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Sample records for cells immunoblot analysis

  1. 2D-immunoblotting analysis of Sporothrix schenckii cell wall

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    Estela Ruiz-Baca

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available We utilized two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting (2D-immunoblotting with anti-Sporothrix schenckii antibodies to identify antigenic proteins in cell wall preparations obtained from the mycelial and yeast-like morphologies of the fungus. Results showed that a 70-kDa glycoprotein (Gp70 was the major antigen detected in the cell wall of both morphologies and that a 60-kDa glycoprotein was present only in yeast-like cells. In addition to the Gp70, the wall from filament cells showed four proteins with molecular weights of 48, 55, 66 and 67 kDa, some of which exhibited several isoforms. To our knowledge, this is the first 2D-immunoblotting analysis of the S. schenckii cell wall.

  2. Electrophoretic analysis of proteins from Mycoplasma hominis strains detected by SDS-PAGE, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, H; Birkelund, Svend; Christiansen, Gunna

    1987-01-01

    The proteins of 14 strains of Mycoplasma hominis were compared by SDS-PAGE in gradient gels, by two-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis of extracts of 35S-labelled cells and by immunoblot analysis of cell proteins. The strains examined included the M. hominis type strain PG21 and 13 others...... isolated variously from genital tract, mouth, blood, upper urinary tract and a wound. These 14 strains shared 76-99% of proteins in SDS-gradient gel analysis and 41-72% in the 2D gels. As expected, the immunoblot analysis likewise revealed the existence of an extensive common protein pattern in M. hominis...

  3. An immunoblotting analysis of cross-reactivity between melon, and plantago and grass pollens.

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    García Ortiz, J C; Ventas, P; Cosmes, P; López-Asunsolo, A

    1996-01-01

    It is known that most patients with type I allergy to pollens also suffer intolerance to fruits. Recently, an epidemiological and CAP-inhibition study has shown a new clustering of allergy between melon and Plantago and grass pollens. The aim of the present study was to confirm these results by immunoblotting analysis and inhibition of immunoblotting. Sera from 3 patients with confirmed allergy to melon, and Dactylis glomerata and Plantago lanceolata pollens were used for the in vitro studies. SDS-PAGE and immunoblotting analysis with a pool of sera revealed that several distinct protein bands were shared by the three extracts at 14, 31, and a spectrum between 40 and 70 kDa, approximately. Immunoblotting inhibition experiments, performed with extracts of melon, Plantago and Dactylis, showed that all allergens of melon blotting were almost completely inhibited by grass and Plantago pollen extracts. Inversely, the melon extract was capable of inhibiting IgE-binding to various allergens of Dactylis at high mol mass and partially to the band at 14 kDa. Moreover, the melon almost totally inhibited the IgE-binding capacity to the proteins of Plantago extract. Taken together, the results support the presence of structurally similar allergens in melon, Plantago and grass pollens, and that all allergenic epitopes of the melon are present in these pollens.

  4. A recombinant Toscana virus nucleoprotein in a diagnostic immunoblot test system.

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    Schwarz, T F; Gilch, S; Schätzl, H M

    1998-01-01

    Sandfly fever, a vector-borne disease endemic in the Mediterranean region, is caused by Toscana virus (TOS). The disease is increasingly important as a travel-related infection. Serological diagnosis is currently dependent on viral antigens derived from TOS-infected cell cultures. In this study, we report the cloning and expression of the TOS nucleoprotein (N) in Escherichia coli and evaluation of the recombinant (r) TOS N protein as an antigen for immunoblot assays. The TOS N gene was amplified by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and cloned into the bacterial expression vector pTrcHis-A. Sera with known TOS antibody status were used to evaluate the immunoblot assay. The expressed rTOS N protein was purified and used as antigen for immunoblots. By recombinant immunoblot, the TOS antibody status (IgM and/or IgG) of the test panel was correctly identified. No cross-reactivity was detected. The rTOS N protein is useful as an antigen for immunoblot assays, and will enable more laboratories to perform TOS antibody diagnosis.

  5. Immunoblot Patterns of Taenia asiatica Taeniasis

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    Jeon, Hyeong-Kyu

    2009-01-01

    Differential diagnosis of Taenia asiatica infection from other human taeniases by serology has been tested. An enzyme-linked immunoelectrotransfer blot (EITB) was applied to subjected human sera and tapeworm materials. Thirty-eight proteins reactive to serum IgG were observed between 121 and 10 kDa in adult worms, and more than 22 serum-reactive components between 97 kDa and 21.5 kDa were observed in eggs of T. asiatica. Antigens of adult T. asiatica revealed immunoblot bands between 120 and 21.5 kDa against T. asiatica infected sera. Antigens of adult Taenia saginata revealed 110-100, 66, 58-56, and 46 kDa immunoblot bands against T. asiatica infected sera. Antigens of adult Taenia solium also revealed 99-97, 68-66, and 46 kDa bands against T. asiatica infected sera. The immunoblot band of 21.5 kDa exhibited specificity to T. asiatica. PMID:19290097

  6. Immunoblot patterns of Taenia asiatica taeniasis.

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    Jeon, Hyeong-Kyu; Eom, Keeseon S

    2009-03-01

    Differential diagnosis of Taenia asiatica infection from other human taeniases by serology has been tested. An enzyme-linked immunoelectrotransfer blot (EITB) was applied to subjected human sera and tapeworm materials. Thirty-eight proteins reactive to serum IgG were observed between 121 and 10 kDa in adult worms, and more than 22 serum-reactive components between 97 kDa and 21.5 kDa were observed in eggs of T. asiatica. Antigens of adult T. asiatica revealed immunoblot bands between 120 and 21.5 kDa against T. asiatica infected sera. Antigens of adult Taenia saginata revealed 110-100, 66, 58-56, and 46 kDa immunoblot bands against T. asiatica infected sera. Antigens of adult Taenia solium also revealed 99-97, 68-66, and 46 kDa bands against T. asiatica infected sera. The immunoblot band of 21.5 kDa exhibited specificity to T. asiatica.

  7. Detection of Yersinia enterocolitica in milk powders by cross-priming amplification combined with immunoblotting analysis.

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    Zhang, Hongwei; Feng, Shaolong; Zhao, Yulong; Wang, Shuo; Lu, Xiaonan

    2015-12-02

    Yersinia enterocolitica (Y. enterocolitica) is frequently isolated from a wide variety of foods and can cause human yersiniosis. Biochemical and culture-based assays are common detection methods, but require a long incubation time and easily misidentify Y. enterocolitica as other non-pathogenic Yersinia species. Alternatively, cross-priming amplification (CPA) under isothermal conditions combined with immunoblotting analysis enables a more sensitive detection in a relatively short time period. A set of specific displacement primers, cross primers and testing primers was designed on the basis of six specific sequences in Y. enterocolitica 16S-23S rDNA internal transcribed spacer. Under isothermal condition, amplification and hybridization were conducted simultaneously at 63°C for 60 min. The specificity of CPA was tested for 96 different bacterial strains and 165 commercial milk powder samples. Two red lines were developed on BioHelix Express strip for all of the Y. enterocolitica strains, and one red line was shown for non-Y. enterocolitica strains. The limit of detection of CPA was 10(0)fg for genomic DNA (1000 times more sensitive than PCR assay), 10(1) CFU/ml for pure bacterial culture, and 10(0) CFU per 100 g milk powder with pre-enrichment at 37°C for 24 h. CPA combined with immunoblotting analysis can achieve highly specific and sensitive detection of Y. enterocolitica in milk powder in 90 min after pre-enrichment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Detection of serum anti-B/B’ UsnRNP antibodies in patients with connective tissue diseases by immunoblotting

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    L. Iaccarino

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the reliability of the immunoblot method in the detection of serum immunoreactivity towards the B/B’ polypeptides of U small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (UsnRNP and to assess the significance of these antibodies in connective tissue disease (CTD patients. Methods: We tested the sera of 348 patients with CTD (101 SLE, 51 systemic sclerosis, 53 primary Sjogren’s syndrome, 27 poly/dermatomyositis, 15 rheumatoid arthritis and 101 overlap CTD, of 31 matched healthy subjects and 13 patients with primary Epstein-Barr virus (EBV infection with high titre IgG anti-EBV antibodies. IgG anti-UsnRNP antibodies were determined by immunoblotting on nuclear extract from Raji cells (an EBV-immortalised human B lymphoid cell line and Jurkat cells (a human T lymphoid cell line. Anti-dsDNA antibodies were detected by indirect immunofluorescence on Crithidia luciliae and anti-ENA by counterimmunoelectrophoresis. Anti-dsDNA activity and avidity were measured in SLE sera by ELISA with Scatchard analysis. Results were statistically analysed by chi-square and Mann-Whitney tests. Results: A high frequency of anti-B/B’ antibodies was found in the sera of CTD patients, confined to SLE (54.4% and overlap CTD with SLE features (55,2%. Anti-B/B’ immune reactivity was closely associated with other anti-UsnRNP specificities, gel precipitating anti-nRNP and anti-P antibodies. Nine out of 15 (60% anti-B/B’ positive/anti-ENA negative lupus sera on Raji blots were confirmed to be positive also on Jurkat blots. The sera from patients with EBV infection provided, on Raji blots, completely different band patterns from those obtained with auto-immune sera. Conclusions. The Sm B/B’ proteins are the predominant or, at least, the most frequently targeted antigens of the UsnRNP auto-immune response in SLE and “lupus-like” overlap CTD. Moreover, anti-B/B’ is diagnostically specific for CTD with SLE features. Immunoblotting on human B lymphoid cells

  9. Signal Peptide and Denaturing Temperature are Critical Factors for Efficient Mammalian Expression and Immunoblotting of Cannabinoid Receptors*

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    WANG, Chenyun; WANG, Yingying; WANG, Miao; CHEN, Jiankui; YU, Nong; SONG, Shiping; KAMINSKI, Norbert E.; ZHANG, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Summary Many researchers employed mammalian expression system to artificially express cannabinoid receptors, but immunoblot data that directly prove efficient protein expression can hardly be seen in related research reports. In present study, we demonstrated cannabinoid receptor protein was not able to be properly expressed with routine mammalian expression system. This inefficient expression was rescued by endowing an exogenous signal peptide ahead of cannabinoid receptor peptide. In addition, the artificially synthesized cannabinoid receptor was found to aggregate under routine sample denaturing temperatures (i.e., ≥95°C), forming a large molecular weight band when analyzed by immunoblotting. Only denaturing temperatures ≤75°C yielded a clear band at the predicted molecular weight. Collectively, we showed that efficient mammalian expression of cannabinoid receptors need a signal peptide sequence, and described the requirement for a low sample denaturing temperature in immunoblot analysis. These findings provide very useful information for efficient mammalian expression and immunoblotting of membrane receptors. PMID:22528237

  10. Immunoblotting studies of coagulation factor XII, plasma prekallikrein, and high molecular weight kininogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laemmle, B.B.; Berrettini, M.; Griffin, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    Immunoblotting techniques for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of FXII, PK, and HMWK in whole plasma are presented. Sensitive, specific, and quantitative immunodetection of FXII and PK can be achieved by developing the blots with polyclonal antiserum followed by radiolabeled FXII or PK, respectively. This approach is based on the assumption that bivalent antibodies bind monovalently to the NC-bound antigen and have available binding sites to bind radiolabeled antigen derived from the fluid phase. This radiolabeled antigen overlay principle may be generally useful for immunodetection of any trace protein in complex mixtures, provided that the radiolabeled purified antigen is available. Immunoblotting may also be helpful for the partial characterization of the structural or functional abnormalities of CRM-positive variant molecules. For example, earlier studies of a FXII-variant molecule that had been purified and characterized were supported by immunoblotting studies of the CRM-positive deficient plasma. Quantitative measurement of HMWK is possible using a monoclonal antibody directed against the light chain of HMWK followed by radiolabeled secondary antibody. Quantitation of cleaved and single-chain HMWK is possible using dilutions of dextran sulfate-activated NHP on unreduced SDS-PAGE and dilutions of unactivated NHP with reduced SDS-PAGE as standards. These assays allow assessment of the degree of in vivo activation of the contact system in various disease states

  11. Validation of commercially available sphingosine kinase 2 antibodies for use in immunoblotting, immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence [version 2; referees: 2 approved

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    Heidi A. Neubauer

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Sphingosine kinase 2 (SK2 is a ubiquitously expressed lipid kinase that has important, albeit complex and poorly understood, roles in regulating cell survival and cell death. In addition to being able to promote cell cycle arrest and apoptosis under certain conditions, it has recently been shown that SK2 can promote neoplastic transformation and tumorigenesis in vivo. Therefore, well validated and reliable tools are required to study and better understand the true functions of SK2. Here, we compare two commercially available SK2 antibodies: a rabbit polyclonal antibody from Proteintech that recognizes amino acids 266-618 of human SK2a, and a rabbit polyclonal antibody from ECM Biosciences that recognizes amino acids 36-52 of human SK2a. We examine the performance of these antibodies for use in immunoblotting, immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence staining of endogenous SK2, using human HEK293 and HeLa cell lines, as well as mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs. Furthermore, we assess the specificity of these antibodies to the target protein through the use of siRNA-mediated SK2 knockdown and SK2 knockout (Sphk2-/- MEFs. Our results demonstrate that the Proteintech anti-SK2 antibody reproducibly displayed superior sensitivity and selectivity towards SK2 in immunoblot analyses, while the ECM Biosciences anti-SK2 antibody was reproducibly superior for SK2 immunoprecipitation and detection by immunofluorescence staining. Notably, both antibodies produced non-specific bands and staining in the MEFs, which was not observed with the human cell lines. Therefore, we conclude that the Proteintech SK2 antibody is a valuable reagent for use in immunoblot analyses, and the ECM Biosciences SK2 antibody is a useful tool for SK2 immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence staining, at least in the human cell lines employed in this study.

  12. Comparative immunoblot analysis with 10 different, partially overlapping recombinant fusion proteins derived from 5 different cytomegalovirus proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zanten, J.; LAZZAROTTO, T; CAMPISI, B; VORNHAGEN, R; JAHN, G; LANDINI, MP; The, T. Hauw

    Ten fusion proteins derived from five various CMV encoded proteins were used for the detection of specific antibody response by immunoblot technique in sera from renal transplant recipients. The fusion proteins were derived from the following CMV specific proteins: the assembly protein ppUL80a with

  13. Hyposensitization therapy with whole pollen extract or purified allergens monitored by immunoblotting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jarolim, E; Matthiesen, F; Skov, P S

    1990-01-01

    . Inhibition experiments using allergenic components isolated by preparative sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis indicated that all antigenic components of timothy grass pollen detected in immunoblot dispose of private and cross-reactive determinants for binding of human IgE. The worse......Patients allergic to grass pollen were hyposensitized with two major allergenic components or whole extract of timothy grass pollen. Specific IgE, IgG1, and IgG4 formed during immunotherapy were analyzed by immunoblotting. Similar antibody-binding patterns were observed in both patient groups...

  14. A sensitive immunoblotting method for screening of microalbuminuria in diabetic patient's urine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdolkhaleg, D.; Behrooz, S.

    2005-01-01

    Urinary albumin excretion is a useful marker in the prognosis of diabetic nephropathy and microvascular diseases. Methods such as enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), radio immunoassay(RIA), radial immunodiffusion, albu screen, micro bumin and micral test are usually used for detection and screening of microalbuminuria in these patients. With consideration to the cost of an assay, methods such as ELISA and RIA are not suitable methods for screening purpose. Therefore, the aim of this work is to set a dot immunoblotting method for the measurement and screening of microalbumin in urine samples. The study was conducted during the period August 2001 to June 2003 at the National Research Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology (NRCGEB) and Pars Hospital Laboratory of Tehran, Iran on 96 diabetic patients urine samples. First, anti human albumin antibodies (Abs) were produced in rabbit and immunoglobulin G (IgG) fraction was purified by protein-A affinity chromatography. Titer of Abs and optimum incubation conditions were tested by direct ELISA. Then different concentration of human albumin (0-300 mg/l) was loaded to nitrocellulose membranes and was assayed by dot immunoblotting method. The specificity and cross reactivity of Abs was tested by SDS-PAGE electrophoresis and western immunoblotting. The sensitivity of the method was calculated from human albumin calibration curve and compared with commercial immunoturbidimetric assays. Our results indicates that in using IgG with the concentrations 0.5-1 ug/ml (2 x 10-5 to 10-4 dilutions) the intensity of color directly increased with the increase of human albumin standards in blots. Western immunoblotting of urine samples did not show any cross reactivity with other urine proteins. Comparison of results of this method by commercial immunoturbidimetric methods indicates the correlation regression of approximately 0.979. The sensitivity of the method was approximately 5 mg/L of human albumin. This simple

  15. Erythema migrans and serodiagnosis by enzyme immunoassay and immunoblot with three borrelia species.

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    Stanek, G; Breier, F; Menzinger, G; Schaar, B; Hafner, M; Partsch, H

    1999-12-10

    There is wide divergence of opinion between physicians regarding the use of serological measures for the diagnosis and treatment of erythema migrans, the hallmark of Lyme borreliosis. We studied the outcome of an enzyme immunoassay and immunoblot (Western blot) used on the sera of patients who had suffered tick bite and erythema migrans, and had been subsequently treated with various antibiotics. Ninety-nine consecutive patients presenting with erythema migrans after tick bite were prospectively recruited at the outpatient department of two Vienna City hospitals and at the consultation office for Lyme borreliosis of the Institute of Hygiene. University Vienna. Blood samples were taken before antibiotic treatment and 3 and 6 months thereafter. Blood samples from 100 blood donors served as controls. Antibodies against Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato were determined by enzyme immunoassay (IgG and IgM EIA) and by IgG immunoblot. The latter was performed with isolates of B. alzelii (H2) B. burgdorferi sensu stricto (Le) and B. garinii (W) from Austrian patients. The 4 interpretation criteria for immunoblot results were: A (3 bands out of 8), B (2 bands out of 9), C and D (1 band out of 6). In all patients, the erythema resolved within the treatment period. No complications secondary to the borrelia infection were registered. After treatment there was no significant change in titre, nor was there a difference in the immunoblot pattern between the first, second and third serum samples. Serum antibodies to B. burgdorferi were positive by EIA in 22.9% (IgG) and 2.5% (IgM). Immunoblot results offered by borrelia species and by the interpretation criteria, ranging between 8.3% (criterion A, strain Le) and 44.2% (criterion D, strain H2). By EIA, control samples were IgG and IgM positive in 5% and 1%, respectively. Positive immunoblot results with strain H2 were found in 9%, 13%, 18%, and 20% by the criteria A through D respectively. After antibiotic treatment of erythema

  16. A long-term follow-up study of hyposensitization with immunoblotting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jarolim, E; Poulsen, L K; Stadler, B M

    1990-01-01

    The formation of specific IgE, IgG1, and IgG4 antibodies was investigated by immunoblotting during hyposensitization with timothy grass-pollen extract and 6 years later, Until the end of immunotherapy, specific IgG antibody levels increased. Also simultaneously, the number of allergenic component...

  17. Comparative analysis of excretory-secretory antigens of Trichinella spiralis and Trichinella britovi muscle larvae by two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting.

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    Bien, Justyna; Näreaho, Anu; Varmanen, Pekka; Gozdzik, Katarzyna; Moskwa, Bozena; Cabaj, Wladyslaw; Nyman, Tuula A; Savijoki, Kirsi

    2012-02-11

    Trichinellosis is a zoonotic disease in humans caused by Trichinella spp. The present study was undertaken to discover excretory-secretory (E-S) proteins from T. spiralis and T. britovi muscle larvae (ML) that hold promise for species-specific diagnostics. To that end, the purified E-S proteins were analyzed by fluorescent two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2-D DIGE) coupled with protein identification by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). To search for immunoreactive proteins that are specifically recognized by host antibodies the E-S proteins were subjected to two-dimensional (2-DE) immunoblotting with antisera derived from pigs experimentally infected with T. spiralis or T. britovi. According to 2-D DIGE analysis, a total of twenty-two proteins including potentially immunogenic proteins and proteins produced only by one of the two Trichinella species were subjected to LC-MS/MS for protein identification. From these proteins seventeen could be identified, of which many were identified in multiple spots, suggesting that they have undergone post-translational modification, possibly involving glycosylation and/or proteolysis. These proteins included 5'-nucleotidase, serine-type protease/proteinase, and p43 glycoprotein (gp43) as well as 49 kDa E-S protein (p49). Our findings also suggest that some of the commonly identified proteins were post-translationally modified to different extents, which in certain cases seemed to result in species-specific modification. Both commonly and specifically recognized immunoreactive proteins were identified by 2-DE immunoblotting; shared antigens were identified as gp43 and different protease variants, whereas those specific to T. britovi included multiple isoforms of the 5'-nucleotidase. Both 2-D DIGE and 2-DE immunoblotting approaches indicate that T. spiralis and T. britovi produce somewhat distinctive antigen profiles, which contain E-S antigens with potential as species-specific diagnostic

  18. A rapid chemical method for lysing Arabidopsis cells for protein analysis

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    Takano Tetsuo

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein extraction is a frequent procedure in biological research. For preparation of plant cell extracts, plant materials usually have to be ground and homogenized to physically break the robust cell wall, but this step is laborious and time-consuming when a large number of samples are handled at once. Results We developed a chemical method for lysing Arabidopsis cells without grinding. In this method, plants are boiled for just 10 minutes in a solution containing a Ca2+ chelator and detergent. Cell extracts prepared by this method were suitable for SDS-PAGE and immunoblot analysis. This method was also applicable to genomic DNA extraction for PCR analysis. Our method was applied to many other plant species, and worked well for some of them. Conclusions Our method is rapid and economical, and allows many samples to be prepared simultaneously for protein analysis. Our method is useful not only for Arabidopsis research but also research on certain other species.

  19. A simple immunoblotting method after separation of proteins in agarose gel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, C; Skjødt, K; Laursen, I

    1985-01-01

    A simple and sensitive method for immunoblotting of proteins after separation in agarose gels is described. It involves transfer of proteins onto nitrocellulose paper simply by diffusion through pressure, a transfer which only takes about 10 min. By this method we have demonstrated the existence ...

  20. Soybean flour asthma: detection of allergens by immunoblotting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bush, R.K.; Schroeckenstein, D.; Meier-Davis, S.; Balmes, J.; Rempel, D.

    1988-01-01

    A 43-year-old woman developed asthma 6 years after beginning work in a food-processing plant in which soybean flour was used as a protein extender. Symptoms of sneezing, coughing, and wheezing would begin within minutes of exposure to soybean flour and resolve 2 hours after exposure ceased. Skin tests were positive to a soy extract prepared from the flour. Airway hyperreactivity was confirmed by a positive bronchial challenge to methacholine. Bronchial challenge with soybean flour produced an immediate increase in specific airway resistance from 5.0 to 22.7 L. cm of H2O/L/sec. There was no response to challenge with lactose. The patient's allergic response to soy-flour extract was further characterized by several immunologic methods. IgE binding to soy-flour protein by direct RAST was 5.98 times that of a normal control serum. The soy-flour extract was separated by dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Twenty-four protein bands were detected in the crude soy-flour extract. After immunoblotting and subsequent autoradiography, nine proteins with molecular weights ranging from 54,500 to 14,875 were found. Cross-reactivity studies with other legumes demonstrated apparent immunologic identity between a component in green pea extract and a soybean protein with a molecular weight of 17,000. The clinical significance of this cross-reactivity is not known. We conclude that in this case of occupational asthma to soybean flour, multiple allergens were involved. Immunoblotting may be useful in identifying the allergens involved in occupational asthma

  1. Use of immunoblotting assay improves the sensitivity of paracoccidioidomycosis diagnosis

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    D. F. Silva

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work was to evaluate two serological assays: double immunodiffusion (DI and immunoblotting (IB in immunodiagnosis of paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM. We evaluated by IB assay 23 sera samples from patients with clinical confirmation of PCM, all of them with negative DI results against culture filtrate from Paracoccidioides brasiliensis isolate 113. For IB, as well as for comparative DI assay, we employed soluble components of the cell wall outer surface (SCCWOS from P. brasiliensis isolate 113 cultivated at 36°C in Fava-Neto's agar medium for 5 and 10 days. Among the 20 sera samples analyzed by DI, 13 (65% were negative and 7 (35% were positive against SCCWOS obtained on the 5th and 10th days. By IB assay, 95.4% and 100% of sera reacted against gp43 and gp70 present in SCCWOS from the 5th day and 95.6% recognized these fractions when evaluated against SCCWOS from the 10th day. Our results demonstrated that the use of an immunoenzymatic assay significantly improves the sensitivity of PCM immunodiagnosis and also suggests that at least two serological tests for antibody detection should be adopted in cases of questionable diagnosis.

  2. Identification of snake venom allergens by two-dimensional electrophoresis followed by immunoblotting.

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    Hu, Yujing; Yang, Liming; Yang, Haiwei; He, Shaoheng; Wei, Ji-Fu

    2017-01-01

    This allergic reaction to snake venom was described to occur in patients after recurrent exposure through bites in amateur and professional snake handlers, which might be underestimated and contribute to fatal snakebites in victim, independently from the toxicity of the venom itself. Few allergens were identified from snake venoms by normal SDS-PAGE, which cannot separate the snake venom completely. In the present study, we identified nine potential allergens by two-dimensional (2D) electrophoresis followed by immunoblotting (named as allergenomics) in Protobothrops mucrosquamatus venom. By multidimensional liquid chromatography-ion trap mass spectrometry (MDLC-ESI-LTQ-MS/MS) analysis, six allergens showed sequence similarity to snake venom serine proteinases. Other allergens showed sequence similarity to snake venom metalloproteinase. These allergic reactions to snake venom allergens might contribute to fatal snakebites in victim, independently. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Quantification of rapid Myosin regulatory light chain phosphorylation using high-throughput in-cell Western assays: comparison to Western immunoblots.

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    Hector N Aguilar

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Quantification of phospho-proteins (PPs is crucial when studying cellular signaling pathways. Western immunoblotting (WB is commonly used for the measurement of relative levels of signaling intermediates in experimental samples. However, WB is in general a labour-intensive and low-throughput technique. Because of variability in protein yield and phospho-signal preservation during protein harvesting, and potential loss of antigen during protein transfer, WB provides only semi-quantitative data. By comparison, the "in-cell western" (ICW technique has high-throughput capacity and requires less extensive sample preparation. Thus, we compared the ICW technique to WB for measuring phosphorylated myosin regulatory light chain (PMLC(20 in primary cultures of uterine myocytes to assess their relative specificity, sensitivity, precision, and quantification of biologically relevant responses.ICWs are cell-based microplate assays for quantification of protein targets in their cellular context. ICWs utilize a two-channel infrared (IR scanner (Odyssey(R to quantify signals arising from near-infrared (NIR fluorophores conjugated to secondary antibodies. One channel is dedicated to measuring the protein of interest and the second is used for data normalization of the signal in each well of the microplate. Using uterine myocytes, we assessed oxytocin (OT-stimulated MLC(20 phosphorylation measured by ICW and WB, both using NIR fluorescence. ICW and WB data were comparable regarding signal linearity, signal specificity, and time course of phosphorylation response to OT.ICW and WB yield comparable biological data. The advantages of ICW over WB are its high-throughput capacity, improved precision, and reduced sample preparation requirements. ICW might provide better sensitivity and precision with low-quantity samples or for protocols requiring large numbers of samples. These features make the ICW technique an excellent tool for the study of phosphorylation endpoints

  4. Aberrant tropoelastin secretion in MG-63 human osteosarcoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curtiss, S.W.

    1989-01-01

    The secretion of newly synthesized tropoelastin, the soluble precursor of the extracellular matrix protein elastin, is not well understood. MG-63 human osteosarcoma cells were found by immunoblot analysis to synthesize 62 kD and 64 kD tropoelastins. Media from 63 cells labelled for five hours with [ 3 H]-valine contain no detectable tropoelastin, unlike media from other tropoelastin-synthesizing cells. Immunoblots of conditioned media and 1Ox-concentrated conditioned media left on the cells for six days also show an absence of tropoelastin from the cell media. No insoluble elastin is associated with the cell layer, as determined by amino acid analysis and electron microscopy of 18-21 day cell cultures. The absence of tropoelastin from the cell medium and elastin from the extracellular matrix indicates that MG63 cells do not secrete tropoelastin as expected, but accumulate it intracellularly. This accumulation is transient: immunoblots and immunofluorescence microscopy show that cells three days after passage have the highest steady-state levels of tropoelastin per cell, that day 8 cells contain lower but still significant amounts of tropoelastin, and that by day 22 tropoelastin is no longer present in the cell cultures. Cell density is a critical factor in the observed pattern of tropoelastin expression. Cells seeded at ten fold their usual initial density have high tropoelastin levels at one day after passage, sooner than cells seeded normally. Tropoelastin also disappears from high density-seeded cells more quickly and is no longer detectable at day 10. Lysosome-like vesicles containing membranous structures appear by immunoelectron microscopy to be the primary site of intracellular tropoelastin localization

  5. Diagnostic performance of a commercial immunoblot assay for myositis antibody testing.

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    Bundell, Chris; Rojana-Udomsart, Arada; Mastaglia, Frank; Hollingsworth, Peter; McLean-Tooke, Andrew

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study was to establish a population based reference range for a commercial immunoblot assay detecting myositis specific autoantibodies (MSAs) and myositis associated autoantibodies (MAAs), and to assess the diagnostic performance of this reference range against the manufacturer's recommended ranges in a myositis patient cohort. A total of 124 patients from a myositis cohort and 197 healthy controls were serologically assessed using a commercial immunoblot containing eleven autoantigens (Jo-1, EJ, OJ, PL7, PL12, Mi-2, SRP, Ku, PMScl75, PMScl100 and Ro52) according to the manufacturer's instructions. Use of the manufacturer's reference ranges resulted in detection of MSAs in 19.4% of myositis patients and 9.1% of controls; MAAs were detected in 41.1% of myositis patients and 14.2% of controls. Reference values derived from the healthy control population resulted in significant differences in cut-off values for some autoantibodies, particularly Ro52 and PMScl75. Use of local reference ranges reduced detection of MSAs to 16.9% of myositis patients and 3% of healthy controls, with MAAs 23.4% of patients and 2% of healthy controls. Application of population based reference ranges resulted in significant differences in detection of MSAs and MAAs compared to the manufacturer's recommended ranges. Cut-off levels should be assessed to ensure suitability for the population tested. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Identification of antigenic proteins of setaria cervi by immunoblotting technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaushal, N.A.; Kaushal, D.C.; Ghatak, S.

    1987-01-01

    Identification and characterization of antigenic proteins of Setaria cervi (bovine filarial parasite) adults and microfilariae was done by immunoblotting technique using hyperimmune rabbit sera against S. cervi and Brugia malayi. The antigens recognized by these sera were detected by using 125 I protein-A followed by autoradiography. Fifteen different antigens were observed to be common between adult and microfilarial stages of the parasite. Some stage specific antigens were also identified. Many antigens of S. cervi adults and microfilariae were also recognized by rabbit anti-B.malayi serum showing the existence of common antigenic determinants between the bovine and human filarial parasites

  7. Evaluation of antibody responses in american visceral leishmaniasis by ELISA and immunoblot Avaliação da resposta imune humoral na leishmaniose visceral americana pelos métodos ELISA e "immunoblot"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas G. Evans

    1989-06-01

    Full Text Available American visceral leishmaniasis (AVL is an important disease among children of northeast Brazil. In order to characterize antibody responses during AVL, sera of hospitalized patients were analyzed by ELISA and Western blot using a Leishmania chagasi antigen preparation. The ELISA was positive (asorbance [greater than or equals to] 0.196 at a serum dilution of 1:1024 in all patients at presentation, and fell to ward control levels over the following year. Only one of 72 control subjects tested positive, and that donor had a sibling with AVL. Immunoblots of the patients' sera recognized multiple bands, the most frequent of which were at approximately 116 kDa, 70 kDa, and 26 kDa. Less frenquently observed were bands at approximately 93 kDa, 74 kDa, 62 kDa, 46 kDa and 32 kDa. The ELISA responses and patterns of banding were distinctive for AVL, and could be used to differentiate patients with AVL from those with Chagas' disease of cutaneous leishmaniasis. Sera from six AVL patients followed for up to six weeks after treatment identified no new bands. Sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE of surface iodinated parasite proteins showed one major band and four minor bands, whereas SDS-PAGE of biotinylated prarasite proteins revealed a banding pattern similar to those of patient sera. AVL appears to produce characteristic immunoblot patterns which can be used along with a sensitive screening ELISA to diagnose AVL.A leishmaniose visceral americana é uma doença importante entre crianças do nordeste do Brasil. Com o objetivo de caracterizar a resposta imune humoral durante o curso da doença, foram analisados soros de pacientes hospitalizados, pelos métodos ELISA e Western blot, usando-se preparaçöes de antígenos de Leishmania donovani chagasi. O teste de ELISA foi positivo (absorbância > 0,196, numa diluiçäo de 1: 1024, em todos os pacientes no início da doença, diminuindo no decorrer do ano, para os níveis dos

  8. Expression and analysis of exogenous proteins in epidermal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagnino, Lina; Ho, Ernest; Chang, Wing Y

    2010-01-01

    In this chapter we review protocols for transient transfection of primary keratinocytes. The ability to transfect primary epidermal cells regardless of their differentiation status allows the biochemical and molecular characterization of multiple proteins. We review methods to analyze exogenous protein abundance in transfected keratinocytes by immunoblot and immunoprecipitation. We also present protocols to determine the subcellular distribution of these proteins by indirect immunofluorescence microscopy approaches.

  9. Simultaneous identification of Trypanosoma cruzi surface and internal antigens reactive to different immunoglobulin classes (radio-immunoblotting)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stolf, A.M.S.; Umezawa, E.S.; Zingales, B.

    1990-01-01

    A radioactive Western blotting technique was developed by which the reactivity of Immunoglobulins (IGs) from different classes to both membrane radiolabelled and internal parasite antigens is simultaneously identified. The method includes radioiodination of parasites, polypeptide fractionation by SDS-PAGE, Western-blot transfer and autoradiography of the immunoblots developed with anti-Igs conjugates labelled with enzymes. The analysis is then performed by the comparison of common bands on the autoradiograms and the respective substrate stained nitrocellulose blots. This technique was used to analyse. T.cruzi trypomastigote surface labelled antigens reactive to IgM, IgA and IgC specific antibodies. A different pattern of reactivity with acute Chagas disease patients sera was thus obtained. (author)

  10. Lawsone inhibits cell growth and improves the efficacy of cisplatin in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cell cycle analysis was done by Flow cytometric studies, Immunoblotting studies for protein expression was done, proteins controlling cell cycle such as cyclinD1, cyclin E, cyclin A, cyclin B1 and Cip1/p21 and p53 which also are cyclin dependent inhibitors of protein kinase were estimated. Annexin V staining was done to ...

  11. Two-dimensional electrophoretic analysis of transformation-sensitive polypeptides during chemically, spontaneously, and oncogene-induced transformation of rat liver epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wirth, P J; Luo, L D; Fujimoto, Y

    1992-01-01

    ; AFB), spontaneously, and oncogene (v-Ha-ras, v-raf, and v-myc/v-raf)-induced transformation of RLE cells. Two-dimensional mapping of [35S]methionine-labeled whole cell lysate, cell-free in vitro translation products and [32P]orthophosphate-labeled polypeptides revealed subsets of polypeptides specific...... for each transformation modality. A search of the RLE protein database indicated the specific subcellular location for the majority of these transformation-sensitive proteins. Significant alterations in the expression of the extracellular matrix protein, fibronectin, as well as tropomyosin......- and intermediate filament-related polypeptides (vimentin, beta-tubulin, the cytokeratins, and actin) were observed among the various transformant cell lines. Immunoprecipitation and Western immunoblot analysis of tropomyosin expression in four individual AFB-, as well as four spontaneously induced, and each...

  12. Comparative sensitivity of 125I-protein A and enzyme-conjugated antibodies for detection of immunoblotted proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernstein, J.M.; Stokes, C.E.; Fernie, B.

    1987-01-01

    Immunoblotting is a powerful technique for the detection of small amounts of immunologically interesting proteins in unpurified preparations. Iodinated protein A (PA) has been widely used as a second antibody for detection of proteins; however, it does not bind equally well to immunoglobulins from different species nor does it bind to all subclasses of immunoglobulin G (IgG). We compared the sensitivity of [ 125 I]PA with those of both horseradish peroxidase-conjugated second antibodies (HRP) and glucose oxidase-anti-glucose oxidase (GAG) soluble complexes for visualizing bovine serum albumin, human IgG, or human C3 which was either dot blotted or electroblotted to nitrocellulose. [ 125 I]PA was uniformly 10- to 100-fold less sensitive than either HRP or GAG. GAG was more sensitive than HRP except for C3 (electroblotting) and bovine serum albumin and IgG (dot blotting), in which they were equivalent. In general, dot blotting was 10- to 1000-fold more sensitive than electroblotting. Although relative sensitivities varied depending on the proteins analyzed and the antisera used, GAG appeared to be superior to [ 125 I]PA and HRP for detection of immunoblotted proteins

  13. Immunological diagnosis of human hydatid cyst using Western immunoblotting technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahboubeh Hadipour

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Echinococcosis is a parasitic disease with worldwide distribution which is caused by the tapeworms Echinococcus granulosus. Diagnosis of the disease relies on imaging techniques, but the techniques are not able to differentiate the cyst from benign or malignant tumors; hence, appropriate serologic methods are required for the differential diagnosis of the infection. Materials and Methods: In this investigation, different sheep hydatid cyst antigens probed with thirty sera of patients with hydatid cyst and also thirty human normal sera using Western immunoblotting technique. Considering results of surgery as gold standard, sensitivity and specificity of Western blotting was estimated. Results: Sera of 29, 26, and 16 patients with hydatid cyst reacted with specific bands of hydatid cyst fluid (HCF, protoscolex crude antigen, and cyst wall crude antigen, respectively. However, none of the normal human sera reacted with those specific bands. Conclusion: A 20 kDa band of sheep HCF is an appropriate antigen for serodiagnosis of hydatid cyst infection.

  14. A novel porcine cell culture based protocol for the propagation of hepatitis E virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Chingwaru

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To present a comprehensive protocol for the processing of hepatitis E virus (HEV infected samples and propagation of the virus in primary cell cultures. Methods: Hepatitis E was extracted from porcine liver and faecal samples following standard protocols. The virus was then allowed to attach in the presence of trypsin to primary cells that included porcine and bovine intestinal epithelial cells and macrophages over a period of up to 3 h. The virus was propagated by rotational passaging through the cell cultures. Propagation was confirmed by immunoblotting. Results: We developed a comprehensive protocol to propagate HEV in porcine cell model that includes (i rotational culturing of the virus between porcine cell types, (ii pre-incubation of infected cells for 210 min, (iii use of a semi-complete cell culture medium supplemented with trypsin (0.33 µg/mL and (iv the use of simple immunoblot technique to detect the amplified virus based on the open reading frame 2/3. Conclusions: This protocol opens doors towards systematic analysis of the mechanisms that underlie the pathogenesis of HEV in vitro. Using our protocol, one can complete the propagation process within 6 to 9 d.

  15. [Fundamental evaluation of apolipoprotein B-48 by chemiluminescence enzyme immunoassay--identification of apolipoprotein B-48 with immunoblotting].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Itsuko; Fujioka, Yoshio; Hayashi, Fujio; Mukai, Masahiko; Kawano, Seiji; Ishikawa, Yuichi; Yamashita, Shizuya; Kumagai, Shunichi

    2007-06-01

    Apolipoprotein B-48 (apo B-48) is a constituent of chylomicrons and chylomicron remnants, and its fasting concentration has been reported to be a marker of postprandial hyperlipidemia, which is thought to be a risk factor of atherosclerosis. We evaluated the serum apo B-48 concentrations by chemiluminescence enzyme immunoassay (CLEIA), which was recently introduced as Lumipulse f fully automated immunosaasy analyzer by Fujirebio Inc (Tokyo, Japan), and performed immunoblotting on agarose gel electrophoresis with anti-apo B-48 antibody. Apo B-48 assay was intra-assay reproducible (CVs: 1.9-3.1%) and inter-assay reproducible (CVs: 2.2-4.4%). The assay range for apo B-48 was from 0.2 to 40.0 microg/ml. The effects of interfering substances such as free/conjugated birirubin, hemoglobin, Intrafat, ascorbic acid and rheumatoid factor were negligible. For storage, it was preferable to freeze, and to avoid frozen-thaw process as much as possible. Anti-apo B-48 antibody was reactive over a wide range from origin to the position of very-low-density lipoproteins in immunoblotting after agarose gel electrophoresis. Apo B-48 measurement by CLEIA was feasible to clinical use for the assessment of lipoprotein metabolism.

  16. Liver cell-derived microparticles activate hedgehog signaling and alter gene expression in hepatic endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witek, Rafal P; Yang, Liu; Liu, Renshui; Jung, Youngmi; Omenetti, Alessia; Syn, Wing-Kin; Choi, Steve S; Cheong, Yeiwon; Fearing, Caitlin M; Agboola, Kolade M; Chen, Wei; Diehl, Anna Mae

    2009-01-01

    Angiogenesis contributes to vascular remodeling during cirrhosis. In cirrhotic livers, cholangiocytes, and myofibroblastic hepatic stellate cells (MF-HSC) produce Hedgehog (Hh) ligands. During embryogenesis Hh ligands are released from ligand-producing cells in microparticles and activate Hh signaling in endothelial cells. We studied whether adult liver cell-derived microparticles contain Hh ligands that alter hepatic sinusoidal endothelial cells (SEC). MF-HSC and cholangiocytes were exposed to platelet-derived growth factor to induce Hh ligands; microparticles were isolated from medium, analyzed by transmission electron microscopy and immunoblots, and applied to Hh-reporter-containing cells. Microparticles were obtained from serum and bile of rats after bile duct ligation (BDL) or sham surgery and applied to normal primary liver SEC with or without cyclopamine, an Hh signaling inhibitor. Effects on SEC gene expression were evaluated by quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and immunoblotting. Hh target gene expression and SEC activation markers were compared in primary SEC and in liver sections from healthy and BDL rats. Platelet-derived growth factor-treated MF-HSC and cholangiocytes released exosome-enriched microparticles containing biologically-active Hh ligands. BDL increased release of Hh-containing exosome-enriched microparticles into plasma and bile. Transmission electron microscopy and immunoblots revealed similarities among microparticles from all sources; all microparticles induced similar Hh-dependent changes in SEC gene expression. SEC from healthy livers did not express Hh target genes or activation markers, but both were up-regulated in SEC after BDL. Hh-containing exosome-enriched microparticles released from liver cells alter hepatic SEC gene expression, suggesting a novel mechanism for cirrhotic vasculopathy.

  17. Nonelectrophoretic bidirectional transfer of a single SDS-PAGE gel with multiple antigens to obtain 12 immunoblots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurien, Biji T; Scofield, R Hal

    2009-01-01

    Protein blotting is an invaluable technique in immunology to detect and characterize proteins of low abundance. Proteins resolved on sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) polyacrylamide gels are normally transferred electrophoretically to adsorbent membranes such as nitrocellulose or polyvinylidene diflouride membranes. Here, we describe the nonelectrophroretic transfer of the Ro 60 (or SSA) autoantigen, 220- and 240-kD spectrin antigens, and prestained molecular weight standards from SDS polyacrylamide gels to obtain up to 12 immunoblots from a single gel and multiple sera.

  18. Frequency of serum anti-cysticercus antibodies in the population of a rural Brazilian community (Cássia dos Coqueiros, SP determined by ELISA and immunoblotting using Taenia crassiceps antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BRAGAZZA Lúcia M.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Considering the impact of cysticercosis on public health, especially the neurologic form of the disease, neurocysticercosis (NC, we studied the frequency of positivity of anti-Taenia solium cysticercus antibodies in serum samples from 1,863 inhabitants of Cássia dos Coqueiros, SP, a municipal district located 80 km from Ribeirão Preto, an area considered endemic for cysticercosis. The 1,863 samples were tested by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA using an antigenic extract from Taenia crassiceps vesicular fluid (Tcra. The reactive and inconclusive ELISA samples were tested by immunoblotting. Of the 459 samples submitted to immunoblotting, 40 were strongly immunoreactive to the immunodominant 18 and 14 kD peptides. Considering the use of immunoblotting as confirmatory due to its high specificity, the anti-cysticercus serum prevalence in this population was 2.1%.

  19. Loss of runt-related transcription factor 3 expression leads hepatocellular carcinoma cells to escape apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakamura Shinichiro

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Runt-related transcription factor 3 (RUNX3 is known as a tumor suppressor gene for gastric cancer and other cancers, this gene may be involved in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Methods RUNX3 expression was analyzed by immunoblot and immunohistochemistry in HCC cells and tissues, respectively. Hep3B cells, lacking endogenous RUNX3, were introduced with RUNX3 constructs. Cell proliferation was measured using the MTT assay and apoptosis was evaluated using DAPI staining. Apoptosis signaling was assessed by immunoblot analysis. Results RUNX3 protein expression was frequently inactivated in the HCC cell lines (91% and tissues (90%. RUNX3 expression inhibited 90 ± 8% of cell growth at 72 h in serum starved Hep3B cells. Forty-eight hour serum starvation-induced apoptosis and the percentage of apoptotic cells reached 31 ± 4% and 4 ± 1% in RUNX3-expressing Hep3B and control cells, respectively. Apoptotic activity was increased by Bim expression and caspase-3 and caspase-9 activation. Conclusion RUNX3 expression enhanced serum starvation-induced apoptosis in HCC cell lines. RUNX3 is deleted or weakly expressed in HCC, which leads to tumorigenesis by escaping apoptosis.

  20. Generation and characterization of APOBEC3G-positive 293T cells for HIV-1 Vif study

    OpenAIRE

    Piroozmand, Ahmad; Yamamoto, Yoshihiko; Khamsri, Boonruang; Fujita, Mikako; Uchiyama, Tsuneo; Adachi, Akio

    2007-01-01

    We have established a number of 293T cell lines that express a human anti HIV-1 factor APOBEC3G. Out of seven cell clones examined, four were readily demonstrated to express APOBEC3G by immunoblotting analysis. In particular, two clones (A3G-C1 and -C4) were found to produce a much higher level of functional APOBEC3G relative to that by pooled cell clones. The transfection efficiency of all these cell clones were similar to that of the parental cells, producing a comparable level of virions u...

  1. Recombinant immunoblot assay reaction patterns and hepatitis C virus RNA in blood donors and non-A, non-B hepatitis patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bresters, D.; Zaaijer, H. L.; Cuypers, H. T.; Reesink, H. W.; Winkel, I. N.; van Exel-Oehlers, P. J.; van Drimmelen, A. A.; Jansen, P. L.; van der Poel, C. L.; Lelie, P. N.

    1993-01-01

    To establish the value of the second-generation recombinant immunoblot assay (RIBA-2) and cDNA polymerase chain reaction (cDNA PCR) for confirmation of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, anti-HCV reaction patterns and the presence of HCV RNA were examined in 610 blood donors and 255 non-A, non-B

  2. Characterization of a new cell-bound alpha-amylase in Bacillus subtilis 168 Marburg that is only immunologically related to the exocellular alpha-amylase.

    OpenAIRE

    Haddaoui, E; Petit-Glatron, M F; Chambert, R

    1995-01-01

    Immunoblot analysis of Bacillus subtilis cell extracts with polyclonal antibodies, raised against purified exocellular alpha-amylase, revealed one protein species of 82,000 Da. This protein was found even in cells in which the amyE gene, encoding exocellular alpha-amylase, was disrupted. Isolated from the membrane fraction, the 82,000-M(r) protein displayed an alpha-amylase activity in vitro.

  3. Specific IgE Antibodies in Young Children with Atopic Dermatitis--Correlation of Multiple Allergen Simultaneous Immunoblot Test and ImmunoCap System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konopka, Ewa; Ceregra, Aldona; Maciorkowska, Elzbieta; Surowska, Barbara; Trojanowska, Ilona; Roszko-Kirpsza, Izabela; Cukrowska, Bozena

    2016-01-01

    Sensitization to food allergens is a common condition in pediatric atopic dermatitis (AD). Recently, the multiple allergen simultaneous test (MAST) allowing for a comprehensive assessment of atopy has been developed, but the usefulness in young AD children is not known. The aim of this study was to determine IgE specificity in AD children using MAST and to compare the results for selected food allergens with the reference ImmunoCap system. The study enrolled 50 children up to 2 years old with a diagnosis of AD. IgE antibodies were measured with the MAST-immunoblots. Children with specific IgE levels ≥ 0.35 kU/L were identified as sensitized to allergens. Most often children were sensitized to food allergens (egg white and yolk, hazelnuts, potato, cow's milk proteins, wheat flour, codfish, and soybean), but a high percentage of them also had IgE antibodies against house dust mites (12%), grass (10%), and birch (10%). Eight percent of children were sensitized to domestic animals (cats and dogs). Almost perfect (kappa index 0.8 - 1.0) and substantial (kappa index 0.6 - 0.8) agreement between MAST and ImmunoCap was found for food allergens except codfish. Pearson's analysis of antibody classes showed a very strong correlation between two methods (r = 0.8 - 1.0) for egg white, hazelnuts, potato, cow's milk proteins, wheat flour, and soybean, and a strong correlation (r = 0.6 - 0.79) was observed for peanut, egg yolk, and codfish. The study showed the frequent occurrence of IgE antibodies against food and airborne and animal allergens in young AD children and confirmed the usefulness of MAST-immunoblots for screening of sensitization in pediatric patients.

  4. Imiquimod activates p53-dependent apoptosis in a human basal cell carcinoma cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shi-Wei; Chang, Shu-Hao; Mu, Szu-Wei; Jiang, Hsin-Yi; Wang, Sin-Ting; Kao, Jun-Kai; Huang, Jau-Ling; Wu, Chun-Ying; Chen, Yi-Ju; Shieh, Jeng-Jer

    2016-03-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 controls DNA repair, cell cycle, apoptosis, autophagy and numerous other cellular processes. Imiquimod (IMQ), a synthetic toll-like receptor (TLR) 7 ligand for the treatment of superficial basal cell carcinoma (BCC), eliminates cancer cells by activating cell-mediated immunity and directly inducing apoptosis and autophagy in cancer cells. To evaluate the role of p53 in IMQ-induced cell death in skin cancer cells. The expression, phosphorylation and subcellular localization of p53 were detected by real-time PCR, luciferase reporter assay, cycloheximide chase analysis, immunoblotting and immunocytochemistry. Using BCC/KMC1 cell line as a model, the upstream signaling of p53 activation was dissected by over-expression of TLR7/8, the addition of ROS scavenger, ATM/ATR inhibitors and pan-caspase inhibitor. The role of p53 in IMQ-induced apoptosis and autophagy was assessed by genetically silencing p53 and evaluated by a DNA content assay, immunoblotting, LC3 puncta detection and acridine orange staining. IMQ induced p53 mRNA expression and protein accumulation, increased Ser15 phosphorylation, promoted nuclear translocation and up-regulated its target genes in skin cancer cells in a TLR7/8-independent manner. In BCC/KMC1 cells, the induction of p53 by IMQ was achieved through increased ROS production to stimulate the ATM/ATR-Chk1/Chk2 axis but was not mediated by inducing DNA damage. The pharmacological inhibition of ATM/ATR significantly suppressed IMQ-induced p53 activation and apoptosis. Silencing of p53 significantly decreased the IMQ-induced caspase cascade activation and apoptosis but enhanced autophagy. Mutant p53 skin cancer cell lines were more resistant to IMQ-induced apoptosis than wildtype p53 skin cancer cell lines. IMQ induced ROS production to stimulate ATM/ATR pathways and contributed to p53-dependent apoptosis in a skin basal cell carcinoma cell line BCC/KMC1. Copyright © 2015 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology

  5. 64 kDa protein is a candidate for a thyrotropin-releasing hormone receptor in prolactin-producing rat pituitary tumor cells (GH4C1 cells)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, M.; Hogset, A.; Alestrom, P.; Gautvik, K.M.

    1988-01-01

    A thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) binding protein of 64 kDa has been identified by covalently crosslinking [ 3 H]TRH to GH4C1 cells by ultraviolet illumination. The crosslinkage of [ 3 H]TRH is UV-dose dependent and is inhibited by an excess of unlabeled TRH. A 64 kDa protein is also detected on immunoblots using an antiserum raised against GH4C1 cell surface epitopes. In a closely related cell line (GH12C1) which does not bind [ 3 H]TRH, the 64 kDa protein cannot be demonstrated by [ 3 H]TRH crosslinking nor by immunoblotting. These findings indicate that the 64 kDa protein is a candidate for a TRH-receptor protein in GH4C1 cells

  6. Blocking Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Signaling in HTR-8/SVneo First Trimester Trophoblast Cells Results in Dephosphorylation of PKBα/AKT and Induces Apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Bolnick

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We identified a major peptide signaling target of EGF/EGFR pathway and explored the consequences of blocking or activating this pathway in the first trimester extravillous trophoblast cells, HTR-8/SVneo. A global analysis of protein phosphorylation was undertaken using novel technology (Kinexus Kinetworks that utilizes SDS-polyacrylamide minigel electrophoresis and multi-lane immunoblotting to permit specific and semiquantitative detection of multiple phosphoproteins. Forty-seven protein phosphorylation sites were queried, and the results reported based on relative phosphorylation at each site. EGF- and Iressa-(gefitinib, ZD1839, an inhibitor of EGFR treated HTR-8/SVneo cells were subjected to immunoblotting and flow cytometry to confirm the phosphoprotein screen and to assess the effects of EGF versus Iressa on cell cycle and apoptosis. EGFR mediates the phosphorylation of important signaling proteins, including PKBα/AKT. This pathway is likely to be central to EGFR-mediated trophoblast survival. Furthermore, EGF treatment induces proliferation and inhibits apoptosis, while Iressa induces apoptosis.

  7. Regulation of Motility, Invasion and Metastatic Potential of Squamous Cell Carcinoma by 1,25D3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yingyu; Yu, Wei-Dong; Su, Bing; Seshadri, Mukund; Luo, Wei; Trump, Donald L.; Johnson, Candace S.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND 1,25D3, the active metabolite of vitamin D, has been shown to exhibit broad spectrum anti-tumor activity in xenograft animal models. However, its activity against metastatic disease has not been extensively investigated. METHODS Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) or 1,25D3-resistant variant SCC-DR cells were treated with 1,25D3. Actin organization was examined by immunofluorescence assay. Cell migration was assessed by “wound” healing and chemotactic migration assay. Cell invasion was assessed by Matrigel-based invasion assay and in situ zymography. MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression and secretion was examined by immunoblot analysis and ELISA, respectively. E-cadherin expression was assessed by flow cytometry, immunoblot analysis and immunohistochemistry. Knockdown of E-cadherin was achieved by siRNA. Experimental metastasis mouse model was done by intravenous injection of tumor cells. Lung tumor development was assessed by magnetic resonance imaging, gross observation and histology. RESULTS SCC cellular morphology and actin organization were altered by 10 nM of 1,25D3. 1,25D3 inhibited SCC cell motility and invasion, which was associated with reduced expression and secretion of MMP-2 and MMP-9. 1,25D3 promoted the expression of E-cadherin. These findings were not observed in SCC-DR cells. Knock down of E-cadherin rescued 1,25D3-inhibited cell migration. Intravenous injection of SCC or SCC-DR cells resulted in the establishment of extensive pulmonary lesions in saline-treated C3H mice. Treatment with 1,25D3 resulted in a marked reduction in the formation of lung tumor colonies in animals injected with SCC but not SCC-DR cells. CONCLUSIONS 1,25D3 suppresses SCC cell motility, invasion and metastasis, partially through the promotion of E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion. PMID:22833444

  8. Comparison of Mother and Child Antibodies That Target High-Molecular-Mass Toxoplasma gondii Antigens by Immunoblotting Improves Neonatal Diagnosis of Congenital Toxoplasmosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallon, Martine; Faucher, Benoit; Piarroux, Renaud; Peyron, François; Franck, Jacqueline

    2012-01-01

    This retrospective study proposes a new reading of immunoblotting (IB) in the diagnosis of congenital toxoplasmosis. Our findings demonstrate that a three-IgM-band association at 75, 90, and 100 kDa called the IgM triplet increases the sensitivity to 95.8% when combined with prenatal and serological neonatal tests. PMID:22695159

  9. Comparison of two enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and one rapid immunoblot assay for detection of herpes simplex virus type 2-specific antibodies in serum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen, J; Van Dijk, G; Niesters, H G; Van Der Meijden, W I; Osterhaus, A D

    The sensitivities and specificities of three immunoassays for the detection of herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2)-specific immunoglobulin G antibodies in serum, including the one-strip rapid immunoblot assay (RIBA; Chiron Corporation) and two indirect enzyme immunosorbent assays (EIA; Gull

  10. Prognostic value of lymphoma-specific S-phase fraction compared with that of other cell proliferation markers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holte, H.; Kvaloey, S. [Dept. of Oncology, Univ. of Oslo (Norway); Suo Zhenhe; Langholm, R. [Dept. of Pathology, Univ. of Oslo (Norway); Smeland, E.B. [Dept. of Immunology, Univ. of Oslo (Norway); Stokke, T. [Dept. of Biophysics, Univ. of Oslo (Norway)

    1999-11-01

    The proliferation-associated antigens Ki67 (immunohistochemistry) and proliferative cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) (immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting) were analysed together with DNA synthesis ({sup 3}H-thymidine incorporation) and cell-cycle distribution (tumour-specific S-phase fraction determined by flow cytometry) in lymph node suspensions from 63 patients with newly diagnosed B-Cell non-Hodgkin`s lymphomas. Details of clinical parameters, treatment and patient outcome were available for all patients, and retrospectively analysed. Of the proliferation-associated parameters, only high S-phase fraction (p < 0.00001) and high PCNA expression by immunoblotting (p=0.012) were predictive of a poor prognosis. Of the conventional parameters, high-grade malignancy, high International Prognostic Index (IPI) score, bulky disease and presence of B symptoms predicted a patient for poor survival. High S-phase fraction was predictive of a short survival for the low-grade lymphomas analyses separately (p < 0.00001), as well as for patients treated with an Adriamycin- and a non-Adriamycin-containing regimen (p < 0.005 for both groups). In a multivariate analysis, S-phase fraction (p=0.00006), IPI score (p=0.015) and B symptoms (p=0.017) had independent prognostic values, but not histological grade. (orig.)

  11. Prognostic value of lymphoma-specific S-phase fraction compared with that of other cell proliferation markers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holte, H.; Kvaloey, S.; Suo Zhenhe; Langholm, R.; Smeland, E.B.; Stokke, T.

    1999-01-01

    The proliferation-associated antigens Ki67 (immunohistochemistry) and proliferative cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) (immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting) were analysed together with DNA synthesis ( 3 H-thymidine incorporation) and cell-cycle distribution (tumour-specific S-phase fraction determined by flow cytometry) in lymph node suspensions from 63 patients with newly diagnosed B-Cell non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. Details of clinical parameters, treatment and patient outcome were available for all patients, and retrospectively analysed. Of the proliferation-associated parameters, only high S-phase fraction (p < 0.00001) and high PCNA expression by immunoblotting (p=0.012) were predictive of a poor prognosis. Of the conventional parameters, high-grade malignancy, high International Prognostic Index (IPI) score, bulky disease and presence of B symptoms predicted a patient for poor survival. High S-phase fraction was predictive of a short survival for the low-grade lymphomas analyses separately (p < 0.00001), as well as for patients treated with an Adriamycin- and a non-Adriamycin-containing regimen (p < 0.005 for both groups). In a multivariate analysis, S-phase fraction (p=0.00006), IPI score (p=0.015) and B symptoms (p=0.017) had independent prognostic values, but not histological grade. (orig.)

  12. Transcript and protein analysis reveals better survival skills of monocyte-derived dendritic cells compared to monocytes during oxidative stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilse Van Brussel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dendritic cells (DCs, professional antigen-presenting cells with the unique ability to initiate primary T-cell responses, are present in atherosclerotic lesions where they are exposed to oxidative stress that generates cytotoxic reactive oxygen species (ROS. A large body of evidence indicates that cell death is a major modulating factor of atherogenesis. We examined antioxidant defence systems of human monocyte-derived (moDCs and monocytes in response to oxidative stress. METHODS: Oxidative stress was induced by addition of tertiary-butylhydroperoxide (tert-BHP, 30 min. Cellular responses were evaluated using flow cytometry and confocal live cell imaging (both using 5-(and-6-chloromethyl-2,7-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate, CM-H(2DCFDA. Viability was assessed by the neutral red assay. Total RNA was extracted for a PCR profiler array. Five genes were selected for confirmation by Taqman gene expression assays, and by immunoblotting or immunohistochemistry for protein levels. RESULTS: Tert-BHP increased CM-H(2DCFDA fluorescence and caused cell death. Interestingly, all processes occurred more slowly in moDCs than in monocytes. The mRNA profiler array showed more than 2-fold differential expression of 32 oxidative stress-related genes in unstimulated moDCs, including peroxiredoxin-2 (PRDX2, an enzyme reducing hydrogen peroxide and lipid peroxides. PRDX2 upregulation was confirmed by Taqman assays, immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry. Silencing PRDX2 in moDCs by means of siRNA significantly increased CM-DCF fluorescence and cell death upon tert-BHP-stimulation. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate that moDCs exhibit higher intracellular antioxidant capacities, making them better equipped to resist oxidative stress than monocytes. Upregulation of PRDX2 is involved in the neutralization of ROS in moDCs. Taken together, this points to better survival skills of DCs in oxidative stress environments, such as atherosclerotic plaques.

  13. Genistein suppresses adhesion-induced protein tyrosine phosphorylation and invasion of B16-BL6 melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, C; Han, R

    1998-07-03

    Protein tyrosine phosphorylation occurs as one of the earlier events in cancer cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interaction. With immunoblot analysis and immunofluorescence microscopy, genistein was found to suppress the tyrosine phosphorylation of proteins located at the cell periphery, including a 125 kDa protein, when B16-BL6 melanoma cells attached to and interacted with ECM. When accompanied by the suppression of adhesion-induced protein tyrosine phosphorylation, the invasive potential of B16-BL6 cells through reconstituted basement membrane was decreased significantly. However, neither adhesive capability nor cell growth was significantly affected by genistein. Therefore, the interruption of cancer cell-ECM interaction by suppression of protein tyrosine phosphorylation may contribute to invasion prevention of genistein.

  14. Neuroprotective effects of curcumin on endothelin-1 mediated cell death in hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankowska, Dorota L; Krishnamoorthy, Vignesh R; Ellis, Dorette Z; Krishnamoorthy, Raghu R

    2017-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by loss of hippocampal neurons leading to memory deficits and cognitive decline. Studies suggest that levels of the vasoactive peptide endothelin-1 (ET-1) are increased in the brain tissue of Alzheimer's patients. Curcumin, the main ingredient of the spice turmeric, has been shown to have anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, and neuroprotective effects. However, the mechanisms underlying some of these beneficial effects are not completely understood. The objective of this study was to determine if curcumin could protect hippocampal neurons from ET-1 mediated cell death and examine the involvement of c-Jun in this pathway. Primary hippocampal neurons from rat pups were isolated using a previously published protocol. Viability of the cells was measured by the live/dead assay. Immunoblot and immunohistochemical analyses were performed to analyze c-Jun levels in hippocampal neurons treated with either ET-1 or a combination of ET-1 and curcumin. Apoptotic changes were evaluated by immunoblot detection of cleaved caspase-3, cleaved fodrin, and a caspase 3/7 activation assay. ET-1 treatment produced a 2-fold increase in the levels of c-Jun as determined by an immunoblot analysis in hippocampal neurons. Co-treatment with curcumin significantly attenuated the ET-1 mediated increase in c-Jun levels. ET-1 caused increased neuronal cell death of hippocampal neurons indicated by elevation of cleaved caspase-3, cleaved fodrin and an increased activity of caspases 3 and 7 which was attenuated by co-treatment with curcumin. Blockade of JNK, an upstream effector of c-Jun by specific inhibitor SP600125 did not fully protect from ET-1 mediated activation of pro-apoptotic enzymes in primary hippocampal cells. Our data suggests that one mechanism by which curcumin protects against ET-1-mediated cell death is through blocking an increase in c-Jun levels. Other possible mechanisms include decreasing pro

  15. Inhibition of Akt activity induces the mesenchymal-to-epithelial reverting transition with restoring E-cadherin expression in KB and KOSCC-25B oral squamous cell carcinoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Sam-Pyo

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Akt/PKB family of kinases is frequently activated in human cancers, including oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC. Akt-induced epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT involves downregulation of E-cadherin, which appears to result from upregulation of the transcription repressor Snail. Recently, it was proposed that carcinoma cells, especially in metastatic sites, could acquire the mesenchymal-to-epithelial reverting transition (MErT in order to adapt the microenvironments and re-expression of E-cadherin be a critical indicator of MErT. However, the precise mechanism and biologic or clinical importance of the MErT in cancers have been little known. This study aimed to investigate whether Akt inhibition would restore the expression of E-cadherin and β-catenin, reduce that of Vimentin, and induce the MErT in OSCC cells with low or negative expression of E-cadherin. We also investigate whether inhibition of Akt activity would affect the E-cadherin repressors and signaling molecules like NF-κB, ERK, and p38. Methods We screened several OSCC cell lines in order to select suitable cell line models for inducing MErT, using immunoblotting and methylation specific-PCR. We examined whether Akt inhibitor phosphatidylinositol ether lipid analogues (PIA treatment would restore the expression of E-cadherin and β-catenin, reduce that of Vimentin, and induce the MErT in KB and KOSCC-25B cells using RT-PCR, immunoblotting, immunofluorescence analysis, and in vitro migration assay. We also investigated whether inhibition of Akt activity would affect the E-cadherin repressors, including Snail, Twist, and SIP-1/ZEB-2 and signaling molecules like NF-κB, ERK, JNK, and p38 using RT-PCR, immunoblotting, and immunofluorescence analysis. Results Of the 7 OSCC cell lines, KB and KOSCC-25B showed constitutively activated phosphorylated Akt and low or negative expression of E-cadherin. Inhibition of Akt activity by PIA decreased NF-κB signaling

  16. Monoclonal antibodies against muscle actin isoforms: epitope identification and analysis of isoform expression by immunoblot and immunostaining in normal and regenerating skeletal muscle [version 2; referees: 3 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Chaponnier

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Higher vertebrates (mammals and birds express six different highly conserved actin isoforms that can be classified in three subgroups: 1 sarcomeric actins, α-skeletal (α-SKA and α-cardiac (α-CAA, 2 smooth muscle actins (SMAs, α-SMA and γ-SMA, and 3 cytoplasmic actins (CYAs, β-CYA and γ-CYA. The variations among isoactins, in each subgroup, are due to 3-4 amino acid differences located in their acetylated N-decapeptide sequence. The first monoclonal antibody (mAb against an actin isoform (α-SMA was produced and characterized in our laboratory in 1986 (Skalli  et al., 1986 . We have further obtained mAbs against the 5 other isoforms. In this report, we focus on the mAbs anti-α-SKA and anti-α-CAA obtained after immunization of mice with the respective acetylated N-terminal decapeptides using the Repetitive Immunizations at Multiple Sites Strategy (RIMMS. In addition to the identification of their epitope by immunoblotting, we describe the expression of the 2 sarcomeric actins in mature skeletal muscle and during muscle repair after micro-lesions. In particular, we analyze the expression of α-CAA, α-SKA and α-SMA by co-immunostaining in a time course frame during the muscle repair process. Our results indicate that a restricted myocyte population expresses α-CAA and suggest a high capacity of self-regeneration in muscle cells. These antibodies may represent a helpful tool for the follow-up of muscle regeneration and pathological changes.

  17. Combination Effect of Nimotuzumab with Radiation in Colorectal Cancer Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Hye Kyung; Kim, Mi Sook; Jeong, Jae Hoon

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the radiosensitizing effect of the selective epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor nimotuzumab in human colorectal cancer cell lines. Four human colorectal cancer cell lines, HCT-8, LoVo, WiDr, and HCT-116 were treated with nimotuzumab and/or radiation. The effects on cell proliferation, viability, and cell cycle progression were measured by MTT, clonogenic survival assay, flow cytometry, and Western blot. An immunoblot analysis revealed that EGFR phosphorylation was inhibited by nimotuzumab in colorectal cancer cell lines. Under these experimental conditions, pre-treatment with nimotuzumab increased radiosensitivity of colorectal cancer cell lines, except for cell line HCT-116. However, cell proliferation or cell cycle progression was not affected by the addition of nimotuzumab, irrespective of irradiation. Nimotuzumab enhanced the radiosensitivity of colorectal cancer cells in vitro by inhibiting EGFR-mediated cell survival signaling. This study provided a rationale for the clinical application of the selective EGFR inhibitor, nimotuzumab in combination with radiation in colorectal cancer cells.

  18. Imunoblot como teste suplementar para detecção de anticorpos contra o vírus da hepatite C em doadores de sangue Immunoblot as a supplemental test to detect antibodies to hepatitis C virus in blood donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco José Dutra Souto

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available Testes suplementares para melhorar a especificidade do anti-VHC por ELISA nos bancos de sangue não são oficialmente recomendados no Brasil. No intuito de avaliar a taxa de falso-positivos, 70 doadores com transaminases normais e anti-VHC por ELISA foram submetidos a imunoblot de 3ª geração no Hemocentro de Mato Grosso, que não dispõe da técnica da reação de cadeia de polimerase. O teste confirmou o anti-VHC em 44 (62,9%, sendo negativo em 22 (31,4% e indeterminado em 4 (5,7%. Confirmação pelo imunoblot ajuda a identificar os testes ELISA que são falso-positivos, tranqüilizando o grande contingente de doadores nessa situação e separando os que necessitam de acompanhamento médico. Com esse objetivo, sugere-se que o imunoblot poderia ser útil nos bancos de sangue brasileiros que não contam com técnicas de Biologia Molecular.Supplemental tests using Immunoblot are recommended to improve specificity of anti-HCV by ELISA. In Brazil immunoblot is not officially recommended. Aiming to identify EIA false-positive rate 70 positive EIA anti-HCV blood donors were submitted to 3rd generation immunoblot at Hemocentro of Mato Grosso State where polymerase chain reaction tests are not performed. There were 44 (62.9% immunoblot-positive, 22 (31.4% negative and 4 (5.7% indeterminate. Anti-HCV immunoblot can distinguish blood donors with false-positive ELISA from those who need medical assessment. Our data suggest that immunoblot could be useful in Brazilian blood banks where molecular biology tests are not available.

  19. Hypoxic enhancement of exosome release by breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, Hamish W; Michael, Michael Z; Gleadle, Jonathan M

    2012-01-01

    Exosomes are nanovesicles secreted by tumour cells which have roles in paracrine signalling during tumour progression, including tumour-stromal interactions, activation of proliferative pathways and bestowing immunosuppression. Hypoxia is an important feature of solid tumours which promotes tumour progression, angiogenesis and metastasis, potentially through exosome-mediated signalling. Breast cancer cell lines were cultured under either moderate (1% O 2 ) or severe (0.1% O 2 ) hypoxia. Exosomes were isolated from conditioned media and quantitated by nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA) and immunoblotting for the exosomal protein CD63 in order to assess the impact of hypoxia on exosome release. Hypoxic exosome fractions were assayed for miR-210 by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and normalised to exogenous and endogenous control genes. Statistical significance was determined using the Student T test with a P value of < 0.05 considered significant. Exposure of three different breast cancer cell lines to moderate (1% O 2 ) and severe (0.1% O 2 ) hypoxia resulted in significant increases in the number of exosomes present in the conditioned media as determined by NTA and CD63 immunoblotting. Activation of hypoxic signalling by dimethyloxalylglycine, a hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) hydroxylase inhibitor, resulted in significant increase in exosome release. Transfection of cells with HIF-1α siRNA prior to hypoxic exposure prevented the enhancement of exosome release by hypoxia. The hypoxically regulated miR-210 was identified to be present at elevated levels in hypoxic exosome fractions. These data provide evidence that hypoxia promotes the release of exosomes by breast cancer cells, and that this hypoxic response may be mediated by HIF-1α. Given an emerging role for tumour cell-derived exosomes in tumour progression, this has significant implications for understanding the hypoxic tumour phenotype, whereby hypoxic cancer cells may release

  20. Determination of the synthesis of uptake of α2-macroglobulin by cultured human glioma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Druskova, E.; Bizik, J.; Grofova, M.

    1994-01-01

    Using immunological techniques, the synthesis of α 2 -macroglobulin was studied in established cell lines derived from human glioblastomas multiform. α 2 -Macroglobulin was detected in cytoplasm and in the culture medium of the analyzed cell lines. Radioimmunoprecipitation, revealed a protein with Mr corresponding to α 2 -macroglobulin in the medium conditioned by U-118MG and U-343MG cells. On the other hand, using immunoblot analysis, α 2 -macroglobulin was detected in all of the analyzed lines. In immunofluorescence test, α 2 -macroglobulin was determined also in all four cell lines, but with different staining pattern. Conditioned culture medium of U-536MG cells with the lowest level of α 2 -macroglobulin exerted the lowest mitogenic activity for human fibroblasts. (author)

  1. A laser ablation ICP-MS based method for multiplexed immunoblot analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Bang, Thomas Christian; Petersen, Jørgen; Pedas, Pai Rosager

    2015-01-01

    developed a multiplexed antibody-based assay and analysed selected PSII subunits in barley (Hordeum vulgare L.). A selection of antibodies were labelled with specific lanthanides and immunoreacted with thylakoids exposed to Mn deficiency after western blotting. Subsequently, western blot membranes were...... analysed by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS), which allowed selective and relative quantitative analysis via the different lanthanides. The method was evaluated against established liquid chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC...... by more than one technique. The developed method enables a higher number of proteins to be multiplexed in comparison to existing immunoassays. Furthermore, multiplexed protein analysis by LA-ICP-MS provides an analytical platform with high throughput appropriate for screening large collections of plants....

