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Sample records for cells healing atherosclerotic

  1. Smooth muscle cells healing atherosclerotic plaque disruptions are of local, not blood, origin in apolipoprotein E knockout mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentzon, Jacob F; Sondergaard, Claus S; Kassem, Mustafa;

    2007-01-01

    circulating bone marrow-derived progenitor cells. Here, we analyzed the contribution of this mechanism to plaque healing after spontaneous and mechanical plaque disruption in apolipoprotein E knockout (apoE-/-) mice. METHODS AND RESULTS: To determine the origin of SMCs after spontaneous plaque disruption......GFP+ SMCs were detected. To examine the origin of healing SMCs in a model that recapitulates more features of human plaque rupture and healing, we developed a mechanical technique that produced consistent plaque disruption, superimposed thrombosis, and SMC-mediated plaque healing in apoE-/- mice. Mechanical...... originating from outside the local arterial segment were detected in healed plaques. CONCLUSIONS: Healing SMCs after atherosclerotic plaque disruption are derived entirely from the local arterial wall and not circulating progenitor cells in apoE-/- mice. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Oct-30...

  2. Cell Therapy for Wound Healing

    OpenAIRE

    You, Hi-Jin; Han, Seung-Kyu

    2014-01-01

    In covering wounds, efforts should include utilization of the safest and least invasive methods with goals of achieving optimal functional and cosmetic outcome. The recent development of advanced wound healing technology has triggered the use of cells to improve wound healing conditions. The purpose of this review is to provide information on clinically available cell-based treatment options for healing of acute and chronic wounds. Compared with a variety of conventional methods, such as skin...

  3. Prevalence of Foam Cells and Helper-T cells in Atherosclerotic Plaques of Korean Patients with Carotid Atheroma

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Won-Ha; Ko, Young-Hyeh; Kim, Dong-Ik; Lee, Byung-Boong; Park, Jeong-Euy

    2000-01-01

    Background Inflammation and activation of immune cells have important roles in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. We analyzed the involvement of various immune cells in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Methods We investigated the presence of foam cells, lymphocytes and killer cells in 11 atherosclerotic plaque specimens removed from Korean patients who underwent carotid endoarterectomy. Atherosclerotic plaques were analyzed by immunohistochemistry using monoclonal antibody specific to f...

  4. Stem Cells for Cutaneous Wound Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giles T. S. Kirby

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Optimum healing of a cutaneous wound involves a well-orchestrated cascade of biological and molecular processes involving cell migration, proliferation, extracellular matrix deposition, and remodelling. When the normal biological process fails for any reason, this healing process can stall resulting in chronic wounds. Wounds are a growing clinical burden on healthcare systems and with an aging population as well as increasing incidences of obesity and diabetes, this problem is set to increase. Cell therapies may be the solution. A range of cell based approaches have begun to cross the rift from bench to bedside and the supporting data suggests that the appropriate administration of stem cells can accelerate wound healing. This review examines the main cell types explored for cutaneous wound healing with a focus on clinical use. The literature overwhelmingly suggests that cell therapies can help to heal cutaneous wounds when used appropriately but we are at risk of clinical use outpacing the evidence. There is a need, now more than ever, for standardised methods of cell characterisation and delivery, as well as randomised clinical trials.

  5. Stem Cells for Cutaneous Wound Healing

    OpenAIRE

    Giles T. S. Kirby; Stuart J. Mills; Cowin, Allison J.; Smith, Louise E.

    2015-01-01

    Optimum healing of a cutaneous wound involves a well-orchestrated cascade of biological and molecular processes involving cell migration, proliferation, extracellular matrix deposition, and remodelling. When the normal biological process fails for any reason, this healing process can stall resulting in chronic wounds. Wounds are a growing clinical burden on healthcare systems and with an aging population as well as increasing incidences of obesity and diabetes, this problem is set to increase...

  6. Mast Cells Regulate Wound Healing in Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellechea, Ana; Leal, Ermelindo C; Kafanas, Antonios; Auster, Michael E; Kuchibhotla, Sarada; Ostrovsky, Yana; Tecilazich, Francesco; Baltzis, Dimitrios; Zheng, Yongjun; Carvalho, Eugénia; Zabolotny, Janice M; Weng, Zuyi; Petra, Anastasia; Patel, Arti; Panagiotidou, Smaro; Pradhan-Nabzdyk, Leena; Theoharides, Theoharis C; Veves, Aristidis

    2016-07-01

    Diabetic foot ulceration is a severe complication of diabetes that lacks effective treatment. Mast cells (MCs) contribute to wound healing, but their role in diabetes skin complications is poorly understood. Here we show that the number of degranulated MCs is increased in unwounded forearm and foot skin of patients with diabetes and in unwounded dorsal skin of diabetic mice (P diabetic mice. Pretreatment with the MC degranulation inhibitor disodium cromoglycate rescues diabetes-associated wound-healing impairment in mice and shifts macrophages to the regenerative M2 phenotype (P diabetic mice deficient in MCs have delayed wound healing compared with their wild-type (WT) controls, implying that some MC mediator is needed for proper healing. MCs are a major source of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in mouse skin, but the level of VEGF is reduced in diabetic mouse skin, and its release from human MCs is reduced in hyperglycemic conditions. Topical treatment with the MC trigger substance P does not affect wound healing in MC-deficient mice, but improves it in WT mice. In conclusion, the presence of nondegranulated MCs in unwounded skin is required for proper wound healing, and therapies inhibiting MC degranulation could improve wound healing in diabetes. PMID:27207516

  7. T Cell CX3CR1 Mediates Excess Atherosclerotic Inflammation in Renal Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Lei; Nordlohne, Johannes; Ge, Shuwang; Hertel, Barbara; Melk, Anette; Rong, Song; Haller, Hermann; von Vietinghoff, Sibylle

    2016-06-01

    Reduced kidney function increases the risk for atherosclerosis and cardiovascular death. Leukocytes in the arterial wall contribute to atherosclerotic plaque formation. We investigated the role of fractalkine receptor CX3CR1 in atherosclerotic inflammation in renal impairment. Apoe(-/-) (apolipoprotein E) CX3CR1(-/-) mice with renal impairment were protected from increased aortic atherosclerotic lesion size and macrophage accumulation. Deficiency of CX3CR1 in bone marrow, only, attenuated atherosclerosis in renal impairment in an independent atherosclerosis model of LDL receptor-deficient (LDLr(-/-)) mice as well. Analysis of inflammatory leukocytes in atherosclerotic mixed bone-marrow chimeric mice (50% wild-type/50% CX3CR1(-/-) bone marrow into LDLr(-/-) mice) showed that CX3CR1 cell intrinsically promoted aortic T cell accumulation much more than CD11b(+)CD11c(+) myeloid cell accumulation and increased IL-17-producing T cell counts. In vitro, fewer TH17 cells were obtained from CX3CR1(-/-) splenocytes than from wild-type splenocytes after polarization with IL-6, IL-23, and TGFβ Polarization of TH17 or TREG cells, or stimulation of splenocytes with TGFβ alone, increased T cell CX3CR1 reporter gene expression. Furthermore, TGFβ induced CX3CR1 mRNA expression in wild-type cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In atherosclerotic LDLr(-/-) mice, CX3CR1(+/-) T cells upregulated CX3CR1 and IL-17A production in renal impairment, whereas CX3CR1(-/-) T cells did not. Transfer of CX3CR1(+/-) but not Il17a(-/-) T cells into LDLr(-/-)CX3CR1(-/-) mice increased aortic lesion size and aortic CD11b(+)CD11c(+) myeloid cell accumulation in renal impairment. In summary, T cell CX3CR1 expression can be induced by TGFβ and is instrumental in enhanced atherosclerosis in renal impairment. PMID:26449606

  8. Protective effects ofMallotus furetianus on functions of endothelial progenitor cells in atherosclerotic rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yue-Li Liu; Dan Zhou; Lian-Bo Lin; Chen Yang

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To investigate protective effects ofMallotus furetianus(M. furetianus)on functions of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) in atherosclerotic rats.Methods:Atherosclerosis was established by intraperitoneal injection of vitamin D3 combined with high fat diet for 9 weeks. Extracts ofM. furetianus were given to prevent damage of EPCs in dose of 0.081 g/kg and 0.026 g/kg. Rats were sacrificed, and then mononuclear cells were isolated from bone marrow to culture EPCs and test the functions of EPCs.Results:M. furetianus can improve the capacities of EPCs on proliferation, migration, adhesion, and tubule formation in doses of 0.081 g/kg; improve adhesion, and tubule formation in dose of 0.026 g/kg in atherosclerotic rats. Conclusion:M. furetianus can protect functions of EPCs in atherosclerotic rats.

  9. Wound healing of intestinal epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiho Konno

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The intestinal epithelial cells (IECs form a selective permeability barrier separating luminal content from underlying tissues. Upon injury, the intestinal epithelium undergoes a wound healing process. Intestinal wound healing is dependent on the balance of three cellular events; restitution, proliferation, and differentiation of epithelial cells adjacent to the wounded area. Previous studies have shown that various regulatory peptides, including growth factors and cytokines, modulate intestinal epithelial wound healing. Recent studies have revealed that novel factors, which include toll-like receptors (TLRs, regulatory peptides, particular dietary factors, and some gastroprotective agents, also modulate intestinal epithelial wound repair. Among these factors, the activation of TLRs by commensal bacteria is suggested to play an essential role in the maintenance of gut homeostasis. Recent studies suggest that mutations and dysregulation of TLRs could be major contributing factors in the predisposition and perpetuation of inflammatory bowel disease. Additionally, studies have shown that specific signaling pathways are involved in IEC wound repair. In this review, we summarize the function of IECs, the process of intestinal epithelial wound healing, and the functions and mechanisms of the various factors that contribute to gut homeostasis and intestinal epithelial wound healing.

  10. Quantifying cell behaviors during embryonic wound healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashburn, David; Ma, Xiaoyan; Crews, Sarah; Lynch, Holley; McCleery, W. Tyler; Hutson, M. Shane

    2011-03-01

    During embryogenesis, internal forces induce motions in cells leading to widespread motion in tissues. We previously developed laser hole-drilling as a consistent, repeatable way to probe such epithelial mechanics. The initial recoil (less than 30s) gives information about physical properties (elasticity, force) of cells surrounding the wound, but the long-term healing process (tens of minutes) shows how cells adjust their behavior in response to stimuli. To study this biofeedback in many cells through time, we developed tools to quantify statistics of individual cells. By combining watershed segmentation with a powerful and efficient user interaction system, we overcome problems that arise in any automatic segmentation from poor image quality. We analyzed cell area, perimeter, aspect ratio, and orientation relative to wound for a wide variety of laser cuts in dorsal closure. We quantified statistics for different regions as well, i.e. cells near to and distant from the wound. Regional differences give a distribution of wound-induced changes, whose spatial localization provides clues into the physical/chemical signals that modulate the wound healing response. Supported by the Human Frontier Science Program (RGP0021/2007 C).

  11. Human macrophage foam cells degrade atherosclerotic plaques through cathepsin K mediated processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barascuk, Natasha; Skjøt-Arkil, Helene; Register, Thomas C; Larsen, Lise; Byrjalsen, Inger; Christiansen, Claus; Karsdal, Morten A

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Proteolytic degradation of Type I Collagen by proteases may play an important role in remodeling of atherosclerotic plaques, contributing to increased risk of plaque rupture.The aim of the current study was to investigate whether human macrophage foam cells degrade the extracellular...... matrix (ECM) of atherosclerotic plaques by cathepsin K mediated processes. METHODS: We 1) cultured human macrophages on ECM and measured cathepsin K generated fragments of type I collagen (C-terminal fragments of Type I collagen (CTX-I) 2) investigated the presence of CTX-I in human coronary arteries and......-I in areas of intimal hyperplasia and in shoulder regions of advanced plaques. Treatment of human monocytes with M-CSF or M-CSF+LDL generated macrophages and foam cells producing CTX-I when cultured on type I collagen enriched matrix. Circulating levels of CTX-I were not significantly different in...

  12. Selective expansion of influenza A virus-specific T cells in symptomatic human carotid artery atherosclerotic plaques

    OpenAIRE

    Keller, Tymen; Meer, Jelger; Teeling, Peter; Sluijs, Koenraad; Idu, Mirza; Rimmelzwaan, Guus; Levi, Michael; Wal, Allard; Boer, Onno

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND AND PURPOSE - Evidence is accumulating that infection with influenza A virus contributes to atherothrombotic disease. Vaccination against influenza decreases the risk of atherosclerotic syndromes, indicating that inflammatory mechanisms may be involved. We tested the hypothesis that influenza A virus-specific T cells contribute to atherosclerotic plaque inflammation, which mediates the onset of plaque rupture. METHODS - T-cell cultures were generated from atheroscleroti...

  13. Piperlongumine inhibits atherosclerotic plaque formation and vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation by suppressing PDGF receptor signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Son, Dong Ju; Kim, Soo Yeon; Han, Seong Su; Kim, Chan Woo; Kumar, Sandeep; Park, Byeoung Soo; Lee, Sung Eun; Yun, Yeo Pyo; Jo, Hanjoong; Park, Young Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Piperlongumine (piplartine, PL) is an alkaloid found in the long pepper (Piper longum L.) and has well-documented anti-platelet aggregation, anti-inflammatory, and anti-cancer properties; however, the role of PL in prevention of atherosclerosis is unknown. We evaluated the anti-atherosclerotic potential of PL in an in vivo murine model of accelerated atherosclerosis and defined its mechanism of action in aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in vitro. Local treatment with PL significant...

  14. Myeloid CD34+CD13+ Precursor Cells Transdifferentiate into Chondrocyte-Like Cells in Atherosclerotic Intimal Calcification

    OpenAIRE

    Doehring, Lars Christian; Heeger, Christian; Aherrahrou, Zouhair; Kaczmarek, Piotr Maciel; Erdmann, Jeanette; Schunkert, Heribert; Ehlers, Eva-Maria

    2010-01-01

    Chondrogenic differentiation is pivotal in the active regulation of artery calcification. We investigated the cellular origin of chondrocyte-like cells in atherosclerotic intimal calcification of C57BL/6 LDLr−/− mice using bone marrow transplantation to trace ROSA26-LacZ-labeled cells. Immunohistochemical costaining of collagen type II with LacZ and leukocyte defining surface antigens was performed and analyzed by high-resolution confocal microscopy. Chondrocyte-like cells were detected in me...

  15. Stem cells in skin wound healing: are we there yet?

    OpenAIRE

    Cerqueira, M. T.; Pirraco, Rogério P.; Marques, A. P.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Cutaneous wound healing is a serious problem worldwide that affects patients with various wound types, resulting from burns, traumatic injuries, and diabetes. Despite the wide range of clinically available skin substitutes and the different therapeutic alternatives, delayed healing and scarring are often observed. Recent Advances: Stem cells have arisen as powerful tools to improve skin wound healing, due to features such as effective secretome, self-renewal, low immunogenicity,...

  16. Oleic acid induces smooth muscle foam cell formation and enhances atherosclerotic lesion development via CD36

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang Bing

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Elevated plasma free fatty acid (FFA levels have been linked to the development of atherosclerosis. However, how FFA causes atherosclerosis has not been determined. Because fatty acid translocase (FAT/CD36 is responsible for the uptake of FFA, we hypothesized that the atherogenic effects of FFA may be mediated via CD36. Results We tested this hypothesis using cultured rat aortic smooth muscle cells (SMCs treated with oleic acid (OA. We found that OA induces lipid accumulation in SMCs in a dose dependent manner. Rat aortic SMCs treated for 48 hours with OA (250 μmol/L became foam cells based on morphological (Oil Red O staining and biochemical (5 times increase in cellular triglyceride criteria. Moreover, specific inhibition of CD36 by sulfo-N-succinimidyl oleate significantly attenuated OA induced lipid accumulation and foam cell formation. To confirm these results in vivo, we used ApoE-deficient mice fed with normal chow (NC, OA diet, NC plus lipolysis inhibitor acipimox or OA plus acipimox. OA-fed mice showed increased plasma FFA levels and enhanced atherosclerotic lesions in the aortic sinus compared to the NC group (both p 5 μm2 vs. OA plus acipimox: 2.60 ± 0.10 ×105 μm2, p p Conclusions These findings suggest that OA induces smooth muscle foam cell formation and enhances atherosclerotic lesions in part though CD36. Furthermore, these findings provide a novel model for the investigation of atherosclerosis.

  17. Piperlongumine inhibits atherosclerotic plaque formation and vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation by suppressing PDGF receptor signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Dong Ju [Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology and Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Kim, Soo Yeon [Division of Life Science, Korea Basic Science Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Han, Seong Su [University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Iowa City, IA (United States); Kim, Chan Woo [Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology and Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Department of Bioinspired Science, Ehwa Womans University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kumar, Sandeep [Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology and Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Park, Byeoung Soo [Nanotoxtech Co., Ansan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sung Eun [Division of Applied Biology and Chemistry, Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Yun, Yeo Pyo [College of Pharmacy, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of); Jo, Hanjoong, E-mail: hjo@emory.edu [Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology and Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Department of Bioinspired Science, Ehwa Womans University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Young Hyun, E-mail: pyh012@sch.ac.kr [Department of Food Science and Nutrition, College of Natural Sciences, Soonchunhyang University, Asan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-19

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Anti-atherogenic effect of PL was examined using partial carotid ligation model in ApoE KO mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PL prevented atherosclerotic plaque development, VSMCs proliferation, and NF-{kappa}B activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Piperlongumine reduced vascular smooth muscle cell activation through PDGF-R{beta} and NF-{kappa}B-signaling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PL may serve as a new therapeutic molecule for atherosclerosis treatment. -- Abstract: Piperlongumine (piplartine, PL) is an alkaloid found in the long pepper (Piper longum L.) and has well-documented anti-platelet aggregation, anti-inflammatory, and anti-cancer properties; however, the role of PL in prevention of atherosclerosis is unknown. We evaluated the anti-atherosclerotic potential of PL in an in vivo murine model of accelerated atherosclerosis and defined its mechanism of action in aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in vitro. Local treatment with PL significantly reduced atherosclerotic plaque formation as well as proliferation and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) activation in an in vivo setting. PL treatment in VSMCs in vitro showed inhibition of migration and platelet-derived growth factor BB (PDGF-BB)-induced proliferation to the in vivo findings. We further identified that PL inhibited PDGF-BB-induced PDGF receptor beta activation and suppressed downstream signaling molecules such as phospholipase C{gamma}1, extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 and Akt. Lastly, PL significantly attenuated activation of NF-{kappa}B-a downstream transcriptional regulator in PDGF receptor signaling, in response to PDGF-BB stimulation. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate a novel, therapeutic mechanism by which PL suppresses atherosclerosis plaque formation in vivo.

  18. Anti-atherosclerotic potential of gossypetin via inhibiting LDL oxidation and foam cell formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gossypetin, a flavone originally isolated from Hibiscus species, has been shown to possess antioxidant, antimicrobial, and antimutagenic activities. Here, we investigated the mechanism(s) underlying the anti-atherosclerotic potential of gossypetin. 1,1-Diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) scavenging activity assay showed that the addition of > 50 μM of gossypetin could scavenge over 50% of DPPH radicals. The inhibitory effects of gossypetin on the lipid and protein oxidation of LDL were defined by thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) assay, the relative electrophoretic mobility (REM) of oxidized LDL (ox-LDL), and fragmentation of apoB in the Cu2+-induced oxidation of LDL. Gossypetin showed potential in reducing ox-LDL-induced foam cell formation and intracellular lipid accumulation, and uptake ability of macrophages under non-cytotoxic concentrations. Molecular data showed that these influences of gossypetin might be mediated via peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα)/liver-X receptor α (LXRα)/ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) and PPARγ/scavenger receptor CD36 pathways, as demonstrated by the transfection of PPARα siRNA or PPARγ expression vector. Our data implied that gossypetin regulated the PPAR signals, which in turn led to stimulation of cholesterol removal from macrophages and delay atherosclerosis. These results suggested that gossypetin potentially could be developed as an anti-atherosclerotic agent. - Highlights: • The anti-atherosclerotic effect of gossypetin in vitro was examined. • Gossypetin inhibited LDL oxidation. • Gossypetin showed potential in reducing on the formation of foam cells. • Gossypetin functions against ox-LDL through PPARa activation and PPARγ depression

  19. Piperlongumine inhibits atherosclerotic plaque formation and vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation by suppressing PDGF receptor signaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Anti-atherogenic effect of PL was examined using partial carotid ligation model in ApoE KO mice. ► PL prevented atherosclerotic plaque development, VSMCs proliferation, and NF-κB activation. ► Piperlongumine reduced vascular smooth muscle cell activation through PDGF-Rβ and NF-κB-signaling. ► PL may serve as a new therapeutic molecule for atherosclerosis treatment. -- Abstract: Piperlongumine (piplartine, PL) is an alkaloid found in the long pepper (Piper longum L.) and has well-documented anti-platelet aggregation, anti-inflammatory, and anti-cancer properties; however, the role of PL in prevention of atherosclerosis is unknown. We evaluated the anti-atherosclerotic potential of PL in an in vivo murine model of accelerated atherosclerosis and defined its mechanism of action in aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in vitro. Local treatment with PL significantly reduced atherosclerotic plaque formation as well as proliferation and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activation in an in vivo setting. PL treatment in VSMCs in vitro showed inhibition of migration and platelet-derived growth factor BB (PDGF-BB)-induced proliferation to the in vivo findings. We further identified that PL inhibited PDGF-BB-induced PDGF receptor beta activation and suppressed downstream signaling molecules such as phospholipase Cγ1, extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 and Akt. Lastly, PL significantly attenuated activation of NF-κB—a downstream transcriptional regulator in PDGF receptor signaling, in response to PDGF-BB stimulation. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate a novel, therapeutic mechanism by which PL suppresses atherosclerosis plaque formation in vivo.

  20. Anti-atherosclerotic potential of gossypetin via inhibiting LDL oxidation and foam cell formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Jing-Hsien [School of Nutrition, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Research, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Tsai, Chia-Wen [Department of Nutrition, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Wang, Chi-Ping [Department of Clinical Laboratory, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Lin, Hui-Hsuan, E-mail: linhh@csmu.edu.tw [Department of Medical Research, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); School of Medical Laboratory and Biotechnology, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China)

    2013-10-15

    Gossypetin, a flavone originally isolated from Hibiscus species, has been shown to possess antioxidant, antimicrobial, and antimutagenic activities. Here, we investigated the mechanism(s) underlying the anti-atherosclerotic potential of gossypetin. 1,1-Diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) scavenging activity assay showed that the addition of > 50 μM of gossypetin could scavenge over 50% of DPPH radicals. The inhibitory effects of gossypetin on the lipid and protein oxidation of LDL were defined by thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) assay, the relative electrophoretic mobility (REM) of oxidized LDL (ox-LDL), and fragmentation of apoB in the Cu{sup 2+}-induced oxidation of LDL. Gossypetin showed potential in reducing ox-LDL-induced foam cell formation and intracellular lipid accumulation, and uptake ability of macrophages under non-cytotoxic concentrations. Molecular data showed that these influences of gossypetin might be mediated via peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα)/liver-X receptor α (LXRα)/ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) and PPARγ/scavenger receptor CD36 pathways, as demonstrated by the transfection of PPARα siRNA or PPARγ expression vector. Our data implied that gossypetin regulated the PPAR signals, which in turn led to stimulation of cholesterol removal from macrophages and delay atherosclerosis. These results suggested that gossypetin potentially could be developed as an anti-atherosclerotic agent. - Highlights: • The anti-atherosclerotic effect of gossypetin in vitro was examined. • Gossypetin inhibited LDL oxidation. • Gossypetin showed potential in reducing on the formation of foam cells. • Gossypetin functions against ox-LDL through PPARa activation and PPARγ depression.

  1. Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventres, William B

    2016-01-01

    My personal ethos of healing is an expression of the belief that I can and do act to heal patients while I attend to the traditional goals of medicine. The 7 supporting principles that inform my ethos are dignity, authenticity, integrity, transparency, solidarity, generosity, and resiliency. I invite others, including medical students, residents, and practicing physicians, to reflect and discover their own ethos of healing and the principles that guide their professional growth. A short digital documentary accompanies this essay for use as a reflective prompt to encourage personal and professional development. PMID:26755787

  2. Phage display identification of CD100 in human atherosclerotic plaque macrophages and foam cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Carolina Aquino Luque

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is a complex disease in which vessels develop plaques comprising dysfunctional endothelium, monocyte derived lipid laden foam cells and activated lymphocytes. Considering that humans and animal models of the disease develop quite distinct plaques, we used human plaques to search for proteins that could be used as markers of human atheromas. Phage display peptide libraries were probed to fresh human carotid plaques, and a bound phage homologous to plexin B1, a high affinity receptor for CD100, was identified. CD100 is a member of the semaphorin family expressed by most hematopoietic cells and particularly by activated T cells. CD100 expression was analyzed in human plaques and normal samples. CD100 mRNA and protein were analyzed in cultured monocytes, macrophages and foam cells. The effects of CD100 in oxLDL-induced foam cell formation and in CD36 mRNA abundance were evaluated. Human atherosclerotic plaques showed strong labeling of CD100/SEMA4D. CD100 expression was further demonstrated in peripheral blood monocytes and in in vitro differentiated macrophages and foam cells, with diminished CD100 transcript along the differentiation of these cells. Incubation of macrophages with CD100 led to a reduction in oxLDL-induced foam cell formation probably through a decrease of CD36 expression, suggesting for the first time an atheroprotective role for CD100 in the human disease. Given its differential expression in the numerous foam cells and macrophages of the plaques and its capacity to decrease oxLDL engulfment by macrophages we propose that CD100 may have a role in atherosclerotic plaque development, and may possibly be employed in targeted treatments of these atheromas.

  3. MRI of the transplanted endothelial progenitor cells for prevent atherosclerotic plaque formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the 1.5 T magnetic resonance imaging system to depict and track in vivo of magnetically labeled endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), and to study the possibility for preventing the atherosclerotic plaque formation in New Zealand rabbit model of carotid arterial injury after transplantation. Methods: New Zealand rabbit EPCs were isolated, confirmed, expanded and then incubated with home synthesized Fe2O3-PLL, Prussian blue stain was performed for showing intracellular irons. The model of carotid arterial injury was performed by 2.5F balloons, the group A of 8 rabbits received magnetically labeled EPCs, group B of 3 rabbits received fluorescent-labeled EPCs and the group C of 5 rabbits were given same volume saline injection after endothelial injury of the carotid artery. MR imaging and histology were performed and compared 4 days later for randomly chosen three rabbit, each from one of the three group; all the other rabbits were fed with high lipid diet and examed using MR imaging and histology after 15 weeks. Results: Epcs labeling efficiency was more than 95% by Prussian blue stain, 4 days after transplantation of EPCs, only in group A, the injured endothelium of carotid artery had signal intensity loss in T2*WI, which were correlated well with the area where the most Prussian blue staining positive cells were found in histopathology analyses. The rabbits of group A and B which received EPCs transplantation exhibited fewer plaques formation than those of the group C (P2O3-PLL. The 1.5 T magnetic resonance imaging system could depict and monitor the magnetically labeled endothelial progenitor cells homing to the injured endothelium of the artery, and EPCs contribute to preventing atherosclerotic plaque formation in New Zealand rabbit model of atherosclerosis. (authors)

  4. Secretome of Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Enhances Wound Healing

    OpenAIRE

    Mildner, Michael; Hacker, Stefan; Haider, Thomas; Gschwandtner, Maria; Werba, Gregor; Barresi, Caterina; Zimmermann, Matthias; Golabi, Bahar; Tschachler, Erwin; Ankersmit, Hendrik Jan

    2013-01-01

    Non-healing skin ulcers are often resistant to most common therapies. Treatment with growth factors has been demonstrated to improve closure of chronic wounds. Here we investigate whether lyophilized culture supernatant of freshly isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) is able to enhance wound healing. PBMC from healthy human individuals were prepared and cultured for 24 hours. Supernatants were collected, dialyzed and lyophilized (SECPBMC). Six mm punch biopsy wounds were set on ...

  5. Stem Cell-Based Therapeutics to Improve Wound Healing

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Michael S.; Tripp Leavitt; Samir Malhotra; Dominik Duscher; Pollhammer, Michael S.; Walmsley, Graham G.; Zeshaan N. Maan; Alexander T. M. Cheung; Manfred Schmidt; Georg M. Huemer; Longaker, Michael T.; Peter Lorenz, H.

    2015-01-01

    Issues surrounding wound healing have garnered deep scientific interest as well as booming financial markets invested in novel wound therapies. Much progress has been made in the field, but it is unsurprising to find that recent successes reveal new challenges to be addressed. With regard to wound healing, large tissue deficits, recalcitrant wounds, and pathological scar formation remain but a few of our most pressing challenges. Stem cell-based therapies have been heralded as a promising mea...

  6. Stem Cells in Skin Wound Healing: Are We There Yet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerqueira, Mariana Teixeira; Pirraco, Rogério Pedro; Marques, Alexandra Pinto

    2016-01-01

    Significance: Cutaneous wound healing is a serious problem worldwide that affects patients with various wound types, resulting from burns, traumatic injuries, and diabetes. Despite the wide range of clinically available skin substitutes and the different therapeutic alternatives, delayed healing and scarring are often observed. Recent Advances: Stem cells have arisen as powerful tools to improve skin wound healing, due to features such as effective secretome, self-renewal, low immunogenicity, and differentiation capacity. They represent potentially readily available biological material that can particularly target distinct wound-healing phases. In this context, mesenchymal stem cells have been shown to promote cell migration, angiogenesis, and a possible regenerative rather than fibrotic microenvironment at the wound site, mainly through paracrine signaling with the surrounding cells/tissues. Critical Issues: Despite the current insights, there are still major hurdles to be overcome to achieve effective therapeutic effects. Limited engraftment and survival at the wound site are still major concerns, and alternative approaches to maximize stem cell potential are a major demand. Future Directions: This review emphasizes two main strategies that have been explored in this context. These comprise the exploration of hypoxic conditions to modulate stem cell secretome, and the use of adipose tissue stromal vascular fraction as a source of multiple cells, including stem cells and factors requiring minimal manipulation. Nonetheless, the attainment of these approaches to target successfully skin regeneration will be only evident after a significant number of in vivo works in relevant pre-clinical models. PMID:27076994

  7. Mediterranean diet polyphenols reduce inflammatory angiogenesis through MMP-9 and COX-2 inhibition in human vascular endothelial cells: a potentially protective mechanism in atherosclerotic vascular disease and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoditti, Egeria; Calabriso, Nadia; Massaro, Marika; Pellegrino, Mariangela; Storelli, Carlo; Martines, Giuseppe; De Caterina, Raffaele; Carluccio, Maria Annunziata

    2012-11-15

    Diets with high content of antioxidant polyphenols are associated with low prevalence of cardiovascular diseases and cancer. Inflammatory angiogenesis is a key pathogenic process both in cancer and atherosclerosis, and is tightly regulated by the proinflammatory enzyme cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 and the matrix degrading enzymes matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). We studied the effects of antioxidant polyphenols from virgin olive oil (oleuropein and hydroxytyrosol) and red wine (resveratrol and quercetin) on endothelial cell angiogenic response in vitro, and explored underlying mechanisms. Cultured endothelial cells were pre-incubated with 0.1-50 μmol/L polyphenols before stimulation with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA). All tested polyphenols reduced endothelial cell tube formation on matrigel and migration in wound healing assays. The reduced angiogenesis was associated with the inhibition of PMA-induced COX-2 protein expression and prostanoid production, as well as MMP-9 protein release and gelatinolytic activity. These effects were accompanied by a significant reduction in the stimulated intracellular reactive oxygen species levels and in the activation of the redox-sensitive transcription factor nuclear factor (NF)-κB. Our findings reveal that olive oil and red wine polyphenols reduce inflammatory angiogenesis in cultured endothelial cells, through MMP-9 and COX-2 inhibition, supporting a potential protective role for dietary polyphenols in atherosclerotic vascular disease and cancer. PMID:22595400

  8. Cell therapy and wound healing - state of art and perspectives

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Smetana, Karel; Dvořánková, B.; Labský, Jiří; Holíková, Z.

    Daejon : Pai Chai University, 2002 - (Kim, H.; Kim, T.; Park, J.), s. 77-80 [International Symposium on Advanced Materials /4./. Daejon (KR), 03.06.2002-07.06.2002] R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A065; GA ČR GA203/00/1310; GA AV ČR IBS4050005 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4050913 Keywords : epidermal stem cell * cell therapy * wound healing Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology

  9. Nox4 NADPH oxidase contributes to smooth muscle cell phenotypes associated with unstable atherosclerotic plaques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaoping Xu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Plaque instability associated with acute coronary syndromes results in part from apoptosis and senescence of cells within the atherosclerotic (AS lesion. Increased cellular oxidative stress has been proposed to contribute to plaque progression and changes in composition, leading to plaque instability. Our objective was to examine the role of NADPH oxidase in smooth muscle cell (SMC phenotypes associated with an unstable plaque. Aortae were isolated from pre-lesion (8 weeks of age and post-lesion (35 weeks of age hypercholesterolemic mice (ApoE−/−/LDLR−/−, AS, and age-matched normal C57BL/6J mice. We observed an age-dependent increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS in aorta from AS mice, with evidence for elevated ROS prior to lesion development. Whereas macrophage infiltration was restricted to the lesion, oxidized lipids extended beyond the plaque and into the vessel wall. Consistent with these findings, we observed dynamic changes in the expression of NADPH oxidases in AS vessels. Specifically, Nox1 expression was increased early and decreased with lesion progression, while induction of Nox4 was a late event. Nox2 and p22phox were elevated throughout lesion development. Similar to observations in aortae, SMCs isolated from the lesion of AS aortae had decreased Nox1 and increased Nox4 levels as compared to SMCs from normal mice. AS SMCs demonstrated increased generation of ROS, cell cycle arrest, evidence of senescence, and increased susceptibility to apoptosis. Overexpression of Nox4 in normal SMCs recapitulated the phenotypes of the AS SMCs. We conclude that increased expression of Nox4 in AS may drive SMC phenotypes that lead to the plaque instability and rupture responsible for myocardial infarction and stroke.

  10. A polymer scaffold for self-healing perovskite solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yicheng; Wei, Jing; Li, Heng; Yan, Yin; Zhou, Wenke; Yu, Dapeng; Zhao, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Advancing of the lead halide perovskite solar cells towards photovoltaic market demands large-scale devices of high-power conversion efficiency, high reproducibility and stability via low-cost fabrication technology, and in particular resistance to humid environment for long-time operation. Here we achieve uniform perovskite film based on a novel polymer-scaffold architecture via a mild-temperature process. These solar cells exhibit efficiency of up to ~16% with small variation. The unencapsulated devices retain high output for up to 300 h in highly humid environment (70% relative humidity). Moreover, they show strong humidity resistant and self-healing behaviour, recovering rapidly after removing from water vapour. Not only the film can self-heal in this case, but the corresponding devices can present power conversion efficiency recovery after the water vapour is removed. Our work demonstrates the value of cheap, long chain and hygroscopic polymer scaffold in perovskite solar cells towards commercialization.

  11. The Use of Stem Cells in Burn Wound Healing: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Fadi Ghieh; Rosalyn Jurjus; Amir Ibrahim; Alice Gerges Geagea; Hisham Daouk; Bassel El Baba; Sana Chams; Michel Matar; Wadih Zein; Abdo Jurjus

    2015-01-01

    Burn wound healing involves a series of complex processes which are subject to intensive investigations to improve the outcomes, in particular, the healing time and the quality of the scar. Burn injuries, especially severe ones, are proving to have devastating effects on the affected patients. Stem cells have been recently applied in the field to promote superior healing of the wounds. Not only have stem cells been shown to promote better and faster healing of the burn wounds, but also they h...

  12. Modeling keratinocyte wound healing dynamics: Cell-cell adhesion promotes sustained collective migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardini, John T; Chapnick, Douglas A; Liu, Xuedong; Bortz, David M

    2016-07-01

    The in vitro migration of keratinocyte cell sheets displays behavioral and biochemical similarities to the in vivo wound healing response of keratinocytes in animal model systems. In both cases, ligand-dependent Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) activation is sufficient to elicit collective cell migration into the wound. Previous mathematical modeling studies of in vitro wound healing assays assume that physical connections between cells have a hindering effect on cell migration, but biological literature suggests a more complicated story. By combining mathematical modeling and experimental observations of collectively migrating sheets of keratinocytes, we investigate the role of cell-cell adhesion during in vitro keratinocyte wound healing assays. We develop and compare two nonlinear diffusion models of the wound healing process in which cell-cell adhesion either hinders or promotes migration. Both models can accurately fit the leading edge propagation of cell sheets during wound healing when using a time-dependent rate of cell-cell adhesion strength. The model that assumes a positive role of cell-cell adhesion on migration, however, is robust to changes in the leading edge definition and yields a qualitatively accurate density profile. Using RNAi for the critical adherens junction protein, α-catenin, we demonstrate that cell sheets with wild type cell-cell adhesion expression maintain migration into the wound longer than cell sheets with decreased cell-cell adhesion expression, which fails to exhibit collective migration. Our modeling and experimental data thus suggest that cell-cell adhesion promotes sustained migration as cells pull neighboring cells into the wound during wound healing. PMID:27105673

  13. Stem cells and chronic wound healing: state of the art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leavitt T

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Tripp Leavitt, Michael S Hu, Clement D Marshall, Leandra A Barnes, Michael T Longaker, H Peter Lorenz Hagey Laboratory for Pediatric Regenerative Medicine, Division of Plastic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA Abstract: Currently available treatments for chronic wounds are inadequate. A clearly effective therapy does not exist, and treatment is often supportive. This is largely because the cellular and molecular processes underlying failure of wound repair are still poorly understood. With an increase in comorbidities, such as diabetes and vascular disease, as well as an aging population, the incidence of these intractable wounds is expected to rise. As such, chronic wounds, which are already costly, are rapidly growing as a tremendous burden to the health-care system. Stem cells have garnered much interest as a therapy for chronic wounds due to their inherent ability to differentiate into multiple lineages and promote regeneration. Herein, we discuss the types of stem cells used for chronic wound therapy, as well as the proposed means by which they do so. In particular, we highlight mesenchymal stem cells (including adipose-derived stem cells, endothelial progenitor cells, and induced pluripotent stem cells. We include the results of recent in vitro and in vivo studies in both animal models and human clinical trials. Finally, we discuss the current studies to improve stem cell therapies and the limitations of stem cell-based therapeutics. Stem cells promise improved therapies for healing chronic wounds, but further studies that are well-designed with standardized protocols are necessary for fruition. Keywords: stem cells, chronic wounds, cell therapy, wound healing

  14. Statins meditate anti-atherosclerotic action in smooth muscle cells by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuda, Kazuki [Department of Metabolic Medicine, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan); Matsumura, Takeshi, E-mail: takeshim@gpo.kumamoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Metabolic Medicine, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan); Senokuchi, Takafumi; Ishii, Norio; Kinoshita, Hiroyuki; Yamada, Sarie; Murakami, Saiko [Department of Metabolic Medicine, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan); Nakao, Saya [Department of Environmental & Symbiotic Sciences, Prefectural University of Kumamoto, Kumamoto (Japan); Motoshima, Hiroyuki; Kondo, Tatsuya; Kukidome, Daisuke; Kawasaki, Shuji [Department of Metabolic Medicine, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan); Kawada, Teruo [Laboratory of Nutrition Chemistry, Division of Food Science and Biotechnology, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Nishikawa, Takeshi; Araki, Eiichi [Department of Metabolic Medicine, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan)

    2015-01-30

    Highlights: • Statins induce PPARγ activation in vascular smooth muscle cells. • Statin-induced PPARγ activation is mediated by COX-2 expression. • Statins suppress cell migration and proliferation in vascular smooth muscle cells. • Statins inhibit LPS-induced inflammatory responses by PPARγ activation. • Fluvastatin suppress the progression of atherosclerosis and induces PPARγ activation in the aorta of apoE-deficient mice. - Abstract: The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) is an important regulator of lipid and glucose metabolism, and its activation is reported to suppress the progression of atherosclerosis. We have reported that 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins) activate PPARγ in macrophages. However, it is not yet known whether statins activate PPARγ in other vascular cells. In the present study, we investigated whether statins activate PPARγ in smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and endothelial cells (ECs) and thus mediate anti-atherosclerotic effects. Human aortic SMCs (HASMCs) and human umbilical vein ECs (HUVECs) were used in this study. Fluvastatin and pitavastatin activated PPARγ in HASMCs, but not in HUVECs. Statins induced cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression in HASMCs, but not in HUVECs. Moreover, treatment with COX-2-siRNA abrogated statin-mediated PPARγ activation in HASMCs. Statins suppressed migration and proliferation of HASMCs, and inhibited lipopolysaccharide-induced expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in HASMCs. These effects of statins were abrogated by treatment with PPARγ-siRNA. Treatment with statins suppressed atherosclerotic lesion formation in Apoe{sup −/−} mice. In addition, transcriptional activity of PPARγ and CD36 expression were increased, and the expression of MCP-1 and TNF-α was decreased, in the aorta of statin-treated Apoe{sup −/−} mice. In conclusion, statins mediate anti-atherogenic effects

  15. Statins meditate anti-atherosclerotic action in smooth muscle cells by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Statins induce PPARγ activation in vascular smooth muscle cells. • Statin-induced PPARγ activation is mediated by COX-2 expression. • Statins suppress cell migration and proliferation in vascular smooth muscle cells. • Statins inhibit LPS-induced inflammatory responses by PPARγ activation. • Fluvastatin suppress the progression of atherosclerosis and induces PPARγ activation in the aorta of apoE-deficient mice. - Abstract: The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) is an important regulator of lipid and glucose metabolism, and its activation is reported to suppress the progression of atherosclerosis. We have reported that 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins) activate PPARγ in macrophages. However, it is not yet known whether statins activate PPARγ in other vascular cells. In the present study, we investigated whether statins activate PPARγ in smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and endothelial cells (ECs) and thus mediate anti-atherosclerotic effects. Human aortic SMCs (HASMCs) and human umbilical vein ECs (HUVECs) were used in this study. Fluvastatin and pitavastatin activated PPARγ in HASMCs, but not in HUVECs. Statins induced cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression in HASMCs, but not in HUVECs. Moreover, treatment with COX-2-siRNA abrogated statin-mediated PPARγ activation in HASMCs. Statins suppressed migration and proliferation of HASMCs, and inhibited lipopolysaccharide-induced expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in HASMCs. These effects of statins were abrogated by treatment with PPARγ-siRNA. Treatment with statins suppressed atherosclerotic lesion formation in Apoe−/− mice. In addition, transcriptional activity of PPARγ and CD36 expression were increased, and the expression of MCP-1 and TNF-α was decreased, in the aorta of statin-treated Apoe−/− mice. In conclusion, statins mediate anti-atherogenic effects through PPAR

  16. Wound Healing and Cancer Stem Cells: Inflammation as a Driver of Treatment Resistance in Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Arnold, Kimberly M; Opdenaker, Lynn M.; Daniel Flynn; Jennifer Sims-Mourtada

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between wound healing and cancer has long been recognized. The mechanisms that regulate wound healing have been shown to promote transformation and growth of malignant cells. In addition, chronic inflammation has been associated with malignant transformation in many tissues. Recently, pathways involved in inflammation and wound healing have been reported to enhance cancer stem cell (CSC) populations. These cells, which are highly resistant to current treatments, are capable o...

  17. Evidence That Mast Cells Are Not Required for Healing of Splinted Cutaneous Excisional Wounds in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Nauta, Allison C.; Grova, Monica; Montoro, Daniel T.; Zimmermann, Andrew; Tsai, Mindy; Geoffrey C Gurtner; Galli, Stephen J.; Longaker, Michael T.

    2013-01-01

    Wound healing is a complex biological process involving the interaction of many cell types to replace lost or damaged tissue. Although the biology of wound healing has been extensively investigated, few studies have focused on the role of mast cells. In this study, we investigated the possible role of mast cells in wound healing by analyzing aspects of cutaneous excisional wound healing in three types of genetically mast cell-deficient mice. We found that C57BL/6-KitW-sh/W-sh , WBB6F1-KitW/W-...

  18. Anti-atherosclerotic activity of platycodin D derived from roots of Platycodon grandiflorum in human endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jingtao; Yang, Guiwen; Zhu, Wenxing; Wen, Wujun; Zhang, Fumiao; Yuan, Jinduo; An, Liguo

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the effects of platycodin D (PD), a triterpene saponin from the the root of Platycodon grandiflorum A.DC on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in vitro, which were pre-treated with PD (0.01, 0.15, 0.25 mg/mL), respectively, and treated with 50 mg/L oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL). The levels of nitric oxide (NO) and malonaldehyde (MAD) in the culture medium, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) mRNA expression in endothelium cells and the adhesion of monocytes to endothelial cells were measured. The results showed that PD increased NO concentration and decreased MDA level induced by oxLDL in the medium of endothelial cells. Moreover, PD significantly inhibited the oxLDL-induced increase in monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells as well as decreasing mRNA expression levels of VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 on these cells. Based on these results, it is suggested that PD is a promising anti-atherosclerotic activity, which is at least in part the result of its increasing NO concentration, reducing the oxLDL-induced cell adhesion molecule expression in endothelial cells and the endothelial adhesion to monocytes. PMID:22863916

  19. Abnormal Cell Responses and Role of TNF-α in Impaired Diabetic Wound Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanxing Xu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Impaired diabetic wound healing constitutes a major health problem. The impaired healing is caused by complex factors such as abnormal keratinocyte and fibroblast migration, proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis, abnormal macrophage polarization, impaired recruitment of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs and endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs, and decreased vascularization. Diabetes-enhanced and prolonged expression of TNF-α also contributes to impaired healing. In this paper, we discuss the abnormal cell responses in diabetic wound healing and the contribution of TNF-α.

  20. Microencapsulated equine mesenchymal stromal cells promote cutaneous wound healing in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Bussche, Leen; Harman, Rebecca M.; Syracuse, Bethany A; Plante, Eric L; Lu, Yen-Chun; Curtis, Theresa M; Ma, Minglin; Van de Walle, Gerlinde R

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The prevalence of impaired cutaneous wound healing is high and treatment is difficult and often ineffective, leading to negative social and economic impacts for our society. Innovative treatments to improve cutaneous wound healing by promoting complete tissue regeneration are therefore urgently needed. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have been reported to provide paracrine signals that promote wound healing, but (i) how they exert their effects on target cells is unclear and (ii...

  1. Abnormal Cell Responses and Role of TNF-α in Impaired Diabetic Wound Healing

    OpenAIRE

    Fanxing Xu; Chenying Zhang; Graves, Dana T.

    2013-01-01

    Impaired diabetic wound healing constitutes a major health problem. The impaired healing is caused by complex factors such as abnormal keratinocyte and fibroblast migration, proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis, abnormal macrophage polarization, impaired recruitment of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), and decreased vascularization. Diabetes-enhanced and prolonged expression of TNF- α also contributes to impaired healing. In this paper, we discuss...

  2. Manganese superoxide dismutase expression in endothelial progenitor cells accelerates wound healing in diabetic mice

    OpenAIRE

    Marrotte, Eric J.; Chen, Dan-Dan; Hakim, Jeffrey S.; Chen, Alex F.

    2010-01-01

    Amputation as a result of impaired wound healing is a serious complication of diabetes. Inadequate angiogenesis contributes to poor wound healing in diabetic patients. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) normally augment angiogenesis and wound repair but are functionally impaired in diabetics. Here we report that decreased expression of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) in EPCs contributes to impaired would healing in a mouse model of type 2 diabetes. A decreased frequency of circulating...

  3. Activity of mesenchymal stem cells in therapies for chronic skin wound healing

    OpenAIRE

    Nuschke, Austin

    2013-01-01

    Chronic or non-healing skin wounds present an ongoing challenge in advanced wound care, particularly as the number of patients increases while technology aimed at stimulating wound healing in these cases remains inefficient. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have proved to be an attractive cell type for various cell therapies due to their ability to differentiate into various cell lineages, multiple donor tissue types, and relative resilience in ex-vivo expansion, as well as immunomodulatory effe...

  4. The effects of T cells and their products on in vitro healing of epitenon cell microwounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wòjciak, B; Crossan, J F

    1994-09-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to study the activity and behaviour of rat epitenon cells cultured in the presence of activated helper/inducer T lymphocytes and T-cell-derived cytokines interleukin-1 (IL-1), IL-2, transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma). We measured the speed of healing of microwounded monolayers of epitenon cells as well as intercellular adhesion, cell proliferation and fibronectin production. The speed of monolayer healing was increased in the presence of activated CD4+ T lymphocytes and cytokines: TGF-beta > IL-2 > IL-1 > IFN-gamma. TGF-beta and IL-2 were also found to promote cell-cell adhesion; other cytokines had a minor effect. IL-2, IL-1 and IFN-gamma promoted [3H]thymidine incorporation in epitenon cells whereas TGF-beta had an inhibitory effect. Fibronectin production was studied with immunofluorescence staining methods. Activated CD4+ T lymphocytes and TGF-beta stimulated the deposition of fibronectin whereas other cytokines did not have a significant effect. Our results suggest that activated T lymphocytes and T-cell-derived cytokines, especially IL-2 and TGF-beta play a crucial role in the regulation of epitenon cell proliferation, adhesion and extracellular matrix production during in vitro microwound healing. As epitenon cells are the main cell type participating in tendon repair, factors regulating their activity may find application in clinical practice. PMID:7821974

  5. Stem Cells in Skin Wound Healing: Are We There Yet?

    OpenAIRE

    Cerqueira, Mariana Teixeira; Pirraco, Rogério Pedro; Marques, Alexandra Pinto

    2016-01-01

    Significance: Cutaneous wound healing is a serious problem worldwide that affects patients with various wound types, resulting from burns, traumatic injuries, and diabetes. Despite the wide range of clinically available skin substitutes and the different therapeutic alternatives, delayed healing and scarring are often observed.

  6. Augmentation of cutaneous wound healing by pharmacologic mobilization of endogenous bone marrow stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolar, Jakub; McGrath, John A

    2014-09-01

    Novel therapeutic tools to accelerate wound healing would have a major impact on the overall burden of skin disease. Lin et al. demonstrate in mice that endogenous bone marrow stem cell mobilization, produced by a pharmacologic combination of AMD3100 and tacrolimus, leads to faster and better-quality wound healing, findings that have exciting potential for clinical translation. PMID:25120149

  7. Effect of Low Level Ionizing Radiation on Endothelial Progenitor Cells in Atherosclerotic Patients with Lower Limb Ischemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains the leading cause of morbidity and mortality throughout the developed world (Williamson et al., 2012). Coronary artery disease (CAD) or atherosclerotic heart disease is a chronic life-threatening disease, which characterized by reducing blood supply to the heart as a result of the accumulation of atheromatous plaques within the walls of the arteries supplying the myocardium. Progressive atherosclerosis in the coronary arteries may lead to intimal thickening and eventual artery occlusion. Coronary artery occlusion can cause acute myocardial ischemia as a result of reduced oxygen supply or increased oxygen demand (Luthje and Andreas, 2008). Convincing evidence indicates that atherosclerosis is associated with endothelial dysfunction at the early stage of the disease process (Chiang et al., 2012). The endothelium is a dynamic cell layer that represents a physiological barrier between circulating blood and the surrounding tissues. Impaired endothelial function is a critical event in the initiation of atherosclerotic plaque development and thus may lead to vasoconstriction, vascular smooth muscle proliferation, hypercoagulability, thrombosis, and eventually, adverse cardiovascular events (Berger and Lavie, 2011). Asahara et al., (1997) described endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) in human peripheral blood. EPC are immature endothelial circulating cells mobilized from the bone marrow. These cells are involved in Introduction and aim of the work repairing the damaged endothelium and in facilitating neovascularization after ischemia (Rouhl et al., 2008). The role of EPC in health and disease is not understood completely. Most studies of healthy subjects and patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) report that the number and function of circulating EPC decrease with age and with the presence of classical vascular risk factors (Fadini et al., 2007). Recent studies suggested that EPCs play an important role in the risk of vascular

  8. Stem Cells in Skin Regeneration, Wound Healing, and Their Clinical Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Nkemcho Ojeh; Irena Pastar; Marjana Tomic-Canic; Olivera Stojadinovic

    2015-01-01

    The skin is the largest organ of the body and has an array of functions. Skin compartments, epidermis, and hair follicles house stem cells that are indispensable for skin homeostasis and regeneration. These stem cells also contribute to wound repair, resulting in restoration of tissue integrity and function of damaged tissue. Unsuccessful wound healing processes often lead to non-healing wounds. Chronic wounds are caused by depletion of stem cells and a variety of other cellular and molecular...

  9. Conditioned Media From Adipose-Derived Stromal Cells Accelerates Healing in 3-Dimensional Skin Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collawn, Sherry S; Mobley, James A; Banerjee, N Sanjib; Chow, Louise T

    2016-04-01

    Wound healing involves a number of factors that results in the production of a "closed" wound. Studies have shown, in animal models, acceleration of wound healing with the addition of adipose-derived stromal cells (ADSC). The cause for the positive effect which these cells have on wound healing has not been elucidated. We have previously shown that addition of ADSC to the dermal equivalent in 3-dimensional skin cultures accelerates reepithelialization. We now demonstrate that conditioned media (CM) from cultured ADSC produced a similar rate of healing. This result suggests that a feedback from the 3-dimensional epithelial cultures to ADSC was not necessary to effect the accelerated reepithelialization. Mass spectrometry of CM from ADSC and primary human fibroblasts revealed differences in secretomes, some of which might have roles in the accelerating wound healing. Thus, the use of CM has provided some preliminary information on a possible mode of action. PMID:26954733

  10. Effect of allogeneic bone marrow derived stromal cells on induced third-degree skin burn healing in mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leyla Soleymani

    2014-10-01

    Conclusion: This experimental modulation of wound healing suggests that bone marrow-derived stromal cells can significantly enhance the rate of wound healing possibly through stimulation of granulation tissue, angiogenesis, fibroblast proliferation and collagen deposition.

  11. The effect of spiritual healing on in vitro tumour cell proliferation and viability - an experimental study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zachariae, R.; Hojgaard, L.; Zachariae, C.;

    2005-01-01

    Alternative treatments such as spiritual healing and prayer are increasingly popular, especially among patients with life-threatening diseases such as cancer. According to theories of spiritual healing, this intervention is thought to influence living cells and organisms independently...... of the recipient's conscious awareness of the healer's intention. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that spiritual healing will reduce proliferation and viability of two cancer cell lines in vitro. Three controlled experiments were conducted with three different healers and randomised allocation...... of cells to five different doses of healing or control. Researchers conducting the assays and statistical analyses were blinded to the experimental conditions. Main outcome measures were MTT viability, 3H-thymidine incorporation and counts of an adherent human breast cancer cell line (MCF-7...

  12. Orp8 deficiency in bone marrow-derived cells reduces atherosclerotic lesion progression in LDL receptor knockout mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik van Kampen

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Oxysterol binding protein Related Proteins (ORPs mediate intracellular lipid transport and homeostatic regulation. ORP8 downregulates ABCA1 expression in macrophages and cellular cholesterol efflux to apolipoprotein A-I. In line, ORP8 knockout mice display increased amounts of HDL cholesterol in blood. However, the role of macrophage ORP8 in atherosclerotic lesion development is unknown. METHODS AND RESULTS: LDL receptor knockout (KO mice were transplanted with bone marrow (BM from ORP8 KO mice and C57Bl/6 wild type mice. Subsequently, the animals were challenged with a high fat/high cholesterol Western-type diet to induce atherosclerosis. After 9 weeks of Western-Type diet feeding, serum levels of VLDL cholesterol were increased by 50% in ORP8 KO BM recipients compared to the wild-type recipients. However, no differences were observed in HDL cholesterol. Despite the increase in VLDL cholesterol, lesions in mice transplanted with ORP8 KO bone marrow were 20% smaller compared to WT transplanted controls. In addition, ORP8 KO transplanted mice displayed a modest increase in the percentage of macrophages in the lesion as compared to the wild-type transplanted group. ORP8 deficient macrophages displayed decreased production of pro-inflammatory factors IL-6 and TNFα, decreased expression of differentiation markers and showed a reduced capacity to form foam cells in the peritoneal cavity. CONCLUSIONS: Deletion of ORP8 in bone marrow-derived cells, including macrophages, reduces lesion progression after 9 weeks of WTD challenge, despite increased amounts of circulating pro-atherogenic VLDL. Reduced macrophage foam cell formation and lower macrophage inflammatory potential are plausible mechanisms contributing to the observed reduction in atherosclerosis.

  13. Concise Review: Clinical Translation of Wound Healing Therapies Based on Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Jackson, Wesley M.; Nesti, Leon J.; Tuan, Rocky S.

    2011-01-01

    There is enormous worldwide demand for therapies to promote the efficient resolution of hard-to-heal wounds with minimal appearance of scarring. Recent in vitro studies with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have identified numerous mechanisms by which these cells can promote the process of wound healing, and there is significant interest in the clinical translation of an MSC-based therapy to promote dermal regeneration. This review provides a systematic analysis of recent preclinical and clinica...

  14. Wound healing potential of Spirulina platensis extracts on human dermal fibroblast cells

    OpenAIRE

    Syarina, Pauzi Nur Aimi; Karthivashan, Govindarajan; Abas, Faridah; Arulselvan, Palanisamy; Fakurazi, Sharida

    2015-01-01

    Blue-green alga (Spirulina platensis) is a well renowned nutri-supplement due to its high nutritional and medicinal properties. The aim of this study was to examine the wound healing efficiency of Spirulina platensis at various solvent extracts using in vitro scratch assay on human dermal fibroblast cells (HDF). Various gradient solvent extracts (50 μg/ml of methanolic, ethanolic and aqueous extracts) from Spirulina platensis were treated on HDF cells to acquire its wound healing properties t...

  15. Actin Is a Target of T-Cell Reactivity in Patients with Advanced Carotid Atherosclerotic Plaques

    OpenAIRE

    Elisabetta Profumo; Brigitta Buttari; Linda Petrone; Giada Lacroce; Maria Chiara Tesori; Raffaele Capoano; Bruno Salvati; Rachele Riganò

    2013-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the arterial wall associated with autoimmune reactions. In a previous study, we observed the presence of actin-specific antibodies in sera from patients with carotid atherosclerosis. To extend our previous results we evaluated the possible role of actin as antigenic target of cell-mediated immune reactions in carotid atherosclerosis. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from 17 patients and 16 healthy subjects were tested by cell proli...

  16. Blood-derived small Dot cells reduce scar in wound healing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wounds in fetal skin heal without scar, however the mechanism is unknown. We identified a novel group of E-cadherin positive cells in the blood of fetal and adult mice and named them 'Dot cells'. The percentage of Dot cells in E16.5 fetal mice blood is more than twenty times higher compared to adult blood. Dot cells also express integrin β1, CD184, CD34, CD13low and Sca1low, but not CD45, CD44, and CD117. Dot cells have a tiny dot shape between 1 and 7 μm diameters with fast proliferation in vitro. Most of the Dot cells remain positive for E-cadherin and integrin β1 after one month in culture. Transplantation of Dot cells to adult mice heals skin wounds with less scar due to reduced smooth muscle actin and collagen expression in the repair tissue. Tracking GFP-positive Dot cells demonstrates that Dot cells migrate to wounds and differentiate into dermal cells, which also express strongly to FGF-2, and later lose their GFP expression. Our results indicate that Dot cells are a group of previously unidentified cells that have strong wound healing effect. The mechanism of scarless wound healing in fetal skin is due to the presence of a large number of Dot cells

  17. Oleic acid induces smooth muscle foam cell formation and enhances atherosclerotic lesion development via CD36

    OpenAIRE

    Tang Bing; Li; Yang Dachun; Ma Shuangtao; Yang Yongjian

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Elevated plasma free fatty acid (FFA) levels have been linked to the development of atherosclerosis. However, how FFA causes atherosclerosis has not been determined. Because fatty acid translocase (FAT/CD36) is responsible for the uptake of FFA, we hypothesized that the atherogenic effects of FFA may be mediated via CD36. Results We tested this hypothesis using cultured rat aortic smooth muscle cells (SMCs) treated with oleic acid (OA). We found that OA induces lipid accum...

  18. Phage Display Identification of CD100 in Human Atherosclerotic Plaque Macrophages and Foam Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Luque, Maria Carolina Aquino; Gutierrez, Paulo Sampaio; Debbas, Victor; Martins, Waleska Kerllen; Puech-Leao, Pedro; Porto, Georgia; Coelho, Verônica; Boumsell, Laurence; Kalil, Jorge; Stolf, Beatriz

    2013-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a complex disease in which vessels develop plaques comprising dysfunctional endothelium, monocyte derived lipid laden foam cells and activated lymphocytes. Considering that humans and animal models of the disease develop quite distinct plaques, we used human plaques to search for proteins that could be used as markers of human atheromas. Phage display peptide libraries were probed to fresh human carotid plaques, and a bound phage homologous to plexin B1, a high affinity rec...

  19. Actin Is a Target of T-Cell Reactivity in Patients with Advanced Carotid Atherosclerotic Plaques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabetta Profumo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the arterial wall associated with autoimmune reactions. In a previous study, we observed the presence of actin-specific antibodies in sera from patients with carotid atherosclerosis. To extend our previous results we evaluated the possible role of actin as antigenic target of cell-mediated immune reactions in carotid atherosclerosis. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC from 17 patients and 16 healthy subjects were tested by cell proliferation assay and by ELISA for cytokine production. Actin induced a proliferative response in 47% of patients’ PBMC samples, with SI ranging from 2.6 to 21.1, and in none of the healthy subjects’ samples (patients versus healthy subjects, P=0.02. The presence of diabetes in patients was significantly associated with proliferative response to actin (P=0.04. IFN-γ and TNF-α concentrations were higher in PBMC from patients than in those from healthy subjects and in PBMC proliferating to actin than in nonproliferating ones. Our data demonstrate for the first time a role of actin as a target autoantigen of cellular immune reactions in patients with carotid atherosclerosis. The preferential proinflammatory Th1 activation suggests that actin could contribute to endothelial dysfunction, tissue damage, and systemic inflammation in carotid atherosclerosis.

  20. Paracrine effects of stem cells in wound healing and cancer progression

    OpenAIRE

    DITTMER, JÜRGEN; Leyh, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Stem cells play an important role in tissue repair and cancer development. The capacity to self-renew and to differentiate to specialized cells allows tissue-specific stem cells to rebuild damaged tissue and cancer stem cells to initiate and promote cancer. Mesenchymal stem cells, attracted to wounds and cancer, facilitate wound healing and support cancer progression primarily by secreting bioactive factors. There is now growing evidence that, like mesenchymal stem cells, also tissue-specific...

  1. Mesenchymal stem cells and cutaneous wound healing: novel methods to increase cell delivery and therapeutic efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dylan E; Ayoub, Nagi; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) (also known as multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells) possess the capacity for self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation, and their ability to enhance cutaneous wound healing has been well characterized. Acting via paracrine interactions, MSCs accelerate wound closure, increase angiogenesis, promote resolution of wound inflammation, favorably regulate extracellular matrix remodeling, and encourage regeneration of skin with normal architecture and function. A number of studies have employed novel methods to amplify the delivery and efficacy of MSCs. Non-traditional sources of MSCs, including Wharton's jelly and medical waste material, have shown efficacy comparable to that of traditional sources, such as bone marrow and adipose tissue. The potential of alternative methods to both introduce MSCs into wounds and increase migration of MSCs into wound areas has also been demonstrated. Taking advantage of the associations between MSCs with M2 macrophages and microRNA, methods to enhance the immunomodulatory capacity of MSCs have shown success. New measures to enhance angiogenic capabilities have also exhibited effectiveness, often demonstrated by increased levels of proangiogenic vascular endothelial growth factor. Finally, hypoxia has been shown to have strong wound-healing potential in terms of increasing MSC efficacy. We have critically reviewed the results of the novel studies that show promise for the continued development of MSC-based wound-healing therapies and provide direction for continued research in this field. PMID:26960535

  2. Knockdown of SVCT2 impairs in-vitro cell attachment, migration and wound healing in bone marrow stromal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajnikumar Sangani

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Bone marrow stromal cell (BMSC adhesion and migration are fundamental to a number of pathophysiologic processes, including fracture and wound healing. Vitamin C is beneficial for bone formation, fracture repair and wound healing. However, the role of the vitamin C transporter in BMSC adhesion, migration and wound healing is not known. In this study, we knocked-down the sodium-dependent vitamin C transporter, SVCT2, the only known transporter of vitamin C in BMSCs, and performed cell adhesion, migration, in-vitro scratch wound healing and F-actin re-arrangement studies. We also investigated the role of oxidative stress on the above processes. Our results demonstrate that both oxidative stress and down-regulation of SVCT2 decreased cell attachment and spreading. A trans-well cell migration assay showed that vitamin C helped in BMSC migration and that knockdown of SVCT2 decreased cell migration. In the in-vitro scratch wound healing studies, we established that oxidative stress dose-dependently impairs wound healing. Furthermore, the supplementation of vitamin C significantly rescued the BMSCs from oxidative stress and increased wound closing. The knockdown of SVCT2 in BMSCs strikingly decreased wound healing, and supplementing with vitamin C failed to rescue cells efficiently. The knockdown of SVCT2 and induction of oxidative stress in cells produced an alteration in cytoskeletal dynamics. Signaling studies showed that oxidative stress phosphorylated members of the MAP kinase family (p38 and that vitamin C inhibited their phosphorylation. Taken together, these results indicate that both the SVCT2 transporter and oxidative stress play a vital role in BMSC attachment, migration and cytoskeletal re-arrangement. BMSC-based cell therapy and modulation of SVCT2 could lead to a novel therapeutic approach that enhances bone remodeling, fracture repair and wound healing in chronic disease conditions.

  3. Intracellular processing of epidermal growth factor by early wound healing cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) is a potent 53-amino-acid residue polypeptide that has been implicated in normal wound healing. Although past studies have shown that locally applied EGF accelerates wound healing, these studies have not examined intracellular events related to the processing of the growth factor. The objective of this study was to characterize both initial and later postbinding intracellular processing of EGF by a responsive cell line (osteoblasts) that is important in the healing of wounds. Cloned mouse calvarial osteoblasts (MC-3TC-E1) were incubated with radiolabeled EGF, with and without preincubation with nonlabeled EGF, for specific time intervals. Cell-associated radioactivity was characterized by nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Results showed that EGF is processed as three distinct species and that the relative proportions of these species are altered at later time periods when compared with initial processing. The patterns, similar to those reported for human fibroblasts, indicate a possible common pathway for the mitogenic signal in cells associated with the early events of wound healing. In addition, these data represent the first direct evidence that preexposure of cells to nonlabeled EGF alters the processing of radiolabeled EGF. This is significant, because cells must be exposed to EGF for 5 to 8 hours to elicit a growth response. Such data may help to explain the lag phase of wound healing

  4. eDNA: A Bio-Inspired Reconfigurable Hardware Cell Architecture Supporting Self-organisation and Self-healing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, Michael Reibel; Madsen, Jan

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the concept of a biological inspired reconfigurable hardware cell architecture which supports self-organisation and self-healing. Two fundamental processes in biology, namely fertilization-to-birth and cell self-healing have inspired the development of this cell architecture. ...

  5. A possible link between loading, inflammation and healing: Immune cell populations during tendon healing in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomgran, Parmis; Blomgran, Robert; Ernerudh, Jan; Aspenberg, Per

    2016-01-01

    Loading influences tendon healing, and so does inflammation. We hypothesized that the two are connected. 48 rats underwent Achilles tendon transection. Half of the rats received Botox injections into calf muscles to reduce mechanical loading. Cells from the regenerating tissue were analyzed by flow cytometry. In the loaded group, the regenerating tissue contained 83% leukocytes (CD45(+)) day 1, and 23% day 10. The M1/M2 macrophage ratio (CCR7/CD206) peaked at day 3, while T helper (CD3(+)CD4(+)) and Treg cells (CD25(+) Foxp3(+)) increased over time. With Botox, markers associated with down-regulation of inflammation were more common day 5 (CD163, CD206, CD25, Foxp3), and M1 or M2 macrophages and Treg cells were virtually absent day 10, while still present with full loading. The primary variable, CCR7/CD206 ratio day 5, was higher with full loading (p = 0.001) and the Treg cell fraction was lower (p < 0.001). Free cage activity loading is known to increase size and strength of the tendon in this model compared to Botox. Loading now appeared to delay the switch to an M2 type of inflammation with more Treg cells. It seems a prolonged M1 phase due to loading might make the tendon regenerate bigger. PMID:27405922

  6. Water fluxes through aquaporin-9 prime epithelial cells for rapid wound healing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, T.; Lagerholm, B. C.; Vikstrom, E.;

    2013-01-01

    about the impact on migrating epithelial sheets during wound healing and epithelial renewal. Here, we investigate and compare the effects of AQP9 on single cell and epithelial sheet migration. To achieve this, MDCK-1 cells stably expressing AQP9 were subjected to migration assessment. We found that AQP9...

