox2 in up to 100% of cells yielded viable F0 larvae with normal SC organization and ependymoglial cell marker expression such as GFAP and ZO-1. However, upon tail amputation, neural stem cell proliferation was inhibited, resulting in spinal-cord-specific regeneration failure. In contrast, the mesodermal blastema formed normally. Sox3 expression during development, but not regeneration, most likely allowed embryonic survival and the regeneration-specific phenotype. This analysis represents the first tissue-specific regeneration phenotype from the genomic deletion of a gene in the axolotl.

  6. Effects of Transplanted Heparin-Poloxamer Hydrogel Combining Dental Pulp Stem Cells and bFGF on Spinal Cord Injury Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lihua Luo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injury (SCI is one of serious traumatic diseases of the central nervous system and has no effective treatment because of its complicated pathophysiology. Tissue engineering strategy which contains scaffolds, cells, and growth factors can provide a promising treatment for SCI. Hydrogel that has 3D network structure and biomimetic microenvironment can support cellular growth and embed biological macromolecules for sustaining release. Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs, derived from cranial neural crest, possess mesenchymal stem cell (MSC characteristics and have an ability to provide neuroprotective and neurotrophic properties for SCI treatment. Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF is able to promote cell survival and proliferation and also has beneficial effect on neural regeneration and functional recovery after SCI. Herein, a thermosensitive heparin-poloxamer (HP hydrogel containing DPSCs and bFGF was prepared, and the effects of HP-bFGF-DPSCs on neuron restoration after SCI were evaluated by functional recovery tests, western blotting, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, histology evaluation, and immunohistochemistry. The results suggested that transplanted HP hydrogel containing DPSCs and bFGF had a significant impact on spinal cord repair and regeneration and may provide a promising strategy for neuron repair, functional recovery, and tissue regeneration after SCI.

  7. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... spinal cord injury? play_arrow What kind of surgery is common after a spinal cord injury? play_ ... How soon after a spinal cord injury should surgery be performed? play_arrow Is it common to ...

  8. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... L Sarah Harrison, OT Anne Bryden, OT The Role of the Social Worker after Spinal Cord Injury ... a spinal cord injury important? play_arrow What role does “compression” play in a spinal cord injury? ...

  9. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cord Injury Diane M. Rowles, MS, NP How Family Life Changes After Spinal Cord Injury Nancy Rosenberg, ... Children with Spinal Cord Injury Patricia Mucia, RN Family Life After Pediatric Spinal Injury Dawn Sheaffer, MSW ...

  10. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics Spinal Cord Injury ... Jennifer Piatt, PhD David Chen, MD Read Bio Medical Director, Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Program, Rehabilitation Institute ...

  11. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics Spinal Cord Injury 101 ... arrow What is the “Spinal Cord Injury Model Systems” program? play_arrow What are the most promising ...

  12. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics Spinal Cord Injury 101 Adult Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 David ...

  13. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics Spinal Cord Injury 101 Adult Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 ...

  14. Spinal Cord Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your spinal cord is a bundle of nerves that runs down the middle of your back. It carries signals back ... of the spine, this can also injure the spinal cord. Other spinal cord problems include Tumors Infections such ...

  15. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Spinal Cord Injury 101 Lawrence Vogel, MD The Basics of Pediatric SCI Rehabilitation Sara Klaas, MSW Transitions for Children with Spinal Cord Injury Patricia Mucia, RN Family Life After Pediatric Spinal Injury Dawn Sheaffer, MSW Rehabilitation ...

  16. Improved cell for water-vapor electrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aylward, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    Continuous-flow electrolytic cells decompose water vapor in steam and room air into hydrogen and oxygen. Sintered iridium oxide catalytic anode coating yields dissociation rates hundredfold greater than those obtained using platinum black. Cell consists of two mirror-image cells, with dual cathode sandwiched between two anodes. Gas traverses serpentine channels within cell and is dissociated at anode. Oxygen mingles with gas stream, while hydrogen migrates through porous matrix and is liberated as gas at cathode.

