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Sample records for cells expressing pancreatic

  1. Adenoviral vectors stimulate glucagon transcription in human mesenchymal stem cells expressing pancreatic transcription factors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zaldumbide, Arnaud; Carlotti, Françoise; Gonçalves, Manuel A; Knaän-Shanzer, Shoshan; Cramer, Steve J; Roep, Bart O; Wiertz, Emmanuel J H J; Hoeben, Rob C

    2012-01-01

    .... Forced expression of key regulators of pancreatic differentiation in stem cells, liver cells, pancreatic duct cells, or cells from the exocrine pancreas, can lead to the initiation of endocrine...

  2. Alterations in integrin expression modulates invasion of pancreatic cancer cells.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, Naomi

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Factors mediating the invasion of pancreatic cancer cells through the extracellular matrix (ECM) are not fully understood. METHODS: In this study, sub-populations of the human pancreatic cancer cell line, MiaPaCa-2 were established which displayed differences in invasion, adhesion, anoikis, anchorage-independent growth and integrin expression. RESULTS: Clone #3 displayed higher invasion with less adhesion, while Clone #8 was less invasive with increased adhesion to ECM proteins compared to MiaPaCa-2. Clone #8 was more sensitive to anoikis than Clone #3 and MiaPaCa-2, and displayed low colony-forming efficiency in an anchorage-independent growth assay. Integrins beta 1, alpha 5 and alpha 6 were over-expressed in Clone #8. Using small interfering RNA (siRNA), integrin beta1 knockdown in Clone #8 cells increased invasion through matrigel and fibronectin, increased motility, decreased adhesion and anoikis. Integrin alpha 5 and alpha 6 knockdown also resulted in increased motility, invasion through matrigel and decreased adhesion. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that altered expression of integrins interacting with different extracellular matrixes may play a significant role in suppressing the aggressive invasive phenotype. Analysis of these clonal populations of MiaPaCa-2 provides a model for investigations into the invasive properties of pancreatic carcinoma.

  3. HIF1 Contributes to Hypoxia-Induced Pancreatic Cancer Cells Invasion via Promoting QSOX1 Expression

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    Chen-Ye Shi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Quiescin sulfhydryl oxidase 1 (QSOX1, which oxidizes sulfhydryl groups to form disulfide bonds in proteins, is found to be over-expressed in various pancreatic cancer cell lines and patients. QSOX1 promotes invasion of pancreatic cancer cells by activating MMP-2 and MMP-9. However, its regulatory mechanism remains largely undefined. Methods: Real-time PCR and Western blot were employed to detect the expression of QSOX1 in human pancreatic cancer cell lines under hypoxic condition. Luciferase reporter and ChIP assays were used to assess the regulation of QSOX1 by hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1. Small interfering RNA (siRNA was applied to knock down endogenous expression of QSOX1. Matrigel-coated invasion chamber essays were conducted to detect the invasion capacity of QSOX1-depleted cells. Results: Both hypoxia and hypoxia mimicking reagent up-regulated the expression of QSOX1 in human pancreatic cancer cell lines. Knockdown of HIF-1α eliminated hypoxia induced QSOX1 expression. HIF-1α was found directly bound to two hypoxia-response elements (HRE of QSOX1 gene, both of which were required for HIF-1 induced QSOX1 expression. Moreover, QSOX1 silencing blocked hypoxia-induced pancreatic cancer cells invasion. Conclusion: QSOX1 is a direct target of HIF-1 and may contribute to hypoxia-induced pancreatic cancer cells invasion.

  4. Effect of Cell Adhesion Molecule 1 Expression on Intracellular Granule Movement in Pancreatic α Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokawa, Satoru; Furuno, Tadahide; Suzuki, Takahiro; Inoh, Yoshikazu; Suzuki, Ryo; Hirashima, Naohide

    2016-09-01

    Although glucagon secreted from pancreatic α cells plays a role in increasing glucose concentrations in serum, the mechanism regulating glucagon secretion from α cells remains unclear. Cell adhesion molecule 1 (CADM1), identified as an adhesion molecule in α cells, has been reported not only to communicate among α cells and between nerve fibers, but also to prevent excessive glucagon secretion from α cells. Here, we investigated the effect of CADM1 expression on the movement of intracellular secretory granules in α cells because the granule transport is an important step in secretion. Spinning disk microscopic analysis showed that granules moved at a mean velocity of 0.236 ± 0.010 μm/s in the mouse α cell line αTC6 that expressed CADM1 endogenously. The mean velocity was significantly decreased in CADM1-knockdown (KD) cells (mean velocity: 0.190 ± 0.016 μm/s). The velocity of granule movement decreased greatly in αTC6 cells treated with the microtubule-depolymerizing reagent nocodazole, but not in αTC6 cells treated with the actin-depolymerizing reagent cytochalasin D. No difference in the mean velocity was observed between αTC6 and CADM1-KD cells treated with nocodazole. These results suggest that intracellular granules in pancreatic α cells move along the microtubule network, and that CADM1 influences their velocity.

  5. Comparison of Oct4, Sox2 and Nanog Expression in Pancreatic Cancer Cell Lines and Human Pancreatic Tumor

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    Vahideh Assadollahi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Genes are involved in the control of stem cell self-renewal as a new class of molecular markers of cancer. Objectives: In this study, the expression of Oct4, Nanog and Sox2 in cell lines MIA Paca-2, PA-TU-8902 and AsPC-1 and pancreatic cancer tissue were examined. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, cell lines, MIA Paca-2, PA-TU-8902 and AsPC-1, were cultured in DMEM (Dulbecco’s Modified Eagles Medium and RPMI-1640 (Roswell Park Memorial Institute containing FBS 10% (fetal bovine serum in a 37°C incubator containing Co2 5% and humidity 90%. Samples of tumor and non-cancer pancreatic tumor were purchased Iran tumor bank. Extraction of RNA and synthesis of cDNA was performed. Expression levels of Oct4, Nanog and Sox2 were determined using Real-time PCR. The protein expression levels of target genes in the cell lines were studied by flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry. Results: The expression rate of Oct4, Nanog and Sox2 is more in the cancer cell lines than those in the control (normal tissue samples. The protein expression levels of target genes in the cell lines were confirmed by flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry. Conclusions: The genes are involved in stem cell self-renewal as a new class of molecular markers of cancer that detected in the pancreatic cell lines. Maybe, these genes play important role in the uncontrolled proliferation of cancer cells.

  6. Pax4 Expression does not Transduce Pancreatic Alpha Cells to Beta Cells

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    Ling Chen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The lack of available beta cells greatly limits the use of beta cell transplantation as a therapy for diabetes. Thus, generation of beta cells from other sources is substantially required. Pax4 has been shown to induce reprograming of alpha cells into beta cells during embryogenesis. Nevertheless, whether expression of Pax4 in adult alpha cells could trigger this alpha-to-beta cell reprogramming is unknown. Methods: Here we generated an adeno-associated virus carrying Pax4 and GFP under a CMV promoter (AAV-Pax4. We used AAV-Pax4 to transduce a mouse alpha cell line in vitro, and to transduce primary alpha cells in diabetic mice. Reprogramming was examined by double immunostaining and by changes in beta cell number. The effects on blood glucose were evaluated by fasting blood glucose and glucose response. Results: In vitro, Pax4 overexpression neither induced insulin expression, nor suppressed glucagon expression in alpha cells. In vivo, Pax4 overexpression failed to increase beta cell number, and did not alter hyperglycemia and glucose response in diabetic mice. Conclusion: Pax4 expression is not sufficient to transduce pancreatic alpha cells into beta cells. Overexpression of Pax4 in alpha cells may not increase functional beta cell number in diabetic patients.

  7. CNT1 expression influences proliferation and chemosensitivity in drug-resistant pancreatic cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhutia, Yangzom D.; Hung, Sau Wai; Patel, Bhavi; Lovin, Dylan; Govindarajan, Rajgopal

    2011-01-01

    Overcoming the inherent chemoresistance of pancreatic cancers remains a major goal of therapeutic investigations in this disease. In this study, we discovered a role for the human concentrative nucleoside transporter-1 (hCNT1; SLC28A1), a high-affinity pyrimidine nucleoside transporter, in determining the chemosensitivity of human pancreatic cancer cells to gemcitabine, the drug used presently as a standard of care. Compared with normal pancreas and pancreatic ductal epithelial cells, hCNT1 expression was frequently reduced in pancreatic tumors and tumor cell lines. In addition, hCNT1-mediated 3H-gemcitabine transport was lower in pancreatic cancer cell lines and correlated with cytotoxic IC50 estimations of gemcitabine. In contrast to gemcitabine-sensitive pancreatic cancer cell lines, MIA PaCa-2, a gemcitabine-resistant pancreatic cancer cell line exhibited relatively restrictive, cell cycle-dependent hCNT1 expression and transport. hCNT1 translation was suppressed in the late G1-enriched MIA PaCa-2 cell population possibly in an miRNA-dependent manner, which corresponded with the lowest hCNT1-mediated gemcitabine transport during this phase. While hCNT1 protein was induced during G1/S transition, increased hCNT1 trafficking resulted in maximal cell surface recruitment and transport-overshoot in the G2/M phase-enriched cell population. hCNT1 protein was directed predominantly to proteasomal or lysosomal degradation in S or G2/M phase MIA PaCa-2 cells, respectively. Pharmacological inhibition of hCNT1 degradation moderately increased cell surface hCNT1 expression and cellular gemcitabine transport in MIA PaCa-2 cells. Constitutive hCNT1 expression reduced clonogenic survival of MIA PaCa-2 cells and steeply augmented gemcitabine transport and chemosensitization. In addition to supporting a putative tumor suppressor role for hCNT1, our findings identify hCNT1 as a potential candidate to render drug-resistant pancreatic cancer cells amenable to chemotherapy. PMID

  8. Docosahexaenoic acid inhibits IL-6 expression via PPARγ-mediated expression of catalase in cerulein-stimulated pancreatic acinar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Eun Ah; Lim, Joo Weon; Kim, Hyeyoung

    2017-07-01

    Cerulein pancreatitis mirrors human acute pancreatitis. In pancreatic acinar cells exposed to cerulein, reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediate inflammatory signaling by Janus kinase (JAK) 2/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 3, and cytokine induction. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) acts as an agonist of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ (PPARγ), which mediates the expression of some antioxidant enzymes. We hypothesized that DHA may induce PPARγ-target catalase expression and reduce ROS levels, leading to the inhibition of JAK2/STAT3 activation and IL-6 expression in cerulein-stimulated acinar cells. Pancreatic acinar AR42J cells were treated with DHA in the presence or absence of the PPARγ antagonist GW9662, or treated with the PPARγ agonist troglitazone, and then stimulated with cerulein. Expression of IL-6 and catalase, ROS levels, JAK2/STAT3 activation, and nuclear translocation of PPARγ were assessed. DHA suppressed the increase in ROS, JAK2/STAT3 activation, and IL-6 expression induced nuclear translocation of PPARγ and catalase expression in cerulein-stimulated AR42J cells. Troglitazone inhibited the cerulein-induced increase in ROS and IL-6 expression, but induced catalase expression similar to DHA in AR42J cells. GW9662 abolished the inhibitory effect of DHA on cerulein-induced increase in ROS and IL-6 expression in AR42J cells. DHA-induced expression of catalase was suppressed by GW9662 in cerulein-stimulated AR42J cells. Thus, DHA induces PPARγ activation and catalase expression, which inhibits ROS-mediated activation of JAK2/STAT3 and IL-6 expression in cerulein-stimulated pancreatic acinar cells. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Cholinergic intrapancreatic neurons induce Ca²+ signaling and early-response gene expression in pancreatic acinar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, D J; cowles, R A; Segura, B J; Romanchuk, G; Barnhart, D C; Mulholland, M W

    2000-01-01

    Pancreatic exocrine function has been demonstrated to be under neuronal regulation. The pathways responsible for this effect, and the long-term consequences of such interactions, are incompletely described. The effects of neuronal depolarization on pancreatic acinar cells were studied to determine whether calcium signaling and c-fos expression were activated. In pancreatic lobules, which contain both neurons and acinar cells, agonists that selectively stimulated neurons increased intracellular calcium in acinar cells. Depolarization also led to the expression of c-fos protein in 24% +/- 4% of the acinar cells. In AR42J pancreatic acinar cells, cholinergic stimulation demonstrated an average increase of 398 +/- 19 nmol/L in intracellular calcium levels, and induced c-fos expression that was time and dose dependent. The data indicate that intrapancreatic neurons induce Ca²+ signaling and early-response gene expression in pancreatic acinar cells.

  10. Interdependence of Gemcitabine Treatment, Transporter Expression, and Resistance in Human Pancreatic Carcinoma Cells

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    Wolfgang Hagmann

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Gemcitabine is widely used as first-line chemotherapeutic drug in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. Our previous experimental chemotherapy studies have shown that treatment of human pancreatic carcinoma cells with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU alters the cellular transporter expression profile and that modulation of the expression of multidrug resistance protein 5 (MRP5; ABCC5 influences the chemoresistance of these tumor cells. Here, we studied the influence of acute and chronic gemcitabine treatment on the expression of relevant uptake and export transporters in pancreatic carcinoma cells by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR, quantitative RT-PCR, and immunoblot analyses. The specific role of MRP5 in cellular gemcitabine sensitivity was studied by cytotoxicity assays using MRP5-overexpressing and MRP5-silenced cells. Exposure to gemcitabine (12 nM for 3 days did not alter the messenger RNA (mRNA expression of MRP1, MRP3, MRP5, and equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (ENT1, whereas high dosages of the drug (20 µM for 1 hour elicited up-regulation of these transporters in most cell lines studied. In cells with acquired gemcitabine resistance (up to 160 nM gemcitabine, the mRNA or protein expression of the gemcitabine transporters MRP5 and ENT1 was upregulated in several cell lines. Combined treatment with 5-FU and gemcitabine caused a 5- to 40-fold increase in MRP5 and ENT1 expressions. Cytotoxicity assays using either MRP5-overexpressing (HEK and PANC-1 or MRP5-silenced (PANC1/shMRP5 cells indicated that MRP5 contributes to gemcitabine resistance. Thus, our novel data not only on drug-induced alterations of transporter expression relevant for gemcitabine uptake and export but also on the link between gemcitabine sensitivity and MRP5 expression may lead to improved strategies of future chemotherapy regimens using gemcitabine in pancreatic carcinoma patients.

  11. Cannabinoids Regulate Bcl-2 and Cyclin D2 Expression in Pancreatic β Cells.

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    Jihye Kim

    Full Text Available Recent reports have shown that cannabinoid 1 receptors (CB1Rs are expressed in pancreatic β cells, where they induce cell death and cell cycle arrest by directly inhibiting insulin receptor activation. Here, we report that CB1Rs regulate the expression of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 and cell cycle regulator cyclin D2 in pancreatic β cells. Treatment of MIN6 and βTC6 cells with a synthetic CB1R agonist, WIN55,212-2, led to a decrease in the expression of Bcl-2 and cyclin D2, in turn inducing cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase and caspase-3-dependent apoptosis. Additionally, genetic deletion and pharmacological blockade of CB1Rs after injury in mice led to increased levels of Bcl-2 and cyclin D2 in pancreatic β cells. These findings provide evidence for the involvement of Bcl-2 and cyclin D2 mediated by CB1Rs in the regulation of β-cell survival and growth, and will serve as a basis for developing new therapeutic interventions to enhance β-cell function and growth in diabetes.

  12. Profile of MMP and TIMP Expression in Human Pancreatic Stellate Cells: Regulation by IL-1α and TGFβ and Implications for Migration of Pancreatic Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjomsland, Vegard; Pomianowska, Eva; Aasrum, Monica; Sandnes, Dagny; Verbeke, Caroline Sophie; Gladhaug, Ivar Prydz

    2016-07-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is characterized by a prominent fibroinflammatory stroma with both tumor-promoting and tumor-suppressive functions. The pancreatic stellate cell (PSC) is the major cellular stromal component and the main producer of extracellular matrix proteins, including collagens, which are degraded by metalloproteinases (MMPs). PSCs interact with cancer cells through various factors, including transforming growth factor (TGF)β and interleukin (IL)-1α. The role of TGFβ in the dual nature of tumor stroma, i.e., protumorigenic or tumor suppressive, is not clear. We aimed to investigate the roles of TGFβ and IL-1α in the regulation of MMP profiles in PSCs and the subsequent effects on cancer cell migration. Human PSCs isolated from surgically resected specimens were cultured in the presence of pancreatic cancer cell lines, as well as IL-1α or TGFβ. MMP production and activities in PSCs were quantified by gene array transcripts, mRNA measurements, fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based activity assay, and zymography. PSC-conditioned media and pancreatic cancer cells were included in a collagen matrix cell migration model. We found that production of IL-1α by pancreatic cancer cells induced alterations in MMP and tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinase (TIMP) profiles and activities in PSCs, upregulated expression and activation of MMP1 and MMP3, and enhanced migration of pancreatic cancer cells in the collagen matrix model. TGFβ counteracted the effects of IL-1α on PSCs, reestablished PSC MMP and TIMP profiles and activities, and inhibited migration of cancer cells. This suggests that tumor TGFβ has a role as a suppressor of stromal promotion of tumor progression through alterations in PSC MMP profiles with subsequent inhibition of pancreatic cancer cell migration. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Arrangement of expression and distribution of tight junction protein claudin-1 in cell dissociation of pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xiaodong; Egami, Hiroshi; Ishikawa, Shinji; Kurizaki, Takashi; Nakagawa, Masahide; Hirota, Masahiko; Ogawa, Michio

    2004-12-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 2 (MEK2) was isolated previously as a potential factor related to cancer cell dissociation in highly (PC-1.0) and weakly (PC-1) invasive pancreatic cancer cells. On the other hand, changes of structure and function of tight junction (TJ) are reported to be correlated with carcinogenesis and tumor development. In this study, immunocytochemistry and Western blot analysis were performed in pancreatic cancer cells using anti-claudin-1, MEK2 and phosphorylated MEK1/2 (p-MEK1/2) antibodies to reveal the correlation between TJ and cancer cell dissociation, as well as the involvement of MEK2 in regulation of TJ in cell dissociation of pancreatic cancer. After incubation with conditioned medium of PC-1.0 cells, plasma membrane distribution of claudin-1 was obviously disrupted, and expressions of MEK2 and p-MEK1/2, as well as dissociation of cell colonies, were significantly induced in PC-1 and CAPAN-2 cells. However, U0126 (a MEK1/2 inhibitor) treatment apparently induced the plasma membrane distribution of claudin-1 and aggregation of single cells in PC-1.0 and AsPC-1 cells, synchronously seriously suppressed MEK2 and p-MEK1/2 expression. Arrangement of expression and distribution of claudin-1 is closely related to cell dissociation status in pancreatic cancer cells through MEK2 activation.

  14. Murine pancreatic adenocarcinoma reduces Ikaros expression and disrupts T cell homeostasis.

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    Nadine Nelson

    Full Text Available Maintenance of T cell immune homeostasis is critical for adequate anti-tumor immunity. The transcription factor Ikaros is essential for lymphocyte development including T cells. Alterations in Ikaros expression occur in blood malignancies in humans and mice. In this study, we investigated the role of Ikaros in regulating T cell immune balance in pancreatic cancer mouse models.Using our Panc02 tumor-bearing (TB mouse model, western blot analysis revealed a reduction in Ikaros proteins while qRT-PCR showed no differences in Ikaros mRNA levels in TB splenocytes compared to control. Treatment of naïve splenocytes with the proteasomal inhibitor, MG132, stabilized Ikaros expression and prevented Ikaros downregulation by Panc02 cells, in vitro. Western blot analyses showed a reduction in protein phosphatase 1 (PP1 and protein kinase CK2 expression in TB splenocytes while CK2 activity was increased. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed altered punctate staining of Ikaros in TB splenocytes. Flow cytometry revealed a significant decrease in effector CD4+ and CD8+ T cell percentages but increased CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells in TB splenocytes. Similar alterations in T cell percentages, as well as reduced Ikaros and CK2 but not PP1 expression, were observed in a transgenic, triple mutant (TrM pancreatic cancer model. Ikaros expression was also reduced in enriched TB CD3+ T cells. MG132 treatment of naïve CD3+ T cells stabilized Ikaros expression in the presence of Panc02 cells. Western blots showed reduced PP1 and CK2 expression in TB CD3+ T cells.The results of this study suggest that the pancreatic tumor microenvironment may cause proteasomal degradation of Ikaros, possibly via dysregulation of PP1 and CK2 expression and activity, respectively. This loss of Ikaros expression may contribute to an imbalance in T cell percentages. Ikaros may potentially be a therapeutic target to restore T cell homeostasis in pancreatic cancer hosts, which may be

  15. MicroRNA expression in alpha and beta cells of human pancreatic islets.

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    Dagmar Klein

    Full Text Available microRNAs (miRNAs play an important role in pancreatic development and adult β-cell physiology. Our hypothesis is based on the assumption that each islet cell type has a specific pattern of miRNA expression. We sought to determine the profile of miRNA expression in α-and β-cells, the main components of pancreatic islets, because this analysis may lead to a better understanding of islet gene regulatory pathways. Highly enriched (>98% subsets of human α-and β-cells were obtained by flow cytometric sorting after intracellular staining with c-peptide and glucagon antibody. The method of sorting based on intracellular staining is possible because miRNAs are stable after fixation. MiRNA expression levels were determined by quantitative high throughput PCR-based miRNA array platform screening. Most of the miRNAs were preferentially expressed in β-cells. From the total of 667 miRNAs screened, the Significant Analysis of Microarray identified 141 miRNAs, of which only 7 were expressed more in α-cells (α-miRNAs and 134 were expressed more in β-cells (β-miRNAs. Bioinformatic analysis identified potential targets of β-miRNAs analyzing the Beta Cell Gene Atlas, described in the T1Dbase, the web platform, supporting the type 1 diabetes (T1D community. cMaf, a transcription factor regulating glucagon expression expressed selectively in α-cells (TFα is targeted by β-miRNAs; miR-200c, miR-125b and miR-182. Min6 cells treated with inhibitors of these miRNAs show an increased expression of cMaf RNA. Conversely, over expression of miR-200c, miR-125b or miR-182 in the mouse alpha cell line αTC6 decreases the level of cMAF mRNA and protein. MiR-200c also inhibits the expression of Zfpm2, a TFα that inhibits the PI3K signaling pathway, at both RNA and protein levels.In conclusion, we identified miRNAs differentially expressed in pancreatic α- and β-cells and their potential transcription factor targets that could add new insights into different

  16. Specific transgene expression in mouse pancreatic β-cells under the control of the porcine insulin promoter

    OpenAIRE

    Grzech, Marjeta; Dahlhoff, Maik; Herbach, Nadja; Habermann, Felix A.; Renner-Müller, Ingrid; Wanke, Rüdiger; Flaswinkel, Heinrich; Wolf, Eckhard; Schneider, Marlon R.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The availability of regulatory sequences directing tissue-specific expression of transgenes in genetically modified mice and large animals is a prerequisite for the development of adequate models for human diseases. The rat insulin 2 gene (Ins2) promoter, widely used to achieve transgene expression in pancreatic ?-cells of mice, also directs expression to extrapancreatic tissues and performs poorly in isolated pancreatic islets of human, mouse, and pig. To evaluate whether...

  17. NFATc4 Regulates Sox9 Gene Expression in Acinar Cell Plasticity and Pancreatic Cancer Initiation

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    Elisabeth Hessmann

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Acinar transdifferentiation toward a duct-like phenotype constitutes the defining response of acinar cells to external stress signals and is considered to be the initial step in pancreatic carcinogenesis. Despite the requirement for oncogenic Kras in pancreatic cancer (PDAC development, oncogenic Kras is not sufficient to drive pancreatic carcinogenesis beyond the level of premalignancy. Instead, secondary events, such as inflammation-induced signaling activation of the epidermal growth factor (EGFR or induction of Sox9 expression, are required for tumor formation. Herein, we aimed to dissect the mechanism that links EGFR signaling to Sox9 gene expression during acinar-to-ductal metaplasia in pancreatic tissue adaptation and PDAC initiation. We show that the inflammatory transcription factor NFATc4 is highly induced and localizes in the nucleus in response to inflammation-induced EGFR signaling. Moreover, we demonstrate that NFATc4 drives acinar-to-ductal conversion and PDAC initiation through direct transcriptional induction of Sox9. Therefore, strategies designed to disrupt NFATc4 induction might be beneficial in the prevention or therapy of PDAC.

  18. [6]-Gingerol Induces Cell Cycle Arrest and Cell Death of Mutant p53-expressing Pancreatic Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yon Jung; Wen, Jing; Bang, Seungmin; Park, Seung Woo

    2006-01-01

    [6]-Gingerol, a major phenolic compound derived from ginger, has anti-bacterial, anti-inflammatory and anti-tumor activities. While several molecular mechanisms have been described to underlie its effects on cells in vitro and in vivo, the underlying mechanisms by which [6]-gingerol exerts anti-tumorigenic effects are largely unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate the action of [6]-gingerol on two human pancreatic cancer cell lines, HPAC expressing wild-type (wt) p53 and BxPC-3 expressing mutated p53. We found that [6]-gingerol inhibited the cell growth through cell cycle arrest at G1 phase in both cell lines. Western blot analyses indicated that [6]-gingerol decreased both Cyclin A and Cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) expression. These events led to reduction in Rb phosphorylation followed by blocking of S phase entry. p53 expression was decreased by [6]-gingerol treatment in both cell lines suggesting that the induction of Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, p21cip1, was p53-independent. [6]-Gingerol induced mostly apoptotic death in the mutant p53-expressing cells, while no signs of early apoptosis were detected in wild type p53-expressing cells and this was related to the increased phosphorylation of AKT. These results suggest that [6]-gingerol can circumvent the resistance of mutant p53-expressing cells towards chemotherapy by inducing apoptotic cell death while it exerts cytostatic effect on wild type p53-expressing cells by inducing temporal growth arrest. PMID:17066513

  19. Global gene expression profiling of pancreatic islets in mice during streptozotocin-induced β-cell damage and pancreatic Glp-1 gene therapy

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    Jason M. Tonne

    2013-09-01

    Streptozotocin (STZ, a glucosamine-nitrosourea compound, has potent genotoxic effects on pancreatic β-cells and is frequently used to induce diabetes in experimental animals. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1 has β-cell protective effects and is known to preserve β-cells from STZ treatment. In this study, we analyzed the mechanisms of STZ-induced diabetes and GLP-1-mediated β-cell protection in STZ-treated mice. At 1 week after multiple low-dose STZ administrations, pancreatic β-cells showed impaired insulin expression, while maintaining expression of nuclear Nkx6.1. This was accompanied by significant upregulation of p53-responsive genes in islets, including a mediator of cell cycle arrest, p21 (also known as Waf1 and Cip1. STZ treatment also suppressed expression of a wide range of genes linked with key β-cell functions or diabetes development, such as G6pc2, Slc2a2 (Glut2, Slc30a8, Neurod1, Ucn3, Gad1, Isl1, Foxa2, Vdr, Pdx1, Fkbp1b and Abcc8, suggesting global β-cell defects in STZ-treated islets. The Tmem229B, Prss53 and Ttc28 genes were highly expressed in untreated islets and strongly suppressed by STZ, suggesting their potential roles in β-cell function. When a pancreas-targeted adeno-associated virus (AAV vector was employed for long-term Glp-1 gene delivery, pancreatic GLP-1 expression protected mice from STZ-induced diabetes through preservation of the β-cell mass. Despite its potent β-cell protective effects, however, pancreatic GLP-1 overexpression showed limited effects on the global gene expression profiles in the islets. Network analysis identified the programmed-cell-death-associated pathways as the most relevant network in Glp-1 gene therapy. Upon pancreatic GLP-1 expression, upregulation of Cxcl13 and Nptx2 was observed in STZ-damaged islets, but not in untreated normal islets. Given the pro-β-cell-survival effects of Cxcl12 (Sdf-1 in inducing GLP-1 production in α-cells, pancreatic GLP-1-mediated Cxcl13 induction might also play a

  20. Impact of breast cancer resistance protein expression on the in vitro efficacy of anticancer drugs in pancreatic cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washio, Ikumi; Nakanishi, Takeo; Ishiguro, Naoki; Yamamura, Norio; Tamai, Ikumi

    2017-12-15

    Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) overexpression confers multidrug resistance to cancer cells, and the efficacy of anticancer drugs has been reported to be significantly affected by BCRP in cell lines transfected with BCRP or selected with drugs. It is unclear whether the in vitro efficacy of anticancer drugs is affected by endogenous BCRP, although cancer cell line panels consisting of defined tumor cell lines with endogenous BCRP have been used to screen for anticancer drugs in the pharmaceutical industry. We assessed the impact of BCRP expression on efficacy of anticancer drugs using pancreatic cancer cell lines expressing varying levels of endogenous BCRP. Pancreatic cancer cell lines were selected from the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia (CCLE). EC50 of SN-38, topotecan, and mitoxantrone decreased in the presence of a BCRP inhibitor in PANC-1 and AsPC-1 cells, which exhibit high BCRP expression. However, no significant alterations in EC50 were observed in HPAF-II, SW 1990, and MIA PaCa-2, which show moderate or low BCRP expression. The shift of EC50 of anticancer drugs with and without a BCRP inhibitor increased with an increase of BCRP mRNA expression levels; however, the shift was obvious only in cells highly expressing BCRP. Thus, the in vitro efficacy of anticancer drugs on cell proliferation may be minimally affected by BCRP in most pancreatic cancer cell lines, considering that 72% pancreatic cancer cell lines in CCLE show moderate or low BCRP expression. The effect of BCRP should be carefully evaluated in pancreatic cell lines that highly express BCRP. The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  1. Silymarin Induces Expression of Pancreatic Nkx6.1 Transcription Factor and β-Cells Neogenesis in a Pancreatectomy Model

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    Claudia Soto

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A physio-pathological feature of diabetes mellitus is a significant reduction of β-pancreatic cells. The growth, differentiation and function maintenance of these cells is directed by transcription factors. Nkx6.1 is a key transcription factor for the differentiation, neogenesis and maintenance of β-pancreatic cells. We reported that silymarin restores normal morphology and endocrine function of damaged pancreatic tissue after alloxan-induced diabetes mellitus in rats. The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of silymarin on Nkx6.1 transcription factor expression and its consequence in β cells neogenesis. Sixty male Wistar rats were partially pancreatectomized and divided into twelve groups. Six groups were treated with silymarin (200 mg/Kg p.o for periods of 3, 7, 14, 21, 42 and 63 days. Additionally, an unpancreatectomized control group was used. Nkx6.1 and insulin gene expression were assessed by RT-PCR assay in total pancreatic RNA. β-Cell neogenesis was determined by immunoperoxidase assay. Silymarin treated group showed an increase of Nkx6.1 and insulin genic expression. In this group, there was an increment of β-cell neogenesis in comparison to pancreatectomized untreated group. Silymarin treatment produced a rise in serum insulin and serum glucose normalization. These results suggest that silymarin may improve the reduction of β pancreatic cells observed in diabetes mellitus.

  2. SIRT1 inhibits proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells expressing pancreatic adenocarcinoma up-regulated factor (PAUF), a novel oncogene, by suppression of {beta}-catenin

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    Cho, Il-Rae [WCU, Department of Cogno-Mechatronics Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Koh, Sang Seok [Immunotherapy Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Functional Genomics, University of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Malilas, Waraporn; Srisuttee, Ratakorn; Moon, Jeong [WCU, Department of Cogno-Mechatronics Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Young-Whan [Department of Horticultural Bioscience, Pusan National University, Miryang 627-706 (Korea, Republic of); Horio, Yoshiyuki [Department of Pharmacology, Sapporo Medical University, Sapporo 060-8556 (Japan); Oh, Sangtaek [Department of Advanced Fermentation Fusion Science and Technology, Kookmin University, Seoul 136-702 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Young-Hwa, E-mail: younghc@pusan.ac.kr [WCU, Department of Cogno-Mechatronics Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-29

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIRT1 inhibits protein levels of {beta}-catenin and its transcriptional activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nuclear localization of SIRT1 is not required for the decrease of {beta}-catenin expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIRT1-mediated degradation of {beta}-catenin is not required for GSK-3{beta} and Siah-1 but for proteosome. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIRT1 activation inhibits proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells expressing PAUF. -- Abstract: Because we found in a recent study that pancreatic adenocarcinoma up-regulated factor (PAUF), a novel oncogene, induces a rapid proliferation of pancreatic cells by up-regulation of {beta}-catenin, we postulated that {beta}-catenin might be a target molecule for pancreatic cancer treatment. We thus speculated whether SIRT1, known to target {beta}-catenin in a colon cancer model, suppresses {beta}-catenin in those pancreatic cancer cells that express PAUF (Panc-PAUF). We further evaluated whether such suppression would lead to inhibition of the proliferation of these cells. The ectopic expression of either SIRT1 or resveratrol (an activator of SIRT1) suppressed levels of {beta}-catenin protein and its transcriptional activity in Panc-PAUF cells. Conversely, suppression of SIRT1 expression by siRNA enhanced {beta}-catenin expression and transcriptional activity. SIRT1 mutant analysis showed that nuclear localization of SIRT1 is not required for reduction of {beta}-catenin. Treatment with MG132, a proteasomal inhibitor, restored {beta}-catenin protein levels, suggesting that SIRT1-mediated degradation of {beta}-catenin requires proteasomal activity. It was reported that inhibition of GSK-3{beta} or Siah-1 stabilizes {beta}-catenin in colon cancer cells, but suppression of GSK-3{beta} or Siah-1 using siRNA in the presence of resveratrol instead diminished {beta}-catenin protein levels in Panc-PAUF cells. This suggests that GSK-3{beta} and Siah-1 are not involved in SIRT1

  3. HDAC gene expression in pancreatic tumor cell lines following treatment with the HDAC inhibitors panobinostat (LBH589) and trichostatine (TSA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehdi, Ouaïssi; Françoise, Silvy; Sofia, Costa Lima; Urs, Giger; Kevin, Zemmour; Bernard, Sastre; Igor, Sielezneff; Anabela, Cordeiro-da-Silva; Dominique, Lombardo; Eric, Mas; Ali, Ouaïssi

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the effect of LBH589 and trichostatin (TSA), a standard histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) toward the growth of pancreatic cancer cell lines was studied. Thus, we examined for the first time, the HDAC family gene expression levels before and after drug treatment. Several human pancreatic cancer cell lines (Panc-1, BxPC-3, SOJ-6) and a normal human pancreatic duct immortalized epithelial cell line (HPDE/E6E7) were used as target cells. The cell growth was measured by MTT assay, cell cycle alteration, membrane phosphatidylserine exposure, DNA fragmentation, mitochondrial membrane potential loss, RT-PCR and Western blots were done using standard methods. The effect of drugs on tumor growth in vivo was studied using subcutaneous xenograft model. Except in the case of certain HDAC gene/tumor cell line couples: (SIRT1/HPDE-SOJ6/TSA- or LBH589-treated cells; LBH589-treated Panc-1 Cells; HDAC2/BxPC-3/LBH589-treated cells or TSA-treated SOJ-6-1 cells), there were no major significant changes of HDACs genes transcription in cells upon drug treatment. However, significant variation in HDACs and SIRTs protein expression levels could be seen among individual cell samples. The in vivo results showed that LBH589 formulation exhibited similar tumor reduction efficacy as the commercial drug gemcitabine. Our data demonstrate that LBH589 induced the death of pancreatic tumor cell by apoptosis. In line with its in vitro activity, LBH589 achieved a significant reduction in tumor growth in BxPC-3 pancreatic tumor cell line subcutaneous xenograft mouse model. Furthermore, exploring the impact of LBH589 on HDACs encoding genes expression revealed for the first time that some of them, depending on the cell line considered, seem to be regulated during translation. Copyright © 2012 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Net expression inhibits the growth of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cell PL45 in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baiwen Li

    Full Text Available Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma has a poor prognosis due to late diagnosis and a lack of effective therapeutic options. Thus, it is important to better understand its molecular mechanisms and to develop more effective treatments for the disease. The ternary complex factor Net, which exerts its strong inhibitory function on transcription of proto-oncogene gene c-fos by forming ternary complexes with a second transcription factor, has been suspected of being involved in pancreatic cancer and other tumors biology. In this study, we found that the majority of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma tissues and cell lines had weak or no expression of Net, whereas significantly high level of Net expression occurred in paired adjacent normal tissues we studied. Furthermore, using in vitro and in vivo model systems, we found that overexpression of Net inhibited cell growth and survival and induced cell apoptosis in human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cell PL45; the mechanisms by which Net inhibited the cell cycle progression were mainly through P21-Cyclin D1/CDK4 Pathway. Our data thus suggested that Net might play an important role in pancreatic carcinogenesis, possibly by acting as a tumor suppressor gene.

  5. NFATc4 Regulates Sox9 Gene Expression in Acinar Cell Plasticity and Pancreatic Cancer Initiation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hessmann, Elisabeth; Zhang, Jin-San; Chen, Nai-Ming; Hasselluhn, Marie; Liou, Geou-Yarh; Storz, Peter; Ellenrieder, Volker; Billadeau, Daniel D; Koenig, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Acinar transdifferentiation toward a duct-like phenotype constitutes the defining response of acinar cells to external stress signals and is considered to be the initial step in pancreatic carcinogenesis...

  6. EPConDB: a web resource for gene expression related to pancreatic development, beta-cell function and diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzarelli, Joan M; Brestelli, John; Gorski, Regina K; Liu, Junmin; Manduchi, Elisabetta; Pinney, Deborah F; Schug, Jonathan; White, Peter; Kaestner, Klaus H; Stoeckert, Christian J

    2007-01-01

    EPConDB (http://www.cbil.upenn.edu/EPConDB) is a public web site that supports research in diabetes, pancreatic development and beta-cell function by providing information about genes expressed in cells of the pancreas. EPConDB displays expression profiles for individual genes and information about transcripts, promoter elements and transcription factor binding sites. Gene expression results are obtained from studies examining tissue expression, pancreatic development and growth, differentiation of insulin-producing cells, islet or beta-cell injury, and genetic models of impaired beta-cell function. The expression datasets are derived using different microarray platforms, including the BCBC PancChips and Affymetrix gene expression arrays. Other datasets include semi-quantitative RT-PCR and MPSS expression studies. For selected microarray studies, lists of differentially expressed genes, derived from PaGE analysis, are displayed on the site. EPConDB provides database queries and tools to examine the relationship between a gene, its transcriptional regulation, protein function and expression in pancreatic tissues.

  7. ChREBP Mediates Glucose Repression of Peroxisome Proliferator-activated Receptor {alpha} Expression in Pancreatic {beta}-Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boergesen, Michael; Poulsen, Lars la Cour; Schmidt, Søren Fisker

    2011-01-01

    alternative first exons that are spliced to exon 2. Expression of all PPARα transcripts is repressed by glucose both in insulinoma cells and in isolated pancreatic islets. The observation that the dynamics of glucose repression of PPARα transcription are very similar to those of glucose activation of target...

  8. CD133 Modulate HIF-1α Expression under Hypoxia in EMT Phenotype Pancreatic Cancer Stem-Like Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koki Maeda

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Although CD133 is a known representative cancer stem cell marker, its function in tumor aggressiveness under hypoxia is not fully known. The aim of this study is to demonstrate that CD133 regulates hypoxia inducible factor (HIF-1α expression with tumor migration. The CD133+ pancreatic cancer cell line, Capan1M9, was compared with the CD133− cell line, shCD133M9, under hypoxia. HIF-1α expression levels were compared by Western blot, HIF-1α nucleus translocation assay and real-time (RT-PCR. The hypoxia responsive element (HRE was observed by luciferase assay. The migration ability was analyzed by migration and wound healing assays. Epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT related genes were analyzed by real-time RT-PCR. HIF-1α was highly expressed in Capan1M9 compared to shCD133M9 under hypoxia because of the high activation of HRE. Furthermore, the migration ability of Capan1M9 was higher than that of shCD133M9 under hypoxia, suggesting higher expression of EMT related genes in Capan1M9 compared to shCD133M9. Conclusion: HIF-1α expression under hypoxia in CD133+ pancreatic cancer cells correlated with tumor cell migration through EMT gene expression. Understanding the function of CD133 in cancer aggressiveness provides a novel therapeutic approach to eradicate pancreatic cancer stem cells.

  9. The voltage-gated proton channel Hv1 is expressed in pancreatic islet β-cells and regulates insulin secretion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Qing [Department of Biophysics, School of Physics Science, The Key Laboratory of Bioactive Materials, Ministry of Education, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Che, Yongzhe [School of Medicine, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Li, Qiang; Zhang, Shangrong [Department of Biophysics, School of Physics Science, The Key Laboratory of Bioactive Materials, Ministry of Education, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Gao, Ying-Tang [Key Laboratory of Artificial Cell, Third Central Clinical College of Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin 300170 (China); Wang, Yifan; Wang, Xudong; Xi, Wang; Zuo, Weiyan [Department of Biophysics, School of Physics Science, The Key Laboratory of Bioactive Materials, Ministry of Education, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Li, Shu Jie, E-mail: shujieli@nankai.edu.cn [Department of Biophysics, School of Physics Science, The Key Laboratory of Bioactive Materials, Ministry of Education, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China)

    2015-12-25

    The voltage-gated proton channel Hv1 is a potent acid extruder that participates in the extrusion of the intracellular acid. Here, we showed for the first time, Hv1 is highly expressed in mouse and human pancreatic islet β-cells, as well as β-cell lines. Imaging studies demonstrated that Hv1 resides in insulin-containing granules in β-cells. Knockdown of Hv1 with RNA interference significantly reduces glucose- and K{sup +}-induced insulin secretion in isolated islets and INS-1 (832/13) β-cells and has an impairment on glucose- and K{sup +}-induced intracellular Ca{sup 2+} homeostasis. Our data demonstrated that the expression of Hv1 in pancreatic islet β-cells regulates insulin secretion through regulating Ca{sup 2+} homeostasis.

  10. Aberrant over-expression of TRPM7 ion channels in pancreatic cancer: required for cancer cell invasion and implicated in tumor growth and metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson S. Yee

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Our previous studies in zebrafish development have led to identification of the novel roles of the transient receptor potential melastatin-subfamily member 7 (TRPM7 ion channels in human pancreatic cancer. However, the biological significance of TRPM7 channels in pancreatic neoplasms was mostly unexplored. In this study, we determined the expression levels of TRPM7 in pancreatic tissue microarrays and correlated these measurements in pancreatic adenocarcinoma with the clinicopathological features. We also investigated the role of TRPM7 channels in pancreatic cancer cell invasion using the MatrigelTM-coated transwell assay. In normal pancreas, TRPM7 is expressed at a discernable level in the ductal cells and centroacinar cells and at a relatively high level in the islet endocrine cells. In chronic pancreatitis, pre-malignant tissues, and malignant neoplasms, there is variable expression of TRPM7. In the majority of pancreatic adenocarcinoma specimens examined, TRPM7 is expressed at either moderate-level or high-level. Anti-TRPM7 immunoreactivity in pancreatic adenocarcinoma significantly correlates with the size and stages of tumors. In human pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells in which TRPM7 is highly expressed, short hairpin RNA-mediated suppression of TRPM7 impairs cell invasion. The results demonstrate that TRPM7 channels are over-expressed in a proportion of the pre-malignant lesions and malignant tumors of the pancreas, and they are necessary for invasion by pancreatic cancer cells. We propose that TRPM7 channels play important roles in development and progression of pancreatic neoplasm, and they may be explored as clinical biomarkers and targets for its prevention and treatment.

  11. Effect of prolonged exposure to sublethal concentrations of DDT and DDE on protein expression in human pancreatic beta cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlikova, Nela; Smetana, Pavel; Halada, Petr; Kovar, Jan

    2015-10-01

    Pollution of the environment represents one of less explored potential reasons for the worldwide epidemic of type 2 diabetes. One of the most prevalent organochlorine pollutants remains the pesticide DDT and its degradation product DDE. Despite some epidemiologic correlations between levels of DDT and DDE in human organism and the prevalence of diabetes, there is almost no information about the exact targets of these compounds inside pancreatic beta cells. To detect functional areas of pancreatic beta cells that could be affected by exposure to DDT and DDE, we analyzed changes in protein expression in the NES2Y human pancreatic beta cell line exposed to three sublethal concentrations (0.1 μM, 1 μM, 10 μM) of DDT and DDE for 1 month. Protein separation and identification was achieved using high-resolution 2D-electrophoresis, computer analysis and mass spectrometry. With these techniques, four proteins were found downregulated after exposure to 10 μM DDT: three cytoskeletal proteins (cytokeratin 8, cytokeratin 18 and actin) and one protein involved in glycolysis (alpha-enolase). Two proteins were downregulated after exposure to 10 μM DDE: cytokeratin 18 and heterogenous nuclear ribonucleoprotein H1 (HNRH1). These changes correlate with previously described effects of other stress conditions (e.g. exposure to palmitate, hyperglycemia, imidazoline derivative, and cytokines) on protein expression in pancreatic beta cells. We conclude that cytoskeletal proteins and their processing, glucose metabolism, and mRNA processing may represent targets affected by exposure to conditions hostile to pancreatic beta cells, including exposure to DDT and DDE. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Modulation of cell cycle and gene expression in pancreatic tumor cell lines by methionine deprivation (methionine stress): implications to the therapy of pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokkinakis, Demetrius M; Liu, Xiaoyan; Neuner, Russell D

    2005-09-01

    The effect of methionine deprivation (methionine stress) on the proliferation, survival, resistance to chemotherapy, and regulation of gene and protein expression in pancreatic tumor lines is examined. Methionine stress prevents successful mitosis and promotes cell cycle arrest and accumulation of cells with multiple micronuclei with decondensed chromatin. Inhibition of mitosis correlates with CDK1 down-regulation and/or inhibition of its function by Tyr(15) phosphorylation or Thr(161) dephosphorylation. Inhibition of cell cycle progression correlates with loss of hyperphosphorylated Rb and up-regulation of p21 via p53 and/or transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) activation depending on p53 status. Although methionine stress-induced toxicity is not solely dependent on p53, the gain in p21 and loss in CDK1 transcription are more enhanced in wild-type p53 tumors. Up-regulation of SMAD7, a TGF-beta signaling inhibitor, suggests that SMAD7 does not restrict the TGF-beta-mediated induction of p21, although it may prevent up-regulation of p27. cDNA oligoarray analysis indicated a pleiotropic response to methionine stress. Cell cycle and mitotic arrest is in agreement with up-regulation of NF2, ETS2, CLU, GADD45alpha, GADD45beta, and GADD45gamma and down-regulation of AURKB, TOP2A, CCNA, CCNB, PRC1, BUB1, NuSAP, IFI16, and BRCA1. Down-regulation of AREG, AGTR1, M-CSF, and EGF, IGF, and VEGF receptors and up-regulation of GNA11 and IGFBP4 signify loss of growth factor support. PIN1, FEN1, and cABL up-regulation and LMNB1, AREG, RhoB, CCNG, TYMS, F3, and MGMT down-regulation suggest that methionine stress sensitizes the tumor cells to DNA-alkylating drugs, 5-fluorouracil, and radiation. Increased sensitivity of pancreatic tumor cell lines to temozolomide is shown under methionine stress conditions and is attributed in part to diminished O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase and possibly to inhibition of the cell cycle progression.

  13. Protease-activated receptor-2 expression and the role of trypsin in cell proliferation in human pancreatic cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Tetsuo; Shimizu, Koichi; Yi, Shuangqin; Takamura, Hiroyuki; Amaya, Kohji; Kitagawa, Hirohisa; Kayahara, Masato; Ninomiya, Itasu; Fushida, Sachio; Fujimura, Takashi; Nishimura, Gen-Ichi; Miwa, Koichi

    2003-07-01

    Protease-activated receptor (PAR)-2 is a G protein-coupled receptor that is activated by trypsin. The purpose of this study was to examine PAR-2 expression and the role of trypsin in cell proliferation in human pancreatic cancer cells. All four pancreatic cancer cell lines studied, from well to undifferentiated types, AsPC-1, BxPC-3, Panc-1, and MIAPaCa-2, had significant levels of PAR-2 mRNA detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and showed a band of about 55 kDa corresponding to the known molecular weight of PAR-2: AsPC-1, BxPC-3 and Panc-1 showed a strong band, and MIAPaCa-2 showed a weak one. Immunocytochemically, AsPC-1, BxPC-3, and Panc-1 showed intense immunostaining for PAR-2, predominantly in the plasma membrane, while in MIAPaCa-2, immunostaining was weak. Proliferative activity of AsPC-1 cells was increased by concentrations of trypsin as low as 10 nM, and activity peaked at a concentration of 100 nM, representing almost 60% of that induced by 10% fetal bovine serum. In contrast, trypsin had no significant effect on proliferation of MIAPaCa-2 cells. These findings suggest that trypsin plays a role in the growth of PAR-2-positive pancreatic cancer cells and serves as a potent mitogen in vitro, functioning as a growth factor.

  14. Pancreatic stellate cells enhance stem cell-like phenotypes in pancreatic cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamada, Shin [Division of Gastroenterology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan); Masamune, Atsushi, E-mail: amasamune@med.tohoku.ac.jp [Division of Gastroenterology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan); Takikawa, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Noriaki; Kikuta, Kazuhiro; Hirota, Morihisa [Division of Gastroenterology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan); Hamada, Hirofumi [Laboratory of Oncology, Department of Life Sciences, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Sciences, Hachioji (Japan); Kobune, Masayoshi [Fourth Department of Internal Medicine, Sapporo Medical University School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Satoh, Kennichi [Division of Cancer Stem Cell, Miyagi Cancer Center Research Institute, Natori (Japan); Shimosegawa, Tooru [Division of Gastroenterology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan)

    2012-05-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) promote the progression of pancreatic cancer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pancreatic cancer cells co-cultured with PSCs showed enhanced spheroid formation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expression of stem cell-related genes ABCG2, Nestin and LIN28 was increased. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Co-injection of PSCs enhanced tumorigenicity of pancreatic cancer cells in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study suggested a novel role of PSCs as a part of the cancer stem cell niche. -- Abstract: The interaction between pancreatic cancer cells and pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs), a major profibrogenic cell type in the pancreas, is receiving increasing attention. There is accumulating evidence that PSCs promote the progression of pancreatic cancer by increasing cancer cell proliferation and invasion as well as by protecting them from radiation- and gemcitabine-induced apoptosis. Recent studies have identified that a portion of cancer cells, called 'cancer stem cells', within the entire cancer tissue harbor highly tumorigenic and chemo-resistant phenotypes, which lead to the recurrence after surgery or re-growth of the tumor. The mechanisms that maintain the 'stemness' of these cells remain largely unknown. We hypothesized that PSCs might enhance the cancer stem cell-like phenotypes in pancreatic cancer cells. Indirect co-culture of pancreatic cancer cells with PSCs enhanced the spheroid-forming ability of cancer cells and induced the expression of cancer stem cell-related genes ABCG2, Nestin and LIN28. In addition, co-injection of PSCs enhanced tumorigenicity of pancreatic cancer cells in vivo. These results suggested a novel role of PSCs as a part of the cancer stem cell niche.

  15. Pancreas duodenal homeobox-1 expression and significance in pancreatic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tao; Gou, Shan-Miao; Wang, Chun-You; Wu, He-Shui; Xiong, Jiong-Xin; Zhou, Feng

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To study the correlations of Pancreas duodenal homeobox-1 with pancreatic cancer characteristics, including pathological grading, TNM grading, tumor metastasis and tumor cell proliferation. METHODS: Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to detect PDX-1 mRNA expression in pancreatic cancer tissue and normal pancreatic tissue. The expression of PDX-1 protein was measured by Western blot and immunohistochemistry. Immunohistochemistry was also used to detect proliferative cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). Correlations of PDX-1 with pancreatic cancer characteristics, including pathological grading, TNM grading, tumor metastasis and tumor cell proliferation, were analyzed by using χ2 test. RESULTS: Immunohistochemistry showed that 41.1% of pancreatic cancers were positive for PDX-1 expression, but normal pancreatic tissue except islets showed no staining for PDX-1. In consistent with the result of imunohistochemistry, Western blot showed that 37.5% of pancreatic cancers were positive for PDX-1. RT-PCR showed that PDX-1 expression was significantly higher in pancreatic cancer tissues than normal pancreatic tissues (2-3.56 ± 0.35 vs 2-8.76 ± 0.14, P < 0.01). Lymph node metastasis (P < 0.01), TNM grading (P < 0.05), pathological grading (P < 0.05) and tumor cell proliferation (P < 0.01) were significantly correlated with PDX-1 expression levels. CONCLUSION: PDX-1 is re-expressed in pancreatic cancer, and PDX-1-positive pancreatic cancer cells show more malignant potential compared to PDX-1-negative cells. Therefore, PDX-1-positive cells may be tumor stem cells and PDX-1 may act as alternate surface marker of pancreatic cancer stem cells. PMID:17552012

  16. Time-Qualified Patterns of Variation of PPARγ, DNMT1, and DNMT3B Expression in Pancreatic Cancer Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerio Pazienza

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Carcinogenesis is related to the loss of homeostatic control of cellular processes regulated by transcriptional circuits and epigenetic mechanisms. Among these, the activities of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs and DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs are crucial and intertwined. PPARγ is a key regulator of cell fate, linking nutrient sensing to transcription processes, and its expression oscillates with circadian rhythmicity. Aim of our study was to assess the periodicity of PPARγ and DNMTs in pancreatic cancer (PC. We investigated the time-related patterns of PPARG, DNMT1, and DNMT3B expression monitoring their mRNA levels by qRT-PCR at different time points over a 28-hour span in BxPC-3, CFPAC-1, PANC-1, and MIAPaCa-2 PC cells after synchronization with serum shock. PPARG and DNMT1 expression in PANC-1 cells and PPARG expression in MIAPaCa-2 cells were characterized by a 24 h period oscillation, and a borderline significant rhythm was observed for the PPARG, DNMT1, and DNMT3B expression profiles in the other cell lines. The time-qualified profiles of gene expression showed different shapes and phase relationships in the PC cell lines examined. In conclusion, PPARG and DNMTs expression is characterized by different time-qualified patterns in cell lines derived from human PC, and this heterogeneity could influence cell phenotype and human disease behaviour.

  17. GLUT-1 Expression in Pancreatic Neoplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basturk, Olca; Singh, Rajendra; Kaygusuz, Ecmel; Balci, Serdar; Dursun, Nevra; Culhaci, Nil; Adsay, N. Volkan

    2011-01-01

    Objectives GLUT-1 has been found to have an important role in the upregulation of various cellular pathways and implicated in neoplastic transformation correlating with biological behavior in malignancies. However, literature regarding the significance of GLUT-1 expression in pancreatic neoplasia has been limited and controversial. Methods Immunohistochemical expression of GLUT-1 was tested in a variety of pancreatic neoplasia including ductal adenocarcinomas (DAs), pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasms (PanINs), intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs), and serous cystadenomas. Results There was a progressive increase in the expression of GLUT-1 from low- to higher-grade dysplastic lesions: All higher-grade PanINs/IPMNs (the ones with moderate/high-grade dysplasia) revealed noticeable GLUT-1 expression. Among the 94 DAs analyzed, there were minimal/moderate expression in 46 and significant expression in 24 DAs. However, all 4 clear-cell variants of DAs revealed significant GLUT-1 immunolabeling, as did areas of clear-cell change seen in other DAs. Moreover, all 12 serous cystadenomas expressed significant GLUT-1. GLUT-1 expression was also directly correlated with DA histological grade (P = 0.016) and tumor size (P = 0.03). Conclusions GLUT-1 may give rise to the distinctive clear-cell appearance of these tumors by inducing the accumulation of glycogen in the cytoplasm. Additionally, because GLUT-1 expression was related to histological grade and tumor size of DA, further studies are warranted to investigate the association of GLUT-1 with prognosis and tumor progression. PMID:21206329

  18. Massive parallel gene expression profiling of RINm5F pancreatic islet beta-cells stimulated with interleukin-1beta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rieneck, K; Bovin, L F; Josefsen, K

    2000-01-01

    found that 146 full-length genes and a large number of expressed sequence tags were differentially regulated 3-fold or more. Most of the differentially regulated transcripts have not previously been described to be regulated by IL-1beta in beta-cells. We have analysed the expression data and sorted......Interleukin 1 (IL-1) is a pleiotropic cytokine with the potential to kill pancreatic beta-cells, and this unique property is thought to be involved in the pathogenesis of type I diabetes mellitus. We therefore determined the quantitative expression of 24,000 mRNAs of RINm5F, an insulinoma cell line...... derived from rat pancreatic beta-cells, before and after challenge with 30 and 1,000 pg/ml of recombinant human IL-1beta. The highest concentration resulted in decreased insulin production and cell death over a period of 4 days. Using three different time points, 2, 4 and 24 hours after challenge, we...

  19. Pancreatic stellate cells promote epithelial-mesenchymal transition in pancreatic cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikuta, Kazuhiro [Division of Gastroenterology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan); Masamune, Atsushi, E-mail: amasamune@med.tohoku.ac.jp [Division of Gastroenterology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan); Watanabe, Takashi; Ariga, Hiroyuki; Itoh, Hiromichi; Hamada, Shin; Satoh, Kennichi [Division of Gastroenterology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan); Egawa, Shinichi; Unno, Michiaki [Department of Hepatobiliary-Pancreatic Surgery, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan); Shimosegawa, Tooru [Division of Gastroenterology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan)

    2010-12-17

    Research highlights: {yields} Recent studies have shown that pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) promote the progression of pancreatic cancer. {yields} Pancreatic cancer cells co-cultured with PSCs showed loose cell contacts and scattered, fibroblast-like appearance. {yields} PSCs decreased the expression of epithelial markers but increased that of mesenchymal markers, along with increased migration. {yields} This study suggests epithelial-mesenchymal transition as a novel mechanism by which PSCs contribute to the aggressive behavior of pancreatic cancer cells. -- Abstract: The interaction between pancreatic cancer cells and pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs), a major profibrogenic cell type in the pancreas, is receiving increasing attention. There is accumulating evidence that PSCs promote the progression of pancreatic cancer by increasing cancer cell proliferation and invasion as well as by protecting them from radiation- and gemcitabine-induced apoptosis. Because epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) plays a critical role in the progression of pancreatic cancer, we hypothesized that PSCs promote EMT in pancreatic cancer cells. Panc-1 and SUIT-2 pancreatic cancer cells were indirectly co-cultured with human PSCs isolated from patients undergoing operation for pancreatic cancer. The expression of epithelial and mesenchymal markers was examined by real-time PCR and immunofluorescent staining. The migration of pancreatic cancer cells was examined by scratch and two-chamber assays. Pancreatic cancer cells co-cultured with PSCs showed loose cell contacts and a scattered, fibroblast-like appearance. The expression of E-cadherin, cytokeratin 19, and membrane-associated {beta}-catenin was decreased, whereas vimentin and Snail (Snai-1) expression was increased more in cancer cells co-cultured with PSCs than in mono-cultured cells. The migration of pancreatic cancer cells was increased by co-culture with PSCs. The PSC-induced decrease of E-cadherin expression was not altered

  20. Nkx2.2 and Arx genetically interact to regulate pancreatic endocrine cell development and endocrine hormone expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastracci, Teresa L; Wilcox, Crystal L; Arnes, Luis; Panea, Casandra; Golden, Jeffrey A; May, Catherine Lee; Sussel, Lori

    2011-11-01

    Nkx2.2 and Arx are essential pancreatic transcription factors. Nkx2.2 is necessary for the appropriate specification of the islet alpha, beta, PP and epsilon cell lineages, whereas Arx is required to form the correct ratio of alpha, beta, delta and PP cells. To begin to understand the cooperative functions of Nkx2.2 and Arx in the development of endocrine cell lineages, we generated progenitor cell-specific deletions of Arx on the Nkx2.2 null background. The analysis of these mutants demonstrates that expansion of the ghrelin cell population in the Nkx2.2 null pancreas is not dependent on Arx; however, Arx is necessary for the upregulation of ghrelin mRNA levels in Nkx2.2 mutant epsilon cells. Alternatively, in the absence of Arx, delta cell numbers are increased and Nkx2.2 becomes essential for the repression of somatostatin gene expression. Interestingly, the dysregulation of ghrelin and somatostatin expression in the Nkx2.2/Arx compound mutant (Nkx2.2(null);Arx(Δpanc)) results in the appearance of ghrelin+/somatostatin+ co-expressing cells. These compound mutants also revealed a genetic interaction between Nkx2.2 and Arx in the regulation of the PP cell lineage; the PP cell population is reduced when Nkx2.2 is deleted but is restored back to wildtype numbers in the Nkx2.2(null);Arx(Δpanc) mutant. Moreover, conditional deletion of Arx in specific pancreatic cell populations established that the functions of Arx are necessary in the Neurog3+ endocrine progenitors. Together, these experiments identify novel genetic interactions between Nkx2.2 and Arx within the endocrine progenitor cells that ensure the correct specification and regulation of endocrine hormone-producing cells. 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Silencing of NRF2 Reduces the Expression of ALDH1A1 and ALDH3A1 and Sensitizes to 5-FU in Pancreatic Cancer Cells

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    Hong-Quan Duong

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer remains an intractable cancer with a poor five-year survival rate, which requires new therapeutic modalities based on the biology of pancreatic oncogenesis. Nuclear factor E2 related factor-2 (NRF2, a key cytoprotective nuclear transcription factor, regulates antioxidant production, reduction, detoxification and drug efflux proteins. It also plays an essential role in cell homeostasis, cell proliferation and resistance to chemotherapy. We aimed to evaluate the possibility that modulation of NRF2 expression could be effective in the treatment of pancreatic cancer cells. We investigated whether the depletion of NRF2 by using small interfering RNAs (siRNAs is effective in the expression of biomarkers of pancreatic cancer stemness such as aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 family, member A1 (ALDH1A1 and aldehyde dehydrogenase 3 family, member A1 (ALDH3A1. NRF2 knockdown markedly reduced the expression of NRF2 and glutamate-cysteine ligase catalytic subunit (GCLC in cell lines established from pancreatic cancers. NRF2 silencing also decreased the ALDH1A1 and ALDH3A1 expression. Furthermore, this NRF2 depletion enhanced the antiproliferative effects of the chemotherapeutic agent, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU in pancreatic cancer cells.

  2. Arsenic trioxide causes redistribution of cell cycle, caspase activation, and GADD expression in human colonic, breast, and pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinquan; Ding, Xianzhong; Adrian, Thomas E

    2004-01-01

    Arsenic trioxide is valuable for treatment of promyelocytic leukemia, but less attention has been paid to its therapeutic potential for other cancers. In this study, the effects of arsenic trioxide were tested in human pancreatic (AsPC-1), colonic (HT-29), and breast (MCF-7) cancer cells. In all three cancer cell lines, arsenic trioxide inhibited proliferation in a concentration and time-dependent manner, as measured by 3H-methyl thymidine incorporation and cell counting. Coincident with inhibition of growth, arsenic trioxide induced marked morphologic changes, including reduced cytoplasmic volume, membrane blebbing, and nuclear condensation consistent with apoptosis. Propidium iodide DNA staining at 24 hours revealed cell cycle arrest in the G0/G1 phase and an increase in the S phase, while at 72 hr there was G2/M phase arrest with a marked increase in the sub-G0/G1, apoptotic cell population. The DNA fragmentation induced by arsenic trioxide was confirmed by the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay in all cell lines. Western blot analysis revealed activation of caspase -3, -7, and -9 by arsenic trioxide. Caspase-3 activity was confirmed by demonstrating cleavage of its downstream target, poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP). Expression of the antiapoptosis protein, Bcl-2, was time-dependently decreased. In contrast, arsenic trioxide markedly enhanced the expression of the p21 protein, GADD45 and GADD153, in a time-dependent manner. These findings suggest that arsenic trioxide has potential as a therapeutic agent for these cancers.

  3. Adenoviruses Expressing PDX-1, BETA2/NeuroD and MafA Induces the Transdifferentiation of Porcine Neonatal Pancreas Cell Clusters and Adult Pig Pancreatic Cells into Beta-Cells

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    Young-Hye You

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundA limitation in the number of insulin-producing pancreatic beta-cells is a special feature of diabetes. The identification of alternative sources for the induction of insulin-producing surrogate beta-cells is a matter of profound importance. PDX-1/VP16, BETA2/NeuroD, and MafA overexpression have been shown to influence the differentiation and proliferation of pancreatic stem cells. However, few studies have been conducted using adult animal pancreatic stem cells.MethodsAdult pig pancreatic cells were prepared from the non-endocrine fraction of adult pig pancreata. Porcine neonatal pancreas cell clusters (NPCCs were prepared from neonatal pigs aged 1-2 days. The dispersed pancreatic cells were infected with PDX-1/VP16, BETA2/NeuroD, and MafA adenoviruses. After infection, these cells were transplanted under the kidney capsules of normoglycemic nude mice.ResultsThe adenovirus-mediated overexpression of PDX-1, BETA2/NeuroD and MafA induced insulin gene expression in NPCCs, but not in adult pig pancreatic cells. Immunocytochemistry revealed that the number of insulin-positive cells in NPCCs and adult pig pancreatic cells was approximately 2.6- and 1.1-fold greater than those in the green fluorescent protein control group, respectively. At four weeks after transplantation, the relative volume of insulin-positive cells in the grafts increased in the NPCCs, but not in the adult porcine pancreatic cells.ConclusionThese data indicate that PDX-1, BETA2/NeuroD, and MafA facilitate the beta-cell differentiation of NPCCs, but not adult pig pancreatic cells. Therefore PDX-1, BETA2/NeuroD, and MafA-induced NPCCs can be considered good sources for the induction of pancreatic beta-cells, and may also have some utility in the treatment of diabetes.

  4. Cyclooxygenase-2 expression in feline pancreatic adenocarcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Shelley Joy; Mrkonjich, Ladonna

    2006-11-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-II) is an inducible enzyme that is responsible for the production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), which is often upregulated in neoplastic conditions. Expression of COX-II is documented in the majority of human pancreatic adenocarcinomas and in many epithelial neoplasms in humans and animals. The purpose of this study was to assess a series of feline pancreatic adenocarcinomas for the expression of COX-II. Eight feline pancreatic adenocarcinomas (5 poorly differentiated ductular variants and 3 well-differentiated acinar variants) were included. Immunohistochemical staining showed that COX-II was expressed in 2 (both poorly differentiated ductular variants) of the 8 neoplasms (25%). Approximately 10% of the epithelial cells from these 2 neoplasms expressed intense cytoplasmic staining. However, because feline pancreatic adenocarcinoma does not appear to consistently express COX-II, it is not a useful prognostic indicator for this group of feline neoplasms. In addition, COX-II inhibitors are not likely to be effective therapeutics for cats with this neoplasm.

  5. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 expression in human and murine pancreatic beta-cells affects cell viability and insulin homeostasis

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    Santos Icaro A

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 is widely recognized as an essential element in the triggering of innate immunity, binding pathogen-associated molecules such as Lipopolysaccharide (LPS, and in initiating a cascade of pro-inflammatory events. Evidence for TLR4 expression in non-immune cells, including pancreatic β-cells, has been shown, but, the functional role of TLR4 in the physiology of human pancreatic β-cells is still to be clearly established. We investigated whether TLR4 is present in β-cells purified from freshly isolated human islets and confirmed the results using MIN6 mouse insulinoma cells, by analyzing the effects of TLR4 expression on cell viability and insulin homeostasis. Results CD11b positive macrophages were practically absent from isolated human islets obtained from non-diabetic brain-dead donors, and TLR4 mRNA and cell surface expression were restricted to β-cells. A significant loss of cell viability was observed in these β-cells indicating a possible relationship with TLR4 expression. Monitoring gene expression in β-cells exposed for 48h to the prototypical TLR4 ligand LPS showed a concentration-dependent increase in TLR4 and CD14 transcripts and decreased insulin content and secretion. TLR4-positive MIN6 cells were also LPS-responsive, increasing TLR4 and CD14 mRNA levels and decreasing cell viability and insulin content. Conclusions Taken together, our data indicate a novel function for TLR4 as a molecule capable of altering homeostasis of pancreatic β-cells.