  7. Wound Healing and Cancer Stem Cells: Inflammation as a Driver of Treatment Resistance in Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Kimberly M; Opdenaker, Lynn M; Flynn, Daniel; Sims-Mourtada, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between wound healing and cancer has long been recognized. The mechanisms that regulate wound healing have been shown to promote transformation and growth of malignant cells. In addition, chronic inflammation has been associated with malignant transformation in many tissues. Recently, pathways involved in inflammation and wound healing have been reported to enhance cancer stem cell (CSC) populations. These cells, which are highly resistant to current treatments, are capable of repopulating the tumor after treatment, causing local and systemic recurrences. In this review, we highlight proinflammatory cytokines and developmental pathways involved in tissue repair, whose deregulation in the tumor microenvironment may promote growth and survival of CSCs. We propose that the addition of anti-inflammatory agents to current treatment regimens may slow the growth of CSCs and improve therapeutic outcomes. PMID:25674014

  8. Sundew-Inspired Adhesive Hydrogels Combined with Adipose-Derived Stem Cells for Wound Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Leming; Huang, Yujian; Bian, Zehua; Petrosino, Jennifer; Fan, Zhen; Wang, Yongzhong; Park, Ki Ho; Yue, Tao; Schmidt, Michael; Galster, Scott; Ma, Jianjie; Zhu, Hua; Zhang, Mingjun

    2016-01-27

    The potential to harness the unique physical, chemical, and biological properties of the sundew (Drosera) plant's adhesive hydrogels has long intrigued researchers searching for novel wound-healing applications. However, the ability to collect sufficient quantities of the sundew plant's adhesive hydrogels is problematic and has eclipsed their therapeutic promise. Inspired by these natural hydrogels, we asked if sundew-inspired adhesive hydrogels could overcome the drawbacks associated with natural sundew hydrogels and be used in combination with stem-cell-based therapy to enhance wound-healing therapeutics. Using a bioinspired approach, we synthesized adhesive hydrogels comprised of sodium alginate, gum arabic, and calcium ions to mimic the properties of the natural sundew-derived adhesive hydrogels. We then characterized and showed that these sundew-inspired hydrogels promote wound healing through their superior adhesive strength, nanostructure, and resistance to shearing when compared to other hydrogels in vitro. In vivo, sundew-inspired hydrogels promoted a "suturing" effect to wound sites, which was demonstrated by enhanced wound closure following topical application of the hydrogels. In combination with mouse adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) and compared to other therapeutic biomaterials, the sundew-inspired hydrogels demonstrated superior wound-healing capabilities. Collectively, our studies show that sundew-inspired hydrogels contain ideal properties that promote wound healing and suggest that sundew-inspired-ADSCs combination therapy is an efficacious approach for treating wounds without eliciting noticeable toxicity or inflammation. PMID:26731614

  9. Increased Number of Langerhans Cells in the Epidermis of Diabetic Foot Ulcers Correlates with Healing Outcome

    OpenAIRE

    Stojadinovic, Olivera; Yin, Natalie; Lehmann, Janin; Pastar, Irena; Kirsner, Robert S.; Tomic-Canic, Marjana

    2013-01-01

    Langerhans cells (LCs) are a specialized subset of epidermal dendritic cells. They represent one of the first cells of immunological barrier and play an important role during the inflammatory phase of acute wound healing. Despite considerable progress in our understanding of the immunopathology of diabetes mellitus and its associated co-morbidities such as diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs), considerable gaps in our knowledge exist. In this study, we utilized the human ex vivo wound model and confir...

  10. Role of endothelial progenitor cells and inflammatory cytokines in healing of diabetic foot ulcers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Tecilazich

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To evaluate changes in endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs and cytokines in patients with diabetic foot ulceration (DFU in association with wound healing. METHODS: We studied healthy subjects, diabetic patients not at risk of DFU, at risk of DFU and with active DFU. We prospectively followed the DFU patients over a 12-week period. We also investigated similar changes in diabetic rabbit and mouse models of wound healing. RESULTS: All EPC phenotypes except the kinase insert domain receptor (KDR(+CD133(+ were reduced in the at risk and the DFU groups compared to the controls. There were no major EPC differences between the control and not at risk group, and between the at risk and DFU groups. Serum stromal-cell derived factor-1 (SDF-1 and stem cell factor (SCF were increased in DFU patients. DFU patients who healed their ulcers had lower CD34(+KDR(+ count at visits 3 and 4, serum c-reactive protein (CRP and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF at visit 1, interleukin-1 (IL-1 at visits 1 and 4. EPCs tended to be higher in both diabetic animal models when compared to their non-diabetic counterparts both before and ten days after wounding. CONCLUSIONS: Uncomplicated diabetes does not affect EPCs. EPCs are reduced in patients at risk or with DFU while complete wound healing is associated with CD34(+KDR(+ reduction, suggesting possible increased homing. Low baseline CRP, IL-1α and GM-CSF serum levels were associated with complete wound healing and may potentially serve as prognostic markers of DFU healing. No animal model alone is representative of the human condition, indicating the need for multiple experimental models.

  11. Endothelial Dysfunction and Diabetes: Effects on Angiogenesis, Vascular Remodeling, and Wound Healing

    OpenAIRE

    Gopi Krishna Kolluru; Bir, Shyamal C.; Kevil, Christopher G.

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a chronic metabolic disorder characterized by inappropriate hyperglycemia due to lack of or resistance to insulin. Patients with DM are frequently afflicted with ischemic vascular disease or wound healing defect. It is well known that type 2 DM causes amplification of the atherosclerotic process, endothelial cell dysfunction, glycosylation of extracellular matrix proteins, and vascular denervation. These complications ultimately lead to impairment of neovascularizati...

  12. Human umbilical mesenchymal stem cells conditioned medium promote primary wound healing regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwi Liliek Kusindarta

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This research was conducted to clarify the capability of human umbilical mesenchymal stem cells conditioned medium (HU-MSCM to promote regenerations of primary wound healing on the incision skin injury. Materials and Methods: In this study, two approaches in vitro and in vivo already done. On in vitro analysis, tube formation was performed using HU vein endothelial cells in the presence of HU-MSCM, in some experiments cells line was incubated prior the presence of lipopolysaccharide and HU-MSCM then apoptosis assay was performed. Furthermore, in vivo experiments 12 female rats (Rattus norvegicus were used after rats anesthetized, 7 mm wound was made by incision on the left side of the body. The wound was treated with HU-MSCM containing cream, povidone iodine was run as a control. Wound healing regenerations on the skin samples were visualized by hematoxylin-eosin staining. Results: In vitro models elucidate HU-MSCM may decreasing inflammation at the beginning of wound healing, promote cell migration and angiogenesis. In addition in vivo models show that the incision length on the skin is decreasing and more smaller, HE staining describe decreasing of inflammation phase, increasing of angiogenesis, accelerate fibroplasia, and maturation phase. Conclusions: Taken together our observation indicates that HU-MSCM could promote the acceleration of skin tissue regenerations in primary wound healing process.

  13. Mosaic analysis of stem cell function and wound healing in the mouse corneal epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morley Steven D

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mouse corneal epithelium is a continuously renewing 5–6 cell thick protective layer covering the corneal surface, which regenerates rapidly when injured. It is maintained by peripherally located limbal stem cells (LSCs that produce transient amplifying cells (TACs which proliferate, migrate centripetally, differentiate and are eventually shed from the epithelial surface. LSC activity is required both for normal tissue maintenance and wound healing. Mosaic analysis can provide insights into LSC function, cell movement and cell mixing during tissue maintenance and repair. The present study investigates cell streaming during corneal maintenance and repair and changes in LSC function with age. Results The initial pattern of corneal epithelial patches in XLacZ+/- X-inactivation mosaics was replaced after birth by radial stripes, indicating activation of LSCs. Stripe patterns (clockwise, anticlockwise or midline were independent between paired eyes. Wound healing in organ culture was analysed by mosaic analysis of XLacZ+/- eyes or time-lapse imaging of GFP mosaics. Both central and peripheral wounds healed clonally, with cells moving in from all around the wound circumference without significant cell mixing, to reconstitute striping patterns. Mosaic analysis revealed that wounds can heal asymmetrically. Healing of peripheral wounds produced stripe patterns that mimicked some aberrant striping patterns observed in unwounded corneas. Quantitative analysis provided no evidence for an uneven distribution of LSC clones but showed that corrected corneal epithelial stripe numbers declined with age (implying declining LSC function but stabilised after 39 weeks. Conclusion Striping patterns, produced by centripetal movement, are defined independently and stochastically in individual eyes. Little cell mixing occurs during the initial phase of wound healing and the direction of cell movement is determined by the position of the wound

  14. Substance P combined with epidermal stem cells promotes wound healing and nerve regeneration in diabetes mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Fei-bin Zhu; Xiang-jing Fang; De-wu Liu; Ying Shao; Hong-yan Zhang; Yan Peng; Qing-ling Zhong; Yong-tie Li; De-ming Liu

    2016-01-01

    Exogenous substance P accelerates wound healing in diabetes, but the mechanism remains poorly understood. Here, we established a rat model by intraperitoneally injecting streptozotocin. Four wounds (1.8 cm diameter) were drilled using a self-made punch onto the back, bilateral to the vertebral column, and then treated using amniotic membrane with epidermal stem cells and/or substance P around and in the middle of the wounds. With the combined treatment the wound-healing rate was 100% at 14 da...

  15. Decreased Regulatory T Cells in Vulnerable Atherosclerotic Lesions: Imbalance between Pro- and Anti-Inflammatory Cells in Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilonka Rohm

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the arterial wall in which presentation of autoantigens by dendritic cells (DCs leads to the activation of T cells. Anti-inflammatory cells like Tregs counterbalance inflammation in atherogenesis. In our study, human carotid plaque specimens were classified as stable (14 and unstable (15 according to established morphological criteria. Vessel specimens (n=12 without any signs of atherosclerosis were used as controls. Immunohistochemical staining was performed to detect different types of DCs (S100, fascin, CD83, CD209, CD304, and CD123, proinflammatory T cells (CD3, CD4, CD8, and CD161, and anti-inflammatory Tregs (FoxP3. The following results were observed: in unstable lesions, significantly higher numbers of proinflammatory cells like DCs, T helper cells, cytotoxic T cells, and natural killer cells were detected compared to stable plaques. Additionally, there was a significantly higher expression of HLA-DR and more T cell activation (CD25, CD69 in unstable lesions. On the contrary, unstable lesions contained significantly lower numbers of Tregs. Furthermore, a significant inverse correlation between myeloid DCs and Tregs was shown. These data suggest an increased inflammatory state in vulnerable plaques resulting from an imbalance of the frequency of local pro- and anti-inflammatory immune cells.

  16. Effects of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on healing of wound combined with local radiation injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To explore the effects of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) on healing of wounds combined with local skin irradiation injury. Methods: MSC were injected into the wound combined with local skin irradiation injury. Light and electron microscopy, fibroblast and capillary vessel counts, detection of hydroxyproline content in the wound and demonstration of MSC distribution by fluorescence examination were carried out. Results: MSC could accelerate the speed of wound healing. The number of fibroblasts and capillary vessels increased obviously during 5 to 20 days after wounding. Granular tissues were abundant in the wound, and the content of hydroxyproline increased in the MSC-treated groups. The fluorescence labelling showed that MSC could be found during 1 to 20 days after injection. Conclusion: MSC can remain alive in the wound for a long time and surely promote wound healing

  17. A cell-regulatory mechanism involving feedback between contraction and tissue formation guides wound healing progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Valero

    Full Text Available Wound healing is a process driven by cells. The ability of cells to sense mechanical stimuli from the extracellular matrix that surrounds them is used to regulate the forces that cells exert on the tissue. Stresses exerted by cells play a central role in wound contraction and have been broadly modelled. Traditionally, these stresses are assumed to be dependent on variables such as the extracellular matrix and cell or collagen densities. However, we postulate that cells are able to regulate the healing process through a mechanosensing mechanism regulated by the contraction that they exert. We propose that cells adjust the contraction level to determine the tissue functions regulating all main activities, such as proliferation, differentiation and matrix production. Hence, a closed-regulatory feedback loop is proposed between contraction and tissue formation. The model consists of a system of partial differential equations that simulates the evolution of fibroblasts, myofibroblasts, collagen and a generic growth factor, as well as the deformation of the extracellular matrix. This model is able to predict the wound healing outcome without requiring the addition of phenomenological laws to describe the time-dependent contraction evolution. We have reproduced two in vivo experiments to evaluate the predictive capacity of the model, and we conclude that there is feedback between the level of cell contraction and the tissue regenerated in the wound.

  18. Stem Cells in Skin Regeneration, Wound Healing, and Their Clinical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojeh, Nkemcho; Pastar, Irena; Tomic-Canic, Marjana; Stojadinovic, Olivera

    2015-01-01

    The skin is the largest organ of the body and has an array of functions. Skin compartments, epidermis, and hair follicles house stem cells that are indispensable for skin homeostasis and regeneration. These stem cells also contribute to wound repair, resulting in restoration of tissue integrity and function of damaged tissue. Unsuccessful wound healing processes often lead to non-healing wounds. Chronic wounds are caused by depletion of stem cells and a variety of other cellular and molecular mechanisms, many of which are still poorly understood. Current chronic wound therapies are limited, so the search to develop better therapeutic strategies is ongoing. Adult stem cells are gaining recognition as potential candidates for numerous skin pathologies. In this review, we will discuss epidermal and other stem cells present in the skin, and highlight some of the therapeutic applications of epidermal stem cells and other adult stem cells as tools for cell/scaffold-based therapies for non-healing wounds and other skin disorders. We will also discuss emerging concepts and offer some perspectives on how skin tissue-engineered products can be optimized to provide efficacious therapy in cutaneous repair and regeneration. PMID:26512657

  19. Stem Cells in Skin Regeneration, Wound Healing, and Their Clinical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nkemcho Ojeh

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The skin is the largest organ of the body and has an array of functions. Skin compartments, epidermis, and hair follicles house stem cells that are indispensable for skin homeostasis and regeneration. These stem cells also contribute to wound repair, resulting in restoration of tissue integrity and function of damaged tissue. Unsuccessful wound healing processes often lead to non-healing wounds. Chronic wounds are caused by depletion of stem cells and a variety of other cellular and molecular mechanisms, many of which are still poorly understood. Current chronic wound therapies are limited, so the search to develop better therapeutic strategies is ongoing. Adult stem cells are gaining recognition as potential candidates for numerous skin pathologies. In this review, we will discuss epidermal and other stem cells present in the skin, and highlight some of the therapeutic applications of epidermal stem cells and other adult stem cells as tools for cell/scaffold-based therapies for non-healing wounds and other skin disorders. We will also discuss emerging concepts and offer some perspectives on how skin tissue-engineered products can be optimized to provide efficacious therapy in cutaneous repair and regeneration.

  20. Electrical wound-healing assay for cells in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Keese, Charles R.; Wegener, Joachim; Walker, Sarah R.; Giaever, Ivar

    2004-01-01

    Confluent cell monolayers in tissue culture are fragile and can easily be mechanically disrupted, often leaving an area devoid of cells. This opening in the cell sheet is then repopulated, because the cells on the fringe of the damage, which are no longer contact-inhibited, move into the available space. This mechanical disruption is often done deliberately in a “wound-healing” assay as a means to assess the migration of the cells. In such assays, a scrape is made in the cell layer followed b...

  1. Therapeutic potential of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells in cutaneous wound healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerry S Chen

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Despite advances in wound care, many wounds never heal and become chronic problems that result in significant morbidity and mortality to the patient. Cellular therapy for cutaneous wounds has recently come under investigation as a potential treatment modality for impaired wound healing. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are a promising source of adult progenitor cells for cytotherapy as they are easy to isolate and expand and have been shown to differentiate into various cell lineages. Early studies have demonstrated that MSCs may enhance epithelialization, granulation tissue formation, and neovascularization resulting in accelerated wound closure. It is currently unclear if these effects are mediated through cellular differentiation or by secretion of cytokines and growth factors. This review discusses the proposed biological contributions of MSCs to cutaneous repair and their clinical potential in cell-based therapies.

  2. Intravenous Application of CD271-selected Mesenchymal Stem Cells during Fracture Healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreger, Tina; Watson, John Tracy; DVM, Walter Akers; Molligan, Jeremy; Achilefu, Samuel; Schon, Lew C.; Zhang, Zijun

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Circulating mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) participate in fracture healing and can be used to enhance fracture healing. This study investigated how CD271-selected MSCs travel in circulation and when it is the optimal time to apply MSCs intravenously during fracture healing. Methods Based on the expression of CD271, MSCs were isolated from human bone marrow and labeled with cypate, a near infrared fluorochrome. A unilateral closed fracture was created at the femur in immunodeficient mice. The cypate-labeled MSCs were injected into the tail vein of the mice at days 1 and 3 after fracture, and were tracked by near infrared imaging. The mice were euthanized at 3 weeks after fracture. Immunohistochemistry was performed to detect human MSCs at the fracture sites. Migration of CD271-selected MSCs, under the influence of stem cell derived factor-1 (SDF-1), was assessed in vitro. Results Intravenously injected at day1, but not day 3, after fracture, CD271-selected MSCs accumulated at the fracture sites significantly and that lasted for at least 7 days. All fractures, with or without MSC injections, healed in 3 weeks. Human cells were localized at the fracture sites in mice by immunohistochemistry. CD271-selected MSCs migrated toward the medium contained SDF-1 in vitro. Conclusions After intravenous injection, CD271-selected MSCs were recruited to fracture sites. The stages of fracture healing influenced the homing of culture-expanded MSCs. In mice, an optimal window of intravenous injection of MSCs was around 24 hours after fracture. Clinical Relevance Intravenous application of MSCs may serve as a practical route to deliver stem cells for the treatment of fracture non-union and delayed union. Levels of evidence Level I PMID:24378433

  3. Adipose-derived Stromal Cells Overexpressing Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Accelerate Mouse Excisional Wound Healing

    OpenAIRE

    Nauta, Allison; Seidel, Catharina; Deveza, Lorenzo; Montoro, Daniel; Grova, Monica; Ko, Sae Hee; Hyun, Jeong; Geoffrey C Gurtner; Longaker, Michael T.; Yang, Fan

    2012-01-01

    Angiogenesis is essential to wound repair, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a potent factor to stimulate angiogenesis. Here, we examine the potential of VEGF-overexpressing adipose-derived stromal cells (ASCs) for accelerating wound healing using nonviral, biodegradable polymeric vectors. Mouse ASCs were transfected with DNA plasmid encoding VEGF or green fluorescent protein (GFP) using biodegradable poly (β-amino) esters (PBAE). Cells transfected using Lipofectamine 2000, a c...

  4. Epidermal Th22 and Tc17 Cells Form a Localized Disease Memory in Clinically Healed Psoriasis

    OpenAIRE

    Cheuk, Stanley; Wikén, Maria; Blomqvist, Lennart; Nylén, Susanne; Talme, Toomas; Ståhle, Mona; Eidsmo, Liv

    2014-01-01

    Psoriasis is a common and chronic inflammatory skin disease in which T cells play a key role. Effective treatment heals the skin without scarring, but typically psoriasis recurs in previously affected areas. A pathogenic memory within the skin has been proposed, but the nature of such site-specific disease memory is unknown. Tissue-resident memory T (TRM) cells have been ascribed a role in immunity after resolved viral skin infections. Because of their localization in the epidermal compartmen...

  5. Bm-TFF2, a toad trefoil factor, promotes cell migration, survival and wound healing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yong [Key Laboratory of Animal Models and Human Disease Mechanisms of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and Yunnan Province, Kunming Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming, Yunnan 650223 (China); Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Yu, Guoyu [Key Laboratory of Animal Models and Human Disease Mechanisms of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and Yunnan Province, Kunming Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming, Yunnan 650223 (China); Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Department of Biochemistry, Kunming Medical College, Kunming, Yunnan 650032 (China); Xiang, Yang [Key Laboratory of Animal Models and Human Disease Mechanisms of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and Yunnan Province, Kunming Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming, Yunnan 650223 (China); Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Wu, Jianbo [Key Laboratory of Animal Models and Human Disease Mechanisms of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and Yunnan Province, Kunming Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming, Yunnan 650223 (China); Jiang, Ping [Key Laboratory of Animal Models and Human Disease Mechanisms of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and Yunnan Province, Kunming Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming, Yunnan 650223 (China); Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Lee, Wenhui [Key Laboratory of Animal Models and Human Disease Mechanisms of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and Yunnan Province, Kunming Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming, Yunnan 650223 (China); Zhang, Yun, E-mail: zhangy@mail.kiz.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Animal Models and Human Disease Mechanisms of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and Yunnan Province, Kunming Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming, Yunnan 650223 (China)

    2010-07-30

    Research highlights: {yields} Bm-TFF2 binds to epithelial cells and induces cell migration and wound healing. {yields} Bm-TFF2 suppresses cell apoptosis. {yields} Bm-TFF2 has no effect on cell proliferation. -- Abstract: Toad skin is naked and continually confronted by various injurious factors. Constant skin renewal and repairs occur frequently. However, the mechanisms of the renewal and repair have not clearly elucidated. In our previous work, a trefoil factor (TFF), Bm-TFF2, has been purified from the Bombina maxima skin and characterized as a platelet agonist. The mRNA of TFFs in toad skin was up-regulated greatly during the metamorphosis, indicating a pivotal role of TFFs in amphibian skin. Here, we presented the effects of Bm-TFF2 on the cell migration, apoptosis and proliferation. Bm-TFF2 bound to epithelial cells and showed strong cell motility activity. At the concentrations of 1-100 nM, Bm-TFF2-induced migration of human epithelial AGS and HT-29 cells, and rat intestinal epithelial IEC-6 cell lines. The in vitro wound healing assay also verified the activity of Bm-TFF2. Bm-TFF2 could also inhibit cell apoptosis induced by ceramide and sodium butyrate. The cell migration-promoting activity was abolished by MEK1 inhibitors, U0126 and PD98059, suggesting that ERK1/2 activation is crucial for Bm-TFF2 to stimulate cell migration. Taken together, Bm-TFF2 promoted wound healing by stimulating cell migration via MAPK pathway and preventing cell apoptosis. The potent biological activity of Bm-TFF2 makes it a useful molecular tool for further studies of structure-function relationship of the related human TFFs.

  6. Bm-TFF2, a toad trefoil factor, promotes cell migration, survival and wound healing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → Bm-TFF2 binds to epithelial cells and induces cell migration and wound healing. → Bm-TFF2 suppresses cell apoptosis. → Bm-TFF2 has no effect on cell proliferation. -- Abstract: Toad skin is naked and continually confronted by various injurious factors. Constant skin renewal and repairs occur frequently. However, the mechanisms of the renewal and repair have not clearly elucidated. In our previous work, a trefoil factor (TFF), Bm-TFF2, has been purified from the Bombina maxima skin and characterized as a platelet agonist. The mRNA of TFFs in toad skin was up-regulated greatly during the metamorphosis, indicating a pivotal role of TFFs in amphibian skin. Here, we presented the effects of Bm-TFF2 on the cell migration, apoptosis and proliferation. Bm-TFF2 bound to epithelial cells and showed strong cell motility activity. At the concentrations of 1-100 nM, Bm-TFF2-induced migration of human epithelial AGS and HT-29 cells, and rat intestinal epithelial IEC-6 cell lines. The in vitro wound healing assay also verified the activity of Bm-TFF2. Bm-TFF2 could also inhibit cell apoptosis induced by ceramide and sodium butyrate. The cell migration-promoting activity was abolished by MEK1 inhibitors, U0126 and PD98059, suggesting that ERK1/2 activation is crucial for Bm-TFF2 to stimulate cell migration. Taken together, Bm-TFF2 promoted wound healing by stimulating cell migration via MAPK pathway and preventing cell apoptosis. The potent biological activity of Bm-TFF2 makes it a useful molecular tool for further studies of structure-function relationship of the related human TFFs.

  7. Studies on angiogenesis and endothelial cell apoptosis in radiation-combined wound healing in Wistar rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the changes and significance of angiogenesis and endothelial cell apoptosis in radiation-combined wound healing. Methods: Wistar rats were wounded and then local irradiation was performed immediately with a dose of 25 Gy 60Co γ-rays in the irradiation wound group. Tissue specimens were obtained at 2, 5, 10, 15, 21 and 28 days after injury and angiogenesis and apoptosis of endothelial cells were investigated by means of LM, EM and in situ terminal labelling. Results: In the non-irradiation wound group, angiogenesis began from day 2 and the capillary number reached its peak on day 10 and decreased on day 15 after injury when the endothelial cells occurred apoptosis and scarcely necrosis. In the irradiation wound group angiogenesis began on day 5 when endothelial cells occurred apoptosis. The capillary number reached its peak on day 15 and decreased on day 21 after injury when endothelial cells occurred both apoptosis and necrosis. Conclusions: Radiation may delay the angiogenesis in wound healing, induce apoptosis of endothelial cells earlier and delay the peak of the capillary number. That radiation may delay the angiogenesis is one of reasons in delay of wound healing by radiation

  8. Kruppel-like factor KLF4 facilitates cutaneous wound healing by promoting fibrocyte generation from myeloid-derived suppressor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Lingling; Shi, Ying; Dong, Wenqi; Liu, Chunming; Schmidt, Thomas J; Nagarkatti, Prakash; Nagarkatti, Mitzi; Fan, Daping; Ai, Walden

    2015-05-01

    Pressure ulcers (PUs) are serious skin injuries whereby the wound healing process is frequently stalled in the inflammatory phase. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) accumulate as a result of inflammation and promote cutaneous wound healing by mechanisms that are not fully understood. Recently, MDSCs have been shown to differentiate into fibrocytes, which serve as emerging effector cells that enhance cell proliferation in wound healing. We postulate that in wound healing MDSCs not only execute their immunosuppressive function to regulate inflammation but also stimulate cell proliferation once they differentiate into fibrocytes. In the current study, by using full-thickness and PU mouse models, we found that Kruppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) deficiency resulted in decreased accumulation of MDSCs and fibrocytes, and wound healing was significantly delayed. Conversely, KLF4 activation by the plant-derived product Mexicanin I increased the number of MDSCs and fibrocytes and accelerated the wound healing. Collectively, our study revealed a previously unreported function of MDSCs in cutaneous wound healing and identified Mexicanin I as a potential agent to accelerate PU wound healing. PMID:25581502

  9. Bioengineered periosteal progenitor cell sheets to enhance tendon-bone healing in a bone tunnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Hsiang Chang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tendon-bone tunnel healing is crucial for long term success in anterior cruciate liga­ment (ACL reconstruction. The periosteum contains osteochondral progenitor cells that can differenti­ate into osteoblasts and chondroblasts during tendon-bone healing. We developed a scaf­fold-free method using polymerized fibrin-coated dishes to make functional periosteal progenitor cell (PPC sheets. Bioengineered PPC sheets for enhancing tendon-bone healing were evaluated in an extra-articular bone tunnel model in rabbit. Methods: PPC derived from rabbit tibia periosteum, cultivated on polymerized fi­brin-coated dishes and harvested as PPC sheet. A confocal microscopy assay was used to evaluate the morphology of PPC sheets. PPC sheets as a periosteum to wrap around hamstring tendon grafts were pulled into a 3-mm diameter bone tunnel of tibia, and compared with a tendon graft without PPC sheets treatment. Rabbits were sacrificed at 4 and 8 weeks postoperatively for biochemical as­say and histological assay to demonstrate the enhancement of PPC sheets in tendon-bone healing. Results: PPC spread deposit on fibrin on the dish surface with continuous monolayer PPC was ob­served. Histological staining revealed that PPC sheets enhance collagen and glycosaminoglycans deposi­tion with fibrocartilage formation in the tendon-bone junction at 4 weeks. Collagen fiber with fibrocartilage formation at tendon-bone junction was also found at 8 weeks. Matured fibrocartilage and dense collagen fiber were formed at the tendon-bone interface at 8 weeks by Masson trichrome and Safranin-O staining Conclusions: Periosteal progenitor cell monolayer maintains the differentiated capacity and osteochon­dral potential in order to promote fibrocartilage formation in tendon-bone junction. Bioengi­neered PPC sheets can offer a new feasible therapeutic strategy of a novel approach to en­hance tendon-bone junction healing.

  10. Effect of an Activated Platelet Concentrate on Differentiated Cells Involved in Tissue Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brini, Anna T; Ceci, Caterina; Taschieri, Silvio; Niada, Stefania; Lolato, Alessandra; Giannasi, Chiara; Mortellaro, Carmen; Del Fabbro, Massimo

    2016-05-01

    Tissue healing is a complex process involving several players such as cells and growth factors released from platelets upon activation. Today, platelet concentrates (PCs) are used in many different medical fields including oral, orthopaedic, and reconstructive surgery since they allow growth factors delivery to the injured site, aiming at enhancing tissue regeneration. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of the acellular plasma of an activated platelet concentrate obtained using a manual protocol, on the proliferation, and biological activity of differentiated cells involved in tissue healing. Human osteoblasts and dermal fibroblasts were grown in serum-free medium supplemented with PC derived from several donors. Human osteoblast and human dermal fibroblast proliferation was assessed by MTT test after 7 days and cells were count up to 12-day incubation. Human osteoblast osteo-differentiation was tested after 7 and 14-day incubation by alkaline phosphatase assay. The addition of PC to the culture medium caused an increased proliferation with respect to cells grown in standard condition. The results of the present study suggest that PC supports the proliferation of terminally differentiated cells involved in wound healing and tissue regeneration, confirming its beneficial clinical application in regenerative therapies. PMID:27054419

  11. Surgical sutures filled with adipose-derived stem cells promote wound healing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann Katharin Reckhenrich

    Full Text Available Delayed wound healing and scar formation are among the most frequent complications after surgical interventions. Although biodegradable surgical sutures present an excellent drug delivery opportunity, their primary function is tissue fixation. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC act as trophic mediators and are successful in activating biomaterials. Here biodegradable sutures were filled with adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ASC to provide a pro-regenerative environment at the injured site. Results showed that after filling, ASCs attach to the suture material, distribute equally throughout the filaments, and remain viable in the suture. Among a broad panel of cytokines, cell-filled sutures constantly release vascular endothelial growth factor to supernatants. Such conditioned media was evaluated in an in vitro wound healing assay and showed a significant decrease in the open wound area compared to controls. After suturing in an ex vivo wound model, cells remained in the suture and maintained their metabolic activity. Furthermore, cell-filled sutures can be cryopreserved without losing their viability. This study presents an innovative approach to equip surgical sutures with pro-regenerative features and allows the treatment and fixation of wounds in one step, therefore representing a promising tool to promote wound healing after injury.

  12. A role for human skin–resident T cells in wound healing

    OpenAIRE

    Toulon, Antoine; Breton, Lionel; Taylor, Kristen R.; Tenenhaus, Mayer; Bhavsar, Dhaval; Lanigan, Caroline; Rudolph, Ross; Jameson, Julie,; Havran, Wendy L.

    2009-01-01

    Epidermal T cells have been shown to play unique roles in tissue homeostasis and repair in mice through local secretion of distinct growth factors in the skin. Human epidermis contains both αβ+ and γδ+ T cells whose functional capabilities are not understood. We demonstrate that human epidermal T cells are able to produce insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) upon activation and promote wound healing in a skin organ culture model. Moreover, an analysis of the functional capabilities of T cells...

  13. Methods to study differences in cell mobility during skin wound healing in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsuur, Hanneke N; Boink, Mireille A; Weijers, Ester M; Roffel, Sanne; Breetveld, Melanie; Gefen, Amit; van den Broek, Lenie J; Gibbs, Susan

    2016-05-24

    Wound healing events which occur in humans are difficult to study in animals due to differences in skin physiology. Furthermore there are increasing restrictions in Europe for using animals for testing the therapeutic properties of new compounds. Therefore, in line with the 3Rs (reduction, refinement and replacement of test animals), a number of human in vitro models of different levels of complexity have been developed to investigate cell mobility during wound healing. Keratinocyte, melanocyte, fibroblast and endothelial cell mobility are described, since these are the residential cells which are responsible for restoring the main structural features of the skin. A monolayer scratch assay is used to study random fibroblast and endothelial cell migration in response to EGF and bFGF respectively and a chemotactic assay is used to study directional fibroblast migration towards CCL5. In order to study endothelial sprouting in response to bFGF or VEGF, which involves continuous degradation and resynthesis of a 3D matrix, a fibrin gel is used. Human physiologically relevant tissue-engineered skin models are used to investigate expansion of the stratified, differentiated epidermis (keratinocytes and melanocytes) over a fibroblast populated dermis and also to study migration and distribution of fibroblasts into the dermis. Together these skin models provide a platform for testing the mode of action of novel compounds for enhanced and scar free wound healing. PMID:26903411

  14. Lineage tracing of resident tendon progenitor cells during growth and natural healing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathaniel A Dyment

    Full Text Available Unlike during embryogenesis, the identity of tissue resident progenitor cells that contribute to postnatal tendon growth and natural healing is poorly characterized. Therefore, we utilized 1 an inducible Cre driven by alpha smooth muscle actin (SMACreERT2, that identifies mesenchymal progenitors, 2 a constitutively active Cre driven by growth and differentiation factor 5 (GDF5Cre, a critical regulator of joint condensation, in combination with 3 an Ai9 Cre reporter to permanently label SMA9 and GDF5-9 populations and their progeny. In growing mice, SMA9+ cells were found in peritendinous structures and scleraxis-positive (ScxGFP+ cells within the tendon midsubstance and myotendinous junction. The progenitors within the tendon midsubstance were transiently labeled as they displayed a 4-fold expansion from day 2 to day 21 but reduced to baseline levels by day 70. SMA9+ cells were not found within tendon entheses or ligaments in the knee, suggesting a different origin. In contrast to the SMA9 population, GDF5-9+ cells extended from the bone through the enthesis and into a portion of the tendon midsubstance. GDF5-9+ cells were also found throughout the length of the ligaments, indicating a significant variation in the progenitors that contribute to tendons and ligaments. Following tendon injury, SMA9+ paratenon cells were the main contributors to the healing response. SMA9+ cells extended over the defect space at 1 week and differentiated into ScxGFP+ cells at 2 weeks, which coincided with increased collagen signal in the paratenon bridge. Thus, SMA9-labeled cells represent a unique progenitor source that contributes to the tendon midsubstance, paratenon, and myotendinous junction during growth and natural healing, while GDF5 progenitors contribute to tendon enthesis and ligament development. Understanding the mechanisms that regulate the expansion and differentiation of these progenitors may prove crucial to improving future repair strategies.

  15. Scratch Cell Test: A Simple, Cost Effective Screening Tool to Evaluate Self-Healing in Anti-Corrosion Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rani, Amitha; Somaiah, Durga; Megha; Poddar, Mitalee

    2014-09-01

    A quick and simple scratch cell set up to evaluate the self-healing of an hybrid sol-gel (ormosil) coating was fabricated. This methacrylate-based anti-corrosion coating was applied on the aerospace aluminium alloy AA2024-T3, and cured at room temperature. This technique of evaluation requires minimum instrumentation. The inhibitors cerium nitrate, benzotriazole and 8-hydroxy quinoline (8-HQ) were used in the study. The self-healing ability of the inhibitors decreased in the following order: 8-HQ, BTZ and Ce. 8-HQ showed the highest self-healing ability and was comparable to the commercial hexavalent chromium conversion coating—Alodine. Spectroscopic analysis of the electrolyte and EDX of the coatings indicated the movement of the inhibitor from the coating to the site of damage, thereby effecting self-healing. It was observed that an increased inhibitor concentration in the coatings did not accelerate the healing process. Inhibitor release was slower in the coatings doped with inhibitor-loaded nano-containers, when compared to inhibitor-spiked coatings. This property of controlled release is desirable in self-healing coatings. Electro impedance studies further confirmed self-healing efficiency of the coatings. The scratch cell study reported here is the first of its kind with the ormosil under study on AA2024-T3 aluminium alloy. The results are encouraging and warranty a quick and simple qualitative screening of the self-healing potential of the inhibitors with minimum instrumentation.

  16. Inhibitory effects of oleoylethanolamide (OEA) on H2O2-induced human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) injury and apolipoprotein E knockout (ApoE-/-) atherosclerotic mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Li; Guo, Xiaobing; Chen, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis (AS) is initiated by vascular endothelial cell injury, which is induced by lipid and protein oxidation. Oleoylethanolamide (OEA), a dietary fat-derived lipid, has shown atheroprotective effect. In vitro studies demonstrated that OEA showed cytoprotective effects on H2O2-induced primary cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) injury model. Further investigation of the cytoprotective effects of OEA demonstrated that OEA exerted its function by scavenging for reactive oxygen species, as well as increasing anti-oxidative enzymes, reducing lipid peroxidation, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL)-positive cells and apoptosis-related proteins expression. The in vivo study using an ApoE-/- mouse model fed with high-fat diet for 8 weeks showed that OEA (10 mg/kg/day, i.g.) administration reduced blood lipid levels, prevented endothelial cell damage and inhibited early AS plaque formation. In conclusion, our results suggested that OEA exerted a pharmacological effect on ameliorating atherosclerotic plaque formation through the inhibition of oxidative stress-induced endothelial cell injury and therefore OEA can be a potential candidate drug for anti-atherosclerosis. PMID:26261506

  17. Inhibitory effects of oleoylethanolamide (OEA) on H₂O₂-induced human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) injury and apolipoprotein E knockout (ApoE-/-) atherosclerotic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Li; Guo, Xiaobing; Chen, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis (AS) is initiated by vascular endothelial cell injury, which is induced by lipid and protein oxidation. Oleoylethanolamide (OEA), a dietary fat-derived lipid, has shown atheroprotective effect. In vitro studies demonstrated that OEA showed cytoprotective effects on H2O2-induced primary cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) injury model. Further investigation of the cytoprotective effects of OEA demonstrated that OEA exerted its function by scavenging for reactive oxygen species, as well as increasing anti-oxidative enzymes, reducing lipid peroxidation, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL)-positive cells and apoptosis-related proteins expression. The in vivo study using an ApoE-/- mouse model fed with high-fat diet for 8 weeks showed that OEA (10 mg/kg/day, i.g.) administration reduced blood lipid levels, prevented endothelial cell damage and inhibited early AS plaque formation. In conclusion, our results suggested that OEA exerted a pharmacological effect on ameliorating atherosclerotic plaque formation through the inhibition of oxidative stress-induced endothelial cell injury and therefore OEA can be a potential candidate drug for anti-atherosclerosis. PMID:26261506

  18. Adult Stem Cell Therapies for Wound Healing: Biomaterials and Computational Models

    OpenAIRE

    Tartarini, Daniele; Mele, Elisa

    2016-01-01

    The increased incidence of diabetes and tumors, associated with global demographic issues (aging and life styles), has pointed out the importance to develop new strategies for the effective management of skin wounds. Individuals affected by these diseases are in fact highly exposed to the risk of delayed healing of the injured tissue that typically leads to a pathological inflammatory state and consequently to chronic wounds. Therapies based on stem cells (SCs) have been proposed for the trea...

  19. A REVIEW OF GENE AND STEM CELL THERAPY IN CUTANEOUS WOUND HEALING

    OpenAIRE

    Branski, Ludwik K.; Gauglitz, Gerd G; Herndon, David N.; Jeschke, Marc G.

    2008-01-01

    Different therapies that modulate wound repair have been proposed over the last few decades. This article reviews the two emerging fields of gene and stem cell therapy in wound healing. Gene therapy, initially developed for treatment of congenital defects, is a new option for enhancing wound repair. In order to accelerate wound closure, genes encoding for growth factors or cytokines have showed the most potential. The majority of gene delivery systems are based on viral transfection, naked DN...

  20. Reduction of ARNT in myeloid cells causes immune suppression and delayed wound healing

    OpenAIRE

    Scott, Christopher; Bonner, James; Min, Danqing; Boughton, Philip; Stokes, Rebecca; Cha, Kuan Minn; Walters, Stacey N.; Maslowski, Kendle; Sierro, Frederic; Grey, Shane T.; Twigg, Stephen; McLennan, Susan; Gunton, Jenny E.

    2014-01-01

    Aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT) is a transcription factor that binds to partners to mediate responses to environmental signals. To investigate its role in the innate immune system, floxed ARNT mice were bred with lysozyme M-Cre recombinase animals to generate lysozyme M-ARNT (LAR) mice with reduced ARNT expression. Myeloid cells of LAR mice had altered mRNA expression and delayed wound healing. Interestingly, when the animals were rendered diabetic, the difference in wou...

  1. Wound healing potential of Spirulina platensis extracts on human dermal fibroblast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syarina, Pauzi Nur Aimi; Karthivashan, Govindarajan; Abas, Faridah; Arulselvan, Palanisamy; Fakurazi, Sharida

    2015-01-01

    Blue-green alga (Spirulina platensis) is a well renowned nutri-supplement due to its high nutritional and medicinal properties. The aim of this study was to examine the wound healing efficiency of Spirulina platensis at various solvent extracts using in vitro scratch assay on human dermal fibroblast cells (HDF). Various gradient solvent extracts (50 μg/ml of methanolic, ethanolic and aqueous extracts) from Spirulina platensis were treated on HDF cells to acquire its wound healing properties through scratch assay and in this investigation we have used allantoin, as a positive control to compare efficacy among the phytoextracts. Interestingly, aqueous extract were found to stimulate proliferation and migration of HDF cells at given concentrations and enhanced closure rate of wound area within 24 hours after treatment. Methanolic and ethanolic extracts have shown proliferative effect, however these extracts did not aid in the migration and closure of wound area when compared to aqueous extract. Based on phytochemical profile of the plant extracts analyzed by LC-MS/MS, it was shown that compounds supposedly involved in accelerating wound healing are cinnamic acid, narigenin, kaempferol, temsirolimus, phosphatidylserine isomeric derivatives and sulphoquinovosyl diacylglycerol. Our findings concluded that blue-green algae may pose potential biomedical application to treat various chronic wounds especially in diabetes mellitus patients. PMID:27004048

  2. The Anti-Atherosclerotic Effect of Naringin Is Associated with Reduced Expressions of Cell Adhesion Molecules and Chemokines through NF-κB Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsueh, Tun-Pin; Sheen, Jer-Ming; Pang, Jong-Hwei S; Bi, Kuo-Wei; Huang, Chao-Chun; Wu, Hsiao-Ting; Huang, Sheng-Teng

    2016-01-01

    Naringin has been reported to have an anti-atherosclerosis effect but the underlying mechanism is not fully understood. The aim of this study is to investigate the impact of naringin on the TNF-α-induced expressions of cell adhesion molecules, chemokines and NF-κB signaling pathway in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). The experiments revealed that naringin, at concentrations without cytotoxicity, dose-dependently inhibited the adhesion of THP-1 monocytes to the TNF-α-stimulated HUVECs. The TNF-α-induced expressions of cell adhesion molecules, including VCAM-1, ICAM-1 and E-selectin, at both the mRNA and protein levels, were significantly suppressed by naringin in a dose dependent manner. In addition, the TNF-α-induced mRNA and protein levels of chemokines, including fractalkine/CX3CL1, MCP-1 and RANTES, were also reduced by naringin. Naringin significantly inhibited TNF-α-induced nuclear translocation of NF-κB, which resulted from the inhibited phosphorylation of IKKα/β, IκB-α and NF-κB. Altogether, we proposed that naringin modulated TNF-α-induced expressions of cell adhesion molecules and chemokines through the inhibition of TNF-α-induced activation of IKK/NF-κB signaling pathway to exert the anti-atherosclerotic effect. PMID:26861272

  3. The Anti-Atherosclerotic Effect of Naringin Is Associated with Reduced Expressions of Cell Adhesion Molecules and Chemokines through NF-κB Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tun-Pin Hsueh

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Naringin has been reported to have an anti-atherosclerosis effect but the underlying mechanism is not fully understood. The aim of this study is to investigate the impact of naringin on the TNF-α-induced expressions of cell adhesion molecules, chemokines and NF-κB signaling pathway in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs. The experiments revealed that naringin, at concentrations without cytotoxicity, dose-dependently inhibited the adhesion of THP-1 monocytes to the TNF-α-stimulated HUVECs. The TNF-α-induced expressions of cell adhesion molecules, including VCAM-1, ICAM-1 and E-selectin, at both the mRNA and protein levels, were significantly suppressed by naringin in a dose dependent manner. In addition, the TNF-α-induced mRNA and protein levels of chemokines, including fractalkine/CX3CL1, MCP-1 and RANTES, were also reduced by naringin. Naringin significantly inhibited TNF-α-induced nuclear translocation of NF-κB, which resulted from the inhibited phosphorylation of IKKα/β, IκB-α and NF-κB. Altogether, we proposed that naringin modulated TNF-α-induced expressions of cell adhesion molecules and chemokines through the inhibition of TNF-α-induced activation of IKK/NF-κB signaling pathway to exert the anti-atherosclerotic effect.

  4. Intracranial Atherosclerotic Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Khan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial atherosclerotic disease (ICAD is the most common proximate mechanism of ischemic stroke worldwide. Approximately half of those affected are Asians. For diagnosis of ICAD, intra-arterial angiography is the gold standard to identify extent of stenosis. However, noninvasive techniques including transcranial ultrasound and MRA are now emerging as reliable modalities to exclude moderate to severe (50%–99% stenosis. Little is known about measures for primary prevention of the disease. In terms of secondary prevention of stroke due to intracranial atherosclerotic stenosis, aspirin continues to be the preferred antiplatelet agent although clopidogrel along with aspirin has shown promise in the acute phase. Among Asians, cilostazol has shown a favorable effect on symptomatic stenosis and is of benefit in terms of fewer bleeds. Moreover, aggressive risk factor management alone and in combination with dual antiplatelets been shown to be most effective in this group of patients. Interventional trials on intracranial atherosclerotic stenosis have so far only been carried out among Caucasians and have not yielded consistent results. Since the Asian population is known to be preferentially effected, focused trials need to be performed to establish treatment modalities that are most effective in this population.

  5. Stem cell therapy: a promising biological strategy for tendon-bone healing after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Zi-Chen; Wang, Shan-Zheng; Zhang, Xue-Jun; Lu, Jun

    2016-04-01

    Tendon-bone healing after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is a complex process, impacting significantly on patients' prognosis. Natural tendon-bone healing usually results in fibrous scar tissue, which is of inferior quality compared to native attachment. In addition, the early formed fibrous attachment after surgery is often not reliable to support functional rehabilitation, which may lead to graft failure or unsatisfied function of the knee joint. Thus, strategies to promote tendon-bone healing are crucial for prompt and satisfactory functional recovery. Recently, a variety of biological approaches, including active substances, gene transfer, tissue engineering and stem cells, have been proposed and applied to enhance tendon-bone healing. Among these, stem cell therapy has been shown to have promising prospects and draws increasing attention. From commonly investigated bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (bMSCs) to emerging ACL-derived CD34+ stem cells, multiple stem cell types have been proven to be effective in accelerating tendon-bone healing. This review describes the current understanding of tendon-bone healing and summarizes the current status of related stem cell therapy. Future limitations and perspectives are also discussed. PMID:26929145

  6. Cell-line-specific stimulation of tumor cell aggressiveness by wound healing factors – a central role for STAT3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Local recurrence is a major factor affecting survival after treatment for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). It is possible that the normal processes involved in wound healing after surgical removal of a primary tumor can boost the regrowth of residual cancer cells, thereby contributing to the recurrent growth. In this work, we collected human wound fluids and used them to investigate the effect of wound healing factors on HNSCC cell lines in vitro. Wound fluids were collected from thyroidectomized patients diagnosed with benign disease and were included in assays of cell proliferation, migration, cell scattering, and invasion. The involvement of intracellular signaling pathways and membrane receptors were investigated by western blotting and the inclusion of specific inhibitors. One out of four cell lines was greatly stimulated in proliferation, migration, cell scattering, and invasion by the addition of wound fluid as compared with addition of fetal bovine or human serum. These effects were accompanied by a sharp increase in activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3). Inhibition of STAT3 activation abolished the wound fluid response, showing that STAT3 plays an important role in the wound healing response. Several of the observed phenotypic changes were epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-like, but the appropriate changes were not seen in any of the EMT markers investigated. The involvement of c-Met or epidermal growth factor receptor family members was excluded, while the interleukin-6 receptor was found to be partly responsible for the activation of STAT3. In conclusion, we found cell-line-specific effects of wound healing factors on HNSCC, setting the stage for therapy development and predictive opportunities

  7. Cell-line-specific stimulation of tumor cell aggressiveness by wound healing factors – a central role for STAT3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekblad Lars

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Local recurrence is a major factor affecting survival after treatment for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC. It is possible that the normal processes involved in wound healing after surgical removal of a primary tumor can boost the regrowth of residual cancer cells, thereby contributing to the recurrent growth. In this work, we collected human wound fluids and used them to investigate the effect of wound healing factors on HNSCC cell lines in vitro. Methods Wound fluids were collected from thyroidectomized patients diagnosed with benign disease and were included in assays of cell proliferation, migration, cell scattering, and invasion. The involvement of intracellular signaling pathways and membrane receptors were investigated by western blotting and the inclusion of specific inhibitors. Results One out of four cell lines was greatly stimulated in proliferation, migration, cell scattering, and invasion by the addition of wound fluid as compared with addition of fetal bovine or human serum. These effects were accompanied by a sharp increase in activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3. Inhibition of STAT3 activation abolished the wound fluid response, showing that STAT3 plays an important role in the wound healing response. Several of the observed phenotypic changes were epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT-like, but the appropriate changes were not seen in any of the EMT markers investigated. The involvement of c-Met or epidermal growth factor receptor family members was excluded, while the interleukin-6 receptor was found to be partly responsible for the activation of STAT3. Conclusions In conclusion, we found cell-line-specific effects of wound healing factors on HNSCC, setting the stage for therapy development and predictive opportunities.

  8. PEDF promotes self-renewal of limbal stem cell and accelerates corneal epithelial wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Tsung-Chuan; Chen, Show-Li; Wu, Ju-Yun; Ho, Mei-Ying; Chen, Lee-Jen; Hsieh, Jui-Wen; Cheng, Huey-Chuan; Tsao, Yeou-Ping

    2013-09-01

    Limbal epithelial stem cell (LSC) transplantation is a prevalent therapeutic method for patients with LSC deficiency. The maintenance of stem cell characteristics in the process of culture expansion is critical for the success of ocular surface reconstruction. Pigment epithelial-derived factor (PEDF) increased the numbers of holoclone in LSC monolayer culture and preserved the stemness of LSC in suspension culture by evidence of ΔNp63α, Bmi-1, and ABCG2 expression. BrdU pulse-labeling assay also demonstrated that PEDF stimulated LSCs proliferation. In air-lift culture of limbal equivalent, PEDF was capable of increasing the numbers of ΔNp63α-positive cells. The mitogenic effect of PEDF was found to be mediated by the phosphorylations of p38 MAPK and STAT3 in LSCs. Synthetic 44-mer PEDF (residues 78-121) was as effective as the full length PEDF in LSC expansion in suspension culture and limbal equivalent formation, as well as the activation of p38 MAPK and STAT3. In mice subjecting to mechanical removal of cornea epithelium, 44-mer PEDF facilitated corneal wound healing. Microscopically, 44-mer PEDF advanced the early proliferative response in limbus, increased the proliferation of ΔNp63α-positive cells both in limbus and in epithelial healing front, and assisted the repopulation of limbus in the late phase of wound healing. In conclusion, the capability of expanding LSC in cell culture and in animal indicates the potential of PEDF and its fragment (e.g., 44-mer PEDF) in ameliorating limbal stem cell deficiency; and their uses as therapeutics for treating corneal wound. PMID:23553951

  9. Electrospun poly(ε-caprolactone)-based skin substitutes: In vivo evaluation of wound healing and the mechanism of cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustine, Robin; Dominic, Edwin Anto; Reju, Indu; Kaimal, Balarama; Kalarikkal, Nandakumar; Thomas, Sabu

    2015-10-01

    In the present study, we have fabricated electrospun poly(ε-caprolactone)-based membranes, characterized and studied the in vivo cell migration and proliferation and wound healing activity. Moreover, we did not seed any cells prior to the animal implantation and we could observe excellent fibroblast attachment and cell proliferation. Further full thickness excision wound on guinea pig completely healed within 35 days. We could reach in an assumption that the enhanced cell proliferation and wound healing might be due to the surface degradation of the polymer under physiological conditions and the formation of functional groups like hydroxyl and carboxyl groups that promoted cell proliferation in a cell adhesion protein mediated mechanism. This study is a novel tissue engineering concept for the reconstruction of a damaged tissue without the in vitro cell seeding and proliferation prior to the in vivo implantation. PMID:25418134

  10. The paratenon contributes to scleraxis-expressing cells during patellar tendon healing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathaniel A Dyment

    Full Text Available The origin of cells that contribute to tendon healing, specifically extrinsic epitenon/paratenon cells vs. internal tendon fibroblasts, is still debated. The purpose of this study is to determine the location and phenotype of cells that contribute to healing of a central patellar tendon defect injury in the mouse. Normal adult patellar tendon consists of scleraxis-expressing (Scx tendon fibroblasts situated among aligned collagen fibrils. The tendon body is surrounded by paratenon, which consists of a thin layer of cells that do not express Scx and collagen fibers oriented circumferentially around the tendon. At 3 days following injury, the paratenon thickens as cells within the paratenon proliferate and begin producing tenascin-C and fibromodulin. These cells migrate toward the defect site and express scleraxis and smooth muscle actin alpha by day 7. The thickened paratenon tissue eventually bridges the tendon defect by day 14. Similarly, cells within the periphery of the adjacent tendon struts express these markers and become disorganized. Cells within the defect region show increased expression of fibrillar collagens (Col1a1 and Col3a1 but decreased expression of tenogenic transcription factors (scleraxis and mohawk homeobox and collagen assembly genes (fibromodulin and decorin. By contrast, early growth response 1 and 2 are upregulated in these tissues along with tenascin-C. These results suggest that paratenon cells, which normally do not express Scx, respond to injury by turning on Scx and assembling matrix to bridge the defect. Future studies are needed to determine the signaling pathways that drive these cells and whether they are capable of producing a functional tendon matrix. Understanding this process may guide tissue engineering strategies in the future by stimulating these cells to improve tendon repair.

  11. The Paratenon Contributes to Scleraxis-Expressing Cells during Patellar Tendon Healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyment, Nathaniel A.; Liu, Chia-Feng; Kazemi, Namdar; Aschbacher-Smith, Lindsey E.; Kenter, Keith; Breidenbach, Andrew P.; Shearn, Jason T.; Wylie, Christopher; Rowe, David W.; Butler, David L.

    2013-01-01

    The origin of cells that contribute to tendon healing, specifically extrinsic epitenon/paratenon cells vs. internal tendon fibroblasts, is still debated. The purpose of this study is to determine the location and phenotype of cells that contribute to healing of a central patellar tendon defect injury in the mouse. Normal adult patellar tendon consists of scleraxis-expressing (Scx) tendon fibroblasts situated among aligned collagen fibrils. The tendon body is surrounded by paratenon, which consists of a thin layer of cells that do not express Scx and collagen fibers oriented circumferentially around the tendon. At 3 days following injury, the paratenon thickens as cells within the paratenon proliferate and begin producing tenascin-C and fibromodulin. These cells migrate toward the defect site and express scleraxis and smooth muscle actin alpha by day 7. The thickened paratenon tissue eventually bridges the tendon defect by day 14. Similarly, cells within the periphery of the adjacent tendon struts express these markers and become disorganized. Cells within the defect region show increased expression of fibrillar collagens (Col1a1 and Col3a1) but decreased expression of tenogenic transcription factors (scleraxis and mohawk homeobox) and collagen assembly genes (fibromodulin and decorin). By contrast, early growth response 1 and 2 are upregulated in these tissues along with tenascin-C. These results suggest that paratenon cells, which normally do not express Scx, respond to injury by turning on Scx and assembling matrix to bridge the defect. Future studies are needed to determine the signaling pathways that drive these cells and whether they are capable of producing a functional tendon matrix. Understanding this process may guide tissue engineering strategies in the future by stimulating these cells to improve tendon repair. PMID:23555841

  12. Effect of LED phototherapy (λ630 +/- 20nm) on mast cells during wound healing in hypothyroid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paraguassú, Gardênia M.; De Castro, Isabele Cardoso V.; Vasconcelos, Rebeca M.; da Guarda, Milena G.; Rodriguez, Tânia T.; Ramalho, Maria José P.; Pinheiro, Antônio Luiz B.; Ramalho, Luciana Maria P.

    2014-02-01

    Hypothyroidism has been associated with the disruption of the body's metabolism, including the healing process. LED phototherapy has been studied using several healing models, but their effects on mast cells proliferation associated to hypothyroidism remains unknown. The aim of this study was to assess the effect LED (λ630+/-20nm) phototherapy on mast cells proliferation during tissue repair in hypothyroid rats. Under general anesthesia, a standard surgical wound (1cm2) was created on the dorsum of 24 male Wistar rats divided into 4 groups of 6 animals each: EC-Control Euthyroid; ED-Euthyroid+LED; HC-Control Hypothyroid and HD-Hypothyroid+LED. The irradiation started immediately after surgery and was repeated every other day for 7 days, when animals death occurred. Hypothyroidism was induced in rats with propylthiouracil (0.05g/100mL) administered orally for 4 weeks and maintained until the end of the experiment. The specimens removed were processed to wax and stained with toluidine blue for mast cell identification. The mast cell proliferation was significantly higher in HC group than in EC group (Mann Whitney, pLED light has a biomodulative effect on mast cell population, even when hipothyroidism was present.

  13. Plasma membrane and cytoskeleton dynamics during single-cell wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher, Eric; Mandato, Craig A

    2015-10-01

    Wounding leads not only to plasma membrane disruption, but also to compromised cytoskeleton structures. This results not only in unwarranted exchanges between the cytosol and extracellular milieu, but also in loss of tensegrity, which may further endanger the cell. Tensegrity can be described as the interplay between the tensile forces generated by the apparent membrane tension, actomyosin contraction, and the cytoskeletal structures resisting those changes (e.g., microtubules). It is responsible for the structural integrity of the cell and for its ability to sense mechanical signals. Recent reviews dealing with single-cell healing mostly focused on the molecular machineries controlling the traffic and fusion of specific vesicles, or their role in different pathologies. In this review, we aim to take a broader view of the different modes of single cell repair, while focussing on the different ways the changes in plasmalemma surface area and composition, plasmalemma tension, and cytoskeletal dynamics may influence and affect single-cell repair. PMID:26209916

  14. Application of Antrodia camphorata Promotes Rat’s Wound Healing In Vivo and Facilitates Fibroblast Cell Proliferation In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra A. Amin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Antrodia camphorata is a parasitic fungus from Taiwan, it has been documented to possess a variety of pharmacological and biological activities. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the potential of Antrodia camphorata ethanol extract to accelerate the rate of wound healing closure and histology of wound area in experimental rats. The safety of Antrodia camphorata was determined in vivo by the acute toxicity test and in vitro by fibroblast cell proliferation assay. The scratch assay was used to evaluate the in vitro wound healing in fibroblast cells and the excision model of wound healing was tested in vivo using four groups of adult Sprague Dawley rats. Our results showed that wound treated with Antrodia camphorata extract and intrasite gel significantly accelerates the rate of wound healing closure than those treated with the vehicle. Wounds dressed with Antrodia camphorata extract showed remarkably less scar width at wound closure and granulation tissue contained less inflammatory cell and more fibroblast compared to wounds treated with the vehicle. Masson’s trichrom stain showed granulation tissue containing more collagen and less inflammatory cell in Antrodia camphorata treated wounds. In conclusion, Antrodia camphorata extract significantly enhanced the rate of the wound enclosure in rats and promotes the in vitro healing through fibroblast cell proliferation.

  15. Nuclear Molecular Imaging for Vulnerable Atherosclerotic Plaques

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Soo Jin; Paeng, Jin Chul

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease as well as a lipid disorder. Atherosclerotic plaque formed in vessel walls may cause ischemia, and the rupture of vulnerable plaque may result in fatal events, like myocardial infarction or stroke. Because morphological imaging has limitations in diagnosing vulnerable plaque, molecular imaging has been developed, in particular, the use of nuclear imaging probes. Molecular imaging targets various aspects of vulnerable plaque, such as inflammatory cell...

  16. HGF Accelerates Wound Healing by Promoting the Dedifferentiation of Epidermal Cells through β1-Integrin/ILK Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Feng Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Skin wound healing is a critical and complex biological process after trauma. This process is activated by signaling pathways of both epithelial and nonepithelial cells, which release a myriad of different cytokines and growth factors. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF is a cytokine known to play multiple roles during the various stages of wound healing. This study evaluated the benefits of HGF on reepithelialization during wound healing and investigated its mechanisms of action. Gross and histological results showed that HGF significantly accelerated reepithelialization in diabetic (DB rats. HGF increased the expressions of the cell adhesion molecules β1-integrin and the cytoskeleton remodeling protein integrin-linked kinase (ILK in epidermal cells in vivo and in vitro. Silencing of ILK gene expression by RNA interference reduced expression of β1-integrin, ILK, and c-met in epidermal cells, concomitantly decreasing the proliferation and migration ability of epidermal cells. β1-Integrin can be an important maker of poorly differentiated epidermal cells. Therefore, these data demonstrate that epidermal cells become poorly differentiated state and regained some characteristics of epidermal stem cells under the role of HGF after wound. Taken together, the results provide evidence that HGF can accelerate reepithelialization in skin wound healing by dedifferentiation of epidermal cells in a manner related to the β1-integrin/ILK pathway.

  17. Platelet Lysate-Modified Porous Silicon Microparticles for Enhanced Cell Proliferation in Wound Healing Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, Flavia; Mori, Michela; Riva, Federica; Mäkilä, Ermei; Liu, Dongfei; Salonen, Jarno; Nicoletti, Giovanni; Hirvonen, Jouni; Caramella, Carla; Santos, Hélder A

    2016-01-13

    The new frontier in the treatment of chronic nonhealing wounds is the use of micro- and nanoparticles to deliver drugs or growth factors into the wound. Here, we used platelet lysate (PL), a hemoderivative of platelets, consisting of a multifactorial cocktail of growth factors, to modify porous silicon (PSi) microparticles and assessed both in vitro and ex vivo the properties of the developed microsystem. PL-modified PSi was assessed for its potential to induce proliferation of fibroblasts. The wound closure-promoting properties of the microsystem were then assessed in an in vitro wound healing assay. Finally, the PL-modified PSi microparticles were evaluated in an ex vivo experiment over human skin. It was shown that PL-modified PSi microparticles were cytocompatible and enhanced the cell proliferation in different experimental settings. In addition, this microsystem promoted the closure of the gap between the fibroblast cells in the wound healing assay, in periods of time comparable with the positive control, and induced a proliferation and regeneration process onto the human skin in an ex vivo experiment. Overall, our results show that PL-modified PSi microparticles are suitable microsystems for further development toward applications in the treatment of chronic nonhealing wounds. PMID:26652045

  18. Impedance spectroscopy applied to the fast wounding dynamics of an electrical wound-healing assay in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electrical wound-healing assays are often used as a means to study in vitro cell migration and proliferation. In such analysis, a cell monolayer that sits on a small electrode is electrically wounded and its spectral impedance is then continuously measured in order to monitor the healing process. The relatively slow dynamics of the cell healing have been extensively studied, while those of the much faster wounding phase have not yet been investigated. An analysis of the electrical properties of a particular cell type during this phase could give extra information about the changes in the cell membrane due to the application of the wounding current, and could also be useful to optimize the wounding regime for different cell types. The main issue when trying to register information about these dynamics is that the traditional measurement scheme employed in typical wound-healing assays doesn’t allow the simultaneous application of the wounding signal and measurement of the system’s impedance. In this paper, we overcome this limitation by implementing a measurement strategy consisting of cycles of fast alternating low- and high-voltage signals applied on electrodes covered with mammalian cells. This approach is capable of registering the fast impedance changes during the transient regime corresponding to the cell wounding process. Furthermore, these quasi-simultaneous high- and low-voltage measurements can be compared in order to obtain an empirical correlation between both quantities. (paper)

  19. Innovative Self-Healing Seals for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raj Singh

    2012-06-30

    Solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) technology is critical to several national initiatives. Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) addresses the technology needs through its comprehensive programs on SOFC. A reliable and cost-effective seal that works at high temperatures is essential to the long-term performance of the SOFC for 40,000 hours at 800°C. Consequently, seals remain an area of highest priority for the SECA program and its industry teams. An innovative concept based on self-healing glasses was advanced and successfully demonstrated through seal tests for 3000 hours and 300 thermal cycles to minimize internal stresses under both steady state and thermal transients for making reliable seals for the SECA program. The self-healing concept requires glasses with low viscosity at the SOFC operating temperature of 800°C but this requirement may lead to excessive flow of the glass in areas forming the seal. To address this challenge, a modification to glass properties by addition of particulate fillers is pursued in the project. The underlying idea is that a non-reactive ceramic particulate filler is expected to form glass-ceramic composite and increase the seal viscosity thereby increasing the creep resistance of the glass-composite seals under load. The objectives of the program are to select appropriate filler materials for making glass-composite, fabricate glass-composites, measure thermal expansion behaviors, and determine stability of the glass-composites in air and fuel environments of a SOFC. Self-healing glass-YSZ composites are further developed and tested over a longer time periods under conditions typical of the SOFCs to validate the long-term stability up to 2000 hours. The new concepts of glass-composite seals, developed and nurtured in this program, are expected to be cost-effective as these are based on conventional processing approaches and use of the inexpensive materials.

  20. Development of a Porcine Delayed Wound-Healing Model and Its Use in Testing a Novel Cell-Based Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: A delayed full-thickness wound-healing model was developed and used for examining the capacity of adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs), either alone or in platelet-rich fibrin gels, to promote healing. Methods and Materials: Four pigs received electron beam radiation to the dorsal skin surface. Five weeks after radiation, subcutaneous fat was harvested from nonirradiated areas and processed to yield ASCs. Two weeks later, 28 to 30 full-thickness 1.5-cm2 wounds were made in irradiated and nonirradiated skin. Wounds were treated with either saline solution, ASCs in saline solution, platelet-rich plasma (PRP) fibrin gel, ASCs in PRP, or non-autologous green fluorescence protein-labeled ASCs. Results: The single radiation dose produced a significant loss of dermal microvasculature density (75%) by 7 weeks. There was a significant difference in the rate of healing between irradiated and nonirradiated skin treated with saline solution. The ASCs in PRP-treated wounds exhibited a significant 11.2% improvement in wound healing compared with saline solution. Enhancement was dependent on the combination of ASCs and PRP, because neither ASCs nor PRP alone had an effect. Conclusions: We have created a model that simulates the clinically relevant late radiation effects of delayed wound healing. Using this model, we showed that a combination of ASCs and PRP improves the healing rates of perfusion-depleted tissues, possibly through enhancing local levels of growth factors.

  1. Estimating the wound healing ability of bioactive milk proteins using an optimized cell based assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyegaard, Steffen; Andreasen, Trine; Rasmussen, Jan Trige

    Milk contains many different proteins of which the larger constituents like the caseins and major whey constituents are well characterized. We have for some time been studying the structure and function of proteins associated with the milk fat globule membrane like lactadherin, MUC1/15, xanthine...... healing assay to determine the bioactive effects of various milk proteins using human small intestine cells grown on extracellular matrix. Silicone inserts are placed in a 96-well plate and enterocytes seeded around it, creating a monolayer with a cell free area. In current ongoing experiments, various...... pure milk proteins and isolates are added and migration quantified. This is done by performing a nuclei count and by measuring the migrated distance. The high reproducibility and gentle nature of the inserts makes this approach a good alternative to the traditional scratch assay. In perspective, it...