  17. Highly efficient magnetic targeting of mesenchymal stem cells in spinal cord injury

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vaněček, Václav; Zablotskyy, Vitaliy A.; Forostyak, Serhiy; Růžička, Jiří; Herynek, V.; Babič, Michal; Jendelová, Pavla; Kubinová, Šárka; Dejneka, Alexandr; Syková, Eva

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 7, 16 Jul (2012), s. 3719-3730 E-ISSN 1178-2013 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP304/12/1370; GA ČR GAP304/11/0731; GA ČR(CZ) GAP304/11/0189; GA ČR GAP304/11/0653; GA AV ČR IAA500390902 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390703; CEZ:AV0Z10100522; CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : nanoparticles * mesenchymal stem cells * magnetic targeting Subject RIV: FH - Neurology; BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism (FZU-D); FH - Neurology (UMCH-V) Impact factor: 3.463, year: 2012

  18. Synaptic plasticity and sensory-motor improvement following fibrin sealant dorsal root reimplantation and mononuclear cell therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benitez, Suzana U.; Barbizan, Roberta; Spejo, Aline B.; Ferreira, Rui S.; Barraviera, Benedito; Góes, Alfredo M.; de Oliveira, Alexandre L. R.

    2014-01-01

    Root lesions may affect both dorsal and ventral roots. However, due to the possibility of generating further inflammation and neuropathic pain, surgical procedures do not prioritize the repair of the afferent component. The loss of such sensorial input directly disturbs the spinal circuits thus affecting the functionality of the injuried limb. The present study evaluated the motor and sensory improvement following dorsal root reimplantation with fibrin sealant (FS) plus bone marrow mononuclear cells (MC) after dorsal rhizotomy. MC were used to enhance the repair process. We also analyzed changes in the glial response and synaptic circuits within the spinal cord. Female Lewis rats (6–8 weeks old) were divided in three groups: rhizotomy (RZ group), rhizotomy repaired with FS (RZ+FS group) and rhizotomy repaired with FS and MC (RZ+FS+MC group). The behavioral tests electronic von-Frey and Walking track test were carried out. For immunohistochemistry we used markers to detect different synapse profiles as well as glial reaction. The behavioral results showed a significant decrease in sensory and motor function after lesion. The reimplantation decreased glial reaction and improved synaptic plasticity of afferent inputs. Cell therapy further enhanced the rewiring process. In addition, both reimplanted groups presented twice as much motor control compared to the non-treated group. In conclusion, the reimplantation with FS and MC is efficient and may be considered an approach to improve sensory-motor recovery following dorsal rhizotomy. PMID:25249946

  19. Evaluation of cell binding peptide (p15) with silk fibre enhanced hydroxyappatite bone substitute for posterolateral spinal fusion in sheep

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsen, M.; Jespersen, Stig; Overgaard, Søren

    2015-01-01

    Background: Spinal fusion is indicated in the surgical management of various spinal disorders. To ensure stabile fusion, bone graft materials are essential. Traditionally allo- or autograft has been used, but both are associated with limitations. Synthetic bone graft materials that reassemble today......: In this study, we compared fusion rates between silk fibre enhanced anorganic bovine derived hydroxyapatite matrix (ABM) with and without P15 peptide coating in uninstrumented PLF in a preclinical setting. Study design: Randomised prospective study in sheep. Method/materials: Twelve Tex/got sheep underwent open...

  20. Spinal cord contusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Gong; Wang, Jian; Wang, Yazhou; Zhao, Xianghui

    2014-04-15

    Spinal cord injury is a major cause of disability with devastating neurological outcomes and limited therapeutic opportunities, even though there are thousands of publications on spinal cord injury annually. There are two major types of spinal cord injury, transaction of the spinal cord and spinal cord contusion. Both can theoretically be treated, but there is no well documented treatment in human being. As for spinal cord contusion, we have developed an operation with fabulous result.