  2. Alterations in the nuclear proteome of HIV-1 infected T-cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeBoer, Jason; Jagadish, Teena; Haverland, Nicole A.; Madson, Christian J.; Ciborowski, Pawel; Belshan, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Virus infection of a cell involves the appropriation of host factors and the innate defensive response of the cell. The identification of proteins critical for virus replication may lead to the development of novel, cell-based inhibitors. In this study we mapped the changes in T-cell nuclei during human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) at 20 hpi. Using a stringent data threshold, a total of 13 and 38 unique proteins were identified in infected and uninfected cells, respectively, across all biological replicates. An additional 15 proteins were found to be differentially regulated between infected and control nuclei. STRING analysis identified four clusters of protein–protein interactions in the data set related to nuclear architecture, RNA regulation, cell division, and cell homeostasis. Immunoblot analysis confirmed the differential expression of several proteins in both C8166-45 and Jurkat E6-1 T-cells. These data provide a map of the response in host cell nuclei upon HIV-1 infection. - Highlights: • We identify changes in the expression of nuclear proteins during HIV-1 infection. • 163 nuclear proteins were found differentially regulated during HIV-1 infection. • Bioinformatic analysis identified several nuclear pathways altered by HIV infection. • Candidate factors were validated in two independent cell lines

  3. Alterations in the nuclear proteome of HIV-1 infected T-cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeBoer, Jason [Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, Creighton University, 2500 California Plaza, Omaha, NE 68178 (United States); Jagadish, Teena; Haverland, Nicole A. [Department of Pharmacology and Experimental Neuroscience, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198 (United States); Madson, Christian J. [Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, Creighton University, 2500 California Plaza, Omaha, NE 68178 (United States); Ciborowski, Pawel [Department of Pharmacology and Experimental Neuroscience, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198 (United States); The Nebraska Center for Virology, University of Nebraska, Lincoln 68583 (United States); Belshan, Michael, E-mail: michaelbelshan@creighton.edu [Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, Creighton University, 2500 California Plaza, Omaha, NE 68178 (United States); The Nebraska Center for Virology, University of Nebraska, Lincoln 68583 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Virus infection of a cell involves the appropriation of host factors and the innate defensive response of the cell. The identification of proteins critical for virus replication may lead to the development of novel, cell-based inhibitors. In this study we mapped the changes in T-cell nuclei during human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) at 20 hpi. Using a stringent data threshold, a total of 13 and 38 unique proteins were identified in infected and uninfected cells, respectively, across all biological replicates. An additional 15 proteins were found to be differentially regulated between infected and control nuclei. STRING analysis identified four clusters of protein–protein interactions in the data set related to nuclear architecture, RNA regulation, cell division, and cell homeostasis. Immunoblot analysis confirmed the differential expression of several proteins in both C8166-45 and Jurkat E6-1 T-cells. These data provide a map of the response in host cell nuclei upon HIV-1 infection. - Highlights: • We identify changes in the expression of nuclear proteins during HIV-1 infection. • 163 nuclear proteins were found differentially regulated during HIV-1 infection. • Bioinformatic analysis identified several nuclear pathways altered by HIV infection. • Candidate factors were validated in two independent cell lines.

  4. Effect of radiation on the expression of E-cadherin and α-catenin and invasive capacity in human lung cancer cell line in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akimoto, Tetsuo; Mitsuhashi, Norio; Saito, Yoshihiro; Ebara, Takeshi; Niibe, Hideo

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of radiation on E-cadherin and α-catenin expression in a human lung cancer cell line, and also evaluate invasive capacity in the membrane invasion culture system using the Boyden Chamber. Materials and Methods: The immunoblot and immunofluorescence analyses were performed using the human lung cancer cell line A549 to examine altered expression of E-cadherin and α-catenin after irradiation. We also compared invasive capacity of untreated cells with that of irradiated cells. Results: Immunoblot analysis revealed that the expression of E-cadherin increased after irradiation. In a time-course analysis, the expression was increased 6 h after irradiation with 10 Gy and reached its peak level at 24 h, being 2.3 times the control value, whereas expression at 1 and 3 h after irradiation was almost equivalent to that of the control. A slight increase in expression was observed after irradiation of 2 Gy and the expression reached peak levels after 5 Gy. After fractionated irradiation, the increase in expression of both E-cadherin and α-catenin was observed, and the alteration of α-catenin was more prominent than that after a single irradiation of the same total dose. In the immunofluorescence study for E-cadherin antibody analyzed by confocal laser scanning microscopy, increased intensity in irradiated cells produced as a nondisrupted and continuous line at cell-cell contact sites. In an invasive assay, the number of migrated cells in irradiated cells after a dose of 5 and 10 Gy was reduced significantly compared to untreated cells. Conclusion: The results indicate that irradiation of A549 increased the expression of E-cadherin, possibly preserving their functional property

  5. Immunomagnetic separation combined with colony immunoblotting for selective enrichment and detection of piliated Lactobacillus rhamnosus strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Z Q; Wei, Y F; Rao, S Q; Gao, L; Yin, Y Q; Xue, F; Fang, W M; Gu, R X; Jiao, X A

    2016-11-01

    Piliated Lactobacillus rhamnosus (pLR) strains have attracted much attention owing to their excellent mucus adhering capacity and immunomodulatory effects. Here, we aimed to develop a rapid, sensitive method for isolating pLR strains in complex ecosystems using immunomagnetic separation (IMS) with colony immunoblotting (CIB). Magnetic nanobeads (diameter: 180 nm) conjugated with anti-pLR SpaA pilin antibodies (anti-SpaA) were prepared and used to preconcentrate pLR strains in samples, followed by confirmation with anti-SpaA-based CIB analysis. Under optimized experimental conditions, IMS-CIB selectively recovered pLR strains from 10 7  CFU ml -1 of faecal microbiota samples spiked with 2·9 × 10 1 to 2·4 × 10 6  CFU ml -1 of pLR strains. No positive colonies were detected in samples without addition of pLR strains. The detection limit of IMS-CIB was 29 CFU pLR ml -1 of faecal microbiota, which is much lower than that of CIB without IMS preconcentration (2·0 × 10 4  CFU ml -1 ). IMS-CIB allowed selective preconcentration of pLR strains in highly heterogeneous bacterial suspensions and direct detection of pLR colonies, which remained readily available for subsequent isolation. Our findings established an effective method for selective enrichment and detection of pLR strains. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  6. Metamorphosis of Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1 cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fengli; Yu-Zhang, Kui; Zhao, Sanjun; Xiao, Tian; Denis, Michel; Wu, Longfei

    2010-03-01

    Magnetospirillum magneticum strain AMB-1 belongs to the family of magnetotactic bacteria. It possesses a magnetosome chain aligning, with the assistance of cytoskeleton filaments MamK, along the long axis of the spiral cells. Most fresh M. magneticum AMB-1 cells exhibit spiral morphology. In addition, other cell shapes such as curved and spherical were also observed in this organism. Interestingly, the spherical cell shape increased steadily with prolonged incubation time. As the actin-like cytoskeleton protein MreB is involved in maintenance of cell shapes in rod-shaped bacteria such as Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis, the correlation between MreB protein levels and cell shape was investigated in this study. Immunoblotting analysis showed that the quantity of MreB decreased when the cell shape changed along with incubation time. As an internal control, the quantity of MamA was not obviously changed under the same conditions. Cell shape directs cell-wall synthesis during growth and division. MreB is required for maintaining the cell shape. Thus, MreB might play an essential role in maintaining the spiral shape of M. magneticum AMB-1 cells.

  7. CXCL12 chemokine expression and secretion regulates colorectal carcinoma cell anoikis through Bim-mediated intrinsic apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke J Drury

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Resistance to anoikis, apoptosis triggered by a loss of cellular adhesion to the underlying extracellular matrix, is a hallmark of metastatic cancer. Previously we have shown re-establishment of CXCL12 expression in colorectal carcinoma cells inhibits metastasis by enhancing anoikis sensitivity. The objective of these studies was to define the signaling mechanisms regulating CXCL12-mediated anoikis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Adhesion, examined by crystal violet staining, immunofluorescence microscopy, and immunoblot analysis indicated decreased focal adhesion signaling corresponding with loss of adhesion in cells constitutively simulated by CXCL12. Loss of adhesion was inhibited by pertussis toxin treatment, indicating CXCL12 regulating anoikis through G(αi-protein coupled receptors. Non-adherent HCT116 and HT29 colorectal carcinoma cells expressing CXCL12 exhibited enhanced anoikis sensitivity by propidium iodide staining, caspase activity assays, and immunoblot compared to GFP control cells. CXCL12 producing carcinomas cultured on poly-HEMA displayed heightened Bim and loss of Mcl-1 and Bcl-2 preceding cytochrome c release, and caspase-9 activation. RNAi knockdown of Bim reversed anoikis sensitivity of CXCL12-expressing cells and fostered increased soft-agar foci formation and hepatic tumors in an orthotopic mouse model of metastasis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data indicate CXCL12 provides a barrier to metastasis by increasing anoikis via activation of a Bim-mediated intrinsic apoptotic pathway. These results underscore the importance of retaining CXCL12 expression to sensitize colorectal carcinomas to anoikis and minimize tumor progression.

  8. Pirarubicin induces an autophagic cytoprotective response through suppression of the mammalian target of rapamycin signaling pathway in human bladder cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Kuiqing; Chen, Xu; Liu, Cheng; Gu, Peng; Li, Zhuohang; Wu, Shaoxu; Xu, Kewei; Lin, Tianxin; Huang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Pirarubicin is widely used in intravesical chemotherapy for bladder cancer, but its efficacy is limited due to drug resistance; the mechanism has not been well studied. Emerging evidence shows that autophagy can be a novel target for cancer therapy. This study aimed to investigate the role of autophagy in pirarubicin-treated bladder cancer cells. Bladder cancer cells EJ and J82 were treated with pirarubicin, siRNA, 3-methyladenine or hydroxychloroquine. Cell proliferation and apoptosis were tested by cell survival assay and flow cytometric analysis, respectively. Autophagy was evaluated by immunoblotting before and after the treatments. The phosphorylated mammalian target of rapamycin, serine/threonine kinase p70 S6 kinase, and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E binding protein 1 were also investigated by immunoblotting. We found that pirarubicin could induce autophagy in bladder cancer cells. Inhibition of autophagy by 3-methyladenine, hydroxychloroquine or knockdown of autophagy related gene 3 significantly increased apoptosis in pirarubicin-treated bladder cancer cells. Pirarubicin-induced autophagy was mediated via the mTOR/p70S6K/4E-BP1 signaling pathway. In conclusion, autophagy induced by pirarubicin plays a cytoprotective role in bladder cancer cells, suggesting that inhibition of autophagy may improve efficacy over traditional pirarubicin chemotherapy in bladder cancer patients. - Highlights: • Pirarubicin induced autophagy in bladder cancer cells. • Inhibition of autophagy enhanced pirarubicin-induced apoptosis. • Pirarubicin induced autophagy through inhibition of mTOR signaling pathway

  9. Pirarubicin induces an autophagic cytoprotective response through suppression of the mammalian target of rapamycin signaling pathway in human bladder cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Kuiqing; Chen, Xu [Department of Urology, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510120 (China); Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Malignant Tumor Epigenetics and Gene Regulation, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510120 (China); Liu, Cheng [Department of Urology, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510120 (China); Gu, Peng; Li, Zhuohang; Wu, Shaoxu [Department of Urology, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510120 (China); Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Malignant Tumor Epigenetics and Gene Regulation, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510120 (China); Xu, Kewei [Department of Urology, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510120 (China); Lin, Tianxin, E-mail: tianxinl@sina.com [Department of Urology, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510120 (China); Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Malignant Tumor Epigenetics and Gene Regulation, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510120 (China); Huang, Jian, E-mail: urolhj@sina.com [Department of Urology, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510120 (China)

    2015-05-01

    Pirarubicin is widely used in intravesical chemotherapy for bladder cancer, but its efficacy is limited due to drug resistance; the mechanism has not been well studied. Emerging evidence shows that autophagy can be a novel target for cancer therapy. This study aimed to investigate the role of autophagy in pirarubicin-treated bladder cancer cells. Bladder cancer cells EJ and J82 were treated with pirarubicin, siRNA, 3-methyladenine or hydroxychloroquine. Cell proliferation and apoptosis were tested by cell survival assay and flow cytometric analysis, respectively. Autophagy was evaluated by immunoblotting before and after the treatments. The phosphorylated mammalian target of rapamycin, serine/threonine kinase p70 S6 kinase, and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E binding protein 1 were also investigated by immunoblotting. We found that pirarubicin could induce autophagy in bladder cancer cells. Inhibition of autophagy by 3-methyladenine, hydroxychloroquine or knockdown of autophagy related gene 3 significantly increased apoptosis in pirarubicin-treated bladder cancer cells. Pirarubicin-induced autophagy was mediated via the mTOR/p70S6K/4E-BP1 signaling pathway. In conclusion, autophagy induced by pirarubicin plays a cytoprotective role in bladder cancer cells, suggesting that inhibition of autophagy may improve efficacy over traditional pirarubicin chemotherapy in bladder cancer patients. - Highlights: • Pirarubicin induced autophagy in bladder cancer cells. • Inhibition of autophagy enhanced pirarubicin-induced apoptosis. • Pirarubicin induced autophagy through inhibition of mTOR signaling pathway.

  10. Abnormal A-type lamin organization in a human lung carcinoma cell line

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Machiels, BM; Broers, JL; Raymond, Y; de Leij, Louis; Kuijpers, HJH; Caberg, NEH; Ramaekers, Frans C. S.

    We have studied the expression of lamins A and C (A-type lamins) in a lung carcinoma cell line using type-specific monoclonal antibodies, Using immunofluorescence and immunoblotting studies it was noted that several irregularities in lamin expression exist in the cell line GLC-A1, derived from an

  11. Growth-Inhibitory and Apoptosis-Inducing Effects of Punica granatum L. var. spinosa (Apple Punice) on Fibrosarcoma Cell Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sineh Sepehr, Koushan; Baradaran, Behzad; Mazandarani, Masoumeh; Yousefi, Bahman; Abdollahpour Alitappeh, Meghdad; Khori, Vahid

    2014-12-01

    Punica granatum L. var. granatum (Pomegranate), an herbaceous plant found in Iran, The aim of this study was to investigate the cytotoxic effects, induction of apoptosis, and the mechanism of cell death of ethanol extract from Punica granatum L. var. spinosa on the mouse fibrosarcoma cell line, WEHI-164. Various parts of the herbs were extracted from fruit using ethanol as the solvent, and the cytotoxicity and cell viability of the ethanolic extract were determined by the MTT assay. To determine whether necrosis or apoptosis is the predominant cause of cell death, cell death detection was performed using the ELISA method. The induction of apoptosis was confirmed using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase- (TdT-) mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay. Moreover, a sensitive immunoblotting technique was used to examine the production of Caspase-3 and Bcl2 proteins. Our findings suggested that the ethalonic extract of Punica granatum L. var. spinosa altered cell morphology, decreased cell viability, suppressed cell proliferation and induced cell death in a time- and dose-dependent manner in WEHI-164 cells (IC50 = 229.024μg/ml), when compared to a chemotherapeutic anticancer drug, Toxol (Vesper Pharmaceuticals), with increased nucleosome production from apoptotic cells. Induction of apoptosis by the plant extract was proved by the decrease of pro-Caspase-3 and Bcl2 proteins and quantitatively confirmed by Immunoblotting analysis. The results obtained from the present study have demonstrated the growth-inhibitory effect of Ethanol Extracts from Punica granatum L. var. spinosa, and clearly showed that apoptosis was the major mechanism of in-vitro cell death induced by the extract.

  12. Combination of ascorbate/epigallocatechin-3-gallate/gemcitabine synergistically induces cell cycle deregulation and apoptosis in mesothelioma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinotti, Simona [Dipartimento di Scienze e Innovazione Tecnologica, Università del Piemonte Orientale “Amedeo Avogadro”, viale T. Michel 11, 15121 Alessandria (Italy); Ranzato, Elia, E-mail: ranzato@unipmn.it [Dipartimento di Scienze e Innovazione Tecnologica, Università del Piemonte Orientale “Amedeo Avogadro”, viale T. Michel 11, 15121 Alessandria (Italy); Parodi, Monica [IRCCS A.O.U. S. Martino-IST, Istituto Nazionale per la Ricerca sul Cancro, 16132 Genova (Italy); DI.ME.S., Università degli Studi di Genova, Via L. Alberti 2, 16132 Genova (Italy); Vitale, Massimo [IRCCS A.O.U. S. Martino-IST, Istituto Nazionale per la Ricerca sul Cancro, 16132 Genova (Italy); Burlando, Bruno [Dipartimento di Scienze e Innovazione Tecnologica, Università del Piemonte Orientale “Amedeo Avogadro”, viale T. Michel 11, 15121 Alessandria (Italy)

    2014-01-01

    Malignant mesothelioma (MMe) is a poor-prognosis tumor in need of innovative therapies. In a previous in vivo study, we showed synergistic anti-MMe properties of the ascorbate/epigallocatechin-3-gallate/gemcitabine combination. We have now focused on the mechanism of action, showing the induction of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest through measurements of caspase 3, intracellular Ca{sup 2+}, annexin V, and DNA content. StellArray™ PCR technology and Western immunoblotting revealed DAPK2-dependent apoptosis, upregulation of cell cycle promoters, downregulation of cell cycle checkpoints and repression of NFκB expression. The complex of data indicates that the mixture is synergistic in inducing cell cycle deregulation and non-inflammatory apoptosis, suggesting its possible use in MMe treatment. - Highlights: • Ascorbate/epigallocathechin-gallate/gemcitabine has been tested on mesothelioma cells • A synergistic mechanism has been shown for cell cycle arrest and apoptosis • PCR-array analysis has revealed the de-regulation of apoptosis and cell cycle genes • Maximum upregulation has been found for the Death-Associated Protein Kinase-2 gene • Data suggest that the mixture could be used as a clinical treatment.

  13. Simultaneous identification of Trypanosoma cruzi surface and internal antigens reactive to different immunoglobulin classes (radio-immunoblotting Identificação simultânea de antígenos internos e de superfície de Trypanosoma cruzi reativos para diferentes classes de imunoglobulinas (radio-immunoblotting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Maria Simonsen Stolf

    1990-10-01

    Full Text Available A radioactive Western-blotting technique was developed by which the reactivity of Immunoglobulins (Igs from different classes to both membrane radiolabelled and internal parasite antigens is simultaneously identified. The method includes radioiodination of parasites, polypeptide fractionation by SDS-PAGE, Western-blot transfer and autoradiography of the immunoblots developed with anti-Igs conjugates labelled with enzymes. The analysis is then performed by the comparison of common bands on the autoradiograms and the respective substrate stained nitrocellulose blots. This technique was used to analyse T. cruzi trypomastigote surface labelled antigens reactive to IgM, IgA and IgG specific antibodies. A different pattern of reactivity with acute Chagas' disease patients sera was thus obtained.Classes e subclasses de anticorpos apresentam diferentes funções, influenciando a resposta imune humoral de um hospedeiro, frente a um agente infeccioso. Na maioria dos sistemas, o alvo principal é representado pelos antígenos de membrana do parasita. Entretanto, a identificação de antígenos de superfície de parasitas, reativos para classe (e subclasse de imunoglobulinas que não se ligam a proteína-A implica em imunoprecipitações sucessivas, que levam a perda de antígenos e/ou reações inespecíficas. Visando esse estudo, foi desenvolvida uma técnica denominada "radio-immunoblotting", através da qual a reatividade de imunoglobulinas de diferentes classes para antígenos de membrana (e/ou internos foi analisada simultaneamente. O método constitui na marcação prévia da superfície dos parasitas por radioiodação, fracionamento dos polipeptídeos por SDS/PA-GE, transferência das frações para nitrocelulose, reação com soros e conjugados anti-Igs - peroxidase e autoradiografia dos mesmos, a análise é feita comparando-se os antígenos comuns evidenciados na autoradiografia e nas tiras de nitrocelulose coradas com o substrato da peroxidase

  14. Capsaicin induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in human KB cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chia-Han; Lu, Wei-Cheng; Wang, Che-Wei; Chan, Ya-Chi; Chen, Mu-Kuan

    2013-02-25

    Capsaicin, a pungent phytochemical in a variety of red peppers of the genus Capsicum, has shown an anti-proliferative effect on various human cancer cell lines. In contrast, capsaicin has also been considered to promote the growth of cancer cells. Thus, the effects of capsaicin on various cell types need to be explored. The anti-proliferative effects of capsaicin on human KB cancer cells are still unknown. Therefore, we examined the viability, cell cycle progression, and factors associated with apoptosis in KB cells treated with capsaicin. The cell proliferation/viability and cytotoxicity of KB cells exposed to capsaicin were determined by a sulforhodamine B colorimetric assay and trypan blue exclusion. Apoptosis was detected by Hoechst staining and confirmed by western blot analysis of poly-(ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage. Cell cycle distribution and changes of the mitochondrial membrane potential were analyzed by flow cytometry. Furthermore, the expression of caspase 3, 8 and 9 was evaluated by immunoblotting. We found that treatment of KB cells with capsaicin significantly reduced cell proliferation/viability and induced cell death in a dose-dependent manner compared with that in the untreated control. Cell cycle analysis indicated that exposure of KB cells to capsaicin resulted in cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase. Capsaicin-induced growth inhibition of KB cells appeared to be associated with induction of apoptosis. Moreover, capsaicin induced disruption of the mitochondrial membrane potential as well as activation of caspase 9, 3 and poly-(ADP-ribose) polymerase in KB cells. Our data demonstrate that capsaicin modulates cell cycle progression and induces apoptosis in human KB cancer cells through mitochondrial membrane permeabilization and caspase activation. These observations suggest an anti-cancer activity of capsaicin.

  15. IgG immune responses to different proteins of Helicobacter Pylori as defined by immunoblot assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raeiszadeh M

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori is an etiologic factor for chronic gastritis and peptic ulcers. Serological testing of H.pylori infection is common in Iran, as other parts of the world. There are geographical variations in the humoral immune response to various H. pylori strains in different parts of the worl. We studied the immunogenic proteins of H.pylori by means of an Immunoblot assay with antigens of H.pylori strains isolated in Iran. Sera of 64 patients suffering from dyspepsia were analyzed to determine antibodlies which were good marker of infection and the antibody patterns associated with peptic ulcer.54 out of 64 dyspeptic patients were infected by H. pylori based on positive culture or positive results of both rapid urease test and direct examination. 14 out of fity-four had peptic ulcers and the rest were catagoriied as patients with non-ulcer dyspepsia. Some of them had multiple erosions in the gut or deodenum. Tweny –two major bands were identified by immunoblot. Of these, IgG antibodies against 10 protients, and they produced immunoreative bands at 14, 16, 22, 26, 32 , 32, 44, 87, 92, 120 Kda. Antibody patterns were not identical in the patients. The presence of at least one band at 14, 16, 22, 26, 32, 35Kda was the best marker of infection(sensitivity, 90% and specificity, 80% Major serological cross reactions were found at moderate molecular weight bands (50, 52, 54, 60, 66 KDa. The presence of at least one band at 14, 16, 22, 26, 32, 35Kda was the best marker of infection (sensitivity, 90% and specificity, 80%. Major serological crossreactions were found at moderate molerate molecular weight bands (50, 52, 54, 60, 66 KDa. The presence of antibodies to 120 Kda protein (Cag A and 87 Kda Protein (Vac A were not associated with the presence of peptic ulcers. These were in contradiction to results obtained across Europe and U.S but in agreement with Asian studies. However the presence of at least one band at either 32 or 35 Kda was

  16. Danshen extract circumvents drug resistance and represses cell growth in human oral cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Cheng-Yu; Hsieh, Cheng-Chih; Lin, Chih-Kung; Lin, Chun-Shu; Peng, Bo; Lin, Gu-Jiun; Sytwu, Huey-Kang; Chang, Wen-Liang; Chen, Yuan-Wu

    2017-12-29

    Danshen is a common traditional Chinese medicine used to treat neoplastic and chronic inflammatory diseases in China. However, the effects of Danshen on human oral cancer cells remain relatively unknown. This study investigated the antiproliferative effects of a Danshen extract on human oral cancer SAS, SCC25, OEC-M1, and KB drug-resistant cell lines and elucidated the possible underlying mechanism. We investigated the anticancer potential of the Danshen extract in human oral cancer cell lines and an in vivo oral cancer xenograft mouse model. The expression of apoptosis-related molecules was evaluated through Western blotting, and the concentration of in vivo apoptotic markers was measured using immunohistochemical staining. The antitumor effects of 5-fluorouracil and the Danshen extract were compared. Cell proliferation assays revealed that the Danshen extract strongly inhibited oral cancer cell proliferation. Cell morphology studies revealed that the Danshen extract inhibited the growth of SAS, SCC25, and OEC-M1 cells by inducing apoptosis. The Flow cytometric analysis indicated that the Danshen extract induced cell cycle G0/G1 arrest. Immunoblotting analysis for the expression of active caspase-3 and X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein indicated that Danshen extract-induced apoptosis in human oral cancer SAS cells was mediated through the caspase pathway. Moreover, the Danshen extract significantly inhibited growth in the SAS xenograft mouse model. Furthermore, the Danshen extract circumvented drug resistance in KB drug-resistant oral cancer cells. The study results suggest that the Danshen extract could be a potential anticancer agent in oral cancer treatment.

  17. Exosomes as potential alternatives to stem cell therapy for intervertebral disc degeneration: in-vitro study on exosomes in interaction of nucleus pulposus cells and bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Kang; Li, Hai-Yin; Yang, Kuang; Wu, Jun-Long; Cai, Xiao-Wei; Zhou, Yue; Li, Chang-Qing

    2017-05-10

    The stem cell-based therapies for intervertebral disc degeneration have been widely studied. However, the mechanisms of mesenchymal stem cells interacting with intervertebral disc cells, such as nucleus pulposus cells (NPCs), remain unknown. Exosomes as a vital paracrine mechanism in cell-cell communication have been highly focused on. The purpose of this study was to detect the role of exosomes derived from bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) and NPCs in their interaction with corresponding cells. The exosomes secreted by BM-MSCs and NPCs were purified by differential centrifugation and identified by transmission electron microscope and immunoblot analysis of exosomal marker proteins. Fluorescence confocal microscopy was used to examine the uptake of exosomes by recipient cells. The effects of NPC exosomes on the migration and differentiation of BM-MSCs were determined by transwell migration assays and quantitative RT-PCR analysis of NPC phenotypic genes. Western blot analysis was performed to examine proteins such as aggrecan, sox-9, collagen II and hif-1α in the induced BM-MSCs. Proliferation and the gene expression profile of NPCs induced by BM-MSC exosomes were measured by Cell Counting Kit-8 and qRT-PCR analysis, respectively. Both the NPCs and BM-MSCs secreted exosomes, and these exosomes underwent uptake by the corresponding cells. NPC-derived exosomes promoted BM-MSC migration and induced BM-MSC differentiation to a nucleus pulposus-like phenotype. BM-MSC-derived exosomes promoted NPC proliferation and healthier extracellular matrix production in the degenerate NPCs. Our study indicates that the exosomes act as an important vehicle in information exchange between BM-MSCs and NPCs. Given a variety of functions and multiple advantages, exosomes alone or loaded with specific genes and drugs would be an appropriate option in a cell-free therapy strategy for intervertebral disc degeneration.

  18. Detection on immunoblot of new proteins from the soluble fraction of the cell recognized either by anti-liver-kidney microsome antibodies type 1 or by anti-liver cytosol antibodies type 1--relationship with hepatitis C virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballot, E; Desbos, A; Monier, J C

    1996-09-01

    Antibodies directed against liver cytosol protein, called anti-liver cytosol type 1 (LC1 Ab), have been described by both immunofluorescence (IF) and immunodiffusion techniques in sera from patients with autoimmune hepatitis (AIH). They have never been found in association with antibodies directed against the hepatitis C virus (HCV), unlike the anti-liver-kidney microsome antibodies type 1 (LKM1 Ab), the serological marker of AIH type 2. This suggests that there are two subgroups of AIH type 2, i.e., HCV-related and non-HCV-related. In this study, immunoblotting experiments were performed using proteins from the soluble phase of the rat liver cell; 141 sera which tested positive for LKM1 Ab by IF, 24 identified as having LC1 Ab by IF, and 50 from blood donors as controls were analyzed. Three bands were stained by LC1 Ab sera more often than by the control sera, and with a statistically significant frequency. These 3 proteins were located at apparent Mr 50,000, 55,000, and 60,000. The LKM1 Ab-positive sera as defined by IF stained six bands with a statistically significant frequency compared to the controls. Their apparent Mr were 35,000, 39,000, 47,000, 50,000, 55,000, and 60,000. LKM1 Ab-positive sera which were anti-HCV negative recognized a 60,000 protein belonging to the soluble phase of the cell, with a statistically significant frequency compared to LKM1 Ab-positive sera which were anti-HCV positive. This 60,000 protein was also recognized by LC1 Ab-positive sera, which were almost always anti-HCV negative. The presence of antibodies against a 60,000 protein from the soluble phase of the cell is discussed in terms of the anti-HCV serological markers found in the sera from patients with AIH.

  19. Xylitol induces cell death in lung cancer A549 cells by autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eunjoo; Park, Mi Hee; Na, Hee Sam; Chung, Jin

    2015-05-01

    Xylitol is a widely used anti-caries agent that has anti-inflammatory effects. We have evaluated the potential of xylitol in cancer treatment. It's effects on cell proliferation and cytotoxicity were measured by MTT assay and LDH assay. Cell morphology and autophagy were examined by immunostaining and immunoblotting. Xylitol inhibited cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner in these cancer cells: A549, Caki, NCI-H23, HCT-15, HL-60, K562, and SK MEL-2. The IC50 of xylitol in human gingival fibroblast cells was higher than in cancer cells, indicating that it is more specific for cancer cells. Moreover, xylitol induced autophagy in A549 cells that was inhibited by 3-methyladenine, an autophagy inhibitor. These results indicate that xylitol has potential in therapy against lung cancer by inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing autophagy of A549 cells.

  20. Ochratoxim A alters cell adhesion and gap junction intercellular communication in MDCK cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mally, Angela; Decker, Martina; Bekteshi, Michaela; Dekant, Wolfgang

    2006-01-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is one of the most potent renal carcinogens studied to date, but the mechanism of tumor formation by ochratoxin A remains largely unknown. Cell adhesion and cell-cell communication participate in the regulation of signaling pathways involved in cell proliferation and growth control and it is therefore not surprising that modulation of cell-cell signaling has been implicated in cancer development. Several nephrotoxicants and renal carcinogens have been shown to alter cell-cell signaling by interference with gap junction intercell communication (GJIC) and/or cell adhesion, and the aim of this study was to determine if disruption of cell-cell interactions occurs in kidney epithelial cells in response to OTA treatment. MDCK cells were treated with OTA (0-50 μM) for up to 24 h and gap junction function was analyzed using the scrape-load/dye transfer assay. In addition, expression and intracellular localization of Cx43, E-cadherin and β-catenin were determined by immunoblot and immunofluorescence analysis. A clear decrease in the distance of dye transfer was evident following treatment with OTA at concentrations/incubation times which did not affect cell viability. Consistent with the functional inhibition of GJIC, treatment with OTA resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in Cx43 expression. In contrast to Cx43, OTA did not alter total amount of the adherens junction proteins E-cadherin and β-catenin. Moreover, Western blot analysis of Triton X-100 soluble and insoluble protein fractions did not indicate translocation of cell adhesion molecules from the membrane to the cytoplasm. However, a ∼78 kDa fragment of β-catenin was detected in the detergent soluble fraction, indicating proteolytic cleavage of β-catenin. Immunofluorescence analysis also revealed changes in the pattern of both β-catenin and E-cadherin labeling, suggesting that OTA may alter cell-adhesion. Taken together, these data support the hypothesis that disruption of cell-cell

  1. Enhancement of Radiation Response in Osteosarcoma and Rhabomyosarcoma Cell Lines by Histone Deacetylase Inhibition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blattmann, Claudia; Oertel, Susanne; Ehemann, Volker

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) can enhance the sensitivity of cells to photon radiation treatment (XRT) by altering numerous molecular pathways. We investigated the effect of pan-HDACIs such as suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) on radiation response in two osteosarcoma (OS) and two rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) cell lines. Methods and Materials: Clonogenic survival, cell cycle analysis, and apoptosis were examined in OS (KHOS-24OS, SAOS2) and RMS (A-204, RD) cell lines treated with HDACI and HDACI plus XRT, respectively. Protein expression was investigated via immunoblot analysis, and cell cycle analysis and measurement of apoptosis were performed using flow cytometry. Results: SAHA induced an inhibition of cell proliferation and clonogenic survival in OS and RMS cell lines and led to a significant radiosensitization of all tumor cell lines. Other HDACI such as M344 and valproate showed similar effects as investigated in one OS cell line. Furthermore, SAHA significantly increased radiation-induced apoptosis in the OS cell lines, whereas in the RMS cell lines radiation-induced apoptosis was insignificant with and without SAHA. In all investigated sarcoma cell lines, SAHA attenuated radiation-induced DNA repair protein expression (Rad51, Ku80). Conclusion: Our results show that HDACIs enhance radiation action in OS and RMS cell lines. Inhibition of DNA repair, as well as increased apoptosis induction after exposure to HDACIs, can be mechanisms of radiosensitization by HDACIs.

  2. Biosensors for Cell Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qing; Son, Kyungjin; Liu, Ying; Revzin, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Biosensors first appeared several decades ago to address the need for monitoring physiological parameters such as oxygen or glucose in biological fluids such as blood. More recently, a new wave of biosensors has emerged in order to provide more nuanced and granular information about the composition and function of living cells. Such biosensors exist at the confluence of technology and medicine and often strive to connect cell phenotype or function to physiological or pathophysiological processes. Our review aims to describe some of the key technological aspects of biosensors being developed for cell analysis. The technological aspects covered in our review include biorecognition elements used for biosensor construction, methods for integrating cells with biosensors, approaches to single-cell analysis, and the use of nanostructured biosensors for cell analysis. Our hope is that the spectrum of possibilities for cell analysis described in this review may pique the interest of biomedical scientists and engineers and may spur new collaborations in the area of using biosensors for cell analysis.

  3. Monoclonal antibodies against muscle actin isoforms: epitope identification and analysis of isoform expression by immunoblot and immunostaining in normal and regenerating skeletal muscle [version 1; referees: 2 approved, 1 approved with reservations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Chaponnier

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Higher vertebrates express six different highly conserved actin isoforms that can be classified in three subgroups: 1 sarcomeric actins, α-skeletal (α-SKA and α-cardiac (α-CAA, 2 smooth muscle actins (SMAs, α-SMA and γ-SMA, and 3 cytoplasmic actins (CYAs, β-CYA and γ-CYA. The variations among isoactins, in each subgroup, are due to 3-4 amino acid differences located in their acetylated N-decapeptide sequence. The first monoclonal antibody (mAb against an actin isoform (α-SMA was produced and characterized in our laboratory in 1986 (Skalli et al., 1986. We have further obtained mAbs against the 5 other isoforms. In this report, we focus on the mAb anti-α-SKA and anti-α-CAA obtained after immunization of mice with the respective acetylated N-terminal decapeptides using the Repetitive Immunizations at Multiple Sites Strategy (RIMMS. In addition to the identification of their epitope by immunoblotting, we describe the expression of the 2 sarcomeric actins in mature skeletal muscle and during muscle repair after micro-lesions. In particular, we analyze the expression of α-CAA, α-SKA and α-SMA by co-immunostaining in a time course frame during the muscle repair process. Our results indicate that a restricted myocyte population expresses α-CAA and suggest a high capacity of self-renewal in muscle cells. These antibodies may represent a helpful tool for the follow-up of muscle regeneration and pathological changes.

  4. Prevention and treatment of colon cancer by peroral administration of HAMLET (human α-lactalbumin made lethal to tumour cells).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puthia, Manoj; Storm, Petter; Nadeem, Aftab; Hsiung, Sabrina; Svanborg, Catharina

    2014-01-01

    Most colon cancers start with dysregulated Wnt/β-catenin signalling and remain a major therapeutic challenge. Examining whether HAMLET (human α-lactalbumin made lethal to tumour cells) may be used for colon cancer treatment is logical, based on the properties of the complex and its biological context. To investigate if HAMLET can be used for colon cancer treatment and prevention. Apc(Min)(/+) mice, which carry mutations relevant to hereditary and sporadic human colorectal tumours, were used as a model for human disease. HAMLET was given perorally in therapeutic and prophylactic regimens. Tumour burden and animal survival of HAMLET-treated and sham-fed mice were compared. Tissue analysis focused on Wnt/β-catenin signalling, proliferation markers and gene expression, using microarrays, immunoblotting, immunohistochemistry and ELISA. Confocal microscopy, reporter assay, immunoprecipitation, immunoblotting, ion flux assays and holographic imaging were used to determine effects on colon cancer cells. Peroral HAMLET administration reduced tumour progression and mortality in Apc(Min)(/+) mice. HAMLET accumulated specifically in tumour tissue, reduced β-catenin and related tumour markers. Gene expression analysis detected inhibition of Wnt signalling and a shift to a more differentiated phenotype. In colon cancer cells with APC mutations, HAMLET altered β-catenin integrity and localisation through an ion channel-dependent pathway, defining a new mechanism for controlling β-catenin signalling. Remarkably, supplying HAMLET to the drinking water from the time of weaning also significantly prevented tumour development. These data identify HAMLET as a new, peroral agent for colon cancer prevention and treatment, especially needed in people carrying APC mutations, where colon cancer remains a leading cause of death.

  5. Expression of cadherin and NCAM in human small cell lung cancer cell lines and xenografts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rygaard, K; Møller, C; Bock, E

    1992-01-01

    characterised, the cadherin family and the Ig superfamily member, neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM). We investigated expression of these two adhesion molecule families in small cell lung cancer (SCLC) cell lines and xenografts by immunoblotting. Nineteen tumours established from 15 patients with SCLC were......Tumour cell adhesion, detachment and aggregation seem to play an important part in tumour invasion and metastasis, and numerous cell adhesion molecules are expressed by tumour cells. Several families of cell-cell adhesion molecules have been described, of which two groups are particularly well...... embryonic development, which may play a role in connection with tumour invasion and metastasis, was found in 14/18 NCAM expressing SCLC tumours. Individual tumours grown as cell lines and as nude mouse xenografts showed no qualitative differences in cadherin or NCAM expression....

  6. Id-1 is not expressed in the luminal epithelial cells of mammary glands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uehara, Norihisa; Chou, Yu-Chien; Galvez, Jose J; Candia, Paola de; Cardiff, Robert D; Benezra, Robert; Shyamala, Gopalan

    2003-01-01

    The family of inhibitor of differentiation/DNA binding (Id) proteins is known to regulate development in several tissues. One member of this gene family, Id-1, has been implicated in mammary development and carcinogenesis. Mammary glands contain various cell types, among which the luminal epithelial cells are primarily targeted for proliferation, differentiation and carcinogenesis. Therefore, to assess the precise significance of Id-1 in mammary biology and carcinogenesis, we examined its cellular localization in vivo using immunohistochemistry. Extracts of whole mammary glands from wild type and Id-1 null mutant mice, and tissue sections from paraffin-embedded mouse mammary glands from various developmental stages and normal human breast were subjected to immunoblot and immunohistochemical analyses, respectively. In both these procedures, an anti-Id-1 rabbit polyclonal antibody was used for detection of Id-1. In immunoblot analyses, using whole mammary gland extracts, Id-1 was detected. In immunohistochemical analyses, however, Id-1 was not detected in the luminal epithelial cells of mammary glands during any stage of development, but it was detected in vascular endothelial cells. Id-1 is not expressed in the luminal epithelial cells of mammary glands

  7. Aspectos epidemiológicos da dirofilariose canina no perímetro urbano de Cuiabá, Mato Grosso: emprego do "Immunoblot" e do teste de Knott modificado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Gorgulho Nogueira Fernandes

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho refere-se a pesquisa dos aspectos epidemiológicos da dirofilariose canina no perímetro urbano de Cuiabá, através de exame de sangue e sorologia. Examinou-se o sangue de 822 cães: em 11,81% das amostras, detectaram-se, por meio de "Immunoblot", anticorpos contra antígenos de Dirofilaria immitis adulto, enquanto em 0,41% foram encontradas, por meio do teste de Knott modificado, microfilárias de D. immitis. A prevalência da dirofilariose canina em Cuiabá, no período de junho a novembro de 1997, e com a metodologia aplicada, foi de 120,8 casos em cada 1.000 animais. O "Immunoblot" diagnosticou como positivas 11,27% das amostras que estavam consideradas negativas pelo teste de Knott modificado. Os autores analisaram estatisticamente informações sobre raça, sexo, idade e região administrativa de origem dos cães pesquisados. Foi questionada a possibilidade de que os animais pesquisados tivessem viajado a regiões endêmicas, usado microfilaricidas, ou apresentado sintomatologia compatível, bem como estudadas as características ecológicas do local de moradia. Cães com idade variando entre um e nove anos e residentes na região Centro-Oeste apresentaram maior índice de positividade. A maioria não apresentava sintomatologia compatível com a doença, não tinha história clínica do uso de microfilaricidas e/ou preventivos contra dirofilariose canina e nunca havia saído do perímetro urbano de Cuiabá, mas residiam em bairros próximos a rios ou córregos e/ou em casas contíguas a áreas de vegetação nativa. Pela primeira vez, o "Immunoblot" foi empregado no diagnóstico de dirofilariose canina no Brasil.

  8. Screening for Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-Modified Cell Wall Proteins in Pichia pastoris and Their Recombinant Expression on the Cell Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Liang, Shuli; Zhou, Xinying; Jin, Zi; Jiang, Fengchun; Han, Shuangyan; Zheng, Suiping

    2013-01-01

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored glycoproteins have various intrinsic functions in yeasts and different uses in vitro. In the present study, the genome of Pichia pastoris GS115 was screened for potential GPI-modified cell wall proteins. Fifty putative GPI-anchored proteins were selected on the basis of (i) the presence of a C-terminal GPI attachment signal sequence, (ii) the presence of an N-terminal signal sequence for secretion, and (iii) the absence of transmembrane domains in mature protein. The predicted GPI-anchored proteins were fused to an alpha-factor secretion signal as a substitute for their own N-terminal signal peptides and tagged with the chimeric reporters FLAG tag and mature Candida antarctica lipase B (CALB). The expression of fusion proteins on the cell surface of P. pastoris GS115 was determined by whole-cell flow cytometry and immunoblotting analysis of the cell wall extracts obtained by β-1,3-glucanase digestion. CALB displayed on the cell surface of P. pastoris GS115 with the predicted GPI-anchored proteins was examined on the basis of potential hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl butyrate. Finally, 13 proteins were confirmed to be GPI-modified cell wall proteins in P. pastoris GS115, which can be used to display heterologous proteins on the yeast cell surface. PMID:23835174

  9. Single Cell Isolation and Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Hu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence shows that the heterogeneity of individual cells within a genetically identical population can be critical to their peculiar function and fate. Conventional cell based assays mainly analysis the average responses from a population cells, while the difference within individual cells may often be masked. The cell size, RNA transcripts and protein expression level are quite different within individual cells and these variations are key point to answer the problems in cancer, neurobiology, stem cell biology, immunology and developmental biology. To better understand the cell-to-cell variations, the single cell analysis can provide much more detailed information which may be helpful for therapeutic decisions in an increasingly personalized medicine. In this review, we will focus on the recent development in single cell analysis, including methods used in single cell isolation, analysis and some application examples. The review provides the historical background to single cell analysis, discusses limitations, and current and future possibilities in this exciting field of research.

  10. Diagnostic accuracy of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunoblot (IB) for the detection of antibodies against Neospora caninum in milk from dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatziprodromidou, I P; Apostolou, T

    2018-04-01

    The aim of the study was to estimate the sensitivity and specificity of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunoblot (IB) for detecting antibodies of Neospora caninum in dairy cows, in the absence of a gold standard. The study complies with STRADAS-paratuberculosis guidelines for reporting the accuracy of the test. We tried to apply Bayesian models that do not require conditional independence of the tests under evaluation, but as convergence problems appeared, we used Bayesian methodology, that does not assume conditional dependence of the tests. Informative prior probability distributions were constructed, based on scientific inputs regarding sensitivity and specificity of the IB test and the prevalence of disease in the studied populations. IB sensitivity and specificity were estimated to be 98.8% and 91.3%, respectively, while the respective estimates for ELISA were 60% and 96.7%. A sensitivity analysis, where modified prior probability distributions concerning IB diagnostic accuracy applied, showed a limited effect in posterior assessments. We concluded that ELISA can be used to screen the bulk milk and secondly, IB can be used whenever needed.

  11. Proteomic Studies of Cholangiocarcinoma and Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cell Secretomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chantragan Srisomsap

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC occur with relatively high incidence in Thailand. The secretome, proteins secreted from cancer cells, are potentially useful as biomarkers of the diseases. Proteomic analysis was performed on the secreted proteins of cholangiocarcinoma (HuCCA-1 and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC-S102, HepG2, SK-Hep-1, and Alexander cell lines. The secretomes of the five cancer cell lines were analyzed by SDS-PAGE combined with LC/MS/MS. Sixty-eight proteins were found to be expressed only in HuCCA-1. Examples include neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (lipocalin 2, laminin 5 beta 3, cathepsin D precursor, desmoplakin, annexin IV variant, and annexin A5. Immunoblotting was used to confirm the presence of lipocalin 2 in conditioned media and cell lysate of 5 cell lines. The results showed that lipocalin 2 was a secreted protein which is expressed only in the conditioned media of the cholangiocarcinoma cell line. Study of lipocalin 2 expression in different types of cancer and normal tissues from cholangiocarcinoma patients showed that lipocalin 2 was expressed only in the cancer tissues. We suggest that lipocalin 2 may be a potential biomarker for cholangiocarcinoma.

  12. Fuel Cell Technology Status Analysis | Hydrogen and Fuel Cells | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Technology Status Analysis Fuel Cell Technology Status Analysis Get Involved Fuel cell developers interested in collaborating with NREL on fuel cell technology status analysis should send an email to NREL's Technology Validation Team at techval@nrel.gov. NREL's analysis of fuel cell technology provides objective

  13. Changes in glycosaminoglycan structure on differentiation of human embryonic stem cells towards mesoderm and endoderm lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasimli, Leyla; Hickey, Anne Marie; Yang, Bo; Li, Guoyun; dela Rosa, Mitche; Nairn, Alison V; Kulik, Michael J; Dordick, Jonathan S; Moremen, Kelley W; Dalton, Stephen; Linhardt, Robert J

    2014-06-01

    Proteoglycans are found on the cell surface and in the extracellular matrix, and serve as prime sites for interaction with signaling molecules. Proteoglycans help regulate pathways that control stem cell fate, and therefore represent an excellent tool to manipulate these pathways. Despite their importance, there is a dearth of data linking glycosaminoglycan structure within proteoglycans with stem cell differentiation. Human embryonic stem cell line WA09 (H9) was differentiated into early mesoderm and endoderm lineages, and the glycosaminoglycanomic changes accompanying these transitions were studied using transcript analysis, immunoblotting, immunofluorescence and disaccharide analysis. Pluripotent H9 cell lumican had no glycosaminoglycan chains whereas in splanchnic mesoderm lumican was glycosaminoglycanated. H9 cells have primarily non-sulfated heparan sulfate chains. On differentiation towards splanchnic mesoderm and hepatic lineages N-sulfo group content increases. Differences in transcript expression of NDST1, HS6ST2 and HS6ST3, three heparan sulfate biosynthetic enzymes, within splanchnic mesoderm cells compared to H9 cells correlate to changes in glycosaminoglycan structure. Differentiation of embryonic stem cells markedly changes the proteoglycanome. The glycosaminoglycan biosynthetic pathway is complex and highly regulated, and therefore, understanding the details of this pathway should enable better control with the aim of directing stem cell differentiation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Multiparameter Cell Cycle Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobberger, James W; Sramkoski, R Michael; Stefan, Tammy; Woost, Philip G

    2018-01-01

    Cell cycle cytometry and analysis are essential tools for studying cells of model organisms and natural populations (e.g., bone marrow). Methods have not changed much for many years. The simplest and most common protocol is DNA content analysis, which is extensively published and reviewed. The next most common protocol, 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine S phase labeling detected by specific antibodies, is also well published and reviewed. More recently, S phase labeling using 5'-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine incorporation and a chemical reaction to label substituted DNA has been established as a basic, reliable protocol. Multiple antibody labeling to detect epitopes on cell cycle regulated proteins, which is what this chapter is about, is the most complex of these cytometric cell cycle assays, requiring knowledge of the chemistry of fixation, the biochemistry of antibody-antigen reactions, and spectral compensation. However, because this knowledge is relatively well presented methodologically in many papers and reviews, this chapter will present a minimal Methods section for one mammalian cell type and an extended Notes section, focusing on aspects that are problematic or not well described in the literature. Most of the presented work involves how to segment the data to produce a complete, progressive, and compartmentalized cell cycle analysis from early G1 to late mitosis (telophase). A more recent development, using fluorescent proteins fused with proteins or peptides that are degraded by ubiquitination during specific periods of the cell cycle, termed "Fucci" (fluorescent, ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicators) provide an analysis similar in concept to multiple antibody labeling, except in this case cells can be analyzed while living and transgenic organisms can be created to perform cell cycle analysis ex or in vivo (Sakaue-Sawano et al., Cell 132:487-498, 2007). This technology will not be discussed.

  15. Patrón de immunoblotting y niveles de anticuerpos anti-Toxoplasma gondii en suero y humor acuoso de pacientes con lesiones de toxoplasmosis ocular

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morella Bouchard Pereira

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este estudio fue evaluar en muestras de suero y humor acuoso los niveles de anticuerpos anti-toxoplasma a través del Coeficiente de Goldmann y Witmer (CGW y el patrón de reconocimiento antigénico a través del immunoblotting (IB, en pacientes con serología positiva con y sin lesiones de toxoplasmosis ocular. Se recogieron simultáneamente muestras de suero y humor acuoso de 26 pacientes: un grupo de casos que poseían lesiones retinales de toxoplasmosis ocular en fase activa e inactiva (n=17 y un grupo control que requería cirugía ocular por presencia de cataratas (n=9. Las determinación de IgM e IgG específicas se realizó por ELISA de inmunocaptura e indirecto, respectivamente. Se utilizó la inmunodifusión radial para la cuantificación de la IgG total. El CGW resultó >2, indicativo de producción local de anticuerpos específicos en 12/17 de los casos, mientras que en los controles no se observó, esto evidenció una sensibilidad del 71% y una especificidad de 100%. En IB, la aparición de bandas diferentes en humor acuoso, indicativo de producción local de anticuerpos específicos se observaron en 11/17 de los casos y 1/9 de los controles, reflejando una sensibilidad de 65% y una especificidad de 89%. Al considerar las dos pruebas la sensibilidad se incrementó a un 73%, pero la especificidad disminuyó a 89%. En conclusión el IB es útil como prueba confirmatoria para diagnóstico de toxoplasmosis ocular, pero sólo como un complemento del coeficiente de GW especialmente en pacientes con lesiones atípicas donde el diagnóstico clínico es difícil. Aqueous humor and serum immunoblotting profiles and anti–toxoplasma gondii antibodies in patients with toxoplasmosis-induced retinal lesions Abstract The purpose of this study was to analize the anti-Toxoplasma gondii antibodies levels in serum and aqueous humor samples in patients with ocular toxoplasmosis by using Goldman and Witmer Coefficient (GWC and the

  16. Multi-tasking Sulf1/Sulf2 enzymes do not only facilitate extracellular cell signalling but also participate in cell cycle related nuclear events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnakumar, Kavithanjali; Chakravorty, Ishani; Foy, Wendy; Allen, Steve; Justo, Tiago; Mukherjee, Abir; Dhoot, Gurtej K

    2018-03-01

    This study demonstrates highly dynamic spatial and temporal pattern of SULF1/SULF2 expression in a number of neuronal cell types growing in normal culture medium that included their transient nuclear mobilisation. Their nuclear translocation became particularly apparent during cell proliferation as both SULF1/SULF2 demonstrated not only cell membrane associated expression, their known site of function but also transient nuclear mobilisation during nuclear cell division. Nuclear localisation was apparent not only by immunocytochemical staining but also confirmed by immunoblotting staining of isolated nuclear fractions of C6, U87 and N2A cells. Immunocytochemical analysis demonstrated rapid nuclear exit of both SULF1/SULF2 following cell division that was slightly delayed but not blocked in a fraction of the polyploid cells observed in C6 cells. The overexpression of both Sulf1 and Sulf2 genes in C6 and U87 cells markedly promoted in vitro growth of these cells accompanied by nuclear mobilisation while inhibition of both these genes inhibited cell proliferation with little or no nuclear SULF1/SULF2 mobilisation. SULF1/SULF2 activity in these cells thus demonstrated a clear co-ordination of extracellular cell signalling with nuclear events related to cell proliferation. Crown Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Microfluidics for single cell analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Marie Pødenphant

    Isolation and manipulation of single cells have gained an increasing interest from researchers because of the heterogeneity of cells from the same cell culture. Single cell analysis can ensure a better understanding of differences between individual cells and potentially solve a variety of clinical...... problems. In this thesis lab on a chip systems for rare single cell analysis are investigated. The focus was to develop a commercial, disposable device for circulating tumour cell (CTC) analysis. Such a device must be able to separate rare cells from blood samples and subsequently capture the specific...... cells, and simultaneously be fabricated and operated at low costs and be user-friendly. These challenges were addressed through development of two microfluidic devices, one for rare cell isolation based on pinched flow fractionation (PFF) and one for single cell capture based on hydrodynamic trapping...

  18. Utilization of human amniotic mesenchymal cells as feeder layers to sustain propagation of human embryonic stem cells in the undifferentiated state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kehua; Cai, Zhe; Li, Yang; Shu, Jun; Pan, Lin; Wan, Fang; Li, Hong; Huang, Xiaojie; He, Chun; Liu, Yanqiu; Cui, Xiaohui; Xu, Yang; Gao, Yan; Wu, Liqun; Cao, Shanxia; Li, Lingsong

    2011-08-01

    Human embryonic stem (ES) cells are usually maintained in the undifferentiated state by culturing on feeder cells layers of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). However, MEFs are not suitable to support human ES cells used for clinical purpose because of risk of zoonosis from animal cells. Therefore, human tissue-based feeder layers need to be developed for human ES cells for clinical purpose. Hereof we report that human amniotic mesenchymal cells (hAMCs) could act as feeder cells for human ES cells, because they are easily obtained and relatively exempt from ethical problem. Like MEFs, hAMCs could act as feeder cells for human ES cells to grow well on. The self-renewal rate of human ES cells cultured on hAMCs feeders was higher than that on MEFs and human amniotic epithelial cells determined by measurement of colonial diameters and growth curve as well as cell cycle analysis. Both immunofluorescence staining and immunoblotting showed that human ES cells cultured on hAMCs expressed stem cell markers such as Oct-3/4, Sox2, and NANOG. Verified by embryoid body formation in vitro and teratoma formation in vivo, we found out that after 20 passages of culture, human ES cells grown on hAMCs feeders could still retain the potency of differentiating into three germ layers. Taken together, our data suggested hAMCs may be safe feeder cells to sustain the propagation of human ES cells in undifferentiated state for future therapeutic use.

  19. MiR-107 and MiR-185 can induce cell cycle arrest in human non small cell lung cancer cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukari Takahashi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: MicroRNAs (miRNAs are short single stranded noncoding RNAs that suppress gene expression through either translational repression or degradation of target mRNAs. The annealing between messenger RNAs and 5' seed region of miRNAs is believed to be essential for the specific suppression of target gene expression. One miRNA can have several hundred different targets in a cell. Rapidly accumulating evidence suggests that many miRNAs are involved in cell cycle regulation and consequentially play critical roles in carcinogenesis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Introduction of synthetic miR-107 or miR-185 suppressed growth of the human non-small cell lung cancer cell lines. Flow cytometry analysis revealed these miRNAs induce a G1 cell cycle arrest in H1299 cells and the suppression of cell cycle progression is stronger than that by Let-7 miRNA. By the gene expression analyses with oligonucleotide microarrays, we find hundreds of genes are affected by transfection of these miRNAs. Using miRNA-target prediction analyses and the array data, we listed up a set of likely targets of miR-107 and miR-185 for G1 cell cycle arrest and validate a subset of them using real-time RT-PCR and immunoblotting for CDK6. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We identified new cell cycle regulating miRNAs, miR-107 and miR-185, localized in frequently altered chromosomal regions in human lung cancers. Especially for miR-107, a large number of down-regulated genes are annotated with the gene ontology term 'cell cycle'. Our results suggest that these miRNAs may contribute to regulate cell cycle in human malignant tumors.

  20. Spread of human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV-I) in the Dutch homosexual community

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goudsmit, J.; de Wolf, F.; van de Wiel, B.; Smit, L.; Bakker, M.; Albrecht-van Lent, N.; Coutinho, R. A.

    1987-01-01

    Sequential sera of 697 homosexual men, participating in a prospective study (1984-1986) of the risk to acquire human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) or AIDS, were tested for antibodies to human T-cell leukaemia virus (HTLV-I) by particle agglutination and immunoblotting. No intravenous drug users were

  1. TMBP200, a XMAP215 homologue of tobacco BY-2 cells, has an essential role in plant mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuhara, Hiroki; Oe, Yuki

    2011-07-01

    TMBP200 from tobacco BY-2 cells is a member of the highly conserved family of microtubule-associated proteins that includes Xenopus XMAP215, human TOGp, and Arabidopsis MOR1/GEM1. XMAP215 homologues have an essential role in spindle assembly and function in animals and yeast, but their role in plant mitosis is not fully clarified. Here, we show by immunoblot analysis that TMBP200 levels in synchronously cultured BY-2 cells increased when the cells entered mitosis, thus indicating that TMBP200 plays an important role in mitosis in tobacco. To investigate the role of TMBP200 in mitosis, we employed inducible RNA interference to silence TMBP200 expression in BY-2 cells. The resulting depletion of TMBP200 caused severe defects in bipolar spindle formation and resulted in the appearance of multinucleated cells with variable-sized nuclei. This finding indicates that TMBP200 has an essential role in bipolar spindle formation and function.

  2. Evaluating the Potential of Adipose Tissue-Derived MSCs as Anticancer Gene Delivery Vehicles to Bone-Metastasized Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    revealed cells with nucleoli and capillary formation (Fig. 19B). The PCa induced proliferative responses of ASCpc cells observed in vitro were... nucleoli (arrowhead) and thin capillaries (arrow) are present and no tumor necrosis was observed. C, immunoblot analysis of PC epithelial markers and

  3. Pregnancy Specific Glycoprotein 17 Binds to the Extracellular Loop 2 of its Receptor, CD9, and Induces the Secretion of IL-lO, IL-6, PGE2 and TGFbeta1 in Murine Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-07-09

    produced in CHO cells using standard methodology (Southern Biotec, Birmingham, AL). For immunoblot analysis, the following Abs were employed: anti-myc...Experimental Cell Reserach . 1999. p. 243- 249. 5. Rudert, F., W. Zimmermann, and J.A. Thompson, Intra- and interspecies analyses of the carcinoembryonic

  4. Sodium nitroprusside induces autophagic cell death in glutathione-depleted osteoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Min Jeong; Lee, Seong-Beom; Byun, Yu Jeong; Lee, Hwa Ok; Kim, Ho-Shik; Kwon, Oh-Joo; Jeong, Seong-Whan

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies reported that high levels of nitric oxide (NO) induce apoptotic cell death in osteoblasts. We examined molecular mechanisms of cytotoxic injury induced by sodium nitroprusside (SNP), a NO donor, in both glutathione (GSH)-depleted and control U2-OS osteoblasts. Cell viability was reduced by much lower effective concentrations of SNP in GSH-depleted cells compared to normal cells. The data suggest that the level of intracellular GSH is critical in SNP-induced cell death processes of osteoblasts. The level of oxidative stress due to SNP treatments doubled in GSH-depleted cells when measured with fluorochrome H2DCFDA. Pretreatment with the NO scavenger PTIO preserved the viability of cells treated with SNP. Viability of cells treated with SNP was recovered by pretreatment with Wortmannin, an autophagy inhibitor, but not by pretreatment with zVAD-fmk, a pan-specific caspase inhibitor. Large increases of LC3-II were shown by immunoblot analysis of the SNP-treated cells, and the increase was blocked by pretreatment with PTIO or Wortmannin; this implies that under GSH-depleted conditions SNP induces different molecular signaling that lead to autophagic cell death. The ultrastructural morphology of SNP-treated cells in transmission electron microscopy showed numerous autophagic vacuoles. These data suggest NO produces oxidative stress and cellular damage that culminate in autophagic cell death of GSH-depleted osteoblasts. Copyright 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Bisphenol A Disrupts Transcription and Decreases Viability in Aging Vascular Endothelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro-Varandas, Edna; Pereira, H. Sofia; Monteiro, Sara; Neves, Elsa; Brito, Luísa; Boavida Ferreira, Ricardo; Viegas, Wanda; Delgado, Margarida

    2014-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a widely utilized endocrine disruptor capable of mimicking endogenous hormones, employed in the manufacture of numerous consumer products, thereby interfering with physiological cellular functions. Recent research has shown that BPA alters epigenetic cellular mechanisms in mammals and may be correlated to enhanced cellular senescence. Here, the effects of BPA at 10 ng/mL and 1 µg/mL, concentrations found in human samples, were analyzed on HT29 human colon adenocarcinona cell line and Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells (HUVEC). Quantitative Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction (qRT-PCR) transcriptional analysis of the Long Interspersed Element-1 (LINE-1) retroelement showed that BPA induces global transcription deregulation in both cell lines, although with more pronounced effects in HUVEC cells. Whereas there was an increase in global transcription in HT29 exclusively after 24 h of exposure, this chemical had prolonged effects on HUVEC. Immunoblotting revealed that this was not accompanied by alterations in the overall content of H3K9me2 and H3K4me3 epigenetic marks. Importantly, cell viability assays and transcriptional analysis indicated that prolonged BPA exposure affects aging processes in senescent HUVEC. To our knowledge this is the first report that BPA interferes with senescence in primary vascular endothelial cells, therefore, suggesting its association to the etiology of age-related human pathologies, such as atherosclerosis. PMID:25207595

  6. Sensitization of gastric cancer cells to alkylating agents by glaucocalyxin B via cell cycle arrest and enhanced cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ur Rahman, Muhammad Saif; Zhang, Ling; Wu, Lingyan; Xie, Yuqiong; Li, Chunchun; Cao, Jiang

    2017-01-01

    Severe side effects are major problems with chemotherapy of gastric cancer (GC). These side effects can be reduced by using sensitizing agents in combination with therapeutic drugs. In this study, the low/nontoxic dosage of glaucocalyxin B (GLB) was used with other DNA linker agents mitomycin C (MMC), cisplatin (DDP), or cyclophosphamide (CTX) to treat GC cells. Combined effectiveness of GLB with drugs was determined by proliferation assay. The molecular mechanisms associated with cell proliferation, migration, invasion, cell cycle, DNA repair/replication, apoptosis, and autophagy were investigated by immunoblotting for key proteins involved. Cell cycle and apoptosis analysis were performed by flow cytometry. Reactive oxygen species level was also examined for identification of its role in apoptosis. Proliferation assay revealed that the addition of 5 µM GLB significantly sensitizes gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells to MMC, DDP, and CTX by decreasing half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC 50 ) by up to 75.40%±5%, 45.10%±5%, and 52.10%±5%, respectively. GLB + drugs decreased the expression level of proteins involved in proliferation and migration, suggesting the anticancer potential of GLB + drugs. GLB + MMC, GLB + CTX, and GLB + DDP arrest the cells in G 0 /G 1 and G 1 /S phase, respectively, which may be the consequence of significant decrease in the level of enzymes responsible for DNA replication and telomerase shortening. Combined use of GLB with these drugs also induces DNA damage and apoptosis by activating caspase/PARP pathways and increased production of reactive oxygen species and increased autophagy in GC cells. GLB dosage sensitizes GC cells to the alkylating agents via arresting the cell cycle and enhancing cell death. This is of significant therapeutic importance in the reduction of side effects associated with these drugs.

  7. CA 15–3 cell lines and tissue expression in canine mammary cancer and the correlation between serum levels and tumour histological grade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuali Elisabetta

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mammary tumours are the most common malignancy diagnosed in female dogs and a significant cause of mortality and morbidity in this species. Carbohydrate antigen (CA 15–3 is a mucinous glycoprotein aberrantly over-expressed in human mammary neoplasms and one of the most widely used serum tumour markers in women with breast cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate the antigenic analogies of human and canine CA 15–3 and to assess its expression in canine mammary cancer tissues and cell lines. Immunohistochemical expression of CA 15–3 was evaluated in 7 canine mammary cancer cell lines and 50 malignant mammary tumours. As a positive control, the human breast carcinoma cell line MCF7 and tissue were used. To assess CA 15–3 staining, a semi-quantitative method was applied. To confirm the specificity and cross-reactivity of an anti-human CA 15–3 antibody to canine tissues, an immunoblot analysis was performed. We also investigated serum CA 15–3 activity to establish whether its expression could be assigned to several tumour characteristics to evaluate its potential use as a serum tumour marker in the canine mammary oncology field. Results Immunocytochemical analysis revealed CA 15–3 expression in all examined canine mammary cancer cell lines, whereas its expression was confirmed by immunoblot only in the most invasive cells (CMT-W1, CMT-W1M, CMT-W2 and CMT-W2M. In the tissue, an immunohistochemical staining pattern was observed in 34 (68% of the malignant tumours. A high statistical correlation (p = 0.0019 between serum CA 15–3 levels and the degree of tumour proliferation and differentiation was shown, which indicates that the values of this serum marker increase as the tumour stage progresses. Conclusions The results of this study reveal that CA 15–3 is expressed in both canine mammary tumour cell lines and tissues and that serum levels significantly correlate with the histological grade of the

  8. A comparative Analysis by SAGE of Gene Expression Profiles of Esophageal Adenocarcinoma and Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jantine W. P. M. van Baal

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Esophageal adenocarcinoma (EA and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC are the two main types of esophageal cancer. Despite extensive research the exact molecular basis of these cancers is unclear. Therefore we evaluated the transcriptome of EA in comparison to non-dysplastic Barrett’s esophagus (BE, the metaplastic epithelium that predisposes for EA, and compared the transcriptome of ESCC to normal esophageal squamous epithelium. For obtaining the transcriptomes tissue biopsies were used and serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE was applied. Validation of results by RT-PCR and immunoblotting was performed using tissues of an additional 23 EA and ESCC patients. Over 58,000 tags were sequenced. Between EA and BE 1013, and between ESCC and normal squamous epithelium 1235 tags were significantly differentially expressed (p < 0.05. The most up-regulated genes in EA compared to BE were SRY-box 4 and Lipocalin2, whereas the most down-regulated genes in EA were Trefoil factors and Annexin A10. The most up-regulated genes in ESCC compared to normal squamous epithelium were BMP4, E-Cadherin and TFF3. The results could suggest that the BE expression profile is closer related to normal squamous esophagus then to EA. In addition, several uniquely expressed genes are identified.

  9. Minoxidil activates β-catenin pathway in human dermal papilla cells: a possible explanation for its anagen prolongation effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwack, Mi Hee; Kang, Bo Mi; Kim, Moon Kyu; Kim, Jung Chul; Sung, Young Kwan

    2011-06-01

    It is believed that the length of the actively growing phase of the anagen hair cycle mainly contributes to hair length. Recent studies showed that maintenance of β-catenin activity in the dermal papilla cells (DPCs) enables hair follicles to keep actively growing. Topical minoxidil treatment promotes hair growth in men with androgenetic alopecia, suggesting that minoxidil may prolong the actively growing phase of the anagen hair cycle. To investigate whether minoxidil prolongs the anagen hair cycle in mice and, if so, to investigate whether minoxidil activates β-catenin pathway in human DPCs. Dorsal skins of C57BL/6 mice were depilated to synchronize the hair cycle. After 10 days, 3% minoxidil were topically applied daily for 10 days. Sections of back skins were stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Hair follicles were graded and hair cycle score (HCS) was calculated. Cultured human DPCs were transiently transfected with the β-catenin responsive TCF reporter plasmid (pTopflash) and corresponding negative control reporter (pFopflash) to assess the activity of β-catenin signaling by minoxidil. Immunofluorescence staining and immunoblot were performed to examine the expression and localization of β-catenin in the presence or absence of minoxidil. Phosphorylation of GSK3β, PKA and PKB were also examined by immunoblot after minoxidil treatment. RT-PCR analysis and immunoblot were employed to investigate the expression of β-catenin pathway targets in DPCs, such as Axin2, Lef-1, and EP2. Modest extension of anagen phase thereby delay of catagen progression was observed by application of minoxidil in mice. Minoxidil stimulated the transcriptional activity of pTopflash but not pFopflash. Nuclear accumulation of β-catenin was also observed after minoxidil treatment. Immunoblot further showed that minoxidil treatment increases the phosphorylation of GSK3β, PKA and PKB. Moreover, minoxidil induced Axin2, Lef-1, and EP2 expression. Our results strongly suggest that

  10. Quantitative determination of the organ distribution of the cell adhesion molecule cell-CAM 105 by radioimmunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odin, P.; Oebrink, B.

    1987-01-01

    The authors have previously identified a 105,000-Da plasma membrane glycoprotein, denoted cell-CAM 105, that is involved in intercellular adhesion of reaggregating rat hepatocytes. In this communication they report on the development of a radioimmunoassay for cell-CAM 105, employing purified cell-CAM 105, specific antisera against the molecule, and formalin-fixed protein A-containing staphylococci for precipitation of the immune complexes. The assay was shown to be sensitive, specific, precise, rapid, and easy to perform. They used this radioimmunoassay in investigations of the occurrence of cell-CAM 105 in different rat organs. Cell-CAM 105 was present in a wide spectrum of organs in varying amounts. The highest concentrations were found in the gastrointestinal tract, liver, some secretory glands, vagina, kidney, and lung. The results were confirmed by immunoblotting, which revealed one distinct protein component, corresponding to cell-CAM 105, in each positive organ

  11. A novel method, digital genome scanning detects KRAS gene amplification in gastric cancers: involvement of overexpressed wild-type KRAS in downstream signaling and cancer cell growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanagihara Kazuyoshi

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gastric cancer is the third most common malignancy affecting the general population worldwide. Aberrant activation of KRAS is a key factor in the development of many types of tumor, however, oncogenic mutations of KRAS are infrequent in gastric cancer. We have developed a novel quantitative method of analysis of DNA copy number, termed digital genome scanning (DGS, which is based on the enumeration of short restriction fragments, and does not involve PCR or hybridization. In the current study, we used DGS to survey copy-number alterations in gastric cancer cells. Methods DGS of gastric cancer cell lines was performed using the sequences of 5000 to 15000 restriction fragments. We screened 20 gastric cancer cell lines and 86 primary gastric tumors for KRAS amplification by quantitative PCR, and investigated KRAS amplification at the DNA, mRNA and protein levels by mutational analysis, real-time PCR, immunoblot analysis, GTP-RAS pull-down assay and immunohistochemical analysis. The effect of KRAS knock-down on the activation of p44/42 MAP kinase and AKT and on cell growth were examined by immunoblot and colorimetric assay, respectively. Results DGS analysis of the HSC45 gastric cancer cell line revealed the amplification of a 500-kb region on chromosome 12p12.1, which contains the KRAS gene locus. Amplification of the KRAS locus was detected in 15% (3/20 of gastric cancer cell lines (8–18-fold amplification and 4.7% (4/86 of primary gastric tumors (8–50-fold amplification. KRAS mutations were identified in two of the three cell lines in which KRAS was amplified, but were not detected in any of the primary tumors. Overexpression of KRAS protein correlated directly with increased KRAS copy number. The level of GTP-bound KRAS was elevated following serum stimulation in cells with amplified wild-type KRAS, but not in cells with amplified mutant KRAS. Knock-down of KRAS in gastric cancer cells that carried amplified wild

  12. A novel method, digital genome scanning detects KRAS gene amplification in gastric cancers: involvement of overexpressed wild-type KRAS in downstream signaling and cancer cell growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mita, Hiroaki; Yanagihara, Kazuyoshi; Fujita, Masahiro; Hosokawa, Masao; Kusano, Masanobu; Sabau, Sorin Vasile; Tatsumi, Haruyuki; Imai, Kohzoh; Shinomura, Yasuhisa; Tokino, Takashi; Toyota, Minoru; Aoki, Fumio; Akashi, Hirofumi; Maruyama, Reo; Sasaki, Yasushi; Suzuki, Hiromu; Idogawa, Masashi; Kashima, Lisa

    2009-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the third most common malignancy affecting the general population worldwide. Aberrant activation of KRAS is a key factor in the development of many types of tumor, however, oncogenic mutations of KRAS are infrequent in gastric cancer. We have developed a novel quantitative method of analysis of DNA copy number, termed digital genome scanning (DGS), which is based on the enumeration of short restriction fragments, and does not involve PCR or hybridization. In the current study, we used DGS to survey copy-number alterations in gastric cancer cells. DGS of gastric cancer cell lines was performed using the sequences of 5000 to 15000 restriction fragments. We screened 20 gastric cancer cell lines and 86 primary gastric tumors for KRAS amplification by quantitative PCR, and investigated KRAS amplification at the DNA, mRNA and protein levels by mutational analysis, real-time PCR, immunoblot analysis, GTP-RAS pull-down assay and immunohistochemical analysis. The effect of KRAS knock-down on the activation of p44/42 MAP kinase and AKT and on cell growth were examined by immunoblot and colorimetric assay, respectively. DGS analysis of the HSC45 gastric cancer cell line revealed the amplification of a 500-kb region on chromosome 12p12.1, which contains the KRAS gene locus. Amplification of the KRAS locus was detected in 15% (3/20) of gastric cancer cell lines (8–18-fold amplification) and 4.7% (4/86) of primary gastric tumors (8–50-fold amplification). KRAS mutations were identified in two of the three cell lines in which KRAS was amplified, but were not detected in any of the primary tumors. Overexpression of KRAS protein correlated directly with increased KRAS copy number. The level of GTP-bound KRAS was elevated following serum stimulation in cells with amplified wild-type KRAS, but not in cells with amplified mutant KRAS. Knock-down of KRAS in gastric cancer cells that carried amplified wild-type KRAS resulted in the inhibition of cell growth and

  13. Thymol Elicits HCT-116 Colorectal Carcinoma Cell Death Through Induction of Oxidative Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Anil Kumar; Bahuguna, Ashutosh; Paul, Souren; Kang, Sun Chul

    2018-02-07

    Colon cancer is one of the most deadly and common carcinomas occurring worldwide and there have been many attempts to treat this cancer. The present work was designed in order to evaluate thymol as a potent drug against colon cancer. Cytotoxicity of thymol at different concentrations was evaluated against a human colon carcinoma cell line (HCT-116 cells). Fluorescent staining was carried out to evaluate the level of ROS as well as mitochondrial and DNA fragmentation and immunoblot analysis were performed to confirm apoptosis and mitoptosis. Results of the study demonstrated that thymol efficiently created an oxidative stress environment inside HCT-116 cells, a colorectal carcinoma cell line, through induction of ROS production along with intense damage to DNA and mitochondria, as observed through Hoechst and rhodamine 123 staining, respectively. Moreover, expression of PARP-1, p-JNK, cytochrome-C and caspase-3 proteins was up-regulated, suggesting HCT-116 cells underwent mitoptotic cell death. Therefore, thymol could be used as a potent drug against colon cancer due to its lower toxicity and prevalence in natural medicinal plants. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  14. Differential expression of the neural cell adhesion molecule NCAM 140 in human pituitary tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Aletsee-Ufrecht, M. C.; Langley, O. K.; Gratzl, O.; Gratzl, Manfred

    1990-01-01

    We have analyzed the expression of the intracellular marker protein neuron specific enolase (NSE), synaptophysin (SYN) and of the cell surface marker NCAM (neural cell adhesion molecule) in both normal human hypophysis and in pituitary adenomas in order to explore their potential use as diagnostic tools. All adenomas (4 prolactinomas, 3 growth hormone (GH) producing adenomas and 4 inactive adenomas) showed SYN and NSE immunoreactivity on tissue sections and this was confirmed by immunoblots. ...