  2. Exosomes derived from human adipose mensenchymal stem cells accelerates cutaneous wound healing via optimizing the characteristics of fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Li; Wang, Juan; Zhou, Xin; Xiong, Zehuan; Zhao, Jiajia; Yu, Ran; Huang, Fang; Zhang, Handong; Chen, Lili

    2016-01-01

    Prolonged healing and scar formation are two major challenges in the treatment of soft tissue trauma. Adipose mesenchymal stem cells (ASCs) play an important role in tissue regeneration, and recent studies have suggested that exosomes secreted by stem cells may contribute to paracrine signaling. In this study, we investigated the roles of ASCs-derived exosomes (ASCs-Exos) in cutaneous wound healing. We found that ASCs-Exos could be taken up and internalized by fibroblasts to stimulate cell migration, proliferation and collagen synthesis in a dose-dependent manner, with increased genes expression of N-cadherin, cyclin-1, PCNA and collagen I, III. In vivo tracing experiments demonstrated that ASCs-Exos can be recruited to soft tissue wound area in a mouse skin incision model and significantly accelerated cutaneous wound healing. Histological analysis showed increased collagen I and III production by systemic administration of exosomes in the early stage of wound healing, while in the late stage, exosomes might inhibit collagen expression to reduce scar formation. Collectively, our findings indicate that ASCs-Exos can facilitate cutaneous wound healing via optimizing the characteristics of fibroblasts. Our results provide a new perspective and therapeutic strategy for the use of ASCs-Exos in soft tissue repair. PMID:27615560

  3. The effect of spirulina gel on fibroblast cell number after wound healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fitria Rahmitasari

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Wound healing treatment after tooth extraction should be an important consideration due to mouth discomfort and pain. Spirulina (blue green algae consists of C-phycocyanin, b–carotenoids, vitamin E, zinc, some other trace elements and natural phytochemical which are believed to act as antioxidant and takes part in wound healing process. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of spirulina gel on fibroblast cell number after wound healing process. Methods: Twenty eight males guinea pig are devided into four group, 7 guinea pig each. They are control group and treatment group which is given 0%, 3%, 6%, and 12% spirulina gel. After tooth extraction, histopathological evaluation was done to count fibroblast cell. The data was analyzed by One-Way ANOVA and Tukey HSD. Results: The research has proven the relation between the increased growth of fibroblast cell and spirulina gel application. The higher the doses, the more cell growth. Hence, there has been significant different (p < 0.05 among groups. Conclusion: Spirulina gel increases the number of fibroblast in wound after tooth extraction and 12% spirulina gel has the most potential ability.Latar Belakang: Proses penyembuhan luka pasca pencabutan gigi merupakan salah satu hal yang penting karena akan menimbulkan rasa nyeri dan tidak nyaman dalam rongga mulut. Spirulina (Blue green Algae mengandung C-phycocyanin, b-carotenoids, vitamin E, seng, beberapa trace elemen lainnya, dan phytochemical alami yang terbukti dapat berperan sebagai antioksidan dalam proses penyembuhan luka. Tujuan: Tujuan dari penelitian ini adalah untuk mengetahui efek pemberian gel spirulina terhadap jumlah sel fibroblas pada proses penyembuhan luka pasca pencabutan gigi. Metode: Dua puluh delapan ekor guinea pig jantan dibagi dalam 7 kelompok, masing-masing terdiri dari 4 ekor. Kelompok tersebut adalah kelompok kontrol dan kelompok perlakuan yang diberikan gel spirulina dengan konsentrasi 0

  4. Mast cell degranulator compound 48-80 promotes atherosclerotic plaque in apolipoprotein E knockout mice with perivascular common carotid collar placement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Ya-ling; YANG Yong-zong; WANG Shuang; HUANG Tao; TANG Chao-ke; XU Zeng-xiang; SUN Yu-hui

    2009-01-01

    Background Study of the relationship between mast cells and atherosclerosis is mostly dependent on pathological observation and cytology experiments. To investigate the effects of mast cells degranulation on plaque and their possible mechanisms we used apolipoprotein E knockout mice which had been placed perivascular common carotid collar with mast cells degranulator compound 48-80.Methods Forty apolipoprotein E knockout mice were fed a western-type diet and operated on with placement of perivascular right common carotid collar. Four weeks after surgery, the mice were intraperitoneally injected with compound 48-80 (0.5 mg/kg) or D-Hanks every other day for 4 times. The serum lipids and activity of tryptase were measured. Tissue sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Corresponding sections were stained with toluidine blue and immunohistochemically with antibodies against macrophage-specific antigen, α-smooth muscle actin, interleukin-1β and van Willebrand factor. Simultaneously, basic fibroblast growth factor was detected by in situ hybridization and immunofluorescence.Results No pathological change was observed in common carotid non-collar placement but atherogenesis in common carotid collar placement of both groups. There was a significant increase in plaque area ((5.85±0.75)×104 vs (0.86±0.28)×104 μm2, P<0.05), the degree of lumen stenosis ((81±15)% vs (41±12)%, P <0.05), the activity of tryptase in serum ((0.57±0.13) U/L vs (0.36±0.10) U/L, P <0.05), and the percentage of degranulated mast cells ((80.6±17.8)% vs (13.5±4.1)%, P <0.05). The expressions of macrophage-specific antigen, α-smooth muscle actin, interleukin-1β, basic fibroblast growth factor and the density of neovessel in plaque were more in the compound 48-80 group than in the control group.Conclusions Perivascular common carotid collar placement can promote atherosclerotic plaque formation in apolipoprotein E knockout mice. Compound 48-80 increases plaque area and the degree

  5. Ciliary neurotrophic factor promotes the activation of corneal epithelial stem/progenitor cells and accelerates corneal epithelial wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qingjun; Chen, Peng; Di, Guohu; Zhang, Yangyang; Wang, Yao; Qi, Xia; Duan, Haoyun; Xie, Lixin

    2015-05-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), a well-known neuroprotective cytokine, has been found to play an important role in neurogenesis and functional regulations of neural stem cells. As one of the most innervated tissue, however, the role of CNTF in cornea epithelium remains unclear. This study was to explore the roles and mechanisms of CNTF in the activation of corneal epithelial stem/progenitor cells and wound healing of both normal and diabetic mouse corneal epithelium. In mice subjecting to mechanical removal of corneal epithelium, the corneal epithelial stem/progenitor cell activation and wound healing were promoted by exogenous CNTF application, while delayed by CNTF neutralizing antibody. In cultured corneal epithelial stem/progenitor cells, CNTF enhanced the colony-forming efficiency, stimulated the mitogenic proliferation, and upregulated the expression levels of corneal epithelial stem/progenitor cell-associated transcription factors. Furthermore, the promotion of CNTF on the corneal epithelial stem/progenitor cell activation and wound healing was mediated by the activation of STAT3. Moreover, in diabetic mice, the content of CNTF in corneal epithelium decreased significantly when compared with that of normal mice, and the supplement of CNTF promoted the diabetic corneal epithelial wound healing, accompanied with the advanced activation of corneal epithelial stem/progenitor cells and the regeneration of corneal nerve fibers. Thus, the capability of expanding corneal epithelial stem/progenitor cells and promoting corneal epithelial wound healing and nerve regeneration indicates the potential application of CNTF in ameliorating limbal stem cell deficiency and treating diabetic keratopathy. PMID:25546438

  6. Amputation of extremity in patients with atherosclerotic gangrene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsareva Yu.O.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim of investigation — to analyze the results of treatment of patients with atherosclerotic gangrene of a limb, to identify the causes of adverse outcomes amputation. Materials and methods: We analyzed the results of examination and treatment of 218 patients with atherosclerotic gangrene of the limb. Good outcome of amputation was considered the primary surgical wound healing of the stump. Suppuration, secondary healing, re-amputation and death we attributed to the adverse results of amputation. Results: The adverse outcomes of amputation due to technical errors in surgery, properly chosen level, inadequate drainage of the wound stump, an unsuccessful operation on the arteries of a limb, inadequate empirical antibiotic therapy, patient's age, functional capabilities of myocardium, the duration of critical ischemia, as well as the lack of psychological adaptation of patients before amputation. Conclusion: To decide the need for amputation in patients with atherosclerotic gangrene follows the assessment of possible vascular reconstructive surgery. In determining the level of amputation is necessary to objectively assess the degree of disruption of regional blood flow using multilevel manometry and laser Dopplerflowmetry. In preparation for amputation should be paid special attention to the correction of rheological and coagulation properties of blood, normalization of the functional state of the myocardium, as well as specialized psychotherapeutic training for timely and adequate psychological adaptation of the patient

  7. Monocytes/macrophages activation contributes to b-gamma-glutamyltransferase accumulation inside atherosclerotic plaques

    OpenAIRE

    Belcastro, Eugenia; Franzini, Maria; Cianchetti, Silvana; Lorenzini, Evelina; Masotti, Silvia; Fierabracci, Vanna; Pucci, Angela; Pompella, Alfonso; Corti, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Background Gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) is a well-established independent risk factor for cardiovascular mortality related to atherosclerotic disease. Four GGT fractions have been identified in plasma, but only b-GGT fraction accumulates in atherosclerotic plaques, and correlates with other histological markers of vulnerability. The present study was aimed to evaluate whether macrophagic lineage cells may provide a source of b-GGT within the atherosclerotic plaque. Methods GGT expression a...

  8. Cell Surface Mechanochemistry and the Determinants of Bleb Formation, Healing, and Travel Velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manakova, Kathryn; Yan, Huaming; Lowengrub, John; Allard, Jun

    2016-04-12

    Blebs are pressure-driven cell protrusions implicated in cellular functions such as cell division, apoptosis, and cell motility, including motility of protease-inhibited cancer cells. Because of their mechanical nature, blebs inform us about general cell-surface mechanics, including membrane dynamics, pressure propagation throughout the cytoplasm, and the architecture and dynamics of the actin cortex. Mathematical models including detailed fluid dynamics have previously been used to understand bleb expansion. Here, we develop mathematical models in two and three dimensions on longer timescales that recapitulate the full bleb life cycle, including both expansion and healing by cortex reformation, in terms of experimentally accessible biophysical parameters such as myosin contractility, osmotic pressure, and turnover of actin and ezrin. The model provides conditions under which blebbing occurs, and naturally gives rise to traveling blebs. The model predicts conditions under which blebs travel or remain stationary, as well as the bleb traveling velocity, a quantity that has remained elusive in previous models. As previous studies have used blebs as reporters of membrane tension and pressure dynamics within the cell, we have used our system to investigate various pressure equilibration models and dynamic, nonuniform membrane tension to account for the shape of a traveling bleb. We also find that traveling blebs tend to expand in all directions unless otherwise constrained. One possible constraint could be provided by spatial heterogeneity in, for example, adhesion density. PMID:27074688

  9. Epidermal Th22 and Tc17 cells form a localized disease memory in clinically healed psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheuk, Stanley; Wikén, Maria; Blomqvist, Lennart; Nylén, Susanne; Talme, Toomas; Ståhle, Mona; Eidsmo, Liv

    2014-04-01

    Psoriasis is a common and chronic inflammatory skin disease in which T cells play a key role. Effective treatment heals the skin without scarring, but typically psoriasis recurs in previously affected areas. A pathogenic memory within the skin has been proposed, but the nature of such site-specific disease memory is unknown. Tissue-resident memory T (TRM) cells have been ascribed a role in immunity after resolved viral skin infections. Because of their localization in the epidermal compartment of the skin, TRM may contribute to tissue pathology during psoriasis. In this study, we investigated whether resolved psoriasis lesions contain TRM cells with the ability to maintain and potentially drive recurrent disease. Three common and effective therapies, narrowband-UVB treatment and long-term biologic treatment systemically inhibiting TNF-α or IL-12/23 signaling were studied. Epidermal T cells were highly activated in psoriasis and a high proportion of CD8 T cells expressed TRM markers. In resolved psoriasis, a population of cutaneous lymphocyte-associated Ag, CCR6, CD103, and IL-23R expressing epidermal CD8 T cells was highly enriched. Epidermal CD8 T cells expressing the TRM marker CD103 responded to ex vivo stimulation with IL-17A production and epidermal CD4 T cells responded with IL-22 production after as long as 6 y of TNF-α inhibition. Our data suggest that epidermal TRM cells are retained in resolved psoriasis and that these cells are capable of producing cytokines with a critical role in psoriasis pathogenesis. We provide a potential mechanism for a site-specific T cell-driven disease memory in psoriasis. PMID:24610014

  10. The regulatory mechanism of Hsp90α secretion from endothelial cells and its role in angiogenesis during wound healing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → Growth factors such as bFGF, VEGF, PDGF and SDF-1 stimulate Hsp90α secretion from endothelial cells. → Secreted Hsp90α localizes on the leading edge of activated endothelial cells. → Secreted Hsp90α promotes angiogenesis in wound healing. -- Abstract: Heat shock protein 90α (Hsp90α) is a ubiquitously expressed molecular chaperone, which is essential for the maintenance of eukaryote homeostasis. Hsp90α can also be secreted extracellularly and is associated with several physiological and pathological processes including wound healing, cancer, infectious diseases and diabetes. Angiogenesis, defined as the sprouting of new blood vessels from pre-existing capillaries via endothelial cell proliferation and migration, commonly occurs in and contributes to the above mentioned processes. However, the secretion of Hsp90α from endothelial cells and also its function in angiogenesis are still unclear. Here we investigated the role of extracellular Hsp90α in angiogenesis using dermal endothelial cells in vitro and a wound healing model in vivo. We find that the secretion of Hsp90α but not Hsp90β is increased in activated endothelial cells with the induction of angiogenic factors and matrix proteins. Secreted Hsp90α localizes on the leading edge of endothelial cells and promotes their angiogenic activities, whereas Hsp90α neutralizing antibodies reverse the effect. Furthermore, using a mouse skin wound healing model in vivo, we demonstrate that extracellular Hsp90α localizes on blood vessels in granulation tissues of wounded skin and promotes angiogenesis during wound healing. Taken together, our study reveals that Hsp90α can be secreted by activated endothelial cells and is a positive regulator of angiogenesis, suggesting the potential application of Hsp90α as a stimulator for wound repair.

  11. The regulatory mechanism of Hsp90{alpha} secretion from endothelial cells and its role in angiogenesis during wound healing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Xiaomin [National Engineering Laboratory for Anti-tumor Protein Therapeutics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Beijing Key Laboratory for Protein Therapeutics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Cancer Biology Laboratory, School of Life Sciences, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Luo, Yongzhang, E-mail: yluo@tsinghua.edu.cn [National Engineering Laboratory for Anti-tumor Protein Therapeutics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Beijing Key Laboratory for Protein Therapeutics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Cancer Biology Laboratory, School of Life Sciences, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2010-07-16

    Research highlights: {yields} Growth factors such as bFGF, VEGF, PDGF and SDF-1 stimulate Hsp90{alpha} secretion from endothelial cells. {yields} Secreted Hsp90{alpha} localizes on the leading edge of activated endothelial cells. {yields} Secreted Hsp90{alpha} promotes angiogenesis in wound healing. -- Abstract: Heat shock protein 90{alpha} (Hsp90{alpha}) is a ubiquitously expressed molecular chaperone, which is essential for the maintenance of eukaryote homeostasis. Hsp90{alpha} can also be secreted extracellularly and is associated with several physiological and pathological processes including wound healing, cancer, infectious diseases and diabetes. Angiogenesis, defined as the sprouting of new blood vessels from pre-existing capillaries via endothelial cell proliferation and migration, commonly occurs in and contributes to the above mentioned processes. However, the secretion of Hsp90{alpha} from endothelial cells and also its function in angiogenesis are still unclear. Here we investigated the role of extracellular Hsp90{alpha} in angiogenesis using dermal endothelial cells in vitro and a wound healing model in vivo. We find that the secretion of Hsp90{alpha} but not Hsp90{beta} is increased in activated endothelial cells with the induction of angiogenic factors and matrix proteins. Secreted Hsp90{alpha} localizes on the leading edge of endothelial cells and promotes their angiogenic activities, whereas Hsp90{alpha} neutralizing antibodies reverse the effect. Furthermore, using a mouse skin wound healing model in vivo, we demonstrate that extracellular Hsp90{alpha} localizes on blood vessels in granulation tissues of wounded skin and promotes angiogenesis during wound healing. Taken together, our study reveals that Hsp90{alpha} can be secreted by activated endothelial cells and is a positive regulator of angiogenesis, suggesting the potential application of Hsp90{alpha} as a stimulator for wound repair.

  12. Stem Cells on Biomaterials for Synthetic Grafts to Promote Vascular Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Babczyk

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This review is divided into two interconnected parts, namely a biological and a chemical one. The focus of the first part is on the biological background for constructing tissue-engineered vascular grafts to promote vascular healing. Various cell types, such as embryonic, mesenchymal and induced pluripotent stem cells, progenitor cells and endothelial- and smooth muscle cells will be discussed with respect to their specific markers. The in vitro and in vivo models and their potential to treat vascular diseases are also introduced. The chemical part focuses on strategies using either artificial or natural polymers for scaffold fabrication, including decellularized cardiovascular tissue. An overview will be given on scaffold fabrication including conventional methods and nanotechnologies. Special attention is given to 3D network formation via different chemical and physical cross-linking methods. In particular, electron beam treatment is introduced as a method to combine 3D network formation and surface modification. The review includes recently published scientific data and patents which have been registered within the last decade.

  13. Glucose Toxic Effects on Granulation Tissue Productive Cells: The Diabetics’ Impaired Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Berlanga-Acosta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic noncommunicable disease with an expanding pandemic magnitude. Diabetes predisposes to lower extremities ulceration and impairs the healing process leading to wound chronification. Diabetes also dismantles innate immunity favoring wound infection. Amputation is therefore acknowledged as one of the disease’s complications. Hyperglycemia is the proximal detonator of systemic and local toxic effectors including proinflammation, acute-phase proteins elevation, and spillover of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Insulin axis deficiency weakens wounds’ anabolism and predisposes to inflammation. The systemic accumulation of advanced glycation end-products irreversibly impairs the entire physiology from cells-to-organs. These factors in concert hamper fibroblasts and endothelial cells proliferation, migration, homing, secretion, and organization of a productive granulation tissue. Diabetic wound bed may turn chronically inflammed, procatabolic, and an additional source of circulating pro-inflammatory cytokines, establishing a self-perpetuating loop. Diabetic fibroblasts and endothelial cells may bear mitochondrial damages becoming prone to apoptosis, which impairs granulation tissue cellularity and perfusion. Endothelial progenitor cells recruitment and tubulogenesis are also impaired. Failure of wound reepithelialization remains a clinical challenge while it appears to be biologically multifactorial. Ulcer prevention by primary care surveillance, education, and attention programs is of outmost importance to reduce worldwide amputation figures.

  14. Coronary-Heart-Disease-Associated Genetic Variant at the COL4A1/COL4A2 Locus Affects COL4A1/COL4A2 Expression, Vascular Cell Survival, Atherosclerotic Plaque Stability and Risk of Myocardial Infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wei; Ng, Fu Liang; Chan, Kenneth; Pu, Xiangyuan; Poston, Robin N; Ren, Meixia; An, Weiwei; Zhang, Ruoxin; Wu, Jingchun; Yan, Shunying; Situ, Haiteng; He, Xinjie; Chen, Yequn; Tan, Xuerui; Xiao, Qingzhong; Tucker, Arthur T; Caulfield, Mark J; Ye, Shu

    2016-07-01

    Genome-wide association studies have revealed an association between coronary heart disease (CHD) and genetic variation on chromosome 13q34, with the lead single nucleotide polymorphism rs4773144 residing in the COL4A2 gene in this genomic region. We investigated the functional effects of this genetic variant. Analyses of primary cultures of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and endothelial cells (ECs) from different individuals showed a difference between rs4773144 genotypes in COL4A2 and COL4A1 expression levels, being lowest in the G/G genotype, intermediate in A/G and highest in A/A. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by allelic imbalance assays of primary cultures of SMCs and ECs that were of the A/G genotype revealed that the G allele had lower transcriptional activity than the A allele. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays and luciferase reporter gene assays showed that a short DNA sequence encompassing the rs4773144 site interacted with a nuclear protein, with lower efficiency for the G allele, and that the G allele sequence had lower activity in driving reporter gene expression. Analyses of cultured SMCs from different individuals demonstrated that cells of the G/G genotype had higher apoptosis rates. Immunohistochemical and histological examinations of ex vivo atherosclerotic coronary arteries from different individuals disclosed that atherosclerotic plaques with the G/G genotype had lower collagen IV abundance and thinner fibrous cap, a hallmark of unstable, rupture-prone plaques. A study of a cohort of patients with angiographically documented coronary artery disease showed that patients of the G/G genotype had higher rates of myocardial infarction, a phenotype often caused by plaque rupture. These results indicate that the CHD-related genetic variant at the COL4A2 locus affects COL4A2/COL4A1 expression, SMC survival, and atherosclerotic plaque stability, providing a mechanistic explanation for the association between the genetic variant and CHD

  15. Effect of 660 nm Light-Emitting Diode on the Wound Healing in Fibroblast-Like Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myung-Sun Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Light in the red to near-infrared (NIR range (630–1000 nm, which is generated using low energy laser or light-emitting diode (LED arrays, was reported to have a range of beneficial biological effects in many injury models. NIR via a LED is a well-accepted therapeutic tool for the treatment of infected, ischemic, and hypoxic wounds as well as other soft tissue injuries in humans and animals. This study examined the effects of exposure to 660 nm red LED light at intensities of 2.5, 5.5, and 8.5 mW/cm2 for 5, 10, and 20 min on wound healing and proliferation in fibroblast-like cells, such as L929 mouse fibroblasts and human gingival fibroblasts (HGF-1. A photo illumination-cell culture system was designed to evaluate the cell proliferation and wound healing of fibroblast-like cells exposed to 600 nm LED light. The cell proliferation was evaluated by MTT assay, and a scratched wound assay was performed to assess the rate of migrating cells and the healing effect. Exposure to the 660 nm red LED resulted in an increase in cell proliferation and migration compared to the control, indicating its potential use as a phototherapeutic agent.

  16. Adult Stem Cell Therapies for Wound Healing: Biomaterials and Computational Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartarini, Daniele; Mele, Elisa

    2015-01-01

    The increased incidence of diabetes and tumors, associated with global demographic issues (aging and life styles), has pointed out the importance to develop new strategies for the effective management of skin wounds. Individuals affected by these diseases are in fact highly exposed to the risk of delayed healing of the injured tissue that typically leads to a pathological inflammatory state and consequently to chronic wounds. Therapies based on stem cells (SCs) have been proposed for the treatment of these wounds, thanks to the ability of SCs to self-renew and specifically differentiate in response to the target bimolecular environment. Here, we discuss how advanced biomedical devices can be developed by combining SCs with properly engineered biomaterials and computational models. Examples include composite skin substitutes and bioactive dressings with controlled porosity and surface topography for controlling the infiltration and differentiation of the cells. In this scenario, mathematical frameworks for the simulation of cell population growth can provide support for the design of bioconstructs, reducing the need of expensive, time-consuming, and ethically controversial animal experimentation. PMID:26793702

  17. Role of mesenchymal stem cells on cornea wound healing induced by acute alkali burn.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Yao

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of subconjunctivally administered mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs on corneal wound healing in the acute stage of an alkali burn. A corneal alkali burn model was generated by placing a piece of 3-mm diameter filter paper soaked in NaOH on the right eye of 48 Sprague-Dawley female rats. 24 rats were administered a subconjunctival injection of a suspension of 2×10(6 MSCs in 0.1 ml phosphate-buffered saline (PBS on day 0 and day 3 after the corneal alkali burn. The other 24 rats were administered a subconjunctival injection of an equal amount of PBS as a control. Deficiencies of the corneal epithelium and the area of corneal neovascularization (CNV were evaluated on days 3 and 7 after the corneal alkali burn. Infiltrated CD68(+ cells were detected by immunofluorescence staining. The mRNA expression levels of macrophage inflammatory protein-1 alpha (MIP-1α, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF were analyzed using real-time polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR. In addition, VEGF protein levels were analyzed using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. MSCs significantly enhanced the recovery of the corneal epithelium and decreased the CNV area compared with the control group. On day 7, the quantity of infiltrated CD68(+ cells was significantly lower in the MSC group and the mRNA levels of MIP-1α, TNF-α, and VEGF and the protein levels of VEGF were also down-regulated. However, the expression of MCP-1 was not different between the two groups. Our results suggest that subconjunctival injection of MSCs significantly accelerates corneal wound healing, attenuates inflammation and reduces CNV in alkaline-burned corneas; these effects were found to be related to a reduction of infiltrated CD68(+ cells and the down-regulation of MIP-1α, TNF-α and VEGF.

  18. Expression of apolipoprotein serum amyloid A mRNA in human atherosclerotic lesions and cultured vascular cells: implications for serum amyloid A function.

    OpenAIRE

    Meek, R L; Urieli-Shoval, S.; Benditt, E. P.

    1994-01-01

    Altered lipoprotein metabolism and vascular injury are considered to be major parts of the pathogenesis of atherosclerotic lesions. Serum amyloid A (SAA) is a family of acute-phase reactants found residing mainly on high density lipoproteins (HDL) in the circulation. Several functions for the SAAs have been proposed that could be important in atherosclerosis. These include involvement in cholesterol metabolism, participation in detoxification, depression of immune responses, and interference ...

  19. Tracking the elusive fibrocyte: identification and characterization of collagen-producing hematopoietic lineage cells during murine wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suga, Hirotaka; Rennert, Robert C; Rodrigues, Melanie; Sorkin, Michael; Glotzbach, Jason P; Januszyk, Michael; Fujiwara, Toshihiro; Longaker, Michael T; Gurtner, Geoffrey C

    2014-05-01

    Fibrocytes are a unique population of circulating cells reported to exhibit characteristics of both hematopoietic and mesenchymal cells, and play an important role in wound healing. However, putative fibrocytes have been found to lose expression of hematopoietic surface markers such as CD45 during differentiation, making it difficult to track these cells in vivo with conventional methodologies. In this study, to distinguish hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic cells without surface markers, we took advantage of the gene vav 1, which is expressed solely on hematopoietic cells but not on other cell types, and established a novel transgenic mouse, in which hematopoietic cells are irreversibly labeled with green fluorescent protein and nonhematopoietic cells with red fluorescent protein. Use of single-cell transcriptional analysis in this mouse model revealed two discrete types of collagen I (Col I) expressing cells of hematopoietic lineage recruited into excisional skin wounds. We confirmed this finding on a protein level, with one subset of these Col I synthesizing cells being CD45+ and CD11b+, consistent with the traditional definition of a fibrocyte, while another was CD45- and Cd11b-, representing a previously unidentified population. Both cell types were found to initially peak, then reduce posthealing, consistent with a disappearance from the wound site and not a loss of identifying surface marker expression. Taken together, we have unambiguously identified two cells of hematopoietic origin that are recruited to the wound site and deposit collagen, definitively confirming the existence and natural time course of fibrocytes in cutaneous healing. PMID:24446236

  20. Autologous adipocyte derived stem cells favour healing in a minipig model of cutaneous radiation syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabien Forcheron

    Full Text Available Cutaneous radiation syndrome (CRS is the delayed consequence of localized skin exposure to high doses of ionizing radiation. Here we examined for the first time in a large animal model the therapeutic potential of autologous adipose tissue-derived stroma cells (ASCs. For experiments, Göttingen minipigs were locally gamma irradiated using a (60Co source at the dose of 50 Gy and grafted (n = 5 or not (n = 8. ASCs were cultured in MEM-alpha with 10% fetal calf serum and basic fibroblast growth factor (2 ng.mL(-1 and post irradiation were intradermally injected on days 25, 46, 67 and finally between days 95 and 115 (50 × 10(6 ASCs each time into the exposed area. All controls exhibited a clinical evolution with final necrosis (day 91. In grafted pigs an ultimate wound healing was observed in four out of five grafted animals (day 130 +/- 28. Immunohistological analysis of cytokeratin expression showed a complete epidermis recovery. Grafted ASCs accumulated at the dermis/subcutis barrier in which they attracted numerous immune cells, and even an increased vasculature in one pig. Globally this study suggests that local injection of ASCs may represent a useful strategy to mitigate CRS.

  1. Ultrafast laser ablation for targeted atherosclerotic plaque removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanvin, Thomas; Conkey, Donald B.; Descloux, Laurent; Frobert, Aurelien; Valentin, Jeremy; Goy, Jean-Jacques; Cook, Stéphane; Giraud, Marie-Noelle; Psaltis, Demetri

    2015-07-01

    Coronary artery disease, the main cause of heart disease, develops as immune cells and lipids accumulate into plaques within the coronary arterial wall. As a plaque grows, the tissue layer (fibrous cap) separating it from the blood flow becomes thinner and increasingly susceptible to rupturing and causing a potentially lethal thrombosis. The stabilization and/or treatment of atherosclerotic plaque is required to prevent rupturing and remains an unsolved medical problem. Here we show for the first time targeted, subsurface ablation of atherosclerotic plaque using ultrafast laser pulses. Excised atherosclerotic mouse aortas were ablated with ultrafast near-infrared (NIR) laser pulses. The physical damage was characterized with histological sections of the ablated atherosclerotic arteries from six different mice. The ultrafast ablation system was integrated with optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging for plaque-specific targeting and monitoring of the resulting ablation volume. We find that ultrafast ablation of plaque just below the surface is possible without causing damage to the fibrous cap, which indicates the potential use of ultrafast ablation for subsurface atherosclerotic plaque removal. We further demonstrate ex vivo subsurface ablation of a plaque volume through a catheter device with the high-energy ultrafast pulse delivered via hollow-core photonic crystal fiber.

  2. Calcium alginate gels as stem cell matrix-making paracrine stem cell activity available for enhanced healing after surgery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Schmitt

    Full Text Available Regeneration after surgery can be improved by the administration of anabolic growth factors. However, to locally maintain these factors at the site of regeneration is problematic. The aim of this study was to develop a matrix system containing human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs which can be applied to the surgical site and allows the secretion of endogenous healing factors from the cells. Calcium alginate gels were prepared by a combination of internal and external gelation. The gelling behaviour, mechanical stability, surface adhesive properties and injectability of the gels were investigated. The permeability of the gels for growth factors was analysed using bovine serum albumin and lysozyme as model proteins. Human MSCs were isolated, cultivated and seeded into the alginate gels. Cell viability was determined by AlamarBlue assay and fluorescence microscopy. The release of human VEGF and bFGF from the cells was determined using an enzyme-linked immunoassay. Gels with sufficient mechanical properties were prepared which remained injectable through a syringe and solidified in a sufficient time frame after application. Surface adhesion was improved by the addition of polyethylene glycol 300,000 and hyaluronic acid. Humans MSCs remained viable for the duration of 6 weeks within the gels. Human VEGF and bFGF was found in quantifiable concentrations in cell culture supernatants of gels loaded with MSCs and incubated for a period of 6 weeks. This work shows that calcium alginate gels can function as immobilization matrices for human MSCs.

  3. Light-activated photocurrent degradation and self-healing in perovskite solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Wanyi; Blancon, Jean-Christophe; Neukirch, Amanda J; Appavoo, Kannatassen; Tsai, Hsinhan; Chhowalla, Manish; Alam, Muhammad A; Sfeir, Matthew Y; Katan, Claudine; Even, Jacky; Tretiak, Sergei; Crochet, Jared J; Gupta, Gautam; Mohite, Aditya D

    2016-01-01

    Solution-processed organometallic perovskite solar cells have emerged as one of the most promising thin-film photovoltaic technology. However, a key challenge is their lack of stability over prolonged solar irradiation. Few studies have investigated the effect of light soaking on hybrid perovskites and have attributed the degradation in the optoelectronic properties to photochemical or field-assisted ion migration. Here we show that the slow photocurrent degradation in thin-film photovoltaic devices is due to the formation of light-activated meta-stable deep-level trap states. However, the devices can self-heal completely by resting them in the dark for <1 min or the degradation can be completely prevented by operating the devices at 0 °C. We investigate several physical mechanisms to explain the microscopic origin for the formation of these trap states, among which the creation of small polaronic states involving localized cooperative lattice strain and molecular orientations emerges as a credible microscopic mechanism requiring further detailed studies. PMID:27181192

  4. Light-activated photocurrent degradation and self-healing in perovskite solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Wanyi; Blancon, Jean-Christophe; Neukirch, Amanda J.; Appavoo, Kannatassen; Tsai, Hsinhan; Chhowalla, Manish; Alam, Muhammad A.; Sfeir, Matthew Y.; Katan, Claudine; Even, Jacky; Tretiak, Sergei; Crochet, Jared J.; Gupta, Gautam; Mohite, Aditya D.

    2016-01-01

    Solution-processed organometallic perovskite solar cells have emerged as one of the most promising thin-film photovoltaic technology. However, a key challenge is their lack of stability over prolonged solar irradiation. Few studies have investigated the effect of light soaking on hybrid perovskites and have attributed the degradation in the optoelectronic properties to photochemical or field-assisted ion migration. Here we show that the slow photocurrent degradation in thin-film photovoltaic devices is due to the formation of light-activated meta-stable deep-level trap states. However, the devices can self-heal completely by resting them in the dark for <1 min or the degradation can be completely prevented by operating the devices at 0 °C. We investigate several physical mechanisms to explain the microscopic origin for the formation of these trap states, among which the creation of small polaronic states involving localized cooperative lattice strain and molecular orientations emerges as a credible microscopic mechanism requiring further detailed studies. PMID:27181192

  5. Light-activated photocurrent degradation and self-healing in perovskite solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Wanyi; Blancon, Jean-Christophe; Neukirch, Amanda J.; Appavoo, Kannatassen; Tsai, Hsinhan; Chhowalla, Manish; Alam, Muhammad A.; Sfeir, Matthew Y.; Katan, Claudine; Even, Jacky; Tretiak, Sergei; Crochet, Jared J.; Gupta, Gautam; Mohite, Aditya D.

    2016-05-01

    Solution-processed organometallic perovskite solar cells have emerged as one of the most promising thin-film photovoltaic technology. However, a key challenge is their lack of stability over prolonged solar irradiation. Few studies have investigated the effect of light soaking on hybrid perovskites and have attributed the degradation in the optoelectronic properties to photochemical or field-assisted ion migration. Here we show that the slow photocurrent degradation in thin-film photovoltaic devices is due to the formation of light-activated meta-stable deep-level trap states. However, the devices can self-heal completely by resting them in the dark for <1 min or the degradation can be completely prevented by operating the devices at 0 °C. We investigate several physical mechanisms to explain the microscopic origin for the formation of these trap states, among which the creation of small polaronic states involving localized cooperative lattice strain and molecular orientations emerges as a credible microscopic mechanism requiring further detailed studies.

  6. Growth regulation of skin cells by epidermal cell-derived factors: implications for wound healing.

    OpenAIRE

    Eisinger, M; Sadan, S; Silver, I. A.; Flick, R B

    1988-01-01

    Epidermal cell-derived factors (EDF), present in extracts and supernatant fluids of cultured epidermal cells, were found to stimulate the proliferation of keratinocytes but to inhibit fibroblasts. In vitro, the effect of EDF on epidermal cells resulted in an increased number of rapidly proliferating colonies composed mainly of basal keratinocytes. Control cultures grown in the absence of EDF had a high proportion of terminally differentiated cells. In fibroblast cultures EDF inhibited the abi...

  7. Methods for promoting wound healing and muscle regeneration with the cell signaling protein Nell1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culiat, Cymbeline T.

    2011-03-22

    The present invention provides methods for promoting wound healing and treating muscle atrophy in a mammal in need. The method comprises administering to the mammal a Nell1 protein or a Nell1 nucleic acid molecule.

  8. Mallotus philippinensis bark extracts promote preferential migration of mesenchymal stem cells and improve wound healing in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furumoto, Tadashi; Ozawa, Noriyasu; Inami, Yuta; Toyoshima, Misaki; Fujita, Kosuke; Zaiki, Kaori; Sahara, Shunya; Akita, Mariko; Kitamura, Keiko; Nakaoji, Koichi; Hamada, Kazuhiko; Tamai, Katsuto; Kaneda, Yasufumi; Maeda, Akito

    2014-02-15

    In the present study, we report the effects of the ethanol extract from Mallotus philippinensis bark (EMPB) on mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) proliferation, migration, and wound healing in vitro and in a mouse model. Chemotaxis assays demonstrated that EMPB acted an MSC chemoattractant and that the main chemotactic activity of EMPB may be due to the effects of cinnamtannin B-1. Flow cytometric analysis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in EMPB-injected mice indicated that EMPB enhanced the mobilization of endogenous MSCs into blood circulation. Bioluminescent whole-animal imaging of luciferase-expressing MSCs revealed that EMPB augmented the homing of MSCs to wounds. In addition, the efficacy of EMPB on migration of MSCs was higher than that of other skin cell types, and EMPB treatment improved of wound healing in a diabetic mouse model. The histopathological characteristics demonstrated that the effects of EMPB treatment resembled MSC-induced tissue repair. Taken together, these results suggested that EMPB activated the mobilization and homing of MSCs to wounds and that enhancement of MSC migration may improve wound healing. PMID:24182990

  9. Three-dimensional graphene foams loaded with bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells promote skin wound healing with reduced scarring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The regeneration of functional skin remains elusive, due to poor engraftment, deficient vascularization, and excessive scar formation. Aiming to overcome these issues, the present study proposed the combination of a three-dimensional graphene foam (GF) scaffold loaded with bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to improve skin wound healing. The GFs demonstrated good biocompatibility and promoted the growth and proliferation of MSCs. Meanwhile, the GFs loaded with MSCs obviously facilitated wound closure in animal model. The dermis formed in the presence of the GF structure loaded with MSCs was thicker and possessed a more complex structure at day 14 post-surgery. The transplanted MSCs correlated with upregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), which may lead to neo-vascularization. Additionally, an anti-scarring effect was observed in the presence of the 3D-GF scaffold and MSCs, as evidenced by a downregulation of transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-β1) and alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) together with an increase of TGF-β3. Altogether, the GF scaffold could guide the wound healing process with reduced scarring, and the MSCs were crucial to enhance vascularization and provided a better quality neo-skin. The GF scaffold loaded with MSCs possesses necessary bioactive cues to improve wound healing with reduced scarring, which may be of great clinical significance for skin wound healing. - Highlights: • The GFs promoted the growth and proliferation of MSCs. • The GFs loaded with MSCs obviously facilitated wound closure in the animal model. • An anti-scarring effect was observed in the presence of 3D-GF scaffold and MSCs. • The GF scaffold loaded with MSCs has great effect on skin wound healing

  10. Three-dimensional graphene foams loaded with bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells promote skin wound healing with reduced scarring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Zhonghua [Department of Burn and Plastic Surgery, Provincial Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan 250021 (China); Department of Burn and Plastic Surgery, The Fourth People' s Hospital Of Jinan, Jinan 250031 (China); Wang, Haiqin [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, The Fifth People' s Hospital Of Jinan, Jinan 250022 (China); Yang, Bo; Sun, Yukai [Department of Burn and Plastic Surgery, The Fourth People' s Hospital Of Jinan, Jinan 250031 (China); Huo, Ran, E-mail: rhuo12@163.com [Department of Burn and Plastic Surgery, Provincial Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan 250021 (China)

    2015-12-01

    The regeneration of functional skin remains elusive, due to poor engraftment, deficient vascularization, and excessive scar formation. Aiming to overcome these issues, the present study proposed the combination of a three-dimensional graphene foam (GF) scaffold loaded with bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to improve skin wound healing. The GFs demonstrated good biocompatibility and promoted the growth and proliferation of MSCs. Meanwhile, the GFs loaded with MSCs obviously facilitated wound closure in animal model. The dermis formed in the presence of the GF structure loaded with MSCs was thicker and possessed a more complex structure at day 14 post-surgery. The transplanted MSCs correlated with upregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), which may lead to neo-vascularization. Additionally, an anti-scarring effect was observed in the presence of the 3D-GF scaffold and MSCs, as evidenced by a downregulation of transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-β1) and alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) together with an increase of TGF-β3. Altogether, the GF scaffold could guide the wound healing process with reduced scarring, and the MSCs were crucial to enhance vascularization and provided a better quality neo-skin. The GF scaffold loaded with MSCs possesses necessary bioactive cues to improve wound healing with reduced scarring, which may be of great clinical significance for skin wound healing. - Highlights: • The GFs promoted the growth and proliferation of MSCs. • The GFs loaded with MSCs obviously facilitated wound closure in the animal model. • An anti-scarring effect was observed in the presence of 3D-GF scaffold and MSCs. • The GF scaffold loaded with MSCs has great effect on skin wound healing.

  11. Mesenchymal stromal cells form vascular tubes when placed in fibrin sealant and accelerate wound healing in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, Julio J; Ghaedi, Mahboobe; Sivarapatna, Amogh; Dimitrievska, Sashka; Shao, Zhen; Osuji, Chinedum O; Steinbacher, Derek M; Leffell, David J; Niklason, Laura E

    2015-02-01

    Non-healing, chronic wounds are a growing public health problem and may stem from insufficient angiogenesis in affected sites. Here, we have developed a fibrin formulation that allows adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (ADSCs) to form tubular structures in vitro. The tubular structures express markers of endothelium, including CD31 and VE-Cadherin, as well as the pericyte marker NG2. The ability for the MSCs to form tubular structures within the fibrin gels was directly dependent on the stoichiometric ratios of thrombin and fibrinogen and the resulting gel concentration, as well as on the presence of bFGF. Fibrin gel formulations that varied in stiffness were tested. ADSCs that are embedded in a stiff fibrin formulation express VE-cadherin and CD31 as shown by PCR, FACS and immunostaining. Confocal imaging analysis demonstrated that tubular structures formed, containing visible lumens, in the stiff fibrin gels in vitro. There was also a difference in the amounts of bFGF secreted by ADSCs grown in the stiffer gels as compared to softer gels. Additionally, hAT-MSCs gave rise to perfusable vessels that were VE-cadherin positive after subcutaneous injection into mice, whereas the softer fibrin formulation containing ADSCs did not. The application of ADSCs delivered in the stiff fibrin gels allowed for the wounds to heal more quickly, as assessed by wound size, amount of granulation tissue and collagen content. Interestingly, following 5 days of healing, the ADSCs remained within the fibrin gel and did not integrate into the granulation tissue of healing wounds in vivo. These data show that ADSCs are able to form tubular structures within fibrin gels, and may also contribute to faster wound healing, as compared with no treatment or to wounds treated with fibrin gels devoid of ADSCs. PMID:25433608

  12. The accumulation of inflammatory cells in synovial sheath and epitenon during adhesion formation in healing rat flexor tendons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojciak, B; Crossan, J F

    1993-01-01

    The accumulation of inflammatory cells in synovial tissue was studied using indirect immunofluorescence assays on cell cultures and frozen tissue sections of healing rat digital flexor tendons. Flexor tendons were collected from rats 3, 7 and 14 days after crush injury. Tendon sheath and epithenon cells were isolated by sequential enzymic digestion and cultured for 2 days. Subpopulations of synovial and inflammatory cells were identified with MoAbs against cell surface glycoproteins present on B lymphocytes (CD45), T lymphocytes (CD2, CD4, CD8), macrophages (CD14) and endothelial cells. A phagocytosis assay was also used to identify macrophages. We report a substantial increase in the number of T lymphocytes (mainly helper/inducer) and phagocytotic cells with monocyte/macrophage surface markers in tendon sheath and epitenon 3 days after crush injury. The infiltration of inflammatory cells into synovial sheath and epitenon preceded an increase in fibronectin production by tendon cells which was seen 7 days after injury. To study the interaction between T lymphocytes and synovial cells in vitro, we established synovial fibroblast-like type B cell cultures and used stimulated and non-stimulated T lymphocytes in cell binding assays. We observed increased adhesiveness between unstimulated synovial cells and synovial cells previously cultured with activated and non-activated T lymphocytes. ELISA inhibition studies have shown an increase in fibronectin production by synovial fibroblasts co-cultured with stimulated CD4+ T lymphocytes. We suggest that the presence of inflammatory cells in synovial sheath and epitenon during tendon healing induces synovial fibroblasts and epitenon cells to increase their production of fibronectin, which provides a scaffold for subsequent adhesion formation. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 4 PMID:8324895

  13. Modulation of Mast Cell Function by Amino Acids In vitro: A Potential Mechanism of Immunonutrition for Wound Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayo Masuko

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available "Mast cells release important chemical mediators, such as histamine and interleukin (IL-13, for the regulation of allergic reactions and inflammation. Recently, mast cell activation has been implicated in wound healing. Glutamine (Gln and Arginine (Arg are used as “immune nutrients” in severe infections and chronic wounds in malnourished patients, but the potential effect of these amino acids on mast cell activation is unclear. We evaluated the effect of Gln and /or Arg in culture on mast cell function. The murine mast cell line P815 was cultured in RPMI-1640 medium under different Gln and/or Arg concentrations and IL-6 stimulation. Histamine and IL-13 release into the supernatant was measured using enzyme-linked immunoassays. As a result, the amino acid concentrations affected cellular viability. Cells cultured in higher Gln concentrations produced a greater histamine response upon IL-6 stimulation while the histamine response in cells cultured in a high Arg concentration was suppressed. IL-13 production in the Gln containing medium was not significantly altered by IL-6 stimulation. In conclusion, in an inflammatory milieu, Gln and/or Arg concentrations in situ may regulate histamine and IL-13 release from mast cells. The appropriate use of functional amino acids as immune nutrients may suppress inflammation and aid in wound healing. "

  14. Enoxaparin and rivaroxaban have different effects on human mesenchymal stromal cells in the early stages of bone healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fröbel, J.; Prodinger, P. M.; Mrotzek, S. J.; Fischer, J. C.; Zilkens, C.; Bittersohl, B.; Krauspe, R.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a major potential complication following orthopaedic surgery. Subcutaneously administered enoxaparin has been used as the benchmark to reduce the incidence of VTE. However, concerns have been raised regarding the long-term administration of enoxaparin and its possible negative effects on bone healing and bone density with an increase of the risk of osteoporotic fractures. New oral anticoagulants such as rivaroxaban have recently been introduced, however, there is a lack of information regarding how these drugs affect bone metabolism and post-operative bone healing. Methods We measured the migration and proliferation capacity of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) under enoxaparin or rivaroxaban treatment for three consecutive weeks, and evaluated effects on MSC mRNA expression of markers for stress and osteogenic differentiation. Results We demonstrate that enoxaparin, but not rivaroxaban, increases the migration potential of MSCs and increases their cell count in line with elevated mRNA expression of C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα), and alpha-B-crystallin (CryaB). However, a decrease in early osteogenic markers (insulin-like growth factors 1 and 2 (IGF1, IGF2), bone morphogenetic protein2 (BMP2)) indicated inhibitory effects on MSC differentiation into osteoblasts caused by enoxaparin, but not by rivaroxaban. Conclusions Our findings may explain the adverse effects of enoxaparin treatment on bone healing. Rivaroxaban has no significant impact on MSC metabolism or capacity for osteogenic differentiation in vitro. Cite this article: Dr H. Pilge. Enoxaparin and rivaroxaban have different effects on human mesenchymal stromal cells in the early stages of bone healing. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:95–100. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.53.2000595. PMID:26989119

  15. Transforming growth factor-beta mediates intestinal healing and susceptibility to injury in vitro and in vivo through epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Paul L; Rosenberg, Ian M; Xavier, Ramnik J; Koh, Theodore; Wong, Josée F; Podolsky, Daniel K

    2003-02-01

    In vitro studies suggest that transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta has potent effects on gastrointestinal mucosal integrity, wound repair, and neoplasia. However, the multiplicity of actions of this peptide on many different cell types confounds efforts to define the role of TGF-beta within the intestinal epithelium in vivo. To delineate these effects selective blockade of intestinal epithelial TGF-beta activity was undertaken through targeted expression of a dominant-negative (DN) TGF-beta RII to intestinal epithelial cells in vitro and in vivo. Stable intestinal epithelial cell (IEC)-6 lines overexpressing TGF-beta RII-DN (nucleotides -7 to 573) were established. Transgenic mice overexpressing TGF-beta RII-DN under the regulation of a modified liver fatty acid-binding promoter (LFABP-PTS4) were constructed. In vitro healing was assessed by wounding of confluent monolayers. Colitis was induced by the addition of dextran sodium sulfate (2.5 to 7.5% w/v) to their drinking water. Overexpression of TGF-beta RII-DN in intestinal epithelial cell-6 cells resulted in a marked reduction in cell migration and TGF-beta-stimulated wound healing in vitro. TGF-beta RII-DN transgenic mice did not exhibit baseline intestinal inflammation or changes in survival, body weight, epithelial cell proliferation, aberrant crypt foci, or tumor formation. TGF-beta RII-DN mice were markedly more susceptible to dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis and exhibited impaired recovery after colonic injury. TGF-beta is required for intestinal mucosal healing and TGF-beta modulation of the intestinal epithelium plays a central role in determining susceptibility to injury. PMID:12547717

  16. Differential properties of human ACL and MCL stem cells may be responsible for their differential healing capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu Freddie H

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The human anterior cruciate ligament (hACL and medial collateral ligament (hMCL of the knee joint are frequently injured, especially in athletic settings. It has been known that, while injuries to the MCL typically heal with conservative treatment, ACL injuries usually do not heal. As adult stem cells repair injured tissues through proliferation and differentiation, we hypothesized that the hACL and hMCL contain stem cells exhibiting unique properties that could be responsible for the differential healing capacity of the two ligaments. Methods To test the above hypothesis, we derived ligament stem cells from normal hACL and hMCL samples from the same adult donors using tissue culture techniques and characterized their properties using immunocytochemistry, RT-PCR, and flow cytometry. Results We found that both hACL stem cells (hACL-SCs and hMCL stem cells (hMCL-SCs formed colonies in culture and expressed stem cell markers nucleostemin and stage-specific embryonic antigen-4 (SSEA-4. Moreover, both hACL-SCs and hMCL-SCs expressed CD surface markers for mesenchymal stem cells, including CD44 and CD90, but not those markers for vascular cells, CD31, CD34, CD45, and CD146. However, hACL-SCs differed from hMCL-SCs in that the size and number of hACL-SC colonies in culture were much smaller and grew more slowly than hMCL-SC colonies. Moreover, fewer hACL-SCs in cell colonies expressed stem cell markers STRO-1 and octamer-binding transcription factor-4 (Oct-4 than hMCL-SCs. Finally, hACL-SCs had less multi-differentiation potential than hMCL-SCs, evidenced by differing extents of adipogenesis, chondrogenesis, and osteogenesis in the respective induction media. Conclusions This study shows for the first time that hACL-SCs are intrinsically different from hMCL-SCs. We suggest that the differences in their properties contribute to the known disparity in healing capabilities between the two ligaments.

  17. Two- and three-dimensional co-culture models of soft tissue healing: pericyte-endothelial cell interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennewein, Martina; Bubel, Monika; Guthörl, Silke; Metzger, Wolfgang; Weigert, Martin; Pohlemann, Tim; Oberringer, Martin

    2016-08-01

    The demographic change in western countries towards an older population is being shadowed by an increased appearance of chronic diseases influencing soft tissue healing in a negative manner. Although various promising therapeutic approaches are available for treating chronic wounds, no in vitro model exists that successfully allows the analysis of interacting cells and of the effect of therapeutic drugs within a wound. Granulation tissue assures wound stability, neo-angiogenesis and revascularization finally leading to functional soft tissue repair. As one of the first steps in developing a model for human granulation tissue, we examined microvascular endothelial cells and pericytes in conventional 2D and in 3D spheroid co-cultures. We determined which parameters could be used in a standardized manner and whether the cultures were responsive to hypoxia and to erythropoietin supplementation. The read-out parameters of cell migration, cell density, rate of apoptotic cells, spatial cell distribution in the spheroid and spheroid volume were shown to be excellent analytic measures. In addition, quantification of hypoxia-related genes identified a total of 13 genes that were up-regulated in spheroids after hypoxia. As these parameters delivered reliable results in the present approach and as the general morphological distribution of pericytes and endothelial cells within the spheroid occurred in a typical manner, we believe that this basic in vitro model will serve for the future study of diverse aspects of soft tissue healing. PMID:27026609

  18. Human unrestricted somatic stem cells loaded in nanofibrous PCL scaffold and their healing effect on skin defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrami, Hoda; Keshel, Saeed Heidari; Chari, Aliakbar Jafari; Biazar, Esmaeil

    2016-09-01

    Unrestricted somatic stem cells (USSCs) loaded in nanofibrous polycaprolactone (PCL) scaffolds can be used for skin regeneration when grafted onto full-thickness skin defects of rats. Nanofibrous PCL scaffolds were designed by the electrospinning method and crosslinked with laminin protein. Afterwards, the scaffolds were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy, and physical and mechanical assays. In this study, nanofibrous PCL scaffolds loaded with USSCs were grafted onto the skin defects. The wounds were subsequently investigated 21 days after grafting. Results of mechanical and physical analyses showed good resilience and compliance to movement as a skin graft. In animal models; study samples exhibited the most pronounced effect on wound closure, with statistically significant improvement in wound healing being seen at 21 days post-operatively. Histological examinations of healed wounds from all samples showed a thin epidermis plus recovered skin appendages in the dermal layer for samples with cell. Thus, the graft of nanofibrous PCL scaffolds loaded with USSC showed better results during the healing process of skin defects in rat models. PMID:26140614

  19. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells as Cell-Based Therapeutics for Wound Healing

    OpenAIRE

    Samir Malhotra; Hu, Michael S.; Marshall, Clement D.; Tripp Leavitt; Alexander T. M. Cheung; Gonzalez, Jennifer G.; Harleen Kaur; Peter Lorenz, H.; Longaker, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic wounds are a source of substantial morbidity for patients and are a major financial burden for the healthcare system. There are no current therapies that reliably improve nonhealing wounds or reverse pathological scarring. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are a promising source of novel cell-based therapies due to the ease of their harvest and their integral role in the native wound repair process. Recent work has addressed the problems of loss of plasticity and off-target delivery th...

  20. Boron promotes streptozotocin-induced diabetic wound healing: roles in cell proliferation and migration, growth factor expression, and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirci, Selami; Doğan, Ayşegül; Aydın, Safa; Dülger, Esra Çikler; Şahin, Fikrettin

    2016-06-01

    Acute wounds do not generally require professional treatment modalities and heal in a predictable fashion, but chronic wounds are mainly accompanied with infection and prolonged inflammation, leading to healing impairments and continuous tissue degradation. Although a vast amount of products have been introduced in the market, claiming to provide a better optimization of local and systemic conditions of patients, they do not meet the expectations due to being expensive and not easily accessible, requiring wound care facilities, having patient-specific response, low efficiency, and severe side-effects. In this sense, developing new, safe, self-applicable, effective, and cheap wound care products with broad-range antimicrobial activity is still an attractive area of international research. In the present work, boron derivatives [boric acid and sodium pentaborate pentahydrate (NaB)] were evaluated for their antimicrobial activity, proliferation, migratory, angiogenesis, gene, and growth factor expression promoting effects on dermal cells in vitro. In addition, boron-containing hydrogel formulation was examined for its wound healing promoting potential using full-thickness wound model in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. The results revealed that while both boron compounds significantly increased proliferation, migration, vital growth factor, and gene expression levels of dermal cells along with displaying remarkable antimicrobial effects against bacteria, yeast, and fungi, NaB displayed greater antimicrobial properties as well as gene and growth factor expression inductive effects. Animal studies proved that NaB-containing gel formulation enhanced wound healing rate of diabetic animals and histopathological scores. Overall data suggest a potential promising therapeutic option for the management of chronic wounds but further studies are highly warranted to determine signaling pathways and target metabolisms in which boron is involved to elucidate the limitations

  1. Ephrin-B reverse signaling induces expression of wound healing associated genes in IEC-6 intestinal epithelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christian Hafner; Stefanie Meyer; Ilja Hagen; Bernd Becker; Alexander Roesch; Michael Landthaler; Thomas Vogt

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Eph receptors and ephrin ligands play a pivotal role in development and tissue maintenance. Since previous data have indicated an involvement of ephrin-B2 in epithelial healing, we investigated the gene expression and downstream signaling pathways induced by ephrin-B mediated cell-cell signaling in intestinal epithelial cells.METHODS: Upon stimulation of ephrin-B pathways in IFC-6 cells with recombinant rat EphB1-Fc, gene expression was analyzed by Affymetrix(R) rat genome 230 high density arrays at different time points. Differentially expressed genes were confirmed by real-time RT-PCR. In addition, MAP kinase pathways and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) activation downstream of ephrin-B were investigated by immunoblotting and fluorescence microscopy.RESULTS: Stimulation of the ephrin-B reverse signaling pathway in IEC-6 cells induces predominant expression of genes known to be involved into wound healing/cell migration, antiapoptotic pathways, host defense and inflammation. Cox-2, c-Fos, Egr-1, Egr-2, and MCP-1 were found among the most significantly regulated genes.Furthermore, we show that the expression of repairrelated genes is also accompanied by activation of the ERK1/2 MAP kinase pathway and FAK, two key regulators of epithelial restitution.CONCLUSION: Stimulation of the ephrin-B reverse signaling pathway induces a phenotype characterized by upregulation of repair-related genes, which may partially be mediated by ERK1/2 pathways.

  2. Effects of transplanted mesenchymal stem cells isolated from Wharton's jelly of caprine umbilical cord on cutaneous wound healing; histopathological evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azari, Omid; Babaei, Homayoon; Derakhshanfar, Amin; Nematollahi-Mahani, Seyed Noureddin; Poursahebi, Raheleh; Moshrefi, Mojgan

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of transplanted Wharton's jelly mesenchymal stem cells (WJMSCs) of caprine umbilical cord on cutaneous wound healing process in goat. After collection of caprine pregnant uterus of mixed breed goats from abattoir, the Wharton's jelly (WJ) of umbilical cord was harvested. The tissues were minced in ventilated flasks and explant culture method was used for separating mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). The isolated cells were immunostained for Actin protein, histochemically assayed for the presence of alkaline phosphatase activity, and analyzed for detection of matrix receptors (CD44) and hematopoetic lineage markers (CD34), using flow cytometery. After The isolated cells, 3×10(6) MSCs were stained with BrdU and prepared for transplantation to each wound. Four 3-cm linear full thickness skin incisions were made on both sides of thoracic vertebrate of four Raeini goats (two wounds on each side). The left wounds were implanted with MSCs in 0.6 ml of Phosphate buffer saline (PBS), and the right wounds considered as control group that received 0.6 ml of PBS. The samples were taken from the wounds 7 and 12 days after the wounding, and healing process was compared histologically between the two groups. Anti-BrdU staining showed that the transplanted cells were still alive in the wound bed during the study. The histopathological study revealed that re-epithelialization was complete at days 7 in treated wounds with WJMSCs, whereas in control wound the wounds still showed incomplete epithelialization 12 days after wounding. Also, microscopic evaluation showed less inflammation, thinner granulation tissue formation with minimum scar in the treated wounds in comparison with control wounds. In conclusion, this study demonstrates the beneficial effect of caprine WJMSCs in cutaneous wound healing in goat. PMID:21340694

  3. Porcine Epidermal Stem Cells: Biomedical Model for Wound Healing and Normal/Malignant Epithelial Cell Propagation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Motlík, Jan; Klíma, Jiří; Dvořánková, B.; Smetana, K. Jr.

    Cairo : National Research Centre, 2007, s. 54-55. [International Conference on Biotechnology in Animal Reproduction /14./. Cairo (EG), 06.08.2007-07.08.2007] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : stem cells Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics

  4. Identification of periodontal pathogens in atherosclerotic vessels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiehn, Nils-Erik; Larsen, Tove; Christiansen, Natalia;

    2005-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown that periodontitis may be associated with presence of atherosclerosis. DNA from periodontal pathogens has been detected in atherosclerotic lesions, but viable oral bacteria have not yet been isolated from atherosclerotic plaques. The purpose of the present study...... was to determine if viable oral bacteria could be isolated from atherosclerotic lesions and if DNA from periodontal pathogens could be detected by use of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques....

  5. Effects of Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating (GM-CSF) Factor on Corneal Epithelial Cells in Corneal Wound Healing Model

    OpenAIRE

    Chang Rae Rho; Mi-young Park; Seungbum Kang

    2015-01-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a pleiotropic cytokine that activates granulocyte and macrophage cell lineages. It is also known to have an important function in wound healing. This study investigated the effect of GM-CSF in wound healing of human corneal epithelial cells (HCECs). We used human GM-CSF derived from rice cells (rice cell-derived recombinant human GM-CSF; rhGM-CSF). An in vitro migration assay was performed to investigate the migration rate of HCECs ...

  6. SELECTINS IN CORONARY ATHEROSCLEROTIC DISEASE:A REVIEW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李远方; 胡健

    2001-01-01

    The development of atherosclerotic lesions appears to be inflammatory in nature. It involves the recruitment of blood monocytes to the vascular endothelium, followed by intimal infiltration. Monocytes differentiate to macrophages, then internalize lipids to form foam cells, thus develop fatty streak lesion. A wide range of adhesion molecules governs these interactions between cells, among these molecules are selectins. Selectins mediate the first step in leukocyte adhesion at sites of inflammation or injury, characterized by rolling and tethering

  7. The anti-motility signaling mechanism of TGFβ3 that controls cell traffic during skin wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Arum; Bandyopadhyay, Balaji; Jayaprakash, Priyamvada; Lua, Ingrid; Sahu, Divya; Chen, Mei; Woodley, David T; Li, Wei

    2012-12-15

    When skin is wounded, migration of epidermal keratinocytes at the wound edge initiates within hours, whereas migration of dermal fibroblasts toward the wounded area remains undetectable until several days later. This "cell type traffic" regulation ensures proper healing of the wound, as disruptions of the regulation could either cause delay of wound healing or result in hypertrophic scars. TGFβ3 is the critical traffic controller that selectively halts migration of the dermal, but not epidermal, cells to ensure completion of wound re-epithelialization prior to wound remodeling. However, the mechanism of TGFβ3's anti-motility signaling has never been investigated. We report here that activated TβRII transmits the anti-motility signal of TGFβ3 in full to TβRI, since expression of the constitutively activated TβRI-TD mutant was sufficient to replace TGFβ3 to block PDGF-bb-induced dermal fibroblast migration. Second, the three components of R-Smad complex are all required. Individual downregulation of Smad2, Smad3 or Smad4 prevented TGFβ3 from inhibiting dermal fibroblast migration. Third, Protein Kinase Array allowed us to identify the protein kinase A (PKA) as a specific downstream effector of R-Smads in dermal fibroblasts. Activation of PKA alone blocked PDGF-bb-induced dermal fibroblast migration, just like TGFβ3. Downregulation of PKA's catalytic subunit nullified the anti-motility signaling of TGFβ3. This is the first report on anti-motility signaling mechanism by TGFβ family cytokines. Significance of this finding is not only limited to wound healing but also to other human disorders, such as heart attack and cancer, where the diseased cells have often managed to avoid the anti-motility effect of TGFβ. PMID:23259050

  8. The anti-motility signaling mechanism of TGFβ3 that controls cell traffic during skin wound healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arum Han

    2012-09-01

    When skin is wounded, migration of epidermal keratinocytes at the wound edge initiates within hours, whereas migration of dermal fibroblasts toward the wounded area remains undetectable until several days later. This “cell type traffic” regulation ensures proper healing of the wound, as disruptions of the regulation could either cause delay of wound healing or result in hypertrophic scars. TGFβ3 is the critical traffic controller that selectively halts migration of the dermal, but not epidermal, cells to ensure completion of wound re-epithelialization prior to wound remodeling. However, the mechanism of TGFβ3's anti-motility signaling has never been investigated. We report here that activated TβRII transmits the anti-motility signal of TGFβ3 in full to TβRI, since expression of the constitutively activated TβRI-TD mutant was sufficient to replace TGFβ3 to block PDGF-bb-induced dermal fibroblast migration. Second, the three components of R-Smad complex are all required. Individual downregulation of Smad2, Smad3 or Smad4 prevented TGFβ3 from inhibiting dermal fibroblast migration. Third, Protein Kinase Array allowed us to identify the protein kinase A (PKA as a specific downstream effector of R-Smads in dermal fibroblasts. Activation of PKA alone blocked PDGF-bb-induced dermal fibroblast migration, just like TGFβ3. Downregulation of PKA's catalytic subunit nullified the anti-motility signaling of TGFβ3. This is the first report on anti-motility signaling mechanism by TGFβ family cytokines. Significance of this finding is not only limited to wound healing but also to other human disorders, such as heart attack and cancer, where the diseased cells have often managed to avoid the anti-motility effect of TGFβ.

  9. Characterization of HSP27 phosphorylation sites in human atherosclerotic plaque secretome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Durán, Mari-Carmen; Boeri-Erba, Elisabetta; Mohammed, Shabaz;

    2007-01-01

    -lymphocytes). These interactions can be mediated by proteins secreted from these cells, which therefore exert an important role in the atherosclerotic process. We recently described a novel strategy for the characterization of the human atherosclerotic plaque secretome, combining two-dimensional gel electrophoresis...... are unknown. Thus, the role that phosphorylated HSP27 could play in the atherosclerotic process is actually under study. The present work shows the strategies employed to characterize the phosphorylation in the HSP27 secreted by atheroma plaque samples. The application of liquid chromatography tandem...

  10. The healing of bony defects by cell-free collagen-based scaffolds compared to stem cell-seeded tissue engineered constructs.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lyons, Frank G

    2010-12-01

    One of the key challenges in tissue engineering is to understand the host response to scaffolds and engineered constructs. We present a study in which two collagen-based scaffolds developed for bone repair: a collagen-glycosaminoglycan (CG) and biomimetic collagen-calcium phosphate (CCP) scaffold, are evaluated in rat cranial defects, both cell-free and when cultured with MSCs prior to implantation. The results demonstrate that both cell-free scaffolds showed excellent healing relative to the empty defect controls and somewhat surprisingly, to the tissue engineered (MSC-seeded) constructs. Immunological analysis of the healing response showed higher M1 macrophage activity in the cell-seeded scaffolds. However, when the M2 macrophage response was analysed, both groups (MSC-seeded and non-seeded scaffolds) showed significant activity of these cells which are associated with an immunomodulatory and tissue remodelling response. Interestingly, the location of this response was confined to the construct periphery, where a capsule had formed, in the MSC-seeded groups as opposed to areas of new bone formation in the non-seeded groups. This suggests that matrix deposited by MSCs during in vitro culture may adversely affect healing by acting as a barrier to macrophage-led remodelling when implanted in vivo. This study thus improves our understanding of host response in bone tissue engineering.

  11. Cells and Tissue Interactions with Glycated Collagen and their Relevance to Delayed Diabetic Wound Healing

    OpenAIRE

    LIAO, HUIJUAN; Zakhaleva, Julia; Chen, Weiliam

    2009-01-01

    Dermal accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) has increasingly been implicated as the underlying cause of delayed diabetic wound healing. Devising an in vitro model to adequately mimic glycated tissues will facilitate investigation into the mechanism of glycation in conjunction with exploration of new approaches or improvement of current therapies for treating diabetic chronic wounds. Collagen matrices were artificially glycated and the presence of AGEs was demonstrated by imm...

  12. Glucose Toxic Effects on Granulation Tissue Productive Cells: The Diabetics’ Impaired Healing

    OpenAIRE

    Jorge Berlanga-Acosta; Schultz, Gregory S.; Ernesto López-Mola; Gerardo Guillen-Nieto; Marianela García-Siverio; Luis Herrera-Martínez

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic noncommunicable disease with an expanding pandemic magnitude. Diabetes predisposes to lower extremities ulceration and impairs the healing process leading to wound chronification. Diabetes also dismantles innate immunity favoring wound infection. Amputation is therefore acknowledged as one of the disease's complications. Hyperglycemia is the proximal detonator of systemic and local toxic effectors including proinflammation, acute-phase proteins elevatio...

  13. WOUND HEALING IN DIABETIC ULCER

    OpenAIRE

    Ida Bagus Putra Pramana; Ketut Putu Yasa

    2013-01-01

    The mechanism of wound healing is a complex mechanism and involves a variety of cells. Injury is defined as a disruption of normal structure and function. Various types of growth factors and cytokines such as platelet derived growth factor and transforming growth factor beta involved in the mechanism of wound healing. There are four phases of wound healing mechanisms : hemostasis, inflammatory, proliferative, and remodeling. Diabetic ulcers is one major complication, occurring in 15% of patie...

  14. Loss of CAR promotes migration and proliferation of HaCaT cells, and accelerates wound healing in rats via Src-p38 MAPK pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Linlin; Fu, Lanqing; Li, Xiaodong; Zhang, Yue; Li, Zhenzhen; Wu, Xue; Li, Yan; Bai, Xiaozhi; Hu, Dahai

    2016-01-01

    The coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR) is a cell adhesion molecule mostly localized to cell-cell contacts in epithelial and endothelial cells. CAR is known to regulate tumor progression, however, its physiological role in keratinocyte migration and proliferation, two essential steps in re-epithelialization during wound healing, has less been investigated. Here we showed that CAR was predominantly expressed in the epidermis of human skin, CAR knockdown by RNAi significantly accelerated HaCaT cell migration and proliferation. In addition, knockdown of CAR in vitro increased p-Src, p-p38, and p-JNK protein levels; however, Src inhibitor PP2 prevented the increase of p-Src and p-p38 induced by CAR RNAi, but not p-JNK, and decelerated cell migration and proliferation. More intriguingly, in vivo CAR RNAi on the skin area surrounding the wounds on rat back visually accelerated wound healing and re-epithelialization process, while treatment with PP2 or p38 inhibitor SB203580 obviously inhibited these effects. By contrast, overexpressing CAR in HaCaT cells significantly decelerated cell migration and proliferation. Above results demonstrate that suppression of CAR could accelerate HaCaT cell migration and proliferation, and promote wound healing in rat skin, probably via Src-p38 MAPK pathway. CAR thus might serve as a novel therapeutic target for facilitating wound healing. PMID:26804208

  15. Healing singing

    OpenAIRE

    Gretsch, Renate

    2013-01-01

    This study confirms the hypothesis that healing singing leads to positive emotional experiences in relation to other people through social resonance and a strong shared bond. People who have had negative interpersonal relationship experiences that have led to depression and fear respond favourably to healing singing, because it makes a positive encounter possible. Even if their resonance ability is limited by their illness, they can be reached through music, which allows them to slowly start ...