  6. Effect of pancreatic stellate cell activation regulated by microRNA on fibrosis of chronic pancreatitis

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    ZHU Yizhou

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Chronic pancreatitis is a progressive chronic inflammatory disease and finally progresses to irreversible pancreatic fibrosis. The diagnosis and treatment of chronic pancreatitis is difficult and there are still no effective measures for delaying or reversing fibrosis. This article introduces the research advances in the role of microRNA (miRNA in the fibrosis of chronic pancreatitis and points out that pancreatic stellate cell activation is the key step in pancreatic fibrosis. Recent studies have demonstrated that miRNA regulates pancreatic stellate cell activation and participates in the fibrosis of chronic pancreatitis through altering gene expression and mediating signaling pathways and epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and miRNA may become a new target for the treatment of chronic pancreatitis.

  7. The zinc transporter ZNT3 co-localizes with insulin in INS-1E pancreatic beta cells and influences cell survival, insulin secretion capacity, and ZNT8 expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smidt, Kamille; Larsen, Agnete; Brønden, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Zinc trafficking in pancreatic beta cells is tightly regulated by zinc transporting (ZNTs) proteins. The role of different ZNTs in the beta cells is currently being clarified. ZNT8 transports zinc into insulin granules and is critical for a correct insulin crystallization and storage...... in the granules whereas ZNT3 knockout negatively affects beta cell function and survival. Here, we describe for the first time the sub-cellular localization of ZNT3 by immuno-gold electron microscopy and supplement previous data from knockout experiments with investigations of the effect of ZNT3 in a pancreatic...... beta cell line, INS-1E overexpressing ZNT3. In INS-1E cells, we found that ZNT3 was abundant in insulin containing granules located close to the plasma membrane. The level of ZNT8 mRNA was significantly decreased upon over-expression of ZNT3 at different glucose concentrations (5, 11 and 21 mM glucose...

  8. Pancreatic β-Cells Express the Fetal Islet Hormone Gastrin in Rodent and Human Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahan, Tehila; Ziv, Oren; Horwitz, Elad; Zemmour, Hai; Lavi, Judith; Swisa, Avital; Leibowitz, Gil; Ashcroft, Frances M; In't Veld, Peter; Glaser, Benjamin; Dor, Yuval

    2017-02-01

    β-Cell failure in type 2 diabetes (T2D) was recently proposed to involve dedifferentiation of β-cells and ectopic expression of other islet hormones, including somatostatin and glucagon. Here we show that gastrin, a stomach hormone typically expressed in the pancreas only during embryogenesis, is expressed in islets of diabetic rodents and humans with T2D. Although gastrin in mice is expressed in insulin+ cells, gastrin expression in humans with T2D occurs in both insulin+ and somatostatin+ cells. Genetic lineage tracing in mice indicates that gastrin expression is turned on in a subset of differentiated β-cells after exposure to severe hyperglycemia. Gastrin expression in adult β-cells does not involve the endocrine progenitor cell regulator neurogenin3 but requires membrane depolarization, calcium influx, and calcineurin signaling. In vivo and in vitro experiments show that gastrin expression is rapidly eliminated upon exposure of β-cells to normal glucose levels. These results reveal the fetal hormone gastrin as a novel marker for reversible human β-cell reprogramming in diabetes. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  9. Differential expression of neural cell adhesion molecule and cadherins in pancreatic islets, glucagonomas, and insulinomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, C J; Christgau, S; Williamson, M R

    1992-01-01

    in a process where cell adhesion molecules are involved. In this study we have analyzed the expression of neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) and cadherin molecules in neonatal, young, and adult rat islet cells as well as in glucagonomas and insulinomas derived from a pluripotent rat islet cell tumor. Whereas...

  10. Islet Cells Serve as Cells of Origin of Pancreatic Gastrin-Positive Endocrine Tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnavion, Rémy; Teinturier, Romain; Jaafar, Rami

    2015-01-01

    The cells of origin of pancreatic gastrinomas remain an enigma, since no gastrin-expressing cells are found in the normal adult pancreas. It was proposed that the cellular origin of pancreatic gastrinomas may come from either the pancreatic cells themselves or gastrin-expressing cells which have...

  11. Sweet Taste-Sensing Receptors Expressed in Pancreatic β-Cells: Sweet Molecules Act as Biased Agonists

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    Itaru Kojima

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The sweet taste receptors present in the taste buds are heterodimers comprised of T1R2 and T1R3. This receptor is also expressed in pancreatic β-cells. When the expression of receptor subunits is determined in β-cells by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, the mRNA expression level of T1R2 is extremely low compared to that of T1R3. In fact, the expression of T1R2 is undetectable at the protein level. Furthermore, knockdown of T1R2 does not affect the effect of sweet molecules, whereas knockdown of T1R3 markedly attenuates the effect of sweet molecules. Consequently, a homodimer of T1R3 functions as a receptor sensing sweet molecules in β-cells, which we designate as sweet taste-sensing receptors (STSRs. Various sweet molecules activate STSR in β-cells and augment insulin secretion. With regard to intracellular signals, sweet molecules act on STSRs and increase cytoplasmic Ca2+ and/or cyclic AMP (cAMP. Specifically, when an STSR is stimulated by one of four different sweet molecules (sucralose, acesulfame potassium, sodium saccharin, or glycyrrhizin, distinct signaling pathways are activated. Patterns of changes in cytoplasmic Ca2+ and/or cAMP induced by these sweet molecules are all different from each other. Hence, sweet molecules activate STSRs by acting as biased agonists.

  12. Sweet Taste-Sensing Receptors Expressed in Pancreatic β-Cells: Sweet Molecules Act as Biased Agonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Itaru; Nakagawa, Yuko; Ohtsu, Yoshiaki; Medina, Anya; Nagasawa, Masahiro

    2014-03-01

    The sweet taste receptors present in the taste buds are heterodimers comprised of T1R2 and T1R3. This receptor is also expressed in pancreatic β-cells. When the expression of receptor subunits is determined in β-cells by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, the mRNA expression level of T1R2 is extremely low compared to that of T1R3. In fact, the expression of T1R2 is undetectable at the protein level. Furthermore, knockdown of T1R2 does not affect the effect of sweet molecules, whereas knockdown of T1R3 markedly attenuates the effect of sweet molecules. Consequently, a homodimer of T1R3 functions as a receptor sensing sweet molecules in β-cells, which we designate as sweet taste-sensing receptors (STSRs). Various sweet molecules activate STSR in β-cells and augment insulin secretion. With regard to intracellular signals, sweet molecules act on STSRs and increase cytoplasmic Ca(2+) and/or cyclic AMP (cAMP). Specifically, when an STSR is stimulated by one of four different sweet molecules (sucralose, acesulfame potassium, sodium saccharin, or glycyrrhizin), distinct signaling pathways are activated. Patterns of changes in cytoplasmic Ca(2+) and/or cAMP induced by these sweet molecules are all different from each other. Hence, sweet molecules activate STSRs by acting as biased agonists.

  13. Transcription factor Glis3, a novel critical player in the regulation of pancreatic beta-cell development and insulin gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hong Soon; Kim, Yong-Sik; ZeRuth, Gary; Beak, Ju Youn; Gerrish, Kevin; Kilic, Gamze; Sosa-Pineda, Beatriz; Jensen, Jan; Pierreux, Christophe E; Lemaigre, Frederic P; Foley, Julie; Jetten, Anton M

    2009-12-01

    In this study, we report that the Krüppel-like zinc finger transcription factor Gli-similar 3 (Glis3) is induced during the secondary transition of pancreatic development, a stage of cell lineage specification and extensive patterning, and that Glis3(zf/zf) mutant mice develop neonatal diabetes, evidenced by hyperglycemia and hypoinsulinemia. The Glis3(zf/zf) mutant mouse pancreas shows a dramatic loss of beta and delta cells, contrasting a smaller relative loss of alpha, PP, and epsilon cells. In addition, Glis3(zf/zf) mutant mice develop ductal cysts, while no significant changes were observed in acini. Gene expression profiling and immunofluorescent staining demonstrated that the expression of pancreatic hormones and several transcription factors important in endocrine cell development, including Ngn3, MafA, and Pdx1, were significantly decreased in the developing pancreata of Glis3(zf/zf) mutant mice. The population of pancreatic progenitors appears not to be greatly affected in Glis3(zf/zf) mutant mice; however, the number of neurogenin 3 (Ngn3)-positive endocrine cell progenitors is significantly reduced. Our study indicates that Glis3 plays a key role in cell lineage specification, particularly in the development of mature pancreatic beta cells. In addition, we provide evidence that Glis3 regulates insulin gene expression through two Glis-binding sites in its proximal promoter, indicating that Glis3 also regulates beta-cell function.

  14. Glucose Regulates Cyclin D2 Expression in Quiescent and Replicating Pancreatic β-Cells Through Glycolysis and Calcium Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salpeter, Seth J.; Klochendler, Agnes; Weinberg-Corem, Noa; Porat, Shay; Granot, Zvi; Shapiro, A. M. James; Magnuson, Mark A.; Eden, Amir; Grimsby, Joseph; Glaser, Benjamin

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the molecular triggers of pancreatic β-cell proliferation may facilitate the development of regenerative therapies for diabetes. Genetic studies have demonstrated an important role for cyclin D2 in β-cell proliferation and mass homeostasis, but its specific function in β-cell division and mechanism of regulation remain unclear. Here, we report that cyclin D2 is present at high levels in the nucleus of quiescent β-cells in vivo. The major regulator of cyclin D2 expression is glucose, acting via glycolysis and calcium channels in the β-cell to control cyclin D2 mRNA levels. Furthermore, cyclin D2 mRNA is down-regulated during S-G2-M phases of each β-cell division, via a mechanism that is also affected by glucose metabolism. Thus, glucose metabolism maintains high levels of nuclear cyclin D2 in quiescent β-cells and modulates the down-regulation of cyclin D2 in replicating β-cells. These data challenge the standard model for regulation of cyclin D2 during the cell division cycle and suggest cyclin D2 as a molecular link between glucose levels and β-cell replication. PMID:21521747

  15. HMGA1 expression levels are elevated in pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia cells in the Ptf1a-Cre; LSL-KrasG12D transgenic mouse model of pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veite-Schmahl, Michelle J; Joesten, William C; Kennedy, Michael A

    2017-08-22

    Pancreatic cancer is currently the third leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States and it is predicted to become the second by the year 2030. High-mobility group A1 protein (HMGA1) is an oncogenic transcription factor, localised and active in cell nuclei, that is linked to tumour progression in many human cancers, including pancreatic cancer. Overexpression of HMGA1 renders cancer cells resistant to chemotherapy. Although the Ptf1a-Cre; LSL-KrasG12D transgenic mouse is perhaps the most widely utilised animal model for human pancreatic cancer, expression levels of HMGA1 in pancreata from this mouse model have not been characterised. Quantitative immunohistochemical analysis was used to determine nuclear HMGA1 levels in pancreatic tissue sections from Ptf1a-Cre; LSL-KrasG12D mice aged 5, 11, and 15 months. The H Score method was used for quantitative analysis. The HMGA1 levels were significantly elevated in pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) epithelia compared with untransformed acinar tissues or fibroinflammatory stroma. The PanINs have long been regarded as precancerous precursors to pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Significantly elevated HMGA1 levels observed in the nuclei of PanINs in Ptf1a-Cre; LSL-KrasG12D mice validate this animal model for investigating the role that HMGA1 plays in cancer progression and testing therapeutic approaches targeting HMGA1 in human cancers.

  16. Proteins differentially expressed in human beta-cells-enriched pancreatic islet cultures and human insulinomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terra, Letícia F; Teixeira, Priscila C; Wailemann, Rosangela A M

    2013-01-01

    In view of the great demand for human beta-cells for physiological and medical studies, we generated cell lines derived from human insulinomas which secrete insulin, C-peptide and express neuroendocrine and islet markers. In this study, we set out to characterize their proteomes, comparing them...... to those of primary beta-cells using DIGE followed by MS. The results were validated by Western blotting. An average of 1800 spots was detected with less than 1% exhibiting differential abundance. Proteins more abundant in human islets, such as Caldesmon, are involved in the regulation of cell......, a molecular snapshot of the orchestrated changes in expression of proteins involved in key processes which could be correlated with the altered phenotype of human beta-cells. Collectively our observations prompt research towards the establishment of bioengineered human beta-cells providing a new and needed...

  17. Role of Pancreatic Stellate Cells in Chemoresistance in Pancreatic Cancer

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    Joshua eMcCarroll

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is highly chemoresistant. A major contributing factor is the characteristic extensive stromal or fibrotic reaction, which comprises up to 90% of the tumour volume. Over the last decade there has been intensive research into the role of the pro-fibrogenic pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs and their interaction with pancreatic cancer cells. As a result of the significant alterations in the tumour microenvironment following activation of pancreatic stellate cells, tumour progression and chemoresistance is enhanced. This review will discuss how PSCs contribute to chemoresistance in pancreatic cancer.

  18. pp32 (ANP32A expression inhibits pancreatic cancer cell growth and induces gemcitabine resistance by disrupting HuR binding to mRNAs.

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    Timothy K Williams

    Full Text Available The expression of protein phosphatase 32 (PP32, ANP32A is low in poorly differentiated pancreatic cancers and is linked to the levels of HuR (ELAV1, a predictive marker for gemcitabine response. In pancreatic cancer cells, exogenous overexpression of pp32 inhibited cell growth, supporting its long-recognized role as a tumor suppressor in pancreatic cancer. In chemotherapeutic sensitivity screening assays, cells overexpressing pp32 were selectively resistant to the nucleoside analogs gemcitabine and cytarabine (ARA-C, but were sensitized to 5-fluorouracil; conversely, silencing pp32 in pancreatic cancer cells enhanced gemcitabine sensitivity. The cytoplasmic levels of pp32 increased after cancer cells are treated with certain stressors, including gemcitabine. pp32 overexpression reduced the association of HuR with the mRNA encoding the gemcitabine-metabolizing enzyme deoxycytidine kinase (dCK, causing a significant reduction in dCK protein levels. Similarly, ectopic pp32 expression caused a reduction in HuR binding of mRNAs encoding tumor-promoting proteins (e.g., VEGF and HuR, while silencing pp32 dramatically enhanced the binding of these mRNA targets. Low pp32 nuclear expression correlated with high-grade tumors and the presence of lymph node metastasis, as compared to patients' tumors with high nuclear pp32 expression. Although pp32 expression levels did not enhance the predictive power of cytoplasmic HuR status, nuclear pp32 levels and cytoplasmic HuR levels associated significantly in patient samples. Thus, we provide novel evidence that the tumor suppressor function of pp32 can be attributed to its ability to disrupt HuR binding to target mRNAs encoding key proteins for cancer cell survival and drug efficacy.

  19. Divergent Effects of Dendritic Cells on Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    of cytokines and chemokines - We showed that DC do not induce PSC expression of ECM proteins - We showed that DC induce PSC expression of cytokines... hepatocellular carcinoma by the intestinal microbiota and TLR4. Cancer Cell. 21:504–516. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ccr.2012.02.007 De Monte, L., M...nearly 15% of intrapancreatic leukocytes. Intrapancreatic DCs acquired a distinct immune phenotype in mice with acute pancreatitis; they expressed

  20. Exocrine pancreatic carcinogenesis and autotaxin expression.

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    Sandeep Kadekar

    Full Text Available Exocrine pancreatic cancer is an aggressive disease with an exceptionally high mortality rate. Genetic analysis suggests a causative role for environmental factors, but consistent epidemiological support is scarce and no biomarkers for monitoring the effects of chemical pancreatic carcinogens are available. With the objective to identify common traits for chemicals inducing pancreatic tumors we studied the National Toxicology Program (NTP bioassay database. We found that male rats were affected more often than female rats and identified eight chemicals that induced exocrine pancreatic tumors in males only. For a hypothesis generating process we used a text mining tool to analyse published literature for suggested mode of actions (MOA. The resulting MOA analysis suggested inflammatory responses as common feature. In cell studies we found that all the chemicals increased protein levels of the inflammatory protein autotaxin (ATX in Panc-1, MIA PaCa-2 or Capan-2 cells. Induction of MMP-9 and increased invasive migration were also frequent effects, consistent with ATX activation. Testosterone has previously been implicated in pancreatic carcinogenesis and we found that it increased ATX levels. Our data show that ATX is a target for chemicals inducing pancreatic tumors in rats. Several lines of evidence implicate ATX and its product lysophosphatidic acid in human pancreatic cancer. Mechanisms of action may include stimulated invasive growth and metastasis. ATX may interact with hormones or onco- or suppressor-genes often deregulated in exocrine pancreatic cancer. Our data suggest that ATX is a target for chemicals promoting pancreatic tumor development.

  1. Inflammatory Cytokines Stimulate Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 Expression and Release from Pancreatic Beta Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Urizar, Adriana Ibarra; Friberg, Josefine; Christensen, Dan Ploug

    2016-01-01

    The proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) and interferon gamma (IFN-γ) play important roles in the progressive loss of beta-cell mass and function during development of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. We have recently showed that bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2 and -4 are expre......The proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) and interferon gamma (IFN-γ) play important roles in the progressive loss of beta-cell mass and function during development of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. We have recently showed that bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2 and -4...... 6- and 3-fold in isolated islets of Langerhans from neonatal rat and human. Downstream target genes of the BMP pathway were also increased by cytokine treatment and could be reversed by neutralization of endogenous BMP activity. Nuclear factor kappa B- (NFκB) binding sites were identified in the rat...... BMP-2 promoter, and reporter assays verified the role of NFκB in cytokine-induced BMP-2 expression. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays confirmed NFκB binding to BMP-2 promoter upon IL-1β stimulation in beta cells. In conclusion, we suggest that NFκ...

  2. A cystic fibrosis pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoumacher, R A; Ram, J; Iannuzzi, M C; Bradbury, N A; Wallace, R W; Hon, C T; Kelly, D R; Schmid, S M; Gelder, F B; Rado, T A

    1990-05-01

    We established a pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell line (CFPAC-1) from a patient with cystic fibrosis (CF) and assessed some of its properties. The cells show epithelial morphology and express cytokeratin and oncofetal antigens characteristic of pancreatic duct cells. Basal and stimulated levels of cAMP and cAMP-dependent protein kinase and the biophysical properties of single Cl- channels in CFPAC-1 are similar to those of airway and sweat gland primary cultures and Cl(-)-secreting epithelial cell lines. Anion transport and single Cl- channel activity was stimulated by Ca2+ ionophores but not by forskolin, cAMP analogs, or phosphodiesterase inhibitors. The cells express the CF gene and manifest the most common CF mutation, deletion of three nucleotides resulting in a phenylalanine-508 deletion. These properties have been stable through greater than 80 passages (24 months), suggesting that CFPAC-1 can serve as a continuous cell line that displays the CF defect.

  3. Activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule regulates the interaction between pancreatic cancer cells and stellate cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei-Wei; Zhan, Shu-Hui; Geng, Chang-Xin; Sun, Xin; Erkan, Mert; Kleeff, Jörg; Xie, Xiang-Jun

    2016-10-01

    Activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM/CD166) is a transmembrane glycoprotein that is involved in tumor progression and metastasis. In the present study, the expression and functional role of ALCAM in pancreatic cancer cells and pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) was investigated. Tissue specimens were obtained from patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (n=56) or chronic pancreatitis (CP; n=10), who underwent pancreatic resection, and from normal pancreatic tissue samples (n=10). Immunohistochemistry was used to analyze the localization and expression of ALCAM in pancreatic tissues. Subsequently, reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunoblotting were applied to assess the expression of ALCAM in pancreatic cancer Panc‑1 and T3M4 cells, as well as in PSCs. An enzyme‑linked immunosorbent assay was used to measure ALCAM levels in cell culture medium stimulated by hypoxia, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)‑α and transforming growth factor‑β. Silencing of ALCAM was performed using ALCAM small interfering (si)RNA and immunocytochemistry was used to analyze the inhibition efficiency. An invasion assay and a cell interaction assay were performed to assess the invasive ability and co‑cultured adhesive potential of Panc‑1 and T3M4 cells, as well as PSCs. Histologically, ALCAM expression was generally weak or absent in pancreatic cancer cells, but was markedly upregulated in PSCs in pancreatic cancer tissues. ALCAM was highly expressed in PSCs from CP tissues and PSCs surrounding pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasias, as well as in pancreatic cancer cells. ALCAM mRNA was highly expressed in PSCs, with a low to moderate expression in T3M4 and Panc‑1 cells. Similar to the mRNA expression, immunoblotting demonstrated that ALCAM protein levels were high in PSCs and T3M4 cells, but low in Panc‑1 cells. The expression of TNF‑α increased, while hypoxia decreased the secretion of ALCAM in pancreatic cancer Panc

  4. Retraction: "Over-expression of FoxM1 leads to epithelial-mesenchymal transition and cancer stem cell phenotype in pancreatic cancer cells" by Bao et al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    The above article, published online on April 18, 2011 in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com), has been retracted by agreement between the journal Editor in Chief, Gary S. Stein, and Wiley Periodicals, Inc. The retraction has been agreed following an investigation from Wayne State University involving the second author that found Figures 1C and 4C to be inappropriately re-used and re-labeled. REFERENCE Bao B, Wang Z, Ali S, Kong D, Banerjee S, Ahmad A, Li Y, Azmi AS, Miele L, Sarkar FH. 2011. Over-expression of FoxM1 leads to epithelial-mesenchymal transition and cancer stem cell phenotype in pancreatic cancer cells. J Cell Biochem 112:2296-2306; doi: 10.1002/jcb.23150. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Clock-controlled output gene Dbp is a regulator of Arnt/Hif-1β gene expression in pancreatic islet β-cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakabayashi, Hiroko; Ohta, Yasuharu, E-mail: yohta@yamaguchi-u.ac.jp; Yamamoto, Masayoshi; Susuki, Yosuke; Taguchi, Akihiko; Tanabe, Katsuya; Kondo, Manabu; Hatanaka, Masayuki; Nagao, Yuko; Tanizawa, Yukio, E-mail: tanizawa@yamaguchi-u.ac.jp

    2013-05-03

    Highlights: •Arnt mRNA expressed in a circadian manner in mouse pancreatic islets. •Expressions of Dbp and Arnt damped in the islets of a diabetic model mouse. •DBP and E4BP4 regulate Arnt promoter activity by direct binding. •Arnt may have a role in connecting circadian rhythm and metabolism. -- Abstract: Aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT)/hypoxia inducible factor-1β (HIF-1β) has emerged as a potential determinant of pancreatic β-cell dysfunction and type 2 diabetes in humans. An 82% reduction in Arnt expression was observed in islets from type 2 diabetic donors as compared to non-diabetic donors. However, few regulators of Arnt expression have been identified. Meanwhile, disruption of the clock components CLOCK and BMAL1 is known to result in hypoinsulinemia and diabetes, but the molecular details remain unclear. In this study, we identified a novel molecular connection between Arnt and two clock-controlled output genes, albumin D-element binding protein (Dbp) and E4 binding protein 4 (E4bp4). By conducting gene expression studies using the islets of Wfs1{sup −/−} A{sup y}/a mice that develop severe diabetes due to β-cell apoptosis, we demonstrated clock-related gene expressions to be altered in the diabetic mice. Dbp mRNA decreased by 50%, E4bp4 mRNA increased by 50%, and Arnt mRNA decreased by 30% at Zeitgever Time (ZT) 12. Mouse pancreatic islets exhibited oscillations of clock gene expressions. E4BP4, a D-box negative regulator, oscillated anti-phase to DBP, a D-box positive regulator. We also found low-amplitude circadian expression of Arnt mRNA, which peaked at ZT4. Over-expression of DBP raised both mRNA and protein levels of ARNT in HEK293 and MIN6 cell lines. Arnt promoter-driven luciferase reporter assay in MIN6 cells revealed that DBP increased Arnt promoter activity by 2.5-fold and that E4BP4 competitively inhibited its activation. In addition, on ChIP assay, DBP and E4BP4 directly bound to D-box elements within the

  6. An increased expression of long non-coding RNA PANDAR promotes cell proliferation and inhibits cell apoptosis in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yuehong; Feng, Enhang; Sun, Lifang; Jin, Wei; You, Yuhong; Yao, Yue; Xu, Yi

    2017-11-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is one of the most aggressive malignancies worldwide. Emerging evidence indicates that aberrantly expressed long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) act as imperative roles in tumorigenesis and progression. PANDAR (promoter of CDKN1A antisense DNA damage activated RNA) is a novel lncRNA that contributes to the development of various cancers. However, its clinical significance and potential effects on PDAC remains unknown. In the present study, qRT-PCR was performed to explore the expression levels of PANDAR in PDAC tissues and corresponding non-tumor tissues, the correlation between PANDAR expression and clinicopathological characteristics was also analyzed. The functional roles of lncRNA PANDAR in PDAC cells were evaluated both in vitro and in vivo. The results indicated that PANDAR was aberrantly overexpressed in PDAC tissues and cell lines, and this overexpression was closely associated with tumor stage and vascular invasion in PDAC patients. Besides, silencing of PANDAR exerted tumor suppressive effect via reducing cell proliferation, colony-forming ability, inducing cell cycle G0/G1 arrest and apoptosis in PANC1 and Capan-2 cells. Further in vivo study confirmed the oncogenesis role of PANDAR in PDAC cells. Overall, our findings may help to develop a potential therapeutic target for the patients with PDAC. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  7. Recombinant expression of different mutant K-ras gene in pancreatic cancer Bxpc-3 cells and its effects on chemotherapy sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, TengFei; Zheng, YuanTing; Zhao, Bei; Li, Tao; Cheng, KeGuang; Cai, WeiMin

    2014-10-01

    K-ras is a member of ras gene family which is involved in cell survival, proliferation and differentiation. When a mutation occurs in ras gene, the activation of Ras proteins may be prolonged to induce oncogenesis. However, the relationship between K-ras mutation and clinical outcomes in pancreatic cancer patients treated with chemotherapy agents is still under debate. In this study, we constructed five pAcGFP1-C3 plasmids for different types of K-ras gene (WT, G12V, G12R, G12D, and G13D) and stably transfected human pancreatic cancer Bxpc-3 cells with these genes. The wild type and mutant clones showed a comparable growth and expression of K-Ras-GFP fusion protein. The expression of some K-ras mutations resulted in a reduced sensitivity to gefitinib, 5-FU, docetaxel and gemcitabine, while showed no effects on erlotinib or cisplatin. Moreover, compared with the wild type clone, K-Ras downstream signals (phospho-Akt and/or phospho-Erk) were increased in K-ras mutant clones. Interestingly, different types of K-ras mutation had non-identical K-Ras downstream signal activities and drug responses. Our results are the first to reveal the relationship between different K-ras mutation and drug sensitivities of these anti-cancer drugs in pancreatic cancer cells in vitro.

  8. Pancreatic hormones are expressed on the surfaces of human and rat islet cells through exocytotic sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, L I; Hutton, J C; Madsen, O D

    1989-01-01

    responsible for the staining. Human insulin cells were surface-labeled by monoclonal antibodies recognizing the mature secretory products, insulin and C-peptide but not with monoclonal antibodies specific for proinsulin. Thus, routing of unprocessed preproinsulin to the cell surface may not account......Human and rat insulin cells show insulin immunoreactivity, and glucagon cells show glucagon immunoreactivity on their membrane surfaces, respectively. The reaction occurs in the form of small dots on the islet cell surface and colocalizes with the chromogranin family of secretory granule markers...

  9. Exposure to ethanol and tobacco smoke in relation to level of PCNA antigen expression in pancreatic and hepatic rat cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiśniewska, Ewa; Dylik, Anna; Kulza, Maksymilian; Florek, Ewa; Piekoszewski, Wojciech; Seńczuk-Przybyłowska, Monika; Marszałek, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    Previous results proved that simultaneous effect of tobacco smoke constituents and alcohol consumption may change toxicity of these substances and have a greater effect on hepatic and pancreatic disease and cancer risk. The aim of this study was to investigate hepatocyte and pancreatic cells regeneration after tobacco and/or ethanol treatment. In the study, four groups of rats were used - alcohol non-addicted and addicted male and female rats. The animals from each group were exposed to tobacco smoke, to ethanol or tobacco smoke and ethanol. After the exposure, pancreas and liver were collected at two time-points--5 and 24 h. Biochemical methods were used to measure concentration of ethanol and cotinine in blood and plasma. Additionally, proliferating cell nuclear antigen labeling index (PCNA-LI), an S-phase marker was assessed by immunohistochemical staining and morphometric method. Our experimental results showed that the exposure of rats to tobacco smoke does not have influence on ethanol concentration in blood of non-addicted (male, female) and addicted (male and female) animals. The results also proved that alcohol addiction did not influence nicotine metabolism in all animals exposed to tobacco smoke. Morphological studies of tissues display significant damage in liver of addicted males, including fatty degradation, fibrosis and slight inflammatory infiltrate. Immunohistochemical studies revealed at first, significant increase of PCNA-LI and, thus, increased cell proliferation activity and damage in tissues were observed in hepatic and pancreatic cells of addicted males when compared with non-addicted males. Secondly, comparison between addicted males and addicted females revealed that PCNA-LI in females is significantly lower, both in hepatic and pancreatic tissues. And finally, animals exposed only to ethanol and to tobacco smoke plus ethanol were characterized by higher percentage of PCNA positive cells in relation to animals exposed only to tobacco smoke

  10. Glucose-induced repression of PPARalpha gene expression in pancreatic beta-cells involves PP2A activation and AMPK inactivation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravnskjaer, Kim; Boergesen, Michael; Dalgaard, Louise T

    2006-01-01

    , the mechanism underlying this transcriptional repression by glucose remains unclear. Here we report that glucose-induced repression of PPARalpha gene expression in INS-1E cells is independent of beta-cell excitation and insulin secretion but requires activation of protein phosphatase 2A in a process involving...... but not AMPKalpha1 using RNAi suppressed PPARalpha expression, thereby mimicking the effect of glucose. These results indicate that activation of protein phosphatase 2A and subsequent inactivation of AMPK is necessary for glucose repression of PPARalpha expression in pancreatic beta-cells....... inactivation of the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Pharmacological activation of AMPK at high glucose concentrations interferes with glucose repression of PPARalpha and PPARalpha target genes in INS-1E cells as well as in rat islets. Specific knock-down of the catalytic AMPK-subunit AMPKalpha2...

  11. Interrogation of multidrug resistance (MDR1) P-glycoprotein (ABCB1) expression in human pancreatic carcinoma cells: correlation of 99mTc-Sestamibi uptake with western blot analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harpstrite, Scott E; Gu, Hannah; Natarajan, Radhika; Sharma, Vijay

    2014-10-01

    Histopathological studies indicate that ∼63% of pancreatic tumors express multidrug resistance (MDR1) P-glycoprotein (Pgp) and its polymorphic variants. However, Pgp expression detected at the mRNA or protein level does not always correlate with functional transport activity. Because Pgp transport activity is affected by specific mutations and the phosphorylation state of the protein, altered or less active forms of Pgp may also be detected by PCR or immunohistochemistry, which do not accurately reflect the status of tumor cell resistance. To interrogate the status of the functional expression of MDR1 Pgp in MiaPaCa-2 and PANC-1 cells, cellular transport studies using Tc-Sestamibi were performed and correlated with western blot analysis. Biochemical transport assays in human pancreatic carcinoma MiaPaCa-2 and PANC-1 cells, human epidermal carcinoma drug-sensitive KB-3-1 cells, and human breast carcinoma MCF-7 cells (negative controls), and human epidermal carcinoma drug-resistant KB-8-5 cells, human breast carcinoma stably transfected with Pgp MCF-7/MDR1Pgp cells, and liver carcinoma HepG2 cells (positive controls) were performed. Protein levels were determined using a monoclonal antibody C219. Tc-Sestamibi demonstrates accumulation in human pancreatic carcinoma MiaPaCa-2 and PANC-1 cells. Uptake profiles are not affected by treatment with LY335979, a Pgp inhibitor, and correlate with western blot analysis. These cellular transport studies indicate an absence of Pgp at a functional level in MiaPaCa-2 and PANC-1 cells. Because major pancreatic tumors originate from the pancreatic duct and Tc-Sestamibi undergoes a dominant hepatobiliary mode of excretion, it would not be a sensitive probe for imaging pancreatic adenocarcinomas. Following interrogation of the functional status of Pgp in other pancreatic carcinoma cells, chemotherapeutic drugs that are also MDR1 substrates could offer alternative therapeutics for treating pancreatic adenocarcinomas.

  12. Prognostic value of metastin expression in human pancreatic cancer

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    Kawaguchi Yoshiya

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background KiSS-1 was identified as a metastasis-suppressing gene in melanoma cells. The KiSS-1 gene product (metastin was isolated from human placenta as the ligand of GPR54, a G-protein-coupled receptor. The role of metastin and GPR54 in tumor progression is not fully understood. Methods We investigated the clinical significance of metastin and GPR54 expression in pancreatic cancer. We evaluated immunohistochemical expression of metastin and GPR54 in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma tissues obtained from 53 consecutive patients who underwent resection between July 2003 and May 2007 at Kyoto University Hospital. In 23 consecutive patients, the plasma metastin level was measured before surgery by enzyme immunoassay. Results Strong immunohistochemical expression of metastin was detected in 13 tumors (24.5%, while strong expression of GPR54 was detected in 30 tumors (56.6%. Tumors that were negative for both metastin and GPR54 expression were significantly larger than tumors that were positive for either metastin or GPR54 (p = 0.047. Recurrence was less frequent in patients who had metastin-positive tumors compared with those who had metastin-negative tumors (38.5% versus 70.0%, p = 0.04. Strong expression of metastin and GPR54 was significantly correlated with longer survival (p = 0.02. Metastin expression by pancreatic cancer was an independent prognostic factor for longer survival (hazard ratio, 2.1; 95% confidence interval, 1.1–4.7; p = 0.03, and the patients with a high plasma metastin level (n = 6 did not die after surgical resection. Conclusion Strong expression of metastin and GPR54 by pancreatic cancer is associated with longer survival. Metastin expression is an independent prognostic factor for the survival of pancreatic cancer patients. The plasma metastin level could become a noninvasive prognostic factor for the assessment of pancreatic cancer.

  13. Prognostic value of metastin expression in human pancreatic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Kazuyuki; Doi, Ryuichiro; Katagiri, Fumihiko; Ito, Tatsuo; Kida, Atsushi; Koizumi, Masayuki; Masui, Toshihiko; Kawaguchi, Yoshiya; Tomita, Kenji; Oishi, Shinya; Fujii, Nobutaka; Uemoto, Shinji

    2009-01-01

    Background KiSS-1 was identified as a metastasis-suppressing gene in melanoma cells. The KiSS-1 gene product (metastin) was isolated from human placenta as the ligand of GPR54, a G-protein-coupled receptor. The role of metastin and GPR54 in tumor progression is not fully understood. Methods We investigated the clinical significance of metastin and GPR54 expression in pancreatic cancer. We evaluated immunohistochemical expression of metastin and GPR54 in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma tissues obtained from 53 consecutive patients who underwent resection between July 2003 and May 2007 at Kyoto University Hospital. In 23 consecutive patients, the plasma metastin level was measured before surgery by enzyme immunoassay. Results Strong immunohistochemical expression of metastin was detected in 13 tumors (24.5%), while strong expression of GPR54 was detected in 30 tumors (56.6%). Tumors that were negative for both metastin and GPR54 expression were significantly larger than tumors that were positive for either metastin or GPR54 (p = 0.047). Recurrence was less frequent in patients who had metastin-positive tumors compared with those who had metastin-negative tumors (38.5% versus 70.0%, p = 0.04). Strong expression of metastin and GPR54 was significantly correlated with longer survival (p = 0.02). Metastin expression by pancreatic cancer was an independent prognostic factor for longer survival (hazard ratio, 2.1; 95% confidence interval, 1.1–4.7; p = 0.03), and the patients with a high plasma metastin level (n = 6) did not die after surgical resection. Conclusion Strong expression of metastin and GPR54 by pancreatic cancer is associated with longer survival. Metastin expression is an independent prognostic factor for the survival of pancreatic cancer patients. The plasma metastin level could become a noninvasive prognostic factor for the assessment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:19154616

  14. Susceptibility of ATM-deficient pancreatic cancer cells to radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayars, Michael; Eshleman, James; Goggins, Michael

    2017-05-19

    Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) is inactivated in a significant minority of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas and may be predictor of treatment response. We determined if ATM deficiency renders pancreatic cancer cells more sensitive to fractionated radiation or commonly used chemotherapeutics. ATM expression was knocked down in three pancreatic cancer cell lines using ATM-targeting shRNA. Isogenic cell lines were tested for sensitivity to several chemotherapeutic agents and radiation. DNA repair kinetics were analyzed in irradiated cells using the comet assay. We find that while rendering pancreatic cancer cells ATM-deficient did not significantly change their sensitivity to several chemotherapeutics, it did render them exquisitely sensitized to radiation. Pancreatic cancer ATM status may help predict response to radiotherapy.

  15. Globally increased ultraconserved noncoding RNA expression in pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jinmai; Azevedo-Pouly, Ana Clara P; Redis, Roxana S; Lee, Eun Joo; Gusev, Yuriy; Allard, David; Sutaria, Dhruvitkumar S; Badawi, Mohamed; Elgamal, Ola A; Lerner, Megan R; Brackett, Daniel J; Calin, George A; Schmittgen, Thomas D

    2016-08-16

    Transcribed ultraconserved regions (T-UCRs) are a class of non-coding RNAs with 100% sequence conservation among human, rat and mouse genomes. T-UCRs are differentially expressed in several cancers, however their expression in pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC) has not been studied. We used a qPCR array to profile all 481 T-UCRs in pancreatic cancer specimens, pancreatic cancer cell lines, during experimental pancreatic desmoplasia and in the pancreases of P48Cre/wt; KrasLSL-G12D/wt mice. Fourteen, 57 and 29% of the detectable T-UCRs were differentially expressed in the cell lines, human tumors and transgenic mouse pancreases, respectively. The vast majority of the differentially expressed T-UCRs had increased expression in the cancer. T-UCRs were monitored using an in vitro model of the desmoplastic reaction. Twenty-five % of the expressed T-UCRs were increased in the HPDE cells cultured on PANC-1 cellular matrix. UC.190, UC.233 and UC.270 were increased in all three human data sets. siRNA knockdown of each of these three T-UCRs reduced the proliferation of MIA PaCa-2 cells up to 60%. The expression pattern among many T-UCRs in the human and mouse pancreases closely correlated with one another, suggesting that groups of T-UCRs are co-activated in PDAC. Successful knockout of the transcription factor EGR1 in PANC-1 cells caused a reduction in the expression of a subset of T-UCRs suggesting that EGR1 may control T-UCR expression in PDAC. We report a global increase in expression of T-UCRs in both human and mouse PDAC. Commonalties in their expression pattern suggest a similar mechanism of transcriptional upregulation for T-UCRs in PDAC.

  16. Protein kinase D regulates cell death pathways in experimental pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingzhen eYuan

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation and acinar cell necrosis are two major pathological responses of acute pancreatitis, a serious disorder with no current therapies directed to its molecular pathogenesis. Serine/threonine protein kinase D family, which includes PKD/PKD1, PKD2, and PKD3, has been increasingly implicated in the regulation of multiple physiological and pathophysiological effects. We recently reported that PKD/PKD1, the predominant PKD isoform expressed in rat pancreatic acinar cells, mediates early events of pancreatitis including NF-kappaB activation and inappropriate intracellular digestive enzyme activation. In current studies, we investigated the role and mechanisms of PKD/PKD1 in the regulation of necrosis in pancreatic acinar cells by using two novel small molecule PKD inhibitors CID755673 and CRT0066101 and molecular approaches in in vitro and in vivo experimental models of acute pancreatitis. Our results demonstrated that both CID755673 and CRT0066101 are PKD-specific inhibitors and that PKD/PKD1 inhibition by either the chemical inhibitors or specific PKD/PKD1 siRNAs attenuated necrosis while promoting apoptosis induced by pathological doses of cholecystokinin-octapeptide (CCK in pancreatic acinar cells. Conversely, upregulation of PKD expression in pancreatic acinar cells increased necrosis and decreased apoptosis. We further showed that PKD/PKD1 regulated several key cell death signals including inhibitors of apoptotic proteins (IAPs, caspases, receptor-interacting protein kinase 1 (RIP1 to promote necrosis. PKD/PKD1 inhibition by CID755673 significantly ameliorated necrosis and severity of pancreatitis in an in vivo experimental model of acute pancreatitis. Thus, our studies indicate that PKD/PKD1 is a key mediator of necrosis in acute pancreatitis and that PKD/PKD1 may represent a potential therapeutic target in acute pancreatitis.

  17. Islet Cells Serve as Cells of Origin of Pancreatic Gastrin-Positive Endocrine Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnavion, Rémy; Teinturier, Romain; Jaafar, Rami; Ripoche, Doriane; Leteurtre, Emmanuelle; Chen, Yuan-Jia; Rehfeld, Jens F; Lepinasse, Florian; Hervieu, Valérie; Pattou, François; Vantyghem, Marie-Christine; Scoazec, Jean-Yves; Bertolino, Philippe; Zhang, Chang Xian

    2015-10-01

    The cells of origin of pancreatic gastrinomas remain an enigma, since no gastrin-expressing cells are found in the normal adult pancreas. It was proposed that the cellular origin of pancreatic gastrinomas may come from either the pancreatic cells themselves or gastrin-expressing cells which have migrated from the duodenum. In the current study, we further characterized previously described transient pancreatic gastrin-expressing cells using cell lineage tracing in a pan-pancreatic progenitor and a pancreatic endocrine progenitor model. We provide evidence showing that pancreatic gastrin-expressing cells, found from embryonic day 12.5 until postnatal day 7, are derived from pancreatic Ptf1a(+) and neurogenin 3-expressing (Ngn3(+)) progenitors. Importantly, the majority of them coexpress glucagon, with 4% coexpressing insulin, indicating that they are a temporary subpopulation of both alpha and beta cells. Interestingly, Men1 disruption in both Ngn3 progenitors and beta and alpha cells resulted in the development of pancreatic gastrin-expressing tumors, suggesting that the latter developed from islet cells. Finally, we detected gastrin expression using three human cohorts with pancreatic endocrine tumors (pNETs) that have not been diagnosed as gastrinomas (in 9/34 pNETs from 6/14 patients with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1, in 5/35 sporadic nonfunctioning pNETs, and in 2/20 sporadic insulinomas), consistent with observations made in mouse models. Our work provides insight into the histogenesis of pancreatic gastrin-expressing tumors. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  18. Papillocystic Variant of Acinar Cell Pancreatic Carcinoma

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    Jasim Radhi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Acinar cell pancreatic carcinoma is a rare solid malignant neoplasm. Recent review of the literature showed occasional cases with papillary or papillocystic growth patterns, ranging from 2 to 5 cm in diameter. We report a large 10 cm pancreatic tumor with papillocystic pathology features involving the pancreatic head. The growth pattern of these tumors could be mistaken for intraductal papillary mucinous tumors or other pancreatic cystic neoplasms.

  19. Loss of Ifnar1 in Pancreatic Acinar Cells Ameliorates the Disease Course of Acute Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Katharina J; Raulefs, Susanne; Kong, Bo; Steiger, Katja; Regel, Ivonne; Gewies, Andreas; Kleeff, Jörg; Michalski, Christoph W

    2015-01-01

    Type I interferon constitutes an essential component of the combinational therapy against viral disease. Acute pancreatitis is one side effect of type I interferon-based therapy, implying that activation of type I interferon signaling affects the homeostasis and integrity of pancreatic acinar cells. Here, we investigated the role of type I interferon signaling in pancreatic acinar cells using a caerulein-induced murine model of acute pancreatitis. Pancreas-specific ablation of interferon (alpha and beta) receptor 1 (Ifnar1) partially protected animals from caerulein-induced pancreatitis, as demonstrated by reduced tissue damage. Profiling of infiltrating immune cells revealed that this dampened tissue damage response correlated with the number of macrophages in the pancreas. Pharmacologic depletion of macrophages reversed the protective effect of Ifnar1 deficiency. Furthermore, expression of chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (Ccl2), a potent factor for macrophage recruitment, was significantly increased in the Ifnar1-deficient pancreas. Thus, type I interferon signaling in pancreatic acinar cells controls pancreatic homeostasis by affecting the macrophage-mediated inflammatory response in the pancreas.

  20. Loss of Ifnar1 in Pancreatic Acinar Cells Ameliorates the Disease Course of Acute Pancreatitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina J Miller

    Full Text Available Type I interferon constitutes an essential component of the combinational therapy against viral disease. Acute pancreatitis is one side effect of type I interferon-based therapy, implying that activation of type I interferon signaling affects the homeostasis and integrity of pancreatic acinar cells. Here, we investigated the role of type I interferon signaling in pancreatic acinar cells using a caerulein-induced murine model of acute pancreatitis. Pancreas-specific ablation of interferon (alpha and beta receptor 1 (Ifnar1 partially protected animals from caerulein-induced pancreatitis, as demonstrated by reduced tissue damage. Profiling of infiltrating immune cells revealed that this dampened tissue damage response correlated with the number of macrophages in the pancreas. Pharmacologic depletion of macrophages reversed the protective effect of Ifnar1 deficiency. Furthermore, expression of chemokine (C-C motif ligand 2 (Ccl2, a potent factor for macrophage recruitment, was significantly increased in the Ifnar1-deficient pancreas. Thus, type I interferon signaling in pancreatic acinar cells controls pancreatic homeostasis by affecting the macrophage-mediated inflammatory response in the pancreas.

  1. Xenoantigen, an αGal epitope-expression construct driven by the hTERT-promoter, specifically kills human pancreatic cancer cell line

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    Fuchinoue Shohei

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We previously reported the usefulness of the αGal epitope as a target molecule for gene therapy against cancer. To induce cancer cell specific transcription of the αGal epitope, an expression vector which synthesizes the αGal epitope under the control of a promoter region of the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT, NK7, was constructed. Methods NK7 was transfected into a human pancreatic carcinoma cell line, MIA cells, and telomerase-negative SUSM-1 cells served controls. Expression of the αGal epitope was confirmed by flow cytometry using IB4 lectin. The susceptibility of transfected MIA cells to human natural antibodies, was examined using a complement-dependent cytotoxic cross-match test (CDC and a flow cytometry using annexin V. Results The αGal epitope expression was detected only on the cell surfaces of NK7-transfected MIA cells, i.e., not on naive MIA cells or telomerase negative SUSM-1 cells. The CDC results indicated that MIA cells transfected with NK7 are susceptible to human natural antibody-mediated cell killing, and the differences, as compared to NK-7 transfected telomerase negative SUSM-1 cells or telomerase positive naïve MIA cells, were statistically significant. The flow cytometry using annexin V showed a higher number of the apoptotic cells in NK-7 transfected MIA cells than in naïve MIA cells. Conclusions The results suggest that αGal epitope-expression, under the control of the hTERT-promoter, may be useful in cancer specific gene therapy.

  2. Adipose tissue-derived stem cells promote pancreatic cancer cell proliferation and invasion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, S.Q.; Cao, J. [Department of Liver Surgery I, Eastern Hepatobiliary Surgery Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China); Zhang, Q.Y.; Li, Y.Y. [Department of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou (China); Yan, Y.Q. [Department of Liver Surgery I, Eastern Hepatobiliary Surgery Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China); Yu, F.X. [Department of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou (China)

    2013-09-27

    To explore the effects of adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs) on the proliferation and invasion of pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and the possible mechanism involved, ADSCs were cocultured with pancreatic cancer cells, and a cell counting kit (CCK-8) was used to detect the proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells. ELISA was used to determine the concentration of stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) in the supernatants. RT-PCR was performed to detect the expression of the chemokine receptor CXCR4 in pancreatic cancer cells and ADSCs. An in vitro invasion assay was used to measure invasion of pancreatic cancer cells. SDF-1 was detected in the supernatants of ADSCs, but not in pancreatic cancer cells. Higher CXCR4 mRNA levels were detected in the pancreatic cancer cell lines compared with ADSCs (109.3±10.7 and 97.6±7.6 vs 18.3±1.7, respectively; P<0.01). In addition, conditioned medium from ADSCs promoted the proliferation and invasion of pancreatic cancer cells, and AMD3100, a CXCR4 antagonist, significantly downregulated these growth-promoting effects. We conclude that ADSCs can promote the proliferation and invasion of pancreatic cancer cells, which may involve the SDF-1/CXCR4 axis.

  3. Oleic acid and glucose regulate glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor expression in a rat pancreatic ductal cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Leshuai W.; McMahon Tobin, Grainne A.; Rouse, Rodney L., E-mail: rodney.rouse@fda.hhs.gov

    2012-10-15

    The glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor (GLP1R) plays a critical role in glucose metabolism and has become an important target for a growing class of drugs designed to treat type 2 diabetes. In vitro studies were designed to investigate the effect of the GLP1R agonist, exenatide (Ex4), in “on-target” RIN-5mF (islet) cells as well as in “off-target” AR42J (acinar) and DSL-6A/C1 (ductal) cells in a diabetic environment. Ex4 increased islet cell proliferation but did not affect acinar cells or ductal cells at relevant concentrations. A high caloric, high fat diet is a risk factor for impaired glucose tolerance and type-2 diabetes. An in vitro Oleic acid (OA) model was used to investigate the effect of Ex4 in a high calorie, high fat environment. At 0.1 and 0.4 mM, OA mildly decreased the proliferation of all pancreatic cell types. Ex4 did not potentiate the inhibitory effect of OA on cell proliferation. Akt phosphorylation in response to Ex4 was diminished in OA-treated ductal cells. GLP1R protein detected by western blot was time and concentration dependently decreased after glucose stimulation in OA-treated ductal cells. In ductal cells, OA treatment altered the intracellular localization of GLP1R and its co-localization with early endosome and recycling endosomes. Chloroquine (lysosomal inhibitor), N-acetyl-L-cysteine (reactive oxygen species scavenger) and wortmannin (a phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase inhibitor), fully or partially, rescued GLP1R protein in OA-pretreated, glucose-stimulated ductal cells. The impact of altered regulation on phenotype/function is presently unknown. However, these data suggest that GLP1R regulation in ductal cells can be altered by a high fat, high calorie environment. -- Highlights: ► Exenatide did not inhibit islet, acinar or ductal cell proliferation. ► GLP1R protein decreased after glucose stimulation in oleic acid-treated ductal cells. ► Oleic acid treatment altered localization of GLP1R with early and recycling

  4. CXCL12 chemokine expression suppresses human pancreatic cancer growth and metastasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishan Roy

    Full Text Available Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is an unsolved health problem with nearly 75% of patients diagnosed with advanced disease and an overall 5-year survival rate near 5%. Despite the strong link between mortality and malignancy, the mechanisms behind pancreatic cancer dissemination and metastasis are poorly understood. Correlative pathological and cell culture analyses suggest the chemokine receptor CXCR4 plays a biological role in pancreatic cancer progression. In vivo roles for the CXCR4 ligand CXCL12 in pancreatic cancer malignancy were investigated. CXCR4 and CXCR7 were consistently expressed in normal and cancerous pancreatic ductal epithelium, established cell lines, and patient-derived primary cancer cells. Relative to healthy exocrine ducts, CXCL12 expression was pathologically repressed in pancreatic cancer tissue specimens and patient-derived cell lines. To test the functional consequences of CXCL12 silencing, pancreatic cancer cell lines stably expressingthe chemokine were engineered. Consistent with a role for CXCL12 as a tumor suppressor, cells producing the chemokine wereincreasingly adherent and migration deficient in vitro and poorly metastatic in vivo, compared to control cells. Further, CXCL12 reintroduction significantly reduced tumor growth in vitro, with significantly smaller tumors in vivo, leading to a pronounced survival advantage in a preclinical model. Together, these data demonstrate a functional tumor suppressive role for the normal expression of CXCL12 in pancreatic ducts, regulating both tumor growth andcellulardissemination to metastatic sites.

  5. Pancreatic acinar cells-derived cyclophilin A promotes pancreatic damage by activating NF-κB pathway in experimental pancreatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Ge [Department of Gastroenterology, Shanghai Tenth People’s Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Wan, Rong [Department of Gastroenterology, Shanghai First People’s Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Hu, Yanling [Department of Gastroenterology, Shanghai Tenth People’s Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Ni, Jianbo [Department of Gastroenterology, Shanghai First People’s Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Yin, Guojian; Xing, Miao [Department of Gastroenterology, Shanghai Tenth People’s Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Shen, Jie [Department of Gastroenterology, Shanghai First People’s Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Tang, Maochun [Department of Gastroenterology, Shanghai Tenth People’s Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Chen, Congying [Department of Gastroenterology, Shanghai First People’s Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Fan, Yuting; Xiao, Wenqin; Zhao, Yan [Department of Gastroenterology, Shanghai Tenth People’s Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Wang, Xingpeng, E-mail: wangxingpeng@hotmail.com [Department of Gastroenterology, Shanghai Tenth People’s Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Department of Gastroenterology, Shanghai First People’s Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); and others

    2014-01-31

    Highlights: • CypA is upregulated in experimental pancreatitis. • CCK induces expression and release of CypA in acinar cell in vitro. • rCypA aggravates CCK-induced acinar cell death and inflammatory cytokine production. • rCypA activates the NF-κB pathway in acinar cells in vitro. - Abstract: Inflammation triggered by necrotic acinar cells contributes to the pathophysiology of acute pancreatitis (AP), but its precise mechanism remains unclear. Recent studies have shown that Cyclophilin A (CypA) released from necrotic cells is involved in the pathogenesis of several inflammatory diseases. We therefore investigated the role of CypA in experimental AP induced by administration of sodium taurocholate (STC). CypA was markedly upregulated and widely expressed in disrupted acinar cells, infiltrated inflammatory cells, and tubular complexes. In vitro, it was released from damaged acinar cells by cholecystokinin (CCK) induction. rCypA (recombinant CypA) aggravated CCK-induced acinar cell necrosis, promoted nuclear factor (NF)-κB p65 activation, and increased cytokine production. In conclusion, CypA promotes pancreatic damage by upregulating expression of inflammatory cytokines of acinar cells via the NF-κB pathway.

  6. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition markers and HER3 expression are predictors of elisidepsin treatment response in breast and pancreatic cancer cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Teixidó

    Full Text Available Elisidepsin (elisidepsin trifluoroacetate, Irvalec®, PM02734 is a new synthetic depsipeptide, a result of the PharmaMar Development Program that seeks synthetic products of marine origin-derived compounds. Elisidepsin is a drug with antiproliferative activity in a wide range of tumors. In the present work we studied and characterized the mechanisms associated with sensitivity and resistance to elisidepsin treatment in a broad panel of tumor cell lines from breast and pancreas carcinomas, focusing on different factors involved in epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT and the use of HER family receptors in predicting the in vitro drug response. Interestingly, we observed that the basal protein expression levels of EMT markers show a significant correlation with cell viability in response to elisidepsin treatment in a panel of 12 different breast and pancreatic cancer cell lines. In addition, we generated three elisidepsin treatment-resistant cell lines (MCF-7, HPAC and AsPC-1 and analyzed the pattern of expression of different EMT markers in these cells, confirming that acquired resistance to elisidepsin is associated with a switch to the EMT state. Furthermore, a direct correlation between basal HER3 expression and sensitivity to elisidepsin was observed; moreover, modulation of HER3 expression levels in different cancer cell lines alter their sensitivities to the drug, making them more resistant when HER3 expression is downregulated by a HER3-specific short hairpin RNA and more sensitive when the receptor is overexpressed. These results show that HER3 expression is an important marker of sensitivity to elisidepsin treatment.

  7. Cyclooxygenase-2 Expression in Hamster and Human Pancreatic Neoplasia1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip-Schneider, Michele T; Savage, Jesse J; Hertzler, Dean A; Cummings, William O

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) has been implicated in the development of gastrointestinal malignancies. The aim of the present study was to determine COX-2 expression/activity throughout stages of experimental and human pancreatic neoplasia. COX-2 immunohistochemistry was performed in pancreata of hamsters subjected to the carcinogen N-nitrosobis-(2-oxopropyl)amine (BOP) and in human pancreatic tumors. COX-2 activity was determined by prostaglandin E2 assay in tumor versus matched normal pancreatic tissues. The activity of the COX inhibitor sulindac was tested in the PC-1 hamster pancreatic cancer model. COX-2 expression was elevated in all pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasias (PanINs) and adenocarcinomas. In BOP-treated hamsters, there were significant progressive elevations in COX-2 expression throughout pancreatic tumorigenesis. In human samples, peak COX-2 expression occurred in PanIN2 lesions and remained moderately elevated in PanIN3 and adenocarcinoma tissues. COX-2 activity was significantly elevated in hamster and human pancreatic cancers compared to pair-matched normal pancreas. Furthermore, hamster pancreatic tumor engraftment/formation in the PC-1 hamster pancreatic cancer model was reduced 4.9-fold by oral administration of sulindac. Increased COX-2 expression is an early event in pancreatic carcinogeneses. The BOP-induced hamster carcinogenesis model is a representative model used to study the role of COX-2 in well-differentiated pancreatic tumorigenesis. COX inhibitors may have a role in preventing tumor engraftment/formation. PMID:16820089

  8. Myxoma virus is oncolytic for human pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Yanghee; Kelly, Kaitlyn J; Stanford, Marianne M; Galanis, Charles; Chun, Yun Shin; Fong, Yuman; McFadden, Grant

    2008-08-01

    Viral oncolytic therapy, which seeks to exploit the use of live viruses to treat cancer, has shown promise in the treatment of cancers resistant to conventional anticancer therapies. Among the most difficult to treat cancers is advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Our study investigates the ability of a novel oncolytic agent, myxoma virus, to infect, productively replicate in, and kill human pancreatic cancer cells in vitro. The myxoma virus vMyxgfp was tested against a panel of human pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell lines. Infectivity, viral proliferation, and tumor cell kill were assessed. Infection of tumor cells was assessed by expression of the marker gene enhanced green fluorescent protein (e-GFP). vMyxgfp had the ability to infect all pancreatic cancer cell lines tested. Killing of tumor cells varied among the 6 cell lines tested, ranging from >90% cell kill at 7 days for the most sensitive Panc-1 cells, to 39% in the most resistant cell line Capan-2. Sensitivity correlated to replication of virus, and was found to maximally exhibit a four-log increase in foci-forming units for the most sensitive Panc-1 cells within 72 h. Our study demonstrates for the first time the ability of the myxoma virus to productively infect, replicate in, and lyse human pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells in vitro. These data encourage further investigation of this virus, which is pathogenic only in rabbits, for treatment of this nearly uniformly fatal cancer.

  9. Hedgehog promotes neovascularization in pancreatic cancers by regulating Ang-1 and IGF-1 expression in bone-marrow derived pro-angiogenic cells.

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    Kazumasa Nakamura

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The hedgehog (Hh pathway has been implicated in the pathogenesis of cancer including pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC. Recent studies have suggested that the oncogenic function of Hh in PDAC involves signaling in the stromal cells rather than cell autonomous effects on the tumor cells. However, the origin and nature of the stromal cell type(s that are responsive to Hh signaling remained unknown. Since Hh signaling plays a crucial role during embryonic and postnatal vasculogenesis, we speculated that Hh ligand may act on tumor vasculature specifically focusing on bone marrow (BM-derived cells.Cyclopamine was utilized to inhibit the Hh pathway in human PDAC cell lines and their xenografts. BM transplants, co-culture systems of tumor cells and BM-derived pro-angiogenic cells (BMPCs were employed to assess the role of tumor-derived Hh in regulating the BM compartment and the contribution of BM-derived cells to angiogenesis in PDAC. Cyclopamine administration attenuated Hh signaling in the stroma rather than in the cancer cells as reflected by decreased expression of full length Gli2 protein and Gli1 mRNA specifically in the compartment. Cyclopamine inhibited the growth of PDAC xenografts in association with regression of the tumor vasculature and reduced homing of BM-derived cells to the tumor. Host-derived Ang-1 and IGF-1 mRNA levels were downregulated by cyclopamine in the tumor xenografts. In vitro co-culture and matrigel plug assays demonstrated that PDAC cell-derived Shh induced Ang-1 and IGF-1 production in BMPCs, resulting in their enhanced migration and capillary morphogenesis activity.We identified the BMPCs as alternative stromal targets of Hh-ligand in PDAC suggesting that the tumor vasculature is an attractive therapeutic target of Hh blockade. Our data is consistent with the emerging concept that BM-derived cells make important contributions to epithelial tumorigenesis.

  10. The expression of dominant negative TCF7L2 in pancreatic beta cells during the embryonic stage causes impaired glucose homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weijuan Shao

    2015-04-01

    Conclusions: Our observations support a cell autonomous role for TCF7L2 in pancreatic β-cells suggested by most, though not all, investigations. βTCFDN is a novel model for further exploring the role of TCF7L2 in β-cell genesis and metabolic homeostasis.

  11. Pancreatic beta cells express two autoantigenic forms of glutamic acid decarboxylase, a 65-kDa hydrophilic form and a 64-kDa amphiphilic form which can be both membrane-bound and soluble

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christgau, S; Schierbeck, H; Aanstoot, H J

    1991-01-01

    The 64-kDa pancreatic beta-cell autoantigen, which is a target of autoantibodies associated with early as well as progressive stages of beta-cell destruction, resulting in insulin-dependent diabetes (IDDM) in humans, has been identified as the gamma-aminobutyric acid-synthesizing enzyme glutamic...... in brain, respectively. The expression of different forms and the flexibility in subcellular localization of the GAD autoantigen in beta-cells may have implications for both its function and autoantigenicity....

  12. TLR9 ligation in pancreatic stellate cells promotes tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambirinis, Constantinos P; Levie, Elliot; Nguy, Susanna; Avanzi, Antonina; Barilla, Rocky; Xu, Yijie; Seifert, Lena; Daley, Donnele; Greco, Stephanie H; Deutsch, Michael; Jonnadula, Saikiran; Torres-Hernandez, Alejandro; Tippens, Daniel; Pushalkar, Smruti; Eisenthal, Andrew; Saxena, Deepak; Ahn, Jiyoung; Hajdu, Cristina; Engle, Dannielle D; Tuveson, David; Miller, George

    2015-11-16

    Modulation of Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling can have protective or protumorigenic effects on oncogenesis depending on the cancer subtype and on specific inflammatory elements within the tumor milieu. We found that TLR9 is widely expressed early during the course of pancreatic transformation and that TLR9 ligands are ubiquitous within the tumor microenvironment. TLR9 ligation markedly accelerates oncogenesis, whereas TLR9 deletion is protective. We show that TLR9 activation has distinct effects on the epithelial, inflammatory, and fibrogenic cellular subsets in pancreatic carcinoma and plays a central role in cross talk between these compartments. Specifically, TLR9 activation can induce proinflammatory signaling in transformed epithelial cells, but does not elicit oncogene expression or cancer cell proliferation. Conversely, TLR9 ligation induces pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) to become fibrogenic and secrete chemokines that promote epithelial cell proliferation. TLR9-activated PSCs mediate their protumorigenic effects on the epithelial compartment via CCL11. Additionally, TLR9 has immune-suppressive effects in the tumor microenvironment (TME) via induction of regulatory T cell recruitment and myeloid-derived suppressor cell proliferation. Collectively, our work shows that TLR9 has protumorigenic effects in pancreatic carcinoma which are distinct from its influence in extrapancreatic malignancies and from the mechanistic effects of other TLRs on pancreatic oncogenesis. © 2015 Zambirinis et al.

  13. Encapsulated Cells Expressing a Chemotherapeutic Activating Enzyme Allow the Targeting of Subtoxic Chemotherapy and Are Safe and Efficacious: Data from Two Clinical Trials in Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Matthias Löhr

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Despite progress in the treatment of pancreatic cancer, there is still a need for improved therapies. In this manuscript, we report clinical experience with a new therapy for the treatment of pancreatic cancer involving the implantation of encapsulated cells over-expressing a cytochrome P450 enzyme followed by subsequent low-dose ifosfamide administrations as a means to target activated ifosfamide to the tumor. The safety and efficacy of the angiographic instillation of encapsulated allogeneic cells overexpressing cytochrome P450 in combination with low-dose systemic ifosfamide administration has now been evaluated in 27 patients in total. These patients were successfully treated in four centers by three different interventional radiologists, arguing strongly that the treatment can be successfully used in different centers. The safety of the intra-arterial delivery of the capsules and the lack of evidence that the patients developed an inflammatory or immune response to the encapsulated cells or encapsulation material was shown in all 27 patients. The ifosfamide dose of 1 g/m2/day used in the first trial was well tolerated by all patients. In contrast, the ifosfamide dose of 2 g/m2/day used in the second trial was poorly tolerated in most patients. Since the median survival in the first trial was 40 weeks and only 33 weeks in the second trial, this strongly suggests that there is no survival benefit to increasing the dose of ifosfamide, and indeed, a lower dose is beneficial for quality of life and the lack of side effects. This is supported by the one-year survival rate in the first trial being 38%, whilst that in the second trial was only 23%. However, taking the data from both trials together, a total of nine of the 27 patients were alive after one year, and two of these nine patients were alive for two years or more.

  14. Generation and Characterization of Transgenic Mice Expressing Mouse Ins1 Promoter for Pancreatic β-Cell-Specific Gene Overexpression and Knockout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yulong; Su, Yutong; Shan, Aijing; Jiang, Xiuli; Ma, Qinyun; Wang, Weiqing; Ning, Guang; Cao, Yanan

    2015-07-01

    The technologies for pancreatic β-cell-specific gene overexpression or knockout are fundamental for investigations of functional genes in vivo. Here we generated the Ins1-Cre-Dsred and Ins1-rtTA mouse models, which expressed the Cre recombinase or reverse tetracycline regulatable transactivator (rtTA) without hGH minigene under the control of mouse Ins1 promoter. Our data showed that the Cre-mediated recombination and rtTA-mediated activation could be efficiently detected at embryonic day 13.5 when these models were crossed with the reporter mice (ROSA(mT/mG) or tetO-HIST1H2BJ/GFP). The Cre and rtTA expression was restricted to β-cells without leakage in the brain and other tissues. Moreover, both the transgenic lines showed normal glucose tolerance and insulin secretion. These results suggested that the Ins1-Cre-Dsred and Ins1-rtTA mice could be used to knock out or overexpress target genes in embryos and adults to facilitate β-cell researches.