  15. Morphologic and proteomic characterization of exosomes released by cultured extravillous trophoblast cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atay, Safinur [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, KY (United States); Gercel-Taylor, Cicek [Obstetrics, Gynecology and Women' s Health, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, KY (United States); Kesimer, Mehmet [Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Taylor, Douglas D., E-mail: ddtaylor@louisville.edu [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, KY (United States); Obstetrics, Gynecology and Women' s Health, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, KY (United States)

    2011-05-01

    Exosomes represent an important intercellular communication vehicle, mediating events essential for the decidual microenvironment. While we have demonstrated exosome induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines, to date, no extensive characterization of trophoblast-derived exosomes has been provided. Our objective was to provide a morphologic and proteomic characterization of these exosomes. Exosomes were isolated from the conditioned media of Swan71 human trophoblast cells by ultrafiltration and ultracentrifugation. These were analyzed for density (sucrose density gradient centrifugation), morphology (electron microscopy), size (dynamic light scattering) and protein composition (Ion Trap mass spectrometry and western immunoblotting). Based on density gradient centrifugation, microvesicles from Sw71 cells exhibit a density between 1.134 and 1.173 g/ml. Electron microscopy demonstrated that microvesicles from Sw71 cells exhibit the characteristic cup-shaped morphology of exosomes. Dynamic light scattering showed a bell-shaped curve, indicating a homogeneous population with a mean size of 165 nm {+-} 0.5 nm. Ion Trap mass spectrometry demonstrated the presence of exosome marker proteins (including CD81, Alix, cytoskeleton related proteins, and Rab family). The MS results were confirmed by western immunoblotting. Based on morphology, density, size and protein composition, we defined the release of exosomes from extravillous trophoblast cells and provide their first extensive characterization. This characterization is essential in furthering our understanding of 'normal' early pregnancy.

  16. Morphologic and proteomic characterization of exosomes released by cultured extravillous trophoblast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atay, Safinur; Gercel-Taylor, Cicek; Kesimer, Mehmet; Taylor, Douglas D.

    2011-01-01

    Exosomes represent an important intercellular communication vehicle, mediating events essential for the decidual microenvironment. While we have demonstrated exosome induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines, to date, no extensive characterization of trophoblast-derived exosomes has been provided. Our objective was to provide a morphologic and proteomic characterization of these exosomes. Exosomes were isolated from the conditioned media of Swan71 human trophoblast cells by ultrafiltration and ultracentrifugation. These were analyzed for density (sucrose density gradient centrifugation), morphology (electron microscopy), size (dynamic light scattering) and protein composition (Ion Trap mass spectrometry and western immunoblotting). Based on density gradient centrifugation, microvesicles from Sw71 cells exhibit a density between 1.134 and 1.173 g/ml. Electron microscopy demonstrated that microvesicles from Sw71 cells exhibit the characteristic cup-shaped morphology of exosomes. Dynamic light scattering showed a bell-shaped curve, indicating a homogeneous population with a mean size of 165 nm ± 0.5 nm. Ion Trap mass spectrometry demonstrated the presence of exosome marker proteins (including CD81, Alix, cytoskeleton related proteins, and Rab family). The MS results were confirmed by western immunoblotting. Based on morphology, density, size and protein composition, we defined the release of exosomes from extravillous trophoblast cells and provide their first extensive characterization. This characterization is essential in furthering our understanding of 'normal' early pregnancy.

  17. Effect of propofol on androgen receptor activity in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatsumi, Kenichiro; Hirotsu, Akiko; Daijo, Hiroki; Matsuyama, Tomonori; Terada, Naoki; Tanaka, Tomoharu

    2017-08-15

    Androgen receptor is a nuclear receptor and transcription factor activated by androgenic hormones. Androgen receptor activity plays a pivotal role in the development and progression of prostate cancer. Although accumulating evidence suggests that general anesthetics, including opioids, affect cancer cell growth and impact patient prognosis, the effect of those drugs on androgen receptor in prostate cancer is not clear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of the general anesthetic propofol on androgen receptor activity in prostate cancer cells. An androgen-dependent human prostate cancer cell line (LNCaP) was stimulated with dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and exposed to propofol. The induction of androgen receptor target genes was investigated using real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, and androgen receptor protein levels and localization patterns were analyzed using immunoblotting and immunofluorescence assays. The effect of propofol on the proliferation of LNCaP cells was analyzed using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assays. Propofol significantly inhibited DHT-induced expression of androgen receptor target genes in a dose- and time-dependent manner, and immunoblotting and immunofluorescence assays indicated that propofol suppressed nuclear levels of androgen receptor proteins. Exposure to propofol for 24h suppressed the proliferation of LNCaP cells, whereas 4h of exposure did not exert significant effects. Together, our results indicate that propofol suppresses nuclear androgen receptor protein levels, and inhibits androgen receptor transcriptional activity and proliferation in LNCaP cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of sunitinib combined with ionizing radiation on endothelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Haiping; Jiao Xiaodong; Li Rui; Wang Jiejun; Takayama, Koichi; Su Bo

    2011-01-01

    The aims of present study were to evaluate the efficacy of combining sunitinib with ionizing radiation (IR) on endothelial cells in vitro and in vivo. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were exposed to IR with or without sunitinib pretreatment. Apoptosis assay and cell cycle distribution were analyzed by flow cytometry. Clonogenic survival assay at 3 Gy dose with or without sunitinib was performed. The activity of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signal pathway was detected by Western immunoblot. Lewis lung carcinoma mouse model was built to examine the effect of combination therapy on endothelial cells in vivo. Microvasculature changes were detected by immunohistochemistry using anti-CD31 antibody. Our results showed combination therapy of sunitinib and IR significantly increased apoptosis of endothelial cells and inhibited colony formation compared to sunitinib or radiotherapy alone. It also resulted in cell cycle redistribution (decreasing cells in S phase and increasing cells in G2/M phase). The activity of PI3K/Akt signal pathway was inhibited, which could be the potential mechanisms that account for the enhanced radiation response induced by sunitinib. In vivo analysis showed that combination therapy significantly decreased microvasculature formation. The results demonstrated that combination therapy of sunitinib and IR has the potential to increase the cytotoxic effects on endothelial cells. (author)

  19. Optimization of Methods for Articular Cartilage Surface Tissue Engineering: Cell Density and Transforming Growth Factor Beta Are Critical for Self-Assembly and Lubricin Secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasa, Kenjiro; Reddi, A Hari

    2017-07-01

    Lubricin/superficial zone protein (SZP)/proteoglycan4 (PRG4) plays an important role in boundary lubrication in articular cartilage. Lubricin is secreted by superficial zone chondrocytes and synoviocytes of the synovium. The specific objective of this investigation is to optimize the methods for tissue engineering of articular cartilage surface. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of cell density on the self-assembly of superficial zone chondrocytes and lubricin secretion as a functional assessment. Superficial zone chondrocytes were cultivated as a monolayer at low, medium, and high densities. Chondrocytes at the three different densities were treated with transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β)1 twice a week or daily, and the accumulated lubricin in the culture medium was analyzed by immunoblots and quantitated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Cell numbers in low and medium densities were increased by TGF-β1; whereas cell numbers in high-density cell cultures were decreased by twice-a-week treatment of TGF-β1. On the other hand, the cell numbers were maintained by daily TGF-β treatment. Immunoblots and quantitation of lubricin by ELISA analysis indicated that TGF-β1 stimulated lubricin secretion by superficial zone chondrocytes at all densities with twice-a-week TGF-β treatment. It is noteworthy that the daily treatment of TGF-β1 increased lubricin much higher compared with twice-a-week treatment. These data demonstrate that daily treatment is optimal for the TGF-β1 response in a higher density of monolayer cultures. These findings have implications for self-assembly of surface zone chondrocytes of articular cartilage for application in tissue engineering of articular cartilage surface.

  20. High efficiency non-viral transfection of retinal and iris pigment epithelial cells with pigment epithelium-derived factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thumann, G; Stöcker, M; Maltusch, C; Salz, A K; Barth, S; Walter, P; Johnen, S

    2010-02-01

    Transplantation of pigment epithelial cells in patients with age-related macular degeneration and Parkinson's disease has the potential to improve functional rehabilitation. Genetic modification of cells before transplantation may allow the delivery of neuroprotective factors to achieve functional improvement. As transplantation of cells modified using viral vectors is complicated by the possible dissemination of viral particles and severe immune reactions, we have explored non-viral methods to insert genetic material in pigment epithelial cells. Using lipofection or nucleofection ARPE-19 cells, freshly isolated and primary retinal and iris pigment epithelial (IPE) cells were transfected with plasmids encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) and with three plasmids encoding recombinant pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) and GFP. Transfection efficiency was evaluated by fluorescence microscopy and stability of protein expression by immunoblotting. Pigment epithelial cells were successfully transfected with plasmid encoding GFP. Expression of GFP in ARPE-19 was transient, but was observed for up to 1 year in IPE cells. Analysis of pigment epithelial cells transfected with PEDF plasmids revealed that PEDF fusion proteins were successfully expressed and functionally active. In conclusion, efficient transfer of genetic information in pigment epithelial cells can be achieved using non-viral transfection protocols.

  1. Role of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) in the effects of oxidative stress on human retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Ji-Ae; Sotani, Yasuyuki; Ibrahim, Diah Gemala; Kiuchi, Yoshiaki

    2017-10-01

    Proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) is the major cause of treatment failure in individuals who undergo surgery for retinal detachment. The epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells contributes to the pathogenesis of PVR. Oxidative stress is thought to play a role in the progression of retinal diseases including PVR. We have now examined the effects of oxidative stress on the EMT and related processes in the human RPE cell line. We found that H 2 O 2 induced the contraction of RPE cells in a three-dimensional collagen gel. Analysis of a cytokine array revealed that H 2 O 2 specifically increased the release of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) from RPE cells. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and immunoblot analyses showed that H 2 O 2 increased the expression of MIF in RPE cells. Immunoblot and immunofluorescence analyses revealed that H 2 O 2 upregulated the expression of α-SMA and vimentin and downregulated that of ZO-1 and N-cadherin. Consistent with these observations, the transepithelial electrical resistance of cell was reduced by exposure to H 2 O 2 . The effects of oxidative stress on EMT-related and junctional protein expression as well as on transepithelial electrical resistance were inhibited by antibodies to MIF, but they were not mimicked by treatment with recombinant MIF. Finally, analysis with a profiling array for mitogen-activated protein kinase signalling revealed that H 2 O 2 specifically induced the phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase. Our results thus suggest that MIF may play a role in induction of the EMT and related processes by oxidative stress in RPE cells and that it might thereby contribute to the pathogenesis of PVR. Proliferative vitreoretinopathy is a major complication of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment, and both oxidative stress and induction of the EMT in RPE cells are thought to contribute to the pathogenesis of this condition. We have now

  2. 2D-DIGE and MALDI TOF/TOF MS analysis reveal that small GTPase signaling pathways may play an important role in cadmium-induced colon cell malignant transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Jian; Zhou, Zhongping; Zheng, Jianzhou; Zhang, Zhuyi; Lu, Rongzhu; Liu, Hanqing; Shi, Haifeng; Tu, Zhigang

    2015-01-01

    Cadmium is a toxic heavy metal present in the environment and in industrial materials. Cadmium has demonstrated carcinogenic activity that induces cell transformation, but how this occurs is unclear. We used 2D-DIGE and MALDI TOF/TOF MS combined with bioinformatics and immunoblotting to investigate the molecular mechanism of cadmium transformation. We found that small GTPases were critical for transformation. Additionally, proteins involved in mitochondrial transcription, DNA repair, and translation also had altered expression patterns in cadmium treated cells. Collectively, our results suggest that activation of small GTPases contributes to cadmium-induced transformation of colon cells. - Highlights: • Colon epithelial cell line is firstly successfully transformed by cadmium. • 2D-DIGE is applied to visualize the differentially expressed proteins. • RhoA plays an important role in cadmium induced malignant transformation. • Bioinformatic and experimental methods are combined to explore new mechanisms.

  3. 2D-DIGE and MALDI TOF/TOF MS analysis reveal that small GTPase signaling pathways may play an important role in cadmium-induced colon cell malignant transformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Jian, E-mail: lujian@ujs.edu.cn [School of Medicine, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Institute of Life Sciences, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Zhou, Zhongping [School of Medicine, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Institute of Life Sciences, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Zheng, Jianzhou [Department of Respiration Medicine, Changzhou No.2 People' s Hospital, Changzhou 213003 (China); Zhang, Zhuyi [School of Medicine, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Institute of Life Sciences, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Lu, Rongzhu [School of Medicine, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Liu, Hanqing [School of Pharmacy, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Shi, Haifeng [Institute of Life Sciences, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Tu, Zhigang, E-mail: tuzg_ujs@ujs.edu.cn [Institute of Life Sciences, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China)

    2015-10-01

    Cadmium is a toxic heavy metal present in the environment and in industrial materials. Cadmium has demonstrated carcinogenic activity that induces cell transformation, but how this occurs is unclear. We used 2D-DIGE and MALDI TOF/TOF MS combined with bioinformatics and immunoblotting to investigate the molecular mechanism of cadmium transformation. We found that small GTPases were critical for transformation. Additionally, proteins involved in mitochondrial transcription, DNA repair, and translation also had altered expression patterns in cadmium treated cells. Collectively, our results suggest that activation of small GTPases contributes to cadmium-induced transformation of colon cells. - Highlights: • Colon epithelial cell line is firstly successfully transformed by cadmium. • 2D-DIGE is applied to visualize the differentially expressed proteins. • RhoA plays an important role in cadmium induced malignant transformation. • Bioinformatic and experimental methods are combined to explore new mechanisms.

  4. In vitro analysis of the invasive phenotype of SUM 149, an inflammatory breast cancer cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dharmawardhane Suranganie F

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC is the most lethal form of locally invasive breast cancer known. However, very little information is available on the cellular mechanisms responsible for manifestation of the IBC phenotype. To understand the unique phenotype of IBC, we compared the motile and adhesive interactions of an IBC cell line, SUM 149, to the non-IBC cell line SUM 102. Results Our results demonstrate that both IBC and non-IBC cell lines exhibit similar adhesive properties to basal lamina, but SUM 149 showed a marked increase in adhesion to collagen I. In vitro haptotaxis assays demonstrate that SUM 149 was less invasive, while wound healing assays show a less in vitro migratory phenotype for SUM 149 cells relative to SUM 102 cells. We also demonstrate a role for Rho and E-cadherin in the unique invasive phenotype of IBC. Immunoblotting reveals higher E-cadherin and RhoA expression in the IBC cell line but similar RhoC expression. Rhodamine phalloidin staining demonstrates increased formation of actin stress fibers and larger focal adhesions in SUM 149 relative to the SUM 102 cell line. Conclusion The observed unique actin and cellular architecture as well as the invasive and adhesive responses to the extracellular matrix of SUM 149 IBC cells suggest that the preference of IBC cells for connective tissue, possibly a mediator important for the vasculogenic mimicry via tubulogenesis seen in IBC pathological specimens. Overexpression of E-cadherin and RhoA may contribute to passive dissemination of IBC by promoting cell-cell adhesion and actin cytoskeletal structures that maintain tissue integrity. Therefore, we believe that these findings indicate a passive metastatic mechanism by which IBC cells invade the circulatory system as tumor emboli rather than by active migratory mechanisms.

  5. MURC/cavin-4 Is Co-Expressed with Caveolin-3 in Rhabdomyosarcoma Tumors and Its Silencing Prevents Myogenic Differentiation in the Human Embryonal RD Cell Line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faggi, Fiorella; Codenotti, Silvia; Poliani, Pietro Luigi; Cominelli, Manuela; Chiarelli, Nicola; Colombi, Marina; Vezzoli, Marika; Monti, Eugenio; Bono, Federica; Tulipano, Giovanni; Fiorentini, Chiara; Zanola, Alessandra; Lo, Harriet P; Parton, Robert G; Keller, Charles; Fanzani, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether MURC/cavin-4, a plasma membrane and Z-line associated protein exhibiting an overlapping distribution with Caveolin-3 (Cav-3) in heart and muscle tissues, may be expressed and play a role in rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS), an aggressive myogenic tumor affecting childhood. We found MURC/cavin-4 to be expressed, often concurrently with Cav-3, in mouse and human RMS, as demonstrated through in silico analysis of gene datasets and immunohistochemical analysis of tumor samples. In vitro expression studies carried out using human cell lines and primary mouse tumor cultures showed that expression levels of both MURC/cavin-4 and Cav-3, while being low or undetectable during cell proliferation, became robustly increased during myogenic differentiation, as detected via semi-quantitative RT-PCR and immunoblotting analysis. Furthermore, confocal microscopy analysis performed on human RD and RH30 cell lines confirmed that MURC/cavin-4 mostly marks differentiated cell elements, colocalizing at the cell surface with Cav-3 and labeling myosin heavy chain (MHC) expressing cells. Finally, MURC/cavin-4 silencing prevented the differentiation in the RD cell line, leading to morphological cell impairment characterized by depletion of myogenin, Cav-3 and MHC protein levels. Overall, our data suggest that MURC/cavin-4, especially in combination with Cav-3, may play a consistent role in the differentiation process of RMS.

  6. MURC/cavin-4 Is Co-Expressed with Caveolin-3 in Rhabdomyosarcoma Tumors and Its Silencing Prevents Myogenic Differentiation in the Human Embryonal RD Cell Line.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiorella Faggi

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate whether MURC/cavin-4, a plasma membrane and Z-line associated protein exhibiting an overlapping distribution with Caveolin-3 (Cav-3 in heart and muscle tissues, may be expressed and play a role in rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS, an aggressive myogenic tumor affecting childhood. We found MURC/cavin-4 to be expressed, often concurrently with Cav-3, in mouse and human RMS, as demonstrated through in silico analysis of gene datasets and immunohistochemical analysis of tumor samples. In vitro expression studies carried out using human cell lines and primary mouse tumor cultures showed that expression levels of both MURC/cavin-4 and Cav-3, while being low or undetectable during cell proliferation, became robustly increased during myogenic differentiation, as detected via semi-quantitative RT-PCR and immunoblotting analysis. Furthermore, confocal microscopy analysis performed on human RD and RH30 cell lines confirmed that MURC/cavin-4 mostly marks differentiated cell elements, colocalizing at the cell surface with Cav-3 and labeling myosin heavy chain (MHC expressing cells. Finally, MURC/cavin-4 silencing prevented the differentiation in the RD cell line, leading to morphological cell impairment characterized by depletion of myogenin, Cav-3 and MHC protein levels. Overall, our data suggest that MURC/cavin-4, especially in combination with Cav-3, may play a consistent role in the differentiation process of RMS.

  7. Paracrine Pathways in Uterine Leiomyoma Stem Cells Involve Insulinlike Growth Factor 2 and Insulin Receptor A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moravek, Molly B; Yin, Ping; Coon, John S; Ono, Masanori; Druschitz, Stacy A; Malpani, Saurabh S; Dyson, Matthew T; Rademaker, Alfred W; Robins, Jared C; Wei, Jian-Jun; Kim, J Julie; Bulun, Serdar E

    2017-05-01

    Uterine leiomyomas (fibroids) are the most common benign tumors in women. Recently, three populations of leiomyoma cells were discovered on the basis of CD34 and CD49b expression, but molecular differences between these populations remain unknown. To define differential gene expression and signaling pathways in leiomyoma cell populations. Cells from human leiomyoma tissue were sorted by flow cytometry into three populations: CD34+/CD49b+, CD34+/CD49b-, and CD34-/CD49b-. Microarray gene expression profiling and pathway analysis were performed. To investigate the insulinlike growth factor (IGF) pathway, real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction, immunoblotting, and 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine incorporation studies were performed in cells isolated from fresh leiomyoma. Research laboratory. Eight African American women. None. Gene expression patterns, cell proliferation, and differentiation. A total of 1164 genes were differentially expressed in the three leiomyoma cell populations, suggesting a hierarchical differentiation order whereby CD34+/CD49b+ stem cells differentiate to CD34+/CD49b- intermediary cells, which then terminally differentiate to CD34-/CD49b- cells. Pathway analysis revealed differential expression of several IGF signaling pathway genes. IGF2 was overexpressed in CD34+/CD49b- vs CD34-/CD49b- cells (83-fold; P leiomyoma stem cell proliferation and may represent paracrine signaling between leiomyoma cell types. Therapies targeting the IGF pathway should be investigated for both treatment and prevention of leiomyomas. Copyright © 2017 by the Endocrine Society

  8. Agmatine protects retinal ganglion cells from hypoxia-induced apoptosis in transformed rat retinal ganglion cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Chan

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Agmatine is an endogenous polyamine formed by the decarboxylation of L-arginine. We investigated the protective effects of agmatine against hypoxia-induced apoptosis of immortalized rat retinal ganglion cells (RGC-5. RGC-5 cells were cultured in a closed hypoxic chamber (5% O2 with or without agmatine. Cell viability was determined by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH assay and apoptosis was examined by annexin V and caspase-3 assays. Expression and phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs; JNK, ERK p44/42, and p38 and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB were investigated by Western immunoblot analysis. The effects of agmatine were compared to those of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, a well-known protective neurotrophin for retinal ganglion cells. Results After 48 hours of hypoxic culture, the LDH assay showed 52.3% cell loss, which was reduced to 25.6% and 30.1% when agmatine and BDNF were administered, respectively. This observed cell loss was due to apoptotic cell death, as established by annexin V and caspase-3 assays. Although total expression of MAPKs and NF-κB was not influenced by hypoxic injury, phosphorylation of these two proteins was increased. Agmatine reduced phosphorylation of JNK and NF-κB, while BDNF suppressed phosphorylation of ERK and p38. Conclusion Our results show that agmatine has neuroprotective effects against hypoxia-induced retinal ganglion cell damage in RGC-5 cells and that its effects may act through the JNK and NF-κB signaling pathways. Our data suggest that agmatine may lead to a novel therapeutic strategy to reduce retinal ganglion cell injury related to hypoxia.

  9. Agmatine protects retinal ganglion cells from hypoxia-induced apoptosis in transformed rat retinal ganglion cell line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Samin; Lee, Jong Eun; Kim, Chan Yun; Seong, Gong Je

    2007-01-01

    Background Agmatine is an endogenous polyamine formed by the decarboxylation of L-arginine. We investigated the protective effects of agmatine against hypoxia-induced apoptosis of immortalized rat retinal ganglion cells (RGC-5). RGC-5 cells were cultured in a closed hypoxic chamber (5% O2) with or without agmatine. Cell viability was determined by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay and apoptosis was examined by annexin V and caspase-3 assays. Expression and phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs; JNK, ERK p44/42, and p38) and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) were investigated by Western immunoblot analysis. The effects of agmatine were compared to those of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a well-known protective neurotrophin for retinal ganglion cells. Results After 48 hours of hypoxic culture, the LDH assay showed 52.3% cell loss, which was reduced to 25.6% and 30.1% when agmatine and BDNF were administered, respectively. This observed cell loss was due to apoptotic cell death, as established by annexin V and caspase-3 assays. Although total expression of MAPKs and NF-κB was not influenced by hypoxic injury, phosphorylation of these two proteins was increased. Agmatine reduced phosphorylation of JNK and NF-κB, while BDNF suppressed phosphorylation of ERK and p38. Conclusion Our results show that agmatine has neuroprotective effects against hypoxia-induced retinal ganglion cell damage in RGC-5 cells and that its effects may act through the JNK and NF-κB signaling pathways. Our data suggest that agmatine may lead to a novel therapeutic strategy to reduce retinal ganglion cell injury related to hypoxia. PMID:17908330

  10. Role of Mitochondria in Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chowdhury, Subir K

    2005-01-01

    ... (LNCaP, DU145, PC3, and CL1). Immunoblot, Real Time RTPCR, polarographic, and spectrophotometric analysis revealed that mGPDH abundance and activity was significantly elevated in prostate cancer cell lines when compared to normal...

  11. Andrographolide suppresses high glucose-induced fibronectin expression in mesangial cells via inhibiting the AP-1 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Tian; Wu, Teng; Gou, Hongju; Zhang, Qianqian; Li, Jiangchao; Qi, Cuiling; He, Xiaodong; Wu, Pingxiang; Wang, Lijing

    2013-11-01

    Mesangial cells (MCs) proliferation and accumulation of glomerular matrix proteins such as fibronectin (FN) are the early features of diabetic nephropathy, with MCs known to upregulate matrix protein synthesis in response to high glucose. Recently, it has been found that andrographolide has renoprotective effects on diabetic nephropathy. However, the molecular mechanism underlying these effects remains unclear. Cell viability and proliferation was evaluated by MTT. FN expression was examined by immunofluorescence and immunoblotting. Activator protein-1 (AP-1) activation was assessed by immunoblotting, luciferase reporter and electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Andrographolide significantly decreased high glucose-induced cell proliferation and FN expression in MCs. Exposure of MCs to high glucose markedly stimulated the expression of phosphorylated c-jun, whereas the stimulation was inhibited by andrographolide. Plasmid pAP-1-Luc luciferase reporter assay showed that andrographolide blocked high glucose-induced AP-1 transcriptional activity. EMSA assay demonstrated that increased AP-1 binding to an AP-1 binding site at -1,029 in the FN gene promoter upon high glucose stimulation, and the binding were disrupted by andrographolide treatment. These data indicate that andrographolide suppresses high glucose-induced FN expression by inhibiting AP-1-mediated pathway. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Role of Mitochondria in Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chowdhury, Subir K

    2006-01-01

    ... (LNCaP DU145 RC3 and CL1). Immunoblot Real Time RT-RCR polarographic and spectrophotometric analysis revealed that mGPDH abundance and activity was significantly elevated in prostate cancer cell lines when compared to normal...

  13. Huaier Aqueous Extract Induces Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells Arrest in S Phase via JNK Signaling Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengshuo Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Huaier aqueous extract, the main active constituent of Huaier proteoglycan, has antihepatocarcinoma activity in experimental and clinical settings. However, the potential and associated antihepatoma mechanisms of Huaier extract are not yet fully understood. Therefore, in this study, we aimed to elucidate the inhibitory proliferation effect of Huaier extract on apoptosis and cycle of HepG2 and Bel-7402 cells. Our data demonstrated that incubation with Huaier extract resulted in a marked decrease in cell viability dose-dependently. Flow cytometric analysis showed that a 48 h treatment of Huaier extract caused cell apoptosis. Typical apoptotic nucleus alterations were observed with fluorescence microscope after Hoechst staining. Immunoblot analysis further demonstrated that Huaier extract activated caspase 3 and PARP. Additionally, Huaier extract inhibited the activity of p-ERK, p-p38, and p-JNK in terms of MAPK. Furthermore, Huaier extract induced HCC cells arrest in S phase and decreased the cycle related protein expression of β-catenin and cyclin D1. Studies with JNK specific inhibitor, SP600125, showed that Huaier extract induced S phase arrest and decreased β-catenin and cyclin D1 expression via JNK signaling pathway. In conclusion, we verify that Huaier extract causes cell apoptosis and induces hepatocellular carcinoma cells arrest in S phase via JNK pathway, which advances our understanding on the molecular mechanisms of Huaier extract in hepatocarcinoma management.

  14. Toll-like receptor 6 and connective tissue growth factor are significantly upregulated in mitomycin-C-treated urothelial carcinoma cells under hydrostatic pressure stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shao-Kuan; Chung, Chih-Ang; Cheng, Yu-Che; Huang, Chi-Jung; Chen, Wen-Yih; Ruaan, Ruoh-Chyu; Li, Chuan; Tsao, Chia-Wen; Hu, Wei-Wen; Chien, Chih-Cheng

    2014-06-01

    Urothelial carcinoma (UC) is the most common histologic subtype of bladder cancer. The administration of mitomycin C (MMC) into the bladder after transurethral resection of the bladder tumor (TURBT) is a common treatment strategy for preventing recurrence after surgery. We previously applied hydrostatic pressure combined with MMC in UC cells and found that hydrostatic pressure synergistically enhanced MMC-induced UC cell apoptosis through the Fas/FasL pathways. To understand the alteration of gene expressions in UC cells caused by hydrostatic pressure and MMC, oligonucleotide microarray was used to explore all the differentially expressed genes. After bioinformatics analysis and gene annotation, Toll-like receptor 6 (TLR6) and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) showed significant upregulation among altered genes, and their gene and protein expressions with each treatment of UC cells were validated by quantitative real-time PCR and immunoblotting. Under treatment with MMC and hydrostatic pressure, UC cells showed increasing apoptosis using extrinsic pathways through upregulation of TLR6 and CTGF.

  15. Bithionol inhibits ovarian cancer cell growth In Vitro - studies on mechanism(s) of action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayyagari, Vijayalakshmi N; Brard, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    Drug resistance is a cause of ovarian cancer recurrence and low overall survival rates. There is a need for more effective treatment approaches because the development of new drug is expensive and time consuming. Alternatively, the concept of ‘drug repurposing’ is promising. We focused on Bithionol (BT), a clinically approved anti-parasitic drug as an anti-ovarian cancer drug. BT has previously been shown to inhibit solid tumor growth in several preclinical cancer models. A better understanding of the anti-tumor effects and mechanism(s) of action of BT in ovarian cancer cells is essential for further exploring its therapeutic potential against ovarian cancer. The cytotoxic effects of BT against a panel of ovarian cancer cell lines were determined by Presto Blue cell viability assay. Markers of apoptosis such as caspases 3/7, cPARP induction, nuclear condensation and mitochondrial transmembrane depolarization were assessed using microscopic, FACS and immunoblotting methods. Mechanism(s) of action of BT such as cell cycle arrest, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, autotaxin (ATX) inhibition and effects on MAPK and NF-kB signalling were determined by FACS analysis, immunoblotting and colorimetric methods. BT caused dose dependent cytotoxicity against all ovarian cancer cell lines tested with IC 50 values ranging from 19 μM – 60 μM. Cisplatin-resistant variants of A2780 and IGROV-1 have shown almost similar IC 50 values compared to their sensitive counterparts. Apoptotic cell death was shown by expression of caspases 3/7, cPARP, loss of mitochondrial potential, nuclear condensation, and up-regulation of p38 and reduced expression of pAkt, pNF-κB, pIκBα, XIAP, bcl-2 and bcl-xl. BT treatment resulted in cell cycle arrest at G1/M phase and increased ROS generation. Treatment with ascorbic acid resulted in partial restoration of cell viability. In addition, dose and time dependent inhibition of ATX was observed. BT exhibits cytotoxic effects on various

  16. Identification of nuclear τ isoforms in human neuroblastoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loomis, P.A.; Howard, T.H.; Castleberry, R.P.; Binder, L.I.

    1990-01-01

    The τ proteins have been reported only in association with microtubules and with ribosomes in situ, in the normal central nervous system. In addition, τ has been shown to be an integral component of paired helical filaments, the principal constituent of the neurofibrillary tangles found in brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease and of most aged individuals with Down syndrome (trisomy 21). The authors report here the localization of the well-characterized Tau-1 monoclonal antibody to the nucleolar organizer regions of the acrocentric chromosomes and to their interphase counterpart, the fibrillar component of the nucleolus, in human neuroblastoma cells. Similar localization to the nucleolar organizer regions was also observed in other human cell lines and in one monkey kidney cell line but was not seen in non-primate species. Immunochemically, they further demonstrated the existence of the entire τ molecule in the isolated nuclei of neuroblastoma cells. Nuclear τ proteins, like the τ proteins of the paired helical filaments, cannot be extracted in standard SDS-containing electrophoresis sample buffer but require pretreatment with formic acid prior to immunoblot analysis. This work indicates that τ may function in processes not directly associated with microtubules and that highly insoluble complexes of τ may also play a role in normal cellular physiology

  17. Expression of the α2-macroglobulin receptor on human neoplastic fibroblastoid cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grofova, M.; Matoska, J.; Bies, J.; Bizik, J.; Vaheri, A.

    1995-01-01

    The α 2 -macroglobulin membrane-associated receptor ( α 2 MR) has been previously detected on hepatocytes, fibroblast, macrophages, syncytiotrophoblasts and recently on human malignant blood cells of myelomonocytic leukemia. In cells growing in vitro from human germ cell tumors α 2 MR mRNA was detected by Northern blotting. Endocytosis of α 2 MR from culture medium was detected in these cells by indirect immunofluorescence. In cell extracts α 2 MR and its degradation products were detected by immunoblotting. The cells expressing α 2 MR and internalizing α 2 MR were identified as fibroblast both by their morphology and expression of vimentin intermediate filaments. The role and function of α 2 MR receptor in the analyzed neoplastic cells of teratomatous origin is discussed. (author)

  18. Differential T-cell recognition of native and recombinant Mycobacterium tuberculosis GroES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkrands, I; Weldingh, K; Ravn, P

    1999-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis GroES was purified from culture filtrate, and its identity was confirmed by immunoblot analysis and N-terminal sequencing. Comparing the immunological recognition of native and recombinant GroES, we found that whereas native GroES elicited a strong proliferative response...

  19. Geographically diverse Australian isolates of Melissococcus pluton exhibit minimal genotypic diversity by restriction endonuclease analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djordjevic, S P; Smith, L A; Forbes, W A; Hornitzky, M A

    1999-04-15

    Melissococcus pluton, the causative agent of European foulbrood is an economically significant disease of honey bees (Apis mellifera) across most regions of the world and is prevalent throughout most states of Australia. 49 Isolates of M. pluton recovered from diseased colonies or honey samples in New South Wales, Queensland, South Australia, Tasmania and Victoria were compared using SDS-PAGE, Western immunoblotting and restriction endonuclease analyses. DNA profiles of all 49 geographically diverse isolates showed remarkably similar AluI profiles although four isolates (one each from Queensland, South Australia, New South Wales and Victoria) displayed minor profile variations compared to AluI patterns of all other isolates. DNA from a subset of the 49 Australian and three isolates from the United Kingdom were digested separately with the restriction endonucleases CfoI, RsaI and DraI. Restriction endonuclease fragment patterns generated using these enzymes were also similar although minor variations were noted. SDS-PAGE of whole cell proteins from 13 of the 49 isolates from different states of Australia, including the four isolates which displayed minor profile variations (AluI) produced indistinguishable patterns. Major immunoreactive proteins of approximate molecular masses of 21, 24, 28, 30, 36, 40, 44, 56, 60, 71, 79 and 95 kDa were observed in immunoblots of whole cell lysates of 22 of the 49 isolates and reacted with rabbit hyperimmune antibodies raised against M. pluton whole cells. Neither SDS-PAGE or immunoblotting was capable of distinguishing differences between geographically diverse isolates of M. pluton. Collectively these data confirm that Australian isolates of M. pluton are genetically homogeneous and that this species may be clonal. Plasmid DNA was not detected in whole cell DNA profiles of any isolate resolved using agarose gel electrophoresis.

  20. FRK inhibits breast cancer cell migration and invasion by suppressing epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunbolude, Yetunde; Dai, Chenlu; Bagu, Edward T; Goel, Raghuveera Kumar; Miah, Sayem; MacAusland-Berg, Joshua; Ng, Chi Ying; Chibbar, Rajni; Napper, Scott; Raptis, Leda; Vizeacoumar, Frederick; Vizeacoumar, Franco; Bonham, Keith; Lukong, Kiven Erique

    2017-12-22

    The human fyn-related kinase (FRK) is a non-receptor tyrosine kinase known to have tumor suppressor activity in breast cancer cells. However, its mechanism of action has not been fully characterized. We generated FRK-stable MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines and analyzed the effect on cell proliferation, migration, and invasiveness. We also used kinome analysis to identify potential FRK-regulated signaling pathways. We employed both immunoblotting and RT-PCR to identify/validate FRK-regulated targets (proteins and genes) in these cells. Finally, we interrogated the TCGA and GENT gene expression databases to determine the correlation between the expression of FRK and epithelial/mesenchymal markers. We observed that FRK overexpression suppressed cell proliferation, migration, and invasiveness, inhibited various JAK/STAT, MAPK and Akt signaling pathways, and suppressed the expression of some STAT3 target genes. Also, FRK overexpression increased the expression of epithelial markers including E-cadherin mRNA and down-regulated the transcript levels of vimentin, fibronectin, and slug. Finally, we observed an inverse correlation between FRK expression and mesenchymal markers in a large cohort of breast cancer cells. Our data, therefore, suggests that FRK represses cell proliferation, migration and invasiveness by suppressing epithelial to mesenchymal transition.

  1. Generation of a Chinese Hamster Ovary Cell Line Producing Recombinant Human Glucocerebrosidase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novo, Juliana Branco; Morganti, Ligia; Moro, Ana Maria; Paes Leme, Adriana Franco; Serrano, Solange Maria de Toledo; Raw, Isaias; Ho, Paulo Lee

    2012-01-01

    Impaired activity of the lysosomal enzyme glucocerebrosidase (GCR) results in the inherited metabolic disorder known as Gaucher disease. Current treatment consists of enzyme replacement therapy by administration of exogenous GCR. Although effective, it is exceptionally expensive, and patients worldwide have a limited access to this medicine. In Brazil, the public healthcare system provides the drug free of charge for all Gaucher's patients, which reaches the order of $ 84 million per year. However, the production of GCR by public institutions in Brazil would reduce significantly the therapy costs. Here, we describe a robust protocol for the generation of a cell line producing recombinant human GCR. The protein was expressed in CHO-DXB11 (dhfr−) cells after stable transfection and gene amplification with methotrexate. As expected, glycosylated GCR was detected by immunoblotting assay both as cell-associated (~64 and 59 kDa) and secreted (63–69 kDa) form. Analysis of subclones allowed the selection of stable CHO cells producing a secreted functional enzyme, with a calculated productivity of 5.14 pg/cell/day for the highest producer. Although being laborious, traditional methods of screening high-producing recombinant cells may represent a valuable alternative to generate expensive biopharmaceuticals in countries with limited resources. PMID:23091360

  2. Generation of a Chinese Hamster Ovary Cell Line Producing Recombinant Human Glucocerebrosidase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Branco Novo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Impaired activity of the lysosomal enzyme glucocerebrosidase (GCR results in the inherited metabolic disorder known as Gaucher disease. Current treatment consists of enzyme replacement therapy by administration of exogenous GCR. Although effective, it is exceptionally expensive, and patients worldwide have a limited access to this medicine. In Brazil, the public healthcare system provides the drug free of charge for all Gaucher’s patients, which reaches the order of $ 84 million per year. However, the production of GCR by public institutions in Brazil would reduce significantly the therapy costs. Here, we describe a robust protocol for the generation of a cell line producing recombinant human GCR. The protein was expressed in CHO-DXB11 (dhfr− cells after stable transfection and gene amplification with methotrexate. As expected, glycosylated GCR was detected by immunoblotting assay both as cell-associated (~64 and 59 kDa and secreted (63–69 kDa form. Analysis of subclones allowed the selection of stable CHO cells producing a secreted functional enzyme, with a calculated productivity of 5.14 pg/cell/day for the highest producer. Although being laborious, traditional methods of screening high-producing recombinant cells may represent a valuable alternative to generate expensive biopharmaceuticals in countries with limited resources.

  3. Parallel single-cell analysis microfluidic platform

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Brink, Floris Teunis Gerardus; Gool, Elmar; Frimat, Jean-Philippe; Bomer, Johan G.; van den Berg, Albert; le Gac, Severine

    2011-01-01

    We report a PDMS microfluidic platform for parallel single-cell analysis (PaSCAl) as a powerful tool to decipher the heterogeneity found in cell populations. Cells are trapped individually in dedicated pockets, and thereafter, a number of invasive or non-invasive analysis schemes are performed.

  4. Traditional Herbal Medicine, Rikkunshito, Induces HSP60 and Enhances Cytoprotection of Small Intestinal Mucosal Cells as a Nontoxic Chaperone Inducer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumiko Tamaki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing incidence of small intestinal ulcers associated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs has become a topic with recent advances of endoscopic technology. However, the pathogenesis and therapy are not fully understood. The aim of this study is to examine the effect of Rikkunshito (TJ-43, a traditional herbal medicine, on expression of HSP60 and cytoprotective ability in small intestinal cell line (IEC-6. Effect of TJ-43 on HSP60 expression in IEC-6 cells was evaluated by immunoblot analysis. The effect of TJ-43 on cytoprotective abilities of IEC-6 cells against hydrogen peroxide or indomethacin was studied by MTT assay, LDH-release assay, caspase-8 activity, and TUNEL. HSP60 was significantly induced by TJ-43. Cell necrosis and apoptosis were significantly suppressed in IEC-6 cells pretreated by TJ-43 with overexpression of HSP60. Our results suggested that HSP60 induced by TJ-43 might play an important role in protecting small intestinal epithelial cells from apoptosis and necrosis in vitro.

  5. Abnormal red cell structure and function in neuroacanthocytosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith C A Cluitmans

    Full Text Available Panthothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN belongs to a group of hereditary neurodegenerative disorders known as neuroacanthocytosis (NA. This genetically heterogeneous group of diseases is characterized by degeneration of neurons in the basal ganglia and by the presence of deformed red blood cells with thorny protrusions, acanthocytes, in the circulation.The goal of our study is to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying this aberrant red cell morphology and the corresponding functional consequences. This could shed light on the etiology of the neurodegeneration.We performed a qualitative and semi-quantitative morphological, immunofluorescent, biochemical and functional analysis of the red cells of several patients with PKAN and, for the first time, of the red cells of their family members.We show that the blood of patients with PKAN contains not only variable numbers of acanthocytes, but also a wide range of other misshapen red cells. Immunofluorescent and immunoblot analyses suggest an altered membrane organization, rather than quantitative changes in protein expression. Strikingly, these changes are not limited to the red blood cells of PKAN patients, but are also present in the red cells of heterozygous carriers without neurological problems. Furthermore, changes are not only present in acanthocytes, but also in other red cells, including discocytes. The patients' cells, however, are more fragile, as observed in a spleen-mimicking device.These morphological, molecular and functional characteristics of red cells in patients with PKAN and their family members offer new tools for diagnosis and present a window into the pathophysiology of neuroacanthocytosis.

  6. Surface Proteome Analysis of a Natural Isolate of Lactococcus lactis Reveals the Presence of Pili Able to Bind Human Intestinal Epithelial Cells*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyrand, Mickael; Guillot, Alain; Goin, Mélodie; Furlan, Sylviane; Armalyte, Julija; Kulakauskas, Saulius; Cortes-Perez, Naima G.; Thomas, Ginette; Chat, Sophie; Péchoux, Christine; Dupres, Vincent; Hols, Pascal; Dufrêne, Yves F.; Trugnan, Germain; Chapot-Chartier, Marie-Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Surface proteins of Gram-positive bacteria play crucial roles in bacterial adhesion to host tissues. Regarding commensal or probiotic bacteria, adhesion to intestinal mucosa may promote their persistence in the gastro-intestinal tract and their beneficial effects to the host. In this study, seven Lactococcus lactis strains exhibiting variable surface physico-chemical properties were compared for their adhesion to Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells. In this test, only one vegetal isolate TIL448 expressed a high-adhesion phenotype. A nonadhesive derivative was obtained by plasmid curing from TIL448, indicating that the adhesion determinants were plasmid-encoded. Surface-exposed proteins in TIL448 were analyzed by a proteomic approach consisting in shaving of the bacterial surface with trypsin and analysis of the released peptides by LC-MS/MS. As the TIL448 complete genome sequence was not available, the tryptic peptides were identified by a mass matching approach against a database including all Lactococcus protein sequences and the sequences deduced from partial DNA sequences of the TIL448 plasmids. Two surface proteins, encoded by plasmids in TIL448, were identified as candidate adhesins, the first one displaying pilin characteristics and the second one containing two mucus-binding domains. Inactivation of the pilin gene abolished adhesion to Caco-2 cells whereas inactivation of the mucus-binding protein gene had no effect on adhesion. The pilin gene is located inside a cluster of four genes encoding two other pilin-like proteins and one class-C sortase. Synthesis of pili was confirmed by immunoblotting detection of high molecular weight forms of pilins associated to the cell wall as well as by electron and atomic force microscopy observations. As a conclusion, surface proteome analysis allowed us to detect pilins at the surface of L. lactis TIL448. Moreover we showed that pili appendages are formed and involved in adhesion to Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells

  7. Expression of synaptogyrin-1 in T1R2-expressing type II taste cells and type III taste cells of rat circumvallate taste buds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotani, Takeshi; Toyono, Takashi; Seta, Yuji; Kitou, Ayae; Kataoka, Shinji; Toyoshima, Kuniaki

    2013-09-01

    Synaptogyrins are conserved components of the exocytic apparatus and function as regulators of Ca(2+)-dependent exocytosis. The synaptogyrin family comprises three isoforms: two neuronal (synaptogyrin-1 and -3) and one ubiquitous (synaptogyrin-2) form. Although the expression patterns of the exocytic proteins synaptotagmin-1, SNAP-25, synaptobrevin-2 and synaptophysin have been elucidated in taste buds, the function and expression pattern of synaptogyrin-1 in rat gustatory tissues have not been determined. Therefore, we examined the expression patterns of synaptogyrin-1 and several cell-specific markers of type II and III cells in rat gustatory tissues. Reverse transcription/polymerase chain reaction assays and immunoblot analysis revealed the expression of synaptogyrin-1 mRNA and its protein in circumvallate papillae. In fungiform, foliate and circumvallate papillae, the antibody against synaptogyrin-1 immunolabeled a subset of taste bud cells and intra- and subgemmal nerve processes. Double-labeling experiments revealed the expression of synaptogyrin-1 in most taste cells immunoreactive for aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase and the neural cell adhesion molecule. A subset of synaptogyrin-1-immunoreactive taste cells also expressed phospholipase Cβ2, gustducin, or sweet taste receptor (T1R2). In addition, most synaptogyrin-1-immunoreactive taste cells expressed synaptobrevin-2. These results suggest that synaptogyrin-1 plays a regulatory role in transmission at the synapses of type III cells and is involved in exocytic function with synaptobrevin-2 in a subset of type II cells in rat taste buds.

  8. Suppression of urinary bladder urothelial carcinoma cell by the ethanol extract of pomegranate fruit through cell cycle arrest and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Song-Tay; Lu, Min-Hua; Chien, Lan-Hsiang; Wu, Ting-Feng; Huang, Li-Chien; Liao, Gwo-Ing

    2013-12-21

    Pomegranate possesses many medicinal properties such as antioxidant, anti-inflammation and antitumor. It has been extensively used as a folk medicine by many cultures. Pomegranate fruit has been shown to have the inhibitory efficacy against prostate cancer and lung cancer in vitro and in vivo. It can be exploited in chemoprevention and chemotherapy of prostate cancer. In this study we examined the anti-cancer efficacy of pomegranate fruit grown in Taiwan against urinary bladder urothelial carcinoma (UBUC) and its mechanism of action. Edible portion of Taiwanese pomegranate was extracted using ethanol and the anti-cancer effectiveness of ethanol extract was evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. Flow cytometry and western immunoblotting were exploited to uncover the molecular pathways underlying anti-UBUC activity of Taiwanese pomegranate ethanol extract. This study demonstrated that Taiwanese pomegranate fruit ethanol extract (PEE) could effectively restrict the proliferation of UBUC T24 and J82 cells. Cell cycle analyses indicated that the S phase arrest induced by PEE treatment might be caused by an increase in cyclin A protein level and a decrease in the expression of cyclin-dependent kinase 1. The results of western immunoblotting demonstrated that PEE treatment could not only evoke the activation of pro-caspase-3, -8,-9 but also increase Bax/Bcl-2 ratio in T24 cells. The above observations implicated that PEE administration might trigger the apoptosis in T24 cells through death receptor signaling and mitochondrial damage pathway. Besides we found that PEE exposure to T24 cells could provoke intensive activation of procaspase-12 and enhance the expressions of CHOP and Bip, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress marker, suggesting that ER stress might be the cardinal apoptotic mechanism of PEE-induced inhibition of bladder cancer cell. The analytical results of this study help to provide insight into the molecular mechanism

  9. Effects of gamma-radiation on cell growth, cycle arrest, death, and superoxide dismutase expression by DU 145 human prostate cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vucic V.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Gamma-irradiation (gamma-IR is extensively used in the treatment of hormone-resistant prostate carcinoma. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of 60Co gamma-IR on the growth, cell cycle arrest and cell death of the human prostate cancer cell line DU 145. The viability of DU 145 cells was measured by the Trypan blue exclusion assay and the 3(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5,diphenyltetrazolium bromide test. Bromodeoxyuridine incorporation was used for the determination of cell proliferation. Cell cycle arrest and cell death were analyzed by flow cytometry. Superoxide dismutase (SOD, specifically CuZnSOD and MnSOD protein expression, after 10 Gy gamma-IR, was determined by Western immunoblotting analysis. gamma-IR treatment had a significant (P < 0.001 antiproliferative and cytotoxic effect on DU 145 cells. Both effects were time and dose dependent. Also, the dose of gamma-IR which inhibited DNA synthesis and cell proliferation by 50% was 9.7 Gy. Furthermore, gamma-IR induced cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase and the percentage of cells in the G2/M phase was increased from 15% (control to 49% (IR cells, with a nonsignificant induction of apoptosis. Treatment with 10 Gy gamma-IR for 24, 48, and 72 h stimulated CuZnSOD and MnSOD protein expression in a time-dependent manner, approximately by 3- to 3.5-fold. These data suggest that CuZnSOD and MnSOD enzymes may play an important role in the gamma-IR-induced changes in DU 145 cell growth, cell cycle arrest and cell death.

  10. Tissue-type plasminogen activator in somatostatin cells of rat pancreas and hypothalamus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, P; Larsson, L I; Danø, K

    1987-01-01

    -PA, and immunoblotting analysis demonstrated one band with a similar electrophoretic mobility. No urokinase-type PA immunoreactivity was found in the rat endocrine pancreas. A granular t-PA immunoreactivity resembling that found in adjacent sections with somatostatin antiserum was found in the median eminence...

  11. Antitumor Effect of AZD4547 in a Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 2–Amplified Gastric Cancer Patient–Derived Cell Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiryeon Jang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: FGFR2 amplification is associated with aggressive gastric cancer (GC, and targeted drugs have been developed for treatment of GC. We evaluated the antitumor activity of an FGFR inhibitor in FGFR2-amplified GC patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis. METHODS: Two GC patients with FGFR2 amplification confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization showed peritoneal seeding and malignant ascites. We used the patient-derived xenograft model; patient-derived cells (PDCs from malignant ascites were used to assess FGFR2 expression and its downstream pathway using immunofluorescence analysis and immunoblot assay in vitro. Apoptosis and cell cycle arrest after treatment of FGFR inhibitor were analyzed by Annexin V-FITC assay and cell cycle analysis. RESULTS: FGFR2 amplification was verified in both PDC lines. AZD4547 as an FGFR inhibitor decreased proliferation of PDCs, and the IC50 value was estimated to be 250 nM in PDC#1 and 210 nM in PDC#2. FGFR inhibitor also significantly decreased levels of phosphorylated FGFR2 and downstream signaling molecules in FGFR2-amplified PDC lines. In cell cycle analysis, apoptosis was significantly increased in AZD4547-treated cells compared with nontreated cells. The proportion of cells in the sub-G1 stage was significantly higher in AZD4547-treated PDCs than in control cells. CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that FGFR2 amplification is a relevant therapeutic target in GC with peritoneal carcinomatosis.

  12. Plant cell wall polysaccharide analysis during cell elongation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Xiaoyuan

    Plant cell walls are complex structures whose composition and architecture are important to various cellular activities. Plant cell elongation requires a high level of rearrangement of the cell wall polymers to enable cell expansion. However, the cell wall polysaccharides dynamics during plant cell...... elongation is poorly understood. This PhD project aims to elucidate the cell wall compositional and structural change during cell elongation by using Comprehensive Microarray Polymer Profiling (CoMPP), microscopic techniques and molecular modifications of cell wall polysaccharide. Developing cotton fibre......, pea and Arabidopsis thaliana were selected as research models to investigate different types of cell elongation, developmental elongation and tropism elongation. A set of comprehensive analysis covering 4 cotton species and 11 time points suggests that non-cellulosic polysaccharides contribute...

  13. Lithium attenuates lead induced toxicity on mouse non-adherent bone marrow cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banijamali, Mahsan; Rabbani-Chadegani, Azra; Shahhoseini, Maryam

    2016-07-01

    Lead is a poisonous heavy metal that occurs in all parts of environment and causes serious health problems in humans. The aim of the present study was to investigate the possible protective effect of lithium against lead nitrate induced toxicity in non-adherent bone marrow stem cells. Trypan blue and MTT assays represented that exposure of the cells to different concentrations of lead nitrate decreased viability in a dose dependent manner, whereas, pretreatment of the cells with lithium protected the cells against lead toxicity. Lead reduced the number and differentiation status of bone marrow-derived precursors when cultured in the presence of colony stimulating factor (CSF), while the effect was attenuated by lithium. The cells treated with lead nitrate exhibited cell shrinkage, DNA fragmentation, anion superoxide production, but lithium prevented lead action. Moreover, apoptotic indexes such as PARP cleavage and release of HMGB1 induced by lead, were protected by lithium, suggesting anti-apoptotic effect of lithium. Immunoblot analysis of histone H3K9 acetylation indicated that lithium overcame lead effect on acetylation. In conclusion, lithium efficiently reduces lead toxicity suggesting new insight into lithium action which may contribute to increased cell survival. It also provides a potentially new therapeutic strategy for lithium and a cost-effective approach to minimize destructive effects of lead on bone marrow stem cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. Progestins Upregulate FKBP51 Expression in Human Endometrial Stromal Cells to Induce Functional Progesterone and Glucocorticoid Withdrawal: Implications for Contraceptive- Associated Abnormal Uterine Bleeding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozlem Guzeloglu Kayisli

    Full Text Available Use of long-acting progestin only contraceptives (LAPCs offers a discrete and highly effective family planning method. Abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB is the major side effect of, and cause for, discontinuation of LAPCs. The endometria of LAPC-treated women display abnormally enlarged, fragile blood vessels, decreased endometrial blood flow and oxidative stress. To understanding to mechanisms underlying AUB, we propose to identify LAPC-modulated unique gene cluster(s in human endometrial stromal cells (HESCs. Protein and RNA isolated from cultured HESCs treated 7 days with estradiol (E2 or E2+ medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA or E2+ etonogestrel (ETO or E2+ progesterone (P4 were analyzed by quantitative Real-time (q-PCR and immunoblotting. HSCORES were determined for immunostained-paired endometria of pre-and 3 months post-Depot MPA (DMPA treated women and ovariectomized guinea pigs (GPs treated with placebo or E2 or MPA or E2+MPA for 21 days. In HESCs, whole genome analysis identified a 67 gene group regulated by all three progestins, whereas a 235 gene group was regulated by E2+ETO and E2+MPA, but not E2+P4. Ingenuity pathway analysis identified glucocorticoid receptor (GR activation as one of upstream regulators of the 235 MPA and ETO-specific genes. Among these, microarray results demonstrated significant enhancement of FKBP51, a repressor of PR/GR transcriptional activity, by both MPA and ETO. q-PCR and immunoblot analysis confirmed the microarray results. In endometria of post-DMPA versus pre-DMPA administered women, FKBP51 expression was significantly increased in endometrial stromal and glandular cells. In GPs, E2+MPA or MPA significantly increased FKBP51 immunoreactivity in endometrial stromal and glandular cells versus placebo- and E2-administered groups. MPA or ETO administration activates GR signaling and increases endometrial FKBP51 expression, which could be one of the mechanisms causing AUB by inhibiting PR and GR

  15. Progestins Upregulate FKBP51 Expression in Human Endometrial Stromal Cells to Induce Functional Progesterone and Glucocorticoid Withdrawal: Implications for Contraceptive- Associated Abnormal Uterine Bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzeloglu Kayisli, Ozlem; Kayisli, Umit A; Basar, Murat; Semerci, Nihan; Schatz, Frederick; Lockwood, Charles J

    2015-01-01

    Use of long-acting progestin only contraceptives (LAPCs) offers a discrete and highly effective family planning method. Abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) is the major side effect of, and cause for, discontinuation of LAPCs. The endometria of LAPC-treated women display abnormally enlarged, fragile blood vessels, decreased endometrial blood flow and oxidative stress. To understanding to mechanisms underlying AUB, we propose to identify LAPC-modulated unique gene cluster(s) in human endometrial stromal cells (HESCs). Protein and RNA isolated from cultured HESCs treated 7 days with estradiol (E2) or E2+ medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) or E2+ etonogestrel (ETO) or E2+ progesterone (P4) were analyzed by quantitative Real-time (q)-PCR and immunoblotting. HSCORES were determined for immunostained-paired endometria of pre-and 3 months post-Depot MPA (DMPA) treated women and ovariectomized guinea pigs (GPs) treated with placebo or E2 or MPA or E2+MPA for 21 days. In HESCs, whole genome analysis identified a 67 gene group regulated by all three progestins, whereas a 235 gene group was regulated by E2+ETO and E2+MPA, but not E2+P4. Ingenuity pathway analysis identified glucocorticoid receptor (GR) activation as one of upstream regulators of the 235 MPA and ETO-specific genes. Among these, microarray results demonstrated significant enhancement of FKBP51, a repressor of PR/GR transcriptional activity, by both MPA and ETO. q-PCR and immunoblot analysis confirmed the microarray results. In endometria of post-DMPA versus pre-DMPA administered women, FKBP51 expression was significantly increased in endometrial stromal and glandular cells. In GPs, E2+MPA or MPA significantly increased FKBP51 immunoreactivity in endometrial stromal and glandular cells versus placebo- and E2-administered groups. MPA or ETO administration activates GR signaling and increases endometrial FKBP51 expression, which could be one of the mechanisms causing AUB by inhibiting PR and GR-mediated transcription

  16. Identification and characterization of a 29-kilodalton protein from Mycobacterium tuberculosis culture filtrate recognized by mouse memory effector cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkrands, I; Rasmussen, P.B.; Carnio, M

    1998-01-01

    Culture filtrate proteins from Mycobacterium tuberculosis induce protective immunity in various animal models of tuberculosis. Two molecular mass regions (6 to 10 kDa and 24 to 36 kDa) of short-term culture filtrate are preferentially recognized by Th1 cells in animal models as well as by patients...... the antigen 85 complex was selected. The 29-kDa antigen (CFP29) was purified from M. tuberculosis short-term culture filtrate by thiophilic adsorption chromatography, anion-exchange chromatography, and gel filtration, In its native form, CFP29 forms a polymer with a high molecular mass. CFP29 was mapped......, and they both elicited the release of high levels of gamma interferon from mouse memory effector cells isolated during the recall of protective immunity to tuberculosis. Interspecies analysis by immunoblotting and PCR demonstrated that CFP29 is widely distributed in mycobacterial species....

  17. Label-free Proteomic Analysis of Exosomes Derived from Inducible Hepatitis B Virus-Replicating HepAD38 Cell Line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Xiaofang; Chen, Jieliang; Megger, Dominik A; Zhang, Xiaonan; Kozlowski, Maya; Zhang, Lijun; Fang, Zhong; Li, Jin; Chu, Qiaofang; Wu, Min; Li, Yaming; Sitek, Barbara; Yuan, Zhenghong

    2017-04-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a major health problem worldwide. Recent evidence suggests that some viruses can manipulate the infection process by packing specific viral and cellular components into exosomes, small nanometer-sized (30-150 nm) vesicles secreted from various cells. However, the impact of HBV replication on the content of exosomes produced by hepatocytes has not been fully delineated. In this work, an HBV-inducible cell line HepAD38 was used to directly compare changes in the protein content of exosomes secreted from HepAD38 cells with or without HBV replication. Exosomes were isolated from supernantants of HepAD38 cells cultured with or without doxycycline (dox) and their purity was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Western immunoblotting assays. Ion-intensity based label-free LC-MS/MS quantitation technologies were applied to analyze protein content of exosomes from HBV replicating cells [referred as HepAD38 (dox - )-exo] and from HBV nonreplicating cells [referred as HepAD38 (dox + )-exo]. A total of 1412 exosomal protein groups were identified, among which the abundance of 35 proteins was significantly changed following HBV replication. Strikingly, 5 subunit proteins from the 26S proteasome complex, including PSMC1, PSMC2, PSMD1, PSMD7 and PSMD14 were consistently enhanced in HepAD38 (dox - )-exo. Bioinformatic analysis of differential exosomal proteins confirmed the significant enrichment of components involved in the proteasomal catabolic process. Proteasome activity assays further suggested that HepAD38 (dox - )-exo had enhanced proteolytic activity compared with HepAD38 (dox + )-exo. Furthermore, human peripheral monocytes incubated with HepAD38 (dox - )-exo induced a significantly lower level of IL-6 secretion compared with IL-6 levels from HepAD38 (dox + )-exo. Irreversible inhibition of proteasomal activity within exosomes restored higher production of IL-6 by monocytes, suggesting that transmission of

  18. Micromagnetic Cancer Cell Immobilization and Release for Real-Time Single Cell Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaiswal, Devina; Rad, Armin Tahmasbi [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, 06269 (United States); Nieh, Mu-Ping [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, 06269 (United States); Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269 (United States); Polymer Program, Institute of Materials Science, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269 (United States); Claffey, Kevin P. [Department of Cell Biology, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, CT 06030 (United States); Hoshino, Kazunori, E-mail: hoshino@engr.uconn.edu [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, 06269 (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Understanding the interaction of live cells with macromolecules is crucial for designing efficient therapies. Considering the functional heterogeneity found in cancer cells, real-time single cell analysis is necessary to characterize responses. In this study, we have designed and fabricated a microfluidic channel with patterned micromagnets which can temporarily immobilize the cells during analysis and release them after measurements. The microchannel is composed of plain coverslip top and bottom panels to facilitate easy microscopic observation and undisturbed application of analytes to the cells. Cells labeled with functionalized magnetic beads were immobilized in the device with an efficiency of 90.8±3.6%. Since the micromagnets are made of soft magnetic material (Ni), they released cells when external magnetic field was turned off from the channel. This allows the reuse of the channel for a new sample. As a model drug analysis, the immobilized breast cancer cells (MCF7) were exposed to fluorescent lipid nanoparticles and association and dissociation were measured through fluorescence analysis. Two concentrations of nanoparticles, 0.06 µg/ml and 0.08 µg/ml were tested and time lapse images were recorded and analyzed. The microfluidic device was able to provide a microenvironment for sample analysis, making it an efficient platform for real-time analysis.

  19. Cell cycle- and cancer-associated gene networks activated by Dsg2: evidence of cystatin A deregulation and a potential role in cell-cell adhesion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhilasha Gupta

    Full Text Available Cell-cell adhesion is paramount in providing and maintaining multicellular structure and signal transmission between cells. In the skin, disruption to desmosomal regulated intercellular connectivity may lead to disorders of keratinization and hyperproliferative disease including cancer. Recently we showed transgenic mice overexpressing desmoglein 2 (Dsg2 in the epidermis develop hyperplasia. Following microarray and gene network analysis, we demonstrate that Dsg2 caused a profound change in the transcriptome of keratinocytes in vivo and altered a number of genes important in epithelial dysplasia including: calcium-binding proteins (S100A8 and S100A9, members of the cyclin protein family, and the cysteine protease inhibitor cystatin A (CSTA. CSTA is deregulated in several skin cancers, including squamous cell carcinomas (SCC and loss of function mutations lead to recessive skin fragility disorders. The microarray results were confirmed by qPCR, immunoblotting, and immunohistochemistry. CSTA was detected at high level throughout the newborn mouse epidermis but dramatically decreased with development and was detected predominantly in the differentiated layers. In human keratinocytes, knockdown of Dsg2 by siRNA or shRNA reduced CSTA expression. Furthermore, siRNA knockdown of CSTA resulted in cytoplasmic localization of Dsg2, perturbed cytokeratin 14 staining and reduced levels of desmoplakin in response to mechanical stretching. Both knockdown of either Dsg2 or CSTA induced loss of cell adhesion in a dispase-based assay and the effect was synergistic. Our findings here offer a novel pathway of CSTA regulation involving Dsg2 and a potential crosstalk between Dsg2 and CSTA that modulates cell adhesion. These results further support the recent human genetic findings that loss of function mutations in the CSTA gene result in skin fragility due to impaired cell-cell adhesion: autosomal-recessive exfoliative ichthyosis or acral peeling skin syndrome.

  20. Cancer cell-oriented migration of mesenchymal stem cells engineered with an anticancer gene (PTEN: an imaging demonstration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang ZS

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Zhuo-Shun Yang,1,* Xiang-Jun Tang,2,* Xing-Rong Guo,1 Dan-Dan Zou,1 Xu-Yong Sun,3 Jing-Bo Feng,1 Jie Luo,1 Long-Jun Dai,1,4 Garth L Warnock4 1Hubei Key Laboratory of Stem Cell Research, Taihe Hospital, Hubei University of Medicine, Shiyan, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Neurosurgery, Taihe Hospital, Hubei University of Medicine, Shiyan, People’s Republic of China; 3Guangxi Key Laboratory for Transplant Medicine, 303 Hospital of PLA, Nanning, People’s Republic of China; 4Department of Surgery, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs have been considered to hold great potential as ideal carriers for the delivery of anticancer agents since the discovery of their tumor tropism. This study was performed to demonstrate the effects of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN engineering on MSCs’ capacity for cancer cell-oriented migration. Methods: MSCs were engineered with a PTEN-bearing plasmid and the expression was confirmed with Western blotting. A human glioma cell line (DBTRG was used as the target cell; DBTRG cell-oriented migration of MSCs was monitored with a micro speed photographic system. Results: The expression of transfected PTEN in MSCs was identified by immunoblotting analysis and confirmed with cell viability assessment of target cells. The DBTRG cell-oriented migration of PTEN-engineered MSCs was demonstrated by a real-time dynamic monitoring system, and a phagocytosis-like action of MSCs was also observed. Conclusion: MSCs maintained their capacity for cancer cell-directed migration after they were engineered with anticancer genes. This study provides the first direct evidence of MSCs’ tropism post-anticancer gene engineering. Keywords: gene therapy, mesenchymal stem cells, phosphatase and tensin homolog, cancer

  1. Intracellular Trafficking Modulation by Ginsenoside Rg3 Inhibits Brucella abortus Uptake and Intracellular Survival within RAW 264.7 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huy, Tran Xuan Ngoc; Reyes, Alisha Wehdnesday Bernardo; Hop, Huynh Tan; Arayan, Lauren Togonon; Min, WonGi; Lee, Hu Jang; Rhee, Man Hee; Chang, Hong Hee; Kim, Suk

    2017-03-28

    Ginsenoside Rg3, a saponin extracted from ginseng, has various pharmacological and biological activities; however, its effects against Brucella infection are still unclear. Herein, the inhibitory effects of ginsenoside Rg3 against intracellular parasitic Brucella infection were evaluated through bacterial infection, adherence assays, and LAMP-1 colocalization, as well as immunoblotting and FACS for detecting MAPK signaling proteins and F-actin polymerization, respectively. The internalization, intracellular growth, and adherence of Brucella abortus in Rg3-treated RAW 264.7 cells were significantly decreased compared with the Rg3-untreated control. Furthermore, an apparent reduction of F-actin content and intensity of F-actin fluorescence in Rg3-treated cells was observed compared with B. abortus -infected cells without treatment by flow cytometry analysis and confocal microscopy, respectively. In addition, treating cells with Rg3 decreased the phosphorylation of MAPK signaling proteins such as ERK 1/2 and p38 compared with untreated cells. Moreover, the colocalization of B. abortus -containing phagosomes with LAMP-1 was markedly increased in Rg3-treated cells. These findings suggest that ginsenoside Rg3 inhibits B. abortus infection in mammalian cells and can be used as an alternative approach in the treatment of brucellosis.

  2. Proline-linked nitrosoureas as prolidase-convertible prodrugs in human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielawski, Krzysztof; Bielawska, Anna; Słodownik, Tomasz; Bołkun-Skórnicka, Urszula; Muszyńska, Anna

    2008-01-01

    A number of novel proline-linked nitrosoureas (1-4) were synthesized and examined for cytotoxicity and influence on DNA and collagen biosynthesis in MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. Evaluation of the cytotoxicity of these compounds employing a MTT assay and inhibition of [(3)H]thymidine incorporation into DNA in both MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 breast cancer cells demonstrated that compound 2, the most active of the series, proved to be only slightly less potent than carmustine. It has also been found that carmustine did not inhibit MCF&-7 cells prolidase activity, while compounds 1-4 significantly increased its activity, when used at 50-250 microM concentrations. Proline-linked nitrosoureas (1-4) also had lower ability to inhibit collagen biosynthesis in MCF-7 cells, compared to carmustine. The expression of beta(1)-integrin receptor and phosphorylated MAPK, ERK(1) and ERK(2) was significantly decreased in MCF-7 cells incubated for 24 h with 60 microM of compounds 2 and 4 compared to the control, untreated cells, whereas under the same conditions carmustine did not evoke any changes in expression of all these signaling proteins, as shown by Western immunoblot analysis. These results indicate the proline-linked nitrosoureas (1-4), represent multifunctional inhibitors of breast cancer cell growth and metabolism.

  3. Allergen and Epitope Targets of Mouse-Specific T Cell Responses in Allergy and Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Véronique Schulten

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Mouse allergy has become increasingly common, mainly affecting laboratory workers and inner-city households. To date, only one major allergen, namely Mus m 1, has been described. We sought to identify T cell targets in mouse allergic patients. PBMC from allergic donors were expanded with either murine urine or epithelial extract and subsequently screened for cytokine production (IL-5 and IFNγ in response to overlapping peptides spanning the entire Mus m 1 sequence, peptides from various Mus m 1 isoforms [major urinary proteins (MUPs], peptides from mouse orthologs of known allergens from other mammalian species and peptides from proteins identified by immunoproteomic analysis of IgE/IgG immunoblots of mouse urine and epithelial extracts. This approach let to the identification of 106 non-redundant T cell epitopes derived from 35 antigens. Three major T cell-activating regions were defined in Mus m 1 alone. Moreover, our data show that immunodominant epitopes were largely shared between Mus m 1 and other MUPs even from different species, suggesting that sequence conservation in different allergens is a determinant for immunodominance. We further identified several novel mouse T cell antigens based on their homology to known mammalian allergens. Analysis of cohort-specific T cell responses revealed that rhinitis and asthmatic patients recognized different epitope repertoires. Epitopes defined herein can be formulated into an epitope “megapool” used to diagnose mouse allergy and study mouse-specific T cell responses directly ex vivo. This analysis of T cell epitopes provides a good basis for future studies to increase our understanding of the immunopathology associated with MO-allergy and asthma.