  16. Imaging Atherosclerotic Plaque Calcification: Translating Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Grant; Meadows, Judith; Morrison, Alan R

    2016-08-01

    Calcification of atherosclerotic lesions was long thought to be an age - related, passive process, but increasingly data has revealed that atherosclerotic calcification is a more active process, involving complex signaling pathways and bone-like genetic programs. Initially, imaging of atherosclerotic calcification was limited to gross assessment of calcium burden, which is associated with total atherosclerotic burden and risk of cardiovascular mortality and of all cause mortality. More recently, sophisticated molecular imaging studies of the various processes involved in calcification have begun to elucidate information about plaque calcium composition and consequent vulnerability to rupture, leading to hard cardiovascular events like myocardial infarction. As such, there has been renewed interest in imaging calcification to advance risk assessment accuracy in an evolving era of precision medicine. Here we summarize recent advances in our understanding of the biologic process of atherosclerotic calcification as well as some of the molecular imaging tools used to assess it. PMID:27339750

  17. Local transplantation of osteogenic pre-differentiated autologous adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells may accelerate non-union fracture healing with limited pro-metastatic potency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Duanyang; Han, Na; Zhang, Peixun; Jiang, Baoguo

    2015-01-01

    Fracture non-union is a serious complication in orthopedic clinical practice. Mesenchymal stem cells are believed to play a vital role in fracture healing process. Among various origins of mesenchymal stem cell, adipose derived stem cells hold great promise especially in clinical milieu. However, the wide spread application of mesenchymal stem cell based therapy is impeded by the pro-metastasis nature of the mesenchymal stem cell itself. Based on the findings from previous studies, we hypothesize that local transplanted osteogenic pre-differentiatiated adipose stem cell may promote the non-union fracture healing. Moreover, the pre-differnetiation stem cells by down-regulating the expression of CCL5 and CCL2. This novel osteogenic pre-differnetiation technique may help clinical orthopedists to resolve the refractory non-union cases and shed new light on other stem cell based therapies to counteract to avoid the pro-metastasis nature of the mesenchymal stem cells. PMID:25785146

  18. Evaluation of early healing events around mesenchymal stem cell-seeded collagen-glycosaminoglycan scaffold. An experimental study in Wistar rats.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Alhag, Mohamed

    2011-03-01

    Tissue engineering using cell-seeded biodegradable scaffolds offers a new bone regenerative approach that might circumvent many of the limitations of current therapeutic modalities. The aim of this experiment was to study the early healing events around mesenchymal stem cell-seeded collagen-glycosaminoglycan scaffolds.

  19. Macrophage p53 controls macrophage death in atherosclerotic lesions of apolipoprotein E deficient mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boesten, L.S.M.; Zadelaar, A.S.M.; Nieuwkoop, A. van; Hu, L.; Teunisse, A.F.A.S.; Jochemsen, A.G.; Evers, B.; Water, B. van de; Gijbels, M.J.J.; Vlijmen, B.J.M. van; Havekes, L.M.; Winther, M.P.J. de

    2009-01-01

    The cellular composition of atherosclerotic lesions is determined by many factors including cell infiltration, proliferation and cell death. Tumor suppressor gene p53 has been shown to regulate both cell proliferation and cell death in many cell types. In the present study, we investigated the role

  20. Calcification Locates to Transglutaminases in Advanced Human Atherosclerotic Lesions

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Transglutaminases play an important role in vascular smooth muscle cell-induced calcification in vitro. In this study, we determined whether these enzymes are also involved in human atherosclerotic calcification using nine carotid artery specimens obtained at endarterectomy. Sections of the carotid artery specimens were registered to micro-computed tomography images and stained for tissue-type transglutaminase, plasma transglutaminase factor XIIIA (FXIIIA), the Nε(γ-glutamyl)lysine cross-link...

  1. Human urotensin II promotes hypertension and atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Takuya; Arita, Shigeko; Shiraishi, Yuji; Suguro, Toshiaki; Sakai, Tetsuo; Hongo, Shigeki; Miyazaki, Akira

    2009-01-01

    Human urotensin II (U-II), the most potent vasoconstrictor undecapeptide identified to date, and its receptor (UT) are involved in the pathogenesis of systemic and pulmonary hypertension. Here, we review recent advances in our understanding of the pathophysiology of U-II with particular reference to its role in atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms of U-II gene (S89N) are associated with onset of essential hypertension, type II diabetes mellitus, and insulin resistance in the Asian population. Plasma U-II levels are elevated in patients with vascular endothelial dysfunction-related diseases such as essential hypertension, diabetes mellitus, atherosclerosis, ischemic heart disease, and heart failure. Chronic infusion of U-II enhances atherosclerotic lesions in the aorta in apolipoprotein E-knockout mice. In human atherosclerotic plaques from the aorta and coronary and carotid arteries, U-II is expressed at high levels in endothelial cells (ECs) and lymphocytes, whereas UT is expressed at high levels in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), ECs, monocytes, and macrophages. U-II stimulates vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression in human ECs as chemoattractant for monocytes, and accelerates foam cell formation by up-regulation of acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase-1 in human monocyte-derived macrophages. U-II produces reactive oxygen species (ROS) via nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase activation in human VSMCs, and stimulates VSMC proliferation with synergistic effects when combined with ROS, oxidized LDL, and serotonin. Clinical studies demonstrated increased plasma U-II levels in accordance with the severity of carotid atherosclerosis in patients with essential hypertension and that of coronary artery lesions in patients with ischemic heart disease. Here, we summarize the key roles of U-II in progression of hypertension and atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases

  2. Progress in corneal wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljubimov, Alexander V; Saghizadeh, Mehrnoosh

    2015-11-01

    Corneal wound healing is a complex process involving cell death, migration, proliferation, differentiation, and extracellular matrix remodeling. Many similarities are observed in the healing processes of corneal epithelial, stromal and endothelial cells, as well as cell-specific differences. Corneal epithelial healing largely depends on limbal stem cells and remodeling of the basement membrane. During stromal healing, keratocytes get transformed to motile and contractile myofibroblasts largely due to activation of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) system. Endothelial cells heal mostly by migration and spreading, with cell proliferation playing a secondary role. In the last decade, many aspects of wound healing process in different parts of the cornea have been elucidated, and some new therapeutic approaches have emerged. The concept of limbal stem cells received rigorous experimental corroboration, with new markers uncovered and new treatment options including gene and microRNA therapy tested in experimental systems. Transplantation of limbal stem cell-enriched cultures for efficient re-epithelialization in stem cell deficiency and corneal injuries has become reality in clinical setting. Mediators and course of events during stromal healing have been detailed, and new treatment regimens including gene (decorin) and stem cell therapy for excessive healing have been designed. This is a very important advance given the popularity of various refractive surgeries entailing stromal wound healing. Successful surgical ways of replacing the diseased endothelium have been clinically tested, and new approaches to accelerate endothelial healing and suppress endothelial-mesenchymal transformation have been proposed including Rho kinase (ROCK) inhibitor eye drops and gene therapy to activate TGF-β inhibitor SMAD7. Promising new technologies with potential for corneal wound healing manipulation including microRNA, induced pluripotent stem cells to generate corneal

  3. Human Wharton's Jelly Mesenchymal Stem Cells plasticity augments scar-free skin wound healing with hair growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikram Sabapathy

    Full Text Available Human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are a promising candidate for cell-based transplantation and regenerative medicine therapies. Thus in the present study Wharton's Jelly Mesenchymal Stem Cells (WJ-MSCs have been derived from extra embryonic umbilical cord matrix following removal of both arteries and vein. Also, to overcome the clinical limitations posed by fetal bovine serum (FBS supplementation because of xenogeneic origin of FBS, usual FBS cell culture supplement has been replaced with human platelet lysate (HPL. Apart from general characteristic features of bone marrow-derived MSCs, wharton jelly-derived MSCs have the ability to maintain phenotypic attributes, cell growth kinetics, cell cycle pattern, in vitro multilineage differentiation plasticity, apoptotic pattern, normal karyotype-like intrinsic mesenchymal stem cell properties in long-term in vitro cultures. Moreover, the WJ-MSCs exhibited the in vitro multilineage differentiation capacity by giving rise to differentiated cells of not only mesodermal lineage but also to the cells of ectodermal and endodermal lineage. Also, WJ-MSC did not present any aberrant cell state upon in vivo transplantation in SCID mice and in vitro soft agar assays. The immunomodulatory potential assessed by gene expression levels of immunomodulatory factors upon exposure to inflammatory cytokines in the fetal WJ-MSCs was relatively higher compared to adult bone marrow-derived MSCs. WJ-MSCs seeded on decellularized amniotic membrane scaffold transplantation on the skin injury of SCID mice model demonstrates that combination of WJ-MSCs and decellularized amniotic membrane scaffold exhibited significantly better wound-healing capabilities, having reduced scar formation with hair growth and improved biomechanical properties of regenerated skin compared to WJ-MSCs alone. Further, our experimental data indicate that indocyanin green (ICG at optimal concentration can be resourcefully used for labeling of stem cells

  4. Revascularisation of atherosclerotic mesenteric arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Max Greve; Lorentzen, Jørgen Ewald; Schroeder, T V

    1994-01-01

    25 patients, chronic ischaemia in 53 and prophylactic reconstruction in connection with aortic surgery in 12 patients. The superior mesenteric artery (SMA) was revascularised in 87 patients and the coeliac axis or common hepatic artery in six. Thus, only three patients had both territories......OBJECTIVES: Visceral artery surgery is well known to vascular surgeons, but most have limited personal experience. We report our experience with 90 patients treated for atherosclerotic lesions of the visceral arteries during a 25-year period 1968-1993. DESIGN: Retrospective study. SETTING...... revascularised. Thromboendarterectomy was performed in 15 patients, transposition of the SMA directly into the infrarenal aorta in 30 and bypass in 48 patients. CHIEF OUTCOME MEASURES: Cumulative symptom-free and survival rates. MAIN RESULTS: The overall perioperative (30 days) mortality rate was 13%, mainly...

  5. Osteoblastic response as a healing reaction to chemotherapy mimicking progressive disease in patients with small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The osteoblastic response (OR) phenomenon as a healing reaction during effective chemotherapy - defined by the appearance of new osteoblastic bone lesions while disease response in other tumor sites was well documented - has previously been described for breast and prostate cancer. The purpose of this study was to investigate this phenomenon that could erroneously be interpreted as progressive disease in patients with small cell lung cancer (SCLC) and to establish guidelines for interpretation of follow-up computed tomography (CT) examinations in this situation. Twenty-four patients with newly diagnosed SCLC and bone metastases were retrospectively included in this study. The characteristics of bone lesions in CT examinations were correlated with bone scintigraphy and magnetic resonance imaging, if available. In target lesions the CT density quantified in Hounsfield units (HU) was evaluated at baseline and during follow-up. New osteoblastic lesions occurred during follow-up in 17 of 24 patients. OR was proven in 4 patients and considered most likely in 11 patients; mean density increase in target lesions was 153 HU. The study indicates that osteoblastic response as a healing reaction seems to occur in the majority of patients with SCLC and bone metastases and should not be misinterpreted as progressive disease. (orig.)

  6. CAROTID ATHEROSCLEROTIC LESION IN YOUNG PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Pizova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to determine the incidence of atherosclerotic lesions in the carotid and vertebral arteries of young patients from Doppler ultrasound data and to compare the quantitatively assessed traditional risk factors of coronary heart disease (CHD with severe extracranial artery atherosclerotic lesion.Subjects and methods. Doppler ultrasound was carried out evaluating structural changes in the aortic arch branches in 1563 railway transport workers less than 45 years of age. A separate sample consisted of 68 young people with carotid atherosclerotic changes, in whom traditional risk factors for CHD were studied, so were in a control group of individuals without atherosclerotic changes (n = 38.Results. Among the examinees, carotid atherosclerotic lesion was detected in 112 (7.1 % cases, the increase in the rate of atherosclerotic plaques in patients aged 35–45 years being 9.08 %; that in the rate of local intima-media thickness in those aged 31–40 years being 5.1 %. Smoking (particularly that along with hypercholesterolemia and a family history of cardiovascular diseases, obesity (along with low activity, and emotional overstrain were defined as important risk factors in the young patients. Moreover, factor analysis has shown that smoking,hypertension, and early cardiovascular pathology in the next of kin makes the greatest contribution to the development of carotid atherosclerotic lesion.Conclusion. Among the patients less than 45 years of age, carotid and vertebral artery atherosclerotic changes were found in 112 (7.1 % cases, which were more pronounced in male patients. Smoking, particularly along with hypercholesterolemia and genetic predisposition to cardiovascular diseases, was a risk factor that had the highest impact on the degree of atherosclerotic lesion in the aortic arch branches of the young patients.

  7. Mesenchymal stem cell-conditioned medium accelerates skin wound healing: An in vitro study of fibroblast and keratinocyte scratch assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have used in vitro scratch assays to examine the relative contribution of dermal fibroblasts and keratinocytes in the wound repair process and to test the influence of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) secreted factors on both skin cell types. Scratch assays were established using single cell and co-cultures of L929 fibroblasts and HaCaT keratinocytes, with wound closure monitored via time-lapse microscopy. Both in serum supplemented and serum free conditions, wound closure was faster in L929 fibroblast than HaCaT keratinocyte scratch assays, and in co-culture the L929 fibroblasts lead the way in closing the scratches. MSC-CM generated under serum free conditions significantly enhanced the wound closure rate of both skin cell types separately and in co-culture, whereas conditioned medium from L929 or HaCaT cultures had no significant effect. This enhancement of wound closure in the presence of MSC-CM was due to accelerated cell migration rather than increased cell proliferation. A number of wound healing mediators were identified in MSC-CM, including TGF-β1, the chemokines IL-6, IL-8, MCP-1 and RANTES, and collagen type I, fibronectin, SPARC and IGFBP-7. This study suggests that the trophic activity of MSC may play a role in skin wound closure by affecting both dermal fibroblast and keratinocyte migration, along with a contribution to the formation of extracellular matrix.

  8. The Protective Effect of Apamin on LPS/Fat-Induced Atherosclerotic Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo-Jung Kim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Apamin, a peptide component of bee venom (BV, has anti-inflammatory properties. However, the molecular mechanisms by which apamin prevents atherosclerosis are not fully understood. We examined the effect of apamin on atherosclerotic mice. Atherosclerotic mice received intraperitoneal (ip injections of lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 2 mg/kg to induce atherosclerotic change and were fed an atherogenic diet for 12 weeks. Apamin (0.05 mg/kg was administered by ip injection. LPS-induced THP-1-derived macrophage inflammation treated with apamin reduced expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α, vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM-1, and intracellular cell adhesion molecule (ICAM-1, as well as the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB signaling pathway. Apamin decreased the formation of atherosclerotic lesions as assessed by hematoxylin and elastic staining. Treatment with apamin reduced lipids, Ca2+ levels, and TNF-α in the serum from atherosclerotic mice. Further, apamin significantly attenuated expression of VCAM-1, ICAM-1, TGF-β1, and fibronectin in the descending aorta from atherosclerotic mice. These results indicate that apamin plays an important role in monocyte/macrophage inflammatory processing and may be of potential value for preventing atherosclerosis.

  9. Anti-atherosclerotic effects of konjac

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidekatsu Yanai

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Definition: The Konjac plant comes from the genus Amorphophallus. Japanese food uses Konjac cake. Konjac contains almost no calories and a great amount of dietary fiber. Here, we reviewed possible anti-atherosclerotic effects of konjac, using the search Pubmed ®. Konjac ingestion is likely beneficially associated with obesity, blood pressure, lipid and glucose metabolism. However, evidence is lacking on the relationship between konjac ingestion and development of atherosclerotic diseases. To more fully understand the anti-atherosclerotic effects of konjac, future studies, preferably with larger numbers of subjects, will be performed.

  10. Congenital Self-Healing Reticulohistiocytosis

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Young H.; Talekar, Mala K.; Chung, Catherine G.; Bell, Moshe D.; Zaenglein, Andrea L.

    2014-01-01

    Congenital self-healing reticulohistiocytosis, also known as congenital self-healing Langerhans cell histiocytosis or Hashimoto-Pritzker disease, is a Langerhans cell histiocytosis. It is characterized by skin lesions in the newborn period in an otherwise healthy infant that show a Langerhans cell infiltrate in the skin on histological analysis. These findings subsequently spontaneously involute. This report describes two newborns who presented at birth with differing presentations of congeni...

  11. Synergistic interactions of blood-borne immune cells, fibroblasts and extracellular matrix drive repair in an in vitro peri-implant wound healing model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhardt, Melanie A.; Waser, Jasmin; Milleret, Vincent; Gerber, Isabel; Emmert, Maximilian Y.; Foolen, Jasper; Hoerstrup, Simon P.; Schlottig, Falko; Vogel, Viola

    2016-02-01

    Low correlations of cell culture data with clinical outcomes pose major medical challenges with costly consequences. While the majority of biomaterials are tested using in vitro cell monocultures, the importance of synergistic interactions between different cell types on paracrine signalling has recently been highlighted. In this proof-of-concept study, we asked whether the first contact of surfaces with whole human blood could steer the tissue healing response. This hypothesis was tested using alkali-treatment of rough titanium (Ti) surfaces since they have clinically been shown to improve early implant integration and stability, yet blood-free in vitro cell cultures poorly correlated with in vivo tissue healing. We show that alkali-treatment, compared to native Ti surfaces, increased blood clot thickness, including platelet adhesion. Strikingly, blood clots with entrapped blood cells in synergistic interactions with fibroblasts, but not fibroblasts alone, upregulated the secretion of major factors associated with fast healing. This includes matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) to break down extracellular matrix and the growth factor VEGF, known for its angiogenic potential. Consequently, in vitro test platforms, which consider whole blood-implant interactions, might be superior in predicting wound healing in response to biomaterial properties.

  12. 5. Accelerated Fracture Healing Targeting Periosteal Cells: Possibility of Combined Therapy of Low-Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound (LIPUS), Bone Graft, and Growth Factor (bFGF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Kentaro; Urabe, Ken; Naruse, Koji; Mikuni-Takagaki, Yuko; Inoue, Gen; Takaso, Masashi

    2016-08-01

    We have studied the mechanism of fracture healing, and the effect of LIPUS, bone graft and growth factor on accelerating fracture healing. We present here the results of our research. To examine callus formation cells in fracture healing, we made marrow GFP chimera mice and a fracture model of marrow mesenchymal stem cell GFP chimera mice. It was demonstrated that periosteal cells were essential for callus formation. We focused on periosteal cells and examined the effect of LIPUS. In an in vitro experiment using a cultured part of the femur, LIPUS promoted ossification of the periosteal tissue. Further, LIPUS accelerated VEGF expression in the experiment using the femoral fracture model of mice. From these results, it was suggested that activation of periosteal cells might play a role in the fracture healing mechanism of LIPUS. Next, we discussed the possibility of combined therapy of LIPUS, bone graft and growth factor. Therapy involving the topical administration of bFGF using a controlled release system and bone graft could promote callus formation. In addition, LIPUS was able to promote membranaceous ossification after the bone graft. It was suggested that combined therapy of LIPUS, bone graft and bFGF could be a new option for treating fractures. PMID:27441766

  13. Adiponectin-coated nanoparticles for enhanced imaging of atherosclerotic plaques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almer G

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Gunter Almer1,6, Karin Wernig2, Matthias Saba-Lepek3, Samih Haj-Yahya1, Johannes Rattenberger4, Julian Wagner4, Kerstin Gradauer3, Daniela Frascione3, Georg Pabst3, Gerd Leitinger5, Harald Mangge1, Andreas Zimmer2, Ruth Prassl31Clinical Institute of Medical and Chemical Laboratory Diagnostics, 2Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, University of Graz, 3Institute of Biophysics and Nanosystems Research, Austrian Academy of Science, 4Institute for Electron Microscopy and Fine Structure Research, Graz University of Technology, 5Institute of Cell Biology, Histology and Embryology, Medical University of Graz, 6Center for Medical Research, Medical University of Graz, AustriaBackground: Atherosclerosis is a leading cause of mortality in the Western world, and plaque diagnosis is still a challenge in cardiovascular medicine. The main focus of this study was to make atherosclerotic plaques visible using targeted nanoparticles for improved imaging. Today various biomarkers are known to be involved in the pathophysiologic scenario of atherosclerotic plaques. One promising new candidate is the globular domain of the adipocytokine adiponectin (gAd, which was used as a targeting sequence in this study.Methods: gAd was coupled to two different types of nanoparticles, namely protamine-oligonucleotide nanoparticles, known as proticles, and sterically stabilized liposomes. Both gAd-targeted nanoparticles were investigated for their potency to characterize critical scenarios within early and advanced atherosclerotic plaque lesions using an atherosclerotic mouse model. Aortic tissue from wild type and apolipoprotein E-deficient mice, both fed a high-fat diet, were stained with either fluorescent-labeled gAd or gAd-coupled nanoparticles. Ex vivo imaging was performed using confocal laser scanning microscopy.Results: gAd-targeted sterically stabilized liposomes generated a strong signal by accumulating at the surface of

  14. Phenolic compounds of Chromolaena odorata protect cultured skin cells from oxidative damage: implication for cutaneous wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, T T; Wang, L; See, P; Grayer, R J; Chan, S Y; Lee, S T

    2001-12-01

    Extracts from the leaves of Chromolaena odorata have been shown to be beneficial for treatment of wounds. The crude ethanol extract of the plant had been demonstrated to be a powerful antioxidant to protect fibroblasts and keratinocytes in vitro. In this study, the most active compounds were fractionated and identified from the crude extract using liquid chromatography coupled with UV spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The antioxidant effects of purified fractions on cultured fibroblasts and keratinocytes were investigated using colorimetric and lactate hydrogenase release assay. The results showed that the phenolic acids present (protocatechuic, p-hydroxybenzoic, p-coumaric, ferulic and vanillic acids) and complex mixtures of lipophilic flavonoid aglycones (flavanones, flavonols, flavones and chalcones) were major and powerful antioxidants to protect cultured skin cells against oxidative damage. In conclusion, the extract from C odorata contains a mixture of powerful antioxidant compounds that may be one of potential mechanism contributing to enhanced wound healing. PMID:11767105

  15. Enhanced Wound Healing, Kinase and Stem Cell Marker Expression in Diabetic Organ-Cultured Human Corneas Upon MMP-10 and Cathepsin F Gene Silencing

    OpenAIRE

    Saghizadeh, Mehrnoosh; Epifantseva, Irina; Hemmati, David M.; Ghiam, Chantelle A.; Brunken, William J; Ljubimov, Alexander V

    2013-01-01

    Adenovirus-driven shRNA silencing of select proteinases upregulated in diabetic corneas restored normal wound healing time, the expression of diabetes-altered markers including limbal stem cell markers, and patterns of activated EGFR and Akt in human diabetic corneal organ cultures. The maximum effect was obtained combining proteinase shRNA with c-met overexpression.

  16. Natural History of Intracranial Atherosclerotic Disease

    OpenAIRE

    YuehuaPu

    2014-01-01

    Intracranial atherosclerotic disease was very common among stroke patients of Asians, Blacks, and Hispanics ancestry. Furthermore, stroke patients with intracranial atherosclerosis (ICAS) have higher recurrence rate of cerebral ischemia and death than those without ICAS. However, the natural history of intracranial atherosclerotic disease is still in controversy. Most of the studies were retrospective and randomized controlled trial of drugs. This review summarized the prognosis of symptomati...

  17. Anti-atherosclerotic effects of konjac

    OpenAIRE

    Hidekatsu Yanai; Hiroki Adachi; Hisayuki Katsuyama; Hidetaka Hamasaki; Akahito Sako

    2015-01-01

    Definition: The Konjac plant comes from the genus Amorphophallus. Japanese food uses Konjac cake. Konjac contains almost no calories and a great amount of dietary fiber. Here, we reviewed possible anti-atherosclerotic effects of konjac, using the search Pubmed ®. Konjac ingestion is likely beneficially associated with obesity, blood pressure, lipid and glucose metabolism. However, evidence is lacking on the relationship between konjac ingestion and development of atherosclerotic diseases. To ...

  18. CXCL13 Promotes the Effect of Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs on Tendon-Bone Healing in Rats and in C3HIOT1/2 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Tian

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are potential effective therapy for tissue repair and bone regeneration. In present study, the effects of CXC chemokine ligand-13 (CXCL13 were evaluated on tendon-bone healing of rats. Methods: Tendon bone healing of the rat model was established and biomechanical testing was performed at 2, 4, 8 weeks after surgery. Murine mesenchymal cell line (C3HIOT1/2 cells was cultured. The expression of miRNA-23a was detected by real-time PCR. The protein expression of ERK1/2, JNK and p38 was detected by western blotting. MiR-23a mimic and inhibitor were used to overexpress or silence the expression of miR-23a. Results: MSCs significantly elevated the levels of ultimate load to failure, stiffness and stress in specimens of rats, the effects of which were enhanced by CXCL13. The expression of miR-23a was down-regulated and the protein of ERK1/2 level was up-regulated by CXCL13 treatment in both in vivo and in vitro experiments. ERK1/2 expression was elevated by overexpression of miR-23a and reduced by miR-23a inhibitor. Conclusions: These findings revealed that CXCL13 promoted the tendon-bone healing in rats with MSCs treatment, and implied that the activation of ERK1/2 via miR-23a was involved in the process of MSCs treated bone regeneration.

  19. Healing actions of essential oils from Citrus aurantium and d-limonene in the gastric mucosa: the roles of VEGF, PCNA, and COX-2 in cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes, Thiago Mello; Rozza, Ariane Leite; Kushima, Hélio; Pellizzon, Claudia Helena; Rocha, Lucia Regina Machado; Hiruma-Lima, Clélia Akiko

    2013-12-01

    Previous studies have described the gastroprotective effects of essential oils that are derived from Citrus aurantium (OEC) and its main compound d-limonene (LIM) in a model of chemically induced ulcers in rats. However, these studies do not address the compound's healing effects on the gastric mucosa. Thus, the aim of this work was to evaluate the healing activity of OEC and LIM in acetic acid-induced gastric ulcers in rats, a model that reproduces human chronic ulcers. The obtained results demonstrated that lower effective doses of OEC (250 mg/kg) and LIM (245 mg/kg) induced gastric mucosal healing with a cure rate of 44% and 56%, respectively, compared with the control group (P<.05). During the 14 days of OEC or LIM treatment, none of the groups demonstrated toxicity in terms of body and organ weight or serum biochemical parameters. Both OEC and LIM treatment promoted an increase in epithelial healing, as confirmed by immunohistochemistry, which was greater in the animals that were treated with the positive control. In addition, both treatments increased cellular proliferation as measured by proliferating cell nuclear antigen and cyclooxygenase 2 expression in the gastric mucosa, vascular endothelial growth factor-mediated blood vessel formation in the margin of the ulcer, and production of gastric mucus, which fortifies the gastric protective barrier. We concluded that OEC and LIM, two common flavoring agents, promote gastric mucosal healing without any apparent toxic effect, resulting in better gastric epithelial organization in the treated rats. PMID:24328705

  20. Molecular magnetic resonance imaging of atherosclerotic vessel wall disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noerenberg, Dominik [Charite - University Medicine Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); University of Munich - Grosshadern, Department of Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Ebersberger, Hans U. [Heart Center Munich-Bogenhausen, Department of Cardiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Munich (Germany); Diederichs, Gerd; Hamm, Bernd [Charite - University Medicine Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Botnar, Rene M. [King' s College London, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom); Makowski, Marcus R. [Charite - University Medicine Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); King' s College London, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom)

    2016-03-15

    Molecular imaging aims to improve the identification and characterization of pathological processes in vivo by visualizing the underlying biological mechanisms. Molecular imaging techniques are increasingly used to assess vascular inflammation, remodeling, cell migration, angioneogenesis and apoptosis. In cardiovascular diseases, molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers new insights into the in vivo biology of pathological vessel wall processes of the coronary and carotid arteries and the aorta. This includes detection of early vascular changes preceding plaque development, visualization of unstable plaques and assessment of response to therapy. The current review focuses on recent developments in the field of molecular MRI to characterise different stages of atherosclerotic vessel wall disease. A variety of molecular MR-probes have been developed to improve the non-invasive detection and characterization of atherosclerotic plaques. Specifically targeted molecular probes allow for the visualization of key biological steps in the cascade leading to the development of arterial vessel wall lesions. Early detection of processes which lead to the development of atherosclerosis and the identification of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques may enable the early assessment of response to therapy, improve therapy planning, foster the prevention of cardiovascular events and may open the door for the development of patient-specific treatment strategies. (orig.)

  1. Molecular magnetic resonance imaging of atherosclerotic vessel wall disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular imaging aims to improve the identification and characterization of pathological processes in vivo by visualizing the underlying biological mechanisms. Molecular imaging techniques are increasingly used to assess vascular inflammation, remodeling, cell migration, angioneogenesis and apoptosis. In cardiovascular diseases, molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers new insights into the in vivo biology of pathological vessel wall processes of the coronary and carotid arteries and the aorta. This includes detection of early vascular changes preceding plaque development, visualization of unstable plaques and assessment of response to therapy. The current review focuses on recent developments in the field of molecular MRI to characterise different stages of atherosclerotic vessel wall disease. A variety of molecular MR-probes have been developed to improve the non-invasive detection and characterization of atherosclerotic plaques. Specifically targeted molecular probes allow for the visualization of key biological steps in the cascade leading to the development of arterial vessel wall lesions. Early detection of processes which lead to the development of atherosclerosis and the identification of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques may enable the early assessment of response to therapy, improve therapy planning, foster the prevention of cardiovascular events and may open the door for the development of patient-specific treatment strategies. (orig.)

  2. Effects of Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating (GM-CSF Factor on Corneal Epithelial Cells in Corneal Wound Healing Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Rae Rho

    Full Text Available Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF is a pleiotropic cytokine that activates granulocyte and macrophage cell lineages. It is also known to have an important function in wound healing. This study investigated the effect of GM-CSF in wound healing of human corneal epithelial cells (HCECs. We used human GM-CSF derived from rice cells (rice cell-derived recombinant human GM-CSF; rhGM-CSF. An in vitro migration assay was performed to investigate the migration rate of HCECs treated with various concentrations of rhGM-CSF (0.1, 1.0, and 10.0 μg/ml. MTT assay and flow cytometric analysis were used to evaluate the proliferative effect of rhGM-CSF. The protein level of p38MAPK was analyzed by western blotting. For in vivo analysis, 100 golden Syrian hamsters were divided into four groups, and their corneas were de-epithelialized with alcohol and a blade. The experimental groups were treated with 10, 20, or 50 μg/ml rhGM-CSF four times daily, and the control group was treated with phosphate-buffered saline. The corneal wound-healing rate was evaluated by fluorescein staining at the initial wounding and 12, 24, 36, and 48 hours after epithelial debridement. rhGM-CSF accelerated corneal epithelial wound healing both in vitro and in vivo. MTT assay and flow cytometric analysis revealed that rhGM-CSF treatment had no effects on HCEC proliferation. Western blot analysis demonstrated that the expression level of phosphorylated p38MAPK increased with rhGM-CSF treatment. These findings indicate that rhGM-CSF enhances corneal wound healing by accelerating cell migration.

  3. Effects of Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating (GM-CSF) Factor on Corneal Epithelial Cells in Corneal Wound Healing Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rho, Chang Rae; Park, Mi-young; Kang, Seungbum

    2015-01-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a pleiotropic cytokine that activates granulocyte and macrophage cell lineages. It is also known to have an important function in wound healing. This study investigated the effect of GM-CSF in wound healing of human corneal epithelial cells (HCECs). We used human GM-CSF derived from rice cells (rice cell-derived recombinant human GM-CSF; rhGM-CSF). An in vitro migration assay was performed to investigate the migration rate of HCECs treated with various concentrations of rhGM-CSF (0.1, 1.0, and 10.0 μg/ml). MTT assay and flow cytometric analysis were used to evaluate the proliferative effect of rhGM-CSF. The protein level of p38MAPK was analyzed by western blotting. For in vivo analysis, 100 golden Syrian hamsters were divided into four groups, and their corneas were de-epithelialized with alcohol and a blade. The experimental groups were treated with 10, 20, or 50 μg/ml rhGM-CSF four times daily, and the control group was treated with phosphate-buffered saline. The corneal wound-healing rate was evaluated by fluorescein staining at the initial wounding and 12, 24, 36, and 48 hours after epithelial debridement. rhGM-CSF accelerated corneal epithelial wound healing both in vitro and in vivo. MTT assay and flow cytometric analysis revealed that rhGM-CSF treatment had no effects on HCEC proliferation. Western blot analysis demonstrated that the expression level of phosphorylated p38MAPK increased with rhGM-CSF treatment. These findings indicate that rhGM-CSF enhances corneal wound healing by accelerating cell migration. PMID:26376304

  4. Possible role of apolipoprotein A1 in healing and cell death after neuronal injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Mohor B; Mukhopadhyay, Debashis

    2016-01-01

    Limited axonal regeneration after traumatic injuries to the CNS presents a challenge in neuroscience. Investigation of CSF from subjects with spinal cord injury (SCI) has found that the lipid catabolism pathway is implicated in the post injury scenario. Sequestration of the CNS by the blood brain barrier ensures a mechanism of cholesterol metabolism and recycling distinct from that in the peripheral tissues. Apolipoprotein A1, the protein component of high density lipoprotein (HDL), is an abundant protein in the mammalian cerebrospinal fluid. Interaction of ApoA1 with its cellular receptor, ABCA1, gives rise to several signaling events, such as the activation of Cdc42 protein leading to actin polymerisation. Emerging evidences suggest that ApoA1 mediates anti-inflammatory effects and conversely, is negatively regulated by inflammatory cytokines. Collating these findings, added to the clinical evidences of using HDL as a therapeutic target for cardio vascular diseases, we hypothesize that ApoA1 could be useful in neurite outgrowth after mechanical injury by 1) mediating polymerisation of actin and 2) restricting inflammatory responses after injury which are deleterious to healing. PMID:27100352

  5. Rapid biomimetic mineralization of collagen fibrils and combining with human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells for bone defects healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Bihua; Luo, Xueshi; Li, Zhiwen; Zhuang, Caiping; Li, Lihua; Lu, Lu; Ding, Shan; Tian, Jinhuan; Zhou, Changren

    2016-11-01

    Collagen biomineralization is regulated by complicated interactions between the collagen matrix and non-collagenous extracellular proteins. Here, the use of sodium tripolyphosphate to simulate the templating functional motif of the C-terminal fragment of non-collagenous proteins is reported, and a low molecular weight polyacrylic acid served as a sequestration agent to stabilize amorphous calcium phosphate into nanoprecursors. Self-assembled collagen fibrils served as a fixed template for achieving rapid biomimetic mineralization in vitro. Results demonstrated that, during the mineralization process, intrafibrillar and extrafibrillar hydroxyapatite mineral with collagen fibrils formed and did so via bottom-up nanoparticle assembly based on the non-classical crystallization approach in the presence of these dual biomimetic functional analogues. In vitro human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cell (hUCMSC) culture found that the mineralized scaffolds have a better cytocompatibility in terms of cell viability, adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation into osteoblasts. A rabbit femoral condyle defect model was established to confirm the ability of the n-HA/collagen scaffolds to facilitate bone regeneration and repair. The images of gross anatomy, MRI, CT and histomorphology taken 6 and 12weeks after surgery showed that the biomimetic mineralized collagen scaffolds with hUCMSCs can promote the healing speed of bone defects in vivo, and both of the scaffolds groups performing better than the bone defect control group. As new bone tissue formed, the scaffolds degraded and were gradually absorbed. All these results demonstrated that both of the scaffolds and cells have better histocompatibility. PMID:27523994

  6. Anti-aging effects of Piper cambodianum P. Fourn. extract on normal human dermal fibroblast cells and a wound-healing model in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee H

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Hyunji Lee,1 Youngeun Hong,1 So Hee Kwon,2 Jongsun Park,1 Jisoo Park1 1Department of Pharmacology and Medical Science, Metabolic Diseases and Cell Signaling Laboratory, Research Institute for Medical Sciences, College of Medicine, Chungnam National University, Daejeon, 2Department of Pharmacy, College of Pharmacy, Yonsei Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Yonsei University, Incheon, South Korea Background: Aging of skin is associated with environmental factors such as ultraviolet rays, air pollution, gravity, and genetic factors, all of which can lead to wrinkling of skin. Previous reports suggest that the wound repair is impaired by the aging process and strategies to manipulate the age-related wound healing are necessary in order to stimulate repair.Objective: Several traditional plant extracts are well-known for their properties of skin protection and care. Piper cambodianum P. Fourn. (PPF, a member of Piperacecae, is a plant found in Vietnam that might have therapeutic properties. Therefore, the effects of PPF stem and leaf extract on aging process were investigated in vitro and in vivo.Methods: PPF extract dissolved in methanol was investigated using Western blotting, real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, flow cytometry, and cell wound-healing assays. We assessed the anti-aging effect of PPF in mouse using the wound-healing assay. The results were analyzed by Student’s unpaired t-test; *P<0.05 and **P<0.01 were considered to indicate significant and highly significant values, respectively, compared with corresponding controls.Results: PPF treatment demonstrated in vitro and in vivo anti-aging activity. Western blot analysis of PPF-treated normal human dermal fibroblast cells showed a dose-dependent increase in the expression of extracellular matrix genes such as collagen and elastin, but decreased expression of the aging gene matrix metalloproteinase-3. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction showed

  7. Concentrated Hypoxia-Preconditioned Adipose Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Conditioned Medium Improves Wounds Healing in Full-Thickness Skin Defect Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Biao; Guo, Shilei; Xu, Fei; Wang, Bin; Liu, Xiujuan; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Xu, Yan

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the bioactive factors were utilized in exercise and athletic skin injuries. In this research, the concentrated conditioned medium of hypoxia-preconditioned adipose mesenchymal stem cells, which is rich in bioactive factor, is applied in full-thickness skin defect model to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy. Adipose mesenchymal stem cells were harvested from the abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissues. The surface markers and the potential of differentiation were analyzed. The conditioned medium of hypoxia-preconditioned stem cells was collected and freeze-dried and then applied on the rat full-thickness skin defect model, and the healing time of each group was recorded. Haematoxylin and eosin staining of skin was assessed by microscope. The characteristics of adipose mesenchymal stem cells were similar to those of other mesenchymal stem cells. The concentration of protein in freeze-dried conditioned medium in 1 mL water was about 15 times higher than in the normal condition medium. In vivo, the concentrated hypoxia-preconditioned conditioned medium can reduce the wound size and accelerate the skin wound healing. The concentrated hypoxia-preconditioned adipose mesenchymal stem cell-conditioned medium has great effect on rat model of wound healing, and it would be an ideal agent for wound care in clinical application. PMID:27433483

  8. Enhancement of tendon-to-bone healing after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells genetically modified with bFGF/BMP2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Biao; Li, Bin; Qi, Yong-Jian; Ni, Qu-Bo; Pan, Zheng-Qi; Wang, Hui; Chen, Liao-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Many strategies, including various growth factors and gene transfer, have been used to augment healing after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The biological environment regulated by the growth factors during the stage of tendon-bone healing was considered important in controlling the integrating process. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) genetically modified with bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) on healing after ACL reconstruction. BMSCs were infected with an adenoviral vector encoding BMP2 (AdBMP2) or bFGF (AdbFGF). Then, the infected BMSCs were surgically implanted into the tendon-bone interface. At 12 weeks postoperatively, the formation of abundant cartilage-like cells, smaller tibial bone tunnel and significantly higher ultimate load and stiffness levels, through histological analysis, micro-computed tomography and biomechanical testing, were observed. In addition, the AdBMP2-plus-AdbFGF group had the smallest bone tunnel and the best mechanical properties among all the groups. The addition of BMP2 or bFGF by gene transfer resulted in better cellularity, new bone formation and higher mechanical property, which contributed to the healing process after ACL reconstruction. Furthermore, the co-application of these two genes was more powerful and efficient than either single gene therapy. PMID:27173013

  9. Atherosclerotic Vessel Changes in Sarcoidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuleta, I; Pingel, S; Biener, L; Pizarro, C; Hammerstingl, C; Öztürk, C; Schahab, N; Grohé, C; Nickenig, G; Schaefer, C; Skowasch, D

    2016-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a systemic granulomatous disease. Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory vessel disease. The aim of our present study was to investigate whether sarcoidosis could be associated with increased risk of atherosclerotic vessel changes. Angiological analysis and blood tests were performed in 71 sarcoidosis patients and 12 matched controls in this prospective cross-sectional study. Specifically, angiological measurements comprised ankle brachial index (ABI), central pulse wave velocity (cPWV), pulse wave index (PWI), and duplex sonography of central and peripheral arteries. Sarcoidosis activity markers (angiotensin converting enzyme, soluble interleukin-2 receptor) and cardiovascular risk parameters such as cholesterol, lipoprotein(a), C-reactive protein, interleukin 6, fibrinogen, d-dimer, and blood count were analyzed in blood. We found no relevant differences in ABI, cPWV, and plaque burden between the sarcoidosis and control groups (1.10 ± 0.02 vs. 1.10 ± 0.02, 6.7 ± 0.5 vs. 6.1 ± 1.2, 53.7 % vs. 54.5 %, respectively). However, PWI was significantly higher in sarcoidosis patients (146.2 ± 6.8) compared with controls (104.9 ± 8.8), irrespectively of the activity of sarcoidosis and immunosuppressive medication. Except for increased lipoprotein(a) and d-dimer in sarcoidosis, the remaining cardiovascular markers were similar in both groups. We conclude that sarcoidosis is associated with increased pulse wave index, which may indicate an early stage of atherosclerosis. PMID:26820732

  10. The Anti-Atherosclerotic Effect of Naringin Is Associated with Reduced Expressions of Cell Adhesion Molecules and Chemokines through NF-κB Pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Tun-Pin Hsueh; Jer-Ming Sheen; Pang, Jong-Hwei S.; Kuo-Wei Bi; Chao-Chun Huang; Hsiao-Ting Wu; Sheng-Teng Huang

    2016-01-01

    Naringin has been reported to have an anti-atherosclerosis effect but the underlying mechanism is not fully understood. The aim of this study is to investigate the impact of naringin on the TNF-α-induced expressions of cell adhesion molecules, chemokines and NF-κB signaling pathway in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). The experiments revealed that naringin, at concentrations without cytotoxicity, dose-dependently inhibited the adhesion of THP-1 monocytes to the TNF-α-stimulated...

  11. Inhibitory effects of oleoylethanolamide (OEA) on H2O2-induced human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) injury and apolipoprotein E knockout (ApoE-/-) atherosclerotic mice

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Li; Guo, Xiaobing; Chen, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis (AS) is initiated by vascular endothelial cell injury, which is induced by lipid and protein oxidation. Oleoylethanolamide (OEA), a dietary fat-derived lipid, has shown atheroprotective effect. In vitro studies demonstrated that OEA showed cytoprotective effects on H2O2-induced primary cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) injury model. Further investigation of the cytoprotective effects of OEA demonstrated that OEA exerted its function by scavenging for react...

  12. Comparison of cytotoxicity and wound healing effect of carboxymethylcellulose and hyaluronic acid on human corneal epithelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jong; Soo; Lee; Seung; Uk; Lee; Cheng-Ye; Che; Ji-Eun; Lee

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the cytotoxic effect on human corneal epithelial cells(HCECs) and the ability to faciliate corneal epithelial wound healing of carboxymethylcellulose(CMC) and hyaluronic acid(HA).METHODS: HCECs were exposed to 0.5% CMC(Refresh plus, Allergan, Irvine, California, USA) and 0.1% and 0.3%HA(Kynex , Alcon, Seoul, Korea, and Hyalein mini,Santen, Osaka, Japan) for the period of 30 min, and 4, 12,and 24 h. Methyl thiazolyl tetrazoiun(MTT)-based calorimetric assay was performed to assess the metabolic activity of cellular proliferation and lactate dehydrogenase(LDH) leakage assay to assess the cytotoxicity. apoptotic response was evaluated with flow cytometric analysis and fluorescence staining with Annexin V and propiodium iodide. Cellular morphology was evaluated by inverted phase-contrast light microscopy and electron microscopy. The wound widths were measured 24 h after confluent HCECs were scratch wounded.RESULTS: The inhibitory effect of human corneal epithelial proliferation and cytotoxicity showed the time-dependent response but no significant effect. Apoptosis developed in flow cytometry and apoptotic cells weredemonstrated in fluorescent micrograph. The damaged HCECs were detached from the bottom of the dish and showed the well-developed vacuole formations. Both CMC and HA stimulated reepithehlialization of HCECs scratched, which were more observed in CMC.CONCLUSION: CMC and HA, used in artificial tear formulation, could be utilized without any significant toxic effect on HCECs. Both significantly stimulated HCEC reepithelialization of corneal wounds.

  13. Salusins: Potential Use as a Biomarker for Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kengo Sato

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Human salusin-α and salusin-β are related peptides produced from prosalusin. Bolus injection of salusin-β into rats induces more profound hypotension and bradycardia than salusin-α. Central administration of salusin-β increases blood pressure via release of norepinephrine and arginine-vasopressin. Circulating levels of salusin-α and salusin-β are lower in patients with essential hypertension. Salusin-β exerts more potent mitogenic effects on human vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs and fibroblasts than salusin-α. Salusin-β accelerates inflammatory responses in human endothelial cells and monocyte-endothelial adhesion. Human macrophage foam cell formation is stimulated by salusin-β but suppressed by salusin-α. Chronic salusin-β infusion into apolipoprotein E-deficient mice enhances atherosclerotic lesions; salusin-α infusion reduces lesions. Salusin-β is expressed in proliferative neointimal lesions of porcine coronary arteries after stenting. Salusin-α and salusin-β immunoreactivity have been detected in human coronary atherosclerotic plaques, with dominance of salusin-β in macrophage foam cells, VSMCs, and fibroblasts. Circulating salusin-β levels increase and salusin-α levels decrease in patients with coronary artery disease. These findings suggest that salusin-β and salusin-α may contribute to proatherogenesis and antiatherogenesis, respectively. Increased salusin-β and/or decreased salusin-α levels in circulating blood and vascular tissue are closely linked with atherosclerosis. Salusin-α and salusin-β could be candidate biomarkers and therapeutic targets for atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases.

  14. Effects of mesenchymal stem cells transfected with human hepatocyte growth factor gene on healing of burn wounds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HA Xiao-qin; L(U) Tong-de; HUI Ling; Dong Fang

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To explore the effects of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs)transfected with adenoviral vector carrying hepatocyte growth factor (HGF, Ad-HGF) on burn wound healing.Methods: BMSCs from male Wistar rats were separated and purified with Percoll separating medium by density gradient centrifugation and cultured with DMEM containing 20% fetal bovine serum (FBS). Then BMSCs were transfected with Ad-HGF at the optimal gene transduction efficiency of 100 multiplicity of infection (MOI). The efficiency of transfection and the expression of HGF in the suspension were detected by flow cytometry and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) respectively. Thirtytwo female rats were subjected to 90℃ water for 12 seconds to induce a partial thickness skin burn. The animals were randomly divided into mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) treatment group (Group A), Ad-HGF treatment group (Group B),Ad-HGF-modified MSCs treatment group (Group C) and saline control group (Group D). On days 3, 5, 7, 14 and 21 postburn, HE and Sirius red stain were performed to observe the burn wound healing and collagen content. The content of hydroxyproline in wounds was also detected.Transplanted cells and the expression of(sex-determining region Y) SRY gene were detected by in situ hybridization and polymerase chain reaction (PCR), while the expression of HGF in wound tissues was detected by ELISA.Results: The result of flow cytometry showed that the transfection efficiency was 86.41% at 100 MOI. Compared with the control group, the content of HGF in the supernatant after transfection increased time-dependently and peaked at 48 h, showing significant differences at 24 h, 48 h,72 h and 96 h (P<0.01 ). Results of HE stain revealed that the range of re-epidermidalization in Group C was significantly larger than that in other groups in the first week. Three weeks postburn, the epidermis was significantly thicker in Group C than in other groups and the nails of dermis inserted into

  15. The alpha3 laminin subunit, alpha6beta4 and alpha3beta1 integrin coordinately regulate wound healing in cultured epithelial cells and in the skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goldfinger, L E; Hopkinson, S B; deHart, G W;

    1999-01-01

    function-inhibiting antibodies, we provide evidence that LN5 and its two integrin receptors (alpha6beta4 and alpha3beta1) appear necessary for wound healing to occur in MCF-10A cell culture wounds. We propose a model for healing of wounded epithelial tissues based on these results....... epithelial cells. We have prepared a monoclonal antibody (12C4) whose epitope is located toward the carboxy terminus of the globular domain of the alpha3 laminin subunit. This epitope is lost from the alpha3 subunit as a consequence of proteolytic processing. Antibody 12C4 stains throughout the matrix of...... cover the wound site. A similar phenomenon is observed in human skin wounds, since we also detect expression of the unprocessed alpha3 laminin subunit at the leading tip of the sheet of epidermal cells that epithelializes skin wounds in vivo. In addition, using alpha3 laminin subunit and integrin...

  16. Multipotent adult progenitor cells : their role in wound healing and the treatment of dermal wounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herdrich, B. J.; Lind, R. C.; Liechty, K. W.

    2008-01-01

    The use of cellular therapy in the treatment of dermal wounds is currently an active area of investigation. Multipotent adult progenitor cells (MAPC) are an attractive choice for cytotherapy because they have a large proliferative potential, the ability to differentiate into different cell types and

  17. Adipose Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells In Wound Healing: A Clinical Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunalp Uzun

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to review clinical studies on the use of adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells in the treatment of chronic wounds. A search on PubMed was performed on April 30th, 2014 to identify the relevant clinical studies. We reviewed 13 articles that reported the use adipose derived stem cells in the treatment of different types of wounds. Adipose derived stem cells have the potential to be used in the treatment of chronic wounds. However, standard methods for isolation, storage and application of these cells are needed. New materials to transfer these stem cells to injured tissues should be investigated. [Dis Mol Med 2014; 2(4.000: 57-64

  18. The Role of Microscopy in Understanding Atherosclerotic Lysosomal Lipid Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray Jerome, W.; Yancey, Patricia G.

    2003-02-01

    Microscopy has played a critical role in first identifying and then defining the role of lysosomes in formation of atherosclerotic foam cells. We review the evidence implicating lysosomal lipid accumulation as a factor in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis with reference to the role of microscopy. In addition, we explore mechanisms by which lysosomal lipid engorgement occurs. Low density lipoproteins which have become modified are the major source of lipid for foam cell formation. These altered lipoproteins are taken into the cell via receptor-mediated endocytosis and delivered to lysosomes. Under normal conditions, lipids from these lipoproteins are metabolized and do not accumulate in lysosomes. In the atherosclerotic foam cell, this normal metabolism is inhibited so that cholesterol and cholesteryl esters accumulate in lysosomes. Studies of cultured cells incubated with modified lipoproteins suggests this abnormal metabolism occurs in two steps. Initially, hydrolysis of lipoprotein cholesteryl esters occurs normally, but the resultant free cholesterol cannot exit the lysosome. Further lysosomal cholesterol accumulation inhibits hydrolysis, producing a mixture of cholesterol and cholesteryl esters within swollen lysosomes. Various lipoprotein modifications can produce this lysosomal engorgement in vitro and it remains to be seen which modifications are most important in vivo.

  19. Xenogeneic Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Improve Wound Healing and Modulate the Immune Response in an Extensive Burn Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caliari-Oliveira, Carolina; Yaochite, Juliana Navarro Ueda; Ramalho, Leandra Náira Zambelli; Palma, Patrícia Vianna Bonini; Carlos, Daniela; Cunha, Fernando de Queiróz; De Souza, Daurea Abadia; Frade, Marco Andrey Cipriani; Covas, Dimas Tadeu; Malmegrim, Kelen Cristina Ribeiro; Oliveira, Maria Carolina; Voltarelli, Julio César

    2016-01-01

    Major skin burns are difficult to treat. Patients often require special care and long-term hospitalization. Besides specific complications associated with the wounds themselves, there may be impairment of the immune system and of other organs. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are a recent therapeutic alternative to treat burns, mainly aiming to accelerate the healing process. Several MSC properties favor their use as therapeutic approach, as they promote angiogenesis, stimulate regeneration, and enhance the immunoregulatory function. Moreover, since patients with extensive burns require urgent treatment and because the expansion of autologous MSCs is a time-consuming process, in this present study we chose to evaluate the therapeutic potential of xenogeneic MSCs in the treatment of severe burns in rats. MSCs were isolated from mouse bone marrow, expanded in vitro, and intradermally injected in the periphery of burn wounds. MSC-treated rats presented higher survival rates (76.19%) than control animals treated with PBS (60.86%, p < 0.05). In addition, 60 days after the thermal injury, the MSC-treated group showed larger proportion of healed areas within the burn wounds (90.81 ± 5.05%) than the PBS-treated group (76.11 ± 3.46%, p = 0.03). We also observed that CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells in spleens and in damaged skin, as well as the percentage of neutrophils in the burned area, were modulated by MSC treatment. Plasma cytokine (TGF-β, IL-10, IL-6, and CINC-1) levels were also altered in the MSC-treated rats, when compared to controls. Number of injected GFP(+) MSCs progressively decreased over time, and 60 days after injection, few MSCs were still detected in the skin of treated animals. This study demonstrates the therapeutic effectiveness of intradermal application of MSCs in a rat model of deep burns, providing basis for future regenerative therapies in patients suffering from deep burn injuries. PMID:25955320

  20. Early wound healing of laser in situ keratomileusis–like flaps after treatment with human corneal stromal stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Siân R.; Dooley, Erin P.; Kamma-Lorger, Christina; Funderburgh, James L.; Funderburgh, Martha L.; Meek, Keith M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To use a well-established organ culture model to investigate the effects of corneal stromal stem cells on the optical and biomechanical properties of corneal wounds after laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK)–like flap creation. Setting School of Optometry and Vision Sciences, Cardiff University, Cardiff, Wales, United Kingdom. Design Experimental study. Methods The LASIK-like flaps were produced in sheep corneas. The flap beds were treated with corneal stromal stem cells and were then replaced and allowed to heal for different periods of up to 3 weeks in organ culture. The optical transmission of the cornea, the force required to detach the flap, and the presence of myofibroblasts near the flap bed were measured. Results Corneal stromal stem cell–treated flap beds were statistically significantly more transparent after 3 weeks in culture than the untreated controls. At 3 weeks, the mean force necessary to detach the flap was more than twice the force required for the respective control samples. Concurrently, there were 44% activated cells immediately below the flap margin of the controls compared with 29% in the same region of the corneal stromal stem cell–treated flaps. Conclusions In this system, the presence of corneal stromal stem cells at the wound margin significantly increased the adherence of LASIK-like flaps while maintaining corneal transparency. It is postulated that this is achieved by the deposition of extracellular connective tissue similar to that found in the normal cornea and by the paucity of activated keratocytes (myofibroblasts), which are known to scatter a significant amount of the incident light. Financial Disclosure No author has a financial or proprietary interest in any material or method mentioned. PMID:27026456

  1. Mitochondrial DNA damage and vascular function in patients with diabetes mellitus and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease

    OpenAIRE

    Fetterman, Jessica L.; Holbrook, Monica; Westbrook, David G.; Brown, Jamelle A.; Kyle P. Feeley; Bretón-Romero, Rosa; Linder, Erika A.; Berk, Brittany D.; Weisbrod, Robert M.; Widlansky, Michael E.; Gokce, Noyan; Ballinger, Scott W.; Hamburg, Naomi M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Prior studies demonstrate mitochondrial dysfunction with increased reactive oxygen species generation in peripheral blood mononuclear cells in diabetes mellitus. Oxidative stress-mediated damage to mitochondrial DNA promotes atherosclerosis in animal models. Thus, we evaluated the relation of mitochondrial DNA damage in peripheral blood mononuclear cells s with vascular function in patients with diabetes mellitus and with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Approach and results ...

  2. Chemokines and diabetic wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa, Oscar; Torres, Francis M; Shireman, Paula K

    2007-01-01

    Chemokines are critical for white blood cell recruitment to injured tissues and play an important role in normal wound healing processes. In contrast, impaired wound healing in diabetic patients is accompanied by decreased early inflammatory cell infiltration but persistence of neutrophils and macrophages in the chronic, nonhealing wounds. These changes in inflammatory cell recruitment occur in conjunction with alterations in chemokine and growth factor expression. In addition to leukocyte trafficking, many different cell types, including endothelial cells, fibroblasts, and keratinocytes, produce and respond to chemokines, and these interactions are altered in diabetic wounds. Thus, the chemokine system may have both direct and inflammatory-mediated effects on many different aspects of diabetic wound healing. The potential roles of chemokines and inflammatory or immune cells in nonhealing diabetic wounds, including impairments in growth factor expression, angiogenesis, extracellular matrix formation, and reepithelialization, are examined. PMID:18053419

  3. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance in carotid atherosclerotic disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Huijun

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Atherosclerosis is a chronic, progressive, inflammatory disease affecting many vascular beds. Disease progression leads to acute cardiovascular events such as myocardial infarction, stroke and death. The diseased carotid alone is responsible for one third of the 700,000 new or recurrent strokes occurring yearly in the United States. Imaging plays an important role in the management of atherosclerosis, and cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR of the carotid vessel wall is one promising modality in the evaluation of patients with carotid atherosclerotic disease. Advances in carotid vessel wall CMR allow comprehensive assessment of morphology inside the wall, contributing substantial disease-specific information beyond luminal stenosis. Although carotid vessel wall CMR has not been widely used to screen for carotid atherosclerotic disease, many trials support its potential for this indication. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge regarding carotid vessel wall CMR and its potential clinical application for management of carotid atherosclerotic disease.

  4. Advances in the research of the role of mesenchymal stem cell in wound healing%间充质干细胞在创面愈合中的作用研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘玲英; 柴家科; 郁永辉; 侯玉森

    2014-01-01

    Wound healing is a dynamic and complicated process,which generally takes three overlapping phases:inflammation,proliferation,and remodeling.If wounds complicated by severe trauma,diabetes,vascular dysfunction disease,or a massive burn injury failed to pass through the three normal phases of healing,they might end up as chronic and refractory wounds.Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) play different important roles in the regulation of all the phases of wound healing.MSCs can be recruited into wound and differentiated into wound repair cells,as well as promote wound healing by exerting functions like anti-inflammation,anti-apoptosis,and neovascularization.This review focuses on the role and mechanism of MSCs in each phase of the wound healing process.

  5. Bone healing: little secrets

    OpenAIRE

    Einhorn, T. A.

    2011-01-01

    The development of new strategies to enhance the healing of fractures continues to evolve with the introduction of both locally and systemically delivered compounds. The recent refinement in the use of autologous bone marrow as a bone graft material has brought the field of stem cell biology into orthopaedic practice. New recombinant peptides such as platelet- derived growth factor and teriparatide show promise as local and systemic enhancers respectively. Finally, recent evidence that mutati...

  6. Rhinovirus infection induces cytotoxicity and delays wound healing in bronchial epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantopoulos Andreas G

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human rhinoviruses (RV, the most common triggers of acute asthma exacerbations, are considered not cytotoxic to the bronchial epithelium. Recent observations, however, have questioned this knowledge. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of RV to induce epithelial cytotoxicity and affect epithelial repair in-vitro. Methods Monolayers of BEAS-2B bronchial epithelial cells, seeded at different densities were exposed to RV serotypes 1b, 5, 7, 9, 14, 16. Cytotoxicity was assessed chromatometrically. Epithelial monolayers were mechanically wounded, exposed or not to RV and the repopulation of the damaged area was assessed by image analysis. Finally epithelial cell proliferation was assessed by quantitation of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA by flow cytometry. Results RV1b, RV5, RV7, RV14 and RV16 were able to induce considerable epithelial cytotoxicity, more pronounced in less dense cultures, in a cell-density and dose-dependent manner. RV9 was not cytotoxic. Furthermore, RV infection diminished the self-repair capacity of bronchial epithelial cells and reduced cell proliferation. Conclusion RV-induced epithelial cytotoxicity may become considerable in already compromised epithelium, such as in the case of asthma. The RV-induced impairment on epithelial proliferation and self-repair capacity may contribute to the development of airway remodeling.

  7. The role of microRNA-146a in the pathogenesis of the diabetic wound-healing impairment: correction with mesenchymal stem cell treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Junwang; Wu, Wenjie; Zhang, Liping; Dorset-Martin, Wanda; Morris, Michael W; Mitchell, Marc E; Liechty, Kenneth W

    2012-11-01

    The impairment in diabetic wound healing represents a significant clinical problem. Chronic inflammation is thought to play a central role in the pathogenesis of this impairment. We have previously shown that treatment of diabetic murine wounds with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can improve healing, but the mechanisms are not completely defined. MicroRNA-146a (miR-146a) has been implicated in regulation of the immune and inflammatory responses. We hypothesized that abnormal miRNA-146a expression may contribute to the chronic inflammation. To test this hypothesis, we examined the expression of miRNA-146a and its target genes in diabetic and nondiabetic mice at baseline and after injury. MiR-146a expression was significantly downregulated in diabetic mouse wounds. Decreased miR-146a levels also closely correlated with increased gene expression of its proinflammatory target genes. Furthermore, the correction of the diabetic wound-healing impairment with MSC treatment was associated with a significant increase in the miR-146a expression level and decreased gene expression of its proinflammatory target genes. These results provide the first evidence that decreased expression of miR-146a in diabetic wounds in response to injury may, in part, be responsible for the abnormal inflammatory response seen in diabetic wounds and may contribute to wound-healing impairment. PMID:22851573

  8. Stability, sterility, coagulation, and immunologic studies of salmon coagulation proteins with potential use for mammalian wound healing and cell engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laidmäe, Ivo; McCormick, Margaret E; Herod, Julia L; Pastore, Jennifer J; Salum, Tiit; Sawyer, Evelyn S; Janmey, Paul A; Uibo, Raivo

    2006-12-01

    Fibrin sealants made by polymerization of fibrinogen activated by the protease thrombin have many applications in hemostasis and wound healing. In treatments of acute injury or surgical wounds, concentrated fibrin preparations mimic the initial matrix that normally prevents bleeding and acts as a scaffold for cells that initiate tissue repair. However risks of infectious disease, immunogenic reaction, and the high cost of purified human or other mammalian blood proteins limit widespread use of these materials. Purified coagulation proteins from Atlantic salmon represent a potentially safer, equally effective, and less costly alternative in part because of the low ambient temperature of these farmed animals and the absence of endogenous agents known to be infectious in mammalian hosts. This study reports rheologic measurements of lyophilized salmon fibrinogen and thrombin that demonstrate stability to prolonged storage and gamma irradiation sufficient to reduce viral loads by over five orders of magnitude. Coagulation and immunologic studies in rats and rabbits treated intraperitoneally with salmon fibrin show no deleterious effects on coagulation profiles and no cross reactivity with host fibrinogen or thrombin. The results support the potential of salmon fibrin as an alternative to mammalian proteins in clinical applications. PMID:16919721

  9. Sostdc1 deficiency accelerates fracture healing by promoting the expansion of periosteal mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collette, Nicole M; Yee, Cristal S; Hum, Nicholas R; Murugesh, Deepa K; Christiansen, Blaine A; Xie, LiQin; Economides, Aris N; Manilay, Jennifer O; Robling, Alexander G; Loots, Gabriela G

    2016-07-01

    Loss of Sostdc1, a growth factor paralogous to Sost, causes the formation of ectopic incisors, fused molars, abnormal hair follicles, and resistance to kidney disease. Sostdc1 is expressed in the periosteum, a source of osteoblasts, fibroblasts and mesenchymal progenitor cells, which are critically important for fracture repair. Here, we investigated the role of Sostdc1 in bone metabolism and fracture repair. Mice lacking Sostdc1 (Sostdc1(-/-)) had a low bone mass phenotype associated with loss of trabecular bone in both lumbar vertebrae and in the appendicular skeleton. In contrast, Sostdc1(-/-) cortical bone measurements revealed larger bones with higher BMD, suggesting that Sostdc1 exerts differential effects on cortical and trabecular bone. Mid-diaphyseal femoral fractures induced in Sostdc1(-/-) mice showed that the periosteal population normally positive for Sostdc1 rapidly expands during periosteal thickening and these cells migrate into the fracture callus at 3days post fracture. Quantitative analysis of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) and osteoblast populations determined that MSCs express Sostdc1, and that Sostdc1(-/-) 5day calluses harbor >2-fold more MSCs than fractured wildtype controls. Histologically a fraction of Sostdc1-positive cells also expressed nestin and α-smooth muscle actin, suggesting that Sostdc1 marks a population of osteochondral progenitor cells that actively participate in callus formation and bone repair. Elevated numbers of MSCs in D5 calluses resulted in a larger, more vascularized cartilage callus at day 7, and a more rapid turnover of cartilage with significantly more remodeled bone and a thicker cortical shell at 21days post fracture. These data support accelerated or enhanced bone formation/remodeling of the callus in Sostdc1(-/-) mice, suggesting that Sostdc1 may promote and maintain mesenchymal stem cell quiescence in the periosteum. PMID:27102547

  10. Cdc42-dependent structural development of auditory supporting cells is required for wound healing at adulthood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anttonen, Tommi; Kirjavainen, Anna; Belevich, Ilya;

    2012-01-01

    of a basolateral membrane protein in the apical domain were observed. These defects and changes in aPKCλ/ι expression suggested that apical polarization is impaired. Following a lesion at adulthood, supporting cells with Cdc42 loss-induced maturational defects collapsed and failed to remodel F...

  11. Human multipotent mesenchymal stem cells improve healing after collagenase tendon injury in the rat

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Machová-Urdzíková, Lucia; Sedláček, R.; Suchý, T.; Amemori, Takashi; Růžička, Jiří; Lesný, P.; Havlas, V.; Syková, Eva; Jendelová, Pavla

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 42 (2014). ISSN 1475-925X R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP304/10/0326; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : Achilles tendon * mesenchymal stromal cells * osteogenesis Subject RIV: FI - Traumatology, Orthopedics Impact factor: 1.427, year: 2014

  12. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy to Characterize Inflammatory Atherosclerotic Plaques

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Fei; Dai, Xiaohu; Beebe, Tyler; Hsiai, Tzung

    2011-01-01

    Despite advances in diagnosis and therapy, atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the Western world. Predicting metabolically active atherosclerotic lesions has remained an unmet clinical need. We hereby developed an electrochemical strategy to characterize the inflammatory states of high-risk atherosclerotic plaques. Using the concentric bipolar microelectrodes, we sought to demonstrate distinct Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopic (...

  13. The key role of insulin-like growth factor I in limbal stem cell differentiation and the corneal wound-healing process

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Trošan, Peter; Svobodová, Eliška; Chudíčková, Milada; Krulová, Magdalena; Zajícová, Alena; Holáň, Vladimír

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 18 (2012), s. 3341-3350. ISSN 1547-3287 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP304/11/0653; GA ČR(CZ) GAP301/11/1568; GA ČR GD310/08/H077; GA AV ČR KAN200520804 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : IGF-I * limbal stem cells * cornea * healing Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.670, year: 2012

  14. Low-magnitude high-frequency vibration enhanced mesenchymal stem cell recruitment in osteoporotic fracture healing through the SDF-1/CXCR4 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, F Y; Chow, S K; Leung, K S; Qin, J; Guo, A; Yu, O L; Li, G; Cheung, W H

    2016-01-01

    Low-magnitude high-frequency vibration (LMHFV) has been proven to promote osteoporotic fracture healing. Mechanical stimulation was reported to enhance SDF-1/CXCR4 signalling in mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). We hypothesised that LMHFV promoted osteoporotic fracture healing by enhancing MSC migration through the SDF-1/CXCR4 pathway. 152 ovariectomised SD-rats received closed femoral fracture in groups of vibration+MSC (VMG) (20 min/d, 5 d/week), vibration+MSC+AMD3100 (VMAG; AMD, a CXCR4 inhibitor) (1 mg/kg/d, intraperitoneal), MSC (MG) (1 × 106 MSC, intracardiac) or control (CG) for a treatment duration of 2, 4 or 8 weeks. MSC migration was evaluated by ex-vivo green fluorescent protein signal in the callus; and fracture healing was examined by weekly radiographs, endpoint computed-tomography and mechanical test. At week-2 and week-4, ex-vivo callus GFP intensity of VMG was significantly higher than other groups (p < 0.05). From week-2 to week-3, both callus width and callus area in VMG were significantly larger; and from week-7 to week-8, smaller than other groups (p < 0.05). At week-8, high-density bone volume fraction, bone volume fraction, bone mineral density and stiffness in VMG were significantly higher than other 3 groups (p < 0.05). This study demonstrated that LMHFV promoted MSC migration and fracture healing in osteoporotic rats. This effect was attenuated by CXCR4 inhibitor, providing strong evidence that SDF-1-mediated MSC migration was one of the important mechanisms through which LMHFV enhanced fracture healing. PMID:27215741

  15. Rhinovirus infection induces cytotoxicity and delays wound healing in bronchial epithelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Constantopoulos Andreas G; Skevaki Chrysanthi L; Gourgiotis Dimitrios; Psarras Stelios; Bossios Apostolos; Saxoni-Papageorgiou Photini; Papadopoulos Nikolaos G

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background Human rhinoviruses (RV), the most common triggers of acute asthma exacerbations, are considered not cytotoxic to the bronchial epithelium. Recent observations, however, have questioned this knowledge. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of RV to induce epithelial cytotoxicity and affect epithelial repair in-vitro. Methods Monolayers of BEAS-2B bronchial epithelial cells, seeded at different densities were exposed to RV serotypes 1b, 5, 7, 9, 14, 16. Cytotoxic...

  16. Epidermal stem cells in physiological tissue regeneration, wound healing and cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Füllgrabe, Anja

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian skin is a versatile organ that protects from external harm, regulates the body temperature, and provides the touch sensation. Its epithelium, the epidermis, forms several highly regenerative structures as the hair follicle (HF), the sebaceous gland (SG), and the interfollicular epidermis (IFE). Lineage tracing experiments in mice have demonstrated that several basal cell populations in the IFE and HF have the capacity to renew the epidermis during homeostasis, and also contribut...