  15. Inhibition of cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis by oleanane triterpenoid (CDDO-Me) in pancreatic cancer cells is associated with the suppression of hTERT gene expression and its telomerase activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deeb, Dorrah; Gao, Xiaohua; Liu, Yongbo [Department of Surgery, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States); Kim, Sahn-Ho [Department of Urology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States); Pindolia, Kirit R. [Department of Medical Genetics, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States); Arbab, Ali S. [Department of Radiology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States); Gautam, Subhash C., E-mail: sgautam1@hfhs.org [Department of Surgery, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CDDO-Me inhibits hTERT gene expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CDDO-Me inhibits hTERT protein expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CDDO-Me inhibits hTERT telomerase activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CDDO-Me inhibits hTERT regulatory proteins. -- Abstract: Methyl-2-cyano-3,12-dioxooleana-1,9(11)-dien-28-oate (CDDO-Me) is a multifunctional oleanane synthetic triterpenoid with potent anti-inflammatory and antitumorigenic properties. The mechanisms of the antisurvival and apoptosis-inducing activities of CDDO-Me and related derivatives of oleanolic acid have been defined; however, to date, no study has been carried out on the effect of CDDOs on human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) gene or telomerase activity. Here we report for the first time that inhibition of cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis by CDDO-Me in pancreatic cancer cell lines is associated with the inhibition of hTERT gene expression, hTERT telomerase activity and a number of proteins that regulate hTERT expression and activity. Furthermore, abrogation or overexpression of hTERT protein altered the susceptibility of tumor cells to CDDO-Me. These findings suggest that telomerase (hTERT) is a relevant target of CDDO-Me in pancreatic cancer cells.

  16. Three-dimensional collagen I promotes gemcitabine resistance in vitro in pancreatic cancer cells through HMGA2-dependent histone acetyltransferase expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surabhi Dangi-Garimella

    Full Text Available Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC is associated with a pronounced collagen-rich stromal reaction that has been shown to contribute to chemo-resistance. We have previously shown that PDAC cells are resistant to gemcitabine chemotherapy in the collagen microenvironment because of increased expression of the chromatin remodeling protein high mobility group A2 (HMGA2. We have now found that human PDAC tumors display higher levels of histone H3K9 and H3K27 acetylation in fibrotic regions. We show that relative to cells grown on tissue culture plastic, PDAC cells grown in three-dimensional collagen gels demonstrate increased histone H3K9 and H3K27 acetylation, along with increased expression of p300, PCAF and GCN5 histone acetyltransferases (HATs. Knocking down HMGA2 attenuates the effect of collagen on histone H3K9 and H3K27 acetylation and on collagen-induced p300, PCAF and GCN5 expression. We also show that human PDAC tumors with HMGA2 demonstrate increased histone H3K9 and H3K27 acetylation. Additionally, we show that cells in three-dimensional collagen gels demonstrate increased protection against gemcitabine. Significantly, down-regulation of HMGA2 or p300, PCAF and GCN5 HATs sensitizes the cells to gemcitabine in three-dimensional collagen. Overall, our results increase our understanding of how the collagen microenvironment contributes to chemo-resistance in vitro and identify HATs as potential therapeutic targets against this deadly cancer.

  17. Inactivation of TGFβ receptor II signalling in pancreatic epithelial cells promotes acinar cell proliferation, acinar-to-ductal metaplasia and fibrosis during pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabliauskaite, Kamile; Saponara, Enrica; Reding, Theresia; Bombardo, Marta; Seleznik, Gitta M; Malagola, Ermanno; Zabel, Anja; Faso, Carmen; Sonda, Sabrina; Graf, Rolf

    2016-02-01

    Determining signalling pathways that regulate pancreatic regeneration following pancreatitis is critical for implementing therapeutic interventions. In this study we elucidated the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ) in pancreatic epithelial cells during tissue regeneration. To this end, we conditionally inactivated TGFβ receptor II (TGFβ-RII) using a Cre-LoxP system under the control of pancreas transcription factor 1a (PTF1a) promoter, specific for the pancreatic epithelium, and evaluated the molecular and cellular changes in a mouse model of cerulein-induced pancreatitis. We show that TGFβ-RII signalling does not mediate the initial acinar cell damage observed at the onset of pancreatitis. However, TGFβ-RII signalling not only restricts acinar cell replication during the regenerative phase of the disease but also limits ADM formation in vivo and in vitro in a cell-autonomous manner. Analyses of molecular mechanisms underlying the observed phenotype revealed that TGFβ-RII signalling stimulates the expression of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors and intersects with the EGFR signalling axis. Finally, TGFβ-RII ablation in epithelial cells resulted in increased infiltration of inflammatory cells in the early phases of pancreatitis and increased activation of pancreatic stellate cells in the later stages of pancreatitis, thus highlighting a TGFβ-based crosstalk between epithelial and stromal cells regulating the development of pancreatic inflammation and fibrosis. Collectively, our data not only contribute to clarifying the cellular processes governing pancreatic tissue regeneration, but also emphasize the conserved role of TGFβ as a tumour suppressor, both in the regenerative process following pancreatitis and in the initial phases of pancreatic cancer. Copyright © 2015 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Calorie restriction decreases murine and human pancreatic tumor cell growth, nuclear factor-κB activation, and inflammation-related gene expression in an insulin-like growth factor-1-dependent manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison E Harvey

    Full Text Available Calorie restriction (CR prevents obesity and has potent anticancer effects that may be mediated through its ability to reduce serum growth and inflammatory factors, particularly insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1 and protumorigenic cytokines. IGF-1 is a nutrient-responsive growth factor that activates the inflammatory regulator nuclear factor (NF-κB, which is linked to many types of cancers, including pancreatic cancer. We hypothesized that CR would inhibit pancreatic tumor growth through modulation of IGF-1-stimulated NF-κB activation and protumorigenic gene expression. To test this, 30 male C57BL/6 mice were randomized to either a control diet consumed ad libitum or a 30% CR diet administered in daily aliquots for 21 weeks, then were subcutaneously injected with syngeneic mouse pancreatic cancer cells (Panc02 and tumor growth was monitored for 5 weeks. Relative to controls, CR mice weighed less and had decreased serum IGF-1 levels and smaller tumors. Also, CR tumors demonstrated a 70% decrease in the expression of genes encoding the pro-inflammatory factors S100a9 and F4/80, and a 56% decrease in the macrophage chemoattractant, Ccl2. Similar CR effects on tumor growth and NF-κB-related gene expression were observed in a separate study of transplanted MiaPaCa-2 human pancreatic tumor cell growth in nude mice. In vitro analyses in Panc02 cells showed that IGF-1 treatment promoted NF-κB nuclear localization, increased DNA-binding of p65 and transcriptional activation, and increased expression of NF-κB downstream genes. Finally, the IGF-1-induced increase in expression of genes downstream of NF-κB (Ccdn1, Vegf, Birc5, and Ptgs2 was decreased significantly in the context of silenced p65. These findings suggest that the inhibitory effects of CR on Panc02 pancreatic tumor growth are associated with reduced IGF-1-dependent NF-κB activation.

  19. Bufalin Induces Mitochondria-Dependent Apoptosis in Pancreatic and Oral Cancer Cells by Downregulating hTERT Expression via Activation of the JNK/p38 Pathway

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    Xin Tian

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bufalin, a digoxin-like active component of the traditional Chinese medicine Chan Su, exhibits potent antitumor activities in many human cancers. Bufalin induces mitochondria-dependent apoptosis in cancer cells, but the detailed molecular mechanisms are largely unknown. hTERT, the catalytic subunit of telomerase, protects against mitochondrial damage by binding to mitochondrial DNA and reducing mitochondrial ROS production. In the present study, we investigated the effects of bufalin on the cell viability, ROS production, DNA damage, and apoptosis of CAPAN-2 human pancreatic and CAL-27 human oral cancer cells. Bufalin reduced CAPAN-2 and CAL-27 cell viability with IC50 values of 159.2 nM and 122.6 nM, respectively. The reduced cell viability was accompanied by increased ROS production, DNA damage, and apoptosis and decreased expression of hTERT. hTERT silencing in CAPAN-2 and CAL-27 cells by siRNA resulted in increased caspase-9/-3 cleavage and DNA damage and decreased cell viability. Collectively, these data suggest that bufalin downregulates hTERT to induce mitochondria-dependent apoptosis in CAPAN-2 and CAL-27 cells. Moreover, bufalin increased the phosphorylation of JNK and p38-MAPK in CAPAN-2 and CAL-27 cells, and blocking the JNK/p38-MAPK pathway using the JNK inhibitor SP600125 or the p38-MAPK inhibitor SB203580 reversed bufalin-induced hTERT downregulation. Thus, the JNK/p38 pathway is involved in bufalin-induced hTERT downregulation and subsequent induction of apoptosis by the mitochondrial pathway.

  20. The kinetics of CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell gene expression correlate with protection in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L) vaccinated against infectious pancreatic necrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munang'andu, Hetron Mweemba; Fredriksen, Børge Nilsen; Mutoloki, Stephen; Dalmo, Roy Ambli; Evensen, Oystein

    2013-04-08

    Infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV) is a highly contagious disease causing high mortalities in juvenile salmonids. Lack of correlation between neutralizing antibodies and infecting virus suggests a likelihood of involvement of the cellular mediated immune response in vaccine protection. To elucidate the kinetics of CD4 and CD8 T-cells responses in vaccine protection, Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L) were vaccinated with a high antigen (HiAg) or low antigen (LoAg) dose vaccine and challenged by cohabitation using a highly virulent Norwegian Sp strain. Analysis of T-cell gene expression in lymphoid organs (headkidney and spleen) showed that GATA-3 was positively correlated with increase in antibody levels when T-bet was low. Conversely, T-bet and FoxP3 were positively correlated with viral infection and negatively correlated with increase in antibody levels. Among the CD8+ T cell genes, expression of eomes and CD8α were positively correlated with increase in viral copy numbers and negatively correlated with increase in antibody levels. Up-regulation of granzyme A was highly correlated with increase in viral copy numbers in the LoAg and control groups indicating that this gene could save as a diagnostic marker of acute infection for IPNV during acute infection. In contrast, its down regulation in the HiAg which had low viral copy numbers corresponded with high antibody levels. Overall, these data show that the kinetics of CD4 and CD8 T-cell genes expression follow the same pattern as that observed in higher vertebrates. These findings suggest that functional signatures of the cellular mediated immune response could be evolutionary conserved across the vertebrate taxa and that they can effectively be used to monitor vaccine protection and infection progression of IPNV in Atlantic salmon. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Simultaneous characterization of pancreatic stellate cells and other pancreatic components within three-dimensional tissue environment during chronic pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wenyan; Fu, Ling

    2013-05-01

    Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) and other pancreatic components that play a critical role in exocrine pancreatic diseases are generally identified separately by conventional studies, which provide indirect links between these components. Here, nonlinear optical microscopy was evaluated for simultaneous characterization of these components within a three-dimensional (3-D) tissue environment, primarily based on multichannel detection of intrinsic optical emissions and cell morphology. Fresh rat pancreatic tissues harvested at 1 day, 7 days, and 28 days after induction of chronic pancreatitis were imaged, respectively. PSCs, inflammatory cells, blood vessels, and collagen fibers were identified simultaneously. The PSCs at day 1 of chronic pancreatitis showed significant enlargement compared with those in normal pancreas (ppancreatic components coincidently within 3-D pancreatic tissues. It is a prospect for intravital observation of dynamic events under natural physiological conditions, and might help uncover the key mechanisms of exocrine pancreatic diseases, leading to more effective treatments.

  2. Parthenolide suppresses pancreatic cell growth by autophagy-mediated apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu W

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Weifeng Liu,1 Xinshuai Wang,2 Junjun Sun,1 Yanhui Yang,1 Wensheng Li,1 Junxin Song1 1Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, 2Department of Oncology, The First Affiliated Hospital, and College of Clinical Medicine of Henan University of Science and Technology, Luo Yang, China Abstract: Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignancy and is unresponsive to conventional chemotherapies. Parthenolide, a sesquiterpene lactone isolated from feverfew, has exhibited potent anticancer effects against various cancers. The purpose of this report was to investigate the effect and underlying mechanism of parthenolide in human pancreatic cancer Panc-1 and BxPC3 cells. The results demonstrated that parthenolide suppressed the growth and induced apoptosis of Panc-1 and BxPC3 pancreatic cancer cells with the half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50 ranging between 7 and 9 µM after 24 h of treatment. Significant autophagy was induced by parthenolide treatment in pancreatic cancer cells. Parthenolide treatment concentration-dependently increased the percentage of autophagic cells and significantly increased the expression levels of p62/SQSTM1, Beclin 1, and LC3II in Panc-1 cells. Punctate LC3II staining confirmed autophagy. Furthermore, inhibiting autophagy by chloroquine, 3-methyladenine, or LC3II siRNA significantly blocked parthenolide-induced apoptosis, suggesting that parthenolide induced apoptosis through autophagy in this study. In conclusion, these studies established that parthenolide inhibits pancreatic cell growth by autophagy-mediated apoptosis. Data of the present study suggest that parthenolide can serve as a potential chemotherapeutic agent for pancreatic cancer. Keywords: parthenolide, pancreatic cancer, autophagy, apoptosis, P62, cleaved PAPRP

  3. ASF-4-1 fibroblast-rich culture increases chemoresistance and mTOR expression of pancreatic cancer BxPC-3 cells at the invasive front in vitro, and promotes tumor growth and invasion in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Masaya; Kanayama, Kazuki; Hirokawa, Yoshifumi S; Shiraishi, Taizo

    2016-04-01

    Pancreatic cancer develops dense stromal tissue through the desmoplastic reaction. The aim of the present study was to assess the effects of a fibroblast-rich environment on the malignant potential of pancreatic cancer. Cells from the human pancreatic cancer cell line BxPC-3 were mixed at a ratio of 1:3 (fibroblast-rich) or 1:1 (fibroblast-poor) with cells from the human skin fibroblast line ASF-4-1. In the fibroblast-rich co-culture, tumor budding was observed and BxPC-3 cells were found to be more resistant to gemcitabine than those in the fibroblast-poor co-culture. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the expression of mammalian target of rapamycin was increased at the invasive front of fibroblast-rich co-cultures. In addition, in mouse xenografts of fibroblast-rich co-cultures, tumors were larger and had a higher Ki-67 index compared with that of the fibroblast-poor co-culture xenografts. These results indicate that fibroblast-rich co-cultures may promote the malignant potential of the pancreatic cancer cell line BxPC-3, both in vitro and in vivo.

  4. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma upregulated factor (PAUF) confers resistance to pancreatic cancer cells against oncolytic parvovirus H-1 infection through IFNA receptor-mediated signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaowinn, Sirichat; Cho, Il-Rae; Moon, Jeong; Jun, Seung Won; Kim, Chang Seok [BK21+, Department of Cogno-Mechatronics Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan 609-736 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Ho Young [Department of Microbiology, Pusan National University, Busan 609-736 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Manbok [Department of Medical Science, Dankook University College of Medicine, Cheonan 330-714 (Korea, Republic of); Koh, Sang Seok [Department of Biological Sciences, Dong-A University, Busan 604-714 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Young-Hwa, E-mail: younghc@pusan.ac.kr [BK21+, Department of Cogno-Mechatronics Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan 609-736 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-03

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma upregulated factor (PAUF), a novel oncogene, plays a crucial role in the development of pancreatic cancer, including its metastasis and proliferation. Therefore, PAUF-expressing pancreatic cancer cells could be important targets for oncolytic virus-mediated treatment. Panc-1 cells expressing PAUF (Panc-PAUF) showed relative resistance to parvovirus H-1 infection compared with Panc-1 cells expressing an empty vector (Panc-Vec). Of interest, expression of type I IFN-α receptor (IFNAR) was higher in Panc-PAUF cells than in Panc-Vec cells. Increased expression of IFNAR in turn increased the activation of Stat1 and Tyk2 in Panc-PAUF cells compared with that in Panc-Vec cells. Suppression of Tyk2 and Stat1, which are important downstream molecules for IFN-α signaling, sensitized pancreatic cancer cells to parvovirus H-1-mediated apoptosis. Further, constitutive suppression of PAUF sensitized Bxpc3 pancreatic cancer cells to parvovirus H-1 infection. Taken together, these results suggested that PAUF conferred resistance to pancreatic cancer cells against oncolytic parvovirus H-1 infection through IFNAR-mediated signaling. - Highlights: • PAUF confers resistance against oncolytic parvovirus H-1 infection. • PAUF enhances the expression of IFNAR in Panc-1 cells. • Increased activation of Tyk2 or Stat1 by PAUF provides resistance to parvovirus H-1-mediated apoptosis. • Constitutive inhibition of PAUF enhances parvovirus H-1-mediated oncolysis of Bxpc3 pancreatic cancer cells.

  5. Demonstration of Calreticulin Expression in Hamster Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma with the Use of Fluorescent Gold Quantum Dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorgakis, Emmanouil; Ramesh, Bala; Kamali-Dashtarzheneh, Ashkan; Fusai, Giuseppe Kito; Imber, Charles; Tsironis, Dimitrios; Loizidou, Marilena

    2016-03-01

    There is dire need for discovery of novel pancreatic cancer biomarkers and of agents with the potential for simultaneous diagnostic and therapeutic capacity. This study demonstrates calreticulin expression on hamster pancreatic adenocarcinoma via bio-conjugated gold quantum dots (AuQDs). Hamster pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells were cultured, fixed and incubated with fluorescent AuQDs, bio-conjugated to anti-calreticulin antibodies. Anti-calreticulin and AuQDs were produced in-house. AuQDs were manufactured to emit in the near-infrared. Cells were further characterized under confocal fluorescence. AuQDs were confirmed to emit in the near-infrared. AuQD bio-conjugation to calreticulin was confirmed via dot-blotting. Upon laser excitation and post-incubation with bio-conjugated AuQDs, pancreatic cancer cell lines emitted fluorescence in near-infrared. Hamster pancreatic cancer cells express calreticulin, which may be labelled with AuQDs. This study demonstrates the application of nanoparticle-based theranostics in pancreatic cancer. Such biomarker-targeting nanosystems are anticipated to play a significant role in the management of pancreatic cancer. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  6. Derivation and Characterization of a Pig Embryonic-Stem-Cell-Derived Exocrine Pancreatic Cell Line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot, Neil C; Shannon, Amy E; Phillips, Caitlin E; Garrett, Wesley M

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to identify an epithelial cell line isolated from the spontaneous differentiation of totipotent pig epiblast cells. PICM-31 and its colony-cloned derivative cell line, PICM-31A, were established from the culture and differentiation of an epiblast mass isolated from an 8-day-old pig blastocyst. The cell lines were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy, marker gene expression, and mass spectroscopy-based proteomics. The PICM-31 cell lines were continuously cultured and could be successively colony cloned. They spontaneously self-organized into acinarlike structures. Transmission electron microscopy indicated that the cell lines' cells were epithelial and filled with secretory granules. Candidate gene expression analysis of the cells showed an exocrine pancreatic profile that included digestive enzyme expression, for example, carboxypeptidase A1, and expression of the fetal marker, α-fetoprotein. Pancreatic progenitor marker expression included pancreatic and duodenal homeobox 1, NK6 homeobox 1, and pancreas-specific transcription factor 1a, but not neurogenin 3. Proteomic analysis of cellular proteins confirmed the cells' production of digestive enzymes and showed that the cells expressed cytokeratins 8 and 18. The PICM-31 cell lines provide in vitro models of fetal pig pancreatic exocrine cells. They are the first demonstration of continuous cultures, that is, cell lines, of nontransformed pig pancreas cells.

  7. The reprogrammed pancreatic progenitor-like intermediate state of hepatic cells is more susceptible to pancreatic beta cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiwei; Wang, Hai; Sun, Yu; Li, Shi-Wu; Donelan, William; Chang, Lung-Ji; Jin, Shouguang; Terada, Naohiro; Cheng, Henrique; Reeves, Westley H; Yang, Li-Jun

    2013-08-15

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) hold great promise for cell therapy. However, their low efficiency of lineage-specific differentiation and tumorigenesis severely hinder clinical translation. We hypothesized that reprogramming of somatic cells into lineage-specific progenitor cells might allow for large-scale expansion, avoiding the tumorigenesis inherent with iPSCs and simultaneously facilitating lineage-specific differentiation. Here we aimed at reprogramming rat hepatic WB cells, using four Yamanaka factors, into pancreatic progenitor cells (PPCs) or intermediate (IM) cells that have characteristics of PPCs. IM clones were selected based on their specific morphology and alkaline phosphatase activity and stably passaged under defined culture conditions. IM cells did not have iPSC properties, could be stably expanded in large quantity, and expressed all 14 genes that are used to define the PPC developmental stage. Directed differentiation of IM and WB cells by Pdx1-Ngn3-MafA (PNM) into pancreatic beta-like cells revealed that the IM cells are more susceptible to directed beta cell differentiation because of their open chromatin configuration, as demonstrated by expression of key pancreatic beta cell genes, secretion of insulin in response to glucose stimulation, and easy access to exogenous PNM proteins at the rat insulin 1 and Pdx1 promoters. This notion that IM cells are superior to their parental cells is further supported by the epigenetic demonstration of accessibility of Pdx1 and insulin 1 promoters. In conclusion, we have developed a strategy to derive and expand PPC cells from hepatic WB cells using conventional cell reprogramming. This proof-of-principal study may offer a novel, safe and effective way to generate autologous pancreatic beta cells for cell therapy of diabetes.

  8. A gene expression signature of epithelial tubulogenesis and a role for ASPM in pancreatic tumor progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei-Yu; Hsu, Chung-Chi; Wang, Ting-Yun; Li, Chi-Rong; Hou, Ya-Chin; Chu, Jui-Mei; Lee, Chung-Ta; Liu, Ming-Sheng; Su, Jimmy J-M; Jian, Kuan-Ying; Huang, Shenq-Shyang; Jiang, Shih-Sheng; Shan, Yan-Shen; Lin, Pin-Wen; Shen, Yin-Ying; Lee, Michael T-L; Chan, Tze-Sian; Chang, Chun-Chao; Chen, Chung-Hsing; Chang, I-Shou; Lee, Yen-Ling; Chen, Li-Tzong; Tsai, Kelvin K

    2013-11-01

    Many patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) develop recurrent or metastatic diseases after surgery, so it is important to identify those most likely to benefit from aggressive therapy. Disruption of tissue microarchitecture is an early step in pancreatic tumorigenesis and a parameter used in pathology grading of glandular tumors. We investigated whether changes in gene expression during pancreatic epithelial morphogenesis were associated with outcomes of patients with PDAC after surgery. We generated architectures of human pancreatic duct epithelial cells in a 3-dimensional basement membrane matrix. We identified gene expression profiles of the cells during different stages of tubular morphogenesis (tubulogenesis) and of PANC-1 cells during spheroid formation. Differential expression of genes was confirmed by immunoblot analysis. We compared the gene expression profile associated with pancreatic epithelial tubulogenesis with that of PDAC samples from 27 patients, as well as with their outcomes after surgery. We identified a gene expression profile associated with tubulogenesis that resembled the profile of human pancreatic tissue with differentiated morphology and exocrine function. Patients with PDACs with this profile fared well after surgery. Based on this profile, we established a 6-28 gene tubulogenesis-specific signature that accurately determined the prognosis of independent cohorts of patients with PDAC (total n = 128; accuracy = 81.2%-95.0%). One gene, ASPM, was down-regulated during tubulogenesis but up-regulated in human PDAC cell lines and tumor samples; up-regulation correlated with patient outcomes (Cox regression P = .0028). Bioinformatic, genetic, biochemical, functional, and clinical correlative studies showed that ASPM promotes aggressiveness of PDAC by maintaining Wnt-β-catenin signaling and stem cell features of PDAC cells. We identified a gene expression profile associated with pancreatic epithelial tubulogenesis and a

  9. YB-1 expression promotes pancreatic cancer metastasis that is inhibited by microRNA-216a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jingjing; Li, Xiaohong; Wang, Fei; Guo, Yibing; Huang, Yan; Zhu, Hui; Wang, Yao; Lu, Yuhua; Wang, Zhiwei

    2017-10-15

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressive cancers. The vast majority of patients are diagnosed with advanced, unresectable disease because of early invasive growth and metastatic spread. The aim of this study was to examine YB-1 expression in pancreatic cancer and determine its effects on cell invasion. YB-1 is overexpressed in pancreatic cancer cell lines and patient tissue samples. In patient tissues, high YB-1 levels correlated with perineural invasion. Silencing of YB-1 significantly reduced cell invasion with decreased expression of MMPs in vitro. Furthermore, we found that the expression of YB-1 was suppressed by miR-216a via direct binding to the YB-1 3'-untranslated region. MiR-216a and YB-1 expression levels were inversely correlated in pancreatic cancer cell lines. In addition, ectopic expression of miR-216a inhibited cell invasion in vitro. Taken together, our findings suggest that YB-1 may play an important role in mediating metastatic behaviour and that repression of YB-1 by miR-216a could have a promising therapeutic potential to inhibit tumor metastasis in pancreatic cancer. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Expression of the Novel Costimulatory Molecule B7-H5 in Pancreatic Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byers, Joshua T; Paniccia, Alessandro; Kaplan, Jeffrey; Koenig, Michelle; Kahn, Nate; Wilson, Lora; Chen, Lieping; Schulick, Richard D; Edil, Barish H; Zhu, Yuwen

    2015-12-01

    This study investigated how the B7-H5 protein, a new member of the B7 family, is expressed in normal human pancreas tissues and examined its expression changes in pancreatic cancer. In this analysis, B7-H5 expression was examined by immunohistochemical staining of frozen specimens from patients undergoing pancreatic resection. Membranous B7-H5 protein was expressed on normal ductal epithelium within the pancreas. Other cell types from the normal pancreas, such as acinar cells and islet cells, did not express B7-H5. In adenocarcinoma, B7-H5 staining was decreased or absent. Interestingly, B7-H5 expression in intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms varied with grade. No B7-H5 expression was found with other cancer types such as neuroendocrine tumors, but normal ducts adjacent to tumors were highly positive. The findings showed that B7-H5 expression was restricted to ductal cells in the normal pancreas and the expression was downregulated in pancreatic adenocarcinomas. In addition, the findings showed that B7-H5 expression changes within different stages of dysplasia. The study suggests that loss of the B7-H5 signal may contribute to immune evasion of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. However future studies are needed.

  11. PD2/Paf1 depletion in pancreatic acinar cells promotes acinar-to-ductal metaplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Parama; Rachagani, Satyanarayana; Vaz, Arokia P; Ponnusamy, Moorthy P; Batra, Surinder K

    2014-06-30

    Pancreatic differentiation 2 (PD2), a PAF (RNA Polymerase II Associated Factor) complex subunit, is overexpressed in pancreatic cancer cells and has demonstrated potential oncogenic property. Here, we report that PD2/Paf1 expression was restricted to acinar cells in the normal murine pancreas, but its expression increased in the ductal cells of KrasG12D/Pdx1Cre (KC) mouse model of pancreatic cancer with increasing age, showing highest expression in neoplastic ductal cells of 50 weeks old mice. PD2/Paf1 was specifically expressed in amylase and CK19 double positive metaplastic ducts, representing intermediate structures during pancreatic acinar-to-ductal metaplasia (ADM). Similar PD2/Paf1 expression was observed in murine pancreas that exhibited ADM-like histology upon cerulein challenge. In normal mice, cerulein-mediated inflammation induced a decrease in PD2/Paf1 expression, which was later restored upon recovery of the pancreatic parenchyma. In KC mice, however, PD2/Paf1 mRNA level continued to decrease with progressive dysplasia and subsequent neoplastic transformation. Additionally, knockdown of PD2/Paf1 in pancreatic acinar cells resulted in the abrogation of Amylase, Elastase and Lipase (acinar marker) mRNA levels with simultaneous increase in CK19 and CAII (ductal marker) transcripts. In conclusion, our studies indicate loss of PD2/Paf1 expression during acinar transdifferentiation in pancreatic cancer initiation and PD2/Paf1 mediated regulation of lineage specific markers.

  12. Targeting senescence cells in pancreatic cancer | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Targeting senescence cells in pancreatic cancer. Cellular senescence is a programmed response to oncogenic (tumour-causing) stress that aims to halt the expansion of cells with malignant potential. It does this by stopping the proliferation of pre-cancerous lesions and recruitment of the immune system for their elimination.

  13. Piperlongumine induces pancreatic cancer cell death by enhancing reactive oxygen species and DNA damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harsharan Dhillon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is one of the most deadly cancers with a nearly 95% mortality rate. The poor response of pancreatic cancer to currently available therapies and the extremely low survival rate of pancreatic cancer patients point to a critical need for alternative therapeutic strategies. The use of reactive oxygen species (ROS-inducing agents has emerged as an innovative and effective strategy to treat various cancers. In this study, we investigated the potential of a known ROS inducer, piperlongumine (PPLGM, a bioactive agent found in long peppers, to induce pancreatic cancer cell death in cell culture and animal models. We found that PPLGM inhibited the growth of pancreatic cancer cell cultures by elevating ROS levels and causing DNA damage. PPLGM-induced DNA damage and pancreatic cancer cell death was reversed by treating the cells with an exogenous antioxidant. Similar to the in vitro studies, PPLGM caused a reduction in tumor growth in a xenograft mouse model of human pancreatic cancer. Tumors from the PPLGM-treated animals showed decreased Ki-67 and increased 8-OHdG expression, suggesting PPLGM inhibited tumor cell proliferation and enhanced oxidative stress. Taken together, our results show that PPLGM is an effective inhibitor for in vitro and in vivo growth of pancreatic cancer cells, and that it works through a ROS-mediated DNA damage pathway. These findings suggest that PPLGM has the potential to be used for treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  14. CCL20/CCR6 expression profile in pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justinger Christoph

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CCL20 and its receptor CCR6 have been shown to play a role in the onset, development and metastatic spread of various gastrointestinal malignancies. In this study, the expression profile and clinical significance of the CCL20/CCR6 system in distinct benign, pre-malignant and malignant pancreatic tissues was investigated. Methods Using RealTime-PCR, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA, Western Blot and immunohistochemistry, we have analyzed the expression profile of CCL20/CCR6 in resection specimens from patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP (n = 22, pancreatic cystadenoma (PA (n = 11 and pancreatic carcinoma (PCA (n = 25 as well as in the respective matched normal pancreatic tissues. Results CCL20 mRNA and protein was weakly expressed in normal pancreatic tissues and CP and PA specimens but significantly up-regulated in PCA (8-fold as compared to the matched normal tissue (P Conclusion CCL20 and CCR6 were significantly up-regulated in PCA as compared to the normal pancreatic tissue and CCL20 was significantly associated with advanced T-category in PCA patients. This suggests that CCL20 and CCR6 play a role in the development and progression of PCA and may constitute potential targets for novel treatment strategies.

  15. Aberrant expression of STYK1 and E-cadherin confer a poor prognosis for pancreatic cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Luguang; Ma, Chao; Bian, Yun; Shao, Chengwei; Wang, Tiegong; Li, Jing; Chong, Xiaodan; Su, Li; Lu, Jianping

    2017-12-19

    Previous studies showed that aberrant Serine/threonine/tyrosine kinase 1 (STYK1, also known as NOK) or/and E-cadherin were involved in the progression of some types of human cancers. However, whether they contributed to the development of pancreatic cancer was unknown. Here, we investigated the prognostic significance of aberrant STYK1 and E-cadherin in pancreatic cancer. Our results showed that STYK1 expression increased while E-cadherin decreased in pancreatic cancer tissues compared with normal pancreas tissues. STYK1 level was positively correlated with lymph node metastasis and clinical stage in pancreatic cancer patients. E-cadherin expression was inversely correlated with STYK1 expression in pancreatic cancer tissue samples. Patients with high STYK1 and low E-cadherin expression had the worst prognosis. In addition, STYK1 knockdown in pancreatic cancer cell lines inhibited cell proliferation, enhanced cell apoptosis, induced cell cycle arrest, and prohibited cell migration, while STYK1 over-expression showed the opposite effects. Silencing STYK1 also increased E-cadherin expression and inhibited epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and p-p38 expression in vitro. Over-expression had showed the opposite trends, and treatment with p38 inhibitor, SB203580, could reverse the trends. Thus, STYK1 repressed E-cadherin expression and promoted EMT, mediated by p38 MAPK signaling pathway, which was the possible mechanism for STYK1-mediated pancreatic cancer cell proliferation and migration. In summary, our results showed that STYK1 might be a prognostic marker for pancreatic cancer patients and might be a novel strategy for the treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  16. The Notch pathway is important in maintaining the cancer stem cell population in pancreatic cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ethan V Abel

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer stem cells (CSCs represent a small subpopulation of pancreatic cancer cells that have the capacity to initiate and propagate tumor formation. However, the mechanisms by which pancreatic CSCs are maintained are not well understood or characterized.Expression of Notch receptors, ligands, and Notch signaling target genes was quantitated in the CSC and non-CSC populations from 8 primary human pancreatic xenografts. A gamma secretase inhibitor (GSI that inhibits the Notch pathway and a shRNA targeting the Notch target gene Hes1 were used to assess the role of the Notch pathway in CSC population maintenance and pancreatic tumor growth.Notch pathway components were found to be upregulated in pancreatic CSCs. Inhibition of the Notch pathway using either a gamma secretase inhibitor or Hes1 shRNA in pancreatic cancer cells reduced the percentage of CSCs and tumorsphere formation. Conversely, activation of the Notch pathway with an exogenous Notch peptide ligand increased the percentage of CSCs as well as tumorsphere formation. In vivo treatment of orthotopic pancreatic tumors in NOD/SCID mice with GSI blocked tumor growth and reduced the CSC population.The Notch signaling pathway is important in maintaining the pancreatic CSC population and is a potential therapeutic target in pancreatic cancer.

  17. Survivin expression and its clinical significance in pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Kyung Shik

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Survivin, an inhibitor of apoptosis is expressed in several human cancers. Its expression is known to be associated with poor clinical outcome, but not widely studied in pancreatic cancer. We performed this study to determine the survivin expression in pancreatic cancer and its clinical significance as a prognostic factor. Methods We performed immunohistochemical staining for survivin, p53, and Bax in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded block from forty-nine pancreatic tissues. To determine the association with clinical course, we reviewed the patients' clinical record. Results Of the 49 cases of pancreatic cancer, 46 cases (93.9% were positive for survivin expression. There was no significant association between survivin expression and p53 or bax. For clinicopathological parameters, perineural invasion was more common in survivin positive and venous invasion was more common in survivin negative (p = 0.041 and 0.040, respectively. Responsiveness to chemotherapy appeared to be slightly better in patients with low survivin expression. Conclusion Survivin expression may be associated with venous or perineural invasion, indicating metastatic route, and seems to have a potential as a predictive marker for chemotherapy. Further study of large scale is required to determine the clinical significance of survivin expression in pancreatic cancer.

  18. Long Noncoding RNA MALAT-1 Enhances Stem Cell-Like Phenotypes in Pancreatic Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Jiao

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells (CSCs play a vital role in tumor initiation, progression, metastasis, chemoresistance, and recurrence. The mechanisms that maintain the stemness of these cells remain largely unknown. Our previous study indicated that MALAT-1 may serve as an oncogenic long noncoding RNA in pancreatic cancer by promoting epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT and regulating CSCs markers expression. More significantly, there is emerging evidence that the EMT process may give rise to CSCs, or at least cells with stem cell-like properties. Therefore, we hypothesized that MALAT-1 might enhance stem cell-like phenotypes in pancreatic cancer cells. In this study, our data showed that MALAT-1 could increase the proportion of pancreatic CSCs, maintain self-renewing capacity, decrease the chemosensitivity to anticancer drugs, and accelerate tumor angiogenesis in vitro. In addition, subcutaneous nude mouse xenografts revealed that MALAT-1 could promote tumorigenicity of pancreatic cancer cells in vivo. The underlying mechanisms may involve in increased expression of self-renewal related factors Sox2. Collectively, we for the first time found the potential effects of MALAT-1 on the stem cell-like phenotypes in pancreatic cancer cells, suggesting a novel role of MALAT-1 in tumor stemness, which remains to be fully elucidated.

  19. IL-8 Expression in Granulocytic Epithelial Lesions of Idiopathic Duct-centric Pancreatitis (Type 2 Autoimmune Pancreatitis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Yuna; Hong, Seung-Mo; Fujikura, Kohei; Kim, Sung Joo; Akita, Masayuki; Abe-Suzuki, Shiho; Shiomi, Hideyuki; Masuda, Atsuhiro; Itoh, Tomoo; Azuma, Takeshi; Kim, Myung-Hwan; Zen, Yoh

    2017-08-01

    Type 2 autoimmune pancreatitis (type 2 AIP) develops in isolation or sometimes in association with ulcerative colitis. Its diagnosis requires the histologic confirmation of granulocytic epithelial lesions (GELs) with no diagnostic biomarker currently available. This study aimed to elucidate the tissue expression of cytokines and their diagnostic value in this condition. In quantitative polymerase chain reaction for multiple cytokines using tissue-derived mRNA, the expression level of interleukin (IL)-8 was markedly higher in type 2 AIP than in type 1 AIP (Ppancreatitis adjacent to pancreatic cancers (peritumoral pancreatitis) exhibited IL-8 expression in the epithelium (3/12; 25%) and inflammatory cells (10/12; 83%), expression levels were significantly lower than those in type 2 AIP (Ppancreatitis with 92% sensitivity and 92% to 100% specificity. Furthermore, CD3/IL-8-coexpressing lymphocytes were almost restricted to type 2 AIP. Interestingly, a similar pattern of IL-8 expression was also observed in colonic biopsies of ulcerative colitis. In conclusion, the overexpression of IL-8 may underlie the development of GELs in type 2 AIP, and IL-8 immunostaining or IL-8/CD3 double staining may become an ancillary method for its diagnosis. The similar expression pattern of IL-8 in ulcerative colitis also suggests a pathogenetic link between the 2 conditions.

  20. Intravital characterization of tumor cell migration in pancreatic cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beerling, Evelyne; Oosterom, Ilse; Voest, Emile E; Lolkema, Martijn P; van Rheenen, Jacco

    2016-01-01

    Curing pancreatic cancer is difficult as metastases often determine the poor clinical outcome. To gain more insight into the metastatic behavior of pancreatic cancer cells, we characterized migratory cells in primary pancreatic tumors using intravital microscopy. We visualized the migratory behavior

  1. Gene expression profiles in primary pancreatic tumors and metastatic lesions of Ela-c-myc transgenic mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liao Dezhong J

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pancreatic carcinoma usually is a fatal disease with no cure, mainly due to its invasion and metastasis prior to diagnosis. We analyzed the gene expression profiles of paired primary pancreatic tumors and metastatic lesions from Ela-c-myc transgenic mice in order to identify genes that may be involved in the pancreatic cancer progression. Differentially expressed selected genes were verified by semi-quantitative and quantitative RT-PCR. To further evaluate the relevance of some of the selected differentially expressed genes, we investigated their expression pattern in human pancreatic cancer cell lines with high and low metastatic potentials. Results Data indicate that genes involved in posttranscriptional regulation were a major functional category of upregulated genes in both primary pancreatic tumors (PT and liver metastatic lesions (LM compared to normal pancreas (NP. In particular, differential expression for splicing factors, RNA binding/pre-mRNA processing factors and spliceosome related genes were observed, indicating that RNA processing and editing related events may play critical roles in pancreatic tumor development and progression. High expression of insulin growth factor binding protein-1 (Igfbp1 and Serine proteinase inhibitor A1 (Serpina1, and low levels or absence of Wt1 gene expression were exclusive to liver metastatic lesion samples. Conclusion We identified Igfbp1, Serpina1 and Wt1 genes that are likely to be clinically useful biomarkers for prognostic or therapeutic purposes in metastatic pancreatic cancer, particularly in pancreatic cancer where c-Myc is overexpressed.

  2. Gene expression profiles in primary pancreatic tumors and metastatic lesions of Ela-c-myc transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Archana; Bollig, Aliccia; Wu, Jiusheng; Liao, Dezhong J

    2008-01-24

    Pancreatic carcinoma usually is a fatal disease with no cure, mainly due to its invasion and metastasis prior to diagnosis. We analyzed the gene expression profiles of paired primary pancreatic tumors and metastatic lesions from Ela-c-myc transgenic mice in order to identify genes that may be involved in the pancreatic cancer progression. Differentially expressed selected genes were verified by semi-quantitative and quantitative RT-PCR. To further evaluate the relevance of some of the selected differentially expressed genes, we investigated their expression pattern in human pancreatic cancer cell lines with high and low metastatic potentials. Data indicate that genes involved in posttranscriptional regulation were a major functional category of upregulated genes in both primary pancreatic tumors (PT) and liver metastatic lesions (LM) compared to normal pancreas (NP). In particular, differential expression for splicing factors, RNA binding/pre-mRNA processing factors and spliceosome related genes were observed, indicating that RNA processing and editing related events may play critical roles in pancreatic tumor development and progression. High expression of insulin growth factor binding protein-1 (Igfbp1) and Serine proteinase inhibitor A1 (Serpina1), and low levels or absence of Wt1 gene expression were exclusive to liver metastatic lesion samples. We identified Igfbp1, Serpina1 and Wt1 genes that are likely to be clinically useful biomarkers for prognostic or therapeutic purposes in metastatic pancreatic cancer, particularly in pancreatic cancer where c-Myc is overexpressed.

  3. Metabolic signalling in pancreatic beta cells

    OpenAIRE

    Piipari, K.

    2011-01-01

    The main function of pancreatic beta cells is to maintain correct glucose homeostasis within the body by secretion of insulin in response to increased blood glucose concentration. Beta cell dysfunction contributes to the pathogenesis of diabetes. Using transgenic mouse models, the work described in this thesis has investigated the role of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) in beta cell function and their role in the regulation of ...

  4. Human pancreatic islet progenitor cells demonstrate phenotypic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2009-04-24

    Apr 24, 2009 ... Phenotypic plasticity is a phenomenon that describes the occurrence of 2 or more distinct phenotypes under diverse conditions. This article discusses the work carried out over the past few years in understanding the potential of human pancreatic islet-derived progenitors for cell replacement therapy in ...

  5. Expression, biosynthesis and release of preadipocyte factor-1/ delta-like protein/fetal antigen-1 in pancreatic -cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friedrichsen, B N; Carlsson, C; Møldrup, A

    2003-01-01

    Preadipocyte factor-1 (Pref-1)/delta-like protein/fetal antigen-1 (FA1) is a member of the epidermal growth factor-like family. It is widely expressed in embryonic tissues, whereas in adults it is confined to the adrenal gland, the anterior pituitary, the endocrine pancreas, the testis and the ov...

  6. Pancreatic differentiation of Pdx1-GFP reporter mouse induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porciuncula, Angelo; Kumar, Anujith; Rodriguez, Saray; Atari, Maher; Araña, Miriam; Martin, Franz; Soria, Bernat; Prosper, Felipe; Verfaillie, Catherine; Barajas, Miguel

    2016-12-01

    Efficient induction of defined lineages in pluripotent stem cells constitutes the determinant step for the generation of therapeutically relevant replacement cells to potentially treat a wide range of diseases, including diabetes. Pancreatic differentiation has remained an important challenge in large part because of the need to differentiate uncommitted pluripotent stem cells into highly specialized hormone-secreting cells, which has been shown to require a developmentally informed step-by-step induction procedure. Here, in the framework of using induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) to generate pancreatic cells for pancreatic diseases, we have generated and characterized iPSCs from Pdx1-GFP transgenic mice. The use of a GFP reporter knocked into the endogenous Pdx1 promoter allowed us to monitor pancreatic induction based on the expression of Pdx1, a pancreatic master transcription factor, and to isolate a pure Pdx1-GFP(+) population for downstream applications. Differentiated cultures timely expressed markers specific to each stage and end-stage progenies acquired a rather immature beta-cell phenotype, characterized by polyhormonal expression even among cells highly expressing the Pdx1-GFP reporter. Our findings highlight the utility of employing a fluorescent protein reporter under the control of a master developmental gene in order to devise novel differentiation protocols for relevant cell types for degenerative diseases such as pancreatic beta cells for diabetes. Copyright © 2016 International Society of Differentiation. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Pim-3 contributes to radioresistance through regulation of the cell cycle and DNA damage repair in pancreatic cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xiang-Yuan; Wang, Zhen [Cancer Research Institute, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Li, Bei [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Zhang, Ying-Jian, E-mail: yjzhang111@aliyun.com [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Li, Ying-Yi, E-mail: liyingyi@fudan.edu.cn [Cancer Research Institute, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai (China)

    2016-04-22

    Resistance of cancer cells to chemoradiotherapy is a major clinical problem in pancreatic cancer treatment. Therefore, understanding the molecular basis of cellular resistance and identifying novel targets are essential for improving treatment efficacy for pancreatic cancer patients. Previous studies have demonstrated a significant role for Pim-3 in pancreatic cancer survival against gemcitabine-induced genotoxic stress. Here, we observed that radiation treatment enhanced Pim-3 expression in human pancreatic cancer cells in vitro. Stable overexpression of Pim-3 in pancreatic cancer cells significantly protected cells against radiation treatment by attenuating G2/M phase cell cycle arrest and DNA damage response. Silencing of Pim-3 expression significantly elevated the phosphorylation of histone variant H2AX, a marker of DNA double strand breaks, and decreased the activation of ataxia-telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) kinase, along with its downstream targets, eventually enhancing the radiosensitivity of human pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Hence, we demonstrated a novel function for Pim-3 in human pancreatic cancer cell survival against radiation. Targeting Pim-3 may be a promising way to improve treatment efficacy in combination with radiotherapy in human pancreatic cancer. - Highlights: • This is first study to demonstrate that Pim-3 is endogenously induced by ionizing radiation in pancreatic cancer cells, and Pim-3 overexpression enhanced radioresistance of pancreatic cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo. • This is first study to provide evidence that radioresistance induced by Pim-3 is mainly attributed to Pim-3 induces activation of ATM, which subsequently activates checkpoint 1, leading to amplification of DNA repair through cell cycle arrest and DNA repair pathways. • This is first study to indicate that targeting Pim-3 may be a promising strategy to provide better treatment efficacy in combination with radiotherapy in human pancreatic

  8. Expression and Diagnostic Value of HE4 in Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

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    Tianhe Huang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Human epididymis protein 4 (HE4 is a recognized biomarker in ovarian and endometrial cancer and over-expressed in pancreatic adenocarcinoma. The diagnostic value of HE4 in pancreatic adenocarcinoma remains unknown. Here we elucidate mRNA, protein and serum level of HE4 in pancreatic adenocarcinoma. HE4 mRNA level in tumor adjacent tissues and pancreatic adenocarcinoma tissues were tested by real time-PCR. Tissue microarray containing normal, adenocarcinoma, and adjacent pancreatic tissue was tested by immunohistochemistry (IHC. Serum level of HE4, carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9, carbohydrate antigen 15-3 (CA15-3 and carbohydrate antigen 125 (CA125 were detected by ELISA assay in control and tumor patients. Further we compared the sensitivity and specificity of determining HE4, CA19-9, CA15-3, and CA125 for diagnosis of pancreatic adenocarcinoma and assessed the complementary diagnostic value of HE4, CA19-9, CA15-3 and CA125. Real time PCR showed significantly increased HE4 mRNA level in pancreatic adenocarcinoma compared with control. Result of IHC showed that HE4 significantly higher expressed in the human pancreatic carcinoma tissues than in both normal and adjacent non-tumorous pancreatic tissues, and the staining intensity is inversely correlated with the clinical stage. HE4 was highly expressed in early stage of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Serum HE4 level is higher in cases with pancreatic adenocarcinoma than in the controls. Serum HE4 levels could research to a sensitivity of 45.83% and specificity of 93.75% when the Cutoff was set at 4.59 ng/mL. The Combined HE4 and CA19-9 increased the sensitivity to 83.33%; and interestingly, the combination of HE4 with CA15-3 led to the most powerful sensitivity of 87.5%. Combined with CA19-9 and CA15-3, HE4 could be a potential biomarker to improve the diagnostic power for pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

  9. αv integrin: a new gastrin target in human pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cayrol, Celine; Bertrand, Claudine; Kowalski-Chauvel, Aline; Daulhac, Laurence; Cohen-Jonathan-Moyal, Elizabeth; Ferrand, Audrey; Seva, Catherine

    2011-10-28

    To analyse αv integrin expression induced by gastrin in pancreatic cancer models. αv integrin mRNA expression in human pancreatic cancer cells was analysed using a "cancer genes" array and confirmed by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Western blotting and semi-quantitative immunohistochemistry were used to examine protein levels in human pancreatic cancer cell lines and pancreatic tissues, respectively. The role of αv integrin on gastrin-induced cell adhesion was examined using blocking anti-αv integrin monoclonal antibodies. Adherent cells were quantified by staining with crystal violet. Using a "cancer genes" array we identified αv integrin as a new gastrin target gene in human pancreatic cancer cells. A quantitative real-time PCR approach was used to confirm αv integrin gene expression. We also demonstrate that Src family kinases and the PI 3-kinase, two signalling pathways specifically activated by the CCK-2 receptor (CCK2R), are involved in gastrin-mediated αv integrin expression. In contrast, inhibition of the ERK pathway was without any effect on αv integrin expression induced by gastrin. Our results also show that gastrin modulates cell adhesion via αv integrins. Indeed, in vitro adhesion assays performed on fibronectin show that gastrin significantly increases adhesion of pancreatic cancer cells. The use of blocking anti-αv integrin monoclonal antibodies completely reversed the increase in cell-substrate adhesion induced by gastrin. In addition, we showed in vivo that the targeted CCK2R expression in the pancreas of Elas-CCK2 mice, leads to the overexpression of αv integrin. This process may contribute to pancreatic tumour development observed in these transgenic animals. αv integrin is a new gastrin target in pancreatic cancer models and contributes to gastrin effects on cell adhesion.

  10. ETV4 Facilitates Cell-Cycle Progression in Pancreatic Cells through Transcriptional Regulation of Cyclin D1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyagi, Nikhil; Deshmukh, Sachin K; Srivastava, Sanjeev K; Azim, Shafquat; Ahmad, Aamir; Al-Ghadhban, Ahmed; Singh, Ajay P; Carter, James E; Wang, Bin; Singh, Seema

    2017-11-08

    The ETS family transcription factor ETV4 is aberrantly expressed in a variety of human tumors and plays an important role in carcinogenesis through upregulation of relevant target gene expression. Here, it is demonstrated that ETV4 is overexpressed in pancreatic cancer tissues as compared with the normal pancreas, and is associated with enhanced growth and rapid cell-cycle progression of pancreatic cancer cells. ETV4 expression was silenced through stable expression of a specific short hairpin RNA (shRNA) in two pancreatic cancer cell lines (ASPC1 and Colo357), while it was ectopically expressed in BXPC3 cells. Silencing of ETV4 in ASPC1 and Colo357 cells reduced the growth by 55.3% and 38.9%, respectively, while forced expression of ETV4 in BXPC3 cells increased the growth by 46.8% in comparison with respective control cells. Furthermore, ETV4-induced cell growth was facilitated by rapid transition of cells from G1- to S-phase of the cell cycle. Mechanistic studies revealed that ETV4 directly regulates the expression of Cyclin D1 CCND1, a protein crucial for cell-cycle progression from G1- to S-phase. These effects on the growth and cell cycle were reversed by the forced expression of Cyclin D1 in ETV4-silenced pancreatic cancer cells. Altogether, these data provide the first experimental evidence for a functional role of ETV4 in pancreatic cancer growth and cell-cycle progression.Implications: The functional and mechanistic data presented here regarding ETV4 in pancreatic cancer growth and cell-cycle progression suggest that ETV4 could serve as a potential biomarker and novel target for pancreatic cancer therapy. Mol Cancer Res; 1-10. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  11. Loss of acinar cell IKKα triggers spontaneous pancreatitis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ning; Wu, Xuefeng; Holzer, Ryan G; Lee, Jun-Hee; Todoric, Jelena; Park, Eek-Joong; Ogata, Hisanobu; Gukovskaya, Anna S; Gukovsky, Ilya; Pizzo, Donald P; VandenBerg, Scott; Tarin, David; Atay, Ciǧdem; Arkan, Melek C; Deerinck, Thomas J; Moscat, Jorge; Diaz-Meco, Maria; Dawson, David; Erkan, Mert; Kleeff, Jörg; Karin, Michael

    2013-05-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease that causes progressive destruction of pancreatic acinar cells and, ultimately, loss of pancreatic function. We investigated the role of IκB kinase α (IKKα) in pancreatic homeostasis. Pancreas-specific ablation of IKKα (Ikkα(Δpan)) caused spontaneous and progressive acinar cell vacuolization and death, interstitial fibrosis, inflammation, and circulatory release of pancreatic enzymes, clinical signs resembling those of human chronic pancreatitis. Loss of pancreatic IKKα causes defective autophagic protein degradation, leading to accumulation of p62-mediated protein aggregates and enhanced oxidative and ER stress in acinar cells, but none of these effects is related to NF-κB. Pancreas-specific p62 ablation prevented ER and oxidative stresses and attenuated pancreatitis in Ikkα(Δpan) mice, suggesting that cellular stress induced by p62 aggregates promotes development of pancreatitis. Importantly, downregulation of IKKα and accumulation of p62 aggregates were also observed in chronic human pancreatitis. Our studies demonstrate that IKKα, which may control autophagic protein degradation through its interaction with ATG16L2, plays a critical role in maintaining pancreatic acinar cell homeostasis, whose dysregulation promotes pancreatitis through p62 aggregate accumulation.

  12. ATP release, generation and hydrolysis in exocrine pancreatic duct cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kowal, Justyna Magdalena; Yegutkin, G.G.; Novak, Ivana

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) regulates pancreatic duct function via P2Y and P2X receptors. It is well known that ATP is released from upstream pancreatic acinar cells. The ATP homeostasis in pancreatic ducts, which secrete bicarbonate-rich fluid, has not yet been examined. First, ou...

  13. A positive feedback regulation of ISL-1 in DLBCL but not in pancreatic β-cells

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    Zhang, Qiao, E-mail: zhangqiao200824@126.com [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Key Laboratory of Molecular Cardiovascular Sciences (Ministry of Education), Peking University, 38 Xueyuan Road, 100191 Beijing (China); Yang, Zhe, E-mail: zheyang@bjmu.edu.cn [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Key Laboratory of Molecular Cardiovascular Sciences (Ministry of Education), Peking University, 38 Xueyuan Road, 100191 Beijing (China); Wang, Weiping, E-mail: wwp@bjmu.edu.cn [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Key Laboratory of Molecular Cardiovascular Sciences (Ministry of Education), Peking University, 38 Xueyuan Road, 100191 Beijing (China); Guo, Ting, E-mail: luckyguoting@bjmu.edu.cn [Department of Gastrointestinal Translation Research, Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Translational Research (Ministry of Education), Peking University Cancer Hospital, 52 Fucheng Road, 100142 Beijing (China); Jia, Zhuqing, E-mail: zhuqingjia@126.com [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Key Laboratory of Molecular Cardiovascular Sciences (Ministry of Education), Peking University, 38 Xueyuan Road, 100191 Beijing (China); Ma, Kangtao, E-mail: makangtao11@126.com [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Key Laboratory of Molecular Cardiovascular Sciences (Ministry of Education), Peking University, 38 Xueyuan Road, 100191 Beijing (China); Zhou, Chunyan, E-mail: chunyanzhou@bjmu.edu.cn [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Key Laboratory of Molecular Cardiovascular Sciences (Ministry of Education), Peking University, 38 Xueyuan Road, 100191 Beijing (China)

    2014-07-04

    Highlights: • ISL-1 is highly expressed in human pancreatic β-cells and DLBCL. • ISL-1 accelerates the tumorigenesis of DLBCL in vivo. • c-Myc positively regulates ISL-1 expression in DLBCL but not in pancreatic β-cells. • ISL-1 and c-Myc forms an ISL-1/c-Myc transcriptional complex only in DLBCL. • Positive feedback regulation of ISL-1 does not exist in normal pancreatic β-cell. - Abstract: Insulin enhancer binding protein-1 (ISL-1), a LIM-homeodomain transcription factor, has been reported to play essential roles in promoting adult pancreatic β-cells proliferation. Recent studies indicate that ISL-1 may also involve in the occurrence of a variety of tumors. However, whether ISL-1 has any functional effect on tumorigenesis, and what are the differences on ISL-1 function in distinct conditions, are completely unknown. In this study, we found that ISL-1 was highly expressed in human pancreatic β-cells, as well as in diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL), but to a much less extent in other normal tissues or tumor specimens. Further study revealed that ISL-1 promoted the proliferation of pancreatic β-cells and DLBCL cells, and also accelerated the tumorigenesis of DLBCL in vivo. We also found that ISL-1 could activate c-Myc transcription not only in pancreatic β-cells but also in DLBCL cells. However, a cell-specific feedback regulation was detectable only in DLBCL cells. This auto-regulatory loop was established by the interaction of ISL-1 and c-Myc to form an ISL-1/c-Myc transcriptional complex, and synergistically to promote ISL-1 transcription through binding on the ISL-1 promoter. Taken together, our results demonstrate a positive feedback regulation of ISL-1 in DLBCL but not in pancreatic β-cells, which might result in the functional diversities of ISL-1 in different physiological and pathological processes.

  14. Evaluation of islets derived from human fetal pancreatic progenitor cells in diabetes treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wen-Jian; Xu, Shi-Qing; Cai, Han-Qing; Men, Xiu-Li; Wang, Zai; Lin, Hua; Chen, Li; Jiang, Yong-Wei; Liu, Hong-Lin; Li, Cheng-Hui; Sui, Wei-Guo; Deng, Hong-Kui; Lou, Jin-Ning

    2013-01-01

    With the shortage of donor organs for islet transplantation, insulin-producing cells have been generated from different types of stem cell. Human fetal pancreatic stem cells have a better self-renewal capacity than adult stem cells and can readily differentiate into pancreatic endocrine cells, making them a potential source for islets in diabetes treatment. In the present study, the functions of pancreatic islets derived from human fetal pancreatic progenitor cells were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Human pancreatic progenitor cells isolated from the fetal pancreas were expanded and differentiated into islet endocrine cells in culture. Markers for endocrine and exocrine functions as well as those for alpha and beta cells were analyzed by immunofluorescent staining and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). To evaluate the functions of these islets in vivo, the islet-like structures were transplanted into renal capsules of diabetic nude mice. Immunohistochemical staining for human C-peptide and human mitochondrion antigen was applied to confirm the human origin and the survival of grafted islets. Human fetal pancreatic progenitor cells were able to expand in medium containing basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and leukemia inhibitor factor (LIF), and to differentiate into pancreatic endocrine cells with high efficiency upon the actions of glucagon-like peptide-1 and activin-A. The differentiated cells expressed insulin, glucagon, glucose transporter-1 (GLUT1), GLUT2 and voltage-dependent calcium channel (VDCC), and were able to aggregate into islet-like structures containing alpha and beta cells upon suspension. These structures expressed and released a higher level of insulin than adhesion cultured cells, and helped to maintain normoglycemia in diabetic nude mice after transplantation. Human fetal pancreatic progenitor cells have good capacity for generating insulin producing cells and provide a promising potential source for diabetes treatment.

  15. Pancreatic duct cells as a source of VEGF in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xiangwei; Prasadan, Krishna; Guo, Ping; El-Gohary, Yousef; Fischbach, Shane; Wiersch, John; Gaffar, Iljana; Shiota, Chiyo; Gittes, George K

    2014-05-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is essential for proper pancreatic development, islet vascularisation and insulin secretion. In the adult pancreas, VEGF is thought to be predominantly secreted by beta cells. Although human duct cells have previously been shown to secrete VEGF at angiogenic levels in culture, an analysis of the kinetics of VEGF synthesis and secretion, as well as elucidation of an in vivo role for this ductal VEGF in affecting islet function and physiology, has been lacking. We analysed purified duct cells independently prepared by flow cytometry, surgical isolation or laser-capture microdissection. We infected duct cells in vivo with Vegf (also known as Vegfa) short hairpin RNA (shRNA) in an intrapancreatic ductal infusion system and examined the effect of VEGF knockdown in duct cells in vitro and in vivo. Pancreatic duct cells express high levels of Vegf mRNA. Compared with beta cells, duct cells had a much higher ratio of secreted to intracellular VEGF. As a bioassay, formation of tubular structures by human umbilical vein endothelial cells was essentially undetectable when cultured alone and was substantially increased when co-cultured with pancreatic duct cells but significantly reduced when co-cultured with duct cells pretreated with Vegf shRNA. Compared with islets transplanted alone, improved vascularisation and function was detected in the islets co-transplanted with duct cells but not in islets co-transplanted with duct cells pretreated with Vegf shRNA. Human islet preparations for transplantation typically contain some contaminating duct cells and our findings suggest that the presence of duct cells in the islet preparation may improve transplantation outcomes.

  16. CUB-domain containing protein 1 represses the epithelial phenotype of pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Shin; Hamada, Shin; Masamune, Atsushi; Satoh, Kennichi; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2014-02-15

    The prognosis of pancreatic cancer is dismal due to the frequent metastasis and invasion to surrounding organs. Numerous molecules are involved in the malignant behavior of pancreatic cancer cells, but the entire process remains unclear. Several reports have suggested that CUB-domain containing protein-1 (CDCP1) is highly expressed in pancreatic cancer, but its impact on the invasive growth and the upstream regulator remain elusive. To clarify the role of CDCP1 in pancreatic cancer, we here examined the effects of CDCP1 knockdown on the cell behaviors of pancreatic cancer cells. Knockdown of CDCP1 expression in Panc-1 resulted in reduced cellular migration accompanied by the increased expression of E-cadherin and decreased expression of N-cadherin. Knockdown of CDCP1 attenuated the spheroid formation and resistance against gemcitabine, which are some of the cancer stem cell-related phenotypes. Bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4) was found to induce CDCP1 expression via the extracellular signal regulated kinase pathway, suggesting that CDCP1 has a substantial role in the BMP4-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition. These results indicate that CDCP1 represses the epithelial phenotype of pancreatic cancer cells. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Analysis of Pancreatic Cancer Microenvironment: Role of Macrophage Infiltrates and Growth Factors Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Gardian, Sława Janczewska, Waldemar L. Olszewski, Marek Durlik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Research over the last twenty years has yielded much insight into pancreatic cancer biology, but it has neither improved diagnostics methods nor the way of treatment. The question remains as to what the critical deciding factor is in making pancreatic cancer such an aggressive disease.Methods: Pancreatic tumor tissue came from 36 patients. To assess lymphatic vessels color lymphangiography and immunohistochemistry were used. Activity of matrix metalloproteinases was studied with gel and in situ zymography. Expression of growth factors and infiltrating immune cells were investigated using immunohistochemistry.Results: Our study revealed that the structures that correspond to lymphatic vessels were not observed in tumor center but only at the edge of the tumor. All studied growth factors were present in tumor tissue. We found that the difference in expression between G2 and G3 stage was statistically relevant in cases of c-Met receptor. Inflammatory cells were present around neoplastic glands and also strongly around nerves infiltrated by cancer cells. The number of infiltrating macrophages in tumor tissue was significantly higher in group with metastases to lymph nodes.Conclusion: We showed two factors that influence pancreatic cancer progression and invasion: c-Met receptors and macrophages infiltrating tumor tissue. Based on our analysis, this indicates that epithelial-mesenchymal transition might be crucial in the progression of pancreatic cancer.

  18. GLUT-1 expression in pancreatic neoplasia: implications in pathogenesis, diagnosis, and prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basturk, Olca; Singh, Rajendra; Kaygusuz, Ecmel; Balci, Serdar; Dursun, Nevra; Culhaci, Nil; Adsay, N Volkan

    2011-03-01

    GLUT-1 has been found to have an important role in the upregulation of various cellular pathways and implicated in neoplastic transformation correlating with biological behavior in malignancies. However, literature regarding the significance of GLUT-1 expression in pancreatic neoplasia has been limited and controversial. Immunohistochemical expression of GLUT-1 was tested in a variety of pancreatic neoplasia including ductal adenocarcinomas (DAs), pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasms (PanINs), intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs), and serous cystadenomas. There was a progressive increase in the expression of GLUT-1 from low- to higher-grade dysplastic lesions: All higher-grade PanINs/IPMNs (the ones with moderate/high-grade dysplasia) revealed noticeable GLUT-1 expression. Among the 94 DAs analyzed, there were minimal/moderate expression in 46 and significant expression in 24 DAs. However, all 4 clear-cell variants of DAs revealed significant GLUT-1 immunolabeling, as did areas of clear-cell change seen in other DAs. Moreover, all 12 serous cystadenomas expressed significant GLUT-1. GLUT-1 expression was also directly correlated with DA histological grade (P = 0.016) and tumor size (P = 0.03). GLUT-1 may give rise to the distinctive clear-cell appearance of these tumors by inducing the accumulation of glycogen in the cytoplasm. Additionally, because GLUT-1 expression was related to histological grade and tumor size of DA, further studies are warranted to investigate the association of GLUT-1 with prognosis and tumor progression.

  19. Hedgehog signaling antagonist GDC-0449 (Vismodegib inhibits pancreatic cancer stem cell characteristics: molecular mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brahma N Singh

    Full Text Available Recent evidence from in vitro and in vivo studies has demonstrated that aberrant reactivation of the Sonic Hedgehog (SHH signaling pathway regulates genes that promote cellular proliferation in various human cancer stem cells (CSCs. Therefore, the chemotherapeutic agents that inhibit activation of Gli transcription factors have emerged as promising novel therapeutic drugs for pancreatic cancer. GDC-0449 (Vismodegib, orally administrable molecule belonging to the 2-arylpyridine class, inhibits SHH signaling pathway by blocking the activities of Smoothened. The objectives of this study were to examine the molecular mechanisms by which GDC-0449 regulates human pancreatic CSC characteristics in vitro.GDC-0499 inhibited cell viability and induced apoptosis in three pancreatic cancer cell lines and pancreatic CSCs. This inhibitor also suppressed cell viability, Gli-DNA binding and transcriptional activities, and induced apoptosis through caspase-3 activation and PARP cleavage in pancreatic CSCs. GDC-0449-induced apoptosis in CSCs showed increased Fas expression and decreased expression of PDGFRα. Furthermore, Bcl-2 was down-regulated whereas TRAIL-R1/DR4 and TRAIL-R2/DR5 expression was increased following the treatment of CSCs with GDC-0449. Suppression of both Gli1 plus Gli2 by shRNA mimicked the changes in cell viability, spheroid formation, apoptosis and gene expression observed in GDC-0449-treated pancreatic CSCs. Thus, activated Gli genes repress DRs and Fas expressions, up-regulate the expressions of Bcl-2 and PDGFRα and facilitate cell survival.These data suggest that GDC-0499 can be used for the management of pancreatic cancer by targeting pancreatic CSCs.

  20. Modeling Cystic Fibrosis Using Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Human Pancreatic Ductal Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simsek, Senem; Zhou, Ting; Robinson, Christopher L; Tsai, Su-Yi; Crespo, Miguel; Amin, Sadaf; Lin, Xiangyi; Hon, Jane; Evans, Todd; Chen, Shuibing

    2016-05-01

    We established an efficient strategy to direct human pluripotent stem cells, including human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and an induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) line derived from patients with cystic fibrosis, to differentiate into pancreatic ductal epithelial cells (PDECs). After purification, more than 98% of hESC-derived PDECs expressed functional cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein. In addition, iPSC lines were derived from a patient with CF carrying compound frameshift and mRNA splicing mutations and were differentiated to PDECs. PDECs derived from Weill Cornell cystic fibrosis (WCCF)-iPSCs showed defective expression of mature CFTR protein and impaired chloride ion channel activity, recapitulating functional defects of patients with CF at the cellular level. These studies provide a new methodology to derive pure PDECs expressing CFTR and establish a "disease in a dish" platform to identify drug candidates to rescue the pancreatic defects of patients with CF. An efficient strategy was established to direct human pluripotent stem cells, including human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and an induced pluripotent stem cell line derived from patients with cystic fibrosis (CF-iPSCs), to differentiate into pancreatic ductal epithelial cells (PDECs). After purification, more than 98% of hESC-PDECs derived from CF-iPSCs showed defective expression of mature cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein and impaired chloride ion channel activity, recapitulating functional pancreatic defects of patients with CF at the cellular level. These studies provide a new methodology for deriving pure PDECs expressing CFTR, and they establish a "disease-in-a-dish" platform for identifying drug candidates to rescue the pancreatic defects of these patients. ©AlphaMed Press.