  4. Micro and nano-platforms for biological cell analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Winnie Edith; Castillo, Jaime; Moresco, Jacob Lange

    2011-01-01

    In this paper some technological platforms developed for biological cell analysis will be presented and compared to existing systems. In brief, we present a novel micro cell culture chamber based on diffusion feeding of cells, into which cells can be introduced and extracted after culturing using...... from the cells, while passive modifications involve the presence of a peptide nanotube based scaffold for the cell culturing that mimics the in vivo environment. Two applications involving fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis and cancer cell sorting are presented, as examples of further...... analysis that can be done after cell culturing. A platform able to automate the entire process from cell culturing to cell analysis by means of simple plug and play of various self-contained, individually fabricated modules is finally described....

  5. Establishment of animal model for the analysis of cancer cell metastasis during radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jong Kuk; Jang, Su Jin; Kang, Sung Wook; Park, Sunhoo; Hwang, Sang-Gu; Kim, Wun-Jae; Kang, Joo Hyun; Um, Hong-Duck

    2012-01-01

    Γ-Ionizing radiation (IR) therapy is one of major therapeutic tools in cancer treatment. Nevertheless, γ-IR therapy failed due to occurrence of metastasis, which constitutes a significant obstacle in cancer treatment. The main aim of this investigation was to construct animal model which present metastasis during radiotherapy in a mouse system in vivo and establishes the molecular mechanisms involved. The C6L transfectant cell line expressing firefly luciferase (fLuc) was treated with γ-IR, followed by immunoblotting, zymography and invasion assay in vitro. We additionally employed the C6L transfectant cell line to construct xenografts in nude mice, which were irradiated with γ-IR. Irradiated xenograft-containing mice were analyzed via survival curves, measurement of tumor size, and bioluminescence imaging in vivo and ex vivo. Metastatic lesions in organs of mice were further assessed using RT-PCR, H & E staining and immunohistochemistry. γ-IR treatment of C6L cells induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and increased cell invasion. In irradiated xenograft-containing mice, tumor sizes were decreased dramatically and survival rates extended. Almost all non-irradiated xenograft-containing control mice had died within 4 weeks. However, we also observed luminescence signals in about 22.5% of γ-IR-treated mice. Intestines or lungs of mice displaying luminescence signals contained several lesions, which expressed the fLuc gene and presented histological features of cancer tissues as well as expression of EMT markers. These findings collectively indicate that occurrences of metastases during γ-IR treatment accompanied induction of EMT markers, including increased MMP activity. Establishment of a murine metastasis model during γ-IR treatment should aid in drug development against cancer metastasis and increase our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the metastatic process

  6. A Role for MEK-Interacting Protein 1 In Hormone Responsiveness of ER Positive Breast Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-01

    48 hours, ER- positiv e cell lines tran sfected with MP1siRNA (but not control siR NA) rounded up and detached fr om the plate, and trypan blue...phenotype to MCF-7. To quantitate the effect of MP1 knockdown, attached and detached cells were collected at 48 h following siRNA transfection, stained...Immunoblot from a representative experiment. Lower panel: Quantitation of MP1/Actin ratios in three independent experiments (mean ± SD, *pɘ.05). Figure

  7. Bladder squamous cell carcinomas express psoriasin and externalize it to the urine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Celis, J E; Rasmussen, H H; Vorum, H

    1996-01-01

    were confined chiefly to the "squamous pearls." The presence of psoriasin in the urine of the 4 SCC patients was demonstrated by two-dimensional gel immunoblotting. Similar analysis of 43 urines from patients with bladder tumors other than SCC revealed 7 positives, some of which may reflect squamous...

  8. Deconstructing stem cell population heterogeneity: Single-cell analysis and modeling approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jincheng; Tzanakakis, Emmanuel S.

    2014-01-01

    Isogenic stem cell populations display cell-to-cell variations in a multitude of attributes including gene or protein expression, epigenetic state, morphology, proliferation and proclivity for differentiation. The origins of the observed heterogeneity and its roles in the maintenance of pluripotency and the lineage specification of stem cells remain unclear. Addressing pertinent questions will require the employment of single-cell analysis methods as traditional cell biochemical and biomolecular assays yield mostly population-average data. In addition to time-lapse microscopy and flow cytometry, recent advances in single-cell genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic profiling are reviewed. The application of multiple displacement amplification, next generation sequencing, mass cytometry and spectrometry to stem cell systems is expected to provide a wealth of information affording unprecedented levels of multiparametric characterization of cell ensembles under defined conditions promoting pluripotency or commitment. Establishing connections between single-cell analysis information and the observed phenotypes will also require suitable mathematical models. Stem cell self-renewal and differentiation are orchestrated by the coordinated regulation of subcellular, intercellular and niche-wide processes spanning multiple time scales. Here, we discuss different modeling approaches and challenges arising from their application to stem cell populations. Integrating single-cell analysis with computational methods will fill gaps in our knowledge about the functions of heterogeneity in stem cell physiology. This combination will also aid the rational design of efficient differentiation and reprogramming strategies as well as bioprocesses for the production of clinically valuable stem cell derivatives. PMID:24035899

  9. (3'R)-hydroxytabernaelegantine C: A bisindole alkaloid with potent apoptosis inducing activity in colon (HCT116, SW620) and liver (HepG2) cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterna, Angela; Gomes, Sofia E; Borralho, Pedro M; Mulhovo, Silva; Rodrigues, Cecília M P; Ferreira, Maria-José U

    2016-12-24

    Tabernaemontana elegans Stapf. (Apocynaceae) is a medicinal plant traditionally used in African countries to treat cancer. To discover new apoptosis inducing lead compounds from T. elegans and provide scientific validation of the ethnopharmacological use of this plant. Through fractionation, (3'R)-hydroxytaberanelegantine C (1), a vobasinyl-iboga bisindole alkaloid, was isolated from a cytotoxic alkaloid fraction of the methanol extract of T. elegans roots. Its structure was identified by spectroscopic methods, mainly 1D and 2D NMR experiments. Compound 1 was evaluated for its ability to induce apoptosis in HCT116 and SW620 colon and HepG2 liver carcinoma cells. The cell viability of compound 1 was evaluated by the MTS and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assays. Induction of apoptosis was analyzed through Guava ViaCount assay, by flow cytometry, caspase-3/7 activity assays and evaluation of nuclear morphology by Hoechst staining. To determine the molecular pathways elicited by 1 exposure, immunoblot analysis was also performed. (3'R)-hydroxytaberanelegantine C (1) displayed strong apoptosis induction activity as compared to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), the most used anticancer agent in colorectal cancer treatment. In the MTS assay, compound 1 exhibited IC 50 values similar or lower than 5-FU in the three cell lines tested. The IC 50 value of 1 was also calculated in CCD18co normal human colon fibroblasts. The lactate dehydrogenase assay showed increased LDH release by compound 1, and the Guava ViaCount assay revealed that 1 significantly increased the incidence of apoptosis to a further extent than 5-FU. Moreover, the induction of apoptosis was corroborated by evaluation of nuclear morphology by Hoechst staining and caspase-3/7 activity assays of 1 treated cells. As expected, in immunoblot analysis, compound 1 treatment led to poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage. This was accompanied by decreased anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl-2 and XIAP steady state levels in all three cancer

  10. Intracellular expression of toll-like receptor 4 in neuroblastoma cells and their unresponsiveness to lipopolysaccharide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, Ferdaus; Islam, Shamima; Tumurkhuu, Gantsetseg; Naiki, Yoshikazu; Koide, Naoki; Mori, Isamu; Yoshida, Tomoaki; Yokochi, Takashi

    2006-01-01

    Recently it has been reported that, toll-like receptors (TLRs) are expressed on a series of tumor cells, such as colon cancer, breast cancer, prostate cancer, melanoma and lung cancer. Although some cancer cells like melanoma cells are known to respond to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) via TLR4, not all cancer cells are positive for TLR4. There is little information on the expression and function of TLR4 in neuroblastoma cells. In this study, we investigated the expression of TLR4 in human neuroblastoma NB-1 cell line. Expression and localization of TLR4 were detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and flow cytometric analysis, respectively. Activation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB by LPS was detected by degradation of IκB-α and NF-κB luciferase assay. Activation and expression of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase and interferon regulatory factor (IRF)-3 was detected by immunoblot analysis. Human NB-1 neuroblastoma cells expressed intracellular form of TLR4, but not the cell surface form. Further, NB-1 cells express CD14, MD2 and MyD88, which are required for LPS response. However, LPS did not significantly induce NF-κB activation in NB-1 cells although it slightly degraded IκB-α. NB-1 cells expressed no IRF-3, which plays a pivotal role on the MyD88-independent pathway of LPS signaling. Collectively, NB-1 cells are capable to avoid their response to LPS. Although human NB-1 neuroblastoma cells possessed all the molecules required for LPS response, they did not respond to LPS. It might be responsible for intracellular expression of TLR4 or lack of IRF-3

  11. Poisson-event-based analysis of cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, Huw D; Wills, John W; Brown, M Rowan; Rees, Paul

    2015-05-01

    A protocol for the assessment of cell proliferation dynamics is presented. This is based on the measurement of cell division events and their subsequent analysis using Poisson probability statistics. Detailed analysis of proliferation dynamics in heterogeneous populations requires single cell resolution within a time series analysis and so is technically demanding to implement. Here, we show that by focusing on the events during which cells undergo division rather than directly on the cells themselves a simplified image acquisition and analysis protocol can be followed, which maintains single cell resolution and reports on the key metrics of cell proliferation. The technique is demonstrated using a microscope with 1.3 μm spatial resolution to track mitotic events within A549 and BEAS-2B cell lines, over a period of up to 48 h. Automated image processing of the bright field images using standard algorithms within the ImageJ software toolkit yielded 87% accurate recording of the manually identified, temporal, and spatial positions of the mitotic event series. Analysis of the statistics of the interevent times (i.e., times between observed mitoses in a field of view) showed that cell division conformed to a nonhomogeneous Poisson process in which the rate of occurrence of mitotic events, λ exponentially increased over time and provided values of the mean inter mitotic time of 21.1 ± 1.2 hours for the A549 cells and 25.0 ± 1.1 h for the BEAS-2B cells. Comparison of the mitotic event series for the BEAS-2B cell line to that predicted by random Poisson statistics indicated that temporal synchronisation of the cell division process was occurring within 70% of the population and that this could be increased to 85% through serum starvation of the cell culture. © 2015 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  12. Pathoproteomics of testicular tissue deficient in the GARP component VPS54. The wobbler mouse model of globozoospermia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jockusch, Harald; Holland, Ashlin; Staunten, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    observed for proteins involved in cell redox homeostasis, cytoskeleton formation, PTMs, detoxification and metabolism. The most dramatically decreased protein in WR testis was identified as fatty acid binding protein FABP3, as confirmed by immunoblot analysis. We conclude that a missense mutation in VPS54...

  13. Development of Cell Analysis Software for Cultivated Corneal Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Naoki; Ishida, Naoya; Kakutani, Kazuya; Hongo, Akane; Hiwa, Satoru; Hiroyasu, Tomoyuki; Koizumi, Noriko

    2017-11-01

    To develop analysis software for cultured human corneal endothelial cells (HCECs). Software was designed to recognize cell borders and to provide parameters such as cell density, coefficient of variation, and polygonality of cultured HCECs based on phase contrast images. Cultured HCECs with high or low cell density were incubated with Ca-free and Mg-free phosphate-buffered saline for 10 minutes to reveal the cell borders and were then analyzed with software (n = 50). Phase contrast images showed that cell borders were not distinctly outlined, but these borders became more distinctly outlined after phosphate-buffered saline treatment and were recognized by cell analysis software. The cell density value provided by software was similar to that obtained using manual cell counting by an experienced researcher. Morphometric parameters, such as the coefficient of variation and polygonality, were also produced by software, and these values were significantly correlated with cell density (Pearson correlation coefficients -0.62 and 0.63, respectively). The software described here provides morphometric information from phase contrast images, and it enables subjective and noninvasive quality assessment for tissue engineering therapy of the corneal endothelium.

  14. Synthesis of mitochondrial uncoupling protein in brown adipocytes differentiated in cell culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopecky, J.; Baudysova, M.; Zanotti, F.; Janikova, D.; Pavelka, S.; Houstek, J.

    1990-01-01

    In order to characterize the biogenesis of unique thermogenic mitochondria of brown adipose tissue, differentiation of precursor cells isolated from mouse brown adipose tissue was studied in cell culture. Synthesis of mitochondrial uncoupling protein (UCP), F1-ATPase, and cytochrome oxidase was examined by L-[35S]methionine labeling and immunoblotting. For the first time, synthesis of physiological amounts of the UCP, a key and tissue-specific component of thermogenic mitochondria, was observed in cultures at about confluence (day 6), indicating that a complete differentiation of brown adipocytes was achieved in vitro. In postconfluent cells (day 8) the content of UCP decreased rapidly, in contrast to some other mitochondrial proteins (beta subunit of F1-ATPase, cytochrome oxidase). In these cells, it was possible, by using norepinephrine, to induce specifically the synthesis of the UCP but not of F1-ATPase or cytochrome oxidase. The maximal response was observed at 0.1 microM norepinephrine and the synthesis of UCP remained activated for at least 24 h. Detailed analysis revealed a major role of the beta-adrenergic receptors and elevated intracellular concentration of cAMP in stimulation of UCP synthesis. A quantitative recovery of the newly synthesized UCP in the mitochondrial fraction indicated completed biogenesis of functionally competent thermogenic mitochondria

  15. Platforms for Single-Cell Collection and Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukas Valihrach

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Single-cell analysis has become an established method to study cell heterogeneity and for rare cell characterization. Despite the high cost and technical constraints, applications are increasing every year in all fields of biology. Following the trend, there is a tremendous development of tools for single-cell analysis, especially in the RNA sequencing field. Every improvement increases sensitivity and throughput. Collecting a large amount of data also stimulates the development of new approaches for bioinformatic analysis and interpretation. However, the essential requirement for any analysis is the collection of single cells of high quality. The single-cell isolation must be fast, effective, and gentle to maintain the native expression profiles. Classical methods for single-cell isolation are micromanipulation, microdissection, and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS. In the last decade several new and highly efficient approaches have been developed, which not just supplement but may fully replace the traditional ones. These new techniques are based on microfluidic chips, droplets, micro-well plates, and automatic collection of cells using capillaries, magnets, an electric field, or a punching probe. In this review we summarize the current methods and developments in this field. We discuss the advantages of the different commercially available platforms and their applicability, and also provide remarks on future developments.

  16. Platforms for Single-Cell Collection and Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valihrach, Lukas; Androvic, Peter; Kubista, Mikael

    2018-03-11

    Single-cell analysis has become an established method to study cell heterogeneity and for rare cell characterization. Despite the high cost and technical constraints, applications are increasing every year in all fields of biology. Following the trend, there is a tremendous development of tools for single-cell analysis, especially in the RNA sequencing field. Every improvement increases sensitivity and throughput. Collecting a large amount of data also stimulates the development of new approaches for bioinformatic analysis and interpretation. However, the essential requirement for any analysis is the collection of single cells of high quality. The single-cell isolation must be fast, effective, and gentle to maintain the native expression profiles. Classical methods for single-cell isolation are micromanipulation, microdissection, and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). In the last decade several new and highly efficient approaches have been developed, which not just supplement but may fully replace the traditional ones. These new techniques are based on microfluidic chips, droplets, micro-well plates, and automatic collection of cells using capillaries, magnets, an electric field, or a punching probe. In this review we summarize the current methods and developments in this field. We discuss the advantages of the different commercially available platforms and their applicability, and also provide remarks on future developments.

  17. Pharmacological targeting of valosin containing protein (VCP) induces DNA damage and selectively kills canine lymphoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nadeau, Marie-Ève; Rico, Charlène; Tsoi, Mayra; Vivancos, Mélanie; Filimon, Sabin; Paquet, Marilène; Boerboom, Derek

    2015-01-01

    Valosin containing protein (VCP) is a critical mediator of protein homeostasis and may represent a valuable therapeutic target for several forms of cancer. Overexpression of VCP occurs in many cancers, and often in a manner correlating with malignancy and poor outcome. Here, we analyzed VCP expression in canine lymphoma and assessed its potential as a therapeutic target for this disease. VCP expression in canine lymphomas was evaluated by immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry. The canine lymphoma cell lines CLBL-1, 17–71 and CL-1 were treated with the VCP inhibitor Eeyarestatin 1 (EER-1) at varying concentrations and times and were assessed for viability by trypan blue exclusion, apoptosis by TUNEL and caspase activity assays, and proliferation by propidium iodide incorporation and FACS. The mechanism of EER-1 action was determined by immunoblotting and immunofluorescence analyses of Lys48 ubiquitin and markers of ER stress (DDIT3), autophagy (SQSTM1, MAP1LC3A) and DNA damage (γH2AFX). TRP53/ATM-dependent signaling pathway activity was assessed by immunoblotting for TRP53 and phospho-TRP53 and real-time RT-PCR measurement of Cdkn1a mRNA. VCP expression levels in canine B cell lymphomas were found to increase with grade. EER-1 treatment killed canine lymphoma cells preferentially over control peripheral blood mononuclear cells. EER-1 treatment of CLBL-1 cells was found to both induce apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in G1. Unexpectedly, EER-1 did not appear to act either by inducing ER stress or inhibiting the aggresome-autophagy pathway. Rather, a rapid and dramatic increase in γH2AFX expression was noted, indicating that EER-1 may act by promoting DNA damage accumulation. Increased TRP53 phosphorylation and Cdkn1a mRNA levels indicated an activation of the TRP53/ATM DNA damage response pathway in response to EER-1, likely contributing to the induction of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. These results correlate VCP expression with malignancy in canine B cell

  18. Rotavirus RRV associates with lipid membrane microdomains during cell entry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isa, Pavel; Realpe, Mauricio; Romero, Pedro; Lopez, Susana; Arias, Carlos F.

    2004-01-01

    Rotavirus cell entry is a multistep process, not completely understood, which requires at least four interactions between the virus and cell surface molecules. In this work, we investigated the role of the sphingolipid- and cholesterol-enriched lipid microdomains (rafts) in the entry of rotavirus strain RRV to MA104 cells. We found that ganglioside GM1, integrin subunits α2 and β3, and the heat shock cognate protein 70 (hsc70), all of which have been implicated as rotavirus receptors, are associated with TX-100 and Lubrol WX detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs). Integrin subunits α2 and β3 were found to be particularly enriched in DRMs resistant to lysis by Lubrol WX. When purified RRV particles were incubated with cells at 4 deg. C, about 10% of the total infectious virus was found associated with DRMs, and the DRM-associated virus increased to 37% in Lubrol-resistant membrane domains after 60-min incubation at 37 deg. C. The virus was excluded from DRMs if the cells were treated with methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD). Immunoblot analysis of the viral proteins showed that the virus surface proteins became enriched in DRMs upon incubation at 37 deg. C, being almost exclusively localized in Lubrol-resistant DRMs after 60 min. These data suggest that detergent-resistant membrane domains play an important role in the cell entry of rotaviruses, which could provide a platform to facilitate the efficient interaction of the rotavirus receptors with the virus particle

  19. Progesterone Receptor Membrane Component 1 (PGRMC1 in cell division: its role in bovine granulosa cells mitosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Terzaghi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The present studies were aimed to assess Progesterone Receptor Membrane Component-1 (PGRMC1 role in regulating bovine granulosa cells (bGC mitosis. First, we performed immunofluorescence studies on in vitro cultured bGC collected from antral follicles, which showed that PGRMC1 localizes to the spindle apparatus in mitotic cells. Then, to evaluate PGRMC1 effect on cell proliferation we silenced its expression with RNA interference technique (RNAi. Quantitative RT-PCR and immunoblotting confirmed down-regulation of PGRMC1 expression, when compared to CTRL-RNAi treated bGC (p<0.05. After 72h of culture, PGRMC1 silencing determined a lower growth rate (p<0.05 and a higher percentage of cells arrested at G2/M phase as assessed by flowcytometry (p<0.05. Accordingly, live imaging studies revealed more aberrant mitosis and a delayed M-phase in PGRMC1-RNAi treated cells compared to CTRL-RNAi group (p<0.05. These data confirmed that PGRMC1 is directly involved in bGC mitosis and ongoing preliminary studies are aimed to elucidate its putative mechanisms of action. Since PGRMC1 is a membrane protein, we hypothesize its possible involvement in vesicular trafficking and endocytosis, which is in turn an important process to assure proper cell division. To assess this hypothesis, we have preliminarily conducted immunofluorescence and in situ proximity ligation assay experiments that showed PGRMC1 co-localization and direct interaction with clathrin. This is important since clathrin is an essential protein for both endosomes formation, and cell division acting directly on the spindle apparatus. Thus our studies set the stage for analysis aimed to further characterize PGRMC1’s mechanism of action in mitotic cell.

  20. Local cell metrics: a novel method for analysis of cell-cell interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Chien-Chiang

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The regulation of many cell functions is inherently linked to cell-cell contact interactions. However, effects of contact interactions among adherent cells can be difficult to detect with global summary statistics due to the localized nature and noise inherent to cell-cell interactions. The lack of informatics approaches specific for detecting cell-cell interactions is a limitation in the analysis of large sets of cell image data, including traditional and combinatorial or high-throughput studies. Here we introduce a novel histogram-based data analysis strategy, termed local cell metrics (LCMs, which addresses this shortcoming. Results The new LCM method is demonstrated via a study of contact inhibition of proliferation of MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts. We describe how LCMs can be used to quantify the local environment of cells and how LCMs are decomposed mathematically into metrics specific to each cell type in a culture, e.g., differently-labelled cells in fluorescence imaging. Using this approach, a quantitative, probabilistic description of the contact inhibition effects in MC3T3-E1 cultures has been achieved. We also show how LCMs are related to the naïve Bayes model. Namely, LCMs are Bayes class-conditional probability functions, suggesting their use for data mining and classification. Conclusion LCMs are successful in robust detection of cell contact inhibition in situations where conventional global statistics fail to do so. The noise due to the random features of cell behavior was suppressed significantly as a result of the focus on local distances, providing sensitive detection of cell-cell contact effects. The methodology can be extended to any quantifiable feature that can be obtained from imaging of cell cultures or tissue samples, including optical, fluorescent, and confocal microscopy. This approach may prove useful in interpreting culture and histological data in fields where cell-cell interactions play a critical

  1. Local cell metrics: a novel method for analysis of cell-cell interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jing; Zapata, Pedro J; Chen, Chien-Chiang; Meredith, J Carson

    2009-10-23

    The regulation of many cell functions is inherently linked to cell-cell contact interactions. However, effects of contact interactions among adherent cells can be difficult to detect with global summary statistics due to the localized nature and noise inherent to cell-cell interactions. The lack of informatics approaches specific for detecting cell-cell interactions is a limitation in the analysis of large sets of cell image data, including traditional and combinatorial or high-throughput studies. Here we introduce a novel histogram-based data analysis strategy, termed local cell metrics (LCMs), which addresses this shortcoming. The new LCM method is demonstrated via a study of contact inhibition of proliferation of MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts. We describe how LCMs can be used to quantify the local environment of cells and how LCMs are decomposed mathematically into metrics specific to each cell type in a culture, e.g., differently-labelled cells in fluorescence imaging. Using this approach, a quantitative, probabilistic description of the contact inhibition effects in MC3T3-E1 cultures has been achieved. We also show how LCMs are related to the naïve Bayes model. Namely, LCMs are Bayes class-conditional probability functions, suggesting their use for data mining and classification. LCMs are successful in robust detection of cell contact inhibition in situations where conventional global statistics fail to do so. The noise due to the random features of cell behavior was suppressed significantly as a result of the focus on local distances, providing sensitive detection of cell-cell contact effects. The methodology can be extended to any quantifiable feature that can be obtained from imaging of cell cultures or tissue samples, including optical, fluorescent, and confocal microscopy. This approach may prove useful in interpreting culture and histological data in fields where cell-cell interactions play a critical role in determining cell fate, e.g., cancer, developmental

  2. Human Mammary Luminal Epithelial Cells Contain Progenitors to Myoepithelial Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pechoux, Christine; Gudjonsson, Thorarinn; Ronnov-Jessen, Lone; Bissell, Mina J; Petersen, Ole

    1999-02-01

    The origin of the epithelial and myoepithelial cells in the human breast has not been delineated. In this study we have addressed whether luminal epithelial cells and myoepithelial cells are vertically connected, i.e., whether one is the precursor for the other. We used a primary culture assay allowing preservation of basic phenotypic traits of luminal epithelial and myoepithelial cells in culture. The two cell types were then separated immunomagnetically using antibodies directed against lineage-specific cell surface antigens into at best 100% purity. The cellular identity was ascertained by cytochemistry, immunoblotting, and 2-D gel electrophoresis. Luminal epithelial cells were identified by strong expression of cytokeratins 18 and 19 while myoepithelial cells were recognized by expression of vimentin and {alpha}-smooth muscle actin. We used a previously devised culture medium (CDM4) that allows vigorous expansion of proliferative myoepithelial cells and also devised a medium (CDM6) that allowed sufficient expansion of differentiated luminal epithelial cells based on addition of hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor. The two different culture media supported each lineage for at least five passages without signs of interconversion. We used parallel cultures where we switched culture media, thus testing the ability of each lineage to convert to the other. Whereas the myoepithelial lineage showed no signs of interconversion, a subset of luminal epithelial cells, gradually, but distinctly, converted to myoepithelial cells. We propose that in the mature human breast, it is the luminal epithelial cell compartment that gives rise to myoepithelial cells rather than the other way around.

  3. Inhibitory effect of blue light emitting diode on migration and invasion of cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Phil-Sun; Kim, Hyun-Soo; Kim, Eun-Mi; Hwang, Hyosook; Ryu, Hyang Hwa; Lim, SeokTae; Sohn, Myung-Hee; Jeong, Hwan-Jeong

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects and molecular mechanism of blue light emitting diode (LED) in tumor cells. A migration and invasion assay for the metastatic behavior of mouse colon cancer CT-26 and human fibrosarcoma HT-1080 cells was performed. Cancer cell migration-related proteins were identified by obtaining a 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) in total cellular protein profile of blue LED-irradiated cancer cells, followed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) analysis of proteins. Protein levels were examined by immunoblotting. Irradiation with blue LED inhibited CT-26 and HT-1080 cell migration and invasion. The anti-metastatic effects of blue LED irradiation were associated with inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 expression. P38 MAPK phosphorylation was increased in blue LED-irradiated CT-26 and HT-1080 cells, but was inhibited after pretreatment with SB203580, a specific inhibitor of p38 MAPK. Inhibition of p38 MAPK phosphorylation by SB203580 treatment increased number of migratory cancer cells in CT-26 and HT-1080 cells, indicating that blue LED irradiation inhibited cancer cell migration via phosphorylation of p38 MAPK. Additionally blue LED irradiation of mice injected with CT-26 cells expressing luciferase decreased early stage lung metastasis compared to untreated control mice. These results indicate that blue LED irradiation inhibits cancer cell migration and invasion in vitro and in vivo. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Differentiation to adipocytes in accompanied by an increase in the amounts of Gi- and Go-proteins in 3T3-L1 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watkins, D.C.; Northup, J.K.; Malbon, C.C.

    1986-01-01

    Treatment of cultures of 3T3-L1 cells with methylisobutyl-xanthine and dexamethasone has been shown to result in accumulation of lipid and conversion to the morphology of adipocytes in more than 90% of the cells. The status of the stimulatory (Gs), inhibitory (Gi) and Go-proteins during the course of 3T3-L1 differentiation was examined. The amount of alpha subunit of Gs (αGs), assayed by radiolabeling in the presence of cholera toxin and [ 32 P]NAD + , increased upon differentiation as previously described by others. The amounts of αGi and αGo assayed by radiolabeling in the presence of pertussis toxin and [ 32 P]NAD + increased 3-fold upon differentiation. Immunoblots of cell membranes subjected to gel electrophoresis in sodium dodecyl sulfate were probed with two rabbit antisera raised against bovine brain αGo and with one raised against theβ-subunit of the bovine rod-outer-segment G-protein, referred to as transducin. The immunoblotting data confirm the increase upon differentiation of αGo and also demonstrate an increase in the amount of the β-subunit. Thus differentiation of 3T3-L1 cells is accompanied by dramatic changes in the complexion of G-proteins in the membranes

  5. Multistrip Western blotting: a tool for comparative quantitative analysis of multiple proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksamitiene, Edita; Hoek, Jan B; Kiyatkin, Anatoly

    2015-01-01

    The qualitative and quantitative measurements of protein abundance and modification states are essential in understanding their functions in diverse cellular processes. Typical Western blotting, though sensitive, is prone to produce substantial errors and is not readily adapted to high-throughput technologies. Multistrip Western blotting is a modified immunoblotting procedure based on simultaneous electrophoretic transfer of proteins from multiple strips of polyacrylamide gels to a single membrane sheet. In comparison with the conventional technique, Multistrip Western blotting increases data output per single blotting cycle up to tenfold; allows concurrent measurement of up to nine different total and/or posttranslationally modified protein expression obtained from the same loading of the sample; and substantially improves the data accuracy by reducing immunoblotting-derived signal errors. This approach enables statistically reliable comparison of different or repeated sets of data and therefore is advantageous to apply in biomedical diagnostics, systems biology, and cell signaling research.

  6. Structurally modified curcumin analogs inhibit STAT3 phosphorylation and promote apoptosis of human renal cell carcinoma and melanoma cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew A Bill

    Full Text Available The Janus kinase-2 (Jak2-signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT3 pathway is critical for promoting an oncogenic and metastatic phenotype in several types of cancer including renal cell carcinoma (RCC and melanoma. This study describes two small molecule inhibitors of the Jak2-STAT3 pathway, FLLL32 and its more soluble analog, FLLL62. These compounds are structurally distinct curcumin analogs that bind selectively to the SH2 domain of STAT3 to inhibit its phosphorylation and dimerization. We hypothesized that FLLL32 and FLLL62 would induce apoptosis in RCC and melanoma cells and display specificity for the Jak2-STAT3 pathway. FLLL32 and FLLL62 could inhibit STAT3 dimerization in vitro. These compounds reduced basal STAT3 phosphorylation (pSTAT3, and induced apoptosis in four separate human RCC cell lines and in human melanoma cell lines as determined by Annexin V/PI staining. Apoptosis was also confirmed by immunoblot analysis of caspase-3 processing and PARP cleavage. Pre-treatment of RCC and melanoma cell lines with FLLL32/62 did not inhibit IFN-γ-induced pSTAT1. In contrast to FLLL32, curcumin and FLLL62 reduced downstream STAT1-mediated gene expression of IRF1 as determined by Real Time PCR. FLLL32 and FLLL62 significantly reduced secretion of VEGF from RCC cell lines in a dose-dependent manner as determined by ELISA. Finally, each of these compounds inhibited in vitro generation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells. These data support further investigation of FLLL32 and FLLL62 as lead compounds for STAT3 inhibition in RCC and melanoma.

  7. Single cell analysis of normal and leukemic hematopoiesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povinelli, Benjamin J; Rodriguez-Meira, Alba; Mead, Adam J

    2018-02-01

    The hematopoietic system is well established as a paradigm for the study of cellular hierarchies, their disruption in disease and therapeutic use in regenerative medicine. Traditional approaches to study hematopoiesis involve purification of cell populations based on a small number of surface markers. However, such population-based analysis obscures underlying heterogeneity contained within any phenotypically defined cell population. This heterogeneity can only be resolved through single cell analysis. Recent advances in single cell techniques allow analysis of the genome, transcriptome, epigenome and proteome in single cells at an unprecedented scale. The application of these new single cell methods to investigate the hematopoietic system has led to paradigm shifts in our understanding of cellular heterogeneity in hematopoiesis and how this is disrupted in disease. In this review, we summarize how single cell techniques have been applied to the analysis of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells in normal and malignant hematopoiesis, with a particular focus on recent advances in single-cell genomics, including how these might be utilized for clinical application. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Protective Effect of D-Limonene against Oxidative Stress-Induced Cell Damage in Human Lens Epithelial Cells via the p38 Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Jie; Zheng, Yi; Wang, Gang; Liu, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress, as mediated by ROS, is a significant factor in initiating the development of age-associated cataracts; D-limonene is a common natural terpene with powerful antioxidative properties which occurs naturally in a wide variety of living organisms. It has been shown to have antioxidant effect; we found that D-limonene can effectively prevent the oxidative damage caused by H2O2 and propose that the main mechanism underlying the inhibitory effects of D-limonene is the inhibition of HLECs apoptosis. In the present study, we used confocal-fluorescence microscopy, flow cytometry analysis, Hoechst staining, H2DCFDA staining, transmission electron microscopy, and immunoblot analysis; the results revealed that slightly higher concentrations of D-limonene (125-1800 μM) reduced the H2O2-induced ROS generation and inhibited the H2O2-induced caspase-3 and caspase-9 activation and decreased the Bcl-2/Bax ratio. Furthermore, it inhibited H2O2-induced p38 MAPK phosphorylation. Thus, we conclude that D-limonene could effectively protect HLECs from H2O2-induced oxidative stress and that its antioxidative effect is significant, thereby increasing the cell survival rate.

  9. Proteomic Analysis of Chinese Hamster Ovary Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baycin-Hizal, Deniz; Tabb, David L.; Chaerkady, Raghothama

    2012-01-01

    To complement the recent genomic sequencing of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, proteomic analysis was performed on CHO cells including the cellular proteome, secretome, and glycoproteome using tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) of multiple fractions obtained from gel electrophoresis, multidimens......To complement the recent genomic sequencing of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, proteomic analysis was performed on CHO cells including the cellular proteome, secretome, and glycoproteome using tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) of multiple fractions obtained from gel electrophoresis...

  10. The ethanol extract of Scutellaria baicalensis and the active compounds induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis including upregulation of p53 and Bax in human lung cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Jiayu; Morgan, Winston A.; Sanchez-Medina, Alberto; Corcoran, Olivia

    2011-01-01

    Despite a lack of scientific authentication, Scutellaria baicalensis is clinically used in Chinese medicine as a traditional adjuvant to chemotherapy of lung cancer. In this study, cytotoxicity assays demonstrated that crude ethanolic extracts of S. baicalensis were selectively toxic to human lung cancer cell lines A549, SK-LU-1 and SK-MES-1 compared with normal human lung fibroblasts. The active compounds baicalin, baicalein and wogonin did not exhibit such selectivity. Following exposure to the crude extracts, cellular protein expression in the cancer cell lines was assessed using 2D gel electrophoresis coupled with MALDI-TOF-MS/Protein Fingerprinting. The altered protein expression indicated that cell growth arrest and apoptosis were potential mechanisms of cytotoxicity. These observations were supported by PI staining cell cycle analysis using flow cytometry and Annexin-V apoptotic analysis by fluorescence microscopy of cancer cells treated with the crude extract and pure active compounds. Moreover, specific immunoblotting identification showed the decreased expression of cyclin A results in the S phase arrest of A549 whereas the G 0 /G 1 phase arrest in SK-MES-1 cells results from the decreased expression of cyclin D1. Following treatment, increased expression in the cancer cells of key proteins related to the enhancement of apoptosis was observed for p53 and Bax. These results provide further insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying the clinical use of this herb as an adjuvant to lung cancer therapy. - Research highlights: → Scutellaria baicalensis is a clinical adjuvant to lung cancer chemotherapy in China. → Scutellaria ethanol extracts selectively toxic to A549, SK-LU-1 and SK-MES-1. → Baicalin, baicalein and wogonin were toxic to all lung cancer cell lines. → Proteomics identified increased p53 and BAX in response to Scutellaria extracts.

  11. The novel anthraquinone derivative IMP1338 induces death of human cancer cells by p53-independent S and G2/M cell cycle arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyun Kyung; Ryu, Hwani; Son, A-Rang; Seo, Bitna; Hwang, Sang-Gu; Song, Jie-Young; Ahn, Jiyeon

    2016-04-01

    To identify novel small molecules that induce selective cancer cell death, we screened a chemical library containing 1040 compounds in HT29 colon cancer and CCD18-Co normal colon cells, using a phenotypic cell-based viability assay system with the Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8). We discovered a novel anthraquinone derivative, N-(4-[{(9,10-dioxo-9,10-dihydro-1-anthracenyl)sulfonyl}amino]phenyl)-N-methylacetamide (IMP1338), which was cytotoxic against the human colon cancer cells tested. The MTT cell viability assay showed that treatment with IMP1338 selectively inhibited HCT116, HCT116 p53(-/-), HT29, and A549 cancer cell proliferation compared to that of Beas2B normal epithelial cells. To elucidate the cellular mechanism underlying the cytotoxicity of IMP1338, we examined the effect of IMP1338 on the cell cycle distribution and death of cancer cells. IMP1338 treatment significantly arrested the cell cycle at S and G2/M phases by DNA damage and led to apoptotic cell death, which was determined using FACS analysis with Annexin V/PI double staining. Furthermore, IMP1338 increased caspase-3 cleavage in wild-type p53, p53 knockout HCT116, and HT29 cells as determined using immunoblotting. In addition, IMP1338 markedly induced the phosphorylation of histone H2AX and Chk1 in both cell lines while the combination of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and radiation inhibited the viability of HCT116, HCT116 p53(-/-), and HT29 cells compared to 5-FU or radiation alone. Our findings indicated that IMP1338 induced p53-independent cell death through S and G2/M phase arrest as well as DNA damage. These results provide a basis for future investigations assessing the promising anticancer properties of IMP1338. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  12. Downregulation of taurine uptake in multidrug resistant Ehrlich ascites tumor cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, K A; Litman, Thomas; Eriksen, J

    2002-01-01

    In daunorubicin resistant Ehrlich ascites tumor cells (DNR), the initial taurine uptake was reduced by 56% as compared to the parental, drug sensitive Ehrlich cells. Kinetic experiments indicated that taurine uptake in Ehrlich cells occurs via both high- and low-affinity transporters. The maximal...... rate constant for the initial taurine uptake was reduced by 45% (high-affinity system) and 49% (low affinity system) in the resistant subline whereas the affinity of the transporters to taurine was unchanged. By immunoblotting we identified 3 TauT protein bands in the 50-70 kDa region. A visible...... reduction in the intensity of the band with the lowest molecular weight was observed in resistant cells. Quantitative RT-PCR indicated a significant reduction in the amount of taurine transporter mRNA in the resistant cells. Drug resistance in DNR Ehrlich cells is associated with overexpression of the mdr1...

  13. The Masticatory Contractile Load Induced Expression and Activation of Akt1/PKBα in Muscle Fibers at the Myotendinous Junction within Muscle-Tendon-Bone Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yüksel Korkmaz

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The cell specific detection of enzyme activation in response to the physiological contractile load within muscle-tendon-bone unit is essential for understanding of the mechanical forces transmission from muscle cells via tendon to the bone. The hypothesis that the physiological mechanical loading regulates activation of Akt1/PKBα at Thr308 and at Ser473 in muscle fibers within muscle-tendon-bone unit was tested using quantitative immunohistochemistry, confocal double fluorescence analysis, and immunoblot analysis. In comparison to the staining intensities in peripheral regions of the muscle fibers, Akt1/PKBα was detected with a higher staining intensity in muscle fibers at the myotendinous junction (MTJ areas. In muscle fibers at the MTJ areas, Akt1/PKBα is dually phosphorylated at Thr308 and Ser473. The immunohistochemical results were confirmed by immunoblot analysis. We conclude that contractile load generated by masticatory muscles induces local domain-dependent expression of Akt1/PKBα as well as activation by dually phosphorylation at Thr308 and Ser473 in muscle fibers at the MTJ areas within muscle-tendon-bone unit.

  14. Adrenomedullin and adrenotensin regulate collagen synthesis and proliferation in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, W. [School of Control Science and Engineering, Biomedical Engineering Institute, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong (China); Kong, Q.Y.; Zhao, C.F. [Department of Pediatrics, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong (China); Zhao, F. [Department of Medicine, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, NY (United States); Li, F.H.; Xia, W. [Department of Pediatrics, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong (China); Wang, R. [Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong (China); Hu, Y.M. [School of Control Science and Engineering, Biomedical Engineering Institute, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong (China); Hua, M. [Shandong Institute of Scientific and Technical Information, Jinan, Shandong (China)

    2013-12-10

    To understand the pathophysiological mechanisms of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cell (PASMC) proliferation and extracellular-matrix accumulation in the development of pulmonary hypertension and remodeling, this study determined the effects of different doses of adrenomedullin (ADM) and adrenotensin (ADT) on PASMC proliferation and collagen synthesis. The objective was to investigate whether extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) signaling was involved in ADM- and ADT-stimulated proliferation of PASMCs in 4-week-old male Wistar rats (body weight: 100-150 g, n=10). The proliferation of PASMCs was examined by 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine incorporation. A cell growth curve was generated by the Cell Counting Kit-8 method. Expression of collagen I, collagen III, and phosphorylated ERK1/2 (p-ERK1/2) was evaluated by immunofluorescence. The effects of different concentrations of ADM and ADT on collagen I, collagen III, and p-ERK1/2 protein expression were determined by immunoblotting. We also investigated the effect of PD98059 inhibition on the expression of p-ERK1/2 protein by immunoblotting. ADM dose-dependently decreased cell proliferation, whereas ADT dose-dependently increased it; and ADM and ADT inhibited each other with respect to their effects on the proliferation of PASMCs. Consistent with these results, the expression of collagen I, collagen III, and p-ERK1/2 in rat PASMCs decreased after exposure to ADM but was upregulated after exposure to ADT. PD98059 significantly inhibited the downregulation by ADM and the upregulation by ADT of p-ERK1/2 expression. We conclude that ADM inhibited, and ADT stimulated, ERK1/2 signaling in rat PASMCs to regulate cell proliferation and collagen expression.

  15. Sensitization of gastric cancer cells to alkylating agents by glaucocalyxin B via cell cycle arrest and enhanced cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ur Rahman MS

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Muhammad Saif Ur Rahman,1 Ling Zhang,2 Lingyan Wu,1 Yuqiong Xie,1 Chunchun Li,1 Jiang Cao1 1Clinical Research Center, 2Cardiovascular Key Laboratory of Zhejiang Province, The Second Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Severe side effects are major problems with chemotherapy of gastric cancer (GC. These side effects can be reduced by using sensitizing agents in combination with therapeutic drugs. In this study, the low/nontoxic dosage of glaucocalyxin B (GLB was used with other DNA linker agents mitomycin C (MMC, cisplatin (DDP, or cyclophosphamide (CTX to treat GC cells. Combined effectiveness of GLB with drugs was determined by proliferation assay. The molecular mechanisms associated with cell proliferation, migration, invasion, cell cycle, DNA repair/replication, apoptosis, and autophagy were investigated by immunoblotting for key proteins involved. Cell cycle and apoptosis analysis were performed by flow cytometry. Reactive oxygen species level was also examined for identification of its role in apoptosis. Proliferation assay revealed that the addition of 5 µM GLB significantly sensitizes gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells to MMC, DDP, and CTX by decreasing half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50 by up to 75.40%±5%, 45.10%±5%, and 52.10%±5%, respectively. GLB + drugs decreased the expression level of proteins involved in proliferation and migration, suggesting the anticancer potential of GLB + drugs. GLB + MMC, GLB + CTX, and GLB + DDP arrest the cells in G0/G1 and G1/S phase, respectively, which may be the consequence of significant decrease in the level of enzymes responsible for DNA replication and telomerase shortening. Combined use of GLB with these drugs also induces DNA damage and apoptosis by activating caspase/PARP pathways and increased production of reactive oxygen species and increased autophagy in GC cells. GLB dosage sensitizes GC

  16. Single cell elemental analysis using nuclear microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren, M.Q.; Thong, P.S.P.; Kara, U.; Watt, F.

    1999-01-01

    The use of Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE), Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) and Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy (STIM) to provide quantitative elemental analysis of single cells is an area which has high potential, particularly when the trace elements such as Ca, Fe, Zn and Cu can be monitored. We describe the methodology of sample preparation for two cell types, the procedures of cell imaging using STIM, and the quantitative elemental analysis of single cells using RBS and PIXE. Recent work on single cells at the Nuclear Microscopy Research Centre,National University of Singapore has centred around two research areas: (a) Apoptosis (programmed cell death), which has been recently implicated in a wide range of pathological conditions such as cancer, Parkinson's disease etc, and (b) Malaria (infection of red blood cells by the malaria parasite). Firstly we present results on the elemental analysis of human Chang liver cells (ATTCC CCL 13) where vanadium ions were used to trigger apoptosis, and demonstrate that nuclear microscopy has the capability of monitoring vanadium loading within individual cells. Secondly we present the results of elemental changes taking place in individual mouse red blood cells which have been infected with the malaria parasite and treated with the anti-malaria drug Qinghaosu (QHS)

  17. Intracellular expression of toll-like receptor 4 in neuroblastoma cells and their unresponsiveness to lipopolysaccharide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mori Isamu

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently it has been reported that, toll-like receptors (TLRs are expressed on a series of tumor cells, such as colon cancer, breast cancer, prostate cancer, melanoma and lung cancer. Although some cancer cells like melanoma cells are known to respond to lipopolysaccharide (LPS via TLR4, not all cancer cells are positive for TLR4. There is little information on the expression and function of TLR4 in neuroblastoma cells. In this study, we investigated the expression of TLR4 in human neuroblastoma NB-1 cell line. Methods Expression and localization of TLR4 were detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and flow cytometric analysis, respectively. Activation of nuclear factor (NF-κB by LPS was detected by degradation of IκB-α and NF-κB luciferase assay. Activation and expression of mitogen-activated protein (MAP kinase and interferon regulatory factor (IRF-3 was detected by immunoblot analysis. Results Human NB-1 neuroblastoma cells expressed intracellular form of TLR4, but not the cell surface form. Further, NB-1 cells express CD14, MD2 and MyD88, which are required for LPS response. However, LPS did not significantly induce NF-κB activation in NB-1 cells although it slightly degraded IκB-α. NB-1 cells expressed no IRF-3, which plays a pivotal role on the MyD88-independent pathway of LPS signaling. Collectively, NB-1 cells are capable to avoid their response to LPS. Conclusion Although human NB-1 neuroblastoma cells possessed all the molecules required for LPS response, they did not respond to LPS. It might be responsible for intracellular expression of TLR4 or lack of IRF-3.

  18. Thermoviscous analysis of open photoacoustic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannoor, Madhusoodanan; Kang, Sangmo

    2017-11-01

    Open photoacoustic cells, apart from the conventional spectroscopic applications, are increasingly useful in bio medical applications such as in vivo blood sugar measurement. Maximising the acoustic pressure amplitude and the quality factor are major design considerations associated with open cells.Conventionaly, resonant photoacoustic cells are analyzed by either transmission line analogy or Eigen mode expansion method. In this study, we conducted a more comprehensive thermo viscous analysis of open photoacoustic cells. A Helmholtz cell and a T-shaped cell, which are acoustically different, are considered for analysis. Effect of geometrical dimensions on the acoustic pressure, quality factor and the intrusion of noise are analyzed and compared between these cells. Specific attention is given to the sizing of the opening and fixtures on it to minimize the radiational losses and the intrusion of noise. Our results are useful for proper selection of the type of open photoacoustic cells for in vivo blood sugar measurement and the optimization of geometric variables of such cells. This research was supported by Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Science, ICT and future planning (2017R1A2B4005006).

  19. Overexpressed HDAC8 in cervical cancer cells shows functional redundancy of tubulin deacetylation with HDAC6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanaja, G R; Ramulu, Hemalatha Golaconda; Kalle, Arunasree M

    2018-05-02

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are involved in epigenetic gene regulation via deacetylation of acetylated lysine residues of both histone and non-histone proteins. Among the 18 HDACs identified in humans, HDAC8, a class I HDAC, is best understood structurally and enzymatically. However, its precise subcellular location, function in normal cellular physiology, its protein partners and substrates still remain elusive. The subcellular localization of HDAC8 was studied using immunofluorescence and confocal imaging. The binding parterns were identified employing immunoprecipitation (IP) followed by MALDI-TOF analysis and confirmed using in-silico protein-protein interaction studies, HPLC-based in vitro deacetylation assay, intrinsic fluorescence spectrophotometric analysis, Circular dichroism (CD) and Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR). Functional characterization of the binding was carried out using immunoblot and knockdown by siRNA. Using one way ANOVA statistical significance (n = 3) was determined. Here, we show that HDAC8 and its phosphorylated form (pHDAC8) localized predominantly in the cytoplasm in cancerous, HeLa, and non-cancerous (normal), HEK293T, cells, although nucleolar localization was observed in HeLa cells. The study identified Alpha tubulin as a novel interacting partner of HDAC8. Further, the results indicated binding and deacetylation of tubulin at ac-lys40 by HDAC8. Knockdown of HDAC8 by siRNA, inhibition of HDAC8 and/or HDAC6 by PCI-34051 and tubastatin respectively, cell-migration, cell morphology and cell cycle analysis clearly explained HDAC8 as tubulin deacetylase in HeLa cells and HDAC6 in HEK 293 T cells. HDAC8 shows functional redundancy with HDAC6 when overexpressed in cervical cancer cells, HeLa, and deacetylaes ac-lys40 of alpha tubulin leading to cervical cancer proliferation and progression.

  20. Docosahexaenoic acid inhibits the growth of hormone-dependent prostate cancer cells by promoting the degradation of the androgen receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhimei; Qi, Haixia; Zhang, Ruixue; Zhang, Kun; Shi, Zhemin; Chang, Yanan; Chen, Linfeng; Esmaeili, Mohsen; Baniahmad, Aria; Hong, Wei

    2015-09-01

    Epidemiological and preclinical data have demonstrated the preventative effects of ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, including docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), on prostate cancer. However, there are inconsistencies in these previous studies and the underlying mechanisms remain to be elucidated. In the present study, the androgen receptor (AR), which is a transcription factor involved in cell proliferation and prostate carcinogenesis, was identified as a target of DHA. It was revealed that DHA inhibited hormone‑dependent growth of LNCaP prostate cancer cells. Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that treatment with DHA caused no alteration in the transcribed mRNA expression levels of the AR gene. However, immunoblotting revealed that this treatment reduces the protein expression level of the AR. The androgen‑induced genes were subsequently repressed by treatment with DHA. It was demonstrated that DHA exhibits no effect on the translation process of the AR, however, it promotes the proteasome‑mediated degradation of the AR. Therefore, the present study provided a novel mechanism by which DHA exhibits an inhibitory effect on growth of prostate cancer cells.

  1. Cadmium nanoparticles citrullinate cytokeratins within lung epithelial cells: cadmium as a potential cause of citrullination in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hutchinson D

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available David Hutchinson,1,2 Judith Müller,3 Joseph E McCarthy,4 Yurii K Gun’ko,4,5 Navin Kumar Verma,6 Xuezhi Bi,7 Luisana Di Cristo,8 Laura Kickham,8 Dania Movia,8 Adriele Prina-Mello,5,8 Yuri Volkov5,8,9 1Royal Cornwall Hospital NHS Trust, Treliske, 2University of Exeter Medical School Cornwall, UK; 3University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland; 4School of Chemistry, 5Advanced Materials for BioEngineering Research Centre (AMBER, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland; 6Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine, Nanyang Technological University, 7Bioprocessing Technology Institute, A*STAR Graduate Academy, Singapore; 8Department of Clinical Medicine, School of Medicine, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland; 9International Laboratory of Magnetically Controlled Nanosystems for Theranostics of Oncological and Cardiovascular Diseases, ITMO University, St. Petersburg, Russia Objective: The objective of the study was to determine whether the cadmium-derived materials induce intracellular protein citrullination. Methods: Human A549 lung epithelial cells were exposed to cadmium in soluble and nanoparticulate forms represented by cadmium chloride (CdCl2 and cadmium oxide (CdO, respectively, and their combinations with ultrafine carbon black (ufCB produced by high temperature combustion, imitating cigarette burning. Protein citrullination in cell lysates was analyzed by Western immunoblotting and verified by immunofluorescent confocal microscopy. Target citrullinated proteins were identified by proteomic analysis. Results: CdO, ufCB and its combination with CdCl2 and CdO after high temperature combustion induced protein citrullination in cultured human lung epithelial cells, as detected by immunoblotting with anti-citrullinated protein antibody. Cytokeratins of type II (1, 2, 5, 6A, 6B and 77 and type I (9, 10 were identified as major intracellular citrullination targets. Immunofluorescent staining confirmed the localization of citrullinated proteins both in the

  2. Tumor suppressor BLU inhibits proliferation of nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells by regulation of cell cycle, c-Jun N-terminal kinase and the cyclin D1 promoter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Xiangning; Liu, Hui; Li, Binbin; Huang, Peichun; Shao, Jianyong; He, Zhiwei

    2012-01-01

    Tumor suppressor genes function to regulate and block tumor cell proliferation. To explore the mechanisms underlying the tumor suppression of BLU/ZMYND10 gene on a frequently lost human chromosomal region, an adenoviral vector with BLU cDNA insert was constructed. BLU was re-expressed in nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells by transfection or viral infection. Clonogenic growth was assayed; cell cycle was analyzed by flow cytometry-based DNA content detection; c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and cyclin D1 promoter activities were measured by reporter gene assay, and phosphorylation was measured by immunoblotting. The data for each pair of groups were compared with Student t tests. BLU inhibits clonogenic growth of nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells, arrests cell cycle at G1 phase, downregulates JNK and cyclin D1 promoter activities, and inhibits phosphorylation of c-Jun. BLU inhibits growth of nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells by regulation of the JNK-cyclin D1 axis to exert tumor suppression

  3. Untangling cell tracks: Quantifying cell migration by time lapse image data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, Carl-Magnus; Medyukhina, Anna; Belyaev, Ivan; Al-Zaben, Naim; Figge, Marc Thilo

    2018-03-01

    Automated microscopy has given researchers access to great amounts of live cell imaging data from in vitro and in vivo experiments. Much focus has been put on extracting cell tracks from such data using a plethora of segmentation and tracking algorithms, but further analysis is normally required to draw biologically relevant conclusions. Such relevant conclusions may be whether the migration is directed or not, whether the population has homogeneous or heterogeneous migration patterns. This review focuses on the analysis of cell migration data that are extracted from time lapse images. We discuss a range of measures and models used to analyze cell tracks independent of the biological system or the way the tracks were obtained. For single-cell migration, we focus on measures and models giving examples of biological systems where they have been applied, for example, migration of bacteria, fibroblasts, and immune cells. For collective migration, we describe the model systems wound healing, neural crest migration, and Drosophila gastrulation and discuss methods for cell migration within these systems. We also discuss the role of the extracellular matrix and subsequent differences between track analysis in vitro and in vivo. Besides methods and measures, we are putting special focus on the need for openly available data and code, as well as a lack of common vocabulary in cell track analysis. © 2017 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry. © 2017 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  4. Monocarboxylate transporters MCT1 and MCT4 regulate migration and invasion of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kong, Su Chii; Nøhr-Nielsen, Asbjørn; Zeeberg, Katrine

    2016-01-01

    , localization, activity, and function were explored in human PDAC cells (MIAPaCa-2, Panc-1, BxPC-3, AsPC-1) and normal human pancreatic ductal epithelial (HPDE) cells, by quantitative polymerase chain reaction, immunoblotting, immunocytochemistry, lactate flux, migration, and invasion assays. RESULTS: MCT1......, or knockdown of MCT1 or MCT4. PDAC cell migration was largely unaffected by MCT1/MCT2 inhibition or MCT1 knockdown but was reduced by 4-CIN and by MCT4 knockdown (BxPC-3). Invasion measured in Boyden chamber (BxPC-3, Panc-1) and spheroid outgrowth (BxPC-3) assays was attenuated by 4-CIN and AR-C155858...

  5. Activation of apoptosis by ethyl acetate fraction of ethanol extract of Dianthus superbus in HepG2 cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jian-Qing; Yin, Yan; Lei, Jia-Chuan; Zhang, Xiu-Qiao; Chen, Wei; Ding, Cheng-Li; Wu, Shan; He, Xiao-Yu; Liu, Yan-Wen; Zou, Guo-Lin

    2012-02-01

    Dianthus superbus L. is commonly used as a traditional Chinese medicine. We recently showed that ethyl acetate fraction (EE-DS) from ethanol extract of D. superbus exhibited the strongest antioxidant and cytotoxic activities. In this study, we examined apoptosis of HepG2 cells induced by EE-DS, and the mechanism underlying apoptosis was also investigated. Treatment of HepG2 cells with EE-DS (20-80 μg/ml) for 48 h led to a significant dose-dependent increase in the percentage of cells in sub-G1 phase by analysis of the content of DNA in cells, and a large number of apoptotic bodies containing nuclear fragments were observed in cells treated with 80 μg/ml of EE-DS for 24 h by using Hoechst 33258 staining. These data show that EE-DS can induce apoptosis of HepG2 cells. Immunoblot analysis showed that EE-DS significantly suppressed the expressions of Bcl-2 and NF-κB. Treatment of cells with EE-DS (80 μg/ml) for 48 h resulted in significant increase of cytochrome c in the cytosol, which indicated cytochrome c release from mitochondria. Activation of caspase-9 and -3 were also determined when the cells treated with EE-DS. The results suggest that apoptosis of HepG2 cells induced by EE-DS could be through the mitochondrial intrinsic pathway. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) data showed that the composition of EE-DS is complicated. Further studies are needed to find the effective constituents of EE-DS. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Cell cycle regulation by the Wee1 Inhibitor PD0166285, Pyrido [2,3-d] pyimidine, in the B16 mouse melanoma cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, Osamu; Shinkawa, Masako; Torimura, Takuji; Nakamura, Toru; Selvendiran, Karuppaiyah; Sakamoto, Masaharu; Koga, Hironori; Ueno, Takato; Sata, Michio

    2006-01-01

    Wee1 kinase plays a critical role in maintaining G2 arrest through its inhibitory phosphorylation of cdc2. In previous reports, a pyridopyrimidine molecule PD0166285 was identified to inhibit Wee1 activity at nanomolar concentrations. This G2 checkpoint abrogation by PD0166285 was demonstrated to kill cancer cells, there at a toxic highest dose of 0.5 μM in some cell lines for exposure periods of no longer than 6 hours. The deregulated cell cycle progression may have ultimately damaged the cancer cells. We herein report one of the mechanism by which PD0166285 leads to cell death in the B16 mouse melanoma cell line. Tumor cell proliferation was determined by counting cell numbers. Cell cycle distribution was determined by flow cytometry. Morphogenesis analysis such as microtubule stabilization, Wee1 distribution, and cyclin B location were observed by immunofluorescence confocal microscopy. An immunoblot analysis of cdc2-Tyr15, cyclin D, E, p16, 21, 27, and Rb. A real-time PCR of the mRNA of cyclin D were completed. In our experiment, B16 cells also dramatically abrogated the G2 checkpoint and were found to arrest in the early G1 phase by treatment with 0.5 μM for 4 hours observed by flow cytometry. Cyclin D mRNA decreased within 4 hours observed by Real-time PCR. Rb was dephosphrylated for 24 hours. However, B16 cells did not undergo cell death after 0.5 μM treatment for 24 hours. Immnofluoscence microscopy showed that the cells become round and small in the morphogenesis. More interesting phenomena were that microtubule stabilization was blocked, and Wee1 distribution was restricted after treatment for 4 hours. We analyzed the effect of Wee1 inhibitor PD0166285 described first by Wang in the G2 transition in the B16 melanoma cell line. The inhibitor PD0166285 abrogated G2/M checkpoint inducing early cell division. Moreover, we found that the treatment of cells with the inhibitor is related to microtubule stabilization and decrease in cyclin D transcription

  7. Mesomere-derived glutamate decarboxylase-expressing blastocoelar mesenchyme cells of sea urchin larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideki Katow

    2013-12-01

    The ontogenetic origin of blastocoelar glutamate decarboxylase (GAD-expressing cells (GADCs in larvae of the sea urchin Hemicentrotus pulcherrimus was elucidated. Whole-mount in situ hybridisation (WISH detected transcription of the gene that encodes GAD in H. pulcherrimus (Hp-gad in unfertilised eggs and all blastomeres in morulae. However, at and after the swimming blastula stage, the transcript accumulation was particularly prominent in clumps of ectodermal cells throughout the embryonic surface. During the gastrula stage, the transcripts also accumulated in the endomesoderm and certain blastocoelar cells. Consistent with the increasing number of Hp-gad transcribing cells, immunoblot analysis indicated that the relative abundance of Hp-Gad increased considerably from the early gastrula stage until the prism stage. The expression pattern of GADCs determined by immunohistochemistry was identical to the pattern of Hp-gad transcript accumulation determined using WISH. In early gastrulae, GADCs formed blastocoelar cell aggregates around the blastopore with primary mesenchyme cells. The increase in the number of blastocoelar GADCs was inversely proportional to the number of ectodermal GADCs ranging from a few percent of total GADCs in early gastrulae to 80% in late prism larvae; this depended on ingression of ectodermal GADCs into the blastocoel. Some of the blastocoelar GADCs were fluorescein-positive in the larvae that developed from the 16-cell stage chimeric embryos; these comprised fluorescein-labeled mesomeres and unlabelled macromeres and micromeres. Our finding indicates that some of the blastocoelar GADCs are derived from the mesomeres and thus they are the new group of mesenchyme cells, the tertiary mesenchyme cells.

  8. Lessons from single-cell transcriptome analysis of oxygen-sensing cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ting; Matsunami, Hiroaki

    2018-05-01

    The advent of single-cell RNA-sequencing (RNA-Seq) technology has enabled transcriptome profiling of individual cells. Comprehensive gene expression analysis at the single-cell level has proven to be effective in characterizing the most fundamental aspects of cellular function and identity. This unbiased approach is revolutionary for small and/or heterogeneous tissues like oxygen-sensing cells in identifying key molecules. Here, we review the major methods of current single-cell RNA-Seq technology. We discuss how this technology has advanced the understanding of oxygen-sensing glomus cells in the carotid body and helped uncover novel oxygen-sensing cells and mechanisms in the mice olfactory system. We conclude by providing our perspective on future single-cell RNA-Seq research directed at oxygen-sensing cells.

  9. Preservation of cardiac function by prolonged action potentials in mice deficient of KChIP2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grubb, Søren Jahn; Aistrup, Gary L; Koivumäki, Jussi T

    2015-01-01

    to the preservation of contractile function. Detailed analysis of current kinetics shows that only ICa,L density is reduced, and immunoblots demonstrate unaltered CaV1.2 and CaVβ2 protein levels. Computer modeling suggests that delayed repolarization would prolong the period of Ca(2+) entry into the cell, thereby...

  10. Analysis of E2F factors during epidermal differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Wing Y; Dagnino, Lina

    2005-01-01

    The multigene E2F family of transcription factors is central in the control of cell cycle progression. The expression and activity of E2F proteins is tightly regulated transcriptionally and posttranslationally as a function of the proliferation and differentiation status of the cell. In this chapter, we review protocols designed to determine E2F mRNA abundance in tissues by in situ hybridization techniques. The ability to culture primary epidermal keratinocytes and maintain them as either undifferentiated or terminally differentiated cells allows the biochemical and molecular characterization of changes in E2F expression and activity. Thus, we also discuss in detail methods to analyze E2F protein abundance by immunoblot and their ability to bind DNA in cultured cells using electrophoretic mobility shift assays.

  11. Epigallocatechin-3-Gallate Suppresses Human Herpesvirus 8 Replication and Induces ROS Leading to Apoptosis and Autophagy in Primary Effusion Lymphoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Yi Tsai

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG, the major constituent of green tea, has been shown to induce cell death in cancer cells. Primary effusion lymphoma (PEL is an aggressive neoplasm caused by human herpesvirus 8 (HHV8. In this study, we examined the role of EGCG on PEL cells in cell death and HHV8 replication. We performed trypan blue exclusion assay to assess the cell viability of PEL cells, flow cytometry analysis to examine the cell cycle distribution and reactive oxygen species (ROS generation, caspase-3 activity to assay apoptosis, acridine orange staining to determine autophagy, and immunoblotting to detect the protein levels involved in apoptosis and autophagy as well as mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs activation upon EGCG treatment. The expression of the HHV8 lytic gene was determined by luciferase reporter assay and reverse transcription-PCR, and viral progeny production was determined by PCR. Results revealed that EGCG induced cell death and ROS generation in PEL cells in a dose-dependent manner. N-acetylcysteine (NAC inhibited the EGCG-induced ROS and rescued the cell from EGCG-induced cell death. Even though EGCG induced ROS generation in PEL cells, it reduced the production of progeny virus from PEL cells without causing HHV8 reactivation. These results suggest that EGCG may represent a novel strategy for the treatment of HHV8 infection and HHV8-associated lymphomas.

  12. Chlamydia trachomatis serovar L2 induces protein tyrosine phosphorylation during uptake by HeLa cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkelund, Svend; Johnsen, H; Christiansen, Gunna

    1994-01-01

    . By use of a monoclonal antibody against phosphotyrosine, we showed that three classes of proteins are tyrosine phosphorylated: a triple band of 68, 66, and 64 kDa, a 97-kDa band, and a 140-kDa band. The phosphorylation could be detected by immunoblotting from 15 min after infection of HeLa cells. We...... inactive. Attachment of EBs to host cells is medicated by a heparan sulfate-like glycosaminoglycan. Following attachment, the EB is internalized within a membrane-bound vesicle, and during the first 8 h of infection the vesicles are transported to a perinuclear location where they aggregate and fuse...

  13. Structural analysis of cell wall polysaccharides using PACE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mortimer, Jennifer C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Joint BioEnergy Institute

    2017-01-01

    The plant cell wall is composed of many complex polysaccharides. The composition and structure of the polysaccharides affect various cell properties including cell shape, cell function and cell adhesion. Many techniques to characterize polysaccharide structure are complicated, requiring expensive equipment and specialized operators e.g. NMR, MALDI-MS. PACE (Polysaccharide Analysis using Carbohydrate gel Electrophoresis) uses a simple, rapid technique to analyze polysaccharide quantity and structure (Goubet et al. 2002). Whilst the method here describes xylan analysis, it can be applied (by use of the appropriate glycosyl hydrolase) to any cell wall polysaccharide.

  14. Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase IV Mediates IFN-γ-Induced Immune Behaviors in Skeletal Muscle Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RuiCai Gu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Whether calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV (CaMKIV plays a role in regulating immunologic features of muscle cells in inflammatory environment, as it does for immune cells, remains mostly unknown. In this study, we investigated the influence of endogenous CaMKIV on the immunological characteristics of myoblasts and myotubes received IFN-γ stimulation. Methods: C2C12 and murine myogenic precursor cells (MPCs were cultured and differentiated in vitro, in the presence of pro-inflammatory IFN-γ. CaMKIV shRNA lentivirus transfection was performed to knockdown CaMKIV gene in C2C12 cells. pEGFP-N1-CaMKIV plasmid was delivered into knockout cells for recovering intracellular CaMKIV gene level. CREB1 antagonist KG-501 was used to block CREB signal. qPCR, immunoblot analysis, or immunofluorescence was used to detect mRNA and protein levels of CaMKIV, immuno-molecules, or pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Co-stimulatory molecules expression was assessed by FACS analysis. Results: IFN-γ induces the expression or up-regulation of MHC-I/II and TLR3, and the up-regulation of CaMKIV level in muscle cells. In contrast, CaMKIV knockdown in myoblasts and myotubes leads to expression inhibition of the above immuno-molecules. As well, CaMKIV knockdown selectively inhibits pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines, and co-stimulatory molecules expression in IFN-γ treated myoblasts and myotubes. Finally, CaMKIV knockdown abolishes IFN-γ induced CREB pathway molecules accumulation in differentiated myotubes. Conclusions: CaMKIV can be induced to up-regulate in muscle cells under inflammatory condition, and positively mediates intrinsic immune behaviors of muscle cells triggered by IFN-γ.

  15. Defining the Role of BTLA in Breast Cancer Immunosurveillance and Selective Targeting of the BTLA-HVEM-LIGHT Costimulatory System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-01

    assay was conducted as reported by Jedema et al. (41), with alterations noted below. Briefly, allogeneic P815 (H-2Kd) or syngeneic EL4 (H-2Kb) target...cells lysed (CFSE7- AAD) was determined by FACS. CTL activity was not observed toward syngeneic (H-2Kb) EL4 cell targets (data not shown). The mean...could induce BTLA phosphor- ylation (Fig. 4c,d). We analyzed BTLA phosphorylation in EL4 cells using immunoprecipitation immunoblot analysis as

  16. Gene Expression Profile Reveals Abnormalities of Multiple Signaling Pathways in Mesenchymal Stem Cell Derived from Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Tang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to compare bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs between systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE and normal controls by means of cDNA microarray, immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence, and immunoblotting. Our results showed there were a total of 1, 905 genes which were differentially expressed by BMMSCs derived from SLE patients, of which, 652 genes were upregulated and 1, 253 were downregulated. Gene ontology (GO analysis showed that the majority of these genes were related to cell cycle and protein binding. Pathway analysis exhibited that differentially regulated signal pathways involved actin cytoskeleton, focal adhesion, tight junction, and TGF-β pathway. The high protein level of BMP-5 and low expression of Id-1 indicated that there might be dysregulation in BMP/TGF-β signaling pathway. The expression of Id-1 in SLE BMMSCs was reversely correlated with serum TNF-α levels. The protein level of cyclin E decreased in the cell cycling regulation pathway. Moreover, the MAPK signaling pathway was activated in BMMSCs from SLE patients via phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and SAPK/JNK. The actin distribution pattern of BMMSCs from SLE patients was also found disordered. Our results suggested that there were distinguished differences of BMMSCs between SLE patients and normal controls.

  17. Curcumin enhances the effects of irinotecan on colorectal cancer cells through the generation of reactive oxygen species and activation of the endoplasmic reticulum stress pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yan-Feng; Zhu, Da-Jian; Chen, Xiao-Wu; Chen, Qi-Kang; Luo, Zhen-Tao; Liu, Chang-Chun; Wang, Guo-Xin; Zhang, Wei-Jie; Liao, Nv-Zhu

    2017-06-20

    Although initially effective against metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC), irinotecan-based chemotherapy leads to resistance and adverse toxicity. Curcumin is well known for its anti-cancer effects in many cancers, including CRC. Here, we describe reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress as important mechanisms by which curcumin enhances irinotecan's effects on CRC cells. CRC cell lines were treated with curcumin and/or irinotecan for 24 h, and then evaluated using cell proliferation assays, cell apoptosis assays, cell cycle analysis, intracellular Ca2+ measurements, ROS measurements and immunoblotting for key ER stress-related proteins. We found that cell viability was inhibited and apoptosis was increased, accompanied by ROS generation and ER stress activation in CRC cells treated with curcumin alone or in combination with irinotecan. Blocking ROS production attenuated the expression of two markers of ER stress: binding of immunoglobulin protein (BIP) and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein homologous protein (CHOP). Blocking CHOP expression using RNA interference also inhibited ROS generation. These results demonstrated that curcumin could enhance the effects of irinotecan on CRC cells by inhibiting cell viability and inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, and that these effects may be mediated, in part, by ROS generation and activation of the ER stress pathway.

  18. Up-regulation of DRP-3 long isoform during the induction of neural progenitor cells by glutamate treatment in the ex vivo rat retina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokuda, Kazuhiro, E-mail: r502um@yamaguchi-u.ac.jp [Department of Ophthalmology, Yamaguchi University Graduate School of Medicine, Ube, Yamaguchi (Japan); Department of Biochemistry and Functional Proteomics, Yamaguchi University Graduate School of Medicine, Ube, Yamaguchi (Japan); Kuramitsu, Yasuhiro; Byron, Baron; Kitagawa, Takao [Department of Biochemistry and Functional Proteomics, Yamaguchi University Graduate School of Medicine, Ube, Yamaguchi (Japan); Tokuda, Nobuko [Faculty of Health Sciences, Yamaguchi University Graduate School of Medicine, Ube (Japan); Kobayashi, Daiki; Nagayama, Megumi; Araki, Norie [Department of Tumor Genetics and Biology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan); Sonoda, Koh-Hei [Department of Ophthalmology, Yamaguchi University Graduate School of Medicine, Ube, Yamaguchi (Japan); Nakamura, Kazuyuki [Department of Biochemistry and Functional Proteomics, Yamaguchi University Graduate School of Medicine, Ube, Yamaguchi (Japan)

    2015-08-07

    Glutamate has been shown to induce neural progenitor cells in the adult vertebrate retina. However, protein dynamics during progenitor cell induction by glutamate are not fully understood. To identify specific proteins involved in the process, we employed two-dimensional electrophoresis-based proteomics on glutamate untreated and treated retinal ex vivo sections. Rat retinal tissues were incubated with 1 mM glutamate for 1 h, followed by incubation in glutamate-free media for a total of 24 h. Consistent with prior reports, it was found that mitotic cells appeared in the outer nuclear layer without any histological damage. Immunohistological evaluations and immunoblotting confirmed the emergence of neuronal progenitor cells in the mature retina treated with glutamate. Proteomic analysis revealed the up-regulation of dihydropyrimidinase-related protein 3 (DRP-3), DRP-2 and stress-induced-phosphoprotein 1 (STIP1) during neural progenitor cell induction by glutamate. Moreover, mRNA expression of DRP-3, especially, its long isoform, robustly increased in the treated retina compared to that in the untreated retina. These results may indicate that glutamate induces neural progenitor cells in the mature rat retina by up-regulating the proteins which mediate cell mitosis and neurite growth. - Highlights: • Glutamate induced neuronal progenitor cells in the mature rat retina. • Proteomic analysis revealed the up-regulation of DRP-3, DRP-2 and STIP1. • mRNA expression of DRP-3, especially, its long isoform, robustly increased.