  17. Mesenchymal stem cell-laden anti-inflammatory hydrogel enhances diabetic wound healing

    OpenAIRE

    Shixuan Chen; Junbin Shi; Min Zhang; Yinghua Chen; Xueer Wang; Lei Zhang; Zhihui Tian; Yuan Yan; Qinglin Li; Wen Zhong; Malcolm Xing; Lu Zhang; Lin Zhang

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to permit bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) to reach their full potential in the treatment of chronic wounds. A biocompatible multifunctional crosslinker based temperature sensitive hydrogel was developed to deliver BMSCs, which improve the chronic inflammation microenvironments of wounds. A detailed in vitro investigation found that the hydrogel is suitable for BMSC encapsulation and can promote BMSC secretion of TGF-β1 and bFGF. In vivo, full-thickness...

  18. Healing of soft and hard tissues of rabbit temporomandibular joint following the application of stem cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Putnová, Barbora; Buchtová, Marcela; Jekl, V.; Hodan, R.; Machoň, V.; Štembírek, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 159, Suppl 1 (2015), S32-S33. ISSN 1213-8118. [Morphology 2015. International Congress of the Czech Anatomical Society /49./. Lojda Symposium on Histochemistry /52./. 06.09.2015-08.09.2015, Olomouc] R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-37368G; GA ČR(CZ) GP14-29273P Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : temporomandibular joint Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology

  19. Animal model of high cholesterol atherosclerotic erectile dysfunction and mechanism of atherosclerotic erectile dysfunction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo-ShengYang; Zhao-DianChen; Hong-JuWang

    2004-01-01

    Aim: To establish the animal model of atherosclerotic erectile dysfunction (ED) induced by high cholesterol diet and explore the mechanism of atherosclerotic ED. Methods: Thirty male rabbits were divided at random into two groups: the normal diet (ND)group (n=10) and the high cholesterol (HCH) group fed with 1.5% cholesterol diet (n=20). Serum total cholesterol, plaque areas of the ascending aorta,

  20. Accelerated healing of diabetic wound using artificial dermis constructed with adipose stem cells and poly(L-glutamic acid)/chitosan scaffold

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Ting; PAN Zhi-gang; ZHOU Xiao; HONG Chao-yang

    2013-01-01

    Background Diabetic wound is one of the most serious complications of diabetes mellitus.There are no significantly effective therapies for chronic non-healing diabetes ulcer so far.This study aimed to explore the feasibility of healing impaired wound using artificial dermis constructed with human adipose derived stem cells (ASCs) and poly(L-glutamic acid)/chitosan (PLGA/CS) scaffold in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice.Methods ASCs were isolated from fresh human lipoaspirates and expanded ex vivo for three passages,and then cells were seeded onto PLGA/CS scaffold to form artificial dermis.Expression of VEGF and TGFβ1 by ASCs presented in artificial dermis was determined.The artificial dermis was transplanted to treat the 20 mm × 20 mm full-thickness cutaneous wound created on the back of diabetic mice.Wound treated with scaffold alone and without treatment,and wound in normal non-diabetic mice served as control.Results Cells growing within scaffold showed great proliferation potential,depositing abundant collagen matrix.Meanwhile,expression of VEGF and TGF-β1 by seeded ASCs maintained at a consistent high level.After treated with ASC based artificial dermis,diabetic wounds exhibited significantly higher healing rate compared with wounds treated with scaffold alone or without treatment.Histological examination also demonstrated an improvement in cutaneous restoration with matrix deposition and organization.Further quantitative analysis showed that there was a significant increase in dermis thickness and collagen content on artificial dermis treated wounds.Conclusion ASC/PLGA artificial dermis can effectively accelerate diabetic wound healing by promoting angiogenic growth factors and dermal collagen synthesis.

  1. The Synergistic Effect of Treadmill Running on Stem-Cell Transplantation to Heal Injured Skeletal Muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Ambrosio, Fabrisia; Ferrari, Ricardo J.; DiStefano, Giovanna; Plassmeyer, Joshua M.; Carvell, George E.; Deasy, Bridget M.; Boninger, Michael L.; Fitzgerald, G. Kelley; Huard, Johnny

    2010-01-01

    Muscle-derived stem-cell (MDSC) transplantation presents a promising method for the treatment of muscle injuries. This study investigated the ability of exercise to enhance MDSC transplantation into the injured muscle. Mice were divided into four groups: contusion + phosphate-buffered saline (C + PBS; n = 14 muscles), C + MDSC transplantation (n = 12 muscles), C + PBS + treadmill running (C + PBS + TM; n = 17 muscles), and C + MDSC + TM (n = 13 muscles). One day after injury, the TM groups be...

  2. [Healing "booster" dressings].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromantin, Isabelle; Téot, Luc; Meaume, Sylvie

    2011-09-01

    The relationship between the dressing and the wound is vital to clinical effectiveness. The more-or-less standard wound-surface coverings have been replaced with initial dressings, referred to as modern dressings, which contain an oily and sticky compound. They provide a moist medium by applying the basic mechanistic principles (liquid absorption and release). Other types of products and techniques modify the behaviour of wound cells by acting directly through irritation, biochemical stimulation or genetic modification of the cells, which accelerates the healing process. PMID:22003786

  3. Ultrasound Tissue Characterization of Vulnerable Atherosclerotic Plaque

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenio Picano

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A thrombotic occlusion of the vessel fed by ruptured coronary atherosclerotic plaque may result in unstable angina, myocardial infarction or death, whereas embolization from a plaque in carotid arteries may result in transient ischemic attack or stroke. The atherosclerotic plaque prone to such clinical events is termed high-risk or vulnerable plaque, and its identification in humans before it becomes symptomatic has been elusive to date. Ultrasonic tissue characterization of the atherosclerotic plaque is possible with different techniques—such as vascular, transesophageal, and intravascular ultrasound—on a variety of arterial segments, including carotid, aorta, and coronary districts. The image analysis can be based on visual, video-densitometric or radiofrequency methods and identifies three distinct textural patterns: hypo-echoic (corresponding to lipid- and hemorrhage-rich plaque, iso- or moderately hyper-echoic (fibrotic or fibro-fatty plaque, and markedly hyperechoic with shadowing (calcific plaque. Hypoechoic or dishomogeneous plaques, with spotty microcalcification and large plaque burden, with plaque neovascularization and surface irregularities by contrast-enhanced ultrasound, are more prone to clinical complications than hyperechoic, extensively calcified, homogeneous plaques with limited plaque burden, smooth luminal plaque surface and absence of neovascularization. Plaque ultrasound morphology is important, along with plaque geometry, in determining the atherosclerotic prognostic burden in the individual patient. New quantitative methods beyond backscatter (to include speed of sound, attenuation, strain, temperature, and high order statistics are under development to evaluate vascular tissues. Although not yet ready for widespread clinical use, tissue characterization is listed by the American Society of Echocardiography roadmap to 2020 as one of the most promising fields of application in cardiovascular ultrasound imaging

  4. Gradient Meshed and Toughened SOEC (Solid Oxide Electrolyzer Cell) Composite Seal with Self-Healing Capabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kathy Lu; W. T. Reynolds, Jr.

    2010-06-08

    High-temperature electrolysis of water steam is a promising approach for hydrogen production. The potential is even more promising when abundant heat source from nuclear power reactors can be efficiently utilized. Hydrogen production through the above approach also allows for low electric consumption. Overall energy conversion efficiencies for high temperature electrolysis are in the 45-50% range compared to ~30% for the conventional electrolysis. Under such motivation, this research is focused on increasing the operation time and high temperature stability of solid oxide electrolyzer cells (SOEC) for splitting water into hydrogen. Specifically, our focus is to improve the SOEC seal thermal stability and performances by alleviating thermal stress and seal cracking issues.

  5. Endothelial lipase is highly expressed in macrophages in advanced human atherosclerotic lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartels, Emil D; Nielsen, John E; Lindegaard, Marie Louise Skakkebæk;

    2007-01-01

    monocytes. EL mRNA expression increased markedly when either type of monocytes was differentiated into macrophages. Upon further differentiation into foam cells EL mRNA decreased whereas protein levels remained high compared to monocytes. In conclusion, macrophages in advanced human atherosclerotic lesions...

  6. Microvesicles enhance the mobility of human diabetic adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells in vitro and improve wound healing in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, Nhu Thuy; Yamashita, Toshiharu; Tu, Tran Cam; Kato, Toshiki; Ohneda, Kinuko; Sato, Fujio; Ohneda, Osamu

    2016-05-13

    Microvesicles (MVs) derived from mesenchymal stem cells showed the ability to alter the cell phenotype and function. We previously demonstrated that type 2 diabetic adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (dAT-MSCs) increase in cell aggregation and adhesion in vitro and impair wound healing in vivo. However, the characterization and function of MVs derived from human non-diabetic AT-MSCs (nAT-MSCs) remain unknown. In this study, we characterized nAT-MSC-derived MVs and their function after the transfection of dAT-MSCs with MVs using the scratch assay and a flap mouse model. We found that human nAT-MSC-derived MVs expressed MSC-surface markers and improved dAT-MSC functions by altering the expression of genes associated with cell migration, survival, inflammation, and angiogenesis as well as miR29c and miR150. Remarkably, the transfection of dAT-MSCs with nAT-MSC-derived MVs improved their migration ability in vitro and wound healing ability in a flap mouse model. These results demonstrate a promising opportunity to modify the function of dAT-MSCs for therapeutic stem cell application in diabetic patients. PMID:27063802

  7. Healing of large periapical lesions following delivery of dental stem cells with an injectable scaffold: New method and three case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahab Shiehzadeh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Regenerative endodontics is the creation and delivery of tissues to replace diseased, missing, and traumatized pulp. A call for a paradigm shift and new protocol for the clinical management of these cases has been brought to attention. These regenerative endodontic techniques will possibly involve some combination of disinfection or debridement of infected root canal systems with apical enlargement to permit revascularization and use of stem cells, scaffolds, and growth factors. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs have been isolated from the pulp tissue of permanent teeth (dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs and deciduous teeth (stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth. Stem cells are characterized as multipotent cells for regeneration.These three case reports describe the treatment of necrotic or immature teeth with periradicular periodontitis, which was not treated with conventional apexification techniques. All cases presented here developed mature apices and bone healing after 3 to 4 months after the initial treatment without complications, and faster than traditional treatments. Our clinical observations support a shifting paradigm toward a biologic approach by providing a favorable environment for tissue regeneration. The mechanism of this continued development and formation of the root end and faster tissue healing is discussed.

  8. Genome-Wide Transcriptional Analysis of Differentially Expressed Genes in Diabetic, Healing Corneal Epithelial Cells: Hyperglycemia-Suppressed TGFβ3 Expression Contributes to the Delay of Epithelial Wound Healing in Diabetic Corneas

    OpenAIRE

    Bettahi, Ilham; Sun, Haijing; Gao, Nan; Wang, Feng; Mi, Xiaofan; Chen, Weiping; Liu, Zuguo; Yu, Fu-Shin X.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) may develop corneal complications and delayed wound healing. The aims of this study are to characterize the molecular signatures and biological pathways leading to delayed epithelial wound healing and to delineate the involvement of TGFβ3 therein. Genome-wide cDNA microarray analysis revealed 1,888 differentially expressed genes in the healing epithelia of normal (NL) versus type 1 DM rat corneas. Gene ontology and enrichment analyses indicated TGFβ signal...

  9. Histochemical and immunohistochemical analysis of ruptured atherosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysm wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanasković Irena

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. The main complication of the atherosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurism (AAA is her rupture that begins with lesion in intima and rupture. The purpose of this work was to determine immunocytochemical and morphofunctional characteristics of the cells in aortic wall in ruptured atherosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysm. Method. During the course of this study, 20 samples of atherosclerotic AAA were analyzed, all of them obtained during authopsy. The samples were fixed in 4% formalin and embedded in paraffin. Sections of 5 μm thickness were stained histochemically (of Heidenhain azan stain and Periodic acid Schiff - PAS stain and immunocytochemically using a DAKO LSAB+/HRP technique to identify α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA, vimentin, myosin heavy chains (MHC, desmin, S-100 protein, CD45 and CD68 (DAKO specification. Results. The results of our study showed that ruptured atherosclerotic AAA is characterized by a complete absence of endothelial cells, the disruption of basal membrane and internal elastic lamina, as well as a presence of the remains of hypocellular complicated atherosclerotic lesion in intima. On the plaque margins, as well as in the media, smooth muscle cells (SMCs are present, which express a α-SMA and vimentin (but without MHC or desmin expression, as well as leukocyte infiltration, and a large number of foam cells. Some of the foam cells show a CD68-immunoreactivity, while the others show vimentin- and S-100 protein-immunoreactivity. Media is thinned out with a disorganized elastic lamellas, while adventitia is characterized by inflammatory inflitrate (infection. Conclusion. Rupture of aneurysm occurs from the primary intimal disruption, which spreads into thinned out media and adventitia. Rupture is caused by unstable atherom, hypocellularity, loss of contractile characteristics of smooth muscle cells in intima and media, neovascularization of the media, as well as by the activity of the macrophages in the

  10. 14S,21R-Dihydroxydocosahexaenoic Acid Remedies Impaired Healing and Mesenchymal Stem Cell Functions in Diabetic Wounds*

    OpenAIRE

    Tian, Haibin; Lu, Yan; Shah, Shraddha P.; Hong, Song

    2010-01-01

    Treatment of diabetes-impaired wound healing remains a major unresolved medical challenge. Here, we identified suppressed formation of a novel reparative lipid mediator 14S,21R-dihydroxydocosa-4Z,7Z,10Z,12E,16Z,19Z-hexaenoic acid (14S,21R-diHDHA) in cutaneous wounds of diabetic db/db mice. These results indicate that diabetes impedes the biosynthetic pathways of 14S,21R-diHDHA in skin wounds. Administration of exogenous 14S,21R-diHDHA to wounds in diabetic animals rescued healing and angiogen...

  11. Mesenchymal stem cells favour healing of the cutaneous radiation syndrome; Les cellules souches mesenchymateuses favorisent la cicatrisation des lesions cutanees radio induites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francois, S.; Mouiseddine, M.; Mathieu, N.; Semont, A.; Monti, P.; Dudoignon, N.; Sache, A.; Boutarfa, A.; Thierry, D.; Voisin, P.; Gourmelon, P.; Chapel, A. [IRSN, Dir. de radioprotection de l' Homme, 92 - Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    2006-10-15

    It has been suggested that human Mesenchymal Stem Cells (hMSC) could be used to repair numerous injured tissues. We have studied the potential use of hMSC in order to limit radiation-induced skin lesions. Immuno-deficient NOD/SCID mice were locally irradiated to the leg (30 Gy, dose rate 2.7 Gy/mn) using a {sup 60} Co source in order to induce a severe skin lesion. Cultured bone marrow hMSC were delivered intravenously to the mice. The irradiated skin samples were studied for the presence of the human cells, the severity of the lesions and the healing process. Macroscopic analysis and histology results showed that the lesions were evolving to a less severe degree of radiation dermatitis following hMSC transplant when compared to irradiated non-transplanted controls. Clinical scores for the studied skin parameters of treated mice were significantly improved. A faster healing was observed when compared to untreated mouse. Immuno-histology and Polymerase Chain reaction (PCR) analysis provided evidence that the human cells were found in the irradiated area. These results suggest a possible use of hMSC for the treatment of the early phase of the cutaneous radiation syndrome. A successful transplant of stem cells and subsequent reduction in radiation-induced complication may open the road to completely new strategies in cutaneous radiation syndrome therapy. (authors)

  12. Human cord blood-derived unrestricted somatic stem cells promote wound healing and have therapeutic potential for patients with recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yanling; Itoh, Munenari; Yang, Albert; Zhu, Hongwen; Roberts, Samantha; Highet, Alexandra M; Latshaw, Shaun; Mitchell, Kelly; van de Ven, Carmella; Christiano, Angela; Cairo, Mitchell S

    2014-03-01

    Human umbilical cord blood (CB)-derived unrestricted somatic stem cells (USSCs) have previously been demonstrated to have a broad differentiation potential and regenerative beneficial effects when administered in animal models of multiple degenerative diseases. Here we demonstrated that USSCs could be induced to express genes that hallmark keratinocyte differentiation. We also demonstrated that USSCs express type VII collagen (C7), a protein that is absent or defective in patients with an inherited skin disease, recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB). In mice with full-thickness excisional wounds, a single intradermal injection of USSCs at a 1-cm distance to the wound edge resulted in significantly accelerated wound healing. USSC-treated wounds displayed a higher density of CD31(+) cells, and the wounds healed with a significant increase in skin appendages. These beneficial effects were demonstrated without apparent differentiation of the injected USSCs into keratinocytes or endothelial cells. In vivo bioluminescent imaging (BLI) revealed specific migration of USSCs modified with a luciferase reporter gene, from a distant intradermal injection site to the wound, as well as following systemic injection of USSCs. These data suggest that CB-derived USSCs could significantly contribute to wound repair and be potentially used in cell therapy for patients with RDEB. PMID:23394106

  13. Chlamydia pneumoniae Infection in Atherosclerotic Lesion Development through Oxidative Stress: A Brief Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Sessa

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Chlamydia pneumoniae, an obligate intracellular pathogen, is known as a leading cause of respiratory tract infections and, in the last two decades, has been widely associated with atherosclerosis by seroepidemiological studies, and direct detection of the microorganism within atheroma. C. pneumoniae is presumed to play a role in atherosclerosis for its ability to disseminate via peripheral blood mononuclear cells, to replicate and persist within vascular cells, and for its pro-inflammatory and angiogenic effects. Once inside the vascular tissue, C. pneumoniae infection has been shown to induce the production of reactive oxygen species in all the cells involved in atherosclerotic process such as macrophages, platelets, endothelial cells, and vascular smooth muscle cells, leading to oxidative stress. The aim of this review is to summarize the data linking C. pneumoniae-induced oxidative stress to atherosclerotic lesion development.

  14. Porcine epidermal stem cells as a biomedical model for wound healing and normal/malignant epithelial cell propagation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Motlík, Jan; Klíma, Jiří; Dvořánková, B.; Smetana, K. Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 67, - (2007), s. 105-111. ISSN 0093-691X Grant ostatní: GA ČR(CZ) GA304/04/0171 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : pig * stem cell * epidermis Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.911, year: 2007

  15. Fast and safe fabrication of a free-standing chitosan/alginate nanomembrane to promote stem cell delivery and wound healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kong Y

    2016-06-01

    nanomembrane may be particularly useful for stem cell delivery and wound healing. Keywords: nanomembrane, layer-by-layer, cell delivery, wound healing

  16. Autophagy in Atherosclerosis: A Phenomenon Found in Human Carotid Atherosclerotic Plaques

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huihui Liu; Yongjun Cao; Tong Tong; Jijun Shi; Yanlin Zhang; Yaping Yang; Chunfeng Liu

    2015-01-01

    Background:Autophagy has been found to be involved in animal and cell models ofatherosclerosis,but to date,it lacks general observation in human atherosclerotic plaques.Here,we investigated autophagy in smooth muscle cells (SMCs),endothelial cells (ECs),and macrophages in human atherosclerotic plaques via transmission electron microscopy (TEM),western blotting,and immunohistochemistry analysis.Methods:The histopathologic morphology of these plaques was observed via hematoxylin and eosin staining.The ultrastructural morphology of the SMCs,ECs,and macrophages in these plaques was observed via TEM.The localization ofmicrotubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (MAP 1-LC3),a relatively special maker ofautophagy,in plaques was observed by double fluorescent immunochemistty and western blotting.Results:All of these human atherosclerotic plaques were considered advanced and unstable in histologically observation.By double fluorescent immunochemistry,the expression of LC3-Ⅱ increased in the SMCs of the fibrous cap,the macrophages,and the microvascular ECs of the plaque shoulders.The protein level of LC3-Ⅱ by western blotting significantly increased in plaques compared with normal controls.In addition,TEM observation of plaques revealed certain features of autophagy in SMCs,ECs,and macrophages including the formation of myelin figures,vacuolization,and the accumulation of inclusions in the cytosol.These results indicate that autophagy is activated in SMCs,ECs,and macrophages in human advanced atherosclerotic plaques.Conclusions:Our study is to demonstrate the existence of autophagy in human atherosclerotic plaques by different methods,which may contribute to the development of pharmacological approaches to stabilize vulnerable and rupture-prone lesions.

  17. In silico analyses of metagenomes from human atherosclerotic plaque samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitra, Suparna; Drautz-Moses, Daniela I; Alhede, Morten;

    2015-01-01

    microbes isolated from human atherosclerotic vessels. However, high-resolution investigation of microbial infectious agents from human vessels that may contribute to atherosclerosis is very limited. In spite of the progress in recent sequencing technologies, analyzing host-associated metagenomes remain...... a challenge. RESULTS: To investigate microbiome diversity within human atherosclerotic tissue samples, we employed high-throughput metagenomic analysis on: (1) atherosclerotic plaques obtained from a group of patients who underwent endarterectomy due to recent transient cerebral ischemia or stroke. (2...

  18. Diabetes induces stable intrinsic changes to myeloid cells that contribute to chronic inflammation during wound healing in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Pauline Bannon; Sally Wood; Terry Restivo; Laura Campbell; Hardman, Matthew J.; Mace, Kimberly A

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Acute inflammation in response to injury is a tightly regulated process by which subsets of leukocytes are recruited to the injured tissue and undergo behavioural changes that are essential for effective tissue repair and regeneration. The diabetic wound environment is characterised by excessive and prolonged inflammation that is linked to poor progression of healing and, in humans, the development of diabetic foot ulcers. However, the underlying mechanisms contributing to excessive i...

  19. Foxo1 Inhibits Diabetic Mucosal Wound Healing but Enhances Healing of Normoglycemic Wounds

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Fanxing; Othman, Badr; Lim, Jason; Batres, Angelika; Ponugoti, Bhaskar; Zhang, Chenying; Yi, Leah; Liu, Jian; Tian, Chen; Hameedaldeen, Alhassan; Alsadun, Sarah; Tarapore, Rohinton; Graves, Dana T.

    2014-01-01

    Re-epithelialization is an important part in mucosal wound healing. Surprisingly little is known about the impact of diabetes on the molecular events of mucosal healing. We examined the role of the transcription factor forkhead box O1 (Foxo1) in oral wounds of diabetic and normoglycemic mice with keratinocyte-specific Foxo1 deletion. Diabetic mucosal wounds had significantly delayed healing with reduced cell migration and proliferation. Foxo1 deletion rescued the negative impact of diabetes o...

  20. Hindlimb unloading alters ligament healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provenzano, Paolo P.; Martinez, Daniel A.; Grindeland, Richard E.; Dwyer, Kelley W.; Turner, Joanne; Vailas, Arthur C.; Vanderby, Ray Jr

    2003-01-01

    We investigated the hypothesis that hindlimb unloading inhibits healing in fibrous connective tissue such as ligament. Male rats were assigned to 3- and 7-wk treatment groups with three subgroups each: sham control, ambulatory healing, and hindlimb-suspended healing. Ambulatory and suspended animals underwent surgical rupture of their medial collateral ligaments, whereas sham surgeries were performed on control animals. After 3 or 7 wk, mechanical and/or morphological properties were measured in ligament, muscle, and bone. During mechanical testing, most suspended ligaments failed in the scar region, indicating the greatest impairment was to ligament and not to bone-ligament insertion. Ligament testing revealed significant reductions in maximum force, ultimate stress, elastic modulus, and low-load properties in suspended animals. In addition, femoral mineral density, femoral strength, gastrocnemius mass, and tibialis anterior mass were significantly reduced. Microscopy revealed abnormal scar formation and cell distribution in suspended ligaments with extracellular matrix discontinuities and voids between misaligned, but well-formed, collagen fiber bundles. Hence, stress levels from ambulation appear unnecessary for formation of fiber bundles yet required for collagen to form structurally competent continuous fibers. Results support our hypothesis that hindlimb unloading impairs healing of fibrous connective tissue. In addition, this study provides compelling morphological evidence explaining the altered structure-function relationship in load-deprived healing connective tissue.

  1. Protective effect of policosanol on atherosclerotic lesions in rabbits with exogenous hypercholesterolemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arruzazabala M.L.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Policosanol is a mixture of higher aliphatic alcohols purified from sugar cane wax, with cholesterol-lowering effects demonstrable in experimental models and in patients with type II hypercholesterolemia. The protective effects of policosanol on atherosclerotic lesions experimentally induced by lipofundin in rabbits and rats and spontaneously developed in stumptail monkeys have been described. The present study was conducted to determine whether policosanol administered orally to rabbits with exogenous hypercholesterolemia also protects against the development of atherosclerotic lesions. Male New Zealand rabbits weighing 1.5 to 2 kg were randomly divided into three experimental groups which received 25 or 200 mg/kg policosanol (N = 7 orally for 60 days with acacia gum as vehicle or acacia gum alone (control group, N = 9. All animals received a cholesterol-rich diet (0.5% during the entire period. Control animals developed marked hypercholesterolemia, macroscopic lesions and arterial intimal thickening. Intima thickness was significantly less (32.5 ± 7 and 25.4 ± 4 µm in hypercholesterolemic rabbits treated with policosanol than in controls (57.6 ± 9 µm. In most policosanol-treated animals, atherosclerotic lesions were not present, and in others, thickness of fatty streaks had less foam cell layers than in controls. We conclude that policosanol has a protective effect on the atherosclerotic lesions occurring in this experimental model.

  2. Stress and Wound Healing

    OpenAIRE

    Christian, Lisa M.; Graham, Jennifer E.; Padgett, David A.; Glaser, Ronald; Kiecolt-Glaser, Janice K.

    2006-01-01

    Over the past decade it has become clear that stress can significantly slow wound healing: stressors ranging in magnitude and duration impair healing in humans and animals. For example, in humans, the chronic stress of caregiving as well as the relatively brief stress of academic examinations impedes healing. Similarly, restraint stress slows healing in mice. The interactive effects of glucocorticoids (e.g. cortisol and corticosterone) and proinflammatory cytokines [e.g. interleukin-1β (IL-1β...

  3. Endovascular revascularization for aortoiliac atherosclerotic disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Vikas; Waldo, Stephen W; Armstrong, Ehrin J

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerotic iliac artery disease is increasingly being treated with endovascular techniques. A number of new stent technologies can be utilized with high long-term patency, including self-expanding stents, balloon-expandable stents, and covered stents, but comparative data on these stent types and in more complex lesions are lacking. This article provides a review of currently available iliac stent technologies, as well as complex procedural aspects of iliac artery interventions, including approaches to the treatment of iliac bifurcation disease, long segment occlusions, choice of stent type, and treatment of iliac artery in-stent restenosis. PMID:27099509

  4. Vasculogenic Cytokines in Wound Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor W. Wong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic wounds represent a growing healthcare burden that particularly afflicts aged, diabetic, vasculopathic, and obese patients. Studies have shown that nonhealing wounds are characterized by dysregulated cytokine networks that impair blood vessel formation. Two distinct forms of neovascularization have been described: vasculogenesis (driven by bone-marrow-derived circulating endothelial progenitor cells and angiogenesis (local endothelial cell sprouting from existing vasculature. Researchers have traditionally focused on angiogenesis but defects in vasculogenesis are increasingly recognized to impact diseases including wound healing. A more comprehensive understanding of vasculogenic cytokine networks may facilitate the development of novel strategies to treat recalcitrant wounds. Further, the clinical success of endothelial progenitor cell-based therapies will depend not only on the delivery of the cells themselves but also on the appropriate cytokine milieu to promote tissue regeneration. This paper will highlight major cytokines involved in vasculogenesis within the context of cutaneous wound healing.

  5. Endovascular treatment of symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SyedIHussain

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic disease (ICAD is responsible for approximately 10% of all ischemic strokes in the United States. The risk of recurrent stroke may be as high as 35% in patient with critical stenosis greater than 70% in diameter narrowing. Recent advances in medical and endovascular therapy have placed ICAD at the forefront of clinical stroke research to optimize the best medical and endovascular approach to treat this important underlying stroke etiology. Analysis of symptomatic ICAD studies lead to the question that whether angioplasty and or stenting is a safe, suitable and efficacious therapeutic strategy in patients with critical stenoses that are deemed refractory to medical management. Most of the currently available data in support of angioplasty and or stenting in high risk patients with severe symptomatic ICAD is in the form of case series and randomized trial results of endovascular therapy versus medical treatment are awaited. This is a comprehensive review of the state of the art in the endovascular approach with angioplasty and or stenting of symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic disease.

  6. The contemporary management of intracranial atherosclerotic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Xinyi; Wong, Ka Sing; Leung, Thomas W

    2016-06-01

    Intracranial atherosclerotic disease is the most common cause of cerebral vasculopathy and an important stroke etiology worldwide, with a higher prevalence in Asian, Hispanic and African ethnicities. Symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic disease portends a recurrent stroke risk as high as 18% at one year. The key to secondary prevention is an understanding of the underlying stroke mechanism and aggressive control of conventional cardiovascular risks. Contemporary treatment includes antiplatelet therapy, optimal glycemic and blood pressure control, statin therapy and lifestyle modifications. For patients with high-grade (70-99%) symptomatic steno-occlusion, short-term dual antiplatelet therapy with aspirin and clopidogrel followed by life-long single antiplatelet therapy may reduce the recurrent risk. Current evidence does not advocate percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and stenting as an initial treatment. External counterpulsation, encephaloduroarteriosynangiosis and remote limb ischemic preconditioning are treatments under investigation. Future studies should aim at predicting patients prone to recurrence despite of medical therapies and testing the efficacy of emerging therapies. PMID:27082149

  7. Hyperspectral imaging of atherosclerotic plaques in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Eivind L. P.; Randeberg, Lise L.; Olstad, Elisabeth; Haugen, Olav A.; Aksnes, Astrid; Svaasand, Lars O.

    2011-02-01

    Vulnerable plaques constitute a risk for serious heart problems, and are difficult to identify using existing methods. Hyperspectral imaging combines spectral- and spatial information, providing new possibilities for precise optical characterization of atherosclerotic lesions. Hyperspectral data were collected from excised aorta samples (n = 11) using both white-light and ultraviolet illumination. Single lesions (n = 42) were chosen for further investigation, and classified according to histological findings. The corresponding hyperspectral images were characterized using statistical image analysis tools (minimum noise fraction, K-means clustering, principal component analysis) and evaluation of reflectance/fluorescence spectra. Image analysis combined with histology revealed the complexity and heterogeneity of aortic plaques. Plaque features such as lipids and calcifications could be identified from the hyperspectral images. Most of the advanced lesions had a central region surrounded by an outer rim or shoulder-region of the plaque, which is considered a weak spot in vulnerable lesions. These features could be identified in both the white-light and fluorescence data. Hyperspectral imaging was shown to be a promising tool for detection and characterization of advanced atherosclerotic plaques in vitro. Hyperspectral imaging provides more diagnostic information about the heterogeneity of the lesions than conventional single point spectroscopic measurements.

  8. Fast and safe fabrication of a free-standing chitosan/alginate nanomembrane to promote stem cell delivery and wound healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Yi; Xu, Rui; Darabi, Mohammad Ali; Zhong, Wen; Luo, Gaoxing; Xing, Malcolm MQ; Wu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Polymeric ultrathin membranes that are compatible with cells offer tremendous advantages for tissue engineering. In this article, we report a free-standing nanomembrane that was developed using a layer-by-layer self-assembly technique with a safe and sacrificial substrate method. After ionization, two oppositely charged polyelectrolytes, alginate and chitosan, were alternately deposited on a substrate of a solidified gelatin block to form an ultrathin nanomembrane. The space between the two adjacent layers was ∼200 nm. The thickness of the nanomembrane was proportional to the number of layers. The temperature-sensitive gelatin gel served as a sacrificial template at 37°C. The free-standing nanomembrane promoted bone marrow stem cell adhesion and proliferation. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting was used to analyze green-fluorescent-protein-positive mesenchymal stem cells from the wounds, which showed a significantly high survival and proliferation from the nanomembrane when cells were transplanted to mouse dorsal skin that had a full-thickness burn. The bone-marrow-stem-cell-loaded nanomembrane also accelerated wound contraction and epidermalization. Therefore, this methodology provides a fast and facile approach to construct free-standing ultrathin scaffolds for tissue engineering. The biocompatibility and free-standing nature of the fabricated nanomembrane may be particularly useful for stem cell delivery and wound healing. PMID:27354789

  9. Fast and safe fabrication of a free-standing chitosan/alginate nanomembrane to promote stem cell delivery and wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Yi; Xu, Rui; Darabi, Mohammad Ali; Zhong, Wen; Luo, Gaoxing; Xing, Malcolm Mq; Wu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Polymeric ultrathin membranes that are compatible with cells offer tremendous advantages for tissue engineering. In this article, we report a free-standing nanomembrane that was developed using a layer-by-layer self-assembly technique with a safe and sacrificial substrate method. After ionization, two oppositely charged polyelectrolytes, alginate and chitosan, were alternately deposited on a substrate of a solidified gelatin block to form an ultrathin nanomembrane. The space between the two adjacent layers was ∼200 nm. The thickness of the nanomembrane was proportional to the number of layers. The temperature-sensitive gelatin gel served as a sacrificial template at 37°C. The free-standing nanomembrane promoted bone marrow stem cell adhesion and proliferation. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting was used to analyze green-fluorescent-protein-positive mesenchymal stem cells from the wounds, which showed a significantly high survival and proliferation from the nanomembrane when cells were transplanted to mouse dorsal skin that had a full-thickness burn. The bone-marrow-stem-cell-loaded nanomembrane also accelerated wound contraction and epidermalization. Therefore, this methodology provides a fast and facile approach to construct free-standing ultrathin scaffolds for tissue engineering. The biocompatibility and free-standing nature of the fabricated nanomembrane may be particularly useful for stem cell delivery and wound healing. PMID:27354789

  10. The Effect of Conditioned Media of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells on Wound Healing after Ablative Fractional Carbon Dioxide Laser Resurfacing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing-Rong Zhou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate the benefits of conditioned medium of Adipose-derived stem cells (ADSC-CM on wound healing after fractional carbon dioxide laser resurfacing (FxCR on human skin. Materials and Methods. Nineteen subjects were treated with FxCR on the bilateral inner arms. ADSC-CM was applied on FxCR site of one randomly selected arm. Transepidermal water loss (TEWL, skin color, and gross-elasticity of FxCR site on both arms were measured. Skin samples were taken by biopsy from three subjects 3 weeks after treatment for histopathological manifestations and mRNA expressions of procollagen types I and III, elastin genes were noted. Results. The index of erythema, melanin, and TEWL of the ADSC-CM-treated skin were significantly lower than those of the control side. The mRNA expression of type III procollagen in ADSC-CM-treated group at 3 weeks posttreatment was 2.6 times of that of the control group. Conclusion. Application of allograft ADSC-CM is an effective method for enhancing wound healing after FxCR, by reducing transient adverse effects such as erythema, hyperpigmentation, and increased TEWL.

  11. Overexpression of TGF-ß1 in macrophages reduces and stabilizes atherosclerotic plaques in ApoE-deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurt Reifenberg

    Full Text Available Although macrophages represent the hallmark of both human and murine atherosclerotic lesions and have been shown to express TGF-ß1 (transforming growth factor β1 and its receptors, it has so far not been experimentally addressed whether the pleiotropic cytokine TGF-ß1 may influence atherogenesis by a macrophage specific mechanism. We developed transgenic mice with macrophage specific TGF-ß1 overexpression, crossed the transgenics to the atherosclerotic ApoE (apolipoprotein E knock-out strain and quantitatively analyzed both atherosclerotic lesion development and composition of the resulting double mutants. Compared with control ApoE(-/- mice, animals with macrophage specific TGF-ß1 overexpression developed significantly less atherosclerosis after 24 weeks on the WTD (Western type diet as indicated by aortic plaque area en face (p<0.05. Reduced atherosclerotic lesion development was associated with significantly less macrophages (p<0.05 after both 8 and 24 weeks on the WTD, significantly more smooth muscle cells (SMCs; p<0.01 after 24 weeks on the WTD, significantly more collagen (p<0.01 and p<0.05 after 16 and 24 weeks on the WTD, respectively without significant differences of inner aortic arch intima thickness or the number of total macrophages in the mice pointing to a plaque stabilizing effect of macrophage-specific TGF-ß1 overexpression. Our data shows that macrophage specific TGF-ß1 overexpression reduces and stabilizes atherosclerotic plaques in ApoE-deficient mice.

  12. Enhancement of Tendon–Bone Healing for Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL Reconstruction Using Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Infected with BMP-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiyi Chen

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available At present, due to the growing attention focused on the issue of tendon–bone healing, we carried out an animal study of the use of genetic intervention combined with cell transplantation for the promotion of this process. Here, the efficacy of bone marrow stromal cells infected with bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2 on tendon–bone healing was determined. A eukaryotic expression vector containing the BMP-2 gene was constructed and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (bMSCs were infected with a lentivirus. Next, we examined the viability of the infected cells and the mRNA and protein levels of BMP-2-infected bMSCs. Gastrocnemius tendons, gastrocnemius tendons wrapped by bMSCs infected with the control virus (bMSCs+Lv-Control, and gastrocnemius tendons wrapped by bMSCs infected with the recombinant BMP-2 virus (bMSCs+Lv-BMP-2 were used to reconstruct the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL in New Zealand white rabbits. Specimens from each group were harvested four and eight weeks postoperatively and evaluated using biomechanical and histological methods. The bMSCs were infected with the lentivirus at an efficiency close to 100%. The BMP-2 mRNA and protein levels in bMSCs were significantly increased after lentiviral infection. The bMSCs and BMP-2-infected bMSCs on the gastrocnemius tendon improved the biomechanical properties of the graft in the bone tunnel; specifically, bMSCs infected with BMP-2 had a positive effect on tendon–bone healing. In the four-week and eight-week groups, bMSCs+Lv-BMP-2 group exhibited significantly higher maximum loads of 29.3 ± 7.4 N and 45.5 ± 11.9 N, respectively, compared with the control group (19.9 ± 6.4 N and 21.9 ± 4.9 N (P = 0.041 and P = 0.001, respectively. In the eight-week groups, the stiffness of the bMSCs+Lv-BMP-2 group (32.5 ± 7.3 was significantly higher than that of the bMSCs+Lv-Control group (22.8 ± 7.4 or control groups (12.4 ± 6.0 (p = 0.036 and 0.001, respectively. Based on the

  13. Biomarkers for wound healing and their evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, S; Maheshwari, A; Chandra, A

    2016-01-01

    A biological marker (biomarker) is a substance used as an indicator of biological state. Advances in genomics, proteomics and molecular pathology have generated many candidate biomarkers with potential clinical value. Research has identified several cellular events and mediators associated with wound healing that can serve as biomarkers. Macrophages, neutrophils, fibroblasts and platelets release cytokines molecules including TNF-α, interleukins (ILs) and growth factors, of which platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) holds the greatest importance. As a result, various white cells and connective tissue cells release both matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and the tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs). Studies have demonstrated that IL-1, IL-6, and MMPs, levels above normal, and an abnormally high MMP/TIMP ratio are often present in non-healing wounds. Clinical examination of wounds for these mediators could predict which wounds will heal and which will not, suggesting use of these chemicals as biomarkers of wound healing. There is also evidence that the application of growth factors like PDGF will alleviate the recuperating process of chronic, non-healing wounds. Finding a specific biomarker for wound healing status would be a breakthrough in this field and helping treat impaired wound healing. PMID:26762498

  14. Fluorescence imaging of macrophages in atherosclerotic plaques using plasmonic gold nanorose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tianyi; Sapozhnikova, Veronika; Mancuso, J. Jacob; Willsey, Brian; Qiu, Jinze; Ma, Li L.; Li, Xiankai; Johnston, Keith P.; Feldman, Marc D.; Milner, Thomas E.

    2011-03-01

    Macrophages are one of the most important cell types involved in the progression of atherosclerosis which can lead to myocardial infarction. To detect macrophages in atherosclerotic plaques, plasmonic gold nanorose is introduced as a nontoxic contrast agent for fluorescence imaging. We report macrophage cell culture and ex vivo tissue studies to visualize macrophages targeted by nanorose using scanning confocal microscopy. Atherosclerotic lesions were created in the aorta of a New Zealand white rabbit model subjected to a high cholesterol diet and double balloon injury. The rabbit was injected with nanoroses coated with dextran. A HeNe laser at 633 nm was used as an excitation light source and a acousto-optical beam splitter was utilized to collect fluorescence emission in 650-760 nm spectral range. Results of scanning confocal microscopy of macrophage cell culture and ex vivo tissue showed that nanoroses produce a strong fluorescence signal. The presence of nanorose in ex vivo tissue was further confirmed by photothermal wave imaging. These results suggest that scanning confocal microscopy can identify the presence and location of nanorose-loaded macrophages in atherosclerotic plaques.

  15. Potential Anti-Atherosclerotic Properties of Astaxanthin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishimoto, Yoshimi; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Kondo, Kazuo

    2016-02-01

    Astaxanthin is a naturally occurring red carotenoid pigment classified as a xanthophyll, found in microalgae and seafood such as salmon, trout, and shrimp. This review focuses on astaxanthin as a bioactive compound and outlines the evidence associated with its potential role in the prevention of atherosclerosis. Astaxanthin has a unique molecular structure that is responsible for its powerful antioxidant activities by quenching singlet oxygen and scavenging free radicals. Astaxanthin has been reported to inhibit low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation and to increase high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol and adiponectin levels in clinical studies. Accumulating evidence suggests that astaxanthin could exert preventive actions against atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD) via its potential to improve oxidative stress, inflammation, lipid metabolism, and glucose metabolism. In addition to identifying mechanisms of astaxanthin bioactivity by basic research, much more epidemiological and clinical evidence linking reduced CVD risk with dietary astaxanthin intake is needed. PMID:26861359

  16. Ophthalmic masquerades of the atherosclerotic carotids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anupriya Arthur

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with carotid atherosclerosis can present with ophthalmic symptoms. These symptoms and signs can be due to retinal emboli, hypoperfusion of the retina and choroid, opening up of collateral channels, or chronic hypoperfusion of the globe (ocular ischemic syndrome. These pathological mechanisms can produce many interesting signs and a careful history can bring out important past symptoms pointing toward the carotid as the source of the patient′s presenting symptom. Such patients are at high risk for an ischemic stroke, especially in the subsequent few days following their first acute symptom. It is important for clinicians to be familiar with these ophthalmic symptoms and signs caused by carotid atherosclerosis for making an early diagnosis and to take appropriate measures to prevent a stroke. This review elaborates the clinical features, importance, and implications of various ophthalmic symptoms and signs resulting from atherosclerotic carotid artery disease.

  17. Bacterial wall products induce downregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors on endothelial cells via a CD14-dependent mechanism: implications for surgical wound healing.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Power, C

    2012-02-03

    INTRODUCTION: Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a potent mitogenic cytokine which has been identified as the principal polypeptide growth factor influencing endothelial cell (EC) migration and proliferation. Ordered progression of these two processes is an absolute prerequisite for initiating and maintaining the proliferative phase of wound healing. The response of ECs to circulating VEGF is determined by, and directly proportional to, the functional expression of VEGF receptors (KDR\\/Flt-1) on the EC surface membrane. Systemic sepsis and wound contamination due to bacterial infection are associated with significant retardation of the proliferative phase of wound repair. The effects of the Gram-negative bacterial wall components lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and bacterial lipoprotein (BLP) on VEGF receptor function and expression are unknown and may represent an important biological mechanism predisposing to delayed wound healing in the presence of localized or systemic sepsis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We designed a series of in vitro experiments investigating this phenomenon and its potential implications for infective wound repair. VEGF receptor density on ECs in the presence of LPS and BLP was assessed using flow cytometry. These parameters were assessed in hypoxic conditions as well as in normoxia. The contribution of CD14 was evaluated using recombinant human (rh) CD14. EC proliferation in response to VEGF was quantified in the presence and absence of LPS and BLP. RESULTS: Flow cytometric analysis revealed that LPS and BLP have profoundly repressive effects on VEGF receptor density in normoxic and, more pertinently, hypoxic conditions. The observed downregulation of constitutive and inducible VEGF receptor expression on ECs was not due to any directly cytotoxic effect of LPS and BLP on ECs, as measured by cell viability and apoptosis assays. We identified a pivotal role for soluble\\/serum CD14, a highly specific bacterial wall product receptor, in

  18. Factors Affecting Wound Healing

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, S; DiPietro, L. A.

    2010-01-01

    Wound healing, as a normal biological process in the human body, is achieved through four precisely and highly programmed phases: hemostasis, inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling. For a wound to heal successfully, all four phases must occur in the proper sequence and time frame. Many factors can interfere with one or more phases of this process, thus causing improper or impaired wound healing. This article reviews the recent literature on the most significant factors that affect cutane...

  19. Cellular imaging of human atherosclerotic lesions by intravascular electric impedance spectroscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ines Streitner

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Newer techniques are required to identify atherosclerotic lesions that are prone to rupture. Electric impedance spectroscopy (EIS is able to provide information about the cellular composition of biological tissue. The present study was performed to determine the influence of inflammatory processes in type Va (lipid core, thick fibrous cap and Vc (abundant fibrous connective tissue while lipid is minimal or even absent human atherosclerotic lesions on the electrical impedance of these lesions measured by EIS. METHODS AND RESULTS: EIS was performed on 1 aortic and 3 femoral human arteries at 25 spots with visually heavy plaque burden. Severely calcified lesions were excluded from analysis. A highly flexible micro-electrode mounted onto a balloon catheter was placed on marked regions to measure impedance values at 100 kHz. After paraffin embedding, visible marked cross sections (n = 21 were processed. Assessment of lesion types was performed by Movats staining. Immunostaining for CD31 (marker of neovascularisation, CD36 (scavenger cells and MMP-3 (matrix metalloproteinase-3 was performed. The amount of positive cells was assessed semi-quantitatively. 15 type Va lesions and 6 type Vc lesions were identified. Lesions containing abundant CD36-, CD31- and MMP-3-positive staining revealed significantly higher impedance values compared to lesions with marginal or without positive staining (CD36 + 455 ± 50 Ω vs. CD36- 346 ± 53 Ω, p = 0.001; CD31 + 436 ± 43 Ω vs. CD31- 340 ± 55 Ω, p = 0.001; MMP-3 + 400 ± 68 Ω vs. MMP-3- 323 ± 33 Ω, p = 0.03. CONCLUSIONS: Atherosclerotic lesions with abundant neovascularisation (CD31, many scavenger receptor class B expressing cells (CD36 or high amount of MMP-3 immunoreactivity reveal significantly higher impedance values compared to lesions with marginal or no detection of immunoreactivity. Findings suggest that inflammatory processes in vulnerable plaques affect the impedance of atherosclerotic

  20. [Comparative transcriptome analysis of human aorta atherosclerotic lesions and peripheral blood leukocytes from essential hypertension patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timofeeva, A V; Goriunova, L E; Khaspekov, G L; Il'inskaia, O P; Sirotkin, V N; Andreeva, E R; Tararak, E M; Bulkina, O S; Buza, V V; Britareva, V V; Karpov, Iu A; Bibilashvili, R Sh

    2009-01-01

    One of the major cardiovascular risk factor which predisposes to and accelerates atherosclerosis is arterial hypertension (AH). To determine the molecular basis of the crosslink between AH and atherosclerosis for the development of new treatment strategies large-scale transcriptome analysis of the cells implicated in atherogenesis is needed. We used cDNA microarray technique for simultaneous analysis of gene expression in human abdominal aorta normal sites and atherosclerotic lesions of different histological types, as well as in peripheral blood leukocytes from patients with essential hypertension (EH) and donors. The microarray data were verified by quantitative RT-PCR (reverse transcription coupled with polymerase chain reaction) and immunohistochemical analysis. Differential expression of 40 genes has been found, among which twenty two genes demonstrated up-regulation and 18 genes demonstrated down-regulation in atherosclerotic aorta compared with normal vessel. New gene-candidates, implicated in atherogenesis, have been identified - FPRL2, CD37, CD53, RGS1, LCP1, SPI1, CTSA, EPAS1, FHL1, GEM, RHOB, SPARCL1, ITGA8, PLN, and COL14A1. These genes participate in cell migration and adhesion, phenotypic changes of smooth muscle cells, immune and inflammatory reactions, oxidative processes and extracellular matrix remodeling. We have found increased expression levels of CD53, SPI1, FPRL2, SPP1, CTSD, ACP5, LCP1, CTSA and LIPA genes in peripheral blood leukocytes from EH patients and in atherosclerotic lesions of human aorta. The majority of these genes significantly (p0.5) correlated with AH stage as well as with histological grading of atherosclerotic lesions. PMID:19772500

  1. Evaluation of recombinant endostatin in the treatment of atherosclerotic plaques and neovascularization in rabbits*

    OpenAIRE

    Mao, Wei; Kong, Jing; Dai, Jin; Huang, Zhao-quan; Wang, Dong-zhi; Ni, Gui-bao; Chen, Min-Li

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Atherosclerotic plaques and neovascularization play an important role in the course of coronary atherosclerosis. This study evaluated the effect of recombinant endostatin on experimental atherosclerotic plaques and neovascularization in rabbits. Methods: Eighteen healthy male rabbits were divided into three groups: control group, atherosclerotic model group, and recombinant endostatin treated group. The atherosclerotic model was established via a high-cholesterol diet after balloon...

  2. IgM antibody level against proinflammatory bacterial peptidoglycan is inversely correlated with extent of atherosclerotic disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.M.O. Nijhuis; Y. van der Graaf (Yolanda); M.J. Melief; A.H. Schoneveld (Arjan); D.P.V. de Kleijn (Dominique); J.D. Laman (Jon); G. Pasterkamp (Gerard)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractObjective: Atherosclerosis may lead to acute clinical events by rupture of a vulnerable atherosclerotic plaque. Previously, we demonstrated that peptidoglycan (PGN), a major cell wall component of gram-positive bacteria that induces production of proinflammatory cytokines through TLR2 an

  3. A comprehensive review of advanced biopolymeric wound healing systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayet, Naeema; Choonara, Yahya E; Kumar, Pradeep; Tomar, Lomas K; Tyagi, Charu; Du Toit, Lisa C; Pillay, Viness

    2014-08-01

    Wound healing is a complex and dynamic process that involves the mediation of many initiators effective during the healing process such as cytokines, macrophages and fibroblasts. In addition, the defence mechanism of the body undergoes a step-by-step but continuous process known as the wound healing cascade to ensure optimal healing. Thus, when designing a wound healing system or dressing, it is pivotal that key factors such as optimal gaseous exchange, a moist wound environment, prevention of microbial activity and absorption of exudates are considered. A variety of wound dressings are available, however, not all meet the specific requirements of an ideal wound healing system to consider every aspect within the wound healing cascade. Recent research has focussed on the development of smart polymeric materials. Combining biopolymers that are crucial for wound healing may provide opportunities to synthesise matrices that are inductive to cells and that stimulate and trigger target cell responses crucial to the wound healing process. This review therefore outlines the processes involved in skin regeneration, optimal management and care required for wound treatment. It also assimilates, explores and discusses wound healing drug-delivery systems and nanotechnologies utilised for enhanced wound healing applications. PMID:24985412

  4. Molecular Imaging of Healing After Myocardial Infarction

    OpenAIRE

    Naresh, Nivedita K; Ben-Mordechai, Tamar; Leor, Jonathan; Epstein, Frederick H

    2011-01-01

    The progression from acute myocardial infarction (MI) to heart failure continues to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Potential new therapies for improved infarct healing such as stem cells, gene therapy, and tissue engineering are being investigated. Noninvasive imaging plays a central role in the evaluation of MI and infarct healing, both clinically and in preclinical research. Traditionally, imaging has been used to assess cardiac structure, function, perfusion, and viability. H...

  5. Cellular events and biomarkers of wound healing

    OpenAIRE

    Shah Jumaat Mohd Yussof; Effat Omar; Pai, Dinker R.; Suneet Sood

    2012-01-01

    Researchers have identified several of the cellular events associated with wound healing. Platelets, neutrophils, macrophages, and fibroblasts primarily contribute to the process. They release cytokines including interleukins (ILs) and TNF-α, and growth factors, of which platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) is perhaps the most important. The cytokines and growth factors manipulate the inflammatory phase of healing. Cytokines are chemotactic for white cells and fibroblasts, while the growth f...

  6. Irradiation of existing atherosclerotic lesions increased inflammation by favoring pro-inflammatory macrophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Recent studies have shown an increased incidence of localized atherosclerosis and subsequent cardiovascular events in cancer patients treated with thoracic radiotherapy. We previously demonstrated that irradiation accelerated the development of atherosclerosis and predisposed to an inflammatory plaque phenotype in young hypercholesterolemic ApoE−/− mice. However, as older cancer patients already have early or advanced stages of atherosclerosis at the time of radiotherapy, we investigated the effects of irradiation on the progression of existing atherosclerotic lesions in vivo. Material and methods: ApoE−/− mice (28 weeks old) received local irradiation with 14 or 0 Gy (sham-treated) at the aortic arch and were examined after 4 and 12 weeks for atherosclerotic lesions, plaque size and phenotype. Moreover, we investigated the impact of irradiation on macrophage phenotype (pro- or anti-inflammatory) and function (efferocytotic capacity, i.e. clearance of apoptotic cells) in vitro. Results: Irradiation of existing lesions in the aortic arch resulted in smaller, macrophage-rich plaques with intraplaque hemorrhage and increased apoptosis. In keeping with the latter, in vitro studies revealed augmented polarization toward pro-inflammatory macrophages after irradiation and reduced efferocytosis by anti-inflammatory macrophages. In addition, considerably more lesions in irradiated mice were enriched in pro-inflammatory macrophages. Conclusions: Irradiation of existing atherosclerotic lesions led to smaller but more inflamed plaques, with increased numbers of apoptotic cells, most likely due to a shift toward pro-inflammatory macrophages in the plaque

  7. A Proteomic Focus on the Alterations Occurring at the Human Atherosclerotic Coronary Intima*

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Cuesta, Fernando; Alvarez-Llamas, Gloria; Maroto, Aroa S.; Donado, Alicia; Zubiri, Irene; Posada, Maria; Padial, Luis R.; Pinto, Angel G.; Barderas, Maria G.; Vivanco, Fernando

    2011-01-01

    Coronary atherosclerosis still represents the major cause of mortality in western societies. Initiation of atherosclerosis occurs within the intima, where major histological and molecular changes are produced during pathogenesis. So far, proteomic analysis of the atherome plaque has been mainly tackled by the analysis of the entire tissue, which may be a challenging approach because of the great complexity of this sample in terms of layers and cell type composition. Based on this, we aimed to study the intimal proteome from the human atherosclerotic coronary artery. For this purpose, we analyzed the intimal layer from human atherosclerotic coronaries, which were isolated by laser microdissection, and compared with those from preatherosclerotic coronary and radial arteries, using a two-dimensional Differential-In-Gel-Electrophoresis (DIGE) approach. Results have pointed out 13 proteins to be altered (seven up-regulated and six down-regulated), which are implicated in the migrative capacity of vascular smooth muscle cells, extracellular matrix composition, coagulation, apoptosis, heat shock response, and intraplaque hemorrhage deposition. Among these, three proteins (annexin 4, myosin regulatory light 2, smooth muscle isoform, and ferritin light chain) constitute novel atherosclerotic coronary intima proteins, because they were not previously identified at this human coronary layer. For this reason, these novel proteins were validated by immunohistochemistry, together with hemoglobin and vimentin, in an independent cohort of arteries. PMID:21248247

  8. A proteomic focus on the alterations occurring at the human atherosclerotic coronary intima.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Cuesta, Fernando; Alvarez-Llamas, Gloria; Maroto, Aroa S; Donado, Alicia; Zubiri, Irene; Posada, Maria; Padial, Luis R; Pinto, Angel G; Barderas, Maria G; Vivanco, Fernando

    2011-04-01

    Coronary atherosclerosis still represents the major cause of mortality in western societies. Initiation of atherosclerosis occurs within the intima, where major histological and molecular changes are produced during pathogenesis. So far, proteomic analysis of the atherome plaque has been mainly tackled by the analysis of the entire tissue, which may be a challenging approach because of the great complexity of this sample in terms of layers and cell type composition. Based on this, we aimed to study the intimal proteome from the human atherosclerotic coronary artery. For this purpose, we analyzed the intimal layer from human atherosclerotic coronaries, which were isolated by laser microdissection, and compared with those from preatherosclerotic coronary and radial arteries, using a two-dimensional Differential-In-Gel-Electrophoresis (DIGE) approach. Results have pointed out 13 proteins to be altered (seven up-regulated and six down-regulated), which are implicated in the migrative capacity of vascular smooth muscle cells, extracellular matrix composition, coagulation, apoptosis, heat shock response, and intraplaque hemorrhage deposition. Among these, three proteins (annexin 4, myosin regulatory light 2, smooth muscle isoform, and ferritin light chain) constitute novel atherosclerotic coronary intima proteins, because they were not previously identified at this human coronary layer. For this reason, these novel proteins were validated by immunohistochemistry, together with hemoglobin and vimentin, in an independent cohort of arteries. PMID:21248247

  9. Proliferation of Keratinocytes Induced by Adipose-Derived Stem Cells on a Chitosan Scaffold and Its Role in Wound Healing, a Review

    OpenAIRE

    Gomathysankar, Sankaralakshmi; Halim, Ahmad Sukari; Yaacob, Nik Soriani

    2014-01-01

    In the field of tissue engineering and reconstruction, the development of efficient biomaterial is in high demand to achieve uncomplicated wound healing. Chronic wounds and excessive scarring are the major complications of tissue repair and, as this inadequate healing continues to increase, novel therapies and treatments for dysfunctional skin repair and reconstruction are important. This paper reviews the various aspects of the complications related to wound healing and focuses on chitosan b...

  10. Gene expression and 18FDG uptake in atherosclerotic carotid plaques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Sune Folke; Græbe, Martin; Hag, Anne Mette Fisker;

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: Metabolic assessment of vascular inflammation by 2-[F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG)-PET is a promising new approach for the evaluation of the vulnerability of atherosclerotic plaques. Quantitative real-time PCR allows measurement of gene expression of markers...... of atherosclerotic plaque vulnerability. These techniques were applied in advanced atherosclerotic disease to relate metabolism and inflammatory activity to the gene expression profile of the vulnerable atherosclerotic plaque. METHODS: Seventeen patients with clinical symptoms of cerebral vascular...... subsequently recovered by carotid endarterectomy. The gene expression of markers of vulnerability - CD68, IL-18, matrix metalloproteinase 9, cathepsin K, GLUT-1, and hexokinase type II (HK2) - were measured in plaques by quantitative PCR. RESULTS: In a multivariate linear regression model, GLUT-1, CD68...

  11. Pregnancy loss and later risk of atherosclerotic disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ranthe, Mattis Flyvholm; Andersen, Elisabeth Anne Wreford; Wohlfahrt, Jan;

    2013-01-01

    Pregnancy losses and atherosclerotic disease may be etiologically linked through underlying pathology. We examined whether miscarriage and stillbirth increase later risk of myocardial infarction, cerebral infarction, and renovascular hypertension....

  12. Self-formed grain boundary healing layer for highly efficient CH3 NH3 PbI3 perovskite solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Dae-Yong; Lee, Jin-Wook; Choi, Yung Ji; Jang, In-Hyuk; Lee, Seonhee; Yoo, Pil J.; Shin, Hyunjung; Ahn, Namyoung; Choi, Mansoo; Kim, Dongho; Park, Nam-Gyu

    2016-07-01

    Perovskite solar cells have attracted significant research efforts due to their remarkable performance, with certified power conversion efficiency now reaching 22%. Solution-processed perovskite thin films are polycrystalline, and grain boundaries are thought to be responsible for causing recombination and trapping of charge carriers. Here we report an effective and reproducible way of treating grain boundaries in CH3NH3PbI3 films deposited by means of a Lewis acid–base adduct approach. We show by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy lattice images that adding 6 mol% excess CH3NH3I to the precursor solution resulted in a CH3NH3I layer forming at the grain boundaries. This layer is responsible for suppressing non-radiative recombination and improving hole and electron extraction at the grain boundaries by forming highly ionic-conducting pathways. We report an average power conversion efficiency of 20.1% over 50 cells (best cell at 20.4%) together with significantly reduced current–voltage hysteresis achieved by this grain boundary healing process.

  13. Multimodality imaging of carotid atherosclerotic plaque: Going beyond stenosis

    OpenAIRE

    Divyata Hingwala; Chandrasekharan Kesavadas; Sylaja, Padmavathy N; Bejoy Thomas; Tirur Raman Kapilamoorthy

    2013-01-01

    Apart from the degree of stenosis, the morphology of carotid atherosclerotic plaques and presence of neovascularization are important factors that may help to evaluate the risk and ′vulnerability′ of plaques and may also influence the choice of treatment. In this article, we aim to describe the techniques and imaging findings on CTA, high resolution MRI and contrast enhanced ultrasound in the evaluation of carotid atherosclerotic plaques. We also discuss a few representative cases from our in...

  14. Atherosclerotic lesions of supra-aortic arteries in diabetic patients

    OpenAIRE

    Vidjak, Vinko; Hebrang, Andrija; Brkljačić, Boris; Brajša, Mladen; Novačić, Karlo; Barada, Ante; Škopljanac, Andrija; Erdelez, Lidija; Crnčević, Maja; Kučan, Damir; Flegar-Meštrić, Zlata; Vrhovski-Hebrang, Danijela; Roić, Goran

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to determine the prevalence and localization of stenotic atherosclerotic lesions of supra-aortic arteries in diabetic patients according to age and sex. Angiograms obtained by digital subtraction angiography were analyzed in 150 diabetic patients (study group) and 150 non-diabetic patients (control group) with symptoms of cerebral ischemia. Diabetic patients were found to have a significantly higher prevalence of stenotic atherosclerotic lesions ...

  15. Management of atherosclerotic renovascular disease after Cardiovascular Outcomes in Renal Atherosclerotic Lesions (CORAL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Sandra M S; Saad, Ahmed; Textor, Stephen C

    2015-03-01

    Many patients with occlusive atherosclerotic renovascular disease (ARVD) may be managed effectively with medical therapy for several years without endovascular stenting, as demonstrated by randomized, prospective trials including the Cardiovascular Outcomes in Renal Atherosclerotic Lesions (CORAL) trial, the Angioplasty and Stenting for Renal Artery Lesions (ASTRAL) trial and the Stent Placement and Blood Pressure and Lipid-Lowering for the Prevention of Progression of Renal Dysfunction Caused by Atherosclerotic Ostial Stenosis of the Renal Artery (STAR) and ASTRAL. These trials share the limitation of excluding subsets of patients with high-risk clinical presentations, including episodic pulmonary edema and rapidly progressing renal failure and hypertension. Although hemodynamically significant, ARVD can reduce renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate; adaptive mechanisms preserve both cortical and medullary oxygenation over a wide range of vascular occlusion. Progression of ARVD to severe vascular compromise eventually produces cortical hypoxia, however, associated with active inflammatory cytokine release and cellular infiltration of the renal parenchyma. In such cases ARVD produces a loss of glomerular filtration rate that no longer is reversible simply by restoring vessel patency with technically successful renal revascularization. Each of these trials reported adverse renal functional outcomes ranging between 16 and 22% over periods of 2-5 years of follow-up. Blood pressure control and medication adjustment may become more difficult with declining renal function and may prevent the use of angiotensin receptor blocker and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. The objective of this review is to evaluate the current management of ARVD for clinical nephrologists in the context of recent randomized clinical trials and experimental research. PMID:24723543

  16. Cationic star-shaped polymer as an siRNA carrier for reducing MMP-9 expression in skin fibroblast cells and promoting wound healing in diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li N

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Na Li,1,* Heng-Cong Luo,1,* Chuan Yang,1 Jun-Jie Deng,2 Meng Ren,1 Xiao-Ying Xie,1 Diao-Zhu Lin,1 Li Yan,1 Li-Ming Zhang2 1Department of Endocrinology, Sun Yat-sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China; 2DSAPM Lab and PCFM Lab, Institute of Polymer Science, Department of Polymer and Materials Science, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Excessive expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9 is deleterious to the cutaneous wound-healing process in the context of diabetes. The aim of the present study was to explore whether a cationic star-shaped polymer consisting of ß-cyclodextrin (ß-CD core and poly(amidoamine dendron arms (ß-CD-[D3]7 could be used as the gene carrier of small interfering RNA (siRNA to reduce MMP-9 expression for enhanced diabetic wound healing. Methods: The cytotoxicity of ß-CD-(D37 was investigated by 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay (MMT method in the rat CRL1213 skin fibroblast cell line. The transfection efficiency of ß-CD-(D37/MMP-9-small interfering RNA (siRNA complexes was determined by confocal microscopy and flow cytometry. Quantitative real time (RT polymerase chain reaction was performed to measure the gene expression of MMP-9 after the transfection by ß-CD-(D37/MMP-9-siRNA complexes. The ß-CD-(D37/MMP-9-siRNA complexes were injected on the wounds of streptozocin-induced diabetic rats. Wound closure was measured on days 4 and 7 post-wounding. Results: ß-CD-(D37 exhibited low cytotoxicity in fibroblast cells, and easily formed the complexes with MMP-9-siRNA. The ß-CD-(D37/MMP-9-siRNA complexes were readily taken up by fibroblast cells, resulting in the downregulation of MMP-9 gene expression (P<0.01. Animal experiments revealed that the treatment by ß-CD-(D37/MMP-9-siRNA complexes enhanced wound

  17. Overexpression of ABCG1 protein attenuates arteriosclerosis and endothelial dysfunction in atherosclerotic rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Ungerer

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The ABCG1 protein is centrally involved in reverse cholesterol transport from the vessel wall. Investigation of the effects of ABCG1 overexpression or knockdown in vivo has produced controversial results and strongly depended on the gene intervention model in which it was studied. Therefore, we investigated the effect of local overexpression of human ABCG1 in a novel model of vessel wall-directed adenoviral gene transfer in atherosclerotic rabbits. We conducted local, vascular-specific gene transfer by adenoviral delivery of human ABCG1 (Ad-ABCG1-GFP in cholesterol-fed atherosclerotic rabbits in vivo. Endothelial overexpression of ABCG1 markedly reduced atheroprogression (plaque size and almost blunted vascular inflammation, as shown by markedly reduced macrophage and smooth muscle cell invasion into the vascular wall. Also endothelial function, as determined by vascular ultrasound in vivo, was improved in rabbits after gene transfer with Ad-ABCG1-GFP. Therefore, both earlier and later stages of atherosclerosis were improved in this model of somatic gene transfer into the vessel wall. In contrast to results in transgenic mice, overexpression of ABCG1 by somatic gene transfer to the atherosclerotic vessel wall results in a significant improvement of plaque morphology and composition, and of vascular function in vivo.

  18. Treatment with sulphated galactan inhibits macrophage chemotaxis and reduces intraplaque macrophage content in atherosclerotic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes Quinderé, Ana Luíza; Barros Benevides, Norma Maria; Pelli, Graziano; Lenglet, Sébastien; Burger, Fabienne; Carbone, Federico; Fraga-Silva, Rodrigo A; Stergiopulos, Nikolaos; Pagano, Sabrina; Bertolotto, Maria; Dallegri, Franco; Vuilleumier, Nicolas; Mach, François; Montecucco, Fabrizio

    2015-08-01

    Experimental data from animal models and clinical studies support connections between the haemostasis and inflammation in atherogenesis. These interfaces among inflammation and thrombogenesis have been suggested as targets for pharmacological intervention to reduce disease progression. We hypothesize that the recently discovered antithrombotic drug Sulphated Galactan (SG) (isolated from the red marine alga Acanthophora muscoides) might reduce atherosclerotic plaque vulnerability and inflammatory gene expression in 10-week aged apolipoprotein E deficient (ApoE-/-) mice under high-cholesterol diet for additional 11weeks. Then, the underlying cellular mechanisms were investigated in vitro. SG (10mg/kg) or Vehicle was subcutaneously injected from week 6 until week 11 of the diet. Treatment with SG reduced intraplaque macrophage and Tissue Factor (TF) content as compared to Vehicle-treated animals. Intraplaque TF co-localized and positively correlated with macrophage rich-areas. No changes on atherosclerotic plaque size, and other intraplaque features of vulnerability (such as lipid, neutrophil, MMP-9 and collagen contents) were observed. Moreover, mRNA expression of MMPs, chemokines and genetic markers of Th1/2/reg/17 lymphocyte polarization within mouse aortic arches and spleens was not affected by SG treatment. In vitro, treatment with SG dose-dependently reduced macrophage chemotaxis without affecting TF production. Overall, the chronic SG treatment was well tolerated. In conclusion, our results indicate that SG treatment reduced intraplaque macrophage content (by impacting on cell recruitment) and, concomitantly, intraplaque TF content of potential macrophage origin in atherosclerotic mice. PMID:25869506

  19. Bacillus-produced surfactin attenuates chronic inflammation in atherosclerotic lesions of ApoE(-/-) mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Ping; Jin, Dong; Zhao, Xiuyun; Gao, Zhenqiu; Wang, Shengying; Du, Peng; Qi, Gaofu

    2016-06-01

    Bacillus-produced surfactin can inhibit acute inflammation in vitro and in vivo. However, there is no report whether surfactin could inhibit chronic inflammation in the atherosclerotic lesions. Apoliprotein E deficient (ApoE(-/-)) mice (fed on atherogenic diet) were intragastrically administered with surfactin for 9 doses, then the athero-protective effect of surfactin was determined in vivo. The results showed surfactin could induce anti-inflammatory factors such as IgA, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β and interleukin (IL)-10 in the intestine. Further investigation discovered that surfactin also systemically induced CD4(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(+) Tregs in spleen, which could inhibit T cells to produce pro-inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interferon (IFN)-γ. The IgG subclass pattern with high titer of IgG1 (Th2-type) but low titer of IgG2a (Th1-type) was also found in the surfactin-treated mice. As a result, the attenuation of chronic inflammation was observed in the surfactin-treated groups accompanying with less TNF-α but more IL-10 in the atherosclerotic lesions. Moreover, surfactin could reduce serum total cholesterol and cholesterol in low-density lipoprotein, and increase serum cholesterol in high-density lipoprotein in mice. Collectively, surfactin could significantly attenuate atherosclerotic lesions on the aorta by restoration of the delicate balance of Th1/Th2 response in mice. PMID:27082998

  20. Endogenous Bioactive Peptides as Potential Biomarkers for Atherosclerotic Coronary Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsutomu Hirano

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death worldwide, with high medical costs and rates of disability. It is therefore important to evaluate the use of cardiovascular biomarkers in the early diagnosis of coronary artery disease (CAD. We have screened a variety of recently identified bioactive peptides candidates in anticipation that they would allow detection of atherosclerotic CAD. Especially, we have focused on novel anti-atherogenic peptides as indicators and negative risk factors for CAD. In vitro, in vivo and clinical studies indicated that human adiponectin, heregulin-β1, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1, and salusin-α, peptides of 244, 71, 30, and 28 amino acids, respectively, attenuate the development and progression of atherosclerotic lesions by suppressing macrophage foam cell formation via down-regulation of acyl-coenzyme A: cholesterol acyltransferase-1. Circulating levels of these peptides in the blood are significantly decreased in patients with CAD compared to patients without CAD. Receiver operating characteristic analyses showed that salusin-α is a more useful biomarker, with better sensitivity and specificity, compared with the others for detecting CAD. Therefore, salusin-α, heregulin-β1, adiponectin, and/or GLP-1, alone or in various combinations, may be useful as biomarkers for atherosclerotic CAD.