  1. Effects of Baicalin on inflammatory mediators and pancreatic acinar cell apoptosis in rats with sever acute pancreatitis

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    zhang xiping

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available

    • BACKGROUND: To investigate the effects of Baicalin and Octreotide on inflammatory mediators and pancreatic acinar cells apoptosis of rats with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP.
    • METHODS: SD rats were randomly divided into sham operated group (I group, model control group (II group, Baicalin treated group (III group and Octreotide treated group (IV group. Each group was also divided into subgroup of 3, 6 and 12 h (n = 15. The mortality rate, ascites/body weight ratio as well as the level of endotoxin, NO and ET-1 in blood were measured. The pathological severity score of pancreas, apoptotic indexes, and expression levels of Bax and Bcl-2 proteins in each group were investigated.
    • RESULTS: The survival rate of III and IV group has a significant difference compared with II group (P12 h < 0.05. The ascites volume, contents of inflammatory mediators in blood and pathological severity score of pancreas of III and IV group declined at different degrees compared to II group (P < 0.05, P < 0.01 or P < 0.001. Apoptotic index in III group was significantly higher than that in II group at 3 and 6 h (P3, 6 h < 0.05. Apoptotic index in IV group was significantly higher than that in II group at pancreatic tail at 6 h (P6 h < 0.05. Expression level of Bax in III group was significantly higher than that in II group (pancreatic head P3 h,6 h < 0.01, pancreatic tail P3 h < 0.001.
    • CONCLUSIONS: Compared with Octreotide in the treatment of SAP, the protective mechanisms of Baicalin include reducing the excessive inflammatory mediators’ release, inducing the pancreatic acinar cells apoptosis.
    • KEY WORDS: Severe acute pancreatitis, baicalin, octreotide, inflammatory mediators, apoptosis, tissue microarrays.

  2. Pancreatic stellate cells and CX3CR1: occurrence in normal pancreas, acute and chronic pancreatitis and effect of their activation by a CX3CR1 agonist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Masahiko; Ito, Tetsuhide; Nakamura, Taichi; Hijioka, Masayuki; Igarashi, Hisato; Oono, Takamasa; Kato, Masaki; Nakamura, Kazuhiko; Suzuki, Koichi; Takayanagi, Ryoichi; Jensen, Robert T.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Numerous studies suggest important roles of the chemokine, fractalkine (CX3CL1) in acute/chronic pancreatitis, however the possible mechanisms of the effects are unclear. Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) can play important roles in pancreatitis, secreting inflammatory cytokines/chemokines, as well as proliferation. Therefore, we investigated CX3CL1 receptor (CX3CR1) occurrence in normal pancreas and pancreatitis (acute/chronic) tissues, and the effects of CX3CL1 on activated-PSCs. Methods CX3CR1 expression/localization in normal pancreas and pancreatitis (acute/chronic) tissues were evaluated with immunohistochemical analysis. CX3CR1 expression and effects of CX3CL1 on activated-PSCs were examined with realtime-PCR, BrdU assays and Western Blotting. Results In normal pancreas, acinar cells expressed CX3CR1 within granule-like-formations in the cytoplasm, whereas in acute/chronic pancreatitis, acinar, ductal and activated-PSCs expressed CX3CR1 on cell membranes. With activation of normal PSCs, CX3CR1 is increased. CX3CL1 activated multiple signaling cascades in PSCs. CX3CL1, did not induce inflammatory-genes expression in activated-PSCs, but induced proliferation. Conclusions CX3CR1s are expressed in normal pancreas. Expression is increased in acute/chronic pancreatitis and the CX3CR1s are activated. CX3CL1 induces proliferation of activated-PSCs without increasing release of inflammatory-mediators. These results suggest that CX3CR1 activation of PSCs could be important in their effects in pancreatitis, especially to PSCs proliferation in pancreatitis where CX3CL1 levels are elevated. PMID:24681877

  3. E-cadherin expression in obesity-associated, Kras-initiated pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Alexander P; Chang, Hui-Hua; Jung, Xiaoman; Moro, Aune; Hertzer, Kathleen; Xu, Mu; Schmidt, Andrea; Hines, O Joe; Eibl, Guido

    2015-12-01

    The epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is critical in the development of invasive epithelial malignancies. EMT is accelerated by inflammation and results in decreased E-cadherin expression. Diet-induced obesity is an inflammatory state that accelerates pancreatic carcinogenesis; its effect on EMT and E-cadherin expression in the development of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is unclear. Conditional Kras(G12D) mice were fed a control diet or a high-fat, high-calorie diet for 3 or 9 months (n = 10 each). Immunohistochemistry with anti-E-cadherin antibody was performed. E-cadherin expression was characterized by staining intensity, location, and proportion of positive cells. In vitro expression of E-cadherin and Slug in primary pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) and cancer cells was determined by Western blot. The HFCD led to increased weight gain in both 3- (15.8 vs 5.6 g, P cancer, E-cadherin expression was aberrant, with loss of membranous staining and prominent cytoplasmic staining, associated with strong, cytoplasmic expression of β-catenin. In vitro expression of E-cadherin was greatest in primary PanIN cells, accompanied by absent Slug expression. Cancer cell lines demonstrated significantly decreased E-cadherin expression in the presence of upregulated Slug. Despite increased pancreatic inflammation and accelerated carcinogenesis, the high-fat, high-calorie diet did not induce changes in E-cadherin expression in PanIN lesions of all stages. Invasive lesions demonstrated aberrant cytoplasmic E-cadherin staining. Loss of normal membranous localization may reflect a functional loss of E-cadherin. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Tenascin-C enhances pancreatic cancer cell growth and motility and affects cell adhesion through activation of the integrin pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Paron

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pancreatic cancer (PDAC is characterized by an abundant fibrous tissue rich in Tenascin-C (TNC, a large ECM glycoprotein mainly synthesized by pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs. In human pancreatic tissues, TNC expression increases in the progression from low-grade precursor lesions to invasive cancer. Aim of this study was the functional characterization of the effects of TNC on biologic relevant properties of pancreatic cancer cells. METHODS: Proliferation, migration and adhesion assays were performed on pancreatic cancer cell lines treated with TNC or grown on a TNC-rich matrix. Stable transfectants expressing the large TNC splice variant were generated to test the effects of endogenous TNC. TNC-dependent integrin signaling was investigated by immunoblotting, immunofluorescence and pharmacological inhibition. RESULTS: Endogenous TNC promoted pancreatic cancer cell growth and migration. A TNC-rich matrix also enhanced migration as well as the adhesion to the uncoated growth surface of poorly differentiated cell lines. In contrast, adhesion to fibronectin was significantly decreased in the presence of TNC. The effects of TNC on cell adhesion were paralleled by changes in the activation state of paxillin and Akt. CONCLUSION: TNC affects proliferation, migration and adhesion of poorly differentiated pancreatic cancer cell lines and might therefore play a role in PDAC spreading and metastasis in vivo.

  5. The pancreatic β-cell transcriptome and integrated-omics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blodgett, David M; Cura, Anthony J; Harlan, David M

    2014-04-01

    β Cells represent one of many cell types in heterogeneous pancreatic islets and play the central role in maintaining glucose homeostasis, such that disrupting β-cell function leads to diabetes. This review summarizes the methods for isolating and characterizing β cells, and describes integrated 'omics' approaches used to define the β cell by its transcriptome and proteome. RNA sequencing and mass spectrometry-based protein identification have now identified RNA and protein profiles for mouse and human pancreatic islets and β cells, and for β-cell lines. Recent publications have outlined these profiles and, more importantly, have begun to assign the presence or absence of specific genes and regulatory molecules to β-cell function and dysfunction. Overall, researchers have focused on understanding the pathophysiology of diabetes by connecting genome, transcriptome, proteome, and regulatory RNA profiles with findings from genome-wide association studies. Studies employing these relatively new techniques promise to identify specific genes or regulatory RNAs with altered expression as β-cell function begins to deteriorate in the spiral toward the development of diabetes. The ultimate goal is to identify the potential therapeutic targets to prevent β-cell dysfunction and thereby better treat the individual with diabetes. http://links.lww.com/COE/A5.

  6. Initial cell seeding density influences pancreatic endocrine development during in vitro differentiation of human embryonic stem cells.

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    Gage, Blair K; Webber, Travis D; Kieffer, Timothy J

    2013-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) have the ability to form cells derived from all three germ layers, and as such have received significant attention as a possible source for insulin-secreting pancreatic beta-cells for diabetes treatment. While considerable advances have been made in generating hESC-derived insulin-producing cells, to date in vitro-derived glucose-responsive beta-cells have remained an elusive goal. With the objective of increasing the in vitro formation of pancreatic endocrine cells, we examined the effect of varying initial cell seeding density from 1.3 x 10(4) cells/cm(2) to 5.3 x 10(4) cells/cm(2) followed by a 21-day pancreatic endocrine differentiation protocol. Low density-seeded cells were found to be biased toward the G2/M phases of the cell cycle and failed to efficiently differentiate into SOX17-CXCR4 co-positive definitive endoderm cells leaving increased numbers of OCT4 positive cells in day 4 cultures. Moderate density cultures effectively formed definitive endoderm and progressed to express PDX1 in approximately 20% of the culture. High density cultures contained approximately double the numbers of PDX1 positive pancreatic progenitor cells and also showed increased expression of MNX1, PTF1a, NGN3, ARX, and PAX4 compared to cultures seeded at moderate density. The cultures seeded at high density displayed increased formation of polyhormonal pancreatic endocrine cell populations co-expressing insulin, glucagon and somatostatin. The maturation process giving rise to these endocrine cell populations followed the expected cascade of pancreatic progenitor marker (PDX1 and MNX1) expression, followed by pancreatic endocrine specification marker expression (BRN4, PAX4, ARX, NEUROD1, NKX6.1 and NKX2.2) and then pancreatic hormone expression (insulin, glucagon and somatostatin). Taken together these data suggest that initial cell seeding density plays an important role in both germ layer specification and pancreatic progenitor commitment, which

  7. Treatment Option Overview (Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors / Islet Cell Tumors)

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    ... Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia Liver Cancer Lung Cancer Lymphoma Pancreatic Cancer Prostate Cancer Skin Cancer Thyroid Cancer Uterine Cancer All ...

  8. Repeated Gene Transfection Impairs the Engraftment of Transplanted Porcine Neonatal Pancreatic Cells

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    Min Koo Seo

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundPreviously, we reported that neonatal porcine pancreatic cells transfected with hepatocyte growth factor (HGF gene in an Epstein-Barr virus (EBV-based plasmid (pEBVHGF showed improved proliferation and differentiation compared to those of the control. In this study, we examined if pancreatic cells transfected repeatedly with pEBVHGF can be successfully grafted to control blood glucose in a diabetes mouse model.MethodsNeonatal porcine pancreatic cells were cultured as a monolayer and were transfected with pEBVHGF every other day for a total of three transfections. The transfected pancreatic cells were re-aggregated and transplanted into kidney capsules of diabetic nude mice or normal nude mice. Blood glucose level and body weight were measured every other day after transplantation. The engraftment of the transplanted cells and differentiation into beta cells were assessed using immunohistochemistry.ResultsRe-aggregation of the pancreatic cells before transplantation improved engraftment of the cells and facilitated neovascularization of the graft. Right before transplantation, pancreatic cells that were transfected with pEBVHGF and then re-aggregated showed ductal cell marker expression. However, ductal cells disappeared and the cells underwent fibrosis in a diabetes mouse model two to five weeks after transplantation; these mice also did not show controlled blood glucose levels. Furthermore, pancreatic cells transplanted into nude mice with normal blood glucose showed poor graft survival regardless of the type of transfected plasmid (pCEP4, pHGF, or pEBVHGF.ConclusionFor clinical application of transfected neonatal porcine pancreatic cells, further studies are required to develop methods of overcoming the damage for the cells caused by repeated transfection and to re-aggregate them into islet-like structures.

  9. HER family receptor expression and prognosis in pancreatic cancer.

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    Bittoni, Alessandro; Mandolesi, Alessandra; Andrikou, Kalliopi; Santoni, Matteo; Alfonsi, Simona; Lanese, Andrea; Loretelli, Cristian; Pellei, Chiara; Piva, Francesco; Scarpelli, Marina; Cascinu, Stefano

    2015-07-22

    HER family receptors play a key role in tumor progression in several malignancies, such as colorectal, lung or breast cancer. The aims of this study were to investigate expression of HER-1, HER-2 and HER-3 in pancreatic cancer (PC) samples and evaluate the association between HER-family receptor expression and patients' clinical outcomes. Tissue samples from 91 PC patients were subjected to immunohistochemical staining to assess the expression of HER-1, HER-2 and HER-3. Semiquantitative scores of zero (no staining or staining in less than 10% of cancer cells), 1+, 2+ or 3+ were assigned to each sample based on the intensity of staining for HER receptors. Scores of 2+ or 3+ were defined as positive staining. HER-1 overexpression was observed in 41 out of 91 samples (45.1%), while HER-2 was not overexpressed in any of the analyzed samples. HER-3 was overexpressed in 37 samples (40.7%) and was found to be associated with advanced TNM stage. In particular, HER-3 was overexpressed in 12 out of 16 stage IV patients (75%) compared with only 33.3% of stage I-III patients (p = 0.02). Among 79 patients with available survival data, the 6 patients with strong HER-3 expression (score 3+) had a shorter survival compared with remaining patients (median overall survival 6.9 months vs. 12.3 months, respectively). HER-1 and HER-3 were found to be expressed in a significant proportion of PC patients. Strong HER-3 expression represents an indicator of poor prognosis in PC patients, being associated with advanced stage and shorter survival.

  10. Human pancreatic islet-derived extracellular vesicles modulate insulin expression in 3D-differentiating iPSC clusters.

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    Diana Ribeiro

    Full Text Available It has been suggested that extracellular vesicles (EVs can mediate crosstalk between hormones and metabolites within pancreatic tissue. However, the possible effect of pancreatic EVs on stem cell differentiation into pancreatic lineages remains unknown. Herein, human islet-derived EVs (h-Islet-EVs were isolated, characterized and subsequently added to human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC clusters during pancreatic differentiation. The h-islet-EVs had a mean size of 117±7 nm and showed positive expression of CD63 and CD81 EV markers as measured by ELISA. The presence of key pancreatic transcription factor mRNA, such as NGN3, MAFA and PDX1, and pancreatic hormone proteins such as C-peptide and glucagon, were confirmed in h-Islet-EVs. iPSC clusters were differentiated in suspension and at the end stages of the differentiation protocol, the mRNA expression of the main pancreatic transcription factors and pancreatic hormones was increased. H-Islet-EVs were supplemented to the iPSC clusters in the later stages of differentiation. It was observed that h-Islet-EVs were able to up-regulate the intracellular levels of C-peptide in iPSC clusters in a concentration-dependent manner. The effect of h-Islet-EVs on the differentiation of iPSC clusters cultured in 3D-collagen hydrogels was also assessed. Although increased mRNA expression for pancreatic markers was observed when culturing the iPSC clusters in 3D-collagen hydrogels, delivery of EVs did not affect the insulin or C-peptide intracellular content. Our results provide new information on the role of h-Islet-EVs in the regulation of insulin expression in differentiating iPSC clusters, and are highly relevant for pancreatic tissue engineering applications.

  11. Long-Term Culture of Self-renewing Pancreatic Progenitors Derived from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

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    Jamie Trott

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Pluripotent stem cells have been proposed as an unlimited source of pancreatic β cells for studying and treating diabetes. However, the long, multi-step differentiation protocols used to generate functional β cells inevitably exhibit considerable variability, particularly when applied to pluripotent cells from diverse genetic backgrounds. We have developed culture conditions that support long-term self-renewal of human multipotent pancreatic progenitors, which are developmentally more proximal to the specialized cells of the adult pancreas. These cultured pancreatic progenitor (cPP cells express key pancreatic transcription factors, including PDX1 and SOX9, and exhibit transcriptomes closely related to their in vivo counterparts. Upon exposure to differentiation cues, cPP cells give rise to pancreatic endocrine, acinar, and ductal lineages, indicating multilineage potency. Furthermore, cPP cells generate insulin+ β-like cells in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that they offer a convenient alternative to pluripotent cells as a source of adult cell types for modeling pancreatic development and diabetes.

  12. Bcl-2 expression in pancreas development and pancreatic cancer progression.

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    Campani, D; Esposito, I; Boggi, U; Cecchetti, D; Menicagli, M; De Negri, F; Colizzi, L; Del Chiaro, M; Mosca, F; Fornaciari, G; Bevilacqua, G

    2001-08-01

    Apoptosis is important for both tissue development and differentiation; its deregulation may contribute to tumourigenesis. In order to clarify the role of Bcl-2, an apoptosis-inhibiting protein, in pancreatic morphogenesis and tumour progression, its immunohistochemical expression was evaluated in 12 samples of fetal pancreas, in 10 samples of adult pancreas with ductal hyperplastic lesions, in 120 cases of primary pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, and in 43 synchronous metastatic lymph nodes. To evaluate the role of apoptosis in pancreatic cancer, p53 expression was also studied in tumour samples. Bcl-2 cytoplasmic acinar and ductal immunostaining was found in all fetal and adult tissue samples; ductal hyperplastic lesions were constantly negative. Thirty out of 120 (25%) tumours and 3 out of 43 (7%) lymph nodes expressed Bcl-2, whereas 67 out of 120 (56%) expressed nuclear p53. Well-differentiated tumours (G1) were more frequently Bcl-2-positive (p=0.002); furthermore, there was an inverse correlation between Bcl-2 and p53 expression in primary tumours (p=0.02). Neither Bcl-2 nor p53 influenced patients' prognosis, which was instead affected by N (p=0.02) and M (p<0.0001) status and stage of the disease (p=0.002). It is concluded that Bcl-2 regulates pancreatic morphogenesis and tissue homeostasis from early fetal to adult life and can be considered a phenotypic marker of normal exocrine pancreas. On the other hand, the lack of expression in preneoplastic lesions and the low positivity found in primary tumours and lymph node metastases suggest that Bcl-2 does not play a centralrole in pancreatic tumourigenesis and cancer progression. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Chlamydia pneumoniae Promotes Dysfunction of Pancreatic Beta Cells

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    Rodriguez, Annette R.; Plascencia-Villa, Germán; Witt, Colleen M.; Yu, Jieh-Juen; José-Yacamán, Miguel; Chambers, James P.; Perry, George; Guentzel, M. Neal; Arulanandam, Bernard P.

    2015-01-01

    The human pathogen Chlamydia pneumoniae has been implicated in chronic inflammatory diseases including type 2 diabetes. Therefore, we designed a study to evaluate pancreatic beta cells and mast cells during chlamydial infection. Our study revealed that C. pneumoniae infected mast cells significantly (ppneumoniae infected mice showed increased interleukin-1β production in splenocytes and pancreatic tissues as was observed with in vitro mast cell-beta cell co-cultures during C. pneumoniae infection. Notably, infected mast cells promoted beta cell destruction. Our findings reveal the negative effect of C. pneumoniae on mast cells, and the consequential impact on pancreatic beta cell function and viability. PMID:25863744

  14. Both PAX4 and MAFA are expressed in a substantial proportion of normal human pancreatic alpha cells and deregulated in patients with type 2 diabetes.

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    Rémy Bonnavion

    Full Text Available Pax4 and MafA (v-maf musculoaponeurotic fibrosarcoma oncogene homolog A are two transcription factors crucial for normal functions of islet beta cells in the mouse. Intriguingly, recent studies indicate the existence of notable difference between human and rodent islet in terms of gene expression and functions. To better understand the biological role of human PAX4 and MAFA, we investigated their expression in normal and diseased human islets, using validated antibodies. PAX4 was detected in 43.0±5.0% and 39.1±4.0% of normal human alpha and beta cells respectively. We found that MAFA, detected in 88.3±6.3% insulin(+cells as in the mouse, turned out to be also expressed in 61.2±6.4% of human glucagons(+ cells with less intensity than in insulin(+ cells, whereas MAFB expression was found not only in the majority of glucagon(+ cells (67.2±7.6%, but also in 53.6±10.5% of human insulin(+ cells. Interestingly, MAFA nuclear expression in both alpha and beta cells, and the percentage of alpha cells expressing PAX4 were found altered in a substantial proportion of patients with type 2 diabetes. Both MAFA and PAX4 display, therefore, a distinct expression pattern in human islet cells, suggesting more potential plasticity of human islets as compared with rodent islets.

  15. Inflammatory cells contribute to the generation of an angiogenic phenotype in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

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    Esposito, I; Menicagli, M; Funel, N; Bergmann, F; Boggi, U; Mosca, F; Bevilacqua, G; Campani, D

    2004-06-01

    Inflammatory cells contribute to the growth and spread of human malignancies by producing molecules that enhance tumour invasiveness. To characterise the inflammatory infiltrate in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and to analyse its contribution to angiogenesis and its prognostic relevance. Immunohistochemistry was used to identify inflammatory cells and evaluate the expression of proangiogenic and prolymphangiogenic molecules (vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A), VEGF-C, and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF)) by inflammatory and cancer cells in 137 pancreatic cancers. Intratumorous microvessel density (IMD) was assessed using CD34 as an endothelial cell marker. There were significantly more mast cells and macrophages in pancreatic cancers than in normal pancreas and the number of mast cells directly correlated with the presence of lymph node metastases. However, there was no relation between numbers of infiltrating inflammatory cells and the presence of chronic pancreatitis (CP)-like changes in the parenchyma surrounding the tumour. Double immunostaining revealed that both pancreatic mast cells and macrophages express VEGF-A, VEGF-C, and bFGF. These factors were also expressed in the tumour cells in many cases. The numbers of VEGF-A expressing tumour cells and bFGF expressing tumour and inflammatory cells significantly correlated with IMD. Moreover, tumours with higher IMD had higher numbers of infiltrating mast cells and macrophages. Mononuclear inflammatory cells of the non-specific immune response are recruited to pancreatic cancer tissues independent of the presence of CP-like changes, may influence the metastatic capacity of the cancer cells, and may contribute to the development of tumours with high angiogenic activity.

  16. Silencing Mist1 Gene Expression Is Essential for Recovery from Acute Pancreatitis.

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    Anju Karki

    Full Text Available Acinar cells of the exocrine pancreas are tasked with synthesizing, packaging and secreting vast quantities of pro-digestive enzymes to maintain proper metabolic homeostasis for the organism. Because the synthesis of high levels of hydrolases is potentially dangerous, the pancreas is prone to acute pancreatitis (AP, a disease that targets acinar cells, leading to acinar-ductal metaplasia (ADM, inflammation and fibrosis-events that can transition into the earliest stages of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Despite a wealth of information concerning the broad phenotype associated with pancreatitis, little is understood regarding specific transcriptional regulatory networks that are susceptible to AP and the role these networks play in acinar cell and exocrine pancreas responses. In this study, we examined the importance of the acinar-specific maturation transcription factor MIST1 to AP damage and organ recovery. Analysis of wild-type and Mist1 conditional null mice revealed that Mist1 gene transcription and protein accumulation were dramatically reduced as acinar cells underwent ADM alterations during AP episodes. To test if loss of MIST1 function was primarily responsible for the damaged status of the organ, mice harboring a Cre-inducible Mist1 transgene (iMist1 were utilized to determine if sustained MIST1 activity could alleviate AP damage responses. Unexpectedly, constitutive iMist1 expression during AP led to a dramatic increase in organ damage followed by acinar cell death. We conclude that the transient silencing of Mist1 expression is critical for acinar cells to survive an AP episode, providing cells an opportunity to suppress their secretory function and regenerate damaged cells. The importance of MIST1 to these events suggests that modulating key pancreas transcription networks could ease clinical symptoms in patients diagnosed with pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer.

  17. In vivo gene transfer targeting in pancreatic adenocarcinoma with cell surface antigens

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    Lafitte Marie

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is a deadly malignancy resistant to current therapies. It is critical to test new strategies, including tumor-targeted delivery of therapeutic agents. This study tested the possibility to target the transfer of a suicide gene in tumor cells using an oncotropic lentiviral vector. Results Three cell surface markers were evaluated to target the transduction of cells by lentiviruses pseudotyped with a modified glycoprotein from Sindbis virus. Only Mucin-4 and the Claudin-18 proteins were found efficient for targeted lentivirus transductions in vitro. In subcutaneous xenografts of human pancreatic cancer cells models, Claudin-18 failed to achieve efficient gene transfer but Mucin-4 was found very potent. Human pancreatic tumor cells were modified to express a fluorescent protein detectable in live animals by bioimaging, to perform a direct non invasive and costless follow up of the tumor growth. Targeted gene transfer of a bicistronic transgene bearing a luciferase gene and the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene into orthotopic grafts was carried out with Mucin-4 oncotropic lentiviruses. By contrast to the broad tropism VSV-G carrying lentivirus, this oncotropic lentivirus was found to transduce specifically tumor cells, sparing normal pancreatic cells in vivo. Transduced cells disappeared after ganciclovir treatment while the orthotopic tumor growth was slowed down. Conclusion This work considered for the first time three aspect of pancreatic adenocarcinoma targeted therapy. First, lentiviral transduction of human pancreatic tumor cells was possible when cells were grafted orthotopically. Second, we used a system targeting the tumor cells with cell surface antigens and sparing the normal cells. Finally, the TK/GCV anticancer system showed promising results in vivo. Importantly, the approach presented here appeared to be a safer, much more specific and an as efficient way to perform gene

  18. Pancreatic Fibroblasts Stimulate the Motility of Pancreatic Cancer Cells through IGF1/IGF1R Signaling under Hypoxia.

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    Toshiki Hirakawa

    Full Text Available Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC is characterized by its hypovascularity, with an extremely poor prognosis because of its highly invasive nature. PDAC proliferates with abundant stromal cells, suggesting that its invasive activity might be controlled by intercellular interactions between cancer cells and fibroblasts. Using four PDAC cell lines and two pancreas cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs, the expression of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF1 and IGF1 receptor (IGF1R was evaluated by RT-PCR, FACScan, western blot, or ELISA. Correlation between IGF1R and the hypoxia marker carbonic anhydrase 9 (CA9 was examined by immunohistochemical staining of 120 pancreatic specimens. The effects of CAFs, IGF1, and IGF1R inhibitors on the motility of cancer cells were examined by wound-healing assay or invasion assay under normoxia (20% O2 and hypoxia (1% O2. IGF1R expression was significantly higher in RWP-1, MiaPaCa-2, and OCUP-AT cells than in Panc-1 cells. Hypoxia increased the expression level of IGF1R in RWP-1, MiaPaCa-2, and OCUP-AT cells. CA9 expression was correlated with IGF1R expression in pancreatic specimens. CAFs produced IGF1 under hypoxia, but PDAC cells did not. A conditioned medium from CAFs, which expressed αSMA, stimulated the migration and invasion ability of MiaPaCa-2, RWP-1, and OCUP-AT cells. The motility of all PDAC cells was greater under hypoxia than under normoxia. The motility-stimulating ability of CAFs was decreased by IGF1R inhibitors. These findings might suggest that pancreas CAFs stimulate the invasion activity of PDAC cells through paracrine IGF1/IGF1R signaling, especially under hypoxia. Therefore the targeting of IGF1R signaling might represent a promising therapeutic approach in IGF1R-dependent PDAC.

  19. Pancreatic Fibroblasts Stimulate the Motility of Pancreatic Cancer Cells through IGF1/IGF1R Signaling under Hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirakawa, Toshiki; Yashiro, Masakazu; Doi, Yosuke; Kinoshita, Haruhito; Morisaki, Tamami; Fukuoka, Tatsunari; Hasegawa, Tsuyoshi; Kimura, Kenjiro; Amano, Ryosuke; Hirakawa, Kosei

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is characterized by its hypovascularity, with an extremely poor prognosis because of its highly invasive nature. PDAC proliferates with abundant stromal cells, suggesting that its invasive activity might be controlled by intercellular interactions between cancer cells and fibroblasts. Using four PDAC cell lines and two pancreas cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), the expression of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF1) and IGF1 receptor (IGF1R) was evaluated by RT-PCR, FACScan, western blot, or ELISA. Correlation between IGF1R and the hypoxia marker carbonic anhydrase 9 (CA9) was examined by immunohistochemical staining of 120 pancreatic specimens. The effects of CAFs, IGF1, and IGF1R inhibitors on the motility of cancer cells were examined by wound-healing assay or invasion assay under normoxia (20% O2) and hypoxia (1% O2). IGF1R expression was significantly higher in RWP-1, MiaPaCa-2, and OCUP-AT cells than in Panc-1 cells. Hypoxia increased the expression level of IGF1R in RWP-1, MiaPaCa-2, and OCUP-AT cells. CA9 expression was correlated with IGF1R expression in pancreatic specimens. CAFs produced IGF1 under hypoxia, but PDAC cells did not. A conditioned medium from CAFs, which expressed αSMA, stimulated the migration and invasion ability of MiaPaCa-2, RWP-1, and OCUP-AT cells. The motility of all PDAC cells was greater under hypoxia than under normoxia. The motility-stimulating ability of CAFs was decreased by IGF1R inhibitors. These findings might suggest that pancreas CAFs stimulate the invasion activity of PDAC cells through paracrine IGF1/IGF1R signaling, especially under hypoxia. Therefore the targeting of IGF1R signaling might represent a promising therapeutic approach in IGF1R-dependent PDAC.

  20. Investigating MicroRNA Expression Profiles in Pancreatic Cystic Neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Linda S; Szafranska-Schwarzbach, Anna E; Wylie, Dennis; Doyle, Leona A; Bellizzi, Andrew M; Kadiyala, Vivek; Suleiman, Shadeah; Banks, Peter A; Andruss, Bernard F; Conwell, Darwin L

    2014-01-30

    Current diagnostic tools for pancreatic cysts fail to reliably differentiate mucinous from nonmucinous cysts. Reliable biomarkers are needed. MicroRNAs (miRNA) may offer insights into pancreatic cysts. Our aims were to (1) identify miRNAs that distinguish benign from both premalignant cysts and malignant pancreatic lesions using formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) pathology specimens; (2) identify miRNAs that distinguish mucinous cystic neoplasm (MCN) from branch duct-intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (BD-IPMN). A total of 69 FFPE pancreatic specimens were identified: (1) benign (20 serous cystadenoma (SCA)), (2) premalignant (10 MCN, 10 BD-IPMN, 10 main duct IPMN (MD-IPMN)), and (3) malignant (19 pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC)). Total nucleic acid extraction was performed followed by miRNA expression profiling of 378 miRNAs interrogated using TaqMan MicroRNA Arrays Pool A and verification of candidate miRNAs. Bioinformatics was used to generate classifiers. MiRNA profiling of 69 FFPE specimens yielded 35 differentially expressed miRNA candidates. Four different 4-miRNA panels differentiated among the lesions: one panel separated SCA from MCN, BD-IPMN, MD-IPMN, and PDAC with sensitivity 85% (62, 97), specificity 100% (93, 100), a second panel distinguished MCN from SCA, BD-IPMN, MD-IPMN, and PDAC with sensitivity and specificity 100% (100, 100), a third panel differentiated PDAC from IPMN with sensitivity 95% (76, 100) and specificity 85% (72, 96), and the final panel diagnosed MCN from BD-IPMN with sensitivity and specificity approaching 100%. MiRNA profiling of surgical pathology specimens differentiates serous cystadenoma from both premalignant pancreatic cystic neoplasms and PDAC and MCN from BD-IPMN.

  1. Pancreatic Reg I and Acinar Cell Differentiation: Influence On Cellular Lineage

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    Sanchez, Didier; Mueller, Catherine; Zenilman, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Objectives Pancreatic reg I has been implicated in cellular differentiation. Acinar cells can transdifferentiate into other pancreatic-derived cells, and we postulated that changes in intracellular levels of reg I would affect the state of differentiation. Methods We transfected AR42J cells with a plasmid containing the entire coding sequence of reg I, and isolated clones with cDNA in sense (SS) or antisense (AS) orientation. Levels of mRNA and protein expression were examined by Western blotting and Real Time-PCR. Results Expression of reg I was confirmed in sense or antisense clones. AR42J transfected with SS demonstrated more acinar-like phenotype while those transfected with AS showed a less differentiated state. Specifically, amylase mRNA and protein levels increased in SS cells while AS cells showed increased PDX-1 and insulin mRNAs and cytokeratin protein. Conversely, cytokeratin and PDX-1 were depressed in SS cells. Conclusions These data demonstrate that in acinar cells, reg I over-expression is linked to acinar cell differentiation, while inhibition of reg I leads to beta-cell and possibly ductal phenotype. Reg I expression in acinar cells is important in maintaining pancreatic cell lineage, and when decreased, cells can de-differentiate and move towards becoming other pancreatic cells. PMID:19557902

  2. Modulation of the leptin receptor mediates tumor growth and migration of pancreatic cancer cells.

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    Alisha M Mendonsa

    Full Text Available Obesity has been implicated as a significant risk factor for development of pancreatic cancer. In the setting of obesity, a systemic chronic inflammatory response is characterized by alterations in the production and secretion of a wide variety of growth factors. Leptin is a hormone whose level increases drastically in the serum of obese patients. High fat diet induced obesity in mice leads to an overall increased body weight, pancreatic weight, serum leptin, and pancreatic tissue leptin levels. Here we report the contribution of obesity and leptin to pancreatic cancer growth utilizing an in vivo orthotopic murine pancreatic cancer model, which resulted in increased tumor proliferation with concomitant increased tumor burden in the diet induced obese mice compared to lean mice. Human and murine pancreatic cancer cell lines were found to express the short as well as the long form of the leptin receptor and functionally responded to leptin induced activation through an increased phosphorylation of AKT473. In vitro, leptin stimulation increased cellular migration which was blocked by addition of a PI3K inhibitor. In vivo, depletion of the leptin receptor through shRNA knockdown partially abrogated increased orthotopic tumor growth in obese mice. These findings suggest that leptin contributes to pancreatic tumor growth through activation of the PI3K/AKT pathway, which promotes pancreatic tumor cell migration.

  3. Modulation of the leptin receptor mediates tumor growth and migration of pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendonsa, Alisha M; Chalfant, Madeleine C; Gorden, Lee D; VanSaun, Michael N

    2015-01-01

    Obesity has been implicated as a significant risk factor for development of pancreatic cancer. In the setting of obesity, a systemic chronic inflammatory response is characterized by alterations in the production and secretion of a wide variety of growth factors. Leptin is a hormone whose level increases drastically in the serum of obese patients. High fat diet induced obesity in mice leads to an overall increased body weight, pancreatic weight, serum leptin, and pancreatic tissue leptin levels. Here we report the contribution of obesity and leptin to pancreatic cancer growth utilizing an in vivo orthotopic murine pancreatic cancer model, which resulted in increased tumor proliferation with concomitant increased tumor burden in the diet induced obese mice compared to lean mice. Human and murine pancreatic cancer cell lines were found to express the short as well as the long form of the leptin receptor and functionally responded to leptin induced activation through an increased phosphorylation of AKT473. In vitro, leptin stimulation increased cellular migration which was blocked by addition of a PI3K inhibitor. In vivo, depletion of the leptin receptor through shRNA knockdown partially abrogated increased orthotopic tumor growth in obese mice. These findings suggest that leptin contributes to pancreatic tumor growth through activation of the PI3K/AKT pathway, which promotes pancreatic tumor cell migration.

  4. FEATURES OF ISLET-LIKE CLUSTERS GENERATION IN PANCREATIC DUCTAL CELL MOLOLAYER CULTURING

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    L. A. Kirsanova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Newborn rabbit pancreatic cell monolayer was obtained as we described earlier.The cultivated epithelial cells were shown by immunofluorescence to express special ductal marker CK19 and were insulin-and glucagon- negative for 10–15 days. A few fusiforms of nestin-positive cells were found in monolayer. Over 2 weeks in serum-free medium the plaques of epithelial cells became crowded and formed 3-dimentional structures – islet- like clusters. Islet-like clusters contain some insulin- and glucagon-positive cells recognized by immunohysto- chemistry staining. Pancreatic endocrine cell generation in 3-dimentional structures is discussed. 

  5. Cytokines and Pancreatic β-Cell Apoptosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berchtold, L A; Prause, M; Størling, J

    2016-01-01

    The discovery 30 years ago that inflammatory cytokines cause a concentration, activity, and time-dependent bimodal response in pancreatic β-cell function and viability has been a game-changer in the fields of research directed at understanding inflammatory regulation of β-cell function and survival...... and the causes of β-cell failure and destruction in diabetes. Having until then been confined to the use of pathophysiologically irrelevant β-cell toxic chemicals as a model of β-cell death, researchers could now mimic endocrine and paracrine effects of the cytokine response in vitro by titrating concentrations...... to gene expressional changes, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and triggering of mitochondrial dysfunction. Preclinical studies have shown preventive effects of cytokine antagonism in animal models of diabetes, and clinical trials demonstrating proof of concept are emerging. The full clinical potential...

  6. Expression of truncated bile salt-dependent lipase variant in pancreatic pre-neoplastic lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Emmanuelle; Crenon, Isabelle; Silvy, Françoise; Del Grande, Jean; Mougel, Alice; Barea, Dolores; Fina, Frederic; Bernard, Jean-Paul; Ouaissi, Mehdi; Lombardo, Dominique; Mas, Eric

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a dismal disease. The lack of specific symptoms still leads to a delay in diagnosis followed by death within months for most patients. Exon 11 of the bile salt-dependent lipase (BSDL) gene encoding variable number of tandem repeated (VNTR) sequences has been involved in pancreatic pathologies. We hypothesized that BSDL VNTR sequences may be mutated in PDAC. The amplification of BSDL VNTR from RNA extracted from pancreatic SOJ-6 cells allowed us to identify a BSDL amplicon in which a cytosine residue is inserted in a VNTR sequence. This insertion gives rise to a premature stop codon, resulting in a truncated protein and to a modification of the C-terminal amino-acid sequence; that is PRAAHG instead of PAVIRF. We produced antibodies directed against these sequences and examined pancreatic tissues from patients with PDAC and PanIN. Albeit all tissues were positive to anti-PAVIRF antibodies, 72.2% of patient tissues gave positive reaction with anti-PRAAHG antibodies, particularly in dysplastic areas of the tumor. Neoplastic cells with ductal differentiation were not reactive to anti-PRAAHG antibodies. Some 70% of PanIN tissues were also reactive to anti-PRAAHG antibodies, suggesting that the C insertion occurs early during pancreatic carcinogenesis. Data suggest that anti-PRAAHG antibodies were uniquely reactive with a short isoform of BSDL specifically expressed in pre-neoplastic lesions of the pancreas. The detection of truncated BSDL reactive to antibodies against the PRAAHG C-terminal sequence in pancreatic juice or in pancreatic biopsies may be a new tool in the early diagnosis of PDAC. PMID:27602750

  7. MicroRNA-218 inhibits cell invasion and migration of pancreatic cancer via regulating ROBO1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Hang; Hao, Si-Jie; Yao, Lie; Yang, Feng; Di, Yang; Li, Ji; Jiang, Yong-Jian; Jin, Chen; Fu, De-Liang

    2014-10-01

    miRNA-218 is a highlighted tumor suppressor and its underlying role in tumor progression is still unknown. Here, we restored the expression of miRNA-218 in pancreatic cancer to clarify the function and potent downstream pathway of miRNA-218. The expressions of both miRNA-218 and its potent target gene ROBO1 were revealed by RT-PCR and western blotting analysis. Transfection of miRNA-218 precursor mimics and luciferase assay were performed to elucidate the regulation mechanism between miRNA-218 and ROBO1. Cells, stably expressing miRNA-218 followed by forced expression of mutant ROBO1, were established through co-transfections of both lentivirus vector and plasmid vector. The cell migration and invasion abilities were evaluated by migration assay and invasion assay respectively. An increased expression of ROBO1 was revealed in cell BxPC-3-LN compared with cell BxPC-3. Elevated expression of miRNA-218 would suppress the expression of ROBO1 via complementary binding to a specific region within 3'UTR of ROBO1 mRNA (sites 971-978) in pancreatic cancer cells. Stably restoring the expression of miRNA-218 in pancreatic cancer significantly downregulated the expression of ROBO1 and effectively inhibited cell migration and invasion. Forced expression of mutant ROBO1 could reverse the repression effects of miRNA-218 on cell migration and invasion. Consequently, miRNA-218 acted as a tumor suppressor in pancreatic cancer by inhibiting cell invasion and migration. ROBO1 was a functional target of miRNA-218's downstream pathway involving in cell invasion and migration of pancreatic cancer.

  8. Targeting anticancer drug delivery to pancreatic cancer cells using a fucose-bound nanoparticle approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Makoto; Takimoto, Rishu; Murase, Kazuyuki; Sato, Yasushi; Hirakawa, Masahiro; Tamura, Fumito; Sato, Tsutomu; Iyama, Satoshi; Osuga, Takahiro; Miyanishi, Koji; Takada, Kohichi; Hayashi, Tsuyoshi; Kobune, Masayoshi; Kato, Junji

    2012-01-01

    Owing to its aggressiveness and the lack of effective therapies, pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma has a dismal prognosis. New strategies to improve treatment and survival are therefore urgently required. Numerous fucosylated antigens in sera serve as tumor markers for cancer detection and evaluation of treatment efficacy. Increased expression of fucosyltransferases has also been reported for pancreatic cancer. These enzymes accelerate malignant transformation through fucosylation of sialylated precursors, suggesting a crucial requirement for fucose by pancreatic cancer cells. With this in mind, we developed fucose-bound nanoparticles as vehicles for delivery of anticancer drugs specifically to cancer cells. L-fucose-bound liposomes containing Cy5.5 or Cisplatin were effectively delivered into CA19-9 expressing pancreatic cancer cells. Excess L-fucose decreased the efficiency of Cy5.5 introduction by L-fucose-bound liposomes, suggesting L-fucose-receptor-mediated delivery. Intravenously injected L-fucose-bound liposomes carrying Cisplatin were successfully delivered to pancreatic cancer cells, mediating efficient tumor growth inhibition as well as prolonging survival in mouse xenograft models. This modality represents a new strategy for pancreatic cancer cell-targeting therapy.

  9. Endothelial cells control pancreatic cell fate at defined stages through EGFL7 signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Der-I; Lacko, Lauretta A; Ding, Bi-Sen; Huang, Chen; Phung, Kathleen; Gu, Guoqiang; Rafii, Shahin; Stuhlmann, Heidi; Chen, Shuibing

    2015-02-10

    Although endothelial cells have been shown to affect mouse pancreatic development, their precise function in human development remains unclear. Using a coculture system containing human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-derived progenitors and endothelial cells, we found that endothelial cells play a stage-dependent role in pancreatic development, in which they maintain pancreatic progenitor (PP) self-renewal and impair further differentiation into hormone-expressing cells. The mechanistic studies suggest that the endothelial cells act through the secretion of EGFL7. Consistently, endothelial overexpression of EGFL7 in vivo using a transgenic mouse model resulted in an increase of PP proliferation rate and a decrease of differentiation toward endocrine cells. These studies not only identified the role of EGFL7 as the molecular handle involved in the crosstalk between endothelium and pancreatic epithelium, but also provide a paradigm for using hESC stepwise differentiation to dissect the stage-dependent roles of signals controlling organogenesis. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Endothelial Cells Control Pancreatic Cell Fate at Defined Stages through EGFL7 Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Der-I Kao

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Although endothelial cells have been shown to affect mouse pancreatic development, their precise function in human development remains unclear. Using a coculture system containing human embryonic stem cell (hESC-derived progenitors and endothelial cells, we found that endothelial cells play a stage-dependent role in pancreatic development, in which they maintain pancreatic progenitor (PP self-renewal and impair further differentiation into hormone-expressing cells. The mechanistic studies suggest that the endothelial cells act through the secretion of EGFL7. Consistently, endothelial overexpression of EGFL7 in vivo using a transgenic mouse model resulted in an increase of PP proliferation rate and a decrease of differentiation toward endocrine cells. These studies not only identified the role of EGFL7 as the molecular handle involved in the crosstalk between endothelium and pancreatic epithelium, but also provide a paradigm for using hESC stepwise differentiation to dissect the stage-dependent roles of signals controlling organogenesis.

  11. Nanotopography Promotes Pancreatic Differentiation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong Hyun; Kim, Hyung Woo; Cha, Kyoung Je; Han, Jiyou; Jang, Yu Jin; Kim, Dong Sung; Kim, Jong-Hoon

    2016-03-22

    Although previous studies suggest that nanotopographical features influence properties and behaviors of stem cells, only a few studies have attempted to derive clinically useful somatic cells from human pluripotent stem cells using nanopatterned surfaces. In the present study, we report that polystyrene nanopore-patterned surfaces significantly promote the pancreatic differentiation of human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells. We compared different diameters of nanopores and showed that 200 nm nanopore-patterned surfaces highly upregulated the expression of PDX1, a critical transcription factor for pancreatic development, leading to an approximately 3-fold increase in the percentage of differentiating PDX1(+) pancreatic progenitors compared with control flat surfaces. Furthermore, in the presence of biochemical factors, 200 nm nanopore-patterned surfaces profoundly enhanced the derivation of pancreatic endocrine cells producing insulin, glucagon, or somatostatin. We also demonstrate that nanopore-patterned surface-induced upregulation of PDX1 is associated with downregulation of TAZ, suggesting the potential role of TAZ in nanopore-patterned surface-mediated mechanotransduction. Our study suggests that appropriate cytokine treatments combined with nanotopographical stimulation could be a powerful tool for deriving a high purity of desired cells from human pluripotent stem cells.

  12. Ski modulate the characteristics of pancreatic cancer stem cells via regulating sonic hedgehog signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Libin; Chen, Xiangyuan; Gao, Song; Zhang, Chenyue; Qu, Chao; Wang, Peng; Liu, Luming

    2016-10-12

    Evidence from in vitro and in vivo studies shows that Ski may act as both a tumor proliferation-promoting factor and a metastatic suppressor in human pancreatic cancer and also may be a therapeutic target of integrative therapies. At present, pancreatic cancer stem cells (CSCs) are responsible for tumor recurrence accompanied by resistance to conventional therapies. Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling pathway is found to be aberrantly activated in CSCs. The objectives of this study were to investigate the role of Ski in modulating pancreatic CSCs and to examine the molecular mechanisms involved in pancreatic cancer treatment both in vivo and in vitro. In in vitro study, the results showed that enhanced Ski expression could increase the expression of pluripotency maintaining markers, such as CD24, CD44, Sox-2, and Oct-4, and also components of Shh signaling pathway, such as Shh, Ptch-1, Smo, Gli-1, and Gli-2, whereas depletion of Ski to the contrary. Then, we investigated the underlying mechanism and found that inhibiting Gli-2 expression by short interfering RNA (siRNA) can decrease the effects of Ski on the maintenance of pancreatic CSCs, indicating that Ski mediates the pluripotency of pancreatic CSCs mainly through Shh pathway. The conclusion is that Ski may be an important factor in maintaining the stemness of pancreatic CSCs through modulating Shh pathway.

  13. Role of bone marrow cells in the development of pancreatic fibrosis in a rat model of pancreatitis induced by a choline-deficient/ethionine-supplemented diet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akita, Shingo; Kubota, Koji [Department of Surgery, Shinshu University School of Medicine, 3-1-1 Asahi, Matsumoto, Nagano 390-8621 (Japan); Kobayashi, Akira, E-mail: kbys@shinshu-u.ac.jp [Department of Surgery, Shinshu University School of Medicine, 3-1-1 Asahi, Matsumoto, Nagano 390-8621 (Japan); Misawa, Ryosuke; Shimizu, Akira; Nakata, Takenari; Yokoyama, Takahide [Department of Surgery, Shinshu University School of Medicine, 3-1-1 Asahi, Matsumoto, Nagano 390-8621 (Japan); Takahashi, Masafumi [Center for Molecular Medicine Division of Bioimaging Sciences, Jichi Medical University, 3311-1 Yakushiji, Shimono, Tochigi 329-0498 (Japan); Miyagawa, Shinichi [Department of Surgery, Shinshu University School of Medicine, 3-1-1 Asahi, Matsumoto, Nagano 390-8621 (Japan)

    2012-04-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BMC-derived PSCs play a role in a rat CDE diet-induced pancreatitis model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BMC-derived PSCs contribute mainly to the early stage of pancreatic fibrosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BMC-derived activated PSCs can produce PDGF and TGF {beta}1. -- Abstract: Bone marrow cell (BMC)-derived myofibroblast-like cells have been reported in various organs, including the pancreas. However, the contribution of these cells to pancreatic fibrosis has not been fully discussed. The present study examined the possible involvement of pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) originating from BMCs in the development of pancreatic fibrosis in a clinically relevant rat model of acute pancreatitis induced by a choline-deficient/ethionine-supplemented (CDE) diet. BMCs from female transgenic mice ubiquitously expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) were transplanted into lethally irradiated male rats. Once chimerism was established, acute pancreatitis was induced by a CDE diet. Chronological changes in the number of PSCs originating from the donor BMCs were examined using double immunofluorescence for GFP and markers for PSCs, such as desmin and alpha smooth muscle actin ({alpha}SMA), 1, 3 and 8 weeks after the initiation of CDE feeding. We also used immunohistochemical staining to evaluate whether the PSCs from the BMCs produce growth factors, such as platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and transforming growth factor (TGF) {beta}1. The percentage of BMC-derived activated PSCs increased significantly, peaking after 1 week of CDE treatment (accounting for 23.3 {+-} 0.9% of the total population of activated PSCs) and then decreasing. These cells produced both PDGF and TGF{beta}1 during the early stage of pancreatic fibrosis. Our results suggest that PSCs originating from BMCs contribute mainly to the early stage of pancreatic injury, at least in part, by producing growth factors in a rat CDE diet-induced pancreatitis model.

  14. In vitro pancreas duodenal homeobox-1 enhances the differentiation of pancreatic ductal epithelial cells into insulin-producing cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tao; Wang, Chun-You; Yu, Feng; Gou, Shan-Miao; Wu, He-Shui; Xiong, Jiong-Xin; Zhou, Feng

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To observe whether pancreatic and duodenal homeobox factor-1 enhances the differentiation of pancreatic ductal epithelial cells into insulin-producing cells in vitro. METHODS: Rat pancreatic tissue was submitted to digestion by collagenase, ductal epithelial cells were separated by density gradient centrifugation and then cultured in RPMI1640 medium with 10% fetal bovine serum. After 3-5 passages, the cells were incubated in a six-well plate for 24 h before transfection of recombination plasmid XlHbox8VP16. Lightcycler quantitative real-time RT-PCR was used to detect the expression of PDX-1 and insulin mRNA in pancreatic epithelial cells. The expression of PDX-1 and insulin protein was analyzed by Western blotting. Insulin secretion was detected by radioimmunoassay. Insulin-producing cells were detected by dithizone-staining. RESULTS: XlHbox8 mRNA was expressed in pancreatic ductal epithelial cells. PDX-1 and insulin mRNA as well as PDX-1 and insulin protein were significantly increased in the transfected group. The production and insulin secretion of insulin-producing cells differentiated from pancreatic ductal epithelial cells were higher than those of the untransfected cells in vitro with a significant difference (1.32 ± 0.43 vs 3.48 ± 0.81, P < 0.01 at 5.6 mmol/L; 4.86 ± 1.15 vs 10.25 ± 1.32, P < 0.01 at 16.7 mmol/L). CONCLUSION: PDX-1 can differentiate rat pancreatic ductal epithelial cells into insulin-producing cells in vitro. In vitro PDX-1 transfection is a valuable strategy for increasing the source of insulin-producing cells. PMID:17876894

  15. Weaning triggers a maturation step of pancreatic β cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolovich-Rain, Miri; Enk, Jonatan; Vikesa, Jonas; Nielsen, Finn Cilius; Saada, Ann; Glaser, Benjamin; Dor, Yuval

    2015-03-09

    Because tissue regeneration deteriorates with age, it is generally assumed that the younger the animal, the better it compensates for tissue damage. We have examined the effect of young age on compensatory proliferation of pancreatic β cells in vivo. Surprisingly, β cells in suckling mice fail to enter the cell division cycle in response to a diabetogenic injury or increased glycolysis. The potential of β cells for compensatory proliferation is acquired following premature weaning to normal chow, but not to a diet mimicking maternal milk. In addition, weaning coincides with enhanced glucose-stimulated oxidative phosphorylation and insulin secretion from islets. Transcriptome analysis reveals that weaning increases the expression of genes involved in replication licensing, suggesting a mechanism for increased responsiveness to the mitogenic activity of high glucose. We propose that weaning triggers a discrete maturation step of β cells, elevating both the mitogenic and secretory response to glucose. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Fenofibrate inhibited pancreatic cancer cells proliferation via activation of p53 mediated by upregulation of LncRNA MEG3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Duanmin [Department of Gastroenterology, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215004 (China); Su, Cunjin [Department of Pharmacy, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215004 (China); Jiang, Min [Department of Breast Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215004 (China); Shen, Yating [Department of Gastroenterology, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215004 (China); Shi, Aiming; Zhao, Fenglun [Department of Pharmacy, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215004 (China); Chen, Ruidong [Department of Gastroenterology, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215004 (China); Shen, Zhu [Department of Pharmacy, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215004 (China); Bao, Junjie, E-mail: baojjsdfey@sina.com [Department of Pharmacy, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215004 (China); Tang, Wen, E-mail: sztangwen@163.com [Department of Gastroenterology, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215004 (China)

    2016-03-04

    There is still no suitable drug for pancreatic cancer treatment, which is one of the most aggressive human tumors. Maternally expressed gene 3 (MEG3), a LncRNA, has been suggested as a tumor suppressor in a range of human tumors. Studies found fenofibrate exerted anti-tumor roles in various human cancer cell lines. However, its role in pancreatic cancer remains unknown. The present study aimed to explore the impacts of fenofibrate on pancreatic cancer cell lines, and to investigate MEG3 role in its anti-tumor mechanisms. We used MTT assay to determine cells proliferation, genome-wide LncRNA microarray analysis to identify differently expressed LncRNAs, siRNA or pCDNA-MEG3 transfection to interfere or upregulate MEG3 expression, western blot to detect protein levels, real-time PCR to determine MEG3 level. Fenofibrate significantly inhibited proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells, increased MEG3 expression and p53 levels. Moreover, knockdown of MEG3 attenuated cytotoxicity induced by fenofibrate. Furthermore, overexpression of MEG3 induced cells death and increased p53 expression. Our results indicated fenofibrate inhibited pancreatic cancer cells proliferation via activation of p53 mediated by upregulation of MEG3. - Highlights: • We found that fenofibrate suppressed proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells. • We found fenofibrate increased LncRNA-MEG3 expression and p53 level in PANC-1 cells. • Inhibition of MEG3 expression attenuated anti-tumor effects of fenofibrate.

  17. Zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) redistribution is involved in the regulation of cell dissociation in pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xiaodong; Egami, Hiroshi; Ishikawa, Shinji; Kurizaki, Takashi; Hirota, Masahiko; Ogawa, Michio

    2005-08-01

    In our previous study, dissociation factor (DF) and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 2 (MEK2) were isolated as factors relating to cancer cell dissociation in pancreatic cancer cells. On the other hand, tight junction protein zonula occludens 1 (ZO-1) has been indicated to be involved in carcinogenesis. In this study, the expression of ZO-1 and a downstream kinase of MEK2, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2 (ERK2), was analyzed to clarify the regulatory mechanism of cell dissociation in pancreatic cancer cells. Two hamster (PC-1.0 and PC-1) and two human (AsPC-1 and CAPAN-2) pancreatic cancer cell lines were used. Immunocytochemical study was performed using anti-ZO-1, ERK2, and phosphorylated ERK1/2 (p-ERK1/2) antibodies. DF treatment obviously disrupted ZO-1 expression at the sites of cell-cell contact and markedly induced ERK2 and p-ERK1/2 expression, as well as the dissociation of cell clones in PC-1 and CAPAN-2 cells. In contrast, U0126 (a MEK1/2 inhibitor) treatment significantly induced the peripheral distribution of ZO-1 as well as cell aggregation in PC-1.0 and AsPC-1 cells, which usually grew as single cells, but seriously suppressed ERK2 and p-ERK1/2 expression. We conclude that redistribution of ZO-1 is closely correlated with cell dissociation status in pancreatic cancer cells through activation of ERK2.

  18. Comprehensive analysis of cellular galectin-3 reveals no consistent oncogenic function in pancreatic cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Hann

    Full Text Available Galectin-3 (Gal-3, a 31 kDa member of the family of beta-galactoside-binding proteins, has been implicated in the progression of different human cancers. However, the proposed roles differ widely, ranging from tumor-promoting cellular functions and negative impact on patient prognosis to tumor-suppressive properties and positive prognostic impact. We and others have previously identified Gal-3 as overexpressed in pancreatic cancer as compared to chronic pancreatitis and normal pancreatic tissue. The purpose of this study was thus the comprehensive analysis of putative cellular functions of Gal-3 by transient as well as stable silencing or overexpression of Gal-3 in a panel of 6 well-established pancreatic cancer cell lines. Our results confirm that galectin-3 is upregulated at the mRNA level in pancreatic cancer and strongly expressed in the majority of pancreatic cancer cell lines. In individual cell lines, transient knockdown of Gal-3 expression resulted in moderate inhibitory effects on proliferation, migration or anchorage-independent growth of the cells, but these effects were not consistent across the spectrum of analyzed cell lines. Moreover, functional effects of the modulation of Gal-3 expression were not observed in stable knockdown or overexpression approaches in vitro and did not alter the growth characteristics of nude mouse xenograft tumors in vivo. Our data thus do not support a direct functional role of Gal-3 in the malignant transformation of pancreatic epithelial cells, although paracrine or systemic effects of Gal-3 expression are not excluded.

  19. CD47-CAR-T Cells Effectively Kill Target Cancer Cells and Block Pancreatic Tumor Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vita Golubovskaya

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available CD47 is a glycoprotein of the immunoglobulin superfamily that is often overexpressed in different types of hematological and solid cancer tumors and plays important role in blocking phagocytosis, increased tumor survival, metastasis and angiogenesis. In the present report, we designed CAR (chimeric antigen receptor-T cells that bind CD47 antigen. We used ScFv (single chain variable fragment from mouse CD47 antibody to generate CD47-CAR-T cells for targeting different cancer cell lines. CD47-CAR-T cells effectively killed ovarian, pancreatic and other cancer cells and produced high level of cytokines that correlated with expression of CD47 antigen. In addition, CD47-CAR-T cells significantly blocked BxPC3 pancreatic xenograft tumor growth after intratumoral injection into NSG mice. Moreover, we humanized mouse CD47 ScFv and showed that it effectively bound CD47 antigen. The humanized CD47-CAR-T cells also specifically killed ovarian, pancreatic, and cervical cancer cell lines and produced IL-2 that correlated with expression of CD47. Thus, CD47-CAR-T cells can be used as a novel cellular therapeutic agent for treating different types of cancer.

  20. CD47-CAR-T Cells Effectively Kill Target Cancer Cells and Block Pancreatic Tumor Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golubovskaya, Vita; Berahovich, Robert; Zhou, Hua; Xu, Shirley; Harto, Hizkia; Li, Le; Chao, Cheng-Chi; Mao, Mike Ming; Wu, Lijun

    2017-10-21

    CD47 is a glycoprotein of the immunoglobulin superfamily that is often overexpressed in different types of hematological and solid cancer tumors and plays important role in blocking phagocytosis, increased tumor survival, metastasis and angiogenesis. In the present report, we designed CAR (chimeric antigen receptor)-T cells that bind CD47 antigen. We used ScFv (single chain variable fragment) from mouse CD47 antibody to generate CD47-CAR-T cells for targeting different cancer cell lines. CD47-CAR-T cells effectively killed ovarian, pancreatic and other cancer cells and produced high level of cytokines that correlated with expression of CD47 antigen. In addition, CD47-CAR-T cells significantly blocked BxPC3 pancreatic xenograft tumor growth after intratumoral injection into NSG mice. Moreover, we humanized mouse CD47 ScFv and showed that it effectively bound CD47 antigen. The humanized CD47-CAR-T cells also specifically killed ovarian, pancreatic, and cervical cancer cell lines and produced IL-2 that correlated with expression of CD47. Thus, CD47-CAR-T cells can be used as a novel cellular therapeutic agent for treating different types of cancer.

  1. Sonic hedgehog signaling inhibition provides opportunities for targeted therapy by sulforaphane in regulating pancreatic cancer stem cell self-renewal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Rodova

    Full Text Available Dysregulation of the sonic hedgehog (Shh signaling pathway has been associated with cancer stem cells (CSC and implicated in the initiation of pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic CSCs are rare tumor cells characterized by their ability to self-renew, and are responsible for tumor recurrence accompanied by resistance to current therapies. The lethality of these incurable, aggressive and invasive pancreatic tumors remains a daunting clinical challenge. Thus, the objective of this study was to investigate the role of Shh pathway in pancreatic cancer and to examine the molecular mechanisms by which sulforaphane (SFN, an active compound in cruciferous vegetables, inhibits self-renewal capacity of human pancreatic CSCs. Interestingly, we demonstrate here that Shh pathway is highly activated in pancreatic CSCs and plays important role in maintaining stemness by regulating the expression of stemness genes. Given the requirement for Hedgehog in pancreatic cancer, we investigated whether hedgehog blockade by SFN could target the stem cell population in pancreatic cancer. In an in vitro model, human pancreatic CSCs derived spheres were significantly inhibited on treatment with SFN, suggesting the clonogenic depletion of the CSCs. Interestingly, SFN inhibited the components of Shh pathway and Gli transcriptional activity. Interference of Shh-Gli signaling significantly blocked SFN-induced inhibitory effects demonstrating the requirement of an active pathway for the growth of pancreatic CSCs. SFN also inhibited downstream targets of Gli transcription by suppressing the expression of pluripotency maintaining factors (Nanog and Oct-4 as well as PDGFRα and Cyclin D1. Furthermore, SFN induced apoptosis by inhibition of BCL-2 and activation of caspases. Our data reveal the essential role of Shh-Gli signaling in controlling the characteristics of pancreatic CSCs. We propose that pancreatic cancer preventative effects of SFN may result from inhibition of the Shh pathway

  2. Microarray analysis of pancreatic gene expression during biotin repletion in biotin-deficient rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dakshinamurti, Krishnamurti; Bagchi, Rushita A; Abrenica, Bernard; Czubryt, Michael P

    2015-12-01

    Biotin is a B vitamin involved in multiple metabolic pathways. In humans, biotin deficiency is relatively rare but can cause dermatitis, alopecia, and perosis. Low biotin levels occur in individuals with type-2 diabetes, and supplementation with biotin plus chromium may improve blood sugar control. The acute effect on pancreatic gene expression of biotin repletion following chronic deficiency is unclear, therefore we induced biotin deficiency in adult male rats by feeding them a 20% raw egg white diet for 6 weeks. Animals were then randomized into 2 groups: one group received a single biotin supplement and returned to normal chow lacking egg white, while the second group remained on the depletion diet. After 1 week, pancreata were removed from biotin-deficient (BD) and biotin-repleted (BR) animals and RNA was isolated for microarray analysis. Biotin depletion altered gene expression in a manner indicative of inflammation, fibrosis, and defective pancreatic function. Conversely, biotin repletion activated numerous repair and anti-inflammatory pathways, reduced fibrotic gene expression, and induced multiple genes involved in pancreatic endocrine and exocrine function. A subset of the results was confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR analysis, as well as by treatment of pancreatic AR42J cells with biotin. The results indicate that biotin repletion, even after lengthy deficiency, results in the rapid induction of repair processes in the pancreas.

  3. KIF20A-Mediated RNA Granule Transport System Promotes the Invasiveness of Pancreatic Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keisuke Taniuchi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancers are aggressive because they are highly invasive and highly metastatic; moreover, effective treatments for aggressive pancreatic cancers are lacking. Here, we report that the motor kinesin protein KIF20A promoted the motility and invasiveness of pancreatic cancer cells through transporting the RNA-binding protein IGF2BP3 and IGF2BP3-bound transcripts toward cell protrusions along microtubules. We previously reported that IGF2BP3 and its target transcripts are assembled into cytoplasmic stress granules of pancreatic cancer cells, and that IGF2BP3 promotes the motility and invasiveness of pancreatic cancer cells through regulation of localized translation of IGF2BP3-bound transcripts in cell protrusions. We show that knockdown of KIF20A inhibited accumulation of IGF2BP3-containing stress granules in cell protrusions and suppressed local protein expression from specific IGF2BP3-bound transcripts, ARF6 and ARHGEF4, in the protrusions. Our results provide insight into the link between regulation of KIF20A-mediated trafficking of IGF2BP3-containing stress granules and modulation of the motility and invasiveness in pancreatic cancers.

  4. Conditioned media trans-differentiate mature fibroblasts into pancreatic beta-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usman, Shumaila; Khan, Irfan; Naeem, Nadia; Iqbal, Hana'a; Ali, Anwar; Usman, Sehrish; Salim, Asmat

    2016-11-01

    The study was carried out to evaluate the role of preconditioning strategies on the trans-differentiation of mature fibroblasts (NIH3T3 cells) into insulin producing β-cells. The NIH3T3 cells were treated with dexamethasone (5μM) and pancreatic extract (0.05 and 0.4mg/mL) separately or in combination. The treated cells were analyzed for the morphological changes, and expression of pancreatic genes and proteins by phase contrast microscopy, RT-PCR and flow cytometry/immunocytochemistry, respectively. Treatment of mature fibroblasts with different combinations of dexamethasone and pancreatic extract in the form of conditioned media resulted in comparable morphological changes and expression of certain pancreatic genes and proteins; however, their expression varied with each treatment. Most prominent effect was observed in case of combined treatment which resulted in significant increase (p<0.001) in gene expression levels of insulin, MafA, and Ngn3. Variable pattern was observed in insulin, MafA, Ngn3 and Sca1 expressions at the protein level. It is concluded from this study that preconditioning of NIH3T3 cells with conditioned media containing different combinations of dexamethasone and pancreatic extract can induce trans-differentiation of these cells into pancreatic β-like cells. The conditioned media however, need to be optimized. The study may offer the possibility of improved regeneration of mature cell type that could serve as a future therapeutic option for diabetes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Hypoxia-induced aggressiveness of pancreatic cancer cells is due to increased expression of VEGF, IL-6 and miR-21, which can be attenuated by CDF treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Bao

    Full Text Available Hypoxia is known to play critical roles in cell survival, angiogenesis, tumor invasion, and metastasis. Hypoxia mediated over-expression of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF has been shown to be associated with therapeutic resistance, and contributes to poor prognosis of cancer patients. Emerging evidence suggest that hypoxia and HIF pathways contributes to the acquisition of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT, maintenance of cancer stem cell (CSC functions, and also maintains the vicious cycle of inflammation-all which lead to therapeutic resistance. However, the precise molecular mechanism(s by which hypoxia/HIF drives these events are not fully understood. Here, we show, for the first time, that hypoxia leads to increased expression of VEGF, IL-6, and CSC signature genes Nanog, Oct4 and EZH2 consistent with increased cell migration/invasion and angiogenesis, and the formation of pancreatospheres, concomitant with increased expression of miR-21 and miR-210 in human pancreatic cancer (PC cells. The treatment of PC cells with CDF, a novel synthetic compound inhibited the production of VEGF and IL-6, and down-regulated the expression of Nanog, Oct4, EZH2 mRNAs, as well as miR-21 and miR-210 under hypoxia. CDF also led to decreased cell migration/invasion, angiogenesis, and formation of pancreatospheres under hypoxia. Moreover, CDF decreased gene expression of miR-21, miR-210, IL-6, HIF-1α, VEGF, and CSC signatures in vivo in a mouse orthotopic model of human PC. Collectively, these results suggest that the anti-tumor activity of CDF is in part mediated through deregulation of tumor hypoxic pathways, and thus CDF could become a novel, and effective anti-tumor agent for PC therapy.