  19. Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor, vildagliptin, inhibits pancreatic beta cell apoptosis in association with its effects suppressing endoplasmic reticulum stress in db/db mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yan-ju; Guo, Xin; Li, Chun-jun; Li, Dai-qing; Zhang, Jie; Yang, Yiping; Kong, Yan; Guo, Hang; Liu, De-min; Chen, Li-ming

    2015-02-01

    Vildagliptin promotes beta cell survival by inhibiting cell apoptosis. It has been suggested that chronic ER (endoplasmic reticulum) stress triggers beta cell apoptosis. The objective of the study is to explore whether the pro-survival effect of vildagliptin is associated with attenuation of endoplasmic reticulum stress in islets of db/db mice. Vildagliptin was orally administered to db/db mice for 6 weeks, followed by evaluation of beta cell apoptosis by caspase3 activity and TUNEL staining method. Endoplasmic reticulum stress markers were determined with quantitative RT-PCR, immunohistochemistry and immunoblot analysis. After 6 weeks of treatment, vildagliptin treatment increased plasma active GLP-1 levels (22.63±1.19 vs. 11.69±0.44, Pvildagliptin treatment down-regulated several genes related to endoplasmic reticulum stress including TRIB3 (tribbles homolog 3) (15.9±0.4 vs. 33.3±1.7, ×10⁻³, PVildagliptin promoted beta cell survival in db/db mice in association with down-regulating markers of endoplasmic reticulum stress including TRIB3, ATF-4 as well as CHOP. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. New insights into circulating FABP4: Interaction with cytokeratin 1 on endothelial cell membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saavedra, Paula; Girona, Josefa; Bosquet, Alba; Guaita, Sandra; Canela, Núria; Aragonès, Gemma; Heras, Mercedes; Masana, Lluís

    2015-11-01

    Fatty acid-binding protein 4 (FABP4) is an adipose tissue-secreted adipokine that is involved in the regulation of energetic metabolism and inflammation. Increased levels of circulating FABP4 have been detected in individuals with cardiovascular risk factors. Recent studies have demonstrated that FABP4 has a direct effect on peripheral tissues, specifically promoting vascular dysfunction; however, its mechanism of action is unknown. The objective of this work was to assess the specific interactions between exogenous FABP4 and the plasma membranes of endothelial cells. Immunofluorescence assays showed that exogenous FABP4 localized along the plasma membranes of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), interacting specifically with plasma membrane proteins. Anti-FABP4 immunoblotting revealed two covalent protein complexes containing FABP4 and its putative receptor; these complexes were approximately 108 kDa and 77 kDa in size. Proteomics and mass spectrometry experiments revealed that cytokeratin 1 (CK1) was the FABP4-binding protein. An anti-CK1 immunoblot confirmed the presence of CK1. FABP4-CK1 complexes were also detected in HAECs, HCASMCs, HepG2 cells and THP-1 cells. Pharmacological FABP4 inhibition by BMS309403 results in a slight decrease in the formation of these complexes, indicating that fatty acids may play a role in FABP4 functionality. In addition, we demonstrated that exogenous FABP4 crosses the plasma membrane to enter the cytoplasm and nucleus in HUVECs. These findings indicate that exogenous FABP4 interacts with plasma membrane proteins, specifically CK1. These data contribute to our current knowledge regarding the mechanism of action of circulating FABP4.

  1. Avoidance Behavior against Positive Allergens Detected with a Multiple Allergen Simultaneous Test Immunoblot Assay in Patients with Urticaria: Factors Associated with Avoidance Success/Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Min Kyung; Kwon, In Ho; Kim, Han Su; Kim, Heung Yeol; Cho, Eun Byul; Bae, Youin; Park, Gyeong Hun; Park, Eun Joo; Kim, Kwang Ho; Kim, Kwang Joong

    2016-02-01

    Avoidance behavior against positive allergens detected by using multiple allergen simultaneous test (MAST)-immunoblot assay in patients with urticaria has been rarely reported. We aimed to assess the avoidance behavior of patients with urticaria against positive allergens detected with a MAST. One hundred and one urticaria patients who showed positivity to at least one allergen on a MAST completed a questionnaire regarding their test results. The avoidance behavior of the patients was evaluated, and relevant determining factors of avoidance success/failure were statistically assessed. We detected 144 different data (n=51, food allergens; n=17, pollen allergens; and n=76, aeroallergens) from 101 patients with urticaria. The avoidance failure rates were 33.3% for food allergens, 70.6% for pollen allergens, and 30.3% for aeroallergens. The pollen group showed a significantly higher avoidance failure rate than the food and aeroallergen groups (psuccessfully avoid allergens (psuccess or failure against allergens in patients with urticaria when clinicians conduct allergen-specific immunoglobulin E tests.

  2. Metformin sensitizes chemotherapy by targeting cancer stem cells and the mTOR pathway in esophageal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    HONJO, SOICHIRO; AJANI, JAFFER A.; SCOTT, AILING W.; CHEN, QIONGRONG; SKINNER, HEATH D.; STROEHLEIN, JOHN; JOHNSON, RANDY L.; SONG, SHUMEI

    2014-01-01

    Our clinical study indicates esophageal adenocarcinoma patients on metformin had a better treatment response than those without metformin. However, the effects of metformin and the mechanisms of its action in esophageal cancer (EC) are unclear. EC cell lines were used to assess the effects of metformin alone or in combination with 5-fluorouracil on survival and apoptosis. RPPA proteomic array and immunoblots were used to identify signaling affected by metformin. Standard descriptive statistic...

  3. Baicalein inhibits pulmonary carcinogenesis-associated inflammation and interferes with COX-2, MMP-2 and MMP-9 expressions in-vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandrashekar, Naveenkumar; Selvamani, Asokkumar; Subramanian, Raghunandhakumar; Pandi, Anandakumar; Thiruvengadam, Devaki, E-mail: devakit@yahoo.co.uk

    2012-05-15

    The objective of the present study is to investigate the therapeutic efficacy of baicalein (BE) on inflammatory cytokines, which is in line with tumor invasion factors and antioxidant defensive system during benzo(a)pyrene [B(a)P] (50 mg/kg body weight) induced pulmonary carcinogenesis in Swiss albino mice. After experimental period, increased levels of total and differential cell count in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were observed. Accompanied by marked increase in immature mast cell by toluidine blue staining and mature mast cell by safranin–alcian blue staining in B(a)P-induced lung cancer bearing animals. Protein expression levels studied by immunohistochemistry and immunoblot analysis of cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β and inducible nitric oxide synthase were also found to be significantly increased in lung cancer bearing animals. B(a)P-exposed mice lung exhibits activated expression of nuclear transcription factor kappa-B as confirmed by immunofluorescence and immunoblot analysis. Administration of BE (12 mg/kg body weight) significantly counteracted all the above deleterious changes. Moreover, assessment of tumor invasion factors on protein levels by immunoblot and mRNA expression levels by RT-PCR revealed that BE treatment effectively negates B(a)P-induced upregulated expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2, matrix metalloproteinase-9 and cyclo-oxygenase-2. Further analysis of lipid peroxidation markers such as thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, hydro-peroxides and antioxidants such as glutathione-S-transferase and reduced glutathione in lung tissue was carried out to substantiate the antioxidant effect of BE. The chemotherapeutic effect observed in the present study is attributed to the potent anti-inflammatory and antioxidant potential by BE against pulmonary carcinogenesis. -- Highlights: ► BE treatment protects from inflammatory cells and mast-cells accumulation in lungs. ► BE altered the expressions of TNF

  4. The expression and role of serotonin receptor 5HTR2A in canine osteoblasts and an osteosarcoma cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracha, Shay; Viall, Austin; Goodall, Cheri; Stang, Bernadette; Ruaux, Craig; Seguin, Bernard; Chappell, Patrick E

    2013-12-12

    The significance of the serotonergic system in bone physiology and, more specifically, the importance of the five hydroxytryptamine receptor 2A (5HTR2A) in normal osteoblast proliferation have been previously described; however the role of serotonin in osteosarcoma remains unclear. Particularly, the expression and function of 5HTR2A in canine osteosarcoma has not yet been studied, thus we sought to determine if this indoleamine modulates cellular proliferation in vitro. Using real time quantitative reverse transcription PCR and immunoblot analyses, we explored receptor expression and signaling differences between non-neoplastic canine osteoblasts (CnOb) and an osteosarcoma cell line (COS). To elucidate specific serotonergic signaling pathways triggered by 5HTR2A, we performed immunoblots for ERK and CREB. Finally, we compared cell viability and the induction of apoptosis in the presence 5HTR2A agonists and antagonists. 5HTR2A was overexpressed in the malignant cell line in comparison to normal cells. In CnOb cells, ERK phosphorylation (ERK-P) decreased in response to both serotonin and a specific 5HTR2A antagonist, ritanserin. In contrast, ERK-P abundance increased in COS cells following either treatment. While endogenous CREB was undetectable in CnOb, CREB was observed constitutively in COS, with expression and exhibited increased CREB phosphorylation following escalating concentrations of ritanserin. To determine the influence of 5HTR2A signaling on cell viability we challenged cells with ritanserin and serotonin. Our findings confirmed that serotonin treatment promoted cell viability in malignant cells but not in normal osteoblasts. Conversely, ritanserin reduced cell viability in both the normal and osteosarcoma cells. Further, ritanserin induced apoptosis in COS at the same concentrations associated with decreased cell viability. These findings confirm the existence of a functional 5HTR2A in a canine osteosarcoma cell line. Results indicate that intracellular

  5. Mapping cellular hierarchy by single-cell analysis of the cell surface repertoire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Guoji; Luc, Sidinh; Marco, Eugenio; Lin, Ta-Wei; Peng, Cong; Kerenyi, Marc A; Beyaz, Semir; Kim, Woojin; Xu, Jian; Das, Partha Pratim; Neff, Tobias; Zou, Keyong; Yuan, Guo-Cheng; Orkin, Stuart H

    2013-10-03

    Stem cell differentiation pathways are most often studied at the population level, whereas critical decisions are executed at the level of single cells. We have established a highly multiplexed, quantitative PCR assay to profile in an unbiased manner a panel of all commonly used cell surface markers (280 genes) from individual cells. With this method, we analyzed over 1,500 single cells throughout the mouse hematopoietic system and illustrate its utility for revealing important biological insights. The comprehensive single cell data set permits mapping of the mouse hematopoietic stem cell differentiation hierarchy by computational lineage progression analysis. Further profiling of 180 intracellular regulators enabled construction of a genetic network to assign the earliest differentiation event during hematopoietic lineage specification. Analysis of acute myeloid leukemia elicited by MLL-AF9 uncovered a distinct cellular hierarchy containing two independent self-renewing lineages with different clonal activities. The strategy has broad applicability in other cellular systems. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. In vitro toxicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons to cetacean cells and tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvan, M.J. III.

    1993-01-01

    Cetaceans bioaccumulate high aromatic hydrocarbon tissue residues, and elevated levels of PCB residues in tissues are proposed to have occurred concurrently with recent epizootic deaths of dolphins. The objectives of this study were: (1) to develop and characterize an epithelial cell line derived from dolphin tissues, (2) to investigate the effects of hydrocarbon pollutants on those cells, and (3) to analyze the toxicity of hydrocarbon pollutants on cetacean tissues in vitro. An epithelial cell line, Carvan dolphin kidney (CDK), isolated from a spontaneously aborted female bottlenose dolphin, Tursiops truncatus, grew rapidly. These cells were neither transformed nor immortal. Velocity sedimentation analysis showed CDK cells contained nuclear aryl hydrocarbon receptor, suggestive of cytochrome P450 inducibility. BaP inhibited mitosis in CDK cells in a dose-dependent manner. Data indicate that CDK cells metabolize BaP, that BaP metabolites bind to cellular DNA initiating unscheduled DNA synthesis, and that the inhibition of cytochrome P450 metabolism decrease the BaP-associated inhibition of mitosis in dolphin cells. The data also suggest that TCDD acts synergistically to increase the levels of DNA damage by the procarcinogen BaP. Cetacean liver microsomes was isolated and evaluated for the presence of cytochrome P450 proteins by SDS-PAGE, apparent minimum molecular weight determination, and immunoblot analysis. P450 activity was induced in cetacean tissue samples and CDK cells by exposure in vitro to one of several cytochrome P450-inducing chemicals. The data suggest that cetacean tissues and cells can be utilized to study the in vitro induction of cytochrome P450, resultant metabolism of xenobiotic contaminants, and the subsequent cellular and molecular responses. However, the identity of specific P450 isozymes involved in this process will remain undetermined until monoclonal antibodies that recognize cetacean P450s can be generated.

  7. Proteomic analysis of human metaphase chromosomes reveals Topoisomerase II alpha as an Aurora B substrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morrison, Ciaran; Henzing, Alexander J; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard

    2002-01-01

    B in the presence of radioactive ATP. Immunoblot analysis confirmed the HeLa scaffold fraction to be enriched for known chromosomal proteins including CENP-A, CENP-B, CENP-C, ScII and INCENP. Mass spectrometry of bands excised from one-dimensional polyacrylamide gels further defined the protein......The essential Aurora B kinase is a chromosomal passenger protein that is required for mitotic chromosome alignment and segregation. Aurora B function is dependent on the chromosome passenger, INCENP. INCENP, in turn, requires sister chromatid cohesion for its appropriate behaviour. Relatively few...... composition of the extracted chromosome fraction. Cloning, fluorescent tagging and expression in HeLa cells of the putative GTP-binding protein NGB/CRFG demonstrated it to be a novel mitotic chromosome protein, with a perichromosomal localisation. Identi fication of the protein bands corresponding to those...

  8. Experimental studies of mitochondrial function in CADASIL vascular smooth muscle cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viitanen, Matti; Sundström, Erik; Baumann, Marc; Poyhonen, Minna; Tikka, Saara; Behbahani, Homira

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral Autosomal Dominant Arteriopathy with Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is a familiar fatal progressive degenerative disorder characterized by cognitive decline, and recurrent stroke in young adults. Pathological features include a dramatic reduction of brain vascular smooth muscle cells and severe arteriopathy with the presence of granular osmophilic material in the arterial walls. Here we have investigated the cellular and mitochondrial function in vascular smooth muscle cell lines (VSMCs) established from CADASIL mutation carriers (R133C) and healthy controls. We found significantly lower proliferation rates in CADASIL VSMC as compared to VSMC from controls. Cultured CADASIL VSMCs were not more vulnerable than control cells to a number of toxic substances. Morphological studies showed reduced mitochondrial connectivity and increased number of mitochondria in CADASIL VSMCs. Transmission electron microscopy analysis demonstrated increased irregular and abnormal mitochondria in CADASIL VSMCs. Measurements of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψ m ) showed a lower percentage of fully functional mitochondria in CADASIL VSMCs. For a number of genes previously reported to be changed in CADASIL VSMCs, immunoblotting analysis demonstrated a significantly reduced SOD1 expression. These findings suggest that alteration of proliferation and mitochondrial function in CADASIL VSMCs might have an effect on vital cellular functions important for CADASIL pathology. -- Highlights: ► CADASIL is an inherited disease of cerebral vascular cells. ► Mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in the pathogenesis of CADASIL. ► Lower proliferation rates in CADASIL VSMC. ► Increased irregular and abnormal mitochondria and lower mitochondrial membrane potential in CADASIL VSMCs. ► Reduced mitochondrial connectivity and increased number of mitochondria in CADASIL VSMCs.

  9. Experimental studies of mitochondrial function in CADASIL vascular smooth muscle cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viitanen, Matti [Division of Clinical Geriatrics, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Department of Geriatrics, Turku City Hospital and University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Sundström, Erik [Division of Neurodegeneration, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Baumann, Marc [Protein Chemistry Unit, Institute of Biomedicine/Anatomy, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); Poyhonen, Minna [Department of Clinical Genetics, Helsinki University Hospital, HUSLAB, Helsinki (Finland); Tikka, Saara [Protein Chemistry Unit, Institute of Biomedicine/Anatomy, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); Behbahani, Homira, E-mail: homira.behbahani@ki.se [Division of Clinical Geriatrics, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Karolinska Institutet Alzheimer' s Disease Research Center, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-02-01

    Cerebral Autosomal Dominant Arteriopathy with Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is a familiar fatal progressive degenerative disorder characterized by cognitive decline, and recurrent stroke in young adults. Pathological features include a dramatic reduction of brain vascular smooth muscle cells and severe arteriopathy with the presence of granular osmophilic material in the arterial walls. Here we have investigated the cellular and mitochondrial function in vascular smooth muscle cell lines (VSMCs) established from CADASIL mutation carriers (R133C) and healthy controls. We found significantly lower proliferation rates in CADASIL VSMC as compared to VSMC from controls. Cultured CADASIL VSMCs were not more vulnerable than control cells to a number of toxic substances. Morphological studies showed reduced mitochondrial connectivity and increased number of mitochondria in CADASIL VSMCs. Transmission electron microscopy analysis demonstrated increased irregular and abnormal mitochondria in CADASIL VSMCs. Measurements of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψ{sub m}) showed a lower percentage of fully functional mitochondria in CADASIL VSMCs. For a number of genes previously reported to be changed in CADASIL VSMCs, immunoblotting analysis demonstrated a significantly reduced SOD1 expression. These findings suggest that alteration of proliferation and mitochondrial function in CADASIL VSMCs might have an effect on vital cellular functions important for CADASIL pathology. -- Highlights: ► CADASIL is an inherited disease of cerebral vascular cells. ► Mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in the pathogenesis of CADASIL. ► Lower proliferation rates in CADASIL VSMC. ► Increased irregular and abnormal mitochondria and lower mitochondrial membrane potential in CADASIL VSMCs. ► Reduced mitochondrial connectivity and increased number of mitochondria in CADASIL VSMCs.

  10. Unraveling cell processes: interference imaging interwoven with data analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brazhe, Nadezda; Brazhe, Alexey; Pavlov, A N

    2006-01-01

    The paper presents results on the application of interference microscopy and wavelet-analysis for cell visualization and studies of cell dynamics. We demonstrate that interference imaging of erythrocytes can reveal reorganization of the cytoskeleton and inhomogenity in the distribution of hemoglo......The paper presents results on the application of interference microscopy and wavelet-analysis for cell visualization and studies of cell dynamics. We demonstrate that interference imaging of erythrocytes can reveal reorganization of the cytoskeleton and inhomogenity in the distribution...... properties differ from cell type to cell type and depend on the cellular compartment. Our results suggest that low frequency variations (0.1-0.6 Hz) result from plasma membrane processes and that higher frequency variations (20-26 Hz) are related to the movement of vesicles. Using double-wavelet analysis, we...... study the modulation of the 1 Hz rhythm in neurons and reveal its changes under depolarization and hyperpolarization of the plasma membrane. We conclude that interference microscopy combined with wavelet analysis is a useful technique for non-invasive cell studies, cell visualization, and investigation...

  11. Chip based electroanalytical systems for cell analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spegel, C.; Heiskanen, A.; Skjolding, L.H.D.

    2008-01-01

    ' measurements of processes related to living cells, i.e., systems without lysing the cells. The focus is on chip based amperometric and impedimetric cell analysis systems where measurements utilizing solely carbon fiber microelectrodes (CFME) and other nonchip electrode formats, such as CFME for exocytosis...

  12. The Effects of Brazilian Green Propolis against Excessive Light-Induced Cell Damage in Retina and Fibroblast Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiromi Murase

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. We investigated the effects of Brazilian green propolis and its constituents against white light- or UVA-induced cell damage in mouse retinal cone-cell line 661W or human skin-derived fibroblast cells (NB1-RGB. Methods. Cell damage was induced by 3,000lx white light for 24 h or 4/10 J/cm2 UVA exposure. Cell viability was assessed by Hoechst33342 and propidium iodide staining or by tetrazolium salt (WST-8 cell viability assay. The radical scavenging activity of propolis induced by UVA irradiation in NB1-RGB cells was measured using a reactive-oxygen-species- (ROS- sensitive probe CM-H2DCFDA. Moreover, the effects of propolis on the UVA-induced activation of p38 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK were examined by immunoblotting. Results. Treatment with propolis and two dicaffeoylquinic acids significantly inhibited the decrease in cell viability induced by white light in 661W. Propolis and its constituents inhibited the decrease in cell viability induced by UVA in NB1-RGB. Moreover, propolis suppressed the intracellular ROS production by UVA irradiation. Propolis also inhibited the levels of phosphorylated-p38 and ERK by UVA irradiation. Conclusion. Brazilian green propolis may become a major therapeutic candidate for the treatment of AMD and skin damage induced by UV irradiation.

  13. Inducible expression of A Disintegrin and Metalloproteinase 8 in chronic periodontitis and gingival epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aung, W P P; Chotjumlong, P; Pata, S; Montreekachon, P; Supanchart, C; Khongkhunthian, S; Sastraruji, T; Krisanaprakornkit, S

    2017-06-01

    The expression of A Disintegrin and Metalloproteinase 8 (ADAM8) is associated with several inflammatory diseases. Elevated ADAM8 levels have been shown in gingival crevicular fluid of patients with chronic periodontitis. The objective of this study was to investigate ADAM8 expression in chronic periodontitis tissues compared with that in normal tissues. ADAM8 expression and its inductive mechanism were examined in human gingival epithelial cells (HGECs) and human gingival fibroblasts. Total RNA and protein were extracted from gingival biopsies of 33 patients with chronic periodontitis and those of 23 healthy volunteers. ADAM8 mRNA and protein expression was analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction, immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry. ADAM8 expression in control and stimulated cells in the presence or absence of specific inhibitors for mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways was assayed by real-time polymerase chain reaction, immunoblotting, flow cytometry and immunofluorescence. ADAM8 mRNA and protein expression in chronic periodontitis tissues was significantly greater than that in normal tissues (p chronic periodontitis tissues (p chronic periodontitis tissues and localized within gingival epithelium, consistent with an upregulation of ADAM8 expression in F. nucleatum-stimulated HGECs, suggesting a possible role of ADAM8 in innate immunity of periodontal tissue. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Single-cell analysis of targeted transcriptome predicts drug sensitivity of single cells within human myeloma tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, A K; Mukherjee, U K; Harding, T; Jang, J S; Stessman, H; Li, Y; Abyzov, A; Jen, J; Kumar, S; Rajkumar, V; Van Ness, B

    2016-05-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is characterized by significant genetic diversity at subclonal levels that have a defining role in the heterogeneity of tumor progression, clinical aggressiveness and drug sensitivity. Although genome profiling studies have demonstrated heterogeneity in subclonal architecture that may ultimately lead to relapse, a gene expression-based prediction program that can identify, distinguish and quantify drug response in sub-populations within a bulk population of myeloma cells is lacking. In this study, we performed targeted transcriptome analysis on 528 pre-treatment single cells from 11 myeloma cell lines and 418 single cells from 8 drug-naïve MM patients, followed by intensive bioinformatics and statistical analysis for prediction of proteasome inhibitor sensitivity in individual cells. Using our previously reported drug response gene expression profile signature at the single-cell level, we developed an R Statistical analysis package available at https://github.com/bvnlabSCATTome, SCATTome (single-cell analysis of targeted transcriptome), that restructures the data obtained from Fluidigm single-cell quantitative real-time-PCR analysis run, filters missing data, performs scaling of filtered data, builds classification models and predicts drug response of individual cells based on targeted transcriptome using an assortment of machine learning methods. Application of SCATT should contribute to clinically relevant analysis of intratumor heterogeneity, and better inform drug choices based on subclonal cellular responses.

  15. Effect of Oxysterol-Induced Apoptosis of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells on Experimental Hypercholesterolemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perales, Sonia; Alejandre, M. José; Palomino-Morales, Rogelio; Torres, Carolina; Iglesias, Jose; Linares, Ana

    2009-01-01

    Smooth muscle cells (SMCs) undergo changes related to proliferation and apoptosis in the physiological remodeling of vessels and in diseases such as atherosclerosis and restenosis. Recent studies also have demonstrated the vascular cell proliferation and programmed cell death contribute to changes in vascular architecture in normal development and in disease. The present study was designed to investigate the apoptotic pathways induced by 25-hydroxycholesterol in SMCs cultures, using an in vivo/in vitro cell model in which SMCs were isolated and culture from chicken exposed to an atherogenic cholesterol-rich diet (SMC-Ch) and/or an antiatherogenic fish oil-rich diet (SMC-Ch-FO). Cells were exposed in vitro to 25-hydroxycholesterol to study levels of apoptosis and apoptotic proteins Bcl-2, Bcl-XL and Bax and the expression of bcl-2 and bcl-xL, genes. The quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and the Immunoblotting western blot analysis showed that 25-hydroxycholesterol produces apoptosis in SMCs, mediated by a high increase in Bax protein and Bax gene expression. These changes were more marked in SMC-Ch than in SMC-Ch-FO, indicating that dietary cholesterol produces changes in SMCs that make them more susceptible to 25-hydroxycholesterol-mediated apoptosis. Our results suggest that the replacement of a cholesterol-rich diet with a fish oil-rich diet produces some reversal of cholesterol-induced changes in the apoptotic pathways induced by 25-hydroxycholesterol in SMCs cultures, making SMCs more resistant to apoptosis. PMID:19727411

  16. Effect of Oxysterol-Induced Apoptosis of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells on Experimental Hypercholesterolemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Perales

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Smooth muscle cells (SMCs undergo changes related to proliferation and apoptosis in the physiological remodeling of vessels and in diseases such as atherosclerosis and restenosis. Recent studies also have demonstrated the vascular cell proliferation and programmed cell death contribute to changes in vascular architecture in normal development and in disease. The present study was designed to investigate the apoptotic pathways induced by 25-hydroxycholesterol in SMCs cultures, using an in vivo/in vitro cell model in which SMCs were isolated and culture from chicken exposed to an atherogenic cholesterol-rich diet (SMC-Ch and/or an antiatherogenic fish oil-rich diet (SMC-Ch-FO. Cells were exposed in vitro to 25-hydroxycholesterol to study levels of apoptosis and apoptotic proteins Bcl-2, Bcl-XL and Bax and the expression of bcl-2 and bcl-xL, genes. The quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and the Immunoblotting western blot analysis showed that 25-hydroxycholesterol produces apoptosis in SMCs, mediated by a high increase in Bax protein and Bax gene expression. These changes were more marked in SMC-Ch than in SMC-Ch-FO, indicating that dietary cholesterol produces changes in SMCs that make them more susceptible to 25-hydroxycholesterol-mediated apoptosis. Our results suggest that the replacement of a cholesterol-rich diet with a fish oil-rich diet produces some reversal of cholesterol-induced changes in the apoptotic pathways induced by 25-hydroxycholesterol in SMCs cultures, making SMCs more resistant to apoptosis.

  17. Down-regulating overexpressed human Lon in cervical cancer suppresses cell proliferation and bioenergetics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaobo Nie

    Full Text Available The human mitochondrial ATP-dependent Lon protease functions in regulating the metabolism and quality control of proteins and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA. However, the role of Lon in cancer is not well understood. Therefore, this study was undertaken to investigate the importance of Lon in cervical cancer cells from patients and in established cell lines. Microarray analysis from 30 cancer and 10 normal cervical tissues were analyzed by immunohistochemistry for Lon protein levels. The expression of Lon was also examined by immunoblotting 16 fresh cervical cancer tissues and their respective non-tumor cervical tissues. In all cases, Lon expression was significantly elevated in cervical carcinomas as compared to normal tissues. Augmented Lon expression in tissue microarrays did not vary between age, tumor-node-metastasis grades, or lymph node metastasis. Knocking down Lon in HeLa cervical cancer cells by lentivrial transduction resulted in a substantial decrease in both mRNA and protein levels. Such down-regulation of Lon expression significantly blocked HeLa cell proliferation. In addition, knocking down Lon resulted in decreased cellular bioenergetics as determined by measuring aerobic respiration and glycolysis using the Seahorse XF24 extracellular flux analyzer. Together, these data demonstrate that Lon plays a potential role in the oncogenesis of cervical cancer, and may be a useful biomarker and target in the treatment of cervical cancer. Lon; immunohistochemistry; cervical cancer; cell proliferation; cellular bioenergetics.

  18. Identification of a novel set of genes reflecting different in vivo invasive patterns of human GBM cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monticone, Massimiliano; Giaretti, Walter; Pfeffer, Ulrich; Daga, Antonio; Candiani, Simona; Romeo, Francesco; Mirisola, Valentina; Viaggi, Silvia; Melloni, Ilaria; Pedemonte, Simona; Zona, Gianluigi

    2012-01-01

    Most patients affected by Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, grade IV glioma) experience a recurrence of the disease because of the spreading of tumor cells beyond surgical boundaries. Unveiling mechanisms causing this process is a logic goal to impair the killing capacity of GBM cells by molecular targeting. We noticed that our long-term GBM cultures, established from different patients, may display two categories/types of growth behavior in an orthotopic xenograft model: expansion of the tumor mass and formation of tumor branches/nodules (nodular like, NL-type) or highly diffuse single tumor cell infiltration (HD-type). We determined by DNA microarrays the gene expression profiles of three NL-type and three HD-type long-term GBM cultures. Subsequently, individual genes with different expression levels between the two groups were identified using Significance Analysis of Microarrays (SAM). Real time RT-PCR, immunofluorescence and immunoblot analyses, were performed for a selected subgroup of regulated gene products to confirm the results obtained by the expression analysis. Here, we report the identification of a set of 34 differentially expressed genes in the two types of GBM cultures. Twenty-three of these genes encode for proteins localized to the plasma membrane and 9 of these for proteins are involved in the process of cell adhesion. This study suggests the participation in the diffuse infiltrative/invasive process of GBM cells within the CNS of a novel set of genes coding for membrane-associated proteins, which should be thus susceptible to an inhibition strategy by specific targeting. Massimiliano Monticone and Antonio Daga contributed equally to this work

  19. Identification of a novel set of genes reflecting different in vivo invasive patterns of human GBM cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monticone, Massimiliano; Daga, Antonio; Candiani, Simona; Romeo, Francesco; Mirisola, Valentina; Viaggi, Silvia; Melloni, Ilaria; Pedemonte, Simona; Zona, Gianluigi; Giaretti, Walter; Pfeffer, Ulrich; Castagnola, Patrizio

    2012-08-17

    Most patients affected by Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, grade IV glioma) experience a recurrence of the disease because of the spreading of tumor cells beyond surgical boundaries. Unveiling mechanisms causing this process is a logic goal to impair the killing capacity of GBM cells by molecular targeting.We noticed that our long-term GBM cultures, established from different patients, may display two categories/types of growth behavior in an orthotopic xenograft model: expansion of the tumor mass and formation of tumor branches/nodules (nodular like, NL-type) or highly diffuse single tumor cell infiltration (HD-type). We determined by DNA microarrays the gene expression profiles of three NL-type and three HD-type long-term GBM cultures. Subsequently, individual genes with different expression levels between the two groups were identified using Significance Analysis of Microarrays (SAM). Real time RT-PCR, immunofluorescence and immunoblot analyses, were performed for a selected subgroup of regulated gene products to confirm the results obtained by the expression analysis. Here, we report the identification of a set of 34 differentially expressed genes in the two types of GBM cultures. Twenty-three of these genes encode for proteins localized to the plasma membrane and 9 of these for proteins are involved in the process of cell adhesion. This study suggests the participation in the diffuse infiltrative/invasive process of GBM cells within the CNS of a novel set of genes coding for membrane-associated proteins, which should be thus susceptible to an inhibition strategy by specific targeting.Massimiliano Monticone and Antonio Daga contributed equally to this work.

  20. Peptidomic analysis of human cell lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelman, Julia S.; Sironi, Juan; Castro, Leandro M.; Ferro, Emer S.; Fricker, Lloyd D.

    2011-01-01

    Peptides have been proposed to function in intracellular signaling within the cytosol. Although cytosolic peptides are considered to be highly unstable, a large number of peptides have been detected in mouse brain and other biological samples. In the present study, we evaluated the peptidome of three diverse cell lines: SH-SY5Y, MCF7, and HEK293 cells. A comparison of the peptidomes revealed considerable overlap in the identity of the peptides found in each cell line. The majority of the observed peptides are not derived from the most abundant or least stable proteins in the cell, and approximately half of the cellular peptides correspond to the N- or C- termini of the precursor proteins. Cleavage site analysis revealed a preference for hydrophobic residues in the P1 position. Quantitative peptidomic analysis indicated that the levels of most cellular peptides are not altered in response to elevated intracellular calcium, suggesting that calpain is not responsible for their production. The similarity of the peptidomes of the three cell lines and the lack of correlation with the predicted cellular degradome implies the selective formation or retention of these peptides, consistent with the hypothesis that they are functional in the cells. PMID:21204522

  1. The expression and serological reactivity of recombinant canine herpesvirus 1 glycoprotein D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MarkéŽta Vaňkov‡á

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to express recombinant glycoprotein D of canine herpesvirus 1 in bacterial cells and to evaluate its diagnostic sensitivity and specificity when compared to traditional serological methods. The gene fragment coding glycoprotein D of canine herpesvirus 1 was amplified by polymerase chain reaction, cloned into plasmid vector and expressed in Escherichia coli cells. Recombinant protein was then purified and used as an antigen in immunoblot for a detection of canine herpesvirus 1 specific antibodies. Antibody testing was performed on the panel of 100 canine sera by immunoblot with recombinant glycoprotein D as antigen and compared with indirect immunofluorescence assay. Serum samples were collected from 83 dogs with no history of canine herpesvirus 1 or reproductive disorders, and from 17 dogs from breeding kennels with a history of canine herpesvirus 1 related reproductive disorders. Sensitivity of glycoprotein D based immunoblot was 89.2% and specificity was 93%. Kappa value was calculated to be 0.8 between immunoblot and indirect immunofluorescence assay. Antibodies against canine herpesvirus 1 infection were detected in 33% of samples by immunoblot assay. Our study confirms that recombinant glycoprotein D expressed in bacterial cells could be used as a suitable and sensitive antigen for immunological tests and that herpesvirus infection seems to be common among the canine population in the Czech Republic.

  2. Reduction of Orc6 expression sensitizes human colon cancer cells to 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine J Gavin

    Full Text Available Previous studies from our group have shown that the expression levels of Orc6 were highly elevated in colorectal cancer patient specimens and the induction of Orc6 was associated with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU treatment. The goal of this study was to investigate the molecular and cellular impact of Orc6 in colon cancer. In this study, we use HCT116 (wt-p53 and HCT116 (null-p53 colon cancer cell lines as a model system to investigate the impact of Orc6 on cell proliferation, chemosensitivity and pathways involved with Orc6. We demonstrated that the down regulation of Orc6 sensitizes colon cancer cells to both 5-FU and cisplatin (cis-pt treatment. Decreased Orc6 expression in HCT-116 (wt-p53 cells by RNA interference triggered cell cycle arrest at G1 phase. Prolonged inhibition of Orc6 expression resulted in multinucleated cells in HCT-116 (wt-p53 cell line. Western immunoblot analysis showed that down regulation of Orc6 induced p21 expression in HCT-116 (wt-p53 cells. The induction of p21 was mediated by increased level of phosphorylated p53 at ser-15. By contrast, there is no elevated expression of p21 in HCT-116 (null-p53 cells. Orc6 down regulation also increased the expression of DNA damaging repair protein GADD45beta and reduced the expression level of JNK1. Orc6 may be a potential novel target for future anti cancer therapeutic development in colon cancer.

  3. Activation of EGFR and ERBB2 by Helicobacter pylori Results in Survival of Gastric Epithelial Cells with DNA Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Rupesh; Asim, Mohammad; Piazuelo, M. Blanca; Yan, Fang; Barry, Daniel P.; Sierra, Johanna Carolina; Delgado, Alberto G.; Hill, Salisha; Casero, Robert A.; Bravo, Luis E.; Dominguez, Ricardo L.; Correa, Pelayo; Polk, D. Brent; Washington, M. Kay; Rose, Kristie L.; Schey, Kevin L.; Morgan, Douglas R.; Peek, Richard M.; Wilson, Keith T.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS The gastric cancer-causing pathogen Helicobacter pylori upregulates spermine oxidase (SMOX) in gastric epithelial cells, causing oxidative stress-induced apoptosis and DNA damage. A subpopulation of SMOXhigh cells are resistant to apoptosis, despite their high levels of DNA damage. Because epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation can regulate apoptosis, we determined its role in SMOX-mediated effects. METHODS SMOX, apoptosis, and DNA damage were measured in gastric epithelial cells from H pylori-infected Egfrwa5 mice (which have attenuated EGFR activity), Egfr wild-type mice, or in infected cells incubated with EGFR inhibitors or deficient in EGFR. Phosphoproteomic analysis was performed. Two independent tissue microarrays containing each stage of disease, from gastritis to carcinoma, and gastric biopsies from Colombian and Honduran cohorts were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. RESULTS SMOX expression and DNA damage were decreased, and apoptosis increased in H pylori-infected Egfrwa5 mice. H pylori-infected cells with deletion or inhibition of EGFR had reduced levels of SMOX, DNA damage, and DNA damagehigh apoptosislow cells. Phosphoproteomic analysis revealed increased EGFR and ERBB2 signaling. Immunoblot analysis demonstrated the presence of a phosphorylated (p)EGFR–ERBB2 heterodimer and pERBB2; knockdown of ErbB2 facilitated apoptosis of DNA damagehigh apoptosislow cells. SMOX was increased in all stages of gastric disease, peaking in tissues with intestinal metaplasia, whereas pEGFR, pEGFR–ERBB2, and pERBB2 were increased predominantly in tissues demonstrating gastritis or atrophic gastritis. Principal component analysis separated gastritis tissues from patients with cancer vs those without cancer. pEGFR, pEGFR–ERBB2, pERBB2, and SMOX were increased in gastric samples from patients whose disease progressed to intestinal metaplasia or dysplasia, compared with patients whose disease did not progress. CONCLUSIONS In an analysis

  4. Secretory vesicles in live cells are not free-floating but tethered to filamentous structures: A study using photonic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abu-Hamdah, Rania; Cho, Won Jin; Hoerber, J.K.H.; Jena, Bhanu P.

    2006-01-01

    It is well established that actin and microtubule cytoskeletal systems are involved in organelle transport and membrane trafficking in cells. This is also true for the transport of secretory vesicles in neuroendocrine cells and neurons. It was however unclear whether secretory vesicles remain free-floating, only to associate with such cytoskeletal systems when needing transport. This hypothesis was tested using live pancreatic acinar cells in physiological buffer solutions, using the photonic force microscope (PFM). When membrane-bound secretory vesicles (0.2-1.2 μm in diameter) in live pancreatic acinar cells were trapped at the laser focus of the PFM and pulled, they were all found tethered to filamentous structures. Mild exposure of cells to nocodazole and cytochalasin B, disrupts the tether. Immunoblot analysis of isolated secretory vesicles, further demonstrated the association of actin, myosin V, and kinesin. These studies demonstrate for the first time that secretory vesicles in live pancreatic acinar cells are tethered and not free-floating, suggesting that following vesicle biogenesis, they are placed on their own railroad track, ready to be transported to their final destination within the cell when required. This makes sense, since precision and regulation are the hallmarks of all cellular process, and therefore would hold true for the transport and localization of subcellular organelles such as secretory vesicles

  5. Secretory vesicles in live cells are not free-floating but tethered to filamentous structures: A study using photonic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abu-Hamdah, Rania [Department of Physiology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, 5245 Scott Hall, 540 E. Canfield, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Cho, Won Jin [Department of Physiology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, 5245 Scott Hall, 540 E. Canfield, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Hoerber, J.K.H. [Department of Physics, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TD (United Kingdom); Jena, Bhanu P. [Department of Physiology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, 5245 Scott Hall, 540 E. Canfield, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States)]. E-mail: bjena@med.wayne.edu

    2006-06-15

    It is well established that actin and microtubule cytoskeletal systems are involved in organelle transport and membrane trafficking in cells. This is also true for the transport of secretory vesicles in neuroendocrine cells and neurons. It was however unclear whether secretory vesicles remain free-floating, only to associate with such cytoskeletal systems when needing transport. This hypothesis was tested using live pancreatic acinar cells in physiological buffer solutions, using the photonic force microscope (PFM). When membrane-bound secretory vesicles (0.2-1.2 {mu}m in diameter) in live pancreatic acinar cells were trapped at the laser focus of the PFM and pulled, they were all found tethered to filamentous structures. Mild exposure of cells to nocodazole and cytochalasin B, disrupts the tether. Immunoblot analysis of isolated secretory vesicles, further demonstrated the association of actin, myosin V, and kinesin. These studies demonstrate for the first time that secretory vesicles in live pancreatic acinar cells are tethered and not free-floating, suggesting that following vesicle biogenesis, they are placed on their own railroad track, ready to be transported to their final destination within the cell when required. This makes sense, since precision and regulation are the hallmarks of all cellular process, and therefore would hold true for the transport and localization of subcellular organelles such as secretory vesicles.

  6. Tenascin-C enhances pancreatic cancer cell growth and motility and affects cell adhesion through activation of the integrin pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Paron

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pancreatic cancer (PDAC is characterized by an abundant fibrous tissue rich in Tenascin-C (TNC, a large ECM glycoprotein mainly synthesized by pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs. In human pancreatic tissues, TNC expression increases in the progression from low-grade precursor lesions to invasive cancer. Aim of this study was the functional characterization of the effects of TNC on biologic relevant properties of pancreatic cancer cells. METHODS: Proliferation, migration and adhesion assays were performed on pancreatic cancer cell lines treated with TNC or grown on a TNC-rich matrix. Stable transfectants expressing the large TNC splice variant were generated to test the effects of endogenous TNC. TNC-dependent integrin signaling was investigated by immunoblotting, immunofluorescence and pharmacological inhibition. RESULTS: Endogenous TNC promoted pancreatic cancer cell growth and migration. A TNC-rich matrix also enhanced migration as well as the adhesion to the uncoated growth surface of poorly differentiated cell lines. In contrast, adhesion to fibronectin was significantly decreased in the presence of TNC. The effects of TNC on cell adhesion were paralleled by changes in the activation state of paxillin and Akt. CONCLUSION: TNC affects proliferation, migration and adhesion of poorly differentiated pancreatic cancer cell lines and might therefore play a role in PDAC spreading and metastasis in vivo.

  7. Dissecting Transcriptional Heterogeneity in Pluripotency: Single Cell Analysis of Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guedes, Ana M V; Henrique, Domingos; Abranches, Elsa

    2016-01-01

    Mouse Embryonic Stem cells (mESCs) show heterogeneous and dynamic expression of important pluripotency regulatory factors. Single-cell analysis has revealed the existence of cell-to-cell variability in the expression of individual genes in mESCs. Understanding how these heterogeneities are regulated and what their functional consequences are is crucial to obtain a more comprehensive view of the pluripotent state.In this chapter we describe how to analyze transcriptional heterogeneity by monitoring gene expression of Nanog, Oct4, and Sox2, using single-molecule RNA FISH in single mESCs grown in different cell culture medium. We describe in detail all the steps involved in the protocol, from RNA detection to image acquisition and processing, as well as exploratory data analysis.

  8. Tetrathiomolybdate sensitizes ovarian cancer cells to anticancer drugs doxorubicin, fenretinide, 5-fluorouracil and mitomycin C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyu Kwang; Lange, Thilo S; Singh, Rakesh K; Brard, Laurent; Moore, Richard G

    2012-01-01

    Our recent study showed that tetrathiomolybdate (TM), a drug to treat copper overload disorders, can sensitize drug-resistant endometrial cancer cells to reactive oxygen species (ROS)-generating anticancer drug doxorubicin. To expand these findings in the present study we explore TM efficacy in combination with a spectrum of ROS-generating anticancer drugs including mitomycin C, fenretinide, 5-fluorouracil and doxorubicin in ovarian cancer cells as a model system. The effects of TM alone or in combination with doxorubicin, mitomycin C, fenretinide, or 5-fluorouracil were evaluated using a sulforhodamine B assay. Flow cytometry was used to detect the induction of apoptosis and ROS generation. Immunoblot analysis was carried out to investigate changes in signaling pathways. TM potentiated doxorubicin-induced cytotoxicity and modulated key regulators of apoptosis (PARP, caspases, JNK and p38 MAPK) in SKOV-3 and A2780 ovarian cancer cell lines. These effects were linked to the increased production of ROS, as shown in SKOV-3 cells. ROS scavenging by ascorbic acid blocked the sensitization of cells by TM. TM also sensitized SKOV-3 to mitomycin C, fenretinide, and 5-fluorouracil. The increased cytotoxicity of these drugs in combination with TM was correlated with the activity of ROS, loss of a pro-survival factor (e.g. XIAP) and the appearance of a pro-apoptotic marker (e.g. PARP cleavage). Our data show that TM increases the efficacy of various anticancer drugs in ovarian cancer cells in a ROS-dependent manner

  9. Selective expression of myosin IC Isoform A in mouse and human cell lines and mouse prostate cancer tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanna Ihnatovych

    Full Text Available Myosin IC is a single headed member of the myosin superfamily. We recently identified a novel isoform and showed that the MYOIC gene in mammalian cells encodes three isoforms (isoforms A, B, and C. Furthermore, we demonstrated that myosin IC isoform A but not isoform B exhibits a tissue specific expression pattern. In this study, we extended our analysis of myosin IC isoform expression patterns by analyzing the protein and mRNA expression in various mammalian cell lines and in various prostate specimens and tumor tissues from the transgenic mouse prostate (TRAMP model by immunoblotting, qRT-PCR, and by indirect immunohistochemical staining of paraffin embedded prostate specimen. Analysis of a panel of mammalian cell lines showed an increased mRNA and protein expression of specifically myosin IC isoform A in a panel of human and mouse prostate cancer cell lines but not in non-cancer prostate or other (non-prostate- cancer cell lines. Furthermore, we demonstrate that myosin IC isoform A expression is significantly increased in TRAMP mouse prostate samples with prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN lesions and in distant site metastases in lung and liver when compared to matched normal tissues. Our observations demonstrate specific changes in the expression of myosin IC isoform A that are concurrent with the occurrence of prostate cancer in the TRAMP mouse prostate cancer model that closely mimics clinical prostate cancer. These data suggest that elevated levels of myosin IC isoform A may be a potential marker for the detection of prostate cancer.

  10. Bioinformatics approaches to single-cell analysis in developmental biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalcin, Dicle; Hakguder, Zeynep M; Otu, Hasan H

    2016-03-01

    Individual cells within the same population show various degrees of heterogeneity, which may be better handled with single-cell analysis to address biological and clinical questions. Single-cell analysis is especially important in developmental biology as subtle spatial and temporal differences in cells have significant associations with cell fate decisions during differentiation and with the description of a particular state of a cell exhibiting an aberrant phenotype. Biotechnological advances, especially in the area of microfluidics, have led to a robust, massively parallel and multi-dimensional capturing, sorting, and lysis of single-cells and amplification of related macromolecules, which have enabled the use of imaging and omics techniques on single cells. There have been improvements in computational single-cell image analysis in developmental biology regarding feature extraction, segmentation, image enhancement and machine learning, handling limitations of optical resolution to gain new perspectives from the raw microscopy images. Omics approaches, such as transcriptomics, genomics and epigenomics, targeting gene and small RNA expression, single nucleotide and structural variations and methylation and histone modifications, rely heavily on high-throughput sequencing technologies. Although there are well-established bioinformatics methods for analysis of sequence data, there are limited bioinformatics approaches which address experimental design, sample size considerations, amplification bias, normalization, differential expression, coverage, clustering and classification issues, specifically applied at the single-cell level. In this review, we summarize biological and technological advancements, discuss challenges faced in the aforementioned data acquisition and analysis issues and present future prospects for application of single-cell analyses to developmental biology. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European

  11. Carabrol suppresses LPS-induced nitric oxide synthase expression by inactivation of p38 and JNK via inhibition of I-κBα degradation in RAW 264.7 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hwa Jin; Lim, Hyo Jin; Lee, Da Yeon; Jung, Hyeyoun; Kim, Mi-Ran; Moon, Dong-Cheul; Kim, Keun Il; Lee, Myeong-Sok; Ryu, Jae-Ha

    2010-01-01

    Carabrol, isolated from Carpesium macrocephalum, showed anti-inflammatory potential in LPS-induced RAW 264.7 murine macrophages. In present study, carabrol demonstrated the inhibitory activity on pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α. In addition, mRNA and protein levels of iNOS and COX-2 were reduced by carabrol. Molecular analysis revealed that these suppressive effects were correlated with the inactivation of p38 and JNK via inhibition of NF-κB activation. Immunoblotting showed that carabrol suppressed LPS-induced degradation of I-κBα and decreased nuclear translocation of p65. Taken together, these results suggest that carabrol can be a modulator of pro-inflammatory signal transduction pathway in RAW 264.7 cells.

  12. Regulation of cell cycle checkpoint kinase WEE1 by miR-195 in malignant melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, A; Schmitz, U; Wolkenhauer, O; Schönherr, M; Raatz, Y; Kunz, M

    2013-06-27

    WEE1 kinase has been described as a major gate keeper at the G2 cell cycle checkpoint and to be involved in tumour progression in different malignant tumours. Here we analysed the expression levels of WEE1 in a series of melanoma patient samples and melanoma cell lines using immunoblotting, quantitative real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry. WEE1 expression was significantly downregulated in patient samples of metastatic origin as compared with primary melanomas and in melanoma cell lines of high aggressiveness as compared with cell lines of low aggressiveness. Moreover, there was an inverse correlation between the expression of WEE1 and WEE1-targeting microRNA miR-195. Further analyses showed that transfection of melanoma cell lines with miR-195 indeed reduced WEE1 mRNA and protein expression in these cells. Reporter gene analysis confirmed direct targeting of the WEE1 3' untranslated region (3'UTR) by miR-195. Overexpression of miR-195 in SK-Mel-28 melanoma cells was accompanied by WEE1 reduction and significantly reduced stress-induced G2-M cell cycle arrest, which could be restored by stable overexpression of WEE1. Moreover, miR-195 overexpression and WEE1 knockdown, respectively, increased melanoma cell proliferation. miR-195 overexpression also enhanced migration and invasiveness of melanoma cells. Taken together, the present study shows that WEE1 expression in malignant melanoma is directly regulated by miR-195. miR-195-mediated downregulation of WEE1 in metastatic lesions may help to overcome cell cycle arrest under stress conditions in the local tissue microenvironment to allow unrestricted growth of tumour cells.

  13. Inhibition of Cell Growth and Induction of Apoptosis by Antrodia camphorata in HER-2/neu-Overexpressing Breast Cancer Cells through the Induction of ROS, Depletion of HER-2/neu, and Disruption of the PI3K/Akt Signaling Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan-Chen Lee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Previously, we demonstrated that a submerged fermentation culture of Antrodia camphorata (AC promotes cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis in human estrogen receptor-positive/negative breast cancer cells. However, whether AC is effective against HER-2/neu-overexpressing breast cancers has not been thoroughly elucidated. In the present study, we showed that AC exhibited a significant cytotoxic effect against HER-2/neu-overexpressing MDA-MB-453 and BT-474 cells. Immunoblot analysis demonstrated that HER-2/neu and their tyrosine phosphorylation were inhibited by AC in a dose-dependent manner. An increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS was observed in AC-treated cells, whereas antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC significantly prevented AC induced HER-2/neu depletion and cell death, which directly indicates that AC-induced HER-2/neu depletion and cell death was mediated by ROS generation. Also, AC significantly downregulated the expression of cyclin D1, cyclin E, and CDK4 followed by the suppression of PI3K/Akt, and their downstream effectors GSK-3β and β-catenin. Notably, AC-treatment induced apoptotic cell death, which was associated with sub-G1 accumulation, DNA fragmentation, mitochondrial dysfunction, cytochrome c release, caspase-3/-9 activation, PARP degradation, and Bcl-2/Bax dysregulation. Assays for colony formation also confirmed the growth-inhibitory effects of AC. This is the first report confirming the anticancer activity of this potentially beneficial mushroom against human HER-2/neu-overexpressing breast cancers.

  14. The Light-Induced FOS Response in Melanopsin Expressing HEK-293 Cells is Correlated with Melanopsin Quantity and Dependent on Light Duration and Irradiance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Georg, Birgitte; Rask, Lene; Hannibal, Jens

    2014-01-01

    We established a cell line (HEK-hMel) expressing melanopsin in a tetracycline dependent manner to elucidate new aspects of melanopsin's light response. Different light stimuli were evaluated using FOS expression as response parameter. Immunoblotting was used to evaluate expression of melanopsin......) s(-1) resulted in equally high FOS expression. The HEK-hMel cells were used to characterize facets of melanopsin's light-induced FOS response not approachable in vivo. Novel information such as dependency of the FOS response on both melanopsin amount and light intensity in addition to a detailed...

  15. Analysis of Electrochemistry Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rance, A.P.; Peat, R.; Smart, N.R.

    2003-12-01

    In previous work for SKB, an electrochemical cell was developed to measure pH, corrosion potential of steel and redox potential in artificial groundwater, in the presence of a mass of anaerobically corroding steel wires. Two cells were run for over 7,500 hours. At the end of the test period, the cells were dismantled and the solutions and specimens analysed, to provide a better understanding of the environment within the test cells and the reactions that had taken place on the surfaces of the test electrodes. A thorough visual examination of the electrodes and the cells was carried out and photographs were taken. The wires in the test cells were black, although the film formed in Cell 1 appeared to be thinner than in Cell 2. Some green slime was present in both cells, but not to the same extent. Microscopic examination indicated that the slime was microbial in origin. The solutions were analysed for silicon, iron, calcium, sodium, organic carbon and total inorganic carbon. Given the uncertainties in the analytical techniques, the analyses were within the range expected based on the weights added to make up the test solutions. The composition of the corrosion product on the steel wires was determined by Raman spectroscopy measurements. The corrosion product was shown to be predominantly magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ), but there was also an indication of goethite (FeOOH) on samples that were analysed while still wet. This supports the hypothesis of a dual layer oxide film being formed during the anaerobic corrosion of iron. The surfaces of the silver-silver chloride reference electrode and the gold redox electrode were examined by scanning electron microscopy and electron microprobe analysis. There was no evidence for loss of the porous chloride coating from the surface of the reference electrode. The potential of the silver-silver chloride electrode from Cell 1 was measured against a stored silver-silver chloride electrode to check the hypothesis that the silver chloride

  16. Analysis of Electrochemistry Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rance, A.P.; Peat, R.; Smart, N.R. [Serco Assurance (United Kingdom)

    2003-12-01

    In previous work for SKB, an electrochemical cell was developed to measure pH, corrosion potential of steel and redox potential in artificial groundwater, in the presence of a mass of anaerobically corroding steel wires. Two cells were run for over 7,500 hours. At the end of the test period, the cells were dismantled and the solutions and specimens analysed, to provide a better understanding of the environment within the test cells and the reactions that had taken place on the surfaces of the test electrodes. A thorough visual examination of the electrodes and the cells was carried out and photographs were taken. The wires in the test cells were black, although the film formed in Cell 1 appeared to be thinner than in Cell 2. Some green slime was present in both cells, but not to the same extent. Microscopic examination indicated that the slime was microbial in origin. The solutions were analysed for silicon, iron, calcium, sodium, organic carbon and total inorganic carbon. Given the uncertainties in the analytical techniques, the analyses were within the range expected based on the weights added to make up the test solutions. The composition of the corrosion product on the steel wires was determined by Raman spectroscopy measurements. The corrosion product was shown to be predominantly magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}), but there was also an indication of goethite (FeOOH) on samples that were analysed while still wet. This supports the hypothesis of a dual layer oxide film being formed during the anaerobic corrosion of iron. The surfaces of the silver-silver chloride reference electrode and the gold redox electrode were examined by scanning electron microscopy and electron microprobe analysis. There was no evidence for loss of the porous chloride coating from the surface of the reference electrode. The potential of the silver-silver chloride electrode from Cell 1 was measured against a stored silver-silver chloride electrode to check the hypothesis that the silver

  17. Single-cell analysis of transcription kinetics across the cell cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Samuel O; Xu, Heng; Nagarkar-Jaiswal, Sonal; Freire, Pablo R; Zwaka, Thomas P; Golding, Ido

    2016-01-01

    Transcription is a highly stochastic process. To infer transcription kinetics for a gene-of-interest, researchers commonly compare the distribution of mRNA copy-number to the prediction of a theoretical model. However, the reliability of this procedure is limited because the measured mRNA numbers represent integration over the mRNA lifetime, contribution from multiple gene copies, and mixing of cells from different cell-cycle phases. We address these limitations by simultaneously quantifying nascent and mature mRNA in individual cells, and incorporating cell-cycle effects in the analysis of mRNA statistics. We demonstrate our approach on Oct4 and Nanog in mouse embryonic stem cells. Both genes follow similar two-state kinetics. However, Nanog exhibits slower ON/OFF switching, resulting in increased cell-to-cell variability in mRNA levels. Early in the cell cycle, the two copies of each gene exhibit independent activity. After gene replication, the probability of each gene copy to be active diminishes, resulting in dosage compensation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12175.001 PMID:26824388

  18. New frontiers in single-cell analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Templer, Richard H.; Ces, Oscar

    2008-01-01

    For this special issue of J. R. Soc. Interface we present an overview of the driving forces behind technological advances in the field of single-cell analysis. These range from increasing our understanding of cellular heterogeneity through to the study of rare cells, areas of research that cannot be tackled effectively using current high-throughput population-based averaging techniques.

  19. Zoledronic acid inhibits vasculogenic mimicry in murine osteosarcoma cell line in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Dehao; He, Xianfeng; Yang, Shuhua; Xu, Weihua; Lin, Tao; Feng, Xiaobo

    2011-06-30

    To study the effects of zoledronic acid (ZA) on the vasculogenic mimicry of osteosarcoma cells in vitro. A Three-dimensional culture of LM8 osteosarcoma cells on a type I collagen matrix was used to investigate whether osteosarcoma cells can develop vasculogenic mimicry, and to determine the effects of ZA on this process. In addition, the cellular ultrastructural changes were observed using scanning electron microscopy and laser confocal microscopy. The effects of ZA on the translocation of RhoA protein from the cytosol to the membrane in LM8 cells were measured via immunoblotting. ZA inhibited the development of vasculogenic mimicry by the LM8 osteosarcoma cells, decreased microvilli formation on the cell surface, and disrupted the F-actin cytoskeleton. ZA prevented translocation of RhoA protein from the cytosol to the membrane in LM8 cells. ZA can impair RhoA membrane localization in LM8 cells, causing obvious changes in the ultrastructure of osteosarcoma cells and induce cell apoptosis, which may be one of the underlying mechanisms by which the agent inhibits the development of vasculogenic mimicry by the LM8 cells.

  20. Zoledronic acid inhibits vasculogenic mimicry in murine osteosarcoma cell line in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Tao

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To study the effects of zoledronic acid (ZA on the vasculogenic mimicry of osteosarcoma cells in vitro. Methods A Three-dimensional culture of LM8 osteosarcoma cells on a type I collagen matrix was used to investigate whether osteosarcoma cells can develop vasculogenic mimicry, and to determine the effects of ZA on this process. In addition, the cellular ultrastructural changes were observed using scanning electron microscopy and laser confocal microscopy. The effects of ZA on the translocation of RhoA protein from the cytosol to the membrane in LM8 cells were measured via immunoblotting. Results ZA inhibited the development of vasculogenic mimicry by the LM8 osteosarcoma cells, decreased microvilli formation on the cell surface, and disrupted the F-actin cytoskeleton. ZA prevented translocation of RhoA protein from the cytosol to the membrane in LM8 cells. Conclusions ZA can impair RhoA membrane localization in LM8 cells, causing obvious changes in the ultrastructure of osteosarcoma cells and induce cell apoptosis, which may be one of the underlying mechanisms by which the agent inhibits the development of vasculogenic mimicry by the LM8 cells.

  1. Hypoxia‐induced alterations of G2 checkpoint regulators

    OpenAIRE

    Hasvold, Grete; Lund-Andersen, Christin; Lando, Malin; Patzke, Sebastian; Hauge, Sissel; Suo, ZhenHe; Lyng, Heidi; Syljuåsen, Randi G.

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia promotes an aggressive tumor phenotype with increased genomic instability, partially due to downregulation of DNA repair pathways. However, genome stability is also surveilled by cell cycle checkpoints. An important issue is therefore whether hypoxia also can influence the DNA damage‐induced cell cycle checkpoints. Here, we show that hypoxia (24 h 0.2% O2) alters the expression of several G2 checkpoint regulators, as examined by microarray gene expression analysis and immunoblotting o...

  2. Cannabidiol restores intestinal barrier dysfunction and inhibits the apoptotic process induced by Clostridium difficile toxin A in Caco-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gigli, Stefano; Seguella, Luisa; Pesce, Marcella; Bruzzese, Eugenia; D'Alessandro, Alessandra; Cuomo, Rosario; Steardo, Luca; Sarnelli, Giovanni; Esposito, Giuseppe

    2017-12-01

    Clostridium difficile toxin A is responsible for colonic damage observed in infected patients. Drugs able to restore Clostridium difficile toxin A-induced toxicity have the potential to improve the recovery of infected patients. Cannabidiol is a non-psychotropic component of Cannabis sativa, which has been demonstrated to protect enterocytes against chemical and/or inflammatory damage and to restore intestinal mucosa integrity. The purpose of this study was to evaluate (a) the anti-apoptotic effect and (b) the mechanisms by which cannabidiol protects mucosal integrity in Caco-2 cells exposed to Clostridium difficile toxin A. Caco-2 cells were exposed to Clostridium difficile toxin A (30 ng/ml), with or without cannabidiol (10 -7 -10 -9  M), in the presence of the specific antagonist AM251 (10 -7  M). Cytotoxicity assay, transepithelial electrical resistence measurements, immunofluorescence analysis and immunoblot analysis were performed in the different experimental conditions. Clostridium difficile toxin A significantly decreased Caco-2 cells' viability and reduced transepithelial electrical resistence values and RhoA guanosine triphosphate (GTP), bax, zonula occludens-1 and occludin protein expression, respectively. All these effects were significantly and concentration-dependently inhibited by cannabidiol, whose effects were completely abolished in the presence of the cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) antagonist, AM251. Cannabidiol improved Clostridium difficile toxin A-induced damage in Caco-2 cells, by inhibiting the apoptotic process and restoring the intestinal barrier integrity, through the involvement of the CB1 receptor.

  3. Pathway analysis of kidney cancer using proteomics and metabolic profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiehn Oliver

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Renal cell carcinoma (RCC is the sixth leading cause of cancer death and is responsible for 11,000 deaths per year in the US. Approximately one-third of patients present with disease which is already metastatic and for which there is currently no adequate treatment, and no biofluid screening tests exist for RCC. In this study, we have undertaken a comprehensive proteomic analysis and subsequently a pathway and network approach to identify biological processes involved in clear cell RCC (ccRCC. We have used these data to investigate urinary markers of RCC which could be applied to high-risk patients, or to those being followed for recurrence, for early diagnosis and treatment, thereby substantially reducing mortality of this disease. Results Using 2-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometric analysis, we identified 31 proteins which were differentially expressed with a high degree of significance in ccRCC as compared to adjacent non-malignant tissue, and we confirmed some of these by immunoblotting, immunohistochemistry, and comparison to published transcriptomic data. When evaluated by several pathway and biological process analysis programs, these proteins are demonstrated to be involved with a high degree of confidence (p values Conclusion Extensive pathway and network analysis allowed for the discovery of highly significant pathways from a set of clear cell RCC samples. Knowledge of activation of these processes will lead to novel assays identifying their proteomic and/or metabolomic signatures in biofluids of patient at high risk for this disease; we provide pilot data for such a urinary bioassay. Furthermore, we demonstrate how the knowledge of networks, processes, and pathways altered in kidney cancer may be used to influence the choice of optimal therapy.

  4. Modulation of SOCS protein expression influences the interferon responsiveness of human melanoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesinski, Gregory B; Zimmerer, Jason M; Kreiner, Melanie; Trefry, John; Bill, Matthew A; Young, Gregory S; Becknell, Brian; Carson, William E III

    2010-01-01

    Endogenously produced interferons can regulate the growth of melanoma cells and are administered exogenously as therapeutic agents to patients with advanced cancer. We investigated the role of negative regulators of interferon signaling known as suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS) in mediating interferon-resistance in human melanoma cells. Basal and interferon-alpha (IFN-α) or interferon-gamma (IFN-γ)-induced expression of SOCS1 and SOCS3 proteins was evaluated by immunoblot analysis in a panel of n = 10 metastatic human melanoma cell lines, in human embryonic melanocytes (HEM), and radial or vertical growth phase melanoma cells. Over-expression of SOCS1 and SOCS3 proteins in melanoma cells was achieved using the PINCO retroviral vector, while siRNA were used to inhibit SOCS1 and SOCS3 expression. Tyr 701 -phosphorylated STAT1 (P-STAT1) was measured by intracellular flow cytometry and IFN-stimulated gene expression was measured by Real Time PCR. SOCS1 and SOCS3 proteins were expressed at basal levels in melanocytes and in all melanoma cell lines examined. Expression of the SOCS1 and SOCS3 proteins was also enhanced following stimulation of a subset of cell lines with IFN-α or IFN-γ. Over-expression of SOCS proteins in melanoma cell lines led to significant inhibition of Tyr 701 -phosphorylated STAT1 (P-STAT1) and gene expression following stimulation with IFN-α (IFIT2, OAS-1, ISG-15) or IFN-γ (IRF1). Conversely, siRNA inhibition of SOCS1 and SOCS3 expression in melanoma cells enhanced their responsiveness to interferon stimulation. These data demonstrate that SOCS proteins are expressed in human melanoma cell lines and their modulation can influence the responsiveness of melanoma cells to IFN-α and IFN-γ

  5. IL-17A induces Pendrin expression and chloride-bicarbonate exchange in human bronchial epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly M Adams

    Full Text Available The epithelium plays an active role in the response to inhaled pathogens in part by responding to signals from the immune system. Epithelial responses may include changes in chemokine expression, increased mucin production and antimicrobial peptide secretion, and changes in ion transport. We previously demonstrated that interleukin-17A (IL-17A, which is critical for lung host defense against extracellular bacteria, significantly raised airway surface pH in vitro, a finding that is common to a number of inflammatory diseases. Using microarray analysis of normal human bronchial epithelial (HBE cells treated with IL-17A, we identified the electroneutral chloride-bicarbonate exchanger Pendrin (SLC26A4 as a potential mediator of this effect. These data were verified by real-time, quantitative PCR that demonstrated a time-dependent increase in Pendrin mRNA expression in HBE cells treated with IL-17A up to 48 h. Using immunoblotting and immunofluorescence, we confirmed that Pendrin protein expression is increased in IL-17 treated HBE cells and that it is primarily localized to the mucosal surface of the cells. Functional studies using live-cell fluorescence to measure intracellular pH demonstrated that IL-17A induced chloride-bicarbonate exchange in HBE cells that was not present in the absence of IL-17A. Furthermore, HBE cells treated with short interfering RNA against Pendrin showed substantially reduced chloride-bicarbonate exchange. These data suggest that Pendrin is part of IL-17A-dependent epithelial changes and that Pendrin may therefore be a therapeutic target in IL-17A-dependent lung disease.

  6. Solid KHT tumor dispersal for flow cytometric cell kinetic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pallavicini, M.G.; Folstad, L.J.; Dunbar, C.

    1981-01-01

    A bacterial neutral protease was used to disperse KHT solid tumors into single cell suspensions suitable for routine cell kinetic analysis by flow cytometry and for clonogenic cell survival. Neutral protease disaggregation under conditions which would be suitable for routine tumor dispersal was compared with a trypsin/DNase procedure. Cell yield, clonogenic cell survival, DNA distributions of untreated and drug-perturbed tumors, rates of radioactive precursor incorporation during the cell cycle, and preferential cell cycle phase-specific cell loss were investigated. Tumors dispersed with neutral protease yielded approximately four times more cells than those dispersed with trypsin/DNase and approximately a 1.5-fold higher plating efficiency in a semisolid agar system. Quantitative analysis of DNA distributions obtained from untreated and cytosine-arabinoside-perturbed tumors produced similar results with both dispersal procedures. The rates of incorporation of tritiated thymidine during the cell cycle were also similar with neutral protease and trypsin/DNase dispersal. Preferential phase-specific cell loss was not obseved with either technique. We find that neutral protease provides good single cell suspensions of the KHT tumor for cell survival measurements and for cell kinetic analysis of drug-induced perturbations by flow cytometry. In addition, the high cell yields facilitate electronic cell sorting where large numbers of cells are often required

  7. Thermoeconomic analysis of a fuel cell hybrid power system from the fuel cell experimental data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez, Tomas [Endesa Generacion, Ribera del Loira, 60, 28042 Madrid (Spain)]. E-mail: talvarez@endesa.es; Valero, Antonio [Fundacion CIRCE, Centro Politecnico Superior, Maria de Luna, 3, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Montes, Jose M. [ETSIMM-Universidad Politecnica de.Madrid, Rios Rosas, 21, 28003 Madrid (Spain)

    2006-08-15

    An innovative configuration of fuel cell technology is proposed based on a hybrid fuel cell system that integrates a turbogenerator to overcome the intrinsic limitations of fuel cells in conventional operation. An analysis is done of the application of molten carbonate fuel cell technology at the Guadalix Fuel Cell Test Facility, for the assessment of the performance of the fuel cell prototype to be integrated in the Hybrid Fuel Cell System. This is completed with a thermoeconomic analysis of the 100 kW cogeneration fuel cell power plant which was subsequently built. The operational results and design limitations are evaluated, together with the operational limits and thermodynamic inefficiencies (exergy destruction and losses) of the 100 kW fuel cell. This leads to the design of a hybrid system in order to demonstrate the possibilities and benefits of the new hybrid configuration. The results are quantified through a thermoeconomic analysis in order to get the most cost-effective plant configuration. One promising configuration is the MCFC topper where the fuel cell in the power plant behaves as a combustor for the turbogenerator. The latter behaves as the balance of plant for the fuel cell. The combined efficiency increased to 57% and NOx emissions are essentially eliminated. The synergy of the fuel cell/turbine hybrids lies mainly in the use of the rejected thermal energy and residual fuel from the fuel cell to drive the turbogenerator in a 500 kW hybrid system.

  8. Basal metabolic state governs AIF-dependent growth support in pancreatic cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, Andrew J.; Wilkinson, Amanda S.; Wilkinson, John C.

    2016-01-01

    Apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF), named for its involvement in cell death pathways, is a mitochondrial protein that regulates metabolic homeostasis. In addition to supporting the survival of healthy cells, AIF also plays a contributory role to the development of cancer through its enzymatic activity, and we have previously shown that AIF preferentially supports advanced-stage prostate cancer cells. Here we further evaluated the role of AIF in tumorigenesis by exploring its function in pancreatic cancer, a disease setting that most often presents at an advanced stage by the time of diagnosis. A bioinformatics approach was first employed to investigate AIF mRNA transcript levels in pancreatic tumor specimens vs. normal tissues. AIF-deficient pancreatic cancer cell lines were then established via lentiviral infection. Immunoblot analysis was used to determine relative protein quantities within cells. Cell viability was measured by flow cytometry; in vitro and Matrigel™ growth/survival using Coulter™ counting and phase contrast microscopy; and glucose consumption in the absence and presence of Matrigel™ using spectrophotometric methods. Archival gene expression data revealed a modest elevation of AIF transcript levels in subsets of pancreatic tumor specimens, suggesting a possible role in disease progression. AIF expression was then suppressed in a panel of five pancreatic cancer cell lines that display diverse metabolic phenotypes. AIF ablation selectively crippled the growth of cells in vitro in a manner that directly correlated with the loss of mitochondrial respiratory chain subunits and altered glucose metabolism, and these effects were exacerbated in the presence of Matrigel™ substrate. This suggests a critical metabolic role for AIF to pancreatic tumorigenesis, while the spectrum of sensitivities to AIF ablation depends on basal cellular metabolic phenotypes. Altogether these data indicate that AIF supports the growth and survival of metabolically defined

  9. Transcriptomic Analysis and Meta-Analysis of Human Granulosa and Cumulus Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanja Burnik Papler

    Full Text Available Specific gene expression in oocytes and its surrounding cumulus (CC and granulosa (GC cells is needed for successful folliculogenesis and oocyte maturation. The aim of the present study was to compare genome-wide gene expression and biological functions of human GC and CC. Individual GC and CC were derived from 37 women undergoing IVF procedures. Gene expression analysis was performed using microarrays, followed by a meta-analysis. Results were validated using quantitative real-time PCR. There were 6029 differentially expressed genes (q < 10-4; of which 650 genes had a log2 FC ≥ 2. After the meta-analysis there were 3156 genes differentially expressed. Among these there were genes that have previously not been reported in human somatic follicular cells, like prokineticin 2 (PROK2, higher expressed in GC, and pregnancy up-regulated nonubiquitous CaM kinase (PNCK, higher expressed in CC. Pathways like inflammatory response and angiogenesis were enriched in GC, whereas in CC, cell differentiation and multicellular organismal development were among enriched pathways. In conclusion, transcriptomes of GC and CC as well as biological functions, are distinctive for each cell subpopulation. By describing novel genes like PROK2 and PNCK, expressed in GC and CC, we upgraded the existing data on human follicular biology.