  1. Carotid endarterectomy for atherosclerotic carotid artery stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have demonstrated carotid endarterectomy (CEA) to be more beneficial for the prevention of recurrent or first-ever ischemic stroke than treatment with antiplatelet agents in patients with moderate-severe stenosis of the cervical internal carotid artery. CEA is the standard treatment for such lesions; however, other RCTs have demonstrated carotid artery stenting (CAS) with a protective device to be comparable to CEA in patients with or without radiological or medical high-risks for CEA, although the selection criteria among these treatments have not yet been established in clinical practice. This review compares the results of RCTs valuating the superiority of CEA over medical treatment or CAS, preoperative examination, procedures of CEA, perioperative management and complications, long-term results, and indications for CEA based on the currently available evidence-based publications. A preoperative evaluation of the patients' medical condition, including atherosclerosis, is therefore important to minimize the perioperative complications of CEA, because myocardial infarction during the perioperative period is frequently observed in patients undergoing CEA. A through radiological examination such as plaque imaging is essential for selecting appropriate treatment strategies involving revascularization or medical treatment for atherosclerotic carotid artery stenosis. In addition, the surgical indications, particularly for asymptomatic lesions, should be carefully considered in light of the recent improvements in medical treatments including antihypertensive agents and statins. (author)

  2. Ultrastructural characteristics of the vascular wall components of ruptured atherosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanasković Irena

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the ultrastructural characteristics of cell populations and extracellular matrix components in the wall of ruptured atherosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA. We analyzed 20 samples of ruptured AAA. For orientation to the light microscopy, we used routine histochemical techniques by standard procedures. For ultrastructural analysis, we applied transmission electron microscopy (TEM. Our results have shown that ruptured AAA is characterized by the remains of an advanced atherosclerotic lesion in the intima followed by a complete absence of endothelial cells, the disruption of basal membrane and disruption of internal elastic lamina. On plaque margins as well as in the inner media we observed smooth muscle cells (SMCs that posses a euchromatic nucleus, a well-developed granulated endoplasmic reticulum around the nucleus and reduced myofilaments. The remains of the ruptured lipid core were acellular in all samples; however, on the lateral sides of ruptured plaque we observed a presence of two types of foam cells (FCs, spindle- and star-shaped. Fusiform FCs possess a well-differentiated basal lamina, caveolae and electron dense bodies, followed by a small number of lipid droplets in the cytoplasm. Star-shaped FCs contain a large number of lipid droplets and do not possess basal lamina. On the inner margins of the plaque, we observed a large number of cells undergoing apoptosis and necrosis, extracellular lipid droplets as well as a large number of lymphocytes. The media was thinned out with disorganized elastic lamellas, while the adventitia exhibited leukocyte infiltration. The presented results suggest that atherosclerotic plaque in ruptured AAA contains vascular SMC synthetic phenotype and two different types of FCs: some were derived from monocyte/macrophage lineage, while others were derived from SMCs of synthetic phenotype. The striking plaque hypocellularity was the result of apoptosis and necrosis

  3. Interleukin 10-coated nanoparticle systems compared for molecular imaging of atherosclerotic lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almer G

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Gunter Almer,1,* Kelli L Summers,1,2,* Bernhard Scheicher,2 Josef Kellner,3 Ingeborg Stelzer,1 Gerd Leitinger,4,5 Anna Gries,3 Ruth Prassl,6 Andreas Zimmer,2 Harald Mangge1,7 1Clinical Institute of Medical and Chemical Laboratory Diagnostics, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria; 2Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, University of Graz, Graz, Austria; 3Institute of Physiological Chemistry, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria; 4Research Unit Electron Microscopic Techniques, Institute of Cell Biology, Histology and Embryology, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria; 5Center for Medical Research (ZMF, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria; 6Institute of Biophysics, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria; 7BioTechMed, Graz, Austria*These authors contributed equally to the study Abstract: Atherosclerosis (AS is one of the leading causes of mortality in high-income countries. Early diagnosis of vulnerable atherosclerotic lesions is one of the biggest challenges currently facing cardiovascular medicine. The present study focuses on developing targeted nanoparticles (NPs in order to improve the detection of vulnerable atherosclerotic-plaques. Various biomarkers involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerotic-plaques have been identified and one of these promising candidates for diagnostic targeting is interleukin 10 (IL10. IL10 has been shown to be a key anti-inflammatory responding cytokine in the early stages of atherogenesis, and has already been used for therapeutic interventions in humans and mice. IL10, the targeting sequence, was coupled to two different types of NPs: protamine-oligonucleotide NPs (proticles and sterically stabilized liposomes in order to address the question of whether the recognition and detection of atherosclerotic-lesions is primarily determined by the targeting sequence itself, or whether it depends on the NP carrier system to which the biomarker is coupled. Each

  4. Vapor and healing treatment for CH3NH3PbI3-xClx films toward large-area perovskite solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouda, Laxman; Gottesman, Ronen; Tirosh, Shay; Haltzi, Eynav; Hu, Jiangang; Ginsburg, Adam; Keller, David A.; Bouhadana, Yaniv; Zaban, Arie

    2016-03-01

    Hybrid methyl-ammonium lead trihalide perovskites are promising low-cost materials for use in solar cells and other optoelectronic applications. With a certified photovoltaic conversion efficiency record of 20.1%, scale-up for commercial purposes is already underway. However, preparation of large-area perovskite films remains a challenge, and films of perovskites on large electrodes suffer from non-uniform performance. Thus, production and characterization of the lateral uniformity of large-area films is a crucial step towards scale-up of devices. In this paper, we present a reproducible method for improving the lateral uniformity and performance of large-area perovskite solar cells (32 cm2). The method is based on methyl-ammonium iodide (MAI) vapor treatment as a new step in the sequential deposition of perovskite films. Following the MAI vapor treatment, we used high throughput techniques to map the photovoltaic performance throughout the large-area device. The lateral uniformity and performance of all photovoltaic parameters (Voc, Jsc, Fill Factor, Photo-conversion efficiency) increased, with an overall improved photo-conversion efficiency of ~100% following a vapor treatment at 140 °C. Based on XRD and photoluminescence measurements, We propose that the MAI treatment promotes a ``healing effect'' to the perovskite film which increases the lateral uniformity across the large-area solar cell. Thus, the straightforward MAI vapor treatment is highly beneficial for large scale commercialization of perovskite solar cells, regardless of the specific deposition method.Hybrid methyl-ammonium lead trihalide perovskites are promising low-cost materials for use in solar cells and other optoelectronic applications. With a certified photovoltaic conversion efficiency record of 20.1%, scale-up for commercial purposes is already underway. However, preparation of large-area perovskite films remains a challenge, and films of perovskites on large electrodes suffer from non

  5. Mechanoregulation of Wound Healing and Skin Homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Rosińczuk

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Basic and clinical studies on mechanobiology of cells and tissues point to the importance of mechanical forces in the process of skin regeneration and wound healing. These studies result in the development of new therapies that use mechanical force which supports effective healing. A better understanding of mechanobiology will make it possible to develop biomaterials with appropriate physical and chemical properties used to treat poorly healing wounds. In addition, it will make it possible to design devices precisely controlling wound mechanics and to individualize a therapy depending on the type, size, and anatomical location of the wound in specific patients, which will increase the clinical efficiency of the therapy. Linking mechanobiology with the science of biomaterials and nanotechnology will enable in the near future precise interference in abnormal cell signaling responsible for the proliferation, differentiation, cell death, and restoration of the biological balance. The objective of this study is to point to the importance of mechanobiology in regeneration of skin damage and wound healing. The study describes the influence of rigidity of extracellular matrix and special restrictions on cell physiology. The study also defines how and what mechanical changes influence tissue regeneration and wound healing. The influence of mechanical signals in the process of proliferation, differentiation, and skin regeneration is tagged in the study.

  6. Solitary Type of Congenital Self-healing Reticulohistiocytosis

    OpenAIRE

    Dorjsuren, Gantsetseg; Kim, Hee Jung; Jung, Jin Young; Bae, Byung Gi; Lee, Ju Hee

    2011-01-01

    Congenital self-healing reticulohistiocytosis is a rare, congenital, benign, self-healing variant of Langerhans cell histiocytosis. It usually appears as multiple papules or nodules; however, occurrence of the solitary type is very rare. We report on a case of solitary congenital self-healing reticulohistiocytosis in a 29-day-old girl who presented with a papule on her sole. Two months later, the lesion regressed with a slight scar. Based upon clinical and histologic findings, we made a diagn...

  7. Inflammation and Neuropeptides: The Connection in Diabetic Wound Healing

    OpenAIRE

    Pradhan, Leena; Nabzdyk, Christoph; Andersen, Nicholas D.; LoGerfo, Frank W; Veves, Aristidis

    2009-01-01

    This article provides a broad overview of the interaction between neuropeptides and inflammatory mediators as it pertains to diabetic wound healing. Abnormal wound healing is a major complication of both type I and type II diabetes and is the most frequent cause of non-traumatic lower limb amputation. Wound healing requires the orchestrated integration of complex biological and molecular events. Inflammation, proliferation and migration of cells followed by angiogenesis and re-epithelization ...

  8. Hemostatic and Wound Healing Properties of Chromolaena odorata Leaf Extract

    OpenAIRE

    Seung Joon Baek; Wandee Gritsanapan; Kyung-Won Min; Jason Liggett; Xiaobo Zhang; Hataichanok Pandith

    2013-01-01

    Chromolaena odorata (L.) King and Robinson (Siam weed) extract has been used to stop bleeding and in wound healing in many tropical countries. However, its detailed mechanisms have not been elucidated. In this study, we examined the molecular mechanisms by which Siam weed extract (SWE) affected hemostatic and wound healing activities. SWE promoted Balb/c 3T3 fibroblast cell migration and proliferation. Subsequently, we found that heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), the accelerating wound healing enzyme,...

  9. Lipid peroxidation-derived etheno-DNA adducts in human atherosclerotic lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nair, Jagadeesan [Division of Toxicology and Cancer Risk Factors, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); De Flora, Silvio [Department of Health Sciences, University of Genoa, Via A. Pastore 1, I-16132 Genoa (Italy); Izzotti, Alberto [Department of Health Sciences, University of Genoa, Via A. Pastore 1, I-16132 Genoa (Italy); Bartsch, Helmut [Division of Toxicology and Cancer Risk Factors, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)]. E-mail: h.bartsch@dkfz.de

    2007-08-01

    Atherosclerosis and cancer are characterized by uncontrolled cell proliferation and share common risk factors, such as cigarette smoking, dietary habits and ageing. Growth of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) in atherosclerotic plaques may result from DNA damage, caused either by exogenous mutagens or by agents endogenously generated due to oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation (LPO). Hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE), a major LPO product, binds covalently to cellular DNA to form the exocyclic etheno-DNA-base adducts, 1,N {sup 6}-ethenodeoxyadenine ({epsilon}dA) and 3,N {sup 4}-ethenodeoxycytosine ({epsilon}dC). By applying an ultrasensitive {sup 32}P-postlabeling-immunoaffinity method, {epsilon}dA and {epsilon}dC were quantified in abdominal aorta SMCs from 13 atherosclerotic patients and 3 non-smoking subjects without atherosclerotic lesions. The levels of etheno-adducts ranged for {epsilon}dA from 2.3 to 39.6/10{sup 8} dA and for {epsilon}dC from 10.7 to 157.7/10{sup 8} dC, with a high correlation between {epsilon}dA and {epsilon}dC (r = 0.84, P = 0.0001). Etheno-adduct levels were higher in atherosclerotic smokers than in ex-smokers for both {epsilon}dA (means 15.2 versus 7.3, P = 0.06) and {epsilon}dC (71.9 versus 51.6, not significant). {epsilon}dC levels were higher in either ex-smokers (P = 0.03) or smokers (P = 0.07) than in non-smokers. There was a poor correlation between either {epsilon}dA or {epsilon}dC and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine, whereas significant positive correlations were detected with the levels of several postlabeled bulky aromatic DNA adducts. In conclusion, two different types of DNA damage may be involved in atherosclerotic plaque formation and progression: (i) bulky aromatic compounds, to which aorta SMCs are chronically exposed in smokers, can either covalently bind to DNA, induce redox-cycling via quinone intermediates and/or activate local chronic inflammatory processes in the arterial wall; ii) this in turn leads to a self perpetuating

  10. Alternation of histone and DNA methylation in human atherosclerotic carotid plaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greißel, A; Culmes, M; Napieralski, R; Wagner, E; Gebhard, H; Schmitt, M; Zimmermann, A; Eckstein, H-H; Zernecke, A; Pelisek, J

    2015-08-01

    Little is known about epigenetics and its possible role in atherosclerosis. We here analysed histone and DNA methylation and the expression of corresponding methyltransferases in early and advanced human atherosclerotic carotid lesions in comparison to healthy carotid arteries. Western Blotting was performed on carotid plaques from our biobank with early (n=60) or advanced (n=60) stages of atherosclerosis and healthy carotid arteries (n=12) to analyse di-methylation patterns of histone H3 at positions K4, K9 and K27. In atherosclerotic lesions, di-methylation of H3K4 was unaltered and that of H3K9 and H3K27 significantly decreased compared to control arteries. Immunohistochemistry revealed an increased appearance of di-methylated H3K4 in smooth muscle cells (SMCs), a decreased expression of di-methylated H3K9 in SMCs and inflammatory cells, and reduced di-methylated H3K27 in inflammatory cells in advanced versus early atherosclerosis. Expression of corresponding histone methyltransferases MLL2 and G9a was increased in advanced versus early atherosclerosis. Genomic DNA hypomethylation, as determined by PCR for methylated LINE1 and SAT-alpha, was observed in early and advanced plaques compared to control arteries and in cell-free serum of patients with high-grade carotid stenosis compared to healthy volunteers. In contrast, no differences in DNA methylation were observed in blood cells. Expression of DNA-methyltransferase DNMT1 was reduced in atherosclerotic plaques versus controls, DNMT3A was undetectable, and DNMT3B not altered. DNA-demethylase TET1 was increased in atherosclerosisc plaques. The extent of histone and DNA methylation and expression of some corresponding methyltransferases are significantly altered in atherosclerosis, suggesting a possible contribution of epigenetics in disease development. PMID:25993995

  11. How wounds heal

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... PA: Mosby Elsevier; 2010: chap. 7. Richardson M. Acute wounds: an overview of the physiological healing process. Nursing Times . 2004; 100(4): 50. Von Der Heyde RL, Evans RB. Wound classification ...

  12. Healing Childhood Trauma Worldwide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuban, Caelan

    2012-01-01

    Millions of the world's children are exposed to traumatic events and relationships every day. Whatever the cause, this overwhelming stress produces a host of unsettling symptoms and reactions. The author highlights six practical principles that undergird healing interventions.

  13. Nestin Positive Bone Marrow Derived Cells Responded to Injury Mobilize into Peripheral Circulation and Participate in Skin Defect Healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Yajie; He, Tao; An, Yulin; Tang, Zhangui; Deng, Zhihong

    2015-01-01

    Exogenously infused mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are thought to migrate to injury site through peripheral blood stream and participate in tissue repair. However, whether and how endogenous bone marrow MSCs mobilized to circulating and targeted to tissue injury has raised some controversy, and related studies were restricted by the difficulty of MSCs identifying in vivo. Nestin, a kind of intermediate filament protein initially identified in neuroepithelial stem cells, was recently reported as a credible criteria for MSCs in bone marrow. In this study, we used a green fluorescent protein (GFP) labeled bone marrow replacement model to trace the nestin positive bone marrow derived cells (BMDCs) of skin defected-mice. We found that after skin injured, numbers of nestin+ cells in peripheral blood and bone marrow both increased. A remarkable concentration of nestin+ BMDCs around skin wound was detected, while few of these cells could be observed in uninjured skin or other organs. This recruitment effect could not be promoted by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), suggests a different mobilization mechanism from ones G-CSF takes effect on hematopoietic cells. Our results proposed nestin+ BMDCs as mobilized candidates in skin injury repair, which provide a new insight of endogenous MSCs therapy. PMID:26633897

  14. Diabetes and wound healing

    OpenAIRE

    Svendsen, Rikke; Irakunda, Gloire; Knudsen List, Karoline Cecilie; Sønderstup-Jensen, Marie; Hölmich Rosca, Mette Maria

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes is a disease where the glucose level in the blood is high, due to either insulin resistance, impaired insulin sensitivity or no insulin production. The high glucose level causes several complications, one of them being an impaired wound healing process, which might lead to chronic wounds, ulcers. Several factors play a role in the development of ulcers, and recent research indicates that microRNA might play a significant role in skin development and wound healing. The purpose of this...

  15. Association of postalimentary lipemia with atherosclerotic manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Tentor

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available We identified different lipemic and metabolic responses after the ingestion of a standardized meal by healthy adults and related them to atherosclerotic markers. Samples from 60 normolipidemic adults were collected before and after a liquid meal (40 g fat/m² body surface at 0, 2, 4, 6, and 8 h for measurements of lipids, free fatty acids (FFA, insulin, cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP, autoantibodies to epitopes of oxidized LDL (oxLDL Ab, lipolytic activities, and apolipoprotein E polymorphism. Mean carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT was determined by Doppler ultrasound. The volunteers were classified into early (N = 39 and late (N = 31 triacylglycerol (TAG responders to the test meal. Late responders showed lower HDL cholesterol concentration at fasting and in the TAG peak, lower insulin and higher FFA concentrations compared to early responders. Multivariate regression analyses showed that mean cIMT was associated with gender (male and age in early responders and by cholesterol levels at the 6th hour in late responders. oxLDL Ab were explained by lipoprotein lipase and negatively by hepatic lipase and oxLDL Ab (fasting period by CETP (negative and FFA (positive. This study is the first to identify a postalimentary insulin resistance state, combined with a reduced CETP response exclusively among late responders, and the identification of the regulators of postalimentary atherogenicity. Further research is required to determine the metabolic mechanisms described in the different postalimentary phenotypes observed in this study, as well as in different pathological states, as currently investigated in our laboratory.

  16. Association of postalimentary lipemia with atherosclerotic manifestations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We identified different lipemic and metabolic responses after the ingestion of a standardized meal by healthy adults and related them to atherosclerotic markers. Samples from 60 normolipidemic adults were collected before and after a liquid meal (40 g fat/m2 body surface) at 0, 2, 4, 6, and 8 h for measurements of lipids, free fatty acids (FFA), insulin, cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP), autoantibodies to epitopes of oxidized LDL (oxLDL Ab), lipolytic activities, and apolipoprotein E polymorphism. Mean carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) was determined by Doppler ultrasound. The volunteers were classified into early (N = 39) and late (N = 31) triacylglycerol (TAG) responders to the test meal. Late responders showed lower HDL cholesterol concentration at fasting and in the TAG peak, lower insulin and higher FFA concentrations compared to early responders. Multivariate regression analyses showed that mean cIMT was associated with gender (male) and age in early responders and by cholesterol levels at the 6th hour in late responders. oxLDL Ab were explained by lipoprotein lipase and negatively by hepatic lipase and oxLDL Ab (fasting period) by CETP (negative) and FFA (positive). This study is the first to identify a postalimentary insulin resistance state, combined with a reduced CETP response exclusively among late responders, and the identification of the regulators of postalimentary atherogenicity. Further research is required to determine the metabolic mechanisms described in the different postalimentary phenotypes observed in this study, as well as in different pathological states, as currently investigated in our laboratory

  17. Association of postalimentary lipemia with atherosclerotic manifestations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tentor, J. [Departamento de Patologia Clínica, Faculdade de Ciências Médicas, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Nakamura, R.T. [Laboratório de Diagnóstico por Imagem, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Radiologia, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Gidlund, M. [Laboratório de Imunofisiopatologia, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Barros-Mazon, S. [Departamento de Patologia Clínica, Faculdade de Ciências Médicas, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Harada, L.M. [Laboratório de Lípides, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Zago, V.S.; Oba, J.F.; Faria, E.C. de [Departamento de Patologia Clínica, Faculdade de Ciências Médicas, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2012-08-10

    We identified different lipemic and metabolic responses after the ingestion of a standardized meal by healthy adults and related them to atherosclerotic markers. Samples from 60 normolipidemic adults were collected before and after a liquid meal (40 g fat/m{sup 2} body surface) at 0, 2, 4, 6, and 8 h for measurements of lipids, free fatty acids (FFA), insulin, cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP), autoantibodies to epitopes of oxidized LDL (oxLDL Ab), lipolytic activities, and apolipoprotein E polymorphism. Mean carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) was determined by Doppler ultrasound. The volunteers were classified into early (N = 39) and late (N = 31) triacylglycerol (TAG) responders to the test meal. Late responders showed lower HDL cholesterol concentration at fasting and in the TAG peak, lower insulin and higher FFA concentrations compared to early responders. Multivariate regression analyses showed that mean cIMT was associated with gender (male) and age in early responders and by cholesterol levels at the 6th hour in late responders. oxLDL Ab were explained by lipoprotein lipase and negatively by hepatic lipase and oxLDL Ab (fasting period) by CETP (negative) and FFA (positive). This study is the first to identify a postalimentary insulin resistance state, combined with a reduced CETP response exclusively among late responders, and the identification of the regulators of postalimentary atherogenicity. Further research is required to determine the metabolic mechanisms described in the different postalimentary phenotypes observed in this study, as well as in different pathological states, as currently investigated in our laboratory.

  18. Guidelines for the optimization of microsurgery in atherosclerotic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hung-Chi; Coskunfirat, O Koray; Ozkan, Omer; Mardini, Samir; Cigna, Emanuele; Salgado, Christopher J; Spanio, Stefano

    2006-01-01

    We review the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and the issues that must be taken into consideration when performing microsurgery in atherosclerotic patients. Atherosclerosis is a systemic disease, and may affect the success of microsurgery. Atherosclerotic patients have a tendency toward thrombosis, because the nature of the arteries is changed. Such patients are usually old and have additional medical problems. To increase the success rate of microsurgery in atherosclerotic patients, special precautions should be considered. Patients must be evaluated properly for the suitability of microsurgery. The microsurgical technique requires a meticulous approach, and various technical tricks can be used to avoid thrombosis. Recipient-vessel selection, anastomotic technique, and the use of vein grafts are all important issues. Prophylactic anticoagulation is recommended in severely atherosclerotic patients. Close monitoring of the patient and flap is necessary after the operation, as with routine microvascular free-tissue transfers. We conclude that atherosclerosis is not a contraindication for microsurgery. If the microsurgeon knows how to deal with the difficulties in atherosclerotic patients, microsurgery can be performed safely. PMID:16761266

  19. Atherosclerotic Renal Artery Stenosis and Hypertension: Pragmatism, Pitfalls, and Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bavishi, Chirag; de Leeuw, Peter W; Messerli, Franz H

    2016-06-01

    For many years and even decades, a diagnostic work-up to look for a secondary form of hypertension, particularly of renovascular origin, has been a central tenet in medicine. Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis is considered the most common cause of renovascular hypertension. However, advances in understanding the complex pathophysiology of this condition and the recently documented futility of renal revascularization bring into question whether atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis truly causes "renovascular hypertension." From a clinical point of view, a clear distinction should be made between hypertension associated with atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis and hypertension caused by renal artery stenosis-induced activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. Most patients with atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis do not have a form of hypertension that is remediable or improved by angioplasty; to expose them to the cost, inconvenience, and risk of a diagnostic work-up add up to little more than a wild goose chase. However, with very few exceptions, medical therapy with antihypertensives and statins remains the cornerstone for the management of patients with atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis and hypertension. PMID:26522797

  20. Intravenous administration of adipose tissue-derived stem cells enhances nerve healing and promotes BDNF expression via the TrkB signaling in a rat stroke model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Zheng, Wei; Bai, Hongying; Wang, Jin; Wei, Ruili; Wen, Hongtao; Ning, Hanbing

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown the beneficial effects of adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) transplantation in stroke. However, the molecular mechanism by which transplanted ADSCs promote nerve healing is not yet elucidated. In order to make clear the molecular mechanism for the neuroprotective effects of ADSCs and investigate roles of the BDNF–TrkB signaling in neuroprotection of ADSCs, we, therefore, examined the neurological function, brain water content, and the protein expression in middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) rats with or without ADSCs transplantation. ADSCs were transplanted intravenously into rats at 30 minutes after MCAO. K252a, an inhibitor of TrkB, was administered into rats by intraventricular and brain stereotaxic injection. Modified neurological severity score tests were performed to measure behavioral outcomes. The results showed that ADSCs significantly alleviated neurological deficits and reduced brain water content in MCAO rats. The protein expression levels of BDNF and TrkB significantly increased in the cortex of MCAO rats with ADSCs treatment. However, K252a administration reversed the ADSCs-induced elevation of BDNF, TrkB, and Bcl-2 and reduction of Bax protein in MCAO rats. ADSCs promote BDNF expression via the TrkB signaling and improve functional neurological recovery in stroke rats.

  1. Using a Hydroquinone/Tretinoin-based Skin Care System Before and After Electrodesiccation and Curettage of Superficial Truncal Basal Cell Carcinoma: A Multicenter, Randomized, Investigator-blind, Controlled Study of Short-term Healing

    OpenAIRE

    David, Pariser; James, Spencer; Brian, Berman; Suzanne, Bruce; Lisa, Parr; Kenneth, Gross

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of using a 4% hydroquinone/0.05% tretinoin skin care system compared with standard treatment of cleanser plus healing ointment to enhance aesthetic outcomes resulting from electrodesiccation and curettage treatment for superficial truncal basal cell carcinomas. Design: Multicenter, investigator-masked, randomized, parallel-group study. Patients received either the hydroquinone/tretinoin system or the standard treatment twice daily for three...

  2. The Advantages of Traditional Chumash Healing

    OpenAIRE

    Cecilia Garcia; Adams, James D.

    2005-01-01

    Chumash healing has been practiced in California for ∼13 000 years. Chumash healers treat their patients with prayer, laughter, dreaming, phytotherapy, aromatherapy, healing ceremonies and other techniques. Healing involves first healing the spirit, then healing the body. Chumash people still maintain their unique identity. Chumash Healers still practice the ancient healing arts in California. This lecture is a brief introduction to Chumash Healing.

  3. RETROSPECTIVE STUDY OF MORPHOLOGICAL AND EVOLUTIVE PARTICULARITIES OF ATHEROSCLEROTIC LESIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Cojocaru

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is not a simple vascular senescence process, but also is a progressive and high risk disease. From morphologic point of vue it can be found a large variety of atherosclerotic lesions depending on their evolution and localization. The aim of this study was to investigate and to correlate clinical and evolutive aspects of the atherosclerotic process, regarding 213 patients of Cardiovascular Department of Cardiovascular Disease Institute ``Prof. Dr. George IM Georgescu``, Iaşi, which have been investigated for a period during 2005-2009. The arterial fragments from both muscular and elastic types of arteries were prelevated by endarterectomy and were specifically prepared for histopathological exam. The microscopic exam revealed the high frequency of advanced atherosclerotic lesions, especially type V and type VI in a positive correlation with age, sex, clinical diagnostic and other associated risk factors.

  4. Value of detection of atherosclerotic lesions using autologous labelled platelets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinzinger, H.; Silberbauer, K.; Fitscha, P.; Kaliman, J. (Vienna Univ. (Austria). 2. Medizinische Klinik; Vienna Univ. (Austria). Kardiologische Abt.; Allgem. Poliklinik, Vienna (Austria). 2. Medizinische Abteilung)

    1982-01-01

    In 44 patients with clinical signs of carotid artery stenosis a positive Doppler-ultrasound was obtained. In all patients the lesions were confirmed by angiography. In the patients labelling of autologous platelets with 111 Indium-oxine-sulphate was done in order to calculate the platelet half-life. In addition we tried to visualize the verified atherosclerotic lesions under a gamma-camera. In all patients the platelet half-life was significantly shortened in comparison to the controls. In none of the patients studied a visualization of the angiographically verified atherosclerotic lesions could be obtained. These findings point out, that only in recently developed and very severe atherosclerotic lesions the number of platelets deposed on the vascular surface is enough to allow gamma-camera imaging.

  5. High shear stress induces atherosclerotic vulnerable plaque formation through angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi; Qiu, Juhui; Luo, Shisui; Xie, Xiang; Zheng, Yiming; Zhang, Kang; Ye, Zhiyi; Liu, Wanqian; Gregersen, Hans; Wang, Guixue

    2016-12-01

    Rupture of atherosclerotic plaques causing thrombosis is the main cause of acute coronary syndrome and ischemic strokes. Inhibition of thrombosis is one of the important tasks developing biomedical materials such as intravascular stents and vascular grafts. Shear stress (SS) influences the formation and development of atherosclerosis. The current review focuses on the vulnerable plaques observed in the high shear stress (HSS) regions, which localizes at the proximal region of the plaque intruding into the lumen. The vascular outward remodelling occurs in the HSS region for vascular compensation and that angiogenesis is a critical factor for HSS which induces atherosclerotic vulnerable plaque formation. These results greatly challenge the established belief that low shear stress is important for expansive remodelling, which provides a new perspective for preventing the transition of stable plaques to high-risk atherosclerotic lesions. PMID:27482467

  6. Induction of the Chemokines CCL3α, CCL3α and CCL5 in Atherosclerotic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyaa Mousa

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemokines recruit immune cells to inflammatory sites and promote the process of inflammation. The role of these mediators in the disease process in atherosclerosis is not fully studied. The spontaneous mRNA expression and intracellular protein production of the potential inflammatory chemokines CCL3 and CCL3 (macrophage- inflammatory protein-1and ; CCR3 ligand and CCL5 (regulated upon activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES; CCR5 ligand in atherosclerotic patients was examined together with the effects of the chlamydial antigen HSP60 and LPS on the gene expression and protein induction of these mediators. Detection of chemokine mRNA and protein levels was assessed by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry respectively. The examined chemokines were detected at significantly high levels on atherosclerotic patients compared to healthy controls at both mRNA and protein levels. Stimulation with HSP60 and LPS from Chlamydia pneumoniae (C. pneumoniae and E. coli showed increased numbers of CCL3, CCL3 and CCL5 mRNA expressing cells in patients compared to health controls. Protein translation of these chemokines was depicted in correspondence to the mRNA gene expression for all examined chemokines spontaneously and after stimulation with chlamydial HSP60 and LPS and E. coli LPS. Thus, the herein data demonstrate the induction of potential inflammatory chemokines in atherosclerotic patients and that bacterial antigens play a role in the immunopathologic events in this disease by generating more inflammatory mediators.

  7. Heat Stress and Hormetin-Induced Hormesis in Human Cells: Effects on Aging, Wound Healing, Angiogenesis, and Differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Rattan, Suresh I.S.; Fernandes, Ricardo A.; Demirovic, Dino; Dymek, Barbara; Lima, Cristovao F.

    2008-01-01

    Accumulation of molecular damage and increased molecular heterogeneity are hallmarks of cellular aging. Mild stress-induced hormesis can be an effective way for reducing the accumulation of molecular damage, and thus slowing down aging from within. We have shown that repeated mild heat stress (RMHS) has anti-aging effects on growth and various other cellular and biochemical characteristics of normal human skin fibroblasts and keratinocytes undergoing aging in vitro. RMHS given to human cells ...

  8. Drug release, cell adhesion and wound healing evaluations of electrospun carboxymethyl chitosan/polyethylene oxide nanofibres containing phenytoin sodium and vitamin C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarandi, Mohammad Amin; Zahedi, Payam; Rezaeian, Iraj; Salehpour, Alireza; Gholami, Mehdi; Motealleh, Behrooz

    2015-08-01

    In this work, N, O-carboxymethyl chitosan (CMCS) samples from virgin chitosan (CS) were synthesised and CMCS/polyethylene oxide (PEO) (50/50) blend nanofibrous samples were successfully electrospun from their aqueous solution. The electrospinning conditions to achieve smooth and fine diameter nanofibrous mats were optimised via D-optimal design approach. Afterwards, vitamin C and phenytoin sodium (PHT-Na) were added to these samples for producing wound dressing materials. H-nuclear magnetic resonance, scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared tests for the evaluation of functionalised CS, morphology and biodegradability studies of CMCS/PEO blend nanofibrous samples were applied. The kinetic and drug release mechanism for vitamin C and PHT-Na drug-loaded electrospun samples were also investigated by UV-vis spectrophotometer and high performance liquid chromatography, respectively. The results showed an approximately similar drug release rate of the two drugs and followed Higuchi's kinetic model. The stem cells viability and their adhesion on the surface of the samples containing PHT-Na and vitamin C were carried out using MTT assay and the best cells' biocompatibility was obtained using both drugs into the CMCS/PEO nanofibrous samples. Moreover, the in vivo animal wound model results revealed that the electrospun samples containing vitamin C and PHT-Na (1%) had a remarkable efficiency in the wounds' closure and their healing process compared with vitamin C/PHT-Na (50/50) ointment. Finally, the histology observations showed that the wound treated with optimised electrospun samples containing two drugs enabled regeneration of epidermis layers due to collagen fibres accumulation followed by granulating tissues formation without necrosis. PMID:26224348

  9. Multimodality imaging of carotid atherosclerotic plaque: Going beyond stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hingwala, Divyata; Kesavadas, Chandrasekharan; Sylaja, Padmavathy N; Thomas, Bejoy; Kapilamoorthy, Tirur Raman

    2013-01-01

    Apart from the degree of stenosis, the morphology of carotid atherosclerotic plaques and presence of neovascularization are important factors that may help to evaluate the risk and ‘vulnerability’ of plaques and may also influence the choice of treatment. In this article, we aim to describe the techniques and imaging findings on CTA, high resolution MRI and contrast enhanced ultrasound in the evaluation of carotid atherosclerotic plaques. We also discuss a few representative cases from our institute with the related clinical implications. PMID:23986615

  10. Multimodality imaging of carotid atherosclerotic plaque: Going beyond stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divyata Hingwala

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Apart from the degree of stenosis, the morphology of carotid atherosclerotic plaques and presence of neovascularization are important factors that may help to evaluate the risk and ′vulnerability′ of plaques and may also influence the choice of treatment. In this article, we aim to describe the techniques and imaging findings on CTA, high resolution MRI and contrast enhanced ultrasound in the evaluation of carotid atherosclerotic plaques. We also discuss a few representative cases from our institute with the related clinical implications.

  11. Advances in combining gene therapy with cell and tissue engineering-based approaches to enhance healing of the meniscus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucchiarini, M; McNulty, A L; Mauck, R L; Setton, L A; Guilak, F; Madry, H

    2016-08-01

    Meniscal lesions are common problems in orthopaedic surgery and sports medicine, and injury or loss of the meniscus accelerates the onset of knee osteoarthritis (OA). Despite a variety of therapeutic options in the clinics, there is a critical need for improved treatments to enhance meniscal repair. In this regard, combining gene-, cell-, and tissue engineering-based approaches is an attractive strategy to generate novel, effective therapies to treat meniscal lesions. In the present work, we provide an overview of the tools currently available to improve meniscal repair and discuss the progress and remaining challenges for potential future translation in patients. PMID:27063441

  12. Quantitative Evaluation of the Polarization Characteristics of Coronary Arteries Atherosclerotic Plaques at Different Development Stages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.V. Gubarkova

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the investigation was to develop an approach to quantitative evaluation of polarization properties (birefringence and cross-scattering basing on cross-polarization OCT images (CP OCT in order to characterize the development stages of atherosclerotic plaques and to reveal unstable ones. Materials and Methods. We report on quantitative analysis of CP OCT images of the seven development stages of atherosclerotic plaques ex vivo. Integral depolarization factor (IDF and effective birefringence coefficient (Δn were proposed as parameters for quantitative characterization of the CP OCT images. Results. Calculation of the IDF and Δn in the local region of interest (intima/fibrous cap showed a statistically relevant difference between stable (stage IV and unstable (stage Va plaques (0.46±0.21 against 0.09±0.04 for IDF and (0.47±0.10·10–3 against (0.25±0.07·10–3 for Δn; (p<0.05. It was found that Δn value in the range (0.22–0.29·10–3 (within the limits of two standard deviations indicates the presence of only a small amount of highly organized collagen in the fibrous cap of an unstable plaque which can indicate its tendency to rupture. We believe that these changes are connected with the prevalence of disorganized fibers during the inflammatory process in the fibrous cap of an unstable plaque, and to the presence of clusters of foam cells and inflammatory cells between them. Conclusion. The proposed approach to the quantitative evaluation of CP OCT images (calculation of IDF and building Δn maps allows to assess both cross-scattering and birefringence of atherosclerotic plaques at various development stages and more reliably reveal their vulnerability.

  13. Cellular events and biomarkers of wound healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah Jumaat Mohd. Yussof

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Researchers have identified several of the cellular events associated with wound healing. Platelets, neutrophils, macrophages, and fibroblasts primarily contribute to the process. They release cytokines including interleukins (ILs and TNF-α, and growth factors, of which platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF is perhaps the most important. The cytokines and growth factors manipulate the inflammatory phase of healing. Cytokines are chemotactic for white cells and fibroblasts, while the growth factors initiate fibroblast and keratinocyte proliferation. Inflammation is followed by the proliferation of fibroblasts, which lay down the extracellular matrix. Simultaneously, various white cells and other connective tissue cells release both the matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs and the tissue inhibitors of these metalloproteinases (TIMPs. MMPs remove damaged structural proteins such as collagen, while the fibroblasts lay down fresh extracellular matrix proteins. Fluid collected from acute, healing wounds contains growth factors, and stimulates fibroblast proliferation, but fluid collected from chronic, nonhealing wounds does not. Fibroblasts from chronic wounds do not respond to chronic wound fluid, probably because the fibroblasts of these wounds have lost the receptors that respond to cytokines and growth factors. Nonhealing wounds contain high levels of IL1, IL6, and MMPs, and an abnormally high MMP/TIMP ratio. Clinical examination of wounds inconsistently predicts which wounds will heal when procedures like secondary closure are planned. Surgeons therefore hope that these chemicals can be used as biomarkers of wounds which have impaired ability to heal. There is also evidence that the application of growth factors like PDGF will help the healing of chronic, nonhealing wounds.

  14. General concept of wound healing, revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theddeus O.H. Prasetyono

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Wound healing is a transition of processes which is also recognized as one of the most complex processes in human physiology. Complex series of reactions and interactions among cells and mediators take place in the healing process of wound involving cellular and molecular events. The inflammatory phase is naturally intended to remove devitalized tissue and prevent invasive infection. The proliferative phase is characterized by the formation of granulation tissue within the wound bed, composed of new capillary network, fibroblast, and macrophages in a loose arrangement of supporting structure. This second phase lasts from day 8 to 21 after the injury is also the phase for epithelialisation. The natural period of proliferative phase is a reflection for us in treating wound to reach the goal which ultimately defines as closed wound. The final maturation phase is also characterized by the balancing between deposition of collagen and its degradation. There are at least three prerequisites which are ideal local conditions for the nature of wound to go on a normal process of healing i.e. 1 all tissue involved in the wound and surrounding should be vital, 2 no foreign bodies in the wound, and 3 free from excessive contamination/infection. The author formulated a step ladder of thinking in regards of healing intentions covering all acute and chronic wounds. Regarding the “hierarchy” of healing intention, the fi rst and ideal choice to heal wounds is by primary intention followed by tertiary intention and lastly the secondary intention. (Med J Indones 2009;18:206-14Key words: inflammatory mediator, epithelialisation, growth factor, wound healing

  15. Healing the nations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl Dortzbach

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available This article gives the motivations, methodology and some results of a study done in Christian healing interventions in African contexts of� stress and violence. Healing in community has been viewed through the prism of �shalom�. Shalom occurs when people who are in a� right� relationship with God� and� each other enjoy and share together the resources of the earth� in ways� that� show Christ� is Lord of all creation. Charts are given showing� the various kinds of community needs, ways to intervene, and some indications of ways to evaluate the interventions.

  16. Hematopoietic Fas Deficiency Does Not Affect Experimental Atherosclerotic Lesion Formation despite Inducing a Proatherogenic State

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Claro, R. Angelo; Zhu, Xiaodong; Tang, Jingjing; Morgan-Stevenson, Vicki; Schwartz, Barbara R.; Iwata, Akiko; Liles, W. Conrad; Raines, Elaine W.; Harlan, John M.

    2011-01-01

    The Fas death receptor (CD95) is expressed on macrophages, smooth muscle cells, and T cells within atherosclerotic lesions. Given the dual roles of Fas in both apoptotic and nonapoptotic signaling, the aim of the present study was to test the effect of hematopoietic Fas deficiency on experimental atherosclerosis in low-density lipoprotein receptor-null mice (Ldlr−/−). Bone marrow from Fas−/− mice was used to reconstitute irradiated Ldlr−/− mice as a model for atherosclerosis. After 16 weeks on an 0.5% cholesterol diet, no differences were noted in brachiocephalic artery lesion size, cellularity, or vessel wall apoptosis. However, Ldlr−/− mice reconstituted with Fas−/− hematopoietic cells had elevated hyperlipidemia [80% increase, relative to wild-type (WT) controls; P < 0.001] and showed marked elevation of plasma levels of CXCL1/KC, CCL2/MCP-1, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12 subunit p70, and soluble Fas ligand (P < 0.01), as well as systemic microvascular inflammation. It was not possible to assess later stages of atherosclerosis because of increased mortality in Fas−/− bone marrow recipients. Our data indicate that hematopoietic Fas deficiency does not affect early atherosclerotic lesion development in Ldlr−/− mice. PMID:21550016

  17. Intramembranous Bone Healing Process Subsequent to Tooth Extraction in Mice: Micro-Computed Tomography, Histomorphometric and Molecular Characterization

    OpenAIRE

    Vieira, Andreia Espindola; Repeke, Carlos Eduardo; Ferreira Junior, Samuel de Barros; Colavite, Priscila Maria; Biguetti, Claudia Cristina; de Oliveira, Rodrigo Cardoso; ASSIS, Gerson Francisco; Taga, Rumio; Trombone, Ana Paula Favaro; Garlet, Gustavo Pompermaier

    2015-01-01

    Bone tissue has a significant potential for healing, which involves a significant the interplay between bone and immune cells. While fracture healing represents a useful model to investigate endochondral bone healing, intramembranous bone healing models are yet to be developed and characterized. In this study, a micro-computed tomography, histomorphometric and molecular (RealTimePCRarray) characterization of post tooth-extraction alveolar bone healing was performed on C57Bl/6 WT mice. After t...

  18. The science of ultrasound therapy for fracture healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Della Rocca Gregory

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Fracture healing involves a complex interplay of cellular processes, culminating in bridging of a fracture gap with bone. Fracture healing can be compromised by numerous exogenous and endogenous patient factors, and intense research is currently going on to identify modalities that can increase the likelihood of successful healing. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS has been proposed as a modality that may have a benefit for increasing reliable fracture healing as well as perhaps increasing the rate of fracture healing. We conducted a review to establish basic scince evidence of therapeutic role of lipus in fracture healing. An electronic search without language restrictions was accomplished of three databases (PubMed, Embase, Cinahl for ultrasound-related research in osteocyte and chondrocyte cell culture and in animal fracture models, published from inception of the databases through December, 2008. Studies deemed to be most relevant were included in this review. Multiple in vitro and animal in vivo studies were identified. An extensive body of literature exists which delineates the mechanism of action for ultrasound on cellular and tissue signaling systems that may be related to fracture healing. Research on LIPUS in animal fracture models has demonstrated promising results for acceleration of fracture healing and for promotion of fracture healing in compromised tissue beds. A large body of cellular and animal research exists which reveals that LIPUS may be beneficial for accelerating normal fracture healing or for promoting fracture healing in compromised tissue beds. Further investigation of the effects of LIPUS in human fracture healing is warranted for this promising new therapy.

  19. Bee Venom Accelerates Wound Healing in Diabetic Mice by Suppressing Activating Transcription Factor-3 (ATF-3) and Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase (iNOS)-Mediated Oxidative Stress and Recruiting Bone Marrow-Derived Endothelial Progenitor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badr, Gamal; Hozzein, Wael N; Badr, Badr M; Al Ghamdi, Ahmad; Saad Eldien, Heba M; Garraud, Olivier

    2016-10-01

    Multiple mechanisms contribute to impaired diabetic wound healing including impaired neovascularization and deficient endothelial progenitor cell (EPC) recruitment. Bee venom (BV) has been used as an anti-inflammatory agent for the treatment of several diseases. Nevertheless, the effect of BV on the healing of diabetic wounds has not been studied. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the impact of BV on diabetic wound closure in a type I diabetic mouse model. Three experimental groups were used: group 1, non-diabetic control mice; group 2, diabetic mice; and group 3, diabetic mice treated with BV. We found that the diabetic mice exhibited delayed wound closure characterized by a significant decrease in collagen production and prolonged elevation of inflammatory cytokines levels in wounded tissue compared to control non-diabetic mice. Additionally, wounded tissue in diabetic mice revealed aberrantly up-regulated expression of ATF-3 and iNOS followed by a marked elevation in free radical levels. Impaired diabetic wound healing was also characterized by a significant elevation in caspase-3, -8, and -9 activity and a marked reduction in the expression of TGF-β and VEGF, which led to decreased neovascularization and angiogenesis of the injured tissue by impairing EPC mobilization. Interestingly, BV treatment significantly enhanced wound closure in diabetic mice by increasing collagen production and restoring the levels of inflammatory cytokines, free radical, TGF-β, and VEGF. Most importantly, BV-treated diabetic mice exhibited mobilized long-lived EPCs by inhibiting caspase activity in the wounded tissue. Our findings reveal the molecular mechanisms underlying improved diabetic wound healing and closure following BV treatment. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2159-2171, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26825453

  20. The heme-heme oxygenase system in wound healing; implications for scar formation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagener, F.A.D.T.G.; Scharstuhl, A.; Tyrrell, R.M.; Hoff, J.W. von den; Jozkowicz, A.; Dulak, J.; Russel, F.G.M.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.

    2010-01-01

    Wound healing is an intricate process requiring the concerted action of keratinocytes, fibroblasts, endothelial cells, and macrophages. Here, we review the literature on normal wound healing and the pathological forms of wound healing, such as hypertrophic or excessive scar formation, with special e

  1. A significant correlation between C - reactive protein levels in blood monocytes derived macrophages versus content in carotid atherosclerotic lesions

    OpenAIRE

    Kaplan, Marielle; Hamoud, Shadi; Tendler, Yevgeny; Meilin, Edna; Lazarovitch, Aviva; Nitecki, Samy; Hayek, Tony

    2014-01-01

    Background Atherosclerosis is a complex disease involving different cell types, including macrophages that play a major role in the inflammatory events occurring in atherogenesis. C-Reactive Protein (CRP) is a sensitive systemic marker of inflammation and was identified as a biomarker of cardiovascular diseases. Histological studies demonstrate CRP presence in human atherosclerotic lesions, and we have previously shown that macrophages express CRP mRNA. CRP could be locally secreted in the at...

  2. Chemically modified RNA induces osteogenesis of stem cells and human tissue explants as well as accelerates bone healing in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balmayor, Elizabeth R; Geiger, Johannes P; Aneja, Manish K; Berezhanskyy, Taras; Utzinger, Maximilian; Mykhaylyk, Olga; Rudolph, Carsten; Plank, Christian

    2016-05-01

    Limitations associated to the use of growth factors represent a major hurdle to musculoskeletal regeneration. On the one hand, they are needed to induce neo-tissue formation for the substitution of a necrotic or missing tissue. On the other hand, these factors are used in supraphysiological concentrations, are short lived and expensive and result in many side effects. Here we develop a gene transfer strategy based on the use of chemically modified mRNA (cmRNA) coding for human bone morphogenetic protein 2 (hBMP-2) that is non-immunogenic and highly stable when compared to unmodified mRNA. Transfected stem cells secrete hBMP-2, show elevated alkaline phosphatase levels and upregulated expression of RunX2, ALP, Osterix, Osteocalcin, Osteopontin and Collagen Type I genes. Mineralization was induced as seen by positive Alizarin red staining. hBMP-2 cmRNA transfected human fat tissue also yielded an osteogenic response in vitro as indicated by expression of hBMP-2, RunX2, ALP and Collagen Type I. Delivering hBMP-2 cmRNA to a femur defect in a rat model results in new bone tissue formation as early as 2 weeks after application of very low doses. Overall, our studies demonstrate the feasibility and therapeutic potential of a new cmRNA-based gene therapy strategy that is safe and efficient. When applied clinically, this approach could overcome BMP-2 growth factor associated limitations in bone regeneration. PMID:26923361

  3. Augmentation of tendon-to-bone healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atesok, Kivanc; Fu, Freddie H; Wolf, Megan R; Ochi, Mitsuo; Jazrawi, Laith M; Doral, M Nedim; Lubowitz, James H; Rodeo, Scott A

    2014-03-19

    Tendon-to-bone healing is vital to the ultimate success of the various surgical procedures performed to repair injured tendons. Achieving tendon-to-bone healing that is functionally and biologically similar to native anatomy can be challenging because of the limited regeneration capacity of the tendon-bone interface. Orthopaedic basic-science research strategies aiming to augment tendon-to-bone healing include the use of osteoinductive growth factors, platelet-rich plasma, gene therapy, enveloping the grafts with periosteum, osteoconductive materials, cell-based therapies, biodegradable scaffolds, and biomimetic patches. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound and extracorporeal shockwave treatment may affect tendon-to-bone healing by means of mechanical forces that stimulate biological cascades at the insertion site. Application of various loading methods and immobilization times influence the stress forces acting on the recently repaired tendon-to-bone attachment, which eventually may change the biological dynamics of the interface. Other approaches, such as the use of coated sutures and interference screws, aim to deliver biological factors while achieving mechanical stability by means of various fixators. Controlled Level-I human trials are required to confirm the promising results from in vitro or animal research studies elucidating the mechanisms underlying tendon-to-bone healing and to translate these results into clinical practice. PMID:24647509

  4. Chemokine Receptor 7 Knockout Attenuates Atherosclerotic Plaque Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luchtefeld, Maren; Grothusen, Christina; Gagalick, Andreas; Jagavelu, Kumaravelu; Schuett, Harald; Tietge, Uwe J. F.; Pabst, Oliver; Grote, Karsten; Drexler, Helmut; Foerster, Reinhold; Schieffer, Bernhard

    2010-01-01

    Background-Atherosclerosis is a systemic inflammatory disease characterized by the formation of atherosclerotic plaques. Both innate immunity and adaptive immunity contribute to atherogenesis, but the mode of interaction is poorly understood. Chemokine receptor 7 (CCR7) is critically involved in the

  5. Acute type II cryoglobulinaemic vasculitis mimicking atherosclerotic peripheral vascular disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Saeed, A

    2012-01-31

    Atherosclerotic peripheral vascular disease is a common presenting cause for digital ischaemia in life long smokers. Acute severe Type II Cryoglobulinaemic vasculitis is a rare yet important cause, which may present with similar clinical features and which if undiagnosed may be rapidly fatal. Following the instigation of therapy with intravenous methylprednisolone and cyclophosphamide this patient made an excellent recovery.

  6. Atherosclerotic Plaque Destabilization in Mice: A Comparative Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helene Hartwig

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis-associated diseases are the main cause of mortality and morbidity in western societies. The progression of atherosclerosis is a dynamic process evolving from early to advanced lesions that may become rupture-prone vulnerable plaques. Acute coronary syndromes are the clinical manifestation of life-threatening thrombotic events associated with high-risk vulnerable plaques. Hyperlipidemic mouse models have been extensively used in studying the mechanisms controlling initiation and progression of atherosclerosis. However, the understanding of mechanisms leading to atherosclerotic plaque destabilization has been hampered by the lack of proper animal models mimicking this process. Although various mouse models generate atherosclerotic plaques with histological features of human advanced lesions, a consensus model to study atherosclerotic plaque destabilization is still lacking. Hence, we studied the degree and features of plaque vulnerability in different mouse models of atherosclerotic plaque destabilization and find that the model based on the placement of a shear stress modifier in combination with hypercholesterolemia represent with high incidence the most human like lesions compared to the other models.

  7. ATHEROSCLEROTIC CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE IN OLDER ADULTS WITH DIABETES MELLITUS

    OpenAIRE

    Barzilay, Joshua I.; Mukamal, Kenneth J.; Kizer, Jorge R.

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes Mellitus exerts a strong effect on atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease risk into older age (beyond ages 70 to 74 years). This effect is particularly noticeable with regard to coronary artery disease and cerebral microvascular disease. Thus Diabetes Mellitus in older age deserves the same careful medical attention as it does in middle age.

  8. In vivo determination of arterial collagen synthesis in atherosclerotic rabbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collagen and non-collagen protein synthesis rates were determined in vivo in tissues from rabbits fed a control or atherogenic diet supplemented with 2% peanut oil and 0.25% cholesterol for 4 months. Rabbits received a bolus intravenous injection of L-[3H]-proline (1.0 mCi/kg) and unlabeled L-proline (7 mmoles/kg) in 0.9% NaCl. Plasma proline specific activity decreased only 20% over 5 hr and was similar to the specific activity of free proline in tissues. Thoracic aortas from atherosclerotic rabbits exhibited raised plaques covering at least 75% of the surface. Thoracic intima plus a portion of the media (TIM) was separated from the remaining media plus adventitia (TMA). Dry delipidated weight, total collagen content, and collagen as a percent of dry weight were increased significantly in the TIM of atherosclerotic rabbits. Collagen synthesis rates and collagen synthesis as a percent of total protein synthesis were likewise increased both in the TIM and in the abdominal aortas. No differences from controls either in collagen content or collagen synthesis rates were observed in the TMA, lung or skin. These results demonstrate for the first time in vivo that formation of atherosclerotic plaques is associated with increased rates of collagen synthesis. Furthermore, as previously observed with incubations in vitro, collagen synthesis was elevated to a greater extent than noncollagen protein synthesis in atherosclerotic aortas from rabbits fed cholesterol plus peanut oil

  9. Self-healing supramolecular nanocomposites

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Z.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to execute a bottom-up design of the intrinsically self-healing nanocomposites. We briefly introduced the self-healing materials in chapter 1, covering classification and basic self-healing mechanism. In chapter 2, we have synthesized polyborosiloxane (PBS) according to the last century recipe as the self-healing supramolecular matrix. Additionally, we provided the long existing recipe with exclusive supplementary details, such as reaction kinetics, structural refine...

  10. Cross-reacting antibacterial auto-antibodies are produced within coronary atherosclerotic plaques of acute coronary syndrome patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Canducci

    Full Text Available Coronary atherosclerosis, the main condition predisposing to acute myocardial infarction, has an inflammatory component caused by stimuli that are yet unknown. We molecularly investigated the nature of the immune response within human coronary lesion in four coronary plaques obtained by endoluminal atherectomy from four patients. We constructed phage-display libraries containing the IgG1/kappa antibody fragments produced by B-lymphocytes present in each plaque. By immunoaffinity, we selected from these libraries a monoclonal antibody, arbitrarily named Fab7816, able to react both with coronary and carotid atherosclerotic tissue samples. We also demonstrated by confocal microscopy that this monoclonal antibody recognized human transgelin type 1, a cytoskeleton protein involved in atherogenesis, and that it co-localized with fibrocyte-like cells transgelin+, CD68+, CD45+ in human sections of coronary and carotid plaques. In vitro fibrocytes obtained by differentiating CD14+ cells isolated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells also interacted with Fab7816, thus supporting the hypothesis of a specific recognition of fibrocytes into the atherosclerotic lesions. Interestingly, the same antibody, cross-reacted with the outer membrane proteins of Proteus mirabilis and Klebsiella pneumoniae (and possibly with homologous proteins of other enterobacteriaceae present in the microbiota. From all the other three libraries, we were able to clone, by immunoaffinity selection, human monoclonal antibodies cross-reacting with bacterial outer membrane proteins and with transgelin. These findings demonstrated that in human atherosclerotic plaques a local cross-reactive immune response takes place.

  11. Phytochemicals in Wound Healing

    OpenAIRE

    Thangapazham, Rajesh L.; Sharad, Shashwat; Radha K. Maheshwari

    2016-01-01

    Significance: Traditional therapies, including the use of dietary components for wound healing and skin regeneration, are very common in Asian countries such as China and India. The increasing evidence of health-protective benefits of phytochemicals, components derived from plants is generating a lot of interest, warranting further scientific evaluation and mechanistic studies.

  12. The arts as healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kivnick, H Q; Erikson, J M

    1983-10-01

    The relationship between artistic involvement and individual mental health is considered, and the concept of "healing" is differentiated from that of "therapy." Seven properties of art experience are identified which, when developed, have contributed to patients' recovery from mental illness. Implications of these properties for clinical programs, and the related value of art experience for non-patients, are discussed. PMID:6638153

  13. Biophysical regulation of Chlamydia pneumoniae-infected monocyte recruitment to atherosclerotic foci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evani, Shankar J.; Ramasubramanian, Anand K.

    2016-01-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae infection is implicated in atherosclerosis although the contributory mechanisms are poorly understood. We hypothesize that C. pneumoniae infection favors the recruitment of monocytes to atherosclerotic foci by altering monocyte biophysics. Primary, fresh human monocytes were infected with C. pneumoniae for 8 h, and the interactions between monocytes and E-selectin or aortic endothelium under flow were characterized by video microscopy and image analysis. The distribution of membrane lipid rafts and adhesion receptors were analyzed by imaging flow cytometry. Infected cells rolled on E-selectin and endothelial surfaces, and this rolling was slower, steady and uniform compared to uninfected cells. Infection decreases cholesterol levels, increases membrane fluidity, disrupts lipid rafts, and redistributes CD44, which is the primary mediator of rolling interactions. Together, these changes translate to higher firm adhesion of infected monocytes on endothelium, which is enhanced in the presence of LDL. Uninfected monocytes treated with LDL or left untreated were used as baseline control. Our results demonstrate that the membrane biophysical changes due to infection and hyperlipidemia are one of the key mechanisms by which C. pneumoniae can exacerbate atherosclerotic pathology. These findings provide a framework to characterize the role of ‘infectious burden’ in the development and progression of atherosclerosis.

  14. Detection of atherosclerotic lesions and intimal macrophages using CD36-targeted nanovesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Shufang; Zhang, Jia; Martinez-Zaguilan, Raul; Sennoune, Souad; Hossen, Md Nazir; Lichtenstein, Alice H; Cao, Jun; Meyerrose, Gary E; Paone, Ralph; Soontrapa, Suthipong; Fan, Zhaoyang; Wang, Shu

    2015-12-28

    Current approaches to the diagnosis and therapy of atherosclerosis cannot target lesion-determinant cells in the artery wall. Intimal macrophage infiltration promotes atherosclerotic lesion development by facilitating the accumulation of oxidized low-density lipoproteins (oxLDL) and increasing inflammatory responses. The presence of these cells is positively associated with lesion progression, severity and destabilization. Hence, they are an important diagnostic and therapeutic target. The objective of this study was to noninvasively assess the distribution and accumulation of intimal macrophages using CD36-targeted nanovesicles. Soy phosphatidylcholine was used to synthesize liposome-like nanovesicles. 1-(Palmitoyl)-2-(5-keto-6-octene-dioyl) phosphatidylcholine was incorporated on their surface to target the CD36 receptor. All in vitro data demonstrate that these targeted nanovesicles had a high binding affinity for the oxLDL binding site of the CD36 receptor and participated in CD36-mediated recognition and uptake of nanovesicles by macrophages. Intravenous administration into LDL receptor null mice of targeted compared to non-targeted nanovesicles resulted in higher uptake in aortic lesions. The nanovesicles co-localized with macrophages and their CD36 receptors in aortic lesions. This molecular target approach may facilitate the in vivo noninvasive imaging of atherosclerotic lesions in terms of intimal macrophage accumulation and distribution and disclose lesion features related to inflammation and possibly vulnerability thereby facilitate early lesion detection and targeted delivery of therapeutic compounds to intimal macrophages. PMID:26450668

  15. Directional cell migration and chemotaxis in wound healing response to PDGF-AA are coordinated by the primary cilium in fibroblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, Linda; Cammer, Michael; Lehman, Jonathan;

    2010-01-01

    . Here we used micropipette analysis to show that a normal chemosensory response to PDGF-AA in fibroblasts requires the primary cilium. In vitro and in vivo wound healing assays revealed that in ORPK mouse (IFT88(Tg737Rpw)) fibroblasts, where ciliary assembly is defective, chemotaxis towards PDGF-AA is...

  16. Healing of Large Segmental Bone Defect after Implantation of Autogenous Cancellous Bone Graft in Comparison to Hydroxyapatite and 0.5% Collagen Scaffold Combined with Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nečas, A.; Proks, P.; Urbanová, L.; Srnec, R.; Stehlík, L.; Crha, M.; Raušer, P.; Plánka, L.; Janovec, J.; Dvořák, M.; Amler, Evžen; Vojtová, L.; Jančář, J.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 79, č. 4 (2010), s. 607-612. ISSN 0001-7213 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 2B06130 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : fracture fixation * bone healing * comminuted fracture Subject RIV: FI - Traumatology, Orthopedics Impact factor: 0.534, year: 2010

  17. Applied Literature for Healing,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna Marie Anderson

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In this qualitative research study interviews conducted with elite participants serve to reveal the underlying elements that unite the richly diverse emerging field of Applied Literature. The basic interpretative qualitative method included a thematic analysis of data from the interviews yielding numerous common elements that were then distilled into key themes that elucidated the beneficial effects of engaging consciously with literature. These themes included developing a stronger sense of self in balance with an increasing connection with community; providing a safe container to engage challenging and potentially overwhelming issues from a stance of empowered action; and fostering a healing space for creativity. The findings provide grounds for uniting the work being done in a range of helping professions into a cohesive field of Applied Literature, which offers effective tools for healing, transformation and empowerment.Keywords: Applied Literature, Bibliotherapy, Poetry Therapy, Arts in Corrections, Arts in Medicine

  18. Self-healing polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Daniel J. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A three dimensional structure fabricated from a self-healing polymeric material, comprising poly(ester amides) obtained from ethylene glycol, azelaic acid and 1,1-aminoundecanoic acid, wherein polymeric material has a melt index above 2.5 g/10 min. as determined by ASTM D1238 at 190.degree. C. and 2.16kg, impact resistance and ductility sufficient to resist cracking and brittle fracture upon impact by a 9 mm bullet fired at a temperature of about 29.degree. C. at subsonic speed in a range from about 800 feet/sec to about 1000 feet/sec. It has been determined that the important factors necessary for self-healing behavior of polymers include sufficient impact strength, control of the degree of crystallinity, low melting point and the ability to instantly melt at impacted area.

  19. Imaging Modalities to Identity Inflammation in an Atherosclerotic Plaque

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic, progressive, multifocal arterial wall disease caused by local and systemic inflammation responsible for major cardiovascular complications such as myocardial infarction and stroke. With the recent understanding that vulnerable plaque erosion and rupture, with subsequent thrombosis, rather than luminal stenosis, is the underlying cause of acute ischemic events, there has been a shift of focus to understand the mechanisms that make an atherosclerotic plaque unstable or vulnerable to rupture. The presence of inflammation in the atherosclerotic plaque has been considered as one of the initial events which convert a stable plaque into an unstable and vulnerable plaque. This paper systemically reviews the noninvasive and invasive imaging modalities that are currently available to detect this inflammatory process, at least in the intermediate stages, and discusses the ongoing studies that will help us to better understand and identify it at the molecular level

  20. From anatomy to function: diagnosis of atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odudu, Aghogho; Vassallo, Diana; Kalra, Philip A

    2015-12-01

    Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis (ARAS) affects 7% of the over 65 s and will be increasingly common with an ageing population. ARAS obstructs normal renal perfusion with adverse renal and cardiovascular consequences. Drug therapy is directed at reducing atherosclerotic risk. Two recent major trials of revascularization for ARAS showed that clinical outcomes were not improved beyond those offered by optimal drug therapy in most patients. This reflects experimental data showing that restoration of blood flow alone may not attenuate a cascade of tissue injury. A shift from anatomic to functional imaging of ARAS coupled to novel therapies might improve clinical outcomes in selected patients. This review outlines the case for separately assessing hemodynamic significance of arterial stenosis and functional reserve of renal parenchymal tissue. The authors consider current and emerging diagnostic techniques for ARAS and their potential to allow individualized and functionally directed treatments. PMID:26480218

  1. Early identification of atherosclerotic disease by noninvasive imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuster, Valentin; Lois, Fátima; Franco, Manuel

    2010-06-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death worldwide, and its prevalence is expected to increase further, which will be associated with a substantial economic burden. High-risk or vulnerable plaques and, indirectly, the burden of atherosclerotic disease, are responsible for most major cardiovascular events. Most of the current prevention strategies are focused on identifying and managing the established risk factors (smoking, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, diabetes, obesity, physical inactivity) for atherosclerosis. Another opportunity for further characterizing the population at high CVD risk would be to measure the occurrence and progression of subclinical (asymptomatic) atherosclerotic burden. The detection of subclinical atherosclerosis and high-risk plaques, if proven to predict cardiovascular events, may enable the establishment of earlier control of CVD risk factors and help preventing CVD. In this Review, we address the potential progress in CVD prevention brought about by the use of noninvasive imaging techniques to identify subclinical atherosclerosis. PMID:20440291

  2. The Advantages of Traditional Chumash Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James D. Adams

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Chumash healing has been practiced in California for ∼13 000 years. Chumash healers treat their patients with prayer, laughter, dreaming, phytotherapy, aromatherapy, healing ceremonies and other techniques. Healing involves first healing the spirit, then healing the body. Chumash people still maintain their unique identity. Chumash Healers still practice the ancient healing arts in California. This lecture is a brief introduction to Chumash Healing.

  3. Severe Brown Fat Lipoatrophy Aggravates Atherosclerotic Process in Male Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Hernández, Almudena; Beneit, Nuria; Escribano, Óscar; Díaz-Castroverde, Sabela; García-Gómez, Gema; Fernández, Silvia; Benito, Manuel

    2016-09-01

    Obesity is one of the major risk factors for the development of cardiovascular diseases and is characterized by abnormal accumulation of adipose tissue, including perivascular adipose tissue (PVAT). However, brown adipose tissue (BAT) activation reduces visceral adiposity. To demonstrate that severe brown fat lipoatrophy might accelerate atherosclerotic process, we generated a new mouse model without insulin receptor (IR) in BAT and without apolipoprotein (Apo)E (BAT-specific IR knockout [BATIRKO];ApoE(-/-) mice) and assessed vascular and metabolic alterations associated to obesity. In addition, we analyzed the contribution of the adipose organ to vascular inflammation. Brown fat lipoatrophy induces visceral adiposity, mainly in gonadal depot (gonadal white adipose tissue [gWAT]), severe glucose intolerance, high postprandial glucose levels, and a severe defect in acute insulin secretion. BATIRKO;ApoE(-/-) mice showed greater hypertriglyceridemia than the obtained in ApoE(-/-) and hypercholesterolemia similar to ApoE(-/-) mice. BATIRKO;ApoE(-/-) mice, in addition to primary insulin resistance in BAT, also showed a significant decrease in insulin signaling in liver, gWAT, heart, aorta artery, and thoracic PVAT. More importantly, our results suggest that severe brown fat lipoatrophy aggravates the atherosclerotic process, characterized by a significant increase of lipid depots, atherosclerotic coverage, lesion size and complexity, increased macrophage infiltration, and proinflammatory markers expression. Finally, an increase of TNF-α and leptin as well as a decrease of adiponectin by BAT, gWAT, and thoracic PVAT might also be responsible of vascular damage. Our results suggest that severe brown lipoatrophy aggravates atherosclerotic process. Thus, BAT activation might protect against obesity and its associated metabolic alterations. PMID:27414981

  4. Platelet inhibition with Ticlopidine in atherosclerotic intermittent claudication.

    OpenAIRE

    Aukland, A; Hurlow, R. A.; George, A J; Stuart, J

    1982-01-01

    Fifty-one men with atherosclerotic intermittent claudication and haemorheological abnormalities completed a double-blind, one-year randomised trial of Ticlopidine (500 mg/day), a new antiplatelet agent. Ticlopidine caused significant inhibition of platelet aggregation but did not fully correct abnormalities of coagulation, viscosity, and fibrinolysis. There was no significant improvement in walking ability, Doppler ankle-pressure indices, or calf blood flow. Sustained platelet inhibition for ...