  1. Assessing attitudes toward spinal immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouland, Andrew J; Jenkins, J Lee; Levy, Matthew J

    2013-10-01

    Prospective studies have improved knowledge of prehospital spinal immobilization. The opinion of Emergency Medical Services (EMS) providers regarding spinal immobilization is unknown, as is their knowledge of recent research advances. To examine the attitudes, knowledge, and comfort of prehospital and Emergency Department (ED) EMS providers regarding spinal immobilization performed under a non-selective protocol. An online survey was conducted from May to July of 2011. Participants were drawn from the Howard County Department of Fire and Rescue Services and the Howard County General Hospital ED. The survey included multiple choice questions and responses on a modified Likert scale. Correlation analysis and descriptive data were used to analyze results. Comfort using the Kendrick Extrication Device was low among ED providers. Experienced providers were more likely to indicate comfort using this device. Respondents often believed that spinal immobilization is appropriate in the management of penetrating trauma to the chest and abdomen. Reported use of padding decreased along with the frequency with which providers practice and encounter immobilized patients. Respondents often indicated that they perform spinal immobilization due solely to mechanism of injury. Providers who feel as if spinal immobilization is often performed unnecessarily were more likely to agree that immobilization causes an unnecessary delay in patient care. The results demonstrate the need for improved EMS education in the use of the Kendrick Extrication Device, backboard padding, and spinal immobilization in the management of penetrating trauma. The attitudes highlighted in this study are relevant to the implementation of a selective spinal immobilization protocol. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Sitting Tai Chi Improves the Balance Control and Muscle Strength of Community-Dwelling Persons with Spinal Cord Injuries: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William W. N. Tsang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To investigate the effects of sitting Tai Chi on muscle strength, balance control, and quality of life (QOL among survivors with spinal cord injuries (SCI. Methods. Eleven SCI survivors participated in the sitting Tai Chi training (90 minutes/session, 2 times/week for 12 weeks and eight SCI survivors acted as controls. Dynamic sitting balance was evaluated using limits of stability test and a sequential weight shifting test in sitting. Handgrip strength was also tested using a hand-held dynamometer. QOL was measured using the World Health Organization’s Quality of Life Scale. Results. Tai Chi practitioners achieved significant improvements in their reaction time (P=0.042; maximum excursion (P=0.016; and directional control (P=0.025 in the limits of stability test after training. In the sequential weight shifting test, they significantly improved their total time to sequentially hit the 12 targets (P=0.035. Significant improvement in handgrip strength was also found among the Tai Chi practitioners (P=0.049. However, no significant within and between-group differences were found in the QOL outcomes (P>0.05. Conclusions. Twelve weeks of sitting Tai Chi training could improve the dynamic sitting balance and handgrip strength, but not QOL, of the SCI survivors.

  3. Conditionally immortalized stem cell lines from human spinal cord retain regional identity and generate functional V2a interneurons and motorneurons

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cocks, G.; Romanyuk, Nataliya; Amemori, Takashi; Jendelová, Pavla; Forostyak, Oksana; Jeffries, A. R.; Perfect, L.; Thuret, S.; Dayanithi, Govindan; Syková, Eva; Price, J.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 3 (2013), s. 69 ISSN 1757-6512 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA500390902; GA ČR GAP304/11/2373; GA ČR GA13-00939S; GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390703 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : neural stem cells * spinal cord * motoneurons Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 4.634, year: 2013

  4. Co-transplantation of olfactory ensheathing glia and mesenchymal stromal cells does not have synergistic effects after spinal cord injury in the rat

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Amemori, Takashi; Jendelová, Pavla; Růžičková, Kateřina; Arboleda Toro, David; Syková, Eva