  6. A subset of human pancreatic beta cells express functional CD14 receptors: a signaling pathway for beta cell-related glycolipids, sulfatide and ß-galactosylceramide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østerbye, Thomas; Funda, David P; Fundová, Petra

    2010-01-01

    T1DM is a T-cell-mediated autoimmune disease targeting insulin-producing beta-cells. Multiple factors may contribute to the development of T1DM. Among these, the metabolic state of beta-cells and pro-inflammatory cytokines, produced by infiltrating immune cells, have been implicated...

  7. TRAIL-engineered pancreas-derived mesenchymal stem cells: characterization and cytotoxic effects on pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moniri, M R; Sun, X-Y; Rayat, J; Dai, D; Ao, Z; He, Z; Verchere, C B; Dai, L-J; Warnock, G L

    2012-09-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have attracted great interest in cancer therapy owing to their tumor-oriented homing capacity and the feasibility of autologous transplantation. Currently, pancreatic cancer patients face a very poor prognosis, primarily due to the lack of therapeutic strategies with an effective degree of specificity. Anticancer gene-engineered MSCs specifically target tumor sites and can produce anticancer agents locally and constantly. This study was performed to characterize pancreas-derived MSCs and investigate the effects of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL)-engineered MSCs on pancreatic cancer cells under different culture conditions. Pancreas-derived MSCs exhibited positive expression on CD44, CD73, CD95, CD105, negative on CD34 and differentiated into adipogenic and osteogenic cells. TRAIL expression was assessed by both enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and western blot analysis. Different patterns of TRAIL receptor expression were observed on the pancreatic cancer cell lines, including PANC1, HP62, ASPC1, TRM6 and BXPC3. Cell viability was assessed using a real-time monitoring system. Pancreatic cancer cell death was proportionally related to conditioned media from MSC(nsTRAIL) and MSC(stTRAIL). The results suggest that MSCs exhibit intrinsic inhibition of pancreatic cancer cells and that this effect can be potentiated by TRAIL-transfection on death receptor-bearing cell types.

  8. Targeting of the P2X7 receptor in pancreatic cancer and stellate cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giannuzzo, Andrea; Saccomano, Mara; Napp, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    The ATP-gated receptor P2X7 (P2X7R) is involved in regulation of cell survival and has been of interest in cancer field. Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a deadly cancer and new markers and therapeutic targets are needed. PDAC is characterized by a complex tumour microenvironment, which...... includes cancer and pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs), and potentially high nucleotide/side turnover. Our aim was to determine P2X7R expression and function in human pancreatic cancer cells in vitro as well as to perform in vivo efficacy study applying P2X7R inhibitor in an orthotopic xenograft mouse model...... into nude mice and tumour growth was followed noninvasively by bioluminescence imaging. AZ10606120-treated mice showed reduced bioluminescence compared to saline-treated mice. Immunohistochemical analysis confirmed P2X7R expression in cancer and PSC cells, and in metaplastic/neoplastic acinar and duct...

  9. MiR-200a inhibits epithelial-mesenchymal transition of pancreatic cancer stem cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yuhua; Lu, Jingjing; Li, Xiaohong; Zhu, Hui; Fan, Xiangjun; Zhu, Shajun; Wang, Yao; Guo, Qingsong; Wang, Lei; Huang, Yan; Zhu, Mingyan; Wang, Zhiwei

    2014-02-12

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressive cancers, and the aggressiveness of pancreatic cancer is in part due to its intrinsic and extrinsic drug resistance characteristics, which are also associated with the acquisition of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Increasing evidence suggests that EMT-type cells share many biological characteristics with cancer stem-like cells. And miR-200 has been identified as a powerful regulator of EMT. Cancer Stem Cells (CSCs) of human pancreatic cancer cell line PANC-1 were processed for CD24, CD44 and ESA multi-colorstaining, and sorted out on a BD FACS Aria II machine. RT-qPCR was performed using the miScript PCR Kit to assay the expression of miR-200 family. In order to find the role of miR-200a in the process of EMT, miR-200a mimic was transfected to CSCs. Pancreatic cancer cells with EMT phenotype displayed stem-like cell features characterized by the expression of cell surface markers CD24, CD44 and epithelial-specific antigen (ESA), which was associated with decreased expression of miR-200a. Moreover, overexpression of miR-200a was resulted in down-regulation of N-cadherin, ZEB1 and vimentin, but up-regulation of E-cadherin. In addition, miR-200a overexpression inhibited cell migration and invasion in CSCs. In our study, we found that miR-200a played an important role in linking the characteristics of cancer stem-like cells with EMT-like cell signatures in pancreatic cancer. Selective elimination of cancer stem-like cells by reversing the EMT phenotype to mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition (MET) phenotype using novel agents would be useful for prevention and/or treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  10. Escin Chemosensitizes Human Pancreatic Cancer Cells and Inhibits the Nuclear Factor-kappaB Signaling Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Rimmon

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. There is an urgent need to develop new treatment strategies and drugs for pancreatic cancer that is highly resistant to radio-chemotherapy. Aesculus hippocastanum (the horse chestnut known in Chinese medicine as a plant with anti-inflammatory, antiedema, antianalgesic, and antipyretic activities. The main active compound of this plant is Escin (C54H84O23. Objective. To evaluate the effect of Escin alone and combined with chemotherapy on pancreatic cancer cell survival and to unravel mechanism(s of Escin anticancer activity. Methods. Cell survival was measured by XTT colorimetric assay. Synergistic effect of combined therapy was determined by CalcuSyn software. Cell cycle and induction of apoptosis were evaluated by FACS analysis. Expression of NF-κB-related proteins (p65, IκBα, and p-IκBα and cyclin D was evaluated by western blot analysis. Results. Escin decreased the survival of pancreatic cancer cells with IC50 = 10–20 M. Escin combined with gemcitabine showed only additive effect, while its combination with cisplatin resulted in a significant synergistic cytotoxic effect in Panc-1 cells. High concentrations of Escin induced apoptosis and decreased NF-κB-related proteins and cyclin D expression. Conclusions. Escin decreased pancreatic cancer cell survival, induced apoptosis, and downregulated NF-κB signaling pathway. Moreover, Escin sensitized pancreatic cancer cells to chemotherapy. Further translational research is required.

  11. Inhibitors of ORAI1 Prevent Cytosolic Calcium-Associated Injury of Human Pancreatic Acinar Cells and Acute Pancreatitis in 3 Mouse Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Li; Voronina, Svetlana; Javed, Muhammad A; Awais, Muhammad; Szatmary, Peter; Latawiec, Diane; Chvanov, Michael; Collier, David; Huang, Wei; Barrett, John; Begg, Malcolm; Stauderman, Ken; Roos, Jack; Grigoryev, Sergey; Ramos, Stephanie; Rogers, Evan; Whitten, Jeff; Velicelebi, Gonul; Dunn, Michael; Tepikin, Alexei V; Criddle, David N; Sutton, Robert

    2015-08-01

    Sustained activation of the cytosolic calcium concentration induces injury to pancreatic acinar cells and necrosis. The calcium release-activated calcium modulator ORAI1 is the most abundant Ca(2+) entry channel in pancreatic acinar cells; it sustains calcium overload in mice exposed to toxins that induce pancreatitis. We investigated the roles of ORAI1 in pancreatic acinar cell injury and the development of acute pancreatitis in mice. Mouse and human acinar cells, as well as HEK 293 cells transfected to express human ORAI1 with human stromal interaction molecule 1, were hyperstimulated or incubated with human bile acid, thapsigargin, or cyclopiazonic acid to induce calcium entry. GSK-7975A or CM_128 were added to some cells, which were analyzed by confocal and video microscopy and patch clamp recordings. Acute pancreatitis was induced in C57BL/6J mice by ductal injection of taurolithocholic acid 3-sulfate or intravenous' administration of cerulein or ethanol and palmitoleic acid. Some mice then were given GSK-7975A or CM_128, which inhibit ORAI1, at different time points to assess local and systemic effects. GSK-7975A and CM_128 each separately inhibited toxin-induced activation of ORAI1 and/or activation of Ca(2+) currents after Ca(2+) release, in a concentration-dependent manner, in mouse and human pancreatic acinar cells (inhibition >90% of the levels observed in control cells). The ORAI1 inhibitors also prevented activation of the necrotic cell death pathway in mouse and human pancreatic acinar cells. GSK-7975A and CM_128 each inhibited all local and systemic features of acute pancreatitis in all 3 models, in dose- and time-dependent manners. The agents were significantly more effective, in a range of parameters, when given at 1 vs 6 hours after induction of pancreatitis. Cytosolic calcium overload, mediated via ORAI1, contributes to the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis. ORAI1 inhibitors might be developed for the treatment of patients with pancreatitis

  12. Inhibition of PRDM14 expression in pancreatic cancer suppresses cancer stem-like properties and liver metastasis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriya, Chiharu; Taniguchi, Hiroaki; Miyata, Kanjiro; Nishiyama, Nobuhiro; Kataoka, Kazunori; Imai, Kohzoh

    2017-06-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal types of cancer, with aggressive properties characterized by metastasis, recurrence and drug resistance. Cancer stem cells are considered to be responsible for these properties. PRDM14, a transcriptional regulator that maintains pluripotency in embryonic stem cells, is overexpressed in some cancers. Here, we assessed PRDM14 expression and the effects of PRDM14 knockdown on cancer stem-like phenotypes in pancreatic cancer. We observed that PRDM14 protein was overexpressed in pancreatic cancer tissues compared with normal pancreatic tissues. Using lentiviral shRNA-transduced pancreatic cancer cells, we found that PRDM14 knockdown decreased sphere formation, number of side population and cell surface marker-positive cells and subcutaneous xenograft tumors and liver metastasis in mice. This was accompanied by upregulation of some microRNAs (miRNAs), including miR-125a-3p. miR-125a-3p, a tumor suppressor that is down-regulated in pancreatic cancer, has been suggested to regulate the expression of the Src-family kinase, Fyn. In PRDM14-knockdown cells, Fyn was expressed at lower levels and downstream proteins were less activated. These changes were considered to cause suppression of the above cancer phenotypes. In addition, we used small interfering RNA (siRNA)-based therapy targeting PRDM14 in a mouse model of liver metastasis induced using MIA-PaCa2 cells, and this treatment significantly decreased metastasis and in vitro migration. Taken together, these results suggest that targeting the overexpression of PRDM14 suppresses cancer stem-like phenotypes, including liver metastasis, via miRNA regulation and siRNA-based therapy targeting it shows promise as a treatment for patients with pancreatic cancer. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. In vivo SPECT imaging with 111In-DOTA-c(RGDfK) to detect early pancreatic cancer in a hamster pancreatic carcinogenesis model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yoshimoto, Mitsuyoshi; Hayakawa, Takuya; Mutoh, Michihiro; Imai, Toshio; Tsuda, Keisuke; Kimura, Sadaaki; Umeda, Izumi O; Fujii, Hirofumi; Wakabayashi, Keiji

    2012-01-01

    Early detection of pancreatic cancer is key to overcoming its poor prognosis. α(v)β(3)-integrin is often overexpressed in pancreatic tumor cells, whereas it is scarcely expressed in normal pancreatic cells...

  14. Increased Expression of the GLUT-1 Gene is Associated With Worse Overall Survival in Resected Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis-Yadley, Ashley H.; Abbott, Andrea M.; Pimiento, Jose M.; Chen, Dung-Tsa; Malafa, Mokenge P.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives There is currently no reliable method to predict the risk of relapse after curative resection of early-stage pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Increased glucose metabolism observed on 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET) by malignant cells, the Warburg effect, is a well-known characteristic of the malignant phenotype. We investigated the role of glucose transporter type 1 (GLUT-1) gene expression, a glucose cell plasma membrane transporter, in early-stage pancreatic cancer. Methods Associations between GLUT-1 gene expression with PET maximum standardized uptake values (SUVmax) and histologic grade were investigated in early-stage pancreatic adenocarcinoma patients. Multivariate analysis was conducted to determine predictors of prognosis. Cox proportional hazards model was used for survival analysis. Results Sixty-three patients had GLUT-1 gene analysis performed, and 50 patients had both GLUT-1 analysis and PET scan. Patients with high GLUT-1 gene expression had a decreased overall survival by univariate analysis using Cox proportional hazards model (HR=2.82, p=0.001) and remained significant on multivariate analysis (HR=2.54, p=0.03). There was no correlation of GLUT-1 gene expression with histologic grade or PET SUVmax. Conclusion Increased GLUT-1 gene expression was associated with a decreased overall survival in pancreatic adenocarcinoma. This supports increased GLUT-1 gene expression as a potential prognostic marker in resected pancreatic adenocarcinoma. PMID:26692443

  15. Single-Cell Gene Expression Analysis of a Human ESC Model of Pancreatic Endocrine Development Reveals Different Paths to β-Cell Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Maja Borup Kjær; Azad, Ajuna; Ingvorsen, Camilla; Hess, Katja; Hansson, Mattias; Grapin-Botton, Anne; Honoré, Christian

    2017-10-10

    The production of insulin-producing β cells from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) in vitro represents a promising strategy for a cell-based therapy for type 1 diabetes mellitus. To explore the cellular heterogeneity and temporal progression of endocrine progenitors and their progeny, we performed single-cell qPCR on more than 500 cells across several stages of in vitro differentiation of hESCs and compared them with human islets. We reveal distinct subpopulations along the endocrine differentiation path and an early lineage bifurcation toward either polyhormonal cells or β-like cells. We uncover several similarities and differences with mouse development and reveal that cells can take multiple paths to the same differentiation state, a principle that could be relevant to other systems. Notably, activation of the key β-cell transcription factor NKX6.1 can be initiated before or after endocrine commitment. The single-cell temporal resolution we provide can be used to improve the production of functional β cells. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. An Exercise-Only Intervention in Obese Fathers Restores Glucose and Insulin Regulation in Conjunction with the Rescue of Pancreatic Islet Cell Morphology and MicroRNA Expression in Male Offspring

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPherson, Nicole O.; Lane, Michelle; Sandeman, Lauren; Owens, Julie A.; Fullston, Tod

    2017-01-01

    Paternal obesity programs metabolic syndrome in offspring. Low-impact exercise in obese males improves the metabolic health of female offspring, however whether this occurred in male offspring remained unknown. C57BL/6NHsd (Harlan) mice were fed a control diet (CD; 6% fat, n = 7) or a high-fat diet (HFD; 21% fat, n = 16) for 18 weeks. After 9 weeks, HFD-fed mice either remained sedentary (HH, n = 8) or undertook low–moderate exercise (HE, n = 8) for another 9 weeks. Male offspring were assessed for glucose/insulin tolerance, body composition, plasma lipids, pancreatic islet cell morphology and microRNA expression. Founder HH induced glucose intolerance, insulin insensitivity, and hyperlipidaemia in male offspring (p obese fathers prior to conception, without dietary change, may be a viable intervention strategy to reduce the ill-effects of obesity-induced paternal programming in male offspring. PMID:28208792

  17. Pancreatic α-cell mass in obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellenbroek, Johanne H; Töns, Hendrica A M; Hanegraaf, Maaike A J; Rabelink, Ton J; Engelse, Marten A; Carlotti, Françoise; de Koning, Eelco J P

    2017-12-01

    While it is well recognized that obesity is associated with an increased β-cell mass, the association with α-cell mass is less clear. Type 2 diabetes (T2DM) associated with obesity is a bihormonal disease characterized by inadequate insulin secretion and hyperglucagonaemia. We examined β- and α-cell mass throughout the pancreas in obese and lean subjects. Pancreatic tissue of the head, body and tail region of the pancreas was examined from 15 obese subjects (body mass index [BMI] ≥ 27 kg/m2 ) and 15 age-matched lean subjects (BMI ≤ 25 kg/m2 ) without diabetes. In obese subjects both β- and α-cell mass were proportionally higher compared with lean subjects, thereby maintaining the α- to β-cell ratio. The adaptation to obesity occurred preferentially in the head of the pancreas. As data so far have been derived from histological studies of β- and α-cell adaptation, in which the head region of the human pancreas was not included, the adaptive capacity of humans to obesity has previously been underestimated. Obesity is associated with an increased α-cell mass, which could contribute to the hyperglucagonaemia observed in people with T2DM. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Sweet Taste Receptor Expressed in Pancreatic β-Cells Activates the Calcium and Cyclic AMP Signaling Systems and Stimulates Insulin Secretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Yuko; Nagasawa, Masahiro; Yamada, Satoko; Hara, Akemi; Mogami, Hideo; Nikolaev, Viacheslav O.; Lohse, Martin J.; Shigemura, Noriatsu; Ninomiya, Yuzo; Kojima, Itaru

    2009-01-01

    Background Sweet taste receptor is expressed in the taste buds and enteroendocrine cells acting as a sugar sensor. We investigated the expression and function of the sweet taste receptor in MIN6 cells and mouse islets. Methodology/Principal Findings The expression of the sweet taste receptor was determined by RT–PCR and immunohistochemistry. Changes in cytoplasmic Ca2+ ([Ca2+]c) and cAMP ([cAMP]c) were monitored in MIN6 cells using fura-2 and Epac1-camps. Activation of protein kinase C was monitored by measuring translocation of MARCKS-GFP. Insulin was measured by radioimmunoassay. mRNA for T1R2, T1R3, and gustducin was expressed in MIN6 cells. In these cells, artificial sweeteners such as sucralose, succharin, and acesulfame-K increased insulin secretion and augmented secretion induced by glucose. Sucralose increased biphasic increase in [Ca2+]c. The second sustained phase was blocked by removal of extracellular calcium and addition of nifedipine. An inhibitor of inositol(1, 4, 5)-trisphophate receptor, 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate, blocked both phases of [Ca2+]c response. The effect of sucralose on [Ca2+]c was inhibited by gurmarin, an inhibitor of the sweet taste receptor, but not affected by a Gq inhibitor. Sucralose also induced sustained elevation of [cAMP]c, which was only partially inhibited by removal of extracellular calcium and nifedipine. Finally, mouse islets expressed T1R2 and T1R3, and artificial sweeteners stimulated insulin secretion. Conclusions Sweet taste receptor is expressed in β-cells, and activation of this receptor induces insulin secretion by Ca2+ and cAMP-dependent mechanisms. PMID:19352508

  19. Sweet taste receptor expressed in pancreatic beta-cells activates the calcium and cyclic AMP signaling systems and stimulates insulin secretion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuko Nakagawa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sweet taste receptor is expressed in the taste buds and enteroendocrine cells acting as a sugar sensor. We investigated the expression and function of the sweet taste receptor in MIN6 cells and mouse islets. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The expression of the sweet taste receptor was determined by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Changes in cytoplasmic Ca(2+ ([Ca(2+](c and cAMP ([cAMP](c were monitored in MIN6 cells using fura-2 and Epac1-camps. Activation of protein kinase C was monitored by measuring translocation of MARCKS-GFP. Insulin was measured by radioimmunoassay. mRNA for T1R2, T1R3, and gustducin was expressed in MIN6 cells. In these cells, artificial sweeteners such as sucralose, succharin, and acesulfame-K increased insulin secretion and augmented secretion induced by glucose. Sucralose increased biphasic increase in [Ca(2+](c. The second sustained phase was blocked by removal of extracellular calcium and addition of nifedipine. An inhibitor of inositol(1, 4, 5-trisphophate receptor, 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate, blocked both phases of [Ca(2+](c response. The effect of sucralose on [Ca(2+](c was inhibited by gurmarin, an inhibitor of the sweet taste receptor, but not affected by a G(q inhibitor. Sucralose also induced sustained elevation of [cAMP](c, which was only partially inhibited by removal of extracellular calcium and nifedipine. Finally, mouse islets expressed T1R2 and T1R3, and artificial sweeteners stimulated insulin secretion. CONCLUSIONS: Sweet taste receptor is expressed in beta-cells, and activation of this receptor induces insulin secretion by Ca(2+ and cAMP-dependent mechanisms.

  20. Aire mediates thymic expression and tolerance of pancreatic antigens via an unconventional transcriptional mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danso-Abeam, Dina; Staats, Kim A; Franckaert, Dean; Van Den Bosch, Ludo; Liston, Adrian; Gray, Daniel H D; Dooley, James

    2013-01-01

    The autoimmune regulator (Aire), mediates central tolerance of peripheral self. Its activity in thymic epithelial cells (TECs) directs the ectopic expression of thousands of tissue-restricted antigens (TRAs), causing the deletion of autoreactive thymocytes. The molecular mechanisms orchestrating the breadth of transcriptional regulation by Aire remain unknown. One prominent model capable of explaining both the uniquely high number of Aire-dependent targets and their specificity posits that tissue-specific transcription factors induced by Aire directly activate their canonical targets, exponentially adding to the total number of Aire-dependent TRAs. To test this "Hierarchical Transcription" model, we analysed mice deficient in the pancreatic master transcription factor pancreatic and duodenal homeobox 1 (Pdx1), specifically in TECs (Pdx1(ΔFoxn1) ), for the expression and tolerance of pancreatic TRAs. Surprisingly, we found that lack of Pdx1 in TECs did not reduce the transcription of insulin or somatostatin, or alter glucagon expression. Moreover, in a model of thymic deletion driven by a neo-TRA under the control of the insulin promoter, Pdx1 in TECs was not required to affect thymocyte deletion or the generation of regulatory T (Treg) cells. These findings suggest that the capacity of Aire to regulate expression of a huge array of TRAs relies solely on an unconventional transcriptional mechanism, without intermediary transcription factors. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Glycogene expression alterations associated with pancreatic cancer epithelial-mesenchymal transition in complementary model systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin A Maupin

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The ability to selectively detect and target cancer cells that have undergone an epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT may lead to improved methods to treat cancers such as pancreatic cancer. The remodeling of cellular glycosylation previously has been associated with cell differentiation and may represent a valuable class of molecular targets for EMT.As a first step toward investigating the nature of glycosylation alterations in EMT, we characterized the expression of glycan-related genes in three in-vitro model systems that each represented a complementary aspect of pancreatic cancer EMT. These models included: 1 TGFβ-induced EMT, which provided a look at the active transition between states; 2 a panel of 22 pancreatic cancer cell lines, which represented terminal differentiation states of either epithelial-like or mesenchymal-like; and 3 actively-migrating and stationary cells, which provided a look at the mechanism of migration. We analyzed expression data from a list of 587 genes involved in glycosylation (biosynthesis, sugar transport, glycan-binding, etc. or EMT. Glycogenes were altered at a higher prevalence than all other genes in the first two models (p<0.05 and <0.005, respectively but not in the migration model. Several functional themes were shared between the induced-EMT model and the cell line panel, including alterations to matrix components and proteoglycans, the sulfation of glycosaminoglycans; mannose receptor family members; initiation of O-glycosylation; and certain forms of sialylation. Protein-level changes were confirmed by Western blot for the mannose receptor MRC2 and the O-glycosylation enzyme GALNT3, and cell-surface sulfation changes were confirmed using Alcian Blue staining.Alterations to glycogenes are a major component of cancer EMT and are characterized by changes to matrix components, the sulfation of GAGs, mannose receptors, O-glycosylation, and specific sialylated structures. These results provide leads for

  2. Protease-activated receptor 2 agonist increases cell proliferation and invasion of human pancreatic cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    XIE, LIQUN; DUAN, ZEXING; LIU, CAIJU; ZHENG, YANMIN; ZHOU, JING

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the expression of protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR-2) in the human pancreatic cancer cell line SW1990, and to evaluate its effect on cell proliferation and invasion. The expression of PAR-2 protein and mRNA in SW1990 cells was determined by immunocytochemistry and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (PCR), respectively. MTT and cell invasion and migration assays, as well as semi-quantitative PCR and zymography analysis, were additionally performed. PAR-2 mRNA was significantly upregulated in the cells treated with trypsin or the PAR-2 activating peptide Ser-Leu-Ile-Gly-Lys-Val (SLIGKV) (P0.05). Trypsin and SLIGKV significantly promoted SW1990 cell proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent manner (P<0.05). Compared with the control group, trypsin and SLIGKV significantly increased the mRNA expression (P<0.01) and gelatinolytic activity (P<0.01) of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2. In conclusion, PAR-2 is expressed in SW1990 cells. PAR-2 activation may promote the invasion and migration of human pancreatic cancer cells by increasing MMP-2 expression. PMID:25452809

  3. Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the hormones insulin and glucagon into the bloodstream. Pancreatitis is inflammation of the pancreas. It happens when digestive enzymes start digesting the pancreas itself. Pancreatitis can be acute or chronic. Either form is ...

  4. Gastrin regulates ABCG2 to promote the migration, invasion and side populations in pancreatic cancer cells via activation of NF-κB signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Juan; Xin, Beibei; Wang, Hui; He, Xiaodan; Wei, Wei; Zhang, Ti; Shen, Xiaohong

    2016-08-01

    Gastrin is absent in most normal adult pancreatic tissues but is highly expressed in pancreatic cancer tissues. Although Gastrin expression was reported to be associated with tumor proliferation in human pancreatic cancer, studies on the relationship between Gastrin and tumor metastasis in pancreatic cancer are rare. In this study, we performed an analysis to determine the effects of Gastrin on modulating the side populations, cell proportion and tumor cell metastatic potential and invasion activity and explored its mechanisms in pancreatic cancer. We indicated that Gastrin and ABCG2 were widely expressed in pancreatic cancer cell lines and overexpressed in cancer tissues. Gastrin induced ABCG2 expression, and this effect was mediated by NF-κB activation. Gastrin regulated the SP proportion of BxPC-3 cells via modulating ABCG2 expression. Through the regulation of the functions of NF-κB/ABCG2, Gastrin functionally promoted the migration and invasion in pancreatic cancer cell. The present study indicated that Gastrin induced ABCG2 expression by activating NF-κB and thereby modulated the SP proportion, tumor cell metastatic potential and invasion activity in pancreatic cancer. Gastrin could serve as an effective therapeutic target for the metastasis of pancreatic cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Tenascin-C induces resistance to apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cell through activation of ERK/NF-κB pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Meiyan; He, Xiaodan; Wei, Wei; Wang, Juan; Zhang, Ti; Shen, Xiaohong

    2015-06-01

    As a glycol-protein located in extracellular matrix (ECM), tenascin-C (TNC) is absent in most normal adult tissues but is highly expressed in the majority of malignant solid tumors. Pancreatic cancer is characterized by an abundant fibrous tissue rich in TNC. Although it was reported that TNC's expression increased in the progression from low-grade precursor lesions to invasive cancer and was associated with tumor differentiation in human pancreatic cancer, studies on the relations between TNC and tumor progression in pancreatic cancer were rare. In this study, we performed an analysis to determine the effects of TNC on modulating cell apoptosis and chemo-resistance and explored its mechanisms involving activation in pancreatic cancer cell. The expressions of TNC, ERK1/2/p-ERK1/2, Bcl-xL and Bcl-2 were detected by immunohistochemistry and western blotting. Then the effects of exogenous and endogenous TNC on the regulation of tumor proliferation, apoptosis and gemcitabine cytotoxicity were investigated. The associations among the TNC knockdown, TNC stimulation and expressions of ERK1/2/NF-κB/p65 and apoptotic regulatory proteins were also analyzed in cell lines. The mechanism of TNC on modulating cancer cell apoptosis and drug resistant through activation of ERK1/2/NF-κB/p65 signals was evaluated. The effect of TNC on regulating cell cycle distribution was also tested. TNC, ERK1/2/p-ERK1/2, and apoptotic regulatory proteins Bcl-xL and Bcl-2 were highly expressed in human pancreatic cancer tissues. In vitro, exogenous TNC promoted pancreatic cancer cell growth also mediates basal as well as starved and drug-induced apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells. The effects of TNC on anti-apoptosis were induced by the activation state of ERK1/2/NF-κB/p65 signals in pancreatic cell. TNC phosphorylate ERK1/2 to induce NF-κB/p65 nucleus translocation. The latter contributes to promote Bcl-xL, Bcl-2 protein expressions and reduce caspase activity, which inhibit cell apoptotic

  6. Designing of promiscuous inhibitors against pancreatic cancer cell lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rahul; Chaudhary, Kumardeep; Singla, Deepak; Gautam, Ankur; Raghava, Gajendra P. S.

    2014-04-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains the most devastating disease with worst prognosis. There is a pressing need to accelerate the drug discovery process to identify new effective drug candidates against pancreatic cancer. We have developed QSAR models for predicting promiscuous inhibitors using the pharmacological data. Our models achieved maximum Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.86, when evaluated on 10-fold cross-validation. Our models have also successfully validated the drug-to-oncogene relationship and further we used these models to screen FDA approved drugs and tested them in vitro. We have integrated these models in a webserver named as DiPCell, which will be useful for screening and designing novel promiscuous drug molecules. We have also identified the most and least effective drugs for pancreatic cancer cell lines. On the other side, we have identified resistant pancreatic cancer cell lines, which need investigative scanner on them to put light on resistant mechanism in pancreatic cancer.

  7. Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be present. How is pancreatitis diagnosed? How is pancreatitis treated? Treatment mainly consists of putting the pancreas to rest ( ... not as a definitive basis for diagnosis or treatment in any particular case. It is very ... pancreatitis is suspected, laboratory tests search for higher than ...

  8. Role of intrapancreatic SPINK1/Spink3 expression in the development of pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaki eOhmuraya

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Studies on hereditary pancreatitis have provided evidence in favor of central role for trypsin activity in the disease. Identification of genetic variants of trypsinogen linked the protease to the onset of pancreatitis, and biochemical characterization proposed an enzymatic gain of function as the initiating mechanism. Mutations of serine protease inhibitor Kazal type 1gene (SPINK1 are shown to be associated with hereditary pancreatitis. We previously reported that Spink3 (a mouse homologue gene of human SPINK1 deficient mice showed excessive autophagy, followed by inappropriate trypsinogen activation in the exocrine pancreas. These data indicate that the role of SPINK1/Spink3 is not only trypsin inhibitor, but also negative regulator of autophagy. On the other hand, recent studies showed that high levels of SPINK1 protein detected in a serum or urine were associated with adverse outcome in various cancer types. It has been suggested that expression of SPINK1 and trypsin is balanced in normal tissue, but this balance could be disrupted during tumor progression. Based on the structural similarity between SPINK1 and epidermal growth factor (EGF, we showed that SPINK1 protein binds and activates EGF receptor, thus acting as a growth factor on tumor cell lines. In this review, we summarize the old and new roles of SPINK1/Spink3 in trypsin inhibition, autophagy, and cancer cell growth. These new functions of SPINK1/Spink3 may be related to the development of chronic pancreatitis.

  9. Histone deacetylase inhibitor MGCD0103 synergizes with gemcitabine in human pancreatic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Victoria; Richard, Normand; Brady, Helen; Maier, Armin; Kelter, Gerhard; Heise, Carla

    2011-06-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors are a group of recently developed compounds that modulate cell growth and survival. We evaluated the effects of the histone deacetylase inhibitor MGCD0103 on growth of pancreatic carcinoma models following single agent treatment and in combination with gemcitabine. MGCD0103 inhibited tumor cell growth and acted synergistically with gemcitabine to enhance its cytotoxic effects. Gene expression analysis identified the cell cycle pathway as one of the most highly modulated gene groups. Our data suggest that MGCD0103 + gemcitabine might be an effective treatment for gemcitabine-refractory pancreatic cancer. © 2011 Japanese Cancer Association.

  10. Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor Activation Modulates Pancreatitis-Associated Gene Expression But Does Not Modify the Susceptibility to Experimental Pancreatitis in Mice

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jacqueline A. Koehler; Laurie L. Baggio; Benjamin J. Lamont; Safina Ali; Daniel J. Drucker

    2009-01-01

    Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor Activation Modulates Pancreatitis-Associated Gene Expression But Does Not Modify the Susceptibility to Experimental Pancreatitis in Mice Jacqueline A. Koehler , Laurie L...

  11. Reprogramming pancreatic stellate cells via p53 activation: A putative target for pancreatic cancer therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maya Saison-Ridinger

    Full Text Available Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC is characterized by an extremely dense fibrotic stroma, which contributes to tumor growth, metastasis, and drug resistance. During tumorigenesis, quiescent pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs are activated and become major contributors to fibrosis, by increasing growth factor signaling and extracellular matrix deposition. The p53 tumor suppressor is known to restrict tumor initiation and progression through cell autonomous mechanisms including apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, and senescence. There is growing evidence that stromal p53 also exerts anti-tumor activity by paracrine mechanisms, though a role for stromal p53 in PDAC has not yet been described. Here, we demonstrate that activation of stromal p53 exerts anti-tumor effects in PDAC. We show that primary cancer-associated PSCs (caPSCs isolated from human PDAC express wild-type p53, which can be activated by the Mdm2 antagonist Nutlin-3a. Our work reveals that p53 acts as a major regulator of PSC activation and as a modulator of PDAC fibrosis. In vitro, p53 activation by Nutlin-3a induces profound transcriptional changes, which reprogram activated PSCs to quiescence. Using immunofluorescence and lipidomics, we have also found that p53 activation induces lipid droplet accumulation in both normal and tumor-associated fibroblasts, revealing a previously undescribed role for p53 in lipid storage. In vivo, treatment of tumor-bearing mice with the clinical form of Nutlin-3a induces stromal p53 activation, reverses caPSCs activation, and decreases fibrosis. All together our work uncovers new functions for stromal p53 in PDAC.

  12. Postprandial lipemia induces pancreatic α cell dysfunction characteristic of type 2 diabetes: studies in healthy subjects, mouse pancreatic islets, and cultured pancreatic α cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederwanger, Andreas; Ciardi, Christian; Tatarczyk, Tobias; Khan, Mohammad I; Hermann, Martin; Mittermair, Christof; Al-Zoairy, Ramona; Salzmann, Karin; Pedrini, Michael T

    2014-11-01

    Type 2 diabetes is associated with pancreatic α cell dysfunction, characterized by elevated fasting plasma glucagon concentrations and inadequate postprandial glucose- and insulin-induced suppression of glucagon secretion. The cause and the underlying mechanisms of α cell dysfunction are unknown. Because Western dietary habits cause postprandial lipemia for a major part of a day and, moreover, increase the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, we tested the hypothesis that postprandial lipemia with its characteristic elevation of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TGRLs) might cause pancreatic α cell dysfunction. In a crossover study with 7 healthy volunteers, 2 experiments using 2 fat-enriched meals were performed on each volunteer; meal 1 was designed to increase plasma concentrations of both TGRLs and nonesterified fatty acids and meal 2 to increase TGRLs only. Intravenous glucose boli were injected at 0800 after an overnight fast and postprandially at 1300, 3 h after ingestion of a fat-enriched meal. Glucagon concentrations were measured throughout the days of the experiments. In addition to the study in humans, in vitro experiments were performed with mouse pancreatic islets and cultured pancreatic alpha TC 1 clone 9 (αTC1c9) cells, which were incubated with highly purified TGRLs. In humans, postprandial lipemia increased plasma glucagon concentrations and led to an inadequate glucose- and insulin-induced suppression of glucagon. There was no difference between the 2 meal types. In mouse pancreatic islets and cultured pancreatic αTC1c9 cells, purified postprandial TGRLs induced abnormalities in glucagon kinetics comparable with those observed in humans. The TGRL-induced α cell dysfunction was due to reduced γ-aminobutyric acid A receptor activation in pancreatic α cells. We concluded that postprandial lipemia induces pancreatic α cell dysfunction characteristic of type 2 diabetes and, therefore, propose that pancreatic α cell dysfunction could be viewed

  13. Dendritic cells fused with different pancreatic carcinoma cells induce different T-cell responses

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    Andoh Y

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Yoshiaki Andoh,1,2 Naohiko Makino,2 Mitsunori Yamakawa11Department of Pathological Diagnostics, 2Department of Gastroenterology, Yamagata University School of Medicine, Yamagata, JapanBackground: It is unclear whether there are any differences in the induction of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL and CD4+CD25high regulatory T-cells (Tregs among dendritic cells (DCs fused with different pancreatic carcinomas. The aim of this study was to compare the ability to induce cytotoxicity by human DCs fused with different human pancreatic carcinoma cell lines and to elucidate the causes of variable cytotoxicity among cell lines.Methods: Monocyte-derived DCs, which were generated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs, were fused with carcinoma cells such as Panc-1, KP-1NL, QGP-1, and KP-3L. The induction of CTL and Tregs, and cytokine profile of PBMCs stimulated by fused DCs were evaluated.Results: The cytotoxicity against tumor targets induced by PBMCs cocultured with DCs fused with QGP-1 (DC/QGP-1 was very low, even though PBMCs cocultured with DCs fused with other cell lines induced significant cytotoxicity against the respective tumor target. The factors causing this low cytotoxicity were subsequently investigated. DC/QGP-1 induced a significant expansion of Tregs in cocultured PBMCs compared with DC/KP-3L. The level of interleukin-10 secreted in the supernatants of PBMCs cocultured with DC/QGP-1 was increased significantly compared with that in DC/KP-3L. Downregulation of major histocompatibility complex class I expression and increased secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor were observed with QGP-1, as well as in the other cell lines.Conclusion: The present study demonstrated that the cytotoxicity induced by DCs fused with pancreatic cancer cell lines was different between each cell line, and that the reduced cytotoxicity of DC/QGP-1 might be related to the increased secretion of interleukin-10 and the extensive induction of Tregs

  14. CRFR1 is expressed on pancreatic beta cells, promotes beta cell proliferation, and potentiates insulin secretion in a glucose-dependent manner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huising, Mark O; van der Meulen, Talitha; Vaughan, Joan M

    2009-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), originally characterized as the principal neuroregulator of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis, has broad central and peripheral distribution and actions. We demonstrate the presence of CRF receptor type 1 (CRFR1) on primary beta cells and show that acti...

  15. Epigenetic Induction of Definitive and Pancreatic Endoderm Cell Fate in Human Fibroblasts

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    Rangarajan Sambathkumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Reprogramming can occur by the introduction of key transcription factors (TFs as well as by epigenetic changes. We demonstrated that histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi Trichostatin A (TSA combined with a chromatin remodeling medium (CRM induced expression of a number of definitive endoderm and early and late pancreatic marker genes. When CRM was omitted, endoderm/pancreatic marker genes were not induced. Furthermore, treatment with DNA methyltransferase inhibitor (DNMTi 5-azacytidine (5AZA CRM did not affect gene expression changes, and when 5AZA was combined with TSA, no further increase in gene expression of endoderm, pancreatic endoderm, and endocrine markers was seen over levels induced with TSA alone. Interestingly, TSA-CRM did not affect expression of pluripotency and hepatocyte genes but induced some mesoderm transcripts. Upon removal of TSA-CRM, the endoderm/pancreatic gene expression profile returned to baseline. Our findings underscore the role epigenetic modification in transdifferentiation of one somatic cell into another. However, full reprogramming of fibroblasts to β-cells will require combination of this approach with TF overexpression and/or culture of the partially reprogrammed cells under β-cell specific conditions.

  16. Sirtuin-1 regulates acinar-to-ductal metaplasia and supports cancer cell viability in pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wauters, Elke; Sanchez-Arévalo Lobo, Victor J; Pinho, Andreia V; Mawson, Amanda; Herranz, Daniel; Wu, Jianmin; Cowley, Mark J; Colvin, Emily K; Njicop, Erna Ngwayi; Sutherland, Rob L; Liu, Tao; Serrano, Manuel; Bouwens, Luc; Real, Francisco X; Biankin, Andrew V; Rooman, Ilse

    2013-04-01

    The exocrine pancreas can undergo acinar-to-ductal metaplasia (ADM), as in the case of pancreatitis where precursor lesions of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) can arise. The NAD(+)-dependent protein deacetylase Sirtuin-1 (Sirt1) has been implicated in carcinogenesis with dual roles depending on its subcellular localization. In this study, we examined the expression and the role of Sirt1 in different stages of pancreatic carcinogenesis, i.e. ADM models and established PDAC. In addition, we analyzed the expression of KIAA1967, a key mediator of Sirt1 function, along with potential Sirt1 downstream targets. Sirt1 was co-expressed with KIAA1967 in the nuclei of normal pancreatic acinar cells. In ADM, Sirt1 underwent a transient nuclear-to-cytoplasmic shuttling. Experiments where during ADM, we enforced repression of Sirt1 shuttling, inhibition of Sirt1 activity or modulation of its expression, all underscore that the temporary decrease of nuclear and increase of cytoplasmic Sirt1 stimulate ADM. Our results further underscore that important transcriptional regulators of acinar differentiation, that is, Pancreatic transcription factor-1a and β-catenin can be deacetylated by Sirt1. Inhibition of Sirt1 is effective in suppression of ADM and in reducing cell viability in established PDAC tumors. KIAA1967 expression is differentially downregulated in PDAC and impacts on the sensitivity of PDAC cells to the Sirt1/2 inhibitor Tenovin-6. In PDAC, acetylation of β-catenin is not affected, unlike p53, a well-characterized Sirt1-regulated protein in tumor cells. Our results reveal that Sirt1 is an important regulator and potential therapeutic target in pancreatic carcinogenesis. ©2012 AACR.

  17. Correlation Between Preoperative Serum Carcinoembryonic Antigen Levels and Expression on Pancreatic and Rectal Cancer Tissue

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    LSF Boogerd

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA–targeted imaging and therapeutic agents are being tested in clinical trials. If CEA overexpression in malignant tissue corresponds with elevated serum CEA, serum CEA could assist in selecting patients who may benefit from CEA-targeted agents. This study aims to assess the relationship between serum CEA and CEA expression in pancreatic (n = 20 and rectal cancer tissues (n = 35 using histopathology. According to local laboratory standards, a serum CEA >3 ng/mL was considered elevated. In pancreatic cancer patients a significant correlation between serum CEA and percentage of CEA-expressing tumor cells was observed ( P  = .04, ρ = .47. All 6 patients with homogeneous CEA expression in the tumor had a serum CEA >3 ng/mL. Most rectal cancer tissues (32/35 showed homogeneous CEA expression, independent of serum CEA levels. This study suggests that selection of pancreatic cancer patients for CEA-targeted agents via serum CEA appears adequate. For selection of rectal cancer patients, serum CEA levels are not informative.

  18. Activation of GLP-1 and gastrin signalling induces in vivo reprogramming of pancreatic exocrine cells into beta cells in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Shugo; Miyatsuka, Takeshi; Matsuoka, Taka-aki; Takahara, Mitsuyoshi; Yamamoto, Yuichi; Yasuda, Tetsuyuki; Kaneto, Hideaki; Fujitani, Yoshio; German, Michael S; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Watada, Hirotaka; Shimomura, Iichiro

    2015-11-01

    Lineage conversion of non-beta cells into insulin-producing cells has been proposed as a therapy for the cure of diabetes. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and its derivatives can induce beta cell neogenesis in vitro and beta cell mass expansion in vivo, but GLP-1 signalling has not been shown to regulate cell fate decisions in vivo. We therefore tested the impact of GLP-1 receptor (GLP1R) expression on beta cell differentiation in vivo. Mice overexpressing GLP1R in pancreatic exocrine cells were generated by Cre-mediated recombination in sex-determining region Y-box 9 (SOX9)-expressing cells and then treated with exendin-4 and/or gastrin. Histological analysis was performed to detect cellular reprogramming from the exocrine lineage into insulin-producing cells. Whereas no newly generated beta cells were detected in the mice treated with exendin-4 alone, treatment with gastrin only induced the conversion of exocrine cells into insulin-producing cells. Furthermore, the overexpression of GLP1R, together with gastrin and exendin-4, synergistically promoted beta cell neogenesis accompanied by the formation of islet-like clusters. These newly generated beta cells expressed beta cell specific transcription factors, such as pancreatic and duodenal homeobox 1 (PDX1), NK6 homeobox 1 (NKX6.1) and musculoaponeurotic fibrosarcoma oncogene family A (MafA). These mice showed no histological evidence of pancreatitis or pancreatic dysplasia in their acini and had normal plasma amylase levels. Activation of GLP-1 and gastrin signalling induces beta cell neogenesis in the exocrine lineage without any deleterious pancreatic changes, which may lead to a potential therapy to cure diabetes by generating surrogate beta cells.

  19. Solanine Induces Mitochondria-Mediated Apoptosis in Human Pancreatic Cancer Cells

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    Hongwei Sun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Steroid alkaloids have been suggested as potential anticancer compounds. However, the underlying mechanisms of how steroid alkaloids inhibit the tumor growth are largely unknown. Here, we reported that solanine, a substance of steroid alkaloids, has a positive effect on the inhibition of pancreatic cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo. In pancreatic cancer cells and nu/nu nude mice model, we found that solanine inhibited cancer cells growth through caspase-3 dependent mitochondrial apoptosis. Mechanically, solanine promotes the opening of mitochondrial membrane permeability transition pore (MPTP by downregulating the Bcl-2/Bax ratio; thereafter, Cytochrome c and Smac are released from mitochondria into cytosol to process the caspase-3 zymogen into an activated form. Moreover, we found that the expression of tumor metastasis related proteins, MMP-2 and MMP-9, was also decreased in the cells treated with solanine. Therefore, our results suggested that solanine was an effective compound for the treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  20. Solanine induces mitochondria-mediated apoptosis in human pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hongwei; Lv, Chongqing; Yang, Longlong; Wang, Yingxiu; Zhang, Qingshun; Yu, Suhui; Kong, Hongru; Wang, Meng; Xie, Jianming; Zhang, Chunwu; Zhou, Mengtao

    2014-01-01

    Steroid alkaloids have been suggested as potential anticancer compounds. However, the underlying mechanisms of how steroid alkaloids inhibit the tumor growth are largely unknown. Here, we reported that solanine, a substance of steroid alkaloids, has a positive effect on the inhibition of pancreatic cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo. In pancreatic cancer cells and nu/nu nude mice model, we found that solanine inhibited cancer cells growth through caspase-3 dependent mitochondrial apoptosis. Mechanically, solanine promotes the opening of mitochondrial membrane permeability transition pore (MPTP) by downregulating the Bcl-2/Bax ratio; thereafter, Cytochrome c and Smac are released from mitochondria into cytosol to process the caspase-3 zymogen into an activated form. Moreover, we found that the expression of tumor metastasis related proteins, MMP-2 and MMP-9, was also decreased in the cells treated with solanine. Therefore, our results suggested that solanine was an effective compound for the treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  1. Transcriptome analysis of pancreatic cells across distant species highlights novel important regulator genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarifeño-Saldivia, Estefania; Lavergne, Arnaud; Bernard, Alice; Padamata, Keerthana; Bergemann, David; Voz, Marianne L; Manfroid, Isabelle; Peers, Bernard

    2017-03-21

    Defining the transcriptome and the genetic pathways of pancreatic cells is of great interest for elucidating the molecular attributes of pancreas disorders such as diabetes and cancer. As the function of the different pancreatic cell types has been maintained during vertebrate evolution, the comparison of their transcriptomes across distant vertebrate species is a means to pinpoint genes under strong evolutionary constraints due to their crucial function, which have therefore preserved their selective expression in these pancreatic cell types. In this study, RNA-sequencing was performed on pancreatic alpha, beta, and delta endocrine cells as well as the acinar and ductal exocrine cells isolated from adult zebrafish transgenic lines. Comparison of these transcriptomes identified many novel markers, including transcription factors and signaling pathway components, specific for each cell type. By performing interspecies comparisons, we identified hundreds of genes with conserved enriched expression in endocrine and exocrine cells among human, mouse, and zebrafish. This list includes many genes known as crucial for pancreatic cell formation or function, but also pinpoints many factors whose pancreatic function is still unknown. A large set of endocrine-enriched genes can already be detected at early developmental stages as revealed by the transcriptomic profiling of embryonic endocrine cells, indicating a potential role in cell differentiation. The actual involvement of conserved endocrine genes in pancreatic cell differentiation was demonstrated in zebrafish for myt1b, whose invalidation leads to a reduction of alpha cells, and for cdx4, selectively expressed in endocrine delta cells and crucial for their specification. Intriguingly, comparison of the endocrine alpha and beta cell subtypes from human, mouse, and zebrafish reveals a much lower conservation of the transcriptomic signatures for these two endocrine cell subtypes compared to the signatures of pan

  2. Embelin suppresses growth of human pancreatic cancer xenografts, and pancreatic cancer cells isolated from KrasG12D mice by inhibiting Akt and Sonic hedgehog pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minzhao Huang

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is a deadly disease, and therefore effective treatment and/or prevention strategies are urgently needed. The objectives of this study were to examine the molecular mechanisms by which embelin inhibited human pancreatic cancer cell growth in vitro, and xenografts in Balb C nude mice, and pancreatic cancer cell growth isolated from KrasG12D transgenic mice. XTT assays were performed to measure cell viability. AsPC-1 cells were injected subcutaneously into Balb c nude mice and treated with embelin. Cell proliferation and apoptosis were measured by Ki67 and TUNEL staining, respectively. The expression of Akt, and Sonic Hedgehog (Shh and their target gene products were measured by the immunohistochemistry, and Western blot analysis. The effects of embelin on pancreatic cancer cells isolated from 10-months old KrasG12D mice were also examined. Embelin inhibited cell viability in pancreatic cancer AsPC-1, PANC-1, MIA PaCa-2 and Hs 766T cell lines, and these inhibitory effects were blocked either by constitutively active Akt or Shh protein. Embelin-treated mice showed significant inhibition in tumor growth which was associated with reduced expression of markers of cell proliferation (Ki67, PCNA and Bcl-2 and cell cycle (cyclin D1, CDK2, and CDK6, and induction of apoptosis (activation of caspase-3 and cleavage of PARP, and increased expression of Bax. In addition, embelin inhibited the expression of markers of angiogenesis (COX-2, VEGF, VEGFR, and IL-8, and metastasis (MMP-2 and MMP-9 in tumor tissues. Antitumor activity of embelin was associated with inhibition of Akt and Shh pathways in xenografts, and pancreatic cancer cells isolated from KrasG12D mice. Furthermore, embelin also inhibited epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT by up-regulating E-cadherin and inhibiting the expression of Snail, Slug, and ZEB1. These data suggest that embelin can inhibit pancreatic cancer growth, angiogenesis and metastasis by suppressing Akt and

  3. Growth Factor Independence-1 (Gfi1) Is Required for Pancreatic Acinar Unit Formation and Centroacinar Cell Differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qu, Xiaoling; Nyeng, Pia; Xiao, Fan

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: The genetic specification of the compartmentalized pancreatic acinar/centroacinar unit is poorly understood. Growth factor independence-1 (Gfi1) is a zinc finger transcriptional repressor that regulates hematopoietic stem cell maintenance, pre-T-cell differentiation, formation...... of pancreatic acinar cells as well as the centroacinar cells (CACs) in Gfi1(-/-) mice when compared with wild-type littermates. Pancreatic endocrine differentiation, islet architecture, and function were unaffected. Organ domain patterning and the formation of ductal cells occurred normally during the murine...... of granulocytes, inner ear hair cells, and the development of secretory cell types in the intestine. As GFI1/Gfi1 is expressed in human and rodent pancreas, we characterized the potential function of Gfi1 in mouse pancreatic development. METHODS: Gfi1 knockout mice were analyzed at histological and molecular...

  4. Involvement of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Capsaicin-Induced Apoptosis of Human Pancreatic Cancer Cells

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    Shengzhang Lin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Capsaicin, main pungent ingredient of hot chilli peppers, has been shown to have anticarcinogenic effect on various cancer cells through multiple mechanisms. In this study, we investigated the apoptotic effect of capsaicin on human pancreatic cancer cells in both in vitro and in vivo systems, as well as the possible mechanisms involved. In vitro, treatment of both the pancreatic cancer cells (PANC-1 and SW1990 with capsaicin resulted in cells growth inhibition, G0/G1 phase arrest, and apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Knockdown of growth arrest- and DNA damage-inducible gene 153 (GADD153, a marker of the endoplasmic-reticulum-stress- (ERS- mediated apoptosis pathway, by specific siRNA attenuated capsaicin-induced apoptosis both in PANC-1 and SW1990 cells. Moreover, in vivo studies capsaicin effectively inhibited the growth and metabolism of pancreatic cancer and prolonged the survival time of pancreatic cancer xenograft tumor-induced mice. Furthermore, capsaicin increased the expression of some key ERS markers, including glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78, phosphoprotein kinase-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (phosphoPERK, and phosphoeukaryotic initiation factor-2α (phospho-eIF2α, activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4 and GADD153 in tumor tissues. In conclusion, we for the first time provide important evidence to support the involvement of ERS in the induction of apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells by capsaicin.

  5. Activating transcription factor 3 promotes loss of the acinar cell phenotype in response to cerulein-induced pancreatitis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazio, Elena N; Young, Claire C; Toma, Jelena; Levy, Michael; Berger, Kurt R; Johnson, Charis L; Mehmood, Rashid; Swan, Patrick; Chu, Alphonse; Cregan, Sean P; Dilworth, F Jeffrey; Howlett, Christopher J; Pin, Christopher L

    2017-09-01

    Pancreatitis is a debilitating disease of the exocrine pancreas that, under chronic conditions, is a major susceptibility factor for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Although down-regulation of genes that promote the mature acinar cell fate is required to reduce injury associated with pancreatitis, the factors that promote this repression are unknown. Activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) is a key mediator of the unfolded protein response, a pathway rapidly activated during pancreatic insult. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by next-generation sequencing, we show that ATF3 is bound to the transcriptional regulatory regions of >30% of differentially expressed genes during the initiation of pancreatitis. Of importance, ATF3-dependent regulation of these genes was observed only upon induction of pancreatitis, with pathways involved in inflammation, acinar cell differentiation, and cell junctions being specifically targeted. Characterizing expression of transcription factors that affect acinar cell differentiation suggested that acinar cells lacking ATF3 maintain a mature cell phenotype during pancreatitis, a finding supported by maintenance of junctional proteins and polarity markers. As a result, Atf3-/- pancreatic tissue displayed increased tissue damage and inflammatory cell infiltration at early time points during injury but, at later time points, showed reduced acinar-to-duct cell metaplasia. Thus our results reveal a critical role for ATF3 as a key regulator of the acinar cell transcriptional response during injury and may provide a link between chronic pancreatitis and PDAC. © 2017 Fazio et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  6. Regulation of Pancreatic Islet Gene Expression in Mouse Islets by Pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Layden, Brian Thomas; Durai, Vivek; Newman, Marsha V

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatic beta cells adapt to pregnancy-induced insulin resistance by unclear mechanisms. This study sought to identify genes involved in beta cell adaptation during pregnancy. To examine changes in global RNA expression during pregnancy, murine islets were isolated at a time point of increased...... beta cell proliferation (E13.5), and RNA levels were determined by 2 different assays (global gene expression array and G protein-coupled receptor array). Follow-up studies confirmed the findings for select genes. Differential expression of 110 genes was identified and follow-up studies confirmed...... the changes in select genes at both the RNA and protein level. Surfactant protein D mRNA and protein levels exhibited large increases which were confirmed in murine islets. Cytokine-induced expression of surfactant protein D in islets was also demonstrated, suggesting a possible role as an anti...

  7. Cigarette smoking impairs pancreatic duct cell bicarbonate secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadiyala, Vivek; Lee, Linda S; Banks, Peter A; Suleiman, Shadeah; Paulo, Joao A; Wang, Wei; Rosenblum, Jessica; Sainani, Nisha I; Mortele, Koenraad; Conwell, Darwin Lewis

    2013-01-10

    To compare pancreatic duct cell function in smokers (current and past) and never smokers by measurement of secretin-stimulated peak bicarbonate concentration ([HCO3-]) in endoscopic collected pancreatic fluid (PF). This retrospective study was cross-sectional in design, recording demographic information (age, gender, etc.), smoking status (former, current, never), alcohol intake, clinical data (imaging, endoscopy), and laboratory results (peak PF [HCO3-]) from subjects evaluated for pancreatic disease at a tertiary pancreas center. Univariate and multivariate statistical analysis (SAS Version 9.2, Cary, NC, USA) was performed to assess the relationship between cigarette smoking and secretin-stimulated pancreatic fluid bicarbonate concentration. A total of 131 subjects underwent pancreatic fluid collection (endoscopic pancreatic function test, ePFT) for bicarbonate analysis: 25.2% (33 out of 131) past smokers, 31.3% (41 out of 131) current smokers, and 43.5% (57 out of 131) were never smokers. Measures of Association: The mean peak PF [HCO3-] in never smokers (81.3 ± 18.5 mEq/L) was statistically higher (indicating better duct cell function) when compared to past smokers (66.8 ± 24.7 mEq/L, P=0.005) and current smokers (70.0 ± 20.2 mEq/L, P=0.005). However, the mean peak [HCO3-] in past smokers was not statistically different from that in current smokers (P=0.575), and therefore, the two smoking groups were combined to form a single "smokers cohort". When compared to the never smokers, the smokers cohort was older (P=0.037) and had a greater proportion of subjects with definite chronic pancreatitis imaging (P=0.010), alcohol consumption ≥20 g/day (P=0.012), and abnormal peak PF [HCO3-] (Psmoking (risk ratio, RR: 2.2, 95% CI: 1.3-3.5; PSmoking (odds ratio, OR: 3.8, 95% CI: 1.6-9.1; P=0.003) and definite chronic pancreatitis imaging (OR: 5.7, 95% CI: 2.2-14.8; Psmoking status and alcohol intake in predicting duct cell dysfunction (P=0.571). Measurement of

  8. Imaging Axl expression in pancreatic and prostate cancer xenografts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nimmagadda, Sridhar, E-mail: snimmag1@jhmi.edu [Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21287 (United States); Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21287 (United States); Pullambhatla, Mrudula; Lisok, Ala [Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21287 (United States); Hu, Chaoxin [Department of Pathology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21287 (United States); Maitra, Anirban [Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21287 (United States); Department of Pathology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21287 (United States); Pomper, Martin G, E-mail: mpomper@jhmi.edu [Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21287 (United States); Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21287 (United States)

    2014-01-10

    Highlights: •Axl is overexpressed in a variety of cancers. •Axl overexpression confers invasive phenotype. •Axl imaging would be useful for therapeutic guidance and monitoring. •Axl expression imaging is demonstrated in pancreatic and prostate cancer xenografts. •Graded levels of Axl expression imaging is feasible. -- Abstract: The receptor tyrosine kinase Axl is overexpressed in and leads to patient morbidity and mortality in a variety of cancers. Axl–Gas6 interactions are critical for tumor growth, angiogenesis and metastasis. The goal of this study was to investigate the feasibility of imaging graded levels of Axl expression in tumors using a radiolabeled antibody. We radiolabeled anti-human Axl (Axl mAb) and control IgG1 antibodies with {sup 125}I with high specific radioactivity and radiochemical purity, resulting in an immunoreactive fraction suitable for in vivo studies. Radiolabeled antibodies were investigated in severe combined immunodeficient mice harboring subcutaneous CFPAC (Axl{sup high}) and Panc1 (Axl{sup low}) pancreatic cancer xenografts by ex vivo biodistribution and imaging. Based on these results, the specificity of [{sup 125}I]Axl mAb was also validated in mice harboring orthotopic Panc1 or CFPAC tumors and in mice harboring subcutaneous 22Rv1 (Axl{sup low}) or DU145 (Axl{sup high}) prostate tumors by ex vivo biodistribution and imaging studies at 72 h post-injection of the antibody. Both imaging and biodistribution studies demonstrated specific and persistent accumulation of [{sup 125}I]Axl mAb in Axl{sup high} (CFPAC and DU145) expression tumors compared to the Axl{sup low} (Panc1 and 22Rv1) expression tumors. Axl expression in these tumors was further confirmed by immunohistochemical studies. No difference in the uptake of radioactivity was observed between the control [{sup 125}I]IgG1 antibody in the Axl{sup high} and Axl{sup low} expression tumors. These data demonstrate the feasibility of imaging Axl expression in pancreatic

  9. Major histocompatibility complex class I-related chain A/B (MICA/B expression in tumor tissue and serum of pancreatic cancer: Role of uric acid accumulation in gemcitabine-induced MICA/B expression

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    Kaufman Howard L

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Major histocompatibility complex class I-related chain A and B (MICA/B are two stress-inducible ligands that bind the immunoreceptor NKG2D and play an important role in mediating the cyotoxicity of NK and T cells. In this study, we sought to study MICA/B expression in pancreatic cancer and to determine whether and how genotoxic drugs such as gemcitabine can affect MICA/B expression and natural killer cytotoxity. Methods Seven pancreatic cancer cell lines were analyzed for MICA/B expression by flow cytometry and for their sensitivity to NK-92 cell killing by a 51Cr release assay. MICA/B expression in tumor tissues and sera of pancreatic cancer was analyzed by immunohistochemical staining (IHC and ELISA, respectively. Results Two MICA/B-positive cell lines were sensitive to the cytotoxic activity of NK-92 cells. Other two MICA/B-positive cell lines and three MICA/B-negative cell lines were resistant to NK-92 cell killing. MICA/B expression was positive in 17 of 25 (68% pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas but not in normal pancreatic ductal epithelial cells. Serum MICA/B levels were significantly elevated in patients with pancreatic adenocarcinomas but did not correlate with the stage of pancreatic cancer and patient survival. Gemcitabine therapy led to increased serum MICA levels in 6 of 10 patients with detectable serum MICA. Allopurinol, an inhibitor of xanthine oxidoreductase that converts xanthine to uric acid, blocked uric acid production, MICA/B expression, and sensitivity to NK-92 cell killing toward a PANC-1 cancer cell line exposed to radiation and two genotoxic drugs, gemcitabine and 5-fluorouracil. Conclusions The levels of MICA/B expression in serum and tissue of pancreatic cancer are elevated. DNA damage-induced MICA/B expression is mediated through increased uric acid production.

  10. Rat pancreatic beta cells and cytomegalovirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smelt, Maaike J; Faas, Marijke M; de Haan, Bart J; Hofstede, Jeroen; Cheung, Chi-Wai; van der Iest, Hanna; de Haan, Aalzen; de Vos, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection has been suggested to accelerate beta-cell destruction and thereby to contribute to new-onset diabetes and failure of islet allografts in both humans and rodents. Surprisingly, direct CMV infection of beta cells has received only minor attention. Therefore, we investigated the susceptibility of rat beta cells for rat CMV (RCMV) infection and the direct effects on the regulation of immune cell-activating ligands. Primary rat beta cells, the rat beta-cell line Rin-m5F, and fibroblasts were RCMV-infected in vitro. The viral gene and protein expression levels were determined as a measure for RCMV susceptibility. Gene expression levels of intracellular adhesion molecule 1, lymphocyte function associated antigen 3, rat major histocompatibility complex region A, rat major histocompatibility complex region E, toll like receptor 2, and clustered domain 14 were determined as a measure for cellular immunogenicity. We demonstrate that beta cells are susceptible for RCMV infection but allow only low levels of viral gene expression. In contrast, infected fibroblasts demonstrated productive viral infection and formation of viral progeny. After RCMV infection, beta-cell immunogenicity was markedly increased, as demonstrated by the increased cellular expression of immune cell-activating ligands. Direct beta-cell infection by RCMV and subsequent low-grade viral gene expression may lead to increased immunogenicity of native or transplanted beta cells in vivo. An infection-induced enhanced beta-cell recognizability may have important consequences for beta-cell survival and the development of diabetes or rejection of islet grafts.

  11. Biotin uptake by mouse and human pancreatic beta cells/islets: a regulated, lipopolysaccharide-sensitive carrier-mediated process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosal, Abhisek; Sekar, Thillai V; Said, Hamid M

    2014-08-01

    Biotin is essential for the normal function of pancreatic beta cells. These cells obtain biotin from their surroundings via transport across their cell membrane. Little is known about the uptake mechanism involved, how it is regulated, and how it is affected by internal and external factors. We addressed these issues using the mouse-derived pancreatic beta-TC-6 cells and freshly isolated mouse and human primary pancreatic beta cells as models. The results showed biotin uptake by pancreatic beta-TC-6 cells occurs via a Na(+)-dependent, carrier-mediated process, that is sensitive to desthiobiotin, as well as to pantothenic acid and lipoate; the process is also saturable as a function of concentration (apparent Km = 22.24 ± 5.5 μM). These cells express the sodium-dependent multivitamin transporter (SMVT), whose knockdown (with doxycycline-inducible shRNA) led to a sever inhibition in biotin uptake. Similarly, uptake of biotin by mouse and human primary pancreatic islets is Na(+)-dependent and carrier-mediated, and both cell types express SMVT. Biotin uptake by pancreatic beta-TC-6 cells is also adaptively regulated (via transcriptional mechanism) by extracellular substrate level. Chronic treatment of pancreatic beta-TC-6 cells with bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS) leads to inhibition in biotin uptake. This inhibition is mediated via a Toll-Like receptor 4-mediated process and involves a decrease in membrane expression of SMVT. These findings show, for the first time, that pancreatic beta cells/islets take up biotin via a specific and regulated carrier-mediated process, and that the process is sensitive to the effect of LPS. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  12. The telomerase inhibitor imetelstat depletes cancer stem cells in breast and pancreatic cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Immanual; Tressler, Robert; Bassett, Ekaterina; Harley, Calvin; Buseman, Christen M; Pattamatta, Preeti; Wright, Woodring E; Shay, Jerry W; Go, Ning F

    2010-11-15

    Cancer stem cells (CSC) are rare drug-resistant cancer cell subsets proposed to be responsible for the maintenance and recurrence of cancer and metastasis. Telomerase is constitutively active in both bulk tumor cell and CSC populations but has only limited expression in normal tissues. Thus, inhibition of telomerase has been shown to be a viable approach in controlling cancer growth in nonclinical studies and is currently in phase II clinical trials. In this study, we investigated the effects of imetelstat (GRN163L), a potent telomerase inhibitor, on both the bulk cancer cells and putative CSCs. When breast and pancreatic cancer cell lines were treated with imetelstat in vitro, telomerase activity in the bulk tumor cells and CSC subpopulations were inhibited. Additionally, imetelstat treatment reduced the CSC fractions present in the breast and pancreatic cell lines. In vitro treatment with imetelstat, but not control oligonucleotides, also reduced the proliferation and self-renewal potential of MCF7 mammospheres and resulted in cell death after telomerase activity expression levels or telomere length of CSCs and bulk tumor cells in these cell lines did not correlate with the increased sensitivity of CSCs to imetelstat, suggesting a mechanism of action independent of telomere shortening for the effects of imetelstat on the CSC subpopulations. Our results suggest that imetelstat-mediated depletion of CSCs may offer an alternative mechanism by which telomerase inhibition may be exploited for cancer therapy. Copyright © 2010 AACR.