  10. The sirtuin 1/2 inhibitor tenovin-1 induces a nonlinear apoptosis-inducing factor-dependent cell death in a p53 null Ewing's sarcoma cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marx, Christian; Marx-Blümel, Lisa; Lindig, Nora; Thierbach, René; Hoelzer, Doerte; Becker, Sabine; Wittig, Susan; Lehmann, Roland; Slevogt, Hortense; Heinzel, Thorsten; Wang, Zhao-Qi; Beck, James F; Sonnemann, Jürgen

    2018-06-01

    The sirtuin 1/2 inhibitor tenovin-1 activates p53 and may have potential in the management of cancer. Here, we investigated the responsiveness of Ewing's sarcoma cells to tenovin-1. We examined its effects in two Ewing's sarcoma cell lines with different p53 status, i.e. in p53 wild-type and p53 null cells. Effects were assessed by flow cytometric analyses of cell death, mitochondrial membrane depolarization and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, by caspase 3/7 activity measurement, by mRNA expression profiling and by immunoblotting. Tenovin-1 elicited caspase-mediated cell death in p53 wild-type cells, but caspase-independent cell death in p53 null cells. Remarkably, it induced a nonlinear concentration response in the latter: low concentrations of tenovin-1 were much more effective than were higher concentrations. Tenovin-1's effects in p53 null cells involved gene expression changes of Bcl-2 family members, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, nuclear translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor, ROS formation and DNA damage; all these effects followed a bell-shaped pattern. In conclusion, our results provide new insights into tenovin-1's mode of action by demonstrating that it can induce different pathways of cell death.

  11. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid affects γH2AX expression in osteosarcoma, atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumor and normal tissue cell lines after irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blattmann, C.; Oertel, S.; Thiemann, M.; Weber, K.J.; Schmezer, P.; Zelezny, O.; Lopez Perez, R.; Kulozik, A.E.; Debus, J.; Ehemann, V.

    2012-01-01

    Osteosarcoma and atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors are tumor entities with varying response to common standard therapy protocols. Histone acetylation affects chromatin structure and gene expression which are considered to influence radiation sensitivity. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the combination therapy with the histone deacetylase inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) and irradiation on atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors and osteosarcoma compared to normal tissue cell lines. Clonogenic assay was used to determine cell survival. DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) were examined by pulsed-field electrophoresis (PFGE) as well as by γH2AX immunostaining involving flow cytometry, fluorescence microscopy, and immunoblot analysis. SAHA lead to an increased radiosensitivity in tumor but not in normal tissue cell lines. γH2AX expression as an indicator for DSB was significantly increased when SAHA was applied 24 h before irradiation to the sarcoma cell cultures. In contrast, γH2AX expression in the normal tissue cell lines was significantly reduced when irradiation was combined with SAHA. Analysis of initial DNA fragmentation and fragment rejoining by PFGE, however, did not reveal differences in response to the SAHA pretreatment for either cell type. SAHA increases radiosensitivity in tumor but not normal tissue cell lines. The increased H2AX phosphorylation status of the SAHA-treated tumor cells post irradiation likely reflects its delayed dephosphorylation within the DNA damage signal decay rather than chromatin acetylation-dependent differences in the overall efficacy of DSB induction and rejoining. The results support the hypothesis that combining SAHA with irradiation may provide a promising strategy in the treatment of solid tumors. (orig.)

  12. Salinomycin induces cell death and differentiation in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma stem cells despite activation of epithelial-mesenchymal transition and Akt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuo, Selena Z; Blair, Katherine J; Rahimy, Elham; Kiang, Alan; Abhold, Eric; Fan, Jian-Bing; Wang-Rodriguez, Jessica; Altuna, Xabier; Ongkeko, Weg M

    2012-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSC) are believed to play a crucial role in cancer recurrence due to their resistance to conventional chemotherapy and capacity for self-renewal. Recent studies have reported that salinomycin, a livestock antibiotic, selectively targets breast cancer stem cells 100-fold more effectively than paclitaxel. In our study we sought to determine the effects of salinomycin on head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) stem cells. MTS and TUNEL assays were used to study cell proliferation and apoptosis as a function of salinomycin exposure in JLO-1, a putative HNSCC stem cell culture. MTS and trypan blue dye exclusion assays were performed to investigate potential drug interactions between salinomycin and cisplatin or paclitaxel. Stem cell-like phenotype was measured by mRNA expression of stem cell markers, sphere-forming capacity, and matrigel invasion assays. Immunoblotting was also used to determine expression of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers and Akt phosphorylation. Arrays by Illumina, Inc. were used to profile microRNA expression as a function of salinomycin dose. In putative HNSCC stem cells, salinomycin was found to significantly inhibit cell viability, induce a 71.5% increase in levels of apoptosis, elevate the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, and work synergistically with cisplatin and paclitaxel in inducing cell death. It was observed that salinomycin significantly inhibited sphere forming-capability and repressed the expression of CD44 and BMI-1 by 3.2-fold and 6.2-fold, respectively. Furthermore, salinomycin reduced invasion of HNSCC stem cells by 2.1 fold. Contrary to expectations, salinomycin induced the expression of EMT markers Snail, vimentin, and Zeb-1, decreased expression of E-cadherin, and also induced phosphorylation of Akt and its downstream targets GSK3-β and mTOR. These results demonstrate that in HNSCC cancer stem cells, salinomycin can cause cell death and decrease stem cell properties despite activation of both EMT and

  13. [DNA damage in human pleural mesothelial cells induced by exposure to carbon nanotubes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogasawara, Yuki; Umezu, Noriaki; Ishii, Kazuyuki

    2012-01-01

    Nanomaterials are currently used in electronics, industrial materials, cosmetics, and medicine because they have useful physicochemical properties, such as strength, conductivity, durability, and chemical stability. As these materials have become widespread, many questions have arisen regarding their effects on health and the environment. In particular, recent studies have demonstrated that carbon nanotubes (CNTs) cause significant inflammation and mesothelioma in vivo. In this study, we investigated the potential risk posed by singlewalled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) and multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) exposure in human pleural mesothelial cells. CNT cytotoxicity was determined by a trypan blue exclusion assay, and DNA damage was detected by an alkaline comet assay. The concentration of 8-oxodeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) in DNA was measured by high perhormance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. The expression of base excision repair enzymes in the cell was estimated by immunoblot analysis. We observed inhibitory effects on cell proliferation and the induction of DNA damage following exposure of cells to purified CNTs that were suspended in dispersion medium. However, accumulation of 8-OHdG in DNA was not found. In addition, the expression levels of base excision enzymes that are involved in hOGG1, hMTH1, and MYH in MeT-5A cells remained unchanged for 24 h after carbon nanotube exposure. CNTs significantly inhibit cell proliferation and decrease DNA damage in human pleural mesothelial cells. Our results indicate that the mechanism of CNT-induced genotoxicity is different from that following exposure to reactive oxygen species, which causes oxidative DNA modifications and 8-OHdG production. Further investigation is required to characterize the specific DNA mutations that occur following CNT exposure.

  14. Vanillin Suppresses Cell Motility by Inhibiting STAT3-Mediated HIF-1α mRNA Expression in Malignant Melanoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eun-Ji; Lee, Yoon-Mi; Oh, Taek-In; Kim, Byeong Mo; Lim, Beong-Ou; Lim, Ji-Hong

    2017-03-01

    Recent studies have shown that vanillin has anti-cancer, anti-mutagenic, and anti-metastatic activity; however, the precise molecular mechanism whereby vanillin inhibits metastasis and cancer progression is not fully elucidated. In this study, we examined whether vanillin has anti-cancer and anti-metastatic activities via inhibition of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) in A2058 and A375 human malignant melanoma cells. Immunoblotting and quantitative real time (RT)-PCR analysis revealed that vanillin down-regulates HIF-1α protein accumulation and the transcripts of HIF-1α target genes related to cancer metastasis including fibronectin 1 ( FN1 ), lysyl oxidase-like 2 ( LOXL2 ), and urokinase plasminogen activator receptor ( uPAR ). It was also found that vanillin significantly suppresses HIF-1α mRNA expression and de novo HIF-1α protein synthesis. To understand the suppressive mechanism of vanillin on HIF-1α expression, chromatin immunoprecipitation was performed. Consequently, it was found that vanillin causes inhibition of promoter occupancy by signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), but not nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), on HIF1A . Furthermore, an in vitro migration assay revealed that the motility of melanoma cells stimulated by hypoxia was attenuated by vanillin treatment. In conclusion, we demonstrate that vanillin might be a potential anti-metastatic agent that suppresses metastatic gene expression and migration activity under hypoxia via the STAT3-HIF-1α signaling pathway.

  15. Identification of a novel set of genes reflecting different in vivo invasive patterns of human GBM cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monticone Massimiliano

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most patients affected by Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, grade IV glioma experience a recurrence of the disease because of the spreading of tumor cells beyond surgical boundaries. Unveiling mechanisms causing this process is a logic goal to impair the killing capacity of GBM cells by molecular targeting. We noticed that our long-term GBM cultures, established from different patients, may display two categories/types of growth behavior in an orthotopic xenograft model: expansion of the tumor mass and formation of tumor branches/nodules (nodular like, NL-type or highly diffuse single tumor cell infiltration (HD-type. Methods We determined by DNA microarrays the gene expression profiles of three NL-type and three HD-type long-term GBM cultures. Subsequently, individual genes with different expression levels between the two groups were identified using Significance Analysis of Microarrays (SAM. Real time RT-PCR, immunofluorescence and immunoblot analyses, were performed for a selected subgroup of regulated gene products to confirm the results obtained by the expression analysis. Results Here, we report the identification of a set of 34 differentially expressed genes in the two types of GBM cultures. Twenty-three of these genes encode for proteins localized to the plasma membrane and 9 of these for proteins are involved in the process of cell adhesion. Conclusions This study suggests the participation in the diffuse infiltrative/invasive process of GBM cells within the CNS of a novel set of genes coding for membrane-associated proteins, which should be thus susceptible to an inhibition strategy by specific targeting. Massimiliano Monticone and Antonio Daga contributed equally to this work

  16. Longevity in vivo of primary cell wall cellulose synthases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Joseph Lee; Josephs, Cooper; Barnes, William J; Anderson, Charles T; Tien, Ming

    2018-02-01

    Our work focuses on understanding the lifetime and thus stability of the three main cellulose synthase (CESA) proteins involved in primary cell wall synthesis of Arabidopsis. It had long been thought that a major means of CESA regulation was via their rapid degradation. However, our studies here have uncovered that AtCESA proteins are not rapidly degraded. Rather, they persist for an extended time in the plant cell. Plant cellulose is synthesized by membrane-embedded cellulose synthase complexes (CSCs). The CSC is composed of cellulose synthases (CESAs), of which three distinct isozymes form the primary cell wall CSC and another set of three isozymes form the secondary cell wall CSC. We determined the stability over time of primary cell wall (PCW) CESAs in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings, using immunoblotting after inhibiting protein synthesis with cycloheximide treatment. Our work reveals very slow turnover for the Arabidopsis PCW CESAs in vivo. Additionally, we show that the stability of all three CESAs within the PCW CSC is altered by mutations in individual CESAs, elevated temperature, and light conditions. Together, these results suggest that CESA proteins are very stable in vivo, but that their lifetimes can be modulated by intrinsic and environmental cues.

  17. Integrative analysis to select cancer candidate biomarkers to targeted validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heberle, Henry; Domingues, Romênia R.; Granato, Daniela C.; Yokoo, Sami; Canevarolo, Rafael R.; Winck, Flavia V.; Ribeiro, Ana Carolina P.; Brandão, Thaís Bianca; Filgueiras, Paulo R.; Cruz, Karen S. P.; Barbuto, José Alexandre; Poppi, Ronei J.; Minghim, Rosane; Telles, Guilherme P.; Fonseca, Felipe Paiva; Fox, Jay W.; Santos-Silva, Alan R.; Coletta, Ricardo D.; Sherman, Nicholas E.; Paes Leme, Adriana F.

    2015-01-01

    Targeted proteomics has flourished as the method of choice for prospecting for and validating potential candidate biomarkers in many diseases. However, challenges still remain due to the lack of standardized routines that can prioritize a limited number of proteins to be further validated in human samples. To help researchers identify candidate biomarkers that best characterize their samples under study, a well-designed integrative analysis pipeline, comprising MS-based discovery, feature selection methods, clustering techniques, bioinformatic analyses and targeted approaches was performed using discovery-based proteomic data from the secretomes of three classes of human cell lines (carcinoma, melanoma and non-cancerous). Three feature selection algorithms, namely, Beta-binomial, Nearest Shrunken Centroids (NSC), and Support Vector Machine-Recursive Features Elimination (SVM-RFE), indicated a panel of 137 candidate biomarkers for carcinoma and 271 for melanoma, which were differentially abundant between the tumor classes. We further tested the strength of the pipeline in selecting candidate biomarkers by immunoblotting, human tissue microarrays, label-free targeted MS and functional experiments. In conclusion, the proposed integrative analysis was able to pre-qualify and prioritize candidate biomarkers from discovery-based proteomics to targeted MS. PMID:26540631

  18. Fast neutrons-induced apoptosis is Fas-independent in lymphoblastoid cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, Barbara; Benzina, Sami; Jeannequin, Pierre; Dufour, Patrick; Bergerat, Jean-Pierre; Denis, Jean-Marc; Gueulette, John; Bischoff, Pierre L.

    2005-01-01

    We have previously shown that ionizing radiation-induced apoptosis in human lymphoblastoid cells differs according to their p53 status, and that caspase 8-mediated cleavage of BID is involved in the p53-dependent pathway. In the present study, we investigated the role of Fas signaling in caspase 8 activation induced by fast neutrons irradiation in these cells. Fas and FasL expression was assessed by flow cytometry and by immunoblot. We also measured Fas aggregation after irradiation by fluorescence microscopy. We found a decrease of Fas expression after irradiation, but no change in Fas ligand expression. We also showed that, in contrast to the stimulation of Fas by an agonistic antibody, Fas aggregation did not occur after irradiation. Altogether, our data strongly suggest that fast neutrons induced-apoptosis is Fas-independent, even in p53-dependent apoptosis

  19. Vacuolar H+ -ATPase c protects glial cell death induced by sodium nitroprusside under glutathione-depleted condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Yu Jeong; Lee, Seong-Beom; Lee, Hwa Ok; Son, Min Jeong; Kim, Ho-Shik; Kwon, Oh-Joo; Jeong, Seong-Whan

    2011-08-01

    We examined the role of the c subunit (ATP6L) of vacuolar H(+) -ATPase and its molecular mechanisms in glial cell death induced by sodium nitroprusside (SNP). ATP6L siRNA-transfected cells treated with SNP showed a significant increase in cytotoxicity under glutathione (GSH)-depleted conditions after pretreatment with buthionine sulfoximine, but reduction of ATP6L did not affect the regulation of lysosomal pH in analyses with lysosomal pH-dependent fluorescence probes. Photodegraded SNP and ferrous sulfate induced cytotoxicity with the same pattern as that of SNP, but SNAP and potassium cyanide did not show activity. Pretreatment of the transfected cells with deferoxamine (DFO) reduced ROS production and significantly inhibited the cytotoxicity, which indicates that primarily iron rather than nitric oxide or cyanide from SNP contributes to cell death. Involvement of apoptotic processes in the cells was not shown. Pretreatment with JNK or p38 chemical inhibitor significantly inhibited the cytotoxicity, and we also confirmed that the MAPKs were activated in the cells by immunoblot analysis. Significant increase of LC3-II conversion was observed in the cells, and the conversions were inhibited by cotransfection of the MAPK siRNAs and pretreatment with DFO. Introduction of Atg5 siRNA inhibited the cytotoxicity and inhibited the activation of MAPKs and the conversion of LC3. We finally confirmed autophagic cell death and involvement of MAPKs by observation of autophagic vacuoles via electron microscopy. These data suggest that ATP6L has a protective role against SNP-induced autophagic cell death via inhibition of JNK and p38 in GSH-depleted glial cells. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Isolation of a hemidesmosome-rich fraction from a human squamous cell carcinoma cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirako, Yoshiaki, E-mail: s47526a@cc.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Division of Biological Science, Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Yonemoto, Yuki; Yamauchi, Tomoe [Division of Biological Science, Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Nishizawa, Yuji; Kawamoto, Yoshiyuki [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Chubu University, 1200 Matsumoto-cho, Kasugai 487-8501 (Japan); Owaribe, Katsushi [Division of Biological Science, Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan)

    2014-06-10

    Hemidesmosomes are cell-to-matrix adhesion complexes anchoring keratinocytes to basement membranes. For the first time, we present a method to prepare a fraction from human cultured cells that are highly enriched in hemidesmosomal proteins. Using DJM-1 cells derived from human squamous cell carcinoma, accumulation of hemidesmosomes was observed when these cells were cultured for more than 10 days in a commercial serum-free medium without supplemental calcium. Electron microscopy demonstrated that numerous electron-dense adhesion structures were present along the basal cell membranes of DJM-1 cells cultured under the aforementioned conditions. After removing cellular materials using an ammonia solution, hemidesmosomal proteins and deposited extracellular matrix were collected and separated by electrophoresis. There were eight major polypeptides, which were determined to be plectin, BP230, BP180, integrin α6 and β4 subunits, and laminin-332 by immunoblotting and mass spectrometry. Therefore, we designated this preparation as a hemidesmosome-rich fraction. This fraction contained laminin-332 exclusively in its unprocessed form, which may account for the promotion of laminin deposition, and minimal amounts of Lutheran blood group protein, a nonhemidesmosomal transmembrane protein. This hemidesmosome-rich fraction would be useful not only for biological research on hemidesmosomes but also for developing a serum test for patients with blistering skin diseases. - Highlights: • A defined condition promoted accumulation of hemidesmosomes in human cultured cells. • A fraction isolated from the cells contained eight major polypeptides. • The polypeptides were the five major hemidesmosome proteins and laminin-332. • The cultured cells deposited laminin-332 in its unprocessed form under the condition. • We report a method to prepare a fraction highly enriched in hemidesmosome proteins.

  1. Gene expression analysis of cell death induction by Taurolidine in different malignant cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chromik, Ansgar M; Weyhe, Dirk; Mittelkötter, Ulrich; Uhl, Waldemar; Hahn, Stephan A; Daigeler, Adrien; Flier, Annegret; Bulut, Daniel; May, Christina; Harati, Kamran; Roschinsky, Jan; Sülberg, Dominique

    2010-01-01

    The anti-infective agent Taurolidine (TRD) has been shown to have cell death inducing properties, but the mechanism of its action is largely unknown. The aim of this study was to identify potential common target genes modulated at the transcriptional level following TRD treatment in tumour cell lines originating from different cancer types. Five different malignant cell lines (HT29, Chang Liver, HT1080, AsPC-1 and BxPC-3) were incubated with TRD (100 μM, 250 μM and 1000 μM). Proliferation after 8 h and cell viability after 24 h were analyzed by BrdU assay and FACS analysis, respectively. Gene expression analyses were carried out using the Agilent -microarray platform to indentify genes which displayed conjoint regulation following the addition of TRD in all cell lines. Candidate genes were subjected to Ingenuity Pathways Analysis and selected genes were validated by qRT-PCR and Western Blot. TRD 250 μM caused a significant inhibition of proliferation as well as apoptotic cell death in all cell lines. Among cell death associated genes with the strongest regulation in gene expression, we identified pro-apoptotic transcription factors (EGR1, ATF3) as well as genes involved in the ER stress response (PPP1R15A), in ubiquitination (TRAF6) and mitochondrial apoptotic pathways (PMAIP1). This is the first conjoint analysis of potential target genes of TRD which was performed simultaneously in different malignant cell lines. The results indicate that TRD might be involved in different signal transduction pathways leading to apoptosis

  2. Protease-activated receptor-2 stimulates intestinal epithelial chloride transport through activation of PLC and selective PKC isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Merwe, Jacques Q; Moreau, France; MacNaughton, Wallace K

    2009-06-01

    Serine proteases play important physiological roles through their activity at G protein-coupled protease-activated receptors (PARs). We examined the roles that specific phospholipase (PL) C and protein kinase (PK) C (PKC) isoforms play in the regulation of PAR(2)-stimulated chloride secretion in intestinal epithelial cells. Confluent SCBN epithelial monolayers were grown on Snapwell supports and mounted in modified Ussing chambers. Short-circuit current (I(sc)) responses to basolateral application of the selective PAR(2) activating peptide, SLIGRL-NH(2), were monitored as a measure of net electrogenic ion transport caused by PAR(2) activation. SLIGRL-NH(2) induced a transient I(sc) response that was significantly reduced by inhibitors of PLC (U73122), phosphoinositol-PLC (ET-18), phosphatidylcholine-PLC (D609), and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K; LY294002). Immunoblot analysis revealed the phosphorylation of both PLCbeta and PLCgamma following PAR(2) activation. Pretreatment of the cells with inhibitors of PKC (GF 109203X), PKCalpha/betaI (Gö6976), and PKCdelta (rottlerin), but not PKCzeta (selective pseudosubstrate inhibitor), also attenuated this response. Cellular fractionation and immunoblot analysis, as well as confocal immunocytochemistry, revealed increases of PKCbetaI, PKCdelta, and PKCepsilon, but not PKCalpha or PKCzeta, in membrane fractions following PAR(2) activation. Pretreatment of the cells with U73122, ET-18, or D609 inhibited PKC activation. Inhibition of PI3K activity only prevented PKCdelta translocation. Immunoblots revealed that PAR(2) activation induced phosphorylation of both cRaf and ERK1/2 via PKCdelta. Inhibition of PKCbetaI and PI3K had only a partial effect on this response. We conclude that basolateral PAR(2)-induced chloride secretion involves activation of PKCbetaI and PKCdelta via a PLC-dependent mechanism resulting in the stimulation of cRaf and ERK1/2 signaling.

  3. Protective role of edaravone against cisplatin-induced ototoxicity in an auditory cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Gi Jung; Chang, Jiwon; Lee, Sehee; Choi, June; Jung, Hak Hyun; Lee, Hyung Min; Ryu, Sung Hoon; Park, Su Kyoung; Kim, Jin Hwan; Kim, Hyung-Jong

    2015-12-01

    Edaravone is a neuroprotective agent with a potent free radical scavenging and antioxidant actions. In the present study we investigated the influence of edaravone on cisplatin ototoxicity in auditory cells. Cell viability was determined using a 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazoliumbromide cell proliferation assay. Oxidative stress and apoptosis were assessed by reactive oxygen species (ROS) measurement, Hoechst 33258 staining, caspase-3 activity assay, and immunoblotting of PARP. Pretreatment with 100 μM of edaravone prior to application of 15 μM of cisplatin increased cell viability after 48 h of incubation in HEI-OC1 cells (from 51.9% to 64. 6% viability) and also, attenuated the cisplatin-induced increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) (from 2.3 fold to 1.9 fold). Edaravone also decreased the activation of caspase-3 and reduced levels of cleaved poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP). We propose that edaravone protects against cisplatin-induced ototoxicity by preventing apoptosis, and limiting ROS production in HEI-OC1 cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. VMP1 related autophagy and apoptosis in colorectal cancer cells: VMP1 regulates cell death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qian, Qinyi [Department of Ultrasonograph, Changshu No. 2 People’s Hospital, Changshu (China); Zhou, Hao; Chen, Yan [Department of General Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou (China); Shen, Chenglong [Department of General Surgery, Changshu No. 2 People’s Hospital, Changshu (China); He, Songbing; Zhao, Hua; Wang, Liang [Department of General Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou (China); Wan, Daiwei, E-mail: 372710369@qq.com [Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Gu, Wen, E-mail: 505339704@qq.com [Department of General Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou (China)

    2014-01-17

    Highlights: •This research confirmed VMP1 as a regulator of autophagy in colorectal cancer cell lines. •We proved the pro-survival role of VMP1-mediated autophagy in colorectal cancer cell lines. •We found the interaction between VMP1 and BECLIN1 also existing in colorectal cancer cell lines. -- Abstract: Vacuole membrane protein 1 (VMP1) is an autophagy-related protein and identified as a key regulator of autophagy in recent years. In pancreatic cell lines, VMP1-dependent autophagy has been linked to positive regulation of apoptosis. However, there are no published reports on the role of VMP1 in autophagy and apoptosis in colorectal cancers. Therefore, to address this gap of knowledge, we decided to interrogate regulation of autophagy and apoptosis by VMP1. We have studied the induction of autophagy by starvation and rapamycin treatment in colorectal cell lines using electron microscopy, immunofluorescence, and immunoblotting. We found that starvation-induced autophagy correlated with an increase in VMP1 expression, that VMP1 interacted with BECLIN1, and that siRNA mediated down-regulation of VMP1-reduced autophagy. Next, we examined the relationship between VMP1-dependent autophagy and apoptosis and found that VMP1 down-regulation sensitizes cells to apoptosis and that agents that induce apoptosis down-regulate VMP1. In conclusion, similar to its reported role in other cell types, VMP1 is an important regulator of autophagy in colorectal cell lines. However, in contrast to its role in pancreatic cell lines, in colorectal cancer cells, VMP1-dependent autophagy appears to be pro-survival rather than pro-cell death.

  5. Expression of major piroplasm protein (p33) of Theileria sergenti (Korean isolate) and its immunogenicity in guinea pigs

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Seung-Won; Kweon, Chang-Hee; Choi, Eun-Jin; Yoon, Yong-Dhuk

    1999-01-01

    To investigate the development of a subunit vaccine against theileriosis in cattle, the DNA fragments encoding piroplasm surface protein (p33) of Theileria sergenti of a Korean isolate were expressed in baculoviruses. The expressed p33 was characterized by indirect fluorescent antibody (IFA) and western blotting analysis. The expression of p33 was mainly detected on the surface of infected Sf21 cells by IFA. The immunoblotting analysis revealed the presence of a same molecular weight protein ...

  6. PPARγ ligand ciglitazone inhibits TNFα-induced ICAM-1 in human airway smooth muscle cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Da Huang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Modification of human airway smooth muscle (ASM function by proinflammatory cytokines has been regarded as a potential mechanism underlying bronchial hyperresponsiveness in asthma. Human ASM cells express intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM-1 in response to cytokines. Synthetic ligands for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPARγ reportedly possess anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties. In this study, we examined whether ciglitazone, a synthetic PPARγ ligand, can modulate the basal and tumor necrosis factor (TNFα-induced ICAM1 gene expression in human ASM cells. Methods: Human ASM cells were treated with TNFα. ICAM-1 expression was assessed by flow cytometry and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR analysis. PPARγ activity was inhibited by target-specific small interfering (si RNA targeting PPARγ and GW9662, a PPARγ antagonist. Activity of nuclear factor (NF-κB was assessed by using immunoblot analysis, immune-confocal images, and electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA. Results: By flow cytometry, ciglitazone alone had no effect on ICAM-1 expression in ASM cells, but inhibited ICAM-1 expression in response to TNFα (10 ng/ml in a dose-dependent manner (1-10 μM. It also inhibited TNFα-induced ICAM1 gene expression by RT-PCR analysis. Knockdown of PPARγ gene by target-specific siRNA targeting PPARγ enhanced ICAM-1 expression and the inhibitory effect of ciglitazone on TNFα-induced ICAM-1 expression was reversed by PPARγ siRNA and GW9662. SN-50 (10 μg/ml, an inhibitor for nuclear translocation of NF-κB, inhibited TNFα-induced ICAM-1 expression. Ciglitazone did not prevent TNFα-induced degradation of the cytosolic inhibitor of NF-κB (IκB, but inhibited the nuclear translocation of p65 induced by TNFα and suppressed the NF-κB/DNA binding activity. Conclusion: These findings suggest that ciglitazone inhibits TNFα-induced ICAM1 gene expression in human ASM cells through

  7. Engineering of red cells of Arabidopsis thaliana and comparative genome-wide gene expression analysis of red cells versus wild-type cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Ming-Zhu; Xie, De-Yu

    2011-04-01

    We report metabolic engineering of Arabidopsis red cells and genome-wide gene expression analysis associated with anthocyanin biosynthesis and other metabolic pathways between red cells and wild-type (WT) cells. Red cells of A. thaliana were engineered for the first time from the leaves of production of anthocyanin pigment 1-Dominant (pap1-D). These red cells produced seven anthocyanin molecules including a new one that was characterized by LC-MS analysis. Wild-type cells established as a control did not produce anthocyanins. A genome-wide microarray analysis revealed that nearly 66 and 65% of genes in the genome were expressed in the red cells and wild-type cells, respectively. In comparison with the WT cells, 3.2% of expressed genes in the red cells were differentially expressed. The expression levels of 14 genes involved in the biosynthetic pathway of anthocyanin were significantly higher in the red cells than in the WT cells. Microarray and RT-PCR analyses demonstrated that the TTG1-GL3/TT8-PAP1 complex regulated the biosynthesis of anthocyanins. Furthermore, most of the genes with significant differential expression levels in the red cells versus the WT cells were characterized with diverse biochemical functions, many of which were mapped to different metabolic pathways (e.g., ribosomal protein biosynthesis, photosynthesis, glycolysis, glyoxylate metabolism, and plant secondary metabolisms) or organelles (e.g., chloroplast). We suggest that the difference in gene expression profiles between the two cell lines likely results from cell types, the overexpression of PAP1, and the high metabolic flux toward anthocyanins.

  8. Essentials of single-cell analysis concepts, applications and future prospects

    CERN Document Server

    Santra, Tuhin

    2016-01-01

    This book provides an overview of single-cell isolation, separation, injection, lysis and dynamics analysis as well as a study of their heterogeneity using different miniaturized devices. As an important part of single-cell analysis, different techniques including electroporation, microinjection, optical trapping, optoporation, rapid electrokinetic patterning and optoelectronic tweezers are described in detail. It presents different fluidic systems (e.g. continuous micro/nano-fluidic devices, microfluidic cytometry) and their integration with sensor technology, optical and hydrodynamic stretchers etc., and demonstrates the applications of single-cell analysis in systems biology, proteomics, genomics, epigenomics, cancer transcriptomics, metabolomics, biomedicine and drug delivery systems. It also discusses the future challenges for single-cell analysis, including the advantages and limitations. This book is enjoyable reading material while at the same time providing essential information to scientists in acad...

  9. Cytoplasmic Overexpression of CD95L in Esophageal Adenocarcinoma Cells Overcomes Resistance to CD95-Mediated Apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory A. Watson

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The CD95/CD95L pathway plays a critical role in tissue homeostasis and immune system regulation; however, the function of this pathway in malignancy remains poorly understood. We hypothesized that CD95L expression in esophageal adenocarcinoma confers advantages to the neoplasm other than immune privilege. Methods: CD95L expression was characterized in immortalized squamous esophagus (HET-1A and Barrett esophagus (BAR-T cells; adenocarcinoma cell lines FLO-1, SEG-1, and BIC-1, and MDA468 (- control; and KFL cells (+ control. Analyses included reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, immunoblots of whole cell and secretory vesicle lysates, FACScan analysis, laser scanning confocal microscopy of native proteins and fluorescent constructs, and assessment of apoptosis and ERK1/2 pathways. Results: Cleaved, soluble CD95L is expressed at both the RNA and protein levels in these cell lines derived from esophageal adenocarcinoma and other human tissues. CD95L was neither trafficked to the cell membrane nor secreted into the media or within vesicles, rather the protein seems to be sequestered in the cytoplasm. CD95 and CD95L colocalize by immunofluorescence, but an interaction was not proven by immunoprecipitation. Overexpression of CD95L in the adenocarcinoma cell lines induced robust apoptosis and, under conditions of pan-caspase inhibition, resulted in activation of ERK signaling. Conclusions: CD95L localization in EA cells is inconsistent with the conference of immune privilege and is more consistent with a function that promotes tumor growth through alternative CD95 signaling. Reduced cell surface expression of CD95 affects cell sensitivity to extracellular apoptotic signals more significantly than alterations in downstream modulators of apoptosis.

  10. Autoantigens targeted in scleroderma patients with vascular disease are enriched in endothelial lineage cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahan, Zsuzsanna H.; Cottrell, Tricia R.; Wigley, Fredrick M.; Antiochos, Brendan; Zambidis, Elias T.; Park, Tea Soon; Halushka, Marc K.; Gutierrez-Alamillo, Laura; Cimbro, Raffaello; Rosen, Antony; Casciola-Rosen, Livia

    2016-01-01

    Objective Scleroderma patients with autoantibodies to centromere proteins (CENPs) and/or interferon-inducible protein 16 (IFI16) are at increased risk of severe vascular complications. We set out to define whether these autoantigens are enriched in cells of the vasculature. Methods Successive stages of embryoid bodies (EBs) as well as vascular progenitors were used to evaluate the expression of scleroderma autoantigens IFI16 and CENP by immunoblotting. CD31 was included to mark early blood vessels. IFI16 and CD31 expression were defined in skin paraffin sections from scleroderma patients and from healthy controls. IFI16 expression was determined by flow cytometry in circulating endothelial cells (CECs) and circulating progenitor cells (CPCs). Results Expression of CENP-A, IFI16 and CD31 was enriched in EBs at days 10 and 12 of differentiation, and particularly in cultures enriched in vascular progenitors (IFI16, CD31, CENPs A and-B). This pattern was distinct from that of comparator autoantigens. Immunohistochemical staining of skin paraffin sections showed enrichment of IFI16 in CD31-positive vascular endothelial cells in biopsies from scleroderma patients and normal controls. Flow cytometry analysis revealed IFI16 expression in CPCs, but minimal expression in CECs. Conclusion Expression of scleroderma autoantigens IFI16 and CENPs, which are associated with severe vascular disease, is increased in vascular progenitors and mature endothelial cells. High level, lineage-enriched expression of autoantigens may explain the striking association between clinical phenotypes and the immune targeting of specific autoantigens. PMID:27159521

  11. Single cell analysis contemporary research and clinical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Cossarizza, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    This book highlights the current state of the art in single cell analysis, an area that involves many fields of science – from clinical hematology, functional analysis and drug screening, to platelet and microparticle analysis, marine biology and fundamental cancer research. This book brings together an eclectic group of current applications, all of which have a significant impact on our current state of knowledge. The authors of these chapters are all pioneering researchers in the field of single cell analysis. The book will not only appeal to those readers more focused on clinical applications, but also those interested in highly technical aspects of the technologies. All of the technologies identified utilize unique applications of photon detection systems.

  12. Characterization of adult α- and β-globin elevated by hydrogen peroxide in cervical cancer cells that play a cytoprotective role against oxidative insults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolei Li

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Hemoglobin (Hgb is the main oxygen and carbon dioxide carrier in cells of erythroid lineage and is responsible for oxygen delivery to the respiring tissues of the body. However, Hgb is also expressed in nonerythroid cells. In the present study, the expression of Hgb in human uterine cervix carcinoma cells and its role in cervical cancer were investigated. METHODOLOGY: The expression level of Hgb in cervical cancer tissues was assessed by quantitative reverse transcriptase-PCR (qRT-PCR. We applied multiple methods, such as RT-PCR, immunoblotting, and immunohistochemical analysis, to confirm Hgb expression in cervical cancer cells. The effects of ectopic expression of Hgb and Hgb mutants on oxidative stress and cell viability were investigated by cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS analysis and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH array, respectively. Both Annexin V staining assay by flow cytometry and caspase-3 activity assay were used, respectively, to evaluate cell apoptosis. RESULTS: qRT-PCR analysis showed that Hgb-α- (HBA1 and Hgb-β-globin (HBB gene expression was significantly higher in cervical carcinoma than in normal cervical tissues, whereas the expression of hematopoietic transcription factors and erythrocyte specific marker genes was not increased. Immunostaining experiments confirmed the expression of Hgb in cancer cells of the uterine cervix. Hgb mRNA and protein were also detected in the human cervical carcinoma cell lines SiHa and CaSki, and Hgb expression was up-regulated by hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress. Importantly, ectopic expression of wild type HBA1/HBB or HBA1, rather than mutants HBA1(H88R/HBB(H93R unable to bind hemo, suppressed oxidative stress and improved cell viability. CONCLUSIONS: The present findings show for the first time that Hgb is expressed in cervical carcinoma cells and may act as an antioxidant, attenuating oxidative stress-induced damage in cervical cancer cells. These data provide a

  13. Identification of proteins specific for human herpesvirus 6-infected human T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balachandran, N.; Amelse, R.E.; Zhou, W.W.; Chang, C.K.

    1989-01-01

    Proteins specific for human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6)-infected human T cells (HSB-2) were examined by using polyclonal rabbit antibodies and monoclonal antibodies against HHV-6-infected cells and human sera. More than 20 proteins and six glycoproteins specific for HHV-6-infected cells were identified from [ 35 S]methionine- and [ 3 H]glucosamine-labeled total-cell extracts. Polyclonal rabbit antibodies immunoprecipitated 33 [ 35 S]methionine-labeled HHV-6-specific polypeptides with approximate molecular weights ranging from 180,000 to 31,000. In immunoprecipitation and Western immunoblot reactions, a patient's serum also recognized more than 30 HHV-6-specific proteins and seven glycoproteins. In contrast, sera from individuals with high-titered antibodies against other human herpesviruses reacted with fewer HHV-6-infected cell proteins, and only a 135,000-M r polypeptide was prominent. Monoclonal antibodies to HHV-6-infected cells reacted with single and multiple polypeptides specific for virus-infected cells and immunoprecipitated three distinct sets of glycoproteins, which were designated gp105k and gp82k, gp116k, gp64k, and gp54k, and gp102k

  14. Identification of proteins specific for human herpesvirus 6-infected human T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balachandran, N.; Amelse, R.E.; Zhou, W.W.; Chang, C.K.

    1989-01-01

    Proteins specific for human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6)-infected human T cells (HSB-2) were examined by using polyclonal rabbit antibodies and monoclonal antibodies against HHV-6-infected cells and human sera. More than 20 proteins and six glycoproteins specific for HHV-6-infected cells were identified from [ 35 S]methionine- and [ 3 H]glucosamine-labeled total-cell extracts. Polyclonal rabbit antibodies immunoprecipitated 33 [ 35 S]methionine-labeled HHV-6-specific polypeptides with approximate molecular weights ranging from 180,000 to 31,000. In immunoprecipitation and Western immunoblot reactions, a patient's serum also recognized more than 30 HHV-6-specific proteins and seven glycoproteins. In contrast, sera from individuals with high-titered antibodies against other human herpes viruses reacted with few HHV-6-infected cell proteins, and only a 135,000-M/sub r/ polypeptide was prominent. Monoclonal antibodies to HHV-6-infected cells reacted with single and multiple polypeptides specific for virus-infected cells and immunoprecipitated three distinct sets of glycoproteins, which were designated gp105K and gp92k, gp116k, gp64k, and gp54k, and gp102k

  15. Analysis of live cell images: Methods, tools and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nketia, Thomas A; Sailem, Heba; Rohde, Gustavo; Machiraju, Raghu; Rittscher, Jens

    2017-02-15

    Advances in optical microscopy, biosensors and cell culturing technologies have transformed live cell imaging. Thanks to these advances live cell imaging plays an increasingly important role in basic biology research as well as at all stages of drug development. Image analysis methods are needed to extract quantitative information from these vast and complex data sets. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of available image analysis methods for live cell imaging, in particular required preprocessing image segmentation, cell tracking and data visualisation methods. The potential opportunities recent advances in machine learning, especially deep learning, and computer vision provide are being discussed. This review includes overview of the different available software packages and toolkits. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Suppression of adhesion-induced protein tyrosine phosphorylation decreases invasive and metastatic potentials of B16-BL6 melanoma cells by protein tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, C; Han, R

    1997-01-01

    Protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) appears to be involved in the activation of signaling during cell attachment to and spreading on extracellular matrix (ECM) in the metastatic cascade. To verify the assumption that PTK inhibitors might impair ECM signaling and prevent cancer metastasis, the highly metastatic B16-BL6 mouse melanoma cells were exposed to the PTK inhibitor genistein for 3 days. The ability of the cells to invade through reconstituted basement membrane (Matrigel) and to establish experimental pulmonary metastatic foci in C57BL/6 mice decreased after genistein exposure. The genistein-treated cells were also prevented from attaching to Matrigel and spread extremely poorly on the ECM substratum. Immunoblot analysis showed that tyrosine phosphorylation of a 125-kD protein in response to cell spreading on Matrigel was suppressed in the genistein-treated cells. Adhesion-induced protein tyrosine phosphorylation represents the earlier and specific event in the activation of ECM signaling, so this result implied ECM signaling was impaired in the treated cells. With immunofluorescence microscopy, the adhesion-induced tyrosine phosphorylated proteins were located at the pericytoplasms of well-spread cells, but not at the periphery of poorly spread genistein-treated cells. Therefore, this paper suggests that genistein might impair ECM signaling and subsequently prevent cancer cells from spreading well and invading or establishing metastasis through the suppression of adhesion-induced protein tyrosine phosphorylation. PTKs and adhesion-induced protein tyrosine phosphorylation might play a role in the control of invasion and metastasis.

  17. BK virus has tropism for human salivary gland cells in vitro: Implications for transmission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeffers, Liesl K.; Madden, Vicki; Webster-Cyriaque, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    Background: In this study, it was determined that BKV is shed in saliva and an in vitro model system was developed whereby BKV can productively infect both submandibular (HSG) and parotid (HSY) salivary gland cell lines. Results: BKV was detected in oral fluids using quantitative real-time PCR (QRTPCR). BKV infection was determined using quantitative RT-PCR, immunofluorescence and immunoblotting assays. The infectivity of BKV was inhibited by pre-incubation of the virus with gangliosides that saturated the major capsid protein, VP1, halting receptor mediated BKV entry into salivary gland cells. Examination of infected cultures by transmission electron microscopy revealed 45-50 nm BK virions clearly visible within the cells. Subsequent to infection, encapsidated BK virus was detected in the supernatant. Conclusion: We thus demonstrated that BKV was detected in oral fluids and that BK infection and replication occur in vitro in salivary gland cells. These data collectively suggest the potential for BKV oral route of transmission and oral pathogenesis.

  18. Wnt modulates MCL1 to control cell survival in triple negative breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Lixin; Zhang, Hang; Zheng, Shu; Liu, Zheng; Ann, David; Yen, Yun; Perez, Aldwin Apollo; Fujie, Sayuri; Warden, Charles; Li, Jie; Wang, Yafan; Yung, Bryan; Chen, Yun-Ru; Liu, Xiyong

    2014-01-01

    Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) has higher rates of recurrence and distant metastasis, and poorer outcome as compared to non-TNBC. Aberrant activation of WNT signaling has been detected in TNBC, which might be important for triggering oncogenic conversion of breast epithelial cell. Therefore, we directed our focus on identifying the WNT ligand and its underlying mechanism in TNBC cells. We performed large-scale analysis of public microarray data to screen the WNT ligands and the clinical significance of the responsible ligand in TNBC. WNT5B was identified and its overexpression in TNBC was confirmed by immunohistochemistry staining, Western blot and ELISA. ShRNA was used to knockdown WNT5B expression (shWNT5B). Cellular functional alteration with shWNT5B treatment was determined by using wound healing assay, mammosphere assay; while cell cycle and apoptosis were examined by flowcytometry. Mitochondrial morphology was photographed by electron microscope. Biological change of mitochondria was detected by RT-PCR and oxygen consumption assay. Activation of WNT pathway and its downstream targets were evaluated by liciferase assay, immunohistochemistry staining and immunoblot analysis. Statistical methods used in the experiments besides microarray analysis was two-tailed t-test. WNT5B was elevated both in the tumor and the patients’ serum. Suppression of WNT5B remarkably impaired cell growth, migration and mammosphere formation. Additionally, G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and caspase-independent apoptosis was observed. Study of the possible mechanism indicated that these effects occurred through suppression of mitochondrial biogenesis, as evidenced by reduced mitochondrial DNA (MtDNA) and compromised oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). In Vivo and in vitro data uncovered that WNT5B modulated mitochondrial physiology was mediated by MCL1, which was regulated by WNT/β-catenin responsive gene, Myc. Clinic data analysis revealed that both WNT5B and MCL1 are associated with

  19. Comparison between dot-immunoblotting assay and clinical sign determination method for quantifying avian infectious bronchitis virus vaccine by titration in embryonated eggs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuk, Seong-Su; Kwon, Jung-Hoon; Noh, Jin-Yong; Hong, Woo-Tack; Gwon, Gyeong-Bin; Jeong, Jei-Hyun; Jeong, Sol; Youn, Ha-Na; Heo, Yong-Hwan; Lee, Joong-Bok; Park, Seung-Yong; Choi, In-Soo; Song, Chang-Seon

    2016-04-01

    A sensitive and specific method for measuring the vaccine titer of infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) is important to commercial manufacturers for improving vaccine quality. Typically, IBV is titrated in embryonated chicken eggs, and the infectivity of the virus dilutions is determined by assessing clinical signs in the embryos as evidence of viral propagation. In this study, we used a dot-immunoblotting assay (DIA) to measure the titers of IBV vaccines that originated from different pathogenic strains or attenuation methods in embryonated eggs, and we compared this assay to the currently used method, clinical sign evaluation. To compare the two methods, we used real-time reverse transcription-PCR, which had the lowest limit of detection for propagated IBV. As a clinical sign of infection, dwarfism of the embryo was quantified using the embryo: egg (EE) index. The DIA showed 9.41% higher sensitivity and 15.5% higher specificity than the clinical sign determination method. The DIA was particularly useful for measuring the titer of IBV vaccine that did not cause apparent stunting but propagated in embryonated chicken eggs such as a heat-adapted vaccine strain. The results of this study indicate that the DIA is a rapid, sensitive, reliable method for determining IBV vaccine titer in embryonated eggs at a relatively low cost. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. RoboSCell: An automated single cell arraying and analysis instrument

    KAUST Repository

    Sakaki, Kelly; Foulds, Ian G.; Liu, William; Dechev, Nikolai; Burke, Robert Douglas; Park, Edward

    2009-01-01

    Single cell research has the potential to revolutionize experimental methods in biomedical sciences and contribute to clinical practices. Recent studies suggest analysis of single cells reveals novel features of intracellular processes, cell-to-cell

  1. Multispectral fingerprinting for improved in vivo cell dynamics analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cooper Cameron HJ

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tracing cell dynamics in the embryo becomes tremendously difficult when cell trajectories cross in space and time and tissue density obscure individual cell borders. Here, we used the chick neural crest (NC as a model to test multicolor cell labeling and multispectral confocal imaging strategies to overcome these roadblocks. Results We found that multicolor nuclear cell labeling and multispectral imaging led to improved resolution of in vivo NC cell identification by providing a unique spectral identity for each cell. NC cell spectral identity allowed for more accurate cell tracking and was consistent during short term time-lapse imaging sessions. Computer model simulations predicted significantly better object counting for increasing cell densities in 3-color compared to 1-color nuclear cell labeling. To better resolve cell contacts, we show that a combination of 2-color membrane and 1-color nuclear cell labeling dramatically improved the semi-automated analysis of NC cell interactions, yet preserved the ability to track cell movements. We also found channel versus lambda scanning of multicolor labeled embryos significantly reduced the time and effort of image acquisition and analysis of large 3D volume data sets. Conclusions Our results reveal that multicolor cell labeling and multispectral imaging provide a cellular fingerprint that may uniquely determine a cell's position within the embryo. Together, these methods offer a spectral toolbox to resolve in vivo cell dynamics in unprecedented detail.

  2. Microfluidic systems and methods for transport and lysis of cells and analysis of cell lysate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culbertson, Christopher T [Oak Ridge, TN; Jacobson, Stephen C [Knoxville, TN; McClain, Maxine A [Knoxville, TN; Ramsey, J Michael [Knoxville, TN

    2008-09-02

    Microfluidic systems and methods are disclosed which are adapted to transport and lyse cellular components of a test sample for analysis. The disclosed microfluidic systems and methods, which employ an electric field to rupture the cell membrane, cause unusually rapid lysis, thereby minimizing continued cellular activity and resulting in greater accuracy of analysis of cell processes.

  3. Inhibitory effects of epigallocatechin-3-O-gallate on serum-stimulated rat aortic smooth muscle cells via nuclear factor-κB down-modulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Dong-Wook; Lim, Hye Ryeon; Baek, Hyun Sook; Lee, Mi Hee; Lee, Seung Jin; Hyon, Suong-Hyu; Park, Jong-Chul

    2006-01-01

    The abnormal growth of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) plays an important role in vascular diseases, including atherosclerosis and restenosis after angioplasty. Although (-)-epigallocatechin-3-O-gallate (EGCG) has antiproliferative effects on various cells, relatively a little is known about precise mechanisms of the inhibitory effects of EGCG on SMCs. In this study, the inhibitory effects of EGCG on attachment, proliferation, migration, and cell cycle of rat aortic SMCs (RASMCs) with serum stimulation were investigated. Also, the involvement of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) during these inhibitions by EGCG was examined. EGCG treatment resulted in significant (p < 0.05) inhibition in attachment and proliferation of RASMCs induced by serum. While non-treated RASMCs migrated into denuded area in response to serum and showed essentially complete closure after 36 h, EGCG-treated cells covered only 31% of the area even after 48 h of incubation. Furthermore, EGCG treatment resulted in an appreciable cell cycle arrest at both G0/G1- and G2/M-phases. The immunoblot analysis revealed that the constitutive expression of NF-κB/p65 nuclear protein in RASMCs was lowered by EGCG in both the cytosol and the nucleus in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggest that the EGCG-caused inhibitory effects on RASMCs may be mediated through NF-κB down-modulation

  4. Heterologous Expression of the Carrot Hsp17.7 gene Increased Growth, Cell Viability, and Protein Solubility in Transformed Yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) under Heat, Cold, Acid, and Osmotic Stress Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Eunhye; Kim, Minhye; Park, Yunho; Ahn, Yeh-Jin

    2017-08-01

    In industrial fermentation of yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), culture conditions are often modified from the optimal growth conditions of the cells to maintain large-scale cultures and/or to increase recombinant protein production. However, altered growth conditions can be stressful to yeast cells resulting in reduced cell growth and viability. In this study, a small heat shock protein gene from carrot (Daucus carota L.), Hsp17.7, was inserted into the yeast genome via homologous recombination to increase tolerance to stress conditions that can occur during industrial culture. A DNA construct, Translational elongation factor gene promoter-carrot Hsp17.7 gene-Phosphoribosyl-anthranilate isomerase gene (an auxotrophic marker), was generated by a series of PCRs and introduced into the chromosome IV of the yeast genome. Immunoblot analysis showed that carrot Hsp17.7 accumulated in the transformed yeast cell lines. Growth rates and cell viability of these cell lines were higher than control cell lines under heat, cold, acid, and hyperosmotic stress conditions. Soluble protein levels were higher in the transgenic cell lines than control cell lines under heat and cold conditions, suggesting the molecular chaperone function of the recombinant Hsp17.7. This study showed that a recombinant DNA construct containing a HSP gene from carrot was successfully expressed in yeast by homologous recombination and increased tolerances to abiotic stress conditions.

  5. A simple method for purification of vestibular hair cells and non-sensory cells, and application for proteomic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herget, Meike; Scheibinger, Mirko; Guo, Zhaohua; Jan, Taha A; Adams, Christopher M; Cheng, Alan G; Heller, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Mechanosensitive hair cells and supporting cells comprise the sensory epithelia of the inner ear. The paucity of both cell types has hampered molecular and cell biological studies, which often require large quantities of purified cells. Here, we report a strategy allowing the enrichment of relatively pure populations of vestibular hair cells and non-sensory cells including supporting cells. We utilized specific uptake of fluorescent styryl dyes for labeling of hair cells. Enzymatic isolation and flow cytometry was used to generate pure populations of sensory hair cells and non-sensory cells. We applied mass spectrometry to perform a qualitative high-resolution analysis of the proteomic makeup of both the hair cell and non-sensory cell populations. Our conservative analysis identified more than 600 proteins with a false discovery rate of Analysis of proteins exclusively detected in either population revealed 64 proteins that were specific to hair cells and 103 proteins that were only detectable in non-sensory cells. Statistical analyses extended these groups by 53 proteins that are strongly upregulated in hair cells versus non-sensory cells and vice versa by 68 proteins. Our results demonstrate that enzymatic dissociation of styryl dye-labeled sensory hair cells and non-sensory cells is a valid method to generate pure enough cell populations for flow cytometry and subsequent molecular analyses.

  6. Curcumin suppresses growth of mesothelioma cells in vitro and in vivo, in part, by stimulating apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Rishi, Arun K; Wu, Wenjuan; Polin, Lisa; Sharma, Sunita; Levi, Edi; Albelda, Steven; Pass, Harvey I; Wali, Anil

    2011-11-01

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is an aggressive, asbestos-related malignancy of the thoracic pleura. Although, platinum-based agents are the first line of therapy, there is an urgent need for second-line therapies to treat the drug-resistant MPM. Cell cycle as well as apoptosis pathways are frequently altered in MPM and thus remain attractive targets for intervention strategies. Curcumin, the major component in the spice turmeric, alone or in combination with other chemotherapeutics has been under investigation for a number of cancers. In this study, we investigated the biological and molecular responses of MPM cells to curcumin treatments and the mechanisms involved. Flow-cytometric analyses coupled with western immunoblotting and gene-array analyses were conducted to determine mechanisms of curcumin-dependent growth suppression of human (H2373, H2452, H2461, and H226) and murine (AB12) MPM cells. Curcumin inhibited MPM cell growth in a dose- and time-dependent manner while pretreatment of MPM cells with curcumin enhanced cisplatin efficacy. Curcumin activated the stress-activated p38 kinase, caspases 9 and 3, caused elevated levels of proapoptotic proteins Bax, stimulated PARP cleavage, and apoptosis. In addition, curcumin treatments stimulated expression of novel transducers of cell growth suppression such as CARP-1, XAF1, and SULF1 proteins. Oral administration of curcumin inhibited growth of murine MPM cell-derived tumors in vivo in part by stimulating apoptosis. Thus, curcumin targets cell cycle and promotes apoptosis to suppress MPM growth in vitro and in vivo. Our studies provide a proof-of-principle rationale for further in-depth analysis of MPM growth suppression mechanisms and their future exploitation in effective management of resistant MPM.

  7. Microdose analysis of ion strikes on SRAM cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheick, L.

    2003-12-01

    A method of measuring the effect from exposure to highly localized ionizing radiation on microstructures is described. The voltage at which a commercial SRAM cell cannot hold a programmed state changes with microdose. The microdose distribution across the array, in addition to the analysis of the occurrence of anomalous shifts in operating bias due to rare, large energy-deposition events is studied. The effect of multiple hits on a SRAM cell is presented. A general theory on multiple hits from which basic device parameters can be extracted is presented. SPICE, as well as analysis of basic device physics, is used to analyze the damage to individual transistors and the response of a SRAM cell.

  8. Quantitative high-resolution genomic analysis of single cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannemann, Juliane; Meyer-Staeckling, Sönke; Kemming, Dirk; Alpers, Iris; Joosse, Simon A; Pospisil, Heike; Kurtz, Stefan; Görndt, Jennifer; Püschel, Klaus; Riethdorf, Sabine; Pantel, Klaus; Brandt, Burkhard

    2011-01-01

    During cancer progression, specific genomic aberrations arise that can determine the scope of the disease and can be used as predictive or prognostic markers. The detection of specific gene amplifications or deletions in single blood-borne or disseminated tumour cells that may give rise to the development of metastases is of great clinical interest but technically challenging. In this study, we present a method for quantitative high-resolution genomic analysis of single cells. Cells were isolated under permanent microscopic control followed by high-fidelity whole genome amplification and subsequent analyses by fine tiling array-CGH and qPCR. The assay was applied to single breast cancer cells to analyze the chromosomal region centred by the therapeutical relevant EGFR gene. This method allows precise quantitative analysis of copy number variations in single cell diagnostics.

  9. RoboSCell: An automated single cell arraying and analysis instrument

    KAUST Repository

    Sakaki, Kelly

    2009-09-09

    Single cell research has the potential to revolutionize experimental methods in biomedical sciences and contribute to clinical practices. Recent studies suggest analysis of single cells reveals novel features of intracellular processes, cell-to-cell interactions and cell structure. The methods of single cell analysis require mechanical resolution and accuracy that is not possible using conventional techniques. Robotic instruments and novel microdevices can achieve higher throughput and repeatability; however, the development of such instrumentation is a formidable task. A void exists in the state-of-the-art for automated analysis of single cells. With the increase in interest in single cell analyses in stem cell and cancer research the ability to facilitate higher throughput and repeatable procedures is necessary. In this paper, a high-throughput, single cell microarray-based robotic instrument, called the RoboSCell, is described. The proposed instrument employs a partially transparent single cell microarray (SCM) integrated with a robotic biomanipulator for in vitro analyses of live single cells trapped at the array sites. Cells, labeled with immunomagnetic particles, are captured at the array sites by channeling magnetic fields through encapsulated permalloy channels in the SCM. The RoboSCell is capable of systematically scanning the captured cells temporarily immobilized at the array sites and using optical methods to repeatedly measure extracellular and intracellular characteristics over time. The instrument\\'s capabilities are demonstrated by arraying human T lymphocytes and measuring the uptake dynamics of calcein acetoxymethylester-all in a fully automated fashion. © 2009 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  10. Regulation of proximal tubular epithelial cell CD44-mediated binding and internalisation of hyaluronan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Stuart George; Ito, Takafumi; Phillips, Aled Owain

    2003-09-01

    Increased expression of the connective tissue polysaccharide hyaluronan (HA) in the renal corticointerstitium is associated with progressive renal fibrosis. Numerous studies have demonstrated involvement proximal tubular epithelial cells in the fibrotic process and in the current study we have characterised their expression of the HA receptor, CD44, and examined changes in CD44 expression and function in response to either IL-1beta or glucose. Characterisation of CD44 splice variant expression was carried out in primary cultures of human proximal tubular cells (PTC) and HK2 cells. Binding and internalisation HA was examined by addition of exogenous of fluorescein-HA (fl-HA), and expression of CD44 examined by immunoblot analysis and flow cytometry. Alteration in "functional" CD44 was determined by immunoprecipitation of CD44 following stimulation in the presence of fl-HA. PTC, both primary culture and the PTC cell line, HK2, express at least 5 CD44 splice variants, the expression of which are not altered by addition of either IL-1beta or 25mM D-glucose. Addition of either stimulus increased cell surface binding and internalisation of fl-HA and increased expression of functionally active CD44. Increased binding and internalisation of fl-HA, was blocked by anti-CD44 antibody, and by the inhibition of O-glycosylation. The data demonstrate that stimuli inducing PTC HA synthesis also regulate PTC-HA interactions. Furthermore increased HA binding and internalisation is the result of post-translational modification of CD44 by O-glycosylation, rather than by alteration in expression of CD44 at the cell surface, or by alternate use of CD44 splice variants.

  11. Nanoparticle curcumin ameliorates experimental colitis via modulation of gut microbiota and induction of regulatory T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masashi Ohno

    Full Text Available Curcumin is a hydrophobic polyphenol derived from turmeric, a traditional Indian spice. Curcumin exhibits various biological functions, but its clinical application is limited due to its poor absorbability after oral administration. A newly developed nanoparticle curcumin shows improved absorbability in vivo. In this study, we examined the effects of nanoparticle curcumin (named Theracurmin on experimental colitis in mice.BALB/c mice were fed with 3% dextran sulfate sodium (DSS in water. Mucosal cytokine expression and lymphocyte subpopulation were analyzed by real-time PCR and flow cytometry, respectively. The profile of the gut microbiota was analyzed by real-time PCR.Treatment with nanoparticle curcumin significantly attenuated body weight loss, disease activity index, histological colitis score and significantly improved mucosal permeability. Immunoblot analysis showed that NF-κB activation in colonic epithelial cells was significantly suppressed by treatment with nanoparticle curcumin. Mucosal mRNA expression of inflammatory mediators was significantly suppressed by treatment with nanoparticle curcumin. Treatment with nanoparticle curcumin increased the abundance of butyrate-producing bacteria and fecal butyrate level. This was accompanied by increased expansion of CD4+ Foxp3+ regulatory T cells and CD103+ CD8α- regulatory dendritic cells in the colonic mucosa.Treatment with nanoparticle curcumin suppressed the development of DSS-induced colitis potentially via modulation of gut microbial structure. These responses were associated with induction of mucosal immune cells with regulatory properties. Nanoparticle curcumin is one of the promising candidates as a therapeutic option for the treatment of IBD.

  12. An integrative multi-platform analysis for discovering biomarkers of osteosarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Guodong; Zhang, Wenjuan; Zeng, Huazong; Chen, Lei; Wang, Wenjing; Liu, Jilong; Zhang, Zhiyu; Cai, Zhengdong

    2009-01-01

    SELDI-TOF-MS (Surface Enhanced Laser Desorption/Ionization-Time of Flight-Mass Spectrometry) has become an attractive approach for cancer biomarker discovery due to its ability to resolve low mass proteins and high-throughput capability. However, the analytes from mass spectrometry are described only by their mass-to-charge ratio (m/z) values without further identification and annotation. To discover potential biomarkers for early diagnosis of osteosarcoma, we designed an integrative workflow combining data sets from both SELDI-TOF-MS and gene microarray analysis. After extracting the information for potential biomarkers from SELDI data and microarray analysis, their associations were further inferred by link-test to identify biomarkers that could likely be used for diagnosis. Immuno-blot analysis was then performed to examine whether the expression of the putative biomarkers were indeed altered in serum from patients with osteosarcoma. Six differentially expressed protein peaks with strong statistical significances were detected by SELDI-TOF-MS. Four of the proteins were up-regulated and two of them were down-regulated. Microarray analysis showed that, compared with an osteoblastic cell line, the expression of 653 genes was changed more than 2 folds in three osteosarcoma cell lines. While expression of 310 genes was increased, expression of the other 343 genes was decreased. The two sets of biomarkers candidates were combined by the link-test statistics, indicating that 13 genes were potential biomarkers for early diagnosis of osteosarcoma. Among these genes, cytochrome c1 (CYC-1) was selected for further experimental validation. Link-test on datasets from both SELDI-TOF-MS and microarray high-throughput analysis can accelerate the identification of tumor biomarkers. The result confirmed that CYC-1 may be a promising biomarker for early diagnosis of osteosarcoma

  13. Single-cell regulome data analysis by SCRAT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Zhicheng; Zhou, Weiqiang; Ji, Hongkai

    2017-09-15

    Emerging single-cell technologies (e.g. single-cell ATAC-seq, DNase-seq or ChIP-seq) have made it possible to assay regulome of individual cells. Single-cell regulome data are highly sparse and discrete. Analyzing such data is challenging. User-friendly software tools are still lacking. We present SCRAT, a Single-Cell Regulome Analysis Toolbox with a graphical user interface, for studying cell heterogeneity using single-cell regulome data. SCRAT can be used to conveniently summarize regulatory activities according to different features (e.g. gene sets, transcription factor binding motif sites, etc.). Using these features, users can identify cell subpopulations in a heterogeneous biological sample, infer cell identities of each subpopulation, and discover distinguishing features such as gene sets and transcription factors that show different activities among subpopulations. SCRAT is freely available at https://zhiji.shinyapps.io/scrat as an online web service and at https://github.com/zji90/SCRAT as an R package. hji@jhu.edu. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  14. Arf6 regulates EGF-induced internalization of E-cadherin in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Rui; Zhang, Yujie; Gu, Luo; Zheng, Jianchao; Cui, Jie; Dong, Jing; Du, Jun

    2015-01-01

    E-cadherin internalization facilitates dissolution of adherens junctions and promotes tumor cell epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and migration. Our previous results have shown that Arf6 exerts pro-migratory action in breast cancer cells after EGF stimulation. Despite the fact that EGF signaling stimulates EMT of breast cancer cells, the effect of Arf6 on internalization of E-cadherin of breast cancer cells under EGF treatment remains to be determined. Here, we showed that EGF dose-dependently stimulated E-cadherin internalization by MCF-7 cells with the maximal effect at 50 ng/ml. Meanwhile, EGF treatment markedly increased Arf6 activation. Arf6 was involved in complexes of E-cadherin, and more E-cadherin was pulled down with Arf6 when the activity of the latter was increased. Immunoblotting and immunofluorescence assays showed that transfection breast cancer cells with Arf6-T27N or Arf6 siRNA suppressed EGF-induced E-cadherin internalization. Taken together, our study demonstrated that Arf6 activation plays a potential role in EGF-induced E-cadherin internalization, providing new mechanism underlying the effect of Arf6 on promoting breast cancer cell metastasis.

  15. Single cell analysis: the new frontier in 'Omics'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Daojing; Bodovitz, Steven

    2010-01-14

    Cellular heterogeneity arising from stochastic expression of genes, proteins, and metabolites is a fundamental principle of cell biology, but single cell analysis has been beyond the capabilities of 'Omics' technologies. This is rapidly changing with the recent examples of single cell genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics. The rate of change is expected to accelerate owing to emerging technologies that range from micro/nanofluidics to microfabricated interfaces for mass spectrometry to third- and fourth-generation automated DNA sequencers. As described in this review, single cell analysis is the new frontier in Omics, and single cell Omics has the potential to transform systems biology through new discoveries derived from cellular heterogeneity.

  16. Aspirin acetylates multiple cellular proteins in HCT-116 colon cancer cells: Identification of novel targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marimuthu, Srinivasan; Chivukula, Raghavender S V; Alfonso, Lloyd F; Moridani, Majid; Hagen, Fred K; Bhat, G Jayarama

    2011-11-01

    Epidemiological and clinical observations provide consistent evidence that regular intake of aspirin may effectively inhibit the occurrence of epithelial tumors; however, the molecular mechanisms are not completely understood. In the present study, we determined the ability of aspirin to acetylate and post-translationally modify cellular proteins in HCT-116 human colon cancer cells to understand the potential mechanisms by which it may exerts anti-cancer effects. Using anti-acetyl lysine antibodies, here we demonstrate that aspirin causes the acetylation of multiple proteins whose molecular weight ranged from 20 to 200 kDa. The identity of these proteins was determined, using immuno-affinity purification, mass spectrometry and immuno-blotting. A total of 33 cellular proteins were potential targets of aspirin-mediated acetylation, while 16 were identified as common to both the control and aspirin-treated samples. These include enzymes of glycolytic pathway, cytoskeleton proteins, histones, ribosomal and mitochondrial proteins. The glycolytic enzymes which were identified include aldolase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, enolase, pyruvate kinase M2, and lactate dehydrogenase A and B chains. Immunoblotting experiment showed that aspirin also acetylated glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and transketolase, both enzymes of pentose phosphate pathway involved in ribonucleotide biosynthesis. In vitro assays of these enzymes revealed that aspirin did not affect pyruvate kinase and lactate dehydrogenase activity; however, it decreased glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase activity. Similar results were also observed in HT-29 human colon cancer cells. Selective inhibition of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase may represent an important mechanism by which aspirin may exert its anti-cancer effects through inhibition of ribonucleotide synthesis.

  17. Detection and Quantification of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor Tyrosine Kinases in Primary Human Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fearnley, Gareth W; Wheatcroft, Stephen B; Ponnambalam, Sreenivasan

    2015-01-01

    Proteins differ widely in their pattern of expression depending on organism, tissue, and regulation in response to changing conditions. In the mammalian vasculature, the endothelium responds to vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGFs) via membrane-bound receptor tyrosine kinases (VEGFRs) to modulate many aspects of vascular physiology including vasculogenesis, angiogenesis, and blood pressure. Studies on VEGFR biology are thus dependent on detecting expression levels in different cell types and evaluating how changes in protein levels correlate with changing conditions including circulating VEGF levels. Here, we present a robust immunoblot-based protocol for detecting and quantifying VEGFRs in human endothelial cells. Using internal and external standards, we can rapidly evaluate receptor copy number and assess how this is altered in response to the cellular environment.

  18. Insulin utilizes the PI 3-kinase pathway to inhibit SP-A gene expression in lung epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snyder Jeanne M

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been proposed that high insulin levels may cause delayed lung development in the fetuses of diabetic mothers. A key event in lung development is the production of adequate amounts of pulmonary surfactant. Insulin inhibits the expression of surfactant protein A (SP-A, the major surfactant-associated protein, in lung epithelial cells. In the present study, we investigated the signal transduction pathways involved in insulin inhibition of SP-A gene expression. Methods H441 cells, a human lung adenocarcinoma cell line, or human fetal lung explants were incubated with or without insulin. Transcription run-on assays were used to determine SP-A gene transcription rates. Northern blot analysis was used to examine the effect of various signal transduction inhibitors on SP-A gene expression. Immunoblot analysis was used to evaluate the levels and phosphorylation states of signal transduction protein kinases. Results Insulin decreased SP-A gene transcription in human lung epithelial cells within 1 hour. Insulin did not affect p44/42 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK phosphorylation and the insulin inhibition of SP-A mRNA levels was not affected by PD98059, an inhibitor of the p44/42 MAPK pathway. In contrast, insulin increased p70 S6 kinase Thr389 phosphorylation within 15 minutes. Wortmannin or LY294002, both inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase, or rapamycin, an inhibitor of the activation of p70 S6 kinase, a downstream effector in the PI 3-kinase pathway, abolished or attenuated the insulin-induced inhibition of SP-A mRNA levels. Conclusion Insulin inhibition of SP-A gene expression in lung epithelial cells probably occurs via the rapamycin-sensitive PI 3-kinase signaling pathway.

  19. Bovine lactoferrin and lactoferricin exert antitumor activities on human colorectal cancer cells (HT-29) by activating various signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Rulan; Lönnerdal, Bo

    2017-02-01

    Lactoferrin (Lf) is an iron-binding glycoprotein that is present at high concentrations in milk. Bovine lactoferricin (LfcinB) is a peptide fragment generated by pepsin proteolysis of bovine lactoferrin (bLf). LfcinB consists of amino acid residues 17-41 proximal to the N-terminus of bLf and a disulfide bond between residues 19 and 36, forming a loop. Both bLf and LfcinB have been demonstrated to have antitumor activities. Colorectal cancer is the second most common cause of cancer death in developed countries. We hypothesized that bLf and LfcinB exert antitumor activities on colon cancer cells (HT-29) by triggering various signaling pathways. bLf and LfcinB significantly induced apoptosis in HT-29 cells but not in normal human intestinal epithelial cells, as revealed by the ApoTox-Glo Triplex Assay. The LIVE/DEAD cell viability assay showed that both bLf and LfcinB reduced the viability of HT-29 cells. Transcriptome analysis indicated that bLf, cyclic LfcinB, and linear LfcinB exerted antitumor activities by differentially activating diverse signaling pathways, including p53, apoptosis, and angiopoietin signaling. Immunoblotting results confirmed that both bLf and LfcinBs increased expression of caspase-8, p53, and p21, critical proteins in tumor suppression. These results provide valuable information regarding bLf and LfcinB for potential clinical applications in colon cancer therapy.

  20. Quantitative high-resolution genomic analysis of single cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliane Hannemann

    Full Text Available During cancer progression, specific genomic aberrations arise that can determine the scope of the disease and can be used as predictive or prognostic markers. The detection of specific gene amplifications or deletions in single blood-borne or disseminated tumour cells that may give rise to the development of metastases is of great clinical interest but technically challenging. In this study, we present a method for quantitative high-resolution genomic analysis of single cells. Cells were isolated under permanent microscopic control followed by high-fidelity whole genome amplification and subsequent analyses by fine tiling array-CGH and qPCR. The assay was applied to single breast cancer cells to analyze the chromosomal region centred by the therapeutical relevant EGFR gene. This method allows precise quantitative analysis of copy number variations in single cell diagnostics.

  1. Automated migration analysis based on cell texture: method & reliability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chittenden Thomas W

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this paper, we present and validate a way to measure automatically the extent of cell migration based on automated examination of a series of digital photographs. It was designed specifically to identify the impact of Second Hand Smoke (SHS on endothelial cell migration but has broader applications. The analysis has two stages: (1 preprocessing of image texture, and (2 migration analysis. Results The output is a graphic overlay that indicates the front lines of cell migration superimposed on each original image, with automated reporting of the distance traversed vs. time. Expert preference compares to manual placement of leading edge shows complete equivalence of automated vs. manual leading edge definition for cell migration measurement. Conclusion Our method is indistinguishable from careful manual determinations of cell front lines, with the advantages of full automation, objectivity, and speed.

  2. Destructive physical analysis of spaceflight qualified nickel-hydrogen battery cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coates, D.; Francisco, J.; Giertz, K.; Smith, R.; Nowlin, G. [Eagle-Picher Industries, Inc., Joplin, MO (United States). Advanced Systems Operation

    1996-11-01

    Nickel-hydrogen (NiH{sub 2}) batteries are extensively used in the aerospace industry as the power system of choice in earth-orbital spacecraft. The batteries are typically required to support a 10--15 year geosynchronous-earth-orbit (GEO) mission or thousands of charge/discharge cycles in low-earth-orbit (LEO). Reliability requirements for this application are extensive and include the routine destructive physical analysis (DPA) of sample flight production battery cells. Standard procedures have been developed over the past 15 years for the disassembly, handling and detailed analysis of the cell components. These include mechanical, thermal and impedance analysis, electrolyte concentration and distribution, gas management, corrosion, dye penetrant and radiographic inspection, and several chemical and electrochemical analytical procedures for the battery electrodes and separator materials. Electrolyte management is a critical issue in the electrolyte-starved NiH{sub 2} cell design and procedures have been developed to particularly address this aspect of the DPA analysis. Specific analytical procedures for cell components includes nickel electrode active material and sinter substrate corrosion analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive x-ray analysis (EDX), cobalt ion, potassium-carbonate and anion analysis. Many of these procedures are also applicable to aerospace battery systems in general and to other alkaline rechargeable batteries.