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 2 (2010), s. 212-225 ISSN 1465-3249 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA500390902; GA ČR GA309/06/1246; GA MŠk(CZ) LC554 Grant - others:GA MŠk.(CZ) 1M0538; GA MZd(CZ) 1A8697 Program:1M Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390703 Keywords : mesemchymal stromal cells * olfactory ensheathing glia * spinal cord injury Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 2.925, year: 2010

  5. Bacterial cells with improved tolerance to isobutyric acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial cells genetically modified to improve their tolerance to certain commodity chemicals, such as isobutyric acid and related compounds, and methods of preparing and using such bacterial cells for production of isobutyric acid and related compounds.......Bacterial cells genetically modified to improve their tolerance to certain commodity chemicals, such as isobutyric acid and related compounds, and methods of preparing and using such bacterial cells for production of isobutyric acid and related compounds....

  6. Modulation of Invading and Resident Inflammatory Cell Activation as a Novel Way to Mitigate Spinal Cord Injury Associated Neuropathic Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    shown by the FDA in the determination of its full range of therapeutic benefits. Tlmeline and Cost Activities Aim 1 Effect of CBD on SCI- NP ...the non-psychoactive cannabinoid cannabidiol (CBD) on spinal cord injury neuropathic pain (SCI- NP ) and associated lnllammation. Changes in thermal and...1 4. Impact ........................................................................... 13 5. Changes/ Problems

  7. Dietary omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids improve the neurolipidome and restore the DHA status while promoting functional recovery after experimental spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, Johnny D; Cordero, Kathia; Llán, Miguel S; De Leon, Marino

    2013-05-15

    Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFAs) confer multiple health benefits and decrease the risk of neurological disorders. Studies are needed, however, to identify promising cellular targets and to assess their prophylactic value against neurodegeneration. The present study (1) examined the efficacy of a preventive diet enriched with ω-3 PUFAs to reduce dysfunction in a well-established spinal cord injury (SCI) animal model and (2) used a novel metabolomics data analysis to identify potential neurolipidomic targets. Rats were fed with either control chow or chow enriched with ω-3 PUFAs (750 mg/kg/day) for 8 weeks before being subjected to a sham or a contusion SCI operation. We report new evidence showing that rats subjected to SCI after being pre-treated with a diet enriched with ω-3 PUFAs exhibit significantly better functional outcomes. Pre-treated animals exhibited lower sensory deficits, autonomic bladder recovery, and early improvements in locomotion that persisted for at least 8 weeks after trauma. We found that SCI triggers a robust alteration in the cord PUFA neurolipidome, which was characterized by a marked docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) deficiency. This DHA deficiency was associated with dysfunction and corrected with the ω-3 PUFA-enriched diet. Multivariate data analyses revealed that the spinal cord of animals consuming the ω-3 PUFA-enriched diet had a fundamentally distinct neurolipidome, particularly increasing the levels of essential and long chain ω-3 fatty acids and lysolipids at the expense of ω-6 fatty acids and its metabolites. Altogether, dietary ω-3 PUFAs prophylaxis confers resiliency to SCI mediated, at least in part, by generating a neuroprotective and restorative neurolipidome.