  13. MiR-371-5p facilitates pancreatic cancer cell proliferation and decreases patient survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De He

    Full Text Available microRNAs (miRNAs play a critical role in tumorigenesis, either as a tumor suppressor or as an oncogenic miRNA, depending on different tumor types. To date, scientists have obtained a substantial amount of knowledge with regard to miRNAs in pancreatic cancer. However, the expression and function of miR-371-5p in pancreatic cancer has not been clearly elucidated. The aim of this study was to investigate the roles of miR-371-5p in pancreatic cancer and its association with the survival of patients with pancreatic cancer.The expression of miR-371-5p was examined in pancreatic duct adenocarcinoma (PDAC and their adjacent normal pancreatic tissues (ANPT or in pancreatic cancer cell lines by qRT-PCR. The association of miR-371-5p expression with overall survival was determined. The proliferation and apoptosis of SW-1990 and Panc-1 cells, transfected with miR-371-5p mimics or inhibitor, were assessed using MTT assay and flow cytometry, respectively. The tumorigenicity was evaluated via mice xenograft experiments. miR-371-5p promoter interactions were analyzed by chromatin immunoprecipitation assays (ChIP. Protein expression was analyzed by Western blot.The expression level of miR-371-5p was dramatically upregulated in clinical PDAC tissues compared with ANPT. Patients with high miR-371-5p expression had a significantly shorter survival than those with low miR-371-5p expression. The in vitro and in vivo assays showed that overexpression of miR-371-5p resulted in cell proliferation and increased tumor growth, which was associated with inhibitor of growth 1 (ING1 downregulation. Interestingly, we also found that ING1, in turn, inhibited expression of miR-371-5p in the promoter region.our study demonstrates a novel ING1-miR-371-5p regulatory feedback loop, which may have a critical role in PDAC. Thus miR-371-5p can prove to be a novel prognostic factor and therapeutic target for pancreatic cancer treatment.

  14. Imaging Axl expression in pancreatic and prostate cancer xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimmagadda, Sridhar; Pullambhatla, Mrudula; Lisok, Ala; Hu, Chaoxin; Maitra, Anirban; Pomper, Martin G

    2014-01-10

    The receptor tyrosine kinase Axl is overexpressed in and leads to patient morbidity and mortality in a variety of cancers. Axl-Gas6 interactions are critical for tumor growth, angiogenesis and metastasis. The goal of this study was to investigate the feasibility of imaging graded levels of Axl expression in tumors using a radiolabeled antibody. We radiolabeled anti-human Axl (Axl mAb) and control IgG1 antibodies with (125)I with high specific radioactivity and radiochemical purity, resulting in an immunoreactive fraction suitable for in vivo studies. Radiolabeled antibodies were investigated in severe combined immunodeficient mice harboring subcutaneous CFPAC (Axl(high)) and Panc1 (Axl(low)) pancreatic cancer xenografts by ex vivo biodistribution and imaging. Based on these results, the specificity of [(125)I]Axl mAb was also validated in mice harboring orthotopic Panc1 or CFPAC tumors and in mice harboring subcutaneous 22Rv1 (Axl(low)) or DU145 (Axl(high)) prostate tumors by ex vivo biodistribution and imaging studies at 72h post-injection of the antibody. Both imaging and biodistribution studies demonstrated specific and persistent accumulation of [(125)I]Axl mAb in Axl(high) (CFPAC and DU145) expression tumors compared to the Axl(low) (Panc1 and 22Rv1) expression tumors. Axl expression in these tumors was further confirmed by immunohistochemical studies. No difference in the uptake of radioactivity was observed between the control [(125)I]IgG1 antibody in the Axl(high) and Axl(low) expression tumors. These data demonstrate the feasibility of imaging Axl expression in pancreatic and prostate tumor xenografts. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Protons released during pancreatic acinar cell secretion acidify the lumen and contribute to pancreatitis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrendorff, Natasha; Floetenmeyer, Matthias; Schwiening, Christof; Thorn, Peter

    2010-11-01

    Secretory granules are acidic; cell secretion will therefore lead to extracellular acidification. We propose that during secretion, protons co-released with proteins from secretory granules of pancreatic acinar cells acidify the restricted extracellular space of the pancreatic lumen to regulate normal physiological and pathophysiological functions in this organ Extracellular changes in pH were quantified in real time using 2-photon microscopy analysis of pancreatic tissue fragments from mouse models of acute pancreatitis (mice given physiological concentrations [10 -20 pM] of cholecystokinin or high concentrations of [100 nM] cerulein). The effects of extracellular changes in pH on cell behavior and structures were measured. With physiological stimulation, secretory granule fusion (exocytosis) caused acidification of the pancreatic lumen. Acidifications specifically affected intracellular calcium responses and accelerated the rate of recovery from agonist-evoked calcium signals. Protons therefore appear to function as negative-feedback, extracellular messengers during coupling of cell stimuli with secretion. At high concentrations of cerulein, large increases in secretory activity were associated with extreme, prolonged acidification of the luminal space. These pathological changes in pH led to disruption of intercellular junctional coupling, measured by movement of occludin and E-cadherin. By measuring changes in extracellular pH in pancreas of mice, we observed that luminal acidification resulted from exocytosis of zymogen granules from acinar cells. This process is part of normal organ function but could contribute to the tissue damage in cases of acute pancreatitis. Copyright © 2010 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Gastrin regulates ABCG2 to promote the migration, invasion and side populations in pancreatic cancer cells via activation of NF-κB signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Juan; Xin, Beibei; Wang, Hui; He, Xiaodan [School of Medicine, Nankai University, 94 Weijin Road, Tianjin 300071 (China); Wei, Wei; Zhang, Ti [Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, Huanhu West Road, Tianjin 300060 (China); Shen, Xiaohong, E-mail: zebal2014@163.com [School of Medicine, Nankai University, 94 Weijin Road, Tianjin 300071 (China)

    2016-08-01

    Gastrin is absent in most normal adult pancreatic tissues but is highly expressed in pancreatic cancer tissues. Although Gastrin expression was reported to be associated with tumor proliferation in human pancreatic cancer, studies on the relationship between Gastrin and tumor metastasis in pancreatic cancer are rare. In this study, we performed an analysis to determine the effects of Gastrin on modulating the side populations, cell proportion and tumor cell metastatic potential and invasion activity and explored its mechanisms in pancreatic cancer. We indicated that Gastrin and ABCG2 were widely expressed in pancreatic cancer cell lines and overexpressed in cancer tissues. Gastrin induced ABCG2 expression, and this effect was mediated by NF-κB activation. Gastrin regulated the SP proportion of BxPC-3 cells via modulating ABCG2 expression. Through the regulation of the functions of NF-κB/ABCG2, Gastrin functionally promoted the migration and invasion in pancreatic cancer cell. The present study indicated that Gastrin induced ABCG2 expression by activating NF-κB and thereby modulated the SP proportion, tumor cell metastatic potential and invasion activity in pancreatic cancer. Gastrin could serve as an effective therapeutic target for the metastasis of pancreatic cancer. - Highlights: • Gastrin induces ABCG2 expression mediated by NF-κB activation. • Gastrin regulates NF-κB's function that binds to the ABCG2 promoter in BxPC-3 cells. • Gastrin promotes the SP proportion in BxPC-3 cells by modulating ABCG2 expression via activation of NF-κB molecule. • Gastrin induces an increase in migration and invasion potential in pancreatic cancer cell by regulating NF-κB/ABCG2 signaling.

  17. γδ T Cells Support Pancreatic Oncogenesis by Restraining αβ T Cell Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daley, Donnele; Zambirinis, Constantinos Pantelis; Seifert, Lena; Akkad, Neha; Mohan, Navyatha; Werba, Gregor; Barilla, Rocky; Torres-Hernandez, Alejandro; Hundeyin, Mautin; Mani, Vishnu Raj Kumar; Avanzi, Antonina; Tippens, Daniel; Narayanan, Rajkishen; Jang, Jung-Eun; Newman, Elliot; Pillarisetty, Venu Gopal; Dustin, Michael Loran; Bar-Sagi, Dafna; Hajdu, Cristina; Miller, George

    2016-09-08

    Inflammation is paramount in pancreatic oncogenesis. We identified a uniquely activated γδT cell population, which constituted ∼40% of tumor-infiltrating T cells in human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA). Recruitment and activation of γδT cells was contingent on diverse chemokine signals. Deletion, depletion, or blockade of γδT cell recruitment was protective against PDA and resulted in increased infiltration, activation, and Th1 polarization of αβT cells. Although αβT cells were dispensable to outcome in PDA, they became indispensable mediators of tumor protection upon γδT cell ablation. PDA-infiltrating γδT cells expressed high levels of exhaustion ligands and thereby negated adaptive anti-tumor immunity. Blockade of PD-L1 in γδT cells enhanced CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell infiltration and immunogenicity and induced tumor protection suggesting that γδT cells are critical sources of immune-suppressive checkpoint ligands in PDA. We describe γδT cells as central regulators of effector T cell activation in cancer via novel cross-talk. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Promoter Hypermethylation and Decreased Expression of Syncytin-1 in Pancreatic Adenocarcinomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinsheng Lu

    Full Text Available Syncytin-1 is a member of human endogenous retroviral W gene family (HERVW1. Known to be expressed in human placental trophoblast, syncytin-1 protein mediates the fusion of cytotrophoblasts for the formation of syncytiotrophoblasts, the terminally differentiated form of trophoblast lineage. In addition, in vitro studies indicate that syncytin-1 possessed nonfusogenic functions such as those for immune suppression, cell cycle regulation and anti-apoptotic activities. Overexpression of syncytin-1 has been observed in various malignant tissues including breast, endometrial and ovarian cancers. It was reported that syncytin-1 gene expression is associated with dynamic changes of DNA hypomethylation in the 5' LTR. In this study, applying the real-time PCR, Western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry methods, we demonstrate a constitutive expression of syncytin-1 in normal pancreas tissues as well as normal tissues adjacent to cancer lesions. Moreover, a reduced expression is found in the pancreatic adenocarcinoma tissues. The expression levels of syncytin-1 are not correlated with the stage, historical grade and gender, but inversely correlated with patients' age. Furthermore, COBRA and bisulfite sequencing results indicated that the lower expression of syncytin-1 is correlated with the hypermethylation of two CpG dinucleotides in the 5' LTR of syncytin-1 gene. The nonfusogenic function of syncytin-1 in normal pancreas as well as its role(s in the pathogenesis and progression of pancreatic cancers remains to be investigated. Identification of the two CpG dinucleotides around transcription start site as key epigenetic elements has provided valuable information for further studies on the epigenetic regulation of syncytin-1 in pancreatic cancer cells.

  19. Peculiarities of death and regeneration of pancreas cells at early stages of alcoholic chronic pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Y. Oshmyanska

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The study has been conducted on 39 white laboratory male rats which formed 5 groups: experimental occlusal pancreatitis caused by ligation of the main pancreatic duct (n = 6, experimental alcoholic pancreatitis caused by oral intake of alcohol (n = 6, against the background of an excess (n = 6 or deficiency (n = 6 of nitric oxide, as well as a control group (n = 15. This study provides the detailed description of the processes of death and regeneration in the islets of Langerhans, typical for early stages of the disease. The expression of the proliferation markers (PCNA and Neurogenin-3 has been analyzed using histological and immunohistochemical methods along with the changes of morphological structure, that led to initiation of the alcoholic chronic pancreatitis against the background of imbalance in NO-ergic regulatory system caused by an excess or deficiency of nitric oxide. It has been found that ligation of the pancreatic duct in the experiment reconstructedthe circumstances of chronic pancreatitis in rats and caused the activation of fibrosis and regeneration of endocrine and exocrine tissue. Compared with occlusion, the effects of ethanol on the pancreas also manifested in the activation of fibrogenesis, but the structural changes were negligible and could unlikely lead to advanced fibrosis and chronic pancreatitis in the future. On the other side, an imbalance of NO-system in alcoholic rats leads to disruption of the zymogens secretion in the acinar cells and dilatation of the capillary network in islets. Uneven distribution of zymogen granules may lead to their intracellular activation as evidenced by the deformation of acini and focal apoptosis without inflammatory response. In this case, violation of the key adaptive responses in the pancreas makes it more vulnerable to the effects of ethanol, its metabolites, and other environmental factors, and may increase the probability of chronic pancreatitis development. At the same time

  20. Raf-1 kinase inhibitory protein (RKIP) mediates ethanol-induced sensitization of secretagogue signaling in pancreatic acinar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Ok; Ives, Kirk L; Wang, Xiaofu; Davey, Robert A; Chao, Celia; Hellmich, Mark R

    2012-09-28

    Excessive alcohol consumption is associated with most cases of chronic pancreatitis, a progressive necrotizing inflammatory disease that can result in pancreatic insufficiency due to acinar atrophy and fibrosis and an increased risk of pancreatic cancer. At a cellular level acute alcohol exposure can sensitize pancreatic acinar cells to secretagogue stimulation, resulting in dysregulation of intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis and premature digestive enzyme activation; however, the molecular mechanisms by which ethanol exerts these toxic effects have remained undefined. In this study we identify Raf-1 kinase inhibitory protein as an essential mediator of ethanol-induced sensitization of cholecystokinin- and carbachol-regulated Ca(2+) signaling in pancreatic acinar cells. We show that exposure of rodent acinar cells to ethanol induces protein kinase C-dependent Raf-1 kinase inhibitory protein phosphorylation, sensitization of cholecystokinin-stimulated Ca(2+) signaling, and potentiation of both basal and cholecystokinin-stimulated extracellular signal-regulated kinase activation. Furthermore, we show that either suppression of Raf-1 kinase inhibitory protein expression using short hairpin RNA or gene ablation prevented the sensitizing effects of ethanol on cholecystokinin- and carbachol-stimulated Ca(2+) signaling and intracellular chymotrypsin activation in pancreatic acinar cells, suggesting that the modulation of Raf-1 inhibitory protein expression may have future therapeutic utility in the prevention or treatment of alcohol-associated pancreatitis.

  1. Regulation of Pancreatic α-Cell Function and Proliferation by Bone Morphogenetic Protein 4 (BMP4) In Vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sofie Sylvest; Christensen, Gitte Lund; Holst, Jens Juul

    2016-01-01

    Increased expression of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) in several tissues is associated with inflammation and type 2 diabetes mellitus. BMP2 and BMP4 mRNA expression is increased in pancreatic islets from db/db mice and β-cell proliferation and function are inhibited by BMP4. The effect of BM...... maintaining α-cell identity....

  2. Pancreatic Cancer: Molecular Characterization, Clonal Evolution and Cancer Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelosi, Elvira; Castelli, Germana

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the fourth most common cause of cancer-related death and is the most lethal of common malignancies with a five-year survival rate of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia. The genetic landscape of PDAC is characterized by the presence of four frequently-mutated genes: KRAS, CDKN2A, TP53 and SMAD4. The development of mouse models of PDAC has greatly contributed to the understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms through which driver genes contribute to pancreatic cancer development. Particularly, oncogenic KRAS-driven genetically-engineered mouse models that phenotypically and genetically recapitulate human pancreatic cancer have clarified the mechanisms through which various mutated genes act in neoplasia induction and progression and have led to identifying the possible cellular origin of these neoplasias. Patient-derived xenografts are increasingly used for preclinical studies and for the development of personalized medicine strategies. The studies of the purification and characterization of pancreatic cancer stem cells have suggested that a minority cell population is responsible for initiation and maintenance of pancreatic adenocarcinomas. The study of these cells could contribute to the identification and clinical development of more efficacious drug treatments. PMID:29156578

  3. Cyclin C stimulates β-cell proliferation in rat and human pancreatic β-cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Palomares, Margarita; López-Acosta, José Francisco; Villa-Pérez, Pablo; Moreno-Amador, José Luis; Muñoz-Barrera, Jennifer; Fernández-Luis, Sara; Heras-Pozas, Blanca; Perdomo, Germán; Bernal-Mizrachi, Ernesto

    2015-01-01

    Activation of pancreatic β-cell proliferation has been proposed as an approach to replace reduced functional β-cell mass in diabetes. Quiescent fibroblasts exit from G0 (quiescence) to G1 through pRb phosphorylation mediated by cyclin C/cdk3 complexes. Overexpression of cyclin D1, D2, D3, or cyclin E induces pancreatic β-cell proliferation. We hypothesized that cyclin C overexpression would induce β-cell proliferation through G0 exit, thus being a potential therapeutic target to recover functional β-cell mass. We used isolated rat and human islets transduced with adenovirus expressing cyclin C. We measured multiple markers of proliferation: [3H]thymidine incorporation, BrdU incorporation and staining, and Ki67 staining. Furthermore, we detected β-cell death by TUNEL, β-cell differentiation by RT-PCR, and β-cell function by glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Interestingly, we have found that cyclin C increases rat and human β-cell proliferation. This augmented proliferation did not induce β-cell death, dedifferentiation, or dysfunction in rat or human islets. Our results indicate that cyclin C is a potential target for inducing β-cell regeneration. PMID:25564474

  4. An epithelial cell adhesion molecule- and CD3-bispecific antibody plus activated T-cells can eradicate chemoresistant cancer stem-like pancreatic carcinoma cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umebayashi, Masayo; Kiyota, Akifumi; Koya, Norihiro; Tanaka, Hiroto; Onishi, Hideya; Katano, Mitsuo; Morisaki, Takashi

    2014-08-01

    Cancer stem-like properties of various types of cancer, including pancreatic cancer, one of the most aggressive types, correlate with metastasis, invasion, and therapeutic resistance. More importantly, chemoresistance in cancer stem-like cells (CSLCs) is a critical problem for eradication of pancreatic cancer. Several cell surface markers, such as CD44 and epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), are molecular targets on CSLCs of pancreatic carcinoma. In this study, we investigated whether catumaxomab, a clinical-grade bi-specific antibody that binds to both EpCAM on tumor cells and CD3 on T-cells, combined with activated T-cells can eliminate chemoresistant pancreatic CSLCs in vitro. Firstly, we established a CSLC line (MU-PK1) from human pancreatic carcinoma cells derived from a patient with chemoresistant and disseminated pancreatic cancer. These CSLCs were almost completely resistant to gemcitabine-mediated cytotoxicity up to a concentration of 10 μg/ml. The cells expressed high levels of CSLC markers (CD44 and EpCAM) and had significantly higher capacities for sphere formation, invasion, and aldehyde dehydrogenase-1 expression, which are associated with cancer stemness properties. We found that pre-treatment with catumaxomab and subsequent addition of interleukin-2/OKT3 activated autologous T-cells eliminated CSLCs during a short incubation period. Moreover, when MU-PK1 cells were cultured under hypoxic conditions, the CSLCs became more aggressive. However, the combination of cytokine-activated killer T-cells with catumaxomab successfully lysed almost all these cells. In conclusion, catumaxomab combined with activated T-cells may be a potent therapeutic modality to eradicate chemoresistant pancreatic CSLCs. Copyright© 2014 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  5. Glucose-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles prepared by metal vapour synthesis are electively internalized in a pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell line expressing GLUT1 transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbaro, Daniele; Di Bari, Lorenzo; Gandin, Valentina; Evangelisti, Claudio; Vitulli, Giovanni; Schiavi, Eleonora; Marzano, Cristina; Ferretti, Anna M; Salvadori, Piero

    2015-01-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONP) can have a variety of biomedical applications due to their visualization properties through Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and heating with radio frequency or alternating magnetic fields. In the oncological field, coating IONP with organic compounds to provide specific features and to achieve the ability of binding specific molecular targets appears to be very promising. To take advantage of the high avidity of tumor cells for glucose, we report the development of very small glucose-coated IONP (glc-IONP) by employing an innovative technique, Metal Vapor Synthesis (MVS). Moreover, we tested the internalization of our gl-IONP on a tumor line, BxPC3, over-expressing GLUT 1 transporter. Both glc-IONP and polyvinylpyrrolidone-IONP (PVP-IONP), as control, were prepared with MVS and were tested on BxPC3 at various concentrations. To evaluate the role of GLUT-1 transporter, we also investigated the effect of adding a polyclonal anti-GLUT1 antibody. After proper treatment, the iron value was assessed by atomic absorption spectrometer, reported in mcg/L and expressed in mg of protein. Our IONP prepared with MVS were very small and homogeneously distributed in a narrow range (1.75-3.75 nm) with an average size of 2.7 nm and were super-paramagnetic. Glc-IONP were internalized by BxPC3 cells in a larger amount than PVP-IONP. After 6h of treatment with 50 mcg/mL of IONPs, the content of Fe was 1.5 times higher in glc-IONP-treated cells compared with PVP-IONP-treated cells. After 1h pre-treatment with anti-GLUT1, a reduction of 41% cellular accumulation of glc-IONP was observed. Conversely, the uptake of PVP-IONPs was reduced only by 14% with antibody pretreatment. In conclusion, MVS allowed us to prepare small, homogeneous, super-paramagnetic glc-IONP, which are electively internalized by a tumor line over-expressing GLUT1. Our glc-IONP appear to have many requisites for in vivo use.

  6. Glucose-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles prepared by metal vapour synthesis are electively internalized in a pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell line expressing GLUT1 transporter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Barbaro

    Full Text Available Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONP can have a variety of biomedical applications due to their visualization properties through Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI and heating with radio frequency or alternating magnetic fields. In the oncological field, coating IONP with organic compounds to provide specific features and to achieve the ability of binding specific molecular targets appears to be very promising. To take advantage of the high avidity of tumor cells for glucose, we report the development of very small glucose-coated IONP (glc-IONP by employing an innovative technique, Metal Vapor Synthesis (MVS. Moreover, we tested the internalization of our gl-IONP on a tumor line, BxPC3, over-expressing GLUT 1 transporter. Both glc-IONP and polyvinylpyrrolidone-IONP (PVP-IONP, as control, were prepared with MVS and were tested on BxPC3 at various concentrations. To evaluate the role of GLUT-1 transporter, we also investigated the effect of adding a polyclonal anti-GLUT1 antibody. After proper treatment, the iron value was assessed by atomic absorption spectrometer, reported in mcg/L and expressed in mg of protein. Our IONP prepared with MVS were very small and homogeneously distributed in a narrow range (1.75-3.75 nm with an average size of 2.7 nm and were super-paramagnetic. Glc-IONP were internalized by BxPC3 cells in a larger amount than PVP-IONP. After 6h of treatment with 50 mcg/mL of IONPs, the content of Fe was 1.5 times higher in glc-IONP-treated cells compared with PVP-IONP-treated cells. After 1h pre-treatment with anti-GLUT1, a reduction of 41% cellular accumulation of glc-IONP was observed. Conversely, the uptake of PVP-IONPs was reduced only by 14% with antibody pretreatment. In conclusion, MVS allowed us to prepare small, homogeneous, super-paramagnetic glc-IONP, which are electively internalized by a tumor line over-expressing GLUT1. Our glc-IONP appear to have many requisites for in vivo use.

  7. Molecular Ghrelin System in the Pancreatic Acinar Cells: The Role of the Polypeptide, Caerulein and Sensory Nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonior, Joanna; Ceranowicz, Piotr; Gajdosz, Ryszard; Kuśnierz-Cabala, Beata; Pierzchalski, Piotr; Warzecha, Zygmunt; Dembiński, Artur; Pędziwiatr, Michał; Kot, Michalina; Leja-Szpak, Anna; Nawrot-Porąbka, Katarzyna; Link-Lenczowski, Paweł; Olszanecki, Rafał; Bartuś, Krzysztof; Jaworek, Jolanta

    2017-05-02

    Ghrelin (GHRL) is an endogenous ligand for the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R). Experimental studies showed that GHRL protects the stomach and pancreas against acute damage, but the effect of GHRL on pancreatic acinar cells was still undetermined. To investigate the effect of GHRL and caerulein on the functional ghrelin system in pancreatic acinar cells taking into account the role of sensory nerves (SN). Experiments were carried out on isolated pancreatic acinar cells and AR42J cells. Before acinar cells isolation, GHRL was administered intraperitoneally at a dose of 50 µg/kg to rats with intact SN or with capsaicin deactivation of SN (CDSN). After isolation, pancreatic acinar cells were incubated in caerulein-free or caerulein containing solution. AR42J cells were incubated under basal conditions and stimulated with caerulein, GHRL or a combination of the above. Incubation of isolated acinar cells with caerulein inhibited GHS-R and GHRL expression at the level of mRNA and protein in those cells. Either in rats with intact SN or with CDSN, administration of GHRL before isolation of acinar cells increased expression of GHRL and GHS-R in those cells and reversed the caerulein-induced reduction in expression of those parameters. Similar upregulation of GHS-R and GHRL was observed after administration of GHRL in AR42J cells. GHRL stimulates its own expression and expression of its receptor in isolated pancreatic acinar cells and AR42J cells on the positive feedback pathway. This mechanism seems to participate in the pancreatoprotective effect of GHRL in the course of acute pancreatitis.

  8. Neonatal pancreatic pericytes support β-cell proliferation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alona Epshtein

    2017-10-01

    Conclusions: This study introduces pancreatic pericytes as regulators of neonatal β-cell proliferation. In addition to advancing current understanding of the physiological β-cell replication process, these findings could facilitate the development of protocols aimed at expending these cells as a potential cure for diabetes.

  9. MiR-184 expression is regulated by AMPK in pancreatic islets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Sanchez, Aida; Nguyen-Tu, Marie-Sophie; Cebola, Ines; Yavari, Arash; Marchetti, Piero; Piemonti, Lorenzo; de Koning, Eelco; Shapiro, A M James; Johnson, Paul; Sakamoto, Kei; Smith, David M; Leclerc, Isabelle; Ashrafian, Houman; Ferrer, Jorge; Rutter, Guy A

    2018-01-08

    AMPK is a critical energy sensor and target for widely used antidiabetic drugs. In β-cells, elevated glucose concentrations lower AMPK activity, and the ablation of both catalytic subunits (βAMPKdKO mice) impairs insulin secretion in vivo and β-cell identity. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small RNAs that silence gene expression that are essential for pancreatic β-cell function and identity and altered in diabetes. Here, we have explored the miRNAs acting downstream of AMPK in mouse and human β-cells. We identified 14 down-regulated and 9 up-regulated miRNAs in βAMPKdKO vs. control islets. Gene ontology analysis of targeted transcripts revealed enrichment in pathways important for β-cell function and identity. The most down-regulated miRNA was miR-184 (miR-184-3p), an important regulator of β-cell function and compensatory expansion that is controlled by glucose and reduced in diabetes. We demonstrate that AMPK is a potent regulator and an important mediator of the negative effects of glucose on miR-184 expression. Additionally, we reveal sexual dimorphism in miR-184 expression in mouse and human islets. Collectively, these data demonstrate that glucose-mediated changes in AMPK activity are central for the regulation of miR-184 and other miRNAs in islets and provide a link between energy status and gene expression in β-cells.-Martinez-Sanchez, A., Nguyen-Tu, M.-S., Cebola, I., Yavari, A., Marchetti, P., Piemonti, L., de Koning, E., Shapiro, A. M. J., Johnson, P., Sakamoto, K., Smith, D. M., Leclerc, I., Ashrafian, H., Ferrer, J., Rutter, G. A. MiR-184 expression is regulated by AMPK in pancreatic islets.

  10. Imaging the Role of Multinucleate Pancreatic Cancer Cells and Cancer-Associated Fibroblasts in Peritoneal Metastasis in Mouse Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Kosuke; Suetsugu, Atsushi; Nakamura, Miki; Matsumoto, Takuro; Aoki, Hitomi; Kunisada, Takahiro; Shimizu, Masahito; Saji, Shigetoyo; Moriwaki, Hisataka; Hoffman, Robert M

    2017-07-01

    The interaction between pancreatic-cancer cells and stromal cells in the tumor microenvironment (TME) is of particular importance in cancer progression and metastasis. The present report demonstrates the role of cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and multinucleate pancreatic-cancer cells in peritoneal metastasis. An orthotopic mouse model of pancreatic cancer was established with the human pancreatic cancer cell line BxPC3, which stably expresses green fluorescent protein (GFP). BxPC3-GFP cells formed peritoneal metastases by week 18 after orthotopic implantation. Using an Olympus FV1000 confocal microscope, multi-nucleated cancer cells were frequently observed in the peritoneal metastases. The primary pancreatic tumor and peritoneal-metastases were harvested, cultured and then transplanted subcutaneously. Subcutaneous tumors established from peritoneal-metastatic cells were larger than subcutaneous tumors established from primary-tumor cells. Subcutaneous tumors of each type were subsequently cultured in vitro. CAFs were observed growing out from the tumors established from peritoneal-metastatic cells, but not the tumors established from the primary cancer. The results of the present study suggest that multi-nucleated cancer cells and CAFs were related to peritoneal metastasis of pancreatic cancer. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  11. Connexin 36 mediates blood cell flow in mouse pancreatic islets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, Kurt W; Head, W Steve; Piston, David W

    2014-02-01

    The insulin-secreting β-cells are contained within islets of Langerhans, which are highly vascularized. Blood cell flow rates through islets are glucose-dependent, even though there are no changes in blood cell flow within in the surrounding exocrine pancreas. This suggests a specific mechanism of glucose-regulated blood flow in the islet. Pancreatic islets respond to elevated glucose with synchronous pulses of electrical activity and insulin secretion across all β-cells in the islet. Connexin 36 (Cx36) gap junctions between islet β-cells mediate this synchronization, which is lost in Cx36 knockout mice (Cx36(-/-)). This leads to glucose intolerance in these mice, despite normal plasma insulin levels and insulin sensitivity. Thus, we sought to investigate whether the glucose-dependent changes in intraislet blood cell flow are also dependent on coordinated pulsatile electrical activity. We visualized and quantified blood cell flow using high-speed in vivo fluorescence imaging of labeled red blood cells and plasma. With the use of a live animal glucose clamp, blood cell flow was measured during either hypoglycemia (∼50 mg/dl) or hyperglycemia (∼300 mg/dl). In contrast to the large glucose-dependent islet blood velocity changes observed in wild-type mice, only minimal differences are observed in both Cx36(+/-) and Cx36(-/-) mice. This observation supports a novel model where intraislet blood cell flow is regulated by the coordinated electrical activity in the islet β-cells. Because Cx36 expression and function is reduced in type 2 diabetes, the resulting defect in intraislet blood cell flow regulation may also play a significant role in diabetic pathology.

  12. The novel mTORC1/2 dual inhibitor INK-128 suppresses survival and proliferation of primary and transformed human pancreatic cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lou, Hai-zhou [Department of Medical Oncology, Sir Run Run Shaw Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310016 (China); Weng, Xiao-chuan [Department of Anesthesiology, Hangzhou Xia-sha Hospital, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Pan, Hong-ming; Pan, Qin [Department of Medical Oncology, Sir Run Run Shaw Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310016 (China); Sun, Peng [Department of Medical Oncology, Sun Yat-Sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou 510060 (China); Liu, Li-li [Department of Medical Oncology, Sir Run Run Shaw Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310016 (China); Chen, Bin, E-mail: chenbinhangzhou126@126.com [Department of Hepatopancreatobiliary Surgery, First People’s Hospital of Hangzhou, Hangzhou 310006 (China)

    2014-07-25

    Highlights: • INK-128 inhibits the survival and growth of human pancreatic cancer cells. • INK-128 induced pancreatic cancer cell apoptosis and necrosis simultaneously. • INK-128 blocks mTORC1/2 activation simultaneously in pancreatic cancer cells. • INK-128 down-regulates cyclin D1 and causes pancreatic cancer cell cycle arrest. • INK-128 significantly increases sensitivity of pancreatic cancer cells to gemcitabine. - Abstract: Pancreatic cancer has one of worst prognosis among all human malignancies around the world, the development of novel and more efficient anti-cancer agents against this disease is urgent. In the current study, we tested the potential effect of INK-128, a novel mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) complex 1 and 2 (mTORC1/2) dual inhibitor, against pancreatic cancer cells in vitro. Our results demonstrated that INK-128 concentration- and time-dependently inhibited the survival and growth of pancreatic cancer cells (both primary cells and transformed cells). INK-128 induced pancreatic cancer cell apoptosis and necrosis simultaneously. Further, INK-128 dramatically inhibited phosphorylation of 4E-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1), ribosomal S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) and Akt at Ser 473 in pancreatic cancer cells. Meanwhile, it downregulated cyclin D1 expression and caused cell cycle arrest. Finally, we found that a low concentration of INK-128 significantly increased the sensitivity of pancreatic cancer cells to gemcitabine. Together, our in vitro results suggest that INK-128 might be further investigated as a novel anti-cancer agent or chemo-adjuvant for pancreatic cancer treatment.

  13. Glucose-induced lipogenesis in pancreatic beta-cells is dependent on SREBP-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandberg, Maria B; Fridriksson, Jakob; Madsen, Lise

    2005-01-01

    High concentrations of glucose induce de novo fatty acid synthesis in pancreatic beta-cells and chronic exposure of elevated glucose and fatty acids synergize to induce accumulation of triglycerides, a phenomenon termed glucolipotoxicity. Here we investigate the role of sterol-regulatory element...... binding proteins in glucose-induced lipogenesis in the pancreatic beta-cell line INS-1E. We show that glucose induces SREBP-1c expression and SREBP-1 activity independent of insulin secretion and signaling. Using adenoviral expression of SREBP-1c and a SREBP-mutant we show that lipogenic gene expression......, de novo fatty acid synthesis and lipid accumulation are induced primarily through sterol-regulatory elements (SREs) and not E-Boxes. Adenoviral expression of a dominant negative SREBP compromises glucose induction of some lipogenic genes and significantly reduces glucose-induction of de novo fatty...

  14. Dimethyl fumarate protects pancreatic islet cells and non-endocrine tissue in L-arginine-induced chronic pancreatitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lourdes Robles

    Full Text Available Chronic pancreatitis (CP is a progressive disorder resulting in the destruction and fibrosis of the pancreatic parenchyma which ultimately leads to impairment of the endocrine and exocrine functions. Dimethyl Fumarate (DMF was recently approved by FDA for treatment of patients with multiple sclerosis. DMF's unique anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties make it an interesting drug to test on other inflammatory conditions. This study was undertaken to determine the effects of DMF on islet cells and non-endocrine tissue in a rodent model of L-Arginine-induced CP.Male Wistar rats fed daily DMF (25 mg/kg or vehicle by oral gavage were given 5 IP injections of L-Arginine (250 mg/100 g × 2, 1 hr apart. Rats were assessed with weights and intra-peritoneal glucose tolerance tests (IPGTT, 2 g/kg. Islets were isolated and assessed for islet mass and viability with flow cytometry. Non-endocrine tissue was assessed for histology, myeloperoxidase (MPO, and lipid peroxidation level (MDA. In vitro assessments included determination of heme oxygenase (HO-1 protein expression by Western blot.Weight gain was significantly reduced in untreated CP group at 6 weeks. IPGTT revealed significant impairment in untreated CP group and its restoration with DMF therapy (P <0.05. Untreated CP rats had pancreatic atrophy, severe acinar architectural damage, edema, and fatty infiltration as well as elevated MDA and MPO levels, which were significantly improved by DMF treatment. After islet isolation, the volume of non-endocrine tissue was significantly smaller in untreated CP group. Although islet counts were similar in the two groups, islet viability was significantly reduced in untreated CP group and improved with DMF treatment. In vitro incubation of human pancreatic tissue with DMF significantly increased HO-1 expression.Administration of DMF attenuated L-Arginine-induced CP and islet function in rats. DMF treatment could be a possible strategy to improve clinical

  15. Expression and prognostic significance of thymidylate synthase (TS) in pancreatic head and periampullary cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Zee, J A; van Eijck, C H J; Hop, W C J; van Dekken, H; Dicheva, B M; Seynhaeve, A L B; Koning, G A; Eggermont, A M M; Ten Hagen, T L M

    2012-11-01

    Pancreatic cancer has a dismal prognosis. Attempts have been made to improve outcome by several 5-FU based adjuvant treatment regimens. However, the results are conflicting. There seems to be a continental divide with respect to the use of 5-FU based chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Furthermore, evidence has been presented showing a different response of pancreatic head and periampullary cancer to 5-FU based CRT. Expression of thymidylate synthase (TS) has been associated with improved outcome following 5-FU based adjuvant treatment in gastrointestinal cancer. This prompted us to determine the differential expression and prognostic value of TS in pancreatic head and periampullary cancer. TS protein expression was studied by immunohistochemistry on original paraffin embedded tissue from 212 patients following microscopic radical resection (R0) of pancreatic head (n = 98) or periampullary cancer (n = 114). Expression was investigated for associations with recurrence free (RFS), cancer specific (CSS) and overall survival (OS), and conventional prognostic factors. High cytosolic TS expression was present in 26% of pancreatic head tumours and 37% of periampullary tumours (p = .11). Furthermore, TS was an independent factor predicting favourable outcome following curative resection of pancreatic head cancer (p = .003, .001 and .001 for RFS, CSS and OS, respectively). In contrast, in periampullary cancer, TS was not associated with outcome (all p > .10). TS, was found to be poorly expressed in both pancreatic head and periampullary cancer and identified as an independent prognostic factor following curative resection of pancreatic head cancer. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, impaired pancreatic β-cell function, and risk of pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolpin, Brian M; Bao, Ying; Qian, Zhi Rong; Wu, Chen; Kraft, Peter; Ogino, Shuji; Stampfer, Meir J; Sato, Kaori; Ma, Jing; Buring, Julie E; Sesso, Howard D; Lee, I-Min; Gaziano, John Michael; McTiernan, Anne; Phillips, Lawrence S; Cochrane, Barbara B; Pollak, Michael N; Manson, JoAnn E; Giovannucci, Edward L; Fuchs, Charles S

    2013-07-17

    Obesity and diabetes mellitus are associated with an increased risk of pancreatic cancer. These associations may be secondary to consequences of peripheral insulin resistance, pancreatic β-cell dysfunction, or hyperglycemia itself. Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) is a measure of hyperglycemia, whereas plasma insulin and proinsulin are markers of peripheral insulin resistance, and the proinsulin to insulin ratio marks pancreatic β-cell dysfunction. This was a prospective, nested case-control study of 449 case patients and 982 control subjects with prediagnostic blood samples and no diabetes history from five prospective US cohorts followed through 2008. Two or three control subjects were matched to each case patient by year of birth, cohort, smoking, and fasting status. Pancreatic cancer risk was assessed by prediagnostic HbA1c, insulin, proinsulin, and proinsulin to insulin ratio with multivariable-adjusted logistic regression. All P values were two-sided. The highest vs lowest quintiles of HbA1c, insulin, and proinsulin were associated with with an increased risk for pancreatic cancer (odds ratio [OR] = 1.79; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.17 to 2.72, P trend = .04 for HbA1c; OR = 1.57; 95% CI = 1.08 to 2.30; Ptrend = .002 for insulin; and OR = 2.22; 95% CI = 1.50 to 3.29; P trend pancreatic cancer risk. Results were similar across studies (all P heterogeneity > .29). In cancers developing 10 or more years after blood collection, the associations with insulin and proinsulin became stronger (highest vs lowest quintile, OR = 2.77; 95% CI = 1.28 to 5.99 for insulin and OR = 3.60; 95% CI = 1.68 to 7.72 for proinsulin). In mutually adjusted models including HbA1c, insulin, and proinsulin, only proinsulin remained statistically significant ( highest vs lowest quintile, OR = 2.55; 95% CI = 1.54 to 4.21; Ptrend pancreatic β-cell dysfunction, were independently associated with pancreatic cancer risk.

  17. Distinct prognostic values of alcohol dehydrogenase mRNA expression in pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liao X

    2017-07-01

    individual marker. The potential mechanism of ADH1A and ADH6 in PAAD prognosis was that a high expression of ADH1A and ADH6 was involved in the P450 pathway and biological processes, while high ADH5 expression was involved in transforming growth factor β regulation-related pathways and biological processes, Wnt, the cell cycle, ErbB, and mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways.Conclusion: Our data suggest that ADH1A, ADH5, and ADH6 expression may be potential prognostic markers of PAAD and in combination have a strong interaction and better predictive value for PAAD prognosis. Keywords: prognostic, alcohol dehydrogenase, pancreatic adenocarcinoma, TCGA, GSEA

  18. Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hormones that help control blood sugar levels. Pancreatic cancer usually begins in the cells that produce the juices. Some risk factors for developing pancreatic cancer include Smoking Long-term diabetes Chronic pancreatitis Certain ...

  19. Pancreatic cell tracing, lineage tagging and targeted genetic manipulations in multiple cell types using pancreatic ductal infusion of adeno-associated viral vectors and/or cell-tagging dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xiangwei; Guo, Ping; Prasadan, Krishna; Shiota, Chiyo; Peirish, Lauren; Fischbach, Shane; Song, Zewen; Gaffar, Iljana; Wiersch, John; El-Gohary, Yousef; Husain, Sohail Z; Gittes, George K

    2014-12-01

    Genetic manipulations, with or without lineage tracing for specific pancreatic cell types, are very powerful tools for studying diabetes, pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. Nevertheless, the use of Cre/loxP systems to conditionally activate or inactivate the expression of genes in a cell type- and/or temporal-specific manner is not applicable to cell tracing and/or gene manipulations in more than one lineage at a time. Here we report a technique that allows efficient delivery of dyes for cell tagging into the mouse pancreas through the duct system, and that also delivers viruses carrying transgenes or siRNA under a specific promoter. When this technique is applied in genetically modified mice, it enables the investigator to perform either double lineage tracing or cell lineage tracing combined with gene manipulation in a second lineage. The technique requires <40 min.

  20. The ACE2-angiotensin-(1-7)-Mas axis protects against pancreatic cell damage in cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Liu, Ruixia; Qi, Haiyu; Wang, Yan; Cui, Lijian; Wen, Yan; Li, Huihui; Yin, Chenghong

    2015-03-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), its product angiotensin-(1-7), and its receptor Mas have been shown to moderate the adverse effects of the ACE-angiotensin II-AT1 axis in many diseases. The aim of this study was to determine whether the ACE2-Ang-(1-7)-Mas axis could have similar effects in a cell culture model of pancreatic damage. AR42J cells were stimulated with 10 nmol/L cerulein to simulate acute pancreatitis. ACE2, Ang-(1-7), Mas receptor, and PI3K/AKT pathway were measured by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis. ACE2 and Mas receptor protein levels in AR42J cells were significantly increased (P Mas receptor gene expression was significantly increased (P Mas axis significantly inhibits pancreatitis in response to decreased inflammatory factors by the activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase and NO signaling pathways.

  1. Persistence of side population cells with high drug efflux capacity in pancreatic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jing; Wang, Chun-You; Liu, Tao; Wu, Bin; Zhou, Feng; Xiong, Jiong-Xin; Wu, He-Shui; Tao, Jing; Zhao, Gang; Yang, Ming; Gou, Shan-Miao

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the persistence of side population (SP) cells in pancreatic cancer and their role and mechanism in the drug resistance. METHODS: The presentation of side population cells in pancreatic cancer cell line PANC-1 and its proportion change when cultured with Gemcitabine, was detected by Hoechst 33342 staining and FACS analysis. The expression of ABCB1 and ABCG2 was detected by real-time PCR in either SP cells or non-SP cells. RESULTS: SP cells do exist in PANC-1, with a median of 3.3% and a range of 2.1-8.7%. After cultured with Gemcitabine for 3 d, the proportion of SP cells increased significantly (3.8% ± 1.9%, 10.7% ± 3.7%, t = 4.616, P = 0.001 < 0.05). ABCB1 and ABCG2 expressed at higher concentrations in SP as compared with non-SP cells (ABCB1: 1.15 ± 0.72, 5.82 ± 1.16, t = 10.839, P = 0.000 < 0.05; ABCG2: 1.16 ± 0.75, 5.48 ± 0.94, t = 11.305, P = 0.000 < 0.05), which may contribute to the efflux of fluorescent staining and drug resistance. CONCLUSION: SP cells with inherently high resistance to chemotherapeutic agents do exist in pancreatic cancers, which may be candidate cancer stem cells contributing to the relapse of the tumor. PMID:18240351

  2. Relationship between activation of epidermal growth factor receptor and cell dissociation in pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xiaodong; Egami, Hiroshi; Ishikawa, Shinji; Nakagawa, Masahide; Ishiko, Takatoshi; Kamohara, Hidenobu; Hirota, Masahiko; Ogawa, Michio

    2004-11-01

    In our previous investigations, mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 2 (MEK2)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2 (ERK2) signaling pathway was found to be correlated with the cell dissociation induced by dissociation factor (DF) in pancreatic cancer cells. In this study, the expressions of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), phosphorylated EGFR (p-EGFR), and its downstream kinases MEK1/2 and ERK1/2, were analyzed to clarify the regulatory mechanism of cell dissociation in pancreatic cancer cells. Two hamster (PC-1.0 and PC-1) and two human (AsPC-1 and Capan-2) pancreatic cancer cell lines were used. Immunocytochemical study was performed using anti-EGFR, p-EGFR, phosphorylated MEK1/2 (p-MEK1/2), and phosphorylated ERK1/2 (p-ERK1/2) antibodies. DF-treatment markedly induced the expressions of EGFR, p-EGFR, p-MEK1/2, p-ERK1/2, as well as the dissociation of cell colonies in PC-1 and Capan-2 cells. In contrast, AG1478 (an EGFR inhibitor) treatment significantly induced the cell aggregation in PC-1.0 and AsPC-1 cells which usually grew as single cells, but strongly suppressed the expressions of EGFR, p-EGFR, p-MEK1/2, and p-ERK1/2. These observations demonstrate that activation of EGFR is closely involved in cell dissociation in pancreatic cancer through activating MEK/ERK signaling pathway.

  3. FTIR Spectroscopic and Molecular Analysis during Differentiation of Pluripotent Stem Cells to Pancreatic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata-Miranda, Monica Maribel; Sanchez-Monroy, Virginia; Delgado-Macuil, Raul Jacobo; Perez-Ishiwara, David Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    Some of the greatest challenges in stem cells (SCs) biology and regenerative medicine are differentiation control of SCs and ensuring the purity of differentiated cells. In this work, we differentiated mouse pluripotent stem cells (mPSCs) toward pancreatic cells characterizing this differentiation process by molecular and spectroscopic technics. Both mPSCs and Differentiated Pancreatic Cells (DPCs) were subjected to a genetic, phenotypic, and biochemical analysis by real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR), immunocytochemistry, and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Cultured mPCSs expressed pluripotent genes and proteins (Nanog and SOX2). DPCs expressed endodermal genes (SOX17 and Pdx1) at day 11, an inductor gene of embryonic pancreas development (Pdx1) at day 17 and pancreas genes and proteins (Insulin and Glucagon) at day 21 of differentiation. Likewise, FTIR spectra of mPSCs and DPCs at different maturation stages (11, 17, and 21 days) were obtained and showed absorption bands related with different types of biomolecules. These FTIR spectra exhibited significant spectral changes agreeing with the differentiation process, particularly in proteins and nucleic acids bands. In conclusion, the obtained DPCs passed through the chronological stages of embryonic pancreas development and FTIR spectra provide a new biophysical parameter based on molecular markers indicating the differentiation process of mPSCs to specialized cells. PMID:27651798

  4. Oncolytic adenovirus expressing interferon alpha in a syngeneic Syrian hamster model for the treatment of pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaRocca, Christopher J; Han, Joohee; Gavrikova, Tatyana; Armstrong, Leonard; Oliveira, Amanda R; Shanley, Ryan; Vickers, Selwyn M; Yamamoto, Masato; Davydova, Julia

    2015-05-01

    The addition of interferon (IFN) alpha to adjuvant chemoradiotherapy regimens resulted in remarkable improvements in survival for pancreatic cancer patients. However, systemic toxicities and insufficient levels of IFN at the tumor sites have limited its widespread adoption in treatment schemes. We have previously developed an IFN-expressing conditionally replicative oncolytic adenovirus and demonstrated its therapeutic effects both in vitro and in vivo. Here, the same vectors were tested in a syngeneic and immunocompetent Syrian hamster model to better understand the roles of adenoviral replication and of the pleiotropic effects of IFN on pancreatic tumor growth suppression. Oncolytic adenoviruses expressing human or hamster IFN were designed and generated. Viral vectors were tested in vitro to determine qualitative and quantitative cell viability, cyclooxygenase 2 (Cox2) promoter activity, and IFN production. For the in vivo studies, subcutaneous hamster pancreatic cancer tumors were treated with 1 intratumoral dose of virus. Similarly, 1 intraperitoneal dose of virus was used to prolong survival in a carcinomatosis model. All cell lines tested demonstrated Cox2 promoter activity. The oncolytic potential of a replication competent adenovirus expressing the IFN cytokine was clearly demonstrated. These viruses resulted in significant tumor growth suppression and survival increases compared with controls in a hamster model. The profound therapeutic potential of an IFN-expressing oncolytic adenovirus for the treatment of pancreatic cancer was demonstrated in a syngeneic Syrian hamster model. These results strongly suggest the potential application of our viruses as part of combination regimens with other therapeutics. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Duct- and Acinar-Derived Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinomas Show Distinct Tumor Progression and Marker Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rute M.M. Ferreira

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The cell of origin of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC has been controversial. Here, we show that identical oncogenic drivers trigger PDAC originating from both ductal and acinar cells with similar histology but with distinct pathophysiology and marker expression dependent on cell of origin. Whereas acinar-derived tumors exhibited low AGR2 expression and were preceded by pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasias (PanINs, duct-derived tumors displayed high AGR2 and developed independently of a PanIN stage via non-mucinous lesions. Using orthotopic transplantation and chimera experiments, we demonstrate that PanIN-like lesions can be induced by PDAC as bystanders in adjacent healthy tissues, explaining the co-existence of mucinous and non-mucinous lesions and highlighting the need to distinguish between true precursor PanINs and PanIN-like bystander lesions. Our results suggest AGR2 as a tool to stratify PDAC according to cell of origin, highlight that not all PanIN-like lesions are precursors of PDAC, and add an alternative progression route to the current model of PDAC development.

  6. NBL1 and anillin (ANLN genes over-expression in pancreatic carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dariusz Lange

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to analyze the gene expression profile of pancreatic cancer to derive novel molecular markers of this malignancy. The snap-frozen or RNA-later preserved samples of 18 pancreatic adenocarcinomas, 5 chronic pancreatitis cases and 6 specimens of grossly normal pancreas were used for microarray analysis by HG-U133 Plus 2.0 oligonucleotide Affymetrix arrays. Validation was carried out by real-time quantitative PCR (Q-PCR in the set of 66 samples: 31 of pancreatic cancer, 14 of chronic pancreatitis and 21 of macroscopically unchanged pancreas. By Principal Component Analysis of the microarray data we found a very consistent expression pattern of normal samples and a less homogenous one in chronic pancreatitis. By supervised comparison (corrected p-value 0.001 we observed 11094 probesets differentiating between cancer and normal samples, while only seventy six probesets were significant for difference between cancer and chronic pancreatitis. The only gene occurring within the best 10 genes in both comparisons was S100 calcium binding protein P (S100P, already indicated for its utility as pancreatic cancer marker by earlier microarray-based studies. For validation we selected two genes which appeared as valuable candidates for molecular markers of pancreatic cancer: neuroblastoma, suppression of tumorigenicity 1 (NBL1 and anillin (ANLN. By Q-PCR, we confirmed statistically significant differences in these genes with a 9.5 fold-change difference between NBL1 expression in cancer/normal comparison and a relatively modest difference between cancer and pancreatitis. For ANLN even more distinct differences were observed (cancer/normal 19.8-fold, cancer/pancreatitis 4.0-fold. NBL1 and anillin are promising markers for pancreatic carcinoma molecular diagnostics.

  7. Pancreatic stellate cells and CX3CR1: occurrence in normal pancreas and acute and chronic pancreatitis and effect of their activation by a CX3CR1 agonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Masahiko; Ito, Tetsuhide; Nakamura, Taichi; Hijioka, Masayuki; Igarashi, Hisato; Oono, Takamasa; Kato, Masaki; Nakamura, Kazuhiko; Suzuki, Koichi; Takayanagi, Ryoichi; Jensen, Robert T

    2014-07-01

    Numerous studies suggest important roles of the chemokine, fractalkine (CX3CL1), in acute/chronic pancreatitis; however, the possible mechanisms of the effects are unclear. Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) can play important roles in pancreatitis, secreting inflammatory cytokines/chemokines, as well as proliferation. Therefore, we investigated CX3CL1 receptor (CX3CR1) occurrence in normal pancreas and pancreatitis (acute/chronic) tissues and the effects of CX3CL1 on activated PSCs. CX3CR1 expression/localization in normal pancreas and pancreatitis (acute/chronic) tissues was evaluated with immunohistochemical analysis. CX3CR1 expression and effects of CX3CL1 on activated PSCs were examined with real-time polymerase chain reaction, BrdU (5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine) assays, and Western blotting. In normal pancreas, acinar cells expressed CX3CR1 within granule-like formations in the cytoplasm, whereas in acute/chronic pancreatitis, acinar, ductal, and activated PSCs expressed CX3CR1 on cell membranes. With activation of normal PSCs, CX3CR1 is increased. CX3CL1 activated multiple signaling cascades in PSCs. CX3CL1 did not induce inflammatory genes expression in activated PSCs, but induced proliferation. CX3CR1s are expressed in normal pancreas. Expression is increased in acute/chronic pancreatitis, and the CX3CR1s are activated. CX3CL1 induces proliferation of activated PSCs without increasing release of inflammatory mediators. These results suggest that CX3CR1 activation of PSCs could be important in their effects in pancreatitis, especially to PSC proliferation in pancreatitis where CX3CL1 levels are elevated.

  8. A pancreatic exocrine-like cell regulatory circuit operating in the upper stomach of the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus larva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perillo, Margherita; Wang, Yue Julia; Leach, Steven D; Arnone, Maria Ina

    2016-05-26

    Digestive cells are present in all metazoans and provide the energy necessary for the whole organism. Pancreatic exocrine cells are a unique vertebrate cell type involved in extracellular digestion of a wide range of nutrients. Although the organization and regulation of this cell type is intensively studied in vertebrates, its evolutionary history is still unknown. In order to understand which are the elements that define the pancreatic exocrine phenotype, we have analyzed the expression of genes that contribute to specification and function of this cell-type in an early branching deuterostome, the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. We defined the spatial and temporal expression of sea urchin orthologs of pancreatic exocrine genes and described a unique population of cells clustered in the upper stomach of the sea urchin embryo where exocrine markers are co-expressed. We used a combination of perturbation analysis, drug and feeding experiments and found that in these cells of the sea urchin embryo gene expression and gene regulatory interactions resemble that of bona fide pancreatic exocrine cells. We show that the sea urchin Ptf1a, a key transcriptional activator of digestive enzymes in pancreatic exocrine cells, can substitute for its vertebrate ortholog in activating downstream genes. Collectively, our study is the first to show with molecular tools that defining features of a vertebrate cell-type, the pancreatic exocrine cell, are shared by a non-vertebrate deuterostome. Our results indicate that the functional cell-type unit of the vertebrate pancreas may evolutionarily predate the emergence of the pancreas as a discrete organ. From an evolutionary perspective, these results encourage to further explore the homologs of other vertebrate cell-types in traditional or newly emerging deuterostome systems.

  9. Human pancreatic cancer-associated stellate cells remain activated after in vivo chemoradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Carla Cabrera

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC is characterized by an extensive fibrotic reaction or desmoplasia and complex involvement of the surrounding tumor microenvironment. Pancreatic stellate cells are a key mediator of the pancreatic matrix and they promote progression and invasion of pancreatic cancer by increasing cell proliferation and offering protection against therapeutic interventions. Our study utilizes human tumor-derived pancreatic stellate cells (HTPSCs isolated from fine needle aspirates of pancreatic cancer tissue from patients with locally advanced, unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma before and after treatment with full dose gemcitabine plus concurrent hypo-fractionated stereotactic radiosurgery. We show that HTPSCs survive in vivo chemotherapy and radiotherapy treatment and display a more activated phenotype post therapy. These data support the idea that stellate cells play an essential role in supporting and promoting pancreatic cancer and further research is needed to develop novel treatments targeting the pancreatic tumor microenvironment.

  10. β-Cell-Specific Mafk Overexpression Impairs Pancreatic Endocrine Cell Development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed M Abdellatif

    Full Text Available The MAF family transcription factors are homologs of v-Maf, the oncogenic component of the avian retrovirus AS42. They are subdivided into 2 groups, small and large MAF proteins, according to their structure, function, and molecular size. MAFK is a member of the small MAF family and acts as a dominant negative form of large MAFs. In previous research we generated transgenic mice that overexpress MAFK in order to suppress the function of large MAF proteins in pancreatic β-cells. These mice developed hyperglycemia in adulthood due to impairment of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. The aim of the current study is to examine the effects of β-cell-specific Mafk overexpression in endocrine cell development. The developing islets of Mafk-transgenic embryos appeared to be disorganized with an inversion of total numbers of insulin+ and glucagon+ cells due to reduced β-cell proliferation. Gene expression analysis by quantitative RT-PCR revealed decreased levels of β-cell-related genes whose expressions are known to be controlled by large MAF proteins. Additionally, these changes were accompanied with a significant increase in key β-cell transcription factors likely due to compensatory mechanisms that might have been activated in response to the β-cell loss. Finally, microarray comparison of gene expression profiles between wild-type and transgenic pancreata revealed alteration of some uncharacterized genes including Pcbd1, Fam132a, Cryba2, and Npy, which might play important roles during pancreatic endocrine development. Taken together, these results suggest that Mafk overexpression impairs endocrine development through a regulation of numerous β-cell-related genes. The microarray analysis provided a unique data set of differentially expressed genes that might contribute to a better understanding of the molecular basis that governs the development and function of endocrine pancreas.

  11. Ca2+ signaling in pancreatic acinar cells: physiology and pathophysiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.H. Petersen

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The pancreatic acinar cell is a classical model for studies of secretion and signal transduction mechanisms. Because of the extensive endoplasmic reticulum and the large granular compartment, it has been possible - by direct measurements - to obtain considerable insights into intracellular Ca2+ handling under both normal and pathological conditions. Recent studies have also revealed important characteristics of stimulus-secretion coupling mechanisms in isolated human pancreatic acinar cells. The acinar cells are potentially dangerous because of the high intra-granular concentration of proteases, which become inappropriately activated in the human disease acute pancreatitis. This disease is due to toxic Ca2+ signals generated by excessive liberation of Ca2+ from both the endoplasmic reticulum and the secretory granules.

  12. EGR-1/Bax Pathway Plays a Role in Vitamin E δ-Tocotrienol-induced Apoptosis in Pancreatic Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chen; Husain, Kazim; Zhang, Anying; Centeno, Barbara A.; Chen, Dung-Tsa; Tong, Zhongsheng; Sebti, Säid M.; Malafa, Mokenge P.

    2015-01-01

    The anticancer activity of δ-tocotrienol, a bioactive vitamin E present in whole grain cereals, annatto beans, and palm fruit, is strongly dependent on its effect on the induction of apoptosis. δ-Tocotrienol-induced apoptosis is associated with consistent induction in the expression of the pro-apoptotic protein Bax. The molecular mechanism by which δ-tocotrienol regulates Bax expression is unknown. We carried out a DNA microarray study that identified δ-tocotrienol induction of the zinc finger transcription factor, EGR-1, in pancreatic cancer cells. Here, we provide evidence linking δ-tocotrienol-induced apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells to EGR-1 regulation of Bax expression. Forced expression of EGR-1 induces Bax expression and apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells. In contrast, knockdown of δ-tocotrienol-induced EGR-1 by small interfering RNA attenuated δ-tocotrienol-induced Bax expression and reduced δ-tocotrienol-induced apoptosis. Further analyses showed that de novo protein synthesis was not required for δ-tocotrienol-induced EGR-1 expression, suggesting a direct effect of δ-tocotrienol on EGR-1 expression. Furthermore, a ChIP assay demonstrated that EGR-1 binds to the Bax gene promoter. Finally, δ-tocotrienol treatment induced Bax expression and activated EGR-1 in the pancreatic neoplastic cells of the PDX-Cre Kras genetically engineered model of pancreatic cancer. Our study provides the first evidence for EGR-1 as a direct target of vitamin E δ-tocotrienol, suggesting that EGR-1 may act as a pro-apoptotic factor in pancreatic cancer cells via induction of Bax. PMID:25997867

  13. Oleanolic acid enhances insulin secretion in pancreatic beta-cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teodoro, T.; Zhang, L.; Alexander, T.; Yue, J.; Vranic, M.; Volchuk, A.

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the effect of oleanolic acid, a plant-derived triterpenoid, on insulin secretion and content in pancreatic beta-cells and rat islets. Oleanolic acid significantly enhanced insulin secretion at basal and stimulatory glucose concentrations in INS-1 832/13 cells and enhanced acute

  14. Efficient Generation of Glucose-Responsive Beta Cells from Isolated GP2+ Human Pancreatic Progenitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ameri, Jacqueline; Borup, Rehannah; Prawiro, Christy

    2017-01-01

    Stem cell-based therapy for type 1 diabetes would benefit from implementation of a cell purification step at the pancreatic endoderm stage. This would increase the safety of the final cell product, allow the establishment of an intermediate-stage stem cell bank, and provide a means for upscaling ...... results contribute tools and concepts toward the isolation and use of PECs as a source for the safe production of hPSC-derived β cells.......Stem cell-based therapy for type 1 diabetes would benefit from implementation of a cell purification step at the pancreatic endoderm stage. This would increase the safety of the final cell product, allow the establishment of an intermediate-stage stem cell bank, and provide a means for upscaling β...... cell manufacturing. Comparative gene expression analysis revealed glycoprotein 2 (GP2) as a specific cell surface marker for isolating pancreatic endoderm cells (PECs) from differentiated hESCs and human fetal pancreas. Isolated GP2+ PECs efficiently differentiated into glucose responsive insulin...

  15. Comparative analysis of the EGF-receptor family in pancreatic cancer: expression of HER-4 correlates with a favourable tumor stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thybusch-Bernhardt, A; Beckmann, S; Juhl, H

    2001-01-01

    Of major interest for a better molecular understanding of pancreatic cancer is the EGF receptor family. While HER-1 (EGF-receptor) and HER-2 have been extensively studied, little is known about the clinical significance of HER-3 and especially HER-4 expression. We investigated the expression of HER-1, HER-2, HER-3 and HER-4 in 11 pancreatic cancer cell lines using FACS-analysis and determined expression and overexpression of these receptors in 24 pancreatic cancer specimens. Therefore, we used two different immunostaining techniques: a highly sensitive streptavidin-biotin method showed receptor expression while an approximatly 10-fold less sensitive indirect immunperoxidase technique determined receptor-overexpression. HER-1 and HER-2 were expressed by all 11 pancreatic cancer cell lines, HER-3 was found in 82% and HER-4 in 54% of the cell lines. Low levels of HER-1, HER-2 and HER-3 were detected in all tumor samples but overexpression was only found in 33%, 25% and 50% of the cases, respectively. HER-4 was expressed by 37% of the tumor specimens but overexpression was seen in one patient only. HER-1 and HER-2 overexpression increased in parallel with the tumor stage and R0-resected tumors showed significantly less often overexpression compared to R1/R2 resected tumors (p HER-1 and HER-2 overexpression contributes to a more aggressive phenotype. In contrast, the lack of HER-4 expression might increase the metastatic capacity of pancreatic cancer cells.

  16. KISS1 over-expression suppresses metastasis of pancreatic adenocarcinoma in a xenograft mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Identifying molecular targets for treatment of pancreatic cancer metastasis is critical due to the high frequency of dissemination prior to diagnosis of this lethal disease. Because the KISS1 metastasis suppressor is expressed at reduced levels in advanced pancreatic cancer, we hypothesized that re-...

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  18. File list: ALL.Pan.50.AllAg.Pancreatic_cancer_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  1. File list: Unc.Pan.05.AllAg.Pancreatic_cancer_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  4. File list: Oth.Pan.05.AllAg.Pancreatic_cancer_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Pan.05.AllAg.Pancreatic_cancer_cells mm9 TFs and others Pancreas Pancreatic cancer... cells SRX174586,SRX174585 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Pan.05.AllAg.Pancreatic_cancer_cells.bed ...

  5. File list: His.Pan.50.AllAg.Pancreatic_cancer_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Pan.50.AllAg.Pancreatic_cancer_cells mm9 Histone Pancreas Pancreatic cancer cel...ls http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Pan.50.AllAg.Pancreatic_cancer_cells.bed ...

  6. Functions of pancreatic stellate cell-derived soluble factors in the microenvironment of pancreatic ductal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qi; Tian, Ying; Zhang, Jingqiu; Zhang, Hongpeng; Gu, Fengming; Lu, Yongdie; Zou, Shengnan; Chen, Yuji; Sun, Pengxiang; Xu, Mengyue; Sun, Xiaoming; Xia, Chao; Chi, Hao; Ying Zhu, A; Tang, Dong; Wang, Daorong

    2017-11-24

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is one of the most lethal forms of cancer with poor prognosis because it is highly resistant to traditional chemotherapy and radiotherapy and it has a low rate of surgical resection eligibility. Pancreatic stellate cells (PSC) have become a research hotspot in recent years, and play a vital role in PDAC microenvironment by secreting soluble factors such as transforming growth factor β, interleukin-6, stromal cell-derived factor-1, hepatocyte growth factor and galectin-1. These PSC-derived cytokines and proteins contribute to PSC activation, participating in PDAC cell proliferation, migration, fibrosis, angiogenesis, immunosuppression, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and chemoradiation resistance, leading to malignant outcome. Consequently, targeting these cytokines and proteins or their downstream signaling pathways is promising for treating PDAC.