  3. Covisualization in living onion cells of putative integrin, putative spectrin, actin, putative intermediate filaments, and other proteins at the cell membrane and in an endomembrane sheath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuzeau, C.; Doolittle, K. W.; McNally, J. G.; Pickard, B. G.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    Covisualizations with wide-field computational optical-sectioning microscopy of living epidermal cells of the onion bulb scale have evidenced two major new cellular features. First, a sheath of cytoskeletal elements clads the endomembrane system. Similar elements clad the inner faces of punctate plasmalemmal sites interpreted as plasmalemmal control centers. One component of the endomembrane sheath and plasmalemmal control center cladding is anti-genicity-recognized by two injected antibodies against animal spectrin. Immunoblots of separated epidermal protein also showed bands recognized by these antibodies. Injected phalloidin identified F-actin with the same cellular distribution pattern, as did antibodies against intermediate-filament protein and other cytoskeletal elements known from animal cells. Injection of general protein stains demonstrated the abundance of endomembrane sheath protein. Second, the endomembrane system, like the plasmalemmal puncta, contains antigen recognized by an anti-beta 1 integrin injected into the cytoplasm. Previously, immunoblots of separated epidermal protein were shown to have a major band recognized both by this antibody prepared against a peptide representing the cytosolic region of beta 1 integrin and an antibody against the matrix region of beta 1 integrin. The latter antiboby also identified puncta at the external face of protoplasts. It is proposed that integrin and associated transmembrane proteins secure the endomembrane sheath and transmit signals between it and the lumen or matrix of the endoplasmic reticulum and organellar matrices. This function is comparable to that proposed for such transmembrane linkers in the plasmalemmal control centers, which also appear to bind cytoskeleton and a host of related molecules and transmit signals between them and the wall matrix. It is at the plasmalemmal control centers that the endoplasmic reticulum, a major component of the endomembrane system, attaches to the plasma membrane.

  4. Hamster thecal cells express muscle characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Self, D.A.; Schroeder, P.C.; Gown, A.M.

    1988-01-01

    Contraction of the follicular wall about the time of ovulation appears to be a coordinated event; however, the cells that mediate it remain poorly studied. We examined the theca externa cells in the wall of hamster follicles for the presence of a functional actomyosin system, both in developing follicles and in culture. We used a monoclonal antibody (HHF35) that recognizes the alpha and gamma isoelectric variants of actin normally found in muscle, but not the beta variant associated with non-muscle sources, to evaluate large preovulatory follicles for actin content and composition. Antibody staining of sectioned ovaries showed intense circumferential reactivity in the outermost wall of developing follicles. Immunoblots from two-dimensional gels of theca externa lysates demonstrated the presence of the two muscle-specific isozymes of actin. Immunofluorescence of cultured follicular cells pulse-labeled with [3H] thymidine (for autoradiographic detection of DNA replication) revealed the presence, in many dividing cells, of actin filaments aligned primarily along the longitudinal axis of the cells. In cultures exposed to the calcium ionophore A23187 (10(-4) M) for varying periods (5 min to 1 h), contraction of many individual muscle-actin-positive cells was observed. Immunofluorescence of these cells, fixed immediately after ionophore-induced contraction, revealed compaction of the actin filaments. Our findings demonstrate that the cells of the theca externa contain muscle actins from an early stage and that these cells are capable of contraction even while proliferating in subconfluent cultures. They suggest that follicular growth may include a naturally occurring developmental sequence in which a contractile cell type proliferates in the differentiated state

  5. Tools for Genomic and Transcriptomic Analysis of Microbes at Single-Cell Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zixi Chen

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Microbiologists traditionally study population rather than individual cells, as it is generally assumed that the status of individual cells will be similar to that observed in the population. However, the recent studies have shown that the individual behavior of each single cell could be quite different from that of the whole population, suggesting the importance of extending traditional microbiology studies to single-cell level. With recent technological advances, such as flow cytometry, next-generation sequencing (NGS, and microspectroscopy, single-cell microbiology has greatly enhanced the understanding of individuality and heterogeneity of microbes in many biological systems. Notably, the application of multiple ‘omics’ in single-cell analysis has shed light on how individual cells perceive, respond, and adapt to the environment, how heterogeneity arises under external stress and finally determines the fate of the whole population, and how microbes survive under natural conditions. As single-cell analysis involves no axenic cultivation of target microorganism, it has also been demonstrated as a valuable tool for dissecting the microbial ‘dark matter.’ In this review, current state-of-the-art tools and methods for genomic and transcriptomic analysis of microbes at single-cell level were critically summarized, including single-cell isolation methods and experimental strategies of single-cell analysis with NGS. In addition, perspectives on the future trends of technology development in the field of single-cell analysis was also presented.

  6. Identification of target genes of transcription factor activator protein 2 gamma in breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ailan, He; Shuanglin, Xiang; Xiangwen, Xiao; Daolong, Ren; Lu, Gan; Xiaofeng, Ding; Xi, Qiao; Xingwang, Hu; Rushi, Liu; Jian, Zhang

    2009-01-01

    Activator protein 2 gamma (AP-2γ) is a member of the transcription factor activator protein-2 (AP-2) family, which is developmentally regulated and plays a role in human neoplasia. AP-2γ has been found to be overexpressed in most breast cancers, and have a dual role to inhibit tumor initiation and promote tumor progression afterwards during mammary tumorigensis. To identify the gene targets that mediate its effects, we performed chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) to isolate AP-2γ binding sites on genomic DNA from human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-453. 20 novel DNA fragments proximal to potential AP-2γ targets were obtained. They are categorized into functional groups of carcinogenesis, metabolism and others. A combination of sequence analysis, reporter gene assays, quantitative real-time PCR, electrophoretic gel mobility shift assays and immunoblot analysis further confirmed the four AP-2γ target genes in carcinogenesis group: ErbB2, CDH2, HPSE and IGSF11. Our results were consistent with the previous reports that ErbB2 was the target gene of AP-2γ. Decreased expression and overexpression of AP-2γ in human breast cancer cells significantly altered the expression of these four genes, indicating that AP-2γ directly regulates them. This suggested that AP-2γ can coordinate the expression of a network of genes, involving in carcinogenesis, especially in breast cancer. They could serve as therapeutic targets against breast cancers in the future

  7. Barcoding T Cell Calcium Response Diversity with Methods for Automated and Accurate Analysis of Cell Signals (MAAACS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergé, Arnauld; Bernard, Anne-Marie; Phélipot, Marie-Claire; Bertaux, Nicolas; Fallet, Mathieu; Grenot, Pierre; Marguet, Didier; He, Hai-Tao; Hamon, Yannick

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a series of experimental procedures enabling sensitive calcium monitoring in T cell populations by confocal video-microscopy. Tracking and post-acquisition analysis was performed using Methods for Automated and Accurate Analysis of Cell Signals (MAAACS), a fully customized program that associates a high throughput tracking algorithm, an intuitive reconnection routine and a statistical platform to provide, at a glance, the calcium barcode of a population of individual T-cells. Combined with a sensitive calcium probe, this method allowed us to unravel the heterogeneity in shape and intensity of the calcium response in T cell populations and especially in naive T cells, which display intracellular calcium oscillations upon stimulation by antigen presenting cells. PMID:24086124

  8. Crosstalk between Helicobacter pylori and gastric epithelial cells is impaired by docosahexaenoic acid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Correia

    Full Text Available H. pylori colonizes half of the world's population leading to gastritis, ulcers and gastric cancer. H. pylori strains resistant to antibiotics are increasing which raises the need for alternative therapeutic approaches. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA has been shown to decrease H. pylori growth and its associated-inflammation through mechanisms poorly characterized. We aimed to explore DHA action on H. pylori-mediated inflammation and adhesion to gastric epithelial cells (AGS and also to identify bacterial structures affected by DHA. H. pylori growth and metabolism was assessed in liquid cultures. Bacterial adhesion to AGS cells was visualized by transmission electron microscopy and quantified by an Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay. Inflammatory proteins were assessed by immunoblotting in infected AGS cells, previously treated with DHA. Bacterial total and outer membrane protein composition was analyzed by 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Concentrations of 100 µM of DHA decreased H. pylori growth, whereas concentrations higher than 250 µM irreversibly inhibited bacteria survival. DHA reduced ATP production and adhesion to AGS cells. AGS cells infected with DHA pre-treated H. pylori showed a 3-fold reduction in Interleukin-8 (IL-8 production and a decrease of COX2 and iNOS. 2D electrophoresis analysis revealed that DHA changed the expression of H. pylori outer membrane proteins associated with stress response and metabolism and modified bacterial lipopolysaccharide phenotype. As conclusions our results show that DHA anti-H. pylori effects are associated with changes of bacteria morphology and metabolism, and with alteration of outer membrane proteins composition, that ultimately reduce the adhesion of bacteria and the burden of H. pylori-related inflammation.

  9. Quantitative proteomics and systems analysis of cultured H9C2 cardiomyoblasts during differentiation over time supports a 'function follows form' model of differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kankeu, Cynthia; Clarke, Kylie; Van Haver, Delphi; Gevaert, Kris; Impens, Francis; Dittrich, Anna; Roderick, H Llewelyn; Passante, Egle; Huber, Heinrich J

    2018-05-17

    The rat cardiomyoblast cell line H9C2 has emerged as a valuable tool for studying cardiac development, mechanisms of disease and toxicology. We present here a rigorous proteomic analysis that monitored the changes in protein expression during differentiation of H9C2 cells into cardiomyocyte-like cells over time. Quantitative mass spectrometry followed by gene ontology (GO) enrichment analysis revealed that early changes in H9C2 differentiation are related to protein pathways of cardiac muscle morphogenesis and sphingolipid synthesis. These changes in the proteome were followed later in the differentiation time-course by alterations in the expression of proteins involved in cation transport and beta-oxidation. Studying the temporal profile of the H9C2 proteome during differentiation in further detail revealed eight clusters of co-regulated proteins that can be associated with early, late, continuous and transient up- and downregulation. Subsequent reactome pathway analysis based on these eight clusters further corroborated and detailed the results of the GO analysis. Specifically, this analysis confirmed that proteins related to pathways in muscle contraction are upregulated early and transiently, and proteins relevant to extracellular matrix organization are downregulated early. In contrast, upregulation of proteins related to cardiac metabolism occurs at later time points. Finally, independent validation of the proteomics results by immunoblotting confirmed hereto unknown regulators of cardiac structure and ionic metabolism. Our results are consistent with a 'function follows form' model of differentiation, whereby early and transient alterations of structural proteins enable subsequent changes that are relevant to the characteristic physiology of cardiomyocytes.

  10. Evidence that Surface Proteins Sn14 and Sn16 of Sarcocystis neurona Merozoites Are Involved in Infection and Immunity†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Fang Ting; Granstrom, David E.; Zhao, Xiao Min; Timoney, John F.

    1998-01-01

    Sarcocystis neurona is the etiologic agent of equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM). Based on an analysis of 25,000 equine serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples, including samples from horses with neurologic signs typical of EPM or with histologically or parasitologically confirmed EPM, four major immunoblot band patterns have been identified. Twenty-three serum and CSF samples representing each of the four immunoblot patterns were selected from 220 samples from horses with neurologic signs resembling EPM and examined for inhibitory effects on the infectivity of S. neurona by an in vitro neutralization assay. A high correlation between immunoblot band pattern and neutralizing activity was detected. Two proteins, Sn14 and Sn16 (14 and 16 kDa, respectively), appeared to be important for in vitro infection. A combination of the results of surface protein labeling, immunoprecipitation, Western blotting, and trypsin digestion suggests that these molecules are surface proteins and may be useful components of a vaccine against S. neurona infection. Although S. neurona is an obligate intracellular parasite, it is potentially a target for specific antibodies which may lyse merozoites via complement or inhibit their attachment and penetration to host cells. PMID:9573058

  11. 27-hydroxycholesterol and the expression of three estrogen-sensitive proteins in MCF7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Pamela; Epuñán, María José; Ramírez, María Eugenia; Torres, Cristian G; Valladares, Luis E; Sierralta, Walter D

    2012-09-01

    The principal aim of this study was to analyze in estrogen receptor-positive MCF7 cells the response of three estrogen-dependent proteins to 27-hydroxycholesterol (27OHC), a major circulating cholesterol metabolite. Immunofluorescence, immunoblotting and immunogold labelling analyses of MCF7 cells exposed for up to 72 h to 2 nM estradiol (E2) or to 2 µM 27OHC demonstrated similar responses in the expression of MnSOD and ERβ compared to the non-stimulated cells. Thus, the results confirm 27OHC's function as a novel selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM). The epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), observed in MCF7 cells stimulated for longer than 48 h with 2 µM 27OHC, was accompanied by lower immunoreactive levels of nuclear FOXM1 in comparison to E2-treated cells. The results presented in this study are discussed taking into consideration the relationship of hypercholesterolemia, 27OHC production, ROS synthesis and macrophage infiltration, potentially occurring in obese patients with ERα-positive, infiltrated mammary tumors.

  12. PER2 is downregulated by the LPS-induced inflammatory response in synoviocytes in rheumatoid arthritis and is implicated in disease susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hwayoung; Nah, Seong-Su; Chang, Sung-Hae; Kim, Hyung-Ki; Kwon, Jun-Tack; Lee, Sanghyun; Cho, Ik-Hyun; Lee, Sang Won; Kim, Young Ock; Hong, Seung-Jae; Kim, Hak-Jae

    2017-07-01

    The clinical symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) present with circadian variation, with joint stiffness and pain more prominent in the early morning. The mammalian clock genes, which include circadian locomotor output cycles kaput, brain and muscle Arnt-like protein 1, period and cryptochrome, regulate circadian rhythms. In order to identify the association between genetic polymorphisms in the circadian clock gene period 2 (PER2) and RA, the present study genotyped three PER2 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs934945, rs6754875, and rs2304674, using genetic information from 256 RA patients and 499 control subjects. Primary cultured rheumatoid synovial cells were stimulated with 10 µM lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Total protein was then extracted from the synovial cells following 12 and 24 h, and PER2 protein expression was assayed by immunoblotting. The rs2304674 SNP demonstrated a significant association with susceptibility to RA following Bonferroni correction. However, statistical analysis indicated that the SNPs were not associated with any clinical features of patients with RA. Immunoblotting analysis demonstrated that PER2 protein expression was decreased by LPS‑induced inflammation in RA synovial cells; however, this was not observed in normal synovial cells. The results suggest that the PER2 gene may be a risk factor for RA, and expression of the PER2 protein may be affected by inflammation. Therefore, PER2 may contribute to the pathogenesis of RA.

  13. Inhibition of histone deacetylases prevents cytokine-induced toxicity in beta cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, L; Tonnesen, M; Ronn, S G

    2007-01-01

    B (NFkappaB) is a critical signalling molecule in inflammation and is required for expression of the gene encoding inducible NO synthase (iNOS) and of pro-apoptotic genes. NFkappaB has recently been shown to associate with chromatin-modifying enzymes histone acetyltransferases and histone...... by immunoblotting and by immunoblotting combined with electrophoretic mobility shift assay, respectively. Viability was analysed by 3-(4,5-dimethyldiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide and apoptosis by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay and histone...

  14. 17β-estradiol induces stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 expression in estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belkaid, Anissa; Duguay, Sabrina R.; Ouellette, Rodney J.; Surette, Marc E.

    2015-01-01

    To sustain cell growth, cancer cells exhibit an altered metabolism characterized by increased lipogenesis. Stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 (SCD-1) catalyzes the production of monounsaturated fatty acids that are essential for membrane biogenesis, and is required for cell proliferation in many cancer cell types. Although estrogen is required for the proliferation of many estrogen-sensitive breast carcinoma cells, it is also a repressor of SCD-1 expression in liver and adipose. The current study addresses this apparent paradox by investigating the impact of estrogen on SCD-1 expression in estrogen receptor-α-positive breast carcinoma cell lines. MCF-7 and T47D mammary carcinomas cells and immortalized MCF-10A mammary epithelial cells were hormone-starved then treated or not with 17β-estradiol. SCD-1 activity was assessed by measuring cellular monounsaturated/saturated fatty acid (MUFA/SFA) ratios, and SCD-1 expression was measured by qPCR, immunoblot, and immunofluorescence analyses. The role of SCD-1 in cell proliferation was measured following treatment with the SCD-1 inhibitor A959372 and following SCD-1 silencing using siRNA. The involvement of IGF-1R on SCD-1 expression was measured using the IGF-1R antagonist AG1024. The expression of SREBP-1c, a transcription factor that regulates SCD-1, was measured by qPCR, and by immunoblot analyses. 17β-estradiol significantly induced cell proliferation and SCD-1 activity in MCF-7 and T47D cells but not MCF-10A cells. Accordingly, 17β-estradiol significantly increased SCD-1 mRNA and protein expression in MCF-7 and T47D cells compared to untreated cells. Treatment of MCF-7 cells with 4-OH tamoxifen or siRNA silencing of estrogen receptor-α largely prevented 17β-estradiol-induced SCD-1 expression. 17β-estradiol increased SREBP-1c expression and induced the mature active 60 kDa form of SREBP-1. The selective SCD-1 inhibitor or siRNA silencing of SCD-1 blocked the 17β-estradiol-induced cell proliferation and increase in

  15. Immunomagnetic cell separation, imaging, and analysis using Captivate ferrofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Laurie; Beechem, Joseph M.

    2002-05-01

    We have developed applications of CaptivateTM ferrofluids, paramagnetic particles (approximately 200 nm diameter), for isolating and analyzing cell populations in combination with fluorescence-based techniques. Using a microscope-mounted magnetic yoke and sample insertion chamber, fluorescent images of magnetically captured cells were obtained in culture media, buffer, or whole blood, while non-magnetically labeled cells sedimented to the bottom of the chamber. We combined this immunomagnetic cell separation and imaging technique with fluorescent staining, spectroscopy, and analysis to evaluate cell surface receptor-containing subpopulations, live/dead cell ratios, apoptotic/dead cell ratios, etc. The acquired images were analyzed using multi-color parameters, as produced by nucleic acid staining, esterase activity, or antibody labeling. In addition, the immunomagnetically separated cell fractions were assessed through microplate analysis using the CyQUANT Cell Proliferation Assay. These methods should provide an inexpensive alternative to some flow cytometric measurements. The binding capacities of the streptavidin- labled Captivate ferrofluid (SA-FF) particles were determined to be 8.8 nmol biotin/mg SA-FF, using biotin-4- fluorescein, and > 106 cells/mg SA-FF, using several cell types labeled with biotinylated probes. For goat anti- mouse IgG-labeled ferrofluids (GAM-FF), binding capacities were established to be approximately 0.2 - 7.5 nmol protein/mg GAM-FF using fluorescent conjugates of antibodies, protein G, and protein A.

  16. Host cell interactions of outer membrane vesicle-associated virulence factors of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157: Intracellular delivery, trafficking and mechanisms of cell injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greune, Lilo; Jarosch, Kevin-André; Steil, Daniel; Zhang, Wenlan; He, Xiaohua; Lloubes, Roland; Fruth, Angelika; Kim, Kwang Sik; Schmidt, M. Alexander; Dobrindt, Ulrich; Mellmann, Alexander; Karch, Helge

    2017-01-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are important tools in bacterial virulence but their role in the pathogenesis of infections caused by enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157, the leading cause of life-threatening hemolytic uremic syndrome, is poorly understood. Using proteomics, electron and confocal laser scanning microscopy, immunoblotting, and bioassays, we investigated OMVs secreted by EHEC O157 clinical isolates for virulence factors cargoes, interactions with pathogenetically relevant human cells, and mechanisms of cell injury. We demonstrate that O157 OMVs carry a cocktail of key virulence factors of EHEC O157 including Shiga toxin 2a (Stx2a), cytolethal distending toxin V (CdtV), EHEC hemolysin, and flagellin. The toxins are internalized by cells via dynamin-dependent endocytosis of OMVs and differentially separate from vesicles during intracellular trafficking. Stx2a and CdtV-B, the DNase-like CdtV subunit, separate from OMVs in early endosomes. Stx2a is trafficked, in association with its receptor globotriaosylceramide within detergent-resistant membranes, to the Golgi complex and the endoplasmic reticulum from where the catalytic Stx2a A1 fragment is translocated to the cytosol. CdtV-B is, after its retrograde transport to the endoplasmic reticulum, translocated to the nucleus to reach DNA. CdtV-A and CdtV-C subunits remain OMV-associated and are sorted with OMVs to lysosomes. EHEC hemolysin separates from OMVs in lysosomes and targets mitochondria. The OMV-delivered CdtV-B causes cellular DNA damage, which activates DNA damage responses leading to G2 cell cycle arrest. The arrested cells ultimately die of apoptosis induced by Stx2a and CdtV via caspase-9 activation. By demonstrating that naturally secreted EHEC O157 OMVs carry and deliver into cells a cocktail of biologically active virulence factors, thereby causing cell death, and by performing first comprehensive analysis of intracellular trafficking of OMVs and OMV-delivered virulence factors

  17. Doxorubicin attached to HPMA copolymer via amide bond modifies the glycosylation pattern of EL4 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovar, Lubomir; Etrych, Tomas; Kabesova, Martina; Subr, Vladimir; Vetvicka, David; Hovorka, Ondrej; Strohalm, Jiri; Sklenar, Jan; Chytil, Petr; Ulbrich, Karel; Rihova, Blanka

    2010-08-01

    To avoid the side effects of the anti-cancer drug doxorubicin (Dox), we conjugated this drug to a N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide (HPMA) copolymer backbone. Dox was conjugated via an amide bond (Dox-HPMA(AM), PK1) or a hydrazone pH-sensitive bond (Dox-HPMA(HYD)). In contrast to Dox and Dox-HPMA(HYD), Dox-HPMA(AM) accumulates within the cell's intracellular membranes, including those of the Golgi complex and endoplasmic reticulum, both involved in protein glycosylation. Flow cytometry was used to determine lectin binding and cell death, immunoblot to characterize the presence of CD7, CD43, CD44, and CD45, and high-performance anion exchange chromatography with pulsed amperometric detector analysis for characterization of plasma membrane saccharide composition. Incubation of EL4 cells with Dox-HPMA(AM) conjugate, in contrast to Dox or Dox-HPMA(HYD), increased the amounts of membrane surface-associated glycoproteins, as well as saccharide moieties recognized by peanut agglutinin, Erythrina cristagalli, or galectin-1 lectins. Only Dox-HPMA(AM) increased expression of the highly glycosylated membrane glycoprotein CD43, while expression of others (CD7, CD44, and CD45) was unaffected. The binding sites for galectin-1 are present on CD43 molecule. Furthermore, we present that EL4 treated with Dox-HPMA(AM) possesses increased sensitivity to galectin-1-induced apoptosis. In this study, we demonstrate that Dox-HPMA(AM) treatment changes glycosylation of the EL4 T cell lymphoma surface and sensitizes the cells to galectin-1-induced apoptosis.

  18. Radiation damage, repopulation and cell recovery analysis of in vitro tumour cell megacolony culture data using a non-Poissonian cell repopulation TCP model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stavrev, P; Weldon, M; Warkentin, B; Stavreva, N; Fallone, B G

    2005-01-01

    The effects of radiation damage, tumour repopulation and cell sublethal damage repair and the possibility of extracting information about the model parameters describing them are investigated in this work. Previously published data on two different cultured cell lines were analysed with the help of a tumour control probability (TCP) model that describes tumour cell dynamics properly. Different versions of a TCP model representing the cases of full or partial cell recovery between fractions of radiation, accompanied by repopulation or no repopulation were used to fit the data and were ranked according to statistical criteria. The data analysis shows the importance of the linear-quadratic mechanism of cell damage for the description of the in vitro cell dynamics. In a previous work where in vivo data were analysed, the employment of the single hit model of cell kill and cell repopulation produced the best fit, while ignoring the quadratic term of cell damage in the current analysis leads to poor fits. It is also concluded that more experiments using different fractionation regimes producing diverse data are needed to help model analysis and better ranking of the models

  19. Numerical Analysis of Hydrodynamic Flow in Microfluidic Biochip for Single-Cell Trapping Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelia Ahmad Khalili

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Single-cell analysis has become the interest of a wide range of biological and biomedical engineering research. It could provide precise information on individual cells, leading to important knowledge regarding human diseases. To perform single-cell analysis, it is crucial to isolate the individual cells before further manipulation is carried out. Recently, microfluidic biochips have been widely used for cell trapping and single cell analysis, such as mechanical and electrical detection. This work focuses on developing a finite element simulation model of single-cell trapping system for any types of cells or particles based on the hydrodynamic flow resistance (Rh manipulations in the main channel and trap channel to achieve successful trapping. Analysis is carried out using finite element ABAQUS-FEA™ software. A guideline to design and optimize single-cell trapping model is proposed and the example of a thorough optimization analysis is carried out using a yeast cell model. The results show the finite element model is able to trap a single cell inside the fluidic environment. Fluid’s velocity profile and streamline plots for successful and unsuccessful single yeast cell trapping are presented according to the hydrodynamic concept. The single-cell trapping model can be a significant important guideline in designing a new chip for biomedical applications.

  20. Ionizing Radiation Activates AMP-Activated Kinase (AMPK): A Target for Radiosensitization of Human Cancer Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanli, Toran; Rashid, Ayesha; Liu Caiqiong

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-activated kinase (AMPK) is a molecular energy sensor regulated by the tumor suppressor LKB1. Starvation and growth factors activate AMPK through the DNA damage sensor ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM). We explored the regulation of AMPK by ionizing radiation (IR) and its role as a target for radiosensitization of human cancer cells. Methods and Materials: Lung, prostate, and breast cancer cells were treated with IR (2-8 Gy) after incubation with either ATM or AMPK inhibitors or the AMPK activator metformin. Then, cells were subjected to either lysis and immunoblotting, immunofluorescence microscopy, clonogenic survival assays, or cell cycle analysis. Results: IR induced a robust phosphorylation and activation of AMPK in all tumor cells, independent of LKB1. IR activated AMPK first in the nucleus, and this extended later into cytoplasm. The ATM inhibitor KU-55933 blocked IR activation of AMPK. AMPK inhibition with Compound C or anti-AMPK α subunit small interfering RNA (siRNA) blocked IR induction of the cell cycle regulators p53 and p21 waf/cip as well as the IR-induced G2/M arrest. Compound C caused resistance to IR, increasing the surviving fraction after 2 Gy, but the anti-diabetic drug metformin enhanced IR activation of AMPK and lowered the surviving fraction after 2 Gy further. Conclusions: We provide evidence that IR activates AMPK in human cancer cells in an LKB1-independent manner, leading to induction of p21 waf/cip and regulation of the cell cycle and survival. AMPK appears to (1) participate in an ATM-AMPK-p21 waf/cip pathway, (2) be involved in regulation of the IR-induced G2/M checkpoint, and (3) may be targeted by metformin to enhance IR responses.

  1. Induction of indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase in human dendritic cells by a cholera toxin B subunit-proinsulin vaccine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques C Mbongue

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DC interact with naïve T cells to regulate the delicate balance between immunity and tolerance required to maintain immunological homeostasis. In this study, immature human dendritic cells (iDC were inoculated with a chimeric fusion protein vaccine containing the pancreatic β-cell auto-antigen proinsulin linked to a mucosal adjuvant the cholera toxin B subunit (CTB-INS. Proteomic analysis of vaccine inoculated DCs revealed strong up-regulation of the tryptophan catabolic enzyme indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase (IDO1. Increased biosynthesis of the immunosuppressive enzyme was detected in DCs inoculated with the CTB-INS fusion protein but not in DCs inoculated with proinsulin, CTB, or an unlinked combination of the two proteins. Immunoblot and PCR analyses of vaccine treated DCs detected IDO1mRNA by 3 hours and IDO1 protein synthesis by 6 hours after vaccine inoculation. Determination of IDO1 activity in vaccinated DCs by measurement of tryptophan degradation products (kynurenines showed increased tryptophan cleavage into N-formyl kynurenine. Vaccination did not interfere with monocytes differentiation into DC, suggesting the vaccine can function safely in the human immune system. Treatment of vaccinated DCs with pharmacological NF-κB inhibitors ACHP or DHMEQ significantly inhibited IDO1 biosynthesis, suggesting a role for NF-κB signaling in vaccine up-regulation of dendritic cell IDO1. Heat map analysis of the proteomic data revealed an overall down-regulation of vaccinated DC functions, suggesting vaccine suppression of DC maturation. Together, our experimental data indicate that CTB-INS vaccine induction of IDO1 biosynthesis in human DCs may result in the inhibition of DC maturation generating a durable state of immunological tolerance. Understanding how CTB-INS modulates IDO1 activity in human DCs will facilitate vaccine efficacy and safety, moving this immunosuppressive strategy closer to clinical applications for prevention

  2. The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 5, 6-dichloro-1-beta-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole induces nongenotoxic, DNA replication-independent apoptosis of normal and leukemic cells, regardless of their p53 status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turinetto, Valentina; Porcedda, Paola; Orlando, Luca; De Marchi, Mario; Amoroso, Antonio; Giachino, Claudia

    2009-01-01

    Current chemotherapy of human cancers focuses on the DNA damage pathway to induce a p53-mediated cellular response leading to either G1 arrest or apoptosis. However, genotoxic treatments may induce mutations and translocations that result in secondary malignancies or recurrent disease. In addition, about 50% of human cancers are associated with mutations in the p53 gene. Nongenotoxic activation of apoptosis by targeting specific molecular pathways thus provides an attractive therapeutic approach. Normal and leukemic cells were evaluated for their sensitivity to 5, 6-dichloro-1-beta-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole (DRB) through cell viability and caspase activation tests. The apoptotic pathway induced by DRB was analysed by immunfluorescence and immunoblot analysis. H2AX phosphorylation and cell cycle analysis were performed to study the dependance of apoptosis on DNA damage and DNA replication, respectively. To investigate the role of p53 in DRB-induced apoptosis, specific p53 inhibitors were used. Statistical analysis on cell survival was performed with the test of independence. Here we report that DRB, an inhibitor of the transcriptional cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) 7 and 9, triggers DNA replication-independent apoptosis in normal and leukemic human cells regardless of their p53 status and without inducing DNA damage. Our data indicate that (i) in p53-competent cells, apoptosis induced by DRB relies on a cytosolic accumulation of p53 and subsequent Bax activation, (ii) in the absence of p53, it may rely on p73, and (iii) it is independent of ATM and NBS1 proteins. Notably, even apoptosis-resistant leukemic cells such as Raji were sensitive to DRB. Our results indicate that DRB represents a potentially useful cancer chemotherapeutic strategy that employs both the p53-dependent and -independent apoptotic pathways without inducing genotoxic stress, thereby decreasing the risk of secondary malignancies

  3. Molecular characterization of breast cancer cell lines through multiple omic approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Shari E; Mellor, Paul; Ward, Alison K; Kendall, Stephanie; McDonald, Megan; Vizeacoumar, Frederick S; Vizeacoumar, Franco J; Napper, Scott; Anderson, Deborah H

    2017-06-05

    Breast cancer cell lines are frequently used as model systems to study the cellular properties and biology of breast cancer. Our objective was to characterize a large, commonly employed panel of breast cancer cell lines obtained from the American Type Culture Collection (ATCC 30-4500 K) to enable researchers to make more informed decisions in selecting cell lines for specific studies. Information about these cell lines was obtained from a wide variety of sources. In addition, new information about cellular pathways that are activated within each cell line was generated. We determined key protein expression data using immunoblot analyses. In addition, two analyses on serum-starved cells were carried out to identify cellular proteins and pathways that are activated in these cells. These analyses were performed using a commercial PathScan array and a novel and more extensive phosphopeptide-based kinome analysis that queries 1290 phosphorylation events in major signaling pathways. Data about this panel of breast cancer cell lines was also accessed from several online sources, compiled and summarized for the following areas: molecular classification, mRNA expression, mutational status of key proteins and other possible cancer-associated mutations, and the tumorigenic and metastatic capacity in mouse xenograft models of breast cancer. The cell lines that were characterized included 10 estrogen receptor (ER)-positive, 12 human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-amplified and 18 triple negative breast cancer cell lines, in addition to 4 non-tumorigenic breast cell lines. Within each subtype, there was significant genetic heterogeneity that could impact both the selection of model cell lines and the interpretation of the results obtained. To capture the net activation of key signaling pathways as a result of these mutational combinations, profiled pathway activation status was examined. This provided further clarity for which cell lines were particularly deregulated

  4. The early human germ cell lineage does not express SOX2 during in vivo development or upon in vitro culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perrett, Rebecca M; Turnpenny, Lee; Eckert, Judith J

    2008-01-01

    NANOG, POU5F1, and SOX2 are required by the inner cell mass of the blastocyst and act cooperatively to maintain pluripotency in both mouse and human embryonic stem cells. Inadequacy of any one of them causes loss of the undifferentiated state. Mouse primordial germ cells (PGCs), from which...... pluripotent embryonic germ cells (EGCs) are derived, also express POU5F1, NANOG, and SOX2. Thus, a similar expression profile has been predicted for human PGCs. Here we show by RT-PCR, immunoblotting, and immunohistochemistry that human PGCs express POU5F1 and NANOG but not SOX2, with no evidence...... of redundancy within the group B family of human SOX genes. Although lacking SOX2, proliferative human germ cells can still be identified in situ during early development and are capable of culture in vitro. Surprisingly, with the exception of FGF4, many stem cell-restricted SOX2 target genes remained detected...

  5. QSpec: online control and data analysis system for single-cell Raman spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lihui Ren

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Single-cell phenotyping is critical to the success of biological reductionism. Raman-activated cell sorting (RACS has shown promise in resolving the dynamics of living cells at the individual level and to uncover population heterogeneities in comparison to established approaches such as fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS. Given that the number of single-cells would be massive in any experiment, the power of Raman profiling technique for single-cell analysis would be fully utilized only when coupled with a high-throughput and intelligent process control and data analysis system. In this work, we established QSpec, an automatic system that supports high-throughput Raman-based single-cell phenotyping. Additionally, a single-cell Raman profile database has been established upon which data-mining could be applied to discover the heterogeneity among single-cells under different conditions. To test the effectiveness of this control and data analysis system, a sub-system was also developed to simulate the phenotypes of single-cells as well as the device features.

  6. Increased proliferation of late-born retinal progenitor cells by gestational lead exposure delays rod and bipolar cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaney, Shawnta Y; Mukherjee, Shradha; Giddabasappa, Anand; Rueda, Elda M; Hamilton, W Ryan; Johnson, Jerry E; Fox, Donald A

    2016-01-01

    Studies of neuronal development in the retina often examine the stages of proliferation, differentiation, and synaptic development, albeit independently. Our goal was to determine if a known neurotoxicant insult to a population of retinal progenitor cells (RPCs) would affect their eventual differentiation and synaptic development. To that end, we used our previously published human equivalent murine model of low-level gestational lead exposure (GLE). Children and animals with GLE exhibit increased scotopic electroretinogram a- and b-waves. Adult mice with GLE exhibit an increased number of late-born RPCs, a prolonged period of RPC proliferation, and an increased number of late-born rod photoreceptors and rod and cone bipolar cells (BCs), with no change in the number of late-born Müller glial cells or early-born neurons. The specific aims of this study were to determine whether increased and prolonged RPC proliferation alters the spatiotemporal differentiation and synaptic development of rods and BCs in early postnatal GLE retinas compared to control retinas. C57BL/6N mouse pups were exposed to lead acetate via drinking water throughout gestation and until postnatal day 10, which is equivalent to the human gestation period for retinal neurogenesis. RT-qPCR, immunohistochemical analysis, and western blots of well-characterized, cell-specific genes and proteins were performed at embryonic and early postnatal ages to assess rod and cone photoreceptor differentiation, rod and BC differentiation and synaptic development, and Müller glial cell differentiation. Real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) with the rod-specific transcription factors Nrl , Nr2e3 , and Crx and the rod-specific functional gene Rho , along with central retinal confocal studies with anti-recoverin and anti-rhodopsin antibodies, revealed a two-day delay in the differentiation of rod photoreceptors in GLE retinas. Rhodopsin immunoblots supported this conclusion. No changes in glutamine synthetase gene

  7. Laser apparatus and method for microscopic and spectroscopic analysis and processing of biological cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourley, P.L.; Gourley, M.F.

    1997-03-04

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for microscopic and spectroscopic analysis and processing of biological cells. The apparatus comprises a laser having an analysis region within the laser cavity for containing one or more biological cells to be analyzed. The presence of a cell within the analysis region in superposition with an activated portion of a gain medium of the laser acts to encode information about the cell upon the laser beam, the cell information being recoverable by an analysis means that preferably includes an array photodetector such as a CCD camera and a spectrometer. The apparatus and method may be used to analyze biomedical cells including blood cells and the like, and may include processing means for manipulating, sorting, or eradicating cells after analysis. 20 figs.

  8. Exploration of intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways in zearalenone-treated rat sertoli cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ming-Long; Hu, Jin; Guo, Bao-Ping; Niu, Ya-Ru; Xiao, Cheng; Xu, Yin-Xue

    2016-12-01

    Zearalenone (ZEA) is a nonsteroidal estrogenic mycotoxin produced mainly by Fusarium. ZEA causes reproductive disorders and is both cytotoxic and genotoxic in animals; however, little is known regarding the molecular mechanism(s) leading to ZEA toxicity. Sertoli cells are somatic cells that support the development of spermatogenic cells. The objective of this study was to explore the effects of ZEA on the proliferation, apoptosis, and necrosis of rat Sertoli cells to uncover signaling pathways underlying ZEA cytotoxicity. ZEA reduced the proliferation of rat Sertoli cells in a dose-dependent manner, as indicated by a CCK8 assay, while flow cytometry revealed that ZEA caused both apoptosis and necrosis. Immunoblotting revealed that ZEA treatment increased the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2, as well as the expression of FasL and caspases-3, -8, and -9, in a dose-dependent manner. Collectively, these data suggest that ZEA induced apoptosis and necrosis in rat Sertoli cells via extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways. This study provides new insights into the molecular mechanisms by which ZEA exhibits cytotoxicity. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 31: 1731-1739, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. 3-Bromopyruvate treatment induces alterations of metabolic and stress-related pathways in glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiasserini, Davide; Davidescu, Magdalena; Orvietani, Pier Luigi; Susta, Federica; Macchioni, Lara; Petricciuolo, Maya; Castigli, Emilia; Roberti, Rita; Binaglia, Luciano; Corazzi, Lanfranco

    2017-01-30

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common and aggressive brain tumour of adults. The metabolic phenotype of GBM cells is highly dependent on glycolysis; therefore, therapeutic strategies aimed at interfering with glycolytic pathways are under consideration. 3-Bromopyruvate (3BP) is a potent antiglycolytic agent, with a variety of targets and possible effects on global cell metabolism. Here we analyzed the changes in protein expression on a GBM cell line (GL15 cells) caused by 3BP treatment using a global proteomic approach. Validation of differential protein expression was performed with immunoblotting and enzyme activity assays in GL15 and U251 cell lines. The results show that treatment of GL15 cells with 3BP leads to extensive changes in the expression of glycolytic enzymes and stress related proteins. Importantly, other metabolisms were also affected, including pentose phosphate pathway, aminoacid synthesis, and glucose derivatives production. 3BP elicited the activation of stress response proteins, as shown by the phosphorylation of HSPB1 at serine 82, caused by the concomitant activation of the p38 pathway. Our results show that inhibition of glycolysis in GL15 cells by 3BP influences different but interconnected pathways. Proteome analysis may help in the molecular characterization of the glioblastoma response induced by pharmacological treatment with antiglycolytic agents. Alteration of the glycolytic pathway characterizes glioblastoma (GBM), one of the most common brain tumours. Metabolic reprogramming with agents able to inhibit carbohydrate metabolism might be a viable strategy to complement the treatment of these tumours. The antiglycolytic agent 3-bromopyruvate (3BP) is able to strongly inhibit glycolysis but it may affect also other cellular pathways and its precise cellular targets are currently unknown. To understand the protein expression changes induced by 3BP, we performed a global proteomic analysis of a GBM cell line (GL15) treated with 3BP. We

  10. Multiway modeling and analysis in stem cell systems biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vandenberg Scott L

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Systems biology refers to multidisciplinary approaches designed to uncover emergent properties of biological systems. Stem cells are an attractive target for this analysis, due to their broad therapeutic potential. A central theme of systems biology is the use of computational modeling to reconstruct complex systems from a wealth of reductionist, molecular data (e.g., gene/protein expression, signal transduction activity, metabolic activity, etc.. A number of deterministic, probabilistic, and statistical learning models are used to understand sophisticated cellular behaviors such as protein expression during cellular differentiation and the activity of signaling networks. However, many of these models are bimodal i.e., they only consider row-column relationships. In contrast, multiway modeling techniques (also known as tensor models can analyze multimodal data, which capture much more information about complex behaviors such as cell differentiation. In particular, tensors can be very powerful tools for modeling the dynamic activity of biological networks over time. Here, we review the application of systems biology to stem cells and illustrate application of tensor analysis to model collagen-induced osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells. Results We applied Tucker1, Tucker3, and Parallel Factor Analysis (PARAFAC models to identify protein/gene expression patterns during extracellular matrix-induced osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells. In one case, we organized our data into a tensor of type protein/gene locus link × gene ontology category × osteogenic stimulant, and found that our cells expressed two distinct, stimulus-dependent sets of functionally related genes as they underwent osteogenic differentiation. In a second case, we organized DNA microarray data in a three-way tensor of gene IDs × osteogenic stimulus × replicates, and found that application of tensile strain to a

  11. Enhancement of esculetin on Taxol-induced apoptosis in human hepatoma HepG2 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuo, H.-C.; Lee, H.-J.; Hu, C.-C.; Shun, H.-I; Tseng, T.-H.

    2006-01-01

    The potential use of low dose chemotherapy has been appealing since lower dosages are more attainable during cancer therapy and cause less toxicity in patients. Combination therapy of Taxol, a promising frontline chemotherapy agent, with natural anti-tumor agents that are considerably less toxic with a capability of activating additional apoptotic signals or inhibiting survival signals may provide a rational molecular basis for novel chemotherapeutic strategies. Esculetin, a well-known lipoxygenase inhibitor, showed an inhibitory effect on the cell cycle progression of HL-60 cells in our previous study. In this report, the effects of a concomitant administration of esculetin and Taxol were investigated in human hepatoma HepG2 cells. Firstly, esculetin alone could exert an antiproliferation effect together with an inhibitory effect on the activation of ERKs and p38 MAPK. As compared to the treatment with Taxol only, a co-administration with esculetin and Taxol could result in a further enhancement of apoptosis as revealed by DNA fragmentation assay and Annexin-V-based assay. Meanwhile, immunoblotting analysis also showed that the co-administration of esculetin and Taxol could increase the expression of Bax and the cytosolic release of cytochrome C and enhance the expression of Fas and Fas ligand while the activation of caspase-8 and caspase-3 was also increased. Finally, the ERK cascade was proven to be involved in the enhancement of esculetin on the Taxol-induced apoptosis

  12. GPR30 decreases cardiac chymase/angiotensin II by inhibiting local mast cell number

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Zhuo; Wang, Hao; Lin, Marina; Groban, Leanne

    2015-01-01

    Chronic activation of the novel estrogen receptor GPR30 by its agonist G1 mitigates the adverse effects of estrogen (E2) loss on cardiac structure and function. Using the ovariectomized (OVX) mRen2.Lewis rat, an E2-sensitive model of diastolic dysfunction, we found that E2 status is inversely correlated with local cardiac angiotensin II (Ang II) levels, likely via Ang I/chymase-mediated production. Since chymase is released from cardiac mast cells during stress (e.g., volume/pressure overload, inflammation), we hypothesized that GPR30-related cardioprotection after E2 loss might occur through its opposing actions on cardiac mast cell proliferation and chymase production. Using real-time quantitative PCR, immunohistochemistry, and immunoblot analysis, we found mast cell number, chymase expression, and cardiac Ang II levels were significantly increased in the hearts of OVX-compared to ovary-intact mRen2.Lewis rats and the GPR30 agonist G1 (50 mg/kg/day, s.c.) administered for 2 weeks limited the adverse effects of estrogen loss. In vitro studies revealed that GPR30 receptors are expressed in the RBL-2H3 mast cell line and G1 inhibits serum-induced cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner, as determined by cell counting, BrdU incorporation assay, and Ki-67 staining. Using specific antagonists to estrogen receptors, blockage of GPR30, but not ERα or ERβ, attenuated the inhibitory effects of estrogen on BrdU incorporation in RBL-2H3 cells. Further study of the mechanism underlying the effect on cell proliferation showed that G1 inhibits cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1) mRNA and protein expression in RBL-2H3 cells in a dose-dependent manner. - Highlights: • GPR30 activation limits mast cell number in hearts from OVX mRen2.Lewis rats. • GPR30 activation decreases cardiac chymase/angiotensin II after estrogen loss. • GPR30 activation inhibits RBL-2H3 mast cell proliferation and CDK1 expression

  13. GPR30 decreases cardiac chymase/angiotensin II by inhibiting local mast cell number

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Zhuo [Department of Anesthesiology, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Medical Center Boulevard, Winston-Salem, NC 27159-1009 (United States); Department of Cardiology, Jinan Central Hospital, Affiliated with Shandong University, 105 Jiefang Road, Jinan, 250013 (China); Wang, Hao; Lin, Marina [Department of Anesthesiology, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Medical Center Boulevard, Winston-Salem, NC 27159-1009 (United States); Groban, Leanne, E-mail: lgroban@wakehealth.edu [Department of Anesthesiology, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Medical Center Boulevard, Winston-Salem, NC 27159-1009 (United States); Hypertension and Vascular Disease Center, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Medical Center Boulevard, Winston-Salem, NC 27157 (United States); Office of Women in Medicine and Science, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Medical Center Boulevard, Winston-Salem, NC 27157 (United States)

    2015-03-27

    Chronic activation of the novel estrogen receptor GPR30 by its agonist G1 mitigates the adverse effects of estrogen (E2) loss on cardiac structure and function. Using the ovariectomized (OVX) mRen2.Lewis rat, an E2-sensitive model of diastolic dysfunction, we found that E2 status is inversely correlated with local cardiac angiotensin II (Ang II) levels, likely via Ang I/chymase-mediated production. Since chymase is released from cardiac mast cells during stress (e.g., volume/pressure overload, inflammation), we hypothesized that GPR30-related cardioprotection after E2 loss might occur through its opposing actions on cardiac mast cell proliferation and chymase production. Using real-time quantitative PCR, immunohistochemistry, and immunoblot analysis, we found mast cell number, chymase expression, and cardiac Ang II levels were significantly increased in the hearts of OVX-compared to ovary-intact mRen2.Lewis rats and the GPR30 agonist G1 (50 mg/kg/day, s.c.) administered for 2 weeks limited the adverse effects of estrogen loss. In vitro studies revealed that GPR30 receptors are expressed in the RBL-2H3 mast cell line and G1 inhibits serum-induced cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner, as determined by cell counting, BrdU incorporation assay, and Ki-67 staining. Using specific antagonists to estrogen receptors, blockage of GPR30, but not ERα or ERβ, attenuated the inhibitory effects of estrogen on BrdU incorporation in RBL-2H3 cells. Further study of the mechanism underlying the effect on cell proliferation showed that G1 inhibits cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1) mRNA and protein expression in RBL-2H3 cells in a dose-dependent manner. - Highlights: • GPR30 activation limits mast cell number in hearts from OVX mRen2.Lewis rats. • GPR30 activation decreases cardiac chymase/angiotensin II after estrogen loss. • GPR30 activation inhibits RBL-2H3 mast cell proliferation and CDK1 expression.

  14. Microfabricated Electrochemical Cell-Based Biosensors for Analysis of Living Cells In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Wang

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Cellular biochemical parameters can be used to reveal the physiological and functional information of various cells. Due to demonstrated high accuracy and non-invasiveness, electrochemical detection methods have been used for cell-based investigation. When combined with improved biosensor design and advanced measurement systems, the on-line biochemical analysis of living cells in vitro has been applied for biological mechanism study, drug screening and even environmental monitoring. In recent decades, new types of miniaturized electrochemical biosensor are emerging with the development of microfabrication technology. This review aims to give an overview of the microfabricated electrochemical cell-based biosensors, such as microelectrode arrays (MEA, the electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS technique, and the light addressable potentiometric sensor (LAPS. The details in their working principles, measurement systems, and applications in cell monitoring are covered. Driven by the need for high throughput and multi-parameter detection proposed by biomedicine, the development trends of electrochemical cell-based biosensors are also introduced, including newly developed integrated biosensors, and the application of nanotechnology and microfluidic technology.

  15. ‘True’ antimitochondrial antibody-negative primary biliary cirrhosis, low sensitivity of the routine assays, or both?

    Science.gov (United States)

    MURATORI, P; MURATORI, L; GERSHWIN, M E; CZAJA, A J; PAPPAS, G; MACCARIELLO, S; GRANITO, A; CASSANI, F; LORIA, P; LENZI, M; BIANCHI, F B

    2004-01-01

    Anti-mitochondrial antibody (AMA) is considered the serological hallmark of primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), but may be missing in a proportion of these patients. We assessed sensitivity and specificity of the currently available techniques for AMA detection in a large series of PBC patients and controls, and analysed their clinical and immunological features according to the AMA status. By indirect immunofluorescence on rat tissue sections and HEp-2 cells, Western immunoblot with bovine submitochondrial particles, and two ELISAs with AMA-specific recombinant proteins, we evaluated the presence of AMA in 127 PBC patients, 166 patients with type 1 autoimmune hepatitis and 100 with non alcoholic fatty liver disease. In PBC patients Western immunoblot detects AMA significantly more often than indirect immunofluorescence on HEp-2 cells (85% versus 72%, P = 0·02) or rodent tissue sections (71%, P = 0·01); both ELISAs are only slightly less sensitive than Western immunoblot (81% and 78%). Ten patients with non alcoholic fatty liver disease were AMA-positive by indirect immunofluorescence, but none recognized AMA-specific epitopes in Western immunoblot or in ELISAs. Twelve patients with type 1 autoimmune hepatitis were AMA-positive by indirect immunofluorescence, but only 6 (3·6%) reacted by Western immunoblot and ELISAs. Western immunoblot or ELISA should be regarded as first-line assay for the detection of AMA. Up to 15% of PBC patients are consistently AMA-negative, yet they share the same clinical, biochemical and histological features of AMA-positive PBC. Detection of AMA in type 1 autoimmune hepatitis might identify a subset of patients at risk of developing a hepatitic/cholestatic syndrome. PMID:14678277

  16. SuperSegger: robust image segmentation, analysis and lineage tracking of bacterial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stylianidou, Stella; Brennan, Connor; Nissen, Silas B; Kuwada, Nathan J; Wiggins, Paul A

    2016-11-01

    Many quantitative cell biology questions require fast yet reliable automated image segmentation to identify and link cells from frame-to-frame, and characterize the cell morphology and fluorescence. We present SuperSegger, an automated MATLAB-based image processing package well-suited to quantitative analysis of high-throughput live-cell fluorescence microscopy of bacterial cells. SuperSegger incorporates machine-learning algorithms to optimize cellular boundaries and automated error resolution to reliably link cells from frame-to-frame. Unlike existing packages, it can reliably segment microcolonies with many cells, facilitating the analysis of cell-cycle dynamics in bacteria as well as cell-contact mediated phenomena. This package has a range of built-in capabilities for characterizing bacterial cells, including the identification of cell division events, mother, daughter and neighbouring cells, and computing statistics on cellular fluorescence, the location and intensity of fluorescent foci. SuperSegger provides a variety of postprocessing data visualization tools for single cell and population level analysis, such as histograms, kymographs, frame mosaics, movies and consensus images. Finally, we demonstrate the power of the package by analyzing lag phase growth with single cell resolution. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Immunologic targeting of FOXP3 in inflammatory breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smita Nair

    Full Text Available The forkhead transcription factor FOXP3 is necessary for induction of regulatory T lymphocytes (Tregs and their immunosuppressive function. We have previously demonstrated that targeting Tregs by vaccination of mice with murine FOXP3 mRNA-transfected dendritic cells (DCs elicits FOXP3-specific T cell responses and enhances tumor immunity. It is clear that FOXP3 expression is not restricted to T-cell lineage and herein, using RT-PCR, flow cytometry, and western immunoblot we demonstrate for the first time that FOXP3 is expressed in inflammatory breast cancer (IBC cells, SUM149 (triple negative, ErbB1-activated and SUM190 (ErbB2-overexpressing. Importantly, FOXP3-specific T cells generated in vitro using human FOXP3 RNA-transfected DCs as stimulators efficiently lyse SUM149 cells. Interestingly, an isogenic model (rSUM149 derived from SUM149 with an enhanced anti-apoptotic phenotype was resistant to FOXP3-specific T cell mediated lysis. The MHC class I cellular processing mechanism was intact in both cell lines at the protein and transcription levels suggesting that the resistance to cytolysis by rSUM149 cells was not related to MHC class I expression or to the MHC class I antigen processing machinery in these cells. Our data suggest that FOXP3 may be an effective tumor target in IBC cells however increased anti-apoptotic signaling can lead to immune evasion.

  18. Analysis of epothilone B-induced cell death in normal ovarian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogalska, Aneta; Gajek, Arkadiusz; Marczak, Agnieszka

    2013-12-01

    We have investigated the mode of cell death induced by a new microtubule-stabilizing agent, epothilone B (EpoB, patupilone), and a clinically used medicine, paclitaxel (PTX), in normal ovarian cells. Using fluorescence microscopy, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis preceding Western blot analysis, as well as spectrofluorimetric and colorimetric detection, we demonstrate that, compared to EpoB, PTX induced high time-dependent morphological and biochemical changes typical of apoptosis. Induction of apoptosis followed an early increase in p53 levels. Apoptosis reached its maximum at 24-48 h. At the same time, there was a significant increase in caspase-9 and -3 activity and PARP fragmentation, which suggests that an intrinsic path was involved. Apoptosis in MM14 cells was increased more by PTX than EpoB, and also induced more necrosis responsible for inflammation (1.4-fold) than EpoB. © 2013 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  19. High throughput protein production screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beernink, Peter T [Walnut Creek, CA; Coleman, Matthew A [Oakland, CA; Segelke, Brent W [San Ramon, CA

    2009-09-08

    Methods, compositions, and kits for the cell-free production and analysis of proteins are provided. The invention allows for the production of proteins from prokaryotic sequences or eukaryotic sequences, including human cDNAs using PCR and IVT methods and detecting the proteins through fluorescence or immunoblot techniques. This invention can be used to identify optimized PCR and WT conditions, codon usages and mutations. The methods are readily automated and can be used for high throughput analysis of protein expression levels, interactions, and functional states.

  20. Diagnostic capabilities of non-treponemal and treponemal reactions in the early forms of syphilis.

    OpenAIRE

    Zakharov, S. V.

    2017-01-01

    A comparative analysis of the sensitivity and specificity of immunoblotting against other non-treponemal and treponemal reactions was carried out in 215 patients with early forms of syphilis. A high diagnostic efficiency of immunoblotting in patients with early latent syphilis was established. It was found that only in case of primary syphilis, immunoblotting is inferior to Immunofluorescence reaction; this test can be used for differential diagnosis between hidden syphilis and false positive...

  1. Quantitative Cell Cycle Analysis Based on an Endogenous All-in-One Reporter for Cell Tracking and Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Zerjatke

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Cell cycle kinetics are crucial to cell fate decisions. Although live imaging has provided extensive insights into this relationship at the single-cell level, the limited number of fluorescent markers that can be used in a single experiment has hindered efforts to link the dynamics of individual proteins responsible for decision making directly to cell cycle progression. Here, we present fluorescently tagged endogenous proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA as an all-in-one cell cycle reporter that allows simultaneous analysis of cell cycle progression, including the transition into quiescence, and the dynamics of individual fate determinants. We also provide an image analysis pipeline for automated segmentation, tracking, and classification of all cell cycle phases. Combining the all-in-one reporter with labeled endogenous cyclin D1 and p21 as prime examples of cell-cycle-regulated fate determinants, we show how cell cycle and quantitative protein dynamics can be simultaneously extracted to gain insights into G1 phase regulation and responses to perturbations.

  2. Stem Cell Therapy for Diabetic Erectile Dysfunction in Rats: A Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingchao Li

    Full Text Available Stem cell therapy is a novel method for the treatment of diabetic erectile dysfunction (ED. Many relative animal studies have been done to evaluate the efficacy of this therapy in rats.This meta-analysis was performed to compare the efficacy of different stem cell therapies, to evaluate the influential factors and to determine the optimal stem cell therapeutic strategy for diabetic ED.We searched the studies analyzing the efficacy of stem cell therapy for diabetic ED in rats published before September 30, 2015 in PubMed, Web of Science and EBSCO. A random effects meta-analysis was conducted to assess the outcomes of stem cell therapy. Subgroup analysis was also performed by separating these studies based on their different characteristics. Changes in the ratio of intracavernous pressure (ICP to mean arterial pressure (MAP and in the structure of the cavernous body were compared.10 studies with 302 rats were enrolled in this meta-analysis. Pooled analysis of these studies showed a beneficial effect of stem cell therapy in improving erectile function of diabetic rats (SMD 4.03, 95% CI = 3.22 to 4.84, P< 0.001. In the stem cell therapy group, both the smooth muscle and endothelium content were much more than those in control group. There was also significant increase in the expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS, the ratio of smooth muscle to collagen, as well as the secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF. Besides, apoptotic cells were reduced by stem cell treatment. The subgroup analysis indicated that modified stem cells were more effective than those without modification.Our results confirmed that stem cell therapy could apparently improve the erectile function of diabetic rats. Some specific modification, especially the gene modification with growth factors, could improve the efficacy of stem cell therapy. Stem cell therapy has potential to be an effective therapeutic

  3. [Research on medical speciality of traditional Chinese medicines using dot-immunoblotting method based on polyclonal antibody prepared from traditional Chinese medicines with hot/cold nature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Houwei; Dou, Yanling; Tian, Jingzhen; Li, Feng; Wang, Shijun; Wang, Zhenguo

    2009-02-01

    To research on the substantial foundation of the medical speciality of Chinese traditional medicines from immunogenicity. Control antigen with hot nature was prepared from the mixture of the aqueous extracts of three Chinese traditional medicines with three typical hot nature of Alpinia officinarum, Cinnamomum cassia and Curculigo orchioides, while that with cold nature prepared with Rheum palmatum, Anemarrhena asphodeloides, Coptis chinensis, and polyclonal antibody was prepared by immunizing rabbit with control antigen. Dot blotting was performed between the polyclonal antibody of control antigen and the aqueous extracts of nine Chinese traditional medicines on a piece of PVDF membrane, and the blotting signals were analyzed by the software of Quantity One. Blotting signals with hot control antigen of nine Chinese traditional medicines in descending were Zingiber officinale, Aconitum carmichaeli, Eucommia ulmoides, Fraxinus rhynchophylla, Lonicera japonica, Anemarrhena asphodeloides, Coptis chinensis, Rheum palmatum and Phellodendron chinense, which degree of similarity to control antigen in peak value were 57.33%, 43.56 %, 34.16%, 30.2%, 28.81%, 26.53%, 21.68%, 17.62% and 14.85%, respectively. Blotting signals with cold control antigen were Rheum palmatum, Anemarrhena asphodeloides, Coptis chinensis, Phellodendron chinense, Zingiber officinale, Lonicera japonica, Fraxinus rhynchophylla, Eucommia ulmoides and Aconitum carmichaeli in descending, of which degree of similarity to cold control antigen in peak value were 55.22%, 54.23%, 46.72%, 34.08%, 30.3%, 24.48%, 24.33%, 20.35% and 15.17%, respectively. Results of cluster analysis with Wistar's method showed that nine medicines were classified into two groups, one group included Phellodendron chinense, Anemarrhena asphodeloides, Coptis chinensis, Rheum palmatum, another was Zingiber officinale, Aconitum carmichaeli, Eucommia ulmoides, Fraxinus rhynchophylla, Lonicera japonica. Blotting signals of nine medicines

  4. [Response of HeLa cells to mitomycine C. III. The analysis of nucleoli of mother and daughter cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, Iu P; Neguliaev, Iu A; Tsupkina, N V

    2014-01-01

    The comparative analysis of the number of nucleoli in cells of the established HeLa-M line was carried out before and after exposure to mitomycin C in a concentration of 10 μg/ml for 2 h. Using time-lapse microscopy, nucleoli in mother and their respective daughter cells were computed. It has been shown that the average number of nucleoli per cell is generally higher in daughter cells than in mother cells, and a standard deviation, on the contrary, decreases. An average number of nucleoli in daughter cells, whose mother cells had been treated with mitomycin C, was higher than in corresponding cells of control group. The separate analysis has been performed for the cells having from 1 to 4 nucleoli. Nonrandom complete coincidence of the number of nucleoli in mather and daughter cells has been typicaly shown for about 1/7 of the total cell population. Mitomycin C reduces this value of about 1.5 times.

  5. Selective expression of a protein-tyrosine kinase, p56lyn, in hematopoietic cells and association with production of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanashi, Yuji; Mori, Shigeo; Inoue, Kazushi; Yamamoto, Tadashi; Toyoshima, Kumao; Yoshida, Mitsuaki; Kishimoto, Tadamitsu

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports the identification of the lyn gene product, a member of the src-related family of protein-tyrosine kinases, and its expression in hematopoietic cells. A lyn-specific sequence (Arg-25 to Ala-119 of the protein) was expressed in Escherichia coli as a fusion protein with β-galactosidase. Antiserum raised against the fusion protein immunoprecipitated a 56-kDa protein from human B lymphocytes. Incubation of the immunoprecipitate with [γ- 32 P]ATP resulted in the phosphorylation of this protein at tyrosine residues. Immunohistological and immunoblotting analyses showed that the lyn gene product was expressed in lymphatic tissues (spleen and tonsil) and in adult lung, which contains many macrophages. Furthermore, both the transcripts and the protein products of the lyn gene accumulated in macrophages/monocytes, platelets, and B lymphocytes but were not expressed appreciably in granulocytes, erythrocytes, or T lymphocytes, suggesting that lyn gene products function primarily in certain differentiated cells of lymphoid and myeloid lineages

  6. A Triterpenoid from Thalictrum fortunei Induces Apoptosis in BEL-7402 Cells Through the P53-Induced Apoptosis Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lvyi Chen

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Thalictrum fortunei S. Moore, a perennial plant distributed in the southeastern part of China, has been used in Traditional Chinese Medicine for thousands of years for its antitumor, antibacterial and immunoregulatory effects. In order to investigate the active components and the mechanism of the anti-tumor effects of Thalictrum fortunei, the growth inhibitory effects of eight triterpenoids isolated from the aerial parts of the plant on tumor cell lines were examined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazoy1-3,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay. The MTT-assay results showed that the inhibitory activity of 3-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1→4-β-D-fucopyranosyl(22S,24Z-cycloart-24-en-3β,22,26-triol 26-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (1 was stronger than that of the other seven tested triterpenoids on human hepatoma Bel-7402 cell line (Bel-7402, human colon lovo cells (LoVo, human non-small cells lung cancer NCIH-460 cells (NCIH-460 and human gastric carcinoma SGC-7901 cells (SGC-7901 after 48 h treatment in vitro, with the IC50 values of 66.4, 84.8, 73.5, 89.6 μM, respectively. Moreover, the antitumor mechanism of compound 1 on Bel-7402 cell was explored through nucleus dyeing, fluorescence assay, flow cytometry and western blot. The flow cytometric analysis results revealed that compound 1 caused apoptosis and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP loss in Bel-7402 cells. A fluorescence assay indicated that intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS were markedly provoked by compound 1 treatment compared to control cells. Immunoblot results showed that compound 1 significantly increased the expression levels of cleaved caspase-3, P53 and Bax protein, and decreased the expression level of Bcl-2 protein. These findings indicate that compound 1 inhibits the growth activity of tumor cells, probably through the P53 protein-induced apoptosis pathway.

  7. Fuel cell hybrid taxi life cycle analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baptista, Patricia, E-mail: patricia.baptista@ist.utl.pt [IDMEC-Instituto Superior Tecnico, Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Ribau, Joao; Bravo, Joao; Silva, Carla [IDMEC-Instituto Superior Tecnico, Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Adcock, Paul; Kells, Ashley [Intelligent Energy, Charnwood Building, HolywellPark, Ashby Road, Loughborough, LE11 3GR (United Kingdom)

    2011-09-15

    A small fleet of classic London Taxis (Black cabs) equipped with hydrogen fuel cell power systems is being prepared for demonstration during the 2012 London Olympics. This paper presents a Life Cycle Analysis for these vehicles in terms of energy consumption and CO{sub 2} emissions, focusing on the impacts of alternative vehicle technologies for the Taxi, combining the fuel life cycle (Tank-to-Wheel and Well-to-Tank) and vehicle materials Cradle-to-Grave. An internal combustion engine diesel taxi was used as the reference vehicle for the currently available technology. This is compared to battery and fuel cell vehicle configurations. Accordingly, the following energy pathways are compared: diesel, electricity and hydrogen (derived from natural gas steam reforming). Full Life Cycle Analysis, using the PCO-CENEX drive cycle, (derived from actual London Taxi drive cycles) shows that the fuel cell powered vehicle configurations have lower energy consumption (4.34 MJ/km) and CO{sub 2} emissions (235 g/km) than both the ICE Diesel (9.54 MJ/km and 738 g/km) and the battery electric vehicle (5.81 MJ/km and 269 g/km). - Highlights: > A Life Cycle Analysis of alternative vehicle technologies for the London Taxi was performed. > The hydrogen powered vehicles have the lowest energy consumption and CO{sub 2} emissions results. > A hydrogen powered solution can be a sustainable alternative in a full life cycle framework.

  8. Fuel cell hybrid taxi life cycle analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baptista, Patricia; Ribau, Joao; Bravo, Joao; Silva, Carla; Adcock, Paul; Kells, Ashley

    2011-01-01

    A small fleet of classic London Taxis (Black cabs) equipped with hydrogen fuel cell power systems is being prepared for demonstration during the 2012 London Olympics. This paper presents a Life Cycle Analysis for these vehicles in terms of energy consumption and CO 2 emissions, focusing on the impacts of alternative vehicle technologies for the Taxi, combining the fuel life cycle (Tank-to-Wheel and Well-to-Tank) and vehicle materials Cradle-to-Grave. An internal combustion engine diesel taxi was used as the reference vehicle for the currently available technology. This is compared to battery and fuel cell vehicle configurations. Accordingly, the following energy pathways are compared: diesel, electricity and hydrogen (derived from natural gas steam reforming). Full Life Cycle Analysis, using the PCO-CENEX drive cycle, (derived from actual London Taxi drive cycles) shows that the fuel cell powered vehicle configurations have lower energy consumption (4.34 MJ/km) and CO 2 emissions (235 g/km) than both the ICE Diesel (9.54 MJ/km and 738 g/km) and the battery electric vehicle (5.81 MJ/km and 269 g/km). - Highlights: → A Life Cycle Analysis of alternative vehicle technologies for the London Taxi was performed. → The hydrogen powered vehicles have the lowest energy consumption and CO 2 emissions results. → A hydrogen powered solution can be a sustainable alternative in a full life cycle framework.

  9. Ran GTPase-activating protein 1 is a therapeutic target in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kung-Chao Chang

    Full Text Available Lymphoma-specific biomarkers contribute to therapeutic strategies and the study of tumorigenesis. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL is the most common type of malignant lymphoma. However, only 50% of patients experience long-term survival after current treatment; therefore, developing novel therapeutic strategies is warranted. Comparative proteomic analysis of two DLBCL lines with a B-lymphoblastoid cell line (LCL showed differential expression of Ran GTPase-activating protein 1 (RanGAP1 between them, which was confirmed using immunoblotting. Immunostaining showed that the majority of DLBCLs (92%, 46/50 were RanGAP1(+, while reactive lymphoid hyperplasia (n = 12 was RanGAP1(+ predominantly in germinal centers. RanGAP1 was also highly expressed in other B-cell lymphomas (BCL, n = 180 with brisk mitotic activity (B-lymphoblastic lymphoma/leukemia: 93%, and Burkitt lymphoma: 95% or cell-cycle dysregulation (mantle cell lymphoma: 83%, and Hodgkin's lymphoma 91%. Interestingly, serum RanGAP1 level was higher in patients with high-grade BCL (1.71 ± 2.28 ng/mL, n = 62 than in low-grade BCL (0.75 ± 2.12 ng/mL, n = 52 and healthy controls (0.55 ± 1.58 ng/mL, n = 75 (high-grade BCL vs. low-grade BCL, p = 0.002; high-grade BCL vs. control, p < 0.001, Mann-Whitney U test. In vitro, RNA interference of RanGAP1 showed no effect on LCL but enhanced DLBCL cell death (41% vs. 60%; p = 0.035 and cell-cycle arrest (G0/G1: 39% vs. 49%, G2/M: 19.0% vs. 7.5%; p = 0.030 along with decreased expression of TPX2 and Aurora kinases, the central regulators of mitotic cell division. Furthermore, ON 01910.Na (Estybon, a multikinase inhibitor induced cell death, mitotic cell arrest, and hyperphosphorylation of RanGAP1 in DLBCL cell lines but no effects in normal B and T cells. Therefore, RanGAP1 is a promising marker and therapeutic target for aggressive B-cell lymphoma, especially DLBCL.

  10. Free energy analysis of cell spreading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEvoy, Eóin; Deshpande, Vikram S; McGarry, Patrick

    2017-10-01

    In this study we present a steady-state adaptation of the thermodynamically motivated stress fiber (SF) model of Vigliotti et al. (2015). We implement this steady-state formulation in a non-local finite element setting where we also consider global conservation of the total number of cytoskeletal proteins within the cell, global conservation of the number of binding integrins on the cell membrane, and adhesion limiting ligand density on the substrate surface. We present a number of simulations of cell spreading in which we consider a limited subset of the possible deformed spread-states assumed by the cell in order to examine the hypothesis that free energy minimization drives the process of cell spreading. Simulations suggest that cell spreading can be viewed as a competition between (i) decreasing cytoskeletal free energy due to strain induced assembly of cytoskeletal proteins into contractile SFs, and (ii) increasing elastic free energy due to stretching of the mechanically passive components of the cell. The computed minimum free energy spread area is shown to be lower for a cell on a compliant substrate than on a rigid substrate. Furthermore, a low substrate ligand density is found to limit cell spreading. The predicted dependence of cell spread area on substrate stiffness and ligand density is in agreement with the experiments of Engler et al. (2003). We also simulate the experiments of Théry et al. (2006), whereby initially circular cells deform and adhere to "V-shaped" and "Y-shaped" ligand patches. Analysis of a number of different spread states reveals that deformed configurations with the lowest free energy exhibit a SF distribution that corresponds to experimental observations, i.e. a high concentration of highly aligned SFs occurs along free edges, with lower SF concentrations in the interior of the cell. In summary, the results of this study suggest that cell spreading is driven by free energy minimization based on a competition between decreasing

  11. Analysis of X-ray induced cell-cycle perturbations in mouse osteosarcoma cells: a two-signal cell-cycle model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meeteren, A. van; Wijk, R. van; Stap, J.; Deys, B.F.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of X-irradiation on mouse osteosarcoma cells have been studied by time-lapse cinematography and the resulting pedigrees have been analysed statistically. It is shown that the irradiation treatment causes three types of cell kinetic lesions: cell death (disintegration), cell sterilization (failure to divide) and proliferation delay. The first two lesions are the most important with regard to survival of the irradiated cell in a clonal assay. Of these two lesions, sterilization appears to be highly correlated for sister cells, while this is not true for cell disintegration. This indicates that cell survival in a clonal assay may be a function of the ratio of the incidences of these two types of lesions. The X-ray-induced proliferation delay was studied in terms of intermitotic time distributions, mother-daughter correlation and sibling correlation in relation to the current cell-cycle phase at the time of treatment. This analysis shows that the effects of irradiation on these cell-cycle characteristics is highly cell-cycle-dependent. A qualitative model to account for the observations is presented. (author)

  12. Analysis of X-ray induced cell-cycle perturbations in mouse osteosarcoma cells: a two-signal cell-cycle model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meeteren, A van; Wijk, R van [Rijksuniversiteit Utrecht (Netherlands); Stap, J; Deys, B F [Amsterdam Univ. (Netherlands)

    1984-03-01

    The effects of X-irradiation on mouse osteosarcoma cells have been studied by time-lapse cinematography and the resulting pedigrees have been analysed statistically. It is shown that the irradiation treatment causes three types of cell kinetic lesions: cell death (disintegration), cell sterilization (failure to divide) and proliferation delay. The first two lesions are the most important with regard to survival of the irradiated cell in a clonal assay. Of these two lesions, sterilization appears to be highly correlated for sister cells, while this is not true for cell disintegration. This indicates that cell survival in a clonal assay may be a function of the ratio of the incidences of these two types of lesions. The X-ray-induced proliferation delay was studied in terms of intermitotic time distributions, mother-daughter correlation and sibling correlation in relation to the current cell-cycle phase at the time of treatment. This analysis shows that the effects of irradiation on these cell-cycle characteristics is highly cell-cycle-dependent. A qualitative model to account for the observations is presented.

  13. Integrated quantitative fractal polarimetric analysis of monolayer lung cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Suman; Zhang, Lin; Quang, Tri; Farrahi, Tannaz; Narayan, Chaya; Deshpande, Aditi; Na, Ying; Blinzler, Adam; Ma, Junyu; Liu, Bo; Giakos, George C.

    2014-05-01

    Digital diagnostic pathology has become one of the most valuable and convenient advancements in technology over the past years. It allows us to acquire, store and analyze pathological information from the images of histological and immunohistochemical glass slides which are scanned to create digital slides. In this study, efficient fractal, wavelet-based polarimetric techniques for histological analysis of monolayer lung cancer cells will be introduced and different monolayer cancer lines will be studied. The outcome of this study indicates that application of fractal, wavelet polarimetric principles towards the analysis of squamous carcinoma and adenocarcinoma cancer cell lines may be proved extremely useful in discriminating among healthy and lung cancer cells as well as differentiating among different lung cancer cells.