  5. Functional tissue engineering of ligament healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsu Shan-Ling

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ligaments and tendons are dense connective tissues that are important in transmitting forces and facilitate joint articulation in the musculoskeletal system. Their injury frequency is high especially for those that are functional important, like the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL and medial collateral ligament (MCL of the knee as well as the glenohumeral ligaments and the rotator cuff tendons of the shoulder. Because the healing responses are different in these ligaments and tendons after injury, the consequences and treatments are tissue- and site-specific. In this review, we will elaborate on the injuries of the knee ligaments as well as using functional tissue engineering (FTE approaches to improve their healing. Specifically, the ACL of knee has limited capability to heal, and results of non-surgical management of its midsubstance rupture have been poor. Consequently, surgical reconstruction of the ACL is regularly performed to gain knee stability. However, the long-term results are not satisfactory besides the numerous complications accompanied with the surgeries. With the rapid development of FTE, there is a renewed interest in revisiting ACL healing. Approaches such as using growth factors, stem cells and scaffolds have been widely investigated. In this article, the biology of normal and healing ligaments is first reviewed, followed by a discussion on the issues related to the treatment of ACL injuries. Afterwards, current promising FTE methods are presented for the treatment of ligament injuries, including the use of growth factors, gene delivery, and cell therapy with a particular emphasis on the use of ECM bioscaffolds. The challenging areas are listed in the future direction that suggests where collection of energy could be placed in order to restore the injured ligaments and tendons structurally and functionally.

  6. Healing responses following cryothermic and hyperthermic tissue ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godwin, Braden L.; Coad, James E.

    2009-02-01

    Minimally invasive, thermally ablative, interventional technologies have been changing the practice of medicine since before the turn of the 20th century. More recently, cryothermic and hyperthermic therapies have expanded in terms of their spectrum of thermal generators, modes for controlling and monitoring the treatment zone and both benign and malignant medical applications. The final tissue, and hence clinical outcome, of a thermal ablation is determined by the summation of direct primary (thermal) and secondary (apoptosis, ischemia, free radical, inflammation, wound healing, etc.) injury followed by possible cellular regeneration and scar formation. The initial thermal lesion can be broadly divided into two major zones of cellular death: 1) the complete ablation zone closer to the thermal source and 2) the peripheral transition zone with a decreasing gradient of cell death. While not applicable to cryotherapy, hyperthermic complete ablation zones are subdivided into two zones: 1) thermal or heat fixation and 2) coagulative necrosis. It is important to clearly differentiate these tissue zones because of their substantially different healing responses. Therefore, the development of clinically successful thermal therapies requires an understanding of tissue healing responses. The healing responses can be affected by a number of additional factors such as the tissue's anatomy, organ specific healing differences, blood supply, protein vs. lipid content, and other factors. Thus, effective biomedical instrument development requires both an understanding of thermal cell injury/death and the body's subsequent healing responses. This paper provides a general overview of the healing pathways that follow thermal tissue treatment.

  7. Angiogenesis & Vasculogenesis: Inducing the growth of new blood vessels and wound healing by stimulation of Bone Marrow Derived Progenitor Cell Mobilization and Homing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velazquez, Omaida C.

    2009-01-01

    During embryonic development, the vasculature is among the first organs to form and is in charge of maintaining metabolic homeostasis by supplying oxygen and nutrients and removing waste products. As one would expect, blood vessels are critical not only for organ growth in the embryo, but also for repair of wounded tissue in the adult. An imbalance in ‘Angiogenesis’ (a time-honored term that globally refers to the growth of new blood vessels) contributes to the pathogenesis of numerous malignant, inflammatory, ischemic, infectious, immune, and wound healing disorders. In this review, we will focus on the central role of the growth of new blood vessels in ischemic and diabetic wound healing. We define the most current nomenclature that describes the neovascularization process in wounds. There are now two well defined, distinct, yet interrelated processes for the formation of post-natal new blood vessels, angiogenesis and vasculogenesis. We review recent new data on vasculogenesis that promises to advance the field of wound healing. PMID:17544023

  8. In Vivo Study of Ligament-Bone Healing after Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Using Autologous Tendons with Mesenchymal Stem Cells Affinity Peptide Conjugated Electrospun Nanofibrous Scaffold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingxian Zhu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrospinning nanofibrous scaffold was commonly used in tissue regeneration recently. Nanofibers with specific topological characteristics were reported to be able to induce osteogenic differentiation of MSCs. In this in vivo study, autologous tendon grafts with lattice-like nanofibrous scaffold wrapping at two ends of autologous tendon were used to promote early stage of ligament-bone healing after rabbit ACL reconstruction. To utilize native MSCs from bone marrow, an MSCs specific affinity peptide E7 was conjugated to nanofibrous meshes. After 3 months, H-E assessment and specific staining of collagen type I, II, and III showed direct ligament-bone insertion with typical four zones (bone, calcified fibrocartilage, fibrocartilage, and ligament in bioactive scaffold reconstruction group. Diameters of bone tunnel were smaller in nanofibrous scaffold conjugated E7 peptide group than those in control group. The failure load of substitution complex also indicated a stronger ligament-bone insertion healing using bioactive scaffold. In conclusion, lattice-like nanofibrous scaffold with specific MSCs affinity peptide has great potential in promoting early stage of ligament-bone healing after ACL reconstruction.

  9. Effects of Using Different Healing Agents on Healing Efficiency in Solid State Self-Healing System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Self-healing polymers possess the ability to heal in response to damage using resources inherently available to the system. The solid-state self-healing system was obtained by blending thermoplastic polymers into epoxy resin matrix. This study aimed to investigate the effect of polymer healing efficiency by using different thermoplastic polymers as healing agents which were poly (bisphenol-A-co-epichlorohydrin) (PDGEBA), polypropylene (PP) and polyethylene (PE). The bonding formed in the epoxy resins were characterized by means of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Healing was achieved by heating the fractured specimen to a specific temperature, above their glass transition temperature (Tg) to mobilize the polymeric chains of the healing agent. The Tg for each specimen was obtained from dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). From the Izod impact test it was found that healable resin with PDGEBA has the highest healing efficiency followed by PP and PE, with 63 %, 31 % and 24 % of average percentage healing efficiencies, respectively. These results were due to the different solubility parameters of the thermoset/network and thermoplastic polymer which led to the phase separation. The morphological properties and the fracture-healing process of the resins were then observed using optical microscope. (author)

  10. Effects of genistein on early-stage cutaneous wound healing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → We examine the effect of genistein on cutaneous wound healing. → Genistein enhanced wound closure during the early stage of wound healing. → These genistein effects on wound closure were induced by reduction of oxidative stress through increasing antioxidant capacity and modulation of pro-inflammatory cytokine expression. -- Abstract: Wound healing occurs in three sequential phases: hemostasis and inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling. Inflammation, the earliest phase, is considered a critical period for wound healing because immune cells remove damaged tissues, foreign debris, and remaining dead tissue. Wound healing would be delayed without inflammation, and this phase is affected by antioxidation capacity. Therefore, we hypothesized that genistein, which has an antioxidant effect, might modulate the wound healing process by altering the inflammatory response. After three days of acclimation, mice were divided into three groups: control, 0.025% genistein, and 0.1% genistein. After two weeks of an experimental diet, skin wounds were induced. Wounded skin areas were imaged, and the healing rate calculated. To measure lipid peroxidation, antioxidant enzyme expression and activity, and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression, skin and liver tissues were harvested at 12, 24, 48, and 72 h. Genistein did not affect body weight. The rate of wound closure in mice fed genistein was significantly faster than in the control group during the early stage of wound healing, especially in first three days. Cu, Zn-SOD and Mn-SOD expression in wound skin tissue in the 0.1% genistein group was lower than in the control group. However, CAT expression did not differ among groups. We also found that genistein modulated NF-κB and TNF-α expression during the early stage of wound healing. The genistein group had significantly lower hepatic lipid peroxidation and higher SOD, CAT, and GPx activities than the control group. These results suggest that genistein

  11. Effects of genistein on early-stage cutaneous wound healing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Eunkyo [Department of Home Economics Education, Chung-Ang University, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seung Min [Research Institute of Health Sciences, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, In-Kyung [Department of Home Economics Education, Chung-Ang University, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Yunsook [Department of Foods and Nutrition, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jung-Hyun, E-mail: jjhkim@cau.ac.kr [Department of Home Economics Education, Chung-Ang University, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-07-08

    Highlights: {yields} We examine the effect of genistein on cutaneous wound healing. {yields} Genistein enhanced wound closure during the early stage of wound healing. {yields} These genistein effects on wound closure were induced by reduction of oxidative stress through increasing antioxidant capacity and modulation of pro-inflammatory cytokine expression. -- Abstract: Wound healing occurs in three sequential phases: hemostasis and inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling. Inflammation, the earliest phase, is considered a critical period for wound healing because immune cells remove damaged tissues, foreign debris, and remaining dead tissue. Wound healing would be delayed without inflammation, and this phase is affected by antioxidation capacity. Therefore, we hypothesized that genistein, which has an antioxidant effect, might modulate the wound healing process by altering the inflammatory response. After three days of acclimation, mice were divided into three groups: control, 0.025% genistein, and 0.1% genistein. After two weeks of an experimental diet, skin wounds were induced. Wounded skin areas were imaged, and the healing rate calculated. To measure lipid peroxidation, antioxidant enzyme expression and activity, and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression, skin and liver tissues were harvested at 12, 24, 48, and 72 h. Genistein did not affect body weight. The rate of wound closure in mice fed genistein was significantly faster than in the control group during the early stage of wound healing, especially in first three days. Cu, Zn-SOD and Mn-SOD expression in wound skin tissue in the 0.1% genistein group was lower than in the control group. However, CAT expression did not differ among groups. We also found that genistein modulated NF-{kappa}B and TNF-{alpha} expression during the early stage of wound healing. The genistein group had significantly lower hepatic lipid peroxidation and higher SOD, CAT, and GPx activities than the control group. These results

  12. Self-healing biomaterials(3)

    OpenAIRE

    Brochu, Alice B. W.; Craig, Stephen L.; Reichert, William M.

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this review is to introduce the biomaterials community to the emerging field of self-healing materials, and also to suggest how one could utilize and modify self-healing approaches to develop new classes of biomaterials. A brief discussion of the in vivo mechanical loading and resultant failures experienced by biomedical implants is followed by presentation of the self-healing methods for combating mechanical failure. If conventional composite materials that retard failure may be ...

  13. Rapid self-healing hydrogels

    OpenAIRE

    Phadke, Ameya; Zhang, Chao; Arman, Bedri; Hsu, Cheng-Chih; Mashelkar, Raghunath A.; Lele, Ashish K.; Tauber, Michael J.; Arya, Gaurav; Varghese, Shyni

    2012-01-01

    Synthetic materials that are capable of autonomous healing upon damage are being developed at a rapid pace because of their many potential applications. Despite these advancements, achieving self-healing in permanently cross-linked hydrogels has remained elusive because of the presence of water and irreversible cross-links. Here, we demonstrate that permanently cross-linked hydrogels can be engineered to exhibit self-healing in an aqueous environment. We achieve this feature by arming the hyd...

  14. Music Healing Rituals in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bussakorn Binson

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the music healing rituals from North, Northeast and Southern Thailand. In general, these healing rituals bring together supportive elements from the family, the community and spiritual entities with the shaman as a conductor. Shaman utilizes music in corporate the community as a whole including elicits the support from the spiritual entitles. Traditional music healing process played the role as enticement to recruit spirits, distract the patients from experiencing unpleasant in their body. Even in today’s modern society these healing rituals have persisted, as they are inseparable from these regions’ animistic beliefs system.

  15. Achilles tendon healing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on symptomatic Achilles tendon abnormalities (rupture, tendinitis) evaluated with MR imaging during the healing phase after either surgical or conservative treatment. A total of 21 patients were studied. Fifteen of 21 underwent surgery (13 tendon ruptures) and six were managed conservatively (one rupture). MR studies were obtained before treatment in 11, at 3 months in eight, at 6 months in seven, and at 12 months in 12. The 1.5-T spin-echo and gradient-echo images were correlated with clinical results, planter reflex response times, and calf force measurements. Sequential T2 times were obtained from representative levels in the tendons

  16. Tendon, tendon healing, hyperlipidemia and statins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esenkaya, Irfan; Unay, Koray

    2011-01-01

    Summary Both hyperlipidemia and metabolic syndrome have adverse effect on tendon structure. Atorvastatin is most widely used antihyperlipidemic drug. Statins have adverse effects on the tendon. Many studies have analyzed the relationship between atorvastatin and skeletal muscles. Atorvastatin administered after the surgical repair of a ruptured tendon appears to affect revascularization, collagenization, inflammatory cell infiltration, and collagen construction. Therefore, further investigations on the effects of atorvastatin on tendon healing are needed. PMID:23738266

  17. Matrix metalloproteinases in impaired wound healing

    OpenAIRE

    auf dem Keller, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Fabio Sabino, Ulrich auf dem Keller Institute of Molecular Health Sciences, Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule (ETH) Zürich, Zürich, Switzerland Abstract: Cutaneous wound healing is a complex tissue response that requires a coordinated interplay of multiple cells in orchestrated biological processes to finally re-establish the skin's barrier function upon injury. Proteolytic enzymes and in particular matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) contribute to all phas...

  18. Clinical Application of Growth Factors and Cytokines in Wound Healing

    OpenAIRE

    Barrientos, Stephan; Brem, Harold; Stojadinovic, Olivera; Tomic-Canic, Marjana

    2014-01-01

    Wound healing is a complex and dynamic biological process that involves the coordinated efforts of multiple cell types and is executed and regulated by numerous growth factors and cytokines. There has been a drive in the past two decades to study the therapeutic effects of various growth factors in the clinical management of non-healing wounds (e.g. pressure ulcers, chronic venous ulcers, diabetic foot ulcers). For this review, we conducted a nonline search of Medline and Pub Medical and crit...

  19. Abnormal pigmentation within cutaneous scars: a complication of wound healing

    OpenAIRE

    Sarah Chadwick; Rebecca Heath; Mamta Shah

    2012-01-01

    Abnormally pigmented scars are an undesirable consequence of cutaneous wound healing and are a complication every single individual worldwide is at risk of. They present a challenge for clinicians, as there are currently no definitive treatment options available, and render scars much more noticeable making them highly distressing for patients. Despite extensive research into both wound healing and the pigment cell, there remains a scarcity of knowledge surrounding the repigmentation of cutan...

  20. Investigating the role of acellular skin substitutes in wound healing

    OpenAIRE

    Greaves, Nicholas Stuart

    2015-01-01

    After cutaneous injury, wound healing is an essential process that restores barrier and homeostatic function to the skin. Tissue restoration is classically grouped into four phases, involving the dynamic, regulated and sequential interaction of multiple cells types, effector molecules and extracellular matrix components. While most wounds heal in a timely fashion, local and systemic factors can prevent wound resolution resulting in chronic wound formation. Examples include diabetic and venous...

  1. Role of mathematical modeling in bone fracture healing

    OpenAIRE

    Pivonka, Peter; Colin R Dunstan

    2012-01-01

    Bone fracture healing is a complex physiological process commonly described by a four-phase model consisting of an inflammatory phase, two repair phases with soft callus formation followed by hard callus formation, and a remodeling phase, or more recently by an anabolic/catabolic model. Data from humans and animal models have demonstrated crucial environmental conditions for optimal fracture healing, including the mechanical environment, blood supply and availability of mesenchymal stem cells...

  2. Data Mining of Atherosclerotic Plaque Transcriptomes Predicts STAT1-Dependent Inflammatory Signal Integration in Vascular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Sikorski

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerotic plaque development involves multiple extra- and intra-cellular signals engaging cells from the immune system and from the vasculature. Pro-inflammatory pathways activated by interferon gamma (IFNγ and toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 ligands are profoundly involved in plaque formation and have been shown to involve cross-talk in all atheroma-interacting cell types leading to increased activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription-1 (STAT1 and elevated expression of pro-inflammatory mediators. Here we demonstrate that in Gene Expression Omnibus repository (GEO deposited microarray datasets, obtained from human coronary and carotid atherosclerotic plaques, a significant increase in expression of pro-inflammatory and immunomodulatory genes can be detected. Moreover, increased expression of multiple chemokines, adhesion molecules and matrix-remodeling molecules was commonly detected in both plaque types and correlated with the presence of putative STAT1 binding sites in their promoters, suggesting strong involvement of STAT1 in plaque development. We also provide evidence to suggest that STAT1-nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NFκB or STAT1-interferon-regulated factor (IRF regulatory modules are over-represented in the promoters of these inflammatory genes, which points to a possible contribution of IFNγ and TLR4 cross-talk in the process of atherogenesis. Finally, a subset of these genes encodes for secreted proteins that could serve as a basis of a non-invasive diagnostic assay. The results of our in silico analysis in vitro provide potential evidence that STAT1-dependent IFNγ-TLR4 cross-talk plays a crucial role in coronary and carotid artery plaque development and identifies a STAT1-dependent gene signature that could represent a novel diagnostic tool to monitor and diagnose plaque progression in human atherosclerosis.

  3. Words that heal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spurio, Maria Grazia

    2015-09-01

    The value of words in the healing process runs constant to the path of therapeutic treatment, the net of exchanges and relationships between brain chemistry and the right words in order to heal is subtle and intricate. Psychotherapy, a treatment with words, is shown to be a treatment that directly affects the brain and that is able to change it stably, even in its anatomical structure and function. According to Kandel (1999), a leading living scientist and Nobel Prize winner for medicine and physiology, American neurologist and psychiatrist, psychotherapy is a real cure, a biological treatment, as it produces behavioral changes through new words and new experiences. The article offers a brief overview of the use of the fantasy of argument, since the time of the classical rethoric of the sophists up to the new rethoric, to illustrate how the structure of the speech, and the dialectic ability of opposing different thoughts, closely resembles the way of thinking. Consequently the choice of words can be considered an instrument of great impact that is inserted in the stream of thoughts that determines the attitude of a person, and therefore, his/her actions. This happens whenever you communicate voluntarily, and not simply when interacting. The right choice of words remains a turning point in all of our relationships, not only in therapeutic situations, but in every other social relationship in life, family or friends. PMID:26417732

  4. Links between atherosclerotic and periodontal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chistiakov, Dimitry A; Orekhov, Alexander N; Bobryshev, Yuri V

    2016-02-01

    Periodontal disease (PD) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) are highly prevalent in the modern community. Both pathologies are chronic inflammatory disorders, which are influenced by multiple risk factors. In part, these factors such as age, smoking, and diabetes overlap between PD and CVD. Epidemiological studies suggest that PD is strongly associated with increased CVD risk. Biochemical and physiological analyses involving in vitro experiments, animal models, and clinical studies provided evidence for the substantial impact of periodontal pathogens, their virulence factors, and bacterial endotoxins on all general pathogenic CVD mechanisms such as endothelial dysfunction, systemic inflammation, oxidative stress, foam cell formation, lipid accumulation, vascular remodeling, and atherothrombosis. Interventional studies showed moderate beneficial effects of PD treatment on reducing systemic inflammation and endothelial dysfunction. However, no interventional studies were performed to assess whether periodontal therapy can primarily prevent CVD. In summary, current data suggest for a strong contributory role of periodontal infection to CVD but cannot provide sufficient evidence for a role of PD as a cause for cardiovascular pathology. PMID:26777261

  5. In vitro electrical-stimulated wound-healing chip for studying electric field-assisted wound-healing process

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Yung-Shin; Peng, Shih-Wei; Cheng, Ji-Yen

    2012-01-01

    The wound-healing assay is an easy and economical way to quantify cell migration under diverse stimuli. Traditional assays such as scratch assays and barrier assays are widely and commonly used, but neither of them can represent the complicated condition when a wound occurs. It has been suggested that wound-healing is related to electric fields, which were found to regulate wound re-epithelialization. As a wound occurs, the disruption of epithelial barrier short-circuits the trans-epithelial ...

  6. The Healing Power of Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith Anthos, Jeannette

    2004-01-01

    This teacher believes that art has the power to heal, or at least aid in the healing process. After the terrorist attacks on 9/11, her students needed some way to express the injustice they felt. They discussed the attacks, and had some free drawing to release it from their system. They even did some patriotic-themed projects to boost their…

  7. Our Pathway toward Healing Racism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honour, Robert

    2013-01-01

    In this article, Robert Honour, Training and Staff Development Manager, at the Fairfax, Virginia, Department of Family Services (DFS), reports on the outcome of "Healing Racism" training at his organization. Participants in "Healing Racism Institutes" are transforming relationships and creating an organizational culture that…

  8. Mucosal healing in ulcerative colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seidelin, Jakob Benedict; Coskun, Mehmet; Nielsen, Ole Haagen

    2013-01-01

    . With the introduction of the tumor necrosis factor-alpha inhibitors for the treatment of UC, it has become increasingly evident that the disease course is influenced by whether or not the patient achieves mucosal healing. Thus, patients with mucosal healing have fewer flare-ups, a decreased risk of...

  9. Lipocalin (LCN 2 Mediates Pro-Atherosclerotic Processes and Is Elevated in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghav Oberoi

    Full Text Available Lipocalin (LCN 2 is associated with multiple acute and chronic inflammatory diseases but the underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we investigated whether LCN2 is released from macrophages and contributes to pro-atherosclerotic processes and whether LCN2 plasma levels are associated with the severity of coronary artery disease progression in humans.In an autocrine-paracrine loop, tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α promoted the release of LCN2 from murine bone-marrow derived macrophages (BMDM and vice versa. Moreover, LCN2 stimulation of BMDM led to up-regulation of M1 macrophage markers. In addition, enhanced migration of monocytic J774A.1 cells towards LCN2 was observed. Furthermore, LCN2 increased the expression of the scavenger receptors Lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1 as well as scavenger receptor class A-1 (SRA-1 and induced the conversion of macrophages to foam cells. In atherosclerotic lesions of low density lipoprotein receptor-deficient (ldlr-/- mice fed a high fat, high cholesterol diet, LCN2 was found to be co-localized with macrophages in the shoulder region of the atherosclerotic plaque. In addition, LCN2 plasma levels were significantly increased in plasma samples of these mice. Finally, LCN2 plasma levels correlated with the severity of coronary artery disease (CAD in patients as determined by coronary angiography.Here we demonstrated that LCN2 plays a pivotal role in processes involved in atherogenesis by promoting polarization and migration of monocytic cells and development of macrophages towards foam cells. Moreover, LCN2 may be used as a prognostic marker to determine the status of CAD progression.

  10. Self-healing composites: A review

    OpenAIRE

    Yongjing Wang; Duc Truong Pham; Chunqian Ji

    2015-01-01

    Self-healing composites are composite materials capable of automatic recovery when damaged. They are inspired by biological systems such as the human skin which are naturally able to heal themselves. This paper reviews work on self-healing composites with a focus on capsule-based and vascular healing systems. Complementing previous survey articles, the paper provides an updated overview of the various self-healing concepts proposed over the past 15 years, and a comparative analysis of healing...

  11. Management of impaired fracture healing: Historical aspects

    OpenAIRE

    Gajdobranski Đorđe; Micić Ivan; Mitković Milorad B.; Mladenović Desimir; Milankov Miroslav

    2005-01-01

    Introduction Establishing continuity of long bones in cases of impaired bone healing and pseudo-arthrosis is one of the most complex problems in orthopedics. Impaired bone healing The problem of impaired fracture healing is not new. As in other areas of human life, the roots of modern treatment of impaired bone healing lie in ancient medicine. A relatively high percentage of impaired bone healing, as well as unsatisfactory results of standard therapies of impaired bone healing and pseudoarthr...

  12. Self-Healing anticorrosive coatings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nesterova, Tatyana

    %. The number is lower than anticipated and needs to be confirmed. Finally, a 3-D model, based on Monte-Carlo simulations, has been developed for prediction of healing efficiency of a microcapsule-based anticorrosive coating. Two kinds of cracks were considered: cracks accommodated within the bulk coating......Self-healing anticorrosive coatings are multi-component so-called smart materials, which have been proposed as a way to long-lasting corrosion protection of steel structures. The presently most promising technology route is based on microcapsules, filled with active healing agents, and has been...... to capillary forces. The healing agents then start to react, form a polymer network, and =glue‘ the crack. The approach has been applied to development of an epoxy-based self-healing anticorrosive coating for above water heavy duty corrosion protection. Emphasis has been on investigation of practical issues...

  13. Synthetic Self-Healing Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bello, Mollie [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-06-02

    Given enough time, pressure, temperature fluctuation, and stress any material will fail. Currently, synthesized materials make up a large part of our everyday lives, and are used in a number of important applications such as; space travel, under water devices, precise instrumentation, transportation, and infrastructure. Structural failure of these material scan lead to expensive and dangerous consequences. In an attempt to prolong the life spans of specific materials and reduce efforts put into repairing them, biologically inspired, self-healing systems have been extensively investigated. The current review explores recent advances in three methods of synthesized self-healing: capsule based, vascular, and intrinsic. Ideally, self-healing materials require no human intervention to promote healing, are capable of surviving all the steps of polymer processing, and heal the same location repeatedly. Only the vascular method holds up to all of these idealities.

  14. Folk Medicine, Folk Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa SEVER

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Folk medicine and folk healing may be defined codified, regulated, taught openly and practised widely, and benefit from thousands of years of experience. On the other hand, it may be highly secretive, mystical and extremely localized, with knowledge of its practices passed on orally. Folk medicine and traditional medical practices emerged as a result of the reactions of primitive men against natural events and their ways of comparing and exchanging the medical practices of relevant communities with their own practices. Magic played an important role in shaping the practices. Folk medicine is the solutions developed by societies against material and moral disorders starting from the mythic period until today. Folk healer, on the other hand, is the wisest and the most respectable person in the society, in terms of materiality and morale. This person has the power of identifying and curing the diseases, disorders, consequently the origin of these diseases and disorders, and the skill of using various drugs for the treatment of the diseases and disorders or applying the practices with the help of information and practices acquired from the tradition. The Turks having rich and deep rooted culture. The Turkısh folk medicine and folk healing that contain rich cultural structure in themselves survive until today by being fed by different sources. Before Islam, the Turks used to believe that there were white and black possessors, ancestors’ spirits (arvaks and their healthy and peaceful life depended on getting on with these spirits. They also believed that diseases were caused when they could no more keep in with possessors and spirits, or when they offended and annoyed them. In such an environment of belief, the visible diseases caused by material reasons were generally cured with products obtained from plants, mines and animals in the region or drugs that were made out of their combinations. On the other hand, in invisible diseases associated with

  15. Reduction of atherosclerotic lesions in rabbits treated with etoposide associated with cholesterol-rich nanoemulsions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tavares ER

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Elaine R Tavares1, Fatima R Freitas1, Jayme Diament1, Raul C Maranhão1,21Heart Institute of the Medical School Hospital (InCor, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil; 2Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, BrazilObjectives: Cholesterol-rich nanoemulsions (LDE bind to low-density lipoprotein (LDL receptors and after injection into the bloodstream concentrate in aortas of atherosclerotic rabbits. Association of paclitaxel with LDE markedly reduces the lesions. In previous studies, treatment of refractory cancer patients with etoposide associated with LDE had been shown devoid of toxicity. In this study, the ability of etoposide to reduce lesions and inflammatory factors in atherosclerotic rabbits was investigated.Methods: Eighteen New Zealand rabbits were fed a 1% cholesterol diet for 60 days. Starting from day 30, nine animals were treated with four weekly intravenous injections of etoposide oleate (6 mg/kg associated with LDE, and nine control animals were treated with saline solution injections.Results: LDE-etoposide reduced the lesion areas of cholesterol-fed animals by 85% and intima width by 50% and impaired macrophage and smooth muscle cell invasion of the intima. Treatment also markedly reduced the protein expression of lipoprotein receptors (LDL receptor, LDL-related protein-1, cluster of differentiation 36, and scavenger receptor class B member 1, inflammatory cytokines (interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α, matrix metallopeptidase-9, and cell proliferation markers (topoisomerase IIα and tubulin.Conclusion: The ability of LDE-etoposide to strongly reduce the lesion area and the inflammatory process warrants the great therapeutic potential of this novel preparation to target the inflammatory-proliferative basic mechanisms of the disease.Keywords: atherosclerosis treatment, drug delivery, LDL-receptors

  16. Unveiling Cebuano Traditional Healing Practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZachiaRaiza Joy S. Berdon

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to identify the features of Cebuano’s traditional healing practices. Specifically, it also answers the following objectives: analyze traditional healing in Cebuano’s perspectives, explain the traditional healing process practiced in terms of the traditional healers’ belief, and extrapolate perceptions of medical practitioners toward traditional healing. This study made use of qualitative approach, among five traditional healers who performed healing for not less than ten years, in the mountain barangays of Cebu City. These healers served as the primary informants who were selected because of their popularity in healing. The use of open-ended interview in local dialect and naturalistic observation provided a free listing of their verbatim accounts were noted and as primary narratives. Participation in the study was voluntary and participants were interviewed privately after obtaining their consent. The Cebuano traditional healing practices or “panambal” comprise the use of “himolso” (pulse-checking, “palakaw” (petition, “pasubay” (determining what causes the sickness and its possible means of healing, “pangalap” (searching of medicinal plants for “palina” (fumigation, “tayhop” (gentle-blowing, “tutho” (saliva-blowing,“tuob” (boiling, “orasyon” (mystical prayers, “hilot” (massage, and “barang” (sorcery. Though traditional with medical science disapproval, it contributes to a mystical identity of Cebuano healers, as a manifestation of folk Catholicism belief, in order to do a good legacy to the community that needs help. For further study, researchers may conduct further the studies on the: curative effects of medicinal plants in Cebu, psychological effect pulsechecking healed persons by the mananambal, and unmasking the other features of traditional healing.

  17. Recent advances on the association of apoptosis in chronic non healing diabetic wound

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Awadhesh; K; Arya; Richik; Tripathi; Santosh; Kumar; Kamlakar; Tripathi

    2014-01-01

    Generally, wounds are of two categories, such as chronic and acute. Chronic wounds takes time to heal when compared to the acute wounds. Chronic wounds include vasculitis, non healing ulcer, pyoderma gangrenosum, and diseases that cause ischemia. Chronic wounds are rapidly increasing among the elderly population with dysfunctional valves in their lower extremity deep veins, ulcer, neuropathic foot and pressure ulcers. The process of the healing of wounds has several steps with the involvement of immune cells and several other cell types. There are many evidences supporting the hypothesis that apoptosis of immune cells is involved in the wound healing process by ending inflammatory condition. It is also involved in the resolution of various phases of tissue repair. During final steps of wound healing most of the endothelial cells, macrophagesand myofibroblasts undergo apoptosis or exit from the wound, leaving a mass that contains few cells and consists mostly of collagen and other extracellular matrix proteins to provide strength to the healing tissue. This review discusses the various phases of wound healing both in the chronic and acute wounds especially during diabetes mellitus and thus support the hypothesis that the oxidative stress, apoptosis, connexins and other molecules involved in the regulation of chronic wound healing in diabetes mellitus and gives proper understanding of the mechanisms controlling apoptosis and tissue repair during diabetes and may eventually develop therapeutic modalities to fasten the healing process in diabetic patients.

  18. An uncommon cause of chest pain - penetrating atherosclerotic aortic ulcer

    OpenAIRE

    Kyaw, Htoo; Sadiq, Sanah; Chowdhury, Arnab; Gholamrezaee, Rashin; Yoe, Linus

    2016-01-01

    Chest pain is a very common symptom and can be of cardiac or non-cardiac origin. It accounts for approximately 5.5 million annual emergency room visits in the United States, according to 2011 CDC data. Penetrating atherosclerotic aortic ulcer (PAU), an uncommon condition, is also a potential cause of chest pain. We here report the case of a 65-year-old woman who presented with atypical chest and back pain. The pain persisted for 4 weeks necessitating two emergency room visits. Initial tests w...

  19. ADIPONECTIN LEVELS AND ATHEROSCLEROTIC RISK FACTORS IN CHILDREN ON HEMODIALYSIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ACVD) is the major cause of mortality in patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD) treated with hemodialysis (HD), even in children. Adiponectin (ADPN) is an adipocyte derived plasma protein having anti-atherogenic properties. ADPN levels are elevated in ESRD but it has been reported that ESRD patients with low plasma ADPN levels have a high risk of cardiovascular death. The aim of this study is to evaluate the relation between ADPN and atherosclerotic risk factors in children on hemodialysis.Twenty-eight children (17 boys and 11girls) with a mean age of 10.6 ± 3.34 years undergoing hemodialysis (HD) for a mean period of 11.96 ± 8.32 months (ranged from 6 to 36 months) and 10 healthy age and sex matched control subjects were enrolled in this study. The acute effect of a hemodialysis session on serum ADPN and other atherosclerotic risk factors , including blood pressure, serum lipids, C-reactive protein (CRP) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) were assessed by comparison of pre- and post-hemodialysis determinations. Serum levels of ADPN and TNF-α were measured by enzyme linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) while CRP was measured by the semi-quantitative latex agglutination assay.The data showed that serum ADPN levels were twice higher in the HD group as compared to the control subjects. Concerning the atherosclerotic risk factors, TNF-α, CRP and triglycerides levels showed significant elevation in the HD group. Meanwhile, serum albumin, cholesterol and phosphorus levels showed significant decreases. The linear regression analysis showed that adiponectin was negatively correlated with glomerular filtration rate (GFR) (r = -0.68,P < 0.0001), and body mass index (r = -0.73, P < 0.0007); ADPN levels are directly related to HDL cholesterol levels (r = 0.76, P < 0.0001) and inversely related to triglycerides level (r = -0.63, P < 0.0003). No relationship was found between adiponectin and CRP.It could be concluded that

  20. Triglyceride-Rich Lipoproteins and Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2016-01-01

    Scientific interest in triglyceride-rich lipoproteins has fluctuated over the past many years, ranging from beliefs that these lipoproteins cause atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) to being innocent bystanders. Correspondingly, clinical recommendations have fluctuated from a need.......1-fold for myocardial infarction, 3.2-fold for ischemic heart disease, 3.2-fold for ischemic stroke, and 2.2-fold for all-cause mortality. Also, genetic studies using the Mendelian randomization design, an approach that minimizes problems with confounding and reverse causation, now demonstrate...

  1. Atherosclerotic plaque detection by confocal Brillouin and Raman microscopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Zhaokai; Basagaoglu, Berkay; Yakovlev, Vladislav V.

    2015-02-01

    Atherosclerosis, the development of intraluminal plaque, is a fundamental pathology of cardiovascular system and remains the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Biomechanical in nature, plaque rupture occurs when the mechanical properties of the plaque, related to the morphology and viscoelastic properties, are compromised, resulting in intraluminal thrombosis and reduction of coronary blood flow. In this report, we describe the first simultaneous application of confocal Brillouin and Raman microscopies to ex-vivo aortic wall samples. Such a non-invasive, high specific approach allows revealing a direct relationship between the biochemical and mechanical properties of atherosclerotic tissue.

  2. Radiotherapy and wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devalia, Haresh L; Mansfield, Lucy

    2008-03-01

    This review article discusses basic radiation physics and effects of radiation on wounds. It examines various postulated hypothesis on the role of circulatory decrease and radiation-induced direct cellular damage. The new concept related to the radiation pathogenesis proposes that there is a cascade of cytokines initiated immediately after the radiation. Sustained activation of myofibroblasts in the wound accounts for its chronicity. Recent advances highlight that transforming growth factor beta1 is the master switch in pathogenesis of radiation fibrosis. This articles overviews its role and summarises the available evidences related to radiation damage. The goal of this article was to provide its modern understanding, as future research will concentrate on antagonising the effects of cytokines to promote wound healing. PMID:18081782

  3. Modulators of Macrophage Polarization Influence Healing of the Infarcted Myocardium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellis N. ter Horst

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available To diminish heart failure development after acute myocardial infarction (AMI, several preclinical studies have focused on influencing the inflammatory processes in the healing response post-AMI. The initial purpose of this healing response is to clear cell debris of the injured cardiac tissue and to eventually resolve inflammation and support scar tissue formation. This is a well-balanced reaction. However, excess inflammation can lead to infarct expansion, adverse ventricular remodeling and thereby propagate heart failure development. Different macrophage subtypes are centrally involved in both the promotion and resolution phase of inflammation. Modulation of macrophage subset polarization has been described to greatly affect the quality and outcome of healing after AMI. Therefore, it is of great interest to reveal the process of macrophage polarization to support the development of therapeutic targets. The current review summarizes (preclinical studies that demonstrate essential molecules involved in macrophage polarization that can be modulated and influence cardiac healing after AMI.

  4. Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP changes gene expression of key molecules of the wound healing machinery and improves wound healing in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Arndt

    Full Text Available Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP has the potential to interact with tissue or cells leading to fast, painless and efficient disinfection and furthermore has positive effects on wound healing and tissue regeneration. For clinical implementation it is necessary to examine how CAP improves wound healing and which molecular changes occur after the CAP treatment. In the present study we used the second generation MicroPlaSter ß® in analogy to the current clinical standard (2 min treatment time in order to determine molecular changes induced by CAP using in vitro cell culture studies with human fibroblasts and an in vivo mouse skin wound healing model. Our in vitro analysis revealed that the CAP treatment induces the expression of important key genes crucial for the wound healing response like IL-6, IL-8, MCP-1, TGF-ß1, TGF-ß2, and promotes the production of collagen type I and alpha-SMA. Scratch wound healing assays showed improved cell migration, whereas cell proliferation analyzed by XTT method, and the apoptotic machinery analyzed by protein array technology, was not altered by CAP in dermal fibroblasts. An in vivo wound healing model confirmed that the CAP treatment affects above mentioned genes involved in wound healing, tissue injury and repair. Additionally, we observed that the CAP treatment improves wound healing in mice, no relevant side effects were detected. We suggest that improved wound healing might be due to the activation of a specified panel of cytokines and growth factors by CAP. In summary, our in vitro human and in vivo animal data suggest that the 2 min treatment with the MicroPlaSter ß® is an effective technique for activating wound healing relevant molecules in dermal fibroblasts leading to improved wound healing, whereas the mechanisms which contribute to these observed effects have to be further investigated.

  5. Identification of atherosclerotic plaque components with intravascular ultrasound elastography in vivo: a Yucatan pig study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korte, C.L. de; Sierevogel, M.J.; Mastik, F.; Strijder, C.; Schaar, J.A.; Velema, E.; Pasterkamp, G.; Serruys, P.W.; Steen, A.F.W. van der

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Intravascular ultrasound elastography assesses the local strain of the atherosclerotic vessel wall. In the present study, the potential to identify different plaque components in vivo was investigated. METHODS AND RESULTS: Atherosclerotic external iliac and femoral arteries (n=24) of 6 Y

  6. CO2 vascular anastomosis of atherosclerotic and calcified arteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, John V.; Leefmans, Eric; Stewart, Gwendolyn J.; Katz, Mira L.; Comerota, Anthony J.

    1990-06-01

    The technique for CO2 laser fusion vascular anastomosis in normal vessels has been well established. Normal arterial wall has a predictable thermal response to the incident laser energy, with rapid heating and cooling of collagen within the arterial wall. Since atherosclerosis involves subendothelial cellular proliferation, lipid and calcium deposition, it may modify the thermal responsiveness of the arterial wall. To this study, CO2 laser fusion anastomoses were attempted in rabbits with non-calcific atherosclerosis and humans with calcific atherosclerosis. All anastomoses were successfully completed without alteration in technique despite the presence of plaque at the site of laser fusion. Histology of rabbit vessels revealed the classic laser fusion cap within the adventitia and persistent atherosclerotic plaque at the flow surface. Duplex imaging of patients post-operatively demonstrated long term anastomotic patency in 2 of 3 fistulae. These results suggest that neither non-calcified or calcified atherosclerosis significantly alters the arterial wall thermal responsiveness to CO2 laser energy or inhibits creation of laser fusion anastomoses. Therefore, this technique may be applicable to the treatment of patients with atherosclerotic occlusive disease.

  7. Spectral CT of carotid atherosclerotic plaque: comparison with histology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To distinguish components of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaque by imaging their energy response using spectral CT and comparing images with histology. After spectroscopic calibration using phantoms of plaque surrogates, excised human carotid atherosclerotic plaques were imaged using MARS CT using a photon-processing detector with a silicon sensor layer and microfocus X-ray tube (50 kVp, 0.5 mA) at 38-μm voxel size. The plaques were imaged, sectioned and re-imaged using four threshold energies: 10, 16, 22 and 28 keV; then sequentially stained with modified Von Kossa, Perl's Prussian blue and Oil-Red O, and photographed. Relative Hounsfield units across the energies were entered into a linear algebraic material decomposition model to identify the unknown plaque components. Lipid, calcium, iron and water-like components of plaque have distinguishable energy responses to X-ray, visible on spectral CT images. CT images of the plaque surface correlated very well with histological photographs. Calcium deposits (>1,000 μm) in plaque are larger than iron deposits (<100 μm), but could not be distinguished from each other within the same voxel using the energy range available. Spectral CT displays energy information in image form at high spatial resolution, enhancing the intrinsic contrast of lipid, calcium and iron within atheroma. (orig.)

  8. Tensile and compressive properties of fresh human carotid atherosclerotic plaques.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Maher, Eoghan

    2009-12-11

    Accurate characterisation of the mechanical properties of human atherosclerotic plaque is important for our understanding of the role of vascular mechanics in the development and treatment of atherosclerosis. The majority of previous studies investigating the mechanical properties of human plaque are based on tests of plaque tissue removed following autopsy. This study aims to characterise the mechanical behaviour of fresh human carotid plaques removed during endarterectomy and tested within 2h. A total of 50 radial compressive and 17 circumferential tensile uniaxial tests were performed on samples taken from 14 carotid plaques. The clinical classification of each plaque, as determined by duplex ultrasound is also reported. Plaques were classified as calcified, mixed or echolucent. Experimental data indicated that plaques were highly inhomogeneous; with variations seen in the mechanical properties of plaque obtained from individual donors and between donors. The mean behaviour of samples for each classification indicated that calcified plaques had the stiffest response, while echolucent plaques were the least stiff. Results also indicated that there may be a difference in behaviour of samples taken from different anatomical locations (common, internal and external carotid), however the large variability indicates that more testing is needed to reach significant conclusions. This work represents a step towards a better understanding of the in vivo mechanical behaviour of human atherosclerotic plaque.

  9. Self-healing epoxy composites: preparation, characterization and healing performance

    OpenAIRE

    Reaz A. Chowdhury; Mahesh V. Hosur; Md. Nuruddin; Alfred Tcherbi-Narteh; Ashok Kumar; Veera Boddu; Shaik Jeelani

    2015-01-01

    Low velocity impact damage is common in fiber reinforced composites, which leads to micro-crack and interfacial debonding, where damage is microscopic and invisible. The concept of self-healing composites can be a way of overcoming this limitation and extending the life expectancy while expanding their usage in structural applications. In the current study, extrinsic self-healing concept was adopted using urea-formaldehyde microcapsules containing room temperature curing epoxy resin system (S...

  10. Healing agent for self-healing cementious material

    OpenAIRE

    Jonkers, H.M.

    2011-01-01

    The invention provides a process for the production of a cementious material. The process comprises mixing cement starting materials and a particulate healing agent to provide the cementious material. The healing agent comprises coated particles, wherein the coated particles comprise bacterial material and additive. The bacterial material is selected from the group consisting of a bacterium, a lyophilized bacterium and a bacterial spore of a bacterium. The present invention solves these probl...

  11. PEG modification on 111In-labeled phosphatidyl serine liposomes for imaging of atherosclerotic plaques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: Previously, we reported a probe for imaging of atherosclerotic plaques: 111In-labeled liposomes. Liposomes were modified with phosphatidylserine (PS) because macrophages recognize PS and phagocytize apoptotic cells in plaques. PS modification was successful and we could visualize atherosclerotic plaques by single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). However, too-rapid blood clearance reduced accumulation of PS-liposomes in plaques in vivo. Therefore, in the present study, PS-liposomes were modified with polyethylene glycol (PEG) to retard the rate of blood clearance. Methods: PS-liposomes (size, 100 nm or 200 nm) were PEGylated with PEG2000 or PEG5000 at 1 or 5 mol%, and radiolabeled with 111In. For the study of uptake in vitro, liposomes were incubated with mouse peritoneal macrophages. Biodistribution studies in vivo were carried out in ddY mice. En face autoradiograms were obtained with apoE−/− mice upon intravenous injection of 111In-liposomes. Results: Uptake was decreased significantly at 5 mol% PEGylation in 100-nm PS-liposomes (*P < 0.05 vs. 0 mol%). All the PEGylated liposomes tested showed significantly lower uptake than the non-PEGylated control in 200-nm liposomes. In vivo results showed slower blood clearance in PEGylated liposomes. Autoradiograms in apoE−/− mice were well matched with Oil Red O staining. Additionally, 200-nm PS-liposomes modified with 5%PEG2000 ([111In]5%PEG2000PS200) showed the highest uptake to the region in vivo. Conclusions: As expected, PEGylation retarded the rate of blood clearance. In addition, it affected liposome uptake by macrophages in vitro. These results suggest that the balance between the rate of blood clearance and macrophage recognition is important, and [111In]5%PEG2000PS200 showed the best results in our investigation

  12. Neovascularization and coronary atherosclerotic plaque: cinematographic localization and quantitative histologic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamat, B R; Galli, S J; Barger, A C; Lainey, L L; Silverman, K J

    1987-10-01

    A new technique was developed for analyzing the neovascularization associated with coronary artery atherosclerosis: cinematography during silicone polymer injection of the coronary arteries of fixed and cleared human hearts, followed by histologic analysis in routine and 1-micron-thick, Epon-embedded sections. Twenty-two hearts obtained at autopsy were studied. On the basis of cinematographic findings, individual regions of the coronary arteries were classified as negative, positive, or abundantly positive for neovascularization. Positive and abundantly positive areas, which invariably occurred in segments exhibiting changes of atherosclerosis, contained numerous small vessels in the adventitia and outer media (4.7 +/- 1.5 and 9.8 +/- 1.3 [SE] vessel profiles/artery cross-section in positive and abundantly positive areas, versus 1.0 +/- 0.6 in negative regions). Abundantly positive areas, which occurred in coronary artery segments demonstrating the most extensive atherosclerotic change, contained numerous small vessels in the inner media or in the plaque itself. Some of these microvessels were in close proximity to mast cells, which represent potentially rich sources of mediators affecting vascular tone and permeability. Vessels were not observed in the inner media or in atherosclerotic plaque in areas designated either positive or negative by cinematography. These findings show how our approach can be used both to define the three-dimensional, in situ configuration of coronary artery neovascularization and to characterize the histology of this process in detail. They also confirm previous work indicating that areas of coronary arteries involved by atherosclerosis frequently exhibit extensive neovascularization. PMID:2443438

  13. 黄芪对动脉粥样硬化兔骨髓内皮祖细胞生长的影响响%Effect of astragalus mongholicus on the growth of endothelial progenitor cells from bone marrow of atherosclerotic rabbits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李蕾; 张怀勤; 尹娟; 范旰; 陈骁

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of astragalus mongholicus on the growth of endothelial progenitor cells from bone marrow of atherosclerotic rabbits, and to investigate the potential of astragalus for treatment of coronary heart disease. Methods New Zealand white rabbits were randomly divided into the control group (n= 6) and the atherosclerosis group (n = 6) to establish animal models of atherosclerosis. EPCs were cultured and identified by Dil-Ac-LDL uptake and FITC-UEA-I-lectin binding using fluorescence microscopy (FM). The ability of tube structure formation of EPCs were assessed using matrigel reagent kit in vitro. The adhesion, migration and proliferation ability of EPCs were also measured in these two groups. Results Plaques and fatty streak leisions, which were positive for DiI-ac-LDL-uptaking and FITC-UEA-I-lectin staining, could be observed in coronary arteries from rabbit models of atherosclerosis. Capillary formation could be observed 6 days post EPCs culturing. Compared with those in the control group, the cell number, the adhesion, migration and proliferation abilities of EPCs decreased significantly in the atherosclerosis group (P < 0.05); Astragalus could significantly increase the EPCs number and the adhesion, migration and proliferation abilities of EPCs at 20 g/L (P < 0.05) than other dosage. Conclusion The potential mechanism for Astragalus as a treatment of coronary artery disease is its contribution to EPCs growth.%目的:研究黄芪对冠状动脉粥样硬化模型兔骨髓内皮祖细胞(endothelial lprogenitor rcells,,EPCs) )生长的影响,并探讨黄芪对冠心病临床治疗的可能机制.方法:建立动脉粥样硬化模型,分为正常对照组和动脉粥样硬化组,体外分离培养EPCs,通过荧光显微镜观察细胞经乙酰化低密度脂蛋白(DiI-ac-LDL) )摄取试验和荆豆凝集素(FITC-UEA-I)和体外成血管试剂matrigel l观察细胞成血管功能来鉴定EPCs,检测细胞黏附能力、迁移能力

  14. Cellular and molecular mechanisms of repair in acute and chronic wound healing

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, P.; Nunan, R

    2015-01-01

    Summary A considerable understanding of the fundamental cellular and molecular mechanisms underpinning healthy acute wound healing has been gleaned from studying various animal models, and we are now unravelling the mechanisms that lead to chronic wounds and pathological healing including fibrosis. A small cut will normally heal in days through tight orchestration of cell migration and appropriate levels of inflammation, innervation and angiogenesis. Major surgeries may take several weeks to ...

  15. The Role of Matrix Metalloproteinases in Diabetic Wound Healing in relation to Photobiomodulation

    OpenAIRE

    Sandra Matabi Ayuk; Heidi Abrahamse; Nicolette Nadene Houreld

    2016-01-01

    The integration of several cellular responses initiates the process of wound healing. Matrix Metalloproteinases (MMPs) play an integral role in wound healing. Their main function is degradation, by removal of damaged extracellular matrix (ECM) during the inflammatory phase, breakdown of the capillary basement membrane for angiogenesis and cell migration during the proliferation phase, and contraction and remodelling of tissue in the remodelling phase. For effective healing to occur, all wound...

  16. Mucopolysaccharides from psyllium involved in wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerhof, W; Das, P K; Middelkoop, E; Verschoor, J; Storey, L; Regnier, C

    2001-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharides derived from the husk of psyllium (Plantago ovata) have properties beneficial for wound cleansing and wound healing. Recent studies indicate that these mucopolysaccharides also limit scar formation. Our in vitro and in vivo studies aimed to investigate the mechanisms involved, e.g., fluid absorption, bacterial adherence and in vitro stimulatory effects on macrophages, which are pivotal in wound healing. The mucopolysaccharides contained in a sachet (Askina Cavity) or in a hydrocolloid mixture (Askina Hydro) were found to have a gradual and sustained absorbency over a period of 7 days, amounting to 4-6 times their weight in water. The swelling index was 9 mm after 312 h. Adherence of wound bacteria to the mucopolysaccharides started after 2 h and was more pronounced after 3 h. Semiquantitative measurements of bacterial adherence used centrifugation and subsequent optical density determinations of supernatant. These confirmed the strong adherence potential of psyllium particles. Lactic acid dehydrogenase staining of pretreated cultured human skin explants did not reveal toxicity of the mucopolysaccharides derived from psyllium husk. Langerhans' cell migration from the epidermis was negligible and interleukin-1 beta expression in the explants was not significant, supporting the very low allergenic potential of psyllium. The characteristics of mucopolysaccharide granulate derived from psyllium husk in Askina Cavity and Askina Hydro related to fluid absorption, bacterial adherence, biocompatibility, stimulation of macrophages, irritancy response and allergenicity showed an optimal profile, supporting the good clinical performance of wound healing products containing psyllium husk. PMID:11951574

  17. Methyl methacrylate as a healing agent for self-healing cementitious materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Different types of healing agents have already been tested on their efficiency for use in self-healing cementitious materials. Generally, commercial healing agents are used while their properties are adjusted for manual crack repair and not for autonomous crack healing. Consequently, the amount of regain in properties due to self-healing of cracks is limited. In this research, a methyl methacrylate (MMA)-based healing agent was developed specifically for use in self-healing cementitious materials. Various parameters were optimized including the viscosity, curing time, strength, etc. After the desired properties were obtained, the healing agent was encapsulated and screened for its self-healing efficiency. The decrease in water permeability due to autonomous crack healing using MMA as a healing agent was similar to the results obtained for manually healed cracks. First results seem promising: however, further research needs to be undertaken in order to obtain an optimal healing agent ready for use in practice

  18. A Novel Three-Dimensional Wound Healing Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuo J. Chen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Wound healing is a well-orchestrated process, with various cells and growth factors coming into the wound bed at a specific time to influence the healing. Understanding the wound healing process is essential to generating wound healing products that help with hard-to-heal acute wounds and chronic wounds. The 2D scratch assay whereby a wound is created by scratching a confluent layer of cells on a 2D substrate is well established and used extensively but it has a major limitation—it lacks the complexity of the 3D wound healing environment. Established 3D wound healing models also have many limitations. In this paper, we present a novel 3D wound healing model that closely mimics the skin wound environment to study the cell migration of fibroblasts and keratinocytes. Three major components that exist in the wound environment are introduced in this new model: collagen, fibrin, and human foreskin fibroblasts. The novel 3D model consists of a defect, representing the actual wound, created by using a biopsy punch in a 3D collagen construct. The defect is then filled with collagen or with various solutions of fibrinogen and thrombin that polymerize into a 3D fibrin clot. Fibroblasts are then added on top of the collagen and their migration into the fibrin—or collagen—filled defect is followed for nine days. Our data clearly shows that fibroblasts migrate on both collagen and fibrin defects, though slightly faster on collagen defects than on fibrin defects. This paper shows the visibility of the model by introducing a defect filled with fibrin in a 3D collagen construct, thus mimicking a wound. Ongoing work examines keratinocyte migration on the defects of a 3D construct, which consists of collagen-containing fibroblasts. The model is also used to determine the effects of various growth factors, delivered in the wound defects, on fibroblasts’ and keratinocytes’ migration into the defects. Thus this novel 3D wound healing model provides a more

  19. Self-Healing Wire Insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A self-healing system for an insulation material initiates a self-repair process by rupturing a plurality of microcapsules disposed on the insulation material. When the plurality of microcapsules are ruptured, reactants within the plurality of microcapsules react to form a replacement polymer in a break of the insulation material. This self-healing system has the ability to repair multiple breaks in a length of insulation material without exhausting the repair properties of the material.

  20. THE BIOLOGY OF FRACTURE HEALING

    OpenAIRE

    Marsell, Richard; Einhorn, Thomas A.

    2011-01-01

    The biology of fracture healing is a complex biological process that follows specific regenerative patterns and involves changes in the expression of several thousand genes. Although there is still much to be learned to fully comprehend the pathways of bone regeneration, the over-all pathways of both the anatomical and biochemical events have been thoroughly investigated. These efforts have provided a general understanding of how fracture healing occurs. Following the initial trauma, bone hea...

  1. Healing Arts Radiation Protection Act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Healing Arts Radiation Protection Act is concerned with regulating the registration, installation, operation, inspection and safety of X-ray machines. The Act provides for the establishment of the Healing Arts Radiation Protection Commission which is responsible for reporting on all the above matters to the Ontario Minister of Health. In addition the board is responsible for the continuing development of an X-ray safety code and for the submission of an annual report of their activities to the minister

  2. Microbial symbionts accelerate wound healing via the neuropeptide hormone oxytocin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theofilos Poutahidis

    Full Text Available Wound healing capability is inextricably linked with diverse aspects of physical fitness ranging from recovery after minor injuries and surgery to diabetes and some types of cancer. Impact of the microbiome upon the mammalian wound healing process is poorly understood. We discover that supplementing the gut microbiome with lactic acid microbes in drinking water accelerates the wound-healing process to occur in half the time required for matched control animals. Further, we find that Lactobacillus reuteri enhances wound-healing properties through up-regulation of the neuropeptide hormone oxytocin, a factor integral in social bonding and reproduction, by a vagus nerve-mediated pathway. Bacteria-triggered oxytocin serves to activate host CD4+Foxp3+CD25+ immune T regulatory cells conveying transplantable wound healing capacity to naive Rag2-deficient animals. This study determined oxytocin to be a novel component of a multi-directional gut microbe-brain-immune axis, with wound-healing capability as a previously unrecognized output of this axis. We also provide experimental evidence to support long-standing medical traditions associating diet, social practices, and the immune system with efficient recovery after injury, sustained good health, and longevity.

  3. El trasplante autólogo de células mesoteliales como acelerador y modificador de la cicatrización cutánea en ratas Autologous mesothelial cells transplantation as accelerator and skin healing modifier in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Esparza Iturbide

    2013-03-01

    ó menor inflamación y fibrosis, mayor colágeno y datos compatibles con una fase de remodelación. En conclusión, el autotrasplante de células mesoteliales peritoneales en heridas de espesor total acelera el proceso de cicatrización cutánea normal en ratas ya que disminuye la inflamación, la fibrosis y aumenta el colágeno.The purpose of this study was to verify if the autologous peritoneal mesothelial cells in full thickness wounds on rats, speed up and adjust the normal skin healing process. Based on the theory that mesothelial cells from tissues such as peritoneum, pleura or pericardium, are responsible for one of the faster healing process and synthesize stimulating wound healing and chemotactical factors (hence the genesis of surgical adhesions, besides possessing the ability to differentiate into other cell series (plasticity. We designed a pilot, analytical, longitudinal, prospective and comparative study in the Laboratory of Experimental Surgery at The American British Cowdray Medical Center, Mexico City (México. Were used 15 Wistar rats which were divided into 2 groups: Group I (n = 5 where after general anesthesia, skin removed 3 mm in diameter with microsurgical technique in the back and was close by secondary intention; and Group II or experimental group (n = 10 where laparotomy was performed with excision of the parietal peritoneum and primary closure, excision of full thickness skin on the dorsal surface of 3mm diameter and peritoneal autograft placement on the dorsal wound. In histological analysis, were reviewed 6 variables: collagen, fibroblasts, number of vessels, macrophages, inflammatory cells and retraction, to point out fully the nature and characteristics of healing in both groups. For the statistical analysis we used Statistical Package for Social Sciences 17.0. The descriptive statistics was made using frequency measures of central tendency and dispersion. The results showed that the Group I rats, had increased inflammation, fibrosis and

  4. A Study on Evaluation of Apoptosis and Expression of Bcl-2-Related Marker in Wound Healing of Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Surya Bhan; Rahul Mitra; Arya, A. K.; Pandey, H. P.; Tripathi, K.

    2013-01-01

    Uncontrolled blood sugar is a major cause of vascular complications and delayed wound healing in diabetes mellitus. During wound healing process, normally, apoptosis is responsible for events such as removal of inflammatory cells and evolution of granulation tissue into scar which occur during the late phase of wound healing. Early apoptosis can lead to abnormal wound healing by removing granulation tissue including fibroblast, endothelial cell, and small vessels. To determine the role of apo...

  5. Plaque Rupture and Thrombosis: the Value of the Atherosclerotic Rabbit Model in Defining the Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abela, Oliver G; Ahsan, Chowdhury H; Alreefi, Fadi; Salehi, Negar; Baig, Imran; Janoudi, Abed; Abela, George S

    2016-06-01

    Persistent inflammation and mechanical injury associated with cholesterol crystal accretion within atherosclerotic plaques typically precedes plaque disruption (rupture and/or erosion) and thrombosis-often the terminal events of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. To elucidate the mechanisms of these events, the atherosclerotic rabbit model provides a unique and powerful tool that facilitates studies of atherogenesis starting with plaque buildup to eventual disruption. Examination of human coronary arteries obtained from patients who died with myocardial infarction demonstrates evidence of cholesterol crystals perforating the plaque cap and intimal surface of the arterial wall that can lead to rupture. These observations were made possible by omitting ethanol, an avid lipid solvent, from the tissue processing steps. Importantly, the atherosclerotic rabbit model exhibits a similar pathology of cholesterol crystals perforating the intimal surface as seen in ruptured human plaques. Local and systemic inflammatory responses in the model are also similar to those observed in humans. The strong parallel between the rabbit and human pathology validates the atherosclerotic rabbit model as a predictor of human pathophysiology of atherosclerosis. Thus, the atherosclerotic rabbit model can be used with confidence to evaluate diagnostic imaging and efficacy of novel anti-atherosclerotic therapy. PMID:27091328

  6. 自体骨髓内皮祖细胞移植治疗动脉粥样硬化大鼠急性脑缺血的实验研究%Treatment of acute cerebral ischemia in atherosclerotic rats with autologous transplantation with bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱江; 刘煜敏; 孔朝红; 道文欣

    2010-01-01

    Objective To explore the effeteness of autologous transplantation of bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells in promoting the neovascularization and improving the neurological functional recovery in atherosclerotic rats with acute cerebral infarction. Methods Male Sprague-Dawley rat models of atherosclerosis were established by fat-rich diet feeding. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) were obtained from bone marrow of all rats; the cells were cultured in vitro in Ml99 with VEGF, bFGF and EGF in it Assays were used to detect the expression of FLK-1 and CD34. on the 7th d, middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) rat models were established by the method of thread thrombus. Three h after MCAO, all of the animals were randomized into experimental group (the autologous endothelial progenitor cells labeled with BrdU were injected into the carotid vein) and control group (same volume of PBS were injected into the carotid vein). Behavioral tests (modified neurological severity scale, mNSS) were performed 6 h and 1, 3, 7, 10 and 14 d after MCAO. Besides, immunohistochemical examinations were employed to observe the distribution of EPCs (labeled by BrdU) in the brain tissue and to measure the microvessel density. Results EPCs from bone marrow were isolated, induced and cultured successfully in vitro, which positively stained for FLK-1 by immunocytochemistry and partly positively expressed CD34 by immunofluorescence. The cells of FITC labeled UEA adsorption and DiL-acLDL internalization were positive under fluorescence confocal microscopy. These cells possessed robust proliferative potential and their number reached 5×106. On the 14th d, the neurological function recovery in the experimental group (mNSS scores: 6.13±0.30) was significantly improved as compared with that in the control group (mNSS scores: 8.50±0.46, P<0.05). On the 28th, some positive EPCs stained by BrdU were found in the experimental group and the numbers of blood vessels in the experimental

  7. Severe supraaortal atherosclerotic disease resembling Takayasu’s Arteritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernhard Kis

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Bernhard Kis1,2, Thomas Liebig3,4, Peter Berlit11Department of Neurology, Alfried Krupp Hospital, Essen, Germany; 2Department of Psychiatry, University of Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Germany; 3Department of Neuroradiology, Alfried Krupp Hospital, Essen, Germany; 4Department of Neuroradiology, Technical University of Munich, Munich, GermanyAbstract: We report a case of a 64 year-old man whose clinical presentation and neuroimaging findings strikingly resembled those found in Takayasu’s Arteritis which is characterized by the triad of absent radial pulses, ischemic retinopathy, and carotid sinus hyperreflexia causing syncopes. Angiographically, the patient exhibited severe atherosclerotic changes of the supraaortic large vessels. Stent-assisted angioplasty resulted in both clinical improvement and increased cerebral blood flow as measured by angiography and ultrasound.Keywords: Takayasu’s arteritis, atherosclerosis, angiography, stent, angioplasty

  8. Lipid and protein maps defining arterial layers in atherosclerotic aorta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Martin-Lorenzo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Subclinical atherosclerosis cannot be predicted and novel therapeutic targets are needed. The molecular anatomy of healthy and atherosclerotic tissue is pursued to identify ongoing molecular changes in atherosclerosis development. Mass Spectrometry Imaging (MSI accounts with the unique advantage of analyzing proteins and metabolites (lipids while preserving their original localization; thus two dimensional maps can be obtained. Main molecular alterations were investigated in a rabbit model in response to early development of atherosclerosis. Aortic arterial layers (intima and media and calcified regions were investigated in detail by MALDI-MSI and proteins and lipids specifically defining those areas of interest were identified. These data further complement main findings previously published in J Proteomics (M. Martin-Lorenzo et al., J. Proteomics. (In press; M. Martin-Lorenzo et al., J. Proteomics 108 (2014 465–468. [1,2].

  9. Lipid and protein maps defining arterial layers in atherosclerotic aorta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Lorenzo, Marta; Balluff, Benjamin; Maroto, Aroa S; Carreira, Ricardo J; van Zeijl, Rene J M; Gonzalez-Calero, Laura; de la Cuesta, Fernando; Barderas, Maria G; Lopez-Almodovar, Luis F; Padial, Luis R; McDonnell, Liam A; Vivanco, Fernando; Alvarez-Llamas, Gloria

    2015-09-01

    Subclinical atherosclerosis cannot be predicted and novel therapeutic targets are needed. The molecular anatomy of healthy and atherosclerotic tissue is pursued to identify ongoing molecular changes in atherosclerosis development. Mass Spectrometry Imaging (MSI) accounts with the unique advantage of analyzing proteins and metabolites (lipids) while preserving their original localization; thus two dimensional maps can be obtained. Main molecular alterations were investigated in a rabbit model in response to early development of atherosclerosis. Aortic arterial layers (intima and media) and calcified regions were investigated in detail by MALDI-MSI and proteins and lipids specifically defining those areas of interest were identified. These data further complement main findings previously published in J Proteomics (M. Martin-Lorenzo et al., J. Proteomics. (In press); M. Martin-Lorenzo et al., J. Proteomics 108 (2014) 465-468.) [1,2]. PMID:26217810

  10. Laser ablation of human atherosclerotic plaque without adjacent tissue injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grundfest, W. S.; Litvack, F.; Forrester, J. S.; Goldenberg, T.; Swan, H. J. C.

    1985-01-01

    Seventy samples of human cadaver atherosclerotic aorta were irradiated in vitro using a 308 nm xenon chloride excimer laser. Energy per pulse, pulse duration and frequency were varied. For comparison, 60 segments were also irradiated with an argon ion and an Nd:YAG laser operated in the continuous mode. Tissue was fixed in formalin, sectioned and examined microscopically. The Nd:YAG and argon ion-irradiated tissue exhibited a central crater with irregular edges and concentric zones of thermal and blast injury. In contrast, the excimer laser-irradiated tissue had narrow deep incisions with minimal or no thermal injury. These preliminary experiments indicate that the excimer laser vaporizes tissue in a manner different from that of the continuous wave Nd:YAG or argon ion laser. The sharp incision margins and minimal damage to adjacent normal tissue suggest that the excimer laser is more desirable for general surgical and intravascular uses than are the conventionally used medical lasers.

  11. Evaluation and percutaneous management of atherosclerotic peripheral vascular disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atherosclerotic peripheral vascular disease (PVD) of the lower extremities deprives a person of the ability to exercise to their satisfaction, later of the ability to perform the activities of their daily life, and finally of their legs themselves. Peripheral vascular disease has long been managed by the vascular surgeon utilizing endarterectomy and peripheral arterial bypass. Patient acceptance of nonsurgical, percutaneous procedures such as percutaneous transluminal balloon angioplasty (PTA) is high. Increased utilization of these procedures has led to improved techniques and adjuncts to therapy, as well as more critical review of long-term results. This article will review the evaluation and nonoperative management of PVD, with an emphasis on the newer modalities of management presently being investigated

  12. Tools for improving the diagnosis of atherosclerotic plaque using ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Søren Kragh

    1997-01-01

    topics have been investigated: an ultrasound pulse-echo simulation tool and a new compound imaging technique for improving visualization of atherosclerotic disease.A tool for simulation of the received electrical signal in a pulse-echo ultrasound system, due to a reflector surface of arbitrary geometry......, has been developed. The method is denoted the Diffraction Response Interpolation Method (DRIM) and is based on the pulse-echo diffraction impulse response method. The DRIM is a computationally efficient tool for calculating the integral of the spatially varying pulse-echo diffraction impulse response...... and experimentally. The MACI method operates by recording information about a given tissue region using a number of beam angles (typically 3 to 11) and combining the information into a single compound image (so-called spatial compounding). During the project a flexible experimental multi-channel ultrasound system...