  7. Tumor-stromal cell interaction under hypoxia increases the invasiveness of pancreatic cancer cells through the hepatocyte growth factor/c-Met pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ide, Takao; Kitajima, Yoshihiko; Miyoshi, Atsushi; Ohtsuka, Takao; Mitsuno, Mayumi; Ohtaka, Kazuma; Koga, Yasuo; Miyazaki, Kohji

    2006-12-15

    The hypoxic environment in tumor is reported to play an important role in pancreatic cancer progression. The interaction between stromal and cancer cells also contributes to the malignant behavior of pancreatic cancer. In the present study, we investigated whether hypoxic stimulation affects stromal as well as pancreatic cancer cells. Our findings demonstrated that hypoxia remarkably elevated the HIF-1alpha expression in both pancreatic cancer (PK8) and fibroblast cells (MRC5). Hypoxic stimulation accelerated the invasive activity of PK8 cells, and invasiveness was thus further accelerated when the hypoxic PK8 cells were cultured with conditioned medium prepared from hypoxic MRC5 cells (hypoxic conditioned medium). MMP-2, MMP-7, MT1-MMP and c-Met expressions were increased in PK8 cells under hypoxia. Hypoxic stimulation also increased the hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) secretion from MRC5 cells, which led to an elevation of c-Met phosphorylation in PK8 cells. Conversely, the elevated cancer invasion, MMP activity and c-Met phosphorylation of PK8 cells were reduced by the removal of HGF from hypoxic conditioned medium. In immunohistochemical study, the HIF-1alpha expression was observed in surrounding stromal as well as pancreatic cancer cells, thus indicating hypoxia exists in both of cancer and stromal cells. Moreover, the stromal HGF expression was found to significantly correlate with not only the stromal HIF-1alpha expression but also the c-Met expression in cancer cells. These results indicate that the hypoxic environment within stromal as well as cancer cells activates the HGF/c-Met system, thereby contributing to the aggressive invasive features of pancreatic cancer. Copyright 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Multifunctionalized iron oxide nanoparticles for selective targeting of pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trabulo, Sara; Aires, Antonio; Aicher, Alexandra; Heeschen, Christopher; Cortajarena, Aitziber L

    2017-06-01

    Nanomedicine nowadays offers novel solutions in cancer therapy by introducing multimodal treatments in one single formulation. In addition, nanoparticles act as nanocarriers changing the solubility, biodistribution and efficiency of the therapeutic molecules, thus generating more efficient treatments and reducing their side effects. To apply these novel therapeutic approaches, efforts are focused on the multi-functionalization of the nanoparticles and will open up new avenues to advanced combinational therapies. Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a cancer with unmet medical needs. Abundant expression of the anti-phagocytosis signal CD47 has also been observed on pancreatic cancer cells, in particular a subset of cancer stem cells (CSCs) responsible for resistance to standard therapy and metastatic potential. CD47 receptor is found on pancreatic cancer and highly expressed on CSCs, but not on normal pancreas. Inhibiting CD47 using monoclonal antibodies has been shown as an effective strategy to treat PDAC in vivo. However, CD47 inhibition effectively slowed tumor growth only in combination with Gemcitabine or Abraxane. In this work, we present the generation of multifunctionalized iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) that include the anti-CD47 antibody and the chemotherapeutic drug Gemcitabine in a single formulation. We demonstrate the in vitro efficacy of the formulation against CD47-positive pancreatic cancer cells. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Recent Advances in Bionanomaterials" Guest Editor: Dr. Marie-Louise Saboungi and Dr. Samuel D. Bader. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Enhanced expression of interleukin-18 in serum and pancreas of patients with chronic pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Alexander; Haas, Stephan L; Hildenbrand, Ralf; Siegmund, Sören; Reinhard, Iris; Nakovics, Helmut; Singer, Manfred V; Feick, Peter

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate interleukin-18 (IL-18) in patients with chronic panreatitis (CP). METHODS: We studied 29 patients with CP and 30 healthy controls. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were isolated and incubated with 50 mmol/L ethanol, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (doses 25 g/L, 250 g/L, 2500 g/L) and both agents for 24 h. Levels of IL-18 in the supernatants, and levels of IL-18, IL-12, interferon (IFN)-γ and soluble CD14 in the serum were analysed by ELISA technique. Expression of IL-18 in PBMC was investigated by reverse-transcription (RT)-PCR. IL-18 protein levels in CP tissue and in normal pancreas were studied by ELISA technique. IL-18 levels in PBMC and pancreatic tissue were determined by Westernblot. Immunohistochemistry for pancreatic IL-18 expression was performed. RESULTS: In patients, IL-18 serum levels were significantly enhanced by 76% (mean: 289.9 ± 167.7 ng/L) compared with controls (mean: 165.2 ± 43.6 ng/L; P < 0.0005). IL-12 levels were enhanced by 25% in patients (18.3 ± 7.3 ng/L) compared with controls (14.7 ± 6.8 ng/L, P = 0.0576) although not reaching the statistical significance. IFN-γ and soluble CD14 levels were not increased. In vitro, LPS stimulated significantly and dose-dependently IL-18 secretion from PBMC. Incubation with ethanol reduced LPS-stimulated IL-18 secretion by about 50%. The mRNA expression of IL-18 in PBMC and the response of PBMC to ethanol and LPS was similar in CP patients and controls. In PBMC, no significant differences in IL-18 protein levels were detected between patients and controls. IL-18 protein levels were increased in CP tissues compared to normal pancreatic tissues. IL-18 was expressed by pancreatic acinar cells and by infiltrating inflammatory cells within the pancreas. CONCLUSION: IL-18 originates from the chronically inflammed pancreas and appears to be involved in the fibrotic destruction of the organ. PMID:17072982

  10. Functional assessment of pancreatic beta-cell area in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Juris J; Menge, Bjoern A; Breuer, Thomas G K; Müller, Christophe A; Tannapfel, Andrea; Uhl, Waldemar; Schmidt, Wolfgang E; Schrader, Henning

    2009-07-01

    beta-Cell mass declines progressively during the course of diabetes, and various antidiabetic treatment regimens have been suggested to modulate beta-cell mass. However, imaging methods allowing the monitoring of changes in beta-cell mass in vivo have not yet become available. We address whether pancreatic beta-cell area can be assessed by functional test of insulin secretion in humans. A total of 33 patients with chronic pancreatitis (n = 17), benign pancreatic adenomas (n = 13), and tumors of the ampulla of Vater (n = 3) at various stages of glucose tolerance were examined with an oral glucose load before undergoing pancreatic surgery. Indexes of insulin secretion were calculated and compared with the fractional beta-cell area of the pancreas. beta-Cell area was related to fasting glucose concentrations in an inverse linear fashion (r = -0.53, P = 0.0014) and to 120-min postchallenge glycemia in an inverse exponential fashion (r = -0.89). beta-Cell area was best predicted by a C-peptide-to-glucose ratio determined 15 min after the glucose drink (r = 0.72, P fasting C-peptide-to-glucose ratio already yielded a reasonably close correlation (r = 0.63, P fasting measures, such as the HOMA index.

  11. Isolated pancreatic metastases from a bronchogenic small cell carcinoma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walshe, T

    2012-01-31

    We describe the case of a 60 year old female smoker who presented with a three month history of weight loss (14 Kg), generalized abdominal discomfort and malaise. Chest radiography demonstrated a mass projected inferior to the hilum of the right lung. Computed Tomography of thorax confirmed a lobulated lesion in the right infrahilar region and subsequent staging abdominal CT demonstrated a low density lesion in the neck of the pancreas. Percutaneous Ultrasound guided pancreatic biopsy was performed, histology of which demonstrated pancreatic tissue containing a highly necrotic small cell undifferentiated carcinoma consistent with metastatic small cell carcinoma of the bronchus.

  12. Differential cell autonomous responses determine the outcome of coxsackievirus infections in murine pancreatic α and β cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marroqui, Laura; Lopes, Miguel; dos Santos, Reinaldo S; Grieco, Fabio A; Roivainen, Merja; Richardson, Sarah J; Morgan, Noel G; Op de Beeck, Anne; Eizirik, Decio L

    2015-06-10

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease caused by loss of pancreatic β cells via apoptosis while neighboring α cells are preserved. Viral infections by coxsackieviruses (CVB) may contribute to trigger autoimmunity in T1D. Cellular permissiveness to viral infection is modulated by innate antiviral responses, which vary among different cell types. We presently describe that global gene expression is similar in cytokine-treated and virus-infected human islet cells, with up-regulation of gene networks involved in cell autonomous immune responses. Comparison between the responses of rat pancreatic α and β cells to infection by CVB5 and 4 indicate that α cells trigger a more efficient antiviral response than β cells, including higher basal and induced expression of STAT1-regulated genes, and are thus better able to clear viral infections than β cells. These differences may explain why pancreatic β cells, but not α cells, are targeted by an autoimmune response during T1D.

  13. Epidermal growth factor receptor expression in pancreatic lesions induced in the rat by azaserine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, C. J.; de Weger, R. A.; van Blokland, W. T.; Seifert-Bock, I.; Kobrin, M. S.; Korc, M.; Woutersen, R. A.

    1996-01-01

    In the present study, the expression of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) was investigated in putative preneoplastic and neoplastic acinar cell lesions induced in the rat pancreas by azaserine, using Northern blotting, in situ hybridisation (ISH) and immunohistochemistry. EGFR protein levels were decreased in putative preneoplastic eosinophilic acinar cell lesions (atypical acinar cell nodules, AACN) in comparison with normal acinar cells of the pancreas. However, EGFR mRNA expression correlated positively with the volume of AACN in pancreatic homogenates and ISH showed equal or stronger EGFR mRNA expression in AACN than in the surrounding normal acinar cells. Neither EGFR protein nor EGFR mRNA was detected in more advanced lesions such as acinar adenocarcinomas (in situ). Moreover, EGFR protein expression showed an inverse relationship with the mitotic rate of the acinar cells. These findings suggest that down-regulation of EGFR at the protein level may abrogate negative constraints on cell growth, which may stimulate the development of putative preneoplastic AACN to more advanced lesions and, ultimately, acinar adenocarcinomas. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8679465

  14. A Scalable System for Production of Functional Pancreatic Progenitors from Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Thomas C.; Young, Holly Y.; Agulnick, Alan D.; Babin, M. Josephine; Baetge, Emmanuel E.; Bang, Anne G.; Bhoumik, Anindita; Cepa, Igor; Cesario, Rosemary M.; Haakmeester, Carl; Kadoya, Kuniko; Kelly, Jonathan R.; Kerr, Justin; Martinson, Laura A.; McLean, Amanda B.; Moorman, Mark A.; Payne, Janice K.; Richardson, Mike; Ross, Kelly G.; Sherrer, Eric S.; Song, Xuehong; Wilson, Alistair Z.; Brandon, Eugene P.; Green, Chad E.; Kroon, Evert J.; Kelly, Olivia G.; D’Amour, Kevin A.; Robins, Allan J.

    2012-01-01

    Development of a human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-based therapy for type 1 diabetes will require the translation of proof-of-principle concepts into a scalable, controlled, and regulated cell manufacturing process. We have previously demonstrated that hESC can be directed to differentiate into pancreatic progenitors that mature into functional glucose-responsive, insulin-secreting cells in vivo. In this study we describe hESC expansion and banking methods and a suspension-based differentiation system, which together underpin an integrated scalable manufacturing process for producing pancreatic progenitors. This system has been optimized for the CyT49 cell line. Accordingly, qualified large-scale single-cell master and working cGMP cell banks of CyT49 have been generated to provide a virtually unlimited starting resource for manufacturing. Upon thaw from these banks, we expanded CyT49 for two weeks in an adherent culture format that achieves 50–100 fold expansion per week. Undifferentiated CyT49 were then aggregated into clusters in dynamic rotational suspension culture, followed by differentiation en masse for two weeks with a four-stage protocol. Numerous scaled differentiation runs generated reproducible and defined population compositions highly enriched for pancreatic cell lineages, as shown by examining mRNA expression at each stage of differentiation and flow cytometry of the final population. Islet-like tissue containing glucose-responsive, insulin-secreting cells was generated upon implantation into mice. By four- to five-months post-engraftment, mature neo-pancreatic tissue was sufficient to protect against streptozotocin (STZ)-induced hyperglycemia. In summary, we have developed a tractable manufacturing process for the generation of functional pancreatic progenitors from hESC on a scale amenable to clinical entry. PMID:22623968

  15. A scalable system for production of functional pancreatic progenitors from human embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas C Schulz

    Full Text Available Development of a human embryonic stem cell (hESC-based therapy for type 1 diabetes will require the translation of proof-of-principle concepts into a scalable, controlled, and regulated cell manufacturing process. We have previously demonstrated that hESC can be directed to differentiate into pancreatic progenitors that mature into functional glucose-responsive, insulin-secreting cells in vivo. In this study we describe hESC expansion and banking methods and a suspension-based differentiation system, which together underpin an integrated scalable manufacturing process for producing pancreatic progenitors. This system has been optimized for the CyT49 cell line. Accordingly, qualified large-scale single-cell master and working cGMP cell banks of CyT49 have been generated to provide a virtually unlimited starting resource for manufacturing. Upon thaw from these banks, we expanded CyT49 for two weeks in an adherent culture format that achieves 50-100 fold expansion per week. Undifferentiated CyT49 were then aggregated into clusters in dynamic rotational suspension culture, followed by differentiation en masse for two weeks with a four-stage protocol. Numerous scaled differentiation runs generated reproducible and defined population compositions highly enriched for pancreatic cell lineages, as shown by examining mRNA expression at each stage of differentiation and flow cytometry of the final population. Islet-like tissue containing glucose-responsive, insulin-secreting cells was generated upon implantation into mice. By four- to five-months post-engraftment, mature neo-pancreatic tissue was sufficient to protect against streptozotocin (STZ-induced hyperglycemia. In summary, we have developed a tractable manufacturing process for the generation of functional pancreatic progenitors from hESC on a scale amenable to clinical entry.

  16. Association of increased DNA methyltransferase expression with carcinogenesis and poor prognosis in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing-Jing; Zhu, Yi; Zhu, Yan; Wu, Jun-Li; Liang, Wen-Biao; Zhu, Rong; Xu, Ze-Kuan; Du, Qing; Miao, Yi

    2012-02-01

    Epigenetic modifications play an important role in multistage carcinogenesis. The role of the three functional DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) in pancreatic carcinogenesis has not been fully understood. The main goal of this study was to examine DNMT expression in different stages of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), and evaluate their prognostic significance in PDAC. A large number of premalignant and malignant pancreatic lesions were obtained by manual microdissection. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR was used to detect DNMTs mRNA expression. Nonparametric test, logrank test and Cox regression analysis were used to evaluate the clinical significance of DNMT expression. The mRNA expression of the three DNMTs increased with the development of pancreatic cancer from normal duct to pancreatic intraductal neoplasia and further to PDAC, and were statistically correlated with each other. Expression of the three DNMTs was statistically correlated with TNM staging and history of chronic pancreatitis. DNMT3A and DNMT3B, but not DNMT1 expression, was statistically correlated with tumour size. Patients with higher levels of DNMT1, DNMT3A and/or DNMT3B expression had an overall lower survival than those with lower levels of expression. Univariate analysis showed that high expression levels of DNMTs, alcohol consumption, tumour differentiation and TNM staging were statistically significant risk factors. Multivariate analysis showed that high level of DNMT3B expression and tumour differentiation were statistically significant independent poor prognostic factors. These results suggested that pancreatic carcinogenesis involves an increased mRNA expression of three DNMTs, and they may become valuable diagnostic and prognostic markers as well as potential therapeutic targets for pancreatic cancer.

  17. General Information about Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors (Islet Cell Tumors)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... History Committees of Interest Legislative Resources Recent Public Laws Careers Visitor Information Search Search Home Cancer Types Pancreatic Cancer Patient Pancreatic Cancer Patient Pancreatic ...

  18. Expression of multiple forms of 3'-end variant CCK2 receptor mRNAs in human pancreatic adenocarcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monstein Hans-Jürg

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two main types of receptors for gastrin and cholecystokinin (CCK have been cloned and identified. CCK1 (CCK-A receptors are expressed in the pancreas, the gallbladder, and parts of the brain, while CCK2 (CCK-B/gastrin receptors (CCK2R are expressed in gastric glands and in most of the brain. A splice variant of the CCK2R designated CCKRi4sv (CCK-C, which is constitutively expressed in human pancreatic cancer cells, has also been described. The purpose of the present investigation was to study CCK2R, CCK2i4svR, and gastrin mRNA expression in human pancreatic adenocarcinoma on the assumption that co-expression of CCK2R and gastrin or constitutive CCK2i4svR mRNA expression plays a pivotal role in the progression of pancreatic cancer. Findings PCR amplification using CCK2R specific primer-pairs, followed by ethidium-bromide stained agarose gel electrophoresis revealed the expression of wild-type CCK2R mRNA in 12 of 17 biopsy specimens. A CCK2R intron 4 specific nested PCR assay revealed that CCK2i4svR mRNA was expressed in only one of the biopsy specimen. The authenticity of PCR amplicons was confirmed by cloning of selected amplicons and DNA sequence analysis. Moreover, we found that hitherto undescribed multiple forms of 3'-end variant CCK2R mRNAs with various deletions in the retained intron 4 and exon 5, tentatively generating truncated proteins, were expressed in the pancreatic adenocarcinomas. Conclusion Cloning and DNA sequencing of selected amplicons revealed that CCK2R and multiple CCK2i4svR-like mRNAs are expressed in human pancreatic adenocarcinoma. The originally described CCK2i4svR mRNA was only expressed in one of 17 tumours and appears to be rarely expressed in pancreatic adenocarcinoma. We report that CCK2R- and gastrin mRNA co-expression may play a role in a portion, but not in all of these tumours, and that aberrant splicing takes places in these tissues generating multiple forms of 3'-end variant CCK2R mRNAs.

  19. Beta-adrenoceptor action on pancreatic cancer cell proliferation and tumor growth in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xueping; Luo, Kai; Lv, Zhongwei; Huang, Jian

    2012-01-01

    There is growing evidence that some cancer progression is closely associated with beta- adrenoreceptors (β-ARs). However, the underlying mechanisms for β-ARs mediated proliferation of pancreatic cancer cell are poorly understood. In the current study, we evaluated the possible function of β-ARs on the proliferation of human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDAC) cell line Panc-1 and explored β-ARsmediated downstream signal pathway. Series of experiments, such as expression of β1- and β2-ARs on pancreatic cancer cell line Panc-1, β-ARsmediated downstream signal pathway activation as well as cell proliferation assay in vitro and in vivo were performed with immunofluorescence, Western blot analysis, BrdU incorporation assays and xenograft tumor growth respectively. Non-selective β-ARs agonist Isoproterenol (ISO) significantly increased cell proliferation via β-ARs in a dose-dependent manner, with concomitant activation of ERK/MAPK signal pathway in Panc-1 cells. ISO increased expression level of phosphorylated ERK in Panc-1 cells. Furthermore, in vivo study showed that ISO enhanced xenograft tumor growth and this effect was suppressed by non-selective β-ARs antagonist (β-blocker), propranolol (PRO) treatment. These findings suggest that the development and progression of PDAC is subject to significant modulation by ISO and PRO and the treatment with PRO may be useful for marker-guided cancer intervention of PDAC. Therefore, PRO may be developed a novel drug for the treatment and intervention of PDAC for its high specificity.

  20. CUB domain-containing protein 1, a prognostic factor for human pancreatic cancers, promotes cell migration and extracellular matrix degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazawa, Yuri; Uekita, Takamasa; Hiraoka, Nobuyoshi; Fujii, Satoko; Kosuge, Tomoo; Kanai, Yae; Nojima, Yoshihisa; Sakai, Ryuichi

    2010-06-15

    CUB domain-containing protein 1 (CDCP1) is a membrane protein that is highly expressed in several solid cancers. We reported previously that CDCP1 regulates anoikis resistance as well as cancer cell migration and invasion, although the underlying mechanisms have not been elucidated. In this study, we found that expression of CDCP1 in pancreatic cancer tissue was significantly correlated with overall survival and that CDCP1 expression in pancreatic cancer cell lines was relatively high among solid tumor cell lines. Reduction of CDCP1 expression in these cells suppressed extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation by inhibiting matrix metalloproteinase-9 secretion. Using the Y734F mutant of CDCP1, which lacks the tyrosine phosphorylation site, we showed that CDCP1 regulates cell migration, invasion, and ECM degradation in a tyrosine phosphorylation-dependent manner and that these CDCP1-associated characteristics were inhibited by blocking the association of CDCP1 and protein kinase Cdelta (PKCdelta). CDCP1 modulates the enzymatic activity of PKCdelta through the tyrosine phosphorylation of PKCdelta by recruiting PKCdelta to Src family kinases. Cortactin, which was detected as a CDCP1-dependent binding partner of PKCdelta, played a significant role in migration and invasion but not in ECM degradation of pancreatic cells. These results suggest that CDCP1 expression might play a crucial role in poor outcome of pancreatic cancer through promotion of invasion and metastasis and that molecules blocking the expression, phosphorylation, or the PKCdelta-binding site of CDCP1 are potential therapeutic candidates.

  1. Transcriptome Analysis of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell (iPSC)-derived Pancreatic β-like Cell Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yan; Wan, Jian; Guo, Yibing; Zhu, Shajun; Wang, Yao; Wang, Lei; Guo, Qingsong; Lu, Yuhua; Wang, Zhiwei

    2017-08-01

    Diabetes affects millions of people worldwide, and β-cell replacement is one of the promising new strategies for treatment. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) can differentiate into any cell type, including pancreatic β cells, providing a potential treatment for diabetes. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the differentiation of iPSC-derived β cells have not yet been fully elucidated. Here, we generated pancreatic β-like cells from mouse iPSCs using a 3-step protocol and performed deep RNA sequencing to get a transcriptional landscape of iPSC-derived pancreatic β-like cells during the selective differentiation period. We then focused on the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) during the time course of the differentiation period, and these genes underwent Gene Ontology annotation and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway analysis. In addition, gene-act networks were constructed for these DEGs, and the expression of pivotal genes detected by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction was well correlated with RNA sequence (RNA-seq). Overall, our study provides valuable information regarding the transcriptome changes in β cells derived from iPSCs during differentiation, elucidates the biological process and pathways underlying β-cell differentiation, and promotes the identification and functional analysis of potential genes that could be used for improving functional β-cell generation from iPSCs.

  2. Identification of markers for quiescent pancreatic stellate cells in the normal human pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Michael Friberg Bruun; Mortensen, Michael Bau; Detlefsen, Sönke

    2017-10-01

    Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) play a central role as source of fibrogenic cells in pancreatic cancer and chronic pancreatitis. In contrast to quiescent hepatic stellate cells (qHSCs), a specific marker for quiescent PSCs (qPSCs) that can be used in formalin-fixed and paraffin embedded (FFPE) normal human pancreatic tissue has not been identified. The aim of this study was to identify a marker enabling the identification of qPSCs in normal human FFPE pancreatic tissue. Immunohistochemical (IHC), double-IHC, immunofluorescence (IF) and double-IF analyses were carried out using a tissue microarray consisting of cores with normal human pancreatic tissue. Cores with normal human liver served as control. Antibodies directed against adipophilin, α-SMA, CD146, CRBP-1, cytoglobin, desmin, GFAP, nestin, S100A4 and vinculin were examined, with special emphasis on their expression in periacinar cells in the normal human pancreas and perisinusoidal cells in the normal human liver. The immunolabelling capacity was evaluated according to a semiquantitative scoring system. Double-IF of the markers of interest together with markers for other periacinar cells was performed. Moreover, the utility of histochemical stains for the identification of human qPSCs was examined, and their ultrastructure was revisited by electron microscopy. Adipophilin, CRBP-1, cytoglobin and vinculin were expressed in qHSCs in the liver, whereas cytoglobin and adipophilin were expressed in qPSCs in the pancreas. Adipophilin immunohistochemistry was highly dependent on the preanalytical time interval (PATI) from removal of the tissue to formalin fixation. Cytoglobin, S100A4 and vinculin were expressed in periacinar fibroblasts (FBs). The other examined markers were negative in human qPSCs. Our data indicate that cytoglobin and adipophilin are markers of qPSCs in the normal human pancreas. However, the use of adipophilin as a qPSC marker may be limited due to its high dependence on optimal PATI

  3. The Role of Platelet-Derived ADP and ATP in Promoting Pancreatic Cancer Cell Survival and Gemcitabine Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Elaskalani

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Platelets have been demonstrated to be vital in cancer epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT, an important step in metastasis. Markers of EMT are associated with chemotherapy resistance. However, the association between the development of chemoresistance, EMT, and the contribution of platelets to the process, is still unclear. Here we report that platelets regulate the expression of (1 human equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (hENT1 and (2 cytidine deaminase (CDD, markers of gemcitabine resistance in pancreatic cancer. Human ENT1 (hENT1 is known to enable cellular uptake of gemcitabine while CDD deactivates gemcitabine. Knockdown experiments demonstrate that Slug, a mesenchymal transcriptional factor known to be upregulated during EMT, regulates the expression of hENT1 and CDD. Furthermore, we demonstrate that platelet-derived ADP and ATP regulate Slug and CDD expression in pancreatic cancer cells. Finally, we demonstrate that pancreatic cancer cells express the purinergic receptor P2Y12, an ADP receptor found mainly on platelets. Thus ticagrelor, a P2Y12 inhibitor, was used to examine the potential therapeutic effect of an ADP receptor antagonist on cancer cells. Our data indicate that ticagrelor negated the survival signals initiated in cancer cells by platelet-derived ADP and ATP. In conclusion, our results demonstrate a novel role of platelets in modulating chemoresistance in pancreatic cancer. Moreover, we propose ADP/ATP receptors as additional potential drug targets for treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  4. Glucolipotoxicity in Pancreatic β-Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Won Kim

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The recent epidemic of type 2 diabetes in Asia differs from that reported in other regions of the world in several key areas: it has evolved over a much shorter time, in an earlier stage of life, and in people with lower body mass indices. These phenotypic characteristics of patients strongly suggest that insulin secretory defects may perform a more important function in the development and progression of diabetes. A genetic element clearly underlies β-cell dysfunction and insufficient β-cell mass; however, a number of modifiable factors are also linked to β-cell deterioration, most notably chronic hyperglycemia and elevated free fatty acid (FFA levels. Neither glucose nor FFAs alone cause clinically meaningful β-cell toxicity, especially in patients with normal or impaired glucose tolerance. Thus the term "glucolipotoxicity" is perhaps more appropriate in describing the phenomenon. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain glucolipotoxicity-induced β-cell dysfunction and death, but its major factors appear to be depression of key transcription factor gene expression by altered intracellular energy metabolism and oxidative stress. Therefore, stabilization of metabolic changes induced by glucolipotoxicity in β-cells represents a new avenue for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  5. Periodontitis aggravated pancreatic β-cell dysfunction in diabetic mice through interleukin-12 regulation on Klotho.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yihua; Zhang, Qiuli

    2016-05-01

    Recent studies have shown that periodontitis can contribute to adipose tissue inflammation and subsequent systemic insulin resistance in the obese rat model. However, the related inflammatory mechanism is not yet clear. The present study aims to investigate the effects of periodontitis on the function of pancreatic β-cells with pro-inflammatory cytokines-related immune mechanism in a mouse model. C57BL/6-db/db and inbred C57BL/6 mice were chosen here to establish a mouse model with periodontitis, which was induced by ligatures for 8 weeks. Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion was introduced to evaluate the function of pancreatic islets and β-cells. Serum levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and Klotho were also measured, and the correlation between immunostimulation and Klotho level was deeply investigated in vitro. Pancreatic β-cell failure, with insulin resistance, was observed in db/db mice, while periodontitis could aggravate β-cell dysfunction-related features. Serum levels of interleukin (IL)-12 and Klotho showed a negatively synergistic change, whereas the expression of Klotho was also inhibited under IL-12 treatment in MIN6 β-cells or isolated islets. Furthermore, IL-12-induced immune stimulation and also decreased insulin secretion were proven to be reversed by Klotho overexpression. Periodontitis aggravated pancreatic β-cell failure in diabetic mice. Further in vitro studies showed IL-12 regulation on Klotho, while Klotho also acted as an inhibitor on IL-12, indicating the potential of Klotho for preserving pancreatic β-cell function in diabetes.

  6. Eruberin A, a Natural Flavanol Glycoside, Exerts Anti-Fibrotic Action on Pancreatic Stellate Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Siu Wai; Zhang, Hong-Jie; Chen, Ye-Gao; Auyeung, Kathy Ka-Wai; Bian, Zhao-Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Eruberin A (2, 3-dehydroflavonoid), a flavanol glycoside isolated from Pronephrium penangianum, has been used as a blood-nourishing folk medicine for centuries; however, it indeed possesses a variety of other health-promoting benefits including anti-fibrotic bioactivity. Activation of pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) is the key initiating step in pancreatic fibrosis, which is a characteristic feature associated with chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic adenocarcinoma. The anti-fibrotic effect of eruberin A and the underlying mechanisms of its anti-fibrotic action in LTC-14 cells, which retained essential characteristics and morphological features of primary PSCs, were examined by means of real-time polymerase chain reactions, Western blotting and immunostaining. The application of eruberin A (20 μg/ml) effectively inhibited the expression levels of fibrotic mediators namely alpha-smooth muscle actin, fibronectin and type I-collagen, so as the sonic hedgehog signaling pathway components post transforming growth factor-beta (5 ng/ml) stimulation. Eruberin A treatment also led to a notable decrease in the activation of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) and the phosphorylation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/serine-threonine kinase (AKT). Our results demonstrated that eruberin A significantly suppressed the expression levels of fibrotic mediators in PSCs, and we suggest that its anti-fibrotic mechanism was associated with an attenuation of the PI3K/AKT/NF-κB signaling pathway. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Eruberin A, a Natural Flavanol Glycoside, Exerts Anti-Fibrotic Action on Pancreatic Stellate Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siu Wai Tsang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Eruberin A (2, 3-dehydroflavonoid, a flavanol glycoside isolated from Pronephrium penangianum, has been used as a blood-nourishing folk medicine for centuries; however, it indeed possesses a variety of other health-promoting benefits including anti-fibrotic bioactivity. Activation of pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs is the key initiating step in pancreatic fibrosis, which is a characteristic feature associated with chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Methods: The anti-fibrotic effect of eruberin A and the underlying mechanisms of its anti-fibrotic action in LTC-14 cells, which retained essential characteristics and morphological features of primary PSCs, were examined by means of real-time polymerase chain reactions, Western blotting and immunostaining. Results: The application of eruberin A (20 µg/ml effectively inhibited the expression levels of fibrotic mediators namely alpha-smooth muscle actin, fibronectin and type I-collagen, so as the sonic hedgehog signaling pathway components post transforming growth factor-beta (5 ng/ml stimulation. Eruberin A treatment also led to a notable decrease in the activation of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB and the phosphorylation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K/serine-threonine kinase (AKT. Conclusion: Our results demonstrated that eruberin A significantly suppressed the expression levels of fibrotic mediators in PSCs, and we suggest that its anti-fibrotic mechanism was associated with an attenuation of the PI3K/AKT/NF-κB signaling pathway.

  8. Crocetinic acid inhibits hedgehog signaling to inhibit pancreatic cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangarajan, Parthasarathy; Subramaniam, Dharmalingam; Paul, Santanu; Kwatra, Deep; Palaniyandi, Kanagaraj; Islam, Shamima; Harihar, Sitaram; Ramalingam, Satish; Gutheil, William; Putty, Sandeep; Pradhan, Rohan; Padhye, Subhash; Welch, Danny R; Anant, Shrikant; Dhar, Animesh

    2015-09-29

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths in the US and no significant treatment is currently available. Here, we describe the effect of crocetinic acid, which we purified from commercial saffron compound crocetin using high performance liquid chromatography. Crocetinic acid inhibits proliferation of pancreatic cancer cell lines in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In addition, it induced apoptosis. Moreover, the compound significantly inhibited epidermal growth factor receptor and Akt phosphorylation. Furthermore, crocetinic acid decreased the number and size of the pancospheres in a dose-dependent manner, and suppressed the expression of the marker protein DCLK-1 (Doublecortin Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Kinase-1) suggesting that crocetinic acid targets cancer stem cells (CSC). To understand the mechanism of CSC inhibition, the signaling pathways affected by purified crocetinic acid were dissected. Sonic hedgehog (Shh) upon binding to its cognate receptor patched, allows smoothened to accumulate and activate Gli transcription factor. Crocetinic acid inhibited the expression of both Shh and smoothened. Finally, these data were confirmed in vivo where the compound at a dose of 0.5 mg/Kg bw suppressed growth of tumor xenografts. Collectively, these data suggest that purified crocetinic acid inhibits pancreatic CSC, thereby inhibiting pancreatic tumorigenesis.

  9. Inflammation increases cells expressing ZSCAN4 and progenitor cell markers in the adult pancreas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azuma, Sakiko; Yokoyama, Yukihiro; Yamamoto, Akiko; Kyokane, Kazuhiro; Niida, Shumpei; Ishiguro, Hiroshi; Ko, Minoru S. H.

    2013-01-01

    We have recently identified the zinc finger and SCAN domain containing 4 (Zscan4), which is transiently expressed and regulates telomere elongation and genome stability in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells. The aim of this study was to examine the expression of ZSCAN4 in the adult pancreas and elucidate the role of ZSCAN4 in tissue inflammation and subsequent regeneration. The expression of ZSCAN4 and other progenitor or differentiated cell markers in the human pancreas was immunohistochemically examined. Pancreas sections of alcoholic or autoimmune pancreatitis patients before and under maintenance corticosteroid treatment were used in this study. In the adult human pancreas a small number of ZSCAN4-positive (ZSCAN4+) cells are present among cells located in the islets of Langerhans, acini, ducts, and oval-shaped cells. These cells not only express differentiated cell markers for each compartment of the pancreas but also express other tissue stem/progenitor cell markers. Furthermore, the number of ZSCAN4+ cells dramatically increased in patients with chronic pancreatitis, especially in the pancreatic tissues of autoimmune pancreatitis actively regenerating under corticosteroid treatment. Interestingly, a number of ZSCAN4+ cells in the pancreas of autoimmune pancreatitis returned to the basal level after 1 yr of maintenance corticosteroid treatment. In conclusion, coexpression of progenitor cell markers and differentiated cell markers with ZSCAN4 in each compartment of the pancreas may indicate the presence of facultative progenitors for both exocrine and endocrine cells in the adult pancreas. PMID:23599043

  10. HER-family gene amplification and expression in resected pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    te Velde, E A; Franke, A C; van Hillegersberg, R; Elshof, S M; de Weger, R W; Borel Rinkes, I H M; van Diest, P J

    2009-10-01

    Despite surgical resection, pancreatic cancer carries a poor prognosis. In search for new molecular therapeutic targets, we investigated the expression of the HER-family and gene amplification of HER-2 in pancreatic adenocarcinomas of different stages. Tissue of 45 resected patients was analyzed for all HER-family 1-4 expression by immunohistochemistry and HER-2 gene amplification was assessed by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification and chromogenic in situ hybridization. The type of surgery, location, stage and grade of the tumor, as well as involvement of the resection margins were correlated with HER-expressions and univariate and multivariate survival analysis performed. Normal pancreatic tissue lacked HER1-2 expression, but did show HER3-4 expression. In cancers, no membranous overexpression of HER-1 and HER-2 was seen nor gene amplification of HER-2 found. HER-3, HER-4 is physiologically expressed in the normal pancreas and loss of cytoplasmic HER-3 and HER-4 expression was seen in 33/45 (73%) and 8/45 (18%) of pancreatic cancers. Cytoplasmic HER-3 expression decreased from early to late stage (p=0.05). HER-4 expression was not associated with survival, stage or tumor grade. There were no statistically significant differences in HER1-4 expression between the papilla of Vater (n=13) and non-papilla cancers (n=32). Multivariate survival analysis showed only stage to be of independent prognostic value (p=0.015). HER-1 and HER-2 are not overexpressed in pancreatic cancers. HER-3 and HER-4 are expressed in the normal pancreas but expression is lost in pancreatic cancer. HER-targeted therapy in pancreatic cancer is not supported by HER-expression of the tumor.

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  19. Autoimmune pancreatitis results from loss of TGFbeta signalling in S100A4-positive dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boomershine, C S; Chamberlain, A; Kendall, P; Afshar-Sharif, A-R; Huang, H; Washington, M K; Lawson, W E; Thomas, J W; Blackwell, T S; Bhowmick, N A

    2009-09-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a poorly understood human disease affecting the exocrine pancreas. The goal of the present study was to elucidate the pathogenic mechanisms underlying pancreatic autoimmunity in a murine disease model. A transgenic mouse with an S100A4/fibroblast-specific protein 1 (FSP1) Cre-mediated conditional knockout of the transforming growth factor beta (TGFbeta) type II receptor, termed Tgfbr2(fspKO), was used to determine the direct role of TGFbeta in S100A4(+) cells. Immunohistochemical studies suggested that Tgfbr2(fspKO) mice develop mouse AIP (mAIP) characterised by interlobular ductal inflammatory infiltrates and pancreatic autoantibody production. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS)-isolated dendritic cells (DCs) from diseased pancreata were verified to have S100A4-Cre-mediated DNA recombination. The Tgfbr2(fspKO) mice spontaneously developed mAIP by 6 weeks of age. DCs were confirmed to express S100A4, a previously reported protein expressed by fibroblasts. Adoptive transfer of bone marrow-derived DCs from Tgfbr2(fspKO) mice into 2-week-old syngenic wild-type C57BL/6 mice resulted in reproduction of pancreatitis within 6 weeks. Similar adoptive transfer of wild-type DCs had no effect on pancreas pathology of the host mice. The inability to induce pancreatitis by adoptive transfer of Tgfbr2(fspKO) DCs in adult mice suggested a developmental event in mAIP pathogenesis. Tgfbr2(fspKO) DCs undergo elevated maturation in response to antigen and increased activation of naïve CD4-positive T cells. The development of mAIP in the Tgfbr2(fspKO) mouse model illustrates the role of TGFbeta in maintaining myeloid DC immune tolerance. The loss of immune tolerance in myeloid S100A4(+) DCs can mediate mAIP and may explain some aspects of AIP disease pathogenesis.

  20. Knockdown of GRP78 promotes apoptosis in pancreatic acinar cells and attenuates the severity of cerulein and LPS induced pancreatic inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Liu

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis (AP is a potentially lethal disease characterized by inflammation and parenchymal cell death; also, the severity of AP correlates directly with necrosis and inversely with apoptosis. However, mechanisms of regulating cell death in AP remain unclear. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER chaperone protein GRP78 has anti-apoptotic properties, in addition to modulating ER stress responses. This study used RNA interference (RNAi approach to investigate the potential role of GRP78 in regulating apoptosis during AP. In vitro models of AP were successfully developed by treating AR42J cells with cerulein or cerulein plus lipoplysaccharide (LPS. There was more pancreatic inflammation and less apoptosis with the cerulein plus LPS treatment. Furthermore, knockdown of GRP78 expression markedly promoted apoptosis and reduced necrosis in pancreatic acinar cells. This was accomplished by enhancing the activation of caspases and inhibiting the activity of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP, as well as a receptor interacting protein kinase-1(RIPK1, which is a key mediator of necrosis. This attenuated the severity of pancreatic inflammation, especially after cerulein plus LPS treatment. In conclusion, these findings indicate that GRP78 plays an anti-apoptotic role in regulating the cell death response during AP. Therefore, GRP78 is a potential therapeutic target for AP.

  1. Downregulation of tight junction-associated MARVEL protein marvelD3 during epithelial-mesenchymal transition in human pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Takashi; Takasawa, Akira; Kyuno, Daisuke; Ito, Tatsuya; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Hirata, Koichi; Tsujiwaki, Mitsuhiro; Murata, Masaki; Tanaka, Satoshi; Sawada, Norimasa

    2011-10-01

    The novel tight junction protein marvelD3 contains a conserved MARVEL (MAL and related proteins for vesicle trafficking and membrane link) domain like occludin and tricellulin. However, little is yet known about the detailed role and regulation of marvelD3 in normal epithelial cells and cancer cells, including pancreatic cancer. In the present study, we investigated marvelD3 expression in well and poorly differentiated human pancreatic cancer cell lines and normal pancreatic duct epithelial cells in which the hTERT gene was introduced into human pancreatic duct epithelial cells in primary culture, and the changes of marvelD3 during Snail-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) under hypoxia, TGF-β treatment and knockdown of FOXA2 in well differentiated pancreatic cancer HPAC cells. MarvelD3 was transcriptionally downregulated in poorly differentiated pancreatic cancer cells and during Snail-induced EMT of pancreatic cancer cells in which Snail was highly expressed and the fence function downregulated, whereas it was maintained in well differentiated human pancreatic cancer cells and normal pancreatic duct epithelial cells. Depletion of marvelD3 by siRNAs in HPAC cells resulted in downregulation of barrier functions indicated as a decrease in transepithelial electric resistance and an increase of permeability to fluorescent dextran tracers, whereas it did not affect fence function of tight junctions. In conclusion, marvelD3 is transcriptionally downregulated in Snail-induced EMT during the progression for the pancreatic cancer. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Alcohol oxidizing enzymes and ethanol-induced cytotoxicity in rat pancreatic acinar AR42J cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhopale, Kamlesh K; Falzon, Miriam; Ansari, G A S; Kaphalia, Bhupendra S

    2014-04-01

    Alcoholic chronic pancreatitis (ACP) is a serious inflammatory disease causing significant morbidity and mortality. Due to lack of a suitable animal model, the underlying mechanism of ACP is poorly understood. Chronic alcohol abuse inhibits alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and facilitates nonoxidative metabolism of ethanol to fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) in the pancreas frequently damaged during chronic ethanol abuse. Earlier, we reported a concentration-dependent formation of FAEEs and cytotoxicity in ethanol-treated rat pancreatic tumor (AR42J) cells, which express high FAEE synthase activity as compared to ADH and cytochrome P450 2E1. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to investigate the role of various ethanol oxidizing enzymes in ethanol-induced pancreatic acinar cell injury. Confluent AR42J cells were pre-treated with inhibitors of ADH class I and II [4-methylpyrazole (MP)] or class I, II, and III [1,10-phenanthroline (PT)], cytochrome P450 2E1 (trans-1,2-dichloroethylene) or catalase (sodium azide) followed by incubation with 800 mg% ethanol at 37°C for 6 h. Ethanol metabolism, cell viability, cytotoxicity (apoptosis and necrosis), cell proliferation status, and formation of FAEEs in AR42J cells were measured. The cell viability and cell proliferation rate were significantly reduced in cells pretreated with 1,10-PT + ethanol followed by those with 4-MP + ethanol. In situ formation of FAEEs was twofold greater in cells incubated with 1,10-PT + ethanol and ∼1.5-fold in those treated with 4-MP + ethanol vs. respective controls. However, cells treated with inhibitors of cytochrome P450 2E1 or catalase in combination of ethanol showed no significant changes either for FAEE formation, cell death or proliferation rate. Therefore, an impaired ADH class I-III catalyzed oxidation of ethanol appears to be a key contributing factor in ethanol-induced pancreatic injury via formation of nonoxidative metabolites of ethanol.

  3. Cytosolic Double-Stranded DNA as a Damage-Associated Molecular Pattern Induces the Inflammatory Response in Rat Pancreatic Stellate Cells: A Plausible Mechanism for Tissue Injury-Associated Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taichi Nakamura

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease of unknown causes. There are many triggers causing pancreatitis, such as alcohol, common bile duct stone, virus and congenital or acquired stenosis of main pancreatic duct, which often involve tissue injuries. Pancreatitis often occurs in sterile condition, where the dead/dying pancreatic parenchymal cells and the necrotic tissues derived from self-digested-pancreas were observed. However, the causal relationship between tissue injury and pancreatitis and how tissue injury could induce the inflammation of the pancreas were not elucidated fully until now. This study demonstrates that cytosolic double-stranded DNA increases the expression of several inflammatory genes (cytokines, chemokines, type I interferon, and major histocompatibility complex in rat pancreatic stellate cells. Furthermore, these increase accompanied the multiple signal molecules genes, such as interferon regulatory factors, nuclear factor-kappa B, low-molecular-weight protein 2, and transporter associated with antigen processing 1. We suggest that this phenomenon is a plausible mechanism that might explain how cell damage of the pancreas or tissue injury triggers acute, chronic, and autoimmune pancreatitis; it is potentially relevant to host immune responses induced during alcohol consumption or other causes.

  4. Exendin-4 protects mitochondria from reactive oxygen species induced apoptosis in pancreatic Beta cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Li

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Mitochondrial oxidative stress is the basis for pancreatic β-cell apoptosis and a common pathway for numerous types of damage, including glucotoxicity and lipotoxicity. We cultivated mice pancreatic β-cell tumor Min6 cell lines in vitro and observed pancreatic β-cell apoptosis and changes in mitochondrial function before and after the addition of Exendin-4. Based on these observations, we discuss the protective role of Exendin-4 against mitochondrial oxidative damage and its relationship with Ca(2+-independent phospholipase A2. METHODS: We established a pancreatic β-cell oxidative stress damage model using Min6 cell lines cultured in vitro with tert-buty1 hydroperoxide and hydrogen peroxide. We then added Exendin-4 to observe changes in the rate of cell apoptosis (Annexin-V-FITC-PI staining flow cytometry and DNA ladder. We detected the activity of the caspase 3 and 8 apoptotic factors, measured the mitochondrial membrane potential losses and reactive oxygen species production levels, and detected the expression of cytochrome c and Smac/DLAMO in the cytosol and mitochondria, mitochondrial Ca2-independent phospholipase A2 and Ca(2+-independent phospholipase A2 mRNA. RESULTS: The time-concentration curve showed that different percentages of apoptosis occurred at different time-concentrations in tert-buty1 hydroperoxide- and hydrogen peroxide-induced Min6 cells. Incubation with 100 µmol/l of Exendin-4 for 48 hours reduced the Min6 cell apoptosis rate (p<0.05. The mitochondrial membrane potential loss and total reactive oxygen species levels decreased (p<0.05, and the release of cytochrome c and Smac/DLAMO from the mitochondria was reduced. The study also showed that Ca(2+-independent phospholipase A2 activity was positively related to Exendin-4 activity. CONCLUSION: Exendin-4 reduces Min6 cell oxidative damage and the cell apoptosis rate, which may be related to Ca(2-independent phospholipase A2.

  5. Spiclomazine induces apoptosis associated with the suppression of cell viability, migration and invasion in pancreatic carcinoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjing Zhao

    Full Text Available The effective treatment for pancreatic carcinoma remains critically needed. Herein, this current study showed that spiclomazine treatment caused a reduction in viability in pancreatic carcinoma cell lines CFPAC-1 and MIA PaCa-2 in vitro. It was notable in this regard that, compared with pancreatic carcinoma cells, normal human embryonic kidney (HEK-293 and liver (HL-7702 cells were more resistant to the antigrowth effect of spiclomazine. Biochemically, spiclomazine treatment regulated the expression of protein levels in the apoptosis related pathways. Consistent with this effect, spiclomazine reduced the mitochondria membrane potential, elevated reactive oxygen species, and activated caspase-3/9. In addition, a key finding from this study was that spiclomazine suppressed migration and invasion of cancer cells through down-regulation of MMP-2/9. Collectively, the proposed studies did shed light on the antiproliferation effect of spiclomazine on pancreatic carcinoma cell lines, and further clarified the mechanisms that spiclomazine induced apoptosis associated with the suppression of migration and invasion.

  6. Drp1 guarding of the mitochondrial network is important for glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in pancreatic beta cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinhardt, Florian; Schultz, Julia; Waterstradt, Rica; Baltrusch, Simone, E-mail: simone.baltrusch@med.uni-rostock.de

    2016-06-10

    Mitochondria form a tubular network in mammalian cells, and the mitochondrial life cycle is determined by fission, fusion and autophagy. Dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) has a pivotal role in these processes because it alone is able to constrict mitochondria. However, the regulation and function of Drp1 have been shown to vary between cell types. Mitochondrial morphology affects mitochondrial metabolism and function. In pancreatic beta cells mitochondrial metabolism is a key component of the glucose-induced cascade of insulin secretion. The goal of the present study was to investigate the action of Drp1 in pancreatic beta cells. For this purpose Drp1 was down-regulated by means of shDrp1 in insulin-secreting INS1 cells and mouse pancreatic islets. In INS1 cells reduced Drp1 expression resulted in diminished expression of proteins regulating mitochondrial fusion, namely mitofusin 1 and 2, and optic atrophy protein 1. Diminished mitochondrial dynamics can therefore be assumed. After down-regulation of Drp1 in INS1 cells and spread mouse islets the initially homogenous mitochondrial network characterised by a moderate level of interconnections shifted towards high heterogeneity with elongated, clustered and looped mitochondria. These morphological changes were found to correlate directly with functional alterations. Mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP generation were significantly reduced in INS1 cells after Drp1down-regulation. Finally, a significant loss of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion was demonstrated in INS1 cells and mouse pancreatic islets. In conclusion, Drp1 expression is important in pancreatic beta cells to maintain the regulation of insulin secretion. -- Highlights: •Down-regulation of Drp1 in INS1 cells reduces mitochondrial fusion protein expression. •Mitochondrial membrane potential in INS1 cells is diminished after Drp1 down-regulation. •Mitochondria become elongated after down-regulation of Drp1 in beta cells. •Down-regulation of

  7. Fibulin-3 negatively regulates ALDH1 via c-MET suppression and increases γ-radiation-induced sensitivity in some pancreatic cancer cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, In-Gyu, E-mail: igkim@kaeri.re.kr [Department of Radiation Biology, Environmental Radiation Research Group, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 989-111 Daedeok-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiation Biotechnology and Applied Radioisotope, Korea University of Science and Technology (UST), 989-111 Daedeok-daero, Yusong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae-Ha [Department of Radiation Biology, Environmental Radiation Research Group, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 989-111 Daedeok-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiation Biotechnology and Applied Radioisotope, Korea University of Science and Technology (UST), 989-111 Daedeok-daero, Yusong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seo-Yoen; Kim, Jeong-Yul [Department of Radiation Biology, Environmental Radiation Research Group, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 989-111 Daedeok-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Eun-Wie [Epigenomics Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, 125 Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-21

    Highlights: • FBLN-3 gene was poorly expressed in some pancreatic cancer lines. • FBLN-3 promoter region was highly methylated in some pancreatic cancer cell lines. • FBLN-3 inhibited c-MET activation and expression and reduced cellular level of ALDH1. • FBLN-3/c-Met/ALDH1 axis modulates stemness and EMT in pancreatic cancer cells. - Abstract: Fibulin-3 (FBLN-3) has been postulated to be either a tumor suppressor or promoter depending on the cell type, and hypermethylation of the FBLN-3 promoter is often associated with human disease, especially cancer. We report that the promoter region of the FBLN-3 was significantly methylated (>95%) in some pancreatic cancer cell lines and thus FBLN-3 was poorly expressed in pancreatic cancer cell lines such as AsPC-1 and MiaPaCa-2. FBLN-3 overexpression significantly down-regulated the cellular level of c-MET and inhibited hepatocyte growth factor-induced c-MET activation, which were closely associated with γ-radiation resistance of cancer cells. Moreover, we also showed that c-MET suppression or inactivation decreased the cellular level of ALDH1 isozymes (ALDH1A1 or ALDH1A3), which serve as cancer stem cell markers, and subsequently induced inhibition of cell growth in pancreatic cancer cells. Therefore, forced overexpression of FBLN-3 sensitized cells to cytotoxic agents such as γ-radiation and strongly inhibited the stemness and epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) property of pancreatic cancer cells. On the other hand, if FBLN3 was suppressed in FBLN-3-expressing BxPC3 cells, the results were opposite. This study provides the first demonstration that the FBLN-3/c-MET/ALDH1 axis in pancreatic cancer cells partially modulates stemness and EMT as well as sensitization of cells to the detrimental effects of γ-radiation.

  8. Decoy receptor 3 suppresses FasL-induced apoptosis via ERK1/2 activation in pancreatic cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yi; Li, Dechun; Zhao, Xin; Song, Shiduo; Zhang, Lifeng; Zhu, Dongming [Department of General Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China); Wang, Zhenxin [Department of Oncology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China); Chen, Xiaochen [Department of Pathology, The Obstetrics & Gynecology Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai 200090 (China); Zhou, Jian, E-mail: zhoujian20150602@126.com [Department of General Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China)

    2015-08-07

    Resistance to Fas Ligand (FasL) mediated apoptosis plays an important role in tumorigenesis. Decoy receptor 3 (DcR3) is reported to interact with FasL and is overexpressed in some malignant tumors. We sought to investigate the role of DcR3 in resistance to FasL in pancreatic cancer. We compared expression of apoptosis related genes between FasL-resistant SW1990 and FasL-sensitive Patu8988 pancreatic cell lines by microarray analysis. We explored the impact of siRNA knockdown of, or exogenous supplementation with, DcR3 on FasL-induced cell growth inhibition in pancreatic cancer cell lines and expression of proteins involved in apoptotic signaling. We assessed the level of DcR3 protein and ERK1/2 phosphorylation in tumor and non-tumor tissue samples of 66 patients with pancreatic carcinoma. RNAi knockdown of DcR3 expression in SW1990 cells reduced resistance to FasL-induced apoptosis, and supplementation of Patu8988 with rDcR3 had the opposite effect. RNAi knockdown of DcR3 in SW1990 cells elevated expression of caspase 3, 8 and 9, and reduced ERK1/2 phosphorylation (P < 0.05), but did not alter phosphorylated-Akt expression. 47 tumor tissue specimens, but only 15 matched non-tumor specimens stained for DcR3 (χ{sup 2} = 31.1447, P < 0.001). The proliferation index of DcR3 positive specimens (14.26  ±  2.67%) was significantly higher than that of DcR3 negative specimens (43.58  ±  7.88%, P < 0.01). DcR3 expression positively correlated with p-ERK1/2 expression in pancreatic cancer tissues (r = 0.607, P < 0.001). DcR3 enhances ERK1/2 phosphorylation and opposes FasL signaling in pancreatic cancer cells. - Highlights: • We investigated the role of DcR3 in FasL resistance in pancreatic cancer. • Knockdown of DcR3 in SW1990 cells reduced resistance to FasL-induced apoptosis. • DcR3 knockdown also elevated caspase expression, and reduced ERK1/2 phosphorylation. • Tumor and non-tumor tissues were collected from 66 pancreatic carcinoma patients

  9. Differential expression of aquaporin-3 and aquaporin-5 in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Direito, Inês; Paulino, Jorge; Vigia, Emanuel; Brito, Maria Alexandra; Soveral, Graça

    2017-06-01

    Aquaporin-5 (AQP5) and -3 (AQP3) are protein channels that showed to be up-regulated in a variety of tumors. Our goal was to investigate the expression pattern of AQP5 and AQP3 in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDA) and correlate with cell proliferation, tumor stage and progression, and clinical significance. 35 PDA samples in different stages of differentiation and locations were analyzed by immunohistochemistry for expression of AQP5, AQP3 and several markers of cell proliferation and tumorigenesis. In PDA samples AQP5 was overexpressed in the apical membrane of intercalated and intralobular ductal cells while AQP3 was expressed at the plasma membrane of ductal cells. AQP5 was also found in infiltrative cancer cells in duodenum. Simultaneous overexpression of EGFR, Ki-67, and CK7, with decreased E-cad and increased Vim that characterize epithelial mesenchymal transition, tumor formation and invasion, strongly suggest AQP3 and AQP5 involvement in cell proliferation and transformation. AQP3 overexpression is reinforced in late and more aggressive PDA stages whereas AQP5 is related with tumor differentiation, suggesting it may represent a novel marker for PDA aggressiveness and intestinal infiltration. These findings suggest AQP3 and AQP5 involvement in PDA development and the usefulness of AQP5 in early PDA diagnosis. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Dendritic cells loaded with pancreatic Cancer Stem Cells (CSCs lysates induce antitumor immune killing effect in vitro.

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    Tao Yin

    Full Text Available According to the cancer stem cells (CSCs theory, malignant tumors may be heterogeneous in which a small population of CSCs drive the progression of cancer. Because of their intrinsic abilities, CSCs may survive a variety of treatments and then lead to therapeutic resistance and cancer recurrence. Pancreatic CSCs have been reported to be responsible for the malignant behaviors of pancreatic cancer, including suppression of immune protection. Thus, development of immune strategies to eradicate pancreatic CSCs may be of great value for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. In this study, we enriched pancreatic CSCs by culturing Panc-1 cells under sphere-forming conditions. Panc-1 CSCs expressed low levels of HLA-ABC and CD86, as measured by flow cytometry analysis. We further found that the Panc-1 CSCs modulate immunity by inhibiting lymphocyte proliferation which is promoted by phytohemagglutinin (PHA and anti-CD3 monoclonal antibodies. The monocyte derived dendritic cells (DCs were charged with total lysates generated from Panc-1 CSCs obtained from tumor sphere culturing. After co-culturing with lymphocytes at different ratios, the Panc-1 CSCs lysates modified DC effectively promoted lymphocyte proliferation. The activating efficiency reached 72.4% and 74.7% at the ratios of 1∶10 and 1∶20 with lymphocytes. The activated lymphocytes secreted high levels of INF-γ and IL-2, which are strong antitumor cytokines. Moreover, Panc-1 CSCs lysates modified DC induced significant cytotoxic effects of lymphocytes on Panc-1 CSCs and parental Panc-1 cells, respectively, as shown by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH assay. Our study demonstrates that the development of CSCs-based vaccine is a promising strategy for treating pancreatic cancer.

  11. Expression, biosynthesis and release of preadipocyte factor-1/ delta-like protein/fetal antigen-1 in pancreatic beta-cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friedrichsen, B N; Carlsson, C; Møldrup, Annette

    2003-01-01

    Preadipocyte factor-1 (Pref-1)/delta-like protein/fetal antigen-1 (FA1) is a member of the epidermal growth factor-like family. It is widely expressed in embryonic tissues, whereas in adults it is confined to the adrenal gland, the anterior pituitary, the endocrine pancreas, the testis and the ov...

  12. Myeloid cells are required for PD-1/PD-L1 checkpoint activation and the establishment of an immunosuppressive environment in pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yaqing; Velez-Delgado, Ashley; Mathew, Esha; Li, Dongjun; Mendez, Flor M; Flannagan, Kevin; Rhim, Andrew D; Simeone, Diane M; Beatty, Gregory L; Pasca di Magliano, Marina

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is characterised by the accumulation of a fibro-inflammatory stroma. Within this stromal reaction, myeloid cells are a predominant population. Distinct myeloid subsets have been correlated with tumour promotion and unmasking of anti-tumour immunity. The goal of this study was to determine the effect of myeloid cell depletion on the onset and progression of pancreatic cancer and to understand the relationship between myeloid cells and T cell-mediated immunity within the pancreatic cancer microenvironment. Primary mouse pancreatic cancer cells were transplanted into CD11b-diphtheria toxin receptor (DTR) mice. Alternatively, the iKras* mouse model of pancreatic cancer was crossed into CD11b-DTR mice. CD11b(+) cells (mostly myeloid cell population) were depleted by diphtheria toxin treatment during tumour initiation or in established tumours. Depletion of myeloid cells prevented Kras(G12D)-driven pancreatic cancer initiation. In pre-established tumours, myeloid cell depletion arrested tumour growth and in some cases, induced tumour regressions that were dependent on CD8(+) T cells. We found that myeloid cells inhibited CD8(+) T-cell anti-tumour activity by inducing the expression of programmed cell death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) in tumour cells in an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)/mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK)-dependent manner. Our results show that myeloid cells support immune evasion in pancreatic cancer through EGFR/MAPK-dependent regulation of PD-L1 expression on tumour cells. Derailing this crosstalk between myeloid cells and tumour cells is sufficient to restore anti-tumour immunity mediated by CD8(+) T cells, a finding with implications for the design of immune therapies for pancreatic cancer. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  13. UCP2 mRNA expression is dependent on glucose metabolism in pancreatic islets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalgaard, Louise T., E-mail: ltd@ruc.dk [Division of Endocrinology, Department of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Department of Science, Systems and Models, Roskilde University (Denmark)

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer UCP2 mRNA levels are decreased in islets of Langerhans from glucokinase deficient mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer UCP2 mRNA up-regulation by glucose is dependent on glucokinase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Absence of UCP2 increases GSIS of glucokinase heterozygous pancreatic islets. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This may protect glucokinase deficient mice from hyperglycemic damages. -- Abstract: Uncoupling Protein 2 (UCP2) is expressed in the pancreatic {beta}-cell, where it partially uncouples the mitochondrial proton gradient, decreasing both ATP-production and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). Increased glucose levels up-regulate UCP2 mRNA and protein levels, but the mechanism for UCP2 up-regulation in response to increased glucose is unknown. The aim was to examine the effects of glucokinase (GK) deficiency on UCP2 mRNA levels and to characterize the interaction between UCP2 and GK with regard to glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in pancreatic islets. UCP2 mRNA expression was reduced in GK+/- islets and GK heterozygosity prevented glucose-induced up-regulation of islet UCP2 mRNA. In contrast to UCP2 protein function UCP2 mRNA regulation was not dependent on superoxide generation, but rather on products of glucose metabolism, because MnTBAP, a superoxide dismutase mimetic, did not prevent the glucose-induced up-regulation of UCP2. Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion was increased in UCP2-/- and GK+/- islets compared with GK+/- islets and UCP2 deficiency improved glucose tolerance of GK+/- mice. Accordingly, UCP2 deficiency increased ATP-levels of GK+/- mice. Thus, the compensatory down-regulation of UCP2 is involved in preserving the insulin secretory capacity of GK mutant mice and might also be implicated in limiting disease progression in MODY2 patients.

  14. Nerve growth factor regulates CD133 function to promote tumor cell migration and invasion via activating ERK1/2 signaling in pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Beibei; He, Xiaodan; Wang, Juan; Cai, Jun; Wei, Wei; Zhang, Ti; Shen, Xiaohong

    Perineural invasion (PNI) is extremely high frequency among the various metastatic routes in pancreatic cancer. Nerve growth factor, secreted by astroglial cells, exerts effects on tumor invasion in some cancer cells, but its function on migration and invasion in pancreatic cancer is still unclear. In the present study, we determined the effects of NGF on modulating tumor cell metastatic potential and invasion activity and explored its mechanisms in pancreatic cancer. NGF and CD133 expression were detected in tumor tissues using immunohistochemical analysis and Western blotting analysis. The effects of NGF on the regulation of CD133 expression and the promotion of cancer migration and invasion were investigated using wound healing and matrigel transwell assay. A related mechanism that NGF regulates CD133's function via activating ERK1/2 signaling also was observed. NGF/CD133 is overexpressed in human pancreatic cancer and promotes the migration and invasion of human pancreatic cancer cells through the activation of the ERK/CD133 signaling cascade. NGF/ERK signaling modulates the cancer cell EMT process, migration and invasion through the regulation of CD133 expression and its subcellular localization. NGF/CD133 signaling initiated the migration and invasion of pancreatic cancer cells. NGF/CD133 might be an effective and potent therapeutic target for pancreatic cancer metastasis, particularly in PNI. Copyright © 2016 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Pancreatic α-cell specific deletion of mouse Arx leads to α-cell identity loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Crystal L; Terry, Natalie A; Walp, Erik R; Lee, Randall A; May, Catherine Lee

    2013-01-01

    The specification and differentiation of pancreatic endocrine cell populations (α-, β-, δ, PP- and ε-cells) is orchestrated by a combination of transcriptional regulators. In the pancreas, Aristaless-related homeobox gene (Arx) is expressed first in the endocrine progenitors and then restricted to glucagon-producing α-cells. While the functional requirement of Arx in early α-cell specification has been investigated, its role in maintaining α-cell identity has yet to be explored. To study this later role of Arx, we have generated mice in which the Arx gene has been ablated specifically in glucagon-producing α-cells. Lineage-tracing studies and immunostaining analysis for endocrine hormones demonstrate that ablation of Arx in neonatal α-cells results in an α-to-β-like conversion through an intermediate bihormonal state. Furthermore, these Arx-deficient converted cells express β-cell markers including Pdx1, MafA, and Glut2. Surprisingly, short-term ablation of Arx in adult mice does not result in a similar α-to-β-like conversion. Taken together, these findings reveal a potential temporal requirement for Arx in maintaining α-cell identity.

  16. Planar Cell Polarity Controls Pancreatic Beta Cell Differentiation and Glucose Homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cortijo, Cedric; Gouzi, Mathieu; Tissir, Fadel

    2012-01-01

    Planar cell polarity (PCP) refers to the collective orientation of cells within the epithelial plane. We show that progenitor cells forming the ducts of the embryonic pancreas express PCP proteins and exhibit an active PCP pathway. Planar polarity proteins are acquired at embryonic day 11.5 synch...... that tridimensional organization and collective communication of cells are needed in the pancreatic epithelium in order to generate appropriate numbers of endocrine cells.......Planar cell polarity (PCP) refers to the collective orientation of cells within the epithelial plane. We show that progenitor cells forming the ducts of the embryonic pancreas express PCP proteins and exhibit an active PCP pathway. Planar polarity proteins are acquired at embryonic day 11.......5 synchronously to apicobasal polarization of pancreas progenitors. Loss of function of the two PCP core components Celsr2 and Celsr3 shows that they control the differentiation of endocrine cells from polarized progenitors, with a prevalent effect on insulin-producing beta cells. This results in a decreased...

  17. Metformin targets the metabolic achilles heel of human pancreatic cancer stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enza Lonardo

    Full Text Available Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas contain a subset of exclusively tumorigenic cancer stem cells (CSCs, which are capable of repopulating the entire heterogeneous cancer cell populations and are highly resistant to standard chemotherapy. Here we demonstrate that metformin selectively ablated pancreatic CSCs as evidenced by diminished expression of pluripotency-associated genes and CSC-associated surface markers. Subsequently, the ability of metformin-treated CSCs to clonally expand in vitro was irreversibly abrogated by inducing apoptosis. In contrast, non-CSCs preferentially responded by cell cycle arrest, but were not eliminated by metformin treatment. Mechanistically, metformin increased reactive oxygen species production in CSC and reduced their mitochondrial transmembrane potential. The subsequent induction of lethal energy crisis in CSCs was independent of AMPK/mTOR. Finally, in primary cancer tissue xenograft models metformin effectively reduced tumor burden and prevented disease progression; if combined with a stroma-targeting smoothened inhibitor for enhanced tissue penetration, while gemcitabine actually appeared dispensable.

  18. Efficient Generation of Glucose-Responsive Beta Cells from Isolated GP2+ Human Pancreatic Progenitors

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    Jacqueline Ameri

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell-based therapy for type 1 diabetes would benefit from implementation of a cell purification step at the pancreatic endoderm stage. This would increase the safety of the final cell product, allow the establishment of an intermediate-stage stem cell bank, and provide a means for upscaling β cell manufacturing. Comparative gene expression analysis revealed glycoprotein 2 (GP2 as a specific cell surface marker for isolating pancreatic endoderm cells (PECs from differentiated hESCs and human fetal pancreas. Isolated GP2+ PECs efficiently differentiated into glucose responsive insulin-producing cells in vitro. We found that in vitro PEC proliferation declines due to enhanced expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK inhibitors CDKN1A and CDKN2A. However, we identified a time window when reducing CDKN1A or CDKN2A expression increased proliferation and yield of GP2+ PECs. Altogether, our results contribute tools and concepts toward the isolation and use of PECs as a source for the safe production of hPSC-derived β cells.

  19. Involvement of the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 2 in the induction of cell dissociation in pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xiaodong; Egami, Hiroshi; Kamohara, Hidenobu; Ishikawa, Shinji; Kurizaki, Takashi; Yoshida, Naoya; Tamori, Yasuhiko; Takai, Eiji; Hirota, Masahiko; Ogawa, Michio

    2004-01-01

    In our previous investigation, mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 2 (MEK2) was detected as a factor which was correlated to the potential of invasion-metastasis. In this study, the immunocytochemical, immunohistochemical and mRNA expressions of MEK2 were examined in pancreatic cancer cell lines and tissue samples, respectively. Constitutive expressions of MEK2 and phosphorylated MEK (p-MEK) were observed in PC-1.0 and ASPC-1 cells, which exhibited a growth pattern of single cells, whereas the relevant expressions were quite faint in PC-1 cells and CAPAN-2 cells, which exhibited a growth pattern of island-like clonies. Simultaneous inductions of MEK2 expressions and cell dissociation were observed after the treatment with a conditioned medium (CM) of PC-1.0 cells. The expression of MEK2 and p-MEK were reduced and the cell aggregation was found in PC-1.0 and ASPC-1 cells after U0126 (a MEK inhibitor) treatment. In vivo, both the MEK2 and p-MEK overexpressed in human pancreatic cancer tissues and p-MEK was found to be more strongly expressed in the invasive front than that in the center of tumor (Pcell dissociation. MEK2 activation is probably involved in the first step of the cascade in the invasion-metastasis of pancreatic cancer.

  20. Expression pattern, ethanol-metabolizing activities, and cellular localization of alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenases in human pancreas: implications for pathogenesis of alcohol-induced pancreatic injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Chien-Ping; Wu, Chew-Wun; Lee, Shiao-Pieng; Chung, Chia-Chi; Wang, Chi-Wei; Lee, Shou-Lun; Nieh, Shin; Yin, Shih-Jiun

    2009-06-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) are major enzymes responsible for metabolism of ethanol. Genetic polymorphisms of ADH1B, ADH1C, and ALDH2 occur among racial populations. The metabolic effect and metabolites contribute to pathogenesis of pancreatic injury. The goal of this study was to determine the functional expressions and cellular localization of ADH and ALDH families in human pancreas. Fifty five surgical specimens of normal pancreas as well as 15 samples each for chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer from archival formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue specimens were investigated. Class-specific antibodies were prepared by affinity chromatographies from rabbit antisera raised against recombinant human ADH1C1, ADH4, ADH5, ADH7, ALDH1A1, ALDH2, and ALDH3A1. The isozyme expression patterns of ADH/ALDH were identified by isoelectric focusing, and the activities were assayed spectrophotometrically. The protein contents of ADH/ALDH isozymes were determined by immunoblotting, and the cellular localizations were detected by immunohistochemistry and histochemistry. At 33 mM ethanol, pH 7.5, the activities were significantly different between allelic phenotypes of ADH1B. The activity of ALDH2-inactive phenotypes was slightly lower than ALDH2-active phenotypes at 200 microM acetaldehyde. The protein contents were in the following decreasing order: ALDH1A1, ALDH2, ADH1, and ADH5. ADH1B was detected in the acinar cells and ADH1C in the ductular, islet, and stellate cells. The expression of ADH1C appeared to be increased in the activated pancreatic stellate cells in chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. Alcohol dehydrogenase and ALDH family members are differentially expressed in the various cell types of pancreas. ADH1C may play an important role in modulation of activation of pancreatic stellate cells.