  8. Dietary Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Improve the Neurolipidome and Restore the DHA Status while Promoting Functional Recovery after Experimental Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, Johnny D.; Cordero, Kathia; llán, Miguel S.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFAs) confer multiple health benefits and decrease the risk of neurological disorders. Studies are needed, however, to identify promising cellular targets and to assess their prophylactic value against neurodegeneration. The present study (1) examined the efficacy of a preventive diet enriched with ω-3 PUFAs to reduce dysfunction in a well-established spinal cord injury (SCI) animal model and (2) used a novel metabolomics data analysis to identify potential neurolipidomic targets. Rats were fed with either control chow or chow enriched with ω-3 PUFAs (750 mg/kg/day) for 8 weeks before being subjected to a sham or a contusion SCI operation. We report new evidence showing that rats subjected to SCI after being pre-treated with a diet enriched with ω-3 PUFAs exhibit significantly better functional outcomes. Pre-treated animals exhibited lower sensory deficits, autonomic bladder recovery, and early improvements in locomotion that persisted for at least 8 weeks after trauma. We found that SCI triggers a robust alteration in the cord PUFA neurolipidome, which was characterized by a marked docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) deficiency. This DHA deficiency was associated with dysfunction and corrected with the ω-3 PUFA-enriched diet. Multivariate data analyses revealed that the spinal cord of animals consuming the ω-3 PUFA-enriched diet had a fundamentally distinct neurolipidome, particularly increasing the levels of essential and long chain ω-3 fatty acids and lysolipids at the expense of ω-6 fatty acids and its metabolites. Altogether, dietary ω-3 PUFAs prophylaxis confers resiliency to SCI mediated, at least in part, by generating a neuroprotective and restorative neurolipidome. PMID:23294084

  9. Characterization and therapeutic evaluation of a Nestin⁺ CNP⁺ NG2⁺ cell population on mouse spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rui; Zhang, Si; Yang, Haijie; Ju, Peijun; Xia, Yinyan; Shi, Yu; Lim, Tse Hui; Lim, Alvin St; Liang, Fengyi; Feng, Zhiwei

    2015-07-01

    The NG2 chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan-expressing neural cells (NG2 cells) have originally been considered as oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs). However, recent findings on their diverse functions and lineage heterogeneity demonstrated that the NG2 cells contain various sub-populations whose concrete features and therapeutic potential yet remained elucidated. In the present study, we characterized a Nestin(+) 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (CNP)(+) NG2(+) subpopulation from embryonic rat cerebral cortex. The Nestin(+) CNP(+) NG2(+) cells exhibited remarkable progenitor characteristics. Having been immortalized by human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), the life span of Nestin(+) CNP(+) NG2(+) cells was extended to 230 population doublings (PDs). With immortalized NG2 cells, we demonstrated their differentiation capacities to oligodendrocytes, astrocytes and neurons. Furthermore, transplanted into injured spinal cord of a mouse model, they were able to promote remyelination and neuronal regeneration, thereby enhancing the functional recovery. Our findings suggest that the Nestin(+) CNP(+) NG2(+) progenitor cells could be a good alternative cell source of cell therapy for neurological disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Anatomy of the Spinal Meninges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakka, Laurent; Gabrillargues, Jean; Coll, Guillaume

    2016-06-01

    The spinal meninges have received less attention than the cranial meninges in the literature, although several points remain debatable and poorly understood, like their phylogenesis, their development, and their interactions with the spinal cord. Their constancy among the chordates shows their crucial importance in central nervous system homeostasis and suggests a role far beyond mechanical protection of the neuraxis. This work provides an extensive study of the spinal meninges, from an overview of their phylogenesis and embryology to a descriptive and topographic anatomy with clinical implications. It examines their involvement in spinal cord development, functioning, and repair. This work is a review of the literature using PubMed as a search engine on Medline. The stages followed by the meninges along the phylogenesis could not be easily compared with their development in vertebrates for methodological aspects and convergence processes throughout evolution. The distinction between arachnoid and pia mater appeared controversial. Several points of descriptive anatomy remain debatable: the functional organization of the arterial network, and the venous and lymphatic drainages, considered differently by classical anatomic and neuroradiological approaches. Spinal meninges are involved in neurodevelopment and neurorepair producing neural stem cells and morphogens, in cerebrospinal fluid dynamics and neuraxis functioning by the synthesis of active molecules, and the elimination of waste products of central nervous system metabolism. The spinal meninges should be considered as dynamic functional formations evolving over a lifetime, with ultrastructural features and functional interactions with the neuraxis remaining not fully understood.