  14. B-cell lymphoma 6 protein stimulates oncogenicity of human breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Qiang; Kong, Xiang-jun; Xu, Xiao-chun; Lobie, Peter E; Zhu, Tao; Wu, Zheng-sheng; Liu, Xue; Yan, Hong; He, Yin-huan; Ye, Shan; Cheng, Xing-wang; Zhu, Gui-lu; Wu, Wen-yong; Wang, Xiao-nan

    2014-01-01

    B-cell lymphoma 6 (BCL6) protein, an evolutionarily conserved zinc finger transcription factor, showed to be highly expressed in various human cancers in addition to malignancies in the lymphoid system. This study investigated the role of BCL6 expression in breast cancer and its clinical significance in breast cancer patients. Expression of BCL6 protein was assessed using in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry in 127 breast cancer patients and 50 patients with breast benign disease as well as in breast cell lines. Expression of BCL6 was restored or knocked down in two breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7 and T47D) using BCL6 cDNA and siRNA, respectively. The phenotypic change of these breast cancer cell lines was assessed using cell viability MTT, Transwell invasion, colony formation, and flow cytometry assays and in a xenograft mice model. Luciferase reporter gene, immunoblot, and qRT-PCR were used to investigate the molecular events after manipulated BCL6 expression in breast cancer cells. BCL6 protein was highly expressed in breast cancer cell lines and tissue specimens and expression of BCL6 protein was associated with disease progression and poor survival of breast cancer patients. In vitro, the forced expression of BCL6 results in increased proliferation, anchorage-independent growth, migration, invasion and survival of breast cancer cell lines, whereas knockdown of BCL6 expression reduced these oncogenic properties of breast cancer cells. Moreover, forced expression of BCL6 increased tumor growth and invasiveness in a nude mouse xenograft model. At the gene level, BCL6 was a target gene of miR-339-5p. Expression of BCL6 induced expression of CXCR4 and cyclinD1 proteins. The current study demonstrated the oncogenic property of BCL6 in breast cancer and further study could target BCL6 as a novel potential therapeutic strategy for breast cancer

  15. Resolving tumor heterogeneity: genes involved in chordoma cell development identified by low-template analysis of morphologically distinct cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin El-Heliebi

    Full Text Available The classical sacrococcygeal chordoma tumor presents with a typical morphology of lobulated myxoid tumor tissue with cords, strands and nests of tumor cells. The population of cells consists of small non-vacuolated cells, intermediate cells with a wide range of vacuolization and large heavily vacuolated (physaliferous cells. To date analysis was only performed on bulk tumor mass because of its rare incidence, lack of suited model systems and technical limitations thereby neglecting its heterogeneous composition. We intended to clarify whether the observed cell types are derived from genetically distinct clones or represent different phenotypes. Furthermore, we aimed at elucidating the differences between small non-vacuolated and large physaliferous cells on the genomic and transcriptomic level. Phenotype-specific analyses of small non-vacuolated and large physaliferous cells in two independent chordoma cell lines yielded four candidate genes involved in chordoma cell development. UCHL3, coding for an ubiquitin hydrolase, was found to be over-expressed in the large physaliferous cell phenotype of MUG-Chor1 (18.7-fold and U-CH1 (3.7-fold cells. The mannosyltransferase ALG11 (695-fold and the phosphatase subunit PPP2CB (18.6-fold were found to be up-regulated in large physaliferous MUG-Chor1 cells showing a similar trend in U-CH1 cells. TMEM144, an orphan 10-transmembrane family receptor, yielded contradictory data as cDNA microarray analysis showed up- but RT-qPCR data down-regulation in large physaliferous MUG-Chor1 cells. Isolation of few but morphologically identical cells allowed us to overcome the limitations of bulk analysis in chordoma research. We identified the different chordoma cell phenotypes to be part of a developmental process and discovered new genes linked to chordoma cell development representing potential targets for further research in chordoma tumor biology.

  16. Detection of anti-liver cytosol antibody type 1 (anti-LC1) by immunodiffusion, counterimmunoelectrophoresis and immunoblotting: comparison of different techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muratori, L; Cataleta, M; Muratori, P; Manotti, P; Lenzi, M; Cassani, F; Bianchi, F B

    1995-12-01

    Liver cytosol specific antibody type 1 (anti-LC1) was first described in a proportion of patients with liver/kidney microsomal antibody type 1 (anti-LKM1)-positive autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) and is routinely evaluated by immunodiffusion (ID). Using human liver cytosol as the source of antigen, we have used ID, counterimmunoelectrophoresis (CIE) and immunoblotting (IB), to test sera from 167 patients with documented chronic liver diseases of different etiology. 15 patients had antinuclear antibody (ANA) and/or smooth muscle antibody (SMA)-positive AIH, 13 had anti-LKM1-positive AIH, four had ANA/SMA/anti-LKM1-negative AIH, 76 had anti-LKM1-positive hepatitis C (recently renamed unclassified chronic hepatitis-UCH), 40 had chronic hepatitis C, 15 had chronic hepatitis B, and 4 had chronic hepatitis D. A precipitin line of identity with an anti-LC1 reference serum was detected both by ID and CIE in 16 patients: six with anti-LKM1-positive 'definite' AIH, four with ANA/SMA/anti-LKM1-negative 'definite' AIH, and six with anti-LKM1-positive UCH. By IB, 14 out of the 16 anti-LC1-positive sera (87.5%) reacted with a 58 kDa human liver cytosolic polypeptide, whereas three out of 16 (19%) recognised an additional 60 kDa band. Compared to ID, CIE is more economical in terms of both time and reagents and provides more clear-cut results. The 58 kDa reactivity by IB was detectable in nearly all CIE/ID anti-LC1-positive patients, was not found among CIE/ID anti-LC1-negative patients. In conclusion, CIE is the ideal screening test for the detection of anti-LC1, an autoantibody that can be regarded as an additional serological marker of AIH and is especially useful in ANA/SMA/anti-LKM1 negative cases.

  17. Nicotine enhances proliferation, migration, and radioresistance of human malignant glioma cells through EGFR activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalil, A.A.; Jameson, M.J.; Broaddus, W.C.; Lin, P.S.; Chung, T.D.

    2013-01-01

    It has been suggested that continued tobacco use during radiation therapy contributes to maintenance of neoplastic growth despite treatment with radiation. Nicotine is a cigarette component that is an established risk factor for many diseases, neoplastic and otherwise. The hypothesis of this work is that nicotine promotes the proliferation, migration, and radioresistance of human malignant glioma cells. The effect of nicotine on cellular proliferation, migration, signaling, and radiation sensitivity were evaluated for malignant glioma U87 and GBM12 cells by use of the AlamarBlue, scratch healing, and clonogenic survival assays. Signal transduction was assessed by immunoblotting for activated EGFR, extracellular regulated kinase (ERK), and AKT. At concentrations comparable with those found in chronic smokers, nicotine induced malignant glioma cell migration, growth, colony formation, and radioresistance. Nicotine increased phosphorylation of EGFR tyr992 , AKT ser473 , and ERK. These molecular effects were reduced by pharmacological inhibitors of EGFR, PI3K, and MEK. It was therefore concluded that nicotine stimulates the malignant behavior of glioma cells in vitro by activation of the EGFR and downstream AKT and ERK pathways. (author)

  18. Analysis of Neural Stem Cells from Human Cortical Brain Structures In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksandrova, M A; Poltavtseva, R A; Marei, M V; Sukhikh, G T

    2016-05-01

    Comparative immunohistochemical analysis of the neocortex from human fetuses showed that neural stem and progenitor cells are present in the brain throughout the gestation period, at least from week 8 through 26. At the same time, neural stem cells from the first and second trimester fetuses differed by the distribution, morphology, growth, and quantity. Immunocytochemical analysis of neural stem cells derived from fetuses at different gestation terms and cultured under different conditions showed their differentiation capacity. Detailed analysis of neural stem cell populations derived from fetuses on gestation weeks 8-9, 18-20, and 26 expressing Lex/SSEA1 was performed.

  19. Diagnostic capabilities of non-treponemal and treponemal reactions in the early forms of syphilis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zakharov S.V.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A comparative analysis of the sensitivity and specificity of immunoblotting against other non-treponemal and treponemal reactions was carried out in 215 patients with early forms of syphilis. A high diagnostic efficiency of immunoblotting in patients with early latent syphilis was established. It was found that only in case of primary syphilis, immunoblotting is inferior to Immunofluorescence reaction; this test can be used for differential diagnosis between hidden syphilis and false positive reactions to syphilis.

  20. Characterization of IKBKE as a Breast Cancer Oncogene

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-01

    HMLE -MEKDD cells stably expressing either pWZL or MF-IKKε. Immunoblot analysis by IKKε antibody. (D) IP with an IKK antibody from MCF-7 breast cancer ...summary is presented of research performed during three years of a project to further characterize the breast cancer oncogene IKKε. Two specific aims...constitutive IKKε transgenic mouse model to study the role of IKKε in breast cancer initiation and maintenance. The long term goals of this research

  1. Novel histone deacetylase 8-selective inhibitor 1,3,4-oxadiazole-alanine hybrid induces apoptosis in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pidugu, Vijaya Rao; Yarla, Nagendra Sastry; Bishayee, Anupam; Kalle, Arunasree M; Satya, Alapati Krishna

    2017-11-01

    Identification of isoform-specific histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) is a significant advantage to overcome the adverse side effects of pan-HDACi for the treatment of various diseases, including cancer. We have designed, and synthesized novel 1,3,4 oxadiazole with glycine/alanine hybrids as HDAC8-specific inhibitors and preliminary evaluation has indicated that 1,3,4 oxadiazole with alanine hybrid [(R)-2-amino-N-((5-phenyl-1,3,4-oxadiazol-2-yl)methyl)propanamide (10b)] to be a potent HDAC8 inhibitor. In the present study, the in vitro efficacy of the molecule in inhibiting the cancer cell proliferation and the underlying molecular mechanism was studied. 10b inhibited the growth of MDA-MB-231 and MCF7 breast cancer cells, with a lower IC 50 of 230 and 1000 nM, respectively, compared to K562, COLO-205 and HepG2 cells and was not cytotoxic to normal breast epithelial cells, MCF10A. 10b was specific to HDAC8 and did not affect the expression of other class I HDACs. Further, a dose-dependent increase in H3K9 acetylation levels demonstrated the HDAC-inhibitory activity of 10b in MDA-MB-231 cells. Flow cytometric analysis indicated a dose-dependent increase and decrease in the percent apoptotic cells and mitochondrial membrane potential, respectively, when treated with 10b. Immunoblot analysis showed a modulation of Bax/Bcl2 ratio with a decrease in Bcl2 expression and no change in Bax expression. 10b treatment resulted in induction of p21 and inhibition of CDK1 proteins along with cytochrome c release from mitochondria, activation of caspases-3 and -9 and cleavage of poly ADP-ribose polymerase leading to apoptotic death of MDA-MB-231 and MCF7 cells. In conclusion, our results clearly demonstrated the efficacy of 10b as an anticancer agent against breast cancer.

  2. [6]-Gingerol Prevents Disassembly of Cell Junctions and Activities of MMPs in Invasive Human Pancreas Cancer Cells through ERK/NF-κB/Snail Signal Transduction Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Ok Kim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To study the effects of [6]-gingerol, a ginger phytochemical, on tight junction (TJ molecules, we investigated TJ tightening and signal transduction pathways in human pancreatic duct cell-derived cancer cell line PANC-1. The following methods were utilized: MTT assay to determine cytotoxicity; zymography to examine matrix metalloproteinase (MMP activities; transepithelial electrical resistance (TER and paracellular flux for TJ measurement; RT-PCR and immunoblotting for proteins related to TJ and invasion; and EMSA for NF-κB activity in PANC-1 cells. Results revealed that TER significantly increased and claudin 4 and MMP-9 decreased compared to those of the control. TJ protein levels, including zonula occludens (ZO- 1, occludin, and E-cadherin, increased in [6]-gingerol-treated cells, which correlated with a decrease in paracellular flux and MMP activity. Furthermore, NF-κB/Snail nuclear translocation was suppressed via downregulation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK pathway in response to [6]-gingerol treatment. Moreover, treatment with U0126, an ERK inhibitor, completely blocked NF-κB activity. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate that [6]-gingerol regulates TJ-related proteins and suppresses invasion and metastasis through NF-κB/Snail inhibition via inhibition of the ERK pathway. Therefore, [6]-gingerol may suppress the invasive activity of PANC-1 cells.

  3. Clonal analysis of stem cells in differentiation and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colom, Bartomeu; Jones, Philip H

    2016-12-01

    Tracking the fate of individual cells and their progeny by clonal analysis has redefined the concept of stem cells and their role in health and disease. The maintenance of cell turnover in adult tissues is achieved by the collective action of populations of stem cells with an equal likelihood of self-renewal or differentiation. Following injury stem cells exhibit striking plasticity, switching from homeostatic behavior in order to repair damaged tissues. The effects of disease states on stem cells are also being uncovered, with new insights into how somatic mutations trigger clonal expansion in early neoplasia. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Potent inhibition of rhabdoid tumor cells by combination of flavopiridol and 4OH-tamoxifen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cimica, Velasco; Smith, Melissa E; Zhang, Zhikai; Mathur, Deepti; Mani, Sridhar; Kalpana, Ganjam V

    2010-01-01

    Rhabdoid Tumors (RTs) are highly aggressive pediatric malignancies with poor prognosis. There are currently no standard or effective treatments for RTs in part because treatments are not designed to specifically target these tumors. Our previous studies indicated that targeting the cyclin/cdk pathway is a novel therapeutic strategy for RTs and that a pan-cdk inhibitor, flavopiridol, inhibits RT growth. Since the toxicities and narrow window of activity associated with flavopiridol may limit its clinical use, we tested the effect of combining flavopiridol with 4-hydroxy-Tamoxifen (4OH-Tam) in order to reduce the concentration of flavopiridol needed for inhibition of RTs. The effects of flavopiridol, 4OH-Tam, and their combination on RT cell cycle regulation and apoptosis were assessed by: i) cell survival assays, ii) FACS analysis, iii) caspase activity assays, and iv) immunoblot analysis. Furthermore, the role of p53 in flavopiridol- and 4OH-Tam-mediated induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis was characterized using RNA interference (siRNA) analysis. The effect of p53 on flavopiridol-mediated induction of caspases 2, 3, 8 and 9 was also determined. We found that the combination of flavopiridol and 4OH-Tam potently inhibited the growth of RT cells. Low nanomolar concentrations of flavopiridol induced G 2 arrest, which was correlated to down-modulation of cyclin B1 and up-regulation of p53. Addition of 4OH-Tam did not affect flavopiridol-mediated G 2 arrest, but enhanced caspase 3,7-mediated apoptosis induced by the drug. Abrogation of p53 by siRNA abolished flavopiridol-induced G 2 arrest, but enhanced flavopiridol- (but not 4OH-Tam-) mediated apoptosis, by enhancing caspase 2 and 3 activities. Combining flavopiridol with 4OH-Tam potently inhibited the growth of RT cells by increasing the ability of either drug alone to induce caspases 2 and 3 thereby causing apoptosis. The potency of flavopiridol was enhanced by abrogation of p53. Our results warrant further

  5. Potent inhibition of rhabdoid tumor cells by combination of flavopiridol and 4OH-tamoxifen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cimica, Velasco; Smith, Melissa E; Zhang, Zhikai; Mathur, Deepti [Department of Genetics, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, New York 10461 (United States); Mani, Sridhar [Department of Genetics, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, New York 10461 (United States); Department of Medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, New York 10461 (United States); Albert Einstein Cancer Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, New York 10461 (United States); Kalpana, Ganjam V [Department of Genetics, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, New York 10461 (United States); Albert Einstein Cancer Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, New York 10461 (United States)

    2010-11-19

    Rhabdoid Tumors (RTs) are highly aggressive pediatric malignancies with poor prognosis. There are currently no standard or effective treatments for RTs in part because treatments are not designed to specifically target these tumors. Our previous studies indicated that targeting the cyclin/cdk pathway is a novel therapeutic strategy for RTs and that a pan-cdk inhibitor, flavopiridol, inhibits RT growth. Since the toxicities and narrow window of activity associated with flavopiridol may limit its clinical use, we tested the effect of combining flavopiridol with 4-hydroxy-Tamoxifen (4OH-Tam) in order to reduce the concentration of flavopiridol needed for inhibition of RTs. The effects of flavopiridol, 4OH-Tam, and their combination on RT cell cycle regulation and apoptosis were assessed by: i) cell survival assays, ii) FACS analysis, iii) caspase activity assays, and iv) immunoblot analysis. Furthermore, the role of p53 in flavopiridol- and 4OH-Tam-mediated induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis was characterized using RNA interference (siRNA) analysis. The effect of p53 on flavopiridol-mediated induction of caspases 2, 3, 8 and 9 was also determined. We found that the combination of flavopiridol and 4OH-Tam potently inhibited the growth of RT cells. Low nanomolar concentrations of flavopiridol induced G{sub 2} arrest, which was correlated to down-modulation of cyclin B1 and up-regulation of p53. Addition of 4OH-Tam did not affect flavopiridol-mediated G{sub 2} arrest, but enhanced caspase 3,7-mediated apoptosis induced by the drug. Abrogation of p53 by siRNA abolished flavopiridol-induced G{sub 2} arrest, but enhanced flavopiridol- (but not 4OH-Tam-) mediated apoptosis, by enhancing caspase 2 and 3 activities. Combining flavopiridol with 4OH-Tam potently inhibited the growth of RT cells by increasing the ability of either drug alone to induce caspases 2 and 3 thereby causing apoptosis. The potency of flavopiridol was enhanced by abrogation of p53. Our results

  6. Potent inhibition of rhabdoid tumor cells by combination of flavopiridol and 4OH-tamoxifen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mani Sridhar

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rhabdoid Tumors (RTs are highly aggressive pediatric malignancies with poor prognosis. There are currently no standard or effective treatments for RTs in part because treatments are not designed to specifically target these tumors. Our previous studies indicated that targeting the cyclin/cdk pathway is a novel therapeutic strategy for RTs and that a pan-cdk inhibitor, flavopiridol, inhibits RT growth. Since the toxicities and narrow window of activity associated with flavopiridol may limit its clinical use, we tested the effect of combining flavopiridol with 4-hydroxy-Tamoxifen (4OH-Tam in order to reduce the concentration of flavopiridol needed for inhibition of RTs. Methods The effects of flavopiridol, 4OH-Tam, and their combination on RT cell cycle regulation and apoptosis were assessed by: i cell survival assays, ii FACS analysis, iii caspase activity assays, and iv immunoblot analysis. Furthermore, the role of p53 in flavopiridol- and 4OH-Tam-mediated induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis was characterized using RNA interference (siRNA analysis. The effect of p53 on flavopiridol-mediated induction of caspases 2, 3, 8 and 9 was also determined. Results We found that the combination of flavopiridol and 4OH-Tam potently inhibited the growth of RT cells. Low nanomolar concentrations of flavopiridol induced G2 arrest, which was correlated to down-modulation of cyclin B1 and up-regulation of p53. Addition of 4OH-Tam did not affect flavopiridol-mediated G2 arrest, but enhanced caspase 3,7-mediated apoptosis induced by the drug. Abrogation of p53 by siRNA abolished flavopiridol-induced G2 arrest, but enhanced flavopiridol- (but not 4OH-Tam- mediated apoptosis, by enhancing caspase 2 and 3 activities. Conclusions Combining flavopiridol with 4OH-Tam potently inhibited the growth of RT cells by increasing the ability of either drug alone to induce caspases 2 and 3 thereby causing apoptosis. The potency of flavopiridol was

  7. Mitogenic activation of B cells in vitro: the properties of adherent accessory cells as revealed by partition analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kettman, J.R.; Soederberg, A.; Lefkovits, I.

    1986-08-15

    The requirement of B cells activated by mitogen (dextran sulfate plus lipopolysaccharide) for accessory cells was studied by partition analysis. Small numbers of splenic B cells were activated to clonal growth, as determined by visual inspection, and to immunoglobulin (Ig) synthesis, as determined by release of Ig into the culture fluid. By placing irradiated adherent cells in the periphery of the microculture wells and forcing responding cells to different areas of the well (slant experiments), it was observed that no cell contact was necessary for B cell activation, and that promoted contact (Rock and Roll experiments) does not increase the efficiency of activation. Sequential microcultures suggest that only some irradiated adherent cells act as accessory cells, but they can perform this function to more than one B cell. Attempts to perform limiting dilution analysis by varying irradiated adherent cell input showed non-single-hit behavior. When the data were rearranged, taking into account the distribution of irradiated adherent cells, then single-hit behavior with about 1 to 5% of irradiated adherent cells acting as an accessory cells for B cell clonal activation was observed. The evidence suggests that an uncommon irradiated adherent cell releases a soluble factor necessary for B cell activation and/or clonal proliferation.

  8. Mitogenic activation of B cells in vitro: the properties of adherent accessory cells as revealed by partition analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kettman, J.R.; Soederberg, A.; Lefkovits, I.

    1986-01-01

    The requirement of B cells activated by mitogen (dextran sulfate plus lipopolysaccharide) for accessory cells was studied by partition analysis. Small numbers of splenic B cells were activated to clonal growth, as determined by visual inspection, and to immunoglobulin (Ig) synthesis, as determined by release of Ig into the culture fluid. By placing irradiated adherent cells in the periphery of the microculture wells and forcing responding cells to different areas of the well (slant experiments), it was observed that no cell contact was necessary for B cell activation, and that promoted contact (Rock and Roll experiments) does not increase the efficiency of activation. Sequential microcultures suggest that only some irradiated adherent cells act as accessory cells, but they can perform this function to more than one B cell. Attempts to perform limiting dilution analysis by varying irradiated adherent cell input showed non-single-hit behavior. When the data were rearranged, taking into account the distribution of irradiated adherent cells, then single-hit behavior with about 1 to 5% of irradiated adherent cells acting as an accessory cells for B cell clonal activation was observed. The evidence suggests that an uncommon irradiated adherent cell releases a soluble factor necessary for B cell activation and/or clonal proliferation

  9. Proximity-based differential single cell analysis of the niche to identify stem/progenitor cell regulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberstein, Lev; Goncalves, Kevin A; Kharchenko, Peter V; Turcotte, Raphael; Kfoury, Youmna; Mercier, Francois; Baryawno, Ninib; Severe, Nicolas; Bachand, Jacqueline; Spencer, Joel; Papazian, Ani; Lee, Dongjun; Chitteti, Brahmananda Reddy; Srour, Edward F; Hoggatt, Jonathan; Tate, Tiffany; Celso, Cristina Lo; Ono, Noriaki; Nutt, Stephen; Heino, Jyrki; Sipilä, Kalle; Shioda, Toshihiro; Osawa, Masatake; Lin, Charles P; Hu, Guo-fu; Scadden, David T

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Physiological stem cell function is regulated by secreted factors produced by niche cells. In this study, we describe an unbiased approach based on differential single-cell gene expression analysis of mesenchymal osteolineage cells close to and further removed from hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells to identify candidate niche factors. Mesenchymal cells displayed distinct molecular profiles based on their relative location. Amongst the genes which were preferentially expressed in proximal cells, we functionally examined three secreted or cell surface molecules not previously connected to HSPC biology: the secreted RNase Angiogenin, the cytokine IL18 and the adhesion molecule Embigin and discovered that all of these factors are HSPC quiescence regulators. Our proximity-based differential single cell approach therefore reveals molecular heterogeneity within niche cells and can be used to identify novel extrinsic stem/progenitor cell regulators. Similar approaches could also be applied to other stem cell/niche pairs to advance understanding of microenvironmental regulation of stem cell function. PMID:27524439

  10. Anthocyanin-Rich Extract from Red Chinese Cabbage Alleviates Vascular Inflammation in Endothelial Cells and Apo E−/− Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee Kyoung Joo

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Anthocyanins, the most prevalent flavonoids in red/purple fruits and vegetables, are known to improve immune responses and reduce chronic disease risks. In this study, the anti-inflammatory activities of an anthocyanin-rich extract from red Chinese cabbage (ArCC were shown based on its inhibitory effects in cultured endothelial cells and hyperlipidemic apolipoprotein E-deficient mice. ArCC treatment suppressed monocyte adhesion to tumor necrosis factor-α-stimulated endothelial cells. This was validated by ArCC’s ability to downregulate the expression and transcription of endothelial adhesion molecules, determined by immunoblot and luciferase promoter assays, respectively. The regulation of adhesion molecules was accompanied by transcriptional inhibition of nuclear factor-κB, which restricted cytoplasmic localization as shown by immunocytochemistry. Administration of ArCC (150 or 300 mg/kg/day inhibited aortic inflammation in hyperlipidemic apolipoprotein E-deficient mice, as shown by in vivo imaging. Immunohistochemistry and plasma analysis showed that the aortas from these mice exhibited markedly lower leukocyte infiltration, reduced plaque formation, and lower concentrations of blood inflammatory cytokines than those observed in the control mice. The results suggest that the consumption of anthocyanin-rich red Chinese cabbage is closely correlated with lowering the risk of vascular inflammatory diseases.

  11. Elemental analysis in cultured cells, tobacco and grape, treated with aluminum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanoi, K.; Iikura, H; Nakanishi, T.M.

    2001-01-01

    Relationship between Al toxicity and the Al, Fe and B amount of element in tobacco and grape cells are discussed. Al and Fe were analyzed by neutron activation analysis and B was analyzed by prompt gamma-ray analysis. Callose content was also measured as an indicator of cell damage induced Al toxicity. When tobacco cells were incubated in 1 mM and 300 μM Al solution, the pattern of callose formation was much similar to that of Fe accumulation than that of Al accumulation in tobacco cells, suggesting that the increase of Fe content induced toxic effect along with Al incorporated into the cells. However, this tendency was not observed in grape cells. Boron content did not show any relation to those of Al or Fe throughout the Al treatment in both tobacco and grape cells. (author)

  12. Expression of HSP27, HSP72 and MRP proteins in in vitro co-culture of colon tumour cell spheroids with normal cells after incubation with rhTGF- beta1 and/or CPT-11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paduch, Roman; Jakubowicz-Gil, Joanna; Kandefer-Szerszen, Martyna

    2009-12-01

    We studied the expression of inducible heat shock protein (HSP27, HSP72) and multidrug-resistance protein (MRP) in co-cultures of human colon carcinoma cell spheroids obtained from different grades of tumour with normal human colon epithelium, myofibroblast and endothelial cell monolayers. We also measured the influence of recombinant human transforming growth factor beta1 (rhTGF-beta1) and camptothecin (CPT-11), added as single agents or in combination, on the levels of the HSPs, MRP, interleukin (IL)-6 and nitric oxide (NO). An immunoblotting analysis with densitometry showed that rhTGF-beta1 and/or CPT-11 increased HSP27, HSP72 and MRP expression in tumour cells and myofibroblasts, as well as in co-cultures compared with appropriate controls. By contrast, in colonic epithelium, inhibition of HSPs and MRP was comparable with that of the control. In endothelial cells, HSP72 was undetectable. Direct interaction of colon tumour spheroids with normal myofibroblasts caused a significant, tumour-grade dependent increase in IL-6 production. Production of IL-6 was significantly lowered by rhTGF-beta1 and/or CPT-11. Tumour cell spheroids cultivated alone produced larger amounts of NO than normal cells. In co-culture, the level of the radical decreased compared with the sum of NO produced by the monocultures of the two types of cells. rhTGF-beta1 and/or CPT-11 decreased NO production both in tumour and normal cell monocultures and their co-cultures. In conclusion, direct interactions between tumour and normal cells influence the expression of HSP27, HSP72 and MRP, and alter IL-6 and NO production. rhTGF-beta1 and/or CPT-11 may potentate resistance to chemotherapy by increasing HSP and MRP expression but, on the other hand, they may limit tumour cell spread by decreasing the level of some soluble mediators of inflammation (IL-6 and NO).

  13. Inhibition of inducible nitric oxide synthesis by azathioprine in a macrophage cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeslinger, Thomas; Friedl, Roswitha; Spieckermann, Paul Gerhard

    2006-06-20

    Azathioprine is used as an anti-inflammatory agent. Although there are numerous data demonstrating cytotoxic and immunosuppressive properties of azathioprine and its metabolite 6-mercaptopurine, the mechanism of the anti-inflammatory action of azathioprine has not yet been fully clarified. During our study, we investigated the effects of azathioprine on the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in lipopolysaccharide stimulated murine macrophages (RAW 264.7) by measurement of iNOS protein (immunoblotting), iNOS mRNA (semiquantitative competitive RT-PCR), and NO production (nitrite levels). Azathioprine (0-210 muM) induces a concentration dependent inhibition of inducible nitric oxide synthesis (IC50: 33.5 muM). iNOS protein expression showed a concentration dependent reduction as revealed by immunoblotting when cells were incubated with increasing amounts of azathioprine. Azathioprine decreases iNOS mRNA levels as shown by semiquantitative competitive RT-PCR. In contrast, 6-mercaptopurine showed no inhibition of inducible nitric oxide synthesis. Azathioprine did not reduce iNOS mRNA stability after the addition of actinomycin D. Enzymatic activity assays with increasing concentrations of azathioprine (0-210 muM) showed no statistically significant inhibition of iNOS enzyme activity compared to cell lysates without azathioprine. Nuclear translocation of NF-kappaB p65 subunit and binding of NF-kappaB p50 subunit from nuclear extracts to a biotinylated-consensus sequence was unaffected by azathioprine treatment. iNOS inhibition by azathioprine was associated with a decreased expression of IRF-1 (interferon regulatory factor 1) and IFN-beta (beta-interferon) mRNA. Azathioprine induced iNOS inhibition seems to be associated with an action of the methylnitroimidazolyl substituent. This suggests a route to the rational design of nontoxic anti-inflammatory agents by replacing the 6-mercaptopurine component of azathioprine with other substituents. The inhibition of

  14. Hot Cell Window Shielding Analysis Using MCNP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pope, Chad L.; Scates, Wade W.; Taylor, J. Todd

    2009-01-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory Materials and Fuels Complex nuclear facilities are undergoing a documented safety analysis upgrade. In conjunction with the upgrade effort, shielding analysis of the Fuel Conditioning Facility (FCF) hot cell windows has been conducted. This paper describes the shielding analysis methodology. Each 4-ft thick window uses nine glass slabs, an oil film between the slabs, numerous steel plates, and packed lead wool. Operations in the hot cell center on used nuclear fuel (UNF) processing. Prior to the shielding analysis, shield testing with a gamma ray source was conducted, and the windows were found to be very effective gamma shields. Despite these results, because the glass contained significant amounts of lead and little neutron absorbing material, some doubt lingered regarding the effectiveness of the windows in neutron shielding situations, such as during an accidental criticality. MCNP was selected as an analysis tool because it could model complicated geometry, and it could track gamma and neutron radiation. A bounding criticality source was developed based on the composition of the UNF. Additionally, a bounding gamma source was developed based on the fission product content of the UNF. Modeling the windows required field inspections and detailed examination of drawings and material specifications. Consistent with the shield testing results, MCNP results demonstrated that the shielding was very effective with respect to gamma radiation, and in addition, the analysis demonstrated that the shielding was also very effective during an accidental criticality.

  15. Image segmentation and dynamic lineage analysis in single-cell fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Quanli; Niemi, Jarad; Tan, Chee-Meng; You, Lingchong; West, Mike

    2010-01-01

    An increasingly common component of studies in synthetic and systems biology is analysis of dynamics of gene expression at the single-cell level, a context that is heavily dependent on the use of time-lapse movies. Extracting quantitative data on the single-cell temporal dynamics from such movies remains a major challenge. Here, we describe novel methods for automating key steps in the analysis of single-cell, fluorescent images-segmentation and lineage reconstruction-to recognize and track individual cells over time. The automated analysis iteratively combines a set of extended morphological methods for segmentation, and uses a neighborhood-based scoring method for frame-to-frame lineage linking. Our studies with bacteria, budding yeast and human cells, demonstrate the portability and usability of these methods, whether using phase, bright field or fluorescent images. These examples also demonstrate the utility of our integrated approach in facilitating analyses of engineered and natural cellular networks in diverse settings. The automated methods are implemented in freely available, open-source software.

  16. A novel RNA sequencing data analysis method for cell line authentication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Fasterius

    Full Text Available We have developed a novel analysis method that can interrogate the authenticity of biological samples used for generation of transcriptome profiles in public data repositories. The method uses RNA sequencing information to reveal mutations in expressed transcripts and subsequently confirms the identity of analysed cells by comparison with publicly available cell-specific mutational profiles. Cell lines constitute key model systems widely used within cancer research, but their identity needs to be confirmed in order to minimise the influence of cell contaminations and genetic drift on the analysis. Using both public and novel data, we demonstrate the use of RNA-sequencing data analysis for cell line authentication by examining the validity of COLO205, DLD1, HCT15, HCT116, HKE3, HT29 and RKO colorectal cancer cell lines. We successfully authenticate the studied cell lines and validate previous reports indicating that DLD1 and HCT15 are synonymous. We also show that the analysed HKE3 cells harbour an unexpected KRAS-G13D mutation and confirm that this cell line is a genuine KRAS dosage mutant, rather than a true isogenic derivative of HCT116 expressing only the wild type KRAS. This authentication method could be used to revisit the numerous cell line based RNA sequencing experiments available in public data repositories, analyse new experiments where whole genome sequencing is not available, as well as facilitate comparisons of data from different experiments, platforms and laboratories.

  17. Identification of Cell Type-Specific Differences in Erythropoietin Receptor Signaling in Primary Erythroid and Lung Cancer Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Merkle

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer, with its most prevalent form non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC, is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide, and is commonly treated with chemotherapeutic drugs such as cisplatin. Lung cancer patients frequently suffer from chemotherapy-induced anemia, which can be treated with erythropoietin (EPO. However, studies have indicated that EPO not only promotes erythropoiesis in hematopoietic cells, but may also enhance survival of NSCLC cells. Here, we verified that the NSCLC cell line H838 expresses functional erythropoietin receptors (EPOR and that treatment with EPO reduces cisplatin-induced apoptosis. To pinpoint differences in EPO-induced survival signaling in erythroid progenitor cells (CFU-E, colony forming unit-erythroid and H838 cells, we combined mathematical modeling with a method for feature selection, the L1 regularization. Utilizing an example model and simulated data, we demonstrated that this approach enables the accurate identification and quantification of cell type-specific parameters. We applied our strategy to quantitative time-resolved data of EPO-induced JAK/STAT signaling generated by quantitative immunoblotting, mass spectrometry and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR in CFU-E and H838 cells as well as H838 cells overexpressing human EPOR (H838-HA-hEPOR. The established parsimonious mathematical model was able to simultaneously describe the data sets of CFU-E, H838 and H838-HA-hEPOR cells. Seven cell type-specific parameters were identified that included for example parameters for nuclear translocation of STAT5 and target gene induction. Cell type-specific differences in target gene induction were experimentally validated by qRT-PCR experiments. The systematic identification of pathway differences and sensitivities of EPOR signaling in CFU-E and H838 cells revealed potential targets for intervention to selectively inhibit EPO-induced signaling in the tumor cells but leave the responses in

  18. Single-Cell Transcriptomic Analysis Defines Heterogeneity and Transcriptional Dynamics in the Adult Neural Stem Cell Lineage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben W. Dulken

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Neural stem cells (NSCs in the adult mammalian brain serve as a reservoir for the generation of new neurons, oligodendrocytes, and astrocytes. Here, we use single-cell RNA sequencing to characterize adult NSC populations and examine the molecular identities and heterogeneity of in vivo NSC populations. We find that cells in the NSC lineage exist on a continuum through the processes of activation and differentiation. Interestingly, rare intermediate states with distinct molecular profiles can be identified and experimentally validated, and our analysis identifies putative surface markers and key intracellular regulators for these subpopulations of NSCs. Finally, using the power of single-cell profiling, we conduct a meta-analysis to compare in vivo NSCs and in vitro cultures, distinct fluorescence-activated cell sorting strategies, and different neurogenic niches. These data provide a resource for the field and contribute to an integrative understanding of the adult NSC lineage.

  19. Activation of NF-κB is involved in 6-hydroxydopamine-but not MPP+-induced dopaminergic neuronal cell death: its potential role as a survival determinant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Seong H.; Choi, Won-Seok; Yoon, So-Young; Ahn, Young Soo; Oh, Young J.

    2004-01-01

    The nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) family plays an important role in the control of the apoptotic response. Its activation has been demonstrated in both neurons and glial cells in many neurological disorders. In the present study, we specifically examined whether and to what extent NF-κB activation is involved in culture models of Parkinson's disease following exposure of MN9D dopaminergic neuronal cells to 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) and 1-methyl-4-phenyl-4-phenylpyridinium ion (MPP + ). Both analysis by immunocytochemistry and of immunoblots revealed that NF-κB-p65 was translocated into the nuclei following 6-OHDA but not MPP + -treatment. A time-dependent activation of NF-κB induced by 6-OHDA but not MPP + was also demonstrated by an electrophoretic mobility shift assay. A competition assay indicated that not only NF-κB-p65 but also -p50 is involved in 6-OHDA-induced NF-κB activity. Co-treatment with an antioxidant, N-acetyl-L-cysteine, blocked 6-OHDA-induced activation of NF-κB signaling. In the presence of an NF-κB inhibitor, pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC), 6-OHDA-induced cell death was accelerated while PDTC did not affect MPP + -induced cell death. Our data may point to a drug-specific activation of NF-κB as a survival determinant for dopaminergic neurons

  20. Generation of Hypertension-Associated STK39 Polymorphism Knockin Cell Lines With the Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats/Cas9 System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandai, Shintaro; Mori, Takayasu; Sohara, Eisei; Rai, Tatemitsu; Uchida, Shinichi

    2015-12-01

    Previous genome-wide association studies identified serine threonine kinase 39 (STK39), encoding STE20/SPS1-related proline/alanine-rich kinase, as one of a limited number of hypertension susceptibility genes. A recent meta-analysis confirmed the association of STK39 intronic polymorphism rs3754777 with essential hypertension, among previously reported hypertension-associated STK39 polymorphisms. However, the biochemical function of this polymorphism in the mechanism responsible for hypertension is yet to be clarified. We generated rs3754777G>A knockin human cell lines with clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats-mediated genome engineering. Homozygous (A/A) and heterozygous (G/A) knockin human embryonic kidney cell lines were generated using a double nickase, single-guide RNAs targeting STK39 intron 5 around single-nucleotide polymorphism, and a 100-bp donor single-stranded DNA oligonucleotide. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction with sequencing analyses revealed the identical STK39 transcripts among the wild-type and both knockin cell lines. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction showed increased STK39 mRNA expression, and immunoblot analysis revealed increases in total and phosphorylated STE20/SPS1-related proline/alanine-rich kinase with increased phosphorylated Na-K-Cl cotransporter isoform 1 in both knockin cell lines. The largest increases in these molecules were observed in the homozygous cell line. These findings indicated that this intronic polymorphism increases STK39 transcription, leading to activation of the STE20/SPS1-related proline/alanine-rich kinase-solute carrier family 12A signaling cascade. Increased interactions between STE20/SPS1-related proline/alanine-rich kinase and the target cation-chloride cotransporters may be responsible for hypertension susceptibility in individuals with this polymorphism. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. Myeloid cell leukemia-1 (Mc1-1 is a candidate target gene of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1 in the testis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palladino Michael A

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spermatic cord torsion can lead to testis ischemia (I and subsequent ischemia-reperfusion (I/R causing germ cell-specific apoptosis. Previously, we demonstrated that the hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1 transcription factor, a key regulator of physiological responses to hypoxia, is abundant in Leydig cells in normoxic and ischemic testes. We hypothesize that testicular HIF-1 activates the expression of antiapoptotic target genes to protect Leydig cells from apoptosis. In silico analysis of testis genes containing a consensus hypoxia response element (HRE, 5’-RCGTG-3’ identified myeloid cell leukemia-1 (Mcl-1 as a potential HIF-1 target gene. The purpose of this study was to determine whether HIF-1 shows DNA-binding activity in normoxic and ischemic testes and whether Mcl-1 is a target gene of testicular HIF-1. Methods The testicular HIF-1 DNA-binding capacity was analyzed in vitro using a quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA and electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA. MCL-1 protein expression was evaluated by immunoblot analysis and immunohistochemistry. The binding of testicular HIF-1 to the Mcl-1 gene was examined via chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP analysis. Results The ELISA and EMSA assays demonstrated that testicular HIF-1 from normoxic and ischemic testes binds DNA equally strongly, suggesting physiological roles for HIF-1 in the normoxic testis, unlike most tissues in which HIF-1 is degraded under normoxic conditions and is only activated by hypoxia. MCL-1 protein was determined to be abundant in both normoxic and ischemic testes and expressed in Leydig cells. In a pattern identical to that of HIF-1 expression, the steady-state levels of MCL-1 were not significantly affected by I or I/R and MCL-1 co-localized with HIF-1α in Leydig cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP analysis using a HIF-1 antibody revealed sequences enriched for the Mcl-1 promoter. Conclusions The results

  2. A signal processing analysis of Purkinje cells in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ze'ev R Abrams

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellar Purkinje cells in vitro fire recurrent sequences of Sodium and Calcium spikes. Here, we analyze the Purkinje cell using harmonic analysis, and our experiments reveal that its output signal is comprised of three distinct frequency bands, which are combined using Amplitude and Frequency Modulation (AM/FM. We find that the three characteristic frequencies - Sodium, Calcium and Switching – occur in various combinations in all waveforms observed using whole-cell current clamp recordings. We found that the Calcium frequency can display a frequency doubling of its frequency mode, and the Switching frequency can act as a possible generator of pauses that are typically seen in Purkinje output recordings. Using a reversibly photo-switchable kainate receptor agonist, we demonstrate the external modulation of the Calcium and Switching frequencies. These experiments and Fourier analysis suggest that the Purkinje cell can be understood as a harmonic signal oscillator, enabling a higher level of interpretation of Purkinje signaling based on modern signal processing techniques.

  3. Id3 induces an Elk-1–caspase-8-dependent apoptotic pathway in squamous carcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, You-Shin; Aubee, Joseph; DiVito, Kyle A; Zhou, Hengbo; Zhang, Weiyi; Chou, Fen-Pi; Simbulan-Rosenthal, Cynthia M; Rosenthal, Dean S

    2015-01-01

    Inhibitor of differentiation/DNA-binding (Id) proteins are helix–loop–helix (HLH) transcription factors. The Id protein family (Id1–Id4) mediates tissue homeostasis by regulating cellular processes including differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis. Ids typically function as dominant negative HLH proteins, which bind other HLH proteins and sequester them away from DNA promoter regions. Previously, we have found that Id3 induced apoptosis in immortalized human keratinocytes upon UVB exposure, consistent with its role as a tumor suppressor. To investigate the role of Id3 in malignant squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) cells (A431), a tetracycline-regulated inducible system was used to induce Id3 in cell culture and mouse xenograft models. We found that upon Id3 induction, there was a decrease in cell number under low serum conditions, as well as in soft agar. Microarray, RT-PCR, immunoblot, siRNA, and inhibitor studies revealed that Id3 induced expression of Elk-1, an E-twenty-six (ETS)-domain transcription factor, inducing procaspase-8 expression and activation. Id3 deletion mutants revealed that 80 C-terminal amino acids, including the HLH, are important for Id3-induced apoptosis. In a mouse xenograft model, Id3 induction decreased tumor size by 30%. Using immunofluorescent analysis, we determined that the tumor size decrease was also mediated through apoptosis. Furthermore, we show that Id3 synergizes with 5-FU and cisplatin therapies for nonmelanoma skin cancer cells. Our studies have shown a molecular mechanism by which Id3 induces apoptosis in SCC, and this information can potentially be used to develop new treatments for SCC patients

  4. HoloMonitor M4: holographic imaging cytometer for real-time kinetic label-free live-cell analysis of adherent cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebesta, Mikael; Egelberg, Peter J.; Langberg, Anders; Lindskov, Jens-Henrik; Alm, Kersti; Janicke, Birgit

    2016-03-01

    Live-cell imaging enables studying dynamic cellular processes that cannot be visualized in fixed-cell assays. An increasing number of scientists in academia and the pharmaceutical industry are choosing live-cell analysis over or in addition to traditional fixed-cell assays. We have developed a time-lapse label-free imaging cytometer HoloMonitorM4. HoloMonitor M4 assists researchers to overcome inherent disadvantages of fluorescent analysis, specifically effects of chemical labels or genetic modifications which can alter cellular behavior. Additionally, label-free analysis is simple and eliminates the costs associated with staining procedures. The underlying technology principle is based on digital off-axis holography. While multiple alternatives exist for this type of analysis, we prioritized our developments to achieve the following: a) All-inclusive system - hardware and sophisticated cytometric analysis software; b) Ease of use enabling utilization of instrumentation by expert- and entrylevel researchers alike; c) Validated quantitative assay end-points tracked over time such as optical path length shift, optical volume and multiple derived imaging parameters; d) Reliable digital autofocus; e) Robust long-term operation in the incubator environment; f) High throughput and walk-away capability; and finally g) Data management suitable for single- and multi-user networks. We provide examples of HoloMonitor applications of label-free cell viability measurements and monitoring of cell cycle phase distribution.

  5. Lithium-thionyl chloride cell system safety hazard analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dampier, F. W.

    1985-03-01

    This system safety analysis for the lithium thionyl chloride cell is a critical review of the technical literature pertaining to cell safety and draws conclusions and makes recommendations based on this data. The thermodynamics and kinetics of the electrochemical reactions occurring during discharge are discussed with particular attention given to unstable SOCl2 reduction intermediates. Potentially hazardous reactions between the various cell components and discharge products or impurities that could occur during electrical or thermal abuse are described and the most hazardous conditions and reactions identified. Design factors influencing the safety of Li/SOCl2 cells, shipping and disposal methods and the toxicity of Li/SOCl2 battery components are additional safety issues that are also addressed.

  6. Fourier analysis of cell-wise Block-Jacobi splitting in two-dimensional geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosa, M.; Warsa, J. S.; Kelley, T. M.

    2009-01-01

    A Fourier analysis is conducted in two-dimensional (2D) geometry for the discrete ordinates (S N ) approximation of the neutron transport problem solved with Richardson iteration (Source Iteration) using the cell-wise Block-Jacobi (BJ) algorithm. The results of the Fourier analysis show that convergence of cell-wise BJ can degrade, leading to a spectral radius equal to 1, in problems containing optically thin cells. For problems containing cells that are optically thick, instead, the spectral radius tends to 0. Hence, in the optically thick-cell regime, cell-wise BJ is rapidly convergent even for problems that are scattering dominated, with a scattering ratio c close to 1. (authors)

  7. Dielectrophoretic capture and genetic analysis of single neuroblastoma tumor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica L Carpenter

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Our understanding of the diversity of cells that escape the primary tumor and seed micrometastases remains rudimentary, and approaches for studying circulating and disseminated tumor cells have been limited by low throughput and sensitivity, reliance on single parameter sorting, and a focus on enumeration rather than phenotypic and genetic characterization. Here we utilize a highly sensitive microfluidic and dielectrophoretic approach for the isolation and genetic analysis of individual tumor cells. We employed fluorescence labeling to isolate 208 single cells from spiking experiments conducted with 11 cell lines, including 8 neuroblastoma cell lines, and achieved a capture sensitivity of 1 tumor cell per 106 white blood cells. Sample fixation or freezing had no detectable effect on cell capture. Point mutations were accurately detected in the whole genome amplification product of captured single tumor cells but not in negative control white blood cells. We applied this approach to capture 144 single tumor cells from 10 bone marrow samples from patients suffering from neuroblastoma. In this pediatric malignancy, high-risk patients often exhibit wide-spread hematogenous metastasis, but access to primary tumor can be difficult or impossible. Here we used flow-based sorting to pre-enrich samples with tumor involvement below 0.02%. For all patients for whom a mutation in the Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase gene had already been detected in their primary tumor, the same mutation was detected in single cells from their marrow. These findings demonstrate a novel, non-invasive, and adaptable method for the capture and genetic analysis of single tumor cells from cancer patients.

  8. Development of a hot cell for post-irradiation analysis of nuclear fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Selma S.C.; Silva Junior, Silverio Ferreira da; Loureiro, Joao Roberto M. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)], e-mail: selmasallam@yahoo.com.br, e-mail: silvasf@cdtn.br, e-mail: jrmattos@cdtn.br

    2009-07-01

    Post irradiation examinations of nuclear fuels are performed in order to verify their in-service behavior. Examinations are conducted in compact structures called hot cells, designed to attend the different types of tests and analysis for fuel's characterization. The characterization of fuel microstructure is an activity performed in hot cells. Usually, hot cells for microstructural fuel analysis are designed to allow the metallographic and ceramographic samples preparation and after that, microscopical analysis of the fuel's microstructure. Due to the complexity of the foreseen operations, the severe limitations imposed by the available space into the hot cells, the capabilities of the remote manipulation devices, the procedures of radiological protection and the needs to obtain samples with an adequate surface quality for microscopic analysis, the design of a hot cell for fuel samples preparation presents a high level of complexity. In this paper, the methodology used to develop a hot cell facility for nuclear fuel's metallographic and ceramographic samples preparation is presented. Equipment, devices and systems used in conventional sample preparation processes were evaluated during bench tests. After the necessary adjustments and processes adaptations, they were assembled in a mock-up of the respective hot cell, where they were tested in conditions as realistic as possible, in order to improve the operations and processes to be performed at the real hot cells. (author)

  9. Development of a hot cell for post-irradiation analysis of nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Selma S.C.; Silva Junior, Silverio Ferreira da; Loureiro, Joao Roberto M.

    2009-01-01

    Post irradiation examinations of nuclear fuels are performed in order to verify their in-service behavior. Examinations are conducted in compact structures called hot cells, designed to attend the different types of tests and analysis for fuel's characterization. The characterization of fuel microstructure is an activity performed in hot cells. Usually, hot cells for microstructural fuel analysis are designed to allow the metallographic and ceramographic samples preparation and after that, microscopical analysis of the fuel's microstructure. Due to the complexity of the foreseen operations, the severe limitations imposed by the available space into the hot cells, the capabilities of the remote manipulation devices, the procedures of radiological protection and the needs to obtain samples with an adequate surface quality for microscopic analysis, the design of a hot cell for fuel samples preparation presents a high level of complexity. In this paper, the methodology used to develop a hot cell facility for nuclear fuel's metallographic and ceramographic samples preparation is presented. Equipment, devices and systems used in conventional sample preparation processes were evaluated during bench tests. After the necessary adjustments and processes adaptations, they were assembled in a mock-up of the respective hot cell, where they were tested in conditions as realistic as possible, in order to improve the operations and processes to be performed at the real hot cells. (author)

  10. Lack of TXNIP protects against mitochondria-mediated apoptosis but not against fatty acid-induced ER stress-mediated beta-cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Junqin; Fontes, Ghislaine; Saxena, Geetu; Poitout, Vincent; Shalev, Anath

    2010-02-01

    We have previously shown that lack of thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP) protects against diabetes and glucotoxicity-induced beta-cell apoptosis. Because the role of TXNIP in lipotoxicity is unknown, the goal of the present study was to determine whether TXNIP expression is regulated by fatty acids and whether TXNIP deficiency also protects beta-cells against lipoapoptosis. RESARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: To determine the effects of fatty acids on beta-cell TXNIP expression, INS-1 cells and isolated islets were incubated with/without palmitate and rats underwent cyclic infusions of glucose and/or Intralipid prior to islet isolation and analysis by quantitative real-time RT-PCR and immunoblotting. Using primary wild-type and TXNIP-deficient islets, we then assessed the effects of palmitate on apoptosis (transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling [TUNEL]), mitochondrial death pathway (cytochrome c release), and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress (binding protein [BiP], C/EBP homologous protein [CHOP]). Effects of TXNIP deficiency were also tested in the context of staurosporine (mitochondrial damage) or thapsigargin (ER stress). Glucose elicited a dramatic increase in islet TXNIP expression both in vitro and in vivo, whereas fatty acids had no such effect and, when combined with glucose, even abolished the glucose effect. We also found that TXNIP deficiency does not effectively protect against palmitate or thapsigargin-induced beta-cell apoptosis, but specifically prevents staurosporine- or glucose-induced toxicity. Our results demonstrate that unlike glucose, fatty acids do not induce beta-cell expression of proapoptotic TXNIP. They further reveal that TXNIP deficiency specifically inhibits the mitochondrial death pathway underlying beta-cell glucotoxicity, whereas it has very few protective effects against ER stress-mediated lipoapoptosis.

  11. Granatum: a graphical single-cell RNA-Seq analysis pipeline for genomics scientists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xun; Wolfgruber, Thomas K; Tasato, Austin; Arisdakessian, Cédric; Garmire, David G; Garmire, Lana X

    2017-12-05

    Single-cell RNA sequencing (scRNA-Seq) is an increasingly popular platform to study heterogeneity at the single-cell level. Computational methods to process scRNA-Seq data are not very accessible to bench scientists as they require a significant amount of bioinformatic skills. We have developed Granatum, a web-based scRNA-Seq analysis pipeline to make analysis more broadly accessible to researchers. Without a single line of programming code, users can click through the pipeline, setting parameters and visualizing results via the interactive graphical interface. Granatum conveniently walks users through various steps of scRNA-Seq analysis. It has a comprehensive list of modules, including plate merging and batch-effect removal, outlier-sample removal, gene-expression normalization, imputation, gene filtering, cell clustering, differential gene expression analysis, pathway/ontology enrichment analysis, protein network interaction visualization, and pseudo-time cell series construction. Granatum enables broad adoption of scRNA-Seq technology by empowering bench scientists with an easy-to-use graphical interface for scRNA-Seq data analysis. The package is freely available for research use at http://garmiregroup.org/granatum/app.

  12. Data Analysis for ARRA Early Fuel Cell Market Demonstrations (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurtz, J.; Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.; Ramsden, T.

    2010-05-01

    Presentation about ARRA Early Fuel Cell Market Demonstrations, including an overview of the ARRE Fuel Cell Project, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's data analysis objectives, deployment composite data products, and planned analyses.

  13. Mechanism of phorbol ester-mediated protein kinase C activation in EL4 thymoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, F.L.; Arora, P.K.; Hanna, E.E.; Huang, K.P.

    1987-01-01

    Mouse thymoma EL4 cells respond to phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) in interleukin-2 secretion and growth inhibition. A rapid translocation of protein kinase C (PKC) from cytosol to the particulate fraction and followed by proteolytic degradation occur when EL4 cells are incubated with PMA. In the present study the translocated membrane-associated PKC (PP-PKC) was solubilized by buffer containing NP-40 and its behavior on column chromatography, molecular weight, and kinetic properties were compared to the cytosolic PKC (CS-PKC) from untreated cells. From DE-52 cellulose column, CS-PKC could be eluted by buffer containing 0.1 M KCl, whereas PP-PKC was eluted with buffer containing 0.25 M KCl and 0.2% NP-40. On gel filtration the partially purified PP-PKC from DE-52 was separated into two species: a high Mr species, which was a complex of 82KDa PKC, PMA, and lipid as evidenced by immunoblot analysis and labeling with [ 3 H]PMA and [ 3 H]myristic acid, and a 82KDa species, which was free of PMA and lipid. This 82KDa PP-PKC, though similar to the CS-PKC in molecular weight, is distinguishable from the CS-PKC in having lower Ka values for both Ca 2+ and PS and no longer requires diacylglycerol for maximum activation. These results indicate that upon PMA treatment of EL4 cells, the CS-PKC was modified through enhancing the kinase activity and affinity for membrane lipid. The modification results in the translocation and complexing of PKC with membrane lipid and PMA and subsequent degradation

  14. Targeting Hodgkin and Reed–Sternberg Cells with an Inhibitor of Heat-Shock Protein 90: Molecular Pathways of Response and Potential Mechanisms of Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscilla Segges

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL cells overexpress heat-shock protein 90 (HSP90, an important intracellular signaling hub regulating cell survival, which is emerging as a promising therapeutic target. Here, we report the antitumor effect of celastrol, an anti-inflammatory compound and a recognized HSP90 inhibitor, in Hodgkin and Reed–Sternberg cell lines. Two disparate responses were recorded. In KM-H2 cells, celastrol inhibited cell proliferation, induced G0/G1 arrest, and triggered apoptosis through the activation of caspase-3/7. Conversely, L428 cells exhibited resistance to the compound. A proteomic screening identified a total of 262 differentially expressed proteins in sensitive KM-H2 cells and revealed that celastrol’s toxicity involved the suppression of the MAPK/ERK (extracellular signal regulated kinase/mitogen activated protein kinase pathway. The apoptotic effects were preceded by a decrease in RAS (proto-oncogene protein Ras, p-ERK1/2 (phospho-extracellular signal-regulated Kinase-1/2, and c-Fos (proto-oncogene protein c-Fos protein levels, as validated by immunoblot analysis. The L428 resistant cells exhibited a marked induction of HSP27 mRNA and protein after celastrol treatment. Our results provide the first evidence that celastrol has antitumor effects in cHL cells through the suppression of the MAPK/ERK pathway. Resistance to celastrol has rarely been described, and our results suggest that in cHL it may be mediated by the upregulation of HSP27. The antitumor properties of celastrol against cHL and whether the disparate responses observed in vitro have clinical correlates deserve further research.

  15. ADAM28 is expressed by epithelial cells in human normal tissues and protects from C1q-induced cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamae, Yuka; Mochizuki, Satsuki; Shimoda, Masayuki; Ohara, Kentaro; Abe, Hitoshi; Yamashita, Shuji; Kazuno, Saiko; Ohtsuka, Takashi; Ochiai, Hiroki; Kitagawa, Yuko; Okada, Yasunori

    2016-05-01

    ADAM28 (disintegrin and metalloproteinase 28), which was originally reported to be lymphocyte-specific, is over-expressed by carcinoma cells and plays a key role in cell proliferation and progression in human lung and breast carcinomas. We studied ADAM28 expression in human normal tissues and examined its biological function. By using antibodies specific to ADAM28, ADAM28 was immunolocalized mainly to epithelial cells in several tissues, including epididymis, bronchus and stomach, whereas lymphocytes in lymph nodes and spleen were negligibly immunostained. RT-PCR, immunoblotting and ELISA analyses confirmed the expression in these tissues, and low or negligible expression by lymphocytes was found in the lymph node and spleen. C1q was identified as a candidate ADAM28-binding protein from a human lung cDNA library by yeast two-hybrid system, and specific binding was demonstrated by binding assays, immunoprecipitation and surface plasmon resonance. C1q treatment of normal bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B and NHBE cells, both of which showed low-level expression of ADAM28, caused apoptosis through activation of p38 and caspase-3, and cell death with autophagy through accumulation of LC3-II and autophagosomes, respectively. C1q-induced cell death was attenuated by treatment of the cells with antibodies against the C1q receptor gC1qR/p33 or cC1qR/calreticulin. Treatment of C1q with recombinant ADAM28 prior to addition to culture media reduced C1q-induced cell death, and knockdown of ADAM28 using siRNAs increased cell death. These data demonstrate that ADAM28 is expressed by epithelial cells of several normal organs, and suggest that ADAM28 plays a role in cell survival by suppression of C1q-induced cytotoxicity in bronchial epithelial cells. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  16. Proximity-Based Differential Single-Cell Analysis of the Niche to Identify Stem/Progenitor Cell Regulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberstein, Lev; Goncalves, Kevin A; Kharchenko, Peter V; Turcotte, Raphael; Kfoury, Youmna; Mercier, Francois; Baryawno, Ninib; Severe, Nicolas; Bachand, Jacqueline; Spencer, Joel A; Papazian, Ani; Lee, Dongjun; Chitteti, Brahmananda Reddy; Srour, Edward F; Hoggatt, Jonathan; Tate, Tiffany; Lo Celso, Cristina; Ono, Noriaki; Nutt, Stephen; Heino, Jyrki; Sipilä, Kalle; Shioda, Toshihiro; Osawa, Masatake; Lin, Charles P; Hu, Guo-Fu; Scadden, David T

    2016-10-06

    Physiological stem cell function is regulated by secreted factors produced by niche cells. In this study, we describe an unbiased approach based on the differential single-cell gene expression analysis of mesenchymal osteolineage cells close to, and further removed from, hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) to identify candidate niche factors. Mesenchymal cells displayed distinct molecular profiles based on their relative location. We functionally examined, among the genes that were preferentially expressed in proximal cells, three secreted or cell-surface molecules not previously connected to HSPC biology-the secreted RNase angiogenin, the cytokine IL18, and the adhesion molecule Embigin-and discovered that all of these factors are HSPC quiescence regulators. Therefore, our proximity-based differential single-cell approach reveals molecular heterogeneity within niche cells and can be used to identify novel extrinsic stem/progenitor cell regulators. Similar approaches could also be applied to other stem cell/niche pairs to advance the understanding of microenvironmental regulation of stem cell function. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Cell wall staining with Trypan blue enables quantitative analysis of morphological changes in yeast cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liesche, Johannes; Marek, Magdalena; Günther-Pomorski, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    staining with fluorescent dyes is a valuable tool. Furthermore, cell wall staining is used to facilitate sub-cellular localization experiments with fluorescently-labeled proteins and the detection of yeast cells in non-fungal host tissues. Here, we report staining of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell wall......Yeast cells are protected by a cell wall that plays an important role in the exchange of substances with the environment. The cell wall structure is dynamic and can adapt to different physiological states or environmental conditions. For the investigation of morphological changes, selective...... with Trypan Blue, which emits strong red fluorescence upon binding to chitin and yeast glucan; thereby, it facilitates cell wall analysis by confocal and super-resolution microscopy. The staining pattern of Trypan Blue was similar to that of the widely used UV-excitable, blue fluorescent cell wall stain...

  18. Enolase 1 (ENO1 and protein disulfide-isomerase associated 3 (PDIA3 regulate Wnt/β-catenin-driven trans-differentiation of murine alveolar epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathrin Mutze

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The alveolar epithelium represents a major site of tissue destruction during lung injury. It consists of alveolar epithelial type I (ATI and type II (ATII cells. ATII cells are capable of self-renewal and exert progenitor function for ATI cells upon alveolar epithelial injury. Cell differentiation pathways enabling this plasticity and allowing for proper repair, however, are poorly understood. Here, we applied proteomics, expression analysis and functional studies in primary murine ATII cells to identify proteins and molecular mechanisms involved in alveolar epithelial plasticity. Mass spectrometry of cultured ATII cells revealed a reduction of carbonyl reductase 2 (CBR2 and an increase in enolase 1 (ENO1 and protein disulfide-isomerase associated 3 (PDIA3 protein expression during ATII-to-ATI cell trans-differentiation. This was accompanied by increased Wnt/β-catenin signaling, as analyzed by qRT-PCR and immunoblotting. Notably, ENO1 and PDIA3, along with T1α (podoplanin; an ATI cell marker, exhibited decreased protein expression upon pharmacological and molecular Wnt/β-catenin inhibition in cultured ATII cells, whereas CBR2 levels were stabilized. Moreover, we analyzed primary ATII cells from mice with bleomycin-induced lung injury, a model exhibiting activated Wnt/β-catenin signaling in vivo. We observed reduced CBR2 significantly correlating with surfactant protein C (SFTPC, whereas ENO1 and PDIA3 along with T1α were increased in injured ATII cells. Finally, siRNA-mediated knockdown of ENO1, as well as PDIA3, in primary ATII cells led to reduced T1α expression, indicating diminished cell trans-differentiation. Our data thus identified proteins involved in ATII-to-ATI cell trans-differentiation and suggest a Wnt/β-catenin-driven functional role of ENO1 and PDIA3 in alveolar epithelial cell plasticity in lung injury and repair.

  19. The substrate matters in the Raman spectroscopy analysis of cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikoliunaite, Lina; Rodriguez, Raul D.; Sheremet, Evgeniya; Kolchuzhin, Vladimir; Mehner, Jan; Ramanavicius, Arunas; Zahn, Dietrich R. T.

    2015-08-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a powerful analytical method that allows deposited and/or immobilized cells to be evaluated without complex sample preparation or labeling. However, a main limitation of Raman spectroscopy in cell analysis is the extremely weak Raman intensity that results in low signal to noise ratios. Therefore, it is important to seize any opportunity that increases the intensity of the Raman signal and to understand whether and how the signal enhancement changes with respect to the substrate used. Our experimental results show clear differences in the spectroscopic response from cells on different surfaces. This result is partly due to the difference in spatial distribution of electric field at the substrate/cell interface as shown by numerical simulations. We found that the substrate also changes the spatial location of maximum field enhancement around the cells. Moreover, beyond conventional flat surfaces, we introduce an efficient nanostructured silver substrate that largely enhances the Raman signal intensity from a single yeast cell. This work contributes to the field of vibrational spectroscopy analysis by providing a fresh look at the significance of the substrate for Raman investigations in cell research.

  20. BRCA1 is expressed in uterine serous carcinoma (USC) and controls insulin-like growth factor I receptor (IGF-IR) gene expression in USC cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amichay, Keren; Kidron, Debora; Attias-Geva, Zohar; Schayek, Hagit; Sarfstein, Rive; Fishman, Ami; Werner, Haim; Bruchim, Ilan

    2012-06-01

    The insulin-like growth factor I receptor (IGF-IR) and BRCA1 affect cell growth and apoptosis. Little information is available about BRCA1 activity on the IGF signaling pathway. This study evaluated the effect of BRCA1 on IGF-IR expression. BRCA1 and IGF-IR immunohistochemistry on archival tissues (35 uterine serous carcinomas [USCs] and 17 metastases) were performed. USPC1 and USPC2 cell lines were transiently cotransfected with an IGF-IR promoter construct driving a luciferase reporter gene and a BRCA1 expression plasmid. Endogenous IGF-IR levels were evaluated by Western immunoblotting. We found high BRCA1 and IGF-IR protein expression in primary and metastatic USC tumors. All samples were immunostained for BRCA1-71% strongly stained; and 33/35 (94%) were stained positive for IGF-IR-2 (6%) strongly stained. No difference in BRCA1 and IGF-IR staining intensity was noted between BRCA1/2 mutation carriers and noncarriers. Metastatic tumors stained more intensely for BRCA1 than did the primary tumor site (P = 0.041) and with borderline significance for IGF-IR (P = 0.069). BRCA1 and IGF-IR staining did not correlate to survival. BRCA1 expression led to 35% and 54% reduction in IGF-IR promoter activity in the USPC1 and USCP2 cell lines, respectively. Western immunoblotting showed a decline in phosphorylated IGF-IR and phosphorylated AKT in both transiently and stably transfected cells. BRCA1 and IGF-IR are highly expressed in USC tumors. BRCA1 suppresses IGF-IR gene expression and activity. These findings suggest a possible biological link between the BRCA1 and the IGF-I signaling pathways in USC. The clinical implications of this association need to be explored.

  1. Interleukin (IL) 36 gamma induces mucin 5AC, oligomeric mucus/gel-forming expression via IL-36 receptor-extracellular signal regulated kinase 1 and 2, and p38-nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells in human airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Chang Hoon; Choi, Yoon Seok; Na, Hyung Gyun; Song, Si-Youn; Kim, Yong-Dae

    2018-03-01

    Mucin 5AC, oligomeric mucus/gel-forming (MUC5AC) expression is significantly increased in allergic and inflammatory airway diseases. Interleukin (IL) 36 gamma is predominantly expressed in airway epithelial cells and plays an important role in innate and adaptive immune responses. IL-36 gamma is induced by many inflammatory mediators, including cytokines and bacterial and viral infections. However, the association between IL-36 gamma and mucin secretion in human airway epithelial cells has not yet been fully investigated. The objective of this study was to determine whether IL-36 gamma might play a role in the regulation of mucin secretion in airway epithelial cells. We investigated the effect and brief signaling pathway of IL-36 gamma on MUC5AC expression in human airway epithelial cells. Enzyme immunoassay, immunoblot analysis, immunofluorescence staining, reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and real-time PCR were performed in mucin-producing human airway epithelial NCI-H292 cells and in human nasal epithelial cells after pretreatment with IL-36 gamma, several specific inhibitors, or small interfering RNAs (siRNA). IL-36 gamma induced MUC5AC expression and activated the phosphorylation of extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) 1 and 2, p38, and nuclear factor-kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-kappa B). IL-36 receptor antagonist significantly attenuated these effects. The specific inhibitor and siRNA of ERK1, ERK2, p38, and NF-kappa B significantly attenuated IL-36 gamma induced MUC5AC expression. These results indicated that IL-36 gamma induced MUC5AC expression via the IL-36 receptor-mediated ERK1/2 and p38/NF-kappa B pathway in human airway epithelial cells.

  2. Abalone visceral extract inhibit tumor growth and metastasis by modulating Cox-2 levels and CD8+ T cell activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    II Kim Jae

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Abalone has long been used as a valuable food source in East Asian countries. Although the nutritional importance of abalone has been reported through in vitro and in vivo studies, there is little evidence about the potential anti-tumor effects of abalone visceral extract. The aim of the present study is to examine anti-tumor efficacy of abalone visceral extract and to elucidate its working mechanism. Methods In the present study, we used breast cancer model using BALB/c mouse-derived 4T1 mammary carcinoma and investigated the effect of abalone visceral extract on tumor development. Inhibitory effect against tumor metastasis was assessed by histopathology of lungs. Cox-2 productions by primary and secondary tumor were measured by real-time RT-PCR and immunoblotting (IB. Proliferation assay based on [3H]-thymidine incorporation and measurement of cytokines and effector molecules by RT-PCR were used to confirm tumor suppression efficacy of abalone visceral extract by modulating cytolytic CD8+ T cells. The cytotoxicity of CD8+ T cell was compared by JAM test. Results Oral administration of abalone visceral extract reduced tumor growth (tumor volume and weight and showed reduced metastasis as confirmed by decreased level of splenomegaly (spleen size and weight and histological analysis of the lung metastasis (gross analysis and histological staining. Reduced expression of Cox-2 (mRNA and protein from primary tumor and metastasized lung was also detected. In addition, treatment of abalone visceral extract increased anti-tumor activities of CD8+ T cells by increasing the proliferation capacity and their cytolytic activity. Conclusions Our results suggest that abalone visceral extract has anti-tumor effects by suppressing tumor growth and lung metastasis through decreasing Cox-2 expression level as well as promoting proliferation and cytolytic function of CD8+ T cells.

  3. Abalone visceral extract inhibit tumor growth and metastasis by modulating Cox-2 levels and CD8+ T cell activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Choong-Gu; Kwon, Ho-Keun; Ryu, Jae Ha; Kang, Sung Jin; Im, Chang-Rok; Ii Kim, Jae; Im, Sin-Hyeog

    2010-10-20

    Abalone has long been used as a valuable food source in East Asian countries. Although the nutritional importance of abalone has been reported through in vitro and in vivo studies, there is little evidence about the potential anti-tumor effects of abalone visceral extract. The aim of the present study is to examine anti-tumor efficacy of abalone visceral extract and to elucidate its working mechanism. In the present study, we used breast cancer model using BALB/c mouse-derived 4T1 mammary carcinoma and investigated the effect of abalone visceral extract on tumor development. Inhibitory effect against tumor metastasis was assessed by histopathology of lungs. Cox-2 productions by primary and secondary tumor were measured by real-time RT-PCR and immunoblotting (IB). Proliferation assay based on [3H]-thymidine incorporation and measurement of cytokines and effector molecules by RT-PCR were used to confirm tumor suppression efficacy of abalone visceral extract by modulating cytolytic CD8+ T cells. The cytotoxicity of CD8+ T cell was compared by JAM test. Oral administration of abalone visceral extract reduced tumor growth (tumor volume and weight) and showed reduced metastasis as confirmed by decreased level of splenomegaly (spleen size and weight) and histological analysis of the lung metastasis (gross analysis and histological staining). Reduced expression of Cox-2 (mRNA and protein) from primary tumor and metastasized lung was also detected. In addition, treatment of abalone visceral extract increased anti-tumor activities of CD8+ T cells by increasing the proliferation capacity and their cytolytic activity. Our results suggest that abalone visceral extract has anti-tumor effects by suppressing tumor growth and lung metastasis through decreasing Cox-2 expression level as well as promoting proliferation and cytolytic function of CD8+ T cells.

  4. Protective Effect of Neuropeptide Apelin-13 on 6-Hydroxydopamine-Induced Neurotoxicity in SH-SY5Y Dopaminergic Cells: Involvement of Its Antioxidant and Antiapoptotic Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouresmaeili-Babaki, Elham; Esmaeili-Mahani, Saeed; Abbasnejad, Mehdi; Ravan, Hadi

    2018-04-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a severe neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the loss of brain dopaminergic neurons. Beside pharmacologic and symptomatic treatment of PD the neuroprotective therapy has recently attracted more attention. Apelin, a novel neuropeptide, and its receptors have numerous reported roles in regulating brain functions. In addition, this peptide has potent neuroprotective effects in some neurodegenerative situations. In this study, the effects of apelin-13 were investigated in a cell model of PD. Human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cell damage was induced by 150 μM 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) and the cells viability was examined by MTT assay. Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mitochondrial membrane potential were determined by fluorescence spectrophotometry method. Immunoblotting analysis was also employed to evaluate cytochrome c release and caspase-3 activity. Data showed that 6-OHDA could decrease cell viability and mitochondrial membrane potential and increase intracellular ROS, cytochrome c, and cleaved caspase-3 levels. Pretreatment of SH-SY5Y cells with apelin-13 (5 and 10 nM) significantly prevented the mentioned biochemical and molecular markers of 6-OHDA-induced neurotoxicity. Furthermore, the results showed that apelin receptor and PI3K signaling contributed to the observed protective effects of apelin. The results suggest that apelin-13 has protective effects against dopa