  1. Syndecan-2 promotes perineural invasion and cooperates with K-ras to induce an invasive pancreatic cancer cell phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Oliveira, Tiago; Abiatari, Ivane; Raulefs, Susanne; Sauliunaite, Danguole; Erkan, Mert; Kong, Bo; Friess, Helmut; Michalski, Christoph W; Kleeff, Jörg

    2012-04-03

    We have identified syndecan-2 as a protein potentially involved in perineural invasion of pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cells. Syndecan-2 (SDC-2) expression was analyzed in human normal pancreas, chronic pancreatitis and PDAC tissues. Functional in vitro assays were carried out to determine its role in invasion, migration and signaling. SDC-2 was expressed in the majority of the tested pancreatic cancer cell lines while it was upregulated in nerve-invasive PDAC cell clones. There were 2 distinct expression patterns of SDC-2 in PDAC tissue samples: SDC-2 positivity in the cancer cell cytoplasm and a peritumoral expression. Though SDC-2 silencing (using specific siRNA oligonucleotides) did not affect anchorage-dependent growth, it significantly reduced cell motility and invasiveness in the pancreatic cancer cell lines T3M4 and Su8686. On the transcriptional level, migration-and invasion-associated genes were down-regulated following SDC-2 RNAi. Furthermore, SDC-2 silencing reduced K-ras activity, phosphorylation of Src and--further downstream--phosphorylation of ERK2 while levels of the putative SDC-2 signal transducer p120GAP remained unaltered. SDC-2 is a novel (perineural) invasion-associated gene in PDAC which cooperates with K-ras to induce a more invasive phenotype.

  2. Syndecan-2 promotes perineural invasion and cooperates with K-ras to induce an invasive pancreatic cancer cell phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Oliveira Tiago

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have identified syndecan-2 as a protein potentially involved in perineural invasion of pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC cells. Methods Syndecan-2 (SDC-2 expression was analyzed in human normal pancreas, chronic pancreatitis and PDAC tissues. Functional in vitro assays were carried out to determine its role in invasion, migration and signaling. Results SDC-2 was expressed in the majority of the tested pancreatic cancer cell lines while it was upregulated in nerve-invasive PDAC cell clones. There were 2 distinct expression patterns of SDC-2 in PDAC tissue samples: SDC-2 positivity in the cancer cell cytoplasm and a peritumoral expression. Though SDC-2 silencing (using specific siRNA oligonucleotides did not affect anchorage-dependent growth, it significantly reduced cell motility and invasiveness in the pancreatic cancer cell lines T3M4 and Su8686. On the transcriptional level, migration-and invasion-associated genes were down-regulated following SDC-2 RNAi. Furthermore, SDC-2 silencing reduced K-ras activity, phosphorylation of Src and - further downstream - phosphorylation of ERK2 while levels of the putative SDC-2 signal transducer p120GAP remained unaltered. Conclusion SDC-2 is a novel (perineural invasion-associated gene in PDAC which cooperates with K-ras to induce a more invasive phenotype.

  3. Roles of Sphingolipid Metabolism in Pancreatic ? Cell Dysfunction Induced by Lipotoxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Julien Véret; Lara Bellini; Paola Giussani; Carl Ng; Christophe Magnan; Hervé Le Stunff

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic β cells secrete insulin in order to maintain glucose homeostasis. However, various environmental stresses such as obesity have been shown to induce loss of secretory responsiveness in pancreatic β cells and pancreatic β cell apoptosis which can favor the development of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Indeed, elevated levels of free fatty acids (FFAs) have been shown to induce β cell apoptosis. Importantly, the chronic adverse effects of FFAs on β cell function and viability are potentiated ...

  4. In Vitro Differentiation of Human Umbilical Cord Blood CD133+Cells into Insulin Producing Cells in Co-Culture with Rat Pancreatic Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahraneshin Samani, Fazel; Ebrahimi, Marzieh; Zandieh, Tahereh; Khoshchehreh, Reyhaneh; Baghaban Eslaminejad, Mohamadreza; Aghdami, Nasser; Baharvand, Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Objective Pancreatic stroma plays an important role in the induction of pancreatic cells by the use of close range signaling. In this respect, we presume that pancreatic mesenchymal cells (PMCs) as a fundamental factor of the stromal niche may have an effective role in differentiation of umbilical cord blood cluster of differentiation 133+ (UCB-CD133+) cells into newly-formed β-cells in vitro. Materials and Methods This study is an experimental research. The UCB-CD133+cells were purified by magnetic activated cell sorting (MACS) and differentiated into insulin producing cells (IPCs) in co-culture, both directly and indirectly with rat PMCs. Immunocytochemistry and enzyme linked immune sorbent assay (ELISA) were used to determine expression and production of insulin and C-peptide at the protein level. Results Our results demonstrated that UCB-CD133+differentiated into IPCs. Cells in islet-like clusters with (out) co-cultured with rat pancreatic stromal cells produced insulin and C-peptide and released them into the culture medium at the end of the induction protocol. However they did not respond well to glucose challenges. Conclusion Rat PMCs possibly affect differentiation of UCB-CD133+cells into IPCs by increasing the number of immature β-cells. PMID:26199900

  5. Plasticity of adult human pancreatic duct cells by neurogenin3-mediated reprogramming.

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    Nathalie Swales

    Full Text Available AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Duct cells isolated from adult human pancreas can be reprogrammed to express islet beta cell genes by adenoviral transduction of the developmental transcription factor neurogenin3 (Ngn3. In this study we aimed to fully characterize the extent of this reprogramming and intended to improve it. METHODS: The extent of the Ngn3-mediated duct-to-endocrine cell reprogramming was measured employing genome wide mRNA profiling. By modulation of the Delta-Notch signaling or addition of pancreatic endocrine transcription factors Myt1, MafA and Pdx1 we intended to improve the reprogramming. RESULTS: Ngn3 stimulates duct cells to express a focused set of genes that are characteristic for islet endocrine cells and/or neural tissues. This neuro-endocrine shift however, is incomplete with less than 10% of full duct-to-endocrine reprogramming achieved. Transduction of exogenous Ngn3 activates endogenous Ngn3 suggesting auto-activation of this gene. Furthermore, pancreatic endocrine reprogramming of human duct cells can be moderately enhanced by inhibition of Delta-Notch signaling as well as by co-expressing the transcription factor Myt1, but not MafA and Pdx1. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: The results provide further insight into the plasticity of adult human duct cells and suggest measurable routes to enhance Ngn3-mediated in vitro reprogramming protocols for regenerative beta cell therapy in diabetes.

  6. Adamantyl Retinoid-Related Molecules Induce Apoptosis in Pancreatic Cancer Cells by Inhibiting IGF-1R and Wnt/β-Catenin Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lulu Farhana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic carcinoma has a dismal prognosis as it often presents as locally advanced or metastatic. We have found that exposure to adamantyl-substituted retinoid-related (ARR compounds 3-Cl-AHPC and AHP3 resulted in growth inhibition and apoptosis induction in PANC-1, Capan-2, and MiaPaCa-2 pancreatic cancer cell lines. In addition, AHP3 and 3-Cl-AHPC inhibited growth and induced apoptosis in spheres derived from the CD44+/CD24+ (CD133+/EpCAM+ stem-like cell population isolated from the pancreatic cancer cell lines. 3-Cl-AHPC-induced apoptosis was preceded by decreasing expression of IGF-1R, cyclin D1, β-catenin, and activated Notch-1 in the pancreatic cancer cell lines. Decreased IGF-1R expression inhibited PANC-1 proliferation, enhanced 3-Cl-AHPC-mediated apoptosis, and significantly decreased sphere formation. 3-Cl-AHPC inhibited the Wnt/β-catenin pathway as indicated by decreased β-catenin nuclear localization and inhibited Wnt/β-catenin activation of transcription factor TCF/LEF. Knockdown of β-catenin using sh-RNA also induced apoptosis and inhibited growth in pancreatic cancer cells. Thus, 3-Cl-AHPC and AHP3 induce apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells and cancer stem-like cells and may serve as an important potential therapeutic agent in the treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  7. Pancreatic beta cell protection/regeneration with phytotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azar Hosseini

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Although currently available drugs are useful in controlling early onset complications of diabetes, serious late onset complications appear in a large number of patients. Considering the physiopathology of diabetes, preventing beta cell degeneration and stimulating the endogenous regeneration of islets will be essential approaches for the treatment of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. The current review focused on phytochemicals, the antidiabetic effect of which has been proved by pancreatic beta cell protection/regeneration. Among the hundreds of plants that have been investigated for diabetes, a small fraction has shown the regenerative property and was described in this paper. Processes of pancreatic beta cell degeneration and regeneration were described. Also, the proposed mechanisms for the protective/regenerative effects of such phytochemicals and their potential side effects were discussed.

  8. Mouse pancreatic islet macrophages use locally released ATP to monitor beta cell activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitz, Jonathan R; Makhmutova, Madina; Almaça, Joana; Stertmann, Julia; Aamodt, Kristie; Brissova, Marcela; Speier, Stephan; Rodriguez-Diaz, Rayner; Caicedo, Alejandro

    2017-09-07

    Tissue-resident macrophages sense the microenvironment and respond by producing signals that act locally to maintain a stable tissue state. It is now known that pancreatic islets contain their own unique resident macrophages, which have been shown to promote proliferation of the insulin-secreting beta cell. However, it is unclear how beta cells communicate with islet-resident macrophages. Here we hypothesised that islet macrophages sense changes in islet activity by detecting signals derived from beta cells. To investigate how islet-resident macrophages respond to cues from the microenvironment, we generated mice expressing a genetically encoded Ca(2+) indicator in myeloid cells. We produced living pancreatic slices from these mice and used them to monitor macrophage responses to stimulation of acinar, neural and endocrine cells. Islet-resident macrophages expressed functional purinergic receptors, making them exquisite sensors of interstitial ATP levels. Indeed, islet-resident macrophages responded selectively to ATP released locally from beta cells that were physiologically activated with high levels of glucose. Because ATP is co-released with insulin and is exclusively secreted by beta cells, the activation of purinergic receptors on resident macrophages facilitates their awareness of beta cell secretory activity. Our results indicate that islet macrophages detect ATP as a proxy signal for the activation state of beta cells. Sensing beta cell activity may allow macrophages to adjust the secretion of factors to promote a stable islet composition and size.

  9. Continuous and low-energy 125I seed irradiation changes DNA methyltransferases expression patterns and inhibits pancreatic cancer tumor growth

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    Gong Yan-fang

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Iodine 125 (125I seed irradiation is an effective treatment for unresectable pancreatic cancers. However, the radiobiological mechanisms underlying brachytherapy remain unclear. Therefore, we investigated the influence of continuous and low-energy 125I irradiation on apoptosis, expression of DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs and cell growth in pancreatic cancers. Materials and methods For in vitro 125I seed irradiation, SW-1990 cells were divided into three groups: control (0 Gy, 2 Gy, and 4 Gy. To create an animal model of pancreatic cancer, the SW 1990 cells were surgically implanted into the mouse pancreas. At 10 d post-implantation, the 30 mice with pancreatic cancer underwent 125I seed implantation and were separated into three groups: 0 Gy, 2 Gy, and 4 Gy group. At 48 or 72 h after irradiation, apoptosis was detected by flow cytometry; changes in DNMTs mRNA and protein expression were assessed by real-time PCR and western blotting analysis, respectively. At 28 d after 125I seed implantation, in vivo apoptosis was evaluated with TUNEL staining, while DNMTs protein expression was detected with immunohistochemical staining. The tumor volume was measured 0 and 28 d after 125I seed implantation. Results 125I seed irradiation induced significant apoptosis, especially at 4 Gy. DNMT1 and DNMT3b mRNA and protein expression were substantially higher in the 2 Gy group than in the control group. Conversely, the 4 Gy cell group exhibited significantly decreased DNMT3b mRNA and protein expression relative to the control group. There were substantially more TUNEL positive in the 125I seed implantation treatment group than in the control group, especially at 4 Gy. The 4 Gy seed implantation group showed weaker staining for DNMT1 and DNMT3b protein relative to the control group. Consequently, 125I seed implantation inhibited cancer growth and reduced cancer volume. Conclusion 125I seed implantation kills pancreatic cancer cells, especially

  10. Pancreas++ : Automated Quantification of Pancreatic Islet Cells in Microscopy Images

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    Hongyu eChen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The microscopic image analysis of pancreatic Islet of Langerhans morphology is crucial for the investigation of diabetes and metabolic diseases. Besides the general size of the islet, the percentage and relative position of glucagon-containing alpha-, and insulin-containing beta-cells is also important for pathophysiological analyses, especially in rodents. Hence, the ability to identify, quantify and spatially locate peripheral and ‘involuted’ alpha-cells in the islet core is an important analytical goal. There is a dearth of software available for the automated and sophisticated positional-quantification of multiple cell types in the islet core. Manual analytical methods for these analyses, while relatively accurate, can suffer from a slow throughput rate as well as user-based biases. Here we describe a newly developed pancreatic islet analytical software program, Pancreas++, which facilitates the fully-automated, non-biased, and highly reproducible investigation of islet area and alpha- and beta-cell quantity as well as position within the islet for either single or large batches of fluorescent images. We demonstrate the utility and accuracy of Pancreas++ by comparing its performance to other pancreatic islet size and cell type (alpha, beta quantification methods. Our Pancreas++ analysis was significantly faster than other methods, while still retaining low error rates and a high degree of result correlation with the manually generated reference standard.

  11. Pancreatic Stellate Cells : A Starring Role in Normal and Diseased Pancreas

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    Minoti eApte

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available While the morphology and function of cells of the exocrine and endocrine pancreas have been studied over several centuries, one important cell type in the gland, the pancreatic stellate cell (PSC, had remained undiscovered until as recently as twenty years ago. Even after its first description in 1982, it was to be another 16 years before its biology could begin to be studied, because it was only in 1998 that methods were developed to isolate and culture PSCs from rodent and human pancreas. PSCs are now known to play a critical role in pancreatic fibrosis, a consistent histological feature of two major diseases of the pancreas - chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. In health, PSCs maintain normal tissue architecture via regulation of the synthesis and degradation of extracellular matrix (ECM proteins. Recent studies have also implied other additional functions for PSCs as progenitor cells, immune cells or intermediaries in exocrine pancreatic secretion in humans.During pancreatic injury, PSCs transform from their quiescent phase into an activated, myofibroblast-like phenotype that secretes excessive amounts of ECM proteins leading to the fibrosis of chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. An ever increasing number of factors that stimulate and/or inhibit PSC activation via paracrine and autocrine pathways are being identified and characterized. It is also now established that PSCs interact closely with pancreatic cancer cells to facilitate cancer progression. Based on these findings, several therapeutic strategies have been examined in experimental models of chronic pancreatitis as well as pancreatic cancer, in a bid to inhibit/retard PSC activation and thereby alleviate chronic pancreatitis or reduce tumour growth in pancreatic cancer. The challenge that remains is to translate these pre-clinical developments into clinically applicable treatments for patients with chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer.

  12. Purinergic receptors and calcium signalling in human pancreatic duct cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mette R; Krabbe, Simon; Novak, Ivana

    2008-01-01

    pancreatic duct cell lines PANC-1 and CFPAC-1. Expression of P2 receptors was examined using RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry. Both cell lines, and also Capan-1 cells, express RNA transcripts for the following receptors: P2Y1, P2Y2, P2Y4, P2Y6, P2Y11-14 and P2X1, P2X2, P2X4, P2X5, P2X6 and P2X7. Using Fura-2......ATP, commonly used to stimulate P2X7 receptors, elicited non-oscillatory and transient Ca(2+) responses. Ivermectin, a potentiator of P2X4 receptors, increased Ca(2+) signals evoked by ATP. The single cell Ca(2+) measurements indicated functional expression of P2Y2 and other P2Y receptors, and notably...... expression of P2X4 and P2X7 receptors. Expression of P2Y2, P2X4 and P2X7 receptors was confirmed by immunocytochemistry. This fingerprint of P2 receptors in human pancreatic duct models forms the basis for studying effect of nucleotides on ion and fluid secretion, as well as on Ca(2+) and tissue homeostasis...

  13. Non-invasive discrimination between pancreatic islets and exocrine cells using multiphoton microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Binlin; Li, Ge; Hao, Mingming; Mukherjee, Sushmita

    2015-03-01

    In this study, we propose a non-invasive method to distinguish pancreatic islet cells from exocrine cell clusters using multiphoton (MP) imaging. We demonstrate the principle of distinguishing them based on autofluorescence. The results show that MP imaging has a potential to distinguish pancreatic islets from exocrine cells. This ability to distinguish the two cell types could have many applications, such as the examination of fresh pancreatic biopsies when staining is not possible or desirable.

  14. Human pancreatic islet progenitor cells demonstrate phenotypic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    exploring alternative sources of insulin-producing cells for cell based therapy in diabetes. Since in vitro culture of islet β-cells demonstrates loss in insulin (Beattie et al. 1999), several attempts have been made to identify stem / progenitor cells capable of differentiation into insulin-producing cells. Embryonic stem cells, which ...

  15. Bcl-xL inhibition by molecular-targeting drugs sensitizes human pancreatic cancer cells to TRAIL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hari, Yoko; Harashima, Nanae; Tajima, Yoshitsugu; Harada, Mamoru

    2015-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) induces apoptosis in various types of cancer cells without damaging normal cells. However, in terms of pancreatic cancer, not all cancer cells are sensitive to TRAIL. In this study, we examined a panel of human pancreatic cancer cell lines for TRAIL sensitivity and investigated the effects of Bcl-2 family inhibitors on their response to TRAIL. Both ABT-263 and ABT-737 inhibited the function of Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, and Bcl-w. Of the nine pancreatic cancer cell lines tested, six showed no or low sensitivity to TRAIL, which correlated with protein expression of Bcl-xL. ABT-263 significantly sensitized four cell lines (AsPC-1, Panc-1, CFPAC-1, and Panc10.05) to TRAIL, with reduced cell viability and increased apoptosis. Knockdown of Bcl-xL, but not Bcl-2, by siRNA transfection increased the sensitivity of AsPC-1 and Panc-1 cells to TRAIL. ABT-263 treatment had no effect on protein expression of Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, or c-FLIPs. In Panc-1 cells, ABT-263 increased the surface expression of death receptor (DR) 5; the NF-κB pathway, but not endoplasmic reticulum stress, participated in the increase. In xenograft mouse models, the combination of TRAIL and ATB-737 suppressed the in vivo tumor growth of AsPC-1 and Panc-1 cells. These results indicate that Bcl-xL is responsible for TRAIL resistance in human pancreatic cancer cells, and that Bcl-2 family inhibitors could represent promising reagents to sensitize human pancreatic cancers in DR-targeting therapy. PMID:26506422

  16. Amygdalin improves microcirculatory disturbance and attenuates pancreatic fibrosis by regulating the expression of endothelin-1 and calcitonin gene-related peptide in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiangqun; Hu, Jiangong; Zhuo, Yuzhen; Cui, Lihua; Li, Caixia; Cui, Naiqiang; Zhang, Shukun

    2017-11-09

    The pathogenesis of chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a complex process of interaction between tissue injury and repair, which involves microcirculatory disturbance. Amygdalin, an effective component extracted from Semen Persicae (a kind of Chinese herbal medicine), can decrease blood viscosity and improve microcirculation. In this study, we investigated the therapeutic effects of amygdalin on pancreatic fibrosis in rats with CP. The rat CP model was induced by injecting dibutyltin dichloride (DBTC) into the right caudal vein. Amygdalin was administrated via the penile vein at a dose of 10 mg/(kg d) from the next day, after the induction of CP, once a day for the previous 3 days, and then once every 2 days, until the end of the experiment. Body weight was observed every 7 days. Pancreatic blood flow and histopathological changes were assessed at 28 days. The activation of pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) was estimated by the expression of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA). At the same time, the expression of platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB), transforming growth factor β-1 (TGFβ-1), endothelin-1 (ET-1), and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) of pancreatic tissues were detected. Treatment of CP rats with amygdalin improved body weight and pancreatic blood flow, as well as alleviated pancreatic fibrosis and acinar destruction, accompanied by the down-regulation of the expressions of α-SMA, PDGF-BB, TGFβ-1, and ET-1, and the up-regulation of the CGRP's expression. Amygdalin could reduce the production of pro-fibrotic cytokines, inhibit the activation of PSCs, and attenuate pancreatic fibrosis in a rat with CP. The mechanism probably includes improving microcirculatory disturbance by regulating the production of ET-1 and CGRP. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Taiwan LLC.

  17. Increased Serotonin Signaling Contributes to the Warburg Effect in Pancreatic Tumor Cells Under Metabolic Stress and Promotes Growth of Pancreatic Tumors in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shu-Heng; Li, Jun; Dong, Fang-Yuan; Yang, Jian-Yu; Liu, De-Jun; Yang, Xiao-Mei; Wang, Ya-Hui; Yang, Min-Wei; Fu, Xue-Liang; Zhang, Xiao-Xin; Li, Qing; Pang, Xiu-Feng; Huo, Yan-Miao; Li, Jiao; Zhang, Jun-Feng; Lee, Ho-Young; Lee, Su-Jae; Qin, Wen-Xin; Gu, Jian-Ren; Sun, Yong-Wei; Zhang, Zhi-Gang

    2017-07-01

    Desmoplasia and poor vascularity cause severe metabolic stress in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDACs). Serotonin (5-HT) is a neuromodulator with neurotransmitter and neuroendocrine functions that contributes to tumorigenesis. We investigated the role of 5-HT signaling in the growth of pancreatic tumors. We measured the levels of proteins that regulate 5-HT synthesis, packaging, and degradation in pancreata from Kras(G12D/+)/Trp53(R172H/+)/Pdx1-Cre (KPC) mice, which develop pancreatic tumors, as well as in PDAC cell lines and a tissue microarray containing 81 human PDAC samples. We also analyzed expression levels of proteins involved in 5-HT synthesis and degradation by immunohistochemical analysis of a tissue microarray containing 311 PDAC specimens, and associated expression levels with patient survival times. 5-HT level in 14 matched PDAC tumor and non-tumor tissues were analyzed by ELISA. PDAC cell lines were incubated with 5-HT and cell survival and apoptosis were measured. We analyzed expression of the 5-HT receptor HTR2B in PDAC cells and effects of receptor agonists and antagonists, as well as HTR2B knockdown with small hairpin RNAs. We determined the effects of 5-HT stimulation on gene expression profiles of BxPC-3 cells. Regulation of glycolysis by 5-HT signaling via HTR2B was assessed by immunofluorescence and immunoprecipitation analyses, as well as by determination of the extracellular acid ratio, glucose consumption, and lactate production. Primary PDACs, with or without exposure to SB204741 (a selective antagonist of HTR2B), were grown as xenograft tumors in mice, and SB204741 was administered to tumor-bearing KPC mice; tumor growth and metabolism were measured by imaging analyses. In immunohistochemical analysis of a tissue microarray of PDAC specimens, increased levels of TPH1 and decreased level of MAOA, which regulate 5-HT synthesis and degradation, correlated with stage and size of PDACs and shorter patient survival time. We found levels

  18. Role of transcription factor KLF11 and its diabetes-associated gene variants in pancreatic beta cell function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neve, Bernadette; Fernandez-Zapico, Martin E; Ashkenazi-Katalan, Vered

    2005-01-01

    and shows lower levels of insulin expression in pancreatic beta cells. In addition, subjects carrying the Gln62Arg allele show decreased plasma insulin after an oral glucose challenge. Interestingly, all three nonsynonymous KLF11 variants show increased repression of the catalase 1 promoter, suggesting...

  19. Bifurcation structure of a model of bursting pancreatic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosekilde, Erik; Lading, B.; Yanchuk, S.

    2001-01-01

    One- and two-dimensional bifurcation studies of a prototypic model of bursting oscillations in pancreatic P-cells reveal a squid-formed area of chaotic dynamics in the parameter plane, with period-doubling bifurcations on one side of the arms and saddle-node bifurcations on the other. The transit......One- and two-dimensional bifurcation studies of a prototypic model of bursting oscillations in pancreatic P-cells reveal a squid-formed area of chaotic dynamics in the parameter plane, with period-doubling bifurcations on one side of the arms and saddle-node bifurcations on the other....... The transition from this structure to the so-called period-adding structure is found to involve a subcritical period-doubling bifurcation and the emergence of type-III intermittency. The period-adding transition itself is not smooth but consists of a saddle-node bifurcation in which (n + 1)-spike bursting...

  20. Antiaging Gene Klotho Attenuates Pancreatic β-Cell Apoptosis in Type 1 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi; Sun, Zhongjie

    2015-12-01

    Apoptosis is the major cause of death of insulin-producing β-cells in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Klotho is a recently discovered antiaging gene. We found that the Klotho gene is expressed in pancreatic β-cells. Interestingly, halplodeficiency of Klotho (KL(+/-)) exacerbated streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes (a model of T1DM), including hyperglycemia, glucose intolerance, diminished islet insulin storage, and increased apoptotic β-cells. Conversely, in vivo β-cell-specific expression of mouse Klotho gene (mKL) attenuated β-cell apoptosis and prevented STZ-induced diabetes. mKL promoted cell adhesion to collagen IV, increased FAK and Akt phosphorylation, and inhibited caspase 3 cleavage in cultured MIN6 β-cells. mKL abolished STZ- and TNFα-induced inhibition of FAK and Akt phosphorylation, caspase 3 cleavage, and β-cell apoptosis. These promoting effects of Klotho can be abolished by blocking integrin β1. Therefore, these cell-based studies indicated that Klotho protected β-cells by inhibiting β-cell apoptosis through activation of the integrin β1-FAK/Akt pathway, leading to inhibition of caspase 3 cleavage. In an autoimmune T1DM model (NOD), we showed that in vivo β-cell-specific expression of mKL improved glucose tolerance, attenuated β-cell apoptosis, enhanced insulin storage in β-cells, and increased plasma insulin levels. The beneficial effect of Klotho gene delivery is likely due to attenuation of T-cell infiltration in pancreatic islets in NOD mice. Overall, our results demonstrate for the first time that Klotho protected β-cells in T1DM via attenuating apoptosis. © 2015 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  1. Expression of DNA-repair proteins and their significance in pancreatic cancer and non-cancerous pancreatic tissues of Sprague-Dawley rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xing-guo; Yang, Zhu-lin; Yang, Le-ping; Miao, Xiong-ying

    2014-02-06

    To establish a model of pancreatic cancer induced by 7,12-dimethylbenzantracene (DMBA) in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats, and detect the expression of DNA-repair proteins (MGMT, ERCC₁, hMSH₂, and hMLH₁) and their significance in pancreatic cancer and non-cancerous pancreatic tissues of SD rats. DMBA was directly implanted into the parenchyma of rat pancreas (group A and group B), and group B rats were then treated with trichostatin A (TSA). The rats in both groups were executed within 3 to 5 months, and their pancreatic tissues were observed by macrography and under microscopy. Meanwhile, the rats in the control group (group C) were executed at 5 months. Immunohistochemistry was used to assay the expression of MGMT, ERCC₁, hMSH₂, and hMLH₁. The incidence of pancreatic cancer in group A within 3 to 5 months was 48.7% (18/37), including 1 case of fibrosarcoma. The incidence of pancreatic cancer in group B was 33.3% (12/36), including 1 case of fibrosarcoma. The mean of maximal diameters of tumors in group A was higher than that in group B (P cancerous pancreatic tissues of group A (P >0.05). The positive rates of MGMT, ERCC₁, hMSH₂, and hMLH₁ were significantly lower in ductal adenocarcinoma than those in non-cancerous tissues of group B (P ≤0.05). All pancreas of group C had positive expression of MGMT, ERCC₁, hMSH₂, and hMLH₁ and two cases of fibrosarcoma showed a negative expression. DMBA, directly implanted into the parenchyma of pancreas, creates an ideal pancreatic cancer model within a short time. TSA might restrain DNA damage related to the genesis and growth of pancreatic cancer in rats. The DNA-repair proteins, including MGMT, ERCC₁, hMSH₂, and hMLH₁, might play an important role in the genesis of pancreatic cancer induced by DMBA in rats.

  2. Incorporation of bone marrow cells in pancreatic pseudoislets improves posttransplant vascularization and endocrine function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Wittig

    Full Text Available Failure of revascularization is known to be the major reason for the poor outcome of pancreatic islet transplantation. In this study, we analyzed whether pseudoislets composed of islet cells and bone marrow cells can improve vascularization and function of islet transplants. Pancreatic islets isolated from Syrian golden hamsters were dispersed into single cells for the generation of pseudoislets containing 4×10(3 cells. To create bone marrow cell-enriched pseudoislets 2×10(3 islet cells were co-cultured with 2×10(3 bone marrow cells. Pseudoislets and bone marrow cell-enriched pseudoislets were transplanted syngeneically into skinfold chambers to study graft vascularization by intravital fluorescence microscopy. Native islet transplants served as controls. Bone marrow cell-enriched pseudoislets showed a significantly improved vascularization compared to native islets and pseudoislets. Moreover, bone marrow cell-enriched pseudoislets but not pseudoislets normalized blood glucose levels after transplantation of 1000 islet equivalents under the kidney capsule of streptozotocin-induced diabetic animals, although the bone marrow cell-enriched pseudoislets contained only 50% of islet cells compared to pseudoislets and native islets. Fluorescence microscopy of bone marrow cell-enriched pseudoislets composed of bone marrow cells from GFP-expressing mice showed a distinct fraction of cells expressing both GFP and insulin, indicating a differentiation of bone marrow-derived cells to an insulin-producing cell-type. Thus, enrichment of pseudoislets by bone marrow cells enhances vascularization after transplantation and increases the amount of insulin-producing tissue. Accordingly, bone marrow cell-enriched pseudoislets may represent a novel approach to increase the success rate of islet transplantation.

  3. Molecular basis of potassium channels in pancreatic duct epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hayashi, M.; Novak, Ivana

    2013-01-01

    in pancreatic duct cells, including KCNN4 (K 3.1), KCNMA1 (K1.1), KCNQ1 (K7.1), KCNH2 (K11.1), KCNH5 (K10.2), KCNT1 (K4.1), KCNT2 (K4.2), and KCNK5 (K5.1). We will give an overview of K channels with respect to their electrophysiological and pharmacological characteristics and regulation, which we know from...

  4. High expression of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor 3 predicts poor prognosis in patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang L

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Lingfu Zhang,1 Dianrong Xiu,1 Jun Zhan,2,3 Xiaokun He,3 Limei Guo,4,5 Jilian Wang,1 Ming Tao,1 Wei Fu,1 Hongquan Zhang2,3 1Department of General Surgery, Peking University Third Hospital, 2Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Translational Research, Ministry of Education, State Key Laboratory of Natural and Biomimetic Drugs, 3Laboratory of Molecular Cell Biology and Tumor Biology, Department of Anatomy, Histology and Embryology, 4Department of Pathology, Peking University Health Science Center, 5Department of Pathology, Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing, People’s Republic of China Aims: Recent studies showed that muscarinic acetylcholine receptor 3 (M3, as a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor family member that plays an important role in normal physiological function, is engaged in cancer progression. However, the role of M3 in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC is not known. The aim of this study is to investigate the expression and prognostic value of M3 in patients with PDAC.Materials and methods: The localization and expression of M3 in PDAC were examined by immunohistochemistry. VAChT was employed to detect parasympathetic nerve fibers in the corresponding M3 PDAC tissues. The correlation between M3 expression and patients’ survival was assessed by Kaplan–Meier analysis.Results: M3 was discovered predominantly localized in the cell cytoplasm and expressed in all specimens of PDAC patients. Significant correlation was noted between increased M3 intensity and high grade of PDAC (P<0.01, more lymph node metastasis (P<0.01 as well as shorter patient overall survival (P<0.01. Morphologically, cells with high M3 expression were more frequently located at the invasive tumor front/tumor budding cells, metastatic lymph nodes and parasympathetic nerve fibers.Conclusion: High expression of M3 is a prognostic marker for PDAC. Keywords: PDAC, muscarinic acetylcholine receptor 3, M3, tumor budding, parasympathetic nerve fiber, prognosis

  5. Study of the expression of cathepsins in histological material from pancreatic lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Martínez

    Full Text Available Background and aims: To assess the expression levels of cathepsins in malignant and premalignant lesions. Methods: We retrospectively included patients who underwent pancreatic surgery on pancreatic solid or cystic masses. The expression of cathepsin H, L, B and S was determined in both types of samples. Lesions were divided into three categories: malignant (pancreatic adenocarcinoma and malignant mucinous neoplasms, premalignant (mucinous neoplasms and benign (other lesions. Results: Thirty-one surgical resection samples were studied. The expression of cathepsins was significantly higher in malignant lesions than in premalignant and benign lesions (H 75%, 27%, 37% p = 0.05; L 92%, 36%, 37% p = 0.011; B 83%, 36%, 62% p = 0.069; S 92%, 36%, 25% p = 0.004, respectively. Conclusions: Cathepsins are overexpressed in histological samples of malignant lesions compared to premalignant and benign lesions. However, the expression of cathepsins is similar in both premalignant and benign lesions.

  6. Angiotensin II activates MAP kinase and NF-kappaB through angiotensin II type I receptor in human pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaya, Koji; Ohta, Tetsuo; Kitagawa, Hirohisa; Kayahara, Masato; Takamura, Hiroyuki; Fujimura, Takashi; Nishimura, Gen-Ichi; Shimizu, Koichi; Miwa, Koichi

    2004-10-01

    Pancreatic ductal cancer has higher angiotensin II concentrations compared with normal pancreas or other solid tumors. This study examined angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptor expression and the role of angiotensin II in proliferation and survival of human pancreatic cancer cells. All three pancreatic cancer cell lines studied, from well to poorly-differentiated types, HPAF-II, AsPC-1, and Panc-1, showed strong expression of AT1 receptor. In contrast, HT-29 human colon cancer cells showed extremely weak expression. Angiotensin II stimulated the growth of pancreatic cancer cells through MAP kinase activation but had no significant effect on proliferation of HT-29 colon cancer cells. In addition, angiotensin II significantly prevented cisplatin (CDDP)-induced apoptosis through NF-kappaB activation and the subsequent production of anti-apoptotic molecules, including survivin and Bcl-XL, in pancreatic cancer cells. These findings suggest that angiotensin II plays a role in the growth and chemoresistance of AT1-positive pancreatic cancer cells through its action as a potent mitogen and anti-apoptotic molecule.

  7. Genetic and pharmacological inhibition of TTK impairs pancreatic cancer cell line growth by inducing lethal chromosomal instability

    OpenAIRE

    Stratford, Jeran K.; Yan, Feng; Hill, Rebecca A.; Major, Michael B.; Lee M Graves; Der, Channing J.; Yeh, Jen Jen

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, which accounts for the majority of pancreatic cancers, is a lethal disease with few therapeutic options. Genomic profiling of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma has identified a complex and heterogeneous landscape. Understanding the molecular characteristics of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma will facilitate the identification of potential therapeutic strategies. We analyzed the gene expression profiles of primary tumors from patients compared to normal pancre...

  8. Derivation and characterization of a pig embryonic stem cell-derived exocrine pancreatic cell line

    Science.gov (United States)

    The establishment and initial characterization of a pig embryonic stem cell-derived pancreatic cell line, PICM-31, and a colony-cloned derivative cell line, PICM-31A, is described. The cell lines were propagated for several months at split ratios of 1:3 or 1:5 at each passage on STO feeder cells af...

  9. Dynamics and Synchrony of Pancreatic beta-cells and Islets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Morten Gram

    2006-01-01

    Pancreatic beta-cells secrete insulin in response to raised glucose levels. Malfunctioning of this system plays an important role in the metabolic disease diabetes. The biological steps from glucose stimulus to the final release of insulin are incompletely understood, and a more complete descript......Pancreatic beta-cells secrete insulin in response to raised glucose levels. Malfunctioning of this system plays an important role in the metabolic disease diabetes. The biological steps from glucose stimulus to the final release of insulin are incompletely understood, and a more complete...... description of these processes and their interactions would provide important input in the search for a better treatment of the disease. The thesis describes several aspects of mathematical modeling of beta-cells relevant for the understanding of glucose stimulated insulin secretion. It consists...... biological hypotheses. The subjects addressed are: Quasi-steady-state approximations of enzyme reactions, the effect of noise on bursting electrical behavior, exciation wave propagation in pancreatic islets, intra- and inter-islet synchronization and pulsatile insulin secretion, and mitochondrial dynamics....

  10. GLP-1 receptor antagonist as a potential probe for pancreatic {beta}-cell imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukai, Eri [Department of Diabetes and Clinical Nutrition, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Japan Association for the Advancement of Medical Equipment, Tokyo (Japan); Toyoda, Kentaro [Department of Diabetes and Clinical Nutrition, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Kimura, Hiroyuki [Department of Patho-Functional Bioanalysis, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Kawashima, Hidekazu [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Fujimoto, Hiroyuki [Department of Diabetes and Clinical Nutrition, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Japan Association for the Advancement of Medical Equipment, Tokyo (Japan); Ueda, Masashi [Radioisotopes Research Laboratory, Kyoto University Hospital, Faculty of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Temma, Takashi [Department of Patho-Functional Bioanalysis, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Hirao, Konomu; Nagakawa, Kenji [Research and Development Division, Arkray, Inc., Kyoto (Japan); Saji, Hideo [Department of Patho-Functional Bioanalysis, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Inagaki, Nobuya, E-mail: inagaki@metab.kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Diabetes and Clinical Nutrition, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); CREST of Japan Science and Technology Cooperation (JST), Kyoto (Japan)

    2009-11-20

    We examined exendin(9-39), an antagonist of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor (GLP-1R), as a potential probe for imaging of pancreatic {beta}-cells. To evaluate in vitro receptor specificity, binding assay was performed using dispersed mouse islet cells. Binding assay showed competitive inhibition of [{sup 125}I]BH-exendin(9-39) binding by non-radioactive exendin(9-39). To assess in vivo selectivity, the biodistribution was evaluated by intravenous administration of [{sup 125}I]BH-exendin(9-39) to mice. Radioactivity of harvested pancreas reached highest levels at 60 and 120 min among organs examined except lung. Pre-administration of excess non-radioactive exendin(9-39) remarkably and specifically blocked the radioactivity of pancreas. After [{sup 125}I]BH-exendin(9-39) injection into transgenic mice with pancreatic {beta}-cells expressing GFP, fluorescent and radioactive signals of sections of pancreas were evaluated with an image analyzer. Imaging analysis showed that the fluorescent GFP signals and the radioactive signals were correspondingly located. Thus, the GLP-1R antagonist exendin(9-39) may serve as a useful probe for pancreatic {beta}-cell imaging.

  11. A human cancer xenograft model utilizing normal pancreatic duct epithelial cells conditionally transformed with defined oncogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inagawa, Yuki; Yamada, Kenji; Yugawa, Takashi; Ohno, Shin-ichi; Hiraoka, Nobuyoshi; Esaki, Minoru; Shibata, Tatsuhiro; Aoki, Kazunori; Saya, Hideyuki; Kiyono, Tohru

    2014-08-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDACs) are considered to arise through neoplastic transformation of human pancreatic duct epithelial cells (HPDECs). In order to evaluate the biological significance of genetic and epigenetic alterations in PDACs, we isolated primary HPDECs and established an in vitro carcinogenesis model. Firstly, lentivirus-mediated transduction of KRAS(G12V), MYC and human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) E6/E7 under the control of a tetracyclin-inducible promoter efficiently immortalized and transformed primary HPDECs, which gave rise to adenocarcinomas subcutaneously in an immune-deficient mouse xenograft model, depending on expression of the four genes. The tumors regressed promptly upon shutting-off the oncogenes, and the remaining tissues showed histological features corresponding to normal ductal structures with simple columnar epithelium. Reexpression of the oncogenes resulted in development of multiple PDACs through pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia-like structures. We also succeeded in efficient immortalization of primary HPDECs with transduction of mutant CDK4, cyclin D1 and TERT. The cells maintained a normal diploid status and formed duct-like structures in a three-dimensional culture. In combination with p53 silencing, KRAS(G12V) alone was sufficient to fully transform the immortalized HPDECs, and MYC markedly accelerated the development of tumors. Our PDAC model supports critical roles of KRAS mutations, inactivation of the p53 and p16-pRB pathways, active telomerase and MYC expression in pancreatic carcinogenesis and thus recapitulates many features of human PDAC development. The present system with reversible control of oncogene expression enabled de novo development of PDAC from quasinormal human tissues preformed subcutaneously in mice and might be applicable to carcinogenesis models in many organ sites. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Lysosome associated membrane proteins maintain pancreatic acinar cell homeostasis : LAMP-2 deficient mice develop pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mareninova, Olga A; Sendler, Matthias; Malla, Sudarshan Ravi; Yakubov, Iskandar; French, Samuel W; Tokhtaeva, Elmira; Vagin, Olga; Oorschot, Viola; Lüllmann-Rauch, Renate; Blanz, Judith; Dawson, David; Klumperman, Judith; Lerch, Markus M; Mayerle, Julia; Gukovsky, Ilya; Gukovskaya, Anna S

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: The pathogenic mechanism of pancreatitis is poorly understood. Recent evidence implicates defective autophagy in pancreatitis responses; however, the pathways mediating impaired autophagy in pancreas remain largely unknown. Here, we investigate the role of lysosome associated

  13. Acinar cell apoptosis in Serpini2-deficient mice models pancreatic insufficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stacie K Loftus

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic insufficiency (PI when left untreated results in a state of malnutrition due to an inability to absorb nutrients. Frequently, PI is diagnosed as part of a larger clinical presentation in cystic fibrosis or Shwachman-Diamond syndrome. In this study, a mouse model for isolated exocrine PI was identified in a mouse line generated by a transgene insertion. The trait is inherited in an autosomal recessive pattern, and homozygous animals are growth retarded, have abnormal immunity, and have reduced life span. Mice with the disease locus, named pequeño (pq, exhibit progressive apoptosis of pancreatic acinar cells with severe exocrine acinar cell loss by 8 wk of age, while the islets and ductal tissue persist. The mutation in pq/pq mice results from a random transgene insertion. Molecular characterization of the transgene insertion site by fluorescent in situ hybridization and genomic deletion mapping identified an approximately 210-kb deletion on Chromosome 3, deleting two genes. One of these genes, Serpini2, encodes a protein that is a member of the serpin family of protease inhibitors. Reintroduction of only the Serpini2 gene by bacterial artificial chromosome transgenic complementation corrected the acinar cell defect as well as body weight and immune phenotypes, showing that deletion of Serpini2 causes the pequeño phenotype. Dietary supplementation of pancreatic enzymes also corrected body size, body weight, and immunodeficiency, and increased the life span of Serpini2-deficient mice, despite continued acinar cell loss. To our knowledge, this study describes the first characterized genetic animal model for isolated PI. Genetic complementation of the transgene insertion mutant demonstrates that Serpini2 deficiency directly results in the acinar cell apoptosis, malabsorption, and malnutrition observed in pq/pq mice. The rescue of growth retardation, immunodeficiency, and mortality by either Serpini2 bacterial artificial chromosome

  14. Estrogen reduces endoplasmic reticulum stress to protect against glucotoxicity induced-pancreatic β-cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooptiwut, Suwattanee; Mahawong, Pitchnischa; Hanchang, Wanthanee; Semprasert, Namoiy; Kaewin, Suchada; Limjindaporn, Thawornchai; Yenchitsomanus, Pa-Thai

    2014-01-01

    Estrogen can improve glucose homeostasis not only in diabetic rodents but also in humans. However, the molecular mechanism by which estrogen prevents pancreatic β-cell death remains unclear. To investigate this issue, INS-1 cells, a rat insulinoma cell line, were cultured in medium with either 11.1mM or 40mM glucose in the presence or the absence of estrogen. Estrogen significantly reduced apoptotic β-cell death by decreasing nitrogen-induced oxidative stress and the expression of the ER stress markers GRP 78, ATF6, P-PERK, PERK, uXBP1, sXBP1, and CHOP in INS-1 cells after prolonged culture in medium with 40mM glucose. In contrast, estrogen increased the expression of survival proteins, including sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) ATPase (SERCA-2), Bcl-2, and P-p38, in INS-1 cells after prolonged culture in medium with 40mM glucose. The cytoprotective effect of estrogen was attenuated by addition of the estrogen receptor (ERα and ERβ) antagonist ICI 182,780 and the estrogen membrane receptor inhibitor G15. We showed that estrogen decreases not only oxidative stress but also ER stress to protect against 40mM glucose-induced pancreatic β-cell death. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Molecular mechanisms of resveratrol-induced apoptosis in human pancreatic cancer cells

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    Napaporn Kaewdoungdee

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Resveratrol is a polyphenolic phytoalexin found at high concentrations in grapes, nuts, fruits and red wine with reported anti -carcinogenic effects. In this study, the molecular mechanism of resveratrol -induced apoptosis in human pancreatic cancer (Panc 2.03 cells is investigated. Resveratrol treatment of Panc 2.03 cells results in dose-dependent inhibition of cell growth and cells accumulated at the S phase transition of the cell cycle. The anti -proliferative effect of resveratrol is due to apoptosis as seen by the appearance of chrom atin condensation, nuclear fragmentation, DNA ladder formation and increased annexin V-stained cells. The apoptotic process is induced by decreased Bcl-2 expression concomitant with increased Bax expression, leading to an increase in the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and subsequent activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3. In addition, resveratrol treatment also decreases the survivin level and increases the apoptosis-inducing factor level in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggest that resveratrol induces apoptosis of Panc 2.03 cells, at least in part through a mitochondrial -associated intrinsic pathway in both caspasedependent and independent manners. The present findings suggest that resveratrol has potential as a chemopreventive agent, and possibly as a therapeutic one against pancreatic cancer.

  16. PARP-1 and YY1 are important novel regulators of CXCL12 gene transcription in rat pancreatic beta cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena Marković

    Full Text Available Despite significant progress, the molecular mechanisms responsible for pancreatic beta cell depletion and development of diabetes remain poorly defined. At present, there is no preventive measure against diabetes. The positive impact of CXCL12 expression on the pancreatic beta cell prosurvival phenotype initiated this study. Our aim was to provide novel insight into the regulation of rat CXCL12 gene (Cxcl12 transcription. The roles of poly(ADP-ribose polymerase-1 (PARP-1 and transcription factor Yin Yang 1 (YY1 in Cxcl12 transcription were studied by examining their in vitro and in vivo binding affinities for the Cxcl12 promoter in a pancreatic beta cell line by the electrophoretic mobility shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation. The regulatory activities of PARP-1 and YY1 were assessed in transfection experiments using a reporter vector with a Cxcl12 promoter sequence driving luciferase gene expression. Experimental evidence for PARP-1 and YY1 revealed their trans-acting potential, wherein PARP-1 displayed an inhibitory, and YY1 a strong activating effect on Cxcl12 transcription. Streptozotocin (STZ-induced general toxicity in pancreatic beta cells was followed by changes in Cxcl12 promoter regulation. PARP-1 binding to the Cxcl12 promoter during basal and in STZ-compromised conditions led us to conclude that PARP-1 regulates constitutive Cxcl12 expression. During the early stage of oxidative stress, YY1 exhibited less affinity toward the Cxcl12 promoter while PARP-1 displayed strong binding. These interactions were accompanied by Cxcl12 downregulation. In the later stages of oxidative stress and intensive pancreatic beta cell injury, YY1 was highly expressed and firmly bound to Cxcl12 promoter in contrast to PARP-1. These interactions resulted in higher Cxcl12 expression. The observed ability of PARP-1 to downregulate, and of YY1 to upregulate Cxcl12 promoter activity anticipates corresponding effects in the natural context where the

  17. [Expression and clinical significance of AHSG and complement C3 in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiong; Wu, Wen; Chen, Longjiang; Ma, Xiaolei; Zhao, Yue; Zhou, Hangcheng; Yang, Renbao; Hu, Liwei

    2014-07-22

    To analyze serum proteins from pancreatic carcinoma patients, pancreatic benign tumor patients, chronic pancreatitis patients and normal controls to discover potential and specific biomarkers. Serum samples were collected from 40 pancreatic carcinoma patients, 10 pancreatic benign tumor patients, 10 chronic pancreatitis patients and 40 cancer-free controls from May 2009 to April 2011. The samples were compared with two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) and differentially expressed proteins were further identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). Then, two up-regulated proteins were further validated by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), Western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry (IHC) from transcriptional and proteinic aspects. We identified 12 differently expressed proteins in pancreatic carcinoma group compared with normal control group, including complement component C3, hemopexin, alpha-2-HS-glycoprotein, apolipoprotein H, serotransferrin, haptoglobin, apolipoprotein E, transthyretin, serum amyloid P-component, vitronectin, prothrombin and isoform 2 of Ig mu chain C region. High level of C3 and AHSG were detected in cancerous tissues by real-time PCR, Western blot and immunohistochemisty. Western blot revealed that gray ratios of C3 and AHSG were 0.11 ± 0.01 and 0.26 ± 0.02 respectively. The Immunohistochemical results showed that positive rate of C3 and AHSG were 72.5% and 82.5% in cancerous group versus 32.5% and 25% respectively in normal control. C3 and AHSG may become pancreatic carcinoma-related biomarkers.

  18. Differential molecular and cellular responses of GLP-1 secreting L-cells and pancreatic alpha cells to glucotoxicity and lipotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasu, Srividya; Moffett, R Charlotte; McClenaghan, Neville H; Flatt, Peter R

    2015-08-01

    Knowledge of the effects of glucotoxic and lipotoxic environments on proglucagon producing intestinal L cells and pancreatic alpha cells is limited compared with pancreatic beta cells. This study compares the in vitro responses of these cell types to hyperglycaemia and hyperlipidaemia. Glucose (30 mM) and palmitate (0.5mM) reduced GLUTag and MIN6 cell viability while alpha TC1 cells were sensitive only to lipotoxicity. Consistent with this, Cat mRNA expression was substantially higher in GLUTag and alpha TC1 cells compared to MIN6 cells. Glucose and palmitate reduced GLUTag cell secretory function while hypersecretion of glucagon was apparent from alpha TC1 cells. Glucose exposure increased transcription of Cat and Sod2 in MIN6 and GLUTag cells respectively while it decreased transcription of Cat and Gpx1 in alpha TC1 cells. Palmitate increased transcription of Cat and Sod2 in all three cell lines. Upregulation of antioxidant enzyme expression by palmitate was accompanied by an increase in Nfkb1 transcription, indicative of activation of defence pathways. Lipotoxicity activated ER stress response, evident from increased Hspa4 mRNA level in GLUTag and MIN6 cells. Glucose and palmitate-induced DNA damage and apoptosis, with substantially smaller effects in alpha TC1 cells. Thus alpha cells are resistant to gluco- and lipotoxicity, partly reflecting higher expression of genes involved in antioxidant defence. In contrast, intestinal L cells, like beta cells, are prone to gluco- and lipotoxicity, possibly contributing to abnormalities of GLP-1 secretion in type 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma with intracranial metastasis in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shih-Chieh; Liao, Jiunn-Wang; Lin, Yung-Chang; Liu, Cheng-I; Wong, Min-Liang

    2007-01-01

    This report concerns a case of pancreatic carcinoma with widespread metastases to many organs including intracranial metastasis. An eleven-year-old, male, mixed-breed dog showed emaciation, ataxia, and multiple visible tumors within the neck. A MRI examination of the patient was conducted because of ataxia, and it was found that the intracranial invasive growth had resulted in compression of the brain stem. Necropsy was performed after the patient died. Based on gross and microscopic examination, the primary tumor cells were located in the left lobe of the pancreas and widespread metastasis was found into various organs, including the brain, lungs, liver, kidneys, tonsils, serosal surface of the esophagus, and submandibular, pulmonary hilar, mediastinal, and mesenteric lymph nodes. This case indicates that pancreatic adenocarcinoma should be included in the differential diagnosis list when cervical neck masses are detected.

  20. Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma With Pancreatic Metastasis: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Alibakhshi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Malignant tumors of pancreas are usually primary neoplasms and pancreatic metastases are rare findings. We are reporting a case of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC of the esophagus with pancreatic metastasis. A 59-year old woman was admitted with chief complaint of abdominal pain and mass. She was a known case of esophageal SCC since 4 years before when she had undergone transthoracic esophagectomy and cervical esophago-gastrostomy. In order to evaluate recent abdominal mass, CT scan was done which revealed septated cystic lesion in the body and the tail of the pancreas. Palliative resection of the tumor was performed and its histological study showed SCC compatible with her previously diagnosed esophageal cancer.

  1. Reduced retinoids and retinoid receptors' expression in pancreatic cancer: A link to patient survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleul, Tim; Rühl, Ralph; Bulashevska, Svetlana; Karakhanova, Svetlana; Werner, Jens; Bazhin, Alexandr V

    2015-09-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) represents one of the deadliest cancers in the world. All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) is the major physiologically active form of vitamin A, regulating expression of many genes. Disturbances of vitamin A metabolism are prevalent in some cancer cells. The main aim of this work was to investigate deeply the components of retinoid signaling in PDAC compared to in the normal pancreas and to prove the clinical importance of retinoid receptor expression. For the study, human tumor tissues obtained from PDAC patients and murine tumors from the orthotopic Panc02 model were used for the analysis of retinoids, using high performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry and real-time RT-PCR gene expression analysis. Survival probabilities in univariate analysis were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method and the Cox proportional hazards model was used for the multivariate analysis. In this work, we showed for the first time that the ATRA and all-trans retinol concentration is reduced in PDAC tissue compared to their normal counterparts. The expression of RARα and β as well as RXRα and β are down-regulated in PDAC tissue. This reduced expression of retinoid receptors correlates with the expression of some markers of differentiation and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition as well as of cancer stem cell markers. Importantly, the expression of RARα and RXRβ is associated with better overall survival of PDAC patients. Thus, reduction of retinoids and their receptors is an important feature of PDAC and is associated with worse patient survival outcomes. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Nicotine induces self-renewal of pancreatic cancer stem cells via neurotransmitter-driven activation of sonic hedgehog signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Wadei, Mohammed H; Banerjee, Jheelam; Al-Wadei, Hussein A N; Schuller, Hildegard M

    2016-01-01

    A small subpopulation of pancreatic cancer cells with characteristics of stem cells drive tumour initiation, progression and metastasis. A better understanding of the regulation of cancer stem cells may lead to more effective cancer prevention and therapy. We have shown that the proliferation and migration of pancreatic cancer cell lines is activated by the nicotinic receptor-mediated release of stress neurotransmitters, responses reversed by γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). However, the observed cancer inhibiting effects of GABA will only succeed clinically if GABA inhibits pancreatic cancer stem cells (PCSCs) in addition to the more differentiated cancer cells that comprise the majority of cancer tissues and cell lines. Using PCSCs isolated from two pancreatic cancer patients by cell sorting and by spheroid formation assay from pancreatic cancer cell line Panc-1, we tested the hypothesis that nicotine induces the self-renewal of PCSCs. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) α3, α4, α5 and α7 were expressed and chronic exposure to nicotine increased the protein expression of these receptors. Immunoassays showed that PCSCs produced the stress neurotransmitters epinephrine and norepinephrine and the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA. Chronic nicotine significantly increased the production of stress neurotransmitters and sonic hedgehog (SHH) while inducing Gli1 protein and decreasing GABA. GABA treatment inhibited the induction of SHH and Gli1. Spheroid formation and 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazoliumbromide assays showed significant nicotine-induced increases in self renewal and cell proliferation, responses blocked by GABA. Our data suggest that nicotine increases the SHH-mediated malignant potential of PCSCs and that GABA prevents these effects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Differentiation of a pancreatic metastasis of a renal cell carcinoma from a primary pancreatic carcinoma by echo-enhanced power Doppler sonography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flath, B; Rickes, S; Schweigert, M; Lochs, H; Possinger, K; Wermke, W

    2003-01-01

    In a 70-year-old patient who had been treated for a renal cell carcinoma, a pancreatic mass was detected on CT scan. To differentiate a pancreatic metastasis of the renal cell carcinoma from a pancreatic carcinoma, an echo-enhanced power Doppler sonography was performed. The pancreatic mass demonstrated a strong echo enhancement, proving its hypervascularization. This behaviour favoured the diagnosis of a pancreatic metastasis of the renal cell carcinoma which was confirmed by histology. The principles and the role of echo-enhanced power Doppler sonography in the differential diagnosis between a primary pancreatic carcinoma and a metastasis of a renal carcinoma in the pancreas are discussed. We conclude that this technique can provide an important contribution to the diagnosis in this special instance. However, histology is the standard in the differential diagnosis of pancreatic tumours. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel and IAP

  4. Transcriptomic analysis of pancreatic cancer cells in response to metformin and aspirin: an implication of synergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Wen; Wang, Tao; Zachariah, Emmanuel; Lin, Yong; Yang, Chung S.; Xu, Qing; DiPaola, Robert S.; Tan, Xiang-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Metformin and aspirin have been studied extensively as cancer preventative and therapeutic agents. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms for the inhibitory effects of pancreatic cancer development remain undefined. To gain further insight into their biological function in pancreatic cancer, we conducted a transcriptomic analysis using RNA sequencing to assess the differential gene expression induced by metformin (5 mM) and aspirin (2 mM), alone or in combination, after treatment of PANC-1 cells for 48 hours. Compared to an untreated control, metformin down-regulated 58 genes and up-regulated 91 genes, aspirin down-regulated 12 genes only, while metformin plus aspirin down-regulated 656 genes and up-regulated 449 genes (fold-change > 2, P  10, P aspirin, PCDH18, CCL2, RASL11A, FAM111B and BMP5 were down-regulated ≥ 20-fold, while NGFR, NPTX1, C7orf57, MRPL23AS1 and UNC5B were up-regulated ≥ 10-fold. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) revealed that the pathways, “cholesterol biosynthesis”, “cell cycle: G1/S checkpoint regulation”, and “axonal guidance signaling” were the most statistically significant pathways modulated by metformin plus aspirin. Although the results need further functional validation, these data provide the first evidence for the synergistic action between metformin and aspirin in modulating the transcriptional profile of pancreatic cancer cells. PMID:26294325

  5. Novel therapy for pancreatic fistula using adipose-derived stem cell sheets treated with mannose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Hirokazu; Kokuryo, Toshio; Yokoyama, Yukihiro; Yamaguchi, Junpei; Yamamoto, Tokunori; Shibata, Rei; Gotoh, Momokazu; Murohara, Toyoaki; Ito, Akira; Nagino, Masato

    2017-06-01

    Given that no studies have reported the use of adipose-derived stem cell sheets for the prevention of pancreatic fistulas, it is unclear whether adipose-derived stem cell sheets are effective at preventing this complication. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of novel therapy for the prevention of pancreatic fistulas using adipose-derived stem cell sheets treated with mannose. The rat pancreatic duct (splenic duct) and surrounding pancreatic parenchyma were transected to induce a pancreatic fistula. Adipose-derived stem cell sheets with or without mannose treatment were attached to the pancreatic transection stump. Amylase and lipase levels were measured in both the ascites and serum. The expression of 40 cytokines in human adipose-derived stem cells with and without mannose treatment was investigated using a multiplex assay. The adipose-derived stem cell sheets remained at the initial attachment site at 48 hours after operation. Macroscopically, more severe degeneration and adhesion in the peritoneal cavity were observed in the untreated rats than in the rats treated with adipose-derived stem cell sheets. The levels of ascitic amylase in the untreated, adipose-derived stem cell-sheet-treated, and adipose-derived stem cell-sheet-with-mannose-treated rats were 10.7 ± 2.9 × 10 4 U/L, 2.6 ± 0.9 × 10 4 U/L, and 1.5 ± 0.3 × 10 4 U/L, respectively. The levels of ascitic lipase in the untreated, adipose-derived stem cell-sheet-treated and adipose-derived stem cell-sheet-with-mannose-treated rats were 9.5 ± 2.9 × 10 3 U/L, 4.0 ± 3.3 × 10 3 U/L, and 0.4 ± 0.2 × 10 3 U/L, respectively. Significant differences were found in both the ascitic and serum levels of amylase and lipase between the untreated rats and the rats treated with adipose-derived stem cell sheets with mannose (P derived stem cells treated with mannose than in human adipose-derived stem cells treated without mannose. Adipose-derived stem cell sheets treated

  6. Oxidative stress plays a role in high glucose-induced activation of pancreatic stellate cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Gyeong Ryul; Lee, Esder; Chun, Hyun-Ji; Yoon, Kun-Ho; Ko, Seung-Hyun; Ahn, Yu-Bae; Song, Ki-Ho, E-mail: kihos@catholic.ac.kr

    2013-09-20

    Highlights: •High glucose increased production of reactive oxygen species in cultured pancreatic stellate cells. •High glucose facilitated the activation of these cells. •Antioxidant treatment attenuated high glucose-induced activation of these cells. -- Abstract: The activation of pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) is thought to be a potential mechanism underlying islet fibrosis, which may contribute to progressive β-cell failure in type 2 diabetes. Recently, we demonstrated that antioxidants reduced islet fibrosis in an animal model of type 2 diabetes. However, there is no in vitro study demonstrating that high glucose itself can induce oxidative stress in PSCs. Thus, PSCs were isolated and cultured from Sprague Dawley rats, and treated with high glucose for 72 h. High glucose increased the production of reactive oxygen species. When treated with high glucose, freshly isolated PSCs exhibited myofibroblastic transformation. During early culture (passage 1), PSCs treated with high glucose contained an increased number of α-smooth muscle actin-positive cells. During late culture (passages 2–5), PSCs treated with high glucose exhibited increases in cell proliferation, the expression of fibronectin and connective tissue growth factor, release of interleukin-6, transforming growth factor-β and collagen, and cell migration. Finally, the treatment of PSCs with high glucose and antioxidants attenuated these changes. In conclusion, we demonstrated that high glucose increased oxidative stress in primary rat PSCs, thereby facilitating the activation of these cells, while antioxidant treatment attenuated high glucose-induced PSC activation.

  7. N-methylhemeanthidine chloride, a novel Amaryllidaceae alkaloid, inhibits pancreatic cancer cell proliferation via down-regulating AKT activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Guoli; Yao, Guangmin; Zhan, Guanqun; Hu, Yufeng [Hubei Key Laboratory of Natural Medicinal Chemistry and Resource Evaluation, School of Pharmacy, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei PR China (China); Yue, Ming [Hubei Key Laboratory of Drug Target Research and Pharmacodynamic Evaluation, School of Basic Medicine, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei (China); Cheng, Ling; Liu, Yaping; Ye, Qi [Hubei Key Laboratory of Natural Medicinal Chemistry and Resource Evaluation, School of Pharmacy, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei PR China (China); Qing, Guoliang [Hubei Key Laboratory of Drug Target Research and Pharmacodynamic Evaluation, School of Basic Medicine, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei (China); Zhang, Yonghui, E-mail: zhangyh@mails.tjmu.edu.cn [Hubei Key Laboratory of Natural Medicinal Chemistry and Resource Evaluation, School of Pharmacy, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei PR China (China); Liu, Hudan, E-mail: hudanliu@hust.edu.cn [Hubei Key Laboratory of Natural Medicinal Chemistry and Resource Evaluation, School of Pharmacy, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei PR China (China)

    2014-11-01

    We previously reported the isolation of a novel Amaryllidaceae alkaloid, N-methylhemeanthidine chloride (NMHC), from Zephyranthes candida, which exhibits potent cytotoxicity in a spectrum of tumor cells. However, the mechanism of action remains unclear. Using multiple cell lines derived from human pancreatic cancer, one of the most mortal and refractory human malignancies, we further studied the NMHC-mediated cytotoxicity and found that it induced drastic cytotoxicity in pancreatic cancer cells whereas an insignificant effect on a noncancerous cell line. The NMHC-mediated growth inhibition was more severe than the first-line chemotherapeutic agent gemcitabine, leading to cell cycle arrest, apoptotic death and decreased glycolysis. NMHC exerted its function through down-regulating AKT activation, and the ectopic expression of activated AKT rescued the growth inhibition. Consistently, NMHC injections in a pancreatic cancer xenograft model manifested the anti-tumor effect in vivo. Engrafted tumor cells underwent AKT attenuation and apoptotic death upon treatments. As such, we here demonstrate the AKT inhibition may be one of the mechanisms by which NMHC decreases tumor cell survival rate in vitro and in vivo. Our data thereby suggest that NMHC holds great promise as a potent chemotherapeutic agent against pancreatic cancer and sheds new light on obtaining such agents from natural products toward therapeutic purposes. - Highlights: • N-methylhemeanthidine chloride (NMHC) is a novel Amaryllidaceae alkaloid. • NMHC exhibits potent anti-neoplastic activity. • NMHC leads to cell cycle arrest, apoptotic death and decreased metabolism. • NMHC down-regulates the AKT signaling pathway.

  8. Liraglutide protects pancreatic beta cells during an early intervention in Gato-Kakizaki rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiu; Pan, Linlin; Nie, Aifang; Wang, Qidi; Gu, Yanyun; Li, Fengying; Zhang, Hongli; Li, Wenyi; Li, Xiaoying

    2013-12-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analogues have emerged as insulin secretagogues and are widely used in type 2 diabetic patients. GLP-1 analogues also demonstrate a promotion of beta cell proliferation and reduction of apoptosis in rodents. In the present study, we investigated the protection of pancreatic beta cells by early use (at the age of 2 weeks) of GLP-1 analogue, liraglutide in Gato-Kakizaki (GK) rats and explored the underlying mechanisms. The effects of liraglutide on glucose tolerance were evaluated by intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test (IPGTT) and insulin release tests (IRT). Ki67 and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) immunostaining, Western blots and real-time polymerase chain reaction were applied to evaluate cell proliferation, apoptosis and related gene expressions. Our results demonstrated that early use of liraglutide improved glucose tolerance during liraglutide treatment in GK rats. Liraglutide increased pancreatic insulin contents and markedly reduced beta cell apoptosis. Liraglutide also downregulated pro-apoptotic gene expressions and reduced intra-islet macrophage infiltration. This experiment reported for the first time that early use of liraglutide could protect beta cell failure in pre-diabetic GK rats through reduction of beta cell apoptosis and ameliorating islet inflammation. © 2013 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  9. Positive selection of gene-modified cells increases the efficacy of pancreatic cancer suicide gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Quintanilla, Jordi; Cascallo, Manel; Gros, Alena; Fillat, Cristina; Alemany, Ramon

    2009-11-01

    Thymidine kinase (TK)-mediated suicide gene therapy has been considered for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. However, despite a bystander effect, the proportion of transduced tumor cells has proven too low to result in efficacy. We propose the use of a drug-selectable marker (MDR1) to enrich TK-expressing cells using chemotherapy. This enrichment or positive selection phase may increase the efficacy of suicide gene therapy. To test this strategy, we generated stable NP18MDR/TK-GFP transfectants and showed docetaxel resistance in vivo. Mixed tumors of MDR/TK-expressing cells and parental NP18 cells were established and docetaxel was used to increase the proportion of TK-expressing cells. After this positi