  13. Atherosclerotic lesions in lymphoma survivors treated with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Radiotherapy causes premature atherosclerosis in Hodgkin’s lymphoma survivors (HLSs). We determined whether atherosclerosis within the radiation field was predicted by traditional risk factors independent of radiation and compared the extent of atherosclerosis in HLSs treated with mantle field radiotherapy with non-irradiated patients. Material and methods: Forty-three HLSs (median age 50 years, range 38–63) treated with mantle field radiotherapy were included. Cardiovascular risk factors were registered at first follow-up (FU-1) 5–13 years after treatment. A second follow-up (FU-2) occurred 18–27 years after treatment. At FU-2, in-field atherosclerosis was assessed by computed tomography with calculation of coronary artery calcium volume score (CACS) and pre-cranial artery atherosclerosis score (PAS). Peripheral endothelial dysfunction was assessed by ante-brachial strain-gauge plethysmography. CT angiography of pre-cranial vessels was also performed in 43 non-irradiated patients. Results: Multiple linear regression analyses showed that cholesterol at FU-1 was a predictor of CACS (β 308 (95% CI 213–403), p < 0.001), PAS (β 3.67 (95% CI 2.29–5.04), p < 0.001) and peripheral endothelial dysfunction (β 2.74 (95% CI 0.47–5.01), p = 0.02). There were more atherosclerotic lesions in HLSs (n = 141) than in non-irradiated patients (n = 73, p = 0.001). Conclusion: Irradiated arteries are characterized by widespread atherosclerotic lesions aggravated by elevated levels of cholesterol

  14. The external microenvironment of healing skin wounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, Carla R; Nuutila, Kristo; Lee, Cameron Cy;

    2015-01-01

    The skin wound microenvironment can be divided into two main components that influence healing: the external wound microenvironment, which is outside the wound surface; and the internal wound microenvironment, underneath the surface, to which the cells within the wound are exposed. Treatment...... methods that directly alter the features of the external wound microenvironment indirectly affect the internal wound microenvironment due to the exchange between the two compartments. In this review, we focus on the effects of temperature, pressure (positive and negative), hydration, gases (oxygen and...

  15. Human miR-221/222 in Physiological and Atherosclerotic Vascular Remodeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry A. Chistiakov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A cluster of miR-221/222 is a key player in vascular biology through exhibiting its effects on vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs and endothelial cells (ECs. These miRNAs contribute to vascular remodeling, an adaptive process involving phenotypic and behavioral changes in vascular cells in response to vascular injury. In proliferative vascular diseases such as atherosclerosis, pathological vascular remodeling plays a prominent role. The miR-221/222 cluster controls development and differentiation of ECs but inhibits their proangiogenic activation, proliferation, and migration. miR-221/222 are primarily implicated in maintaining endothelial integrity and supporting quiescent EC phenotype. Vascular expression of miR-221/222 is upregulated in initial atherogenic stages causing inhibition of angiogenic recruitment of ECs and increasing endothelial dysfunction and EC apoptosis. In contrast, these miRNAs stimulate VSMCs and switching from the VSMC “contractile” phenotype to the “synthetic” phenotype associated with induction of proliferation and motility. In atherosclerotic vessels, miR-221/222 drive neointima formation. Both miRNAs contribute to atherogenic calcification of VSMCs. In advanced plaques, chronic inflammation downregulates miR-221/222 expression in ECs that in turn could activate intralesion neoangiogenesis. In addition, both miRNAs could contribute to cardiovascular pathology through their effects on fat and glucose metabolism in nonvascular tissues such as adipose tissue, liver, and skeletal muscles.

  16. Atherosclerotic Aneurysm of the Basilar Artery and Hydrocephalus. A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ania Alvarado Borges

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial aneurysms are fairly common. Many of them produce no symptoms, often remaining undiagnosed during life. At autopsy, aneurysms of the basilar artery appear in 2 to 5% of the cases; among them, saccular and congenital aneurysms are more common than atherosclerotic and fusiform aneurysms. A case of atherosclerotic aneurysm of the basilar artery diagnosed at autopsy in an 88-year-old man is presented. This patient had been admitted with a diagnosis of ischemic stroke, intracranial hypertension and hydrocephalus, which led physicians to consider a posterior fossa tumor. This paper aims at presenting the autopsy findings that showed the presence of an atherosclerotic aneurysm of the basilar artery.

  17. Effect of biomaterial properties on bone healing in a rabbit tooth extraction socket model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fisher, J.P.; Lalani, Z.; Bossano, C.M.; Brey, E.M.; Demian, N.; Johnston, C.M.; Dean, D.; Jansen, J.A.; Wong, M.E.; Mikos, A.G.

    2004-01-01

    In this work we sought to understand the effect of biomaterial properties upon healing bone tissue. We hypothesized that a hydrophilic polymer gel implanted into a bone tissue defect would impede the healing process owing to the biomaterial's prevention of protein adsorption and thus cell adhesion.

  18. The Combination of Three Natural Compounds Effectively Prevented Lung Carcinogenesis by Optimal Wound Healing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linxin Liu

    Full Text Available The tumor stroma has been described as "normal wound healing gone awry". We explored whether the restoration of a wound healing-like microenvironment may facilitate tumor healing. Firstly, we screened three natural compounds (shikonin, notoginsenoside R1 and aconitine from wound healing agents and evaluated the efficacies of wound healing microenvironment for limiting single agent-elicited carcinogenesis and two-stage carcinogenesis. The results showed that three compounds used alone could promote wound healing but had unfavorable efficacy to exert wound healing, and that the combination of three compounds made up treatment disadvantage of a single compound in wound healing and led to optimal wound healing. Although individual treatment with these agents may prevent cancer, they were not effective for the treatment of established tumors. However, combination treatment with these three compounds almost completely prevented urethane-induced lung carcinogenesis and reduced tumor burden. Different from previous studies, we found that urethane-induced lung carcinogenesis was associated with lung injury independent of pulmonary inflammation. LPS-induced pulmonary inflammation did not increase lung carcinogenesis, whereas decreased pulmonary inflammation by macrophage depletion promoted lung carcinogenesis. In addition, urethane damaged wound healing in skin excision wound model, reversed lung carcinogenic efficacy by the combination of three compounds was consistent with skin wound healing. Further, the combination of these three agents reduced the number of lung cancer stem cells (CSCs by inducing cell differentiation, restoration of gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC and blockade of the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT. Our results suggest that restoration of a wound healing microenvironment represents an effective strategy for cancer prevention.

  19. Cellular and genetic analysis of wound healing in Drosophila larvae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J Galko

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available To establish a genetic system to study postembryonic wound healing, we characterized epidermal wound healing in Drosophila larvae. Following puncture wounding, larvae begin to bleed but within an hour a plug forms in the wound gap. Over the next couple of hours the outer part of the plug melanizes to form a scab, and epidermal cells surrounding the plug orient toward it and then fuse to form a syncytium. Subsequently, more-peripheral cells orient toward and fuse with the central syncytium. During this time, the Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK pathway is activated in a gradient emanating out from the wound, and the epidermal cells spread along or through the wound plug to reestablish a continuous epithelium and its basal lamina and apical cuticle lining. Inactivation of the JNK pathway inhibits epidermal spreading and reepithelialization but does not affect scab formation or other wound healing responses. Conversely, mutations that block scab formation, and a scabless wounding procedure, provide evidence that the scab stabilizes the wound site but is not required to initiate other wound responses. However, in the absence of a scab, the JNK pathway is hyperinduced, reepithelialization initiates but is not always completed, and a chronic wound ensues. The results demonstrate that the cellular responses of wound healing are under separate genetic control, and that the responses are coordinated by multiple signals emanating from the wound site, including a negative feedback signal between scab formation and the JNK pathway. Cell biological and molecular parallels to vertebrate wound healing lead us to speculate that wound healing is an ancient response that has diversified during evolution.

  20. Activation of sterol regulatory element binding protein and NLRP3 inflammasome in atherosclerotic lesion development in diabetic pigs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Aberrantly elevated sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP, the lipogenic transcription factor, contributes to the development of fatty liver and insulin resistance in animals. Our recent studies have discovered that AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK phosphorylates SREBP at Ser-327 and inhibits its activity, represses SREBP-dependent lipogenesis, and thereby ameliorates hepatic steatosis and atherosclerosis in insulin-resistant LDLR(-/- mice. Chronic inflammation and activation of NLRP3 inflammasome have been implicated in atherosclerosis and fatty liver disease. However, whether SREBP is involved in vascular lipid accumulation and inflammation in atherosclerosis remains largely unknown. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The preclinical study with aortic pouch biopsy specimens from humans with atherosclerosis and diabetes shows intense immunostaining for SREBP-1 and the inflammatory marker VCAM-1 in atherosclerotic plaques. The cleavage processing of SREBP-1 and -2 and expression of their target genes are increased in the well-established porcine model of diabetes and atherosclerosis, which develops human-like, complex atherosclerotic plaques. Immunostaining analysis indicates an elevation in SREBP-1 that is primarily localized in endothelial cells and in infiltrated macrophages within fatty streaks, fibrous caps with necrotic cores, and cholesterol crystals in advanced lesions. Moreover, concomitant suppression of NAD-dependent deacetylase SIRT1 and AMPK is observed in atherosclerotic pigs, which leads to the proteolytic activation of SREBP-1 by diminishing the deacetylation and Ser-372 phosphorylation of SREBP-1. Aberrantly elevated NLRP3 inflammasome markers are evidenced by increased expression of inflammasome components including NLPR3, ASC, and IL-1β. The increase in SREBP-1 activity and IL-1β production in lesions is associated with vascular inflammation and endothelial dysfunction in atherosclerotic pig aorta, as demonstrated

  1. Chinese Food and Cancer Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Xu

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In cancer treatment, apart from studying the effectiveness of chemo or radiotherapy in killing cancer cells, studies should examine ways of reducing drug side effects on patients and ways of enhancing the bodies’ immune system at the same time. Our defence system not only includes immune response, there are also detoxifying enzymes, antioxidant mechanisms, the ability for DNA damage repair and regulation of the hormone metabolism. Harmful environmental oestrogens that enter the human body can cause an increase of 16-α-hydroxyestrone as a harmful estradiol metabolite, the ratio between 16-α-hydroxyestrone and 2-hydroxyestrone relates to the risk of breast cancer. It is suggested that choosing nutritional products (that decrease the amount of 16-α-hydroxyestrone to regulate the hormone metabolism can help with prevention of breast cancer. Increasing the ratio of monounsaturated fatty acid omega-3 (Ω-3 benefits health. Unsaturated fatty acid omega-6 (Ω-6 appears to be easily oxidised which can lead to DNA damage and increase the occurrence of cancer. The most important aspect to this approach is to reduce the ratio between saturated fatty acid and polyunsaturated fatty acid Ω-6, which is harmful to health. Olive oil has a high content of Ω-3 that benefits health. Ω-3 fatty acid can also be obtained from some fish, green vegetables and nuts. Linoleic acid is the most important source of Ω-6 fatty acid. Linolenic acid is the most important source of Ω-3 fatty acid. Natural foods e.g., purslane, is rich in Ω-3; the mustard family vegetables can increase the activity of detoxifying enzymes. Chinese Kiwi fruit drink reduces the side effects of the chemotherapy drug cyclophosphamide, which is also a DNA damaging agent. Soybean, job’s tears, garlic, mushroom varieties and tea have anti-cancer effects. Properly used nutritional products may assist treatment and recovery. Good balanced nutrition is essential for cancer healing.

  2. Regenerative Medicine: Novel Approach in Burn Wound Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zare

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Context Burn wounds of the skin require a long period to healing, which very often is incomplete, with functional and esthetic consequences for the patients. Stem cells in the traumatized tissue represent the promoters of the healing process and are a primary focus for regenerative medicine, which aims to find and use the triggers for the activation of stem cells of sin tissue. Evidence Acquisition At present, tissue engineering, composite epithelial autografts, multipotent stem cells and combined gene delivery with stem cell therapy are the approaches used in regenerative medicine. Alongside, the development of 3D scaffolds or matrices is a promising adjunct, as studies investigate the multiple uses of these supports for wound repair. Results Application of cells to the burn wound could be performed, either by the bedside, as a non-invasive procedure, or in the operating room, with the use of a matrix, scaffold or dermal substitute. Cell spraying, although under use in clinical setting, is not yet supported by conclusive data. Magnetic resonance imaging, optical imaging and positron emission tomography are currently used to assess the viability and location of stem cells, after transplantation. Conclusions Stem cell therapies in wound care may lessen the morbidities associated with wound healing. An ideal method for the effective administration of stem cells for burn patients has not yet been elucidated. Further comparison of the local and systemic effects in burn patients, associated with each route of stem cell delivery, needs to be performed.

  3. P2Y6 receptor potentiates pro-inflammatory responses in macrophages and exhibits differential roles in atherosclerotic lesion development.

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    Ricardo A Garcia

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: P2Y(6, a purinergic receptor for UDP, is enriched in atherosclerotic lesions and is implicated in pro-inflammatory responses of key vascular cell types and macrophages. Evidence for its involvement in atherogenesis, however, has been lacking. Here we use cell-based studies and three murine models of atherogenesis to evaluate the impact of P2Y(6 deficiency on atherosclerosis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Cell-based studies in 1321N1 astrocytoma cells, which lack functional P2Y(6 receptors, showed that exogenous expression of P2Y(6 induces a robust, receptor- and agonist-dependent secretion of inflammatory mediators IL-8, IL-6, MCP-1 and GRO1. P2Y(6-mediated inflammatory responses were also observed, albeit to a lesser extent, in macrophages endogenously expressing P2Y(6 and in acute peritonitis models of inflammation. To evaluate the role of P2Y(6 in atherosclerotic lesion development, we used P2Y(6-deficient mice in three mouse models of atherosclerosis. A 43% reduction in aortic arch plaque was observed in high fat-fed LDLR knockout mice lacking P2Y(6 receptors in bone marrow-derived cells. In contrast, no effect on lesion development was observed in fat-fed whole body P2Y(6xLDLR double knockout mice. Interestingly, in a model of enhanced vascular inflammation using angiotensin II, P2Y(6 deficiency enhanced formation of aneurysms and exhibited a trend towards increased atherosclerosis in the aorta of LDLR knockout mice. CONCLUSIONS: P2Y(6 receptor augments pro-inflammatory responses in macrophages and exhibits a pro-atherogenic role in hematopoietic cells. However, the overall impact of whole body P2Y(6 deficiency on atherosclerosis appears to be modest and could reflect additional roles of P2Y(6 in vascular disease pathophysiologies, such as aneurysm formation.

  4. Revisiting perioperative chemotherapy: the critical importance of targeting residual cancer prior to wound healing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scientists and physicians have long noted similarities between the general behavior of a cancerous tumor and the physiological process of wound healing. But it may be during metastasis that the parallels between cancer and wound healing are most pronounced. And more particularly and for the reasons detailed in this paper, any cancer remaining after the removal of a solid tumor, whether found in micrometastatic deposits in the stroma or within the circulation, may be heavily dependent on wound healing pathways for its further survival and proliferation. If cancer cells can hijack the wound healing process to facilitate their metastatic spread and survival, then the period immediately after surgery may be a particularly vulnerable period of time for the host, as wound healing pathways are activated and amplified after the primary tumor is removed. Given that we often wait 30 days or more after surgical removal of the primary tumor before initiating adjuvant chemotherapy to allow time for the wound to heal, this paper challenges the wisdom of that clinical paradigm, providing a theoretical rationale for administering therapy during the perioperative period. Waiting for wound healing to occur before initiating adjuvant therapies may be seriously compromising their effectiveness, and patients subsequently rendered incurable as a result of this wait. Clinical trials to establish the safety and effectiveness of administering adjuvant therapies perioperatively are needed. These therapies should target not only the residual cancer cells, but also the wound healing pathway utilized by these cells to proliferate and metastasize

  5. Morphological study of atherosclerotic plaque and its application in vulnerability evaluation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The relationships between the morphological characteristics and the vulnerability of atherosclerotic plaque were analyzed theoretically and several suggestions were proposed to evaluate the plaque vulnerability. Validated by animal experiments and clinical studies, the theoretical results were confirmed.

  6. Inhibiting extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer maybe beneficial for diminishing the atherosclerotic plaque instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xie S

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerotic plaque rupture and local thrombosis activation in the artery cause acute serious incidents such as acute coronary syndrome and stroke. The exact mechanism of plaque rupture remains unclear but excessive degradation of the extracellular matrix scaffold by matrix-degrading metalloproteinases (MMPs has been implicated as one of the major molecular mechanisms in this process. Convincing evidence is available to prove that extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN induces MMP expression and is involved in the inflammatory responses in the artery wall. The inflammation and MMPs have been shown to play a critical role for atherosclerotic lesion development and progression. More recent data showed that increased EMMPRIN expression was associated with vulnerable atherosclerotic lesions. Therefore, we speculate that EMMPRIN may be pivotal for atherosclerotic plaque instability, and hence inhibition of EMMPRIN expression could be a promising approach for the prevention or treatment of atheroma instability.

  7. Atherosclerosis and Atheroma Plaque Rupture: Imaging Modalities in the Visualization of Vasa Vasorum and Atherosclerotic Plaques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhonghua Sun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Invasive angiography has been widely accepted as the gold standard to diagnose cardiovascular pathologies. Despite its superior resolution of demonstrating atherosclerotic plaque in terms of degree of lumen stenosis, the morphological assessment for the plaque is insufficient for the analysis of plaque components, and therefore, unable to predict the risk status or vulnerability of atherosclerotic plaque. There is an increased body of evidence to show that the vasa vasorum play an important role in the initiation, progression, and complications of atherosclerotic plaque leading to major adverse cardiac events. This paper provides an overview of the evidence-based reviews of various imaging modalities with regard to their potential value for comprehensive characterization of the composition, burden, and neovascularization of atherosclerotic plaque.

  8. Atherosclerosis and atheroma plaque rupture: imaging modalities in the visualization of vasa vasorum and atherosclerotic plaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhonghua

    2014-01-01

    Invasive angiography has been widely accepted as the gold standard to diagnose cardiovascular pathologies. Despite its superior resolution of demonstrating atherosclerotic plaque in terms of degree of lumen stenosis, the morphological assessment for the plaque is insufficient for the analysis of plaque components, and therefore, unable to predict the risk status or vulnerability of atherosclerotic plaque. There is an increased body of evidence to show that the vasa vasorum play an important role in the initiation, progression, and complications of atherosclerotic plaque leading to major adverse cardiac events. This paper provides an overview of the evidence-based reviews of various imaging modalities with regard to their potential value for comprehensive characterization of the composition, burden, and neovascularization of atherosclerotic plaque. PMID:24688380

  9. Serum Asymmetric Dimethylarginine, and Adiponectin as Predictors of Atherosclerotic Risk among Obese Egyptian Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enas R. Abdel Hameed

    2014-06-01

    CONCLUSIONS: Our results revealed that ADMA, Adiponectin and lipid profile can be considered as predictive biomarkers in prediction and prevention of atherosclerotic risk in the future among overweight and obese Egyptian children.

  10. Plasminogen is a critical regulator of cutaneous wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulniute, Rima; Shen, Yue; Guo, Yong-Zhi; Fallah, Mahsa; Ahlskog, Nina; Ny, Lina; Rakhimova, Olena; Broden, Jessica; Boija, Hege; Moghaddam, Aliyeh; Li, Jinan; Wilczynska, Malgorzata; Ny, Tor

    2016-05-01

    Wound healing is a complicated biological process that consist of partially overlapping inflammatory, proliferation and tissue remodelling phases. A successful wound healing depends on a proper activation and subsequent termination of the inflammatory phase. The failure to terminate the inflammation halts the completion of wound healing and is a known reason for formation of chronic wounds. Previous studies have shown that wound closure is delayed in plasminogen-deficient mice, and a role for plasminogen in dissection of extracellular matrix was suggested. However, our finding that plasminogen is transported to the wound by inflammatory cells early during the healing process, where it potentiates inflammation, indicates that plasminogen may also have other roles in the wound healing process. Here we report that plasminogen-deficient mice have extensive fibrin and neutrophil depositions in the wounded area long after re-epithelialisation, indicating inefficient debridement and chronic inflammation. Delayed formation of granulation tissue suggests that fibroblast function is impaired in the absence of plasminogen. Therefore, in addition to its role in the activation of inflammation, plasminogen is also crucial for subsequent steps, including resolution of inflammation and activation of the proliferation phase. Importantly, supplementation of plasminogen-deficient mice with human plasminogen leads to a restored healing process that is comparable to that in wild-type mice. Besides of being an activator of the inflammatory phase during wound healing, plasminogen is also required for the subsequent termination of inflammation. Based on these results, we propose that plasminogen may be an important future therapeutic agent for wound treatment. PMID:26791370

  11. The role of neuropeptide Y in the pathophysiology of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ping; Sun, Weiwei; Zhang, Chenliang; Song, Zhiyuan; Lin, Shu

    2016-10-01

    With average life expectancy rising greatly, the incidence rate of arteriosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) has significantly increased. The heart disease has now become the number one killer that threatens the global population health, the second is stroke. It will be of great significance to investigate the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms of ASCVD in order to promote effective prevention and treatment. The neuropeptide Y (NPY) has now been discovered for more than thirty years and is widely distributed in the central nervous system (CNS) and peripheral tissues. By combining with certain receptors, NPY performs a variety of physiological functions, including the regulation of food intake, cardiovascular effects, development, hormonal secretion, sexual behavior, biological rhythms, temperature and emotion. In ASCVD, increased peripheral NPY was involved in the pathophysiological process of atherosclerosis through affecting the vascular endothelial dysfunction, the formation of foam cells, the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells, the local inflammatory response of plaques and the activation and aggregation of platelets. Via central and/or the peripheral nervous system, increased NPY was associated with dyslipidemia, hypertension, obesity, diabetes, impaired glucose tolerance, and smoking which are all risk factors for ASCVD. In this review, we summarize the role of neuropeptide Y in the development of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. PMID:27389447

  12. Oxidized low-density lipoproteins may induce expression of monocyte chemotactic protein-3 in atherosclerotic plaques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genes induced or suppressed by oxidized low-density lipoproteins (oxLDL) in human monocytic THP-1 cells were searched using the differential display reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. One of the differentially expressed (up-regulated) cDNA fragments was found to contain sequences corresponding to monocyte chemotactic protein-3 (MCP-3). The stimulatory effect of the oxLDL on the expression of MCP-3 mRNA was both time- and dose-dependent. Treatment with GF109203X and genistein, inhibitors of protein kinase C and tyrosine kinase, respectively, had no effect on the induction of MCP-3 mRNA by oxLDL, while treatment with cycloheximide inhibited the induction. The induction was reproduced by the lipid components in oxLDL such as 9-HODE and 13-HODE, which are known to activate the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ). Introduction of an endogenous PPARγ ligand, 15d-PGJ2, in the culture of THP-1 cells resulted in the induction of MCP-3 gene expression. Furthermore, analyses of human atherosclerotic plaques revealed that the expressional pattern of MCP-3 in the regions of neointimal and necrotic core overlapped with that of PPARγ. These results suggest that oxLDL delivers its signal for MCP-3 expression via PPARγ, which may be further related to the atherogenesis

  13. Human macrophage scavenger receptors: Primary structure, expression, and localization in atherosclerotic lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two types of cDNAs for human macrophage scavenger receptors were cloned from a cDNA library derived from the phorbol ester-treated human monocytic cell line THP-1. The type I and type II human scavenger receptors encoded by these cDNAs are homologous (73% and 71% amino acid identity) to their previously characterized bovine counterparts and consist of six domains: cytoplasmic (I), membrane-spanning (II), spacer (III), α-helical coiled-coil (IV), collagen-like (V), and a type-specific C-terminal (VI). The receptor gene is located on human chromosome 8. The human receptors expressed in CHO-K1 cells mediated endocytosis of modified low density lipoproteins. Two mRNAs, 4.0 and 3.2 kilobases, have been detected in human liver, placenta, and brain. Immunohistochemical studies using an anti-peptide antibody which recognizes human scavenger receptors indicated the presence of the scavenger receptors in the macrophages of lipid-rich atherosclerotic lesions, suggesting the involvement of scavenger receptors in atherogenesis

  14. Modeling self-healing materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna C. Balazs

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available We describe recent computational studies to design such systems as ‘artificial leukocytes’ that facilitate the healing of damaged substrates, polymer nanocomposites where nanoparticles are driven to fill cracks in fractured surfaces, and polymer gels that effectively act as a ‘skin’ by signaling mechanical impact. Computational research into self-healing materials is still in its infancy. However, progress in this field can ultimately facilitate the fabrication of the next generation of adaptive materials that both monitor their structural integrity and mend themselves before any catastrophic failure can occur.

  15. Self healing of defected graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For electronics applications, defects in graphene are usually undesirable because of their ability to scatter charge carriers, thereby reduce the carrier mobility. It would be extremely useful if the damage can be repaired. In this work, we employ Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and electrical measurements to study defects in graphene introduced by argon plasma bombardment. We have found that majority of these defects can be cured by a simple thermal annealing process. The self-healing is attributed to recombination of mobile carbon adatoms with vacancies. With increasing level of plasma induced damage, the self-healing becomes less effective.

  16. Toward a theology of healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studer, J N

    1982-12-01

    A sense of magic has always permeated our theology of healing. Consider the following theses: 1. By the very nature of material creation, however mysteriously it was initiated and is sustained, the power of God to influence material creation is restricted to the immanent (from within) and indirect; 2. God does not arbitrarily, in the case of two persons who have "identical" illnesses, decide the recovery of one and the death of the other. Rather, his love bears equally on all. This study will defend these theses and show that they are foundational and integral, to a theology of primarily physical healing. PMID:24310077

  17. Symptomatic intracranial vertebral artery atherosclerotic stenosis (≥70%) with concurrent contralateral vertebral atherosclerotic diseases in 88 patients treated with the intracranial stenting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zi-Liang [Stroke Center, Henan Provincial People’s Hospital, Zhengzhou University (China); Gao, Bu-Lang [Department of Medical Research Shijiazhuang First Hospital, Hebei Medical University (China); Li, Tian-Xiao, E-mail: litianxiaod@163.com [Stroke Center, Henan Provincial People’s Hospital, Zhengzhou University (China); Cai, Dong-Yang; Zhu, Liang-Fu; Bai, Wei-Xing; Xue, Jiang-Yu; Li, Zhao-Shuo [Stroke Center, Henan Provincial People’s Hospital, Zhengzhou University (China)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Symptomatic vertebral artery stenosis can be treated with intracranial stenting. • Stenting for intracranial vertebral artery stenosis is safe and effective. • Stenting for intracranial vertebral artery stenosis can prevent long-term stroke. - Abstract: Purpose: To investigate the safety, effect and instent restenosis rate of Wingspan stenting in treating patients with intracranial vertebral artery atherosclerotic stenosis (70–99%) concurrent with contralateral vertebral artery atherosclerotic diseases. Materials and methods: Eighty-eight patients with severe symptomatic intracranial vertebral artery atherosclerotic stenosis (≥70%) combined with contralateral vertebral artery atherosclerotic diseases were treated with the Wingpsan stent. All the baseline, cerebral angiography, success rate, perioperative complications, clinical and imaging follow-up data were prospectively analyzed. Results: The success rate of stenting was 100%, and the mean stenotic rate was reduced from prestenting (84.9 ± 6.8)% to poststenting (17.2 ± 5.9)%. The perioperative stroke rate was 1.1%. Among eighty patients (90.9%) with clinical follow-up 8-62 months (mean 29.3 ± 17.2) poststenting, five (6.3%) had posterior circulation TIA only, three (3.8%) had mild stroke in the posterior circulation but recovered completely, and another five patients greater than 70 years old died of non-ischemic stroke. Imaging follow-up in 46 patients (52.3%) 5–54 months (mean 9.9 ± 9.9) following stenting revealed instent restenosis in 12 patients (26.1%) including 7 (58.3%) symptomatic restenosis. Age and residual stenosis were the two factors to significantly (P < 0.05) affect instent restenosis. Conclusion: Wingspan stenting in the intracranial vertebral artery atherosclerotic stenosis combined with contralateral vertebral artery atherosclerotic diseases has a low perioperative stroke rate and a good preventive effect on long-term ischemic stroke, but the instent restenosis

  18. Symptomatic intracranial vertebral artery atherosclerotic stenosis (≥70%) with concurrent contralateral vertebral atherosclerotic diseases in 88 patients treated with the intracranial stenting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Symptomatic vertebral artery stenosis can be treated with intracranial stenting. • Stenting for intracranial vertebral artery stenosis is safe and effective. • Stenting for intracranial vertebral artery stenosis can prevent long-term stroke. - Abstract: Purpose: To investigate the safety, effect and instent restenosis rate of Wingspan stenting in treating patients with intracranial vertebral artery atherosclerotic stenosis (70–99%) concurrent with contralateral vertebral artery atherosclerotic diseases. Materials and methods: Eighty-eight patients with severe symptomatic intracranial vertebral artery atherosclerotic stenosis (≥70%) combined with contralateral vertebral artery atherosclerotic diseases were treated with the Wingpsan stent. All the baseline, cerebral angiography, success rate, perioperative complications, clinical and imaging follow-up data were prospectively analyzed. Results: The success rate of stenting was 100%, and the mean stenotic rate was reduced from prestenting (84.9 ± 6.8)% to poststenting (17.2 ± 5.9)%. The perioperative stroke rate was 1.1%. Among eighty patients (90.9%) with clinical follow-up 8-62 months (mean 29.3 ± 17.2) poststenting, five (6.3%) had posterior circulation TIA only, three (3.8%) had mild stroke in the posterior circulation but recovered completely, and another five patients greater than 70 years old died of non-ischemic stroke. Imaging follow-up in 46 patients (52.3%) 5–54 months (mean 9.9 ± 9.9) following stenting revealed instent restenosis in 12 patients (26.1%) including 7 (58.3%) symptomatic restenosis. Age and residual stenosis were the two factors to significantly (P < 0.05) affect instent restenosis. Conclusion: Wingspan stenting in the intracranial vertebral artery atherosclerotic stenosis combined with contralateral vertebral artery atherosclerotic diseases has a low perioperative stroke rate and a good preventive effect on long-term ischemic stroke, but the instent restenosis

  19. Atherosclerotic plaque component segmentation in combined carotid MRI and CTA data incorporating class label uncertainty

    OpenAIRE

    Engelen, Arna; Niessen, Wiro; Klein, Stefan; Groen, Harald; Verhagen, Hence; Wentzel, Jolanda; van der Lugt, Aad; de Bruijne, Marleen

    2014-01-01

    textabstractAtherosclerotic plaque composition can indicate plaque vulnerability. We segment atherosclerotic plaque components from the carotid artery on a combination of in vivo MRI and CT-angiography (CTA) data using supervised voxelwise classification. In contrast to previous studies the ground truth for training is directly obtained from 3D registration with histology for fibrous and lipid-rich necrotic tissue, and with μCT for calcification. This registration does, however, not provide a...

  20. Atherosclerotic Plaque Component Segmentation in Combined Carotid MRI and CTA Data Incorporating Class Label Uncertainty

    OpenAIRE

    van Engelen, A.; Niessen, W.J.; Klein, S.; Groen, H. C.; Verhagen, H. J. M.; Wentzel, J.J.; van der Lugt, A.; De Bruijne, M.

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerotic plaque composition can indicate plaque vulnerability. We segment atherosclerotic plaque components from the carotid artery on a combination of in vivo MRI and CT-angiography (CTA) data using supervised voxelwise classification. In contrast to previous studies the ground truth for training is directly obtained from 3D registration with histology for fibrous and lipid-rich necrotic tissue, and with CT for calcification. This registration does, however, not provide accurate voxel...

  1. Atherosclerotic plaque component segmentation in combined carotid MRI and CTA data incorporating class label uncertainty

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerotic plaque composition can indicate plaque vulnerability. We segment atherosclerotic plaque components from the carotid artery on a combination of in vivo MRI and CT-angiography (CTA) data using supervised voxelwise classification. In contrast to previous studies the ground truth for training is directly obtained from 3D registration with histology for fibrous and lipid-rich necrotic tissue, and with [Formula: see text]CT for calcification. This registration does, however, not pro...

  2. Increased ADRP expression in human atherosclerotic lesions correlates with plaque instability

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Bin; Zhao, Huiying; Wang, Shengnan; Sun, Xiwei; Qin, Xiujiao

    2015-01-01

    Adipose differentiation-related protein (ADRP) is intrinsically associated with the surface of lipid droplets implicated in the development of atherosclerosis. We analyzed expression of ADRP in human popliteal artery plaques. Atherosclerotic plaque tissue from the popliteal artery was obtained from 18 patients undergoing lower extremity amputation for arteriosclerosis obliterans, and with either stable (n = 6) or unstable (n = 12) atherosclerotic plaques. Plaques were histologically classifie...

  3. Effect of atorvastatin therapy on oxidant-antioxidant status and atherosclerotic plaque formation

    OpenAIRE

    Sezer ED; Sozmen EY; Nart D; Onat T

    2011-01-01

    Ebru Demirel Sezer1, Eser Yildirim Sozmen1, Deniz Nart2, Taner Onat11Medical Biochemistry, 2Pathology Department, Ege University School of Medicine, Izmir, TurkeyBackground: The aim of this study was to determine the oxidant–antioxidant status and lipid peroxidation products, as well as paraoxonase and atherosclerotic plaque formation, in a hypercholesterolemic atherosclerosis rabbit model to investigate the effects of atorvastatin in the atherosclerotic process.Methods: Forty male ...

  4. In-vivo Attenuation and Equivalent Scatterer size parameters for Atherosclerotic Carotid Plaque: Preliminary Results

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Hairong; Varghese, Tomy; Mitchell, Carol C; McCormick, Matthew; Dempsey, Robert J; Kliewer, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    We have previously reported on the equivalent scatterer size, attenuation coefficient, and axial strain properties of atherosclerotic plaque ex-vivo. Since plaque structure and composition may be damaged during a carotid endarterectomy procedure, characterization of in-vivo properties of atherosclerotic plaque is essential. The relatively shallow depth of the carotid artery and plaque enables non-invasive evaluation of carotid plaque utilizing high frequency linear array transducers. We inves...

  5. Atherosclerosis and Atheroma Plaque Rupture: Imaging Modalities in the Visualization of Vasa Vasorum and Atherosclerotic Plaques

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Invasive angiography has been widely accepted as the gold standard to diagnose cardiovascular pathologies. Despite its superior resolution of demonstrating atherosclerotic plaque in terms of degree of lumen stenosis, the morphological assessment for the plaque is insufficient for the analysis of plaque components, and therefore, unable to predict the risk status or vulnerability of atherosclerotic plaque. There is an increased body of evidence to show that the vasa vasorum play an important r...

  6. Effects of Mechanical Properties and Atherosclerotic Artery Size on Biomechanical Plaque Disruption - Mouse versus Human

    OpenAIRE

    Riou, Laurent M.; Broisat, Alexis; Ghezzi, Catherine; Finet, Gérard; Rioufol, Gilles; Gharib, Ahmed M.; Pettigrew, Roderic I.; Ohayon, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    Mouse models of atherosclerosis are extensively being used to study the mechanisms of atherosclerotic plaque development and the results are frequently extrapolated to humans. However, major differences have been described between murine and human atherosclerotic lesions and the determination of similarities and differences between these species has been largely addressed recently. This study takes over and extends previous studies performed by our group and related to the biomechanical chara...

  7. Cellular Imaging of Human Atherosclerotic Lesions by Intravascular Electric Impedance Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Streitner, Ines; Goldhofer, Markus; Cho, Sungbo; Kinscherf, Ralf; Thielecke, Hagen; Borggrefe, Martin; Süselbeck, Tim; Streitner, Florian

    2012-01-01

    Background Newer techniques are required to identify atherosclerotic lesions that are prone to rupture. Electric impedance spectroscopy (EIS) is able to provide information about the cellular composition of biological tissue. The present study was performed to determine the influence of inflammatory processes in type Va (lipid core, thick fibrous cap) and Vc (abundant fibrous connective tissue while lipid is minimal or even absent) human atherosclerotic lesions on the electrical impedance of ...

  8. Platelet activation and platelet-monocyte aggregate formation by the atherosclerotic plaque lipid lysophosphatidic acid

    OpenAIRE

    Haserück, Nadine

    2007-01-01

    Oxidized LDL and platelets play a central role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and ischemic cardiovascular diseases. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a thrombogenic substance that accumulates in mildly-oxidized LDL and in human atherosclerotic lesions, and is responsible for the initial platelet activation, shape change, induced by mildly-oxidized LDL and extracts of lipid-rich atherosclerotic plaques (Siess et al., 1999 Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 1999). LPA directly induced platelet shape c...

  9. Resolution of apoptosis in atherosclerotic plaque by dietary modification and statin therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Hartung, D; Sarai, M; Petrov, A.; Kolodgie, F; Narula, N.; Verjans, J.; Virmani, R; Reutelingsperger, C; Hofstra, L; Narula, J

    2005-01-01

    Although apoptosis within atherosclerotic plaques is associated with plaque vulnerability and rupture, the role of inhibition of the apoptotic process is not clear. We evaluated the impact of dietary modification and statin therapy (measures known to favorably influence outcomes in coronary disease) on the incidence of apoptosis in experimental atherosclerotic lesions. Methods: A total of 30 animals were studied; 1 group of 6 animals served as the controls (group 1), and the remaining 24 anim...

  10. Shedding Light on a New Treatment for Diabetic Wound Healing: A Review on Phototherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolette N. Houreld

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Impaired wound healing is a common complication associated with diabetes with complex pathophysiological underlying mechanisms and often necessitates amputation. With the advancement in laser technology, irradiation of these wounds with low-intensity laser irradiation (LILI or phototherapy, has shown a vast improvement in wound healing. At the correct laser parameters, LILI has shown to increase migration, viability, and proliferation of diabetic cells in vitro; there is a stimulatory effect on the mitochondria with a resulting increase in adenosine triphosphate (ATP. In addition, LILI also has an anti-inflammatory and protective effect on these cells. In light of the ever present threat of diabetic foot ulcers, infection, and amputation, new improved therapies and the fortification of wound healing research deserves better prioritization. In this review we look at the complications associated with diabetic wound healing and the effect of laser irradiation both in vitro and in vivo in diabetic wound healing.

  11. Congenital self-healing reticulohistiocytosis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shricharith Shetty

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Congenital self-healing reticulohistiocytosis (CSHRH is a benign type of Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH also known as Hashimoto-Pritzker disease. Clinically it presents with skin lesions at birth or in neonatal period, usually without any systemic involvement. Lesions often heal spontaneously in period of weeks to months. We report a case of CSHRH presenting with skin lesions at birth, describing need to make an early diagnosis and to have a multidisciplinary approach with regular follow-up, in managing this rare type of LCH.

  12. Abnormal pigmentation within cutaneous scars: A complication of wound healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Chadwick

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abnormally pigmented scars are an undesirable consequence of cutaneous wound healing and are a complication every single individual worldwide is at risk of. They present a challenge for clinicians, as there are currently no definitive treatment options available, and render scars much more noticeable making them highly distressing for patients. Despite extensive research into both wound healing and the pigment cell, there remains a scarcity of knowledge surrounding the repigmentation of cutaneous scars. Pigment production is complex and under the control of many extrinsic and intrinsic factors and patterns of scar repigmentation are unpredictable. This article gives an overview of human skin pigmentation, repigmentation following wounding and current treatment options.

  13. Fluid-phase pinocytosis of LDL by macrophages: a novel target to reduce macrophage cholesterol accumulation in atherosclerotic lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruth, Howar S

    2013-01-01

    Circulating low-density lipoprotein (LDL) that enters the blood vessel wall is the main source of cholesterol that accumulates within atherosclerotic plaques. Much of the deposited cholesterol accumulates within plaque macrophages converting these macrophages into cholesterol-rich foamy looking cells. Cholesterol accumulation in macrophages contributes to cholesterol retention within the vessel wall, and promotes vessel wall inflammation and thrombogenicity. Thus, how macrophages accumulate cholesterol and become foam cells has been the subject of intense investigation. It is generally believed that macrophages accumulate cholesterol only through scavenger receptor-mediated uptake of modified LDL. However, an alternative mechanism for macrophage foam cell formation that does not depend on LDL modification or macrophage receptors has been elucidated. By this alternative mechanism, macrophages show receptor-independent uptake of unmodified native LDL that is mediated by fluid-phase pinocytosis. In receptor-independent, fluid-phase pinocytosis, macrophages take up LDL as part of the fluid that they ingest during micropinocytosis within small vesicles called micropinosomes, and by macropinocytosis within larger vacuoles called macropinosomes. This produces cholesterol accumulation in macrophages to levels characteristic of macrophage foam cells in atherosclerotic plaques. Fluid-phase pinocytosis of LDL is a plausible mechanism that can explain how macrophages accumulate cholesterol and become disease-causing foam cells. Fluid-phase pinocytosis of LDL is a relevant pathway to target for modulating macrophage cholesterol accumulation in atherosclerosis. Recent studies show that phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), liver X receptors (LXRs), the macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) receptor, and protein kinase C (PKC) mediate macrophage macropinocytosis of LDL, and thus, these may be relevant targets to inhibit macrophage cholesterol accumulation in atherosclerosis

  14. Magnetic characterization of human blood in the atherosclerotic process in coronary arteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janus, B. [Institute of Environmental Engineering PAS, ul. SkLodowskiej-Curie 34, 41-819 Zabrze (Poland); Bucko, M.S., E-mail: michal.bucko@helsinki.f [Institute of Environmental Engineering PAS, ul. SkLodowskiej-Curie 34, 41-819 Zabrze (Poland); Division of Geophysics and Astronomy, P.O. Box 64, Gustaf Haellstroemin katu 2, 00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); Chrobak, A. [University of Silesia, Institute of Physics, ul. Uniwersytecka 4, 40-007 Katowice (Poland); Wasilewski, J. [3rd Chair and Clinical Ward of Cardiology, Medical University of Silesia, Katowice, Silesian Centre of Heart Diseases, ul. Szpitalna 2, 41-800 Zabrze (Poland); Zych, M. [Department of Pharmacognosy and Phytochemistry, Medical University of Silesia, ul. Jagiellonska 4, 41-200 Sosnowiec (Poland)

    2011-03-15

    In the last decades there has been an increasing interest in biomagnetism-a field of biophysics concerned with the magnetic properties of living organisms. Biomagnetism focuses on the measurement of magnetic properties of biological samples in the clinical environment. Progress in this field can provide new data for the understanding of the pathomechanism of atherosclerosis and support the diagnostic options for the evaluation and treatment of atherothrombotic complications. Lyophilized human blood samples from patients with atherosclerotic lesions (calcium scoring (CS) CS>0) and without atherosclerotic lesions (CS=0) were magnetically investigated. Magnetic measurements (performed in room and low temperature) indicated significant magnetic differences between these two groups of patients. Atherosclerotic blood samples are characterized by higher concentration of ferrimagnetic particles (magnetite and/or maghemite) and significant changes in the superparamagnetic behaviour. This research presents that magnetometry, in combination with medical research can lead to a better understanding of iron physiology in the atherosclerotic process. - Research Highlights: {yields}Blood samples are characterized by higher concentration of ferrimagnetic particles. {yields}Atherosclerotic blood samples consist of larger superparamagnetic clusters. {yields}Superparamagnetic particles in pathological samples are considered to be magnetite. {yields}The formation of ferrimagnetic particles is favoured in the atherosclerotic patients. {yields}Magnetite may play a role in the progression of atherosclerosis.

  15. Self-healing epoxy composites: preparation, characterization and healing performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reaz A. Chowdhury

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Low velocity impact damage is common in fiber reinforced composites, which leads to micro-crack and interfacial debonding, where damage is microscopic and invisible. The concept of self-healing composites can be a way of overcoming this limitation and extending the life expectancy while expanding their usage in structural applications. In the current study, extrinsic self-healing concept was adopted using urea-formaldehyde microcapsules containing room temperature curing epoxy resin system (SC-15 as the healing agent prepared by in situ polymerization. Microcapsules were characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR for structural analysis. Size and shape of microcapsules were studied using optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Size of the microcapsules was between 30 and 100 μm. Thermal characterization was carried out using thermogravimetric analysis. Microcapsules were thermally stable till 210 °C without any significant decomposition. Fiber reinforced composite fabrication was carried out in three different steps. In the first step, epoxy resin was encapsulated in urea-formaldehyde shell material, which was confirmed by FTIR analysis. In the next step, encapsulation of amine hardener was achieved by vacuum infiltration method. These two different microcapsules were added with epoxy at 10:3 ratio and composite fabrication was done with hand layup method. Finally, healing performance was measured in terms of low velocity impact test and thermoscopy analysis. Low velocity impact test with 30 J and 45 J impact loads confirmed the delamination and micro-crack in composite materials and subsequent healing recovery observed in terms of damaged area reduction and restoration of mechanical properties.

  16. Self Healing Coating/Film Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summerfield, Burton; Thompson, Karen; Zeitlin, Nancy; Mullenix, Pamela; Calle, Luz; Williams, Martha

    2015-01-01

    Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has been developing self healing materials and technologies. This project seeks to further develop self healing functionality in thin films for applications such as corrosion protective coatings, inflatable structures, space suit materials, and electrical wire insulation.

  17. Childhood Asthma: A Chance to HEAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Special Section Childhood Asthma: A Chance to HEAL Past Issues / Fall ... HEAL is seeking ways to reduce the nation's childhood asthma challenge. Even before Hurricane Katrina swept through ...

  18. Involvement of the endocannabinoid system in periodontal healing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozono, Sayaka [Department of Periodontology, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8520 (Japan); Matsuyama, Takashi, E-mail: takashi@dent.kagoshima-u.ac.jp [Department of Periodontology, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8520 (Japan); Biwasa, Kamal Krishna [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Rajshahi University, Rajshahi 6205 (Bangladesh); Kawahara, Ko-ichi [Department of Laboratory and Vascular Medicine, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8520 (Japan); Nakajima, Yumiko; Yoshimoto, Takehiko; Yonamine, Yutaka; Kadomatsu, Hideshi [Department of Periodontology, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8520 (Japan); Tancharoen, Salunya [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Dentistry, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Hashiguchi, Teruto [Department of Laboratory and Vascular Medicine, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8520 (Japan); Noguchi, Kazuyuki [Department of Periodontology, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8520 (Japan); Maruyama, Ikuro [Department of Laboratory and Vascular Medicine, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8520 (Japan)

    2010-04-16

    Endocannabinoids including anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) are important lipid mediators for immunosuppressive effects and for appropriate homeostasis via their G-protein-coupled cannabinoid (CB) receptors in mammalian organs and tissues, and may be involved in wound healing in some organs. The physiological roles of endocannabinoids in periodontal healing remain unknown. We observed upregulation of the expression of CB1/CB2 receptors localized on fibroblasts and macrophage-like cells in granulation tissue during wound healing in a wound-healing model in rats, as well as an increase in AEA levels in gingival crevicular fluid after periodontal surgery in human patients with periodontitis. In-vitro, the proliferation of human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) by AEA was significantly attenuated by AM251 and AM630, which are selective antagonists of CB1 and CB2, respectively. CP55940 (CB1/CB2 agonist) induced phosphorylation of the extracellular-regulated kinases (ERK) 1/2, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38MAPK), and Akt in HGFs. Wound closure by CP55940 in an in-vitro scratch assay was significantly suppressed by inhibitors of MAP kinase kinase (MEK), p38MAPK, and phosphoinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K). These findings suggest that endocannabinoid system may have an important role in periodontal healing.

  19. Involvement of the endocannabinoid system in periodontal healing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endocannabinoids including anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) are important lipid mediators for immunosuppressive effects and for appropriate homeostasis via their G-protein-coupled cannabinoid (CB) receptors in mammalian organs and tissues, and may be involved in wound healing in some organs. The physiological roles of endocannabinoids in periodontal healing remain unknown. We observed upregulation of the expression of CB1/CB2 receptors localized on fibroblasts and macrophage-like cells in granulation tissue during wound healing in a wound-healing model in rats, as well as an increase in AEA levels in gingival crevicular fluid after periodontal surgery in human patients with periodontitis. In-vitro, the proliferation of human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) by AEA was significantly attenuated by AM251 and AM630, which are selective antagonists of CB1 and CB2, respectively. CP55940 (CB1/CB2 agonist) induced phosphorylation of the extracellular-regulated kinases (ERK) 1/2, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38MAPK), and Akt in HGFs. Wound closure by CP55940 in an in-vitro scratch assay was significantly suppressed by inhibitors of MAP kinase kinase (MEK), p38MAPK, and phosphoinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K). These findings suggest that endocannabinoid system may have an important role in periodontal healing.

  20. The use of healing touch in integrative oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Laura K; Freel, Mildred I; Haylock, Pam J; Lutgendorf, Susan K

    2011-10-01

    The use of complementary therapies by patients with cancer has become increasingly prevalent; as a result, oncology nurses find themselves needing to understand those therapies and the evidence-based support for their use. This article describes the integrative use of the biofield therapy healing touch in conjunction with the chemoradiation received by patients with cervical cancer (stages IB1 to IVA) as reported in a 2010 research study. Findings indicated effects on the immune response and depression in healing touch recipients compared to patients receiving relaxation or standard care. Specifically, healing touch recipients demonstrated a minimal decrease in natural killer cell cytotoxicity over the course of treatment, whereas the cytotoxicity of patients receiving relaxation therapy and standard care declined sharply during radiation. Healing touch recipients also showed decreases in depressed mood compared to relaxation therapy and standard care recipients. The findings suggest that appropriate integration of complementary modalities into oncology care can enhance the impact of conventional care by putting patients in the best condition to use their innate healing resources. PMID:21951738

  1. New Guar Biopolymer Silver Nanocomposites for Wound Healing Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Runa Ghosh Auddy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Wound healing is an innate physiological response that helps restore cellular and anatomic continuity of a tissue. Selective biodegradable and biocompatible polymer materials have provided useful scaffolds for wound healing and assisted cellular messaging. In the present study, guar gum, a polymeric galactomannan, was intrinsically modified to a new cationic biopolymer guar gum alkylamine (GGAA for wound healing applications. Biologically synthesized silver nanoparticles (Agnp were further impregnated in GGAA for extended evaluations in punch wound models in rodents. SEM studies showed silver nanoparticles well dispersed in the new guar matrix with a particle size of ~18 nm. In wound healing experiments, faster healing and improved cosmetic appearance were observed in the new nanobiomaterial treated group compared to commercially available silver alginate cream. The total protein, DNA, and hydroxyproline contents of the wound tissues were also significantly higher in the treated group as compared with the silver alginate cream (P<0.05. Silver nanoparticles exerted positive effects because of their antimicrobial properties. The nanobiomaterial was observed to promote wound closure by inducing proliferation and migration of the keratinocytes at the wound site. The derivatized guar gum matrix additionally provided a hydrated surface necessary for cell proliferation.

  2. Crosstalk between platelets and PBMC: New evidence in wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nami, Niccolò; Feci, Luca; Napoliello, Luca; Giordano, Antonio; Lorenzini, Sauro; Galeazzi, Mauro; Rubegni, Pietro; Fimiani, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Platelet-derived products have proven useful in accelerating healing processes and tissue regeneration. However, despite their widespread use in clinical practice, the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved have not yet been completely clarified. Recent studies show that interaction between platelet gel (PG) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) can result in activation of PBMC and production of several cytokines involved in wound healing and tissue repair. The aim of our study was to analyze whether crosstalk between platelets and PBMC can influence wound healing by modulating release of VEGF, bFGF and IL-10 by PBMC. Cultures of PBMC alone and co-cultures with autologous PG of 24 healthy volunteers were incubated under normoxia for 24 h. VEGF, bFGF and IL-10 concentration and expression were then analyzed in supernatants by ELISA and by real-time RT-PCR. We observed a down-regulation of VEGF and bFGF release and an up-regulation of IL-10 release in co-cultures of PBMC and PG. Platelets are not only important in the early stages of the healing process (clot formation, direct release of growth factors), but also can influence the whole process of tissue regeneration by modulating synthesis and release of VEGF, bFGF and IL-10 by PBMC. These effects could give platelets a new key role in the control of healing processes and provide insights into the clinical success of platelet-derived products in many medical fields. PMID:26030799

  3. The effects of Ankaferd, a hemostatic agent, on wound healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevgi Özbaysar Sezgin

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: There have been a lot of topical and systemic agents to provide an ideal scar formation and to decrease the periods of wound healing process by affecting the factors of healing (inflammatory cells, thrombocytes, extracellular matrix etc.. In this study, we investigated the effects of Ankaferd on wound healing. Materials and Methods: Wounds were created with 8 mm punch biopsy knots on the back of 32 rats which were separated into 4 groups of 9 rats. No treatment was done in group D which was the control group while group A received topical Ankaferd treatment twice a day; group B treated with silver sulfadiazine twice a day, and group C put on base cream, which did not include any active agent, twice a day. The rats were followed for 15 days macroscopically and examined histopathologically on days 0., 3., 7., and 15. by taking biopsy specimens. Result: At the end of our study, it was detected that Ankaferd accelerated the healing process in comparison to control and base cream groups according to the macroscopic and histopathologic results. Additionally, similar to this situation, it was observed that the healing process in silver sulfadiazine group was faster than in control and base cream groups. Conclusion: More experimental and clinical studies in larger populations are needed to prove and confirm its efficacy.

  4. Congenital self-healing reticulohistiocytosis - an important diagnostic challenge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Marie Louise Slott; Bygum, Anette; Clemmensen, Ole; Fenger-Gron, Jesper

    2011-01-01

    Aim:  To present current and new knowledge on congenital self-healing reticulohistiocytosis, a benign variant of cutaneous Langerhans cell histiocytosis presenting with skin lesions in the neonatal period. Methods:  We describe and photo document two cases of this rare disease and review the...... literature. Results:  Only few newborns have acute access to a neonatal dermatologist and we demonstrate how the spontaneous cutaneous involution may happen even prior to the first dermatological assessment. As no sole criterion can reliably distinguish the self-healing form from disseminated disease......, multidisciplinary assessment and follow up are essential. Conclusion:  Our data document how easily the diagnosis congenital self-healing reticulocytosis may be missed and emphasize the importance and value of instant clinical photographing at the neonatal unit and the use of teledermatology whenever congenital...

  5. Immune and vascular dysfunction in diabetic wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, A S; Antonsen, E L

    2016-07-01

    The diminished capacity for wound healing in patients with diabetes contributes to morbidity through ulceration and recurrent infections, loss of function and decreased workplace productivity, increased hospitalisation rates, and rising health-care costs. These are due to diabetes' effects on signalling molecules, cellular cascades, different cell populations, and the vasculature. The function of multiple immune system components including cellular response, blood factors, and vascular tone are all negatively impacted by diabetes. The purpose of this paper is to review the current understanding of immune and vascular dysfunction contributing to impaired wound healing mechanisms in the diabetic population. Normal wound healing mechanisms are reviewed followed by diabetic aberrations to immune and inflammatory function and atherogenesis and angiopathy. PMID:27410470

  6. The Effect of Nitric Oxide Donor in Diabetic Wound Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Dashti

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes is characterized by a nitric oxide deficiency at the wound site. Diabetes is a factor that influences all stages of wound healing. In animals with acute experimental diabetes induced by streptozotocin (STZ, the early inflammatory responses after wounding is impaired, fibroblast and endothelial cell proliferation is reduced as well as accumulation of reparative collagen and gain in wound breaking strenght. This study investigated whether exogenous nitric oxide supplimentation with nitric oxide donor DETA NONOate could reverse impaired healing in diabetes. The results suggest nitric oxide donor DETA NONOate can reverse impaired healing associated with diabetes (P<0.001 and urinary nitrate (NO-3 output may reflect the extent of repair in this wound model (P<0.001.

  7. Assessment of atherosclerotic plaque vulnerability of coronary arteries in cases of sudden cardiac death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To study the plaque vulnerability in coronary arteries taken from autopsy specimens, of individuals dying of ischemic heart disease in our setup and to compare it with atheroma of those who died of non-cardiac causes. Sixty coronary arteries having atherosclerosis, from autopsies of patients who died of sudden cardiac death were divided into case and control groups. Case group included thirty coronary arteries having atherosclerosis from autopsies of patients of whose death was attributable to Ischemic Heart Disease (IHD). Control group included thirty coronary arteries where atherosclerotic changes were found by chance (death not attributable to ischemic heart disease). Plaques were assessed for fibrous cap thickness, foam cells; mean percentage of inflammatory cells on Haemotoxylin and Eosin (H and E) stained slides whereas immunohistochemical (IHC) markers for T-Cells were done by IHC stain method. In present study, foam cells are significantly more in study group than in control group (P=0.007). Fibrous cap thickness fulfilling the criteria of vulnerable plaque was more in study group as compared to control group (P<0.001). The present study demonstrated that there was insignificant difference (P=0.152), in the mean percentage of inflammatory cells in case group and control group. An overall significant association was found between vulnerable plaque and death due to ischemic heart disease (P<0.001). Conclusion: Patients dying of ischemic heart disease have more vulnerable plaque in their coronary arteries as compared to those dying from non ischemic cause. Although this is an autopsy study but the significance of in this study can be very important to guide cardiologists to identify patients at high risk of acute coronary syndrome and use new diagnostic modalities like intravascular ultrasonography and therapeutic strategies like genomic and proteomic techniques. This will help the early detection and treatment of such cases and may ultimately reduce the

  8. Chemokine Regulation of Angiogenesis During Wound Healing

    OpenAIRE

    Bodnar, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Angiogenesis plays a critical role in wound healing. A defect in the formation of a neovasculature induces ulcer formation. One of the challenges faced by the clinician when devising strategies to promote healing of chronic wounds is the initiation of angiogenesis and the formation of a stable vasculature to support tissue regeneration. Understanding the molecular factors regulating angiogenesis during wound healing will lead to better therapies for healing chronic wounds.

  9. Global gene expression profiling displays a network of dysregulated genes in non-atherosclerotic arterial tissue from patients with type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skov Vibe

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Generalized arterial alterations, such as endothelial dysfunction, medial matrix accumulations, and calcifications are associated with type 2 diabetes (T2D. These changes may render the vessel wall more susceptible to injury; however, the molecular characteristics of such diffuse pre-atherosclerotic changes in diabetes are only superficially known. Methods To identify the molecular alterations of the generalized arterial disease in T2D, DNA microarrays were applied to examine gene expression changes in normal-appearing, non-atherosclerotic arterial tissue from 10 diabetic and 11 age-matched non-diabetic men scheduled for a coronary by-pass operation. Gene expression changes were integrated with GO-Elite, GSEA, and Cytoscape to identify significant biological pathways and networks. Results Global pathway analysis revealed differential expression of gene-sets representing matrix metabolism, triglyceride synthesis, inflammation, insulin signaling, and apoptosis. The network analysis showed a significant cluster of dysregulated genes coding for both intra- and extra-cellular proteins associated with vascular cell functions together with genes related to insulin signaling and matrix remodeling. Conclusions Our results identify pathways and networks involved in the diffuse vasculopathy present in non-atherosclerotic arterial tissue in patients with T2D and confirmed previously observed mRNA-alterations. These abnormalities may play a role for the arterial response to injury and putatively for the accelerated atherogenesis among patients with diabetes.

  10. Maintenance of Macrophage Redox Status by ChREBP Limits Inflammation and Apoptosis and Protects against Advanced Atherosclerotic Lesion Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Sarrazy

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Enhanced glucose utilization can be visualized in atherosclerotic lesions and may reflect a high glycolytic rate in lesional macrophages, but its causative role in plaque progression remains unclear. We observe that the activity of the carbohydrate-responsive element binding protein ChREBP is rapidly downregulated upon TLR4 activation in macrophages. ChREBP inactivation refocuses cellular metabolism to a high redox state favoring enhanced inflammatory responses after TLR4 activation and increased cell death after TLR4 activation or oxidized LDL loading. Targeted deletion of ChREBP in bone marrow cells resulted in accelerated atherosclerosis progression in Ldlr−/− mice with increased monocytosis, lesional macrophage accumulation, and plaque necrosis. Thus, ChREBP-dependent macrophage metabolic reprogramming hinders plaque progression and establishes a causative role for leukocyte glucose metabolism in atherosclerosis.

  11. Continuum Damage-healing Mechanics with Application to Self-healing Composites

    OpenAIRE

    Barbero, Ever J; Greco, Fabrizio; Lonetti, Paolo

    2005-01-01

    Abstract The general behavior of self-healing materials is modeled including both irreversible and healing processes. A constitutive model, based on a continuum thermodynamic framework, is proposed to predict the general response of self-healing materials. The self-healing materials? response produces a reduction in size of microcracks and voids, opposite to damage. The constitutive model, developed in the ...

  12. 99mTc-Annexin A5 for noninvasive characterization of atherosclerotic lesions: imaging and histological studies in myocardial infarction-prone Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic rabbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apoptosis is commonly observed in advanced atherosclerotic lesions. 99mTc-annexin A5 (99mTc-annexin V) has been proposed as a potential tracer for imaging apoptosis in atherosclerotic plaques. Accordingly, we determined the usefulness of 99mTc-annexin A5 as an atherosclerosis imaging tracer in a rabbit model (myocardial infarction-prone Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic rabbits; WHHLMI rabbits) of spontaneous atherosclerosis. The WHHLMI and control rabbits were injected intravenously with 99mTc-annexin A5. After in vivo planar imaging, the radioactivity in the aorta was measured. Autoradiography, TUNEL staining, Azan-Mallory staining and immunohistological studies were performed serially throughout the aorta. 99mTc-Annexin A5 accumulation in the aorta of the WHHLMI rabbits was 5.6-fold higher than in that of control rabbits. Autoradiography showed heterogeneous multifocal accumulation of 99mTc-annexin A5 in WHHLMI rabbits. 99mTc-Annexin A5 accumulation was highest in the atheromatous lesions (6.2 ± 2.5, %ID x BW/mm2 x 103), followed in decreasing order by neointimal (4.9 ± 1.3), fibroatheromatous (4.5 ± 1.9), and collagen-rich lesions (3.3 ± 1.4). The regional 99mTc-annexin A5 accumulation was significantly correlated with the TUNEL-positive cell density, macrophage density and ''vulnerability index,'' an index of the morphological destabilized characteristics. The in vivo imaging clearly visualized the atherosclerotic lesions in WHHLMI rabbits. The present study in WHHLMI rabbits showed higher 99mTc-annexin A5 accumulation in grade IV atheroma than in other more stable lesions. 99mTc-Annexin A5 may be useful in identifying atheroma that is at higher risk for rupture and possibly in assessing the response to anti-atherosclerotic therapy. (orig.)

  13. Wound Healing Devices Brief Vignettes

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Caesar A.; Hare, Marc A.; Perdrizet, George A.

    2016-01-01

    Significance: The demand for wound care therapies is increasing. New wound care products and devices are marketed at a dizzying rate. Practitioners must make informed decisions about the use of medical devices for wound healing therapy. This paper provides updated evidence and recommendations based on a review of recent publications.

  14. Parathyroid hormone and bone healing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellegaard, M; Jørgensen, N R; Schwarz, P

    2010-01-01

    pharmacological treatments are available. There is therefore an unmet need for medications that can stimulate bone healing. Parathyroid hormone (PTH) is the first bone anabolic drug approved for the treatment of osteoporosis, and intriguingly a number of animal studies suggest that PTH could be beneficial in the...

  15. Polyurethanes as self-healing materials

    OpenAIRE

    Tomasz Szmechtyk; Natalia Sienkiewicz; Joanna Woźniak; Krzysztof Strzelec

    2015-01-01

    The current development of polyurethane self-healing materials has been evaluated and reviewed. Three main ways of self-healing – microcontainers, microvascular networks and reversible polymers - are described, and recent most prominent examples of self-healing materials applications presented.

  16. Diagnosis of atherosclerotic tissue by resonance fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neu, Walter; Haase, Karl K.; Tischler, Christian; Nyga, Ralf; Karsch, Karl R.

    1991-05-01

    Resonantly enhanced fluorescence emission induced by a tunable dye laser can be used for the identification of ablated atherosclerotic tissue. This method has been tested with anorganic samples exposed to air and to saline solution. A XeCl excimer laser pulse ((lambda) = 308 nm), delivered by a fused silica optical fiber, causes an efficient ablation of the irradiated samples. The wavelength of the narrow-band dye laser radiation is set to a strong transition of a specific species to be detected in the ablation plume. Taking into account the formation of the plume, the dye laser pulse is applied with a certain delay in order to excite resonantly the selected species in the plume. The resulting resonance fluorescence then is guided by optical fibers to an optical multi-channel analyzer system. Compared to the broad-band fluorescence during excimer laser ablation the resonance fluorescence signal shows a distinct and easily detectable sharp peak. The signal-to-background ratio is improved by one order of magnitude.

  17. Directional spatial frequency analysis of lipid distribution in atherosclerotic plaque

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korn, Clyde; Reese, Eric; Shi, Lingyan; Alfano, Robert; Russell, Stewart

    2016-04-01

    Atherosclerosis is characterized by the growth of fibrous plaques due to the retention of cholesterol and lipids within the artery wall, which can lead to vessel occlusion and cardiac events. One way to evaluate arterial disease is to quantify the amount of lipid present in these plaques, since a higher disease burden is characterized by a higher concentration of lipid. Although therapeutic stimulation of reverse cholesterol transport to reduce cholesterol deposits in plaque has not produced significant results, this may be due to current image analysis methods which use averaging techniques to calculate the total amount of lipid in the plaque without regard to spatial distribution, thereby discarding information that may have significance in marking response to therapy. Here we use Directional Fourier Spatial Frequency (DFSF) analysis to generate a characteristic spatial frequency spectrum for atherosclerotic plaques from C57 Black 6 mice both treated and untreated with a cholesterol scavenging nanoparticle. We then use the Cauchy product of these spectra to classify the images with a support vector machine (SVM). Our results indicate that treated plaque can be distinguished from untreated plaque using this method, where no difference is seen using the spatial averaging method. This work has the potential to increase the effectiveness of current in-vivo methods of plaque detection that also use averaging methods, such as laser speckle imaging and Raman spectroscopy.

  18. Imaging of atherosclerotic plaques by optical coherence tomography (OCT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perree, Jop; van Leeuwen, Ton G. J. M.; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Izatt, Joseph A.

    2000-05-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is an imaging technique that measures the intensity of light back scattered from sub- surface tissue structures with a very high resolution. This report describes the qualitative and quantitative correlation of OCT and histology measurements for plaque presence and thickness of caps overlying atherosclerotic plaques, respectively. Imaging of samples (n equals 12) was performed from the luminal side with 1300 nm 1 mW or 10 mW light sources, with coherence lengths of 21 and 16 micrometer, respectively. Samples were histologically processed and stained with H&E, EvG and picro-sirius red (PSR) and histological and OCT images were matched. For each sample, the presence of plaque was assessed and the minimal cap thickness was measured by means of histomorphometry and OCT. We found a sensitivity of 6/6 and a specificity of 5/6 for detection of plaques with OCT. Quantitative analysis showed a strong and significant correlation between OCT and histology cap thickness measurements (R2 equals 0.968). Thus, OCT is a sensitive method for detection of plaques, is quantitatively comparable to histology and holds promise as a high-resolution diagnostic tool for visualization of plaque cap thickness.

  19. Rheumatoid Arthritis Pharmacotherapies: Do They Have Anti-Atherosclerotic Activity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, Jon T

    2016-05-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is associated with a heightened risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) events, presumably related to a greater burden of atherosclerosis, as well as atherosclerotic plaques that tend to be inflamed and rupture prone. Many of the inflammatory pathways underlying the pathobiology of RA are also recognized contributors to atherosclerosis. Immunomodulation is the mainstay for RA therapy, and a variety of biologic and non-biologic pharmacotherapies are used either singly or in combination to control articular and systemic inflammation and prevent joint destruction. Almost all of these agents have theoretical potential to favorably affect atherogenesis and atherothrombosis, but mechanisms by which they exert effects have been incompletely studied, to date. However, whether clinical control of RA disease activity is associated with a reduction in CVD events regardless of agent used or whether the potency of anti-atherogenic effects varies between disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) is an area of current interest in RA research. More broadly, RA immunotherapies are currently being tested in high-CVD-risk patients in proof-of-concept clinical trials that could alter the paradigm for CVD treatment and prevention in the general population. In this review, we will summarize the current evidence ascribing atheroprotective effects to RA pharmacotherapies. PMID:27032790

  20. Androgen actions in mouse wound healing: Minimal in vivo effects of local antiandrogen delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yiwei; Simanainen, Ulla; Cheer, Kenny; Suarez, Francia G; Gao, Yan Ru; Li, Zhe; Handelsman, David; Maitz, Peter

    2016-05-01

    The aims of this work were to define the role of androgens in female wound healing and to develop and characterize a novel wound dressing with antiandrogens. Androgens retard wound healing in males, but their role in female wound healing has not been established. To understand androgen receptor (AR)-mediated androgen actions in male and female wound healing, we utilized the global AR knockout (ARKO) mouse model, with a mutated AR deleting the second zinc finger to disrupt DNA binding and transcriptional activation. AR inactivation enhanced wound healing rate in males by increasing re-epithelialization and collagen deposition even when wound contraction was eliminated. Cell proliferation and migration in ARKO male fibroblasts was significantly increased compared with wild-type (WT) fibroblasts. However, ARKO females showed a similar healing rate compared to WT females. To exploit local antiandrogen effects in wound healing, while minimizing off-target systemic effects, we developed a novel electrospun polycaprolactone (PCL) scaffold wound dressing material for sustained local antiandrogen delivery. Using the antiandrogen hydroxyl flutamide (HF) at 1, 5, and 10 mg/mL in PCL scaffolds, controlled HF delivery over 21 days significantly enhanced in vitro cell proliferation of human dermal fibroblasts and human keratinocytes. HF-PCL scaffolds also promoted in vivo wound healing in mice compared with open wounds but not to PCL scaffolds. PMID:26873751