  11. Improved fuel-cell-type hydrogen sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudek, F. P.; Rutkowski, M. D.

    1968-01-01

    Modified hydrogen sensor replaces oxygen cathode with a cathode consisting of a sealed paste of gold hydroxide and a pure gold current collector. The net reaction which occurs during cell operation is the reduction of the gold hydroxide to gold and water, with a half-cell potential of 1.4 volts.

  12. Multispectral fingerprinting for improved in vivo cell dynamics analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cooper Cameron HJ

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tracing cell dynamics in the embryo becomes tremendously difficult when cell trajectories cross in space and time and tissue density obscure individual cell borders. Here, we used the chick neural crest (NC as a model to test multicolor cell labeling and multispectral confocal imaging strategies to overcome these roadblocks. Results We found that multicolor nuclear cell labeling and multispectral imaging led to improved resolution of in vivo NC cell identification by providing a unique spectral identity for each cell. NC cell spectral identity allowed for more accurate cell tracking and was consistent during short term time-lapse imaging sessions. Computer model simulations predicted significantly better object counting for increasing cell densities in 3-color compared to 1-color nuclear cell labeling. To better resolve cell contacts, we show that a combination of 2-color membrane and 1-color nuclear cell labeling dramatically improved the semi-automated analysis of NC cell interactions, yet preserved the ability to track cell movements. We also found channel versus lambda scanning of multicolor labeled embryos significantly reduced the time and effort of image acquisition and analysis of large 3D volume data sets. Conclusions Our results reveal that multicolor cell labeling and multispectral imaging provide a cellular fingerprint that may uniquely determine a cell's position within the embryo. Together, these methods offer a spectral toolbox to resolve in vivo cell dynamics in unprecedented detail.

  13. An improved hydrothermal diamond anvil cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiankang; Bassett, W. A.; Chou, I.-Ming; Ding, Xin; Li, Shenghu; Wang, Xinyan

    2016-05-01

    A new type of HDAC-V hydrothermal diamond anvil cell (HDAC-VT) has been designed to meet the demands of X-ray research including X-Ray Fluorescence, X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy, and small angle X-ray scattering. The earlier version of HDAC-V that offered a large rectangular solid angle used two posts and two driver screws on both sides of a rectangular body. The new version HDAC-VT in a triangular shape has two alternative guide systems, either three posts inserted into bushings suitable for small anvil faces or linear ball bearings suitable for large anvil faces. The HDAC-VT having three driver screws offers the advantage of greater control and stability even though it sacrifices some of the size of solid angle. The greater control allows better sealing of samples, while greater stability results in longer survival for anvils and ceramic parts. This improved design retains several beneficial features of the original HDAC-V as well. These include the small collar that surrounds the heater and sample chamber forming an Ar + H2 gas chamber to protect diamonds and their heating parts from being oxidized. Three linear ball bearings, when used, fit to the three posts prevent seizing that can result from deterioration of lubricant at high temperatures. Positioning the posts and bearings outside of the gas chamber as in HDAC-V also prevents seizing and possible deformation due to overheating. In order to control the heating rate precisely with computer software, we use Linkam T95 and have replaced the Linkam 1400XY heating stage with the HDAC-VT allowing the HDAC to be heated to 950 °C at a rate from 0.01 °C/min to 50 °C/min. We have used the HDAC-VT and Linkam T95 to observe in situ nucleation and growth of zabuyelite in aqueous fluid and to homogenize melt inclusions in quartz from three porphyry deposits in Shanxi, China.

  14. Improved Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Stack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Mahlon S.; Ramsey, John C.

    2005-03-08

    A stack of direct methanol fuel cells exhibiting a circular footprint. A cathode and anode manifold, tie-bolt penetrations and tie-bolts are located within the circular footprint. Each fuel cell uses two graphite-based plates. One plate includes a cathode active area that is defined by serpentine channels connecting the inlet and outlet cathode manifold. The other plate includes an anode active area defined by serpentine channels connecting the inlet and outlet of the anode manifold, where the serpentine channels of the anode are orthogonal to the serpentine channels of the cathode. Located between the two plates is the fuel cell active region.

  15. Improve T Cell Therapy in Neuroblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    relapsed lymphoma following genetic modi - fi cation of tumor-antigen presenting cells and T-lymphocyte transfer. Blood 110:2838–2845 4. Heslop HE et...CD4þCD25þFOXP3þ regulatory T cells of both healthy subjects and type 1 diabetic patients. J Immunol 2006;177:8338–47. 32. HeslopHE, SlobodKS,PuleMA

  16. Improve T Cell Therapy in Neuroblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    bioluminescence was then measured overtime. The graph is representative of one of 4 experiments using CMV-CTLs from 4 donors. Panel E. Kaplan-Meier...whole-cell vaccine expressing the iC9 gene and labeled with an enhanced firefly luciferase. Tumor growth was measured by in vivo imaging. Panel E...down regulation in LTE -T cells is not caused by specific culture conditions. T lymphocytes were activated with immobilized OKT3 (1 μg ml) and

  17. Polymeric implant of methylprednisolone for spinal injury ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Polymeric implant of methylprednisolone for spinal injury: preparation and characterization. Bo Yin, Jian-Jun Ji, Ming Yang. Abstract. Purpose: To improve the effectiveness and reduce the systemic side effects of methylprednisolone in traumatic spinal injuries, its polymeric implants were prepared using chitosan and sodium ...

  18. The mechanism of Naringin-enhanced remyelination after spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Rong

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Our previous study revealed that intragastric administration of naringin improved remyelination in rats with spinal cord injury and promoted the recovery of neurological function of the injured spinal cord. This study sought to reveal the mechanisms by which naringin improves oligodendrocyte precursor cell differentiation and maturation, and promotes remyelination. Spinal cord injury was induced in rats by the weight-drop method. Naringin was intragastrically administered daily (20, 40 mg/kg for 4 weeks after spinal cord injury induction. Behavioral assessment, histopathological staining, immunofluorescence spectroscopy, ultrastructural analysis and biochemical assays were employed. Naringin treatment remarkably mitigated demyelination in the white matter, increased the quality of myelinated nerve fibers and myelin sheath thickness, promoted oligodendrocyte precursor cell differentiation by upregulating the expression of NKx2.2 and 2′3′-cyclic nucleotide 3′-phosphodiesterase, and inhibited β-catenin expression and glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β phosphorylation. These findings indicate that naringin treatment regulates oligodendrocyte precursor cell differentiation and promotes remyelination after spinal cord injury through the β-catenin/GSK-3β signaling pathway.

  19. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Abuse and Spinal Cord Injury Allen Heinemann, PhD How Peer Counseling Works Julie Gassaway, MS, RN Pediatric Injuries Pediatric Spinal ... What is a spinal cord injury? play_arrow How does the spinal cord work? play_arrow Why is the level of a ...

  20. VEGF improves survival of mesenchymal stem cells in infarcted hearts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pons, Jennifer; Huang Yu; Arakawa-Hoyt, Janice; Washko, Daniel; Takagawa, Junya; Ye, Jianqin; Grossman, William; Su Hua

    2008-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are a promising source for cell-based treatment of myocardial infarction (MI), but existing strategies are restricted by low cell survival and engraftment. We examined whether vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) improve MSC viability in infracted hearts. We found long-term culture increased MSC-cellular stress: expressing more cell cycle inhibitors, p16 INK , p21 and p19 ARF . VEGF treatment reduced cellular stress, increased pro-survival factors, phosphorylated-Akt and Bcl-xL expression and cell proliferation. Co-injection of MSCs with VEGF to MI hearts increased cell engraftment and resulted in better improvement of cardiac function than that injected with MSCs or VEGF alone. In conclusion, VEGF protects MSCs from culture-induce cellular stress and improves their viability in ischemic myocardium, which results in improvements of their therapeutic effect for the treatment of MI